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Sample records for suspected liver disease

  1. Prevalence of suspected nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in Hispanic/Latino individuals differs by heritage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallwitz, Eric R; Daviglus, Martha L; Allison, Matthew A; Emory, Kristen T; Zhao, Lihui; Kuniholm, Mark H; Chen, Jinsong; Gouskova, Natalia; Pirzada, Amber; Talavera, Gregory A; Youngblood, Marston E; Cotler, Scott J

    2015-03-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) was shown to disproportionally affect Hispanic persons. We examined the prevalence of suspected NAFLD in Hispanic/Latino persons with diverse backgrounds. We studied the prevalence of suspected NAFLD among 12,133 persons included in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. We collected data on levels of aminotransferase, metabolic syndrome (defined by National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines), demographics, and health behaviors. Suspected NAFLD was defined on the basis of increased level of aminotransferase in the absence of serologic evidence for common causes of liver disease or excessive alcohol consumption. In multivariate analyses, data were adjusted for metabolic syndrome, age, acculturation, diet, physical activity, sleep, and levels of education and income. In multivariate analysis, compared with persons of Mexican heritage, persons of Cuban (odds ratio [OR], 0.69; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.57-0.85), Puerto Rican (OR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.52-0.87), and Dominican backgrounds (OR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.54-0.93) had lower rates of suspected NAFLD. Persons of Central American and South American heritage had a similar prevalence of suspected NAFLD compared with persons of Mexican heritage. NAFLD was less common in women than in men (OR, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.40-0.60). Suspected NAFLD associated with metabolic syndrome and all 5 of its components. On the basis of an analysis of a large database of health in Latino populations, we found the prevalence of suspected NAFLD among Hispanic/Latino individuals to vary by region of heritage. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Prevalence and Correlates of Suspected Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Chinese Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peige Song

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD has become a serious public health problem worldwide; however, the availability of information on the prevalence of NAFLD in the general pediatric population is still limited. The primary aim of this study was to reveal the prevalence and correlates of suspected NAFLD in Chinese children at the national level. Data from the China Health and Nutrition Surveys (CHNS was used. Weight, height, waist circumference (WC, blood pressure (BP were measured for children aged 7–18 years. Blood samples were collected and analyzed. Children were classified as having suspected NAFLD if common causes of liver disease were excluded, and serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT values were above the established thresholds (>22.1 IU/L for girls and >25.8 IU/L for boys. A percentage of 9.03% (75 out of 831 of Chinese children was found to have suspected NAFLD. Overweight and obesity according to BMI percentiles, abdominal obesity, hyperuricemia (uric acid (UA > 327 μmol/L, and elevated total cholesterol (TC were all detected as the correlates of childhood suspected NAFLD when adjusting for other factors. Our study revealed the prevalence of suspected NAFLD in general Chinese children at the national level for the first time. Our findings indicate that suspected NAFLD in children is associated with increasing childhood morbidities, further studies are needed to better understand the prevalence of childhood NAFLD and its correlates, and large-scale programs should be launched to screen NAFLD in the pediatric population in China.

  3. Controlled attenuation parameter for diagnosing steatosis in bariatric surgery candidates with suspected nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

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    Naveau, Sylvie; Voican, Cosmin S; Lebrun, Amandine; Gaillard, Martin; Lamouri, Karima; Njiké-Nakseu, Micheline; Courie, Rodi; Tranchart, Hadrien; Balian, Axel; Prévot, Sophie; Dagher, Ibrahim; Perlemuter, Gabriel

    2017-09-01

    Steatosis in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is often benign, but may progress to fibrosis. The accurate diagnosis of hepatic steatosis is therefore important for clinical decision-making and prognostic assessments. The controlled attenuation parameter (CAP), a noninvasive measurement obtained with Fibro-Scan, has been developed for liver steatosis assessment. CAP performs poorly in patients with high BMI. The XL probe was initially developed for measuring liver stiffness in overweight patients. We assessed the diagnostic value of CAP in candidates for bariatric surgery with suspected NAFLD examined with the XL probe. For the retrospective group, raw ultrasonic radiofrequency signals were stored prospectively in the Fibro-Scan examination file for offline CAP calculation in 194 consecutive obese patients undergoing liver stiffness measurement in the 15 days before liver biopsy. For the prospective group, CAP was calculated automatically and prospectively from the XL probe in 123 obese patients. In the retrospective group, the diagnostic accuracy of CAP was satisfactory for differentiating S3 from S0-S1-S2 (0.79±0.03; 95% confidence interval: 0.71-0.84) and S3 from S0 (0.85±0.05; 95% confidence interval: 0.73-0.92). The Obuchowski measure demonstrated a very good discriminatory performance: 0.87±0.02 in the retrospective group and 0.91±0.02 in the prospective group. CAP calculations from XL probe measurements efficiently detected severe steatosis in morbidly obese patients with suspected NAFLD. However, the cutoff values should now be confirmed in a larger prospective cohort.

  4. Sleep-disordered breathing: a new risk factor of suspected fatty liver disease in overweight children and adolescents?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Verhulst

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB in childhood obesity is associated with hyperinsulinemia, dyslipidemia and inflammation and by these mechanisms, SDB could contribute to development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. We, therefore, investigated if SDB was an independent predictor of suspected fatty liver disease in a clinical sample of overweight and obese children and adolescents. Retrospective case study of consecutive overweight or obese children and adolescents attending a paediatric obesity clinic. Suggestive fatty liver disease was defined as a serum alanine aminotransferase >40 U·L–1 and/or a hyperechoic liver on abdominal ultrasound. Subjects with suggestive fatty liver disease presented with higher waist circumference, more circulating peripheral leukocytes and a lower % of total sleep time with SaO2 95% than their peers with a normal liver evaluation. Multiple logistic regression (stepwise forward selected waist circumference (odds ratio = 1.05; 95% confidence interval = 1.00–1.10; p = 0.06 and SaO2nadir (odds ratio = 0.87; 95% confidence interval = 0.76–0.99; p = 0.03 as predictors of suggestive fatty liver disease. This study suggests an association between the severity of SDB and suspected fatty liver disease in a clinical sample of overweight and obese children and adolescents. We strongly recommend more and carefully designed research on the influence of SDB on the development of fatty liver disease and on the effect of treating sleep apnoea on liver function parameters.

  5. Paediatric gastroenterology evaluation of overweight and obese children referred from primary care for suspected non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

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    Schwimmer, J B; Newton, K P; Awai, H I; Choi, L J; Garcia, M A; Ellis, L L; Vanderwall, K; Fontanesi, J

    2013-01-01

    Background Screening overweight and obese children for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is recommended by paediatric and endocrinology societies. However, gastroenterology societies have called for more data before making a formal recommendation. Aim To determine whether the detection of suspected NAFLD in overweight and obese children through screening in primary care and referral to paediatric gastroenterology resulted in a correct diagnosis of NAFLD. Methods Information generated in the clinical evaluation of 347 children identified with suspected NAFLD through screening in primary care and referral to paediatric gastroenterology was captured prospectively. Diagnostic outcomes were reported. The diagnostic performance of two times the upper limit of normal (ULN) for alanine aminotransferase (ALT) was assessed. Results Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease was diagnosed in 55% of children identified by screening and referral. Liver disease other than NAFLD was present in 18% of those referred. Autoimmune hepatitis was the most common alternative diagnosis. Children with NAFLD had significantly (P gastroenterology has the potential to identify clinically relevant liver pathology. Consensus is needed on how to value the risk and rewards of screening and referral, to identify children with liver disease in the most appropriate manner. PMID:24117728

  6. Liver Disease

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    ... from one or both of your parents can cause various substances to build up in your liver, resulting in liver damage. Genetic liver diseases include: Hemochromatosis Hyperoxaluria and oxalosis Wilson's disease Cancer and other growths Examples include: Liver cancer Bile ...

  7. Progression of Liver Disease

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    ... The Progression of Liver Disease Diagnosing Liver DiseaseLiver Biopsy and Liver Function Tests Clinical Trials Liver Transplant ... The Progression of Liver Disease Diagnosing Liver Disease: Liver Biopsy and Liver Function Tests Clinical Trials Liver Transplant ...

  8. Liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000205.htm Liver disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The term "liver disease" applies to many conditions that stop the ...

  9. Liver Diseases

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    Your liver is the largest organ inside your body. It helps your body digest food, store energy, and remove poisons. There are many kinds of liver diseases: Diseases caused by viruses, such as hepatitis ...

  10. Development and evaluation of a nurse-led transient elastography service for the staging of hepatic fibrosis in patients with suspected chronic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCorry, R B; Palaniyappan, N; Chivinge, A; Kaye, P; James, M W; Aithal, G P

    2012-08-01

    Establishing the presence of fibrosis and cirrhosis is an essential step in the management of patients with chronic liver diseases (CLD). Liver stiffness measurement (LSM) based on transient elastography (TE) correlates well with the stages of liver fibrosis and has been developed as a non-invasive alternative to liver biopsy. The studies performed to date have used physician operators. With the potential use of TE for screening of community-based populations for liver disease, we aimed to evaluate the performance of nurse operators. Retrospective analysis. We reviewed the reliability and accuracy of LSMs performed by the nurse-led TE service at Queen's Medical Centre, Nottingham between May 2009 and January 2011. Consecutive patients with suspected CLD who underwent LSM were included. Over the study period 585 LSMs were performed. Analysis was performed on the 208 patients where LSM could be compared with liver biopsy findings. Of these 11 (5.3%) had unreliable LSM results (less than 10 valid shots or success rate liver biopsy specimen led to exclusion in 26 (12.5%) patients. For the detection of significant fibrosis (Ishak stage >2), a sensitivity of 0.78 and specificity of 0.81 was obtained, with a cut-off value of 8 kPa. Using a cut-off value of 13 kPa for detection of cirrhosis, a sensitivity and specificity of 0.8 and 0.92 was obtained. We have demonstrated that a nurse-led TE service can produce a low level of unreliable results and LSM failures, with comparable sensitivity and specificity for detecting significant fibrosis and cirrhosis to those reported in the literature. The demands on the use of TE could potentially be eased through the introduction of nurse-led service delivery.

  11. Decision analytic model of the diagnostic pathways for patients with suspected non-alcoholic fatty liver disease using non-invasive transient elastography and multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging

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    Blake, Laurence; Cummins, Carole

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The mortality associated with liver disease continues to increase, despite the improvements implemented in the UK healthcare as does the prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), given the escalating prevalence of obesity. The currently available methods to assess and monitor the stage of liver disease present several limitations. Recently, multiparametric MRI has been developed to address these limitations. The aim of this study is to develop a decision analytic model for patients with suspected NAFLD, to investigate the effect of adding multiparametric MRI to the diagnostic pathway. Perspective The model takes the perspective of the UK National Health Service (NHS) as the service provider. Methods A simple decision-tree model was developed to compare the costs associated with 3 diagnostic pathways for NAFLD that use non-invasive techniques. First, using transient elastography alone; second, using multiparametric MRI as an adjunct to transient elastography and third, multiparametric MRI alone. The model was built to capture these clinical pathways, and used to compare the expected diagnostic outcomes and costs associated with each. Results The use of multiparametric MRI as an adjunct to transient elastography, while increasing screening costs, is predicted to reduce the number of liver biopsies required by about 66%. Used as the sole diagnostic scan, there remains an expected 16% reduction in the number of biopsies required. There is a small drop in the overall diagnostic accuracy, as in the current model, liver biopsy is presumed to give a definitive diagnosis. Conclusions The inclusion of multiparametric MRI, either as an adjunct to or replacement of transient elastography, in the diagnostic pathway of NAFLD may lead to cost savings for the NHS if the model presumptions hold. Further high-quality clinical evidence and cost data are required to test the model's predictions. PMID:27650757

  12. Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A through E and beyond. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. http://digestive.niddk.nih.gov/ddiseases/pubs/viralhepatitis/index.aspx. Accessed March 25, 2014. July 15, 2014 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/liver- ...

  13. Fatty Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... two main types: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) Alcoholic fatty liver disease, also called alcoholic steatohepatitis What is nonalcoholic ... lead to cirrhosis or liver cancer. What is alcoholic fatty liver disease? Alcoholic fatty liver disease is due to ...

  14. [Rare differential diagnosis on suspected liver tumor].

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    Kinkel, B; Walgenbach-Brünagel, G; Risse, J H; Pauleit, D O

    2009-05-01

    This case report describes a 77-year old woman with a leiomyosarcoma of subhepatic inferior caval vein. The presented symptom was unspecific abdominal pain. Ultrasound and CT suggested a primary liver tumor. MRI revealed retroperitoneal location of the neoplasm. The tumor was resected completely and ICV was replaced by a PTF-graft. Vascular leiomyosarcoma is a rare tumor entity, which often is diagnosed in advanced stage. Depending on location it can be mistaken for neoplasms of other organs.

  15. Liver Disease and IBD

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    ... Home > Resources > Liver Disease and IBD Go Back Liver Disease and IBD Email Print + Share Several complications ... be necessary to make the definitive diagnosis. FATTY LIVER DISEASE (HEPATCI STEATOSIS) This is the most common ...

  16. Autoimmune liver disease panel

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    Liver disease test panel - autoimmune ... Autoimmune disorders are a possible cause of liver disease. The most common of these diseases are autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cholangitis (formerly called primary biliary cirrhosis). This group of tests ...

  17. Alcoholic Liver Disease

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    ... liver disease is more likely to develop if people Drink large amounts of alcohol Have been drinking a long time (usually, for more than 8 years) Are women Have a genetic makeup that makes them susceptible to alcoholic liver disease ...

  18. Alcoholic liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liver disease due to alcohol; Cirrhosis or hepatitis - alcoholic; Laennec's cirrhosis ... Alcoholic liver disease occurs after years of heavy drinking. Over time, scarring and cirrhosis can occur. Cirrhosis is the ...

  19. Diet - liver disease

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    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002441.htm Diet - liver disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Some people with liver disease must eat a special diet. This diet ...

  20. Herbal Traditional Chinese Medicine and suspected liver injury: A prospective study.

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    Melchart, Dieter; Hager, Stefan; Albrecht, Sabine; Dai, Jingzhang; Weidenhammer, Wolfgang; Teschke, Rolf

    2017-10-18

    To analyze liver tests before and following treatment with herbal Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) in order to evaluate the frequency of newly detected liver injury. Patients with normal values of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) as a diagnostic marker for ruling out pre-existing liver disease were enrolled in a prospective study of a safety program carried out at the First German Hospital of TCM from 1994 to 2015. All patients received herbal products, and their ALT values were reassessed 1-3 d prior to discharge. To verify or exclude causality for suspected TCM herbs, the Roussel Uclaf Causality Assessment Method (RUCAM) was used. This report presents for the first time liver injury data derived from a prospective, hospital-based and large-scale study of 21470 patients who had no liver disease prior to treatment with herbal TCM. Among these, ALT ranged from 1 × to liver adaptive abnormalities. However, 26 patients (0.12%) experienced higher ALT values of ≥ 5 × ULN (300.0 ± 172.9 U/L, mean ± SD). Causality for TCM herbs was RUCAM-based probable in 8/26 patients, possible in 16/26, and excluded in 2/26 cases. Bupleuri radix and Scutellariae radix were the two TCM herbs most commonly implicated. In 26 (0.12%) of 21470 patients treated with herbal TCM, liver injury with ALT values of ≥ 5 × ULN was found, which normalized shortly following treatment cessation, also substantiating causality.

  1. Liver fibrosis in alcoholic liver disease.

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    Bataller, Ramon; Gao, Bin

    2015-05-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption causes a wide spectrum of liver disease, ranging from simple steatosis to severe forms of liver injury such as steatohepatitis, liver fibrosis, cirrhosis, and liver cancer. Moreover, alcohol consumption also accelerates liver fibrosis in patients with other types of liver diseases such as viral hepatitis and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Virtually all clinical complications of alcoholic liver disease occur in patients with established fibrosis and cirrhosis, thus making fibrosis a key parameter for treatment and prognosis of patients. Here, the authors review diagnosis, management, and antifibrotic therapy of alcoholic liver fibrosis. They discuss both the unique features of alcoholic liver fibrosis and the similarities to liver fibrosis from other etiologies, and review molecular pathogenesis and animal models. Finally, future directions for basic and clinical research on alcoholic liver fibrosis are proposed. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  2. Liver fibrosis markers in alcoholic liver disease

    OpenAIRE

    Chrostek, Lech; Panasiuk, Anatol

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol is one of the main factors of liver damage. The evaluation of the degree of liver fibrosis is of great value for therapeutic decision making in patients with alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Staging of liver fibrosis is essential to define prognosis and management of the disease. Liver biopsy is a gold standard as it has high sensitivity and specificity in fibrosis diagnostics. Taking into account the limitations of liver biopsy, there is an exigency to introduce non-invasive serum mark...

  3. Combination of liver biopsy with MELD-XI scores for post-transplant outcome prediction in patients with advanced heart failure and suspected liver dysfunction.

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    Farr, Maryjane; Mitchell, James; Lippel, Matthew; Kato, Tomoko S; Jin, Zhezhen; Ippolito, Paul; Dove, Lorna; Jorde, Ulrich P; Takayama, Hiroo; Emond, Jean; Naka, Yoshifumi; Mancini, Donna; Lefkowitch, Jay H; Schulze, P Christian

    2015-07-01

    Functional and structural liver abnormalities may be found in patients with advanced heart failure (HF). The Model of End-Stage Liver Disease Excluding INR (MELD-XI) score allows functional risk stratification of HF patients on and off anti-coagulation awaiting heart transplantation (HTx), but these scores may improve or worsen depending on bridging therapies and during time on the waiting list. Liver biopsy is sometimes performed to assess for severity of fibrosis. Uncertainty remains whether biopsy in addition to MELD-XI improves prediction of adverse outcomes in patients evaluated for HTx. Sixty-eight patients suspected of advanced liver disease underwent liver biopsy as part of their HTx evaluation. A liver risk score (fibrosis-on-biopsy + 1) × MELD-XI was generated for each patient. Fifty-two patients were listed, of whom 14 had mechanical circulatory support (MCS). Thirty-six patients underwent transplantation and 27 patients survived ≥1 year post-HTx (74%, as compared with 88% average 1-year survival in HTx patients without suspected liver disease; p liver risk score at evaluation for HTx (31.0 ± 20.4 vs 65.2 ± 28.6, p liver risk score was identified by receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) analysis. In the analysis using Cox proportional hazards models, a liver risk score ≥45 at evaluation for HTx was associated with greater risk of death at 1 year post-HTx compared with a score of liver risk score at evaluation for HTx also predicted 1-year mortality after HTx listing (p liver dysfunction are high-risk HTx candidates. Liver biopsy in addition to MELD-XI improves risk stratification of patients with advanced HF and suspected irreversible liver dysfunction. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Autoimmune liver diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Invernizzi, Pietro; Mackay, Ian R

    2008-01-01

    The liver was one of the earliest recognized sites among autoimmune diseases yet autoimmune hepatitis, primary biliary cirrhosis, primary sclerosing cholangitis, and their overlap forms, are still problematic in diagnosis and causation. The contributions herein comprise 'pairs of articles' on clinical characteristics, and concepts of etiopathogenesis, for each of the above diseases, together with childhood autoimmune liver disease, overlaps, interpretations of diagnostic serology, and liver t...

  5. Metabolic Liver Diseases Presenting as Acute Liver Failure in Children.

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    Alam, Seema; Lal, Bikrant Bihari

    2016-08-08

    Suspecting metabolic liver disease in an infant or young child with acute liver failure, and a protocol-based workup for diagnosis is the need of the hour. Data over the last 15 years was searched through Pubmed using the keywords Metabolic liver disease and Acute liver failure with emphasis on Indian perspective. Those published in English language where full text was retrievable were included for this review. Metabolic liver diseases account for 13-43% cases of acute liver failure in infants and young children. Etiology remains indeterminate in very few cases of liver failure in studies where metabolic liver diseases were recognized in large proportion. Galactosemia, tyrosinemia and mitochondrial disorders in young children and Wilsons disease in older children are commonly implicated. A high index of suspicion for metabolic liver diseases should be kept when there is strong family history of consanguinity, recurrent abortions or sibling deaths; and history of recurrent diarrhea, vomiting, failure to thrive or developmental delay. Simple dietary modifications and/or specific management can be life-saving if instituted promptly. A high index of suspicion in presence of red flag symptoms and signs, and a protocol-based approach helps in timely diagnosis and prompt administration of lifesaving therapy.

  6. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patrick-Melin, A J; Kalinski, M I; Kelly, K R

    2009-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a rapidly emerging chronic liver disease and is reported to affect up to 70-80% of overweight and obese individuals. NAFLD represents a spectrum of liver diseases that range from simple hepatic steatosis, to a more severe and treatment resistant stage...... that features steatosis plus inflammation, termed nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), which may in turn progress to hepatic fibrosis, cirrhosis, and sub-acute liver failure. Thus, NAFLD and its subsequent complications create a significant health burden, and currently there is no effective treatment strategy...

  7. Liver disease in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashank Shekhar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Deranged liver function tests are encountered in 3% of pregnancies. The potential causes are classified as those unique to and those just incidental to pregnancy. Pregnancy-related diseases are the most frequent causes of liver dysfunction during pregnancy and exhibit a trimester-specific occurrence during pregnancy. Differentiation of liver dysfunction as that related to and just incidental to pregnancy is the key to management, especially when liver dysfunction is encountered after 28 weeks of pregnancy. It can be judged from the fact that delivery remains the cornerstone of management of pregnancy-related diseases except hyperemesis gravidarum. This is an overview of the causes of liver dysfunction during pregnancy; an update on the underlying mechanisms of their occurrence, especially liver diseases unique to pregnancy; and a methodological approach to their diagnosis and management.

  8. Relationship between hemoglobin levels and risk for suspected non-alcoholic fatty liver in Taiwanese adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Chyi-Huey; Wu, Ming-Shun; Owaga, Eddy; Cheng, Shu-Yu; Pan, Wen-Harn; Chang, Jung-Su

    2014-10-31

    Body iron levels have recently been shown to be a strong predictor for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The aims of this study were to investigate the prevalence of NAFLD in a general adult population, and to investigate the relationship between body iron levels, NAFLD and the metabolic syndrome (MetS). 2186 adults participated in the third National Nutrition and Health Survey in Taiwan (NAHSIT, 2005-2008). The participants underwent anthropometry measurements and phlebotomy after an overnight fast, and those with excessive alcohol intake, iron overload of serum ferritin > 600 ng/ml, hepatitis viral infection and hepatocellular carcinoma were excluded. Suspected NAFLD was diagnosed by three alanine transaminase (ALT) cut-points: cut-point 1: serum ALT > 40 U/l; cut-point 2: ALT ≥ 25 U/l for male and ALT ≥ 17 U/l for female; and cut-point 3: ALT ≥ 35 U/l for male and ALT ≥ 26 U/l for female. The prevalence proportion of suspected NAFLD among Taiwanese adults was 6.6% (cut-point 1), 36% (cut-point 2); and 14.3% (cut-point 3). Body iron levels were significantly higher in individuals with suspected NAFLD compared with those without. Distribution of hemoglobin levels, but not serum ferritin levels, by decade of age showed strong correlation with the prevalence of suspected NAFLD in individuals with MetS. Multivariate adjusted odds ratio (OR) showed that the best predictors for suspected NAFLD with the MetS were hemoglobin [OR 1.43 (1.21-1.68); P hemoglobin [OR 1.25 (1.12-1.41); P hemoglobin levels (14.4 μg/dl for male and 13.2 μg/dl for female) are at the greatest risk for developing abnormal liver function. Hemoglobin test should be considered as a part of clinical evaluation for patients with NAFLD.

  9. Liver diseases and pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Crispino

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy is a time of great maternal physiological and metabolic changes and affects biochemical and hematological parameters used in the assessment of liver disease. Due to the increased physiological and metabolic stress of pregnancy, liver disorders that have previously been subclinical may become symptomatic such as cholestatic diseases. The viral hepatitis constitutes a huge disease burden worldwide and the pregnant state confers particular concerns for the mother and her baby. In particular, hepatitis E has a predilection for the pregnant population and confers a particularly poor prognosis. In addition, certain pregnancy specific disorders such as elevated liver enzymes, low platelets syndrome, acute fatty liver of pregnancy, and obstetric cholestasis-affect primarily the liver. It is important to know how to diagnose and manage these conditions and distinguish them from non-pregnancy specific conditions as this will change the timing and management of affected women and their babies, some of whom can be seriously ill.

  10. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease & NASH

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    ... NASH). Weight loss can reduce fat in the liver, inflammation, and fibrosis. No medicines have been approved to treat NAFLD ... Health Information Diabetes Digestive Diseases Kidney Disease Weight Management Liver Disease Urologic Diseases Endocrine Diseases Diet & Nutrition ...

  11. Cytokines and Liver Diseases

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    Herbert Tilg

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytokines are pleiotropic peptides produced by virtually every nucleated cell in the body. In most tissues, including the liver, constitutive production of cytokines is absent or minimal. There is increasing evidence that several cytokines mediate hepatic inflammation, apoptosis and necrosis of liver cells, cholestasis and fibrosis. Interestingly, the same mediators also mediate the regeneration of liver tissue after injury. Among the various cytokines, the proinflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-a has emerged as a key factor in various aspects of liver disease, such as cachexia and/or cholestasis. Thus, antagonism of TNF-a and other injury-related cytokines in liver diseases merits evaluation as a treatment of these diseases. However, because the same cytokines are also necessary for the regeneration of the tissue after the liver has been injured, inhibition of these mediators might impair hepatic recovery. The near future will bring the exiting clinical challenge of testing new anticytokine strategies in various liver diseases.

  12. Antioxidant supplements for liver diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjelakovic, Goran; Gluud, Lise Lotte; Nikolova, Dimitrinka

    2011-01-01

    Several liver diseases have been associated with oxidative stress. Accordingly, antioxidants have been suggested as potential therapeutics for various liver diseases. The evidence supporting these suggestions is equivocal.......Several liver diseases have been associated with oxidative stress. Accordingly, antioxidants have been suggested as potential therapeutics for various liver diseases. The evidence supporting these suggestions is equivocal....

  13. Paediatric Autoimmune Liver Disease.

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    Liberal, Rodrigo; Vergani, Diego; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina

    2015-01-01

    In paediatrics, there are 2 liver disorders in which liver damage most likely stems from an autoimmune attack: 'classical' autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and the AIH/sclerosing cholangitis overlap syndrome (also known as autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis, ASC). The presentation of childhood autoimmune liver disease (AILD) is non-specific and can mimic most other liver disorders. AIH is exquisitely responsive to immunosuppressive treatment, which should be instituted promptly to prevent rapid deterioration and promote remission and long-term survival. Difficult-to-treat or non-responsive patients should be treated with mycophenolate mofetil; if this fails then calcineurin inhibitors can be tried. Persistent failure to respond or lack of adherence to treatment result in end-stage liver disease. These patients, and those with fulminant liver failure at diagnosis, will require liver transplantation. ASC responds to the same immunosuppressive treatment used for AIH when treatment is initiated early. Abnormal liver function tests often resolve within a few months of treatment, although medium- to long-term prognosis is worse than that of AIH because bile duct disease continues to progress despite treatment in approximately 50% of patients. Ursodeoxycholic acid is usually added to conventional treatment regimen in ASC, but whether this actually helps arrest the progression of bile duct disease remains to be established. The pathogenesis of paediatric-onset AILD is not fully understood, although there is mounting evidence that genetic susceptibility, molecular mimicry and impaired immunoregulatory networks contribute to the initiation and perpetuation of the autoimmune attack. Liver damage is thought to be mediated primarily by CD4pos T-cells. While Th1 effector cells are associated with hepatocyte damage in both AIH and ASC, Th17 immune responses predominate in the latter where they correlate with biochemical indices of cholestasis, indicating that IL-17 is involved in the

  14. Gut microbiota and liver diseases.

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    Minemura, Masami; Shimizu, Yukihiro

    2015-02-14

    Several studies revealed that gut microbiota are associated with various human diseases, e.g., metabolic diseases, allergies, gastroenterological diseases, and liver diseases. The liver can be greatly affected by changes in gut microbiota due to the entry of gut bacteria or their metabolites into the liver through the portal vein, and the liver-gut axis is important to understand the pathophysiology of several liver diseases, especially non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and hepatic encephalopathy. Moreover, gut microbiota play a significant role in the development of alcoholic liver disease and hepatocarcinogenesis. Based on these previous findings, trials using probiotics have been performed for the prevention or treatment of liver diseases. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the changes in gut microbiota associated with various liver diseases, and we describe the therapeutic trials of probiotics for those diseases.

  15. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    OpenAIRE

    Erickson, Sandra K.

    2009-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease in the United States and, indeed, worldwide. It has become a global public health issue. In the United States, the prevalence in the general population is estimated at ∼20%, while that in the morbidly obese population at ∼75-92% and in the pediatric population at ∼13–14%. The progressive form of NAFLD, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, is estimated at ∼3–5%, with ∼3–5% of these having progressed to cirrhosis. Thus, the numb...

  16. Liver fibrosis markers in alcoholic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrostek, Lech; Panasiuk, Anatol

    2014-07-07

    Alcohol is one of the main factors of liver damage. The evaluation of the degree of liver fibrosis is of great value for therapeutic decision making in patients with alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Staging of liver fibrosis is essential to define prognosis and management of the disease. Liver biopsy is a gold standard as it has high sensitivity and specificity in fibrosis diagnostics. Taking into account the limitations of liver biopsy, there is an exigency to introduce non-invasive serum markers for fibrosis that would be able to replace liver biopsy. Ideal serum markers should be specific for the liver, easy to perform and independent to inflammation and fibrosis in other organs. Serum markers of hepatic fibrosis are divided into direct and indirect. Indirect markers reflect alterations in hepatic function, direct markers reflect extracellular matrix turnover. These markers should correlate with dynamic changes in fibrogenesis and fibrosis resolution. The assessment of the degree of liver fibrosis in alcoholic liver disease has diagnostic and prognostic implications, therefore noninvasive assessment of fibrosis remains important. There are only a few studies evaluating the diagnostic and prognostic values of noninvasive biomarkers of fibrosis in patients with ALD. Several noninvasive laboratory tests have been used to assess liver fibrosis in patients with alcoholic liver disease, including the hyaluronic acid, FibroTest, FibrometerA, Hepascore, Forns and APRI indexes, FIB4, an algorithm combining Prothrombin index (PI), α-2 macroglobulin and hyaluronic acid. Among these tests, Fibrotest, FibrometerA and Hepascore demonstrated excellent diagnostic accuracy in identifying advanced fibrosis and cirrhosis, and additionally, Fibrotest was independently associated with survival. Therefore, the use of biomarkers may reduce the need for liver biopsy and permit an earlier treatment of alcoholic patients.

  17. Epigenetics in liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Derek A

    2014-10-01

    Epigenetics is a term that encompasses a variety of regulatory processes that are able to crosstalk in order to influence gene expression and cell phenotype in response to environmental cues. A deep understanding of epigenetics offers the potential for fresh insights into the basis for complex chronic diseases and improved diagnostic and prognostic tools. Moreover, as epigenetic modifications are highly plastic and responsive to the environment, there is much excitement around the theme of epigenetic therapeutics, including not only new drugs but also more informed patient advice on lifestyle choices and their impact on pathology. This review briefly explains the molecular nature of the individual regulatory process that constitute epigenetics, including DNA methylation, histone modifications, chromatin remodeling, transcriptional control, and noncoding RNAs. The ways in which these epigenetic mechanisms influence liver physiology and disease will be considered in detail, particularly in the context of cancer, fibrosis, and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. The current limitations associated with epigenetic profiling and therapeutics in liver disease are discussed, as is the intriguing possibility that environmental-induced epigenetic changes may become stable and heritable. The aim of the review is to inform hepatologists of the emerging key epigenetic ideas of relevance to liver diseases that are highly likely to form a component of patient management and care in the next decade. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Hepatology published by Wiley on behalf of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  18. Hypertension and liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik; Møller, Søren

    2004-01-01

    Arterial hypertension is a common disorder with a frequency of 10% to 15% in subjects in the 40- to 60-year age group. Yet most reports find the prevalence of arterial hypertension in patients with chronic liver disease (cirrhosis) much lower. In this review, we consider the alterations in systemic...

  19. ACR Appropriateness Criteria® Suspected Liver Metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Harmeet; Hindman, Nicole M; Al-Refaie, Waddah B; Arif-Tiwari, Hina; Cash, Brooks D; Chernyak, Victoria; Farrell, James; Grajo, Joseph R; Horowitz, Jeanne M; McNamara, Michelle M; Noto, Richard B; Qayyum, Aliya; Lalani, Tasneem; Kamel, Ihab R

    2017-05-01

    Liver metastases are the most common malignant liver tumors. The accurate and early detection and characterization of liver lesions is the key to successful treatment strategies. Increasingly, surgical resection in combination with chemotherapy is effective in significantly improving survival if all metastases are successfully resected. MRI and multiphase CT are the primary imaging modalities in the assessment of liver metastasis, with the relative preference toward multiphase CT or MRI depending upon the clinical setting (ie, surveillance or presurgical planning). The optimization of imaging parameters is a vital factor in the success of either modality. PET/CT, intraoperative ultrasound are used to supplement CT and MRI. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances where evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Propylthiouracil for alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fede, Giuseppe; Germani, Giacomo; Gluud, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Randomised clinical trials have addressed the question whether propylthiouracil has any beneficial effects in patients with alcoholic liver disease.......Randomised clinical trials have addressed the question whether propylthiouracil has any beneficial effects in patients with alcoholic liver disease....

  1. Propylthiouracil for alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rambaldi, A; Gluud, C

    2002-01-01

    Alcohol is the most common cause of liver disease in the Western world today. Randomised clinical trials have addressed the question whether propylthiouracil has any efficacy in patients with alcoholic liver disease.......Alcohol is the most common cause of liver disease in the Western world today. Randomised clinical trials have addressed the question whether propylthiouracil has any efficacy in patients with alcoholic liver disease....

  2. Amebic liver abscess and polycystic liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karan V. S. Rana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycystic liver disease is a rare disorder which remains asymptomatic. Infection of cyst is a major complication and is usually pyogenic. We report a rare case of amebic liver abscess in a patient with polycystic liver disease. In our search we found one such case report. Clinical features and radiological findings are usually sufficient, but atypical history and the presence of multiple hepatic abscesses in CT scan delayed diagnosis in our case. Histopathology of the cyst wall and enzyme immunoassay asserted the diagnosis.

  3. A suspected case of Addison’s disease in cattle

    OpenAIRE

    Lambacher, Bianca; Wittek, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    A 4.75-year old Simmental cow was presented with symptoms of colic and ileus. The clinical signs and blood analysis resulted in the diagnosis of suspected primary hypoadrenocorticism (Addison’s disease). Although Addison’s disease has been frequently described in other domestic mammals, to our knowledge, this disease has not previously been reported in cattle.

  4. Liver transplantation in polycystic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krohn, Paul S; Hillingsø, Jens; Kirkegaard, Preben

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Polycystic liver disease (PLD) is a rare, hereditary, benign disorder. Hepatic failure is uncommon and symptoms are caused by mass effects leading to abdominal distension and pain. Liver transplantation (LTX) offers fully curative treatment, but there is still some controversy about...... whether it is a relevant modality considering the absence of liver failure, relative organ shortage, perioperative risks and lifelong immunosuppression. The purpose of this study was to review our experience of LTX for PLD and to compare the survival with the overall survival of patients who underwent LTX...... from 1992 to 2005. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A retrospective study of the journals of 440 patients, who underwent 506 LTXs between 1992 and 2005, showed that 14 patients underwent LTX for PLD. All patients had normal liver function. Three were receiving haemodialysis and thus underwent combined liver...

  5. [Liver diseases in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruguera, Miguel

    2014-11-01

    Liver diseases in the elderly have aroused less interest than diseases of other organs, since the liver plays a limited role in aging. There are no specific liver diseases of old age, but age-related anatomical and functional modifications of the liver cause changes in the frequency and clinical behavior of some liver diseases compared with those in younger patients. This review discusses the most important features of liver function in the healthy elderly population, as well as the features of the most prevalent liver diseases in this age group, especially the diagnostic approach to the most common liver problems in the elderly: asymptomatic elevation of serum transaminases and jaundice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  6. Polycystic Liver Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linda, Nguyen, E-mail: nguyenli@einstein.edu [5501 Old York Road, Philadelphia, PA 19141 (United States)

    2016-03-25

    A 77-year-old African American male presented with intermittent abdominal pain for one week. He denied nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, fevers, anorexia, or weight loss. He denied a family history of liver disease, recent travel, or history of intravenous drug abuse. His vital signs were normal. Labs revealed total bilirubin of 1.5 mg/dl, hypoalbuminaemia 3.0 gm/dl and prolonged prothrombin time of 14.8 sec. Computed Tomography of the abdomen and pelvis with contrast showed multiple hepatic cysts with the largest cyst occupying the right abdomen, measuring 20.6 cm (Panel A and). This cyst had predominantly fluid attenuation, but also contained several septations. The patient underwent laparoscopic fenestration of the large hepatic cyst with hepatic cyst wall biopsy. Pathology revealed blood without malignant cells. The patient tolerated the procedure well with improvement of his abdominal pain and normalization of his liver function tests and coagulation profile.

  7. Symptomatic Patency Capsule Retention in Suspected Crohn's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Bjørn; Nathan, Torben; Jensen, Michael Dam

    2016-01-01

    The main limitation of capsule endoscopy is the risk of capsule retention. In patients with suspected Crohn's disease, however, this complication is rare, and if a small bowel stenosis is not reliably excluded, small bowel patency can be confirmed with the Pillcam patency capsule. We present two...... patients examined for suspected Crohn's disease who experienced significant symptoms from a retained patency capsule. Both patients had Crohn's disease located in the terminal ileum. In one patient, the patency capsule caused abdominal pain and vomiting and was visualized at magnetic resonance enterography...

  8. Case Report: Clinical Features of a Case of Suspected Borrelia miyamotoi Disease in Hokkaido, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamano, Kimiaki; Ito, Takuya; Kiyanagi, Kaori; Yamazaki, Hirotaka; Sugawara, Mutsubu; Saito, Takashige; Ohashi, Norio; Zamoto-Niikura, Aya; Sato, Kozue; Kawabata, Hiroki

    2017-07-01

    We herein report a case of suspected Borrelia miyamotoi disease in Hokkaido, Japan. The patient complained of lassitude, arthralgia, and high fever after a tick bite. Furthermore, at the time of consultation, the patient exhibited momentary loss of consciousness and low blood pressure. Laboratory tests revealed elevation of liver enzymes, thrombocytopenia, and increased C-reactive protein. Seroconversion to B. miyamotoi glycerophosphoryl diester phosphodiesterase antigen suggested the patient was infected with a relapsing fever group Borrelia species.

  9. Pediatric liver transplantation for fibropolycystic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jae Sung; Yi, Nam-Joon; Suh, Kyung Suk; Seo, Jeong Kee

    2012-03-01

    Fibropolycystic liver disease includes CHF, Caroli's syndrome, and Caroli's disease. Patients with Caroli's disease and Caroli's syndrome have an increased risk of recurrent cholangitis, intrahepatic calculi, biliary cirrhosis, and cholangiocarcinoma. The aim of this study was to examine the post-transplantation outcomes of children with fibropolycystic liver disease. Of the 158 children transplanted at Seoul National University Hospital, there were four patients with Caroli's syndrome, two patients with CHF, and one patient with Caroli's disease. One patient underwent combined liver/kidney transplantation. Associated renal manifestations included ARPKD in three children and nephronophthisis in one child. The indications for LT were recurrent cholangitis, decompensated cirrhosis, and refractory complications of portal hypertension. Both graft and patient survival rates were 100% at a median follow-up period of two yr after LT. Three children with growth failure achieved catch-up growth after LT. In three patients with ARPKD, mean serum creatinine levels increased from 0.53 mg/dL at the time of LT to 0.91 mg/dL at the last follow-up (p = 0.01). LT is an excellent option for children with complications from fibropolycystic liver disease. Renal function should be monitored cautiously after LT in the patients with ARPKD. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  10. Liver Disease in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijewantha, Hasitha S

    2017-01-01

    Liver disease in Sri Lanka is mainly due to alcoholic liver disease and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. In contrast to other South Asian countries, the prevalence of hepatitis B and C is low in Sri Lanka and prevalence of hepatitis A is intermediate. The few reported cases of hepatitis E in Sri Lanka are mainly in people who have traveled to neighboring South Asian countries. Wilson's disease, autoimmune hepatitis, hemochromatosis, drug-induced liver disease, and primary biliary cirrhosis are recognized causes of liver disease in Sri Lanka. Pyogenic and amebic liver abscesses and dengue infection are the other causes of liver disease. Some of the commonly used plants as traditional herbal medicine in Sri Lanka have been shown to have deleterious effects on the liver in animal studies. Considering the high popularity of traditional herbal medicine in the country, it is likely that herbal medicine is an etiological factor for liver disease in Sri Lanka, but no published data are available. Address reprint requests to: Wijewantha HS. Liver Disease in Sri Lanka. Euroasian J Hepato-Gastroenterol 2017;7(1):78-81.

  11. Hypertension and liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens H; Møller, Søren

    2004-01-01

    Arterial hypertension is a common disorder with a frequency of 10% to 15% in subjects in the 40- to 60-year age group. Yet most reports find the prevalence of arterial hypertension in patients with chronic liver disease (cirrhosis) much lower. In this review, we consider the alterations in systemic...... to increased arterial blood pressure. Subjects with established arterial hypertension (essential, secondary) may become normotensive during the development of cirrhosis, and arterial hypertension is rarely manifested in patients with cirrhosis, even in cases with renovascular disease and high circulating renin...... activity. There is much dispute as to the understanding of homeostatic regulation in cirrhotic patients with manifest arterial hypertension. This is a topic for future research....

  12. Stem cells in liver disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poll, D. van

    2008-01-01

    Failure of the liver, the largest vital organ in the body, unequivocally results in death. Hepatic failure most commonly evolves over a period of several years as a result of chronic liver disease, most often viral hepatitis or alcoholic liver damage. In rarer cases, the organ shuts down within

  13. Fibropolycystic liver disease in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veigel, Myka Call [Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences, Kansas City, MO (United States); University of Missouri-Kansas City, St. Luke' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kansas City, MO (United States); Prescott-Focht, Julia; Zinati, Reza [University of Missouri-Kansas City, St. Luke' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kansas City, MO (United States); Rodriguez, Michael G. [University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, Kansas City, MO (United States); Shao, Lei [Children' s Mercy Hospitals and Clinics, Department of Pathology, Kansas City, MO (United States); Moore, Charlotte A.W.; Lowe, Lisa H. [University of Missouri-Kansas City, Department of Radiology, Kansas City, MO (United States); Children' s Mercy Hospitals and Clinics, Department of Radiology, Kansas City, MO (United States)

    2009-04-15

    Fibropolycystic liver diseases are a group of associated congenital disorders that present most often in childhood. These disorders include congenital hepatic fibrosis, biliary hamartomas, autosomal dominant polycystic liver disease, choledochal cysts and Caroli disease. We present a discussion and illustrations of the embryology, genetics, anatomy, pathology, imaging approach and key imaging features that distinguish fibropolycystic liver disease in children. The pathogenesis of these disorders is believed to be abnormal development of the embryonic ductal plates, which ultimately form the liver and biliary systems. An understanding of the abnormal embryogenesis helps to explain the characteristic imaging features of these disorders. (orig.)

  14. Periodontal disease and liver cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønkjær, Lea Ladegaard

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Studies suggest that periodontal disease, a source of subclinical and persistent infection, may be associated with various systemic conditions, including liver cirrhosis. The aim of this study was to examine the literature and determine the relationship between periodontal disease...... and liver cirrhosis and to identify opportunities and directions for future research in this area. METHODS: A systematic review of English articles in the PubMed, EMBASE, and Scopus databases was conducted using search terms including 'liver cirrhosis', 'end-stage liver disease', 'liver diseases', 'oral...... in patients with liver cirrhosis, measured with several different periodontal indices. The reported prevalence of periodontal disease in cirrhosis patients ranged from 25.0% to 68.75% in four studies and apical periodontitis was found in 49%-79% of the patients. One study found that mortality was lower among...

  15. Faecal Calprotectin in Suspected Paediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Degraeuwe, Pieter L. J.; Beld, Monique P. A.; Ashorn, Merja; Canani, Roberto Berni; Day, Andrew S.; Diamanti, Antonella; Fagerberg, Ulrika L.; Henderson, Paul; Kolho, Kaija-Leena; Van de Vijver, Els; van Rheenen, Patrick F.; Wilson, David C.; Kessels, Alfons G. H.

    Objectives: The diagnostic accuracy of faecal calprotectin (FC) concentration for paediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is well described at the population level, but not at the individual level. We reassessed the diagnostic accuracy of FC in children with suspected IBD and developed an

  16. Suspected Rhinolithiasis Associated With Endodontic Disease in a Cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Kevin; Fiani, Nadine; Peralta, Santiago

    2017-12-01

    Rhinoliths are rare, intranasal, mineralized masses formed via the precipitation of mineral salts around an intranasal nidus. Clinical signs are typically consistent with inflammatory rhinitis and nasal obstruction, but asymptomatic cases are possible. Rhinoliths may be classified as exogenous or endogenous depending on the origin of the nidus, with endogenous rhinoliths reportedly being less common. This case report describes a suspected case of endogenous rhinolithiasis in a cat which was detected as an incidental finding during radiographic assessment of a maxillary canine tooth with endodontic disease. Treatment consisted of removal of the suspected rhinolith via a transalveolar approach after surgical extraction of the maxillary canine tooth.

  17. Diagnosis and Management of Alcoholic Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugum, Mohannad; McCullough, Arthur

    2015-06-28

    Alcohol is a leading cause of liver disease and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Several factors, including the amount and duration of alcohol consumption, affect the development and progression of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). ALD represents a spectrum of liver pathology ranging from fatty change to fibrosis to cirrhosis. Early diagnosis of ALD is important to encourage alcohol abstinence, minimize the progression of liver fibrosis, and manage cirrhosis-related complications including hepatocellular carcinoma. A number of questionnaires and laboratory tests are available to screen for alcohol intake. Liver biopsy remains the gold-standard diagnostic tool for ALD, but noninvasive accurate alternatives, including a number of biochemical tests as well as liver stiffness measurement, are increasingly being utilized in the evaluation of patients with suspected ALD. The management of ALD depends largely on complete abstinence from alcohol. Supportive care should focus on treating alcohol withdrawal and providing enteral nutrition while managing the complications of liver failure. Alcoholic hepatitis (AH) is a devastating acute form of ALD that requires early recognition and specialized tertiary medical care. Assessment of AH severity using defined scoring systems is important to allocate resources and initiate appropriate therapy. Corticosteroids or pentoxifylline are commonly used in treating AH but provide a limited survival benefit. Liver transplantation represents the ultimate therapy for patients with alcoholic cirrhosis, with most transplant centers mandating a 6 month period of abstinence from alcohol before listing. Early liver transplantation is also emerging as a therapeutic measure in specifically selected patients with severe AH. A number of novel targeted therapies for ALD are currently being evaluated in clinical trials.

