WorldWideScience

Sample records for suspended graphene membranes

  1. Graphene-based structure, method of suspending graphene membrane, and method of depositing material onto graphene membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettl, Alexander K.; Meyer, Jannik Christian

    2013-04-02

    An embodiment of a method of suspending a graphene membrane across a gap in a support structure includes attaching graphene to a substrate. A pre-fabricated support structure having the gap is attached to the graphene. The graphene and the pre-fabricated support structure are then separated from the substrate which leaves the graphene membrane suspended across the gap in the pre-fabricated support structure. An embodiment of a method of depositing material includes placing a support structure having a graphene membrane suspended across a gap under vacuum. A precursor is adsorbed to a surface of the graphene membrane. A portion of the graphene membrane is exposed to a focused electron beam which deposits a material from the precursor onto the graphene membrane. An embodiment of a graphene-based structure includes a support structure having a gap, a graphene membrane suspended across the gap, and a material deposited in a pattern on the graphene membrane.

  2. Optomechanics for thermal characterization of suspended graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolleman, Robin J.; Houri, Samer; Davidovikj, Dejan; Cartamil-Bueno, Santiago J.; Blanter, Yaroslav M.; van der Zant, Herre S. J.; Steeneken, Peter G.

    2017-10-01

    The thermal response of graphene is expected to be extremely fast due to its low heat capacity and high thermal conductivity. In this work, the thermal response of suspended single-layer graphene membranes is investigated by characterization of their mechanical motion in response to a high-frequency modulated laser. A characteristic delay time τ between the optical intensity and mechanical motion is observed, which is attributed to the time required to raise the temperature of the membrane. We find, however, that the measured time constants are significantly larger than the predicted ones based on values of the specific heat and thermal conductivity. In order to explain the discrepancy between measured and modeled τ , a model is proposed that takes a thermal boundary resistance at the edge of the graphene drum into account. The measurements provide a noninvasive way to characterize thermal properties of suspended atomically thin membranes, providing information that can be hard to obtain by other means.

  3. Influence of charge carriers on corrugation of suspended graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirilenko, Demid A.; Gorodetsky, Andrei; Baidakova, Marina V.

    2018-02-01

    Electronic degrees of freedom are predicted to play a significant role in mechanics of two-dimensional crystalline membranes. Here we show that appearance of charge carriers may cause a considerable impact on suspended graphene corrugation, thus leading to additional mechanism resulting in charge carriers mobility variation with their density. This finding may account for some details of suspended graphene conductivity dependence on its doping level and suggests that proper modeling of suspended graphene-based device properties must include the influence of charge carriers on its surface corrugation.

  4. Colorimetry Technique for Scalable Characterization of Suspended Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartamil-Bueno, Santiago J; Steeneken, Peter G; Centeno, Alba; Zurutuza, Amaia; van der Zant, Herre S J; Houri, Samer

    2016-11-09

    Previous statistical studies on the mechanical properties of chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) suspended graphene membranes have been performed by means of measuring individual devices or with techniques that affect the material. Here, we present a colorimetry technique as a parallel, noninvasive, and affordable way of characterizing suspended graphene devices. We exploit Newton's rings interference patterns to study the deformation of a double-layer graphene drum 13.2 μm in diameter when a pressure step is applied. By studying the time evolution of the deformation, we find that filling the drum cavity with air is 2-5 times slower than when it is purged.

  5. Low-energy electron point projection microscopy/diffraction study of suspended graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wei-Hao; Chang, Wei-Tse; Lin, Chun-Yueh; Chang, Mu-Tung; Hsieh, Chia-Tso; Wang, Chang-Ran; Lee, Wei-Li; Hwang, Ing-Shouh

    2017-11-01

    In this work, we present our study of suspended graphene with low-energy electrons based on a point projection microscopic/diffractive imaging technique. Both exfoliated and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene samples were studied in an ultra-high vacuum chamber. This method allows imaging of individual adsorbates at the nanometer scale and characterizing graphene layers, graphene lattice orientations, ripples on graphene membranes, etc. We found that long-duration exposure to low-energy electron beams induced aggregation of adsorbates on graphene when the electron dose rate was above a certain level. We also discuss the potential of this technique to conduct coherent diffractive imaging for determining the atomic structures of biological molecules adsorbed on suspended graphene.

  6. Sticking of Hydrogen on Supported and Suspended Graphene at Low Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepetit, Bruno; Jackson, Bret

    2011-12-01

    The physisorption of atomic hydrogen on graphene is investigated quantum mechanically using a semiempirical model for the lattice dynamics. A thermally averaged wave packet propagation describes the motion of the H atoms with respect to the membrane. Two graphene configurations, either supported on a silicone oxide substrate or suspended over a hole in the substrate, are considered. In both cases, the phonon spectrum is modified in such a way that graphene is stabilized with respect to thermal fluctuations. The sticking probabilities of hydrogen on these stabilized membranes at 10 K are high at low collision energies, and larger than on graphite.

  7. Quantum Hall effect in multi-terminal suspended graphene devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghahari, Fereshte; Zhao, Yue; Bolotin, Kirill; Kim, Philip

    2010-03-01

    The integer and fractional quantum hall effects have been already observed in two terminal suspended graphene devices. However in this two probe device geometry, mixing between magnetoresistance ρxx and Hall resistance ρxy for incompletely developed quantum Hall states leads to substantial deviation of conductance plateaus values. In this talk, we present the experimental results from four terminal suspended graphene devices. The quality of quantum Hall effect will be discussed in muti-terminal device geometry in conjunction with the current-induced annealing process to improve the quality of graphene samples.

  8. Length-dependent thermal conductivity in suspended single-layer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiangfan; Pereira, Luiz F C; Wang, Yu; Wu, Jing; Zhang, Kaiwen; Zhao, Xiangming; Bae, Sukang; Tinh Bui, Cong; Xie, Rongguo; Thong, John T L; Hong, Byung Hee; Loh, Kian Ping; Donadio, Davide; Li, Baowen; Özyilmaz, Barbaros

    2014-04-16

    Graphene exhibits extraordinary electronic and mechanical properties, and extremely high thermal conductivity. Being a very stable atomically thick membrane that can be suspended between two leads, graphene provides a perfect test platform for studying thermal conductivity in two-dimensional systems, which is of primary importance for phonon transport in low-dimensional materials. Here we report experimental measurements and non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of thermal conduction in suspended single-layer graphene as a function of both temperature and sample length. Interestingly and in contrast to bulk materials, at 300 K, thermal conductivity keeps increasing and remains logarithmically divergent with sample length even for sample lengths much larger than the average phonon mean free path. This result is a consequence of the two-dimensional nature of phonons in graphene, and provides fundamental understanding of thermal transport in two-dimensional materials.

  9. Fabrication of nanoporous graphene/polymer composite membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madauß, Lukas; Schumacher, Jens; Ghosh, Mandakranta; Ochedowski, Oliver; Meyer, Jens; Lebius, Henning; Ban-d'Etat, Brigitte; Toimil-Molares, Maria Eugenia; Trautmann, Christina; Lammertink, Rob G H; Ulbricht, Mathias; Schleberger, Marika

    2017-07-27

    Graphene is currently investigated as a promising membrane material in which selective pores can be created depending on the requirements of the application. However, to handle large-area nanoporous graphene a stable support material is needed. Here, we report on composite membranes consisting of large-area single layer nanoporous graphene supported by a porous polymer. The fabrication is based on ion-track nanotechnology with swift heavy ions directly creating atomic pores in the graphene lattice and damaged tracks in the polymer support. Subsequent chemical etching converts the latent ion tracks in the supporting polymer foil, here polyethylene terephthalate (PET), into open microchannels while the perfectly aligned pores in the graphene top layer remain unaffected. To avoid unintentional damage creation and delamination of the graphene layer from the substrate, the graphene is encapsulated by a protecting poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) layer. By this procedure a stable composite membrane is obtained consisting of nanoporous graphene (coverage close to 100%) suspended across selfaligned track-etched microchannels in a polymer support film. Our method presents a facile way to create high quality suspended graphene of tunable pore size supported on a flexible porous polymeric support, thus enabling the development of membranes for fast and selective ultrafiltration separation processes.

  10. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering of suspended monolayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cheng-Wen; Lin, Bing-Jie; Lin, Hsing-Ying; Huang, Chen-Han; Shih, Fu-Yu; Wang, Wei-Hua; Liu, Chih-Yi; Chui, Hsiang-Chen

    2013-11-01

    The interactions between phonons and electrons induced by the dopants or the substrate of graphene in spectroscopic investigation reveal a rich source of interesting physics. Raman spectra and surface-enhanced Raman spectra of supported and suspended monolayer graphenes were measured and analyzed systemically with different approaches. The weak Raman signals are greatly enhanced by the ability of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy which has attracted considerable interests. The technique is regarded as wonderful and useful tool, but the dopants that are produced by depositing metallic nanoparticles may affect the electron scattering processes of graphene. Therefore, the doping and substrate influences on graphene are also important issues to be investigated. In this work, the peak positions of G peak and 2D peak, the I 2D/ I G ratios, and enhancements of G and 2D bands with suspended and supported graphene flakes were measured and analyzed. The peak shifts of G and 2D bands between the Raman and SERS signals demonstrate the doping effect induced by silver nanoparticles by n-doping. The I 2D/ I G ratio can provide a more sensitive method to carry out the doping effect on the graphene surface than the peak shifts of G and 2D bands. The enhancements of 2D band of suspended and supported graphenes reached 138, and those of G band reached at least 169. Their good enhancements are helpful to measure the optical properties of graphene. The different substrates that covered the graphene surface with doping effect are more sensitive to the enhancements of G band with respect to 2D band. It provides us a new method to distinguish the substrate and doping effect on graphene.

  11. Microscopic characterisation of suspended graphene grown by chemical vapour deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bignardi, L.; Dorp, W.F. van; Gottardi, S.; Ivashenko, O.; Dudin, P.; Barinov, A.; de Hosson, J.T.M.; Stöhr, M.; Rudolf, P.

    2013-01-01

    We present a multi-technique characterisation of graphene grown by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) and thereafter transferred to and suspended on a grid for transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The properties of the electronic band structure are investigated by angle-resolved photoelectron

  12. Spin Transport in High-Quality Suspended Graphene Devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guimaraes, Marcos H. D.; Veligura, A.; Zomer, P. J.; Maassen, T.; Vera-Marun, I. J.; Tombros, N.; van Arees, B. J.; Wees, B.J. van

    We measure spin transport in high mobility suspended graphene (mu approximate to 10(5)cm(2)/(V s)), obtaining a (spin) diffusion coefficient of 0.1 m(2)/s and giving a lower bound on the spin relaxation time (tau(s) approximate to 150 ps) and spin relaxation length (lambda(s) = 4.7 mu m) for

  13. Discrete Dynamics of Nanoparticle Channelling in Suspended Graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Booth, Tim; Pizzocchero, Filippo; Andersen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    We have observed a previously undescribed stepwise oxidation of mono- and few layer suspended graphene by silver nanoparticles in situ at subnanometer scale in an environmental transmission electron microscope. Over the range of 600–850 K, we observe crystallographically oriented channelling...

  14. Nanomechanical properties of few-layer graphene membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poot, M.; Van der Zant, H.S.J.

    2008-01-01

    We have measured the mechanical properties of few-layer graphene and graphite flakes that are suspended over circular holes. The spatial profile of the flake’s spring constant is measured with an atomic force microscope. The bending rigidity of and the tension in the membranes are extracted by

  15. Noninvasive Scanning Raman Spectroscopy and Tomography for Graphene Membrane Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Stefan; Dieing, Thomas; Centeno, Alba; Zurutuza, Amaia; Smith, Anderson D; Östling, Mikael; Kataria, Satender; Lemme, Max C

    2017-03-08

    Graphene has extraordinary mechanical and electronic properties, making it a promising material for membrane-based nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS). Here, chemical-vapor-deposited graphene is transferred onto target substrates to suspend it over cavities and trenches for pressure-sensor applications. The development of such devices requires suitable metrology methods, i.e., large-scale characterization techniques, to confirm and analyze successful graphene transfer with intact suspended graphene membranes. We propose fast and noninvasive Raman spectroscopy mapping to distinguish between free-standing and substrate-supported graphene, utilizing the different strain and doping levels. The technique is expanded to combine two-dimensional area scans with cross-sectional Raman spectroscopy, resulting in three-dimensional Raman tomography of membrane-based graphene NEMS. The potential of Raman tomography for in-line monitoring is further demonstrated with a methodology for automated data analysis to spatially resolve the material composition in micrometer-scale integrated devices, including free-standing and substrate-supported graphene. Raman tomography may be applied to devices composed of other two-dimensional materials as well as silicon micro- and nanoelectromechanical systems.

  16. Experimental study of thermal rectification in suspended monolayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haidong; Hu, Shiqian; Takahashi, Koji; Zhang, Xing; Takamatsu, Hiroshi; Chen, Jie

    2017-06-01

    Thermal rectification is a fundamental phenomenon for active heat flow control. Significant thermal rectification is expected to exist in the asymmetric nanostructures, such as nanowires and thin films. As a one-atom-thick membrane, graphene has attracted much attention for realizing thermal rectification as shown by many molecular dynamics simulations. Here, we experimentally demonstrate thermal rectification in various asymmetric monolayer graphene nanostructures. A large thermal rectification factor of 26% is achieved in a defect-engineered monolayer graphene with nanopores on one side. A thermal rectification factor of 10% is achieved in a pristine monolayer graphene with nanoparticles deposited on one side or with a tapered width. The results indicate that the monolayer graphene has great potential to be used for designing high-performance thermal rectifiers for heat flow control and energy harvesting.

  17. Fluorine and sulfur simultaneously co-doped suspended graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struzzi, C.; Sezen, H.; Amati, M.; Gregoratti, L.; Reckinger, N.; Colomer, J.-F.; Snyders, R.; Bittencourt, C.; Scardamaglia, M.

    2017-11-01

    Suspended graphene flakes are exposed simultaneously to fluorine and sulfur ions produced by the μ-wave plasma discharge of the SF6 precursor gas. The microscopic and spectroscopic analyses, performed by Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and photoelectron spectromicroscopy, show the homogeneity in functionalization yield over the graphene flakes with F and S atoms covalently bonded to the carbon lattice. This promising surface shows potential for several applications ranging from biomolecule immobilization to lithium battery and hydrogen storage devices. The present co-doping process is an optimal strategy to engineer the graphene surface with a concurrent hydrophobic character, thanks to the fluorine atoms, and a high affinity with metal nanoparticles due to the presence of sulfur atoms.

  18. Giant magneto-photoelectric effect in suspended graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonntag, Jens; Kurzmann, Annika; Geller, Martin; Queisser, Friedemann; Lorke, Axel; Schützhold, Ralf

    2017-06-01

    We study the optical response of a suspended, monolayer graphene field-effect transistor structure in magnetic fields of up to 9 T (quantum Hall regime). With an illumination power of only 3 μW, we measure a photocurrent of up to 400 nA (without an applied bias) corresponding to a photo-responsivity of 0.13 A W-1, which we believe to be one of the highest values ever measured in single-layer graphene. We discuss possible mechanisms for generating this strong photo-response (17 electron-hole pairs per 100 incident photons). Based on our experimental findings, we believe that the most likely scenario is a ballistic two-stage process including carrier multiplication via Auger-type inelastic Coulomb scattering at the graphene edge.

  19. Wavelength-Tunable IR Detector based on Suspended Bilayer Graphene Micro Ribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-05

    high purity copper foil using a low pressure CVD furnace at 1000 oC in a hydrogen, argon and methane environment. Raman spectrum of the graphene ...characterized in Year One a device with suspended graphene microribbons, and found that fully suspended CVD -grown graphene devices are dominated by the...photoelectric effect, which is promising towards CVD -grown graphene photodetectors approaching THz cut-off frequencies. chemical vapor deposition, strain

  20. High-field electrical and thermal transport in suspended graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorgan, Vincent E; Behnam, Ashkan; Conley, Hiram J; Bolotin, Kirill I; Pop, Eric

    2013-10-09

    We study the intrinsic transport properties of suspended graphene devices at high fields (≥1 V/μm) and high temperatures (≥1000 K). Across 15 samples, we find peak (average) saturation velocity of 3.6 × 10(7) cm/s (1.7 × 10(7) cm/s) and peak (average) thermal conductivity of 530 W m(-1) K(-1) (310 W m(-1) K(-1)) at 1000 K. The saturation velocity is 2-4 times and the thermal conductivity 10-17 times greater than in silicon at such elevated temperatures. However, the thermal conductivity shows a steeper decrease at high temperature than in graphite, consistent with stronger effects of second-order three-phonon scattering. Our analysis of sample-to-sample variation suggests the behavior of "cleaner" devices most closely approaches the intrinsic high-field properties of graphene. This study reveals key features of charge and heat flow in graphene up to device breakdown at ~2230 K in vacuum, highlighting remaining unknowns under extreme operating conditions.

  1. Suspended graphene devices with local gate control on an insulating substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Florian R; Cui, Zheng; Yurtalan, Muhammet A; Vojvodin, Cameron; Papaj, Michał; Orgiazzi, Jean-Luc F X; Deng, Chunqing; Bal, Mustafa; Lupascu, Adrian

    2015-10-09

    We present a fabrication process for graphene-based devices where a graphene monolayer is suspended above a local metallic gate placed in a trench. As an example we detail the fabrication steps of a graphene field-effect transistor. The devices are built on a bare high-resistivity silicon substrate. At temperatures of 77 K and below, we observe the field-effect modulation of the graphene resistivity by a voltage applied to the gate. This fabrication approach enables new experiments involving graphene-based superconducting qubits and nano-electromechanical resonators. The method is applicable to other two-dimensional materials.

  2. Multilayer Nanoporous Graphene Membranes for Water Desalination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Tanugi, David; Lin, Li-Chiang; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2016-02-10

    While single-layer nanoporous graphene (NPG) has shown promise as a reverse osmosis (RO) desalination membrane, multilayer graphene membranes can be synthesized more economically than the single-layer material. In this work, we build upon the knowledge gained to date toward single-layer graphene to explore how multilayer NPG might serve as a RO membrane in water desalination using classical molecular dynamic simulations. We show that, while multilayer NPG exhibits similarly promising desalination properties to single-layer membranes, their separation performance can be designed by manipulating various configurational variables in the multilayer case. This work establishes an atomic-level understanding of the effects of additional NPG layers, layer separation, and pore alignment on desalination performance, providing useful guidelines for the design of multilayer NPG membranes.

  3. Simultaneous measurement of electrical and thermal conductivities of suspended monolayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haidong; Kurata, Kosaku; Fukunaga, Takanobu; Ago, Hiroki; Takamatsu, Hiroshi; Zhang, Xing; Ikuta, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Koji; Nishiyama, Takashi; Takata, Yasuyuki

    2016-06-01

    We measured both in-plane electrical and thermal properties of the same suspended monolayer graphene using a novel T-type sensor method. At room temperature, the values are about 240 000 Ω-1 m-1 and 2100 W m-1 K-1 for the electrical and thermal conductivities, respectively. Based on the Wiedemann-Franz law, the electrons have negligible contribution to the thermal conductivity of graphene, while the in-plane LA and TA modes phonons are the dominant heat carriers. In monolayer graphene, the absence of layer-layer and layer-substrate interactions enhances the contribution of long wave-length phonons to the heat transport and increases the thermal conductivity accordingly. The reported method and experimental data of suspended monolayer graphene are useful for understanding the basic physics and designing the future graphene electronic devices.

  4. Simultaneous measurement of electrical and thermal conductivities of suspended monolayer graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Haidong; Kurata, Kosaku; Fukunaga, Takanobu; Takamatsu, Hiroshi, E-mail: takamatsu@mech.kyushu-u.ac.jp, E-mail: x-zhang@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Ago, Hiroki [Institute for Materials Chemistry and Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Zhang, Xing, E-mail: takamatsu@mech.kyushu-u.ac.jp, E-mail: x-zhang@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Engineering Mechanics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Ikuta, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Koji; Nishiyama, Takashi [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Takata, Yasuyuki [International Institute for Carbon-Neutral Energy Research, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2016-06-28

    We measured both in-plane electrical and thermal properties of the same suspended monolayer graphene using a novel T-type sensor method. At room temperature, the values are about 240 000 Ω{sup −1} m{sup −1} and 2100 W m{sup −1} K{sup −1} for the electrical and thermal conductivities, respectively. Based on the Wiedemann-Franz law, the electrons have negligible contribution to the thermal conductivity of graphene, while the in-plane LA and TA modes phonons are the dominant heat carriers. In monolayer graphene, the absence of layer-layer and layer-substrate interactions enhances the contribution of long wave-length phonons to the heat transport and increases the thermal conductivity accordingly. The reported method and experimental data of suspended monolayer graphene are useful for understanding the basic physics and designing the future graphene electronic devices.

  5. Development of an ultra-thin film comprised of a graphene membrane and carbon nanotube vein support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaoyang; Liu, Peng; Wei, Yang; Li, Qunqing; Wang, Jiaping; Wu, Yang; Feng, Chen; Zhang, Lina; Fan, Shoushan; Jiang, Kaili

    2013-01-01

    Graphene, exhibiting superior mechanical, thermal, optical and electronic properties, has attracted great interest. Considering it being one-atom-thick, and the reduced mechanical strength at grain boundaries, the fabrication of large-area suspended chemical vapour deposition graphene remains a challenge. Here we report the fabrication of an ultra-thin free-standing carbon nanotube/graphene hybrid film, inspired by the vein-membrane structure found in nature. Such a square-centimetre-sized hybrid film can realize the overlaying of large-area single-layer chemical vapour deposition graphene on to a porous vein-like carbon nanotube network. The vein-membrane-like hybrid film, with graphene suspended on the carbon nanotube meshes, possesses excellent mechanical performance, optical transparency and good electrical conductivity. The ultra-thin hybrid film features an electron transparency close to 90%, which makes it an ideal gate electrode in vacuum electronics and a high-performance sample support in transmission electron microscopy.

  6. Towards intrinsic graphene biosensor: A label-free, suspended single crystalline graphene sensor for multiplex lung cancer tumor markers detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Zhang, Bo; Cui, Tianhong

    2015-10-15

    Graphene biosensors reported so far are based on polycrystalline graphene flakes which are anchored on supporting substrates. The influence of grain boundary and the scattering from substrate drastically degrade the properties of graphene and conceal the performance of intrinsic graphene as a sensor. Here we report a label-free biosensor based on suspended single crystalline graphene (SCG), which can get rid of grain boundary and substrate scattering, revealing the biosensing mechanism of intrinsic graphene for the first time. Monolayer SCG flakes were derived from low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) method. Multiplex detection of three different lung cancer tumor markers was realized. The suspended structure can largely improve the sensitivity and detection limit (0.1 pg/ml) of the sensor, and the single crystalline nature of SCG enable the biosensor to have superior uniformity compared to polycrystalline ones. The SCG sensors exhibit superb specificity and large linear detection range from 1 pg/ml to 1 μg/ml, showing the prominent advantages of graphene as a sensing material. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The Electromechanical Responses of Suspended Graphene Ribbons for Electrostatic Discharge Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei

    This dissertation presents a novel suspended graphene ribbon device for electrostatic discharge (ESD) applications. The device structure is proposed and fabricated after careful design considerations. Compared to the conventional ESD devices such as diodes, bipolar junction transistors (BJTs), and metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs), the proposed device structure is believed to render several advantages including zero leakage, low parasitic effects, fast response, and high current carrying capability, etc. A process flow is developed for higher yield and reliability of the suspended graphene ribbon device which is very delicate in nature. Direct current (DC) and transmission-line pulse test (TLP) measurements are carried out to investigate the switch-on behavior of the device which is crucial for ESD protection. DC measurement with a different configuration is used to characterize the mechanical shape evolution of the graphene ribbon upon biasing. Finite Element Simulations are also conducted to verify the experimental results, which are in good agreements. Furthermore, the breakdown properties of graphene ribbons are tested using TLP. It is found that graphene has a better current drivability compared to copper wires which is widely used as interconnects in integrated circuits (ICs). Also, bi-layer graphene has a higher breakdown current than monolayer graphene which indicates that multilayer graphene should be superior in current discharging. Last, Ab inito calculations are carried out to study the growth mechanism of multilayer graphene which is needed for graphene homo-epitaxy with precise control. It is found that a carbon cluster with six carbon atoms has the smallest kinetic barrier thus largest surface diffusivity during surface diffusion. So it is believed to be the most favorable diffusing species for graphene homo-epitaxy.

  8. Measuring the height-to-height correlation function of corrugation in suspended graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirilenko, D.A., E-mail: Demid.Kirilenko@mail.ioffe.ru [Ioffe Institute, Politekhnicheskaya ul. 26, 194021 St-Petersburg (Russian Federation); EMAT, Universiteit Antwerpen, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerpen (Belgium); Brunkov, P.N. [Ioffe Institute, Politekhnicheskaya ul. 26, 194021 St-Petersburg (Russian Federation); ITMO University, Kronverksky pr. 49, 197101 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-15

    Nanocorrugation of 2D crystals is an important phenomenon since it affects their electronic and mechanical properties. The corrugation may have various sources; one of them is flexural phonons that, in particular, are responsible for the thermal conductivity of graphene. A study of corrugation of just the suspended graphene can reveal much of valuable information on the physics of this complicated phenomenon. At the same time, the suspended crystal nanorelief can hardly be measured directly because of high flexibility of the 2D crystal. Moreover, the relief portion related to rapid out-of-plane oscillations (flexural phonons) is also inaccessible by such measurements. Here we present a technique for measuring the Fourier components of the height–height correlation function H(q) of suspended graphene which includes the effect of flexural phonons. The technique is based on the analysis of electron diffraction patterns. The H(q) is measured in the range of wavevectors q≈0.4–4.5 nm{sup −1}. At the upper limit of this range H(q) does follow the T/κq{sup 4} law. So, we measured the value of suspended graphene bending rigidity κ=1.2±0.4 eV at ambient temperature T≈300 K. At intermediate wave vectors, H(q) follows a slightly weaker exponent than theoretically predicted q{sup −3.15} but is closer to the results of the molecular dynamics simulation. At low wave vectors, the dependence becomes even weaker, which may be a sign of influence of charge carriers on the dynamics of undulations longer than 10 nm. The technique presented can be used for studying physics of flexural phonons in other 2D materials. - Highlights: • A technique for measuring free-standing 2D crystal corrugation is proposed. • The height-to-height correlation function of the suspended graphene corrugation is measured. • Various parameters of the intrinsic graphene properties are experimentally determined.

  9. Freely suspended nanocomposite membranes as highly sensitive sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chaoyang; Markutsya, Sergiy; Pikus, Yuri; Tsukruk, Vladimir V

    2004-10-01

    Highly sensitive sensor arrays are in high demand for prospective applications in remote sensing and imaging. Measuring microscopic deflections of compliant micromembranes and cantilevers is developing into one of the most versatile approaches for thermal, acoustic and chemical sensing. Here, we report on an innovative fabrication of compliant nanocomposite membranes with nanoscale thickness showing extraordinary sensitivity and dynamic range, which makes them candidates for a new generation of membrane-based sensor arrays. These nanomembranes with a thickness of 25-70 nm, which can be freely suspended over large (hundred micrometres) openings are fabricated with molecular precision by time-efficient, spin-assisted layer-by-layer assembly. They are designed as multilayered molecular composites made of a combination of polymeric monolayers and a metal nanoparticle intralayer. We demonstrate that these nanocomposite membranes possess unparalleled sensitivity and a unique autorecovering ability. The membrane nanostructure that is responsible for these outstanding properties combines multilayered polymer/nanoparticle organization, high polymer-chain orientation, and a pre-stretched state.

  10. The electro-mechanical responses of suspended graphene ribbons for electrostatic discharge applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Ma, Rui; Chen, Qi; Xia, Ming; Ng, Jimmy; Wang, Albert; Xie, Ya-Hong

    2016-04-01

    This work presents a suspended graphene ribbon device for electrostatic discharge (ESD) applications. The device structure was proposed and fabricated after careful design considerations. Compared to the conventional ESD devices such as diodes, bipolar junction transistors, and metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors, the proposed device structure is believed to render several advantages including zero leakage, low parasitic effects, fast response, and high critical current density. A process flow was developed for higher yield and reliability of the suspended graphene ribbons. Direct current (DC) and transmission-line pulse (TLP) measurements were carried out to investigate the switching behavior of the device, which is crucial for ESD operation. DC measurements with a different configuration were used to assess the mechanical shape evolution of the graphene ribbon upon biasing. Finite Element Simulations were conducted and agreed well with the experimental results. Furthermore, the current carrying capability of non-suspended graphene ribbons was tested using TLP. It was found that the critical current density of graphene is higher than that of copper wires widely used as interconnects in integrated circuits (ICs).

  11. Graphene membrane as a pressure gauge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milovanović, S. P.; Tadić, M. Ž.; Peeters, F. M.

    2017-07-01

    Straining graphene results in the appearance of a pseudo-magnetic field which alters its local electronic properties. Applying a pressure difference between the two sides of the membrane causes it to bend/bulge resulting in a resistance change. We find that the resistance changes linearly with pressure for bubbles of small radius while the response becomes non-linear for bubbles that stretch almost to the edges of the sample. This is explained as due to the strong interference of propagating electronic modes inside the bubble. Our calculations show that high gauge factors can be obtained in this way which makes graphene a good candidate for pressure sensing.

  12. An atomistic investigation of the effect of strain on frictional properties of suspended graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingshun Bai

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We performed molecular dynamics (MD simulations of a diamond probe scanned on a suspended graphene to reveal the effect of strain on the frictional properties of suspended graphene. The graphene was subjected to some certain strain along the scanning direction. We compared the friction coefficient obtained from different normal loads and strain. The results show that the friction coefficient can be decreased about one order of magnitude with the increase of the strain. And that can be a result of the decreased asymmetry of the contact region which is caused by strain. The synthetic effect of potential energy and the fluctuation of contact region were found to be the main reason accounting for the fluctuation of the friction force. The strain can reduce the fluctuation of the contact region and improve the stability of friction.

  13. An atomistic investigation of the effect of strain on frictional properties of suspended graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Qingshun; He, Xin; Bai, Jinxuan [School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Tong, Zhen [Centre for precision technologies, University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield, HD1 3DH (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-15

    We performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of a diamond probe scanned on a suspended graphene to reveal the effect of strain on the frictional properties of suspended graphene. The graphene was subjected to some certain strain along the scanning direction. We compared the friction coefficient obtained from different normal loads and strain. The results show that the friction coefficient can be decreased about one order of magnitude with the increase of the strain. And that can be a result of the decreased asymmetry of the contact region which is caused by strain. The synthetic effect of potential energy and the fluctuation of contact region were found to be the main reason accounting for the fluctuation of the friction force. The strain can reduce the fluctuation of the contact region and improve the stability of friction.

  14. Suspended graphene with periodic dimer nanostructure on Si cavities for surface-enhanced Raman scattering applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Hsin-Chia; Nien, Li-Wei; Li, Jia-Han; Hsueh, Chun-Hway

    2017-04-01

    Periodic gold dimer nanoantennas on a one-atomic-layer graphene sheet elevated above Si cavities were fabricated to systematically study the effects of the cavity depth on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The periodic trend of Raman intensity as a function of the cavity depth resulting from the interference effect between the plasmonic resonance of the gold dimer and the cavity resonance of the underlying Si cavity was observed, and the electric field was greatly enhanced compared with the non-suspended system. The finite-difference time-domain method was used to simulate the interaction between the electromagnetic wave and the suspended system and to verify the observed SERS response in experiments. Our work has the advantages of combining the superior properties of graphene with suspended metallic nanostructures to result in the enhanced electric field for SERS applications.

  15. Thermal conductivity of suspended few-layer graphene by a modified T-bridge method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, W.; Bao, W.; Jing, L.; Lau, C. N.; Dames, C.

    2013-09-01

    We measured the in-plane thermal conductivity of suspended few-layer graphene flakes by a modified T-bridge technique from 300 K to below 100 K. The thermal conductivities at room temperature are 389, 344, 302, and 596 W/m K for 2-, 3-, 4-, and 8-layer graphene, respectively. The thinner (2-, 3-, 4-layer) graphene samples did not show any clear thickness dependence, while the thicker (8-layer) sample clearly has higher thermal conductivity. In situ current annealing was used to remove polymer residues from the central portion of the 3- and 8-layer graphene samples, as confirmed by electrical transport measurements and post-experiment characterization by Raman and scanning electron microscopy, although some residues still remained near both ends (heater and heat sink). Comparing the 2, 3, and 4-layer samples suggests the annealing had little effect near room temperature but leads to increased thermal conductivity at low temperature. These results also show that the thermal conductivities of suspended few-layer graphene are higher than those of encased few-layer graphene of similar thickness measured previously [Jang et al., Nano Lett. 10, 3909 (2010)].

  16. Cricket inspired sensory hairs on suspended membranes with capacitive displacement detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Baar, J.J.J.; Dijkstra, Marcel; Wiegerink, Remco J.; Lammerink, Theodorus S.J.; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the fabrication of artificial hairs of siliconnitride and SU-8 on suspended membranes for flow sensing applications. The suspended membranes contain electrodes for capacitive sensing of the rotation of the hairs. For the siliconnitride hairs a silicon wafer is used as mould and

  17. Self-assembly of suspended graphene wrinkles with high pre-tension and elastic property

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liusi; Niu, Tianxiao; Zhang, Hui; Xu, Wenjing; Zou, Mingchu; Xu, Lu; Cao, Guoxin; Cao, Anyuan

    2017-12-01

    Wrinkles exist universally in graphene-based structures, yet their controlled fabrication remains challenging; most graphene wrinkles have been produced either in attachment to elastic substrates or limited in small single sheets. Here, we utilize the phenomenon of gel-cracking to generate uniaxial strains locally on solution-precipitated graphene oxide (GO) sheets, thus creating suspended and aligned wrinkles over the trenches between cracked TiO2 islands. In particular, those GO wrinkles are subjected to a high pre-tension, which is important for making stable suspended configuration, as confirmed by theoretical calculations based on the wrinkle geometry and measured spring constants, respectively. As a result, in situ atomic force microscope indentation reveals elastic deformation with tunable spring constants depending on the gap width. We further obtain chemically reduced GO wrinkles with enhanced spring constants and reversible behavior after 1000 indentation cycles. Our suspended and aligned graphene wrinkles have potential applications in many areas such as sensors, actuators, and micro/nano electromechanical systems.

  18. Simulation of Strain Induced Pseudomagnetic Fields in Graphene Suspended on MEMS Chevron Actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vutukuru, Mounika; Christopher, Jason; Bishop, David; Swan, Anna

    Graphene has been shown to withstand remarkable levels of mechanical strain an order of magnitude larger than bulk crystalline materials. This exceptional stretchability of graphene allows for the direct tuning of fundamental material properties, as well as for the investigation of novel physics such as generation of strain induced pseudomagnetic fields. However, current methods for strain such as polymer elongation or pressurized wells do not integrate well into devices. We propose microelectromechanical (MEMS) Chevron actuators as a reliable platform for applying strain to graphene. In addition to their advantageous controllable output force, low input power and ease of integration into existing technologies, MEMS allow for different strain orientations to optimize pseudomagnetic field generation in graphene. Here, we model nonuniform strain in suspended graphene on Chevron actuators using COMSOL Multiphysics. By simulating the deformation of the graphene geometry under the device actuation, we explore the pseudomagnetic field map induced by numerically calculating the components of the strain tensor. Our models provide the theoretical framework with which experimental analysis is compared, and optimize our MEMS designs for further exploration of novel physics in graphene. The authors would like to thank NSF DMR 1411008 for their support on this project.

  19. Measurement of the ν=1/3 Fractional Quantum Hall Energy Gap in Suspended Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghahari, Fereshte; Zhao, Yue; Cadden-Zimansky, Paul; Bolotin, Kirill; Kim, Philip

    2011-01-01

    We report on magnetotransport measurements of multiterminal suspended graphene devices. Fully developed integer quantum Hall states appear in magnetic fields as low as 2 T. At higher fields the formation of longitudinal resistance minima and transverse resistance plateaus are seen corresponding to fractional quantum Hall states, most strongly for ν=1/3. By measuring the temperature dependence of these resistance minima, the energy gap for the 1/3 fractional state in graphene is determined to be at ˜20K at 14 T.

  20. A Simple Transmission Electron Microscopy Method for Fast Thickness Characterization of Suspended Graphene and Graphite Flakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubino, Stefano; Akhtar, Sultan; Leifer, Klaus

    2016-02-01

    We present a simple, fast method for thickness characterization of suspended graphene/graphite flakes that is based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We derive an analytical expression for the intensity of the transmitted electron beam I 0(t), as a function of the specimen thickness t (tgraphene/graphite, the method we propose has the advantage of being simple and fast, requiring only the acquisition of bright-field images.

  1. Fractional quantum Hall effect in suspended graphene: Transport coefficients and electron interaction strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abanin, D. A.; Skachko, I.; Du, X.; Andrei, E. Y.; Levitov, L. S.

    2010-03-01

    Recently, fractional-quantized Hall effect was observed in suspended graphene (SG), a free-standing monolayer of carbon, where it was found to persist up to T=10K . The best results in those experiments were obtained on micron-size flakes, on which only two-terminal transport measurements could be performed. Here we address the problem of extracting transport coefficients of a fractional quantum Hall state from the two-terminal conductance. We develop a general method, based on the conformal invariance of two-dimensional magnetotransport, and employ it to analyze the measurements on SG. From the temperature dependence of longitudinal conductivity, extracted from the measured two-terminal conductance, we estimate the energy gap of quasiparticle excitations in the fractional-quantized ν=1/3 state. The gap is found to be significantly larger than in GaAs-based structures, signaling much stronger electron interactions in suspended graphene. Our approach provides a tool for the studies of quantum transport in suspended graphene and other nanoscale systems.

  2. Large yield production of high mobility freely suspended graphene electronic devices on a polydimethylglutarimide based organic polymer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tombros, Nikolaos; Veligura, Alina; Junesch, Juliane; Berg, J. Jasper van den; Zomer, Paul J.; Wojtaszek, Magdalena; Vera Marun, Ivan J.; Jonkman, Harry T.; Wees, Bart J. van

    2011-01-01

    The recent observation of a fractional quantum Hall effect in high mobility suspended graphene devices introduced a new direction in graphene physics, the field of electron–electron interaction dynamics. However, the technique used currently for the fabrication of such high mobility devices has

  3. Fabrication of nanoporous graphene/polymer composite membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Madauß, Lukas; Schumacher, Jens; Ghosh, Mandakranta; Ochedowski, Oliver; Meyer, Jens; Lebius, Henning; Ban-D'Etat, Brigitte; Toimil-Molares, Maria Eugenia; Trautmann, Christina; Lammertink, Rob G.H.; Ulbricht, Mathias; Schleberger, Marika

    2017-01-01

    Graphene is currently investigated as a promising membrane material in which selective pores can be created depending on the requirements of the application. However, to handle large-area nanoporous graphene a stable support material is needed. Here, we report on composite membranes consisting of

  4. Signatures of evanescent transport in ballistic suspended graphene-superconductor junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaravadivel, Piranavan; Du, Xu

    2016-04-01

    In Dirac materials, the low energy excitations behave like ultra-relativistic massless particles with linear energy dispersion. A particularly intriguing phenomenon arises with the intrinsic charge transport behavior at the Dirac point where the charge density approaches zero. In graphene, a 2-D Dirac fermion gas system, it was predicted that charge transport near the Dirac point is carried by evanescent modes, resulting in unconventional “pseudo-diffusive” charge transport even in the absence of disorder. In the past decade, experimental observation of this phenomenon remained challenging due to the presence of strong disorder in graphene devices which limits the accessibility of the low carrier density regime close enough to the Dirac point. Here we report transport measurements on ballistic suspended graphene-Niobium Josephson weak links that demonstrate a transition from ballistic to pseudo-diffusive like evanescent transport below a carrier density of ~1010 cm-2. Approaching the Dirac point, the sub-harmonic gap structures due to multiple Andreev reflections display a strong Fermi energy-dependence and become increasingly pronounced, while the normalized excess current through the superconductor-graphene interface decreases sharply. Our observations are in qualitative agreement with the long standing theoretical prediction for the emergence of evanescent transport mediated pseudo-diffusive transport in graphene.

  5. Strain and morphology of graphene membranes on responsive microhydrogel patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaina, P. R.; Jaiswal, Manu [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India)

    2014-11-10

    We study the configuration of atomically-thin graphene membranes on tunable microhydrogel patterns. The polyethylene oxide microhydrogel structures patterned by electron-beam lithography show increase in height, with a persistent swelling ratio up to ∼10, upon exposure to vapors of an organic solvent. We demonstrate that modifying the height fluctuations of the microhydrogel affects the strain and morphology of ultrathin graphene membrane over-layer. Raman spectroscopic investigations indicate that small lattice strains can be switched on in mechanically exfoliated few-layer graphene membranes that span these microhydrogel structures. In case of chemical-vapor deposited single-layer graphene, we observe Raman signatures of local depinning of the membranes upon swelling of microhydrogel pillars. We attribute this depinning transition to the competition between membrane-substrate adhesion energy and membrane strain energy, where the latter is tuned by hydrogel swelling.

  6. One-step synthesis of a suspended ultrathin graphene oxide film: application in transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirilenko, D A; Dideykin, A T; Aleksenskiy, A E; Sitnikova, A A; Konnikov, S G; Vul', A Ya

    2015-01-01

    Ultrathin graphene films find their use as advantageous support for nano- and biomaterials investigations. Thin film causes a very slight deterioration to measured signals, thus providing more details of the object's structure at nanoscale. The ultimate thinness of graphene works in the best way for this purpose. However, obtaining suspended thin film of a large-area, which is convenient for applications, is often a relatively complicated and time-consuming task. Here we present a one-step 1-min technique for synthesis of an extremely thin (about 1-2 nm) continuous film suspended over cells of a conventional copper grid (50-400 μm mesh). This technique enables us to acquire a large-area film which is water-resistant, stable in organic solvents and can act as a support when studying nanoparticles or biomaterials. Moreover, the very mechanism of the film formation can be interesting from the point of view of other applications of ultrathin graphene oxide papers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Reexamination of basal plane thermal conductivity of suspended graphene samples measured by electro-thermal micro-bridge methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Insun Jo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Thermal transport in suspended graphene samples has been measured in prior works and this work with the use of a suspended electro-thermal micro-bridge method. These measurement results are analyzed here to evaluate and eliminate the errors caused by the extrinsic thermal contact resistance. It is noted that the room-temperature thermal resistance measured in a recent work increases linearly with the suspended length of the single-layer graphene samples synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD, and that such a feature does not reveal the failure of Fourier’s law despite the increase in the reported apparent thermal conductivity with length. The re-analyzed apparent thermal conductivity of a single-layer CVD graphene sample reaches about 1680 ± 180 W m−1 K−1 at room temperature, which is close to the highest value reported for highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. In comparison, the apparent thermal conductivity values measured for two suspended exfoliated bi-layer graphene samples are about 880 ± 60 and 730 ± 60 Wm−1K−1 at room temperature, and approach that of the natural graphite source above room temperature. However, the low-temperature thermal conductivities of these suspended graphene samples are still considerably lower than the graphite values, with the peak thermal conductivities shifted to much higher temperatures. Analysis of the thermal conductivity data reveals that the low temperature behavior is dominated by phonon scattering by polymer residue instead of by the lateral boundary.

  8. Broken-Symmetry States and Divergent Resistance in Suspended Bilayer Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Benjamin; Martin, Jens; Weitz, Thomas; Allen, Monica; Yacoby, Amir

    2010-03-01

    We report the fabrication of suspended bilayer graphene devices with very little disorder. Transport measurements at zero magnetic field indicate that charge inhomogeneity in these flakes reaches as low as 10^10 cm-2. We observe quantum Hall states that are fully quantized at a magnetic field of 0.2 T, as well as broken-symmetry states at intermediate filling factors ν = 0, ±1, ±2 and ±3. In the ν = 0 state, the resistance of the flakes increases exponentially with applied magnetic field and scales as magnetic field divided by temperature. This resistance is predominantly affected by the perpendicular component of the applied field and the extracted gap size is larger than expected from Zeeman splitting, indicating that the broken-symmetry states arise from many-body interactions and underscoring the importance of Coulomb interactions in bilayer graphene.

  9. Sub-harmonic gap structure and Magneto-transport in suspended graphene -Superconductor ballistic junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaravadivel, Piranavan; Du, Xu

    2015-03-01

    Inducing superconductivity in graphene via the proximity effect enables to study the rich transport of the massless Dirac fermions at the Superconductor(S) - Graphene (G) interface. Some of the predictions are pseudo diffusive transport in Ballistic SGS junctions at low carrier densities and the unique specular and retro Andreev reflections in graphene. One of the challenges in observing these experimentally is to fabricate highly transparent ballistic SGS junctions that can be probed at low carrier densities near the Dirac point. In this talk we will present our recent results on suspended graphene- Niobium Josephson weak links. Our devices exhibit a mobility of ~ 350000 cm2V-1s-1 with a carrier density as low as 109 cm-2. Below the Superconducting transition temperature (Tc) ~ 9K, the devices show supercurrent and sub-harmonic gap structure due to Multiple Andreev reflections. In the vicinity of the Dirac point, the sub-harmonic gap structure becomes more pronounced, which as predicated, is indicative of pseudo-diffusive transport. With a fine scanning of gate voltage close to Dirac point we see emergence of some unusual sub- gap structures. We also report on our study of these samples below the upper critical field of Nb (~ 3.5T), where superconducting proximity effect coexists with Quantum Hall effect.

  10. Improved photoresponse with enhanced photoelectric contribution in fully suspended graphene photodetectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Vikram; Capone, Aaron; Strauf, Stefan; Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    2013-09-27

    Graphene's unique optoelectronic properties are promising to realize photodetectors with ultrafast photoresponse over a wide spectral range from far-infrared to ultraviolet radiation. The underlying mechanism of the photoresponse has been a particular focus of recent work and was found to be either photoelectric or photo-thermoelectric in nature and enhanced by hot carrier effects. Graphene supported by a substrate was found to be dominated by the photo-thermoelectric effect, which is known to be an order of magnitude slower than the photoelectric effect. Here we demonstrate fully-suspended chemical vapor deposition grown graphene microribbon arrays that are dominated by the faster photoelectric effect. Substrate removal was found to enhance the photoresponse by four-fold compared to substrate-supported microribbons. Furthermore, we show that the light-current input/output curves give valuable information about the underlying photophysical process responsible for the generated photocurrent. These findings are promising towards wafer-scale fabrication of graphene photodetectors approaching THz cut-off frequencies.

  11. Measuring the size dependence of thermal conductivity of suspended graphene disks using null-point scanning thermal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Gwangseok; Kwon, Ohmyoung

    2016-03-07

    Using null-point scanning thermal microscopy (NP SThM), we have measured and analyzed the size dependence of the thermal conductivity of graphene. To do so, we rigorously re-derived the principal equation of NP SThM in terms of thermal property measurements so as to explain how this technique can be effectively used to quantitatively measure the local thermal resistance with nanoscale spatial resolution. This technique has already been proven to resolve the major problems of conventional SThM, and to quantitatively measure the temperature profile. Using NP SThM, we measured the variation in the thermal resistance of suspended chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-grown graphene disks with radii of 50-3680 nm from the center to the edge with respect to the size. By thoroughly analyzing the size dependence of the thermal resistance, we show that, with increasing graphene size, the ballistic resistance becomes more dominant in the thermal resistance experienced by a heat source of finite size and that the thermal conductivity experienced by such a heat source can even decrease. The results of this study reveal that the thermal conductivity of graphene detected by a heat source depends on the size of the heat source relative to that of the suspended graphene and on how the heat source and graphene are connected. As demonstrated in this study, NP SThM will be very useful for quantitative thermal characterization of not only CVD-grown graphene but also various other nanomaterials and nanodevices.

  12. Biomimetic Phospholipid Membrane Organization on Graphene and Graphene Oxide Surfaces: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, Nathalie; Urtizberea, Ainhoa; Verre, Andrea F; Iliut, Maria; Lelimousin, Mickael; Hirtz, Michael; Vijayaraghavan, Aravind; Sansom, Mark S P

    2017-02-28

    Supported phospholipid membrane patches stabilized on graphene surfaces have shown potential in sensor device functionalization, including biosensors and biocatalysis. Lipid dip-pen nanolithography (L-DPN) is a method useful in generating supported membrane structures that maintain lipid functionality, such as exhibiting specific interactions with protein molecules. Here, we have integrated L-DPN, atomic force microscopy, and coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation methods to characterize the molecular properties of supported lipid membranes (SLMs) on graphene and graphene oxide supports. We observed substantial differences in the topologies of the stabilized lipid structures depending on the nature of the surface (polar graphene oxide vs nonpolar graphene). Furthermore, the addition of water to SLM systems resulted in large-scale reorganization of the lipid structures, with measurable effects on lipid lateral mobility within the supported membranes. We also observed reduced lipid ordering within the supported structures relative to free-standing lipid bilayers, attributed to the strong hydrophobic interactions between the lipids and support. Together, our results provide insight into the molecular effects of graphene and graphene oxide surfaces on lipid bilayer membranes. This will be important in the design of these surfaces for applications such as biosensor devices.

  13. Effective NaCl and dye rejection of hybrid graphene oxide/graphene layered membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelos-Gomez, Aaron; Cruz-Silva, Rodolfo; Muramatsu, Hiroyuki; Ortiz-Medina, Josue; Araki, Takumi; Fukuyo, Tomoyuki; Tejima, Syogo; Takeuchi, Kenji; Hayashi, Takuya; Terrones, Mauricio; Endo, Morinobu

    2017-11-01

    Carbon nanomaterials are robust and possess fascinating properties useful for separation technology applications, but their scalability and high salt rejection when in a strong cross flow for long periods of time remain challenging. Here, we present a graphene-based membrane that is prepared using a simple and environmentally friendly method by spray coating an aqueous dispersion of graphene oxide/few-layered graphene/deoxycholate. The membranes were robust enough to withstand strong cross-flow shear for a prolonged period (120 h) while maintaining NaCl rejection near 85% and 96% for an anionic dye. Experimental results and molecular dynamic simulations revealed that the presence of deoxycholate enhances NaCl rejection in these graphene-based membranes. In addition, these novel hybrid-layered membranes exhibit better chlorine resistance than pure graphene oxide membranes. The desalination performance and aggressive shear and chlorine resistance of these scalable graphene-based membranes are promising for use in practical water separation applications.

  14. Synthesis, morphology and properties of polycrystalline graphene membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Vargas, Carlos Samuel

    Graphene has recently emerged as a promising material for a wide range of potential applications, thanks to its outstanding electrical, mechanical, thermal and optical properties. This interest has fueled many efforts to establish methods for large scale graphene synthesis. One of the most promising scalable approaches is to obtain graphene on metal surfaces, most notably on copper, via chemical vapor deposition (CVD). We have developed novel fabrication methods to obtain CVD graphene devices in large quantities. This allowed a thorough study of the polycrystalline structure in CVD graphene, as well as the characterization of mechanical and electrical properties, which are affected by graphene's grain structure. We found that grain boundaries are not the dominant factor in determining the electrical properties of devices. However, grain boundaries were observed to strongly affect graphene mechanical properties. For example, tearing and unzipping along grain boundaries were observed in graphene membranes, as a result of nanoindentation. Finally, we have fabricated microcapsules featuring atomically thin windows made of reinforced double-layer CVD graphene. We have demonstrated the use of these windows for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of samples in water. As proof of principle, we have imaged metallic nanoparticles in solution, with resolution and signal to noise ratio superior to those obtained with polyimide-based commercially available environmental cells.

  15. Synthesis of Graphene Based Membranes: Effect of Substrate Surface Properties on Monolayer Graphene Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feras Kafiah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we report the transfer of graphene onto eight commercial microfiltration substrates having different pore sizes and surface characteristics. Monolayer graphene grown on copper by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD process was transferred by the pressing method over the target substrates, followed by wet etching of copper to obtain monolayer graphene/polymer membranes. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM, atomic force microscopy (AFM, and contact angle (CA measurements were carried out to explore the graphene layer transferability. Three factors, namely, the substrate roughness, its pore size, and its surface wetting (degree of hydrophobicity are found to affect the conformality and coverage of the transferred graphene monolayer on the substrate surface. A good quality graphene transfer is achieved on the substrate with the following characteristics; being hydrophobic (CA > 90°, having small pore size, and low surface roughness, with a CA to RMS (root mean square ratio higher than 2.7°/nm.

  16. Synthesis of Graphene Based Membranes: Effect of Substrate Surface Properties on Monolayer Graphene Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafiah, Feras; Khan, Zafarullah; Ibrahim, Ahmed; Atieh, Muataz; Laoui, Tahar

    2017-01-21

    In this work, we report the transfer of graphene onto eight commercial microfiltration substrates having different pore sizes and surface characteristics. Monolayer graphene grown on copper by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process was transferred by the pressing method over the target substrates, followed by wet etching of copper to obtain monolayer graphene/polymer membranes. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and contact angle (CA) measurements were carried out to explore the graphene layer transferability. Three factors, namely, the substrate roughness, its pore size, and its surface wetting (degree of hydrophobicity) are found to affect the conformality and coverage of the transferred graphene monolayer on the substrate surface. A good quality graphene transfer is achieved on the substrate with the following characteristics; being hydrophobic (CA > 90°), having small pore size, and low surface roughness, with a CA to RMS (root mean square) ratio higher than 2.7°/nm.

  17. Elastic modulus of suspended purple membrane measured by atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siitonen, Ari M. [NTT Basic Research Laboratories, NTT Corporation, 3-1 Morinosato-Wakamiya, Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0198 (Japan); Sumitomo, Koji [NTT Basic Research Laboratories, NTT Corporation, 3-1 Morinosato-Wakamiya, Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0198 (Japan)], E-mail: sumitomo@will.brl.ntt.co.jp; Ramanujan, Chandra S. [Bionanotechnology IRC, Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Oxfordshire OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Shinozaki, Youichi; Kasai, Nahoko; Furukawa, Kazuaki [NTT Basic Research Laboratories, NTT Corporation, 3-1 Morinosato-Wakamiya, Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0198 (Japan); Ryan, John F. [Bionanotechnology IRC, Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Oxfordshire OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Torimitsu, Keiichi [NTT Basic Research Laboratories, NTT Corporation, 3-1 Morinosato-Wakamiya, Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0198 (Japan)

    2008-09-30

    We have probed the mechanical properties of purple membrane (PM) in a physiological environment using the atomic force microscope (AFM). By suspending PM over nano-trenches, the elastic properties of PM can be evaluated free from the interaction with the substrate. Force-displacement curves were obtained on the suspended membrane and the data was compared to that of a simple model of a thin film over a trench. By fitting the data to the model, the elastic modulus of PM was estimated to be 8 MPa. When the membrane is repeatedly indented, we observed a change in the force-distance data consistent with damage to the two-dimensional crystal of PM. In this paper we demonstrate that the AFM allows us to evaluate the mechanics of biological membranes in their native conditions.

  18. THE EFFECT OF THE TYPE OF ADMIXTURE ON THE PROPERTIES OF POLYACRYLONITRILE MEMBRANES MODIFIED WITH NANOTUBES, GRAPHENE OXIDE AND GRAPHENE

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beata Fryczkowska; Lucyna Przywara

    2017-01-01

    ...) membranes with nanotubes (MWCNT), graphene (RG) and graphene oxide (GO) addition. All of the specified additions differ diametrically in terms of properties, starting from the spatial structure of the particles, up to the chemical properties...

  19. Are vacuum-filtrated reduced graphene oxide membranes symmetric?

    KAUST Repository

    Tang, Bo

    2015-12-02

    Graphene or reduced graphene oxide (rGO) membrane-based materials are promising for many advanced applications due to their exceptional properties. One of the most widely used synthesis methods for rGO membranes is vacuum filtration of graphene oxide (GO) on a filter membrane, followed by reduction, which shows great advantages such as operational convenience and good controllability. Despite vacuum-filtrated rGO membranes being widely used in many applications, a fundamental question is overlooked: are the top and bottom surfaces of the membranes formed at the interfaces with air and with the filter membrane respectively symmetric or asymmetric? This work, for the first time, reports the asymmetry of the vacuum-filtrated rGO membranes and discloses the filter membranes’ physical imprint on the bottom surface of the rGO membrane, which takes place when the filter membrane surface pores have similar dimension to GO sheets. This result points out that the asymmetric surface properties should be cautiously taken into consideration while designing the surface-related applications for GO and rGO membranes.

  20. Impact of suspended solids concentration on sludge filterability in Full-scale membrane bioreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lousada Ferreira, M.D.C.; Van Lier, J.B.; Van der Graaf, J.H.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    The relation between activated sludge filterability and mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) concentration in membrane bioreactors (MBRs) is framed in a single hypothesis, explaining results seemingly contradictory. A total of 44 activated sludge samples were collected and analyzed on a variety of

  1. Antibacterial activity of graphite, graphite oxide, graphene oxide, and reduced graphene oxide: membrane and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shaobin; Zeng, Tingying Helen; Hofmann, Mario; Burcombe, Ehdi; Wei, Jun; Jiang, Rongrong; Kong, Jing; Chen, Yuan

    2011-09-27

    Health and environmental impacts of graphene-based materials need to be thoroughly evaluated before their potential applications. Graphene has strong cytotoxicity toward bacteria. To better understand its antimicrobial mechanism, we compared the antibacterial activity of four types of graphene-based materials (graphite (Gt), graphite oxide (GtO), graphene oxide (GO), and reduced graphene oxide (rGO)) toward a bacterial model-Escherichia coli. Under similar concentration and incubation conditions, GO dispersion shows the highest antibacterial activity, sequentially followed by rGO, Gt, and GtO. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and dynamic light scattering analyses show that GO aggregates have the smallest average size among the four types of materials. SEM images display that the direct contacts with graphene nanosheets disrupt cell membrane. No superoxide anion (O(2)(•-)) induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is detected. However, the four types of materials can oxidize glutathione, which serves as redox state mediator in bacteria. Conductive rGO and Gt have higher oxidation capacities than insulating GO and GtO. Results suggest that antimicrobial actions are contributed by both membrane and oxidation stress. We propose that a three-step antimicrobial mechanism, previously used for carbon nanotubes, is applicable to graphene-based materials. It includes initial cell deposition on graphene-based materials, membrane stress caused by direct contact with sharp nanosheets, and the ensuing superoxide anion-independent oxidation. We envision that physicochemical properties of graphene-based materials, such as density of functional groups, size, and conductivity, can be precisely tailored to either reducing their health and environmental risks or increasing their application potentials. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  2. PENGGUNAAN MEMBRAN KERAMIK UNTUK MENURUNKAN BAKTERI E. COLI DAN TOTAL SUSPENDED SOLID (TSS PADA AIR PERMUKAAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ir kasam

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available digunakan sebagai air minum. Adapun parameter yang cukup tinggi pada air permukaan adalah bakteri E. Coli dan Total Suspended Solid (TSS. Salah satu alternative pengolahan untuk parameter bakteri E. Coli dan TSS adalah dengan filtrasi dengan membran filter. Membran keramik adalah salah satu alat yang bisa digunakan sebagai filter pada air permukaan. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui kinerja membran keramik dalam menurunkan E.Coli dan TSS pada air permukan. Metode penelitian dilakukan dengan menggunakan membran keramik ukuran diameter 10 cm dan tinggi 20 cm yang terbuat dari tanah lempung, pasir kwarsa dan serbuk gergaji dengan komposisi 7,5% (membran 1 dan 10% (membran 2 bertujuan untuk membuat porositas dan pembakaran pada temperatur 900 – 1200 oC. Selanjutnya air permukaan dialirkan pada membran keramik secara kontinyu. Pengujian E.Coli dan TSS dilakukan pada menit ke 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, dan 180 dari waktu pengaliran. Dari hasil pengujian E. Coli dan TSS, diketahui bahwa membran keramik dapat menurunkan parameter E.Coli dan TSS pada air permukaan. E. Coli menurun hingga 98% untuk kedua membran 7,5% dan 10 % serbuk gergaji. Sedangkan TSS menurun hingga 72,55% pada membran keramik 7,5 % dan 65,22% pada membran 10%.

  3. Study of Hydrophilic Electrospun Nanofiber Membranes for Filtration of Micro and Nanosize Suspended Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurxat Nuraje

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Polymeric nanofiber membranes of polyvinyl chloride (PVC blended with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP were fabricated using an electrospinning process at different conditions and used for the filtration of three different liquid suspensions to determine the efficiency of the filter membranes. The three liquid suspensions included lake water, abrasive particles from a water jet cutter, and suspended magnetite nanoparticles. The major goal of this research work was to create highly hydrophilic nanofiber membranes and utilize them to filter the suspended liquids at an optimal level of purification (i.e., drinkable level. In order to overcome the fouling/biofouling/blocking problems of the membrane, a coagulation process, which enhances the membrane’s efficiency for removing colloidal particles, was used as a pre-treatment process. Two chemical agents, Tanfloc (organic and Alum (inorganic, were chosen for the flocculation/coagulation process. The removal efficiency of the suspended particles in the liquids was measured in terms of turbidity, pH, and total dissolved solids (TDS. It was observed that the coagulation/filtration experiments were more efficient at removing turbidity, compared to the direct filtration process performed without any coagulation and filter media.

  4. Low-stress photosensitive polyimide suspended membrane for improved thermal isolation performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, J.; Xing, R. Y.; Wu, W. J.; Liu, H. F.; Liu, J. Q.; Tu, L. C.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we introduce a method of isolating thermal conduction from silicon substrate for accommodating thermal-sensitive micro-devices. This method lies in fabrication of a low-stress photosensitive polyimide (PSPI) suspension structure which has lower thermal conductivity than silicon. First, a PSPI layer was patterned on a silicon wafer and hard baked. Then, a cavity was etched from the backside of the silicon substrate to form a membrane or a bridge-shape PSPI structure. After releasing, a slight deformation of about 20 nm was observed in the suspended structures, suggesting ultralow residual stress which is essential for accommodating micro-devices. In order to investigate the thermal isolation performance of the suspended PSPI structures, micro Pirani vacuum gauges, which are thermal-sensitive, had been fabricated on the PSPI structures. The measurement results illustrated that the Pirani gauges worked as expected in the range from 1– 470 Pa. Moreover, the results of the Pirani gauges based on the membrane and bridge structures were comparable, indicating that the commonly used bridge-shape structure for further reducing thermal conduction was unnecessary. Due to the excellent thermal isolation performance of PSPI, the suspended PSPI membrane is promising to be an outstanding candidate for thermal isolation applications.

