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Sample records for suspected pulmonary embolism

  1. The clinical course of patients with suspected pulmonary embolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beek, E. J.; Kuijer, P. M.; Büller, H. R.; Brandjes, D. P.; Bossuyt, P. M.; ten Cate, J. W.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The outcome of patients with suspected pulmonary embolism is known to a limited extent only. OBJECTIVE: To address this limited knowledge in a cohort in whom pulmonary embolism was proved or ruled out. METHODS: Consecutive patients with clinically suspected pulmonary embolism underwent

  2. CT Pulmonary Angiography and Suspected Acute Pulmonary Embolism

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    Enden, T.; Kloew, N.E. [Ullevaal Univ. Hospital, Oslo (Norway). Dept. of Cardiovascular Radiology

    2003-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the use and quality of CT pulmonary angiography in our department, and to relate the findings to clinical parameters and diagnoses. Material and Methods: A retrospective study of 324 consecutive patients referred to CT pulmonary angiography with clinically suspected pulmonary embolism (PE). From the medical records we registered clinical parameters, blood gases, D-dimer, risk factors and the results of other relevant imaging studies. Results: 55 patients (17%) had PE detected on CT. 39 had bilateral PE, and 8 patients had isolated peripheral PE. 87% of the examinations showing PE had satisfactory filling of contrast material including the segmental pulmonary arteries, and 60% of the subsegmental arteries. D-dimer test was performed in 209 patients, 85% were positive. A negative D-dimer ruled out PE detected at CT. Dyspnea and concurrent symptoms or detection of deep vein thrombosis (DVT), contraceptive pills and former venous thromboembolism (VTE) were associated with PE. The presence of only one clinical parameter indicated a negative PE diagnosis (p < 0.017), whereas two or more suggested a positive PE diagnosis (p < 0.002). CT also detected various ancillary findings such as consolidation, pleural effusion, nodule or tumor in nearly half of the patients; however, there was no association with the PE diagnosis. Conclusion: The quality of CT pulmonary angiography was satisfactory as a first-line imaging of PE. CT also showed additional pathology of importance in the chest. Our study confirmed that a negative D-dimer ruled out clinically suspected VTE.

  3. Investigating suspected acute pulmonary embolism - what are hospital clinicians thinking?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McQueen, A.S.; Worthy, S.; Keir, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    Aims: To assess local clinical knowledge of the appropriate investigation of suspected acute pulmonary embolism (PE) and this compare with the 2003 British Thoracic Society (BTS) guidelines as a national reference standard. Methods: A clinical questionnaire was produced based on the BTS guidelines. One hundred and eight-six participants completed the questionnaires at educational sessions for clinicians of all grades, within a single NHS Trust. The level of experience amongst participants ranged from final year medical students to consultant physicians. Results: The clinicians were divided into four groups based on seniority: Pre-registration, Junior, Middle, and Senior. Forty-six point eight percent of all the clinicians correctly identified three major risk factors for PE and 25.8% recognized the definition of the recommended clinical probability score from two alternatives. Statements regarding the sensitivity of isotope lung imaging and computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) received correct responses from 41.4 and 43% of participants, respectively, whilst 81.2% recognized that an indeterminate ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy (V/Q) study requires further imaging. The majority of clinicians correctly answered three clinical scenario questions regarding use of D-dimers and imaging (78, 85, and 57.5%). There was no statistically significant difference between the four groups for any of the eight questions. Conclusions: The recommended clinical probability score was unfamiliar to all four groups of clinicians in the present study, and the majority of doctors did not agree that a negative CTPA or isotope lung scintigraphy reliably excluded PE. However, questions based on clinical scenarios received considerably higher rates of correct responses. The results indicate that various aspects of the national guidelines on suspected acute pulmonary embolism are unfamiliar to many UK hospital clinicians. Further research is needed to identify methods to improve

  4. Usefulness of the Negative Multidetector CT Angiography in Patients with Suspected Pulmonary Embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holguin Holguin, Alfonso Jose; Lombana, Milton; Collazos, Giovanny; Bravo, Hector; Abella Calle, Jose

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study is to evaluate alternative findings in pulmonary CT angiography using MDCT reported as negative in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism. Material and method: Cross sectional study with 178 patients. We recognized other findings reported in pulmonary CT angiography using MDCT whose result was negative. Subsequently these findings were classified into six different categories of clinical relevance and their association with clinical scenario was analyzed. Results: from November 2004 to June 2007 we requested 231 pulmonary CT angiography using MDCT in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism. 217 patients were included in the final analysis. Of these, 39 (185) were positive for pulmonary embolism. The 178 remaining negative studies, 8.43% were normal, 53.37% were classified as category A, 20.79% category B, 14.04% category C; category D 1.12% and 2.25% were not interpretable. The most frequent diagnoses were pneumonia, interstitial lung disease and cardiogenic pulmonary edema. It was less likely to find a normal report whether the study was requested in the hospital department in emergency patients (OR = 0.38 95% 0.16 to 0.88, p = 0.0007). No differences were found in other categories or between patients younger or older than 65 years (p = 0.436). Conclusion: Pulmonary CT angiography as first line imaging tool in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism is useful, offering alternative diagnoses in hospitalized and emergency room patients, regardless of their age and clinical findings.

  5. An alternative diagnostic strategy with lower radiatioin risk in young women with suspected pulmonary embolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douma, R.A.; Kamphuisen, P.W.; Rijnders, A.J.M.; Hendrickx, B.; Ten Wolde, M.; Büller, H.R.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Since younger women have an increased risk of cancer following radiation exposure with CT scanning, they might benefit from an alternative diagnostic strategy for suspected pulmonary embolism (PE).Methods: We investigated the safety and efficiency of a diagnostic strategy consisting of

  6. Suspected Pulmonary Embolism during Hickman Catheterization in a Child: What Else Should Be Considered besides Pulmonary Embolism?

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    Haemi Lee

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A 16-month-old girl with acute lymphoblastic leukemia expired during Hickman catheter insertion. She had undergone chemoport insertion of the left subclavian vein six months earlier and received five cycles of chemotherapy. Due to malfunction of the chemoport and the consideration of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, insertion of a Hickmann catheter on the right side and removal of the malfunctioning chemoport were planned under general anesthesia. The surgery was uneventful during catheter insertion, but the patient experienced the sudden onset of pulseless electrical activity just after saline was flushed through the newly inserted catheter. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was commenced aggressively, but the patient was refractory. Migration of a thrombus generated by the previous central catheter to the pulmonary circulation was suspected, resulting in a pulmonary embolism.

  7. Pulmonary Embolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    A pulmonary embolism is a sudden blockage in a lung artery. The cause is usually a blood clot in ... loose and travels through the bloodstream to the lung. Pulmonary embolism is a serious condition that can ...

  8. Computed Tomography Pulmonary Angiography for Evaluation of Patients With Suspected Pulmonary Embolism: Use or Overuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molaee, Shima; Ghanaati, Hossein; Safavi, Enayat; Foroumandi, Morteza; Peiman, Soheil

    2015-01-01

    The use of computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) has been increased during the last decade. We studied the adherence to current diagnostic recommendations for evaluation of pulmonary embolism in a teaching hospital of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The registered medical records (Wells scores and serum D-dimer level) of all patients whose CTPA was performed with suspicion of pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) were studied retrospectively. Modified Wells score of each patient was determined without being aware of the CTPA results. The patients were categorized to those with a high (likely) clinical probability (score > 4) and low (unlikely) clinical probability (score≤ 4) of PTE. During a 6-month period, 82 patients who underwent CTPA were included. The prevalence of PTE was 62.2% in the group of subjects with a likely clinical risk. In 45 (54.8%) of those patients whose CTPA was requested, the PTE was unlikely based on modified Wells criteria. In the clinically unlikely group, serum D-dimer assay was done in 15 out of 45 (33.3%), while it was inappropriately checked in 10 out of 37 (27.0%) with a clinically likely risk. General adherence rate to diagnostic algorithm of PTE was 43.9%. There is still excessive unjustified concern of PTE in less trained physicians leading to excessive diagnostic work-up. Loyalty to the existing guideline for management of suspected PTE in educational hospitals and supervision of attending physicians could prevent overuse of CTPA

  9. Noninvasive diagnosis of suspected severe pulmonary embolism. Trans-esophageal echocardiography vs spiral CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruszczyk, P.; Torbicki, A.; Pacho, R.

    1998-01-01

    Patients with pulmonary embolism (PE) and echocardiographic signs of right ventricular over-lead have worse prognosis and may be require aggressive therapy. Unequivocal confirmation of PE is required before thrombolysis or embolectomy. This study compares the value of trans-esophageal echocardiography (TEE) and spiral CT (sCT) in direct visualization of pulmonary artery thrombo-emboli in patients with suspected PE and echocardiographic signs of right ventricular over-lead. Because of high prevalence of bilateral central pulmonary thrombo-emboli in patients with hemo-dynamically significant PE, both sCT and TEE allow its definitive confirmation in most cases. Thrombi reported by sCT distally to lobar arteries should be interpreted with caution. (author)

  10. Equipment availability and diagnostic strategies for suspected pulmonary embolism in Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schibany, N.; Fleischmann, D.; Thallinger, C.; Ba-Ssalamah, A.; Hahne, J.; Herold, C.J.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate equipment availability and current diagnostic strategies for suspected pulmonary embolism (PE) in Austrian hospitals. A questionnaire was sent to the medical directors of all Austrian hospitals with emergency and/or surgical, orthopedic, and medical departments. The questionnaire contained questions regarding the available equipment suitable for the imaging diagnosis of PE, the first-line and second-line imaging tests for patients with suspected PE, and additional lower extremity venous imaging and laboratory tests that complement the diagnostic armamentarium. The return rate for questionnaires was 81% (127 of 157 hospitals). There were 97% of hospitals that had the equipment to perform sonography, 59% could perform pulmonary angiography, 54% spiral CT, 19% ventilation/perfusion (V/P) scintigraphy, and 4% perfusion scintigraphy alone. Spiral-CT angiography (SCTA) was the first-line imaging study for suspected PE in 56% of hospitals, followed by echocardiography and V/P scintigraphy. Lower extremity venous imaging (47%) and, interestingly, V/P scintigraphy (43%), served as second-line imaging tests. D-dimer tests were included in the diagnostic strategy in 74% of hospitals. Spiral-CT angiography is the most commonly used primary method for suspected PE in Austrian hospitals. The V/P scintigraphy is available only in a minority of hospitals to investigate patients with suspected PE. When V/P scintigraphy is available, however, it is employed in a large number of patients per annum. (orig.)

  11. "I can't find anything wrong: it must be a pulmonary embolism": Diagnosing suspected pulmonary embolism in primary care, a qualitative study.

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    Marie Barais

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Before using any prediction rule oriented towards pulmonary embolism (PE, family physicians (FPs should have some suspicion of this diagnosis. The diagnostic reasoning process leading to the suspicion of PE is not well described in primary care. OBJECTIVE: to explore the diagnostic reasoning of FPs when pulmonary embolism is suspected. METHOD: Semi-structured qualitative interviews with 28 FPs. The regional hospital supplied data of all their cases of pulmonary embolism from June to November 2011. The patient's FP was identified where he/she had been the physician who had sent the patient to the emergency unit. The first consecutive 14 FPs who agreed to participate made up the first group. A second group was chosen using a purposeful sampling method. The topic guide focused on the circumstances leading to the suspicion of PE. A thematic analysis was performed, by three researchers, using a grounded theory coding paradigm. RESULTS: In the FPs' experience, the suspicion of pulmonary embolism arose out of four considerations: the absence of indicative clinical signs for diagnoses other than PE, a sudden change in the condition of the patient, a gut feeling that something was seriously wrong and an earlier failure to diagnose PE. The FPs interviewed did not use rules in their diagnostic process. CONCLUSION: This study illustrated the diagnostic role of gut feelings in the specific context of suspected pulmonary embolism in primary care. The FPs used the sense of alarm as a tool to prevent the diagnostic error of missing a PE. The diagnostic accuracy of gut feelings has yet to be evaluated.

  12. Ruling out clinically suspected pulmonary embolism by assessment of clinical probability and D-dimer levels: a management study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leclercq, Monique G. L.; Lutisan, Johan G.; van Marwijk Kooy, Marinus; Kuipers, Bart F.; Oostdijk, Ad H. J.; van der Leur, Jef J. C. M.; Büller, Harry R.

    2003-01-01

    D-dimer test combined with clinical probability assessment has been proposed as the first step in the diagnostic work-up of patients with suspected pulmonary embolism (PE). In a prospective management study we investigated the safety and efficiency of excluding PE by a normal D-dimer combined with a

  13. Comparison of a clinical probability estimate and two clinical models in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism. ANTELOPE-Study Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanson, B. J.; Lijmer, J. G.; Mac Gillavry, M. R.; Turkstra, F.; Prins, M. H.; Büller, H. R.

    2000-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that both the subjective judgement of a physician and standardized clinical models can be helpful in the estimation of the probability of the disease in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism (PE). We performed a multi-center study in consecutive in- and outpatients

  14. Interest of chest X-ray in tailoring the diagnostic strategy in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Philippe; Le Roux, Pierre-Yves; Tissot, Valentin; Delluc, Aurélien; Le Duc-Pennec, Alexandra; Abgral, Ronan; Palard, Xavier; Couturaud, Francis; Le Gal, Grégoire; Salaun, Pierre-Yves

    2015-09-01

    Current diagnostic strategies for pulmonary embolism rely on the sequential use of noninvasive diagnostic tests including ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) scan and computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA). V/Q scan remains criticized because of a high proportion of nondiagnostic test results, especially when the chest X-ray (CXR) is abnormal. The present study assesses whether CXR results have an impact on the conclusiveness of a noninvasive diagnostic strategy of pulmonary embolism based on the combination of pretest probability, compression ultrasonography, V/Q scan, and CTPA. Patients suspected of having pulmonary embolism were managed according to a validated diagnostic strategy. All patients underwent a CXR within 24 h of the suspicion of pulmonary embolism. CXR results were correlated to strategy conclusiveness, as assessed by the rate of required CTPA as per the diagnostic algorithm. Two hundred and twenty-three patients were retrospectively analyzed. CXRs were considered as normal in 108 (48%) patients and abnormal in 115 (52%) patients. According to the diagnostic algorithm, a CTPA was required to reach a diagnostic conclusion in 11 (10%) patients of the normal CXR group, and in 14 (12%) patients of the abnormal CXR group (P > 0.05). In this study, the presence of CXR abnormalities did not have an impact on the conclusiveness of a diagnostic strategy of pulmonary embolism based on V/Q scan. CXR abnormalities should likely not be regarded as a contraindication to the use of V/Q scan in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism.

  15. Suspected pulmonary embolism and lung scan interpretation: Trial of a Bayesian reporting method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, D.M.; Philbrick, J.T.; Schoonover, F.W.; Teates, C.D.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this research is to determine whether a Bayesian method of lung scan (LS) reporting could influence the management of patients with suspected pulmonary embolism (PE). The study is performed by the following: (1) A descriptive study of the diagnostic process for suspected PE using the new reporting method; (2) a non-experimental evaluation of the reporting method comparing prospective patients and historical controls; and (3) a survey of physicians' reactions to the reporting innovation. Of 148 consecutive patients enrolled at the time of LS, 129 were completely evaluated; 75 patients scanned the previous year served as controls. The LS results of patients with suspected PE were reported as posttest probabilities of PE calculated from physician-provided pretest probabilities and the likelihood ratios for PE of LS interpretations. Despite the Bayesian intervention, the confirmation or exclusion of PE was often based on inconclusive evidence. PE was considered by the clinician to be ruled out in 98% of patients with posttest probabilities less than 25% and ruled in for 95% of patients with posttest probabilities greater than 75%. Prospective patients and historical controls were similar in terms of tests ordered after the LS (e.g., pulmonary angiography). Patients with intermediate or indeterminate lung scan results had the highest proportion of subsequent testing. Most physicians (80%) found the reporting innovation to be helpful, either because it confirmed clinical judgement (94 cases) or because it led to additional testing (7 cases). Despite the probabilistic guidance provided by the study, the diagnosis of PE was often neither clearly established nor excluded. While physicians appreciated the innovation and were not confused by the terminology, their clinical decision making was not clearly enhanced

  16. Diagnostic value of dual section helical CT in suspected acute pulmonary embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marangoni, Alberto A.; Torrecillas, Maria D.; Marchegiani, Silvio H.; Surur, Alberto

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To asses the role of Dual Section Helical Computed Tomography (DSHCT) in patients with clinically suspected acute pulmonary embolism (APE). Material and Methods: A retrospective evaluation of 102 patients (57 male, 45 female; age range: 30-83 years; mean: 56 years) with high suspicion of APE studied by DSHCT, was carried out. From the medical records we analyzed clinical parameters, blood gases, D-dimer, risk factors and other imaging examinations. US Doppler of the inferior limbs was performed in 58/102 patients (57%). Results. 52 patients (51%) had APE on DSHCT. Scans of the other 50 patients (49%) were negative for APE. In 39/50 cases (78%) without evidence of APE, DSHCT detected ancillary thoracic findings such as atelectasia (n=11), pulmonary consolidation/edema (n=10), interstitial lung disease (n=8), pleural effusion (n=6), emphysema (n=2), nodules (n=2). 11 cases (22%) DSHCT showed no abnormal features. In this group, with persistent clinical symptoms, angio MRI showed 2 additional cases of APE (false negatives on DSHCT). On DSHCT 51/52 patients (98%) with APE showed satisfactory filling of iodinate contrast in segmental pulmonary arteries, and 45/52 patients (87%) in sub segmental arteries. On DSHCT 36 patients showed bilateral APE, and 7 had isolated peripheral APE. In 7/12 patients DSHCT demonstrated deep venous thrombosis (DVT) of the inferior limbs. In other 27/58 cases (47%) US Doppler was positive for DVT. Conclusion: DSHCT can be effectively used to rule out suspected APE and also provides additional information in patients without APE. In addition DSHCT also contributes to demonstrate deep venous thrombosis. (author)

  17. Investigation of Suspected Pulmonary Embolism at Hutt Valley Hospital with CT Pulmonary Angiography: Current Practice and Opportunities for Improvement

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    Nick Kennedy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To study the use of CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA at Hutt Hospital and investigate the use of pretest probability scoring in the assessment of patients with suspected pulmonary embolism (PE. Methods. We studied patients with suspected PE that underwent CTPA between January and May 2012 and collected data on demographics, use of pretest probability scoring, and use of D Dimer and compared our practice with the British Thoracic Society (BTS guideline. Results. 105 patients underwent CTPA and 15% of patients had PE. 13% of patients had a Wells score prior to their scan. Wells score calculated by researchers revealed 54%, 36%, and 8% patients had low, medium, and high risk pretest probabilities and 8%, 20%, and 50% of these patients had positive scans. D Dimer was performed in 58% of patients and no patients with a negative D Dimer had a PE. Conclusion. The CTPA positive rate was similar to other contemporary studies but lower than previous New Zealand studies and some international guidelines. Risk stratification of suspected PE using Wells score and D Dimer was underutilised. A number of scans could have been safely avoided by using accepted guidelines reducing resources use and improving patient safety.

  18. Incremental value of CT angiography over chest x-rays in suspected pulmonary embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, W.B.G.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: CT pulmonary angiography (CT) may detect nonembolic diagnoses in up to 25% of patients with suspected pulmonary embolism (PE). In a prospective study of 104 patients at Sir Charles Gairdner and Royal Perth Hospitals, chest x-ray (CXR), VQ scan and CT angiography were all performed within a period of 24-hours. CT angiograms were positive in 21/26 cases of PE (81%), but the CXR was positive for PE in only 2 (7%). The initial CXR was normal in 42 patients (39%). Nonspecific or unrelated abnormalities were detected in 64 patients, including basal atelectasis and/or small effusion(s) in 40 patients (62% abnormal CXRs), confluent consolidation (12 patients), malignancy (11) and interstitial oedema (11). The most common abnormality detected only by CT was mild-moderate enlargement of mediastinal lymph nodes, in 22 patients (21%). No cause for this was found at follow up in 12 patients. In the remaining 10 patients, mediastinal adenopathy was due to cancer but affected immediate management in only three.In a further 5 patients, nonembolic lesions were detected on CT angiography but did not affect management. In 7 patients, abnormalities were reported only on plain CXR, including interstitial oedema, lower lobe consolidation and a small pneumothorax. In patients with suspected PE, CT angiography was useful to detect PE in those with abnormal CXRs. The incremental diagnostic yield in terms of nonembolic diagnoses was relatively low in this series and confined largely to detection of mild-moderate mediastinal lymphadenopathy, which remained undiagnosed in more than 50% of patients. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  19. V/P SPECT as a diagnostic tool for pregnant women with suspected pulmonary embolism

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    Bajc, Marika; Olsson, Berit; Joegi, Jonas [Skaane University Hospital and Lund University, Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Lund (Sweden); Gottsaeter, Anders [Skaane University Hospital, Vascular Diseases, Malmoe (Sweden); Hindorf, Cecilia [Skaane University Hospital, Radiation Physics, Lund (Sweden)

    2015-07-15

    The purpose of the study was to assess the prevalence of pulmonary embolism (PE) and other lung diseases among pregnant women with suspected PE and to calculate the radiation exposure to patient and fetus in this population. As a secondary aim, we evaluated the negative predictive value of a normal ventilation/perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (V/P SPECT) examination in pregnancy. We studied all 127 pregnant women who had suspected PE and had undergone V/P SPECT at our institution in the course of a 5-year period. Radiation exposure to patient and fetus and the negative predictive value of a normal V/P SPECT examination were also measured. V/P SPECT identified PE in 11 women (9 %). Moreover, in 15 women (12 %) the examination revealed pneumonia (in 2 cases in addition to PE) and in 1 woman signs of airway obstruction were revealed. Among the 116/127 women (91 %) where PE was ruled out by V/P SPECT, none was diagnosed subsequently with PE or deep venous thrombosis (DVT) during the same pregnancy or puerperal period. For P SPECT, the calculated fetal absorbed dose was < 0.6 mGy,and the calculated breast absorbed dose 0.6 mGy. For V SPECT, the calculated fetal absorbed dose was < 0.014 mGy and the breast absorbed dose 0.25 mGy. The prevalence of PE was low (9 %) among pregnant women with suspected disease. Pneumonia was diagnosed in 12 % of patients. The negative predictive value of V/P SPECT was high, and the radiation exposure from V/P SPECT was low both for fetus and patient. (orig.)

  20. Value of venous color flow duplex scan as initial screening test for geriatric inpatients with clinically suspected pulmonary embolism

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    Kreidy R

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Raghid Kreidy1, Elias Stephan2, Pascale Salameh3, Mirna Waked4 1Department of Vascular Surgery, Saint George Hospital, University Medical Center, University of Balamand, Beirut, Lebanon; 2Department of Geriatrics, Saint George Hospital, University Medical Center, University of Balamand, Beirut, Lebanon; 3Laboratory of Clinical and Epidemiological Research, Faculty of Pharmacy, Lebanese University, 4Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Saint George Hospital, University Medical Center, University of Balamand, Beirut, Lebanon Aim: The contribution of lower extremity venous duplex scan to the diagnostic strategy for pulmonary embolism has been demonstrated by many authors. However, the positive diagnostic value of this noninvasive test in clinically suspected pulmonary embolism is not very high (10%–18%. Since thromboembolic risks increase considerably in hospitalized patients with advanced age, this study aims to determine the importance of lower extremity venous color flow duplex scan in this particular subgroup of patients with clinically suspected pulmonary embolism. The effects of clinical presentation and risk factors on the results of duplex scan have been also studied. Methods: Between July 2007 and January 2010, 95 consecutive Lebanese geriatric ($60 years of age inpatients with clinically suspected pulmonary embolism assessed in an academic tertiary-care center for complete lower extremity venous color flow duplex scan were retrospectively reviewed. Age varied between 60 and 96 years (mean, 79.9 years. Forty patients were males and 55 females. Absence of compressibility was the most important criteria for detecting acute venous thrombosis. Results: Out of 95 patients, 33 patients (34.7% were diagnosed with recent deep venous thrombosis of lower extremities (14 proximal and 19 distal using complete venous ultrasound. Nine of these 33 patients (27.2% had a history of venous thromboembolism and eleven (33.3% presented with edema of lower

  1. Triage for suspected acute Pulmonary Embolism: Think before opening Pandora's Box

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    Levin, David [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Seo, Joon Beom [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kiely, David G. [Sheffield Pulmonary Vascular Disease Unit, M-15, M-Floor, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Hatabu, Hiroto [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School Boston, MA (United States); Gefter, Warren [Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Beek, Edwin J.R. van [Clinical Research Imaging Centre, University of Edinburgh, Scotland (United Kingdom); Schiebler, Mark L., E-mail: mschiebler@uwhealth.org [Department of Radiology, UW-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI 53792-3252 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    This is a review of the current strengths and weaknesses of the various imaging modalities available for the diagnosis of suspected non-massive Pulmonary Embolism (PE). Without careful consideration for the clinical presentation, and the timely application of clinical decision support (CDS) methodology, the current overutilization of imaging resources for this disease will continue. For a patient with a low clinical risk profile and a negative D-dimer there is no reason to consider further workup with imaging; as the negative predictive value in this scenario is the same as imaging. While the current efficacy and effectiveness data support the continued use of Computed Tomographic angiography (CTA) as the imaging golden standard for the diagnosis of PE; this test does have the unintended consequences of radiation exposure, possible overdiagnosis and overuse. There is a persistent lack of appreciation on the part of ordering physicians for the effectiveness of the alternatives to CTA (ventilation–perfusion imaging and contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography) in these patients. Careful use of standardized protocols for patient triage and the application of CDS will allow for a better use of imaging resources.

  2. Symptomatology, Clinical Presentation and Basic Work up in Patients with Suspected Pulmonary Embolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Poul Henning; Hess, Søren

    2017-01-01

    referral to a relevant facility should be a part of the skills of all clinicians. Sudden onset dyspnea, chest pain, syncope and hemoptysis are essential symptoms of pulmonary embolism, and in most of these patients basic investigations like arterial blood gas analysis, electrocardiogram, chest x...

  3. Non-invasive diagnostic work-up of patients with clinically suspected pulmonary embolism; results of a management study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Wolde, M.; Hagen, P. J.; Macgillavry, M. R.; Pollen, I. J.; Mairuhu, A. T. A.; Koopman, M. M. W.; Prins, M. H.; Hoekstra, O. S.; Brandjes, D. P. M.; Postmus, P. E.; Büller, H. R.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Clinicians often deviate from the recommended algorithm for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism consisting of ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy and pulmonary angiography. Objectives: To assess the safety and feasibility of a diagnostic algorithm which reduces the need for lung

  4. Pulmonary embolism; Lungenarterienembolie

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    Sudarski, Sonja; Henzler, Thomas [Heidelberg Univ., Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin

    2016-09-15

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) requires a quick diagnostic algorithm, as the untreated disease has a high mortality and morbidity. Crucial for the diagnostic assessment chosen is the initial clinical likelihood of PE and the individual risk profile of the patient. The overall goal is to diagnose or rule out PE as quickly and safely as possible or to initiate timely treatment if necessary. CT angiography of the pulmonary arteries (CTPA) with multi-slice CT scanner systems presents the actual diagnostic reference standard. With CTPA further important diagnoses can be made, like presence of right ventricular dysfunction. There are different scan and contrast application protocols that can be applied in order to gain diagnostic examinations with sufficient contrast material enhancement in the pulmonary arteries while avoiding all kinds of artifacts. This review article is meant to be a practical guide to examine patients with suspected PE according to the actual guidelines.

  5. Suspected pulmonary embolism and deep venous thrombosis: A comprehensive MDCT diagnosis in the acute clinical setting

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    Salvolini, Luca [Radiology Department, ' Umberto I' Hospital - Ospedali Riuniti - ' Politecnica delle Marche' University, Via Conca, 60020 Ancona (Italy)], E-mail: lucasalvolini@alice.it; Scaglione, Mariano [Emergency and Trauma CT Section, Department of Radiology, Cardarelli Hospital, Via G. Merliani 31, 80127 Naples (Italy); Giuseppetti, Gian Marco; Giovagnoni, Andrea [Radiology Department, ' Umberto I' Hospital - Ospedali Riuniti - ' Politecnica delle Marche' University, Via Conca, 60020 Ancona (Italy)

    2008-03-15

    Both pulmonary arterial and peripheral venous sides of venous thromboembolism (VTE) can now be efficiently and safely investigated by multi-detector CT (MDCT) at the same time by a combined CT angiography/CT venography protocol. In the emergency setting, the use of such a single test for patients suspected of suffering from VTE on a clinical grounds may considerably shorten and simplify diagnostic algorithms. The selection of patients to be submitted to MDCT must follow well-established clinical prediction rules in order to avoid generalized referral to CT on a generic clinical suspicion basis and excessive population exposure to increased ionizing radiation dose, especially in young patients. Clinical and anatomical wide-panoramic capabilities of MDCT allow identification of underlying disease that may explain patients' symptoms in a large number of cases in which VTE is not manifest. The analysis of MDCT additional findings on cardiopulmonary status and total thrombus burden can lead to better prognostic stratification of patients and influence therapeutic options. Some controversial points such as optimal examination parameters, clinical significance of subsegmentary emboli, CT pitfalls and/or possible falsely positive diagnoses, and outcome of untreated patients in which VTE has been excluded by MDCT without additional testing, must of course be taken into careful consideration before the definite role of comprehensive MDCT VTE 'one-stop-shop' diagnosis in everyday clinical practice can be ascertained.

  6. Suspected pulmonary embolism and deep venous thrombosis: A comprehensive MDCT diagnosis in the acute clinical setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvolini, Luca; Scaglione, Mariano; Giuseppetti, Gian Marco; Giovagnoni, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    Both pulmonary arterial and peripheral venous sides of venous thromboembolism (VTE) can now be efficiently and safely investigated by multi-detector CT (MDCT) at the same time by a combined CT angiography/CT venography protocol. In the emergency setting, the use of such a single test for patients suspected of suffering from VTE on a clinical grounds may considerably shorten and simplify diagnostic algorithms. The selection of patients to be submitted to MDCT must follow well-established clinical prediction rules in order to avoid generalized referral to CT on a generic clinical suspicion basis and excessive population exposure to increased ionizing radiation dose, especially in young patients. Clinical and anatomical wide-panoramic capabilities of MDCT allow identification of underlying disease that may explain patients' symptoms in a large number of cases in which VTE is not manifest. The analysis of MDCT additional findings on cardiopulmonary status and total thrombus burden can lead to better prognostic stratification of patients and influence therapeutic options. Some controversial points such as optimal examination parameters, clinical significance of subsegmentary emboli, CT pitfalls and/or possible falsely positive diagnoses, and outcome of untreated patients in which VTE has been excluded by MDCT without additional testing, must of course be taken into careful consideration before the definite role of comprehensive MDCT VTE 'one-stop-shop' diagnosis in everyday clinical practice can be ascertained

  7. Deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Nisio, Marcello; van Es, Nick; Büller, Harry R.

    2016-01-01

    Deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, collectively referred to as venous thromboembolism, constitute a major global burden of disease. The diagnostic work-up of suspected deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism includes the sequential application of a clinical decision rule and D-dimer

  8. {sup 99m}Tc-apcitide scintigraphy in patients with clinically suspected deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunzinger, Andreas; Piswanger-Soelkner, Jutta-Claudia; Lipp, Rainer W. [Medical University of Graz, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Graz (Austria); Hafner, Franz; Brodmann, Marianne [Medical University of Graz, Divison of Angiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Graz (Austria); Schaffler, Gottfried [Medical University of Graz, Department of Radiology, Graz (Austria)

    2008-11-15

    Detection of acute deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in patients presenting with clinical symptoms suggesting DVT and pulmonary embolism (PE) with {sup 99m}Tc-apcitide, a synthetic polypeptide, binding to glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptors expressed on activated platelets is the objective of the study. Nineteen patients (11 males, eight females) received within 24h after admission to the hospital a mean of 841MBq (range 667 to 1,080) {sup 99m}Tc-apcitide i.v. followed by planar recordings 10, 60, and 120min after injection. Images were compared to the results of compression ultrasonography and/or phlebography. Patients with clinically suspected PE underwent spiral computed tomography or lung perfusion scans. {sup 99m}Tc-apcitide scintigraphy showed acute clot formation in 14 out of 16 patients where the other imaging modalities suggested DVT. Positive scintigraphic results were seen up to 17days after the onset of clinical symptoms. In three out of three patients without any proof of DVT, {sup 99m}Tc-apcitide scintigraphy was truly negative. Glycoprotein receptor imaging showed only one segmental PE in six patients with imaging-proven subsegmental (N = 3) or segmental PE (N = 3). {sup 99m}Tc-apcitide scintigraphy may be an easy and promising tool for the detection of acute clot formation in patients with DVT up to 17days after the onset of clinical symptoms with a sensitivity of 87% and a specificity of 100%. However, it failed to demonstrate PE in 83% of examined patients with proven PE. (orig.)

  9. sup(99m)Tc particle perfusion/sup(99m)Tc aerosol ventilation imaging using a subtraction technique in suspected pulmonary embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poeyhoenen, L.; Turjanmaa, V.; Virjo, A.

    1985-01-01

    It is generally acknowledged that ventilation-perfusion mismatch is diagnostic of pulmonary embolism. Lung ventilation imaging with radioactive gases is a good method for the detection of pulmonary embolism, but it is not in widespread use because of the limited availability of sup(81m)Kr gas and the poor physical properties of 133 Xe. Aerosols have been proposed, instead of gases for use in lung ventilation imaging. As perfusion and ventilation distributions may change very rapidly, the two imaging procedures should be done in rapid succession. The cheapest way to perform the combined perfusion-ventilation (Q/V) imaging is to use sup(99m)Tc-labelled macroaggregates and aerosols. In our method the perfusion imaging was done first, immediately followed by the ventilation imaging with sup(99m)Tc-labelled aerosols. A computer program was used to subtract the contribution of the perfusion from the combined Q/V image so that the pure ventilation image alone was obtained. The method was tested in 41 patients with suspected pulmonary embolism. (orig.)

  10. Comparison of the unstructured clinician gestalt, the wells score, and the revised Geneva score to estimate pretest probability for suspected pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penaloza, Andrea; Verschuren, Franck; Meyer, Guy; Quentin-Georget, Sybille; Soulie, Caroline; Thys, Frédéric; Roy, Pierre-Marie

    2013-08-01

    The assessment of clinical probability (as low, moderate, or high) with clinical decision rules has become a cornerstone of diagnostic strategy for patients with suspected pulmonary embolism, but little is known about the use of physician gestalt assessment of clinical probability. We evaluate the performance of gestalt assessment for diagnosing pulmonary embolism. We conducted a retrospective analysis of a prospective observational cohort of consecutive suspected pulmonary embolism patients in emergency departments. Accuracy of gestalt assessment was compared with the Wells score and the revised Geneva score by the area under the curve (AUC) of receiver operating characteristic curves. Agreement between the 3 methods was determined by κ test. The study population was 1,038 patients, with a pulmonary embolism prevalence of 31.3%. AUC differed significantly between the 3 methods and was 0.81 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.78 to 0.84) for gestalt assessment, 0.71 (95% CI 0.68 to 0.75) for Wells, and 0.66 (95% CI 0.63 to 0.70) for the revised Geneva score. The proportion of patients categorized as having low clinical probability was statistically higher with gestalt than with revised Geneva score (43% versus 26%; 95% CI for the difference of 17%=13% to 21%). Proportion of patients categorized as having high clinical probability was higher with gestalt than with Wells (24% versus 7%; 95% CI for the difference of 17%=14% to 20%) or revised Geneva score (24% versus 10%; 95% CI for the difference of 15%=13% to 21%). Pulmonary embolism prevalence was significantly lower with gestalt versus clinical decision rules in low clinical probability (7.6% for gestalt versus 13.0% for revised Geneva score and 12.6% for Wells score) and non-high clinical probability groups (18.3% for gestalt versus 29.3% for Wells and 27.4% for revised Geneva score) and was significantly higher with gestalt versus Wells score in high clinical probability groups (72.1% versus 58.1%). Agreement

  11. Non-ECG-gated CT pulmonary angiography and the prediction of right ventricular dysfunction in patients suspected of pulmonary embolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutte, Henrik; Mortensen, Jann; Mørk, Mette Louise

    2017-01-01

    angiography (CTPA) could predict RVD in patients suspected of PE using ECG-gated cardiac CT angiography as reference. METHODS: Consecutive patients suspected of PE were referred to a ventilation/perfusion single-photon emission tomography (V/Q-SPECT) as first-line imaging procedure. Patients had a V/Q-SPECT/CT......, a CTPA and an ECG-gated cardiac CT angiography performed the same day. RESULTS: A total of 71 patients were available for analysis. Seventeen patients (24%) had RVD. The non-ECG-gated dimensions of left and right ventricle and the major vessels were correlated with ECG-gated cardiac dimensions. The size...

  12. Trends and Variation in the Utilization and Diagnostic Yield of Chest Imaging for Medicare Patients With Suspected Pulmonary Embolism in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, Arjun K; Agha, Leila; Abaluck, Jason; Rothenberg, Craig; Kabrhel, Christopher; Raja, Ali S

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess trends and variation in chest CT utilization in the emergency department (ED) and its diagnostic yield for suspected pulmonary embolism (PE) among a national sample of Medicare beneficiaries. The relationship between hospital and provider characteristics is also discussed. We conducted an observational analysis of Medicare beneficiaries evaluated in the ED for suspected PE from 2000 to 2009. Standard Medicare analytic files representing a 20% sample of fee-for-service beneficiaries were linked to the American Hospital Association Annual Survey of Hospitals, American Medical Association Physician Masterfile, Medicare Physician Identification and Eligibility Registry, and Dartmouth Atlas Project to calculate geographic- and physician-level chest CT utilization (i.e., the proportion of ED visits involving chest CT examination for suspected PE) and diagnostic yield (i.e., the proportion of chest CT examinations with a positive PE diagnosis). Of 2.5 million ED visits, 2.5% (n = 164,274) included chest CT for suspected PE; 6.2% visits (n = 10,121) resulted in positive findings for PE. Between 2000 and 2009, chest CT utilization increased fivefold. Geographic variation in CT utilization (median, 2.38%; interquartile range [IQR], 1.91-2.92%) and diagnostic yield (median, 6.31%; IQR, 5.11-7.66%) was observed between 306 hospital referral regions. Physician use of imaging was explained by greater experience (lower utilization and higher yield) and emergency medicine board certification (lower utilization and equivalent yield). CT utilization in the ED for suspected PE has steadily risen, whereas diagnostic yields have declined over time. Wide variation in practice is observed at the physician and geographic levels and is explained by several physician and hospital characteristics. Taken together, our findings suggest a substantial inefficiency of chest CT use and substantial opportunities for improvement.

  13. Thrombolytic therapy in pulmonary embolism.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nagi, D

    2010-01-01

    Massive pulmonary embolism carries a high mortality. Potential treatment includes anticoagulation, thrombolytic therapy and embolectomy. We report a case of deep vein thrombosis leading to progressive massive pulmonary embolism despite appropriate anticoagulation, where thrombolysis with IVC filter placement resulted in a successful outcome.

  14. State-of-the-Art Imaging in Pulmonary Embolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hess, Søren; Frary, Charles; Gerke, Oke

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a common, ubiquitous, and potentially lethal disease. As symptoms and clinical findings are notoriously nonspecific, diagnostic imaging is essential to avoid undertreatment as well as overtreatment. Controversies remain regarding first-line imaging in suspected PE...

  15. Comparison of automated 4-chamber cardiac views versus axial views for measuring right ventricular enlargement in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittenberg, R.; Vliet, J.W. van; Ghaye, B.; Peters, J.F.; Schaefer-Prokop, C.M.; Coche, E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Compare the right ventricle to left ventricle (RV/LV) diameter ratio obtained from axial pulmonary CT angiograms (CTPA) with those derived from automatically generated 4-chamber (4-CH) reformats in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism (PE). Methods: In this institutional review board-approved study we included 120 consecutive non ECG-gated CTPA from 3 institutions (mean age 60 ± 16 years; 71 women). Twenty 64-slice CTPA with PE and 20 without PE were selected per institution. For each patient the RV/LV diameter ratio was obtained from both axial CTPA images and automatically generated 4-CH reformats. Measurements were performed twice in two separated sessions by 2 experienced radiologists and 2 residents. The differences between the measurements on both views were evaluated. Results: The 4-CH view was successfully obtained in 113 patients. The mean axial and 4-CH diameter ratios were comparable for three of the four readers (p = 0.56, p = 0.13, p = 0.08). Although the mean diameters (1.0 and 1.03 respectively) for one resident were significantly different (p = 0.013), the difference of 0.03 seems negligible in clinical routine. Three readers achieved equally high intra-reader agreements with both measurements (ICCs of 0.94, 0.95 and 0.96), while one reader showed a different variability with ICCs of 0.96 for the axial view and 0.91 for the 4-CH view. The inter-reader agreement was equally high for both measurement types with ICCs of 0.95 and 0.94, respectively. Conclusion: In patients with suspected PE, RV/LV diameters ratio can be measured with the same reproducibility and accuracy using an automatically generated 4-CH view compared to the axial view.

  16. Use of a clinical decision rule in combination with D-dimer concentration in diagnostic workup of patients with suspected pulmonary embolism - A prospective management study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruip, Marieke J. H. A.; Slob, Marjan J.; Schijen, Joost H. E. M.; van der Heul, Cees; Büller, Harry R.

    2002-01-01

    Background: We designed a diagnostic strategy, based on clinical probability and D-dimer concentration, to select patients who were unlikely to have pulmonary embolism (PE), before further diagnostic workup was performed. The utility and safety of this strategy were evaluated in a prospective

  17. Multidetector computed tomography pulmonary angiography in childhood acute pulmonary embolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Chun Xiang; Zhang, Long Jiang; Lu, Guang Ming [Medical School of Nanjing University, Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Schoepf, U.J. [Medical School of Nanjing University, Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Pediatrics, Charleston, SC (United States); Chowdhury, Shahryar M. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Pediatrics, Charleston, SC (United States); Fox, Mary A. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Pulmonary embolism is a life-threatening condition affecting people of all ages. Multidetector row CT pulmonary angiography has improved the imaging of pulmonary embolism in both adults and children and is now regarded as the routine modality for detection of pulmonary embolism. Advanced CT pulmonary angiography techniques developed in recent years, such as dual-energy CT, have been applied as a one-stop modality for pulmonary embolism diagnosis in children, as they can simultaneously provide anatomical and functional information. We discuss CT pulmonary angiography techniques, common and uncommon findings of pulmonary embolism in both conventional and dual-energy CT pulmonary angiography, and radiation dose considerations. (orig.)

  18. Comparison of Tc-99m DTPA aerosol with radioactive gas ventilation imaging in patients (pts) with suspected pulmonary embolism (PE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alderson, P.O.; Kroop, S.A.; Biello, D.R.; Siegel, B.A.; Gottschalk, A.; Hoffer, P.B.; Ramanna, L.; Waxman, A.D.

    1984-01-01

    The utility of Tc-99m labeled DTPA aerosol (A) as a ventilation agent was compared to that of Xe-133 (Xe) or Kr-81m (Kr) gases in a series of 100 pts (age range 20-83, 53% women) undergoing ventilation-perfusion (V-P) imaging for suspected PE. The majority of pts had A and Xe studies in conjunction with P scans; 26 had A and Kr studies. All A studies were comprised of multiple 100K ct views performed prior to P scanning. Conventional Xe or Kr studies were then performed in conjunction with a multiview P scan. The studies were later reviewed by four independent readers who evaluated 100 V-P studies (100 A-P pairs, 100 gas-P pairs) and the accompanying chest radiographs and determined the probability of PE as none, low, high, or nondiagnostic (NDX). The A scans showed central hot spots in 27% of pts, but poor peripheral penetration in only 5%. Prominent lower lobe deposition was seen in 19 of the 66 pts who inhaled A upright, but in none who inhaled in the supine position. The A-P and gas-P scans were either both diagnostic or both NDX 82% of the time. There were 77% agreement between probability categories for A-P and Kr-P studies, and 74% agreement with Xe-P. These results were better than the inter-observer agreement for gas-P studies alone. Angiography revealed that 3 A-P studies were true negatives, 3 were true positives (pos), and one was a false pos (also pos by gas-P). The results suggest that commercially available DTPA aerosols provide comparable results to gas-P studies in pts with suspected PE

  19. Assessment of pulmonary ventilation scans using xenon-127 in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, I.F.; Sleight, P.J.; Gaunt, J.I.; Croft, D.N.

    1984-03-01

    Pulmonary ventilation scans using /sup 127/Xe were compared with scans using /sup 133/Xe in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. A perfusion scan using sup(99m)Tc-microspheres and ventilation scans with each of the xenon isotopes were performed on 44 patients referred for lung scanning to confirm or exclude a suspected clinical diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. No significant difference was found in the frequency of diagnosis of pulmonary embolism when comparing each of the ventilation scans with the corresponding perfusion scan. For reasons discussed, /sup 127/Xe may be more useful than /sup 133/Xe for pulmonary ventilation scanning.

  20. CTPA for the diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism during pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia; Prokop, Mathias

    2008-01-01

    CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) has been suggested by the Fleischner society as the first test following a negative leg ultrasound in pregnant patients with suspected pulmonary embolism. This editorial discusses the use of CTPA as a diagnostic tool in pregnant women and comments on the need for

  1. Pulmonary embolism and nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peltier, P.; Planchon, B.; Faucal, P. de; Touze, M.D.; Dupas, B.

    1988-01-01

    Risks related to pulmonary embolism require use of diagnostic procedures with good sensitivity, and the potential complications of effective anticoagulant therapy require procedures with good specificity. Clinical signs are not more accurate for diagnosis of pulmonary than are ECG, blood gas and chest X ray examinations. Perfusion-ventilation scintigraphy has good diagnostic accuracy approaching that of pulmonary angiography which remains the gold standard. Since pulmonary embolism is usually a complication of deep venous thrombosis, distal clot detection should be associated with lung explorations. Plethysmography, ultrasonography, doppler studies and scintigraphy of the lower limbs could provide data supplementing those of contrast venography. The value and role of these examinations are analyzed and discussed in terms of different clinical situations.

  2. Pulmonary thrombo-embolic disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    plasminogen abnormalities, have been found to have an increased incidence of venous thrombo-embolic episodes. Pregnancy, a hypercoagulable state with ... Diagnostic tests. 1. e ECG shows sinus tachycardia, features of pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular strain such as P-pulmonale,. S1Q3T3 pattern, right ...

  3. Deep venous thrombosis with suspected pulmonary embolism: simultaneous evaluation using combined CT venography and pulmonary CT angiography; Trombose venosa profunda e suspeita de tromboembolismo pulmonar: avaliacao simultanea por meio de angiotomografia pulmonar e venotomografia combinadas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Laura de Moraes [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: lauramgomes@terra.com.br; Marchiori, Edson [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Rodrigues, Rosana Souza [Hospital Copa D' Or, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2006-01-15

    Objective: To evaluate the occurrence and the correlation between pulmonary embolism (PE) and deep venous thrombosis (DVT) using a single CT angiography protocol. Materials and methods: This was a prospective study performed at Hospital Copa D'Or, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil from July 2003 to June 2004. We analyzed 116 CT angiography examinations of patients with clinical suspicion of PE. After an interval of approximately three minutes, venous phase images from the diaphragm to the knees were acquired without additional contrast injection in order to determine the presence of DVT. Results: From the 116 patients studied, 23 (19.8%) had PE, 24 (20.7%) had DVT, 15 (12.9%) had both PE and DVT and 9 (7.8%) had DVT alone. Among the 23 cases of PE, 15 (65.2%) had concomitant DVT whereas 8 (34.8%) had only PE. Among the 24 cases of DVT, 15 (62.5%) had associated PE and 9 (37.5%) had DVT alone. Conclusion: The results showed a strong relationship between PE and DVT, as well as the importance of investigating DVT in cases with suspected PE and the benefits of performing indirect CT venography after pulmonary CT angiography as a single examination alternative method for simultaneous investigation of PE and DVT. (author)

  4. METABOLIC DISORDERS AND PULMONARY EMBOLISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Ya. Vasiltseva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study. To examine the contribution of diabetes and obesity in the development of pulmonary embolism on the based data of the Register of new hospital of pulmonary embolism (PE in hospitals inTomsk(2003–2012. Material and Methods. The medical history and records of autopsies of patients treated in hospitals in the city ofTomsk, 2003–2012, and anatomopathological and/or instrumental examination revealed pulmonary embolism have been subjected to studies. We used the classification of diabetes mellitus proposed by the WHO in1999 inour work, because the register including data (2003–2012. The degree of obesity was assessed according to WHO classification (1997. Statistical analysis of the results was carried out with the help of software for computer Statistica for Windows, version 8.0. The Shapiro–Wilk and Kolmogorov–Smirnov tests was used to determine the nature of the distribution of the data. The ho mogeneity of the population variance was assessed using Fisher's exact test andLeuventest. The Mann– Whitney test was used when comparing two independent samples to determine the significance of differences. The analysis was conducted by means of qualitative characteristics contingency tables using Pearson χ 2 . The odds ratio was calculated to assess the association between a specific outcome and the risk. Data are presented as M ± SD factor. The significance level of p for all procedures used by the statistical analysis was taken to be 0.05. It was considered statistically significant level of p < 0.05. The results of the study. In intermediate urbanized city ofWestern Siberia,Tomsk, established register of hospital pulmonary embolism (2003–2012. The register included 751patients whose in vivo and / or postmortem revealed pulmonary embolism (PE. The data histories and autopsy reports was analyze. The type 2diabetes was diagnosed in 205 patients. The type 2 diabetes moderate had 29%. Diabetes severe suffer 82

  5. Diagnostic accuracy of triage tests to exclude pulmonary embolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mac Gillavry, M. R.; Lijmer, J. G.; Sanson, B. J.; Büller, H. R.; Brandjes, D. P.

    2001-01-01

    We performed a study in 403 prospectively included patients with suspected pulmonary embolism to compare the accuracy of a combination of the SimpliRED D-dimer assay and an intuitive clinical probability estimate with either one alone. Based on a conjoint diagnostic refer, ence standard, including

  6. The value of lung scintigraphy in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beek, E. J.; Tiel-van Buul, M. M.; Büller, H. R.; van Royen, E. A.; ten Cate, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    The role of lung scintigraphy in the diagnostic management of patients with clinically suspected pulmonary embolism is reviewed. Evidence is provided that a normal perfusion scan excludes clinically relevant pulmonary embolism, and that a high probability lung scan, defined as a segmental perfusion

  7. Pulmonary embolism: spiral CT evaluation; Embolie pulmonaire: apport de la tomodensitometrie helicoidale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senac, J.P.; Vernhet, H.; Bousquet, C.; Giron, J.; Pieuchot, P.; Durand, G.; Benezet, O.; Aubas, P. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 34 - Montpellier (France)

    1995-06-01

    Purpose: Spiral computed tomography was compared retrospectively with digital substraction pulmonary angiography (PA) in 45 patients suspected of having acute or chronic pulmonary embolism. Materials and method : 45 patients in whom the presence of acute or chronic pulmonary embolism was suspected underwent examination by spiral CT and PA. Diagnosis of pulmonary embolism was based on the direct visualization of intraluminal clots. The study of the agreement between the two methods was based on the Kappa test. In 35 cases, pulmonary emboli were proved. Acute pulmonary emboli were present in 28 cases and chronic in 7 cases. Results: Spiral computed tomography represents an excellent way to detect acute pulmonary embolism. In the chronic form, spiral CT is better than PA to detect intraluminal clots. However, Spiral CT can fail to detect small emboli in the peripheral arterial bed. In the 10 patients without pulmonary embolism, the spiral CT proved diagnosis pulmonary oedema (n=3), lymphangi-carcinoma (n=4), pleural effusion (n=3). Conclusion: This study suggest that the spiral CT examination is accurate for diagnosis of pulmonary embolism specifically in case of suspected important embolism. The advantages of spiral CT are multiple (non invasive, wide diagnosis spectrum). However, may be a limitation to is use is insufficient distal thrombi detection. This eventuality (5 to 10% in the Pioped study) justify the practice of pulmonary angiography. Spiral CT improvements should reduce this insufficiency in the next future. (Authors). 16 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. The clinical presentation of pulmonary embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otto, A.C.; Dunn, M.; Van der Merwe, B.; Katz, M.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Pulmonary embolism is often misdiagnosed by many clinicians because of confusion with pulmonary infarction. According to present literature, the latter seldomly occurs, thus pleuritic pain and hemoptysis are usually absent. The purpose of our study was to re-evaluate the clinical presentation of pulmonary embolism with specific reference to the presence of pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary infarction. Materials and methods: Ethical committee approval was obtained to study fifteen patients with abnormal lung perfusion and high probability for pulmonary embolism retrospectively. Clinical data will be presented in table format. Appropriate symptoms and signs not mentioned was considered absent. Specific investigations not available was considered not done. Results: Will be displayed in table format. The main findings can be summarized as follows: 1. Dyspnea was present in all the patients; 2. Pleuritic pain and hemoptysis was absent in all the patients; 3. None of the patients had clinical signs of pulmonary hypertension or infarction; 4. The available special investigations confirmed the above mentioned findings. Conclusion: The absence of pulmonary infarction and pulmonary hypertension with submassive pulmonary embolism (<60% of pulmonary vascular bed occluded) was reconfirmed and should be emphasized more in clinical practice. (author)

  9. Dermatomyositis masquerading as pulmonary embolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mroz RM

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A 61-year-old Caucasian was admitted to Department of Chest Diseases and Tuberculosis, Medical University of Bialystok, Poland for progressive muscle weakness and weight loss. Eighteen months prior to admission, the patient had been diagnosed with pulmonary embolism. At that point he was started on Enoxaparin QD. Past medical history was unremarkable. In the interim, the patient developed fever, myalgia and progressive dyspnea. Physical examination on admission revealed a rash on his upper torso and back, and the extensor surfaces of all four extremities. Laboratory values included CPK 8229, MB fraction 219, LDH 981. Chest X-ray and CT scan revealed bilateral patchy consolidations and ground-glass opacities. EMG was consistent with myositis. The patient was started on solumedrol 40 mg i.v., b.i.d., and then switched to prednisone 40 mg b.i.d. His symptoms and muscle strength improved remarkably. The patient was discharged with prednisone with an outpatient follow up.

  10. Pulmonary Embolism with Vertebral Augmentation Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swetha Bopparaju

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available With the prevalence of an aging American population on the rise, osteoporotic vertebral fractures are becoming a common occurrence, resulting in an increase in vertebral augmentation procedures and associated complications such as cement leakage, vertebral compressions, and pulmonary embolism. We describe a patient who presented with respiratory distress three years following kyphoplasty of the lumbar vertebra. Computed tomography (CT angiogram of the chest confirmed the presence of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA cement in the lung fields and pulmonary vessels. We conducted a systematic review of the published literature identifying effective management strategies for the treatment of vertebroplasty-associated pulmonary embolism.

  11. A diagnostic strategy for pulmonary embolism based on standardised pretest probability and perfusion lung scanning: a management study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miniati, Massimo; Monti, Simonetta; Bauleo, Carolina; Scoscia, Elvio; Tonelli, Lucia; Dainelli, Alba; Catapano, Giosue; Formichi, Bruno; Di Ricco, Giorgio; Prediletto, Renato; Carrozzi, Laura; Marini, Carlo

    2003-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism remains a challenging diagnostic problem. We developed a simple diagnostic strategy based on combination of assessment of the pretest probability with perfusion lung scan results to reduce the need for pulmonary angiography. We studied 390 consecutive patients (78% in-patients) with suspected pulmonary embolism. The pretest probability was rated low ( 10%, ≤50%), moderately high (>50%, ≤90%) or high (>90%) according to a structured clinical model. Perfusion lung scans were independently assigned to one of four categories: normal; near-normal; abnormal, suggestive of pulmonary embolism (wedge-shaped perfusion defects); abnormal, not suggestive of pulmonary embolism (perfusion defects other than wedge shaped). Pulmonary embolism was diagnosed in patients with abnormal scans suggestive of pulmonary embolism and moderately high or high pretest probability. Patients with normal or near-normal scans and those with abnormal scans not suggestive of pulmonary embolism and low pretest probability were deemed not to have pulmonary embolism. All other patients were allocated to pulmonary angiography. Patients in whom pulmonary embolism was excluded were left untreated. All patients were followed up for 1 year. Pulmonary embolism was diagnosed non-invasively in 132 patients (34%), and excluded in 191 (49%). Pulmonary angiography was required in 67 patients (17%). The prevalence of pulmonary embolism was 41% (n=160). Patients in whom pulmonary embolism was excluded had a thrombo-embolic risk of 0.4% (95% confidence interval: 0.0%-2.8%). Our strategy permitted a non-invasive diagnosis or exclusion of pulmonary embolism in 83% of the cases (95% confidence interval: 79%-86%), and appeared to be safe. (orig.)

  12. Arteriovenous Fistula Embolization in Suspected Parauterine Choriocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husain Alturkistani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a case of choriocarcinoma that did not regress after chemotherapy treatment. A 30-year-old female patient (gravida 2, para 2, presented to our ER with stroke and persistent mild pelvic pain 2 months after a Caesarean section. Computed tomography (CT revealed an ischemic left hemicerebellar region and a hypervascular mass in the pelvic region. This mass was not present on routine fetal ultrasound during pregnancy. The lesion was treated by chemotherapy after closure of a foramen ovale and insertion of an inferior vena cava (IVC filter. After that, 2 courses of EMACO (Etoposide, Methotrexate, Actinomycin D, Cyclophosphamide, and Vincristine chemotherapy regimen were given. Posttreatment CT showed the hypervascular mass without any changes. Arteriography showed the arteriovenous fistulae that were embolized successfully with plugs, coils, and glue. Embolization was considered due to the risk of acute hemorrhagic life-threatening complications. Eight chemotherapy courses were added after embolization. Treatment by endovascular approach and reduction of the hypervascular mass can be a valuable adjunct to chemotherapy treatment of choriocarcinoma.

  13. Multislice CT imaging of pulmonary embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoepf, J.U.; Kessler, M.A.; Rieger, C.T.; Herzog, P.; Wiesgigl, S.; Becker, C.R.; Exarhos, D.N.; Reiser, M.F.

    2001-01-01

    In recent years CT has been established as the method of choice for the diagnosis of central pulmonary embolism (PE) to the level of the segmental arteries. The key advantage of CT over competing modalities is the reliable detection of relevant alternative or additional disease causing the patient's symptoms. Although the clinical relevance of isolated peripheral emboli remains unclear, the alleged poor sensitivity of CT for the detection of such small clots has to date prevented the acceptance of CT as the gold standard for diagnosing PE. With the advent of multislice CT we can now cover the entire chest of a patient with 1-mm slices within one breath-hold. In comparison with thicker sections, the detection rate of subsegmental emboli can be significantly increased with 1-mm slices. In addition, the interobserver correlation which can be achieved with 1-mm sections by far exceeds the reproducibility of competing modalities. Meanwhile use of multislice CT for a combined diagnosis of PE and deep venous thrombosis with the same modality appears to be clinically accepted. In the vast majority of patients who receive a combined thoracic and venous multislice CT examination the scan either confirms the suspected diagnosis or reveals relevant alternative or additional disease. The therapeutic regimen is usually chosen based on the functional effect of embolic vascular occlusion. With the advent of fast CT scanning techniques, also functional parameters of lung perfusion can be non-invasively assessed by CT imaging. These advantages let multislice CT appear as an attractive modality for a non-invasive, fast, accurate, and comprehensive diagnosis of PE, its causes, effects, and differential diagnoses. (orig.)

  14. Pulmonary embolism presenting with ST segment elevation in inferior leads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzaffer Kahyaoğlu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute pulmonary embolism is a form of venous thromboembolism that is widespread and sometimes mortal. The clinical presentation of pulmonary embolism is variable and often nonspecific making the diagnosis challenging. In this report, we present a case of pulmonary embolism characterized by ST segment elevation in inferior leads without reciprocal changes in the electrocardiogram.

  15. Lung scintigraphy and helical computed tomography for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism : A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beek, EJR; Brouwers, Elise M J; Song, B; Bongaerts, AHH; Oudkerk, M

    To assess the diagnostic value of lung scintigraphy and helical computed tomography (hCT) in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism (PE), all English-language articles that described lung scintigraphy and hCT in patients with suspected PE were retrieved. Articles were assessed for strength of

  16. Mucous plug syndrome. A pulmonary embolism mimic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bray, S.T.; Johnstone, W.H.; Dee, P.M.; Pope, T.L. Jr.; Teates, C.D.; Tegtmeyer, C.J.

    1984-01-01

    Reported are ten instances of major bronchial obstruction by mucous plugs in eight patients during which the clinical features resembled pulmonary embolism. Perfusion lung studies showed significantly diminished perfusion of the involved portions of the lungs. The chest radiographs generally did not, however, reflect the severity of the airway obstruction and in some instances were completely normal. The ventilation studies indicated the extent and severity of the obstruction and matched with the perfusion scans. Pulmonary arteriograms were performed in three patients and gave direct evidence of focally diminished lung perfusion without embolism. The physiologic mechanisms underlying the condition are discussed

  17. Microscopic Pulmonary Tumour Embolism: An Unusual Presentation of Thymic Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brita L Sperling

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The present report describes the first reported case of microscopic pulmonary tumour embolism (MPTE from thymic carcinoma. The carcinoma was discovered during an autopsy in a 55-year-old man who had undergone surgery for a pilonidal sinus two weeks before presentation. Pulmonary thromboembolism was suspected. This case was unusual because MPTE has never before been associated with thymic carcinoma, MPTE was the first clinical indication of an occult malignancy, and the clinical presentation was that of sudden onset of dyspnea associated with acute cor pulmonale. The cause of death was determined to be hypoxia secondary to extrinsic compression of the right pulmonary artery and extensive tumour emboli in the small arteries, arterioles and venules of the pulmonary parenchyma. A review of the clinical presentation and diagnosis of MPTE is included.

  18. Coagulopathy in patients with acute pulmonary embolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehnert, Per; Johansson, Pär I; Ostrowski, Sisse R

    2017-01-01

    Whole blood coagulation and markers of endothelial damage were studied in patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE), and evaluated in relation to PE severity. Twenty-five patients were enrolled prospectively each having viscoelastical analysis of whole blood done using thrombelastography (TEG...

  19. A temible complication of ischemic stroke: pulmonary embolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Iurato

    2015-12-01

    Pulmonary embolism is a major contributor to in-hospital death after stroke. Although the rate of clinically overt pulmonary embolism after stroke has been estimated to be less than 1%, pulmonary emboli account for up to 50% of early deaths after stroke. In daily practice, the clinical burden of pulmonary embolism in patient with stroke is, however, underestimated since the clinical symptoms of stroke may obscure the recognition of this complication. The aim of this article is to describe the clinical and therapeutic aspects of pulmonary embolism as complication after stroke.

  20. Update on diagnostic strategies of pulmonary embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kauczor, H.U.; Heussel, C.P.; Thelen, M.

    1999-01-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism is a frequent disease with non-specific findings, high mortality, and multiple therapeutic options. A definitive diagnosis must be established by accurate, non-invasive, easily performed, cost-effective, and widely available imaging modalities. Conventional diagnostic strategies have relied on ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy complemented by venous imaging. If the results are inconclusive, pulmonary angiography, which is regarded as the gold standard, is to be performed. Recently, marked improvements in CT and MRI and shortcomings of scintigraphy led to an update of the diagnostic strategy. Spiral CT is successfully employed as a second-line procedure to clarify indeterminate scintigraphic results avoiding pulmonary angiography. It can also be used as a first-line screening tool if service and expertise is provided. Venous imaging is indicated if CT is inconclusive. The MRI technique can be applied as an alternative second-line test if spiral CT is not available or is contraindicated. It has the greatest potential for further developments and refinements. Echocardiography should be used as a first-line bedside examination in critical patients. If inconclusive stabilized patients undergo spiral CT, unstable patients should be referred for pulmonary angiography. Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension is a rare sequela of acute pulmonary embolism which can be cured surgically. Morphology, complications, and differential diagnoses are better illustrated by spiral CT and MRA, whereas invasive acquisition of hemodynamic data is the sole advantage of angiography. (orig.)

  1. Assessing the clinical probability of pulmonary embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miniati, M.; Pistolesi, M.

    2001-01-01

    Clinical assessment is a cornerstone of the recently validated diagnostic strategies for pulmonary embolism (PE). Although the diagnostic yield of individual symptoms, signs, and common laboratory tests is limited, the combination of these variables, either by empirical assessment or by a prediction rule, can be used to express a clinical probability of PE. The latter may serve as pretest probability to predict the probability of PE after further objective testing (posterior or post-test probability). Over the last few years, attempts have been made to develop structured prediction models for PE. In a Canadian multicenter prospective study, the clinical probability of PE was rated as low, intermediate, or high according to a model which included assessment of presenting symptoms and signs, risk factors, and presence or absence of an alternative diagnosis at least as likely as PE. Recently, a simple clinical score was developed to stratify outpatients with suspected PE into groups with low, intermediate, or high clinical probability. Logistic regression was used to predict parameters associated with PE. A score ≤ 4 identified patients with low probability of whom 10% had PE. The prevalence of PE in patients with intermediate (score 5-8) and high probability (score ≥ 9) was 38 and 81%, respectively. As opposed to the Canadian model, this clinical score is standardized. The predictor variables identified in the model, however, were derived from a database of emergency ward patients. This model may, therefore, not be valid in assessing the clinical probability of PE in inpatients. In the PISA-PED study, a clinical diagnostic algorithm was developed which rests on the identification of three relevant clinical symptoms and on their association with electrocardiographic and/or radiographic abnormalities specific for PE. Among patients who, according to the model, had been rated as having a high clinical probability, the prevalence of proven PE was 97%, while it was 3

  2. A comparative analysis of pulmonary ventilation-perfusion imaging with pulmonary angiography in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jincheng; Mi Hongzhi; Wang Qian; Zhang Weijun; Lu Biao; Yang Hao; Ding Jian; Lu Yao

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To assess the value of ventilation-perfusion imaging in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE). Methods: Thirty consecutive patients with clinically suspected pulmonary embolism were studied, male: female 15:15, mean age was (36.2 +- 13.9) years. The chest radiograms were obtained in all 30 patients. All patients underwent radionuclide ventilation-perfusion imaging and pulmonary angiography. Results: Of the 30 patients, 22 with lobe, multiple segment or multi-subsegment perfusion defects and normal or nearly normal ventilation images were reported as PE. 20 of them were confirmed to be with PE by pulmonary angiography, 2 patients were not confirmed. Eight of 30 patients with multiple perfusion defects, ventilative abnormalities were reported as non-PE and the diagnoses were confirmed by pulmonary angiography. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of diagnosis of PE by ventilation-perfusion imaging was 100%, 80.0% and 93.3% respectively. Conclusions: (1) Ventilation-perfusion imaging is one of the most valuable methods in the diagnosis of PE. (2) The results suggest that pulmonary embolism can be diagnosed non-invasively in most patients on the basis of clinical manifestation, chest radiograms and ventilation-perfusion imaging findings. (3) Pulmonary angiography is required while clinical manifestation and ventilation-perfusion imaging findings are discordant with each other

  3. [Massive pulmonary embolism. When medical treatment is not enough].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerardin, B; Glorion, M; Rodriguez, A; Garcia, C; Stephan, F; Fabre, D; Mercier, O; Brenot, P; Fadel, E

    2017-12-01

    Emergency bedside veno-arterious ECMO implantation can be the only saving gesture in the suspicion of acute massive pulmonary embolism leading to haemodynamic failure, even before CT-scan imaging. Once the massive pulmonary embolism is confirmed it is possible to undergo surgical or percutaneous pulmonary thrombectomy, when thrombolytic therapy is contraindicated. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  4. Pulmonary embolism: sifting the risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, K G; Roush, M B

    1998-12-01

    A 20-year-old female college cross-country runner developed chest pain and dyspnea that increased with running. A chest radiograph revealed a right-side pleural effusion, and a ventilation-perfusion scan indicated a probable pulmonary embolism. The diagnosis was left-side pulmonary emboli. Testing for genetic risk factors was negative, leaving oral contraceptive use as the likely cause of the condition. The patient was treated with anticoagulant drugs and discontinuation of oral contraceptives, and was allowed to resume running gradually. Discussion covers genetic and other risk factors, anticoagulation therapy, and return to play.

  5. Pulmonary Embolism as the Initial Presentation of Testicular Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Berber, Ilhami; Bentli, Recep; Erkurt, Mehmet Ali; Ulutas, Ozkan; Ediz, Caner; Nizam, Ilknur; Kırıcı Berber, Nurcan; Unlu, Serkan; Koroglu, Reyhan; Koroglu, Mustafa; Akpolat, Nusret

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The risk of pulmonary embolism is well recognized as showing an increase in oncological patients. We report a case presenting with pulmonary embolism initially, which was then diagnosed with testicular cancer. Clinical Presentation and Intervention. A 25-year-old man was admitted to the emergency department with a complaint of dyspnoea. Thoracic tomography, lung ventilation/perfusion scintigraphy, and an increased D-dimer level revealed pulmonary embolism. For the aetiology of pulm...

  6. Radionuclide venography of the lower limbs in pulmonary embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Ricco, G.; Formichi, B.; Marini, C.; Rindi, M.; Solfanelli, S.; Giuntini, C.

    1986-01-01

    In 62 unselected patients affected by pulmonary embolism, radionuclide venography of the lower limbs was performed in order to detect the source of the emboli. Vascular obstruction were found in the deep veins in 13 cases, in the superficial veins in another 13, while in 3 patients both veneous systems were affected. These results suggest that a relationship between superficial vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism exists. Radionuclide venography allowed us to detect venous obstruction in 6 out of 15 patients with pulmonary embolism but without both anamnesic and clinical evidence of venous thrombosis; hence, this technique may be useful in all cases of pulmonary embolism of unknown origin

  7. Retrograde pulmonary embolectomy in massive pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrabi, Khalil; Yarmohammadi, Hooman; Ostovan, Mohammad Ali

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of this study was introduction and evaluation of efficacy and safety of retrograde thromboembolectomy in acute massive pulmonary emboli. The method is described in a 56-year-old woman with acute massive pulmonary thromboemboli. Postoperative course was uneventful. The described surgical technique is not a panacea and definitely not the whole answer, but is a big part of the solution and may be accompanied with less adverse effects. Additionally, there is a need of being reviewed further in large experimental studies and measurements before it could be used safely as a new technique.

  8. Pulmonary embolism and cor pulmonale in a cat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sottiaux, J.; Franck, M.

