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Sample records for suspected thermally intermittent

  1. Evaluation of a directly observed six months fully intermittent treatment regimen for tuberculosis in patients suspected of poor compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caminero, J A; Pavón, J M; Rodríguez de Castro, F; Díaz, F; Julià, G; Caylá, J A; Cabrera, P

    1996-11-01

    Although a priority for tuberculosis control is to achieve the maximum cure rate, compliance with chemotherapy in specific high risk groups (homeless, intravenous drug abusers, chronic alcoholics) is usually poor. From January 1990 to December 1994 102 patients with tuberculosis (96 pulmonary, six extrapulmonary) who were poorly compliant with treatment were treated with a six month fully intermittent (twice weekly) directly observed regimen. They comprised 71 homeless subjects, 50 chronic alcoholics, 23 intravenous drug abusers, nine infected with HIV, and 11 who had previously abandoned a daily antituberculosis regimen; 53 had more than one of these risk factors. Treatment included isoniazid and rifampicin for six months and pyrazinamide during the first two months. Patients who failed to take their medication on two consecutive occasions were actively sought by telephone or by personal search. After two months of treatment 95 of the 102 patients had taken their medication regularly and 90 of them had negative cultures. Four of the remaining patients had negative cultures after three months. At the end of the six months 87 patients had completed treatment and were considered cured. Only 15 patients abandoned the treatment (13 of whom had more than one risk factor). Only three relapses occurred in the 102 patients at one year follow up and in the 88 patients followed for two years. Two patients required a change of treatment due to major side effects. Although intravenous drug abuse was the only predictor of non-compliance in the multivariate analysis, if the available variables in the second month of treatment were analysed, current poor compliance and abandonment of treatment in the past were found to be significantly associated with non-compliance. This study shows the efficacy of this intermittent regimen and the effectiveness of a directly observed treatment programme.

  2. Intermittent whole-body cold immersion induces similar thermal stress but different motor and cognitive responses between males and females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solianik, Rima; Skurvydas, Albertas; Mickevičienė, Dalia; Brazaitis, Marius

    2014-10-01

    The main aim of this study was to compare the thermal responses and the responses of cognitive and motor functions to intermittent cold stress between males and females. The intermittent cold stress continued until rectal temperature (TRE) reached 35.5°C or for a maximum of 170 min. Thermal response and motor and cognitive performance were monitored. During intermittent cold stress, body temperature variables decreased in all subjects (P differ between sexes. The presence of fast and slow cooling types for participants with similar effect on physiological variables were observed; thus the different rate coolers were grouped together and were attributed only sex specific responses. Overall, TRE cooling rate and cold strain index did not differ between sexes. Maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) decreased after intermittent cold exposure only in males (P differ between sexes. The effects of intermittent cold stress on electrically evoked muscle properties, spinal (H-reflex), and supraspinal (V-waves) reflexes did not differ between sexes. Intermittent cold-induced cognitive perturbation of attention and memory task performance was greater in males (P males and females experience similar thermal stress induced by intermittent whole-body cold immersion. Although no sex-specific differences were observed in muscle EMG activity, involuntary muscle properties, spinal and supraspinal reflexes, some of the sex differences observed (e.g., lower isometric MVC and greater cognitive perturbation in males) support the view of sex-specific physiological responses to core temperature decrease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. From intermittent to nonintermittent behavior in two dimensional thermal convection in a soap bubble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seychelles, F; Ingremeau, F; Pradere, C; Kellay, H

    2010-12-31

    Turbulent thermal convection in half a soap bubble heated from below displays a new and surprising transition from intermittent to nonintermittent behavior for the temperature field. This transition is observed here by studying the high order moments of temperature increments. For high temperature gradients, these structure functions display Bolgiano-like scaling predicted some 60 years ago with no observable deviations. The probability distribution functions of these increments are Gaussian throughout the scaling range. These measurements are corroborated with additional velocity structure function measurements.

  4. Thermoregulation and thermal perception in the cold and heat before and after intermittent heat adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issing, K.; Fuhr, E.

    1986-09-01

    Students wearing swim suits were exposed for 30 min to neutral room temperature (TR=28‡C). During the following 60 min they were subjected to gradual decreases or increases of room temperature reaching 12‡C or 45‡C, respectively. Static thermal stimuli were applied to the palms of the right (38‡C) and left (25‡C) hands. Hands and feet of all subjects were thermally isolated at 22‡C ambient temperature. General thermal comfort (GTC), local thermal comfort (LTC), skin blood flow (which is proportional to heat transport index λ) several body temperatures, oxygen-consumption(dot V_{O_2 } ), and sweat rate (S), were measured. After moderate intermittent heat exposures (7 times for 1h at TR=42.5‡C) the experiments started again. From GTC, LTC, or λ as functions of TR, no new knowledge about thermoregulatory or adaptive mechanisms was available. The high λ in the cold stimulated left hand, however, and the oscillatory thresholds (λOSC) for rhythmic vasomotion indicated the peripheral influence of skin temperature, as well as local, mean skin temperature (¯Ts) and core temperature. When exposed to moderate temperature decreases or increases the body seems to react only with increasing thermal resistance by vasoconstriction or an increase of sweat rate, respectively. Moderate heat adaptation is only able to raise sweat rate, but not the thresholds and gain of the S-function. We assume that functional studies of adaptive modifications in humans must be conducted at temperatures greatly beyond those used in these experiments.

  5. Thermal perceptions and skin temperatures during continuous and intermittent ventilation of the torso throughout and after exercise in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, Sarah L; Barwood, Martin J; Tipton, Michael J

    2013-11-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that intermittent cooling in air-perfused vests (APV) will not only maintain thermal balance but, due to cyclical activations of cutaneous thermoreceptors, also enhance thermal perceptions. Ten physically active males completed four conditions where they exercised (walking: 5 km h(-1), 2 % gradient) in a hot environment (~34.0 °C, 50 % RH) for 72 min, followed by a 33-min period of rest. They wore an APV throughout. The four conditions differed in respect to the profile of ambient air that was perfused through the APV: continuous perfusion (CP); intermittent perfusion of 6 min ON/OFF periods (IPonoff); a steady increase and decrease in flow rate in equal increments (IPramp); and an initial step-increase in the flow rate followed by an incremental decrease to zero flow rate (IPtriang). Whole body and torso thermal comfort (TC, TTC), whole body and torso temperature sensation (TS, TTS), whole body and torso skin temperature ([Formula: see text], [Formula: see text]), local relative humidity ([Formula: see text]) and rectal temperature (T re) were measured. There were no significant differences in T re, absolute whole body and local [Formula: see text], TC, TTC and TS between the cooling profiles. However, TTS was cooler in CP and IPramp than IPonoff and IPtriang. Even though intermittent cooling did not significantly enhance thermal perceptions in CP, a trend existed for TC (P = 0.063) to become less favourable over time. To reduce the power consumption and extend the battery life of an APV, it is recommended that an intermittent cooling profile should be adopted.

  6. Characterising the dynamics of surface water-groundwater interactions in intermittent and ephemeral streams using streambed thermal signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, Gabriel C.; Halloran, Landon J. S.; Cuthbert, Mark O.; Andersen, Martin S.; Acworth, R. Ian; Tellam, John H.

    2017-09-01

    Ephemeral and intermittent flow in dryland stream channels infiltrates into sediments, replenishes groundwater resources and underpins riparian ecosystems. However, the spatiotemporal complexity of the transitory flow processes that occur beneath such stream channels are poorly observed and understood. We develop a new approach to characterise the dynamics of surface water-groundwater interactions in dryland streams using pairs of temperature records measured at different depths within the streambed. The approach exploits the fact that the downward propagation of the diel temperature fluctuation from the surface depends on the sediment thermal diffusivity. This is controlled by time-varying fractions of air and water contained in streambed sediments causing a contrast in thermal properties. We demonstrate the usefulness of this method with multi-level temperature and pressure records of a flow event acquired using 12 streambed arrays deployed along a ∼ 12 km dryland channel section. Thermal signatures clearly indicate the presence of water and characterise the vertical flow component as well as the occurrence of horizontal hyporheic flow. We jointly interpret thermal signatures as well as surface and groundwater levels to distinguish four different hydrological regimes: [A] dry channel, [B] surface run-off, [C] pool-riffle sequence, and [D] isolated pools. The occurrence and duration of the regimes depends on the rate at which the infiltrated water redistributes in the subsurface which, in turn, is controlled by the hydraulic properties of the variably saturated sediment. Our results have significant implications for understanding how transitory flows recharge alluvial sediments, influence water quality and underpin dryland ecosystems.

  7. Intermittent thermal plasma acceleration linked to sporadic motions of the magnetopause, first Cluster results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-A. Sauvaud

    Full Text Available This paper presents the first observations with Cluster of a very dense population of thermal ionospheric ions (H+, He+, O+ locally "accelerated" perpendicularly to the local magnetic field in a region adjacent to the magnetopause and on its magnetospheric side. The observation periods follow a long period of very weak magnetic activity. Recurrent motions of the magnetopause are, in the presented cases, unexpectedly associated with the appearance inside closed field lines of recurrent energy structures of ionospheric ions with energies in the 5 eV to  ~1000 eV range. The heaviest ions were detected with the highest energies. Here, the ion behaviour is interpreted as resulting from local electric field enhancements/decreases which adiabatically enhance/lower the bulk energy of a local dense thermal ion population. This drift effect, which is directly linked to magnetopause motions caused by pressure changes, allows for the thermal ions to overcome the satellite potential and be detected by the suprathermal CIS Cluster experiment. When fast flowing, i.e. when detectable, the density (~ 1 cm-3 of these ions from a terrestrial origin is (in the cases presented here largely higher than the local density of ions from magnetospheric/plasma sheet origin which poses again the question of the relative importance of solar and ionospheric sources for the magnetospheric plasma even during very quiet magnetic conditions.

    Key words. Ionosphere (planetary ionosphere; plasma convection Magnetospheric physics (magnetopause, cusp and boundary layers

  8. Acute intermittent porphyria after right hemi-colectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadi Alshammary

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Acute intermittent porphyria should be suspected in any patient, particularly young women, who develop diverse neuro-visceral and psychiatric manifestations and hyponatremia after surgery.

  9. Energy intermittency

    CERN Document Server

    Sorensen, Bent

    2014-01-01

    The first book to consider intermittency as a key point of an energy system, Energy Intermittency describes different levels of variability for traditional and renewable energy sources, presenting detailed solutions for handling energy intermittency through trade, collaboration, demand management, and active energy storage. Addressing energy supply intermittency systematically, this practical text:Analyzes typical time-distributions and intervals between episodes of demand-supply mismatch and explores their dependence on system layouts and energy source characteristicsSimulates scenarios regar

  10. Spooky Suspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacifici, Lara

    2011-01-01

    This activity presents an option for covering biology content while engaging students in an investigation that highlights the spirit of Halloween. Students are engaged in the story line and have fun trying to solve the mystery kidnapping by using science skills to examine the evidence and eliminate some ghoulish suspects. (Contains 1 figure.)

  11. Comment on "Intermittent plate tectonics?".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korenaga, Jun

    2008-06-06

    Silver and Behn (Reports, 4 January 2008, p. 85) proposed that intermittent plate tectonics may resolve a long-standing paradox in Earth's thermal evolution. However, their analysis misses one important term, which subsequently brings their main conclusion into question. In addition, the Phanerozoic eustasy record indicates that the claimed effect of intermittency is probably weak.

  12. Method translation and full metadata transfer from thermal to differential flow modulated comprehensive two dimensional gas chromatography: Profiling of suspected fragrance allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero, Chiara; Rubiolo, Patrizia; Reichenbach, Stephen E; Carretta, Andrea; Cobelli, Luigi; Giardina, Matthew; Bicchi, Carlo

    2017-01-13

    The possibility to transfer methods from thermal to differential-flow modulated comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatographic (GC×GC) platforms is of high interest to improve GC×GC flexibility and increase the compatibility of results from different platforms. The principles of method translation are here applied to an original method, developed for a loop-type thermal modulated GC×GC-MS/FID system, suitable for quali-quantitative screening of suspected fragrance allergens. The analysis conditions were translated to a reverse-injection differential flow modulated platform (GC×2GC-MS/FID) with a dual-parallel secondary column and dual detection. The experimental results, for a model mixture of suspected volatile allergens and for raw fragrance mixtures of different composition, confirmed the feasibility of translating methods by preserving 1 D elution order, as well as the relative alignment of resulting 2D peak patterns. A correct translation produced several benefits including an effective transfer of metadata (compound names, MS fragmentation pattern, response factors) by automatic template transformation and matching from the original/reference method to its translated counterpart. The correct translation provided: (a) 2D pattern repeatability, (b) MS fragmentation pattern reliability for identity confirmation, and (c) comparable response factors and quantitation accuracy within a concentration range of three orders of magnitude. The adoption of a narrow bore (i.e. 0.1mm d c ) first-dimension column to operate under close-to-optimal conditions with the differential-flow modulation GC×GC platform was also advantageous in halving the total analysis under the translated conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The use of race winnings, ratings and a performance index to assess the effect of thermocautery of the soft palate for treatment of horses with suspected intermittent dorsal displacement. A case-control study in 110 racing Thoroughbreds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, R J M; Fraser, B S L; Heller, J; Lischer, C; Parkin, T; Bladon, B M

    2008-07-01

    There have been no reports of the efficacy of thermocautery of the soft palate (TSP) assessed objectively as a treatment of intermittent dorsal displacement of the soft palate (DDSP). To compare: racing performance of horses that underwent thermocautery of the soft palate with matched controls; and 'Racing Post ratings' (RPR) with prize money won (RE) and a performance index (PI) for each of the horses in the study. Thermocautery of the soft palate has no beneficial effect on racing performance and the 3 measures of performance are significantly related. The inclusion criteria were fulfilled by 110 horses and each was matched with 2 controls. Changes in performance were compared statistically. RPR, RE and PI were analysed using a regression model. The percentage of horses that improved in performance following the procedure was 28-51% for the 3 measures of performance, compared to 21-53% for the matched controls. There was no significant effect of the procedure on the changes in RPR or RE. There was a significant effect of the procedure on the change in PI (P=0.015) with more treated horses achieving an improved PI and fewer acquiring a worse PI than matched control horses. The measures of performance showed significant correlation. Thermocautery of the soft palate alone may not be the most efficacious treatment of DDSP. Production of a reliable measure of racehorse performance may be possible.

  14. Defining "intermittent UVR exposure".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodekær, M; Philipsen, P A; Petersen, B; Heydenreich, J; Wulf, H C

    2016-08-31

    Cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) has been associated with "intermittent UVR exposure", which in previous studies has mainly been assessed by retrospective questionnaire data. Further, there is no uniform definition of the term "intermittent UVR exposure". We aimed to define and quantify "intermittent UVR exposure" by an objective measure. A broad study population of adults and children had data collected during a summer period. Data were personal UVR dosimetry measurements, from which the number of "intermittent days" was derived, sun behaviour diaries and retrospective questionnaires. Two definitions of intermittent UVR exposure were tested: (1) days when UVR dose exceeded 3 times individual average daily UVR dose, and (2) days when UVR dose exceeded individual constitutive skin type. Measures of nevi and lentigines were used as surrogates for CMM. Using the first definition based solely on UVR dosimetry data we found 1241 "intermittent days" out of a total of 17 277 days (7.2%) among 148 participants. The numbers for nevi and lentigo density were significantly predicted by the number of intermittent days (R(2) = 0.15 and R(2) = 0.40, p intermittent UVR exposure. This measure may provide a better prediction of solar skin damage and CMM than retrospective questionnaire data.

  15. Intermittent Testicular Torsion

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-12-05

    Dec 5, 2017 ... Objective: The aim of this study is to highlight the clinical characteristics of patients with intermittent testicular torsion and draw attention to this underreported condition. Methods: Clinical and demographic data of all patients treated for intermittent testicular torsion from January 2007 to June 2015 were ...

  16. Defining "intermittent UVR exposure"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodekær, Mette; Philipsen, Peter Alshede; Petersen, Bibi Øager

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) has been associated with “intermittent UVR exposure”, which in previous studies has mainly been assessed by retrospective questionnaire data. Further, there is no uniform definition of the term “intermittent UVR exposure”. Objectives: We aimed...... to define and quantify “intermittent UVR exposure” by an objective measure. Methods: A broad study population of adults and children had data collected during a summer period. Data were personal UVR dosimetry measurements, from which the number of “intermittent days” was derived, sun behaviour diaries...... and retrospective questionnaires. Two definitions of intermittent UVR exposure were tested: (1) days when UVR dose exceeded 3 times individual average daily UVR dose, and (2) days when UVR dose exceeded individual constitutive skin type. Measures of nevi and lentigines were used as surrogates for CMM. Results...

  17. Experimental Study on Thermal Performance of Externally Insulated Walls of Intermittent Air-Conditioned Rooms in Summer in Hot Summer and Cold Winter Region, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Ding

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Now requirements for the thermal performance of building walls are based on the assumption that heat flux transfers in one direction through the wall. However, in Hot Summer and Cold Winter Region of China, the direction of heat flow in the wall not only changes with the seasons, but also changes in the same period of using. In this paper, dynamic thermal process of externally insulated walls in different air-conditioner’s running state in summer in Chongqing, China, was tested. The distribution characteristics of the outdoor and indoor air temperature and the surface and inner temperatures of the wall were analyzed and demonstrated. Based on the unsteady-state heat transfer theory, the study calculated and analyzed the distribution characteristics of the direction of the heat flux in the thermal process. Also the characteristics of insulation and heat preservation for walls under different air-conditioner’s running state were analyzed. It is shown that, in any air-conditioner’s running state, the direction of the heat flux through the wall is obviously dynamically changing. There is obvious difference in the thermal performance needs of the wall; that is, it has strong demand for thermal insulation in daytime and strong demand for heat dissipation during night time in summer.

  18. Acute intermittent porphyria after right hemi-colectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshammary, Shadi; Dulaijan, Reem Al; Saleh, Khaldoon; Zakaria, Hazem; Eldamati, Ahmed; Alwakeel, Norah; Al-Mulhim, Abdulmohsen

    2017-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria is a rare autosomal dominant metabolic disease. It is caused by a genetic mutation that results in deficiency of porphobilinogen deaminase enzyme, the third enzyme in heme biosynthesis. Acute intermittent porphyria precipitated by surgery is very rare. We present a 24 year-old woman who developed acute intermittent porphyria five days after right hemi-colectomy. Her presentation included neuro-visceral and psychiatric manifestations, and severe hyponatremia. She received critical care symptomatic management including mechanical ventilation. The diagnosis was based on a positive urine test for porphobilinogen and confirmed by the presence of a heterozygous mutation in the hydroxyrmethylbilane synthase (HMBS) gene (c.760delC p Leu254). Acute intermittent porphyria is the most common and life threatining type of acute porphyrias. It is more common in women and usually presents after puberty with acute abdominal pain and diverse neuro-psychiatric manifestations that can be confused with several surgical and medical diseases. Acute intermittent porphyria after surgery is most likely due to postoperative pain and low-calorie intake. Once suspected, prompt ICU management including high calorie intake are necessary to avoid serious complications and mortality before starting definitive treatment with hematin. Acute intermittent porphyria should be suspected in any patient, particularly young women, who develop diverse neuro-visceral and psychiatric manifestations and hyponatremia after surgery. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Intermittent hyperthyreosis -- a heat stress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulman, F G; Tal, E; Pfeifer, Y; Superstine

    1975-09-01

    Intermittent hyperthyreosis occurs under various forms of stress, especially heat stress. The clinician may diagnose such cases as masked or apathetic hyperthyroidism or "forme fruste" hyperthyreosis or thyroid autonomy. As most routine and standard tests may here yield inconsistent results, it is the patients' anamnesis which may provide the clue. Our Bioclimatology Unit has now seen over 100 cases in which thyroid hypersensitivity towards heat was the most prominent syndrome: 10-15% of weather-sensitive patients are affected. The patients complain before or during heat spells of such contradictory symptoms as insomnia, irritability, tension, tachycardia, palpitations, precordial pain, dyspnoe, flushes with sweating or chills, tremor, abdominal pain or diarrhea, polyuria or pollakisuria, weight loss in spite of ravenous appetite, fatigue, exhaustion, depression, adynamia, lack of concentration and confusion. Determination of urinary neurohormones allows a differential diagnosis, intermittent hyperthyreosis being characterized by three cardinal symptoms: 1. tachycardia -- every case with more than 80 pulse beats being suspect (not specific); 2. urinary histamine -- every case excreting more than 90 mug/day being suspect. Again the drawback of this test is its lack of specificity, as histamine may also be increased in cases of allergy and spondylitis; 3. urinary thyroxine -- every case excreting more than 20 mug/day T-4 being suspect. This is the only specific test. Therapy should make use of lithium carbonate and beta-blockers. Propyl thiouracil is rarely required.

  20. Intermittent degradation and schizotypy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew W. Roché

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent degradation refers to transient detrimental disruptions in task performance. This phenomenon has been repeatedly observed in the performance data of patients with schizophrenia. Whether intermittent degradation is a feature of the liability for schizophrenia (i.e., schizotypy is an open question. Further, the specificity of intermittent degradation to schizotypy has yet to be investigated. To address these questions, 92 undergraduate participants completed a battery of self-report questionnaires assessing schizotypy and psychological state variables (e.g., anxiety, depression, and their reaction times were recorded as they did so. Intermittent degradation was defined as the number of times a subject’s reaction time for questionnaire items met or exceeded three standard deviations from his or her mean reaction time after controlling for each item’s information processing load. Intermittent degradation scores were correlated with questionnaire scores. Our results indicate that intermittent degradation is associated with total scores on measures of positive and disorganized schizotypy, but unrelated to total scores on measures of negative schizotypy and psychological state variables. Intermittent degradation is interpreted as potentially derivative of schizotypy and a candidate endophenotypic marker worthy of continued research.

  1. Economic and Environmental Analysis of Cool Thermal Energy Storage as an Alternative to Batteries for the Integration of Intermittent Renewable Energy Sources

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Matthew John

    2015-01-01

    The balance of the supply of renewable energy sources with electricity demand will become increasingly difficult with further penetration of renewable energy sources. Traditionally, large stationary batteries have been used to store renewable energy in excess of electricity demand and dispatch the stored energy to meet future electricity demand. Cool thermal energy storage is a feasible renewable energy balancing solution that has economic and environmental advantages over utility scale stati...

  2. Intermittent Explosive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Headache Intermittent explosive disorder Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  3. Intermittent Explosive Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lut Tamam

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent explosive disorder is an impulse control disorder characterized by the occurrence of discrete episodes of failure to resist aggressive impulses that result in violent assault or destruction of property. Though the prevalence intermittent explosive disorder has been reported to be relatively rare in frontier studies on the field, it is now common opinion that intermittent explosive disorder is far more common than previously thought especially in clinical psychiatry settings. Etiological studies displayed the role of both psychosocial factors like childhood traumas and biological factors like dysfunctional neurotransmitter systems and genetics. In differential diagnosis of the disorder, disorders involving agression as a symptom such as alcohol and drug intoxication, antisocial and borderline personality disorders, personality changes due to general medical conditions and behavioral disorder should be considered. A combination of pharmacological and psychotherapeutic approaches are suggested in the treatment of the disorder. This article briefly reviews the historical background, diagnostic criteria, epidemiology, etiology and treatment of intermittent explosive disorder.

  4. Towards an intermittency-friendly energy system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blarke, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Distributed cogeneration has played a key role in the implementation of sustainable energy policies for three decades. However, increasing penetration levels of intermittent renewables is challenging that position. The paradigmatic case of West Denmark indicates that distributed operators...... using low-temperature heat recovered from flue gasses in combination with an intermediate cold storage, which enables the independent operation of heat pump and cogenerator. It is found that an electric boiler provides consistent improvements in the intermittency-friendliness of distributed cogeneration....... However, well-designed heat pump concepts are more cost-effective than electric boilers, and in future markets where the gas/electricity price ratio is likely to increase, compression heat pumps in combination with intermediate thermal storages represent a superior potential for combining an intermittency...

  5. Pediatric glaucoma suspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kooner K

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Karanjit Kooner,1 Matthew Harrison,1 Zohra Prasla,1 Mohannad Albdour,1 Beverley Adams-Huet21Department of Ophthalmology, 2Department of Clinical Sciences, Division of Biostatistics, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USAPurpose: To report demographic and ocular features of pediatric glaucoma suspects in an ethnically diverse population of North Central Texas.Design: Retrospective cross-sectional chart review.Participants: Subjects included 75 (136 eyes pediatric glaucoma suspects. Patients with one or more of the following risk factors were included: cup-to disc (C/D ratio of ≥0.6; intraocular pressure (IOP ≥21 mmHg; family history of glaucoma; congenital glaucoma in the opposite eye; history of blunt trauma to either eye; and presence of either Sturge–Weber or Axenfeld–Rieger syndrome, or oculodermal melanocytosis.Methods: Data were extracted from electronic patient medical records. Patient records with incomplete data were excluded. The main outcome measures were race, sex, age, IOP, C/D, family history of glaucoma; and glaucoma treatment.Results: Subjects included 28 (37.3% Hispanics, 20 (26.6% African Americans, 20 (26.6% Caucasians, and seven (9.3% Asians. Forty (53.3% of the patients were male. Suspicious optic disc was seen in 57 (76%; elevated IOP in 25 (33.3%; presence of family history in 13 (17.3%, and Sturge–Weber syndrome in nine (12% patients. The average C/D ratio was 0.58±0.2. The C/D ratios of African American (0.65±0.2, Hispanic (0.63±0.2, and Asian (0.62±0.15 patients were significantly greater than those of Caucasians (0.43±0.18; P=0.0004, 0.0003, and 0.0139, respectively. Caucasian patients were the youngest (7.9±4.8 years. Eleven cases (14.7% required medication.Conclusion: Thirty-three point seven percent of patients seen in the glaucoma clinic were glaucoma suspects. The most common risk factors for suspected glaucoma were suspicious optic discs, elevated IOP, and family history

  6. Intermittency in Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Hayot, F

    1999-01-01

    We derive from the Navier-Stokes equation an exact equation satisfied by the dissipation rate correlation function. We exploit its mathematical similarity to the corresponding equation derived from the 1-dimensional stochastic Burgers equation to determine the intermittency exponents in terms of the exponents characterizing the behavior of the dynamical velocity structure functions. We discuss the role of sweeping and Galilean invariance in determining the intermittency exponents

  7. Fate in intermittent claudication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelnes, Rolf; Gaardsting, O; Hougaard Jensen, K

    1986-01-01

    The fate of 257 consecutive patients (100 women) aged 36-85 years (mean 65) first seen with intermittent claudication in 1977 was analysed after a mean of 6.5 (SD 0.5) years. When first seen none of the patients complained of rest pain or had ulcers or gangrenous lesions on the feet. At follow up......, or an ankle/arm pressure index below 50% were individually significantly associated with progression of the arteriosclerotic disease. These findings show the importance of peripheral blood pressure measurements in the management of patients with intermittent claudication due to arteriosclerotic disease....

  8. Diagnosing Intermittent Faults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Gemund, A.J.C.; Abreu, R.F.; Zoeteweij, P.

    2008-01-01

    In this working report we outline how to determine the intermittency parameters gj from the activity matrix A (context: DX’08 paper Abreu, Zoeteweij, Van Gemund). We start with the single fault (SF) case and show that averaging over the error vector e is the exact way. We also show that in this way

  9. Technology and the Glaucoma Suspect

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Blumberg, Dana M; De Moraes, Carlos Gustavo; Liebmann, Jeffrey M; Garg, Reena; Chen, Cynthia; Theventhiran, Alex; Hood, Donald C

    2016-01-01

    ...), stereoscopic disc photographs, and automated perimetry as assessed by a group of glaucoma specialists in differentiating individuals with early glaucoma from suspects. Forty-six eyes (46 patients...

  10. Production intermittence in sport markets

    OpenAIRE

    Augusto Ruperez Micola; Albert Banal-Estanol

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyses the influence of production intermittence on spot markets. We use both game theory and an adaptation of the Camerer and Ho (1999) behavioural model. Controlling for costs, we find that intermittent technologies yield lower prices when incumbents have individual market power, but are higher when they do not have it. This happens both when firms are risk-neutral and risk-averse, and also under different intermittence and ownership configurations.Replacing high-cost assets wi...

  11. Intermittent hypoxia and neurorehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Rothi, Elisa J.; Lee, Kun-Ze; Dale, Erica A.; Reier, Paul J.; Mitchell, Gordon S.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, it has become clear that brief, repeated presentations of hypoxia [i.e., acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH)] can boost the efficacy of more traditional therapeutic strategies in certain cases of neurologic dysfunction. This hypothesis derives from a series of studies in animal models and human subjects performed over the past 35 yr. In 1980, Millhorn et al. (Millhorn DE, Eldridge FL, Waldrop TG. Respir Physiol 41: 87-103, 1980) showed that electrical stimulation of carotid chemoafferent neurons produced a persistent, serotonin-dependent increase in phrenic motor output that outlasts the stimulus for more than 90 min (i.e., a “respiratory memory”). AIH elicits similar phrenic “long-term facilitation” (LTF) by a mechanism that requires cervical spinal serotonin receptor activation and de novo protein synthesis. From 2003 to present, a series of studies demonstrated that AIH can induce neuroplasticity in the injured spinal cord, causing functional recovery of breathing capacity after cervical spinal injury. Subsequently, it was demonstrated that repeated AIH (rAIH) can induce recovery of limb function, and the functional benefits of rAIH are greatest when paired with task-specific training. Since uncontrolled and/or prolonged intermittent hypoxia can elicit pathophysiology, a challenge of intermittent hypoxia research is to ensure that therapeutic protocols are well below the threshold for pathogenesis. This is possible since many low dose rAIH protocols have induced functional benefits without evidence of pathology. We propose that carefully controlled rAIH is a safe and noninvasive modality that can be paired with other neurorehabilitative strategies including traditional activity-based physical therapy or cell-based therapies such as intraspinal transplantation of neural progenitors. PMID:25997947

  12. Intermittency in Complex Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Mahjoub, Otman; Redondo, Jose M.

    2017-04-01

    Experimental results of the complex turbulent wake of a cilinder in 2D [1] and 3D flows [2] were used to investigate the scaling of structure functions, similar research was also performed on wave propagation and breaking in the Ocean [3], in the the stratified Atmosphere (ABL) [4] and in a 100large flume (UPC) for both regular and irregular waves, where long time series of waves propagating and generating breaking turbulence velocity rms and higher order measurements were taken in depth. [3,5] by means of a velocimeter SONTEK3-D. The probability distribution functions of the velocity differences and their non Gaussian distribution related to the energy spectrum indicate that irregularity is an important source of turbulence. From Kolmogorov's K41 and K61 intermittency correction: the p th-order longitudinal velocity structure function δul at scale l in the inertial range of three-dimensional fully developed turbulence is related by ⟨δup⟩ = ⟨(u(x+ l)- u(x))p⟩ ˜ ɛp0/3lp/3 l where ⟨...⟩ represents the spatial average over flow domain, with ɛ0 the mean energy dissipation per unit mass and l is the separation distance. The importance of the random nature of the energy dissipation led to the K62 theory of intermittency, but locality and non-homogeneity are key issues. p p/3 p/3 ξd ⟨δul⟩ ˜ ⟨ɛl ⟩l ˜ l and ξp = p 3 + τp/3 , where now ɛl is a fractal energy dissipation at scale l, τp/3 is the scaling of and ξp is the scaling exponent of the velocity structure function of order p. Both in K41 and K62, the structure functions of third order related to skewness is ξ3 = 1. But this is not true either. We show that scaling exponents ξp do deviate from early studies that only investigated homogeneous turbulence, where a large inertial range dominates. The use of multi-fractal analysis and improvements on Structure function calculations on standard Enhanced mixing is an essential property of turbulence and efforts to alter and to control

  13. 5 CFR 340.403 - Intermittent employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Intermittent employment. 340.403 Section... FULL-TIME CAREER EMPLOYMENT (PART-TIME, SEASONAL, ON-CALL, AND INTERMITTENT) Seasonal and intermittent Employment § 340.403 Intermittent employment. (a) Appropriate use. An intermittent work schedule is...

  14. Metabolic Effects of Intermittent Fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Ruth E; Sears, Dorothy D

    2017-08-21

    The objective of this review is to provide an overview of intermittent fasting regimens, summarize the evidence on the health benefits of intermittent fasting, and discuss physiological mechanisms by which intermittent fasting might lead to improved health outcomes. A MEDLINE search was performed using PubMed and the terms "intermittent fasting," "fasting," "time-restricted feeding," and "food timing." Modified fasting regimens appear to promote weight loss and may improve metabolic health. Several lines of evidence also support the hypothesis that eating patterns that reduce or eliminate nighttime eating and prolong nightly fasting intervals may result in sustained improvements in human health. Intermittent fasting regimens are hypothesized to influence metabolic regulation via effects on (a) circadian biology, (b) the gut microbiome, and (c) modifiable lifestyle behaviors, such as sleep. If proven to be efficacious, these eating regimens offer promising nonpharmacological approaches to improving health at the population level, with multiple public health benefits.

  15. Intermittent Hypoxemia and OSA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, F. Javier; Somers, Virend K.

    2015-01-01

    OSA is a common chronic disorder that is associated with significant morbidity and mortality including cardiovascular, metabolic, and neurocognitive disease and increased cancer-related deaths. OSA is characterized by recurrent episodes of apneas and hypopneas associated with repetitive episodes of intermittent hypoxemia, intrathoracic pressure changes, and arousals. Intermittent hypoxemia (IH) is now being recognized as a potential major factor contributing to the pathogenesis of OSA-related comorbidities. OSA-related high-frequency IH is characterized by cycles of hypoxemia with reoxygenation that is distinctly different than sustained low-frequency hypoxia and contributes to ischemia-reperfusion injury. Data from both animal and human studies support mechanistic links between IH and its adverse impact at the tissue level. IH promotes oxidative stress by increased production of reactive oxygen species and angiogenesis, increased sympathetic activation with BP elevation, and systemic and vascular inflammation with endothelial dysfunction that contributes to diverse multiorgan chronic morbidity and mortality affecting cardiovascular disease, metabolic dysfunction, cognitive decline, and progression of cancer. Data from observational studies in large population groups also support the role for hypoxia in the pathogenesis of OSA comorbidity. Treatment with CPAP to reverse OSA-related symptoms and comorbidities has been shown to provide variable benefit in some but not all patient groups. Early treatment with CPAP makes intuitive sense to promote maximal functional recovery and minimize residual injury. More studies are needed to determine the interacting effects of IH and obesity, differential effects of both short-term and long-term hypoxemia, and the effect of CPAP treatment. PMID:25560865

  16. Intermedia and Intermittency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veres Bálint

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available It is commonly known that medial reflections have been initiated by attempts to secure the borders of discrete medial forms and to define the modus operandi of each essentialized medial area. Later on, the focus of study has shifted to plurimedial formations and the interactions between predefined medial genres. In the last few decades, taxonomic approaches to various multi-, inter-, and transmedial phenomena dominated the discussions, which offered invaluable support in mapping the terrain, but at the same time hindered the analysis of the ephemeral, time-dependent aspects of plurimedial operations. While we explore the properties of each medial configuration, we lose sight of the actual historical drivers that produce ever-new configurations. My thesis is that any discourse on intermediality should be paralleled by a discourse on cultural intermittency, and consequently, media studies should involve an approach that focuses on the “ecosystem” of the constantly renewing media configurations from the point of view of their vitalizing potential and capability to trigger heightened experiences. This approach draws much inspiration from K. Ludwig Pfeiffer’s media anthropology that gives orientation in my paper.

  17. Optical diagnostics of intermittent flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okulov, V.L.; Naumov, I.V.; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2007-01-01

    image velocimetry, frequently give erroneous results, especially for the transition flow and developed nonstationary flow. However, their combined use in diagnostics of unsteady (intermittent) flows significantly improves both the temporal and spatial resolution of measurements. Such a complex approach...

  18. Coho salmon dependence on intermittent streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    P.J. Wigington; J.L. Ebersole; M.E. Colvin; S.G. Leibowitz; B. Miller; B. Hansen; H. Lavigne; D. White; J.P. Baker; M.R. Church; J.R. Brooks; M.A. Cairns; J.E. Compton

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we quantify the contributions of intermittent streams to coho salmon production in an Oregon coastal watershed. We provide estimates of (1) proportion of spawning that occurred in intermittent streams, (2) movement of juveniles into intermittent streams, (3) juvenile survival in intermittent and perennial streams during winter, and (4) relative size of...

  19. Influence of time, surface-to-volume ratio, and heating process (continuous or intermittent) on the emission rates of selected carbonyl compounds during thermal oxidation of palm and soybean oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Thalita Oliveira; Pereira, Pedro Afonso de Paula

    2008-05-14

    The aim of this work was to compare the emission rates of selected carbonyl compounds (CC) produced by palm and soybean oils when heated at 180 degrees C in the presence of air, through different time intervals and at different surface-to-volume ratios ( S/ V), in continuous and intermittent processes. The CC were collected and derivatized onto silica C18 cartridges impregnated with an acid 2,4-dinitrophenylhidrazine solution, followed by extraction with acetonitrile and analysis by HPLC-UV and, in some cases, HPLC-MS with electrospray ionization. Among the CC quantified, namely, acetaldehyde, acrolein, propanal, butanal, hexanal, 2-heptenal, and 2-octenal, acrolein was the main emission in both oils and all S/ V ratios, followed by hexanal and 2-heptenal. The soybean oil has presented greater emission rates of acrolein than palm oil. When different S/ V ratios used during the heating process of the oil were compared, the emission rates, in general, were directly related to them, although saturated and nonsaturated CC have had different behaviors toward oxidation reactions. During intermittent heating, there was a trend of increasing emission rates of saturated aldehydes, whereas the opposite was observed with unsaturated aldehydes, probably due to the reactivity of the double bond present in these compounds.

  20. Magnetic Reconnection and Intermittent Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, K.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Kiyani, K. H.; Gosling, J. T.; Chapman, S. C.; Hnat, B.; Greco, A.; Servidio, S.; Phan, T. D.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.

    2014-12-01

    The relationship between magnetic reconnection and plasma turbulence is investigated using in-situ measurements both in the solar wind and within a high-speed reconnection jet in the terrestrial magnetotail. In the solar wind, reconnection events and current sheets are found for the first time to be concentrated in intervals of intermittent turbulence: within the most non-Gaussian 1% of magnetic field fluctuations, 87-92% of reconnection exhausts and about 9% of current sheets are found. Also, the likelihood that an identified current sheet will also correspond to a reconnection exhaust increases dramatically as the least intermittent fluctuations are removed. Hence, the turbulent solar wind contains a hierarchy of intermittent magnetic field structures that are increasingly linked to current sheets, which in turn are progressively more likely to correspond to sites of magnetic reconnection. In a magnetotail reconnection jet, the work done by electromagnetic fields on the particles, J·E, is found for the first time to have a non-Gaussian heavy tailed probability density function. Furthermore, J·E is non-uniform and concentrated in regions of high electric current density. This suggests magnetic energy is converted to kinetic energy within the reconnection jet in a manner that is intermittent, and could be analogous to fluid-like turbulent phenomenology where dissipation proceeds via coherent structures generated by an intermittent cascade. These results could have far reaching implications for space and astrophysical plasmas where turbulence and magnetic reconnection are ubiquitous.

  1. Elastically driven intermittent microscopic dynamics in soft solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzid, Mehdi; Colombo, Jader; Barbosa, Lucas Vieira; Del Gado, Emanuela

    2017-06-01

    Soft solids with tunable mechanical response are at the core of new material technologies, but a crucial limit for applications is their progressive aging over time, which dramatically affects their functionalities. The generally accepted paradigm is that such aging is gradual and its origin is in slower than exponential microscopic dynamics, akin to the ones in supercooled liquids or glasses. Nevertheless, time- and space-resolved measurements have provided contrasting evidence: dynamics faster than exponential, intermittency and abrupt structural changes. Here we use 3D computer simulations of a microscopic model to reveal that the timescales governing stress relaxation, respectively, through thermal fluctuations and elastic recovery are key for the aging dynamics. When thermal fluctuations are too weak, stress heterogeneities frozen-in upon solidification can still partially relax through elastically driven fluctuations. Such fluctuations are intermittent, because of strong correlations that persist over the timescale of experiments or simulations, leading to faster than exponential dynamics.

  2. Bursts in intermittent aeolian saltation

    CERN Document Server

    Carneiro, M V; Herrmann, H J

    2014-01-01

    Close to the onset of Aeolian particle transport through saltation we find in wind tunnel experiments a regime of intermittent flux characterized by bursts of activity. Scaling laws are observed in the time delay between each burst and in the measurements of the wind fluctuations at the critical Shields number $\\theta_c$. The time delay between each burst decreases on average with the increase of the Shields number until saltation becomes non-intermittent and the sand flux becomes continuous. A numerical model for saltation including the wind-entrainment from the turbulent fluctuations can reproduce these observations and gives insight about their origin. We present here also for the first time measurements showing that with feeding it becomes possible to sustain intermittent flux even below the threshold $\\theta_c$ for natural saltation initiation.

  3. Intermittent plate tectonics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Paul G; Behn, Mark D

    2008-01-04

    Although it is commonly assumed that subduction has operated continuously on Earth without interruption, subduction zones are routinely terminated by ocean closure and supercontinent assembly. Under certain circumstances, this could lead to a dramatic loss of subduction, globally. Closure of a Pacific-type basin, for example, would eliminate most subduction, unless this loss were compensated for by comparable subduction initiation elsewhere. Given the evidence for Pacific-type closure in Earth's past, the absence of a direct mechanism for termination/initiation compensation, and recent data supporting a minimum in subduction flux in the Mesoproterozoic, we hypothesize that dramatic reductions or temporary cessations of subduction have occurred in Earth's history. Such deviations in the continuity of plate tectonics have important consequences for Earth's thermal and continental evolution.

  4. Sprint cycling training improves intermittent run performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardaway Chun-Kwan Chan

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: Sprint cycling significantly improved intermittent run performance, VO2max and peak power output at VO2max. Sprint cycling training is suitable for intermittent sports athletes but separate speed and COD training should be included.

  5. Intermittent Control in Man and Machine

    OpenAIRE

    Gawthrop, Peter; Gollee, Henrik; Loram, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Intermittent control has a long history in the physiological literature and there is strong experimental evidence that some human control systems are intermittent. Intermittent control has also appeared in various forms in the engineering literature. This article discusses a particular mathematical model of Event-driven Intermittent Control which brings together engineering and physiological insights and builds on and extends previous work in this area. Illustrative examples of the properties...

  6. Probabilistic signatures of spatiotemporal intermittency in the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-27

    Nov 27, 2015 ... Keywords. Coupled map lattice; spatiotemporal intermittency; cellular automata. Abstract. The phase diagram of the coupled sine circle map system exhibits a variety of interesting phenomena including spreading regions with spatiotemporal intermittency, non-spreading regions with spatial intermittency, ...

  7. Suspected levamisole intoxication in calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, K R; Dwyer, C

    2016-07-01

    A group of 32 Friesian and four Hereford calves, 3-4 months old with body weights between 100-120 kg, were purchased from a weaner sale. On arrival at the property the Hereford calves were treated with a combination anthelmintic containing 2 g/L abamectin and 80 g/L levamisole hydrochloride. Shortly afterwards they developed tremors and frothing from the mouth, and two died overnight. The Friesian calves were treated with the same anthelmintic on the following day, when some showed hypersalivation and frothing from the mouth. Examination of the three most severely affected Friesian calves revealed severe nicotinic-type symptoms including hypersalivation, frothing from the mouth, muscle tremors, recumbency, rapid respiration, hyperaesthesia, and central nervous system depression. Other calves showed mild to moderate signs of intoxication including restlessness, tail switching, salivation, tremors, frequent defaecation, mild colic and jaw chomping. Two calves died shortly afterwards. An adverse drug event investigation revealed that the formulation and quality of the anthelmintic was within the correct specification, and that the drench gun was functioning correctly. Suspected levamisole intoxication due to a combination of possible overdosing, dehydration, and stress caused by transportation and prolonged yarding. Susceptibility to levamisole toxicity in New Zealand calves can be increased if factors like dehydration or stress are present. Levamisole has a narrow margin of safety, and overdosing in calves can easily occur if the dose rate is not based on their actual weight or health status.

  8. Experiment and simulation of temperature characteristics of intermittently-controlled ground heat exchanges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Qing; Li, Ming; Yu, Ming [Department of Thermal Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun (China)

    2010-06-15

    Because of poor heat transfer coefficients of soil/rock, ground source heat pumps (GSHP) or underground thermal energy storage (UTES) systems always occupy a large area and need many ground heat exchangers. This initial energy investment is so heavy that it cannot be used on a large-scale. Intermittent operation can reduce the extreme temperatures around the ground heat exchangers (GHEs) and keep the temperature in reasonable range. The aim of this study is to implement an experiment and develop a dynamic model of hydronic heating systems of GSHP in order to get a more fair comparison of energy efficiency between continuously controlled and intermittently controlled systems. Factors such as thermal inertia, temperature levels and lag time are also considered to see how they affect the efficiency. It is shown that temperature variation is related to the intermittent period and that intermittence prolongs the heat transfer without reaching at an utmost temperature (operation limitation). An effectively controlled intermittent process can optimize the capacity of heat exchange units so as to achieve better application of the ground energy. Additionally, the intermittent control can decrease the number of GHEs of GSHP and UTES systems and keep better working conditions. (author)

  9. Padma 28 for intermittent claudication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morling, Joanne R; Maxwell, Heather; Stewart, Marlene

    2013-07-16

    Intermittent claudication is pain caused by chronic occlusive arterial disease that develops in a limb during exercise and is relieved with rest. Most drug treatments of intermittent claudication have a limited effect in improving walking distance. Padma 28, a Tibetan herbal preparation, has been used to treat intermittent claudication, but there is debate as to whether Padma 28 produces a clinical benefit beyond the placebo effect. To determine whether Padma 28 is effective, compared with placebo or other medications, in increasing pain-free and maximum walking distance for patients with intermittent claudication. The Cochrane Peripheral Vascular Diseases Group Trials Search Co-ordinator (TSC) searched the Specialised Register (last searched April 2013), CENTRAL (2013, Issue 3) and clinical trials databases. In addition, a pharmaceutical company was contacted. Randomised controlled trials of Padma 28 compared with placebo or other pharmacological treatments in people suffering from intermittent claudication. All review authors independently assessed the selected studies and extracted the data. Risk of bias was evaluated independently by two review authors. Depending on the data provided in the individual trials, we extracted mean or median walking distance at the end of the trial, or change in walking distance over the course of the trial, or both. Where not provided, and whenever possible, the statistical significance of differences in these parameters between treatment and placebo groups in individual trials was calculated. Where possible, data were combined by meta-analysis. Five trials involving 365 participants were identified. All trials compared Padma 28 with placebo for at least 16 weeks of follow-up. Pain-free and maximum walking distances both increased significantly in the groups treated with Padma 28, with no significant change in the placebo group. In general, the studies presented results comparing the treatment arms before and after treatment but

  10. Empirical heuristics for improving Intermittent Demand Forecasting

    OpenAIRE

    Petropoulos, Fotios; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Spithourakis, George; Assimakopoulos, Vassilios

    2013-01-01

    Purpose– Intermittent demand appears sporadically, with some time periods not even displaying any demand at all. Even so, such patterns constitute considerable proportions of the total stock in many industrial settings. Forecasting intermittent demand is a rather difficult task but of critical importance for corresponding cost savings. The current study aims to examine the empirical outcomes of three heuristics towards the modification of established intermittent demand forecasting approaches...

  11. A case of suspect “cyanosis”

    OpenAIRE

    Elisabetta Antonucci; Matteo Conte; Michele Di Pumpo; Giuseppe Antonucci

    2013-01-01

    CLINICAL CASE A 70-year old woman was admitted to our hospital because of fever, asthenia and a suspected stroke. Her medical history showed a congenital cardiopathy (Patent Foramen Ovale, PFO). Skin and oral mucosa pigmentation, orthostatic hypotension, hypoglycemia and hyponatriemia arose the suspect of Addison’s disease. The diagnosis was confirmed by the evaluation of basal levels of plasma ACTH and serum cortisol, and serum cortisol levels after ACTH stimulation. Abdominal CT scan showed...

  12. Brownian semistationary processes and volatility/intermittency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole Eiler; Schmiegel, Jürgen

    of the semimartingale type. We focus on semimartingale - nonsemimartingale issues and on inference problems concerning the underlying volatility/intermittency process, in the nonsemimartingale case and based on normalised realised quadratic variation. The concept of BSS processes has arisen out of an ongoing study...... on the volatility/intermittency....

  13. Effects of vacusac in intermittent claudication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Himmelstrup, H; Himmelstrup, Bodil; Mehlsen, J

    1991-01-01

    The effect of a new physical treatment modality, Vacusac, was tested on a group of patients with stable intermittent claudication. Twenty-two patients with a median age of 65 years and a median duration of intermittent claudication of 5 years were randomized to either active or placebo treatments...

  14. Kinetic intermittency in magnetized plasma turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Teaca, Bogdan; Told, Daniel; Jenko, Frank

    2016-01-01

    We employ magnetized plasma turbulence, described by a gyrokinetic formalism in an interval ranging from the end of the fluid scales to the electron gyroradius, to introduce the first study of kinetic intermittency, in which nonlinear structures formed directly in the distribution functions are analyzed by accounting for velocity space correlations generated by linear (Landau resonance) and nonlinear phase mixing. Electron structures are found to be strongly intermittent and dominated by linear phase mixing, while nonlinear phase mixing dominates the weakly intermittent ions. This is the first time spatial intermittency and linear phase mixing are shown to be self-consistently linked for the electrons and, as the magnetic field follows the intermittency of the electrons at small scales, explain why magnetic islands are places dominated by Landau damping in steady state turbulence.

  15. Anisotropic Intermittency of Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Osman, K T; Chapman, S C; Hnat, B

    2013-01-01

    A higher-order multiscale analysis of spatial anisotropy in inertial range magnetohydrodynamic turbulence is presented using measurements from the STEREO spacecraft in fast ambient solar wind. We show for the first time that, when measuring parallel to the local magnetic field direction, the full statistical signature of the magnetic and Els\\"asser field fluctuations is that of a non-Gaussian globally scale-invariant process. This is distinct from the classic multi-exponent statistics observed when the local magnetic field is perpendicular to the flow direction. These observations are interpreted as evidence for the weakness, or absence, of a parallel magnetofluid turbulence energy cascade. As such, these results present strong observational constraints on the statistical nature of intermittency in turbulent plasmas.

  16. ANISOTROPIC INTERMITTENCY OF MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osman, K. T.; Kiyani, K. H.; Chapman, S. C.; Hnat, B., E-mail: k.t.osman@warwick.ac.uk [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-10

    A higher-order multiscale analysis of spatial anisotropy in inertial range magnetohydrodynamic turbulence is presented using measurements from the STEREO spacecraft in fast ambient solar wind. We show for the first time that, when measuring parallel to the local magnetic field direction, the full statistical signature of the magnetic and Elsässer field fluctuations is that of a non-Gaussian globally scale-invariant process. This is distinct from the classic multiexponent statistics observed when the local magnetic field is perpendicular to the flow direction. These observations are interpreted as evidence for the weakness, or absence, of a parallel magnetofluid turbulence energy cascade. As such, these results present strong observational constraints on the statistical nature of intermittency in turbulent plasmas.

  17. Anisotropic Intermittency of Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, K.; Kiyani, K. H.; Chapman, S. C.; Hnat, B.

    2014-12-01

    A higher-order multiscale analysis of spatial anisotropy in inertial range magnetohydrodynamic turbulence is presented using measurements from the STEREO spacecraft in fast ambient solar wind. We show for the first time that, when measuring parallel to the local magnetic field direction, the full statistical signature of the magnetic and Elsässer field fluctuations is that of a non-Gaussian globally scale invariant process. This is distinct from the classic multifractal scaling observed when the local magnetic field is perpendicular to the flow direction. These observations are interpreted as evidence for the weakness, or absence, of a parallel magnetofluid turbulence energy cascade. As such, these results present strong observational contraints on the statistical nature of intermittency in turbulent plasmas.

  18. Ginkgo biloba for intermittent claudication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaï, Saskia P A; Kruidenier, Lotte M; Bendermacher, Bianca L W; Prins, Martin H; Stokmans, Rutger A; Broos, Pieter P H L; Teijink, Joep A W

    2013-06-06

    People with intermittent claudication (IC) suffer from pain in the muscles of the leg occurring during exercise which is relieved by a short period of rest. Symptomatic relief can be achieved by (supervised) exercise therapy and pharmacological treatments. Ginkgo biloba is a vasoactive agent and is used to treat IC. To assess the effect of Ginkgo biloba on walking distance in people with intermittent claudication. For this update the Cochrane Peripheral Vascular Diseases Group Trials Search Co-ordinator searched the Specialised Register (March 2013) and CENTRAL (2013, Issue 2). Randomised controlled trials of Ginkgo biloba extract, irrespective of dosage, versus placebo in people with IC. Two authors independently assessed trials for selection, assessed study quality and extracted data. We extracted number of patients, mean walking distances or times and standard deviations. To standardise walking distance or time, caloric expenditures were used to express the difference between the different treadmill protocols, which were calculated from the speed and incline of the treadmill. Fourteen trials with a total of 739 participants were included. Eleven trials involving 477 participants compared Ginkgo biloba with placebo and assessed the absolute claudication distance (ACD). Following treatment with Ginkgo biloba at the end of the study the ACD increased with an overall effect size of 3.57 kilocalories (confidence interval (CI) -0.10 to 7.23, P = 0.06), compared with placebo. This translates to an increase of just 64.5 ( CI -1.8 to 130.7) metres on a flat treadmill with an average speed of 3.2 km/h. Publication bias leading to missing data or "negative" trials is likely to have inflated the effect size. Overall, there is no evidence that Ginkgo biloba has a clinically significant benefit for patients with peripheral arterial disease.

  19. Analytical approach to continuous and intermittent bottleneck flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helbing, Dirk; Johansson, Anders; Mathiesen, Joachim

    2006-01-01

    Many-particle-inspired theory, Continuous and Intermittent Bottleneck Flows Udgivelsesdato: Oct. 20......Many-particle-inspired theory, Continuous and Intermittent Bottleneck Flows Udgivelsesdato: Oct. 20...

  20. The phenomenology of specialization of criminal suspects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Tumminello

    Full Text Available A criminal career can be either general, with the criminal committing different types of crimes, or specialized, with the criminal committing a specific type of crime. A central problem in the study of crime specialization is to determine, from the perspective of the criminal, which crimes should be considered similar and which crimes should be considered distinct. We study a large set of Swedish suspects to empirically investigate generalist and specialist behavior in crime. We show that there is a large group of suspects who can be described as generalists. At the same time, we observe a non-trivial pattern of specialization across age and gender of suspects. Women are less prone to commit crimes of certain types, and, for instance, are more prone to specialize in crimes related to fraud. We also find evidence of temporal specialization of suspects. Older persons are more specialized than younger ones, and some crime types are preferentially committed by suspects of different ages.

  1. The Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsbo, Jens; Iaia, F. Marcello; Krustrup, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The two Yo-Yo intermittent recovery (IR) tests evaluate an individual's ability to repeatedly perform intense exercise. The Yo-Yo IR level 1 (Yo-Yo IR1) test focuses on the capacity to carry out intermittent exercise leading to a maximal activation of the aerobic system, whereas Yo-Yo IR level 2...... (Yo-Yo IR2) determines an individual's ability to recover from repeated exercise with a high contribution from the anaerobic system. Evaluations of elite athletes in various sports involving intermittent exercise showed that the higher the level of competition the better an athlete performs in the Yo...

  2. Assessing Relative Volatility/Intermittency/Energy Dissipation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole E.; Pakkanen, Mikko; Schmiegel, Jürgen

    process in particular. While this estimation method is motivated by the assessment of relative energy dissipation in empirical data of turbulence, we apply it also to energy price data. Moreover, we develop a probabilistic asymptotic theory for relative power variations of Brownian semistationary......We introduce the notion of relative volatility/intermittency and demonstrate how relative volatility statistics can be used to estimate consistently the temporal variation of volatility/intermittency even when the data of interest are generated by a non-semimartingale, or a Brownian semistationary...... processes and Ito semimartingales and discuss how it can be used for inference on relative volatility/intermittency....