  5. Graphene oxide – molybdenum disulfide hybrid membranes for hydrogen separation

    KAUST Repository

    Ostwal, Mayur

    2017-12-24

    Graphene oxide – molybdenum disulfide hybrid membranes were prepared using vacuum filtration technique. The thickness and the MoS2 content in the membranes were varied and their H2 permeance and H2/CO2 selectivity are reported. A 60nm hybrid membrane containing ~75% by weight of MoS2 exhibited the highest H2 permeance of 804×10−9mol/m2·s·Pa with corresponding H2/CO2 selectivity of 26.7; while a 150nm hybrid membrane with ~29% MoS2 showed the highest H2/CO2 selectivity of 44.2 with corresponding H2 permeance of 287×10−9mol/m2·s·Pa. The hybrid membranes exhibited much higher H2 permeance compared to graphene oxide membranes and higher selectivity compared to MoS2 membranes, which fully demonstrated the synergistic effect of both nanomaterials. The membranes also displayed excellent operational long-term stability.

  6. Recent Developments of Graphene Oxide-Based Membranes: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jinxia; Ping, Dan; Dong, Xinfa

    2017-01-01

    Membrane-based separation technology has attracted great interest in many separation fields due to its advantages of easy-operation, energy-efficiency, easy scale-up, and environmental friendliness. The development of novel membrane materials and membrane structures is an urgent demand to promote membrane-based separation technology. Graphene oxide (GO), as an emerging star nano-building material, has showed great potential in the membrane-based separation field. In this review paper, the latest research progress in GO-based membranes focused on adjusting membrane structure and enhancing their mechanical strength as well as structural stability in aqueous environment is highlighted and discussed in detail. First, we briefly reviewed the preparation and characterization of GO. Then, the preparation method, characterization, and type of GO-based membrane are summarized. Finally, the advancements of GO-based membrane in adjusting membrane structure and enhancing their mechanical strength, as well as structural stability in aqueous environment, are particularly discussed. This review hopefully provides a new avenue for the innovative developments of GO-based membrane in various membrane applications. PMID:28895877

  7. Touch-mode capacitive pressure sensor with graphene-polymer heterostructure membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Christian; Phillips, Rory; Pasternak, Iwona; Sobieski, Jan; Strupinski, Wlodek; Vijayaraghavan, Aravind

    2018-01-01

    We describe the fabrication and characterisation of a touch-mode capacitive pressure sensor (TMCPS) with a robust design that comprises a graphene-polymer heterostructure film, laminated onto the silicon dioxide surface of a silicon wafer, incorporating a SU-8 spacer grid structure. The spacer grid structure allows the flexible graphene-polymer film to be partially suspended above the substrate, such that a pressure on the membrane results in a reproducible deflection, even after exposing the membrane to pressures over 10 times the operating range. Sensors show reproducible pressure transduction in water submersion at varying depths under static and dynamic loading. The measured capacitance change in response to pressure is in good agreement with an analytical model of clamped plates in touch mode. The device shows a pressure sensitivity of 27.1 +/- 0.5 fF Pa‑1 over a pressure range of 0.5 kPa–8.5 kPa. In addition, we demonstrate the operation of this device as a force-touch sensor in air.

  8. Tailoring perpendicular magnetic anisotropy with graphene oxide membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Ning, Keyu

    2017-11-15

    Graphene oxide (GO) membranes have been widely explored for their excellent physical and chemical properties, and abundant functional groups. In this work, we report the improvement of the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) of CoFeB thin films by applying a coating of GO membranes. We observe that the PMA of the CoFeB/MgAl–O stacks is strongly enhanced by the coating of GO membranes and even reaches 0.6 mJ m−2 at room temperature after an annealing process. The critical thickness of the membrane-coated CoFeB for switching the magnetization from the out-of-plane to the in-plane axis exceeds 1.6 nm. First-principle calculations are performed to investigate the contribution of the GO membranes to the magnetic anisotropy energy (MAE). Due to changes in the hybridization of 3d orbitals, varying the location of the C atomic layer with Co changes the contribution of the Co–C stacks to PMA. Thus, the large PMA achieved with GO membranes can be attributed to the orbital hybridization of the C and O atoms with the Co orbitals. These results provide a comprehensive understanding of the PMA and point towards opportunities to achieve multifunctional graphene-composite spintronic devices.

  9. Suppressing thermal conductivity of suspended tri-layer graphene by gold deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiayi; Zhu, Liyan; Chen, Jie; Li, Baowen; Thong, John T L

    2013-12-17

    A simple and general strategy for suppressing the thermal conductivity in graphene is shown. The strategy uses gold nano-particles physically deposited on graphene to continuously reduce the thermal conductivity of graphene with increasing coverage, which demonstrates the potential for practical development of graphene-based devices with tunable thermal conductivity for thermal management. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Microbial dynamics of biofilm and suspended flocs in anammox membrane bioreactor: The effect of non-woven fabric membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Long-Fei; Lv, Lu; Kang, Qi; Gao, Baoyu; Ni, Shou-Qing; Chen, Yi-Han; Xu, Shiping

    2018-01-01

    Membrane bioreactor with non-woven fabric membranes (NWMBR) is developing into a suitable method for anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox). As a carrier, non-woven fabric membrane divided total biomass into biofilm and suspended flocs gradually. Total nitrogen removal efficiency was maintained around 82.6% under nitrogen loading rate of 567.4mgN/L/d after 260days operation. Second-order substrate removal and Stover-Kincannon models were successfully used to simulate the nitrogen removal performance in NWMBR. High-throughput sequence was employed to elucidate the underlying microbial community dynamics. Candidatus Brocadia, Kuenenia, Jettenia were detected to affirm the dominant status of anammox microorganisms and 98.2% of anammox microorganisms distributed in biofilm. In addition, abundances of functional genes (hzs, nirK) in biofilm and suspended flocs were assessed by quantitative PCR to further investigate the coexistence of anammox and other microorganisms. Potential nitrogen removal pathways were established according to relevant nitrogen removal performance and microbial community. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Research on the Helium Permeability of Graphene Oxide Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, G. H.; Meng, D. H.; Yan, R. X.; Guo, C. W.

    2017-11-01

    In order to meet the sealing performance requirements, extra-high sensitive mass spectrometer leak detection method is developed. So the leak rate of 10‑15Pa•m3 / s on the order of the standard leakage is demanded. Increasing the number of holes in the graphene on the artificial control, the leak rate of grapheme would be improved. Based on this idea, a certain defective graphene as a penetrating element, using in the ultra-sensitive leak detection can be made. In this paper the relationship among the permeability of helium and the pressure difference and the thickness of the GO membrane were studied. The permeation mechanism of GO membrane of the minimal leak rate was discussed, which provides a reference for the study of ultra-sensitive leak detection technology.

  12. Separation of tritiated water using graphene oxide membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevigny, Gary J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Motkuri, Radha K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gotthold, David W. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fifield, Leonard S. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Frost, Anthony P. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bratton, Wesley [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-06-28

    In future nuclear fuel reprocessing plants and possibly for nuclear power plants, the cleanup of tritiated water will be needed for hundreds of thousands of gallons of water with low activities of tritium. This cleanup concept utilizes graphene oxide laminar membranes (GOx) for the separation of low-concentration (10-3-10 µCi/g) tritiated water to create water that can be released to the environment and a much smaller waste stream with higher tritium concentrations. Graphene oxide membranes consist of hierarchically stacked, overlapping molecular layers and represent a new class of materials. A permeation rate test was performed with a 2-µm-thick cast Asbury membrane using mixed gas permeability testing with zero air (highly purified atmosphere) and with air humidified with either H2O or D2O to a nominal 50% relative humidity. The membrane permeability for both H2O and D2O was high with N2 and O2 at the system measurement limit. The membrane water permeation rate was compared to a Nafion® membrane and the GOx permeation was approximately twice as high at room temperature. The H2O vapor permeation rate was 5.9 × 102 cc/m2/min (1.2 × 10-6 g/min-cm2), which is typical for graphene oxide membranes. To demonstrate the feasibility of such isotopic water separation through GOX laminar membranes, an experimental setup was constructed to use pressure-driven separation by heating the isotopic water mixture at one side of the membrane to create steam while cooling the other side. Several membranes were tested and were prepared using different starting materials and by different pretreatment methods. The average separation result was 0.8 for deuterium and 0.6 for tritium. Higher or lower temperatures may also improve separation efficiency but neither has been tested yet. A rough estimate of cost compared to current technology was also included as an indication of potential viability of the process. The relative process costs were based on the rough size of facility to

  13. Tunable sieving of ions using graphene oxide membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Jijo; Vasu, Kalangi S.; Williams, Christopher D.; Gopinadhan, Kalon; Su, Yang; Cherian, Christie T.; Dix, James; Prestat, Eric; Haigh, Sarah J.; Grigorieva, Irina V.; Carbone, Paola; Geim, Andre K.; Nair, Rahul R.

    2017-07-01

    Graphene oxide membranes show exceptional molecular permeation properties, with promise for many applications. However, their use in ion sieving and desalination technologies is limited by a permeation cutoff of ˜9 Å (ref. 4), which is larger than the diameters of hydrated ions of common salts. The cutoff is determined by the interlayer spacing (d) of ˜13.5 Å, typical for graphene oxide laminates that swell in water. Achieving smaller d for the laminates immersed in water has proved to be a challenge. Here, we describe how to control d by physical confinement and achieve accurate and tunable ion sieving. Membranes with d from ˜9.8 Å to 6.4 Å are demonstrated, providing a sieve size smaller than the diameters of hydrated ions. In this regime, ion permeation is found to be thermally activated with energy barriers of ˜10-100 kJ mol-1 depending on d. Importantly, permeation rates decrease exponentially with decreasing sieve size but water transport is weakly affected (by a factor of method to obtain graphene-based membranes with limited swelling, which exhibit 97% rejection for NaCl.

  14. Selective Ion-permeation through Strained and Charged Graphene Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun; Tao, Yi; Li, Zhongwu; Sha, Jingjie; Chen, Yunfei

    2017-11-16

    By means of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we demonstrate that stretched and charged graphene can act as ion sieve membranes. It is observed that loading 30% strain on graphene can induce pores in the dense electron cloud to allow ions to pass through the aromatic rings. Meanwhile, charged surface is helpful to peel the hydration layers from the ions and decrease the energy barrier for ion translocation through nanopores. Our results suggest that with membrane charge density of 6.80 e/nm2, Li+ can be highly purified from the mixed solution including Li+, K+, Na+ and Cl- ions. Further increasing the charge density to 15.78 e/nm2 can obtain excellent Na+/K+ selectivity. The potential of mean force (PMF) profiles of ion permeation reveal that the potential for each ion is quite different. Fine tuning membrane charge density, pristine monolayer graphene can act as ion sieves with both high permeability and high selectivity. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  15. Selective ion-permeation through strained and charged graphene membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun; Tao, Yi; Li, Zhongwu; Sha, Jingjie; Chen, Yunfei

    2018-01-01

    By means of molecular dynamics simulations and density functional theory calculations, we demonstrate that stretched and charged graphene can act as ion sieve membranes. It is observed that loading 30% strain on graphene can induce pores in the dense electron cloud to allow ions to pass through the aromatic rings. Meanwhile, a charged surface is helpful to peel the hydration layers from the ions and decrease the energy barrier for ion translocation through nanopores. Our results suggest that with a membrane charge density of 6.80 e nm‑2, Li+ can be highly purified from the mixed solution including Li+, K+, Na+ and Cl‑ ions. Further increasing the charge density to 15.78 e nm‑2 can obtain excellent Na+/K+ selectivity. The potential of mean force profiles of ion permeation reveal that the potential for each ion is quite different. By fine tuning membrane charge density, pristine monolayer graphene can act as ion sieves with both high permeability and high selectivity.

  16. Graphene membranes with nanoslits for seawater desalination via forward osmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahanayaka, Madhavi; Liu, Bo; Hu, Zhongqiao; Pei, Qing-Xiang; Chen, Zhong; Law, Adrian Wing-Keung; Zhou, Kun

    2017-11-22

    Stacked graphene (GE) membranes with cascading nanoslits can be synthesized economically compared to monolayer nanoporous GE membranes, and have potential for molecular separation. This study focuses on investigating the seawater desalination performance of these stacked GE layers as forward osmosis (FO) membranes by using molecular dynamics simulations. The FO performance is evaluated in terms of water flux and salt rejection and is explained by analysing the water density distribution and radial distribution function. The water flow displays an Arrhenius type relation with temperature and the activation energy for the stacked GE membrane is estimated to be 8.02 kJ mol-1, a value much lower than that of commercially available FO membranes. The study reveals that the membrane characteristics including the pore width, offset, interlayer separation distance and number of layers have significant effects on the desalination performance. Unlike monolayer nanoporous GE membranes, at an optimum layer separation distance, the stacked GE membranes with large pore widths and completely misaligned pore configuration can retain complete ion rejection and maintain a high water flux. Findings from the present study are helpful in developing GE-based membranes for seawater desalination via FO.

  17. Low-temperature thermal reduction of suspended graphene oxide film for electrical sensing of DNA-hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tun; Guo, Hong-Chen; Chen, Xin-Yi; Lu, Miao

    2017-03-01

    A reduced graphene oxide (RGO) based capacitive real time bio-sensor was presented. Suspended graphene oxide (GO) film was assembled electrophoretically between the source and drain electrodes of a transistor and then reduced by annealing in hydrogen/nitrogen forming gas to optimize the surface functional groups and conductivity. The resonance frequency of the transmission coefficient (S21) of the transistor was observed to shift with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-hybridization, with a detecting limit of ~5nM. The advantages of the bio-sensing approach include low-noise frequency output, solution based real time detection and capable of on-chip integration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Thermal transport in suspended silicon membranes measured by laser-induced transient gratings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vega-Flick

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Studying thermal transport at the nanoscale poses formidable experimental challenges due both to the physics of the measurement process and to the issues of accuracy and reproducibility. The laser-induced transient thermal grating (TTG technique permits non-contact measurements on nanostructured samples without a need for metal heaters or any other extraneous structures, offering the advantage of inherently high absolute accuracy. We present a review of recent studies of thermal transport in nanoscale silicon membranes using the TTG technique. An overview of the methodology, including an analysis of measurements errors, is followed by a discussion of new findings obtained from measurements on both “solid” and nanopatterned membranes. The most important results have been a direct observation of non-diffusive phonon-mediated transport at room temperature and measurements of thickness-dependent thermal conductivity of suspended membranes across a wide thickness range, showing good agreement with first-principles-based theory assuming diffuse scattering at the boundaries. Measurements on a membrane with a periodic pattern of nanosized holes (135nm indicated fully diffusive transport and yielded thermal diffusivity values in agreement with Monte Carlo simulations. Based on the results obtained to-date, we conclude that room-temperature thermal transport in membrane-based silicon nanostructures is now reasonably well understood.

  19. Mechanical properties of freely suspended semiconducting graphene-like layers based on MoS2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castellanos-Gomez, A.; Poot, M.; Steele, G.A.; Van der Zant, H.S.J.; Agrait, N.; Rubio-Bollinger, G.

    2012-01-01

    We fabricate freely suspended nanosheets of molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) which are characterized by quantitative optical microscopy and high-resolution friction force microscopy. We study the elastic deformation of freely suspended nanosheets of MoS2 using an atomic force microscope. The Young’s

  20. Achieving enhanced hydrophobicity of graphene membranes by covalent modification with polydimethylsiloxane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei, Wei-Wei; Li, Hang [College of Polymer Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Polymer Materials Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Shi, Ling-Ying, E-mail: shilingying@scu.edu.cn [College of Polymer Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Polymer Materials Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Diao, Yong-Fu; Zhang, Yu-Lin; Ran, Rong [College of Polymer Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Polymer Materials Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Ni, Wei, E-mail: niwei@iccas.ac.cn [Institute of Chemical Materials, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Chengdu 610200 (China)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • The graphene oxide (GO) was covalently modified by amino terminated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) through amidation reaction. • Through the vacuum filtration method, the GO, RGO and PDMS-modified graphene membranes were successfully prepared respectively. • The morphology of membranes had smooth surface and well-stacked structure indicated by SEM and EDS mapping results. • The contact angle of GO-g-PDMS membrane was high to be 129.5° indicating a great enhancement of hydrophobicity. - Abstract: In this study, the graphene oxide was covalently modified by amino terminated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) through amidation reaction. And the membranes of the graphene oxide (GO), reduced graphene oxide (RGO) and PDMS-covalently modified graphene were prepared respectively by a vacuum filtration method, and the wettability of these membranes were investigated. Infrared spectroscopy, Raman, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and thermogravimetry analysis combined with dispersion ability indicated that PDMS chains were successfully grafted on the surface of graphene oxide sheets. The morphology of the prepared membranes had smooth surface and well-stacked structure in the cross-section indicated by the scanning electron microscope and EDS-mapping. The contact angle measurements indicated that the PDMS-modified graphene membrane with water contact angle 129.5° showed increased hydrophobicity compared with GO and RGO membranes.

  1. Supported graphene oxide hollow fibre membrane for oily wastewater treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Nur Hidayati; Alias, Nur Hashimah; Shahruddin, Munawar Zaman; Hussein, Siti Nurliyana Che Mohamed; Dollah, Aqilah

    2017-12-01

    Oil and gas industry deals with a large amount of undesirable discharges of liquid, solid, and gaseous wastes and the amounts can considerably change during the production phases. Oilfield wastewater or produced water is known to constitute various organic and inorganic components. Discharging the produced water can pollute surface and underground water and therefore the necessity to treat this oily wastewater is an inevitable challenge. The current technologies for the treatment of this metastable oil-in-water are not really effective and very pricey. As a result, there is a great interest from many parties around the world in finding cost-effective technologies. In recent years, membrane processes have been utilized for oily wastewater treatment. In these work, a graphene oxide membrane supported on a highly porous Al2O3 hollow fibre was prepared using vacuum assisted technique and its performance in treating oily wastewater was investigated. Graphene oxide (GO) was prepared using a modified Hummer's method and further characterized using XRD, FTIR, TGA and SEM. The results showed that the GO was successfully synthesized. The GO membrane was deposited on alumina hollow fibre substrates. The membrane performance was then investigated using dead-end filtration setup with synthetic oily wastewater as a feed. The effects of operating times on rejection rate and permeate flux were investigated. The experimental results showed that the oil rejections were over 90%. It was concluded that the supported GO membrane developed in this study may be considered feasible in treating oily wastewater. Detail study on the effects of transmembrane pressure, oil concentration, pH and fouling should be carried out in the future

  2. Lateral acoustic wave resonator comprising a suspended membrane of low damping resonator material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Roy H.; El-Kady; , Ihab F.; Ziaei-Moayyed, Maryam; Branch; , Darren W.; Su; Mehmet F.,; Reinke; Charles M.,

    2013-09-03

    A very high-Q, low insertion loss resonator can be achieved by storing many overtone cycles of a lateral acoustic wave (i.e., Lamb wave) in a lithographically defined suspended membrane comprising a low damping resonator material, such as silicon carbide. The high-Q resonator can sets up a Fabry-Perot cavity in a low-damping resonator material using high-reflectivity acoustic end mirrors, which can comprise phononic crystals. The lateral overtone acoustic wave resonator can be electrically transduced by piezoelectric couplers. The resonator Q can be increased without increasing the impedance or insertion loss by storing many cycles or wavelengths in the high-Q resonator material, with much lower damping than the piezoelectric transducer material.

  3. A facile electrospinning method to fabricate polylactide/graphene/MWCNTs nanofiber membrane for tissues scaffold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chunyu; Chen, Sihao; Wang, Jihu; Zhu, Tonghe; Xu, Gang; Chen, Zhichang; Ma, Xiaobiao; Li, Wenyao

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we have successfully prepared polylactide (PLA)/Graphene (G)/multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) solution by a solution-blending technique, and the different composition proportion of PLA/G/MWCNTs composite nanofiber membranes were produced via an electrospinning technique. The morphology, dispersion of graphene/MWCNTs, crystal structure and thermal stability of PLA/G/MWCNTs membranes were studied by SEM, TEM, XRD and TG, respectively. The results showed that the MWCNTs and graphene could disperse randomly into the fibers, and the introduction of graphene and MWCNTs did not mainly affect the crystal structure of PLA. TG test indicated that the addition of MWCNTs and graphene enhanced the thermal stability of the composites. Additionally, the presence of the graphene and MWCNTs in the PLA matrix had an obvious delaying effect on the degradation of PLA, which made PLA/G/MWCNTs nanofiber membrane have large potential in tissues scaffold.

  4. Dewetting transition assisted clearance of (NFGAILS) amyloid fibrils from cell membranes by graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jiajia; Yang, Zaixing; Gu, Zonglin [Institute of Quantitative Biology and Medicine, SRMP and RAD-X, Collaborative Innovation Center of Radiation Medicine of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, and Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Radiation Medicine and Protection, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Li, Haotian [Bio-X Lab, Department of Physics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Garate, Jose Antonio [IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Zhou, Ruhong, E-mail: ruhongz@us.ibm.com [Institute of Quantitative Biology and Medicine, SRMP and RAD-X, Collaborative Innovation Center of Radiation Medicine of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, and Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Radiation Medicine and Protection, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

    2014-12-14

    Clearance of partially ordered oligomers and monomers deposited on cell membrane surfaces is believed to be an effective route to alleviate many potential protein conformational diseases (PCDs). With large-scale all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, here we show that graphene nanosheets can easily and quickly win a competitive adsorption of human islet amyloid polypeptides (hIAPP{sub 22-28}) NFGAILS and associated fibrils against cell membrane, due to graphene's unique two-dimensional, highly hydrophobic surface with its all-sp{sup 2} hybrid structure. A nanoscale dewetting transition was observed at the interfacial region between the fibril (originally deposited on the membrane) and the graphene nanosheet, which significantly assisted the adsorption of fibrils onto graphene from the membrane. The π–π stacking interaction between Phe23 and graphene played a crucial role, providing the driving force for the adsorption at the graphene surface. This study renders new insight towards the importance of water during the interactions between amyloid peptides, the phospholipidic membrane, and graphene, which might shed some light on future developments of graphene-based nanomedicine for preventing/curing PCDs like type II diabetes mellitus.

  5. Dewetting transition assisted clearance of (NFGAILS) amyloid fibrils from cell membranes by graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiajia; Yang, Zaixing; Li, Haotian; Gu, Zonglin; Garate, Jose Antonio; Zhou, Ruhong

    2014-12-01

    Clearance of partially ordered oligomers and monomers deposited on cell membrane surfaces is believed to be an effective route to alleviate many potential protein conformational diseases (PCDs). With large-scale all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, here we show that graphene nanosheets can easily and quickly win a competitive adsorption of human islet amyloid polypeptides (hIAPP22-28) NFGAILS and associated fibrils against cell membrane, due to graphene's unique two-dimensional, highly hydrophobic surface with its all-sp2 hybrid structure. A nanoscale dewetting transition was observed at the interfacial region between the fibril (originally deposited on the membrane) and the graphene nanosheet, which significantly assisted the adsorption of fibrils onto graphene from the membrane. The π-π stacking interaction between Phe23 and graphene played a crucial role, providing the driving force for the adsorption at the graphene surface. This study renders new insight towards the importance of water during the interactions between amyloid peptides, the phospholipidic membrane, and graphene, which might shed some light on future developments of graphene-based nanomedicine for preventing/curing PCDs like type II diabetes mellitus.

  6. Measurement of specific heat and thermal conductivity of supported and suspended graphene by a comprehensive Raman optothermal method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qin-Yi; Xia, Kailun; Zhang, Ji; Zhang, Yingying; Li, Qunyang; Takahashi, Koji; Zhang, Xing

    2017-08-03

    The last decade has seen the rapid growth of research on two-dimensional (2D) materials, represented by graphene, but research on their thermophysical properties is still far from sufficient owing to the experimental challenges. Herein, we report the first measurement of the specific heat of multilayer and monolayer graphene in both supported and suspended geometries. Their thermal conductivities were also simultaneously measured using a comprehensive Raman optothermal method without needing to know the laser absorption. Both continuous-wave (CW) and pulsed lasers were used to heat the samples, based on consideration of the variable laser spot radius and pulse duration as well as the heat conduction within the substrate. The error from the laser absorption was eliminated by comparing the Raman-measured temperature rises for different spot radii and pulse durations. The thermal conductivity and specific heat were extracted by analytically fitting the temperature rise ratios as a function of spot size and pulse duration, respectively. The measured specific heat was about 700 J (kg K)(-1) at room temperature, which is in accordance with theoretical predictions, and the measured thermal conductivities were in the range of 0.84-1.5 × 10(3) W (m K)(-1). The measurement method demonstrated here can be used to investigate in situ and comprehensively the thermophysical properties of many other emerging 2D materials.

  7. Recent progress in molecular simulation of nanoporous graphene membranes for gas separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemi, S. Mahmood; Baniasadi, Aminreza; Moradi, Mahrokh

    2017-07-01

    If an ideal membrane for gas separation is to be obtained, the following three characteristics should be considered: the membrane should be as thin as possible, be mechanically robust, and have welldefined pore sizes. These features will maximize its solvent flux, preserve it from fracture, and guarantee its selectivity. Graphene is made up of a hexagonal honeycomb lattice of carbon atoms with sp 2 hybridization state forming a one-atom-thick sheet of graphite. Following conversion of the honeycomb lattices into nanopores with a specific geometry and size, a nanoporous graphene membrane that offers high efficiency as a separation membrane because of the ultrafast molecular permeation rate as a result of its one-atom thickness is obtained. Applications of nanoporous graphene membranes for gas separation have been receiving remarkably increasing attention because nanoporous graphene membranes show promising results in this area. This review focuses on the recent advances in nanoporous graphene membranes for applications in gas separation, with a major emphasis on theoretical works. The attractive properties of nanoporous graphene membranes introduce make them appropriate candidates for gas separation and gas molecular-sieving processes in nanoscale dimensions.

  8. Incorporation of Graphene-Related Carbon Nanosheets in Membrane Fabrication for Water Treatment: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Lawler

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The minimization of the trade-off between the flux and the selectivity of membranes is a key area that researchers are continually working to optimise, particularly in the area of fabrication of novel membranes. Flux versus selectivity issues apply in many industrial applications of membranes, for example the unwanted diffusion of methanol in fuel cells, retention of valuable proteins in downstream processing of biopharmaceuticals, rejection of organic matter and micro-organisms in water treatment, or salt permeation in desalination. The incorporation of nanosheets within membrane structures can potentially lead to enhancements in such properties as the antifouling ability, hydrophilicy and permeability of membranes, with concomitant improvements in the flux/selectivity balance. Graphene nanosheets and derivatives such as graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide have been investigated for this purpose, for example inclusion of nanosheets within the active layer of Reverse Osmosis or Nanofiltration membranes or the blending of nanosheets as fillers within Ultrafiltration membranes. This review summarizes the incorporation of graphene derivatives into polymeric membranes for water treatment with a focus on a number of industrial applications, including desalination and pharmaceutical removal, where enhancement of productivity and reduction in fouling characteristics have been afforded by appropriate incorporation of graphene derived nanosheets during membrane fabrication.

  9. Incorporation of Graphene-Related Carbon Nanosheets in Membrane Fabrication for Water Treatment: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    The minimization of the trade-off between the flux and the selectivity of membranes is a key area that researchers are continually working to optimise, particularly in the area of fabrication of novel membranes. Flux versus selectivity issues apply in many industrial applications of membranes, for example the unwanted diffusion of methanol in fuel cells, retention of valuable proteins in downstream processing of biopharmaceuticals, rejection of organic matter and micro-organisms in water treatment, or salt permeation in desalination. The incorporation of nanosheets within membrane structures can potentially lead to enhancements in such properties as the antifouling ability, hydrophilicy and permeability of membranes, with concomitant improvements in the flux/selectivity balance. Graphene nanosheets and derivatives such as graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide have been investigated for this purpose, for example inclusion of nanosheets within the active layer of Reverse Osmosis or Nanofiltration membranes or the blending of nanosheets as fillers within Ultrafiltration membranes. This review summarizes the incorporation of graphene derivatives into polymeric membranes for water treatment with a focus on a number of industrial applications, including desalination and pharmaceutical removal, where enhancement of productivity and reduction in fouling characteristics have been afforded by appropriate incorporation of graphene derived nanosheets during membrane fabrication. PMID:27999364

  10. A multi-material topology optimization approach for wrinkle-free design of cable-suspended membrane structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yangjun; Niu, Yanzhuang; Li, Ming; Kang, Zhan

    2017-06-01

    In order to eliminate stress-related wrinkles in cable-suspended membrane structures and to provide simple and reliable deployment, this study presents a multi-material topology optimization model and an effective solution procedure for generating optimal connected layouts for membranes and cables. On the basis of the principal stress criterion of membrane wrinkling behavior and the density-based interpolation of multi-phase materials, the optimization objective is to maximize the total structural stiffness while satisfying principal stress constraints and specified material volume requirements. By adopting the cosine-type relaxation scheme to avoid the stress singularity phenomenon, the optimization model is successfully solved through a standard gradient-based algorithm. Four-corner tensioned membrane structures with different loading cases were investigated to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method in automatically finding the optimal design composed of curved boundary cables and wrinkle-free membranes.

  11. Plasmonic and Photonic Modes Excitation in Graphene on Silicon Photonic Crystal Membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andryieuski, Andrei; Gu, Tingyi; Hao, Yufeng

    in the most important for applications plasmonic and photonic regimes are numerically investigated. We also demonstrate fabrication of photonic crystal membranes, high-quality transfer of large area chemically vapor deposited graphene on them and their comprehensive Raman, AFM and FTIR experimental...... characterization. Measured data are well correlated with the numerical analysis. Combined graphene – silicon photonic crystal membranes can find applications for infrared absorbers, modulators, filters, sensors and photodetectors....

  12. Graphene modified electrospun poly(vinyl alcohol nanofibrous membranes for glucose oxidase immobilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Wu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, poly(vinyl alcohol (PVA/Glucose oxidase (GOx/graphene biocomposite membranes were prepared using an electrospinning technique and used for enzyme immobilization. The PVA/GOx/graphene membrane’s morphology was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM, while its electrochemical sensitivity was studied by chronoamperometry. Kinetic parameters were determined to clarify the role of graphene in enzyme immobilization, while a spectrophotometric assay was used to quantify the active enzyme. The results indicated that the presence of graphene helps to stabilize the enzyme’s conformation, facilitate the catalytic reaction, and increase the survivability of the enzyme.

  13. Study on submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (SAMBR) treating high suspended solids raw tannery wastewater for biogas production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umaiyakunjaram, R; Shanmugam, P

    2016-09-01

    This study deals with the treatment of high suspended solids raw tannery wastewater using flat sheet Submerged Anaerobic Membrane (0.4μm) Bioreactor (SAMBR) acclimatized with hypersaline anaerobic seed sludge for recovering biogas. The treatability of SAMBR achieved higher CODremoval efficiency (90%) and biogas yield (0.160L.g(-1) CODremoved) coincided with high r(2) values between permeate flux and TSS (0.95), biogas and COD removed (0.96). The acidification of hypersaline influent wastewater by biogas mixing with high CO2, achieved quadruplet benefit of gas liquid and solid separation, in-situ pH and NH3 control, in-situ CH4 enrichment, and prevention of membrane fouling. The initial high VFA became stable as time elapsed reveals the hydrolysing ability of particulate COD into soluble COD and into biogas, confirms the suitability of SAMBR for high suspended solids tannery wastewater. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. UV-enhanced sacrificial layer stabilised graphene oxide hollow fibre membranes for nanofiltration

    OpenAIRE

    J. Y. Chong; Aba, N. F. D.; Wang, B.; Mattevi, C.; K. Li

    2015-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) membranes have demonstrated great potential in gas separation and liquid filtration. For upscale applications, GO membranes in a hollow fibre geometry are of particular interest due to the high-efficiency and easy-assembly features at module level. However, GO membranes were found unstable in dry state on ceramic hollow fibre substrates, mainly due to the drying-related shrinkage, which has limited the applications and post-treatments of GO membranes. We demonstrate here t...

  15. Macroscopic nanoporous graphene membranes for molecular-sieving-based gas separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutilier, Michael; Karnik, Rohit; Hadjiconstantinou, Nicolas

    2016-11-01

    Nanoporous graphene membranes have the potential to exceed permeance and selectivity limits of existing gas separation membranes. This is made possible by the atomic thickness of the material, which can support sub-nanometer pores that enable molecular sieving while presenting low resistance to permeate flow. The feasibility of gas separation by graphene nanopores has been demonstrated experimentally on micron-scale areas of graphene. However, scaling up to macroscopic membrane areas presents significant challenges, including graphene imperfections and control of the selective nanopore size distribution across large areas. Towards this goal, gas permeance experiments are conducted on single and few layer graphene membranes to understand leakage pathways and a model is developed to predict conditions under which molecular sieving can occur in macroscopic membranes. Approaches to seal or mitigate the effects of micron and nanometer scale defects in graphene are investigated and methods of creating a high density of selectively permeable nanopores are explored. Experimental results demonstrating separation ratios exceeding the Knudsen effusion limit, indicating molecular sieving in agreement with the model predictions, are presented and discussed.

  16. A monolayer graphene - Nafion sandwich membrane for direct methanol fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, X. H.; Wu, Ruizhe; Xu, J. B.; Luo, Zhengtang; Zhao, T. S.

    2016-04-01

    Methanol crossover due to the low selectivity of proton exchange membranes is a long-standing issue in direct methanol fuel cell technology. Here we attempt to address this issue by designing a composite membrane fabricated by sandwiching a monolayer graphene between two thin Nafion membranes to take advantage of monolayer graphene's selective permeability to only protons. The methanol permeability of the present membrane is demonstrated to have a 68.6% decrease in comparison to that of the pristine Nafion membrane. The test in a passive direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) shows that the designed membrane retains high proton conductivity while substantially suppressing methanol crossover. As a result, the present membrane enables the passive DMFC to exhibit a decent performance even at a methanol concentration as high as 10.0 M.

  17. Ion sieving in graphene oxide membranes via cationic control of interlayer spacing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang; Shi, Guosheng; Shen, Jie; Peng, Bingquan; Zhang, Bowu; Wang, Yuzhu; Bian, Fenggang; Wang, Jiajun; Li, Deyuan; Qian, Zhe; Xu, Gang; Liu, Gongping; Zeng, Jianrong; Zhang, Lijuan; Yang, Yizhou; Zhou, Guoquan; Wu, Minghong; Jin, Wanqin; Li, Jingye; Fang, Haiping

    2017-10-01

    Graphene oxide membranes—partially oxidized, stacked sheets of graphene—can provide ultrathin, high-flux and energy-efficient membranes for precise ionic and molecular sieving in aqueous solution. These materials have shown potential in a variety of applications, including water desalination and purification, gas and ion separation, biosensors, proton conductors, lithium-based batteries and super-capacitors. Unlike the pores of carbon nanotube membranes, which have fixed sizes, the pores of graphene oxide membranes—that is, the interlayer spacing between graphene oxide sheets (a sheet is a single flake inside the membrane)—are of variable size. Furthermore, it is difficult to reduce the interlayer spacing sufficiently to exclude small ions and to maintain this spacing against the tendency of graphene oxide membranes to swell when immersed in aqueous solution. These challenges hinder the potential ion filtration applications of graphene oxide membranes. Here we demonstrate cationic control of the interlayer spacing of graphene oxide membranes with ångström precision using K+, Na+, Ca2+, Li+ or Mg2+ ions. Moreover, membrane spacings controlled by one type of cation can efficiently and selectively exclude other cations that have larger hydrated volumes. First-principles calculations and ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy reveal that the location of the most stable cation adsorption is where oxide groups and aromatic rings coexist. Previous density functional theory computations show that other cations (Fe2+, Co2+, Cu2+, Cd2+, Cr2+ and Pb2+) should have a much stronger cation–π interaction with the graphene sheet than Na+ has, suggesting that other ions could be used to produce a wider range of interlayer spacings.

  18. Graphene immobilized enzyme/polyethersulfone mixed matrix membrane: Enhanced antibacterial, permeable and mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Linlin; Wang, Yuanming [School of Chemical Engineering and Energy, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Zhang, Yatao, E-mail: zhangyatao@zzu.edu.cn [School of Chemical Engineering and Energy, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); UNESCO Centre for Membrane Science and Technology, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Liu, Jindun [School of Chemical Engineering and Energy, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China)

    2015-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Lysozyme was immobilized on the surface of graphene oxide (GO) and reduced GO (RGO). • The novel hybrid membranes based on lysozyme and graphene were fabricated firstly. • These membranes showed good antibacterial and mechanical performance. - Abstract: Enzyme immobilization has been developed to address lots of issues of free enzyme, such as instability, low activity and difficult to retain. In this study, graphene was used as an ideal carrier for lysozyme immobilization, including graphene oxide (GO) immobilized lysozyme (GO-Ly) and chemically reduced graphene oxide (CRGO) immobilized lysozyme (CRGO-Ly). Herein, lysozyme as a bio-antibacterial agent has excellent antibacterial performance and the products of its catalysis are safety and nontoxic. Then the immobilized lysozyme materials were blended into polyethersulfone (PES) casting solution to prepare PES ultrafiltration membrane via phase inversion method. GO and CRGO were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Ultraviolet–visible spectrum (UV), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and the immobilized lysozyme composites were observed by fluorescent microscopy. The results revealed that GO and CRGO were successfully synthesized and lysozyme was immobilized on their surfaces. The morphology, hydrophilicity, mechanical properties, separation properties and antibacterial activity of the hybrid membranes were characterized in detail. The hydrophilicity, water flux and mechanical strength of the hybrid membranes were significantly enhanced after adding the immobilized lysozyme. In the antibacterial experiment, the hybrid membranes exhibited an effective antibacterial performance against Escherichia coli (E. coli).

  19. Graphene-Supported Platinum Catalyst-Based Membrane Electrode Assembly for PEM Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devrim, Yilser; Albostan, Ayhan

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is the preparation and characterization of a graphene-supported platinum (Pt) catalyst for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) applications. The graphene-supported Pt catalysts were prepared by chemical reduction of graphene and chloroplatinic acid (H2PtCl6) in ethylene glycol. X-ray powder diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and scanning electron microscopy have been used to analyze structure and surface morphology of the graphene-supported catalyst. The TGA results showed that the Pt loading of the graphene-supported catalyst was 31%. The proof of the Pt particles on the support surfaces was also verified by energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analysis. The commercial carbon-supported catalyst and prepared Pt/graphene catalysts were used as both anode and cathode electrodes for PEMFC at ambient pressure and 70°C. The maximum power density was obtained for the Pt/graphene-based membrane electrode assembly (MEA) with H2/O2 reactant gases as 0.925 W cm2. The maximum current density of the Pt/graphene-based MEA can reach 1.267 and 0.43 A/cm2 at 0.6 V with H2/O2 and H2/air, respectively. The MEA prepared by the Pt/graphene catalyst shows good stability in long-term PEMFC durability tests. The PEMFC cell voltage was maintained at 0.6 V without apparent voltage drop when operated at 0.43 A/cm2 constant current density and 70°C for 400 h. As a result, PEMFC performance was found to be superlative for the graphene-supported Pt catalyst compared with the Pt/C commercial catalyst. The results indicate the graphene-supported Pt catalyst could be utilized as the electrocatalyst for PEMFC applications.

  20. CO2-selective PEO–PBT (PolyActive™)/graphene oxide composite membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Karunakaran, Madhavan

    2015-07-31

    CO2-selective graphene oxide (GO) nano-composite membranes were prepared for the first time by embedding GO into a commercially available poly(ethylene oxide)–poly(butylene terephthalate) (PEO–PBT) copolymer (PolyActive™). The as-prepared GO membrane shows high CO2 permeability (143 Barrer) and CO2/N2 selectivity (α = 73).

  1. Electrochemically reduced graphene oxide / sulfonated polyether ether ketone composite membrane for electrochemical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seetharaman, S.; Ramya, K.; Dhathathreyan, K. S.

    2013-06-01

    A simple and effective method for the preparation of sulfonated polyether ether ketone (SPEEK) based composites with electrochemical reduced graphene oxide (EGO) as inorganic fillers has been described. The resulting dispersions are homogeneous and the cast membranes show significant improvement on tensile strength and thermal properties. It has high ionic conductivity and is cost effective making it a promising alternative membrane for electrochemical applications.

  2. THE EFFECT OF THE TYPE OF ADMIXTURE ON THE PROPERTIES OF POLYACRYLONITRILE MEMBRANES MODIFIED WITH NANOTUBES, GRAPHENE OXIDE AND GRAPHENE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Fryczkowska

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of research on the production of composite polyacrylonitrile (PAN membranes with nanotubes (MWCNT, graphene (RG and graphene oxide (GO addition. All of the specified additions differ diametrically in terms of properties, starting from the spatial structure of the particles, up to the chemical properties. Membranes were obtained using phase inversion method from a solution of N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF. Subsequently, the impact of the nano-addition on the transport and separation properties of the membranes were investigated using Millipore AMICON ultrafiltration kit. Membranes with graphene addition (PAN/RG are characterized by the best transport properties and the highest specific permeate flux values in the range of ~913÷1006 [dm3/m2×h] for working pressure of 2.0 MPa. To test the separation properties, electroplating waste water generated in one of the Silesian galvanizing plants was used. The qualitative and quantitative composition of the waste water was tested by UV-Vis spectrophotometer (HACH and absorption atomic spectrometry (AAS. The ultrafiltration process carried out on composite membranes allows for the complete removal of phosphate ions and ~88÷94% of iron from the waste water. The rejection coefficient of the remaining metals is high: ~ 35 ÷ 85% for copper and ~ 17 ÷ 100% for cadmium.

  3. The structure of graphene oxide membranes in liquid water, ethanol and water-ethanol mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talyzin, Alexandr V; Hausmaninger, Tomas; You, Shujie; Szabó, Tamás

    2014-01-07

    The structure of graphene oxide (GO) membranes was studied in situ in liquid solvents using synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction in a broad temperature interval. GO membranes are hydrated by water similarly to precursor graphite oxide powders but intercalation of alcohols is strongly hindered, which explains why the GO membranes are permeated by water and not by ethanol. Insertion of ethanol into the membrane structure is limited to only one monolayer in the whole studied temperature range, in contrast to precursor graphite oxide powders, which are intercalated with up to two ethanol monolayers (Brodie) and four ethanol monolayers (Hummers). As a result, GO membranes demonstrate the absence of "negative thermal expansion" and phase transitions connected to insertion/de-insertion of alcohols upon temperature variations reported earlier for graphite oxide powders. Therefore, GO membranes are a distinct type of material with unique solvation properties compared to parent graphite oxides even if they are composed of the same graphene oxide flakes.

  4. Graphene oxide doped ionic liquid ultrathin composite membranes for efficient CO2 capture

    KAUST Repository

    Karunakaran, Madhavan

    2016-11-28

    Advanced membrane systems with high flux and sufficient selectivity are required for industrial gas separation processes. In order to achieve high flux and high selectivity, the membrane material should be as thin as possible and it should have selective sieving channels and long term stability. This could be achieved by designing a three component material consisting of a blend of an ionic liquid and graphene oxide covered by a highly permeable low selective polymeric coating. By using a simple dip coating technique, we prepared high flux and CO selective ultrathin graphene oxide (GO)/ionic liquid membranes on a porous ultrafiltration support. The ultrathin composite membranes derived from GO/ionic liquid complex displays remarkable combinations of permeability (CO flux: 37 GPU) and selectivity (CO/N selectivity: 130) that surpass the upper bound of ionic liquid membranes for CO/N separation. Moreover, the membranes were stable when tested for 120 hours.

  5. Improving the performance of water desalination through ultra-permeable functionalized nanoporous graphene oxide membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Mostafa; Azamat, Jafar; Erfan-Niya, Hamid

    2018-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the water desalination performance of nanoporous graphene oxide (NPGO) membranes. The simulated systems consist of a NPGO as a membrane with a functionalized pore in its center immersed in an aqueous ionic solution and a graphene sheet as a barrier. The considered NPGO membranes are involved four types of pore with different size and chemistry. The results indicated that the NPGO membrane has effective efficiency in salt rejection as well as high performance in water flux. For all types of pore with the radius size of 2.9-4.5 Å, the NPGO shows salt rejection of >89%. Functional groups on the surface and edge of pores have a great effect on water flux. To precisely understand the effect of functional groups on the surface of nanostructured membranes, nanoporous graphene was simulated under the same condition for comparison. Hydrophilic groups on the surface make the NPGO as an ultra-permeable membrane. As a result, the obtained water flux for NPGO was about 77% greater than graphene. Also, it was found that the water flux of NPGO is 2-5 orders of magnitude greater than other existing reverse osmosis membranes. Therefore, the investigated systems can be recommended as a model for the water desalination.

  6. Synthesis and Characterization of Composite Membranes made of Graphene and Polymers of Intrinsic Microporosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-16

    polymer . The high surface-to-volume ratios, relatively low pro- duction cost, and the unique properties of graphene make this material very attractive as...characterization of composite membranes made of graphene and polymers of intrinsic microporosity Yuyoung Shin a, Eric Prestat b, Kai-Ge Zhou a, Patricia Gorgojo c...Khalid Althumayri a, Wayne Harrison a, Peter M. Budd a, Sarah J. Haigh b, Cinzia Casiraghi a, * a School of Chemistry , University of Manchester

  7. Reduced Graphene Oxide Bipolar Membranes for Integrated Solar Water Splitting in Optimal pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Michael B; Bruce, Jared P; McEleney, Kevin; Freund, Michael S

    2015-08-24

    The integration of light absorbers and catalysts for the water splitting process requires a membrane capable of both ion and electron management and product separation to realize efficient solar fuels systems. Bipolar membranes can maintain a pH gradient for optimal reaction conditions by the dissociation of water. Such membranes that contain graphene in the interfacial layer are fabricated by the chemical reduction of a uniformly deposited graphene oxide layer to convert sp(3) catalyst regions to sp(2) conductive regions. The resulting electrical and water dissociation properties are optimized by adjusting the exposure conditions, and treatments of less than 5 min render an interface that exceeds the conductivity requirements for integrated solar water splitting and increases the overpotential by graphene and Si microwires, and we found that efficient Ohmic junctions are possible. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Highly sensitive fiber optic Fabry-Perot geophone with graphene coated PMMA membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, C. B.; Wu, Y.; Wu, F.; Li, C.; Zhou, J. H.; Rao, Y. J.; Chen, Y. F.

    2017-04-01

    A highly sensitive fiber-optic Fabry-Perot interferometric geophone (FFPG) with graphene coated PMMA membrane is proposed and demonstrated, where the graphene coating is used for enhancement of the mechanical strength of the membrane. It is found that the sensitivity of the FFPG is much higher than that of the conventional electrical geophone. Such a novel all-optical geophone with low cost, high sensitivity, electromagnetic interference immunity, easy fabrication and robust structure would have great potential for use in oil/gas exploration and seismic wave detection.

  9. O-(carboxymethyl)-chitosan nanofiltration membrane surface functionalized with graphene oxide nanosheets for enhanced desalting properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiali; Gao, Xueli; Wang, Jian; Wei, Yi; Li, Zhaokui; Gao, Congjie

    2015-02-25

    A novel O-(carboxymethyl)-chitosan (OCMC) nanofiltration (NF) membrane is developed via surface functionalization with graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets to enhance desalting properties. Using ring-opening polymerization between epoxy groups of GO nanosheets and amino groups of OCMC active layer, GO nanosheets are irreversibly bound to the membrane. The OCMC NF membranes surface-functionalized with GO nanosheets are characterized by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, contact angle analyzer, and zeta potential analyzer. The membranes exhibit not only higher permeability but also better salt rejections than the pristine membranes and the commercial NF membranes; besides, the desalting properties are enhanced with the concentration of GO nanosheets increasing. Furthermore, the transport mechanism of GO-OCMC NF membranes reveals that the nanoporous structure of GO-OCMC functional layer and size exclusion and electrostatic repulsion of water nanochannels formed by GO nanosheets lead to the membranes possessing enhanced desalting properties.

  10. Protein corona mitigates the cytotoxicity of graphene oxide by reducing its physical interaction with cell membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Guangxin; Kang, Seung-gu; Tian, Xin; Garate, Jose Antonio; Zhao, Lin; Ge, Cuicui; Zhou, Ruhong

    2015-10-07

    Many recent studies have shown that the way nanoparticles interact with cells and biological molecules can vary greatly in the serum-containing or serum-free culture medium. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of how the so-called "protein corona" formed in serum medium affects nanoparticles' biological responses are still largely unresolved. Thus, it is critical to understand how absorbed proteins on the surfaces of nanoparticles alter their biological effects. In this work, we have demonstrated with both experimental and theoretical approaches that protein BSA coating can mitigate the cytotoxicity of graphene oxide (GO) by reducing its cell membrane penetration. Our cell viability and cellular uptake experiments showed that protein corona decreased cellular uptake of GO, thus significantly mitigating the potential cytotoxicity of GO. The electron microscopy images also confirmed that protein corona reduced the cellular morphological damage by limiting GO penetration into the cell membrane. Further molecular dynamics (MD) simulations validated the experimental results and revealed that the adsorbed BSA in effect weakened the interaction between the phospholipids and graphene surface due to a reduction of the available surface area plus an unfavorable steric effect, thus significantly reducing the graphene penetration and lipid bilayer damaging. These findings provide new insights into the underlying molecular mechanism of this important graphene protein corona interaction with cell membranes, and should have implications in future development of graphene-based biomedical applications.

  11. Reduced Graphene Oxide Membranes: Applications in Fog Collection and Water Purification

    KAUST Repository

    Tang, Bo

    2017-05-01

    Reduced graphene oxide (rGO) has attracted considerable interest recently as the low cost and chemical stable derivative of pristine graphene with application in many applications such as energy storage, water purification and electronic devices. This dissertation thoroughly investigated stacked rGO membrane fabrication process by vacuum-driven filtration, discovered asymmetry of the two surfaces of the rGO membrane, explored application perspectives of the asymmetric rGO membrane in fog collection and microstructure patterning, and disclosed membrane compaction issue during water filtration and species rejection. In more details, this dissertation revealed that, with suitable pore size, the filtration membrane substrate would leave its physical imprint on the bottom surface of the rGO membrane in the form of surface microstructures, which result in asymmetric dynamic water wettability properties of the two surfaces of the rGO membrane. The asymmetric wettability of the rGO membrane would lead to contrasting fog harvesting behavior of its two surfaces. The physical imprint mechanism was further extended to engineering pre-designed patterns selectively on the bottom surface of the rGO membrane. This dissertation, for the first time, reported the water flux and rejection kinetics, which was related to the compaction of the rGO membrane under pressure in the process of water filtration.

  12. Development of a nanocomposite ultrafiltration membrane based on polyphenylsulfone blended with graphene oxide

    OpenAIRE

    Arun Kumar Shukla; Javed Alam; Mansour Alhoshan; Lawrence Arockiasamy Dass; M. R. Muthumareeswaran

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, graphene oxide (GO) was incorporated as a nanoadditive into a polyphenylsulfone (PPSU) to develop a PPSU/GO nanocomposite membrane with enhanced antifouling properties. A series of membranes containing different concentrations (0.2, 0.5 and 1.0 wt.%) of GO were fabricated via the phase inversion method, using N-methyl pyrrolidone (NMP) as the solvent, deionized water as the non-solvent, and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as a pore forming agent. The prepared nanocomposite me...

  13. Scalable Graphene-Based Membranes for Ionic Sieving with Ultrahigh Charge Selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seunghyun; Constans, Charlotte; Surmani Martins, Marcos Vinicius; Seow, Yong Chin; Guevara Carrió, Juan Alfredo; Garaj, Slaven

    2017-02-08

    Nanostructured graphene-oxide (GO) laminate membranes, exhibiting ultrahigh water flux, are excellent candidates for next generation nanofiltration and desalination membranes, provided the ionic rejection could be further increased without compromising the water flux. Using microscopic drift-diffusion experiments, we demonstrated the ultrahigh charge selectivity for GO membranes, with more than order of magnitude difference in the permeabilities of cationic and anionic species of equivalent hydration radii. Measuring diffusion of a wide range of ions of different size and charge, we were able to clearly disentangle different physical mechanisms contributing to the ionic sieving in GO membranes: electrostatic repulsion between ions and charged chemical groups; and the compression of the ionic hydration shell within the membrane's nanochannels, following the activated behavior. The charge-selectivity allows us to rationally design membranes with increased ionic rejection and opens up the field of ion exchange and electrodialysis to the GO membranes.

  14. Evaluation of Humic Acid and Tannic Acid Fouling in Graphene Oxide-Coated Ultrafiltration Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Kyoung Hoon; Huang, Yi; Yu, Miao; Her, Namguk; Flora, Joseph R V; Park, Chang Min; Kim, Suhan; Cho, Jaeweon; Yoon, Yeomin

    2016-08-31

    Three commercially available ultrafiltration (UF) membranes (poly(ether sulfone), PES) that have nominal molecular weight cut-offs (5, 10, and 30 kDa) were coated with graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy, water contact angle measurements, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were employed to determine the changed physicochemical properties of the membranes after GO coating. The water permeability and single-solute rejection of GO-coated (GOC) membranes for humic acid (HA) molecules were significantly higher by approximately 15% and 55%, respectively, compared to those of pristine UF membranes. However, the GOc membranes for single-solute tannic acid (TA) rejection showed similar trends of higher flux decline versus pristine PES membranes, because the relatively smaller TA molecules were readily adsorbed onto the membrane pores. When the mixed-solute of HA and TA rejection tests were performed, in particular, the adsorbed small TA molecules resulted in irreversible membrane fouling due to cake formation and membrane pore blocking on the membrane surface for the HA molecules. Although both membranes showed significantly higher flux declines for small molecules rejection, the GOc membranes showed better performance than the pristine UF membranes in terms of the rejection of various mixed-solute molecules, due to higher membrane recovery and antifouling capabilities.

  15. Quantum elasticity of graphene: Thermal expansion coefficient and specific heat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burmistrov, I.S.; Gornyi, I.V.; Kachorovskii, V.Y.; Katsnelson, M.I.; Mirlin, A.D.

    2016-01-01

    We explore thermodynamics of a quantum membrane, with a particular application to suspended graphene membrane and with a particular focus on the thermal expansion coefficient. We show that an interplay between quantum and classical anharmonicity-controlled fluctuations leads to unusual elastic

  16. Differences in microbial communities and performance between suspended and attached growth anaerobic membrane bioreactors treating synthetic municipal wastewater

    KAUST Repository

    Harb, Moustapha

    2015-08-14

    Two lab-scale anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs), one up-flow attached-growth (UA) and another continuously stirred (CSTR), were operated under mesophilic conditions (35 °C) while treating synthetic municipal wastewater (800 mg L−1 COD). Each reactor was attached to both polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and polyethersulfone (PES) microfiltration (MF) membranes in an external cross-flow configuration. Both reactors were started up and run under the same operating conditions for multiple steady-state experiments. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal rates were similar for both reactors (90–96%), but captured methane was found to be 11–18% higher for the CSTR than the UA reactor. Ion Torrent sequencing targeting 16S rRNA genes showed that several operational taxonomic units (OTUs) most closely related to fermentative bacteria (e.g., Microbacter margulisiae) were dominant in the suspended biomass of the CSTR, accounting for 30% of the microbial community. Conversely, methanogenic archaea (e.g., Methanosaeta) and syntrophic bacteria (e.g., Smithella propionica) were found in significantly higher relative abundances in the UA AnMBR as compared to the CSTR due to their affinity for surface attachment. Of the methanogens that were present in the CSTR sludge, hydrogenotrophic methanogens dominated (e.g., Methanobacterium). Measured EPS (both proteins and carbohydrates), which has been broadly linked to fouling, was determined to be consistently lower in the UA AnMBR membrane samples than in CSTR AnMBR membrane samples. Principal component analysis (PCA) based on HPLC profiles of soluble microbial products (SMPs) further demonstrated these differences between reactor types in replicate runs. The results of this study showed that reactor configuration can significantly impact the development of the microbial communities of AnMBRs that are responsible for both membrane and reactor performance.

  17. Suspended graphene device fabrication

    OpenAIRE

    Hiltunen, Vesa-Matti

    2016-01-01

    Tämän pro gradu -tutkielman aiheena oli tutkia itsekantavien grafeeninäytteiden valmistusta. Grafeeni syntetisoitiin kaasufaasikasvatuksella ilmakehän paineessa kupariohutkalvoille. Kupariohutkalvot valmistattiin käyttämällä elektronisuihkuhöyrystystä. Projektin aikana synteesiprosessia parannettiin optimoimalla synteesiparametreja. Syntetisoinnin jälkeen grafeeninäytteet siirrettiin piinitridikalvoille, joihin oli valmistettu reikiä. Viimeinen vaihe siirrossa on PMMA tukikerro...

  18. Nanofriction of Graphene/Ionic Liquid-Infused Block Copolymer Homoporous Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Rong; Fan, Pengpeng; Yan, Nina; Ji, Qingmin; Sunkulp, Goel; Wang, Yong

    2017-10-24

    We have infused graphene/ionic liquid into block copolymer homoporous membranes (HOMEs), which have highly ordered uniform cylindrical nanopores, to form compact, dense, and continuous graphene/ionic liquid (Gr/IL) lubricating layers at interfaces, enabling a reduction in the friction coefficient. Raman and XPS analyses, confirmed the parallel alignment of the cation of ILs on graphene by the π-π stacking interaction of the imidazolium ring with the graphene layer. This alignment loosens the lattice spacing of Gr in Gr/ILs, leading to a larger lattice spacing of 0.36 nm in Gr of Gr/ILs hybrids than the pristine Gr (0.33 nm). The loose graphene layers, which are caused by the coexistence of graphene and ILs, would make the sliding easier, and favor the lubrication. An increase in the friction coefficient was observed on ILs-infused block copolymer HOMEs, as compared to Gr/ILs-infused ones, due to the absence of Gr and the unstably formed ILs film. Gr/ILs-infused block copolymer HOMEs also exhibit much smaller residual indentation depth and peak indentation depth in comparison with ILs-infused ones. This indicates that the existence of stably supported Gr/ILs hybrid liquid films aids the reduction of the friction coefficient by preventing the thinning of the lubricant layer and exposure of the underlying block copolymer HOMEs.

  19. Strict molecular sieving over electrodeposited 2D-interspacing-narrowed graphene oxide membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Benyu; He, Xiaofan; Zeng, Gaofeng; Pan, Yichang; Li, Guihua; Liu, Guojuan; Zhang, Yanfeng; Chen, Wei; Sun, Yuhan

    2017-10-10

    To separate small molecules/species, it's crucial but still challenging to narrow the 2D-interspacing of graphene oxide (GO) membranes without damaging the membrane. Here the fast deposition of ultrathin, defect-free and robust GO layers is realized on porous stainless steel hollow fibers (PSSHFs) by a facile and practical electrophoresis deposition (ED) method. In this approach, oxygen-containing groups of GO are selectively reduced, leading to a controlled decrease of the 2D channels of stacked GO layers. The resultant ED-GO@PSSHF composite membranes featured a sharp cutoff between C2 (ethane and ethene) and C3 (propane and propene) hydrocarbons and exhibited nearly complete rejections for the smallest alcohol and ion in aqueous solutions. This demonstrates the versatility of GO based membranes for the precise separation of various types of mixtures. At the same time, a robust mechanical strength of the ED-GO@PSSHF membrane is also achieved due to the enhanced interaction at GO/support and GO/GO interfaces.Producing graphene oxide membranes with narrow channels is desirable for small molecule separations, but methods to narrow the 2D spacing typically result in membrane damage. Here the authors exploit electrophoresis-deposition to prepare GO membranes that are reduced in situ, leading to narrow and uniform 2D channels.

  20. The effect of hydrophilicity of graphene oxide as additive towards performance of polysulfone membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamalludin, Mohd Riduan; Harun, Zawati; Zakaria, M. S.; Rahim, Wan Mohd Faizal Wan Abd; Khor, C. Y.; Rosli, M. U.; Ishak, Muhammad Ikman; Nawi, M. A. M.; Shahrin, Suhaimi

    2017-09-01

    This study investigates the effect of hydrophilicity of graphene oxide as additive towards properties and performance on polysulfone (PSf) membrane. A polysulfone (PSf) membrane containing graphene oxide (GO) with different content was prepared via phase inversion technique. Characterization on the fabricated membrane were water contact angle measurement, porosity and mean pore size. The effects of PSf/GO were further investigated in terms of permeation test, rejection test and antifouling test. Based on the result obtained, PSf membrane incorporating with GO additive shows better capability to permeate more water compared to unfilled PSf membrane. The PSf/GO membrane were able to increase the permeate rate rapidly with the highest value is given by sample 4 (consist of 0.7 g of GO) at 571.78 J/m2h. Furthermore, water contact angle confirmed the hydrophilicity of this membrane at 62°. The transmembrane fouling activity showed that GO embedded in PSf membrane has improved tremendously. In addition, this study revealed that 0.7g of GO had the highest permeation test, rejection test and antifouling test.

  1. A Capacitive Humidity Sensor Based on an Electrospun PVDF/Graphene Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Rivera, Daniel; Rodríguez-Roldán, Grissel; Mora-Martínez, Rodrigo; Suaste-Gómez, Ernesto

    2017-05-03

    Humidity sensors have been widely used in areas such as agriculture, environmental conservation, medicine, instrumentation and climatology. Hydrophobicity is one of the important factors in capacitive humidity sensors: recent research has shown that the inclusion of graphene (G) in polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) improves its hydrophobicity. In this context, a methodology to fabricate electrospun membranes of PVDF blended with G was developed in order to improve the PVDF properties allowing the use of PVDF/G membrane as a capacitive humidity sensor. Micrographs of membranes were obtained by scanning electron microscopy to analyze the morphology of the fabricated samples. Subsequently, the capacitive response of the membrane, which showed an almost linear and directly proportional response to humidity, was tested. Results showed that the response time of PVDF/G membrane was faster than that of a commercial DHT11 sensor. In summary, PVDF/G membranes exhibit interesting properties as humidity sensors.

  2. Polyethersulfone/Graphene Oxide Ultrafiltration Membranes from Solutions in Ionic Liquid

    KAUST Repository

    Mahalingam, Dinesh. K.

    2017-07-18

    Novel high flux polyethersulfone (PES) ultrafiltration membranes were fabricated by incorporating different amounts of graphene oxide (GO) sheets to PES as nanofillers. The membranes were prepared from solutions in 50/50 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium-diethylphosphate/N,N-dimethyl formamide. It was observed that the water permeance increased from 550 to 800 L m-2h-1bar-1, with incorporation of 1 wt% GO, keeping a molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) of approximately 32-34 kg mol-1. Cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy images of GO/PES membranes showed the formation of ultrathin selective layer unlike pristine membranes. Contact angle measurements confirmed the increase of hydrophilicity, by increasing the GO concentration. The rejection of humic acid and bovine serum albumin was demonstrated. The mechanical properties were improved, compared with the pristine membranes. The performance was just above the trade-off relationship between permeance and separation factor for PES membranes reported in the literature.