  18. Gut microbiome and liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilg, Herbert; Cani, Patrice D; Mayer, Emeran A

    2016-12-01

    The gut microbiota has recently evolved as a new important player in the pathophysiology of many intestinal and extraintestinal diseases. The liver is the organ which is in closest contact with the intestinal tract, and is exposed to a substantial amount of bacterial components and metabolites. Various liver disorders such as alcoholic liver disease, non-alcoholic liver disease and primary sclerosing cholangitis have been associated with an altered microbiome. This dysbiosis may influence the degree of hepatic steatosis, inflammation and fibrosis through multiple interactions with the host's immune system and other cell types. Whereas few results from clinical metagenomic studies in liver disease are available, evidence is accumulating that in liver cirrhosis an oral microbiome is overrepresented in the lower intestinal tract, potentially contributing to disease process and severity. A major role for the gut microbiota in liver disorders is also supported by the accumulating evidence that several complications of severe liver disease such as hepatic encephalopathy are efficiently treated by various prebiotics, probiotics and antibiotics. A better understanding of the gut microbiota and its components in liver diseases might provide a more complete picture of these complex disorders and also form the basis for novel therapies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  19. Autoimmune liver disease, autoimmunity and liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Marco; Neuberger, James M

    2014-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) represent the three major autoimmune liver diseases (AILD). PBC, PSC, and AIH are all complex disorders in that they result from the effects of multiple genes in combination with as yet unidentified environmental factors. Recent genome-wide association studies have identified numerous risk loci for PBC and PSC that host genes involved in innate or acquired immune responses. These loci may provide a clue as to the immune-based pathogenesis of AILD. Moreover, many significant risk loci for PBC and PSC are also risk loci for other autoimmune disorders, such type I diabetes, multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis, suggesting a shared genetic basis and possibly similar molecular pathways for diverse autoimmune conditions. There is no curative treatment for all three disorders, and a significant number of patients eventually progress to end-stage liver disease requiring liver transplantation (LT). LT in this context has a favourable overall outcome with current patient and graft survival exceeding 80% at 5years. Indications are as for other chronic liver disease although recent data suggest that while lethargy improves after transplantation, the effect is modest and variable so lethargy alone is not an indication. In contrast, pruritus rapidly responds. Cholangiocarcinoma, except under rigorous selection criteria, excludes LT because of the high risk of recurrence. All three conditions may recur after transplantation and are associated with a greater risk of both acute cellular and chronic ductopenic rejection. It is possible that a crosstalk between alloimmune and autoimmune response perpetuate each other. An immunological response toward self- or allo-antigens is well recognised after LT in patients transplanted for non-autoimmune indications and sometimes termed "de novo autoimmune hepatitis". Whether this is part of the spectrum of rejection or an autoimmune

  20. Liver macrophages in healthy and diseased liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Zeinab; Knolle, Percy A

    2017-04-01

    Kupffer cells, the largest tissue resident macrophage population, are key for the maintenance of liver integrity and its restoration after injury and infections, as well as the local initiation and resolution of innate and adaptive immunity. These important roles of Kupffer cells were recently identified in healthy and diseased liver revealing diverse functions and phenotypes of hepatic macrophages. High-level phenotypic and genomic analysis revealed that Kupffer cells are not a homogenous population and that the hepatic microenvironment actively shapes both phenotype and function of liver macrophages. Compared to macrophages from other organs, hepatic macrophages bear unique properties that are instrumental for their diverse roles in local immunity as well as liver regeneration. The diverse and, in part, contradictory roles of hepatic macrophages in anti-tumor and inflammatory immune responses as well as regulatory and regenerative processes have been obscured by the lack of appropriate technologies to specifically target or ablate Kupffer cells or monocyte-derived hepatic macrophages. Future studies will need to dissect the exact role of the hepatic macrophages with distinct functional properties linked to their differentiation status and thereby provide insight into the functional plasticity of hepatic macrophages.

  1. Chronic Liver Disease and Hispanic Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Population Profiles > Hispanic/Latino > Chronic Liver Disease Chronic Liver Disease and Hispanic Americans Among the Hispanic/Latino population, chronic liver disease is a leading cause of death. While ...

  2. Chronic Liver Disease and African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Population Profiles > Black/African American > Chronic Liver Disease Chronic Liver Disease and African Americans Among African Americans, chronic liver disease is a leading cause of death. While the ...

  3. Percutaneous cholecystocentesis in cats with suspected hepatobiliary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byfield, Victoria L; Callahan Clark, Julie E; Turek, Bradley J; Bradley, Charles W; Rondeau, Mark P

    2017-12-01

    Objectives The objective was to evaluate the safety and diagnostic utility of percutaneous ultrasound-guided cholecystocentesis (PUC) in cats with suspected hepatobiliary disease. Methods Medical records of 83 cats with suspected hepatobiliary disease that underwent PUC were retrospectively reviewed. Results At the time of PUC, at least one additional procedure was performed in 79/83 cats, including hepatic aspiration and/or biopsy (n = 75) and splenic aspiration (n = 18). Complications were noted in 14/83 cases, including increased abdominal fluid (n = 11), needle-tip occlusion (n = 1), failed first attempt to penetrate the gall bladder wall (n = 1) and pneumoperitoneum (n = 1). There were no reports of gall bladder rupture, bile peritonitis or hypotension necessitating treatment with vasopressor medication. Blood products were administered to 7/83 (8%) cats. Seventy-two cats (87%) survived to discharge. Of the cats that were euthanized (9/83) or died (2/83), none were reported as a definitive consequence of PUC. Bacteria were identified cytologically in 10/71 samples (14%); all 10 had a positive aerobic bacterial culture. Bile culture was positive in 11/80 samples (14%). Of the cases with a positive bile culture, cytological description of bacteria corresponded to the organism cultured in fewer than 50% of cases. The most common cytologic diagnosis was hepatic lipidosis (49/66). The most common histopathologic diagnosis was cholangitis (10/21). Conclusions and relevance PUC was safe in this group of cats with suspected hepatobiliary disease. Complications were likely associated with ancillary procedures performed at the time of PUC. Bile analysis yielded an abnormal result in nearly one-third of cats with suspected hepatobiliary disease. Complete agreement between bile cytology and culture was lacking. Further evaluation of the correlation between bile cytology and bile culture is warranted.

  4. Liver disease, HIV and aging

    OpenAIRE

    Falade-Nwulia, Oluwaseun; THIO, Chloe L.

    2011-01-01

    The life expectancy of HIV-infected patients has increased due to the efficacy of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in controlling HIV replication; thus, the population living with HIV infection is steadily aging. Liver-related morbidity and mortality has emerged as a leading problem in HIV-infected patients. Since aging, HIV infection and HAART all affect the liver, understanding the impact of the combination of these factors on liver disease is crucial for optimisation of care in...

  5. Enterobius vermicularis infection of the liver in a patient with colorectal carcinoma with suspected liver metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furnée, Edgar J B; Spoto, Clothaire; de Graaf, Melanie J; Smakman, Niels

    2015-11-05

    A 68-year-old man diagnosed with cT3N2 adenocarcinoma of the rectum presented with a synchronous solitary liver metastasis on CT scan. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy was started to downstage the primary tumour. Resection of the rectal tumour followed 3 months after the last radiotherapy session and primary resection of the isolated liver lesion was performed in the intervening period. Histopathological assessment of the liver lesion, however, showed no malignancy, but did reveal a necrotic infection due to Enterobius vermicularis. This parasite is frequently found in the intestines, but only rarely infects the liver. The patient was subsequently treated with the anthelmintic drug mebendazole 100 mg once a week for 2 weeks. Histopathological assessment of the rectal specimen showed complete regression after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy without evidence of remaining E. vermicularis, suggesting pinworm eradication. The patient recovered promptly after both surgical procedures. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  6. Global challenges in liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Roger

    2006-09-01

    Immigration, cheap air travel, and globalization are all factors contributing to a worldwide spread of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. End-stage chronic liver disease (ESLD) as a result of co-infection with HBV/HCV is now the major cause of death for individuals who have been infected with the HIV virus. The high incidence of HCV infection in Egypt--the legacy left from the mass use of tartar emetic to eradicate schistosomiasis, as in other high prevalence areas--will take years to reduce. Steatohepatitis due to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is developing into a new and major health problem as a result of rising levels of obesity in populations worldwide. Hepatic steatosis also has an adverse influence on the progression of other liver diseases including chronic HCV infection and alcoholic liver disease. In many countries, considerable public concern is on the rise due to increased levels of alcohol consumption adversely affecting younger and affluent age groups. With the rising prevalence of cirrhosis, primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is increasing in frequency as is that of primary intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. Finally, despite the successes of liver transplantation, many deserving patients are not getting transplants due to low levels of cadaver organ donation in many countries, thereby increasing pressures on the use of living donor liver transplantation. Only through a concerted effort from governments, health agencies, healthcare professionals at all levels, and the pharmaceutical industry can this grim outlook for liver disease worldwide be reversed.

  7. Endothelins in chronic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Henriksen, Jens Henrik

    1996-01-01

    . In addition, marked associations with disturbance of systemic haemodynamics and with abnormal distribution of blood volume have been reported. Although the pathophysiological importance of the ET system in chronic liver disease is not completely understood, similarities to other vasopressive...

  8. Autoantibodies in autoimmune liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sener, Asli Gamze

    2015-11-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic hepatitis of unknown etiology characterized by clinical, histological, and immunological features, generally including circulating autoantibodies and a high total serum and/or gamma globulin. Liver-related autoantibodies are very significant for the correct diagnosis and classification of autoimmune liver diseases (AILD), namely autoimmune hepatitis types 1 and 2 (AIH-1 and 2), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), and the sclerosing cholangitis types in adults and children. This article intends to review recent studies that investigate autoantibodies in autoimmune liver diseases from a microbiological perspective. © 2015 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Loss of brain function - liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of chronic liver damage. Common causes of chronic liver disease in the United States are: Chronic hepatitis B ... hepatitis Bile duct disorders Some medicines Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) Once you have ...

  10. Plugged percutaneous biopsy of the liver in living-donor liver transplantation recipients suspected to have graft rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Jung; Won, Je Hwan; Kim, Young Bae; Wang, Hee-Jung; Kim, Bong-Wan; Kim, Haeryoung; Kim, Jinoo

    2017-07-01

    Background Percutaneous biopsy is a widely-accepted technique for acquiring histologic samples of the liver. When there is concern for bleeding, plugged percutaneous biopsy (PPB) may be performed, which involves embolization of the biopsy tract. Purpose To evaluate the efficacy and safety of PPB of the liver in patients suspected to have graft rejection after living-donor liver transplantation (LDLT). Material and Methods During January 2007 and December 2013, 51 patients who underwent PPB of the liver under the suspicion of post-LDLT graft rejection were retrospectively analyzed. A total of 73 biopsies were performed. Biopsy was performed with a 17-gauge core needle and 18-gauge cutting needle. The needle tract was embolized using gelatin sponge (n = 44) or N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) (n = 29). The specimens were reviewed to determine their adequacy for histologic diagnosis. We reviewed all medical records after PPB. Results Specimens were successfully acquired in all procedures (100%). They were adequate for diagnosis in 70 cases (95.9%) and inadequate in three (1.3%). Average of 9.8 complete portal tracts was counted per specimen. One minor complication (1.4%) occurred where the patient had transient fever after the procedure. Conclusion PPB is easy and safe to perform in LDLT recipients and provides high diagnostic yield.

  11. related chronic liver disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-03-08

    Mar 8, 2012 ... Gelsolin, an actin-binding protein, which serves as a substrate of caspase in tissue injury has been proposed as a prognostic marker in acute .... hepatic cirrhosis patients together with hepatocellular carcinoma, and acute-on-chronic liver failure .... al., 2000). Cellular over-expression can inhibit the release ...

  12. HEMOSTATIC DISORDERS IN LIVER DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. F. Minov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The liver is an essential player in the pathway of coagulation in both primary and secondary hemostasis as it is the site of synthesis of all coagulation factors and their inhibitors. Liver diseases are associated with complex changes in coagulation and the delicate balance between pro and antithrombotic factors is preserved but reset to a lower level. There is growing evidence that portal and hepatic vein thrombosis is cause of disease progression in cirrhotic patients and worsens hemostatic abnormalities. These hemostatic abnormalities do not always lead to spontaneous bleeding, which may be triggered only by additional factors, such as infections. Usually therapy for coagulation disorders in liver disease is needed only during bleeding or before invasive procedures. In patients with end stage liver disease liver transplantation is the only treatment available, which can restore normal hemostasis, and correct genetic clotting defects. During liver transplantation hemorrhage may occur due to the pre-existing hypocoagulable state, the collateral circulation caused by portal hypertension and increased fibrinolysis. 

  13. Folate, alcohol, and liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medici, Valentina; Halsted, Charles H

    2013-04-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is typically associated with folate deficiency, which is the result of reduced dietary folate intake, intestinal malabsorption, reduced liver uptake and storage, and increased urinary folate excretion. Folate deficiency favors the progression of liver disease through mechanisms that include its effects on methionine metabolism with consequences for DNA synthesis and stability and the epigenetic regulation of gene expression involved in pathways of liver injury. This paper reviews the pathogenesis of ALD with particular focus on ethanol-induced alterations in methionine metabolism, which may act in synergy with folate deficiency to decrease antioxidant defense as well as DNA stability while regulating epigenetic mechanisms of relevant gene expressions. We also review the current evidence available on potential treatments of ALD based on correcting abnormalities in methionine metabolism and the methylation regulation of relevant gene expressions. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Extracellular Matrix and Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriazu, Elena; Ruiz de Galarreta, Marina; Cubero, Francisco Javier; Varela-Rey, Marta; Pérez de Obanos, María Pilar; Leung, Tung Ming; Lopategi, Aritz; Benedicto, Aitor; Abraham-Enachescu, Ioana

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a dynamic microenvironment that undergoes continuous remodeling, particularly during injury and wound healing. Chronic liver injury of many different etiologies such as viral hepatitis, alcohol abuse, drug-induced liver injury, obesity and insulin resistance, metabolic disorders, and autoimmune disease is characterized by excessive deposition of ECM proteins in response to persistent liver damage. Critical Issues: This review describes the main collagenous and noncollagenous components from the ECM that play a significant role in pathological matrix deposition during liver disease. We define how increased myofibroblasts (MF) from different origins are at the forefront of liver fibrosis and how liver cell-specific regulation of the complex scarring process occurs. Recent Advances: Particular attention is paid to the role of cytokines, growth factors, reactive oxygen species, and newly identified matricellular proteins in the regulation of fibrillar type I collagen, a field to which our laboratory has significantly contributed over the years. We compile data from recent literature on the potential mechanisms driving fibrosis resolution such as MF’ apoptosis, senescence, and reversal to quiescence. Future Directions: We conclude with a brief description of how epigenetics, an evolving field, can regulate the behavior of MF and of how new “omics” tools may advance our understanding of the mechanisms by which the fibrogenic response to liver injury occurs. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 1078–1097. PMID:24219114

  15. Alcoholic liver disease: The gut microbiome and liver crosstalk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Phillipp; Seebauer, Caroline T.; Schnabl, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Alcoholic fatty liver disease can progress to steatohepatitis, alcoholic hepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis. Patients with alcohol abuse show quantitative and qualitative changes in the composition of the intestinal microbiome. Furthermore, patients with alcoholic liver disease have increased intestinal permeability and elevated systemic levels of gut-derived microbial products. Maintaining eubiosis, stabilizing the mucosal gut barrier or preventing cellular responses to microbial products protect from experimental alcoholic liver disease. Therefore, intestinal dysbiosis and pathological bacterial translocation appear fundamental for the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease. This review highlights causes for intestinal dysbiosis and pathological bacterial translocation, their relationship and consequences for alcoholic liver disease. We also discuss how the liver affects the intestinal microbiota. PMID:25872593

  16. Increased Porphyrins in Primary Liver Cancer Mainly Reflect a Parallel Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Kaczynski

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic porphyries have been associated with an increased risk of primary liver cancer (PLC, which on the other hand may cause an increased porphyrin production. To evaluate the role of an underlying liver disorder we analyzed porphyrins in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC (n=65, cholangiocellular carcinoma (n=3, or suspected PLC, which turned out to be metastases (n=18 or a benign disorder (n=11. None of the patients had a family history of porphyry or clinical signs of porphyry. Increased aminolevulinic acid or porphyrin values were common not only in patients with PLC (43% but also in metastatic (50% and benign (64% liver disorders. The corresponding proportion for HCC patients with liver cirrhosis (55% was higher (P<.05 than in those without cirrhosis (17%. We conclude that symptomatic porphyries are unusual in PLC, whereas elevated urinary and/or faecal porphyrins are common, primarily reflecting a parallel liver disease and not the PLC.

  17. Endothelins in chronic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, S; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    1996-01-01

    This review describes recent progress in the accumulation of knowledge about the endothelins (ETs), a family of vasoactive 21-amino acid polypeptides, in chronic liver disease. Particular prominence is given to the dynamics of ET-1 and ET-3 and their possible relation to the disturbed circulation...... renal failure. Studies on liver biopsies have revealed synthesis of ET-1 in hepatic endothelial and other cells, and recent investigations have identified the hepatosplanchnic system as a major source of ET-1 and ET-3 spillover into the circulation, with a direct relation to portal venous hypertension....... In addition, marked associations with disturbance of systemic haemodynamics and with abnormal distribution of blood volume have been reported. Although the pathophysiological importance of the ET system in chronic liver disease is not completely understood, similarities to other vasopressive...

  18. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Patients Investigated for Elevated Liver Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krikor Kichian

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is a common diagnosis among patients referred to gastroenterology and hepatology clinics for the evaluation of elevated liver enzymes. The diagnosis of NAFLD is supported by blood work to exclude other liver diseases, and by ultrasound evidence of fat in the liver in patients without a significant history of alcohol intake. The gold standard, however, is a liver biopsy to show the typical histological features of NAFLD, which are almost identical to those of alcohol-induced liver damage and can range from mild steatosis to cirrhosis. A variety of retrospective series have linked NAFLD to obesity, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, total parenteral nutrition, jejunoileal bypass surgery and certain medications. A subset of patients with NAFLD that had an initial presentation of elevated liver enzymes was studied. Two hundred and two patients were reviewed, of whom 49 met the inclusion criteria including a liver biopsy. Patients were excluded if insufficient data were available, if the patients had a significant history of ethanol intake or if they had other coexisting liver disease. These patients were seen between 1996 and 2000 in gastroenterology and hepatology clinics in two community hospitals and one regional liver transplant centre in Edmonton, Alberta. NAFLD was associated with a spectrum of changes in the liver ranging from mild steatosis to more significant steatosis with inflammation and fibrosis. Cases of NAFLD with steatosis and mixed inflammatory infiltration but lacking ballooning degeneration or fibrosis were prevalent in young (20 to 40 years of age patients with no other significant medical history except for obesity. NAFLD with biopsies showing significant fibrosis and ballooning cell degeneration was associated with obesity, diabetes and older age. It was concluded that, in this predominantly outpatient setting, age over 40 years and diabetes at any age are risk factors for both nonalcoholic

  19. Liver transplantation for Wilson disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catana, Andreea M; Medici, Valentina

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to review the current status of liver transplantation (LT) for Wilson disease (WD), focusing on indications and controversies, especially in patients with neuropsychiatric disease, and on identification of acute liver failure (ALF) cases related to WD. LT remains the treatment of choice for patients with ALF, as initial presentation of WD or when anti-copper agents are stopped, and for patients with chronic liver disease progressed to cirrhosis, unresponsive to chelating medications or not timely treated with copper chelating agents. The indication for LT in WD remains highly debated in patients with progressive neurological deterioration and failure to improve with appropriate medical treatment. In case of Wilsonian ALF, early identification is key as mortality is 100% without emergency LT. As many of the copper metabolism parameters are believed to be less reliable in ALF, simple biochemical tests have been proposed for diagnosis of acute WD with good sensitivity and specificity. LT corrects copper metabolism and complications resulting from WD with excellent 1 and 5 year survival. Living related liver transplantation represents an alternative to deceased donor LT with excellent long-term survival, without disease recurrence. Future options may include hepatocyte transplantation and gene therapy. Although both of these have shown promising results in animal models of WD, prospective human studies are much needed to demonstrate their long-term beneficial effects and their potential to replace the need for medical therapy and LT in patients with WD. PMID:22312450

  20. Pre-admission antibiotics for suspected cases of meningococcal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudarsanam, Thambu D; Rupali, Priscilla; Tharyan, Prathap; Abraham, Ooriapadickal Cherian; Thomas, Kurien

    2013-08-02

    Meningococcal disease can lead to death or disability within hours after onset. Pre-admission antibiotics aim to reduce the risk of serious disease and death by preventing delays in starting therapy before confirmation of the diagnosis. To study the effectiveness and safety of pre-admission antibiotics versus no pre-admission antibiotics or placebo, and different pre-admission antibiotic regimens in decreasing mortality, clinical failure and morbidity in people suspected of meningococcal disease. We updated searches of CENTRAL (2013, Issue 4), MEDLINE (1966 to April week 4, 2013), EMBASE (1980 to May 2013), Web of Science (1985 to May 2013), CAB Abstracts (1985 to May 2013), LILACS (1982 to May 2013) and prospective trials registries to May 2013. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-RCTs comparing antibiotics versus placebo or no intervention, in people with suspected meningococcal infection, or different antibiotics administered before admission to hospital or confirmation of the diagnosis. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data from the search results. We calculated the risk ratio (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for dichotomous data. We included only one trial so data synthesis was not performed. We assessed the overall quality of the evidence using the GRADE approach. We found no RCTs that compared pre-admission antibiotics versus no pre-admission antibiotics or placebo. One open-label, non-inferiority RCT, conducted during an epidemic in Niger, evaluated a single dose of intramuscular ceftriaxone versus a single dose of intramuscular long-acting (oily) chloramphenicol. Ceftriaxone was not inferior to chloramphenicol in reducing mortality (RR 1.2, 95% CI 0.6 to 2.6; N = 503; 308 confirmed meningococcal meningitis; 26 deaths; moderate-quality evidence), clinical failures (RR 0.8, 95% CI 0.3 to 2.2; N = 477, 18 clinical failures; moderate-quality evidence) or neurological sequelae (RR 1.3, 95% CI 0.6 to 2.6; N

  1. Diagnosis and management of polycystic liver disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gevers, T.J.G.; Drenth, J.P.H.

    2013-01-01

    Polycystic liver disease (PLD) is arbitrarily defined as a liver that contains >20 cysts. The condition is associated with two genetically distinct diseases: as a primary phenotype in isolated polycystic liver disease (PCLD) and as an extrarenal manifestation in autosomal dominant polycystic

  2. Liver transplantation for overlap syndromes of autoimmune liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhanji, Rahima A; Mason, Andrew L; Girgis, Safwat; Montano-Loza, Aldo J

    2013-02-01

    The term overlap syndrome describes variant forms of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) that present in combination with either characteristics of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), or primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). This study analysed the outcomes and evidence of recurrent liver disease after liver transplantation in patients with overlap syndromes compared with patients transplanted for single autoimmune liver disease. We evaluated 231 adult patients who received a liver transplant as a result of autoimmune liver diseases; including 103 with PBC, 84 with PSC, 32 with AIH and 12 with overlap syndrome (7 AIH-PBC and 5 AIH-PSC). Patients with overlap syndromes had a higher probability of recurrence than patients with a single autoimmune liver disease (5 years: 53% vs. 17%; 10 years 69% vs. 29%, P = 0.001). Furthermore, median time for recurrence in overlap syndrome was shorter when compared with patients with single autoimmune liver disease (67 ± 20 vs. 172 ± 9 months, P = 0.001). The diagnosis of overlap syndrome was independently associated with a higher risk to develop recurrent disease than patients transplanted with a single disease (HR 3.39, P = 0.007). Median graft survival for overlap syndrome was 123 ± 16 months and 180 ± 8 months in patients with single autoimmune liver diseases (P = 0.9), and median patient survival for overlap syndrome was 135 ± 13 months and 193 ± 8 months in patients with single autoimmune liver disease (P = 0.6). Patients that received an allograft for end-stage liver disease secondary to overlap syndrome had a higher rate of disease recurrence when compared with transplant recipients with single autoimmune liver disorders, but the overall survival was comparable. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. Polycystic liver disease - a disease entity presenting as part of autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Boonzaaier-Botha

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available A 65-year-old man was referred to the Gastroenterology Department with complaints of longstanding upper abdominal discomfort and hepatomegaly. Ultrasound of the liver revealed a massively enlarged liver with multiple cystic areas. Aspiration of the largest cyst revealed 15 ml of yellow fluid without any organisms or malignant cells.A diagnosis of autosomal- dominant polycystic kidney disease was suspected, but could not initially be confirmed on ultrasound/ computed tomography imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the multiple hepatic cysts and revealed multiple smaller cysts in both kidneys. Symptomatology subsided after aspiration of the largest cyst and the patient was discharged. The patient has subsequently been followed up and is currently symptom free. The case illustrates the importance of screening for associated kidney disease in patients with polycystic liver disease.

  4. Endothelins in chronic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Henriksen, Jens Henrik

    1996-01-01

    renal failure. Studies on liver biopsies have revealed synthesis of ET-1 in hepatic endothelial and other cells, and recent investigations have identified the hepatosplanchnic system as a major source of ET-1 and ET-3 spillover into the circulation, with a direct relation to portal venous hypertension......This review describes recent progress in the accumulation of knowledge about the endothelins (ETs), a family of vasoactive 21-amino acid polypeptides, in chronic liver disease. Particular prominence is given to the dynamics of ET-1 and ET-3 and their possible relation to the disturbed circulation...... and neurohumoral dysregulation found in cirrhosis. Recent studies have shown that the ET system is highly activated in most cirrhotic patients. Circulating ET-1 and ET-3 levels have a positive relation to the severity of the disease and fluid retention, with the highest values recorded in patients with functional...

  5. COAGULATION ACTIVITY IN LIVER DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Sheikh Sajjadieh Mohammad Reza

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Patients with advanced hepatic failure may present with the entire spectrum of coagulation factor deficiencies. This study was designed to determine laboratory abnormalities in coagulation in chronic liver disease and the association of these abnormalities with the extent of chronic hepatitis and cirrhosis. Coagulation markers were assayed in 60 participants: 20 patients with chronic hepatitis, 20 patients with cirrhosis, and 20 healthy individuals (control. Plasma levels of anti-thrombin III were determined by a chromogenic substrate method, and plasma concentrations of fibrinogen were analyzed by the Rutberg method. Commercially available assays were used for laboratory coagulation tests. The levels of coagualation activity markers in patients with chronic liver disease were significantly different in comparison to those in healthy participants. These results indicate the utility of measuring markers for coagulation activity in determining which cirrhosis patients are more susceptible to disseminated intravascular coagulation.

  6. MEDICINAL PLANTS AGAINST LIVER DISEASES

    OpenAIRE

    Pandey Govind

    2011-01-01

    India is the largest producer of medicinal plants and is rightly called the “Botanical Garden of the World”. The medicinal plants have very important place in the health and vitality of human beings as well as animals. As per the WHO estimates, about three quarters of the world’s population currently use herbs and other traditional medicines to cure various diseases, including liver disorders. Hence, several phytomedicines (medicinal plants or herbal drugs) are now used for the prevention and...

  7. Chest pain and behavior in suspected coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, L D; Barboriak, J J; Anderson, A J

    1988-01-01

    This study assessed behavioral activity, dietary and emotional variables among patient cohorts with angina pectoris, atypical chest pain, and no chest pain in whom coronary disease is suspected. Questionnaire responses of 3,899 employed male patients at the time of coronary arteriography were analyzed. Patients with angina pectoris had high levels of coronary-prone and neurotic attitudes, and fatigue variables including feeling unrested on awakening, easy fatiguability, reducing activity at work and arriving home tired. Atypical chest pain patients showed coronary-prone and neurotic attitudes similar to the angina pectoris group but had less coronary occlusion and lower levels of fatigue variables. Compared to the other groups, atypical chest pain patients were more likely to skip breakfast and showed a trend to eat fast. These findings suggest that including assessment of activity levels, fatiguability, eating behavior, neurotic traits and coronary-prone attitudes at time of coronary arteriography can have some limited value for patients with chest pain who may seek cardiac treatment but could benefit from alternative approaches.

  8. ORAL HEALTH IN PATIENTS WITH LIVER DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir E. Panov

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In most of the patients with chronic hepatitis B and C, the disease progression to liver cirrhosis and a liver transplantation is necessary. Untreated oral diseases (including dental problems can lead to infections and sepsis and may cause many complications in transplanted patients and a prerequisite dental evaluation is usually recommended for potential organ transplant candidates.Our aim was to determine the dental status in patients with chronic liver disease, knowing that liver transplant will be a life choices.

  9. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Sadeghian

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is increasing in pediatric age group parallel to the growing prevalence of obesity and overweight all around the world. So changing in life style and   interventions on obesogenic environment is cornerstone of NAFLD therapy in obese children. Some experts recommend that children and adolescents be encouraged to follow a low-fat, low-glycemic-index diet that includes eating a minimum of 5 servings of vegetables and fruits daily, engaging in physical activity for at least 1 hour daily, and minimizing television/computer time to 2 hours daily.  In spite of effectiveness of weight loss and exercise in improvement NAFLD, this goal is very difficult to be achieved and pharmacological approaches have become necessary. Pharmacologic therapies against one or more specific factors and/or molecules involved in the development of NAFLD (i.e., insulin resistance, free fatty acid lipid toxicity, and oxidative stress also might slow the progression of NAFLD to NASH or cirrhosis.  On this basis, insulin sensitizers, antioxidants, cytoprotective agents, and dietary supplementations have been evaluated in pediatric clinical trials but there is no approved pharmacologic therapy for NAFLD or NASH. Not all obese children affected by NAFLD. Diet modification and regular exercise beside to serial medical follow up highly suggested for this group of children. Normal weight and thin children with NAFLD or NASH should be investigated appropriately in a logical manner based on causes of primary liver steatosis in children and treatment of underlying disease can cause improvement fatty liver in these patients.   Keywords: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis; Children; Steatosis; Treatment

  10. [Polycystic liver disease without autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peces, R; González, P; Venegas, J L

    2003-01-01

    Polycystic liver disease is characterized by the presence of multiple bile duct-derived epithelial cysts scattered in the liver parenchyma. The natural history and clinical manifestations of polycystic liver disease are based on the disease as it manifests in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). The occurrence of polycystic liver disease independently from polycystic kidney disease has been known for a long time. More recently, a gene for autosomal dominant polycystic liver disease has been identified on chromosome 19p 13.2-13.1. Isolated polycystic liver disease is underdiagnosed and genetically distinct from polycystic liver disease associated with ADPKD but with similar pathogenesis and clinical manifestations. We report here two men with polycystic liver disease no associated with ADPKD. Ultrasound and computed tomography imaging were effective in documenting the underlying lesions non-invasively.

  11. Excellent survival after liver transplantation for isolated polycystic liver disease : an European Liver Transplant Registry study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Keimpema, Loes; Nevens, Frederik; Adam, Rene; Porte, Robert J.; Fikatas, Panagiotis; Becker, Thomas; Kirkegaard, Preben; Metselaar, Herold J.; Drenth, Joost P. H.

    2011-01-01

    Patients with end-stage isolated polycystic liver disease (PCLD) suffer from incapacitating symptoms because of very large liver volumes. Liver transplantation (LT) is the only curative option. This study assesses the feasibility of LT in PCLD. We used the European Liver Transplant Registry (ELTR)

  12. Lymphocyte recruitment to the liver in alcoholic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haydon, Geoffrey; Lalor, Patricia F; Hubscher, Stefan G; Adams, David H

    2002-05-01

    The normal liver contains a large number of lymphocytes, which include not only specialized natural killer (NK) and NKT cells but also CD4 and CD8 T cells. Whereas some of these cells are terminally differentiated effector cells that are destined to die by apoptosis, many of them are not and include immunocompetent cells that traffic through the liver to provide continuing immune surveillance as well as epithelial-associated effector T cells. In alcoholic liver disease the number of lymphocytes in the liver increases and the type and distribution of these infiltrating cells will determine the nature of the inflammation. For instance, a predominance of parenchymal inflammation is a feature of alcoholic hepatitis, whereas a predominantly portal infiltrate is a feature of cirrhosis. In this article we discuss the molecular mechanisms that regulate the entry of lymphocytes to the inflamed liver in alcoholic hepatitis. Lymphocytes play a critical role in regulating the immune/inflammatory response to alcohol, and understanding how these cells are recruited to the liver has important implications for understanding the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease in which parenchymal infiltration is a critical determinant of disease progression. Aberrant recruitment and retention of lymphocytes in the liver may explain why some patients with alcoholic liver disease show progressive inflammatory damage whereas in others the disease takes a more indolent course. Similarly, leukocyte recruitment may present new therapeutic targets in which lymphocyte recruitment to the specific liver compartments can be inhibited, thereby minimizing tissue damage whilst leaving generalized lymphocyte recirculation intact. Potentially the most exciting potential is to modulate the nature of the lymphocyte subsets recruited to the liver, so that harmful cells are excluded and beneficial subsets are preferentially recruited.

  13. Trace elements and chronic liver diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loguercio, C.; De Girolamo, V.; Federico A., A.; Del Vecchio Blanco, C. [Seconda Universita di Napoli, Naples (Italy). Cattedra di Gastroenterologia; Feng, S.L.; Gialanella, G. [Naples Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche; Cataldi, V. [Naples Univ. (Italy). Prima Medicina Ospedale Ascalesi

    1997-12-31

    The relationships between chronic liver diseases and trace element (TE) contents are debated. Particularly, no defined data are available about the TE levels in viral liver disease patients with or without malnutrition. In this study we evaluated blood and plasma levels of various trace elements in patients with HCV-related chronic liver disease, at different stages of liver damage (8 patients with chronic hepatitis and 32 with liver cirrhosis) with or without malnutrition. We also studied 10 healthy volunteers as control group. We found that cirrhotic subjects had a significant decrease of blood levels of Zn and Se, independently on the nutritional status, whereas plasma levels of Fe were significantly reduced only in malnourished cirrhotic patients. Our data indicate that liver impairment is the main cause of the blood decrease of Se and Zn levels in patients with non alcoholic liver disease, whereas the malnutrition affects Fe levels only. (orig.)

  14. [Orthotopic liver transplantation in therapy of advanced polycystic liver disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klupp, J; Bechstein, W O; Lobeck, H; Neuhaus, P

    1996-05-01

    Polycystic liver disease (PLD) is an autosomal-dominant hereditary disease which usually presents together with polycystic kidney degeneration (ADPKD). The renal problems determine the course of this disease. Due to the development of dialysis an increasing number of patients present with symptoms from their liver cysts: These range from compression caused by hepatomegaly, which can severely limit the quality of life, to chronic liver failure. Ten patients with advanced symptoms of PLD underwent orthotopic liver transplantation, five of them with combined renal transplantation. Postoperative complications occurred in three patients. One patient died postoperatively from multiorgan failure after experiencing coagulopathy of unknown origin. After follow-up of 6-60 months, all patients had better quality of life after transplantation. There was a complete relief of symptoms; liver or renal failure did not occur. Liver transplantation should be considered in patients with highly symptomatic PLD. In the case of severe hepatomegaly or liver and renal failure the combined liver and renal transplantation are able to cure the PLD and ADPKD without rising the disadvantage of immunosuppression incurred with single organ transplantation.

  15. Correlation between liver morphology and haemodynamics in alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsgaard, K; Gluud, C; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    1985-01-01

    was found with haemodynamic variables. The present data substantiate the concept that established portal hypertension in alcoholic liver disease is mainly accomplished by a derangement in hepatic architecture, whereas parenchymal changes, including hepatocyte size, are of less importance....

  16. Microbiota-Liver Axis in Hepatic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassaing, Benoit; Etienne-Mesmin, Lucie; Gewirtz, Andrew T.

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that the gut microbiota, long appreciated to be a key determinant of intestinal inflammation, is also playing a key role in chronic inflammatory disease of the liver. Such studies have yielded a general central hypothesis whereby microbiota products activate the innate immune system to drive pro-inflammatory gene expression thus promoting chronic inflammatory disease of the liver. This article reviews the background supporting this hypothesis, outlines how it can potentially explain classic and newly emerging epidemiological chronic inflammatory liver disease, and discusses potential therapeutic means to manipulate the microbiota so as to prevent and/or treat liver disease. PMID:23703735

  17. Lactate metabolism in chronic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Johanne B; Mortensen, Christian; Bendtsen, Flemming

    2013-01-01

    Background. In the healthy liver there is a splanchnic net-uptake of lactate caused by gluconeogenesis. It has previously been shown that patients with acute liver failure in contrast have a splanchnic release of lactate caused by a combination of accelerated glycolysis in the splanchnic region...... and a reduction in hepatic gluconeogenesis. Aims. The aims of the present study were to investigate lactate metabolism and kinetics in patients with chronic liver disease compared with a control group with normal liver function. Methods. A total of 142 patients with chronic liver disease and 14 healthy controls...

  18. [Liver ultrasound: focal lesions and diffuse diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura Grau, A; Valero López, I; Díaz Rodríguez, N; Segura Cabral, J M

    2016-01-01

    Liver ultrasound is frequently used as a first-line technique for the detection and characterization of the most common liver lesions, especially those incidentally found focal liver lesions, and for monitoring of chronic liver diseases. Ultrasound is not only used in the Bmode, but also with Doppler and, more recently, contrast-enhanced ultrasound. It is mainly used in the diagnosis of diffuse liver diseases, such as steatosis or cirrhosis. This article presents a practical approach for diagnosis workup, in which the different characteristics of the main focal liver lesions and diffuse liver diseases are reviewed. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Association of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and liver cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Perla Oliveira; Ferreira, Fabio Gonçalves; Nascimento, Maria de Fátima Araújo; Vieira, Andrea; Ribeiro, Mauricio Alves; David, André Ibrahim; Szutan, Luiz Arnaldo

    2015-01-21

    To investigate the association between nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and liver cancer, and NAFLD prevalence in different liver tumors. This is a retrospective study of the clinical, laboratory and histological data of 120 patients diagnosed with primary or secondary hepatic neoplasms and treated at a tertiary center where they underwent hepatic resection and/or liver transplantation, with subsequent evaluation of the explant or liver biopsy. The following criteria were used to exclude patients from the study: a history of alcohol abuse, hepatitis B or C infection, no tumor detected in the liver tissue examined by histological analysis, and the presence of chronic autoimmune hepatitis, hemochromatosis, Wilson's disease, or hepatoblastoma. The occurrence of NAFLD and the association with its known risk factors were studied. The risk factors considered were diabetes mellitus, impaired glucose tolerance, impaired fasting glucose, body mass index, dyslipidemia, and arterial hypertension. Presence of reticulin fibers in the hepatic neoplasms was assessed by histological analysis using slide-mounted specimens stained with either hematoxylin and eosin or Masson's trichrome and silver impregnation. Analysis of tumor-free liver parenchyma was carried out to determine the association between NAFLD and its histological grade. No difference was found in the association of NAFLD with the general population (34.2% and 30.0% respectively, 95%CI: 25.8-43.4). Evaluation by cancer type showed that NAFLD was more prevalent in patients with liver metastasis of colorectal cancer than in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (OR = 3.99, 95%CI: 1.78-8.94, P liver fibrosis in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (OR = 3.50, 95%CI: 1.06-11.57, P = 0.032). Evaluation of the relationship between the presence of NAFLD, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, and liver fibrosis, and their risk factors, showed no significant statistical association for any

  20. Alcoholic Liver Disease: Pathogenesis and Current Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osna, Natalia A; Donohue, Terrence M; Kharbanda, Kusum K

    2017-01-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption is a global healthcare problem. The liver sustains the greatest degree of tissue injury by heavy drinking because it is the primary site of ethanol metabolism. Chronic and excessive alcohol consumption produces a wide spectrum of hepatic lesions, the most characteristic of which are steatosis, hepatitis, and fibrosis/cirrhosis. Steatosis is the earliest response to heavy drinking and is characterized by the deposition of fat in hepatocytes. Steatosis can progress to steatohepatitis, which is a more severe, inflammatory type of liver injury. This stage of liver disease can lead to the development of fibrosis, during which there is excessive deposition of extracellular matrix proteins. The fibrotic response begins with active pericellular fibrosis, which may progress to cirrhosis, characterized by excessive liver scarring, vascular alterations, and eventual liver failure. Among problem drinkers, about 35 percent develop advanced liver disease because a number of disease modifiers exacerbate, slow, or prevent alcoholic liver disease progression. There are still no FDA-approved pharmacological or nutritional therapies for treating patients with alcoholic liver disease. Cessation of drinking (i.e., abstinence) is an integral part of therapy. Liver transplantation remains the life-saving strategy for patients with end-stage alcoholic liver disease.

  1. Rheumatic Manifestations in Autoimmune Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selmi, Carlo; Generali, Elena; Gershwin, Merrill Eric

    2018-02-01

    Autoimmune liver diseases coexist with rheumatic disorders in approximately 30% of cases and may also share pathogenic mechanisms. Autoimmune liver diseases result from an immune-mediated injury of different tissues, with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) targeting hepatocytes, and primary biliary cholangitis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis targeting cholangiocytes. Sjogren syndrome is diagnosed in 7% of AIH cases and serologic autoimmunity profiles are a common laboratory abnormality, particularly in the case of serum antimitochondrial (PBC) or anti-liver kidney microsomal antibodies (AIH). Therapeutic strategies may overlap between rheumatic and autoimmune liver diseases and practitioners should be vigilant in managing bone loss. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Autoantibodies in chronic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghonaim, Mabrouk; Al-Ghamdi, Abdullah; El-Bana, Hassan; Bakr, Ahmed; Ghoneim, Enas; El-Edel, Rawhia; Hassona, Mona; Shoeib, Sabry; Allam, Heba

    2005-01-01

    Some hepatotropic viruses (HBV and HCV) are capable of triggering autoimmune phenomena and manifest the features of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) in the course of the disease. Careful attention is required to differentiate between AIH and chronic viral hepatitis (CVH) before the selection of treatment. This study was performed to assess the prevalence of rheumatoid factor (RF), antinuclear antibodies (ANA), anti-smooth muscle antibodies (ASMA), anti-mitochondrial antibodies (AMA), anti-parietal cell antibodies (APCA), anti-liver/kidney microsomal antibodies type I (ALKMA1) and anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) among patients with chronic liver diseases (CLD), and to assess the diagnostic value of these autoantibodies and their relation to HCV viral load and genotype and treatment with interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha). Five groups of patients with CLD (HCV, HBV, HCC, AIH and schistosomal hepatic fibrosis {SHF}) as well as a group of age- and gender-matched healthy controls were enrolled in the study. All the studied persons were subjected to full clinical assessment and laboratory investigations, including liver function tests, hepatitis markers, and HCV RNA by PCR. Detection of ANA, ASMA, APCA, AMA and ALKMA-1 was done by indirect immunofluorescence technique, while ANCA and RF were detected by EIA and latex agglutination test respectively. Results showed a significantly higher prevalence of RF, ASMA and ANCA among patients with CHC, RF and ASMA among HCC patients and ASMA and ALKMA1, among AIH patients as compared to the control group. Patients with HBV and those with SHF had a non-significantly higher prevalence of RF, ASMA and ANCA compared to controls. However, AMA was not detected in this study, and APCA showed no significant difference between the studied groups. The occurrence of these autoantibodies was not significantly related to HCV viral load, HCV genotype or treatment with IFN-alpha. There was a significant association between the occurrence of RF

  3. Dental considerations in patients with liver disease

    OpenAIRE

    Cruz Pamplona, Marta; Margaix Muñoz, María; Sarrión Pérez, María Gracia

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Liver diseases are very common, and the main underlying causes are viral infections, alcohol abuse and lipid and carbohydrate metabolic disorders. The liver has a broad range of functions in maintaining homeostasis and health, and moreover metabolizes many drug substances. Objective: An update is provided on the oral manifestations seen in patients with viral hepatitis, alcoholic and non-alcoholic liver disease, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, and on the dent...

  4. Traditional Chinese medicine treatment of liver diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Rongbing

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM treatment of liver diseases is derived from the regulation of liver function including storing blood and governing the free flow of qi, in which functional systems such as modern digestion, endocrine, and the gut-liver axis are involved, and is established on modern hepatic physiology, pathology, and etiology. To objectively reveal the characteristics and advantages of modern TCM treatment of liver diseases, we analyzed the clinical and research situation of TCM therapy for liver diseases in the last decade and collected major achievements that have been applied in clinical treatment of diseases, published in core journals, and confirmed by major scientific research programs. The results showed TCM combined with antiviral therapy can improve the clinical outcomes of chronic hepatitis B. TCM can help HBV carriers prevent disease progression. Integrated traditional Chinese and Western medicine therapy for acute-on-chronic liver failure can block the deterioration induced by endotoxin. TCM has been widely applied in protecting the liver through nonspecific anti-inflammation, alleviating hepatic fibrosis, and preventing non-alcoholic fatty liver. TCM plays an important role in treating some currently untreatable liver diseases. Therefore, it is our common responsibility to inherit and develop effective principle-method-recipe-medicines and create a better medical care system.

  5. Management of coagulation abnormalities in liver disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potze, Wilma; Porte, Robert J.; Lisman, Ton

    Liver disease is characterized by changes in all phases of hemostasis. These hemostatic alterations were long considered to predispose patients with liver disease towards a bleeding tendency, as they are associated with prolonged conventional coagulation tests. However, these patients may also

  6. Caroli's disease misdiagnosed as hydatid liver cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akoglu, M.; Davidson, B. R.

    1991-01-01

    A 27 year old woman who presented with upper abdominal pain was found on ultrasonography to have multiple liver cysts consistent with hydatid disease. Three years previously she had undergone evacuation of multiple infected liver cysts thought to be due to hydatid disease. Computed tomographic scanning supported the diagnosis of hydatid disease affecting the right lobe of the liver. At laparotomy the right lobe contained multiple cysts which were removed by right lobectomy. Histology revealed congenital dilatation of the intrahepatic bile ducts with fibrosis (Caroli's disease) but no evidence of hydatid disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2057431

  7. Ileoscopy reduces the need for small bowel imaging in suspected Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael Dam; Nathan, Torben; Rafaelsen, Søren Rafael

    2012-01-01

    In suspected Crohn's disease (CD), current diagnostic guidelines recommend additional small bowel imaging irrespective of the findings at ileocolonoscopy. Magnetic resonance imaging enterography (MRE) and computed tomography enterography (CTE) are regarded first line imaging techniques and should...