  3. A case of suspect “cyanosis”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Antonucci

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available CLINICAL CASE A 70-year old woman was admitted to our hospital because of fever, asthenia and a suspected stroke. Her medical history showed a congenital cardiopathy (Patent Foramen Ovale, PFO. Skin and oral mucosa pigmentation, orthostatic hypotension, hypoglycemia and hyponatriemia arose the suspect of Addison’s disease. The diagnosis was confirmed by the evaluation of basal levels of plasma ACTH and serum cortisol, and serum cortisol levels after ACTH stimulation. Abdominal CT scan showed atrophy and calcification of adrenal glands. CONCLUSIONS In most cases, Addison’s disease is provoked by autoimmune destruction of the adrenal cortex; however, in our reported patient, tuberculosis could be a possible cause.

  4. Run-Off Computed Tomography Angiography (CTA for Discriminating the Underlying Causes of Intermittent Claudication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Preuß

    Full Text Available To evaluate run-off computed tomography angiography (CTA of abdominal aorta and lower extremities for detecting musculoskeletal pathologies and clinically relevant extravascular incidental findings in patients with intermittent claudication (IC and suspected peripheral arterial disease (PAD. Does run-off CTA allow image-based therapeutic decision making by discriminating the causes of intermittent claudication in patients with suspected peripheral arterial disease PAD?Retrospective re-evaluation of CTAs performed in patients with acute or chronic intermittent claudication (i.e., Fontaine stages I to IIB between January 2005 and October 2013. Allocation to one of three categories of underlying causes of IC symptoms: vascular, musculoskeletal (MSK or both. Clinically relevant extravascular incidental findings were evaluated. Medical records were reviewed to verify specific therapies as well as main and incidental findings.While focused on vascular imaging, CTA image quality was sufficient for evaluation of the MSK system in all cases. The underlying cause of IC was diagnosed in run-off CTA as vascular, MSK and a combination in n = 138 (65%, n = 10 (4%, and n = 66 (31% cases, respectively. Specific vascular or MSK therapy was recorded in n = 123 and n = 9 cases. In n = 82, no follow-up was possible. Clinically relevant extravascular incidental findings were detected in n = 65 patients (30% with neoplasia, ascites and pleural effusion being the most common findings.Run-off CTA allows identification of vascular, MSK, and combined causes of IC in patients with suspected PAD and can guide specific therapy. CTA also allowed confident detection of crEVIF although detection did not necessarily trigger workup or treatment.

  5. Beneficial effects of intermittent suction and pressure treatment in intermittent claudication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehlsen, J; Himmelstrup, H; Himmelstrup, Bodil

    1993-01-01

    The present study reports on the effects of a physical treatment modality in patients with intermittent claudication. During this treatment a major part of the skin surface is subjected to intermittent suction and pressure. In a previous, preliminary study the authors found a beneficial effect...... of this treatment in intermittent claudication. The study included 34 patients with moderate, stable intermittent claudication. Twenty-two patients participated in a double-blinded, randomized trial comparing the effects of 25 treatments to 25 placebo applications given over a period of two months. Twelve patients...... administration. The treatment caused significant increments in the ADP thresholds for platelet aggregation, while the effects on fibrinolysis were uncertain. It is concluded that intermittent suction and pressure treatment offers a new approach for conservative treatment of intermittent claudication....

  6. Sky dancer: an intermittent system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cros, Anne; Rodríguez Romero, Jesse Alexander; Damián Díaz Andrade, Oscar

    2009-11-01

    Sky dancers attract people sight to make advertising. What is the origin of those large vertical tubes fluctuations above an air blower? This study complements the previous one [1] about the system analysis from a dynamical system point of view. As a difference from the ``garden hose-instability'' [2], the tube shape has got ``break points''. Those ``break points'' separate the air-filled bottom tube portion from its deflated top portion. We record the tube dynamics with a high-speed videocamera simultaneously that we measure the pressure at the air blower exit. The intermittent pressure evolution displays picks when the tube fluctuates. We compare those overpressure values with the ones that appears in a rigid tube whose exit is partially obstructed. [1] F. Castillo Flores & A. Cros ``Transition to chaos of a vertical collapsible tube conveying air flow'' J. Phys.: Conf. Ser. 166, 012017 (2009). [2] A. S. Greenwald & J. Dungundji ``Static and dynamic instabilities of a propellant line'' MIT Aeroelastic and Structures Research Lab, AFOSR Sci. Report: AFOSR 67-1395 (1967).

  7. Social Smoking among Intermittent Smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiffman, Saul; Li, Xiaoxue; Dunbar, Michael S.; Ferguson, Stuart G.; Tindle, Hilary A.; Scholl, Sarah M.

    2015-01-01

    Background “Social smoking” - smoking mostly or even only with others – may be an important pattern that implies smoking motivated extrinsically by social influences. Non-daily smokers (intermittent smokers; ITS) are often assumed to be social smokers, with some authors even assuming that all ITS are social smokers (SS+). We sought to identify and characterize social smokers in a sample of ITS. Methods 204 adult ITS (smoking 4–27 days/month) recorded the circumstances of smoking in their natural settings using Ecological Momentary Assessment, while also recording their circumstances in nonsmoking moments. SS+ were defined as ITS who were with others when they smoked most of their cigarettes, and who were ≥ 50% more likely to be with others when smoking than when not. Results Only 13% of ITS were SS+. Although defined solely on the basis of presence of others, SS+ showed a distinct pattern of smoking across multiple dimensions: Compared to other ITS (who were significantly less likely to smoke when with others), SS+ smoking was more associated with socializing, being with friends and acquaintances, drinking alcohol, weekends, evening or nighttime, being in other people’s homes, but not their own home. SS+ smoking was low in the morning and increased in the evening. SS+ smoked fewer days/week and were less dependent, but did not differ demographically. Conclusions Social smoking does constitute a highly distinct smoking pattern, but is not common among adult ITS. PMID:26205313

  8. Scalings of intermittent structures in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Zhdankin, Vladimir; Uzdensky, Dmitri A

    2016-01-01

    Turbulence is ubiquitous in plasmas, leading to rich dynamics characterized by irregularity, irreversibility, energy fluctuations across many scales, and energy transfer across many scales. Another fundamental and generic feature of turbulence, although sometimes overlooked, is the inhomogeneous dissipation of energy in space and in time. This is a consequence of intermittency, the scale-dependent inhomogeneity of dynamics caused by fluctuations in the turbulent cascade. Intermittency causes turbulent plasmas to self-organize into coherent dissipative structures, which may govern heating, diffusion, particle acceleration, and radiation emissions. In this paper, we present recent progress on understanding intermittency in incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence with a strong guide field. We focus on the statistical analysis of intermittent dissipative structures, which occupy a small fraction of the volume but arguably account for the majority of energy dissipation. We show that, in our numerical simulat...

  9. Intermittent chaotic chimeras for coupled rotators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olmi, Simona; Martens, Erik Andreas; Thutupalli, Shashi

    2015-01-01

    Two symmetrically coupled populations of N oscillators with inertia m display chaotic solutions with broken symmetry similar to experimental observations with mechanical pendulums. In particular, we report evidence of intermittent chaotic chimeras, where one population is synchronized and the other...

  10. On-line intermittent connector anomaly detection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This paper investigates a non-traditional use of differential current sensor and current sensor to detect intermittent disconnection problems in connectors. An...

  11. Linear response in aging glassy systems, intermittency and the Poisson statistics of record fluctuations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sibani, Paolo

    2007-01-01

    in a correlated fashion and through irreversible bursts, `quakes', which punctuate reversible and equilibrium-like fluctuations of zero average. The temporal distribution of the quakes is a Poisson distribution with an average growing logarithmically on time, indicating that the quakes are triggered by record...... to capture the time dependencies of the EA simulation results. Finally, we argue that whenever the changes of the linear response function and of its conjugate autocorrelation function follow from the same intermittent events a fluctuation-dissipation-like relation can arise between the two in off......We study the intermittent behavior of the energy decay and the linear magnetic response of a glassy system during isothermal aging after a deep thermal quench, using the Edward-Anderson spin glass model as a paradigmatic example. The large intermittent changes in the two observables occur...

  12. Congenital Malaria Among Newborns Admitted for Suspected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Signs and symptoms of congenital malaria do not differ much from those of neonatal sepsis: both can co-exist, and most times very difficult to differentiate clinically. Objective: To document the prevalence, risk factors for congeni tal malar ia among neonates admitted for suspected neonatal sepsis, and ...

  13. Congenital Malaria Among Newborns Admitted for Suspected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    None of the clinical feature had good sensitivity, specificity or predictive value for congenital malaria, and only 1.6% death was recorded in a baby with high parasite density. Conclusion: Congenital malaria is common in newborns with suspected neonatal sepsis. History of peripartum pyrexia, prematurity and intrauterine ...

  14. MRI for clinically suspected appendicitis during pregnancy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cobben, L.P.; Groot, I.; Haans, L.; Blickman, J.G.; Puylaert, J.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether MRI can be used to accurately diagnose or exclude appendicitis in pregnant patients with clinically suspected appendicitis. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that MRI is helpful in the examination and diagnosis of acute appendicitis in

  15. Biomechanical properties of keratoconus suspect eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Alain; Lteif, Yara; Azan, Elodie; Gatinel, Damien

    2010-06-01

    Measuring corneal biomechanical properties may help detect keratoconus suspect corneas and eliminate the risk of ectasia after LASIK. Data of 504 eyes separated into three groups were retrospectively reviewed: normal (n = 252), keratoconus suspect (n = 80), and keratoconus (n = 172). Corneal hysteresis (CH) and corneal resistance factor (CRF) were measured with an ocular biomechanics analyzer. Mean corneal hysteresis was 10.6 +/- 1.4 (SD) mm Hg in the normal group, compared with 10.0 +/- 1.6 mm Hg in the keratoconus suspect group and 8.1 +/- 1.4 mm Hg in the keratoconus group. The mean CRF was 10.6 +/- 1.6 mm Hg in the normal group compared with 9.7 +/- 1.7 in the keratoconus suspect group and 7.1 +/- 1.6 mm Hg in the keratoconus group. Mean CH and CRF were significantly different between the three groups (P corneas. Analyzing signal curves obtained with the biomechanics analyzer may provide additional valuable information for selecting qualified patients for refractive surgery.

  16. Characterization of suspected illegal skin whitening cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmedt, B; Van Hoeck, E; Rogiers, V; Courselle, P; De Beer, J O; De Paepe, K; Deconinck, E

    2014-03-01

    An important group of suspected illegal cosmetics consists of skin bleaching products, which are usually applied to the skin of the face, hands and décolleté for local depigmentation of hyper pigmented regions or more importantly, for a generalized reduction of the skin tone. These cosmetic products are suspected to contain illegal active substances that may provoke as well local as systemic toxic effects, being the reason for their banning from the EU market. In that respect, illegal and restricted substances in cosmetics, known to have bleaching properties, are in particular hydroquinone, tretinoin and corticosteroids. From a legislative point of view, all cosmetic products containing a prohibited whitening agent are illegal and must be taken off the EU market. A newly developed screening method using ultra high performance liquid chromatography-time off flight-mass spectrometry allows routine analysis of suspected products. 163 suspected skin whitening cosmetics, collected by Belgian inspectors at high risk sites such as airports and so-called ethnic cosmetic shops, were analyzed and 59% were classified as illegal. The whitening agents mostly detected were clobetasol propionate and hydroquinone, which represent a serious health risk when repeatedly and abundantly applied to the skin. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Suspecting Neurological Dysfunction From E Mail Messages ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A non medical person suspected and confirmed neurological dysfunction in an individual, based only on e mail messages sent by the individual. With email communication becoming rampant “peculiar” email messages may raise the suspicion of neurological dysfunction. Organic pathology explaining the abnormal email ...

  18. Ocular lesions following suspected lightning injury in a horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Paige M; Armour, Micki D; Dubielzig, Richard R

    2012-07-01

      To describe the gross and histopathological ocular findings in a horse following suspected lightning injury.   The eyes of a 2-year-old thoroughbred gelding were clinically and histopathologically evaluated following a severe lightning storm following euthanasia because of visual impairment.   Severe corneal edema and hydrops were noted clinically oculus dexter. Indirect ophthalmoscopy revealed bilateral symmetrical raised hyporeflective peripapillary geographic lesions. Histopathologic evaluation revealed corneal edema in the right eye with normal corneal endothelium. Posterior segment evaluation revealed localized, pericentral choroidal lesions characterized by the presence of hemorrhage, early fibrosis, and minimal lymphoplasmacytic, neutrophilic, and histiocytic inflammation with spindle cell proliferation. The retinas overlying the choroidal lesions were necrotic and mostly absent. Peripheral to the focal lesion, the retina abruptly returned to normal architecture peripheral to a zone of apoptotic photoreceptors. Centrally, swollen axons extended into the optic disc.   There have been few descriptions of ocular lesions in animals following suspected lightning injury. We believe these findings to be unique because of the type of thermal injury that may be characteristic of lightening injury. We do not know whether these lesions would have progressed over time. © 2011 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  19. Compensatory mechanisms activated with intermittent energy restriction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coutinho, Sílvia Ribeiro; Halset, Eline Holli; Gåsbakk, Sigrid

    2017-01-01

    Background & aims: Strong compensatory responses, with reduced resting metabolic rate (RMR), increased exercise efficiency (ExEff) and appetite, are activated when weight loss (WL) is achieved with continuous energy restriction (CER), which try to restore energy balance. Intermittent energy......, respectively). No between group differences were apparent for any of the outcomes. Conclusions: The technique used to achieve energy restriction, whether it is continuous or intermittent, does not appear to modulate the compensatory mechanisms activated by weight loss. Clinical Trial Registration number: NCT...

  20. Smart Dual-Mode Heat Pump With HP2Grid Functionality To Support Large-Scale Integration Of Intermittent Renewables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carmo, Carolina; Blarke, Morten Boje

    2013-01-01

    The transition towards a 100 % fossil-free energy system, while achieving extreme penetration levels of intermittent wind and solar power in electricity generation, requires demandside technologies that are smart (intermittency-friendly) and efficient. The interaction between electric and thermal...... materials and the ability to generate electricity back to the grid. This new concept will not only improve the residential thermal supply system efficiency by 30-40 %, but will also extend the current intra-day flexibility of heat pumps to a wider range of flexible uses. In this paper, we will investigate...

  1. Estimating the Energy Costs of Intermittent Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Christopher B.; Fountaine, Charles

    2013-01-01

    To date, steady state models represent the only acceptable methodology for the estimation of exercise energy costs. Conversely, comparisons made between continuous and intermittent exercise generally reveal major physiological discrepancies, leading to speculation as to why steady state energy expenditure models should be applied to intermittent exercise. Under intermittent conditions, skeletal muscle invokes varying aerobic and anaerobic metabolic responses, each with the potential to make significant contributions to overall energy costs. We hypothesize that if the aerobic-only energetic profile of steady state exercise can be used to estimate the energetics of non-steady state and intermittent exercise, then the converse also must be true. In fact, reasonable estimates of energy costs to work volumes or work rates can be demonstrated under steady state, non-steady state and intermittent conditions; the problem with the latter two is metabolic variability. Using resistance training as a model, estimates of both aerobic and anaerobic energy cost components, as opposed to one or the other, have reduced the overall energetic variability that appears inherent to brief, intense, intermittent exercise models. PMID:24235988

  2. Exercise training for intermittent claudication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Mary M

    2017-11-01

    The objective of this study was to provide an overview of evidence regarding exercise therapies for patients with lower extremity peripheral artery disease (PAD). This manuscript summarizes the content of a lecture delivered as part of the 2016 Crawford Critical Issues Symposium. Multiple randomized clinical trials demonstrate that supervised treadmill exercise significantly improves treadmill walking performance in people with PAD and intermittent claudication symptoms. A meta-analysis of 25 randomized trials demonstrated a 180-meter increase in treadmill walking distance in response to supervised exercise interventions compared with a nonexercising control group. Supervised treadmill exercise has been inaccessible to many patients with PAD because of lack of medical insurance coverage. However, in 2017, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services issued a decision memorandum to support health insurance coverage of 12 weeks of supervised treadmill exercise for patients with walking impairment due to PAD. Recent evidence also supports home-based walking exercise to improve walking performance in people with PAD. Effective home-exercise programs incorporate behavioral change interventions such as a remote coach, goal setting, and self-monitoring. Supervised treadmill exercise programs preferentially improve treadmill walking performance, whereas home-based walking exercise programs preferentially improve corridor walking, such as the 6-minute walk test. Clinical trial evidence also supports arm or leg ergometry exercise to improve walking endurance in people with PAD. Treadmill walking exercise appears superior to resistance training alone for improving walking endurance. Supervised treadmill exercise significantly improves treadmill walking performance in people with PAD by approximately 180 meters compared with no exercise. Recent evidence suggests that home-based exercise is also effective and preferentially improves over-ground walking performance, such as

  3. Suspected poisoning of domestic animals by pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caloni, Francesca; Cortinovis, Cristina; Rivolta, Marina; Davanzo, Franca

    2016-01-01

    A retrospective study was carried out by reviewing all suspected cases of domestic animal poisoning attributed to pesticides, reported to the Milan Poison Control Centre (MPCC) between January 2011 and December 2013. During this period, pesticides were found to be responsible for 37.3% of all suspected poisoning enquiries received (815). The most commonly species involved was the dog (71.1% of calls) followed by the cat (15.8%), while a limited number of cases involved horses, goats and sheep. Most cases of exposure (47.1%) resulted in mild to moderate clinical signs. The outcome was reported in 59.9% of these cases, with death occurring in 10.4% of them. Insecticides (40.8%) proved to be the most common group of pesticides involved and exposure to pyrethrins-pyrethroids accounted for the majority of calls. According to the MPCC data, there has been a decrease in the number of suspected poisonings cases attributed to pesticides that have been banned by the EU, including aldicarb, carbofuran, endosulfan and paraquat. In contrast, there has been an increase of suspected poisoning cases attributed to the neonicotinoids, imidacloprid and acetamiprid, probably due to their widespread use in recent years. Cases of suspected poisoning that involved exposure to rodenticides accounted for 27.6% of calls received by the MPCC and anticoagulant rodenticides were the primary cause of calls, with many cases involving brodifacoum and bromadiolone. Herbicides were involved in 14.2% of calls related to pesticides and glyphosate was the main culprit in cases involving dogs, cats, horses, goats and sheep. As far as exposure to molluscicides (11.5%) and fungicides (5.9%), most of the cases involved dogs and the suspected poisoning agents were metaldehyde and copper compounds respectively. The data collected are useful in determining trends in poisoning episodes and identifying newly emerging toxicants, thus demonstrating the prevalence of pesticides as causative agents in animal

  4. Intermittency in MHD turbulence and coronal nanoflares modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Veltri

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available High resolution numerical simulations, solar wind data analysis, and measurements at the edges of laboratory plasma devices have allowed for a huge progress in our understanding of MHD turbulence. The high resolution of solar wind measurements has allowed to characterize the intermittency observed at small scales. We are now able to set up a consistent and convincing view of the main properties of MHD turbulence, which in turn constitutes an extremely efficient tool in understanding the behaviour of turbulent plasmas, like those in solar corona, where in situ observations are not available. Using this knowledge a model to describe injection, due to foot-point motions, storage and dissipation of MHD turbulence in coronal loops, is built where we assume strong longitudinal magnetic field, low beta and high aspect ratio, which allows us to use the set of reduced MHD equations (RMHD. The model is based on a shell technique in the wave vector space orthogonal to the strong magnetic field, while the dependence on the longitudinal coordinate is preserved. Numerical simulations show that injected energy is efficiently stored in the loop where a significant level of magnetic and velocity fluctuations is obtained. Nonlinear interactions give rise to an energy cascade towards smaller scales where energy is dissipated in an intermittent fashion. Due to the strong longitudinal magnetic field, dissipative structures propagate along the loop, with the typical speed of the Alfvén waves. The statistical analysis on the intermittent dissipative events compares well with all observed properties of nanoflare emission statistics. Moreover the recent observations of non thermal velocity measurements during flare occurrence are well described by the numerical results of the simulation model. All these results naturally emerge from the model dynamical evolution without any need of an ad-hoc hypothesis.

  5. The evaluation of suspected child physical abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Cindy W

    2015-05-01

    Child physical abuse is an important cause of pediatric morbidity and mortality and is associated with major physical and mental health problems that can extend into adulthood. Pediatricians are in a unique position to identify and prevent child abuse, and this clinical report provides guidance to the practitioner regarding indicators and evaluation of suspected physical abuse of children. The role of the physician may include identifying abused children with suspicious injuries who present for care, reporting suspected abuse to the child protection agency for investigation, supporting families who are affected by child abuse, coordinating with other professionals and community agencies to provide immediate and long-term treatment to victimized children, providing court testimony when necessary, providing preventive care and anticipatory guidance in the office, and advocating for policies and programs that support families and protect vulnerable children. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  6. Suspects in criminal investigations of rape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinković Darko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigations of sexual assaults mostly focus on victims and their credibility, which may cause lack of firm evidence in relation to suspects. Given the fact that the criminal offence of rape is characterised by a high incidence of false reports and accusations, frequently indicating specific persons as the perpetrators, certain caution is necessary in the investigation in order to avoid false accusations and/or convictions. As regards the personality of the rapist and motives for committing a forcible sexual act, certain types or rather certain categories of perpetrators can be distinguished, although it should be noted that a large number of rapists do not belong to one category only, but rather combine characteristics of several different types. During a criminal investigation it is of vital importance to differentiate between a rape as a surprise attack and a rape as abuse of trust, as they are compatible with the nature of the suspect's defence. The suspect shall be subjected to a forensic examination in the course of the investigation in order to find traces which prove vaginal, anal or oral penetration, coerced sexual intercourse and identity of the rapist. While conducting an interrogation of a suspected rapist, a crime investigating officer shall use either factual or emotional approach to his interviewee, depending on his psychological and motivational characteristics. In this regard, the factual approach is believed to be more efficient with anger rapists and sadistic rapists, whereas the compassionate approach gives good results with the gentlemen-rapists and partly with the power asserting rapists.

  7. Intermittent changing axis deviation with intermittent left anterior hemiblock during atrial flutter with subclinical hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patanè, Salvatore; Marte, Filippo

    2009-06-26

    Subclinical hyperthyroidism is an increasingly recognized entity that is defined as a normal serum free thyroxine and free triiodothyronine levels with a thyroid-stimulating hormone level suppressed below the normal range and usually undetectable. It has been reported that subclinical hyperthyroidism is not associated with CHD or mortality from cardiovascular causes but it is usually associated with a higher heart rate and a higher risk of supraventricular arrhythmias including atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter. Intermittent changing axis deviation during atrial fibrillation has also rarely been reported. We present a case of intermittent changing axis deviation with intermittent left anterior hemiblock in a 59-year-old Italian man with atrial flutter and subclinical hyperthyroidism. To our knowledge, this is the first report of intermittent changing axis deviation with intermittent left anterior hemiblock in a patient with atrial flutter.

  8. Glaucoma suspect & Humphrey Field Analyzer a correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Dahal

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Glaucoma originally meant "clouded", in Greek.The term glaucoma refers to a group of diseases that have in common characteristic optic neuropathy with associated visual field loss for which elevated intraocular pressure is one of the primary risk factor. The purpose of the study is to correlate the clinically diagnosed cases of glaucoma suspect with the Humphrey Field Analyzer (HFA. Fifty cases of glaucoma suspect who attended the glaucoma clinic of Nepal Eye Hospital Tripureswor, Kathmandu, Nepal and who meets at least two criteria, among the four types of glaucoma suspects were advised for the HFA for the study. In this study out of 50 patient, 36 (72% patients had normal visual field. 14 (28% patients had thinning of the neural retinal rim (NRR in both eyes. The significant relation with thinning of neural retina rim and glaucomatous hemifield test was found in the study. Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal,2012,Vol-8,No-1, 23-28 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v8i1.6822

  9. Tocolytics for suspected intrapartum fetal distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulier, R; Hofmeyr, G J

    2000-01-01

    Prophylactic tocolysis with betamimetics and other agents has become widespread as a treatment for fetal distress. Uterine relaxation may improve placental blood flow and therefore fetal oxygenation. However there may also be adverse maternal cardiovascular effects. The objective of this review was to assess the effects of tocolytic therapy for suspected fetal distress on fetal, maternal and perinatal outcomes. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group trials register and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register. Date of last search: February 1999. Randomised trials comparing tocolytic therapy with no treatment or treatment with another tocolytic agent for suspected fetal distress. Two reviewers assessed trial quality and extracted data. Three studies were included. Compared with no treatment, there were fewer failed improvements in fetal heart rate abnormalities with tocolytic therapy (relative risk 0.26, 95% 0.13 to 0.53). Betamimetic therapy compared with magnesium sulphate showed a non-significant trend towards reduced uterine activity (relative risk 0.07, 95% confidence interval 0.00 to 1.10). Betamimetic therapy appears to be able to reduce the number of fetal heart rate abnormalities and perhaps reduce uterine activity. However there is not enough evidence based on clinically important outcomes to evaluate the use of betamimetics for suspected fetal distress.

  10. Detecting special nuclear materials in suspect containers using high-energy gamma rays emitted by fission products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Eric B [Oakland, CA; Prussin, Stanley G [Kensington, CA

    2009-01-27

    A method and a system for detecting the presence of special nuclear materials in a suspect container. The system and its method include irradiating the suspect container with a beam of neutrons, so as to induce a thermal fission in a portion of the special nuclear materials, detecting the gamma rays that are emitted from the fission products formed by the thermal fission, to produce a detector signal, comparing the detector signal with a threshold value to form a comparison, and detecting the presence of the special nuclear materials using the comparison.

  11. Intermittent bradyarrhythmia in a Hispaniolan Amazon parrot (Amazona ventralis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rembert, Melanie S; Smith, Julie A; Strickland, Keith N; Tully, Thomas N

    2008-03-01

    A clinically normal 2-year-old Hispaniolan Amazon parrot (Amazona ventralis) was found to have periodic second-degree atrioventricular (AV) block with variable nodal conductions while anesthetized with isoflurane during a thermal-support research project. Arrhythmias were observed on 5 successive weekly electrocardiograms. A complete cardiac evaluation, including a diagnostic electrocardiogram, revealed intermittent bradyarrhythmias ranging from a 2:1 to a 7:1 second-degree AV block, with concurrent hypotensive episodes during the nodal blocks. Results of a complete blood cell count, plasma biochemical profile, blood gas analysis, and atropine-response test, as well as radiography and auscultation, revealed no obvious cause for the arrhythmias. Echocardiography demonstrated cardiac wall thickness, chamber size, and systolic function similar to other psittacine birds. On return to the colony, the parrot continued to be outwardly asymptomatic despite the dramatic conduction disturbances. Although cardiac arrhythmias, including second-degree AV block, have been widely reported in birds, the wide variation of nodal conductions, the intermittent nature, and an arrhythmia with a 7:1 second-degree AV block that spontaneously reverts to normal as seen in this case have not been well documented in parrots.

  12. Intermittency in {sup 197}Au fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dabrowska, A.; Holynski, R.; Olszewski, A.; Szarska, M.; Wilczynska, B.; Wolter, W.; Wosiek, B. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland); Cherry, M.L.; Deines-Jones, P.; Jones, W.V.; Sengupta, K.; Wefel, B. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Waddington, C.J. [Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis, MN (United States). School of Physics and Astronomy; Pozharova, E.A.; Skorodko, T.Yu. [Inst. of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); KLMM Collaboration

    1995-07-01

    The concept of factorial moments was applied to an analysis of the dynamical fluctuations in the charge distributions of the fragments emitted from gold nuclei with energies 10.6 and < 1.0 GeV/n interacting with emulsion nuclei. Clear evidence for intermittent fluctuations has been found in an analysis using all the particles released from the gold projectile, with a stronger effect observed below 1 GeV/n than at 10.6 GeV/n. For the full data sets, however, the intermittency effect was found to be very sensitive to the singly charged particles, and neglecting these particles strongly reduces the intermittency signal. When the analysis is restricted to the multiply charged fragments, an intermittency effect is revealed only for multifragmentation events, although one that is enhanced as compared to the analysis of all, singly and multiply charged, particles. The properties of the anomalous fractal dimensions suggest a sequential decay mechanism, rather than the existence of possible critical behaviour in the process of nuclear fragmentation. The likely influence of the charge conservation effects and the finite size of decaying systems on the observed intermittency signals was pointed out. (author). 37 refs, 9 figs, 5 tabs.

  13. Magnetic field generation by intermittent convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chertovskih, R.; Rempel, E. L.; Chimanski, E. V.

    2017-10-01

    Magnetic field generation in three-dimensional Rayleigh-Bénard convection of an electrically conducting fluid is studied numerically by fixing the Prandtl number at P = 0.3 and varying the Rayleigh number (Ra) as a control parameter. A recently reported route to hyperchaos involving quasiperiodic regimes, crises and chaotic intermittent attractors is followed, and the critical magnetic Prandtl number (Pmc) for dynamo action is determined as a function of Ra. A mechanism for the onset of intermittency in the magnetic energy is described, the most beneficial convective regimes for dynamo action in this transition to weak turbulence are identified, and the impact of intermittency on the dependence of Pmc on Ra is discussed.

  14. Magnetic field generation by intermittent convection

    CERN Document Server

    Chertovskih, R; Chimanski, E V

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic field generation by convective flows in transition to weak turbulence is studied numerically. By fixing the Prandtl number at P=0.3 and varying the Rayleigh number (Ra) as a control parameter in three-dimensional Rayleigh-Benard convection of an electrically conducting fluid, a recently reported route to hyperchaos involving quasiperiodic regimes, crises and chaotic intermittent attractors is followed, and the critical magnetic Prandtl number ($P_m^c$) for dynamo action is determined as a function of Ra. A mechanism for the onset of on-off intermittency in the magnetic energy is described, the most beneficial convective regimes for dynamo action are identified, and how intermittency affects the dependence of $P_m^c$ on Ra is discussed.

  15. Forces and energetics of intermittent swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floryan, Daniel; Van Buren, Tyler; Smits, Alexander J.

    2017-08-01

    Experiments are reported on intermittent swimming motions. Water tunnel experiments on a nominally two-dimensional pitching foil show that the mean thrust and power scale linearly with the duty cycle, from a value of 0.2 all the way up to continuous motions, indicating that individual bursts of activity in intermittent motions are independent of each other. This conclusion is corroborated by particle image velocimetry (PIV) flow visualizations, which show that the main vortical structures in the wake do not change with duty cycle. The experimental data also demonstrate that intermittent motions are generally energetically advantageous over continuous motions. When metabolic energy losses are taken into account, this conclusion is maintained for metabolic power fractions less than 1.

  16. Assessing relative volatility/intermittency/energy dissipation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole E.; Pakkanen, Mikko S.; Schmiegel, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    process in particular. This estimation method is motivated by the assessment of relative energy dissipation in empirical data of turbulence, but it is also applicable in other areas. We develop a probabilistic asymptotic theory for realised relative power variations of Brownian semistationary processes......, and introduce inference methods based on the theory. We also discuss how to extend the asymptotic theory to other classes of processes exhibiting stochastic volatility/intermittency. As an empirical application, we study relative energy dissipation in data of atmospheric turbulence.......We introduce the notion of relative volatility/intermittency and demonstrate how relative volatility statistics can be used to estimate consistently the temporal variation of volatility/intermittency when the data of interest are generated by a non-semimartingale, or a Brownian semistationary...

  17. Complexity and Intermittent Turbulence in Space Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tom; Tam, Sunny W. Y.; Wu, Cheng-Chin

    2004-01-01

    Sporadic and localized interactions of coherent structures arising from plasma resonances can be the origin of "complexity" of the coexistence of non- propagating spatiotemporal fluctuations and propagating modes in space plasmas. Numerical simulation results are presented to demonstrate the intermittent character of the non-propagating fluctuations. The technique of the dynamic renormalization-group is introduced and applied to the study of scale invariance of such type of multiscale fluctuations. We also demonstrate that the particle interactions with the intermittent turbulence can lead to the efficient energization of the plasma populations. An example related to the ion acceleration processes in the auroral zone is provided.

  18. Sprint cycling training improves intermittent run performance

    OpenAIRE

    Hardaway Chun-Kwan Chan; Weeraya Ka-Yan Ho; Patrick Shu-Hang Yung

    2018-01-01

    Background/Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the effect of sprint cycling training on the intermittent run performance, sprinting speed, and change of direction (COD) ability of recreational intermittent sports athletes. Methods: Sixteen participants participated in the study. The experimental group (EG, n = 8) received a total of 12 sessions of sprint cycling training in a 4-week period and the control group (CG, n = 8) received no training. Both EG and CG were instructed to...

  19. Impacts of large-scale Intermittent Renewable Energy Sources on electricity systems, and how these can be modeled

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Anne Sjoerd|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/330822748; Van Den Broek, Machteld|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/092946895; Seebregts, Ad; Faaij, André

    The electricity sector in OECD countries is on the brink of a large shift towards low-carbon electricity generation. Power systems after 2030 may consist largely of two low-carbon generator types: Intermittent Renewable Energy Sources (IRES) such as wind and solar PV and thermal generators such as

  20. "Intermittent claudication intermittence" as a manifestation of adventitial cystic disease communicating with the knee joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buijsrogge, Marc P; van der Meij, Suzan; Korte, Jan H; Fritschy, Wilbert M

    2006-09-01

    In this report, we describe a patient with adventitial cystic disease of the popliteal artery, in which direct communication via a duct-like structure between the cystic lesion and the knee-joint synovium resulted in recurrent episodes of intermittent claudication and complete symptom-free intervals (intermittent claudication intermittence). This unusual observation could shed more light on the debated etiology of the disease. Moreover, it emphasizes the importance of complete excision of the cyst along with the presenting anatomic connection with the knee joint.

  1. Prevalence of glaucoma suspects and pattern of intra-ocular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Glaucoma is the commonest cause of irreversible blindness in the world. Some glaucoma patients start out as glaucoma suspects for years. Aim: To determine the prevalence of glaucoma suspects and pattern of intra-ocular pressure distribution in glaucoma suspects. Methods: This survey was carried out in ...

  2. Nuclear Pedigree Criteria of Suspected HNPCC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kładny Józef

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The criteria for the diagnosis of HNPCC established by the ICG-HNPCC are very restrictive as they do not allow for the diagnosis of a large number of "suspected HNPCC" cases - these are families which do no fulfill the strict diagnostic "Amsterdam criteria", but do present with several pedigree and clinical features characteristic for HNPCC. Several series of families suspected of harboring germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes have been studied for germline changes in DNA mismatch repair genes and a mutation rate of somewhere between 8-60% was found. Therefore a subgroup of members of the ICG-HNPCC has been working on pedigree/clinical diagnostic criteria for suspected HNPCC. Materials and methods Part I The study was based on two series of colorectal cancer (CRC cases: 1 HNPCC - this group comprised 190 patients affected by CRC from randomly selected families which fulfilled the Amsterdam II criteria registered in Düsseldorf, Germany (102 cases of CRC, Denmark (18 CRCs, Leiden, Holland (23 CRCs and Szczecin, Poland (47 CRCs. 2 Consecutive CRCs - this group comprised 629 (78.0% of 806 individuals with CRC diagnosed in 1991-1997 in the city of Szczecin (ca. 400,000 of inhabitants, Poland. Nuclear pedigrees in both groups were compared for frequency of occurrence of clinical features, that have been shown to be associated with HNPCC. Part II 52 consecutive CRC cases from Szczecin, matching the criteria recognized in part I as appropriate for diagnosis of cases "suspected of HNPCC" were studied for the occurrence of germline hMSH2/hMLH1 constitutional mutations using "exon by exon" sequencing. Results The combination of features - i.e. the occurrence of an HNPCC associated cancer (CRC or cancer of the endometrium, small bowel or urinary tract in a 1st degree relative of a CRC patient; at least one of the patients being diagnosed under age of 50 - appeared to be strongly associated to HNPCC with an OR - 161. Constitutional

  3. Intermittent oral iron supplementation during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Rosas, Juan Pablo; De-Regil, Luz Maria; Gomez Malave, Heber; Flores-Urrutia, Monica C; Dowswell, Therese

    2015-10-19

    Anaemia is a frequent condition during pregnancy, particularly among women in low- and middle-income countries. Traditionally, gestational anaemia has been prevented with daily iron supplements throughout pregnancy, but adherence to this regimen due to side effects, interrupted supply of the supplements, and concerns about safety among women with an adequate iron intake, have limited the use of this intervention. Intermittent (i.e. two or three times a week on non-consecutive days) supplementation has been proposed as an alternative to daily supplementation. To assess the benefits and harms of intermittent supplementation with iron alone or in combination with folic acid or other vitamins and minerals to pregnant women on neonatal and pregnancy outcomes. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (31 July 2015), the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (31 July 2015) and contacted relevant organisations for the identification of ongoing and unpublished studies (31 July 2015). Randomised or quasi-randomised trials. We assessed the methodological quality of trials using standard Cochrane criteria. Two review authors independently assessed trial eligibility, extracted data and conducted checks for accuracy. This review includes 27 trials from 15 countries, but only 21 trials (with 5490 women) contributed data to the review. All studies compared daily versus intermittent iron supplementation. The methodological quality of included studies was mixed and most had high levels of attrition.The overall assessment of the quality of the evidence for primary infant outcomes was low and for maternal outcomes very low.Of the 21 trials contributing data, three studies provided intermittent iron alone, 14 intermittent iron + folic acid and four intermittent iron plus multiple vitamins and minerals in comparison with the same composition of supplements provided in a daily regimen.Overall, for women receiving any intermittent

  4. Probabilistic signatures of spatiotemporal intermittency in the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Coupled map lattice; spatiotemporal intermittency; cellular automata. PACS Nos 05.45.Ra; 05.45.-a; 05.45.Df; 64.60.Ak. 1. Introduction. The coupled sine circle map lattice has been known to model the mode-locking behaviour [1] seen commonly in coupled oscillators, Josephson junction arrays, etc., and is also found to be ...

  5. Clean Intermittent Catheterization in the School Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katrancha, Elizabeth D.

    2008-01-01

    Spina bifida (SB) is a neural tube defect that causes many physical and mental disabilities. Bowel and bladder incontinence is the disability seen most often in these students that requires the school nurse's attention. Clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) provides the student with SB a vehicle to reach a satisfactory level of continence,…

  6. EFFECT OF CLEAN INTERMITTENT CATHETERIZATION ON LOWER

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    M. E. ABDEL MAGID, R.A. SALEH . Urology and Anatomy Departments, Faculty of Medicine, A/-Azhar University, Cairo, Egypt. Objective To investigate the effect of clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) on the lower urinary tract in experimental animals. Patients and Methods Eight male spinalized cats were subjected to ...

  7. Intermittent demand : Linking forecasting to inventory obsolescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunter, Ruud H.; Syntetos, Aris A.; Babai, M. Zied

    2011-01-01

    The standard method to forecast intermittent demand is that by Croston. This method is available in ERP-type solutions such as SAP and specialised forecasting software packages (e.g. Forecast Pro), and often applied in practice. It uses exponential smoothing to separately update the estimated demand

  8. INTERMITTENCY, A TEST FOR STRING FRAGMENTATION PROCESSES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHOLTEN, O

    The Artru-Mennessier and the string fragmentation procedure as implemented in the code VENUS have been compared. The two fragmentation prescriptions predict a similar rapidity spectrum including its energy dependence and event multiplicities, but give rise to very different intermittency results.

  9. Walking training for intermittent claudication in diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ubels, FL; Links, TP; Sluiter, WJ; Smit, AJ

    OBJECTIVE - Walking training (WT) is an established treatment for patients with intermittent claudication (IC). Abnormalities specific to diabetes, such as a relative preponderance of distal lesions and the contribution of microcirculatory disease, might well influence the results of WT. We compared

  10. EFFECT OF CLEAN INTERMITTENT CATHETERIZATION ON ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective To investigate the effect of clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) on the lower urinary tract in experimental animals. Patients and Methods Eight male spinalized cats were subjected to CIC for a period of 6 – 9 weeks. A urine specimen for culture was obtained weekly. A pathological examination of the proximal ...

  11. 21 CFR 890.1600 - Intermittent pressure measurement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intermittent pressure measurement system. 890.1600 Section 890.1600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Intermittent pressure measurement system. (a) Identification. An intermittent pressure measurement system is an...

  12. 21 CFR 868.5955 - Intermittent mandatory ventilation attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intermittent mandatory ventilation attachment. 868... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5955 Intermittent mandatory ventilation attachment. (a) Identification. An intermittent mandatory ventilation (IMV) attachment...

  13. Macroscopic Manifestation of Microscopic Entropy Production: Space-Dependent Intermittence

    OpenAIRE

    Grigolini, Paolo; Mannella, Riccardo; Palatella, Luigi

    2000-01-01

    We study a spatial diffusion process generated by velocity fluctuations of intermittent nature. We note that intermittence reduces the entropy production rate while enhancing the diffusion strength. We study a case of space-dependent intermittence and prove it to result in a deviation from uniform distribution. This macroscopic effect can be used to measure the relative value of the trajectory entropy.

  14. 40 CFR 51.119 - Intermittent control systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... and type were consistent with the air quality objective and operation of the system. (ii... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intermittent control systems. 51.119... Intermittent control systems. (a) The use of an intermittent control system (ICS) may be taken into account in...

  15. Muscle coordination changes during intermittent cycling sprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billaut, François; Basset, Fabien A; Falgairette, Guy

    2005-06-03

    Maximal muscle power is reported to decrease during explosive cyclical exercises owing to metabolic disturbances, muscle damage, and adjustments in the efferent neural command. The aim of the present study was to analyze the influence of inter-muscle coordination in fatigue occurrence during 10 intermittent 6-s cycling sprints, with 30-s recovery through electromyographic activity (EMG). Results showed a decrease in peak power output with sprint repetitions (sprint 1 versus sprint 10: -11%, Pfatigue occurrence. In conclusion, the maximal power output, developed during intermittent cycling sprints of short duration, decreased possibly due to the inability of muscles to maintain maximal force. This reduction in maximal power output occurred in parallel to changes in the muscle coordination pattern after fatigue.

  16. Intermittence and roughening of periodic elastic media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seppälä, E T; Alava, M J; Duxbury, P M

    2001-03-01

    We analyze intermittence and roughening of an elastic interface or domain wall pinned in a periodic potential, in the presence of random-bond disorder in 1+1 and 2+1 dimensions. Though the ensemble average behavior is smooth, the typical behavior of a large sample is intermittent, and does not self-average to a smooth behavior. Instead, large fluctuations occur in the mean location of the interface and the onset of interface roughening is via an extensive fluctuation which leads to a jump in the roughness of order lambda, the period of the potential. Analytical arguments based on extreme statistics are given for the number of the minima of the periodicity visited by the interface and for the roughening crossover, which is confirmed by extensive exact ground state calculations.

  17. Optimal intermittent search strategies: smelling the prey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Revelli, J A; Wio, H S [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, Universidad de Cantabria and CSIC, E-39005 Santander (Spain); Rojo, F; Budde, C E [Fa.M.A.F., Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Ciudad Universitaria, X5000HUA Cordoba (Argentina)

    2010-05-14

    We study the kinetics of the search of a single fixed target by a searcher/walker that performs an intermittent random walk, characterized by different states of motion. In addition, we assume that the walker has the ability to detect the scent left by the prey/target in its surroundings. Our results, in agreement with intuition, indicate that the prey's survival probability could be strongly reduced (increased) if the predator is attracted (or repelled) by the trace left by the prey. We have also found that, for a positive trace (the predator is guided towards the prey), increasing the inhomogeneity's size reduces the prey's survival probability, while the optimal value of {alpha} (the parameter that regulates intermittency) ceases to exist. The agreement between theory and numerical simulations is excellent.

  18. Intermittent character of interplanetary magnetic field fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Roberto; Carbone, Vincenzo; Chapman, Sandra; Hnat, Bogdan; Noullez, Alain; Sorriso-Valvo, Luca

    2007-03-01

    Interplanetary magnetic field magnitude fluctuations are notoriously more intermittent than velocity fluctuations in both fast and slow wind. This behavior has been interpreted in terms of the anomalous scaling observed in passive scalars in fully developed hydrodynamic turbulence. In this paper, the strong intermittent nature of the interplanetary magnetic field is briefly discussed comparing results performed during different phases of the solar cycle. The scaling properties of the interplanetary magnetic field magnitude show solar cycle variation that can be distinguished in the scaling exponents revealed by structure functions. The scaling exponents observed around the solar maximum coincide, within the errors, to those measured for passive scalars in hydrodynamic turbulence. However, it is also found that the values are not universal in the sense that the solar cycle variation may be reflected in dependence on the structure of the velocity field.

  19. Experimental and numerical validation of a fuzzy intermittence programming system; Validation experimentale et numerique d`un programmateur d`intermittence flou

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraisse, G.; Virgone, J. [Centre de Thermiquede Lyon, CETHIL (CNRS), 69 - Villeurbanne (France)

    1997-12-31

    In this paper, a new intermittence programming system using fuzzy logic for heating systems is presented. Its originality concerns the consideration of the thermal state of the building in addition to the external temperature. The experimentation of a prototype of this regulator during mid-time season has shown its good adaptability to climate and to the building-heating system ensemble. Also, numerical simulations of the experimentation site have allowed to study the behaviour of both the Honeywell and the prototype regulators during cold season and to evaluate the energy consumption. Both regulators show close regulation performances but the prototype allows to greatly reduce the energy consumption. (J.S.) 8 refs.

  20. Bladder calculi complicating intermittent clean catheterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amendola, M A; Sonda, L P; Diokno, A C; Vidyasagar, M

    1983-10-01

    Eight male patients on clean intermittent catheterization programs for neurogenic bladder dysfunction developed vesical calculi around pubic hairs inadvertently introduced into the bladder, acting as a nidus for incrustation. In three patients, the radiographic appearance of serpentine calcifications in the pelvis was highly consistent with calcareous deposits on strands of hair. Familiarity with this radiologic appearance should suggest the diagnosis in the appropriate clinical setting and help avoid misinterpretation of these calcifications, atypical of usual bladder stones.

  1. Cardiac calcification in acute intermittent porphyria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanmoy Ghatak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aetiology of pericardial calcifications can be multifactorial. Tuberculosis has been reported as the most common cause. Other known causes include uraemia, asbestosis, post-traumatic or postoperative. We report a rare case of pericardial calcification seen in a patient with established acute intermittent porphyria. A direct causal relationship cannot be established between porphyria and pericardial calcification, but it may be due to deposition of the porphyrin in the pericardium.

  2. Intermittent amantadine for fluoxetine-induced anorgasmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balon, R

    1996-01-01

    Various drugs, including amantadine, have been reported in the successful treatment of antidepressant-induced sexual dysfunction. Only a regular daily dosing schedule of amantadine has been used for the treatment of sexual dysfunction so far. This case demonstrates that an intermittent dose of amantadine at 100 mg five to six hours prior to coitus could be useful in the treatment of fluoxetine-induced anorgasmia.

  3. Characteristics of Adolescent Intermittent and Daily Smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Mark L.; Rait, Michelle A.; Sen, Saunak; Shiffman, Saul

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Intermittent smoking is common among adolescent smokers, but little is known about adolescent intermittent smokers (ITS). This study describes a cohort of adolescent ITS and compares them to adolescent daily smokers (DS) for the purpose of providing a more detailed characterization of adolescent ITS, specifically patterns of smoking, level of selfreported addiction, and experience with essation METHODS Participants were 124 ITS and 55 DS. ITS were defined as smoking at least monthly but smoking daily. Participants completed demographic, smoking and addiction surveys including the HONC and mFTQ. RESULTS ITS started smoking at an older age, smoked fewer cigarettes per day and scored significantly lower on addiction scales, but had similar difficulty to DS in quitting smoking with similar numbers of reported quit attempts. These differences remained after adjusting for years of smoking. ITS were more likely to smoke in social situations, while DS were more likely to smoke when angry. Both groups were equally likely to report smoking when drinking alcohol. CONCLUSIONS We documented significant differences in smoking related behaviors between adolescent ITS and DS. Importantly, we also found that, despite low level infrequent smoking, ITS reported difficulty quitting smoking. Given the risks from light and intermittent smoking, it is essential that we develop a greater understanding of adolescent ITS, including their difficulty quitting and the contextual factors influencing their smoking, so that we may develop new targeted interventions. PMID:24837757

  4. Large dynamic characterizers of spatiotemporal intermittency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupte, Neelima

    2006-11-01

    Systems of coupled sine circle maps show regimes of spatiotemporally intermittent behaviour with associated scaling exponents which belong to the DP class, as well as regimes of spatially intermittent behaviour (with associated regular dynamical behaviour) which do not belong to the DP class. Both types of behaviour are seen along the bifurcation boundaries of the synchronized solutions, and contribute distinct signatures to the dynamical characterizers of the system, viz. the distribution of eigenvalues of the one step stability matrix. Within the spatially intermittent (SI) class, the temporal behaviour of the burst solutions can be quasi-periodic or travelling wave. The usual characterizers of bifurcations, i.e. the eigenvalues of the stability matrix crossing the unit circle, pick up the bifurcation from the synchronized solution to SI with quasi-periodic bursts but are unable to pick up the bifurcation of the synchronized solution to SI with TW bursts. Other characterizers, such as the Shannon entropy of the eigenvalue distribution, and the rate of change of the largest eigenvalue with parameter are required to pick up this bifurcation. This feature has also been seen for other bifurcations in this system, e.g. that from the synchronized solution to kink solutions. We therefore conjecture that in the case of high dimensional systems, entropic characterizers provide better signatures of bifurcations from one ordered solution to another.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of suspected atrial tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menegus, M A; Greenberg, M A; Spindola-Franco, H; Fayemi, A

    1992-05-01

    Two-dimensional echocardiography has become the standard technique for evaluation of cardiac and paracardiac mass lesions. We have used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as an independent assessment of cardiac-associated masses in patients with echocardiograms demonstrating sessile atrial tumors. MRI was performed in seven patients, ages 33 to 84, whose echocardiographic diagnoses included left atrial mass (five), right atrial mass (one), and interatrial mass (one). In four of the patients with a diagnosis of left atrial mass, MRI showed extracardiac compression of the atrium, simulating a tumor (hiatal hernia, tortuous descending aorta, bronchogenic cyst). MRI was entirely normal in one patient with an apparent left atrial mass. MRI elucidated extension of an extracavitary mass into the interatrial septum in two patients. One of these patients with an echocardiographic right atrial mass had extension of a lipoma into the interatrial septum without atrial tumor. MRI confirmed the echocardiographic diagnosis of an interatrial mass in the other patient. We conclude that MRI, because of its ability to define anatomic relationships and tissue characteristics, is a powerful noninvasive tool for evaluating suspected cardiac mass lesions. Although echocardiography remains the primary screening test for the detection of cardiac masses, MRI is a more specific modality for precise diagnosis. Correct MRI interpretation may obviate the need for invasive studies or surgery.

  6. [Effect of intermittent rehydration therapy as an oral and enteral rehydration solution, alone or in combination with intravenous administration on intravascular dehydration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takehisa, Yozo; Takehisa, Takahiro; Yamato, Kaoru; Kuramoto, Etsuko; Ikawa, Seiichiro

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the effectiveness of intermittent fluid infusion (intermittent rehydration therapy) to dehydrated elderly patients and the efficacy of Heisei Solution Water (HSW), an oral and enteral rehydration solution developed by our group. We enrolled 375 elderly patients with suspected dehydration from among 1,921 patients of our hospital and 13 affiliated hospitals. A total of 36 of 375 patients received intermittent rehydration therapy. These patients were then divided into 3 groups according to the method of administration: (1) oral and enteral administration (n=16), (2) intravenous administration only (n=10) and (3) combined oral, enteral and intravenous administration (n=10). We then compared blood urea nitrogen/creatinine (BUN/Cr) ratios among the 3 groups. BUN/Cr ratios were improved in all groups, but there was no statistically significant difference in the degree of improvement of BUN/Cr ratios among the 3 groups. Intermittent rehydration therapy is a highly effective way to manage dehydration. The intermittent oral and enteral administration of HSW demonstrated the same effectiveness as other forms of administration.

  7. Intermittency and structures in edge plasma turbulence; Intermittence et turbulence dans les plasmas de bord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hidalgo, C.; Van Milligen, B.Ph.; Pedrosa, M.A. [Asociacion Euratom-Ciemat, Lab. Nacional de Fusion, Madrid (Spain)

    2006-07-15

    A view of the mechanisms underlying particle and energy transport in fusion plasmas devices is presented. Heat and energy transport in fusion plasmas is partly due to turbulent processes having an intermittent character and presenting some universal features. The improved understanding of intermittent turbulent transport is changing the standard picture of transport, based on local diffusive mechanisms. The development of new diagnostic methods and the improvement of modeling tools are spawning a new era in fusion plasma research, in which the non-equilibrium aspects of the systems under study is carefully taken into account in order to unravel the global picture connecting transport, gradients and flows. (authors)

  8. Detection of Rabies antigen in brains of suspected Rabid dogs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To detect the presence of rabies antigen in brains of suspected rabid dogs. Materials and Methods: Ninety six (96) brain specimens from suspected rabid dogs were examined for the presence of rabies antigen using Seller's staining technique and enzyme immunoassay. Results: The two techniques were both ...

  9. 48 CFR 803.806 - Processing suspected violations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Limitation on the Payment of Funds to Influence Federal Transactions 803.806 Processing suspected violations. A VA employee must report suspected violations of 31 U.S.C. 1352, Limitation on Use of Appropriated Funds to Influence Certain Federal...

  10. The clinical course of patients with suspected pulmonary embolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beek, E. J.; Kuijer, P. M.; Büller, H. R.; Brandjes, D. P.; Bossuyt, P. M.; ten Cate, J. W.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The outcome of patients with suspected pulmonary embolism is known to a limited extent only. OBJECTIVE: To address this limited knowledge in a cohort in whom pulmonary embolism was proved or ruled out. METHODS: Consecutive patients with clinically suspected pulmonary embolism underwent

  11. Seasonal variation among tuberculosis suspects in four countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mabaera, Biggie; Naranbat, Nymadawa; Katamba, Achilles

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the study was to analyze monthly trends across a calendar year in tuberculosis suspects and sputum smear-positive cases based on nationally representative samples of tuberculosis laboratory registers from Moldova, Mongolia, Uganda and Zimbabwe. Out of the 47 140 suspects registered...... in the tuberculosis laboratory registers, 13.4% (6312) were cases. The proportion varied from country to country, Moldova having the lowest (9%) and Uganda the highest (21%). From the monthly proportion of suspects and cases among total suspects and cases, seasonal variations were most marked in Mongolia which, among...... attendance to diagnostic laboratory services, evidenced by the contrasting findings of Mongolia (extreme continental northern climate) compared to Uganda (equatorial climate). A combination of external and possibly endogenous factors seems to determine whether tuberculosis suspects and cases present...

  12. Acute intermittent porphyria in the puerperium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sparić Radmila

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Acute intermittent porphyria emerges as a result of partial defect of porphobilinogen deaminase and is manifested by repeated episodes of somatic, psychiatric and neurological disorders. The disease is conducted via the autosomaldominant gene of variable penetration, so most of the carriers never experience seizures. Timely making of diagnosis, screening of blood relatives of the patient and education of patients on avoidance of provoking factors are the key to adequate treatment. Case Outline. A 23-year-old patient having born the third child was hospitalized due to pains in the abdomen and convulsive seizures nine days after the vaginal delivery. At admittance, she suffered a generalized convulsive seizure of clonic-tonic type. The patient immediately underwent a complete clinical, laboratory, bacteriological and ultrasound examination. Bearing in mind the fact that the patient had several convulsive seizures even after the given neurological therapy, haem-arginate was introduced into therapy during four days. The administration of haem-arginate led to the normalization of blood pressure, pulse and bowel function. The administration of haem-arginate led to the normalization of blood pressure, pulse and bowel function. The patient was treated by a team of doctors, in the intensive care ward, with the use of medicaments, which are allowed in the case of acute porphyria. Sixteen days after the admittance, with clean neurological status and gynaecological and ultra-sound findings, she was released for ambulatory treatment. Conclusion. The presented case exhibits the gravity of making a diagnosis of acute intermittent porphyria in puerperium and the necessity of multi-disciplinary approach in treating this disease. Acute intermittent porphyria should be considered in cases of ambiguous abdominal pain, as well as in patients having abdominal pains followed by neuro-psychiatric disorders.