    1999-01-01

    A 14-year-old male neutered cat experienced pulmonary embolism 15 days following surgical debridement of a recurrent dorsolumbar abscess. Clinical signs were dominated by respiratory distress. Pulmonary embolism was suggested from the lateral thoracic radiograph by the presence of an abruptly attenuated lobar artery and a contiguous oligaemic area in the caudal lung lobe. Pulmonary hypertension was demonstrated on Doppler echocardiography by right pulmonary artery dilation and tricuspid regurgitation raising the pulmonary arterial pressure to 56 mmHg. Chronic pulmonary hypertension, assumed from right ventricular wall hypertrophy, and hypokinesia, indicating chronic cor pulmonale, was suggestive of chronic rather than acute pulmonary embolism. Postmortem histological evidence of pulmonary arteriolar occlusion confirmed the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism

  9. Multidetector-row computed tomography management of acute pulmonary embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasui, Takahiro; Tanabe, Nobuhiro; Terada, Jiro

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness and safety of multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) pulmonary angiography and indirect venography management of acute pulmonary embolism (PE), including indication for inferior vena cava (IVC) filter. Seventy-one consecutive patients who were clinically suspected of PE and underwent 16-slice MDCT pulmonary angiography and indirect venography were enrolled. Management included indication of IVC filter for patients with extensive deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in submassive or massive PE. A right ventricular to left ventricular short-axis diameter by MDCT >1.0 was judged as submassive PE. All patients were followed for 1 year. MDCT identified 50 patients with venous thromboembolism and 47 patients had acute PE: 4 were judged as massive, 14 as submassive, and 29 as non-massive by MDCT; 3 patients had DVT alone and 7 patients had caval or iliac DVT. Only 1 patient with massive PE and DVT near the right atrium died of recurrence. No other patients died of PE. Management based on MDCT pulmonary angiography combined with indirect venography is considered to be safe and reliable in patients with suspected acute PE. (author)

  10. CTPA for the diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism during pregnancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer-Prokop, C. [Dept. of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Prokop, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Utrecht Medical Center (Netherlands)

    2008-12-15

    CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) has been suggested by the Fleischner society as the first test following a negative leg ultrasound in pregnant patients with suspected pulmonary embolism. This editorial discusses the use of CTPA as a diagnostic tool in pregnant women and comments on the need for specifically adapting CT protocols during pregnancy in the light of new research describing a substantial number of non-diagnostic examinations in pregnant women if routine scanning protocols are used for CTA of the pulmonary arteries. Potential reasons for these high numbers of insufficient examinations are physiological changes occurring during pregnancy that lead to a hyperdynamic circulation, which reduces average enhancement of the pulmonary vasculature. In addition, there are possible breathing-related effects that include an increased risk for Valsalva manoeuvre with devastating effects for pulmonary vascular enhancement. Techniques to overcome these problems are discussed: bolus triggering with short start delays, high flow rates or high contrast medium concentration, preferential use of fast CT systems and the use of low kVp CT techniques. CT data acquisition during deep inspiration should be avoided and shallow respiration may be considered as an alternative to suspended breathing in this patient group. All these factors can contribute to optimization of the quality of pulmonary CTA in pregnant patients. It is time now to adapt our protocols and provide optimum care for this sensitive patient group.

  11. SPECT/CT and pulmonary embolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Jann; Borgwardt, Henrik Gutte

    2014-01-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is diagnosed either by ventilation/perfusion (V/P) scintigraphy or pulmonary CT angiography (CTPA). In recent years both techniques have improved. Many nuclear medicine centres have adopted the single photon emission CT (SPECT) technique as opposed to the planar...... technique for diagnosing PE. SPECT has been shown to have fewer indeterminate results and a higher diagnostic value. The latest improvement is the combination of a low-dose CT scan with a V/P SPECT scan in a hybrid tomograph. In a study comparing CTPA, planar scintigraphy and SPECT alone, SPECT/CT had...... the best diagnostic accuracy for PE. In addition, recent developments in the CTPA technique have made it possible to image the pulmonary arteries of the lungs in one breath-hold. This development is based on the change from a single-detector to multidetector CT technology with an increase in volume...

  12. The use of a rapid D-dimer blood test in the diagnostic work-up for pulmonary embolism: a management study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, M. R.; van Marwijk Kooy, M.; Pouwels, J. G.; Engelage, A. H.; Kuipers, B. F.; Büller, H. R.

    1999-01-01

    D-dimer assays have a potential to rule out pulmonary embolism in case of a normal test result. We studied the clinical utility of incorporating the SimpliRED D-dimer test result and clinical probability in the routine diagnostic work-up of patients with suspected acute pulmonary embolism. In a

  13. Imaging for Pulmonary Embolism in Sickle Cell Disease: a 17-Year Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tivnan, Patrick; Billett, Henny H; Freeman, Leonard M; Haramati, Linda B

    2018-02-01

    Sickle cell disease, a complex disorder with known pulmonary complications, has the potential to confound the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. We hypothesized that when the choice of imaging is guided by chest radiographic results, CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) and Ventilation-Perfusion (V/Q) scintigraphy have comparable diagnostic performance in sickle cell disease. Methods: A retrospective cohort of adults with sickle cell disease who were imaged for suspected pulmonary embolism with either CTPA or V/Q, from 2000-2016, at our institution, was established. To reduce radiation exposure, our practice recommends V/Q for stable patients with normal chest radiographs. Results of index pulmonary embolism imaging, 90-day follow-up, and results of chest radiography were recorded. Results: 245 adults with sickle cell disease comprised the cohort. Mean age of 33±10.5 years and 58% (141) were men. Index imaging was V/Q in 62.9% (154) and CTPA in 37.1% (91). Chest radiographs, performed in 96.3% (236), were normal in 72.8% (172). Imaging results for pulmonary embolism were negative in 88.2% (216), positive in 4.1% (10) and indeterminate in 7.8% (19) with no difference between V /Q and CTPA ( P = 0.63). Reimaging within 90-days occurred in 9.8% (24), 14.7% (20/136) after initial V/Q and 5% (4/109) after initial CTPA, P = 0.08. Reimaging revealed a pulmonary embolism diagnosis after negative/indeterminate results in 0.7% (1/149) of V/Qs and 1.2% of (1/86) CTPAs, ( P = 0.69). Over the 17-year study period 47% (114/245) underwent repeat imaging and 11% (27/245) were diagnosed with pulmonary embolism at least once. Conclusion: In sickle cell disease patients with suspected pulmonary embolism, positive imaging rates were low for any given clinical presentation, but 11% of the cohort was diagnosed with pulmonary embolism over the 17-year study period. CTPA and V/Q performed comparably for pulmonary embolism diagnosis when the choice of imaging was guided by results of chest

  14. Sudden death due to pulmonary embolism in north Tunisia: 37 cases study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimi, Maha; Allouche, Mohamed; Ben Ahmed, Habib; Zoghlemi, Bilel; Gloulou, Fatma; Ben Khelil, Mahdi; Banasr, Ahmed; Zhioua, Mongi; Benzarti, Anis; Hamdoun, Moncef; Baccar, Hédi

    2014-10-01

    To determine frequency of pulmonary embolism as the cause of sudden death and to study clinical, epidemiological characteristics and risk factors. Prospective study of cases of sudden death secondary to pulmonary embolism, whose autopsy was performed in the forensic department of Tunis, between October 2009 and of September, 2011. During study period, 37 cases of pulmonary embolism were recorded. They represented 6.8 % of all cases of sudden cardiovascular deaths. Victims were male in most cases (65 %). Victims were aged between 21 and 87 years with an average age of about 52 years. Pathological histories were noted in 9 cases: three cases of recent surgery, four cases of pelvic trauma, a case of ovarian tumor and a case of which the PE arose in post-partum. Concerning other risk factors of pulmonary embolism, confinement to bed was noted in 24 cases (64.8 %), obesity in 12 cases (32.4 %), an arterial high blood pressure in 4 cases. Histories of psychiatric pathology were noted in 5 cases (13.5 %). Symptomatology preceding death was dominated by sudden death (35 %) followed by dyspnoea (30 %) and thoracic pains (16 %). In 8 cases , victims consulted emergencies within 48 hours preceding death, for a varied symptomatology without diagnosis of pulmonary embolism is suspected. At autopsy, in 30 cases embolism was massive. In 29 % of the cases, a deep venous thrombosis was revealing in particular at the primitive iliac veins. Pulmonary embolism is an affection that still kills a lot. It can benefit from prevention and from an effective treatment. This testifies the major importance of clinical diagnosis of pulmonary embolism as well as the technical means for the diagnosis.

  15. Changes in perfusion scintigraphy in the first days of heparin therapy in patients with acute pulmonary embolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, M. R.; Oostdijk, A. H.; Engelage, A. H.; van Marwijk Kooy, M.; Büller, H. R.

    2000-01-01

    Patients with suspected pulmonary embolism often receive heparin therapy for hours to days before ventilation/perfusion scintigraphy is completed. We assessed to what extent the lung scan classification and pulmonary vascular perfusion changed over a period of 2-4 days of full anticoagulant therapy.

  16. Near fatal pulmonary embolism in a 16-year-old

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farlow, D.; Field, L.

    1992-01-01

    Acute pulmonary thrombo-embolism (PE) may present with a variety of clinical problems; patients with this condition may range from being asymptomatic to acutely unwell, with sudden death being at the extreme end of the spectrum. This case report of a young man with PE demonstrates the scintigraphic features of massive, near-fatal embolism. On transfer to the Nuclear Medicine Department, the patient's blood pressure was unrecordable, the heart rate was 150/min, there was deep cyanosis despite 100 per cent oxygen and the pupils were fixed and dilated. A limited perfusion scan was obtained using 76 MBq of 99m Tc-MAA (Technescan MAA, Mallinckrodt), with an estimated 260 000 MAA particles being injected directly into a peripheral vein. Anterior and posterior images showed perfusion only to a small portion of the left upper lobe. The patient recovered quickly following embolectomy resulting in removal of a large amount of thrombus from both pulmonary arteries. It has been thus demonstrated that the perfusion scan is a rapid and safe method of confirming suspected massive PE prior to surgery. 4 refs., 2 figs

  17. A clinical study on the interventional treatment of acute pulmonary embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Xixiang; Zhang Minghua; Ci Xiao; Wang Chunmei; Lin Xiaojie; Si Tongguo; Huang Linfen; Feng Xiaofeng

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of interventional procedures in the treatment of acute pulmonary embolism (PE). Methods: Pulmonary arterial thrombolytic therapy, suction and fragmentation of thromhi, anti-spasm, and balloon dilation were performed in eighteen cases with clinically highly suspected PE confirmed by emergent pulmonary artery angiography beforehand. Wedged pulmonary arterial pressure, pulmonary recanalization rate, the display ratio of distal pulmonary capillary net, blood gas analysis, blood oxygen saturation, and the improvement of clinical symptoms and signs were used for evaluation of the effectiveness. Seventeen of the alive cases with dislodgement of deep vein thrombi of the lower extremities were confirmed for the formation of PE and then thrombolytic treatment of the thrombotic deep vein was performed after the placement of inferior vena cava filter. Results: Pulmanory artery angiographies showed embolism of the pulmonary arterial trunks or more than two of the branches. The post-treatment pulmonary patency reached 80%-90% in three cases, 90%-95% in eleven cases and 100% in five cases. The display ratio of distal pulmonary capillary net was over 90% in all the cases. Wedged pulmonary arterial pressure decreased to below 25 mmHg in thirteen cases, and to 25-30 mmHg in five cases. Blood oxygen saturation rate improved immediately to 90%-95% in ten cases and to 95%-100% in eight cases. Cough, hemoptysis, dyspnea, and chest pain were completely relieved in thirteen cases and significantly relieved in five cases. Digestive track bleeding was complicated in one case. Conclusions: Pulmonary artery angiography is the golden standard for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. Interventional therapy is very effective for acute pulmonary embolism, which can significantly reduce the mortality rate. (authors)

  18. Evaluation of meteorological and epidemiological characteristics of fatal pulmonary embolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Törő, Klára; Pongrácz, Rita; Bartholy, Judit; Váradi-T, Aletta; Marcsa, Boglárka; Szilágyi, Brigitta; Lovas, Attila; Dunay, György; Sótonyi, Péter

    2016-03-01

    The objective of the present study was to identify risk factors among epidemiological factors and meteorological conditions in connection with fatal pulmonary embolism. Information was collected from forensic autopsy records in sudden unexpected death cases where pulmonary embolism was the exact cause of death between 2001 and 2010 in Budapest. Meteorological parameters were detected during the investigated period. Gender, age, manner of death, cause of death, place of death, post-mortem pathomorphological changes and daily meteorological conditions (i.e. daily mean temperature and atmospheric pressure) were examined. We detected that the number of registered pulmonary embolism (No 467, 211 male) follows power law in time regardless of the manner of death. We first described that the number of registered fatal pulmonary embolism up to the nth day can be expressed as Y( n) = α ṡ n β where Y denotes the number of fatal pulmonary embolisms up to the nth day and α > 0 and β > 1 are model parameters. We found that there is a definite link between the cold temperature and the increasing incidence of fatal pulmonary embolism. Cold temperature and the change of air pressure appear to be predisposing factors for fatal pulmonary embolism. Meteorological parameters should have provided additional information about the predisposing factors of thromboembolism.

  19. Pulmonary embolism in pregnancy: comparison of pulmonary CT angiography and lung scintigraphy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ridge, Carole A

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to retrospectively compare the diagnostic adequacy of lung scintigraphy with that of pulmonary CT angiography (CTA) in the care of pregnant patients with suspected pulmonary embolism. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patient characteristics, radiology report content, additional imaging performed, final diagnosis, and diagnostic adequacy were recorded for pregnant patients consecutively referred for lung scintigraphy or pulmonary CTA according to physician preference. Measurements of pulmonary arterial enhancement were performed on all pulmonary CTA images of pregnant patients. Lung scintigraphy and pulmonary CTA studies deemed inadequate for diagnosis at the time of image acquisition were further assessed, and the cause of diagnostic inadequacy was determined. The relative contribution of the inferior vena cava to the right side of the heart was measured on nondiagnostic CTA images and compared with that on CTA images of age-matched nonpregnant women, who were the controls. RESULTS: Twenty-eight pulmonary CTA examinations were performed on 25 pregnant patients, and 25 lung scintigraphic studies were performed on 25 pregnant patients. Lung scintigraphy was more frequently adequate for diagnosis than was pulmonary CTA (4% vs 35.7%) (p = 0.0058). Pulmonary CTA had a higher diagnostic inadequacy rate among pregnant than nonpregnant women (35.7% vs 2.1%) (p < 0.001). Transient interruption of contrast material by unopacified blood from the inferior vena cava was identified in eight of 10 nondiagnostic pulmonary CTA studies. CONCLUSION: We found that lung scintigraphy was more reliable than pulmonary CTA in pregnant patients. Transient interruption of contrast material by unopacified blood from the inferior vena cava is a common finding at pulmonary CTA of pregnant patients.

  20. Pulmonary embolism: comprehensive diagnosis by using electron-beam CT for detection of emboli and assessment of pulmonary blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoepf, U J; Bruening, R; Konschitzky, H; Becker, C R; Knez, A; Weber, J; Muehling, O; Herzog, P; Huber, A; Haberl, R; Reiser, M F

    2000-12-01

    To comprehensively assess thoracic anatomy and pulmonary microcirculation in pulmonary embolism by using computed tomographic (CT) angiography of the pulmonary arteries combined with functional CT imaging of blood flow. Twenty-two patients suspected of having acute pulmonary embolism underwent contrast material-enhanced thin-section electron-beam CT angiography of the pulmonary arteries. In addition, in each patient, a dynamic multisection blood flow CT study was performed on a 7.6-cm lung volume with electrocardiographic gating. Pulmonary blood flow was calculated, and perfusion parameters were visualized on color-coded maps. The color-coded maps and CT angiograms were independently evaluated, segment by segment, by two readers for perfusion deficits and the presence of clots, respectively. The results were compared. Mean pulmonary blood flow was 0.63 mL/min/mL in the occluded segments versus 2.27 mL/min/mL in the nonoccluded segments (P: =.001). The sensitivity and specificity of perfusion maps for the presence of segmental pulmonary embolism compared with those of CT angiography were 75.4% and 82.3%, respectively, with positive and negative predictive values of 79.6% and 84.7%, respectively. The false-negative findings were caused mainly by partial occlusion of vessels. In eight patients, a substantial alternative or additional pathologic entity was diagnosed. By combining CT angiography and dynamic CT imaging, a comprehensive and noninvasive diagnosis of thoracic structure and function is feasible with a single modality.

  1. SPECT/CT and pulmonary embolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortensen, Jann [Copenhagen University Hospital, Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); The Faroese National Hospital, Department of Medicine, Torshavn (Faroe Islands); Gutte, Henrik [Copenhagen University Hospital, Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Herlev Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Copenhagen (Denmark); University of Copenhagen, Cluster for Molecular Imaging, Faculty of Health Sciences, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2014-05-15

    Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is diagnosed either by ventilation/perfusion (V/P) scintigraphy or pulmonary CT angiography (CTPA). In recent years both techniques have improved. Many nuclear medicine centres have adopted the single photon emission CT (SPECT) technique as opposed to the planar technique for diagnosing PE. SPECT has been shown to have fewer indeterminate results and a higher diagnostic value. The latest improvement is the combination of a low-dose CT scan with a V/P SPECT scan in a hybrid tomograph. In a study comparing CTPA, planar scintigraphy and SPECT alone, SPECT/CT had the best diagnostic accuracy for PE. In addition, recent developments in the CTPA technique have made it possible to image the pulmonary arteries of the lungs in one breath-hold. This development is based on the change from a single-detector to multidetector CT technology with an increase in volume coverage per rotation and faster rotation. Furthermore, the dual energy CT technique is a promising modality that can provide functional imaging in combination with anatomical information. Newer high-end CT scanners and SPECT systems are able to visualize smaller subsegmental emboli. However, consensus is lacking regarding the clinical impact and treatment. In the present review, SPECT and SPECT in combination with low-dose CT, CTPA and dual energy CT are discussed in the context of diagnosing PE. (orig.)

  2. Isolated Pulmonary Embolism following Shoulder Arthroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole H. Goldhaber

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary embolism (PE following shoulder arthroscopy is a rare complication. We present a unique case report of a 43-year-old right-hand dominant female who developed a PE 41 days postoperatively with no associated upper or lower extremity DVT. The patient had minimal preoperative and intraoperative risk factors. Additionally, she had no thromboembolic symptoms postoperatively until 41 days following surgery when she developed sudden right-hand swelling, labored breathing, and abdominal pain. A stat pulmonary computed tomography (CT angiogram of the chest revealed an acute PE in the right lower lobe, and subsequent extremity ultrasounds showed no upper or lower extremity deep vein thrombosis. After a thorough review of the literature, we present the first documented isolated PE following shoulder arthroscopy. Although rare, sudden development of an isolated PE is possible, and symptoms such as sudden hand swelling, trouble breathing, and systemic symptoms should be evaluated aggressively with a pulmonary CT angiogram given the fact that an extremity ultrasound may be negative for deep vein thrombosis.

  3. The establishment of animal model of acute massive pulmonary embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Junliang; Yang Ning; Yang Jianping; Ma Junshan; Zhao Shijun

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To find a way of establishing the model of acute massive pulmonary embolism in dog. Methods: Seven dogs were selected with self-clots made outside the body transferring through a 10 F guiding catheter into the central branch of pulmonary artery via the femoral vein approach on one side and then under pressure monitor of pulmonary artery until the very branch of pulmonary artery was occluded. Blood gas and pulmonary arterial pressure were tested before and after the embolization, Pulmonary artery pressure was continuously monitored together with the examinations of angiography. The bilateral lung specimens were resected for histological examination 12 hours in average after the embolization for comparative study. Results: One animal died of cardiogenic shock after clots injection; the other one presented with tachycardia and premature ventricular beat causing partial recanalization 12 h later. The others were occluded successfully in central branch of pulmonary artery and the pulmonary arterial pressure reached above 50 mmHg after occlusion. Pathologic examination showed the formation of red and mix thrombi within the vascular lumens. Conclusions: This method for making acute massive pulmonary embolism animal model was reliable, feasible and reproducible, and could provide an animal model of acute massive pulmonary embolism for other correlative experiments. (authors)

  4. Therapeutic management of acute pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tromeur, Cécile; Van Der Pol, Liselotte M; Couturaud, Francis; Klok, Frederikus A; Huisman, Menno V

    2017-08-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is a potentially fatal manifestation of venous thromboembolism. Prompt anticoagulant treatment is crucial for PE patients, which can decrease morbidity and mortality. Risk assessment is the cornerstone of the therapeutic management of PE. It guides physicians to the most appropriate treatment and selects patients for early discharge or home treatment. Areas covered: Here, we review the current treatments of acute PE according to contemporary risk stratification strategies, highlighting each step of PE therapeutic management. Expert commentary: Currently, direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) represent the first-line therapy of patients presenting with non-high risk PE with a better risk-benefit ratios than vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) due to lower risk of major bleeding. Only high-risk patients with PE who present in shock should be treated with systematic thrombolysis, while surgical thrombectomy or catheter direct thrombolysis (CDT) should only be considered when thrombolysis is contraindicated because of too high bleeding risk.

  5. [Secondary pulmonary embolism to right atrial myxoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vico Besó, L; Zúñiga Cedó, E

    2013-10-01

    A case of pulmonary thromboembolism secondary to atrial myxoma right. The myxoma is a primary cardiac tumor, namely, has his origin in the cardiac tissue. Primary cardiac tumors are rare, including myxomas, the most common type. Have a predilection for females and the most useful tool for diagnosis is echocardiography. About 75% of myxomas occur in the left atrium of the heart and rest are in the right atrium. Right atrial myxomas in some sometimes associated with tricuspid stenosis and atrial fibrillation. The most common clinical manifestations include symptoms of this neoplasm constitutional, and embolic phenomena resulting from the obstruction to the flow intracavitary. The treatment of this condition is surgical. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  6. Persistent tachypnea in children: keep pulmonary embolism in mind

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ommen, C. H.; Heyboer, H.; Groothoff, J. W.; Teeuw, R.; Aronson, D. C.; Peters, M.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: Tachypnea in children is associated with respiratory disorders and nonrespiratory disorders such as cardiac disease, metabolic acidosis, fever, pain, and anxiety. Pulmonary embolism is seldom considered by pediatricians as a cause of tachypnea. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Three children of

  7. Rivaroxaban to Prevent Pulmonary Embolism after Hip or Knee Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Prevent Pulmonary Embolism After Hip or Knee Replacement Deborah Cios , John Fanikos Download PDF https://doi. ... Rivaroxaban to Prevent Clots After Hip or Knee Replacement Many different medications are used to prevent blood ...

  8. A cardiac hydatid cyst underlying pulmonary embolism: a case report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    induced dyspnea and blood expectorations. Multiple and bilateral opacities were visualized on standard chest x-ray. Signs of right-sided hypertrophy were seen on ECG. Imaging findings led to the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism complicating ...

  9. Acute Pulmonary Embolism Mimics Acute Coronary Syndrome in Older Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Chieh Liu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute pulmonary embolism is a fatal disease and an often missed diagnosis. There are no specific symptoms or signs. Accurate diagnosis followed by effective therapy can reduce mortality. We report on a 67-year-old man who underwent lumbar laminectomy and developed an acute anterior compressive-like chest pain and jaw numbness rather than dyspnea on the fifth postoperative day. Owing to refractory chest pain with suspicious posterior myocardial infarction or unstable angina on surface electrocardiogram, the patient received emergency coronary catheterization, which demonstrated normal coronary arteries. Further investigation provided a final diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism. Acute pulmonary embolism with simultaneous recent neuro-surgery was a therapeutic dilemma because of the risk of postoperative hemorrhage threatening neurologic function. After treatment with enoxaparin and close monitoring of his neurologic condition, his symptoms were eliminated. Clinicians must keep in mind a differential diagnosis of pulmonary embolism in a postoperative high-risk patient.

  10. Computed tomography of acute pulmonary embolism: state-of-the-art

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Long Jiang; Lu, Guang Ming [Medical School of Nanjing University, Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Meinel, Felix G.; McQuiston, Andrew D.; Ravenel, James G. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Schoepf, U.J. [Medical School of Nanjing University, Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Multidetector computed tomography (CT) plays an important role in the detection, risk stratification and prognosis evaluation of acute pulmonary embolism. This review will discuss the technical improvements for imaging peripheral pulmonary arteries, the methods of assessing pulmonary embolism severity based on CT findings, a multidetector CT technique for pulmonary embolism detection, and lastly, how to avoid overutilization of CT pulmonary angiography and overdiagnosis of pulmonary embolism. (orig.)

  11. The relationship between tumor markers and pulmonary embolism in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Wei; Zhao, Yunfeng; Xu, Mei; Guo, Jian; Pudasaini, Bigyan; Wu, Xueling; Liu, Jinming

    2017-06-20

    Tumor markers (TMs) and D-Dimer are both hallmarks of severity and prognosis of lung cancer. Tumor markers could be related to pulmonary embolism (PE) in lung cancer. The number of abnormal tumor markers of lung cancer patients with pulmonary embolism (3.9 ± 1.1vs1.6 ± 0.6,P 0.005) was more than that in patients without pulmonary embolism. TMs panel (P trend tumor markers, TMs panel (OR5.98, P Tumor markers were compared between lung cancer patients complicated with pulmonary embolism and those without pulmonary embolism Then the correlation between each tumor marker as well as panel of combined TMs and D-Dimer as well as pulmonary embolism were analyzed for patients with pulmonary embolism. There is a relationship between tumor markers and pulmonary embolism in patients with lung cancer. The panel of combined tumor markers is a valuable diagnostic marker for pulmonary embolism in lung cancer.

  12. The clinical value of pulmonary perfusion imaging complicated with pulmonary embolism in children of nephrotic syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Jun; Chen Ning; Miao Weibing; Peng Jiequan; Jiang Zhihong; Wu Jing

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the clinical features of complicated with pulmonary embolism nephrotic syndrome in children. 99m Tc-MAA pulmonary perfusion imaging was performed on 30 nephrotic syndrome in children with elevated plasma D-dimer. Results shown that 14 of 30 patients were found to have pulmonary embolism (46.7%). Pulmonary perfusion imaging showed an involvement of 1 pulmonary segment in 3 cases, 2 segments in 2 cases and over 3 segments in other 9 cases. Among them, there were 7 segments involved in one case. After two weeks of heparin anti-coagulative therapy, most cases showed a recovery. The result of this study suggested that pulmonary embolism is a common complication of nephrotic syndrome. Pulmonary perfusion imaging is simple, effective and accurate method for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism, and it also can help to assess the value of clinical therapy

  13. Central Venous Catheter-directed Tissue Plasminogen Activator in Massive Pulmonary Embolism

    OpenAIRE

    Vishal Gulati

    2018-01-01

    We present the case of an 88-year-old female who presented to the emergency department (ED) with suspected massive pulmonary embolism (PE) causing respiratory failure, right heart strain, and shock, who despite early and aggressive resuscitation with vasopressors and continuous peripheral infusion of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), suffered a cardiac arrest in the ED. We describe the approach of a tPA bolus directed through a central venous catheter, resulting in return of spontaneous cir...

  14. [Comparison of value of Qanadli versus Mastora pulmonary embolism index in evaluating straddle-type pulmonary embolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shanshan; Cheng, Ruirui; Zhang, Guojun

    2014-12-16

    To compare the value of Qanadli versus Mastora pulmonary embolism index in evaluating straddle-type pulmonary embolism by computed tomography (CT). The clinical data were collected for 38 hospitalized patients with straddle-type pulmonary embolism diagnosed by CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) from January 2011 to May 2014. There were 20 males and 18 females with an average age of (59.2 ± 17.4 years). And the serum levels of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and D-dimer were recorded. And Qanadli and Mastora pulmonary embolism indices were used to independently determine the CT embolism indices. Difference and correlation between Quandli and Mastora pulmonary embolism index were analyzed. And the relations between Qanadli score, Mastora score and serum parameters and right heart function parameters were analyzed. Qanadli score of 38 patients was 20.0 ± 0.0 while Mastora score 80.9 ± 26.1. No significant correlation existed between Qanadli and Mastora scores. Median serum D-dimer level was 708.5 (9.6, 1 025.5) µg/L and median NT-proBNP 1 358.5 (576.7, 3 047.3) ng/L. Qanadli score was not statistically significantly correlated with serum D-dimer or NT-proBNP level. Mastora score was not correlated with serum D-dimer level statistically significantly, but it was positively correlated with the level of NT-proBNP (r = 0.495, P = 0.010). No significant correlation existed between Qanadli score and right atrial diameter, right ventricular/left ventricular diameter ratio on CTPA. Mastora score was positively correlated with right atrial diameter/left atrial diameter ratio (r = 0.627, P < 0.001) and right ventricular diameter/left ventricular diameter ratio on CTPA (r = 0.628, P < 0.001). The Mastora score was not significantly correlated with main pulmonary artery diameter and main pulmonary artery diameter/ascending aorta diameter ratio on CTPA. Mastora pulmonary embolism index is better than Qanadli pulmonary embolism index in evaluating straddle

  15. Computer-Assisted Detection of Acute Pulmonary Embolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wittenberg, R.

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a common and often potentially life threatening disease. Severe morbidity and mortality can be prevented if PE is diagnosed and treated in time. CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) has emerged as an effective method for diagnosis of PE, but interpreting a CTPA is complicated

  16. Short-term results of the pulmonary embolism treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Nikonenko

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Acute pulmonary embolism (PE is a common and often fatal disease with the level of mortality in the acute phase from 7 to 11%. In order to develop indications to thrombolytic therapy the short-term results of treatment with the use of combination therapy were studied. This treatment included: thrombolysis and /or anticoagulant therapy, with the usage of new oral anticoagulants and treatment of acute pulmonary hypertension. 231 patients with pulmonary embolism were examined. Methods and results. Angiography, echocardiography, multidetector computed tomography of the chest were used to evaluate the results of treatment. Among those groups prevailed elderly and senile patients with concomitant chronic disorders of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems. This for certain significantly worsens pulmonary embolism. Therefore, thrombolysis was used in cases of massive and submassive pulmonary embolism and as well as prostaglandin E1 drugs were used for the treatment of acute pulmonary hypertension and new oral anticoagulants. It was found that this treatment regimen resulted to a significant clinical improvement, restoration of adequate pulmonary blood flow and pulmonary hypertension rate decrease.

  17. Evaluation of 16 detector row spiral CT in diagnosing pulmonary embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Xiaokun; Li Lei

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the value of 16 detector row spiral CT in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism(PE). Methods: Imaging data of 20 patients (plain 16 detector row spiral CT scanning plus enhanced scanning imaging) highly suspected of PE was retrospectively analyzed. Results: Among the 20 cases, embolism was showed in 13 patients on 16 detector row spiral CT pulmonary angiography (MSCTPA). 6 cases of the 13 PE's patients have masculine findings on plain MSCT scanning images. Localized tenuous lung markings, dilated pulmonary artery, 'mosaic' sign, pleural or pericardial effusion, local high attenuation centrally in the pulmonary arteries and lung infarction occurred respectively. Conclusion: MSCTPA may be an effective, simple and safe technique for the diagnosis of PE. It was a reliable means in defecting PE However, for the cases unfit for contrast media and cases only suitable for unenhanced CT because of nonspecific heart-pulmonary symptom, noticeable abnormal signs of plain MSCT scanning could suggest the occurrence of pulmonary embolism. (authors)

  18. Right Heart Thrombi Accompained with Pulmonary Embolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Çörtük

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Right sided heart thrombus (RSHT is rarely seen. It is generally detected during transthoracic echocardiographic (TTE examination or multislice thoracic computed tomographic scanning for pulmonary embolism (PE. Although RSHT and PE secondary to this situation is rare, mortality during the course of process is very high. We aim to aproach right cardiac trombus and determine the results of treatment. Method: In this study 25 patients hospital records were investigated retrospectively. The data obtained consisted of diagnostic methods, presence of shock state, treatments applied and results were assessed. Results: Th present study revealed that the 32% of patients had been admitted to hospital in shock state, hospital mortality rate was 24%, and this mortality rate was not affected by different treatment choices. Conclusion: The exact incidence of RSHT is unknown. It is reported that the probability of seeing a case suffering from RSHT during echocardiographic examination performed to diagnose the PE is 9%. RSHT may cause PE anytime and requires urgent treatment. In our study, we determined that the hospital mortaliy did not change with the type of given treatment and overall mortality was determined as 24%. There are no sufficient studies searching large series on RSHT in literature. Therefore, there is no agreement on treatment tecniques.

  19. Age-related incidence of pulmonary embolism and additional pathologic findings detected by computed tomography pulmonary angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groth, M.; Henes, F.O.; Mayer, U.; Regier, M.; Adam, G.; Begemann, P.G.C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare the incidence of pulmonary embolism (PE) and additional pathologic findings (APF) detected by computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) according to different age-groups. Materials and methods: 1353 consecutive CTPA cases for suspected PE were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were divided into seven age groups: ≤29, 30–39, 40–49, 50–59, 60–69, 70–79 and ≥80 years. Differences between the groups were tested using Fisher's exact or chi-square test. A p-value 0.0024). Conclusion: The incidences of PE and APF detected by CTPA reveal no significant differences between various age groups.

  20. Ruling out pulmonary embolism in primary care : Comparison of the diagnostic performance of “gestalt” and the wells rule

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriksen, Janneke M T; Lucassen, Wim A M; Erkens, Petra M G; Stoffers, Henri E J H; van Weert, Henk C P M; Büller, Harry R.; Hoes, Arno W.; Moons, Karel G M; Geersing, Geert Jan

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE Diagnostic prediction models such as the Wells rule can be used for safely ruling out pulmonary embolism (PE) when it is suspected. A physician’s own probability estimate (“gestalt”), however, is commonly used instead. We evaluated the diagnostic performance of both approaches in primary

  1. Ruling Out Pulmonary Embolism in Primary Care: Comparison of the Diagnostic Performance of "Gestalt" and the Wells Rule

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriksen, Janneke M. T.; Lucassen, Wim A. M.; Erkens, Petra M. G.; Stoffers, Henri E. J. H.; van Weert, Henk C. P. M.; Büller, Harry R.; Hoes, Arno W.; Moons, Karel G. M.; Geersing, Geert-Jan

    2016-01-01

    Diagnostic prediction models such as the Wells rule can be used for safely ruling out pulmonary embolism (PE) when it is suspected. A physician's own probability estimate ("gestalt"), however, is commonly used instead. We evaluated the diagnostic performance of both approaches in primary care.

  2. Differentiation of pulmonary embolism from high altitude pulmonary edema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, D.A.; Hashim, R.; Mirza, T.M.; Matloob-ur-Rehman, M.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To differentiate the high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) from pulmonary embolism (PE) by clinical probability model of PE, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), aspartate transaminase (AST) and D-dimer assays at high altitude. Subjects and Methods: Consecutive 40 patients evacuated from height > 3000 meters with symptoms of PE or HAPE were included. Clinical pretest probabilities scores of PE, Minutex D-dimer assay (Biopool international) and cardiac enzymes estimation by IFCC approved methods, were used for diagnosis. Mann-Whitney U test was applied by using SPSS and level of significance was taken at (p 500 ng/ml. Plasma D-dimer of 500 ng/ml was considered as cut-off value; 6(66.7%) patients of PE could be diagnosed and 30 (96.7%) cases of HAPE excluded indicating very good negative predictive value. Serum LDH, AST and CK were raised above the reference ranges in 8 (89%), 7 (78%) and 3 (33%) patients of PE as compared to 11 (35%), 6 (19%) and 9 (29%) of HAPE respectively. Conclusion: Clinical assessment in combination with D-dimer assay, LDH and AST can be used for timely differentiation of PE from HAPE at high altitude where diagnostic imaging procedures are not available. (author)

  3. Management of Severe Hemoptysis from Pulmonary Aspergilloma Using Endovascular Embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corr, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the effectiveness of endovascular embolization as a temporizing measure in the management of severe hemoptysis caused by intracavitary pulmonary aspergilloma. Methods. Patients presenting with hemoptysis, estimated to be more than 300 ml in the preceding 24 hr, in whom a radiological diagnosis of pulmonary aspergilloma was made on chest radiographs and/or computed tomography of the chest were subjected to bronchial and systemic arteriography and embolization using triacryl microspheres. Results. Twelve patients with upper lobe intracavitary aspergillomas were managed with embolization. In 11 patients hemoptysis stopped within 24 hr and with no recurrence over the next 4 weeks. In 1 patient hemoptysis persisted and an upper lobe lobectomy was performed. Conclusion. Embolization of bronchial and systemic arteries is an effective method for treating acute severe hemoptysis from intracavitary aspergillomas, allowing the patient time to recover for definitive surgical management

  4. Symptoms, location and prognosis of pulmonary embolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.T. García-Sanz

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: Pulmonary embolism (PE is a common disease with variable symptoms and high overall mortality. The clinical relevance of the extent of PE is still debatable, and the role of anticoagulation in patients with subsegmental involvement has been contested. Our objective is to describe the clinical details of patients with PE in our hospital and to analyze their prognosis based on the extent of the disease. Materials and methods: Retrospective study of 313 patients diagnosed with PE by chest computed tomography (CT scan at the Hospital Complex of Pontevedra in Spain for six years. Predictors of mortality were determined by multivariate analysis. Results: Women accounted for 56% of patients, and patient median age was 70 years (interquartile range 53–78 years. Subsegmental PE accounted for 7% of all cases; these patients were younger and had lower comorbidity; they reported chest pain more often, performed better in blood gas analysis and none of them had proximal deep vein thrombosis (DVT. Patients with subsegmental PE had a higher survival rate. Factors independently associated with mortality were cancer diagnosis and higher comorbidity. Conclusions: Patients with subsegmental PE clinically differ from those with more proximal PE. Underlying diseases have more influence on the prognosis than the extent of the disease. Resumo: Contexto e objectivo: A embolia pulmonar (PE é uma doença comum com sintomas variáveis e uma elevada taxa de mortalidade global. A relevância clínica da extensão da PE é ainda fonte de debate, e o papel da anticoagulação em pacientes com envolvimento de sub-segmentos foi contestado. O nosso objectivo é descrever os dados clínicos de doentes com PE no nosso hospital e analisar o seu prognóstico, com base na extensão da doença. Materiais e métodos: Estudo retrospectivo de 313 doentes, diagnosticados com PE, através de uma tomografia computadorizada de t

  5. Unsuspected pulmonary embolism identified using multidetector computed tomography in hospital outpatients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrell, C.; Jones, M.; Girvin, F.; Ritchie, G. [Department of Radiology, Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Murchison, J.T., E-mail: john.murchison@luht.scot.nhs.u [Department of Radiology, Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-15

    Aim: To evaluate the incidence of unsuspected pulmonary embolism (PE) in an unselected population of outpatients undergoing contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) for indications other than the investigation of PE. Materials and methods: Outpatients undergoing CT of the chest over a 6-month period were retrospectively identified and images reviewed. Inpatients and patients undergoing unenhanced CT of the chest were excluded. Data, including referring specialty, patient age and sex, reasons for examination, level of embolism, image quality, and section thickness were recorded. Radiology reports were reviewed with respect to whether or not the embolism was noted at the time of initial reporting. Results: Following exclusions 440 patients were reviewed (195 women and 245 men). PE was identified in 10 of the 440 patients, an incidence of 2.23%. One pulmonary embolus was in the main pulmonary artery, three were in lobar arteries, three in segmental arteries, and three in subsegmental arteries. Patients over the age of 60 years were more likely to have an embolism (9/300, 2.9%) compared with those under 60 years (1/140, 0.7%). Seven of the 10 positive examinations were carried out in patients who were known or later shown to have malignancy. Seven of the 10 emboli were reported at the time of initial reporting. Conclusion: The outpatient population has a significant incidence of unsuspected PE. PE should be actively sought when reporting examinations performed for alternative indications, particularly where cancer is a known or suspected diagnosis.

  6. Specificity of Electrocardiography and Echocardiography Changes at the Patients with the Pulmonary Embolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amra Macić-Džanković

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated electrocardiographic and echocardiographic changes of 40 patients with pulmonary thrombo-embolism proved by perfusion scintigrams. ECG-changes included sinus tachycardia or absolute tachyarrhythmia de novo, changes type Q1S3T3 and changes in right precordial leads. Analyses of echocardiography included hyperkinesis and then dilatation and apical hypokinesis of right ventricule and tricuspid regurgitation with maximal transvalvular gradients. We emphasize such a sensibility of echocardiographic changes in early estimation of pulmonary thrombo-embolism severity and necessity for echocardiography as early as possible in suspected patients.

  7. A giant right atrial villous myxoma with simultaneous pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydın, Cemalettin; Taşal, Abdurrahman; Ay, Yasin; Vatankulu, Mehmet Akif; Inan, Bekir; Bacaksız, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Primary cardiac tumors are rare and approximately three quarters of them are benign and up to half of the benign tumors are myxomas. Right atrial villous myxoma with pulmonary embolism is an unusual apparition. A 29 year-old male was admitted to our outpatient clinic with progressive exertional dyspnea, chest pain and intermittent feeling faint. A giant right atrial villous mobile mass was detected by means of transthoracic echocardiography. To exclude possible pulmonary embolism, chest computed tomography scan was performed and showed filling defects in the branch of the pulmonary artery. The mass was totally resected. RA villous myxoma is a rare subtype in an unusual location with high potential of pulmonary embolism. Early surgery for villous myxoma has a great importance in order to reduce the risk of pulmonary embolism. 3D TEE should be a sufficient technique for diagnosis and evoluation of shape, size and origin of the cardiac mass an adequate guide to surgical treatment. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Value of the ventilation/perfusion scan in acute pulmonary embolism: Results of the prospective investigation of pulmonary embolism diagnosis (PIOPED)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    To determine the sensitivities and specificities of ventilation/perfusion lung scans for acute pulmonary embolism, a random sample of 933 of 1,493 patients was studied prospectively. Nine hundred thirty-one underwent scintigraphy and 755 underwent pulmonary angiography; 251 (33%) of 755 demonstrated pulmonary embolism. Almost all patients with pulmonary embolism had abnormal scans of high, intermediate, or low probability, but so did most without pulmonary embolism. Of 116 patients with high-probability scans and definitive angiograms, 102 (88%) had pulmonary embolism, but only a minority with pulmonary embolism had high-probability scans. Of 322 with intermediate-probability scans and definitive angiograms, 105 (33%) had pulmonary embolism. Follow-up and angiography together suggest pulmonary embolism occurred among 12% of patients with low-probability scans. Clinical assessment combined with the ventilation/perfusion scan established the diagnosis or exclusion of pulmonary embolism only for a minority of patients--those with clear and concordant clinical and ventilation/perfusion scan findings

  9. Acute pulmonary embolism due to multiple hydatid cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lioulias, A; Kotoulas, C; Kokotsakis, J; Konstantinou, M

    2001-07-01

    A case of acute pulmonary embolism due to multiple hydatid cysts is reported. Chest X-ray, echocardiography, spiral CT scan and MR-angiography were performed for the diagnostic evaluation. The patient underwent a left anterior thoracotomy and a left pulmonary arteriotomy in order to remove the hydatid cysts, without using extracorporeal circulation. The post-operative recovery was uneventful and the patient, 42 months later, has a normal life.

  10. QR in V1--an ECG sign associated with right ventricular strain and adverse clinical outcome in pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucher, Nils; Walpoth, Nazan; Wustmann, Kerstin; Noveanu, Markus; Gertsch, Marc

    2003-06-01

    To test the hypothesis that Qr in V(1)is a predictor of pulmonary embolism, right ventricular strain, and adverse clinical outcome. ECG's from 151 patients with suspected pulmonary embolism were blindly interpreted by two observers. Echocardiography, troponin I, and pro-brain natriuretic peptide levels were obtained in 75 patients with pulmonary embolism. Qr in V(1)(14 vs 0 in controls; p or =1 mV (15 vs 1 in controls; p=0.0002) were more frequently present in patients with pulmonary embolism. Sensitivity and specificity of Qr in V(1)and T wave inversion in V(2)for predicting right ventricular dysfunction were 31/97% and 45/94%, respectively. Three of five patients who died in-hospital and 11 of 20 patients with a complicated course, presented with Qr in V(1). After adjustment for right ventricular strain including ECG, echocardiography, pro-brain natriuretic peptide and troponin I levels, Qr in V(1)(OR 8.7, 95%CI 1.4-56.7; p=0.02) remained an independent predictor of adverse outcome. Among the ECG signs seen in patients with acute pulmonary embolism, Qr in V(1)is closely related to the presence of right ventricular dysfunction, and is an independent predictor of adverse clinical outcome.

  11. Clinician gestalt estimate of pretest probability for acute coronary syndrome and pulmonary embolism in patients with chest pain and dyspnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Jeffrey A; Stubblefield, William B

    2014-03-01

    Pretest probability helps guide diagnostic testing for patients with suspected acute coronary syndrome and pulmonary embolism. Pretest probability derived from the clinician's unstructured gestalt estimate is easier and more readily available than methods that require computation. We compare the diagnostic accuracy of physician gestalt estimate for the pretest probability of acute coronary syndrome and pulmonary embolism with a validated, computerized method. This was a secondary analysis of a prospectively collected, multicenter study. Patients (N=840) had chest pain, dyspnea, nondiagnostic ECGs, and no obvious diagnosis. Clinician gestalt pretest probability for both acute coronary syndrome and pulmonary embolism was assessed by visual analog scale and from the method of attribute matching using a Web-based computer program. Patients were followed for outcomes at 90 days. Clinicians had significantly higher estimates than attribute matching for both acute coronary syndrome (17% versus 4%; Pgestalt versus 0.78 (95% CI 0.71 to 0.85) for attribute matching. For pulmonary embolism, these values were 0.81 (95% CI 0.79 to 0.92) for clinician gestalt and 0.84 (95% CI 0.76 to 0.93) for attribute matching. Compared with a validated machine-based method, clinicians consistently overestimated pretest probability but on receiver operating curve analysis were as accurate for pulmonary embolism but not acute coronary syndrome. Copyright © 2013 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The diagnosis and treatment of two kinds of pulmonary embolism complications after interventional therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Hongying; Xiao Liang; Zhong Hongshan; Xu Ke; Zheng Yanbo; Lu Zaiming

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To summarize the different types, clinical manifestation, treatment and prognosis of pulmonary embolism after interventional therapy in order to promote the diagnosis and treatment for the severe complication. Methods: The cases of pulmonary embolism complications after interventional therapy were collected from three hospitals between 1998 and 2005. The patients were divided into two types of iodized oil and thrombus pulmonary embolism according to the different types of the embolus. The experience of the clinical manifestation, diagnosis and treatment were summarized. Results: Ten patients with pulmonary embolism complication after interventional therapy were collected, including five with thrombus pulmonary embolism and four with iodized oil pulmonary embolism. All 5 cases of the thrombus pulmonary embolism suffered burst dyspnea and apsychia, two died and the others recovered or turned better. Aggravating dyspnea without shock occurred in the five iodized oil pulmonary embolism cases, 1 to 3 days after interventional therapy. The symptoms disappeared 15 to 50 days after combined therapy including majorly oxygen supply therapy. Conclusion: Pulmonary embolism is an emergent and severe complication after interventional therapy including acute thrombus pulmonary embolism without deep vein thrombosis which can be effectively treated be effectively treated with maintaining effective circulation and thrombolysis; and iodized oil pulmonary embolism with slow onsets could disappear within 1 month after combined therapy with mainly oxygen supplying therapy. The diagnosis and antidiastole mainly rely on enhancement of CT scan. (authors)

  13. Oral Rivaroxaban for the Treatment of Symptomatic Pulmonary Embolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Büller, Harry R.; Prins, Martin H.; Lensin, Anthonie W. A.; Decousus, Hervé; Jacobson, Barry F.; Minar, Erich; Chlumsky, Jaromir; Verhamme, Peter; Wells, Phil; Agnelli, Giancarlo; Cohen, Alexander; Berkowitz, Scott D.; Bounameaux, Henri; Davidson, Bruce L.; Misselwitz, Frank; Gallus, Alex S.; Raskob, Gary E.; Schellong, Sebastian; Segers, Annelise; Berkowitz, Scott; Gallus, Alexander; Lensing, Anthonie W. A.; Haskell, Lloyd; Raskob, Gary; Bauersachs, Rupert; van Bellen, Bonno; Boda, Zoltán; Borris, Lars; Brenner, Benjamin; Brighton, Tim; Davidson, Bruce; Decousus, Herve; Eriksson, Henry; Jacobson, Barry; Kakkar, Ajay; Kwong, Yok-Lam; Lee, Lai Heng; Meijer, Karina; van der Meer, Jan; Monreal, Manuel; Piovella, Franco; Sandset, Per Morten; Smith, Mark; Tomkowski, Witold; Wang, Yuqi; Brandjes, Dees; Mac Gillavry, Melvin; Otten, Hans-Martin; Carlsson, Anders; Laporte, Silvy; Schulman, Sam; Gent, Michael; Turpie, Alexander; Martinelli, Ida; Lensing, Anthonie W.; Muhlhofer, Eva; Tewes, Miriam; Trajanovic, Mila; Muller, Karin; Kim, Calvin; Gebel, Martin; Benson, Alice; Pap, Akos Ferenc; Godrie, Juliette; Horvat-Broecker, Andrea; Spadari, Giovanni; Peters-Wulf, Cornelia; Roig, J.; Baker, R.; Bianchi, A.; Blombery, P.; Brighton, T.; Campbell, P.; Carroll, P.; Geraghty, R.; Chong, B.; Ramanathan, S.; Archis, C.; Coughlin, P.; Salem, H.; Crispin, P.; Dean, M.; Soni, R.; Denaro, C.; Kubler, P.; Coghlan, D.; Gallus, A.; Gan, T. Eng; Tran, H.; Coleman, C.; Jackson, D.; Khalafallah, A.; Leahy, M.; Leyden, M.; Leyden, D.; Sturtz, C.; McCann, A.; Gibbs, H.; McRae, S.; Richards, B.; Ward, C.; Curnow, J.; Baghestanian, M.; Erdogmus, B.; Samaha, E.; Nikoupayan-Mofrad, M.; Hirschl, M.; Sturm, W.; Kirchmair, R.; Marschang, P.; Drexel, H.; Mathies, R.; Pilger, E.; Brodmann, M.; Weltermann, A.; Buche, M.; Demelenne, J.; Gustin, M.; Hainaut, P.; Pothen, L.; de Leersnyder, J.; Motte, S.; Schroë, H.; Sprynger, M.; Verhamme, P.; Peerlinck, K.; Delcroix, M.; Vermassen, F.; Verstraeten, P.; Smet, V.; Vossaert, R.; van Bellen, B.; Panico, M.; Costa, C.; Blondal, J.; Kovacs, M.; Wells, P.; Rodger, M.; Carrier, M.; Wong, T.; Bi, J.; Chen, Z.; Chen, R.; Jing, Z.-C.; He, J.; Liu, C.; Liu, S.; Long, S.; Ma, Y.; Shao, Y.; Wang, Y.; Wang, C.; Yang, Y. H.; Xie, C.; Xu, J.; Ying, K.; Zhihong, L.; Chlumsky, J.; Hola, D.; Jirat, S.; Vitovec, M.; Kovářová, K.; Gilík, J.; Dosál, J.; Mandakova, E.; Matoška, P.; Podpera, I.; Podperova, M.; Spacek, R.; Urbanova, R.; Tuxen, C.; Sukles, K.; Pietila, K.; Vesanen, M.; Achkar, A.; Agraou, B.; Aquilanti, S.; Rifaï, A.; Berremili, T.; Brisot, D.; Brousse, C.; Tarodo, P.; Bura, A.; Amid-Lacombe, C.; Malloizel, J.; Boulon, C.; Alavoine, L.; Crestani, B.; Mismetti, P.; Buchmuller, A.; Accassat, S.; Elias, A.; Elias, M.; Emmerich, J.; Ferrari, E.; Guérin, T.; Beaka, P.; Lacroix, P.; Szwebel, T. A.; Benhamou, Y.; de Maistre, E.; Falvo, N.; Mahe, I.; Meneveau, N.; Schiele, F.; Meyer, G.; Sanchez, O.; Planquette, B.; Mottier, D.; Le Moigne, E.; Couturaud, F.; Parent, F.; Pernod, G.; Imbert, B.; Elkouri, D.; Dary, M.; Queguiner, A.; Quere, I.; Galanaud, J. P.; Roy, P. M.; de Boisjolly-Bonnefoi, J. M.; Schmidt, J.; Breuil, N.; Heuser, S.; Sevestre, M. A.; Simoneau, G.; Bergmann, J. F.; Stephan, D.; Trinh-Duc, A.; Gaillardou, A.; Grange, C.; Fassier, T.; Wahl, D.; Baron Von Bilderling, P.; Bauersachs, R.; Kuhlencordt, P.; Beyer-Westendorf, J.; Halbritter, K.; Werth, S.; Diehm, C.; Lawall, H.; Eifrig, B.; Espinola-Klein, C.; Weisser, G.; Giannitsis, E.; Haering, H. U.; Hasslacher, C.; Herrmann, T.; Hoffmann, U.; Czihal, M.; Horacek, Th; Ibe, M.; Bauer, A.; Kieback, A.; Landgraf, H.; Lindhoff-Last, E.; Malyar, N.; Petermann, W.; Potratz, J.; Ranft, J.; Röcken, M.; Schellong, S.; Pomper, L.; Frommhold, R.; Schwaiblmair, M.; Berghaus, Th; Taute, B.; Lau, Y. K.; Tse, E.; Boda, Z.; Olah, Zs; Farkas, K.; Kolossváry, E.; Gurzó, M.; Kis, E.; Kovács, A.; Landi, A.; Lupkovics, G.; Pecsvarady, Zs; Riba, M.; Sipos, Gy; Parakh, R.; Sembiring, R.; Barton, J.; Goldstein, L.; Gavish, D.; Hoffman, R.; Hussein, O.; Inbal, A.; Lishner, M.; Elis, A.; Lugassy, G.; Varon, D.; Zeltser, D.; Rogowski, O.; Steinvil, A.; Zisman, D.; Ageno, W.; Ambrosio, G.; Cattaneo, M.; D'Angelo, A.; Ghirarduzzi, A.; Lotti, M.; Pierfranceschi, M. Giorgi; Lodigiani, C.; Martinelli, I.; Palareti, G.; Barone, M.; Beltrametti, C.; Porreca, E.; Prandoni, P.; Spiezia, L.; Quintavalla, R.; Cho, W. H.; Ha, J. W.; Kim, H. S.; Park, K.; Sime, I.; Miliauskas, S.; Petrauskiene, R.; Sathar, J.; Beeker, A.; ten Cate, H.; de Groot, M.; Kamphuisen, P.; Douma, R.; Kooy, M. van Marwijk; Coenen, J.; Meijer, K.; Mäkelburg, A.; Knol, M.; Tichelaar, V.; Harper, P.; Knottenbelt, E.; Ockelford, P.; Young, L.; Royle, G.; Simpson, D.; Chunilal, S.; Smith, M.; Ghanima, W.; Foyn, S.; Sandset, P. M.; Tveit, A.; Abola, M. T.; Adamiec, R.; Gorski, P.; Kloczko, J.; Lewczuk, J.; Nowak, M.; Musial, J.; Tomkowski, W.; Wronski, J.; Ng, H. J.; Adler, D.; Becker, J. H. R.; Ellis, G.; Isaacs, R.; Bloy, B.; Allie, R.; Eckstein, F.; Jacobson, B.; van Rensburg, J. H. Jansen; Schmidt, S.; Siebert, H.; Zyl, L.; Carrera, M.; del Campo, F.; Diego, I.; Garcia-Bragado, F.; Jiménez, D.; Sánchez-Álvarez, J.; Redondo, M.; Roman Sanchez, P.; Villalta, J.; Eriksson, H.; Villegas-Scivetti, M.; Jonson, T.; Tygesen, H.; Lapidus, L.; Ottosson, E.; Själander, A.; Asmis, L.; Banyai, M.; Heidemann, M.; Baumgartner, I.; Bounameaux, H.; Righini, M.; Frank, U.; Hayoz, D.; Periard, D.; Chang, W. T.; Chiu, K.; Wang, K. Y.; Weng, Z.-C.; Angchaisuksiri, P.; Pothirat, C.; Rojnuckarin, P.; Cohen, A.; Solis, J.; Hunt, B. J.; Luckit, J.; Albrecht, C.; Banish, D.; Feinbloom, D.; Botnick, W.; Chen, D.; Dexter, J.; Ettinger, N.; Gleeson, J.; Jaffer, A.; Joseph, S.; Kennedy, M.; Krell, K.; Lavender, R.; Lyons, R. M.; Moll, S.; Nadar, V.; Darrow, K.; Hardman, V.; Rathbun, S.; Rehm, J.; Rodriguez-Cintron, W.; Stevens, K.; Wright, P.; Ramaswamy, M.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND A fixed-dose regimen of rivaroxaban, an oral factor Xa inhibitor, has been shown to be as effective as standard anticoagulant therapy for the treatment of deep-vein thrombosis, without the need for laboratory monitoring. This approach may also simplify the treatment of pulmonary embolism.

  14. Phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors (PDE5i) and pulmonary embolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, R.F.; Bijl, A.; Van Puijenbroek, E.P.

    Introduction: PDE5i-related arterial thromboembolism is described in literature. Published venous thrombotic events are limited to one case of pulmonary embolism (tadalafil) and of recurrent deep venous thrombosis (DVT) related to sildenafil. Aim of the study: Presentation of two cases of vardenafil

  15. The New Diagnostic Marker For Acute Pulmonary Embolism In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The New Diagnostic Marker For Acute Pulmonary Embolism In Emergency Department; Mean Platelet Volume. Fahrettin Talay, Tarık Ocak, Aytekin Alcelik, Kurşat Erkuran, Akcan Akkaya, Arif Duran, Abdullah Demirhan, Ozlem Kar Kurt, Zehra Asuk ...

  16. Acute pulmonary embolism. Part 1: Epidemiology and diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douma, Renée A.; Kamphuisen, Pieter W.; Büller, Harry R.

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a frequently occurring, acute, and potentially fatal condition. Numerous risk factors for PE, both inherited and acquired, have been identified. Adequate diagnosis is mandatory to prevent PE-related morbidity and mortality on the one hand, and unnecessary treatment on the

  17. Acute pulmonary embolism: A review | Saleh | Nigerian Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a common clinical disorder which is associated with high morbidity and mortality if untreated. Due to the high morbidity and mortality associated with undiagnosed and poorly treated PE, there is a need for protocols based on risk factor assessment to facilitate early diagnosis of PE ...

  18. MRI of pulmonary embolism; MRT der akuten Lungenembolie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, C.; Schoenberg, S.O. [Universitaetsklinikum Mannheim, Medizinische Fakultaet Mannheim der Universitaet Heidelberg, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Mannheim (Germany); Thieme, S.; Clevert, D.; Reiser, M.F. [Klinikum Grosshadern der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany); Ley, S. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum Heidelberg, Abteilung Radiologie, Heidelberg (Germany); Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Abteilung Paediatrische Radiologie, Heidelberg (Germany); Kauczor, H.U. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum Heidelberg, Abteilung Radiologie, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2007-08-15

    Recent technical developments have substantially improved the potential of MRI for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. On the MR scanner side this includes the development of short magnets and dedicated whole-body MRI systems, which allow a comprehensive evaluation of pulmonary embolism and deep venous thrombosis in a single exam. The introduction of parallel imaging has substantially improved the spatial and temporal resolution of pulmonary MR angiography. By combining time-resolved pulmonary perfusion MRI with high-resolution pulmonary MRA a sensitivity and specificity of over 90% is achievable, which is comparable to the accuracy of CTA. Thus, for certain patient groups, such as patients with contraindications to iodinated contrast media and young women with a low clinical probability for pulmonary embolism, MRI can be considered as a first-line imaging tool for the assessment of pulmonary embolism. (orig.) [German] Technische Weiterentwicklungen der MRT haben deren Moeglichkeiten fuer die Diagnostik der Lungenembolie erheblich verbessert. Hierzu zaehlen auf Geraeteseite kuerzere Magneten sowie dedizierte Ganzkoerper-MRT-Systeme, die einerseits den Patientenzugang beguenstigen und andererseits eine Abklaerung einer potenziell zugrunde liegenden Venenthrombose in einer Untersuchung ermoeglichen. Auf Seite der Sequenztechnik hat die Einfuehrung der parallelen Bildgebung die raeumliche und zeitliche Aufloesung der MR-Angiographie (MRA) der Lunge deutlich verbessert. Durch eine Kombination zeitaufgeloester Messungen der Lungenperfusion und einer raeumlich hochaufgeloesten MRA kann fuer die Diagnostik der Lungenembolie eine Sensitivitaet und Spezifitaet von ueber 90% erzielt werden, was vergleichbar der Genauigkeit der CT-Angiographie (CTA) ist. Daher kann die MRT fuer bestimmte Personen, wie z. B. Patienten mit Kontraindikationen gegen jodhaltige Roentgenkontrastmittel (z. B. Hyperthyreose) oder juengere Frauen mit einer geringen klinischen Wahrscheinlichkeit fuer

  19. Identification of patients with low-risk pulmonary embolism suitable for outpatient treatment using the pulmonary embolism severity index (PESI).

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCabe, A

    2013-06-01

    There is increasing evidence that outpatient treatment of patients with low-risk stable pulmonary embolism (PE) is safe, effective and potentially reduces costs. It is not clear how many patients presenting to an Irish Emergency Department (ED) are potentially suitable for outpatient management.

  20. CT pulmonary angiography findings that predict 30-day mortality in patients with acute pulmonary embolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bach, Andreas Gunter, E-mail: mail@andreas-bach.de [Department of Radiology, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Ernst-Grube-Str. 40, 06120 Halle (Germany); Nansalmaa, Baasai; Kranz, Johanna [Department of Radiology, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Ernst-Grube-Str. 40, 06120 Halle (Germany); Taute, Bettina-Maria [Department of Internal Medicine, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Ernst-Grube-Str. 40, 06120 Halle (Germany); Wienke, Andreas [Institute of Medical Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Informatics, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Magdeburger-Str. 8, 06112 Halle (Germany); Schramm, Dominik; Surov, Alexey [Department of Radiology, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Ernst-Grube-Str. 40, 06120 Halle (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • In patients with acute pulmonary embolism contrast reflux in inferior vena cava is significantly stronger in non-survivors (odds ratio 3.29; p < 0.001). • This finding is independent from the following comorbidities: heart insufficiency and pulmonary hypertension. • Measurement of contrast reflux is a new and robust radiologic method for predicting 30-day mortality in patients with acute pulmonary embolism. • Measurement of contrast reflux is a better predictor of 30-day mortality after acute pulmonary embolism than any other existing radiologic predictor. This includes thrombus distribution, and morphometric measurements of right ventricular dysfunction. - Abstract: Purpose: Standard computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) can be used to diagnose acute pulmonary embolism. In addition, multiple findings at CTPA have been proposed as potential tools for risk stratification. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to examine the prognostic value of (I) thrombus distribution, (II) morphometric parameters of right ventricular dysfunction, and (III) contrast reflux in inferior vena cava on 30-day mortality. Material and methods: In a retrospective, single-center study from 06/2005 to 01/2010 365 consecutive patients were included. Inclusion criteria were: presence of acute pulmonary embolism, and availability of 30-day follow-up. A review of patient charts and images was performed. Results: There were no significant differences between the group of 326 survivors and 39 non-survivors in (I) thrombus distribution, and (II) morphometric measurements of right ventricular dysfunction. However, (III) contrast reflux in inferior vena cava was significantly stronger in non-survivors (odds ratio 3.29; p < 0.001). Results were independent from comorbidities like heart insufficiency and pulmonary hypertension. Conclusion: Measurement of contrast reflux is a new and robust method for predicting 30-day mortality in patients with acute pulmonary

  1. Radiographic findings in pulmonary hypertension from unresolved embolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodruff, W.W. III; Hoeck, B.E.; Chitwood, W.R. Jr.; Lyerly, H.K.; Sabiston, D.C. Jr.; Chen, J.T.T.

    1985-04-01

    Pulmonary artery hypertension with chronic pulmonary embolism is an uncommon entity that is potentially treatable with pulmonary embolectomy. Although the classic radiographic features have been described, several recent investigators report a significant percentage of these patients with normal chest radiographs. In a series of 22 patients, no normal radiographs were seen. Findings included cardiomegaly (86.4%) with right-sided enlargement (68.4%), right descending pulmonary artery enlargement (54.5%), azygos vein enlargement (27.3%), mosaic oligemia (68.2%), chronic volume loss (27.3%), atelectasis and/or effusion (22.7%), and pleural thickening (13.6%). Good correlation with specific areas of diminished vascularity was seen on chest radiographs compared with pulmonary angiograms.

  2. Radiographic findings in pulmonary hypertension from unresolved embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodruff, W.W. III; Hoeck, B.E.; Chitwood, W.R. Jr.; Lyerly, H.K.; Sabiston, D.C. Jr.; Chen, J.T.T.

    1985-01-01

    Pulmonary artery hypertension with chronic pulmonary embolism is an uncommon entity that is potentially treatable with pulmonary embolectomy. Although the classic radiographic features have been described, several recent investigators report a significant percentage of these patients with normal chest radiographs. In a series of 22 patients, no normal radiographs were seen. Findings included cardiomegaly (86.4%) with right-sided enlargement (68.4%), right descending pulmonary artery enlargement (54.5%), azygos vein enlargement (27.3%), mosaic oligemia (68.2%), chronic volume loss (27.3%), atelectasis and/or effusion (22.7%), and pleural thickening (13.6%). Good correlation with specific areas of diminished vascularity was seen on chest radiographs compared with pulmonary angiograms

  3. The iPad as a mobile device for CT display and interpretation: diagnostic accuracy for identification of pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Pamela T; Zimmerman, Stefan L; Heath, David; Eng, John; Horton, Karen M; Scott, William W; Fishman, Elliot K

    2012-08-01

    Recent software developments enable interactive, real-time axial, 2D and 3D CT display on an iPad by cloud computing from a server for remote rendering. The purpose of this study was to compare radiologists' interpretative performance on the iPad to interpretation on the conventional picture archive and communication system (PACS). Fifty de-identified contrast-enhanced CT exams performed for suspected pulmonary embolism were compiled as an educational tool to prepare our residents for night call. Two junior radiology attendings blindly interpreted the cases twice, one reader used the PACS first, and the other interpreted on the iPad first. After an interval of at least 2 weeks, the cases were reinterpreted in different order using the other display technique. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for identification of pulmonary embolism were compared for each interpretation method. Pulmonary embolism was present in 25 patients, ranging from main pulmonary artery to subsegmental thrombi. Both readers interpreted 98 % of cases correctly regardless of display platform. There was no significant difference in sensitivity (98 vs 100 %, p = 1.0), specificity (98 vs 96 %, p = 1.0), or accuracy (98 vs 98 %, p = 1.0) for interpretation with the iPad vs the PACS, respectively. CT interpretation on an iPad enabled accurate identification of pulmonary embolism, equivalent to display on the PACS. This mobile device has the potential to expand radiologists' availability for consultation and expedite emergency patient management.

  4. Partial pulmonary embolization disrupts alveolarization in fetal sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hooper Stuart B

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although bronchopulmonary dysplasia is closely associated with an arrest of alveolar development and pulmonary capillary dysplasia, it is unknown whether these two features are causally related. To investigate the relationship between pulmonary capillaries and alveolar formation, we partially embolized the pulmonary capillary bed. Methods Partial pulmonary embolization (PPE was induced in chronically catheterized fetal sheep by injection of microspheres into the left pulmonary artery for 1 day (1d PPE; 115d gestational age; GA or 5 days (5d PPE; 110-115d GA. Control fetuses received vehicle injections. Lung morphology, secondary septal crests, elastin, collagen, myofibroblast, PECAM1 and HIF1α abundance and localization were determined histologically. VEGF-A, Flk-1, PDGF-A and PDGF-Rα mRNA levels were measured using real-time PCR. Results At 130d GA (term ~147d, in embolized regions of the lung the percentage of lung occupied by tissue was increased from 29 ± 1% in controls to 35 ± 1% in 1d PPE and 44 ± 1% in 5d PPE fetuses (p VEGF and Flk-1, although a small increase in PDGF-Rα expression at 116d GA, from 1.00 ± 0.12 in control fetuses to 1.61 ± 0.18 in 5d PPE fetuses may account for impaired differentiation of alveolar myofibroblasts and alveolar development. Conclusions PPE impairs alveolarization without adverse systemic effects and is a novel model for investigating the role of pulmonary capillaries and alveolar myofibroblasts in alveolar formation.

  5. Pulmonary Embolism as the First Manifestation of Multiple Myeloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Vallianou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple myeloma is considered a hypercoagulable state due to several mechanisms such as the increased IL-6 and immunoglobulins production, the defective fibrinolytic mechanism, and the acquired resistance to activated protein C that are involved in the pathogenesis and clinical futures of the disease. We describe a case of a female patient who presented to the hospital with pulmonary embolism as the first manifestation of the hypercoagulability of multiple myeloma.

  6. Pulmonary fat embolism induced intravenous injection of autologous bone marrow in rabbit: CT and pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Seong Jin; Sung, Dong Wook; Jun, Yang Hyun; Oh, Joo Hyung; Ko, Young Tae; Lee, Joo Hee; Yoon, Yup

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the correlation between CT and pathologic findings of pulmonary fat embolism in rabbits. In 16 rabbits, pulmonary fat embolism was induced by intravenous injection of autologous bone marrow(mean 3.3 mL). Chest CT scans were obtained immediately(within 1 hour), and 1, 3, and 7 days after embolization. The rabbits were divided into four groups. Group 1 underwent CT scanning immediately after embolization, group 2 immediately and 1 day after embolization, group 3 immediately, 1 day and 3 days after embolization, group 4 immediately, 1 day, 3 days and 7 days after embolization. Pathologic specimens were obtained immediately after the last CT scan. The earliest CT findings of pulmonary fat embolism in rabbits were peripheral lung lucency(16/16, 100%), perivascular ground-glass(12/16, 75.0%) and enlargement of the central pulmonary artery(11/16, 68.8%). Pathologically, perivascular ground-glass opacity correlated with extensive perivascular alveolar congestion and enlargement of the central pulmonary artery correlated with perivascular connective tissue edema and reactive pulmonary arterial engorgement. Peripheral lung lucency was probably caused by embolic occlusion of the pulmonary artery and decreased perfusion and air trapping induced by arterial and bronchial spasm associated with hypoxia. CT scans obtained 1 and 3 days after embolization showed nodules and patchy ground-glass opacity and consolidation. Aggregation of nodules resulted in patch opacities. Pathologically, pulmonary nodules correlated with focal inflammation surrounding an artery and parenchymal opacity correlated with parenchymal consolidation and hemorrhagic edema. CT scans and pathologic specimens obtained 7 days after embolization showed improvement of parenchymal lung abnormalities. Pulmonary fat embolism in rabbits show CT and pathologic findings which vary with dynamic change. Typical earliest findings of pulmonary fat embolism were peripheral lung lucency, perivascular ground

  7. Acute Pulmonary Embolism Following Laparoscopic Ovariectomy: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Sheng Chu

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Laparoscopic surgery is usually considered to be less invasive when compared to traditional laparotomy, and is regarded as a relatively low-risk procedure for postoperative complications because of the reduced surgical stress and earlier mobilization. However, we describe a 47-year-old woman who presented with acute respiratory distress, drowsy consciousness, and circulatory collapse shortly after gynecologic laparoscopic ovariectomy for removing an ovarian teratoma at a local hospital. After resuscitation, the patient was transferred to our emergency department. Immediate bedside electrocardiographic and echocardiographic examination results led to acute pulmonary embolism being quickly diagnosed. The patient received subsequent intensive care with smooth course. Although pulmonary embolism is rare after laparoscopic surgery, early detection and quick treatment are important in the management of this life-threatening complication and offer good prognosis. The risk of pulmonary embolism after gynecologic laparoscopic surgery remains unclear. Therefore, the decision to provide prophylaxis is up to the individual physician, and should take into consideration the patient's individual risk factors and comorbidities.

  8. Pulmonary embolism in an adolescent soccer player: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffatt, Kody; Silberberg, Phillip J; Gnarra, David J

    2007-06-01

    Pulmonary emboli are potentially life threatening and are rare in the young, healthy, athletic population. We describe the presentation of pulmonary emboli in an otherwise healthy athlete; this has not been reported previously in the literature. A 16-yr-old male soccer player with no apparent risk factors presented in distress with bilateral pulmonary emboli. An extensive workup did not reveal a cause for this phenomenon. The patient was anticoagulated, and a Greenfield inferior vena cava filter was placed because of recurrent symptoms and poor compliance with anticoagulation. This case report illustrates the importance of considering pulmonary embolism as a diagnosis in athletes who present with sudden onset of dyspnea with no discernable cause. Greenfield filter placement in the management of these cases remains controversial.