  8. Nutritional support for liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koretz, Ronald L; Avenell, Alison; Lipman, Timothy O

    2012-05-16

    Weight loss and muscle wasting are commonly found in patients with end-stage liver disease. Since there is an association between malnutrition and poor clinical outcome, such patients (or those at risk of becoming malnourished) are often given parenteral nutrition, enteral nutrition, or oral nutritional supplements. These interventions have costs and adverse effects, so it is important to prove that their use results in improved morbidity or mortality, or both. To assess the beneficial and harmful effects of parenteral nutrition, enteral nutrition, and oral nutritional supplements on the mortality and morbidity of patients with underlying liver disease. The following computerised databases were searched: the Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Science Citation Index Expanded (January 2012). In addition, reference lists of identified trials and review articles and Clinicaltrials.gov were searched. Trials identified in a previous systematic handsearch of Index Medicus were also considered. Handsearches of a number of medical journals, including abstracts from annual meetings, were done. Experts in the field and manufacturers of nutrient formulations were contacted for potential references. Randomised clinical trials (parallel or cross-over design) comparing groups of patients with any underlying liver disease who received, or did not receive, enteral or parenteral nutrition or oral nutritional supplements were identified without restriction on date, language, or publication status. Six categories of trials were separately considered: medical or surgical patients receiving parenteral nutrition, enteral nutrition, or supplements. The following data were sought in each report: date of publication; geographical location; inclusion and exclusion criteria; the type of nutritional support and constitution of the nutrient formulation; duration of

  9. Role of liver biopsy in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalbantoglu, I L Ke; Brunt, Elizabeth M

    2014-07-21

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), defined as abnormal accumulation (> 5%) of hepatic triglyceride without excess alcohol intake, is the most common form of chronic liver disease in adults and children in the United States. NAFLD encompasses a spectrum of histologic findings including uncomplicated steatosis, steatosis with inflammation and steatohepatitis [nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH)]; the latter can advance to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. NASH is currently accepted as the hepatic manifestation of the set of cardiovascular risk factors collectively known as metabolic syndrome. In 1999 a system for histologic grading and staging for NASH was proposed; this was revised by the NASH Clinical Research Network in 2005 for the entire spectrum of lesions in NAFLD, including the lesions and patterns of pediatric NAFLD, and for application in clinical research trials. Diagnosis remains distinct from grade and stage. A recent European proposal separates steatosis from activity to derive a numeric diagnosis of NASH. Even though there have been promising advancements in non-invasive testing, these tests are not yet detailed enough to replace the full range of findings provided by liver biopsy evaluation. Limitations of biopsy are acknowledged, but liver biopsy remains the "gold standard" for diagnosis and determination of amounts of necroinflammatory activity, and location of fibrosis, as well as remodeling of the parenchyma in NASH. This review focuses on the specific histologic lesions of NAFLD and NASH, grading and staging, differential diagnoses to be considered, and the continuing role of the liver biopsy in this important liver disease.

  10. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Pathophysiology and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Rotonya M; Oranu, Amanke; Khungar, Vandana

    2016-12-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and is rapidly becoming the leading cause of end-stage liver disease and liver transplant. With a prevalence of 30% in the United States, it has reached epidemic proportions. The clinical syndrome of NAFLD spans from bland steatosis to steatohepatitis, which can progress to fibrosis and cirrhosis. The pathogenesis includes the roles of hormones, nutritional and intestinal dysbiosis, insulin resistance, lipotoxicity, hepatic inflammation, and genes. Noninvasive testing and liver biopsy indications are reviewed. Approved and investigational therapies for NAFLD and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis are outlined in this article. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Phenotypes and Pathology of Drug-Induced Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Zachary D

    2017-02-01

    Drug hepatotoxicity can simulate nearly any clinical syndrome or pathologic lesion that may occur in the liver, so clinical and histopathologic diagnosis of drug-induced liver injury may be difficult. Nevertheless, most drugs that are known to idiosyncratic liver injury tend to cause patterns of injury that produce characteristic phenotypes. Recognition of these patterns or phenotypes in liver biopsy material is helpful in evaluation of clinical cases of suspected drug-induced liver injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. HEME OXYGENASE-1 AND FATTY LIVER DISEASE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Nicolosi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Fatty liver diseases are a spectrum of liver pathologies characterized by abnormal hepatocellular accumulations of lipids. This condition may occur in both adults and children, particularly those who are obese or have insulin resistance or following abuse of alcohol consumption. They are classified in Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD and Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (AFLD. Steatohepatitis is a specific pattern of injury within the spectrum of NAFLD and this pattern is associated with fibrotic progression and cirrhosis. The role of oxidative stress in liver steatosis production and its progression to inflammation leading to steatohepatitis has been discussed in relation to alterations in metabolic and pro-inflammatory pathway. One of the main enzymes responsible for antioxidant activity in the presence of liver damage is the Heme Oxygenase-1(HO-1.The products of the HO-1-catalyzed reaction, particularly carbon monoxide (CO and biliverdin/bilirubin have been shown to exert protective effects in several organs against oxidative and other noxious stimuli. In this context, it is interesting to note that induction of HO-1 expression contributes to protection against liver damage in various experimental models. The focus of this review is on the significance of targeted induction of HO-1 as a potential therapeutic strategy to protect the liver against fatty liver diseases.

  13. Current pharmacotherapy for cholestatic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Elizabeth J; Lindor, Keith D

    2012-12-01

    The cholestatic liver diseases comprise a heterogeneous group of disorders which, left untreated, usually progresses to cirrhosis and liver failure. Most are recognized before the onset of advanced fibrosis, thereby affording an opportunity for disease modifying therapy. This review will cover the current pharmacologic management of the most common causes of cholestatic liver disease in adults, including primary biliary cirrhosis, primary biliary cirrhosis-autoimmune hepatitis overlap syndrome, primary sclerosing cholangitis, intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy, intestinal failure-associated liver disease, and immunoglobulin G4-associated cholangitis. Pharmacologic management of complications of cholestasis will also be reviewed. Effective therapy for most cholestatic liver disease is lacking. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) slows the progression of primary biliary cirrhosis but the majority of patients do not have a full response. Even in those with a complete response, UDCA does not cure the disease. There is currently no effective medical therapy for primary sclerosing cholangitis. Symptoms and serum liver biochemistry values in intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy are improved with UDCA, but it is not certain if this alters the course of disease. Immunoglobulin G4-associated cholangitis is responsive to steroids but may relapse. The farnesoid X receptor agonists are a promising new class of drugs currently being tested in cholestatic liver disease.

  14. Chronic Liver Disease and Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Population Profiles > Asian American > Chronic Liver Disease Chronic Liver Disease and Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders Among Asian Americans, chronic liver disease is a leading cause of death. While the ...

  15. Chronic Liver Disease and American Indians/Alaska Natives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... American Indian/Alaska Native > Chronic Liver Disease Chronic Liver Disease and American Indians/Alaska Natives Among American Indians and Alaska Natives, chronic liver disease is a leading cause of death. While the ...

  16. Chronic Liver Disease and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander > Chronic Liver Disease Chronic Liver Disease and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander Native Hawaiian/Pacific ... times more likely to be diagnosed with chronic liver disease in 2006. American Samoans were 8 times more ...

  17. The Relationship Between Fatty Liver Disease and Periodontal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-22

    Periodontitis is a highly prevalent and destructive chronic disease. Numerous studies support an association between periodontal disease and other...systemic diseases ( diabetes , cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease, adverse pregnancy outcome, etc.). Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is a...destruction seen in periodontal disease. The association between the two diseases has never been investigated. A reasonable mechanism in which periodontal

  18. Cell and Tissue Engineering for Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Sangeeta N.; Underhill, Gregory H.; Zaret, Kenneth S.; Fox, Ira J.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the tremendous hurdles presented by the complexity of the liver’s structure and function, advances in liver physiology, stem cell biology and reprogramming, and the engineering of tissues and devices are accelerating the development of cell-based therapies for treating liver disease and liver failure. This State of the Art Review discusses both the near and long-term prospects for such cell-based therapies and the unique challenges for clinical translation. PMID:25031271

  19. Liver disease in the elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, PLM

    Ageing of the liver mainly affects the sinusoids and the Kupffer cells. Pseudocapillarization, manifested by reduced sinusoidal fenestration and subendothelial collagen deposition, causes a reduction in oxygen-dependent hepatocyte functions such as oxidative drug metabolism. The liver mass in old

  20. Excellent survival after liver transplantation for isolated polycystic liver disease: an European Liver Transplant Registry study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Keimpema, Loes; Nevens, Frederik; Adam, René

    2011-01-01

    Patients with end-stage isolated polycystic liver disease (PCLD) suffer from incapacitating symptoms because of very large liver volumes. Liver transplantation (LT) is the only curative option. This study assesses the feasibility of LT in PCLD. We used the European Liver Transplant Registry (ELTR......) database to extract demographics and outcomes of 58 PCLD patients. We used Kaplan-Meier survival analysis for survival rates. Severe abdominal pain (75%) was the most prominent symptom, while portal hypertension (35%) was the most common complication in PCLD. The explantation of the polycystic liver...

  1. Association of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and liver cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Perla Oliveira; Ferreira, Fabio Gonçalves; Nascimento, Maria de Fátima Araújo; Vieira, Andrea; Ribeiro, Mauricio Alves; David, André Ibrahim; Szutan, Luiz Arnaldo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the association between nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and liver cancer, and NAFLD prevalence in different liver tumors. METHODS: This is a retrospective study of the clinical, laboratory and histological data of 120 patients diagnosed with primary or secondary hepatic neoplasms and treated at a tertiary center where they underwent hepatic resection and/or liver transplantation, with subsequent evaluation of the explant or liver biopsy. The following criteria were used to exclude patients from the study: a history of alcohol abuse, hepatitis B or C infection, no tumor detected in the liver tissue examined by histological analysis, and the presence of chronic autoimmune hepatitis, hemochromatosis, Wilson’s disease, or hepatoblastoma. The occurrence of NAFLD and the association with its known risk factors were studied. The risk factors considered were diabetes mellitus, impaired glucose tolerance, impaired fasting glucose, body mass index, dyslipidemia, and arterial hypertension. Presence of reticulin fibers in the hepatic neoplasms was assessed by histological analysis using slide-mounted specimens stained with either hematoxylin and eosin or Masson’s trichrome and silver impregnation. Analysis of tumor-free liver parenchyma was carried out to determine the association between NAFLD and its histological grade. RESULTS: No difference was found in the association of NAFLD with the general population (34.2% and 30.0% respectively, 95%CI: 25.8-43.4). Evaluation by cancer type showed that NAFLD was more prevalent in patients with liver metastasis of colorectal cancer than in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (OR = 3.99, 95%CI: 1.78-8.94, P liver fibrosis in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (OR = 3.50, 95%CI: 1.06-11.57, P = 0.032). Evaluation of the relationship between the presence of NAFLD, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, and liver fibrosis, and their risk factors, showed no significant

  2. Effect of Korean Red Ginseng in chronic liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Young Park

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Chronic liver disease, one of the most common diseases, typically arises from nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, alcoholic liver disease, chronic viral hepatitis, or hepatocellular carcinoma. Therefore, there is a pressing need for improved treatment strategies. Korean Red Ginseng has been known to have positive effects on liver disease and liver function. In this paper, we summarize the current knowledge on the beneficial effects of Korean Red Ginseng on chronic liver disease, a condition encompassing nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, alcoholic liver disease, chronic viral hepatitis, and hepatocellular carcinoma, as supported by experimental evaluation and clinical investigation.

  3. Pediatric Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppal, Vikas; Mansoor, Sana; Furuya, Katryn N

    2016-05-01

    Childhood obesity has reached epidemic proportions, and by 2012, more than one third of American children were overweight or obese. As a result, increasingly, children are developing complications of obesity including liver disease. In fact, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is the most common form of chronic liver disease seen in children today. Recently, there has been a burgeoning literature examining the pathogenesis, genetic markers, and role of the microbiome in this disease. On the clinical front, new modalities of diagnosing hepatic steatosis and hepatic fibrosis are being developed to provide non-invasive methods of surveillance in children. Lastly, the mainstay of treatment of pediatric non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has been largely through lifestyle interventions, namely, dieting and exercise. Currently, there are a number of clinical trials examining novel lifestyle and drug therapies for NAFLD that are registered with the US National Institutes of Health ClinicalTrials.gov website.

  4. Brain MRI changes in chronic liver disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skehan, S. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Vincent`s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Norris, S. [Liver Unit, St. Vincent`s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Hegarty, J. [Liver Unit, St. Vincent`s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Owens, A. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Vincent`s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); MacErlaine, D. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Vincent`s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

    1997-08-01

    Cirrhotic patients are known to have abnormally high signal principally in the globus pallidus on non-contrast T1-weighted MRI. The purpose of this study was to relate MR changes to clinical and pathological features of chronic liver disease. We confirmed abnormally high signal in the globus pallidus on T1-weighted images in 25 of 28 patients with chronic liver disease, showing that it also occurs in patients who have not yet progressed to cirrhosis. Changes were seen in patients both with and without clinical portosystemic shunting. This abnormality is not responsible for hepatic encephalopathy. Cholestatic disease was more likely to produce marked changes than non-cholestatic disease. No statistically significant correlation was demonstrated between the severity of liver disease and the degree of MR abnormality. However, marked improvement in MR appearances was seen after successful liver transplantation. (orig.). With 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuschwander-Tetri, Brent A

    2017-02-28

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease has emerged a major challenge because of it prevalence, difficulties in diagnosis, complex pathogenesis, and lack of approved therapies. As the burden of hepatitis C abates over the next decade, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease will become the major form of chronic liver disease in adults and children and could become the leading indication for liver transplantation. This overview briefly summarizes the most recent data on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Ongoing clinical trials are focused on an array of disease mechanisms and reviewed here are how these treatments fit into the current paradigm of substrate overload lipotoxic liver injury. Many of the approaches are directed at downstream events such as inflammation, injury and fibrogenesis. Addressing more proximal processes such as dysfunctional satiety mechanisms and inappropriately parsimonious energy dissipation are potential therapeutic opportunities that if successfully understood and exploited would not only address fatty liver disease but also the other components of the metabolic syndrome such as obesity, diabetes and dyslipidemia.

  6. Nutrition for children with cholestatic liver disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Los, E. Leonie; Lukovac, Sabina; Werner, Anniek; Dijkstra, Tietie; Verkade, Henkjan J.; Rings, Edmond H. H. M.; Cooke, RJ; Vandenplas, Y; Wahn, U

    2007-01-01

    Cholestatic liver disease (CLD) in children negatively affects nutritional status, growth and development, which all lead to an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. This is illustrated by the fact that the clinical outcome of children with CLD awaiting a liver transplantation is in part

  7. Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis Risk and Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert F. Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Evaluate the incidence of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF in patients with liver disease in the peritransplant period. Materials and Methods. This IRB approved study retrospectively reviewed patients requiring transplantation for cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, or both from 2003 to 2013. Records were reviewed identifying those having gadolinium enhanced MRI within 1 year of posttransplantation to document degree of liver disease, renal disease, and evidence for NSF. Results. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI was performed on 312 of 837 patients, including 23 with severe renal failure (GFR 30. Two of 23 patients with renal failure developed NSF compared to zero NSF cases in 289 patients with GFR > 30 (0/289; P<0.003. High dose gadodiamide was used in the two NSF cases. There was no increased incidence of NSF with severe liver disease (1/71 compared to nonsevere liver disease (1/241; P=0.412. Conclusion. Renal disease is a risk factor for NSF, but in our small sample our evidence suggests liver disease is not an additional risk factor, especially if a low-risk gadolinium agent is used. Noting that not all patients received high-risk gadolinium, a larger study focusing on patients receiving high-risk gadolinium is needed to further evaluate NSF risk in liver disease in the peritransplant period.

  8. Pathophysiology of Non Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Petta

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The physiopathology of fatty liver and metabolic syndrome are influenced by diet, life style and inflammation, which have a major impact on the severity of the clinicopathologic outcome of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. A short comprehensive review is provided on current knowledge of the pathophysiological interplay among major circulating effectors/mediators of fatty liver, such as circulating lipids, mediators released by adipose, muscle and liver tissues and pancreatic and gut hormones in relation to diet, exercise and inflammation.

  9. Acid-base disorders in liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiner, Bernhard; Lindner, Gregor; Reiberger, Thomas; Schneeweiss, Bruno; Trauner, Michael; Zauner, Christian; Funk, Georg-Christian

    2017-11-01

    Alongside the kidneys and lungs, the liver has been recognised as an important regulator of acid-base homeostasis. While respiratory alkalosis is the most common acid-base disorder in chronic liver disease, various complex metabolic acid-base disorders may occur with liver dysfunction. While the standard variables of acid-base equilibrium, such as pH and overall base excess, often fail to unmask the underlying cause of acid-base disorders, the physical-chemical acid-base model provides a more in-depth pathophysiological assessment for clinical judgement of acid-base disorders, in patients with liver diseases. Patients with stable chronic liver disease have several offsetting acidifying and alkalinising metabolic acid-base disorders. Hypoalbuminaemic alkalosis is counteracted by hyperchloraemic and dilutional acidosis, resulting in a normal overall base excess. When patients with liver cirrhosis become critically ill (e.g., because of sepsis or bleeding), this fragile equilibrium often tilts towards metabolic acidosis, which is attributed to lactic acidosis and acidosis due to a rise in unmeasured anions. Interestingly, even though patients with acute liver failure show significantly elevated lactate levels, often, no overt acid-base disorder can be found because of the offsetting hypoalbuminaemic alkalosis. In conclusion, patients with liver diseases may have multiple co-existing metabolic acid-base abnormalities. Thus, knowledge of the pathophysiological and diagnostic concepts of acid-base disturbances in patients with liver disease is critical for therapeutic decision making. Copyright © 2017 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Alcohol-Related Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... amount of alcohol: • One 12-ounce bottle of beer • One 4-ounce glass of wine • One 1- ... alcoholic hepatitis but never have symptoms. Additionally, alcohol consumption may worsen liver injury caused by non-alcoholic ...

  11. Innate immunity in alcoholic liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Ekihiro; Brenner, David A.; Friedman, Scott; Cohen, Jessica I.; Nagy, Laura; Szabo, Gyongyi; Zakhari, Samir

    2011-01-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption is a leading cause of chronic liver disease in the Western world. Alcohol-induced hepatotoxicity and oxidative stress are important mechanisms contributing to the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease. However, emerging evidence suggests that activation of innate immunity involving TLR4 and complement also plays an important role in initiating alcoholic steatohepatitis and fibrosis, but the role of adaptive immunity in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease remains obscure. Activation of a TLR4-mediated MyD88-independent (TRIF/IRF-3) signaling pathway in Kupffer cells contributes to alcoholic steatohepatitis, whereas activation of TLR4 signaling in hepatic stellate cells promotes liver fibrosis. Alcohol consumption activates the complement system in the liver by yet unidentified mechanisms, leading to alcoholic steatohepatitis. In contrast to activation of TLR4 and complement, alcohol consumption can inhibit natural killer cells, another important innate immunity component, contributing to alcohol-mediated acceleration of viral infection and liver fibrosis in patients with chronic viral hepatitis. Understanding of the role of innate immunity in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease may help us identify novel therapeutic targets to treat this disease. PMID:21252049

  12. Quantitative skeletal muscle ultrasonography in children with suspected neuromuscular disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pillen, S.; Scholten, R.R.; Zwarts, M.J.; Verrips, A.

    2003-01-01

    We determined prospectively the diagnostic value of quantitative ultrasonography in detecting neuromuscular disorders in children. Ultrasonographic scans of four muscles were made in 36 children with symptoms or signs suggestive of neuromuscular disease, such as muscle weakness and hypotonia. The

  13. Hepatic progenitors for liver disease: current position

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Conigliaro

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Alice Conigliaro1, David A Brenner2, Tatiana Kisseleva21University “La Sapienza”, Dipartimento di Biotecnologie Cellulari ed Ematologia Policlinico Umberto I, V Clinica Medica, Rome, Italy; 2Department of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USAAbstract: Liver regeneration restores the original functionality of hepatocytes and cholangiocytes in response to injury. It is regulated on several levels, with different cellular populations contributing to this process, eg, hepatocytes, liver precursor cells, intrahepatic stem cells. In response to injury, mature hepatocytes have the capability to proliferate and give rise to new hepatocytes and cholangiocytes. Meanwhile, liver precursor cells (oval cells have become the most recognized bipotential precursor cells in the damaged liver. They rapidly proliferate, change their cellular composition, and differentiate into hepatocytes and cholangiocytes to compensate for the cellular loss and maintain liver homeostasis. There is a growing body of evidence that oval cells originate from the intrahepatic stem cell(s, which in turn give(s rise to epithelial, including oval cells, and/or other hepatic cells of nonepithelial origin. Since there is a close relationship between the liver and hematopoiesis, bone marrow derived cells can also contribute to liver regeneration by the fusion of myeloid cells with damaged hepatocytes, or differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into hepatocyte-like cells. The current review discusses the contribution of different cells to liver regeneration and their characteristics.Keywords: hepatic progenitor, liver disease, liver precursor cells, oval cells, hepatocytes, intrahepatic stem cells, cholangiocytes

  14. Managing non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ngu, Jing Hieng; Goh, George Boon Bee; Poh, Zhongxian; Soetikno, Roy

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is increasing rapidly with the obesity and diabetes mellitus epidemics. It is rapidly becoming the most common cause of liver disease worldwide. NAFLD can progress to serious complications such as cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma and death. Therefore, it is important to recognise this condition so that early intervention can be implemented. Lifestyle modifications and strict control of metabolic risk factors are the mainstay of tr...

  15. Liver Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The Progression of Liver Disease Diagnosing Liver DiseaseLiver Biopsy and Liver Function Tests Clinical Trials Liver Transplant ... The Progression of Liver Disease Diagnosing Liver Disease: Liver Biopsy and Liver Function Tests Clinical Trials Liver Transplant ...

  16. Dame Sheila Sherlock: pioneer in liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Harold

    2009-04-01

    Within living memory of some of us, liver disease was a Cinderella subject. If you look up the first edition of the standard medical textbook of the time, Sir William Osler's 'Principles and Practice of Medicine', published in 1892, you will find a mere 24 of its 1079 pages devoted to the liver, compared with 38 pages on typhoid fever alone; and matters hardly changed throughout the first half of the 20th century. Although 'cirrhosis' and 'hepatitis' were well recognised conditions when I was a house surgeon in 1948, their classification, aetiologies, detailed pathology and management were little understood, while laboratory investigations of the liver diseases were few and non-specific.

  17. Management of Pruritus in Chronic Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angeline Bhalerao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. There continues to be uncertainty on the ideal treatment of pruritus in chronic liver disease. The aim of this study was to gather the latest information on the evidence-based management of pruritus in chronic liver disease. Methodology. A literature search for pruritus in chronic liver disease was conducted using Pubmed and Embase database systems using the MeSH terms “pruritus,” “chronic liver disease,” “cholestatic liver disease,” and “treatment.” Results. The current understanding of the pathophysiology of pruritus is described in addition to detailing research into contemporary treatment options of the condition. These medical treatments range from bile salts, rifampicin, and opioid receptor antagonists to antihistamines. Conclusion. The burden of pruritus in liver disease patients persists and, although it is a common symptom, it can be difficult to manage. In recent years there has been greater study into the etiology and treatment of the condition. Nonetheless, pruritus remains poorly understood and many patients continue to suffer, reiterating the need for further research to improve our understanding of the etiology and treatment for the condition.

  18. Risk stratification of patients suspected of coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Møller; Voss, Mette; Hansen, Vibeke B

    2012-01-01

    To compare the performance of five risk models (Diamond-Forrester, the updated Diamond-Forrester, Morise, Duke, and a new model designated COronary Risk SCORE (CORSCORE) in predicting significant coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with chest pain suggestive of stable angina pectoris....

  19. Pin Worms Presenting as Suspected Crohn’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Saffar, Farah; Najjar, Nimeh; Ibrahim, Saif; Clark, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 24 Final Diagnosis: Pinworms infection Symptoms: Abdominal pain • bloating Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Colonoscopy and biopsy Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare disease Background: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is well recognized in developed countries and is generally among the differential diagnoses of young patients presenting with refractory diarrhea once other more common etiologies have been excluded. Pinworm infections, on the other hand, are not as common among adults in the United States. Case Report: Based on computed tomography features, a 24-year-old female patient with a history of multiple autoimmune disorders presented with abdominal pain and was diagnosed recently with Crohn’s disease. Colonoscopy was significant for pinworms seen throughout the colon. Colonic biopsy was negative for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)-related changes. Conclusions: The diagnosis of IBD is a serious label that requires biopsy confirmation before committing to possibly lifelong treatment and possible adverse effects. Even in the most typical patient and when the presentation and imaging are classical, uncommon conditions (like Enterobius infection in this case) may preclude appropriate diagnosis and management. PMID:26471462

  20. Management and diagnosis of fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneier, Amanda Tamar; Citti, Caitlin Colleen; Dieterich, Douglas T

    2015-05-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is a common cause of chronic liver disease and has been an increasingly studied topic of research as the obesity epidemic has been growing. There is a significant morbidity and mortality with uncontrolled steatohepatitis, which can progress to fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The prevalence of this disease has been estimated to be roughly one-third of the western population, thought to be largely due to diet and sedentary lifestyle. Several treatments have been studied including vitamin E, insulin-sensitizing agents and ursodeoxycholic acid; however, the only treatment shown to improve the histologic changes of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is weight loss. Given the proven benefit of weight loss, there may be reason to screen at-risk populations; however, limited availability of other disease-modifying treatments may limit the cost-benefit ratios. A better understanding of the diagnosis and management of this condition is required to alter the course of this modifiable disease.

  1. Pharmacological interventions for alcoholic liver disease (alcohol-related liver disease)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buzzetti, Elena; Kalafateli, Maria; Thorburn, Douglas

    2017-01-01

    Background: Alcohol-related liver disease is due to excessive alcohol consumption. It includes a spectrum of liver diseases such as alcohol-related fatty liver, alcoholic hepatitis, and alcoholic cirrhosis. Mortality associated with alcoholic hepatitis is high. The optimal pharmacological treatment...... of alcoholic hepatitis and other alcohol-related liver disease remains controversial. Objectives: To assess the comparative benefits and harms of different pharmacological interventions in the management of alcohol-related liver disease through a network meta-analysis and to generate rankings of the available...... Citation Index Expanded, World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform and randomised controlled trials registers until February 2017 to identify randomised clinical trials on pharmacological treatments for alcohol-related liver diseases. Selection criteria: Randomised clinical...

  2. Micronutrient Antioxidants and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanliang Chen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is one of the most important chronic liver diseases worldwide and has garnered increasing attention in recent decades. NAFLD is characterized by a wide range of liver changes, from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The blurred pathogenesis of NAFLD is very complicated and involves lipid accumulation, insulin resistance, inflammation, and fibrogenesis. NAFLD is closely associated with complications such as obesity, diabetes, steatohepatitis, and liver fibrosis. During the progression of NAFLD, reactive oxygen species (ROS are activated and induce oxidative stress. Recent attempts at establishing effective NAFLD therapy have identified potential micronutrient antioxidants that may reduce the accumulation of ROS and finally ameliorate the disease. In this review, we present the molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of NAFLD and introduce some dietary antioxidants that may be used to prevent or cure NAFLD, such as vitamin D, E, and astaxanthin.

  3. Circadian rhythms in liver physiology and liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Xin; Yin, Lei

    2013-04-01

    In mammals, circadian rhythms function to coordinate a diverse panel of physiological processes with environmental conditions such as food and light. As the driving force for circadian rhythmicity, the molecular clock is a self-sustained transcription-translational feedback loop system consisting of transcription factors, epigenetic modulators, kinases/phosphatases, and ubiquitin E3 ligases. The molecular clock exists not only in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus but also in the peripheral tissues to regulate cellular and physiological function in a tissue-specific manner. The circadian clock system in the liver plays important roles in regulating metabolism and energy homeostasis. Clock gene mutant animals display impaired glucose and lipid metabolism and are susceptible to diet-induced obesity and metabolic dysfunction, providing strong evidence for the connection between the circadian clock and metabolic homeostasis. Circadian-controlled hepatic metabolism is partially achieved by controlling the expression and/or activity of key metabolic enzymes, transcription factors, signaling molecules, and transporters. Reciprocally, intracellular metabolites modulate the molecular clock activity in response to the energy status. Although still at the early stage, circadian clock dysfunction has been implicated in common chronic liver diseases. Circadian dysregulation of lipid metabolism, detoxification, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and cell-cycle control might contribute to the onset and progression of liver steatosis, fibrosis, and even carcinogenesis. In summary, these findings call for a comprehensive study of the function and mechanisms of hepatic circadian clock to gain better understanding of liver physiology and diseases.

  4. Caroli's disease and outcomes after liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millwala, Farida; Segev, Dorry L; Thuluvath, Paul J

    2008-01-01

    Caroli's disease is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by intrahepatic cystic dilatation of the bile ducts that, when progressive, leads to intrahepatic stones, recurrent cholangitis, portal hypertension, cholangiocarcinoma, and liver failure. Liver transplantation is a promising curative option for advanced Caroli's disease. The aim of this study was to determine the outcomes of liver transplantation in unselected patients with Caroli's disease and recommend an evidence-based therapeutic algorithm for the management of Caroli's disease. Of the 78,124 patients transplanted in the United States between 1987 and 2006, 104 had Caroli's disease; 96 of these underwent liver alone, and 8 underwent combined liver/kidney transplantation. The patient survival and graft survival were analyzed by Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, and risk of death and risk of graft loss were analyzed by Cox proportional hazards regression. The overall 1-, 3-, and 5-year graft (79.9%, 72.4%, and 72.4%) and patient (86.3%, 78.4%, and 77%) survival rates were excellent for patients after liver transplantation. For combined liver/kidney transplantation (n = 8), the 1-year patient survival and graft survival were 100%. Proportional hazards analysis identified Asian ethnicity, elevated bilirubin, requirement of life support or hospitalization prior to transplantation, and a cold ischemia time greater than 12 hours as associated with increased risk of both graft loss and death. A history of prior transplant or prior abdominal surgery was also associated with increased risk of graft loss. In conclusion, liver transplantation is an excellent treatment option for patients with advanced Caroli's disease and should be considered in a timely fashion to prevent worsening complications including refractory cholangitis and cholangiocarcinoma. (c) 2007 AASLD.

  5. Anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rambaldi, A; Gluud, C

    2006-01-01

    Alcohol is one of the most common causes of liver disease in the Western World. Randomised clinical trials have examined the effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease.......Alcohol is one of the most common causes of liver disease in the Western World. Randomised clinical trials have examined the effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease....

  6. Gut microbiome and liver diseases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shalimar

    2014-01-01

    ...), Chunhui Yuan(1), Wenchao Ding(1), Yuanting Chen(1), Xinjun Hu(1), Beiwen Zheng(1,2), Guirong Qian(1), Wei Xu(1), S. Dusko Ehrlich(3,4), Shusen Zheng(2,5) and Lanjuan Li(1,2) Alterations of the human gut microbiome in liver cirrhosis...

  7. Unexpected MRI findings in clinically suspected Legg-Calve-Perthes disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobert, Philip F.; Dillman, Jonathan R.; Strouse, Peter J.; Hernandez, Ramiro J. [University of Michigan Health System, Department of Radiology, Section of Pediatric Radiology, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital/F3503, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2011-03-15

    In the setting of clinically suspected Legg-Calve-Perthes (LCP) disease and negative/equivocal radiographs, contrast-enhanced MRI can be performed to confirm the diagnosis. To determine the frequency of unexpected causes of hip pain as identified by MRI in children with clinically suspected LCP disease and negative/equivocal radiographs. All pediatric contrast-enhanced MRI examinations of the pelvis and hips performed between January 2000 and February 2009 to evaluate for possible LCP disease in the setting of negative/equivocal radiographs were identified. MRI examinations performed to evaluate for secondary avascular necrosis were excluded. Imaging reports were retrospectively reviewed for unexpected clinically important causes of hip pain. Thirty-six pediatric patients underwent contrast-enhanced MRI examinations for clinically suspected LCP disease in the setting of negative/equivocal radiographs. Twenty-two (61%) imaging studies were normal, while four (11%) imaging studies demonstrated findings consistent with LCP disease. Ten (28%) imaging studies revealed unexpected clinically important causes of hip pain, including nonspecific unilateral joint effusion and synovitis (n = 7, juvenile chronic arthritis was eventually diagnosed in 3 patients), sacral fracture (n = 1), apophyseal injury (n = 1), and femoral head subluxation (n = 1). MRI frequently reveals unexpected clinically important causes of hip pain in children with suspected LCP disease and negative/equivocal radiographs. (orig.)

  8. Training enhancement for new challenges in pediatric liver diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Jianshe

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available With the improvement in health economics and wide application of vaccines, the incidence of viral hepatitis decreases dramatically; however, the proportion of non-infectious liver diseases, such as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, hereditary liver disease, and autoimmune hepatitis, climbs up rapidly. This paper summarizes the development and current situation of the subspecialties of pediatric liver diseases. In recent years, the clinical and basic research on domestic pediatric liver diseases has made some progress through the application of new techniques, such as liver biopsy, bile acid spectrum analysis, screening for inherited metabolic diseases, and genetic diagnosis. However, Chinese pediatricians are confronting new challenges from growing knowledge on liver diseases, expanding disease spectrum, and increasing demand for liver transplant. However, there is an urgent need to enhance the development of the subspecialty of pediatric hepatology in China, because most Chinese pediatricians have little knowledge of liver diseases, and there is a severe shortage of specialized medical staff for pediatric liver diseases.

  9. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging for the assessment of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlides, Michael; Banerjee, Rajarshi; Tunnicliffe, Elizabeth M; Kelly, Catherine; Collier, Jane; Wang, Lai Mun; Fleming, Kenneth A; Cobbold, Jeremy F; Robson, Matthew D; Neubauer, Stefan; Barnes, Eleanor

    2017-07-01

    The diagnosis of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and fibrosis staging are central to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease assessment. We evaluated multiparametric magnetic resonance in the assessment of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and fibrosis using histology as standard in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Seventy-one patients with suspected non-alcoholic fatty liver disease were recruited within 1 month of liver biopsy. Magnetic resonance data were used to define the liver inflammation and fibrosis score (LIF 0-4). Biopsies were assessed for steatosis, lobular inflammation, ballooning and fibrosis and classified as non-alcoholic steatohepatitis or simple steatosis, and mild or significant (Activity ≥2 and/or Fibrosis ≥2 as defined by the Fatty Liver Inhibition of Progression consortium) non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Transient elastography was also performed. Magnetic resonance success rate was 95% vs 59% for transient elastography (Pliver inflammation and fibrosis (rs =.51, Pliver inflammation and fibrosis for the diagnosis of cirrhosis was 0.85. Liver inflammation and fibrosis score for ballooning grades 0, 1 and 2 was 1.2, 2.7 and 3.5 respectively (Pliver inflammation and fibrosis (1.3) compared to patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (3.0) (Palcoholic steatohepatitis was 0.80. Liver inflammation and fibrosis scores for patients with mild and significant non-alcoholic fatty liver disease were 1.2 and 2.9 respectively (Pliver inflammation and fibrosis for the diagnosis of significant non-alcoholic fatty liver disease was 0.89. Multiparametric magnetic resonance is a promising technique with good diagnostic accuracy for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease histological parameters, and can potentially identify patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. © 2017 The Authors Liver International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Acetaldehyde Adducts in Alcoholic Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mashiko Setshedi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic alcohol abuse causes liver disease that progresses from simple steatosis through stages of steatohepatitis, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and eventually hepatic failure. In addition, chronic alcoholic liver disease (ALD, with or without cirrhosis, increases risk for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Acetaldehyde, a major toxic metabolite, is one of the principal culprits mediating fibrogenic and mutagenic effects of alcohol in the liver. Mechanistically, acetaldehyde promotes adduct formation, leading to functional impairments of key proteins, including enzymes, as well as DNA damage, which promotes mutagenesis. Why certain individuals who heavily abuse alcohol, develop HCC (7.2–15% versus cirrhosis (15–20% is not known, but genetics and co-existing viral infection are considered pathogenic factors. Moreover, adverse effects of acetaldehyde on the cardiovascular and hematologic systems leading to ischemia, heart failure, and coagulation disorders, can exacerbate hepatic injury and increase risk for liver failure. Herein, we review the role of acetaldehyde adducts in the pathogenesis of chronic ALD and HCC.

  11. Genetics of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongiovanni, Paola; Valenti, Luca

    2016-08-01

    Epidemiological, familial, and twin studies indicate that non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, now the leading cause of liver damage in developed countries, has a strong heritability. The common I148M variant of PNPLA3 impairing hepatocellular lipid droplets remodeling is the major genetic determinant of hepatic fat content. The I148M variant has a strong impact on the full spectrum of liver damage related to fatty liver, encompassing non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, advanced fibrosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma, and influences the response to therapeutic approaches. Common variants in GCKR enhance de novo hepatic lipogenesis in response to glucose and liver inflammation. Furthermore, the low-frequency E167K variant of TM6SF2 and rare mutations in APOB, which impair very low-density lipoproteins secretion, predispose to progressive fatty liver. These and other recent findings reviewed here indicate that impaired lipid handling by hepatocytes has a major role in the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease by triggering inflammation, fibrogenesis, and carcinogenesis. These discoveries have provided potential novel biomarkers for clinical use and have revealed intriguing therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Liver fat content, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and ischaemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Bo Kobberø; Stender, Stefan; Kristensen, Thomas Skårup

    2017-01-01

    Aims: In observational studies, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is associated with high risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD). We tested the hypothesis that a high liver fat content or a diagnosis of NAFLD is a causal risk factor for IHD. Methods and results: In a cohort study...

  13. Management of alcoholic liver disease: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kershenobich, David; Corona, Dana Lau; Kershenovich, Ruben; Gutierrez-Reyes, Gabriela

    2011-05-01

    Treatment of alcoholic liver disease is for the most part based on the stage of the disease and the pathogenic event that is being targeted. The primary treatment modalities that are considered in the treatment of alcoholic liver disease include abstinence, agents that suppress inflammation, anticytokine therapy, nutritional support, modifiers of alcohol metabolism, anti-oxidants, and inhibitors of hepatic fibrosis. Future therapeutic options include exploration of new pathways such as the patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 3 protein (PNPLA-3). Copyright © 2011 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  14. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Reenam S; Newsome, Philip N

    2016-08-01

    Cirrhosis secondary to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a common indication for liver transplant. In comparison to other cirrhotic patients, patients with NASH cirrhosis are more likely to be older and have the metabolic syndrome. Pre-transplant, patients require careful evaluation of cardiovascular risk. As the incidence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is rising, a greater proportion of donor grafts have steatosis greater than 30%, which is associated with poor outcomes. Grafts with steatosis greater than 60% are unsuitable for transplant. Overall, post-transplant survival outcomes for patients with NASH cirrhosis are similar to those with cirrhosis without NASH. However, NASH cirrhosis is associated with a higher 30-day mortality, predominantly from an increase in cardiovascular events and infections. Following liver transplant, there is a significant risk of NASH recurrence, although this seldom results in allograft loss. Furthermore, a significant number of patients who had a liver transplant for other reasons develop NASH de novo. When patients with NASH cirrhosis are considered for transplant, one of the major challenges lies in identifying which patients are too high risk for surgery. This review aims to provide information to aid this decision making process, and to provide guidance on the peri-operative care strategies that can modify risk. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Pediatric Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haley Bush

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: With the increase in the prevalence of obesity, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD has become among the leading causes of chronic liver disease in the pediatric age group. Once believed to be a “two-hit process”, it is now clear that the actual pathophysiology of NAFLD is complex and involves multiple pathways. Moreover, NAFLD is not always benign, and patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH are at increased risk of developing advanced stages of liver disease. It has also been shown that NAFLD is not only a liver disease, but is also associated with multiple extrahepatic manifestations, including cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, and low bone mineral density. Although the data is scarce in the pediatric population, some studies have suggested that long-term mortality and the requirement of liver transplantation will continue to increase in patients with NAFLD. More studies are needed to better understand the natural history of NAFLD, especially in the pediatric age group.

  16. Cortical capillary dysfunction in patients suspected of Alzheimer’s disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskildsen, Simon Fristed; Gyldensted, Louise; Nagenthiraja, Kartheeban

    Vascular risk factors are suspected to play a role in the etiology of Alzheimer’s disease. Recently, a model that relates capillary dysfunction to the development of AD was proposed[1]. The model predicts that capillary dysfunction in form of increased capillary transit time heterogeneity (CTH...

  17. Endoscopic pH Monitoring for Patients with Suspected or Refractory Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian G Turner

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Wireless pH studies can offer prolonged pH monitoring, which may potentially facilitate the diagnosis and management of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the detection rate of abnormal esophageal acid exposure using prolonged pH monitoring in patients with suspected or refractory GERD symptoms.

  18. Pattern of liver diseases among children attending the National ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Diseases of the liver contribute to childhood morbidities and mortality. Early recognition and proper management of liver diseases can limit the progression to irreparable damage which requires liver transplant. However, there is scarcity of data in the pattern of liver disease in Nigerian children. Objective: To ...

  19. Management approaches for suspected and established Lyme disease used at the Lyme disease diagnostic center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wormser, Gary P; McKenna, Donna; Nowakowski, John

    2016-01-14

    2015 marks the 27th year that the Lyme Disease Diagnostic Center, located in New York State in the United States, has provided care for patients with suspected or established deer tick-transmitted infections. There are five deer tick-transmitted infectious in this geographic area of which Lyme disease is the most common.For patients with erythema migrans, we do not obtain any laboratory testing. However, if the patient is febrile at the time of the visit or reports rigors and high-grade fevers, we consider the possibility of a co-infection and order pertinent laboratory tests.Our preferred management for Lyme disease-related facial palsy and/or radiculopathy is a 2-week course of doxycycline. Patients who are hospitalized for Lyme meningitis are usually treated at least initially with ceftriaxone. We have not seen convincing cases of encephalitis or myelitis solely due to Borrelia burgdorferi infection in the absence of laboratory evidence of concomitant deer tick virus infection (Powassan virus). We have also never seen Lyme encephalopathy or a diffuse axonal peripheral neuropathy and suggest that these entities are either very rare or nonexistent.We have found that Lyme disease rarely presents with fever without other objective clinical manifestations. Prior cases attributed to Lyme disease may have overlooked an asymptomatic erythema migrans skin lesion or the diagnosis may have been based on nonspecific IgM seroreactivity. More research is needed on the appropriate management and significance of IgG seropositivity in asymptomatic patients who have no history of Lyme disease.

  20. Targeting endoplasmic reticulum stress in liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fa-Ling; Liu, Wen-Yue; Van Poucke, Sven; Braddock, Martin; Jin, Wei-Min; Xiao, Jian; Li, Xiao-Kun; Zheng, Ming-Hua

    2016-09-01

    The accumulation of unfolded protein in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) initiates an unfolded protein response (UPR) via three signal transduction cascades, which involve protein kinase RNA-like ER kinase (PERK), inositol requiring enzyme-1α (IRE1α) and activating transcription factor-6α (ATF6α). An ER stress response is observed in nearly all physiologies related to acute and chronic liver disease and therapeutic targeting of the mechanisms implicated in UPR signaling have attracted considerable attention. This review focuses on the correlation between ER stress and liver disease and the possible targets which may drive the potential for novel therapeutic intervention. Expert Commentary: We describe pathways which are involved in UPR signaling and their potential correlation with various liver diseases and underlying mechanisms which may present opportunities for novel therapeutic strategies are discussed.

  1. Neurohumoral fluid regulation in chronic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Henriksen, Jens Henrik

    1998-01-01

    Impaired homeostasis of the blood volume, with increased fluid and sodium retention, is a prevailing element in the deranged systemic and splanchnic haemodynamics in patients with liver disease. In this review, some basic elements of the circulatory changes that take place and of neurohumoral fluid...... regulation are outlined in order to provide an update of recent investigations on the neuroendocrine compensation of circulatory and volume dysfunction in chronic liver disease. The underlying pathophysiology is a systemic vasodilatation in which newly described potent vasoactive substances such as nitric...... and lungs. It is still an enigma why patients with chronic liver disease are at the same time overloaded and functional hypovolaemic with a hyperdynamic, hyporeactive circulation. Further research is needed to find the solution to this apparent haemodynamic conflict concerning the abnormal neurohumoral...

  2. Nuclear Receptors in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Velázquez, Jorge A.; Carrillo-Córdova, Luis D.; Chávez-Tapia, Norberto C.; Uribe, Misael; Méndez-Sánchez, Nahum

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear receptors comprise a superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors that are involved in important aspects of hepatic physiology and pathophysiology. There are about 48 nuclear receptors in the human. These nuclear receptors are regulators of many hepatic processes including hepatic lipid and glucose metabolism, bile acid homeostasis, drug detoxification, inflammation, regeneration, fibrosis, and tumor formation. Some of these receptors are sensitive to the levels of molecules that control lipid metabolism including fatty acids, oxysterols, and lipophilic molecules. These receptors direct such molecules to the transcriptional networks and may play roles in the pathogenesis and treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Understanding the mechanisms underlying the involvement of nuclear receptors in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease may offer targets for the development of new treatments for this liver disease. PMID:22187655

  3. Nuclear Receptors in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge A. López-Velázquez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear receptors comprise a superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors that are involved in important aspects of hepatic physiology and pathophysiology. There are about 48 nuclear receptors in the human. These nuclear receptors are regulators of many hepatic processes including hepatic lipid and glucose metabolism, bile acid homeostasis, drug detoxification, inflammation, regeneration, fibrosis, and tumor formation. Some of these receptors are sensitive to the levels of molecules that control lipid metabolism including fatty acids, oxysterols, and lipophilic molecules. These receptors direct such molecules to the transcriptional networks and may play roles in the pathogenesis and treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Understanding the mechanisms underlying the involvement of nuclear receptors in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease may offer targets for the development of new treatments for this liver disease.

  4. Liver Disease in Cystic Fibrosis: an Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, Giuseppe Fabio; Di Dio, Giovanna; Franzonello, Chiara; Gennaro, Alessia; Rotolo, Novella; Lionetti, Elena; Leonardi, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    Context Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most widespread autosomal recessive genetic disorder that limits life expectation amongst the Caucasian population. As the median survival has increased related to early multidisciplinary intervention, other manifestations of CF have emergedespecially for the broad spectrum of hepatobiliary involvement. The present study reviews the existing literature on liver disease in cystic fibrosis and describes the key issues for an adequate clinical evaluation and management of patients, with a focus on the pathogenetic, clinical and diagnostic-therapeutic aspects of liver disease in CF. Evidence Acquisition A literature search of electronic databases was undertaken for relevant studies published from 1990 about liver disease in cystic fibrosis. The databases searched were: EMBASE, PubMed and Cochrane Library. Results CF is due to mutations in the gene on chromosome 7 that encodes an amino acidic polypeptide named CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator). The hepatic manifestations include particular changes referring to the basic CFTR defect, iatrogenic lesions or consequences of the multisystem disease. Even though hepatobiliary disease is the most common non-pulmonary cause ofmortalityin CF (the third after pulmonary disease and transplant complications), only about the 33%ofCF patients presents clinically significant hepatobiliary disease. Conclusions Liver disease will have a growing impact on survival and quality of life of cystic fibrosis patients because a longer life expectancy and for this it is important its early recognition and a correct clinical management aimed atdelaying the onset of complications. This review could represent an opportunity to encourage researchers to better investigate genotype-phenotype correlation associated with the development of cystic fibrosis liver disease, especially for non-CFTR genetic polymorphisms, and detect predisposed individuals. Therapeutic trials are needed to find strategies of

  5. Liver disease in cystic fibrosis: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, Giuseppe Fabio; Di Dio, Giovanna; Franzonello, Chiara; Gennaro, Alessia; Rotolo, Novella; Lionetti, Elena; Leonardi, Salvatore

    2013-08-14

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most widespread autosomal recessive genetic disorder that limits life expectation amongst the Caucasian population. As the median survival has increased related to early multidisciplinary intervention, other manifestations of CF have emerged especially for the broad spectrum of hepatobiliary involvement. The present study reviews the existing literature on liver disease in cystic fibrosis and describes the key issues for an adequate clinical evaluation and management of patients, with a focus on the pathogenetic, clinical and diagnostic-therapeutic aspects of liver disease in CF. A literature search of electronic databases was undertaken for relevant studies published from 1990 about liver disease in cystic fibrosis. The databases searched were: EMBASE, PubMed and Cochrane Library. CF is due to mutations in the gene on chromosome 7 that encodes an amino acidic polypeptide named CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator). The hepatic manifestations include particular changes referring to the basic CFTR defect, iatrogenic lesions or consequences of the multisystem disease. Even though hepatobiliary disease is the most common non-pulmonary cause of mortality in CF (the third after pulmonary disease and transplant complications), only about the 33%of CF patients presents clinically significant hepatobiliary disease. Liver disease will have a growing impact on survival and quality of life of cystic fibrosis patients because a longer life expectancy and for this it is important its early recognition and a correct clinical management aimed at delaying the onset of complications. This review could represent an opportunity to encourage researchers to better investigate genotype-phenotype correlation associated with the development of cystic fibrosis liver disease, especially for non-CFTR genetic polymorphisms, and detect predisposed individuals. Therapeutic trials are needed to find strategies of fibrosis prevention and to avoid its

  6. Management of thrombocytopenia in advanced liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangireddy, VGR; Kanneganti, PC; Sridhar, S; Talla, S; Coleman, T

    2014-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia (defined as a platelet count thrombocytopenia (platelet count Thrombocytopenia can negatively impact the care of patients with severe liver disease by potentially interfering with diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Multiple factors can contribute to the development of thrombocytopenia including splenic platelet sequestration, immunological processes, bone marrow suppression by chronic viral infection, and reduced levels or activity of the hematopoietic growth factor thrombopoietin. The present review focuses on the etiologies and management options for severe thrombocytopenia in the setting of advanced liver disease. PMID:25222481

  7. Vitamin D status, liver enzymes, and incident liver disease and mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaaby, Tea; Husemoen, Lise Lotte Nystrup; Borglykke, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is common among patients with liver diseases. Both cholestatic and non-cholestatic liver diseases can cause vitamin D deficiency. Whether vitamin D status can also affect liver function is poorly understood. To investigate the association between vitamin D status, liver enzym...