  13. Hovering and intermittent flight in birds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobalske, Bret W, E-mail: bret.tobalske@mso.umt.ed [Field Research Station at Fort Missoula, Division of Biological Sciences, University of Montana, Missoula, MT 59812 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    Two styles of bird locomotion, hovering and intermittent flight, have great potential to inform future development of autonomous flying vehicles. Hummingbirds are the smallest flying vertebrates, and they are the only birds that can sustain hovering. Their ability to hover is due to their small size, high wingbeat frequency, relatively large margin of mass-specific power available for flight and a suite of anatomical features that include proportionally massive major flight muscles (pectoralis and supracoracoideus) and wing anatomy that enables them to leave their wings extended yet turned over (supinated) during upstroke so that they can generate lift to support their weight. Hummingbirds generate three times more lift during downstroke compared with upstroke, with the disparity due to wing twist during upstroke. Much like insects, hummingbirds exploit unsteady mechanisms during hovering including delayed stall during wing translation that is manifest as a leading-edge vortex (LEV) on the wing and rotational circulation at the end of each half stroke. Intermittent flight is common in small- and medium-sized birds and consists of pauses during which the wings are flexed (bound) or extended (glide). Flap-bounding appears to be an energy-saving style when flying relatively fast, with the production of lift by the body and tail critical to this saving. Flap-gliding is thought to be less costly than continuous flapping during flight at most speeds. Some species are known to shift from flap-gliding at slow speeds to flap-bounding at fast speeds, but there is an upper size limit for the ability to bound ({approx}0.3 kg) and small birds with rounded wings do not use intermittent glides.

  14. Intermittent oral iron supplementation during pregnancy (Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Rosas, Juan Pablo; De-Regil, Luz Maria; Dowswell, Therese; Viteri, Fernando E

    2014-01-01

    Background Anaemia is a frequent condition during pregnancy, particularly among women from developing countries who have insufficient iron intake to meet increased iron needs of both the mother and the fetus. Traditionally, gestational anaemia has been prevented with the provision of daily iron supplements throughout pregnancy, but adherence to this regimen due to side effects, interrupted supply of the supplements, and concerns about safety among women with an adequate iron intake, have limited the use of this intervention. Intermittent (i.e. one, two or three times a week on non-consecutive days) supplementation with iron alone or in combination with folic acid or other vitamins and minerals has recently been proposed as an alternative to daily supplementation. Objectives To assess the benefits and harms of intermittent supplementation with iron alone or in combination with folic acid or other vitamins and minerals to pregnant women on neonatal and pregnancy outcomes. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (23 March 2012). We also searched the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) for ongoing studies and contacted relevant organisations for the identification of ongoing and unpublished studies (23 March 2012). Selection criteria Randomised or quasi-randomised trials. Data collection and analysis We assessed the methodological quality of trials using standard Cochrane criteria. Two review authors independently assessed trial eligibility, extracted data and conducted checks for accuracy. Main results This review includes 21 trials from 13 different countries, but only 18 trials (with 4072 women) reported on our outcomes of interest and contributed data to the review. All of these studies compared daily versus intermittent iron supplementation. Three studies provided iron alone, 12 iron+folic acid and three more iron plus multiple vitamins and minerals. Their methodological quality was mixed

  15. Game performance and intermittent hypoxic training

    OpenAIRE

    Hinckson, E A; Hamlin, M J; Wood, M R; Hopkins, W G

    2007-01-01

    Live high‐train low altitude exposure simulated by hypoxic devices may improve athletic performance. In this study, intermittent normobaric hypoxia was achieved with the GO2altitude® hypoxicator to determine its effects on sea level performance in rugby players. Ten players were randomly assigned to two groups. Players in each group received 14 sessions of either hypoxic (10–15% O2) or normoxic (21% O2) exposure at rest over 14 consecutive days in a single blind fashion. Various performance m...

  16. Intermittent fasting and cardiovascular disease: current evidence and unresolved questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinsley, Grant M; Horne, Benjamin D

    2018-01-01

    Intermittent fasting has produced a variety of beneficial health effects in animal models, although high-quality research in humans has been limited. This special report examines current evidences for intermittent fasting in humans, discusses issues that require further examination, and recommends new research that can improve the knowledge base in this emerging research area. While potentially useful for health improvement, intermittent fasting requires further study prior to widespread implementation for health purposes. Randomized, longer-term studies are needed to determine whether using intermittent fasting as a lifestyle rather than a diet is feasible and beneficial for the health of some members of the human population.

  17. Diagnosing Intermittent and Persistent Faults using Static Bayesian Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megshoel, Ole Jakob

    2010-01-01

    Both intermittent and persistent faults may occur in a wide range of systems. We present in this paper the introduction of intermittent fault handling techniques into ProDiagnose, an algorithm that previously only handled persistent faults. We discuss novel algorithmic techniques as well as how our static Bayesian networks help diagnose, in an integrated manner, a range of intermittent and persistent faults. Through experiments with data from the ADAPT electrical power system test bed, generated as part of the Second International Diagnostic Competition (DXC-10), we show that this novel variant of ProDiagnose diagnoses intermittent faults accurately and quickly, while maintaining strong performance on persistent faults.

  18. The effect of hand cooling during intermittent training of elite swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zochowski, Thomas; Docherty, David

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this paper was to determine the effects of using intermittent hand cooling during high intensity, intermittent training on thermoregulatory, performance and psychophysical variables in elite level swimmers in a training pool (30.5±0.5 °C). Randomized cross-over design. Following a standard warm-up, ten male swimmers (20.3±3.2 years) were instructed to maintain the fastest 100-m time (on average) for an 8 x 100 m freestyle swimming set performed either in a training pool with cooling (TPC) or a training pool with no-cooling (TPNC). Time at 100 m, core temperature (Tc), heart rate (HR), ratings of perceived exertion (RPE), thermal comfort (ThC) and thermal sensation (ThS) were recorded following each repetition. Participants were cooled during the 90 s rest interval between repetitions using the Rapid Thermal Exchange System (RTX) (AVAcore Technologies Inc., Ann Arbor, MI, USA). There was a better performance when comparing 100 m time (1.50±1.98 s faster) for the final repetition in the TPC condition compared to the final repetition in the TPNC condition (P<0.05). There was no significant difference between Tc, HR, RPE, ThC and ThS (P<0.05). There was a performance benefit in the last set of the training block in the TPC condition that could not be attributed to any of the physiological and psychophysical measures used in the study.

  19. Impact of intermittent fasting on glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varady, Krista A

    2016-07-01

    This article provides an overview of the most recent human trials that have examined the impact of intermittent fasting on glucose homeostasis. Our literature search retrieved one human trial of alternate day fasting, and three trials of Ramadan fasting published in the past 12 months. Current evidence suggests that 8 weeks of alternate day fasting that produces mild weight loss (4% from baseline) has no effect on glucose homeostasis. As for Ramadan fasting, decreases in fasting glucose, insulin, and insulin resistance have been noted after 4 weeks in healthy normal weight individuals with mild weight loss (1-2% from baseline). However, Ramadan fasting may have little impact on glucoregulatory parameters in women with polycystic ovarian syndrome who failed to observe weight loss. Whether intermittent fasting is an effective means of regulating glucose homeostasis remains unclear because of the scarcity of studies in this area. Large-scale, longer-term randomized controlled trials will be required before the use of fasting can be recommended for the prevention and treatment of metabolic diseases.

  20. Intermittent exotropia: facts, opinions, and unknowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanchuk, Kenneth G

    2011-01-01

    Intermittent exotropia (IXT) can be a controversial topic, often eliciting lively discussion. This lecture will discuss its definition, incidence, age of onset, presentation, natural variation, criteria for deterioration, goals of treatment, effectiveness of surgical treatment, types of surgical treatment, and unwanted effects of surgical treatment. Results from the scientific literature, opinions of respected colleagues, the opinion of the author, and the results of live polling of the audience during the John Pratt-Johnson lecture are presented. IXT is defined as an exotropia that is present intermittently predominantly for distance. Its incidence is about 1% and it usually has an onset before age 5. Patients often present because of concern regarding the appearance of the eye misalignment. There is natural variation in the control of IXT, the angle of IXT, and the amount of stereopsis. Criteria that denote deterioration are increasing frequency of IXT, progressively and consistently increasing angle of IXT, loss of binocular vision, and increasing concern regarding the patient's appearance and its effect on social interaction. Goals of treatment are to retain equal or nearly equal vision, to obtain acceptable cosmesis, and to retain binocular vision. The long-term success of surgical treatment is not well proven. Persistent postoperative overcorrection is an unwanted effect of surgical treatment. The inherent biologic variation that occurs when measuring the components of IXT makes it difficult to be dogmatic about IXT, particularly when trying to decide when deterioration is occurring.

  1. Economic evaluation of wells with intermittent operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenzana, E.R.B.

    1972-06-01

    The operating characteristics of wells are analyzed which are operated by means of an air-lift system intermittently opened. The study has for its objective estimation of the economic limit of such operation. To this end, the Method of Balance Point is used. This permits knowing if the revenue from producing the oil by this idea is greater than that generated by a conventional means of operation of the wells. As an illustrative example, the method is applied to the Papantla field of the District of Poza Rica. The tank battery, located 20 km southeast of the City of Poza Rica, receives the production from 16 wells of the field as well as from other wells. The following economic results are presented: (1) determination of the cost per cubic meter of the oil produced in the Papantla field; (2) an estimate of the cost of 9 intermittently operated wells, 3 of which are effective einstallations; and (3) the application of the Method of Balance Point to the Papantla field. From the data presented, it is concluded that although the Papantla field produces at a loss when the price is 78.63 $/cu m, it produces at a profit at the international price of 258 $/cu m. This indicates when considering the low yield of the field, the revenue should be properly placed for arriving at the total cost.

  2. Intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbonye, A.K.; Bygbjerg, Ib Christian; Magnussen, Pascal

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether traditional birth attendants, drug-shop vendors, community reproductive-health workers, or adolescent peer mobilizers could administer intermittent preventive treatment (IPTp) for malaria with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine to pregnant women. METHODS: A non-randomized comm......OBJECTIVE: To assess whether traditional birth attendants, drug-shop vendors, community reproductive-health workers, or adolescent peer mobilizers could administer intermittent preventive treatment (IPTp) for malaria with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine to pregnant women. METHODS: A non......-randomized community trial was implemented in 21 community clusters (intervention) and four clusters where health units provided routine IPTp (control). The primary outcome measures were access and adherence to IPTp, number of malaria episodes, prevalence of anaemia, and birth weight. Numbers of live births, abortions......, still births, and maternal and child deaths were secondary endpoints. FINDINGS: 1404 (67.5%) of 2081 with the new delivery system received two doses of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine versus 281 (39.9%) of 704 with health units (P malaria episodes decreased from 906 (49...

  3. Game performance and intermittent hypoxic training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinckson, E A; Hamlin, M J; Wood, M R; Hopkins, W G

    2007-01-01

    Live high‐train low altitude exposure simulated by hypoxic devices may improve athletic performance. In this study, intermittent normobaric hypoxia was achieved with the GO2altitude® hypoxicator to determine its effects on sea level performance in rugby players. Ten players were randomly assigned to two groups. Players in each group received 14 sessions of either hypoxic (10–15% O2) or normoxic (21% O2) exposure at rest over 14 consecutive days in a single blind fashion. Various performance measures were obtained consecutively in a single testing session pre‐ and post‐exposure. Effects of hypoxic exposure on maximum speed and sprint times were trivial (<1.0%) but unclear (90% likely range, ±5% to ±9%). In rugby simulation, hypoxic exposure produced impairments of peak power in two scrums (15%, ±8%; 9%, ±7%) and impairments of time in offensive sprints (7%, ±8%) and tackle sprints (11%, ±9%). Pending further research, rugby players would be unwise to use normobaric intermittent hypoxic exposure to prepare for games at sea level. PMID:17311807

  4. Acute Effects of Carbohydrate Supplementation on Intermittent Sports Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Lindsay B.; Rollo, Ian; Stein, Kimberly W.; Jeukendrup, Asker E.

    2015-01-01

    Intermittent sports (e.g., team sports) are diverse in their rules and regulations but similar in the pattern of play; that is, intermittent high-intensity movements and the execution of sport-specific skills over a prolonged period of time (~1–2 h). Performance during intermittent sports is dependent upon a combination of anaerobic and aerobic energy systems, both of which rely on muscle glycogen and/or blood glucose as an important substrate for energy production. The aims of this paper are to review: (1) potential biological mechanisms by which carbohydrate may impact intermittent sport performance; (2) the acute effects of carbohydrate ingestion on intermittent sport performance, including intermittent high-intensity exercise capacity, sprinting, jumping, skill, change of direction speed, and cognition; and (3) what recommendations can be derived for carbohydrate intake before/during exercise in intermittent sports based on the available evidence. The most researched intermittent sport is soccer but some sport-specific studies have also been conducted in other sports (e.g., rugby, field hockey, basketball, American football, and racquet sports). Carbohydrate ingestion before/during exercise has been shown in most studies to enhance intermittent high-intensity exercise capacity. However, studies have shown mixed results with regards to the acute effects of carbohydrate intake on sprinting, jumping, skill, change of direction speed, and cognition. In most of these studies the amount of carbohydrate consumed was ~30–60 g/h in the form of a 6%–7% carbohydrate solution comprised of sucrose, glucose, and/or maltodextrin. The magnitude of the impact that carbohydrate ingestion has on intermittent sport performance is likely dependent on the carbohydrate status of the individual; that is, carbohydrate ingestion has the greatest impact on performance under circumstances eliciting fatigue and/or hypoglycemia. Accordingly, carbohydrate ingestion before and during a

  5. Acute Effects of Carbohydrate Supplementation on Intermittent Sports Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay B. Baker

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent sports (e.g., team sports are diverse in their rules and regulations but similar in the pattern of play; that is, intermittent high-intensity movements and the execution of sport-specific skills over a prolonged period of time (~1–2 h. Performance during intermittent sports is dependent upon a combination of anaerobic and aerobic energy systems, both of which rely on muscle glycogen and/or blood glucose as an important substrate for energy production. The aims of this paper are to review: (1 potential biological mechanisms by which carbohydrate may impact intermittent sport performance; (2 the acute effects of carbohydrate ingestion on intermittent sport performance, including intermittent high-intensity exercise capacity, sprinting, jumping, skill, change of direction speed, and cognition; and (3 what recommendations can be derived for carbohydrate intake before/during exercise in intermittent sports based on the available evidence. The most researched intermittent sport is soccer but some sport-specific studies have also been conducted in other sports (e.g., rugby, field hockey, basketball, American football, and racquet sports. Carbohydrate ingestion before/during exercise has been shown in most studies to enhance intermittent high-intensity exercise capacity. However, studies have shown mixed results with regards to the acute effects of carbohydrate intake on sprinting, jumping, skill, change of direction speed, and cognition. In most of these studies the amount of carbohydrate consumed was ~30–60 g/h in the form of a 6%–7% carbohydrate solution comprised of sucrose, glucose, and/or maltodextrin. The magnitude of the impact that carbohydrate ingestion has on intermittent sport performance is likely dependent on the carbohydrate status of the individual; that is, carbohydrate ingestion has the greatest impact on performance under circumstances eliciting fatigue and/or hypoglycemia. Accordingly, carbohydrate ingestion before

  6. Acute Effects of Carbohydrate Supplementation on Intermittent Sports Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Lindsay B; Rollo, Ian; Stein, Kimberly W; Jeukendrup, Asker E

    2015-07-14

    Intermittent sports (e.g., team sports) are diverse in their rules and regulations but similar in the pattern of play; that is, intermittent high-intensity movements and the execution of sport-specific skills over a prolonged period of time (~1-2 h). Performance during intermittent sports is dependent upon a combination of anaerobic and aerobic energy systems, both of which rely on muscle glycogen and/or blood glucose as an important substrate for energy production. The aims of this paper are to review: (1) potential biological mechanisms by which carbohydrate may impact intermittent sport performance; (2) the acute effects of carbohydrate ingestion on intermittent sport performance, including intermittent high-intensity exercise capacity, sprinting, jumping, skill, change of direction speed, and cognition; and (3) what recommendations can be derived for carbohydrate intake before/during exercise in intermittent sports based on the available evidence. The most researched intermittent sport is soccer but some sport-specific studies have also been conducted in other sports (e.g., rugby, field hockey, basketball, American football, and racquet sports). Carbohydrate ingestion before/during exercise has been shown in most studies to enhance intermittent high-intensity exercise capacity. However, studies have shown mixed results with regards to the acute effects of carbohydrate intake on sprinting, jumping, skill, change of direction speed, and cognition. In most of these studies the amount of carbohydrate consumed was ~30-60 g/h in the form of a 6%-7% carbohydrate solution comprised of sucrose, glucose, and/or maltodextrin. The magnitude of the impact that carbohydrate ingestion has on intermittent sport performance is likely dependent on the carbohydrate status of the individual; that is, carbohydrate ingestion has the greatest impact on performance under circumstances eliciting fatigue and/or hypoglycemia. Accordingly, carbohydrate ingestion before and during a game

  7. Modes of exercise training for intermittent claudication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauret, Gert Jan; Fakhry, Farzin; Fokkenrood, Hugo J P; Hunink, M G Myriam; Teijink, Joep A W; Spronk, Sandra

    2014-07-04

    According to international guidelines and literature, all patients with intermittent claudication should receive an initial treatment of cardiovascular risk modification, lifestyle coaching, and supervised exercise therapy. In most studies, supervised exercise therapy consists of treadmill or track walking. However, alternative modes of exercise therapy have been described and yielded similar results to walking. Therefore, the following question remains: Which exercise mode gives the most beneficial results? To assess the effects of different modes of supervised exercise therapy on the maximum walking distance (MWD) of patients with intermittent claudication. To assess the effects of different modes of supervised exercise therapy on pain-free walking distance (PFWD) and health-related quality of life scores (HR-QoL) of patients with intermittent claudication. The Cochrane Peripheral Vascular Diseases Group Trials Search Co-ordinator searched the Cochrane Peripheral Vascular Diseases Group Specialised Register (July 2013); CENTRAL (2013, Issue 6), in The Cochrane Lib rary; and clinical trials databases. The authors searched the MEDLINE (1946 to July 2013) and Embase (1973 to July 2013) databases and reviewed the reference lists of identified articles to detect other relevant citations. Randomised controlled trials of studies comparing alternative modes of exercise training or combinations of exercise modes with a control group of supervised walking exercise in patients with clinically determined intermittent claudication. The supervised walking programme needed to be supervised at least twice a week for a consecutive six weeks of training. Two authors independently selected studies, extracted data, and assessed the risk of bias for each study. Because of different treadmill test protocols to assess the maximum or pain-free walking distance, we converted all distances or walking times to total metabolic equivalents (METs) using the American College of Sports Medicine

  8. Prediction of Suspect Location Based on Spatiotemporal Semantics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lian Duan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The prediction of suspect location enables proactive experiences for crime investigations and offers essential intelligence for crime prevention. However, existing studies have failed to capture the complex social location transition patterns of suspects and lack the capacity to address the issue of data sparsity. This paper proposes a novel location prediction model called CMoB (Crime Multi-order Bayes model based on the spatiotemporal semantics to enhance the prediction performance. In particular, the model groups suspects with similar spatiotemporal semantics as one target suspect. Then, their mobility data are applied to estimate Markov transition probabilities of unobserved locations based on a KDE (kernel density estimating smoothing method. Finally, by integrating the total transition probabilities, which are derived from the multi-order property of the Markov transition matrix, into a Bayesian-based formula, it is able to realize multi-step location prediction for the individual suspect. Experiments with the mobility dataset covering 210 suspects and their 18,754 location records from January to June 2012 in Wuhan City show that the proposed CMoB model significantly outperforms state-of-the-art algorithms for suspect location prediction in the context of data sparsity.

  9. B Plant/WESF suspect/counterfeit parts identification program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mertz, D.W.

    1996-01-12

    This document describes a suspect/counterfeit parts inspection program required by DOE conducted in accordance with Internal Memo 16710-94-DWM-048, J.A. O`Brien to J. N. Nansen, B Plant Suspect/ Counterfeit Parts Action Plan, dated May 24, 1994. The program included: physical inspection of all spare parts inventories within the plant; screening of installed B Plant/WESF (Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility) systems for applications where the use and subsequent potential failure of suspect/counterfeit parts could have critical consequences; and a physical inspection based upon this screening.

  10. Bound by Children: Intermittent Cohabitation and Living Together Apart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross-Barnet, Caitlin; Cherlin, Andrew; Burton, Linda

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we examine variations in low-income mothers' patterns of intermittent cohabitation and the voluntary and involuntary nature of these unions. Intermittent cohabitation involves couples living together and separating in repeating cycles. Using Three-City Study ethnographic data, we identified 45 low-income mothers involved in these…

  11. Intermittent versus Continuous Physiotherapy in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Annette Sandahl; Lange, Christa

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effect of the delivery of the same amount of intermittent versus continuous physiotherapy given to children with cerebral palsy (CP). This was organized either in an intermittent regime four times a week for 4 weeks alternating with a 6-week treatment pause, or a continuous once or twice a week regime, both…

  12. Rescattering effects and intermittent exponents in nucleus-nucleus interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pajares, C. (Universidad de Santiago de Compostela (Spain). Dept. de Particulas Elementales)

    1991-04-11

    It is shown that the rescattering in nucleus-nucleus collisions provides a natural branching mechanism which explains the dependence of the intermittent exponents on the energy, projectile and target. The possibility of finding some new coherent phenomena by studying the dependence of the intermittent exponents on the number of collisions is discussed. (orig.).

  13. Intermittent Turbulence in Stratified Flow over a Canopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boing, S.; Jonker, H.J.J.; Wiel, van de B.J.H.; Moene, A.F.

    2010-01-01

    During the night turbulence can often be very intermittent, occurring in sudden vigorous bursts after prolonged periods of low-intensity. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain intermittency. The present study focuses on the role of porous surface elements, which influence the mean wind

  14. Therapeutic Efficacy of Intermittent Cryotherapy in the Management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Therapeutic Efficacy of Intermittent Cryotherapy in the Management of Closed Soft Tissue Injuries. ... The study has demonstrated that intermittent mode of cryotherapy application for a period of 20 mins. on alternate days could produce optimal pain relief among subjects who sustained various CSTIs. The procedure was ...

  15. Intermittent Testicular Torsion | Obi | Nigerian Journal of Clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The aim of this study is to highlight the clinical characteristics of patients with intermittent testicular torsion and draw attention to this underreported condition. Methods: Clinical and demographic data of all patients treated for intermittent testicular torsion from January 2007 to June 2015 were prospectively collected ...

  16. the role of community participation in intermittent preventive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-06-01

    Jun 1, 2014 ... community participation in malaria control had in- formed the implementation of Intermittent Preventive ... Keywords: Community Participation, Intermittent. Preventive Treatment of Childhood Malaria, Home ..... for training as assistants while the studies in Mali and. Burkina Faso made use of existing CHWs.

  17. [Comparative measurements of exodeviations in intermittent exotropia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shan; Li, Feng-Jiao; Wang, Li-Hua

    2013-07-01

    To compare the results of 4 methods for measuring angle of exodeviation including when fixating at indoor distance target of 6m, fixating at outdoor far distance target, after 1 hour diagnostic occlusion test (1h-DOT), and prism adaption test (PAT), in patients with intermittent exotropia. Prospective case series study. Inpatients with intermittent exotropia was recruited from Sep 2011 to May 2012 in the Eye Center of Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University. Fifty involved patients included 26 males and 24 females with average age (10.1 ± 6.9) years. Prism and alternative cover test was used to evaluate the exodeviation on the primary position in patients with intermittent exotropia. All the patients were measured when fixating at indoor distance target of 6m and near target of 33 cm, fixating at outdoor far distance target, after 1h-DOT, and PAT. The mean deviations measured with 4 methods for distance and 3 methods for near were analysed statistically with levene test. LSD test was applied to compare the differences between each two methods. Positive increased angle of exodeviation was defined as equal to and more than 10 prism diopters (PD) when tested with fixating at outdoor far distance target, after 1h-DOT, and PAT, compared with the results of primary measurement of fixating at indoor distance target of 6 m and near target of 33 cm. A Chi-square test was applied to compare the distribution of sub-types of intermittent exotropia in 4 methods of measuring angle of exodeviation. (1) The exodeviations tested with fixating at indoor distance target of 6 m, after 1h-DOT, fixating at outdoor far distance target, and PAT were (28.2 ± 8.4), (30.8 ± 9.7), (32.3 ± 8.8), (36.5 ± 9.5) PD, respectively (F = 7.235, P = 0.000) . The exodeviation tested with fixating at outdoor far distance target (P = 0.027) and PAT (P = 0.000) were greater than that tested with the primary measurement of fixating at indoor distance target of 6m. There are no significant

  18. Intermittent drying of beans in a spouted bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Oliveira

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Carioca beans are a highly nutritious grain, in terms of the amount of protein, iron and potassium as well as carbohydrates and fiber and as a source of vitamins. The moisture content of recently picked beans is too high for good preservation and storage, resulting in the need for drying before packaging. In this work, the drying of Carioca beans in a laboratory scale spouted bed under intermittent conditions of the drying air was experimentally analyzed. Experiments carried out consisted of two types of intermittent regime: intermittence in the spout regime, referred to as spouted/fixed bed and intermittence of the air supply to the bed, called spouted bed/rest. The results were compared to those for bean drying in a spouted bed dryer without intermittence.

  19. Magnetic Reconnection and Intermittent Turbulence in the Solar Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Osman, K T; Gosling, J T; Greco, A; Servidio, S; Hnat, B; Chapman, S C; Phan, T D

    2014-01-01

    A statistical relationship between magnetic reconnection, current sheets and intermittent turbulence in the solar wind is reported for the first time using in-situ measurements from the Wind spacecraft at 1 AU. We identify intermittency as non-Gaussian fluctuations in increments of the magnetic field vector, $\\mathbf{B}$, that are spatially and temporally non-uniform. The reconnection events and current sheets are found to be concentrated in intervals of intermittent turbulence, identified using the partial variance of increments method: within the most non-Gaussian 1% of fluctuations in $\\mathbf{B}$, we find 87%-92% of reconnection exhausts and $\\sim$9% of current sheets. Also, the likelihood that an identified current sheet will also correspond to a reconnection exhaust increases dramatically as the least intermittent fluctuations are removed from the dataset. Hence, the turbulent solar wind contains a hierarchy of intermittent magnetic field structures that are increasingly linked to current sheets, which ...

  20. Stopping and Questioning Suspected Shoplifters Without Creating Civil Liability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Jack R., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Legal problems concerned with shoplifting suspects are addressed, including common law, criminal penalties, and the merchant's liability. Tangential questions and answers are presented along with discussion of pertinent court cases. (LBH)

  1. ALGORITHM OF MANAGEMENT OF PATIENTS WITH SUSPECTED BLUNT CARDIAC TRAUMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Gilarevsky

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Contemporary algorithm of diagnostic examination of patients with suspected blunt cardiac trauma is presented. General aspects of monitoring and treatment of such patients are also discussed. 

  2. Suspect confession of child sexual abuse to investigators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippert, Tonya; Cross, Theodore P; Jones, Lisa; Walsh, Wendy

    2010-05-01

    Increasing the number of suspects who give true confessions of sexual abuse serves justice and reduces the burden of the criminal justice process on child victims. With data from four communities, this study examined confession rates and predictors of confession of child sexual abuse over the course of criminal investigations (final N = 282). Overall, 30% of suspects confessed partially or fully to the crime. This rate was consistent across the communities and is very similar to the rates of suspect confession of child sexual abuse found by previous research, although lower than that from a study focused on a community with a vigorous practice of polygraph testing. In a multivariate analysis, confession was more likely when suspects were younger and when more evidence of abuse was available, particularly child disclosure and corroborative evidence. These results suggest the difficulty of obtaining confession but also the value of methods that facilitate child disclosure and seek corroborative evidence, for increasing the odds of confession.

  3. [State of dementia due to intermittent acute porphyria: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convert, H; Védie, C

    2014-09-01

    Porphyrias are rare inherited disorders due to specific enzyme abnormalities of heme biosynthesis. We can classify them as hepatic or erythropoïetic, the type depends on the organ in which the enzyme is deficient. Among the hepatic forms, three of them are clinically characterised by acute abdominal pain and neuropathy, sometimes associated with psychiatric disorders. This 58-year-old woman has been hospitalized frequently since 1995 with depression, apathy, or for suicide attempts. She has a history of alcohol addiction and since 1992 suffers from non-insulin dependant diabetes. She had been treated by benzodiazepines and neuroleptic medication for several years. Psychiatric examination revealed persecution and megalomania delirium associated with a Capgras syndrome, confusion, disorientation, depression and blunted affect. Results of neurologic examination showed reduced deep tendon reflexes, and nerve conduction revealed sensitive neuropathy. Moreover, she lay down, remained non-responsive and resisted care. The whole clinical picture evoked early dementia. Coloured urine was noticed and porphyria tested. When the diagnosis of intermittent acute porphyria was made, she gradually improved by stopping the drugs not indicated for the case, and by treating her diabetes. A few months later, while hospitalized for a similar episode, she choked on her food and died, probably caused by autonomic neuropathy. Our hypothesis was that chronic and debilitating psychopathology may be due to acute intermittent porphyria. Probably, among patients treated for psychiatric illness, some of them may suffer from this enzyme abnormality. Above all, the psychopathology associated with intermittent acute porphyria is polymorphous such as atypical psychosis, schizoaffective disorder, depression, apathetic withdrawal, and in this case report dementia. In like manner, organic manifestations are numerous and varied, leading to erroneous diagnosis. We suspect that patients with porphyria

  4. Scale Dependence of Spatiotemporal Intermittence of Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Prasun K.; Siddani, Ravi K.

    2011-01-01

    It is a common experience that rainfall is intermittent in space and time. This is reflected by the fact that the statistics of area- and/or time-averaged rain rate is described by a mixed distribution with a nonzero probability of having a sharp value zero. In this paper we have explored the dependence of the probability of zero rain on the averaging space and time scales in large multiyear data sets based on radar and rain gauge observations. A stretched exponential fannula fits the observed scale dependence of the zero-rain probability. The proposed formula makes it apparent that the space-time support of the rain field is not quite a set of measure zero as is sometimes supposed. We also give an ex.planation of the observed behavior in tenus of a simple probabilistic model based on the premise that rainfall process has an intrinsic memory.

  5. Anisotropic Intermittency Scaling of Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnat, B.; Osman, K.; Kiyani, K. H.; Chapman, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    A higher-order multiscale analysis of spatial anisotropy in inertial range magnetohydrodynamic turbulence is presented using measurements from the STEREO spacecraft in fast ambient solar wind. We show for the first time that, when the local magnetic field direction is parallel to the flow, the full statistical signature of both the magnetic and Elsasser field fluctuations is that of a non-Gaussian globally scale-invariant process. This is distinct from the classic multi-exponent statistics observed when the local magnetic field is perpendicular to the flow direction. These observations are interpreted as evidence for the weakness, or absence, of a magnetic field-parallel turbulent energy cascade, as is consistent with several theoretical models. As such, these results present strong observational constraints on the statistical nature of intermittency in turbulent plasmas.

  6. Intermittent Versus Continuous and Intermittent Medications for Pain and Sedation After Pediatric Cardiothoracic Surgery; A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penk, Jamie S; Lefaiver, Cheryl A; Brady, Colleen M; Steffensen, Christine M; Wittmayer, Kimberly

    2017-10-12

    Compare continuous infusions of morphine and midazolam in addition to intermittent doses with an intermittent only strategy for pain and sedation after pediatric cardiac surgery. Randomized controlled trial. Advocate Children's Hospital, Oak Lawn, IL. Sixty patients 3 months to 4 years old with early extubation after pediatric cardiac surgery. Patients received a continuous infusion of morphine and midazolam or placebo for 24 hours. Both groups received intermittent morphine and midazolam doses as needed. Gender, age, bypass time, and surgical complexity were not different between groups. Scheduled ketorolac and acetaminophen were used in both groups and were not associated with adverse events. The mean, median, and maximum Faces, Legs, Activity, Cry, And Consolability score were not different between groups. There was no significant difference in number of intermittent doses received between groups. The total morphine dose was higher in the continuous/intermittent group (0.90 vs 0.23 mg/kg; p intermittent group (0.90 vs 0.18 mg/kg; p intermittent group (8.4 vs 4.9 d; p = 0.04). Pain was not better controlled with the addition of continuous infusions of morphine and midazolam when compared with intermittent dosing only. Use of continuous infusions resulted in a significantly higher total dosage of these medications and a longer length of stay.

  7. Intermittent intravenous followed by intermittent oral 1 alpha(OH)D3 treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism in uraemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandi, L; Daugaard, H; Egsmose, C

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine whether intermittent oral 1 alpha(OH)D3 treatment of patients on haemodialysis with secondary hyperparathyroidism (HPT) was able to maintain the marked suppression of PTH, which previously had been induced by an intermittent intravenous administration of 1 alpha(OH)D3...

  8. Increased C-C Chemokine Receptor 2 Gene Expression in Monocytes of Severe Obstructive Sleep Apnea Patients and under Intermittent Hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Li-Pang; Chen, Ning-Hung; Lin, Shih-Wei; Chang, Ying-Ling; Liao, Hsiang-Ruei; Lin, Yu-Sheng; Chao, I-Ju; Lin, Yuling; Pang, Jong-Hwei S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is known to be a risk factor of coronary artery disease. The chemotaxis and adhesion of monocytes to the endothelium in the early atherosclerosis is important. This study aimed to investigate the effect of intermittent hypoxia, the hallmark of OSA, on the chemotaxis and adhesion of monocytes. Methods Peripheral blood was sampled from 54 adults enrolled for suspected OSA. RNA was prepared from the isolated monocytes for the analysis of C-C chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2). The effect of intermittent hypoxia on the regulation and function of CCR2 was investigated on THP-1 monocytic cells and monocytes. The mRNA and protein expression levels were investigated by RT/real-time PCR and western blot analysis, respectively. Transwell filter migration assay and cell adhesion assay were performed to study the chemotaxis and adhesion of monocytes. Results Monocytic CCR2 gene expression was found to be increased in severe OSA patients and higher levels were detected after sleep. Intermittent hypoxia increased the CCR2 expression in THP-1 monocytic cells even in the presence of TNF-α and CRP. Intermittent hypoxia also promoted the MCP-1-mediated chemotaxis and adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells. Furthermore, inhibitor for p42/44 MAPK or p38 MAPK suppressed the activation of monocytic CCR2 expression by intermittent hypoxia. Conclusions This is the first study to demonstrate the increase of CCR2 gene expression in monocytes of severe OSA patients. Monocytic CCR2 gene expression can be induced under intermittent hypoxia which contributes to the chemotaxis and adhesion of monocytes. PMID:25411969

  9. [Intermittent Explosive Disorder: A Controversial Diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Juan Pablo; Palacio, Juan David

    2016-01-01

    Intermittent explosive disorder (IED) is aan externalizing externalising disorder characterized characterised by recurrent aggression episodes. Even though this disorder was described several decades ago, and it carries personal and social consequences, there is little in the medical scientific literature on this. bibliographic production about it is scanty. To perform a conceptualization conceptualisation of this disorder, through the review and bibliometric analysis of the available scientific articles. A search was performed in databases with the english English terms intermittent explosive disorder, impulse disorders control [MeSH], in combination with other terms. A bibliometric analysis in the GoPubMed® search engineer was also performed using all data obtained in the search. was also perfomed. IED prevalence ranges from 1.4% to 7%, it presents more frequently during middle adolescence, and with more noticeable repercussions in men males than in womenfemales. The psychopathological core of IED is the impulsive aggressive behaviour that presents in the form of «attacks» that occurs in response to a lower precipitating stimulus. Scientific publications about IED are few and relatively recent, and the vast majority is provided bycomes from the United States (56.56%), and headed by a single author. This fact highlights the need to replicate the findings described about the IED in order to demonstrate the validity and reliability of its diagnostic criteria. It is possible that doubts about the existence of a diagnosis lead have led to such a scant literature about the IED. Available studies about IED allow have allowed characterizing a group of subjects with episodes of impulsive aggression to be characterised, but this description requires replication in different latitudesneeds to be repeated in different areas. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  10. Intermittent drinking, oxytocin and human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruimboom, L; Reheis, D

    2016-07-01

    Looking at a waterhole, it is surprising that so many animals share the same space without visible signs of anxiety or aggression. Although waterholes are the preferred feeding locations of large carnivores, waterholes are shared by all type of herbivores of all sizes and shapes, including elephants. Recent research shows that the homeostatic disturbances leading to the "thirst feeling" not only activate specific substances regulating water and mineral household, but also the "trust and love" hormone oxytocin, while decreasing the production of the typical stress hormone cortisol. People using drugs, seem to be in search for oxytocin, as evidenced in studies with individuals on drugs such as ecstasy and gamma-hydroxybyturate. Hot environment, drought and increased sweating also activate specific oxytocin-producing parts of the hypothalamus, just as breastfeeding does in mother and infant. Water homeostasis is the only allostatic system activating trust neuro-anatomy and we suggest that this is due to the fact that all animals depend on water, whereas food type is species specific. Our hypothesis; regulating drinking behaviour through intermittent bulk drinking could increase oxytocin signalling, recover human trust and increase health by down-regulation of stress axis activity and inflammatory activity of the immune system. Intermittent bulk drinking should be defined as water (including tea and coffee) drinking up to a feeling of satiety and regulated by a mild feeling of thirst. This would mean that people would not drink less quantity but less frequently and that's how all animals, but also human newborns behave. It is the latter group, which is probably the only group of humans with a normal fluid homeostasis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Enhancement of Intermittent Androgen Ablation Therapy by Finasteride Administration in Animal Models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Zhou

    2003-01-01

    .... Intermittent androgen ablation therapy may slow down the development of androgen refractory tumors because intermittent recovery of androgens can induce differentiation of prostatic epithelial cells...

  12. Suspect aggression and victim resistance in multiple perpetrator rapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhams, Jessica; Cooke, Claire

    2013-11-01

    Several research studies have reported an elevated level of aggression in rapes committed by multiple perpetrators compared to rapes committed by lone suspects. Several factors that have been linked to elevated aggression in generic samples of rape were examined for the first time with a sample of multiple perpetrator rapes. Factors that might be associated with victim resistance were also investigated. Victim and offender characteristics, as well as the behaviors displayed by victims and offenders, were extracted from the police files of 89 multiple perpetrator stranger rapes perpetrated against female victims in the United Kingdom. These behaviors were rated for their level of suspect (non-sexual) aggression and victim resistance, respectively. Degree of victim resistance was significantly and positively associated with suspect aggression. Older victims were the recipients of significantly higher levels of suspect aggression. Victims who were incapacitated from drugs and/or alcohol were less likely to be the recipients of suspect aggression. Group leaders displayed more aggression towards the victim than the followers in the groups. The number of perpetrators was significantly related to the degree of resistance displayed by the victim with offences perpetrated by fewer suspects being characterized by more victim resistance. Research regarding cognitive appraisal during criminal interactions and the respective roles of offenders is referred to in considering these relationships.

  13. Interviewing strategically to elicit admissions from guilty suspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekin, Serra; Granhag, Pär Anders; Strömwall, Leif; Giolla, Erik Mac; Vrij, Aldert; Hartwig, Maria

    2015-06-01

    In this article we introduce a novel interviewing tactic to elicit admissions from guilty suspects. By influencing the suspects' perception of the amount of evidence the interviewer holds against them, we aimed to shift the suspects' counterinterrogation strategies from less to more forthcoming. The proposed tactic (SUE-Confrontation) is a development of the Strategic Use of Evidence (SUE) framework and aims to affect the suspects' perception by confronting them with statement-evidence inconsistencies. Participants (N = 90) were asked to perform several mock criminal tasks before being interviewed using 1 of 3 interview techniques: (a) SUE-Confrontation, (b) Early Disclosure of Evidence, or (c) No Disclosure of Evidence. As predicted, the SUE-Confrontation interview generated more statement-evidence inconsistencies from suspects than the Early Disclosure interview. Importantly, suspects in the SUE-Confrontation condition (vs. Early and No disclosure conditions) admitted more self-incriminating information and also perceived the interviewer to have had more information about the critical phase of the crime (the phase where the interviewer lacked evidence). The findings show the adaptability of the SUE-technique and how it may be used as a tool for eliciting admissions. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Analyzing screen heat insulation and its effect on energy consumption while heating building envelopes in conditions of intermittent heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vytchikov Yuri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to screen heat insulation and its effect on energy consumption while heating building envelopes in conditions of intermittent heating. It also describes the non-stationary process of heat transfer through heat insulated outer walls. The authors introduce calculation results of specific energy consumption for heating insulated and non-insulted outer walls. The paper proves that energy consumption for heating insulated outer walls depends on the thickness of non-aerated air-space insulation The research shows positive effects of using thermal protection systems with screen thermal insulation in outer building envelopes in conditions of intermitten heating.

  15. Successful Treatment of Suspected Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension in a Mealy Amazon Parrot (Amazona farinose).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Sean M; Burgdorf-Moisuk, Anne; Silverman, Sarah; Wack, Raymund F

    2016-12-01

    A 25-year-old, male mealy Amazon parrot (Amazona farinose) with a history of polycythemia, hepatomegaly, and epistaxis was evaluated for progressive lethargy and anorexia. Clinical laboratory testing revealed severe polycythemia (71%), hypophosphatemia (1.6 mg/dL), and mild hypokalemia (2.8 mEq/L). Radiographs showed marked hepatomegaly and loss of air sac space. Despite supportive treatments, the bird's condition deteriorated, and it developed ataxia, was unable to fly, and became oxygen dependent. An echocardiogram, including an air bubble study, revealed a right-to-left atrial shunt and presumed pulmonary arterial hypertension. The bird was started on periodic phlebotomy (5-10 mL/kg q6wk) to reduce packed cell volume and sildenafil citrate (2.5 mg/kg PO q8h) for treatment of suspected pulmonary arterial hypertension. One week later, the patient was weaned off oxygen, and 24 days after initial presentation, the parrot was returned to its outdoor exhibit. Intermittent periods of increased respiratory rate and effort have been reported but have resolved without additional treatments. Epistaxis, once common in this bird, has not been noted since initiating treatment with sildenafil citrate 15 months ago.

  16. The importance of laboratory re-evaluation in cases of suspected child abuse - A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woydt, L; König, C; Bernhard, M K; Nickel, P; Dreßler, J; Ondruschka, B

    2017-09-01

    In order to accurately diagnose child abuse or neglect, a physician needs to be familiar with diseases and medical conditions that can simulate maltreatment. Unrecognized cases of abuse may lead to insufficient child protection, whereas, on the other hand, over-diagnosis could be the cause of various problems for the family and their potentially accused members. Regarding child abuse, numerous cases of false diagnoses with undetected causes of bleeding are described in the scientific literature, but, specifically concerning leukemia in childhood, only very few case reports exist. Here, for the first time, we report a case of a 2-year-old boy who got hospitalized twice because of suspicious injuries and psychosocial conspicuities, in a family situation known for repeated endangerment of the child's well-being. After his first hospitalization with injuries typical for child abuse, but without paraclinical abnormalities, medical inspections were arranged periodically. The child was hospitalized with signs of repeated child abuse again five months later. During second admission, an acute lymphoblastic leukemia was revealed by intermittent laboratory examination, ordered due to new bruises with changes in morphology, identifiable as petechial hemorrhages. This case elucidates the discussion of known cases of leukemia in childhood associated with suspected child abuse in order to provide an overview of possible diseases mimicking maltreatment. To arrange necessary supportive examinations, a skillful interaction between pediatrician and forensic pathologist is crucial in the differentiation between accidental and non-accidental injury. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Carbohydrate ingestion and pre-cooling improves exercise capacity following soccer-specific intermittent exercise performed in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, N D; Maclaren, D P M; Reilly, T; Drust, B

    2011-07-01

    Ingestion of carbohydrate and reducing core body temperature pre-exercise, either separately or combined, may have ergogenic effects during prolonged intermittent exercise in hot conditions. The aim of this investigation was to examine the effect of carbohydrate ingestion and pre-cooling on the physiological responses to soccer-specific intermittent exercise and the impact on subsequent high-intensity exercise performance in the heat. Twelve male soccer players performed a soccer-specific intermittent protocol for 90 min in the heat (30.5°C and 42.2% r.h.) on four occasions. On two occasions, the participants underwent a pre-cooling manoeuvre. During these sessions either a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution (CHOc) or a placebo was consumed at (PLAc). During the remaining sessions either the carbohydrate-electrolyte solution (CHO) or placebo (PLA) was consumed. At 15-min intervals throughout the protocol participants performed a mental concentration test. Following the soccer-specific protocol participants performed a self-chosen pace test and a test of high-intensity exercise capacity. The period of pre-cooling significantly reduced core temperature, muscle temperature and thermal sensation (P carbohydrate during exercise enhances exercise capacity and helps maintain mental performance during intermittent exercise in hot conditions.

  18. Presumed prevalence analysis on suspected and highly suspected breast cancer lesions in São Paulo using BIRADS® criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian Milani

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Breast cancer screening programs are critical for early detection of breast cancer. Early detection is essential for diagnosing, treating and possibly curing breast cancer. Since there are no data on the incidence of breast cancer, nationally or regionally in Brazil, our aim was to assess women by means of mammography, to determine the prevalence of this disease. DESIGN AND SETTING: The study protocol was designed in collaboration between the Department of Diagnostic Imaging (DDI, Institute of Diagnostic Imaging (IDI and São Paulo Municipal Health Program. METHODS: A total of 139,945 Brazilian women were assessed by means of mammography between April 2002 and September 2004. Using the American College of Radiology (ACR criteria (Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System, BIRADS®, the prevalence of suspected and highly suspected breast lesions were determined. RESULTS: The prevalence of suspected (BIRADS® 4 and highly suspected (BIRADS® 5 lesions increased with age, especially after the fourth decade. Accordingly, BIRADS® 4 and BIRADS® 5 lesions were more prevalent in the fourth, fifth, sixth and seventh decades. CONCLUSION: The presumed prevalence of suspected and highly suspected breast cancer lesions in the population of São Paulo was 0.6% and it is similar to the prevalence of breast cancer observed in other populations.

  19. Identification of intermittent control in man and machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loram, Ian D.; van de Kamp, Cornelis; Gollee, Henrik; Gawthrop, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Regulation by negative feedback is fundamental to engineering and biological processes. Biological regulation is usually explained using continuous feedback models from both classical and modern control theory. An alternative control paradigm, intermittent control, has also been suggested as a model for biological control systems, particularly those involving the central nervous system. However, at present, there is no identification method explicitly formulated to distinguish intermittent from continuous control; here, we present such a method. The identification experiment uses a special paired-step set-point sequence. The corresponding data analysis use a conventional ARMA model to relate a theoretically derived equivalent set-point to control signal; the novelty lies in sequentially and iteratively adjusting the timing of the steps of this equivalent set-point to optimize the linear time-invariant fit. The method was verified using realistic simulation data and was found to robustly distinguish not only between continuous and intermittent control but also between event-driven intermittent and clock-driven intermittent control. When applied to human pursuit tracking, event-driven intermittent control was identified, with an intermittent interval of 260–310 ms (n = 6, p < 0.05). This new identification method is applicable for machine and biological applications. PMID:22491973

  20. Intermittent fasting: a "new" historical strategy for controlling seizures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Adam L; Rubenstein, James E; Kossoff, Eric H

    2013-05-01

    In antiquity, fasting was a treatment for epilepsy and a rationale for the ketogenic diet (KD). Preclinical data indicate the KD and intermittent fasting do not share identical anticonvulsant mechanisms. We implemented an intermittent fasting regimen in six children with an incomplete response to a KD. Three patients adhered to the combined intermittent fasting/KD regimen for 2 months and four had transient improvement in seizure control, albeit with some hunger-related adverse reactions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Transfert thermique à travers une interface de contact intermittent en ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dans cet article, on présente un modèle unidirectionnel pour décrire le transfert thermique à travers une interface de contact intermittent en régime thermique périodique établi. Le champ de température et le flux transféré sont gouvernés par les paramètres d'intermittence, à savoir la fréquence d'intermittence et le ...

  2. Intermittent left anterior hemiblock. A rare case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldini, M; Carmenini, E; Barbaro, G; Liguori, A; Giancaspro, G

    2002-01-01

    The Authors report a rare case of intermittent left anterior hemiblock in a 86-year-old man admitted to Department of Emergency Medicine for progressive impoverishment of intellectual functions and episodes of chest pain. They present this rare case of intermittent left anterior hemiblock where the intermittence was not linked to heart rate variations preceding the beginning of the hemiblock being present on the same ECG two different QRS complexes with no modification in frequency or A-V conduction: this finding suggesting a vascular origin of the disturbance. They also stress the importance of a prompt diagnosis in a Department of Emergency Medicine.

  3. Photoluminescence intermittency of semiconductor quantum dots in dielectric environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaac, A.

    2006-08-11

    The experimental studies presented in this thesis deal with the photoluminescence intermittency of semiconductor quantum dots in different dielectric environments. Detailed analysis of intermittency statistics from single capped CdSe/ZnS, uncapped CdSe and water dispersed CdSe/ZnS QDs in different matrices provide experimental evidence for the model of photoionization with a charge ejected into the surrounding matrix as the source of PL intermittency phenomenon. We propose a self-trapping model to explain the increase of dark state lifetimes with the dielectric constant of the matrix. (orig.)

  4. Evaluation of continuous and intermittent myocardial topical negative pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindstedt, Sandra; Malmsjö, Malin; Gesslein, Bodil

    2008-01-01

    to intermittent therapy shows twice as much granulation tissue formation than that exposed to continuous pressure after 2 weeks of therapy. The present study was designed to elucidate the differences in microvascular blood flow in the left anterior descending artery area between continuous and intermittent......Topical negative pressure, commonly used in wound therapy, has been shown to increase blood flow and stimulate angiogenesis in subcutaneous tissue and skeletal muscle. In wound therapy, intermittent negative pressure is often preferred to continuous negative pressure as tissue exposed...

  5. Acute Effects of Carbohydrate Supplementation on Intermittent Sports Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Baker, Lindsay B.; Rollo, Ian; Stein, Kimberly W.; Jeukendrup, Asker E.

    2015-01-01

    Intermittent sports (e.g., team sports) are diverse in their rules and regulations but similar in the pattern of play; that is, intermittent high-intensity movements and the execution of sport-specific skills over a prolonged period of time (~1–2 h). Performance during intermittent sports is dependent upon a combination of anaerobic and aerobic energy systems, both of which rely on muscle glycogen and/or blood glucose as an important substrate for energy production. The aims of this paper are...

  6. Intermittent Renewable Management Pilot Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiliccote, Sila [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Homan, Gregory [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Anderson, Robert [Olivine, Inc., San Ramon, CA (United States); Hernandez, John [Pacific Gas & Electric Company, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2015-04-01

    The Intermittent Renewable Management Pilot - Phase 2 (IRM2) was designed to study the feasibility of demand-side resources to participate into the California Independent System Operator (CAISO) wholesale market as proxy demand resources (PDR). The pilot study focused on understanding the issues related with direct participation of third-parties and customers including customer acceptance; market transformation challenges (wholesale market, technology); technical and operational feasibility; and value to the rate payers, DR resource owners and the utility on providing an enabling mechanism for DR resources into the wholesale markets. The customer had the option of committing to either three contiguous hour blocks for 24 days or six contiguous hours for 12 days a month with day-ahead notification that aligned with the CAISO integrated forward market. As a result of their being available, the customer was paid $10/ kilowatt (kW)-month for capacity in addition to CAISO energy settlements. The participants were limited to no more than a 2 megawatt (MW) capacity with a six-month commitment. Four participants successfully engaged in the pilot. In this report, we provide the description of the pilot, participant performance results, costs and value to participants as well as outline some of the issues encountered through the pilot. Results show that participants chose to participate with storage and the value of CAISO settlements were significantly lower than the capacity payments provided by the utility as incentive payments. In addition, this pilot revealed issues both on the participant side and system operations side. These issues are summarized in the report.The Intermittent Renewable Management Pilot - Phase 2 (IRM2) was designed to study the feasibility of demand-side resources to participate into the California Independent System Operator (CAISO) wholesale market as proxy demand resources (PDR). The pilot study focused on understanding the issues related with

  7. Effects of GI meals on intermittent exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulton, A T; Gregson, W; Maclaren, D; Doran, D A

    2012-09-01

    Pre-exercise meals or single foods containing low glycaemic index (LGI) carbohydrates (CHO) have been shown to enhance performance prior to prolonged steady state exercise compared to high glycaemic index (HGI) CHO. This study investigated the impact of HGI and LGI pre-exercise meals on intermittent high intensity exercise. Nine male recreational football players performed a football specific protocol followed by a 1 km time trial 3.5 h after ingesting 1 of 2 isoenergetic test meals (HGI: 870.3 kcal, LGI: 889.5 kcal), which were either HGI (GI: 80) or LGI (GI: 44). Blood glucose, fatty acids (FA), glycerol, β-hydroxybutyrate, lactate and insulin were assessed before, during, and after the exercise bout, whilst rates of CHO and fat oxidation were determined at 4 time points during the protocol. No significant differences were found for the 1 km time trial (LGI: 210.2 ± 19.1 s: HGI: 215.8 ± 22.6 s) (mean ± SD), nor for any of the other variables measured (P>0.05) apart from a significant condition effect with FA and significant interaction effects observed for glucose, β-hydroxybutyrate and lactate (Pexercise. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Challenges, developments and perspectives in intermittent ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although more than half the world's river networks comprise channels that periodically cease to flow and dry [intermittent rivers (IRs)], river ecology was largely developed from and for perennial systems. Ecological knowledge of IRs is rapidly increasing, so there is a need to synthesise this knowledge and deepen ecological understanding.In this Special Issue, we bring together 13 papers spanning observational case studies, field and laboratory experiments and reviews to guide research and management in this productive field of freshwater science. We summarise new developments in IR ecology, identify research gaps and needs, and address how the study of IRs as highly dynamic ecosystems informs ecological understanding more broadly.This series of articles reveals that contemporary IR ecology is a multifaceted and maturing field of research at the interface between aquatic and terrestrial ecology. This research contributes to fresh water and general ecology by testing concepts across a range of topics, including disturbance ecology, metacommunity ecology and coupled aquatic-terrestrial ecosystems.Drying affects flow continuity through time and flow connectivity across longitudinal, lateral and vertical dimensions of space, which aligns well with the recent emphasis of mainstream ecology on meta-system perspectives. Although most articles here focus on the wet phase, there is growing interest in dry phases, and in the terrestrial vegetation and invertebrate assemb

  9. Optimal Intermittent Reorientation in Insect Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleg, Orit; Mahadevan, Lakshminarayanan; Applied Math Lab Team

    2015-03-01

    The process of navigation is often accompanied by several cognitive demanding activities, such as motor control, locomotion planning, and multi-sensory acquisition and integration. Organisms with limited cognitive resources must therefore multitask and develop optimal schemes to dynamically allocate resources to the different tasks. An extreme example of task alternations during navigation is the hallmark of ball rolling dung beetles. The beetles need to roll their dung-ball along a straight path away from the dung pile where intense competition occurs. Before initiating a roll, dung beetles climb on top of the ball and rotate about their vertical axis. This action serves as an orientation mechanism that allows them to set an initial bearing, and to regain this bearing if they experience an unintentional disturbance along the way. We developed a model inspired by the beetle's navigational scheme, where an agent performs a random walk intermittent by reorientation events, in which its heading direction is corrected. We show that the resultant paths are a characteristic of correlated diffusion in short time scale, and biased diffusion in the long time scale. We identify optimal alternation schemes and characterize their robustness upon introducing noisy sensory acquisition and rough environmental conditions.

  10. The role of intermittence in PTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, W D

    1991-07-01

    Exposure of chinchillas to noise that is continuous results in auditory damage that is a function of the total energy of the exposure, provided that a critical exposure is not exceeded. Breaking a continuous exposure into 45 exposure periods given once a day Monday through Friday for 9 weeks (an interrupted exposure) is shown to result in a slight reduction in damage, but breaking each of the 45 daily exposures into short noise bursts presented at regular intervals (interrupted and intermittent exposures) reduces the damage more significantly. The shorter the noise bursts, the greater will be the reduction in damage. Too few data are available to establish a principle that will predict correctly the amount of reduction afforded by a particular temporal pattern; while the "equal energy" principle predicts no reduction at all, the "mean level" principle derived from studies of temporary threshold shifts (e.g., a noise at 80 dB half the time and at 100 dB half the time has a mean level of 90 dB and will have the same effect as a continuous 90-dB noise) predicts too much reduction.