  3. Water transport through graphene oxide membranes: the roles of driving forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, J Y; Wang, B; Li, K

    2018-02-21

    Graphene oxide (GO) membranes have shown excellent selectivities in nanofiltration and pervaporation. However, the water transport mechanisms in the unique membrane laminar structure are still not well understood, especially in pervaporation which involves selective permeation and evaporation. Herein, water transport in GO membranes was tested under two different modes: pressure-driven permeation and pervaporation. The pure water flux was found to be 1-2 orders of magnitude higher in pervaporation due to the large capillary pressure induced by evaporation. The water flux in pervaporation was suggested to be limited by evaporation at room temperature but surface diffusion at high temperature.

  4. Crown-Ether Derived Graphene Hybrid Composite for Membrane-Free Potentiometric Sensing of Alkali Metal Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Gunnar; Ulstrup, Jens; Chi, Qijin

    2016-01-01

    We report the design and synthesis of newly functionalized graphene hybrid material that can be used for selective membrane-free potentiometric detection of alkali metal ions, represented by potassium ions. Reduced graphene oxide (RGO) functionalized covalently by 18-crown[6] ether with a dense...

  5. Functionalized graphene as a nanostructured membrane for removal of copper and mercury from aqueous solution: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azamat, Jafar; Khataee, Alireza; Joo, Sang Woo

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the removal of copper and mercury using functionalized graphene as a nanostructured membrane. The molecular dynamics simulation method was used to investigate the removal ability of these ions from aqueous solution using functionalized graphene membrane. The studied systems included a functionalized graphene membrane which was placed in the aqueous ionic solution of CuCl2 and HgCl2. An external electrical field was applied along the z axis of the system. The results indicated that the application of electrical field on the system caused the desired ions to pass through the functionalized graphene membrane. The Fluorinated pore (F-pore) terminated graphene selectively conducted Cu(2+) and Hg(2+) ions. The calculation of the potential of mean force of ions revealed that Cu(2+) and Hg(2+) ions face a relatively small energy barrier and could not pass through the F-pore graphene unless an external electrical field was applied upon them. In contrast, the energy barrier for the Cl(-) ion was large and it could not pass through the F-pore graphene. The findings of the study indicate that the permeation of ions across the graphene was a function of applied electrical fields. The findings of the present study are based on the detailed analysis and consideration of potential of mean force and radial distribution function curves. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. UV-Enhanced Sacrificial Layer Stabilised Graphene Oxide Hollow Fibre Membranes for Nanofiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, J. Y.; Aba, N. F. D.; Wang, B.; Mattevi, C.; Li, K.

    2015-11-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) membranes have demonstrated great potential in gas separation and liquid filtration. For upscale applications, GO membranes in a hollow fibre geometry are of particular interest due to the high-efficiency and easy-assembly features at module level. However, GO membranes were found unstable in dry state on ceramic hollow fibre substrates, mainly due to the drying-related shrinkage, which has limited the applications and post-treatments of GO membranes. We demonstrate here that GO hollow fibre membranes can be stabilised by using a porous poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) sacrificial layer, which creates a space between the hollow fibre substrate and the GO membrane thus allowing stress-free shrinkage. Defect-free GO hollow fibre membrane was successfully determined and the membrane was stable in a long term (1200 hours) gas-tight stability test. Post-treatment of the GO membranes with UV light was also successfully accomplished in air, which induced the creation of controlled microstructural defects in the membrane and increased the roughness factor of the membrane surface. The permeability of the UV-treated GO membranes was greatly enhanced from 0.07 to 2.8 L m-2 h-1 bar-1 for water, and 0.14 to 7.5 L m-2 h-1 bar-1 for acetone, with an unchanged low molecular weight cut off (~250 Da).

  7. Anisotropic straining of graphene using micropatterned SiN membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca F. Settembrini

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We use micro-Raman spectroscopy to study strain in free-standing graphene monolayers anchored to SiN holes of non-circular geometry. We show that a uniform differential pressure load yields measurable deviations from hydrostatic strain, conventionally observed in radially symmetric microbubbles. A pressure load of 1 bar yields a top hydrostatic strain of ≈ 0.7% and a G± splitting of 10 cm−1 in graphene clamped to elliptical boundaries with axes 40 and 20 μm, in good agreement with the calculated anisotropy Δε ≈ 0.6% and consistently with recent reports on Grüneisen parameters. The implementation of arbitrary strain configurations by designing suitable boundary clamping conditions is discussed.

  8. Graphene immobilized enzyme/polyethersulfone mixed matrix membrane: Enhanced antibacterial, permeable and mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Linlin; Wang, Yuanming; Zhang, Yatao; Liu, Jindun

    2015-11-01

    Enzyme immobilization has been developed to address lots of issues of free enzyme, such as instability, low activity and difficult to retain. In this study, graphene was used as an ideal carrier for lysozyme immobilization, including graphene oxide (GO) immobilized lysozyme (GO-Ly) and chemically reduced graphene oxide (CRGO) immobilized lysozyme (CRGO-Ly). Herein, lysozyme as a bio-antibacterial agent has excellent antibacterial performance and the products of its catalysis are safety and nontoxic. Then the immobilized lysozyme materials were blended into polyethersulfone (PES) casting solution to prepare PES ultrafiltration membrane via phase inversion method. GO and CRGO were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Ultraviolet-visible spectrum (UV), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and the immobilized lysozyme composites were observed by fluorescent microscopy. The results revealed that GO and CRGO were successfully synthesized and lysozyme was immobilized on their surfaces. The morphology, hydrophilicity, mechanical properties, separation properties and antibacterial activity of the hybrid membranes were characterized in detail. The hydrophilicity, water flux and mechanical strength of the hybrid membranes were significantly enhanced after adding the immobilized lysozyme. In the antibacterial experiment, the hybrid membranes exhibited an effective antibacterial performance against Escherichia coli (E. coli).

  9. Protein corona mitigates the cytotoxicity of graphene oxide by reducing its physical interaction with cell membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Guangxin; Kang, Seung-Gu; Tian, Xin; Garate, Jose Antonio; Zhao, Lin; Ge, Cuicui; Zhou, Ruhong

    2015-09-01

    Many recent studies have shown that the way nanoparticles interact with cells and biological molecules can vary greatly in the serum-containing or serum-free culture medium. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of how the so-called ``protein corona'' formed in serum medium affects nanoparticles' biological responses are still largely unresolved. Thus, it is critical to understand how absorbed proteins on the surfaces of nanoparticles alter their biological effects. In this work, we have demonstrated with both experimental and theoretical approaches that protein BSA coating can mitigate the cytotoxicity of graphene oxide (GO) by reducing its cell membrane penetration. Our cell viability and cellular uptake experiments showed that protein corona decreased cellular uptake of GO, thus significantly mitigating the potential cytotoxicity of GO. The electron microscopy images also confirmed that protein corona reduced the cellular morphological damage by limiting GO penetration into the cell membrane. Further molecular dynamics (MD) simulations validated the experimental results and revealed that the adsorbed BSA in effect weakened the interaction between the phospholipids and graphene surface due to a reduction of the available surface area plus an unfavorable steric effect, thus significantly reducing the graphene penetration and lipid bilayer damaging. These findings provide new insights into the underlying molecular mechanism of this important graphene protein corona interaction with cell membranes, and should have implications in future development of graphene-based biomedical applications.Many recent studies have shown that the way nanoparticles interact with cells and biological molecules can vary greatly in the serum-containing or serum-free culture medium. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of how the so-called ``protein corona'' formed in serum medium affects nanoparticles' biological responses are still largely unresolved. Thus, it is critical

  10. Biofouling Mitigation in Forward Osmosis Using Graphene Oxide Functionalized Thin-Film Composite Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perreault, François; Jaramillo, Humberto; Xie, Ming; Ude, Mercy; Nghiem, Long D; Elimelech, Menachem

    2016-06-07

    Forward osmosis (FO) is an emerging membrane process with potential applications in the treatment of highly fouling feedwaters. However, biofouling, the adhesion of microorganisms to the membrane and the subsequent formation of biofilms, remains a major limitation since antifouling membrane modifications offer limited protection against biofouling. In this study, we evaluated the use of graphene oxide (GO) for biofouling mitigation in FO. GO functionalization of thin-film composite membranes (GO-TFC) increased the surface hydrophilicity and imparted antimicrobial activity to the membrane without altering its transport properties. After 1 h of contact time, deposition and viability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa cells on GO-TFC were reduced by 36% and 30%, respectively, compared to pristine membranes. When GO-TFC membranes were tested for treatment of an artificial secondary wastewater supplemented with P. aeruginosa, membrane biofouling was reduced by 50% after 24 h of operation. This biofouling resistance is attributed to the reduced accumulation of microbial biomass on GO-TFC compared to pristine membranes. In addition, confocal microscopy demonstrated that cells deposited on the membrane surface are inactivated, resulting in a layer of dead cells on GO-TFC that limit biofilm formation. These findings highlight the potential of GO to be used for biofouling mitigation in FO.

  11. Pebax®1657/Graphene oxide composite membranes for improved water vapor separation

    KAUST Repository

    Akhtar, Faheem Hassan

    2016-11-02

    In this study composite mixed matrix membranes containing hydrophilic microphase-separated block copolymer (Pebax® 1657) and graphene oxide nanosheets were prepared using a dip coating method. Water vapor and N2 gas permeation were measured as a function of different parameters: (i) layer thickness, (ii) content of graphene oxide (GO), and (iii) content of reduced GO. Surprisingly, a concentration of only 2 wt% of GO nanosheets well dispersed in the Pebax layer boosted the selectivity 8 times by decreasing the water vapor permeance by only 12% whereas N2 gas permeance decreased by 70%. Using reduced GO instead, the water vapor permeance declined by up to 16% with no influence on the N2 gas permeance. We correlated the permeation properties of the mixed matrix membranes with different models and found, that both the modified Nielsen model and the Cussler model give good correlation with experimental findings.

  12. Defect production in Ar irradiated graphene membranes under different initial applied strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Asencio, J., E-mail: jesusmartinez@ua.es [Dept. Física Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Fase II, Universidad de Alicante, Alicante E-036090 (Spain); Ruestes, C.J.; Bringa, E. [CONICET and Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Mendoza 5500 (Argentina); Caturla, M.J. [Dept. Física Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Fase II, Universidad de Alicante, Alicante E-036090 (Spain)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Defects in graphene membranes are formed due to 140 eV Ar ions irradiation using MD. • Different initial strains are applied, which influence the type and number of defects. • Mono-vacancies, di-vacancies and tri-vacancies production behaves linearly with dose. • The total number of defects under compression is slightly higher than under tension. - Abstract: Irradiation with low energy Ar ions of graphene membranes gives rise to changes in the mechanical properties of this material. These changes have been associated to the production of defects, mostly isolated vacancies. However, the initial state of the graphene membrane can also affect its mechanical response. Using molecular dynamics simulations we have studied defect production in graphene membranes irradiated with 140 eV Ar ions up to a dose of 0.075 × 10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2} and different initial strains, from −0.25% (compressive strain) to 0.25% (tensile strain). For all strains, the number of defects increases linearly with dose with a defect production of about 80% (80 defects every 100 ions). Defects are mostly single vacancies and di-vacancies, although some higher order clusters are also observed. Two different types of di-vacancies have been identified, the most common one being two vacancies at first nearest neighbours distance. Differences in the total number of defects with the applied strain are observed which is related to the production of a higher number of di-vacancies under compressive strain compared to tensile strain. We attribute this effect to the larger out-of-plane deformations of compressed samples that could favor the production of defects in closer proximity to others.

  13. Development of a stable cation modified graphene oxide membrane for water treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wenzheng; (Yet Yu, Tong; Graham, Nigel

    2017-12-01

    Membranes prepared from layers of graphene oxide (GO) offer substantial advantages over conventional materials for water treatment (e.g. greater flux), but the stability of GO membranes in water has not been achieved until now. In this study the behavior of GO membranes prepared with different quantities and species of cations has been investigated to establish the feasibility of their application in water treatment. A range of cation-modified GO membranes were prepared and exposed to aqueous solutions containing specific chemical constituents. In pure water, unmodified and Na-modified GO membranes were highly unstable, while GO membranes modified with multivalent cations were stable provided there were sufficient quantities of cations present; their relative capability to achieve GO stability was as follows: Al3+  >  Ca2+  >  Mg2+  >  Na+. It is believed that the mechanism of cross-linking, and membrane stability, is via metal-carboxylate chelates and cation-graphite surface interactions (cation-π interaction), and that the latter appears to increase with increasing cation valency. The instability of cation (Ca or Al)-modified GO membranes by NaCl solutions during permeation occurred as Na+ exchanged with the incorporated multivalent cations, but a high content of Al3+ in the GO membrane impeded Al3+/Na+ exchange and thus retained membrane stability. In solutions containing biopolymers representative of surface waters or seawater (protein and polysaccharide solutions), Ca-GO membranes (even with high Ca2+ content) were not stable, while Al-GO membranes were stable if the Al3+ content was sufficiently high; Al-formed membranes also had a greater flux than Ca-GO membranes.

  14. Studies on carboxylated graphene oxide incorporated polyetherimide mixed matrix ultrafiltration membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaleekkal, Noel Jacob, E-mail: noeljacob89@gmail.com [Membrane Laboratory, Department of Chemical Engineering, ACT, Anna University, Chennai, 600025 (India); Thanigaivelan, A., E-mail: thanichemstar@gmail.com [Membrane Laboratory, Department of Chemical Engineering, ACT, Anna University, Chennai, 600025 (India); Rana, Dipak, E-mail: rana@uottawa.ca [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Ottawa, 161 Louis Pasteur Private, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 (Canada); Mohan, D., E-mail: mohantarun@gmail.com [Membrane Laboratory, Department of Chemical Engineering, ACT, Anna University, Chennai, 600025 (India)

    2017-01-15

    In this work the graphene oxide prepared by the modified Hummers’ method was effectively carboxylated. These carboxylated graphene oxide (c-GO) microsheets was characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, Raman shift, zeta potential, and their morphology was observed using a high resolution scanning/transmission electron microscopy. Polyetherimide mixed matrix membranes (MMMs) were fabricated by the non-solvent induced phase separation technique with varying concentration of this microsheet. The presence of these microsheets on the membrane surface was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and could also be confirmed visually by optical images. The membranes were further characterized; they showed a greater water flux, higher porosity, and sufficient thermal stability. Incorporation of these microsheets improved the hydrophilicity of the membrane confirmed by the lower contact angle values, which in turn explained the lower interfacial free energy, the increase in work of adhesion, the higher solid-vapor free energy and the spreading coefficient. Membranes loaded with 0.3 wt% of c-GO showed a flux recovery of 94% and only a small flux decline even after 180 min of filtration of humic acid (HA) solution. The efficiency of these membranes in removal of HA, toxic metal ions was also investigated. The bacterial anti-adhesion property of c-GO in the membranes was also explored using Escherichia coli, as a model bio-foulant. The charge of the microsheets and their unique architecture imparts higher hydrophilicity and greater fouling resistance along with improved permeation flux when incorporated into the polymer matrix. - Highlights: • Novel membranes by incorporating carboxylated GO into polyetherimide matrix. • Modified membranes exhibited greater porosity, flux and high humic acid rejection. • Nanoplatelets improved the flux recovery ratio to >94%. • Liquid phase polymer based retention utilized for toxic heavy metal

  15. Extended friction elucidates the breakdown of fast water transport in graphene oxide membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montessori, A.; Amadei, C. A.; Falcucci, G.; Sega, M.; Vecitis, C. D.; Succi, S.

    2016-12-01

    The understanding of water transport in graphene oxide (GO) membranes stands out as a major theoretical problem in graphene research. Notwithstanding the intense efforts devoted to the subject in the recent years, a consolidated picture of water transport in GO membranes is yet to emerge. By performing mesoscale simulations of water transport in ultrathin GO membranes, we show that even small amounts of oxygen functionalities can lead to a dramatic drop of the GO permeability, in line with experimental findings. The coexistence of bulk viscous dissipation and spatially extended molecular friction results in a major decrease of both slip and bulk flow, thereby suppressing the fast water transport regime observed in pristine graphene nanochannels. Inspection of the flow structure reveals an inverted curvature in the near-wall region, which connects smoothly with a parabolic profile in the bulk region. Such inverted curvature is a distinctive signature of the coexistence between single-particle zero-temperature (noiseless) Langevin friction and collective hydrodynamics. The present mesoscopic model with spatially extended friction may offer a computationally efficient tool for future simulations of water transport in nanomaterials.

  16. A superhydrophobic chip based on SU-8 photoresist pillars suspended on a silicon nitride membrane

    KAUST Repository

    Marinaro, Giovanni

    2014-07-28

    We developed a new generation of superhydrophobic chips optimized for probing ultrasmall sample quantities by X-ray scattering and fluorescence techniques. The chips are based on thin Si3N4 membranes with a tailored pattern of SU-8 photoresist pillars. Indeed, aqueous solution droplets can be evaporated and concentrated at predefined positions using a non-periodic pillar pattern. We demonstrated quantitatively the deposition and aggregation of gold glyconanoparticles from the evaporation of a nanomolar droplet in a small spot by raster X-ray nanofluorescence. Further, raster nanocrystallography of biological objects such as rod-like tobacco mosaic virus nanoparticles reveals crystalline macro-domain formation composed of highly oriented nanorods. © 2014 the Partner Organisations.

  17. Water treatment: A scalable graphene-based membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlassiouk, Ivan V.

    2017-11-01

    An improved industrial manufacturability has been achieved for a hybrid water-treatment membrane that exhibits high water permeance, prolonged high salt and dye rejection under cross-flow conditions and better resistance to chlorine treatment.

  18. Reverse osmosis desalination of chitosan cross-linked graphene oxide/titania hybrid lamellar membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Hui; Sun, Penzhan; Zhang, Yingjiu; Zhu, Hongwei

    2016-07-08

    With excellent mass transport properties, graphene oxide (GO)-based lamellar membranes are believed to have great potential in water desalination. In order to quantify whether GO-based membranes are indeed suitable for reverse osmosis (RO) desalination, three sub-micrometer thick GO-based lamellar membranes: GO-only, reduced GO (RGO)/titania (TO) nanosheets and RGO/TO/chitosan (CTS) are prepared, and their RO desalination performances are evaluated in a home-made RO test apparatus. The photoreduction of GO by TO improves the salt rejection, which increases slowly with the membrane thickness. The RGO/TO/CTS hybrid membranes exhibit higher rejection rates of only about 30% (greater than threefold improvement compared with a GO-only membrane) which is still inferior compared to other commercial RO membranes. The low rejection rates mainly arise from the pressure-induced weakening of the ion-GO interlayer interactions. Despite the advantages of simple, low-cost preparation, high permeability and selectivity of GO-based lamellar membranes, as the current desalination performances are not high enough to afford practical application, there still remains a great challenge to realize high performance separation membranes for water desalination applications.

  19. Reverse osmosis desalination of chitosan cross-linked graphene oxide/titania hybrid lamellar membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Hui; Sun, Penzhan; Zhang, Yingjiu; Zhu, Hongwei

    2016-07-01

    With excellent mass transport properties, graphene oxide (GO)-based lamellar membranes are believed to have great potential in water desalination. In order to quantify whether GO-based membranes are indeed suitable for reverse osmosis (RO) desalination, three sub-micrometer thick GO-based lamellar membranes: GO-only, reduced GO (RGO)/titania (TO) nanosheets and RGO/TO/chitosan (CTS) are prepared, and their RO desalination performances are evaluated in a home-made RO test apparatus. The photoreduction of GO by TO improves the salt rejection, which increases slowly with the membrane thickness. The RGO/TO/CTS hybrid membranes exhibit higher rejection rates of only about 30% (greater than threefold improvement compared with a GO-only membrane) which is still inferior compared to other commercial RO membranes. The low rejection rates mainly arise from the pressure-induced weakening of the ion-GO interlayer interactions. Despite the advantages of simple, low-cost preparation, high permeability and selectivity of GO-based lamellar membranes, as the current desalination performances are not high enough to afford practical application, there still remains a great challenge to realize high performance separation membranes for water desalination applications.

  20. Ultrathin graphene-based membrane with precise molecular sieving and ultrafast solvent permeation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Q.; Su, Y.; Chi, C.; Cherian, C. T.; Huang, K.; Kravets, V. G.; Wang, F. C.; Zhang, J. C.; Pratt, A.; Grigorenko, A. N.; Guinea, F.; Geim, A. K.; Nair, R. R.

    2017-12-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) membranes continue to attract intense interest due to their unique molecular sieving properties combined with fast permeation. However, their use is limited to aqueous solutions because GO membranes appear impermeable to organic solvents, a phenomenon not yet fully understood. Here, we report efficient and fast filtration of organic solutions through GO laminates containing smooth two-dimensional (2D) capillaries made from large (10-20 μm) flakes. Without modification of sieving characteristics, these membranes can be made exceptionally thin, down to ~10 nm, which translates into fast water and organic solvent permeation. We attribute organic solvent permeation and sieving properties to randomly distributed pinholes interconnected by short graphene channels with a width of 1 nm. With increasing membrane thickness, organic solvent permeation rates decay exponentially but water continues to permeate quickly, in agreement with previous reports. The potential of ultrathin GO laminates for organic solvent nanofiltration is demonstrated by showing >99.9% rejection of small molecular weight organic dyes dissolved in methanol. Our work significantly expands possibilities for the use of GO membranes in purification and filtration technologies.

  1. Electronic properties of disclinated flexible membrane beyond the inextensional limit: application to graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kochetov, E A; Osipov, V A; Pincak, R, E-mail: kochetov@theor.jinr.r, E-mail: osipov@theor.jinr.r, E-mail: pincak@saske.s [Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2010-10-06

    A gauge-theory approach to describe Dirac fermions on a disclinated flexible membrane beyond the inextensional limit is formulated. The elastic membrane is considered as an embedding of a 2D surface into R{sup 3}. The disclination is incorporated through an SO(2) gauge vortex located at the origin, which results in a metric with a conical singularity. A smoothing of the conical singularity is accounted for by replacing a disclinated rigid plane membrane with a hyperboloid of near-zero curvature pierced at the tip by the SO(2) vortex. The embedding parameters are chosen to match the solution to the von Karman equations. A homogeneous part of that solution is shown to stabilize the theory. The modification of the Landau states and density of electronic states of the graphene membrane due to elasticity is discussed.

  2. Graphene oxide membranes with high permeability and selectivity for dehumidification of air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Yongsoon; Liu, Wei; Schwenzer, Birgit; Manandhar, Sandeep; Chase-Woods, Dylan G.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Devanathan, Ram; Fifield, Leonard S.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Ginovska-Pangovska, Bojana; Gotthold, David W.

    2016-09-01

    Hierarchically stacked 2D graphene oxide (GO) membranes are a fascinating and promising new class of materials with the potential for radically improved water vapor/gas separation with excellent selectivity and high permeability. This paper details dehumidification results from flowing gas mixtures through free-standing GO membrane samples prepared by a casting method. The first demonstrated use of free-standing GO membranes for water vapor separation reveals outstanding water vapor permeability and H2O/N2 selectivity. Free-standing GO membranes exhibit extremely high water vapor permeability of 1.82 x 105 Barrer and a water vapor permeance of 1.01 x 10-5 mol/m2sPa, while the nitrogen permeability was below the system’s detection limit, yielding a selectivity >104 in 80% relative humidity (RH) air at 30.8 °C. The results show great potential for a range of energy conversion and environmental applications

  3. Development of a nanocomposite ultrafiltration membrane based on polyphenylsulfone blended with graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Arun Kumar; Alam, Javed; Alhoshan, Mansour; Dass, Lawrence Arockiasamy; Muthumareeswaran, M. R.

    2017-02-01

    In the present study, graphene oxide (GO) was incorporated as a nanoadditive into a polyphenylsulfone (PPSU) to develop a PPSU/GO nanocomposite membrane with enhanced antifouling properties. A series of membranes containing different concentrations (0.2, 0.5 and 1.0 wt.%) of GO were fabricated via the phase inversion method, using N-methyl pyrrolidone (NMP) as the solvent, deionized water as the non-solvent, and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as a pore forming agent. The prepared nanocomposite membranes were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), and were also characterized with respect to contact angle, zeta potential and porosity, mean pore radius, tortuosity and molecular weight cut-off (MWCO). Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and tensile testing were used to measure thermal and mechanical properties. The membrane performance was evaluated by volumetric flux and rejection of proteins, and antifouling properties. According to the results, the optimum addition of 0.5 wt% GO resulted in a membrane with an increased flux of 171 ± 3 Lm-2h-1 with a MWCO of ~40 kDa. In addition, the GO incorporation efficiently inhibited the interaction between proteins and the membrane surface, thereby improving the fouling resistance ability by approximately 58 ± 3%. Also, the resulting membranes showed a significant improvement in mechanical and thermal properties.

  4. Template-Assisted Preparation of Micrometric Suspended Membrane Lattices of Photoluminescent and Non-Photoluminescent Polymers by Capillarity-Driven Solvent Evaporation: Application to Microtagging

    OpenAIRE

    Polito, Giovanni; Robbiano, Valentina; Cozzi, Chiara; Cacialli, Franco; Barillaro, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    In this work, the bottom-up template-assisted preparation of high-density lattices (up to 11???106?membranes/cm2) of suspended polymer membranes with micrometric size (in the order of few ?m2) and sub-micrometric thickness (in the order of hundreds of nm) is demonstrated for both photoluminescent and non-photoluminescent polymers by capillarity-driven solvent evaporation. Solvent evaporation of low concentration polymer solutions drop-cast on an array of open-ended micropipes is shown to lead...

  5. Template-Assisted Preparation of Micrometric Suspended Membrane Lattices of Photoluminescent and Non-Photoluminescent Polymers by Capillarity-Driven Solvent Evaporation: Application to Microtagging

    OpenAIRE

    Polito, G.; Robbiano, V.; Cozzi, C.; Cacialli, F.; Barillaro, G.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, the bottom-up template-assisted preparation of high-density lattices (up to 11 · 10(6) membranes/cm(2)) of suspended polymer membranes with micrometric size (in the order of few μm(2)) and sub-micrometric thickness (in the order of hundreds of nm) is demonstrated for both photoluminescent and non-photoluminescent polymers by capillarity-driven solvent evaporation. Solvent evaporation of low concentration polymer solutions drop-cast on an array of open-ended micropipes is shown t...

  6. Graphene Oxide Quantum Dots Covalently Functionalized PVDF Membrane with Significantly-Enhanced Bactericidal and Antibiofouling Performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Zhiping; Yu, Dingshan; He, Ziming; Liu, Jing; Xiao, Fang-Xing; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Rong; Bhattacharyya, Dibakar; Tan, Timothy Thatt Yang

    2016-02-01

    Covalent bonding of graphene oxide quantum dots (GOQDs) onto amino modified polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane has generated a new type of nano-carbon functionalized membrane with significantly enhanced antibacterial and antibiofouling properties. A continuous filtration test using E. coli containing feedwater shows that the relative flux drop over GOQDs modified PVDF is 23%, which is significantly lower than those over pristine PVDF (86%) and GO-sheet modified PVDF (62%) after 10 h of filtration. The presence of GOQD coating layer effectively inactivates E. coli and S. aureus cells, and prevents the biofilm formation on the membrane surface, producing excellent antimicrobial activity and potentially antibiofouling capability, more superior than those of previously reported two-dimensional GO sheets and one-dimensional CNTs modified membranes. The distinctive antimicrobial and antibiofouling performances could be attributed to the unique structure and uniform dispersion of GOQDs, enabling the exposure of a larger fraction of active edges and facilitating the formation of oxidation stress. Furthermore, GOQDs modified membrane possesses satisfying long-term stability and durability due to the strong covalent interaction between PVDF and GOQDs. This study opens up a new synthetic avenue in the fabrication of efficient surface-functionalized polymer membranes for potential waste water treatment and biomolecules separation.

  7. Structurally stable graphene oxide-based nanofiltration membranes with bioadhesive polydopamine coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chongbin; Li, Zhiyuan; Chen, Jianxin; Yin, Yongheng; Wu, Hong

    2018-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO)-based membranes possess promising potential in liquid separation for its high flux. The state-of-art GO-based membranes need to be supported by a substrate to ensure that the ultra-thin GO layer can withstand transmembrane pressure in practical applications. The interfacial compatibility of this kind of composite membrane remains a great challenge due to the intrinsic difference in chemical/physical properties between the GO sheets and the substrate. In this paper, a structurally stable GO-based composite nanofiltration membrane was fabricated by coupling the mussel-inspired adhesive platform and filtration-assisted assembly of GO laminates. The water flux for the prepared GO-based nanofiltration membrane reached up to 85 L m-2 h-1 bar-1 with a high retention above 95% and 100% for Orange G and Congo Red, respectively. The membrane exhibited highly stable structure owing to the covalent and noncovalent interactions between GO separation layer and dopamine adhesive platform.

  8. Graphene oxide based ultrafiltration membranes for photocatalytic degradation of organic pollutants in salty water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastrana-Martínez, Luisa M; Morales-Torres, Sergio; Figueiredo, José L; Faria, Joaquim L; Silva, Adrián M T

    2015-06-15

    Flat sheet ultrafiltration (UF) membranes with photocatalytic properties were prepared with lab-made TiO2 and graphene oxide-TiO2 (GOT), and also with a reference TiO2 photocatalyst from Evonik (P25). These membranes were tested in continuous operation mode for the degradation and mineralization of a pharmaceutical compound, diphenhydramine (DP), and an organic dye, methyl orange (MO), under both near-UV/Vis and visible light irradiation. The effect of NaCl was investigated considering simulated brackish water (NaCl 0.5 g L(-1)) and simulated seawater (NaCl 35 g L(-1)). The results indicated that the membranes prepared with the GOT composite (M-GOT) exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity, outperforming those prepared with bare TiO2 (M-TiO2) and P25 (M-P25), both inactive under visible light illumination. The best performance of M-GOT may be due to the lower band-gap energy (2.9 eV) of GOT. In general, the permeate flux was also higher for M-GOT probably due to a combined effect of its highest photocatalytic activity, highest hydrophilicity (contact angles of 11°, 17° and 18° for M-GOT, M-TiO2 and M-P25, respectively) and higher porosity (71%). The presence of NaCl had a detrimental effect on the efficiency of the membranes, since chloride anions can act as hole and hydroxyl radical scavengers, but it did not affect the catalytic stability of these membranes. A hierarchically ordered membrane was also prepared by intercalating a freestanding GO membrane in the structure of the M-GOT membrane (M-GO/GOT). The results showed considerably higher pollutant removal in darkness and good photocatalytic activity under near-UV/Vis and visible light irradiation in continuous mode experiments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Hot-pressed polymer nanofiber supported graphene membrane for high-performance nanofiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhao; Sahadevan, Rajesh; Yeh, Che-Ning; Menkhaus, Todd J.; Huang, Jiaxing; Fong, Hao

    2017-08-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) sheets can be readily surface-overlaid on hot-pressed electrospun polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofiber membrane to form a continuous and crack-free layer; upon thermal reduction at 150 °C for 12 h, the resulting reduced GO (rGO) layer can reject ∼90% MgSO4 with high water flux (due to the size exclusion mechanism), making the prepared PAN-rGO membranes promising nanofiltration media for water purification. It is important to note that no delamination of GO/rGO sheet layers has been observed throughout this study. We highlight that a simple processing method (i.e., hot pressing) is critical for the successful preparation of 2D materials (e.g., GO/rGO) based membranes/media. It is envisioned that the reported study can benefit many groups working on various membrane applications of 2D materials; in other words, the hot-pressed electrospun nanofiber membranes could be generally utilized as an innovative type of platform to support various 2D sheets for different separation applications such as highly efficient and cost-effective removal of dissolved components (e.g., organic molecules) and even (hydrated) ions from water.

  10. Engineered Graphene Materials: Synthesis and Applications for Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Daping; Tang, Haolin; Kou, Zongkui; Pan, Mu; Sun, Xueliang; Zhang, Jiujun; Mu, Shichun

    2017-05-01

    Engineered graphene materials (EGMs) with unique structures and properties have been incorporated into various components of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) such as electrode, membrane, and bipolar plates to achieve enhanced performances in terms of electrical conductivity, mechanical durability, corrosion resistance, and electrochemical surface area. This research news article provides an overview of the recent development in EGMs and EGM-based PEMFCs with a focus on the effects of EGMs on PEMFC performance when they are incorporated into different components of PEMFCs. The challenges of EGMs for practical PEMFC applications in terms of production scale, stability, conductivity, and coupling capability with other materials are also discussed and the corresponding measures and future research trends to overcome such challenges are proposed. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Selective trans-membrane transport of alkali and alkaline earth cations through graphene oxide membranes based on cation-π interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Pengzhan; Zheng, Feng; Zhu, Miao; Song, Zhigong; Wang, Kunlin; Zhong, Minlin; Wu, Dehai; Little, Reginald B; Xu, Zhiping; Zhu, Hongwei

    2014-01-28

    Graphene and graphene oxide (G-O) have been demonstrated to be excellent filters for various gases and liquids, showing potential applications in areas such as molecular sieving and water desalination. In this paper, the selective trans-membrane transport properties of alkali and alkaline earth cations through a membrane composed of stacked and overlapped G-O sheets ("G-O membrane") are investigated. The thermodynamics of the ion transport process reveal that the competition between the generated thermal motions and the interactions of cations with the G-O sheets results in the different penetration behaviors to temperature variations for the considered cations (K(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), and Ba(2+)). The interactions between the studied metal atoms and graphene are quantified by first-principles calculations based on the plane-wave-basis-set density functional theory (DFT) approach. The mechanism of the selective ion trans-membrane transportation is discussed further and found to be consistent with the concept of cation-π interactions involved in biological systems. The balance between cation-π interactions of the cations considered with the sp(2) clusters of G-O membranes and the desolvation effect of the ions is responsible for the selectivity of G-O membranes toward the penetration of different ions. These results help us better understand the ion transport process through G-O membranes, from which the possibility of modeling the ion transport behavior of cellular membrane using G-O can be discussed further. The selectivity toward different ions also makes G-O membrane a promising candidate in areas of membrane separations.

  12. Attractive force-driven superhardening of graphene membranes as a pin-point breaking of continuum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashino, Makoto; Wiesendanger, Roland

    2017-04-01

    Bending at the nanometre scale can substantially modify the mechanical, chemical and electronic properties of graphene membranes. The subsequent response of chemical bonds leads to deviations from plate idealisation in continuum mechanics. However, those phenomena have thus far been investigated exclusively by measuring the electronic properties of graphene deformed by compressing and stretching with local-probe techniques. Here, we report that the interatomic-attractive forces applied on the convexly-curved graphene by the probe tip give rise to a pin-point breaking of the plate idealisation in the continuum mechanics, facilitating atomically-localised enhancements in its chemical reactivity and mechanical strength. Thorough characterisations were conducted by atomic force microscopy and force field spectroscopy on hollow nanotubes, rolled-up graphene, with different diameters. Their topmost parts supplied well-defined curvatures of the convex graphene. We found that a significant enhancement in the out-of-plane Young’s modulus from 13 to 163 GPa, “superhardening”, was realised with the nonlinear transition of bond configurations. Our findings provide a fundamental understanding of the relationships between the structure of atomistic membranes and the dynamic behaviour of approaching exterior atoms or molecules and their subsequent interplay with chemical and mechanical properties. Thus, these results encourage the application of such membranes in functionally-controllable materials or devices.

  13. Graphene Oxide Membranes with Heterogeneous Nanodomains for Efficient CO2 Separations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaofei; Xie, Yu; He, Guangwei; Xin, Qingping; Zhang, Jinhui; Yang, Leixin; Li, Yifan; Wu, Hong; Zhang, Yuzhong; Guiver, Michael D; Jiang, Zhongyi

    2017-11-06

    Achieving high membrane performance in terms of gas permeance and carbon dioxide selectivity is an important target in carbon capture. Aiming to manipulate the channel affinity towards CO2 to implement efficient separations, gas separation membranes containing CO2 -philic and non-CO2 -philic nanodomains in the interlayer channels of graphene oxide (GO) were formed by intercalating poly(ethylene glycol) diamines (PEGDA). PEGDA reacts with epoxy groups on the GO surface, constructing CO2 -philic nanodomains and rendering a high sorption capacity, whereas unreacted GO surfaces give non-CO2 -philic nanodomains, rendering low-friction diffusion. Owing to the orderly stacking of nanochannels through cross-linking and the heterogeneous nanodomains with moderate CO2 affinity, a GO-PEGDA500 membrane exhibits a high CO2 permeance of 175.5 GPU and a CO2 /CH4 selectivity of 69.5, which is the highest performance reported for dry-state GO-stacking membranes. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Efficiency of Polymeric Membrane Graphene Oxide-TiO2 for Removal of Azo Dye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elahe Dadvar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Achieving the desired standard of drinking water quality has been one of the concerns across water treatment plants in the developing countries. Processes such as grid chamber, coagulation, sedimentation, clarification, filtration, and disinfection are typically used in water purification plants. Among these methods, unit filtration which employs polymers is one of the new technologies. There have been many studies about the use of semiconductive TiO2 with graphene oxide (GO on the base of different polymeric membranes for the removal of azo dyes, especially methylene blue (MB. Polymeric GO-TiO2 membranes have high photocatalytic, antifouling property and permeate the flux removal of organic pollutants. The aim of this study was to investigate the characteristics of different polymeric membranes such as anionic perfluorinated polymer (Nafion, cellulose acetate, polycarbonate (PC, polysulfone fluoride (PSF, and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF. The result of this study showed that the GO-TiO2 membrane can be used in the field of water treatment and will be used for the removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs from wastewater.

  15. Static Capacitive Pressure Sensing Using a Single Graphene Drum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidovikj, Dejan; Scheepers, Paul H; van der Zant, Herre S J; Steeneken, Peter G

    2017-12-13

    To realize nanomechanical graphene-based pressure sensors, it is beneficial to have a method to electrically readout the static displacement of a suspended graphene membrane. Capacitive readout, typical in micro-electromechanical systems, gets increasingly challenging as one starts shrinking the dimensions of these devices because the expected responsivity of such devices is below 0.1 aF/Pa. To overcome the challenges of detecting small capacitance changes, we design an electrical readout device fabricated on top of an insulating quartz substrate, maximizing the contribution of the suspended membrane to the total capacitance of the device. The capacitance of the drum is further increased by reducing the gap size to 110 nm. Using an external pressure load, we demonstrate the successful detection of capacitance changes of a single graphene drum down to 50 aF, and pressure differences down to 25 mbar.

  16. Highly sensitive thermal conductivity measurements of suspended membranes (SiN and diamond) using a 3ω-Völklein method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, A; Ftouni, H; Richard, J; Hébert, C; Eon, D; Omnès, F; Bourgeois, O

    2012-05-01

    A suspended system for measuring the thermal properties of membranes is presented. The sensitive thermal measurement is based on the 3ω dynamic method coupled to a Völklein geometry. The device obtained using micro-machining processes allows the measurement of the in-plane thermal conductivity of a membrane with a sensitivity of less than 10 nW/K (+∕-5 × 10(-3) Wm(-1) K(-1) at room temperature) and a very high resolution (ΔK/K = 10(-3)). A transducer (heater/thermometer) centered on the membrane is used to create an oscillation of the heat flux and to measure the temperature oscillation at the third harmonic using a Wheatstone bridge set-up. Power as low as 0.1 nW has been measured at room temperature. The method has been applied to measure thermal properties of low stress silicon nitride and polycrystalline diamond membranes with thickness ranging from 100 nm to 400 nm. The thermal conductivity measured on the polycrystalline diamond membrane support a significant grain size effect on the thermal transport.

  17. Degradation of graphene coated copper in simulated proton exchange membrane fuel cell environment: Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Y. J.; Anisur, M. R.; Qiu, W.; He, J. J.; Al-Saadi, S.; Singh Raman, R. K.

    2017-09-01

    Metallic materials are most suitable for bipolar plates of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) because they possess the required mechanical strength, durability, gas impermeability, acceptable cost and are suitable for mass production. However, metallic bipolar plates are prone to corrosion or they can passivate under PEMFC environment and interrupt the fuel cell operation. Therefore, it is highly attractive to develop corrosion resistance coating that is also highly conductive. Graphene fits these criteria. Graphene coating is developed on copper by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with an aim to improving corrosion resistance of copper under PEMFC condition. The Raman Spectroscopy shows the graphene coating to be multilayered. The electrochemical degradation of graphene coated copper is investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in 0.5 M H2SO4 solution at room temperature. After exposure to the electrolyte for up to 720 h, the charge transfer resistance (Rt) of the graphene coated copper is ∼3 times greater than that of the bare copper, indicating graphene coatings could improve the corrosion resistance of copper bipolar plates.

  18. Mussel-Inspired Architecture of High-Flux Loose Nanofiltration Membrane Functionalized with Antibacterial Reduced Graphene Oxide-Copper Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Junyong; Wang, Jing; Uliana, Adam Andrew; Tian, Miaomiao; Zhang, Yiming; Zhang, Yatao; Volodin, Alexander; Simoens, Kenneth; Yuan, Shushan; Li, Jian; Lin, Jiuyang; Bernaerts, Kristel; Van der Bruggen, Bart

    2017-08-30

    Graphene-based nanocomposites have a vast potential for wide-ranging antibacterial applications due to the inherently strong biocidal activity and versatile compatibility of such nanocomposites. Therefore, graphene-based functional nanomaterials can introduce enhanced antibiofouling and antimicrobial properties to polymeric membrane surfaces. In this study, reduced graphene oxide-copper (rGOC) nanocomposites were synthesized as newly robust biocides via in situ reduction. Inspired by the emerging method of bridging ultrafiltration membrane surface cavities, loose nanofiltration (NF) membranes were designed using a rapid (2 h) bioinspired strategy in which rGOC nanocomposites were firmly codeposited with polydopamine (PDA) onto an ultrafiltration support. A series of analyses (SEM, EDS, XRD, XPS, TEM, and AFM) confirmed the successful synthesis of the rGO-Cu nanocomposites. The secure loading of rGOC composites onto the membrane surfaces was also confirmed by SEM and AFM images. Water contact angle results display a high surface hydrophilicity of the modified membranes. The PDA-rGOC functionalization layer facilitated a high water permeability (22.8 L m(-2) h(-1) bar(-1)). The PDA-rGOC modification additionally furnished the membrane with superior separation properties advantageous for various NF applications such as dye purification or desalination, as ultrahigh (99.4% for 0.5 g L(-1) reactive blue 2) dye retention and high salt permeation (7.4% for 1.0 g L(-1) Na2SO4, 2.5% for 1.0 g L(-1) NaCl) was achieved by the PDA-rGOC-modified membranes. Furthermore, after 3 h of contact with Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria, the rGOC-functionalized membranes exhibited a strong antibacterial performance with a 97.9% reduction in the number of live E. coli. This study highlights the use of rGOC composites for devising loose NF membranes with strong antibacterial and separation performance.

  19. Graphene-coated hollow fiber membrane as the cathode in anaerobic electrochemical membrane bioreactors – Effect of configuration and applied voltage on performance and membrane fouling

    KAUST Repository

    Werner, Craig M.

    2015-12-22

    Electrically conductive, graphene-coated hollow-fiber porous membranes were used as cathodes in anaerobic electrochemical membrane bioreactors (AnEMBRs) operated at different applied voltages (0.7 V and 0.9 V) using a new rectangular reactor configuration, compared to a previous tubular design (0.7 V). The onset of biofouling was delayed and minimized in rectangular reactors operated at 0.9 V, compared to those at 0.7 V due to higher rates of hydrogen production. Maximum transmembrane pressures for the rectangular reactor were only 0.10 bar (0.7 V) or 0.05 bar (0.9 V) after 56 days of operation, compared to 0.46 bar (0.7 V) for the tubular reactor after 52 days. The thickness of the membrane biofouling layer was approximately 0.4 µm for rectangular reactors and 4 µm for the tubular reactor. Higher permeate quality (TSS = 0.05 mg/L) was achieved in the rectangular AnEMBR than the tubular AnEMBR (TSS = 17 mg/L), likely due to higher current densities that minimized the accumulation of cells in suspension. These results show that the new rectangular reactor design, which had increased rates of hydrogen production, successfully delayed the onset of cathode biofouling and improved reactor performance.

  20. Graphene-supported platinum catalyst prepared with ionomer as surfactant for anion exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, L.; Zhao, T. S.; An, L.; Zhao, G.; Yan, X. H.; Jung, C. Y.

    2015-02-01

    In this work, we have synthesized an ionomer-coated graphene-supported platinum catalyst for anion exchange membrane fuel cells. Unlike the common surfactant stabilized colloidal method, we employ a home-made anion exchange ionomer (AEI), namely quaternary ammonia poly (2, 6-dimethyl-1, 4-phenylene oxide) (QAPPO), as the surfactant. The AEI coated on reduced graphene oxide (rGO) surfaces serves as a stabilizer to anchor the platinum precursor on rGO surfaces due to electrostatic interactions. As a result, platinum nanoparticles (Pt NPs) can be easily deposited onto rGO surfaces with a uniform distribution. The remarkable feature of the present synthesis method is that the surfactant, the coated AEI, does not need to be removed from the catalyst, but serves as hydroxide-conductive paths in the catalyst layer, leading to enhanced triple phase boundaries. It is demonstrated that the use of the catalyst obtained with the present method enables a H2/O2 AEMFC to yield a peak power density of 264.8 mW cm-2 at 60 °C, which is 30% higher than that produced from the same fuel cell but with the use of the catalyst synthesized by the conventional synthesis method.

  1. Influence of graphene oxide on mechanical, morphological, barrier, and electrical properties of polymer membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ammar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper expresses a short review of research on the effects of graphene oxide (GO as a nanocomposite element on polymer morphology and resulting property modifications including mechanical, barrier, and electrical conductivity. The effects on mechanical enhancement related to stress measurements in particular are a focus of this review. To first order, varying levels of aggregation of GO in different polymer matrices as a result of their weak inter-particle attractive interactions mainly affect the nanocomposite mechanical properties. The near surface dispersion of GO in polymer/GO nanocomposites can be investigated by studying the surface morphology of these nanocomposites using scanning probe microscopy such as atomic force microscope (AFM and scanning electron microscope (SEM. In the bulk, GO dispersion can be studied by wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXD by analyzing the diffraction peaks corresponding to the undispersed GO fraction in the polymer matrix. In terms of an application, we review how the hydrophilicity of graphene oxide and its hydrogen bonding potential can enhance water flux of these nanocomposite materials in membrane applications. Likewise, the electrical conductivity of polymer films and bulk polymers can be advantageously enhanced via the percolative dispersion of GO nanoparticles, but this typically requires some additional chemical treatment of the GO nanoparticles to transform it to reduced GO.

  2. Large-area, conductive and flexible reduced graphene oxide (RGO) membrane fabricated by electrophoretic deposition (EPD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mei; Duong, Le Dai; Oh, Joon-Suk; Mai, Nguyen Thi; Kim, Sanghoon; Hong, Seungchul; Hwang, Taeseon; Lee, Youngkwan; Nam, Jae-Do

    2014-02-12

    A large-area, conductive, and flexible membrane made from the stabilized aqueous solution of reduced graphene oxide (RGO) is successfully fabricated using an electrophoretic deposition (EPD) method. A low-voltage operation of EPD (∼3 volts) allows a robust consolidation of RGO layers desirably aligned in the in-plane direction through the cohesive electrophoretic squeezing force near the current collector. Transferring the deposited RGO layers to arbitrary substrates or achieving as a free-standing form, two methods of "chemical etching" and "electrochemical etching" are developed to detach the RGO layers from the EPD current collector without damaging the deposited RGO. Further reducing the free-standing RGO membrane by thermal annealing up to 1000 °C, a graphite-like architecture is restored (d-spacing at 3.42 Å with C/O ratio at 16.66) and the electrical conductivity increases as high as 5.51 × 10(5) S/m. The tightly-consolidated and securely-detached RGO membrane allows the free-standing and flexible features and highly conductive characteristics, which are further developed during thermal treatment. Because of the facile scale-up nature of the EPD process and RGO solution, the developed methodology has a considerable potential to be applied to various energy storage devices, flexible conductive coatings, and other electrochemical systems.

  3. A nitrogen-doped graphene/gold nanoparticle/formate dehydrogenase bioanode for high power output membrane-less formic acid/O2 biofuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gai, Panpan; Ji, Yusheng; Chen, Yun; Zhu, Cheng; Zhang, Jianrong; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2015-03-21

    A high power output, membrane-less formic acid/O2 enzymatic biofuel cell was fabricated, in which nitrogen-doped graphene was proven to be effective for recycling the NAD(+)/NADH cofactor at a nitrogen-doped graphene/gold nanoparticle/formate dehydrogenase bioanode in the catalytic oxidation of formic acid.

  4. Synthesis and performance of antifouling and self-cleaning polyethersulfone/graphene oxide composite membrane functionalized with photoactive semiconductor catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dizge, Nadir; Gonuldas, Hakan; Ozay, Yasin; Ates, Hasan; Ocakoglu, Kasim; Harputlu, Ersan; Yildirimcan, Saadet; Unyayar, Ali

    2017-02-01

    This study was performed to synthesize membranes of polyethersulfone (PES) blended with graphene oxide (GO) and PES blended with GO functionalized with photoactive semiconductor catalyst (TiO 2 and ZnO). The antifouling and self-cleaning properties of composite membranes were also investigated. The GO was prepared from natural graphite powder by oxidation method at low temperature. TiO 2 and ZnO nanopowders were synthesized by anhydrous sol-gel method. The surface of TiO 2 and ZnO nanopowders was modified by a surfactant (myristic acid) to obtain a homogeneously dispersed mixture in a solvent, and then GO was functionalized by loading with these metal oxide nanopowders. The PES membranes blended with GO and functionalized GO into the casting solution were prepared via phase inversion method and tested for their antifouling as well as self-cleaning properties. The composite membranes were synthesized as 14%wt. of PES polymer with three different concentrations (0.5, 1.0, and 2.0%wt.) of GO, GO-TiO 2 , and GO-ZnO. The functionalization of membranes improved hydrophilicity property of membranes as compared to neat PES membrane. However, the lowest flux was obtained by functionalized membranes with GO-TiO 2 . The results showed that functionalized membranes demonstrated better self-cleaning property than neat PES membrane. Moreover, the flux recovery rate of functionalized membranes over five cycles was higher than that of neat membrane.

  5. Fabrication and characterization of an integrated ionic device from suspended polypyrrole and alamethicin-reconstituted lipid bilayer membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northcutt, Robert; Sundaresan, Vishnu-Baba

    2012-09-01

    Conducting polymers are electroactive materials that undergo conformal relaxation of the polymer backbone in the presence of an electrical field through ion exchange with solid or aqueous electrolytes. This conformal relaxation and the associated morphological changes make conducting polymers highly suitable for actuation and sensing applications. Among smart materials, bioderived active materials also use ion transport for sensing and actuation functions via selective ion transport. The transporter proteins extracted from biological cell membranes and reconstituted into a bilayer lipid membrane in bioderived active materials regulate ion transport for engineering functions. The protein transporter reconstituted in the bilayer lipid membrane is referred to as the bioderived membrane and serves as the active component in bioderived active materials. Inspired by the similarities in the physics of transduction in conducting polymers and bioderived active materials, an integrated ionic device is formed from the bioderived membrane and the conducting polymer membrane. This ionic device is fabricated into a laminated thin-film membrane and a common ion that can be processed by the bioderived and the conducting polymer membranes couple the ionic function of these two membranes. An integrated ionic device, fabricated from polypyrrole (PPy) doped with sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (NaDBS) and an alamethicin-reconstituted DPhPC bilayer lipid membrane, is presented in this paper. A voltage-gated sodium current regulates the electrochemical response in the PPy(DBS) layer. The integrated device is fabricated on silicon-based substrates through microfabrication, electropolymerization, and vesicle fusion, and ionic activity is characterized through electrochemical measurements.

  6. Large scale integration of CVD-graphene based NEMS with narrow distribution of resonance parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjmandi-Tash, Hadi; Allain, Adrien; (Vitto Han, Zheng; Bouchiat, Vincent

    2017-06-01

    We present a novel method for the fabrication of the arrays of suspended micron-sized membranes, based on monolayer pulsed-CVD graphene. Such devices are the source of an efficient integration of graphene nano-electro-mechanical resonators, compatible with production at the wafer scale using standard photolithography and processing tools. As the graphene surface is continuously protected by the same polymer layer during the whole process, suspended graphene membranes are clean and free of imperfections such as deposits, wrinkles and tears. Batch fabrication of 100 μm-long multi-connected suspended ribbons is presented. At room temperature, mechanical resonance of electrostatically-actuated devices show narrow distribution of their characteristic parameters with high quality factor and low effective mass and resonance frequencies, as expected for low stress and adsorbate-free membranes. Upon cooling, a sharp increase of both resonant frequency and quality factor is observed, enabling to extract the thermal expansion coefficient of CVD graphene. Comparison with state-of-the-art graphene NEMS is presented.

  7. Headspace thin-film microextraction onto graphene membranes for specific detection of methyl(cyclopentadienyl)-tricarbonyl manganese in water samples by total reflection X-ray fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, V.; Costas-Mora, I.; Lavilla, I.; Bendicho, C.

    2016-12-01

    In this work, a novel analytical approach for determining methyl(cyclopentadienyl)-tricarbonyl (MMT) by total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) based on its trapping onto unmodified graphene membranes is described. Graphene membranes were synthesized by mild-thermal reduction of graphene oxide following drop-casting onto a glass substrate. High flexible and easy-to-handle graphene membranes with 10 mm diameter were obtained. In order to use the as-prepared membranes as extraction phases for headspace thin-solid film microextraction of MMT, they were fitted to quartz reflectors and placed onto the top of the glass vial containing the sample. Reflectors containing graphene membranes were directly used as sample carriers for TXRF analysis. Different parameters involved in the microextraction step were optimized in order to obtain the best performance. Detection and quantification limits were 18 and 60 ng L- 1 MMT, respectively. An enrichment factor of 265 was obtained. The method was successfully applied for the specific detection of MMT in different water samples and a certified reference material e.g., NWTM-27.2 fortified lake water. A recovery study was carried out on spiked water samples showing recoveries in the range 98-104% with a relative standard deviation of 4% (N = 5). In addition, speciation of manganese, i.e. MMT and Mn(II),in water samples can be accomplished since only volatile MMT is transferred to the headspace and retained onto graphene membranes.

  8. Superhydrophilic graphene oxide@electrospun cellulose nanofiber hybrid membrane for high-efficiency oil/water separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Chenghong; Yuan, Wei; Zhao, Jiangqi; He, Xu; Zhang, Xiaofang; Li, Qingye; Xia, Tian; Zhang, Wei; Lu, Canhui

    2017-11-01

    Inspired from fishscales, membranes with special surface wettability have been applied widely for the treatment of oily waste water. Herein, a novel superhydrophilic graphene oxide (GO)@electrospun cellulose nanofiber (CNF) membrane was successfully fabricated. This membrane exhibited a high separation efficiency, excellent antifouling properties, as well as a high flux for the gravity-driven oil/water separation. Moreover, the GO@CNF membrane was capable to effectively separate oil/water mixtures in a broad pH range or with a high concentration of salt, suggesting that this membrane was quite promising for future real-world practice in oil spill cleanup and oily wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of Graphene and Fullerene Nanofillers on Controlling the Pore Size and Physicochemical Properties of Chitosan Nanocomposite Mesoporous Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene S. Fahim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan (CS nanocomposite mesoporous membranes were fabricated by mixing CS with graphene (G and fullerene (F nanofillers, and the diffusion properties through CS membranes were studied. In addition, in order to enhance the binding between the internal CS chains, physical cross-linking of CS by sodium tripolyphosphate (TPP was carried out. F and G with different weight percentages (0.1, 0.5, and 1 wt.% were added on physically cross-linked chitosan (CLCS and non-cross-linked chitosan (NCLCS membranes by wet mixing. Permeability and diffusion time of CLCS and NCLCS membranes at different temperatures were investigated. The results revealed that the pore size of all fabricated CS membranes is in the mesoporous range (i.e., 2–50 nm. Moreover, the addition of G and F nanofillers to CLCS and NCLCS solutions aided in controlling the CS membranes’ pore size and was found to enhance the barrier effect of the CS membranes either by blocking the internal pores or decreasing the pore size. These results illustrate the significant possibility of controlling the pore size of CS membranes by cross-linking and more importantly the careful selection of nanofillers and their percentage within the CS membranes. Controlling the pore size of CS membranes is a fundamental factor in packaging applications and membrane technology.

  10. Template-Assisted Preparation of Micrometric Suspended Membrane Lattices of Photoluminescent and Non-Photoluminescent Polymers by Capillarity-Driven Solvent Evaporation: Application to Microtagging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polito, Giovanni; Robbiano, Valentina; Cozzi, Chiara; Cacialli, Franco; Barillaro, Giuseppe

    2017-08-21

    In this work, the bottom-up template-assisted preparation of high-density lattices (up to 11 · 106 membranes/cm2) of suspended polymer membranes with micrometric size (in the order of few μm2) and sub-micrometric thickness (in the order of hundreds of nm) is demonstrated for both photoluminescent and non-photoluminescent polymers by capillarity-driven solvent evaporation. Solvent evaporation of low concentration polymer solutions drop-cast on an array of open-ended micropipes is shown to lead to polymer membrane formation at the inlet of the micropipes thanks to capillarity. The method is proven to be robust with high-yield (>98%) over large areas (1 cm2) and of general validity for both conjugated and non-conjugated polymers, e.g. poly(9,9-di-n-octylfluorene-alt-benzothiadiazole (F8BT), poly[2-methoxy-5-(3',7'-dimethyloctyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene] (MDMO-PPV), polystyrene (PS), thus breaking a new ground on the controlled preparation of polymer micro and nanostructures. Angle dependence and thermal stability of photoluminescence emission arising from F8BT membrane lattices was thorough investigated, highlighting a non-Lambertian photoluminescence emission of membrane lattices with respect to F8BT films. The method is eventually successfully applied to the preparation of both photoluminescent and non-photoluminescent micro Quick Response (μQR) codes using different polymers, i.e. F8BT, MDMO-PPV, PS, thus providing micrometric-sized taggants suitable for anti-counterfeiting applications.

  11. Selective Molecular Separation on Ti3C2Tx-Graphene Oxide Membranes during Pressure-Driven Filtration: Comparison with Graphene Oxide and MXenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Kyoung Min; Kim, Dae Woo; Ren, Chang E; Cho, Kyeong Min; Kim, Seon Joon; Choi, Jung Hoon; Nam, Yoon Tae; Gogotsi, Yury; Jung, Hee-Tae

    2017-12-27

    In this work, we prepared 90 nm thick Ti3C2Tx-graphene oxide (GO) membranes laminated on a porous support by mixing GO with Ti3C2Tx. This process was chosen to prevent the penetration of target molecules through inter-edge defects or voids with poor packing. The lattice period of the prepared membrane was 14.28 Å, as being swelled with water, resulting in an effective interlayer spacing of around 5 Å, which corresponds to two layers of water molecules. The composite membranes effectively rejected dye molecules with hydrated radii above 5 Å, as well as positively charged dye molecules, during pressure-driven filtration at 5 bar. Rejection rates were 68% for methyl red, 99.5% for methylene blue, 93.5% for rose Bengal, and 100% for brilliant blue (hydrated radii of 4.87, 5.04, 5.88, and 7.98 Å, respectively). Additionally, the rejections of composite membrane were compared with GO membrane and Ti3C2Tx membrane.

  12. Preparation and characterization of antibacterial electrospun chitosan/poly (vinyl alcohol)/graphene oxide composite nanofibrous membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuai; Lei, Peng; Shan, Yujuan; Zhang, Dawei

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, chitosan (CS)/poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA)/graphene oxide (GO) composite nanofibrous membranes were prepared via electrospinning. Such nanofibrous membranes have been characterized and investigated for their morphological, structural, thermal stability, hydrophilic and antibacterial properties. SEM images showed that the uniform and defect-free nanofibers were obtained and GO sheets, shaping spindle and spherical, were partially embedded into nanofibers. FTIR, XRD, DSC and TGA indicated the good compatibility between CS and PVA. There were strong intermolecular hydrogen bonds between the chitosan and PVA molecules. Contact angle measurement indicated that while increasing the content of GO, the distance between fibers increased and water drop showed wetting state on the surface of nanofibrous membranes. As a result, the contact angle decreased significantly. Meanwhile, good antibacterial activity of the prepared nanofibrous membranes were exhibited against Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus.

  13. Fine-Tuning the Surface of Forward Osmosis Membranes via Grafting Graphene Oxide: Performance Patterns and Biofouling Propensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegab, Hanaa M; ElMekawy, Ahmed; Barclay, Thomas G; Michelmore, Andrew; Zou, Linda; Saint, Christopher P; Ginic-Markovic, Milena

    2015-08-19

    Graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets were attached to the polyamide selective layer of thin film composite (TFC) forward osmosis (FO) membranes through a poly L-Lysine (PLL) intermediary using either layer-by-layer or hybrid (H) grafting strategies. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, zeta potential, and thermogravimetric analysis confirmed the successful attachment of GO/PLL, the surface modification enhancing both the hydrophilicity and smoothness of the membrane's surface demonstrated by water contact angle, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The biofouling resistance of the FO membranes determined using an adenosine triphosphate bioluminescence test showed a 99% reduction in surviving bacteria for GO/PLL-H modified membranes compared to pristine membrane. This antibiofouling property of the GO/PLL-H modified membrane was reflected in reduced flux decline compared to all other samples when filtering brackish water under biofouling conditions. Further, the high density and tightly bound GO nanosheets using the hybrid modification reduced the reverse solute flux compared to the pristine, which reflects improved membrane selectivity. These results illustrate that the GO/PLL-H modification is a valuable addition to improve the performance of FO TFC membranes.

  14. Geometry, mechanics, and electronics of singular structures and wrinkles in graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Vitor M; Castro Neto, A H; Liang, H Y; Mahadevan, L

    2010-10-08

    As the thinnest atomic membrane, graphene presents an opportunity to combine geometry, elasticity, and electronics at the limits of their validity. We describe the transport and electronic structure in the neighborhood of conical singularities, the elementary excitations of the ubiquitous wrinkled and crumpled graphene. We use a combination of atomistic mechanical simulations, analytical geometry, and transport calculations in curved graphene, and exact diagonalization of the electronic spectrum to calculate the effects of geometry on electronic structure, transport, and mobility in suspended samples, and how the geometry-generated pseudomagnetic and pseudoelectric fields might disrupt Landau quantization.