  9. Role of combined perfusion/ventilation scanning in diagnosis of pulmonary embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moustafa, H.; Elhaddad, SH.; Wageeh, SH.; Samy, A.; Abdo, S.

    1995-01-01

    This study was conducted on 200 patients with suspected pulmonary embolism. Their age ranged 9-74 years with a mean age of 41.9+14.6 years.The commonest symptoms were dyspnea; chest pain and haemoptysis in 67.5%,49.5% and 14.5% respectively, whereas the main signs were tachycardia in 64.5% followed by rales and oedema of lower limbs in 28.5% and 14% respectively. Cardiac diseases were presenting the main risk factors in 47% followed by DVT, surgery, COLD in 24%,10% and 9.5% respectively. perfusion lung scan was normal in 27.5%, whereas low, intermediate and high probability scans were seen in 7%,23.5% and 42% respectively. The addition of ventilation scan, change probability of perfusion defects into 18.5%,19% and 31.5% in low, intermediate and high probability scans respectively. In addition 3.5% of patient diagnosed as non- embolic disease. There was significant correlation with increase number of symptoms and signs in relation to scan probability in both whole group and high probability group. Also, the incidence of pulmonary embolism appear to be additive with increase number of risk factors in the group of high probability scans. 3 figs., 3 tabs

  10. Unsuspected pulmonary embolism identified using multidetector computed tomography in hospital outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, C; Jones, M; Girvin, F; Ritchie, G; Murchison, J T

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence of unsuspected pulmonary embolism (PE) in an unselected population of outpatients undergoing contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) for indications other than the investigation of PE. Outpatients undergoing CT of the chest over a 6-month period were retrospectively identified and images reviewed. Inpatients and patients undergoing unenhanced CT of the chest were excluded. Data, including referring specialty, patient age and sex, reasons for examination, level of embolism, image quality, and section thickness were recorded. Radiology reports were reviewed with respect to whether or not the embolism was noted at the time of initial reporting. Following exclusions 440 patients were reviewed (195 women and 245 men). PE was identified in 10 of the 440 patients, an incidence of 2.23%. One pulmonary embolus was in the main pulmonary artery, three were in lobar arteries, three in segmental arteries, and three in subsegmental arteries. Patients over the age of 60 years were more likely to have an embolism (9/300, 2.9%) compared with those under 60 years (1/140, 0.7%). Seven of the 10 positive examinations were carried out in patients who were known or later shown to have malignancy. Seven of the 10 emboli were reported at the time of initial reporting. The outpatient population has a significant incidence of unsuspected PE. PE should be actively sought when reporting examinations performed for alternative indications, particularly where cancer is a known or suspected diagnosis. Copyright 2009 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Pulmonary embolism: ′the great masquerader′ of pneumonia in a patient with progressive supranuclear palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin G Manappallil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with Parkinson′s disease are at risk of developing aspiration pneumonia. Pulmonary embolism is a rare but life-threatening complication in such patients, but could the same be true in progressive supranuclear palsy, an atypical form of Parkinsonism? This case report aims at highlighting the development of unprovoked pulmonary embolism in a patient with progressive supranuclear palsy and also describes how pulmonary embolism can mimic pneumonia in such patients.

  12. Massive hemoptysis in a patient with pulmonary embolism, a real therapeutic conundrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiolanda Herodotou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Massive Hemoptysis and pulmonary embolism are two very severe and potentially fatal pulmonary emergencies requiring completely different treatments. We present the case of a 45-year old male transmitted to our Hospital for massive hemoptysis who at the same time was found to suffer from pulmonary embolism. Hemoptysis was treated with bronchial artery embolization which resulted in cessation of haemorrhage and allowed the administration of anticoagulant therapy a few days later. This case report gives an answer on how to manage a real therapeutic conundrum which is the coexistence of a massive hemoptysis and a concomitant pulmonary embolism.

  13. Role of ventilation scintigraphy in diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism: an evaluation using artificial neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evander, Eva; Holst, Holger; Jaerund, Andreas; Wollmer, Per; Edenbrandt, Lars; Ohlsson, Mattias; Aastroem, Karl

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the value of the ventilation study in the diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism using a new automated method. Either perfusion scintigrams alone or two different combinations of ventilation/perfusion scintigrams were used as the only source of information regarding pulmonary embolism. A completely automated method based on computerised image processing and artificial neural networks was used for the interpretation. Three artificial neural networks were trained for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. Each network was trained with 18 automatically obtained features. Three different sets of features originating from three sets of scintigrams were used. One network was trained using features obtained from each set of perfusion scintigrams, including six projections. The second network was trained using features from each set of (joint) ventilation and perfusion studies in six projections. A third network was trained using features from the perfusion study in six projections combined with a single ventilation image from the posterior view. A total of 1,087 scintigrams from patients with suspected pulmonary embolism were used for network training. The test group consisted of 102 patients who had undergone both scintigraphy and pulmonary angiography. Performances in the test group were measured as area under the receiver operation characteristic curve. The performance of the neural network in interpreting perfusion scintigrams alone was 0.79 (95% confidence limits 0.71-0.86). When one ventilation image (posterior view) was added to the perfusion study, the performance was 0.84 (0.77-0.90). This increase was statistically significant (P=0.022). The performance increased to 0.87 (0.81-0.93) when all perfusion and ventilation images were used, and the increase in performance from 0.79 to 0.87 was also statistically significant (P=0.016). The automated method presented here for the interpretation of lung scintigrams shows a significant

  14. [Air embolism during lumbar discal hernia repair. Retroperioneal vessels lesions have to be suspected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieutaud, T; Terrier, A; Linne, M; Farhat, F; Tahon, F

    2006-03-01

    Occurrence of deep PETCO(2) drop during surgical lumbar disk repair is rare but dramatic. This case report leads to the diagnosis of retroperitoneal vessels lesions. We review the different diagnosis related to the drop of the PETCO(2) during surgery in the genupectoral position. We recommend that the diagnosis of retroperitoneal vessels lesion have to be suspected early if air embolism occurs during lumbar disk surgery.

  15. Fatal pulmonary embolism in hospitalized patients. Clinical diagnosis versus pathological confirmation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio Tinoco Mesquita

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE - To assess the incidence of fatal pulmonary embolism (FPE, the accuracy of clinical diagnosis, and the profile of patients who suffered an FPE in a tertiary University Hospital. METHODS - Analysis of the records of 3,890 autopsies performed at the Department of General Pathology from January 1980 to December 1990. RESULTS - Among the 3,980 autopsies, 109 were cases of clinically suspected FPE; of these, 28 cases of FPE were confirmed. FPE accounted for 114 deaths, with clinical suspicion in 28 cases. The incidence of FPE was 2.86%. No difference in sex distribution was noted. Patients in the 6th decade of life were most affected. The following conditions were more commonly related to FPE: neoplasias (20% and heart failure (18.5%. The conditions most commonly misdiagnosed as FPE were pulmonary edema (16%, pneumonia (15% and myocardial infarction (10%. The clinical diagnosis of FPE showed a sensitivity of 25.6%, a specificity of 97.9%, and an accuracy of 95.6%. CONCLUSION - The diagnosis of pulmonary embolism made on clinical grounds still has considerable limitations.

  16. Unusual ventilation perfusion scintigram in a case of immunologic pulmonary edema clinically simulating pulmonary embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campeau, R.J.; Faust, J.M.; Ahmad, S.

    1987-01-01

    A case of immunologic pulmonary edema secondary to hydrochlorothiazide allergy developed in a 55-year-old woman that clinically simulated pulmonary embolism. The patient had abnormal washin images with normal washout images on an Xe-133 ventilation study. On the perfusion study, large bilateral central and posterior perfusion defects were present that showed an unusual mirror image pattern on the lateral and posterior oblique views. Resolution of radiographic and scintigraphic abnormalities occurred over a 3-day period in conjunction with corticosteroid therapy

  17. Unusual ventilation perfusion scintigram in a case of immunologic pulmonary edema clinically simulating pulmonary embolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campeau, R.J.; Faust, J.M.; Ahmad, S.

    1987-11-01

    A case of immunologic pulmonary edema secondary to hydrochlorothiazide allergy developed in a 55-year-old woman that clinically simulated pulmonary embolism. The patient had abnormal washin images with normal washout images on an Xe-133 ventilation study. On the perfusion study, large bilateral central and posterior perfusion defects were present that showed an unusual mirror image pattern on the lateral and posterior oblique views. Resolution of radiographic and scintigraphic abnormalities occurred over a 3-day period in conjunction with corticosteroid therapy.

  18. Rescue surgical pulmonary embolectomy for acute massive pulmonary embolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Abdulrahman Elassal

    2016-08-01

    Conclusion: Surgical pulmonary embolectomy is a rescue operation in high-risk PE. It could save patients with preoperative cardiac arrest. Early diagnosis, interdisciplinary team action, appropriate and emergent treatment strategy are necessary for favorable outcome.

  19. Labeling the pulmonary arterial tree in CT images for automatic quantification of pulmonary embolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, R.J.M.; Marquering, H.A.; Dogan, H.; Hendriks, E.A.; De Roos, A.; Reiber, J.H.C.; Stoel, B.C.

    2007-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced CT Angiography has become an accepted diagnostic tool for detecting Pulmonary Embolism (PE). The CT obstruction index proposed by Qanadli, which is based on the number of obstructed arterial segments, enables the quantification of PE severity. Because the required manual

  20. Current role of lung scintigraphy in pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, A; Angiolillo, D J

    2001-12-01

    The pivotal role of lung scintigraphy in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE) has been questioned in recent years due to the introduction of spiral computed tomography. However, the scintigraphic results used for comparisons are often those of the authoritative PIOPED (Prospective Investigation of Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis) study, carried out in the 1980s. Pulmonary scintigraphy has progressed from those years both in the methodological and interpretative fields, although perhaps too slowly. Results better than those of PIOPED's have been presented by study groups who used: 1) perfusion-only approach, 2) SPET imaging; 3) new interpretative criteria; 4) different prediction rules to integrate clinical and scintigraphic probabilities of PE. These advances are still insufficiently recognised by the nuclear medicine community, possibly due to a sort of PIOPED-based "cultural globalisation". This paper reviews the actual advantages and limitations of nuclear medicine techniques, the diagnostic role of scintigraphy within the diagnostic algorithms proposed by international working groups and scientific societies and the results obtained from SPET imaging in the diagnosis of PE.

  1. Current role of lung scintigraphy in pulmonary embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giordano, A.; Angiolillo, D. J.

    2001-01-01

    The pivotal role of lung scintigraphy in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE) has been questioned in recent years due to the introduction of spiral computed tomography. However, the scintigraphic results used for comparisons are often those of the authoritative PIOPED (Prospective Investigation of Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis) study, carried out in the 1980s. Pulmonary scintigraphy has progressed from those years both in the methodological and interpretative fields, although perhaps too slowly. Results better than those of PIOPED's have been presented by study groups who used: 1) perfusion-only approach; 2) SPET imaging; 3) new interpretative criteria; 4) different prediction rules to integrate clinical and scintigraphic probabilities of PE. These advances are still insufficiently recognised by the nuclear medicine community, possibly due to a sort of PIOPED-based cultural globalisation. This paper reviews the actual advantages and limitations of nuclear medicine techniques, the diagnostic role of scintigraphy within the diagnostic algorithms proposed by international working groups and scientific societies and the results obtained from SPET imaging in the diagnosis of PE

  2. Pulmonary Embolism Originating from a Hepatic Hydatid Cyst Ruptured into the Inferior Vena Cava: CT and MRI Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Necdet Poyraz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary embolism due to hydatid cysts is a very rare clinical entity. Hydatid pulmonary embolism can be distinguished from other causes of pulmonary embolism with contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. MRI especially displays the cystic nature of lesions better than CECT. Here we report a 45-year-old male patient with the pulmonary embolism due to ruptured hydatid liver cyst into the inferior vena cava.

  3. Fatal pulmonary embolism in hospitalized patients: a large autopsy-based matched case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solange Aparecida Petilo Carvalho Bricola

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Pulmonary embolism is an underdiagnosed major cause of death for hospitalized patients. The objective of this study was to identify the conditions associated with fatal pulmonary embolism in this population. METHODS: A total of 13,074 autopsy records were evaluated in a case-control study. Patients were matched by age, sex, and year of death, and factors potentially associated with fatal pulmonary embolism were analyzed using univariate and multivariate conditional logistic regression. RESULTS: Pulmonary embolism was considered fatal in 328 (2.5% patients. In the multivariate analysis, conditions that were more common in patients who died of pulmonary embolism were atherosclerosis, congestive heart failure, and neurological surgery. Some conditions were negatively associated with fatal pulmonary embolism, including hemorrhagic stroke, aortic aneurism, cirrhosis, acquired immune deficiency syndrome, and pneumonia. In the control group, patients with hemorrhagic stroke and aortic aneurism had short hospital stays (8.5 and 8.8 days, respectively, and the hemorrhage itself was the main cause of death in most of them (90.6% and 68.4%, respectively, which may have prevented the development of pulmonary embolism. Cirrhotic patients in the control group also had short hospital stays (7 days, and 50% died from bleeding complications. CONCLUSIONS: In this large autopsy study, atherosclerosis, congestive heart failure, and neurological surgery were diagnoses associated with fatal pulmonary embolism.

  4. Unprovoked Pulmonary Embolism in a Young Patient with Marfan Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Stella; Kilgore, Andrew; Thornhill, Rosanne; Rako, Kyle; Meier, Ali; Pora, Gavriella; Costello, Jillian M; Dee, Christine

    2017-09-05

    Marfan syndrome is a rare connective tissue disorder with a prevalence of approximately 2 to 3 per 10,000 individuals. There have been some reports of young patients with Marfan syndrome developing arteriovenous thromboembolism. These events were unprovoked and recurrent. Owing to its rarity, hypercoagulopathy and other metabolic derangement in patients with Marfan syndrome remains largely unknown. Herein, we report a case of a young man with Marfan syndrome who had myocardial infarction and pulmonary embolism. We hope that this case adds to the scant body of knowledge about this patient population.

  5. Deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism following physical restraint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, S B; Jensen, T N; Bolwig, T

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We describe a case of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) following the use of physical restraint in a patient with a diagnosis of acute delusional psychotic disorder. METHOD: A new case report of DVT and PE associated with prolonged physical restraint is presented...... physical restraint may occur in spite of no pre-existing risk factors. Medical guidelines for the prevention of thrombosis following physical restraint are presented. Despite the absence of controlled trials of treatment effectiveness, the catastrophic outcome of DVT and PE warrants early and vigorous...

  6. Deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism following physical restraint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, S B; Jensen, T N; Bolwig, T

    2005-01-01

    . The literature on physical restraint, DVT, and PE was reviewed using a search of Medline and Psychinfo from 1966 to the present. RESULTS: Four other reported cases of DVT and PE were found in association with physically restrained patients. CONCLUSION: Risk of DVT and PE in association with immobilization during......OBJECTIVE: We describe a case of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) following the use of physical restraint in a patient with a diagnosis of acute delusional psychotic disorder. METHOD: A new case report of DVT and PE associated with prolonged physical restraint is presented...... intervention in patients undergoing physical restraint....

  7. Pulmonary Embolism Associated with Hyperemesis Gravidarum Two Case Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bekir Keskinkılıç

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary embolism is a major cause of death during pregnancy or the puerperium. The hemostatic changes in pregnancy creates a prothrombotic milieu. Hyperemesis gravidarum  is one of the recognised risk factors for venous tromboembolism.Two cases of maternal mortality were attributed to  PE associated with severe hyperemesis gravidarum in 2014 in Turkey. These two cases have been reported and discussed in the literature review. We aimed to alert clinicians that thromboprophylaxis should be considered when a pregnant woman suffers vomiting leading to clinical evidence of dehydration.

  8. Pulmonary embolism as the primary presenting feature of nephrotic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallavi Periwal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 36-year-old previously healthy male presented with subacute onset of shortness of breath and chest pain. He was diagnosed with bilateral extensive pulmonary embolism (PE. In the absence of any predisposing factors, an extensive workup for unprovoked thrombophilia was done. During the course of his illness, the patient developed anasarca and was diagnosed to be suffering from nephrotic syndrome (NS, secondary to membranous glomerulopathy. Although, thrombotic complications are commonly associated with NS, it is unusual for PE to be the primary presenting feature in these patients.

  9. Updates on Advanced Therapies for Acute Pulmonary Embolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bavand Bikdeli

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Venous thromboembolism is the third common vascular disease after acute myocardial infarction and stroke, and acute pulmonary embolism (PE remains as the most common preventable cause of in-hospital mortality. In addition to routine anticoagulant therapy, several advanced treatment options have been introduced over the past three decades. We provide a succinct and contemporary summary of the evidence base and important indications for inferior vena caval filter placement, systemic and catheter-based thrombolytic therapy, as well as percutaneous and surgical thrombectomy. Appropriate case selection for advance therapies for PE could minimize the adverse effects and costs, while optimizing the outcomes.

  10. Pulmonary embolism in pregnancy: is nuclear medicine imaging still a valid option?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ezwawah, O

    2008-10-01

    In this study we demonstrate our Radiology Department\\'s experience in utilizing low dose (half the normal dose) lung perfusion radionuclide scanning for pregnant patients as the initial investigation for suspected pulmonary embolism (PE). Secondly; we highlight the radiation dose reduction advantages of nuclear medicine imaging over multi-detector computed tomography in this group. We performed a retrospective study of 21 consecutive pregnant women who presented with suspected PE. These patients underwent either lung perfusion scanning or CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA), over a two-year period (May 2005 to July 2007). 19 patients of the cohort studied underwent low dose perfusion-only scintigraphy, with half the usual dose of radionuclide activity. All scans were considered of diagnostic quality. No patient in our study required a ventilation scan. No patient with a negative perfusion scan represented during the 3 month follow up period with PE. We conclude, nuclear medicine imaging is an effective initial investigation for pregnant patients with suspected PE. While scinitigraphy is associated with a greater fetal radiation dose than CTPA, it imparts a lower maternal dose and significantly lower dose to radiosensitive tissues such as breast.

  11. An experimental study of the radiologic-pathologic findings of pulmonary embolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Dong Sung; Oh, Joo Hyung; Yoon, Yup; Cho, Kyu Suck; Choi, Young Gyu; Lee, Joo Hee [Kyunghee Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine; Lee, Soon Jin [Soungkyunkwan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine

    1997-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the low attenuation of mosaic pattern in pulmonary embolism, as observed on HRCT, and to correlate the findings with the pathologic features of resected lung. Using permanent embolic materials, pulmonary embolism was induced in eight Yorkshire pigs. Pre-and post-embolic pulmonary angiography was performed and after 6 weeks, the incidence and pattern of parenchymal change in low attenuation (mosaic pattern), as seen on HRCT, was evaluated. The animals were then sacrificed and contact radiography of the lung was performed. Thirty-eight segments of pathology were taken from the area in which the presence of embolism had been suggested. Pathologic and HRCT findings were then correlated. HRCT findings of pulmonary embolism at six weeks after embolization showed variable patterns of low attenuation, diminished diameter of pulmonary arteries, and normal diameter of bronchi. In cases with large segmental arterial occlusion, the findings of low attenuation was more common; this may be due to reduced blood flow to the embolic area, in combination with bronchiolar spasm. For the early diagnosis of pulmonary embolism, these findings may be useful. (author). 18 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Spontaneous, resolving S1Q3T3 in pulmonary embolism: A case report and literature review on prognostic value of electrocardiography score for pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cygan, Lukasz D; Weizberg, Moshe; Hahn, Barry

    2016-09-01

    Electrocardiography findings in patients with pulmonary embolism have been investigated since 1935. As medicine has evolved, more effective modalities have surpassed the electrocardiogram in diagnostic utility. Despite the advent of these other modalities, the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism remains elusive and the prognosis is variable amongst each clinical presentation of its pathology. After presenting a case of a resolving S1Q3T3 in subsequent electrocardiogram findings of a patient with pulmonary embolism, this literature review will provide information on a 21-point electrocardiogram scoring system that helps the emergency physician stratify the risk of a patient with an acute presentation of pulmonary embolism. Why should emergency care staff be aware of this? Given the time-sensitive nature of diagnosis and appropriate treatment, Electrocardiogram continues to be a tool in the assessment of patients with a clinical suspicion of pulmonary embolism. Based on the information provided, 21-point electrocardiogram score has been shown to have strong usefulness in assessing prognosis of patients presenting with acute pulmonary embolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Diagnostic pathways in acute pulmonary embolism: recommendations of the PIOPED II investigators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Campanini

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Pulmonary embolism (PE is a potentially fatal disease. Diagnosis is challenging for clinicians because clinical presentation is variable and there is no diagnostic test that combines sufficiently high sensitivity and specificity to be used alone in clinically suspected PE. AIM OF THE STUDY PIOPED II investigators have formulated recommendations for the diagnostic approach to patients with suspected PE based on randomized trials. METHODS Diagnostic work-up recommendations were formulated based on the results of the Prospective Investigation of Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis II and outcomes studies. RESULTS In many patients that present the combination of low or moderate clinical probability with negative D-dimer PE can be safely excluded. In other patients with suspected PE and positive D-dimer a CT angiography in combination with CT venography is recommended. PIOPED II investigators have also formulated recommendations for patients with suspected PE and allergy to iodinated contrast medium, with impaired renal function, and for women at fertile age and during pregnancy. In patients with discordant findings between clinical assessment and CTA o CTA/CTV, and with segmental or sub-segmental EP, further evaluation may be necessary and the diagnosis should be re-assessed. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS PIOPED II recommendations are of particular interest because consider, after the right clinical evaluation necessary for risk stratification of PE, the most recent, sensitive and specific imaging techniques for definitive diagnosis, such as CTA and CTV. D-dimer evaluation is recommended but, however, its low specificity is not underlined. The importance of combining CTA and CTV for a complete evaluation of the deep venous system is stated, but the difficulties of a routinary similar approach are not considered and alternative techniques, like compressive ultrasound and Colour Doppler ultrasound, are not proposed. The study faces also the issue of

  14. Automated interpretation of ventilation-perfusion lung scintigrams for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism using artificial neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holst, H.; Jaerund, A.; Traegil, K.; Evander, E.; Edenbrandt, L.; Aastroem, K.; Heyden, A.; Kahl, F.; Sparr, G.; Palmer, J.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a completely automated method for the interpretation of ventilation-perfusion (V-P) lung scintigrams used in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. An artificial neural network was trained for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism using 18 automatically obtained features from each set of V-P scintigrams. The techniques used to process the images included their alignment to templates, the construction of quotient images based on the ventilation and perfusion images, and the calculation of measures describing V-P mismatches in the quotient images. The templates represented lungs of normal size and shape without any pathological changes. Images that could not be properly aligned to the templates were detected and excluded automatically. After exclusion of those V-P scintigrams not properly aligned to the templates, 478 V-P scintigrams remained in a training group of consecutive patients with suspected pulmonary embolism, and a further 87 V-P scintigrams formed a separate test group comprising patients who had undergone pulmonary angiography. The performance of the neural network, measured as the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, was 0.87 (95% confidence limits 0.82-0.92) in the training group and 0.79 (0.69-0.88) in the test group. It is concluded that a completely automated method can be used for the interpretation of V-P scintigrams. The performance of this method is similar to others previously presented, whereby features were extracted manually. (orig.)

  15. Co-existance of Lymph Node Tuberculosis and Pulmonary Embolism: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ižbrahim Koc

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary embolism is occlusion of pulmonary arteries with a material originating from another part of the body and has a high fatality rate if not diagnosed and managed early. Tuberculosis is an infection caused by mycobacterium tuberculosis, generally effecting lungs but involvement of other parts of the body is possible. Here we report a sixty three years old woman who admitted to our clinic with complaints of shortness of breath, weight loss and night sweats. Weight loss and night sweats in old age were suggestive of a malignancy but tumor markers were negative. Low oxygen saturation in a non-smoking previously healty person arise suspicion of pulmonary embolism. Computed tomography pulmonary angiography revealed lymphadenopathy and pulmonary embolism. Pathology of the servical lymph node revealed caseation necrosis. In conclusion in patients with pulmonary embolism who has weight loss and low oxygen saturation beside the malignancy tuberculosis also should be excluded.

  16. Unresolved major pulmonary embolism: Importance of follow-up lung scan in diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, H.S.; Intenzo, C.M.; Park, C.H.

    1986-09-01

    Unresolved major pulmonary embolism (UMPE) is an uncommon condition which causes pulmonary hypertension, cor pulmonale and death. An accurate and prompt diagnosis of UMPE is very important in the management of such patients with pulmonary embolectomy. Folow-up lung scans can lead to earlier diagnosis of UMPE, especially in patients who have a history of acute pulmonary embolism and present with pulmonary hypertension, respiratory insufficiency and cor pulmonale. We report a case of UMPE strongly suggested by follow-up lung scans and subsequently confirmed by pulmonary angiography and postmortem examination.

  17. Pulmonary bone cement embolism: CT angiographic evaluation with material decomposition using gemstone special imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huh, Sun; Lee, Heon [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University Hospital Bucheon, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    We report a case of pulmonary bone cement embolism in a female who presented with dyspnea following multiple sessions of vertebroplasty. She underwent spectral CT pulmonary angiography and the diagnosis was made based on enhanced visualization of radiopaque cement material in the pulmonary arteries and a corresponding decrease in the parenchymal iodine content. Here, we describe the CT angiography findings of bone cement embolism with special emphasis on the potential benefits of spectral imaging, providing additional information on the material composition.

  18. Pulmonary embolism rule-out criteria (PERC) rule in European patients with low implicit clinical probability (PERCEPIC): a multicentre, prospective, observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penaloza, Andrea; Soulié, Caroline; Moumneh, Thomas; Delmez, Quentin; Ghuysen, Alexandre; El Kouri, Dominique; Brice, Christian; Marjanovic, Nicolas S; Bouget, Jacques; Moustafa, Fares; Trinh-Duc, Albert; Le Gall, Catherine; Imsaad, Lionel; Chrétien, Jean-Marie; Gable, Béatrice; Girard, Philippe; Sanchez, Olivier; Schmidt, Jeannot; Le Gal, Grégoire; Meyer, Guy; Delvau, Nicolas; Roy, Pierre-Marie

    2017-12-01

    The ability of the pulmonary embolism rule-out criteria (PERC) to exclude pulmonary embolism without further testing remains debated outside the USA, especially in the population with suspected pulmonary embolism who have a high prevalence of the condition. Our main objective was to prospectively assess the predictive value of negative PERC to rule out pulmonary embolism among European patients with low implicit clinical probability. We did a multicentre, prospective, observational study in 12 emergency departments in France and Belgium. We included consecutive patients aged 18 years or older with suspected pulmonary embolism. Patients were excluded if they had already been hospitalised for more than 2 days, had curative anticoagulant therapy in progress for more than 48 h, or had a diagnosis of thromboembolic disease documented before admission to emergency department. Physicians completed a standardised case report form comprising implicit clinical probability assessment (low, moderate, or high) and a list of risk factors including criteria of the PERC rule. They were asked to follow international recommendations for diagnostic strategy, masked to PERC assessment. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients with low implicit clinical probability and negative PERC who had venous thromboembolic events, diagnosed during initial diagnostic work-up or during 3-month follow-up, as externally adjudicated by an independent committee masked to the PERC and clinical probability assessment. The upper limit of the 95% CI around the 3-month thromboembolic risk was set at 3%. We did all analyses by intention to treat, including all patients with complete follow-up. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02360540. Between May 1, 2015, and April 30, 2016, 1773 consecutive patients with suspected pulmonary embolism were prospectively assessed for inclusion, of whom 1757 were included. 1052 (60%) patients were classed as having low clinical probability

  19. Pulmonary embolism and transitory anti-beta2-GPI antibodies in an adult with chicken pox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viseux, V; Darnige, L; Carmi, E; Chaby, G; Poulain, J F; Cevallos, R; Lok, C; Denoeux, J P

    2000-01-01

    Anti-beta2-glycoprotein I antibodies are considered as a specific marker for the antiphospholipid syndrome. In contrast to lupus circulating anticoagulant and anticardiolipin (aCL) antibodies, they are usually not found at significant levels in infections. We report a case of pulmonary embolism in an adult with varicella. Transient significant levels of aCL antibodies and of IgM anti-beta2-GPI antibodies were observed. No other prothrombotic factor, including free protein S antigen deficiency, was found. The direct pathogenic role of these transient antibodies on the thrombotic event may then be suspected. They are probably associated with VZV acute infection and are absent two months after varicella.

  20. Electron beam computed tomography and ventilation perfusion scintigraphy in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kettner, Beatrice I.; Sandrock, Dirk; Reisinger, Ingrid; Munz, Dieter L.; Enzweiler, Christian N.H.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study, performed in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism (PE), was to compare V/Q scans and electron beam computed tomography (CT) scans on a patient-by-patient and segment-by-segment basis. Both a segment-based and a lobe-based analysis was performed in those patients positive for PE. The diagnosis of PE was assumed on the basis of a mismatch at V/Q scanning or a filling defect in a pulmonary vessel at contrast-enhanced electron beam CT. In 37/45 patients (24 female, 21 male, 58±16 years) with suspected PE, the diagnosis of PE was confirmed or excluded by both modalities, resulting in a correlation of 82% between electron beam CT and V/Q scanning. In the 28 patients positive for PE according to one or both modalities, 504 segments were evaluated. Of these 504 segments, 248 (nearly 50%) showed perfusion defects on V/Q scans, of which only 90 (36%) displayed emboli at electron beam CT. Overall, a total of only 135 of the 504 segments (27%) were abnormal at electron beam CT. More than 50% of the patients with discrepant results did not show an embolus at electron beam CT. It is concluded that there is a good correlation (82%) between V/Q scanning and electron beam CT on a patient-by-patient basis but a markedly less good correlation (62%) in a segment-based analysis. (orig.)

  1. Severity assessment of acute pulmonary embolism: evaluation using helical CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collomb, D.; Paramelle, P.J.; Calaque, O. [Department of Radiology, CHU Grenoble, BP 218, 38043, Grenoble Cedex (France); Bosson, J.L. [Department of Statistics and Vascular diseases, CHU Grenoble, BP 218, 38043, Grenoble Cedex (France); Vanzetto, G. [Department of Cardiology, CHU Grenoble, BP 218, 38043, Grenoble Cedex (France); Barnoud, D. [Department of Medical Intensive Care, CHU Grenoble, BP 218, BP 218, 38043, Grenoble Cedex (France); Pison, C. [Department of Pulmonary Medicine, CHU Grenoble, BP 218, 38043, Grenoble Cedex (France); Coulomb, M.; Ferretti, G.

    2003-07-01

    The objective was to evaluate the helical CT (HCT) criteria that could indicate severe pulmonary embolism (PE). In a retrospective study, 81 patients (mean age 62 years) with clinical suspicion of PE explored by HCT were studied. The patients were separated into three different groups according to clinical severity and treatment decisions: group SPE included patients with severe PE based on clinical data who were treated by fibrinolysis or embolectomy (n=20); group NSPE included patients with non-severe PE who received heparin (n=30); and group WPE included patients without PE (n=31). For each patient we calculated a vascular obstruction index based on the site of obstruction and the degree of occlusion in the pulmonary artery. We noted the HCT signs, i.e., cardiac and pulmonary artery dimensions, that could indicate acute cor pulmonale. According to multivariate analysis, factors significantly correlated with the severity of PE were: the vascular obstruction index (group SPE: 54%; group NSPE: 24%; p<0.001); the maximum minor axis of the left ventricle (group SPE: 30.2 mm; group NSPE: 40.4 mm; p<0.001); the diameter of the central pulmonary artery (group SPE: 32.4 mm; group NSPE: 28.3 mm; p<0.001); the maximum minor axis of the right ventricle (group SPE: 47.5 mm; group NSPE: 42.7 mm; p=0.029); the right ventricle/left ventricle minor axis ratio (group SPE: 1.63; group NSPE: 1.09; p<0.0001). Our data suggest that hemodynamic severity of PE can be assessed on HCT scans by measuring four main criteria: the vascular obstruction index; the minimum diameter of the left ventricle; the RV:LV ratio; and the diameter of the central pulmonary artery. (orig.)

  2. Quantification of right ventricular function in acute pulmonary embolism: relation to extent of pulmonary perfusion defects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergaard, J.; Schaadt, B.K.; Lund, J.O.

    2008-01-01

    and global and regional performance. Intermediate and large pulmonary emboli were associated with a significant impact on RV pressure and function. For small pulmonary emboli obstructing ...Aims The relation of the extent of obstruction of the pulmonary vascutature in pulmonary embolism (PE) and impact on right ventricular (RV) hemodynamics is not well established. This study evaluated the relation of size of perfusion defects and changes in echocardiographic measures of global...... and regional RV dysfunction in 58 consecutive patients with non-massive PE. Methods and results Patients were compared with 58 age-matched controls that had normal ventilation/perfusion scintigraphies. A 2D, Doppler and Tissue Doppler echocardiography performed on the same day, quantified RV pressure...

  3. Quantification of right ventricular function in acute pulmonary embolism: relation to extent of pulmonary perfusion defects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergaard, J.; Schaadt, B.K.; Lund, J.O.

    2008-01-01

    Aims The relation of the extent of obstruction of the pulmonary vascutature in pulmonary embolism (PE) and impact on right ventricular (RV) hemodynamics is not well established. This study evaluated the relation of size of perfusion defects and changes in echocardiographic measures of global...... and regional RV dysfunction in 58 consecutive patients with non-massive PE. Methods and results Patients were compared with 58 age-matched controls that had normal ventilation/perfusion scintigraphies. A 2D, Doppler and Tissue Doppler echocardiography performed on the same day, quantified RV pressure...... and global and regional performance. Intermediate and large pulmonary emboli were associated with a significant impact on RV pressure and function. For small pulmonary emboli obstructing

  4. Pulmonary embolism hotline 2012. Recent and expected trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinides, S; Lankeit, M

    2013-01-01

    Management of acute pulmonary embolism (PE) has advanced considerably in the past year, and progress is expected to continue in 2013. To help determine the optimal management strategy for normotensive patients with intermediate-risk PE, the Pulmonary Embolism Thrombolysis (PEITHO) study completed enrolment of 1006 patients with evidence of right ventricular dysfunction (by echocardiography or computed tomography) plus a positive troponin test. Patients have been randomised to thrombolytic treatment with tenecteplase versus placebo, and the effects on clinical end points (death or haemodynamic collapse) assessed at 7 and 30 days. The results are expected in spring 2013; long-term follow-up is also being performed. The results of a randomised trial on ultrasound-enhanced low-dose catheter-delivered thrombolysis will also become available soon. While optimisation of treatment with vitamin K antagonists incorporating pharmacogenetic testing is still being pursued, new oral anticoagulants are entering the field of PE treatment and secondary prophylaxis. Following the successful use of rivaroxaban as single oral drug therapy in the EINSTEIN-PE trial, the approval of this drug has recently been extended to cover, apart from deep vein thrombosis, PE as well. The apixaban (AMPLIFY) and edoxaban (HOKUSAI) trials have finished recruitment of PE patients, and their results will become available shortly. In the meantime, the AMPLIFY-EXT trial showed that both the therapeutic (5 mg twice daily) and the prophylactic dose (2.5 mg twice daily) of apixaban are effective and safe for long-term secondary prophylaxis after PE. For the extended prophylaxis (after the reommended initial anticoagulation period) of the (few) patients who are unable to tolerate any form of anticoagulation, low-dose asprin may be a safe albeit moderately efficacious option, as indicated by two recent investigator-initiated trials with a total of 1224 patients.

  5. Factors Influencing Hospital Stay for Pulmonary Embolism. A Cohort Study.

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    Rodríguez-Núñez, Nuria; Ruano-Raviña, Alberto; Abelleira, Romina; Ferreiro, Lucía; Lama, Adriana; González-Barcala, Francisco J; Golpe, Antonio; Toubes, María E; Álvarez-Dobaño, José M; Valdés, Luis

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to identify factors influencing hospital stay due to pulmonary embolism. We performed a retrospective cohort study of patients hospitalized between 2010 and 2015. Patients were identified using information recorded in hospital discharge reports (ICD-9-CM codes 415.11 and 415.19). We included 965 patients with a median stay of 8 days (IQR 6-13 days). Higher scores on the simplified Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index (sPESI) were associated with increased probability of longer hospital stay. The probability of a hospital stay longer than the median was 8.65 (95% CI 5.42-13.79) for patients referred to the Internal Medicine Department and 1.54 (95% CI 1.07-2.24) for patients hospitalized in other departments, compared to those referred to the Pneumology Department. Patients with grade 3 on the modified Medical Research Council dyspnea scale had an odds ratio of 1.63 (95% CI: 1.07-2.49). The likelihood of a longer than median hospital stay was 1.72 (95% CI: 0.85-3.48) when oral anticoagulation (OAC) was initiated 2-3 days after admission, and 2.43 (95% CI: 1.16-5.07) when initiated at 4-5 days, compared to OAC initiation at 0-1 days. sPESI grade, the department of referral from the Emergency Department, the grade of dyspnea and the time of initiating OAC were associated with a longer hospital stay. Copyright © 2017 SEPAR. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Use of bisphosphonates and raloxifene and risk of deep venous thromboembolism and pulmonary embolism

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    Vestergaard, P; Schwartz, K; Pinholt, E M

    2010-01-01

    Prior studies have associated raloxifene and strontium ranelate with deep venous thromboembolism and pulmonary embolism. In a cohort study, we observed an increased risk also with the bisphosphonates. However, the increase was present already before the start of bisphosphonates pointing...

  7. Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) / Pulmonary Embolism (PE) - Blood Clot Forming in a Vein

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Deep Vein Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism (DVT/PE) are often underdiagnosed and serious, but preventable medical conditions. Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a medical condition that occurs when ...

  8. McConnell sign in the echocardiography diagnosis of the pulmonary embolism. Regarding a case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merida Alvarez, Oyantay; Valdes Garcia, Maikel; Senra Piedra, Gerardo

    2010-01-01

    The case of a 38 years old patient with sudden shortness of breath is presented. The diagnosis of Pulmonary Embolism was suggested by the echocardiogram, especially by Mc Connell's sign. Shortly thereafter the condition was confirmed by computed tomography

  9. The relationship between right ventricular outflow tract fractional shortening and Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index in acute pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şahan, Ekrem; Karamanlıoğlu, Murat; Şahan, Suzan; Gül, Murat; Korkmaz, Ahmet; Tüfekçioğlu, Omaç

    2017-12-01

    Right ventricular (RV) functions are clinically important in acute pulmonary embolism (APE). Measurement of systolic function of the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) with echocardiography is a simple method to evaluate RV function. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between RVOT systolic function and the Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index (PESI). A total of 151 patients diagnosed with APE by pulmonary computed tomography angiography or ventilation/perfusion scintigraphy were included. Patients were assigned to 2 groups based on the simplified PESI (sPESI): sPESI 1 patients (58.7±12.9 years vs. 61.1±12.7 years, respectively). Frequency of male gender was significantly higher in PESI <1 group (61.2% vs. 40.2%, p=0.013). No significant differences were found between the groups in fasting glucose, serum creatinine, hemoglobin, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, troponin, and D-dimer levels, and left ventricular ejection fraction. RVOT-FS was higher in patients with sPESI <1 than in patients with sPESI ≥1 (34.41±3.56 vs. 22.98±4.22), and this difference was significant (p<0.001). Tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion values were lower and pulmonary artery systolic pressure values were higher in the sPESI ≥1 group, which was also statistically significant (p<0.05). Mortality occurred in 7 patients with sPESI <1 and in 16 patients with sPESI ≥1. The mortality rate was higher in patients with lower RVOT-FS, and a RVOT-FS <0.22 predicted mortality with a sensitivity of 54.5% (AUC: 0.674, 95% CI 0.552-0.796; p=0.009). The RVOT-FS is a noninvasive measurement of RV systolic function, is well-correlated with the sPESI score, and associated with mortality in patients with APE. This easily applied measurement may be used to predict short-term mortality in patients with APE.

  10. Prevalence of venous thrombo-embolism in acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

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    M.M. Kamel

    2013-10-01

    Conclusion: VTE appeared to be a common problem in COPD patients with exacerbations. The role of CTPA is the cornerstone in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. DVT of lower limbs was not essential in all cases of proven pulmonary embolism. Serum D-dimer, Wells criteria and Geneva score are useful bedside criteria that may help to assess the occurrence of VTE in such patients.

  11. Analysis of risk factors of pulmonary embolism in diabetic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Changhui; Ma Zhihai; Zhu Lin; Chi Lianxiang

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study the related risk factors in diabetic patients with pulmonary embolism (PE). Methods: 58 diabetic cases underwent lower limbs 99m Tc-MAA veins imaging (and/or ultrasonography) and pulmonary perfusion imaging. The related laboratory data [fasting blood glucose (FBG), blood cholesterol, blood long chain triglycerides (LCT)] and clinic information [age, disease courses, chest symptoms (chest pain and short of breathe), lower limbs symptoms (swelling, varicose veins and diabetic foot) and acute complication (diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar non ketotic diabetic coma)] were collected simultaneously. SPSS was used for χ 2 -test and Logistic regression analysis. Results: (1) 28 patients (48.3%) were showed to be with lower limbs deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and by 99m Tc-MAA imaging, 10 cases (17.2%) with PE. The PE ratios (32.1%) of the patients with DVT was more higher than no DVT (3.3%) (χ 2 =6.53, P 2 ≥4.23, P 2 ≤2.76, P>0.05), respectively. (3) Multiplicity analysis indicated: the related risk factors for PE included chest symptoms (Score=13.316, P=0.000) and lower limbs symptoms (Score=7.780, P=0.005). No significant difference to other factors (Score≤2.494, P>0.114), respectively. Conclusion: The serious DM with chest symptoms, lower limbs symptoms and/or DVT must be controlled as early as possible by all kinds of treatment. It will decrease the PE complication. (authors)

  12. Multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT imaging of cardiovascular effects of pulmonary embolism: What the radiologists need to know

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    Mohamed Aboul-fotouh E. Mourad

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with pulmonary embolism have high mortality and morbidity rate due to right heart failure and circulatory collapse leading to sudden death. Multi-detector computed tomography MDCT can efficiently evaluate the cardiovascular factors related to pulmonary embolism. Objectives: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT in differentiation of between sever and non-severe pulmonary embolism groups depending on the associated cardiovascular parameters and create a simple reporting system. Patients & methods: Prospective study contained 145 patients diagnosed clinically pulmonary embolism. All patients were examined by combined electrocardiographically gated computed tomography pulmonary angiography-computed tomography venography (ECG-CTPA-CTV using certain imaging criteria in a systematic manner. Results: Our study revealed 95 and 55 non-severe and severe pulmonary embolism groups respectively. Many cardiovascular parameters related to pulmonary embolism shows significant p value and can differentiate between sever and non-severe pulmonary embolism patients include pulmonary artery diameter, intraventricular septum flattening, bowing, superior vena cava and Azygos vein diameters, right and left ventricular diameters. Conclusion: Multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT can be valuable to assess the severity of pulmonary embolism using the related cardiovascular parameters and leading the management strategy aim for best outcome. Keywords: Pulmonary embolism, MDCT, Cardiovascular, Computed tomography venography

  13. S WAVE IN PULMONARY EMBOLISM, A NEW ECG SIGN TO AID THROMBOLYSIS

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    Thomas John

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Acute pulmonary embolism is a devastating disease that often leads to mortality . Previous investigators have found that thrombolysis reduces mortality in men but not significantly in women with pulmonary embolism. Many of the previous studies are with tenecteplase and alteplase. Here, we describe intra - venous thrombolysis with streptokinase in seven patients with pulmonary embolism who survived including two women. Further, we have one patient who had a new onset of S wave in lead I which subsequently disappeared after embolectomy. We also comment on the usefulness of shock sign in 2 deciding on thrombolysis .We propose a new sign for noninvasive assessment of need for thrombolysis in pulmonary embolism. New onset S wave in Lead I in pulmonary embolism can be used as a new sign for deciding the need for thrombolysis. When added to the shock sign it can be used in the emergency deparment to decide the need for thrombolysis. Further, there are no clear end points as to when to stop thrombolysis. In all 4 patients we switched to heparin when spontaneous bleeding or oozing started. In all 4 patients subsequent CT scans showed that the patient has mild to moderate resolution of the pulmonary embolism and patients remained stable and have been discharged and are under regular follow up. Hence we propose that bleeding can be used as an end point for thrombolysis in acute pulmonary embolism. We also describe a patient who had new onset S wave that disappeared after successful pulmonary embolectomy. Probably, the S wave is a marker of main pulmonary artery branch occlusions.

  14. Controversial imaging diagnosis of cardiac cause of recurrent pulmonary embolism

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    Ganesan Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 44 years old lady with a past medical history of asthma and pulmonary emboli receiving adjuvant cytotoxic chemotherapy via a PICC line for a triple negative grade 3 invasive ductal carcinoma of right breast, presented to emergency with acute shortness of breath. She was managed initially as asthma, but 2 days latter was hospitalised due to worsening symptoms. An urgent V/Q scan confirmed further multiple pulmonary emboli despite therapy dose low molecular weight heparin. A trans-thoracic echocardiography revealed a large 2.6 x 2.5cm mass attached to the tricuspid valve. Inflammatory markers were elevated and a blood culture and sensitivity confirmed coagulase-negative staphylococcus which, in the presence of PICC line (Fig 2 raised the suspicion of endocarditis. A trans-oesophageal echocardiogram (Fig 1,2,3,4 and CT chest were both in favour of possible intra cardiac neoplasm or metastases. Further investigation with cardiac MRI and PET were not in favour of metastasis or primary neoplasm. The patient was treated for PICC line infection with i.v. antibiotics and i.v. heparin resulting initially in reduced mass size but subsequent progression. Despite adequate anticoagulation the patient had further pulmonary embolism and subsequently proceeded to surgical removal of the mass. The histopathology analysis at the tertiary care centre confirmed fibrin core and large amount of neutrophils consistent with thrombus with no features of neoplasm or malignancy. The patient made good post-operative recovery and was commenced on long term low molecular weight heparin as per protocol.

  15. Pulmonary Empty Spaces: Silicone Embolism-A Decade of Increased Incidence and Its Histological Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyapichev, Kirill; Chinea, Felix Manuel; Poveda, Julio; Pereda, Jeniffer; Bejarano, Pablo A; Garcia-Buitrago, Monica T

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a critical complication related to multiple disorders and different medical or cosmetic procedures. This case report presents two patients who were admitted for respiratory symptoms in the setting of previously receiving silicone injections for cosmetic purposes and were diagnosed with silicone pulmonary embolism. The relevance of including questions about all cosmetic procedures as a part of a medical history is highlighted, in particular about silicone injections. The diagnosis is confirmed by histological means. Additionally, our review showed the change of most common sites of silicone injections and a significant increase in cosmetic procedures causing silicone embolism during the past twelve years.

  16. Arterial embolization for management of hemoptysis in pulmonary tuberculosis : factors of rebleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Kwan Soo; Kim, Young Ju; Kim, Sung Min; Sung, Ki Joon; Kim, Dong Jin; Park, Joong Wha; Oh, Jin Hwan; Shim, Soo Yeon

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of arterial embolization in reducing hemoptysis in pulmonary tuberculosis, and rebleeding factors after embolization. Fifty-nine patients with massive or recurrent hemoptysis from pulmonary tuberculosis were underwent percutaneous transcatheter embolotherapy and thirteen were subsequently operated on. In 46 patients, we retrospectively analyzed on plain chest PA the extent of pulmonary tuberculosis lesions, the period from initial diagnosis to embolization, and angiographic findings. The extent of lesions shown on plain chest PA were classified into minimal, moderately advanced, and far advanced. If there was no evidence of rebleeding after the first embolization,this was regarded as initial success in the control of hemoptysis. Angiographic findings were classified into hypervascularity, shunt, aneurysmal dilatation, and extravasation. Using the chi-square test, differences in these findings between rebleedig and non-rebleeding cases were anlysed. Immediate control of hemoptysis was achieved in 27 (58.7%) of 46 patients. Hemoptysis recurred in 19 (41.3%) of 46 patients followed up. Rebleeding cases showed more nonbronchial systemic collateral vessels and shunt than non-rebleeding cases (p<0.05). More advanced lesions of pulmonary tuberculosis on plain chest PA showed an increased rebleeding rate after embolization, but this was not statistically significant. There was no correlation between the period from initial diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis to embolization and the rate of rebleeding. But the longer the period, the greater the number of nonbronchial systemic collateral vessels. In cases with more advanced lesions of pulmonary tuberculosis on plain chese PA and a long period from initial diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis to embolization, angiographic findings showed numerous nonbronchial systemic collateral vessels but increases in the rebleeding rate were statistically not significant. The greater the number of nonbronchial

  17. Study of some genetic predisposition in pulmonary embolism

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    Gehan Elassal

    2014-10-01

    Conclusion: Gene mutation especially factor V Leiden mutation is very important to be considered in young patients presented with venous thrombo-embolism, patients with thrombosis in unusual sites or patients with recurrent thrombo-embolic manifestations.

  18. Recovery of right and left ventricular function after acute pulmonary embolism

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    Klok, F.A., E-mail: f.a.klok@lumc.nl [Section of Vascular Medicine, Department of General Internal Medicine-Endocrinology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Romeih, S. [Department of Cardiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Kroft, L.J.M.; Westenberg, J.J.M. [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Huisman, M.V. [Section of Vascular Medicine, Department of General Internal Medicine-Endocrinology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Roos, A. de [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2011-12-15

    Aim: To evaluate recovery of cardiac function after acute pulmonary embolism (PE). Materials and methods: Routine breath-held computed tomography (CT)-pulmonary angiography was performed in patients with suspected PE to confirm or exclude the diagnosis of PE at initial presentation. Electrocardiogram (ECG)-triggered cardiac CT was performed to assess biventricular function. After 6 months, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed. In total, 15 consecutive patients with PE and 10 without were studied. A significant change in ventricular volume was defined as a >15% change in end-diastolic or -systolic volumes (EDV, ESV), and significant ventricular function improvement as a >5% increase in ejection fraction (EF) as based on reported cut-off values. Results: Right and left ventricular (RV and LV) EDV and ESV changed non-significantly (<1.3%) in the patients without PE, indicating good comparability of those values measured by CT and MRI. PE patients with baseline normal RV function (RVEF {>=}47%) revealed a >5% improvement in the RVEF (+5.4 {+-} 3.1%) due to a decrease in the RVESV. Patients with baseline abnormal RV function showed a >5% improvement in the RVEF (+14 {+-} 15%) due to decreases in both the RVESV and RVEDV. Furthermore, the LVEDV increased in this latter patient group. Conclusions: The present study demonstrated an improvement in RV function in the majority of patients with PE, independent of baseline RV function. The degree of RV and LV recovery was dependent on the severity of baseline RV dysfunction.

  19. Cost-effectiveness analysis of various strategies in the diagnostic management of pulmonary embolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudkerk, M.; van Beek, E. J.; van Putten, W. L.; Büller, H. R.

    1993-01-01

    Since the clinical diagnosis of pulmonary embolism is unreliable, various objective diagnostic methods (or combinations thereof) are advocated. Pulmonary angiography is the accepted reference method but is considered less suitable for initial screening due to its invasive nature. Therefore, at least

  20. Electroconvulsive therapy and anticoagulation after pulmonary embolism: a case report

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    Julio Cesar Lazaro

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is considered the most effective treatment for catatonia regardless its underlying condition. The rigid fixed posture and immobility observed in catatonia may lead to several clinical complications, of which, pulmonary embolism (PE is one of the most severe. The rapid improvement of the psychiatric condition in catatonia-related PE is essential, since immobility favors the occurrence of new thromboembolic events and further complications. In that scenario, ECT should be considered, based on a risk-benefit analysis, aiming at the faster resolution of the catatonia. Methods Case report and literature review. Results A 66-years-old woman admitted to the psychiatric ward with catatonia due to a depressive episode presented bilateral PE. Clinically stable, but still severely depressed after a trial of antidepressants, she was treated with ECT in the course of full anticoagulation with enoxaparin. After five ECT sessions, her mood was significantly better and she was walking and eating spontaneously. She did not present complications related either to PE or to anticoagulation. After the eighth ECT session, she evolved with hypomania, which was managed with oral medication adjustments. The patient was completely euthymic at discharge. Conclusion The case we presented provides further evidence to the anecdotal case reports on the safety of ECT in the course of concomitant full anticoagulant therapy after PE, and illustrates how, with the proper precautions, the benefits of ECT in such condition might outweigh its risks.

  1. Evaluation of pulmonary embolism - role of lung scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blinder, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Approximately 200,000 people die each year either directly or indirectly from PE. If PE is not treated, the mortality rate is estimated to be 30%, whereas this rate is 8% in patients that are treated with anticoagulant. If a patient is falsely diagnosed of having PE, he is needlessly subjected to the risk of anticoagulation. The complication rate of anticoagulation therapy is estimated to be ∼ 15%, and heparin is considered to be a major cause of drug related deaths in hospitalized patients. Thus, it is important that the diagnosis of PE be made accurately. The clinical history, physical exam, and laboratory evaluation have limited ability to accurately diagnose or exclude PE. Therefore, medical imaging is the major means by which this diagnosis must be made or excluded. This article will examine the various methods by which PE may be diagnosed and will discuss the proper methods of their interpretation

  2. [Treatment of Right Atrial Myxoma Complicated with Pulmonary Embolism;Report of a Case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinnouchi, Kouki; Rikitake, Kazuhisa; Furutachi, Akira; Yoshida, Nozomi

    2016-07-01

    Myxomas are account for approximately half of primary cardiac tumors, 75% of which originate in the left atrium. We report a case of a right atrial myxoma complicated with bilateral pulmonary embolism. A 54-year-old woman was admitted to the hospital with a complaint of dyspnea. Echocardiography and computed tomography angiography showed a right atrial tumor and bilateral pulmonary embolism. We performed an emergency surgery to remove both the right atrial tumor and the pulmonary emboli. Histopathologically, the tumor was revealed to be myxoma. The postoperative course was uneventful. She is now doing well without any symptoms.

  3. Successful treatment of massive pulmonary embolism with prolonged catheter-directed thrombolysis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, Peter

    2012-02-03

    This is a case report of a young woman who presented with an extensive pulmonary embolism and echocardiographic evidence of right ventricular dysfunction. Although hemodynamically stable, the patient\\'s clinical condition failed to improve with standard heparin anticoagulation. Successful local catheter-directed thrombolysis was performed over an extended period of 48 h with regular monitoring of response to therapy by computed tomography-pulmonary angiography and echocardiography. To our knowledge, treatment of a pulmonary embolism by catheter-directed thrombolytic infusion over an extended period of 48 h has not previously been described.

  4. Intravascular lymphoma presenting as a specific pulmonary embolism and acute respiratory failure: a case report

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    Georgin-Lavialle Sophie

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The occurrence of an intravascular lymphoma with severe pulmonary involvement mimicking pulmonary embolism is described. Case presentation A 38-year-old man was referred to our intensive care unit with acute respiratory failure and long lasting fever. Appropriate investigations failed to demonstrate any bacterial, viral, parasitic or mycobacterial infection. A chest computed tomography scan ruled out any proximal or sub-segmental pulmonary embolism but the ventilation/perfusion lung scan concluded that there was a high probability of pulmonary embolism. The cutaneous biopsy pathology diagnosed intravascular lymphoma. Conclusion Intravascular lymphoma is a rare disease characterized by exclusive or predominant growth of neoplastic cells within the lumina of small blood vessels. Lung involvement seems to be common, but predominant lung presentation of this disease is rare. In our patient, urgent chemotherapy, along with adequate supportive care allowed complete recovery.

  5. Swyer-James-Macleod syndrome mimicking an acute pulmonary embolism: a report of six adult cases and a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgedik, Recep; Karamanli, Harun; Aytekin, İlknur; Kurt, Ali Bekir; Öztürk, Hasan; Dağlı, Canan Eren

    2018-02-01

    In patients with pulmonary embolism (PE), a pulmonary radiograph may reveal oligemic fields (the Westermark sign) associated with sites of occlusion of the pulmonary arteries, interruption or loss of the artery line (the knuckle sign), and even unilateral hyperlucency attributable to reduced overall lung vascularity. In Swyer-James-Macleod syndrome (SJMS), which develops as a result of bronchiolitis obliterans, unilateral hyperlucency is evident because of emphysema and hypoplasia of the pulmonary artery and its branches. Therefore, SJMS cases with clinical and laboratory data compatible with PE may in fact be confused with PE. The cases of six adult patients who were initially presumed to have PE but on further investigation were diagnosed with SJMS are presented in this report, which thus can serve as a guide for diagnosis of similar cases in future. We studied six adult patients who presented with dyspnea. Their pulmonary radiographs revealed lobar/unilateral hyperlucency and PE was initially suspected. The pulmonary artery and branches thereof exhibited parenchymal emphysema and hypoplasia, and we thus diagnosed SJMS. We studied 4 males and 2 females with a mean age of 51 years (range, 20-73 years). Left lung involvement was evident in five cases. Unilateral hyperlucency may be a feature of both PE and SJMS. Although these conditions are very different, both present similarly in radiographic terms and may be easily confused when the clinical data and the anamnesis raise a suspicion of PE, causing unnecessary testing and treatment. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. The influence of weather and environment on pulmonary embolism: pollutants and fossil fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauss, Ralf; Mayes, Julian; Hilton, Paul; Lawrenson, Ross

    2005-01-01

    Previous publications have highlighted seasonal variations in the incidence of thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, and that weather patterns can influence these. While medical risk factors for pulmonary thrombo-embolism such as age, obesity, hypercoagulable states, cancer, previous thrombo-embolism, immobility, limb paralysis, surgery, major illness, trauma, hypotension, tachypnoea and right ventricular hypokinesis are not directly implicated regarding environmental factors such as weather, they could be influenced indirectly by these. This would be especially relevant in polluted areas that are associated with a higher pulmonary embolism risk. Routine nuclear medicine lung ventilation/perfusion studies (V/Q scans) of 2071 adult patients referred to the nuclear medicine department of the Royal Surrey County Hospital in Guildford, UK, between January 1998 and October 2002 were reviewed and 316 of these patients were classified as positive for pulmonary embolism with high probability scan on PIOPED criteria. The occurrence of positive scans was compared to environmental factors such as temperature, humidity, vapour pressure, air pressure and rainfall. Multiple linear regression was used to establish the significance of these relations. The incidence of pulmonary embolism was positively related to vapour pressure and rainfall. The most significant relation was to vapour pressure (p=0.010) while rainfall was less significant (p=0.017). There was no significant relation between pulmonary embolism and air pressure, humidity or temperature. It is postulated that rainfall and water vapour may be contributary factors in thrombosis and pulmonary embolism by way of pollutants that are carried as condensation nuclei in micro-droplets of water. In particular, fossil fuel pollutants are implicated as these condensation nuclei. Pollutants may be inhaled by populations exposed to windborne vapour droplets in cities or airports. Polluted vapour droplets may be absorbed by the lung

  7. Chronic pulmonary embolism - radiological imaging and differential diagnosis; Chronische Lungenembolie - Radiologische Bildmorphologie und Differenzialdiagnose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppenrath, E.; Herzog, P.; Attenberger, U.; Reiser, M. [Klinikum Innenstadt der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany)

    2007-08-15

    In chronic pulmonary embolism branches of the pulmonary arterial tree remain partially or totally occluded. This may lead to pulmonary hypertension with the development of right ventricular hypertrophy as well as structural changes of pulmonary arteries. Imaging of chronic pulmonary embolism should prove vessel occlusions (pulmonary angiography, MSCT, MRI) and reduction of regional lung perfusion (lung scanning, MSCT, MRI). According to current guidelines ventilation-perfusion lung scanning and pulmonary angiography are still recommended as the methods of choice. MSCT and MRI provide technical alternatives which are helpful in differential diagnosis versus other types of pulmonary hypertension. In spite of medical and surgical measures (in rare cases pulmonary thromboendarterectomy) the prognosis of chronic pulmonary embolism remains unfavourable. (orig.) [German] Bei der chronischen Lungenembolie sind Abschnitte der arteriellen Lungenstrombahn dauerhaft verschlossen. Dies kann zu einer Erhoehung des pulmonal-arteriellen Drucks mit den Folgen einer Rechtsherzbelastung und strukturellen Veraenderungen der Pulmonalarterien fuehren. Bildmorphologisch nachzuweisen sind Gefaessverschluesse (Pulmonalisangiographie, MSCT, MRT) und die Minderperfusion des Lungenparenchyms (Szintigraphie, MSCT, MRT). Nach den bisherigen Empfehlungen gelten fuer die Diagnostik der chronischen Lungenembolie die Lungenszintigraphie (Ventilation/Perfusion) und die Pulmonalisangiographie als Methoden der ersten Wahl. Die MSCT und MRT (Angiographie/Perfusion) stellen technische Alternativen dar. Differenzialdiagnostisch sind andere Formen der pulmonalen Hypertonie abzugrenzen. Trotz medikamentoeser und chirurgischer Therapiemassnahmen (z. B. pulmonale Thrombendarterektomie) bleibt die Prognose der chronischen Lungenembolie unguenstig. (orig.)

  8. Clinical and echocardiographic predictors of mortality in acute pulmonary embolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talal Dahhan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of adding quantitative assessments of cardiac function from echocardiography to clinical factors in predicting the outcome of patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE. Methods Patients with a diagnosis of acute PE, based on a positive ventilation perfusion scan or computed tomography (CT chest angiogram, were identified using the Duke University Hospital Database. Of these, 69 had echocardiograms within 24–48 h of the diagnosis that were suitable for offline analysis. Clinical features that were analyzed included age, gender, body mass index, vital signs and comorbidities. Echocardiographic parameters that were analyzed included left ventricular (LV ejection fraction (EF, regional, free wall and global RV speckle-tracking strain, RV fraction area change (RVFAC, Tricuspid Annular Plane Systolic Excursion (TAPSE, pulmonary artery acceleration time (PAAT and RV myocardial performance (Tei index. Univariable and multivariable regression statistical analysis models were used. Results Out of 69 patients with acute PE, the median age was 55 and 48 % were female. The median body mass index (BMI was 27 kg/m2. Twenty-nine percent of the cohort had a history of cancer, with a significant increase in cancer prevalence in non-survivors (57 % vs 29 %, p = 0.02. Clinical parameters including heart rate, respiratory rate, troponin T level, active malignancy, hypertension and COPD were higher among non-survivors when compared to survivors (p ≤ 0.05. Using univariable analysis, NYHA class III symptoms, hypoxemia on presentation, tachycardia, tachypnea, elevation in Troponin T, absence of hypertension, active malignancy and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD were increased in non-survivors compared to survivors (p ≤ 0.05. In multivariable models, RV Tei Index, global and free (lateral wall RVLS were found to be negatively associated with survival probability after

  9. A Giant Mesenteric Desmoid Tumor Revealed by Acute Pulmonary Embolism due to Compression of the Inferior Vena Cava

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palladino, Elisa; Nsenda, Joseph; Siboni, Renaud; Lechner, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Male, 69 Final Diagnosis: Mesenteric desmoid tumor Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Surgery Objective: Rare disease Background: Intra-abdominal fibromatosis is a benign rare tumor of fibrous origin with a significant potential for local invasion and no ability to metastasize, but it can recur. The etiology of desmoid tumors is unknown. It is often associated with conditions such as familial adenomatous polyposis and Gardner syndrome. Case Report: We report the case of a 69-year-old man who presented to our hospital with an acute pulmonary embolism. The patient had a past history of colic surgery for a polyp with a high-grade dysplasia. Pulmonary angiography showed partial occlusion of the right superior lobe artery and partial occlusion of the middle lobe artery. The patient was given thrombolytic therapy. Abdominal computerized tomography revealed a mesenterial giant mass with compression of the inferior vena cava (IVC). A biopsy of the mass, confirming aggressive fibromatosis. A laparotomy was performed, which revealed a massive growth occupying the abdomen and attached to the previous ileocolic anastomosis. One day after surgery, his condition deteriorated. Conclusions: This report underlines the potential of imaging investigations of abdomen and vena cava if pulmonary embolism is suspected, especially when there is no evidence of peripheral venous thrombosis or other predisposing factors. Unfortunately, data on the surgical management of desmoid tumor is scarce. Therefore, the standard of treatment is a surgical resection for resectable tumors. PMID:25180474

  10. Bronchial Artery Embolization in the Management of Pulmonary Parenchymal Endometriosis with Hemoptysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kervancioglu, Selim; Andic, Cagatay; Bayram, Nazan; Telli, Cumali; Sarica, Akif; Sirikci, Akif

    2008-01-01

    Pulmonary parenchymal endometriosis is extremely rare and usually manifests itself with a recurrent hemoptysis associated with the menstrual cycle. The therapies proposed for women with endometriosis consist of medical treatments and surgery. Bronchial artery embolization has become a well-established and minimally invasive treatment modality for hemoptysis, and to the best of our knowledge, it has not been reported in pulmonary endometriosis. We report a case of pulmonary parenchymal endometriosis treated with embolotheraphy for hemoptysis.

  11. [Clinical analysis of 12 patients with pediatric antiphospholipid syndrome with pulmonary embolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, J R; Song, H M; Xiao, J; Tang, X Y; He, Y Y; Wei, M

    2017-01-02

    Objective: To identify the clinical and immunological characteristics of pediatric antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) patients with pulmonary embolism. Method: Among 47 pediatric APS patients from Peking Union Medical College Hospital during the year of 2000 to 2015, 12 patients were diagnosed of pulmonary embolism, who were investigated and compared with APS patients without pulmonary embolism. Result: Twelve patients (among whom 6 cases were primary and the other 6 were secondary APS)had pulmonary embolism and all of them were non-shock type, which was the first presenting manifestation in 6 of them.Eight cases were misdiagnosed as infection, while 3 cases were missed.Among patients with pulmonary embolism, 10 patients suffered from deep vein thrombosis at the same time, mainly in lower extremities.2 cases had thrombotic recurrence, which happened only in primary APS patients, because of irregular monitoring of International Normalized Ratio, or not taking aspirin after quitting warfarin.Positive anticardiolipin (ACL) and lupus anticoagulant (LA) were found in 10 and 9 patients respectively.Four primary APS patients had positive anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA). During follow-up of 3-100 months (median 23 months) of primary APS, no one had evolved manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus.Primary APS was more often seen in males (M∶F 5∶1 vs . 0∶6) and the patients were much younger ((15±1) vs . (17±0) years old) than those with secondary APS.Besides that, no statistically significant difference was seen between primary and secondary APS ( P all>0.05). Compared with APS patients without pulmonary embolism, pulmonary hypertension was more common in patients suffered from pulmonary embolism (3/12 vs . 0, P irregular.Positive anti-nuclear antibodies can be seen in primary APS patients, but no manifestations of lupus come out during follow-up.There is no significant difference between primary APS and secondary APS.Pulmonary hypertension is more common in APS

  12. Effects of oral supplementation of L-arginine in the treatment of pulmonary hypertension secondary to pulmonary embolism: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Ogata, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Tomoko; Ishikawa, Kazunobu; Ishibashi, Tosiyuki; Maruyama, Yukio; Watanabe, Machiko; Edo, Kiyoto

    2010-01-01

    We tried L-arginine for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension secondary to pulmonary embolism. The plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) level inversely correlated with the plasma concentration of L-arginine. After oral supplementation of L-arginine, patient's symptoms (shortness of breath and general malaise), state of congestive heart failure, and exercise capacity all improved. L-arginine may be effective in the treatment of pulmonary hypertension secondary to pulmonary embolism.

  13. Prevention of fatal postoperative pulmonary embolism by low doses of heparin. An international multicentre trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-07-12

    The efficacy of low-dose heparin in preventing fatal postoperative pulmonary embolism has been investigated in a multicentre prospective randomised trial. 4121 patients over the age of forty years undergoing a variety of elective major surgical procedures were included in the trial; 2076 of these were in the control group and 2045 patients received heparin. The two groups were well matched for age, sex, weight, blood-group, and other factors which could predispose to the development of venous thromboembolism. 180 (4-4 %) patients died during the postoperative period, 100 in the control and 80 in the heparin group: 72% of deaths in the control and 66% in the heparin group had necropsy examination. 16 patients in the control group and 2 in the heparin group were found at necropsy to have died due to acute massive pulmonary embolism (P smaller than 0-005). In addition, emboli found at necropsy in 6 patients in the control group and 3 in the heparin group were considered either contributory to death or an incidental finding since death in these patients was attributed to other causes. Taking all pulmonary emboli together, the findings were again significant (P smaller than 0-005). Of 1292 patients in whom the 125-I-fibrinogen test was performed to detect deep-vein thrombosis (D.V.T.) 667 were in the control group and 625 in the heparin group. The frequency of isotopic D.V.T. was reduced from 24-6% in the control group 7-7% in the heparin group (P smaller 0-005). In 30 patients D.V.T. was detected at necropsy; 24 in the control and 6 in the heparin group (P smaller 0-005). 32 patients in the control group and 11 in the heparin group developed clinically diagnosed D.V.T. which was confirmed by venography (P smaller than 0-005). In addition, 24 patients in the control and 8 in the heparin group were treated for clinically suspected pulmonary emoblism. The difference in the number of patients requiring treatment for D.V.T. and/or pulmonary embolism in the two groups was

  14. Inferior vena cava filters in pulmonary embolism: A historic controversy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerjes-Sanchez, Carlos; Rodriguez, David; Navarrete, Aline; Parra-Cantu, Carolina; Joya-Harrison, Jorge; Vazquez, Eduardo; Ramirez-Rivera, Alicia

    Rationale for non-routine use of inferior venous cava filters (IVCF) in pulmonary embolism (PE) patients. Thrombosis mechanisms involved with IVCF placement and removal, the blood-contacting medical device inducing clotting, and the inorganic polyphosphate in the contact activation pathway were analyzed. In addition, we analyzed clinical evidence from randomized trials, including patients with and without cancer. Furthermore, we estimated the absolute risk reduction (ARR), the relative risk reduction (RRR), and the number needed to treat (NNT) based on the results of each study using a frequency table. Finally, we analyzed the outcome of our PE patients that were submitted to thrombolysis with short and long term follow-up. IVCF induces thrombosis by several mechanisms including placement and removal, rapid protein adsorption, and simultaneous surface-induced activation via the contact activation pathway. Also, inorganic polyphosphate has an important role as a procoagulant, reversing the effect of anticoagulants. Randomized control trials included 904 cancer and non-cancer PE patients. In terms of ARR, RRR, and NNT, there is no evidence for routine use of IVCF. In 290 patients with proved PE, extensive thrombotic burden and right ventricular dysfunction under thrombolysis and oral anticoagulation, we observed a favorable outcome in a short- and long-term follow-up; additionally, IVCF was only used in 5% of these patients. Considering the complex mechanisms of thrombosis related with IVCF, the evidence from randomized control trials and ARR, RRR, and NNT obtained from venous thromboembolism patients with and without cancer, non-routine use of IVCF is recommended. Copyright © 2017 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  15. Molecular detection of Burkholderia pseudomallei in patients with suspected pulmonary and extra pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangeline Jayakumar, Ramya Barani, Vigna Seshan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Since melioidosis mimics tuberculosis clinically and radiologically, there is a need for a rapid diagnostic method to help the clinician to initiate appropriate antimicrobial treatment in order to prevent mortality. Our objective was to standardize a nested PCR for B. pseudomallei and its detection in pulmonary and extra pulmonary samples from patients with suspected TB. Materials and Methods: Archived pulmonary and extra pulmonary samples which were negative for M. tuberculosis smear microscopy, culture and PCR were included in the study. DNA was extracted (QiAmp Blood DNA kit, Qiagen, Germany and conventional nested PCR were carried out to detect the presence of 16S-23S spacer region of B. pseudomallei. The DNA was detected by 2% agarose gel electrophoresis and the presence of 251 bp was considered positive. Results: A total of 55 samples were tested, out of which 9 (16.3% samples tested positive for Burkholderia pseudomallei using nested PCR, which included 5 extra pulmonary and 4 pulmonary samples. These patients belonged to Tamil Nadu 8 (88.8% and West Bengal 1 (11.1% both of which are rice growing regions. Among the nine patients who were positive for B. pseudomallei by nested PCR, 2 (22% were receiving empirical anti-tubercular treatment (ATT. Also, these patients encountered co-morbid condition like renal failure, malignancy, diabetes and co-infection with HIV. Conclusion: We suggest that the patients with symptoms suggestive of both pulmonary and extra pulmonary tuberculosis should be routinely tested for Burkholderia pseudomallei by molecular methods for timely initiation of appropriate therapy and avoid unnecessary exposure to ATT. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2017; 7(1: 21-28

  16. Is the prevalence of the factor V Leiden mutation in patients with pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis really different?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turkstra, F.; Karemaker, R.; Kuijer, P. M.; Prins, M. H.; Büller, H. R.