  8. Effects of Melatonin on Liver Injuries and Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiao-Jiao; Meng, Xiao; Li, Ya; Zhou, Yue; Xu, Dong-Ping; Li, Sha; Li, Hua-Bin

    2017-03-23

    Liver injuries and diseases are serious health problems worldwide. Various factors, such as chemical pollutants, drugs, and alcohol, could induce liver injuries. Liver diseases involve a wide range of liver pathologies, including hepatic steatosis, fatty liver, hepatitis, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocarcinoma. Despite all the studies performed up to now, therapy choices for liver injuries and diseases are very few. Therefore, the search for a new treatment that could safely and effectively block or reverse liver injuries and diseases remains a priority. Melatonin is a well-known natural antioxidant, and has many bioactivities. There are numerous studies investigating the effects of melatonin on liver injuries and diseases, and melatonin could regulate various molecular pathways, such as inflammation, proliferation, apoptosis, metastasis, and autophagy in different pathophysiological situations. Melatonin could be used for preventing and treating liver injuries and diseases. Herein, we conduct a review summarizing the potential roles of melatonin in liver injuries and diseases, paying special attention to the mechanisms of action.

  9. Vitamin D in autoimmune liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyk, Daniel S; Orfanidou, Timoklia; Invernizzi, Pietro; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P; Lenzi, Marco

    2013-11-01

    The development of autoimmune disease is based on the interaction of genetic susceptibility and environmental causes. Environmental factors include infectious and non-infectious agents, with some of these factors being implicated in several autoimmune diseases. Vitamin D is now believed to play a role in the development (or prevention) of several autoimmune diseases, based on its immunomodulatory properties. As well, the increasing incidence of autoimmune disease as one moves away from the equator, may be due to the lack of sunlight, which is crucial for the maintenance of normal vitamin D levels. A deficiency in vitamin D levels or vitamin D receptors is commonly indicated in autoimmune diseases, with multiple sclerosis (MS) being one of the best-studied and well-known examples. However, the role of vitamin D in other autoimmune diseases is not well defined, including autoimmune liver diseases such as primary biliary cirrhosis, autoimmune hepatitis, and primary sclerosing cholangitis. This review will examine the role of vitamin D as an immunomodulator, followed by a comparison of vitamin D in MS versus autoimmune liver disease. From this comparison, it will become clear that vitamin D likely plays a role in the development of autoimmune liver disease, but this area requires further investigation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Liver Transplantation for Hepatitis C and Alcoholic Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Carbone

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available End-stage liver disease due to hepatitis C (HCV and cirrhosis from alcohol (ALD are the commonest indications for liver transplantation in the western countries. Up to one third of HCV-infected transplant candidates have a history of significant alcohol intake prior to transplantation. However, there are few data available about the possible interaction between alcohol and HCV in the post-transplant setting. Patients with both HCV and alcohol are more likely to die on the waiting list than those with ALD and HCV alone. However, after transplantation, non-risk adjusted graft and patient survival of patients with HCV + ALD are comparable to those of patients with HCV cirrhosis or ALD cirrhosis alone. In the short and medium term HCV recurrence after transplant in patients with HCV + ALD cirrhosis does not seem more aggressive than that in patients with HCV cirrhosis alone. A relapse in alcohol consumption in patients with HCV + ALD cirrhosis does not have a major impact on graft survival. The evidence shows that, as is currently practiced, HCV + ALD as an appropriate indication for liver transplantation. However, these data are based on retrospective analyses with relatively short follow-up so the conclusions must be treated with caution.

  11. Etiologies of chronic liver disease in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farahmand F

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic Liver diseases in children is the result of many different diseases including: metabolic, genetic, infectious, toxic and idiopathic causes. This was a case series study on 133 infants and children with age range 6 month to 12 years old, who presented clinically with manifestation of chronic liver disease and were admitted to Children Hospital Medical Center from year 1999 to 2000. In this study, 32 (24.5 percent patients had autoimmune chronic hepatitis, 15 (11.3 percent Glycogen storage diseases, 12 (9 percent extrahepatic biliary atresia, 11 (8.2 percent willson disease, 10 (7.5 percent cryptogenic cirrhosis, 6 (4.5 percent chronic hepatitis C, 5 (3.8 percen chronic hepatitic B, 5 (3.8 percent galactosemia 3 (2.25 percent congenital hepatic fibrosis, 3 (3.8 percent histiocytosis X, 3 (2.25 percent sclerosing cholangitis, 2 (1.5 percent byler’s disease 2 (1.5 percent primary tuberculosis, 1 (0.75 percent choledocalcyst, 1 (0.75 percent Alagyle syndrome. According to our data, chronic liver disease should be considered in infants and children. In our study, the most common causes are found to be: metabolic and genetic diseases (37.5 percent, chronic autoimmune hepatitis (24 percent and biliary disorders (14 percent, that encompass 86 percent of the patients.

  12. Quantification of disease activity in patients undergoing leucocyte scintigraphy for suspected inflammatory bowel disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheow, Heok K.; Voutnis, Demetrius D.; Evans, John W.; Szczepura, Katy R.; Swift, E. Anna; Bird, Nicholas J.; Ruparelia, Prina; Solanki, Chandra K.; Ballinger, James R.; Chilvers, Edwin R.; Peters, A. Michael [Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Middleton, Stephen J. [Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Department of Gastroenterology, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2005-03-01

    Whole-body gamma camera counting is an alternative to faecal {sup 111}In collection for quantifying disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) but requires administration of imaging activities of {sup 111}In. The aim of this study was to explore a dedicated whole-body counter which requires 20-fold less activity than gamma camera counting. Thirty patients with known or suspected IBD received {sup 99m}Tc-granulocytes ({proportional_to}200 MBq) and {sup 111}In-granulocytes ({proportional_to}0.5 MBq). The {sup 99m}Tc-cells were injected 45 min after the {sup 111}In-cells and immediately after a baseline {sup 111}In whole-body count. The decay-corrected count at 120 h was expressed as a fraction of baseline to give whole-body {sup 111}In retention (WBR). One patient was excluded as the injected cells were non-viable. Median 45-min intravascular {sup 111}In recovery was 35% in patients compared with 43% in six normal volunteers (p<0.05). WBR in normals ranged from 91% to 93% and in 11 patients with negative {sup 99m}Tc imaging from 87% to 96%. Only one of 11 patients with negative imaging had WBR <90% while 11/12 patients with WBR <90% had abnormal imaging. Ten of 13 patients with Crohn's disease (CD) had abnormal imaging. The lowest WBR in these ten was 77% and six had values of >90%. There was a significant association between WBR and {sup 99m}Tc image grade (R{sub s}=0.73, p<0.002) in 16 patients without CD, but not in 13 patients with CD (R{sub s}=0.54, p>0.05). Dedicated whole-body counting is able to quantify disease activity in IBD but may give normal values in active CD. (orig.)

  13. Outcome in cystic fibrosis liver disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rowland, Marion

    2011-01-01

    Evidence suggests that cystic fibrosis liver disease (CFLD) does not affect mortality or morbidity in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). The importance of gender and age in outcome in CF makes selection of an appropriate comparison group central to the interpretation of any differences in mortality and morbidity in patients with CFLD.

  14. Circadian rhythms in liver metabolism and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica M. Ferrell

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Mounting research evidence demonstrates a significant negative impact of circadian disruption on human health. Shift work, chronic jet lag and sleep disturbances are associated with increased incidence of metabolic syndrome, and consequently result in obesity, type 2 diabetes and dyslipidemia. Here, these associations are reviewed with respect to liver metabolism and disease.

  15. Neurohumoral fluid regulation in chronic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    1998-01-01

    and lungs. It is still an enigma why patients with chronic liver disease are at the same time overloaded and functional hypovolaemic with a hyperdynamic, hyporeactive circulation. Further research is needed to find the solution to this apparent haemodynamic conflict concerning the abnormal neurohumoral...

  16. Overlap syndromes among autoimmune liver diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rust, Christian; Beuers, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    The three major immune disorders of the liver are autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). Variant forms of these diseases are generally called overlap syndromes, although there has been no standardise definition. Patients with overlap

  17. Overlap syndromes among autoimmune liver diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rust, Christian; Beuers, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    The three major immune disorders of the liver are autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). Variant forms of these diseases are generally called overlap syndromes, although there has been no standardized definition. Patients with overlap syndromes present with both hepatitic and cholestatic serum liver tests and have histological features of AIH and PBC or PSC. The AIH-PBC overlap syndrome is the most common form, affecting almost 10% of adults with AIH or PBC. Single cases of AIH and autoimmune cholangitis (AMA-negative PBC) overlap syndrome have also been reported. The AIH-PSC overlap syndrome is predominantly found in children, adolescents and young adults with AIH or PSC. Interestingly, transitions from one autoimmune to another have also been reported in a minority of patients, especially transitions from PBC to AIH-PBC overlap syndrome. Overlap syndromes show a progressive course towards liver cirrhosis and liver failure without treatment. Therapy for overlap syndromes is empiric, since controlled trials are not available in these rare disorders. Anticholestatic therapy with ursodeoxycholic acid is usually combined with immunosuppressive therapy with corticosteroids and/or azathioprine in both AIH-PBC and AIH-PSC overlap syndromes. In end-stage disease, liver transplantation is the treatment of choice. PMID:18528934

  18. Genetic predisposition in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sookoian, Silvia; Pirola, Carlos J

    2017-03-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease whose prevalence has reached global epidemic proportions. Although the disease is relatively benign in the early stages, when severe clinical forms, including nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), cirrhosis and even hepatocellular carcinoma, occur, they result in worsening the long-term prognosis. A growing body of evidence indicates that NAFLD develops from a complex process in which many factors, including genetic susceptibility and environmental insults, are involved. In this review, we focused on the genetic component of NAFLD, with special emphasis on the role of genetics in the disease pathogenesis and natural history. Insights into the topic of the genetic susceptibility in lean individuals with NAFLD and the potential use of genetic tests in identifying individuals at risk are also discussed.

  19. Malnutrition in end stage liver disease : Who is malnourished?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, E.J.

    2017-01-01

    Liver diseases are highly prevalent. While death rates of most other diseases, such as heart disease and cancer, have decreased, standardized mortality rates of liver diseases have increased up to 400% in the last decades. Cirrhosis is the endstage of patients who have chronic progressive liver

  20. The nutritional geometry of liver disease including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Stephen J; Raubenheimer, David; Cogger, Victoria C; Macia, Laurence; Solon-Biet, Samantha M; Le Couteur, David G; George, Jacob

    2018-02-01

    Nutrition has a profound effect on chronic liver disease, especially non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Most observational studies and clinical trials have focussed on the effects of total energy intake, or the intake of individual macronutrients and certain micronutrients, such as vitamin D, on liver disease. Although these studies have shown the importance of nutrition on hepatic outcomes, there is not yet any unifying framework for understanding the relationship between diet and liver disease. The Geometric Framework for Nutrition (GFN) is an innovative model for designing nutritional experiments or interpreting nutritional data that can determine the effects of nutrients and their interactions on animal behaviour and phenotypes. Recently the GFN has provided insights into the relationship between dietary energy and macronutrients on obesity and ageing in mammals including humans. Mouse studies using the GFN have disentangled the effects of macronutrients on fatty liver and the gut microbiome. The GFN is likely to play a significant role in disentangling the effects of nutrients on liver disease, especially NAFLD, in humans. Copyright © 2017 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Vitamin E reduces liver stiffness in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Aiko; Kawabe, Naoto; Hashimoto, Senju; Murao, Michihito; Nakano, Takuji; Shimazaki, Hiroaki; Kan, Toshiki; Nakaoka, Kazunori; Ohki, Masashi; Takagawa, Yuka; Takamura, Tomoki; Kamei, Hiroyuki; Yoshioka, Kentaro

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of vitamin E treatment on liver stiffness in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). METHODS: Thirty-eight NAFLD patients were administered vitamin E for > 1 year. The doses of vitamin E were 150, 300, or 600 mg; three times per day after each meal. Responses were assessed by liver enzyme levels [aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotranferease (ALT), and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (γ-GTP)], noninvasive scoring systems of hepatic fibrosis-4 [FIB-4 index and aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet index (APRI)], and liver stiffness [velocity of shear wave (Vs)] measured by acoustic radiation force impulse elastography. Vs measurements were performed at baseline and 12 mo after baseline. The patients were genotyped for the patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 3 (PNPLA3) polymorphisms and then divided into either the CC/CG or GG group to examine each group’s responses to vitamin E treatment. RESULTS: We found marked differences in the platelet count, serum albumin levels, alkaline phosphatase levels, FIB-4 index, APRI, and Vs at baseline depending on the PNPLA3 polymorphism. AST, ALT, and γ-GTP levels (all P < 0.001); FIB-4 index (P = 0.035); APRI (P < 0.001); and Vs (P < 0.001) significantly decreased from baseline to 12 mo in the analysis of all patients. In the subset analyses of PNPLA3 genotypes, AST levels (P = 0.011), ALT levels (P < 0.001), γ-GTP levels (P = 0.005), APRI (P = 0.036), and Vs (P = 0.029) in genotype GG patients significantly improved, and AST and ALT levels (both P < 0.001), γ-GTP levels (P = 0.003), FIB-4 index (P = 0.017), and APRI (P < 0.001) in genotype CC/CG patients. CONCLUSION: One year of vitamin E treatment improved noninvasive fibrosis scores and liver stiffness in NAFLD patients. The responses were similar between different PNPLA3 genotypes. PMID:26644818

  2. Cholestasis and endogenous opioids: liver disease and exogenous opioid pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Mellar

    2007-01-01

    A class of endogenous opioids is upregulated in liver disease particular to cholestasis, which contributes to symptoms in liver disease such as pruritus, hypotension and encephalopathy. Symptoms associated with cholestasis are reversed or at least ameliorated by mu opioid receptor antagonists. Palliation of symptoms related to cholestatic liver disease also involves bile acid binding agents. Opioid receptor antagonists, unlike bile acid binding agents, have been reported to relieve multiple symptoms, except for pruritus, and improve liver function as demonstrated in experimental cholestasis. Exogenous opioid pharmacology is altered by liver disease. Dose reduction or prolongation of dose intervals is necessary depending on the severity of liver disease.

  3. Ovine white-liver disease (OWLD). Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulvund, M J

    1990-01-01

    Microscopic liver changes could earliest be found after 1 month on OWLD pasture, and include extensive fatty change with large spherical vacuoles in hepatocytes, varying size of hepatocytes and nuclei, and formation of Councilman bodies. Later came ceroid deposits, biliary hyperplasia and mesenchymal proliferation. Changes occurred in all lambs which died or were killed due to OWLD, and altogether 83% of the lambs grazing OWLD pastures showed typical or suspect changes. Widespread haemosiderosis of the spleen was common. In severely affected lambs, sclerosis of the Peyer's patches and of the germinative centres of the intestinal lymph nodes were seen, as were neuronal atrophy and patchy microcavitation of areas in the brain stem. Four had polyvasculitis. Cobalt/vitamin B12 supplemented lambs showed no specific changes. Lambs which grew well on other pastures (H lambs), but which were subclinically Co/B12 deficient some years, showed no fulminant hepatic OWLD, but 15% developed some features seen in OWLD. They showed no extensive fatty change. Results indicate that OWLD is a manifestation of B12 deficiency worsened by factors triggering early hepatic fatty change resulting in a more severe liver damage with loss of intracellular homeostasis rendering the hepatocytes vulnerable to other elements, like copper.

  4. Caroli's disease and orthotopic liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Shahid; Shakil, Obaid; Couto, Osvaldo F; Demetris, Anthony J; Fung, John J; Marcos, Amadeo; Chopra, Kapil

    2006-03-01

    Caroli's disease is a rare congenital hepatic disease, characterized by segmental dilatation of the biliary tree. Patients who have recurrent bouts of biliary infection, particularly those with complications related to portal hypertension, may require orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Few case reports have described the outcome of OLT in patients with Caroli's disease and to date there is no large series reported in the literature. We retrospectively analyzed the outcome of OLT in patients with Caroli's disease who underwent OLT between 1982 and 2002 at Starzl Transplantation Institute, University of Pittsburgh. Patients were identified and data was collected by computerized search of the electronic database system. All patients had confirmation of diagnosis by histopathology of explanted liver. A total of 33 patients with Caroli's disease were listed for liver transplantation, 3 of whom were excluded, as they were not transplanted. A total of 90% had signs of hepatic decompensation at the time of OLT. Median posttransplantation follow-up was 7.7 yr. Short-term graft and patient survival at 1 month was 83% and 86%, whereas overall long-term graft survival rates at 1, 5, and 10 yr were 73%, 62%, and 53%, respectively, and patient survival rates were 76%, 65%, and 56%, respectively. Long-term outcome in patients who survived the first year after transplantation was significantly better. Their survival rate at 5 and 10 yr was 90% and 78%. On univariable analysis, recipient age, donor male gender, coexistent congenital hepatic fibrosis, and re-OLT were associated with poor patient survival. Eight patients were retransplanted, 3 of whom had primary nonfunction. A total of 13 patients died; the most common cause of death being sepsis and cardiovascular complications. Patients who died of sepsis had cholangitis pre-OLT. In conclusion, OLT is a form of curative and life-saving therapy in patients with Caroli's disease, especially in those with decompensated liver

  5. [Parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Villares, J M

    2008-05-01

    Parenteral nutrition associated liver disease (PNALD) is an important problem in patients who require longterm parenteral nutrition as well as in preterm infants. Prevalence varies according to different series. Clinical presentation is different in adults and infants. Although since its first descriptions several hypothesis have been elucidated, the aetiology is not quite clear. It is possible that different factors could be involved. PNALD risk factors can be classified in three groups: 1) those derived from the lack of enteral nutrition stimulus; 2) parenteral nutrition components acting as toxic or the lack of specific nutrients and 3) those due to the underlying disease. If PNALD appears in short-term PN and it presents only as a mild elevation of liver enzymes, there is no need to treat. On the contrary, when direct bilirubin is > 2 mg/dL and lasts longer, there is a need to consider different causes and to minimize risk factors. We review the different approaches to manage PNALD, including optimizing enteral nutrition, modify parenteral solutions, use of specific nutrients -taurine, choline, etc.- or the use of drugs (mainly ursodeoxicolic acid). If liver disease progresses to cirrhosis a liver transplant must be considered.

  6. MR enterography versus capsule endoscopy in paediatric patients with suspected Crohn's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casciani, Emanuele; Masselli, Gabriele; Polettini, Elisabetta; Bertini, Luca; Gualdi, Gianfranco [University, Radiology DEA, Azienda Policlinico Umberto I, Rome (Italy); Di Nardo, Giovanni; Oliva, Salvatore; Cucchiara, Salvatore [University, Pediatric Gastroenterology, Rome (Italy); Floriani, Irene [Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche ' ' Mario Negri' ' , Milan (Italy)

    2011-04-15

    The aim of this prospective study was to compare the diagnostic yield of MR enterography (MRE) with small-bowel capsule endoscopy (SBCE) in paediatric patients with suspected Crohn's disease (CD). Paediatric patients with suspected CD were considered eligible to be enrolled in the study. All patients underwent diagnostic work-up including 1.5-T MRE, ileo-colonoscopy and oesophagogastroduodenoscopy. SBCE was not performed if MRE showed SB stricture or extra-intestinal findings consistent with symptoms. Sixty consecutive paediatric patients (36 male; average age 14) were enrolled into the study. A positive diagnosis for CD was made in 19 patients, 29 had a negative result and 12 were affected by other gastro-intestinal conditions. SBCE was performed in 37 patients (61.7%); 23 patients were excluded (strictures in five, extra-intestinal findings in 11 and parents' refusal in seven cases). The accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of MRE and SBCE were 98.3%, 100%, 97.6%, and 91.9%, 90.9%, 92.3%, respectively. Both MRE and SBCE are accurate methods for patients with suspected CD. MRE can be used as a primary imaging technique in suspected CD, in that it allows access to the ileal stricture, which forms a contra-indication for SBCE and provides extra-intestinal information. (orig.)

  7. Anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rambaldi, Andrea; Iaquinto, Gaetano; Gluud, Christian

    2002-01-01

    The objectives were to assess the beneficial and harmful effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease.......The objectives were to assess the beneficial and harmful effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease....

  8. Iron stores assessment in alcoholic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa Matos, Luís; Batista, Paulo; Monteiro, Nuno; Ribeiro, João; Cipriano, Maria A; Henriques, Pedro; Girão, Fernando; Carvalho, Armando

    2013-06-01

    The relation between alcoholic liver disease (ALD) and iron overload is well known. Liver biopsy is the gold standard for assessing iron stores. MRI is also validated for liver iron concentration (LIC) assessment. We aimed to assess the effect of active drinking in liver iron stores and the practicability of measuring LIC by MRI in ALD patients. We measured LIC by MRI in 58 ALD patients. We divided patients into two groups - with and without active alcoholism - and we compared several variables between them. We evaluated MRI-LIC, liver iron stores grade, ferritin and necroinflammatory activity grade for significant correlations. Significant necroinflammation (40.0% vs. 4.3%), LIC (40.1 vs. 24.3 µmol/g), and ferritin (1259.7 vs. 568.7 pmol/L) were significantly higher in drinkers. LIC values had a strong association with iron stores grade (r s = 0.706). Ferritin correlated with LIC (r s = 0.615), iron stores grade (r s = 0.546), and necroinflammation (r s = 0.313). The odds ratio for elevated serum ferritin when actively drinking was 7.32. Active alcoholism is associated with increased ALD activity. It is also the key factor in iron overload. Scheuers' semiquantitative score with Perls' staining gives a fairly accurate picture of liver iron overload. Serum ferritin also shows a good correlation with LIC values and biopsy iron stores grade. As most patients present only with mild iron overload, serum ferritin measurement and semiquantitative evaluation of iron stores are adequate, considering MRI high cost. However, if MRI is required to evaluate liver structure, LIC assessment could be performed without added cost.

  9. Arterial hypertension and chronic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Møller, S

    2005-01-01

    , calcitonin gene-related peptide, nitric oxide, and other vasodilators, and is most pronounced in the splanchnic area. This provides an effective (although relative) counterbalance to raised arterial blood pressure. Subjects with arterial hypertension (essential, secondary) may become normotensive during...... the development of chronic liver disease, and arterial hypertension is rarely manifested in patients with cirrhosis, even in those with renovascular disease and high circulating renin activity. There is much dispute as to the understanding of homoeostatic regulation in cirrhotic patients with manifest arterial......This review looks at the alterations in the systemic haemodynamics of patients with chronic liver disease (cirrhosis) in relation to essential hypertension and arterial hypertension of renal origin. Characteristic findings in patients with cirrhosis are vasodilatation with low overall systemic...

  10. Incidental findings at MRI-enterography in patients with suspected or known Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael Dam; Nathan, Torben; Kjeldsen, Jens

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To determine the frequency and clinical impact of incidental findings detected with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-enterography in patients with suspected or known Crohn's disease (CD). METHODS: Incidental findings were defined as unexpected lesions outside the small intestine, not previou......AIM: To determine the frequency and clinical impact of incidental findings detected with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-enterography in patients with suspected or known Crohn's disease (CD). METHODS: Incidental findings were defined as unexpected lesions outside the small intestine......, not previously known or suspected at the time of referral, and not related to inflammatory bowel disease. Through a systematic review of medical charts we analyzed the clinical impact of incidental findings, and compared the MRI findings with subsequent diagnostic procedures. RESULTS: A total of 283 patients...... were included in the analysis, and MRI detected active CD in 31%, fistula in 1.4% and abscess in 0.7%. Extra-intestinal findings not related to CD were recorded in 72 patients (25%), of which 58 patients (20%) had 74 previously unknown lesions. Important or incompletely characterized findings were...

  11. Obesity, fatty liver disease and intestinal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Nur

    2014-11-28

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic liver disorder that is increasing in prevalence with the worldwide epidemic of obesity. NAFLD is the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. The term NAFLD describes a spectrum of liver pathology ranges from simple steatosis to steatosis with inflammation nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and even cirrhosis. Metabolic syndrome and NAFLD also predict hepatocellular carcinoma. Many genetic and environmental factors have been suggested to contribute to the development of obesity and NAFLD, but the exact mechanisms are not known. Intestinal ecosystem contains trillions of microorganisms including bacteria, Archaea, yeasts and viruses. Several studies support the relationship between the intestinal microbial changes and obesity and also its complications, including insulin resistance and NAFLD. Given that the gut and liver are connected by the portal venous system, it makes the liver more vulnerable to translocation of bacteria, bacterial products, endotoxins or secreted cytokines. Altered intestinal microbiota (dysbiosis) may stimulate hepatic fat deposition through several mechanisms: regulation of gut permeability, increasing low-grade inflammation, modulation of dietary choline metabolism, regulation of bile acid metabolism and producing endogenous ethanol. Regulation of intestinal microbial ecosystem by diet modifications or by using probiotics and prebiotics as a treatment for obesity and its complications might be the issue of further investigations.

  12. Utility of controlled attenuation parameter measurement for assessing liver steatosis in Japanese patients with chronic liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaki, Keiichi; Takaki, Shintaro; Hyogo, Hideyuki; Kobayashi, Tomoki; Fukuhara, Takayuki; Naeshiro, Noriaki; Honda, Yoji; Nakahara, Takashi; Ohno, Atsushi; Miyaki, Daisuke; Murakami, Eisuke; Nagaoki, Yuko; Kawaoka, Tomokazu; Tsuge, Masataka; Hiraga, Nobuhiko; Hiramatsu, Akira; Imamura, Michio; Kawakami, Yoshiiku; Aikata, Hiroshi; Ochi, Hidenori; Takahashi, Shoichi; Arihiro, Koji; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2013-11-01

    Steatosis is a common histological feature of chronic liver disease, especially alcoholic and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, as well as chronic hepatitis C. A recent study showed that evaluating the controlled attenuation parameter (CAP) with transient elastography was an efficient way of non-invasively determining the severity of hepatic steatosis. The objective of this study was to prospectively evaluate the utility of CAP for diagnosing steatosis in patients with chronic liver disease. One hundred and fifty-five consecutive patients with suspected chronic liver disease underwent steatosis diagnosis using CAP, blood sample analyses, computed tomography for assessing the liver/spleen ratio and liver biopsy. Steatosis was graded according to the percentage of fat-containing hepatocytes: S0, less than 5%; S1, 5-33%; S2, 34-66%; and S3: more than 66%. The CAP was significantly correlated with steatosis grade, and there were significant differences between the CAP value of the S0 patients and those of the patients with other grades of steatosis. S0 and S1-3 hepatic steatosis were considered to represent mild and significant steatosis, respectively. The CAP values of the patients with mild and significant steatosis were significantly different (P CAP for diagnosing significant steatosis was 0.878 (95% confidence interval, 0.818-0.939), and the optimal CAP cut-off value for detecting significant steatosis was 232.5 db/m. In multivariate analysis, the CAP (P = 0.0002) and the liver to spleen ratio (P = 0.004) were found to be significantly associated with significant steatosis. The CAP is a promising tool for rapidly and non-invasively diagnosing steatosis. © 2013 The Japan Society of Hepatology.

  13. Anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rambaldi, A; Iaquinto, G; Gluud, C

    2003-01-01

    Alcohol is one of the most common causes of liver disease in the Western World today. Randomised clinical trials have examined the effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease.......Alcohol is one of the most common causes of liver disease in the Western World today. Randomised clinical trials have examined the effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease....

  14. Increased Porphyrins in Primary Liver Cancer Mainly Reflect a Parallel Liver Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Jerzy Kaczynski; Göran Hansson; Sven Wallerstedt

    2009-01-01

    Hepatic porphyries have been associated with an increased risk of primary liver cancer (PLC), which on the other hand may cause an increased porphyrin production. To evaluate the role of an underlying liver disorder we analyzed porphyrins in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) (n = 65), cholangiocellular carcinoma (n = 3), or suspected PLC, which turned out to be metastases (n = 18) or a benign disorder (n = 11). None of the patients had a family history of porphyry or clinical signs...

  15. Alcohol Dependence and Alcoholic Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Mann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol dependence is a disabling condition that has a high prevalence, but in Europe only a small fraction of the people diagnosed with alcohol abuse and dependence are treated, representing the widest treatment gap, as compared with other mental disorders. Early diagnosis and monitoring of alcoholic liver disease (ALD is still insufficiently solved. Although ALD is the most common cause for liver disease in the Western world, it largely remains underestimated and underdiagnosed for many reasons. The recent introduction of non-invasive elastographic techniques such as transient elastography (TE has significantly improved the early diagnosis of alcoholic liver cirrhosis (ALC. As demonstrated in the literature, inflammation-associated liver stiffness (LS rapidly decreases during alcohol detoxification, and is also directly correlated to change in LS in both abstinent and relapsing patients. Newly published data show that LS could be used to monitor and validate hepatoprotective effects during nalmefene usage. Nalmefene is an opioid system modulator that diminishes the reinforcing effects of alcohol, helping the patient to reduce drinking. Three randomised, multicentre, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallelgroup Phase III studies were designed to assess the efficacy and safety of nalmefene in reducing alcohol consumption. Patients with a high or very high drinking risk level (DRL at baseline and randomisation show a clinically significant effect from nalmefene treatment, which is generally well tolerated. Moreover, reduced alcohol consumption supported by nalmefene in combination with psychosocial support may indeed help to reduce the alcohol-related burden and the large treatment gap.

  16. Psoriasis and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrascosa, J M; Bonanad, C; Dauden, E; Botella, R; Olveira-Martín, A

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most prevalent liver condition in the West. The prevalence and severity of NAFLD is higher and the prognosis worse in patients with psoriasis. The pathogenic link between psoriasis and NAFLD is chronic inflammation and peripheral insulin resistance, a common finding in diseases associated with psoriasis. NAFLD should therefore be ruled out during the initial evaluation of patients with psoriasis, in particular if they show signs of metabolic syndrome and require systemic treatment. Concomitant psoriasis and NAFLD and the likelihood of synergy between them place limitations on general recommendations and treatment for these patients given the potential for liver toxicity. As hepatotoxic risk is associated with some of the conventional drugs used in this setting (e.g., acitretin, methotrexate, and ciclosporin), patients prescribed these treatments should be monitored as appropriate. Anti-tumor necrosis factor agents hold the promise of potential benefits based on their effects on the inflammatory process and improving peripheral insulin resistance. However, cases of liver toxicity have also been reported in relation to these biologics. No evidence has emerged to suggest that anti-p40 or anti-interleukin 17 agents provide benefits or have adverse effects. Copyright © 2017 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Lower Muscle Endurance in Patients with Alcoholic Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Henning; Aagaard, Niels K.; Jakobsen, Johannes; Dorup, Inge; Vilstrup, Hendrik

    2012-01-01

    Patients with alcoholic liver disease often complain of restricted physical capacity, which could be due to decreased muscle endurance. The aim of this study was to assess the muscular endurance in patients with alcoholic liver disease. In a cross sectional study, 24 patients with alcoholic liver disease and 22 controls were evaluated using…

  18. Correlation between liver morphology and haemodynamics in alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsgaard, K; Gluud, C; Henriksen, J H

    1985-01-01

    was found with haemodynamic variables. The present data substantiate the concept that established portal hypertension in alcoholic liver disease is mainly accomplished by a derangement in hepatic architecture, whereas parenchymal changes, including hepatocyte size, are of less importance.......In 32 alcoholic patients the degree of hepatic architectural destruction was graded (preserved architecture, nodules alternating with preserved architecture, totally destroyed architecture) and related to portal pressure. A significant positive correlation was found between degree of architectural...... destruction and wedged-to-free hepatic vein pressure (W-FHVP) (p less than 0.001). The degree of necrosis, fatty change and inflammation showed no correlation with portal pressure, whereas a significant positive correlation was found between the occurrence of Mallory bodies and W-FHVP (p less than 0...

  19. The ascending pathophysiology of cholestatic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Peter L M; Ghallab, Ahmed; Vartak, Nachiket; Reif, Raymond; Schaap, Frank G; Hampe, Jochen; Hengstler, Jan G

    2017-02-01

    In this review we develop the argument that cholestatic liver diseases, particularly primary biliary cholangitis and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), evolve over time with anatomically an ascending course of the disease process. The first and early lesions are in "downstream" bile ducts. This eventually leads to cholestasis, and this causes bile salt (BS)-mediated toxic injury of the "upstream" liver parenchyma. BS are toxic in high concentration. These concentrations are present in the canalicular network, bile ducts, and gallbladder. Leakage of bile from this network and ducts could be an important driver of toxicity. The liver has a great capacity to adapt to cholestasis, and this may contribute to a variable symptom-poor interval that is often observed. Current trials with drugs that target BS toxicity are effective in only about 50%-60% of primary biliary cholangitis patients, with no effective therapy in PSC. This motivated us to develop and propose a new view on the pathophysiology of primary biliary cholangitis and PSC in the hope that these new drugs can be used more effectively. These views may lead to better stratification of these diseases and to recommendations on a more "tailored" use of the new therapeutic agents that are currently tested in clinical trials. Apical sodium-dependent BS transporter inhibitors that reduce intestinal BS absorption lower the BS load and are best used in cholestatic patients. The effectiveness of BS synthesis-suppressing drugs, such as farnesoid X receptor agonists, is greatest when optimal adaptation is not yet established. By the time cytochrome P450 7A1 expression is reduced these drugs may be less effective. Anti-inflammatory agents are probably most effective in early disease, while drugs that antagonize BS toxicity, such as ursodeoxycholic acid and nor-ursodeoxycholic acid, may be effective at all disease stages. Endoscopic stenting in PSC should be reserved for situations of intercurrent cholestasis and

  20. Characteristics and outcomes of chronic liver disease patients with acute deteriorated liver function by severity of underlying liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yun Soo; Sinn, Dong Hyun; Gwak, Geum-Youn; Cho, Juhee; Kang, Danbee; Paik, Yong-Han; Choi, Moon Seok; Lee, Joon Hyeok; Koh, Kwang Cheol; Paik, Seung Woon

    2016-04-14

    To analyze characteristics and outcome of patients with acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) according to the severity of underlying liver disease. One hundred and sixty-seven adult patients with chronic liver disease and acute deteriorated liver function, defined by jaundice and coagulopathy, were analyzed. Predisposition, type of injury, response, organ failure, and survival were analyzed and compared between patients with non-cirrhosis (type A), cirrhosis (type B) and cirrhosis with previous decompensation (type C). The predisposition was mostly hepatitis B in type A, while it was alcoholic liver disease in types B and C. Injury was mostly hepatic in type A, but was non-hepatic in type C. Liver failure, defined by CLIF-SOFA, was more frequent in types A and B, and circulatory failure was more frequent in type C. The 30-d overall survival rate (85.3%, 81.1% and 83.7% for types A, B and C, respectively, P = 0.31) and the 30-d transplant-free survival rate (55.9%, 65.5% and 62.5% for types A, B and C, respectively P = 0.33) were not different by ACLF subtype, but 1-year overall survival rate were different (85.3%, 71.7% and 58.7% for types A, B and C, respectively, P = 0.02). There were clear differences in predisposition, type of injury, accompanying organ failure and long-term mortality according to spectrum of chronic liver disease, implying classifying subtype according to the severity of underlying liver disease is useful for defining, clarifying and comparing ACLF.

  1. Growth Differentiation Factor 15 Predicts Chronic Liver Disease Severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eaum Seok; Kim, Seok Hyun; Kim, Hyun Jin; Kim, Kyung Hee; Lee, Byung Seok; Ku, Bon Jeong

    2017-03-15

    Growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF-15) belongs to the transforming growth factor-β superfamily. GDF-15 is emerging as a biomarker for several diseases. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical performances of GDF-15 for the prediction of liver fibrosis and severity in chronic liver disease. The serum GDF-15 levels were examined via enzyme immunoassay in 145 patients with chronic liver disease and 101 healthy individuals. The patients with chronic liver disease consisted of 54 patients with chronic hepatitis, 44 patients with compensated liver cirrhosis, and 47 patients with decompensated liver cirrhosis. Of the patients with chronic liver diseases, the decompensated liver cirrhosis patients had an increased serum GDF-15 (3,483 ng/L) level compared with the patients with compensated liver cirrhosis (1,861 ng/L) and chronic hepatitis (1,232 ng/L). The overall diagnostic accuracies of GDF-15, as determined by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curves, were as follows: chronic hepatitis=0.656 (>574 ng/L, sensitivity, 53.7%; specificity, 79.2%), compensated liver cirrhosis=0.886 (>760 ng/L, sensitivity, 75.6%; specificity, 92.1%), and decompensated liver cirrhosis=0.984 (>869 ng/L, sensitivity, 97.9%; specificity, 94.1%). This investigation represents the first study to demonstrate the availability of GDF-15 in chronic liver disease. GDF-15 comprised a useful biomarker for the prediction of liver fibrosis and severity in chronic liver disease.

  2. Pediatric Parenteral Nutrition-Associated Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israelite, Jill C

    Pediatric parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD) is typically defined as a decrease in bile flow that is independent of a mechanical obstruction and of any other underlying liver disease. It is most often seen in pediatric patients receiving parenteral nutrition support. Up to 50% to 66% of children receiving long-term parenteral nutrition are reported to be diagnosed with PNALD. The goal of treatment for PNALD is advancement to full enteral nutrition and elimination of dependence on parenteral nutrition support. Achieving this goal is not always possible, especially in patients with short bowel syndrome. The following review article highlights some of the current treatment strategies focused on prevention or correction of PNALD as noted in current American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition guidelines.

  3. Screening for significant chronic liver disease by using three simple ultrasound parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lignon, Grégoire [Department of Radiology, LUNAM Université, France Université d’Angers, CHU Angers, Angers F-49100 (France); Boursier, Jérome [Department of Hepatology, LUNAM Université, France Université d’Angers, CHU Angers, Angers F-49100 (France); Laboratory HIFIH, UPRES 3859, LUNAM Université, France Université d’Angers, CHU Angers, Angers F-49100 (France); Delumeau, Stéphanie [Department of Radiology, LUNAM Université, France Université d’Angers, CHU Angers, Angers F-49100 (France); Michalak-Provost, Sophie [Department of Pathology, LUNAM Université, France Université d’Angers, CHU Angers, Angers F-49100 (France); Lebigot, Jérome [Department of Radiology, LUNAM Université, France Université d’Angers, CHU Angers, Angers F-49100 (France); Oberti, Frederic [Department of Hepatology, LUNAM Université, France Université d’Angers, CHU Angers, Angers F-49100 (France); Laboratory HIFIH, UPRES 3859, LUNAM Université, France Université d’Angers, CHU Angers, Angers F-49100 (France); and others

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Three US parameters have diagnosis accuracy for the diagnosis of severe fibrosis equal to 66%. • These three signs detect unidentified fibrosis with a predictive positive value of 32%. • It would be an easy way to detect patients with silent chronic liver diseases. - Abstract: Objectives: Chronic liver diseases remain asymptomatic for many years. Consequently, patients are diagnosed belatedly, when cirrhosis is unmasked by lifethreatening complications. We aimed to identify simple ultrasound parameters for the screening of patients with unknown significant chronic liver disease. Methods: Three hundred and twenty seven patients with chronic liver disease, liver biopsy, and ultrasound examination were included in the derivation set. 283 consecutive patients referred for ultrasound examination were included in the validation set; those selected according to the ultrasound parameters identified in the derivation set were then referred for specialized consultation including non-invasive fibrosis tests and ultimately liver biopsy if liver fibrosis was suspected. Results: In the derivation set, three ultrasound parameters were independent predictors of severe fibrosis: liver surface irregularity, spleen length (>110 mm), and demodulation of hepatic veins. The association of ≥2 of the three above parameters provided 49.1% sensitivity and 86.9% specificity. In the validation set, at ≥2 of the three parameters were present in 23 (8%) of the patients. Among these patients, 8 had liver fibrosis (F ≥ 1), 5 had significant fibrosis (F ≥2) and two cirrhosis. Conclusion: The generalized search of three simple ultrasound signs in patients referred for abdominal ultrasound examination may be an easy way to detect those with silent but significant chronic liver disease.

  4. Fucosylated Glycoproteins as Markers of Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Mehta

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in N-linked glycosylation are known to occur during the development of various diseases. For example, increased branching of oligosaccharides has been associated with cancer metastasis and has been correlated to tumor progression in human cancers of the breast, colon and melanomas. Increases in core fucosylation have also been associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Recently, changes in both the total serum glycome and the glycosylation of specific IgG molecules have been observed in people with liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. The mechanisms by which changes in glycosylation are observed and their use as biomarkers of disease will be discussed.

  5. Recurrence of autoimmune liver disease and inflammatory bowel disease after pediatric liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberal, Rodrigo; Vergani, Diego; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina

    2016-09-01

    Approximately 10% of children with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and 30% of those with sclerosing cholangitis (SC) require liver transplantation (LT). LT is indicated in patients who present with fulminant hepatic failure (ie, with encephalopathy) and in those who develop end-stage liver disease despite treatment. After LT, recurrent AIH is reported in approximately 30% of patients and recurrent SC in up to 50%. Diagnosis of recurrence is based on biochemical abnormalities, seropositivity for autoantibodies, interface hepatitis on histology, steroid dependence, and, for SC, presence of cholangiopathy. Recurrence of SC after LT is often associated with poorly controlled inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Recurrence may even appear years after LT; therefore, steroid-based immunosuppression should be maintained at a higher dose than that used for patients transplanted for nonautoimmune liver diseases. Although the impact of recurrent disease on graft function is controversial, it seems that in pediatric LT recipients recurrence of AIH or SC is associated with compromised graft survival. Exacerbation of preexistent IBD may be observed after LT for SC or AIH, and IBD appears to have a more aggressive course than before LT. In addition, IBD can develop de novo following LT. Liver Transplantation 22 1275-1283 2016 AASLD. © 2016 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  6. Nutritional Needs and Support for Children with Chronic Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine H. Yang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Malnutrition has become a dangerously common problem in children with chronic liver disease, negatively impacting neurocognitive development and growth. Furthermore, many children with chronic liver disease will eventually require liver transplantation. Thus, this association between malnourishment and chronic liver disease in children becomes increasingly alarming as malnutrition is a predictor of poorer outcomes in liver transplantation and is often associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Malnutrition requires aggressive and appropriate management to correct nutritional deficiencies. A comprehensive review of the literature has found that infants with chronic liver disease (CLD are particularly susceptible to malnutrition given their low reserves. Children with CLD would benefit from early intervention by a multi-disciplinary team, to try to achieve nutritional rehabilitation as well as to optimize outcomes for liver transplant. This review explains the multifactorial nature of malnutrition in children with chronic liver disease, defines the nutritional needs of these children, and discusses ways to optimize their nutritional.

  7. Real-time Tissue Elastography for Assessment of Liver Stiffness in Adults Without Known Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yu; Gong, Hai-Yan; Lin, Hong-Jun

    2015-10-01

    To investigate normal liver stiffness and its influential factors in adults without liver disease using real-time tissue elastography. The liver stiffness threshold value for identifying patients with chronic liver disease was also determined. One hundred twenty healthy volunteers were examined with real-time tissue elastography. An integrated quantitative elastographic parameter, defined as the liver fibrosis index, was obtained by tissue dispersion quantitative analysis. Correlations between the liver fibrosis index and age, sex, and body mass index (BMI) were studied. To determine the threshold value for identifying chronic liver disease, 29 patients with chronic hepatitis B who underwent liver biopsy, including patients without fibrosis (fibrosis stage F0; n = 9) and patients with substantial fibrosis (F1-F2; n = 20) were also investigated. A receiver operating characteristic curve analysis for differentiating the F0 from the F1-F2 group was performed. There were no significant differences in the mean liver fibrosis index between sexes or among different age groups. There was a positive correlation between BMI and the liver fibrosis index. The mean liver fibrosis index ± SD in healthy participants with a normal BMI was 1.31 ± 0.25. The mean liver fibrosis index values for F0 and F1-F2 patients with a normal BMI were 1.47 ± 0.24 and 2.44 ± 0.49, respectively (P liver fibrosis index threshold value for discriminating normal liver from noncirrhotic chronic liver disease was 2.12 in participants with a normal BMI. Liver stiffness determined by real-time tissue elastography in healthy Chinese adults is not affected by age and sex but has a positive correlation with BMI. Real-time tissue elastography for assessment of liver stiffness can also be used for identification of substantial fibrosis in patients with chronic liver disease. © 2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  8. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, association with cardiovascular disease and treatment (II). The treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brea, Ángel; Pintó, Xavier; Ascaso, Juan F; Blasco, Mariano; Díaz, Ángel; González-Santos, Pedro; Hernández-Mijares, Antonio; Mantilla, Teresa; Millán, Jesús; Pedro-Botet, Juan

    Disease nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) comprises a series of histologically similar to those induced by alcohol consumption in people with very little or no liver damage same. The importance of NAFLD is its high prevalence in our Western societies, from the point of view liver in its progressive evolution from steatosis to steatohepatitis, cirrhosis and liver cancer. During the last decade it has been observed that NAFLD leads to an increased cardiovascular risk with accelerated atherosclerosis and cardiovascular events, the leading cause of morbidity and mortality. This updated January 2016 revision consists of two parts. In this second part, the treatment of NAFLD and its influence on cardiovascular disease and drugs used in the control of cardiovascular risk factors showing a beneficial effect on the liver disease will be reviewed. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Regenerative and fibrotic pathways in canine liver disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spee, Bart

    2006-01-01

    Liver diseases occur quite frequently in dogs; the overall incidence in dogs has been estimated around 1-2% of the clinical cases. Most liver diseases are, like in humans, chronic and occur through chronic inflammation due to different causes. In all cases the on-going liver cell damage leads to a

  10. Caput medusae in alcoholic liver disease | Hari Kumar | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Caput medusae and palmar erythema are cardinal signs in cirrhosis of liver with portal hypertension. Palmar erythema is described more often as a marker for alcoholic etiology of chronic liver disease. The peripheral stigmata of chronic liver disease are not routinely seen now a days due to early diagnosis and better ...