  15. Graphene oxide based nanohybrid proton exchange membranes for fuel cell applications: An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Ravi P; Shukla, Geetanjali; Manohar, Murli; Shahi, Vinod K

    2017-02-01

    In the context of many applications, such as polymer composites, energy-related materials, sensors, 'paper'-like materials, field-effect transistors (FET), and biomedical applications, chemically modified graphene was broadly studied during the last decade, due to its excellent electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties. The presence of reactive oxygen functional groups in the grapheme oxide (GO) responsible for chemical functionalization makes it a good candidate for diversified applications. The main objectives for developing a GO based nanohybrid proton exchange membrane (PEM) include: improved self-humidification (water retention ability), reduced fuel crossover (electro-osmotic drag), improved stabilities (mechanical, thermal, and chemical), enhanced proton conductivity, and processability for the preparation of membrane-electrode assembly. Research carried on this topic may be divided into protocols for covalent grafting of functional groups on GO matrix, preparation of free-standing PEM or choice of suitable polymer matrix, covalent or hydrogen bonding between GO and polymer matrix etc. Herein, we present a brief literature survey on GO based nano-hybrid PEM for fuel cell applications. Different protocols were adopted to produce functionalized GO based materials and prepare their free-standing film or disperse these materials in various polymer matrices with suitable interactions. This review article critically discussed the suitability of these PEMs for fuel cell applications in terms of the dependency of the intrinsic properties of nanohybrid PEMs. Potential applications of these nanohybrid PEMs, and current challenges are also provided along with future guidelines for developing GO based nanohybrid PEMs as promising materials for fuel cell applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A reduced graphene oxide nanofiltration membrane intercalated by well-dispersed carbon nanotubes for drinking water purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xianfu; Qiu, Minghui; Ding, Hao; Fu, Kaiyun; Fan, Yiqun

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we report a promising rGO-CNT hybrid nanofiltration (NF) membrane that was fabricated by loading reduced graphene oxide that was intercalated with carbon nanotubes (rGO-CNTs) onto an anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) microfiltration membrane via a facile vacuum-assisted filtration process. To create this NF membrane, the CNTs were first dispersed using block copolymers (BCPs); the effects of the types and contents of BCPs used on the dispersion of CNTs have been investigated. The as-prepared rGO-CNT hybrid NF membranes were then used for drinking water purification to retain the nanoparticles, dyes, proteins, organophosphates, sugars, and particularly humic acid. Experimentally, it is shown that the rGO-CNT hybrid NF membranes have high retention efficiency, good permeability and good anti-fouling properties. The retention was above 97.3% even for methyl orange (327 Da); for other objects, the retention was above 99%. The membrane's permeability was found to be as high as 20-30 L m-2 h-1 bar-1. Based on these results, we can conclude that (i) the use of BCPs as a surfactant can enhance steric repulsion and thus disperse CNTs effectively; (ii) placing well-dispersed 1D CNTs within 2D graphene sheets allows an uniform network to form, which can provide many mass transfer channels through the continuous 3D nanostructure, resulting in the high permeability and separation performance of the rGO-CNT hybrid NF membranes.In this study, we report a promising rGO-CNT hybrid nanofiltration (NF) membrane that was fabricated by loading reduced graphene oxide that was intercalated with carbon nanotubes (rGO-CNTs) onto an anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) microfiltration membrane via a facile vacuum-assisted filtration process. To create this NF membrane, the CNTs were first dispersed using block copolymers (BCPs); the effects of the types and contents of BCPs used on the dispersion of CNTs have been investigated. The as-prepared rGO-CNT hybrid NF membranes were then used for

  17. Effect of graphene oxide on affinity-immobilization of purple membranes on solid supports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsiu-Mei; Lin, Chi-Jung; Jheng, Kai-Ru; Kosasih, Aline; Chang, Jia-Yaw

    2014-04-01

    The effect of graphene oxide (GO) on the surface fabrication of purple membranes (PM) containing photosensitive bacteriorhodopsin is first reported in this study. GO was initially modified with biotin and then coupled with oxidized avidin to generate a GO-avidin complex, which was subsequently used as a linker to immobilize biotinylated PM (b-PM) onto amine-functionalized supports. Indium-tin-oxide glass coated with the GO-avidin complex was more hydrophilic than the electrode coated only with oxidized avidin, and the successive b-PM adsorption yielded a 1.4-fold higher (410 nA/cm(2)) photoelectric activity. AFM analysis on mica revealed that the GO-avidin complex layer had less surface roughness and dissipation energy than the pure oxidized avidin linker layer. For subsequent b-PM fabrication, GO addition not only reduced the stacking of immobilized b-PM patches but also improved their interior compactness and surface smoothness. This study demonstrates a convenient way to introduce GO into PM fabrication technology to provide enhanced surface morphology and photoelectric activity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Layer-by-layer assembly of graphene oxide on polypropylene macroporous membranes via click chemistry to improve antibacterial and antifouling performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhen-Bei, E-mail: 1021453457@qq.com [The Key Laboratory of Functional Molecular Solids, Ministry of Education, Anhui Key Laboratory of Molecular-Based Materials, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Anhui Normal University, East Beijing Rd. 1, Wuhu, Anhui 241000 (China); Wu, Jing-Jing, E-mail: 957522275@qq.com [The Key Laboratory of Functional Molecular Solids, Ministry of Education, Anhui Key Laboratory of Molecular-Based Materials, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Anhui Normal University, East Beijing Rd. 1, Wuhu, Anhui 241000 (China); Su, Yu, E-mail: 819388710@qq.com [The Key Laboratory of Functional Molecular Solids, Ministry of Education, Anhui Key Laboratory of Molecular-Based Materials, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Anhui Normal University, East Beijing Rd. 1, Wuhu, Anhui 241000 (China); Zhou, Jin, E-mail: zhoujin_ah@163.com [Department of Materials and Chemical Engineering, Chizhou University, Muzhi Rd. 199, Chizhou, Anhui 247000 (China); Gao, Yong, E-mail: 154682180@qq.com [School of Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Jiangsu University of Technology, Changzhou 213001 (China); Yu, Hai-Yin, E-mail: yhy456@mail.ahnu.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Functional Molecular Solids, Ministry of Education, Anhui Key Laboratory of Molecular-Based Materials, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Anhui Normal University, East Beijing Rd. 1, Wuhu, Anhui 241000 (China); Gu, Jia-Shan, E-mail: jiashanG@mail.ahnu.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Functional Molecular Solids, Ministry of Education, Anhui Key Laboratory of Molecular-Based Materials, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Anhui Normal University, East Beijing Rd. 1, Wuhu, Anhui 241000 (China)

    2015-03-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Clickable membrane prepared by photo bromination and S{sub N}2 nucleophilic substitution. • Azide graphene oxide prepared by ring-opening reaction. • Alkyne graphene oxide was prepared via esterification reaction. • Layer-by-layer assembly of graphene oxide on membrane by click chemistry. • Antibacterial and antifouling characteristics were enhanced greatly. - Abstract: Polypropylene is an extensively used membrane material; yet, polypropylene membranes exhibit extremely poor resistance to protein fouling. To ameliorate this issue, graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets were used to modify macroporous polypropylene membrane (MPPM) via layer-by-layer assembly technique through click reaction. First, alkyne-terminated GO was prepared through esterification between carboxyl groups in GO and amide groups in propargylamine; azide-terminated GO was synthesized by the ring-opening reaction of epoxy groups in GO with sodium azide. Second, GO was introduced to the membrane by click chemistry. Characterizations of infrared spectra and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the modification. The sharply decreasing of static water contact angle indicated the improvement of the surface hydrophilicity for GO modified membrane. Introducing GO to the membrane results in a dramatic increase of water flux, improvements in the antifouling characteristics and antibacterial property for the membranes. The pure water flux through the 5-layered GO modified membrane is 1.82 times that through the unmodified one. The water flux restores to 43.0% for the unmodified membrane while to 79.8% for the modified membrane. The relative flux reduction decreases by 32.1% due to GO modification. The antibacterial property was also enhanced by two-thirds. These results demonstrate that the antifouling and antibacterial characteristics can be raised by tethering GO to the membrane surface.

  19. Protecting nickel with graphene spin-filtering membranes: A single layer is enough

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, M.-B.; Dlubak, B.; Piquemal-Banci, M.; Collin, S.; Petroff, F.; Anane, A.; Fert, A.; Seneor, P. [Unité Mixte de Physique CNRS/Thales, 1 Avenue Augustin Fresnel, 91767 Palaiseau, France and Université Paris Sud, 91405 Orsay (France); Weatherup, R. S.; Hofmann, S.; Robertson, J. [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB21PZ (United Kingdom); Yang, H. [IBS Center for Integrated Nanostructure Physics (CINAP), Institute for Basic Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Energy Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Blume, R. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fur Materialien und Energie, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Schloegl, R. [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-07-06

    We report on the demonstration of ferromagnetic spin injectors for spintronics which are protected against oxidation through passivation by a single layer of graphene. The graphene monolayer is directly grown by catalytic chemical vapor deposition on pre-patterned nickel electrodes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that even with its monoatomic thickness, monolayer graphene still efficiently protects spin sources against oxidation in ambient air. The resulting single layer passivated electrodes are integrated into spin valves and demonstrated to act as spin polarizers. Strikingly, the atom-thick graphene layer is shown to be sufficient to induce a characteristic spin filtering effect evidenced through the sign reversal of the measured magnetoresistance.

  20. Sandwich morphology and superior dye-removal performances for nanofiltration membranes self-assemblied via graphene oxide and carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hui; Shi, Jie; Liu, Liyan; Shan, Mingjing; Xu, Zhiwei; Li, Nan; Li, Jing; Lv, Hanming; Qian, Xiaoming; Zhao, Lihuan

    2018-01-01

    To tune interlayer spacing, regulate water channel and improve stability of composite membrane, graphene oxide (GO) and oxidized carbon nanotubes (OCNTs) were assembled alternately to form sandwich morphology on a polyacrylonitrile substrate by layer-by-layer self-assembly technique. Polyelectrolyte played a part in cross-linking between GO and OCNTs. The effects about concentration ratio of GO and OCNTs on nanofiltration performance were investigated in detail. The composite membrane was used for dye rejection. When composite membrane with concentration ratio of GO and OCNTs was 10:1, water flux and rejection rate for methyl blue reached 21.71 L/(m2 h) and 99.3%, respectively. Meanwhile, this composite membrane had higher flux compared with reported literatures in which rejection also reached up to 99%. When concentration ratio of composite membranes about GO and OCNTs were 10:1 and 15:1, dye rejection for methyl blue remained 99.3% and 99.6% respectively after operating time of 50 h. Irreversible fouling ratio of composite membrane in a concentration ratio of 10:1 was only 4.4%, indicating that composite membrane had excellent antifouling performance for Bovine Serum Albumin. It was speculated that proper distribution of OCNTs in the sandwich morphology formed proper support points and water channels which benefited for a more stable performance.

  1. Preparation of graphene oxide modified poly(m-phenylene isophthalamide) nanofiltration membrane with improved water flux and antifouling property

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mei; Zhao, Changwei; Zhang, Shaofeng; Li, Pei; Hou, Deyin

    2017-02-01

    Poly (m-phenylene isophthalamide)/graphene oxide (PMIA/GO) composite nanofiltartion (NF) membranes were prepared via a facile phase inversion method. Structures, surface properties and hydrophilicities of the membrane were analyzed using FT-IR, XPS, AFM, SEM, water contact angle and Zeta-potential measurements. FTIR spectra indicated the existence of hydrophilic carboxylic acid and hydroxyl groups in the GO molecules. SEM pictures revealed the large and finger-like micro-voids formed in the sublayer of the NF membranes after adding GO. The zeta-potential and water contact angle results proved that PMIA/GO composite membranes had more negatively charged and greater hydrophilic surfaces. The pure water flux of the PMIA/GO (0.3 wt% GO) composite membrane (125.2 (L/m2/h)) was 2.6 times as high as that of the pristine PMIA NF membrane (48.3 (L/m2/h)) at 0.8 MPa with slightly higher rejections to all tested dyes and better fouling resistance to bovine serum albumin (BSA). This study gave an effective method for preparing composite PMIA NF membranes with high water flux and excellent antifouling property, which showed potential application in water treatment.

  2. Flame Retardancy Effects of Graphene Nanoplatelet/Carbon Nanotube Hybrid Membranes on Carbon Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongxian Zhuo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotube/graphene nanoplatelet (MWCNT/GNP hybrid membranes with lower liquid permeability and better barrier effect compared to MWCNT membranes were successfully synthesized by vacuum filtering. Their morphologies, water permeability, and pore structures were characterized by a scanning electron microscope (SEM and nitrogen adsorption isotherms. Furthermore, MWCNT/GNP membranes were used to improve the flame retardancy of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP composites, and the influence of weight percentage of GNPs on the permeability and flame retardancy of MWCNT/GNP membranes was systematically investigated. Results show that incorporation of MWCNT/GNP membranes on CFRP composite plates can remarkably improve the flame retardancy of CFRP composites. Specifically, the incorporation of hierarchical MWCNT/GNP membrane with 7.5 wt% of GNP displays a 35% reduction in the peak heat release rate (PHRR for a CFRP composite plate with the epoxy as matrix and a 11% reduction in PHRR compared with the incorporation of MWCNT membrane only. A synergistic flame retarding mechanism is suggested to be attributed to these results, which includes controlling the pore size and penetrative network structure.

  3. APPLICATION OF MEMBRANES FROM POLYACRYLONITRITE DOPPED WITH GRAPHEN OXIDE IN PURIFICATION OF INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATER GENERATED DURING PROCESSING OF METALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Turek

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of research on the use of composite membranes of polyacrylonitrile (PAN doped with graphene oxide (GO to remove contaminations of galvanic wastewater. Membranes were obtained using phase inversion method from PAN and GO solution in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF. Wastewater was pre-treated with the flocculant Magnafloc®336. Next, ultrafiltration of the treated wastewater was carried out in the ultrafiltration cell AMICON on the previously prepared PAN/GO composite membranes. Physico-chemical properties and composition of solutions before and after integrated purification process were analyzed by UV-Vis spectrophotometer and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS. As a result of flocculation from wastewater there have been removed phosphates (97%, chlorides (5,2%, sulfates (5,9% and iron (82%. In addition, as a result of ultrafiltration was complete removal of phosphate anions (100% and iron (~91-92%, zinc (68÷84%, lead (65-98% and cadmium (~67%.

  4. Graphene Coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoot, Adam Carsten; Camilli, Luca; Bøggild, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Owing to its remarkable electrical and mechanical properties, graphene has been attracting tremendous interest in materials science. In particular, its chemical stability and impermeability make it a promising protective membrane. However, recent investigations reveal that single layer graphene...... cannot be used as a barrier in the long run, due to galvanic corrosion phenomena arising when oxygen or water penetrate through graphene cracks or domain boundaries. Here, we overcome this issue by using a multilayered (ML) graphene coating. Our lab- as well as industrial-scale tests demonstrate that ML...... graphene can effectively protect Ni in harsh environments, even after long term exposure. This is made possible by the presence of a high number of graphene layers, which can efficiently mask the cracks and domain boundaries defects found in individual layers of graphene. Our findings thus show...

  5. Far-field and near-field monitoring of hybridized optical modes from Au nanoprisms suspended on a graphene/Si nanopillar array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nien, Li-Wei; Chen, Kai; Dao, Thang Duy; Ishii, Satoshi; Hsueh, Chun-Hway; Nagao, Tadaaki

    2017-11-09

    The optical hybridization of localized surface plasmons and photonic modes of dielectric nanostructures provides us wide arenas of opportunities for designing tunable nanophotonics with excellent spectral selectivity, signal enhancement, and light harvesting for many optical applications. Graphene-supported Au nanoprisms on a periodic Si nanopillar array will be an ideal model system for examining such an optical hybridization effect between plasmonic modes and photonic modes. Here, through the measurement of the reflectance spectra as well as graphene phonons by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), we investigated both the far-field and near-field properties of these optically hybridized modes. The effects of photonic modes and Mie resonances of the Si nanopillars on the localized surface plasmons of the Au nanoprisms and on their near-field enhancement were experimentally elucidated through the measurements of graphene phonons using two excitation lasers with wavelengths of 532 and 785 nm. The wavelength-dependent SERS intensities of monolayer graphene are clearly understood in terms of the optical hybridization, and the SERS enhancement factor estimated from finite-difference time-domain simulations exhibited good agreement with the measurements. The elucidated spectral tunability in the near-field light-matter interaction would be useful for potential applications in various types of graphene-based photonics.

  6. Optimized permeation and antifouling of PVDF hybrid ultrafiltration membranes: synergistic effect of dispersion and migration for fluorinated graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingming; Shi, Jie; Chen, Cheng; Li, Nan; Xu, Zhiwei; Li, Jing; Lv, Hanming; Qian, Xiaoming; Jiao, Xiaoning

    2017-03-01

    Nanoparticles may have suffered from low modification efficiency in hybrid membranes due to embedding and aggregating in polymer matrix. In order to analyze the modification mechanisms of nanoparticle migration and dispersion on the properties of hybrid membranes, we designed different F/ O ratios ( R F/ O ) of fluorinated graphene oxide (FGO, diameter = 1.5 17.5 μm) by carbon tetrafluoride (CF4) plasma treatment GO for 3, 5, 10, 15, and 20 min and successfully prepared novel PVDF hybrid membranes containing FGO via the phase inversion method. After a prolonged plasma treatment, the R F/ O of FGO was enhanced sharply, indicating an increasing compatibility of FGO with the matrix, especially FGO-20 (GO treated for 20 min). FGO contents in the top layer, sublayer, and the whole of membranes were probed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy-dispersive spectrometer, and indirect computation, respectively. In the top layer of membranes, FGO contents declined from 13.14 wt% (PVDF/GO) to 4.00 wt% (PVDF/FGO-10) and 1.96 wt% (PVDF/FGO-20) due to the reduced migration ability of FGO. It is worth mentioning that PVDF/FGO-10 membranes exhibited an excellent water flux and flux recovery rate (up to 406.90 L m-2 h-1 and 88.9%), which were improved by 67.3% and 14.6% and 52.5% and 24.0% compared with those of PVDF/GO and PVDF/FGO-20 membranes, respectively, although the dispersion and migration ability of FGO-10 was maintained at a moderate level. It indicated that the migration and dispersion of FGO in membranes could result in dynamic equilibrium, which played a key role in making the best use of nanomaterials to optimize membrane performance.

  7. Three-Dimensional Graphene Matrix-Supported and Thylakoid Membrane-Based High-Performance Bioelectrochemical Solar Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pankratova, Galina; Pankratov, Dmitrii; Di Bari, Chiara

    2018-01-01

    A combination of thylakoid membranes (TMs) as photobiocatalysts with high-surface-area electroactive materials could hold great potential for sustainable “green” solar energy conversion. We have studied the orientated immobilization of TMs on high-surface-area graphene electrodes, which were...... generated by the optimized mediator-free TM-based bioanodes yielded up to 5.24 ± 0.50 μA cm−2. The photobioelectrochemical cell integrating the photobioanode in combination with an oxygen reducing enzymatic biocathode delivered a maximum power output of 1.79 ± 0.19 μW cm−2. Our approach ensures a simplified...

  8. Efficient performance and the microbial community changes of submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor in treatment of sewage containing cellulose suspended solid at 25°C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Ryoya; Nie, Yulun; Takahashi, Shintaro; Wakahara, Shinichiro; Li, Yu-You

    2016-09-01

    Influence of cellulose as suspended solid (SS) on the performance of submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (SAnMBR) was evaluated at 25°C using two types of synthetic sewage (SS contained or not). During the 110days operation, COD and BOD removal, CH4 gas recovery and cellulose accumulation were investigated in detail. The influence of cellulose as SS in sewage on the SAnMBR performance was not significant at HRT longer than12h and 65-72% of the influent COD was recovered as methane gas at HRT of 12h. At HRT of 6h, the quality of effluent got worse and the accumulation of cellulose was found in reactor. 16S rRNA analysis revealed that the microbial diversity distribution including Archaea and Bacteria changed due to the addition of SS in sewage and specific microbe for cellulose degradation such as Proteobacteria was detected. Sludge in SAnMBR could acclimate to characteristics of sewage by self-adaptation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Unimpeded permeation of water through biocidal graphene oxide sheets anchored on to 3D porous polyolefinic membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mural, Prasanna Kumar S.; Jain, Shubham; Kumar, Sachin; Madras, Giridhar; Bose, Suryasarathi

    2016-04-01

    3D porous membranes were developed by etching one of the phases (here PEO, polyethylene oxide) from melt-mixed PE/PEO binary blends. Herein, we have systematically discussed the development of these membranes using X-ray micro-computed tomography. The 3D tomograms of the extruded strands and hot-pressed samples revealed a clear picture as to how the morphology develops and coarsens over a function of time during post-processing operations like compression molding. The coarsening of PE/PEO blends was traced using X-ray micro-computed tomography and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of annealed blends at different times. It is now understood from X-ray micro-computed tomography that by the addition of a compatibilizer (here lightly maleated PE), a stable morphology can be visualized in 3D. In order to anchor biocidal graphene oxide sheets onto these 3D porous membranes, the PE membranes were chemically modified with acid/ethylene diamine treatment to anchor the GO sheets which were further confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and surface Raman mapping. The transport properties through the membrane clearly reveal unimpeded permeation of water which suggests that anchoring GO on to the membranes does not clog the pores. Antibacterial studies through the direct contact of bacteria with GO anchored PE membranes resulted in 99% of bacterial inactivation. The possible bacterial inactivation through physical disruption of the bacterial cell wall and/or reactive oxygen species (ROS) is discussed herein. Thus this study opens new avenues in designing polyolefin based antibacterial 3D porous membranes for water purification.3D porous membranes were developed by etching one of the phases (here PEO, polyethylene oxide) from melt-mixed PE/PEO binary blends. Herein, we have systematically discussed the development of these membranes using X-ray micro-computed tomography. The 3D tomograms of the extruded strands and

  10. Thin, High-Flux, Self-Standing, Graphene Oxide Membranes for Efficient Hydrogen Separation from Gas Mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouša, Daniel; Friess, Karel; Pilnáček, Kryštof; Vopička, Ondřej; Lanč, Marek; Fónod, Kristián; Pumera, Martin; Sedmidubský, David; Luxa, Jan; Sofer, Zdeněk

    2017-08-22

    The preparation and gas-separation performance of self-standing, high-flux, graphene oxide (GO) membranes is reported. Defect-free, 15-20 μm thick, mechanically stable, unsupported GO membranes exhibited outstanding gas-separation performance towards H2 /CO2 that far exceeded the corresponding 2008 Robeson upper bound. Remarkable separation efficiency of GO membranes for H2 and bulky C3 or C4 hydrocarbons was achieved with high flux and good selectivity at the same time. On the contrary, N2 and CH4 molecules, with larger kinetic diameter and simultaneously lower molecular weight, relative to that of CO2 , remained far from the corresponding H2 /N2 or H2 /CH4 upper bounds. Pore size distribution analysis revealed that the most abundant pores in GO material were those with an effective pore diameter of 4 nm; therefore, gas transport is not exclusively governed by size sieving and/or Knudsen diffusion, but in the case of CO2 was supplemented by specific interactions through 1) hydrogen bonding with carboxyl or hydroxyl functional groups and 2) the quadrupole moment. The self-standing GO membranes presented herein demonstrate a promising route towards the large-scale fabrication of high-flux, hydrogen-selective gas membranes intended for the separation of H2 /CO2 or H2 /alkanes. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Detection of Guanine and Adenine Using an Aminated Reduced Graphene Oxide Functional Membrane-Modified Glassy Carbon Electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Li

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A new electrochemical sensor based on a Nafion, aminated reduced graphene oxide and chitosan functional membrane-modified glassy carbon electrode was proposed for the simultaneous detection of adenine and guanine. Fourier transform-infrared spectrometry (FTIR, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and electrochemical methods were utilized for the additional characterization of the membrane materials. The prepared electrode was utilized for the detection of guanine (G and adenine (A. The anodic peak currents to G and A were linear in the concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 120 μM and 0.2 to 110 μM, respectively. The detection limits were found to be 0.1 μM and 0.2 μM, respectively. Moreover, the modified electrode could also be used to determine G and A in calf thymus DNA.

  12. Suspended microfluidics

    OpenAIRE

    Casavant, Benjamin P.; Berthier, Erwin; Theberge, Ashleigh B.; Jean BERTHIER; Montanez-Sauri, Sara I.; Bischel, Lauren L.; Brakke, Kenneth; Hedman, Curtis J.; Bushman, Wade; Keller, Nancy P.; Beebe, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Although the field of microfluidics has made significant progress in bringing new tools to address biological questions, the accessibility and adoption of microfluidics within the life sciences are still limited. Open microfluidic systems have the potential to lower the barriers to adoption, but the absence of robust design rules has hindered their use. Here, we present an open microfluidic platform, suspended microfluidics, that uses surface tension to fill and maintain a fluid in microscale...

  13. Effect of incorporating graphene oxide and surface imprinting on polysulfone membranes on flux, hydrophilicity and rejection of salt and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibechu, Rose Waithiegeni; Ndinteh, Derek Tantoh; Msagati, Titus Alfred Makudali; Mamba, Bhekie Briliance; Sampath, S.

    2017-08-01

    We report a significant enhancement of hydrophillity of polysulfone (Psf) membranes after modification with graphene oxide (GO) as a filler followed by surface imprinting on the surface of GO/Psf composite imprinted membranes (CIMs). The surface imprinting on the GO-Psf membrane was employed in order to enhance its selectivity towards polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in water. The CIMs were prepared through a process of phase inversion of a mixture of graphene oxide and polysulfone (Psf) in N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP). Fourier-transform spectroscopy (FT-IR) of the imprinted showed new peaks at 935 cm-1 and 1638 cm-1 indicating success in surface imprinting on the GO-Psf membrane. The CIM also showed improvement in flux from 8.56 LM-2 h-1 of unmodified polysulfone membrane to 15.3 LM-2 h-1 in the CIM, salt rejection increased from 57.2 ± 4.2% of polysulfone membrane to 76 ± 4.5%. The results obtained from the contact angle measurements showed a decrease with increase in GO content from 72 ± 2.7% of neat polysulfone membrane to 62.3 ± 2.1% of CIM indicating an improvement in surface hydrophilicity. The results from this study shows that, it is possible to improve the hydrophilicity of the membranes without affecting the performance of the membranes.

  14. Graphene: A membrane with steadily improving charge and spin transport properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beschoten, Bernd

    Long electron spin lifetimes are an important prerequisite for enabling advanced spintronic devices. In this respect the 1-ns benchmark is of high technological interest as it marks the threshold at which manipulation of spins with electrical high frequency technology becomes feasible (1 ns 1 GHz). For a long time, the measured spin lifetimes were shorter than 1 ns. Here we report on a major improvement in device fabrication which pushes the spin lifetimes to 12.6 ns in single layer graphene spin transport devices at room temperature which results in spin diffusion lengths as long as 30.5 μm. This is accomplished by the fabrication of Co/MgO-electrodes on a Si/SiO2 substrate and the subsequent dry transfer of a graphene/hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) stack on top of this electrode structure where a large hBN flake is needed in order to diminish the ingress of solvents along the hBN-to-substrate interface. We demonstrate that the spin lifetime does not depend on the contact resistance area products in these devices, indicating that spin absorption at the contacts is not the predominant source for spin dephasing which may pave the way towards probing intrinsic spin properties of graphene. In the second part, we summarize our effort to replace natural by synthetically grown graphene. We report on an advanced transfer technique that allows both reusing the copper substrate of the CVD graphene growth process and making devices with carrier mobilities as high as three million cm2/(Vs) thus rivaling exfoliated ''natural'' graphene. This material quality allows truly ballistic experiments with electron mean free paths exceeding 28 μm which brings novel electron-optic devices into reach. In collaboration with M. Drögeler, C. Franzen, F. Volmer, L. Banszerus, M. Schmitz, S. Engels, J. Dauber, M. Goldsche, M. Oellers, T. Pohlmann, M. Wolter, F. Haupt, K. Watanabe, T. Taniguchi, and C. Stampfer.

  15. Sulfonated Holey Graphene Oxide (SHGO) Filled Sulfonated Poly(ether ether ketone) Membrane: The Role of Holes in the SHGO in Improving Its Performance as Proton Exchange Membrane for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhong-Jie; Jiang, Zhongqing; Tian, Xiaoning; Luo, Lijuan; Liu, Meilin

    2017-06-14

    Sulfonated holey graphene oxides (SHGOs) have been synthesized by the etching of sulfonated graphene oxides with concentrated HNO 3 under the assistance of ultrasonication. These SHGOs could be used as fillers for the sulfonated aromatic poly(ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) membrane. The obtained SHGO-incorporated SPEEK membrane has a uniform and dense structure, exhibiting higher performance as proton exchange membranes (PEMs), for instance, higher proton conductivity, lower activation energy for proton conduction, and comparable methanol permeability, as compared to Nafion 112. The sulfonated graphitic structure of the SHGOs is believed to be one of the crucial factors resulting in the higher performance of the SPEEK/SHGO membrane, since it could increase the local density of the -SO 3 H groups in the membrane and induce a strong interfacial interaction between SHGO and the SPEEK matrix, which improve the proton conductivity and lower the swelling ratio of the membrane, respectively. Additionally, the proton conductivity of the membrane could be further enhanced by the presence of the holes in the graphitic planes of the SHGOs, since it provides an additional channel for transport of the protons. When used, direct methanol fuel cell with the SPEEK/SHGO membrane is found to exhibit much higher performance than that with Nafion 112, suggesting potential use of the SPEEK/SHGO membrane as the PEMs.

  16. Optimized permeation and antifouling of PVDF hybrid ultrafiltration membranes: synergistic effect of dispersion and migration for fluorinated graphene oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Mingming; Shi, Jie; Chen, Cheng; Li, Nan; Xu, Zhiwei, E-mail: xuzhiwei@tjpu.edu.cn; Li, Jing; Lv, Hanming; Qian, Xiaoming, E-mail: qianxiaoming@tjpu.edu.cn; Jiao, Xiaoning [Tianjin Polytechnic University, State Key Laboratory of Separation Membranes and Membrane Processes, School of Textiles (China)

    2017-03-15

    Nanoparticles may have suffered from low modification efficiency in hybrid membranes due to embedding and aggregating in polymer matrix. In order to analyze the modification mechanisms of nanoparticle migration and dispersion on the properties of hybrid membranes, we designed different F/O ratios (R{sub F/O}) of fluorinated graphene oxide (FGO, diameter = 1.5 ~ 17.5 μm) by carbon tetrafluoride (CF{sub 4}) plasma treatment GO for 3, 5, 10, 15, and 20 min and successfully prepared novel PVDF hybrid membranes containing FGO via the phase inversion method. After a prolonged plasma treatment, the R{sub F/O} of FGO was enhanced sharply, indicating an increasing compatibility of FGO with the matrix, especially FGO-20 (GO treated for 20 min). FGO contents in the top layer, sublayer, and the whole of membranes were probed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy-dispersive spectrometer, and indirect computation, respectively. In the top layer of membranes, FGO contents declined from 13.14 wt% (PVDF/GO) to 4.00 wt% (PVDF/FGO-10) and 1.96 wt% (PVDF/FGO-20) due to the reduced migration ability of FGO. It is worth mentioning that PVDF/FGO-10 membranes exhibited an excellent water flux and flux recovery rate (up to 406.90 L m{sup −2} h{sup −1} and 88.9%), which were improved by 67.3% and 14.6% and 52.5% and 24.0% compared with those of PVDF/GO and PVDF/FGO-20 membranes, respectively, although the dispersion and migration ability of FGO-10 was maintained at a moderate level. It indicated that the migration and dispersion of FGO in membranes could result in dynamic equilibrium, which played a key role in making the best use of nanomaterials to optimize membrane performance.

  17. 18-Crown[6]ether functionalized reduced graphene oxide for membrane-free ion selective sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Gunnar; Ulstrup, Jens; Chi, Qijin

    The focus of this work is on the synthesis of a 1-Aza-18-crown[6]ether functionalized reduced graphene oxide (RGO-crown[6]) with specific K+ binding sites on the RGO surface. Glassy carbon electrodes (GCE) functionalized with RGO-crown[6] weretested for selective potentiometric sensing of K...

  18. The hybrid nanobiointerface between nitrogen-doped graphene oxide and lipid membranes: a theoretical and experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Di Pietro

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we present a comparison between graphene oxide (GO and nitrogen-doped GO (N-GO in terms of spectroscopic properties and biomolecule-binding potentiality features. Specifically, GO nanosheets, both in aqueous dispersion and in solid state, were successfully modified with different amino-containing moieties, in order to obtain graphene-based nanostructures able to respond to chemical stimuli (e.g., pH and with tunable surface properties. The physisorption of dye-labelled lipid vesicles loaded with curcumin, was scrutinised both theoretically and experimentally. The energetics of the hybrid lipid membrane-curcumin-GO interface at different pH values, representative respectively of physiological (7.4 and pathological (5.5 environment, were estimated by molecular dynamics (MD simulations. The GO and GO-N samples characterization by Raman, fluorescence, and UV-vis spectroscopies, as well as confocal microscopy demonstrated promising features of the (N-GO/lipid platforms for fluorescence imaging and drug delivery applications.

  19. Integrating nanohybrid membranes of reduced graphene oxide: chitosan: silica sol gel with fiber optic SPR for caffeine detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Ravi; Tabassum, Rana; Gupta, Banshi D.

    2017-05-01

    Caffeine is the most popular psychoactive drug consumed in the world for improving alertness and enhancing wakefulness. However, caffeine consumption beyond limits can result in lot of physiological complications in human beings. In this work, we report a novel detection scheme for caffeine integrating nanohybrid membranes of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) in chitosan modified silica sol gel (rGO: chitosan: silica sol gel) with fiber optic surface plasmon resonance. The chemically synthesized nanohybrid membrane forming the sensing route has been dip coated over silver coated unclad central portion of an optical fiber. The sensor works on the mechanism of modification of dielectric function of sensing layer on exposure to analyte solution which is manifested in terms of red shift in resonance wavelength. The concentration of rGO in polymer network of chitosan and silica sol gel and dipping time of the silver coated probe in the solution of nanohybrid membrane have been optimized to extricate the supreme performance of the sensor. The optimized sensing probe possesses a reasonably good sensitivity and follows an exponentially declining trend within the entire investigating range of caffeine concentration. The sensor boasts of an unparalleled limit of detection value of 1.994 nM and works well in concentration range of 0-500 nM with a response time of 16 s. The impeccable sensor methodology adopted in this work combining fiber optic SPR with nanotechnology furnishes a novel perspective for caffeine determination in commercial foodstuffs and biological fluids.

  20. Integrating nanohybrid membranes of reduced graphene oxide: chitosan: silica sol gel with fiber optic SPR for caffeine detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Ravi; Tabassum, Rana; Gupta, Banshi D

    2017-05-12

    Caffeine is the most popular psychoactive drug consumed in the world for improving alertness and enhancing wakefulness. However, caffeine consumption beyond limits can result in lot of physiological complications in human beings. In this work, we report a novel detection scheme for caffeine integrating nanohybrid membranes of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) in chitosan modified silica sol gel (rGO: chitosan: silica sol gel) with fiber optic surface plasmon resonance. The chemically synthesized nanohybrid membrane forming the sensing route has been dip coated over silver coated unclad central portion of an optical fiber. The sensor works on the mechanism of modification of dielectric function of sensing layer on exposure to analyte solution which is manifested in terms of red shift in resonance wavelength. The concentration of rGO in polymer network of chitosan and silica sol gel and dipping time of the silver coated probe in the solution of nanohybrid membrane have been optimized to extricate the supreme performance of the sensor. The optimized sensing probe possesses a reasonably good sensitivity and follows an exponentially declining trend within the entire investigating range of caffeine concentration. The sensor boasts of an unparalleled limit of detection value of 1.994 nM and works well in concentration range of 0-500 nM with a response time of 16 s. The impeccable sensor methodology adopted in this work combining fiber optic SPR with nanotechnology furnishes a novel perspective for caffeine determination in commercial foodstuffs and biological fluids.

  1. Platinum Nanoparticles Strongly Bonded to Freestanding Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibado, Paul; Schoelz, J. K.; Ghosh, P. K.; Thompson, J.; Dong, L.; Neek-Amal, M.; Peeters, F. M.

    2015-03-01

    Freestanding graphene membranes were successfully functionalized with platinum nanoparticles (Pt NPs). The membranes were imaged using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, revealing a homogeneous distribution of uniformly sized, single-crystal Pt NPs that exhibit a preferred orientation and nearest-neighbor distance. The Pt NPs were also found to be partially elevated by the graphene substrate, as deduced from atomic-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images. Furthermore, the electrostatic force between the STM tip and sample was utilized to estimate the binding energy of the Pt NPs to the suspended graphene. Local strain accumulation due to strong sp3 bond formation is thought to be the origin of the Pt NP self-organization. Such detailed insight into the atomic nature of this functionalized system was only possible through the cooperation of dual microscopic techniques combined with molecular dynamics simulations. The findings are expected to shape future approaches to develop high-performance electronics based on nanoparticle-functionalized graphene as well as fuel cells using Pt NP catalysts. Financial support provided by the Office of Naval Research under Grant No. N00014-10-1-0181 and the National Science Foundation under Grant No. DMR-0855358.

  2. Suppression of intrinsic roughness in encapsulated graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Joachim Dahl; Gunst, Tue; Gregersen, Søren Schou; Gammelgaard, Lene; Jessen, Bjarke Sørensen; Mackenzie, David M. A.; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Bøggild, Peter; Booth, Timothy J.

    2017-07-01

    Roughness in graphene is known to contribute to scattering effects which lower carrier mobility. Encapsulating graphene in hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) leads to a significant reduction in roughness and has become the de facto standard method for producing high-quality graphene devices. We have fabricated graphene samples encapsulated by hBN that are suspended over apertures in a substrate and used noncontact electron diffraction measurements in a transmission electron microscope to measure the roughness of encapsulated graphene inside such structures. We furthermore compare the roughness of these samples to suspended bare graphene and suspended graphene on hBN. The suspended heterostructures display a root mean square (rms) roughness down to 12 pm, considerably less than that previously reported for both suspended graphene and graphene on any substrate and identical within experimental error to the rms vibrational amplitudes of carbon atoms in bulk graphite. Our first-principles calculations of the phonon bands in graphene/hBN heterostructures show that the flexural acoustic phonon mode is localized predominantly in the hBN layer. Consequently, the flexural displacement of the atoms in the graphene layer is strongly suppressed when it is supported by hBN, and this effect increases when graphene is fully encapsulated.

  3. Realizing Synchronous Energy Harvesting and Ion Separation with Graphene Oxide Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Pengzhan; Zheng, Feng; Zhu, Miao; Wang, Kunlin; Zhong, Minlin; Wu, Dehai; Zhu, Hongwei

    2014-07-01

    A synchronous ion separation and electricity generation process has been developed using G-O membranes. In addition to the size effect proposed prevsiouly, the separation of ions can be attributed to the different interactions between ions and G-O membranes; the generation of electricity is due to the confinement of G-O membranes, and the mobility difference of ions. Efficient energy transduction has been achieved with G-O membranes, converting magnetic, thermal and osmotic energy to electricity, distinguishing this material from other commercial semi-permeable membranes. Our study indicated that G-O membranes could find potential applications in the purification of wastewater, while producing electricity simultaneously. With G-O membranes, industrial magnetic leakage and waste heat could also be used to produce electricity, affording a superior approach for energy recovery.

  4. Graphene as membrane for encapsulation of yeast cells: protective and electrically conducting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempaiah, Ravindra; Salgado, Shehan; Chung, Wai L; Maheshwari, Vivek

    2011-11-07

    Graphene sheets (chemically reduced), a high modulus and high thermal and electrically conductive material are coupled with yeast cells to form an encapsulating inorganic functional layer. The coupling of the high modulus sheets with the cells increases their stability to osmotic stresses. The sheets also allow the direct visualization of the cells in an electron microscope. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  5. Reduced graphene oxide-NH2 modified low pressure nanofiltration composite hollow fiber membranes with improved water flux and antifouling capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xipeng; Zhao, Changwei; Yang, Mei; Yang, Bin; Hou, Deyin; Wang, Tao

    2017-10-01

    Reduced graphene oxide-NH2 (R-GO-NH2), a kind of amino graphene oxide, was embedded into the polyamide (PA) layer of nanofiltration (NF) composite hollow fiber membranes via interfacial polymerization to enhance the permeate flux and antifouling properties of NF membranes under low pressure conditions. In addition, it could mitigate the poor compatibility issue between graphene oxide materials and PA layer. To evaluate the influence of R-GO-NH2 on the performance of the NF composite hollow fiber membrane, SEM, AFM, FTIR, XPS and Zeta potentials were used to characterize the membranes. The results indicated that the compatibility and interactions between R-GO-NH2 and PA layer were enhanced, which was mainly due to the polymerization reaction between amino groups of R-GO-NH2 and acyl chloride groups of TMC. Therefore, salts rejection of the current membranes was improved significantly, and the modified membranes with 50 mg/L R-GO-NH2 demonstrated highest performance in terms of the rejections, which were 26.9%, 98.5%, 98.1%, and 96.1%, for NaCl, Na2SO4, MgSO4, and CaCl2 respectively. It was found that with the R-GO-NH2 contents rasing from 0 to 50 mg/L, pure water flux increased from 30.44 ± 1.71 to 38.57 ± 2.01 L/(m2.h) at 2 bar. What's more, the membrane demonstrated improved antifouling properties.

  6. Membrane/mediator-free rechargeable enzymatic biofuel cell utilizing graphene/single-wall carbon nanotube cogel electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Alan S; Jeong, Yeon Joo; Geier, Steven M; Koepsel, Richard R; Russell, Alan J; Islam, Mohammad F

    2015-02-25

    Enzymatic biofuel cells (EBFCs) utilize enzymes to convert chemical energy present in renewable biofuels into electrical energy and have shown much promise in the continuous powering of implantable devices. Currently, however, EBFCs are greatly limited in terms of power and operational stability with a majority of reported improvements requiring the inclusion of potentially toxic and unstable electron transfer mediators or multicompartment systems separated by a semipermeable membrane resulting in complicated setups. We report on the development of a simple, membrane/mediator-free EBFC utilizing novel electrodes of graphene and single-wall carbon nanotube cogel. These cogel electrodes had large surface area (∼ 800 m(2) g(-1)) that enabled high enzyme loading, large porosity for unhindered glucose transport and moderate electrical conductivity (∼ 0.2 S cm(-1)) for efficient charge collection. Glucose oxidase and bilirubin oxidase were physically adsorbed onto these electrodes to form anodes and cathodes, respectively, and the EBFC produced power densities up to 0.19 mW cm(-2) that correlated to 0.65 mW mL(-1) or 140 mW g(-1) of GOX with an open circuit voltage of 0.61 V. Further, the electrodes were rejuvenated by a simple wash and reloading procedure. We postulate these porous and ultrahigh surface area electrodes will be useful for biosensing applications, and will allow reuse of EBFCs.

  7. Magnetic field intensity and graphene concentration effects on electrical and rheological properties of MREs-based membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bica, I.; Anitas, E. M.

    2017-10-01

    Electric capacitors are manufactured having as dielectric materials cotton fabric-based membranes reinforced with silicone oil (20 % {{vol}}), carbonyl iron (20 % {{vol}}), graphene nanoparticles (nGr; {{Φ }}=0 % ,4 % ,8 % ,12 % ,16 % and respectively 20 % {{vol}}) and silicone rubber (60 % ,56 % ,52 % ,48 % ,44 % and respectively 40 % {{vol}}). The equivalent capacitance (C p ) and resistance (R p ) of the capacitors are measured using an RLC bridge at a frequency of 10 {kHz} and for magnetic field intensities 0≤slant H({{kA}} {{{m}}}-1)≤slant 200. From the functions {C}p={C}p{(H)}{{Φ }} and {R}p={R}p{(H)}{{Φ }} we obtain the real ({ε }r{\\prime }) and imaginary ({ε }r{\\prime\\prime }) components of the complex relative dielectric permittivity {ε }r* , the electrical conductivity σ, and viscosity η of the membranes. We show that {ε }r{\\prime }, {ε }r{\\prime\\prime }, σ and η increase with H and they are sensibly influenced by Φ. We present and discuss the obtained results.

  8. Applying graphene oxide nano-film over a polycarbonate nanoporous membrane to monitor E. coli by infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Krishna Pal; Dhek, Neeraj Singh; Nehra, Anuj; Ahlawat, Sweeti; Puri, Anu

    2017-01-05

    Nano-biosensors are excellent monitoring tools for rapid, specific, sensitive, inexpensive, in-field, on-line, and/or real-time detection of pathogens in foods, soil, air, and water samples. A variety of nano-materials (metallic, polymeric, and/or carbon-based) were employed to enhance the efficacy, efficiency, and sensitivity of these nano-biosensors, including graphene-based materials, especially graphene oxide (GO)-based materials. GO bears many oxygen-bearing groups, enabling ligand conjugation at the high density critical for sensitive detection. We have fabricated GO-modified nano-porous polycarbonate track-etched (PCTE) membranes that were conjugated to an Escherichia coli-specific antibody (Ab) and used to detect E. coli. The random distribution of nanopores on the PCTE membrane surface and the bright coating of the GO onto the membrane were confirmed by scanning electron microscope. Anti-E. coli β-gal Abs were conjugated to the GO surface via 1-ethyl-3,3-dimethylaminopropyl carbodiimide hydrochloride-N-hydroxysuccinimide chemistry; antibody coating was confirmed by the presence of a characteristic IR peak near 1600cm(-1). A non-corresponding Ab (anti-Pseudomonas) was used as a negative control under identical conditions. When E. coli interacted anti-E.coli β-gal with Ab-coated GO-nano-biosensor units, we observed a clear shift in the IR peak from 3373.14 to 3315cm(-1); in contrast, we did not observe any shift in IR peaks when the GO unit was coated with the non-corresponding Ab (anti-Pseudomonas). Therefore, the detection of E. coli using the described GO-nano-sensor unit is highly specific, is highly selective and can be applied for real-time monitoring of E. coli with a detection limit between 100μg/mL and 10μg/mL, similar to existing detection systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Highly effective permeability and antifouling performances of polypropylene non-woven fabric membranes modified with graphene oxide by inkjet printing and immersion coating methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chuan-Qi; Xu, Xiao-Chen; Li, Rui-Yun; Chen, Jie; Yang, Feng-Lin

    2013-01-01

    In the current study, graphene oxide (GO)-modified polypropylene non-woven fabric (PP-NWF) membranes were prepared via inkjet printing and immersion coating methods. Scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, contact angle measurements, pure water permeation (JPWP) and protein adsorption were tested to evaluate the impact of the GO nanosheet on the characteristics and performance of modified PP-NWF membranes. The results showed that the exfoliated GO nanosheets uniformly deposited on the membrane surface and firmly embedded into the interlaced fibers, resulting in the improvement of membrane hydrophilicity, permeability and antifouling properties comparing with original PP-NWF membranes. The GO-printed and GO-coated membranes had 113 and 188% higher fluxes, and 70.95 and 75.74% lower protein adsorptions than the original PP-NWF membranes, respectively. After cross-linked treatment, ultrasound processing was conducted to evaluate the stability of the modified PP-NWF membranes. The results demonstrated that there was almost no decrease in permeation after ultrasonic treatment indicating that the cross-linking treatment could enhance the immobilization of the GO nanosheets on and into the modified membranes.

  10. Rippling instabilities in suspended nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hailong; Upmanyu, Moneesh

    2012-11-01

    Morphology mediates the interplay between the structure and electronic transport in atomically thin nanoribbons such as graphene as the relaxation of edge stresses occurs preferentially via out-of-plane deflections. In the case of end-supported suspended nanoribbons that we study here, past experiments and computations have identified a range of equilibrium morphologies, in particular, for graphene flakes, yet a unified understanding of their relative stability remains elusive. Here, we employ atomic-scale simulations and a composite framework based on isotropic elastic plate theory to chart out the morphological stability space of suspended nanoribbons with respect to intrinsic (ribbon elasticity) and engineered (ribbon geometry) parameters, and the combination of edge and body actuation. The computations highlight a rich morphological shape space that can be naturally classified into two competing shapes, bendinglike and twistlike, depending on the distribution of ripples across the interacting edges. The linearized elastic framework yields exact solutions for these rippled shapes. For compressive edge stresses, the body strain emerges as a key variable that controls their relative stability and in extreme cases stabilizes coexisting transverse ripples. Tensile edge stresses lead to dimples within the ribbon core that decay into the edges, a feature of obvious significance for stretchable nanoelectronics. The interplay between geometry and mechanics that we report should serve as a key input for quantifying the transport along these ribbons.

  11. Charge Transfer Properties Through Graphene Layers in Gas Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Thuiner, P.; Jackman, R.B.; Müller, H.; Nguyen, T.T.; Oliveri, E.; Pfeiffer, D.; Resnati, F.; Ropelewski, L.; Smith, J.A.; van Stenis, M.; Veenhof, R.

    2016-01-01

    Graphene is a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice with remarkable mechanical, electrical and optical properties. For the first time graphene layers suspended on copper meshes were installed into a gas detector equipped with a gaseous electron multiplier. Measurements of low energy electron and ion transfer through graphene were conducted. In this paper we describe the sample preparation for suspended graphene layers, the testing procedures and we discuss the preliminary results followed by a prospect of further applications.

  12. Electrochemical Deposition of Zinc Oxide on the Surface of Composite Membrane Polysulfone-Graphene-Polystyrene in the Presence of Water Soluble Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Mocanu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study consisted in the development of an alternative synthesis procedure for hybrid ultrafiltration membranes for water purification. The membranes were obtained by wet-phase inversion method based on aliquots of polysulfone (PSF and graphene nanoplatelets modified with poly(styrene (G-PST. The hybrid materials were modified by electrochemical deposition of zinc oxide (ZnO on one side of the membranes in the presence of water soluble polymers. Raman, XPS, and TGA analyses were used to characterize the chemical and thermal characteristics of the PST-G. SEM analysis showed the formation of asymmetric porous configuration in all cases and the generation of ZnO with different shapes/structures on the bottom surface of the membrane or inside the porous channels. EDS analysis confirmed the formation of ZnO.

  13. Membrane properties and anti-bacterial/anti-biofouling activity of polysulfone–graphene oxide composite membranes phase inversed in graphene oxide non-solvent† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6ra25015g Click here for additional data file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koseoglu-Imer, Derya Yuksel; Yilmaz-Deveci, Nurmiray; Mijakovic, Ivan; Koyuncu, Ismail

    2017-01-01

    A new and facile method for the fabrication of polysulfone–graphene oxide composite membranes is reported, where after casting, phase inversion is carried out with graphene oxide flakes (GO) in a coagulation bath. The membranes were characterized and the morphology was analysed using scanning electron microscopy. A bacterial inhibition ratio of 74.5% was observed with membranes fabricated from a very low concentration of di-water–GO non-solvent (0.048% of GO). The membranes were successfully tested for permeate flux and fouling resistance using activated sludge filtration from an MBR system. The observed trend shows that GO can operate as a protective barrier for membrane pores against the bacterial community. To our knowledge this is the first time where the immersion precipitation mechanism was carried out in a coagulation bath with GO flakes under continuous stirring. Using this method, a very low concentration of GO is required to fabricate membranes with conventional GO composite membrane properties and better selectivity. PMID:28496976

  14. Novel Slightly Reduced Graphene Oxide Based Proton Exchange Membrane with Constructed Long-Range Ionic Nanochannels via Self-Assembling of Nafion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Wei; Tang, Beibei; Wu, Peiyi

    2017-07-12

    A facile method to prepare high-performance Nafion slightly reduced graphene oxide membranes (N-srGOMs) via vacuum filtration is proposed. The long-range connected ionic nanochannels in the membrane are constructed via the concentration-dependent self-assembling of the amphiphilic Nafion and the hydrophilic-hydrophobic interaction between graphene oxide (GO) and Nafion in water. The obtained N-srGOM possesses high proton conductivity, and low methanol permeability benefitted from the constructed unique interior structures. The proton conductivity of N-srGOM reaches as high as 0.58 S cm-1 at 80 °C and 95%RH, which is near 4-fold of the commercialized Nafion 117 membrane under the same condition. The methanol permeability of N-srGOM is 2.0 × 10-9 cm2 s-1, two-magnitude lower than that of Nafion 117. This novel membrane fabrication strategy has proved to be highly efficient in overcoming the "trade-off" effect between proton conductivity and methanol resistance and displays great potential in DMFC application.

  15. A fully spray-coated fuel cell membrane electrode assembly using Aquivion ionomer with a graphene oxide/cerium oxide interlayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitwieser, Matthias; Bayer, Thomas; Büchler, Andreas; Zengerle, Roland; Lyth, Stephen M.; Thiele, Simon

    2017-05-01

    A novel multilayer membrane electrode assembly (MEA) for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) is fabricated in this work, within a single spray-coating device. For the first time, direct membrane deposition is used to fabricate a PEMFC by spraying the short-side-chain ionomer Aquivion directly onto the gas diffusion electrodes. The fully sprayed MEA, with an Aquivion membrane 10 μm in thickness, achieved a high power density of 1.6 W/cm2 for H2/air operation at 300 kPaabs. This is one of the highest reported values for thin composite membranes operated in H2/air atmosphere. By the means of confocal laser scanning microscopy, individual carbon fibers from the gas diffusion layer are identified to penetrate through the micro porous layer (MPL), likely causing a low electrical cell resistance in the range of 150 Ω cm2 through the thin sprayed membranes. By spraying a 200 nm graphene oxide/cerium oxide (GO/CeO2) interlayer between two layers of Aquivion ionomer, the impact of the electrical short is eliminated and the hydrogen crossover current density is reduced to about 1 mA/cm2. The peak power density of the interlayer-containing MEA drops only by 10% compared to a pure Aquivion membrane of similar thickness.

  16. Surface Decoration of Amino-Functionalized Metal-Organic Framework/Graphene Oxide Composite onto Polydopamine-Coated Membrane Substrate for Highly Efficient Heavy Metal Removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Zhuang; Feng, Kai; Tang, Beibei; Wu, Peiyi

    2017-01-25

    A new metal-organic framework/graphene oxide composite (IRMOF-3/GO) with high adsorption capacity of copper(II) (maximal adsorption amount = 254.14 mg/g at pH 5.0 and 25 °C) was prepared. Novel and highly efficient nanofiltration (NF) membrane can be facilely fabricated via surface decoration of IRMOF-3/GO onto polydopamine (PDA)-coated polysulfone (PSF) substrate. After decoration of IRMOF-3/GO, membrane surface potential increased from 6.7 to 13.1 mV at pH 5.0 and 25 °C. Due to the adsorption effect of IRMOF-3/GO and the enhancement of membrane surface potential, the prepared NF membrane (the loading amount of IRMOF-3/GO is ca. 13.6 g/m2) exhibits a highly efficient rejection of copper(II). The copper(II) rejection reaches up to ∼90%, while maintaining a relatively high flux of ∼31 L/m2/h at the pressure of 0.7 MPa and pH 5.0. Moreover, the membrane also presents an outstanding stability throughout the 2000 min NF testing period. Thus, the newly developed NF membrane shows a promising potential for water cleaning. This work provides a worthy reference for designing highly efficient NF membranes modified by metal-organic framework (MOF) relevant materials.

  17. Anti-fouling and high water permeable forward osmosis membrane fabricated via layer by layer assembly of chitosan/graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Hasan; Rastgar, Masoud; Shakeri, Alireza

    2017-08-01

    To date, forward osmosis (FO) has received considerable attention due to its potential application in seawater desalination. FO does not require external hydraulic pressure and consequently is believed to have a low fouling propensity. Despite the numerous privileges of FO process, a major challenge ahead for its development is the lack of high performance membranes. In this study, we fabricated a novel highly-efficient FO membrane using layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of positive chitosan (CS) and negative graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets via electrostatic interaction on a porous support layer. The support layer was prepared by blending hydrophilic sulfonated polyethersulfone (SPES) into polyethersulfone (PES) matrix using wet phase inversion process. Various characterization techniques were used to confirm successful fabrication of LbL membrane. The number of layers formed on the SPES-PES support layer was easily adjusted by repeating the CS and GO deposition cycles. Thin film composite (TFC) membrane was also prepared by the same SPES-PES support layer and polyamide (PA) active layer to compare membranes performances. The water permeability and salt rejection of the fabricated membranes were obtained by two kinds of draw solutions (including Na2SO4 and sucrose) under two different membrane orientations. The results showed that membrane coated by a CS/GO bilayers had water flux of 2-4 orders of magnitude higher than the TFC one. By increasing the number of CS/GO bilayers, the selectivity of the LbL membrane was improved. The novel fabricated LbL membrane showed better fouling resistance than the TFC one in the feed solution containing 200 ppm of sodium alginate as a foulant model.

  18. Graphene-on-silicon hybrid plasmonic-photonic integrated circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ting-Hui; Cheng, Zhenzhou; Goda, Keisuke

    2017-06-16

    Graphene surface plasmons (GSPs) have shown great potential in biochemical sensing, thermal imaging, and optoelectronics. To excite GSPs, several methods based on the near-field optical microscope and graphene nanostructures have been developed in the past few years. However, these methods suffer from their bulky setups and low GSP-excitation efficiency due to the short interaction length between free-space vertical excitation light and the atomic layer of graphene. Here we present a CMOS-compatible design of graphene-on-silicon hybrid plasmonic-photonic integrated circuits that achieve the in-plane excitation of GSP polaritons as well as localized surface plasmon (SP) resonance. By employing a suspended membrane slot waveguide, our design is able to excite GSP polaritons on a chip. Moreover, by utilizing a graphene nanoribbon array, we engineer the transmission spectrum of the waveguide by excitation of localized SP resonance. Our theoretical and computational study paves a new avenue to enable, modulate, and monitor GSPs on a chip, potentially applicable for the development of on-chip electro-optic devices.

  19. Self-Organized Platinum Nanoparticles Elevated on Freestanding Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Matthew; Xu, Peng; Barber, Steven; Schoelz, James; Qi, Dejun; Thibado, Paul; Dong, Lifeng; Yu, Jianhua; Xu, Fangfang; Neek-Amal, Mehdi; Peeters, Francois

    2014-03-01

    Freestanding graphene membranes were successfully functionalized with platinum nanoparticles (Pt NPs) using a single-step sputtering deposition process. The membranes were imaged using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, revealing a homogeneous distribution of uniformly sized, single-crystal Pt NPs that exhibit a preferred orientation and nearest-neighbor distance. The NPs were also found to be partially elevated by the graphene substrate, as deduced from atomic-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images. Furthermore, the electrostatic force between the STM tip and sample was utilized to estimate the binding energy of the NPs to the suspended graphene. Local strain accumulation due to elevation during the growth process is thought to be the origin of the NP self-organization. Such detailed insight into the atomic nature of this functionalized system was only possible through the cooperation of dual microscopic techniques combined with molecular dynamics simulations. The findings are expected to shape future approaches to develop high-performance electronics based on nanoparticle-functionalized graphene as well as fuel cells using Pt NP catalysts. ONR Grant No. N00014-10-1-0181, NSF Grant No. DMR-0855358 and DMR-0821159, National Natural Science Foundation of China (51172113), Shandong Natural Science Foundation (JQ201118), Qingdao Municipal Science and Technology Commission (12-1-4-136-hz).

  20. Multilayer graphene for long-term corrosion protection of stainless steel bipolar plates for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoot, Adam Carsten; Camilli, Luca; Spiegelhauer, Susie Ann

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Motivated by similar investigations recently published (Pu et al., 2015), we report a comparative corrosion study of three sets of samples relevant as bipolar plates for polymer electrolyte fuel cells: stainless steel, stainless steel with a nickel seed layer (Ni/SS) and stainless steel...... with Ni seed layer coated by a multi-layered graphene thin film (G/Ni/SS). The graphene film, synthesized by chemical vapour deposition (CVD), has a moderate amount of defects according to Raman spectroscopy. Short/medium-term corrosion test shows no significant advantage of using G/Ni/SS rather than Ni....../SS, both samples exhibiting a similar trend, thus questioning the short-term positive effect of graphene coatings. However, partial immersion in boiling seawater for three weeks reveals a clear superiority of the graphene coating with respect to steel just protected by Ni. After the test, the graphene film...

  1. In vitro evaluation of biocompatibility of uncoated thermally reduced graphene and carbon nanotube-loaded PVDF membranes with adult neural stem cell-derived neurons and glia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çagla Defterali

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Graphene, graphene-based nanomaterials (GBNs and carbon nanotubes (CNTs are being investigated as potential substrates for the growth of neural cells. However, in most in vitro studies the cells were seeded on these materials coated with various proteins implying that the observed effects on the cells could not solely be attributed to the GBN and CNT properties. Here we studied the biocompatibility of uncoated thermally reduced graphene (TRG and poly-vinylidene fluoride (PVDF membranes loaded with multi walled CNTs (MWCNTs using neural stem cells (NSCs isolated from the adult mouse olfactory bulb (termed aOBSCs. When aOBSCs were induced to differentiate on coverslips treated with TRG or control materials (polyethyleneimine-PEI and polyornithine plus fibronectin-PLO/F in a serum-free medium, neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes were generated in all conditions, indicating that TRG permits the multi-lineage differentiation of aOBSCs. However, the total number of cells was reduced on both PEI and TRG. In a serum-containing medium, aOBSC-derived neurons and oligodendrocytes grown on TRG were more numerous than in controls; the neurons developed synaptic boutons and oligodendrocytes were more branched. In contrast, neurons growing on PVDF membranes had reduced neurite branching and on MWCNTs-loaded membranes, oligodendrocytes were lower in numbers than in controls. Overall, these findings indicate that uncoated TRG may be biocompatible with the generation, differentiation, and maturation of aOBSC-derived neurons and glial cells, implying a potential use for TRG to study functional neuronal networks.

  2. Membraner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Finn

    2009-01-01

    Notatet giver en kort introduktion til den statiske virkemåde af membraner og membrankonstruktioner......Notatet giver en kort introduktion til den statiske virkemåde af membraner og membrankonstruktioner...