    1999-01-01

    Previous investigations have suggested a lower prevalence of the factor V Leiden mutation in patients with pulmonary embolism, as compared to patients with deep leg vein thrombosis. We studied unselected patients with pulmonary embolism, in whom we also assessed the presence of deep vein thrombosis

  17. Value of chest X-ray combined with perfusion scan versus ventilation/perfusion scan in acute pulmonary embolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, M. R.; Turkstra, F.; van Marwijk Kooy, M.; Oostdijk, A. H.; van Beek, E. J.; Büller, H. R.

    2000-01-01

    The main purpose of ventilation scanning, as adjunct to perfusion lung scintigraphy, in acute pulmonary embolism is to allow for the classification of segmental perfusion defects as mismatched, which is generally accepted as proof for the presence of pulmonary embolism. We examined whether this

  18. Delayed Diagnosis in an Elderly Schizophrenic Patient with Catatonic State and Pulmonary Embolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsueh-Chin Hu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Catatonia is a syndrome with any two of five core features: stupor/motoric immobility/catalepsy/waxy flexibility, excitement, negativism/mutism, posturing, and echolalia/echopraxia. We describe a case of delayed diagnosis of pulmonary embolism with an atypical presentation in an elderly schizophrenia male patient, which led to a life-threatening brain infarction. A 75-year-old male was hospitalized in a psychiatric ward because of stupor, poor intake and mutism under a diagnosis of recurrent catatonia. His inability to express his suffering, dehydration, exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and upper gastrointestinal bleeding, however, made an accurate diagnosis difficult. Finally, the high D-dimer level and further chest computed tomography confirmed pulmonary embolism in the trunk of the bilateral main pulmonary arteries. The brain computed tomography also confirmed brain infarcts. He was transferred to the cardiac intensive care unit and was eventually rescued from near death due to pulmonary embolism and brain infarction. A careful differential diagnosis for pulmonary embolism-induced delirium and catatonic state is important in the treatment of patients with a previous diagnosis of catatonic schizophrenia.

  19. Benefits of texture analysis of dual energy CT for Computer-Aided pulmonary embolism detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foncubierta-Rodríguez, Antonio; Jiménez del Toro, Óscar Alfonso; Platon, Alexandra; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Müller, Henning; Depeursinge, Adrien

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism is an avoidable cause of death if treated immediately but delays in diagnosis and treatment lead to an increased risk. Computer-assisted image analysis of both unenhanced and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) have proven useful for diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. Dual energy CT provides additional information over the standard single energy scan by generating four-dimensional (4D) data, in our case with 11 energy levels in 3D. In this paper a 4D texture analysis method capable of detecting pulmonary embolism in dual energy CT is presented. The method uses wavelet-based visual words together with an automatic geodesic-based region of interest detection algorithm to characterize the texture properties of each lung lobe. Results show an increase in performance with respect to the single energy CT analysis, as well as an accuracy gain compared to preliminary work on a small dataset.

  20. The brain in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia with pulmonary AVM: The clinical importance of paradoxical embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, W.S.; Kinnison, M.L.; Charnas, L.; Rosenbaum, A.E.; White, R.I. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Despite the literature's emphasis on the presence of intracerebral vascular malformations in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), few cases have been documented. The authors prospectively evaluated brain CT scans in 29 consecutive patients with pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) and known HHT. Fifty-five percent of the CT scans revealed the signs of embolic phenomena: infarctions (n=11) and intracerebral abscesses (n=5). In only one patient was a small enhancing vascular lesion seen. They conclude that embolic phenomena rather than vascular malformations cause the majority of abnormal CT findings in patients with HHT and pulmonary AVMs. Infarctions and intracerebral abscesses probably result from paradoxical embolization through the AVMs in the lungs. The therapeutic implications seem clear, since 55% of these patients are potentially treatable by balloon occlusion of the pulmonary AVMs

  1. Postoperative Massive Pulmonary Embolism Due to Superficial Vein Thrombosis of the Upper Limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascella, Marco; Viscardi, Daniela; Bifulco, Francesca; Cuomo, Arturo

    2016-04-01

    It is well known that deep vein thrombosis of the upper extremities is linked to high morbidity/mortality, resulting in 12-20% of all documented pulmonary embolism; however, there are few data about thromboembolism originating from a vein and/or a branch of a superficial vein of the upper extremities. Pulmonary embolism secondary to upper limb superficial vein thrombosis (not combined with upper extremities deep vein thrombosis) is a very rare clinical manifestation with few cases reported in the literature. We report a rare case of thrombophlebitis in departure from a superficial branch of the cephalic vein of the right arm, complicated by cardiac arrest secondary to a massive pulmonary embolism in a patient who underwent major surgery for ovarian cancer. We discuss on the numerous thrombotic risk factors, triggering a cascade of reactions and resulting in a potential fatal clinical manifestation.

  2. Percutaneous transplantation of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells in a dog suspected to have fibrocartilaginous embolic myelopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Wook-Hun; Park, Seon-Ah; Lee, Jae-Hoon; Chung, Dai-Jung; Yang, Wo-Jong; Kang, Eun-Hee; Choi, Chi-Bong; Chang, Hwa-Seok; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Hwang, Soo-Han; Han, Hoon; Kim, Hwi-Yool

    2013-01-01

    The use of human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells for cell transplantation therapy holds great promise for repairing spinal cord injury. Here we report the first clinical trial transplantation of human umbilical cord (hUCB)-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into the spinal cord of a dog suspected to have fibrocartilaginous embolic myelopathy (FCEM) and that experienced a loss of deep pain sensation. Locomotor functions improved following transplantation in a dog. Based ...

  3. Influence of ethanol-induced pulmonary embolism on hemodynamics in pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinsaku Yata

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: Ethanol is widely used for the embolization treatment of vascular malformations, but it can also cause serious complications such us pulmonary hypertension, cardiopulmonary collapse and death. The complications are considered secondary to pulmonary vasospasm and ethanol-induced sludge embolism, etc., We studied the hemodynamic effects of intravenous absolute ethanol injection and ethanol sludge injection in pigs. Materials and Methods: A total of 5 pigs underwent intravenous injection of ex vivo generated ethanol-induced sludge in which residual ethanol was removed (Group S and 4 pigs underwent intravenous injection of absolute ethanol (Group E. Hemodynamic parameters related to the pulmonary and systemic circulation were compared between the groups. Results: Transient pulmonary hypertension was observed in both groups and the hemodynamic changes were similar in both groups. Conclusions: Sludge can induce transient pulmonary hypertension or cardiopulmonary collapse, without ethanol and may be the mechanism by which ethanol induces its adverse hemodynamic effects.

  4. Quality of CT pulmonary angiography for suspected pulmonary embolus in pregnancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U-King-Im, Jean Marie; Freeman, Susan J.; Boylan, Teresa [Addenbrooke' s Hospital and the University of Cambridge, University Department of Radiology, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Cheow, Heok K. [Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Box 170, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2008-12-15

    The main objective of this study was to assess the quality of CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) for suspected pulmonary embolus (PE) in the pregnant population. We retrospectively identified 40 consecutive pregnant patients who underwent CTPA from January 2005 to December 2006. Forty consecutive age-matched non-pregnant women were used as a control group. Studies were subjectively graded according to overall image quality by two readers in consensus, in randomised and blinded manner. Moreover, contrast enhancement of pulmonary arteries was subjectively and objectively evaluated. The proportion of sub-optimal studies was more than three times higher in the pregnant group (27.5%, n = 11) compared with the non-pregnant group (7.5%, n = 3; p = 0.015). Mean contrast enhancement was consistently higher in the non-pregnant group compared with pregnant group, both subjectively and objectively. The percentage of inadequately opacified vascular segments was more than two times higher in the pregnant group (28.7%, n = 264) than in the non-pregnant group (13.3%, n = 122; p = 0.0001). The incidence of sub-optimal CTPA studies is higher in pregnancy when compared with an age-matched non-pregnant control group. In addition to radiation issues, this should also be considered when implementing diagnostic strategies for suspected PE in pregnancy. (orig.)

  5. Splenic Infarct and Pulmonary Embolism as a Rare Manifestation of Cytomegalovirus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashanth Rawla

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytomegalovirus (CMV is a type of herpes infection that has a characteristic feature of maintaining lifelong latency within the host cell. CMV manifestations can cover a broad spectrum from fever to as severe as pancytopenia, hepatitis, retinitis, meningoencephalitis, Guillain-Barre syndrome, pneumonia, and thrombosis. Multiple case reports of thrombosis associated with CMV have been reported. Deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism is more common in immunocompetent patients while splenic infarct is more common in immunocompromised patients. However, here we report a female patient on low-dose methotrexate for rheumatoid arthritis who presented with both pulmonary embolism and splenic infarct.

  6. ANP, BNP and D-dimer predict right ventricular dysfunction in patients with acute pulmonary embolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borgwardt, Henrik Gutte; Mortensen, Jann; Jensen, Claus V

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to predict right ventricular dysfunction (RVD) using plasma concentration of D-dimer, pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (pro-ANP), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), endothelin-1 (ET-1) and cardiac troponin I (TNI) in patients with pulmonary embolism (PE).......The aim of this study was to predict right ventricular dysfunction (RVD) using plasma concentration of D-dimer, pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (pro-ANP), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), endothelin-1 (ET-1) and cardiac troponin I (TNI) in patients with pulmonary embolism (PE)....

  7. Protein-C deficiency presenting as pulmonary embolism and myocardial infarction in the same patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, Syed; Rastogi, Vishal; Seth, Ashok; Singh, Satbir; Kumar, Vijay; Mustaqueem, Arif

    2013-10-01

    Plasma protein-C exerts anticoagulatory effects by inactivating factors V and VIII. Hereditary protein C deficiency is transmitted as an autosomal dominant disorder. Homozygous individuals usually develop purpura fulminans as newborns; heterozygous protein C-deficient individuals are at increased risk for venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. However, arterial thrombosis occurring as a result of congenital protein-C deficiency is still controversial. We describe a young patient with heterozygous protein-C deficiency who experienced both pulmonary embolism as well as myocardial infarction due to thrombotic occlusion without underlying major risk factors. Acute myocardial infarction in young without underlying major risk factors may be evaluated for protein c deficiency.

  8. Accelerated thrombolysis in the acute pulmonary embolism with ecocardiographic and tomographic evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sainz Gonzalez de la Penna, Benito; Ramos Gutierrez, Luis Benito; Gonzalez Artiles, Iovank

    2010-01-01

    The pulmonary embolism is a frequent and many times fatal disease. In a study in U.S of 42 million deaths during a 20 year period, around 600.000 patients (1,5%) were diagnosed with pulmonary embolism. However, this study surely doesn't estimate the real prevalence and incidence of this entity, because more than half of these cases are not diagnosed. We report a female 46 years-old patient with personal antecedents of Hipothyroidism and Arterial Hypertension without treatment and a tendosinovitis in the right inferior member that maintained her in bed for a month, with 10 days of rehabilitation therapy, maintaining an important functional limitation

  9. Complication of venous thrombosis of the lower extremities with pulmonary embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Teruyasu; Morita, Rikushi

    1993-01-01

    We studied the relationship between the complication of the pulmonary embolism and the localization of the venous thrombus in the lower extremities using Tc-99m macroaggregated albumin (MAA) venography. Tc-99m MAA venography clearly demonstrated most of the deep and superficial veins from the leg to the pelvis and the abdomen. The incidence of venous thrombosis was highest in the pelvic veins (28.8%), and second in the superficial leg veins (10.9%). The complication of pulmonary embolism was highest in the pelvic venous thrombosis (20.4%), and second in the femoral venous thrombosis (16.0%). (author)

  10. Long-Term Follow-up After Embolization of Pulmonary Arteriovenous Malformations with Detachable Silicone Balloons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul Erik; Kjeldsen, Anette D

    2008-01-01

    Long-term follow-up results after embolization of 13 pulmonary arteriovenous malformations in 10 patients by use of 14 detachable silicone balloons are given. Patients were followed for a mean of 99 months (range, 63-123 months) with chest x-rays and for a mean of 62 months (range, 3-101 months...... anymore, but use of these balloons for embolization of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations has been shown to be a safe and precise method, with immediate occlusion of the feeding artery and with long-lasting occlusion, even though many balloons deflate with time, leaving a fibrotic scar replacing...

  11. Impact of rescue-thrombolysis during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in patients with pulmonary embolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fikret Er

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cardiac arrest in patients with pulmonary embolism (PE is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Thrombolysis is expected to improve the outcome in these patients. However studies evaluating rescue-thrombolysis in patients with PE are missing, mainly due to the difficulties of clinical diagnosis of PE. We aimed to determine the success influencing factors of thrombolysis during resuscitation in patients with PE. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed retrospectively the outcome of 104 consecutive patients with confirmed (n = 63 or highly suspected (n = 41 PE and monitored cardiac arrest. In all patients rtPA was administrated for thrombolysis during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. In 40 of the 104 patients (38.5% a return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC could be achieved successfully. Patients with ROSC received thrombolysis significantly earlier after CPR onset compared to patients without ROSC (13.6+/-1.2 min versus 24.6+/-0.8 min; p<0.001. 19 patients (47.5% out of the 40 patients with initially successful resuscitation survived to hospital discharge. In patients with hospital discharge thrombolysis therapy was begun with a significantly shorter delay after cardiac arrest compared to all other patients (11.0+/-1.3 vs. 22.5+/-0.9 min; p<0.001. CONCLUSION: Rescue-thrombolysis should be considered and started in patients with PE and cardiac arrest, as soon as possible after cardiac arrest onset.

  12. Odontogenic orbital cellulitis associated with cavernous sinus thrombosis and pulmonary embolism: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegrini, D; Reposi, S; Nocerino, E; Pece, A

    2017-06-20

    This case illustrates the importance of prompt assessment and treatment of orbital cellulitis. In fact the ocular signs and symptoms may be associated with systemic complications which should be investigated and identified as soon as possible to avoid a poor prognosis. A 46-year-old white woman presented to our emergency room with proptosis, ophthalmoplegia, and conjunctival chemosis of her left eye. An ophthalmologist, having diagnosed orbital cellulitis in her left eye, suspected a cavernous sinus thrombosis. Hematochemical and radiological examinations confirmed the cavernous sinus thrombosis and also showed septic pulmonary embolism. A blood culture indicated Streptococcus constellatus, which is a member of the Peptostreptococcus family, a saprophyte of the oral mucosa that can be pathogenic in immunocompromised persons. The odontogenic origin was then confirmed by dental radiography which showed a maxillary abscess. Her eye signs regressed after antibiotic and anticoagulant therapy. This complex case shows the importance of a multidisciplinary approach for the management of orbital cellulitis, for the prompt diagnosis and treatment of eye injuries and possible complications, so as to avoid serious and permanent sequelae.

  13. Comparative analysis of radionuclide inhalation and perfusion lung imaging with X ray pulmonary angiography for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yanyan; Chen Man; Shao Maogang; Zhang Songlin; Mao Jieming; Guo Jingxuan

    1993-01-01

    The result of radionuclide lung imaging was compared in 18 patients of pulmonary embolism (PE) and 2 normal persons. The discovered perfusion defects correlated well with the location of angiographic obstruction. The positive angiographic and radionuclide finding was in 141 and 104 emboli arteries respectively. The sensitivity of total emboli pulmonary segments of lung imaging was 73.8%, the specificity was 82.7 and the accuracy was 79%. The techniques correlated quite well (r = 0.83, P<0.001)

  14. Pulmonary embolism caused by ovarian vein thrombosis during cesarean section: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Yutaka; Fujita, Michie; Motohisa, Chika; Nakata, Shinichi; Shimada, Motoko; Komatsu, Ryushi

    2018-01-01

    Ovarian vein thrombosis is a rare complication of pregnancy. The representative complaints of patients with ovarian vein thrombosis are abdominal pain and fever. In some cases, however, fatal pulmonary embolism may develop. We report a case of pulmonary embolism presenting with severe hypotension and loss of consciousness during cesarean section possibly caused by ovarian vein thrombosis. A 25-year-old woman at 38 weeks 4 days of gestation was scheduled for repeat cesarean section. Her past history was unremarkable, and the progress of her pregnancy was uneventful. She did not experience any symptoms indicative of deep vein thrombosis. Cesarean section was performed under spinal anesthesia, and a healthy newborn was delivered. After removal of the placenta, she suddenly developed dyspnea, hypotension, and loss of consciousness with decreased peripheral oxygen saturation. Blood pressure, heart rate, and oxygen saturation recovered after tracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation with oxygen. Postoperative computed tomography revealed no abnormality in the brain or in the pulmonary artery, but a dilated right ovarian vein with thrombi, extending up to the inferior vena cava, was found. A diagnosis of pulmonary embolism caused by ovarian vein thrombosis was made, and heparin was administered. The tracheal tube was removed on the first postoperative day. Her postoperative course was uneventful, and she was discharged with no complications. Fatal pulmonary embolism might be caused by ovarian vein thrombosis during cesarean section. Careful and continuous observation of the patient after delivery and prompt treatment are important.

  15. Long-Term Follow-up After Embolization of Pulmonary Arteriovenous Malformations with Detachable Silicone Balloons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, Poul Erik; Kjeldsen, Anette D.

    2008-01-01

    Long-term follow-up results after embolization of 13 pulmonary arteriovenous malformations in 10 patients by use of 14 detachable silicone balloons are given. Patients were followed for a mean of 99 months (range, 63-123 months) with chest x-rays and for a mean of 62 months (range, 3-101 months) with pulmonary angiography. Fifty-four percent of the balloons were deflated at latest radiographic chest film follow-up, but at pulmonary angiographic follow-up all embolized malformations were without flow irrespective of whether or not the balloons were visible. Detachable silicone balloons are not available anymore, but use of these balloons for embolization of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations has been shown to be a safe and precise method, with immediate occlusion of the feeding artery and with long-lasting occlusion, even though many balloons deflate with time, leaving a fibrotic scar replacing the pulmonary arteriovenous malformation. No case of recanalization has been discovered, and these results seem to justify a reduced number of controls of these balloon-embolized malformations

  16. Ancillary lung parenchymal findings at spiral CT scanning in pulmonary embolism. Relationship to chest sonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reissig, Angelika; Heyne, Jens-Peter; Kroegel, Claus

    2004-01-01

    Introduction/objective: The aim of the study was to compare findings of transthoracic sonography (TS) and of spiral computed tomography (sCT) in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism (PE). Methods and patients: Peripheral parenchymal and pleural findings of TS and sCT were compared in 62 patients (25 females, 37 males; mean age 62.2 years) with suspected PE. Results: In 39 patients PE was established, of whose pleura-based lesions could be detected by TS in 30 patients and by sCT in 31 patients. Whilst in three of the patients parenchymal lesions were exclusively detected by sonography, no peripheral abnormalities could be discovered with either technique in five patients. Among the nine patients lacking peripheral abnormalities on sonography, four revealed peripheral lesions in sCT. In 23 patients without PE, peripheral consolidations at CT were detected in six patients whereas two showed lesions on TS. With respect to the appearance, pleura-based wedge-shaped consolidations were the main parenchymal alterations (82.4% at TS, 66.1% at sCT) as compared with non-wedge-shaped consolidations (17.6% at TS, 33.9% at sCT). Peripheral lesions were located preferentially within the lower lobes. In addition, both localised and basal pleural effusion associated with PE could be demonstrated in 58.9% at TS and in 23.1% by sCT. Discussions and conclusion: The study shows that in PE parenchymal and pleural changes are detectable by TS and sCT. If parenchymal findings are present at sCT, peripheral PE should be considered, even in the absence of directly visible emboli

  17. Probability scores and diagnostic algorithms in pulmonary embolism: are they followed in clinical practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjuán, Pilar; Rodríguez-Núñez, Nuria; Rábade, Carlos; Lama, Adriana; Ferreiro, Lucía; González-Barcala, Francisco Javier; Alvarez-Dobaño, José Manuel; Toubes, María Elena; Golpe, Antonio; Valdés, Luis

    2014-05-01

    Clinical probability scores (CPS) determine the pre-test probability of pulmonary embolism (PE) and assess the need for the tests required in these patients. Our objective is to investigate if PE is diagnosed according to clinical practice guidelines. Retrospective study of clinically suspected PE in the emergency department between January 2010 and December 2012. A D-dimer value ≥ 500 ng/ml was considered positive. PE was diagnosed on the basis of the multislice computed tomography angiography and, to a lesser extent, with other imaging techniques. The CPS used was the revised Geneva scoring system. There was 3,924 cases of suspected PE (56% female). Diagnosis was determined in 360 patients (9.2%) and the incidence was 30.6 cases per 100,000 inhabitants/year. Sensitivity and the negative predictive value of the D-dimer test were 98.7% and 99.2% respectively. CPS was calculated in only 24 cases (0.6%) and diagnostic algorithms were not followed in 2,125 patients (54.2%): in 682 (17.4%) because clinical probability could not be estimated and in 482 (37.6%), 852 (46.4%) and 109 (87.9%) with low, intermediate and high clinical probability, respectively, because the diagnostic algorithms for these probabilities were not applied. CPS are rarely calculated in the diagnosis of PE and the diagnostic algorithm is rarely used in clinical practice. This may result in procedures with potential significant side effects being unnecessarily performed or to a high risk of underdiagnosis. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Safety of ventilation/perfusion single photon emission computed tomography for pulmonary embolism diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Roux, Pierre-Yves; Palard, Xavier; Robin, Philippe; Abgral, Ronan; Querellou, Solene; Salaun, Pierre-Yves [Universite Europeenne de Bretagne, Brest (France); Universite de Brest, Brest (France); CHRU de la Cavale Blanche, Service de medecine nucleaire, Brest (France); Delluc, Aurelien; Couturaud, Francis [Universite Europeenne de Bretagne, Brest (France); Universite de Brest, Brest (France); CHRU de la Cavale Blanche, Departement de medecine interne et de pneumologie, Brest (France); Le Gal, Gregoire [Universite Europeenne de Bretagne, Brest (France); University of Ottawa, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa (Canada); CHRU de la Cavale Blanche, Departement de medecine interne et de pneumologie, Brest (France); Universite de Brest, Brest (France)

    2014-10-15

    The aim of this management outcome study was to assess the safety of ventilation/perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (V/Q SPECT) for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE) using for interpretation the criteria proposed in the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) guidelines for V/Q scintigraphy. A total of 393 patients with clinically suspected PE referred to the Nuclear Medicine Department of Brest University Hospital from April 2011 to March 2013, with either a high clinical probability or a low or intermediate clinical probability but positive D-dimer, were retrospectively analysed. V/Q SPECT were interpreted by the attending nuclear medicine physician using a diagnostic cut-off of one segmental or two subsegmental mismatches. The final diagnostic conclusion was established by the physician responsible for patient care, based on clinical symptoms, laboratory test, V/Q SPECT and other imaging procedures performed. Patients in whom PE was deemed absent were not treated with anticoagulants and were followed up for 3 months. Of the 393 patients, the prevalence of PE was 28 %. V/Q SPECT was positive for PE in 110 patients (28 %) and negative in 283 patients (72 %). Of the 110 patients with a positive V/Q SPECT, 78 (71 %) had at least one additional imaging test (computed tomography pulmonary angiography or ultrasound) and the diagnosis of PE was eventually excluded in one patient. Of the 283 patients with a negative V/Q SPECT, 74 (26 %) patients had another test. The diagnosis of PE was finally retained in one patient and excluded in 282 patients. The 3-month thromboembolic risk in the patients not treated with anticoagulants was 1/262: 0.38 % (95 % confidence interval 0.07-2.13). A diagnostic management including V/Q SPECT interpreted with a diagnostic cut-off of ''one segmental or two subsegmental mismatches'' appears safe to exclude PE. (orig.)

  19. Percutaneous transhepatic venous embolization of pulmonary artery aneurysm in Hughes-Stovin syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung Ah; Kim, Man Deuk; Oh, Do Yun; Park, Pil Won [Bundang CHA General Hospital, Pochon CHA University, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-08-15

    Hughes-Stovin syndrome is an extremely rare entity. We present a case of a 42-year-old man, who developed deep vein and inferior vena cava (IVC) thrombosis, repeated internal bleeding and pulmonary artery aneurysms (PAAs). The patient presented with massive hemoptysis and with PAAs of a 2.5 cm maximum diameter. We describe the successful percutaneous transhepatic venous embolization of the PAAs due to occluded common vascular pathways to the pulmonary artery.

  20. Establishment and evaluation of acute pulmonary embolism model in rabbit monitored with echocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cong Dengli; Yu Xiaofeng; Qu Shaochun; Cong Zhibin

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To establish acute pulmonary embolism (APE) model in rabbit under echocardiography, and compare with the pathological results, and explore the feasibility of establishment of APE model monitored with echocardiography. Methods: APE models were established in 25 healthy Japanese white rabbits. The rabbit models of APE were created by right external jugular vena catheter using gelatin sponge monitored with echocardiography. Gelatin sponge emboli, 2 mm x 2 mm x 10 mm each, following with 5 mL physiologic saline were injected separately to right atrium via the right external jugular vein, which could make these emboli embolize pulmonary artery following blood stream. And the pulmonary artery systolic pressure was detected. Then the lung tissues slices near embolism place were detected by pathology after the model rabbits were dissected. Results: Twenty-three rabbit models with APE were successfully established from twenty-five healthy rabbits. However, one rabbit was unexpectedly dead because of anesthesia, another rabbit was dead owing to acute congestive heart failure of cor dextrum by emboli stagnation in cor dextrum. The echocardiogram of rabbits before and after model establishment showed that the pulmonary artery systolic pressure was significantly increased after APE, the main pulmonary artery, the left pulmonary artery and the right pulmonary artery were passively expanded. The right ventricle was increased and left ventricle was decreased oppositely, interventricular septum expanded toward left ventricle. there was significant difference compared with pre-embolism (P< 0.01). Gelatin sponge emboli in the pulmonary artery were detected by pathological detection. Conclusion: The method to establish APE model monitored with echocardiography is simple and feasible. It could be used as one of methods to establish APE model, animal. (authors)

  1. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT diagnosis of unexpected extracardiac septic embolisms in patients with suspected cardiac endocarditis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonfiglioli, Rachele; Nanni, Cristina; Morigi, Joshua James; Ambrosini, Valentina; Fanti, Stefano [Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Bologna, Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, Nuclear Medicine, Bologna (Italy); Graziosi, Maddalena; Rapezzi, Claudio [Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Bologna, Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, Cardiology, Bologna (Italy); Trapani, Filippo; Bartoletti, Michele; Tumietto, Fabio; Viale, Pier Luigi [Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Bologna, Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, Infective Diseases, Bologna (Italy); Ferretti, Alice; Rubello, Domenico [Azienda Ospedaliera S. Maria della Misericordia, Nuclear Medicine, Radiology, Neuroradiology, Medical Physics, Rovigo (Italy)

    2013-08-15

    Acute infective endocarditis is a potentially life-threatening disease. Its outcome strongly depends on systemic embolization and extracardiac infections. When present, these conditions usually lead to a more aggressive therapeutic approach. However, the diagnosis of peripheral septic embolism is very challenging. {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT has proven to be accurate for the detection of inflammatory diseases and occult infections. The aim of this study was to assess the added value of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in the detection of extracardiac embolisms in the evaluation of patients with suspected valvular endocarditis (VE). Seventy-one patients with suspected infective endocarditis, enrolled between June 2010 and December 2012, underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT with the standard procedure on a dedicated PET/CT scanner. Extracardiac findings were subsequently evaluated with other imaging procedures. Of the 71 patients with suspicion of infective endocarditis, we found unexpected extracardiac findings in 17 patients (24 %) without any clinical suspicion. Extracardiac findings were subsequently evaluated with other imaging procedures. PET/CT detected unexpected extra sites of infection in 24 % of cases, leading to changes in therapeutic management in a very relevant percentage of patients. These findings may have important therapeutic implications. (orig.)

  2. Low attenuation on high resolution computed tomography in pulmonary embolism: an experimental study in pigs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Dong Wook; Oh, Joo Hyung; Yoon, Yup; You, Jee Hong; Choi, Young Gyu [Kyunghee Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeong Sook [Jungmun Medical College, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-08-01

    To evaluate the incidence and type of low attenuation seen on high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) performed after artificially included pulmonary embolism. Using permanent embolic materials, pulmonary embolism was induced in ten Yorkshire pigs. Pre- and postembolic pulmonary angiography was performed, and HRCT was performed immediately and 1, 3, and 6 weeks after embolization. The incidence and type of low attenuation of all segments, as seen on HRCT, was evaluated. Low attenuation was classified as mottled, lobular, segmental, or peripheral. The pigs were sacrified after 6 weeks and contact radiographs were obtained. Low attenuation developed in eight of ten pigs. Pulmonary angiography revealed arterial occlusion in 15 large and 19 small segmental arteries (34 of 45 segments). In the remaining 11 segments, follow-up HRCT demonstrated areas of low attenuation. This was present in 25 of 35 segments (71%) as seen on HRCT images obtained immediately; in 16 of 41 segments (39%) on images obtained 1 week after embolization; in 17 of 41 segments (41%) on those acquired at 3 weeks; and in 25 of 45 segments (56%) on those acquired at 6 weeks. The overall incidence of low attenuation was 83/166 (50%). The types of low attenuation were mottled in 32/83 cases, lobular in 13/83, segmental in 13/83, and peripheral in 25/83. In large segmental arterial occlusion, the incidence of low attenuation on HRCT was 100% immediately, 57% at 1 week, 60% at 3 weeks, and 80% at 6 weeks. In small segmental arterial occlusion, the incidence was 47%, 25%, 11%, and 21% respectively. The overall incidence of low attenuation was 40/55 (73%) in large segmental arterial occlusion and 18/71 (25%) in small segmental arterial occlusion. Low attenuation on HRCT is a finding of pulmonary embolism and is more common on HRCT performed immediately after embolization (71%) and in large segmental arterial occlusion (73%). Low attenuation on HRCT is an ancillary finding and may be useful in the

  3. Pulmonary embolism in intensive care unit: Predictive factors, clinical manifestations and outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahloul Mabrouk

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : To determine predictive factors, clinical and demographics characteristics of patients with pulmonary embolism (PE in ICU, and to identify factors associated with poor outcome in the hospital and in the ICU. Methods : During a four-year prospective study, a medical committee of six ICU physicians prospectively examined all available data for each patient in order to classify patients according to the level of clinical suspicion of pulmonary thromboembolism. During the study periods, all patients admitted to our ICU were classified into four groups. The first group includes all patients with confirmed PE; the second group includes some patients without clinical manifestations of PE; the third group includes patients with suspected and not confirmed PE and the fourth group includes all patients with only deep vein thromboses (DVTs without suspicion of PE. The diagnosis of PE was confirmed either by a high-probability ventilation/perfusion (V/Q scan or by a spiral computed tomography (CT scan showing one or more filling defects in the pulmonary artery or in its branches. The diagnosis was also confirmed by echocardiography when a thrombus in the pulmonary artery was observed. Results : During the study periods, 4408 patients were admitted in our ICU. The diagnosis of PE was confirmed in 87 patients (1.9%. The mean delay of development of PE was 7.8 ± 9.5 days. On the day of PE diagnosis, clinical examination showed that 50 patients (57.5% were hypotensive, 63 (72.4% have SIRS, 15 (17.2% have clinical manifestations of DVT and 71 (81.6% have respiratory distress requiring mechanical ventilation. In our study, intravenous unfractionated heparin was used in 81 cases (93.1% and low molecular weight heparins were used in 4 cases (4.6%. The mean ICU stay was 20.2 ± 25.3 days and the mean hospital stay was 25.5 ± 25 days. The mortality rate in ICU was 47.1% and the in-hospital mortality rate was 52.9%. Multivariate analysis showed that

  4. Multidetector computed tomographic pulmonary angiography in patients with a high clinical probability of pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moores, L; Kline, J; Portillo, A K; Resano, S; Vicente, A; Arrieta, P; Corres, J; Tapson, V; Yusen, R D; Jiménez, D

    2016-01-01

    ESSENTIALS: When high probability of pulmonary embolism (PE), sensitivity of computed tomography (CT) is unclear. We investigated the sensitivity of multidetector CT among 134 patients with a high probability of PE. A normal CT alone may not safely exclude PE in patients with a high clinical pretest probability. In patients with no clear alternative diagnosis after CTPA, further testing should be strongly considered. Whether patients with a negative multidetector computed tomographic pulmonary angiography (CTPA) result and a high clinical pretest probability of pulmonary embolism (PE) should be further investigated is controversial. This was a prospective investigation of the sensitivity of multidetector CTPA among patients with a priori clinical assessment of a high probability of PE according to the Wells criteria. Among patients with a negative CTPA result, the diagnosis of PE required at least one of the following conditions: ventilation/perfusion lung scan showing a high probability of PE in a patient with no history of PE, abnormal findings on venous ultrasonography in a patient without previous deep vein thrombosis at that site, or the occurrence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in a 3-month follow-up period after anticoagulation was withheld because of a negative multidetector CTPA result. We identified 498 patients with a priori clinical assessment of a high probability of PE and a completed CTPA study. CTPA excluded PE in 134 patients; in these patients, the pooled incidence of VTE was 5.2% (seven of 134 patients; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.5-9.0). Five patients had VTEs that were confirmed by an additional imaging test despite a negative CTPA result (five of 48 patients; 10.4%; 95% CI 1.8-19.1), and two patients had objectively confirmed VTEs that occurred during clinical follow-up of at least 3 months (two of 86 patients; 2.3%; 95% CI 0-5.5). None of the patients had a fatal PE during follow-up. A normal multidetector CTPA result alone may not safely

  5. Diagnostic strategies for excluding pulmonary embolism in clinical outcome studies - A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruip, Marieke J. H. A.; Leclercq, Monique G. L.; van der Heul, Cees; Prins, Martin H.; Büller, Harry R.

    2003-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary embolism is a common clinical disorder that is associated with high morbidity and mortality if untreated. It is important to confirm or rule out the diagnosis in patients with clinical suspicion of the disease. Purpose: To evaluate various diagnostic strategies for excluding

  6. Quality of life after pulmonary embolism as assessed with SF-36 and PEmb-QoL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Es, Josien; den Exter, Paul L.; Kaptein, Ad A.; Andela, Cornelie D.; Erkens, Petra M. G.; Klok, Frederikus A.; Douma, Renee A.; Mos, Inge C. M.; Cohn, Danny M.; Kamphuisen, Pieter W.; Huisman, Menno V.; Middeldorp, Saskia

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Although quality of life (QoL) is recognized as an important indicator of the course of a disease, it has rarely been addressed in studies evaluating the outcome of care for patients with pulmonary embolism (PE). This study primarily aimed to evaluate the QoL of patients with acute PE

  7. Sudden death in a case of catatonia due to pulmonary embolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana Javadekar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Catatonic syndrome carries relatively high mortality. One of the causes of death is pulmonary embolism. Prolonged immobility, dehydration, use of low-potency antipsychotic drugs, and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT increase the risk of venous thromboembolism. Evaluating the risk of catatonic patients is of paramount importance. Prevention of venous thromboembolism by reducing the risk factors and relieving catatonic symptoms early is essential.

  8. Prevalence and potential determinants of exertional dyspnea after acute pulmonary embolism.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klok, F.A.; Kralingen, K.W. van; Dijk, A.P.J. van; Heyning, F.H.; Vliegen, H.W.; Huisman, M.V.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The exact prevalence and etiology of exertional dyspnea in the clinical course of acute pulmonary embolism (PE) have not yet been established. METHODS: A large cohort of consecutive patients diagnosed with acute PE was subjected to a dyspnea questionnaire and invited for cardiopulmonary

  9. High‑risk pulmonary embolism in a patient with acute dissecting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-04-07

    Apr 7, 2016 ... In the last decades, an increased incidence of pulmonary embolism (PE) and acute dissection (AD) of aortic aneurysms has been registered mostly due to increased availability of advanced imaging techniques. They seldom occur concomitantly in the same patient. In this paper, we present the clinical ...

  10. High‑risk pulmonary embolism in a patient with acute dissecting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the last decades, an increased incidence of pulmonary embolism (PE) and acute dissection (AD) of aortic aneurysms has been registered mostly due to increased availability of advanced imaging techniques. They seldom occur concomitantly in the same patient. In this paper, we present the clinical challenges and ...

  11. Treatment of superficial vein thrombosis to prevent deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wichers, Iris M.; Di Nisio, Marcello; Büller, Harry R.; Middeldorp, Saskia

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to summarize the evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCT) concerning the efficacy and safety of medical or surgical treatments of superficial vein thrombosis (SVT) for the prevention of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE). A

  12. Isolated Pulmonary Infective Endocarditis with Septic Pulmonary Embolism Complicating a Right Ventricular Outflow Tract Obstruction: Scarce and Devious Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelrahmen Abdelbar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a fifty-three-year-old male who presented with severe sepsis. He had been treated as a pneumonia patient for five months before the admission. Investigations revealed isolated pulmonary valve endocarditis and septic pulmonary embolism in addition to undiagnosed right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT obstruction. The patient underwent surgery for the relief of RVOT obstruction by substantial muscle resection of the RVOT, pulmonary artery embolectomy, pulmonary valve replacement, and reconstruction of RVOT and main pulmonary artery with two separate bovine pericardial patches. He was discharged from our hospital after 6 weeks of intravenous antibiotics. He recovered well on follow-up 16 weeks after discharge. A high-suspicion index is needed to diagnose right-side heart endocarditis. Blood cultures and transesophageal echocardiogram are the key diagnostic tools.

  13. The algorithm of imaging diagnostics of pulmonary embolism - time for a new definition?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, H.C.; Kauczor, H.U.; Pitton, M.B.; Schweden, F.; Thelen, M.

    1997-01-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is an increasing and underdiagnosed cause of mortality and morbidity in hospitalised patients; pulmonary hypertension based on chronic pulmonary embolism is an uncommon, but severe and surgically curable complication. Since clinical signs might be silent or unspecific, both acute and chronic PE require imaging methods for diagnosis and treatment planning. Chest radiographic findings are usually non-specific. Scintigraphy provides a high sensitivity for PE, but lacks anatomic resolution and sufficient specificity. Pulmonary angiography, albeit accurate, is an invasive procedure associated with low but still not negligible morbidity and mortality. Hence, non-invasive methods offer advantages. Spiral CT, for example, is most reliable in the diagnosis of acute and chronic PE: Such fast CT techniques provide a non-invasive means to detect and differentiate acute emboli and organised thrombi, as well as perfusion abnomalities and other concomitant findings. MRI offers both morphological and functional information on lung perfusion and right heart function, but its image quality still needs improvement to be comparable with CT. Thus, while MRI must still be tested in clinical studies. CT is recommended as a screening method in acute and chronic pulmonary embolism. (orig.) [de

  14. Acute pulmonary embolism in the era of multi-detector CT: a reality in sub-Saharan Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tambe, Joshua; Moifo, Boniface; Fongang, Emmanuel; Guegang, Emilienne; Juimo, Alain Georges

    2012-01-01

    The advantages of multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) have made it the imaging modality of choice for some patients with suspected cardiothoracic disease, of which pulmonary embolism (PE) is an exponent. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence of PE in patients with clinical suspicion of acute PE using MDCT in a sub-Saharan setting, and to describe the demographic characteristics of these patients. Consecutive records of patients who underwent MDCT pulmonary angiography for suspected acute PE over a two-year period at the Radiology Department of a university-affiliated hospital were systematically reviewed. All MDCT pulmonary angiograms were performed with a 16-detector computed tomography (CT) scanner using real-time bolus tracking technique. Authorization for the study was obtained from the institutional authorities. Forty-one MDCT pulmonary angiograms were reviewed of which 37 were retained. Of the 4 excluded studies, 3 were repeat angiograms and 1 study was not technically adequate. Twelve of 37 patients (32.4%) had CT angiograms that were positive for PE, of which 7 were males. The mean age of these patients was 47.6±10.5 years (age range from 33 to 65 years). Twenty five patients out of 37 (67.6%) had CT angiograms that were negative for PE. Eleven PE-positive patients (91.7%) had at least 1 identifiable thromboembolic risk factor whilst 5 PE-negative patients (20%) also had at least a thromboembolic risk factor. The relative risk of the occurrence of PE in patients with at least a thromboembolic risk factor was estimated at 14.4. Acute PE is a reality in sub-Saharan Africa, with an increased likelihood of MDCT evidence in patients with clinical suspicion of PE who have at least a thromboembolic risk factor. The increasing availability of MDCT will help provide more information on the occurrence of PE in these settings

  15. Percutaneous transplantation of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells in a dog suspected to have fibrocartilaginous embolic myelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Wook-Hun; Park, Seon-Ah; Lee, Jae-Hoon; Chung, Dai-Jung; Yang, Wo-Jong; Kang, Eun-Hee; Choi, Chi-Bong; Chang, Hwa-Seok; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Hwang, Soo-Han; Han, Hoon; Kim, Hwi-Yool

    2013-01-01

    The use of human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells for cell transplantation therapy holds great promise for repairing spinal cord injury. Here we report the first clinical trial transplantation of human umbilical cord (hUCB)-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into the spinal cord of a dog suspected to have fibrocartilaginous embolic myelopathy (FCEM) and that experienced a loss of deep pain sensation. Locomotor functions improved following transplantation in a dog. Based on our findings, we suggest that transplantation of hUCB-derived MSCs will have beneficial therapeutic effects on FCEM patients lacking deep pain sensation.

  16. Analysis of decrease in lung perfusion blood volume with occlusive and non-occlusive pulmonary embolisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Yohei; Yoshimura, Norihiko; Hori, Yoshiro; Horii, Yosuke; Ishikawa, Hiroyuki; Yamazaki, Motohiko; Noto, Yoshiyuki; Aoyama, Hidefumi

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The proportion of preserved PE lesions in the non-occlusive group was 76.7% (33/43). • HUs of the iodine map were significantly higher in the non-occlusive group than in the occlusive group. • There was no significant difference in HUs between the non-occlusive and corresponding normal group. - Abstract: Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine if lung perfusion blood volume (lung PBV) with non-occlusive pulmonary embolism (PE) differs quantitatively and visually from that with occlusive PE and to investigate if lung PBV with non-occlusive PE remains the same as that without PE. Materials and methods: Totally, 108 patients suspected of having acute PE underwent pulmonary dual-energy computed tomography angiography (DECTA) between April 2011 and January 2012. Presence of PE on DECTA was evaluated by one radiologist. Two radiologists visually evaluated the PE distribution (segmental or subsegmental) and its nature (occlusive or non-occlusive) on DECTA and classified perfusion in lung PBV as “decreased,” “slightly decreased,” and “preserved”. Two radiologists used a lung PBV application to set a region of interest (ROI) in the center of the lesion and measured HU values of an iodine map. In the same slice as the ROI of the lesion and close to the lesion, another ROI was set in the normal perfusion area without PE, and HUs were measured. The proportion of lesions was compared between the occlusive and non-occlusive groups. HUs were compared among the occlusive, non-occlusive, and corresponding normal groups. Results: Twenty-five patients had 80 segmental or subsegmental lesions. There were 37 and 43 lesions in the occlusive and non-occlusive groups, respectively. The proportion of decreased lesions was 73.0% (27/37) in the occlusive group, while that of preserved lesions in the non-occlusive group was 76.7% (33/43). There was a significant difference in the proportion of lesions (P < 0.001) between the two groups. HUs of the

  17. Evaluation of Hemodynamic Changes and Respiratory Physical Findings in Patients with Pulmonary Embolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masome Rabieepour

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE is a potentially fatal disease with nonspecific symptoms and signs. Patients with Pulmonary embolism often have dyspnea, chest pain, haemoptysis, tachycardia tachypnea and respiratory physical finding including hypoxia and decreased ETCO2. Daily patients with Pulmonary embolism are very few in hospital course and we aimed to determine clinical and paraclinical findings in hospital pulmonary embolism patients. Methods: we assessed in hospital course of 104 patients with pulmonary embolism with symptom (dyspnea, chest pain, and hemoptysis and signs (tachypnea, tachycardia, DVT signs, blood pressure and respiratory physical findings (PO2, ETCO2. Results: majority of patients had risk factor for PTE; the most common was cancer. 21.2% of patients had apparent DVT in Doppler sonography. Isolated dyspnea (38%, chest pain with and without hemoptysis (60% and syncope (2% were observed in patients. Mean duration of dyspnea resolution was 3.4 days. Mean duration of chest pain resolution was 1.76 days. Mean duration of hemoptysis resolution was 2 days. 64.4% of the patients were hypoxic and mean duration of hypoxic resolution was 2.63 days. Mean duration of tachycardia resolution was 2.37 days. No relation was observed between size of PTE and mortality or hypotension and PO2. Mean ETCO2 was 23±2 mmHg and 86.5% of patients had ETCO2 lower than 28. Mean duration of ETCO2 resolution was 3.6 days. Most common physical finding that resolved later than others was ETCO2. In 32.7% of patients, ETCO2 did not resolve.   Key words: Pulmonary thromboembolism; Tachycardia; Tachypnea; Hemoptysis; Hypoxic; ETCO2

  18. Pulmonary Embolism Associated with Pandemic H1N1 Influenza A Virus Infection: a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Cumhur Dülger

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available On May 15, 2009, the Turkish Ministry of Health reported the first case of 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1 virus infection in the Republic of Turkey. Pandemic H1N1virus is a new and mutant influenza virus and has many epidemiologic and clinic features. These cases have been reported in multiple geographic regions of the world. School children are more affected than adults. In the elderly, it has a higher mortality rate. The clinical aspects of infection with H1N1 influenza A virus remains to be understood. A few cases of pulmonary embolism associated with H1N1 influenza A virus infection were reported. We herein report a pulmonary embolism in a patient with pandemic influenza A (H1N1 virus infection. A 42-year-old Turkish woman was admitted to our emergency department with dyspnea and pleuritic chest pain. She complained of fever, myalgia, sore throat and cough of four days duration on admission to our hospital. She was tested for pandemic influenza A (H1N1 virus by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR test which revealed a positive result. Chest tomography showed pulmonary embolism. She was successfully treated with intravenous heparin and oseltamivir. This case report demonstrates the importance of considering pulmvonary embolism as a diagnosis in 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1 virus infected persons who present with sudden onset of dyspnea, fever and chest pain.

  19. Clinical and Radiological Long-Term Follow-up After Embolization of Pulmonary Arteriovenous Malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, Poul Erik; Kjeldsen, Anette D.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose was to evaluate the clinical and radiological long-term results of embolization of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) and to assess the quality of life after treatment. A clinical follow-up was undertaken after 67 months (mean) in 35 consecutive patients with 106 PAVMs. Outcome parameters at follow-up were PaO 2 and patients' satisfaction. During follow-up, the patients had a clinical examination, measurement of arterial blood gases, chest X-ray, and contrast echocardiography performed and were asked to fill in a questionnaire exploring experience of the treatment and subjective effect of treatment on physical and social functioning. A significant rise in oxygenation of the blood after embolization was measured. In 77% of the patients symptoms improved, and 71% felt better performance. In eight patients, one of the PAVMs was found insufficiently embolized or recanalized at follow-up angiography and therefore were re-embolized. Endovascular embolization for PAVMs is effective. Clinical parameters and quality of life improved significantly. Regular clinical controls after therapy are necessary to discover insufficiently embolized, recanalized or new PAVMs

  20. Comparison of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography and conventional pulmonary angiography for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism : a prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudkerk, M; van Beek, EJR; Wielopolski, P; van Ooijen, PMA; Brouwers-Kuyper, EMJ; Bongaerts, AHH; Berghout, A

    2002-01-01

    Background Diagnostic strategies for pulmonary embolism are complex and consist of non-invasive diagnostic tests done to avoid conventional pulmonary angiography as much as possible. We aimed to assess the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) for the diagnosis of pulmonary

  1. Lung scans with significant perfusion defects limited to matching pleural effusions have a low probability of pulmonary embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datz, F.L.; Bedont, R.A.; Taylor, A.

    1985-01-01

    Patients with a pleural effusion on chest x-ray often undergo a lung scan to exclude pulmonary embolism (PE). According to other studies, when the scan shows a perfusion defect equal in size to a radiographic abnormality on chest x-ray, the scan should be classified as indeterminate or intermediate probability for PE. However, since those studies dealt primarily with alveolar infiltrates rather than pleural effusions, the authors undertook a retrospective study to determine the probability of PE in patients with pleural effusion and a matching perfusion defect. The authors reviewed 451 scans and x-rays of patients studied for suspected PE. Of those, 53 had moderate or large perfusion defects secondary to pleural effusion without other significant (>25% of a segment) effusion without other significant (>25% of a segment) defects on the scan. Final diagnosis was confirmed by pulmonary angiography (16), thoracentesis (40), venography (11), other radiographic and laboratory studies, and clinical course. Of the 53 patients, only 2 patients had venous thrombotic disease. One patient had PE on pulmonary angiography, the other patient had thrombophlebitis on venography. The remainder of the patients had effusions due to congestive heart failure (12), malignancy (12), infection (7), trauma (7), collegen vascular disease (7), sympathetic effusion (3) and unknown etiology (3). The authors conclude that lung scans with significant perfusion defects limited to matching pleural effusions on chest x-ray have a low probability for PE

  2. Temporal trends in outpatient management of incident pulmonary embolism and associated mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klil-Drori, Adi J; Coulombe, Janie; Suissa, Samy; Hirsch, Andrew; Tagalakis, Vicky

    2018-01-01

    In clinical trial settings, outpatient management of pulmonary embolism (PE) is feasible and safe, but less is known on its use in routine care. We determined trends in outpatient management of PE and associated mortality in a large non-select patient population. All residents of Quebec, Canada with a first-ever work-up for suspected PE in the emergency department (ED) over 10years were included. Patients could transition to outpatient management and from unconfirmed to confirmed PE in a time-varying fashion. Comparing the years 2005-9 with 2000-4, we assessed the odds ratio (OR) for outpatient management, and relative risk (RR) for all-cause mortality, readmissions for PE, and major bleeding in 30days. We adjusted the RR for a mortality risk score. Of 15,217 patients included, 7583 were outpatients (7.5% confirmed PE) and 7634 were inpatients (60.6% confirmed PE). In all, 10.9% of patients with confirmed PE were outpatients, but outpatient management of confirmed PE was more likely in the latter study period (OR 1.73, 95%CI 1.44-2.09). Among outpatients with confirmed PE, mortality (RR 0.84, 95%CI 0.15-4.61) and readmission (RR 1.25, 95%CI 0.45-3.48) rates were stable, and only 3 major bleeding events were noted. Inpatients with confirmed PE had stable mortality rates (RR 0.95, 95%CI 0.72-1.24). Outpatient PE management increased over 10years while remaining fairly uncommon. Nevertheless, stable mortality and readmission rates indicate this practice is safe in routine care, and add to the growing evidence in support of outpatient PE management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. CASE REPORT CASE A metal foreign body pulmonary embolism

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-04-04

    Apr 4, 2009 ... from the pelvis to the inferior vena cava and from there to the right atrium and right ventricle, from where it entered the left pulmonary artery to the pulmonary circulation loop. This could have happened in the 6 years between the X-rays or possibly during the trauma. Foreign bodies can usually be diagnosed ...

  4. Non-Thrombotic Pulmonary Embolism from Inorganic Particulate Matter & Foreign Bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asah, Derick; Raju, Shine; Ghosh, Subha; Mukhopadhyay, Sanjay; Mehta, Atul C

    2018-02-23

    Non-thrombotic pulmonary embolism (NTPE) is a complete or partial occlusion of the pulmonary vasculature by various organic and inorganic materials. These include organic particulate matter (PM) such as adipocytes, tumor cells, bacteria, fungi, or gas and inorganic PM. While NTPE due to organic PM has been extensively reported in the medical literature, there are no comprehensive reviews of inorganic material embolizing to the lungs. The purpose of this article is to examine the current literature describing NTPE resulting from inorganic PM and foreign bodies (FB). Cases of NTPE are uncommon and often difficult to diagnose. The diagnosis is challenging due to its varied presentation, clinical features, and unusual radiological features. In contrast to the "classic" pulmonary thromboembolism, the pathophysiological effects of embolism by PM is not just mechanical but also a consequence of the nature of the offending material. NTPE caused by these substances can be relatively innocuous, life-threatening or lead to chronic pulmonary disease if left undetected. We hope that the heightened sense of awareness of this entity may allow earlier diagnosis and recognition of its complications. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Cardiac metastasis of tongue squamous cell carcinoma complicated by pulmonary embolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekzadeh, Sonaz; Platon, Alexandra; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Cardiac metastasis is known as a rare complication of head and neck malignancy. Patient concerns: We present a 58-year-old woman patient with a history of tongue carcinoma who was admitted in emergency department for sudden chest pain. Imaging work-up by computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) diagnosed a cardiac metastasis complicated by intraventricular thrombus and pulmonary embolism. Diagnosis: Cardiac metastasis from tongue carcinoma complicated by pulmonary embolism. Interventions: After undergoing 2 cycles of palliative chemotherapy, the patient declined any further treatment. Outcomes: Patient died 3 months after the diagnosis of cardiac metastasis. Lessons: Cardiac metastasis should be considered as a differential diagnosis in patients with a history of head and neck malignancy who present non-specific cardiac symptoms. PMID:28700484

  6. Cardiac metastasis of tongue squamous cell carcinoma complicated by pulmonary embolism: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekzadeh, Sonaz; Platon, Alexandra; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre

    2017-07-01

    Cardiac metastasis is known as a rare complication of head and neck malignancy. We present a 58-year-old woman patient with a history of tongue carcinoma who was admitted in emergency department for sudden chest pain. Imaging work-up by computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) diagnosed a cardiac metastasis complicated by intraventricular thrombus and pulmonary embolism. Cardiac metastasis from tongue carcinoma complicated by pulmonary embolism. After undergoing 2 cycles of palliative chemotherapy, the patient declined any further treatment. Patient died 3 months after the diagnosis of cardiac metastasis. Cardiac metastasis should be considered as a differential diagnosis in patients with a history of head and neck malignancy who present non-specific cardiac symptoms.

  7. Acute myocardial infarction with concomitant pulmonary embolism as a result of patent foramen ovale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayıroğlu, Mert İlker; Bozbeyoğlu, Emrah; Akyüz, Şükrü; Yıldırımtürk, Özlem; Bozbay, Mehmet; Bakhshaliyev, Nijad; Renda, Emir; Gök, Gülay; Eren, Mehmet; Pehlivanoğlu, Seçkin

    2015-07-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (MI) and pulmonary embolism canal one lead to life-threatening conditions such as sudden cardiac death and congestive heart failure. We discuss a case of a 74-year-old man presented to the emergency department with acute dyspnea and chest pain. Acute anterior MI and pulmonary embolism concomitantly were diagnosed. Primary percutaneous coronary intervention performed because of preliminary acute anterior MI diagnosis. Transthoracic echocardiography was performed to determine further complications caused by acute MI because patient had a continuous tachycardia and dyspnea although hemodynamically stable. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed a thrombus that was stuck into the patent foramen ovale with parts in right and left atria. Anticoagulation therapy was started; neither fibrinolytic therapy nor operation was performed because of low survey expectations of the patient's recently diagnosed primary disease stage IV lung cancer. Patient was discharged on his 20th day with oral anticoagulation and antiagregant therapy.

  8. Fatal pulmonary embolism during legal induced abortion in the United States from 1972 to 1985.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, H W; Atrash, H K; Franks, A L

    1990-04-01

    To determine the risk factors for abortion-related deaths caused by pulmonary embolism, we investigated all deaths from legal abortions in the United States from 1972 through 1985. Of 213 deaths, 45 (21%) were due to air, blood clot, or amniotic fluid embolism. The risk of embolism death was higher among minority women and older women (34 to 44 years). Our analysis revealed that curettage at less than or equal to 21 weeks and abortions at less than or equal to 12 weeks, regardless of method, were both associated with the least risk of embolism death. In comparing 1972 to 1978 and 1979 to 1985, we found that the embolism mortality rate decreased 79%. During 1979 to 1985, the number of abortions performed by noncurettage methods decreased 58%, possibly as a result of earlier abortion morbidity studies, which showed that these methods carried a greater risk of complications. Although a decrease in mortality rates may be partially attributable to the declining use of these methods, our analysis suggests that changes in methods over time have not been universally applied to all racial groups.

  9. Suspected pulmonary tuberculosis in rural South Africa - Sputum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three (125%) of the 24 patients with a discharge diagnosis other than TB (17 pneumonia, 3 old TB, 2 carcinoma of the lung, 1 bronchiectasis) turned out to have TB within the follow-up period; 2 of those had extrapulmonary TB Conclusion, SI produced a positive smear result in 29% of patients with suspected TB who had ...

  10. Pulmonary embolism occurring in a patient treated with spinal cord stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arıcı, Tülin; Kurçaloğlu, Mustafa; Uyar, Meltem; Eyigör, Can

    2017-10-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has been shown to be an effective method for treating many chronic pain syndromes. In addition, providing pain relief with SCS can reduce immobilization and complications related to immobilization. The present case describes pulmonary embolism (PE) that occurred in patient being treated with SCS for post-laminectomy syndrome. The possibility of PE must be kept in mind while treating patients with SCS.

  11. Delayed Diagnosis in an Elderly Schizophrenic Patient with Catatonic State and Pulmonary Embolism

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Hsueh-Chin; Chiu, Nien-Mu

    2013-01-01

    Catatonia is a syndrome with any two of five core features: stupor/motoric immobility/catalepsy/waxy flexibility, excitement, negativism/mutism, posturing, and echolalia/echopraxia. We describe a case of delayed diagnosis of pulmonary embolism with an atypical presentation in an elderly schizophrenia male patient, which led to a life-threatening brain infarction. A 75-year-old male was hospitalized in a psychiatric ward because of stupor, poor intake and mutism under a diagnosis of recurrent ...

  12. A giant right atrial villous myxoma with simultaneous pulmonary embolism

    OpenAIRE

    Aydın, Cemalettin; Taşal, Abdurrahman; Ay, Yasin; Vatankulu, Mehmet Akif; İnan, Bekir; Bacaksız, Ahmet

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Primary cardiac tumors are rare and approximately three quarters of them are benign and up to half of the benign tumors are myxomas. Right atrial villous myxoma with pulmonary embolism is an unusual apparition. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 29 year-old male was admitted to our outpatient clinic with progressive exertional dyspnea, chest pain and intermittent feeling faint. A giant right atrial villous mobile mass was detected by means of transthoracic echocardiography. To exclude possib...

  13. Technical Error During Deployment Leads to Vena Cava Filter Migration and Massive Pulmonary Embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fotiadis, Nikolas I.; Sabharwal, Tarun; Dourado, Renato; Fikrat, Shabbo; Adam, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    The Guenther Tulip vena cava filter is a safe, effective, well-established device for pulmonary embolism prophylaxis. We report a patient in whom there was migration of the filter to the right atrium, 2 weeks after insertion, caused by a technical error during deployment. An attempt to retrieve the filter percutaneously failed, necessitating removal at open-heart surgery. The potential causes of migration are described and the lessons learned from this unusual case are outlined.

  14. Pulmonary Embolism following Endovenous Laser Ablation (EVLA of the Great Saphenous Vein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nnamdi Nwaejike

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available

    A 70yr old lady presented to accident and emergency with sudden onset pleuritic chest pain. A pulmonary embolus (PE was diagnosed by CTPA. Ten days earlier she had bilateral EVLA for recurrent long saphenous vein disease. Confounding risk factors for pulmonary embolism included bilateral ligation and stripping of the long saphenous vein a year earlier, malignancy, EVLA and phlebitic tributary varices. EVLA has been shown to be an effective treatment for superficial venous insufficiency with low morbidity and high patient satisfaction. The investigation of confounding risk factors and possible causes should not compromise the initial treatment of PE.

  15. ACR Appropriateness Criteria® Suspected Pulmonary Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirajuddin, Arlene; Donnelly, Edwin F; Crabtree, Traves P; Henry, Travis S; Iannettoni, Mark D; Johnson, Geoffrey B; Kazerooni, Ella A; Maldonado, Fabien; Olsen, Kathryn M; Wu, Carol C; Mohammed, Tan-Lucien; Kanne, Jeffrey P

    2017-05-01

    Pulmonary hypertension may be idiopathic or related to a large variety of diseases. Various imaging examinations that may be helpful in diagnosing and determining the etiology of pulmonary hypertension are discussed. Imaging examinations that may aid in the diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension include chest radiography, ultrasound echocardiography, ventilation/perfusion scans, CT, MRI, right heart catheterization, pulmonary angiography, and fluorine-18-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose PET/CT. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances where evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Mechanisms underlying gas exchange alterations in an experimental model of pulmonary embolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.H.T. Ferreira

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to determine the ventilation/perfusion ratio that contributes to hypoxemia in pulmonary embolism by analyzing blood gases and volumetric capnography in a model of experimental acute pulmonary embolism. Pulmonary embolization with autologous blood clots was induced in seven pigs weighing 24.00 ± 0.6 kg, anesthetized and mechanically ventilated. Significant changes occurred from baseline to 20 min after embolization, such as reduction in oxygen partial pressures in arterial blood (from 87.71 ± 8.64 to 39.14 ± 6.77 mmHg and alveolar air (from 92.97 ± 2.14 to 63.91 ± 8.27 mmHg. The effective alveolar ventilation exhibited a significant reduction (from 199.62 ± 42.01 to 84.34 ± 44.13 consistent with the fall in alveolar gas volume that effectively participated in gas exchange. The relation between the alveolar ventilation that effectively participated in gas exchange and cardiac output (V Aeff/Q ratio also presented a significant reduction after embolization (from 0.96 ± 0.34 to 0.33 ± 0.17 fraction. The carbon dioxide partial pressure increased significantly in arterial blood (from 37.51 ± 1.71 to 60.76 ± 6.62 mmHg, but decreased significantly in exhaled air at the end of the respiratory cycle (from 35.57 ± 1.22 to 23.15 ± 8.24 mmHg. Exhaled air at the end of the respiratory cycle returned to baseline values 40 min after embolism. The arterial to alveolar carbon dioxide gradient increased significantly (from 1.94 ± 1.36 to 37.61 ± 12.79 mmHg, as also did the calculated alveolar (from 56.38 ± 22.47 to 178.09 ± 37.46 mL and physiological (from 0.37 ± 0.05 to 0.75 ± 0.10 fraction dead spaces. Based on our data, we conclude that the severe arterial hypoxemia observed in this experimental model may be attributed to the reduction of the V Aeff/Q ratio. We were also able to demonstrate that V Aeff/Q progressively improves after embolization, a fact attributed to the alveolar ventilation redistribution

  17. Comparison of contrast-enhanced spiral CT scan and pulmonary angiography in diagnosing pulmonary embolism: an experimental study in pig models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyae Young; Lee, Sun Wha [Ewha Womans University Mokdong Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Im, Jung Gi; Goo, Jin Mo; Seo, Joon Beom; Park, Sun Won; Lee, Whal [Seoul National University College of Medicine and the Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to compare the diagnostic value of contrast-enhanced spiral CT scanning and pulmonary angiography in detecting central and peripheral pulmonary embolism (PE) in pigs. Experiments were performed in a porcine model of acute pulmonary embolism. Five pigs underwent contrast-enhanced spiral CT and pulmonary angiography after central venous administration of embolic material (Konyak). Three thoracic radiologists read the films and the results were compared with the findings of pathologic specimens. Of 85 cases of PE detected pathologically, 78 (91.8%) were visible with spiral CT and 65 (76.5%) with pulmonary angiography. Sensitivity and specificity for the detection of central emboli were 95% and 100%, respectively, with spiral CT, and 89% and 100%, respectively, with pulmonary angiography. Sensitivity and specificity for the detection peripheral emboli were 88% and 99%, respectively, with spiral CT, and 64% and 100%, respectively, with pulmonary angiography. Contrast-enhanced spiral CT is a very useful method for the diagnosis of both peripheral and central pulmonary embolism. Compared to pulmonary angiography its sensitivity and specificity are high. (author)

  18. Diagnosis of pulmonary embolism with spiral and electron-beam CT; Diagnostik der Lungenembolie mit Spiral- und Elektronenstrahl-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoepf, U.J.; Bruening, R.D.; Becker, C.R.; Konschitzky, H.; Muehling, O.; Staebler, A.; Helmberger, T.; Holzknecht, N.; Reiser, M.F. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Knez, A.; Haberl, R. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Medizinische Klinik 1

    1998-12-01

    Purpose: To compare spiral (SCT) and electron-beam CT (EBT) for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE). Materials and methods: From June 1997 to June 1998 188 patients with suspected acute or chronic thrombembolism of the pulmonary arteries were examined. A total of 108 patients were scanned using SCT and 80 patients using EBT. On each scanner two different scan protocols were evaluated. Conclusions: Advanced CT scanning techniques allow the highly accurate diagnosis of central and peripheral PE. Other potentially life-threatening underlying diseases are also readily recognized. (orig./AJ) [Deutsch] Fragestellung: Spiral-CT (SCT) und Elektronenstrahlcomputertomographie (EBT) sollten hinsichtlich ihrer Eignung fuer die Diagnostik der Lungenembolie (LE) verglichen werden. Methode: Von Juni 1997 bis Juni 1998 wurden 188 Patienten mit Verdacht auf akute oder chronische thrombembolische Veraenderungen der Lungenarterien untersucht. Die CT-Diagnostik erfolgte dabei bei 108 Patienten mit Spiral-CT und bei 80 Patienten mit EBT. Schlussfolgerungen: Moderne CT-Scan-Verfahren erlauben mit hoher Genauigkeit die Diagnose der zentralen und peripheren Lungenembolie. Die EBT bietet Vorteile in der Darstellung herznaher peripherer Lungenarterien. Andere lebendsbedrohliche Ursachen fuer die Beschwerden des Patienten werden mit der CT sicher erkannt. (orig./AJ)

  19. Risk factors for pulmonary embolism in patients preliminarily diagnosed with community-acquired pneumonia: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunfeng; Zhou, Qixing; Zou, Ying; Song, Xiaolian; Xie, Shuanshuan; Tan, Min; Zhang, Guoliang; Wang, Changhui

    2016-05-01

    D-dimer levels are increased in patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE). However, D-dimer levels are also increased in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). The aim of this prospective cohort study was to examine the incidence and clinical features of patients preliminarily diagnosed with CAP and with increased D-dimer levels, and who finally were diagnosed with PE. Patients diagnosed with CAP and hospitalized in the Respiratory Department of the Tenth People's Hospital Affiliated to Tongji University between May 2011 and May 2013 were enrolled. D-dimer levels were measured routinely after admission. For patients with increased D-dimer levels, those suspected with PE underwent computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA). A total of 2387 patients with CAP was included: 724 (30.3 %) had increased D-dimer levels (median of 0.91 mg/L). CTPA was performed for 139 of the 724 patients (median D-dimer levels of 1.99 mg/L). Among the 139 patients, 80 were diagnosed with PE, and 59 without PE; D-dimer levels were 2.83 and 1.41 mg/L, respectively (p risk factors for PE. Presentation of PE and CAP are similar. Nevertheless, these results indicated that for hospitalized patients with CAP and elevated D-dimer levels, PE should be considered for those >60 years; with CHD, COPD, or lower limb varicosity; with chest pain, shortness of breath, hemoptysis, increased troponin I, or low fever.

  20. Risk stratification of patients with combined acute pulmonary embolism and pulmonary hypertension using dynamic and regular pulmonary perfusion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xuemei; Wang Jing; Li Guohua; Wang Xiangcheng; Zhang Kaixiu; Liu Caiping

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To stratify the risks of patients with acute pulmonary embolism (APE) and pulmonary hypertension (PH) by dynamic pulmonary perfusion imaging (DPPI) and pulmonary perfusion imaging (PPI). Methods: From October 2007 to February 2009, 20 healthy volunteers (12 males, 8 females; mean age =48.47±13.47 years) and 31 APE patients (21 males, 10 females; mean age =47.68±18.06 years; from October 2007 to July 2009) were included in the study. DPPI and PPI were performed in all subjects. Percentage of perfusion defect scores (PPDs%) were calculated by semi-quantitative analysis of PPI. Risk levels were defined according to PPDs% calculated from PPI: normal (PPDs% =0); very low risk (0 60%). Lung equilibrium time (LET) was calculated on region of interest (ROI) drawn over DPPI. Clinical risk was scored by Aujesky method.The t-test, ANOVA and correlation analysis were used with SPSS 13.0 software. Results: (1) LET in healthy volunteers and APE patients was (12.18±3.28) and (32.90±14.29) s respectively (t = 6.81, P<0.01). (2) The correlation coefficient, coefficient of determination between LET and PPDs% in APE patients were 0.93 and 0.87, respectively. The correlation coefficient between LET and clinical risk score was 0.86. (3) The mean LET of APE patients in very low risk (n =5), low risk (n = 12), moderate risk (n=9), high risk (n=4) and very high risk groups (n=1) were (19.59 ±0.04), (25.03±0.08), (36.07±0.10), (57.15±0.06) and (70±0.00) s, respectively. There was significant difference among APE patients with different risk levels (F =16.78, P<0.01). Conclusions: (1) DPPI was a reliable, convenient and non-invasive method for the evaluation of PH in APE. (2) Combined LET of DPPI and PPDs% of PPI was valuable for risk stratification and prognosis estimation in APE patients. (authors)

  1. Acute pancreatitis complicated with deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herath, H M M T B; Kulatunga, Aruna

    2016-06-23

    Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammatory process of the pancreas that can trigger a systemic inflammatory response. Pulmonary embolism refers to obstruction of the pulmonary artery or one of its branches by material (usually a thrombus) that originated elsewhere in the body. Extensive lower limb deep vein thrombosis with pulmonary embolism is a rare complication of acute pancreatitis that has been described in a few case reports. Deep vein thrombosis and hypercoagulable states in pancreatitis are thought to be due to release of pancreatic proteolytic enzymes from a cyst that is connected to the pancreatic duct and penetrates into a vessel. Proteolytic damage or inflammation of the vessels may also play a significant part. Acute pancreatitis also causes a systemic inflammatory response that has effects on an endothelium-dependent relaxing response for acetylcholine. A 38-year-old Sri Lankan man presented with acute pancreatitis and later he developed progressive abdominal distention with bilateral ankle edema. A contrast-enhanced computed tomographic scan showed two pancreatic pseudocysts and deep vein thrombosis in both lower limbs, as well as a pulmonary embolism involving the right lower lobe pulmonary artery and the left segmental pulmonary arteries. One of the pseudocysts in the head of the pancreas was compressing the inferior vena cava without direct communication. The patient's thrombophilia screen result was negative. He was started on subcutaneous enoxaparin 1 mg/kg twice daily and warfarin to achieve a target international normalized ratio of 2-3. Deep vein thrombosis with pulmonary embolism is a rare but life-threatening complication of acute pancreatitis. Once diagnosed, early treatment with intravenous heparin or thrombolysis is effective. Patients with severe acute pancreatitis may be at risk of deep vein thrombosis due to immobilization and other mechanisms, but anticoagulation as prophylaxis is often not used. However, it may be considered on a

  2. Correlation between the site of pulmonary embolism and the extent of deep vein thrombosis. Evaluation by computed tomography pulmonary angiography and computed tomography venography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horii, Yosuke; Yoshimura, Norihiko; Hori, Yoshiro; Takano, Toru; Inagawa, Shoichi; Aoyama, Hidefumi; Takaki, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relation between the sites of pulmonary embolism (PE) and deep vein thrombosis (DVT) by computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) and CT venography (CTV) of the pelvis and lower extremities. We retrospectively reevaluated CTPA-CTV data sets for 227 consecutive patients suspected of having a PE. The PEs were divided into proximal (located at the lobar artery or proximal to it) and distal groups. DVTs were divided into proximal (located above the knee) and distal groups. Cohen's kappa statistic and chi-squared tests were performed. The incidence of PE was significantly higher in patients with a proximal DVT than with a distal DVT (P<0.01). In patients with a proximal DVT, the incidence of proximal PE was significantly higher than that of distal PE (P<0.05). In patients with a proximal DVT, the incidence of PE was significantly higher in patients with a right-side DVT than with a left-side DVT (P<0.05). Proximal PEs were correlated with proximal DVTs. Patients with a proximal DVT tended to have a PE, especially with a right-proximal DVT. Hence, the presence of a right-proximal DVT has the potential for serious complications, and carefully diagnosis is required for PE and DVT. (author)

  3. Evaluation of computer-aided detection and dual energy software in detection of peripheral pulmonary embolism on dual-energy pulmonary CT angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choong Wook; Seo, Joon Beom; Song, Jae-Woo; Kim, Mi-Young; Lee, Ha Young; Park, Yang Shin; Chae, Eun Jin; Jang, Yu Mi; Kim, Namkug; Krauss, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the sensitivity of computer-aided detection(CAD) and dual-energy software('Lung PBV', 'Lung Vessels') for detecting peripheral pulmonary embolism(PE). Between Jan-2007 and Jan-2008, 309 patients underwent dual-energy CT angiography(DECTA) for the evaluation of suspected PE. Among them, 37 patients were retrospectively selected; 21 with PE at segmental-or-below levels and 16 without PE according to clinical reports. A standard computer assisted detection (CAD) package and two new types of software('Lung PBV', 'Lung Vessels') were applied on a dedicated workstation. This resulted in four alternative tests for detecting PE: DECTA alone and DECTA with CAD, 'Lung Vessels' and 'Lung PBV'. Two radiologists independently read all cases at different reading sessions. Two thoracic radiologists set the reference standard by combining all information from DECTA and software. The sensitivity of detection for all, segmental and subsegmental-or-below PE were assessed. The reference standard contained 136 PE(segmental 65, subsegmental-or-below 71). With DECTA alone, the sensitivity of detection for all, segmental and subsegmental-or-below pulmonary arteries was 54.5%/73.7%/34.4%; DECTA with CAD, 57.8%/76.8%/37.9%; DECTA with 'Lung PBV', 61.1%/79.9%/41.4%; DECTA with 'Lung Vessels', 64.0%/78.3%/48.5% respectively. The use of CAD, Lung Vessels and Lung PBV shows improved capability to detect peripheral PE. (orig.)