  11. Hints for clarification of influencing factors in case of occupational liver diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zober, A.; Raithel, H.; Valentin, H.

    1981-05-01

    Clarification of influencing factors is of great importance in suspected occupational liver diseases. Hints are given on the basis of the author's own experience and after critical evaluation of the relevant literature. Most important are: 1) Establishment of a comprehensive working anamnesis with special regard to specific features of the job, exposure patterns, and all working materials; 2) assessment of the hepatotoxic potential of the suspected working material according to the present state of knowledge in working medicine and toxicology; 3) objectification and quantification of the suspected noxious substances at the place of work by means of air analysis and analysis of the biological matter; 4) differential diagnosis in view of possible competitive influencing factors.

  12. The epidemiology, pathogenesis and histopathology of fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levene, Adam P; Goldin, Robert D

    2012-08-01

    Fatty liver disease includes non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and alcoholic liver disease (ALD), each of which is increasing in prevalence. Each represents a histological spectrum that extends from isolated steatosis to steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. NAFLD is associated with obesity, diabetes, and insulin resistance, and is considered to be the liver manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. The pathogenesis of NAFLD and ALD involves cytokines, adipokines, oxidative stress, and apoptosis. Histopathology is the gold standard for assessing the severity of liver damage in NAFLD and ALD. We have reviewed the literature, and described and compared the epidemiology, natural disease history, pathogenesis and histopathology of NAFLD and ALD. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Outcomes of patients calling emergency medical services for suspected acute cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoos, Mikkel Malby; Sejersten, Maria Sejersten; Baber, Usman

    2015-01-01

    Adequate health care is increasingly dependent on prehospital systems and cardiovascular (CV) disease remains the most common cause for hospital admission. However the prevalence of CV dispatches of emergency medical services (EMS) is not well reported and survival data described in clinical trials.......4%, respectively. Stroke, acute heart failure, and ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) carried a 25- to 50-fold adjusted mortality hazard during the first 4 days. In patients with suspected STEMI, 90.5% had an acute angiography performed. Nontransferred, nonreperfused patients with STEMI (9...

  14. The utility of cardiac CT beyond the assessment of suspected coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakouros, N. [Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States); Giles, J.; Crundwell, N.B. [Conquest Hospital, St Leonards-on-Sea, East Sussex (United Kingdom); McWilliams, E.T.M., E-mail: eric.mcwilliams@esht.nhs.uk [Conquest Hospital, St Leonards-on-Sea, East Sussex (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-15

    Extensive work has been done over recent years to improve the spatial and temporal resolution of electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated cardiac computed tomography (CT). Advances in both hardware and software analysis have enabled the development of non-invasive coronary angiography. However, these high-quality examinations lend themselves to multiple additional applications beyond coronary angiography. In this review, we illustrate and discuss some established and some emerging applications of ECG-gated cardiac CT beyond the assessment of suspected coronary disease, particularly in light of recent recommendations on the appropriate use of this technology.

  15. Lyme disease: a selective medium for isolation of the suspected etiological agent, a spirochete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, S E; Klein, G C; Schmid, G P; Bowen, G S; Feeley, J C; Schulze, T

    1984-01-01

    A simple procedure with a new selective culture medium for the isolation of the suspected etiological agent of Lyme disease from ticks is described. Live ticks (Ixodes dammini) were ground with a mortar and pestle, and the suspensions were inoculated into a selective and nonselective medium. The selective medium, which contained kanamycin and 5-fluorouracil, yielded positive spirochete cultures from 100% of the pooled ticks and from 79% of the single tick specimens. The isolation rate for the nonselective medium was 0% from the tick pools and 58% from the single tick specimens. PMID:6361065

  16. A Non-Invasive Method to Assess Cerebral Perfusion Pressure in Geriatric Patients with Suspected Cerebrovascular Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bo Liu; Qi Li; Kewei Li; Nan Deng; Peng He; Chunchang Qin; Deyu Yang; Zhiwei Li; Peng Xie

    2015-01-01

    Background Cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) can adversely impact cerebrovascular hemodynamics but cannot be practically measured in most clinical settings. Here, we aimed to establish a representative mathematical model for CPP in geriatric patients with suspected cerebrovascular disease. Methods A total of 100 patients (54 males and 46 females between 60?80 years of age) with suspected cerebrovascular disease and no obvious cerebrovascular stenosis were selected for invasive CPP monitoring ...

  17. Depressed mood, positive affect, and heart rate variability in patients with suspected coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Mimi R; Whitehead, Daisy L; Rakhit, Roby; Steptoe, Andrew

    2008-11-01

    To test associations between heart rate variability (HRV), depressed mood, and positive affect in patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). Depression is associated with impaired HRV post acute cardiac events, but evidence in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) is inconsistent. Seventy-six patients (52 men, 24 women; mean age = 61.1 years) being investigated for suspected CAD on the basis of symptomatology and positive noninvasive tests, completed 24-hour electrocardiograms. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) was administered, and positive and depressed affect was measured over the study period with the Day Reconstruction Method (DRM). A total of 46 (60.5%) patients were later found to have definite CAD. HRV was analyzed, using spectral analysis. Typical diurnal profiles of HRV were observed, with greater normalized high frequency (HF) and lower normalized low frequency (LF) power in the night compared with the day. BDI depression scores were not consistently associated with HRV. But positive affect was associated with greater normalized HF power (p = .039) and reduced normalized LF power (p = .007) independently of age, gender, medication with beta blockers, CAD status, body mass index, smoking, and habitual physical activity level. In patients with definite CAD, depressed affect assessed using the DRM was associated with reduced normalized HF power and heightened normalized LF power (p = .007) independently of covariates. Relationships between depression and HRV in patients with CAD may depend on affective experience over the monitoring period. Enhanced parasympathetic cardiac control may be a process through which positive affect protects against cardiovascular disease.

  18. Balloon-Assisted Enteroscopy and Capsule Endoscopy in Suspected Small Bowel Crohn's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Hsu-Heng; Chang, Chen-Wang; Chou, Jen-Wei; Wei, Shu-Chen

    2017-09-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are idiopathic inflammatory diseases of two main types, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Crohn's disease can affect the entire gastrointestinal tract, and the distal ileum is involved in up to 70% of patients. Moreover, Crohn's disease in one-quarter to one-third of patients involves isolation of the small bowel. Due to the nonspecific symptoms and anatomical location of the disease, small bowel Crohn's disease is a phenotype that is particularly difficult to manage. Since the introduction of capsule endoscopy in 2000 and balloon-assisted enteroscopy in the 21st century, it is now possible to directly inspect for small bowel Crohn's disease. However, the new modalities still have limitations, such as capsule retention and invasiveness of balloon-assisted enteroscopy. The diagnostic yields of both capsule endoscopy and balloon-assisted enteroscopy are high for patients with suspected small bowel Crohn's disease. Therefore, earlier use of capsule endoscopy or balloon-assisted enteroscopy can help with the diagnosis and earlier treatment of these patients to avert possible disastrous outcomes.

  19. Accuracy and cost of diagnostic strategies for patients with suspected Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maconi, Giovanni; Bolzoni, Enrico; Giussani, Andrea; Friedman, Antony B; Duca, Piergiorgio

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate accuracy and cost of non-invasive diagnostic strategies including magnetic resonance imaging, intestinal ultrasonography, ileocolonoscopy and video-capsule endoscopy in suspected Crohn's disease. A decision-analytic model was used to assess the costs in low (25%), intermediate (50%) or high (75%) pre-test probability of Crohn's disease. Based on the published accuracy of diagnostic modalities and Bayes' rule, we calculated post-test probability of Crohn's disease using different strategies, starting from ileocolonoscopy, ultrasonography or magnetic resonance. Each strategy was considered successful when post-test probability was >95% or Crohn's disease while a normal ultrasonography may exclude Crohn's disease. With high pre-test probability, ileocolonoscopy or ultrasonography as the first test may confirm Crohn's disease, but at least 3 negative tests are required to exclude Crohn's disease. The cost to diagnose one patient was cheapest utilising an ultrasonography-based strategy both in low (ultrasonography €1076; ileocolonoscopy €2005; magnetic resonance €4515) and high pre-test probability of Crohn's disease (ultrasonography €321; ileocolonoscopy €712; magnetic resonance €1412). The accuracy and cost of these strategies depend on pre-test probability of Crohn's disease and vary according to the first test used. Ileocolonoscopy plus ultrasonography is the most accurate and less expensive initial diagnostic strategy. Copyright © 2014 European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Replacement of Diseased Mouse Liver by Hepatic Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhim, Jonathan A.; Sandgren, Eric P.; Degen, Jay L.; Palmiter, Richard D.; Brinster, Ralph L.

    1994-02-01

    Adult liver has the unusual ability to fully regenerate after injury. Although regeneration is accomplished by the division of mature hepatocytes, the replicative potential of these cells is unknown. Here, the replicative capacity of adult liver cells and their medical usefulness as donor cells for transplantation were investigated by transfer of adult mouse liver cells into transgenic mice that display an endogenous defect in hepatic growth potential and function. The transplanted liver cell populations replaced up to 80 percent of the diseased recipient liver. These findings demonstrate the enormous growth potential of adult hepatocytes, indicating the feasibility of liver cell transplantation as a method to replace lost or diseased hepatic parenchyma.

  1. Imaging Algorithms for Evaluating Suspected Rotator Cuff Disease: Society of Radiologists in Ultrasound Consensus Conference Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Jon A.; Benson, Carol B.; Bancroft, Laura W.; Bedi, Asheesh; McShane, John M.; Miller, Theodore T.; Parker, Laurence; Smith, Jay; Steinbach, Lynne S.; Teefey, Sharlene A.; Thiele, Ralf G.; Tuite, Michael J.; Wise, James N.; Yamaguchi, Ken

    2013-01-01

    The Society of Radiologists in Ultrasound convened a panel of specialists from a variety of medical disciplines to reach a consensus about the recommended imaging evaluation of painful shoulders with clinically suspected rotator cuff disease. The panel met in Chicago, Ill, on October 18 and 19, 2011, and created this consensus statement regarding the roles of radiography, ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT), CT arthrography, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and MR arthrography. The consensus panel consisted of two co-moderators, a facilitator, a statistician and health care economist, and 10 physicians who have specialty expertise in shoulder pain evaluation and/or treatment. Of the 13 physicians on the panel, nine were radiologists who were chosen to represent a broad range of skill sets in diagnostic imaging, different practice types (private and academic), and different geographical regions of the United States. Five of the radiologists routinely performed musculoskeletal US as part of their practice and four did not. There was also one representative from each of the following clinical specialties: rheumatology, physical medicine and rehabilitation, orthopedic surgery, and nonoperative sports medicine. The goal of this conference was to construct several algorithms with which to guide the imaging evaluation of suspected rotator cuff disease in patients with a native rotator cuff, patients with a repaired rotator cuff, and patients who have undergone shoulder replacement. The panel hopes that these recommendations will lead to greater uniformity in rotator cuff imaging and more cost-effective care for patients suspected of having rotator cuff abnormality. © RSNA, 2013 PMID:23401583

  2. Ubiquitin: an immunohistochemical marker of Mallory bodies and alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vyberg, Mogens; Leth, Peter Mygind

    1991-01-01

    One hundred forty eight liver needle biopsies, comprising 88 consecutive biopsies from patients with clinically diagnosed or suspected alcoholic liver disease and 60 selected biopsies from non-alcoholics, were immunostained for the cell stress protein ubiquitin (Ub). Ub + cells were detected in all...... biopsies from non-alcoholic patients with liver diseases in which hepatocyte ballooning and occasionally MBs are seen, a few Ub + cells were revealed in two out of ten with primary biliary cirrhosis (one of which also showed MBs) but none in biopsies with primary sclerosing cholangitis, long-standing large...... of 33 biopsies with alcoholic hepatitis (AH). Practically all Mallory bodies (MBs) showed intense Ub-staining. In addition, many cells revealed Ub + granules lying aggregated (pre-MBs) or dispersed in the cytoplasm of ballooned cells. The mean number of Ub + cells in 10 biopsies with AH was more than 30...

  3. Concepts and Treatment Approaches in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Dina L. Halegoua-De Marzio; Jonathan M. Fenkel

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) affects up to 30% of adults and is the most common liver disease in Western nations. NAFLD is associated with central adiposity, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, and cardiovascular disease. It encompasses the entire spectrum of fatty liver diseases from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) with lobular/portal inflammation, hepatocellular necrosis, and fibrosis. Of those who develop NASH, 15–25% will progr...

  4. Liver Atrophy Associated With Monolobar Caroli's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, L. N.; Kilpadi, A. B.; D'Cunha, S.

    1991-01-01

    The association of the atrophy-hypertrophy complex in monolobar Caroli’s disease (Type I) is reported in a 30 year old male who presented with recurrent cholangitis. Ultrasound and CT scan showed localised, right sided, saccular biliary dilatation in a normal sized liver. Severe right lobar atrophy was detected at operation and the resected right lobe weighed only 140 gms. Distortion of the hilar vascular anatomy and posterior displacement of the right hepatic duct orifice were problems encountered at surgery. PMID:1931788

  5. Autoimmune liver disease and concomitant extrahepatic autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratori, Paolo; Fabbri, Angela; Lalanne, Claudine; Lenzi, Marco; Muratori, Luigi

    2015-10-01

    To assess the frequency and clinical impact of associated extrahepatic autoimmune diseases (EAD) on autoimmune liver diseases (ALD). We investigated 608 patients with ALD (327 autoimmune hepatitis - AIH and 281 primary biliary cirrhosis - PBC) for concomitant EAD. In both AIH and PBC, we observed a high prevalence of EAD (29.9 and 42.3%, respectively); both diseases showed a significant association with autoimmune thyroid disease, followed by autoimmune skin disease, celiac disease, and vasculitis in AIH patients and sicca syndrome, CREST syndrome, and celiac disease in PBC patients. At diagnosis, AIH patients with concurrent EAD were more often asymptomatic than patients with isolated AIH (Pautoimmune thyroid disease. In the light of our results, all patients with an EAD should be assessed for the concomitant presence of an asymptomatic ALD.

  6. Simultaneous liver-pancreas transplantation for cystic fibrosis-related liver disease : A multicenter experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bandsma, R. H. J.; Bozic, M. A.; Fridell, J. A.; Crull, M. H.; Molleston, J.; Avitzur, Y.; Mozer-Glassberg, Y.; Gonzalez-Peralta, R. P.; Hodik, M.; Fecteau, A.; de Angelis, M.; Durie, P.; Ng, V. L.

    Background: Diabetes is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). While liver transplantation is well established for CF-related liver disease (CFLD), the role of simultaneous liver pancreas transplantation is less understood. Methods: We polled 81

  7. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viglino, Damien; Jullian-Desayes, Ingrid; Minoves, Mélanie; Aron-Wisnewsky, Judith; Leroy, Vincent; Zarski, Jean-Pierre; Tamisier, Renaud; Joyeux-Faure, Marie; Pépin, Jean-Louis

    2017-06-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is independently linked to cardiometabolic morbidity and mortality. Low-grade inflammation, oxidative stress and ectopic fat, common features of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), might contribute to the development of NAFLD.We aimed to investigate the prevalence of NAFLD and to evaluate the relationship between various types of liver damage and COPD severity, comorbidities and circulating inflammatory cytokines. Validated noninvasive tests (FibroMax: SteatoTest, NashTest and FibroTest) were used to assess steatosis, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and liver fibrosis. Patients underwent an objective assessment of COPD comorbidities, including sleep studies. Biological parameters included a complete lipid profile and inflammatory markers.In COPD patients the prevalence of steatosis, NASH and fibrosis were 41.4%, 36.9% and 61.3%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, SteatoTest and FibroTest were significantly associated with sex, body mass index (BMI), untreated sleep apnoea and insulin resistance, and, in addition, COPD Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stage for SteatoTest. Patients with steatosis had higher tumour necrosis factor-α levels and those with NASH or a combination of liver damage types had raised leptin levels after adjustment for age, sex and BMI.We concluded that NAFLD is highly prevalent in COPD and might contribute to cardiometabolic comorbidities. Copyright ©ERS 2017.

  8. Long term prognosis of fatty liver: risk of chronic liver disease and death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam-Larsen, S; Franzmann, M; Andersen, I B

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Fatty liver is a common histological finding in human liver biopsy specimens. It affects 10-24% of the general population and is believed to be a marker of risk of later chronic liver disease. The present study examined the risk of development of cirrhotic liver disease...... and the risk of death in a cohort diagnosed with pure fatty liver without inflammation. METHODS: A total of 215 patients who had a liver biopsy performed during the period 1976-1987 were included in the study. The population consisted of 109 non-alcoholic and 106 alcoholic fatty liver patients. Median follow...... of Patients and the nationwide Registry of Causes of Death, and all admissions, discharge diagnoses, and causes of death were obtained. RESULTS: In the non-alcoholic fatty liver group, one patient developed cirrhosis during the follow up period compared with 22 patients in the alcoholic group. Survival...

  9. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: one entity, multiple impacts on liver health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierbinteanu-Braticevici, Carmen; Sinescu, Crina; Moldoveanu, Alexandru; Petrisor, Ana; Diaconu, Sorina; Cretoiu, Dragos; Braticevici, Bogdan

    2017-02-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is very prevalent and now considered the most common cause of chronic liver disease. Staging the severity of liver damage is very important because the prognosis of NAFLD is highly variable. The long-term prognosis of patients with NAFLD remains incompletely elucidated. Even though the annual fibrosis progression rate is significantly higher in patients with nonalcoholic hepatitis (NASH), both types of NAFLD (nonalcoholic fatty liver and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis) can lead to fibrosis. The risk for progressive liver damage and poor outcomes is assessed by staging the severity of liver injury and liver fibrosis. Algorithms (scores) that incorporate various standard clinical and laboratory parameters alongside imaging-based approaches that assess liver stiffness are helpful in predicting advanced fibrosis.

  10. The Gut Microbiota, Tumorigenesis, and Liver Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guishuai Lv

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, diseases concerning the gut microbiota have presented some of the most serious public health problems worldwide. The human host’s physiological status is influenced by the intestinal microbiome, thus integrating external factors, such as diet, with genetic and immune signals. The notion that chronic inflammation drives carcinogenesis has been widely established for various tissues. It is surprising that the role of the microbiota in tumorigenesis has only recently been recognized, given that the presence of bacteria at tumor sites was first described more than a century ago. Extensive epidemiological studies have revealed that there is a strong link between the gut microbiota and some common cancers. However, the exact molecular mechanisms linking the gut microbiota and cancer are not yet fully understood. Changes to the gut microbiota are instrumental in determining the occurrence and progression of hepatocarcinoma, chronic liver diseases related to alcohol, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, and cirrhosis. To be specific, the gut milieu may play an important role in systemic inflammation, endotoxemia, and vasodilation, which leads to complications such as spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and hepatic encephalopathy. Relevant animal studies involving gut microbiota manipulations, combined with observational studies on patients with NAFLD, have provided ample evidence pointing to the contribution of dysbiosis to the pathogenesis of NAFLD. Given the poor prognosis of these clinical events, their prevention and early management are essential. Studies of the composition and function of the gut microbiota could shed some light on understanding the prognosis because the microbiota serves as an essential component of the gut milieu that can impact the aforementioned clinical events. As far as disease management is concerned, probiotics may provide a novel direction for therapeutics for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC and NAFLD

  11. Role of liver immunological inflammation in development and progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHU Juanjuan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is a common liver disease in clinical practice and has a complex pathogenesis. At present, the "two- or three-hit" theory is still widely acknowledged as the major pathogenesis of NAFLD. However, in recent years, the role of liver immunological inflammation in the development and progression of NAFLD has been taken more and more seriously. This article elaborates on the mechanism of liver immunological inflammation in the development and progression of NAFLD from the perspective of liver immunological inflammation.

  12. Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ur Rahman, Zia; Hurairah, Abu

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to study nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) as a relevant risk factor associated with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with and without cirrhosis. HCC is a common cancer worldwide that predominantly involves patients with hepatic cirrhosis. HCC has recently been linked to NAFLD, the hepatic manifestation of obesity and related metabolic disorders. This association is alarming due to the high prevalence of NAFLD globally, which may contribute to the rising incidence of HCC. A 31-year-old female with a history of dyslipidemia, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus presented with abdominal pain that persisted for six months. The pain was associated with gastrointestinal symptoms and weight loss. She was drug-free and a nonalcoholic and a nonsmoker. The physical examination was unremarkable. The abdominal exam showed a soft and non-tender abdomen, with no organomegaly or ascites. The laboratory evaluation was unremarkable. The imaging studies showed a hypodense lesion in the right hepatic lobe with strong arterial enhancement. Subsequently, the patient underwent a liver biopsy. The histopathology results were consistent with HCC. The patient underwent an uneventful segment VI liver resection and tumor-free margins were achieved. In our patient, NAFLD was designated as an independent etiology for HCC, without cirrhosis. Our patient recovered well and has been disease free for over a year. HCC may complicate non-cirrhotic NAFLD with mild or absent fibrosis, greatly expanding the population potentially at higher risk of HCC. These results provide new targets for surveillance, prevention, early recognition, and effective treatment of HCC associated with NAFLD. PMID:27733959

  13. Efficacy of Patient Selection for Diagnostic Coronary Angiography in Suspected Coronary Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Flávio Costa Filho

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground:Guidelines recommend that in suspected stable coronary artery disease (CAD, a clinical (non-invasive evaluation should be performed before coronary angiography.Objective:We assessed the efficacy of patient selection for coronary angiography in suspected stable CAD.Methods:We prospectively selected consecutive patients without known CAD, referred to a high-volume tertiary center. Demographic characteristics, risk factors, symptoms and non-invasive test results were correlated to the presence of obstructive CAD. We estimated the CAD probability based on available clinical data and the incremental diagnostic value of previous non-invasive tests.Results:A total of 830 patients were included; median age was 61 years, 49.3% were males, 81% had hypertension and 35.5% were diabetics. Non-invasive tests were performed in 64.8% of the patients. At coronary angiography, 23.8% of the patients had obstructive CAD. The independent predictors for obstructive CAD were: male gender (odds ratio [OR], 3.95; confidence interval [CI] 95%, 2.70 - 5.77, age (OR for 5 years increment, 1.15; CI 95%, 1.06 - 1.26, diabetes (OR, 2.01; CI 95%, 1.40 - 2.90, dyslipidemia (OR, 2.02; CI 95%, 1.32 - 3.07, typical angina (OR, 2.92; CI 95%, 1.77 - 4.83 and previous non-invasive test (OR 1.54; CI 95% 1.05 - 2.27.Conclusions:In this study, less than a quarter of the patients referred for coronary angiography with suspected CAD had the diagnosis confirmed. A better clinical and non-invasive assessment is necessary, to improve the efficacy of patient selection for coronary angiography.

  14. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in HIV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macías, Juan; Pineda, Juan A; Real, Luis M

    2017-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is one of the most frequent chronic hepatic conditions worldwide. The spectrum of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease goes from hepatic steatosis to steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Risk factors for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease are metabolic, mainly obesity and the accompanying consequences. Treatment and prevention of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease should target those metabolic abnormalities. The frequency of and the factors associated with hepatic steatosis in HIV infection seem to be similar to those reported in the general population, though direct comparisons are lacking. Hepatic steatosis in HIV infection may also be secondary to antiretroviral drugs or HCV-related factors in HCV-coinfected subjects. However, more recent data suggest that hepatic steatosis in HIV infection represents true non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. As such, management of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in HIV infection should follow the same principles as in the general population.

  15. Pharmacological management of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barb, Diana; Portillo-Sanchez, Paola; Cusi, Kenneth

    2016-08-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) affects one-third of the population and two-thirds of patients with obesity or type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Its more aggressive form is known as nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and is characterized by hepatocyte necrosis, inflammation and often fibrosis. The presence of fibrosis indicates a more aggressive course and may lead to cirrhosis. Premature mortality in NASH is related to both hepatic (cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma) and extra-hepatic complications, largely cardiovascular disease (CVD). Many therapeutic agents have been tested, but still none approved specifically for NASH. Treatment of NAFLD includes aggressive management of diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors, although the role of controlling hyperglycemia per se in patients with T2DM and NASH remains unknown. Agents tested with some success in non-diabetic patients with NASH include pioglitazone, liraglutide, vitamin E and to a lesser degree, pentoxiphylline. In patients with T2DM and NASH only pioglitazone has shown to significantly improve liver histology, with only a handful of patients with diabetes having been studied with other modalities. This review focuses on available agents for NASH to assist clinicians in the management of these complex patients. Many novel compounds are being studied and will likely make combination therapy for NASH a reality in the future. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Management of liver disease in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladep, Nimzing G; Taylor-Robinson, Simon D

    2007-10-01

    Nigeria is the most populous country in Africa but, despite extensive oil deposits, little of the country's recently found wealth has filtered through into the healthcare sector. Nigerian hospitals are poorly equipped and infrastructure for interventional procedures is mostly lacking. Liver disease is common, owing to the high prevalence of hepatitis B and hepatitis C, which often coexist with HIV infection. Antiviral treatments are expensive and drugs are commonly unavailable, even if they can be afforded. Therapy for end-stage liver disease is difficult, since endoscopic services are not widespread. A new training programme for oesophageal variceal band ligation at Jos University Teaching Hospital, Central Nigeria, aided by educational bursaries from the Royal College of Physicians, however, provides some promise in improving healthcare standards. The work of agencies, such as the Tropical Health and Educational Trust has fostered direct one-to-one links between UK hospitals and healthcare workers in a variety of African countries and offers a model for future development, albeit on a local, rather than a national or international, basis.

  17. Evaluation and Management of the Patient With Suspected Inflammatory Spine Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Vibeke; Singh, Jasvinder A

    2017-04-01

    Axial spondyloarthritis (AxSpA) is a chronic inflammatory rheumatic disease characterized by inflammatory back pain (IBP) that manifests in childhood, late adolescence, or early adulthood. Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and nonradiographic AxSpA represent 2 ends of the AxSpA spectrum. Diagnosis can be challenging because patients develop IBP that may not be associated with radiographic changes in the sacroiliac joints. Patients early in the course of disease are estimated to have at least the same level of disease activity and pain as patients with established disease; thus, they could benefit substantially from earlier diagnosis. Although the recent use of magnetic resonance imaging and its inclusion in diagnostic criteria has enhanced the identification of early AxSpA, improvement in early diagnosis has not been consistently reported across all studies. Limited knowledge of the continuum of AxSpA disease manifestations and lack of recognition of IBP in primary practice may contribute to this. Implementing a referral strategy that identifies patients with IBP for additional testing and assessment may lead to better recognition of early signs and symptoms of AxSpA, thereby offering the potential for improved patient outcomes. This review presents an overview of the epidemiology, clinical characteristics, and burdens of AxSpA, followed by a case presentation outlining approaches to the evaluation and management of a patient with suspected inflammatory spine disease. Copyright © 2016 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Liver Disorders in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Uko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Disorders of the hepatobiliary system are relatively common extraintestinal manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. These disorders are sometimes due to a shared pathogenesis with IBD as seen in primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC and small-duct primary sclerosing cholangitis (small-duct PSC. There are also hepatobiliary manifestations such as cholelithiasis and portal vein thrombosis that occur due to the effects of chronic inflammation and the severity of bowel disease. Lastly, medications used in IBD such as sulfasalazine, thiopurines, and methotrexate can adversely affect the liver. It is important to be cognizant of these disorders as some do have serious long-term consequences. The management of these disorders often requires the expertise of multidisciplinary teams to achieve the best outcomes.

  19. Anesthetic Management for Prolonged Incidental Surgery in Advanced Liver Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kundu, Riddhi; Subramaniam, Rajeshwari; Sardar, Arijit

    2017-01-01

    In spite of advances in perioperative management, operative procedures in patients with chronic liver disease pose a significant challenge for the anesthesiologist due to multisystem involvement, high risk of postoperative hepatic decompensation, and mortality. We describe the anesthetic management of an elderly patient with advanced liver disease (model for end-stage liver disease 16) for prolonged abdominal surgery. The use of invasive hemodynamic monitoring, point-of-care biochemical, and ...

  20. Role of Th17 cells in common liver diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WEI Linlin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, it has been found that T helper type 17 (Th17 cells are a new subset of CD4+ Th cells. Th17 cells play an important role in the onset and development of many liver diseases and have become the research focus in immunology. This paper summarizes the studies on the relationship between Th17 cells and various liver diseases in order to provide a new idea for the study and treatment of liver diseases.

  1. Markers of autoimmune liver diseases in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis

    OpenAIRE

    Umit Secil Demirdal; Ihsan Hakkı Ciftci; Vural Kavuncu

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Osteoporosis is a common complication of chronic liver diseases. However, there is limited information about autoimmune liver diseases as a factor of secondary osteoporosis. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the autoantibodies of autoimmune liver diseases in patients with osteoporosis. METHODS: One hundred fifty female patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis were included. Bone mineral density was measured by dual energy X?ray absorptiometry. We analysized autoantibodies incl...

  2. Mitochondrial alterations in children with chronic liver disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rabah M. Shawky

    mitochondrial DNA) have been identified, with the promise of genetic and prenatal diagnosis [5]. Studies assessing mito- chondrial function and structure in livers from humans with chronic liver disease, including liver cirrhosis, revealed a variety of alterations in comparison with normal subjects. Depending on the aetiology ...

  3. Polycystic liver disease: ductal plate malformation and the primary cilium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wills, E.S.; Roepman, R.; Drenth, J.P.H.

    2014-01-01

    Polycystic livers are found in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), caused by polycystic kidney disease (PKD)1 and PKD2 mutations in virtually all cases, and in isolated polycystic liver disease (PCLD), where 20% of cases are caused by mutations in Protein kinase C substrate 80K-H

  4. Exercise manual for liver disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limongi, Vivian; Dos Santos, Daniele Costa; de Oliveira da Silva, Aurea Maria; Boin, Ilka de Fátima Santana Ferreira; Stucchi, Raquel Silveira Bello

    2016-06-24

    To increase inspiratory muscle strength and improve the quality of life of candidates for liver transplantation. Twenty-three candidates for liver transplantation participated in the control group and 14 made up the intervention group. The control group consisted of 18 men and 5 women, body mass index (BMI) 27.3 ± 4.5 kg/m(2) and Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) 18.2 ± 6.1. The intervention group consisted of 11 men and 3 women, BMI 28.6 ± 5.4 kg/m(2) and MELD 18 ± 4.5. The presence or absence of ascites was identified in the first patient evaluation and after three months. We evaluated maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) and maximal expiratory pressure, spirometry, root mean square (RMS) of diaphragm and rectus abdominis, and the quality of life. The exercises were performed daily by patients at home for three months and were supervised at distance monthly. The manual consisted of diaphragmatic breathing exercises, diaphragmatic isometric exercise, Threshold IMT(®), lifting upper limbs with a bat and strengthening the abdomen. There was significant difference (P = 0.01) between the first (initial) and the third month (final) MIP in the control group and in the intervention group, but there was no difference (P = 0.45) between the groups. The RMS of the diaphragm was lower (P = 0.001) and the functional capacity was higher (P = 0.006) in the intervention group compared to the control. The general health and mental health domains received higher scores after three months in the control group (P = 0.01) and the intervention group (P = 0.004), but there was no significant difference between them. The comparison between the presence of initial ascites with the presence of ascites was performed after three months in the control group (P = 0.083) and intervention group (P = 0.31). There was no significant difference, in relation to the presence of ascites after three months between groups (P = 0.21). In the intervention group, patients with ascites at the end

  5. The Role of Oxidative Stress and Antioxidants in Liver Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sha; Tan, Hor-Yue; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Zhang-Jin; Lao, Lixing; Wong, Chi-Woon; Feng, Yibin

    2015-01-01

    A complex antioxidant system has been developed in mammals to relieve oxidative stress. However, excessive reactive species derived from oxygen and nitrogen may still lead to oxidative damage to tissue and organs. Oxidative stress has been considered as a conjoint pathological mechanism, and it contributes to initiation and progression of liver injury. A lot of risk factors, including alcohol, drugs, environmental pollutants and irradiation, may induce oxidative stress in liver, which in turn results in severe liver diseases, such as alcoholic liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Application of antioxidants signifies a rational curative strategy to prevent and cure liver diseases involving oxidative stress. Although conclusions drawn from clinical studies remain uncertain, animal studies have revealed the promising in vivo therapeutic effect of antioxidants on liver diseases. Natural antioxidants contained in edible or medicinal plants often possess strong antioxidant and free radical scavenging abilities as well as anti-inflammatory action, which are also supposed to be the basis of other bioactivities and health benefits. In this review, PubMed was extensively searched for literature research. The keywords for searching oxidative stress were free radicals, reactive oxygen, nitrogen species, anti-oxidative therapy, Chinese medicines, natural products, antioxidants and liver diseases. The literature, including ours, with studies on oxidative stress and anti-oxidative therapy in liver diseases were the focus. Various factors that cause oxidative stress in liver and effects of antioxidants in the prevention and treatment of liver diseases were summarized, questioned, and discussed. PMID:26540040

  6. The Role of Oxidative Stress and Antioxidants in Liver Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sha; Tan, Hor-Yue; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Zhang-Jin; Lao, Lixing; Wong, Chi-Woon; Feng, Yibin

    2015-11-02

    A complex antioxidant system has been developed in mammals to relieve oxidative stress. However, excessive reactive species derived from oxygen and nitrogen may still lead to oxidative damage to tissue and organs. Oxidative stress has been considered as a conjoint pathological mechanism, and it contributes to initiation and progression of liver injury. A lot of risk factors, including alcohol, drugs, environmental pollutants and irradiation, may induce oxidative stress in liver, which in turn results in severe liver diseases, such as alcoholic liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Application of antioxidants signifies a rational curative strategy to prevent and cure liver diseases involving oxidative stress. Although conclusions drawn from clinical studies remain uncertain, animal studies have revealed the promising in vivo therapeutic effect of antioxidants on liver diseases. Natural antioxidants contained in edible or medicinal plants often possess strong antioxidant and free radical scavenging abilities as well as anti-inflammatory action, which are also supposed to be the basis of other bioactivities and health benefits. In this review, PubMed was extensively searched for literature research. The keywords for searching oxidative stress were free radicals, reactive oxygen, nitrogen species, anti-oxidative therapy, Chinese medicines, natural products, antioxidants and liver diseases. The literature, including ours, with studies on oxidative stress and anti-oxidative therapy in liver diseases were the focus. Various factors that cause oxidative stress in liver and effects of antioxidants in the prevention and treatment of liver diseases were summarized, questioned, and discussed.

  7. The Role of Oxidative Stress and Antioxidants in Liver Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sha Li

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A complex antioxidant system has been developed in mammals to relieve oxidative stress. However, excessive reactive species derived from oxygen and nitrogen may still lead to oxidative damage to tissue and organs. Oxidative stress has been considered as a conjoint pathological mechanism, and it contributes to initiation and progression of liver injury. A lot of risk factors, including alcohol, drugs, environmental pollutants and irradiation, may induce oxidative stress in liver, which in turn results in severe liver diseases, such as alcoholic liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Application of antioxidants signifies a rational curative strategy to prevent and cure liver diseases involving oxidative stress. Although conclusions drawn from clinical studies remain uncertain, animal studies have revealed the promising in vivo therapeutic effect of antioxidants on liver diseases. Natural antioxidants contained in edible or medicinal plants often possess strong antioxidant and free radical scavenging abilities as well as anti-inflammatory action, which are also supposed to be the basis of other bioactivities and health benefits. In this review, PubMed was extensively searched for literature research. The keywords for searching oxidative stress were free radicals, reactive oxygen, nitrogen species, anti-oxidative therapy, Chinese medicines, natural products, antioxidants and liver diseases. The literature, including ours, with studies on oxidative stress and anti-oxidative therapy in liver diseases were the focus. Various factors that cause oxidative stress in liver and effects of antioxidants in the prevention and treatment of liver diseases were summarized, questioned, and discussed.

  8. Contrast-enhanced Ultrasound for Non-tumor Liver Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Maruyama

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS is a simple, safe and reliable technique for the clinical management of patients with various liver diseases. Although the major target of the technique may be focal hepatic lesions, it is also effective for the diagnosis of non-tumor liver diseases, such as grading hepatic fibrosis, characterization of chronic liver diseases and diagnosis of portal vein thrombosis. This review article aimed to overview the recent application of CEUS in the assessment of non-tumor liver diseases. Keywords: Cirrhosis, contrast agent, fibrosis, idiopathic portal hypertension, microbubble, portal vein thrombosis, ultrasound.

  9. Management of Suspected Pemphigus Vulgaris in Elderly Patient with Chronic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayu M. Prihanti

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available 72 1024x768 Pemphigus vulgaris (PV is a group of vesicobullous disease affecting skin and mucous membranes. PV is associated with autoimmune diseases, characterized by binding of IgG autoantibodies to desmoglein 3. PV lesion is a thin-walled bulla arising on the skin or mucosa. Oral mucous bulla are fragile and easily breakdown, forming irreguler ulcers. There are several factors that trigger PV, including genetic factors, age, drugs and food. This paper aimed to report treatment of suspected pemphigus vulgaris in elderly patient with history of chronic diseases. A 75-year-old woman with 2 months history of bulla formation on skin and history of persistent oral ulceration. Ulcers were covered with fibrin and erosive erythematous on labial, buccal and gingival mucosa. History of hypertension, diabetes mellitus and hepatitis was revealed. Routine complete blood count showed thrombocytopenia. Diagnosis was confirmed by anamnesis, clinical examination and complete blood investigation. PV should be distinguished from other vesicobullous disease. Systemic corticosteroid was given concurrently with hepato-protector, mouthwash, supportive therapy and topical lip cream. Bulla on skin and persistent erosive ulcers of the oral mucosa are the manifestations of PV. Elderly patient with history of chronic diseases showed a complex care of PV requiring more intensive and comprehensive treatment.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v20i1.129

  10. Can ultrasound be used as the primary imaging in children with suspected Crohn disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Timothy L; Marine, Megan B; Wanner, Matthew R; Cooper, Matthew L; Steiner, Steven J; Ouyang, Fangqian; Gregory Jennings, S; Karmazyn, Boaz

    2017-07-01

    There is growing literature on the use of ultrasound (US) for evaluation of Crohn disease in adults, but few studies have been conducted on children. Several studies demonstrated high accuracy of US in the diagnosis of Crohn disease. Using US as the primary screening imaging modality for Crohn disease can reduce health care costs, the need for sedation and ionizing radiation exposure. The aim of our study is to determine if US can be used for screening evaluation of pediatric Crohn disease. A prospective cohort study of pediatric patients undergoing MR enterography (MRE) for suspected or known history of Crohn disease was performed, with gray-scale and Doppler US of the terminal ileum done immediately before or after MRE. US images were interpreted by two radiologists (Reader 1 and Reader 2) not involved in image acquisition, in blinded and randomized fashion. US findings of Crohn disease including bowel wall thickening, wall stratification, increased vascularity on Doppler, lymphadenopathy, fat infiltration and extraintestinal complications were evaluated. MRE findings of terminal ileitis were considered the reference standard. Demographic data, body mass index (BMI), symptoms, and laboratory, endoscopic and histopathological data were obtained from electronic medical records. Forty-one patients (mean age: 13.7 years: 4.6-18.9 years) were evaluated. Mean BMI was 21.2 (range: 13-40.2); 10 patients (24.3%) were either overweight or obese. Final diagnoses were Crohn disease (n=24), ulcerative colitis (n=4) and normal/non-inflammatory bowel disease-related diagnoses (n=13). US demonstrated sensitivity of 67% and 78% and specificity of 78% and 83%, by Reader 1 and Reader 2, respectively. MRE sensitivity and specificity were 75% and 100%, respectively, compared to final clinicopathological diagnosis. Interobserver agreement between Reader 1 and Reader 2 was good (0.6Crohn disease in children, US has limited sensitivity for detecting terminal ileitis.

  11. Toll-Like Receptor 3 in Liver Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Yin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3 is a member of the TLR family that can recognize double-stranded RNA (dsRNA, playing an important role in antiviral immunity. Recent studies have shown that TLR3 is also expressed on parenchymal and nonparenchymal cells in the liver as well as on several types of immune cells. In this review, we summarize the role of TLR3 in liver injury, inflammation, regeneration, and liver fibrosis, and discuss the implication of TLR3 in the pathogenesis of human liver diseases including viral hepatitis and autoimmune liver disease.

  12. Fibrosis in nonalcoholic Fatty liver disease: mechanisms and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo, Paul; Machado, Mariana Verdelho; Diehl, Anna Mae

    2015-05-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is tightly associated with obesity and the metabolic syndrome in the United States and other Western countries. It is also the liver disease most rapidly increasing in prevalence in the United States, and has become a major indication for liver transplantation worldwide. Compelling evidence shows that the degree of liver fibrosis dictates liver prognosis in NAFLD. This review focuses on fibrosis based on clinical and basic perspectives. The authors summarize the physiopathology of fibrosis development and progression in NAFLD, highlighting its molecular mechanisms, clinical consequences of fibrosis, the diagnostic approach and management strategies. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  13. Cardiovascular Dysfunction in Patients with End-stage Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merceds Susan Mandell

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Most patients with advanced liver disease have a normal or even supernormal ejection fraction judged by echocardiogra-phy. Thus, physicians previously assumed that cardiac function was normal in most patients with liver disease. However, further investigation has uncovered multiple problems in cardiac performance that place patients at risk of heart failure. Patients with liver disease have defects in both systolic and diastolic function that only become obvious with physiologic stress such as liver transplantation. In addition there are additional defects in the electromechanical coupling of the heart that can have significant clinical consequences. These collective pathologic changes are termed “cirrhotic cardiomyopathy” and occur to some degree in all patients with liver disease. This review will explore the pathophysiology of cardiovascular changes in patients with end-stage liver disease.

  14. [Gastrointestinal surgery and gastroenterology. XV. Polycystic liver disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssens, A R; Janssen, M J F M

    2002-05-11

    Polycystic liver disease is a congenital disorder with an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. There are two variants. In one, liver cysts occur as an extra-renal phenomenon in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. In the other, the disease is not associated with renal pathology. The cysts have to reach a certain diameter before becoming clinically manifest and therefore are generally only detected many years after birth. Polycystic liver disease causes symptoms in 20% of the patients. These symptoms are the consequence of the weight and size of the liver or of complications such as abscess formation, obstructive jaundice or the Budd-Chiari syndrome. Most symptoms can be treated at least temporarily by fenestration of the larger cysts and resection of parts of the liver, which are affected by large groups of small cysts. A permanent cure of the disease is only obtained by liver transplantation.

  15. Gut-Liver Axis, Nutrition, and Non Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kirpich, Irina A.; Marsano, Luis S.; McClain, Craig J.

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) represents a spectrum of diseases involving hepatic fat accumulation, inflammation with the potential progression to fibrosis and cirrhosis over time. NAFLD is often associated with obesity, insulin resistance, and diabetes. The interactions between the liver and the gut, the so-called ”gut-liver axis”, play a critical role in NAFLD onset and progression. Compelling evidence links the gut microbiome, intestinal barrier integrity, and NAFLD. The dietary...

  16. Hotspots in clinical management of severe liver diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LYU Jiayu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Severe liver diseases such as liver failure and acute decompensated cirrhosis have critical conditions and high mortality rates, and the prognosis of such patients is closely associated with early warning, timely dynamic assessment, and comprehensive and effective therapy. The patients require a series of effective clinical management measures for elimination of causative factors, organ support, and prevention and treatment of complications. Medical treatment-artificial liver-liver transplantation is an important modality for severe liver diseases. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, stem cell therapy, and bioartificial liver have a promising future, while there are still controversies over non-selective β-blocker. This article reviews the hotspots in the clinical management of severe liver diseases.

  17. Novel plasma biomarkers associated with liver disease severity in adults with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajmera, Veeral; Perito, Emily R; Bass, Nathan M; Terrault, Norah A; Yates, Katherine P; Gill, Ryan; Loomba, Rohit; Diehl, Anna Mae; Aouizerat, Bradley E

    2017-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), therapeutic options and noninvasive markers of disease activity and severity remain limited. We investigated the association between plasma biomarkers and liver histology in order to identify markers of disease activity and severity in patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD. Thirty-two plasma biomarkers chosen a priori as possible discriminators of NAFLD were measured in participants enrolled in the Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH) Clinical Research Network. Dichotomized histologic outcomes were evaluated using centrally read biopsies. Biomarkers with statistically significant associations with NAFLD histology were evaluated in multivariable models adjusted for clinical factors. Of 648 participants (74.4% white, 61.7% female, mean age 47.7 years), 58.0% had definite NASH, 55.5% had mild/no fibrosis (stage 0-1), and 44.4% had significant fibrosis (stage 2-4). Increased activated plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 had a strong association with definite NASH compared to not NASH or borderline NASH in multivariable analysis (odds ratio = 1.20, 95% confidence interval 1.08-1.34, P disease activity and severity of fibrosis in NAFLD and are potentially valuable tools for noninvasive stratification of patients with NAFLD and identification of targets for therapeutic intervention. (Hepatology 2017;65:65-77). © 2016 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  18. ANALYTICAL JUSTIFICATION OF INCLUDING THE ANTIVIRAL DRUG INTO TREATMENT SCHEME FOR PATIENTS WITH SUSPECTED VIRAL DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soloviov S. O

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Viruses play a leading role in human pathology development, causing a large number of infectious diseases in acute, persistent or chronic forms. Although the number of deaths caused by viral infections have decreased significantly today, they continue to be a significant factor in reducing of the population overall productivity. Viral diseases cause additional losses in community related to the duration of the course or disease or its chronization, increased use of health care, loss of working hours, premature death etc. Introduction of the new antiviral drugs into medical practice is accompanied by the emergence of questions to assess its effectiveness and including into existing clinical protocols. So the aim of this work is the development of methodology of choosing and justification of optimal treatment strategy for viral diseases that could be included into certain clinical protocols for managing patients with certain viral diseases. Methodology justification: The methodology based on the method of pharmacoeconomic analysis "cost of illness", takes into account the economic burden of viral diseases: direct costs for treating of disease, indirect costs related to the disease and intangible costs. Algorithm of treatment scheme choice depends on the cost of treatment for the patient without viral disease also as for patient with viral disease. It was proposed to use lower limit priori probability (critical prevalence of viral disease as decision rule in the choice of treatment scheme. Results: Examples of the proposed methodology use show that the choice of the optimal therapeutic scheme for patients with suspected viral disease depends on the current prevalence of this disease among patients with similar clinical symptoms of the disease and its cost, depending on the chosen strategy of therapy. The proposed methodology determines the critical level of viral infection prevalence, which comparing to the current prevalence level is

  19. Retinoids and their target genes in liver functions and diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiota, Goshi; Kanki, Keita

    2013-08-01

    Retinoids have been reported to prevent several kinds of cancers, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Retinoic acid (RA) coupled with retinoic acid receptor/retinoid X receptor heterodimer exerts its functions by regulating its target genes. We previously reported that transgenic mice, in which RA signaling is suppressed in a hepatocyte-specific manner, developed liver cancer at a high rate, and that disruption of RA functions led to the increased oxidative stress via aberrant metabolisms of lipid and iron, indicating that retinoids play an important role in liver pathophysiology. These data suggest that exploring the metabolism of retinoids in liver diseases and their target genes provides us with useful information to understand the liver functions and diseases. Consequently, the altered metabolism of retinoids was observed in liver diseases, including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. In this review, we summarize the metabolism of retinoids in the liver, highlight the functions of retinoids in HCC, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and alcoholic liver disease, and discuss the target genes of RA. Investigation of retinoids in the liver will likely help us identify novel therapies and diagnostic modalities for HCC. © 2013 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. Liver diseases in pregnancy: Diseases not unique to pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almashhrawi, Ashraf A; Ahmed, Khulood T; Rahman, Rubayat N; Hammoud, Ghassan M; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2013-01-01

    Pregnancy is a special clinical state with several normal physiological changes that influence body organs including the liver. Liver disease can cause significant morbidity and mortality in both pregnant women and their infants. Few challenges arise in reaching an accurate diagnosis in light of such physiological changes. Laboratory test results should be carefully interpreted and the knowledge of what normal changes to expect is prudent to avoid clinical misjudgment. Other challenges entail the methods of treatment and their safety for both the mother and the baby. This review summarizes liver diseases that are not unique to pregnancy. We focus on viral hepatitis and its mode of transmission, diagnosis, effect on the pregnancy, the mother, the infant, treatment, and breast-feeding. Autoimmune hepatitis, primary biliary cirrhosis, primary sclerosing cholangitis, Wilson’s disease, Budd Chiari and portal vein thrombosis in pregnancy are also discussed. Pregnancy is rare in patients with cirrhosis because of the metabolic and hormonal changes associated with cirrhosis. Variceal bleeding can happen in up to 38% of cirrhotic pregnant women. Management of portal hypertension during pregnancy is discussed. Pregnancy increases the pathogenicity leading to an increase in the rate of gallstones. We discuss some of the interventions for gallstones in pregnancy if symptoms arise. Finally, we provide an overview of some of the options in managing hepatic adenomas and hepatocellular carcinoma during pregnancy. PMID:24282352

  1. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Liangping

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available As the etiology of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC has been changing, the incidence of HCC related to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is gradually increasing in developed countries in Europe and America and some countries in Asia. This article introduces the close association between NAFLD and HCC, risk factors, clinicopathological features, and prevention and screening, and points out that although the incidence of NAFLD is not as high as that of hepatitis B- or hepatitis C-related HCC, there are a large absolute number of NAFLD patients, especially the high-risk patients with diabetes and obesity, or liver fibrosis/cirrhosis, due to a huge base number of NAFLD patients. NAFLD-related HCC is commonly seen in the elderly with various comorbidities and a poor prognosis. This article also points out that the prevention should focus on the effective treatment of NAFLD. The strict screening of high-risk population is the strategy for the diagnosis of early-stage HCC. At present, the sensitivity of alpha-fetoprotein is relatively low, and imaging examinations including computed tomography are the main screening methods; however, there are no measures for early warning of NAFLD-related HCC.