  3. Rapid and Sensitive Detection of Bacteria Response to Antibiotics Using Nanoporous Membrane and Graphene Quantum Dot (GQDs-Based Electrochemical Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Ye

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The wide abuse of antibiotics has accelerated bacterial multiresistance, which means there is a need to develop tools for rapid detection and characterization of bacterial response to antibiotics in the management of infections. In the study, an electrochemical biosensor based on nanoporous alumina membrane and graphene quantum dots (GQDs was developed for bacterial response to antibiotics detection. Anti-Salmonella antibody was conjugated with amino-modified GQDs by glutaraldehyde and immobilized on silanized nanoporous alumina membranes for Salmonella bacteria capture. The impedance signals across nanoporous membranes could monitor the capture of bacteria on nanoporous membranes as well as bacterial response to antibiotics. This nanoporous membrane and GQD-based electrochemical biosensor achieved rapid detection of bacterial response to antibiotics within 30 min, and the detection limit could reach the pM level. It was capable of investigating the response of bacteria exposed to antibiotics much more rapidly and conveniently than traditional tools. The capability of studying the dynamic effects of antibiotics on bacteria has potential applications in the field of monitoring disease therapy, detecting comprehensive food safety hazards and even life in hostile environment.

  4. Substrate Dependent Ad-Atom Migration on Graphene and the Impact on Electron-Beam Sculpting Functional Nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Kevin J; Goyal, Gaurav; Ahn, Chi Won; Kim, Min Jun

    2017-05-10

    The use of atomically thin graphene for molecular sensing has attracted tremendous attention over the years and, in some instances, could displace the use of classical thin films. For nanopore sensing, graphene must be suspended over an aperture so that a single pore can be formed in the free-standing region. Nanopores are typically drilled using an electron beam (e-beam) which is tightly focused until a desired pore size is obtained. E-beam sculpting of graphene however is not just dependent on the ability to displace atoms but also the ability to hinder the migration of ad-atoms on the surface of graphene. Using relatively lower e-beam fluxes from a thermionic electron source, the C-atom knockout rate seems to be comparable to the rate of carbon ad-atom attraction and accumulation at the e-beam/graphene interface (i.e., R knockout ≈ R accumulation ). Working at this unique regime has allowed the study of carbon ad-atom migration as well as the influence of various substrate materials on e-beam sculpting of graphene. We also show that this information was pivotal to fabricating functional graphene nanopores for studying DNA with increased spatial resolution which is attributed to atomically thin membranes.

  5. Very large scale characterization of graphene mechanical devices using a colorimetry technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartamil-Bueno, Santiago Jose; Centeno, Alba; Zurutuza, Amaia; Steeneken, Peter Gerard; van der Zant, Herre Sjoerd Jan; Houri, Samer

    2017-06-08

    We use a scalable optical technique to characterize more than 21 000 circular nanomechanical devices made of suspended single- and double-layer graphene on cavities with different diameters (D) and depths (g). To maximize the contrast between suspended and broken membranes we used a model for selecting the optimal color filter. The method enables parallel and automatized image processing for yield statistics. We find the survival probability to be correlated with a structural mechanics scaling parameter given by D4/g3. Moreover, we extract a median adhesion energy of Γ = 0.9 J m-2 between the membrane and the native SiO2 at the bottom of the cavities.

  6. Simultaneous wastewater treatment and bioelectricity production in microbial fuel cells using cross-linked chitosan-graphene oxide mixed-matrix membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holder, Shima L; Lee, Ching-Hwa; Popuri, Srinivasa R

    2017-05-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are emerging technology for wastewater treatment by chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction and simultaneous bioelectricity production. Fabrication of an effective proton exchange membrane (PEM) is a vital component for MFC performance. In this work, green chitosan-based (CS) PEMs were fabricated with graphene oxide (GO) as filler material (CS-GO) and cross-linked with phosphoric acid (CS-GO-P(24)) or sulfuric acid (CS-GO-S(24)) to determine their effect on PEM properties. Interrogation of the physicochemical, thermal, and mechanical properties of the cross-linked CS-GO PEMs demonstrated that ionic cross-linking based on the incorporation of PO43- groups in the CS-GO mixed-matrix composites, when compared with sulfuric acid cross-linking commonly used in proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) studies, generated additional density of ionic cluster domains, rendered enhanced sorption properties, and augmented the thermal and mechanical stability of the composite structure. Consequently, bioelectricity performance analysis in MFC application showed that CS-GO-P(24) membrane produced 135% higher power density than the CS-GO-S(24) MFC system. Simultaneously, 89.52% COD removal of primary clarifier municipal wastewater was achieved in the MFC operated with the CS-GO-P(24) membrane.

  7. High Pt Loading on Polydopamine Functionalized Graphene as a High Performance Cathode Electrocatalyst for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monireh Faraji

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Morphology and size of platinum nanoparticles are a crucial factor in improving their catalytic activity and stability. Here, we firstly report the synthesis of high loading Pt nanoparticles on polydopamine reduced Graphene. The loading concentration of Pt (nanoparticles NPs on Graphene can be adjusted in the range of 60-70%.With the insertion of polydopamine between Graphene oxide sheets, stacking of Graphene can be effectively prevented, promoting diffusion of oxygen molecules through the Graphene sheets and enhancing the oxygen reduction reaction electrocatalytic activity. Compared to commercial catalysts (i.e., state-of-the-art Pt/C catalyst the as synthesized Pt supported polydopamine grafted reduced graphite oxide (Pt@PDA-rGO hybrid displays very high oxygen reduction reaction catalytic activities. We propose a unique 2D profile of the polydopamine-rGO role as a barrier preventing leaching of Pt into the electrolyte. The fabricated electrodes were evaluated with electrochemical techniques for oxygen reduction reaction and the obtained results were further verified by the transmission electron microscopy micrographs on the microstructure of the integrated pt@PDA-rGO structures. It has been revealed that the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy technique can provide more explicit information than polarization curves on the performance dependence on charge-transfer and mass transport processes at different overpotential regions.

  8. Graphene oxide as an anaerobic membrane scaffold for the enhancement of B. adolescentis proliferation and antagonistic effects against pathogens E. coli and S. aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Han-qing; Gao, Di; Wang, Bing; Zhao, Rui-fang; Guan, Ming; Zheng, Ling-na; Zhou, Xiao-yan; Chai, Zhi-fang; Feng, Wei-yue

    2014-04-01

    The impact of the gut microbiota on human health is widely perceived as the most exciting advancement in biomedicine. The gut microbiota has been known to play a crucial role in defining states of human health and diseases, and thus becomes a potential new territory for drug targeting. Herein, graphene oxide (GO) interaction with five common human gut bacteria, B. adolescentis, L. acidophilus, E. coli, E. faecalis, and S. aureus, was studied. It was shown that, in bacterial media, GO sheets were able to form effective, anaerobic membrane scaffolds that enhanced the antagonistic activity of B. adolescentis against the pathogens E. coli andS. aureus. Data obtained using bacterial growth measurements, colony counting and 16S rRNA gene sequencing consistently indicated that GO sheets promoted proliferation of gut bacteria, particularly for B. adolescentis. Scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy images, and membrane potential measurements showed that cell membranes maintained their integrity and that no observable variations in cell morphology were induced after interaction with GO sheets, indicating good biocompatibility of GO. These results suggest the possibility of using GO sheets as efficient drug carriers in therapeutic applications to treat diseases related to the gut microbiota.

  9. Hydrogenation Dynamics of Biphenylene Carbon (Graphenylene) Membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Splugues, Vinicius; Autreto, Pedro Alves da Silva; Galvao, Douglas S

    2017-01-01

    The advent of graphene created a revolution in materials science. Because of this there is a renewed interest in other carbon-based structures. Graphene is the ultimate (just one atom thick) membrane. It has been proposed that graphene can work as impermeable membrane to standard gases, such argon and helium. Graphene-like porous membranes, but presenting larger porosity and potential selectivity would have many technological applications. Biphenylene carbon (BPC), sometimes called graphenyle...

  10. Negligible environmental sensitivity of graphene in a hexagonal boron nitride/graphene/h-BN sandwich structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Chen, Zheyuan; Dean, Cory R; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Brus, Louis E; Hone, James

    2012-10-23

    Using Raman spectroscopy, we study the environmental sensitivity of mechanically exfoliated and electrically floating single-layer graphene transferred onto a hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) substrate, in comparison with graphene deposited on a SiO(2) substrate. In order to understand and isolate the substrate effect on graphene electrical properties, we model and correct for Raman optical interference in the substrates. As-deposited and unannealed graphene shows a large I(2D)/I(G) ratio on both substrates, indicating extremely high quality, close to that of graphene suspended in vacuum. Thermal annealing strongly activates subsequent environmental sensitivity on the SiO(2) substrate; such activation is reduced but not eliminated on the h-BN substrate. In contrast, in a h-BN/graphene/h-BN sandwich structure, with graphene protected on both sides, graphene remains pristine despite thermal processing. Raman data provide a deeper understanding of the previously observed improved graphene electrical conductivity on h-BN substrates. In the sandwich structure, the graphene 2D Raman feature has a higher frequency and narrower line width than in pristine suspended graphene, implying that the local h-BN environment modestly yet measurably changes graphene electron and phonon dispersions.

  11. Promising applications of graphene and graphene-based nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Bich Ha; Hieu Nguyen, Van

    2016-06-01

    The present article is a review of research works on promising applications of graphene and graphene-based nanostructures. It contains five main scientific subjects. The first one is the research on graphene-based transparent and flexible conductive films for displays and electrodes: efficient method ensuring uniform and controllable deposition of reduced graphene oxide thin films over large areas, large-scale pattern growth of graphene films for stretchble transparent electrodes, utilization of graphene-based transparent conducting films and graphene oxide-based ones in many photonic and optoelectronic devices and equipments such as the window electrodes of inorganic, organic and dye-sensitized solar cells, organic light-emitting diodes, light-emitting electrochemical cells, touch screens, flexible smart windows, graphene-based saturated absorbers in laser cavities for ultrafast generations, graphene-based flexible, transparent heaters in automobile defogging/deicing systems, heatable smart windows, graphene electrodes for high-performance organic field-effect transistors, flexible and transparent acoustic actuators and nanogenerators etc. The second scientific subject is the research on conductive inks for printed electronics to revolutionize the electronic industry by producing cost-effective electronic circuits and sensors in very large quantities: preparing high mobility printable semiconductors, low sintering temperature conducting inks, graphene-based ink by liquid phase exfoliation of graphite in organic solutions, and developing inkjet printing technique for mass production of high-quality graphene patterns with high resolution and for fabricating a variety of good-performance electronic devices, including transparent conductors, embedded resistors, thin-film transistors and micro supercapacitors. The third scientific subject is the research on graphene-based separation membranes: molecular dynamics simulation study on the mechanisms of the transport of

  12. Membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Junbo Hou; Min Yang

    2012-01-01

    Lithium ion batteries have proven themselves the main choice of power sources for portable electronics. Besides consumer electronics, lithium ion batteries are also growing in popularity for military, electric vehicle, and aerospace applications. The present review attempts to summarize the knowledge about some selected membranes in lithium ion batteries. Based on the type of electrolyte used, literature concerning ceramic-glass and polymer solid ion conductors, microporous filter type separa...

  13. Thermal conductivity of twisted bilayer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongyang; Ying, Hao; Chen, Xiangping; Nika, Denis L; Cocemasov, Alexandr I; Cai, Weiwei; Balandin, Alexander A; Chen, Shanshan

    2014-11-21

    We have investigated experimentally the thermal conductivity of suspended twisted bilayer graphene. The measurements were performed using an optothermal Raman technique. It was found that the thermal conductivity of twisted bilayer graphene is lower than that of monolayer graphene and the reference, Bernal stacked bilayer graphene in the entire temperature range examined (∼300-700 K). This finding indicates that the heat carriers - phonons - in twisted bilayer graphene do not behave in the same manner as that observed in individual graphene layers. The decrease in the thermal conductivity found in twisted bilayer graphene was explained by the modification of the Brillouin zone due to plane rotation and the emergence of numerous folded phonon branches that enhance the phonon Umklapp and normal scattering. The results obtained are important for understanding thermal transport in two-dimensional systems.

  14. 3D-Graphene supports for palladium nanoparticles: Effect of micro/macropores on oxygen electroreduction in Anion Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, Sadia; Serov, Alexey; Atanassov, Plamen

    2018-01-01

    Hierarchically structured 3D-Graphene nanosheets as supports for palladium nanoparticles (Pd/3D-GNS) were fabricated using the Sacrificial Support Method. The pore size distribution of the 3D-GNS supports were tuned by utilizing smaller and larger sized sacrificial silica templates, EH5 and L90. Using a combination of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), N2 sorption and Rotating Ring Disc Electrode (RRDE) technique, it was demonstrated that the EH5 and L90 modified 3D-GNS supports had higher percentage of micro- (50 nm), respectively. The templated pores also played a role in enhancing the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) as well as membrane electrode assembly (MEA) performance of the Pd nanoparticles in comparison to non-porous 2D-GNS supports. Particularly, incorporation of micropores increased peroxide generation at higher potentials whereas presence of macropores increased both limiting current densities and reduce peroxide yields. Integration of the Pd/GNS nanocomposites into a H2/O2 fed Anion Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (AEMFC) operating at 60 °C also demonstrated the effect of modified porosity on concentration polarization or transport losses at high current densities. This strategy for the tunable synthesis of hierarchically 3D porous graphitized supports offers a platform for developing morphologically modified nanomaterials for energy conversion.

  15. Photocatalytic Nanostructuring of Graphene Guided by Block Copolymer Self-Assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Zhongli; Li, Tao; Schulte, Lars

    2016-01-01

    graphene nanomesh was fabricated by photocatalysis of single-layer graphene suspended on top of TiO2-covered nanopillars, which were produced by combining block copolymer nanolithography with atomic layer deposition. Graphene nanoribbons were also prepared by the same method applied to a line-forming block...

  16. Thermal conductivity of graphene laminate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekpour, H; Chang, K-H; Chen, J-C; Lu, C-Y; Nika, D L; Novoselov, K S; Balandin, A A

    2014-09-10

    We have investigated thermal conductivity of graphene laminate films deposited on polyethylene terephthalate substrates. Two types of graphene laminate were studied, as deposited and compressed, in order to determine the physical parameters affecting the heat conduction the most. The measurements were performed using the optothermal Raman technique and a set of suspended samples with the graphene laminate thickness from 9 to 44 μm. The thermal conductivity of graphene laminate was found to be in the range from 40 to 90 W/mK at room temperature. It was found unexpectedly that the average size and the alignment of graphene flakes are more important parameters defining the heat conduction than the mass density of the graphene laminate. The thermal conductivity scales up linearly with the average graphene flake size in both uncompressed and compressed laminates. The compressed laminates have higher thermal conductivity for the same average flake size owing to better flake alignment. Coating plastic materials with thin graphene laminate films that have up to 600× higher thermal conductivity than plastics may have important practical implications.

  17. Synthetic Graphene Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition on Copper Foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-11

    potential applications of such large-scale synthetic graphene . Keywords: CVD graphene ; atmospheric pressure CVD growth; copper foil; Raman scat- tering...b) Transparent PMMA/ graphene membrane floating on copper etchant. (c) Three layers of stacked CVD graphene on a cover glass made by consecutively...Deposition on Copper Foils Fig. 3. Raman spectra of tBLG domains on Si/SiO2 substrate. (a) Optical image of transferred CVD graphene film with randomly

  18. Cable suspended windmill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Moses G. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A windmill is disclosed which includes an airframe having an upwind end and a downwind end. The first rotor is rotatably connected to the airframe, and a generator is supported by the airframe and driven by the rotor. The airframe is supported vertically in an elevated disposition by poles which extend vertically upwardly from the ground and support cables which extend between the vertical poles. Suspension cables suspend the airframe from the support cable.

  19. To immobilize polyethylene glycol-borate ester/lithium fluoride in graphene oxide/poly(vinyl alcohol for synthesizing new polymer electrolyte membrane of lithium-ion batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. F. Huang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs are potentially applicable in lithium-ion batteries with high safety, low cost and good performance. Here, to take advantages of ionic conductivity and selectivity of borate ester-functionalized small molecules as well as structural properties of polymer nanocomposite, a strategy of immobilizing as-synthesized polyethylene glycol-borate ester/lithium fluoride (B-PEG/LiF in graphene oxide/poly(vinyl alcohol (GO/PVA to prepare a PEM is put forward. Chemical structure of the PEM is firstly characterized by 1H-, 11B- and 19F-nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectra, respectively, and then is further investigated under consideration of the interactions among PVA, B-PEG and LiF components. The immobilization of B-PEG/LiF in PVA-based structure is confirmed. As the interactions within electrolyte components can be further tuned by GO, ionic conductivity (~10–3 S·cm–1, lithium-ion transfer number (~0.49, and thermal (~273 °C/electrochemical (>4 V stabilities of the PEM can be obtained, and the feasibility of PEMs applied in a lithium-ion battery is also confirmed. It is believed that such PEM is a promising candidate as a new battery separator.

  20. Graphene Quantum Dots/Eggshell Membrane Composite as a Nano-sorbent for Preconcentration and Determination of Organophosphorus Pesticides by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahideh Abdollahi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study graphene quantum dots/eggshell membrane nanocomposite (GQDS/ESM is prepared and used as an efficient solid-phase extraction (SPE sorbent for preconcentration of organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs from aqueous solutions. The retained analytes on the sorbent are stripped by acetonitrile and subsequently are determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Various parameters affecting the extraction efficiency of OPPs on the GQDS/ESM, such as solution pH, amount of nano-sorbent, sample loading flow rate, elution conditions and sample volume are investigated. The results demonstrated that the proposed method has a wide dynamic linear range (0.05–100 ng mL-1, good linearity (R2>0.997 and low detection limits (0.006-0.32 ng mL-1. High enrichment factors are achieved ranging from 110 to 140. In the optimum experimental conditions, the established method is successfully applied for the determination of OPPs in spiked water samples (well, tap, shaft and canal and apple juice. Satisfactory recovery results show that the sample matrices under consideration do not significantly affect the extraction process.

  1. Elastic properties of suspended multilayer WSe2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Koutsos, Vasileios; Cheung, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    We report the experimental determination of the elastic properties of suspended multilayer WSe2, a promising two-dimensional (2D) semiconducting material combined with high optical quality. The suspended WSe2 membranes have been fabricated by mechanical exfoliation of bulk WSe2 and transfer of the exfoliated multilayer WSe2 flakes onto SiO2/Si substrates pre-patterned with hole arrays. Then, indentation experiments have been performed on these membranes with an atomic force microscope. The results show that the 2D elastic modulus of the multilayer WSe2 membranes increases linearly while the prestress decreases linearly as the number of layers increases. The interlayer interaction in WSe2 has been observed to be strong enough to prevent the interlayer sliding during the indentation experiments. The Young's modulus of multilayer WSe2 (167.3 ± 6.7 GPa) is statistically independent of the thickness of the membranes, whose value is about two thirds of other most investigated 2D semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides, namely, MoS2 and WS2. Moreover, the multilayer WSe2 can endure ˜12.4 GPa stress and ˜7.3% strain without fracture or mechanical degradation. The 2D WSe2 can be an attractive semiconducting material for application in flexible optoelectronic devices and nano-electromechanical systems.

  2. In Situ Polymer Graphenization Ingrained with Nanoporosity in a Nitrogenous Electrocatalyst Boosting the Performance of Polymer-Electrolyte-Membrane Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiaogang; Zamani, Pouyan; Choi, Ja-Yeon; Hassan, Fathy M; Jiang, Gaopeng; Higgins, Drew C; Zhang, Yining; Hoque, Md Ariful; Chen, Zhongwei

    2017-02-01

    Rich, porous graphene frameworks decorated with uniformly dispersed active sites are prepared by using polyaniline as a graphene precursor and introducing phenanthroline as a pore-forming agent. The unprecedented fuel-cell performance of this electrocatalyst is linked to the graphene frameworks with vast distribution of pore sizes, which maximizes the active-sites accessibility, facilitates mass-transport properties, and improves the carbon corrosion resistance. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Graphene-Based Superconducting Weak Links in Low Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Scott; Kumaravadivel, Piranavan; Du, Xu

    The impact of magnetic field on Andreev reflection is studied in graphene-based superconducting weak links. We found, through studying weak links with different adhesion layers and superconducting leads (including Graphene-Ti/Au-Nb, Graphene-Ti/Pd-Nb, Graphene-V-Nb, Graphene-Ti-Nb, Graphene-Ti/Pd-NbN), that in low field (B graphene-superconductor interface. As the effective gap of the weak link approaches the intrinsic gap of the superconducting leads, a remnant of Andreev reflection can survive into the quantum Hall regime, allowing study of the interplay between the quantum Hall effect and Andreev reflection in high quality suspended graphene-superconductor weak links.

  4. Bright visible light emission from graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Duck; Kim, Hakseong; Cho, Yujin; Ryoo, Ji Hoon; Park, Cheol-Hwan; Kim, Pilkwang; Kim, Yong Seung; Lee, Sunwoo; Li, Yilei; Park, Seung-Nam; Yoo, Yong Shim; Yoon, Duhee; Dorgan, Vincent E; Pop, Eric; Heinz, Tony F; Hone, James; Chun, Seung-Hyun; Cheong, Hyeonsik; Lee, Sang Wook; Bae, Myung-Ho; Park, Yun Daniel

    2015-08-01

    Graphene and related two-dimensional materials are promising candidates for atomically thin, flexible and transparent optoelectronics. In particular, the strong light-matter interaction in graphene has allowed for the development of state-of-the-art photodetectors, optical modulators and plasmonic devices. In addition, electrically biased graphene on SiO2 substrates can be used as a low-efficiency emitter in the mid-infrared range. However, emission in the visible range has remained elusive. Here, we report the observation of bright visible light emission from electrically biased suspended graphene devices. In these devices, heat transport is greatly reduced. Hot electrons (∼2,800 K) therefore become spatially localized at the centre of the graphene layer, resulting in a 1,000-fold enhancement in thermal radiation efficiency. Moreover, strong optical interference between the suspended graphene and substrate can be used to tune the emission spectrum. We also demonstrate the scalability of this technique by realizing arrays of chemical-vapour-deposited graphene light emitters. These results pave the way towards the realization of commercially viable large-scale, atomically thin, flexible and transparent light emitters and displays with low operation voltage and graphene-based on-chip ultrafast optical communications.

  5. Extremely High Thermal Conductivity of Graphene: Experimental Study

    OpenAIRE

    Balandin, A. A.; Ghosh, S.; Bao, W.; Calizo, I.; Teweldebrhan, D.; Miao, F.; Lau, C. N.

    2008-01-01

    We report on the first measurement of the thermal conductivity of a suspended single layer graphene. The measurements were performed using a non-contact optical technique. The near room-temperature values of the thermal conductivity in the range ~ 4840 to 5300 W/mK were extracted for a single-layer graphene. The extremely high value of the thermal conductivity suggests that graphene can outperform carbon nanotubes in heat conduction.

  6. Single-layer graphene on silicon nitride micromembrane resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmid, Silvan; Bagci, Tolga; Zeuthen, Emil

    2014-01-01

    for exciting new devices, such as optoelectromechanical transducers. Here, we add a single-layer graphene on SiN micromembranes and compare electromechanical coupling and mechanical properties to bare dielectric membranes and to membranes metallized with an aluminium layer. The electrostatic coupling...... of graphene covered membranes is found to be equal to a perfectly conductive membrane, without significantly adding mass, decreasing the superior mechanical quality factor or affecting the optical properties of pure SiN micromembranes. The concept of graphene-SiN resonators allows a broad range of new...... experiments both in applied physics and fundamental basic research, e.g., for the mechanical, electrical, or optical characterization of graphene....

  7. Graphene on graphene antidot lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Søren Schou; Pedersen, Jesper Goor; Power, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Graphene bilayer systems are known to exhibit a band gap when the layer symmetry is broken by applying a perpendicular electric field. The resulting band structure resembles that of a conventional semiconductor with a parabolic dispersion. Here, we introduce a bilayer graphene heterostructure......, where single-layer graphene is placed on top of another layer of graphene with a regular lattice of antidots. We dub this class of graphene systems GOAL: graphene on graphene antidot lattice. By varying the structure geometry, band-structure engineering can be performed to obtain linearly dispersing...

  8. On the Design of Suspended Roofs with Paraboloidal Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ungureanu

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Some considerations concerning the design of the paraboloidal suspended roofs are made. The main geometric aspects are first time presented. For the roofs we propose, as pattern, the equivalent continuum membranes, and the efforts in the cable are determined by using the membrane efforts and their equations. Two examples are analyzed: elliptic paraboloide and hyperbolic paraboloide, with horizontal projection under the form of an ellipse.

  9. Dispersive suspended microextraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhong-Hua; Liu, Yu; Lu, Yue-Le; Wu, Tong; Zhou, Zhi-Qiang; Liu, Dong-Hui

    2011-11-14

    A novel sample pre-treatment technique termed dispersive suspended microextraction (DSME) coupled with gas chromatography-flame photometric detection (GC-FPD) has been developed for the determination of eight organophosphorus pesticides (ethoprophos, malathion, chlorpyrifos, isocarbophos, methidathion, fenamiphos, profenofos, triazophos) in aqueous samples. In this method, both extraction and two phases' separation process were performed by the assistance of magnetic stirring. After separating the two phases, 1 μL of the suspended phase was injected into GC for further instrument analysis. Varieties of experiment factors which could affect the experiment results were optimized and the following were selected: 12.0 μL p-xylene was selected as extraction solvent, extraction speed was 1200 rpm, extraction time was 30 s, the restoration speed was 800 rpm, the restoration time was 8 min, and no salt was added. Under the optimum conditions, limits of detections (LODs) varied between 0.01 and 0.05 μg L(-1). The relative standard deviation (RSDs, n=6) ranged from 4.6% to 12.1%. The linearity was obtained by five points in the concentration range of 0.1-100.0 μg L(-1). Correlation coefficients (r) varied from 0.9964 to 0.9995. The enrichment factors (EFs) were between 206 and 243. In the final experiment, the developed method has been successfully applied to the determination of organophosphorus pesticides in wine and tap water samples and the obtained recoveries were between 83.8% and 101.3%. Compared with other pre-treatment methods, DSME has its own features and could achieve satisfied results for the analysis of trace components in complicated matrices. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Performance and mechanisms for the removal of phthalates and pharmaceuticals from aqueous solution by graphene-containing ceramic composite tubular membrane coupled with the simultaneous electrocoagulation and electrofiltration process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gordon C C; Chen, Ying-Chun; Yang, Hao-Xuan; Yen, Chia-Heng

    2016-07-01

    In this study, commonly detected emerging contaminants (ECs) in water, including di-n-butyl phthalate (DnBP), di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), cephalexin (CLX), sulfamethoxazole (SMX) and caffeine (CAF), were selected as the target contaminants. A lab-prepared graphene-containing ceramic composite tubular membrane (TGCCM) coupled with the simultaneous electrocoagulation and electrofiltration process (EC/EF) in crossflow filtration mode was used to remove target contaminants in model solution. Meanwhile, a comparison of the removal efficiency was made among various tubular composite membranes reported, including carbon fibers/carbon/alumina composite tubular membrane (TCCACM), titania/alumina composite tubular membrane (TTACM) and alumina tubular membrane (TAM). The results of this study showed that the removal efficiencies for DnBP and DEHP were 99%, whereas 32-97% for cephalexin (CLX), sulfamethoxazole (SMX) and caffeine (CAF). In this work the mechanisms involved in removing target ECs were proposed and their roles in removing various ECs were also discussed. Further, two actual municipal wastewaters were treated to evaluate the applicability of the aforementioned treatment technology (i.e., TGCCM coupled with EC/EF) to various aqueous solutions in the real world. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Programmed synthesis of freestanding graphene nanomembrane arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waduge, Pradeep; Larkin, Joseph; Upmanyu, Moneesh; Kar, Swastik; Wanunu, Meni

    2015-02-04

    Freestanding graphene membranes are unique materials. The combination of atomically thin dimensions, remarkable mechanical robustness, and chemical stability make porous and non-porous graphene membranes attractive for water purification and various sensing applications. Nanopores in graphene and other 2D materials have been identified as promising devices for next-generation DNA sequencing based on readout of either transverse DNA base-gated current or through-pore ion current. While several ground breaking studies of graphene-based nanopores for DNA analysis have been reported, all methods to date require a physical transfer of the graphene from its source of production onto an aperture support. The transfer process is slow and often leads to tears in the graphene that render many devices useless for nanopore measurements. In this work, we report a novel scalable approach for site-directed fabrication of pinhole-free graphene nanomembranes. Our approach yields high quality few-layer graphene nanomembranes produced in less than a day using a few steps that do not involve transfer. We highlight the functionality of these graphene devices by measuring DNA translocation through electron-beam fabricated nanopores in such membranes. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Determination of the Thermal Noise Limit of Graphene Biotransistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosser, Michael S; Brown, Morgan A; McEuen, Paul L; Minot, Ethan D

    2015-08-12

    To determine the thermal noise limit of graphene biotransistors, we have measured the complex impedance between the basal plane of single-layer graphene and an aqueous electrolyte. The impedance is dominated by an imaginary component but has a finite real component. Invoking the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, we determine the power spectral density of thermally driven voltage fluctuations at the graphene/electrolyte interface. The fluctuations have 1/f(p) dependence, with p = 0.75-0.85, and the magnitude of fluctuations scales inversely with area. Our results explain noise spectra previously measured in liquid-gated suspended graphene devices and provide realistic targets for future device performance.

  13. Graphene Spintronics

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Wei; Kawakami, Roland K.; Gmitra, Martin; Fabian, Jaroslav

    2015-01-01

    The isolation of graphene has triggered an avalanche of studies into the spin-dependent physical properties of this material and of graphene-based spintronic devices. Here, we review the experimental and theoretical state-of-art concerning spin injection and transport, defect-induced magnetic moments, spin–orbit coupling and spin relaxation in graphene. Future research in graphene spintronics will need to address the development of applications such as spin transistors and spin logic devices,...

  14. Graphene aerogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauzauskie, Peter J; Worsley, Marcus A; Baumann, Theodore F; Satcher, Jr., Joe H; Biener, Juergen

    2015-03-31

    Graphene aerogels with high conductivity and surface areas including a method for making a graphene aerogel, including the following steps: (1) preparing a reaction mixture comprising a graphene oxide suspension and at least one catalyst; (2) curing the reaction mixture to produce a wet gel; (3) drying the wet gel to produce a dry gel; and (4) pyrolyzing the dry gel to produce a graphene aerogel. Applications include electrical energy storage including batteries and supercapacitors.

  15. Mechanism of water transport in graphene oxide laminates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Junjiao; You, Yi; Bustamante, Heriberto; Sahajwalla, Veena; Joshi, Rakesh K

    2017-03-01

    It is understood that nano-channels of graphene oxide membranes have a water flow mechanism which is similar to the water flow inside carbon nanotube pores. The water transport mechanisms recently proposed by various researchers suggest that membranes composed of graphene oxide laminates could be regarded as an assembly of many tiny carbon nanotubes stacked together with attached functional groups as spacers.

  16. A new function of graphene oxide emerges: inactivating phytopathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas oryzae pv. Oryzae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Juanni; Wang Xiuping; Han Heyou, E-mail: hyhan@mail.hzau.edu.cn [College of Science, Huazhong Agricultural University, State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology (China)

    2013-05-15

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) is one representative phytopathogenic bacterium causing bacteria infections in rice. The antibacterial activity of graphene suspended in different dispersants against Xoo was first investigated. Bacteriological test data, fluorescence microscope and transmission electron microscopy images are provided, which yield insight into the antibacterial action of the nanoscale materials. Surprisingly, the results showed graphene oxide (GO) exhibits superior bactericidal effect even at extremely low dose in water (250 {mu}g/mL), almost killing 94.48% cells, in comparison to common bactericide bismerthiazol with only 13.3% mortality. The high efficiency in inactivating the bacteria on account of considerable changes in the cell membranes caused by the extremely sharp edges of graphene oxide and generation of reactive oxygen species, which may be the fatal factor for bacterial inactivation. Given the superior antibacterial effect of GO and the fact that GO can be mass-produced with low cost, we expect a new application could be developed as bactericide for controlling plant disease, which may be a matter of great importance for agricultural development.

  17. A new function of graphene oxide emerges: inactivating phytopathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas oryzae pv. Oryzae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Juanni; Wang, Xiuping; Han, Heyou

    2013-05-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae ( Xoo) is one representative phytopathogenic bacterium causing bacteria infections in rice. The antibacterial activity of graphene suspended in different dispersants against Xoo was first investigated. Bacteriological test data, fluorescence microscope and transmission electron microscopy images are provided, which yield insight into the antibacterial action of the nanoscale materials. Surprisingly, the results showed graphene oxide (GO) exhibits superior bactericidal effect even at extremely low dose in water (250 μg/mL), almost killing 94.48 % cells, in comparison to common bactericide bismerthiazol with only 13.3 % mortality. The high efficiency in inactivating the bacteria on account of considerable changes in the cell membranes caused by the extremely sharp edges of graphene oxide and generation of reactive oxygen species, which may be the fatal factor for bacterial inactivation. Given the superior antibacterial effect of GO and the fact that GO can be mass-produced with low cost, we expect a new application could be developed as bactericide for controlling plant disease, which may be a matter of great importance for agricultural development.

  18. Graphene as a thin-film catalyst booster: graphene-catalyst interface plays a critical role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Sieun; Jin Choi, Won; Sang Chae, Soo; Jang, Seunghun; Chang, Hyunju; Lee, Tae Il; Kim, Youn Sang; Lee, Jeong-O

    2017-12-08

    Due to its extreme thinness, graphene can transmit some surface properties of its underlying substrate, a phenomenon referred to as graphene transparency. Here we demonstrate the application of the transparency of graphene as a protector of thin-film catalysts and a booster of their catalytic efficiency. The photocatalytic degradation of dye molecules by ZnO thin films was chosen as a model system. A ZnO thin film coated with monolayer graphene showed greater catalytic efficiency and long-term stability than did bare ZnO. Interestingly, we found the catalytic efficiency of the graphene-coated ZnO thin film to depend critically on the nature of the bottom ZnO layer; graphene transferred to a relatively rough, sputter-coated ZnO thin film showed rather poor catalytic degradation of the dye molecules while a smooth sol-gel-synthesized ZnO covered with monolayer graphene showed enhanced catalytic degradation. Based on a systematic investigation of the interface between graphene and ZnO thin films, we concluded the transparency of graphene to be critically dependent on its interface with a supporting substrate. Graphene supported on an atomically flat substrate was found to efficiently transmit the properties of the substrate, but graphene suspended on a substrate with a rough nanoscale topography was completely opaque to the substrate properties. Our experimental observations revealed the morphology of the substrate to be a key factor affecting the transparency of graphene, and should be taken into account in order to optimally apply graphene as a protector of catalytic thin films and a booster of their catalysis.

  19. Graphene as a thin-film catalyst booster: graphene-catalyst interface plays a critical role

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Sieun; Choi, Won Jin; Chae, Soo Sang; Jang, Seunghun; Chang, Hyunju; Lee, Tae Il; Kim, Youn Sang; Lee, Jeong-O.

    2017-12-01

    Due to its extreme thinness, graphene can transmit some surface properties of its underlying substrate, a phenomenon referred to as graphene transparency. Here we demonstrate the application of the transparency of graphene as a protector of thin-film catalysts and a booster of their catalytic efficiency. The photocatalytic degradation of dye molecules by ZnO thin films was chosen as a model system. A ZnO thin film coated with monolayer graphene showed greater catalytic efficiency and long-term stability than did bare ZnO. Interestingly, we found the catalytic efficiency of the graphene-coated ZnO thin film to depend critically on the nature of the bottom ZnO layer; graphene transferred to a relatively rough, sputter-coated ZnO thin film showed rather poor catalytic degradation of the dye molecules while a smooth sol–gel-synthesized ZnO covered with monolayer graphene showed enhanced catalytic degradation. Based on a systematic investigation of the interface between graphene and ZnO thin films, we concluded the transparency of graphene to be critically dependent on its interface with a supporting substrate. Graphene supported on an atomically flat substrate was found to efficiently transmit the properties of the substrate, but graphene suspended on a substrate with a rough nanoscale topography was completely opaque to the substrate properties. Our experimental observations revealed the morphology of the substrate to be a key factor affecting the transparency of graphene, and should be taken into account in order to optimally apply graphene as a protector of catalytic thin films and a booster of their catalysis.

  20. Synthesis of free-standing MnO{sub 2}/reduced graphene oxide membranes and electrochemical investigation of their performances as anode materials for half and full lithium-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Xiaojun [Northwest University, Key Laboratory of Synthetic and Nature Functional Molecule Chemistry (Ministry of Education), College of Chemistry & Materials Science (China); Wang, Gang [Northwest University, National Key Laboratory of Photoelectric Technology and Functional Materials (Culture Base), National Photoelectric Technology and Functional Materials & Application International Cooperation Base, Institute of Photonics & Photon-Technology (China); Wang, Hui, E-mail: huiwang@nwu.edu.cn [Northwest University, Key Laboratory of Synthetic and Nature Functional Molecule Chemistry (Ministry of Education), College of Chemistry & Materials Science (China)

    2016-10-15

    MnO{sub 2} nanotubes/reduced graphene oxide (MnO{sub 2}/RGO) membranes with different MnO{sub 2} contents are successfully synthesized by a facile two-step method including vacuum filtration and subsequent thermal reduction route. The MnO{sub 2} nanotubes obtained are 38 nm in diameter and homogeneously imbedded in RGO sheets as spacers. The synthesized MnO{sub 2}/RGO membranes exhibit excellent mechanical flexibilities and free-standing properties. Using the membranes directly as anode materials for lithium batteries (LIBs), the membranes for half LIBs show superb cycling stabilities and rate performances. Importantly, the electrochemical performances of MnO{sub 2}/RGO membranes show a strong dependence on the MnO{sub 2} nanotube contents in the hybrids. In addition, our results show that the hybrid membranes with 49.0 wt% MnO{sub 2} nanotube in half LIBs achieve a high reversible capacity of 1006.7 mAh g{sup −1} after 100 cycles at a current density of 0.1 A g{sup −1}, which is higher lithium storage capacity than that of reported MnO{sub 2}-carbon electrodes. Furthermore, the synthesized full cell (MnO{sub 2}/RGO//LiCoO{sub 2}) system also exhibit excellent electrochemical performances, which can be attributed to the unique microstructures of MnO{sub 2} and GRO, coupled with the strong synergistic interaction between MnO{sub 2} nanotubes and GRO sheets.

  1. Charge Transfer Properties Through Graphene for Applications in Gaseous Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Franchino, S.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Jackman, R.B.; Muller, H.; Nguyen, T.T.; de Oliveira, R.; Oliveri, E.; Pfeiffer, D.; Resnati, F.; Ropelewski, L.; Smith, J.; van Stenis, M.; Streli, C.; Thuiner, P.; Veenhof, R.

    2016-07-11

    Graphene is a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice with remarkable mechanical and electrical properties. Regarded as the thinnest and narrowest conductive mesh, it has drastically different transmission behaviours when bombarded with electrons and ions in vacuum. This property, if confirmed in gas, may be a definitive solution for the ion back-flow problem in gaseous detectors. In order to ascertain this aspect, graphene layers of dimensions of about 2x2cm$^2$, grown on a copper substrate, are transferred onto a flat metal surface with holes, so that the graphene layer is freely suspended. The graphene and the support are installed into a gaseous detector equipped with a triple Gaseous Electron Multiplier (GEM), and the transparency properties to electrons and ions are studied in gas as a function of the electric fields. The techniques to produce the graphene samples are described, and we report on preliminary tests of graphene-coated GEMs.

  2. Determination of Young's Modulus of Graphene by Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Ung; Yoon, Duhee; Cheong, Hyeonsik

    2012-02-01

    The mechanical properties of graphene are interesting research subjects because its Young's modulus and strength are extremely high. Values of ˜1 TPa for the Young's modulus have been reported [Lee et al. Science, 321, 385 (2008), Koenig et al. Nat. Nanotech. 6, 543 (2011)]. We made a graphene sample on a SiO2/Si substrate with closed-bottom holes by mechanical exfoliation. A pressure difference across the graphene membrane was applied by putting the sample in a vacuum chamber. This pressure difference makes the graphene membrane bulge upward like a balloon. By measuring the shifts of the Raman G and 2D bands, we estimated the amount of strain on the graphene membrane. By comparing the strain estimated from the Raman measurements with numerical simulations based on the finite element method, we obtained the Young's modulus of graphene.

  3. Toxicity of Graphene Shells, Graphene Oxide, and Graphene Oxide Paper Evaluated with Escherichia coli Biotests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efremova, Ludmila V.; Vasilchenko, Alexey S.; Rakov, Eduard G.; Deryabin, Dmitry G.

    2015-01-01

    The plate-like graphene shells (GS) produced by an original methane pyrolysis method and their derivatives graphene oxide (GO) and graphene oxide paper (GO-P) were evaluated with luminescent Escherichia coli biotests and additional bacterial-based assays which together revealed the graphene-family nanomaterials' toxicity and bioactivity mechanisms. Bioluminescence inhibition assay, fluorescent two-component staining to evaluate cell membrane permeability, and atomic force microscopy data showed GO expressed bioactivity in aqueous suspension, whereas GS suspensions and the GO-P surface were assessed as nontoxic materials. The mechanism of toxicity of GO was shown not to be associated with oxidative stress in the targeted soxS::lux and katG::lux reporter cells; also, GO did not lead to significant mechanical disruption of treated bacteria with the release of intracellular DNA contents into the environment. The well-coordinated time- and dose-dependent surface charge neutralization and transport and energetic disorders in the Escherichia coli cells suggest direct membrane interaction, internalization, and perturbation (i.e., “membrane stress”) as a clue to graphene oxide's mechanism of toxicity. PMID:26221608

  4. Noncommutative Graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Bastos, C.; Bertolami, O.; Dias, N.; Prata, J.

    2012-01-01

    We consider a noncommutative description of graphene. This description consists of a Dirac equation for massless Dirac fermions plus noncommutative corrections, which are treated in the presence of an external magnetic field. We argue that, being a two-dimensional Dirac system, graphene is particularly interesting to test noncommutativity. We find that momentum noncommutativity affects the energy levels of graphene, but that it does not entail any kind of correction to the Hall conductivity.

  5. Epitaxial graphene

    OpenAIRE

    de Heer, Walt A.; Berger, Claire; Wu, Xiaosong; First, Phillip N.; Conrad, Edward H.; Li, Xuebin; Li, Tianbo; Sprinkle, Michael; Hass, Joanna; Sadowski, Marcin L.; Potemski, Marek; Martinez, Gerard

    2007-01-01

    Graphene multilayers are grown epitaxially on single crystal silicon carbide. This system is composed of several graphene layers of which the first layer is electron doped due to the built-in electric field and the other layers are essentially undoped. Unlike graphite the charge carriers show Dirac particle properties (i.e. an anomalous Berry's phase, weak anti-localization and square root field dependence of the Landau level energies). Epitaxial graphene shows quasi-ballistic transport and l...

  6. Aromatic graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, D. K., E-mail: gour.netai@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Material Science Engineering, National Institute of Technology Durgapur-713209, West Bengal (India); Sahoo, S., E-mail: sukadevsahoo@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology Durgapur-713209, West Bengal (India)

    2016-04-13

    In recent years graphene attracts the scientific and engineering communities due to its outstanding electronic, thermal, mechanical and optical properties and many potential applications. Recently, Popov et al. [1] have studied the properties of graphene and proved that it is aromatic but without fragrance. In this paper, we present a theory to prepare graphene with fragrance. This can be used as scented pencils, perfumes, room and car fresheners, cosmetics and many other useful household substances.

  7. Enhanced solar light absorption of graphene by interaction with anisole

    KAUST Repository

    Kahaly, M. Upadhyay

    2014-10-01

    We study suspended graphene in contact with the organic molecule anisole to analyse the implications of the interaction for the optical absorption, using first principle calculations. Because of a weak interaction multiple orientations of the molecule with respect to the graphene sheet are possible. A substantial enhancement of the optical absorption independent of the specific orientation is observed, which is promising for energy harvesting. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Graphene Origami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blees, Melina; Barnard, Arthur; Roberts, Samantha; Ong, Peijie; Zaretski, Aliaksandr; Wang, Si Ping; McEuen, Paul

    2012-02-01

    Graphene, which features unparalleled in-plane strength and low out-of-plane bending energy, is an ideal material with which to tackle the challenge of building three-dimensional structures and moving parts at the nanoscale. Here we demonstrate laser-induced folding and scrolling of large-area monolayer graphene in solution. Monolayer graphene is typically well-adhered to its substrate, but we have achieved control of the adhesion using a combination of an aluminum sacrificial layer and surfactants. Once the graphene can move, local heating with an infrared laser and the interfacial tension of laser-nucleated bubbles allow us to lift, fold, and scroll the graphene. We have also formed a regular array of polymer dots on the graphene surface which can be easily imaged in three dimensions, allowing us to optically track the shape of the graphene as it moves. And finally, we establish graphene's viability as a strong but flexible sheet hinge by building and manipulating structures of rigid metallic panels connected by strips of graphene.

  9. Graphene hot-electron light bulb: incandescence from hBN-encapsulated graphene in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Seok-Kyun; Šiškins, Makars; Mullan, Ciaran; Yin, Jun; Kravets, Vasyl G.; Kozikov, Aleksey; Ozdemir, Servet; Alhazmi, Manal; Holwill, Matthew; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Ghazaryan, Davit; Novoselov, Kostya S.; Fal’ko, Vladimir I.; Mishchenko, Artem

    2018-01-01

    The excellent electronic and mechanical properties of graphene allow it to sustain very large currents, enabling its incandescence through Joule heating in suspended devices. Although interesting scientifically and promising technologically, this process is unattainable in ambient environment, because graphene quickly oxidises at high temperatures. Here, we take the performance of graphene-based incandescent devices to the next level by encapsulating graphene with hexagonal boron nitride (hBN). Remarkably, we found that the hBN encapsulation provides an excellent protection for hot graphene filaments even at temperatures well above 2000 K. Unrivalled oxidation resistance of hBN combined with atomically clean graphene/hBN interface allows for a stable light emission from our devices in atmosphere for many hours of continuous operation. Furthermore, when confined in a simple photonic cavity, the thermal emission spectrum is modified by a cavity mode, shifting the emission to the visible range spectrum. We believe our results demonstrate that hBN/graphene heterostructures can be used to conveniently explore the technologically important high-temperature regime and to pave the way for future optoelectronic applications of graphene-based systems.

  10. EDITORIAL: Epitaxial graphene Epitaxial graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Heer, Walt A.; Berger, Claire

    2012-04-01

    Graphene is widely regarded as an important new electronic material with interesting two-dimensional electron gas properties. Not only that, but graphene is widely considered to be an important new material for large-scale integrated electronic devices that may eventually even succeed silicon. In fact, there are countless publications that demonstrate the amazing applications potential of graphene. In order to realize graphene electronics, a platform is required that is compatible with large-scale electronics processing methods. It was clear from the outset that graphene grown epitaxially on silicon carbide substrates was exceptionally well suited as a platform for graphene-based electronics, not only because the graphene sheets are grown directly on electronics-grade silicon carbide (an important semiconductor in its own right), but also because these sheets are oriented with respect to the semiconductor. Moreover, the extremely high temperatures involved in production assure essentially defect-free and contamination-free materials with well-defined interfaces. Epitaxial graphene on silicon carbide is not a unique material, but actually a class of materials. It is a complex structure consisting of a reconstructed silicon carbide surface, which, for planar hexagonal silicon carbide, is either the silicon- or the carbon-terminated face, an interfacial carbon rich layer, followed by one or more graphene layers. Consequently, the structure of graphene films on silicon carbide turns out to be a rich surface-science puzzle that has been intensively studied and systematically unravelled with a wide variety of surface science probes. Moreover, the graphene films produced on the carbon-terminated face turn out to be rotationally stacked, resulting in unique and important structural and electronic properties. Finally, in contrast to essentially all other graphene production methods, epitaxial graphene can be grown on structured silicon carbide surfaces to produce graphene

  11. Suspended animation for delayed resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safar, Peter J; Tisherman, Samuel A

    2002-04-01

    'Suspended animation for delayed resuscitation' is a new concept for attempting resuscitation from cardiac arrest of patients who currently (totally or temporarily) cannot be resuscitated, such as traumatic exsanguination cardiac arrest. Suspended animation means preservation of the viability of brain and organism during cardiac arrest, until restoration of stable spontaneous circulation or prolonged artificial circulation is possible. Suspended animation for exsanguination cardiac arrest of trauma victims would have to be induced within the critical first 5 min after the start of cardiac arrest no-flow, to buy time for transport and resuscitative surgery (hemostasis) performed during no-flow. Cardiac arrest is then reversed with all-out resuscitation, usually requiring cardiopulmonary bypass. Suspended animation has been explored and documented as effective in dogs in terms of long-term survival without brain damage after very prolonged cardiac arrest. In the 1990s, the Pittsburgh group achieved survival without brain damage in dogs after cardiac arrest of up to 90 min no-flow at brain (tympanic) temperature of 10 degrees C, with functionally and histologically normal brains. These studies used emergency cardiopulmonary bypass with heat exchanger or a single hypothermic saline flush into the aorta, which proved superior to pharmacologic strategies. For the large number of normovolemic sudden cardiac death victims, which currently cannot be resuscitated, more research in large animals is needed.

  12. Graphene Nanodevices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calado, V.E.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis describes a divergent set of experiments on graphene, a one-atom thin sheet of carbon. We employ graphene’s unique properties to explore fundamental physics and novel applications. This is done by nano fabricating graphene to nanodevices, which are subject to experiments. Here we first

  13. Direct transfer of graphene onto flexible substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Luiz G P; Song, Yi; Zeng, Tingying; Dresselhaus, Mildred S; Kong, Jing; Araujo, Paulo T

    2013-10-29

    In this paper we explore the direct transfer via lamination of chemical vapor deposition graphene onto different flexible substrates. The transfer method investigated here is fast, simple, and does not require an intermediate transfer membrane, such as polymethylmethacrylate, which needs to be removed afterward. Various substrates of general interest in research and industry were studied in this work, including polytetrafluoroethylene filter membranes, PVC, cellulose nitrate/cellulose acetate filter membranes, polycarbonate, paraffin, polyethylene terephthalate, paper, and cloth. By comparing the properties of these substrates, two critical factors to ensure a successful transfer on bare substrates were identified: the substrate's hydrophobicity and good contact between the substrate and graphene. For substrates that do not satisfy those requirements, polymethylmethacrylate can be used as a surface modifier or glue to ensure successful transfer. Our results can be applied to facilitate current processes and open up directions for applications of chemical vapor deposition graphene on flexible substrates. A broad range of applications can be envisioned, including fabrication of graphene devices for opto/organic electronics, graphene membranes for gas/liquid separation, and ubiquitous electronics with graphene.

  14. Graphene Electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pizzocchero, Filippo

    The production of graphene and the other 2D materials is presented in the beginning of this thesis. Micromechanical exfoliation is the best method for obtaining relatively small and top quality samples. The invention of Graphene Finder simplifies the procedure of finding the exfoliated flakes...... in copper thin films is studied and found to be detrimental for the growth of graphene. The modified synthesis of rGO is introduced, as rGO represents a cheap alternative to CVD for large scale production of graphene. The transfer of flakes is performed by several methods, such as with PVA/PMMA support, CAB...... wedging and the pick-up technique with hBN. Several important improvements of the pick-up technique are introduced. These allowed us to transfer any 2D crystals and patterned graphene flakes with PMMA residues. We also developed the drop-down technique, which is used to release any crystal on the surface...

  15. Exposure monitoring of graphene nanoplatelets manufacturing workplaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Han, Jong Hun; Kim, Jae Hyun; Kim, Boowook; Bello, Dhimiter; Kim, Jin Kwon; Lee, Gun Ho; Sohn, Eun Kyung; Lee, Kyungmin; Ahn, Kangho; Faustman, Elaine M; Yu, Il Je

    2016-01-01

    Graphenes have emerged as a highly promising, two-dimensional engineered nanomaterial that can possibly substitute carbon nanotubes. They are being explored in numerous R&D and industrial applications in laboratories across the globe, leading to possible human and environmental exposures to them. Yet, there are no published data on graphene exposures in occupational settings and no readily available methods for their detection and quantitation exist. This study investigates for the first time the potential exposure of workers and research personnel to graphenes in two research facilities and evaluates the status of the control measures. One facility manufactures graphene using graphite exfoliation and chemical vapor deposition (CVD), while the other facility grows graphene on a copper plate using CVD, which is then transferred to a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) sheet. Graphene exposures and process emissions were investigated for three tasks - CVD growth, exfoliation, and transfer - using a multi-metric approach, which utilizes several direct reading instruments, integrated sampling, and chemical and morphological analysis. Real-time instruments included a dust monitor, condensation particle counter (CPC), nanoparticle surface area monitor, scanning mobility particle sizer, and an aethalometer. Morphologically, graphenes and other nanostructures released from the work process were investigated using a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Graphenes were quantified in airborne respirable samples as elemental carbon via thermo-optical analysis. The mass concentrations of total suspended particulate at Workplaces A and B were very low, and elemental carbon concentrations were mostly below the detection limit, indicating very low exposure to graphene or any other particles. The real-time monitoring, especially the aethalometer, showed a good response to the released black carbon, providing a signature of the graphene released during the opening of the CVD reactor

  16. 7 CFR 1206.21 - Suspend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... part thereof during a particular period of time specified in the rule. ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.21 Suspend. Suspend means to...

  17. Polymeric and Lipid Membranes-From Spheres to Flat Membranes and vice versa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saveleva, Mariia S; Lengert, Ekaterina V; Gorin, Dmitry A; Parakhonskiy, Bogdan V; Skirtach, Andre G

    2017-08-15

    Membranes are important components in a number of systems, where separation and control of the flow of molecules is desirable. Controllable membranes represent an even more coveted and desirable entity and their development is considered to be the next step of development. Typically, membranes are considered on flat surfaces, but spherical capsules possess a perfect "infinite" or fully suspended membranes. Similarities and transitions between spherical and flat membranes are discussed, while applications of membranes are also emphasized.

  18. Improved surface hydrophilicity and antifouling property of polysulfone ultrafiltration membrane with poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate grafted graphene oxide nanofillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haidong; Lu, Xiaofei; Lu, Xinglin; Wang, Zhenghui; Ma, Jun; Wang, Panpan

    2017-12-01

    In this study, the GO-g-P(PEGMA) nanoplates were first synthesized by grafting hydrophilic poly (poly (ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate) via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) method. A novel polysulfone (PSF) nanocomposite membrane using GO-g-P(PEGMA) nanoplates as nanofillers was fabricated. FTIR, TGA, 1H NMR, GPC and TEM were applied to verify the successful synthesis of the prepared nanoplates, while SEM, AFM, XPS, contact angle goniometry and filtration experiments were used to characterize the fabricated nanocomposite membranes. It was found that the new prepared nanofillers were well dispersed in organic PSF matrix, and the PSF/GO-g-P(PEGMA) nanocomposite membrane showed significant improvements in water flux and flux recovery rate. Based on the results of resistance-in-series model, the nanocomposite membrane exhibited superior resistance to the irreversible fouling. The excellent filtration and antifouling performance are attributed to the segregation of GO-g-P(PEMGA) nanofillers toward the membrane surface and the pore walls. Notably, the blended nanofillers appeared a stable retention in/on nanocomposite membrane after 30 days of washing time. The demonstrated method of synthesis GO-g-P(PEGMA) in this study can also be extended to preparation of other nanocomposite membrane in future.

  19. Superlubricating graphene and graphene oxide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumant, Anirudha V.; Erdemir, Ali; Choi, Junho; Berman, Diana

    2018-02-13

    A system and method for forming at least one of graphene and graphene oxide on a substrate and an opposed wear member. The system includes graphene and graphene oxide formed by an exfoliation process or solution processing method to dispose graphene and/or graphene oxide onto a substrate. The system further includes an opposing wear member disposed on another substrate and a gas atmosphere of an inert gas like N2, ambient, a humid atmosphere and a water solution.

  20. Hexagonal boron nitride: a promising substrate for graphene with high heat dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongwei; Hu, Shiqian; Chen, Jie; Li, Baowen

    2017-06-01

    Supported graphene on a standard SiO2 substrate exhibits unsatisfactory heat dissipation performance that is far inferior to the intrinsic ultrahigh thermal conductivity of a suspended sample. A suitable substrate for enhancing thermal transport in supported graphene is highly desirable for the development of graphene devices for thermal management. By using molecular dynamics simulations, here we demonstrate that bulk hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is a more appealing substrate to achieve high performance heat dissipation in supported graphene. Notable length dependence and high thermal conductivity are observed in h-BN-supported single-layer graphene (SLG), suggesting that the thermal transport characteristics are close to that of suspended SLG. At room temperature, the thermal conductivity of h-BN-supported SLG is as high as 1347.3 ± 20.5 Wm-1 K-1, which is about 77% of that for the suspended case, and is more than twice that of the SiO2-supported SLG. Furthermore, we find that the smooth and atomically flat h-BN substrate gives rise to a regular and weak stress distribution in graphene, resulting in a less affected phonon relaxation time and dominant phonon mean free path. We also find that stacking and rotation significantly impacts the thermal transport in h-BN-supported graphene. Our study provides valuable insights towards the design of graphene devices on realistic substrate for high performance heat dissipation applications.

  1. Atomic-Scale Topographic and Electronic Structure of Graphene Films on Ultraflat Insulating Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Christopher; Zhao, Liuyan; Ghahari, Fereshte; Dean, Cory; Rim, Kwang; Hone, James; Flynn, George; Kim, Philip; Pasupathy, Abhay

    2011-03-01

    Graphene, a unique two-dimensional material, has attracted much attention for its exotic electronic properties. But owing to its nature as a single monolayer, many of these interesting properties depend heavily on the substrate on which the graphene rests. Scanning tunneling microscope (STM) experiments offer the unique ability to investigate the effect of the substrate on the surface roughness (via topography maps) as well as the local electronic properties (via spectroscopy maps) of graphene. In this talk we will present such experimental results of graphene on atomically flat insulating substrates such as mica and boron nitride, as well as suspended graphene sheets. We will describe experiments performed both on exfoliated graphene flakes as well as large-area graphene films grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD).

  2. Nonlinear Nanomechanical Resonators using CVD Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobel, Robert; Chaudhuri, Arnab

    Graphene is an ideal material for high quality nanoelectromechanical resonators due to high Young's modulus, low mass, ability to sustain high in-plane strain, and unique electrical properties. In this work, atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition is employed to obtain monolayer graphene on copper. Scanning electron microscopy, Raman imaging and two-terminal electrical measurements reveal the presence of high quality, monolayer graphene. The graphene is transferred to Si/SiO2 substrate and electron beam lithography is used to fabricate suspended doubly-clamped resonators. The devices are electrostatically actuated and their motion is read out using nonlinear mixing of graphene's electrical conductivity. Modeling the devices as Duffing resonators shows the presence of mechanical nonlinearity in response to an applied force even at moderate bias voltages. We discuss implications of this nonlinearity for parametric amplification, mode-mixing and the generation and measurement of squeezed thermomechanical states. The models are compared with experimental data and prospects for developing measurement techniques for high precision sensors and quantum-limited mechanical measurements of graphene are explored.

  3. Graphene Exfoliation at a Ferroelectric Domain Wall Induced by the Piezoelectric Effect: Impact on the Conductance of the Graphene Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozovska, Anna N.; Kurchak, Anatolii I.; Strikha, Maksym V.

    2017-11-01

    p -n junctions in graphene on ferroelectric substrates have been actively studied, but the impact of the piezoelectric effect in ferroelectric substrate with ferroelectric domain walls (FDWs) on graphene characteristics was not considered. Because of the piezoeffect, ferroelectric domain stripes with opposite spontaneous polarizations elongate or contract depending on the polarity of voltage applied to the substrate. We show that the alternating piezoelectric displacement of the ferroelectric domain surfaces can lead to the alternate stretching and separation of graphene areas at the steps between elongated and contracted domains. Graphene separation at FDWs induced by the piezoeffect can cause unusual effects. In particular, the conductance of the graphene channel in a field-effect transistor increases significantly because electrons in the stretched section scatter on acoustic phonons. At the same time, the graphene conductance is determined by ferroelectric spontaneous polarization and varies greatly in the presence of FDWs. The revealed piezomechanism of graphene conductance control is promising for next generations of graphene-based field-effect transistors, modulators, electrical transducers, and piezoresistive elements. Also, our results propose the method of suspended graphene fabrication based on the piezoeffect in a ferroelectric substrate that does not require any additional technological procedures.

  4. Ultrahigh-throughput exfoliation of graphite into pristine 'single-layer' graphene using microwaves and molecularly engineered ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Michio; Saito, Yusuke; Park, Chiyoung; Fukushima, Takanori; Aida, Takuzo

    2015-09-01

    Graphene has shown much promise as an organic electronic material but, despite recent achievements in the production of few-layer graphene, the quantitative exfoliation of graphite into pristine single-layer graphene has remained one of the main challenges in developing practical devices. Recently, reduced graphene oxide has been recognized as a non-feasible alternative to graphene owing to variable defect types and levels, and attention is turning towards reliable methods for the high-throughput exfoliation of graphite. Here we report that microwave irradiation of graphite suspended in molecularly engineered oligomeric ionic liquids allows for ultrahigh-efficiency exfoliation (93% yield) with a high selectivity (95%) towards 'single-layer' graphene (that is, with thicknesses graphene sheets show negligible structural deterioration. They are also readily redispersible in oligomeric ionic liquids up to ~100 mg ml(-1), and form physical gels in which an anisotropic orientation of graphene sheets, once induced by a magnetic field, is maintained.

  5. Beyond graphene

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Service, Robert F

    2015-01-01

      In 2013, researchers around the globe published more than 15000 papers on single-layer graphite, called graphene, a number that has grown exponentially since the material was invented 11 years ago...

  6. Experimental characterization of graphene by electrostatic resonance frequency tuning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sajadi, B.; Alijani, F.; Davidovikj, D.; Goosen, J.F.L.; Steeneken, P.G.; van Keulen, A.