  4. Left ventricular dysfunction in patients with suspected pulmonary arterial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca Gavilanes

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the role of right heart catheterization in the diagnosis of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH. METHODS: We evaluated clinical, functional, and hemodynamic data from all patients who underwent right heart catheterization because of diagnostic suspicion of PAH-in the absence of severe left ventricular dysfunction (LVD, significant changes in pulmonary function tests, and ventilation/perfusion lung scintigraphy findings consistent with chronic pulmonary thromboembolism-between 2008 and 2013 at our facility. RESULTS: During the study period, 384 patients underwent diagnostic cardiac catheterization at our facility. Pulmonary hypertension (PH was confirmed in 302 patients (78.6%. The mean age of those patients was 48.7 years. The patients without PH showed better hemodynamic profiles and lower levels of B-type natriuretic peptide. Nevertheless, 13.8% of the patients without PH were categorized as New York Heart Association functional class III or IV. Of the 218 patients who met the inclusion criteria, 40 (18.3% and 178 (81.7% were diagnosed with PH associated with LVD (PH-LVD and with PAH, respectively. The patients in the HP-LVD group were significantly older than were those in the PAH group (p < 0.0001. CONCLUSIONS: The proportional difference between the PAH and PH-LVD groups was quite significant, considering the absence of echocardiographic signs suggestive of severe LVD during the pre-catheterization investigation. Our results highlight the fundamental role of cardiac catheterization in the diagnosis of PAH, especially in older patients, in whom the prevalence of LVD that has gone undiagnosed by non-invasive tests is particularly relevant.

  5. CMS reimbursement reform and the incidence of hospital-acquired pulmonary embolism or deep vein thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidwani, Risha; Bhattacharya, Jay

    2015-05-01

    In October 2008, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) stopped reimbursing hospitals for the marginal cost of treating certain preventable hospital-acquired conditions. This study evaluates whether CMS's refusal to pay for hospital-acquired pulmonary embolism (PE) or deep vein thrombosis (DVT) resulted in a lower incidence of these conditions. We employ difference-in-differences modeling using 2007-2009 data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, an all-payer database of inpatient discharges in the U.S. Discharges between 1 January 2007 and 30 September 2008 were considered "before payment reform;" discharges between 1 October 2008 and 31 December 2009 were considered "after payment reform." Hierarchical regression models were fit to account for clustering of observations within hospitals. The "before payment reform" and "after payment reform" incidences of PE or DVT among 65-69-year-old Medicare recipients were compared with three different control groups of: a) 60-64-year-old non-Medicare patients; b) 65-69-year-old non-Medicare patients; and c) 65-69-year-old privately insured patients. Hospital reimbursements for the control groups were not affected by payment reform. CMS payment reform for hospital-based reimbursement of patients with hip and knee replacement surgeries. The outcome was the incidence proportion of hip and knee replacement surgery admissions that developed pulmonary embolism or deep vein thrombosis. At baseline, pulmonary embolism or deep vein thrombosis were present in 0.81% of all hip or knee replacement surgeries for Medicare patients aged 65-69 years old. CMS payment reform resulted in a 35% lower incidence of hospital-acquired pulmonary embolism or deep vein thrombosis in these patients (p = 0.015). Results were robust to sensitivity analyses. CMS's refusal to pay for hospital-acquired conditions resulted in a lower incidence of hospital-acquired pulmonary embolism or deep vein thrombosis after hip or knee replacement surgery

  6. Cardiovascular parameters to assess the severity of acute pulmonary embolism with computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dian-Jiang Zhao; Da-Qing Ma; Wen He; Jian-Jun Wang; Yan Xu; Chun-Shuang Guan

    2010-01-01

    Background: Computed tomographic pulmonary angiography (CTPA) has been established as a first-line test in the acute pulmonary embolism (APE) diagnostic algorithm, but the assessment of the severity of APE by this method remains to be explored. Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate right ventricular (RV) dysfunction and severity in patients with APE without underlying cardiopulmonary disease using helical computed tomography (CT). Material and Methods: Seventy-three patients (35 men and 38 women) were divided into two groups according to the clinical findings: severe APE (n=22) and non-severe APE (n=51). Pulmonary artery CT obstruction index was calculated according to the location and degree of clots in the pulmonary arteries. Cardiovascular parameters including RV short axis and left ventricular (LV) short axis, RV short axis to LV short axis (RV/LV) ratio, main pulmonary artery, azygous vein, and superior vena cava diameters were measured. Leftward bowing of the interventricular septum, reflux of contrast medium into the inferior vena cava and azygous vein, and bronchial artery dilatation were also recorded. The results were analyzed by Mann-Whitney U test, x2 test, Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (Az). Results: CT obstruction index in patients with severe APE (median 43%) was higher than that of patients with non-severe APE (median 20%). Comparison of cardiovascular parameters between patients with severe and non-severe pulmonary embolism showed significant differences in RV short axis, LV short axis, RV/LV ratio, RV wall thickness, main pulmonary artery diameter, azygous vein diameter, leftward bowing of the interventricular septum, and bronchial artery dilatation. The correlation between CT obstruction indexes and cardiovascular parameters was significant. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was highest between RV/LV ratio and CT obstruction index. Az values were significantly higher

  7. Experimental study on high-resolution CT of pulmonary oil embolism induced by lipiodol-adriamycin emulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Jin Wook; Park, Jae Hyung; Im, Jung Gi; Yoon, Dae Young; Yu, In Kyu; Yeon, Kyung Mo

    1994-01-01

    To elucidate high-resolution CT(HRCT) findings and their pathologic basis in pulmonary oil embolism induced by Lipiodol-Adriamycin emulsion. Pulmonary oil embolism was induced by infusing Lipiodol-Adriamycin emulsion through a peripheral vein in twelve Yorkshire pigs. Serial HRCT scans were performed on 2nd, 4th, 7th, 14th, and 28th day after the procedure. The pigs were sacrificed immediately after HRCT and histologic specimens were prepared in the same plane and level with HRCT. The basic pathology was reversible hemorrhagic edema of the lung. On HRCT, intra alveolar hemorrhage and edema in the acute stage manifested as ground-glass opacity or air-space consolidation of the whole secondary lobule. The lesions were predominantly distributed over the dependent posterior lung fields because the specific gravity of Lipiodol is 1.28. Interlobular septal thickening due to edematous fluid collection was also associated. With the elapse of time, the extent and severity of the acute lesions resolved and, sometimes, changed into small nodular opacities. Pulmonary opacity was most severe on the post-embolization 2nd day and completely resolved within 2 weeks. Pulmonary embolization of Lipiodol-Adriamycin emulsion causes reversible hemorrhagic edema of the lung and Lipiodol toxicity seems to playa major role. HRCT findings of pulmonary oil embolism are quite different from those of pneumonia and pulmonary metastasis, which suggests the possibility of clinical application

  8. Predicting in-hospital death during acute presentation with pulmonary embolism to facilitate early discharge and outpatient management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerrett K Lau

    Full Text Available Pulmonary embolism continues to be a significant cause of death. The aim was to derive and validate a risk prediction model for in-hospital death after acute pulmonary embolism to identify low risk patients suitable for outpatient management.A confirmed acute pulmonary embolism database of 1,426 consecutive patients admitted to a tertiary-center (2000-2012 was analyzed, with odd and even years as derivation and validation cohorts respectively. Risk stratification for in-hospital death was performed using multivariable logistic-regression modelling. Models were compared using receiver-operating characteristic-curve and decision curve analyses.In-hospital mortality was 3.6% in the derivation cohort (n = 693. Adding day-1 sodium and bicarbonate to simplified Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index (sPESI significantly increased the C-statistic for predicting in-hospital death (0.71 to 0.86, P = 0.001. The validation cohort yielded similar results (n = 733, C-statistic 0.85. The new model was associated with a net reclassification improvement of 0.613, and an integrated discrimination improvement of 0.067. The new model also increased the C-statistic for predicting 30-day mortality compared to sPESI alone (0.74 to 0.83, P = 0.002. Decision curve analysis demonstrated superior clinical benefit with the use of the new model to guide admission for pulmonary embolism, resulting in 43 fewer admissions per 100 presentations based on a risk threshold for admission of 2%.A risk model incorporating sodium, bicarbonate, and the sPESI provides accurate risk prediction of acute in-hospital mortality after pulmonary embolism. Our novel model identifies patients with pulmonary embolism who are at low risk and who may be suitable for outpatient management.

  9. Life-Threatening Contraceptive-Related Pulmonary Embolism in a 14-Year-Old Girl with Hereditary Thrombophilia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellfritzsch, Maja; Grove, Erik Lerkevang

    2015-01-01

    . Based on a case of life-threatening COC-associated pulmonary embolism in a girl heterozygous for the prothrombin G20210A mutation and with a family history of thrombotic disease, we discuss the importance of assessing not just the genotype but also the phenotype when considering initiation of COCs...... in patients with thrombophilia. CASE REPORT: A 14-year-old girl presented with acute onset of chest pain and dyspnea followed by syncope. She was hypoxic and hemodynamically compromised at admission. Computed tomography pulmonary angiography revealed a large central "saddle" pulmonary embolism causing nearly...

  10. A case of Multiple Unilateral Pulmonary arteriovenous Malformation Relapse: Efficacy of embolization treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masiello Rossella

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary arteriovenous Malformations (PAVMs are a rare vascular alteration characterized by abnormal communications between the pulmonary arteries and veins resulting in an extracardiac right-to-left (R-L shunt. The majority of PAVMs are associated with an autosomal dominant vascular disorder also known as Osler-Weber- Rendu Syndrome. PAVMs appearance can be both single and multiple. Clinical manifestations include hypoxemia, dyspnea cyanosis, hemoptysis and cerebrovascular ischemic events or abscesses. We report a case of an 18 year old female with severe respiratory failure caused by a relapse of multiple unilateral pulmonary arterovenous fistula. Symptoms at admission include dyspnea, cyanosis and clubbing. The patient underwent pulmonary angio-TC scan, brain CT and echocardiography. The thoracic angio-CT scan showed the presence of PAVMs of RUL and RLL; a marked increase of right bronchial artery caliber and its branches with an aneurismatic dilatation was also observed. The patient underwent percutaneous transcatheter embolization using Amplatzer Vascular Plug IV; a relevant clinical and functional improvement was subsequently recorded. Embolization is effective in the treatment of relapsing PAVMS.

  11. Nephrotic Syndrome Complicated by Life-Threatening Pulmonary Embolism in an Adult Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szu-Chia Chen

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available We report a 23-year-old male presenting with edema. He was originally admitted for an elective renal biopsy for diagnosis of renal pathology. Unfortunately, because of acute abdominal pain an exploratory laparotomy was done. Progressive azotemia and oliguria then developed, and he required temporary hemodialysis. However, he suffered from sudden-onset severe respiratory distress, and blood gas analysis showed profound hypoxemia with a marked arterial–alveolar oxygen difference. Assessment of a pulmonary embolism by radioisotope imaging was not possible because of his dependence on mechanical ventilation. Subcutaneous low molecular weight heparin and intravenous methylprednisolone were given to treat the presumed pulmonary embolism and the underlying nephrotic syndrome. His partial oxygen level gradually increased after continuous heparin and steroid administration. Complete obliteration of one major pulmonary artery and partial obliteration of other smaller arteries were revealed by magnetic resonance angiography. He was discharged and followed-up as an outpatient, and was given oral warfarin and prednisolone. Follow-up magnetic resonance angiography 5 months later showed a normal pulmonary tree with no residual lesions.

  12. Qualitative Study to Understand Ordering of CT Angiography to Diagnose Pulmonary Embolism in the Emergency Room Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyftopoulos, Soterios; Smith, Silas W; Simon, Emma; Kuznetsova, Masha; Horwitz, Leora I; Makarov, Danil V

    2017-10-19

    To better understand the decision making behind the ordering of CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE) in the emergency department. We conducted semistructured interviews with our institution's emergency medicine (EM) providers and radiologists who read CTPAs performed in the emergency department. We employed the Theoretical Domains Framework-a formal, structured approach used to better understand the motivations and beliefs of physicians surrounding a complex medical decision making-to categorize the themes that arose from our interviews. EM providers were identified as the main drivers of CTPA ordering. Both EM and radiologist groups perceived the radiologist's role as more limited. Experience- and gestalt-based heuristics were the most important factors driving this decision and more important, in many cases, than established algorithms for CTPA ordering. There were contrasting views on the value of d-dimer in the suspected PE workup, with EM providers finding this test less useful than radiologists. EM provider and radiologist suggestions for improving the appropriateness of CTPA ordering consisted of making this process more arduous and incorporating d-dimer tests and prediction rules into a decision support tool. EM providers were the main drivers of CTPA ordering, and there was a marginalized role for the radiologist. Experience- and gestalt-based heuristics were the main influencers of CTPA ordering. Our findings suggest that a more nuanced intervention than simply including a d-dimer and a prediction score in each preimaging workup may be necessary to curb overordering of CTPA in patients suspected of PE. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Percutaneous catheter-based rheolytic thrombectomy for massive pulmonary embolism: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Dang; Yaacob, Yazmin; Muda, Sobri; Mohamed, Zahiah

    2013-03-01

    Pulmonary thromboembolism is a life-threatening cardiovascular condition. The mortality rate is high in its current management. Besides supportive treatments, systemic thrombolysis and surgical thrombectomy play important roles in the comprehensive management of pulmonary embolism (PE). The percutaneous catheter-based rheolytic thrombectomy is a promising alternative for management of massive pulmonary emboli, particularly, when patients have contraindication with systemic thrombolysis or are not suitable for surgery. We present the case of a 36-year-old Somalian man who came to our center for a total knee replacement (TKR). Three days after TKR, he developed sudden shortness of breath and decreased oxygen saturation. Computed tomography of pulmonary arteriogram showed extensive thrombi within the main pulmonary trunk, right and left pulmonary arteries, bilateral ascending and bilateral descending pulmonary arteries in keeping with massive PE. Because the patient was contraindicated for systemic thrombolysis, percutaneous, catheter-based rheolytic thrombectomy was chosen as the alternative treatment. His clinical symptoms improved immediately post-treatment. In conclusion, catheter-based rheolytic thrombectomy can serve as an alternative treatment for massive PE with a good clinical outcome.

  14. Diagnostic impact of digital tomosynthesis in oncologic patients with suspected pulmonary lesions on chest radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaia, Emilio; Baratella, Elisa; Poillucci, Gabriele; Gennari, Antonio Giulio; Cova, Maria Assunta

    2016-08-01

    To assess the actual diagnostic impact of digital tomosynthesis (DTS) in oncologic patients with suspected pulmonary lesions on chest radiography (CXR). A total of 237 patients (135 male, 102 female; age, 70.8 ± 10.4 years) with a known primary malignancy and suspected pulmonary lesion(s) on CXR and who underwent DTS were retrospectively identified. Two radiologists (experience, 10 and 15 years) analysed in consensus CXR and DTS images and proposed a diagnosis according to a confidence score: 1 or 2 = definitely or probably benign pulmonary or extrapulmonary lesion, or pseudolesion; 3 = indeterminate; 4 or 5 = probably or definitely pulmonary lesion. DTS findings were proven by CT (n = 114 patients), CXR during follow-up (n = 105) or histology (n = 18). Final diagnoses included 77 pulmonary opacities, 26 pulmonary scars, 12 pleural lesions and 122 pulmonary pseudolesions. DTS vs CXR presented a higher (P radiography (CXR) in oncologic patients. • DTS improves confidence of CXR in oncologic patients. • DTS allowed avoidance of CT in about 50 % of oncologic patients.

  15. Severe pulmonary oedema following therapeutic embolization with Onyx for cerebral arteriovenous malformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murugesan, C.; Saravanan, Sundararaj; Rajkumar, John; Prasad, Jagadish; Banakal, Sanjay; Muralidhar, Kanchi

    2008-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by sudden onset of respiratory distress, infiltrates on radiographs consistent with pulmonary oedema, hypoxaemia and increased work in breathing. Infiltrates on radiographs are bilateral, but may be patchy or diffuse and fluffy or dense. It is associated with absence of left heart failure and a PaO 2 /FiO 2 ratio of ≤200. Ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), which was approved by the US FDA in July 2005, is used as an embolic agent for cerebral arteriovenous malformation (AVM). It is a biocompatible liquid polymer that precipitates and solidifies on contact with blood, thus forming a soft and spongy embolus. We report a case of ARDS following therapeutic embolization with ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer for cerebral AVM under general anaesthesia. Experienced perioperative physicians adopted standard anaesthetic technique and monitoring for this procedure. Acute respiratory distress and hypoxaemia developed in the patient following extubation of the trachea. Infiltrates seen on postprocedural chest radiographs were consistent with pulmonary oedema. DMSO, the solvent for the ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer, is excreted via the lungs after administration and we postulate that DMSO was the possible cause of ARDS in this patient. Monitoring of haemodynamic parameters (invasive blood pressure, electrocardiography) and ventilatory parameters (ETCO 2 , SpO 2 , airway pressure monitoring) are important in the recognition of this possible event. One should be vigilant and anticipate this complication following therapeutic embolization with ethylene vinyl alcohol polymer for the treatment of cerebral AVM. (orig.)

  16. Congenital anomalous/aberrant systemic artery to pulmonary venous fistula: Closure with vascular plugs & coil embolization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Jariwala

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 7-month-old girl with failure to thrive, who, on clinical and diagnostic evaluation [echocardiography & CT angiography] to rule out congenital heart disease, revealed a rare vascular anomaly called systemic artery to pulmonary venous fistula. In our case, there was dual abnormal supply to the entire left lung as1 anomalous supply by normal systemic artery [internal mammary artery]2 and an aberrant feeder vessel from the abdominal aorta. Left Lung had normal bronchial connections and normal pulmonary vasculature. The fistula drained through the pulmonary veins to the left atrium leading to ‘left–left shunt’. Percutaneous intervention in two stages was performed using Amplatzer vascular plugs and coil embolization to close them successfully. The patient gained significant weight in follow up with other normal developmental and mental milestones.

  17. Contribution of V/Q SPECT to planar scintigraphy in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirce, R; Ibáñez-Bravo, S; Jiménez-Bonilla, J; Martínez-Rodríguez, I; Martínez-Amador, N; Ortega-Nava, F; Lavado-Pérez, C; Bravo-Ferrer, Z; Carril, J M

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of V/Q SPECT and analyze its contribution to planar V/Q lung scintigraphy in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE). A total of 109 patients with suspected PE showing Wells score>2 and elevated D-dimer were studied. The V/Q could not be completed in 7 patients, so they were excluded. Ventilation and perfusion scans were done using Technegas and (99m)Tc-MAA. Planar study included 8 projections on a 256×256 matrix and 128 projections on a 128×128 matrix were acquired for the SPECT study, applying an iterative method. Planar images were interpreted according to modified PIOPED criteria, and SPECT by the guidelines of the EANMMI. The results with both techniques were compared. V/Q planar scintigraphy and SPECT could be performed in 102 patients. V/Q planar scintigraphy was considered "diagnostic" in 39 of the 102 patients, and "non-diagnostic" in 63. Of the 39 "diagnostic" studies, 31 were reported as high probability of PE and 8 as normal. Of the 63 "non-diagnostic", 26 corresponded to intermediate, 29 to low, and 8 to very low probability. The SPECT study was "diagnostic" in 97 and indeterminate in only 5. All patients with a high probability planar scintigraphy had a positive SPECT. In the 8 patients with a normal planar scintigraphy SPECT was negative in 5 and positive in 3. In the 63 patients with a "non-diagnostic" planar scintigraphy SPECT was "diagnostic" in 58 of them, positive in 17 and negative in 41. V/Q SPECT is a feasible technique as it was performed in 102 of the 109 patients who were enrolled in the study (94%). The addition of V/Q SPECT to planar V/Q decreases the number of "non-diagnostic" reports from 62% in planar scintigraphy to 4.9% in SPECT. Therefore, V/Q SPECT should be included in the diagnosis approach of PE due to its high diagnostic yield. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  18. Risk management in acute pulmonary embolism: correlation between right heart dysfunction, pulmonary clots distribution, biomarkers and prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Masotti

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Right heart dysfunction (RHD is related to adverse outcomes in acute pulmonary embolism (PE. AIM OF THE STUDY To evaluate the relation between RHD, pulmonary clots distribution and biomarkers and prognosis of patients with PE. METHODS We analysed echocardiographic data of 70 patients with diagnosis of PE confirmed by pulmonary computer tomography, hCT. We considered the enddiastolic right/left ventricles ratio > 1 as index of RHD; echocardiographic data were compared with clots distribution in pulmonary vascular tree such as hCT findings and biomarkers. For each patient we calculated the shock index (heart rate/systolic blood pressure ratio, shock defined as ratio ≥ 1. RESULTS Hospital mortality was 8.5%. Mean age of dead patients was significantly higher compared to alive (85.67 vs 71.57 years, p < 0.05. 41% of patients revealed unilateral PE, 59% had bilateral. In 10% of patients main pulmonary artery was interested by clot, 48% of patients had involved one of the main branches, 90% had involved at least one of the lobar branches, 59% one of segmental branches of pulmonary arteries. 52% of patients had RHD. Mortality in RHD patients was 14.8% vs 8% in no RHD, p < 0.05. Mean values of troponin I and D-dimer were significantly higher in RHD patients. Shock index was ≥ 1 in 37.5% of RHD and 20% in no RHD. RHD patients showed significantly higher involvement of main pulmonary artery and its branches and higher bilateral involvement. CONCLUSIONS RHD is related to proximal and bilateral pulmonary clots distribution and troponin I and D-dimer values and poorer prognosis.

  19. The diagnostic value of ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy combined with plasma D-dimer assay in diagnosis of pulmonary embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qian; Huang Lili; Qin Shuling; Yue Minggang; Wang Yu; Nie Yuxin; Liang Tiejun

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical diagnostic value of ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy combined with plasma D-dimer assay in diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE). Methods: One hundred and four patients with clinically suspected PE underwent both pulmonary ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy and plasma D-dimer assay. According to the criteria of prospective investigation of the pulmonary embolism diagnosis (PIOPED), ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy was interpreted as normal, very low or low probability of PE, intermediate probability of PE and high probability of PE. High probability was considered as positive; normal and very low or low probability as negative and intermediate probability as non-diagnostic. Plasma D-dimer levels were measured using a quantitative immunoturbidimetric method, and a cut-off value of 500 mg/L was used in the diagnosis of PE. Clinical diagnostic value of ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy, D-dimer assay and combined use of ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy and D-dimer assay for diagnosing PE was evaluated, respectively, comparing with the final clinical diagnosis that was based on the clinical findings. Results: Among the 104 patients, 44 were diagnosed with PE and 60 were excluded. Ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy provided diagnostic interpretations for 86 (82.7%) patients, and non-diagnostic interpretations for 18 (17.3%) patients. For diagnosing PE, the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy was 84.1%, 75.0%, 78.8%, 71.2% and 86.5%, respectively, and with D-dimer assay was 93.2%, 60.0%, 74.0%, 63.1% and 92.3%, respectively. If a plasma D-dimer level of < 500 mg/L was taken as a criterion to exclude PE for those intermediate probability of ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy, the diagnostic specificity and accuracy would be raised to 85.0% and 84.6%, respectively. Conclusions: When a non-diagnostic interpretation was occurred on

  20. Simultaneous Acute Pulmonary Embolism and Isolated Septal Myocardial Infarction in a Young Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Burkhardt

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We report here the case of a young patient with a simultaneous isolated septal myocardial infarction (MI and pulmonary embolism (PE. The aim was to describe a rare clinical entity and to explain why these two pathologies were present at the same time in a young patient.
 A review of literature was established. An interventional cardiologist, an interventional radiologist and a lung specialist were consulted. The diagnostic workup revealed only heterozygous Factor Leiden V mutation. This presentation was probably fortuitous, but worth reporting to our opinion.

  1. Covered Stent and Coils Embolization of a Pulmonary Artery Pseudoaneurysm After Gunshot Wound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huet, Nicolas, E-mail: nhuet@chu-grenoble.fr; Rodiere, Mathieu, E-mail: mrodiere@chu-grenoble.fr [Hôpital Universitaire de Grenoble and Université Grenoble Alpes, Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging (France); Badet, Michel, E-mail: michel.badet@ch-chambery.fr [Centre Hospitalier Métropôle Savoie, site de Chambéry, Intensive Care Unit (France); Michoud, Marie, E-mail: marie.michoud@ch-chambery.fr [Centre Hospitalier Métropôle Savoie, Site de Chambéry, Department of Radiology (France); Brichon, Pierre-Yves, E-mail: pybrichon@chu-grenoble.fr [Hôpital Universitaire de Grenoble and Université Grenoble Alpes, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery (France); Ferretti, Gilbert, E-mail: gferretti@chu-grenoble.fr; Thony, Frédéric, E-mail: fthony@chu-grenoble.fr [Hôpital Universitaire de Grenoble and Université Grenoble Alpes, Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging (France)

    2016-05-15

    We report the first case of endovascular covered stent implantation for the treatment of a large pulmonary artery pseudoaneurysm (PAPA) following a right thoracic gunshot wound. After resuscitation and hemodynamic stabilization, a CT angiography was performed to analyze the neck size of the PAPA and its position relative to the branches of the parent artery. Covered stent implantation with additional coil embolization was successfully performed. At the 4-year follow-up, the stents remained patent and there was neither pseudoaneurysm recurrence nor treatment-related complication.

  2. Covered Stent and Coils Embolization of a Pulmonary Artery Pseudoaneurysm After Gunshot Wound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huet, Nicolas; Rodiere, Mathieu; Badet, Michel; Michoud, Marie; Brichon, Pierre-Yves; Ferretti, Gilbert; Thony, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    We report the first case of endovascular covered stent implantation for the treatment of a large pulmonary artery pseudoaneurysm (PAPA) following a right thoracic gunshot wound. After resuscitation and hemodynamic stabilization, a CT angiography was performed to analyze the neck size of the PAPA and its position relative to the branches of the parent artery. Covered stent implantation with additional coil embolization was successfully performed. At the 4-year follow-up, the stents remained patent and there was neither pseudoaneurysm recurrence nor treatment-related complication.

  3. Fatal paradoxical pulmonary air embolism complicating percutaneous computed tomography-guided needle biopsy of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakravarti, Rajesh; Singh, Virendra; Isaac, Rethish; John, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    A 63-year-old man with left upper zone haziness on chest X-ray and an infiltrative lesion with a pleural mass in the left upper lobe on CT scan was scheduled for CT-guided percutaneous trans-thoracic needle biopsy. During the procedure, the patient had massive haemoptysis and cardiorespiratory arrest and could not be revived. Post-mortem CT showed air in the right atrium, right ventricle, pulmonary artery and also in the left atrium and aorta. A discussion on paradoxical air embolism following percutaneous trans-thoracic needle biopsy is presented Copyright (2004) Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd

  4. Temporary interventional pneumonectomy used as an emergency treatment for acute massive pulmonary embolism: the initial experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Yong; Liu Yang; Wu Qi; Li Ping; Tian Jing; Bao Guijun; He Nengshu

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate regional airway obstruction with balloon catheter in stabilizing the vital signs in experimental animals suffered from acute massive pulmonary embolism. Methods: Pulmonary embolism of right lung artery by using auto-blood clots or detachable latex balloons was established in 27 healthy sheep. When the blood oxygen saturation decreased by 25% compared to that before the procedure, the placement of balloon catheter in corresponding right main bronchus was carried out in 18 sheep (study group). Five sheep were used as control group. The blood oxygen saturation in the remaining four sheep did not reach the intervention level. The pulmonary arterial pressure, the peripheral arterial pressure, the central venous pressure, the heart rate, the blood oxygen saturation, the arterial partial pressure of oxygen as well as of carbon dioxide were invasively determined. Results: The experimental model of acute massive pulmonary embolism was successfully established in 23 sheep. After the establishment of pulmonary embolism, increased heart rate, tachypnea, a decrease of ≥ 25% in blood oxygen saturation within 30 minutes and a rise in pulmonary arterial pressure were detected. After the placement of balloon catheter in study group, a reduction of the pulmonary arterial pressure and an elevation of the blood oxygen saturation as well as the arterial partial pressure of oxygen rose were observed.The difference between study group and control group was statistically significant (P<0.05). Conclusion: The result of this animal experiment indicates that obstruction of airway with balloon can be served as a first aid for acute massive pulmonary embolism, which can stabilizes the animal's vital signs and, therefore, can help gain precious time for the follow-up thrombolysis treatment. (authors)

  5. Pulmonary embolism and difficult-to-treat asthma

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    Catarina Teles Martins

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Asthma control is a key point in patient management. GINA's most recent report emphasises the need to investigate uncontrolled asthma, of which non-compliance with treatment, COPD, smoking, chronic sinusitis, gastroesophageal reflux disease and obesity are the usual causes.The aim of this work is to evaluate the role of pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE in cases of difficult-to-treat asthma. We reviewed the case reports of patients with severe persistent asthma followed in our Asthma Outpatients Clinic between 2004 and 2006. We selected the ones that maintained uncontrolled disease despite an optimal therapeutical approach and investigated the causes.In this group (n = 254, 28 (11% had severe persistent asthma and their mean age was 44 ± SD18 years old. 86% were females. Of these, 57% (n = 16 had uncontrolled disease: 35% (n = 6 due to non-compliance with treatment; 29% (n = 5 pulmonary thrombombolism (scintigraphic confirmation; 12% (n = 2 severe rhinosinusitis; 6% (n = 1 hypereosinophilic syndrome; 6% (n = 1 persistent allergen exposure and 6% (n = 1 are still being investigated.Patients with TPE (mean age 56 ± SD9 years old; 80% females; 80% Caucasians were diagnosed with asthma as adults (mean age 37 ± SD14 years old. The mean time until the diagnosis of TPE was 18 ± SD12 years. Predisposing factors for TPE were venous insufficiency (40%, hypertension (40% and deficit of functional protein C and S (20%.All these patients received anticoagulant therapy (80% are still medicated. It should be noted that after the beginning of anticoagulants, 40% of the patients achieved control of their asthma and 40% have partially controlled disease. There were no hospital admissions for asthma exacerbations after the beginning of anticoagulation in this group.This study supports the inclusion of TPE in the group of comorbidities to consider while investigating uncontrolled

  6. A Single Imaging Modality in the Diagnosis, Severity, and Prognosis of Pulmonary Embolism

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    Hadice Selimoglu Sen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This study aimed to investigate the currency of computerized tomography pulmonary angiography-based parameters as pulmonary artery obstruction index (PAOI, as well as right ventricular diameters for pulmonary embolism (PE risk evaluation and prediction of mortality and intensive care unit (ICU requirement. Materials and Methods. The study retrospectively enrolled 203 patients hospitalized with acute PE. PAOI was calculated according to Qanadli score. Results. Forty-three patients (23.9% were hospitalized in the ICU. Nineteen patients (10.6% died during the 30-day follow-up period. The optimal cutoff value of PAOI for PE 30th day mortality and ICU requirement were found as 36.5% in ROC curve analysis. The pulmonary artery systolic pressure had a significant positive correlation with right/left ventricular diameter ratio (r=0.531, P<0.001, PAOI (r=0.296, P<0.001, and pulmonary artery diameter (r=0.659, P<0.001. The patients with PAOI values higher than 36.5% have a 5.7-times increased risk of death. Conclusion. PAOI is a fast and promising parameter for risk assessment in patients with acute PE. With greater education of clinicians in this radiological scoring, a rapid assessment for diagnosis, clinical risk evaluation, and prognosis may be possible in emergency services without the need for echocardiography.

  7. The Effects of Aquaporin-1 in Pulmonary Edema Induced by Fat Embolism Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiwei; Tian, Kun; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Rong; Shang, Jiawei; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Aizhong

    2016-07-21

    This study was designed to investigate the role of aquaporin1 (AQP1) in the pathologic process of pulmonary edema induced by fat embolism syndrome (FES) and the effects of a free fatty acid (FFA) mixture on AQP1 expression in pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs). In vivo, edema was more serious in FES mice compared with the control group. The expression of AQP1 and the wet-to-dry lung weight ratio (W/D) in the FES group were significantly increased compared with the control group. At the same time, inhibition of AQP1 decreased the pathological damage resulting from pulmonary edema. Then we performed a study in vitro to investigate whether AQP1 was induced by FFA release in FES. The mRNA and protein level of AQP1 were increased by FFAs in a dose- and time-dependent manner in PMVECs. In addition, the up-regulation of AQP1 was blocked by the inhibitor of p38 kinase, implicating the p38 MAPK pathway as involved in the FFA-induced AQP1 up-regulation in PMVECs. Our results demonstrate that AQP1 may play important roles in pulmonary edema induced by FES and can be regarded as a new therapy target for treatment of pulmonary edema induced by FES.

  8. Computer-aided detection of pulmonary embolism: Influence on radiologists' detection performance with respect to vessel segments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Marco; Muehlenbruch, Georg; Helm, Anita; Guenther, Rolf W.; Wildberger, Joachim E.; Bakai, Annemarie; Salganicoff, Marcos; Liang, Jianming; Wolf, Matthias; Stanzel, Sven

    2008-01-01

    The purpose was to assess the sensitivity of a CAD software prototype for the detection of pulmonary embolism in MDCT chest examinations with regard to vessel level and to assess the influence on radiologists' detection performance. Forty-three patients with suspected PE were included in this retrospective study. MDCT chest examinations with a standard PE protocol were acquired at a 16-slice MDCT. All patient data were read by three radiologists (R1, R2, R3), and all thrombi were marked. A CAD prototype software was applied to all datasets, and each finding of the software was analyzed with regard to vessel level. The standard of reference was assessed in a consensus read. Sensitivity for the radiologists and CAD software was assessed. Thirty-three patients were positive for PE, with a total of 215 thrombi. The mean overall sensitivity for the CAD software alone was 83% (specificity, 80%). Radiologist sensitivity was 77% = R3, 82% = R2, and R1 = 87%. With the aid of the CAD software, sensitivities increased to 98% (R1), 93% (R2), and 92% (R3) (p<0.0001). CAD performance at the lobar level was 87%, at the segmental 90% and at the subsegmental 77%. With the use of CAD for PE, the detection performance of radiologists can be improved. (orig.)

  9. Values of the Wells and Revised Geneva Scores Combined with D-dimer in Diagnosing Elderly Pulmonary Embolism Patients

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    Dan-Jie Guo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pulmonary embolism (PE can be difficult to diagnose in elderly patients because of the coexistent diseases and the combination of drugs that they have taken. We aimed to compare the clinical diagnostic values of the Wells score, the revised Geneva score and each of them combined with D-dimer for suspected PE in elderly patients. Methods: Three hundred and thirty-six patients who were admitted for suspected PE were enrolled retrospectively and divided into two groups based on age (≥65 or <65 years old. The Wells and revised Geneva scores were applied to evaluate the clinical probability of PE, and the positive predictive values of both scores were calculated using computed tomography pulmonary arteriography as a gold standard; overall accuracy was evaluated by the area under the curve (AUC of receiver operator characteristic curve; the negative predictive values of D-dimer, the Wells score combined with D-dimer, and the revised Geneva score combined with D-dimer were calculated. Results: Ninety-six cases (28.6% were definitely diagnosed as PE among 336 cases, among them 56 cases (58.3% were ≥65 years old. The positive predictive values of Wells and revised Geneva scores were 65.8% and 32.4%, respectively (P < 0.05 in the elderly patients; the AUC for the Wells score and the revised Geneva score in elderly was 0.682 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.612-0.746 and 0.655 (95% CI: 0.584-0.722, respectively (P = 0.389. The negative predictive values of D-dimer, the Wells score combined with D-dimer, and the revised Geneva score combined with D-dimer were 93.7%, 100%, and 100% in the elderly, respectively. Conclusions: The diagnostic value of the Wells score was higher than the revised Geneva score for the elderly cases with suspected PE. The combination of either the Wells score or the revised Geneva score with a normal D-dimer concentration is a safe strategy to rule out PE.

  10. Spontaneous Pneumothorax as a Complication of Septic Pulmonary Embolism in an Intravenous Drug User: A Case Report

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    Chau-Chyun Sheu

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Infective endocarditis has been the major cause of morbidity and mortality among intravenous drug users (IDUs with infections, mostly involving the tricuspid valve and presenting multiple septic pulmonary embolisms. Numerous pulmonary complications of septic pulmonary embolism have been described, but only a few have reported spontaneous pneumothorax. Our patient, a 23-year-old heroin addict, was hospitalized for tricuspid endocarditis and septic pulmonary embolism. Acute onset of respiratory distress occurred on his seventh hospital day and rapidly resulted in hypoxemia. Immediate bedside chest radiograph demonstrated left pneumothorax. It was thought to be a spontaneous pneumothorax, because he had not undergone any invasive procedure before the occurrence of pneumothorax. His clinical condition improved after the insertion of an intercostal chest tube. He later underwent surgery to replace the tricuspid valve as a result of the large size of the vegetation and poor control of infection. He ultimately survived. Pneumothorax is a possible lethal complication of septic pulmonary embolism in IDUs with right-sided endocarditis and should be considered in such patients when respiratory distress occurs acutely during their hospitalization.

  11. Incidental pulmonary embolism in cancer patients: clinical characteristics and outcome – a comprehensive cancer center experience

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    Abdel-Razeq H

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Hikmat N Abdel-Razeq1, Asem H Mansour2, Yousef M Ismael11Department of Internal Medicine, 2Department of Radiology, King Hussein Cancer Center, Amman, JordanBackground and objectives: Cancer patients undergo routine imaging studies much more than others. The widespread use of the recently introduced multi-detector CT scanners has resulted in an increasing number of incidentally diagnosed pulmonary embolism (PE in asymptomatic cancer patients. The significance and clinical outcome of such incidental PE is described.Methods: Both radiology department and hospital databases were searched for all cancer patients with a diagnosis of incidental PE. CT scans were performed using a 64-slice scanner with a 5.0 mm slice thickness.Results: During the study period, 34 patients with incidental PE were identified. The mean age (±SD was 57.7 (±12.4 years. All patients had active cancer, gastric, lung, colorectal, and lymphomas being the most frequent. Most patients had advanced-stage disease at the time of PE diagnosis; 26 (77% patients had stage IV, whereas only 3 patients had stages I or II disease. Twenty-seven (79% patients had their PE while undergoing active treatment with chemotherapy (68% or radiotherapy (12%; none, however, were on hormonal therapy. Most (74% patients had their PE diagnosed without history of recent hospital admission. Except for 5 (15%, all other patients were anticoagulated. With follow-up, 2 patients developed recurrent PE, 2 others had clinical and echocardiographic evidence of pulmonary hypertension, and 9 (26% died suddenly within 30 days of the diagnosis of incidental PE; 2 of these where among the 5 patients who were not anticoagulated.Conclusion: Incidental PE in cancer patients is increasingly encountered. Similar to symptomatic PE, many were diagnosed in patients with advanced stage disease and while undergoing active anti-cancer therapy. A significant percentage of patients had recurrent emboli, pulmonary hypertension

  12. Transcatheter Embolization of Pulmonary Artery False Aneurysm Associated with Primary Pulmonary Hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraki, T.; Kanazawa, S.; Mimura, H.; Yasui, K.; Okumura, Y.; Dendo, S.; Yoshimura, K.; Takahara, M.; Hiraki, Y.

    2004-01-01

    A 29-year-old woman with primary pulmonary hypertension presented with recurrent hemoptysis. Contrast-enhanced CT of the chest demonstrated the enhanced mass surrounded by consolidation related to parenchymal hemorrhage. Pulmonary angiography suggested that the mass was a pulmonary artery false aneurysm. After a microcatheter was superselectively inserted into the parent artery of the falseaneurysm, the false aneurysm was successfully treated by transcatheterembolization with coils. Her hemoptysis has never recurred

  13. Residual pulmonary hypertension after retrograde pulmonary embolectomy: long-term follow-up of 30 patients with massive and submassive pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrabi, Khalil; Zolghadrasli, Abdolali; Ali Ostovan, Mohammad; Azimifar, Azimeh; Malekmakan, Leila

    2013-08-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients following acute pulmonary embolism. Although thrombolytic therapy decreases pulmonary arterial pressure, compared with anticoagulation alone, it has the propensity for haemorrhagic complications, distal embolization and incomplete recanalization, with the potential risk of late pulmonary hypertension. Surgical embolectomy-once performed solely on critically-ill patients-has now gained favour in a wider range of patients. In this paper we present the outcomes of patients who underwent surgical embolectomy complemented with retrograde technique and follow-up systolic pulmonary arterial pressure (SPAP). From January 2004 to December 2010, 30 consecutive patients with a mean age of 58±15 years underwent pulmonary embolectomy at our centre. The patients were followed for a mean period of 30.5±12 months. Their New York Heart Association (NYHA) classifications were assessed and their SPAPs were measured by echocardiography. The overall mortality rate was 13.2% (4/30). Of the remaining patients, 19 patients (73.1%) were in NYHA classes I and II, 7 patients (26.9%) in class III and no patient in class IV. The patients' preoperative and postoperative mean SPAPs were 44.9±5.7 and 34.9±7.1 mmHg, respectively, which showed a significant reduction (P<0.001). The mean SPAP in the follow-up was 29.4±11.5 mmHg, which again showed significant reduction compared with early postoperation values (P<0.001). No significant correlations were found between the level of SPAP reduction in patients' follow-up with age (P=0.727) and total days of ICU admission (P=0.700), but weak correlations with sex (P=0.016) and total intubation time were noticed (P=0.035). This is the first series reporting the long-term outcome of patients undergoing surgical embolectomy complemented by retrograde embolectomy technique, demonstrating the safety and favourable long-term outcome of this technique. It is also a new element in

  14. Computed tomography for pulmonary embolism - Assessment of a 1-year cohort and estimated cancer risk associated with diagnostic irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niemann, T. [Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Univ. Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Dept. of Thoracic Imaging, Univ. Lille Nord de France, Hospital Calmette, Lille (France)], e-mail: tilo.niemann@usb.ch; Zbinden, I.; Bremerich, J.; Bongartz, G. [Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Univ. Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Roser, H. W. [Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Univ. Hospital, Radiological Physics, Basel (Switzerland); Remy-Jardin, M. [Dept. of Thoracic Imaging, Univ. Lille Nord de France, Hospital Calmette, Lille (France)

    2013-09-15

    Background: The principal concern of any radiation exposure in computed tomography (CT) is the induction of stochastic risks of developing a radiation-induced cancer. The results given in this manuscript will allow to (re-)calculate yield of chest CT. Purpose: To demonstrate a method to evaluate the lifetime attributable risk (LAR) of cancer incidence/mortality due to a single diagnostic investigation in a 1-year cohort of consecutive chest CT for suspected pulmonary embolism (PE). Material and Methods: A 1-year cohort of consecutive chest CT for suspected PE using a standard scan protocol was analyzed retrospectively (691 patients, 352 men, 339 women). Normalized patient-specific estimations of the radiation doses received by individual organs were correlated with age- and sex-specific mean predicted cancer incidence and age- and sex-specific predicted cancer mortality based on the BEIR VII results. Additional correlation was provided for natural occurring risks. Results: LAR of cancer incidence/mortality following one chest CT was calculated for cancer of the stomach, colon, liver, lung, breast, uterus, ovaries, bladder, thyroid, and for leukemia. LAR remains very low for all age and sex categories, being highest for cancer of the lungs and breasts in 20-year-old women (0.61% and 0.4%, respectively). Summation of all cancer sites analyzed raised the cumulative relative LAR up to 2.76% in 20-year-old women. Conclusion: Using the method presented in this work, LAR of cancer incidence and cancer mortality for a single chest CT for PE seems very low for all age groups and both sexes, but being highest for young patients. Hence the risk for radiation-induced organ cancers must be outweighed with the potential benefit or a treatment and the potential risks of a missed and therefore untreated PE.

  15. Simulated Flow Pattern in Massive Pulmonary Embolism: Significance for Selective Intrapulmonary Thrombolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Kilbinger, Markus; Guenther, Rolf W.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: The flow pattern in the central pulmonary arteries proximal to large pulmonary emboli was studied experimentally. The currents to which thrombolytic agents are exposed when administered via an intrapulmonary catheter were visualized in order to explain the lack of benefit of local versus systemic administration. Methods: By illumination of suspended microspheres, the flow pattern proximal to an obstructing embolus was visualized in an in vitro pulmonary arterial flow model. In six dogs massive pulmonary embolism was created. A pigtail catheter was positioned in the pulmonary artery immediately proximal to the central edge of the occluding embolus. To allow visualization of the local flow pattern, a small amount of contrast material (4 ml) was injected through the catheter at a high flow rate (25 ml/sec). The course of the radiopaque spot that emerged from the catheter tip within 160 msec was monitored with digital subtraction angiography at a frame rate of 12.5 frames/sec. In two dogs, the study was repeated after embolus fragmentation with the same catheter position. Results: The flow model study revealed formation of a vortex proximal to the occluding embolus. In vivo experiments showed that the radiopaque spot was whirled by the vortex proximal to the embolus and made only evanescent contact with the edge of the embolus. Regardless of the embolus location, the contrast spot was washed into the non-occluded ipsilateral and contralateral pulmonary arteries within 0.40-0.64 sec. After embolus fragmentation, the contrast spot was carried completely into the formerly occluded artery. Conclusion: Flow studies explain why thrombolytic agents administered via a catheter positioned adjacent to the embolus may have no more effect than systemically administered agents. An enhanced local effect is precluded by the rapid washout into the non-occluded pulmonary arteries and subsequent systemic dilution. These results support the practice of direct intrathrombic

  16. Suspected Pulmonary Infection with Trichoderma longibrachiatum after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Akagi, Tomoaki; Kawamura, Chizuko; Terasawa, Norio; Yamaguchi, Kohei; Kubo, Kohmei

    2017-01-01

    Aspergillus and Candida species are the main causative agents of invasive fungal infections in immunocompromised human hosts. However, saprophytic fungi are now increasingly being recognized as serious pathogens. Trichoderma longibrachiatum has recently been described as an emerging pathogen in immunocompromised patients. We herein report a case of isolated suspected invasive pulmonary infection with T. longibrachiatum in a 29-year-old man with severe aplastic anemia who underwent allogeneic ...

  17. Titanium greenfield inferior vena cava filter; effectiveness of percutaneous placement for prevention of pulmonary embolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Bong Gak; Hahn, Seong Tai; Jung, Jung Im; Lee, Sang Hoon; Koh, Ki Young; Park, Seog Hee; Shinn, Kyung Sub [The Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-11-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of percutaneous placement of a Greenfield titanium filter in the inferior vena cava (IVC) for the prevention of pulmonary embolism (PE) in patients with deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Twelve patients with DVT underwent percutaneous Greenfield titanium filter placement. The indications included recurrent pulmonary embolism or failed anticoagulation therapy in six patients, extensive PE in three, and prophylaxis for high risk of PE in the remaining three. In all cases the filter was positioned after confirming the anatomy, patency, and presence of thrombosis of the IVC and renal veins by inferior vena cavography. Long-term follow-up study involved clinical evaluation, plain radiography, Doppler ultrasonography and CT scanning. Filter placement [infrarenal in ten patients (83%) and suprarenal in two (17%)] was technically successful in all cases (100%). The venous approach involved the right femoral vein in eight patients (67%) and the right internal jugular vein in four (33%). Complications included overlapping of the filter legs in three patients (25%), and misplacement in one (8%). After filter placement, no further PE developed. In all of five patients followed up for two years, the IVC maintained patency without evidence of caval perforation or occlusion. In patients with DVT, percutaneous placement of a Greenfield titanium filter is a safe and effective method for the prevention of PE.

  18. Idiopathic pulmonary embolism in a case of severe family ANKRD26 thrombocytopenia

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    Jérôme Guison

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Venous thrombosis affecting thrombocytopenic patients is challenging. We report the case of a thrombocytopenic woman affected by deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism leading to the discovery of a heterozygous mutation in the gene encoding ankyrin repeat domain 26 (ANKRD26 associated with a heterozygous factor V (FV Leiden mutation. This woman was diagnosed with left lower-limb deep vein thrombosis complicated by pulmonary embolism. Severe thrombocytopenia was observed. The genetic study evidenced a heterozygous FV Leiden mutation. Molecular study sequencing was performed after learning that her family had a history of thrombocytopenia. Previously described heterozygous mutation c-127C>A in the 5′ untranslated region (5′UTR of the ANKRD26 gene was detected in the patient, her aunt, and her grandmother. ANKRD26-related thrombocytopenia and thrombosis are rare. This is, to our knowledge, the first case reported in the medical literature. This mutation should be screened in patients with a family history of thrombocytopenia.

  19. Idiopathic Pulmonary Embolism in a case of Severe Family ANKRD26 Thrombocytopenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guison, Jerome; Blaison, Gilles; Stoica, Oana; Hurstel, Remy; Favier, Marie; Favier, Remy

    2017-01-01

    Venous thrombosis affecting thrombocytopenic patients is challenging. We report the case of a woman affected by deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in a thrombocytopenic context leading to the discovery of a heterozygous mutation in the gene encoding ankyrin repeat domain 26 (ANKRD26) associated with a heterozygous factor V (FV) Leiden mutation. This woman was diagnosed with lower-limb deep vein thrombosis complicated by pulmonary embolism. Severe thrombocytopenia was observed. The genetic study evidenced a heterozygous FV Leiden mutation. Molecular study sequencing was performed after learning that her family had a history of thrombocytopenia. Previously described heterozygous mutation c-127C>A in the 5′untranslated region (5′UTR) of the ANKRD26 gene was detected in the patient, her aunt, and her grandmother. ANKRD26-related thrombocytopenia and thrombosis are rare. This is, to our knowledge, the first case reported in the medical literature. This mutation should be screened in patients with a family history of thrombocytopenia. PMID:28698781

  20. Fatal Pulmonary Embolism Due to Inherited Thrombophilia Factors in a Child With Wolfram Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küçüktaşçi, Kazim; Semiz, Serap; Balci, Yasemin Işik; Özsari, Tamer; Gürses, Dolunay; Önem, Gökhan; Saçar, Mustafa; Düzcan, Füsun; Yüksel, Doğangün; Semiz, Ender

    2016-10-01

    Wolfram syndrome-1 is a rare and severe autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease characterized by diabetes mellitus (DM), optic atrophy, diabetes insipidus, and deafness. Poorly controlled type 1 DM increases the risk for thrombosis. However, coexistence of DM and hereditary thrombosis factors is rarely observed. Here we present the case of a 13.5-year-old, nonfollowed girl newly diagnosed with poorly controlled Wolfram syndrome on the basis of the results of clinical and laboratory examinations. On the eighth day after diabetic ketoacidosis treatment, pulmonary embolism developed in the subject. Thrombus identified in the right atrium using echocardiography was treated by emergency thrombectomy. Homozygous mutation in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene C677T, heterozygous factor-V Leiden mutation, and active protein C resistance were identified in the patient. The patient was lost because of a recurring episode of pulmonary embolism on the 86th day of hospitalization. We present this case to highlight the need for investigating hereditary thrombosis risk factors in diabetic patients in whom thromboembolism develops.

  1. Severe pulmonary oedema following therapeutic embolization with Onyx for cerebral arteriovenous malformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murugesan, C.; Saravanan, Sundararaj; Rajkumar, John; Prasad, Jagadish; Banakal, Sanjay; Muralidhar, Kanchi [Narayana Hrudayalaya Institute of Medical Sciences, Bangalore (India)

    2008-05-15

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by sudden onset of respiratory distress, infiltrates on radiographs consistent with pulmonary oedema, hypoxaemia and increased work in breathing. Infiltrates on radiographs are bilateral, but may be patchy or diffuse and fluffy or dense. It is associated with absence of left heart failure and a PaO{sub 2}/FiO{sub 2} ratio of {<=}200. Ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), which was approved by the US FDA in July 2005, is used as an embolic agent for cerebral arteriovenous malformation (AVM). It is a biocompatible liquid polymer that precipitates and solidifies on contact with blood, thus forming a soft and spongy embolus. We report a case of ARDS following therapeutic embolization with ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer for cerebral AVM under general anaesthesia. Experienced perioperative physicians adopted standard anaesthetic technique and monitoring for this procedure. Acute respiratory distress and hypoxaemia developed in the patient following extubation of the trachea. Infiltrates seen on postprocedural chest radiographs were consistent with pulmonary oedema. DMSO, the solvent for the ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer, is excreted via the lungs after administration and we postulate that DMSO was the possible cause of ARDS in this patient. Monitoring of haemodynamic parameters (invasive blood pressure, electrocardiography) and ventilatory parameters (ETCO{sub 2}, SpO{sub 2}, airway pressure monitoring) are important in the recognition of this possible event. One should be vigilant and anticipate this complication following therapeutic embolization with ethylene vinyl alcohol polymer for the treatment of cerebral AVM. (orig.)

  2. New generation aspiration catheter: Feasibility in the treatment of pulmonary embolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heberlein, Wolf E; Meek, Mollie E; Saleh, Omar; Meek, James C; Lensing, Shelly Y; Culp, William C

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To report our preliminary experience with a new generation aspiration catheter in the treatment of symptomatic pulmonary embolism (PE). METHODS: A retrospective database search for pulmonary artery embolectomy since introduction of the Pronto .035” and XL extraction catheter (Vascular Solutions, Minneapolis, MN) at our institution in 10/2009 was performed. Ten consecutive patients were identified in which the Pronto .035” or XL catheter was used between 01/2010 and 03/2013. All patients were referred for catheter based embolectomy due to contraindications to systemic lysis, or for being in such a critical clinical condition that immediate percutaneous treatment deemed warranted. The computed tomography (CT) right to left heart ratio as predictor for the severity of the PE was retrospectively evaluated on standard axial views. The difference between pre- and post-procedure pulmonary pressure measures was taken to assess the procedural effect. RESULTS: Extensive PE was confirmed angiographically in all patients. Measured right- to left ventricle (RV/LV) ratios were elevated beyond one in seven of the eight available CTs. Acute procedural success defined as clinical removal of visible thrombus and improvement in mean pulmonary artery pressure was seen in all recorded patients (n = 8), the mean pulmonary pressures declined from a median (range) of 35.5 (19-46) to 23 (10-37, P = 0.008) mmHg. Neither death nor other complications occurred intra- or immediately periprocedural, yet short term mortality within 30 d was found in 6 out of 9 patients, one patient was lost in follow up. The cause of death within 30 d in the 6 patients was identified as: Circulatory failure in direct connection with the PE (n = 2), stroke, sepsis, or succumbing to malignancy in a hospice setting (n = 2). CONCLUSION: Success in thrombus removal with improved pulmonary hypertension and systemic hypotension suggests this aspiration technique to be effective. Aspiration catheters should be

  3. Massive Pulmonary Embolism: Treatment with Thrombus Fragmentation and Local Fibrinolysis with Recombinant Human-Tissue Plasminogen Activator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stock, Klaus Wilhelm; Jacob, Augustinus Ludwig; Schnabel, Karl Jakob; Bongartz, Georg; Steinbrich, Wolfgang

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To report the results of thrombus fragmentation in combination with local fibrinolysis using recombinant human-tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) in patients with massive pulmonary embolism. Methods: Five patients with massive pulmonary embolism were treated with thrombus fragmentation followed by intrapulmonary injection of rtPA. Clot fragmentation was performed with a guidewire, angiographic catheter, and balloon catheter. Three patients had undergone recent surgery; one of them received a reduced dosage of rtPA. Results: All patients survived and showed clinical improvement with a resultant significant (p < 0.05) decrease in the pulmonary blood pressure (mean systolic pulmonary blood pressure before treatment, 49 mmHg; 4 hr after treatment, 28 mmHg). Angiographic follow-up in three patients revealed a decrease in thrombus material and an increase in pulmonary perfusion. Two patients developed retroperitoneal hematomas requiring transfusion. Conclusion: Clot fragmentation and local fibrinolysis with rtPA was an effective therapy for massive pulmonary embolism. Bleeding at the puncture site was a frequent complication

  4. Bullet embolism of pulmonary artery: a case report; Embolia pulmonar por projetil de arma de fogo: relato de caso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamanari, Mauricio Gustavo Ieiri; Mansur, Maria Clara Dias; Kay, Fernando Uliana; Silverio, Paulo Rogerio Barboza; Jayanthi, Shri Krishna; Funari, Marcelo Buarque de Gusmao, E-mail: mauriciogustavo91@yahoo.com.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IHC-FMUSP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Hospital das Clinicas

    2014-03-15

    The authors report the case of a patient victim of gunshots, with a very rare complication: venous bullet embolism from the left external iliac vein to the lingular segment of the left pulmonary artery. Diagnosis is made with whole-body radiography or computed tomography. Digital angiography is reserved for supplementary diagnosis or to be used as a therapeutic procedure. (author)

  5. Polyacrylamide hydrogel pulmonary embolism--A fatal consequence of an illegal cosmetic vaginal tightening procedure: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yijie; Zhang, Lin; Li, Shangxun; Yang, Yi; Xing, Jingjun; Li, Wenhe; Wang, Xinmei; Zhou, Yiwu

    2014-05-01

    Vaginal tightening is a kind of esthetic surgery aimed at enhancing sexual satisfaction during intercourse. Although the injective vaginal tightening procedure is informal, there are already some reports of its application. But pulmonary embolism is a really rare therapeutic complication of this procedure. We report a case of death due to the non-thrombotic pulmonary embolism as a consequence of illegal cosmetic vaginal-tightening procedure using polyacrylamide hydrogel. A 34-year-old woman was hospitalized with paroxysmal abdominal cramps and diarrhea as initial symptoms, while she concealed the genital cosmetic surgery history. Respiratory distress presented only 1.5h before she died. The result of autopsy revealed the cause of death as pulmonary embolism due to the hydrogel which was injected into her vaginal wall. The emboli were confirmed as polyacrylamide hydrogel by Alcian-blue stain and the Fourier transform infrared scanning. It is suggested that pulmonary embolism should not be discarded in the expertise of deaths following cosmetic implant surgeries. It broadens our understanding about death associated with esthetic genital procedures and informs clinicians and medical examiners of the potential death of this type. And detailed investigations of previous medical and surgical history will always play a critical role in the certification of cause of death. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Catheter-Related Right Atrial Thrombus and Pulmonary Embolism: A Case Report and Systematic Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen EA Burns

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Central venous catheters (CVCs are commonly used in clinical practice. One of the foremost complications associated with their use is the potential for symptomatic or asymptomatic thrombosis. CVC thrombosis, in turn, may not only result in vascular and catheter occlusion but also infection, pulmonary embolism, and formation of right heart thromboemboli. Thrombi within cardiac chambers are associated with an increased risk of mortality due to their potential for embolization to the pulmonary vasculature. We describe the case of a 77-year-old man, who was successfully thrombolyzed following detection of a right atrial thrombus and hemodynamically significant pulmonary embolism resulting from thrombus formation on the tip of a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC. The present article is the first report of a PICC-related right atrial thrombus in an adult treated with thrombolysis. A systematic review of the literature suggests that the true incidence of this complication may be underestimated because the diagnosis may not be considered in asymptomatic and symptomatic patients, or may be missed by transthoracic echocardiography. The present case highlights the importance of maintaining a high index of suspicion for thromboembolic complications and heparin-induced thrombocytopenia in patients with CVCs or a PICC. It also underscores the important role of transesophageal echocardiography and thrombolysis in the diagnosis and management, respectively, of right heart thromboemboli with associated pulmonary embolism.

  7. Use of the Trauma Embolic Scoring System (TESS) to predict symptomatic deep vein thrombosis and fatal and non-fatal pulmonary embolism in severely injured patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, K M; Rao, S; Rittenhouse, K J; Rogers, F B

    2014-11-01

    Fatal pulmonary embolism is the third most common cause of death after major trauma. We hypothesised that the Trauma Embolic Scoring System (TESS) would have adequate calibration and discrimination in a group of severely injured trauma patients in predicting venous thromboembolism (VTE), and could be used to predict fatal and non-fatal symptomatic pulmonary embolism. Calibration and discrimination of the TESS were assessed by the slope and intercept of the calibration curve and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, respectively. Of the 357 patients included in the study, 74 patients (21%) developed symptomatic VTE after a median period of 14 days following injury. The TESS predicted risks of VTE were higher among patients who developed VTE than those who did not (14 versus 9%, P=0.001) and had a moderate ability to discriminate between patients who developed VTE and those who did not (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve 0.71, 95% confidence interval 0.65 to 0.77). The slope and intercept of the calibration curve were 2.76 and 0.34, respectively, suggesting that the predicted risks of VTE were not sufficiently extreme and overall, underestimated the observed risks of VTE. Using 5% predicted risk of VTE as an arbitrary cut-point, TESS had a high sensitivity and negative predictive value (both ≥0.97) in excluding fatal and non-fatal pulmonary embolism. The TESS had a reasonable ability to discriminate between patients who developed VTE and those who did not and may be useful to select different strategies to prevent VTE in severely injured patients.

  8. Risk of severe pulmonary embolism in cancer patients receiving bevacizumab: Results from a meta-analysis of published and unpublished data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meidan; Zheng, Yayuan; Chen, Zuguang; Qiu, Yumiao; Pan, Zhanchun; Cai, Zitao; Shi, Yapeng; Cheng, Junfen; Yao, Weimin

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the association between severe pulmonary embolism events and bevacizumab, we conducted the first meta-analysis evaluating the incidence and risk of pulmonary embolism associated with bevacizumab-based therapy. We searched PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and ClinicalTrials.gov up to September 2016 for randomized controlled trials comparing bevacizumab with no bevacizumab on cancer patients. Incidence rates, relative risks, and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using fixed- or random-effects models. The primary end point was the association of bevacizumab with pulmonary embolism. Subgroup analyses were performed according to tumor type, dose, and publication status. In total, 23 randomized controlled trials were included. For patients receiving bevacizumab, the overall incidence of severe pulmonary embolism events was 1.76% (95% confidence interval = 1.25%-2.27%). Cancer patients treated with bevacizumab did not increase the risk of pulmonary embolism events (relative risk = 1.00, 95% confidence interval = 0.80-1.25). No significant differences in pulmonary embolism incidence or risk among subgroup analyses were observed. No evidence of publication bias was observed. This study suggested that bevacizumab may not increase the risk of pulmonary embolism in cancer patients.

  9. Suspected acute pulmonary emboli: cost-effectiveness of chest helical computed tomography versus a standard diagnostic algorithm incorporating ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larcos, G.; Chi, K.K.G.; Berry, G.; Westmead Hospital, Sydney, NSW; Shiell, A.

    2000-01-01

    There is a controversy regarding the investigation of patients with suspected acute pulmonary embolism (PE). To compare the cost-effectiveness of alternative methods of diagnosing acute PE, chest helical computed tomography (CT) alone and in combination with venous ultrasound (US) of legs and pulmonary angiography (PA) were compared to a conventional algorithm using ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) scintigraphy supplemented in selected cases by US and PA. A decision-analytical model was constructed to model the costs and effects of the three diagnostic strategies in a hypothetical cohort of 1000 patients each. Transition probabilities were based on published data. Life years gained by each strategy were estimated from published mortality rates. Schedule fees were used to estimate costs. The V/Q protocol is both more expensive and more effective than CT alone resulting in 20.1 additional lives saved at a (discounted) cost of $940 per life year gained. An additional 2.5 lives can be saved if CT replaces V/Q scintigraphy in the diagnostic algorithm but at a cost of $23,905 per life year saved. It resulted that the more effective diagnostic strategies are also more expensive. In patients with suspected PE, the incremental cost-effectiveness of the V/Q based strategy over CT alone is reasonable in comparison with other health interventions. The cost-effectiveness of the supplemented CT strategy is more questionable. Copyright (2000) The Australasian College of Physicians

  10. Pulmonary Embolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You'll lie on a table, and an x-ray tube will rotate around you. The tube will take ... do the test. For this test, a flexible tube called a catheter is threaded ... the catheter. X-ray pictures are taken to show blood flowing through ...

  11. Age-Adjusted D-Dimer in the Prediction of Pulmonary Embolism: Does a Normal Age-Adjusted D-Dimer Rule Out PE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Ortiz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Risk assessment for pulmonary embolism (PE currently relies on physician judgment, clinical decision rules (CDR, and D-dimer testing. There is still controversy regarding the role of D-dimer testing in low or intermediate risk patients. The objective of the study was to define the role of clinical decision rules and D-dimer testing in patients suspected of having a PE. Records of 894 patients referred for computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA at a University medical center were analyzed. The clinical decision rules overall had an ROC of approximately 0.70, while signs of DVT had the highest ROC (0.80. A low probability CDR coupled with a negative age-adjusted D-dimer largely excluded PE. The negative predictive value (NPV of an intermediate CDR was 86–89%, while the addition of a negative D-dimer resulted in NPVs of 94%. Thus, in patients suspected of having a PE, a low or intermediate CDR does not exclude PE; however, in patients with an intermediate CDR, a normal age-adjusted D-dimer increases the NPV.

  12. Ruling Out Pulmonary Embolism in Primary Care: Comparison of the Diagnostic Performance of “Gestalt” and the Wells Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriksen, Janneke M. T.; Lucassen, Wim A. M.; Erkens, Petra M. G.; Stoffers, Henri E. J. H.; van Weert, Henk C. P. M.; Büller, Harry R.; Hoes, Arno W.; Moons, Karel G. M.; Geersing, Geert-Jan

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE Diagnostic prediction models such as the Wells rule can be used for safely ruling out pulmonary embolism (PE) when it is suspected. A physician’s own probability estimate (“gestalt”), however, is commonly used instead. We evaluated the diagnostic performance of both approaches in primary care. METHODS Family physicians estimated the probability of PE on a scale of 0% to 100% (gestalt) and calculated the Wells rule score in 598 patients with suspected PE who were thereafter referred to secondary care for definitive testing. We compared the discriminative ability (c statistic) of both approaches. Next, we stratified patients into PE risk categories. For gestalt, a probability of less than 20% plus a negative point-of-care d-dimer test indicated low risk; for the Wells rule, we used a score of 4 or lower plus a negative d-dimer test. We compared sensitivity, specificity, efficiency (percentage of low-risk patients in total cohort), and failure rate (percentage of patients having PE within the low-risk category). RESULTS With 3 months of follow-up, 73 patients (12%) were confirmed to have venous thromboembolism (a surrogate for PE at baseline). The c statistic was 0.77 (95% CI, 0.70–0.83) for gestalt and 0.80 (95% CI, 0.75–0.86) for the Wells rule. Gestalt missed 2 out of 152 low-risk patients (failure rate = 1.3%; 95% CI, 0.2%–4.7%) with an efficiency of 25% (95% CI, 22%–29%); the Wells rule missed 4 out of 272 low-risk patients (failure rate = 1.5%; 95% CI, 0.4%–3.7%) with an efficiency of 45% (95% CI, 41%–50%). CONCLUSIONS Combined with d-dimer testing, both gestalt using a cutoff of less than 20% and the Wells rule using a score of 4 or lower are safe for ruling out PE in primary care. The Wells rule is more efficient, however, and PE can be ruled out in a larger proportion of suspected cases. PMID:27184993

  13. Ruling Out Pulmonary Embolism in Primary Care: Comparison of the Diagnostic Performance of "Gestalt" and the Wells Rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriksen, Janneke M T; Lucassen, Wim A M; Erkens, Petra M G; Stoffers, Henri E J H; van Weert, Henk C P M; Büller, Harry R; Hoes, Arno W; Moons, Karel G M; Geersing, Geert-Jan

    2016-05-01

    Diagnostic prediction models such as the Wells rule can be used for safely ruling out pulmonary embolism (PE) when it is suspected. A physician's own probability estimate ("gestalt"), however, is commonly used instead. We evaluated the diagnostic performance of both approaches in primary care. Family physicians estimated the probability of PE on a scale of 0% to 100% (gestalt) and calculated the Wells rule score in 598 patients with suspected PE who were thereafter referred to secondary care for definitive testing. We compared the discriminative ability (c statistic) of both approaches. Next, we stratified patients into PE risk categories. For gestalt, a probability of less than 20% plus a negative point-of-care d-dimer test indicated low risk; for the Wells rule, we used a score of 4 or lower plus a negative d-dimer test. We compared sensitivity, specificity, efficiency (percentage of low-risk patients in total cohort), and failure rate (percentage of patients having PE within the low-risk category). With 3 months of follow-up, 73 patients (12%) were confirmed to have venous thromboembolism (a surrogate for PE at baseline). The c statistic was 0.77 (95% CI, 0.70-0.83) for gestalt and 0.80 (95% CI, 0.75-0.86) for the Wells rule. Gestalt missed 2 out of 152 low-risk patients (failure rate = 1.3%; 95% CI, 0.2%-4.7%) with an efficiency of 25% (95% CI, 22%-29%); the Wells rule missed 4 out of 272 low-risk patients (failure rate = 1.5%; 95% CI, 0.4%-3.7%) with an efficiency of 45% (95% CI, 41%-50%). Combined with d-dimer testing, both gestalt using a cutoff of less than 20% and the Wells rule using a score of 4 or lower are safe for ruling out PE in primary care. The Wells rule is more efficient, however, and PE can be ruled out in a larger proportion of suspected cases. © 2016 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  14. A case report: Cavitary infarction caused by pulmonary tumor thrombotic microangiopathy in a patient with pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Kyoung Kyg; Kwon, Woon Jung; Choi, Seong Hoon; Lee, Jong Hwa; Cha, Hee Jeong [Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan School of Medicine, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    Pulmonary tumor embolism is commonly discovered at autopsy, but is rarely suspected ante-mortem. Microangiopathy is an uncommon and distinct form of simple tumor pulmonary embolism. Here, we present a 52-year-old male with tumor thrombotic microangiopathy and pulmonary infarction, which might have originated from intraductal papillary mucinous tumor of the pancreas. Multiple wedge-shaped consolidations were found initially and aggravated with cavitation. These CT features of pulmonary infarction were pathologically confirmed to result from pulmonary tumor thrombotic microangiopathy.