  11. Multifractality and intermittency in the solar wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. M. Macek

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Within the complex dynamics of the solar wind's fluctuating plasma parameters, there is a detectable, hidden order described by a chaotic strange attractor which has a multifractal structure. The multifractal spectrum has been investigated using Voyager (magnetic field data in the outer heliosphere and using Helios (plasma data in the inner heliosphere. We have also analyzed the spectrum for the solar wind attractor. The spectrum is found to be consistent with that for the multifractal measure of the self-similar one-scale weighted Cantor set with two parameters describing uniform compression and natural invariant probability measure of the attractor of the system. In order to further quantify the multifractality, we also consider a generalized weighted Cantor set with two different scales describing nonuniform compression. We investigate the resulting multifractal spectrum depending on two scaling parameters and one probability measure parameter, especially for asymmetric scaling. We hope that this generalized model will also be a useful tool for analysis of intermittent turbulence in space plasmas.

  12. Long-range forecasting of intermittent streamflow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. F. van Ogtrop

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Long-range forecasting of intermittent streamflow in semi-arid Australia poses a number of major challenges. One of the challenges relates to modelling zero, skewed, non-stationary, and non-linear data. To address this, a statistical model to forecast streamflow up to 12 months ahead is applied to five semi-arid catchments in South Western Queensland. The model uses logistic regression through Generalised Additive Models for Location, Scale and Shape (GAMLSS to determine the probability of flow occurring in any of the systems. We then use the same regression framework in combination with a right-skewed distribution, the Box-Cox t distribution, to model the intensity (depth of the non-zero streamflows. Time, seasonality and climate indices, describing the Pacific and Indian Ocean sea surface temperatures, are tested as covariates in the GAMLSS model to make probabilistic 6 and 12-month forecasts of the occurrence and intensity of streamflow. The output reveals that in the study region the occurrence and variability of flow is driven by sea surface temperatures and therefore forecasts can be made with some skill.

  13. Acute Intermittent Porphyria in Argentina: An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerbino, Gabriela Nora; Gerez, Esther Noemí; Varela, Laura Sabina; Melito, Viviana Alicia; Parera, Victoria Estela; Rossetti, María Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Porphyrias are a group of metabolic diseases that arise from deficiencies in the heme biosynthetic pathway. A partial deficiency in hydroxymethylbilane synthase (HMBS) produces a hepatic disorder named Acute Intermittent Porphyria (AIP); the acute porphyria is more frequent in Argentina. In this paper we review the results obtained for 101 Argentinean AIP families and 6 AIP families from foreign neighbour countries studied at molecular level at Centro de Investigaciones sobre Porfirinas y Porfirias (CIPYP). Thirty-five different mutations were found, of which 14 were described for the first time in our population. The most prevalent type of mutations was the missense mutations (43%) followed by splice defects (26%) and small deletions (20%). An odd case of a double heterozygous presentation of AIP in a foreign family from Paraguay is discussed. Moreover, it can be noted that 38 new families were found carrying the most frequent mutation in Argentina (p.G111R), increasing to 55.66% the prevalence of this genetic change in our population and adding further support to our previous hypothesis of a founder effect for this mutation in Argentina. Identification of patients with an overt AIP is important because treatment depends on an accurate diagnosis, but more critical is the identification of asymptomatic relatives to avoid acute attacks which may progress to death. PMID:26075277

  14. Membrane-aerated Nitrifying Biofilms: Continuous versus Intermittent Aeration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Yunjie; Piscedda, A.; Smets, Barth F.

    This study evaluated the process performance of a lab-scale membrane-aerated nitrifying biofilm under continuous versus intermittent aeration regimes. Effects of intermittent aeration on the competition between individual microbial communities and the emission of nitrous oxide (N2O) were...... specifically studied. The principle observation under continuous aeration was more efficient ammonium removal (4.3 gNH4+_N/m2/day) but also higher N2O emission (2.9% of the N loading) and minor anaerobic ammonium oxidizer (AMX) activity compared to intermittent aeration (3.1 gNH4+_N/m2/day, 0.3% of the N...... loading). AMX activity increased at the expense of decreasing nitrite oxidizer (NOB) activity with intermittent aeration. Dissolved oxygen and pH microprofiles under each aeration regimes revealed that the dynamic variation of pH relevant effects could be the potential causes to these different...

  15. Development of intermittent drought stress tolerant common bean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Development of intermittent drought stress tolerant common bean genotypes in Uganda. ... yielding and drought-tolerant are crucial in coping with the effects of drought, ... Thus, these genotypes could be useful sources of genes for drought ...

  16. Diurnal characteristics of turbulent intermittency in the Taklimakan Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Wang, Minzhong; Zhang, Hongsheng; He, Qing; Ali, Mamtimin; Wang, Yinjun

    2017-12-01

    A case study is performed to investigate the behavior of turbulent intermittency in the Taklimakan Desert using an intuitive, direct, and adaptive method, the arbitrary-order Hilbert spectral analysis (arbitrary-order HSA). Decomposed modes from the vertical wind speed series confirm the dyadic filter-bank essence of the empirical mode decomposition processes. Due to the larger eddies in the CBL, higher energy modes occur during the day. The second-order Hilbert spectra L2 (ω ) delineate the spectral gap separating fine-scale turbulence from large-scale motions. Both the values of kurtosis and the Hilbert-based scaling exponent ξ ( q ) reveal that the turbulence intermittency at night is much stronger than that during the day, and the stronger intermittency is associated with more stable stratification under clear-sky conditions. This study fills the gap in the characteristics of turbulence intermittency in the Taklimakan Desert area using a relatively new method.

  17. Isolated intermittent vertigo: A presenting feature of persistent trigeminal artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajsrinivas Parthasarathy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic carotid – basilar anastomosis when persistent in adult life can present with a variety of neurological symptoms. We present a patient with isolated intermittent vertigo attributable to the embryonic anastomosis and describe the different types of persistent trigeminal artery. A 76-year-old Caucasian man presented with isolated intermittent vertigo and symptoms suggestive of anterior and posterior circulation strokes. Impaired vasomotor reactivity was demonstrated on insonation of the anterior and posterior cerebral arteries in this patient with a persistent left trigeminal artery and 75% stenosis of the left internal carotid artery (ICA. The symptom of intermittent vertigo resolved with carotid endarterectomy. Decreased flow across the stenotic segment of the ICA which subserved the posterior circulation resulted in basilar insufficiency. Hypoperfusion to the flocculonodular lobe supplied by the anterior inferior cerebellar artery is a likely cause for the intermittent vertigo.

  18. Short-phase anomalies in intermittent band switching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, T.; Capel, H.W.; van der Weele, J.P.

    1988-01-01

    The distribution of phase lengths t for intermittent band switching is investigated for small t. Some typical deviations from exponential behaviour are reported, in particular the occurrence of a minimal phase length with enhanced probability.

  19. Factors relevant to utility integration of intermittent renewable technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Yih-huei; Parsons, B.K.

    1993-08-01

    This study assesses factors that utilities must address when they integrate intermittent renewable technologies into their power-supply systems; it also reviews the literature in this area and has a bibliography containing more than 350 listings. Three topics are covered: (1) interface (hardware and design-related interconnection), (2) operability/stability, and (3) planning. This study finds that several commonly held perceptions regarding integration of intermittent renewable energy technologies are not valid. Among findings of the study are the following: (1) hardware and system design advances have eliminated most concerns about interface; (2) cost penalties have not occurred at low to moderate penetration levels (and high levels are feasible); and (3) intermittent renewable energy technologies can have capacity values. Obstacles still interfering with intermittent renewable technologies are also identified.

  20. Factors Relevant to Utility Integration of Intermittent Renewable Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Y.; Parsons, B.

    1993-08-24

    This study assesses factors that utilities must address when they integrate intermittent renewable technologies into their power-supply systems; it also reviews the literature in this area and has a bibliography containing more than 350 listings. Three topics are covered: (1) interface (hardware and design-related interconnection), (2) operability/stability, and (3) planning. This study finds that several commonly held perceptions regarding integration of intermittent renewable energy technologies are not valid. Among fmdings of the study are the following: (1) hardware and system design advances have eliminated most concerns about interface, (2) cost penalties have not occurred at low to moderate penetration levels (and high levels am feasible); and (3) intermittent renewable energy technologies can have capacity values. Obstacles still interfering with intermittent renewable technologies are also indentified.

  1. Sensing and characterization of EMI during intermittent connector anomalies

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This paper presents a new on-line methodology for detecting intermittent disconnection failures. The detection principle operates on the fundamental Lorentz Law that...

  2. Rapid intermittent movement of axonal neurofilaments observed by fluorescence photobleaching

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, L; Brown, A

    2001-01-01

    Observations on naturally occurring gaps in the axonal neurofilament array of cultured neurons have demonstrated that neurofilament polymers move along axons in a rapid, intermittent, and highly asynchronous manner...

  3. Intermittent fasting during Ramadan: does it affect sleep?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    BaHammam, Ahmed S; Almushailhi, Khalid; Pandi‐Perumal, Seithikurippu R; Sharif, Munir M

    2014-01-01

    .... We hypothesised that if a regimen of a fixed sleep–wake schedule and a fixed caloric intake is followed during intermittent fasting, the effects of fasting on sleep architecture and daytime sleepiness will be minimal...

  4. Adverse drug reactions of Intermittent chemotherapy compared to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adverse drug reactions of Intermittent chemotherapy compared to daily regimen in Sudanese patients with pulmonary Tuberculosis. MSM Salih, IB Eltayeb, AM Zaki, B Eldein, H Idriss, AEH Ahmed, HMM Eldein ...

  5. Electrokinetic strengthening of a marine sediment using intermittent current

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Micic S; Shang J.Q; Lo K.Y; Lee Y.N; Lee S.W

    2001-01-01

    An experimental program on electrokinetic strengthening of a marine sediment using intermittent current was conducted on a high-salinity marine clay recovered from a land reclamation site on the Korean coast...

  6. Adaptations with intermittent exercise training in post- and premenopausal women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seidelin, Kåre; Nyberg, Michael Permin; Piil, Peter Bergmann

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The purposes of the present study was to examine the effect of intermittent exercise training on musculoskeletal and metabolic health in postmenopausal (PM) and premenopausal (PRM) women and, furthermore, to evaluate whether the adaptations can be maintained with a reduced training......-Yo intermittent endurance test 1 (YYIET-1) performance was better (P training period. Procollagen type 1 amino-terminal propeptide was higher (P training period. In PM40, total......: Twelve weeks of intermittent exercise training increased BMD, intermittent exercise capacity, and V˙O2max in PM and PRM, with PM also having positive changes in body composition. Additional 40 wk of training with a reduced frequency was sufficient to preserve these physiological adaptations and also...

  7. The use of psychoactive prescription drugs among DUI suspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karjalainen, Karoliina; Haukka, Jari; Lintonen, Tomi; Joukamaa, Matti; Lillsunde, Pirjo

    2015-10-01

    The study seeks to increase understanding of the use of psychoactive prescription drugs among persons suspected of driving under the influence (DUI). We studied whether the use of prescribed psychoactive medication was associated with DUI, and examined the difference in the use of prescription drugs between DUI recidivists and those arrested only once. In this register-based study, persons suspected of DUI (n=29470) were drawn from the Register of DUI suspects, and an age- and gender-matched reference population (n=30043) was drawn from the Finnish general population. Data on prescription drug use was obtained by linkage to the National Prescription Register. The associations of DUI arrest and use of psychoactive prescription drugs in different DUI groups (findings for alcohol only, prescription drugs, prescription drugs and alcohol, illicit drugs) were estimated by using mixed-effect logistic regression. The use of psychoactive prescription drugs and DUI appeared to be strongly associated, with DUI suspects significantly more likely to use psychoactive prescription drugs compared to the reference population. Gender differences existed, with the use of benzodiazepines being more common among female DUI suspects. Moreover, DUI recidivists were more likely to use psychoactive prescription drugs compared to those arrested only once. In addition to alcohol and/or illicit drug use, a significant proportion of DUI suspects were using psychoactive prescription drugs. When prescribing psychoactive medication, especially benzodiazepines, physicians are challenged to screen for possible substance use problems and also to monitor for patients' alcohol or illicit drug use while being medicated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty of infrarenal arteries in intermittent claudication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, L O; Jørgensen, B; Holstein, P E

    1988-01-01

    Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty was performed on 55 iliac and 31 femoropopliteal arteries in 71 patients with intermittent claudication (23 women, 48 men). The two-year patency rate was 80% after iliac and 41% after femoropopliteal angioplasty. In 17 femoropopliteal cases with lesions greater...... in intermittent claudication is indicated for all cases of occlusion or stenosis of the iliac artery and for occlusion or stenosis shorter than 5 cm of the superficial femoral or the popliteal artery....

  9. Multi-scale magnetic field intermittence in the plasma sheet

    OpenAIRE

    Vörös, Z.; Baumjohann, W.; Nakamura, R.; Runov, A.; Zhang, T. L.; Volwerk, M.; Eichelberger, H. U.; Balogh, A.; Horbury, T. S.; Glaßmeier, K. -H.; Klecker, B.; Rème, H.

    2004-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that intermittent magnetic field fluctuations in the plasma sheet exhibit transitory, localized, and multi-scale features. We propose a multifractal-based algorithm, which quantifies intermittence on the basis of the statistical distribution of the "strength of burstiness", estimated within a sliding window. Interesting multi-scale phenomena observed by the Cluster spacecraft include large-scale motion of the current sheet and bursty bulk flow ...

  10. Lactate Kinetics After Intermittent and Continuous Exercise Training

    OpenAIRE

    Gharbi, Adnene; Chamari, Karim; Kallel, Amjad; Ahmaidi, Saîd; Tabka, Zouhair; Abdelkarim, Zbidi

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess, the effects of continuous and intermittent exercise training on lactate kinetic parameters and maximal aerobic speed (MAS) using field tests. Twenty-four male sport students were equally divided into continuous (CT) and intermittent (IT) physically trained groups. Another six participants acted as non-trained controls (CG). The trained participants practiced 6-days per week for 6 weeks. Before and after training, all participants completed an increment...

  11. Book Review: Placing the Suspect behind the Keyboard: Using Digital Forensics and Investigative Techniques to Identify Cybercrime Suspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Nash

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Shavers, B. (2013. Placing the Suspect behind the Keyboard: Using Digital Forensics and Investigative Techniques to Identify Cybercrime Suspects. Waltham, MA: Elsevier, 290 pages, ISBN-978-1-59749-985-9, US$51.56. Includes bibliographical references and index.Reviewed by Detective Corporal Thomas Nash (tnash@bpdvt.org, Burlington Vermont Police Department, Internet Crime against Children Task Force. Adjunct Instructor, Champlain College, Burlington VT.In this must read for any aspiring novice cybercrime investigator as well as the seasoned professional computer guru alike, Brett Shaver takes the reader into the ever changing and dynamic world of Cybercrime investigation.  Shaver, an experienced criminal investigator, lays out the details and intricacies of a computer related crime investigation in a clear and concise manner in his new easy to read publication, Placing the Suspect behind the Keyboard. Using Digital Forensics and Investigative techniques to Identify Cybercrime Suspects. Shaver takes the reader from start to finish through each step of the investigative process in well organized and easy to follow sections, with real case file examples to reach the ultimate goal of any investigation: identifying the suspect and proving their guilt in the crime. Do not be fooled by the title. This excellent, easily accessible reference is beneficial to both criminal as well as civil investigations and should be in every investigator’s library regardless of their respective criminal or civil investigative responsibilities.(see PDF for full review

  12. Suspected Rhinolithiasis Associated With Endodontic Disease in a Cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Kevin; Fiani, Nadine; Peralta, Santiago

    2017-12-01

    Rhinoliths are rare, intranasal, mineralized masses formed via the precipitation of mineral salts around an intranasal nidus. Clinical signs are typically consistent with inflammatory rhinitis and nasal obstruction, but asymptomatic cases are possible. Rhinoliths may be classified as exogenous or endogenous depending on the origin of the nidus, with endogenous rhinoliths reportedly being less common. This case report describes a suspected case of endogenous rhinolithiasis in a cat which was detected as an incidental finding during radiographic assessment of a maxillary canine tooth with endodontic disease. Treatment consisted of removal of the suspected rhinolith via a transalveolar approach after surgical extraction of the maxillary canine tooth.

  13. Cholescintigraphy and ultrasonography in patients suspected of having acute cholecystitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, K B; Sommer, W; Hahn, L

    1988-01-01

    The diagnostic power of combined cholescintigraphy and ultrasonography was tested in 67 patients suspected of having acute cholecystitis; of these, 42 (63%) had acute cholecystitis. The predictive value of a positive scintigraphy (PVpos) was 95% and that of a negative (PVneg) was 91% (n = 67...... that in patients suspected of having acute cholecystitis cholescintigraphy should be the first diagnostic procedure performed. If the scintigraphy is positive, additional ultrasonographic detection of gallstones makes the diagnosis almost certain. If one diagnostic modality is inconclusive, the other makes a fair...

  14. Symptomatic Patency Capsule Retention in Suspected Crohn's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Bjørn; Nathan, Torben; Jensen, Michael Dam

    2016-01-01

    The main limitation of capsule endoscopy is the risk of capsule retention. In patients with suspected Crohn's disease, however, this complication is rare, and if a small bowel stenosis is not reliably excluded, small bowel patency can be confirmed with the Pillcam patency capsule. We present two...... patients examined for suspected Crohn's disease who experienced significant symptoms from a retained patency capsule. Both patients had Crohn's disease located in the terminal ileum. In one patient, the patency capsule caused abdominal pain and vomiting and was visualized at magnetic resonance enterography...

  15. Clinical outcomes of intermittent antegrade warm versus cold blood cardioplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Mirza Ahmad Raza; Sher-I-Murtaza, Muhammad; Iqbal, Azhar; Ahmad, Muhammad Zubair; Farhan Ali Rizvi, Hafiz Muhammad; Ahmed, Nosheen; Shair, Alia; Ijaz, Anum

    2015-06-01

    To compare clinical outcome in patients undergoing conventional coronary artery bypass graft surgery who received intermittent antegrade warm blood cardioplegia or intermittent antegrade cold blood cardioplegia for myocardial protection. The observational, prospective non-randomised analytical comparative study was conducted at the Punjab Institute of Cardiology, Lahore, and Chaudhry Pervaiz Elahi Institute of Cardiology, Multan, from September 2012 to October 2013, and comprised patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery. They were divided into two groups, with Group I having those who received intermittent antegrade warm blood cardioplegia, and Group II having those who received intermittent antegrade cold blood cardioplegia. SPSS 16 was used for statistical analysis. Of the 215 patients, 94(44%) were in Group I, and 121(56%) in Group II. Total surgical time in Group II was 119.26±22.24 minutes compared to 105.73±31.34 in Group I (p >0.0001). Spontaneous resumption of sinus rhythm and peri-operative myocardial infarction was statistically insignificant (p>0.05). There were 21(17.4%) patients in Group II to whom peri-operative myocardial infarction occurred compared to 9(9.6%) in Group I (p=0.10). Intermittent antegrade warm blood cardioplegia showed better myocardial protection in early postoperative period compared to intermittent antegrade cold blood cardioplegia.

  16. Uncoupling of Vascular Nitric Oxide Synthase Caused by Intermittent Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Badran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, characterized by chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH, is often present in diabetic (DB patients. Both conditions are associated with endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease. We hypothesized that diabetic endothelial dysfunction is further compromised by CIH. Methods. Adult male diabetic (BKS.Cg-Dock7m +/+ Leprdb/J (db/db mice (10 weeks old and their heterozygote littermates were subjected to CIH or intermittent air (IA for 8 weeks. Mice were separated into 4 groups: IA (intermittent air nondiabetic, IH (intermittent hypoxia nondiabetic, IADB (intermittent air diabetic, and IHDB (intermittent hypoxia diabetic groups. Endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent relaxation and modulation by basal nitric oxide (NO were analyzed using wire myograph. Plasma 8-isoprostane, interleukin-6 (IL-6, and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA were measured using ELISA. Uncoupling of eNOS was measured using dihydroethidium (DHE staining. Results. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation and basal NO production were significantly impaired in the IH and IADB group compared to IA group but was more pronounced in IHDB group. Levels of 8-isoprostane, IL-6, ADMA, and eNOS uncoupling were ≈2-fold higher in IH and IADB groups and were further increased in the IHDB group. Conclusion. Endothelial dysfunction is more pronounced in diabetic mice subjected to CIH compared to diabetic or CIH mice alone. Oxidative stress, ADMA, and eNOS uncoupling were exacerbated by CIH in diabetic mice.

  17. Physiological and Genomic Consequences of Intermittent Hypoxia: Invited Review: Oxygen sensing during intermittent hypoxia: cellular and molecular mechanisms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Prabhakar, Nanduri R

    2001-01-01

    ... encountered in life than sustained hypoxia. Until recently, much of the information on the long-term effects of intermittent hypoxia has come from studies on human subjects experiencing chronic recurrent apneas...

  18. Regionalization of patterns of flow intermittence from gauging station records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. H. Snelder

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding large-scale patterns in flow intermittence is important for effective river management. The duration and frequency of zero-flow periods are associated with the ecological characteristics of rivers and have important implications for water resources management. We used daily flow records from 628 gauging stations on rivers with minimally modified flows distributed throughout France to predict regional patterns of flow intermittence. For each station we calculated two annual times series describing flow intermittence; the frequency of zero-flow periods (consecutive days of zero flow in each year of record (FREQ; yr−1, and the total number of zero-flow days in each year of record (DUR; days. These time series were used to calculate two indices for each station, the mean annual frequency of zero-flow periods (mFREQ; yr−1, and the mean duration of zero-flow periods (mDUR; days. Approximately 20% of stations had recorded at least one zero-flow period in their record. Dissimilarities between pairs of gauges calculated from the annual times series (FREQ and DUR and geographic distances were weakly correlated, indicating that there was little spatial synchronization of zero flow. A flow-regime classification for the gauging stations discriminated intermittent and perennial stations, and an intermittence classification grouped intermittent stations into three classes based on the values of mFREQ and mDUR. We used random forest (RF models to relate the flow-regime and intermittence classifications to several environmental characteristics of the gauging station catchments. The RF model of the flow-regime classification had a cross-validated Cohen's kappa of 0.47, indicating fair performance and the intermittence classification had poor performance (cross-validated Cohen's kappa of 0.35. Both classification models identified significant environment-intermittence associations, in particular with regional-scale climate patterns and also

  19. The 30-15 intermittent fitness test: accuracy for individualizing interval training of young intermittent sport players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchheit, Martin

    2008-03-01

    The objective of this study was to gather evidence supporting the accuracy of the 30-15 Intermittent Fitness Test (30-15IFT) for individualizing interval training of young intermittent sport players. In 59 young intermittent sport players (age, 16.2 +/- 2.3 years), we observed the relationships between the maximal running speed (MRS) reached at the end of the 30-15IFT (MRS30-15IFT) and physiological variables elicited by shuttle intermittent runs, including maximal oxygen uptake, explosive power of lower limbs, and the ability to repeat intense exercise bouts through cardiorespiratory recovery kinetics during exercise. To observe the capacity of the 30-15IFT to prescribe suitable running intensities for interval training sessions, we compared heart rates (HRs) reached during 3 series of intermittent runs, where distances were set according to the MRS30-15IFT and to MRS reached with 2 popular continuous field tests: the University of Montreal track test and the 20-m shuttle run test. The results show that the MRS30-15IFT is significantly correlated with all physiological variables elicited by shuttle intermittent runs (P intermittent runs, HR recorded during the runs based on MRS30-15IFT presented significantly less interindividual variation than when the continuously determined MRS were used as reference speeds. In conclusion, we can say that the 30-15IFT leads to an MRS that simultaneously takes into account various physiological qualities elicited when performing shuttle intermittent runs. For scheduling interval training sessions, the MRS30-15IFT appears to be an accurate reference speed for getting players with different physiological profiles to a similar level of cardiorespiratory demand and thus for standardizing training content.

  20. Intermittency and Topology of Shock Induced Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellez, Jackson; Redondo, Jose M.; Ben Mahjoub, Otman; Malik, Nadeem; Vila, Teresa

    2016-04-01

    The advance of a Rayleigh-Taylor front is described in Linden & Redondo (1991),[1-3] and may be shown to follow a quadratic law in time where the width of the growing region of instability depends on the local mixing efficiency of the different density fluids that accelerate against each other g is the acceleration and A is the Atwood number defined as the diference of densities divided by their sum. This results show the independence of the large amplitude structures on the initial conditions the width of the mixing region depends also on the intermittency of the turbulence. Then dimensional analysis may also depend on the relevant reduced acceleration driven time and the molecular reactive time akin to Damkholer number and the fractal structure of the contact zone [2,4]. Detailed experiments and simulations on RT and RM shock induced fronts analized with respect to structure functions are able to determine which mechanisms are most effective in local mixing which increase the effective fractal dimension, as well as the effect of higher order geometrical parameters, such as the structure functions, in non-homogeneous fluids (Mahjoub et al 1998)[5]. The structure of a Mixing blob shows a relatively sharp head with most of the mixing taking place at the sides due to what seems to be shear instability very similar to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities, but with sideways accelerations. The formation of the blobs and spikes with their secondary instabilities produces a turbulent cascade, evident just after about 1 non-dimensional time unit, from a virtual time origin that takes into account the linear growth phase, as can be seen by the growth of the fractal dimension for different volume fractions. Two-dimensional cuts of the 3D flow also show that vortex flows have closed or spiral streamlines around their core. Examples of such flows can be also seen in the laboratory, for example at the interface of atwo-layer stratified fluid in a tank in which case streamlines

  1. Thermal Characterization of the Overload Carbon Resistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Kostić

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In many applications, the electronic component is not continuously but only intermittently overloaded (e.g., inrush current, short circuit, or discharging interference. With this paper, we provide insight into carbon resistors that have to hold out a rarely occurring transient overload. Using simple electrical circuit, the resistor is overheating with higher current than declared, and dissipation is observed by a thermal camera.

  2. PMS2 Involvement in Patients Suspected of Lynch Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niessen, Renee C.; Kleibeuker, Jan H.; Westers, Helga; Jager, Paul O. J.; Rozeveld, Dennie; Bos, Krista K.; Boersma-van Ek, Wytske; Hollema, Harry; Sijmons, Rolf H.; Hofstra, Robert M. W.

    It is well-established that germline mutations in the mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 cause Lynch syndrome. However, mutations in these three genes do not account for all Lynch syndrome (suspected) families. Recently, it was shown that germline mutations in another mismatch repair gene,

  3. Faecal Calprotectin in Suspected Paediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Degraeuwe, Pieter L. J.; Beld, Monique P. A.; Ashorn, Merja; Canani, Roberto Berni; Day, Andrew S.; Diamanti, Antonella; Fagerberg, Ulrika L.; Henderson, Paul; Kolho, Kaija-Leena; Van de Vijver, Els; van Rheenen, Patrick F.; Wilson, David C.; Kessels, Alfons G. H.

    Objectives: The diagnostic accuracy of faecal calprotectin (FC) concentration for paediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is well described at the population level, but not at the individual level. We reassessed the diagnostic accuracy of FC in children with suspected IBD and developed an

  4. Stabilization of the spine in patients with suspected cervical spine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stabilization of the spine in patients with suspected cervical spine injury in Mulago Hospital. BM Ndeleva, T Beyeza. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/eaoj.v5i1.67487 · AJOL African Journals ...

  5. Talking heads : interviewing suspects from a cultural perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beune, K.

    2009-01-01

    Although the literature on the interviewing of suspects has increased over the past decade, research on the use and effectiveness of police strategies and their boundary conditions is very rare. The present dissertation aims to fill this void by identifying behaviors that appeal to and persuade

  6. Nonreferral of Nursing Home Patients With Suspected Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamaker, Marije E.; Hamelinck, Victoria C.; van Munster, Barbara C.; Bastiaannet, Esther; Smorenburg, Carolien H.; Achterberg, Wilco P.; Liefers, Gerrit-Jan; de Rooij, Sophia E.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: People with suspected breast cancer who are not referred for diagnostic testing remain unregistered and are not included in cancer statistics. Little is known about the extent of and motivation for nonreferral of these patients. Methods: A Web-based survey was sent to all elderly care

  7. DNA typing from vaginal smear slides in suspected rape cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayse Aparecida da Silva

    Full Text Available In an investigation of suspected rape, proof of sexual assault with penetration is required. In view of this, detailed descriptions of the genitalia, the thighs and pubic region are made within the forensic medical service. In addition, vaginal swabs are taken from the rape victim and some of the biological material collected is then transferred to glass slides. In this report, we describe two rape cases solved using DNA typing from cells recovered from vaginal smear slides. In 1999, two young women informed the Rio de Janeiro Police Department that they had been victims of sexual assaults. A suspect was arrested and the victims identified him as the offender. The suspect maintained that he was innocent. In order to elucidate these crimes, vaginal smear slides were sent to the DNA Diagnostic Laboratory for DNA analysis three months after the crimes, as unique forensic evidence. To get enough epithelial and sperm cells to perform DNA analysis, we used protocols modified from the previously standard protocols used for DNA extraction from biological material fixed on glass slides. The quantity of cells was sufficient to perform human DNA typing using nine short tandem repeat (STR loci. It was 3.3 billion times more probable that it was the examined suspect who had left sperm cells in the victims, rather than any other individual in the population of Rio de Janeiro.

  8. Cognitive Linguistic Performances of Multilingual University Students Suspected of Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Signe-Anita; Laine, Matti

    2011-01-01

    High-performing adults with compensated dyslexia pose particular challenges to dyslexia diagnostics. We compared the performance of 20 multilingual Finnish university students with suspected dyslexia with 20 age-matched and education-matched controls on an extensive test battery. The battery tapped various aspects of reading, writing, word…

  9. Differential Diagnosis of Children with Suspected Childhood Apraxia of Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Elizabeth; McCabe, Patricia; Heard, Robert; Ballard, Kirrie J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The gold standard for diagnosing childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) is expert judgment of perceptual features. The aim of this study was to identify a set of objective measures that differentiate CAS from other speech disorders. Method: Seventy-two children (4-12 years of age) diagnosed with suspected CAS by community speech-language…

  10. A suspected case of Addison’s disease in cattle

    OpenAIRE

    Lambacher, Bianca; Wittek, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    A 4.75-year old Simmental cow was presented with symptoms of colic and ileus. The clinical signs and blood analysis resulted in the diagnosis of suspected primary hypoadrenocorticism (Addison’s disease). Although Addison’s disease has been frequently described in other domestic mammals, to our knowledge, this disease has not previously been reported in cattle.

  11. Is extended biopsy protocol justified in all patients with suspected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the significance of an extended 10-core transrectal biopsy protocol in different categories of patients with suspected prostate cancer using digital guidance. Materials and Methods: We studied 125 men who were being evaluated for prostate cancer. They all had an extended 10-core digitally guided ...

  12. Correlates and Suspected Causes of Obesity in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crothers, Laura M.; Kehle, Thomas J.; Bray, Melissa A.; Theodore, Lea A.

    2009-01-01

    The correlates and suspected causes of the intractable condition obesity are complex and involve environmental and heritable, psychological and physical variables. Overall, the factors associated with and possible causes of it are not clearly understood. Although there exists some ambiguity in the research regarding the degree of happiness in…

  13. Medical Evaluation of Suspected Child Sexual Abuse: 2011 Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Joyce A.

    2011-01-01

    The medical evaluation of children with suspected sexual abuse includes more than just the physical examination of the child. The importance of taking a detailed medical history from the parents and a history from the child about physical sensations following sexual contact has been emphasized in other articles in the medical literature. The…

  14. Selective screening in neonates suspected to have inborn errors of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) have a high morbidity and mortality in neonates. Unfortunately, there is no nationwide neonatal screen in Egypt, so several cases may be missed. Objective: The aim of this work was to detect the prevalence of IEM among neonates with suspected IEM, and to diagnose IEM as ...

  15. Sexual Health Before Treatment in Women with Suspected Gynecologic Malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretschneider, C Emi; Doll, Kemi M; Bensen, Jeannette T; Gehrig, Paola A; Wu, Jennifer M; Geller, Elizabeth J

    2017-08-22

    Sexual health in survivors of gynecologic cancer has been studied; however, sexual health in these women before treatment has not been thoroughly evaluated. The objective of our study was to describe the pretreatment characteristics of sexual health of women with suspected gynecologic cancer before cancer treatment. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of women with a suspected gynecologic cancer, who were prospectively enrolled in a hospital-based cancer survivorship cohort from August 2012 to June 2013. Subjects completed the validated Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Sexual Function and Satisfaction Questionnaire. Pretreatment sexual health was assessed in terms of sexual interest, desire, lubrication, discomfort, orgasm, enjoyment, and satisfaction. Of 186 eligible women with suspected gynecologic cancer, 154 (82%) completed the questionnaire pretreatment. Mean age was 58.1 ± 13.3 years. Sexual health was poor: 68.3% reported no sexual activity, and 54.7% had no interest in sexual activity. When comparing our study population to the general U.S. population, the mean pretreatment scores for the subdomains of lubrication and vaginal discomfort were similar, while sexual interest was significantly lower and global satisfaction was higher. In a linear regression model, controlling for cancer site, age remained significantly associated with sexual function while cancer site did not. Problems with sexual health are prevalent in women with suspected gynecologic malignancies before cancer treatment. Increasing awareness of the importance of sexual health in this population will improve quality of life for these women.

  16. Use of budesonide Turbuhaler in young children suspected of asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H; Pedersen, S; Nikander, K

    1994-01-01

    The question addressed in this study was the ability of young children to use a dry-powder inhaler, Turbuhaler. One hundred and sixty five children suspected of asthma, equally distributed in one year age-groups from 6 months to 8 yrs, inhaled from a Pulmicort Turbuhaler, 200 micrograms budesonid...

  17. Doppler ultrasound in the assessment of suspected intra-uterine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ramakantb

    obesity with hypertension and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.[3] In this review, a brief discussion about the ultrasound diagnosis of suspected IUGR, and thereafter about the use of Doppler ultrasound in the diagnosis of IUGR, will be ... before that, all fetuses have relatively larger heads, which will mask the brain-.

  18. Candida meningitis in a suspected immunosuppressive patient - A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Candida meningitis in a suspected immunosuppressive patient - A case report. EO Sanya, NB Ameen, BA Onile. Abstract. No Abstract. West African Journal of Medicine Vol. 25 (1) 2006: pp.79-81. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  19. Ajmaline challenge in young individuals with suspected Brugada syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorgente, A.; Sarkozy, A.; Asmundis, C. de; Chierchia, G.B.; Capulzini, L.; Paparella, G.; Henkens, S.; Brugada, P.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The clinical characteristics and the results of ajmaline challenge in young individuals with suspected Brugada syndrome (BS) have not been systematically investigated. METHODS: Among a larger series of patients included in the BS database of our Department, 179 patients undergoing

  20. A Diagnostic Program for Patients Suspected of Having Lung Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stigt, Jos A.; Uil, Steven M.; Oostdijk, Ad H.; Boers, James E.; van den Berg, Jan-Willem K.; Groen, Harry J. M.

    2012-01-01

    In 297 patients suspected of having lung cancer, invasive diagnostic procedures followed positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET-CT) on the same day. For patients with a diagnosis of malignancy (215/297), investigations were finalized on 1 day in 85%, and bronchoscopy was performed in

  1. Use of Chest Radiography In Patients Suspected of Pulmonary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    may be rushed into treatfng all cases of cough, fever and weight loss with negative sputums as PTB, and other diagnoses may be overlooked. A cheaper, quicker way of screening TB suspects would help con- siderably in this common problem. In Febuary 1991, the Norwegian Government do- nated two Odelka camer;l,s to ...

  2. Effects of Intermittent Neck Cooling During Repeated Bouts of High-Intensity Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Galpin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this investigation was to determine the influence of intermittent neck cooling during exercise bouts designed to mimic combat sport competitions. Participants (n = 13, age = 25.3 ± 5.0 year height = 176.9 ± 7.5 cm, mass = 79.3 ± 9.0 kg, body fat = 11.8% ± 3.1% performed three trials on a cycle ergometer. Each trial consisted of two, 5-min high-intensity exercise (HEX intervals (HEX1 and HEX2—20 s at 50% peak power, followed by 15 s of rest, and a time to exhaustion (TTE test. One-minute rest intervals were given between each round (RI1 and RI2, during which researchers treated the participant’s posterior neck with either (1 wet-ice (ICE; (2 menthol spray (SPRAY; or (3 no treatment (CON. Neck (TNECK and chest (TCHEST skin temperatures were significantly lower following RI1 with ICE (vs. SPRAY. Thermal sensation decreased with ICE compared to CON following RI1, RI2, TTE, and a 2-min recovery. Rating of perceived exertion was also lower with ICE following HEX2 (vs. CON and after RI2 (vs. SPRAY. Treatment did not influence TTE (68.9 ± 18.9s. The ability of intermittent ICE to attenuate neck and chest skin temperature rises during the initial HEX stages likely explains why participants felt cooler and less exerted during equivalent HEX bouts. These data suggest intermittent ICE improves perceptual stress during short, repeated bouts of vigorous exercise.

  3. Opioid analgesic administration in patients with suspected drug use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreling, Maria Clara Giorio Dutra; Mattos-Pimenta, Cibele Andrucioli de

    2017-01-01

    To identify the prevalence of patients suspected of drug use according to the nursing professionals' judgement, and compare the behavior of these professionals in opioid administration when there is or there is no suspicion that patient is a drug user. A cross-sectional study with 507 patients and 199 nursing professionals responsible for administering drugs to these patients. The Chi-Square test, Fisher's Exact and a significance level of 5% were used for the analyzes. The prevalence of suspected patients was 6.7%. The prevalence ratio of administration of opioid analgesics 'if necessary' is twice higher among patients suspected of drug use compared to patients not suspected of drug use (p = 0.037). The prevalence of patients suspected of drug use was similar to that of studies performed in emergency departments. Patients suspected of drug use receive more opioids than patients not suspected of drug use. Identificar a prevalência de pacientes com suspeita de uso de drogas conforme opinião de profissionais de enfermagem e comparar a conduta desses profissionais na administração de opioides quando há ou não suspeita de que o paciente seja usuário de drogas. Estudo transversal com 507 pacientes e 199 profissionais de enfermagem responsáveis pela administração de medicamentos a esses pacientes. Para as análises foram utilizados os testes de Qui-Quadrado, Exato de Fisher e um nível de significância de 5%. A prevalência de pacientes suspeitos foi 6,7%. A razão de prevalência de administração de analgésicos opioides "se necessário" é duas vezes maior entre os pacientes suspeitos em relação aos não suspeitos (p=0,037). A prevalência de suspeitos foi semelhante à de estudos realizados em departamentos de emergência. Os suspeitos de serem usuários de drogas recebem mais opioides do que os não suspeitos.

  4. Intermittent inhaled corticosteroid therapy versus placebo for persistent asthma in children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Jimmy; Haran, Cheyaanthan; Chauhan, Bhupendrasinh F; Asher, Innes

    2015-07-22

    International guidelines advocate using daily inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) in the management of children and adults with persistent asthma. However, in real world clinical settings, these medicines are often used at irregular intervals by patients. Recent evidence suggests that the use of intermittent ICS, with treatment initiated at the time of early symptoms, may still have benefits for reducing the severity of an asthma exacerbation. To compare the efficacy and safety of intermittent ICS versus placebo in the management of children and adults diagnosed with, or suspected to have, symptoms of mild persistent asthma. We searched the Cochrane Airways Group Specialised Register of trials (CAGR), the ClinicalTrials.gov website and the World Health Organization (WHO) trials portal in March 2015. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared intermittent ICS versus placebo in children and adults with symptoms of persistent asthma. No co-interventions were permitted other than rescue relievers and oral corticosteroids used during exacerbations. Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion, methodological quality and extracted data. The primary efficacy outcome was the risk of asthma exacerbations requiring oral corticosteroids and the primary safety outcome was serious adverse health events. Secondary outcomes included exacerbations, lung function tests, asthma control, adverse effects, and withdrawal rates. Quality of the evidence was assessed using the GRADE criteria. Six trials (representing 490 preschool children, 145 school-aged children and 240 adults) met the inclusion criteria. Study durations were 12 to 52 weeks. Results for preschool children were presented in a separate analysis as this represents a distinct clinical condition, not necessarily related to the development of long term asthma.There was a reduction in the risk of patients experiencing one or more exacerbations requiring oral corticosteroids in older children

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging versus bone scintigraphy in suspected scaphoid fracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiel-van Buul, M.M.C. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Academic Medical Center, Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Roolker, W. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Academic Medical Center, Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Verbeeten, B.W.B. Jr. [Dept. of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Broekhuizen, A.H. [Dept. of Traumatology, Academic Medical Center, Univ. of Amsredam (Netherlands)

    1996-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become increasingly useful in the evaluation of musculoskeletal problems, including those of the wrist. In patients with a wrist injury, MRI is used mainly to assess vascularity of scaphoid non-union. However, the use of MRI in patients in the acute phase following carpal injury is not common. Three-phase bone scintigraphy is routinely performed from at least 72 h after injury in patients with suspected scaphoid fracture and negative initial radiographs. We evaluated MRI in this patient group. The bone scan was used as the reference method. Nineteen patients were included. Bone scintigraphy was performed in all 19 patients, but MRI could be obtained in only 16 (in three patients, MRI was stopped owing to claustrophobia). In five patients, MRI confirmed a scintigraphically suspected scaphoid fracture. In one patient, a perilunar luxation, without a fracture, was seen on MRI, while bone scintigraphy showed a hot spot in the region of the lunate bone, suspected for fracture. This was confirmed by surgery. In two patients, a hot spot in the scaphoid region was suspected for scaphoid fracture, and immobilization and employed for a period of 12 weeks. MRI was negative in both cases; in one of them a scaphoid fracture was retrospectively proven on the initial X-ray series. In another two patients, a hot spot in the region of MCP I was found with a negative MRI. In both, the therapy was adjusted. In the remaining six patients, both modalities were negative. We conclude that in the diagnostic management of patients with suspected scaphoid fracture and negative initial radiographs, the use of MRI may be promising, but is not superior to three-phase bone scintigraphy. (orig.)

  6. Cancer risk and subsequent survival after hospitalization for intermittent claudication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onega, Tracy; Baron, John A; Johnsen, Søren P; Pedersen, Lars; Farkas, Dóra K; Sørensen, Henrik T

    2015-04-01

    Intermittent claudication, muscle ischemia due to reduced arterial circulation, may be associated with an increased risk of cancer risk and death due to neoplasm-induced hypercoagulability and angiogenesis, or to shared risk factors, but the relation is not well understood. We conducted a population-based cohort study using the Danish National Registry of Patients to identify patients with intermittent claudication from 1980 to 2011 and no history of cancer. We followed these patients for incident cancers using the Danish Cancer Registry and compared cancer incidence among patients with intermittent claudication to that expected in the general population. We also compared the survival of patients with cancer with and without claudication, matched for sex, cancer site, stage, age at diagnosis, and diagnosis year. A total of 53,762 patients with intermittent claudication were identified. We observed 6,270 incident cancers over a total 269,430 years of follow-up (mean, 5.0), compared with 4,306 cancer cases expected [standardized incidence ratio = 1.46; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.42-1.49]. Cancer risk also increased after the exclusion of patients with a prior diagnosis of cerebrovascular disease, myocardial infarction, or diabetes, particularly for tobacco-related cancers. The elevated cancer risk persisted over 10 years of follow-up. For patients with cancer, diagnosis of intermittent claudication within 3 months preceding the cancer diagnosis did not influence survival, but before 3 months, was associated with modestly worse survival (mortality rate ratio = 1.19; 95% CI, 1.14-1.25). Intermittent claudication is associated with an increased risk of cancer and poorer subsequent survival. Clinical attention following intermittent claudication diagnosis may reveal incident cancers. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. Intermittent Turbulence in the Very Stable Ekman Layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnard, James C [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2001-01-01

    This study describes a Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of a very stable Ekman layer in which a constant downward heat flux is applied at the lower boundary, thus cooling the fluid above. Numerical experiments were performed in which the strength of the imposed heat flux was varied. For downward heat fluxes above a certain critical value the turbulence becomes intermittent and, as the heat flux increases beyond this value, the flow tends to relaminarize because of the very strong ambient stratification. We adopt Mahrt?s (1999) definition of the very stable boundary layer as a boundary layer in which intermittent, rather than continuous turbulence, is observed. Numerical experiments were used to test various hypothesis of where in ?stability parameter space? the very stable boundary layer is found. These experiments support the findings of Howell and Sun (1999) that the boundary layer will exhibit intermittency and therefore be categorized as ?very stable?, when the stability parameter, z/L, exceeds unity. Another marker for the very stable boundary layer, Derbyshire?s (1990) maximum heat flux criterion, was also examined. Using a case study drawn from the simulations where turbulence intermittency was observed, the mechanism that causes the intermittence was investigated. It was found that patchy turbulence originates from a vigorous inflectional, Ekman-like instability -- a roll cell -- that lifts colder air over warmer air. The resulting convective instability causes an intense burst of turbulence. This turbulence is short-lived because the lifting motion of the roll cell, as well as the roll cell itself, is partially destroyed after the patchy turbulence is generated. Examples of intermittent turbulence obtained from the simulations appear to be consistent with observations of intermittency even though the Reynolds number of the DNS is relatively low (400).

  8. Pressure Autoregulation Measurement Techniques in Adult Traumatic Brain Injury, Part I: A Scoping Review of Intermittent/Semi-Intermittent Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiler, Frederick A; Donnelly, Joseph; Calviello, Leanne; Menon, David K; Smielewski, Peter; Czosnyka, Marek

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform a systematic, scoping review of commonly described intermittent/semi-intermittent autoregulation measurement techniques in adult traumatic brain injury (TBI). Nine separate systematic reviews were conducted for each intermittent technique: computed tomographic perfusion (CTP)/Xenon-CT (Xe-CT), positron emission tomography (PET), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), arteriovenous difference in oxygen (AVDO 2 ) technique, thigh cuff deflation technique (TCDT), transient hyperemic response test (THRT), orthostatic hypotension test (OHT), mean flow index (Mx), and transfer function autoregulation index (TF-ARI). MEDLINE ® , BIOSIS, EMBASE, Global Health, Scopus, Cochrane Library (inception to December 2016), and reference lists of relevant articles were searched. A two tier filter of references was conducted. The total number of articles utilizing each of the nine searched techniques for intermittent/semi-intermittent autoregulation techniques in adult TBI were: CTP/Xe-CT (10), PET (6), MRI (0), AVDO 2 (10), ARI-based TCDT (9), THRT (6), OHT (3), Mx (17), and TF-ARI (6). The premise behind all of the intermittent techniques is manipulation of systemic blood pressure/blood volume via either chemical (such as vasopressors) or mechanical (such as thigh cuffs or carotid compression) means. Exceptionally, Mx and TF-ARI are based on spontaneous fluctuations of cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) or mean arterial pressure (MAP). The method for assessing the cerebral circulation during these manipulations varies, with both imaging-based techniques and TCD utilized. Despite the limited literature for intermittent/semi-intermittent techniques in adult TBI (minus Mx), it is important to acknowledge the availability of such tests. They have provided fundamental insight into human autoregulatory capacity, leading to the development of continuous and more commonly applied techniques in the intensive care unit (ICU). Numerous methods of

  9. Effect of intermittent cold exposure on brown fat activation, obesity, and energy homeostasis in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yann Ravussin

    Full Text Available Homeotherms have specific mechanisms to maintain a constant core body temperature despite changes in thermal environment, food supply, and metabolic demand. Brown adipose tissue, the principal thermogenic organ, quickly and efficiently increases heat production by dissipating the mitochondrial proton motive force. It has been suggested that activation of brown fat, via either environmental (i.e. cold exposure or pharmacologic means, could be used to increase metabolic rate and thus reduce body weight. Here we assess the effects of intermittent cold exposure (4°C for one to eight hours three times a week on C57BL/6J mice fed a high fat diet. Cold exposure increased metabolic rate approximately two-fold during the challenge and activated brown fat. In response, food intake increased to compensate fully for the increased energy expenditure; thus, the mice showed no reduction in body weight or adiposity. Despite the unchanged adiposity, the cold-treated mice showed transient improvements in glucose homeostasis. Administration of the cannabinoid receptor-1 inverse agonist AM251 caused weight loss and improvements in glucose homeostasis, but showed no further improvements when combined with cold exposure. These data suggest that intermittent cold exposure causes transient, meaningful improvements in glucose homeostasis, but without synergy when combined with AM251. Since energy expenditure is significantly increased during cold exposure, a drug that dissociates food intake from metabolic demand during cold exposure may achieve weight loss and further metabolic improvements.

  10. Aerodynamics of intermittent bounds in flying birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobalske, Bret W.; Hearn, Jason W. D.; Warrick, Douglas R.

    sagittal plane during upstroke of flapping flight, we hypothesize that body lift is produced during flapping phases. Future efforts to model the mechanics of intermittent flight should take into account that flap-bounding birds may support up to 20% of their weight even with their wings fully flexed.

  11. Intermittent pacing therapy favorably modulates infarct remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uitterdijk, André; Springeling, Tirza; Hermans, Kevin C M; Merkus, Daphne; de Beer, Vincent J; Gorsse-Bakker, Charlotte; Mokelke, Eric; Daskalopoulos, Evangelos P; Wielopolski, Piotr A; Cleutjens, Jack P M; Blankesteijn, W Matthijs; Prinzen, Frits W; van der Giessen, Willem J; van Geuns, Robert-Jan M; Duncker, Dirk J

    2017-05-01

    Despite early revascularization, remodeling and dysfunction of the left ventricle (LV) after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) remain important therapeutic targets. Intermittent pacing therapy (IPT) of the LV can limit infarct size, when applied during early reperfusion. However, the effects of IPT on post-AMI LV remodeling and infarct healing are unknown. We therefore investigated the effects of IPT on global LV remodeling and infarct geometry in swine with a 3-day old AMI. For this purpose, fifteen pigs underwent 2 h ligation of the left circumflex coronary artery followed by reperfusion. An epicardial pacing lead was implanted in the peri-infarct zone. After three days, global LV remodeling and infarct geometry were assessed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Animals were stratified into MI control and IPT groups. Thirty-five days post-AMI, follow-up MRI was obtained and myofibroblast content, markers of extracellular matrix (ECM) turnover and Wnt/frizzled signaling in infarct and non-infarct control tissue were studied. Results showed that IPT had no significant effect on global LV remodeling, function or infarct mass, but modulated infarct healing. In MI control pigs, infarct mass reduction was principally due to a 26.2 ± 4.4% reduction in infarct thickness (P ≤ 0.05), whereas in IPT pigs it was mainly due to a 35.7 ± 4.5% decrease in the number of infarct segments (P ≤ 0.05), with no significant change in infarct thickness. Myofibroblast content of the infarct zone was higher in IPT (10.9 ± 2.1%) compared to MI control (5.4 ± 1.6%; P ≤ 0.05). Higher myofibroblast presence did not coincide with alterations in expression of genes involved in ECM turnover or Wnt/frizzled signaling at 5 weeks follow-up. Taken together, IPT limited infarct expansion and altered infarct composition, showing that IPT influences remodeling of the infarct zone, likely by increasing regional myofibroblast content.

  12. Intermittent attendance at breast cancer screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padraic Fleming

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. To determine why women skip rounds and factors influencing return of previous non attenders (PNAs to breast screening. Design and methods. Retrospective, quantitative, structured questionnaire posted to 2500 women. First PNAs did not attend their first screening appointment in 2007/2008 but then attended in 2010; First Controls first attended in 2010 without missed previous appointments. Women who attended screening in 2006 or earlier then skipped a round but returned in 2010 were Subsequent PNAs; Subsequent Controls attended all appointments.Results. More First Controls than First PNAs had family history of cancer (72.7% vs 63.2%; P=0.003; breast cancer (31.3% vs 24.8%; P=0.04. More PNAs lived rurally; more First PNAs had 3rd level education (33.2% vs 23.6%; P=0.002 and fewer had private insurance than First Controls (57.7% vs 64.8%; P=0.04. Excellent/good health was reported in First PNAs and First Controls (82.9% vs 83.2%, but fewer Subsequent PNAs than Subsequent Controls (72.7% vs 84.9%; P=0.000. Common considerations at time of missed appointment were had mammogram elsewhere (33% First PNA and postponed to next round (16% First PNA, 18.8% Subsequent PNA. Considerations when returning to screening were similar for First PNAs and Subsequent PNAs: I am older (35.4%, 29.6%, I made sure I remembered (29%, 23.6%, could reschedule (17.6%, 20.6%, illness of more concern (16.5%, 19%. More First PNAs stated my family/friends advised (22.3% vs 15.2% or my GP (12.6% vs 4.6% advised me to attend, heard good things about BreastCheck (28.8% vs 13.6%.Conclusions. Intermittent attenders do not fit socio-demographic patterns of non-attenders; GP recommendation and word of mouth were important in women’s return to screening. Fear and anxiety seem to act as a screening facilitator rather than an inhibitor.

  13. Intermittent Hypoxia Effect on Osteoclastogenesis Stimulated by Neuroblastoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskara, Vasantha Kumar; Mohanam, Indra; Gujrati, Meena; Mohanam, Sanjeeva

    2014-01-01

    Background Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial pediatric solid tumor. Intermittent hypoxia, which is characterized by cyclic periods of hypoxia and reoxygenation, has been shown to positively modulate tumor development and thereby induce tumor growth, angiogenic processes, and metastasis. Bone is one of the target organs of metastasis in advanced neuroblastoma Neuroblastoma cells produce osteoclast-activating factors that increase bone resorption by the osteoclasts. The present study focuses on how intermittent hypoxia preconditioned SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells modulate osteoclastogenesis in RAW 264.7 cells compared with neuroblastoma cells grown at normoxic conditions. Methods We inhibited HIF-1α and HIF-2α in neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells by siRNA/shRNA approaches. Protein expression of HIF-1α, HIF-2α and MAPKs were investigated by western blotting. Expression of osteoclastogenic factors were determined by real-time RT-PCR. The influence of intermittent hypoxia and HIF-1α siRNA on migration of neuroblastoma cells and in vitro differentiation of RAW 264.7 cells were assessed. Intratibial injection was performed with SH-SY5Y stable luciferase-expressing cells and in vivo bioluminescence imaging was used in the analysis of tumor growth in bone. Results Upregulation of mRNAs of osteoclastogenic factors VEGF and RANKL was observed in intermittent hypoxia-exposed neuroblastoma cells. Conditioned medium from the intermittent hypoxia-exposed neuroblastoma cells was found to enhance osteoclastogenesis, up-regulate the mRNAs of osteoclast marker genes including TRAP, CaSR and cathepsin K and induce the activation of ERK, JNK, and p38 in RAW 264.7 cells. Intermittent hypoxia-exposed neuroblastoma cells showed an increased migratory pattern compared with the parental cells. A significant increase of tumor volume was found in animals that received the intermittent hypoxia-exposed cells intratibially compared with parental cells. Conclusions Intermittent hypoxic

  14. Neural correlates of performance monitoring in daily and intermittent smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rass, Olga; Fridberg, Daniel J; O'Donnell, Brian F

    2014-07-01

    Despite efforts that have increased smoking regulation, cigarette taxation, and social stigma, cigarette smoking remains the leading cause of preventable death worldwide, and a significant personal and public economic burden. In the U.S., intermittent smokers comprise approximately 22% of all smokers and represent a stable, non-dependent group that may possess protective factors that prevent the transition to dependence. One possibility is that intermittent smokers have intact CNS frontal regulatory and control mechanisms that enable resistance to nicotine-induced changes. The present study measured inhibitory control using a flanker task and a go-nogo continuous performance tasks in daily dependent smokers, intermittent non-dependent smokers, and nonsmokers. Event-related potential (ERP) measures of were concurrently recorded to measure performance monitoring via Event-Related Negativity (ERN) and error positivity (Pe) components during error trials for each task. In both tasks, behavioral and ERN measures did not differ between groups; however, amplitude of the Pe component was largest among intermittent smokers. Thus, intermittent smokers differed from both daily smokers and nonsmokers on error processing, potentially revealing neuroprotective cognitive processes in nicotine dependence. A better understanding of factors that mediate behavioral regulation may provide novel treatment approaches that help individuals achieve controlled smoking or cessation. Copyright © 2013 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in acute intermittent porphyria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bi; Wei, QianQian; Wang, YunHan; Chen, YongPing; Shang, HuiFang

    2014-09-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria is an inherited disease that is rarely diagnosed in prepubertal children. It can affect the autonomic, peripheral, and central nervous system. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is a clinicoradiological entity characterized by headache, seizures, altered consciousness, and visual disorder associated with potentially reversible neuroradiological abnormalities predominantly in the parieto-occipital lobes. We report a child with acute intermittent porphyria who presented with radiological manifestations suggestive of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. A 9-year-old girl underwent an appendectomy after developing abdominal pain. She subsequently developed bilateral visual disturbance, confusion, seizures, hypertension, tachycardia, nausea, vomiting, constipation, dark tea-colored urine, and recurrent abdominal pain. Initial brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed hyperintense gyriform lesions on T2-weighted images and hypointense to isointense lesions on T1-weighted images in both parieto-occipital lobes with mild enhancement. The diagnosis of acute intermittent porphyria was confirmed by increased urinary excretion of porphyrin precursors. Her clinical signs gradually improved after intravenous high-dose glucose treatment and symptomatic therapies. A repeat magnetic resonance imaging confirmed complete resolution of the parieto-occipital lesions, suggesting with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. The association of abdominal pain, mental status changes, and autonomic dysfunction should arouse the suspicion of acute intermittent porphyria. Acute intermittent porphyria can be associated with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Intermittent Divergent Squint in Prematurity and Its Neurophysiological Aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Kalpana; Panwar, Praveen; Chaudhary, Kulbhushan Prakash

    2017-01-01

    Intermittent distance exotropia is a deviation characterized by an exophoria at near fixation and manifest exotropia at distance fixation. There is normal binocular fusional vergence and stereoacuity at near fixation, but the eyes tend to diverge in bright sunlight, tiredness, day dreaming and the patient may close one eye in such circumstances. Prematurity is associated with numerous eye pathology, besides retinopathy of prematurity, amblyopia, refractive errors, it is also associated with a higher risk esotropia and exotropia. We report a case of a 5-year-old girl (preterm and very low birth weight) with an intermittent deviation of both eyes since three years. On her detailed ocular examination diagnosis of divergence excess intermittent exotropia with normal accommodative convergence to accommodation ratio was made. Bilateral lateral rectus recession was done using hang back technique. Postoperatively, the eyes were aligned normally thereby achieving orthotropia. This article reviews various neurophysiological aspects of intermittent divergent squint delineating the etiopathogenesis, classification system, and management options in intermittent exotropia.