  2. Echocardiography in chronic liver disease: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Vitor Gomes; Markman Filho, Brivaldo

    2013-04-01

    Doppler echocardiography (Echo) is a non-invasive method of excellent accuracy to screen portopulmonary hypertension (PPH) and to assess intrapulmonary shunts (IPS) in chronic liver disease (CLD). In the past decade, Echo proved to play a fundamental role in the diagnosis of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy (CCM). To perform a systematic review of relevant articles on the subject 'Echo in CLD'. In November 2011, a systematic review was performed in the PubMed, LILACS and SciELO databases, and the characteristics of the studies selected were reported. The search based on descriptors and free terms obtained 204 articles (179 in Pubmed, 21 in LILACS, and 1 in SciELO). Of those 204 articles, 22 were selected for systematic review. A meta-analysis could not be performed because of the heterogeneity of the articles. Echo should be part of CLD stratification for screening PPH, IPS and CCM, because, most of the time, such complications are diagnosed only when patients are already waiting for a liver transplant.

  3. Donepezil decreases annual rate of hippocampal atrophy in suspected prodromal Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Bruno; Chupin, Marie; Hampel, Harald; Lista, Simone; Cavedo, Enrica; Croisile, Bernard; Louis Tisserand, Guy; Touchon, Jacques; Bonafe, Alain; Ousset, Pierre Jean; Ait Ameur, Amir; Rouaud, Olivier; Ricolfi, Fréderic; Vighetto, Alain; Pasquier, Florence; Delmaire, Christine; Ceccaldi, Mathieu; Girard, Nadine; Dufouil, Carole; Lehericy, Stéphane; Tonelli, Isabelle; Duveau, Françoise; Colliot, Olivier; Garnero, Line; Sarazin, Marie; Dormont, Didier

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to study the effect of donepezil on the rate of hippocampal atrophy in prodromal Alzheimer's disease (AD). A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled parallel group design using donepezil (10 mg/day) in subjects with suspected prodromal AD. Subjects underwent two brain magnetic resonance imaging scans (baseline and final visit). The primary efficacy outcome was the annualized percentage change (APC) of total hippocampal volume (left + right) measured by an automated segmentation method. Two-hundred and sixteen only subjects were randomized across 28 French expert clinical sites. In the per protocol population (placebo = 92 and donepezil = 82), the donepezil group exhibited a significant reduced rate of hippocampal atrophy (APC = -1.89%) compared with the placebo group (APC = -3.47%), P donepezil compared with placebo. Copyright © 2015 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A case suspected for yellow fever vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Pol, Eva M; Gisolf, Elizabeth H; Richter, Clemens

    2014-01-01

    Yellow fever (YF) 17D vaccine is one of the most successful vaccines ever developed. Since 2001, 56 cases of yellow fever vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease (YEL-AVD) have been published in the peer-reviewed literature. Here, we report a new case suspected for YEL-AVD in the Netherlands. Further research is needed to determine the true incidence of YEL-AVD and to clarify host and vaccine-associated factors in the pathogenesis of YEL-AVD. Because of the potential adverse events, healthcare providers should carefully consider vaccination only in people who are truly at risk for YF infection, especially in primary vaccine recipients. © 2014 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  5. Can Alcoholic Liver Disease and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Co-Exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Manu; Satsangi, Sandeep; Duseja, Ajay; Taneja, Sunil; Dhiman, Radha K; Chawla, Yogesh

    2017-06-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) by definition would require exclusion of significant alcohol intake. Present study was aimed to assess the prevalence of various components of metabolic syndrome (MS) in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis (AC) and to study the affect of its presence on the severity of liver disease, testing the hypothesis if alcoholic liver disease (ALD) and NAFLD could co-exist. In a retrospective analysis of 16 months data, 81 patients with AC were analysed for the prevalence of MS. The diagnosis of AC was based on the history of alcohol intake, clinical examination, serum biochemistry, hematological parameters, exclusion of other causes of chronic liver disease, imaging and upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Severity of liver disease was assessed by Child-Turcott-Pugh (CTP) score. MS was assessed as per the ATP III criteria and the affect of MS on CTP score was evaluated. All 81 patients with AC were male [mean age 50.9 ± 9.5, mean CTP score 8.38 ± 1.66]. But for three patients (3.7%) all other 78 patients (96.3%) with AC had at least one component of MS. Forty-three (53.0%) patients had full blown MS with three or more components of MS. Sixty-one (75.30%) patients were either overweight [22 (27.1%)] or obese [39 (48.1%)], with a mean BMI of 25.35 ± 3.86 kg/m2. Type II DM was present in 40 (25%) and 28 (34.5%) patients were hypertensive. Twenty-two (27.2%) patients had hypertriglyceridemia and 52 (64.2%) had low HDL. Eleven (13.6%) patients had Child's A cirrhosis, 46 (56.8%) had Child's B and 24 (29.6%) patients had Child's C cirrhosis. Even though not significant statistically, patients with Child's C cirrhosis (17, 70.83%) had higher presence of MS in comparison to Child's A (7, 63.6%) and B (19, 41.3%) cirrhosis. MS is common in patients with AC. Presence of MS may be contributing towards severity of liver disease in these patients indirectly suggesting the co-existence of ALD and NAFLD.

  6. Focused cardiac ultrasound (FOCUS) by emergency medicine residents in patients with suspected cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farsi, Davood; Hajsadeghi, Skokoufeh; Hajighanbari, Mohammad Javad; Mofidi, Mani; Hafezimoghadam, Peyman; Rezai, Mahdi; Mahshidfar, Babak; Abiri, Samaneh; Abbasi, Saeed

    2017-06-01

    Few studies have assessed the value and accuracy of focused cardiac ultrasound (FOCUS) performed by emergency physicians. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of FOCUS performed by emergency medicine residents compared to echocardiography performed by a cardiologist in emergency department (ED) patients suspected of cardiovascular disease. The research involved a prospective observational cross-sectional study enrolling patients over 18-years old suspected of having cardiovascular disease who required an echocardiograph. For each patient, a FOCUS test was conducted by a trained emergency medicine resident. The diagnostic accuracy of ED performed FOCUS was compared to echocardiography performed by a cardiologist (gold standard) in the ED. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and likelihood ratios were calculated for FOCUS. The agreement of EM residents and cardiologists on each finding was evaluated using Cohen's kappa coefficient with 95% CI. Two hundred and five patients, with a mean age of 61.0 ± 17 years (50% male), were included in this study. Agreement between FOCUS performed by an emergency medicine resident and echocardiography performed by a cardiologist in measuring ejection fraction of the left ventricle was 91% (κ = 0.85; 95% CI = 0.79-0.91). Reports of the two groups for identifying right ventricular enlargement showed 96% agreement (κ = 0.86; 95% CI = 0.82-0.90). The agreements for right ventricular pressure overload, wall motion abnormality and pericardial effusion were 100% (κ = 0.83; 95% CI = 0.77-0.89), 92% (κ = 0.83; 95% CI = 0.76-0.90), and 96% (κ = 0.83; 95% CI = 0.77-0.89), respectively. FOCUS performed by emergency medicine residents is comparable to echocardiography performed by cardiologists. Therefore, it could be a reliable tool and screening test for initial testing of patients suspected of cardiac abnormalities.

  7. Research progress in association between interleukin-23 and liver diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BAO Suxia

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin 23 (IL-23 is a recently discovered cytokine, and growing evidence suggests that IL-23 plays an important role in the development and progression of autoimmune diseases and inflammatory diseases. In recent years, certain research advances in association between IL-23 and liver diseases have been achieved at home and abroad. General features and biological characteristics of IL-23 are described, and its role in the development and progression of diseases such as hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and hepatocellular carcinoma is reviewed here, so that clinicians will have a deeper understanding of the effect of IL-23 in liver diseases and provide optimized therapies for patients with liver diseases.

  8. Assessment of Liver Fibrosis by Transient Elastography Should Be Done After Hemodialysis in End Stage Renal Disease Patients with Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taneja, Sunil; Borkakoty, Amritangsu; Rathi, Sahaj; Kumar, Vivek; Duseja, Ajay; Dhiman, Radha K; Gupta, Krishan L; Chawla, Yogesh

    2017-11-01

    The patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) are at greater risk of acquiring chronic hepatitis B or C and subsequently development of liver disease. The aim of the study was to assess liver fibrosis by transient elastography (TE) and look for factors associated with change in liver stiffness measurement (LSM) with one session of hemodialysis (HD). Consecutive ESRD patients on maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) with suspected liver disease were enrolled. They underwent LSM by TE before and after one session of HD. Bioelectric impedance analysis was done to evaluate the volume status at the time of TE. Sixty-eight patients with mean age of 40 ± 14 years were included. There was a significant reduction in LSM after HD (18.5 [95% CI 14.8-23.1] vs. 11.2 [95% CI 8.8-13.7] kPa, p  or  2.5 L (8.6 [95% CI 5.7-11.5] vs. 5.1 [95% CI 2.9-7.5], p = 0.05). In 18 patients who underwent liver biopsy, LSM after HD performed better at detecting significant fibrosis, with area under receiver operating characteristics curve 0.71 [95% CI 0.46-0.97], versus 0.64 [95% CI 0.38-0.90], respectively. An LSM value of 12.2 kPa after HD was 71% sensitive and 74% specific for detection of significant fibrosis (≥ F2), while values less than 9 kPa ruled out significant fibrosis with a sensitivity and specificity of 37 and 100%, respectively. LSM by TE decreases significantly after HD in patients with ESRD on long-term MHD. Hence, TE should be done after HD for accurate assessment of liver fibrosis.

  9. The emerging role of mast cells in liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarido, Veronica; Kennedy, Lindsey; Hargrove, Laura; Demieville, Jennifer; Thomson, Joanne; Stephenson, Kristen; Francis, Heather

    2017-08-01

    The depth of our knowledge regarding mast cells has widened exponentially in the last 20 years. Once thought to be only important for allergy-mediated events, mast cells are now recognized to be important regulators of a number of pathological processes. The revelation that mast cells can influence organs, tissues, and cells has increased interest in mast cell research during liver disease. The purpose of this review is to refresh the reader's knowledge of the development, type, and location of mast cells and to review recent work that demonstrates the role of hepatic mast cells during diseased states. This review focuses primarily on liver diseases and mast cells during autoimmune disease, hepatitis, fatty liver disease, liver cancer, and aging in the liver. Overall, these studies demonstrate the potential role of mast cells in disease progression.

  10. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: The diagnosis and management

    OpenAIRE

    Abd El-Kader, Shehab M; El-Den Ashmawy, Eman M Salah

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is now the most frequent chronic liver disease that occurs across all age groups and is recognized to occur in 14%-30% of the general population, representing a serious and growing clinical problem due to the growing prevalence of obesity and overweight. Histologically, it resembles alcoholic liver injury but occurs in patients who deny significant alcohol consumption. NAFLD encompasses a spectrum of conditions, ranging from benign hepatocellular stea...

  11. Liver diseases and aging : friends or foes?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sheedfar, Fareeba; Di Biase, Stefano; Koonen, Debby; Vinciguerra, Manlio

    2013-01-01

    The liver is the only internal human organ capable of natural regeneration of lost tissue, as little as 25% of a liver can regenerate into a whole liver. The process of aging predisposes to hepatic functional and structural impairment and metabolic risk. Therefore, understanding how aging could

  12. Autoantibodies in liver disease: important clues for the diagnosis, disease activity and prognosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Himoto, Takashi; Nishioka, Mikio

    2013-01-01

    .... However, these autoantibodies are present even in sera of patients with viral hepatitis, drug-induced hepatitis, alcoholic liver disease, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and hepatocelluar carcinoma...

  13. Transcranial Doppler Ultrasound Examination in Dogs with Suspected Intracranial Hypertension Caused by Neurologic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaoka, K; Nakamura, K; Osuga, T; Morita, T; Yokoyama, N; Morishita, K; Sasaki, N; Ohta, H; Takiguchi, M

    2017-12-19

    Transcranial Doppler ultrasound examination (TCD) is a rapid, noninvasive technique used to evaluate cerebral blood flow and is useful for the detection of intracranial hypertension in humans. However, the clinical usefulness of TCD in diagnosing intracranial hypertension has not been demonstrated for intracranial diseases in dogs. To determine the association between the TCD variables and intracranial hypertension in dogs with intracranial diseases. Fifty client-owned dogs with neurologic signs. Cross-sectional study. All dogs underwent TCD of the basilar artery under isoflurane anesthesia after magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Dogs were classified into 3 groups based on MRI findings: no structural diseases (group I), structural disease without MRI evidence of intracranial hypertension (group II), and structural disease with MRI evidence of intracranial hypertension (group III). The TCD vascular resistance variables (resistive index [RI], pulsatility index [PI], and the ratio of systolic to diastolic mean velocity [Sm/Dm]) were measured. Fifteen, 22, and 13 dogs were classified into groups I, II, and III, respectively. Dogs in group III had significantly higher Sm/Dm (median, 1.78; range, 1.44-2.58) than those in group I (median, 1.63; range, 1.43-1.75) and group II (median, 1.62; range, 1.27-2.10). No significant differences in RI and PI were identified among groups. Our findings suggest that increased Sm/Dm is associated with MRI findings of suspected intracranial hypertension in dogs with intracranial diseases and that TCD could be a useful tool to help to diagnose intracranial hypertension. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  14. The clinical role of stress myocardial perfusion imaging in women with suspected coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieres, Jennifer H; Rosman, David R; Shaw, Leslee J

    2004-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the number one cause of mortality for women in the United States, with coronary artery disease (CAD) accounting for 54% of all cardiovascular deaths. CAD claims the lives of more than 250,000 women each year and is therefore the single largest killer of American women. For several decades, the under-representation of women in clinical trials led to both a lack of available sex-specific evidence and a generalized misconception that CAD was a "man's disease." In actuality, not only are women vulnerable to CAD, they typically develop it 10 to 15 years later than men. Furthermore, sex differences exist in the mortality rates of women and men with CAD, such that once CAD is present in women, they have worse outcomes than their male counterparts. Consequently, early and accurate diagnosis of CAD is crucial for reducing mortality rates in women. Stress myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) using contemporary techniques has been shown to have significant value in the diagnosis and prognosis of CAD in women. In the risk assessment of women with an intermediate clinical pretest likelihood of CAD, using MPI with exercise or pharmacologic stress has been shown to add incremental value to clinical variables or exercise electrocardiogram stress testing alone. This review discusses the clinical role of stress MPI in the management of women with suspected CAD.

  15. Intereye asymmetry in bilateral keratoconus, keratoconus suspect and normal eyes and its relationship with disease severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naderan, Mohammad; Rajabi, Mohammad Taher; Zarrinbakhsh, Parviz

    2017-11-01

    To describe the intereye asymmetry in patients with keratoconus (KC), keratoconus suspect (KCS) and normal participants, and to evaluate the relationship between asymmetry and disease severity. In this prospective observational comparative study, 446 patients with bilateral KC, 68 patients with bilateral KCS and 306 normal participants underwent topographic, keratometric and pachymetric evaluations by Pentacam as well as refractive and visual acuity examinations. The intereye asymmetry in each parameter was calculated and compared between the groups. All parameters were significantly different between the worse and better eyes in the KC group (p0.05). There was a statistically significant greater intereye asymmetry in all parameters in the KC group compared with the KCS and normal groups (pKeratoconus Severity Score classification (p<0.05). According to receiver operating characteristic analysis, the intereye asymmetry would effectively discriminate KC and KCS from normal eyes. KC is an asymmetric disease, and the degree of asymmetry is associated with disease severity. The analysis of intereye asymmetry should be performed along with unilateral evaluation in the screening of KC. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. Diagnosis of alcohol misuse and alcoholic liver disease among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Among these, 46.8% acknowledged use of alcohol while 21% and 10% met the study definition of alcoholic misuse and alcoholic liver disease respectively. Both alcohol misuse and alcoholic liver disease was significantly associated (p-value ≤ 0.05) with male gender, region of origin, number of life time sexual partners ...

  17. Pattern of liver disease admissions in a Nigerian tertiary hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Liver disease is an important cause of morbidity and mortality globally. Its pattern varies in different geographical locations. This study aimed to determine the pattern and risk factors of liver disease in a Nigerian tertiary hospital. Study Design: Retrospective Study Site: University of Nigeria teaching hospital ...

  18. Congenital cystic disease of the liver in seven dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingh, T.S.G.A.M. van den; Rothuizen, J.

    1985-01-01

    Seven canine cases of cystic disease of the liver are described. They included 3 cases with solitary cysts, 3 with the adult type of polycystic disease of the liver and one with congenital dilatation of the bile ducts type V, i.e. fusiform dilatation of the intrahepatic and extrahepatic bile ducts.

  19. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: From patient to population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.M. Koehler (Edith)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractNon-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become the most common chronic liver disease in Western countries, in parallel with epidemics in obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. NAFLD comprises a wide range of histological findings, extending from simple steatosis to

  20. S-adenosyl-L-methionine for alcoholic liver diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rambaldi, A; Gluud, C

    2006-01-01

    Alcohol is a major cause of liver disease and disrupts methionine and oxidative balances. S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAMe) acts as a methyl donor for methylation reactions and participates in the synthesis of glutathione, the main cellular antioxidant. Randomised clinical trials have addressed...... the question whether SAMe may benefit patients with alcoholic liver diseases....

  1. Pattern of chronic liver disease in Omani children – A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pattern of chronic liver disease in Omani children – A clinicopathological review. ... West African Journal of Medicine ... 33F } aged 4 days to 10 years, referred to the Paediatric Gastroenterology clinic of the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Muscat, Oman, between 1995-2000 for evaluation of liver disease were studied.

  2. Chronic liver disease and hepatic encephalopathy: Clinical profile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The risk factors for liver disease included significant alcohol ingestion, hepatitis B virus infection, and previous jaundice, while other complications of liver disease noted were deepening jaundice, ascites, bleeding tendencies, and renal failure. The identified precipitants for HE were sepsis 6 (29%), electrolyte inbalance 3 ...

  3. Nutritional support of children with chronic liver disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In some children the liver disease requires specific nutritional therapy such as a galactose-free diet. However, even children with less severe liver disease require nutritional ..... and language therapist may be warranted. Conclusions. Malnutrition is an important complication of CLD in children. Survival and quality of life are ...

  4. Lessons from Epidemiology: The Burden of Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Ian A

    2017-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis is responsible for more than 1 million deaths annually and the majority of these deaths are preventable. There is marked geographical variation in rates of mortality due to cirrhosis, and this variation in liver disease burden exemplifies the links between population risks for liver disease and mortality. The differing geographical distribution of the major risks factors for the development of liver disease including alcohol consumption, hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, hepatitis B virus infection, and obesity and the metabolic syndrome has the potential to highlight opportunities for intervention, while the evolution of these risk factors provides insights into understanding the future burden of liver disease. This review focuses on the use of population data to identify high-risk areas and populations that would benefit from preventative interventions to reduce the mortality from liver disease. Specific strategies that are effective at the policy and public health levels are discussed to illustrate the impact these can have if widely implemented. The impact of therapies that have the potential to change the natural history of liver disease, including direct acting antivirals for HCV infection is also described. Finally, the challenges of describing the epidemiology of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease are highlighted to illustrate the need to understand the natural history of disease to inform and influence the development of novel therapies. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Pattern of liver diseases among children attending the National ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-08-05

    Aug 5, 2015 ... gence of non- alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) as the leading cause of chronic liver disease among chil- dren and adolescents in the United States. 12 In addition, emerging data suggest that children with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) progress to cirrhosis which may ultimately increase ...

  6. Depression and Chronic Liver Diseases: Are There Shared Underlying Mechanisms?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqin Huang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of depression is higher in patients with chronic liver disease (CLD than that in the general population. The mechanism described in previous studies mainly focused on inflammation and stress, which not only exists in CLD, but also emerges in common chronic diseases, leaving the specific mechanism unknown. This review was to summarize the prevalence and risk factors of depression in CLD including chronic hepatitis B, chronic hepatitis, alcoholic liver disease, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and to point out the possible underlying mechanism of this potential link. Clarifying the origins of this common comorbidity (depression and CLD may provide more information to understand both diseases.

  7. Liver imaging findings of Wilson's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akpinar, Erhan [Hacettepe University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 06100 Ankara (Turkey); Akhan, Okan [Hacettepe University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 06100 Ankara (Turkey)]. E-mail: akhano@tr.net

    2007-01-15

    Wilson's disease is a rare, autosomal-recessive inherited disorder of copper metabolism resulting in accumulation of copper in liver. The form of liver disease varies, depending on the severity of the disease at the time of diagnosis and pathological findings include fatty changes, acute hepatitis, chronic active hepatitis, cirrhosis and occasionally fulminant hepatic necrosis. Liver imaging findings reflect a wide range of physiopathological processes of the disease and also demonstrate the associated findings of cirrhosis in cases with advanced disease.

  8. Endocrine-Manifestations of Cirrhosis and Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Khalili

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The liver is involved in the synthesis and metabolism of many kinds of hormones, various abnormalities hormone levels are found in advanced liver disease. For example the liver is, extremely sensitive to changes in insulin or glucagon levels. The liver is the primary organ of iron storage is frequently involved, diabetes is common in patients with iron overload and may be seen in cirrhosis. Chronic infection with HCV is associated with insulin resistance. Thyroid disease often accompanies chronic hepatitis C infection .Anti thyroid autoantibodies are also found in chronic HCV infection. Nonalcoholic liver disease (NAFLDas a most common cause of chronic liver disease in western world ,as well accompanied by Type 2 diabetes and hyperlipidemia. Hypopituitarism and hypothyroidism also have been in NAFLD.The patients with NAFLD and Hypopituitarism may be susceptible to central obesity, dyslipidemia and insulin resistance leading to disease progression. Hepatic cirrhosis as the end stage of chronic liver disease is also associated with hypogonadism and signs of feminization. The peripheral metabolism of steroids is altered in many of hypogonadism, low testosterone level decreased libido, infertility, reduced secondary sex hair and gynecomastia, reduced spermatogenesis and peritubular fibrosis are found in men with cirrhosis .The normal function of the hypothalamic-pituitary gonadal axis is affected in liver disease. In cirrhotic patients the estrogen/androgen ratio is usually increased, the level of testosterone and dihydroepiandosteron are reduced while the estradiol level are normal or slightly elevated, these alterations are dependent on the severity of the liver disease.Succsesfull orthotropic liver transplantation  leads to improvement of the sex hormone disturbances. The pathogenesis of gynecomastia is due to the loss of equilibrium between estrogen and androgen caused by a feminizing state but it is due to increased estrogen precursor in

  9. Liver disease and heart failure: Back and forth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correale, Michele; Tarantino, Nicola; Petrucci, Rossella; Tricarico, Lucia; Laonigro, Irma; Di Biase, Matteo; Brunetti, Natale Daniele

    2017-10-31

    In their clinical practice, physicians can face heart diseases (chronic or acute heart failure) affecting the liver and liver diseases affecting the heart. Systemic diseases can also affect both heart and liver. Therefore, it is crucial in clinical practice to identify complex interactions between heart and liver, in order to provide the best treatment for both. In this review, we sought to summarize principal evidence explaining the mechanisms and supporting the existence of this complicate cross-talk between heart and liver. Hepatic involvement after heart failure, its pathophysiology, clinical presentation (congestive and ischemic hepatopathy), laboratory and echocardiographic prognostic markers are discussed; likewise, hepatic diseases influencing cardiac function (cirrhotic cardiomyopathy). Several clinical conditions (congenital, metabolic and infectious causes) possibly affecting simultaneously liver and heart have been also discussed. Cardiovascular drug therapy may present important side effects on the liver and hepato-biliary drug therapy on heart and vessels; post-transplantation immunosuppressive drugs may show reciprocal cardio-hepatotoxicity. A heart-liver axis is drafted by inflammatory reactants from the heart and the liver, and liver acts a source of energy substrates for the heart. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Anti-neutrophil cytoplasm autoantibodies (ANCA) in autoimmune liver diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roozendaal, C.; Kallenberg, Cees

    1999-01-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibodies (ANCA) are autoantibodies directed against cytoplasmic constituents of neutrophil granulocytes and monocytes. ANCA have been detected in serum from patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (mainly ulcerative colitis) and autoimmune mediated liver diseases

  11. Comparison of Liver Biopsy Findings with the Digestive Disease Week Japan 2004 Scale for Diagnosis of Drug-Induced Liver Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Akemi; Nakanuma, Yasuni; Takaguchi, Kouichi; Nakamura, Satoko; Shibata, Hiroshi; Baba, Nobuyuki; Senoh, Tomonori; Nagano, Takuya; Ikeda, Hiroko

    2015-01-01

    The liver biopsy remains a valuable tool in the diagnosis of drug-induced liver injury (DILI). The Digestive Disease Week Japan 2004 (DDW-J) scale proposed as an objective tool for the diagnosis of DILI has been widely used in Japan. So far, the histological features have not been compared with DDW-J scale in detail. Herein, we examined the correlation between liver biopsy findings and clinical features, particularly DDW-J scales. A total of 80 patients with liver injuries of unknown cause were enrolled. Based on the histological findings, these cases were categorized into 3 groups: A (DILI was strongly suspected), B (DILI was suspected), and C (DILI should be considered in the differential diagnosis). Histological groups and DDW-J scale were moderately correlated (κ = 0.60). The mean total DDW-J scale scores were as follows: 4.89 for A, 3.26 for B, and 0.75 for C (p biopsy findings and DDW-J scale were well correlated, and the hepatocellular type of liver injuries was well coincided by both evaluations, though there were several discrepant cases, particularly in cholestatic type.

  12. Comparison of Liver Biopsy Findings with the Digestive Disease Week Japan 2004 Scale for Diagnosis of Drug-Induced Liver Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akemi Tsutsui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The liver biopsy remains a valuable tool in the diagnosis of drug-induced liver injury (DILI. The Digestive Disease Week Japan 2004 (DDW-J scale proposed as an objective tool for the diagnosis of DILI has been widely used in Japan. So far, the histological features have not been compared with DDW-J scale in detail. Herein, we examined the correlation between liver biopsy findings and clinical features, particularly DDW-J scales. A total of 80 patients with liver injuries of unknown cause were enrolled. Based on the histological findings, these cases were categorized into 3 groups: A (DILI was strongly suspected, B (DILI was suspected, and C (DILI should be considered in the differential diagnosis. Histological groups and DDW-J scale were moderately correlated (κ=0.60. The mean total DDW-J scale scores were as follows: 4.89 for A, 3.26 for B, and 0.75 for C (p<0.05. While hepatocellular type was coincided in a majority of cases by histological and DDW-J scale evaluation, cholestatic type was not well coincided. In conclusion, biopsy findings and DDW-J scale were well correlated, and the hepatocellular type of liver injuries was well coincided by both evaluations, though there were several discrepant cases, particularly in cholestatic type.

  13. The role of air pollutants in initiating liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Won; Park, Surim; Lim, Chae Woong; Lee, Kyuhong; Kim, Bumseok

    2014-06-01

    Recent episodes of severe air pollution in eastern Asia have been reported in the scientific literature and news media. Therefore, there is growing concern about the systemic effects of air pollution on human health. Along with the other well-known harmful effects of air pollution, recently, several animal models have provided strong evidence that air pollutants can induce liver toxicity and act to accelerate liver inflammation and steatosis. This review briefly describes examples where exposure to air pollutants was involved in liver toxicity, focusing on how particulate matter (PM) or carbon black (CB) may be translocated from lung to liver and what liver diseases are closely associated with these air pollutants.

  14. Liver transplantation for hemochromatosis, Wilson's disease, and other metabolic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, B Y; Kowdley, K V

    1997-08-01

    Liver transplantation provides an effective means for replacing a failing liver, in addition to correcting the underlying abnormality in many metabolic disorders. Results of liver transplantation for metabolic diseases have been generally encouraging, with the exception of hereditary hemochromatosis, in which infectious and cardiac complications appear to increase post-transplant mortality. Better pretransplant diagnosis of hemochromatosis, utilizing the recently identified putative gene, may help reduce post-transplant complications. In metabolic diseases, improved understanding of the underlying genetic and molecular defects will lead to advances in medical therapy and perhaps a decreased need for liver transplantation. NTBC therapy for hereditary tyrosinemia and purified glucocerebroside therapy for Gaucher disease are two such examples. The prospects of gene therapy are being actively pursued for many metabolic diseases, such as CF, hemophilia, and familial hypercholesterolemia. Until such investigation leads directly to clinical practice, however, liver transplantation remains an effective option for therapy for a wide range of metabolic diseases.

  15. The effect of liver disease on the cardiovascular system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik; Møller, Søren

    2007-01-01

    into the practical applications to benefit people).Edited by ten leading experts in the liver and biliary tract and their diseases, along with outstanding contributions from over 200 international clinicians, this text has global references, evidence and extensive subject matter - giving you the best science...... and clinical practice discussed by the best authors.It includes unique sections on: Symptoms and signs in liver diseaseIndustrial diseases affecting the liverThe effects of diseases of other systems on the liverThe effects of liver diseases on other systemsIt 's bigger and more extensive than other books...... and discusses new areas in more depth such as stem cells, genetics, genomics, proteomics, transplantation, mathematics and much more.Plus, it comes with a fully searchable CD ROM of the entire content....

  16. [Research advances in autoimmune liver diseases in 2016].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, B; Wang, Q X; Ma, X

    2017-02-20

    Autoimmune liver diseases are a group of abnormal autoimmune-mediated inflammatory hepatobiliary injuries, mainly including autoimmune hepatitis(AIH), primary biliary cholangitis(PBC), and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). The diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune liver diseases, an important type of non-viral liver disease, have become a prominent issue in hepatology. In 2016, many new advances have been achieved in the clinical and basic research on autoimmune liver diseases, including the phase 3 clinical trial of obeticholic acid, the proposal of UK-PBC risk score, and the research on gut microbiota associated with PSC. This article reviews the research advances in the diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune liver diseases in 2016.

  17. [Sexuality Risk Factors among People with Suspect of Sexually Transmitted Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Morente, María Ángeles; Cano-Romero, Esperanza; Sánchez-Ocón, María Teresa; Castro-López, Esperanza; Jiménez-Bautista, Francisco; Hueso-Montoro, César

    2017-01-25

    Describing determinants factors in Sexually Transmitted Diseases is necessary to evaluate and design effective measures for prevention and treatment. The aim of this research was to determine the sexual risk factors of people who are treated at Sexually Transmitted Diseases Centre and to analyze differences based on gender. Cross-sectional study on 496 clinical reports, period of time 2010 to 2014, of people who come to the Sexually Transmitted Diseases and Sexual Orientation Centre of Granada, for suspected of Sexually Transmitted Diseases. Sociodemographic, clinical and sexual patterns data were collected. Calculation of descriptive statistics and Chi-square test to compare proportions were performed. 56% men and 44% women. The mean age was 29,01 years (SD=9,07). Most of the sample were single (85,9%). 54,2% had a higher education level. The most prevalent infections were the Human Papilloma-virus (18,8%), followed Molluscum contagiosum (5,6%) and Candidiasis (3,8%). Significant differences were found by sex with sexual behavior, there are more gay men (n=89) and bisexual (n=22) than women (n=4, n=7, respectively) (p smaller than 0,001); differences between sex and sexual life were also found, finding higher prevalence of men with 10-20 couples (n=23) and more than 20 couples (n=20) than women (n=10, n=4, respectively). The user profile is a young, single, with higher education. The most prevalent infection is the Human Papillomavirus. Men are a vulnerable population for contracting sexually transmitted diseases because of their sexual practices.

  18. Periodontal disease and liver cirrhosis: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grønkjær, Lea Ladegaard

    2015-01-01

    Studies suggest that periodontal disease, a source of subclinical and persistent infection, may be associated with various systemic conditions, including liver cirrhosis. The aim of this study was to examine the literature and determine the relationship between periodontal disease and liver cirrhosis and to identify opportunities and directions for future research in this area. A systematic review of English articles in the PubMed, EMBASE, and Scopus databases was conducted using search terms including 'liver cirrhosis', 'end-stage liver disease', 'liver diseases', 'oral health', 'periodontal disease', 'mouth disease', 'gingivitis', and 'periodontitis'. Thirteen studies published between 1981 and 2014 were found to include data on oral health and periodontal disease in cirrhotic patients. Studies indicated an increased incidence of periodontal disease in patients with liver cirrhosis, measured with several different periodontal indices. The reported prevalence of periodontal disease in cirrhosis patients ranged from 25.0% to 68.75% in four studies and apical periodontitis was found in 49%-79% of the patients. One study found that mortality was lower among patients who underwent dental treatment versus non-treated patients. Another study suggested an association between periodontal disease and the progression of liver cirrhosis, but data are sparse and conflicting as to whether periodontal disease is correlated to cirrhosis aetiology and severity. Despite the clinical reality of periodontal disease in liver cirrhosis patients, there are few published studies. Before clinical implications can be addressed, more data on the prevalence of and correlation between periodontal disease and liver cirrhosis aetiology, duration, and progression are needed.

  19. Genetics of liver disease: From pathophysiology to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsen, Tom H; Lammert, Frank; Thompson, Richard J

    2015-04-01

    Paralleling the first 30 years of the Journal of Hepatology we have witnessed huge advances in our understanding of liver disease and physiology. Genetic advances have played no small part in that. Initial studies in the 1970s and 1980s identified the strong major histocompatibility complex associations in autoimmune liver diseases. During the 1990 s, developments in genomic technologies drove the identification of genes responsible for Mendelian liver diseases. Over the last decade, genome-wide association studies have allowed for the dissection of the genetic susceptibility to complex liver disorders, in which also environmental co-factors play important roles. Findings have allowed the identification and elaboration of pathophysiological processes, have indicated the need for reclassification of liver diseases and have already pointed to new disease treatments. In the immediate future genetics will allow further stratification of liver diseases and contribute to personalized medicine. Challenges exist with regard to clinical implementation of rapidly developing technologies and interpretation of the wealth of accumulating genetic data. The historical perspective of genetics in liver diseases illustrates the opportunities for future research and clinical care of our patients. Copyright © 2015 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. [NASH (non-alcoholic steatohepatitis): fatty liver or fatal liver disease?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeb, E

    2014-04-01

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) was first described in 1980 and has emerged from an anecdotal disease to a widely distributed liver disease in the current decade. This review is based on publications in PubMed and our own experiences and deals with basic pathophysiological aspects, diagnostic, and therapeutic tools as well as with the modern management of this serious liver disease. For a long time the potenial for serious liver destruction and enhanced liver mortality by NASH has been observed. The recognition of the metabolic origin of NASH has contributed to diagnostic as well as therapeutic approaches. Since then patients with metabolic syndrome are often screened for liver disease. NASH might worsen other chronic liver diseases but should be judged as an independent illness rather than the exclusion of other potential liver diseases. Furthermore, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis has systemic consequences concerning insulin resistance, metabolic complications and cardiovascular diseases. Future research should concentrate on non-invasive screening strategies, identification of risk factors, evaluation of hepatocellular carcinogenesis and new therapeutic targets. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Empirical validation of the Horowitz Multiple Systemic Infectious Disease Syndrome Questionnaire for suspected Lyme disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Citera M

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Maryalice Citera,1 Phyllis R Freeman,2 Richard I Horowitz2 1Department of Psychology, State University of New York at New Paltz, New Paltz, NY, 2Hudson Valley Healing Arts Center, Hyde Park, NY, USA Purpose: Lyme disease is spreading worldwide, with multiple Borrelia species causing a broad range of clinical symptoms that mimic other illnesses. A validated Lyme disease screening questionnaire would be clinically useful for both providers and patients. Three studies evaluated such a screening tool, namely the Horowitz Multiple Systemic Infectious Disease Syndrome (MSIDS Questionnaire. The purpose was to see if the questionnaire could accurately distinguish between Lyme patients and healthy individuals.Methods: Study 1 examined the construct validity of the scale examining its factor structure and reliability of the questionnaire among 537 individuals being treated for Lyme disease. Study 2 involved an online sample of 999 participants, who self-identified as either healthy (N=217 or suffering from Lyme now (N=782 who completed the Horowitz MSIDS Questionnaire (HMQ along with an outdoor activity survey. We examined convergent validity among components of the scale and evaluated discriminant validity with the Big Five personality characteristics. The third study compared a sample of 236 patients with confirmed Lyme disease with an online sample of 568 healthy individuals.Results: Factor analysis results identified six underlying latent dimensions; four of these overlapped with critical symptoms identified by Horowitz – neuropathy, cognitive dysfunction, musculoskeletal pain, and fatigue. The HMQ showed acceptable levels of internal reliability using Cronbach’s coefficient alpha and exhibited evidence of convergent and divergent validity. Components of the HMQ correlated more highly with each other than with unrelated traits.Discussion: The results consistently demonstrated that the HMQ accurately differentiated those with Lyme disease from

  2. Empirical validation of the Horowitz Multiple Systemic Infectious Disease Syndrome Questionnaire for suspected Lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citera, Maryalice; Freeman, Phyllis R; Horowitz, Richard I

    2017-01-01

    Lyme disease is spreading worldwide, with multiple Borrelia species causing a broad range of clinical symptoms that mimic other illnesses. A validated Lyme disease screening questionnaire would be clinically useful for both providers and patients. Three studies evaluated such a screening tool, namely the Horowitz Multiple Systemic Infectious Disease Syndrome (MSIDS) Questionnaire. The purpose was to see if the questionnaire could accurately distinguish between Lyme patients and healthy individuals. Study 1 examined the construct validity of the scale examining its factor structure and reliability of the questionnaire among 537 individuals being treated for Lyme disease. Study 2 involved an online sample of 999 participants, who self-identified as either healthy (N=217) or suffering from Lyme now (N=782) who completed the Horowitz MSIDS Questionnaire (HMQ) along with an outdoor activity survey. We examined convergent validity among components of the scale and evaluated discriminant validity with the Big Five personality characteristics. The third study compared a sample of 236 patients with confirmed Lyme disease with an online sample of 568 healthy individuals. Factor analysis results identified six underlying latent dimensions; four of these overlapped with critical symptoms identified by Horowitz - neuropathy, cognitive dysfunction, musculoskeletal pain, and fatigue. The HMQ showed acceptable levels of internal reliability using Cronbach's coefficient alpha and exhibited evidence of convergent and divergent validity. Components of the HMQ correlated more highly with each other than with unrelated traits. The results consistently demonstrated that the HMQ accurately differentiated those with Lyme disease from healthy individuals. Three migratory pain survey items (persistent muscular pain, arthritic pain, and nerve pain/paresthesias) robustly identified individuals with verified Lyme disease. The results support the use of the HMQ as a valid, efficient, and low

  3. Differential diagnoses of suspected Lyme borreliosis or post-Lyme-disease syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, M F; Domene, A Belda; Vetter, H

    2007-09-01

    The symptoms of Lyme borreliosis are similar to those of a variety of autoimmune musculoskeletal diseases. Persistence of complaints is frequently interpreted as unsuccessful antibiotic treatment of Borrelia-associated infections. However, such refractory cases are rare, and re-evaluation of differential diagnoses helps to avoid the substantial risk of long-term antibiotic therapy. In this study, we analyzed patients who presented to our rheumatology unit with previous suspected or diagnosed Lyme borreliosis. Eighty-six patients from a 3.5-year period were evaluated. The mean age of patients was 49.2 +/- 17.2 years; 60% (n = 52) reported a tick bite and 33% (n = 28) an erythema. Forty-seven percent (n = 39) had positive enzyme-linked immunoassay results and Western blots (Mikrogen, Martinsried, Germany). All but 12 patients had already received antibiotic treatment previously. Nine percent (n = 8) had ongoing or recent Lyme borreliosis. Twenty-nine percent (n = 25) showed clinical symptoms and radiographic changes compatible with degenerative disorders of the cervical and/or lumbar spine. These patients were significantly older when compared to the other patients (59.3 +/- 13.7 years vs 46.1 +/- 17.2 years, p = 0.001). Seventeen percent (n = 16) had arthropathies related to psoriasis or rheumatoid arthritis. Twelve percent (n = 10) were positive for the HLA B27 antigen. Other diseases were less frequent. Six patients (7%) could not be diagnosed conclusively, and four of these patients had negative Borrelia immunoassay results. In conclusion, Borrelia-associated diseases were rare in this study. Differential diagnoses helped to initiate a successful disease-specific therapeutic strategy.

  4. Autochthonous Chagas disease in the southern United States: A case report of suspected residential and military exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, N; Woc-Colburn, L; Gunter, S M; Gorchakov, R; Murray, K O; Rossmann, S; Garcia, M N

    2017-09-01

    Chagas disease is a parasitic infection that can result in a progressive dilated cardiomyopathy. Here, we present the epidemiologic details of a suspected locally acquired transmission case originating from the southern United States. This is the first published report of Chagas disease in a young, healthy United States veteran with repeat triatomine exposures in Arizona. Military personnel and Arizona residents should be aware of their Chagas disease transmission risks. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  5. Cell therapy for liver diseases: current medicine and future promises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejandra, Meza-Ríos; Juan, Armendáriz-Borunda; Ana, Sandoval-Rodríguez

    2015-06-01

    Liver diseases are a major health problem worldwide since they usually represent the main causes of death in most countries, causing excessive costs to public health systems. Nowadays, there are no efficient current therapies for most hepatic diseases and liver transplant is infrequent due to the availability of organs, cost and risk of transplant rejection. Therefore, alternative therapies for liver diseases have been developed, including cell-based therapies. Stem cells (SCs) are characterized by their self-renewing capacity, unlimited proliferation and differentiation under certain conditions into tissue- or organ-specific cells with special functions. Cell-based therapies for liver diseases have been successful in experimental models, showing anti-inflammatory, antifibrogenic and regenerative effects. Nowadays, clinical trials using SCs for liver pathologies are increasing in number, and those that have reached publication have achieved favorable effects, encouraging us to think that SCs will have a potential clinical use in a short time.

  6. Increased intestinal permeability to macromolecules and endotoxemia in patients with chronic alcohol abuse in different stages of alcohol-induced liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parlesak, Alexandr; Schäfer, C.; Schütz, Tanja

    2000-01-01

    and mild to more advanced stages of liver disease, and to measure the concentration of endotoxins in the plasma, as these compounds derive from the intestinal flora and are suspected to contribute to the development of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). METHODS: The permeability to polyethylene glycol Mr 400......BACKGROUND/AIMS: No information is yet available about the influence of alcohol abuse on the translocation of larger molecules (Mr>1200) through the intestinal mucosa in man. The present study aimed to determine the intestinal permeability to macromolecules in patients with chronic alcohol abuse...... with alcoholic liver disease (20/54, pintestinal barrier, which might enhance...

  7. Diagnosis and Evaluation of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikako Obika

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is the most common cause of elevated liver function tests results, after the commonly investigated causes have been excluded, and frequently coexists with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM because the conditions have common risk factors. As both T2DM and NAFLD are related to adverse outcomes of the other, diagnosis and valuation of fatty liver is an important part of the management of diabetes. Although noninvasive methods, such as biomarkers, panel markers, and imaging, may support a diagnostic evaluation of NAFLD patients, accurate histopathological findings cannot be achieved without a liver biopsy. As it is important to know whether steatohepatitis and liver fibrosis are present for the management of NAFLD, liver biopsy remains the gold standard for NAFLD diagnosis and evaluation. Therefore, new investigations of the pathogenesis of NAFLD are necessary to develop useful biomarkers that could provide a reliable noninvasive alternative to liver biopsy.

  8. Bone histomorphometric changes after liver transplantation for chronic cholestatic liver disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guichelaar, MMJ; Malinchoc, M; Sibonga, JD; Clarke, BL; Hay, JE

    2003-01-01

    Introduction: Patients with advanced liver disease, especially chronic cholestasis, often have osteopenia, which worsens early after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) before starting to recover. The changes in bone metabolism leading to this rapid loss of bone after OLT, and to its recovery,

  9. Alkaline phosphatase predicts response in polycystic liver disease during somatostatin analogue therapy: a pooled analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gevers, T.J.; Nevens, F.; Torres, V.E.; Hogan, M.C.; Drenth, J.P.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Somatostatin analogues reduce liver volumes in polycystic liver disease. However, patients show considerable variability in treatment responses. Our aim was to identify specific patient, disease or treatment characteristics that predict response in polycystic liver disease during

  10. Management of Hemostatic Disorders in Patients With Advanced Liver Disease Admitted to an Intensive Care Unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisman, Ton; Bernal, William

    2017-01-01

    Patients with liver diseases frequently acquire complex changes in their hemostatic system. Traditionally, bleeding complications in patients with liver disease were ascribed to these hemostatic changes, and liver diseases were considered as an acquired bleeding disorder. Nowadays, it is

  11. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: molecular mechanisms for the hepatic steatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Hoi Koo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Liver plays a central role in the biogenesis of major metabolites including glucose, fatty acids, and cholesterol. Increased incidence of obesity in the modern society promotes insulin resistance in the peripheral tissues in humans, and could cause severe metabolic disorders by inducing accumulation of lipid in the liver, resulting in the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. NAFLD, which is characterized by increased fat depots in the liver, could precede more severe diseases such as non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, cirrhosis, and in some cases hepatocellular carcinoma. Accumulation of lipid in the liver can be traced by increased uptake of free fatty acids into the liver, impaired fatty acid beta oxidation, or the increased incidence of de novo lipogenesis. In this review, I would like to focus on the roles of individual pathways that contribute to the hepatic steatosis as a precursor for the NAFLD.