  15. Long-term follow-up of protection efficacy of vena cava filters in the prevention of pulmonary embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Manrui; Dou Yongchong; Hu Guodong; Peng Fang; Li Shengfeng

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the protection efficacy of the vena cava filter from pulmonary thromboembolism and report the problems and complications after filter placement. Methods: Fifty-five Vena Tech-LGM filters (VTF) and 6 Titanium-Greenfield filters (TGF) were placed in 61 patients. Follow-up was obtained by means of duplex sonography of the inferior vena cava and abdominal radiography in 38 patients, and by means of computed tomography in 11 patients. Results: One case of pulmonary embolism was seen following filter placement. Filter thrombosis occurred in 9 cases. There had been 1 case of incomplete filter opening and one case of filter tilting. Filter migration was noted in 1 case. Conclusion: This experience suggests that vena cava filter is safe and effective for the prevention of pulmonary embolism. A vena cava filter should only be inserted in a patient when there is strict proof of the indication

  16. Global T waves inversion and QT prolongation. An uncommon presentation of acute pulmonary embolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Savastano

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This is the case of a man presenting to the emergency department for dyspnea. Despite a very common symptom he presented an uncommon twelve leads electrocardiogram (ECG. At a first glance it could have suggested an acute coronary syndrome, a Takotsubo cardiomyopathy or a hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. However the further investigations showed an acute pulmonary embolism (APE whose pre-test probability was low with a Wells score of 0 and a Geneva simplified score of 1. Negative T waves have been described in APE, however, such a morphology associated with QT prolongation is a very rare presentation. This case confirms how the diagnosis of APE could be often insidious representing a challenge for the emergency physician.

  17. Right atrial and ventricular function evaluated with speckle tracking in patients with acute pulmonary embolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramberg, Emilie; Olausson, Maria; Jørgensen, Tem Bendix Salkvist

    2017-01-01

    Aims Assessment of right ventricular (RV) function in acute pulmonary embolism (PE) has prognostic significance. The aim of this study was to evaluate right atrium (RA) and RV myocardial damage with 2-dimensional speckle-tracking in patients with an acute central vs an acute peripheral PE. Methods...... and Results Twenty-six patients with acute PE and 10 controls were retrospectively enrolled. Right atrium and RV myocardial deformation was analyzed using speckle-tracking imaging echocardiography. Parameters were evaluated to illustrate myocardial damage in patients with a central or a peripherally located...... of an increased D-dimer in this group. Right ventricular dimensions were more affected among patients with a PE. Compared with controls, segmental RV and RA strain/strain rate in the free wall was significantly reduced in patients with PE (P

  18. Salvage intraosseous thrombolysis and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for massive pulmonary embolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Cameron Northey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intraosseous access is an alternative route of pharmacotherapy during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO provides cardiac and respiratory support when conventional therapies fail. This case reports the use of intraosseous thrombolysis and ECMO in a patient with acute massive pulmonary embolism (PE. A 34-year-old female presented to the emergency department with sudden onset severe shortness of breath. Due to difficulty establishing intravenous access, an intraosseous needle was inserted into the left tibia. Echocardiography identified severe right ventricular dilatation with global systolic impairment and failure, indicative of PE. Due to the patient′s hemodynamic compromise a recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (Alteplase bolus was administered through the intraosseous route. After transfer to the intensive care unit, venous-arterial ECMO was initiated as further therapy. The patient recovered and was discharged 36 days after admission. This is the first report of combination intraosseous thrombolysis and ECMO as salvage therapy for massive PE.

  19. Clinical gestalt versus prognostic scores for prognostication of patients with acute symptomatic pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quezada, Carlos Andrés; Zamarro, Celia; Gómez, Vicente; Guerassimova, Ina; Nieto, Rosa; Barbero, Esther; Chiluiza, Diana; Barrios, Deisy; Morillo, Raquel; Jiménez, David

    2017-12-21

    To determine the accuracy of clinical gestalt to identify patients with acute symptomatic pulmonary embolism (PE) at low-risk for short-term complications. This study included a total of 154 consecutive patients diagnosed with acute symptomatic PE in a tertiary university hospital. We compared the prognostic accuracy of the Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index (PESI), the simplified PESI (sPESI), and clinical gestalt of 1) 2senior physicians (one with and one without experience in the management of patients with PE), 2) a fourth-year resident of Pneumology, 3) a third-year resident of Pneumology, and 4) a second-year resident of Pneumology. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality during the first month after the diagnosis of PE. Thirty-day all-cause mortality was 8.4% (13/154; 8.4%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.1-12.8%). The PESI and clinical gestalt classified more patients as low-risk, compared to the sPESI (36.4%, 31.3% y 28.6%, respectively). There were no deaths in the sPESI low-risk category (negative predictive value 100%). Prognostic accuracy increased with increasing experience (84.6 vs. 92.3%; P=.049). The sPESI showed the best accuracy at correctly identifying low-risk patients with acute symptomatic PE. Clinical gestalt is not inferior to standardized clinical prediction rules to prognosticate patients with acute PE. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. The primary experimental study of self-made percutaneous catheterized thrombectomy device for acute massive pulmonary embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Junliang; Yang Ning; Zhao Shijun; Ma Junshan; Yang Jianping

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate efficacy, feasibility and safety of the self-made percutaneous catheterized thrombectomy divice in animal model for thrombus removal. Methods: Seven dogs were selected, with acute massive pulmonary embolism animal models created by injecting thrombi into the pulmonary arterial trunk via percutaneous femoral vein approach. After half an hours the catheter sheath was inserted into the occluded pulmonary artery through right femoral vein in 5 dogs, left femoral vein in 1 dog and right internal jugular vein in another one. The procedure began to remove the thrombi with simultaneous recording the thrombectomy time and the blood volume drainage. Blood gass was tested before and after embolization together with those of thrombi removement, continuously monitored pulmonary arterial pressure and intermittently performed angiography. The mean time form vascular recanalization to euthanasia was 2 hours, and then the lung specimens were resected for histological examination. Results: One animal died of pulmonary arterial penetration during thrombi removal, but others were all alive by the end of the test. Mean time of removing thrombi was 2.4 minutes with mean volume blood drainage of 84 ml. Angiograms showed the approximately complete patency of the pulmonary arterial trunk after reopening of occlusion but still with remnont thrombi within distal branches and arterial pressure with blood gas returned to normal level. Pathology revealed the recanalization of pulmonary arterial trunk but with thromi still staying in the distal branches, and effusion around the arteries. Conclusions: The self-made percutaneous catheterized thrombectomy device is effective, feasible and comparatively safe in the treatment of acute massive pulmonary embolism in this primary test. (authors)

  1. Suspected Pulmonary Infection with Trichoderma longibrachiatum after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akagi, Tomoaki; Kawamura, Chizuko; Terasawa, Norio; Yamaguchi, Kohei; Kubo, Kohmei

    2017-01-01

    Aspergillus and Candida species are the main causative agents of invasive fungal infections in immunocompromised human hosts. However, saprophytic fungi are now increasingly being recognized as serious pathogens. Trichoderma longibrachiatum has recently been described as an emerging pathogen in immunocompromised patients. We herein report a case of isolated suspected invasive pulmonary infection with T. longibrachiatum in a 29-year-old man with severe aplastic anemia who underwent allogeneic stem cell transplantation. A direct microscopic examination of sputum, bronchoaspiration, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples revealed the presence of fungal septate hyphae. The infection was successfully treated with 1 mg/kg/day liposomal amphotericin B.

  2. Clinical and echocardiographic findings of patients with suspected acute pulmonary thromboembolism who underwent computed tomography pulmonary angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adibi, Atoosa; Nouri, Shadi; Moradi, Maryam; Shahabi, Javad

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of the study was to determine the correlation between clinical and echocardiographic findings and risk factors of patients with suspected acute pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) who underwent computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA). Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 310 hospitalized patients aged >18 years with high clinical suspicion of PTE referred to imaging center of our hospital from different wards for CTPA were enrolled. The frequency of different clinical presentations, risk factors, items of Wells’ criteria, and echocardiographic findings was compared in patients with and without PTE, which have been diagnosed according to the CTPA results. Results: PTE was diagnosed in 53 (17.1%) of patients with suspected PTE. From clinical manifestations, tachypnea, pleuritic chest pain, and edema of lower extremities were significantly more frequent among patients with PTE (P < 0.05). Major surgery was the risk factor which was significantly more prevalent among patients with PTE (P < 0.05). Frequency of all criteria of Wells’ criteria, except hemoptysis, was significantly higher in patients with PTE (P < 0.05). The frequency of all studied echocardiographic variables was significantly higher in patients with PTE (P < 0.05). Conclusion: It is suggested that we could use the results of this study for utilizing the diagnostic process of PTE in patients with highly clinical suspicion of PTE and providing more validated decision. Using the results of this study, we could identify high-risk patients and made appropriate risk assessment for better management of patients with suspected PTE as well as reduce the rate of unnecessary CTPA and its related adverse consequences. PMID:28255326

  3. Clinical and echocardiographic findings of patients with suspected acute pulmonary thromboembolism who underwent computed tomography pulmonary angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atoosa Adibi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of the study was to determine the correlation between clinical and echocardiographic findings and risk factors of patients with suspected acute pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE who underwent computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 310 hospitalized patients aged >18 years with high clinical suspicion of PTE referred to imaging center of our hospital from different wards for CTPA were enrolled. The frequency of different clinical presentations, risk factors, items of Wells' criteria, and echocardiographic findings was compared in patients with and without PTE, which have been diagnosed according to the CTPA results. Results: PTE was diagnosed in 53 (17.1% of patients with suspected PTE. From clinical manifestations, tachypnea, pleuritic chest pain, and edema of lower extremities were significantly more frequent among patients with PTE (P < 0.05. Major surgery was the risk factor which was significantly more prevalent among patients with PTE (P < 0.05. Frequency of all criteria of Wells' criteria, except hemoptysis, was significantly higher in patients with PTE (P < 0.05. The frequency of all studied echocardiographic variables was significantly higher in patients with PTE (P < 0.05. Conclusion: It is suggested that we could use the results of this study for utilizing the diagnostic process of PTE in patients with highly clinical suspicion of PTE and providing more validated decision. Using the results of this study, we could identify high-risk patients and made appropriate risk assessment for better management of patients with suspected PTE as well as reduce the rate of unnecessary CTPA and its related adverse consequences.

  4. Dynamic (4D) CT perfusion offers simultaneous functional and anatomical insights into pulmonary embolism resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirsadraee, Saeed, E-mail: saeed.mirsadraee@ed.ac.uk [Clinical Research Imaging Centre, Queen' s Medical Research Institute, University of Edinburgh, 47 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh EH16 4TJ (United Kingdom); Reid, John H.; Connell, Martin [Clinical Research Imaging Centre, Queen' s Medical Research Institute, University of Edinburgh, 47 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh EH16 4TJ (United Kingdom); MacNee, William; Hirani, Nikhil [The Queen' s Medical Research Institute, University of Edinburgh, 47 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh EH16 4TJ (United Kingdom); Murchison, John T. [Department of Radiology, Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, 51 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh EH16 4SA (United Kingdom); Beek, Edwin J. van [Clinical Research Imaging Centre, Queen' s Medical Research Institute, University of Edinburgh, 47 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh EH16 4TJ (United Kingdom)

    2016-10-15

    Objective: Resolution and long-term functional effects of pulmonary emboli are unpredictable. This study was carried out to assess persisting vascular bed perfusion abnormalities and resolution of arterial thrombus in patients with recent pulmonary embolism (PE). Methods and materials: 26 Patients were prospectively evaluated by dynamic (4D) contrast enhanced CT perfusion dynamic pulmonary CT perfusion. Intermittent volume imaging was performed every 1.5–1.7 s during breath-hold and perfusion values were calculated by maximum-slope technique. Thrombus load (modified Miller score; MMS) and ventricular diameter were determined. Perfusion maps were visually scored and correlated with residual endoluminal filling defects. Results: The mean initial thrombus load was 13.1 ± 4.6 MMS (3–16), and 1.2 ± 2.1 MMS (0–8) at follow up. From the 24 CTPs with diagnostic quality perfusion studies, normal perfusion was observed in 7 (29%), and mildly-severely abnormal in 17 (71%). In 15 patients with no residual thrombus on follow up CTPA, normal perfusion was observed in 6, and abnormal perfusion in 9. Perfusion was abnormal in all patients with residual thrombus on follow up CTPA. Pulmonary perfusion changes were classified as reduced (n = 4), delayed (systemic circulation pattern; n = 5), and absent (no-flow; n = 5). The right ventricle was dilated in 12/25 (48%) at presentation, and normal in all 26 follow up scans. Weak correlation was found between initial ventricular dilatation and perfusion abnormality at follow up (r = 0.15). Conclusions: Most patients had substantial perfusion abnormality at 3–6 months post PE. Abnormal perfusion patterns were frequently observed in patients and in regions with no corresponding evidence of residual thrombus on CTPA. Some defects exhibit delayed, presumed systemic, enhancement (which we have termed ‘stunned’ lung). CT perfusion provides combined anatomical and functional information about PE resolution.

  5. Lung Perfusion SPECT: Application in a Patient With Tetralogy of Fallot and Suspected Pulmonary Thromboemboli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranji Amjad, Mina; Abbasi, Mehrshad; Farzanehfar, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    A 22-year-old woman presented with acute left-sided pleuritic chest pain and dyspnea 6 days after surgery for revision of the stenotic central aortopulmonary shunt. She had a history of tetralogy of Fallot (TOF), pulmonary valve stenosis, ventricular septal defect and major aortopulmonary collateral artery. Her Waterston shunt was placed when she was 5 years old and stented and re-dilated after stenosis. Acute pulmonary thromboemboli (PTE) was suspected and pulmonary perfusion scan was performed with 4 mCi 99m Technetium labeled macroaggregated albumin. The left lung was globally hypoperfused with evident uptake in the brain, renal parenchyma and thyroid. SPECT images revealed a segmental wedge-shaped peripheral defect in the posterior segment of the left upper lobe. The scan was interpreted as acute/chronic PTE or vascular abnormality. CT angiography excluded PTE; nevertheless the patient was treated with a therapeutic dose of heparin changed to warfarin and was discharged with improvement of the symptoms. Pulmonary artery angiography was not performed

  6. Balloon Pulmonary Angioplasty in Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension: New Horizons in the Interventional Management of Pulmonary Embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers-Bowerman, Michael D; Zener, Rebecca; Jaberi, Arash; de Perrot, Marc; Granton, John; Moriarty, John M; Tan, Kong T

    2017-09-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is an underdiagnosed potential complication of acute or recurrent pulmonary thromboembolic disease. Multiple studies suggest that up to 5% of patients with acute pulmonary thromboembolic disease go on to develop CTEPH. The prognosis of untreated CTEPH is poor, but advances in medical and surgical treatments over the past few decades have improved patient outcomes. The gold standard and curative treatment for CTEPH is pulmonary endarterectomy; however, some patients are inoperable and others who have undergone pulmonary endarterectomy experience persistent or recurrent pulmonary hypertension despite medical therapy. In recent years, balloon pulmonary angioplasty has emerged as a primary and adjunctive treatment for these CTEPH patients at expert or specialized centers. This review outlines an approach to balloon pulmonary angioplasty for CTEPH, including clinical presentation and evaluation; patient selection and indications; treatment planning; equipment and technique; overcoming technical challenges; recognition and management of complications; postprocedural care and clinical follow-up; and expected outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Computer-assisted detection of pulmonary embolism: performance evaluation in consensus with experienced and inexperienced chest radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelke, Christoph; Marten, Katharina; Schmidt, Stephan; Auer, Florian; Bakai, Annemarie

    2008-01-01

    The value of a computer-aided detection tool (CAD) as second reader in combination with experienced and inexperienced radiologists for the diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism (PE) was assessed prospectively. Computed tomographic angiography (CTA) scans (64 x 0.6 mm collimation; 61.4 mm/rot table feed) of 56 patients (31 women, 34-89 years, mean = 66 years) with suspected PE were analysed by two experienced (R1, R2) and two inexperienced (R3, R4) radiologists for the presence and distribution of emboli using a five-point confidence rating, and by CAD. Informed consent was obtained from all patients. Results were compared with an independent reference standard. Inter-observer agreement was calculated by kappa, confidence assessed by ROC analysis. A total of 1,116 emboli [within mediastinal (n = 72), lobar (n 133), segmental (n = 465) and subsegmental arteries (n = 455)] were included. CAD detected 343 emboli (sensitivity = 30.74%, correct-positive rate 6.13/patient; false-positive rate = 4.1/patient). Inter-observer agreement was good (R1, R2: κ = 0.84, 95% CI = 0.81-0.87; R3, R4: κ = 0.79, 95% CI = 0.76-0.81). Extended inter-observer agreement was higher in mediastinal and lobar than in segmental and subsegmental arteries (κ 0.84-0.86 and κ = 0.51-0.58 for mediastinal/lobar and segmental/subsegmental arteries, respectively P 0.05). Particularly inexperienced readers benefit from consensus with CAD data, greatly improving detection of segmental and subsegmental emboli. This system is advocated as a second reader. (orig.)

  8. Short-term results of retrograde pulmonary embolectomy in massive and submassive pulmonary embolism: a single-center study of 30 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrabi, Khalil; Zolghadrasli, Abdolali; Ostovan, Mohammad Ali; Azimifar, Azimeh

    2011-10-01

    Surgical pulmonary embolectomy is usually reserved for critically ill patients with pulmonary embolism. The conventional antegrade technique of embolectomy may miss peripheral clots, rendering the patient amenable to developing pulmonary hypertension. Here, we present our experience with a new retrograde pulmonary embolectomy supplementing the current antegrade technique. From January 2004 through December 2010, 30 consecutive patients underwent pulmonary embolectomy in our center. The study included 15 men and 15 women whose age ranged from 28 to 80 years, with mean age of 58±15 years. All the patients except one were taken to the operating room with at least one imaging modality confirming the presence of a large thrombus in pulmonary-arterial vasculature. The most common presenting symptoms of patients was dyspnea (n=27, 90%). The major indications for surgery were severe hemodynamic or respiratory compromise (n=11, 36%). After performing antegrade embolectomy, retrograde flushing of the pulmonary veins was done. The in-hospital mortality in our study was 6.6% (2/30). Mean intubation time for the patients was 52.7±36.5 h, with a range of 12-120 h. Mean intensive care unit (ICU) admission for the patients was 7 days with a range of 2-60 days. As far as we know, this is the largest series of cases published so far regarding the immediate results of retrograde pulmonary embolectomy. This technique can successfully dislodge the remaining clots in distal pulmonary vasculature not directly visualized. Surgical pulmonary embolectomy is a safe method and should not be used as a last resort for patients with pulmonary embolism. Copyright © 2011 European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A nationwide, retrospective analysis of symptoms, comorbidities, medical care and autopsy findings in cases of fatal pulmonary embolism in younger patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilade, J; Winkel, B G; Holst, A G

    2010-01-01

    Our objective was to provide a comprehensive description of fatal pulmonary embolism (PE) in younger persons. Specifically, we recorded information on symptoms, comorbidity, medical contact, if this had been required, and subsequent autopsy findings.......Our objective was to provide a comprehensive description of fatal pulmonary embolism (PE) in younger persons. Specifically, we recorded information on symptoms, comorbidity, medical contact, if this had been required, and subsequent autopsy findings....

  10. Prevalence of Intestinal Parasites and Associated Factors among Pulmonary Tuberculosis Suspected Patients Attending University of Gondar Hospital, Gondar, Northwest Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalewayker Tegegne

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Intestinal parasitic infections are among the major public health problems in developing countries. Hence, it is significant to explore coinfection with intestinal parasites and pulmonary tuberculosis because coinfection increases the complexity of control and prevention of pulmonary tuberculosis and parasitic diseases. Objective. To assess the prevalence of intestinal parasites among pulmonary tuberculosis suspected patients. Method. Institutional based cross-sectional study was conducted at University of Gondar Hospital from March to May, 2017. Stool samples were taken from each participant and examined by direct microscopy and concentration technique. Descriptive statistics was performed and chi-square test was used to show the association between variables. P values of <0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results. Intestinal parasites were detected in 50 (19.6% among a total of 256 pulmonary tuberculosis suspected patients who were included in the study, whereas the prevalence of pulmonary tuberculosis was 16.8% (43/256. Pulmonary tuberculosis and intestinal parasite coinfection was detected in 5 (2.0% of the participants. The most prevalent intestinal parasites infection in this study was Ascaris lumbricoides, 15 (5.85%, followed by Entamoeba histolytica/dispar, 14 (5.46%, and Hookworm, 13 (5.1%. Conclusion. The prevalence of intestinal parasites and their coinfection rate with pulmonary tuberculosis among pulmonary tuberculosis suspected patients were considerable.

  11. Detection of pulmonary fat embolism with dual-energy CT: an experimental study in rabbits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Chun Xiang; Zhou, Chang Sheng; Zhao, Yan E.; Han, Zong Hong; Qi, Li; Zhang, Long Jiang; Lu, Guang Ming [Medical School of Nanjing University, Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Schoepf, U.J. [Medical School of Nanjing University, Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Mangold, Stefanie; Ball, B.D. [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States)

    2017-04-15

    To evaluate the use of dual-energy CT imaging of the lung perfused blood volume (PBV) for the detection of pulmonary fat embolism (PFE). Dual-energy CT was performed in 24 rabbits before and 1 hour, 1 day, 4 days and 7 days after artificial induction of PFE via the right ear vein. CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) and lung PBV images were evaluated by two radiologists, who recorded the presence, number, and location of PFE on a per-lobe basis. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of CTPA and lung PBV for detecting PFE were calculated using histopathological evaluation as the reference standard. A total of 144 lung lobes in 24 rabbits were evaluated and 70 fat emboli were detected on histopathological analysis. The overall sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 25.4 %, 98.6 %, and 62.5 % for CTPA, and 82.6 %, 76.0 %, and 79.2 % for lung PBV. Higher sensitivity (p < 0.001) and accuracy (p < 0.01), but lower specificity (p < 0.001), were found for lung PBV compared with CTPA. Dual-energy CT can detect PFE earlier than CTPA (all p < 0.01). Dual-energy CT provided higher sensitivity and accuracy in the detection of PFE as well as earlier detection compared with conventional CTPA in this animal model study. (orig.)

  12. Age Adjusted D-Dimer for exclusion of Pulmonary Embolism: a retrospective cohort study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Monks, D

    2017-08-01

    D-Dimer (DD) will increase with age and recent studies have shown the upper limit of normal can be raised in those who are low risk and over 50. We studied age adjusted D-dimer (AADD) levels to assess whether pulmonary embolism (PE) could be safely excluded. This study analysed the Emergency Department (ED) Computed Tomographic Pulmonary Angiography (CTPA) requests. There were 756 requests. The parameters studied were; age, DD value, calculated AADD, CT result and Simplified Geneva Score (SGS). The primary outcome was the diagnostic performance of AADD. One hundred and eighty-five patients were included in the final cohort. Twenty-one patients had a negative DD after age adjustment. Of these one had a PE, corresponding to a failure rate of 4.76% (1 in 22). The sensitivity of AADD was 0.96 (95% CI 0.76 to 0.99) and its specificity was 0.12 (95% CI 0.08- 0.19). AADD demonstrated a reduction in false positives with one false negative, giving rise to a failure rate higher than that of other larger studies. Further study is indicated to accurately define the diagnostic characteristics for the Irish context.

  13. Logistic regression model for identification of right ventricular dysfunction in patients with acute pulmonary embolism by means of computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staskiewicz, Grzegorz; Czekajska-Chehab, Elżbieta; Uhlig, Sebastian; Przegalinski, Jerzy; Maciejewski, Ryszard; Drop, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Diagnosis of right ventricular dysfunction in patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is known to be associated with increased risk of mortality. The aim of the study was to calculate a logistic regression model for reliable identification of right ventricular dysfunction (RVD) in patients diagnosed with computed tomography pulmonary angiography. Material and methods: Ninety-seven consecutive patients with acute pulmonary embolism were divided into groups with and without RVD basing upon echocardiographic measurement of pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP). PE severity was graded with the pulmonary obstruction score. CT measurements of heart chambers and mediastinal vessels were performed; position of interventricular septum and presence of contrast reflux into the inferior vena cava were also recorded. The logistic regression model was prepared by means of stepwise logistic regression. Results: Among the used parameters, the final model consisted of pulmonary obstruction score, short axis diameter of right ventricle and diameter of inferior vena cava. The calculated model is characterized by 79% sensitivity and 81% specificity, and its performance was significantly better than single CT-based measurements. Conclusion: Logistic regression model identifies RVD significantly better, than single CT-based measurements

  14. Long-term outcome of patients with persistent vascular obstruction on computed tomography pulmonary angiography 6 months after acute pulmonary embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golpe, Rafael; Llano, Luis A. Perez de; Olalla, Castro-Anon; Vazquez-Caruncho, Manuel; Gonzalez-Juanatey, Carlos; Farinas, Maria Carmen

    2012-01-01

    Background: The incidence and clinical significance of pulmonary residual thrombosis 6 months after an acute pulmonary embolism (PE) are still not well-known. Purpose: To evaluate the association between residual vascular obstruction and the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) recurrence or death. Material and Methods: Computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) was repeated in 97 consecutive patients 6 months after an acute episode of hemodynamically stable pulmonary embolism. We assessed the long-term consequences of residual thrombosis on vital status and incidence of recurrent VTE. Results: Six patients were lost for follow-up. The remaining 91 patients were classified according to the presence (Group 1: 18 cases) or absence (Group 2: 73 cases) of residual pulmonary vascular obstruction. After a mean ±SD of 2.91 ±0.99 years, there were eight (8.8%) deaths and 11 (12.1%) VTE recurrences. Groups 1 and 2 did not differ in the incidence of death or VTE recurrence. Conclusion: Persistent pulmonary vascular obstruction on 6-month CTPA did not predict long-term adverse outcome events

  15. Acute pulmonary embolism detection with ventilation/perfusion SPECT combined with full dose CT: What is the best option?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milà, M; Bechini, J; Vázquez, A; Vallejos, V; Tenesa, M; Espinal, A; Fraile, M; Monreal, M

    To compare diagnostic accuracy of Ventilation/Perfusion (V/P) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) combined with simultaneous full-dose CT with a hybrid SPECT/CT scanner versus planar ventilation/perfusion (V/P) SPECT and CT angiography (CTA) in patients suspected with acute pulmonary embolism (PE). Between 2009 and 2011, consecutive patients suspected of acute PE were referred for V/P SPECT/CT (reviewed board approved study). A contrast agent was administered to patients who had no contraindications. Non-contrast V/P SPECT/CT was performed on the remaining patients. All patients were followed-up for at least 3 months. A total of 314 patients were available during the study period, with the diagnosis of PE confirmed in 70 (22.29%) of them. The overall population sensitivity and specificity was 90.91% and 92.44%, respectively for V/P SPECT, 80% and 99.15%, respectively, for CTA, and 95.52% and 97.08% for V/P SPECT/CT. SPECT/CT performed better than V/P SPECT (AUC differences=0.0419, P=0.0043, 95% CI; 0.0131-0.0706) and CTA (AUC differences=0.0681, P=0.0208, 95% CI; 0.0103-0.1259)). Comparing imaging modalities when contrast agent could be administered, sensitivity and specificity increased and V/P SPECT/CT was significantly better than CTA (AUC differences=0.0681, P=0.0208, 95% CI; 0.0103-0.1259) and V/P SPECT (AUC differences=0.0659, P=0.0052, 95% CI; 0.0197-0.1121). In case of non-contrast enhancement, there was non-significant increase of specificity. Secondary findings on CT impacted patient management in 14.65% of cases. Our study shows that combined V/P SPECT/CT scanning has a higher diagnostic accuracy for detecting acute PE than V/P SPECT and CTA alone. When feasible, V/P SPECT/CT with contrast enhancement is the best option. Copyright © 2016. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  16. Comparing axillary and mediastinal lymphadenopathy on CT in children with suspected pulmonary tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theron, Salomine; Andronikou, Savvas

    2005-01-01

    Radiographic demonstration of mediastinal lymphadenopathy is important for the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB). Plain radiographs are unreliable for this and CT, which is relatively more expensive and carries a high radiation burden, remains the gold standard. No studies correlating the presence of axillary with mediastinal lymphadenopathy have been reported. Such a correlation would allow for clinical or ultrasound diagnosis of PTB via the axilla. To correlate the presence of axillary lymphadenopathy with mediastinal lymphadenopathy in children with suspected PTB. CT scans were performed and reviewed in 100 children (prospectively recruited) with suspected PTB. The axilla and mediastinum were reviewed separately by covering the non-relevant sections on the CT scans prior to reading. Only nodes greater than 1 cm were regarded as pathological. Mediastinal lymphadenopathy was present in 46% of children; 70% had lymphadenopathy in either axilla. Bilateral axillary lymphadenopathy was identified in 47%. Axillary lymphadenopathy showed a sensitivity of 74% and a specificity of 33% for the presence of mediastinal adenopathy. Bilateral axillary adenopathy had a sensitivity of 50% and a specificity of 56%. Axillary lymphadenopathy has a moderate sensitivity and low specificity for the presence of mediastinal and hilar lymphadenopathy in children with suspected PTB. Further research should be aimed at correlating ultrasound-detected axillary lymphadenopathy with FNA results in children. (orig.)

  17. The Role of the Pulmonary Embolism Response Team: How to Build One, Who to Include, Scenarios, Organization, and Algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galmer, Andrew; Weinberg, Ido; Giri, Jay; Jaff, Michael; Weinberg, Mitchell

    2017-09-01

    Pulmonary embolism response teams (PERTs) are multidisciplinary response teams aimed at delivering a range of diagnostic and therapeutic modalities to patients with pulmonary embolism. These teams have gained traction on a national scale. However, despite sharing a common goal, individual PERT programs are quite individualized-varying in their methods of operation, team structures, and practice patterns. The tendency of such response teams is to become intensely structured, algorithmic, and inflexible. However, in their current form, PERT programs are quite the opposite. They are being creatively customized to meet the needs of the individual institution based on available resources, skills, personnel, and institutional goals. After a review of the essential core elements needed to create and operate a PERT team in any form, this article will discuss the more flexible feature development of the nascent PERT team. These include team planning, member composition, operational structure, benchmarking, market analysis, and rudimentary financial operations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. An unusual finding of massive pulmonary embolism in a patient during treatment with high-dose ibuprofen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilora, Franca; Adamo, Angelo; Pomerri, Fabio; Prandoni, Paolo

    2016-02-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have been associated with an increased risk of venous thromboembolism. We report for the first time, the case of a patient who developed massive pulmonary embolism after a long period of treatment with high doses of ibuprofen. A 65-year-old woman was admitted with severe dyspnea while on treatment with high doses of ibuprofen for diffuse spine pain due to arthrosis. A spiral computed tomography showed a massive pulmonary embolism. No other explanation for the thromboembolic disorder was found. She was successfully treated with therapeutic doses of low-molecular-weight heparin followed by rivaroxaban. Ibuprofen was discontinued and replaced by tramadol. High-dose ibuprofen is likely to have accounted for the life-threatening thromboembolic disorder.

  19. Software-based hybrid perfusion SPECT/CT provides diagnostic accuracy when other pulmonary embolism imaging is indeterminate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Nishant; Xie, Karen; Mar, Winnie; Anderson, Thomas M.; Carney, Benjamin; Mehta, Nikhil; Machado, Roberto; Blend, Michael J.; Lu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the diagnostic performance of perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (Q-SPECT/CT) in patients suspected to have pulmonary embolism (PE) but with indeterminate computed tomographic pulmonary angiography (CTPA) or planar ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) scans. This retrospective study included two groups of patients. Group I consisted of 49 patients with nondiagnostic CTPA. These 49 patients underwent subsequent V/Q scans. Further Q-SPECTs were obtained in patients with indeterminate planar images and fused with existing CTPA. Group II consisted of 182 non-CTPA patients with indeterminate V/Q scans. These 182 patients underwent further Q-SPECT and separate noncontrast low-dose CT chest. Fusion Q-SPECT/CT scans were obtained through FDA-approved software and interpreted according to published criteria as positive, negative, or indeterminate for PE. Upon retrospective analyses, the final diagnosis was made using composite reference standards including all available clinical and imaging information for at least 6-month follow-up. In group I patients, 1 was positive, 24 were negative, and another 24 (49 %, 24/49) were indeterminate. In the subsequent 24 Q-SPECT/CTPAs, 4 were positive, 19 were negative, and 1 was indeterminate (4.2 %, 1/24). In group II patients, 9 (4.9 %, 9/182) were indeterminate, 33 were positive, and 140 were negative. The combined nondiagnostic rate for Q-SPECT/CT was only 4.9 % (10/206). There was six false-negative and one false-positive Q-SPECT/CT examinations. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive value of Q-SPECT/CT were 85.7 % (36/42), 99.4 % (153/154), 97.3 % (36/37) and 96.2 % (153/159), respectively. Q-SPECT/CT improves the diagnostic rate with promising accuracy in diagnosing PE that yields a satisfactory clinical verdict, especially when the CTPA and planar V/Q scan are indeterminate

  20. Pulmonary embolism incidence and fatality trends in chinese hospitals from 1997 to 2008: a multicenter registration study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanhua Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There has not been sufficient evidence to support the Asians being less susceptible to pulmonary embolism (PE than other ethnicities, because the prevalence of PE/deep venous thrombosis (DVT in different racial and ethnic groups has not been carefully studied until recently except in Caucasians. To test the hypothesis that the Chinese population has a lower risk for PE, this study comprehensively assessed the hospital-based incidence and case fatality rates for PE during the 1997-2008 in China. METHODS: A registration study of patients with suspected PE syndromes admitted to 60 level-3 hospitals involved in the National Cooperative Project for the Prevention and Treatment of Venous Thromboembolism (NCPPT was conducted from January 1997 to December 2008. The only exclusion criterion was an age of less than 18 years. Helical computed tomography scan, ventilation-perfusion lung scintigraphy or pulmonary angiography was carried out before or after hospitalization. All images were reviewed and evaluated independently by two specialists. RESULTS: A total of 18,206 patients were confirmed with PE from 16,972,182 hospital admissions. The annual incidence was 0.1% (95% CI: 0.1% to 0.2%. The overall incidence of PE in male patients (0.2%, 95% CI: 0.1% to 0.3% was higher than that in female patients (0.1% and 95% CI: 0.0% to 0.1%. An increasing incidence gradient for PE was noticed from Southern to Northern China. In addition, the case fatality rate was apparently decreasing: 25.1% (95% CI: 16.2% to 36.9% in 1997 to 8.7% (95% CI: 3.5% to 15.8% in 2008. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest the relatively stable PE incidence and decreasing fatality trends in Chinese hospitals may be partially attributable to the implementation of the NCCPT and suggest the government should reevaluate the severity of PE so that health resources for the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of PE could be used to their fullest.

  1. Association of Admission Glucose Level and Improvement in Pulmonary Artery Pressure in Patients with Submassive-type Acute Pulmonary Embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohbara, Masaomi; Hayakawa, Keigo; Hayakawa, Azusa; Akazawa, Yusuke; Yamaguchi, Yukihiro; Furihata, Shuta; Kondo, Ai; Fukushima, Yusuke; Tomari, Sakie; Mitsuhashi, Takayuki; Endo, Tsutomu; Kimura, Kazuo

    2018-03-01

    Objective The admission glucose level is a predictor of mortality even in patients with acute pulmonary embolism (APE). However, whether or not the admission glucose level is associated with the severity of APE itself or the underlying disease of APE is unclear. Methods This study was a retrospective observational study. A pulmonary artery (PA) catheter was used to accurately evaluate the severity of APE. The percentage changes in the mean PA pressure (PAPm) upon placement and removal of the inferior vena cava filter (IVCF) were evaluated. We hypothesized that the admission glucose level was associated with the improvement in the PA pressure in patients with APE. Patients A total of consecutive 22 patients with submassive APE who underwent temporary or retrievable IVCF insertion on admission and repetitive PA catheter measurements upon placement and removal of IVCFs were enrolled. Results There was a significant positive correlation between the admission glucose levels and the percentage changes in the PAPm (r=0.543, p=0.009). A univariate linear regression analysis showed that the admission glucose level was the predictor of the percentage change in PAPm (β coefficient=0.169 per 1 mg/dL; 95% confidence interval, 0.047-0.291; p=0.009). A multivariate linear regression analysis with the forced inclusion model showed that the admission glucose level was the predictor of the percentage change in PAPm independent of diabetes mellitus, PAPm on admission, troponin positivity, and brain natriuretic peptide level (all plevel was associated with the improvement in the PAPm in patients with submassive-type APE.

  2. Prognostic importance of quantitative echocardiographic evaluation in patients suspected of first non-massive pulmonary embolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergaard, Jesper; Schaadt, Bente Krogsgaard; Lund, Jens Otto

    2008-01-01

    is predictive of event-free survival (all-cause mortality and heart failure hospitalizations) adjusted for LV ejection fraction, age, and sex (HR=0.78 per 10 ms increase, P=0.04). Measures of regional myocardial function were not related to outcome in this study, regardless of presence of PE. CONCLUSION: PA...... tissue Doppler imaging, was performed in 283 consecutive patients referred for ventilation/perfusion scintigraphy (V/Q scan) on suspicion of first non-massive PE. The prognostic information of quantitative measures of right ventricular (RV) size, function, and pressure was assessed. Patients with PE had...

  3. Pulmonary Arteriovenous Malformations Embolized Using a Micro Vascular Plug System: Technical Note on a Preliminary Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boatta, Emanuele, E-mail: emanuele.boatta@yahoo.it; Jahn, Christine, E-mail: christine.jahn@chru-strasbourg.fr [Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Service de Imagerie Interventionelle, Nouvel Hôpital Civil (France); Canuet, Matthieu, E-mail: matthieu.canuet@chru-strasbourg.fr [Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Service Service de Pneumologie, Nouvel Hôpital Civil (France); Garnon, Julien, E-mail: juleiengarnon@gmail.com [Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Service de Imagerie Interventionelle, Nouvel Hôpital Civil (France); Ramamurthy, Nitin, E-mail: nitin-ramamurthy@hotmail.com [Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Cazzato, Roberto Luigi, E-mail: gigicazzato@hotmail.it; Gangi, Afshin, E-mail: gangi@unistra.fr [Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Service de Imagerie Interventionelle, Nouvel Hôpital Civil (France)

    2017-02-15

    AIMTo report our preliminary experience using a Micro Vascular Plug (MVP) deployed through a 2.8Fr micro-catheter for the treatment of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) in a cohort of patients affected by Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT).Materials and MethodsFour consecutive female patients (mean age 38.0 years; range 25–55 years) with PAVMs diagnosed on echocardiogram/bubble test and contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) underwent MVP embolization. One patient was symptomatic with recent transient ischaemic attack. Follow-up was undertaken at 1-month post-procedure with CECT to assess PAVMs permeability and MVP positioning and at 1-, 6-, and 12-month post-procedure, with echocardiography/bubble test and standard neurological history, to confirm absence of right-to-left shunts and recurrent symptoms.ResultsEight PAVMs were treated in 4 patients over 5 interventional sessions (mean 1.6 PAVMs per session). All PAVMs were simple, with mean feeding artery diameter of 4.25 mm. Eight 6.5 mm MVPs were deployed in total (one per lesion). Technical success was 100%. Mean procedural time and patient dose per session were 70 min (range 40–70 min) and 53418 mGy.cm{sup 2} (range 6113–101628 mGy.cm{sup 2}), respectively. No signs of reperfusion neither of MPV migration were noted at 1-month CECT follow-up. At early follow-up (mean 3.75 months; range 1–12 months), clinical success was 100% with no evidence of recurrent right-to-left shunt, and no neurological symptoms. No immediate or late complications were observed.ConclusionsMVP embolization of PAVMs appears technically feasible, safe, and effective at early follow-up. Further prospective studies are required to confirm long-term safety and efficacy of this promising technique.

  4. Comparison of V/Q SPECT and planar V/Q lung scintigraphy in diagnosing acute pulmonary embolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borgwardt, Henrik Gutte; Mortensen, Jann; Jensen, Claus Verner

    2010-01-01

    Planar ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) scintigraphy is currently the standard method for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE) in most nuclear medicine centers. However, recent studies have shown a superior sensitivity and specificity when applying V/Q single photon emission computed tomography...... (SPECT) in diagnosing PE. This study evaluated the diagnostic performance of three-dimensional V/Q SPECT in comparison with planar V/Q scintigraphy....

  5. A Case of Nonthrombotic Pulmonary Embolism after Facial Injection of Hyaluronic Acid in an Illegal Cosmetic Procedure

    OpenAIRE

    Jang, Jong Geol; Hong, Kyung Soo; Choi, Eun Young

    2014-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid is widely used in medical procedures, particularly in cosmetic procedures administered by physicians or nonmedical personnel. The materials used for cosmetic procedures by physicians as well as illegally by non-medical personnel can cause nonthrombotic pulmonary embolism (NTPE). We report the case of a woman with acute respiratory failure, neurologic symptoms and petechiae after an illegal procedure of hyaluronic acid dermal filler performed by an unlicensed medical practition...

  6. Combined detection for pulmonary embolism and venous thrombosis of lower extremity using sup(99m)Tc labeled microsphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Yasushi; Hamanaka, Daisaburo; Suzuki, Teruyasu; Yonekura, Yoshiharu; Torizuka, Kanji

    1978-01-01

    Using capillary blockage for radionuclide venography (RNV) as well as lung scintigraphy, we attempted to investigate the relation between venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Fourty patients with a symptom of swelling of the lower extremity were investigated. About 10 mCi of diluted volume of sup(99m)Tc microsphere was introduced into dorsal vein, and standard RNV were taken concerning deep and superficial vein with or without application of tourniquet to the proximal site of ankle. Early dynamic images and late static images were taken, respectively, followed by the standard lung scintigraphy. Additional inhalation scintigraphy was done later, if it was necessary to differentiate pulmonary embolism with other diseases with a perfusion defect. The criteria for the presence of venous thrombosis was as follows; the presence of stenosis or defect with collateral circulation at the early dynamic images, and the presence of hot spot formation at the late static images. A sole finding of the hot spot formation was evaluated to be false positive and twelve of seventeen cases with the hot spot at calf revealed to be false positive. According to this criteria, thirty five cases of all revealed positive findings, which located mostly in pelvic region and in popliteocalf region. Twelve of all cases revealed the pulmonary embolism, half of these have not any symptom suggestive of this disease, nine of these were with positive RNV findings and remainders were with false positive finding at calf region. In conclusion 25% of cases with venous thrombosis resulted in pulmonary embolism, which was the same incidence comparable with the reports in the western country. Hence, whenever indicative, combined RNV and lung scintigraphy for the detection of the thromboembolic disease should be necessary also in Japan. (auth.)

  7. Audit of the practice of sputum smear examination for patients with suspected pulmonary tuberculosis in Fiji.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gounder, Shakti; Tayler-Smith, Katherine; Khogali, Mohammed; Raikabula, Maopa; Harries, Anthony D

    2013-07-01

    In Fiji, patients with suspected pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) currently submit three sputum specimens for smear microscopy for acid-fast bacilli, but there is little information about how well this practice is carried out. A cross-sectional retrospective review was carried out in all four TB diagnostic laboratories in Fiji to determine among new patients presenting with suspected PTB in 2011: the quality of submitted sputum; the number of sputum samples submitted; the relationship between quality and number of submitted samples to smear-positivity; and positive yield from first, second and third samples. Of 1940 patients with suspected PTB, 3522 sputum samples were submitted: 997 (51.4%) patients submitted one sample, 304 (15.7%) patients submitted two samples and 639 (32.9%) submitted three samples. Sputum quality was recorded in 2528 (71.8%) of samples, of which 1046 (41.4%) were of poor quality. Poor quality sputum was more frequent in females, inpatients and children (0-14 years). Good quality sputum and a higher number of submitted samples positively correlated with smear-positivity for acid-fast bacilli. There were 122 (6.3%) patients with suspected PTB who were sputum smear positive. Of those, 89 had submitted three sputum samples: 79 (89%) were diagnosed based on the first sputum sample, 6 (7%) on the second sample and 4 (4%) on the third sample. This study shows that there are deficiencies in the practice of sputum smear examination in Fiji with respect to sputum quality and recommended number of submitted samples, although the results support the continued use of three sputum samples for TB diagnosis. Ways to improve sputum quality and adherence to recommended guidelines are needed.

  8. Pulmonary embolism in the elderly: a review on clinical, instrumental and laboratory presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Masotti

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Luca Masotti1,8, Patrick Ray2, Marc Righini3, Gregoire Le Gal4, Fabio Antonelli5, Giancarlo Landini1, Roberto Cappelli6, Domenico Prisco7, Paola Rottoli81Internal Medicine, Cecina Hospital, Cecina, Italy; 2Department of Emergency Medicine, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire Pitié-Salpêtrière, Université Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, Paris, France; 3Division of Angiology and Hemostasis, Geneva University Hospital and Faculty of Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland; 4Department of Internal Medicine and Chest Diseases, Brest University Hospital, Brest, France; 5Clinical Chemistry, Cecina Hospital, Cecina, Italy; 6Department of Internal, Cardiovascular and Geriatric Medicine, University of Siena, Siena, Italy; 7Department of Critical Care Medicine, Thrombosis Centre, Careggi Hospital, Florence, Italy; 8Departiment of Clinical Medicine and Immunological Sciences, Division of Respiratory Diseases, University of Siena, Siena, ItalyObjective: Diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE remains difficult and is often missed in the elderly due to nonspecific and atypical presentation. Diagnostic algorithms able to rule out PE and validated in young adult patients may have reduced applicability in elderly patients, which increases the number of diagnostic tools use and costs. The aim of the present study was to analyze the reported clinical presentation of PE in patients aged 65 and more.Materials and Methods: Prospective and retrospective English language studies dealing with the clinical, instrumental and laboratory aspects of PE in patients more than 65 and published after January 1987 and indexed in MEDLINE using keywords as pulmonary embolism, elderly, old, venous thromboembolism (VTE in the title, abstract or text, were reviewed.Results: Dyspnea (range 59%–91.5%, tachypnea (46%–74%, tachycardia (29%–76%, and chest pain (26%–57% represented the most common clinical symptoms and signs. Bed rest was the most frequent risk factor for VTE (15%–67%; deep vein

  9. Detection of Acute Pulmonary Embolism by Bedside Ultrasound in a Patient Presenting in PEA Arrest: A Case Report

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    Hangyul Chung-Esaki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Optimal management of the critically ill patient in shock requires rapid identification of its etiology. We describe a successful application of an emergency physician performed bedside ultrasound in a patient presenting with shock and subsequent cardiac arrest. Pulmonary embolus was diagnosed using bedside echocardiogram and confirmed with CTA of the thorax. Further validation and real-time implementation of this low-cost modality could facilitate the decision to implement thrombolytics for unstable patients with massive pulmonary embolism who cannot undergo formal radiographic evaluation.

  10. Acute, massive pulmonary embolism with right heart strain and hypoxia requiring emergent tissue plasminogen activator (TPA infusion

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    Jonathan Patane

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 63-year-old male presented to the emergency department with shortness of breath. He had a history of prostate cancer and two previous pulmonary embolisms, but was not currently on blood thinners. He had no associated chest pain at the time of presentation, but endorsed hemoptysis. Vital signs were significant for a heart rate of 88, blood pressure 145/89, oxygen saturation in the mid-70’s on room air which increased to mid-80’s on 15L facemask. His exam was significant for clear lung sounds bilaterally. He immediately underwent chest x-ray which showed no acute abnormalities. A bedside ultrasound was performed which showed evidence of right ventricular and atrial dilation, consistent with right heart strain. Given that the patient’s oxygen saturations improved to 88% on 15L facemask, the patient was felt to be stable enough for CT angiography. Significant findings: CT angiogram showed multiple large acute pulmonary emboli, most significantly in the distal right main pulmonary artery (image 1 and 2. Additional pulmonary emboli were noted in the bilateral lobar, segmental, and subsegmental levels of all lobes. There was a peripheral, wedge-shaped consolidation surrounded by groundglass changes in the posterolateral basal right lower lobe that was consistent with a small lung infarction (image 3. Discussion: The patient underwent in the Emergency Department a tissue plasminogen activator (TPA infusion of alteplase 100 mg over 2 hours for his massive acute pulmonary embolisms. Throughout his TPA infusion his oxygen saturations became improved to mid-90’s and his shortness of breath symptoms began improving. His troponin returned at 0.15 ng/mL, suggesting right heart strain. He was admitted to the ICU for continued monitoring and treatment. An acute, massive pulmonary embolism is described as having more than 50% occlusion of pulmonary blood flow.1 The main causes of hypoxia includes ventilation

  11. Age-adjusted high-sensitivity troponin T cut-off value for risk stratification of pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeberich, Anja; Seeber, Valerie; Jiménez, David; Kostrubiec, Maciej; Dellas, Claudia; Hasenfuß, Gerd; Giannitsis, Evangelos; Pruszczyk, Piotr; Konstantinides, Stavros; Lankeit, Mareike

    2015-05-01

    High-sensitivity troponin T (hsTnT) helps in identifying pulmonary embolism patients at low risk of an adverse outcome. In 682 normotensive pulmonary embolism patients we investigate whether an optimised hsTnT cut-off value and adjustment for age improve the identification of patients at elevated risk. Overall, 25 (3.7%) patients had an adverse 30-day outcome. The established hsTnT cut-off value of 14 pg·mL(-1) retained its high prognostic value (OR (95% CI) 16.64 (2.24-123.74); p=0.006) compared with the cut-off value of 33 pg·mL(-1) calculated by receiver operating characteristic analysis (7.14 (2.64-19.26); pvalue of 45 pg·mL(-1) but not the established cut-off value of 14 pg·mL(-1) predicted an adverse outcome. An age-adjusted hsTnT cut-off value (≥14 pg·mL(-1) for patients aged risk (12.4% adverse outcome). Risk assessment of normotensive pulmonary embolism patients was improved by the introduction of an age-adjusted hsTnT cut-off value. A three-step approach helped identify patients at higher risk of an adverse outcome who might benefit from advanced therapy. Copyright ©ERS 2015.

  12. Evaluation of perioperative fatal pulmonary embolism and death in cancer surgical patients: the MC-4 cancer substudy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakkar, Ajay K; Haas, Sylvia; Wolf, Helmut; Encke, Albrecht

    2005-10-01

    Cancer patients undergoing surgery are at a high risk of venous thromboembolism, but few studies have described the rate of autopsy-confirmed fatal pulmonary embolism after heparin thromboprophylaxis. In a post hoc analysis of a randomized study (MC-4), which compared the efficacy and safety of certoparin (3000 anti-Xa IU, subcutaneously, once-daily) with unfractionated heparin (5000 IU, subcutaneously, three-times daily) in 23078 patients undergoing surgery lasting more than 30 min, the incidence of autopsy-confirmed fatal pulmonary embolism, death and bleeding in the cancer patients (n=6124) was compared with non-cancer patients (n=16954). Fatal pulmonary embolism was significantly more frequent in cancer patients (0.33% [20/6124]) than in non-cancer patients (0.09% [15/16954], relative risk (RR), 3.7 [95% confidence intervals (CI), 1.80, 7.77], p=0.0001) at 14 days post-prophylaxis. Perioperative mortality was also significantly higher in cancer patients than in noncancer patients (3.14% [192/6124] vs. 0.71% [120/16954], RR, 4.54 [95% CI, 3.59, 5.76], p=0.0001), as were blood loss (p<0.0001), and transfusion requirements (p<0.0001). Prevention of venous thromboembolism in cancer surgical patients remains a clinical challenge.

  13. Septic pulmonary embolism caused by a Klebsiella pneumoniae liver abscess: clinical characteristics, imaging findings, and clinical courses

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    Deng-Wei Chou

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Septic pulmonary embolism caused by a Klebsiella (K. pneumoniae liver abscess is rare but can cause considerable morbidity and mortality. However, clinical information regarding this condition is limited. This study was conducted to elucidate the full disease spectrum to improve its diagnosis and treatment. METHOD: We reviewed the clinical characteristics, imaging findings, and clinical courses of 14 patients diagnosed with septic pulmonary embolism caused by a K. pneumoniae liver abscess over a period of 9 years. RESULTS: The two most prevalent symptoms were fever and shortness of breath. Computed tomography findings included a feeding vessel sign (79%, nodules with or without cavities (79%, pleural effusions (71%, peripheral wedge-shaped opacities (64%, patchy ground-glass opacities (50%, air bronchograms within a nodule (36%, consolidations (21%, halo signs (14%, and lung abscesses (14%. Nine (64% of the patients developed severe complications and required intensive care. According to follow-up chest radiography, the infiltrates and consolidations were resolved within two weeks, and the nodular opacities were resolved within one month. Two (14% patients died of septic shock; one patient had metastatic meningitis, and the other had metastatic pericarditis. CONCLUSION: The clinical presentations ranged from insidious illness with fever and respiratory symptoms to respiratory failure and septic shock. A broad spectrum of imaging findings, ranging from nodules to multiple consolidations, was detected. Septic pulmonary embolism caused by a K. pneumoniae liver abscess combined with the metastatic infection of other vital organs confers a poor prognosis.

  14. D-dimer assays - A help or hindrance in suspected pulmonary thromboembolism assessment?

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    H K Bayes

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Suspected pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE is a common presentation to acute medical units and can cause diagnostic difficulty. National guidelines on PTE management highlight the need for clinical probability assessment and D-dimer assays to ensure appropriate use of diagnostic imaging. D-dimers are used widely in UK hospitals, yet concern exists regarding their misuse. Aims : In this study we aimed to assess the impact of the introduction of D-dimer assays, combined with clinical probability assessment, for evaluation of suspected PTE in our unit. Materials and Methods : This was a prospective audit of all patients presenting with suspected PTE over two 12-week periods, exactly 1 year apart. D-dimers were introduced into our unit between these two periods. We recorded the clinical probability score, potential causes of false-positive D-dimer assay, diagnostic imaging result, patient outcome, admission rates, and length of inpatient stay. Statistical Analysis : Categorical variables were compared using a 2 x 2 chi-square test or Fisher′s exact test. Groups were compared utilizing the two-sample t-test or Mann-Whitney U test. Results : A total of 190 patients were included in the study; 65% were female. PTE was confirmed in 8.4%. Patients in both audit periods were comparable with regard to suitability for D-dimer measurement. Following D-dimer introduction, 40 out of 110 patients in period 2 could be discharged directly from the emergency department. Of those admitted to hospital, the median length of stay was significantly reduced in period 2 (3 days in period 1 vs 1 day in period 2; P=0.0007. Use of diagnostic imaging was significantly reduced following the introduction of D-dimers (90% in period 1 vs 40% in period 2; P<0.0001. The positive diagnostic yield for PTE on CT pulmonary angiogram (CTPA increased significantly from 10% in period 1 to 23% in period 2 (P=0.039. Conclusion : D-dimers must be used judiciously in the

  15. Diclofenac for reversal of right ventricular dysfunction in acute normotensive pulmonary embolism: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, David; Nieto, Rosa; Corres, Jesús; Fernández-Golfín, Covadonga; Barrios, Deisy; Morillo, Raquel; Quezada, Carlos Andres; Huisman, Menno; Yusen, Roger D; Kline, Jeffrey

    2018-02-01

    The inflammatory response associated with acute pulmonary embolism (PE) contributes to the development of right ventricular (RV) dysfunction. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may facilitate the reversal of PE-associated RV dysfunction. We randomly assigned normotensive patients who had acute PE associated with echocardiographic RV dysfunction and normal systemic blood pressure to receive intravenous (IV) diclofenac (two doses of 75mg in the first 24h after diagnosis) or IV placebo. All patients received standard anticoagulation with subcutaneous low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) and an oral vitamin K antagonist. RV dysfunction was defined by the presence of, at least, two of the following criteria: i) RV diastolic diameter>30mm in the parasternal window; ii) RV diameter>left ventricle diameter in the apical or subcostal space; iii) RV free wall hypokinesis; and iv) estimated pulmonary artery systolic pressure>30mmHg. Persistence of RV dysfunction at 48h and 7days after randomization were the primary and secondary efficacy outcomes, respectively. The primary safety outcome was major bleeding within 7days after randomization. Of the 34 patients randomly assigned to diclofenac or placebo, the intention-to-treat analysis showed persistent RV dysfunction at 48h in 59% (95% confidence interval [CI], 33-82%) of the diclofenac group and in 76% (95% CI, 50-93%) of the placebo group (difference in risk [diclofenac minus standard anticoagulation], -17 percentage points; 95% CI, -47 to 17). Similar proportions (35%) of patients in the diclofenac and placebo groups had persistent RV dysfunction at 7days. Major bleeding occurred in none of patients in the diclofenac group and in 5.9% (95% CI, 0.2-29%) of patient in the placebo group. Due to slow recruitment, our study is inconclusive as to a potential benefit of diclofenac over placebo to reverse RV dysfunction in normotensive patients with acute PE. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT

  16. Clinical Characteristics and Prognosis of Pulmonary Embolism Caused by Economy Class Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abellás, María; Menéndez, Ana; Morillo, Raquel; Jara-Palomares, Luis; Barrios, Deisy; Nieto, Rosa; Barbero, Esther; Corres, Jesús; Ruiz-Artacho, Pedro; Jiménez, David

    2017-09-01

    Clinical presentation and short-term prognosis of patients with travel-associated acute pulmonary embolism (PE) (i.e., economy class syndrome [ECS]) is not well understood. In this retrospective cohort study of patients with acute PE identified from a single center registry, we assessed the clinical presentation and the association between ECS and the outcomes of all-cause mortality, PE-related mortality, nonfatal venous thromboembolism and nonfatal major bleeding rates through 30days after initiation of PE treatment. Of the 2,333 patients with acute symptomatic PE, 124 (5.3%; 95% confidence interval, 4.4-6.3%) had ECS. Patients with ECS were younger and had fewer comorbid diseases (recent bleeding, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, congestive heart failure), but they presented with more signs of clinical severity (syncope [48% vs. 14%; P<.001], tachycardia [37% vs. 21%; P<.001], right ventricular dysfunction [31% vs. 19%; P<.01] and myocardial injury [57% vs. 28%; P<.001]) compared to those without ECS. Regression analyses showed a significantly lower risk of all-cause mortality for patients with ECS compared to patients without ECS (1.6% vs. 9.6%; P<.01). We did not detect a difference in PE-related mortality at 30days between those with and those without ECS (0.8% vs. 3.1%; P=.18). PE patients with ECS are younger and have fewer comorbid diseases compared to those without ECS. Though they present with more signs of clinical severity, their short-term prognosis is excellent. Copyright © 2017 SEPAR. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Position of lung scintigraphy in emergency diagnosis and therapeutic indications in cases of severe pulmonary embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torquat, Sabine de.

    1975-01-01

    The position of lung scintigraphy in diagnostic strategy is discussed. This technique appears to afford the key examination in severe pulmonary embolism because of its qualities, which are: - speed of execution, - absolute harmlessness, - diagnostic safety. Taking these points in order: - speed of execution is ensured by the very rapid uptake of I 131-labelled albumin macroaggregates (usable immediately) and the existence of the gamma camera; - harmlessness of the examination by the use of non-allergenic radioactive tracers and doses not significantly restricting the vascular bed still perfused; whichever of the two possible techniques is employed (scanner and gamma camera) the examination can always be practised without getting the patient out of bed, which avoids the risk of clot migration due to movement; - certainty of the result by the fact that in the event of a surgical indication the circulation cut-off image is spectacular and obvious in fact a lung amputation image must be equal to or greater than 50% of the pulmonary field before an operation is decided upon all other images remaining within the scope of a hypocoagulant treatment. A study was carried out in a cardio-vascular surgery department on 28 patients hospitalised with a possible view to embolectomy. Lung scintigraphy allows a quick exploration of the minor circulation. In the special clinical situation of the patients, for whom the advisability of an embolectomy is discussed, the scintigraphic examination provides the key: if normal it eliminates the diagnosis absolutely; if not it reveals without extra risk the spectacular obliterations of the vascular bed on which any therapeutic decision, medical or surgical is based [fr

  18. Clinical Analysis of Pulmonary Lipiodol Embolism in Patients with Hepatic Carcinoma after Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization

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    Wen-jin JIANG

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective:To explore the clinical manifestations, therapeutic methods and preventive measures of pulmonary lipiodol embolism (PLE induced by transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE so as to improve the cognition and management of PLE. Methods:A total of 2 613 patients with hepatic cancer without history of pulmonary disease who were treated with TACE in our hospital from Sept., 2004 to Mar., 2013 were selected. The clinical manifestations, therapeutic methods and preventing measures of the 9 patients who were accompanied with PLE were observed to analyze the pre-operative hepatic computed tomography (CT and chest X-ray, intra-operative contrast examination, dosage of lipiodol and chemotherapeutic drugs, clinical manifestation and therapeutic progression as well as the postoperative follow-up.Results: Nine patients accompanied by PLE had different-severity cough, hemoptysis and progressive dyspnea, and chest X-ray and/or CT showed flaky high-density radiography. After treated with oxygen inhalation, bronchus expansion and inflammation alleviation, 8 patients were improved but 1 died. Of the 8 patients, 2 were given ventilator to assist breath, and the clinical symptoms of 8 patients disappeared within 3-15 d. The re-examined chest X-ray showed normal after 20-60 d follow-up observation. Additionally, 6 patients were with nidus diameter ≥10 cm, 6 with hepatic artery-vein fistula and 7 with lipiodol dosage ≥20 mL.Conclusion: PLE often occurs in patients with giant hepatic carcinoma accompanied by hepatic artery-vein fistula, whose lipiodol dosage is ≥20 mL. Accurate and correct management during operation can effectively reduce the development of PLE.

  19. Amplatzer Vascular Plugs Versus Coils for Embolization of Pulmonary Arteriovenous Malformations in Patients with Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tau, Noam; Atar, Eliyahu; Mei-Zahav, Meir; Bachar, Gil N.; Dagan, Tamir; Birk, Einat; Bruckheimer, Elchanan

    2016-01-01

    PurposeCoil embolization of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) has a high re-canalization/re-perfusion rate. Embolization with Amplatzer plugs has been previously described, but the long-term efficacy is not established. This study reports the experience of a referral medical center with the use of coils and Amplatzer plugs for treating PAVMs in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.MethodsThe study was approved by the Institutional Review Board with waiver of informed consent. The cohort included all patients who underwent PAVM embolization in 2004–2014 for whom follow-up imaging scans were available. The medical files were retrospectively reviewed for background data, embolization method (coils, Amplatzer plugs, both), and complications. Re-canalization of treated PAVMs was assessed from intrapulmonary angiograms (following percutaneous procedures) or computed tomography angiograms. Fisher’s exact test and Pearson Chi-squared test or t test were used for statistical analysis, with significance at p < 0.05.Results16 patients met the study criteria. Imaging scans were available for 63 of the total 110 PAVMs treated in 41 procedures. Coils were used for embolization in 37 PAVMs, Amplatzer plugs in 21, and both in five. Median follow-up time was 7.7 years (range 1.4–18.9). Re-canalization was detected in seven vessels, all treated with coils; there were no cases of re-canalization in plug-occluded vessels (p = 0.0413).ConclusionThe use of Amplatzer plugs for the embolization of PAVMs in patients with hemorrhagic telangiectasia is associated with a significantly lower rate of re-canalization of feeding vessels than coils. Long-term prospective studies are required to confirm these findings.

  20. Amplatzer Vascular Plugs Versus Coils for Embolization of Pulmonary Arteriovenous Malformations in Patients with Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tau, Noam, E-mail: taunoam@gmail.com; Atar, Eliyahu [Rabin Medical Center – Beilinson and HaSharon Campuses, Department of Diagnostic Imaging (Israel); Mei-Zahav, Meir [Schneider Children’s Medical Center of Israel, Department of Pulmonology and National HHT Center (Israel); Bachar, Gil N. [Rabin Medical Center – Beilinson and HaSharon Campuses, Department of Diagnostic Imaging (Israel); Dagan, Tamir; Birk, Einat; Bruckheimer, Elchanan [Schneider Children’s Medical Center of Israel, Institute of Pediatric Cardiology (Israel)

    2016-08-15

    PurposeCoil embolization of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) has a high re-canalization/re-perfusion rate. Embolization with Amplatzer plugs has been previously described, but the long-term efficacy is not established. This study reports the experience of a referral medical center with the use of coils and Amplatzer plugs for treating PAVMs in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.MethodsThe study was approved by the Institutional Review Board with waiver of informed consent. The cohort included all patients who underwent PAVM embolization in 2004–2014 for whom follow-up imaging scans were available. The medical files were retrospectively reviewed for background data, embolization method (coils, Amplatzer plugs, both), and complications. Re-canalization of treated PAVMs was assessed from intrapulmonary angiograms (following percutaneous procedures) or computed tomography angiograms. Fisher’s exact test and Pearson Chi-squared test or t test were used for statistical analysis, with significance at p < 0.05.Results16 patients met the study criteria. Imaging scans were available for 63 of the total 110 PAVMs treated in 41 procedures. Coils were used for embolization in 37 PAVMs, Amplatzer plugs in 21, and both in five. Median follow-up time was 7.7 years (range 1.4–18.9). Re-canalization was detected in seven vessels, all treated with coils; there were no cases of re-canalization in plug-occluded vessels (p = 0.0413).ConclusionThe use of Amplatzer plugs for the embolization of PAVMs in patients with hemorrhagic telangiectasia is associated with a significantly lower rate of re-canalization of feeding vessels than coils. Long-term prospective studies are required to confirm these findings.

  1. Stand-alone performance of a computer-assisted detection prototype for detection of acute pulmonary embolism: a multi-institutional comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wittenberg, R.; Peters, J. F.; Weber, M.; Lely, R. J.; Cobben, L. P. J.; Prokop, M.; Schaefer-Prokop, C. M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess whether the performance of a computer-assisted detection (CAD) algorithm for acute pulmonary embolism (PE) differs in pulmonary CT angiographies acquired at various institutions. Methods: In this retrospective study, we included 40 consecutive scans with and 40 without PE from 3

  2. Stand-alone performance of a computer-assisted detection prototype for detection of acute pulmonary embolism: a multi-institutional comparison.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wittenberg, R.; Peters, J.F.; Weber, M.; Lely, R.J.; Cobben, L.P.; Prokop, M.; Schaefer-Prokop, C.M.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether the performance of a computer-assisted detection (CAD) algorithm for acute pulmonary embolism (PE) differs in pulmonary CT angiographies acquired at various institutions. METHODS: In this retrospective study, we included 40 consecutive scans with and 40 without PE from 3

  3. Complementarity of lung scintigraphy and D-dimer test in pulmonary embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnin, F.; Hadjikostova, H.; Jebrak, G.; Denninger, M.H.; Vera, P.; Rufat, P.; Seknadji, P.; Bok, B.

    1997-01-01

    D-dimer assay (DDA), measuring fibrin degradation products, was compared with lung scintigraphy (LS) in a prospective unselected series of 83 consecutive patients referred owing to suspicion of pulmonary embolism (PE). This patient series was also used to compare several methods of performing and interpreting LS images. The final diagnosis was established independently by a separate panel with all available information except for the result of DDA. D-dimer was determined by ELISA (threshold value 500 ng/ml). LS, including perfusion (.Q) and pseudo-ventilation (Technegas) (.V), was classified according to PIOPED, (1) immediately by the physician on duty, and (2) retrospectively by a blinded panel. A positive (19) or negative (61) diagnosis of PE was achieved in 80 patients, the prevalence of PE being 24%. Only one false-negative was noted on DDA (sensitivity=95%) but there were 42 false-positives (specificity=31%), resulting in a positive predictive value of 30% and a negative predictive value of 95%. Emergency and retrospective interpretations of LS were close (kappa=0.4). In a minority of patients, PE may be excluded with reasonable certainty if DDA is normal, resulting in a significant saving in terms of time and money. (orig.). With 3 tabs

  4. How to train radiology residents to diagnose pulmonary embolism using a dedicated MRI protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordgren Rogberg, Anna; Nyrén, Sven; Westerlund, Eli; Lindholm, Peter

    2017-09-01

    In recent years, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been suggested as an alternative to computed tomography angiography (CTA) to diagnose pulmonary embolism (PE). In previous studies, only senior radiologists have been evaluated as reviewers. To investigate if radiology residents can be trained to review MRI regarding PE and to determine the learning curve effects. Four residents independently went through a training program consisting of 70 participants that had undergone steady-state free precession MRI. The individuals were randomized into ten training sessions. For each exam, the review time and presence or absence of embolus was recorded. After completing each session, the residents received feedback on diagnostic accuracy compared to a consensus reading by two specialists. The residents were also presented with the corresponding CTA. The review time was nearly halved ( P  = 0.0002) during the training program. Comparing the first three sessions with the last three sessions for all residents, the review time decreased from 5:22 min to 2:51 min. The inter-reader agreement improved for all residents during the training program reaching a clinically acceptable level after seven sessions. Our study suggests that radiology residents can be trained to independently review MRI investigations regarding PE within a short training program. Similar training programs could be more extensively used as effective teaching method for residents.

  5. Variable Resistance to Plasminogen Activator Initiated Fibrinolysis for Intermediate-Risk Pulmonary Embolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William B Stubblefield

    Full Text Available We examine the clinical significance and biomarkers of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA-catalyzed clot lysis time (CLT in patients with intermediate-risk pulmonary embolism (PE.Platelet-poor, citrated plasma was obtained from patients with PE. Healthy age- and sex-matched patients served as disease-negative controls. Fibrinogen, α2-antiplasmin, plasminogen, thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI, plasminogen activator Inhibitor 1 (PAI-1, thrombin time and D-dimer were quantified. Clotting was induced using CaCl2, tissue factor, and phospholipid. Lysis was induced using 60 ng/mL tPA. Time to 50% clot lysis (CLT was assessed by both thromboelastography (TEG and turbidimetry (A405.Compared with disease-negative controls, patients with PE exhibited significantly longer mean CLT on TEG (+2,580 seconds, 95% CI 1,380 to 3,720 sec. Patients with PE and a short CLT who were treated with tenecteplase had increased risk of bleeding, whereas those with long CLT had significantly worse exercise tolerance and psychometric testing for quality of life at 3 months. A multivariate stepwise removal regression model selected PAI-1 and TAFI as predictive biomarkers of CLT.The CLT from TEG predicted increased risk of bleeding and clinical failure with tenecteplase treatment for intermediate-risk PE. Plasmatic PAI-1 and TAFI were independent predictors of CLT.