  17. Swirl effects on external intermittency in turbulent jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranga Dinesh, K.K.J., E-mail: Ranga.Dinesh@Lancaster.ac.uk [Energy Lancaster, Engineering Department, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YR (United Kingdom); Jenkins, K.W.; Savill, A.M. [School of Engineering, Cranfield University, Cranfield, Bedford MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); Kirkpatrick, M.P. [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Modelling and Simulation of Intermittent Turbulent Flows. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Swirl Effects on External Intermittency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gaussian and Non-Gaussian Probability Density Distribution. - Abstract: In this paper we present the modelled results of velocity and mixture fraction intermittency for selected isothermal swirling jet flows using Large Eddy Simulation (LES). The modelled problems considered three different swirl numbers S = 0.3, 0.54 and 0.8 respectively. The probability density functions (pdfs) and intermittency of velocity and mixture fraction are presented. The simulations capture well complex flow features such as centre jet precession, a bluff body stabilised recirculation zone, and swirl induced vortex breakdown and also describe the effects of far field flow as well as scalar distributions. The calculated probability density distributions exhibit changes from a Gaussian to a delta function with increased radial distance from the jet centreline, and also a non-Gaussian shape on the jet centreline near the precession region. The radial variation of the intermittency shows differences between results with increased swirl number, especially inside the downstream swirl-induced recirculation region.

  18. Entropic-Skins Geometry to Describe Wall Turbulence Intermittency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo Queiros-Conde

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to describe the phenomenon of intermittency in wall turbulence and, more particularly, the behaviour of moments  and and intermittency exponents ζP with the order p and distance to the wall, we developed a new geometrical framework called “entropic-skins geometry” based on the notion of scale-entropy which is here applied to an experimental database of boundary layer flows. Each moment has its own spatial multi-scale support Ωp (“skin”. The model assumes the existence of a hierarchy of multi-scale sets Ωp ranged from the “bulk” to the “crest”. The crest noted characterizes the geometrical support where the most intermittent (the highest fluctuations in energy dissipation occur; the bulk is the geometrical support for the whole range of fluctuations. The model assumes then the existence of a dynamical flux through the hierarchy of skins. The specific case where skins display a fractal structure is investigated. Bulk fractal dimension  and crest dimension  are linked by a scale-entropy flux defining a reversibility efficiency  (d is the embedding dimension. The model, initially developed for homogeneous and isotropic turbulent flows, is applied here to wall bounded turbulence where intermittency exponents are measured by extended self-similarity. We obtained for intermittency exponents the analytical expression with γ ≈ 0.36 in agreement with experimental results.

  19. Intermittent synchronization in a network of bursting neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Choongseok; Rubchinsky, Leonid L

    2011-09-01

    Synchronized oscillations in networks of inhibitory and excitatory coupled bursting neurons are common in a variety of neural systems from central pattern generators to human brain circuits. One example of the latter is the subcortical network of the basal ganglia, formed by excitatory and inhibitory bursters of the subthalamic nucleus and globus pallidus, involved in motor control and affected in Parkinson's disease. Recent experiments have demonstrated the intermittent nature of the phase-locking of neural activity in this network. Here, we explore one potential mechanism to explain the intermittent phase-locking in a network. We simplify the network to obtain a model of two inhibitory coupled elements and explore its dynamics. We used geometric analysis and singular perturbation methods for dynamical systems to reduce the full model to a simpler set of equations. Mathematical analysis was completed using three slow variables with two different time scales. Intermittently, synchronous oscillations are generated by overlapped spiking which crucially depends on the geometry of the slow phase plane and the interplay between slow variables as well as the strength of synapses. Two slow variables are responsible for the generation of activity patterns with overlapped spiking, and the other slower variable enhances the robustness of an irregular and intermittent activity pattern. While the analyzed network and the explored mechanism of intermittent synchrony appear to be quite generic, the results of this analysis can be used to trace particular values of biophysical parameters (synaptic strength and parameters of calcium dynamics), which are known to be impacted in Parkinson's disease.

  20. Eccentric strength and endurance in patients with unilateral intermittent claudication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Basyches

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze concentric and eccentric strength and endurance in patients with unilateral intermittent claudication. INTRODUCTION: Basic motor tasks are composed of concentric, isometric, and eccentric actions, which are related and contribute to physical performance. In previous studies of patients with intermittent claudication, the disease-related reduction in concentric and isometric muscular strength and endurance resulted in poorer walking performance. To date, no study has evaluated eccentric muscle action in patients with intermittent claudication. METHODS: Eleven patients with unilateral intermittent claudication performed isokinetic concentric and eccentric actions at the ankle joints to assess peak torque and total work in both symptomatic and asymptomatic legs. RESULTS: Concentric peak torque and total work were lower in the symptomatic than in the asymptomatic leg (80 ± 32 vs. 95 ± 41 N/m, P = 0.01; 1479 ± 667 vs. 1709 ± 879 J, P = 0.03, respectively. There were no differences in eccentric peak torque and total work between symptomatic and asymptomatic legs (96 ± 30 vs. 108 ± 48 N/m; 1852 ± 879 vs. 1891 ± 755 J, respectively. CONCLUSION: Strength and endurance in the symptomatic leg were lower during concentric compared to eccentric action. Future studies are recommended to investigate the mechanisms underlying these responses and to analyze the effects of interventions to improve concentric strength and endurance on functional limitations in patients with intermittent claudication.

  1. Magnetic Reconnection and Intermittent Turbulence in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, K. T.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Gosling, J. T.; Greco, A.; Servidio, S.; Hnat, B.; Chapman, S. C.; Phan, T. D.

    2014-05-01

    A statistical relationship between magnetic reconnection, current sheets, and intermittent turbulence in the solar wind is reported for the first time using in situ measurements from the Wind spacecraft at 1 AU. We identify intermittency as non-Gaussian fluctuations in increments of the magnetic field vector B that are spatially and temporally nonuniform. The reconnection events and current sheets are found to be concentrated in intervals of intermittent turbulence, identified using the partial variance of increments method: within the most non-Gaussian 1% of fluctuations in B, we find 87%-92% of reconnection exhausts and ˜9% of current sheets. Also, the likelihood that an identified current sheet will also correspond to a reconnection exhaust increases dramatically as the least intermittent fluctuations are removed from the data set. Hence, the turbulent solar wind contains a hierarchy of intermittent magnetic field structures that are increasingly linked to current sheets, which in turn are progressively more likely to correspond to sites of magnetic reconnection. These results could have far reaching implications for laboratory and astrophysical plasmas where turbulence and magnetic reconnection are ubiquitous.

  2. Intermittent Volcanism in the S Pacific: Tracking Persistent Geochemical Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konter, J. G.; Koppers, A. A.; Staudigel, H.; Hanan, B. B.; Blichert-Toft, J.

    2004-12-01

    South Pacific ocean intraplate volcanoes (OIV's) have formed relatively short, discontinuous chains over the last 140 Ma, in contrast to classic continuous hot spot chains like Hawaii or Louisville. Moreover, its volcanism stands apart by very diverse and radiogenic mantle source regions, defining the South Pacific Isotopic and Thermal Anomaly (SOPITA). Discontinuous SOPITA OIV's form a complex array of crossing lineaments and isolated seamounts that can be back-tracked in time to the western Pacific. We studied the Hf and Pb isotopic composition of the prominent western Gilbert's and Tokelau chain that mostly correspond to the plate motion stage expressed by the Emperor Seamounts. The Gilbert's chain (to the West of Tokelau) has an age range of 74-65 Ma, and back-tracks to an OIV source origin near Rurutu. Notably, this chain shows an isotopic signature similar to the Rurutu chain, from Burtaritari (176Hf/177Hf: 0.282900, 206Pb/204Pb: 20.582) to Tuba (0.282938, 19.691). The parallel-running Tokelau chain ranges from 76-58 Ma, projecting current activity around Macdonald seamount. Its isotopic composition is also similar to Macdonald seamount, as shown by Howland (0.282951, 20.773) to Polo (0.283050, 19.390). However, both chains also contain seamounts with ages and isotopic signatures that are outliers, inconsistent with their general age range and isotopic trends (e.g. Ava; 0.282641, 17.729 and Sakau; 0.282880, 18.997). Our results show that the discontinuous magmatic provinces within SOPITA can be tracked back in time by geochronology and geochemical fingerprinting. This suggests that the SOPITA OIV's are fed by distinct, long-lived mantle source regions that may turn "on" or "off" for distinct periods during their life-times. This intermittent volcanism is inconsistent with the "standard" fixed hot spot model, since it does not produce continuous chains with linear age progressions. Furthermore, our results demonstrate the utility of geochemical fingerprinting

  3. Intermittent Solar Ammonia Absorption Cycle (ISAAC) refrigeration for lesser developed countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Donald C.

    1990-02-01

    The Intermittent Solar Ammonia Absorption Cycle (ISAAC) refrigerator is a solar thermal technology which provides low cost, efficient, reliable ice-making to areas without ready access to electricity. An ISAAC refrigeration system consists of a compound parabolic solar collector, two pressure vessels, a condenser, a cold box or refrigerated space, and simple connective piping -- no moving parts or electrical components. Most parts are simple construction or plumbing grade materials, locally available in many remote areas. This technology has numerous potential benefits in lesser developed countries both by providing a cheap, reliable source of ice, and, since manufacture requires only semi-skilled labor, a source of employment to the local economy. Applications include vaccine storage for health care clinics; fish, meat, and dairy product storage; and personal consumption. Importantly, this technology increases the quality of life for people in lesser developed countries without depleting fossil fuel resources or increasing the release of greenhouse gases such as CO2 and chlorofluorocarbons.

  4. ANESTHETIC MANAGEMENT FOR A PATIENT WITH ACUTE INTERMITTENT PORPHYRIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nenad Savić

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Acute intermittent porphyria is a rare metabolic disorder resulting from a partial deficiency of porphobilinogen deaminase, enzyme in the heme biosynthetic pathway. Its inheritance is autosomal dominant. A deficiency of porphobilinogen deaminase is not sufficient by its self to produce acute intermittent porphyria, and other activating factors must also be present. These include some drugs, hormones, infection, injury and alcohol. Besides others, anesthetics have been implicated in the triggering of a number of severe porphyric reactions. Although there is no clinical evidence, the fear of hypothesized porphyrinogenicity of repetitive anesthetics exposures still remains. Despite these doubts, we report here the case of uneventful repeated exposure to anesthetics in a patient suffering from acute intermittent porphyria, within a fifteen- month period. On both occasions, the patient was safely exposed to certain anesthetics included: propofol, sevoflurane, rocuronium, midazolam and fentanyl.

  5. Effect of Linguizhugan decoction on hyperlipidemia rats with intermittent fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yubin; Qin, Jian; Ke, Bin; Zhang, Junjie; Shi, Lanying; Li, Qiong

    2013-04-01

    To explore the effect of Linguizhugan decoction on hyperlipidemia rats with caloric restriction. The hyperlipidemia model of rat was induced by high fat diet for 8 weeks. After the model was established, 26 rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: the control group (n = 6), the model group (n = 6), the intermittent fasting (IF) group (n = 8), and the IF and herbal medicine (IFH) group (n = 6). IF group was applied intermittent fasting every other day. The IFH group was given Linguizhugan decoction every day and intermittent fasting every other day. Blood samples were taken at the end of 16 weeks, and serum ghrelin and lipid was tested. Serum ghrelin in the IF group significantly increased (P < 0.01). Serum ghrelin in IFH group was lower than the IF group (P < 0.05), but higher than the model group (P < 0.01). Linguizhugan decoction may play a part in regulation of energy and appetite in hyperlipidemia rats with IF.

  6. Generalized description of intermittency in turbulence via stochastic methods

    CERN Document Server

    Friedrich, J

    2016-01-01

    We present a generalized picture of intermittency in turbulence that is based on the theory of stochastic processes. To this end, we rely on the experimentally and numerically verified finding by R.~Friedrich and J.~Peinke [Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 863 (1997)] that allows for an interpretation of the turbulent energy cascade as a Markov process of the velocity increments in scale. It is explicitly shown that all known phenomenological models of turbulence can be reproduced by the Kramers-Moyal expansion of the velocity increment probability density function that is associated to a Markov process. We compare the different sets of Kramers-Moyal coefficients of each phenomenology and deduce that an accurate description of intermittency should take into account an infinite number of coefficients. This is demonstrated in more detail for the case of Burgers turbulence that exhibits the strongest intermittency effects. Moreover, the influence of nonlocality on the Kramers-Moyal coefficients is investigated by direct num...

  7. Intermittency in Fractal Fourier Hydrodynamics: Lessons from the Burgers Equation

    CERN Document Server

    Buzzicotti, Michele; Frisch, Uriel; Ray, Samriddhi Sankar

    2016-01-01

    We present theoretical and numerical results for the one-dimensional stochastically forced Burgers equation decimated on a fractal Fourier set of dimension $D$. We investigate the robustness of the energy transfer mechanism and of the small-scale statistical fluctuations by changing $D$. We find that a very small percentage of mode-reduction ($D \\lesssim 1$) is enough to destroy most of the characteristics of the original non-decimated equation. In particular, we observe a suppression of intermittent fluctuations for $D <1$ and a quasi-singular transition from the fully intermittent ($D=1$) to the non-intermittent case for $D \\lesssim 1$. Our results indicate that the existence of strong localized structures (shocks) in the one-dimensional Burgers equation is the result of highly entangled correlations amongst all Fourier modes.

  8. Photonic integrated circuits unveil crisis-induced intermittency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsaklian Dal Bosco, Andreas; Akizawa, Yasuhiro; Kanno, Kazutaka; Uchida, Atsushi; Harayama, Takahisa; Yoshimura, Kazuyuki

    2016-09-19

    We experimentally investigate an intermittent route to chaos in a photonic integrated circuit consisting of a semiconductor laser with time-delayed optical feedback from a short external cavity. The transition from a period-doubling dynamics to a fully-developed chaos reveals a stage intermittently exhibiting these two dynamics. We unveil the bifurcation mechanism underlying this route to chaos by using the Lang-Kobayashi model and demonstrate that the process is based on a phenomenon of attractor expansion initiated by a particular distribution of the local Lyapunov exponents. We emphasize on the crucial importance of the distribution of the steady-state solutions introduced by the time-delayed feedback on the existence of this intermittent dynamics.

  9. Multiparticle correlations and intermittency in high energy collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Bozek, P

    1992-01-01

    In this work the analysis of the intermittency signal observed in high energy experi- ments is done using multiparticle distributions and correlation functions. The effect of the dimensional projection of the multiparticle distributions on one or two-dimensional subspace is discussed. The structure of the multiparticle cumulants is analyzed for the DELPHI e + e~ annihilation data. The language of the self-similar distribution func- tions, which is used in this work, is shown to be largely equivalent to the well known a-model. In the case of the ultrarelativistic nuclear collisions, where the Monte-Carlo simulations fail to reproduce the data, we argue that the observed intermittency pattern is a signal of some nonlinear effect beyond the simple superposition of nucleon-nucleon collisions. The model of spatiotemporal intermittency is discussed in details and is shown to reproduce qualitatively the dependence of t...

  10. Pattern formation via intermittence from microscopic deterministic dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Marco; Escaff, Daniel; Finger, Ricardo

    2012-05-01

    We propose a one-dimensional lattice model, inspired by population dynamics interaction. The model combines a variable coupling range with the Allee effect. The system is capable of exhibiting pattern formation that is similar to what occurs in similar continuous models for population dynamics. However, the formation features are quite different; in this case the pattern emerges from a disorder state via intermittence. We analytically estimated the selected wavelength of the formed pattern and numerically studied fluctuations around the mean wavelength. We also comment on the relationship between intermittence and the edge of chaos as well as sensitivity to initial conditions. Next, we present an analytical prediction of the influence of the world size on the intermittent regime which is in good agreement with the numerical observations. Moreover, the last calculation provided us an alternative way to compute the pattern wavelength. Finally, we discuss the continuous limit of our lattice model.

  11. Scenedesmus dimorphus biofilm: Photoefficiency and biomass production under intermittent lighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toninelli, Andrea Efrem; Wang, Junfeng; Liu, Mingshen; Wu, Hong; Liu, Tianzhong

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of intermittent lighting on the growth performances of a Scenedesmus dimorphus biofilm. Flashing light effect (FLE) is common in traditional suspended cultures of microalgae; yet, publications about this phenomenon, in the context of biofilm cultivation, are scarce. In this work we demonstrate that, thanks to intermittent illumination, it is possible for attached cultivations to fulfill FLE, improve photoefficiency and productivity as well as providing protection from photoinhibition using much lower flashing light frequencies than those usually required with suspended cultures. Medium frequency intermittent lighting (0.1 Hz) guaranteed excellent light integration resulting in 9.13 g m−2 d−1 biomass productivity, which was 8.9% higher than with continuous lighting. Results showed that a light fraction value of 0.5 always improved photoefficiency values as related to continuous light with a 118.8% maximum increase. PMID:27561323

  12. Slit ventricle syndrome: a case report of intermittent intracranial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Nitin; Vernier, Eric; Ravenscroft, Sheri; Schwartz, Lauren; Oleske, James; Ming, Xue

    2013-06-01

    Slit ventricle syndrome is a rare condition whereby brain compliance is reduced and can be associated with intermittent intracranial hypertension. A 19-year-old male with a ventriculoperitoneal shunt for congenital hydrocephalus presented with a 1-day history of headache and drowsiness-symptoms from which he suffered in many recurrent episodes over the past 5 years. The improvement of headaches without surgical intervention led to the diagnosis of migraine. During this hospitalization, episodes of intermittent intracranial hypertension were documented along with the remission and relapse of the symptoms. While the patient's intracranial pressure was within normal range in over 90% of his monitoring period, which postponed shunting, replacement of his ventriculoperitoneal shut eventually resolved his symptoms. Slit ventricle syndrome with reduced ventricular compliances should be considered in patients with clinical evidence of intermittent intracranial hypertension and small ventricular size. The authors advocate shunt replacement as an appropriate treatment for this condition.

  13. Acute intermittent porphyria with SIADH and fluctuating dysautonomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabin, A; Thapa, L J; Paudel, R; Rana, P V S

    2012-01-01

    Three cases of acute intermittent porphyria are reported. While in first case severe pain in abdomen with intermittent exacerbation was the only presentation, the second patient presented as accelerated hypertension and acute abdominal crises in whom the clinical course was characterized by development of deep coma due to inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone before she made complete recovery. The third patient, initially manifested as acute encephalitic syndrome. After initial improvement, she developed features of acute intermittent porphyria i.e. acute abdomen, neuropsychiatric symptoms, and rapidly progressing acute motor neuropathy leading to respiratory and bulbar paralysis. In addition, she developed severe and fluctuating dysautonomia leading to cardiac arrest and fatal termination. The importance of early diagnosis, recognition of autonomic disturbances, prompt treatment and counseling for avoidance of precipitating factors is stressed.

  14. A rational clinical approach to suspected insulin allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødtger, Uffe; Wittrup, M

    2005-01-01

    AIMS: Allergy to recombinant human (rDNA) insulin preparations is a rare complication of insulin therapy. However, insulin preparations contain several allergens, and several disorders can resemble insulin allergy. Studies evaluating the diagnostic procedures on suspected insulin allergy...... technique (n = 5), skin disease (n = 3) and other systemic allergy (n = 1). Nine other patients were found to be allergic to protamine (n = 3) or rDNA insulin (n = 6), and specific treatment was associated with relief in 8 patients (89%). Four patients had local reactions of unknown causes but symptom...... relief was obtained in three cases by unspecific therapy. Overall, 20 (91%) reported relief of symptoms. CONCLUSION: Our standardized investigative procedure of suspected insulin preparation (IP) allergy was associated with relief of symptoms in > 90% of patients. IP allergy was diagnosed in 41...

  15. Interdisciplinary action of nurses to children with suspected sexual abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lia Leão Ciuffo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Understanding the role of nurses as members of interdisciplinary teams in the care of children with suspected sexual abuse. Methodology. This is a qualitative research based on the sociological phenomenology of Alfred Schutz. In 2008 were interviewed eleven nurses who worked in reference institutions for the care of child victims of sexual abuse in Rio de Janeiro. Results. The category called 'Interacting with other professionals in child care' emerged from the analysis of performance of professionals. The intersubjective relations between the nurses and the interdisciplinary team will enable to understand the intent of care from the perspective of social, emotional and psychological needs of children and their families. Conclusion. Interdisciplinarity favored the development of actions based on acceptance, listening and agreements on possible solutions in the care of children with suspected sexual abuse.

  16. Atlantoaxial subluxation and nasopharyngeal necrosis complicating suspected granulomatosis with polyangiitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Anand; Holekamp, Terrence F; Diaz, Jason A; Zebala, Lukas; Brasington, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Granulomatosis polyangiitis (GPA, formerly Wegener granulomatosis) is a vasculitis that typically involves the upper respiratory tract, lungs, and kidneys. The 2 established methods to confirm a suspicion of GPA are the antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) test and biopsy. However, ANCA-negative cases have been known to occur, and it can be difficult to find biopsy evidence of granulomatous disease.We report a case of suspected granulomatosis with polyangiitis limited to the nasopharynx. With a negative ANCA and no histological evidence, our diagnosis was founded on the exclusion of other diagnoses and the response to cyclophosphamide therapy. This case is unique because the patient's lesion resulted in atlantoaxial instability, which required a posterior spinal fusion at C1-C2. This is the first reported case of suspected GPA producing damage to the cervical spine and threatening the spinal cord.

  17. Suspected side effects to the quadrivalent human papilloma vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinth, Louise; Theibel, Ann Cathrine; Pors, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The quadrivalent vaccine that protects against human papilloma virus types 6, 11, 16 and 18 (Q-HPV vaccine, Gardasil) was included into the Danish childhood vaccination programme in 2009. During the past years, a collection of symptoms primarily consistent with sympathetic nervous...... system dysfunction have been described as suspected side effects to the Q-HPV vaccine. METHODS: We present a description of suspected side effects to the Q-HPV vaccine in 53 patients referred to our Syncope Unit for tilt table test and evaluation of autonomic nervous system function. RESULTS: All...... consistency in the reported symptoms as well as between our findings and those described by others. Our findings neither confirm nor dismiss a causal link to the Q-HPV vaccine, but they suggest that further research is urgently warranted to clarify the pathophysiology behind the symptoms experienced...

  18. Radiological (scintigraphic) evaluation of patients with suspected pulmonar thromboembolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biello, D.R.

    1987-06-19

    The optimal strategy for diagnostic evaluation of patients with suspected pulmonary thromboembolism (PE) is subject of controversial and often conflicting opinions. If untreated, as many as 30% of patients with PE may die. Conversely, anticoagulant therapy significantly decreases mortality from PE, but bleeding complications occur. Underdiagnosis may result in a preventable death, and overdiagnosis may lead to significant hemorrhage from unnecessary anticoagulant therapy. This article outlines a practical guide for the use of pulmonary ventilation-perfusion (V-P) scintigraphy in patients with suspected PE. Perfusion imaging involves the intravenous injection of radiolabeled particles ranging from 10 to 60 ..mu..m in diameter (technetium Tc 99m macroaggregated albumin or technetium Tc 99m serum albumin microspheres); these particles are trapped in the capillaries and precapillary arterioles of the lung. The radiolabeled particles are distributed to the lungs in proportion to regional pulmonary blood flow. The correspondence of perfusion defects to bronchopulmonary segments is best appreciated in the posterior oblique views.

  19. Radiotherapy in three suspect cases of feline thymoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaser-Hotz, B; Rohrer, C R; Fidel, J L; Nett, C S; Hörauf, A; Hauser, B

    2001-01-01

    Radiation therapy for three cases of suspect feline thymoma is described. The thymoma was controlled for 4 years in case no. 1. Case no. 2 responded well to radiation therapy but was euthanized after 2 months because of a nasal adenocarcinoma. Case no. 3 continues to do well more than 8 months after radiotherapy. Difficulties in diagnosing feline thymomas are discussed, and biological behavior as well as different treatment modalities of feline and human thymomas are compared.

  20. Percutaneous cholecystocentesis in cats with suspected hepatobiliary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byfield, Victoria L; Callahan Clark, Julie E; Turek, Bradley J; Bradley, Charles W; Rondeau, Mark P

    2017-12-01

    Objectives The objective was to evaluate the safety and diagnostic utility of percutaneous ultrasound-guided cholecystocentesis (PUC) in cats with suspected hepatobiliary disease. Methods Medical records of 83 cats with suspected hepatobiliary disease that underwent PUC were retrospectively reviewed. Results At the time of PUC, at least one additional procedure was performed in 79/83 cats, including hepatic aspiration and/or biopsy (n = 75) and splenic aspiration (n = 18). Complications were noted in 14/83 cases, including increased abdominal fluid (n = 11), needle-tip occlusion (n = 1), failed first attempt to penetrate the gall bladder wall (n = 1) and pneumoperitoneum (n = 1). There were no reports of gall bladder rupture, bile peritonitis or hypotension necessitating treatment with vasopressor medication. Blood products were administered to 7/83 (8%) cats. Seventy-two cats (87%) survived to discharge. Of the cats that were euthanized (9/83) or died (2/83), none were reported as a definitive consequence of PUC. Bacteria were identified cytologically in 10/71 samples (14%); all 10 had a positive aerobic bacterial culture. Bile culture was positive in 11/80 samples (14%). Of the cases with a positive bile culture, cytological description of bacteria corresponded to the organism cultured in fewer than 50% of cases. The most common cytologic diagnosis was hepatic lipidosis (49/66). The most common histopathologic diagnosis was cholangitis (10/21). Conclusions and relevance PUC was safe in this group of cats with suspected hepatobiliary disease. Complications were likely associated with ancillary procedures performed at the time of PUC. Bile analysis yielded an abnormal result in nearly one-third of cats with suspected hepatobiliary disease. Complete agreement between bile cytology and culture was lacking. Further evaluation of the correlation between bile cytology and bile culture is warranted.

  1. Interviewing strategically to elicit admissions from guilty suspects

    OpenAIRE

    Tekin, Serra; Granhag, Pär Anders; Strömwall, Leif; Giolla, Erik Mac; Vrij, Aldert; Hartwig, Maria

    2015-01-01

    In this article we introduce a novel interviewing tactic to elicit admissions from guilty suspects. By influencing the suspects’ perception of the amount of evidence the interviewer holds against them, we aimed to shift the suspects’ counterinterrogation strategies from less to more forthcoming. The proposed tactic (SUE-Confrontation) is a development of the Strategic Use of Evidence (SUE) framework and aims to affect the suspects’ perception by confronting them with statement-evidence incons...

  2. MRI for clinically suspected pediatric appendicitis: case interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Michael M.; Brian, James M.; Methratta, Sosamma T.; Hulse, Michael A.; Choudhary, Arabinda K.; Eggli, Kathleen D.; Boal, Danielle K.B. [Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, Hershey, PA (United States)

    2014-05-15

    As utilization of MRI for clinically suspected pediatric appendicitis becomes more common, there will be increased focus on case interpretation. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to share our institution's case interpretation experience. MRI findings of appendicitis include appendicoliths, tip appendicitis, intraluminal fluid-debris level, pitfalls of size measurements, and complications including abscesses. The normal appendix and inguinal appendix are also discussed. (orig.)

  3. MRI for clinically suspected pediatric appendicitis: an implemented program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Michael M.; Gustas, Cristy N.; Choudhary, Arabinda K.; Methratta, Sosamma T.; Hulse, Michael A.; Eggli, Kathleen D.; Boal, Danielle K.B. [Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Mail Code H066, 500 University Drive, P.O. Box 850, Hershey, PA (United States); Geeting, Glenn [Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Department of Emergency Medicine, Hershey, PA (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Emergent MRI is now a viable alternative to CT for evaluating appendicitis while avoiding the detrimental effects of ionizing radiation. However, primary employment of MRI in the setting of clinically suspected pediatric appendicitis has remained significantly underutilized. To describe our institution's development and the results of a fully implemented clinical program using MRI as the primary imaging evaluation for children with suspected appendicitis. A four-sequence MRI protocol consisting of coronal and axial single-shot turbo spin-echo (SS-TSE) T2, coronal spectral adiabatic inversion recovery (SPAIR), and axial SS-TSE T2 with fat saturation was performed on 208 children, ages 3 to 17 years, with clinically suspected appendicitis. No intravenous or oral contrast material was administered. No sedation was administered. Data collection includes two separate areas: time parameter analysis and MRI diagnostic results. Diagnostic accuracy of MRI for pediatric appendicitis indicated a sensitivity of 97.6% (CI: 87.1-99.9%), specificity 97.0% (CI: 93.2-99.0%), positive predictive value 88.9% (CI: 76.0-96.3%), and negative predictive value 99.4% (CI: 96.6-99.9%). Time parameter analysis indicated clinical feasibility, with time requested to first sequence obtained mean of 78.7 +/- 52.5 min, median 65 min; first-to-last sequence time stamp mean 14.2 +/- 8.8 min, median 12 min; last sequence to report mean 57.4 +/- 35.2 min, median 46 min. Mean age was 11.2 +/- 3.6 years old. Girls represented 57% of patients. MRI is an effective and efficient method of imaging children with clinically suspected appendicitis. Using an expedited four-sequence protocol, sensitivity and specificity are comparable to CT while avoiding the detrimental effects of ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  4. Epidemiology of suspected wrist joint infection versus inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeete, Kshamata; Hess, Erik P; Clark, Tod; Moran, Steven; Kakar, Sanjeev; Rizzo, Marco

    2011-03-01

    To determine the cumulative prevalence of septic arthritis presenting to the emergency department of an academic medical center and evaluate the use of clinical data to diagnose infection versus inflammation. We conducted a records review of a single institution with 80,000 annual emergency room visits. We included a consecutive series of patients with suspected wrist infection from January 1, 2007, to December 31, 2008. Adults complaining of atraumatic wrist pain with either erythema or swelling on physical examination or a final diagnosis of septic arthritis, gout, pseudogout, cellulitis, wrist hematoma/edema, or wrist arthritic flare were suspected to have infection. We collected data using a standardized data abstraction form. We reviewed 804 patient records. A total of 104 patients meeting inclusion criteria for suspected wrist joint infection during the 2-year study period were included. Mean age was 62.5 years (SD, 20.2 y); 63 were men. There were 12 patients with a history of gout, 4 with a history of pseudogout, and 19 with a history of diabetes. Wrist arthrocentesis was performed in 31 patients, and 11 underwent surgical treatment. There were 16 patients with a final diagnosis of gout, 11 with pseudogout, 43 with cellulitis, 13 with upper extremity hematoma/edema, and 15 with wrist arthritic flare. The cumulative prevalence of septic arthritis was 5%. In this series of emergency department patients with suspected wrist joint infection, gout, pseudogout, and cellulitis were the most common etiologies. The cumulative incidence of septic wrist arthritis was low. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Suspected spinocellular carcinoma of the inferior eyelid resulted multiple chalazion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onesti, Maria Giuseppina; Troccola, Antonietta; Maruccia, Michele; Conversi, Andrea; Scuderi, Gianluca

    2013-01-01

    Chalazion is a subacute granulomatous inflammation of the eyelid caused by retention of tarsal gland secretions and it's the most common inflammatory lesion of the eyelid. In cases of doubtful clinical presentation the diagnosis with a biopsy and a histopathological examination is important because it can orientate an appropriate surgical treatment. We report a case of a 64-years-old diabetic man, suspected for a spinocellular lesion of the inferior eyelid of the left eye, it resulted unexpectedly a chalazion.

  6. CT-guided biopsy of suspected malignancy: A potential pitfall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Henderson

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Paragangliomas are rare catecholamine-secreting neuro-endocrine tumours that can arise from sympathetic or parasympathetic tissue. Any manipulation of these tumours, without appropriate medical therapy, can result in excess catecholamine release leading to a catecholamine crisis. Neuro-endocrine tumours must be considered prior to interventional biopsy of an unknown soft-tissue mass, and appropriate biochemical investigations should be performed in suspected cases to prevent catastrophic complications.

  7. [Three cases of suspected re-infection of mumps virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatanaka, Akio; Kamada, Tomoko; Honda, Keiji; Tazaki, Akihisa; Kishine, Naomi; Kawashima, Yoshiyuki

    2012-08-01

    A 32-year-old woman, 5-year-old girl, and 33-year-old man visited our otorhinolaryngology outpatient clinic with tumentia of the unilateral parotid gland. A high titer of serum IgG antibodies against the mumps virus was detected. Around the same time, other members of their families had the same parotid tumentia, and they were diagnosed as having their first mumps infection. Therefore, the diagnosis of the three cases was strongly suspected to be re-infection with mumps. In Japan, it was classically believed that the mumps virus infection occurs only once in patients and reinfection doesn't occur. However, some pediatricians in Japan have reported that re-infection with mumps is strongly suspected when high titers of serum IgG antibodies against the mumps virus are found at the initial visit. It is now believed many more examples of mumps re-infection cases have existed than we previously believed. When high titers of serum IgG antibodies against the mumps virus are detected at an initial visit in patients who have had mumps previously, re-infection should be strongly suspected. And to make it certain, we suggest that the mumps IgG antibodies should be checked twice to confirm the diagnosis. If elevation of the IgG antibodies persist, the diagnosis will be much more certain.

  8. Ten-day observation of live rabies suspected dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepsumethanon, V; Wilde, H; Sitprija, V

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed at analyzing a ten-day observation period of rabies suspected dogs and cats according to six criteria. Dogs and cats suspected of being rabid were brought for observation when they had either bitten a person or another animal or when abnormal behaviour or unusual illness was observed. Between 1985 and 2005, retrospective and prospective data from 1,222 dogs and 303 cats was collected during the ten-day observation period. If an animal had died, brain examination using fluorescent antibody testing was routinely performed. If an animal had survived for > or =10 days, it was released to its owner or transferred to the municipal dog shelter. A total of 644 dogs and 58 cats found rabid died within 10 days of observation. In addition, for 208 dogs confirmed rabid with laboratory tests between 1997 and 2005, six criteria were analysed from the day of submission. This experience with the implemented 10-day observation period confirms the WHO recommendation on identifying suspected rabid dogs or cats under veterinary supervision following a human exposure.

  9. MR delayed enhancement imaging findings in suspected acute myocarditis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gahide, Gerald [CHU de Montpellier, Radiologie centrale - Pole Cardiovasculaire et Thoracique, Montpellier (France); Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Montpellier, Hopital A de Villeneuve, Montpellier (France); Bertrand, D.; Dacher, J.N. [CHU de Rouen, Radiologie centrale - Hopital Charles Nicolle, Rouen (France); Roubille, F.; Skaik, S.; Piot, C.; Leclerq, F. [CHU de Montpellier, Departement de Cardiologie - Pole Cardiovasculaire et Thoracique, Montpellier (France); Tron, C.; Cribier, A. [CHU de Rouen, Departement de Cardiologie - Hopital Charles Nicolle, Rouen (France); Vernhet, H. [CHU de Montpellier, Radiologie centrale - Pole Cardiovasculaire et Thoracique, Montpellier (France)

    2010-01-15

    The purpose of the study was to prospectively assess the clinical impact of routinely performed delayed enhancement imaging in suspected acute myocarditis. A two-centre prospective study was performed in patients with suspected acute myocarditis. The protocol included horizontal long axis, vertical long axis and short axis cine MR and delayed enhancement imaging after Gd-DTPA infusion (0.2 mmol/kg). Sixty consecutive patients were enrolled (aged 49.4{+-}17.8 years). MRI demonstrated delayed enhancement sparing the subendocardicardial layer in 51.6% of patients, concordant with the diagnosis of acute myocarditis; 16.7% of patients exhibited delayed enhancement involving the subendocardial layer with irregular margins, concordant with the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction; 31.7% of patients had delayed enhancement imaging that was considered normal. Routine imaging to identify delayed enhancement provided crucial information in suspected acute myocarditis by reinforcing the diagnosis in 51.6% of patients and correcting a misdiagnosed acute myocardial infarction in 16.7% of patients. (orig.)

  10. Low dose computed tomography in suspected acute renal colic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meagher, T; Sukumar, V P; Collingwood, J; Crawley, T; Schofield, D; Henson, J; Lakin, K; Connolly, D; Giles, J

    2001-11-01

    To evaluate whether computed tomography (CT) of the renal tract in suspected renal colic using reduced exposure factors maintains diagnostic accuracy. Prospective multi-centre cohort study. Patients with suspected renal colic were examined using computed tomography (CT) of the renal tract followed by intravenous urography (IVU) in four different centres with five different CT systems. Sixty-nine patients with suspected renal colic had CT of the renal tract followed by IVU. CT was performed with reduced exposure factors, giving a mean CT effective dose of 3.5 (range 2.8-4.5) mSv compared with 1.5 mSv for IVU. Ureteric calculi were detected in 43 patients: CT and IVU detected 40 (93%) ureteric calculi. CT identified other lesions causing symptoms in five patients and identified renal calculi in 24 patients. IVU identified renal calculi in six patients and made false positive diagnosis of renal calculi in seven patients. Mean examination time for CT was 5 minutes and for IVU was 80 minutes. CT examination at reduced exposure factors maintains the diagnostic accuracy recorded in other series. Copyright 2001 The Royal College of Radiologists.

  11. The economics of cardiac biomarker testing in suspected myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodacre, Steve; Thokala, Praveen

    2015-03-01

    Suspected myocardial infarction (MI) is a common reason for emergency hospital attendance and admission. Cardiac biomarker measurement is an essential element of diagnostic assessment of suspected MI. Although the cost of a routinely available biomarker may be small, the large patient population and consequences in terms of hospital admission and investigation mean that the economic impact of cardiac biomarker testing is substantial. Economic evaluation involves comparing the estimated costs and effectiveness (outcomes) of two or more interventions or care alternatives. This process creates some difficulties with respect to cardiac biomarkers. Estimating the effectiveness of cardiac biomarkers involves identifying how they help to improve health and how we can measure this improvement. Comparison to an appropriate alternative is also problematic. New biomarkers may be promoted on the basis of reducing hospital admission or length of stay, but hospital admission for low risk patients may incur significant costs while providing very little benefit, making it an inappropriate comparator. Finally, economic evaluation may conclude that a more sensitive biomarker strategy is more effective but, by detecting and treating more cases, is also more expensive. In these circumstances it is unclear whether we should use the more effective or the cheaper option. This article provides an introduction to health economics and addresses the specific issues relevant to cardiac biomarkers. It describes the key concepts relevant to economic evaluation of cardiac biomarkers in suspected MI and highlights key areas of uncertainty and controversy. Copyright © 2014 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Limitation of personal freedom by detention of suspect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knežević Saša

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The right of personal freedom is one of the most important right from the set of basic human rights and freedoms, contained in the most important acts of international legal character, and the constitutions of states based on the rule of law. This right is directly related to the very human existence, and, therefore, it is necessary to make its legal articulation. Personal freedom means the right to security of the citizen, that he will not be arrested and detained in prison by the state authorities, as well as the right to be free to move and inhabit. However, from the very nature of Criminal Law protection of social values, arises the need to limit the right to personal freedom in exceptional circumstances, including the detention of the suspect. Keeping the suspect is a measure of procedural compulsion, by which, through the police decision, detained prison is temporarily imprisoned, for gathering information and hearing. The basic principles of humanity require that the detained suspect retains all the rights, derived from the principle of personal liberty.

  13. MIBG in the evaluation of suspected pheochromocytoma: Mayo Clinic experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.L.; Sheps, S.G.; Sizemore, G.; Swensen, S.J.; Gharib, H.; Grant, C.S.; van Heerden, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    Work done at the University of Michigan has shown that I-131 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) is an effective agent for the diagnosis and localization of pheochromocytoma. A recent report questioned the sensitivity of this test. In 1983, 40 patients at Mayo Clinic had 42 scans during the workup of suspected spontaneous pheochromocytoma or metastatic pheochromocytoma. All patients were given 500 ..mu..Ci I-131 MIBG supplied by the University of Michigan. The final diagnosis of pheochromocytoma (true positive (TP) and false negative (FN) and false positive (FP)) was made by surgery and pathology. True negative (TN) diagnosis was made by normal plasma and urinary catecholamines, and in many patients CT. There were 15 TP studies (six spontaneous pheochrocytoma, nine metastatic or recurrent pheochromoctyoma), and 22 TN studies. There was one FP study of recurrent paraganglioma near the bladder (CT was also FP) and four FN studies (two spontaneous and two metastatic) where one CT was also FN. This results in a sensitivity of 79%, specificity of 96%, and accuracy of 88%. MIBG is very useful in the workup of patients with known or suspected recurrent or metastatic pheochromocytoma and is helpful in the evaluation of the patient suspected of having a spontaneous pheochromocytoma when CT is normal.

  14. [Evidence-based renal replacement therapy--intermittent versus CRRT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jörres, Achim

    2013-03-01

    Continuous and intermittent renal replacement procedures are equally adequate therapies for acute kidney injury. The choice of modality should be made individually and on the basis of the specific clinical situation which may include switching between modalities during the course of treatment. In patients with haemodynamic instability or at risk of disequilibrium and cerebral edema CRRT or prolonged intermittent treatment may offer advantages whilst IHD should be preferred for the acute treatment of life-threatening electrolyte abnormalities or metabolic acidosis. Overall, the different modalities should be viewed as complementary. © Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Intermittency-friendly and high-efficiency cogeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blarke, Morten; Dotzauer, Erik

    2011-01-01

    -efficiency and widely applicable option in distributed cogeneration better supporting the co-existence between cogenerators and intermittent renewables in the energy system. The concept involves integrating an efficient high-temperature compression heat pump that uses only waste heat recovered from flue gases as low....... It is found that CHP-HP-FG-CS offers significant reductions in fuel consumption (−8.9%) and operational production costs (−11.4%). The plant’s fuel-to-energy efficiency increases from 88.9 to 95.5%, which is state-of-the-art. The plant’s intermittency-friendliness coefficient Rc improves only marginally due...

  16. Epidemiological study of the Danish Acute Intermittent Porphyriapopulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brusgaard, Klaus

    The aim of our study was to describe the occurrence of Acute Intermittent Porphyria (AIP) in Denmark demographically, genetically and biochemically.The study was based on a database of porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD) mutations detected in the period of 2000-2010. A total of 148 individuals were...... in several other countries (Sweden (10:100.000),Finland (3:100.000),USA (4:100.000), and Western Australia (3:100.000)).[1] 1. Bylesjö I. Epidemiological, clinical and pathogenetic studies of Acute Intermittent Porphyria. Dissertation, Umeå University. 2008....

  17. Multi-scale magnetic field intermittence in the plasma sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Vörös

    Full Text Available This paper demonstrates that intermittent magnetic field fluctuations in the plasma sheet exhibit transitory, localized, and multi-scale features. We propose a multifractal-based algorithm, which quantifies intermittence on the basis of the statistical distribution of the "strength of burstiness", estimated within a sliding window. Interesting multi-scale phenomena observed by the Cluster spacecraft include large-scale motion of the current sheet and bursty bulk flow associated turbulence, interpreted as a cross-scale coupling (CSC process.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetotail; plasma sheet – Space plasma physics (turbulence

  18. Turbulence and intermittent transport at the boundary of magnetized plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, O.E.; Naulin, V.; Nielsen, A.H.

    2005-01-01

    Numerical fluid simulations of interchange turbulence for geometry and parameters relevant to the boundary region of magnetically confined plasmas are shown to result in intermittent transport qualitatively similar to recent experimental measurements. The two-dimensional simulation domain features...... a forcing region with spatially localized sources of particles and heat outside which losses due to the motion along open magnetic-field lines dominate, corresponding to the edge region and the scrape-off layer, respectively. Turbulent states reveal intermittent eruptions of hot plasma from the edge region...

  19. Acute Intermittent Porphyria Associated with Respiratory Failure: A Multidisciplinary Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menegueti, Mayra Gonçalves; Gil Cezar, Alkmim-Teixeira; Casarini, Karin Aparecida; Muniz Cordeiro, Kátia Simone; Basile-Filho, Anibal; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Auxiliadora-Martins, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Despite being challenging, delivery of effective nursing care to patients with acute intermittent porphyria is a matter of utmost importance. In this paper, the diversity of symptoms and the difficult diagnosis of this condition are emphasized, and details concerning the treatment of this disorder in the intensive care unit are presented. We believe that acute intermittent porphyria should be borne in mind during performance of differential diagnosis of neurological, psychiatric, and gastroenterological disorders on patients whose routine investigation tests are normal, especially when precipitating factors exist. Intensive care measures and a multidisciplinary team approach are essential. PMID:21687623

  20. Hierarchy compensation of non-homogeneous intermittent atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo, Jose M.; Mahjoub, Otman B.; Cantalapiedra, Inma R.

    2010-05-01

    In this work a study both the internal turbulence energy cascade intermittency evaluated from wind speed series in the atmospheric boundary layer, as well as the role of external or forcing intermittency based on the flatness (Vindel et al 2008)is carried out. The degree of intermittency in the stratified ABL flow (Cuxart et al. 2000) can be studied as the deviation, from the linear form, of the absolute scaling exponents of the structure functions as well as generalizing for non-isotropic and non-homogeneous turbulence, even in non-inertial ranges (in the Kolmogorov-Kraichnan sense) where the scaling exponents are not constant. The degree of intermittency, evaluated in the non-local quasi-inertial range, is explained from the variation with scale of the energy transfer as well as the dissipation. The scale to scale transfer and the structure function scaling exponents are calculated and from these the intermittency parametres. The turbulent diffusivity could also be estimated and compared with Richardson's law. Some two point correlations and time lag calculations are used to investigate the time and spatial integral length scales obtained from both Lagrangian and Eulerian correlations and functions, and we compare these results with both theoretical and laboratory data. We develop a theoretical description of how to measure the different levels of intermittency following (Mahjoub et al. 1998, 2000) and the role of locality in higher order exponents of structure function analysis. Vindel J.M., Yague C. and Redondo J.M. (2008) Structure function analysis and intermittency in the ABL. Nonlin. Processes Geophys., 15, 915-929. Cuxart J, Yague C, Morales G, Terradellas E, Orbe J, Calvo J, Fernández A, Soler M R, Infante C, Buenestado P, Espinalt A, Joergensen H E, Rees J M, Vilá J, Redondo J M, Cantalapiedra R and Conangla L (2000): Stable atmospheric boundary-layer experiment in Spain (Sables 98): a report, Boundary-Layer Meteorology 96, 337-370 Mahjoub O

  1. Multi-scale magnetic field intermittence in the plasma sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Vörös

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper demonstrates that intermittent magnetic field fluctuations in the plasma sheet exhibit transitory, localized, and multi-scale features. We propose a multifractal-based algorithm, which quantifies intermittence on the basis of the statistical distribution of the "strength of burstiness", estimated within a sliding window. Interesting multi-scale phenomena observed by the Cluster spacecraft include large-scale motion of the current sheet and bursty bulk flow associated turbulence, interpreted as a cross-scale coupling (CSC process.Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetotail; plasma sheet – Space plasma physics (turbulence

  2. Imaging trends in suspected appendicitis-a Canadian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Victoria F; Patlas, Michael N; Katz, Douglas S

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of our study was to assess trends in the imaging of suspected appendicitis in adult patients in emergency departments of academic centers in Canada. A questionnaire was sent to all 17 academic centers in Canada to be completed by a radiologist who works in emergency radiology. The questionnaires were sent and collected over a period of 4 months from October 2015 to February 2016. Sixteen centers (94%) responded to the questionnaire. Eleven respondents (73%) use IV contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) as the imaging modality of choice for all patients with suspected appendicitis. Thirteen respondents (81%) use ultrasound as the first modality of choice in imaging pregnant patients with suspected appendicitis. Eleven respondents (69%) use ultrasound (US) as the first modality of choice in patients younger than 40 years of age. Ten respondents (67%) use ultrasound as the first imaging modality in female patients younger than 40 years of age. When CT is used, 81% use non-focused CT of the abdomen and pelvis, and 44% of centers use oral contrast. Thirteen centers (81%) have ultrasound available 24 h a day/7 days a week. At 12 centers (75%), ultrasound is performed by ultrasound technologists. Four centers (40%) perform magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in suspected appendicitis in adult patients at the discretion of the attending radiologist. Eleven centers (69%) have MRI available 24/7. All 16 centers (100%) use unenhanced MRI. Various imaging modalities are available for the work-up of suspected appendicitis. Although there are North American societal guidelines and recommendations regarding the appropriateness of the multiple imaging modalities, significant heterogeneity in the first-line modalities exist, which vary depending on the patient demographics and resource availability. Imaging trends in the use of the first-line modalities should be considered in order to plan for the availability of the imaging examinations and to consider plans for

  3. Predictors of bacteremia in emergency department patients with suspected infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, Maureen; Klasco, Richard S; Joyce, Nina R; Donnino, Michael W; Wolfe, Richard E; Shapiro, Nathan I

    2012-11-01

    The goal of this study is to identify clinical variables associated with bacteremia. Such data could provide a rational basis for blood culture testing in emergency department (ED) patients with suspected infection. This is a secondary analysis of a prospective cohort of ED patients with suspected infection. Data collected included demographics, vital signs, medical history, suspected source of infection, laboratory and blood culture results and outcomes. Bacteremia was defined as a positive blood culture by Centers for Disease Control criteria. Clinical variables associated with bacteremia on univariate logistic regression were entered into a multivariable model. There were 5630 patients enrolled with an average age of 59.9 ± 19.9 years, and 54% were female. Blood cultures were obtained on 3310 (58.8%). There were 409 (12.4%) positive blood cultures, of which 68 (16.6%) were methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and 161 (39.4%) were Gram negatives. Ten covariates (respiratory failure, vasopressor use, neutrophilia, bandemia, thrombocytopenia, indwelling venous catheter, abnormal temperature, suspected line or urinary infection, or endocarditis) were associated with all-cause bacteremia in the final model (c-statistic area under the curve [AUC], 0.71). Additional factors associated with MRSA bacteremia included end-stage renal disease (odds ratio [OR], 3.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.9-7.8) and diabetes (OR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.1-3.6) (AUC, 0.73). Factors strongly associated with Gram-negative bacteremia included vasopressor use in the ED (OR, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.7-4.6), bandemia (OR, 3.5; 95% CI, 2.3-5.3), and suspected urinary infection (OR, 4.0; 95% CI, 2.8-5.8) (AUC, 0.75). This study identified several clinical factors associated with bacteremia as well as MRSA and Gram-negative subtypes, but the magnitude of their associations is limited. Combining these covariates into a multivariable model moderately increases their predictive value. Copyright

  4. Effects of Intermittent Fasting, Caloric Restriction, and Ramadan Intermittent Fasting on Cognitive Performance at Rest and During Exercise in Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherif, Anissa; Roelands, Bart; Meeusen, Romain; Chamari, Karim

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review was to highlight the potent effects of intermittent fasting on the cognitive performance of athletes at rest and during exercise. Exercise interacts with dietary factors and has a positive effect on brain functioning. Furthermore, physical activity and exercise can favorably influence brain plasticity. Mounting evidence indicates that exercise, in combination with diet, affects the management of energy metabolism and synaptic plasticity by affecting molecular mechanisms through brain-derived neurotrophic factor, an essential neurotrophin that acts at the interface of metabolism and plasticity. The literature has also shown that certain aspects of physical performance and mental health, such as coping and decision-making strategies, can be negatively affected by daylight fasting. However, there are several types of intermittent fasting. These include caloric restriction, which is distinct from fasting and allows subjects to drink water ad libitum while consuming a very low-calorie food intake. Another type is Ramadan intermittent fasting, which is a religious practice of Islam, where healthy adult Muslims do not eat or drink during daylight hours for 1 month. Other religious practices in Islam (Sunna) also encourage Muslims to practice intermittent fasting outside the month of Ramadan. Several cross-sectional and longitudinal studies have shown that intermittent fasting has crucial effects on physical and intellectual performance by affecting various aspects of bodily physiology and biochemistry that could be important for athletic success. Moreover, recent findings revealed that immunological variables are also involved in cognitive functioning and that intermittent fasting might impact the relationship between cytokine expression in the brain and cognitive deficits, including memory deficits.

  5. Intermittent screening and treatment versus intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy: provider knowledge and acceptability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy Smith Paintain

    Full Text Available Malaria in pregnancy (MiP is associated with increased risks of maternal and foetal complications. The WHO recommends a package of interventions including intermittent preventive treatment (IPT with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP, insecticide-treated nets and effective case management. However, with increasing SP resistance, the effectiveness of SP-IPT has been questioned. Intermittent screening and treatment (IST has recently been shown in Ghana to be as efficacious as SP-IPT. This study investigates two important requirements for effective delivery of IST and SP-IPT: antenatal care (ANC provider knowledge, and acceptance of the different strategies. Structured interviews with 134 ANC providers at 67 public health facilities in Ashanti Region, Ghana collected information on knowledge of the risks and preventative and curative interventions against MiP. Composite indicators of knowledge of SP-IPT, and case management of MiP were developed. Log binomial regression of predictors of provider knowledge was explored. Qualitative data were collected through in-depth interviews with fourteen ANC providers with some knowledge of IST to gain an indication of the factors influencing acceptance of the IST approach. 88.1% of providers knew all elements of the SP-IPT policy, compared to 20.1% and 41.8% who knew the treatment policy for malaria in the first or second/third trimesters, respectively. Workshop attendance was a univariate predictor of each knowledge indicator. Qualitative findings suggest preference for prevention over cure, and increased workload may be barriers to IST implementation. However, a change in strategy in the face of SP resistance is likely to be supported; health of pregnant women is a strong motivation for ANC provider practice. If IST was to be introduced as part of routine ANC activities, attention would need to be given to improving the knowledge and practices of ANC staff in relation to appropriate treatment of MiP. Health

  6. Thermal comfort

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Osburn, L

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available wider range of temperature limits, saving energy while still satisfying the majority of building occupants. It is also noted that thermal comfort varies significantly between individuals and it is generally not possible to provide a thermal environment...

  7. 29 CFR 825.202 - Intermittent leave or reduced leave schedule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... and Medical Leave Act § 825.202 Intermittent leave or reduced leave schedule. (a) Definition. FMLA... period of six months, such as for chemotherapy. A pregnant employee may take leave intermittently for...

  8. Prognostic importance of quantitative echocardiographic evaluation in patients suspected of first non-massive pulmonary embolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergaard, Jesper; Schaadt, Bente Krogsgaard; Lund, Jens Otto

    2008-01-01

    AIMS: Patients suspected of acute pulmonary embolism (PE) frequently undergo echocardiography as a part of the initial work-up. Prognostic implication of routine echocardiography in patients suspected of PE remain to be established. METHODS AND RESULTS: Transthoracic echocardiography, including...

  9. effect of clean intermittent catheterization on lower urinary tract

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective To investigate the effect of clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) on the lower urinary tract in experimental animals. Patients and Methods Eight male spinalized cats were subjected to CIC for a period of 6 – 9 weeks. A urine specimen for culture was obtained weekly. A pathological examination of the proximal ...