    2017-01-01

    In the last decade, graphene membranes have drawn tremendous attention due to their potential application in Nano-Electro-Mechanical Systems. In this paper, we show that the frequency response curves of graphene resonators are powerful tools for their dynamic characterization and for extracting

  7. Rebar Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    As the cylindrical sp2-bonded carbon allotrope, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been widely used to reinforce bulk materials such as polymers, ceramics, and metals. However, both the concept demonstration and the fundamental understanding on how 1D CNTs reinforce atomically thin 2D layered materials, such as graphene, are still absent. Here, we demonstrate the successful synthesis of CNT-toughened graphene by simply annealing functionalized CNTs on Cu foils without needing to introduce extraneous carbon sources. The CNTs act as reinforcing bar (rebar), toughening the graphene through both π–π stacking domains and covalent bonding where the CNTs partially unzip and form a seamless 2D conjoined hybrid as revealed by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy analysis. This is termed rebar graphene. Rebar graphene can be free-standing on water and transferred onto target substrates without needing a polymer-coating due to the rebar effects of the CNTs. The utility of rebar graphene sheets as flexible all-carbon transparent electrodes is demonstrated. The in-plane marriage of 1D nanotubes and 2D layered materials might herald an electrical and mechanical union that extends beyond carbon chemistry. PMID:24694285

  8. Graphene and Graphene Nanomesh Spintronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junji Haruyama

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Spintronics, which manipulate spins but not electron charge, are highly valued as energy and thermal dissipationless systems. A variety of materials are challenging the realization of spintronic devices. Among those, graphene, a carbon mono-atomic layer, is very promising for efficient spin manipulation and the creation of a full spectrum of beyond-CMOS spin-based nano-devices. In the present article, the recent advancements in graphene spintronics are reviewed, introducing the observation of spin coherence and the spin Hall effect. Some research has reported the strong spin coherence of graphene. Avoiding undesirable influences from the substrate are crucial. Magnetism and spintronics arising from graphene edges are reviewed based on my previous results. In spite of carbon-based material with only sp2 bonds, the zigzag-type atomic structure of graphene edges theoretically produces spontaneous spin polarization of electrons due to mutual Coulomb interaction of extremely high electron density of states (edge states localizing at the flat energy band. We fabricate honeycomb-like arrays of low-defect hexagonal nanopores (graphene nanomeshes; GNMs on graphenes, which produce a large amount of zigzag pore edges, by using a nonlithographic method (nanoporous alumina templates and critical temperature annealing under high vacuum and hydrogen atmosphere. We observe large-magnitude ferromagnetism, which arises from polarized spins localizing at the hydrogen-terminated zigzag-nanopore edges of the GNMs, even at room temperature. Moreover, spin pumping effects are found for magnetic fields applied in parallel with the few-layer GNM planes. Strong spin coherence and spontaneously polarized edge spins of graphene can be expected to lead to novel spintronics with invisible, flexible, and ultra-light (wearable features.

  9. Coating of graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, G.F.; Dekker, C.

    2014-01-01

    The present invention is in the field of highly crystalline graphene and coating said graphene with a layer. Said graphene may have further structures, such as nanopores, nanogaps, and nanoribbons. The coated graphene can be used for biomolecular analysis and modification, such as DNA-sequencing, as a sensor, etc. The invention therefor also relates to use of coated graphene.

  10. Graphene shield enhanced photocathodes and methods for making the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Nathan Andrew

    2014-09-02

    Disclosed are graphene shield enhanced photocathodes, such as high QE photocathodes. In certain embodiments, a monolayer graphene shield membrane ruggedizes a high quantum efficiency photoemission electron source by protecting a photosensitive film of the photocathode, extending operational lifetime and simplifying its integration in practical electron sources. In certain embodiments of the disclosed graphene shield enhanced photocathodes, the graphene serves as a transparent shield that does not inhibit photon or electron transmission but isolates the photosensitive film of the photocathode from reactive gas species, preventing contamination and yielding longer lifetime.

  11. Tensile strain mapping in flat germanium membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhead, S. D., E-mail: S.Rhead@warwick.ac.uk; Halpin, J. E.; Myronov, M.; Patchett, D. H.; Allred, P. S.; Wilson, N. R.; Leadley, D. R. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Shah, V. A. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Department of Engineering, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Kachkanov, V.; Dolbnya, I. P. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Reparaz, J. S. [ICN2 - Institut Catala de Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Sotomayor Torres, C. M. [ICN2 - Institut Catala de Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain)

    2014-04-28

    Scanning X-ray micro-diffraction has been used as a non-destructive probe of the local crystalline quality of a thin suspended germanium (Ge) membrane. A series of reciprocal space maps were obtained with ∼4 μm spatial resolution, from which detailed information on the strain distribution, thickness, and crystalline tilt of the membrane was obtained. We are able to detect a systematic strain variation across the membranes, but show that this is negligible in the context of using the membranes as platforms for further growth. In addition, we show evidence that the interface and surface quality is improved by suspending the Ge.

  12. Optical switching of a graphene mechanical switch using the Casimir effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inui, Norio

    2017-09-01

    We propose a method to control a graphene-based mechanical switch with light. By positioning a self-supporting graphene sheet parallel to a doped silicon membrane, irradiation of the membrane with light can bring the graphene into contact with the membrane. This operation is based on the enhancement of the Casimir force between the graphene sheet and a doped silicon membrane that results from photoionization; therefore, pull-in phenomena can occur even without applying any voltage. We theoretically investigated the dependence of the maximum displacement of a graphene sheet on the power of the irradiation light. Furthermore, the switching time is estimated by analyzing the time-evolution of the carrier density in a doped silicon membrane.

  13. Switch on the high thermal conductivity of graphene paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yangsu; Yuan, Pengyu; Wang, Tianyu; Hashemi, Nastaran; Wang, Xinwei

    2016-10-14

    This work reports on the discovery of a high thermal conductivity (κ) switch-on phenomenon in high purity graphene paper (GP) when its temperature is reduced from room temperature down to 10 K. The κ after switch-on (1732 to 3013 W m(-1) K(-1)) is 4-8 times that before switch-on. The triggering temperature is 245-260 K. The switch-on behavior is attributed to the thermal expansion mismatch between pure graphene flakes and impurity-embedded flakes. This is confirmed by the switch behavior of the temperature coefficient of resistance. Before switch-on, the interactions between pure graphene flakes and surrounding impurity-embedded flakes efficiently suppress phonon transport in GP. After switch-on, the structure separation frees the pure graphene flakes from the impurity-embedded neighbors, leading to a several-fold κ increase. The measured κ before and after switch-on is consistent with the literature reported κ values of supported and suspended graphene. By conducting comparison studies with pyrolytic graphite, graphene oxide paper and partly reduced graphene paper, the whole physical picture is illustrated clearly. The thermal expansion induced switch-on is feasible only for high purity GP materials. This finding points out a novel way to switch on/off the thermal conductivity of graphene paper based on substrate-phonon scattering.

  14. Biomedical applications of graphene and graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Chul; Kim, Young-Kwan; Shin, Dolly; Ryoo, Soo-Ryoon; Hong, Byung Hee; Min, Dal-Hee

    2013-10-15

    Graphene has unique mechanical, electronic, and optical properties, which researchers have used to develop novel electronic materials including transparent conductors and ultrafast transistors. Recently, the understanding of various chemical properties of graphene has facilitated its application in high-performance devices that generate and store energy. Graphene is now expanding its territory beyond electronic and chemical applications toward biomedical areas such as precise biosensing through graphene-quenched fluorescence, graphene-enhanced cell differentiation and growth, and graphene-assisted laser desorption/ionization for mass spectrometry. In this Account, we review recent efforts to apply graphene and graphene oxides (GO) to biomedical research and a few different approaches to prepare graphene materials designed for biomedical applications. Because of its excellent aqueous processability, amphiphilicity, surface functionalizability, surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), and fluorescence quenching ability, GO chemically exfoliated from oxidized graphite is considered a promising material for biological applications. In addition, the hydrophobicity and flexibility of large-area graphene synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) allow this material to play an important role in cell growth and differentiation. The lack of acceptable classification standards of graphene derivatives based on chemical and physical properties has hindered the biological application of graphene derivatives. The development of an efficient graphene-based biosensor requires stable biofunctionalization of graphene derivatives under physiological conditions with minimal loss of their unique properties. For the development graphene-based therapeutics, researchers will need to build on the standardization of graphene derivatives and study the biofunctionalization of graphene to clearly understand how cells respond to exposure to graphene derivatives. Although several

  15. Synthesis of flower-like molybdenum sulfide/graphene hybrid as an efficient oxygen reduction electrocatalyst for anion exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunchander, A.; Peera, S. Gouse; Sahu, A. K.

    2017-06-01

    Nanostructured transition metal chalcogenides (TMCs) have significant interest towards electrochemical devices such as fuel cells, metal-ion batteries, due to their unique physical and electrochemical properties. Herein, we report a facile hydrothermal synthesis of flower-like nanostructured molybdenum sulphide and its incorporation on to graphene as a potential oxygen reduction reaction catalyst in alkaline medium. The phase purity and morphological evolution of MoS2 is systematically studied through X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopic techniques. The electronic states of metal and non-metallic species are deeply studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The effect of annealing temperatures and TMC concentrations are also investigated by electrochemical techniques such as cyclic and linear sweep voltammograms. The optimised electrocatalyst (MoS2/G-500) delivers significant ORR activity with onset and half-wave potentials of 0.91 and 0.80 V (vs. RHE), respectively. Superior durability compared to state-of-art Pt/C catalyst is ascertained by repeating potential cycles for about 5000 times and also by chronoamperometric technique. Finally, the hybrid catalyst is evaluated in AEMFC as cathode catalyst which delivers peak power density of about 29 mW cm-2 under ambient temperature and pressure. The present findings emphasis that MoS2/G catalyst is promising as cost-effective and alternative to noble metal-based catalysts for fuel cell applications.

  16. Shuffle dislocation induced magnetic moment in graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Sancho, M.P., E-mail: pilar@icmm.csic.e [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid-CSIC, C/Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Juan, F. de; Vozmediano, M.A.H. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid-CSIC, C/Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-05-15

    Graphene, a honeycomb arrangement of carbon atoms, is a promising material for nanoelectronics applications due to its unusual electronic properties. Recent experiments performed on suspended graphene indicate the existence of intrinsic defects on the samples. It is known that lattice defects such as vacancies or voids leaving unpaired atoms, lead to the formation of local magnetic moments (Vozmediano et al., 2005). The existence and ordering of these moments is largely determined by the bipartite character of the honeycomb lattice seen as two interpenetrating triangular sublattices. Dislocations made by pentagon-heptagon pairs or octagons with an unpaired atom have been studied recently and found to be stable in the graphene lattice (Carpio et al., 2008). These defects frustrate the sublattice structure and affect the magnetic properties of graphene. We study the magnetic properties of graphene in the presence of these defects. The system is described by a p{sub z} tight-binding model with electron-electron interactions modelled by a Hubbard term. Spin-polarized mean-field solutions are investigated within an unrestricted Hartree-Fock approximation.

  17. Graphene as an atomically thin interface for growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Rahul; Chen, Gugang; Arava, Leela Mohana Reddy; Kalaga, Kaushik; Ishigami, Masahiro; Heinz, Tony F; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Harutyunyan, Avetik R

    2013-01-01

    Growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) forests is highly sensitive to the nature of the substrate. This constraint narrows the range of available materials to just a few oxide-based dielectrics and presents a major obstacle for applications. Using a suspended monolayer, we show here that graphene is an excellent conductive substrate for CNT forest growth. Furthermore, graphene is shown to intermediate growth on key substrates, such as Cu, Pt, and diamond, which had not previously been compatible with nanotube forest growth. We find that growth depends on the degree of crystallinity of graphene and is best on mono- or few-layer graphene. The synergistic effects of graphene are revealed by its endurance after CNT growth and low contact resistances between the nanotubes and Cu. Our results establish graphene as a unique interface that extends the class of substrate materials for CNT growth and opens up important new prospects for applications.

  18. Strain induced highly oriented graphene wrinkles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen; Yang, Shudu; Wang, Ashu

    2017-07-01

    Graphene, a two-dimensional (2D) material, is an important constituent part for the development of mechanic, electronic and photonic systems due to its remarkable properties, however, wrinkling is a ubiquitous phenomenon in 2D membranes. As a 2D material with atomic thickness, graphene is found to be wrinkled easily because of its relatively low bending rigidity, and besides, wrinkle affects graphene’s remarkable physical property severely. Despite their prevalence and potential impact on large-scale graphene properties, only a several approaches have been dedicated to control their structural morphology and orientation by transferring graphene onto polymer substrates. Here we report a new route to control the orientation of wrinkles by directly applying external mechanical strains to metal substrates until plastic deformation happens. By changing direction and magnitude of tension strain, wrinkles with different spacing but all with orientations perpendicular to the tensile direction can be obtained.

  19. Macroscopic quantum coherence and mechanical squeezing of a graphene sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiyun; Nie, Wenjie; Chen, Aixi; Lan, Yueheng

    2017-12-01

    We theoretically investigate the macroscopic quantum coherence and the mechanical squeezing of a mechanical oscillator in a hybrid optomechanical system consisting of a suspended graphene sheet and an ultracold atomic ensemble trapped inside a Fabry-Pérot cavity. In the study the vacuum is used to mediate an effective optomechanical coupling between the graphene oscillator and the cavity field driven by an external laser beam. We find that in the presence of this coupling, the macroscopic quantum coherence and the mechanical squeezing of the graphene sheet can be attained in a certain range of driving power. In particular, the quantum coherence in the optomechanical system can be transferred from the optical field to the mechanical oscillator. We also investigate in detail the spectrum and the squeezing of the output field and the attained results may be used to study the mechanical squeezing of a graphene sheet.

  20. Hydrophilic and size-controlled graphene nanopores for protein detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Gaurav; Bok Lee, Yong; Darvish, Armin; Ahn, Chi Won; Kim, Min Jun

    2016-12-01

    This paper describes a general approach for transferring clean single-layer graphene onto silicon nitride nanopore devices and the use of the electron beam of a transmission electron microscope (TEM) to drill size-controlled nanopores in freely suspended graphene. Besides nanopore drilling, we also used the TEM to heal and completely close the unwanted secondary holes formed by electron beam damage during the drilling process. We demonstrate electron beam assisted shrinking of irregularly shaped 40-60 nm pores down to 2 nm, exhibiting an exquisite control of graphene nanopore diameter. Our fabrication workflow also rendered graphene nanopores hydrophilic, allowing easy wetting and use of the pores for studying protein translocation and protein-protein interaction with a high signal to noise ratio.

  1. Observation of the fractional quantum Hall effect in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolotin, Kirill; Ghahari, Fereshte; Shulman, Michael D.; Stormer, Horst L.; Kim, Philip

    2010-03-01

    Only a glimpse of correlated electron physics has been observed in graphene so far, mostly due to the strong electron scattering caused by charged impurities in the substrate. To overcome this limitation,we fabricate devices where electrically contacted and electrostatically gated graphene samples are suspended over a substrate. The measured low-temperature sample mobility is found to exceed 100,000 cm2/Vs in such devices. The very high mobility of our specimens allows us to observe previously inaccessible transport regimes in graphene. We report the observation of the fractional quantum Hall effect, supporting the existence of interaction induced correlated electron states in the presence of a magnetic field. In addition, at low carrier density graphene becomes an insulator with an energy gap tunable by magnetic field.

  2. Carbon membranes for efficient water-ethanol separation

    CERN Document Server

    Gravelle, Simon; Joly, Laurent; Ybert, Christophe; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate, on the basis of molecular dynamics simulations, the possibility of an efficient water-ethanol separation using nanoporous carbon membranes, namely carbon nanotube membranes, nanoporous graphene sheets, and multilayer graphene membranes. While these carbon membranes are in general permeable to both pure liquids, they exhibit a counter-intuitive "self-semi-permeability" to water in the presence of water-ethanol mixtures. This originates in a preferred ethanol adsorption in nanoconfinement that prevents water molecules from entering the carbon nanopores. An osmotic pressure is accordingly expressed across the carbon membranes for the water-ethanol mixture, which agrees with the classic van't Hoff type expression. This suggests a robust and versatile membrane-based separation, built on a pressure-driven reverse-osmosis process across these carbon-based membranes. In particular, the recent development of large-scale 'graphene-oxide' like membranes then opens an avenue for a versatile and efficient ...

  3. 23 Elemental Composition of Suspended Particulate Matter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    `123456789jkl''''#

    Elemental Composition of Suspended Particulate Matter Collected at Two Different. Heights above the Ground in A Sub-Urban Site in Kenya. Gitari W. M1, Kinyua A. M. 2, Kamau G. N3 and C. K. Gatebe C. K4. Abstract. Suspended particulate matter samples were collected in a sub-urban area in Nairobi over a 12 month ...

  4. A highly sensitive and selective sensor based on a graphene-coated carbon paste electrode modified with a computationally designed boron-embedded duplex molecularly imprinted hybrid membrane for the sensing of lamotrigine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongjuan; Qian, Duo; Xiao, Xilin; Gao, Shuqin; Cheng, Jianlin; He, Bo; Liao, Lifu; Deng, Jian

    2017-08-15

    An innovative electrochemical sensor, based on a carbon paste electrode (CPE) modified with graphene (GR) and a boron-embedded duplex molecularly imprinted hybrid membrane (B-DMIHM), was fabricated for the highly sensitive and selective determination of lamotrigine (LMT). Density functional theory (DFT) was employed to study the interactions between the template and monomers to screen appropriate functional monomers for rational design of the B-DMIHM. The distinct synergic effect of GR and B-DMIHM was evidenced by the positive shift of the reduction peak potential of LMT at B-DMIHM/GR modified CPE (B-DMIHM/GR/CPE) by about 300mV, and the 13-fold amplification of the peak current, compared to a bare carbon paste electrode (CPE). The electrochemical reduction mechanism of lamotrigine was investigated by different voltammetric techniques. It was illustrated that square wave voltammetry (SWV) was more sensitive than different pulse voltammetry (DPV) for the quantitative analysis of LMT. Thereafter, a highly sensitive electroanalytical method for LMT was established by SWV at B-DMIHM/GR/CPE with a good linear relationship from 5.0×10-8 to 5.0×10-5 and 5.0×10-5 to 3.0×10-4molL-1 with a lower detection limit (1.52×10-9molL-1) based on the lower linear range(S/N=3). The practical application of the sensor was demonstrated by determining the concentration of LMT in pharmaceutical and biological samples with good precision (RSD 1.04-4.41%) and acceptable recoveries (92.40-107.0%). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of metallic contacts on electron transport through graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barraza-Lopez, Salvador; Vanevic, Mihajlo; Kindermann, Markus; Chou, Mei-Yin

    2010-03-01

    Despite their undoubted importance in eventual graphene electronics, theoretical studies of the specific features of electron transport through graphene between metal contacts are in their first stages. In order to bridge this gap we perform a first-principles based, non-equilibrium Green's functions study of the conductance through graphene junctions suspended between noncovalent aluminum contacts as a function of the distance L between metal leads and the width W (up to 100 nm) of the junction. Electron-hole asymmetry is obtained as a consequence of doping at the leads. Furthermore, the doping in graphene originated by charge transfer from metals at the leads results in two conductance minima at the energies of the crossing of the linear bands in suspended and clamped graphene, for sufficiently large L. We present a tight-binding model that accounts for the first-principles results and can be employed for larger lengths and widths of the junctions up to experimental accessible values and for arbitrary noncovalent-bonding metal leads.

  6. Coating of graphene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneider, G.F.; Dekker, C.

    2014-01-01

    The present invention is in the field of highly crystalline graphene and coating said graphene with a layer. Said graphene may have further structures, such as nanopores, nanogaps, and nanoribbons. The coated graphene can be used for biomolecular analysis and modification, such as DNA-sequencing, as

  7. Improving suspended sediment measurements by automatic samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettel, Melissa; Gulliver, John S; Kayhanian, Masoud; DeGroot, Gregory; Brand, Joshua; Mohseni, Omid; Erickson, Andrew J

    2011-10-01

    Suspended solids either as total suspended solids (TSS) or suspended sediment concentration (SSC) is an integral particulate water quality parameter that is important in assessing particle-bound contaminants. At present, nearly all stormwater runoff quality monitoring is performed with automatic samplers in which the sampling intake is typically installed at the bottom of a storm sewer or channel. This method of sampling often results in a less accurate measurement of suspended sediment and associated pollutants due to the vertical variation in particle concentration caused by particle settling. In this study, the inaccuracies associated with sampling by conventional intakes for automatic samplers have been verified by testing with known suspended sediment concentrations and known particle sizes ranging from approximately 20 μm to 355 μm under various flow rates. Experimental results show that, for samples collected at a typical automatic sampler intake position, the ratio of sampled to feed suspended sediment concentration is up to 6600% without an intake strainer and up to 300% with a strainer. When the sampling intake is modified with multiple sampling tubes and fitted with a wing to provide lift (winged arm sampler intake), the accuracy of sampling improves substantially. With this modification, the differences between sampled and feed suspended sediment concentration were more consistent and the sampled to feed concentration ratio was accurate to within 10% for particle sizes up to 250 μm.

  8. Thermal Transport in Graphene and Graphene Multilayers

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander A. Balandin; Nika, Denis L.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we review thermal properties of graphene and multilayer graphene and discuss the optothermal technique developed for the thermal conductivity measurements. We also outline different theoretical approaches used for the description of phonon transport in graphene and provide comparison with available experimental thermal conductivity data.

  9. Ballistic thermophoresis on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosatti, Erio; Panizon, Emanuele; Guerra, Roberto

    The textbook thermophoretic force acting on a diffusing body in a fluid is proportional to the local temperature gradient. Not so for a diffusing physisorbed body on a submicron sized 2D suspended layer. A non-equilibrium Molecular Dynamics study of a test nanosystem - a gold nanocluster adsorbed on a single graphene sheet of length L clamped between two temperatures ΔT apart - reveals a phoretic force that is parallel to, but essentially independent of, the gradient magnitude ΔT / L up to a substantial L of up to 150 nm. This is argued to represent ballistic thermophoresis, where the force is provided by the flux of massively excited flexural phonons, whose flow is in turn known to be ballistic and distance-independent up to relatively long scattering lengths before the eventual onset of the more standard diffusive regime. The surprising thrust and real momentum provided by the flexural modes are analysed and understood in terms of the large mass non-uniformity involved with these modes. The ensuing surf-riding of adsorbates on the vibrating 2D hard sheet, and the resulting gradient independent thermophoretic force, are not unlikely to possess practical applications. ERC MODPHYSFRICT Advanced Grant No. 320796.

  10. Substrate-enhanced superconductivity in Li-decorated graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Kaloni, Thaneshwor P.

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the role of the substrate for the strength of the electron-phonon coupling in Li-decorated graphene. We find that the interaction with a h-BN substrate leads to a significant enhancement from to , which corresponds to a 25% increase of the transition temperature from to . The superconducting gaps amount to 1.56 meV (suspended) and 1.98 meV (supported). These findings open up a new route to enhanced superconducting transition temperatures in graphene-based materials by substrate engineering. © 2013 EPLA.

  11. Graphene Electronic Tattoo Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabiri Ameri, Shideh; Ho, Rebecca; Jang, Hongwoo; Tao, Li; Wang, Youhua; Wang, Liu; Schnyer, David M; Akinwande, Deji; Lu, Nanshu

    2017-08-22

    Tattoo-like epidermal sensors are an emerging class of truly wearable electronics, owing to their thinness and softness. While most of them are based on thin metal films, a silicon membrane, or nanoparticle-based printable inks, we report sub-micrometer thick, multimodal electronic tattoo sensors that are made of graphene. The graphene electronic tattoo (GET) is designed as filamentary serpentines and fabricated by a cost- and time-effective "wet transfer, dry patterning" method. It has a total thickness of 463 ± 30 nm, an optical transparency of ∼85%, and a stretchability of more than 40%. The GET can be directly laminated on human skin just like a temporary tattoo and can fully conform to the microscopic morphology of the surface of skin via just van der Waals forces. The open-mesh structure of the GET makes it breathable and its stiffness negligible. A bare GET is able to stay attached to skin for several hours without fracture or delamination. With liquid bandage coverage, a GET may stay functional on the skin for up to several days. As a dry electrode, GET-skin interface impedance is on par with medically used silver/silver-chloride (Ag/AgCl) gel electrodes, while offering superior comfort, mobility, and reliability. GET has been successfully applied to measure electrocardiogram (ECG), electromyogram (EMG), electroencephalogram (EEG), skin temperature, and skin hydration.

  12. Effects of low energy E-beam irradiation on graphene and graphene field effect transistors and raman metrology of graphene on split gate test structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Gayathri S.

    2011-12-01

    Apart from its compelling performance in conventional nanoelectronic device geometries, graphene is an appropriate candidate to study certain interesting phenomenon (e.g. the Veselago lens effect) predicted on the basis of its linear electron dispersion relation. A key requirement for the observation of such phenomenon in graphene and for its use in conventional field-effect transistor (FET) devices is the need to minimize defects such as consisting of -- or resulting from -- adsorbates and lattice non-uniformities, and reduce deleterious substrate effects. Consequently the investigation of the origin and interaction of defects in the graphene lattice is essential to improve and tailor graphene-based device performance. In this thesis, optical spectroscopic studies on the influence of low-energy electron irradiation on adsorbate-induced defectivity and doping for substrate supported and suspended graphene were carried out along with spectroscopic and transport measurements on graphene FETs. A comparative investigation of the effects of single-step versus multi-step, low-energy electron irradiation (500 eV) on suspended, substrate supported graphene and on graphene FETs is reported. E-beam irradiation (single-step and multi-step) of substrate-supported graphene resulted in an increase in the Raman ID/IG ratio largely from hydrogenation due to radiolysis of the interfacial water layer between the graphene and the SiO2 substrate and from irradiated surface adsorbates. GFETs subjected to single and multi-step irradiation showed n-doping from CNP (charge neutrality point) shift of ˜ -8 and ˜ -16 V respectively. Correlation of this data with Raman analysis of suspended and supported graphene samples implied a strong role of the substrate and irradiation sequence in determining the level of doping. A correspondingly higher reduction in mobility per incident electron was also observed for GFETs subjected to multi-step irradiation compared to single step, in line with

  13. Graphene and Graphene Metamaterials for Terahertz Absorbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andryieuski, Andrei; Pizzocchero, Filippo; Booth, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Graphene, due to the possibility to tune its conductivity, is the promising material for a range of the terahertz (THz) applications, such as tunable reflectors, absorbers, modulators, filters and polarization converters. Subwavelength structuring of graphene in order to form metamaterials allows...... for even more control over the THz waves. In this poster presentation I will show an elegant way to describe the graphene metamaterials and the design of graphene based absorbers. I will also present our recent experimental results on the graphene absorbers characterization....

  14. Thermal conductivity of giant mono- to few-layered CVD graphene supported on an organic substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Wang, Tianyu; Xu, Shen; Yuan, Pengyu; Xu, Xu; Wang, Xinwei

    2016-05-01

    The thermal conductivity (k) of supported graphene is a critical property that reflects the graphene-substrate interaction, graphene structure quality, and is needed for thermal design of a graphene device. Yet the related k measurement has never been a trivial work and very few studies are reported to date, only at the μm level. In this work, for the first time, the k of giant chemical vapor decomposition (CVD) graphene supported on poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) is characterized using our transient electro-thermal technique based on a differential concept. Our graphene size is ~mm, far above the samples studied in the past. This giant graphene measurement eliminates the thermal contact resistance problems and edge phonon scattering encountered in μm-scale graphene k measurement. Such mm-scale measurement is critical for device/system-level thermal design since it reflects the effect of abundant grains in graphene. The k of 1.33-layered, 1.53-layered, 2.74-layered and 5.2-layered supported graphene is measured as 365 W m-1 K-1, 359 W m-1 K-1, 273 W m-1 K-1 and 33.5 W m-1 K-1, respectively. These values are significantly lower than the k of supported graphene on SiO2, and are about one order of magnitude lower than the k of suspended graphene. We speculate that the abundant C atoms in the PMMA promote more ready energy and momentum exchange with the supported graphene, and give rise to more phonon scattering than the SiO2 substrate. This leads to a lower k of CVD graphene on PMMA than that on SiO2. We attribute the existence of disorder in the sp2 domain, graphene oxide (GO) and stratification in the 5.2-layered graphene to its more k reduction. The Raman linewidth (G peak) of the 5.2-layered graphene is also twice larger than that of the other three kinds of graphene, indicating the much more phonon scattering and shorter phonon lifetime in it. Also the electrical conductivity of the 5.2-layered graphene is about one-fifth of that for the other three. This

  15. Thermal conductivity of giant mono- to few-layered CVD graphene supported on an organic substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Wang, Tianyu; Xu, Shen; Yuan, Pengyu; Xu, Xu; Wang, Xinwei

    2016-05-21

    The thermal conductivity (k) of supported graphene is a critical property that reflects the graphene-substrate interaction, graphene structure quality, and is needed for thermal design of a graphene device. Yet the related k measurement has never been a trivial work and very few studies are reported to date, only at the μm level. In this work, for the first time, the k of giant chemical vapor decomposition (CVD) graphene supported on poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) is characterized using our transient electro-thermal technique based on a differential concept. Our graphene size is ∼mm, far above the samples studied in the past. This giant graphene measurement eliminates the thermal contact resistance problems and edge phonon scattering encountered in μm-scale graphene k measurement. Such mm-scale measurement is critical for device/system-level thermal design since it reflects the effect of abundant grains in graphene. The k of 1.33-layered, 1.53-layered, 2.74-layered and 5.2-layered supported graphene is measured as 365 W m(-1) K(-1), 359 W m(-1) K(-1), 273 W m(-1) K(-1) and 33.5 W m(-1) K(-1), respectively. These values are significantly lower than the k of supported graphene on SiO2, and are about one order of magnitude lower than the k of suspended graphene. We speculate that the abundant C atoms in the PMMA promote more ready energy and momentum exchange with the supported graphene, and give rise to more phonon scattering than the SiO2 substrate. This leads to a lower k of CVD graphene on PMMA than that on SiO2. We attribute the existence of disorder in the sp(2) domain, graphene oxide (GO) and stratification in the 5.2-layered graphene to its more k reduction. The Raman linewidth (G peak) of the 5.2-layered graphene is also twice larger than that of the other three kinds of graphene, indicating the much more phonon scattering and shorter phonon lifetime in it. Also the electrical conductivity of the 5.2-layered graphene is about one-fifth of that for the

  16. Wrinkling of floating monoatomic graphene sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elettro, Herve; Melo, Francisco; Soft Matter Research; Technology Center (SMAT-C) Team

    Graphene is a carbon-based honeycomb structure only one atom thick that combines exceptional thermal, electrical, optical and mechanical properties. Whereas conventional bulk and thin film materials have been studied extensively, the key mechanical behavior of 2D materials (cracking, folding) are barely explored, mainly due to complexity of manipulation. Reaching quantitative understanding of these phenomena will prove valuable to the production of high-quality graphene at industrial scale, applicable in a wide range of technologies such as wearable bio-sensors and supercapacitors. In that state of mind, we investigate the complex behavior of graphene under compression and bending in a free-floating configuration. This adaptative support allows study of graphene intrinsic properties both at large and local scales. We have optimized preparation protocols for production of few defects mm scale floating samples. We use capillary confinement and micromechanical indentation to induce wrinkling, folding and tearing of monoatomic graphene sheets. Graphene samples are characterized by high-resolution optical microscopy combined with confocal Raman analysis to assess its physical quality and monoatomic thinness. Our results show exciting insights into the unique mechanics of 2D membranes. We acknowledge support from the chilean ministry of science Fondecyt/Conycit.

  17. Optothermal Raman Studies of Thermal Properties of Graphene Based Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekpour, Hoda

    Efficient thermal management is becoming a critical issue for development of the next generation of electronics. As the size of electronic devices shrinks, the dissipated power density increases, demanding a better heat removal. The discovery of graphene's unique electrical and thermal properties stimulated interest of electronic industry to development of graphene based technologies. In this dissertation, I report the results of my investigation of thermal properties of graphene derivatives and their applications in thermal management. The dissertation consists of three parts. In the first part, I investigated thermal conductivity of graphene laminate films deposited on thermally insulating polyethylene terephthalate substrates. Graphene laminate is made of chemically derived graphene and few layer graphene flakes packed in overlapping structure. Two types of graphene laminate were studied: as deposited and compressed. The thermal conductivity of the laminate was found to be in the range from 40 W/mK to 90 W/mK at room temperature. It was established that the average size and the alignment of graphene flakes are parameters dominating the heat conduction. In the second part of this dissertation, I investigated thermal conductivity of chemically reduced freestanding graphene oxide films. It was found that the in-plane thermal conductivity of graphene oxide can be increased significantly using chemical reduction and temperature treatment. Finally, I studied the effect of defects on thermal conductivity of suspended graphene. The knowledge of the thermal conductivity dependence on the concentration of defects can shed light on the strength of the phonon - point defect scattering in two-dimensional materials. The defects were introduced to graphene in a controllable way using the low-energy electron beam irradiation. It was determined that as the defect density increases the thermal conductivity decreases down to about 400 W/mK, and then reveal saturation type behavior

  18. Effects of graphene on electro-optic switching and spontaneous polarization of a ferroelectric liquid crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basu, Rajratan, E-mail: basu@usna.edu [Department of Physics, Soft-matter and Nanomaterials Laboratory, The United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland 21402 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    A small quantity of graphene flakes was doped in a ferroelectric liquid crystal (FLC), and the field-induced ferroelectric electro-optic switching was found to be significantly faster in the FLC + graphene hybrid than that of the pure FLC. Further studies revealed that the suspended graphene flakes enhanced the FLC's spontaneous polarization by improving smectic-C ordering resulting from the π–π electron stacking, and reduced rotation viscosity by trapping some of the free ions of the FLC media. These effects coherently impacted the FLC-switching phenomenon, enabling the FLC molecules to switch faster on reversing an external electric field.

  19. Graphene Meets Microbubbles: A Superior Contrast Agent for Photoacoustic Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toumia, Yosra; Domenici, Fabio; Orlanducci, Silvia; Mura, Francesco; Grishenkov, Dmitry; Trochet, Philippe; Lacerenza, Savino; Bordi, Federico; Paradossi, Gaio

    2016-06-29

    Coupling graphene with a soft polymer surface offers the possibility to build hybrid constructs with new electrical, optical, and mechanical properties. However, the low reactivity of graphene is a hurdle in the synthesis of such systems which is often bypassed by oxidizing its carbon planar structure. However, the defects introduced with this process jeopardize the properties of graphene. In this paper we present a different approach, applicable to many different polymer surfaces, which uses surfactant assisted ultrasonication to exfoliate, and simultaneously suspend, graphene in water in its intact form. Tethering pristine graphene sheets to the surfaces is accomplished by using suitable reactive functional groups of the surfactant scaffold. We focused on applying this approach to the fabrication of a hybrid system, made of pristine graphene tethered to poly(vinyl alcohol) based microbubbles (PVA MBs), designed for enhancing photoacoustic signals. Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is a powerful preclinical diagnostic tool which provides real time images at a resolution of 40 μm. The leap toward clinical imaging has so far been hindered by the limited tissues penetration of near-infrared (NIR) pulsed laser radiation. Many academic and industrial research laboratories have met this challenge by designing devices, each with pros and cons, to enhance the photoacoustic (PA) signal. The major advantages of the hybrid graphene/PVA MBs construct, however, are (i) the preservation of graphene properties, (ii) biocompatibility, a consequence of the robust anchoring of pristine graphene to the bioinert surface of the PVA bubble, and (iii) a very good enhancement in a NIR spectral region of the PA signal, which does not overlap with the signals of PA active endogenous molecules such as hemoglobin.

  20. Filterability and Sludge Concentration in Membrane Bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Lousada-Ferreira, M.

    2011-01-01

    The Thesis entitled “Filterability and Sludge Concentration in Membrane Bioreactors” aims at explaining the relation between Mixed Liquid Suspended Solids (MLSS) concentration, the amount of solids in the wastewater being treated, also designated as sludge, and filterability, being the ability of the sludge to be filtrated through a membrane, in a wastewater treatment system designated as Membrane Bioreactor (MBR). An MBR is a wastewater treatment system that combines an activated sludge proc...

  1. Efficient photovoltaic conversion of graphene-carbon nanotube hybrid films grown from solid precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Xin; Lv, Ruitao; Bai, Junfei; Zhang, Zexia; Wei, Jinquan; Huang, Zheng-Hong; Zhu, Hongwei; Kang, Feiyu; Terrones, Mauricio

    2015-09-01

    Large-area (e.g. centimeter size) graphene sheets are usually synthesized via pyrolysis of gaseous carbon precursors (e.g. methane) on metal substrates like Cu using chemical vapor deposition (CVD), but the presence of grain boundaries and the residual polymers during transfer deteriorates significantly the properties of the CVD graphene. If carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be covalently bonded to graphene, the hybrid system could possess excellent electrical conductivity, transparency and mechanical strength. In this work, conducting and transparent CNT-graphene hybrid films were synthesized by a facile solid precursor pyrolysis method. Furthermore, the synthesized CNT-graphene hybrid films display enhanced photovoltaic conversion efficiency when compared to devices based on CNT membranes or graphene sheets. Upon chemical doping, the graphene-CNT/Si solar cells reveal power conversion efficiencies up to 8.50%.

  2. Performance enhancement of reduced graphene oxide-modified carbon electrodes for vanadium redox-flow systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chakrabarti, B.; Nir, D.; Yufit, V; Tariq, F; Rubio-Garcia, J.; Maher, R.; Kucernak, A.; Purushothaman Vellayani, A.; Brandon, N.

    2017-01-01

    Reduced graphene oxide (rGO) suspended in an N,N′-dimethylformamide (DMF) solvent underwent electrophoretic deposition (EPD) on carbon paper (CP) electrodes. X-ray computed micro-tomography (XMT) indicates a 24 % increase in the specific surface area of CP modified with rGO in comparison to the

  3. Identification of pristine and defective graphene nanoribbons by phonon signatures in the electron transport characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Rasmus Bjerregaard; Frederiksen, Thomas; Brandbyge, Mads

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by recent experiments where electron transport was measured across graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) suspended between a metal surface and the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope [Koch, Nat. Nanotechnol.7, 713 (2012)], we present detailed first-principles simulations of inelastic electron t...

  4. Antibacterial activity of large-area monolayer graphene film manipulated by charge transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinhua; Wang, Gang; Zhu, Hongqin; Zhang, Miao; Zheng, Xiaohu; di, Zengfeng; Liu, Xuanyong; Wang, Xi

    2014-03-01

    Graphene has attracted increasing attention for potential applications in biotechnology due to its excellent electronic property and biocompatibility. Here we use both Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Gram-negative Escherichia coli (E. coli) to investigate the antibacterial actions of large-area monolayer graphene film on conductor Cu, semiconductor Ge and insulator SiO2. The results show that the graphene films on Cu and Ge can surprisingly inhibit the growth of both bacteria, especially the former. However, the proliferation of both bacteria cannot be significantly restricted by the graphene film on SiO2. The morphology of S. aureus and E. coli on graphene films further confirms that the direct contact of both bacteria with graphene on Cu and Ge can cause membrane damage and destroy membrane integrity, while no evident membrane destruction is induced by graphene on SiO2. From the viewpoint of charge transfer, a plausible mechanism is proposed here to explain this phenomenon. This study may provide new insights for the better understanding of antibacterial actions of graphene film and for the better designing of graphene-based antibiotics or other biomedical applications.

  5. Antibacterial activity of large-area monolayer graphene film manipulated by charge transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinhua; Wang, Gang; Zhu, Hongqin; Zhang, Miao; Zheng, Xiaohu; Di, Zengfeng; Liu, Xuanyong; Wang, Xi

    2014-01-01

    Graphene has attracted increasing attention for potential applications in biotechnology due to its excellent electronic property and biocompatibility. Here we use both Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Gram-negative Escherichia coli (E. coli) to investigate the antibacterial actions of large-area monolayer graphene film on conductor Cu, semiconductor Ge and insulator SiO2. The results show that the graphene films on Cu and Ge can surprisingly inhibit the growth of both bacteria, especially the former. However, the proliferation of both bacteria cannot be significantly restricted by the graphene film on SiO2. The morphology of S. aureus and E. coli on graphene films further confirms that the direct contact of both bacteria with graphene on Cu and Ge can cause membrane damage and destroy membrane integrity, while no evident membrane destruction is induced by graphene on SiO2. From the viewpoint of charge transfer, a plausible mechanism is proposed here to explain this phenomenon. This study may provide new insights for the better understanding of antibacterial actions of graphene film and for the better designing of graphene-based antibiotics or other biomedical applications. PMID:24619247

  6. Mechanical and electromechanical properties of graphene and their potential application in MEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Zulfiqar H.; Kermany, Atieh R.; Öchsner, Andreas; Iacopi, Francesca

    2017-02-01

    Graphene-based micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) are very promising candidates for next generation miniaturized, lightweight, and ultra-sensitive devices. In this review, we review the progress to date of the assessment of the mechanical, electromechanical, and thermomechanical properties of graphene for application in graphene-based MEMS. Graphene possesses a plethora of outstanding properties—such as a 1 TPa Young’s modulus, exceptionally high 2D failure strength that stems from its sp2 hybridization, and strong sigma bonding between carbon atoms. Such exceptional mechanical properties can enable, for example, graphene-based sound sources capable of generating sound beyond the audible range. The recently engineered piezoelectric properties of atomic force microscope tip-pressed graphene membranes or supported graphene on SiO2 substrates, have paved the way in fabricating graphene-based nano-generators and actuators. On the other hand, graphene’s piezoresistive properties have enabled miniaturized pressure and strain sensors. 2D graphene nano-mechanical resonators can potentially measure ultralow forces, charges and potentially detect single atomic masses. The exceptional tribology of graphene can play a significant role in achieving superlubricity. In addition, the highest reported thermal conductivity of graphene is amenable for use in chips and providing better performing MEMS, as heat is efficiently dissipated. On top of that, graphene membranes could be nano-perforated to realize specialized applications like DNA translocation and desalination. Finally, to ensure stability and reliability of the graphene-based MEMS, adhesion is an important mechanical property that should be considered. In general, graphene could be used as a structural material in resonators, sensors, actuators and nano-generators with better performance and sensitivity than conventional MEMS.

  7. Induction of cell death by graphene in Arabidopsis thaliana (Columbia ecotype) T87 cell suspensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begum, Parvin, E-mail: parvinchy@ees.hokudai.ac.jp; Fugetsu, Bunshi

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • This study was set up to explore potential influence of graphene on T87 cells. • Fragmented nuclei, membrane damage, mitochondrial dysfunction were observed. • ROS increased, ROS are key mediators in the cell death signaling pathway. • Translocation of graphene into cells and an endocytosis-like structure was observed. • Graphene entering into the cells by endocytosis. -- Abstract: The toxicity of graphene on suspensions of Arabidopsis thaliana (Columbia ecotype) T87 cells was investigated by examining the morphology, mitochondrial dysfunction, reactive oxygen species generation (ROS), and translocation of graphene as the toxicological endpoints. The cells were grown in Jouanneau and Péaud-Lenoel (JPL) media and exposed to graphene at concentrations 0–80 mg/L. Morphological changes were observed by scanning electron microscope and the adverse effects such as fragmented nuclei, membrane damage, mitochondrial dysfunction was observed with fluorescence microscopy by staining with Hoechst 33342/propidium iodide and succinate dehydrogenase (mitochondrial bioenergetic enzyme). Analysis of intracellular ROS by 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein diacetate demonstrated that graphene induced a 3.3-fold increase in ROS, suggesting that ROS are key mediators in the cell death signaling pathway. Transmission electron microscopy verified the translocation of graphene into cells and an endocytosis-like structure was observed which suggested graphene entering into the cells by endocytosis. In conclusion, our results show that graphene induced cell death in T87 cells through mitochondrial damage mediated by ROS.

  8. Graphene Nanoelectronics Metrology, Synthesis, Properties and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Graphene is a perfectly two-dimensional single-atom thin membrane with zero bandgap. It has attracted huge attention due to its linear dispersion around the Dirac point, excellent transport properties, novel magnetic characteristics, and low spin-orbit coupling. Graphene and its nanostructures may have potential applications in spintronics, photonics, plasmonics and electronics. This book brings together a team of experts to provide an overview of the most advanced topics in theory, experiments, spectroscopy and applications of graphene and its nanostructures. It covers the state-of-the-art in tutorial-like and review-like manner to make the book useful not only to experts, but also newcomers and graduate students.

  9. Thermal Conduction in Graphene and Graphene Multilayers

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh, Suchismita

    2009-01-01

    There has been increasing interest in thermal conductivity of materials motivated by the heat removal issues in electronics and by the need of fundamental science to understand heat conduction at nanoscale. This dissertation reports the results of the experimental investigation of heat conduction in graphene and graphene multilayers. Graphene is a planar single sheet of sp2–bonded carbon atoms arranged in honeycomb lattice. It reveals many unique properties, including the extraordinaril...

  10. Graphene-cellulose paper flexible supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weng, Zhe; Su, Yang; Li, Feng; Du, Jinhong; Cheng, Hui-Ming [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Wang, Da-Wei [ARC Centre of Excellence for Functional Nanomaterials, Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Qld 4072 (Australia)

    2011-10-15

    A simple and scalable method to fabricate graphene-cellulose paper (GCP) membranes is reported; these membranes exhibit great advantages as freestanding and binder-free electrodes for flexible supercapacitors. The GCP electrode consists of a unique three-dimensional interwoven structure of graphene nanosheets and cellulose fibers and has excellent mechanical flexibility, good specific capacitance and power performance, and excellent cyclic stability. The electrical conductivity of the GCP membrane shows high stability with a decrease of only 6% after being bent 1000 times. This flexible GCP electrode has a high capacitance per geometric area of 81 mF cm{sup -2}, which is equivalent to a gravimetric capacitance of 120 F g{sup -1} of graphene, and retains >99% capacitance over 5000 cycles. Several types of flexible GCP-based polymer supercapacitors with various architectures are assembled to meet the power-energy requirements of typical flexible or printable electronics. Under highly flexible conditions, the supercapacitors show a high capacitance per geometric area of 46 mF cm{sup -2} for the complete devices. All the results demonstrate that polymer supercapacitors made using GCP membranes are versatile and may be used for flexible and portable micropower devices. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Fabrication and characterization of polycaprolactone-graphene powder electrospun nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginestra, Paola; Ghazinejad, Maziar; Madou, Marc; Ceretti, Elisabetta

    2016-09-01

    Porous fibrous membranes having multiple scales geometries and tailored properties have become attractive microfabrication materials in recent years. Due to the feasibility of incorporating graphene in electrospun nanofibres and the growing interest on these nanomaterials, the present paper focuses on the electrospinning of Poly (ɛ-Caprolactone) (PCL) solutions in the presence of different amounts of Graphene platelets. Electrospinning is a process whereby ultrafine fibers are formed in a high-voltage electrostatic field. The morphological appearance, fiber diameter, and structure of PCL nanofibers produced by the electrospinning process were studied in the presence of different concentration of graphene. Moreover, the effect of a successful incorporation of graphene nanosheets into PCL polymer nanofibers was analyzed. Scanning electron microscope micrographs of the electrospun fibers showed that the average fiber diameter increases in the presence of graphene. Furthermore, the intrinsic properties developed due to the interactions of graphene and PCL improved the mechanical properties of the nanofibers. The results reveal the effect of various graphene concentrations on PCL and the strong interfacial interactions between the graphene platelets phase and the polymer matrix. The functional complexity of the electrospun fibers provides significant advantages over other techniques and shows the promise of these fibers for many applications including air/water filters, sensors, organic solar cells, smart textiles, biocompatible scaffolds for tissue engineering and load-bearing applications. Optimizing deposition efficiency, however, is a necessary milestone for the widespread use of this technique.

  12. Graphene Chemical Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The sensor uses graphene based devices to sense the surface potential of a graphene channel exposed to an analyte. When analyte molecules adsorb onto the...

  13. Gauge fields in graphene

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vozmediano, M.A.H; Katsnelson, M.I; Guinea, F

    2010-01-01

    The physics of graphene is acting as a bridge between quantum field theory and condensed matter physics due to the special quality of the graphene quasiparticles behaving as massless two dimensional Dirac fermions...

  14. Graphene for Space Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Individual talks by JPL and Caltech experts on graphene to present the different ambits of application in which graphene is currently being used on campus,...

  15. Graphene-polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotenuto, G.; Romeo, V.; Cannavaro, I.; Roncato, D.; Martorana, B.; Gosso, M.

    2012-09-01

    Graphene is a novel nanostructured material that can be conveniently used as filler for thermoplastic polymers or thermosetting resins, and the resulting nanocomposite material has unique mechanical and chemical/physical properties. Industrial production of graphene/polymer materials requires the availability of a chemical route to produce massive amount of graphene. Natural graphite flakes can be the best starting material for a bulk-production of graphene to be used in the polymeric nanocomposite preparation.

  16. Graphene quantum dots

    CERN Document Server

    Güçlü, Alev Devrim; Korkusinski, Marek; Hawrylak, Pawel

    2014-01-01

    This book reflects the current status of theoretical and experimental research of graphene based nanostructures, in particular quantum dots, at a level accessible to young researchers, graduate students, experimentalists and theorists. It presents the current state of research of graphene quantum dots, a single or few monolayer thick islands of graphene. It introduces the reader to the electronic and optical properties of graphite, intercalated graphite and graphene, including Dirac fermions, Berry's phase associated with sublattices and valley degeneracy, covers single particle properties of

  17. The magnetorheological fluid of carbonyl iron suspension blended with grafted MWCNT or graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rwei, Syang-Peng; Ranganathan, Palraj; Chiang, Whe-Yi; Wang, Tza-Yi

    2017-12-01

    In this work, the magnetorheological (MR) fluids containing MWCNT/CI (carbonyl iron) complex and graphene/CI complex were prepared and have the better dispersity in silicone oil than CI powders alone. 1, 4-Aminobenzoic acid (PABA) was used as a grafting agent to modify CI powders to have NH2-end-group so that such nanoparticles can adsorb to acid-treated MWCNT or graphene via attraction of NH2 and COOH groups. The MWCNT/CI complex and graphene/CI complex have a structure of carbonyl iron nanoparticles adsorbed to MWCNT and graphene by self assembly, respectively. Because the carbonyl iron particles possessing magnetic permeability in nanometer scale adsorb to MWCNT or graphene which usually has a nanometer-scaled diameter and a micrometer-scaled length in this work, the dispersity of MWCNT/CI or graphene/CI complex in silicone oil is superior than the previous report [15] that the micrometer-scaled carbonyl iron microspheres were coated with multiwalled carbon nanotubes. Among CI (unmodified), MWCNT/CI and graphene/CI, graphene/CI has the best dispersity while MWCNT/CI still has the better dispersity than unmodified CI. At the temperature T = 300 K, the saturation magnetizations of CI, MWCNT/CI, graphene/CI are 208, 211 emu/g, and 204 emu/g, respectively, indicating that MWCNT/CI complex and graphene/CI complex still maintain the saturation magnetization as high as CI without being interfered by the blended MWCNT or graphene. A wide dynamic range of the yield stress adjusted through varying the electric current can be achieved by the MR fluids containing 69 wt% MWCNT/CI and graphene/CI which is useful in a shock absorber or damper. The result of the yield stress indicates the suspended MWCNT/CI particles are oriented more easily toward the direction perpendicular to the flow direction to block the flow stream lines.

  18. Graphene-graphene oxide-graphene hybrid nanopapers with superior mechanical, gas barrier and electrical properties

    OpenAIRE

    Xilian Ouyang; Wenyi Huang; Eusebio Cabrera; Jose Castro; James Lee, L.

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid nanopaper-like thin films with a graphene oxide (GO) layer sandwiched by two functionalized graphene (GP-SO3H) layers were successfully prepared from oxidized graphene and benzene sulfonic modified graphene. The hybrid graphene-graphene oxide-graphene (GP-GO-GP) nanopapers showed combination of high mechanic strength and good electrical conductivity, leading to desirable electromagnetic interference shielding performance, from the GP-SO3H layers, and superior gas diffusion barrier prov...

  19. Simulation of Graphene Mechanics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jain, S.K.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412769646

    2017-01-01

    Graphene is a one atom thick layer of carbon atoms arranged in hexagonal lattice in two-dimensions. The discovery of graphene has provoked a revolution in nanotechnology, as the structural, thermal, and electronic properties of graphene make it a very useful component for a large variety of devices.

  20. Bacteriohopanepolyol distribution in Yenisei River and Kara Sea suspended particulate matter and sediments traces terrigenous organic matter input

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jonge, C.; Talbot, H.M.; Bischoff, J.; Cherkashov, G.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriohopanepolyols (BHPs) are ubiquitous bacterial membrane lipids, encountered in soils, river and marine suspended particulate matter (SPM) and sediments. Their abundance and distribution provides a direct means to identify bacterial inputs and can be used to trace soil-derived bacterial

  1. Hidden Area and Mechanical Nonlinearities in Freestanding Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholl, Ryan J. T.; Lavrik, Nickolay V.; Vlassiouk, Ivan; Srijanto, Bernadeta R.; Bolotin, Kirill I.

    2017-06-01

    We investigated the effect of out-of-plane crumpling on the mechanical response of graphene membranes. In our experiments, stress was applied to graphene membranes using pressurized gas while the strain state was monitored through two complementary techniques: interferometric profilometry and Raman spectroscopy. By comparing the data obtained through these two techniques, we determined the geometric hidden area which quantifies the crumpling strength. While the devices with hidden area ˜0 % obeyed linear mechanics with biaxial stiffness 428 ±10 N /m , specimens with hidden area in the range 0.5%-1.0% were found to obey an anomalous nonlinear Hooke's law with an exponent ˜0.1 .

  2. 9 CFR 201.81 - Suspended registrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 201.81 Animals and Animal Products GRAIN INSPECTION, PACKERS AND STOCKYARDS ADMINISTRATION (PACKERS AND STOCKYARDS PROGRAMS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE REGULATIONS UNDER THE PACKERS AND STOCKYARDS ACT Services § 201.81 Suspended registrants. No stockyard owner, packer, market agency, or dealer shall employ...

  3. Electrodialytic remediation of suspended mine tailings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henrik K.; Rojo, Adrian; Pino, Denisse

    2008-01-01

    experiment at 40 mA, with approximately 137.5 g mine tailings on dry basis. The removal for a static (baseline) experiment only amounted 15% when passing approximately the same amount of charge through 130 g of mine tailings. The use of air bubbling to keep the tailings suspended increased the removal...

  4. Environmental toxicology: Acute effects of suspended particulate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... from the control values were found significant at 99% confidence level. Possible inhalatory problems are thus anticipated from prolonged accumulation of the dust in the respiratory system. KEY WORDS: Environmental toxicology, Suspended particulate matter, Dust analysis, Hematological indices, Wister albino rats. Bull.

  5. Suspended sediment concentration and particle size distribution ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    face area, shape, minerals and source) and conse- quent interaction with heavy metal concentrations. (HMCs). Recent studies have shown a growing awareness of the wider environmental significance of the suspended sediment loads transported by rivers and streams. This includes the importance of fine grain sediment in ...

  6. Environmental toxicology: Acute effects of suspended particulate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The elemental contents of suspended particulate matter (dust) samples from Maiduguri, Nigeria, were determined which showed appreciably high levels for especially Pb, Fe, Cu, Zn, K, Ca, and. Na. Wister albino rats were exposed to graded doses of phosphate buffered saline carried dust particles. The hematological ...

  7. A depth integrated model for suspended transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galappatti, R.

    1983-01-01

    A new depth averaged model for suspended sediment transport in open channels has been developed based on an asymptotic solution to the two dimensional convection-diffusion equation in the vertical plane. The solution for the depth averaged concentration is derived from the bed boundary condition and

  8. The Shape of Breasts Suspended in Liquid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Kleijn, S.C.; Rensen, W.H.J.

    2007-01-01

    Philips has designed an optical mammography machine. In this machine the breast is suspended into a cup in which the measurements take place. A special fluid is inserted into the cup to prevent the light from going around the breast instead of going through it but this fluid also weakens the signal.

  9. Flow Laminarization and Acceleration by Suspended Particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertsch, M.; Hulshof, J.; Prostokishin, V.M.

    2015-01-01

    In [Comm. Appl. Math. Comput. Sci., 4(2009), pp. 153-175], Barenblatt presents a model for partial laminarization and acceleration of shear flows by the presence of suspended particles of different sizes, and provides a formal asymptotic analysis of the resulting velocity equation. In the present

  10. Emulsifying and Suspending Properties of Enterolobium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background:The thermodynamic instability of emulsions and suspensions necessitate the incorporation of emulsifiers and suspending agents respectively, in order to stabilize the formulations and ensure administration of accurate doses. Objective:Enterolobium cyclocarpum gum was characterized and evaluated for its ...

  11. A new electrospun graphene-silk fibroin composite scaffolds for guiding Schwann cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yahong; Gong, Jiahuan; Niu, Changmei; Wei, Ziwei; Shi, Jiaqi; Li, Guohui; Yang, Yumin; Wang, Hongbo

    2017-12-01

    Graphene (Gr) has been made of various forms used for repairing peripheral nerve injury with favorable electroactivity, however, graphene-based scaffolds in peripheral nerve regeneration are still rarely reported due to the difficulty of realizing uniform dispersion of graphene and electroactive materials at nanoscale as well as lacking biocompatibility. In this paper, graphene-silk fibroin (SF) composite nanofiber membranes with different mass ratios were prepared via electrospinning. Microscopic observation revealed that electrospun Gr/SF membranes had a nanofibrous structure. Electrochemical analysis provided electroactivity characterization of the Gr/SF membranes. The physiochemical results showed that the physiochemical properties of electrospun Gr/SF membranes could be changed by varying Gr concentration. Swelling ratio and contact angle measurements confirmed that electrospun Gr/SF membranes possessed large absorption capacity and hydrophilic surface, and the mechanical property was improved with increasing Gr concentration. Additionally, in-vitro cytotoxicity with L929 revealed that all the electrospun Gr/SF membranes are biocompatible. Moreover, the morphology and quantity showed that the membranes supported the survival and growth of the cultured Schwann cells. Collectively, all of the results suggest that the electrospun Gr/SF membranes combine the excellent electrically conductivity and mechanical strength of the graphene with biocompatibility property of silk to mimic the natural neural cell micro-environment for nerve development.

  12. Graphene transfer process and optimization of graphene coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norfaezah Sabki, Syarifah; Hafly Shamsuri, Shafiq; Fazlina Fauzi, Siti; Lim Chon-Ki, Meghashama; Othman, Noraini

    2017-11-01

    Graphene grown on transition metal is known to be high in quality due to its controlled amount of defects and potentially used for many electronic applications. The transfer process of graphene grown on transition metal to a new substrate requires optimization in order to ensure that high graphene coverage can be obtained. In this work, an improvement in the graphene transfer process is performed from graphene grown on copper foil. It has been observed that the graphene coverage is affected by the pressure given to the top of PDMS to eliminate water and air between graphene and SiO2 (new substrate). This work experimented with different approaches to optimize the graphene coverage, and stamping method has proven to be the best technique in obtaining the largest graphene coverage. This work also highlights the elimination of impurities from graphene after the transfer process, known to be PMMA residues, which involved immersion of graphene in acetone. This method has improved the graphene conductivity.

  13. Preparation of Pt-Co nanoparticles by galvanostatic pulse electrochemical codeposition on in situ electrochemical reduced graphene nanoplates based carbon paper electrode for oxygen reduction reaction in proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaldagard, Maryam; Seghatoleslami, Naser; Jahanshahi, Mohsen

    2014-10-01

    Nanocomposite films of Pt-Co nanoparticles deposited on graphene nanoplate based gas diffusion layer electrode are fabricated via an electrochemical route involving a series of electrochemical process. Pt-Co nanoparticles of 11.37 nm in average size are prepared by galvanostatic codeposition in 0.5 M NaCl at PH of 2.5 at 300 mA cm-2 on the surface of in situ reduced graphene nanoplates on carbon paper. The topographical features, structure, morphology and composition of the prepared film samples are characterized by Atomic Force microscopy, Raman Spectroscopy, FTIR analysis, X-ray Diffraction, FESEM and EDS. At the same time, the catalytic activities of prepared electrodes for the oxygen reduction reaction are evaluated through cyclic voltammetry, linear sweep voltammetry and chronoamperometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements. Raman spectroscopy measurements confirmed the graphitic structure of the produced graphene nanoplates. The nanoparticles in the film were observed to be uniform spherical objects and well distributed. Catalytic properties of Pt-Co/GNP/GDL electrode were compared with Pt/C/GDL using half cell polarization measurements based on both mass activity and specific activity. The as prepared Pt-Co/GNP/GDL electrode exhibits high catalytic activity for the ORR, which may be attributed to structural changes caused by alloying and the high specific surface area of graphene nanoplates catalyst support. The mass activity peak current is found to be as high as 728.25 mA mgPt-1.

  14. Permeation through graphene ripples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Tao; He, Guangyu; Wu, Xu; Ren, Jindong; Guo, Hongxuan; Kong, Yuhan; Iwai, Hideo; Fujita, Daisuke; Gao, Hongjun; Guo, Haiming; Liu, Yingchun; Xu, Mingsheng

    2017-06-01

    Real graphene sheets show limited anti-permeation performance deviating from the ideally flat honeycomb carbon lattice that is impermeable to gases. Ripples in graphene are prevalent and they could significantly influence carrier transport. However, little attention has been paid to the role of ripples in the permeation properties of graphene. Here, we report that gases can permeate through graphene ripples at room temperature. The feasibility of gas permeation through graphene ripples is determined by detecting the initial oxidation sites of Cu surface covered with isolated graphene domain. Nudged elastic band (NEB) calculations demonstrate that the oxygen atom permeation occurs via the formation of C-O-C bond, in which process the energy barrier through the rippled graphene lattice is much smaller than that through a flat graphene lattice, rendering permeation through ripples more favorable. Combining with the recent advances in atoms intercalation between graphene and metal substrate for transfer-free and electrically insulated graphene, this discovery provides new perspectives regarding graphene’s limited anti-permeation performance and evokes for rational design of graphene-based encapsulation for barrier and selective gas separation applications through ripple engineering.

  15. Water-assisted growth of graphene on carbon nanotubes by the chemical vapor deposition method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jian-Min; Dai, Ye-Jing

    2013-05-21

    Combining carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with graphene has been proved to be a feasible method for improving the performance of graphene for some practical applications. This paper reports a water-assisted route to grow graphene on CNTs from ferrocene and thiophene dissolved in ethanol by the chemical vapor deposition method in an argon flow. A double injection technique was used to separately inject ethanol solution and water for the preparation of graphene/CNTs. First, CNTs were prepared from ethanol solution and water. The injection of ethanol solution was suspended and water alone was injected into the reactor to etch the CNTs. Thereafter, ethanol solution was injected along with water, which is the key factor in obtaining graphene/CNTs. Transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Raman scattering analyses confirmed that the products were the hybrid materials of graphene/CNTs. X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy analysis showed the presence of oxygen rich functional groups on the surface of the graphene/CNTs. Given the activity of the graphene/CNT surface, CdS quantum dots adhered onto it uniformly through simple mechanical mixing.