  12. Practice patterns and clinical significance of use of capsule endoscopy in suspected and established Crohn's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghyun Kim

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Although the role of capsule endoscopy (CE in Crohn's disease (CD has expanded, CE is not used routinely for diagnosing and evaluating CD in Korea. We aimed to investigate current patterns of practice and evaluate the clinical significance of the use of CE in CD in Korean patients.Methods: Among 651 CE procedures performed for various indications, we retrospectively analyzed the medical records of patients who underwent CE in 57 cases of suspected CD (sCD and 14 cases of established CD (eCD.Results: In the sCD group, CE was most commonly used for the initial diagnosis of CD (54.4%. Capsule retention was found in only 1 patient in the eCD group (1/71, 1.4%. In the sCD group, 28.1% of patients were diagnosed with CD on the basis of CE findings; other diseases diagnosed included tuberculous enteritis (7.0%, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced enteropathy (5.3%, and other enteritis (17.5%. Only 11.5% of patients with eCD (14/122 underwent CE. The indication for CE in the 14 patients with eCD was to assess disease extent and activity. The overall diagnostic yield of CE was 59.7%. Therapeutic strategies were changed in 70.2% of patients in the sCD group and 50% of those in the eCD group based on CE findings.Conclusions: In clinical practice, CE was most commonly indicated for the initial diagnosis of CD and was not generally performed in patients with eCD. CE appears to be an effective diagnostic modality for evaluating sCD and is useful for determining therapeutic strategies for patients with sCD and those with eCD.

  13. Predictive value of "Marsh 1" type histology in subjects with suspected cealic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortora, Raffaella; Capone, Pietro; Imperatore, Nicola; De Stefano, Giuliano; Gerbino, Nicolò; Leo, Maria; Caporaso, Nicola; Rispo, Antonio

    2014-07-01

    The diagnosis of celiac disease (CD) is based on histology in combination with anti-tissue transglutaminase (a-tTG) and anti-endomysial antibodies (EMAs). The increase of intraepithelial lymphocytes defines the Marsh 1 histology that appears not to be specific for CD. To explore the positive predictive value (PPV) and clinical relevance of Marsh 1 histology in suspected CD. We carried out an observational prospective study including all consecutive subjects with a Marsh 1 histology. All patients were tested for a-tTG and EMAs. Diagnosis of potential CD was defined in the presence of Marsh 1 with positive a-tTG and EMAs. Patients were investigated for symptoms, CD familial aggregation, other diseases, and current medication. Sixty-three patients with Marsh 1 were included. Diagnosis of potential CD was made in 23 subjects (36%), so that Marsh 1 histology showed a PPV of 36%. With regard to familial aggregation, patients with potential CD showed a higher frequency of familiarity for CD (60.8% vs. 15.0%; p < 0.01). No significant difference was detected between CD and non-CD in terms of intestinal and extra-intestinal symptoms. We also documented the presence of conditions other than CD in the remaining population: 7 patients (17.5%) with immuno-mediated diseases while 5 patients (12.5%) showed Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection. About medication, 3 patients (7.5%) were on non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, while another 4 (10%) patients were being treated with other drugs. The Marsh 1 type histology is not specific for CD and it can also be associated with immuno-mediated disorders, HP infection, and drugs.

  14. The Enhanced liver fibrosis score is associated with clinical outcomes and disease progression in patients with chronic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, Katharine M; Wockner, Leesa F; Shanker, Mihir; Fagan, Kevin J; Horsfall, Leigh U; Fletcher, Linda M; Ungerer, Jacobus P J; Pretorius, Carel J; Miller, Gregory C; Clouston, Andrew D; Lampe, Guy; Powell, Elizabeth E

    2016-03-01

    Current tools for risk stratification of chronic liver disease subjects are limited. We aimed to determine whether the serum-based ELF (Enhanced Liver Fibrosis) test predicted liver-related clinical outcomes, or progression to advanced liver disease, and to compare the performance of ELF to liver biopsy and non-invasive algorithms. Three hundred patients with ELF scores assayed at the time of liver biopsy were followed up (median 6.1 years) for liver-related clinical outcomes (n = 16) and clear evidence of progression to advanced fibrosis (n = 18), by review of medical records and clinical data. Fourteen of 73 (19.2%) patients with ELF score indicative of advanced fibrosis (≥9.8, the manufacturer's cut-off) had a liver-related clinical outcome, compared to only two of 227 (liver-related event (adjusted for age and stage of fibrosis). In patients without advanced fibrosis on biopsy at recruitment, 55% (10/18) with an ELF score ≥9.8 showed clear evidence of progression to advanced fibrosis (after an average 6 years), whereas only 3.5% of those with an ELF score liver disease. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Preparedness for admission of patients with suspected Ebola virus disease in European hospitals: A survey, August-September 2014

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.D. de Jong (Menno); C.B.E.M. Reusken (Chantal); P. Horby; M.P.G. Koopmans D.V.M. (Marion); M. Bonten; J.D. Chiche; C. Giaquinto; T. Welte; F. Leus; J. Schotsman; H. Goossens

    2014-01-01

    textabstractIn response to the Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in West Africa, the World Health Organization has advised all nations to prepare for the detection, investigation and management of confirmed and suspected EVD cases in order to prevent further spread through international travel. To

  16. Preparedness for admission of patients with suspected Ebola virus disease in European hospitals: a survey, August-September 2014

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, M. D.; Reusken, C.; Horby, P.; Koopmans, M.; Bonten, M.; Chiche, Jd; Giaquinto, C.; Welte, T.; Leus, F.; Schotsman, J.; Goossens, H.

    2014-01-01

    In response to the Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in West Africa, the World Health Organization has advised all nations to prepare for the detection, investigation and management of confirmed and suspected EVD cases in order to prevent further spread through international travel. To gain

  17. Pediatric intestinal failure-associated liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Cathleen M; Warner, Brad W

    2017-06-01

    The goal of this review is to provide updates on the definition, pathophysiology, treatment, and prevention of intestinal failure-associated liver disease (IFALD) that are relevant to care of pediatric patients. Current literature emphasizes the multifactorial nature of IFALD. The pathogenesis is still largely unknown; however, molecular pathways have been identified. Key to these pathways are proinflammatory cytokines involved in hepatic inflammation and bile acids synthesis such as Toll-like receptor 4 and farnesoid X receptor, respectively. Research for prevention and treatment is aimed at alleviating risk factors associated with IFALD, principally those associated with parental nutrition. Multiple nutrients and amino acids are relevant to the development of IFALD, but lipid composition has been the primary focus. Lipid emulsions with a lower ratio of omega-6-to-omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (FAs) appear to improve bile flow and decrease intrahepatic inflammation. Long-term consequences of these alternative lipid emulsions are yet to be determined. IFALD remains the greatest contributor of mortality in patients with intestinal failure. Many factors contribute to its development, namely, alterations in the gut microbiome, sepsis, and lack of enteral intake. Novel combinations of lipid formulations are promising alternatives to purely soy-based formulas to reduce cholestasis.

  18. Cryptosporidiosis in patients with diarrhea and chronic liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousa, Nasser; Abdel-Razik, Ahmed; El-Nahas, Hala; El-Shazly, Atef; Abdelaziz, Mohammad; Nabih, Marwa; Hamed, Magdy; Eissa, Mohammad; Effat, Narmin; Eldars, Walled

    2014-12-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the epidemiology and clinical significance of Cryptosporidium in patients with diarrhea and chronic liver diseases. The study included 150 patients with chronic liver diseases and diarrhea, and 50 subjects with diarrhea as a control group. Stool samples were screened for the presence of Cryptosporidium by microscopic examination after modified Ziehl-Neelsen staining and detection of Cryptosporidium coproantigen by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The prevalence of Cryptosporidium infection in patients with chronic liver diseases was 30% (45/150) versus 14% (7/50) in controls. Cryptosporidium infection increased with the progression of chronic liver diseases from Child-Pugh class A to Child-Pugh class C (p 9 (pdiarrhea associated with Cryptosporidium infection developed hepatic encephalopathy, and only diarrhea was identified as a precipitating factor for hepatic encephalopathy. Cryptosporidium is one of the important causes of diarrhea in patients with chronic liver diseases. The infection significantly increased with the progression of chronic liver diseases. In patients with advanced chronic liver diseases, Cryptosporidium infection may be a precipitating factor of hepatic encephalopathy.

  19. Impact of coffee on liver diseases: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saab, Sammy; Mallam, Divya; Cox, Gerald A; Tong, Myron J

    2014-04-01

    Coffee is one of the most commonly consumed beverages in the world. Its health benefits including improved overall survival have been demonstrated in a variety of disease states. To examine the association of coffee consumption with liver disease, a systematic review of studies on the effects of coffee on liver associated laboratory tests, viral hepatitis, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was performed. Coffee consumption was associated with improved serum gamma glutamyltransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase values in a dose dependent manner in individuals at risk for liver disease. In chronic liver disease patients who consume coffee, a decreased risk of progression to cirrhosis, a lowered mortality rate in cirrhosis patients, and a lowered rate of HCC development were observed. In chronic hepatitis C patients, coffee was associated with improved virologic responses to antiviral therapy. Moreover, coffee consumption was inversely related to the severity of steatohepatitis in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Therefore, in patients with chronic liver disease, daily coffee consumption should be encouraged. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Mechanisms and Biomarkers of Apoptosis in Liver Disease and Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayashree Bagchi Chakraborty

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Liver fibrosis and cirrhosis are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Development of the fibrotic scar is an outcome of chronic liver diseases of varying aetiologies including alcoholic liver disease (ALD nonalcoholic liver disease (NAFLD including non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH viral hepatitis B and C (HBV, HCV. The critical step in the development of scar is activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs, which become the primary source of extracellular matrix. Aberrant apoptosis is a feature of chronic liver diseases and is associated with worsening stages of fibrosis. However, apoptosis is also the main mechanism promoting the resolution of fibrosis, and spontaneous or targeted apoptosis of HSC is associated with regression of fibrosis in animal models and patients with chronic liver disease. Given the importance of apoptosis in disease progression and resolution, there is much interest in precisely delineating the mechanisms involved and also developing biomarkers that accurately reflect the underlying pathogenesis. Here, we review the mechanisms driving apoptosis in development of liver disease and use of apoptosis -related biomarkers to aid in clinical diagnosis. Finally, we will also examine the recent literature regarding new insights into mechanisms involved in apoptosis of activated HSCs as possible method of fibrosis regression.

  1. Stem Cell Therapies for Treatment of Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell therapy is an emerging form of treatment for several liver diseases, but is limited by the availability of donor livers. Stem cells hold promise as an alternative to the use of primary hepatocytes. We performed an exhaustive review of the literature, with a focus on the latest studies involving the use of stem cells for the treatment of liver disease. Stem cells can be harvested from a number of sources, or can be generated from somatic cells to create induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs. Different cell lines have been used experimentally to support liver function and treat inherited metabolic disorders, acute liver failure, cirrhosis, liver cancer, and small-for-size liver transplantations. Cell-based therapeutics may involve gene therapy, cell transplantation, bioartificial liver devices, or bioengineered organs. Research in this field is still very active. Stem cell therapy may, in the future, be used as a bridge to either liver transplantation or endogenous liver regeneration, but efficient differentiation and production protocols must be developed and safety must be demonstrated before it can be applied to clinical practice.

  2. Neurologic Manifestations of Liver Disease | Salawu | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This review describes the clinical features of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) associated with acute liver failure or liver cirrhosis, diagnostic approaches, and current therapeutic concepts. A striking feature of HE is the reversibility of symptoms. In addition, it gives a short overview of current knowledge about hepatitis C virus ...

  3. Periodontal disease and liver cirrhosis: A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Studies suggest that periodontal disease, a source of subclinical and persistent infection, may be associated with various systemic conditions, including liver cirrhosis. The aim of this study was to examine the literature and determine the relationship between periodontal disease and liver cirrhosis and to identify opportunities and directions for future research in this area. Methods: A systematic review of English articles in the PubMed, EMBASE, and Scopus databases was conducted using search terms including ‘liver cirrhosis’, ‘end-stage liver disease’, ‘liver diseases’, ‘oral health’, ‘periodontal disease’, ‘mouth disease’, ‘gingivitis’, and ‘periodontitis’. Results: Thirteen studies published between 1981 and 2014 were found to include data on oral health and periodontal disease in cirrhotic patients. Studies indicated an increased incidence of periodontal disease in patients with liver cirrhosis, measured with several different periodontal indices. The reported prevalence of periodontal disease in cirrhosis patients ranged from 25.0% to 68.75% in four studies and apical periodontitis was found in 49%–79% of the patients. One study found that mortality was lower among patients who underwent dental treatment versus non-treated patients. Another study suggested an association between periodontal disease and the progression of liver cirrhosis, but data are sparse and conflicting as to whether periodontal disease is correlated to cirrhosis aetiology and severity. Conclusion: Despite the clinical reality of periodontal disease in liver cirrhosis patients, there are few published studies. Before clinical implications can be addressed, more data on the prevalence of and correlation between periodontal disease and liver cirrhosis aetiology, duration, and progression are needed. PMID:26770799

  4. Paradoxical protective effect of central obesity in patients with suspected stable coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechlioulis, Aris; Vakalis, Konstantinos; Naka, Katerina K; Bourantas, Christos V; Papamichael, Nikolaos D; Kotsia, Anna; Tzimas, Thomas; Pappas, Konstantinos; Katsouras, Christos S; Michalis, Lampros K

    2013-03-01

    Increased body mass index (BMI) has been paradoxically inversely associated with the presence of angiographic coronary artery disease (CAD). Central obesity measures, considered to be more appropriate for assessing obesity-related cardiovascular risk, have been little studied in relation to the presence of CAD. The aim was to investigate the association of central obesity with the presence of angiographic CAD as well as the prognostic significance of obesity measures in CAD prediction when added to other cardiovascular risk factors. Patients with suspected stable CAD (n = 403, age 61 ± 10 years, 302 males) referred for diagnostic coronary angiography with documented anthropometric data were enrolled. Significant angiographic CAD was found in 51% of patients. Both BMI (OR = 0.64 per 1 SD increase, P = 0.001) and waist circumference (WC) (OR = 0.54 per 1 SD increase, P cardiovascular risk factors. In subgroup analysis, BMI and WC were significantly inversely associated with the presence of CAD in males, non diabetics, patients >60 years old and patients with Framingham risk score (FRS) >20% (P obesity were independently associated with a reduced prevalence of angiographic CAD, lending further credence to the existence of the 'obesity paradox'. Obesity measures may further improve risk discrimination for the presence of CAD when added in an established risk score such as FRS. Copyright © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  5. The utility of the contrast enema in neonates with suspected Hirschsprung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, Luke R; John, Susan D; Greenfield, Susan A; Kellagher, Caroline M; Austin, Mary T; Lally, Kevin P; Tsao, Kuojen

    2015-06-01

    The contrast enema (CE) is commonly utilized for suspected Hirschsprung disease (HD) patients. We set out to determine the utility of the CE in the newborn for clinically suspicious HD. All CEs performed for suspicion of HD in neonates from January 2004 to December 2013 were reviewed by two pediatric radiologists who were blinded to the original interpretations and final diagnoses. A standardized scoring sheet was utilized to document essential radiographic findings. Definitive diagnoses were determined by pathology. Descriptive statistics, likelihood ratios, and interrater agreement were determined. 158 CEs were reviewed. Interrater agreement was 89% with kappa (95% CI) of 0.63 (0.47-0.76). Common indications for CE were similar between non-HD and HD groups. The positive, inconclusive, and negative likelihood ratios (95% CI) were 38 (10-172), 3.2 (1.3-9.1), and 0.15 (0.06-0.47), respectively, leading to posttest probabilities for positive, inconclusive, and negative tests of 83%, 32%, and 2.5%, respectively. Although radiographic positive CE for HD portends a high probability of HD, inconclusive studies still represent a significant increased risk. In clinically suspicious infants for HD, those with inconclusive studies may benefit from a lower threshold to perform follow-up rectal biopsy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Role of NKT cells in autoimmune liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santodomingo-Garzon, Tania; Swain, Mark G

    2011-10-01

    The three main broad categories of autoimmune liver disease are autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). The etiologies of these diseases are still incompletely understood, but seem to involve a combination of immune, genetic and environmental factors. Although each of these diseases has relatively distinct clinical, serologic and histological profiles, all of them share common pathways of immune-mediated liver injury. The development of autoimmune liver diseases is thought to be due to an imbalance of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory immune responses within the liver, with proinflammatory immune responses being upregulated and anti-inflammatory ones downregulated. The available evidence, suggest that during autoimmune responses within the liver, "self" antigens are presented by antigen presenting cells (APCs) which then activate, directly and/or indirectly, NKT cells and other innate immune cells within the liver. Importantly, the hepatic innate immune system plays an increasingly recognized role in the development and propagation of autoimmune liver injury. NKT cells predominantly reside in the liver sinusoids, and through their ability to rapidly produce a wide variety of cytokines (e.g. Th1, TH2, Th17 cytokine patterns), are a critical checkpoint that bridges innate and adaptive immune responses. Specifically, activated NKT cells are capable of transactivating other innate and adaptive immune cells within the liver to amplify and regulate subsequent immune responses within the liver. It has been hypothesized that NKT cells in the setting of autoimmune liver disease can play diverse roles, including driving both anti-inflammatory and proinflammatory responses, as well as regulating the hepatic recruitment of other types of immunoregulatory cells, including regulatory T cells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Reversal of intestinal failure-associated liver disease (IFALD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Christian; Kodjabashia, Kamelia; Nixon, Emma

    2016-01-01

    Patients with intestinal failure (IF) and home parenteral nutrition commonly develop abnormal liver function tests. The presentations of IF-associated liver disease (IFALD) range from mild cholestasis or steatosis to cirrhosis and decompensated liver disease. We describe the reversal of IFALD...... in an adult patient with IF secondary to severe Crohn's disease and multiple small bowel resections. The patient developed liver dysfunction and pathology consistent with IFALD. Multiple causal factors were implicated, including nutrition-related factors, catheter sepsis and the use of hepatotoxic medications....... Multidisciplinary treatment in a tertiary IF referral centre included aggressive sepsis management, discontinuation of hepatotoxic medications and a reduction of parenteral nutrition dependency through optimisation of enteral nutrition via distal enteral tube feeding. Upon this, liver function tests normalised....

  8. Liver hemangioma and vascular liver diseases in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berzigotti, Annalisa; Frigato, Marilena; Manfredini, Elena; Pierpaoli, Lucia; Mulè, Rita; Tiani, Carolina; Zappoli, Paola; Magalotti, Donatella; Malavolta, Nazzarena; Zoli, Marco

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is associated with benign focal liver lesions and vascular liver diseases, since these have been occasionally reported in SLE patients. METHODS: Thirty-five consecutive adult patients with SLE and 35 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were evaluated. Hepatic and portal vein patency and presence of focal liver lesions were studied by colour-Doppler ultrasound, computerized tomography and magnetic resonance were used to refine the diagnosis, clinical data of SLE patients were reviewed. RESULTS: Benign hepatic lesions were common in SLE patients (54% vs 14% controls, P hepatic hemangioma were observed, both in patients hospitalized for abdominal symptoms, suggesting that vascular liver diseases should be specifically investigated in this population. CONCLUSION: SLE is associated with 5-fold increased odds of liver hemangiomas, suggesting that these might be considered among the hepatic manifestations of SLE. PMID:22110281

  9. Meta-analysis: antioxidant supplements for liver diseases - the Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjelakovic, Goran; Gluud, L L; Nikolova, D

    2010-01-01

    Several liver diseases have been associated with oxidative stress. Accordingly, antioxidants have been suggested as potential therapeutics for various liver diseases. The evidence supporting these suggestions is equivocal....

  10. Polycystic liver: clinical characteristics of patients with isolated polycystic liver disease compared with patients with polycystic liver and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoevenaren, I.A.; Wester, R.; Schrier, R.W.; McFann, K.; Doctor, R.B.; Drenth, J.P.H.; Everson, G.T.

    2008-01-01

    AIM: The goal of this study was to compare the clinical features of patients with isolated polycystic liver disease (PCLD) with those of patients with polycystic liver and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). METHODS: Cases were identified from clinical records at the University of

  11. Clinical Utility of a Precision Medicine Test Evaluating Outpatients with Suspected Obstructive Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladapo, Joseph A; Budoff, Matt; Sharp, David; Zapien, Michael; Huang, Lin; Maniet, Bruce; Herman, Lee; Monane, Mark

    2017-04-01

    Identifying patients with obstructive coronary artery disease can be challenging for primary care physicians. Advances in precision medicine may help augment clinical tools and redefine the paradigm for evaluating coronary artery disease in the outpatient setting. A blood-based age/sex/gene expression score (ASGES) incorporating key features of precision medicine has shown clinical validity with a 96% negative predictive value and 89% sensitivity in estimating a symptomatic patient's current likelihood of obstructive coronary artery disease. To better characterize the clinical utility of the ASGES and measure its impact on clinician decision-making, a community-based registry was established. The prospective PRESET Registry (NCT01677156) enrolled stable, nonacute adult patients presenting with typical or atypical symptoms suggestive of obstructive coronary artery disease from 21 US primary care practices from August 2012 to August 2014. Demographics, clinical characteristics, and ASGES results (predefined as low [ASGES ≤15] or elevated [ASGES >15]) were collected, as were referrals to Cardiology or further functional/anatomic cardiac testing after ASGES testing. Patients were followed for 1 year post ASGES testing. Among the 566-patient cohort (median age 56 years), clinicians referred 26/252 (10%) of patients with low scores vs 137/314 (44%) of patients with elevated scores to Cardiology or advanced cardiac testing for further evaluation (unadjusted odds ratio 0.15, P clinical covariates = 0.18, P advanced cardiac testing showed abnormal findings in 0 of 13 (0%) low ASGES and 10 of 71 (14%) elevated ASGES patients. Major adverse cardiovascular events and revascularization were noted in 3/252 (1.2%) patients with low ASGES and 14/314 (4.5%) patients with elevated ASGES score (P clinical utility in the evaluation of patients with suspected obstructive coronary artery disease. Low-score patients were less likely to undergo cardiac referral, were unlikely to have

  12. [Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma - 2016].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pár, Alajos; Pár, Gabriella

    2016-06-19

    In the past decade non-alcoholic liver disease became the most frequently diagnosed liver disease in developed countries. At the same time, the dramatic rise in the incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma is attributed to this common metabolic disorder, and mainly to its severe form, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. The risk factors of these associated diseases are genetic predisposition, obesity and diabetes as well as chronic low grade necro-infammation, which often leads to liver fibrosis. Free fatty acids, cytokines, lipotoxicity, insulin resistance, microRNS dysregulation and alteration in intestinal microbiota play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis. Treatment of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease - weight reduction and physical exercise in obesity, metformin in diabetes, statins in dyslipidemia and, as a new option, obeticholic acid - may diminish the risk of the hepatocellular carcinoma related to this metabolic disease.

  13. Liver disease due to parenteral and enteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, V; George, J

    2004-11-01

    Liver disease due to parenteral and enteral nutrition is a well-recognized iatrogenic phenomenon, but its cause and pathogenesis have not been clearly elucidated. Various mechanisms have been postulated, but it is likely that the cause is multifactorial with significant interplay among several factors. A preventive approach to management is ideal but awaits a more complete understanding of the pathophysiology. A variety of management strategies has been proposed in small case series, but level 1 evidence-based guidelines have yet to be established. Although an abundance of both clinical and animal studies exist regarding liver disease associated with parenteral nutrition (PN), there is a paucity of data regarding enteral nutrition (EN)-associated hepatic disease. The latter probably reflects differences in the frequency and severity of PN- versus EN-associated liver disease. This article addresses the two routes of nutritional support individually, with the major focus on PN-associated liver disease.

  14. Role of the Nrf2-ARE Pathway in Liver Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Mi Shin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The liver is a central organ that performs a wide range of functions such as detoxification and metabolic homeostasis. Since it is a metabolically active organ, liver is particularly susceptible to oxidative stress. It is well documented that liver diseases including hepatitis, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma are highly associated with antioxidant capacity. NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2 is an essential transcription factor that regulates an array of detoxifying and antioxidant defense genes expression in the liver. It is activated in response to electrophiles and induces its target genes by binding to the antioxidant response element (ARE. Therefore, the roles of the Nrf2-ARE pathway in liver diseases have been extensively investigated. Studies from several animal models suggest that the Nrf2-ARE pathway collectively exhibits diverse biological functions against viral hepatitis, alcoholic and nonalcoholic liver disease, fibrosis, and cancer via target gene expression. In this review, we will discuss the role of the Nrf2-ARE pathway in liver pathophysiology and the potential application of Nrf2 as a therapeutic target to prevent and treat liver diseases.

  15. The Natural Course of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzadilla Bertot, Luis; Adams, Leon Anton

    2016-05-20

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most prevalent form of chronic liver disease in the world, paralleling the epidemic of obesity and Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). NAFLD exhibits a histological spectrum, ranging from "bland steatosis" to the more aggressive necro-inflammatory form, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) which may accumulate fibrosis to result in cirrhosis. Emerging data suggests fibrosis, rather than NASH per se, to be the most important histological predictor of liver and non-liver related death. Nevertheless, only a small proportion of individuals develop cirrhosis, however the large proportion of the population affected by NAFLD has led to predictions that NAFLD will become a leading cause of end stage liver disease, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and indication for liver transplantation. HCC may arise in non-cirrhotic liver in the setting of NAFLD and is associated with the presence of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and male gender. The MetS and its components also play a key role in the histological progression of NAFLD, however other genetic and environmental factors may also influence the natural history. The importance of NAFLD in terms of overall survival extends beyond the liver where cardiovascular disease and malignancy represents additional important causes of death.

  16. Pattern of liver diseases among children attending the National ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-08-05

    Aug 5, 2015 ... Conclusion: Risk factors associ- ated with liver ... Diseases, Pattern viduals, with some age specific features and patterns which differ from one region of the world to another.1. The clinical features of liver dysfunction may include symptoms related ..... dren are most commonly spread from mother to child at.

  17. [Nutritional risk assessment in patients with chronic liver disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shuyun; Han, Junjun; Yan, Ming; Wang, Kefei; Yu, Hongwei; Meng, Qinghua

    2014-07-01

    To use the European Nutritional Risk Screening (NRS)-2002 survey tool to investigate nutritional risk associated to different degrees of liver disease and to assess its ability to identify the nutritional risk of hospitalized patients with chronic liver disease. A total of 366 hospitalized patients were assessed with the NRS-2002 on the day of admission. Patients who meet the criteria for malnourishment (NRS-2002 score of more than 3 points (severely impaired nutritional status with body mass index (BMI) less than 18.5 kg/m2) were selected for further study to determine liver function. Patients were classified according to liver dysfunction-related features, including cirrhosis status, Child-Pugh classification, and underlying disease causes (e.g.alcohol, hepatitis virus infection). Chi square test was used in statistical analysis of inter-group difference. The incidence of patients surveyed who were at nutritional risk was 41.0%, and the incidence of malnutrition was 7.6%. The patients with liver failure showed the highest rate of nutritional risk (72.8%). Moreover, among the 97 patients with liver cirrhosis, significantly more had Child-Pugh grade B than grade A (88.6% vs.33.1%; x2=24.019, P=0.000). The cause of liver failure with the highest incidence of nutritional risk was alcohol-related liver disease (66.7%). The overall malnutrition rate among the total 156 patients classified by the NRS-2002 as being at nutritional risk was 76.2%. The NRS-2002 is a suitable screening tool for use in Chinese patients with mild early liver disease, but it must be interpreted carefully as its findings alone may promote a false positive rate. The NRS-2002 is less accurate in patients with end-stage liver disease.

  18. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Dependent Modulation of Liver Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazdic, Marina; Arsenijevic, Aleksandar; Markovic, Bojana Simovic; Volarevic, Ana; Dimova, Ivanka; Djonov, Valentin; Arsenijevic, Nebojsa; Stojkovic, Miodrag; Volarevic, Vladislav

    2017-01-01

    Acute liver failure and cirrhosis display sequential and overlapping severe pathogenic processes that include inflammation, hepatocyte necrosis, and fibrosis, carrying a high mortality rate. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a heterogeneous subset of stromal stem cells with immunonodulatory characteristics. MSCs are considered to act through multiple mechanisms to coordinate a dynamic, integrated response to liver inflammation and fibrosis, which prevents the progressive distortion of hepatic architecture. Accordingly, MSCs as well as their products have been investigated as a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of inflammatory and fibrotic liver diseases. In this review, we highlight the current findings on the MSC-based modulation of liver inflammation and fibrosis, and the possible use of MSCs in the therapy of immune-mediated liver pathology. We briefly describe the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in MSC-dependent modulation of cytokine production, phenotype and function of liver infiltrated inflammatory cells and compare effects of engrafted MSCs versus MSC-generated conditioned medium (MSC-CM) in the therapy of acute liver injury. In order to elucidate therapeutic potential of MSCs and their products in modulation of chronic liver inflammation and fibrosis, we present the current findings regarding pathogenic role of immune cells in liver fibrosis and describe mechanisms involved in MSC-dependent modulation of chronic liver inflammation with the brief overview of on-going and already published clinical trials that used MSCs for the treatment of immune mediated chronic liver diseases. The accumulating evidence shows that MSCs had a significant beneficial effect in the treatment of immune-mediated liver diseases.

  19. Hippocampal and Clinical Trajectories of Mild Cognitive Impairment with Suspected Non-Alzheimer's Disease Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jun Ku; Plitman, Eric; Nakajima, Shinichiro; Caravaggio, Fernando; Iwata, Yusuke; Gerretsen, Philip; Kim, Julia; Takeuchi, Hiroyoshi; Shinagawa, Shunichiro; Patel, Raihaan; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Graff-Guerrero, Ariel

    2017-01-01

    Suspected non-Alzheimer's disease pathology (SNAP) characterizes individuals showing neurodegeneration (e.g., hypometabolism) without amyloid-β (Aβ). Findings from previous studies regarding clinical and structural trajectories of SNAP are inconsistent. Using data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative, patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) were categorized into four groups: amyloid positive with hypometabolism (Aβ+ND+), amyloid only (Aβ+ND-), neither amyloid nor hypometabolism (Aβ-ND-), and SNAP (Aβ-ND+). Aβ+ND+(n = 33), Aβ+ND-(n = 32), and Aβ-ND-(n = 36) were matched to SNAP for age, gender, apolipoprotein E4 (apoE4) genotype, and scores on the Montreal Cognitive Assessment. Elderly controls (n = 40) were also matched to SNAP for age, gender, and apoE4 genotype. Longitudinal changes were compared across groups in terms of hippocampal volume, clinical symptoms, daily functioning, and cognitive functioning over a 2-year period. At baseline, no difference in cognition and functioning was observed between SNAP and Aβ+groups. SNAP showed worse clinical symptoms and impaired functioning at baseline compared to Aβ-ND-and controls. Two years of follow-up showed no differences in hippocampal volume changes between SNAP and any of the comparison groups. SNAP showed worse functional deterioration in comparison to Aβ-ND-and controls. However, Aβ+ND+ showed more severe changes in clinical symptoms in comparison to SNAP. Thus, patients with MCI and SNAP showed 1) more severe functional deterioration compared to Aβ-ND-and controls, 2) no differences with Aβ+ND-, and 3) less cognitive deterioration than Aβ+ND+. Future studies should investigate what causes SNAP, which is different from typical AD pathology and biomarker cascades.

  20. Liver fibrosis in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease - diagnostic challenge with prognostic significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stål, Per

    2015-10-21

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease in the Western world, with a prevalence of 20%. In a subgroup of patients, inflammation, ballooning degeneration of hepatocytes and a varying degree of fibrosis may develop, a condition named non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Advanced liver fibrosis (stage F3) and cirrhosis (stage F4) are histologic features that most accurately predict increased mortality in both liver-related and cardiovascular diseases. Patients with advanced fibrosis or cirrhosis are at risk for complications such as hepatocellular carcinoma and esophageal varices and should therefore be included in surveillance programs. However, liver disease and fibrosis are often unrecognized in patients with NAFLD, possibly leading to a delayed diagnosis of complications. The early diagnosis of advanced fibrosis in NAFLD is therefore crucial, and it can be accomplished using serum biomarkers (e.g., the NAFLD Fibrosis Score, Fib-4 Index or BARD) or non-invasive imaging techniques (transient elastography or acoustic radiation force impulse imaging). The screening of risk groups, such as patients with obesity and/or type 2 diabetes mellitus, for NAFLD development with these non-invasive methods may detect advanced fibrosis at an early stage. Additionally, patients with a low risk for advanced fibrosis can be identified, and the need for liver biopsies can be minimized. This review focuses on the diagnostic challenge and prognostic impact of advanced liver fibrosis in NAFLD.

  1. The increasing burden of potentially preventable liver disease among adult liver transplant recipients: A comparative analysis of liver transplant indication by era in Australia and New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Jessica; Balderson, Glenda; Hellard, Margaret; Gow, Paul; Strasser, Simone; Stuart, Katherine; Wigg, Alan; Jeffrey, Gary; Gane, Ed; Angus, Peter W

    2016-02-01

    Hepatitis C (HCV), hepatitis B (HBV), alcohol-related liver disease (ALD), and non-alcohol-related fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are leading indications for adult liver transplantation in Australia and New Zealand. However, these diseases are potentially preventable through effective primary and/or secondary prevention strategies. This study evaluates the relative contribution of potentially preventable liver diseases to liver transplant numbers in Australia and New Zealand over time. Prospectively recorded clinical, demographic, and outcome data were collected from the Australian and New Zealand Liver Transplant Registry for all primary adult liver transplants performed in Australia and New Zealand from 1 January 1985 until 31 December 2012. Potentially preventable liver disease was defined as HBV, HCV, NAFLD, ALD, and HCC. The etiology of liver disease leading to liver transplantation and the proportion of preventable liver disease-related liver transplantation was compared between Era 1 (1985-1993), Era 2 (1994-2003), and Era 3 (2004-2012). Overall, 1252 of 3266 adult primary liver transplants (38.3%) were performed for potentially preventable liver disease. There was a significant increase in the proportion of liver transplants because of preventable liver disease from 21.2% (93 of 439) in Era 1, to 49.8% (623 of 1252) in Era 2 and 63.5% (1000 of 1575) in Era 3 (P New Zealand have been because of potentially preventable liver diseases and the prevalence of these diseases has increased over time. This finding represents an opportunity for clinicians to make a significant impact on the overall burden of advanced liver disease in Australia and New Zealand by improving primary and secondary prevention measures. © 2015 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  2. The usefulness of measuring liver stiffness by transient elastography for assessing hepatic fibrosis in patients with various chronic liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamano, Masaya; Kojima, Kazuo; Akima, Takashi; Murohisa, Toshimitsu; Hashimoto, Takashi; Uetake, Chizu; Sugaya, Takeshi; Nakano, Masakazu; Hiraishi, Hideyuki; Yoneda, Masashi

    2012-05-01

    The degree of hepatic fibrosis is an important factor for prognosis and management of patients with chronic liver disease; however, liver biopsy is an invasive method of measuring fibrosis. Here, we investigated the diagnostic utility of liver stiffness, as measured by transient elastography in assessing hepatic fibrosis of viral chronic liver disease and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Four hundred and nine eligible patients underwent transient elastography to measure liver stiffness. Liver biopsy for histopathological assessment of fibrosis (F0-F4) was performed in 71 of these patients. Serum levels of hyaluronic acid were determined in 110 patients. We assessed liver stiffness in several chronic liver diseases and compared correlations among liver stiffness, hepatic fibrosis stage and serum hyaluronic acid levels. A steady stepwise increase in liver stiffness was observed with progressing severity of hepatic fibrosis (pliver biopsy. In 32 chronic viral hepatitis patients, measuring liver stiffness was useful for differentiating between F1, or F2, or F3 and F4, while in 32 NAFLD liver stiffness can differentiate between F0 and F1, F2, or F3, F1 and F3 or F4 and F2 and F4. There was no significant correlation between liver fibrotic stages and serum hyaluronic levels. The present data advocates measuring liver stiffness for assessing hepatic fibrosis is more sensitive in NAFLD than viral chronic diseases, and liver stiffness is useful compared to serum hyaluronic acid level in estimating hepatic fibrosis.

  3. [An interpretation of the AASLD practice guideline on the diagnosis and management of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in 2017].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Y M; Fu, N; Li, W C; Kong, L L; Yuan, X W; Zhang, S Y; Liu, L D; Lu, Y; Cui, L Y

    2017-09-20

    The American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) updated and published the Practice Guidance for the Diagnosis and Management of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) in July 2017, which provides recommendations for the accurate diagnosis, treatment, and effective prevention of NAFLD. Related metabolic diseases should be considered during the initial evaluation of patients suspected of NAFLD. Noninvasive diagnostic techniques including transient elastography, magnetic resonance elastography, and serum biochemical models should be used to evaluate the development and progression of liver fibrosis in patients with NAFLD. Clinical liver pathology report should clearly differentiate between nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFL), NAFL with inflammation, and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and identify the presence or absence of liver fibrosis and its degree. Early medication for NAFLD can only be used in patients with pathologically confirmed NASH and liver fibrosis, and it is not recommended to use pioglitazone and vitamin E as the first-line drugs for patients with NASH which has not been proven by biopsy or non-diabetic NASH patients. Foregut bariatric surgery can be considered for obese patients with NAFLD/NASH who meet related indications. It is emphasized that the risk factors for cardiovascular disease should be eliminated for NAFLD patients. Statins can be used for the treatment of dyslipidemia in patients with NAFLD/NASH, but they cannot be used in patients with decompensated liver cirrhosis. Routine screening or hepatocellular carcinoma surveillance is not recommended for NASH patients without liver cirrhosis. Cardiovascular disease should be taken seriously during liver transplantation evaluation. There is still no adequate clinical evidence for the treatment of NAFLD in children and adolescents, and intensive lifestyle intervention is recommended as the first-line therapy for such patients.

  4. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusi, Kenneth

    2009-04-01

    To increase awareness about the close interrelationship between nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus, and of recent diagnostic and treatment advances in the field. The perception of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease as an uncommon and benign condition is rapidly changing. Approximately 70% of persons with type 2 diabetes mellitus have a fatty liver and the disease follows a more aggressive course with necroinflammation and fibrosis (i.e. nonalcoholic steatohepatitis) in diabetes. New evidence suggests that it is not steatosis per se but the development of lipotoxicity-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and activation of inflammatory pathways that leads to progressive liver damage. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis is a leading cause of end-stage liver disease and contributes to cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Because nonalcoholic steatohepatitis may develop even in the presence of normal liver transaminases, a liver biopsy is still necessary for a definitive diagnosis. However, new imaging methods and plasma biomarkers are emerging as alternative diagnostic tools. Lifestyle intervention is the gold standard for the management of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Recent randomized controlled trials suggest thiazolidiendiones are promising therapeutic agents. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis is a frequently overlooked and potentially severe complication of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Patients may benefit from its early diagnosis and treatment.

  5. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guber, Robert D; Takyar, Varun; Kokkinis, Angela; Fox, Derrick A; Alao, Hawwa; Kats, Ilona; Bakar, Dara; Remaley, Alan T; Hewitt, Stephen M; Kleiner, David E; Liu, Chia-Ying; Hadigan, Colleen; Fischbeck, Kenneth H; Rotman, Yaron; Grunseich, Christopher

    2017-12-12

    To determine the prevalence and features of fatty liver disease in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA). Two groups of participants with SBMA were evaluated. In the first group, 22 participants with SBMA underwent laboratory analysis and liver imaging. In the second group, 14 participants with SBMA were compared to 13 female carriers and 23 controls. Liver biopsies were done in 4 participants with SBMA. Evidence of fatty liver disease was detected by magnetic resonance spectroscopy in all participants with SBMA in the first group, with an average dome intrahepatic triacylglycerol of 27% (range 6%-66%, ref ≤5.5%). Liver dome magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements were significantly increased in participants with SBMA in the second group relative to age- and sex-matched controls, with average disease and male control measurements of 17% and 3%, respectively. Liver biopsies were consistent with simple steatosis in 2 participants and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis in 2 others. We observed evidence of nonalcoholic liver disease in nearly all of the participants with SBMA evaluated. These observations expand the phenotypic spectrum of the disease and provide a potential biomarker that can be monitored in future studies. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology.

  6. Concepts and Treatment Approaches in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina L. Halegoua-De Marzio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD affects up to 30% of adults and is the most common liver disease in Western nations. NAFLD is associated with central adiposity, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, and cardiovascular disease. It encompasses the entire spectrum of fatty liver diseases from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH with lobular/portal inflammation, hepatocellular necrosis, and fibrosis. Of those who develop NASH, 15–25% will progress to end stage liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma over 10–20 years. Its pathogenesis is complex, and involves a state of lipid accumulation due to increased uptake of free fatty acids into the liver, impaired fatty acid beta oxidation, and increased incidence of de novo lipogenesis. Plasma aminotransferases and liver ultrasound are helpful in the diagnosis of NAFLD/NASH, but a liver biopsy is often required for definitive diagnosis. Many new plasma biomarkers and imaging techniques are now available that should improve the ability to diagnose NAFLD noninvasively Due to its complexity and extrahepatic complications, treatment of NAFLD requires a multidisciplinary approach with excellent preventative care, management, and treatment. This review will evaluate our current understanding of NAFLD, with a focus on existing therapeutic approaches and potential pharmacological developments.

  7. Rapid tests for the diagnosis of visceral leishmaniasis in patients with suspected disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boelaert, Marleen; Verdonck, Kristien; Menten, Joris; Sunyoto, Temmy; van Griensven, Johan; Chappuis, Francois; Rijal, Suman

    2014-01-01

    Background The diagnosis of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in patients with fever and a large spleen relies on showing Leishmania parasites in tissue samples and on serological tests. Parasitological techniques are invasive, require sophisticated laboratories, consume time, or lack accuracy. Recently, rapid diagnostic tests that are easy to perform have become available. Objectives To determine the diagnostic accuracy of rapid tests for diagnosing VL in patients with suspected disease presenting at health services in endemic areas. Search methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, CIDG SR, CENTRAL, SCI-expanded, Medion, Arif, CCT, and the WHO trials register on 3 December 2013, without applying language or date limits. Selection criteria This review includes original, phase III, diagnostic accuracy studies of rapid tests in patients clinically suspected to have VL. As reference standards, we accepted: (1) direct smear or culture of spleen aspirate; (2) composite reference standard based on one or more of the following: parasitology, serology, or response to treatment; and (3) latent class analysis. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed quality of included studies using the QUADAS-2 tool. Discrepancies were resolved by a third author. We carried out a meta-analysis to estimate sensitivity and specificity of rapid tests, using a bivariate normal model with a complementary log-log link function. We analysed each index test separately. As possible sources of heterogeneity, we explored: geographical area, commercial brand of index test, type of reference standard, disease prevalence, study size, and risk of bias (QUADAS-2). We also undertook a sensitivity analysis to assess the influence of imperfect reference standards. Main results Twenty-four studies containing information about five index tests (rK39 immunochromatographic test (ICT), KAtex latex agglutination test in urine, FAST agglutination test, rK26 ICT, and r

  8. Encephalopathy in Wilson disease: copper toxicity or liver failure?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ferenci, Peter; Litwin, Tomasz; Seniow, Joanna; Czlonkowska, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a complex syndrome of neurological and psychiatric signs and symptoms that is caused by portosystemic venous shunting with or without liver disease irrespective of its etiology...

  9. Pattern of chronic liver disease in Omani children -

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Congenital hepatic fibrosis. Glycogen storage disorder. Galactosaemia. Cystic Fibrosis. Chronic hepatitis (HBV x 2). Fatty Liver. Progressive familial Intrahepatic cholestasis. Budd Chiari Syndrome. Chronic granulomatous disease. Non diagnostic other one hepatitis B surface antigen and the e antigen were positive.

  10. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and the epidemic of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collantes, Rochelle; Ong, Janus P; Younossi, Zobair M

    2004-08-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is common in patients with the metabolic syndrome, and it is expected to become more common in countries where obesity, one of the components of the metabolic syndrome, is increasing.

  11. Monogenic diseases that can be cured by liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagiuoli, Stefano; Daina, Erica; D'Antiga, Lorenzo; Colledan, Michele; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2013-09-01

    While the prevalence of most diseases caused by single-gene mutations is low and defines them as rare conditions, all together, monogenic diseases account for approximately 10 in every 1000 births according to the World Health Organisation. Orthotopic liver transplantation (LT) could offer a therapeutic option in monogenic diseases in two ways: by substituting for an injured liver or by supplying a tissue that can replace a mutant protein. In this respect, LT may be regarded as the correction of a disease at the level of the dysfunctional protein. Monogenic diseases that involve the liver represent a heterogeneous group of disorders. In conditions associated with predominant liver parenchymal damage (i.e., genetic cholestatic disorders, Wilson's disease, hereditary hemochromatosis, tyrosinemia, α1 antitrypsin deficiency), hepatic complications are the major source of morbidity and LT not only replaces a dysfunctional liver but also corrects the genetic defect and effectively cures the disease. A second group includes liver-based genetic disorders characterised by an architecturally near-normal liver (urea cycle disorders, Crigler-Najjar syndrome, familial amyloid polyneuropathy, primary hyperoxaluria type 1, atypical haemolytic uremic syndrome-1). In these defects, extrahepatic complications are the main source of morbidity and mortality while liver function is relatively preserved. Combined transplantation of other organs may be required, and other surgical techniques, such as domino and auxiliary liver transplantation, have been attempted. In a third group of monogenic diseases, the underlying genetic defect is expressed at a systemic level and liver involvement is just one of the clinical manifestations. In these conditions, LT might only be partially curative since the abnormal phenotype is maintained by extrahepatic synthesis of the toxic metabolites (i.e., methylmalonic acidemia, propionic acidemia). This review focuses on principles of diagnosis, management

  12. HISTOPATHOLOGICAL PATTERNS OF LIVER DISEASES IN MEDICAL AUTOPSIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sampa Choudhury

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Liver is the site for wide spectrum of diseases, primary as well secondary, which maybe symptomatic or silent and incidentally diagnosed during routine investigation or autopsy examination. The main purpose of our study was to identify different spectrum of histopathological findings of liver in medical autopsies. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study was conducted in the Department of Pathology, Regional Institute of Medical Sciences (RIMS, Imphal. All the consecutive liver specimens dissected out during medical autopsy and postmortem were included in the study. Detailed clinical information including age and sex were obtained. All the liver specimens were examined meticulously and the gross findings were noted down. Histopathological slides were prepared from the representative areas and findings recorded. RESULTS In the present study, a total of 330 liver specimens were examined from medical autopsies during the period of 5 years. Among them, 39 cases were autolysed and remaining 291 cases were analysed grossly and histologically. 249 (85.5% cases were males and 42 (14.4% cases were females. 71 (24.39% cases had no obvious pathology, followed by fatty liver (20.96%, portal triaditis (18.55%, cirrhosis (14.08%, hepatitis (11.34% and steatohepatitis (5.15%. Other important cases like liver necrosis (2.40%, granulomatous lesion (0.68%, tuberculosis (0.68%, chronic venous congestion (0.68%, malaria pigment (0.34%, leukaemic infiltration (0.34% and bile duct hamartoma (0.34%. Fatty liver and cirrhosis was found to be most common in the age group of 41-50 years with male predominance. Incidentally, diagnosed liver diseases are not uncommon in medical autopsy. CONCLUSION We concluded that the autopsy examination of liver is very helpful to identify silent liver diseases as it is very common in apparently healthy individuals.This data may be utilised for a medical audit.