  10. Intermittent accreting millisecond pulsars: Light houses with broken lamps?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altamirano, D.; Casella, P.

    2008-01-01

    Intermittent accreting millisecond X-ray pulsars are an exciting new type of sources. Their pulsations appear and disappear either on timescales of hundreds of seconds or on timescales of days. The study of these sources add new observational constraints to present models that explain the presence

  11. Governance, legislation and protection of intermittent rivers and ephemeral streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Institutions and processes governing the conveyance and control of water have a long history. In this chapter, we discuss the extent to which water governance systems consider the management of intermittent rivers and ephemeral streams (IRES) and identify where research could inf...

  12. Effect of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria on the outcome ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The study was on the effect of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy on the prevalence of malaria in pregnancy and the outcome of pregnancy. Method: It was a prospective descriptive cross-sectional study and a semi-structured questionnaire was administered to women in the lying in ward ...

  13. Factors influencing utilization of intermittent presumptive treatment of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Intermittent presumptive treatment of malaria in pregnancy (IPTp) is one of the recommended interventions by World Health Organization to mitigate the impact of malaria in pregnancy in malaria stable transmission zones such as Sub Saharan regions so as to ensure the best outcome for both the mother and ...

  14. Challenges, developments and perspectives in intermittent river ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although more than half the world's river networks comprise channels that periodically cease to flow and dry [intermittent rivers (IRs)], river ecology was largely developed from and for perennial systems. Ecological knowledge of IRs is rapidly increasing, so there is a need to s...

  15. 2. Evaluating the biological significance of intermittent streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie M. Reid; Robert R. Ziemer

    1994-01-01

    Abstract - Intermittent channels comprise a large proportion of the drainage network in many parts of the Pacific Northwest, and recent policy changes now afford them an unprecedented level of protection. If, during watershed analysis, these sites are found to be relatively unimportant in maintaining the overall ecosystem, then their level of protection is likely to be...

  16. Flow intermittence and ecosystem services in rivers of the Anthropocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intermittent rivers and ephemeral streams (IRES) are watercourses that cease flow at some point in time and space. Arguably Earth's most widespread type of flowing water, IRES are expanding where Anthropocenic climates grow drier and human demands for water escalate. However, IRE...

  17. Biomonitoring of intermittent rivers and ephemeral streams in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stubbington, Rachel; Chadd, Richard; Cid, Núria; Csabai, Zoltán; Miliša, Marko; Morais, Manuela; Munné, Antoni; Pařil, Petr; Pešić, Vladimir; Tziortzis, Iakovos; Verdonschot, Ralf C.M.; Datry, Thibault

    2018-01-01

    Intermittent rivers and ephemeral streams (IRES) are common across Europe and dominate some Mediterranean river networks. In all climate zones, IRES support high biodiversity and provide ecosystem services. As dynamic ecosystems that transition between flowing, pool, and dry states, IRES are

  18. Fire severity in intermittent stream drainages, Western Cascade Range, Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennifer E. Tollefson; Frederick J. Swanson; John H. Cissel

    2004-01-01

    We quantified fire severity patterns within intermittent stream drainages in a recently burned area of the central western Cascades, Oregon. Aerial photographs were used to estimate post fire live canopy cover within streamside and upland zones on the southeast and southwest-facing slopes of 33 watersheds. Live canopy cover did not differ significantly between...

  19. 14 malaria in pregnancy: experience with intermittent preventive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-11-23

    Nov 23, 2009 ... Artemisinin based combination therapy. (ACT) and effective malaria chemoprophylaxis in pregnancy using intermittent preventative treatment. (IPT).5 The ... analysed using SPSS version 16. (SPSS, Chicago, IL, USA) for. Windows. Data was expressed as percentages, means, and standard deviations for ...

  20. Detecting intermittent resistive faults in digital CMOS circuits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ebrahimi, Hassan; Kerkhoff, Hans G.; Rohani, A.

    2016-01-01

    Interconnection reliability threats dependability of highly critical electronic systems. One of most challenging interconnection-induced reliability threats are intermittent resistive faults (IRFs). The occurrence rate of this kind of defects can take e.g. one month, and the duration of defects can

  1. missed opportunities for intermittent preventive treatment for malaria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and maternal anemia while consequences to the child. MISSED OPPORTUNITIES ... ABSTRACT. Background: Malaria is of global health concern particularly among pregnant women. Nigeria contributes largely to global burden but coverage of. Intermittent Preventive Treatment of malaria in pregnancy using. Sulphadoxine ...

  2. Effectiveness of 3 doses of Intermittent Preventive Therapy with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In 2014, Nigeria scaled up to at least 3 doses of intermittent preventive therapy in pregnancy with Sulphadoxine-Pyrimethamine (ITPp-SP). While the fact of existing evidence as to the superiority of SP3 over SP2 was shown by WHO back in 2012, the Nigerian Government domesticated it in her Federal Ministry ...

  3. Uptake of intermittent preventive therapy in pregnancy for malaria in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To assess the uptake of malaria chemoprophylaxis using Sulfadoxine and Pyrimethamine (SP) in pregnant women attending antenatal care. To compare the uptake of malaria chemoprophylaxis using Intermittent Preventive Therapy in pregnancy with Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine (IPTp –SP) between 2 audit ...

  4. The Role of Community Participation in Intermittent Preventive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Very little attention was paid to community participation in malaria control in the past and this has affected most of the desired outcomes. The recent recognition of the importance of community participation in malaria control had informed the implementation of Intermittent Preventive Treatment of Childhood Malaria (IPTc).

  5. Acute intermittent porphyria: Diagnostic dilemma and treatment options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Deep Kaur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP presents with diverse group of symptoms making its early diagnosis difficult. Delaying diagnosis and treatment of AIP can be fatal or can cause long term or permanent neurological damage. We present here a case report of AIP where the diagnosis was missed. The diversity of symptoms and details concerning the treatment options for AIP are discussed.

  6. Noise and Signal for Spectra of Intermittent Noiselike Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwinn, C. R.; Johnson, M. D.

    2011-05-01

    We show that intermittency of noiselike emission, after propagation through a scattering medium, affects the distribution of noise in the observed correlation function. Intermittency also affects correlation of noise among channels of the spectrum, but leaves the average spectrum, average correlation function, and distribution of noise among channels of the spectrum unchanged. Pulsars are examples of such sources: intermittent and affected by interstellar propagation. We assume that the source emits Gaussian white noise, modulated by a time envelope. Propagation convolves the resulting time series with an impulse-response function that represents effects of dispersion, scattering, and absorption. We assume that this propagation kernel is shorter than the time for an observer to accumulate a single spectrum. We show that rapidly varying intermittent emission tends to concentrate noise near the central lag of the correlation function. We derive mathematical expressions for this effect, in terms of the time envelope and the propagation kernel. We present examples, discuss effects of background noise, and compare our results with observations.

  7. Application of Intermittent Microwave Irradiation to Western Blot Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-Ting; Toyokuni, Shinya

    2015-01-01

    We established a shortened protocol for Western blot analysis using intermittent microwave irradiation. With this method, the procedure is completed within 1 h after applying the primary antibody, and thus greatly saves time. This procedure appears to be applicable to any antibody based on our experience of several years.

  8. Dynamic droop scheme considering effect of intermittent renewable energy source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yanbo; Chen, Zhe; Deng, Fujin

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a dynamic droop control scheme for islanded microgrids dominated by intermittent renewable energy sources, which is able to perform desirable power sharing in the presence of renewable energy source fluctuation. First, allowable maximum power points of wind generator and PV...... flexibility and effectiveness in the presence of the renewable energy sources fluctuation....

  9. Intermittent lag synchronization in a driven system of coupled ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Paseo de Las Monta˜nas, Lagos del Moreno 47460, Jalisco, Mexico. E-mail: apisarch@cio.mx. Abstract. We study intermittent lag synchronization in a system of two identical mu- tually coupled Duffing oscillators with parametric modulation in one of them. This phe- nomenon in a periodically forced system can be seen as ...

  10. Intermittent reservoir daily-inflow prediction using lumped and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this study, multi-linear regression (MLR) approach is used to construct intermittent reservoir daily inflow forecasting system. To illustrate the applicability and effect of using lumped and distributed input data in MLR approach, Koyna river watershed in Maharashtra, India is chosen as a case study. The results are also ...

  11. Pollution by air filters: Continuous vs intermittent air flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cox, C.W.J.; Bluyssen, P.M.

    2000-01-01

    Within the framework of the EU research project Airless, a long-term experiment of 28 weeks was carried out to investigate the influence of intermittent airflow compared to continuous airflow on the pollution effect of glass fibre filters (F7). No statistical relevant differences between odour

  12. Intermittent Preventive Therapy and Treatment of Malaria during ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To assess the knowledge and awareness of pregnant women regarding the use of sulfadoxinepyrimethamine (SP) for intermittent preventive therapy (IPT) and artemether-lumefantrine (ALu) for treatment of malaria during pregnancy. Methods: The study was conducted in Rufiji district, southern Tanzania from ...

  13. Effect of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria on the outcome ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Saharan Africa and among the under five children and pregnant women and is associated with a lot of maternal and foetal complications. Objective: The study was on the effect of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy on the ...

  14. Clean Intermittent Catheterization: Overview of Results in 194 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) is a life-saving procedure in children with spina bifida, but its effectiveness in Kenya has not been previously documented. Patients and Methods: The current study analyzed the application of CIC in a series of 194 patients with spina bifida who fulfilled set criteria for ...

  15. Bochdalek Hernia As A Cause Of Intermittent AV Block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etsadashvili, Kakhaber; Rashid, Haroon Mohammed; Jalabadze, Khatuna; Melia, Anzor

    2011-09-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is very rare cause of AV block. We report such a patient with sick sinus node syndrome and previous AAIR pacemaker implantation, in which intermittent AV block was diagnosed by 24-hours ECG monitoring and upgrade of pacing system to DDDR was suggested.

  16. Acute and intermittent testicular torsion: Analysis of presentation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Testicular torsion compromises the blood supply to the testes and may result in testicular loss or damage if not dealt with promptly. It can occur either as acute testicular torsion (ATT) or intermittent testicular torsion (ITT). This study examines the presentation, management, and outcome of adult testicular torsion.

  17. Acute and intermittent testicular torsion: Analysis of presentation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-11-18

    Nov 18, 2015 ... Background: Testicular torsion compromises the blood supply to the testes and may result in testicular loss or damage if not dealt with promptly. It can occur either as acute testicular torsion (ATT) or intermittent testicular torsion (ITT). This study examines the presentation, management, and outcome of adult ...

  18. Muscle Fatigue during Intermittent Exercise in Individuals with Mental Retardation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafeiridis, Andreas; Giagazoglou, Paraskevi; Dipla, Konstantina; Salonikidis, Konstantinos; Karra, Chrisanthi; Kellis, Eleftherios

    2010-01-01

    This study examined fatigue profile during intermittent exercise in 10 men with mild to moderate mental retardation (MR) and 10 men without mental retardation (C). They performed 4 x 30 s maximal knee extensions and flexions with 1-min rest on an isokinetic dynamometer. Peak torque of flexors (PTFL) and extensors (PTEX), total work (TW), and…

  19. Intermittency and multifractional Brownian character of geomagnetic time series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Consolini

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The Earth's magnetosphere exhibits a complex behavior in response to the solar wind conditions. This behavior, which is described in terms of mutifractional Brownian motions, could be the consequence of the occurrence of dynamical phase transitions. On the other hand, it has been shown that the dynamics of the geomagnetic signals is also characterized by intermittency at the smallest temporal scales. Here, we focus on the existence of a possible relationship in the geomagnetic time series between the multifractional Brownian motion character and the occurrence of intermittency. In detail, we investigate the multifractional nature of two long time series of the horizontal intensity of the Earth's magnetic field as measured at L'Aquila Geomagnetic Observatory during two years (2001 and 2008, which correspond to different conditions of solar activity. We propose a possible double origin of the intermittent character of the small-scale magnetic field fluctuations, which is related to both the multifractional nature of the geomagnetic field and the intermittent character of the disturbance level. Our results suggest a more complex nature of the geomagnetic response to solar wind changes than previously thought.

  20. Intermittency and multifractional Brownian character of geomagnetic time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consolini, G.; De Marco, R.; De Michelis, P.

    2013-07-01

    The Earth's magnetosphere exhibits a complex behavior in response to the solar wind conditions. This behavior, which is described in terms of mutifractional Brownian motions, could be the consequence of the occurrence of dynamical phase transitions. On the other hand, it has been shown that the dynamics of the geomagnetic signals is also characterized by intermittency at the smallest temporal scales. Here, we focus on the existence of a possible relationship in the geomagnetic time series between the multifractional Brownian motion character and the occurrence of intermittency. In detail, we investigate the multifractional nature of two long time series of the horizontal intensity of the Earth's magnetic field as measured at L'Aquila Geomagnetic Observatory during two years (2001 and 2008), which correspond to different conditions of solar activity. We propose a possible double origin of the intermittent character of the small-scale magnetic field fluctuations, which is related to both the multifractional nature of the geomagnetic field and the intermittent character of the disturbance level. Our results suggest a more complex nature of the geomagnetic response to solar wind changes than previously thought.

  1. Two-scale analysis of intermittency in fully developed turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badii, R.; Talkner, P. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    A self-affinity test for turbulent time series is applied to experimental data for the estimation of intermittency exponents. The method employs exact relations satisfied by joint expectations of observables computed across two different length scales. One of these constitutes a verification tool for the existence and the extent of the inertial range. (author) 2 figs., 13 refs.

  2. Improved Prescription of Intermittent Preventive Therapy for Malaria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intermittent preventive therapy for malaria in pregnancy (IPTp) is a key recommendation in the National guideline for malaria control in Nigeria. Previous data from this hospital reported a very low implementation of this guideline . Scale up of services and training were thereafter implemented. This study assessed the current ...

  3. Safety of supervised exercise therapy in patients with intermittent claudication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gommans, Lindy N. M.; Fokkenrood, Hugo J. P.; van Dalen, Hendrika C. W.; Scheltinga, Marc R. M.; Teijink, Joep A. W.; Peters, Ron J. G.

    2015-01-01

    Supervised exercise therapy (SET) is recommended as the primary treatment for patients with intermittent claudication (IC). However, there is concern regarding the safety of performing SET because IC patients are at risk for untoward cardiovascular events. The Dutch physical therapy guideline

  4. Impact of intermittent physical exercises on mental health of some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... from Nkonkobe District freely volunteered in physical exercises training programme for twelve weeks at the University of Fort Hare. During the programme, they completed pre-intervention and post intervention questionnaires probing their perceptions and the impact of intermittent physical exercises on their mental health.

  5. Optimizing supervised exercise therapy for patients with intermittent claudication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolaï, Saskia P A; Hendriks, Erik J M; Prins, Martin H; Teijink, Joep A W; van Asselt, Thea

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The first-line intervention for intermittent claudication is usually supervised exercise therapy (SET). The literature describes a range of exercise programs varying in setting, duration, and content. The purpose of the present study was to examine the exercise protocols offered and to

  6. Small-world networks exhibit pronounced intermittent synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Anshul; Mitra, Chiranjit; Kohar, Vivek; Sinha, Sudeshna; Kurths, Jürgen

    2017-11-01

    We report the phenomenon of temporally intermittently synchronized and desynchronized dynamics in Watts-Strogatz networks of chaotic Rössler oscillators. We consider topologies for which the master stability function (MSF) predicts stable synchronized behaviour, as the rewiring probability (p) is tuned from 0 to 1. MSF essentially utilizes the largest non-zero Lyapunov exponent transversal to the synchronization manifold in making stability considerations, thereby ignoring the other Lyapunov exponents. However, for an N-node networked dynamical system, we observe that the difference in its Lyapunov spectra (corresponding to the N - 1 directions transversal to the synchronization manifold) is crucial and serves as an indicator of the presence of intermittently synchronized behaviour. In addition to the linear stability-based (MSF) analysis, we further provide global stability estimate in terms of the fraction of state-space volume shared by the intermittently synchronized state, as p is varied from 0 to 1. This fraction becomes appreciably large in the small-world regime, which is surprising, since this limit has been otherwise considered optimal for synchronized dynamics. Finally, we characterize the nature of the observed intermittency and its dominance in state-space as network rewiring probability (p) is varied.

  7. Accessibility of Insecticide Treated Bed Nets and Intermittent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Both Malawian and Mozambican nationals were required to present the 'Health passport' in order to access ITNs and presumptive intermittent treatment of malaria from the health facilities. For effective prevention and control of malaria in border of Malawi and Mozambique, there is need for the collaboration between ...

  8. Scaling up Intermittent Rice Irrigation for Malaria Control on the ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Scaling up Intermittent Rice Irrigation for Malaria Control on the North Coast of Peru. New research aims to help control malaria in one watershed in northern Peru. Malaria is widespread in Peru's arid North Coast because of the extensive irrigation required to support rice paddies. Rice growing in the region accounts for ...

  9. Universal Power Laws Govern Intermittent Rarity in Communities of Interacting Species

    OpenAIRE

    R. Ferriere; Cazelles, B.

    1998-01-01

    The temporal dynamics of many populations involve intermittent rarity, that is, the alternation, over variable periods of time, of phases of extremely low abundance, and short outbreaks. In this paper we show that intermittent rarity can arise in simple community models as a result of competitive interactions within and between species. Intermittently rare species are typified as weak invaders in fluctuating communities. Although the dynamics of intermittent rarity are highly irregular, the d...

  10. Randomized double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study of caffeine in patients with intermittent claudication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Momsen, A H; Jensen, M B; Norager, C B

    2010-01-01

    Intermittent claudication is a disabling symptom of peripheral arterial disease for which few medical treatments are available. This study investigated the effect of caffeine on physical capacity in patients with intermittent claudication.......Intermittent claudication is a disabling symptom of peripheral arterial disease for which few medical treatments are available. This study investigated the effect of caffeine on physical capacity in patients with intermittent claudication....

  11. 30 CFR 780.28 - Activities in or adjacent to perennial or intermittent streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... intermittent streams. 780.28 Section 780.28 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND... RECLAMATION AND OPERATION PLAN § 780.28 Activities in or adjacent to perennial or intermittent streams. (a... applies to applications to conduct surface mining activities in perennial or intermittent streams or on...

  12. 30 CFR 784.28 - Surface activities in or adjacent to perennial or intermittent streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... or intermittent streams. 784.28 Section 784.28 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION... intermittent streams. (a) Applicability. (1) In general. Except as otherwise provided in paragraph (a)(2) of... surface activities in perennial or intermittent streams or on the surface of lands within 100 feet...

  13. 29 CFR 825.601 - Special rules for school employees, limitations on intermittent leave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... intermittent leave. 825.601 Section 825.601 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR... to Employees of Schools § 825.601 Special rules for school employees, limitations on intermittent... working at the end of the school year. (1) If an eligible instructional employee needs intermittent leave...

  14. 30 CFR 816.57 - Hydrologic balance: Activities in or adjacent to perennial or intermittent streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... to perennial or intermittent streams. 816.57 Section 816.57 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE... or adjacent to perennial or intermittent streams. (a)(1) Buffer requirement. Except as provided in..., measured horizontally, of a perennial or intermittent stream, unless the regulatory authority authorizes...

  15. Observation of intermittency in gene expression on cDNA microarrays

    CERN Document Server

    Peterson, L E

    2002-01-01

    We used scaled factorial moments to search for intermittency in the log expression ratios (LERs) for thousands of genes spotted on cDNA microarrays (gene chips). Results indicate varying levels of intermittency in gene expression. The observation of intermittency in the data analyzed provides a complimentary handle on moderately expressed genes, generally not tackled by conventional techniques.

  16. Intermittent Anisotropic Turbulence Detected by THEMIS in the Magnetosheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macek, W. M.; Wawrzaszek, A.; Kucharuk, B.; Sibeck, D. G.

    2017-12-01

    Following our previous study of Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) data, we consider intermittent turbulence in the magnetosheath depending on various conditions of the magnetized plasma behind the Earth’s bow shock and now also near the magnetopause. Namely, we look at the fluctuations of the components of the Elsässer variables in the plane perpendicular to the scale-dependent background magnetic fields and along the local average ambient magnetic fields. We have shown that Alfvén fluctuations often exhibit strong anisotropic non-gyrotropic turbulent intermittent behavior resulting in substantial deviations of the probability density functions from a normal Gaussian distribution with a large kurtosis. In particular, for very high Alfvénic Mach numbers and high plasma beta, we have clear anisotropy with non-Gaussian statistics in the transverse directions. However, along the magnetic field, the kurtosis is small and the plasma is close to equilibrium. On the other hand, intermittency becomes weaker for moderate Alfvén Mach numbers and lower values of the plasma parameter beta. It also seems that the degree of intermittency of turbulence for the outgoing fluctuations propagating relative to the ambient magnetic field is usually similar as for the ingoing fluctuations, which is in agreement with approximate equipartition of energy between these oppositely propagating Alfvén waves. We believe that the different characteristics of this intermittent anisotropic turbulent behavior in various regions of space and astrophysical plasmas can help identify nonlinear structures responsible for deviations of the plasma from equilibrium.

  17. Icare rebound tonometry in children with known and suspected glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemmons, Meghan S; Hsiao, Ya-Chuan; Dzau, Jacqueline; Asrani, Sanjay; Jones, Sarah; Freedman, Sharon F

    2011-04-01

    Accurate intraocular pressure (IOP) measurement, important in managing pediatric glaucoma, often presents challenges. The Icare rebound tonometer shows promise for screening healthy children and has been reported comparable with Goldmann applanation in adults with glaucoma. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Icare tonometer against Goldmann applanation for clinic IOP measurement in pediatric glaucoma. This was a prospective study comparing Icare versus Goldmann tonometry in pediatric glaucoma. Children with known or suspected glaucoma were recruited from scheduled clinic visits. IOP was measured with the Icare tonometer by a clinician and subsequently measured with Goldmann applanation tonometry (GAT) by a different single masked clinician. A total of 71 eyes of 71 children with known or suspected glaucoma were included. IOP by GAT ranged from 9 to 36 mm Hg. Icare readings ranged from 11 to 44 mm Hg. Mean difference between Icare and GAT was 2.3 ± SD 3.7 mm Hg, p IOPs were within ± 3 mm Hg of GAT in 63%. Icare IOPs were ≥GAT IOPs in 75%. The following factors were not associated with Icare IOPs greater than GAT: child's age, glaucoma diagnosis, strabismus, nystagmus, central corneal thickness, Icare instrument-reported reliability, number of glaucoma surgeries or medications, corneal abnormalities, and visual acuity. IOP by Icare tonometry was within 3 mm Hg of IOP by GAT in 63% and greater than GAT in 75%. This device may be reasonable to estimate IOP in selected children with known or suspected glaucoma whose IOP cannot otherwise be obtained in clinic; however, correlation of Icare IOPs with clinical findings must continue to be considered in each case. Copyright © 2011 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Herbal hepatotoxicity: suspected cases assessed for alternative causes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teschke, Rolf; Schulze, Johannes; Schwarzenboeck, Alexander; Eickhoff, Axel; Frenzel, Christian

    2013-09-01

    Alternative explanations are common in suspected drug-induced liver injury (DILI) and account for up to 47.1% of analyzed cases. This raised the question of whether a similar frequency may prevail in cases of assumed herb-induced liver injury (HILI). We searched the Medline database for the following terms: herbs, herbal drugs, herbal dietary supplements, hepatotoxic herbs, herbal hepatotoxicity, and herb-induced liver injury. Additional terms specifically addressed single herbs and herbal products: black cohosh, Greater Celandine, green tea, Herbalife products, Hydroxycut, kava, and Pelargonium sidoides. We retrieved 23 published case series and regulatory assessments related to hepatotoxicity by herbs and herbal dietary supplements with alternative causes. The 23 publications comprised 573 cases of initially suspected HILI; alternative causes were evident in 278/573 cases (48.5%). Among them were hepatitis by various viruses (9.7%), autoimmune diseases (10.4%), nonalcoholic and alcoholic liver diseases (5.4%), liver injury by comedication (DILI and other HILI) (43.9%), and liver involvement in infectious diseases (4.7%). Biliary and pancreatic diseases were frequent alternative diagnoses (11.5%), raising therapeutic problems if specific treatment is withheld; pre-existing liver diseases including cirrhosis (9.7%) were additional confounding variables. Other diagnoses were rare, but possibly relevant for the individual patient. In 573 cases of initially assumed HILI, 48.5% showed alternative causes unrelated to the initially incriminated herb, herbal drug, or herbal dietary supplement, calling for thorough clinical evaluations and appropriate causality assessments in future cases of suspected HILI.

  19. Benefits of sonography in diagnosing suspected uncomplicated acute diverticulitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Welfur C; Shuaib, Waqas; Vijayasarathi, Arvind; Fajardo, Carlos G; Cabrera, Waldo E; Costa, Juan L

    2015-01-01

    Despite evidence demonstrating equivalent accuracy of sonography and computed tomography (CT) in the workup of mild/uncomplicated acute diverticulitis, CT is overwhelmingly performed as the initial diagnostic test, particularly in the acute setting. Our study evaluated potential radiation and turnaround time savings associated with performing sonography instead of CT as the initial diagnostic examination in the workup of suspected uncomplicated acute diverticulitis. We retrospectively reviewed medical records from January 2010 to December 2012 for patients presenting with clinical symptoms of acute diverticulitis. Patients were categorized as a whole and subgrouped by age (>40 and 40 years and 121 diverticulitis. © 2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  20. A Suspected Pelvic Aneurysmal Bone Cyst in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rayan Elkattah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Albeit rare, the majority of identified bone lesions in pregnancy spare the pelvis. Once encountered with a pelvic bone lesion in pregnancy, the obstetrician may face a challenging situation as it is difficult to determine and predict the effects that labor and parturition impart on the pelvic bones. Bone changes and pelvic bone fractures have been well documented during childbirth. The data regarding clinical outcomes and management of pregnancies complicated by pelvic ABCs is scant. Highly suspected to represent an aneurysmal bone cyst, the clinical evaluation of a pelvic lesion in the ilium of a pregnant individual is presented, and modes of delivery in such a scenario are discussed.

  1. Patch Testing in Suspected Allergic Contact Dermatitis to Cosmetics

    OpenAIRE

    Pramod Kumar; Rekha Paulose

    2014-01-01

    Background. Increasing use of cosmetics has contributed to a rise in the incidence of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) to cosmetics. It is estimated that 1–5.4% of the population is sensitized to a cosmetic ingredient. Patch testing helps to confirm the presence of an allergy and to identify the actual allergens which are chemical mixtures of various ingredients. Objectives. The aims of this study are to perform patch testing in suspected ACD to cosmetics and to identify the most common alle...

  2. 111 sun concentrator photovoltaic module with wide acceptance angle that can efficiently operate using 30-min intermittent tracking system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Nawwar; Ota, Yasuyuki; Araki, Kenji; Lee, Kan-Hua; Yamaguchi, Masafumi; Nishioka, Kensuke

    2017-09-01

    In this study, we propose a new concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) system design with a large-acceptance-angle lens, which tracks the sun on the basis of a new 30-min intermittent tracking method that does not require a special high-precision CPV tracking system. This will reduce costs, because a large percentage of the cost of a typical CPV system comes from the expensive accurate tracking system. The present system had a concentration ratio of 111 and an acceptance angle of 4.5°. We conducted an experiment to evaluate the thermal and electrical performances of the system in an outdoor test site in Miyazaki, Japan. The experimental results were compared with optical, thermal, and electrical simulation results. The simulated results showed good agreement with the experimental ones.

  3. Investigation of suspected chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owe, Jone Furlund; Næss, Halvor; Gjerde, Ivar Otto; Bødtker, Jørn Eilert; Tysnes, Ole-Bjørn

    2016-02-09

    Chronic fatigue is a frequently occurring problem in both the primary and specialist health services. The Department of Neurology at Haukeland University Hospital has established a standard assessment for patients referred with suspected CFS/ME. This study reports diagnoses and findings upon assessment, and considers the benefit of supplementary examinations. Diagnoses and findings from examinations of 365 patients assessed for suspected CFS/ME are retrospectively reported. A total of 48 patients (13.2%) were diagnosed with CFS/ME, while a further 18 patients (4.9%) were diagnosed with post-infectious fatigue. Mental and behavioural disorders were diagnosed in 169 patients (46.3%), and these represented by far the largest group. Serious, but unrecognised somatic illness was discovered in two patients, while changes of uncertain significance were identified by MRI and lumbar puncture in a few patients. Fatigue is a frequently occurring symptom in the population. Thorough somatic and psychiatric investigation is necessary before referral to the specialist health services. Mental disorders and reactions to life crises are common and important differential diagnoses for CFS/ME. Long waiting times in the specialist health services may result in delayed diagnosis for these patients.

  4. Perioperative sexual interest in women with suspected gynecologic malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretschneider, C E; Bensen, Jeannette T; Geller, Elizabeth J; Gehrig, Paola A; Wu, Jennifer M; Doll, Kemi M

    2017-07-01

    For women with gynecologic cancer, the impact of surgery on sexual interest and desire in the immediate and later postoperative period is not well characterized. The objective of this study was to report the perioperative trends of changing sexual interest and desire in a cohort of women undergoing surgery for suspected gynecologic malignancies. This is an ancillary analysis of a cohort study analyzing health-related outcomes in women who underwent primary surgical management of a suspected gynecologic malignancy between 10/2013 and 10/2014. Subjects completed the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Sexual Function and Satisfaction Questionnaire (PROMIS-SFQ) preoperatively and questions on sexual interest and desire at one, three, and six months postoperatively. Bivariate tests and multiple linear regression were used to analyze data. Of 231 women who completed a baseline PROMIS-SFQ, 187 (81%) completed one-month, 170 (74%) three-month, and 174 (75%) six-month follow-up interviews. Following surgery, 71% of enrolled subjects were diagnosed with a malignancy. Women age women age >55 (-5.5±1.0 vs -2.3±0.9, p=0.02). In a multivariable analysis, age women of all ages (-5.6, 95% CI: -9.6, -1.5). This study provides new data regarding the timing and magnitude of changes in sexual interest following gynecologic oncology procedures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. MRI diagnosis of suspected atlanto-occipital dissociation in childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grabb, B.C.; Frye, T.A.; Hedlund, G.L.; Vaid, Y.N.; Royal, S.A. [Department of Radiology, The Children`s Hospital of Alabama, Birmingham (United States); Grabb, P.A. [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Alabama at Birmingham (United States)

    1999-04-01

    Objective. To demonstrate the utility of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the diagnosis of complete and partial ligamentous injuries in patients with suspected atlanto-occipital dissociation (AOD). Materials and methods. Five patients with suspected AOD had MR imaging performed within an average of 4 days after injury. MR scans were reviewed with specific analysis of craniocervical ligamentous structures. Charts were reviewed to obtain clinical information regarding presentation, treatment, hospital course, and outcome. Results. Two patients demonstrated MR evidence of complete AOD. One had disruption of all visualized major ligamentous structures at the craniocervical junction with anterolisthesis and evidence of cord damage. The second had injuries to the tectorial membrane, superior band of the cruciform ligament, apical ligament, and interspinous ligament at C 1-2. The remaining three patients sustained incomplete severance of the ligamentous structures at the craniocervical junction. All patients demonstrated subtle radiographic findings suggestive of AOD, including soft tissue swelling at the craniocervical junction without fracture. The two patients with complete AOD died. The three patients with partial AOD were treated with stabilization. On follow-up, these three children were asymptomatic following their craniocervical injury. Conclusion. MR imaging of acute AOD provides accurate identification of the craniocervical ligaments injured, classification of full versus partial ligamentous disruption, and analysis of accompanying spinal cord injury. This information is important for early appropriate neurosurgical management and preservation of neurologic function in survivors. (orig.) With 7 figs., 1 tab., 14 refs.

  6. MRI diagnosis of suspected atlanto-occipital dissociation in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabb, B C; Frye, T A; Hedlund, G L; Vaid, Y N; Grabb, P A; Royal, S A

    1999-04-01

    To demonstrate the utility of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the diagnosis of complete and partial ligamentous injuries in patients with suspected atlanto-occipital dissociation (AOD). Five patients with suspected AOD had MR imaging performed within an average of 4 days after injury. MR scans were reviewed with specific analysis of craniocervical ligamentous structures. Charts were reviewed to obtain clinical information regarding presentation, treatment, hospital course, and outcome. Two patients demonstrated MR evidence of complete AOD. One had disruption of all visualized major ligamentous structures at the craniocervical junction with anterolisthesis and evidence of cord damage. The second had injuries to the tectorial membrane, superior band of the cruciform ligament, apical ligament, and interspinous ligament at C 1-2. The remaining three patients sustained incomplete severance of the ligamentous structures at the craniocervical junction. All patients demonstrated subtle radiographic findings suggestive of AOD, including soft tissue swelling at the craniocervical junction without fracture. The two patients with complete AOD died. The three patients with partial AOD were treated with stabilization. On follow-up, these three children were asymptomatic following their craniocervical injury. MR imaging of acute AOD provides accurate identification of the craniocervical ligaments injured, classification of full versus partial ligamentous disruption, and analysis of accompanying spinal cord injury. This information is important for early appropriate neurosurgical management and preservation of neurologic function in survivors.

  7. CT Pulmonary Angiography and Suspected Acute Pulmonary Embolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enden, T.; Kloew, N.E. [Ullevaal Univ. Hospital, Oslo (Norway). Dept. of Cardiovascular Radiology

    2003-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the use and quality of CT pulmonary angiography in our department, and to relate the findings to clinical parameters and diagnoses. Material and Methods: A retrospective study of 324 consecutive patients referred to CT pulmonary angiography with clinically suspected pulmonary embolism (PE). From the medical records we registered clinical parameters, blood gases, D-dimer, risk factors and the results of other relevant imaging studies. Results: 55 patients (17%) had PE detected on CT. 39 had bilateral PE, and 8 patients had isolated peripheral PE. 87% of the examinations showing PE had satisfactory filling of contrast material including the segmental pulmonary arteries, and 60% of the subsegmental arteries. D-dimer test was performed in 209 patients, 85% were positive. A negative D-dimer ruled out PE detected at CT. Dyspnea and concurrent symptoms or detection of deep vein thrombosis (DVT), contraceptive pills and former venous thromboembolism (VTE) were associated with PE. The presence of only one clinical parameter indicated a negative PE diagnosis (p < 0.017), whereas two or more suggested a positive PE diagnosis (p < 0.002). CT also detected various ancillary findings such as consolidation, pleural effusion, nodule or tumor in nearly half of the patients; however, there was no association with the PE diagnosis. Conclusion: The quality of CT pulmonary angiography was satisfactory as a first-line imaging of PE. CT also showed additional pathology of importance in the chest. Our study confirmed that a negative D-dimer ruled out clinically suspected VTE.

  8. Suspected side effects to the quadrivalent human papilloma vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinth, Louise; Theibel, Ann Cathrine; Pors, Kirsten; Mehlsen, Jesper

    2015-04-01

    The quadrivalent vaccine that protects against human papilloma virus types 6, 11, 16 and 18 (Q-HPV vaccine, Gardasil) was included into the Danish childhood vaccination programme in 2009. During the past years, a collection of symptoms primarily consistent with sympathetic nervous system dysfunction have been described as suspected side effects to the Q-HPV vaccine. We present a description of suspected side effects to the Q-HPV vaccine in 53 patients referred to our Syncope Unit for tilt table test and evaluation of autonomic nervous system function. All patients had symptoms consistent with pronounced autonomic dysfunction including different degrees of orthostatic intolerance, severe non-migraine-like headache, excessive fatigue, cognitive dysfunction, gastrointestinal discomfort and widespread pain of a neuropathic character. We found consistency in the reported symptoms as well as between our findings and those described by others. Our findings neither confirm nor dismiss a causal link to the Q-HPV vaccine, but they suggest that further research is urgently warranted to clarify the pathophysiology behind the symptoms experienced in these patients and to evaluate the possibility and the nature of any causal link and hopefully establish targeted treatment options. not relevant. not relevant.

  9. Patch Testing in Suspected Allergic Contact Dermatitis to Cosmetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulose, Rekha

    2014-01-01

    Background. Increasing use of cosmetics has contributed to a rise in the incidence of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) to cosmetics. It is estimated that 1–5.4% of the population is sensitized to a cosmetic ingredient. Patch testing helps to confirm the presence of an allergy and to identify the actual allergens which are chemical mixtures of various ingredients. Objectives. The aims of this study are to perform patch testing in suspected ACD to cosmetics and to identify the most common allergen and cosmetic product causing dermatitis. Methods. Fifty patients with suspected ACD to cosmetics were patch-tested with 38 antigens of the Indian Cosmetic Series and 12 antigens of the Indian Standard Series. Results. The majority (58%) of patients belonged to the 21–40 years age group. The presence of ACD to cosmetics was confirmed in 38 (76%) patients. Face creams (20%), hair dyes (14%), and soaps (12%) were the most commonly implicated. The most common allergens identified were gallate mix (40%), cetrimide (28%), and thiomersal (20%). Out of a total of 2531 patches applied, positive reactions were obtained in 3.75%. Conclusion. Incidence of ACD to cosmetics was greater in females. Face creams and hair dyes were the most common cosmetic products implicated. The principal allergens were gallate mix, cetrimide, and thiomersal. PMID:25295057

  10. Feline toxicological emergencies: when to suspect and what to do.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grave, Tobias W; Boag, Amanda K

    2010-11-01

    Confirmed or suspected intoxications with a wide variety of agents represent a small but important group of feline emergency cases. Generally it is thought that toxicities are less common in cats compared with dogs, with a higher proportion relating to dermal as opposed to oral exposure. Once toxicity is suspected or diagnosed, it must be recognised that treatment regimes may need modification compared with those established for dogs. Different drugs or different dosages may be warranted and the choice of available drugs may be reduced. This review draws on published studies, case reports and clinical experience to summarise key features of the general management of the intoxicated feline patient before describing some of the more serious and common intoxications in more detail. The focus throughout the review is on the peculiarities of feline metabolism and how they may impact on presentation and treatment. The aim is to assist companion animal and feline practitioners, who are in the frontline when it comes to managing these emergency cases. Copyright © 2010 ISFM and AAFP. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Influenza Illness among Case-Patients Hospitalized for Suspected Dengue, El Salvador, 2012.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Chacon

    Full Text Available We estimate the proportion of patients hospitalized for suspected dengue that tested positive for influenza virus in El Salvador during the 2012 influenza season. We tested specimens from 321 hospitalized patients: 198 patients with SARI and 123 patients with suspected dengue. Among 121 hospitalized suspected dengue (two co-infected excluded patients, 28% tested positive for dengue and 19% positive for influenza; among 35 with suspected dengue and respiratory symptoms, 14% were positive for dengue and 39% positive for influenza. One percent presented co-infection between influenza and dengue. Clinicians should consider the diagnosis of influenza among patients with suspected dengue during the influenza season.

  12. Influenza Illness among Case-Patients Hospitalized for Suspected Dengue, El Salvador, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacon, Rafael; Clara, Alexey Wilfrido; Jara, Jorge; Armero, Julio; Lozano, Celina; El Omeiri, Nathalie; Widdowson, Marc-Alain; Azziz-Baumgartner, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    We estimate the proportion of patients hospitalized for suspected dengue that tested positive for influenza virus in El Salvador during the 2012 influenza season. We tested specimens from 321 hospitalized patients: 198 patients with SARI and 123 patients with suspected dengue. Among 121 hospitalized suspected dengue (two co-infected excluded) patients, 28% tested positive for dengue and 19% positive for influenza; among 35 with suspected dengue and respiratory symptoms, 14% were positive for dengue and 39% positive for influenza. One percent presented co-infection between influenza and dengue. Clinicians should consider the diagnosis of influenza among patients with suspected dengue during the influenza season.

  13. The Role of Meteorological Forecasting in Quantifying the Carbon Emissions Associated with Highly Intermittent Renewable Portfolios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, E.; Jacobson, M. Z.

    2010-12-01

    A new model is proposed for carbon emissions assessments of systems with very high penetrations of intermittent renewables. Our approach combines a deterministic portfolio planning module with a Monte Carlo simulation of system operation that determines the conventional dispatchable generating capacity required to meet a reliability constraint. Least-cost scheduling optimizations utilize day-ahead wind speed, irradiance, and load forecasts, while real-time dispatch relies on simple statistical models of forecast errors that maintain historical geographical and temporal correlations. The model includes treatments of intermittent generators including wind, centralized solar thermal, and rooftop photovoltaics, as well as conventional generators including natural gas, hydroelectric, and geothermal plants. Results are presented from a model run of the years 2005 and 2006 with wind speed data from the Western Wind Resources Database (WWRD), irradiance data from the 1991-2005 National Solar Radiation Database (NSRDB), hydroelectric discharge data from California Department of Water Resources (DWR), and load data from the California ISO. The resulting portfolio is capable of meeting the California ISO load over the simulation period with an 80% reduction in electric power sector carbon emissions, while also meeting a loss of load expectation of 1 day in 10 years. With this portfolio, over 99% of the annual load can be met with non-carbon-based generation and all of the instantaneous demand can be met with non-carbon-based sources in 97% of the hours in the Monte Carlo simulation. The results suggest that further reductions in carbon emissions may be achieved with emerging technologies that can reliably provide large capacities without necessarily providing positive net annual energy generation. These technologies may include demand response, vehicle-to-grid systems, and large-scale energy storage.

  14. Structures and Intermittency in a Passive Scalar Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergassola, M.; Mazzino, A.

    1997-09-01

    Perturbative expansions for intermittency scaling exponents in the Kraichnan passive scalar model [Phys. Rev. Lett. 72, 1016 (1994)] are investigated. A one-dimensional compressible model is considered for this purpose. High resolution Monte Carlo simulations using an Ito approach adapted to an advecting velocity field with a very short correlation time are performed and lead to clean scaling behavior for passive scalar structure functions. Perturbative predictions for the scaling exponents around the Gaussian limit of the model are derived as in the Kraichnan model. Their comparison with the simulations indicates that the scale-invariant perturbative scheme correctly captures the inertial range intermittency corrections associated with the intense localized structures observed in the dynamics.

  15. Horizontal running mattress suture modified with intermittent simple loops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacon, Anna H; Shiman, Michael I; Strozier, Narissa; Zaiac, Martin N

    2013-01-01

    Using the combination of a horizontal running mattress suture with intermittent loops achieves both good eversion with the horizontal running mattress plus the ease of removal of the simple loops. This combination technique also avoids the characteristic railroad track marks that result from prolonged non-absorbable suture retention. The unique feature of our technique is the incorporation of one simple running suture after every two runs of the horizontal running mattress suture. To demonstrate its utility, we used the suturing technique on several patients and analyzed the cosmetic outcome with post-operative photographs in comparison to other suturing techniques. In summary, the combination of running horizontal mattress suture with simple intermittent loops demonstrates functional and cosmetic benefits that can be readily taught, comprehended, and employed, leading to desirable aesthetic results and wound edge eversion.

  16. Quasi-One-Dimensional Intermittent Flux Behavior in Superconducting Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Qviller

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent filamentary dynamics of the vortex matter in superconductors is found in films of YBa_{2}Cu_{3}O_{7-δ} deposited on tilted substrates. Deposition of this material on such substrates creates parallel channels of easy flux penetration when a magnetic field is applied perpendicular to the film. As the applied field is gradually increased, magneto-optical imaging reveals that flux penetrates via numerous quasi-one-dimensional jumps. The distribution of flux avalanche sizes follows a power law, and data collapse is obtained by finite-size scaling, with the depth of the flux front used as crossover length. The intermittent behavior shows no threshold value in the applied field, in contrast to conventional flux jumping. The results strongly suggest that the quasi-one-dimensional flux jumps are of a different nature than the thermomagnetic dendritic (branching avalanches that are commonly found in superconducting films.

  17. Does intermittence in induced rotary movement have any explanatory significance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt-Rutland, A H

    1991-06-01

    Induced rotary movement has been reported to start and stop repeatedly during 1 min of observation. This has been taken as evidence for the involvement either of cyclorotational optokinetic nystagmus or of roll vection. Both assertions are dubious. Regarding cyclorotational optokinetic nystagmus, available evidence shows that it is too weak to be important in induced rotary movement. Also, induced rotary movement and cyclorotational optokinetic nystagmus are affected differently by the velocity of eliciting stimulation. Regarding roll vection, the conditions for its intermittence do not match those for induced rotary movement. Also, although aftereffects for induced rotary movement are negative, those for roll vection are positive and negative. Intermittence in induced rotary movement may be parsimoniously explained as characteristic of a weak effect.

  18. Environmental heat stress, hyperammonemia and nucleotide metabolism during intermittent exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohr, Magni; Rasmussen, Peter; Drust, Barry

    2006-01-01

    exercise with heat stress, the core and muscle temperatures peaked at 39.5±0.2 and 40.2±0.2°C to be ~ 1°C higher (P...Abstract  This study investigated the influence of environmental heat stress on ammonia (NH3) accumulation in relation to nucleotide metabolism and fatigue during intermittent exercise. Eight males performed 40 min of intermittent exercise (15 s at 306±22 W alternating with 15 s of unloaded cycling......) followed by five 15 s all-out sprints. Control trials were conducted in a 20°C environment while heat stress trials were performed at an ambient temperature of 40°C. Muscle biopsies and venous blood samples were obtained at rest, after 40 min of exercise and following the maximal sprints. Following...

  19. [Intermittent thrombolytic treatment. Results during severe, chronic arterial diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiessinger, J N; Aiach, M; Lagneau, P; Cormier, J M; Housset, E

    1975-04-20

    38 patients with severe chronic arteritis of the lower limbs were treated with streptokinase intermittently. All had been refused for surgical operation. One patient died, 4 others had early interruption of treatment. Eleven of the 38 patients had efficient thrombolysis confirmed by arteriography. The facts confirm the possibility of thrombolysis during chronic arterial disease. The fact that the aggravation was recent was favourable factor in prognosis. The eleven patients improved, had severe aggravation of symptomes for less than 2 months. Thus thrombolytic treatment has a place of choice in the treatment of severe arterial disease where surgery is impossible, or dangerous, owing to the uncertain state of the vascular bed below the lesion. Efficacious, it permits reconstructive surgery in cases where it had been at first refused. The use of intermittent treatment, apart from advantages of confort and cost, seems to increase the efficacy of treatment.

  20. Considering Intermittent Dormancy in an Advanced Life Support Systems Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargusingh, Miriam J.; Perry, Jay L.

    2017-01-01

    Many advanced human space exploration missions being considered by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) include concepts in which in-space systems cycle between inhabited and uninhabited states. Managing the life support system (LSS) may be particularly challenged during these periods of intermittent dormancy. A study to identify LSS management challenges and considerations relating to dormancy is described. The study seeks to define concepts suitable for addressing intermittent dormancy states and to evaluate whether the reference LSS architectures being considered by the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Life Support Systems Project (LSSP) are sufficient to support this operational state. The primary focus of the study is the mission concept considered to be the most challenging-a crewed Mars mission with an extensive surface stay. Results from this study are presented and discussed.

  1. Intermittent left bundle branch block caused by coronary vasospasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhaji, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Intermittent left bundle branch block (LBBB) has been reported in the literature following certain conditions such as cardiac blunt trauma, myocardial infarction (MI) or exercise induced LBBB. In the majority of cases, the patients usually have underlying coronary arteries disease. LBBB often prevents the electrocardiographic diagnosis of acute MI; therefore, new LBBB in the setting of chest pain is usually treated as transmural MI. We describe a case of patient who presented with intermittent LBBB associated with chest pain, and subsequently the patient was taken to the catheterization laboratory for emergency coronary angiogram, which revealed 80% spasm in left anterior descending artery, which was totally relieved by nitroglycerin infusion. No other significant CAD was noted. PMID:23930243

  2. Optimization of the rapping process of an intermittent electrostatic precipitator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloua, F.; Tilmatine, A.; Gouri, R.; Kadous, N.; Dascalescu, L.

    2008-01-01

    Intermittent operation mode is specific to electrostatic precipitators (ESP) used in workshops where the polluting product is produced in a discontinuous way. The rapping system is necessary in order to ensure a continuous and effective operation of a dry electrostatic precipitator, but causes at the same time, a problem of re-entrainment of dust and thus the degradation of filtration efficiency. The objective of this paper is to propose a procedure based on the methodology of experimental designs (Tagushi's Methodology) aiming at optimizing the rapping process; it consists to determine optimal values of rapping, i.e. the moment, the position and the force of rapping. Several “one-factor-at-a-time" experimental designs followed by a Full Factorial design, made it possible to model the process and to analyze interactions between the factors. The experiments were carried out on a laboratory experimental device which simulates an industrial precipitator with intermittent operation.

  3. Intermittency and local heating in the solar wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, K T; Matthaeus, W H; Wan, M; Rappazzo, A F

    2012-06-29

    Evidence for nonuniform heating in the solar wind plasma near current sheets dynamically generated by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence is obtained using measurements from the ACE spacecraft. These coherent structures only constitute 19% of the data, but contribute 50% of the total plasma internal energy. Intermittent heating manifests as elevations in proton temperature near current sheets, resulting in regional heating and temperature enhancements extending over several hours. The number density of non-Gaussian structures is found to be proportional to the mean proton temperature and solar wind speed. These results suggest magnetofluid turbulence drives intermittent dissipation through a hierarchy of coherent structures, which collectively could be a significant source of coronal and solar wind heating.

  4. Continuous use of intermittent bladder catheterization - can social support contribute?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjoyre Anne Lindozo Lopes

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to investigate the factors affecting the adequate continuous use of intermittent catheterization and its relation with social support.METHOD: sectional, descriptive and correlational study involving 49 patients with neuropathic bladder caused by spinal cord injury.RESULTS: almost all (92% participants continued the intermittent catheterization, but 46.9% made some changes in the technique. The complications (28.6% of the sample were mainly infection and vesicolithiasis. There were high scores for social support in relation to people that were part of the patient's social support.CONCLUSION: All of them noticed great support from the family, but not from the society in general. The difficulties were related to the lack of equipment and inadequate infrastructure, leading to changes that increased urologic complications.

  5. Intermittency and correlations in hadronic $Z^0$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Betts, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bock, P.; Bohme, J.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Ciocca, C.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Davis, R.; De Jong, S.; de Roeck, A.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Graham, K.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hargrove, C.K.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hobson, P.R.; Hoch, M.; Hocker, James Andrew; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ishii, K.; Jacob, F.R.; Jawahery, A.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Jones, C.R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klier, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S.R.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A.M.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Liebisch, R.; List, B.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, A.W.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Lui, D.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markopoulos, C.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Palinkas, J.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Przybycien, M.; Rembser, C.; Rick, H.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Roscoe, K.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W.M.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spagnolo, S.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Surrow, B.; Talbot, S.D.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomas, J.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A.S.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    1999-01-01

    A multidimensional study of local multiplicity fluctuations and multiparticle correlations of hadrons produced in Z decays is performed. The study is based on the data sample of more than 4 million events recorded with the OPAL detector at LEP. The fluctuations and correlations are analysed in terms of the normalized scaled factorial moments and cumulants up to the fifth order. The moments are observed to have intermittency-like behaviour, which is found to be more pronounced with increasing dimension. The large data sample allows for the first time a study of the factorial cumulants in e+e- annihilation. The analysis of the cumulants shows the existence of genuine multiparticle correlations with a strong intermittency rise up to higher orders. These correlations are found to be stronger in higher dimensions. The decomposition of the factorial moments into lower-order correlations that the dynamical fluctuations have important contributions from genuine many-particle correlations. The Monte Carlo models JETSE...

  6. Quasi-one-dimensional intermittent flux behavior in superconducting films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qviller, A. J.; Yurchenko, V. V.; Galperin, Y. M.

    2012-01-01

    Intermittent filamentary dynamics of the vortex matter in superconductors is found in films of YBa2Cu3O7-δ deposited on tilted substrates. Deposition of this material on such substrates creates parallel channels of easy flux penetration when a magnetic field is applied perpendicular to the film....... As the applied field is gradually increased, magneto-optical imaging reveals that flux penetrates via numerous quasi-one-dimensional jumps. The distribution of flux avalanche sizes follows a power law, and data collapse is obtained by finite-size scaling, with the depth of the flux front used as crossover length....... The intermittent behavior shows no threshold value in the applied field, in contrast to conventional flux jumping. The results strongly suggest that the quasi-one-dimensional flux jumps are of a different nature than the thermomagnetic dendritic (branching) avalanches that are commonly found in superconducting...

  7. Detailed characteristics of intermittent current pulses due to positive corona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yang, E-mail: liuyangwuh520@sina.com; Cui, Xiang; Lu, Tiebing; Wang, Zhenguo; Li, Xuebao; Xiang, Yu; Wang, Xiaobo [State Key Laboratory of Alternate Electrical Power System with Renewable Energy Sources, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China)

    2014-08-15

    In order to get detailed characteristics of intermittent current pulses due to positive corona such as the repetition rate of burst-pulse trains, the peak value ratio of the primary pulse to the secondary pulse, the number of pulses per burst, and the interval of the secondary pulses, a systematic study was carried out in a coaxial conductor-cylinder electrode system with the conductor electrode being set with a discharge point. Empirical formulae for the number of pulses per burst and the interval of the secondary pulses are first presented. A theoretical model based on the motion of the space-charge clouds is proposed. Analysis with the model gives explanations to the experimental results and reveals some new insights into the physical mechanism of positive intermittent corona.

  8. Current practice of conventional intermittent hemodialysis for acute kidney injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Schiffl

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of conventional intermittent hemodialysis (IHD represents a mainstay of supportive care of patients with acute kidney injury (AKI. However, a number of fundamental questions regarding the optimal management of IHD remain unanswered after more than six decades of renal replacement therapy (RRT. This review summarizes current evidence regarding the timing of initiation of intermittent hemodialysis, the comparative outcomes (mortality and recovery of renal function, the prescription of the intensity of this therapy and discontinuation of dialysis. The way conventional IHD is performed has an impact on the outcome of sick patients with AKI. The value of regular education and training of those who provide IHD cannot be emphasized enough. However, we must be realistic in our expectations that no mode of RRT per se will substantially alter the excessive mortality of critically ill-patients with AKI.

  9. Tissue-specific splicing mutation in acute intermittent porphyria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grandchamp, B.; Picat, C. (Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire, Paris (France)); Mignotte, V.; Romeo, P.H.; Goossens, M. (Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale, Creteil (France)); Wilson, J.H.P.; Sandkuyl, L. (Erasmus Univ., Rotterdam (Netherlands)); Te Velde, K. (Saint Geertruiden Hospital, Deventer (Netherlands)); Nordmann, Y. (Hopital Louis Mourier, Colombes (France))

    1989-01-01

    An inherited deficiency of porphobilinogen deaminase in humans is responsible for the autosomal dominant disease acute intermittent porphyria. Different classes of mutations have been described at the protein level suggesting that this is a heterogeneous disease. It was previously demonstrated that porphobilinogen deaminase is encoded by two distinct mRNA species expressed in a tissue-specific manner. Analysis of the genomic sequences indicated that these two mRNAs are transcribed from two promoters and only differ in their first exon. The first mutation identified in the human porphobilinogen deaminase gene is a single-base substitution (G {yields} A) in the canonical 5{prime} splice donor site of intron 1. This mutation leads to a particular subtype of acute intermittent porphyria characterized by the restriction of the enzymatic defect to nonerythropoietic tissues. Hybridization analysis using olignonucleotide probes after in vitro amplification of genomic DNA offers another possibility of detecting asymptomatic carriers of the mutation in affected families.

  10. Kullback-Leibler divergence measure of intermittency: Application to turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granero-Belinchón, Carlos; Roux, Stéphane G.; Garnier, Nicolas B.

    2018-01-01

    For generic systems exhibiting power law behaviors, and hence multiscale dependencies, we propose a simple tool to analyze multifractality and intermittency, after noticing that these concepts are directly related to the deformation of a probability density function from Gaussian at large scales to non-Gaussian at smaller scales. Our framework is based on information theory and uses Shannon entropy and Kullback-Leibler divergence. We provide an extensive application to three-dimensional fully developed turbulence, seen here as a paradigmatic complex system where intermittency was historically defined and the concepts of scale invariance and multifractality were extensively studied and benchmarked. We compute our quantity on experimental Eulerian velocity measurements, as well as on synthetic processes and phenomenological models of fluid turbulence. Our approach is very general and does not require any underlying model of the system, although it can probe the relevance of such a model.