  16. Annealing and polycrystallinity effects on the thermal conductivity of supported CVD graphene monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Shyamprasad N; Osenberg, David; Choi, Kyoungjun; Park, Hyung Gyu; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2017-10-19

    The thermal transport properties of graphene are strongly influenced by its contact environment and the strength of such interactions can be used to tailor these properties. Here we find that annealing suppresses the basal plane thermal conductivity (κ) of graphene supported on silicon dioxide, due to the increased conformity of graphene to the nanoscale asperities of the substrate after annealing. Intriguingly, increasing the polycrystallinity of graphene, grown by chemical vapor deposition on copper, increases the severity of this suppression after annealing, revealing the role of grain boundaries and associated defects in aiding phonon scattering by the substrate. In highly polycrystalline graphene, the value of κ after annealing is comparable to that after significant fluorination of an identical unannealed sample. Our experiments employ the suspended micro-bridge platform for basal plane thermal conductivity measurements. Using xenon difluoride gas for the final release also enables the investigation of thermal transport in graphene in contact with polymers. We find evidence for weaker phonon scattering in graphene, due to a 10 nm thick polymer layer on top compared to the pre-existing silicon dioxide substrate, which is a promising result for flexible electronics applications of graphene.

  17. Nonlinear graphene plasmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Kelvin J. A.; Tan, Dawn T. H.

    2017-10-01

    The rapid development of graphene has opened up exciting new fields in graphene plasmonics and nonlinear optics. Graphene's unique two-dimensional band structure provides extraordinary linear and nonlinear optical properties, which have led to extreme optical confinement in graphene plasmonics and ultrahigh nonlinear optical coefficients, respectively. The synergy between graphene's linear and nonlinear optical properties gave rise to nonlinear graphene plasmonics, which greatly augments graphene-based nonlinear device performance beyond a billion-fold. This nascent field of research will eventually find far-reaching revolutionary technological applications that require device miniaturization, low power consumption and a broad range of operating wavelengths approaching the far-infrared, such as optical computing, medical instrumentation and security applications.

  18. Polymeric and Lipid Membranes—From Spheres to Flat Membranes and vice versa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saveleva, Mariia S.; Gorin, Dmitry A.; Skirtach, Andre G.

    2017-01-01

    Membranes are important components in a number of systems, where separation and control of the flow of molecules is desirable. Controllable membranes represent an even more coveted and desirable entity and their development is considered to be the next step of development. Typically, membranes are considered on flat surfaces, but spherical capsules possess a perfect “infinite” or fully suspended membranes. Similarities and transitions between spherical and flat membranes are discussed, while applications of membranes are also emphasized. PMID:28809796

  19. CENTRIFUGAL MEMBRANE FILTRATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William A. Greene; Patricia A. Kirk; Richard Hayes; Joshua Riley

    2005-10-28

    SpinTek Membrane Systems, Inc., the developer of a centrifugal membrane filtration technology, has engineered and developed a system for use within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) Program. The technology uses supported microporous membranes rotating at high rpm, under pressure, to separate suspended and colloidal solids from liquid streams, yielding a solids-free permeate stream and a highly concentrated solids stream. This is a crosscutting technology that falls under the Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program, with potential application to tank wastes, contaminated groundwater, landfill leachate, and secondary liquid waste streams from other remediation processes, including decontamination and decommissioning systems. SpinTek II High Shear Rotary Membrane Filtration System is a unique compact crossflow membrane system that has large, demonstrable advantages in performance and cost compared to currently available systems: (1) High fluid shear prevents membrane fouling even with very high solids content; hazardous and radioactive components can be concentrated to the consistency of a pasty slurry without fouling. (2) Induced turbulence and shear across the membrane increases membrane flux by a factor of ten over existing systems and allows operation on fluids not otherwise treatable. (3) Innovative ceramic membrane and mechanical sealing technology eliminates compatibility problems with aggressive DOE waste streams. (4) System design allows rapid, simple disassembly for inspection or complete decontamination. (5) Produces colloidal- and suspended-solids-free filtrate without the addition of chemicals. The first phase of this project (PRDA maturity stage 5) completed the physical scale-up of the SpinTek unit and verified successful scale-up with surrogate materials. Given successful scale-up and DOE concurrence, the second phase of this project (PRDA maturity stage 6) will provide for the installation and

  20. Membrane-on-a-Chip : Microstructured Silicon/Silicon-Dioxide Chips for High-Throughput Screening of Membrane Transport and Viral Membrane Fusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kusters, Ilja; van Oijen, Antoine M.; Driessen, Arnold J. M.

    Screening of transport processes across biological membranes is hindered by the challenge to establish fragile supported lipid bilayers and the difficulty to determine at which side of the membrane reactants reside. Here, we present a method for the generation of suspended lipid bilayers with

  1. On corrected formula for irradiated graphene quantum conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firsova, N. E.

    2017-09-01

    Graphene membrane irradiated by weak activating periodic electric field in terahertz range is considered. The corrected formula for the graphene quantum conductivity is found. The obtained formula gives complex conjugate results when radiation polarization direction is clockwise or it is opposite clockwise. The found formula allows us to see that the graphene membrane is an oscillating contour. Its eigen frequency coincides with a singularity point of the conductivity and depends on the electrons concentration. So the graphene membrane could be used as an antenna or a transistor and its eigen frequency could be tuned by doping in a large terahertz-infrared frequency range. The obtained formula allows us also to calculate the graphene membrane quantum inductivity and capacitance. The found dependence on electrons concentration is consistent with experiments. The method of the proof is based on study of the time-dependent density matrix. The exact solution of von Neumann equation for density matrix is found for our case in linear approximation on the external field. On this basis the induced current is studied and then the formula for quantum conductivity as a function of external field frequency and temperature is obtained. The method of the proof suggested in this paper could be used to study other problems. The found formula for quantum conductivity can be used to correct the SPPs Dispersion Relation and for the description of radiation process. It would be useful to take the obtained results into account when constructing devices containing graphene membrane nanoantenna. Such project could make it possible to create wireless communications among nanosystems. This would be promising research area of energy harvesting applications.

  2. Membrane dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    Current topics include membrane-protein interactions with regard to membrane deformation or curvature sensing by BAR domains. Also, we study the dynamics of membrane tubes of both cells and simple model membrane tubes. Finally, we study membrane phase behavior which has important implications...... for the lateral organization of membranes as wells as for physical properties like bending, permeability and elasticity...

  3. [Mechanism of membrane fouling and filtration characteristics in a membrane bioreactor for industrial wastewater treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ju-Hong; Yu, Su-Lin; Zhang, Pei-Shuai; Lan, Ya-Qiong; Liu, Rui; Chen, Liu-Jun

    2013-03-01

    The influence of mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS), soluble microbial product (SMP), extracellular polymeric substance (EPS), colloidal particles and other factors contributed to membrane fouling was analyzed in this pilot test by membrane bioreactor (MBR) process for the leather printing and dyeing industrial park mixed wastewater treatment. The results showed that slight membrane fouling occurred after 120-day experiment with an observable increase in membrane resistance R20 from 1.5 x 10(12) m(-1) to 1.8 x 10(12) m(-1). Also, a linear correlation was found between the proportion of colloidal particles concentration in TOC of MBR former solution and membrane filtration resistance change. However, the change of MLSS, SMP, EPS and other factors was not correlated with the membrane filtration resistance change. Therefore, the colloidal particle was considered to be the main factor causing membrane fouling, which attached to the membrane surface and deposited to block the membrane pore.

  4. Energy content of suspended detritus from Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Krishnakumari, L.; Sumitra-Vijayaraghavan; Royan, J.P.

    Energy components of suspended matter included phytoplankton, zooplankton and detritus inclusive of microorganisms adsorbed to detritus. Of these, detritus contributed most of the energy (98%). The average caloric content of suspended detritus...

  5. Graphene as a flexible template for controlling magnetic interactions between metal atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sungwoo; Kim, Dongwook; Robertson, Alex W; Yoon, Euijoon; Hong, Suklyun; Ihm, Jisoon; Yu, Jaejun; Warner, Jamie H; Lee, Gun-Do

    2017-03-01

    Metal-doped graphene produces magnetic moments that have potential application in spintronics. Here we use density function theory computational methods to show how the magnetic interaction between metal atoms doped in graphene can be controlled by the degree of flexure in a graphene membrane. Bending graphene by flexing causes the distance between two substitutional Fe atoms covalently bonded in graphene to gradually increase and these results in the magnetic moment disappearing at a critical strain value. At the critical strain, a carbon atom can enter between the two Fe atoms and blocks the interaction between relevant orbitals of Fe atoms to quench the magnetic moment. The control of interactions between doped atoms by exploiting the mechanical flexibility of graphene is a unique approach to manipulating the magnetic properties and opens up new opportunities for mechanical-magnetic 2D device systems.

  6. The suspended sentence in French Criminal Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovašević Dragan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available From the ancient times until today, criminal law has provided different criminal sanctions as measures of social control. These coercive measures are imposed on the criminal offender by the competent court and aimed at limitting the offender's rights and freedoms or depriving the offender of certain rights and freedoms. These sanctions are applied to the natural or legal persons who violate the norms of the legal order and injure or endanger other legal goods that enjoy legal protection. In order to effectively protect social values, criminal legislations in all countries predict a number of criminal sanctions. These are: 1 imprisonment, 2 precautions, 3 safety measures, 4 penalties for juveniles, and 5 sanctions for legal persons. Apart and instead of punishment, warning measures have a significant role in the jurisprudence. Since they emerged in the early 20th century in the system of criminal sanctions, there has been an increase in their application to criminal offenders, especially when it comes to first-time offenders who committed a negligent or accidental criminal act. Warnings are applied in case of crimes that do not have serious consequences, and whose perpetrators are not hardened and incorrigible criminals. All contemporary criminal legislations (including the French legilation provide a warning measure of suspended sentence. Suspended sentence is a conditional stay of execution of sentence of imprisonment for a specified time, provided that the convicted person does not commit another criminal offense and fulfills other obligations. This sanction applies if the following two conditions are fulfilled: a forma! -which is attached to the sentence of imprisonment; and b material -which is the court assessment that the application of this sanction is justified and necessary in a particular case. In many modern criminal legislations, there are two different types of suspended (conditional sentence: 1 ordinary (classical suspended

  7. Characterization of Platinum Nanoparticles Deposited on Functionalized Graphene Sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chun Chiang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to its special electronic and ballistic transport properties, graphene has attracted much interest from researchers. In this study, platinum (Pt nanoparticles were deposited on oxidized graphene sheets (cG. The graphene sheets were applied to overcome the corrosion problems of carbon black at operating conditions of proton exchange membrane fuel cells. To enhance the interfacial interactions between the graphene sheets and the Pt nanoparticles, the oxygen-containing functional groups were introduced onto the surface of graphene sheets. The results showed the Pt nanoparticles were uniformly dispersed on the surface of graphene sheets with a mean Pt particle size of 2.08 nm. The Pt nanoparticles deposited on graphene sheets exhibited better crystallinity and higher oxygen resistance. The metal Pt was the predominant Pt chemical state on Pt/cG (60.4%. The results from the cyclic voltammetry analysis showed the value of the electrochemical surface area (ECSA was 88 m2/g (Pt/cG, much higher than that of Pt/C (46 m2/g. The long-term test illustrated the degradation in ECSA exhibited the order of Pt/C (33% > Pt/cG (7%. The values of the utilization efficiency were calculated to be 64% for Pt/cG and 32% for Pt/C.

  8. Surface-induced hybridization between graphene and titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Allen L; Koch, Roland J; Ong, Mitchell T; Fang, Wenjing; Hofmann, Mario; Kim, Ki Kang; Seyller, Thomas; Dresselhaus, Mildred S; Reed, Evan J; Kong, Jing; Palacios, Tomás

    2014-08-26

    Carbon-based materials such as graphene sheets and carbon nanotubes have inspired a broad range of applications ranging from high-speed flexible electronics all the way to ultrastrong membranes. However, many of these applications are limited by the complex interactions between carbon-based materials and metals. In this work, we experimentally investigate the structural interactions between graphene and transition metals such as palladium (Pd) and titanium (Ti), which have been confirmed by density functional simulations. We find that the adsorption of titanium on graphene is more energetically favorable than in the case of most metals, and density functional theory shows that a surface induced p-d hybridization occurs between atomic carbon and titanium orbitals. This strong affinity between the two materials results in a short-range ordered crystalline deposition on top of graphene as well as chemical modifications to graphene as seen by Raman and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). This induced hybridization is interface-specific and has major consequences for contacting graphene-nanoelectronic devices as well as applications toward metal-induced chemical functionalization of graphene.

  9. Surface-Induced Hybridization between Graphene and Titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Allen L. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States).; Koch, Roland J. [Technische Universitat, Chemnitz (Germany); Ong, Mitchell T. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Fang, Wenjing [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Hofmann, Mario [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Kim, Ki Kang [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States).; Seyller, Thomas [Technische Universitat, Chemnitz (Germany); Dresselhaus, Mildred S. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Reed, Evan J. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Kong, Jing [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Palacios, Tomás [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2014-08-26

    Carbon-based materials such as graphene sheets and carbon nanotubes have inspired a broad range of applications ranging from high-speed flexible electronics all the way to ultrastrong membranes. However, many of these applications are limited by the complex interactions between carbon-based materials and metals. In this work, we experimentally investigate the structural interactions between graphene and transition metals such as palladium (Pd) and titanium (Ti), which have been confirmed by density functional simulations. We find that the adsorption of titanium on graphene is more energetically favorable than in the case of most metals, and density functional theory shows that a surface induced p-d hybridization occurs between atomic carbon and titanium orbitals. This strong affinity between the two materials results in a short-range ordered crystalline deposition on top of graphene as well as chemical modifications to graphene as seen by Raman and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). This induced hybridization is interface-specific and has major consequences for contacting graphene nanoelectronic devices as well as applications toward metal-induced chemical functionalization of graphene.

  10. My Spring with Graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Leary, Timothy Sean [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-06-08

    Graphene is a two-dimensional structure, one atom thick, with many uses in the world of technology. It has many useful electrical properties, is a very strong and durable material, and can be used to protect different types of substances. The world would be able to use these properties to further the strength of cars, protect metals from oxidation, increase computer speeds, use to improve superconductors, and whatever future uses that scientist invent or discover. We sought to optimize the growth and transfer of graphene. We grew graphene on copper foils by heating the foil in a furnace, and having various gases flow through a tube, where the copper foil was placed. We varied some of the concentrations of gases, along with having different times for heating the copper foil, different times for graphene growth, or a combination of the two. The focus of our experiment was to specifically grow monolayer single crystal graphene, which means that we do not want multiplayers of graphene, and do not want multiple crystals growing to form a bigger crystal. Our goal was to grow large single crystals from the growth experiment. We used a few different types of transfer methods that ranged from: using heat and pressure to press the graphene on different materials, using a polymer to cover the graphene with a method to destroy the copper, but leave the graphene and polymer intact, and using a type of heat tape with a combination of varying pressures to transfer the graphene, and then destroy the copper foil. To discover if we grew graphene we used different techniques involving lasers and microscopes to take different types of measurements. Discovering the best way of growing and transferring graphene will help with managing the cost of the future uses of graphene.

  11. Experimental study on thermal conductivity of free-standing fluorinated single-layer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narasaki, Masahiro; Wang, Haidong; Nishiyama, Takashi; Ikuta, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Koji

    2017-08-01

    We measured the thermal conductivity of free-standing fluorinated single-layer graphene (FSLG) using a precise T-type method. Pristine graphene was fluorinated and suspended above the substrate using xenon difluoride gas. Compared with the thermal conductivity of pristine single-layer graphene (SLG) (˜2000 W/mK) previously measured by the same T-type method for the same original SLG, the FSLG exhibited a much lower thermal conductivity (˜80 W/mK) and a weak dependence of the thermal conductivity on nanohole defects. The experimental results suggest that the fluorine atoms and sp3 bonding in the FSLG strongly contributed to phonon scattering. The phonon scattering by the fluorine atoms and sp3 bonding has a dominant effect on the thermal conductivity decrease over the phonon scattering by nanohole defects. This study lays a foundation for the thermal measurement of 2D fluorinated materials and benefits future applications of fluorinated graphene.

  12. Towards the Synthesis of Graphene Azide from Graphene Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbig, Christian E; Rietsch, Philipp; Eigler, Siegfried

    2015-11-26

    In the last decades, organic azides haven proven to be very useful precursors in organic chemistry, for example in 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reactions (click-chemistry). Likewise, azides can be introduced into graphene oxide with an almost intact carbon framework, namely oxo-functionalized graphene (oxo-G₁), which is a highly oxidized graphene derivative and a powerful precursor for graphene that is suitable for electronic devices. The synthesis of a graphene derivative with exclusively azide groups (graphene azide) is however still a challenge. In comparison also hydrogenated graphene, called graphene or halogenated graphene remain challenging to synthesize. A route to graphene azide would be the desoxygenation of azide functionalized oxo-G₁. Here we show how treatment of azide functionalized oxo-G₁ with HCl enlarges the π-system and removes strongly adsorbed water and some oxo-functional groups. This development reflects one step towards graphene azide.

  13. Graphene device and method of using graphene device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchiat, Vincent; Girit, Caglar; Kessler, Brian; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2015-08-11

    An embodiment of a graphene device includes a layered structure, first and second electrodes, and a dopant island. The layered structure includes a conductive layer, an insulating layer, and a graphene layer. The electrodes are coupled to the graphene layer. The dopant island is coupled to an exposed surface of the graphene layer between the electrodes. An embodiment of a method of using a graphene device includes providing the graphene device. A voltage is applied to the conductive layer of the graphene device. Another embodiment of a method of using a graphene device includes providing the graphene device without the dopant island. A dopant island is placed on an exposed surface of the graphene layer between the electrodes. A voltage is applied to the conductive layer of the graphene device. A response of the dopant island to the voltage is observed.

  14. Graphene-based and graphene-like materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanovskii, Alexander L.

    2012-07-01

    The review generalizes information on methods for modification of graphene-based carbon materials through creation of structural defects, introduction of substitutional impurities, adsorption of impurity atoms and mechanical deformations. Graphene ribbons and nano-flakes, graphene allotropes, as well as multi-layer graphenes and graphene-containing hybrid carbon structures are considered. Methods of synthesis and the results of studies on the properties and simulation of graphene derivatives (graphane, graphone and fluorographene) are discussed. The results obtained in studies of related non-carbon graphene-like materials including silicon-, germanium- and tin-based structural analogues of graphene, graphene-like binary phases SiC, GeC, SiGe, SiSn, etc., as well as compounds AIIIBV (white graphene, etc.) and AIIBVI (BeO, ZnO, ZnS) are generalized. Other graphene-like materials including metal dichalcogenides, oxides and carbides are briefly outlined. The bibliography includes 605 references.

  15. Estimating total suspended sediment yield with probability sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert B. Thomas

    1985-01-01

    The ""Selection At List Time"" (SALT) scheme controls sampling of concentration for estimating total suspended sediment yield. The probability of taking a sample is proportional to its estimated contribution to total suspended sediment discharge. This procedure gives unbiased estimates of total suspended sediment yield and the variance of the...

  16. Graphene-on-dielectric micromembrane for optoelectromechanical hybrid devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmid, Silvan; Bagci, Tolga; Zeuthen, Emil

    2013-01-01

    Due to their exceptional mechanical and optical properties, dielectric silicon nitride (SiN) micromembranes have become the centerpiece of many optomechanical experiments. Efficient capacitive coupling of the membrane to an electrical system would facilitate exciting hybrid optoelectromechanical...... devices. However, capacitive coupling of such SiN membranes is rather weak. Here we add a single layer of graphene on SiN micromembranes (SiN-G) and compare the electromechanical coupling and mechanical properties to bare SiN membranes and to membranes coated with an aluminium layer (Si...

  17. Polishing of POME by Chlorella sp. in suspended and immobilized system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahin, F. A.; Sarbatly, R.; Suali, E.

    2016-06-01

    The effect of using suspended and immobilized growth of Chlorella sp. to treat POME was studied. Cotton and nylon ropes were used as the immobilization material in a rotating microalgae biofilm reactor. The result showed that POME treated in suspended growth system was able to remove 81.9% and 55.5% of the total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) respectively. Whereas the immobilized system showed lower removal of 77.22% and 53.02% for TN and TP. Lower performance of immobilized microalgae is due to the limited light penetration and supply of CO2 inside the immobilization materials. The rotating microalgae biofilm reactor was able to reduce the biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) to 90 mg/L and chemical oxygen demand (COD) to 720 mg/L. Higher BOD and COD reading were obtained in suspended growth due to the presence of small number of microalgae cell in the samples. This study shows that suspended growth system is able to remove higher percentages of nitrogen and phosphorus. However, an efficient separation method such as membrane filtration is required to harvest the cultivated microalgae cell to avoid organic matter release into water bodies.

  18. SINTESIS GRAPHENE OXIDE DAN REDUCED GRAPHENE OXIDE

    OpenAIRE

    Rafitasari, Yeti; Suhendar, Haris; Imani, Nurul; Luciana, Fitri; Radean, Hesti; Santoso, Iman

    2016-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) have been synthesized chemically from graphite powder. Graphite powder was oxidized with strong oxidator agent molekul  to get graphite oxide, this process was called by Hummer’s methode. Graphite oxide was dispersed in water with ultasonic vibrator to exfoliated graphite oxide layers, and become graphene oxide. Epoxy group in GO structure was reduced by hydrazine 80 wt% to get rGO. Comparation was done between self synthetic rGO and S...

  19. Micro- and nanoscale electrical characterization of large-area graphene transferred to functional substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Fisichella

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Chemical vapour deposition (CVD on catalytic metals is one of main approaches for high-quality graphene growth over large areas. However, a subsequent transfer step to an insulating substrate is required in order to use the graphene for electronic applications. This step can severely affect both the structural integrity and the electronic properties of the graphene membrane. In this paper, we investigated the morphological and electrical properties of CVD graphene transferred onto SiO2 and on a polymeric substrate (poly(ethylene-2,6-naphthalene dicarboxylate, briefly PEN, suitable for microelectronics and flexible electronics applications, respectively. The electrical properties (sheet resistance, mobility, carrier density of the transferred graphene as well as the specific contact resistance of metal contacts onto graphene were investigated by using properly designed test patterns. While a sheet resistance Rsh ≈ 1.7 kΩ/sq and a specific contact resistance ρc ≈ 15 kΩ·μm have been measured for graphene transferred onto SiO2, about 2.3× higher Rsh and about 8× higher ρc values were obtained for graphene on PEN. High-resolution current mapping by torsion resonant conductive atomic force microscopy (TRCAFM provided an insight into the nanoscale mechanisms responsible for the very high ρc in the case of graphene on PEN, showing a ca. 10× smaller “effective” area for current injection than in the case of graphene on SiO2.

  20. Sedimentation of suspended solids in ultrasound field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikulina Vera

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Physical and chemical effects of aquatic environment that occur in an ultrasonic field change the sedimentation rate of coagulated suspension. This might only happen in case of cavitation of ultrasonic filed that causes a change of potentials of the medium. Research of the influence of ultrasonic vibrations on coagulation of suspended solids within water purification allows expanding their scope of implementation. The objective of the research is to estimate the effect of ultrasound on the sedimentation of the suspended solids, to determine of the efficiency of the process in relation to the dose of the coagulant, and to calculate the numerical values of the constants in the theoretical equation. The experiment condition was held in the water with the clay substances before the introduction of the coagulant. The method of magnetostriction ultrasonic generator was applied to receive ultrasonic vibration. Estimate of concentration of clay particles in water was performed using photometry. As a result of the research, the obtained data allow determining the increase in efficiency of suspended particles sedimentation related to the dose of coagulant, depending on time of ultrasonic treatment. The experiments confirmed the connection between the effect of sedimentation in the coagulation process, the coagulant dose and the time of scoring. Studies have shown that the increase in the duration of ultrasonic treatment causes a decrease of administered doses of coagulant.

  1. Suspended sediments limit coral sperm availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricardo, Gerard F.; Jones, Ross J.; Clode, Peta L.; Humanes, Adriana; Negri, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Suspended sediment from dredging activities and natural resuspension events represent a risk to the reproductive processes of coral, and therefore the ongoing maintenance of reefal populations. To investigate the underlying mechanisms that could reduce the fertilisation success in turbid water, we conducted several experiments exposing gametes of the corals Acropora tenuis and A. millepora to two sediment types. Sperm limitation was identified in the presence of siliciclastic sediment (230 and ~700 mg L−1), with 2–37 fold more sperm required to achieve maximum fertilisation rates, when compared with sediment-free treatments. This effect was more pronounced at sub-optimum sperm concentrations. Considerable (>45%) decreases in sperm concentration at the water’s surface was recorded in the presence of siliciclastic sediment and a >20% decrease for carbonate sediment. Electron microscopy then confirmed sediment entangled sperm and we propose entrapment and sinking is the primary mechanism reducing sperm available to the egg. Longer exposure to suspended sediments and gamete aging further decreased fertilisation success when compared with a shorter exposure. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that high concentrations of suspended sediments effectively remove sperm from the water’s surface during coral spawning events, reducing the window for fertilisation with potential subsequent flow-on effects for recruitment. PMID:26659008

  2. Graphene Nanopores for Electronic Recognition of DNA Methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarathy, Aditya; Qiu, Hu; Leburton, Jean-Pierre

    2017-04-20

    We investigate theoretically the ability of graphene nanopore membranes to detect methylated sites along a DNA molecule by electronic sheet current along the two-dimensional (2D) materials. Special emphasis is placed on the detection sensitivity changes due to pore size, shape, position, and the presence of defects around the nanopore in a membrane with constricted geometry. Enhanced sensitivity for detecting methylated CpG sites, labeled by methyl-CpG binding domain (MBD) proteins along a DNA molecule, is obtained for electronic transport through graphene midgap states caused by the constriction. A large square deviation from the graphene conductance with respect to the open nanopore is observed during the translocation of MBD proteins. This approach exhibits superior resolution in the detection of multiple methylated sites along the DNA compared to conventional ionic current blockade techniques.

  3. Cooling and entanglement of multimode graphene resonators via vacuum fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Sofia; Terças, Hugo

    2017-08-01

    Sympathetic laser cooling of a single mode graphene membrane coupled to an atomic cloud interacting via Casimir-Polder forces has been recently proposed. Here, we extend this study to the effect of secondary graphene membrane whose frequency may be far or close to resonance. We show that if the two mechanical modes are close together, it is possible to simultaneously cool both modes. Conversely, if the two frequencies are set far apart, the secondary mode does not affect the cooling of the first one. We also study the entanglement properties of the steady-state using the logarithmic negativity. We show how stationary mechanical entanglement between two graphene sheets can be generated by means of vacuum fluctuations. Moreover, we find that, within feasible experimental parameters, large steady-state acoustomechanical entanglement, i.e. entanglement between the phononic and mechanical mode, {E}N≈ 5, can be generated.

  4. Actuator tests for a large deformable membrane mirror

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamelinck, R.F.M.M.; Rosielle, P.C.J.N.; Steinbuch, M.; Ellenbroek, R.M.L.; Verhaegen, M.; Doelman, N.J.

    2006-01-01

    In the design of a large adaptive deformable membrane mirror, variable reluctance actuators are used. These consist of a closed magnetic circuit in which a strong permanent magnet provides a static magnetic force on a ferromagnetic core which is suspended in a membrane. By applying a current through

  5. Graphene based biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gürel, Hikmet Hakan, E-mail: hhakan.gurel@kocaeli.edu.tr [Kocaeli University, Kocaeli (Turkey); Salmankurt, Bahadır [Sakarya University, Sakarya (Turkey)

    2016-03-25

    Nanometer-sized graphene as a 2D material has unique chemical and electronic properties. Because of its unique physical, chemical, and electronic properties, its interesting shape and size make it a promising nanomaterial in many biological applications. It is expected that biomaterials incorporating graphene will be developed for the graphene-based drug delivery systems and biomedical devices. The interactions of biomolecules and graphene are long-ranged and very weak. Development of new techniques is very desirable for design of bioelectronics sensors and devices. In this work, we present first-principles calculations within density functional theory to calculate effects of charging on nucleobases on graphene. It is shown that how modify structural and electronic properties of nucleobases on graphene by applied charging.

  6. Graphene based biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürel, Hikmet Hakan; Salmankurt, Bahadır

    2016-03-01

    Nanometer-sized graphene as a 2D material has unique chemical and electronic properties. Because of its unique physical, chemical, and electronic properties, its interesting shape and size make it a promising nanomaterial in many biological applications. It is expected that biomaterials incorporating graphene will be developed for the graphene-based drug delivery systems and biomedical devices. The interactions of biomolecules and graphene are long-ranged and very weak. Development of new techniques is very desirable for design of bioelectronics sensors and devices. In this work, we present first-principles calculations within density functional theory to calculate effects of charging on nucleobases on graphene. It is shown that how modify structural and electronic properties of nucleobases on graphene by applied charging.

  7. Trifluoromethylation of graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Zhou

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate trifluoromethylation of graphene by copper-catalyzed free radical reaction. The covalent addition of CF3 to graphene, which changes the carbon atom hybridization from sp2 to sp3, and modifies graphene in a homogeneous and nondestructive manner, was verified with Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that CF3 groups are grafted to the basal plane of graphene, with about 4 at. % CF3 coverage. After trifluoromethylation, the average resistance increases by nearly one order of magnitude, and an energy gap of about 98 meV appears. The noninvasive and mild reaction to synthesize trifluoromethylated graphene paves the way for graphene's applications in electronics and biomedical areas.

  8. Graphene antidot lattice waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Goor; Gunst, Tue; Markussen, Troels

    2012-01-01

    We introduce graphene antidot lattice waveguides: nanostructured graphene where a region of pristine graphene is sandwiched between regions of graphene antidot lattices. The band gaps in the surrounding antidot lattices enable localized states to emerge in the central waveguide region. We model...... the waveguides via a position-dependent mass term in the Dirac approximation of graphene and arrive at analytical results for the dispersion relation and spinor eigenstates of the localized waveguide modes. To include atomistic details we also use a tight-binding model, which is in excellent agreement...... with the analytical results. The waveguides resemble graphene nanoribbons, but without the particular properties of ribbons that emerge due to the details of the edge. We show that electrons can be guided through kinks without additional resistance and that transport through the waveguides is robust against...

  9. Trifluoromethylation of graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Lin; Zhou, Lushan; Wang, Xi; Yu, Jingwen; Yang, Mingmei; Wang, Jianbo; Peng, Hailin, E-mail: zfliu@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: hlpeng@pku.edu.cn; Liu, Zhongfan, E-mail: zfliu@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: hlpeng@pku.edu.cn [Center for Nanochemistry, Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, State Key Laboratory for Structural Chemistry of Unstable and Stable Species, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate trifluoromethylation of graphene by copper-catalyzed free radical reaction. The covalent addition of CF{sub 3} to graphene, which changes the carbon atom hybridization from sp{sup 2} to sp{sup 3}, and modifies graphene in a homogeneous and nondestructive manner, was verified with Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that CF{sub 3} groups are grafted to the basal plane of graphene, with about 4 at. % CF{sub 3} coverage. After trifluoromethylation, the average resistance increases by nearly one order of magnitude, and an energy gap of about 98 meV appears. The noninvasive and mild reaction to synthesize trifluoromethylated graphene paves the way for graphene's applications in electronics and biomedical areas.

  10. Enabling graphene nanoelectronics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Wei; Ohta, Taisuke; Biedermann, Laura Butler; Gutierrez, Carlos; Nolen, C. M.; Howell, Stephen Wayne; Beechem Iii, Thomas Edwin; McCarty, Kevin F.; Ross, Anthony Joseph, III

    2011-09-01

    Recent work has shown that graphene, a 2D electronic material amenable to the planar semiconductor fabrication processing, possesses tunable electronic material properties potentially far superior to metals and other standard semiconductors. Despite its phenomenal electronic properties, focused research is still required to develop techniques for depositing and synthesizing graphene over large areas, thereby enabling the reproducible mass-fabrication of graphene-based devices. To address these issues, we combined an array of growth approaches and characterization resources to investigate several innovative and synergistic approaches for the synthesis of high quality graphene films on technologically relevant substrate (SiC and metals). Our work focused on developing the fundamental scientific understanding necessary to generate large-area graphene films that exhibit highly uniform electronic properties and record carrier mobility, as well as developing techniques to transfer graphene onto other substrates.

  11. Filterability and Sludge Concentration in Membrane Bioreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lousada-Ferreira, M.

    2011-01-01

    The Thesis entitled “Filterability and Sludge Concentration in Membrane Bioreactors” aims at explaining the relation between Mixed Liquid Suspended Solids (MLSS) concentration, the amount of solids in the wastewater being treated, also designated as sludge, and filterability, being the ability of

  12. Two-dimensional membranes in motion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davidovikj, D.

    2018-01-01

    This thesis revolves around nanomechanical membranes made of suspended two - dimensional materials. Chapters 1-3 give an introduction to the field of 2D-based nanomechanical devices together with an overview of the underlying physics and the measurementtools used in subsequent chapters. The research

  13. Active microrheology of smectic membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhiyuan; Ferguson, Kyle; Sechrest, Yancey; Munsat, Tobin; Park, Cheol Soo; Glaser, Matthew A.; Maclennan, Joseph E.; Clark, Noel A.; Kuriabova, Tatiana; Powers, Thomas R.

    2017-02-01

    Thin fluid membranes embedded in a bulk fluid of different viscosity are of fundamental interest as experimental realizations of quasi-two-dimensional fluids and as models of biological membranes. We have probed the hydrodynamics of thin fluid membranes by active microrheology using small tracer particles to observe the highly anisotropic flow fields generated around a rigid oscillating post inserted into a freely suspended smectic liquid crystal film that is surrounded by air. In general, at distances more than a few Saffman lengths from the meniscus around the post, the measured velocities are larger than the flow computed by modeling a moving disklike inclusion of finite extent by superposing Levine-MacKintosh response functions for pointlike inclusions in a viscous membrane. The observed discrepancy is attributed to additional coupling of the film with the air below the film that is displaced directly by the shaft of the moving post.

  14. Electrospun nylon 6 microfiltration membrane for treatment of brewery wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md. Shahidul; Sultana, Sormin; Rahaman, Md. Saifur

    2016-07-01

    Nylon 6 microfiltration membrane, for the treatment of brewery wastewater, was fabricated using an electrospinning technique, followed by hot-pressing. The fabricated membrane was robust and demonstrated highly hydrophilic property (water contact angle 39° at the touching point to the membrane surface and the water droplet was completely immersed into the membrane in 7 seconds), and higher porosity (65%) with pore sizes of 100 to 210 nm. The electrospun nylon 6 membrane showed higher pure water flux (850 LMH) at an applied pressure of 4 psi. The same membrane also demonstrated a 95% rejection rate of suspended solids (SS) in brewery wastewater treatment.

  15. Wettability of graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Rishi; Maroo, Shalabh C; Wang, Evelyn N

    2013-04-10

    Graphene, an atomically thin two-dimensional material, has received significant attention due to its extraordinary electronic, optical, and mechanical properties. Studies focused on understanding the wettability of graphene for thermo-fluidic and surface-coating applications, however, have been sparse. Meanwhile, wettability results reported in literature via static contact angle measurement experiments have been contradictory and highlight the lack of clear understanding of the underlying physics that dictates wetting behavior. In this work, dynamic contact angle measurements and detailed graphene surface characterizations were performed to demonstrate that the defects present in CVD grown and transferred graphene coatings result in unusually high contact angle hysteresis (16-37°) on these otherwise smooth surfaces. Hence, understanding the effect of the underlying substrate based on static contact angle measurements as reported in literature is insufficient. The advancing contact angle measurements on mono-, bi-, and trilayer graphene sheets on copper, thermally grown silica (SiO2), and glass substrates were observed to be independent of the number of layers of graphene and in good agreement with corresponding molecular dynamics simulations and theoretical calculations. Irrespective of the number of graphene layers, the advancing contact angle values were also in good agreement with the advancing contact angle on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), reaffirming the negligible effect of the underlying substrate. These results suggest that the advancing contact angle is a true representation of a graphene-coated surface while the receding contact angle is significantly influenced by intrinsic defects introduced during the growth and transfer processes. These observations, where the underlying substrates do not affect the wettability of graphene coatings, is shown to be due to the large interlayer spacing resulting from the loose interlamellar coupling between

  16. Biomedical Applications of Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, He; Zhang, Liming; Liu, Min; Zhang, Zhijun

    2012-01-01

    Graphene exhibits unique 2-D structure and exceptional phyiscal and chemical properties that lead to many potential applications. Among various applications, biomedical applications of graphene have attracted ever-increasing interests over the last three years. In this review, we present an overview of current advances in applications of graphene in biomedicine with focus on drug delivery, cancer therapy and biological imaging, together with a brief discussion on the challenges and perspectives for future research in this field. PMID:22448195

  17. Elastic modulus of Extreme Ultraviolet exposed single-layer graphene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mund, Baibhav Kumar; Gao, An; Sturm, Jacobus Marinus; Lee, Christopher James; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2015-01-01

    Highly transparent membranes are required for a number of applications, such as protective coatings for components in Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, beam splitters (EUV pump-probe experiments), transmission gratings, and reticles. Graphene is an excellent candidate due to its high tensile

  18. Relativistic Dynamics of Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenoff, Gordon

    2011-10-01

    Graphene is a one-atom thick layer of carbon atoms where electrons obey an emergent Dirac equation. Only seven years after it first became available in the laboratory, graphene has captured the attention of a wide spectrum of scientists: from particle physicists interested in using graphene's emergent relativistic dynamics to study quantum field theory phenomena to condensed matter physicists fascinated by its unusual electronic propertied and technologists searching for materials for the nest generation of electronic devices. This presentation will review the basics of graphene and some questions, such as the possibility of chiral symmetry breaking, which have overlap with similar ones in strong interaction particle physics.

  19. Graphene: synthesis and applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Choi, Wonbong; Lee, Jo-won

    2012-01-01

    .... Suitable for researchers and graduate students, it provides a cohesive, critical review of graphene nanoscience and technology, offering valuable insight into how this material is made and used...

  20. Graphene Conductance Uniformity Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buron, Jonas Christian Due; Petersen, Dirch Hjorth; Bøggild, Peter

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a combination of micro four-point probe (M4PP) and non-contact terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) measurements for centimeter scale quantitative mapping of the sheet conductance of large area chemical vapor deposited graphene films. Dual configuration M4PP measurements......, demonstrated on graphene for the first time, provide valuable statistical insight into the influence of microscale defects on the conductance, while THz-TDS has potential as a fast, non-contact metrology method for mapping of the spatially averaged nanoscopic conductance on wafer-scale graphene with scan times......, dominating the microscale conductance of the investigated graphene film....

  1. Graphene based nanocomposite hybrid electrodes for supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aphale, Ashish N.

    There is an unmet need to develop high performance energy storage systems (ESS), capable of storing energy from both renewable and non-renewable sources to meet the current energy crisis and depletion of non-renewable sources. Amongst many available ESS, supercapacitors (ECs) are the most promising because they exhibit a high charge/discharge rate and power density, along with a long cycle life. The possibility of exploring the use of atomically thin carbon allotropes like graphene, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and electrically conducting polymers (ECPs) such as polypyrrole (PPy) has been studied as a high performance conducting electrodes in supercapacitor application. A novel templated sustainable nanocomposite electrode has been fabricated using cellulose extracted from Cladophora c. aegagropila algae as component of the assembled supercapacitor device which later has been transitioned to a unique template-less freestanding nanocomposite supercapacitor electrode. The specific capacitance of polypyrrole-graphene-cellulose nanocomposite as calculated from cyclic voltammetry curve is 91.5 F g -1 at the scan rate 50 m Vs-1 in the presence of 1M NaCl electrolyte. The open circuit voltage of the device with polypyrrole -graphene-cellulose electrode was found to be around 225 m V and that of the polypyrrole -cellulose device is only 53 m V without the presence of graphene in the nanocomposite electrode. Understanding the fundamentals by fabricating template nanocomposite electrode, it led to fabricate a unique nanocomposite template-less freestanding film which comprises of polypyrrole-graphene-CNT hybrid. Various experiments have been performed using different electrolytes such ascorbic acid, sodium sulfate and sulfuric acid in different scan rates. The specific capacitance of polypyrrole-graphene-CNT nanocomposite with 0.1 wt% of graphene-CNT, as calculated from cyclic voltammetry curve is 450 F g-1 at the scan rate 5 m V s-1. For the first time a nanofibrous membrane has

  2. Casimir friction and near-field radiative heat transfer in graphene structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volokitin, A.I. [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). Peter Gruenberg Inst.; Samara State Technical Univ. (Russian Federation). Physical Dept.

    2017-05-01

    The dependence of the Casimir friction force between a graphene sheet and a (amorphous) SiO{sub 2} substrate on the drift velocity of the electrons in the graphene sheet is studied. It is shown that the Casimir friction is strongly enhanced for the drift velocity above the threshold velocity when the friction is determined by the resonant excitation of the surface phonon-polaritons in the SiO{sub 2} substrate and the electron-hole pairs in graphene. The theory agrees well with the experimental data for the current-voltage dependence for unsuspended graphene on the SiO{sub 2} substrate. The theories of the Casimir friction and the near-field radiative energy transfer are used to study the heat generation and dissipation in graphene due to the interaction with phonon-polaritons in the (amorphous) SiO{sub 2} substrate and acoustic phonons in graphene. For suspended graphene, the energy transfer coefficient at nanoscale gap is ∝ three orders of magnitude larger than the radiative heat transfer coefficient of the blackbody radiation limit.

  3. Using bicellar mixtures to form supported and suspended lipid bilayers on silicon chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeineldin, Reema; Last, Julie A; Slade, Andrea L; Ista, Linnea K; Bisong, Paul; O'Brien, Michael J; Brueck, S R J; Sasaki, Darryl Y; Lopez, Gabriel P

    2006-09-12

    Bicellar mixtures, planar lipid bilayer assemblies comprising long- and short-chain phosphatidylcholine lipids in suspension, were used to form supported lipid bilayers on flat silicon substrate and on nanotextured silicon substrates containing arrays of parallel troughs (170 nm wide, 380 nm deep, and 300 nm apart). Confocal fluorescence and atomic force microscopies were used to characterize the resulting lipid bilayer. Formation of a continuous biphasic undulating lipid bilayer membrane, where the crests and troughs corresponded to supported and suspended lipid bilayer regions, is demonstrated. The use of interferometric lithography to fabricate nanotexured substrates provides an advantage over other nanotextured substrates such as nanoporous alumina by offering flexibility in designing different geometries for suspending lipid bilayers.

  4. Application of electrochemically reduced graphene oxide on screen-printed ion-selective electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Jianfeng; Wang, Yixian; Ying, Yibin; Wu, Jian

    2012-04-03

    In this study, a novel disposable all-solid-state ion-selective electrode using graphene as the ion-to-electron transducer was developed. The graphene film was prepared on screen-printed electrode directly from the graphene oxide dispersion by a one-step electrodeposition technique. Cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were employed to demonstrate the large double layer capacitance and fast charge transfer of the graphene film modified electrode. On the basis of these excellent properties, an all-solid-state calcium ion-selective electrode as the model was constructed using the calcium ion-selective membrane and graphene film modified electrode. The mechanism about the graphene promoting the ion-to-electron transformation was investigated in detail. The disposable electrode exhibited a Nernstian slope (29.1 mV/decade), low detection limit (10(-5.8) M), and fast response time (less than 10 s). With the high hydrophobic character of graphene materials, no water film was formed between the ion-selective membrane and the underlying graphene layer. Further studies revealed that the developed electrode was insensitive to light, oxygen, and redox species. The use of the disposable electrode for real sample analysis obtained satisfactory results, which made it a promising alternative in routine sensing applications.

  5. Mechanochemistry of graphene: Tuning ion absorption on graphene via strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yonghong; Wu, Yunyi; Yan, Zhong; Mao, Caixia; Xue, Li; Sun, Tieyu; Wang, Yu

    2017-12-01

    The ultra-high specific surface area of graphene endows this two-dimensional material with an excellent capacity of ion absorption. Here we show that the ion absorption properties of graphene can be tailored via mechanical deformation. By using density function theory (DFT) analysis, we found that strain could enhance the ion absorption capacity of graphene. Our results provide perspective for the development of graphene-based electrochemical devices, such as stress difference battery and mechanochemistry sensors with graphene electrodes.

  6. Physical origin of satellites in photoemission of doped graphene: an ab initio GW plus cumulant study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lischner, Johannes; Vigil-Fowler, Derek; Louie, Steven G

    2013-04-05

    We calculate the photoemission spectra of suspended and epitaxial doped graphene using an ab initio cumulant expansion of the Green's function based on the GW self-energy. Our results are compared to experiment and to standard GW calculations. For doped graphene on a silicon carbide substrate, we find, in contrast to earlier calculations, that the spectral function from GW only does not reproduce experimental satellite properties. However, ab initio GW plus cumulant theory combined with an accurate description of the substrate screening results in good agreement with experiment, but gives no plasmaron (i.e., no extra well-defined excitation satisfying Dyson's equation).

  7. Preparation and Characterization of Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Man

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The homogeneous-dispersed graphene oxide was prepared by the improved Hummers method, which would be reduced to graphene with the reducing agent called hydrazine hydrate. The X-ray diffraction, Infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectra and Transmission electron microscopy were used to analysis the phase, morphology and structure of the graphene and graphene oxide. The results show that the graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide prepared via this method, whose degree of oxidation and reduction are high; Also obtained a higher well-disperses and less structural imperfection of the graphene that was manufactured in the reducing system that added ammonia reduction

  8. Monitoring of suspended sediment in South Tyrol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadalet, Rudi; Dinale, Roberto; Pernter, Martin; Maraldo, Luca; Peterlin, Dieter; Richter, Arnold; Comiti, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    In the context of the EU Water Framework Directive (WFD), which aims to achieve a good status of European water bodies, the Hydrographic Office of the Autonomous Province of Bolzano (Italy) extended in 2014 its institutional activities including the monitoring of suspended sediment in the river channel network. Currently, the only active monitoring station is on the Adige River at the gauging station of Ponte Adige near Bolzano (drainage area 2705 km2). The applied monitoring strategy and the data analysis concept are both based on the guidelines issued by the Austrian Federal Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry, Environment and Water Management (BMLFUW). The results indicates that the temporal variability strongly differs during the investigated period (2014-2015). In addition to the analysis of precipitation and water discharge, temperature and lightning activity were also included to better understand the sediment transport dynamics observed at the station. In summer 2015, the combination of constantly high daily temperature throughout the Adige basin (which drove intense glacier melting in the headwaters) with a high frequency of convective rainfall events (90% more than in 2014, obtained through lightning detection), led to an annual mass of transported suspended sediment of 260000 t. Interestingly, this value is similar to the one estimated for 2014 (300000 t), which was characterized by very different meteorological conditions (colder and wetter summer), but with the occurrence of an important flood in August, which transported half of the annual amount. Finally, we can conclude that the adopted monitoring strategy is applicable for institutional aims in terms of costs as well as in terms of time effort. During the next years, other stations for suspended sediment monitoring are planned to be installed in the Province to cover the most important river segments.

  9. Active noise cancellation in a suspended interferometer

    CERN Document Server

    Driggers, Jennifer C; Pepper, Keenan; Adhikari, Rana

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate feed-forward vibration isolation on a suspended Fabry-Perot interferometer using Wiener filtering and a variant of the common Least Mean Square (LMS) adaptive filter algorithm. We compare the experimental results with theoretical estimates of the cancellation efficiency. Using data from the recent LIGO Science Run, we also estimate the impact of this technique on full scale gravitational wave interferometers. In the future, we expect to use this technique to also remove acoustic, magnetic, and gravitational noise perturbations from the LIGO interferometers. This noise cancellation technique is simple enough to implement in standard laboratory environments and can be used to improve SNR for a variety of high precision experiments.

  10. Geodetic monitoring of suspended particles in rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamnik, Rok; Maksimova, Daria; Kovačič, Boštjan

    2017-10-01

    There is a trend in modern approach to the management of space of collecting the spatial data, in order to obtain useful information. In this paper a research of suspended particles in the river Drava and Mura will be introduced. The goal is to connect different fields of water management in countries where the rivers Drava and Mura flows in purpose of water management sustainability. The methods such as GNSS for mapping cross sections of the river, the use of ADCP (Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler) measurement system and water sampling to monitor sediment in the water will be presented.

  11. Safety Harness For Work Under Suspended Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunoo, Su Young

    1994-01-01

    Safety device protects worker under suspended engine or other heavy load. Mechanically linked with load so if load should fall, worker yanked safely away. Worker wears chest-plate vest with straps crossing eye on back. Lower safety cable connected to eye extends horizontally away from worker to nearby wall, wrapped on pulley and extends upward to motion amplifier or reducer. Safety cables transform any sudden downward motion of overhanging load into rapid sideways motion of worker. Net catches worker, preventing worker from bumping against wall.

  12. The defect level and ideal thermal conductivity of graphene uncovered by residual thermal reffusivity at the 0 K limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yangsu; Xu, Zaoli; Xu, Shen; Cheng, Zhe; Hashemi, Nastaran; Deng, Cheng; Wang, Xinwei

    2015-06-14

    Due to its intriguing thermal and electrical properties, graphene has been widely studied for potential applications in sensor and energy devices. However, the reported value for its thermal conductivity spans from dozens to thousands of W m(-1) K(-1) due to different levels of alternations and defects in graphene samples. In this work, the thermal diffusivity of suspended four-layered graphene foam (GF) is characterized from room temperature (RT) down to 17 K. For the first time, we identify the defect level in graphene by evaluating the inverse of thermal diffusivity (termed "thermal reffusivity": Θ) at the 0 K limit. By using the Debye model of Θ = Θ0 + C× e(-θ/2T) and fitting the Θ-T curve to the point of T = 0 K, we identify the defect level (Θ0) and determine the Debye temperature of graphene. Θ0 is found to be 1878 s m(-2) for the studied GF and 43-112 s m(-2) for three highly crystalline graphite materials. This uncovers a 16-43-fold higher defect level in GF than that in pyrolytic graphite. In GF, the phonon mean free path solely induced by defects and boundary scattering is determined as 166 nm. The Debye temperature of graphene is determined to be 1813 K, which is very close to the average theoretical Debye temperature (1911 K) of the three acoustic phonon modes in graphene. By subtracting the defect effect, we report the ideal thermal diffusivity and conductivity (κideal) of graphene presented in the 3D foam structure in the range of 33-299 K. Detailed physics based on chemical composition and structure analysis are given to explain the κideal-T profile by comparing with those reported for suspended graphene.

  13. Wetting of Water on Graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Bera, Bijoyendra; Shahidzadeh, Noushine; Mishra, Himanshu; Bonn, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The wetting properties of graphene have proven controversial and difficult to assess. The presence of a graphene layer on top of a substrate does not significantly change the wetting properties of the solid substrate, suggesting that a single graphene layer does not affect the adhesion between the wetting phase and the substrate. However, wetting experiments of water on graphene show contact angles that imply a large amount of adhesion. Here, we investigate the wetting of graphene by measurin...

  14. Physics of graphene

    CERN Document Server

    S Dresselhaus, Mildred

    2013-01-01

    This book provides a state of the art report of the results of graphene research, one of the fastest-moving topics on condensed-matter physics. Covers not only transport but optical and other properties of multilayer as well as monolayer graphene systems.

  15. Inkjet printing of graphene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arapov, K.; Abbel, R.; De With, G.; Friedrich, H.

    2014-01-01

    The inkjet printing of graphene is a cost-effective, and versatile deposition technique for both transparent and non-transparent conductive films. Printing graphene on paper is aimed at low-end, high-volume applications, i.e.; in electromagnetic shielding, photovoltaics or, e.g.; as a replacement

  16. GRAPHENE: A NEW MATERIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cătălin IANCU

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the properties of a new but allready known material – graphene. Graphene is a 2-dimensional network of carbon atoms. Are presented the estonished characteristics of this form of carbon, alongwith some interesting field of use.

  17. Quantum transport in graphene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostinga, J.B.

    2010-01-01

    After the experimental discovery of graphene -a single atomic layer of graphite- a scientific rush started to explore graphene’s electronic behaviour. Graphene is a fascinating two-dimensional electronic system, because its electrons behave as relativistic particles. Moreover, it is a promising

  18. Path-integral simulation of graphene monolayers under tensile stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, Carlos P; Ramírez, Rafael

    2017-11-27

    Finite-temperature properties of graphene monolayers under tensile stress have been studied by path-integral molecular dynamics (PIMD) simulations. This method allows one to consider the quantization of vibrational modes in these crystalline membranes and to analyze the influence of anharmonic effects on the membrane properties. Quantum nuclear effects turn out to be appreciable on the structural and thermodynamic properties of graphene at low temperature, and they can even be noticeable at room temperature. Such quantum effects become more relevant as the applied stress is increased, mainly for properties related to out-of-plane atomic vibrations. The relevance of quantum dynamics in the out-of-plane motion depends on the system size, and is enhanced by tensile stress. For applied tensile stresses, we analyze the contribution of the elastic energy to the internal energy of graphene. Results of PIMD simulations are compared with calculations based on a harmonic approximation for the vibrational modes of the graphene lattice. This approximation describes rather well the structural properties of graphene, provided that the frequencies of ZA (flexural) acoustic modes in the transverse direction include a pressure-dependent correction.

  19. Supersonically blown nylon-6 nanofibers entangled with graphene flakes for water purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Gun; Kim, Do-Yeon; Mali, Mukund G; Al-Deyab, Salem S; Swihart, Mark T; Yoon, Sam S

    2015-12-07

    Water purification membranes, capable of purifying a few to tens of milliliters of aqueous methylene blue solution in a minute, were produced by supersonically blowing graphene flakes with a nylon-6 polymeric solution. The solution-blown nylon-6 nanofibers became entangled with graphene flakes thereby locking the graphene flakes within the frame of the bendable two-dimensional film structure. This method, which yielded a 5 × 7 cm(2)-sized membrane in less than 10 seconds, is commercially viable owing to fast fabrication and scalability. We show that our water purification device allows a flow rate range of 0.3-4 L h(-1) with a membrane area of just 5 cm(2), under a pressure difference of 0.5-3.5 bar. If the membrane were scaled up to 0.5 m(2), it could provide 300-4000 L h(-1) flow rate, an ample supply for home use.

  20. Hybrid Filter Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laicer, Castro; Rasimick, Brian; Green, Zachary

    2012-01-01

    Cabin environmental control is an important issue for a successful Moon mission. Due to the unique environment of the Moon, lunar dust control is one of the main problems that significantly diminishes the air quality inside spacecraft cabins. Therefore, this innovation was motivated by NASA s need to minimize the negative health impact that air-suspended lunar dust particles have on astronauts in spacecraft cabins. It is based on fabrication of a hybrid filter comprising nanofiber nonwoven layers coated on porous polymer membranes with uniform cylindrical pores. This design results in a high-efficiency gas particulate filter with low pressure drop and the ability to be easily regenerated to restore filtration performance. A hybrid filter was developed consisting of a porous membrane with uniform, micron-sized, cylindrical pore channels coated with a thin nanofiber layer. Compared to conventional filter media such as a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter, this filter is designed to provide high particle efficiency, low pressure drop, and the ability to be regenerated. These membranes have well-defined micron-sized pores and can be used independently as air filters with discreet particle size cut-off, or coated with nanofiber layers for filtration of ultrafine nanoscale particles. The filter consists of a thin design intended to facilitate filter regeneration by localized air pulsing. The two main features of this invention are the concept of combining a micro-engineered straight-pore membrane with nanofibers. The micro-engineered straight pore membrane can be prepared with extremely high precision. Because the resulting membrane pores are straight and not tortuous like those found in conventional filters, the pressure drop across the filter is significantly reduced. The nanofiber layer is applied as a very thin coating to enhance filtration efficiency for fine nanoscale particles. Additionally, the thin nanofiber coating is designed to promote capture of

  1. Membrane tension and membrane fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Kozlov, Michael M.; Chernomordik, Leonid V.

    2015-01-01

    Diverse cell biological processes that involve shaping and remodeling of cell membranes are regulated by membrane lateral tension. Here we focus on the role of tension in driving membrane fusion. We discuss the physics of membrane tension, forces that can generate the tension in plasma membrane of a cell, and the hypothesis that tension powers expansion of membrane fusion pores in late stages of cell-to-cell and exocytotic fusion. We propose that fusion pore expansion can require unusually la...

  2. Enhanced Neural Cell Adhesion and Neurite Outgrowth on Graphene-Based Biomimetic Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Ho; Kang, Seok Hee; Hwang, Eun Young; Hwang, Yu-Shik; Lee, Mi Hee; Park, Jong-Chul

    2014-01-01

    Neural cell adhesion and neurite outgrowth were examined on graphene-based biomimetic substrates. The biocompatibility of carbon nanomaterials such as graphene and carbon nanotubes (CNTs), that is, single-walled and multiwalled CNTs, against pheochromocytoma-derived PC-12 neural cells was also evaluated by quantifying metabolic activity (with WST-8 assay), intracellular oxidative stress (with ROS assay), and membrane integrity (with LDH assay). Graphene films were grown by using chemical vapor deposition and were then coated onto glass coverslips by using the scooping method. Graphene sheets were patterned on SiO2/Si substrates by using photolithography and were then covered with serum for a neural cell culture. Both types of CNTs induced significant dose-dependent decreases in the viability of PC-12 cells, whereas graphene exerted adverse effects on the neural cells just at over 62.5 ppm. This result implies that graphene and CNTs, even though they were the same carbon-based nanomaterials, show differential influences on neural cells. Furthermore, graphene-coated or graphene-patterned substrates were shown to substantially enhance the adhesion and neurite outgrowth of PC-12 cells. These results suggest that graphene-based substrates as biomimetic cues have good biocompatibility as well as a unique surface property that can enhance the neural cells, which would open up enormous opportunities in neural regeneration and nanomedicine. PMID:24592382

  3. Graphene mobility mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buron, Jonas Christian Due; Pizzocchero, Filippo; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2015-01-01

    Carrier mobility and chemical doping level are essential figures of merit for graphene, and large-scale characterization of these properties and their uniformity is a prerequisite for commercialization of graphene for electronics and electrodes. However, existing mapping techniques cannot directly...... assess these vital parameters in a non-destructive way. By deconvoluting carrier mobility and density from non-contact terahertz spectroscopic measurements of conductance in graphene samples with terahertz-transparent backgates, we are able to present maps of the spatial variation of both quantities over...... graphene indicates dominance by charged scatterers. Unexpectedly, significant variations in mobility rather than doping are the cause of large conductance inhomogeneities, highlighting the importance of statistical approaches when assessing large-area graphene transport properties....

  4. Graphene heat dissipating structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Cody M.; Lambert, Timothy N.; Wheeler, David R.; Rodenbeck, Christopher T.; Railkar, Tarak A.

    2017-08-01

    Various technologies presented herein relate to forming one or more heat dissipating structures (e.g., heat spreaders and/or heat sinks) on a substrate, wherein the substrate forms part of an electronic component. The heat dissipating structures are formed from graphene, with advantage being taken of the high thermal conductivity of graphene. The graphene (e.g., in flake form) is attached to a diazonium molecule, and further, the diazonium molecule is utilized to attach the graphene to material forming the substrate. A surface of the substrate is treated to comprise oxide-containing regions and also oxide-free regions having underlying silicon exposed. The diazonium molecule attaches to the oxide-free regions, wherein the diazonium molecule bonds (e.g., covalently) to the exposed silicon. Attachment of the diazonium plus graphene molecule is optionally repeated to enable formation of a heat dissipating structure of a required height.

  5. Propagation and excitation of graphene plasmon polaritons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Yan, Wei; Jeppesen, Claus

    2013-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the propagation of graphene plasmon polaritons in graphene nanoribbon waveguides and experimentally observe the excitation of the graphene plasmon polaritons in a continuous graphene monolayer. We show that graphene nanoribbon bends do not induce any additional loss...... and nanofocusing occurs in a tapered graphene nanoriboon, and we experimentally demonstrate the excitation of graphene plasmon polaritonss in a continuous graphene monolayer assisted by a two-dimensional subwavelength silicon grating....

  6. Shearing graphene and its transmission properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concha, Andres; Cheng, Shengfeng; Mahadevan, L.

    2013-03-01

    Graphene being the thinnest possible membrane is prone to deformations under slight external forcing or even under thermal fluctuations. Here, we take advantage of this proneness to deformations to manipulate transport properties of graphene ribbons. We do so by using the spontaneous pattern produced when a wide ribbon is subject to shear. The deformation of the ribbon produces pseudo-magnetic fields as well as scalar potentials, resulting in the modification of transmission properties without the need of an external gate potential. Our proposal is a concrete realization of a quantum device that takes full advantage of an elastic instability that spans from the nano to macro-scales. A.C. would like to acknowledge partial support from Conicyt PAI #79112004

  7. Modification of graphene by ion beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawlik, G.; Ciepielewski, P.; Jagielski, J.; Baranowski, J.

    2017-09-01

    Ion induced defect generation in graphene was analyzed using Raman spectroscopy. A single layer graphene membrane produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on copper foil and then transferred on glass substrate was subjected to helium, carbon, nitrogen, argon and krypton ions bombardment at energies from the range 25 keV to 100 keV. A density of ion induced defects and theirs mean size were estimated by using Raman measurements. Increasing number of defects generated by ion with increase of ion mass and decrease of ion energy was observed. Dependence of ion defect efficiency (defects/ion) on ion mass end energy was proportional to nuclear stopping power simulated by SRIM. No correlation between ion defect efficiency and electronic stopping power was observed.