  6. Variable Resistance to Plasminogen Activator Initiated Fibrinolysis for Intermediate-Risk Pulmonary Embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubblefield, William B; Alves, Nathan J; Rondina, Matthew T; Kline, Jeffrey A

    2016-01-01

    We examine the clinical significance and biomarkers of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA)-catalyzed clot lysis time (CLT) in patients with intermediate-risk pulmonary embolism (PE). Platelet-poor, citrated plasma was obtained from patients with PE. Healthy age- and sex-matched patients served as disease-negative controls. Fibrinogen, α2-antiplasmin, plasminogen, thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI), plasminogen activator Inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), thrombin time and D-dimer were quantified. Clotting was induced using CaCl2, tissue factor, and phospholipid. Lysis was induced using 60 ng/mL tPA. Time to 50% clot lysis (CLT) was assessed by both thromboelastography (TEG) and turbidimetry (A405). Compared with disease-negative controls, patients with PE exhibited significantly longer mean CLT on TEG (+2,580 seconds, 95% CI 1,380 to 3,720 sec). Patients with PE and a short CLT who were treated with tenecteplase had increased risk of bleeding, whereas those with long CLT had significantly worse exercise tolerance and psychometric testing for quality of life at 3 months. A multivariate stepwise removal regression model selected PAI-1 and TAFI as predictive biomarkers of CLT. The CLT from TEG predicted increased risk of bleeding and clinical failure with tenecteplase treatment for intermediate-risk PE. Plasmatic PAI-1 and TAFI were independent predictors of CLT.

  7. PULMONARY EMBOLISM: SOME ISSUES OF EPIDEMIOLOGY AND TREATMENT IN CANCER PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. D. Rozanov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The risk of pulmonary embolism (PE in cancer patients  is 4–7-fold, compared to other  patient  categories. PE is the  second  most frequent  cause of death  in the first year after cancer diagnosis. PE is diagnosed in 7.5% of patients with malignant brain tumors, in 1 to 25% of those  with gastrointestinal tumors, in 4.5 to 17.5% of those with breast cancer and in 4 to 10% of lung cancer patients. The risk of PE is higher with surgical interventions and chemotherapy, as well as in metastatic tumors. In 13% of cases, PE may be the first symptom of cancer manifestation. For prevention and treatment of PE low molecular weight heparin (LMWH and warfarin are   used. The risk of recurrent  PE is 2-fold lower with LMWH. The frequency of bleeding with LMWH and warfarin treatment is from 14 to 19%. Placement of a cava filter is indicated  only if anticoagulation is inefficient.  New oral anticoagulants,  which act as selective thrombin  or Factor Xa inhibitors, are not used in cancer patients. Thus, diagnostics and treatment of PE is a very urgent  problem in oncology that requires new approaches to be looked for.

  8. Treatment of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism: The present state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes eThaler

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available AbstractVenous thromboembolism (VTE, a disease entity comprising deep vein thrombosis (DVT and pulmonary embolism (PE, is a frequent and potentially life-threatening event. To date different agents are available for the effective treatment of acute VTE and the prevention of recurrence. For several years the standard of care was the subcutaneous application of a low molecular weight heparin (LMWH or fondaparinux, followed by a vitamin K antagonist (VKA. The so-called direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs were introduced rather recently in clinical practice for the treatment of VTE. DOACs seem to have a favourable risk-benefit profile compared to VKAs. Moreover, DOACs significantly simplify VTE treatment, because they are administered in fixed doses and no routine monitoring is needed.Patients with objectively diagnosed DVT or PE should receive therapeutic anticoagulation for a minimum of 3 months. Whether a patient ought to receive extended treatment needs to be evaluated on an individual basis, depending mainly on risk factors determined by characteristics of the thrombotic event and patient-related factors. In specific patients groups (e.g. pregnant women, cancer patients and elderly patients treatment of VTE is more challenging than in the general population and additional issues need to be considered in those patients.The aim of this review is to give an overview of the currently available treatment modalities of acute VTE and secondary prophylaxis. In particular, specific aspects regarding the initiation of VTE treatment, duration of anticoagulation and specific patient groups will be discussed.

  9. Right ventricular dysfunction in acute pulmonary embolism: NT-proBNP vs. troponin T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotugno, Marilena; Orgaz-Molina, Jacinto; Rosa-Salazar, Vladimir; Guirado-Torrecillas, Leticia; García-Pérez, Bartolomé

    2017-04-21

    Dysfunction of the right ventricle (RV) is a parameter of severity in acute pulmonary embolism (PE). Echocardiographic assessment is not always possible in accident and emergency, hence the need to predict the presence of RV dysfunction using easily measurable parameters. To analyse the value of NT-proBNP and troponin T as markers of RV dysfunction in patients with acute PE. Secondarily, to assess the relationship between RV failure and clinical parameters related to PE. Analytical, observational, cross-sectional and retrospective study comparing the values NT-proBNP, troponin T and presenting symptoms of PE among patients with and without RV dysfunction. One hundred seventy-two patients (52 with RV failure,120 without) were included. All symptoms occurred with similar frequency between the 2groups except dyspnea and syncope (more common in the group with RV failure). Both NT-proBNP and troponin T had significantly higher values in the group of patients with RV dysfunction. However, in the multivariate analysis, NT-proBNP had a higher explanatory value for RV failure than troponin T. NT-proBNP is a diagnostic parameter of RV dysfunction with higher sensitivity in the context of acute PE. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Risk-Adapted Management of Acute Pulmonary Embolism: Recent Evidence, New Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Käberich

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Venous thromboembolism (VTE, the third most frequent acute cardiovascular syndrome, may cause life-threatening complications and imposes a substantial socio-economic burden. During the past years, several landmark trials paved the way towards novel strategies in acute and long-term management of patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE. Risk stratification is increasingly recognized as a cornerstone for an adequate diagnostic and therapeutic management of the highly heterogeneous population of patients with acute PE. Recently published European Guidelines emphasize the importance of clinical prediction rules in combination with imaging procedures (assessment of right ventricular function and laboratory biomarkers (indicative of myocardial stress or injury for identification of normotensive PE patients at intermediate risk for an adverse short-term outcome. In this patient group, systemic full-dose thrombolysis was associated with a significantly increased risk of intracranial bleeding, a complication which discourages its clinical application unless hemodynamic decompensation occurs. A large-scale clinical trial program evaluating new oral anticoagulants in the initial and long-term treatment of venous thromboembolism showed at least comparable efficacy and presumably increased safety of these drugs compared to the current standard treatment. Research is continuing on catheter-directed, ultrasound-assisted, local, low-dose thrombolysis in the management of intermediate-risk PE.

  11. Analyse of the prevalence rate and risk factors of pulmonary embolism in the patients with dyspnea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Yanxia; Su Jian; Wang Bingsheng; Wu Songhong; Dai Ruiting; Cao Caixia

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To analyse the prevalence rate and risk factors of pulmonary embolism (PE) in patients with dyspnea and to explore the predisposing causes and its early clinical manifestations. Methods: Retrospective analysis was done in 461 patients with dyspnea performed 99 Tc m -macroaggregated albumin (MAA) lung perfusion imaging and 99 Tc m -DTPA ventilation imaging or 99 Tc m -MAA perfusion imaging and chest X-ray examination. Among them, 48 cases without apparent disease were considered as control group, whereas the remaining patients with other underlying illnesses as patients group. PEMS statistics software package was used for estimation of prevalence rate, χ 2 test and PE risk factor analysis. Results: There were 251 PE patients among 461 patients, the prevalence rate [ (π)=95% confidence interval (CI) ] was: lower extremity thrombosis and varicosity (80.79-95.47 ), post cesarean section (55.64-87.12), lower extremity bone surgery or fracture (52.76-87.27 ), cancer operation (52.19-78.19), atrial fibrillation or heart failure (53.30-74.88), obesity (23.14-50.20), post abdominal surgery (20.23-59.43), diabetes (19.12-63.95), chronic bronchitis (1.80-23.06), normal control group (3.47-22.66). Except chronic bronchitis, PE prevalence rate between patients group and control group had significant difference (P 99 Tc m -MAA and DTPA lung imaging should be done as early as possible. (authors)

  12. Potential role of systemic thrombolysis in acute submassive intermediate risk pulmonary embolism: review and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teleb, Mohamed; Porres-Aguilar, Mateo; Anaya-Ayala, Javier E; Rodriguez-Castro, Carlos; Porres-Muñoz, Mateo; Mukherjee, Debabrata

    2016-04-01

    Submassive (intermediate risk) pulmonary embolism (PE) continues to be a significantly morbid disease process that remains unrecognized, inadequately risk stratified and suboptimally treated. Appropriate early clinical and imaging-based risk stratification represents the cornerstone for adequate therapeutic decision making, particularly for the selection of candidates who may benefit the most from systemic thrombolysis. The relevance of estimating clinical prognostic scores, in combination with imaging data, for accurate assessment of right ventricular function and laboratory biomarkers, indicative of myocardial injury for identification of normotensive patients at intermediate risk for an adverse short-term outcome are emphasized in this review. Recent clinical trials have demonstrated improvement in hemodynamics and mortality with the use of systemic thrombolysis among intermediate risk patients; however, it came at the cost of a significantly increased risk of major bleeding. Catheter-based therapies have garnered considerable clinical interest in recent years; of particular note is the ultrasound accelerated catheter-directed thrombolysis which has emerged as a novel and attractive alternative therapeutic modality with an increasing number of single center studies and ongoing randomized trials. Our review focuses on the major trials and studies involved in submassive PE in the recent literature including the role of thrombolytic therapy. We include major trials with reasonable sample size and extensive review of the potential side effects, such as major bleeding. © The Author(s), 2016.

  13. Prominent cerebral veins on susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) in pulmonary embolism

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    Oeztoprak, Bilge [Cumhuriyet University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Sivas (Turkey)

    2017-07-15

    Clinical applications of susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) are increasing steadily. The aim of this study is to investigate the appearance of cerebral veins on SWI, which is very sensitive to the deoxyhaemoglobin level in vessels, in pulmonary embolism (PE). The cranial SWI images of 19 patients with PE and 22 controls from September 2013 through March 2016 were retrospectively examined for the presence of prominent cerebral veins. MRI findings were correlated with blood oxygen levels. 12 of 19 patients with PE had hypoxemia and SWI images of 11 of these hypoxemic patients depicted prominent cerebral veins in the form of increased number, diameter, and elongation. The mean PaO{sub 2} and SaO{sub 2} in these patients were 48.5 ± 9.1 mmHg and 75.2 ± 8.0 %, respectively. There was a significant correlation between the presence of prominent veins on SWI and hypoxemia (p < 0.05). Of the 7 patients with normal blood oxygen pressure and saturation, 1 also showed an augmented appearance of cerebral veins on SWI. In the presence of neurological symptoms suggestive of an intracranial pathology in patients with PE, a SWI added to the conventional MRI sequences may predict hypoxemia and exclude other intracranial pathologies. (orig.)

  14. Alternative diagnoses based on CT angiography of the chest in patients with suspected pulmonary thromboembolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Eleci Vaz; Gazzana, Marcelo Basso; Seligman, Renato; Knorst, Marli Maria, E-mail: mknorst@gmail.com [Hospital de Clinicas de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Guerra, Vinicius Andre [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Pneumologicas; Sarmento, Muriel Bossle; Guazzelli, Pedro Arends; Hoffmeister, Mariana Costa [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRS), Porto Alegre (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    2016-01-15

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of alternative diagnoses based on chest CT angiography (CTA) in patients with suspected pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) who tested negative for PTE, as well as whether those alternative diagnoses had been considered prior to the CTA. Methods: This was a cross-sectional, retrospective study involving 191 adult patients undergoing CTA for suspected PTE between September of 2009 and May of 2012. Chest X-rays and CTAs were reviewed to determine whether the findings suggested an alternative diagnosis in the cases not diagnosed as PTE. Data on symptoms, risk factors, comorbidities, length of hospital stay, and mortality were collected. Results: On the basis of the CTA findings, PTE was diagnosed in 47 cases (24.6%). Among the 144 patients not diagnosed with PTE via CTA, the findings were abnormal in 120 (83.3%). Such findings were consistent with an alternative diagnosis that explained the symptoms in 75 patients (39.3%). Among those 75 cases, there were only 39 (20.4%) in which the same alterations had not been previously detected on chest X-rays. The most common alternative diagnosis, made solely on the basis of the CTA findings, was pneumonia (identified in 20 cases). Symptoms, risk factors, comorbidities, and the in-hospital mortality rate did not differ significantly between the patients with and without PTE. However, the median hospital stay was significantly longer in the patients with PTE than in those without (18.0 and 9.5 days, respectively; p = 0.001). Conclusions: Our results indicate that chest CTA is useful in cases of suspected PTE, because it can confirm the diagnosis and reveal findings consistent with an alternative diagnosis in a significant number of patients. (author)

  15. Prognostic value of computed tomography pulmonary angiography indices in patients with cancer-related pulmonary embolism: Data from a multicenter cohort study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plasencia-Martínez, Juana María, E-mail: plasen79@gmail.com [Radiology Department, Hospital Universitario Morales Meseguer, Av Marqués de los Vélez, s/n, 30008, Murcia (Spain); Carmona-Bayonas, Alberto [Hematology and Medical Oncology Department, Hospital Universitario Morales Meseguer, Av Marqués de los Vélez, s/n, 30008, Murcia (Spain); Calvo-Temprano, David [Radiology Department, Hospital Universitario Central de Asturias, Avenida de Roma, s/n, 33011, Oviedo (Spain); Jiménez-Fonseca, Paula [Medical Oncology Department, Hospital Universitario Central de Asturias, Avenida de Roma, s/n, 33011, Oviedo (Spain); Fenoy, Francisco [Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Campus Universitario de Espinardo, University of Murcia, s/n, 30100 Espinardo, Murcia (Spain); Benegas, Mariana; Sánchez, Marcelo [Radiology Department, Hospital Clínic de Barcelona (HCB), Villarroel, 170, 08036, Barcelona (Spain); Font, Carme [Medical Oncology Department, Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Translational Genomics and Targeted Therapeutics in Solid Tumors, IDIBAPS, Villarroel, 170, 08036, Barcelona (Spain); Varona, Diego [Radiology Department, Hospital Universitari Vall d’Hebron, Passeig de la Vall d' Hebron, 119-129, 08035, Barcelona (Spain); Martínez de la Haza, David [Radiology Department, Hospital Duran i Reynals, Institut Català d’Oncologia (ICO), Avinguda Granvia, 199-203, 08907, Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona (Spain); and others

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • CTPA can predict the prognosis of pulmonary embolism in cancer patients. • Right ventricular dysfunction (RVD) is predictive of complications at 15 days. • The Frank-Starling mechanism is the theoretical framework to interpret RVD signs. • Pulmonary artery obstruction plays a pathophysiological role only in subjects with RVD. • A proposal for an explanation of clinical-radiological dissociation is presented. - Abstract: Objective: To analyze the prognostic value of pulmonary artery obstruction versus right-ventricle (RV) dysfunction radiologic indices in cancer-related pulmonary embolism (PE). Methods: We enrolled 303 consecutive patients with paraneoplastic PE, evaluated by computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) between 2013 and 2014. The primary outcome measure was serious complications at 15 days. Multivariate analyses were conducted by using binary logistic and robust regressions. Radiological features such as the Qanadli index (QI) and RV dysfunction signs were analyzed with Spearman’s partial rank correlations. Results: RV diameter was the only radiological variable associated with an adverse outcome. Subjects with enlarged RV (diameter > 45 mm) had more 15-day complications (58% versus 40%, p = 0.001). The QI correlated with the RV diameter (r = 0.28, p < 0.001), left ventricle diameter (r = −0.19, p < 0.001), right ventricular-to-left ventricular diameter ratio (r = 0.39, p < 0.001), pulmonary artery diameter (r = 0.22, p < 0.001), and pulmonary artery/ascending aorta ratio (r = 0.27, p < 0.001). A QI ≥ 50% was only associated with 15-day complications in subjects with enlarged RV, inverted intraventricular septum, or chronic cardiopulmonary diseases. The central or peripheral PE location did not affect the correlations among radiological variables and was not associated with clinical outcomes. Conclusions: Right ventricular dysfunction signs in CTPA are more useful than QI in predicting cancer-related PE outcome.

  16. Ultralow contrast medium doses at CT to diagnose pulmonary embolism in patients with moderate to severe renal impairment: a feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristiansson, Mattias; Nyman, Ulf [Lasarettet Trelleborg, University of Lund, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Trelleborg (Sweden); Holmquist, Fredrik [Malmoe University Hospital, University of Lund, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Malmoe (Sweden)

    2010-06-15

    To analyse 80-kVp 16-MDCT in patients with clinically suspected pulmonary embolism (PE) and diminished renal function after a reduction in dose of contrast medium (CM) from 200 to 150 mg I/kg. Fifty patients with suspected PE and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) less than 50 mL/min underwent 80-kVp 16-MDCT with 150 mg I/kg. Mean density/image noise (1 standard deviation) was measured in a region of interest in the left pulmonary artery (LPA) and a lower lobe segmental artery (LLSA), and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was calculated. The values of LPA and LLSA were averaged. Median values/2.5-97.5 percentiles were: age 84/67-96 years, weight 65/43-84 kg, GFR 36/21-45 mL/min, CM dose 9.6/6.4-12 g of iodine, PA density 353/164-495 HU and CNR 11/4.4-20. PE incidence was 16%, and 8% and 12% of the examinations were regarded suboptimal by observer 1 and 2, respectively. Density/CNR values were within ranges reported for common 120-kVp MDCT protocols. None of 32 patients with plasma-creatinine follow-up within 1 week experienced a rise of more than 44.2 {mu}mol/L and none of 50 patients had oliguria/anuria or dialysis. None of 40 patients with a negative CT/no anticoagulation had thromboembolism during follow-up. 80-kVp MDCT combined with individualised ultralow CM doses may provide satisfactory diagnostic quality, which should be to the benefit of patients at risk of contrast medium-induced nephropathy. (orig.)

  17. Acute pulmonary embolism: prediction of cor pulmonale and short-term patient survival from assessment of cardiac dimensions in routine multidetector-row CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engeike, C.; Rummeny, E.; Marten, K.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: evaluation of the prognostic value of morphological cardiac parameters in patients with suspected and incidental acute pulmonary embolism (PE) using multidetector-row chest CT (MSCT). Materials and methods: 2335 consecutive MSCT scans were evaluated for the presence of PE. The arterial enhancement and analysability of pulmonary arteries and the heart were assessed as parameters of the scan quality. The diastolic right and left ventricular short axes (RV D , LV D ) and the interventricular septal deviation (ISD) were measured in all PE-positive patients and the echocardiography reports were reviewed. The clinical data assessment included cardio-respiratory and other co-morbidities, systemic anticoagulant therapy (ACT), and the 30-day outcome. Predictors of acute cor pulmonale and the short-term outcome were calculated by univariate and multivariate logistic regressions including odds ratios (OR) and ROC analyses using positive (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV). Results: 90 patients with acute PE were included (36 with clinically suspected PE, 54 with incidental PE). 26 patients had cardio-respiratory co-morbidities. Four patients underwent systemic thrombolysis, 43 underwent anticoagulation in therapeutic doses, 19 underwent anticoagulation in prophylactic doses, and 24 patients did not undergo ACT. 15 of 41 patients had echocardiographic evidence of acute cor pulmonale. 8 patients died within 30 days. The RV D was the best independent predictor of acute cor pulmonale (p = 0,002, OR = 9.16, PPV = 0.68, NPV=1 at 4.49 cm cut off) and short-term outcome (p= 0,0005, OR = 2.82, PPV = 0.23, NPV = 0.98 at 4.75 cm cut off). The RV D /LV D ratio had a PPV of 0.85 for cor pulmonale. (orig.)

  18. Ventilation/Perfusion SPECT lung scintigraphy and computed tomography pulmonary angiography in patients with clinical suspicion of pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez-Bravo, S; Banzo, I; Quirce, R; Martínez-Rodríguez, I; Jiménez-Bonilla, J; Martínez-Amador, N; Parra, J A; González-Macías, J; Carril, J M

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to compare ventilation/perfusion SPECT lung scintigraphy (V/Q-SPECT) and computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) in patients with suspicion of pulmonary embolism (PE). This prospectively designed study included 53 patients with intermediate or high clinical probability of PE. A V/Q-SPECT and CTPA was performed on all patients. The V/Q-SPECT was interpreted according to the European Association of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (EANMMI) guidelines. CTPA was reported as positive, negative, or indeterminate. CTPA was positive in 22 cases, negative in 28, and indeterminate in 3. V/Q-SPECT was positive in 27 cases, negative in 24, and non-diagnostic in 2. In the 22 with positive CTPA, V/Q-SPECT was positive in 18, negative in 3, and non-diagnostic in 1. In the 28 with negative CTPA, V/Q-SPECT was positive in 8, negative in 19, and non-diagnostic in 1. In the 3 with indeterminate CTPA, V/Q-SPECT was positive in 1 and negative in 2. In the 2 non-diagnostic cases V/Q-SPECT, CTPA was positive in 1 and negative in one. In the 10 high clinical probabilities, CTPA and V/Q-SPECT were positive in 7, negative in 2, and in 1, CTPA was positive and V/Q-SPECT negative. In the 38 intermediate probability group, CTPA and V/Q-SPECT were positive in 11, negative in 17, with CTPA negative and V/Q-SPECT positive in 8, and in 2 CTPA was positive and V/Q-SPECT negative. The results show that V/Q-SPECT detected PE in 5 patients more than CTPA. Our results show a 77% concordance of both techniques. Overall V/Q-SPECT detected PE in 18% more patients than CTPA in the intermediate group. Both techniques have a complementary role when a diagnosis cannot be made with one of them. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  19. Contrast Circulation Time to Assess Right Ventricular Dysfunction in Pulmonary Embolism: A Retrospective Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Gregor; Platon, Alexandra; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Perrier, Arnaud; Bendjelid, Karim

    2016-01-01

    To optimize enhancement of pulmonary arteries and facilitate diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE), modern computed tomography angiography (CTA) contains a contrast bolus tracking system. We explored the diagnostic accuracy of the time-intensity curves given by this automated system to identify right ventricular dysfunction (RVD) in acute PE. 114 CTAs with a diagnosis of PE were reviewed. RVD was defined as right-to-left ventricular diameter ratio of 1 or greater. Four parameters on time-intensity curves were identified. Parameters between CTAs with and those without RVD were compared with the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. The ability of the four parameters to discriminate patients with RVD was explored by compiling the area under the operating curves (AUC). The time needed by the contrast media to reach the pulmonary artery [8 seconds (IQR: 7-9) versus 7 seconds (IQR: 6-8), p<0.01], the time needed to reach 40 Hounsfield units (HU) [11 seconds (IQR: 8.5-14) versus 9.5 seconds (IQR: 8-10.5), p<0.01], and the contrast intensity reached after 10 seconds [19 HU (IQR: 4-67) versus 53 HU (IQR: 32-80), p<0.05] were all statistically different between CTA with and CTA without RVD. Those three parameters changed gradually across severity categories of RVD (p<0.05 for trend). Their AUC to identify RVD ranged from 0.63 to 0.66. The slope of contrast intensity over time was not informative: [31 HU/s (IQR: 20-57) in CTA with, compared to 36 HU/s (IQR: 22.5-53) in CTA without RVD, p = 0.60]. Several parameters of the time-intensity curve obtained by the bolus tracking system are associated with RVD assessed on CTA images. Of those, the time needed to reach a predefined threshold seems to be the easiest to obtain in any CTA without additional processing time or contrast injection. However, the performance of those parameters is globally low.

  20. Successful Off-Label Use of Recombinant Factor VIIa and Coil Embolization in an Adolescent with Massive Hemoptysis Due to Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek Gürlek Gökçebay

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Invasive fungal infections have turned out to be a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in pediatric patients with malignant disorders. Massive hemoptysis, a rare complication of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, may threaten the lives of patients, usually during the resolution of neutropenia. In this report, we describe a patient with massive hemoptysis due to invasive pulmonary aspergillosis whose bleeding was controlled successfully with off-label use of recombinant factor VIIa and subsequent coil embolization of the right pulmonary artery.

  1. Lung infarction following pulmonary embolism. A comparative study on clinical conditions and CT findings to identify predisposing factors

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    Kirchner, J.; Obermann, A.; Stueckradt, S.; Tueshaus, C. [General Hospital Hagen (Germany). Radiology; Goltz, J.; Kickuth, R. [University Hospital Wuerzburg (Germany). Radiology; Liermann, D. [University Hospital Marienhospital Herne (Germany). Radiology

    2015-06-15

    The aim of this study was to identify factors predisposing to lung infarction in patients with pulmonary embolism (PE). We performed a retrospective analysis on 154 patients with the final diagnosis of PE being examined between January 2009 and December 2012 by means of a Toshiba Aquilion 64 CT scanner. The severity of clinical symptoms was defined by means of a clinical index with 4 classes. The pulmonary clot load was quantified using a modified severity index of PE as proposed by Miller. We correlated several potential predictors of pulmonary infarction such as demographic data, pulmonary clot burden, distance of total vascular obstruction and pleura, the presence of cardiac congestion, signs of chronic bronchitis or emphysema with the occurrence of pulmonary infarction. Computed tomography revealed 78 areas of pulmonary infarction in 45/154 (29.2%) patients. The presence of infarction was significantly higher in the right lung than in the left lung (p < 0.001). We found no correlation between pulmonary infarction and the presence of accompanying malignant diseases (r=-0.069), signs of chronic bronchitis (r=-0.109), cardiac congestion (r=-0.076), the quantified clot burden score (r=0.176), and the severity of symptoms (r=-0.024). Only a very weak negative correlation between the presence of infarction and age (r=-0.199) was seen. However, we could demonstrate a moderate negative correlation between the distance of total vascular occlusion and the occurrence of infarction (r=-0.504). Neither cardiac congestion nor the degree of pulmonary vascular obstruction are main factors predisposing to pulmonary infarction in patients with PE. It seems that a peripheral total vascular obstruction more often results in infarction than even massive central clot burden.

  2. Therapeutic Challenges in the Management of Acute Pulmonary Embolism in a Cancer Patient with Chemotherapy-induced Thrombocytopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abuajela Sreh

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This case demonstrates the therapeutic challenges encountered when managing an acute pulmonary embolism in a cancer patient with thrombocytopenia. A 64-year-old man with a history of lung cancer receiving chemotherapy was admitted to Walsall Manor Hospital with haemodynamic instability consistent with a pulmonary embolism, proven on computed tomographic pulmonary angiogram. His platelet count was noted to be 35×109/l (chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia. After discussions, he was deemed not suitable for thrombolysis based on risk versus benefits. The patient was initially transfused one adult dose of platelets and treated with half the therapeutic dose of low molecular weight heparin (LMWH. The same management plan was followed until the platelet count exceeded 50×10sup>9/l, after which the patient was established on the full therapeutic dose of LMWH. Clinically, the patient improved and was discharged. Three months after discharge, follow-up revealed sustained clinical improvement while the patient continued to be on the full therapeutic dose of LMWH with a stable platelet count.

  3. Post-operative Unexpected Bilateral Massive Pulmonary Embolism in a Thirty-Year-Old Woman: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Öznur Şen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary embolism (PE is a rare, yet serious complication. That, generally follows invasive procedures in adults. The present report details the case of bilateral pulmonary embolism in a thirty-year-old women after ovarian cyst surgery. A thirty-year-old female patient, who had ovarian cystectomy ten days previously, consulted the emergency department with the complaints of sickness and syncope. Her blood pressure, pulse and respiratory rate were 90/40 mmHg, 150/min. and 35/min, respectively. During examination and phlebotomy, she had a cardiac arrest and responded to a 3-minute cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR with tracheal intubation. During imaging procedures, she had three further cardiac arrests and was admitted to the intensive care unit. The preliminary diagnoses were acute renal failure (ARF and PE. Fluid replacement, inotropic support, anticoagulant therapies, as well as sedation to prevent brain damage were started immediately. Thrombolytic therapy was not attempted because she had surgery ten days ago and hematoma was observed on abdominal ultrasound. Inhaled nitric oxide and inhaled iloprost with sildenafil were employed to reduce pulmonary hypertension. When discharged 136 days after hospitalization she was a tracheotomized and, spontaneously breathing home care patient with hypoxic brain injury. Early detection and treatment of PE are of great importance for a good prognosis and prevention of life-threatening complications.

  4. Septic Pulmonary Embolism Caused by Infected Pacemaker Leads After Replacement of a Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, Salah A M; Nijhuis, Rogier; Derks, Anita; Droste, Herman

    2016-07-20

    BACKGROUND Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) has been demonstrated to reduce morbidity and mortality in patients with advanced, drug-refractory heart failure. Procedure-related mortality is less than 1% in larger studies. Approximately10% of CRT patients have to undergo surgical revision because of infections, dislocations, or unacceptable electrical behavior manifested as high threshold, unstable sensing, or unwanted phrenic nerve stimulation. CASE REPORT A 70-year-old man with symptomatic congestive heart failure underwent implantation of a biventricular pacemaker on the left anterior chest wall in 2003 and pulse generator exchange in August 2009. The patient responded well to CRT. At follow-up, the pacing system functioned normally. In September 2009, in the context of a predialysis program, an abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan was performed in another hospital for assessment and evaluation of chronic kidney disease. This procedure was complicated with peripheral thrombophlebitis that was managed appropriately with complete recovery. Eight months later (May 2010), the patient was admitted to our hospital with fever, anemia, and elevated infection parameters. During admission, blood cultures grew Staphylococcus epidermidis. The chest X-ray, lung perfusion scintigraphy, and CT scan depicted pulmonary embolism and infarction. The right ventricular lead threshold was found to be increased to 7 volts with unsuccessful capture. Echocardiography demonstrated vegetations on leads. The entire pacing system was explanted, but the patient expired few days later following percutaneous removal due to multiorgan failure. CONCLUSIONS In heart failure, replacement of the CRT device may be complicated by bacterial endocarditis. As noted from this case report, sudden elevation of the pacing lead threshold should prompt thorough and immediate investigation to unravel its causes, not only the electrical characteristics but also the anatomical features.

  5. Clinical evaluation of a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) prototype for the detection of pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhmann, Sonja; Herzog, Peter; Liang, Jin; Wolf, Mathias; Salganicoff, Marcos; Kirchhoff, Chlodwig; Reiser, Maximilian; Becker, Christoph H

    2007-06-01

    To evaluate the performance of a prototype computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) tool using artificial intelligence techniques for the detection of pulmonary embolism (PE) and the possible benefit for general radiologists. Forty multidetector row computed tomography datasets (16/64- channel scanner) using 100 kVp, 100 mAs effective/slice, and 1-mm axial reformats in a low-frequency reconstruction kernel were evaluated. A total of 80 mL iodinated contrast material was injected at a flow rate of 5 mL/seconds. Primarily, six general radiologists marked any PE using a commercially available lung evaluation software with simultaneous, automatic processing by CAD in the background. An expert panel consisting of two chest radiologists analyzed all PE marks from the readers and CAD, also searching for additional finding primarily missed by both, forming the ground truth. The ground truth consisted of 212 emboli. Of these, 65 (31%) were centrally and 147 (69%) were peripherally located. The readers detected 157/212 emboli (74%) leading to a sensitivity of 97% (63/65) for central and 70% (103/147) for peripheral emboli with 9 false-positive findings. CAD detected 168/212 emboli (79%), reaching a sensitivity of 74% for central (48/65) and 82%(120/147) for peripheral emboli. A total of 154 CAD candidates were considered as false positives, yielding an average of 3.85 false positives/case. The CAD software showed a sensitivity comparable to that of the general radiologists, but with more false positives. CAD detection of findings incremental to the radiologists suggests benefit when used as a second reader. Future versions of CAD have the potential to further increase clinical benefit by improving sensitivity and reducing false marks.

  6. Influence of recent immobilization and recent surgery on mortality in patients with pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauffal, D; Ballester, M; Reyes, R Lopez; Jiménez, D; Otero, R; Quintavalla, R; Monreal, M

    2012-09-01

    The influence of recent immobilization or surgery on mortality in patients with pulmonary embolism (PE) is not well known. We used the Registro Informatizado de Enfermedad TromboEmbólica (RIETE) data to compare the 3-month mortality rate in patients with PE, with patients categorized according to the presence of recent immobilization, recent surgery, or neither. Of 18,028 patients with PE, 4169 (23%) had recent immobilization, 2212 (12%) had recent surgery, and 11,647 (65%) had neither. The all-cause mortality was 10.0% (95% confidence interval [CI] 9.5-10.4), and the PE-related mortality was 2.6% (95% CI 2.4-2.9). One in every two patients who died from PE had recent immobilization (43%) or recent surgery (6.7%). Only 25% of patients with immobilization had received prophylaxis, as compared with 65% of the surgical patients. Fatal PE was more common in patients with recent immobilization (4.9%; 95% CI 4.3-5.6) than in those with surgery (1.4%; 95% CI 1.0-2.0) or those with neither (2.1%; 95% CI 1.8-2.3). On multivariate analysis, patients with immobilization were at increased risk for fatal PE (odds ratio 2.2; 95% CI 1.8-2.7), with no differences being seen between patients immobilized in hospital or in the community. Forty-three per cent of patients dying from PE had recent immobilization for ≥4 days. Many of these deaths could have been prevented. © 2012 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  7. MicroRNA-134 as a potential plasma biomarker for the diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute pulmonary embolism (APE remains a diagnostic challenge due to a variable clinical presentation and the lack of a reliable screening tool. MicroRNAs (miRNAs regulate gene expression in a wide range of pathophysiologic processes. Circulating miRNAs are emerging biomarkers in heart failure, type 2 diabetes and other disease states; however, using plasma miRNAs as biomarkers for the diagnosis of APE is still unknown. Methods Thirty-two APE patients, 32 healthy controls, and 22 non-APE patients (reported dyspnea, chest pain, or cough were enrolled in this study. The TaqMan miRNA microarray was used to identify dysregulated miRNAs in the plasma of APE patients. The TaqMan-based miRNA quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reactions were used to validate the dysregulated miRNAs. The receiver-operator characteristic (ROC curve analysis was conducted to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the miRNA identified as the candidate biomarker. Results Plasma miRNA-134 (miR-134 level was significantly higher in the APE patients than in the healthy controls or non-APE patients. The ROC curve showed that plasma miR-134 was a specific diagnostic predictor of APE with an area under the curve of 0.833 (95% confidence interval, 0.737 to 0.929; P Conclusions Our findings indicated that plasma miR-134 could be an important biomarker for the diagnosis of APE. Because of this finding, large-scale investigations are urgently needed to pave the way from basic research to clinical utilization.

  8. Multi-slice CT for visualization of acute pulmonary embolism: single breath-hold subtraction technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wildberger, J.E.; Mahnken, A.H.; Spuentrup, E.; Guenther, R.W. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Univ. of Technology, Aachen (Germany); Klotz, E.; Ditt, H. [Siemens Medical Solutions, Computed Tomography, Forchheim (Germany)

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: the purpose of our preliminary animal study was to evaluate the feasibility of a new subtraction technique for visualization of perfusion defects within the lung parenchyma in segmental and subsegmental pulmonary embolism (PE). Materials and methods: in three healthy pigs, PE were artificially induced by fresh human clot material. Within a single breath-hold, CT angiography (CTA) was performed on a 16-slice multi-slice CT scanner (SOMATOM Sensation 16; Siemens, Forchheim, Germany) before and after intravenous application of 80 mL of contrast-medium, followed by a saline chaser. Scan parameters were 120 kV and 100 mAs{sub eff.}, using a collimation of 16 x 1.5 mm and a table speed/rot. of 36 mm (pitch: 1.5; rotation time: 0.5 s). A new 3D subtraction technique was developed, which is based on automated segmentation, non-linear spatial filtering and non-rigid registration. Data were analysed using a color-encoded ''compound view'' of parenchymal enhancement and CTA information displayed in axial, coronal and sagittal orientation. Results: subtraction was technically feasible in all three data sets. The mean scan time for each series was 4.7 s, interscan delay was 14.7 s, respectively. Therefore, an average breath-hold of approximately 24 s was required for the overall scanning procedure. Downstream of occluded segmental and subsegmental arteries, perfusion defects were clearly assessable, showing lower or missing enhancement compared to normally perfused lung parenchyma. In all pigs, additional peripheral areas with triangular shaped perfusion defects were delineated, considered typical for PE. Conclusions: our initial results from the animal model studied slow that perfusion imaging of PE is feasible within a single breath-hold. It allows a comprehensive assessment of perfusion deficits as the direct proof of a pulmonary embolus, can be combined with an indirect visual quantification of the density changes in the adjacent lung tissue

  9. Different risk of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in carriers with factor V Leiden compared with non-carriers, but not in other thrombophilic defects. Results from a large retrospective family cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Makelburg, Anja B. U.; Veeger, Nic J. G. M.; Middeldorp, Saskia; Hamulyak, Karly; Prins, Martin H.; Buller, Harry R.; Lijfering, Willem M.

    The term factor V Leiden (FVL) paradox is used to describe the different risk of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism that has been found in carriers of FVL. In a thrombophilic family-cohort, we estimated differences in absolute risks of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism for various

  10. The importance of MTHFR C677T/A1298C combined polymorphisms in pulmonary embolism in Turkish population

    OpenAIRE

    Nursah Basol; Nevin Karakus; Asli Yasemen Savas; Ilker Kaya; Kayhan Karakus; Serbulent Yigit

    2016-01-01

    Background and objective: Pulmonary embolism (PE) is an important cardiovascular emergency with high mortality. There are still problems related to the diagnosis of PE and genetic research may play a key role on diagnosis as well as determining risk stratification. In the present study, the aim was to evaluate MTHFR C677T and A1298C polymorphisms that play a role on folate metabolism in PE patients. Materials and methods: A total of 118 PE patients and 126 controls were enrolled in the cur...

  11. Does computer-assisted detection of pulmonary emboli enhance severity assessment and risk stratification in acute pulmonary embolism?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelke, C.; Schmidt, S.; Auer, F.; Rummeny, E.J.; Marten, K.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To prospectively assess the value of computer-aided detection (CAD) for the computed tomography (CT) severity assessment of acute pulmonary embolism (PE). Materials and methods: CT angiographic scans of 58 PE-positive patients (34-89 years, mean 66 years) were analysed by four observers for PE severity using the Mastora index, and by CAD. Patients were stratified to three PE risk groups and results compared to an independent reference standard. Interobserver agreement was tested by Bland and Altman and extended kappa (Ke) statistics. Mastora index changes after CAD data review were tested by Wilcoxon signed ranks. Results: CAD detected 343 out of 1118 emboli within given arterial segments and a total of 155 out of 218 polysegmental emboli (segmental vessel-based sensitivity = 30.7%, embolus-based sensitivity = 71.2% false-positive rate = 4.1/scan). Interobserver agreement on PE severity [95% limits of agreement (LOA) = -19.7-7.5% and-5.5-3% for reader pairs 1 versus 2 and 3 versus 4, respectively was enhanced by consensus with CAD data (LOA = -6.5-5.4% and-3.7-2% for reader pairs 1 versus 2 and 3 versus 4, respectively). Simultaneously, the percentual scoring errors (PSE) were significantly decreased (PSE = 35.4 ± 31.8% and 5.1 ± 8.9% for readers1/2 and 2/3, respectively, and PSE = 27.6 ± 31% and 3.8 ± 6.2%, respectively, after CAD consensus; p ≤ 0.005). Misclassifications to PE risk groups occurred in 27.6, 24.1, 5.2, and 5.2% of patients for readers 1-4, respectively, (Ke = 0.74) and were corrected by CAD consensus in 56.3, 36, 33.3, and 33.3% of misclassified patients, respectively (Ke = 0.83; p < 0.05). Conclusion: Radiologists may benefit from consensus with CAD data that improve PE severity scores and stratification to PE risk groups.

  12. Low dose oestrogen combined oral contraception and risk of pulmonary embolism, stroke, and myocardial infarction in five million French women: cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalichampt, Marie; Raguideau, Fanny; Ricordeau, Philippe; Blotière, Pierre-Olivier; Rudant, Jérémie; Alla, François; Zureik, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the risk of pulmonary embolism, ischaemic stroke, and myocardial infarction associated with combined oral contraceptives according to dose of oestrogen (ethinylestradiol) and progestogen. Design Observational cohort study. Setting Data from the French national health insurance database linked with data from the French national hospital discharge database. Participants 4 945 088 women aged 15-49 years, living in France, with at least one reimbursement for oral contraceptives and no previous hospital admission for cancer, pulmonary embolism, ischaemic stroke, or myocardial infarction, between July 2010 and September 2012. Main outcome measures Relative and absolute risks of first pulmonary embolism, ischaemic stroke, and myocardial infarction. Results The cohort generated 5 443 916 women years of oral contraceptive use, and 3253 events were observed: 1800 pulmonary embolisms (33 per 100 000 women years), 1046 ischaemic strokes (19 per 100 000 women years), and 407 myocardial infarctions (7 per 100 000 women years). After adjustment for progestogen and risk factors, the relative risks for women using low dose oestrogen (20 µg v 30-40 µg) were 0.75 (95% confidence interval 0.67 to 0.85) for pulmonary embolism, 0.82 (0.70 to 0.96) for ischaemic stroke, and 0.56 (0.39 to 0.79) for myocardial infarction. After adjustment for oestrogen dose and risk factors, desogestrel and gestodene were associated with statistically significantly higher relative risks for pulmonary embolism (2.16, 1.93 to 2.41 and 1.63, 1.34 to 1.97, respectively) compared with levonorgestrel. Levonorgestrel combined with 20 µg oestrogen was associated with a statistically significantly lower risk than levonorgestrel with 30-40 µg oestrogen for each of the three serious adverse events. Conclusions For the same dose of oestrogen, desogestrel and gestodene were associated with statistically significantly higher risks of pulmonary embolism but not arterial

  13. Multislice computed tomography perfusion imaging for visualization of acute pulmonary embolism: animal experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wildberger, Joachim Ernst; Spuentrup, Elmar; Mahnken, Andreas H.; Guenther, Rolf W. [University Hospital, RWTH Aachen, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Aachen (Germany); Klotz, Ernst; Ditt, Hendrik [Computed Tomography, Siemens Medical Solutions, Forchheim (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    The purpose of our animal study was to evaluate a new computed tomography (CT) subtraction technique for visualization of perfusion defects within the lung parenchyma in subsegmental pulmonary embolism (PE). Seven healthy pigs were entered into a prospective trial. Acute PE was artificially induced by fresh clot material prior to the CT scans. Within a single breath-hold, whole thorax CT scans were performed with a 16-slice multidetector-row CT scanner (SOMATOM Sensation 16; Siemens, Forchheim, Germany) before and after intravenous application of 80 ml of contrast medium with a flow rate of 4 ml/s, followed by a saline chaser. The scan parameters were 120 kV and 100 mAs{sub eff}, using a thin collimation of 16 x 0.75 mm and a table speed/rotation of 15-18 mm (pitch, 1.25-1.5; rotation time, 0.5 s). Axial source images were reconstructed with an effective slice thickness of 1 mm (overlap, 30%). A new automatic subtraction technique was used. After 3D segmentation of the lungs in the plain and contrast-enhanced series, threshold-based extraction of major airways and vascular structures in the contrast images was performed. This segmentation was repeated in the plain CT images segmenting the same number of vessels and airways as in the contrast images. Both scans were registered onto each other using nonrigid registration. After registration both image sets were filtered in a nonlinear fashion excluding segmented airways and vessels. After subtracting the plain CT data from the contrast data the resulting enhancement images were color-encoded and overlaid onto the contrast-enhanced CT angiography (CTA) images. This color-encoded combined display of parenchymal enhancement of the lungs was evaluated interactively on a workstation (Leonardo, Siemens) in axial, coronal and sagittal plane orientations. Axial contrast-enhanced CTA images were rated first, followed by an analysis of the combination images. Finally, CTA images were reread focusing on areas with perfusion

  14. Dual energy CT pulmonary blood volume assessment in acute pulmonary embolism - correlation with D-dimer level, right heart strain and clinical outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, Ralf W.; Frellesen, Claudia; Schell, Boris; Lehnert, Thomas; Jacobi, Volkmar; Vogl, Thomas J.; Kerl, J.M.; Renker, Matthias; Ackermann, Hanns; Schoepf, U.J.

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the role of perfusion defect (PD) size on dual energy CT pulmonary blood volume assessment as predictor of right heart strain and patient outcome and its correlation with d-dimer levels in acute pulmonary embolism (PE). 53 patients with acute PE who underwent DECT pulmonary angiography were retrospectively analyzed. Pulmonary PD size caused by PE was measured on DE iodine maps and quantified absolutely (VolPD) and relatively to the total lung volume (RelPD). Signs of right heart strain (RHS) on CT were determined. Information on d-dimer levels and readmission for recurrent onset of PE and death was collected. D-dimer level was mildly (r = 0.43-0.47) correlated with PD size. Patients with RHS had significantly higher VolPD (215 vs. 73 ml) and RelPD (9.9 vs. 2.9%) than patients without RHS (p 5% RelPD, while no such events were found for patients with <5% RelPD. Pulmonary blood volume on DECT in acute PE correlates with RHS and appears to be a predictor of patient outcome in this pilot study. (orig.)

  15. Ileus following total hip or knee arthroplasty is associated with increased risk of deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berend, Keith R; Lombardi, Adolph V; Mallory, Thomas H; Dodds, Kathleen L; Adams, Joanne B

    2004-10-01

    Venous thromboembolic disease (VTD), deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, causes morbidity and mortality following total hip and total knee arthroplasties, while ileus complicates up to 4.0%. The clinical courses of 2,949 patients undergoing 3,364 consecutive primary and revision total hip and total knee arthroplasties, radical debridements, and reimplantations at one institution over a 2-year period were reviewed to examine the relationship between ileus and VTD. VTD prophylaxis consisted of aspirin and intermittent plantar pulse boots for all patients except those at high risk, who received parenteral chemical prophylaxis and boots. Ileus occurred in 62 patients (2.1%) and symptomatic DVT in 51 (1.7%). With ileus, the incidence of DVT was 8.1%: odds ratio 5.5 (P =.0036). Symptomatic pulmonary embolism occurred in 7 patients (0.24%); with ileus the incidence was 3.2%: odds ratio 19.6 (P =.0082). A significant increase was observed in rates of VTD with ileus. We recommend using parenteral chemical and mechanical prophylaxis in patients with ileus following total hip and total knee arthroplasties.

  16. Prognostic value of neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio in patients with acute pulmonary embolism: a restrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayrak, Mehmet; Erdoğan, Halil Ibrahim; Solak, Yalcin; Akilli, Hakan; Gül, Enes Elvin; Yildirim, Oğuzhan; Erer, Murat; Akilli, Nezire Belgin; Bekci, Taha Tahir; Aribaş, Alpay; Yazici, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is a serious clinical condition characterised by a high mortality rate. Previous studies showed that leukocytosis was associated with recurrences of venous thromboemboli, major bleeding and increased mortality. The aim of the present study was to investigate the prognostic value of neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) in patients with acute PE during short term follow-up. A total of 640 patients were screened by I26 code of ICD-9 and 359 patients were included as cases of confirmed acute PE. Admission blood counts and clinical data were obtained from medical charts. The predictors of 30-day mortality were examined. Fifty-one out of 359 patients (14.2%) included in the study died during 30 days follow-up. In multivariate Cox regression analysis systolic blood pressure (HR:0.97 (0.94-0.99 CI95%), p=0.019), diabetes mellitus (HR:3.3 (1.30-8.39 CI95%), p=0.012), CK-MB(HR:1.03 (1.01-1.06 CI95%), p=0.024) and NLR (HR:1.03 (1.01-1.06 CI95%), p=0.008) were predictors of 30-day mortality. An optimal cut-off value of NLR was determined as 9.2 by using ROC curve. Hazards ratio of NLR>9.2 was found to be 3.60 (1.44-9.18 CI95%, p=0.006). NLR>9.2 had a sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, and positive predictive value of 68.6%, 80.5%, 93.9% and 36.5%, respectively. NLR on hospital admission may be a predictor of 30-day mortality in acute PE. Since complete blood count is a part of the routine laboratory investigation in the most hospitalised patients use and preliminary promising results of this study, NLR should be investigated in future prospective randomised trials regarding prognostic value in acute PE. Copyright © 2013 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Low incidence of pulmonary embolism associated with upper-extremity deep venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Mark M; Albuquerque, Francisco; Pfeifer, Justin D

    2012-10-01

    Most recent Chest 2008 guidelines counsel at least 3 months of anticoagulation for acute upper-extremity deep venous thrombosis (UEDVT). These guidelines are inconsistently followed, perhaps owing to relatively limited information regarding clinical outcomes among patients with UEDVT. Our institution maintains an UEDVT registry of consecutively encountered patients with sonographically confirmed UEDVT. We analyzed patient characteristics, treatment, and outcomes among these patients. Between April 2005 and November 2008, 300 consecutively encountered peripheral vascular laboratory patients with UEDVTs were identified. Data on UEDVT sonographic characteristics, patient demographics, anticoagulation treatment, pulmonary embolism (PE) incidence and diagnostic modality, hemorrhagic complications, and mortality were then extracted. Among the 300 patients, there was deep venous obstruction in the distal innominate (n = 69), internal jugular (n = 146), subclavian (n = 161), axillary (n = 107), and brachial (n = 91) veins. Two hundred forty-six patients (82%) had UEDVTs identified as clearly acute or acute on chronic, based on sonographic appearance. Most patients with UEDVTs were symptomatic (n = 265, 88%). One hundred six patients had documented malignancy (35%), 92 were postoperative or trauma patients (31%), and 76 patients were obese (body mass index: >30, 25%). Additionally, 240 patients had associated or previous indwelling central venous lines or leads (80%). One hundred twenty-eight patients (43%) were initially anticoagulated with heparin, whereas 121 of these patients were converted to warfarin therapy (40%) for variable lengths of time. One hundred sixty-seven patients were not treated with anticoagulation (56%), of whom 16 had documented contraindication to anticoagulation. Although the anticoagulated subset of patients tended to be younger, the decision to anticoagulate patients correlated significantly with the sonographically documented acute nature of the

  18. Dyslipidemia as a long-term marker for survival in pulmonary embolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Jara-Palomares

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To analyse survival rate after 24 months in consecutive patients with a diagnosis of PE as well as associated factors. Methods: Prospective cohort study during a follow-up period of two years in a series of consecutive patients with PE. Results: During the follow-up period, 34 out of 148 patients died (23%. Factors independently associated with reduced survival rate were: creatinine levels > 2 (OR, 8.8; 95% CI, 1.1 - 70.87, previous neoplasm (OR, 8.8; 95% CI, 3.69 - 20.98, dementia (OR, 6.85; 95% CI, 2.1 - 22.33 and dyslipidemia (OR, 5.07; 95% CI, 1.92 - 13.44. Forty four percent of the patients with dyslipidemia died vs. 20.8% of patients without this condition. Conclusions: In our study dyslipidemia shows as a long-term negative prognostic marker for survival in patients with EP. Resumo: Objetivos: Analisar a taxa de sobrevivência após 24 meses, em pacientes consecutivos com diagnóstico de PE, bem como fatores associados. Métodos: Estudo prospectivo durante um período de seguimento de dois anos em uma série consecutiva de pacientes com PE. Resultados: Durante o período de acompanhamento, 34 dos 148 pacientes morreram (23%. Fatores independentemente associados à reduzida taxa de sobrevivência foram: os níveis de creatinina> 2 (OR, 8,8; 95% CI, 1,1-70,87, neoplasia anterior (OR, 8,8; IC 95%, 3,69-20,98, demência (OR, 6,85; 95% CI, 2,1-22,33 e dislipidemia (OR, 5,07; IC 95%, 1,92-13,44. Quarenta e quatro por cento dos pacientes com dislipidemia morreram contra 20,8% dos pacientes sem essa condição. Conclusões: No nosso estudo, a dislipidemia mostra-se um marcador prognóstico negativo de longo prazo na sobrevida de pacientes com EP. Keywords: Dyslipidemia, Lipid metabolic disorders, Pulmonary embolism, Survival analysis, Venous thromboembolism, Palavras-chave: Dislipidemia, Doenças metabólicas lipídicas, Embolia pulmonar, Análise de sobrevivência, Tromboembolismo venoso

  19. Incidence, clinical characteristics, and long-term prognosis of travel-associated pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Ralf; Suess, Christian; Leus, Maria; Luxembourg, Beate; Miesbach, Wolfgang; Lindhoff-Last, Edelgard; Zeiher, Andreas M; Spyridopoulos, Ioakim

    2009-01-01

    Prolonged air travel is considered a risk factor for pulmonary embolism (PE). The clinical characteristics as well as the long-term prognosis of patients suffering from travel-associated PE ('economy-class syndrome', ECS) remain largely unknown. Owing to its proximity, our hospital is the primary referral centre for Frankfurt Airport, Europe's third-largest airport. The goal of our study was to follow-up all patients with ECS, who were admitted to our hospital between 1997 and 2006. We systematically reviewed all medical charts from patients presenting with acute PE to our emergency room or intensive care unit (ICU) and performed a telephone follow-up on patients discharged alive. Together with the data provided from the statistics department of Fraport Inc., the operating company of the Frankfurt International Airport, we were also able to put the medical data in context with the corresponding number of passengers and flight distances. A total of 257 patients with acute PE were admitted to our emergency and ICU between 1997 and 2006. Out of these, 62 patients suffered from ECS (45 flight-associated PE and 17 from other travel-associated PE). ECS patients were prone to more haemodynamic relevant acute events, reflected by a higher rate of initial cardiopulmonary resuscitation (4.8% vs. 1.5%; P = 0.153) and higher percentage of massive PE (8% vs. 3%; P = 0.064). Nevertheless, intrahospital mortality was similar in both groups (ECS 4.8%, others 4.1%; P = 0.730). Interestingly, the long-term outcome of ECS patients was excellent (Kaplan-Meier analysis; P log-rank: 0.008 vs. other entities). In general, ECS was a rare event (one event/5 million passengers), where long-haul flights over 5000 km lead to a 17-fold risk increase compared with shorter flights. Travel-associated PE was a common cause of PE in our hospital, with patients showing excellent long-term prognosis after discharge. The risk of ECS is rather low and strictly dependent on the flight distance.

  20. Echocardiogram in the Evaluation of Hemodynamically Stable Acute Pulmonary Embolism: National Practices and Clinical Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, David M; Winter, Michael; Lindenauer, Peter K; Walkey, Allan J

    2018-01-03

    Societal guideline recommendations vary with regard to the role of routine trans-thoracic echocardiography (TTE) to screen for right ventricular strain in patients with hemodynamically-stable, acute pulmonary embolism (PE). To characterize national patterns in use of early TTE for the evaluation of patients with hemodynamically-stable, acute PE, and determine associations between TTE use and patient outcomes. Retrospective cohort study using Premier, Inc. database of approximately 20% of patients hospitalized in the United States with hemodynamically stable, acute PE between 2008-2011. Multivariable, risk-adjusted hierarchical regression models were used to evaluate hospital variation in use of TTE for PE and associations between hospital TTE rates and patient outcomes. Patient-level TTE exposure was used in sensitivity analyses. We identified 64,037 patients (mean age 61.7 years, 54% women, 68% white) hospitalized at 363 US hospitals. TTE rates for hemodynamically-stable, acute PE varied widely among hospitals (median TTE rate 41.4%, range 0-89%, IQR 32.7-51.7%). Hospital rates of TTE were not associated with significant differences in risk-adjusted mortality (TTE rate quartile 4 vs. quartile 1: OR 0.88, 95% CI 0.69-1.13) or use of thrombolytics (OR 1.28, 95% CI 0.84-1.96), but rates of ICU admission (OR 1.57, 95% CI 1.18-2.07), hospital length of stay (RR 1.08, 95% CI 1.03-1.15) and costs (RR 1.15, 95% CI 1.07-1.23) were significantly higher at high TTE-rate hospitals. Analyses of patient-level TTE exposure produced similar results, except with higher rates of thrombolysis (OR 5.58, 95% CI 4.40-7.09) and bleeding (OR 1.37, 95% CI 1.24-1.51) among patients receiving TTE. TTE use in the evaluation of patients with hemodynamically-stable, acute PE varied widely between hospitals. Hospitals with high rates of PE-associated TTE use did not achieve different patient mortality outcomes, but had higher resource utilization and costs. Our findings support the 2016

  1. Deep vein thrombosis and/or pulmonary embolism concurrent with superficial vein thrombosis of the legs: cross-sectional single center study of prevalence and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirmerova, J; Seidlerova, J; Subrt, I

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this paper was to assess the prevalence of concurrent deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and/or pulmonary embolism (PE) in the patients with superficial vein thrombosis (SVT) of the legs and to find factors significantly and independently associated with coincident DVT/PE. In the setting of a tertiary referral hospital, patients with SVT, attending vascular clinic, underwent physical examination, laboratory testing and leg vein ultrasound (in the case of clinically suspected PE also perfusion/ventilation lung scan or/and helical CT pulmonary angiography). In statistical analysis, we used unpaired t-test, non-parametric Wilcoxon rank sum test, stepwise logistic regression and multivariable logistic regression model. We examined 138 patients (age 61.4 ± 13.9 years, 36.2% men), with ST mostly on varicose veins (89.9%). The prevalence of concurrent DVT/PE was 34.1%. Neither the clinical manifestation nor SVT localization differed significantly between the group with isolated SVT and that with coincident DVT/PE. Of all the assessed patients characteristics (age and sex, BMI, history of SVT, DVT or PE, hypercoagulable states, cardiovascular risk factors) only two factors were significantly and independently associated with the presence of concurrent DVT/PE. Log BMI was significantly higher in the patients with isolated SVT. Factor V Leiden (FVL) was proved as an independent risk factor for concomitant DVT/PE with odds ratio 2,531 (95% CI 1,064-6,016). The prevalence of concurrent DVT/PE in patients with SVT, referred to hospital vascular clinic was 34.1%. Lower BMI (log BMI, respectively) and the presence of FVL were significantly and independently associated with concurrent DVT/PE. Our results should be further investigated in a larger prospective study.

  2. Transesofagic echocardiography in the study of patient with cerebrovascular events in who origin cardiovascular embolic is suspected

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escobar Q, Carlos I; Jaramillo U, Mario; Tenorio, Luis F; Molina V, Claudia; Saldarriaga A, Marcela; Arango, Angela M

    2003-01-01

    Cerebrovascular events have an enormous social and economic impact. Twenty percent are of cardiac embolic origin and thirty five percent are of unknown cause or cryptogenic. In the cryptogenic group some echocardiographic findings could explain a cardiovascular origin. Echocardiography helps to study 55% of patients with cerebrovascular accidents. We present our experience during ten years since December 1992 to May 2002 in the Santa Maria cardiovascular clinic with 866 patients, 416 women and 450 men, mean age of 62:1:15 years. The five most frequent diagnoses were: aortic atheromatosis (34%), dilated cardiopathy (8.2%), ischemic cardiopathy (8.2%), left atrial spontaneous contrast (8%), patent foramen ovale (7.7%) and atrial septal aneurysm (4.5%). thirty percent of this population had a normal study. echocardiography helped to guide most of the patient's treatment. there was one esophagus rupture and fifteen minor oropharinx hemorrhages. Trans esophageal echocardiography is a very useful diagnostic method in this patient's study

  3. 3D pulmonary perfusion MRI and MR angiography of pulmonary embolism in pigs after a single injection of a blood pool MR contrast agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, Christian; Ley, Sebastian; Puderbach, Michael; Plathow, Christian; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich [Department of Radiology, Innovative Cancer Diagnostic and Therapy, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120, Heidelberg (Germany); Bock, Michael [Department of Medical Physics in Radiology, Innovative Cancer Diagnostic and Therapy, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of contrast-enhanced 3D perfusion MRI and MR angiography (MRA) of pulmonary embolism (PE) in pigs using a single injection of the blood pool contrast Gadomer. PE was induced in five domestic pigs by injection of autologous blood thrombi. Contrast-enhanced first-pass 3D perfusion MRI (TE/TR/FA: 1.0 ms/2.2 ms/40 ; voxel size: 1.3 x 2.5 x 4.0 mm{sup 3}; TA: 1.8 s per data set) and high-resolution 3D MRA (TE/TR/FA: 1.4 ms/3.4 ms/40 ; voxel size: 0.8 x 1.0 x 1.6 mm{sup 3}) was performed during and after a single injection of 0.1 mmol/kg body weight of Gadomer. Image data were compared to pre-embolism Gd-DTPA-enhanced MRI and post-embolism thin-section multislice CT (n=2). SNR measurements were performed in the pulmonary arteries and lung. One animal died after induction of PE. In all other animals, perfusion MRI and MRA could be acquired after a single injection of Gadomer. At perfusion MRI, PE could be detected by typical wedge-shaped perfusion defects. While the visualization of central PE at MRA correlated well with the CT, peripheral PE were only visualized by CT. Gadomer achieved a higher peak SNR of the lungs compared to Gd-DTPA (21{+-}8 vs. 13{+-}3). Contrast-enhanced 3D perfusion MRI and MRA of PE can be combined using a single injection of the blood pool contrast agent Gadomer. (orig.)

  4. Dead Space Ventilation Parallels Changes in Scintigraphic Vascular Obstruction at Recurrence of Pulmonary Embolism and after Thrombolytic Therapy: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Marc A Rodger; Gwynne Jones; Francois Raymond; Daniel Lalonde; Mike Proulx; Lothar Huebsch; Christopher Bredeson

    1998-01-01

    Physiological and alveolar dead space ventilation both increase in pulmonary embolism (PE) in proportion to the severity of vascular obstruction. The case of a patient with recurrent PE while on heparin therapy is presented. The recurrence was characterized clinically by severe pulmonary vascular obstruction and right heart dysfunction. The patient was treated with thrombolytic therapy, with excellent clinical and scintigraphic resolution. Dead space ventilation measurements at baseline, at t...

  5. Embolia pulmonar séptica de origen cutáneo Septic pulmonary embolism of cutaneous origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustina Sosa Beláustegui

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available La embolia pulmonar séptica es una enfermedad grave y poco frecuente que se caracteriza por presentar infiltrados pulmonares bilaterales asociados a un foco infeccioso extrapulmonar. Se relaciona principalmente a endocarditis derecha, tromboflebitis pelviana, accesos vasculares y menos frecuentemente a infecciones profundas como osteomielitis, artritis séptica o piomiositis. El Staphylococcus aureus meticilino-resistente adquirido en la comunidad (SAMR-AC es un patógeno emergente, con alta virulencia y de rápida propagación, que afecta a sujetos sin enfermedades previas relacionadas o factores de riesgo conocidos. Causa infecciones de piel y partes blandas y con menor frecuencia infecciones graves como fascitis necrotizante, artritis séptica, osteomielitis, piomiositis y neumonía necrotizante. Su epidemiología, patogenia y manifestaciones clínicas difieren de las causadas por el SAMR adquirido en el hospital. Presentamos el caso de un varón de 67 años con embolias pulmonares sépticas causadas por SAMR-AC con origen en una infección cutánea.Septic pulmonary embolism is a serious and rare illness characterized by pulmonary infiltrates associated with an extrapulmonary infectious focus. It is mainly related to right-sided endocarditis, pelvic thrombophlebitis, vascular access and less frequently to deep infections such as osteomyelitis, septic arthritis and pyomyositis. The community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is an emerging pathogen with high virulence and rapid spread involving subjects without previous related diseases or known risk factors. It causes infections of skin and soft tissue and less frequently other serious infections such as necrotizing fascitits, septic arthritis, osteomyelitis, pyomyositis and necrotizing pneumonia. Epidemiologically, pathogenesis and clinical manifestations differ from those caused by MRSA acquired in the hospital. We present the case of a 67 year-old male with septic

  6. Anticoagulant treatment of cancer patients with pulmonary embolism in the real world Actual use of low-molecular-weight heparin in cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinjan, A.; Hutten, B. A.; Di Nisio, M.; Buller, H. R.; Kamphuisen, P. W.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Since 2004, guidelines recommend long-term treatment with low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) in patients with cancer and pulmonary embolism (PE). We assessed the proportion of cancer patients with PE actually treated with LMWH and the duration of anticoagulant treatment in the

  7. Pregnancy complicated by superior vena cava thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in a patient with Behcet disease and the use of heparin for treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kale, A.; Akdeniz, N.A.; Akyildiz, L.; Kale, E.

    2006-01-01

    Batch disease is a multi systemic vasculitis of unknown origin. Vascular involvement has been considered to result from systemic vasculitis, occurs in 5-10% of these patients. We report a 34-year-old pregnant woman complicated by superior vena ca va thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism in a patient with Batch disease. (author)

  8. [Results from a general training hospital for the implementation of a diagnostic workup for pulmonary embolism according to the Dutch Institute for Health Care Improvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuisen, P.W.; Jacobs, E.M.G.; Mol, J.J.; Rijnders, A.J.; Ullmann, E.F.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the active implementation of the Dutch Institute for Healthcare Improvement's guideline for the diagnostic work-up for pulmonary embolism in a general training hospital, and to analyse reasons for not following the guideline strategy. DESIGN: Partly retrospective and partly

  9. Recurrent venous thromboembolism in patients with pulmonary embolism and right ventricular dysfunction: a post-hoc analysis of the Hokusai-VTE study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brekelmans, Marjolein P. A.; Ageno, Walter; Beenen, Ludo F.; Brenner, Benjamin; Buller, Harry R.; Chen, Cathy Z.; Cohen, Alexander T.; Grosso, Michael A.; Meyer, Guy; Raskob, Gary; Segers, Annelise; Vanassche, Thomas; Verhamme, Peter; Wells, Philip S.; Zhang, George; Weitz, Jeffrey I.

    2016-01-01

    Background In patients with pulmonary embolism, right ventricular dysfunction is associated with early mortality. The Hokusai-VTE study used N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and right to left ventricular diameter ratio on CT as indicators of right ventricular dysfunction and

  10. Qualitative point-of-care D-dimer testing compared with quantitative D-dimer testing in excluding pulmonary embolism in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucassen, W. A. M.; Erkens, P. M. G.; Geersing, G. J.; Büller, H. R.; Moons, K. G. M.; Stoffers, H. E. J. H.; van Weert, H. C. P. M.

    2015-01-01

    General practitioners can safely exclude pulmonary embolism (PE) by using the Wells PE rule combined with D-dimer testing. To compare the accuracy of a strategy using the Wells rule combined with either a qualitative point-of-care (POC) D-dimer test performed in primary care or a quantitative

  11. Pulmonary thromboembolic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, W R; Bartholomew, J R

    1985-09-01

    This monograph includes a state-of-the-art discussion of pulmonary embolism, including its pathogenesis, predisposing factors, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and medical and surgical treatment. This remains one of the most common yet most difficult problems in medical practice. The disease affects 650,000 patients each year in the US, with over 200,000 fatalities. 40-60% of patients who die because of pulmonary emboli arrive at autopsy without the correct diagnosis and treatment. The major source of pulmonary embolism is the deep venous system of the legs and pelvis. Its frequency is greatest in patients ages 50-65 years, with no significant difference between men and women. An association has been identified with oral contraceptives. Figures in the monograph schematize an appropriate diagnostic plan of approach to the patient with suspected pulmonary embolism as well as a combined approach to both diagnosis and treatment. Elements of the latter include a history taking and physical examination for suspicion of pulmonary embolism, arterial blood gas, chest x-ray, electrocardiogram, ventilation-perfusion lung scan, pulmonary angiography, Doppler ultrasound, and thrombolytic therapy followed by heparin. A total of 572 references are cited.

  12. Severity of acute pulmonary embolism: evaluation of a new spiral CT angiographic score in correlation with echocardiographic data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mastora, Ioana; Remy-Jardin, Martine; Masson, Pascal; Remy, Jacques [Department of Radiology, University Center Hospital Calmette, Boulevard Jules Leclerc, 59037 Lille Cedex (France); Medical Research Group ' ' Equipe d' Accueil no. 2682' ' , Boulevard Jules Leclerc, 59037 Lille Cedex (France); Galland, Eric; Bauchart, Jean-Jacques [Department of Cardiology, University Center Cardiology Hospital; Boulevard Jules Leclerc, 59037 Lille Cedex (France); Delannoy, Valerie [Department of Medical Statistics, University of Lille, Place de Verdun, 59037 Lille Cedex (France)

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the severity of acute pulmonary embolism (PE) could be quantitatively assessed with spiral CT angiography (SCTA). Thirty-six consecutive patients without underlying cardiopulmonary disease and high clinical suspicion of PE underwent prospectively thin-collimation SCTA and echocardiography at the time of the initial diagnosis (T0) and after initial therapy (T1; mean interval of time T1-T2: 32 days). The CT severity score was based on the percentage of obstructed surface of each central and peripheral pulmonary arterial section using a 5-point scale (1: <25%; 2: 25-49%; 3: 50-74%; 4: 75-99%; 5: 100%). The sum of the detailed scores attributed to 5 mediastinal, 6 lobar and 20 segmental arteries per patient led to the determination of central, peripheral and global CT severity scores and subsequent determination of percentages of obstruction of the pulmonary circulation. Echocardiographic severity criteria included the presence of signs of acute cor pulmonale and/or systolic pulmonary hypertension (>40 mm Hg). The SCTA depicted acute PE in all patients at T0 with complete resolution of endovascular clots in 10 patients at T1. At T0, the mean percentage of obstruction of the pulmonary arterial bed was significantly higher in the 22 patients with echocardiographic signs of severity (56{+-}13 vs 28{+-}32%; p<0.001). A significant reduction in the mean percentage of pulmonary artery obstruction was observed in the 19 patients with resolution of echocardiographic criteria of severity between T0 and T1 T0: 57{+-}14%; T1: 7{+-}11%; p<0.001. The threshold value for severe PE on CT angiograms was 49% (sensitivity: 0.773; specificity: 0.214). The mean ({+-}SD) pulmonary artery pressure was significantly higher in the 26 patients with more than 50% obstruction of the pulmonary artery bed (45{+-}15 mm Hg) than in the 10 patients with less than 50% obstruction of pulmonary artery bed at T0 (31{+-}11 mm Hg; p<0.01). The CT

  13. Treatment of patients with chronic thrombo­embolic pulmonary hypertension: focus on riociguat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith ZR

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Zachary R Smith,1 Charles T Makowski,1 Rana L Awdish2 1Department of Pharmacy Services, 2Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine Division, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI, USA Abstract: Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH is a disease of the pulmonary vascular bed that is characterized by elevations in the mean pulmonary artery pressure in the setting of perfusion defects on ventilation–perfusion scan, and subsequently confirmed by pulmonary angiography. CTEPH, or World Health Organization (WHO group 4 pulmonary hypertension, is a result of unresolved thromboembolic obstruction in the pulmonary arteries. Pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA is the treatment of choice for CTEPH as it is a potentially curative therapy. However, up to one-third of patients are not candidates for the surgery, either due to distal and inaccessible nature of the lesions or comorbid conditions. Due to remodeling that occurs in nonobstructed pulmonary vessels, a portion of patients who have undergone PEA have residual CTEPH after the procedure, attributable to high shear stress prior to PEA. This phenomenon has led to the understanding of a so-called “two-compartment model” of CTEPH, opening the door to pharmacologic treatment strategies. In 2013, riociguat, a soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator, was approved in the US and Europe for the treatment of inoperable or persistent/recurrent CTEPH. This article reviews the current management of CTEPH with a focus on riociguat. Keywords: riociguat, chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension, pulmonary endarterectomy, pulmonary hypertension

  14. [Acute pulmonary embolism: prediction of cor pulmonale and short-term patient survival from assessment of cardiac dimensions in routine multidetector-row CT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelke, C; Rummeny, E; Marten, K

    2006-10-01

    Evaluation of the prognostic value of morphological cardiac parameters in patients with suspected and incidental acute pulmonary embolism (PE) using multidetector-row chest CT (MSCT). 2335 consecutive MSCT scans were evaluated for the presence of PE. The arterial enhancement and analysability of pulmonary arteries and the heart were assessed as parameters of the scan quality. The diastolic right and left ventricular short axes (RV (D), LV (D)) and the interventricular septal deviation (ISD) were measured in all PE-positive patients and the echocardiography reports were reviewed. The clinical data assessment included cardio-respiratory and other co-morbidities, systemic anticoagulant therapy (ACT), and the 30-day outcome. Predictors of acute cor pulmonale and the short-term outcome were calculated by univariate and multivariate logistic regressions including odds ratios (OR) and ROC analyses using positive (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV). 90 patients with acute PE were included (36 with clinically suspected PE, 54 with incidental PE). 26 patients had cardio-respiratory co-morbidities. Four patients underwent systemic thrombolysis, 43 underwent anticoagulation in therapeutic doses, 19 underwent anticoagulation in prophylactic doses, and 24 patients did not undergo ACT. 15 of 41 patients had echocardiographic evidence of acute cor pulmonale. 8 patients died within 30 days. The RV (D) was the best independent predictor of acute cor pulmonale (p = 0,002, OR = 9.16, PPV = 0.68, NPV = 1 at 4.49 cm cut off) and short-term outcome (p = 0,0005, OR = 2.82, PPV = 0.23, NPV = 0.98 at 4.75 cm cut off). The RV (D)/LV (D) ratio had a PPV of 0.85 for cor pulmonale. The RV (D) and RV (D)/LV (D) ratio were suitable for identifying patients with acute cor pulmonale and for benign short-term prognosis. Further studies should prospectively address the combined use of CT-morphological and clinical parameters for the prediction of patient outcome.