  11. Methodological foundations for physical rehabilitation of patients on intermittent asthma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigus I.M.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to improve the physical rehabilitation of patients with intermittent bronchial asthma exacerbation by applying the pathogenetic modes of physical activity and a range of physical therapeutic factors. A total of 70 patients with intermittent asthma in the acute stage. In the hospital carried out a specific program of physical rehabilitation, including the modified methods of therapeutic physical culture and physiotherapy facilities. The use of physical rehabilitation resulted in a reduction of assault period of the disease, significantly improved the physical performance of patients. In all cases of physical rehabilitation program achieved full control of the disease, significantly improves the quality of life of patients, did not occur in the treatment of patients with only medicines.

  12. Enhanced cerebral perfusion during brief exposures to cyclic intermittent hypoxemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoli; Xu, Diqun; Hall, James R; Ross, Sarah; Chen, Shande; Liu, Howe; Mallet, Robert T; Shi, Xiangrong

    2017-12-01

    Cerebral vasodilation and increased cerebral oxygen extraction help maintain cerebral oxygen uptake in the face of hypoxemia. This study examined cerebrovascular responses to intermittent hypoxemia in eight healthy men breathing 10% O 2 for 5 cycles, each 6 min, interspersed with 4 min of room air breathing. Hypoxia exposures raised heart rate ( P hypoxemia. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Five bouts of 6-min intermittent hypoxia (IH) exposures to 10% O 2 progressively reduce arterial oxygen saturation ([Formula: see text]) to 67% without causing discomfort or distress. Cerebrovascular responses to hypoxemia are dynamically reset over the course of a single IH session, such that threshold and saturation for cerebral vasodilations occurred at lower [Formula: see text] and cerebral tissue oxygenation ([Formula: see text]) during the fifth vs. first hypoxia bouts. Cerebral oxygen extraction is augmented during acute hypoxemia, which compensates for decreased arterial O 2 content.

  13. Vorticity scaling and intermittency in drift-interchange plasma turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dura, P. D.; Hnat, B.; Robinson, J.; Dendy, R. O. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2012-09-15

    The effects of spatially varying magnetic field strength on the scaling properties of plasma turbulence, modelled by an extended form of Hasegawa-Wakatani model, are investigated. We study changes in the intermittency of the velocity, density, and vorticity fields, as functions of the magnetic field inhomogeneity C=-{partial_derivative} ln B/{partial_derivative}x. While the velocity fluctuations are always self-similar and their scaling is unaffected by the value of C, the intermittency levels in density and vorticity change with parameter C, reflecting morphological changes in the coherent structures due to the interchange mechanism. Given the centrality of vorticity in conditioning plasma transport, this result is of interest in scaling the results of transport measurements and simulations in tokamak edge plasmas, where drift-interchange turbulence in the presence of a magnetic field gradient is likely to occur.

  14. Vorticity scaling and intermittency in drift-interchange plasma turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dura, P. D.; Hnat, B.; Robinson, J.; Dendy, R. O.

    2012-09-01

    The effects of spatially varying magnetic field strength on the scaling properties of plasma turbulence, modelled by an extended form of Hasegawa-Wakatani model, are investigated. We study changes in the intermittency of the velocity, density, and vorticity fields, as functions of the magnetic field inhomogeneity C =-∂ ln B/∂x. While the velocity fluctuations are always self-similar and their scaling is unaffected by the value of C, the intermittency levels in density and vorticity change with parameter C, reflecting morphological changes in the coherent structures due to the interchange mechanism. Given the centrality of vorticity in conditioning plasma transport, this result is of interest in scaling the results of transport measurements and simulations in tokamak edge plasmas, where drift-interchange turbulence in the presence of a magnetic field gradient is likely to occur.

  15. Intermittent Testing and Training for High-Level Football Players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingebrigtsen, Jørgen

    on the Yo-Yo IR2 test and other field- and laboratory tests of intermittent interval training performed as anaerobic speed-endurance production training is very limited for football players. Hence, this latter question is examined in Study IV.In Study I we find no differences in anthropometric...... times, RSA, or jump performances. Hence, our results indicate that short-term anaerobic production training is effective for improving acceleration and intermittent exercise performance among well-trained junior elite players.In conclusion, the present thesis provides evidence that the traditional...... on four articles that focus on physical testing and training for elite and sub-elite football players.The first article (Study I) aims to identify and establish aerobic capacities and anthropometric characteristics of elite female football players with the use of laboratory tests, and to examine whether...

  16. Mars Atmospheric Entry Integrated Navigation with Partial Intermittent Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai-shan Lou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Signal degradation suffered by the vehicle is a combination brownout and blackout during Mars atmospheric entry. The communications brownout means that signal fades and blackout means that the signal is lost completely. The communications brownout and blackout periods are analyzed and predicted with an altitude and velocity profiles. In the brownout period, the range measurements between the vehicle and the orbiters are modeled as intermittent measurements with the radio signal arrival probabilities, which are distributed as a Rayleigh distribution of the electron number density around the entry vehicle. A new integrated navigation strategy during the Mars atmospheric entry phase is proposed to consider the probabilities of the radio measurements in the communications brownout and blackout periods under the IMU/beacon scenario based on the information filter with intermittent measurements. Numerical navigation simulations are designed to show the performance of the proposed navigation strategy under the integrated navigation scenario.

  17. Using Internet Artifacts to Profile a Child Pornography Suspect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus K. Rogers

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Digital evidence plays a crucial role in child pornography investigations. However, in the following case study, the authors argue that the behavioral analysis or “profiling” of digital evidence can also play a vital role in child pornography investigations. The following case study assessed the Internet Browsing History (Internet Explorer Bookmarks, Mozilla Bookmarks, and Mozilla History from a suspected child pornography user’s computer. The suspect in this case claimed to be conducting an ad hoc law enforcement investigation. After the URLs were classified (Neutral; Adult Porn; Child Porn; Adult Dating sites; Pictures from Social Networking Profiles; Chat Sessions; Bestiality; Data Cleaning; Gay Porn, the Internet history files were statistically analyzed to determine prevalence and trends in Internet browsing. First, a frequency analysis was used to determine a baseline of online behavior. Results showed 54% (n = 3205 of the URLs were classified as “neutral” and 38.8% (n = 2265 of the URLs were classified as a porn website. Only 10.8% of the URLs were classified as child pornography websites. However when the IE history file was analyzed by visit, or “hit,” count, the Pictures/Profiles (31.5% category had the highest visit count followed by Neutral (19.3%, Gay Porn (17%, and Child Porn (16.6%. When comparing the frequency of URLs to the Hit Count for each pornography type, it was noted that the accused was accessing gay porn, child porn, chat rooms, and picture profiles (i.e., from Facebook more often than adult porn and neutral websites. The authors concluded that the suspect in this case was in fact a child pornography user and not an ad hoc investigator, and the findings from the behavioral analysis were admitted as evidence in the sentencing hearing for this case. The authors believe this case study illustrates the ability to conduct a behavioral analysis of digital evidence. More work is required to further validate the

  18. Teicoplanin versus vancomycin for proven or suspected infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, Alexandre B; Goncalves, Anderson R; Almeida, Claudia S; Bugano, Diogo Dg; Silva, Eliezer

    2010-06-16

    Vancomycin and teicoplanin are commonly used to treat gram-positive infections, particularly those caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). There is uncertainty regarding the effects of teicoplanin compared to vancomycin on kidney function with some previous studies suggesting teicoplanin is less nephrotoxic than vancomycin. To investigate the efficacy and safety of vancomycin versus teicoplanin in patients with proven or suspected infection. We searched the Cochrane Renal Group's Specialised Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, reference lists of nephrology textbooks, review articles with relevant studies and sent letters seeking information about unpublished or incomplete studies to investigators involved in previous studies. We searched for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in any language comparing teicoplanin to vancomycin for patients with proven or suspected infection. Two authors independently evaluated methodological quality and extracted data using standardised data extraction forms. Study investigators were contacted for information not available in the original manuscripts. Random effects model was used to estimate the pooled risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI). We included 24 studies (2,610 patients) in this review. Teicoplanin reduced the risk of nephrotoxicity compared to vancomycin (RR 0.66, 95% CI 0.48 to 0.90).The effects of teicoplanin or vancomycin were similar for clinical cure (RR 1.03, 95% CI 0.98 to 1.08), microbiological cure (RR 0.98, 95% CI 0.93 to 1.03) and mortality (RR 1.02, 95% CI 0.79 to1.30). Six studies reported no cases of acute kidney injury (AKI) needing dialysis. Adverse events were less frequent with teicoplanin including cutaneous rash (RR 0.57, 95% CI 0.35 to 0.92), red man syndrome (RR 0.21, 95% CI 0.08 to 0.59) and total adverse events (RR 0.73, 95% CI 0.53 to 1.00). A lower risk of nephrotoxicity with teicoplanin was observed in patients either with (RR 0.51, 95% CI 0.30 to 0.88) or

  19. Intermittent fasting during Ramadan: does it affect sleep?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahammam, Ahmed S; Almushailhi, Khalid; Pandi-Perumal, Seithikurippu R; Sharif, Munir M

    2014-02-01

    Islamic intermittent fasting is distinct from regular voluntary or experimental fasting. We hypothesised that if a regimen of a fixed sleep-wake schedule and a fixed caloric intake is followed during intermittent fasting, the effects of fasting on sleep architecture and daytime sleepiness will be minimal. Therefore, we designed this study to objectively assess the effects of Islamic intermittent fasting on sleep architecture and daytime sleepiness. Eight healthy volunteers reported to the Sleep Disorders Centre on five occasions for polysomnography and multiple sleep latency tests: (1) during adaptation; (2) 3 weeks before Ramadan, after having performed Islamic fasting for 1 week (baseline fasting); (3) 1 week before Ramadan (non-fasting baseline); (4) 2 weeks into Ramadan (Ramadan); and (5) 2 weeks after Ramadan (non-fasting; Recovery). Daytime sleepiness was assessed using the Epworth Sleepiness Scale and the multiple sleep latency test. The participants had a mean age of 26.6 ± 4.9 years, a body mass index of 23.7 ± 3.5 kg m(-2) and an Epworth Sleepiness Scale score of 7.3 ± 2.7. There was no change in weight or the Epworth Sleepiness Scale in the four study periods. The rapid eye movement sleep percentage was significantly lower during fasting. There was no difference in sleep latency, non-rapid eye movement sleep percentage, arousal index and sleep efficiency. The multiple sleep latency test analysis revealed no difference in the sleep latency between the 'non-fasting baseline', 'baseline fasting', 'Ramadan' and 'Recovery' time points. Under conditions of a fixed sleep-wake schedule and a fixed caloric intake, Islamic intermittent fasting results in decreased rapid eye movement sleep with no impact on other sleep stages, the arousal index or daytime sleepiness. © 2013 European Sleep Research Society.

  20. Consequences of intermittent suckling for performance in the pig

    OpenAIRE

    Kuller, W.I.

    2008-01-01

    In Europe, piglets are usually weaned before 4 weeks of age, thus changing abruptly from highly digestible milk to a less digestible starter diet, resulting in reduced feed intake and growth after weaning and sometimes post weaning diarrhea. Intake of a sufficient amount of creep feed during lactation can reduce these post weaning problems, but creep feed consumption is usually low and highly variable. This thesis describes the effect of intermittent suckling (IS; a management technique in wh...

  1. Epidemiological, clinical anf pathogenetic studies of acute intermittent porphyria

    OpenAIRE

    Bylesjö, Ingemar

    2008-01-01

    Porphyrias are inherited metabolic disorders characterised by an impairment of heme biosynthesis. Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is the most common of the acute porphyrias in Sweden. Acute attacks of AIP are characterised by neuro-psychiatric symptoms, including epileptic seizures. Environmental and acquired factors are related to the induction of symptoms. Acute attacks of AIP are treated with high doses of glucose and/or hematin infusions. The pathogenesis of the neuro-psychiatric sympt...

  2. Consensus of Multiagent Networks with Intermittent Interaction and Directed Topology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent interaction control is introduced to solve the consensus problem for second-order multiagent networks due to the limited sensing abilities and environmental changes periodically. And, we get some sufficient conditions for the agents to reach consensus with linear protocol from the theoretical findings by using the Lyapunov control approach. Finally, the validity of the theoretical results is validated through the numerical example.

  3. On the possibility of intermittence during fixations: a conceptual assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talasli, U

    1993-08-01

    A prevalent tacit assumption of the continuity of visual representation during fixations is challenged and shown to be logically tenuous. Relying upon three lines of suggestive evidence, it is then argued that representation must be in the form of static snapshots which alternate with very short dark periods wherein the image is omitted from vision. In view of the difficulties of a direct experimental verification of such a high-frequency intermittence, a conceptual approach to the question is defended.

  4. Effects of intermittent fasting on metabolism in men

    OpenAIRE

    de Azevedo, Fernanda Reis; Ikeoka, Dimas; Caramelli, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    This review analyzes the available literature on the impact of intermittent fasting (IF), a nutritional intervention, on different aspects of metabolism. The epidemic of metabolic disturbances, such as obesity, metabolic syndrome (MS), and diabetes mellitus type 2 has led to an increase in the prevalence of cardiovascular diseases, and affected patients might significantly benefit from modifications in nutritional habits. Recent experimental studies have elucidated some of the metabolic mecha...

  5. Measurement Science of the Intermittent Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    investigate intermittency fluxes of clear-air radar reflectivity inthe atmospheric boundary layer, 2013 IEEE International Symposium on Antennas and...meridionally by 40 m), eight ultrasonic anemometers, two low-response thermometers, two low-response hygrometers, three quartz-crystal barometers, and...vertically spaced sonics can be used for post-facto calibration (Muschinski and Ayvazian, 2014) of relative biases in a pair of ultrasonic

  6. Prolapsed bilateral ureteroceles leading to intermittent outflow obstruction.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Stunell, H

    2012-02-01

    A ureterocele refers to a cystic dilatation of the distal ureter. It may be unilateral or bilateral and may be associated with a duplex system in some cases. We present an unusual case where a young patient was found to have large bilateral ureteroceles which prolapsed into the urethra, causing intermittent incontinence and obstruction. We discuss the case and review the literature concerning this rare anomaly.

  7. Optimizing intermittent water supply in urban pipe distribution networks

    OpenAIRE

    Lieb, Anna M.; Rycroft, Chris H.; Wilkening, Jon

    2015-01-01

    In many urban areas of the developing world, piped water is supplied only intermittently, as valves direct water to different parts of the water distribution system at different times. The flow is transient, and may transition between free-surface and pressurized, resulting in complex dynamical features with important consequences for water suppliers and users. Here, we develop a computational model of transition, transient pipe flow in a network, accounting for a wide variety of realistic bo...

  8. [Intermittent hemodialysis, irreplaceable in specific cases of severe poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventresca, M; Teta, D; Burnier, M; Kissling, S

    2015-02-25

    The medical practitioner is in general well aware of the indications for hemodialysis in severe, acute or chronic renal insufficiency. Apart from the traditional indications for renal replacement therapy, there are some cases such as metfomin and ethylene glycol poisoning, lithium intoxication severe hypercalcemia and tumor lysis syndrome, in which intermittent hemodialysis is the most effective treatment, or sometimes the only effective one. Although these situations remain infrequent, it is crucial to recognize them as quickly as possible.

  9. Verbal versus Physical Aggression in Intermittent Explosive Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Look, Amy E.; McCloskey, Michael S.; Coccaro, Emil F.

    2014-01-01

    Intermittent Explosive Disorder (IED) is the only adult psychiatric diagnosis for which pathological aggression is primary. DSM-IV criteria focused on physical aggression, but DSM-5 allows for an IED diagnosis in the presence of frequent verbal aggression with or without concurrent physical aggression. It remains unclear how individuals with verbal aggression differ from those with physical aggression with respect to cognitive-affective deficits and psychosocial functioning. The current study...

  10. Acute intermittent porphyria precipitated by atazanavir/ritonavir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharti, Sheena; Malhotra, Prashant; Hirsch, Bruce

    2016-11-01

    Porphyrias are a group of metabolic disorders that are relatively uncommon and underdiagnosed. Although the association between HIV infection and antiretrovirals with porphyria cutanea tarda is well established, there are fewer data linking HIV and the acute hepatic porphyrias. We report the first case of acute intermittent porphyria precipitated by the drugs atazanavir and ritonavir, presenting with unexplained abdominal pain. © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. Sand intermittent filtration technology for safer domestic sewage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Maximum pollution reduction potential of intermittent filtration bed was recorded at 2 feet depth of sand and soil mixture at ratio of 3:1. Percentage of pollution reducing potential was found in CO2 83.4%, BOD 72.5%, COD 69.9%, Total alkalinity 37.9%, Total solids 88.5%, Total dissolved solids 86.1%, Total suspended solids ...

  12. Adaptations with Intermittent Exercise Training in Post- and Premenopausal Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidelin, Kåre; Nyberg, Michael; Piil, Peter; Jørgensen, Niklas Rye; Hellsten, Ylva; Bangsbo, Jens

    2017-01-01

    The purposes of the present study was to examine the effect of intermittent exercise training on musculoskeletal and metabolic health in postmenopausal (PM) and premenopausal (PRM) women and, furthermore, to evaluate whether the adaptations can be maintained with a reduced training frequency. Eighteen PM (51 ± 1 yr, mean ± SEM) and 12 PRM (48 ± 1 yr) women participated in floorball training approximately two times per week for 12 wk. In a subgroup (n = 9) of PM women (PM40), exercise training was performed for an additional 40 wk with a reduced training frequency of approximately one training session per week. In PM, the body fat percentage decreased (P < 0.05) and the total lean leg mass increased (P < 0.05) during the 12-wk training period, with no changes in PRM. In both PM and PRM, lean body mass and maximal oxygen uptake (V˙O2max) were higher, and Yo-Yo intermittent endurance test 1 (YYIET-1) performance was better (P < 0.05) after the 12-wk training period. Procollagen type 1 amino-terminal propeptide was higher (P < 0.05) in PM, and total leg bone mineral density (BMD) was higher (P < 0.05) in both PM and PRM after the 12-wk training period. In PM40, total lean leg mass, V˙O2max, YYIET-1 performance, level of procollagen type 1 amino-terminal propeptide, and total leg BMD were maintained, whereas whole-body BMD and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) were reduced (P < 0.05) and the expression of muscle glucose transporter type 4 was higher (P < 0.05). Twelve weeks of intermittent exercise training increased BMD, intermittent exercise capacity, and V˙O2max in PM and PRM, with PM also having positive changes in body composition. Additional 40 wk of training with a reduced frequency was sufficient to preserve these physiological adaptations and also improve blood glucose regulation in PM.

  13. Seizure tests distinguish intermittent fasting from the ketogenic diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Adam L; Zheng, Xiangrong; Bergbower, Emily; Kennedy, Michiko; Hardwick, J Marie

    2010-08-01

    Calorie restriction can be anticonvulsant in animal models. The ketogenic diet was designed to mimic calorie restriction and has been assumed to work by the same mechanisms. We challenged this assumption by profiling the effects of these dietary regimens in mice subjected to a battery of acute seizure tests. Juvenile male NIH Swiss mice received ketogenic diet or a normal diet fed in restricted quantities (continuously or intermittently) for ∼12 days, starting at 3-4 weeks of age. Seizures were induced by the 6 Hz test, kainic acid, maximal electroshock, or pentylenetetrazol. The ketogenic and calorie-restricted diets often had opposite effects depending on the seizure test. The ketogenic diet protected from 6 Hz-induced seizures, whereas calorie restriction (daily and intermittent) increased seizure activity. Conversely, calorie restriction protected juvenile mice against seizures induced by kainic acid, whereas the ketogenic diet failed to protect. Intermittent caloric restriction worsened seizures induced by maximal electroshock but had no effect on those induced by pentylenetetrazol. In contrast to a longstanding hypothesis, calorie restriction and the ketogenic diet differ in their acute seizure test profiles, suggesting that they have different underlying anticonvulsant mechanisms. These findings highlight the importance of the 6 Hz test and its ability to reflect the benefits of ketosis and fat consumption. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2010 International League Against Epilepsy.

  14. Seizure tests distinguish intermittent fasting from the ketogenic diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Adam L.; Zheng, Xiangrong; Bergbower, Emily; Kennedy, Michiko; Hardwick, J. Marie

    2010-01-01

    Summary Purpose Calorie restriction can be anticonvulsant in animal models. The ketogenic diet was designed to mimic calorie restriction and has been assumed to work by the same mechanisms. We challenged this assumption by profiling the effects of these dietary regimens in mice subjected to a battery of acute seizure tests. Methods Juvenile male NIH Swiss mice received ketogenic diet or a normal diet fed in restricted quantities (continuously or intermittently) for ~ 12 days, starting at 3–4 weeks of age. Seizures were induced by the 6 Hz test, kainic acid, maximal electroshock, or pentylenetetrazol. Results The ketogenic and calorie-restricted diets often had opposite effects depending on the seizure test. The ketogenic diet protected from 6 Hz–induced seizures, whereas calorie restriction (daily and intermittent) increased seizure activity. Conversely, calorie restriction protected juvenile mice against seizures induced by kainic acid, whereas the ketogenic diet failed to protect. Intermittent caloric restriction worsened seizures induced by maximal electroshock but had no effect on those induced by pentylenetetrazol. Discussion In contrast to a longstanding hypothesis, calorie restriction and the ketogenic diet differ in their acute seizure test profiles, suggesting that they have different underlying anticonvulsant mechanisms. These findings highlight the importance of the 6 Hz test and its ability to reflect the benefits of ketosis and fat consumption. PMID:20477852

  15. Distribution of Chironomidae in a semiarid intermittent river of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias, R L; Carvalho, L K; Medeiros, E S F

    2012-12-01

    The effects of the intermittency of water flow on habitat structure and substrate composition have been reported to create a patch dynamics for the aquatic fauna, mostly for that associated with the substrate. This study aims to describe the spatial distribution of Chironomidae in an intermittent river of semiarid Brazil and to associate assemblage composition with environmental variables. Benthic invertebrates were sampled during the wet and dry seasons using a D-shaped net (40 cm wide and 250 μm mesh), and the Chironomidae were identified to genus level. The most abundant genera were Tanytarsus, Polypedilum, and Saetheria with important contributions of the genera Procladius, Aedokritus, and Dicrotendipes. Richness and density were not significantly different between the study sites, and multiple regression showed that the variation in richness and density explained by the environmental variables was significant only for substrate composition. The composition of genera showed significant spatial segregation across the study sites. Canonical Correspondence Analysis showed significant correspondence between Chironomidae composition and the environmental variables, with submerged vegetation, elevation, and leaf litter being important predictors of the Chironomidae fauna. This study showed that Chironomidae presented important spatial variation along the river and that this variation was substantially explained by environmental variables associated with the habitat structure and river hierarchy. We suggest that the observed spatial segregation in the fauna results in the high diversity of this group of organisms in intermittent streams.

  16. Sensitivity of intermittent streams to climate variations in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, Kenny; Wolock, David M.; Dettinger, Mike

    2015-01-01

    There is a great deal of interest in the literature on streamflow changes caused by climate change because of the potential negative effects on aquatic biota and water supplies. Most previous studies have primarily focused on perennial streams, and there have been only a few studies examining the effect of climate variability on intermittent streams. Our objectives in this study were to (1) identify regions of similar zero-flow behavior, and (2) evaluate the sensitivity of intermittent streams to historical variability in climate in the United States. This study was carried out at 265 intermittent streams by evaluating: (1) correlations among time series of flow metrics (number of zero-flow events, the average of the central 50% and largest 10% of flows) with climate (magnitudes, durations and intensity), and (2) decadal changes in the seasonality and long-term trends of these flow metrics. Results identified five distinct seasonality patterns in the zero-flow events. In addition, strong associations between the low-flow metrics and historical changes in climate were found. The decadal analysis suggested no significant seasonal shifts or decade-to-decade trends in the low-flow metrics. The lack of trends or changes in seasonality is likely due to unchanged long-term patterns in precipitation over the time period examined.

  17. Intermittent Surface Water Connectivity: Fill and Spill vs. Fill ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intermittent surface connectivity can influence aquatic systems, since chemical and biotic movements are often associated with water flow. Although often referred to as fill and spill, wetlands also fill and merge. We examined the effects of these connection types on water levels, ion concentrations, and biotic communities of eight prairie pothole wetlands between 1979 and 2015. Fill and spill caused pulsed surface water connections that were limited to periods following spring snow melt. In contrast, two wetlands connected through fill and merge experienced a nearly continuous, 20-year surface water connection and had completely coincident water levels. Fill and spill led to minimal convergence in dissolved ions and macroinvertebrate composition, while these constituents converged under fill and merge. The primary factor determining difference in responses was duration of the surface water connection between wetland pairs. Our findings suggest that investigations into the effects of intermittent surface water connections should not consider these connections generically, but need to address the specific types of connections. In particular, fill and spill promotes external water exports while fill and merge favors internal storage. The behaviors of such intermittent connections will likely be accentuated under a future with more frequent and severe climate extremes. Under the Safe and Sustainable Water Resources National Program, work is being done to qu

  18. Environmental heat stress, hyperammonemia and nucleotide metabolism during intermittent exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Magni; Rasmussen, Peter; Drust, Barry; Nielsen, Bodil; Nybo, Lars

    2006-05-01

    This study investigated the influence of environmental heat stress on ammonia (NH3) accumulation in relation to nucleotide metabolism and fatigue during intermittent exercise. Eight males performed 40 min of intermittent exercise (15 s at 306+/-22 W alternating with 15 s of unloaded cycling) followed by five 15 s all-out sprints. Control trials were conducted in a 20 degrees C environment while heat stress trials were performed at an ambient temperature of 40 degrees C. Muscle biopsies and venous blood samples were obtained at rest, after 40 min of exercise and following the maximal sprints. Following exercise with heat stress, the core and muscle temperatures peaked at 39.5+/-0.2 and 40.2+/-0.2 degrees C to be approximately 1 degrees C higher (Pheat stress trial (PNH3 increased from 31+/-2 microM at rest to 93+/-6 at 40 min and 151+/-15 microM after the maximal sprints to be 34% higher than control (Pheat stress compared to control, while muscle glycogen, CP, ATP and IMP levels were similar across trials. In conclusion, altered levels of "classical peripheral fatiguing agents" does apparently not explain the reduced capacity for performing repeated sprints following intermittent exercise in the heat, whereas the augmented systemic NH3 response may be a factor influencing fatigue during exercise with superimposed heat stress.

  19. Intermittency and bifurcation in SEPICs under voltage-mode control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fang

    2010-08-01

    A stroboscopic map for voltage-controlled single ended primary inductor converter (SEPIC) with pulse width modulation (PWM) is presented, where low-frequency oscillating phenomena such as quasi-periodic and intermittent quasi-periodic bifurcations occurring in the system are captured by numerical and experimental methods. According to bifurcation diagrams and nonlinear dynamical theory, the characteristics of the low-frequency oscillation and the mechanism for the appearance of the low-frequency oscillation are investigated. It is shown that as the controller parameter varies, the change in the conduction mode takes place from the continuous conduction mode (CCM) under the originally stable period one and high periodic orbits to the intermittent changes between CCM and discontinuous conduction mode (DCM), which may be related to the losing stability of the system and brought the system to exhibiting low-frequency oscillating behaviour in the time domain. Moreover, the occurrence of the intermittent quasi-periodic oscillation reflects that the system undergoes a Neimark-Sacker bifurcation.

  20. New advances on chaotic intermittency and its applications

    CERN Document Server

    Elaskar, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    One of the most important routes to chaos is the chaotic intermittency. However, there are many cases that do not agree with the classical theoretical predictions. In this book, an extended theory for intermittency in one-dimensional maps is presented. A new general methodology to evaluate the reinjection probability density function (RPD) is developed in Chapters 5 to 8. The key of this formulation is the introduction of a new function, called M(x), which is used to calculate the RPD function. The function M(x) depends on two integrals. This characteristic reduces the influence on the statistical fluctuations in the data series. Also, the function M(x) is easy to evaluate from the data series, even for a small number of numerical or experimental data. As a result, a more general form for the RPD is found; where the classical theory based on uniform reinjection is recovered as a particular case. The characteristic exponent traditionally used to characterize the intermittency type, is now a function depending ...

  1. Sprint vs. intermittent training in young female basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attene, G; Pizzolato, F; Calcagno, G; Ibba, G; Pinna, M; Salernitano, G; Padulo, J

    2014-04-01

    This study aimed at comparing the effects of intermittent and repeated sprint ability training on physiological variables. Sixteen young female basketball players were randomly allocated to intermittent training (IT=8) or repeated sprint ability training (RST=8) groups. The following outcomes were measured at baseline and after 6 weeks of training: Yo-Yo intermittent recovery (Yo-Yo) and repeated sprint ability (RSA) tests. For all the variables investigated the effect of training type showed a different trend respect at current knowledge. In the RSA, best time (BT) was a significant main effect of training time (pre- vs. post-) (P<0.0001), and of the interaction training type/time (P=0.03). The RST showed a decrease in BT of 3.1% (P=0.005) while the IT showed a decrease of 6.2% (P<0.0001). In the IT there was a significant main effect of time for the total distance with an increment of 26.9%, and a significant main effect of time in the final speed with an increment of 1.23%. These findings suggest that the two training methods used in this study can be an effective training strategy for inducing anaerobic and basketball-specific training schedules. Besides, even when IT training is not done at very high speed, it can increase the maximum speed of the RSA.

  2. Structure functions and intermittency in ionospheric plasma turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Dyrud

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Low frequency electrostatic turbulence in the ionospheric E-region is studied by means of numerical and experimental methods. We use the structure functions of the electrostatic potential as a diagnostics of the fluctuations. We demonstrate the inherently intermittent nature of the low level turbulence in the collisional ionospheric plasma by using results for the space-time varying electrostatic potential from two dimensional numerical simulations. An instrumented rocket can not directly detect the one-point potential variation, and most measurements rely on records of potential differences between two probes. With reference to the space observations we demonstrate that the results obtained by potential difference measurements can differ significantly from the one-point results. It was found, in particular, that the intermittency signatures become much weaker, when the proper rocket-probe configuration is implemented. We analyze also signals from an actual ionospheric rocket experiment, and find a reasonably good agreement with the appropriate simulation results, demonstrating again that rocket data, obtained as those analyzed here, are unlikely to give an adequate representation of intermittent features of the low frequency ionospheric plasma turbulence for the given conditions.

  3. Pararenal splenosis encountered during the evaluation of a suspected pheochromocytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Joel D; Kwee, Sandi

    2010-11-01

    The authors describe a patient in whom pararenal splenosis nodules were initially interpreted as probable pheochromocytoma. A 22-year-old man with chronic glomerulonephritis, hypertension and a childhood history of splenectomy was hospitalized for a hypertensive emergency. He did not improve with aggressive antihypertensive therapy. A pheochromocytoma was suspected, and a renal ultrasound and a magnetic resonance imaging showed 2 left pararenal masses. Laboratory evaluation for pheochromocytoma and aldosteronoma were negative. Biopsies of the masses were planned, but the masses were subsequently shown to be splenic tissue by a (99m)technnetium heat-damaged red blood cell scan. Ectopic splenic masses, eg, splenosis or accessory spleens, should be considered in patients with undiagnosed abdominal or kidney masses and a history of splenectomy.

  4. Seroprevalance of brucellosis among suspected cases in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jama'ayah, M Z; Heu, J Y; Norazah, A

    2011-06-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic disease which can be transmitted by direct or indirect contact with infected animal or their products. It is an important public health problem but little is known on brucellosis in the Malaysian population. The aim of this study was to determine the presence of Brucella antibodies using commercial Brucella IgG and IgM ELISA kits (Vircell, SL, Barcelona Spain). A total of 184 sera from suspected patients were received from 16 hospitals in Malaysia over the years 2004 to 2009. Only 10 serum samples (5.4%) were positive for Brucella antibodies in which 5 showed the presence of both IgM and IgG. Most of the positive patients were occupationally involved with animals. This study suggests the seroprevalance of brucellosis among individuals who have contact with infected animals in Malaysia is low.

  5. Unenhanced MR Imaging in adults with clinically suspected acute appendicitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chabanova, Elizaveta; Balslev, Ingegerd; Achiam, Michael

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of the study was to evaluate unenhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for the diagnosis of appendicitis or another surgery-requiring condition in an adult population scheduled for emergency appendectomy based on a clinical diagnosis of suspected acute appendicitis. MATERIALS...... radiologists and one surgeon independent of each other and compared with surgical and pathological records. RESULTS: According to the surgical and histopathological findings 30 of 48 patients (63%) had acute appendicitis. Of the remaining 18 patients, 4 patients had no reasons for the clinical symptoms and 14...... patients had other pathology. For the three reviewers the performance of MRI in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis showed the following sensitivity, specificity and accuracy ranges: 83-93%, 50-83% and 77-83%. Moderate (kappa=0.51) and fair (kappa=0.31) interobserver agreements in the MR diagnosis of acute...

  6. CT diagnosis of suspected acute appendicitis in adult patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamase, Hiroshi; Sahashi, Kiyomi; Kawai, Masayuki; Kishida, Yoshihiko; Sumida, Kei; Kawamura, Ken-ichi [Gifu Syakaihoken Hospital (Japan)

    1998-06-01

    In order to assess the CT diagnosis of suspected acute appendicitis, we performed abdominal contrasted CT measurements in 77 patients from 20 to 86 years old, and of 50 men and 27 women from June 1993 to June 1996. The surgical findings were compared with the preoperative CT findings. By the preoperative CT imaging, we can know the degree and the position of inflammation in appendix vermiformis and the degree and the spread of periappendicular inflammation in the case of appendicitis, and can make a differential diagnosis of diverticulitis or gynecological diseases from appendicitis. It is important to make a preoperative diagnosis by the objectively excellent abdominal CT imaging and to avoid unnecessary surgery. (K.H.)

  7. Cost-effectiveness of routine imaging of suspected appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, N; Marsden, M; Bottomley, S; Nagarajah, N; Scutt, F; Toh, S

    2018-01-01

    Introduction The misdiagnosis of appendicitis and consequent removal of a normal appendix occurs in one in five patients in the UK. On the contrary, in healthcare systems with routine cross-sectional imaging of suspected appendicitis, the negative appendicectomy rate is around 5%. If we could reduce the rate in the UK to similar numbers, would this be cost effective? This study aimed to calculate the financial impact of negative appendicectomy at the Queen Alexandra Hospital and to explore whether a policy of routine imaging of such patients could reduce hospital costs. Materials and methods We performed a retrospective analysis of all appendicectomies over a 1-year period at our institution. Data were extracted on outcomes including appendix histology, operative time and length of stay to calculate the negative appendicectomy rate and to analyse costs. Results A total of 531 patients over 5 years of age had an appendicectomy. The negative appendicectomy rate was 22% (115/531). The additional financial costs of negative appendicectomy to the hospital during this period were £270,861. Universal imaging of all patients with right iliac fossa pain that could result in a 5% negative appendicectomy rate would cost between £67,200 and £165,600 per year but could save £33,896 (magnetic resonance imaging), £105,896 (computed tomography) or £132,296 (ultrasound) depending on imaging modality used. Conclusions Negative appendicectomy is still too frequent and results in additional financial burden to the health service. Routine imaging of patients with suspected appendicitis would not only reduce the negative appendicectomy rate but could lead to cost savings and a better service for our patients.

  8. Reliability of Examination Findings in Suspected Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florin, Todd A; Ambroggio, Lilliam; Brokamp, Cole; Rattan, Mantosh S; Crotty, Eric J; Kachelmeyer, Andrea; Ruddy, Richard M; Shah, Samir S

    2017-09-01

    The authors of national guidelines emphasize the use of history and examination findings to diagnose community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in outpatient children. Little is known about the interrater reliability of the physical examination in children with suspected CAP. This was a prospective cohort study of children with suspected CAP presenting to a pediatric emergency department from July 2013 to May 2016. Children aged 3 months to 18 years with lower respiratory signs or symptoms who received a chest radiograph were included. We excluded children hospitalized ≤14 days before the study visit and those with a chronic medical condition or aspiration. Two clinicians performed independent examinations and completed identical forms reporting examination findings. Interrater reliability for each finding was reported by using Fleiss' kappa (κ) for categorical variables and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for continuous variables. No examination finding had substantial agreement (κ/ICC > 0.8). Two findings (retractions, wheezing) had moderate to substantial agreement (κ/ICC = 0.6-0.8). Nine findings (abdominal pain, pleuritic pain, nasal flaring, skin color, overall impression, cool extremities, tachypnea, respiratory rate, and crackles/rales) had fair to moderate agreement (κ/ICC = 0.4-0.6). Eight findings (capillary refill time, cough, rhonchi, head bobbing, behavior, grunting, general appearance, and decreased breath sounds) had poor to fair reliability (κ/ICC = 0-0.4). Only 3 examination findings had acceptable agreement, with the lower 95% confidence limit >0.4: wheezing, retractions, and respiratory rate. In this study, we found fair to moderate reliability of many findings used to diagnose CAP. Only 3 findings had acceptable levels of reliability. These findings must be considered in the clinical management and research of pediatric CAP. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  9. Investigating suspected acute pulmonary embolism - what are hospital clinicians thinking?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McQueen, A.S. [Department of Radiology, Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom)], E-mail: andrewmcqueen7@hotmail.com; Worthy, S. [Department of Radiology, Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Keir, M.J. [Department of Medical Physics, Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom)

    2008-06-15

    Aims: To assess local clinical knowledge of the appropriate investigation of suspected acute pulmonary embolism (PE) and this compare with the 2003 British Thoracic Society (BTS) guidelines as a national reference standard. Methods: A clinical questionnaire was produced based on the BTS guidelines. One hundred and eight-six participants completed the questionnaires at educational sessions for clinicians of all grades, within a single NHS Trust. The level of experience amongst participants ranged from final year medical students to consultant physicians. Results: The clinicians were divided into four groups based on seniority: Pre-registration, Junior, Middle, and Senior. Forty-six point eight percent of all the clinicians correctly identified three major risk factors for PE and 25.8% recognized the definition of the recommended clinical probability score from two alternatives. Statements regarding the sensitivity of isotope lung imaging and computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) received correct responses from 41.4 and 43% of participants, respectively, whilst 81.2% recognized that an indeterminate ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy (V/Q) study requires further imaging. The majority of clinicians correctly answered three clinical scenario questions regarding use of D-dimers and imaging (78, 85, and 57.5%). There was no statistically significant difference between the four groups for any of the eight questions. Conclusions: The recommended clinical probability score was unfamiliar to all four groups of clinicians in the present study, and the majority of doctors did not agree that a negative CTPA or isotope lung scintigraphy reliably excluded PE. However, questions based on clinical scenarios received considerably higher rates of correct responses. The results indicate that various aspects of the national guidelines on suspected acute pulmonary embolism are unfamiliar to many UK hospital clinicians. Further research is needed to identify methods to improve

  10. Role of DR-70 immunoassay in suspected malignant pleural effusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Amitabha; Saha, Kaushik; Jash, Debraj; Banerjee, Sourindra Nath; Biswas, Nirendra Mohan; Dey, Atin

    2013-01-01

    Context: A good proportion of patients with undiagnosed pleural effusion (PE) turn into malignancy over a period of time. Identification of positive biomarker may help in selecting the individuals who require close follow-up. Aims: The aims of this study were to evaluate the role of DR-70 immunoassay in suspected malignant PE. Settings and Design: We conducted a cross-sectional study among 89 patients of suspected malignant PE and 50 normal subjects (NS) were taken as control. Materials and Methods: Patients with exudative PE; who had pleural fluid lymphocyte count greater than 50% and adenosine deaminase less than 30 U/L were taken as cases. We had selected NSs among relatives of patients having normal blood chemistry and radiological investigations. Sensitivity and specificity of the test to differentiate malignant and non-malignant PE and also to identify PE with underlying malignancy was analyzed. Results: Mean value of DR-70 in NS was found to be 0.83 ± 0.273 mg/L without any significant difference between males (0.82 mg/L) and females (0.85 mg/L). Mean value of DR-70 in PE with underlying cancer was 5.03 ± 3.79 mg/L. Sensitivity (80%) and specificity (77.78%) of the test was maximum in PE with underlying cancer using cut-off value of 2 mg/L. Mean value DR-70 in malignant PE was 5.18 ± 3.75 mg/L and in non-malignant PE was 3.73 ± 3.74 mg/L without any statistically significant difference (P = 0.08). Conclusions: DR-70 assay has high sensitivity in detecting underlying lung cancer, but has no role in differentiating malignant PE from non-malignant PE. PMID:24339491

  11. COSTS OF THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debrayan Bravo Hidalgo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Thermal accumulation facilities allow energy to be available in the absence of sunlight. This fact reduces the difficulty of the intermittence in the incidence of the king star in our planet. Thermal accumulation technology also contributes to smooth the fluctuations in energy demand during different times of the day. This contribution identifies the nations with the most favorable research results in this area; as well as the main research lines that are being developed today. A compendium of various thermal energy storage materials, their current costs per unit mass, and their physical properties are presented. Techniques for implementing thermal accumulation technologies can be classified as areas of high, medium and low temperature. In the high temperature area, inorganic materials such as nitrate salts are the most widely used thermal energy storage materials, while in the medium and lower temperature areas; organic materials such as commercial paraffin are more common. Currently, one of the research trends in this area are the projects aimed at optimizing the chemical and physical characteristics of thermal storage materials, because the success of any thermos-energetic storage technology has a strong dependence on the cost of the materials selected for thermal storage.

  12. Cost effectiveness of intermittent screening followed by treatment versus intermittent preventive treatment during pregnancy in West Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandes, Silke; Sicuri, Elisa; Halimatou, Diawara

    2016-01-01

    Background: Emergence of high-grade sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) resistance in parts of Africa has led to growing concerns about the efficacy of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria during pregnancy (IPTp) with SP. The incremental cost-effectiveness of intermittent screening and treatment...... for ISTp-AL). Cost estimates were obtained from observational studies, health facility costings and public procurement databases. Results were calculated as incremental cost per DALY averted. Finally, the cost-effectiveness changes with decreasing SP efficacy were explored by simulation. Results: Relative...... to IPTp-SP, delivering ISTp-AL to 1000 pregnant women cost US$ 4966.25 more (95 % CI US$ 3703.53; 6376.83) and led to a small excess of 28.36 DALYs (95 % CI -75.78; 134.18), with LBW contributing 81.3 % of this difference. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was -175.12 (95 % CI -1166.29; 1267.71) US...

  13. Lactate Kinetics After Intermittent and Continuous Exercise Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharbi, Adnene; Chamari, Karim; Kallel, Amjad; Ahmaidi, Saîd; Tabka, Zouhair; Abdelkarim, Zbidi

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess, the effects of continuous and intermittent exercise training on lactate kinetic parameters and maximal aerobic speed (MAS) using field tests. Twenty-four male sport students were equally divided into continuous (CT) and intermittent (IT) physically trained groups. Another six participants acted as non-trained controls (CG). The trained participants practiced 6-days per week for 6 weeks. Before and after training, all participants completed an incremental exercise test to assess their MAS, and a 30- second supra-maximal exercise followed by 30 minutes of active recovery to determine the individual blood lactate recovery curve. It was found that exercise training has significantly increased MAS (p < 0.001), the lactate exchange and removal abilities as well as the lactate concentrations at the beginning of the recovery ([La]-(0)); for both CT and IT groups; this was accompanied by a significant reduction of the time to lactate-peak. Nevertheless, the improvement in MAS was significantly higher (p < 0.001) post-intermittent (15.1 % ± 2.4) than post-continuous (10.3 % ± 3.2) training. The lactate-exchange and removal abilities were also significantly higher for IT than for CT-group (P<0.05). Moreover, IT-group showed a significantly shorter half-time of the blood lactate (t-½-[La]) than CT-group (7.2 ± 0.5 min vs 7.7 ± 0.3 min, respectively) (p < 0.05). However, no significant differences were observed in peak blood lactate concentration ([La]peak), time to reach [La]peak (t-[La]peak), and [La]-(0) between the two physically-trained groups. We conclude that both continuous and intermittent training exercises were equally effective in improving t-[La]peak and [La]peak, although intermittent training was more beneficial in elevating MAS and in raising the lactate exchange (γ1) and removal (γ2) indexes. Key points Coaches and athletes need to be aware of the potentiality positive effects of exercise intensity. Improvements

  14. LACTATE KINETICS AFTER INTERMITTENT AND CONTINUOUS EXERCISE TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnene Gharbi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assess, the effects of continuous and intermittent exercise training on lactate kinetic parameters and maximal aerobic speed (MAS using field tests. Twenty-four male sport students were equally divided into continuous (CT and intermittent (IT physically trained groups. Another six participants acted as non-trained controls (CG. The trained participants practiced 6-days per week for 6 weeks. Before and after training, all participants completed an incremental exercise test to assess their MAS, and a 30- second supra-maximal exercise followed by 30 minutes of active recovery to determine the individual blood lactate recovery curve. It was found that exercise training has significantly increased MAS (p < 0.001, the lactate exchange and removal abilities as well as the lactate concentrations at the beginning of the recovery ([La]-(0; for both CT and IT groups; this was accompanied by a significant reduction of the time to lactate-peak. Nevertheless, the improvement in MAS was significantly higher (p < 0.001 post-intermittent (15.1 % ± 2.4 than post-continuous (10.3 % ± 3.2 training. The lactate-exchange and removal abilities were also significantly higher for IT than for CT-group (P<0.05. Moreover, IT-group showed a significantly shorter half-time of the blood lactate (t-½-[La] than CT-group (7.2 ± 0.5 min vs 7.7 ± 0.3 min, respectively (p < 0.05. However, no significant differences were observed in peak blood lactate concentration ([La]peak, time to reach [La]peak (t-[La]peak, and [La]-(0 between the two physically-trained groups. We conclude that both continuous and intermittent training exercises were equally effective in improving t-[La]peak and [La]peak, although intermittent training was more beneficial in elevating MAS and in raising the lactate exchange (γ1 and removal (γ2 indexes

  15. Human control of an inverted pendulum: Is continuous control necessary? Is intermittent control effective? Is intermittent control physiological?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loram, Ian D; Gollee, Henrik; Lakie, Martin; Gawthrop, Peter J

    2011-01-01

    Human motor control is often explained in terms of engineering ‘servo’ theory. Recently, continuous, optimal control using internal models has emerged as a leading paradigm for voluntary movement. However, these engineering paradigms are designed for high bandwidth, inflexible, consistent systems whereas human control is low bandwidth and flexible using noisy sensors and actuators. By contrast, engineering intermittent control was designed for bandwidth-limited applications. Our general interest is whether intermittent rather than continuous control is generic to human motor control. Currently, it would be assumed that continuous control is the superior and physiologically natural choice for controlling unstable loads, for example as required for maintaining human balance. Using visuo-manual tracking of an unstable load, we show that control using gentle, intermittent taps is entirely natural and effective. The gentle tapping method resulted in slightly superior position control and velocity minimisation, a reduced feedback time delay, greater robustness to changing actuator gain and equal or greater linearity with respect to the external disturbance. Control was possible with a median contact rate of 0.8 ± 0.3 s−1. However, when optimising position or velocity regulation, a modal contact rate of 2 s−1 was observed. This modal rate was consistent with insignificant disturbance–joystick coherence beyond 1–2 Hz in both tapping and continuous contact methods. For this load, these results demonstrate a motor control process of serial ballistic trajectories limited to an optimum rate of 2 s−1. Consistent with theoretical reasoning, our results suggest that intermittent open loop action is a natural consequence of human physiology. PMID:21098004

  16. Intermittent versus continuous exercise training in chronic heart failure: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Neil A; Dieberg, Gudrun; Giallauria, Francesco

    2013-06-20

    We conducted a meta-analysis of randomized, controlled trials of combined strength and intermittent aerobic training, intermittent aerobic training only and continuous exercise training in heart failure patients. A systematic search was conducted of Medline (Ovid) (1950-September 2011), Embase.com (1974-September 2011), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and CINAHL (1981-September 19 2011). The search strategy included a mix of MeSH and free text terms for the key concepts heart failure, exercise training, interval training and intermittent exercise training. The included studies contained an aggregate of 446 patients, 212 completed intermittent exercise training, 66 only continuous exercise training, 59 completed combined intermittent and strength training and 109 sedentary controls. Weighted mean difference (MD) in Peak VO2 was 1.04mlkg(-1)min(-1) and (95% C.I.) was 0.42-1.66 (p=0.0009) in intermittent versus continuous exercise training respectively. Weighted mean difference in Peak VO2 was -1.10mlkg(-1)min(-1) (95% C.I.) was -1.83-0.37 p=0.003 for intermittent only versus intermittent and strength (combined) training respectively. In studies reporting VE/VCO2 for intermittent versus control groups, MD was -1.50 [(95% C.I. -2.64, -0.37), p=0.01] and for intermittent versus continuous exercise training MD was -1.35 [(95% C.I. -2.15, -0.55), p=0.001]. Change in peak VO2 was positively correlated with weekly exercise energy expenditure for intermittent exercise groups (r=0.48, p=0.05). Combined strength and intermittent exercise appears superior for peak VO2 changes when compared to intermittent exercise of similar exercise energy expenditure. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Catalog of known hot springs and thermal place names for Honduras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finch, R.C.

    1986-08-01

    Thermal place names were compiled from all 1:50,000 topographic quadrangle maps for the Republic of Honduras as of July 1986, from other published maps, and from several sources of unpublished data. Known hot spring sites include those visited by Empresa Nacional de Energia Electrica (Honduras) geologists, sites visited by Los Alamos geologists in 1985, and other sites known to R.C. Finch. The number of known hot spring sites in Honduras with temperatures >30/sup 0/C is 125. In addition, 56 thermal sites are suspected on the basis of thermal place names. The total number of geothermal sites, known and suspected, is 181.

  18. Pre-admission antibiotics for suspected cases of meningococcal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudarsanam, Thambu D; Rupali, Priscilla; Tharyan, Prathap; Abraham, Ooriapadickal Cherian; Thomas, Kurien

    2013-08-02

    Meningococcal disease can lead to death or disability within hours after onset. Pre-admission antibiotics aim to reduce the risk of serious disease and death by preventing delays in starting therapy before confirmation of the diagnosis. To study the effectiveness and safety of pre-admission antibiotics versus no pre-admission antibiotics or placebo, and different pre-admission antibiotic regimens in decreasing mortality, clinical failure and morbidity in people suspected of meningococcal disease. We updated searches of CENTRAL (2013, Issue 4), MEDLINE (1966 to April week 4, 2013), EMBASE (1980 to May 2013), Web of Science (1985 to May 2013), CAB Abstracts (1985 to May 2013), LILACS (1982 to May 2013) and prospective trials registries to May 2013. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-RCTs comparing antibiotics versus placebo or no intervention, in people with suspected meningococcal infection, or different antibiotics administered before admission to hospital or confirmation of the diagnosis. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data from the search results. We calculated the risk ratio (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for dichotomous data. We included only one trial so data synthesis was not performed. We assessed the overall quality of the evidence using the GRADE approach. We found no RCTs that compared pre-admission antibiotics versus no pre-admission antibiotics or placebo. One open-label, non-inferiority RCT, conducted during an epidemic in Niger, evaluated a single dose of intramuscular ceftriaxone versus a single dose of intramuscular long-acting (oily) chloramphenicol. Ceftriaxone was not inferior to chloramphenicol in reducing mortality (RR 1.2, 95% CI 0.6 to 2.6; N = 503; 308 confirmed meningococcal meningitis; 26 deaths; moderate-quality evidence), clinical failures (RR 0.8, 95% CI 0.3 to 2.2; N = 477, 18 clinical failures; moderate-quality evidence) or neurological sequelae (RR 1.3, 95% CI 0.6 to 2.6; N

  19. Suspected vitreous seeding of uveal melanoma: relevance of diagnostic vitrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, Claudia H D; Bornfeld, Norbert; Metz, Klaus A; Gök, Mete

    2016-05-01

    To review all cases of suspected vitreous seeding of treated or untreated uveal melanoma at our clinic and to compare clinical, cytological and histological findings with patients' survival. Retrospective non-randomised study of 23 patients with consecutive uveal melanoma who underwent diagnostic vitrectomy in our clinic between January 2000 and November 2013. Reason for vitrectomy was suspected dissemination of tumour cells inside the eye. Treated as well as treatment-naïve primary uveal melanomas were included in this study. Follow-up data of all patients were collected. The study included 23 patients with a mean age of 66 years. Four patients presented pigmented vitreous debris at initial presentation prior to treatment of the uveal melanoma. All but one of these four patients has been enucleated as a consequence of cytology-proven vitreous spreading of vital melanoma cells. The remaining 19 patients presented pigmented vitreous debris at a mean of 60 months following local tumour treatment. Thirteen of these patients had been treated with a ruthenium plaque (mean scleral dose 1295 Gy, mean apex dose 152 Gy), three with binuclid plaque (mean scleral dose 1005 Gy, mean apex dose 70 Gy) and three with proton beam radiation. Of the 19 patients, 10 showed only melanophages in the vitreous specimen, while the remaining 9 patients had vital tumour cells in vitreous cytology. Four out of these nine patients have been enucleated in the course of follow-up. During follow-up of our cohort of 23 patients, 4 patients died, but only 1 of them due to metastatic disease. The outcome of this small cohort study shows that obtaining a vitreous specimen helps to distinguish melanophages from vital tumour cells. We could not observe an increased risk of metastasis in patients who showed melanoma cell dissemination inside the eye, compared with those patients only showing melanophages. We therefore suggest to carefully re-evaluate the necessity of enucleation in every

  20. Cost analysis of inappropriate treatments for suspected dermatomycoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuela Fiammenghi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Superficial mycoses are estimated to affect more than 20-25% of the world’s population with a consistent increase over the years. Most patients referred to our clinic for suspected dermatomycoses have already been treated with pharmacotherapy, without a previous mycological examination and many show changes in the clinical manifestations. Indeed, some medications, such as steroids, antiviral, antibiotics and antihistamines are not able to erase a fungal infection, but also they can cause atypical clinical manifestations. The consequences of inappropriate treatment include delayed diagnosis, prolonged healing time, and additional costs. The aims of this study were (1 to evaluate the incidence of increased costs attributable to inappropriate therapy sustained by the National Health Service and patients and (2 to highlight the importance of mycological evaluation before starting treatment, in order to improve diagnostic accuracy. An observational retrospective and prospective study was performed from September 2013 to February 2014, in 765 patients referred to our center (University Hospital “ Federico II” in Naples, Italy, for suspected mycological infection. The following treatments (alone or in combination were defined as inappropriate: (1 cortisone in a patient with at least one positive site; (2 antifungals in (a patients with all negative sites or (b ineffective antifungal treatment (in terms of drug chosen, dose or duration in those with all positive sites; or (3 antibiotics; (4 antivirals or (5 antihistamines, in patients with ≥ 1 positive site. Five hundred and fifty patients were using medications before the assessment visit. The total amount of avoidable costs related to inappropriate previous treatments was € 121,417, representing 74% of the total treatment costs. 253/550 patients received drugs also after the visit. For these patients, the cost of treatment prescribed after mycological testing was € 42,952, with a decrease

  1. Intermittent Fasting Modulation of the Diabetic Syndrome in Streptozotocin-Injected Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Louiza Belkacemi; Ghalem Selselet-Attou; Emeline Hupkens; Evrard Nguidjoe; Karim Louchami; Abdullah Sener; Malaisse, Willy J

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of intermittent overnight fasting in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats (STZ rats). Over 30 days, groups of 5-6 control or STZ rats were allowed free food access, starved overnight, or exposed to a restricted food supply comparable to that ingested by the intermittently fasting animals. Intermittent fasting improved glucose tolerance, increased plasma insulin, and lowered Homeostatis Model Assessment index. Caloric restriction failed to cause such benefic...

  2. Intermittent fasting: A “new” historical strategy for controlling seizures?

    OpenAIRE

    Hartman, Adam L.; Rubenstein, James E.; Kossoff, Eric H.

    2012-01-01

    In antiquity, fasting was a treatment for epilepsy and a rationale for the ketogenic diet (KD). Preclinical data indicate the KD and intermittent fasting do not share identical anticonvulsant mechanisms. We implemented an intermittent fasting regimen in six children with an incomplete response to a KD. Three patients adhered to the combined intermittent fasting/KD regimen for 2 months and four had transient improvement in seizure control, albeit with some hunger-related adverse reactions.

  3. Intermittent fasting: A “new” historical strategy for controlling seizures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Adam L.; Rubenstein, James E.; Kossoff, Eric H.