  8. Antibacterial activity of graphene supported FeAg bimetallic nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Ayyaz; Qureshi, Abdul Sattar; Li, Li; Bao, Jie; Jia, Xin; Xu, Yisheng; Guo, Xuhong

    2016-07-01

    We report the simple one pot synthesis of iron-silver (FeAg) bimetallic nanoparticles with different compositions on graphene support. The nanoparticles are well dispersed on the graphene sheet as revealed by the TEM, XRD, and Raman spectra. The antibacterial activity of graphene-FeAg nanocomposite (NC) towards Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus aureus was investigated by colony counting method. Graphene-FeAg NC demonstrates excellent antibacterial activity as compared to FeAg bimetallic without graphene. To understand the antibacterial mechanism of the NC, oxidative stress caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the glutathione (GSH) oxidation were investigated in the system. It has been observed that ROS production and GSH oxidation are concentration dependent while the increase in silver content up to 50% generally enhances the ROS production while ROS decreases on further increase in silver content. Graphene loaded FeAg NC demonstrates higher GSH oxidation capacity than bare FeAg bimetallic nanocomposite. The mechanism study suggests that the antibacterial activity is probably due to membrane and oxidative stress produced by the nanocomposites. The possible antibacterial pathway mainly includes the non-ROS oxidative stress (GSH oxidation) while ROS play minor role. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Graphene in the aquatic environment: adsorption, dispersion, toxicity and transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian; Wang, Zhenyu; White, Jason C; Xing, Baoshan

    2014-09-02

    Graphene-family nanomaterials (GFNs) including pristine graphene, reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and graphene oxide (GO) offer great application potential, leading to the possibility of their release into aquatic environments. Upon exposure, graphene/rGO and GO exhibit different adsorption properties toward environmental adsorbates, thus the molecular interactions at the GFN-water interface are discussed. After solute adsorption, the dispersion/aggregation behaviors of GFNs can be altered by solution chemistry, as well as by the presence of colloidal particles and biocolloids. GO has different dispersion performance from pristine graphene and rGO, which is further demonstrated from surface properties. Upon exposure in aquatic environments, GFNs have adverse impacts on aquatic organisms (e.g., bacteria, algae, plants, invertebrates, and fish). The mechanisms of GFNs toxicity at the cellular level are reviewed and the remaining unclear points on toxic mechanisms such as membrane damage are presented. Moreover, we highlight the transformation routes of GO to rGO. The degradation of GFNs upon exposure to UV irradiation and/or biota is also reviewed. In view of the unanswered questions, future research should include comprehensive characterization of GFNs, new approaches for explaining GFNs aggregation, environmental behaviors of metastable GO, and the relationship between dispersion of GFNs and the related adsorption properties.

  10. Comparison of frictional forces on graphene and graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyunsoo; Lee, Naesung; Seo, Yongho [Faculty of Nanotechnology and Advanced Material Engineering and Institute of Fundamental Physics, Sejong University, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of); Eom, Jonghwa [Department of Physics and Institute of Fundamental Physics, Sejong University, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, SangWook, E-mail: yseo@sejong.ac.k [Division of Quantum Phases and Devices, School of Physics, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-107 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-08-12

    We report on the frictional force between an SiN tip and graphene/graphite surfaces using lateral force microscopy. The cantilever we have used was made of an SiN membrane and has a low stiffness of 0.006 N m{sup -1}. We prepared graphene flakes on a Si wafer covered with silicon oxides. The frictional force on graphene was smaller than that on the Si oxide and larger than that on graphite (multilayer of graphene). Force spectroscopy was also employed to study the van der Waals force between the graphene and the tip. Judging that the van der Waals force was also in graphite-graphene-silicon oxide order, the friction is suspected to be related to the van der Waals interactions. As the normal force acting on the surface was much weaker than the attractive force, such as the van der Waals force, the friction was independent of the normal force strength. The velocity dependency of the friction showed a logarithmic behavior which was attributed to the thermally activated stick-slip effect.

  11. Comparison of frictional forces on graphene and graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunsoo; Lee, Naesung; Seo, Yongho; Eom, Jonghwa; Lee, Sang Wook

    2009-08-01

    We report on the frictional force between an SiN tip and graphene/graphite surfaces using lateral force microscopy. The cantilever we have used was made of an SiN membrane and has a low stiffness of 0.006 N m-1. We prepared graphene flakes on a Si wafer covered with silicon oxides. The frictional force on graphene was smaller than that on the Si oxide and larger than that on graphite (multilayer of graphene). Force spectroscopy was also employed to study the van der Waals force between the graphene and the tip. Judging that the van der Waals force was also in graphite-graphene-silicon oxide order, the friction is suspected to be related to the van der Waals interactions. As the normal force acting on the surface was much weaker than the attractive force, such as the van der Waals force, the friction was independent of the normal force strength. The velocity dependency of the friction showed a logarithmic behavior which was attributed to the thermally activated stick-slip effect.

  12. Method for forming suspended micromechanical structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, James G.

    2000-01-01

    A micromachining method is disclosed for forming a suspended micromechanical structure from {111} crystalline silicon. The micromachining method is based on the use of anisotropic dry etching to define lateral features of the structure which are etched down into a {111}-silicon substrate to a first etch depth, thereby forming sidewalls of the structure. The sidewalls are then coated with a protection layer, and the substrate is dry etched to a second etch depth to define a spacing of the structure from the substrate. A selective anisotropic wet etchant (e.g. KOH, EDP, TMAH, NaOH or CsOH) is used to laterally undercut the structure between the first and second etch depths, thereby forming a substantially planar lower surface of the structure along a {111} crystal plane that is parallel to an upper surface of the structure. The lateral extent of undercutting by the wet etchant is controlled and effectively terminated by either timing the etching, by the location of angled {111}-silicon planes or by the locations of preformed etch-stops. This present method allows the formation of suspended micromechanical structures having large vertical dimensions and large masses while allowing for detailed lateral features which can be provided by dry etch definition. Additionally, the method of the present invention is compatible with the formation of electronic circuitry on the substrate.

  13. Quasi-periodic nanoripples in graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition and its impact on charge transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Guang-Xin; Zheng, Yi; Bae, Sukang; Kim, Hye Ri; Pachoud, Alexandre; Kim, Young Soo; Tan, Chang-Ling; Im, Danho; Ahn, Jong-Hyun; Hong, Byung Hee; Ozyilmaz, Barbaros

    2012-02-28

    The technical breakthrough in synthesizing graphene by chemical vapor deposition methods (CVD) has opened up enormous opportunities for large-scale device applications. To improve the electrical properties of CVD graphene grown on copper (Cu-CVD graphene), recent efforts have focused on increasing the grain size of such polycrystalline graphene films to 100 μm and larger. While an increase in grain size and, hence, a decrease of grain boundary density is expected to greatly enhance the device performance, here we show that the charge mobility and sheet resistance of Cu-CVD graphene is already limited within a single grain. We find that the current high-temperature growth and wet transfer methods of CVD graphene result in quasi-periodic nanoripple arrays (NRAs). Electron-flexural phonon scattering in such partially suspended graphene devices introduces anisotropic charge transport and sets limits to both the highest possible charge mobility and lowest possible sheet resistance values. Our findings provide guidance for further improving the CVD graphene growth and transfer process.

  14. Semiconducting graphene: converting graphene from semimetal to semiconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ganhua; Yu, Kehan; Wen, Zhenhai; Chen, Junhong

    2013-02-21

    Interest in graphene has grown extensively in the last decade or so, because of its extraordinary physical properties, chemical tunability, and potential for various applications. However, graphene is intrinsically a semimetal with a zero bandgap, which considerably impedes its use in many applications where a suitable bandgap is required. The transformation of graphene into a semiconductor has attracted significant attention, because the presence of a sizable bandgap in graphene can vastly promote its already-fascinating potential in an even wider range of applications. Here we review major advances in the pursuit of semiconducting graphene materials. We first briefly discuss the electronic properties of graphene and some theoretical background for manipulating the band structure of graphene. We then summarize many experimental approaches proposed in recent years for producing semiconducting graphene. Despite the relatively short history of research in semiconducting graphene, the progress has been remarkable and many significant developments are highly anticipated.

  15. Membrane fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    At Stanford University, Boxer lab, I worked on membrane fusion of small unilamellar lipid vesicles to flat membranes tethered to glass surfaces. This geometry closely resembles biological systems in which liposomes fuse to plasma membranes. The fusion mechanism was studied using DNA zippering...... between complementary strands linked to the two apposing membranes closely mimicking the zippering mechanism of SNARE fusion complexes....

  16. A strategy to synthesize graphene-incorporated lignin polymer composite materials with uniform graphene dispersion and covalently bonded interface engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mei; Duong, Le Dai; Ma, Yifei; Sun, Yan; Hong, Sung Yong; Kim, Ye Chan; Suhr, Jonghwan; Nam, Jae-Do

    2017-08-01

    Graphene-incorporated polymer composites have been demonstrated to have excellent mechanical and electrical properties. In the field of graphene-incorporated composite material synthesis, there are two main obstacles: Non-uniform dispersion of graphene filler in the matrix and weak interface bonding between the graphene filler and polymer matrix. To overcome these problems, we develop an in-situ polymerization strategy to synthesize uniformly dispersed and covalently bonded graphene/lignin composites. Graphene oxide (GO) was chemically modified by 4,4'-methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) to introduce isocyanate groups and form the urethane bonds with lignin macromonomers. Subsequential polycondensation reactions of lignin groups with caprolactone and sebacoyl chloride bring about a covalent network of modified GO and lignin-based polymers. The flexible and robust lignin polycaprolactone polycondensate/modified GO (Lig-GOm) composite membranes are achieved after vacuum filtration, which have tunable hydrophilicity and electrical resistance according to the contents of GOm. This research transforms lignin from an abundant biomass into film-state composite materials, paving a new way for the utilization of biomass wastes.

  17. Graphene oxide: a carrier for pharmaceuticals and a scaffold for cell interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán, Nelson; Martinez, Diego Stéfani T; Silveira, Camila P; Durán, Marcela; de Moraes, Ana C M; Simões, Mateus B; Alves, Oswaldo L; Fávaro, Wagner J

    2015-01-01

    During the last ten years, graphene oxide has been explored in many applications due to its remarkable electroconductivity, thermal properties and mobility of charge carriers, among other properties. As discussed in this review, the literature suggests that a total characterization of graphene oxide must be conducted because oxidation debris (synthesis impurities) present in the graphene oxides could act as a graphene oxide surfactant, stabilizing aqueous dispersions. It is also important to note that the structure models of graphene oxide need to be revisited because of significant implications for its chemical composition and its direct covalent functionalization. Another aspect that is discussed is the need to consider graphene oxide surface chemistry. The hemolysis assay is recommended as a reliable test for the preliminary assessment of graphene oxide toxicity, biocompatibility and cell membrane interaction. More recently, graphene oxide has been extensively explored for drug delivery applications. An important increase in research efforts in this emerging field is clearly represented by the hundreds of related publications per year, including some reviews. Many studies have been performed to explore the graphene oxide properties that enable it to deliver more than one activity simultaneously and to combine multidrug systems with photothermal therapy, indicating that graphene oxide is an attractive tool to overcome hurdles in cancer therapies. Some strategic aspects of the application of these materials in cancer treatment are also discussed. In vitro studies have indicated that graphene oxide can also promote stem cell adhesion, growth and differentiation, and this review discusses the recent and pertinent findings regarding graphene oxide as a valuable nanomaterial for stem cell research in medicine. The protein corona is a key concept in nanomedicine and nanotoxicology because it provides a biomolecular identity for nanomaterials in a biological environment

  18. Graphene-based three-body amplification of photon heat tunneling

    CERN Document Server

    Simchi, Hamidreza

    2016-01-01

    We consider a three slabs configuration including two non-doped single layer graphene on insulating silicon dioxide (G/SiO2) substrates and one non-doped suspended single layer graphene (SG). The suspended layer is placed between two G/SiO2 layers. Without SG layer, the heat flux has maximum at Plasmon frequency supported by the G/SiO2 slabs. In three slabs configuration, the photon heat tunneling is amplified between two G/SiO2 layers significantly, only for specific range of vacuum gap between SG layer and G/SiO2 layers and Plasmon frequency, due to the coupling of modes between each G/SiO2 layer and SG layer. Since, the SG layer is a single atomic layer, the photon heat tunneling assisted by this configuration does not depend on the thickness of middle layer and in consequence, it can enable novel applications for nanoscale thermal management.

  19. Environmentally-suspended sediment production of the Nasia River ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study assessed the level of suspended sediment produced in the Nasia River Basin. Hydrological and meteorological data and water samples were used for the study. Average suspended sediment yield (33 years) in the basin was 19.90 t/km2/yr. With mean annual runoff of 439.13m3/s, 322.43 t/yr suspended sediment ...

  20. Mutual diffusion of inclusions in freely suspended smectic liquid crystal films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhiyuan; Nguyen, Zoom Hoang; Park, Cheol Soo; Glaser, Matthew A; Maclennan, Joseph E; Clark, Noel A; Kuriabova, Tatiana; Powers, Thomas R

    2014-09-19

    We study experimentally and theoretically the hydrodynamic interaction of pairs of circular inclusions in two-dimensional, fluid smectic membranes suspended in air. By analyzing their Brownian motion, we find that the radial mutual mobilities of identical inclusions are independent of their size but that the angular coupling becomes strongly size dependent when their radius exceeds a characteristic hydrodynamic length. These observations are described well for arbitrary inclusion separations by a model that generalizes the Levine-MacKintosh theory of point-force response functions and uses a boundary-element approach to calculate the mobility matrix for inclusions of finite extent.

  1. Graphene nanoplatelets spontaneously translocate into the cytosol and physically interact with cellular organelles in the fish cell line PLHC-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lammel, Tobias; Navas, José M., E-mail: jmnavas@inia.es

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • We assessed the cytotoxicity and uptake of graphene nanomaterials in PLHC-1 cells. • GO and CXYG nanoplatelets caused physical injury of the plasma membrane. • GO and CXYG accumulated in the cytosol and interacted with cellular organelles. • PLHC-1 cells exposed to GO/CXYG demonstrated high ROS levels but low cytotoxicity. • ROS formation was related with GO/CXYG-induced structural damage of mitochondria. - Abstract: Graphene and graphene derivatives constitute a novel class of carbon-based nanomaterials being increasingly produced and used in technical and consumer applications. Release of graphene nanoplatelets during the life cycle of these applications may result in human and environmental exposure calling for assessment of their potential to cause harm to humans and wildlife. This study aimed to assess the toxicity of graphene oxide (GO) and carboxyl graphene (CXYG) nanoplatelets to non-mammalian species using the fish cell line PLHC-1 as in vitro model. The cytotoxicity of GO and CXYG was assessed using different assays measuring alterations in plasma membrane integrity, metabolic activity, and lysosomal and mitochondrial function. The induction of oxidative stress was assessed by measuring intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Interaction with the plasma membrane and internalization of nanoplatelets were investigated by electron microscopy. Graphene nanoplatelets spontaneously penetrated through the plasma membrane and accumulated in the cytosol, where they further interacted with mitochondrial and nuclear membranes. PLHC-1 cells demonstrated significantly reduced mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and increased ROS levels at 16 μg/ml GO and CXYG (72 h), but barely any decrease in cell viability. The observation of intracellular graphene accumulations not enclosed by membranes suggests that GO and CXYG internalization in fish hepatoma cells occurs through an endocytosis-independent mechanism.

  2. Ultrafast, Unimpeded Liquid Water Transport Through Graphene-Based Nanochannels Measured by Isotope Labelling

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Pengzhan; Wang, Kunlin; Zhong, Minlin; Wu, Dehai; Zhu, Hongwei

    2014-01-01

    Graphene-based laminates, with ultralong and tortuous nanocapillaries formed by simply stacking graphene flakes together, have great promises in filtration and separation. However, the information on liquid water trans-membrane permeation is lacking, which is the most fundamental problem and of crucial importance in solution-based mass transport. Here, based on isotope labelling, we investigate the liquid water transportation through graphene-based nanocapillaries under no external hydrostatic pressures. Liquid water can afford an unimpeded permeation through graphene-based nanochannels with a diffusion coefficient 4~5 orders of magnitude larger than through sub-micrometer-sized polymeric channels. When dissolving ions in sources, the diffusion coefficient of ions through graphene channels lies in the same order of magnitude as water, while the ion diffusion is faster than water, indicating that the ions are mainly transported by fast water flows and the delicate interactions between ions and nanocapillary wa...

  3. Graphene-based smart materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaowen; Cheng, Huhu; Zhang, Miao; Zhao, Yang; Qu, Liangti; Shi, Gaoquan

    2017-09-01

    The high specific surface area and the excellent mechanical, electrical, optical and thermal properties of graphene make it an attractive component for high-performance stimuli-responsive or 'smart' materials. Complementary to these inherent properties, functionalization or hybridization can substantially improve the performance of these materials. Typical graphene-based smart materials include mechanically exfoliated perfect graphene, chemical vapour deposited high-quality graphene, chemically modified graphene (for example, graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide) and their macroscopic assemblies or composites. These materials are sensitive to a range of stimuli, including gas molecules or biomolecules, pH value, mechanical strain, electrical field, and thermal or optical excitation. In this Review, we outline different graphene-based smart materials and their potential applications in actuators, chemical or strain sensors, self-healing materials, photothermal therapy and controlled drug delivery. We also introduce the working mechanisms of graphene-based smart materials and discuss the challenges facing the realization of their practical applications.

  4. Architecting Graphene Oxide Rolled-Up Micromotors: A Simple Paper-Based Manufacturing Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista-Pires, Luis; Orozco, Jahir; Guardia, Pablo; Merkoçi, Arben

    2017-11-24

    A graphene oxide rolled-up tube production process is reported using wax-printed membranes for the fabrication of on-demand engineered micromotors at different levels of oxidation, thickness, and lateral dimensions. The resultant graphene oxide rolled-up tubes can show magnetic and catalytic movement within the addition of magnetic nanoparticles or sputtered platinum in the surface of graphene-oxide-modified wax-printed membranes prior to the scrolling process. As a proof of concept, the as-prepared catalytic graphene oxide rolled-up micromotors are successfully exploited for oil removal from water. This micromotor production technology relies on an easy, operator-friendly, fast, and cost-efficient wax-printed paper-based method and may offer a myriad of hybrid devices and applications. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Ultrafast laser patterning of graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrinetskiy, Ivan I.; Emelianov, Alexey V.; Lin, Chih-Lang; Otero, Nerea; Romero, Pablo M.

    2017-05-01

    This paper describes the recent results in ultrafast (femtoseconds and picoseconds) pulsed laser patterning of graphene films (single layer graphene, graphene oxide (GO)). We investigated such effects of nonlinear optical interaction like selective laser ablation of graphene, laser reduction of graphene oxide and local functionalization (oxidation) of graphene based on multiphoton absorption for microelectrode patterning. The graphene oxide and reduction was demonstrated under femtosecond laser pulses as well as fine ablation for monolayer GO films under ps laser pulses. We demonstrated the patterned laser reduction over the GO film leads to minimum in resistance for laser fluence because of interplay of chemical and thermal effects in carbon lattice and photons. The micro-scale patterns in graphene on SiO2 substrates were fabricated using ultrashort 515 nm laser pulses. For both picosecond and femtosecond laser pulses two competitive processes, based on photo-thermal (ablation) and photochemical (oxidation/etching) effects, were observed. The laser-induced etching of graphene starts just below the threshold energy of graphene ablation. The mechanisms of ultrafast laser interaction with graphene are discussed. Patterned graphene was investigated by AFM, microRaman, SEM and sheet resistance measurements and other techniques. The mechanisms of ultrafast laser interaction with graphene are discussed. The comprehensive models of graphene oxidation/reduction are suggested.

  6. Suspended sediment yield in Texas watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coonrod, Julia Ellen Allred

    The Texas Water Development Board collected suspended sediment samples across the state of Texas for approximately 60 years. Until this research, no comprehensive analysis of the data had been conducted. This study compiles the suspended sediment data along with corresponding streamflow and rainfall. GIS programs are developed which characterize watersheds corresponding to the sediment gauging stations. The watersheds are characterized according to topography, climate, soils, and land use. All of the data is combined to form several SAS data sets which can subsequently be analyzed using regression. Annual data for all of the stations across the state are classified temporally and spatially to determine trends in the sediment yield. In general, the suspended sediment load increases with increasing runoff but no correlation exists with rainfall. However, the annual average rainfall can be used to classify the watersheds according to climate, which improves the correlation between sediment load and runoff. The watersheds with no dams have higher sediment loads than watersheds with dams. Dams in the drier parts of Texas reduce the sediment load more than dams in the wetter part of the state. Sediment rating curves are developed separately for each basin in Texas. All but one of the curves fall into a band which varies by about two orders of magnitude. The study analyzes daily time series data for the Lavaca River near Edna station. USGS data are used to improve the sediment rating curve by the addition of physically related variables and interaction terms. The model can explain an additional 41% of the variability in sediment concentration compared to a simple bivariate regression of sediment load and flow. The TWDB daily data for the Lavaca River near Edna station are used to quantify temporal trends. There is a high correlation between sediment load and flowrate for the Lavaca River. The correlation can be improved by considering a flow-squared term and by

  7. Printed optically transparent graphene cellulose electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinar, Dogan; Knopf, George K.; Nikumb, Suwas; Andrushchenko, Anatoly

    2016-02-01

    Optically transparent electrodes are a key component in variety of products including bioelectronics, touch screens, flexible displays, low emissivity windows, and photovoltaic cells. Although highly conductive indium tin oxide (ITO) films are often used in these electrode applications, the raw material is very expensive and the electrodes often fracture when mechanically stressed. An alternative low-cost material for inkjet printing transparent electrodes on glass and flexible polymer substrates is described in this paper. The water based ink is created by using a hydrophilic cellulose derivative, carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC), to help suspend the naturally hydrophobic graphene (G) sheets in a solvent composed of 70% DI water and 30% 2-butoxyethanol. The CMC chain has hydrophobic and hydrophilic functional sites which allow adsorption on G sheets and, therefore, permit the graphene to be stabilized in water by electrostatic and steric forces. Once deposited on the functionalized substrate the electrical conductivity of the printed films can be "tuned" by decomposing the cellulose stabilizer using thermal reduction. The entire electrode can be thermally reduced in an oven or portions of the electrode thermally modified using a laser annealing process. The thermal process can reduce the sheet resistance of G-CMC films to conductive electrode is a dependent on the film thickness (ie. superimposed printed layers). The printed electrodes have also been doped with AuCl3 to increase electrical conductivity without significantly increasing film thickness and, thereby, maintain high optical transparency.

  8. Synthesis and Characterization of Graphene Nanocomposites for Non-Linear Optical Applications (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    transmission electron microscopy. Additionally, segregation behavior of the suspended flakes over time was analyzed qualitatively by UV-Visible...have strong saturable and reverse-saturable behavior from visible wavelengths all the way out to the midwave infrared where is now used for passive Q...V., Electronic properties of graphene and other carbon-based hybrid materials for flexible electronics . 2014, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin

  9. Industrial graphene metrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, Jennifer Reiber; Ozkan, Cengiz S; Ozkan, Mihrimah

    2012-07-07

    Graphene is an allotrope of carbon whose structure is based on one-atom-thick planar sheets of carbon atoms that are densely packed in a honeycomb crystal lattice. Its unique electrical and optical properties raised worldwide interest towards the design and fabrication of future electronic and optical devices with unmatched performance. At the moment, extensive efforts are underway to evaluate the reliability and performance of a number of such devices. With the recent advances in synthesizing large-area graphene sheets, engineers have begun investigating viable methodologies for conducting graphene metrology and quality control at industrial scales to understand a variety of reliability issues including defects, patternability, electrical, and physical properties. This review summarizes the current state of industrial graphene metrology and provides an overview of graphene metrology techniques. In addition, a recently developed large-area graphene metrology technique based on fluorescence quenching is introduced. For each metrology technique, the industrial metrics it measures are identified--layer thickness, edge structure, defects, Fermi level, and thermal conductivity--and a detailed description is provided as to how the measurements are performed. Additionally, the potential advantages of each technique for industrial use are identified, including throughput, scalability, sensitivity to substrate/environment, and on their demonstrated ability to achieve quantified results. The recently developed fluorescence-quenching metrology technique is shown to meet all the necessary criteria for industrial applications, rendering it the first industry-ready graphene metrology technique.

  10. Photosensitive graphene transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinhua; Niu, Liyong; Zheng, Zijian; Yan, Feng

    2014-08-20

    High performance photodetectors play important roles in the development of innovative technologies in many fields, including medicine, display and imaging, military, optical communication, environment monitoring, security check, scientific research and industrial processing control. Graphene, the most fascinating two-dimensional material, has demonstrated promising applications in various types of photodetectors from terahertz to ultraviolet, due to its ultrahigh carrier mobility and light absorption in broad wavelength range. Graphene field effect transistors are recognized as a type of excellent transducers for photodetection thanks to the inherent amplification function of the transistors, the feasibility of miniaturization and the unique properties of graphene. In this review, we will introduce the applications of graphene transistors as photodetectors in different wavelength ranges including terahertz, infrared, visible, and ultraviolet, focusing on the device design, physics and photosensitive performance. Since the device properties are closely related to the quality of graphene, the devices based on graphene prepared with different methods will be addressed separately with a view to demonstrating more clearly their advantages and shortcomings in practical applications. It is expected that highly sensitive photodetectors based on graphene transistors will find important applications in many emerging areas especially flexible, wearable, printable or transparent electronics and high frequency communications. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Study on the graphene-based actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Liang; Oh, Il Kwon

    2011-04-01

    Bilayer actuators comprising of MWCNT (Multi-walled carbon nanotubes) and Graphene oxide (GO) were studied for their actuation performance by using induction heating system. A simple fabrication method namely, filtration of the colloidal suspensions of MWCNT and GO through an Anodisc membrane was used to fabricate the actuators. In case of bilayer actuators, sequential filtration of MWCNTs and Graphene oxide dispersions through a membrane filter membrane was used. Morphological studies by SEM showed that the bilayer paper did not delaminate at the macro-scale and a certain degree of adhesion between MWCNT and GO can be achieved even without any functionalization of either of the constituents of bilayer actuators. Actuation was tested by using the induction heating system, operated at different current densities. Substantial degree of deformation, as much as 0.128 mm-1 at 300 A was measured. The degree of actuation was defined in terms of bending curvature, because the deformation was too large to be detected by conventional displacement laser sensors. An attempt has been made to explain the basic mechanism of bilayer actuator in terms of the differential thermal expansion rates and eddy current which was confirmed from images obtained from thermal camera wherein the variation in bilayer actuator's surface temperature were monitored. Finally the deformation trend under different pulses is also examined.

  12. Magnetism and Interaction-Induced Gap Opening in Graphene with Vacancies or Hydrogen Adatoms: Quantum Monte Carlo Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulybyshev, M V; Katsnelson, M I

    2015-06-19

    We study the electronic properties of graphene with a finite concentration of vacancies or other resonant scatterers by a straightforward lattice quantum Monte Carlo calculation. Taking into account a realistic long-range Coulomb interaction, we calculate the distribution of the spin density associated with midgap states and demonstrate antiferromagnetic ordering. An energy gap is open due to interaction effects, both in the bare graphene spectrum and in the vacancy or impurity bands. In the case of a 5% concentration of resonant scatterers the latter gap is estimated to be 0.7 eV and 1.1 eV for graphene on boron nitride and freely suspended graphene, respectively.

  13. Design consideration for magnetically suspended flywheel systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, D.; Kirk, J. A.; Frommer, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    Consideration is given to the design, fabrication, and testing of a magnetically suspended flywheel system for energy storage applications in space. The device is the prototype of a system combining passive suspension of the flywheel plate by samarium cobalt magnets and active control in the radial direction using eight separate magnetic coils. The bearing assembly was machined from a nickel-iron alloy, and the machine parts are all hydrogen annealed. Slots in the magnetic plate allow four independent quadrants for control. The motor/generator component of the system is a brushless dc-permanent magnetic/ironless engine using electronic communication. The system has been tested at over 2500 rpm with satisfactory results. The system characteristics of the flywheel for application in low earth orbit (LEO) are given in a table.

  14. Organics and Suspended Solids Removal from Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakhri Y. Hmood

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The Sequencing Batch Reactor (SBR method is used for treating samples of waste water taken from hospitals in Mosul. Many run periods are used (6-24 hours for             6 months. It is found that the organics and suspended solids removal increase with increasing the period of run, it is in the range ( 96-82 % and ( 100-95 % respectively, while the pH values are nearly neutral (7.05 to 7.5.     BOD5 and SS concentrations of the effluent are within the limits of Iraqi standards,  40:30 mg/l respectively. Hence, SBR method could be used for treating hospitals, small factories and some  residential sectors waste waters.  

  15. Batch fabrication of nanotubes suspended between microelectrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mateiu, Ramona Valentina; Stöckli, T.; Knapp, H. F.

    2007-01-01

    We report a fabrication method, which uses standard UV-lithography to pattern the catalyst for the chemical vapour deposition(CVD) of suspended double clamped single walled carbon nanotubes. By using an aqueous solution of Fe(NO3)3 the patterning of the catalyst material onto microelectrodes can...... be done with a simple lift-off process with standard photolithographic resist. An applied electric field is sustained between the microelectrodes during CVD to guide the nanotube growth. Comparison with simulations shows that the location and the orientation of the grown carbon nanotubes (CNT) correspond...... to the regions of maximum electric field, enabling accurate positioning of a nanotube by controlling the shape of the microelectrodes. The CNT bridges are deflected tens of nm when a DC voltage is applied between the nanotube and a gate microelectrode indicating that the clamping through the catalyst particles...

  16. Synthesis and selected properties of graphene and graphene mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, C N R; Matte, H S S Ramakrishna; Subrahmanyam, K S

    2013-01-15

    Graphene has generated great excitement in the last few years because of its novel properties with potential applications. Graphene exhibits an ambipolar electric field effect, ballistic conduction of charge carriers, and the quantum Hall effect at room temperature. Some of the other interesting characteristics of graphene include high transparency toward visible light, high elasticity and thermal conductivity, unusual magnetic properties, and charge transfer interactions with molecules. In this Account, we present the highlights of some of our research on the synthesis of graphene and its properties. Since the isolation and characterization of graphene by micromechanical cleavage from graphite, several strategies have been developed for the synthesis of graphene with either a single or just a few layers. The most significant contribution from our laboratory is the synthesis of two to four layer graphene by arc-discharge of graphite in a hydrogen atmosphere. Besides providing clean graphene surfaces, this method allows for doping with boron and nitrogen. UV and laser irradiation of graphene oxide provides fairly good graphene samples, and laser unzipping of nanotubes produces graphene nanoribbons. We have exploited Raman spectroscopy to investigate the charge-transfer interactions of graphene with electron-donor and -acceptor molecules, as well as with nanoparticles of noble metals. Graphene quenches the fluorescence of aromatics because of electron transfer or energy transfer. Notable potential applications of the properties of graphene are low turn-on field emission and radiation detection. High-temperature ferromagnetism is another intriguing feature of graphene. Although incorporation of graphene improves the mechanical properties of polymers, its incorporation with nanodiamond or carbon nanotubes exhibits extraordinary synergy. The potential of graphene and its analogues as adsorbents and chemical storage materials for H(2) and CO(2) is noteworthy.

  17. Friedel oscillations in graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawlor, J. A.; Power, S. R.; Ferreira, M.S.

    2013-01-01

    Symmetry breaking perturbations in an electronically conducting medium are known to produce Friedel oscillations in various physical quantities of an otherwise pristine material. Here we show in a mathematically transparent fashion that Friedel oscillations in graphene have a strong sublattice...... asymmetry. As a result, the presence of impurities and/or defects may impact the distinct graphene sublattices very differently. Furthermore, such an asymmetry can be used to explain the recent observations that nitrogen atoms and dimers are not randomly distributed in graphene but prefer to occupy one...

  18. Tunable nonlinear graphene metasurfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, Daria A.; Miroshnichenko, Andrey E.; Kivshar, Yuri S.; Khanikaev, Alexander B.

    2015-10-01

    We introduce an important approach for enhancing the nonlinear response of graphene through its resonant coupling to a plasmonic metasurface via cascaded Fano resonances. Such a hybrid metasurface supports two types of subradiant resonant modes, i.e., asymmetric modes of structured metamaterial elements ("metamolecules") and graphene plasmons exhibiting strong mutual coupling and avoided dispersion crossing. We demonstrate that the tunability of graphene plasmons facilitates the strong interaction between the subradiant modes, modifying the spectral position and lifetime of the Fano resonances. We reveal that a strong resonant interaction, combined with the subwavelength localization of plasmons, leads to an enhanced nonlinear response and high efficiency of the second-harmonic generation.

  19. Methanol Adsorption on Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsebeth Schröder

    2013-01-01

    bonds like the covalent and hydrogen bonds. The adsorption of a single methanol molecule and small methanol clusters on graphene is studied at various coverages. Adsorption in clusters or at high coverages (less than a monolayer is found to be preferable, with the methanol C-O axis approximately parallel to the plane of graphene. The adsorption energies calculated with vdW-DF are compared with previous DFT-D and MP2-based calculations for single methanol adsorption on flakes of graphene (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. For the high coverage adsorption energies, we also find reasonably good agreement with previous desorption measurements.

  20. In vitro and in vivo effects of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide on glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworski, Sławomir; Sawosz, Ewa; Kutwin, Marta; Wierzbicki, Mateusz; Hinzmann, Mateusz; Grodzik, Marta; Winnicka, Anna; Lipińska, Ludwika; Włodyga, Karolina; Chwalibog, Andrè

    2015-01-01

    Graphene and its related counterparts are considered the future of advanced nanomaterials owing to their exemplary properties. However, information about their toxicity and biocompatibility is limited. The objective of this study is to evaluate the toxicity of graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) platelets, using U87 and U118 glioma cell lines for an in vitro model and U87 tumors cultured on chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane for an in vivo model. The in vitro investigation consisted of structural analysis of GO and rGO platelets using transmission electron microscopy, evaluation of cell morphology and ultrastructure, assessment of cell viability by XTT assay, and investigation of cell proliferation by BrdU assay. Toxicity in U87 glioma tumors was evaluated by calculation of weight and volume of tumors and analyses of ultrastructure, histology, and protein expression. The in vitro results indicate that GO and rGO enter glioma cells and have different cytotoxicity. Both types of platelets reduced cell viability and proliferation with increasing doses, but rGO was more toxic than GO. The mass and volume of tumors were reduced in vivo after injection of GO and rGO. Moreover, the level of apoptotic markers increased in rGO-treated tumors. We show that rGO induces cell death mostly through apoptosis, indicating the potential applicability of graphene in cancer therapy.

  1. Graphene and Graphene Derivatives for Pharmaceutical Residual Removal from Drinking Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ming; Zhang, Haifeng

    Strategy to keeping pharmaceuticals out of the nation's water supplies is the most essential and long-term procedure, while improving effective filtering systems at water treatment plants or at resident home is more practical and efficient. Current techniques including oxidation/ozonation, activated carbons, and filtration using membranes are relatively efficient when the concentration of pharmaceutical residues in the aquatic ecosystem is high, while when the concentration is relatively low, no one effective technique can remove so many different pharmaceuticals. To overcome such significant limitation, we are seeking to develop graphene based materials for pharmaceutical residual removal from drinking water and to initiate the study on dealing with this issue through fundamental understanding. Our results have shown that the graphene/graphene derivate could possess high adsorption rate to pharmaceutical residues (e.g., estradiol), promising their potential applications for pharmaceutical contamination removal from drinking water. Detailed information about the activities of the graphene with a variety of biomolecules, the type of adsorptions, and the effects of the attached hydroxyl, epoxyl, and carboxyl functional groups will be presented in the Meeting. The authors acknowledge computing resource support from the Cardinal Research Cluster at the University of Louisville.

  2. Bacteriohopanepolyol distribution in Yenisei River and Kara Sea suspended particulate matter and sediments traces terrigenous organic matter input and submerged permafrost

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jonge, C.; Talbot, Helen M.; Bischoff, Juliane; Stadnitskaia, A.N.; Cherkashov, Georgy; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriohopanepolyols (BHPs) are ubiquitous bacterial membrane lipids, encountered in soils, river and marine suspended particulate matter (SPM) and sediments. Their abundance and distribution provides a direct means to identify bacterial inputs and can be used to trace soil-derived bacterial

  3. Carbon membranes for efficient water-ethanol separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravelle, Simon; Yoshida, Hiroaki; Joly, Laurent; Ybert, Christophe; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate, on the basis of molecular dynamics simulations, the possibility of an efficient water-ethanol separation using nanoporous carbon membranes, namely, carbon nanotube membranes, nanoporous graphene sheets, and multilayer graphene membranes. While these carbon membranes are in general permeable to both pure liquids, they exhibit a counter-intuitive "self-semi-permeability" to water in the presence of water-ethanol mixtures. This originates in a preferred ethanol adsorption in nanoconfinement that prevents water molecules from entering the carbon nanopores. An osmotic pressure is accordingly expressed across the carbon membranes for the water-ethanol mixture, which agrees with the classic van't Hoff type expression. This suggests a robust and versatile membrane-based separation, built on a pressure-driven reverse-osmosis process across these carbon-based membranes. In particular, the recent development of large-scale "graphene-oxide" like membranes then opens an avenue for a versatile and efficient ethanol dehydration using this separation process, with possible application for bio-ethanol fabrication.

  4. In vitro studies of graphene oxide reinforced hydroxyapatite nanobiocomposite on human erythrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radha, G.; Rohith Vinod, K.; Venkatesan, Balaji; Vellaichamy, Elangovan; Balakumar, S.

    2017-05-01

    We report the interaction of graphene oxide reinforced hydroxyapatite (GO-HAp) nanocomposites with human erythrocytes. The hemocompatibility of GO-HAp found to be superior as compared to the pristine graphene oxide. It is found that the HAp nanoparticles on GO decrease the disruption of erythrocytes by minimizing the exposure of oxygen groups to phosphatidylcholine surface of erythrocyte membrane and it enhances hemocompatibility. Further, it is also found that the graphene oxide reinforced HAp nanobiocomposite enhances the metabolic activity of osteoblasts-like cells by promoting cell proliferation.

  5. Electrical and thermal conductivity of low temperature CVD graphene: the effect of disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlassiouk, Ivan; Smirnov, Sergei; Ivanov, Ilia; Fulvio, Pasquale F; Dai, Sheng; Meyer, Harry; Chi, Miaofang; Hensley, Dale; Datskos, Panos; Lavrik, Nickolay V

    2011-07-08

    In this paper we present a study of graphene produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) under different conditions with the main emphasis on correlating the thermal and electrical properties with the degree of disorder. Graphene grown by CVD on Cu and Ni catalysts demonstrates the increasing extent of disorder at low deposition temperatures as revealed by the Raman peak ratio, IG/ID. We relate this ratio to the characteristic domain size, La, and investigate the electrical and thermal conductivity of graphene as a function of La. The electrical resistivity, ρ, measured on graphene samples transferred onto SiO2/Si substrates shows linear correlation with La(-1). The thermal conductivity, K, measured on the same graphene samples suspended on silicon pillars, on the other hand, appears to have a much weaker dependence on La, close to K∼La1/3. It results in an apparent ρ∼K3 correlation between them. Despite the progressively increasing structural disorder in graphene grown at lower temperatures, it shows remarkably high thermal conductivity (10(2)-10(3) W K(-1) m(-1)) and low electrical (10(3)-3×10(5) Ω) resistivities suitable for various applications.

  6. Metal-graphene interaction studied via atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zan, Recep; Bangert, Ursel; Ramasse, Quentin; Novoselov, Konstantin S

    2011-03-09

    Distributions and atomic sites of transition metals and gold on suspended graphene were investigated via high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy, especially using atomic resolution high angle dark field imaging. All metals, albeit as singular atoms or atom aggregates, reside in the omni-present hydrocarbon surface contamination; they do not form continuous films, but clusters or nanocrystals. No interaction was found between Au atoms and clean single-layer graphene surfaces, i.e., no Au atoms are retained on such surfaces. Au and also Fe atoms do, however, bond to clean few-layer graphene surfaces, where they assume T and B sites, respectively. Cr atoms were found to interact more strongly with clean monolayer graphene, they are possibly incorporated at graphene lattice imperfections and have been observed to catalyze dissociation of C-C bonds. This behavior might explain the observed high frequency of Cr-cluster nucleation, and the usefulness as wetting layer, for depositing electrical contacts on graphene.

  7. Energy efficient reduced graphene oxide additives: Mechanism of effective lubrication and antiwear properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Bhavana; Kumar, N.; Panda, Kalpataru; Dash, S.; Tyagi, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    Optimized concentration of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) in the lube is one of the important factors for effective lubrication of solid body contacts. At sufficiently lower concentration, the lubrication is ineffective and friction/wear is dominated by base oil. In contrast, at sufficiently higher concentration, the rGO sheets aggregates in the oil and weak interlayer sliding characteristic of graphene sheets is no more active for providing lubrication. However, at optimized concentration, friction coefficient and wear is remarkably reduced to 70% and 50%, respectively, as compared to neat oil. Traditionally, such lubrication is described by graphene/graphite particle deposited in contact surfaces that provides lower shear strength of boundary tribofilm. In the present investigation, graphene/graphite tribofilm was absent and existing traditional lubrication mechanism for the reduction of friction and wear is ruled out. It is demonstrated that effective lubrication is possible, if rGO is chemically linked with PEG molecules through hydrogen bonding and PEG intercalated graphene sheets provide sufficiently lower shear strength of freely suspended composite tribofilm under the contact pressure. The work revealed that physical deposition and adsorption of the graphene sheets in the metallic contacts is not necessary for the lubrication.

  8. A large-scale NEMS light-emitting array based on CVD graphene (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyungsik; Kim, Young Duck; Lee, Changhyuk; Lee, Sunwoo; Seo, Dong-jea; Jerng, Sahng-Kyoon; Chun, Seung-Hyun; Hone, James; Shepard, Kenneth L.

    2017-02-01

    Graphene has received much interest from optical communities largely owing to its photon-like linear energy band structure called Dirac cone. While majority of the recent research has dealt with plasmon and polariton of the two-dimensional material, a recently reported graphene light emitter could render a new dimension of applications, particularly in high-speed optical communication. Moreover chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth technique for graphene is available today providing means for scalable high quality graphene. The reported graphene emitter provides broadband light emission from visible to mid-infrared which could be instrumental in multi-color display units and optical communications, however a truly large scale implementation has not previously been achieved. Here we demonstrate a CMOS-compatible 262,144 light-emitting pixels array (10 x 10 mm2) based on suspended CVD graphene nano-electro-mechanical systems (GNEMS). A single photoemission area is 19.6 µm2 and a unit pixel is consisting of 512 photoemission devices (16 x 16) where a multiplexer and a digital to analog converter (DAC) are used to control each pixel. This work clearly demonstrates scalability of multi-channel GNEMS light-emitting array, an atomically thin electro-optical module, and further paves a path for its commercial implementation transparent display or high-speed optical communication.

  9. Graphene and graphene oxide: biofunctionalization and applications in biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Li, Zhaohui; Wang, Jun; Li, Jinghong; Lin, Yuehe

    2011-05-01

    Graphene is the basic building block of 0D fullerene, 1D carbon nanotubes, and 3D graphite. Graphene has a unique planar structure, as well as novel electronic properties, which have attracted great interests from scientists. This review selectively analyzes current advances in the field of graphene bioapplications. In particular, the biofunctionalization of graphene for biological applications, fluorescence-resonance-energy-transfer-based biosensor development by using graphene or graphene-based nanomaterials, and the investigation of graphene or graphene-based nanomaterials for living cell studies are summarized in more detail. Future perspectives and possible challenges in this rapidly developing area are also discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Simulation of suspended sediment transport initialized with satellite derived suspended sediment concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Ratheesh; Rajawat, A. S.

    2012-10-01

    Suspended sediment transport in the Gulf of Kachchh is simulated utilizing the suspended sediment concentration (SSC) derived from Oceansat OCM imagery, as the initial condition in MIKE-21 Mud Transport model. Optimization of the model mud parameters, like settling velocity and critical shear stress for erosion are realized with respect to the sediment size distribution and the bottom bed materials observed in the Gulf. Simulated SSCs are compared with alternate OCM derived SSC. The results are observed to be impetus where the model is able to generate the spatial dynamics of the sediment concentrations. Sediment dynamics like deposition, erosion and dispersion are explained with the simulated tidal currents and OCM derived sediment concentrations. Tidal range is observed as the important physical factor controlling the deposition and resuspension of sediments within the Gulf. From the simulation studies; maximum residual current velocities, tidal fronts and high turbulent zones are found to characterise the islands and shoals within the Gulf, which results in high sediment concentrations in those regions. Remarkable variability in the bathymetry of the Gulf, different bed materials and varying tidal conditions induces several circulation patterns and turbulence creating the unique suspended sediment concentration pattern in the Gulf.

  11. A suspended sediment yield predictive equation for river basins in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An empirical equation that can be used for estimating the suspended sediment yields of river drainage basins without sediment data has been established for basins in the sub-tropical forest Southwestern river basin system of Ghana. The power law equation relates mean annual specific suspended sediment yield (t km-2 ...

  12. Simulation of suspended sediment transport initialized with satellite ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Suspended sediment transport in the Gulf of Kachchh is simulated utilizing the suspended sediment concentration (SSC) derived from Oceansat OCM imagery, as the initial condition in MIKE-21 Mud. Transport model. Optimization of the model mud parameters, like settling velocity and critical shear stress for erosion are ...

  13. Energy values of suspended detritus in Andaman Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Krishnakumari, L.; Royan, J.P.; Sumitra-Vijayaraghavan

    Energy content of suspended detritus was determined in Andaman Sea waters during April-May 1988. The caloric content of suspended detritus ranged from 987 to 7040 cal. per gram dry wt with an average value of 5530 cal. per gram dry wt. The results...

  14. A wave-resolving model for nearshore suspended sediment transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Gangfeng; Chou, Yi-Ju; Shi, Fengyan

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a wave-resolving sediment transport model, which is capable of simulating sediment suspension in the field-scale surf zone. The surf zone hydrodynamics is modeled by the non-hydrostatic model NHWAVE (Ma et al., 2012). The turbulent flow and suspended sediment are simulated in a coupled manner. Three effects of suspended sediment on turbulent flow field are considered: (1) baroclinic forcing effect; (2) turbulence damping effect and (3) bottom boundary layer effect. Through the validation with the laboratory measurements of suspended sediment under nonbreaking skewed waves and surfzone breaking waves, we demonstrate that the model can reasonably predict wave-averaged sediment profiles. The model is then utilized to simulate a rip current field experiment (RCEX) and nearshore suspended sediment transport. The offshore sediment transport by rip currents is captured by the model. The effects of suspended sediment on self-suspension are also investigated. The turbulence damping and bottom boundary layer effects are significant on sediment suspension. The suspended sediment creates a stably stratified water column, damping fluid turbulence and reducing turbulent diffusivity. The suspension of sediment also produces a stably stratified bottom boundary layer. Thus, the drag coefficient and bottom shear stress are reduced, causing less sediment pickup from the bottom. The cross-shore suspended sediment flux is analyzed as well. The mean Eulerian suspended sediment flux is shoreward outside the surf zone, while it is seaward in the surf zone.

  15. Evaluation of the suspending properties of Cola acuminata gum on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Many natural gums are employed as suspending agents in the formulation of pharmaceutical suspensions. The search to develop locally available natural gum from apparently a waste product as an alternative suspending agent stimulated the interest in this present study. Cola acuminata gum (CAG) extracted from Cola ...

  16. 40 CFR 230.21 - Suspended particulates/turbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... time. These new levels may reduce light penetration and lower the rate of photosynthesis and the... suspended particulates persist. The biological and the chemical content of the suspended material may react with the dissolved oxygen in the water, which can result in oxygen depletion. Toxic metals and organics...

  17. Simulation of suspended sediment transport initialized with satellite ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Suspended sediment transport in the Gulf of Kachchh is simulated utilizing the suspended sediment concentration (SSC) derived from Oceansat OCM imagery, as the initial condition in MIKE-21 Mud Transport model. Optimization of the model mud parameters, like settling velocity and critical shear stress for erosion are ...

  18. Evaluation of the suspending property of grewia gum in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The suspending property of grewia gum in sulphadimidine suspension was evaluated. The gum was extracted by maceration, filtration, precipitation and drying techniques. It was used at 0.3 to 1% w/v as a suspending agent for sulphadimidine. Sodiumcarboxymethylcellulose (SCMC) and tragacanth were used as basis for ...

  19. Evaluation of the suspending properties of Adansonia digitata gum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sedimentation volume and rate, rheology, and ease of redispersion were employed as evaluation parameters. The results showed that both hot and cold water extracts of the gum used at 2-3 % w/v produced a better suspending property than 4 % w/v Compound Tragacanth gum. The suspending ability of the gums was in ...

  20. Evaluation of the Suspending Property of Grewia Gum in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The suspending property of grewia gum in metronidazole suspension was evaluated. The gum was extracted by maceration, filtration, precipitation and drying techniques. It was used at 0.3 to 1% w/v as a suspending agent for metronidazole. Sodiumcarboxymethylcellulose (SCMC) and tragacanth were used as basis for ...

  1. Methylbenzenes on graphene

    CERN Document Server

    Borck, Øyvind

    2016-01-01

    We present a theory study of the physisorption of the series of methylbenzenes (toluene, xylene and mesitylene), as well as benzene, on graphene. This is relevant for the basic understanding of graphene used as a material for sensors and as an idealized model for the carbon in active carbon filters. The molecules are studied in a number of positions and orientations relative graphene, using density functional theory with the van der Waals functional vdW-DF. We focus on the vdW-DF1 and vdW-DF-cx functionals, and find that the binding energy of the molecules on graphene grows linearly with the number of methyl groups, at the rate of 0.09 eV per added methyl group.

  2. Transformation Optics Using Graphene

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ashkan Vakil; Nader Engheta

    2011-01-01

    .... We report a theoretical study showing that by designing and manipulating spatially inhomogeneous, nonuniform conductivity patterns across a flake of graphene, one can have this material as a one-atom...

  3. Magnetism in intercalated graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Sajid [Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai – 600036 (India); Nanda, B. R. K. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai – 600036 (India)

    2016-05-23

    Using density functional calculations we explore the possibilities of inducing spin moments in otherwise non-magnetic electronic structure of graphene. Through intercalation of H, N, O and F atoms between two hexagonal stacked graphene layers, we show that unpaired electrons can be generated when the planar coordinates of the functional atoms coincide with the center of the graphene hexagon. The spin-half states are realized at the functional sites for certain values of interlayer separations. For oxygen and fluorine these interlayer separations represent the natural stable phases and for hydrogen and nitrogen they induce instability which can be overcome by applying external pressure. We attribute the formation of spin-half states to the one dimensional confinement potential exerted by the graphene layers on the valence electrons of the functional elements.

  4. Magnetic Catalysis in Graphene

    CERN Document Server

    Winterowd, Christopher; Zafeiropoulos, Savvas

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important developments in condensed matter physics in recent years has been the discovery and characterization of graphene. A two-dimensional layer of Carbon arranged in a hexagonal lattice, graphene exhibits many interesting electronic properties, most notably that the low energy excitations behave as massless Dirac fermions. These excitations interact strongly via the Coulomb interaction and thus non-perturbative methods are necessary. Using methods borrowed from lattice QCD, we study the graphene effective theory in the presence of an external magnetic field. Graphene, along with other $(2+1)$-dimensional field theories, has been predicted to undergo spontaneous breaking of flavor symmetry including the formation of a gap as a result of the external magnetic field. This phenomenon is known as magnetic catalysis. Our study investigates magnetic catalysis using a fully non-perturbative approach.

  5. Transformation optics using graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakil, Ashkan; Engheta, Nader

    2011-06-10

    Metamaterials and transformation optics play substantial roles in various branches of optical science and engineering by providing schemes to tailor electromagnetic fields into desired spatial patterns. We report a theoretical study showing that by designing and manipulating spatially inhomogeneous, nonuniform conductivity patterns across a flake of graphene, one can have this material as a one-atom-thick platform for infrared metamaterials and transformation optical devices. Varying the graphene chemical potential by using static electric field yields a way to tune the graphene conductivity in the terahertz and infrared frequencies. Such degree of freedom provides the prospect of having different "patches" with different conductivities on a single flake of graphene. Numerous photonic functions and metamaterial concepts can be expected to follow from such a platform.

  6. High-performance sound source devices based on graphene woven fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zihan; Tian, He; Lv, Peng; Yang, Yi; Yang, Qiuyun; Yang, Shaolin; Wang, Guanzhong; Ren, Tianling

    2017-02-01

    Graphene woven fabrics (GWFs) consisting of a large number of overlapping graphene micro-ribbons were fabricated by chemical vapor deposition. We demonstrated that GWF films can emit sound efficiently once they are actuated by a sound-frequency electric field owing to the thermoacoustic effect. Because of its ultra-low heat capacity per unit area, the GWF shows sound generation performance comparable to single-layer graphene and carbon nanotubes, and would perform better than them when it is suspended on a high porosity substrate. This sound source can be used in a wide variety of applications, taking advantage of its transparency, flexibility, ultrathin nature, absence of moving parts, and biologically compatible characteristics.

  7. Thermal conductivity of graphene with defects induced by electron beam irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekpour, Hoda; Ramnani, Pankaj; Srinivasan, Srilok; Balasubramanian, Ganesh; Nika, Denis L; Mulchandani, Ashok; Lake, Roger K; Balandin, Alexander A

    2016-08-14

    We investigate the thermal conductivity of suspended graphene as a function of the density of defects, ND, introduced in a controllable way. High-quality graphene layers are synthesized using chemical vapor deposition, transferred onto a transmission electron microscopy grid, and suspended over ∼7.5 μm size square holes. Defects are induced by irradiation of graphene with the low-energy electron beam (20 keV) and quantified by the Raman D-to-G peak intensity ratio. As the defect density changes from 2.0 × 10(10) cm(-2) to 1.8 × 10(11) cm(-2) the thermal conductivity decreases from ∼(1.8 ± 0.2) × 10(3) W mK(-1) to ∼(4.0 ± 0.2) × 10(2) W mK(-1) near room temperature. At higher defect densities, the thermal conductivity reveals an intriguing saturation-type behavior at a relatively high value of ∼400 W mK(-1). The thermal conductivity dependence on the defect density is analyzed using the Boltzmann transport equation and molecular dynamics simulations. The results are important for understanding phonon - point defect scattering in two-dimensional systems and for practical applications of graphene in thermal management.

  8. Magnetic graphene metamaterial

    OpenAIRE

    Papasimakis, N.; Thongrattanasiri, S.; Zheludev, N.I.; García de Abajo, F.J.

    2013-01-01

    Graphene has emerged as a novel plasmonic material with advantageous properties for metamaterial design, such as highly confined plasmons and fast electrical tuning by carrier injection. Here, we predict strong magnetic dipole response by graphene split nanorings at THz frequencies allowing to achieve metamaterials with a high degree of field confinement (~ one hundredth of the excitation wavelength) that is not attainable by using thin layers of conventional noble metals.

  9. Graphene superstrates for metamaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Papasimakis, N.; Luo, Z.; Shen, Z.X.; De Angelis, F.; Di Fabrizio, E.; Nikolaenko, A.E.; Zheludev, N.I.

    2010-01-01

    The electromagnetic properties of a photonic metamaterial are dramatically modified by a graphene monolayer superstrate. The strong polarizability of the graphene layer combined with the Fano-type, resonant plasmonic modes supported by the metamaterial leads to substantial red-shift of the narrow metamaterial resonances. These frequency shifts translate to multi-fold increase in the measured transmission at a specific wavelength. In our experiments we used chemical vapor deposited (CVD) graph...

  10. Methanol Adsorption on Graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Elsebeth Schröder

    2013-01-01

    The adsorption energies and orientation of methanol on graphene are determined from first-principles density functional calculations. We employ the well-tested vdW-DF method that seamlessly includes dispersion interactions with all of the more close-ranged interactions that result in bonds like the covalent and hydrogen bonds. The adsorption of a single methanol molecule and small methanol clusters on graphene is studied at various coverages. Adsorption in clusters or at high coverages (le...

  11. Selective Electroless Silver Deposition on Graphene Edges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durhuus, D.; Larsen, M. V.; Andryieuski, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a method of electroless selective silver deposition on graphene edges or between graphene islands without covering the surface of graphene. Modifications of the deposition recipe allow for decoration of graphene edges with silver nanoparticles or filling holes in damaged graphene...... on silica substrate and thus potentially restoring electric connectivity with minimal influence on the overall graphene electrical and optical properties. The presented technique could find applications in graphene based transparent conductors as well as selective edge functionalization and can be extended...

  12. Characterization of fouling of membrane contactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciurkot, Kaludia; Zarebska, Agata; Christensen, Knud Villy

    2013-01-01

    In this study liquid-liquid membrane contactors have been tested for ammonia removal from model manure solution and undigested pig manure. The aim of this work is to compare the efficiency of ammonia removal by different hydrophobic membranes including the material’s influence on mass transfer...... of ammonia and membrane fouling tendency. The surface morphology of both clean and fouled membranes by model manure solution and undigested pig manure has been studied by: Optical and Atomic Force Microscopy and contact angle measurements. Based on the experimental results, it is concluded that real manure...... achieved higher ammonia removal than the synthetic model manure solution. This might be due to the larger particle size of the milled straw in the model solution compared to the size of suspended solids present in real manure. From the fouling autopsy, it was found that PTFE membranes are more prone...

  13. Artificial Lipid Membranes: Past, Present, and Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siontorou, Christina G; Nikoleli, Georgia-Paraskevi; Nikolelis, Dimitrios P; Karapetis, Stefanos K

    2017-07-26

    The multifaceted role of biological membranes prompted early the development of artificial lipid-based models with a primary view of reconstituting the natural functions in vitro so as to study and exploit chemoreception for sensor engineering. Over the years, a fair amount of knowledge on the artificial lipid membranes, as both, suspended or supported lipid films and liposomes, has been disseminated and has helped to diversify and expand initial scopes. Artificial lipid membranes can be constructed by several methods, stabilized by various means, functionalized in a variety of ways, experimented upon intensively, and broadly utilized in sensor development, drug testing, drug discovery or as molecular tools and research probes for elucidating the mechanics and the mechanisms of biological membranes. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art, discusses the diversity of applications, and presents future perspectives. The newly-introduced field of artificial cells further broadens the applicability of artificial membranes in studying the evolution of life.

  14. Graphene transfer process and optimization of graphene coverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabki Syarifah Norfaezah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Graphene grown on transition metal is known to be high in quality due to its controlled amount of defects and potentially used for many electronic applications. The transfer process of graphene grown on transition metal to a new substrate requires optimization in order to ensure that high graphene coverage can be obtained. In this work, an improvement in the graphene transfer process is performed from graphene grown on copper foil. It has been observed that the graphene coverage is affected by the pressure given to the top of PDMS to eliminate water and air between graphene and SiO2 (new substrate. This work experimented with different approaches to optimize the graphene coverage, and stamping method has proven to be the best technique in obtaining the largest graphene coverage. This work also highlights the elimination of impurities from graphene after the transfer process, known to be PMMA residues, which involved immersion of graphene in acetone. This method has improved the graphene conductivity.

  15. Intrinsic structure and friction properties of graphene and graphene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, atomic structure of single-layered graphene oxide (GO) and chemically reduced graphene oxide (CRGO) nanosheets was investigated using atomic force microscopy and scanning tunnelingmicroscopy (AFM and STM). Furthermore, friction properties of the graphene and GO nanosheets were studied by ...

  16. Terahertz carrier dynamics in graphene and graphene nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren A.; Turchinovich, Dmitry; Tielrooij, Klaas Jan

    2014-01-01

    Photoexcited charge carriers in 2D graphene and in 1D graphene nanostructures were studied with optical pump-THz probe spectroscopy. We find efficient hot-carrier multiplication in 2D graphene, and predominantly free carrier early time response in 1D nanostructures. © 2014 OSA....

  17. Graphene Oxide Annealing Procedures for Graphene-Based Supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    to produce single- layer (SL) graphene oxide (GO). GO can then be reduced through multiple methods, such as thermal reduction, to produce conductive...multiple ways. One method is to deposit graphene oxide (GO) onto a surface and reduce it, resulting in reduced graphene oxide (rGO). There are many...

  18. Graphene: One Material, Many Possibilities—Application Difficulties in Biological Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Skoda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Energetic technologies, nanoelectronics, biomedicine including gene therapy, cell imaging or tissue engineering are only few from all possible applications for graphene, the thinnest known carbon configuration and a basic element for other more complicated, better discovered and widely used nanostructures such as graphite, fullerenes and carbon nanotubes. The number of researches concerning graphene applications is rising every day which proves the great interest in its unique structure and properties. Ideal pristine graphene sheet presents a flat membrane of unlimited size with no imperfections while in practice we get different flakes with irregular edges and structural defects which influence the reactivity. Nanomaterials from graphene family differ in size, shape, layer number, lateral dimension, surface chemistry and defect density causing the existence of graphene samples with various influence on biological systems. Whether graphene induces cellular stress and activates apoptosis, or on the contrary facilitates growth and differentiation of the cells depends on its structure, chemical modifications and the growth process. A certain number of in vitro studies has indicated cytotoxic effects of graphene while the other show that it is safe. The diversity of the samples and methods of the production make it impossible to establish clearly the biological impact of graphene.

  19. Methylbenzenes on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borck, Øyvind; Schröder, Elsebeth

    2017-10-01

    We present a theory study of the physisorption of the series of methylbenzenes (toluene, xylene and mesitylene), as well as benzene, on graphene. The aim is two fold: we provide data that will be used as input to larger-scale methods like molecular-dynamics simulations, and at the same time we enhance the basic understanding of graphene used as a material for sensors and as an idealized model for the carbon in active carbon filters. The molecules are studied in a number of positions and orientations relative to graphene, using density functional theory with the van der Waals functional vdW-DF. The molecules are adsorbed fractional coverage. We focus on the vdW-DF1 and vdW-DF-cx functionals, and find that the binding energy of the molecules on graphene grows linearly with the number of methyl groups, at the rate of 0.09 eV (vdW-DF1) to 0.11 eV (vdW-DF-cx) per added methyl group. We further find that the orientation of the methyl groups of the molecules relative to graphene is at least as important as the lateral position of the whole molecule on graphene.

  20. Bipolar supercurrent in graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heersche, Hubert B; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo; Oostinga, Jeroen B; Vandersypen, Lieven M K; Morpurgo, Alberto F

    2007-03-01

    Graphene--a recently discovered form of graphite only one atomic layer thick--constitutes a new model system in condensed matter physics, because it is the first material in which charge carriers behave as massless chiral relativistic particles. The anomalous quantization of the Hall conductance, which is now understood theoretically, is one of the experimental signatures of the peculiar transport properties of relativistic electrons in graphene. Other unusual phenomena, like the finite conductivity of order 4e(2)/h (where e is the electron charge and h is Planck's constant) at the charge neutrality (or Dirac) point, have come as a surprise and remain to be explained. Here we experimentally study the Josephson effect in mesoscopic junctions consisting of a graphene layer contacted by two closely spaced superconducting electrodes. The charge density in the graphene layer can be controlled by means of a gate electrode. We observe a supercurrent that, depending on the gate voltage, is carried by either electrons in the conduction band or by holes in the valence band. More importantly, we find that not only the normal state conductance of graphene is finite, but also a finite supercurrent can flow at zero charge density. Our observations shed light on the special role of time reversal symmetry in graphene, and demonstrate phase coherent electronic transport at the Dirac point.