  15. Current status of the use of inferior vena cava filters in cases of pulmonary embolism in CCUs: From the Tokyo CCU Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Yasuhiro; Obayashi, Toru; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Nakata, Jun; Yagi, Hidenori; Takayama, Morimasa; Nagao, Ken

    2014-05-01

    To elucidate the current status of use of inferior vena cava filters (IVCFs) in cases of pulmonary embolism at institutions belonging to the Tokyo CCU Network. We conducted a retrospective investigation of 832 consecutive cases of pulmonary embolism reported on survey forms to the Tokyo CCU Network between 2005 and 2010. Of 832 cases of pulmonary embolism, IVCFs were used in 338 (40.6%) and not used in 415 (49.9%). Their use was unclear in 79 (9.5%) cases. The use rate gradually increased each year from 2005 until 2008 but decreased from 2009 onward. Moreover, 68.9% of the IVCFs used in cases were non-permanent types. In terms of pulmonary embolism severity, the rate of use was 37.2% in non-massive cases, 49.4% in sub-massive cases, 46.9% in massive cases, and 31.9% in collapse cases. Thirty-day mortality in cases of collapse in which IVCFs were not used was extremely high at 75.8%, suggesting that in many cases, rapid deterioration may occur with insufficient time for IVCF insertion. The differences in IVCF usage rate among institutions were large in the range of 12.5-90% from 2005 to 2008, which slightly declined to the range of 25.0-72.2% from 2009 to 2010. We elucidated the current IVCF use status in cases of pulmonary embolism at institutions belonging to the Tokyo CCU Network. Since the status of use differed among institutions, future studies of effective methods of use are required. Copyright © 2013 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Captopril improves postresuscitation hemodynamics protective against pulmonary embolism by activating the ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hong-Li; Li, Chun-Sheng; Zhao, Lian-Xing; Yang, Jun; Tong, Nan; An, Le; Liu, Qi-Tong

    2016-11-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism (APE) has a very high mortality rate, especially at cardiac arrest and even after the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). This study investigated the protective effect of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor captopril on postresuscitation hemodynamics, in a porcine model of cardiac arrest established by APE. Twenty-nine Beijing Landrace pigs were infused with an autologous thrombus leading to cardiac arrest and subjected to standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation and thrombolysis. Ten resuscitated pigs were randomly and equally apportioned to receive either captopril (22.22 mg/kg) infusion or the same volume saline, 30 min after ROSC. Hemodynamic changes and ACE-Ang II-angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) and ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas receptor axis levels were determined. APE was associated with a decline in mean arterial pressure and a dramatic increase in pulmonary artery pressure and mean right ventricular pressure. After ROSC, captopril infusion was associated with significantly lower mean right ventricular pressure and systemic and pulmonary vascular resistance, faster heart rate, and higher Ang-(1-7) levels, ACE2/ACE, and Ang-(1-7)/Ang II, compared with the saline infusion. The ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas pathway correlated negatively with external vascular lung water and pulmonary vascular permeability and positively with the right cardiac index. In conclusion, in a pig model of APE leading to cardiac arrest, captopril infusion was associated with less mean right ventricular pressure overload after resuscitation, compared with saline infusion. The reduction in systemic and pulmonary vascular resistance associated with captopril may be by inhibiting the ACE-Ang II-AT1R axis and activating the ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis.

  17. Usefulness of admission red blood cell distribution width as a predictor of severity of acute pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgedik, Recep; Karamanli, Harun; Kurt, Ali Bekir; Günaydın, Zeki Yüksel

    2018-02-01

    Previous researches have represented a considerable relation between acute pulmonary embolism (PE) and red blood cell distribution width (RDW). To the authors' knowledge no research has been informed in subjects with PE severity. Pulmonary arterial obstruction index (PAOI) is associated with the severity of acute PE. In our investigation, we purposed to assess the relation between PAOI and RDW and the benefit of these factors in the detection of PE severity. We retrospectively investigated the demographic information, probability of clinical scores, laboratory parameters, serum D-dimer levels, and echocardiographic findings of systolic pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) in Acute PE individuals who were diagnosed by computed tomography of pulmonary arterial angiography. Right ventricular dysfunction (RVD) on CT was assessed by calculating the right ventricular/left ventricular (RV/LV) diameter ratios on transverse (RV/LVtrans). The information of 131 patients with acute PE and 51 (64.6%) female and 28 (35.4%) male healthy control were evaluated. Acute PE group's RDW values were higher than control subjects (P < .0001). RDW (%) level was remarkable higher in patients with massive PE than in patients with nonmassive PE. There were statistically considerable differences in terms of PAOI and systolic pulmonary arterial pressure (sPAP) between nonmassive and massive PE patients (P < .0001 for all). PAOI was correlated with PE severity, D-dimer level, sPAP and clinical probability scores. PAOI was correlated with RDW levels. RDW levels, an inexpensive and easily measurable laboratory factor, were considerable associated with the severity and presence of PE. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Imaging of acute pulmonary embolism using multi-detector CT angiography: An update on imaging technique and interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, Ieneke J.C.; Wittenberg, Rianne; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia

    2010-01-01

    Computed tomography angiography (CTA) of the pulmonary arteries has become the main diagnostic test for the evaluation of pulmonary embolism (PE). Not only due to the good availability, low cost and minimal invasiveness of this technique, but mainly because of the introduction of multi-detector CT techniques resulting in significant improvement in resolution, speed and image quality. This continuous gain in image acquisition speed went along with the introduction of new techniques of image acquisition, such as the dual-source CT scanning and novel concepts of image interpretation beyond morphological findings including the definition of the resulting perfusion defects and assessment of the cardiopulmonary circulation as a functional unit. This article will focus on technical and practical aspects to optimize CTPA examinations with modern multi-detector CT scanners, discusses aspects to be considered in specific patient groups (e.g., during pregnancy, young patients) and outlines new advents such as dual-source lung perfusion and automatic detection of pulmonary emboli.

  19. Imaging of acute pulmonary embolism using multi-detector CT angiography: An update on imaging technique and interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, Ieneke J.C. [Department of Radiology, Erasmus MC University Medical Centre, ' s-Gravendijkwal 230, NL-3015 CE Rotterdam (Netherlands)], E-mail: i.hartmann@erasmusmc.nl; Wittenberg, Rianne [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Radiology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht (Netherlands); Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Radiology, Meander Medical Centre, Amersfoort (Netherlands)

    2010-04-15

    Computed tomography angiography (CTA) of the pulmonary arteries has become the main diagnostic test for the evaluation of pulmonary embolism (PE). Not only due to the good availability, low cost and minimal invasiveness of this technique, but mainly because of the introduction of multi-detector CT techniques resulting in significant improvement in resolution, speed and image quality. This continuous gain in image acquisition speed went along with the introduction of new techniques of image acquisition, such as the dual-source CT scanning and novel concepts of image interpretation beyond morphological findings including the definition of the resulting perfusion defects and assessment of the cardiopulmonary circulation as a functional unit. This article will focus on technical and practical aspects to optimize CTPA examinations with modern multi-detector CT scanners, discusses aspects to be considered in specific patient groups (e.g., during pregnancy, young patients) and outlines new advents such as dual-source lung perfusion and automatic detection of pulmonary emboli.

  20. Patient's Guide to Recovery After Deep Vein Thrombosis or Pulmonary Embolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Embolism Beth Waldron , Stephan Moll Download PDF https://doi.org/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.113.006285 Circulation. 2014; 129: ... e477-e479 , originally published April 28, 2014 https://doi.org/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.113.006285 Citation Manager Formats ...

  1. Detection of pulmonary embolism with combined ventilation-perfusion SPECT and low-dose CT: head-to-head comparison with multidetector CT angiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutte, Henrik; Mortensen, Jann; Jensen, Claus Verner

    2009-01-01

    The diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE) is usually established by a combination of clinical assessment, D-dimer testing, and imaging with either pulmonary ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) scintigraphy or pulmonary multidetector CT (MDCT) angiography. Both V/Q SPECT and MDCT angiography seem to have...... high diagnostic accuracy. However, only limited data directly comparing these 2 modalities are available. Hybrid gamma-camera/MDCT systems have been introduced and allow simultaneous 3-dimensional lung V/Q SPECT and MDCT angiography, suitable for diagnosing PE. The aim of our study was to compare...

  2. [Percutaneous rheolytic thrombectomy in the treatment of high-risk acute pulmonary embolism: Initial experience of a single center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Rita; Oliveira, Márcia; Ponte, Marta; Pires-Morais, Gustavo; Sousa, Marta; Fernandes, Paula; Rodrigues, Alberto; Braga, Pedro; Gonçalves, Manuel; Gama, Vasco

    2014-06-01

    For years, the treatment of high-risk pulmonary embolism (PE) was based on two well-defined strategies: thrombolysis, whose benefits have been documented in randomized trials, and surgical embolectomy. However, mechanical reperfusion by percutaneous techniques is used in an increasing number of patients, and is a valid therapeutic option when there is a formal contraindication to thrombolysis, as rescue therapy when thrombolysis fails to improve hemodynamics, and/or when emergency surgical thrombectomy is unavailable or contraindicated. This article discusses the indications for the use of percutaneous techniques in PE, reports the initial experience of our center with the AngioJet® thrombectomy device (Possis Medical Inc, Minneapolis, MN, USA) and reviews the available evidence, the most recent recommendations and the main complications associated with this procedure. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  3. High risk of pulmonary embolism and deep venous thrombosis but not of stroke in granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurschou, Mikkel; Obel, Niels; Baslund, Bo

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the incidence of stroke, pulmonary embolism (PE), and deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's) (GPA). METHODS: Patients diagnosed with GPA at a Danish tertiary care center during 1993-2011 were identified (n = 180). Each patient was matched...... with 19 population controls (n = 3,420). Information on hospitalizations for stroke, PE, and DVT was obtained from the Danish National Hospital Register. The occurrence of vascular events in the GPA cohort was compared with that in the control group by calculation of incidence rate ratios (IRRs). RESULTS......: The median duration of followup was 7.2 years (interquartile range 3.1-11.7 years) in the GPA cohort. Within the first 2 years following the diagnosis of vasculitis, the incidences of PE and DVT were substantially increased among the patients (IRR 25.7 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 6.9-96] for PE and IRR...

  4. Effective Treatment of Intermediate-Risk Pulmonary Embolism by Manual Thrombus Aspiration. A Report of Two Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebik, Rodrigo; Cortese, Bernardo; Buccheri, Dario; Silva-Orrego, Pedro; Rubboli, Andrea

    2015-08-01

    Manual thrombectomy, part of the armamentarium of interventional cardiologists, might also be considered as an effective and safe alternative to manage intermediate/high risk acute PE patients with contraindications to thrombolysis or with acute haemodynamic decompensation. We here describe two cases with intermediate risk pulmonary embolism and severe hypoxaemia where manual thrombectomy with a 10F dedicated catheter was effective and improved clinical and haemodynamic parameters. Currently, there's no clear and effective treatment for these patients, thus we believe that this therapy, as current ESC guidelines suggest, should become a possible alternative to systemic thrombolysis and anticoagulant regimen. Copyright © 2015 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Femoral vein thrombophlebitis and septic pulmonary embolism due to a mixed anaerobic infection including Solobacterium moorei: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Claire A

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary foci of necrobacillosis infection outside the head and neck are uncommon but have been reported in the urogenital or gastrointestinal tracts. Reports of infection with Solobacterium moorei are rare. Case presentation A 37-year-old male intravenous drug user was admitted with pain in his right groin, fever, rigors and vomiting following a recent injection into the right femoral vein. Admission blood cultures grew Fusobacterium nucleatum, Solobacterium moorei and Bacteroides ureolyticus. The patient was successfully treated with intravenous penicillin and metronidazole. Conclusion This case report describes an unusual case of femoral thrombophlebitis with septic pulmonary embolism associated with anaerobic organisms in a groin abscess. Solobacterium moorei, though rarely described, may also have clinically significant pathogenic potential.

  6. Frequency of use and acceptability of clinical prediction rules for pulmonary embolism among Swiss general internal medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faller, N; Stalder, O; Limacher, A; Bassetti, S; Beer, J H; Genné, D; Battegay, E; Hayoz, D; Leuppi, J; Mueller, B; Perrier, A; Waeber, G; Rodondi, N; Aujesky, D

    2017-12-01

    Whether clinical prediction rules for pulmonary embolism are accepted and used among general internal medicine residents remains uncertain. We therefore evaluated the frequency of use and acceptability of the Revised Geneva Score (RGS) and the Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index (PESI), and explored which factors were associated with rule use. In an online survey among general internal medicine residents from 10 Swiss hospitals, we assessed rule acceptability using the Ottawa Acceptability of Decision Rules Instrument (OADRI) and explored the association between physician and training-related factors and rule use using mixed logistic regression models. The response rate was 50.4% (433/859). Overall, 61% and 36% of the residents reported that they always or regularly use the RGS and the PESI, respectively. The mean overall OADRI score was 4.3 (scale 0-6) for the RGS and 4.1 for the PESI, indicating a good acceptability. Rule acceptability (odds ratio [OR] 6.19 per point, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.64-10.51), prior training in emergency medicine (OR 5.14, CI 2.20-12.01), and availability of internal guidelines recommending RGS use (OR 4.25, CI 2.15-8.43) were associated with RGS use. Rule acceptability (OR 6.43 per point, CI 4.17-9.92) and rule taught at medical school (OR 2.06, CI 1.24-3.43) were associated with PESI use. The RGS was more frequently used than the PESI. Both rules were considered acceptable. Rule acceptability, prior training in emergency medicine, availability of internal guidelines, and rule taught at medical school were associated with rule use and represent potential targets for quality improvement interventions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Follow-Up of 6 Patients with Permanent ; Vena Cava Filters in the Prevention of Pulmonary Embolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vahedian

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Venous thromboembolic disease is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Deep venous thrombosis (DVT and pulmonary embolism (PE are a spectrum of a single disease entity. In most clinical situations, anticoagulation is the preferred form of therapy .IVC filter placement when using anticoagulation therapy is contraindicated or proves ineffective. The placement of an IVC filter is considered standard preventive treatment for PE. The aim of this study was follow up of patients with permanent vena cava filters in the prevention of pulmonary embolism after six months. Materials & Methods: In this cross sectional study 6 patients with IVC filter were followed up after 6 months. They were examined about having emboli, reccurent DVT, edema, varicosis, bleeding, misplacement, and fracture of filter. Data were analyzed with SPSSV17. Results: 6 patients having a mean age of 58.6 years were evaluated. There was no difference in sex . The reason of admission in all cases was DVT. Doppler sonography was done for all the patients. In 66.66% anticoagulation therapy was done before surgery. The filter was placed percutaneously in all cases. After 6 months in 5 cases there were no signs of DVT, PE, edema, and varicosis. In addition one patient died because of respiratory arrest due to encephalopathy. No complications were seen during admission period. Conclusion: Although IVC filter increases the risk of recurrent DVT in the long term ,it remarkablely decreases the risk of PE.IVC filter is a useful and effective treatment in patients with contraindication of using anticoagulation therapy especially in patients with cancer. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2011;18(2:29-32

  8. Selective Embolization of Systemic Collaterals for the Treatment of Recurrent Hemoptysis Secondary to the Unilateral Absence of a Pulmonary Artery in a Child

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Yin, E-mail: zhouyin502@163.com [West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Department of Pediatric Surgery (China); Tsauo, Jiaywei, E-mail: 80732059@qq.com [West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Institute of Interventional Radiology (China); Li, Yuan, E-mail: liyuanletters@163.com [West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Department of Pediatric Surgery (China); Li, Xiao, E-mail: simonlixiao@gmail.com [West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Institute of Interventional Radiology (China)

    2015-10-15

    The unilateral absence of the pulmonary artery (UAPA) is a rare anomaly. Hemoptysis due to systemic collaterals is one of the most common complications of UAPA. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, the utility of selective embolization for the treatment of this condition in children has not been reported previously. This report describes a 6-year-old girl with isolated UAPA (IUAPA) admitted for a 10-month history of recurrent hemoptysis that had worsened during the previous 2 months. Selective embolization of the bronchial systemic collaterals was performed. The patient remained asymptomatic with no recurrence of hemoptysis 8 months after the procedure.

  9. Bronchial artery embolization for the treatment of hemoptysis due to pulmonary tuberculosis: its clinical effect with an analysis of the causes of recurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Shoumin; Li Jingying; Wang Guoxing

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate clinical effect of bronchial artery embolization (BAE) in treating massive hemoptysis due to pulmonary tuberculosis and to analyze the causes of recurrence in order to improve the therapeutic results. Methods: A total of 39 cases of patients with recurrent massive hemoptysis due to pulmonary tuberculosis, who were encountered during the period from Oct. 2007 to Sep. 2010, were enrolled in this study. The lesions included infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis (n= 28) and chronic fibrocavitary pulmonary tuberculosis (n= 11). BAE with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) particles only was performed in 14 cases (group A), while BAE with both PVA particles and coils was carried out in 25 cases (group B). All the patients were followed up for 12 - 48 months. The results were compared between the two groups. Results: Immediate hemostasis was obtained in 36 cases (92.3%), the clinical result was excellent in 3 cases. The complete cure or excellent result with single embolization procedure was achieved in 30 cases (76.9%). Recurrence was seen in 9 cases (23.1%). The difference in the recurrence rate between group A (42.9%) and group B (12.0%) was statistically significant (P < 0.05). The relapsing rate of patients with chronic fibrocavitary pulmonary tuberculosis was significantly higher than that of patients with infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis (45.5% vs. 14.3%, P < 0.05). Conclusion: BAE has an instant effect of hemostasis and satisfactory clinical result. Nowadays BAE has already become the treatment of first choice for hemoptysis caused by pulmonary tuberculosis. The dual embolization technique with the combination use of PVA particles and coils can effectively reduce the recurrence of' pulmonary tuberculosis hemoptysis. (authors)

  10. Pulmonary thromboembolism in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babyn, Paul S.; Gahunia, Harpal K. [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Pediatric Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Massicotte, Patricia [Stollery Children' s Hospital and University of Alberta, Departments of Pediatric Hematology and Cardiology, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2005-03-01

    Pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) is uncommonly diagnosed in the pediatric patient, and indeed often only discovered on autopsy. The incidence of pediatric PTE depends upon the associated underlying disease, diagnostic tests used, and index of suspicion. Multiple risk factors can be found including: peripartum asphyxia, dyspnea, haemoptysis, chest pain, dehydration, septicemia, central venous lines (CVLs), trauma, surgery, ongoing hemolysis, vascular lesions, malignancy, renal disease, foreign bodies or, uncommonly, intracranial venous sinus thrombosis, burns, or nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis. Other types of embolism can occur uncommonly in childhood and need to be recognized, as the required treatment will vary. These include pulmonary cytolytic thrombi, foreign bodies, tumor and septic emboli, and post-traumatic fat emboli. No single noninvasive test for pulmonary embolism is both sensitive and specific. A combination of diagnostic procedures must be used to identify suspect or confirmed cases of PTE. This article reviews the risk factors, clinical presentation and treatment of pulmonary embolism in children. It also highlights the current diagnostic tools and protocols used to evaluate pulmonary embolism in pediatric patients. (orig.)

  11. Isquemia pulmonar embólica: aspectos clínicos e experimentais Pulmonary embolic ischemia: clinical and experimental aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Biscegli Jatene

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available A isquemia está freqüentemente relacionada a mecanismos embólicos e esta oclusão arterial mecânica não é sempre seguida de conseqüências isquêmicas severas porque mudanças na circulação brônquica suprem as áreas sem fluxo sangüíneo. No entanto, ocorre o fenômeno de remodelação vascular, também relacionado a níveis elevados de pressão arterial pulmonar, principalmente no tromboembolismo pulmonar crônico. Modelos experimentais têm sido produzidos para estudar a relação entre a oclusão arterial mecânica, a hipertensão pulmonar e a remodelação vascular, entretanto mais avaliações sistemáticas são necessárias para se entender esta relação no parênquima pulmonar isquêmico e não isquêmico.Pulmonary ischemia is usually related with embolics mechanisms, and this mechanic artery occlusion is not always followed by severe ischemic consequences, because the bronchial circulation changes supply the areas without blood flow. However, small artery vascular remodeling occurs, related to persistent high pulmonary pressure levels, mainly in the chronic pulmonary thromboembolism. Experimental models have been produced to study the relation-ship between mechanic artery occlusion, pulmonary hypertension and vascular remodeling, however, more systematic evaluation is necessary to understand such a these relation-ship, in the ischemic and not ischemic lung parenchyma.

  12. Automated volumetric analysis of four cardiac chambers in pulmonary embolism: a novel technology for fast risk stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviram, Galit; Sirota-Cohen, Chen; Steinvil, Arie; Keren, Gad; Banai, Shmuel; Sosna, Jacob; Berliner, Shlomo; Rogowski, Ori

    2012-08-01

    Identification of patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE) who might be at risk of circulatory collapse by using a fast, automated system is highly desired. It was our objective to investigate whether automated cardiac volumetric analysis following computerised tomographic pulmonary angiography (CTPA) is useful to identify increased clot load and adverse prognosis in patients with acute PE. We retrospectively analysed a consecutive series of non-gated CTPA studies of 124 patients with acute PE and 43 controls. Right and left ventricular diameters (RV/LV) were measured on four-chamber view, while each cardiac chamber underwent automatic volumetric measurements. Findings were correlated to the pulmonary arterial obstruction index (PAOI). Outcome was expressed by admission to an intensive care unit (ICU) or mortality within 30 days. There was a significant positive correlation between the PAOI and the volumes of the right side cavities (r=0.25 for the atrium and r=0.49 for the ventricle), and between the right-to-left atrial and ventricular volume ratios (r=0.49 and r=0.57, respectively). Results for the combined outcome of mortality or ICU admission that fell in the upper tertile of the right atrial and right ventricular volumes yielded hazard ratios of 3.9 and 3.3, respectively, compared to those in the lower tertile. RV/LV diameter ratio did not correlate with outcome. In conclusion, adverse outcome and significant pulmonary clot load in patients with acute PE are associated with a volume shift towards right heart cavities, which correlates to prognosis better than the CT-measured RV/LV diameter ratio, suggesting the advantage of using fast fully automatic volumetric analysis to identify patients at risk.

  13. Treatment of patients with chronic thrombo embolic pulmonary hypertension: focus on riociguat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Zachary R; Makowski, Charles T; Awdish, Rana L

    2016-01-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a disease of the pulmonary vascular bed that is characterized by elevations in the mean pulmonary artery pressure in the setting of perfusion defects on ventilation–perfusion scan, and subsequently confirmed by pulmonary angiography. CTEPH, or World Health Organization (WHO) group 4 pulmonary hypertension, is a result of unresolved thromboembolic obstruction in the pulmonary arteries. Pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA) is the treatment of choice for CTEPH as it is a potentially curative therapy. However, up to one-third of patients are not candidates for the surgery, either due to distal and inaccessible nature of the lesions or comorbid conditions. Due to remodeling that occurs in nonobstructed pulmonary vessels, a portion of patients who have undergone PEA have residual CTEPH after the procedure, attributable to high shear stress prior to PEA. This phenomenon has led to the understanding of a so-called “two-compartment model” of CTEPH, opening the door to pharmacologic treatment strategies. In 2013, riociguat, a soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator, was approved in the US and Europe for the treatment of inoperable or persistent/recurrent CTEPH. This article reviews the current management of CTEPH with a focus on riociguat. PMID:27354811

  14. Sudden hearing loss followed by deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in a patient with factor V Leiden mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovato, A; Tormene, D; Staffieri, C; Breda, S; Staffieri, A; Marioni, G

    2014-09-01

    Factor V Leiden (FVL) is by far the most prevalent inherited thrombophilic abnormality in Western countries, and this genetic condition has been associated with sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL). Audiologists should be aware that SSHL may be the precursor of life-threatening thromboembolic events, especially in Caucasians who are more likely to be FVL carriers. Case report. A 41-year-old male patient. Although this is not the first report of SSHL in a FVL carrier, it is the first to describe SSHL occurring in a heterozygous FVL carrier who--within a month--was also diagnosed with deep vein thrombosis of the left common femoral, saphenous, and popliteal veins, and pulmonary embolism of the left pulmonary artery branch serving the posterior basal segment of the inferior lobe. SSHL is an emergency condition that warrants prompt medical examination and treatment. Hematological investigations should be considered in SSHL patients at least for those with a family history of thrombotic events, and for women on estrogen-progestin therapy or during pregnancy, with a view to providing adequate antithrombotic prophylaxis and reducing the risk of other thromboembolic events.

  15. Prothrombotic Fibrin Clot Phenotype in Patients with Deep Vein Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism: A New Risk Factor for Recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anetta Undas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Prothrombotic fibrin clot phenotype, involving faster formation of dense meshwork composed of thinner and highly branched fibers that are relatively resistant to plasmin-induced lysis, has been reported in patients with not only myocardial infarction or stroke, but also venous thromboembolism (VTE, encompassing deep vein thrombosis (DVT, and/or pulmonary embolism (PE. Prothrombotic fibrin clot phenotype, in particular prolonged clot lysis time, is considered a novel risk factor for VTE as well as venous thrombosis at unusual location, for example, cerebral sinus venous thrombosis, retinal vein obstruction, and Budd-Chiari syndrome. Growing evidence from observational studies indicates that abnormal fibrin clot properties can predict recurrent DVT and PE and they are involved in serious complications of VTE, for example, thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension and postthrombotic syndrome. The purpose of this article is to review our current understanding of the role of fibrin clot structure and function in venous thrombosis with emphasis on clinical issues ranging from prognosis to therapy.

  16. Onconeuronal and antineuronal antibodies in patients with neoplastic and non-neoplastic pulmonary pathologies and suspected for paraneoplastic neurological syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michalak S

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Onconeuronal antibodies are important diagnostic tool in patients with suspicion of paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS. However, their role in PNS pathophysiology and specificity for particular neurological manifestation remains unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate onconeuronal and antineuronal antibodies in patients with pulmonary pathologies and suspected for PNS. Materials and methods Twenty one patients with pulmonary pathologies were selected from the database of 525 consecutive patients with suspicion of PNS. Patients' sera were screened for the presence of onconeuronal and antineuronal antibodies by means of indirect immunofluorescence; the presence was confirmed by Western blotting. Clinical data were obtained from medical records, hospital data base, and questionnaire-based direct telephone contact with patients. Results Among 21 patients, aged 54 ± 11, with pulmonary pathologies, the most frequent neurological manifestations were neuropathies. Typical PNS included paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD and limbic encephalitis (LE. We found cases with multiple onconeuronal antibodies (anti-Ri and anti-Yo and coexisting PNS (PCD/LE. Well-defined onconeuronal antibodies were identified in 23.8% of patients. Among antineuronal antibodies, the most frequent were anti-MAG (23.8%. ROC curves analysis revealed high sensitivity of onconeuronal and antineuronal antibodies for typical PNS and lower for pulmonary malignancies. Conclusions Tests for antibodies are highly sensitive for the diagnosis of typical paraneoplastic neurological syndromes. Anti-myelin and anti-MAG antibodies are associated with non-neoplastic pulmonary diseases. Patients with well-defined onconeuronal antibodies require careful screening and follow-up, because the PNS diagnosis indicates a high probability of an underlying malignancy.

  17. Baseline characteristics and the association between hyponatraemia and pulmonary embolism prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korkmaz, I.; Guven, F. M. K.; Eren, S. H.; Beydilli, I.; Yildirim, B.; Aktas, C.; Alagozlu, H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of hyponatraemia on pulmonary thromboembolism mortality rates. Methods: The retrospective study was conducted at the Cumhuriyet University Medicine Faculty's Emergency Department, and involved the analysis of records related to all patients who were diagnosed with acute pulmonary thromboembolism between January 2005 and June 2011. Diagnoses were confirmed by pulmonary angiography, multi-slice computed tomography or high-probablity ventilation/perfusion scintigraphy. All patients (n=260) were over 16 years of age. SPSS 14 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Plasma sodium level, platelet count and hospitalisation time were significantly lower among those who died (n=16; 6.29) (p<0.005, p<0.035, p<0.035). Pearson correlation analysis found a negative correlation between plasma sodium level and C-reactive protein, white blood cells and pulmonary artery pressure (r=-0.238, p<0.001; r=-0.222, p<0.001; r=-0.444, p<0.018 respectively). A positive correlation was found between plasma sodium level and hospitalisation time (r=0.130; p<0.039). Conclusion: While mortality rates in hyponatraemic pulmonary thromboembolism patients increases, low plasma sodium is an easy parameter that should be kept in mind for the prognosis of pulmonary thromboembolism disease. (author)

  18. Catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome and pulmonary embolism in a 3-year-old child

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivier, Carine; Blondiaux, Eleonore; Dacher, Jean-Nicolas [University Hospital of Rouen, Department of Radiology, Rouen (France); Blanc, Thierry [University Hospital of Rouen, Department of Neonatal Medicine, Rouen (France); Borg, Jeanne-Yvonne [University Hospital of Rouen, Haematology Laboratory, Rouen (France)

    2006-08-15

    We report a rare example of catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS) in a young child. A 3-year-old girl with no previous medical history presented with extensive and recurrent thromboses. The diagnosis of CAPS was based on the occurrence of cardiopulmonary embolism in the child with a high titre of autoantibodies directed against phospholipids and beta-2-glycoprotein 1. In spite of a relatively rapid diagnosis and multiple treatments, the outcome was unfavourable. Multimodality imaging, including both ultrasonography and spiral CT, allowed close follow-up of the thromboses. (orig.)

  19. Catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome and pulmonary embolism in a 3-year-old child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivier, Carine; Blondiaux, Eleonore; Dacher, Jean-Nicolas; Blanc, Thierry; Borg, Jeanne-Yvonne

    2006-01-01

    We report a rare example of catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS) in a young child. A 3-year-old girl with no previous medical history presented with extensive and recurrent thromboses. The diagnosis of CAPS was based on the occurrence of cardiopulmonary embolism in the child with a high titre of autoantibodies directed against phospholipids and beta-2-glycoprotein 1. In spite of a relatively rapid diagnosis and multiple treatments, the outcome was unfavourable. Multimodality imaging, including both ultrasonography and spiral CT, allowed close follow-up of the thromboses. (orig.)

  20. Imaging of acute pulmonary embolism using a dual energy CT system with rapid kVp switching: Initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geyer, Lucas L., E-mail: Lucas.Geyer@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Clinical Radiology, Medical Center of the University of Munich, Nussbaumstraße 20, 80336 Munich (Germany); Scherr, Michael, E-mail: michael.scherr@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Clinical Radiology, Medical Center of the University of Munich, Nussbaumstraße 20, 80336 Munich (Germany); Körner, Markus, E-mail: markus.koerner@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Clinical Radiology, Medical Center of the University of Munich, Nussbaumstraße 20, 80336 Munich (Germany); Wirth, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.wirth@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Clinical Radiology, Medical Center of the University of Munich, Nussbaumstraße 20, 80336 Munich (Germany); Deak, Paul, E-mail: paul.deak@ge.com [GE Healthcare, Oskar-Schlemmer-Straße 11, 80807 Munich (Germany); Reiser, Maximilian F., E-mail: maximilian.reiser@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Clinical Radiology, Medical Center of the University of Munich, Nussbaumstraße 20, 80336 Munich (Germany); Linsenmaier, Ulrich, E-mail: ulrich.linsenmaier@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Clinical Radiology, Medical Center of the University of Munich, Nussbaumstraße 20, 80336 Munich (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: Computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) is considered as clinical gold standard for diagnosing pulmonary embolism (PE). Whereas conventional CTPA only offers anatomic information, dual energy CT (DECT) provides functional information on blood volume as surrogate of perfusion by assessing the pulmonary iodine distribution. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of lung perfusion imaging using a single-tube DECT scanner with rapid kVp switching. Materials and methods: Fourteen patients with suspicion of acute PE underwent DECT. Two experienced radiologists assessed the CTPA images and lung perfusion maps regarding the presence of PE. The image quality was rated using a semi-quantitative 5-point scale: 1 (=excellent) to 5 (=non-diagnostic). Iodine concentrations were quantified by a ROI analysis. Results: Seventy perfusion defects were identified in 266 lung segments: 13 (19%) were rated as consistent with PE. Five patients had signs of PE at CTPA. All patients with occlusive clots were correctly identified by DECT perfusion maps. On a per patient basis the sensitivity and specificity were 80.0% and 88.9%, respectively, while on a per segment basis it was 40.0% and 97.6%, respectively. None of the patients with a homogeneous perfusion map had an abnormal CTPA. The overall image quality of the perfusion maps was rated with a mean score of 2.6 ± 0.6. There was a significant ventrodorsal gradient of the median iodine concentrations (1.1 mg/cm{sup 3} vs. 1.7 mg/cm{sup 3}). Conclusion: Lung perfusion imaging on a DE CT-system with fast kVp-switching is feasible. DECT might be a helpful adjunct to assess the clinical severity of PE.

  1. Suspected metastatic adrenocortical carcinoma revealing as pulmonary Kaposi sarcoma in adrenal Cushing’s syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is a malignant disease most commonly diagnosed in the setting of a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and in patients receiving immunosuppressive treatment. Pulmonary KS has never been reported in association with endogenous Cushing’s syndrome (CS). Case presentation A 60-year-old woman presented with symptoms and signs of CS. Adrenal CS was confirmed by standard biochemical evaluation. Imaging revealed a right adrenal lesion (diameter 3.5 cm) and multiple pulmonary nodules, suggesting a cortisol-secreting adrenal carcinoma with pulmonary metastases. The patient underwent right adrenalectomy with a pathohistological diagnosis of an adrenal adenoma. Subsequent thoracoscopic wedge resection of one lung lesion revealed pulmonary KS with positive immunostaining for human herpes virus 8 (HHV-8). HIV-serology was negative. Hydrocortisone replacement was initiated for secondary adrenal insufficiency after surgery. Post-operative follow up imaging showed complete remission of all KS-related pulmonary nodules solely after resolution of hypercortisolism. Conclusion KS may occur in the setting of endogenous CS and may go into remission after cure of hypercortisolism without further specific treatment. PMID:25077599

  2. Predictive value of biomarkers for the prognosis of acute pulmonary embolism in Japanese patients: Results of the Tokyo CCU Network registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Yasuhiro; Obayashi, Toru; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Takayama, Morimasa; Nagao, Ken

    2015-12-01

    Several studies from Western countries have reported associations between cardiac troponin and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels and acute pulmonary embolism prognosis; however, the number of such reports from Asian countries, including Japan, is limited. Thus, we evaluated the relationship between blood biochemical findings and acute-phase pulmonary embolism prognosis in Japanese patients. The subjects included 441 patients with acute pulmonary embolism (191 men, 250 women; average age, 65.8±16.0 years) treated at Tokyo CCU Network Institutions from 2009 to 2011 and registered via survey forms. The association between blood biochemical findings at admission and 30-day mortality was investigated. The median BNP value was 186.5pg/mL (25th to 75th interquartile range: 49.8-500pg/mL) of 210 cases. No deaths were recorded among those with BNP levels <90pg/mL (n=70), whereas significantly higher mortality (10 deaths/140 cases, 7.1%; p=0.033) was observed among those with BNP levels ≥90pg/mL. A qualitative cardiac troponin test was positive in 58 of the 204 cases (28.4%), with a significantly higher mortality incidence (p=0.017) among the troponin-positive cases [6 (10.3%) versus 3 (2.1%) deaths among the 146 troponin-negative cases]. The overall mean blood glucose level at admission of 331 cases was 152.0±74.0mg/dL, and 30-day mortality significantly increased with blood glucose values (p=0.048). Troponin, BNP, and blood glucose levels are useful prognostic biomarkers for acute pulmonary embolism in Japanese patients. Copyright © 2015 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator plus heparin compared with heparin alone for patients with acute submassive pulmonary embolism: one-year outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Mi, Yu-Hong; Liang, Ying; Lu, Yan-Hui; Li, Ya-Min; Liu, Wen-Xu; Qian, Wang

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the long-term effects of thrombolysis on patients with submassive pulmonary embolism (PE). Methods Data of 136 patients with acute submassive PE and low risk of bleeding were prospectively collected from January 2005 to October 2011 in a single medical center. Patients received recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-tPA) plus low molecular weight heparin (LMWH, TT group, n = 79) or LMWH alone (AT group, n = 57), depending on treating physician's recommendation and p...

  4. Lung imaging in pulmonary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taplin, G.V.; Chopra, S.K.

    1976-01-01

    Although it has been recognized for several years that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can cause lung perfusion defects which may simulate pulmonary embolism, relatively little use has been made of either the radioxenon or the radioaerosol inhalation lung imaging procedures until the last few years as a means of distinguishing pulmonary embolism (P.E.) from COPD is reported. Recent experience is reported with the use of both of these procedures in comparison with pulmonary function tests for the early detection of COPD in population studies and also in P.E. suspects. Equal emphasis is given to simultaneous aerosol ventilation-perfusion (V/P) imaging in the differential diagnosis of P.E. Finally, this paper is concerned with new developments in regional lung diffusion imaging following the inhalation of radioactive gases and rapidly absorbed radioaerosols. Their experimental basis is presented and their potential clinical applications in pulmonary embolism are discussed. As a result of these investigations, a functional (V/P) diagnosis of pulmonary embolism in patients may be possible in the near future with a sequential radioaerosol inhalation procedure alone

  5. Dead Space Ventilation Parallels Changes in Scintigraphic Vascular Obstruction at Recurrence of Pulmonary Embolism and after Thrombolytic Therapy: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc A Rodger

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Physiological and alveolar dead space ventilation both increase in pulmonary embolism (PE in proportion to the severity of vascular obstruction. The case of a patient with recurrent PE while on heparin therapy is presented. The recurrence was characterized clinically by severe pulmonary vascular obstruction and right heart dysfunction. The patient was treated with thrombolytic therapy, with excellent clinical and scintigraphic resolution. Dead space ventilation measurements at baseline, at the time of recurrence and after thrombolytic therapy are presented. The potential utility of dead space ventilation measurements for PE diagnosis and management are discussed.

  6. A fatal case of acute pulmonary embolism caused by right ventricular masses of acute lymphoblastic lymphoma-leukemia in a 13 year old girl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Mi Ko Ko

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 13-year-old girl with acute lymphoblastic lymphoma- leukemia, who presented with a cardiac metastasis in the right ventricle, resulting in a pulmonary embolism. At the time of her leukemia diagnosis, a cardiac mass was incidentally found. The differential diagnosis for this unusual cardiac mass included cardiac tumor, metastasis, vegetation, and thrombus. Empirical treatment was initiated, including anticoagulation and antibiotics. She underwent plasmapheresis and was administered oral prednisolone for her leukemia. Five days later, she experienced sudden hemodynamic collapse and required extracorporeal membrane oxygenation insertion and emergency surgery. These interventions proved futile, and the patient died. Pathology revealed that the cardiac mass comprised an aggregation of small, round, necrotic cells consistent with leukemia. This is the first known case of acute lymphoblastic leukemia presenting as a right ventricular mass, with consequent fatal acute pulmonary embolism. A cardiac mass in a child with acute leukemia merits investigation to rule out every possible etiology, including vegetation, thrombus, and even a mass of leukemic cells, which could result in the fatal complication of pulmonary embolism.

  7. A clinical evaluation of the intraluminal bronchial artery infusion with reptilase or plus additional target artery embolization in treatment of severe hemoptysis in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Puxuan; Cai Xiongmao; Cao Mairui; Yu Weiye; Yang Gendong; Chen Xinchun; Sun Yanzhi; Liu Jinqing; Gong Xiaolong; Fu Xiangdong; Deng Yongcong; Liu Zhi; Zheng Guangping

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of bronchial artery infusion with Reptilase or plus additional target artery embolization in treatment of massive hemoptysis in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. Methods: Among 34 patients with massive hemoptysis (≥600 ml/24 hours) resultant from pulmonary tuberculosis, 21 cases (group 1) received by bronchial artery infusion with Reptilase (1-3KU) plus target artery embolization with gelfoam sponge. In the rest 13 cases (group 2) a simple bronchial artery infusion with Reptilase (1-3KU) was performed because the bleeding target arteries were inaccessible. Results: In total 32 cases out of 34 (94.1%) the hemoptysis ceased after the intervention, while 1 case in each group respectively needed further surgery. Among the cured 34 cases, single treatment was done in 32 cases, twice interventions were performed in 1 case and triple intraluminal therapies were done in 1 case. There is no significant difference between the efficiency of the treatment applied in group 1 and group 2 (P>0.05). Conclusion: Bronchial artery infusion with Reptilase or plus additional target artery embolization is effective and safe method in the management of massive hemoptysis in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. When the target the bleed artery is inaccessible, local intraluminal infusion with Reptilase (1-3KU) is an acceptable option

  8. [Central lung embolism in chronic interstitial pneumopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordasini, C; Hess, B; Zimmermann, A

    1998-04-15

    An 80 year old patient with known interstitial pneumopathy of unknown etiology was hospitalized because of acute onset and rapid deterioration of dyspnea at rest within days. A foregoing neurologic investigation including CT and EEG because of prior syncopes and cramp attacks had not revealed pathologic findings. Thorax X-ray at admission showed homogenous loss of transparency on the left side, calcified basal plaques on both sides and prominent central pulmonary vessels with jumping caliber. A punctate of the leftsided pleural effusion revealed lymphocytic exsudate, normal pH, low glucose and an elevated LDH. The patient died shortly after a collapse at a bowel visit and pulmonary embolism was suspected in accordance to results from arterial blood gas analysis, ECG and chest X-ray. Neurologic symptoms could be explained by recurrent pulmonary embolism. Pleural plaques together with the punctate suggested a malignant etiology. A mesothelioma was taken into consideration, although there were no anamnestic reports on an exposition to asbestos. Autopsy revealed almost complete central embolism of the left pulmonary artery with acute cor pulmonale thus confirming the clinical suspicion. The embolus showed components of different ages of origin. Besides bronchitic and emphysematous alteration histology of the pulmonary tissue revealed interstitial and septal fibrosis with focal tissue consolidation. In one giant cell a typical asbestos body was found (in 1 out of 10 sections). In spite of missing information on an exposition to asbestos an abnormally high exposition must be taken into consideration because of the finding of an asbestos particle in relation to the amount of tissue studied. Apart from interstitial fibrosis asbestos may also cause consolidation of pulmonary tissue. Histology of plaquelike lesions revealed mesothelioma of fibrous type. This finding supports the suspicion that a major part of the pulmonary lesions was due to exposition to asbestos.

  9. Doppler Velocimetry of the Ductus Arteriosus in Normal Fetuses and Fetuses Suspected for Pulmonary Hypoplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerards, F.A.; Twisk, J.W.R.; van Vugt, J.M.G.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine whether the pulsatility index (PI) of the ductus arteriosus could predict the occurrence of pulmonary hypoplasia secondary to congenital disorders or complications during pregnancy. Sample and Methods: In this longitudinal study, 78 uncomplicated

  10. Pulmonary embolism in spine surgery: a comparison of combined anterior/posterior approach versus posterior approach surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Han Jo; Kepler, Christopher; Cunningham, Matthew; Rawlins, Bernard; Boachie-Adjei, Oheneba

    2011-01-15

    retrospective review. to determine if Anterior/Posterior Combined approach spine surgery is associated with an increased risk of pulmonary embolism (PE) compared to Posterior Only approach surgery. combined anterior/posterior approach spine surgery is associated with a significantly increased risk for PE. However, it is uncertain if there is any difference in risk between combined approaches versus a posterior-only approach. a prospective cohort of patients who underwent anterior/posterior combined approach spine surgery from January 2002 to January 2006 was compared to a retrospective cohort of consecutive patients who underwent posterior only approach spine surgery from September2007 to September 2008. Patient demographics, medical history, body-mass indexes, type of surgery, length of surgery, transfusions, and instrumented vertebral levels were collected from hospital and office records. Hospital records were used to identify patients who developed PE based on diagnosis by spiral CT scan. CT scans were only performed when a patient's clinical picture raised suspicion of PE. Fisher exact test for significance, χ test and odds ratios were used for analysis. a total of 119 patients were included in the study: 63 patients underwent posterior approach spine surgery and 66 patients underwent combined anterior/posterior approach surgery. One patient (1.6%) developed PE after posterior approach surgery while 5 patients (7.5%) developed PE in the combined approach group. Those undergoing combined approaches were 5.08 times more likely to suffer from PE, but this increase was not significant (P = 0.208). Overall, increased risk for PE was associated with the number of levels fused (P = 0.006), total blood loss (P = 0.029), and number of units transfused (P = 0.030). The combined approach was associated with older age (P spine surgery is associated with an increased risk for pulmonary embolism compared to posterior only approaches. However, regardless of the surgical

  11. Algorithm for the diagnosis and follow-up of acute pulmonary embolisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvillo Batllés, P

    The urgent diagnosis of acute pulmonary thromboembolism benefits from the use of evidence-based clinical guidelines that improve patients' prognoses and reduce the unnecessary use of imaging tests. This article explains the diagnostic algorithms for pulmonary thromboembolism most recently published by the relevant scientific societies both for the general population and for special situations, trying to clear up common doubts and analyzing persistent controversies. It also discusses the need to follow up the thromboembolism after anticoagulation treatment, which is not currently recommended in the guidelines. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Clinical application of radioaerosol studies - pulmonary embolism, inhalation burns and glue-sniffers and COPD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundram, Felix

    1994-01-01

    The alveolar epithelium and the capillary endothelium together form the alveolar capillary membrane. Fluid exchange occurs across this membrane, and is dependent on intravascular and interstitial hydrostatic and oncotic pressures, and on permeability of this membrane. Damage to either the alveolar or capillary component can result in a high permeability pulmonary oedema, even though the alveolar epithelium forms an extremely tight membrane which is ten times less permeable than the capillary endothelium. Nuclear medicine methods can be used to observe changes in integrity of pulmonary capillary endothelium (with first pass dual-indicator dilution technique using successive injections of radiotracer), and of alveolar epithelium, and it is important that the damage should be detected before patients develop clinical pulmonary oedema so that intensive therapy can be instituted early. We have used 99m Tc DTPA radioaerosol to measure alteration in pulmonary epithelial permeability and to image the distribution of ventilation in normal and some pathological states. In some clinical studies Tc-99m (tin) colloid radioaerosol has been used to obtain the ventilation images

  13. Chronic cough and an atypical pattern of peripheral pulmonary opacities: A case report secondary to suspected drug onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alas, Ronnie; Williams, Mark Tony; Yamin, Ghiam; Rofoogaran, Mohsen

    2018-01-01

    Chronic eosinophilic pneumonia (CEP) is an idiopathic interstitial lung disease with nonspecific symptoms that involves a complex inflammatory cascade. A 36-year-old prisoner with a history of psoriasis presented with progressive worsening dyspnea, chest pain, and cough. His symptoms started 2-months after starting adalimumab, a tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-inhibitor, for psoriasis treatment. Initial workup revealed 27% eosinophils on complete blood count, elevated IgE levels on bronchoalveolar lavage, and bilateral peripheral lung opacities on imaging. The patient's symptoms and eosinophilia improved markedly after starting corticosteroids. Based on these findings, the patient was diagnosed with CEP. To our knowledge, this is the first case of asthma and CEP in a patient taking adalimumab. We suspect adalimumab unmasked the Th2 cell pathway response that was otherwise suppressed by psoriasis, a primarily Th1 cell pathway disease. The patient's pulmonary changes can be attributed to an eosinophilic asthma phenotype with adalimumab putatively indirectly causing CEP.

  14. Low WSS and High OSI Measured by 3D Cine PC MRI Reflect High Pulmonary Artery Pressures in Suspected Secondary Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Masaki; Takehara, Yasuo; Isoda, Haruo; Uto, Tomohiro; Matsunaga, Masaki; Alley, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Institutional Review Board (IRB)-approved prospective study was conducted to test whether objective and quantitative hemodynamic markers wall shear stress (WSS) and oscillatory shear index (OSI) measured by three-dimensional (3D) cine phase-contrast (PC) can reflect pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Seventeen consecutive patients of suspected secondary PAH were examined for pulmonary artery pressures (PAPs) with right heart catheterization (RHC) and three-dimensional (3D) cine PC MR. Based on the RHC data, patients were subdivided into two groups of 12 non-PAH (median age of 74.5 years) and 5 PAH (median age of 77 years) patients. Based on 3D cine PC magnetic resonance (MR), hemodynamic parameters including spatially averaged systolic WSS (sWSS), diastolic WSS (dWSS), mean WSS (mWSS), OSI and blood vessel section area (BVSA) at the pulmonary arterial trunk were calculated. Streamline images in the pulmonary arteries were also assessed. All the parameters were compared between non-PAH and PAH groups. sWSS (N/m(2)) and mWSS (N/m(2)) of PAH group was lower than that of non-PAH group (0.594 ± 0.067 vs. 0.961 ± 0.590, P = 0.001), (0.365 ± 0.035 vs. 0.489 ± 0.132, P = 0.027). OSI of PAH group was higher than that of non-PAH (0.214 ± 0.026 vs. 0.130 ± 0.046, P = 0.001). sWSS, mWSS, and dWSS were inversely correlated and OSI was positively correlated to mean PAP or systolic PAP with r values of -0.638 (P = 0.005), -0.643 (P = 0.005), -0.485 (P = 0.049), and 0.625 (P = 0.007); or -0.622 (P = 0.008), -0.629 (P = 0.007), -0.484 (P = 0.049), and 0.594 (P = 0.012), respectively. sWSS was also inversely correlated to BVSA with r value of -0.488 (P = 0.049), and OSI was correlated to BVSA with r value of 0.574 (P = 0.016). Vortex or helical flows were observed more frequently in PAH patients. The low sWSS and mWSS as well as high OSI measured with 3D cine PC MR could be potential hemodynamic markers for the increased PAP in suspected secondary PAH patients.

  15. Early, real-world experience with direct oral anticoagulants in the treatment of intermediate-high risk acute pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Sónia Martins; Cunha, Susana; Baptista, Rui; Monteiro, Sílvia; Monteiro, Pedro; Gonçalves, Francisco; Pêgo, Mariano

    2017-11-01

    Intermediate-high risk pulmonary embolism (IHR-PE) has a poor prognosis, but is under-represented in trials of direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) in venous thromboembolic disease (VTE). We aimed to assess whether the administration of DOACs was equivalent to the conventional (CONV) treatment of low-molecular weight heparin bridged with warfarin for treating IHR-PE. We conducted a retrospective cohort study including 59 consecutive patients admitted with IHR-PE and followed for up to three months after discharge. Two groups were created based on the anticoagulant strategy: CONV (n=35) and DOAC (n=24). The efficacy endpoints were death, recurrent PE, estimated pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP), right ventricular systolic function (RVSF) at discharge, and length of stay; the safety endpoint was major bleeding. The two groups were similar regarding demographics, PE etiology and markers of clinical severity. There were four in-hospital deaths in the CONV group and none in the DOAC group. No recurrent PE or major bleeding event was recorded in either group. At discharge, neither PASP nor RVSF was different between the groups. Patients in the DOAC group were discharged 1.7 days earlier on average than patients in the CONV group (4.7±2.4 vs. 3.0±1.5 days, p=0.002). The adoption of a DOAC treatment strategy in this real-world cohort of IHR-PE patients was associated with similar efficacy and safety to the CONV approach. The fact that monitoring of anticoagulation effect was unnecessary probably led to the significant reduction in length of stay. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Prevalence of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in superficial thrombophlebitis of the lower limbs: prospective study of 60 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobreira, M Lima; Maffei, F Humberto De Abreu; Yoshida, W Bonetti; Rollo, H Almeida; Lastória, S; Griva, B Lotufo; De Carvalho, L Raquel

    2009-10-01

    Superficial thrombophlebitis (ST) ascending the lower limbs is a common disease, which may be associated with deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE). The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of DVT and PE as complications of ascending ST of the lower limbs in the great saphenous vein (GSV) or SSV (SSV) and probable risk factors. For this study 60 consecutive patients were enrolled with ascending ST of the GSV or SSV, seen between 2000 and 2003 at a public hospital in Botucatu, SP, Brazil. All patients were assessed clinically, by venous Duplex scanning of the lower limbs to confirm ST and test for DVT, and by means of pulmonary scintigraphy to test for PE. In 13 ST cases (21.67%) there was concomitant DVT and 17 ST patients (28.33%) also had PE. Eleven patients had a clinical status suggestive of DVT, but only in eight of these (61.5%), this clinical diagnosis was confirmed. Fourteen patients had a clinical status suggestive of PE, and this diagnosis was confirmed in six cases (35.30%). ST patients who also had DVT and/or PE were given anticoagulant treatment with heparin and warfarin. None of the variables studied was predictive of DVT or PE (P>0.05). However, the presence of varicose veins reduced the risk of patients having DVT (relative risk=9.09; 95%CI:1.75 - 50.00 and P=0.023). The prevalence rates of PE (28.3%) and DVT (21.6%) were elevated in this sample of ascending ST cases, indicating a need for detailed assessment of patients for signs of these complications, including for therapeutic management decision making.

  17. Usefulness of Clinical Prediction Rules, D-dimer, and Arterial Blood Gas Analysis to Predict Pulmonary Embolism in Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shazia Awan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Pulmonary embolism (PE is seven times more common in cancer patients than non-cancer patients. Since the existing clinical prediction rules (CPRs were validated predominantly in a non-cancer population, we decided to look at the utility of arterial blood gas (ABG analysis and D-dimer in predicting PE in cancer patients. Methods: Electronic medical records were reviewed between December 2005 and November 2010. A total of 177 computed tomography pulmonary angiograms (CTPAs were performed. We selected 104 individuals based on completeness of laboratory and clinical data. Patients were divided into two groups, CTPA positive (patients with PE and CTPA negative (PE excluded. Wells score, Geneva score, and modified Geneva score were calculated for each patient. Primary outcomes of interest were the sensitivities, specificities, positive, and negative predictive values for all three CPRs. Results: Of the total of 104 individuals who had CTPAs, 33 (31.7% were positive for PE and 71 (68.3% were negative. There was no difference in basic demographics between the two groups. Laboratory parameters were compared and partial pressure of oxygen was significantly lower in patients with PE (68.1 mmHg vs. 71 mmHg, p = 0.030. Clinical prediction rules showed good sensitivities (88−100% and negative predictive values (93−100%. An alveolar-arterial (A-a gradient > 20 had 100% sensitivity and negative predictive values. Conclusions: CPRs and a low A-a gradient were useful in excluding PE in cancer patients. There is a need for prospective trials to validate these results.

  18. The Prediction of the Risk Level of Pulmonary Embolism and Deep Vein Thrombosis through Artificial Neural Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agharezaei, Laleh; Agharezaei, Zhila; Nemati, Ali; Bahaadinbeigy, Kambiz; Keynia, Farshid; Baneshi, Mohammad Reza; Iranpour, Abedin; Agharezaei, Moslem

    2016-10-01

    Venous thromboembolism is a common cause of mortality among hospitalized patients and yet it is preventable through detecting the precipitating factors and a prompt diagnosis by specialists. The present study has been carried out in order to assist specialists in the diagnosis and prediction of the risk level of pulmonary embolism in patients, by means of artificial neural network. A number of 31 risk factors have been used in this study in order to evaluate the conditions of 294 patients hospitalized in 3 educational hospitals affiliated with Kerman University of Medical Sciences. Two types of artificial neural networks, namely Feed-Forward Back Propagation and Elman Back Propagation, were compared in this study. Through an optimized artificial neural network model, an accuracy and risk level index of 93.23 percent was achieved and, subsequently, the results have been compared with those obtained from the perfusion scan of the patients. 86.61 percent of high risk patients diagnosed through perfusion scan diagnostic method were also diagnosed correctly through the method proposed in the present study. The results of this study can be a good resource for physicians, medical assistants, and healthcare staff to diagnose high risk patients more precisely and prevent the mortalities. Additionally, expenses and other unnecessary diagnostic methods such as perfusion scans can be efficiently reduced.

  19. The importance of MTHFR C677T/A1298C combined polymorphisms in pulmonary embolism in Turkish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basol, Nursah; Karakus, Nevin; Savas, Asli Yasemen; Kaya, Ilker; Karakus, Kayhan; Yigit, Serbulent

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is an important cardiovascular emergency with high mortality. There are still problems related to the diagnosis of PE and genetic research may play a key role on diagnosis as well as determining risk stratification. In the present study, the aim was to evaluate MTHFR C677T and A1298C polymorphisms that play a role on folate metabolism in PE patients. A total of 118 PE patients and 126 controls were enrolled in the current study. Genomic DNA was isolated and genotyped using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses for the MTHFR C677T and A1298C polymorphisms. There was no association between clinical and demographic characteristics of PE patients and both MTHFR C677T and A1298C polymorphisms. Allele frequencies showed a significant difference between patients and controls. T allele frequency was significantly higher in the patients' group than the control group. There was an association between PE and combined MTHFR C677T and A1298C polymorphisms. We found an association between MTHFR C677T/A1298C combined mutations and PE in the Turkish population. Future genetic studies investigating combined mutations could be very helpful to identify risk population in PE. Copyright © 2016 The Lithuanian University of Health Sciences. Production and hosting by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  20. A novel prognostic indicator for in-hospital and 4-year outcomes in patients with pulmonary embolism: TIMI risk index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Muhammed; Güvenç, Tolga Sinan; Hayıroğlu, Mert İlker; Kaya, Adnan; Tatlısu, Mustafa Adem; Avşar, Şahin; Öz, Ahmet; Keskin, Taha; Uzun, Ahmet Okan; Kozan, Ömer

    2017-10-01

    Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) risk index (TRI) was recently evaluated in patients with acute myocardial infarction and found as an important prognostic index. In the current study, we evaluated the prognostic value of TRI in patients with moderate-high and high risk pulmonary embolism (PE) who were treated with thrombolytic agents. We retrospectively evaluated the in-hospital and long-term (4-year) prognostic impact of TRI in a total number of 456 patients with moderate-high and high risk PE. Patients were stratified by quartiles (Q) of admission TRI. In-hospital analysis revealed significantly higher rates of in-hospital death for patients with TRI in Q4. After adjustment for confounding baseline variables, TRI in Q4 was associated with 2.8-fold hazard of in-hospital death. Upon multivariate analysis, admission TRI in Q4 vs. Q1-3 was associated with 3.1 fold hazard of 4-year mortality rate. TRI in Q4, as compared to Q1-3, was significantly predictive of short term and long-term outcomes in PE patients who treated with thrombolytic agents. Our data suggest TRI to be an independent, feasible, and cost-effective tool for rapid risk stratification in moderate-high and high risk PE patients who treated with thrombolytic agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Efficacy of prophylactic inferior vena caval filters in prevention of pulmonary embolism in the absence of deep venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Mark G; Hart, Joseph P; El-Sayed, Hosam F

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing use of inferior vena caval filters (IVCFs) as prophylactic activity in the absence of a deep venous thrombosis (DVT) to prevent pulmonary embolism (PE) in high-risk patients. These devices are effective in preventing PE in the presence of lower extremity DVT, when anticoagulation is contraindicated or has failed. An electronic databases search of MEDLINE, PubMed, The Cochrane Library, and Google Scholar for relevant articles listed between January 2000 and December 2014 was performed. The review was confined to patients without a history of previous venous thromboembolism and no evidence of changes on venous duplex imaging suggestive of previous DVT. At present, the use of prophylactic IVCF is predominantly in the trauma, orthopedic, and bariatric surgical populations. Currently, no class I studies exist to support insertion of an IVCF in a patient without an established DVT or PE. However, there is a body of class II and class III evidence that would support the use of IVCFs in certain "high-risk" patients who do not have a documented DVT or the occurrence of a PE. Widespread use of prophylactic IVCFs is not supported by evidence and should be discouraged. Copyright © 2016 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Fatal pulmonary embolism following splenectomy in a patient with Evan's syndrome: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monga, Varun; Maliske, Seth M; Perepu, Usha

    2017-01-01

    Evans syndrome (ES) is a rare disease characterized by simultaneous or sequential development of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) and immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) with or without immune neutropenia. Splenectomy is one of the treatment options for disease refractory to medical therapy. Venous thromboembolism (VTE) following splenectomy for hematological diseases has an incidence of 10%. Here we describe a case report of a young patient hospitalized with severe hemolytic anemia with Hgb 4.8 g/dl. He developed thrombocytopenia with platelet nadir of 52,000/mm 3 , thus formally diagnosed with ES. He failed standard medical therapy. He underwent splenectomy and had a fatal outcome. Autopsy confirmed the cause of death as pulmonary embolism (PE). This case report and review of the literature highlight important aspects of the association between VTE, splenectomy, and hemolytic syndromes including the presence of thrombocytopenia. The burden of the disease is reviewed as well as various pathophysiologic mechanisms contributing to thromboembolic events in these patients and current perioperative prophylactic anticoagulation strategies. Despite an advancing body of literature increasing awareness of VTE following splenectomy, morbidity and mortality remains high. Identifying high risk individuals for thromboembolic complications from splenectomy remains a challenge. There are no consensus guidelines for proper perioperative and post-operative anti-coagulation. We encourage future research to determine which factors might be playing a role in increasing the risk for VTE in real time with hope of forming a consensus to guide management.

  3. Are inferior vena cava filters effective for prophylaxis of critical pulmonary embolism in patients with cancer and coexisting venous thromboembolism?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deguchi, Juno; Nagayoshi, Mikiko; Onozuka, Atsuko

    2008-01-01

    Cancer sometimes causes venous thromboembolisms (VTE) including pulmonary embolisms (PE), which impedes aggressive treatment such as chemotherapy. From January 2003 to March 2007, there were 120 hospitalized patients with existing VTE in The University of Tokyo Hospital. Among them we reviewed 39 patients with cancer who required aggressive chemoradiotherapy and examined whether inferior vena cava (IVC) filtration was necessary in addition to ordinary anticoagulant therapy. The clinical stage of cancer was stage I in 7, stage II in 4, stage III in 11, and stage IV in 17. Most were advanced cancer. Of the 39, 9 underwent an IVC filter placement (filter group) and 30 did not (no-filter group). All of them received regular anticoagulant therapy. In the long-term follow up averaging 16.9 months, one patient of the filter group required discontinuation of chemotherapy due to symptomatic PE, but there was no such a case in the no-filter group. Filter-related complications such as IVC occlusion or migration did not occur. Computed tomography showed VTE in the long-term course in 27 out of 39 patients, and suggested increased thrombi in cases of recurrent cancer and those with poor outcome. Seventeen died of cancer but no one died of PE during the study. This study showed that IVC filters offered no beneficial effect for the patients with existing VTE who receive aggressive chemotherapy. (author)

  4. Pulmonary Embolism in Pneumonia: Still a Diagnostic Challenge? Results of a Case-Control Study in 100 Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Paparoupa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the diagnostic value of D-dimer, CRP, and leucocytes count to detect an underlying pulmonary embolism (PE in patients with pneumonia. A predictive model of an underlying PE, based on laboratory markers and clinical symptoms, was our ultimate objective. Overall 100 patients underwent a computed tomography angiography (CTA of the lung: 54 with coexistence of PE and pneumonia (cases and 46 with pneumonia without PE (controls. Cases and controls were matched 1 : 1. Symptoms and paraclinical findings were registered on admission. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves, search for an optimal threshold, and conditional logistic regression analysis were conducted. D-dimer has a moderate ability to detect PE in pneumonia. Sensitivity of D-dimer was estimated at 97.78% and specificity at 11.11%. No optimal cut-point has acceptable diagnostic ability. After excluding patients with sepsis, sensitivity was reduced to 96.97%, whereas specificity increased to 16.13%. Consolidation in chest X-ray and positive D-dimer predict better an underlying PE as D-dimer itself. Thus, discriminatory power of the prediction model (AUC of 0.740 is not much greater than D-dimer (AUC of 0.703. No threshold that could increase the diagnostic value of D-dimer or a prediction model which is significantly better than D-dimer itself was identified.

  5. Unusual deep vein thrombosis sites: magnetic resonance venography in patients with negative compression ultrasound and symptomatic pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, T; Steidl, K; Belaj, K; Hafner, F; Froehlich, H; Deutschmann, H; Pilger, E; Brodmann, M

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate the clinical characteristics of patients with pulmonary embolism (PE), negative compression ultrasound (CUS) of the lower limbs and detection of unusual deep vein thrombosis (DVT) sites by means of magnetic resonance (MR) venography. A retrospective data analysis of PE patients hospitalized at our institution from April 2009 to 2011. From April 2009 to 2011, a total of 762 PE patients were treated at our institution. In 169 of these patients CUS for DVT was negative. In these patients MR venography was performed for further evaluation. We found venous thrombosis at unusual sites in 12 of these patients. Due to free floating thrombus masses and fear of life-threatening PE progression we inserted an inferior vena cava filter in three of these 12 patients. The leading venous thromboembolism risk factor in our patients was immobilization (5 patients, 41.7%). We conclude that especially in patients with PE and negative CUS of the lower limbs a thrombosis of the pelvic veins should be considered in case of symptoms for venous thrombosis in this area. Further diagnostic work-up with MR venography should be scheduled in these patients especially in patients with risk factor immobilization as therapeutic consequences might occur.

  6. A successful salvage therapy with daptomycin and linezolid for right-sided infective endocarditis and septic pulmonary embolism caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazaki, Megumi; Oami, Takehiko; Nakanishi, Kazuya; Hase, Ryota; Watanabe, Hiroyuki

    2018-03-10

    Although vancomycin administration is recommended for the treatment of infective endocarditis (IE) caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), it is unclear whether an alternative agent, daptomycin, can be used to treat IE with pulmonary complications. A 26-year-old female who had undergone surgical repair of a ventricular septal defect as an early teenager presented with fever, headache, and vomiting. She was admitted to our hospital and diagnosed with right-sided IE with septic pulmonary embolism caused by MRSA. Vancomycin, rifampicin, and gentamicin were administered; however, exacerbation of drug eruption due to the antimicrobial agents on the 11th day led us to switch from vancomycin and rifampicin to daptomycin. Furthermore, we included linezolid to treat lung abscesses that accompanied the septic pulmonary embolism. We confirmed negative blood cultures on the 18th day. On the same day, a patch closure for the ventricular septal defect and tricuspid valve replacement were performed. She was discharged on the 65th day with an uneventful postoperative course. This experience suggests that daptomycin and linezolid are effective salvage therapies for right-sided IE caused by MRSA and accompanied by pulmonary complications. Copyright © 2018 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Acute pulmonary embolism: prediction of cor pulmonale and short-term patient survival from assessment of cardiac dimensions in routine multidetector-row CT; Mehrschicht-Spiral-CT bei vermuteter und inzidenteller akuter Lungenembolie: prognostischer Wert morpholoqischer Herzparameter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engeike, C. [Radiologie, Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Rummeny, E.; Marten, K. [Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik, Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Univ. Muenchen (Germany)

    2006-10-15

    Purpose: evaluation of the prognostic value of morphological cardiac parameters in patients with suspected and incidental acute pulmonary embolism (PE) using multidetector-row chest CT (MSCT). Materials and methods: 2335 consecutive MSCT scans were evaluated for the presence of PE. The arterial enhancement and analysability of pulmonary arteries and the heart were assessed as parameters of the scan quality. The diastolic right and left ventricular short axes (RV{sub D}, LV{sub D}) and the interventricular septal deviation (ISD) were measured in all PE-positive patients and the echocardiography reports were reviewed. The clinical data assessment included cardio-respiratory and other co-morbidities, systemic anticoagulant therapy (ACT), and the 30-day outcome. Predictors of acute cor pulmonale and the short-term outcome were calculated by univariate and multivariate logistic regressions including odds ratios (OR) and ROC analyses using positive (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV). Results: 90 patients with acute PE were included (36 with clinically suspected PE, 54 with incidental PE). 26 patients had cardio-respiratory co-morbidities. Four patients underwent systemic thrombolysis, 43 underwent anticoagulation in therapeutic doses, 19 underwent anticoagulation in prophylactic doses, and 24 patients did not undergo ACT. 15 of 41 patients had echocardiographic evidence of acute cor pulmonale. 8 patients died within 30 days. The RV{sub D} was the best independent predictor of acute cor pulmonale (p = 0,002, OR = 9.16, PPV = 0.68, NPV=1 at 4.49 cm cut off) and short-term outcome (p= 0,0005, OR = 2.82, PPV = 0.23, NPV = 0.98 at 4.75 cm cut off). The RV{sub D}/LV{sub D} ratio had a PPV of 0.85 for cor pulmonale. (orig.)

  8. Minimizing Contrast Medium Doses to Diagnose Pulmonary Embolism with 80-kVp Multidetector Computed Tomography in Azotemic Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmquist, F. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Malmoe Univ. Hospital, Univ. of Lund, Malmoe (Sweden)); Hansson, K.; Pasquariello, F. (Dept. of Internal Medicine, Lasarettet Trelleborg, Univ. of Lund, Trelleborg (Sweden)); Bjoerk, J. (Competence Center for Clinical Research, Univ. Hospital, Univ. of Lund, Lund (Sweden)); Nyman, U. (Dept. of Radiology, Lasarettet Trelleborg, Univ. of Lund, Trelleborg (Sweden))

    2009-02-15

    Background: In diagnosing acute pulmonary embolism (PE) in azotemic patients, scintigraphy and magnetic resonance imaging are frequently inconclusive or not available in many hospitals. Computed tomography is readily available, but relatively high doses (30-50 g I) of potentially nephrotoxic iodine contrast media (CM) are used. Purpose: To report on the diagnostic quality and possible contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) after substantially reduced CM doses to diagnose PE in azotemic patients using 80-peak kilovoltage (kVp) 16-row multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) combined with CM doses tailored to body weight, fixed injection duration adapted to scan time, automatic bolus tracking, and saline chaser. Material and Methods: Patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <50 ml/min were scheduled to undergo 80-kVp MDCT using 200 mg I/kg, and those with eGFR =50 ml/min, 120-kVp MDCT with 320 mg I/kg. Both protocols used an 80-kg maximum dose weight and a fixed 15-s injection time. Pulmonary artery density and contrast-to-noise ratio were measured assuming 70 Hounsfield units (HU) for a fresh clot. CIN was defined as a plasma creatinine rise >44.2 mumol/l from baseline. Results: 89/148 patients (63/68 females) underwent 80-/120-kVp protocols, respectively, with 95% of the examinations being subjectively excellent or adequate. Mean values in the 80-/120-kVp cohorts regarding age were 82/65 years, body weight 66/78 kg, effective mAs 277/117, CM dose 13/23 g I, pulmonary artery density 359/345 HU, image noise (1 standard deviation) 24/21 HU, contrast-to-noise ratio 13/13, and dose-length product 173/258 mGycm. Only 1/65 and 2/119 patients in the 80- and 120-kVp cohorts, respectively, with negative CT and no anticoagulation suffered non-f