    2013-01-01

    Summary In antiquity, fasting was a treatment for epilepsy and a rationale for the ketogenic diet (KD). Preclinical data indicate the KD and intermittent fasting do not share identical anticonvulsant mechanisms. We implemented an intermittent fasting regimen in six children with an incomplete response to a KD. Three patients adhered to the combined intermittent fasting/KD regimen for 2 months and four had transient improvement in seizure control, albeit with some hunger-related adverse reactions. PMID:23206889

  4. Comparison of Work of Breathing During Mechanical Ventilation Using Assist Control and Intermittent Mandatory Ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-07-19

    AD-A285 516 AD MIPR NO: 92MM2539 TITLE: COMPARISON OF WORK OF BREATHING DURING MECHANICAL VENTILATION USING ASSIST CONTROL AND INTERMITTENT MANDATORY...1993, for the subject MIPR, titled: Comparison of Work of Breathing During Mechanical Ventilation Using Assist Control and Intermittent Mandatory...MIPR 92MM2539, titled: Comparison of Work of Breathing During Mechanical Ventilation Using Assist Control and Intermittent Mandatory Ventilation . 2

  5. [Suspected pathogenic mutation identified in two cases with oculocutaneous albinism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiangmei; Zheng, Meiling; Zhang, Guilin; Hua, Ailing

    2015-08-01

    To detect potential mutations in genes related with non-syndromic oculocutaneous albinism I-IV and ocular albinism type I in two couples who had given births to children with albinism. All exons of the non-syndromic albinism related genes TYR, OCA2, TYRP-1, MITF, SLC45A2 and GPR143 were subjected to deep sequencing. The results were verified with Sanger sequencing. For the two female carriers, the coding region of the TYR gene was found to harbor a frameshift mutation c.925_926insC, which was also suspected to have been pathogenic. In one of the male partners, a nonsense mutations c.832C>T was found, which was also known to be pathogenic. Another male partner was found to harbor a TYR gene mutation c.346C>T, which was also known to be a pathogenic nonsense mutation. The coding region of the TYR gene c.925_926insC (p.Thr309ThrfsX9) probably underlies the OCA1 disease phenotype.

  6. Chest pain and behavior in suspected coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, L D; Barboriak, J J; Anderson, A J

    1988-01-01

    This study assessed behavioral activity, dietary and emotional variables among patient cohorts with angina pectoris, atypical chest pain, and no chest pain in whom coronary disease is suspected. Questionnaire responses of 3,899 employed male patients at the time of coronary arteriography were analyzed. Patients with angina pectoris had high levels of coronary-prone and neurotic attitudes, and fatigue variables including feeling unrested on awakening, easy fatiguability, reducing activity at work and arriving home tired. Atypical chest pain patients showed coronary-prone and neurotic attitudes similar to the angina pectoris group but had less coronary occlusion and lower levels of fatigue variables. Compared to the other groups, atypical chest pain patients were more likely to skip breakfast and showed a trend to eat fast. These findings suggest that including assessment of activity levels, fatiguability, eating behavior, neurotic traits and coronary-prone attitudes at time of coronary arteriography can have some limited value for patients with chest pain who may seek cardiac treatment but could benefit from alternative approaches.

  7. Acute aortic dissection in patient with suspected pheochromocytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lešanović Jelena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Aortic dissection is one of the most fatal vascular emergencies. Almost 40% of the patients do not reach hospital in time while more than quarter die in the first 24 hours after the dissection begins. Case Report: A 37-year old man was admitted to our hospital with severe anterior chest pain which had lasted for over a week. Suspected aortic dissection was rapidly confirmed using imaging modalities - MDCT chest scan and TTE, followed by an urgent surgical management - Bentall procedure. MDCT chest scan also discovered adrenal incidentaloma defined as malignant, pheochromocytoma like mass. Due to the critical state of the patient, there was not enough time for further endocrinologic testing. Discussion and conclusion: When treating patients with pheochromocytoma and acute aortic disection, it is crucial to obtain a stable hemodynamic state before the surgery, since they can trigger a severe hypertensive crisis due to high levels of cathecholamines induced chronic vasoconctriction. The most vulnerable periods are the induction of anesthesia and perioperative hemodynamic oscillations, so treating patients with short acting alpha- 1 adrenergic blocking agents preoperatively has proven to be helpful - Phentolamine. Both dissection of aorta and pheochromocytoma present challenges for anesthesiologists and early recognition of symptoms is essential in establishing the diagnosis and reducing the mortality rate.

  8. [Predictive value of procalcitonin in children with suspected sepsis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustos B, Raúl; Padilla P, Oslando

    2015-01-01

    The use of biomarkers could be a tool for diagnosis, prognosis and stratifying children with sepsis. Our main goal was to analyze the value of procalcitonin (PCT), C reactive protein (CRP) and lactate in predicting mortality, septic shock and the stratification in children with suspected sepsis Prospective study in 81 patients. Plasma levels of PCT, CRP and lactate were measured at admission in the pediatric intensive care unit. Patients were categorized into systemic inflammatory response syndrome, sepsis, severe sepsis and septic shock. Concentrations of PCT (ng/mL) increased significantly according to the severity of sepsis: 0.36 (0-1.2) for systemic inflammatory response syndrome; 1.96 (0.4-3.5) for sepsis; 7.5 (3.9-11.1) for severe sepsis; and 58.9 (35.1-82.7) for septic shock (P<.001). Compared to CRP and lactate, the area under the ROC curve revealed a good discriminative power of PCT to predict septic shock and mortality, 0.91 (95% CI: 0.83-0.97) and 0.80 (95% CI: 0.69-0.88), respectively. In contrast to CRP and lactate, the determination of PCT in pediatric intensive care unit admission is a good predictor of mortality and septic shock and can stratify patients according to severity of sepsis. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. The optimal diagnostic workup for children with suspected food allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berni Canani, Roberto; Di Costanzo, Mara; Troncone, Riccardo

    2011-10-01

    Food allergy is defined as an abnormal immunologic reaction to food proteins that causes an adverse clinical reaction. In addition to well-known acute allergic reactions and anaphylaxis triggered by immunoglobulin E antibody-mediated immune responses to food proteins, there is an increasing recognition of cell-mediated disorders such as eosinophilic esophagitis and food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome. More than 90% of food allergies in childhood are caused by eight foods: cow's milk, hen's egg, soy, peanuts, tree nuts, wheat, fish, and shellfish. The diagnostic workup for a child with suspected food allergy includes a detailed medical history, physical examination, food allergy screening tests, and responses to an elimination diet and an oral food challenge. None of the screening tests, alone or in combination, can definitely diagnose or exclude a food allergy. Novel diagnostic methods including those that focus on immune responses to specific food proteins or epitopes of specific proteins are under active study. Unconventional diagnostic methods are increasingly used, but they lack scientific rationale, standardization, and reproducibility. In selected cases, such as eosinophilic esophageal gastroenteropathies or food protein-induced gastroesophageal reflux disease, invasive procedures are mandatory for an accurate diagnosis. Properly done, an oral food challenge is still the gold standard in the diagnostic workup. An incorrect diagnosis is likely to result in unnecessary dietary restrictions, which, if prolonged, may adversely affect the child's nutritional status and growth. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Control of Suspect/Counterfeit and Defective Items

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheriff, Marnelle L.

    2013-09-03

    This procedure implements portions of the requirements of MSC-MP-599, Quality Assurance Program Description. It establishes the Mission Support Alliance (MSA) practices for minimizing the introduction of and identifying, documenting, dispositioning, reporting, controlling, and disposing of suspect/counterfeit and defective items (S/CIs). employees whose work scope relates to Safety Systems (i.e., Safety Class [SC] or Safety Significant [SS] items), non-safety systems and other applications (i.e., General Service [GS]) where engineering has determined that their use could result in a potential safety hazard. MSA implements an effective Quality Assurance (QA) Program providing a comprehensive network of controls and verification providing defense-in-depth by preventing the introduction of S/CIs through the design, procurement, construction, operation, maintenance, and modification of processes. This procedure focuses on those safety systems, and other systems, including critical load paths of lifting equipment, where the introduction of S/CIs would have the greatest potential for creating unsafe conditions.

  11. Effects of intermittent fasting on glucose and lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoni, Rona; Johnston, Kelly L; Collins, Adam L; Robertson, M Denise

    2017-08-01

    Two intermittent fasting variants, intermittent energy restriction (IER) and time-restricted feeding (TRF), have received considerable interest as strategies for weight-management and/or improving metabolic health. With these strategies, the pattern of energy restriction and/or timing of food intake are altered so that individuals undergo frequently repeated periods of fasting. This review provides a commentary on the rodent and human literature, specifically focusing on the effects of IER and TRF on glucose and lipid metabolism. For IER, there is a growing evidence demonstrating its benefits on glucose and lipid homeostasis in the short-to-medium term; however, more long-term safety studies are required. Whilst the metabolic benefits of TRF appear quite profound in rodents, findings from the few human studies have been mixed. There is some suggestion that the metabolic changes elicited by these approaches can occur in the absence of energy restriction, and in the context of IER, may be distinct from those observed following similar weight-loss achieved via modest continuous energy restriction. Mechanistically, the frequently repeated prolonged fasting intervals may favour preferential reduction of ectopic fat, beneficially modulate aspects of adipose tissue physiology/morphology, and may also impinge on circadian clock regulation. However, mechanistic evidence is largely limited to findings from rodent studies, thus necessitating focused human studies, which also incorporate more dynamic assessments of glucose and lipid metabolism. Ultimately, much remains to be learned about intermittent fasting (in its various forms); however, the findings to date serve to highlight promising avenues for future research.

  12. Intermittent exotropia surgery: results in different age groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayane Cristine Issaho

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: To report the outcomes in patients undergoing surgical correction of intermittent exotropia and to compare the age at surgery to motor and sensory success. Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study. The results of patients with intermittent exotropia treated with surgery over a 4-year period were reviewed. Patients were divided into two groups based on age at first surgery (<4 years vs. ≥4 years, and motor and sensory outcomes were compared between the two groups. Results: One hundred thirty-six patients were evaluated, with 67 and 51 patients undergoing surgery before and after the age of 4 years, respectively. The mean age at surgery was 6.8 ± 2.6 years. The reoperation rate for the patients who underwent surgery before 4 years of age was 48% versus 42% for the ones who underwent surgery after this age (p=0.93. Postoperative stereopsis showed an inverse linear association with age at surgery (p<0.001. For each month younger at the time of surgery, there was 0.69 s of arc worsening in the Titmus test. Conversely, when we separately analyzed the patients in whom the first postoperative alignment was esotropic vs. orthophoric/exotropic, we found no correlation between the immediate postoperative alignment in the first week and sensory outcome at the last visit. Conclusions: When indicated, patients with intermittent exotropia can be operated upon safely under 4 years of age, and may even present better motor results than older patients. Postoperative stereoacuity in younger children revealed to be worse than in older children; however, this result is unlikely to be due to inadequate age for surgery, but rather, immaturity for performing the stereopsis test.

  13. Efficacy of botulinum toxin in the treatment of intermittent exotropia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etezad Razavi, Mohammad; Sharifi, Mohammad; Armanfar, Fateme

    2014-12-01

    Multiple surgical interventions are burden to patients with intermittent exotropia (IXT) due to a high recurrence rate. This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of botulinum toxin injection in the treatment of intermittent exotropia (IXT). A total of 21 patients with IXT, who had a far deviation of less than 40 prism diopters (PD), were enrolled. All cases were followed for at least 6 months with non-surgical management and had decremented fusional control (increasing 3 or more scores in Newcastle Control Score [NCS]). Botulinum toxin was injected (10 units Dysport) to both lateral rectus muscles. Fusional control, sensory and motor status were evaluated at 1 day, 1 week, and 1, 3, and 6 months after injection to compare with the pre-injection values. Fusional control (based on NCS) showed a significant improvement during 6-month follow-up. Mean NCS was 4.4±0.8 SD before botulinum toxin injection and 1.4±0.4 SD after 6 months (psensorial status with Worth Four Dot Test (WFDT) also demonstrated an improvement of fusion (the percentage of patients demonstrating fusion on WFDT were 10.5% before injection and 61.5% after 6 months). The mean far and near deviations decreased during 6 months of follow-up examination. Satisfactory outcome (stable binocular alignment of the eyes to an orthophoria+/-10 PD in primary position) for far distance was achieved in 38.1% at 6 months. The percentage of satisfactory outcome at near was 86% at 6 months follow-up examination. Botulinum toxin injection to lateral rectus muscles seems to be a promising procedure in the management of fusional control, far and near deviations in patients with intermittent exotropia in short time.

  14. Quantifying variability in the measurement of control in intermittent exotropia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatt, Sarah R; Leske, David A; Liebermann, Laura; Holmes, Jonathan M

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the performance of a series of summary measures of control and to assess reliability in quantifying exodeviation control in intermittent exotropia. A large, simulated dataset of control scores for 10,000 hypothetical patients with intermittent exotropia was created using Monte Carlo simulations. These data were based on children with intermittent exotropia in whom control was assessed twice during one clinical examination, using the office control score (0-5). Each simulated patient had a baseline and 11 subsequent control scores. The repeatability of a series of summary measures of control (the mean of 2 vs the mean of 3 up to the mean of 6), was calculated using 95% limits of agreement (LOA). A total of 322 examinations in 152 patients were used to provide representative distributions of control scores. From the resultant Monte Carlo simulations, the 95% LOAs were 2.60 for 1 distance control score measure, 1.76 for the average of 3, and 1.28 for the average of 6. Therefore using the average of 3 scores, a change of variability, whereas a change of >1.76 would suggest a real change in control. The large dataset of simulated control scores allowed us to assess the variability of specific summary measures of control. We recommend the average of 3 scores (a triple control score) as a new standard for assessing control, providing improved reliability over a single measure, while remaining implementable in clinical practice. Copyright © 2015 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Ergometric performance during exercise training in men with intermittent claudication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figoni, Stephen F; Kunkel, Charles F; Scremin, A M Erika; Scremin, Oscar U; Cohen, Babak

    2010-06-01

    To determine and describe changes in weekly work, power, exercise times, and recovery times during an exercise training intervention in men with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and intermittent calf claudication. Tracking of weekly exercise training parameters involved repeated measures over time in one group of participants. Other outcomes of this pilot study used a one-group, pretest-posttest design. Tertiary-care medical center. Fifteen male veterans (mean age, 69 years) with Fontaine stage IIa PAD and classic intermittent calf claudication. Participants completed graded treadmill exercise tests before and after intervention from which maximal walking power was calculated. Work, power, and exercise and recovery times for each exercise training session were computed and averaged for each week. The intervention consisted of an intensive 3-month exercise training program involving walking and calf muscle exercises: 3 sessions per week at the clinic (treadmill walking and calf ergometry) and 2 sessions per week at home (free walking and standing heel raises). After training, participants increased treadmill maximal walking power from 220 to 414 W (by 87%). Treadmill and calf exercise work, power, and exercise time per session increased linearly during 13 weeks of training, whereas recovery time per session of treadmill exercise decreased. During the same period, treadmill and calf exercise training power outputs increased by averages of 227% and 92%, respectively. Calculation of work and power during exercise training can be used to track progress quantitatively at short intervals. Weekly linear increases in training work and power per exercise session suggest that optimal intervention duration may be longer than 3 months for men with PAD and intermittent calf claudication. Copyright 2010 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Supplemental intermittent-day heat training and the lactate threshold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollan, Stuart; Chalmers, Samuel; Alderton, Stephen; Norton, Kevin

    2017-04-01

    Heat acclimation over consecutive days has been shown to improve aerobic-based performance. Recently, it has been suggested that heat training can improve performance in a temperate environment. However, due to the multifactorial training demands of athletes, consecutive-day heat training may not be suitable. The current study aimed to investigate the effect of brief (8×30min) intermittent (every 3-4 days) supplemental heat training on the second lactate threshold point (LT 2 ) in temperate and hot conditions. 21 participants undertook eight intermittent-day mixed-intensity treadmill exercise training sessions in hot (30°C; 50% relative humidity [RH]) or temperate (18°C; 30% RH) conditions. A pre- and post-incremental exercise test occurred in temperate (18°C; 30% RH) and hot conditions (30°C; 50% RH) to determine the change in LT 2 . The heat training protocol did not improve LT 2 in temperate (Effect Size [ES]±90 confidence interval=0.10±0.16) or hot (ES=0.26±0.26) conditions. The primary finding was that although the intervention group had a change greater than the SWC, no statistically significant improvements were observed following an intermittent eight day supplemental heat training protocol comparable to a control group training only in temperate conditions. This is likely due to the brief length of each heat training session and/or the long duration between each heat exposure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. High-intensity kayak performance after adaptation to intermittent hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonetti, Darrell L; Hopkins, Will G; Kilding, Andrew E

    2006-09-01

    Live-high train-low altitude training produces worthwhile gains in performance for endurance athletes, but the benefits of adaptation to various forms of artificial altitude are less clear. To quantify the effects of intermittent hypoxic exposure on kayak performance. In a crossover design with a 6-week washout, we randomized 10 subelite male sprint kayak paddlers to hypoxia or control groups for 3 weeks (5 days/week) of intermittent hypoxic exposure using a nitrogen-filtration device. Each day's exposure consisted of alternately breathing hypoxic and ambient air for 5 minutes each over 1 hour. Performance tests were an incremental step test to estimate peak power, maximal oxygen uptake, exercise economy, and lactate threshold; a 500-m time trial; and 5 x 100-m sprints. All tests were performed on a wind-braked kayak ergometer 7 and 3 days pretreatment and 3 and 10 days posttreatment. Hemoglobin concentration was measured at 1 day pretreatment, 5 and 10 days during treatment, and 3 days after treatment. Relative to control, at 3 days posttreatment the hypoxia group showed the following increases: peak power 6.8% (90% confidence limits, + or - 5.2%), mean repeat sprint power 8.3% (+ or - 6.7%), and hemoglobin concentration 3.6% (+ or - 3.2%). Changes in lactate threshold, mean 500-m power, maximal oxygen uptake, and exercise economy were unclear. Large effects for peak power and mean sprint speed were still present 10 days posthypoxia. These effects of intermittent hypoxic exposure should enhance performance in kayak racing. The effects might be mediated via changes in oxygen transport.

  18. A Thermal grid coordinated by a Multi Agent Energy Management System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pruissen, O.P. van; Kamphuis, V.; Togt, A. van der; Werkman, E.

    2013-01-01

    In the near future an increase of both thermal grids and sustainable suppliers of heat with intermittency behavior, connected to these heat grids, is expected. For smart operation this challenges the current centralized management systems. To deal with this and to optimize cost and energy efficiency

  19. Evaluating piezo-electric transducer response to thermal shock from in-cylinder pressure data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosseel, E.; Sierens, R.; Baert, R.S.G.

    1999-01-01

    One of the major effects limiting the accuracy of piezo-electric transducers for performing in-cyclinder pressure measurements is their sensitivity to the cyclic thermal loading effects of the intermittent combustion process. This paper compares 5 different methods for evaluating the effect of this

  20. Google matrix and Ulam networks of intermittency maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermann, L; Shepelyansky, D L

    2010-03-01

    We study the properties of the Google matrix of an Ulam network generated by intermittency maps. This network is created by the Ulam method which gives a matrix approximant for the Perron-Frobenius operator of dynamical map. The spectral properties of eigenvalues and eigenvectors of this matrix are analyzed. We show that the PageRank of the system is characterized by a power law decay with the exponent beta dependent on map parameters and the Google damping factor alpha . Under certain conditions the PageRank is completely delocalized so that the Google search in such a situation becomes inefficient.

  1. Atomistic Model of Fluorescence Intermittency of Colloidal Quantum Dots

    KAUST Repository

    Voznyy, O.

    2014-04-16

    Optoelectronic applications of colloidal quantum dots demand a high emission efficiency, stability in time, and narrow spectral bandwidth. Electronic trap states interfere with the above properties but understanding of their origin remains lacking, inhibiting the development of robust passivation techniques. Here we show that surface vacancies improve the fluorescence yield compared to vacancy-free surfaces, while dynamic vacancy aggregation can temporarily turn fluorescence off. We find that infilling with foreign cations can stabilize the vacancies, inhibiting intermittency and improving quantum yield, providing an explanation of recent experimental observations. © 2014 American Physical Society.

  2. Intermittent sizing on carbon fiber for composite application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norris, Jr, Robert E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Paulauskas, Felix L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ozcan, Soydan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Xiong, Fue [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Grappe, Hippolyte A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Intermittent sizing is a technique designed to improve the bonding of carbon fiber to a resin when manufacturing composite parts. The purpose of this technique is to improve Sheet Molding Composites (SMC) made of non-continuous carbon fibers while using regular material. At the end of the project, tests showed that improved mechanical properties have been achieved using this technique compared to conventional process. Mechanical properties have been improved by 110% for the peak tensile stress and by 60% for the modulus at the laboratory scale. In this project, Continental Structural Plastics and ORNL have worked to demonstrate the scalability and viability of commercialization of this technique.

  3. Intermittent stochastic fields and space-time symmetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole E.; Schmiegel, Jürgen

    We present a spatio-temporal modelling framework for stochastic fields that obey exact symmetry in space and time, i.e. the field amplitude considered as a stochastic process in time at a fixed position in space is identical, as a stochastic process, to the field amplitude considered as a stochas...... as a stochastic process in space at a fixed time point. The stochastic fields are given in explicit form and include intermittency as a basic ingredient. A causal version is discussed with respect to turbulence modelling and in relation to Taylor’s Frozen Flow Hypothesis....

  4. Fluctuation relations with intermittent non-Gaussian variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budini, Adrián A

    2011-12-01

    Nonequilibrium stationary fluctuations may exhibit a special symmetry called fluctuation relations (FRs). Here, we show that this property is always satisfied by the subtraction of two random and independent variables related by a thermodynamiclike change of measure. Taking one of them as a modulated Poisson process, it is demonstrated that intermittence and FRs are compatible properties that may coexist naturally. Strong non-Gaussian features characterize the probability distribution and its generating function. Their associated large deviation functions develop a "kink" at the origin and a plateau regime respectively. Application of this model in different stationary nonequilibrium situations is discussed.

  5. Intermittent inhaled corticosteroids in infants with episodic wheezing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Hans; Hermansen, Mette Northman; Loland, Lotte

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We hypothesized that asthma is preceded by a stage of recurrent episodes of wheezing during the first years of life and that inhaled corticosteroid therapy during symptomatic episodes in this early phase may delay progression to persistent wheezing. METHODS: We assigned one-month-old ...... not affected by treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Intermittent inhaled corticosteroid therapy had no effect on the progression from episodic to persistent wheezing and no short-term benefit during episodes of wheezing in the first three years of life. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00234390.)....

  6. Infinite invariant densities due to intermittency in a nonlinear oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Philipp; Kantz, Holger

    2017-08-01

    Dynamical intermittency is known to generate anomalous statistical behavior of dynamical systems, a prominent example being the Pomeau-Manneville map. We present a nonlinear oscillator, i.e., a physical model in continuous time, whose properties in terms of weak ergodity breaking and aging have a one-to-one correspondence to the properties of the Pomeau-Manneville map. So for both systems in a wide range of parameters no physical invariant density exists. We show how this regime can be characterized quantitatively using the techniques of infinite invariant densities and the Thaler-Dynkin limit theorem. We see how expectation values exhibit aging in terms of scaling in time.

  7. Infinite invariant densities due to intermittency in a nonlinear oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Philipp; Kantz, Holger

    2017-08-01

    Dynamical intermittency is known to generate anomalous statistical behavior of dynamical systems, a prominent example being the Pomeau-Manneville map. We present a nonlinear oscillator, i.e., a physical model in continuous time, whose properties in terms of weak ergodity breaking and aging have a one-to-one correspondence to the properties of the Pomeau-Manneville map. So for both systems in a wide range of parameters no physical invariant density exists. We show how this regime can be characterized quantitatively using the techniques of infinite invariant densities and the Thaler-Dynkin limit theorem. We see how expectation values exhibit aging in terms of scaling in time.

  8. Intermittent contact atomic force microscopy in electrochemical environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haering, P.; Koetz, R. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Siegenthaler, H. [Bern Univ., Bern (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    In situ measurements with Atomic Force Microscopy may cause surface modifications due to the tip-surface interactions. As an alternative and less destructive method, Intermittent Contact Atomic Force Microscopy (ICAFM) has been tested in an electrolytic environment. In the ICAFM mode the tip is not constantly in contact with the surface under investigation but is tapping onto the surface with a certain frequency. A commercial Park Scientific Instruments Microscopy has been modified to enable in situ experiment with ICAFM. It was possible to image iridium oxide films with ICAFM in the electrolytic environment without any noticeable surface modifications. (author) 3 figs., 4 refs.

  9. Differential diagnosis of acute abdominal pain – acute intermittent porphyria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mislav Klobučić

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP is a rare autosomal dominant disorder of heme biosynthesis in liver due to deficiency of porphobilinogen deaminase enzyme. Clinically, AIP is dominatedby a colicky type pain, which does not subside after taking usual analgesics. Additional frequent symptoms are vomiting, hypertension, peripheral neuropathy, seizures, depression, delirium and coma. This paper reported a case of a twenty-fi- ve-year-old female patient, who had undergone a period of six days between the first presentationto the medical department and the diagnosis confirmation. It has accentuated possible mistakes in symptomatic therapy administration as well as dangers of a delayed diagnosis.

  10. Monitoring antifolate resistance in intermittent preventive therapy for malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venkatesan, Meera; Alifrangis, Michael; Roper, Cally

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum genes Pfdhfr and Pfdhps have rendered sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) ineffective for malaria treatment in most regions of the world. Yet, SP is efficacious as intermittent preventive therapy in pregnant women (IPTp) and infants (IPTi) and as seasonal malaria...... control in children (SMC). SP-IPTp is being widely implemented in sub-Saharan Africa. SP-IPTi is recommended where the prevalence of SP-resistant malaria parasites is low, whereas SMC is recommended for areas of intense seasonal malaria transmission. The continuing success of these interventions depends...

  11. [Effect of intermittent hypoxia of sleep apnea on embryonic rat cortical neurons in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chanjuan; Li, Yanzhong; Wang, Yan

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the effects of different pattens of intermittent hypoxia on the activity and apoptosis of primary cultured rat embryonic cortical neurons, and to evaluate the role of intermittent hypoxia in the mechanism of obstructive sleep syndrom induced cognitive function loss. The embryonic cerebral cortical neurons were cultured in vitro and were identified by immunofluorescence. Cultured neurons were randomly divided into intermittent hypoxia group, intermittent normal oxygen group, persistent hypoxia group and the control group, and intermittent hypoxia group was divided into five subgroups according to different frequency and time-bound. Neurons were exposed in different modes of hypoxia. MTT colorimetry was used to detect the viability of the neurons, and DAPI colorated measurement was used to calculate the percentages of neuron apoptosis. There were significantly different effects between all subgroups of intermittent hypoxia and the continued hypoxia group on neuronal activity and apoptosis (P Intermittent hypoxia groups with different frequency and time had no difference in neuronal activity and apoptosis (P > 0.05). The effect of intermittent hypoxia was more serious than that of continued hypoxia on neuronal activity and apoptosis; The impact of intermittent hypoxia on neuronal activity and apoptosis may be an important factor in obstructive sleep apnea related cognitive impairment.

  12. Degrees-of-Freedom of the MIMO Three-Way Channel with Node-Intermittency

    KAUST Repository

    Neu, Joachim

    2017-08-28

    The characterization of fundamental performance bounds of many-to-many communication systems in which participating nodes are active in an intermittent way is one of the major challenges in communication theory. In order to address this issue, we introduce the multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) three-way channel (3WC) with an intermittent node and study its degrees-of-freedom (DoF) region and sum-DoF. We devise a non-adaptive encoding scheme based on zero-forcing, interference alignment and erasure coding, and show its DoF region (and thus sum-DoF) optimality for non-intermittent 3WCs and its sum-DoF optimality for (node-)intermittent 3WCs. However, we show by example that in general some DoF tuples in the intermittent 3WC can only be achieved by adaptive schemes, such as multi-hop or decode-forward relaying. This shows that non-adaptive encoding is sufficient for the non-intermittent 3WC and for the sum-DoF of intermittent 3WCs, but adaptive encoding is necessary for the DoF region of intermittent 3WCs. Our work contributes to a better understanding of the fundamental limits of multi-way communication systems with intermittency and the impact of adaptation therein.

  13. Atrial fibrillation with left bundle branch block and intermittent right axis deviation during acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patanè, Salvatore; Marte, Filippo; Di Bella, Gianluca

    2008-06-23

    Rarely the ECG shows an LBBB with changing QRS morphology and changing axis deviation. The intermittent positive aspect of the neglected lead aVR indicates an intermittent right axis deviation in the presence of complete LBBB. An additional left posterior fascicular block accompanying predivisional LBBB is the possible explanation. We describe the case of a 78-year-old Italian woman admitted to the Cardiology Unit with acute myocardial infarction and permanent atrial fibrillation. Electrocardiographic changes were observed. The ECG showed atrial fibrillation and LBBB with intermittent left axis deviation or atrial fibrillation and LBBB with intermittent right axis deviation.

  14. Intermittency in the coherence collapse of a semiconductor laser with external feedback

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacher, J.; Elsasser, W.; Gobel, E.O. (Fachbereich Physik and Zentrum fuer Materialwissenschaften, Philipps Universitaet Marburg, Renthof 5, D-3550 Marburg, Federal Republic of Germany (DE))

    1989-11-13

    We report the first experimental observation of type-II intermittency in an optical system. The type-II intermittency is observed in the light intensity of a GaAs/GaAlAs semiconductor laser with external feedback in the regime of the coherence collapse. We conclude the occurrence of a time-inverted type-II intermittency from the time distribution of the observed intensity breakdowns, with the injection current as control parameter. This interpretation is confirmed by a reconstructed Poincare plot exhibiting the spiraling behavior of the type-II intermittency.

  15. Heat transfer and thermal storage in fixed and fluidized beds of phase change materials

    OpenAIRE

    Izquierdo Barrientos, Maria Asunción

    2016-01-01

    Mención Internacional en el título de doctor Thermal energy storage is a key technology for energy conservation since many energy sources are intermittent in nature. Latent heat storage is considered one of the most efficient ways of storing thermal energy because, unlike sensible heat storage, it provides a high-energy storage density with a small temperature swing. There are available many storage techniques, including sensible and latent heat storage or a combination of b...

  16. The influence of interfaces on fluorescence intermittency of single CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasselt, Cornelius; Schuster, Joerg; Borczyskowski, Christian von [TU Chemnitz, Institute of Physics, 09107 Chemnitz (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Fluorescence intermittency, characterized by inverse power law distributions for both the bright and dark times, appears to be a common feature of many different classes of individual emitters. Meanwhile it is generally accepted, that this behaviour is due to trapping and detrapping of charges. Two basic approaches, a tunneling model by Verberk and the DCET model by Tang try to explain the experimental circumstances associated with the blinking phenomena. To contribute to the current discussion of the physical nature of blinking we investigated the influence of static trap sites in the local surroundings of ZnS overcoated CdSe nanocrystals spincoated on thermally grown silicon oxide. Therefore we have modified the trap density by annealing the silcon oxide substrate to reduce the amount of trapping silanol groups on the one hand and by passivation of the silicon oxide with an organic (ODS) monolayer on the other hand. Among the modification of the blinking statistics through the ODS-monolayer we found atypical distributions for the ''on'' time statistics which are different from a power law or exponential behaviour.

  17. Solar-thermal conversion and thermal energy storage of graphene foam-based composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lianbin; Li, Renyuan; Tang, Bo; Wang, Peng

    2016-08-14

    Among various utilizations of solar energy, solar-thermal conversion has recently gained renewed research interest due to its extremely high energy efficiency. However, one limiting factor common to all solar-based energy conversion technologies is the intermittent nature of solar irradiation, which makes them unable to stand-alone to satisfy the continuous energy need. Herein, we report a three-dimensional (3D) graphene foam and phase change material (PCM) composite for the seamlessly combined solar-thermal conversion and thermal storage for sustained energy release. The composite is obtained by infiltrating the 3D graphene foam with a commonly used PCM, paraffin wax. The high macroporosity and low density of the graphene foam allow for high weight fraction of the PCM to be incorporated, which enhances the heat storage capacity of the composite. The interconnected graphene sheets in the composite provide (1) the solar-thermal conversion capability, (2) high thermal conductivity and (3) form stability of the composite. Under light irradiation, the composite effectively collects and converts the light energy into thermal energy, and the converted thermal energy is stored in the PCM and released in an elongated period of time for sustained utilization. This study provides a promising route for sustainable utilization of solar energy.

  18. Solar-thermal conversion and thermal energy storage of graphene foam-based composite

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Lianbin

    2016-07-11

    Among various utilizations of solar energy, solar-thermal conversion has recently gained renewed research interest due to its extremely high energy efficiency. However, one limiting factor common to all solar-based energy conversion technologies is the intermittent nature of solar irradiation, which makes them unable to stand-alone to satisfy continuous energy need. Herein, we report a three-dimensional (3D) graphene foam and phase change material (PCM) composite for the seamlessly combined solar-thermal conversion and thermal storage for sustained energy release. The composite is obtained by infiltrating the 3D graphene foam with a commonly used PCM, paraffin wax. The high macroporosity and low density of the graphene foam allow for high weight fraction of the PCM to be incorporated, which enhances heat storage capacity of the composite. The interconnected graphene sheets in the composite provide (1) the solar-thermal conversion capability, (2) high thermal conductivity and (3) form stability of the composite. Under light irradiation, the composite effectively collects and converts the light energy into thermal energy, and the converted thermal energy is stored in the PCM and released in an elongated period of time for sustained utilization. This study provides a promising route for sustainable utilization of solar energy.

  19. Detecting switching and intermittent causalities in time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanin, Massimiliano; Papo, David

    2017-04-01

    During the last decade, complex network representations have emerged as a powerful instrument for describing the cross-talk between different brain regions both at rest and as subjects are carrying out cognitive tasks, in healthy brains and neurological pathologies. The transient nature of such cross-talk has nevertheless by and large been neglected, mainly due to the inherent limitations of some metrics, e.g., causality ones, which require a long time series in order to yield statistically significant results. Here, we present a methodology to account for intermittent causal coupling in neural activity, based on the identification of non-overlapping windows within the original time series in which the causality is strongest. The result is a less coarse-grained assessment of the time-varying properties of brain interactions, which can be used to create a high temporal resolution time-varying network. We apply the proposed methodology to the analysis of the brain activity of control subjects and alcoholic patients performing an image recognition task. Our results show that short-lived, intermittent, local-scale causality is better at discriminating both groups than global network metrics. These results highlight the importance of the transient nature of brain activity, at least under some pathological conditions.

  20. Positive effects of intermittent fasting in ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fann, David Yang-Wei; Ng, Gavin Yong Quan; Poh, Luting; Arumugam, Thiruma V

    2017-03-01

    Intermittent fasting (IF) is a dietary protocol where energy restriction is induced by alternate periods of ad libitum feeding and fasting. Prophylactic intermittent fasting has been shown to extend lifespan and attenuate the progress and severity of age-related diseases such as cardiovascular (e.g. stroke and myocardial infarction), neurodegenerative (e.g. Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease) and cancerous diseases in animal models. Stroke is the second leading cause of death, and lifestyle risk factors such as obesity and physical inactivity have been associated with elevated risks of stroke in humans. Recent studies have shown that prophylactic IF may mitigate tissue damage and neurological deficit following ischemic stroke by a mechanism(s) involving suppression of excitotoxicity, oxidative stress, inflammation and cell death pathways in animal stroke models. This review summarizes data supporting the potential hormesis mechanisms of prophylactic IF in animal models, and with a focus on findings from animal studies of prophylactic IF in stroke in our laboratory. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Low Dose Intermittent Isotretinoin Therapy in Moderate Acne Vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belçın İzol

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this study, we aimed to investigate the efficiency and side effects of intermittent low dose isotretinoin therapy in moderate acne. Materials and Methods: Patients followed up at our acne outpatient clinic between September 2007 and April 2009 were evaluated. Those treated with 20 mg/day isotretinoin three times a week were included in the study. Relevant data were recorded from patient files. We recorded the age and weight of the cases, duration of acne, previous treatments, acne grading based on global acne scoring system, side effects and pretreatment and posttreatment Dermatology Life Quality Index scores. Hemogram, liver function tests, lipid profiles at baseline and monthly follow-ups were noted. Results: Global acne scoring of complete response rate in 94.3% of 35 patients was achieved after one year of therapy. The partial response rate was 5.7%. The earliest clinical response was observed after four weeks. The Dermatology Life Quality Index was 7.8 at baseline and 1.8 at the end of the treatment. Cheilitis was the only side effect observed. We observed mild degree relapses in 5 cases in the evaluation 17 months after the end of the treatment.Conclusion: Our results show that low dose intermittent isotretinoin therapy is an effective and tolerable treatment in moderate acne.

  2. Intermittent exposure to xenon protects against gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Jia

    Full Text Available Aminoglycoside antibiotics, especially gentamicin, are widely used to treat Gram-negative infections due to their efficacy and low cost. Nevertheless the use of gentamicin is limited by its major side effect, nephrotoxicity. Xenon (Xe provided substantial organoprotective effects in acute injury of the brain and the heart and protected against renal ischemic-reperfusion injury. In this study, we investigated whether xenon could protect against gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity. Male Wistar rats were intermittently exposed to either 70% xenon or 70% nitrogen (N2 balanced with 30% oxygen before and during gentamicin administration at a dose of 100 mg/kg for 7 days to model gentamicin-induced kidney injury. We observed that intermittent exposure to Xe provided morphological and functional renoprotection, which was characterized by attenuation of renal tubular damage, apoptosis, and oxidative stress, but not a reduction in inflammation. We also found that Xe pretreatment upregulated hypoxia-inducible factor 2α (HIF-2α and its downstream effector vascular endothelial growth factor, but not HIF-1α. With regard to the three HIF prolyl hydroxylases, Xe pretreatment upregulated prolyl hydroxylase domain-containing protein-2 (PHD2, suppressed PHD1, and had no influence on PHD3 in the rat kidneys. Pretreatment with Xe also increased the expression of miR-21, a microRNA known to have anti-apoptotic effects. These results support Xe renoprotection against gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity.

  3. Intermittent structures at ion scales in the turbulent solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, Denise; Alexandrova, Olga; Lion, Sonny; Roberts, Owen W.; Maksimovic, Milan; Escoubet, Philippe C.; Zouganelis, Yannis

    2017-04-01

    Understanding the physical mechanisms of dissipation, and the related heating, in turbulent collisionless plasmas (such as the solar wind) represents nowadays one of the key issues of plasma physics. Although the complex behavior of the solar wind has been matter of investigation of many years, some of the primary problems still remain a puzzle for the scientific community. Here, we study coherent structures responsible for solar wind intermittency around ion characteristic scales. We find that, in fast solar wind, intermittency is due to current sheets and Alfvén vortex-like structures. In slow solar wind, we observe as well compressive structures like magnetic solitons, holes and shocks. By using high-time resolution magnetic field data of multi-point measurements of Cluster spacecraft, we characterize the observed coherent structures in terms of topology and propagation speed. We show that all structures, both in fast and slow solar wind, are characterized by a strong wave-vector anisotropy in the perpendicular direction with respect to the local magnetic field and typical scales around ion characteristic scales. Moreover, some of them propagate in the plasma rest frame. Moreover, a further analysis on the ion velocity distribution shows a high variability; in particular, close to coherent structures the proton distribution function appears strongly deformed and far from the thermodynamic equilibrium. We discuss possible interpretation of the observed structures and their role in the heating process of the plasma.

  4. Intermittent Smoothing Approaches for Wind Power Output: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Jabir

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Wind energy is one of the most common types of renewable energy resource. Due to its sustainability and environmental benefits, it is an emerging source for electric power generation. Rapid and random changes of wind speed makes it an irregular and inconsistent power source when connected to the grid, causing different technical problems in protection, power quality and generation dispatch control. Due to these problems, effective intermittent smoothing approaches for wind power output are crucially needed to minimize such problems. This paper reviews various intermittent smoothing approaches used in smoothing the output power fluctuations caused by wind energy. Problems associated with the inclusion of wind energy resources to grid are also briefly reviewed. From this review, it has been found that battery energy storage system is the most suitable and effective smoothing approach, provided that an effective control strategy is available for optimal utilization of battery energy system. This paper further demonstrates different control strategies built for battery energy storage system to obtain the smooth output wind power.

  5. Antral hyperplastic polyp causing intermittent gastric outlet obstruction: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurtkaya-Yapicier Ozlem

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyperplastic polyps are the most common polypoid lesions of the stomach. Rarely, they cause gastric outlet obstruction by prolapsing through the pyloric channel, when they arise in the prepyloric antrum. Case presentation A 62-year-old woman presented with intermittent nausea and vomiting of 4 months duration. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed a 30 mm prepyloric sessile polyp causing intermittent gastric outlet obstruction. Following submucosal injection of diluted adrenaline solution, the polyp was removed with a snare. Multiple biopsies were taken from the greater curvature of the antrum and the corpus. Rapid urease test for Helicobacter pylori yielded a negative result. Histopathologic examination showed a hyperplastic polyp without any evidence of malignancy. Biopsies of the antrum and the corpus revealed gastritis with neither atrophic changes nor Helicobacter pylori infection. Follow-up endoscopy after a 12-week course of proton pomp inhibitor therapy showed a complete healing without any remnant tissue at the polypectomy site. The patient has been symptom-free during 8 months of follow-up. Conclusions Symptomatic gastric polyps should be removed preferentially when they are detected at the initial diagnostic endoscopy. Polypectomy not only provides tissue to determine the exact histopathologic type of the polyp, but also achieves radical treatment.

  6. Intermittent Flow Regimes in a Transonic Fan Airfoil Cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepicovsky, J.; McFarland, E. R.; Chima, R. V.; Capece, V. R.; Hayden, J.

    2002-01-01

    A study was conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center linear cascade on the intermittent flow on the suction surface of an airfoil section from the tip region of a modern low aspect ratio fan blade. Experimental results revealed that, at a large incidence angle, a range of transonic inlet Mach numbers exist where the leading-edge shock-wave pattern was unstable. Flush mounted high frequency response pressure transducers indicated large local jumps in the pressure in the leading edge area, which generates large intermittent loading on the blade leading edge. These measurements suggest that for an inlet Mach number between 0.9 and 1.0 the flow is bi-stable, randomly switching between subsonic and supersonic flows. Hence, it appears that the change in overall flow conditions in the transonic region is based on the frequency of switching between two stable flow states rather than on the continuous increase of the flow velocity. To date, this flow behavior has only been observed in a linear transonic cascade. Further research is necessary to confirm this phenomenon occurs in actual transonic fans and is not the byproduct of an endwall restricted linear cascade.

  7. Biological Nutrient Removal in an Intermittently Aerated Bioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Derco

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The extension of biological processes from carbonaceous impurities removal to nitrogen and phosphorus removal had an impact on the biological system configuration. The system must be well designed, optimized, and operated at its optimum in order to meet the ever more stringent effluent standards. An intermittently aerated completely mixed lab-scale activated sludge bioreactor (IACMB has been used for modelling biological processes of nutrients removal. Concerning the nitrogen removal, the operating cycles 15–30 (15 minutes of aeration, 30 minutes of only mixing without aeration and 30–30 were tested. For the experiments with luxury uptake processes, the operating cycles 15–45, 15–90, 30–60 and 15–75 were used. The cycle 15–75 was the most satisfactory with convenient lengths of aerobic, anoxic, and anaerobic period, high efficiency of the nitrification and denitrification processes, and significant decrease in phosphorus concentration. The results have shown that the intermittently aerated bioreactors are suitable for nitrogen removal as well as luxury uptake of phosphorus. The main advantage is high flexibility in maintenance and control of biochemical environments in the bioreactor.

  8. Thymic Selection of T Cells as Diffusion with Intermittent Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Košmrlj, Andrej

    2011-04-01

    T cells orchestrate adaptive immune responses by recognizing short peptides derived from pathogens, and by distinguishing them from self-peptides. To ensure the latter, immature T cells (thymocytes) diffuse within the thymus gland, where they encounter an ensemble of self-peptides presented on (immobile) antigen presenting cells. Potentially autoimmune T cells are eliminated if the thymocyte binds sufficiently strongly with any such antigen presenting cell. We model thymic selection of T cells as a random walker diffusing in a field of immobile traps that intermittently turn "on" and "off". The escape probability of potentially autoimmune T cells is equivalent to the survival probability of such a random walker. In this paper we describe the survival probability of a random walker on a d-dimensional cubic lattice with randomly placed immobile intermittent traps, and relate it to the result of a well-studied problem where traps are always "on". Additionally, when switching between the trap states is slow, we find a peculiar caging effect for the survival probability.

  9. Intermittent versus indwelling catheters for older patients with hip fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Inger; Athlin, Elsy; Frykholm, Lillemor; Bolinder, Helen; Larsson, Gerry

    2002-09-01

    Nursing staff identified postoperative urinary tract infection (UTI) in patients with hip fracture as an increasing problem. A quality improvement project was carried out to investigate the problem and to reduce the incidence. The aim of the study was to describe the occurrence of UTI among patients with hip fracture before and after surgery, to assess whether the decision to use intermittent catheters instead of indwelling catheters was adopted and to test the hypothesis that hospital stay is significantly longer for patients with UTI than for those without infection. One hundred and forty-four patients were investigated for bacteriuria before the first catheterization and 1 week after the last catheterization. Positive urine cultures on admission to hospital were found in 38% of patients. Among those free from bacteria on admission, 61% had a positive urine culture after indwelling catheterization compared with 32% in the group treated with intermittent catetherization. A significantly longer hospital stay (P

  10. Intermittent exotropia surgery: results in different age groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issaho, Dayane Cristine; Wang, Serena Xiaohong; Weakley, David Robert

    2017-01-01

    To report the outcomes in patients undergoing surgical correction of intermittent exotropia and to compare the age at surgery to motor and sensory success. This was a retrospective cohort study. The results of patients with intermittent exotropia treated with surgery over a 4-year period were reviewed. Patients were divided into two groups based on age at first surgery (groups. One hundred thirty-six patients were evaluated, with 67 and 51 patients undergoing surgery before and after the age of 4 years, respectively. The mean age at surgery was 6.8 ± 2.6 years. The reoperation rate for the patients who underwent surgery before 4 years of age was 48% versus 42% for the ones who underwent surgery after this age (p=0.93). Postoperative stereopsis showed an inverse linear association with age at surgery (page, and may even present better motor results than older patients. Postoperative stereoacuity in younger children revealed to be worse than in older children; however, this result is unlikely to be due to inadequate age for surgery, but rather, immaturity for performing the stereopsis test.

  11. Intermittent pneumatic compression in patients with postmastectomy lymphedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria Dominika Chmielewska

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Postmastectomy lymphedema frequently affecting young patients constitutes a personal, family and social problem. For this reason, primary care physicians often consult both patients and their families. Objectives. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC alone or in combination with exercises on upper limbs circumference and hand function. Material and methods. The study population consisted of 21 patients with breast cancer-related lymphedema. In Group A, the treatment consisted of 20 IPC sessions (45 minutes a day at 60 mm Hg, 5 times weekly and physical exercises (combination therapy. Group B only received 20 IPC sessions. Prior to and after intermittent pneumatic compression, all patients had arm circumference measurements at 6 sites on the mastectomy side. Hand function was assessed with the Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Functional Status Scale. Results . Both groups exhibited a reduction in upper limb circumferences after the therapy in comparison to the initial values. However, a comparison of percentage circumference changes did not show any advantage of the combination therapy on the magnitude of the edema and hand function. Conclusions . Pneumatic compression is an effective method of reducing upper limb edema in postmastectomy patients. The exercises did not have a significant effect on function of hand.

  12. Removal of Pharmaceuticals from Wastewater by Intermittent Electrocoagulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benny Marie B. Ensano

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The continuous release of emerging contaminants (ECs in the aquatic environment, as a result of the inadequate removal by conventional treatment methods, has prompted research to explore viable solutions to this rising global problem. One promising alternative is the use of electrochemical processes since they represent a simple and highly efficient technology with less footprint. In this paper, the feasibility of treating ECs (i.e., pharmaceuticals using an intermittent electrocoagulation process, a known electrochemical technology, has been investigated. Diclofenac (DCF, carbamazepine (CBZ and amoxicillin (AMX were chosen as being representative of highly consumed drugs that are frequently detected in our water resources and were added in synthetic municipal wastewater. The removal efficiencies of both individual and combined pharmaceuticals were determined under different experimental conditions: hydraulic retention time (HRT (6, 19 and 38 h, initial concentration (0.01, 4 and 10 mg/L and intermittent application (5 min ON/20 min OFF of current density (0.5, 1.15 and 1.8 mA/cm2. Results have shown that these parameters have significant effects on pharmaceutical degradation. Maximum removals (DCF = 90%, CBZ = 70% and AMX = 77% were obtained at a current density of 0.5 mA/cm2, an initial concentration of 10 mg/L and HRT of 38 h.

  13. Effects of Intermittent Traction in Patients With Cervical Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Akbari

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Background:Osteoarthritis(OA is the most common joint disease occuring after middle age.Because of the high mobility of the neck, OA is common in the cervical spine. The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the effects of intermittent traction on patients with mild and moderate cervical OA. Therefore, 32 patients with cervical OA were recruited.Methods:Aclinical trial study was designed for patients with cervical OA that were randomly assigned in two equal groups.Control group received a routine physical therapy protocol which included moist heat, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS, and an exercise for neck and shoulder girdle. Experimental group received a routine physical therapy protocol plus intermittent traction (IT.Results: Pain and mobility improved in both groups.There was significant difference in interaction of the improvement of cervical pain between the two groups,the rate of pain reduction; sleep ease, medicine taking and range of motion (ROM improvement in the experimental group were higher than that of the control group.Conclusion: The results justify the efficacy of IT, therefore it can be concluded that the IT is an effective modality for patients with mild and moderate cervical OA.  

  14. Intermittency, coherent structures and dissipation in plasma turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, M. [Department of Mechanics and Aerospace Engineering, South University of Science and Technology of China, Shenzhen, Guangdong 518055 (China); Matthaeus, W. H.; Parashar, T. N.; Wu, P. [Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States); Roytershteyn, V. [Space Science Institute, Boulder, Colorado 80301 (United States); Karimabadi, H. [12837 Caminito del Canto, Del Mar, California 92014 (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Collisionless dissipation in turbulent plasmas such as the solar wind and the solar corona has been an intensively studied subject recently, with new insights often emerging from numerical simulation. Here we report results from high resolution, fully kinetic simulations of plasma turbulence in both two (2D) and three (3D) dimensions, studying the relationship between intermittency and dissipation. The simulations show development of turbulent coherent structures, characterized by sheet-like current density structures spanning a range of scales. An approximate dissipation measure is employed, based on work done by the electromagnetic field in the local electron fluid frame. This surrogate dissipation measure is highly concentrated in small subvolumes in both 2D and 3D simulations. Fully kinetic simulations are also compared with magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations in terms of coherent structures and dissipation. The interesting result emerges that the conditional averages of dissipation measure scale very similarly with normalized current density J in 2D and 3D particle-in-cell and in MHD. To the extent that the surrogate dissipation measure is accurate, this result implies that on average dissipation scales as ∼J{sup 2} in turbulent kinetic plasma. Multifractal intermittency is seen in the inertial range in both 2D and 3D, but at scales ∼ion inertial length, the scaling is closer to monofractal.

  15. Emission Enhancement and Intermittency in Polycrystalline Organolead Halide Perovskite Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Li

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Inorganic-organic halide organometal perovskites have demonstrated very promising performance for opto-electronic applications, such as solar cells, light-emitting diodes, lasers, single-photon sources, etc. However, the little knowledge on the underlying photophysics, especially on a microscopic scale, hampers the further improvement of devices based on this material. In this communication, correlated conventional photoluminescence (PL characterization and wide-field PL imaging as a function of time are employed to investigate the spatially- and temporally-resolved PL in CH3NH3PbI3−xClx perovskite films. Along with a continuous increase of the PL intensity during light soaking, we also observe PL blinking or PL intermittency behavior in individual grains of these films. Combined with significant suppression of PL blinking in perovskite films coated with a phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM layer, it suggests that this PL intermittency is attributed to Auger recombination induced by photoionized defects/traps or mobile ions within grains. These defects/traps are detrimental for light conversion and can be effectively passivated by the PCBM layer. This finding paves the way to provide a guideline on the further improvement of perovskite opto-electronic devices.

  16. Urban community perception towards intermittent water supply system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, M W; Talkhande, A V; Andey, S P; Kelkar, P S

    2002-04-01

    While evaluating intermittent and continuous water supply systems, consumers opinion survey was undertaken for critical appraisal of both modes of operation. With the help of a pre-designed set of questions relating to various aspects of water supply and the opinion of consumers regarding degree of service, a house to house survey was conducted in the study area of Ghaziabad and Jaipur. The consumer opinion survey clearly indicated a satisfactory degree of service wherever adequate quantity of water was made available irrespective of the mode of water supply. Number of complaints regarding quality of water supplied, timings of supply, low pressures and breakdowns in supply were reported during intermittent water supply. Every family stored water for drinking and other uses. Most of the families discard drinking water once the fresh water supply is resumed next day. Discarded drinking water is usually used in kitchen for washing and gardening. Storage for other purposes depends on economic status and availability of other sources like open dug well in the house. While most of the respondents had no complaints on water tariff, all of them were in favour of continuous water supply.

  17. Intermittent flow regimes near the convection threshold in ferromagnetic nanofluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauzina, Marina T; Bozhko, Alexandra A; Putin, Gennady F; Suslov, Sergey A

    2015-01-01

    The onset and decay of convection in a spherical cavity filled with ferromagnetic nanofluid and heated from below are investigated experimentally. It is found that, unlike in a single-component Newtonian fluid where stationary convection sets in as a result of supercritical bifurcation and where convection intensity increases continuously with the degree of supercriticality, convection in a multicomponent ferromagnetic nanofluid starts abruptly and has an oscillatory nature. The hysteresis is observed in the transition between conduction and convection states. In moderately supercritical regimes, the arising fluid motion observed at a fixed temperature difference intermittently transitions from quasiharmonic to essentially irregular oscillations that are followed by periods of a quasistationary convection. The observed oscillations are shown to result from the precession of the axis of a convection vortex in the equatorial plane. When the vertical temperature difference exceeds the convection onset value by a factor of 2.5, the initially oscillatory convection settles to a steady-state regime with no intermittent behavior detected afterward. The performed wavelet and Fourier analyses of thermocouple readings indicate the presence of various oscillatory modes with characteristic periods ranging from one hour to several days.

  18. Intermittency in the Helimak, a simple magnetic torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, E. I.; Rowan, W. L.; Gentle, K. W.; Horton, W.; Bernard, T.

    2017-10-01

    Irregularly-spaced, large-amplitude bursts are observed in the Helimak plasma turbulence with sufficient definition to investigate their physical basis and possibly improve understanding of the induced particle transport. The Helimak is an experimental realization of a sheared cylindrical slab that generates and heats a plasma with microwaves and confines it in a helical magnetic field. Although it is MHD stable, the plasma is always in a nonlinearly saturated state of microturbulence. The intermittency in this turbulence manifests itself in highly skewed PDFs of the normalized electron density. Cross-conditional averaging exposes large amplitude structures propagating down the density gradient at a few hundred meters per second. Introduction of a radial electric field via bias plates appears to suppress these intermittent transport events (ITEs) for Er pointing down the density gradient. In addition, the cross-conditionally averaged waveforms are relatively unchanged as connection length is varied. Within certain regimes, our measurements are consistent with the predictions of a stochastic model that represents the plasma fluctuations as a random sequence of burst events. Furthermore, we attempt to gain insight into the physical origin of these ITEs by searching for similar statistical behavior in fluid and gyrokinetic simulations. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences under Award Number DE-FG02- 04ER5476.

  19. Prevalence of IgE sensitization in Danish children with suspected asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann-Petersen, Benjamin; Høst, Arne; Larsen, Kirsten Toksvig

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this article was to estimate the prevalence of IgE sensitization in Danish children with suspected asthma and to characterize the pattern of sensitization. STUDY DESIGN: We performed a cross-sectional study including 1744 children from 0 to 15 yr suspected of asthma who were...

  20. Diagnostic accuracy and patient acceptance of MRI in children with suspected appendicitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thieme, Mai E.; Leeuwenburgh, Marjolein M. N.; Valdehueza, Zaldy D.; Bouman, Donald E.; de Bruin, Ivar G. J. M.; Schreurs, W. Hermien; Houdijk, Alexander P. J.; Stoker, Jaap; Wiarda, Bart M.

    2014-01-01

    To compare magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound in children with suspected appendicitis. In a single-centre diagnostic accuracy study, children with suspected appendicitis were prospectively identified at the emergency department. All underwent abdominal ultrasound and MRI within 2 h,