  13. [Role of probiotics in treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M; Wang, M C; Ni, R; Wang, J; Wang, L; Wang, G N; Zhang, L Y

    2017-01-20

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common chronic liver diseases in China and manifests as simple fatty liver, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Studies have shown that intestinal flora can affect the development and progression of NAFLD via the "gut-liver axis" . Probiotics are active microorganisms with beneficial effects on the host, and more and more studies have found that probiotics play a positive role in improving NAFLD. They are cheaper, less harmful, and safer compared with antibiotics and surgery, and therefore, it may become a new method for the prevention and treatment of NAFLD. This article reviews the research advances in probiotics in the treatment of NAFLD, in order to provide a basis for the treatment of NAFLD using probiotics.

  14. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease – an etiological approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florentina Ioniță Radu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is defined as the presence of fat in the liver (hepatic steatosis either on imaging or on liver histology only after the exclusion of secondary causes of fat accumulation in the liver (e.g. high alcohol drinking, drugs and other medical ailments. Considering the fact that there are many causes of hepatic steatosis, the term NAFLD is reserved for the liver disease that is predominantly associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome. The presence of inflammation and cell injury defines steatohepatitis (NASH which has the potential to evolve into cirrhosis and hepatocarcinoma, being, therefore, the stage of NAFLD most amenable to treatment. Among the treatments available, the most important are: weight loss, vitamin E and, last but not least, probiotics.

  15. Non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis in patients with alcoholic liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Rosa; Buzzetti, Elena; Roccarina, Davide; Tsochatzis, Emmanuel A

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) consists of a broad spectrum of disorders, ranging from simple steatosis to alcoholic steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. Fatty liver develops in more than 90% of heavy drinkers, however only 30%-35% of them develop more advanced forms of ALD. Therefore, even if the current “gold standard” for the assessment of the stage of alcohol-related liver injury is histology, liver biopsy is not reasonable in all patients who present with ALD. Currently, although several non-invasive fibrosis markers have been suggested as alternatives to liver biopsy in patients with ALD, none has been sufficiently validated. As described in other liver disease, the diagnostic accuracy of such tests in ALD is acceptable for the diagnosis of significant fibrosis or cirrhosis but not for lesser fibrosis stages. Existing data suggest that the use of non-invasive tests could be tailored to first tier screening of patients at risk, in order to diagnose early patients with progressive liver disease and offer targeted interventions for the prevention of decompensation. We review these tests and critically appraise the existing evidence. PMID:26494961

  16. [Suspected Non-Alzheimer's Disease Pathophysiology (SNAP) and Its Pathological Backgrounds in the Diagnosis of Preclinical and Clinical Alzheimer's Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Masahito

    2018-01-01

    Suspected non-Alzheimer's disease pathophysiology (SNAP) is a biomarker-based condition that is found in individuals with normal levels of amyloid-β protein (Aβ) markers (A-) and abnormal levels of markers of neurodegeneration or neuronal injury (N+). SNAP is found in 20-26% of cognitively normal (CN) individuals aged 65 years or older and 17-35% of individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Similarly, 7-39% of patients with clinically probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) dementia are negative for Aβ. The ε4 allele of the apolipoprotein E gene is underrepresented in individuals with SNAP compared with amyloid-positive (A+) groups. The progression of the cognitive impairments of individuals with SNAP was slower than that of A+N+ subjects who had a high likelihood of AD pathophysiology and faster than that of A-N- subjects. The pathological backgrounds of the individuals with SNAP were heterogeneous and included cerebrovascular disorders, mixed pathologies, and non-AD neurodegeneration, such as primary age-related tauopathy [PART, also known as senile dementia of the neurofibrillary tangle type (SD-NFT) (tangle-only dementia) at the dementia stage] and argyrophilic grain disease. Further clarification of SNAP is needed to better define the mechanisms underlying the progression of AD pathologies in older individuals.

  17. Nuclear magnetic tomography in the differential diagnosis of liver disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roedl, W.

    1985-05-01

    In evaluating nuclear magnetic tomography for the diagnosis of liver disease, one must differentiate between circumscribed and diffuse lesions. Nuclear magnetic tomography provides additional information for lesions which are echogenic on ultrasound and can differentiate between metastases, haemangiomas and hamartomas. In diffuse parenchymal disease measurement of relaxation time can differentiate between fatty liver, cirrhosis (alcoholic, primary biliary), haemochromatosis (cirrhotic transformation) and hepatoma. NMR spectroscopy is a method for the future.

  18. Research advances in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Hu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD has been developing rapidly in recent years and has become one of the most common liver diseases. However, its pathogenesis remains unclear, and there are no widely accepted therapeutic regimens. NAFLD has a complex pathogenesis with multiple factors involved, including insulin resistance, oxidative stress, bile acid metabolic disorders, and autophagy. This article reviews the pathogenesis of NAFLD in order to provide a reference for further research and clinical treatment in the future.

  19. Haemostatic abnormalities in cats with naturally occurring liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dircks, Brigitte; Nolte, Ingo; Mischke, Reinhard

    2012-07-01

    Alterations in the haemostatic system were characterized in cats with different naturally occurring liver diseases. The study looked at 44 healthy cats and 45 cats with different liver diseases confirmed histologically or cytologically (neoplasia, n=9; inflammation, n=12; hepatic lipidosis, n=13; other degenerative liver diseases, n=11). The following parameters were evaluated: platelet count; prothrombin time; activated partial thromboplastin time; thrombin time; factor (F) II, FV, FVII, FX, and FXIII activities; fibrinogen concentration; activities of antithrombin, protein C, plasminogen, and α(2)-plasmin inhibitor, and D-dimer concentration. In cats with liver diseases, 44/45 (98%) had one or more abnormalities of the coagulation parameters measured. In cats with inflammatory liver diseases, increased D-dimer concentrations and decreased FXIII activity were the most consistent abnormalities and were found in 83% and 75% of cats, respectively. The most common abnormality in cats with neoplastic liver disease was FXIII deficiency (78%). The most consistent abnormalities in cats with hepatic lipidosis were increased FV activity and D-dimer concentration with 54% of cats having values above the reference range for both parameters. Cats with miscellaneous degenerative liver disease most frequently showed FXIII deficiency (64%). The results of this study show that alterations of single haemostatic components are a frequent finding in cats with liver disease. Activation of haemostasis with subsequent consumptive coagulopathy (rather than decreased synthesis) seems to be responsible for these alterations. Increased blood levels of different haemostatic components in cats with inflammatory lesions may be related to an acute phase reaction. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation in coronary and brachial arteries in patients with suspected coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruhashi, Tatsuya; Kajikawa, Masato; Nakashima, Ayumu; Iwamoto, Yumiko; Iwamoto, Akimichi; Oda, Nozomu; Kishimoto, Shinji; Matsui, Shogo; Higaki, Tadanao; Shimonaga, Takashi; Watanabe, Noriaki; Ikenaga, Hiroki; Hidaka, Takayuki; Kihara, Yasuki; Chayama, Kazuaki; Goto, Chikara; Aibara, Yoshiki; Noma, Kensuke; Higashi, Yukihito

    2016-09-15

    Nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation, an index of endothelium-independent vasodilation, is measured for the assessment of vascular smooth muscle cell function or alterations of vascular structure. Both coronary and brachial artery responses to nitroglycerine have been demonstrated to be independent prognostic markers of cardiovascular events. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation in coronary and brachial arteries in the same patients. We measured nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation in coronary and brachial arteries in 30 subjects with suspected coronary artery disease who underwent coronary angiography (19 men and 11 women; mean age, 69.0±8.8years; age range, 42-85years). The mean values of nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation in the brachial artery, left anterior descending coronary artery, and left circumflex coronary artery were 12.6±5.2%, 11.6±10.3%, and 11.9±11.0%, respectively. Nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation in the brachial artery correlated significantly with that in the left anterior descending coronary artery (r=0.43, P=0.02) and that in the left circumflex coronary artery (r=0.49, P=0.006). There was also a significant correlation between nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation in the left anterior descending coronary artery and that in the left circumflex coronary artery (r=0.72, Parteries and that in coronary arteries are simultaneously present. Nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation in the brachial artery could be used as a surrogate for that in a coronary artery and as a prognostic marker for cardiovascular events. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Opioid Drugs in Patients With Liver Disease: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleimanpour, Hassan; Safari, Saeid; Shahsavari Nia, Kavous; Sanaie, Sarvin; Alavian, Seyed Moayed

    2016-01-01

    Context The liver, one of the most important organs of the body, is known to be responsible for several functions. The functional contribution of the liver to the metabolism of carbohydrates, protein, drugs and toxins, fats and cholesterol and many other biological processes are still unknown. Liver disorders are classified into two types: acute and chronic. Different drugs are used in liver diseases to treat and control pain. Most pain relief medications such as opioids are metabolized via the liver; therefore, the adverse reactions of drugs are probably higher for patients with liver disease. The current study aimed to evaluate the effects of opioid drugs on patients with liver disease; therefore, it is necessary to select suitable opioids for such patients. Evidence Acquisition This review was written by referring to research literature including 70 articles and four textbooks published from 1958 to 2015 on various reputable sites. Searches were carried out on the key phrases of narcotic pain relievers (opioids), acute and chronic hepatic failure, opioid adverse drug reactions, drug-induced liver injury (DILI) and other similar keywords. References included a variety of research papers (descriptive and analytical), intervention and review articles. Results In patients with liver disease, administration of opioid analgesics should be observed, accurately. As a general rule, lower doses of drugs should be administered at regular intervals based on the signs of drug accumulation. Secondly, the interactions of opioid drugs with different levels of substrates of the P450 cytochrome enzyme should be considered. Conclusions Pain management in patients with liver dysfunction is always challenging to physicians because of the adverse reactions of drugs, especially opioids. Opioids should be used cautiously since they can cause sedation, constipation and sudden encephalopathy effects. Since the clearance of these drugs in patients with hepatic insufficiency is decreased

  2. Hepatobiliary magnetic resonance imaging in patients with liver disease: correlation of liver enhancement with biochemical liver function tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukuk, Guido M.; Schaefer, Stephanie G.; Hadizadeh, Dariusch R.; Schild, Hans H.; Willinek, Winfried A. [University of Bonn, Department of Radiology, Bonn (Germany); Fimmers, Rolf [University of Bonn, Department of Medical Biometry, Informatics and Epidemiology, Bonn (Germany); Ezziddin, Samer [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bonn (Germany); Spengler, Ulrich [Department of Internal Medicine I, Bonn (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    To evaluate hepatobiliary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using Gd-EOB-DTPA in relation to various liver function tests in patients with liver disorders. Fifty-one patients with liver disease underwent Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced liver MRI. Based on region-of-interest (ROI) analysis, liver signal intensity was calculated using the spleen as reference tissue. Liver-spleen contrast ratio (LSCR) and relative liver enhancement (RLE) were calculated. Serum levels of total bilirubin, gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), serum albumin level (AL), prothrombin time (PT), creatinine (CR) as well as international normalised ratio (INR) and model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score were tested for correlation with LSCR and RLE. Pre-contrast LSCR values correlated with total bilirubin (r = -0.39; p = 0.005), GGT (r = -0.37; p = 0.009), AST (r = -0.38; p = 0.013), ALT (r = -0.29; p = 0.046), PT (r = 0.52; p < 0.001), GLDH (r = -0.55; p = 0.044), INR (r = -0.42; p = 0.003), and MELD Score (r = -0.53; p < 0.001). After administration of Gd-EOB-DTPA bilirubin (r = -0.45; p = 0.001), GGT (r = -0.40; p = 0.004), PT (r = 0.54; p < 0.001), AST (r = -0.46; p = 0.002), ALT (r = -0.31; p = 0.030), INR (r = -0.45; p = 0.001) and MELD Score (r = -0.56; p < 0.001) significantly correlated with LSCR. RLE correlated with bilirubin (r = -0.40; p = 0.004), AST (r = -0.38; p = 0.013), PT (r = 0.42; p = 0.003), GGT (r = -0.33; p = 0.020), INR (r = -0.36; p = 0.011) and MELD Score (r = -0.43; p = 0.003). Liver-spleen contrast ratio and relative liver enhancement using Gd-EOB-DTPA correlate with a number of routinely used biochemical liver function tests, suggesting that hepatobiliary MRI may serve as a valuable biomarker for liver function. The strongest correlation with liver enhancement was found for the MELD Score. (orig.)

  3. Inherited metabolic liver diseases in infants and children: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Barić

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Inborn errors of metabolism, which affect the liver are a large, continuously increasing group of diseases. Their clinical onset can occur at any age, from intrauterine period presenting as liver failure already at birth to late adulthood. Inherited metabolic disorders must be considered in differential diagnosis of every unexplained liver disease. Specific diagnostic work-up for either their confirmation or exclusion should start immediately since any postponing can result in delayed diagnosis and death or irreversible disability. This can be particularly painful while many inherited metabolic liver diseases are relatively easily treatable if diagnosed on time, for instance galactosemia or hereditary fructose intolerance by simple dietary means. Any unexplained liver disease, even one looking initially benign, should be considered as a potential liver failure and therefore should deserve proper attention. Diagnosis in neonates is additionally complicated because of the factors which can mask liver disease, such as physiological neonatal jaundice, normally relatively enlarged liver and increased transaminases at that age. In everyday practice, in order to reveal the etiology, it is useful to classify and distinguish some clinical patterns which, together with a few routine, widely available laboratory tests (aminotransferases, prothrombine time, albumin, gammaGT, total and conjugated bilirubin, ammonia, alkaline phosphatase and glucose make the search for the cause much easier. These patterns are isolated hyperbilirubinemia, syndrome of cholestasis in early infancy, hepatocellular jaundice, Reye syndrome, portal cirrhosis and isolated hepatomegaly. Despite the fact that some diseases can present with more than one pattern (for instance, alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency as infantile cholestasis, but also as hepatocellular jaundice, and that in some disesases one pattern can evolve into another (for instance, Wilson disease from hepatocellular

  4. Association between nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Uğur; Türkoğlu, Sedat; Balcioğlu, Serhat; Tavil, Yusuf; Karakan, Tarkan; Cengel, Atiye

    2007-09-01

    To demonstrate whether there is a relationship between the presence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and the presence and extent of coronary artery disease (CAD). Ninety-two consecutive patients who planned to undergo coronary angiographies (CAG) without known CAD, other than findings of acute coronary syndrome, were enrolled in this study. Abdominal ultrasonography was performed before the CAG to detect NAFLD. CAD was defined as a stenosis of at least 50% in at least one major coronary artery. The extent of CAD was measured according to the number of major coronary artery/arteries affected by CAD. All the risk factors for CAD were included in a binary logistic regression model. Forward, backward, or step-wise selections were not used. P<0.05 was accepted as being significant. Sixty-five of the 92 patients (70.7%) were detected, by abdominal ultrasonography, to have fatty liver and 43 patients out of 92 (46.7%) were detected, by CAG, to have significant CAD. According to the results of logistic regression analysis, the presence of NAFLD independently increased the risk for CAD, as seen in CAG [odds ratio (OR), 95% confidence interval (CI): 6.73 (1.14-39.61); P=0.035]; this was despite factoring in the other risk factors for CAD and the components of metabolic syndrome. NAFLD was more commonly found in patients as the extent of CAD increased (P=0.001). The presence of NAFLD is independently associated with the presence and extent of CAD. Future studies are needed to explain the mechanisms of this relationship.

  5. Liver fibrosis scores predict liver disease mortality in the United States population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unalp-Arida, Aynur; Ruhl, Constance E

    2017-07-01

    Fatty liver disease is common in the United States and worldwide due to changing lifestyles and can progress to fibrosis and cirrhosis contributing to premature death. We examined whether liver fibrosis scores were associated with increased overall and disease-specific mortality in a United States population-based prospective survey with up to 23 years of linked-mortality data. Data were analyzed from 14,841 viral hepatitis-negative adult participants in the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1988-1994. Liver fibrosis was predicted using the aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index (APRI), fibrosis-4 (FIB-4) score, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease fibrosis score (NFS), and Forns score. Participants were passively followed for mortality, identified by death certificate underlying or contributing causes, by linkage to National Death Index records through 2011. Hazard ratios (HR) for mortality were calculated using Cox proportional hazards regression to adjust for mortality risk factors. During follow-up, cumulative mortality was 28.0% from all causes and 0.82% with liver disease, including primary liver cancer. Elevated liver disease mortality was found with an intermediate to high APRI (HR, 9.44; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.02-17.73), intermediate (HR, 3.15; 95% CI, 1.33-7.44) or high (HR, 25.14; 95% CI, 8.38-75.40) FIB-4 score, high NFS (HR, 6.52; 95% CI, 2.30-18.50), and intermediate (HR, 3.58; 95% CI, 1.78-7.18) or high (HR, 63.13; 95% CI, 22.16-179.78) Forns score. Overall mortality was also greater with higher fibrosis scores. In the United States population, higher liver fibrosis scores were associated with increased liver disease and overall mortality. Liver health management with common clinical measures of fibrosis risk stratification merits further investigation. (Hepatology 2017;66:84-95). © 2017 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases. This article has been contributed to by U.S. Government

  6. Epstein-Barr viral load before a liver transplant in children with chronic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakibazad, Nader; Honar, Naser; Dehghani, Seyed Mohsen; Alborzi, Abdolvahab

    2014-12-01

    Many children with chronic liver disease require a liver transplant. These patients are prone to various infections, including Epstein-Barr virus infection. This study sought to measure the Epstein-Barr viral load by polymerase chain reaction before a liver transplant. This cross-sectional study was done at the Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran, in 2011. All patients were aged younger than 18 years with chronic liver disease and were candidates for a liver transplant at the Shiraz Nemazee Hospital Organ Transplant Center. They had been investigated regarding their demographic characteristics, underlying disease, laboratory findings, and Epstein-Barr viral load by real-time TaqMan polymerase chain reaction. Ninety-eight patients were studied and the mean age was 6.5 ± 5.9 years. Cryptogenic cirrhosis was the most-prevalent reason for liver transplant, and the death rate before a transplant was 15%. Among the study subjects, 6 had measurable Epstein-Barr viral load by polymerase chain reaction before the transplant, and 4 of them had considerably higher Epstein-Barr viral loads (more than 1000 copies/mL). With respect to the close prevalence of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease (6%) and the high Epstein-Barr viral load in the patients before a transplant (4%), high pretransplant Epstein-Barr viral load can be considered a risk factor for posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder.

  7. Intestinal permeability is increased in children with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and correlates with liver disease severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgio, Valentina; Miele, Luca; Principessa, Luigi; Ferretti, Francesca; Villa, Maria Pia; Negro, Valentina; Grieco, Antonio; Alisi, Anna; Nobili, Valerio

    2014-06-01

    Increased intestinal permeability seems to play a major role in non-alcoholic liver disease development and progression. To investigate the prevalence of altered intestinal permeability in children with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and to study its potential association with the stage of liver disease. We performed a case-control study examining intestinal permeability in children using the lactulose-mannitol bowel permeability test. Overall, 39 consecutive patients (30 males, median age 12 years) and 21 controls (14 males, median age 11.8 years) were included. The lactulose/mannitol ratio resulted impaired in 12/39 patients (31%) and none of the controls. Intestinal permeability was higher in children with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (lactulose/mannitol ratios: 0.038±0.037 vs. 0.008±0.007, pnon-alcoholic fatty liver disease group, intestinal permeability was increased in children with steatohepatitis compared to those with steatosis only (0.05±0.04 vs. 0.03 vs. 0.03, psteatohepatitis (2.27±0.68 vs. 2.80±0.35, pnon-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and correlates with the severity of the disease. Copyright © 2014 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Chronic Liver Diseases in Children: Clinical Profile and Histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhole, Sachin Devidas; Kher, Archana S; Ghildiyal, Radha G; Tambse, Manjusha P

    2015-07-01

    The main aim of the study is to study the clinical profile of disorders of the liver and hepatobiliary system in paediatric patients and to correlate the histopathology findings of liver biopsy in chronic liver disease. Another aim being to assess the prognosis and to know the outcome and the effects of treatment in chronic liver diseases in paediatric age group. It was a prospective study, included the clinical profile of Chronic Liver Diseases (CLD) in children and the histopathological correlation. A total of 55 children were thoroughly investigated by doing relevant investigations and liver biopsy. A male predominance (60%) was noted with maximum incidence in the age group of 6-12 years. The incidence of CLD was 1.1% of total admissions. The most common presenting complaint was jaundice and abdominal distension. Hepatic encephalopathy was noted in 29% patients. Hepatomegaly was seen in 63% patients and spleenomegaly was seen in 60% patients. The incidence of cirrhosis on liver biopsy was 42% (23cases) in CLD patients. The most common diagnosis on histopathology was Wilson's disease (22%), followed by hepatitis and autoimmune hepatitis. The predominant spectrum of CLD was metabolic liver disease and also the predominant cause of death. As the incidence of CLD is quite low, a very high index of suspicion is required for its diagnosis. Some uncommon causes of CLD in children were seen in our study like neutral lipid storage disease, α1-Antitrypsin deficiency disease, lupus hepatitis, Alagille syndrome and Budd-Chiari syndrome. A patient of CLD with jaundice and hepatomegaly should be treated aggressively as those are the poor prognostic indicators of the disease. Hepatic encephalopathy and cirrhosis are also associated with poor outcome in patients with CLD. Liver biopsy histopathology by an expert and its correlation with laboratory investigations plays an important role in the diagnosis of CLD. The major cause of deaths in patients with CLD is due to end stage

  9. Recidivism in Liver Transplant Recipients With Alcoholic Liver Disease: Analysis of Demographic, Psychosocial, and Histology Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satapathy, Sanjaya K; Eason, James D; Nair, Satheesh; Dryn, Oleksandra; Sylvestre, Pamela B; Kocak, Mehmet; Vanatta, Jason M

    2015-10-01

    Liver transplant for alcoholic liver disease requires identifying potential recipients at risk for recidivism. We sought to identify risk factors for recidivism and survival in recipients of liver transplant with alcoholic liver disease. Demographic, psychosocial, and histology features were evaluated as risk factors toward harmful recidivism in 148 recipients of liver transplant with alcoholic liver disease. Based on the univariate analysis using Cox proportional hazards model, duration of alcohol abstinence 6 months (HR 3.74; P = .011, 95% CI: 1.36-10.3), non-alcohol related criminal history (HR 3.18; P = .032, 95% CI: 1.1-9.15), support from immediate family (HR 0.24; P = .0061, 95% CI: 0.09-0.67), and active smoking at the time of liver transplant (HR 2.74; P = .041, 95% CI: 1-7.53) were identified as significant predictors for recidivism. Older patients had less likelihood of alcohol relapse (HR 0.91; P = .0014, 95% CI: 0.87-0.97) on univariate model. In multivariate model older patients (HR 0.91; P = .004, 95% CI: 0.86-0.97) and patients who have immediate family support (HR 0.27; P = .012, 95% CI: 0.10-0.76) predicated against recidivism. Suggestive features of alcoholic hepatitis on liver explant did not predict recidivism or long-term survival. One-, three-, and five-year patient survival rates estimated by Kaplan-Meier survival model in the recipients that remained abstinent were 95%, 87%, and 80%, compared with 87%, 49%, and 49% for the recipients with recidivism (P = .001). Recidivism is associated with earlier death after liver transplant. Older recipients and patients with immediate family support are less likely to have alcohol relapse, and have better long-term survival.

  10. Liver transplantation for massive hepatomegaly due to polycystic liver disease: an extreme case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gringeri, E; D'Amico, F E; Bassi, D; Mescoli, C; Bonsignore, P; Boetto, R; Lodo, E; Noaro, G; Polacco, M; D'Amico, F; Boccagni, P; Zanus, G; Brolese, A; Cillo, U

    2012-09-01

    Polycystic liver disease (PLD) is due to a genetic disorder and frequently coexists with polycystic kidney disease (PKD). If the cysts produce symptomatology owing to their number and size, many palliative treatments are available. When none of the liver parenchyma is spared, or kidney insufficiency is marked, the only potentially curable treatment is liver transplantation (LT). A 49-year old woman, diagnosed with PLD and PKD, was listed in January 2008 for combined LT and kidney transplantation (KT). A compatible organ became available 8 months later. Despite preserved liver function, the patient's clinical condition was poor; she experienced dyspnea, advanced anorexia, abdominal pain, and severe ascites. At LT, which took 9 hours and was performed using the classic technique, the liver was hard, massive in size (15.5 kg), and not dissociable from the vena cava. The postoperative course was complicated by many septic episodes, the last one being fatal for the patient at 4 months after transplantation. LT for PLD in many series shows a high mortality rate. The Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score does not stage patients properly, because liver function is usually preserved. The liver can achieve a massive size causing many symptoms, especially malnutrition and ascites; in this setting LT is the only possible treatment. Patients with a low MELD score undergo LT with severe malnutrition that predisposes them to greater susceptibility to sepsis. To identify predictor factors, beyond MELD criteria that relate to the increased liver volume before development of late symptoms is essential to expeditiously treat patients with the poorest prognosis to improve their outcomes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Role of capsule endoscopy in suspected celiac disease: A European multi-centre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luján-Sanchis, Marisol; Pérez-Cuadrado-Robles, Enrique; García-Lledó, Javier; Juanmartiñena Fernández, José-Francisco; Elli, Luca; Jiménez-García, Victoria-Alejandra; Egea-Valenzuela, Juan; Valle-Muñoz, Julio; Carretero-Ribón, Cristina; Fernández-Urién-Sainz, Ignacio; López-Higueras, Antonio; Alonso-Lázaro, Noelia; Sanjuan-Acosta, Mileidis; Sánchez-Ceballos, Francisco; Rosa, Bruno; González-Vázquez, Santiago; Branchi, Federica; Ruano-Díaz, Lucía; Prieto-de-Frías, César; Pons-Beltrán, Vicente; Borque-Barrera, Pilar; González-Suárez, Begoña; Xavier, Sofía; Argüelles-Arias, Federico; Herrerías-Gutiérrez, Juan-Manuel; Pérez-Cuadrado-Martínez, Enrique; Sempere-García-Argüelles, Javier

    2017-01-28

    To analyze the diagnostic yield (DY), therapeutic impact (TI) and safety of capsule endoscopy (CE). This is a multi-centre, observational, analytical, retrospective study. A total of 163 patients with suspicion of celiac disease (CD) (mean age = 46.4 ± 17.3 years, 68.1% women) who underwent CE from 2003 to 2015 were included. Patients were divided into four groups: seronegative CD with atrophy (Group-I, n = 19), seropositive CD without atrophy (Group-II, n = 39), contraindication to gastroscopy (Group-III, n = 6), seronegative CD without atrophy, but with a compatible context (Group-IV, n = 99). DY, TI and the safety of CE were analysed. The overall DY was 54% and the final diagnosis was villous atrophy ( n = 65, 39.9%), complicated CD ( n = 12, 7.4%) and other enteropathies ( n = 11, 6.8%; 8 Crohn's). DY for groups I to IV was 73.7%, 69.2%, 50% and 44.4%, respectively. Atrophy was located in duodenum in 24 cases (36.9%), diffuse in 19 (29.2%), jejunal in 11 (16.9%), and patchy in 10 cases (15.4%). Factors associated with a greater DY were positive serology (68.3% vs 49.2%, P = 0.034) and older age ( P = 0.008). On the other hand, neither sex nor clinical presentation, family background, positive histology or HLA status were associated with DY. CE results changed the therapeutic approach in 71.8% of the cases. Atrophy was associated with a greater TI (92.3% vs 45.3%, P < 0.001) and 81.9% of the patients responded to diet. There was one case of capsule retention (0.6%). Agreement between CE findings and subsequent histology was 100% for diagnosing normal/other conditions, 70% for suspected CD and 50% for complicated CD. CE has a high DY in cases of suspicion of CD and it leads to changes in the clinical course of the disease. CE is safe procedure with a high degree of concordance with histology and it helps in the differential diagnosis of CD.

  12. Multidetector CT Enterography versus Double-Balloon Enteroscopy: Comparison of the Diagnostic Value for Patients with Suspected Small Bowel Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To compare the diagnostic value of multidetector CT enterography (MDCTE and double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE for patients with suspected small bowel diseases. Methods. From January 2009 to January 2014, 190 patients with suspected small bowel diseases were examined with MDCTE and DBE. The characteristics of the patients, detection rates, diagnostic yields, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were described and analyzed. Results. The overall detection rates of DBE and MDCTE were 92.6% and 55.8%, respectively (P<0.05, while the overall diagnostic yields were 83.2% and 33.7%, respectively (P<0.05. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of DBE were all higher than those of MDCTE. DBE had a higher diagnostic yield for OGIB (87.3% versus 20.9%, P<0.05. The diagnostic yields of DBE were higher than those of MDCTE for inflammatory diseases, angioma/angiodysplasia, and diverticulums, while being not for gastrointestinal tumors/polyps. Conclusions. The diagnostic value of DBE for small bowel diseases is better than that of MDCTE as a whole, but if gastrointestinal tumors are suspected, MDCTE is also needed to gain a comprehensive and accurate diagnosis.

  13. The impact of hepatocyte phase imaging from infancy to young adulthood in patients with a known or suspected liver lesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolbe, Amy B. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Podberesky, Daniel J.; Towbin, Alexander J. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Zhang, Bin [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Hepatocyte-specific contrast agents are used to help characterize liver lesions. However, there are no studies evaluating the utility of these agents in detecting or diagnosing pediatric liver lesions. The purpose of this study is to assess the impact of the hepatocyte phase of imaging on lesion detection, tumor staging and diagnostic confidence. All patients undergoing an MRI between September 2010 and August 2012 using gadoxetate disodium as the contrast agent were included in this study. Each exam was duplicated so that one copy contained all sequences, including the hepatocyte phase of imaging, and the other copy contained all sequences except the hepatocyte phase of imaging. One reviewer evaluated all exams in a blinded, random fashion. Data tracked included imaging diagnosis, confidence in diagnosis, number of lesions and PRETEXT grade. The imaging diagnosis was compared to histopathology, when available. Data were analyzed for the study population as well as the subset of patients diagnosed with focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH). There were 112 patients (56 male; mean age: 9.25 years) included in this study. A total of 33 patients had a malignant tumor and the remainder had either a benign lesion or no lesion. The addition of the hepatocyte phase of imaging significantly improved the diagnostic confidence for all patients (P < 0.0001) as well as specifically for patients diagnosed with FNH (P = 0.003). In nearly a quarter of patients, the hepatocyte phase of imaging allowed the reviewer to detect additional lesions (P = 0.005). In the patients with a malignant tumor, the addition of the hepatocyte phase of imaging changed the PRETEXT grade in 7/30 patients although the results were not significant (P = 0.161). The addition of the hepatocyte phase of imaging helps to improve lesion detection and increase the diagnostic confidence for all liver tumors, as well as for FNH in particular. (orig.)

  14. Anesthesia and liver biopsy techniques for pigeon guillemots (Cepphus columba) suspected of exposure to crude oil in marine environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degernes, Laurel A.; Harms, Craig A.; Golet, Gregory H.; Mulcahy, Daniel M.

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports on the anesthesia and liver biopsy techniques used in adult and nestling pigeon guillemots (Cepphus columba) to test for continued exposure to residual crude oil in the marine environment. Populations of pigeon guillemots have declined significantly in Prince William Sound, Alaska, USA, possibly because of residual effects of crude oil in the environment after the Exxon Valdez oil spill in March 1989. Measurement of hepatic cytochrome P450 1A (CYP1A) is currently the best way to assess crude oil exposure from food sources; however, lethal sampling to obtain adequate liver tissue was not desirable in this declining population of birds. As part of a larger study to identify factors limiting the recovery of pigeon guillemots and other seabird populations, we surgically collected liver samples from adult and nestling guillemots to provide samples for measurement of hepatic CYP1A concentrations. Results from the larger study were reported elsewhere. Liver samples were taken from 26 nestling (1998) and 24 adult (1999) guillemots from a previously oiled site (Naked Island; 12 chicks, 13 adults) and from a nonoiled site (Jackpot Island/Icy Bay; 14 chicks, 11 adults). The birds were anesthetized with isoflurane. No surgical complications occurred with any of the birds and all adult and nestling birds survived after surgery to the point of release or return to the nest. Thirteen out of 14 chicks from the Jackpot Island/Icy Bay and 8 out of 12 chicks from Naked Island fledged. Four chicks at Naked Island were depredated before fledging. All adults abandoned their nests after surgery, so the study sites were revisited the following summer (2000) in an attempt to assess overwinter survival of the adults. All but 1 adult biopsied bird at the nonoiled site (Icy Bay) was found renesting, whereas only 2 birds at the previously oiled site (Naked Island) were similarly observed. The percent of 1999 breeders at Naked Island that returned to their nest sites to breed

  15. [Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and steatohepatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pár, Gabriella; Horváth, Gábor; Pár, Alajos

    2013-07-21

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, the hepatic manifestations of metabolic syndrome with close association with inzulin resistance and obesity, are the most common liver diseases, affecting up to a third of the population worldwide. They confer increased risk for hepatocellular carcinoma as well as cardiovascular diseases. The review aims to summarize advances in epidemiology, pathogenesis and clinical management of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Besides liver biopsy and biomarkers, a novel non-invasive diagnostic tool the called "controlled attenuation parameter" measuring the attenuation of ultrasound generated by the transient elastography transducer, can quantitatively assess the hepatic fat content and differentiate between steatosis grades. At the same time, liver stiffness (fibrosis) can also be evaluated. The authors present their own results obtained with the latter procedure. In non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, the lifestyle intervention, weight loss, diet and exercise supported by cognitive behavioural therapy represent the basis of management. Components of metabolic syndrome (obesity, dyslipidaemia, diabetes and arterial hypertension) have to be treated. Although there is no approved pharmacological therapy for NASH, it seems that long lasting administration of vitamin E in association with high dose ursodeoxycholic acid may be beneficial. In addition, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid substitution can also decrease liver fat, however, the optimal dose is not known yet. Further controlled clinical studies are warranted to establish the real value of any suggested treatment modalities for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, although these are in experimental phase yet.

  16. Time spent in hospital after liver transplantation: Effects of primary liver disease and comorbidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovikkai, Chutwichai; Charman, Susan C; Praseedom, Raaj K; Gimson, Alexander E; van der Meulen, Jan

    2016-01-01

    AIM To explore the effect of primary liver disease and comorbidities on transplant length of stay (TLOS) and LOS in later admissions in the first two years after liver transplantation (LLOS). METHODS A linked United Kingdom Liver Transplant Audit - Hospital Episode Statistics database of patients who received a first adult liver transplant between 1997 and 2010 in England was analysed. Patients who died within the first two years were excluded from the primary analysis, but a sensitivity analysis was also performed including all patients. Multivariable linear regression was used to evaluate the impact of primary liver disease and comorbidities on TLOS and LLOS. RESULTS In 3772 patients, the mean (95%CI) TLOS was 24.8 (24.2 to 25.5) d, and the mean LLOS was 24.2 (22.9 to 25.5) d. Compared to patients with cancer, we found that the largest difference in TLOS was seen for acute hepatic failure group (6.1 d; 2.8 to 9.4) and the largest increase in LLOS was seen for other liver disease group (14.8 d; 8.1 to 21.5). Patients with cardiovascular disease had 8.5 d (5.7 to 11.3) longer TLOS and 6.0 d (0.2 to 11.9) longer LLOS, compare to those without. Patients with congestive cardiac failure had 7.6 d longer TLOS than those without. Other comorbidities did not significantly increase TLOS nor LLOS. CONCLUSION The time patients spent in hospital varied according to their primary liver disease and some comorbidities. Time spent in hospital of patients with cancer was relatively short compared to most other indications. Cardiovascular disease and congestive cardiac failure were the comorbidities with a strong impact on increased LOS. PMID:28058226

  17. NON-ALCOHOLIC FATTY LIVER DISEASE IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.V. Chistova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome that represents a totality of interrelated carbohydrate metabolism and lipid disorders, as well as a mechanism regulating arterial tension and endothelium function is one of the critical issues in pediatrics. In recent years, children with metabolic syndrome are increasingly diagnosed with liver injuries symptoms that are associated with a fatty transformation of the liver [1–3]. In this case, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, a liver manifestation of metabolic syndrome is diagnosed. The diagnosis is confirmed in the absence of alcohol abuse in the past medical history, virus and autoimmune liver disease markers, elimination of toxic and drug influence, as wells as disorders of copper and iron exchange in the patient’s system. One of the key risk factors for developing NAFLD in children is overeating and reduced physical activities. It was believed in the past that NAFLD is relatively benign, however, there is evidence in current literature that this is a pathological condition that may develop and result in extreme fibrotic alterations in the liver parenchymatous tissue all the way to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma [4]. Early-stage identification and timely launch of therapy for NAFLD in children represents one of the most important objectives in modern healthcare. Key words: metabolic syndrome, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, children, steatohepatosis. (Pediatric Pharmacology. – 2010; 7(6:68-72

  18. Study of Hepatic Osteodystrophy in Patients with Chronic Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karoli, Yogesh; Karoli, Ritu; Fatima, Jalees; Manhar, Mohammad

    2016-08-01

    Chronic Liver Disease (CLD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. It involves haemodynamic and metabolic complications. Hepatic Osteodystrophy is a metabolic bone disease that may occur in individuals with chronic liver disease. It can significantly affect morbidity and quality of life of these patients. Fractures are also associated with an excess mortality. It has been an under recognized and inadequately studied complication among Indian population. An early diagnosis is essential to correct reversible risk factors which predispose to bone mass loss. To assess the prevalence of metabolic bone disease and identify the risk factors associated with hepatic osteodystrophy in patients with cirrhosis. This was an observational, cross-sectional, hospital based study conducted at a medical college hospital. All patients more than 20-year-old, diagnosed with chronic liver disease/Cirrhosis were enrolled. They were subjected to haematological, biochemical investigations, evaluation of Vitamin D and other hormonal parameters. Bone Mineral Density (BMD) was estimated by Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DEXA). A total of 72 patients with mean age 50.04±11.24 years were included in the study. Amongst causes of chronic liver disease were alcoholic liver disease 22 (30.6%), CLD due to hepatitis B 24 (33.3%) and chronic hepatitis C 26 (36.1%). Twenty one (29.2%) patients had normal BMD while 51 (70.8%) had a low BMD. Out of these 51 patients, 36 (70.6%) were diagnosed of osteopenia and 15 (29.4%) others were found to have osteoporosis. Vitamin D levels and severity of liver disease had correlation with low BMD. Low BMD is highly prevalent in patients with chronic liver disease of variable aetiologies. We advocate more randomised and prospective studies to be conducted on homogeneous groups with chronic liver disease in its various stages. In view of numerous therapeutic options available both for liver disease and bone disease, it is prudent to characterize

  19. Correlation of serum apelin level with coronary calcium score in patients with suspected coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Hassan Zeitoun

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an independent association between apelin and CCS in patients with suspected CAD. Apelin emerges as a possible novel biomarker for CAD, but this result remains to be proved prospectively.

  20. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: Synopsis of current developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onyekwere, C A; Ogbera, A O; Samaila, A A; Balogun, B O; Abdulkareem, F B

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) which is defined as the accumulation of fat>5% of liver weight is increasingly becoming an important cause of chronic liver disease. This article tries to chronicle advances that have occurred in the understanding of the pathogenesis, pathology as well as the management of this disease. We have done a Medline search on published work on the subject and reviewed major conference proceedings in the preceding years. The Pathogenesis involves a multi-hit process in which increased accumulation of triglycerides in face of insulin resistance results in increased susceptibility to inflammatory damage mediated by increased expression of inflammatory cytokines and adipokines, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction, endoplasmic reticulum stress and gut derived endotoxemia. An interplay of multiple metabolic genetic expression and environmental factors however determine which patient with NAFLD will progress from simple steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and liver cirrhosis. The minimum criteria for diagnosis of NASH are steatosis, ballooning and lobular inflammation; fibrosis is not required. The NASH Clinical Research Network (CRN), histological scoring system is used to grade and stage the disease for standardization. The management of NAFLD consists of treating liver disease as well as associated metabolic co-morbidities such as obesity, hyperlipidaemia, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Patient education is important as their insight and commitment is pivotal, and lifestyle modification is the first line of treatment. Improvement in liver histology in non-diabetic NASH patients has been reported with use of Vitamin E. Other liver-related therapies under investigations include pentoxyfiylins, Caspar inhibitors, Resveratrol as well as probiotics. The prognosis (both overall and liver-related mortality) for simple steatosis is not different from that of the general population however.

  1. Diabetes mellitus and renal involvement in chronic viral liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iovanescu, V F; Streba, C T; Ionescu, M; Constantinescu, A F; Vere, C C; Rogoveanu, I; Moța, E

    2015-01-01

    Chronic viral liver disease is often associated with other conditions. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is frequently reported in this context and may play a role in the progression of the liver disease to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Renal disease is also an important extrahepatic manifestation of hepatitis viral infection and its presence is associated with poor prognosis and management issues. Our study had multiple purposes: to determine the frequency of the association between chronic viral liver disease and diabetes mellitus, evaluate the potential of diabetes mellitus as a risk factor for HCC and assess an eventual renal involvement. We included in our study a number of 246 patients with chronic liver disease, from whom 136 were diagnosed with chronic viral hepatitis and 110 with viral liver cirrhosis. These patients were assessed by using a clinical examination and a series of tests, including serum transaminase levels, serum bilirubin, serum albumin, markers of cholestasis, fasting plasma glucose levels, serum creatinine, urea, albuminuria, Addis-Hamburger test, electrophoresis of urinary proteins, abdominal ultrasound and, in some cases, CT examination. We obtained the following results: diabetes mellitus is often associated with chronic liver disease of viral etiology, having been identified in 18.29% of the patients in our study. Age above 60 in patients with chronic hepatitis (p=0.013diabetes mellitus. Renal disease was present in 13.4% of the patients with chronic liver disease and it was especially associated with liver cirrhosis and hepatitis C virus. The most common form of renal injury was glomerulonephritis. Acute kidney injury was diagnosed only in cirrhotic patients as hepatorenal syndrome, occurring in 7.27% of the subjects, while chronic kidney disease was identified only in two cases of chronic viral hepatitis. Four patients in our study were diagnosed with HCC and none of them presented diabetes mellitus. Our study revealed that there is a

  2. The natural history of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Stephen; Argo, Curtis

    2010-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease has a variable prognosis which is predictable to an extent based on the presence or absence of histological liver injury. Past studies have determined a number of clinical and laboratory parameters which predict greater severity on the initial biopsy, although all of these measures have limitations and biopsy remains the gold standard at this time. For patients with early stage non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), about one third will progress to stage 3 or 4 (cirrhosis) over 5-10 years. Thus, early-stage NASH constitutes one of the groups most likely to benefit from treatments now undergoing investigation. Among those who progress to NASH cirrhosis, about 25% will develop major complications of portal hypertension within 3 years. In contrast, non-NASH fatty liver tends to be stable over time, although there appears to be an increased cancer risk in all forms of fatty liver, albeit greater in NASH compared to non-NASH fatty liver. Interestingly, the cause of death among patients with NASH is more often due to cardiovascular disease or non-liver malignancy than cirrhosis. However, the accelerated risk of cirrhosis in this group compared to cardiovascular disease suggests that this picture is likely to change in the foreseeable future. Meanwhile, the relationship between these comorbidities will increasingly lead to patients with both coronary disease or malignancy and NASH-related cirrhosis presenting clinicians with a very challenging set of problems in coming years. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. [Occurrence of autoantibodies in patients with alcoholic liver disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szulzyk, Tomasz; Parfieniuk-Kowerda, Anna; Luto, Magdalena; Lapiński, Tadeusz Wojciech; Flisiak, Robert

    2012-09-01

    Autoantigens are present in normal cells and tissues. However, in physiological conditions autoantigens pose no danger due to the phenomenon of immunologic tolerance. The loss of immunologic tolerance and following autoagression could result from the structure changes of autoantigens as an effect of the activity of chemical factors, such as acetaldehyde, which is metabolite of ethanol. The aim of the study was to evaluate of occurrence of autoantibodies in patients with alcoholic liver disease. Ninety-five patients with chronic alcoholic liver disease and 16 healthy controls were enrolled in this study. The presence of autoantibodies against liver proteins were assessed. The occurrence of studied autoantibodies was evaluated with regard to the degree of liver damage. Inclusion criteria were: age over 21 yrs, at least 3-yrs history of alcoholic liver disease, HBV and HCV-negativity, absence of autoimmunological diseases. The presence of autoantibodies AMA-M2, SLA/LP, LKM-1, LC1, anti-F-actin, desmin and miozin in serum was assessed by immunoblotting method and ANA by ELISA. Autoantibodies were demonstrated in sera of 33% of patients. Single isolated autoantibodies were present in 24% of patients, whereas 9% of patients have several autoantibodies. The most prevalent were anti-F-actin (19%) and antinuclear antibodies (11%). Occurrence of anti-F-actin antibodies increased with degree of liver damage. Concluding these results suggest that alcohol may contribute to the activation of autoimmune processes, and particularly against contractile filaments of cells for which F-actin antibodies are produced.

  4. Multicentric Castleman's disease with multiple hepatic mass lesions mimicking malignant liver tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, Toshimitsu; Nasuno, Masaru; Kaiume, Hiroko; Hiroshima, Yuki; Sumi, Masahiko; Watanabe, Masahide; Inoue, Dai; Masaki, Yasufumi; Sato, Yasuharu; Kojima, Masaru; Kobayashi, Hikaru

    2017-01-01

    Multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD) is a rare, non-malignant lymphoproliferative disorder. We report a case of MCD with multiple liver masses. A 26-year-old woman presented with asymptomatic anemia and hypoalbuminemia. Laboratory tests detected high CRP levels and findings indicative of polyclonal gammopathy. Abdominal CT revealed multiple hepatic large masses (≤10 cm) and partial calcification in the right lobe. Multiple enlarged lymph nodes were also identified in the cardiophrenic angle and porta hepatis. We suspected hepatic malignancy, but pathological examinations of the liver and lymph nodes demonstrated polyclonal plasma cell infiltration and fibrosis. IL-6 staining was positive for plasma cell infiltration of lymph nodes. A few plasma cells were positive for IgG4, and tests for HIV and HHV-8 were negative. Serum IL-6 and plasma VEGF levels were both elevated (45 and 536 pg/ml, respectively). The patient was diagnosed with plasma cell type MCD. We started treatment with PSL 1 mg/kg/day, which led to improvement of anemia, hypoalbuminemia, and high CRP levels. Marginal regression of liver masses was also observed. At the last follow-up, the patient had been progression-free for 18 months. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a plasma cell type MCD with liver masses.

  5. Liver mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of experimental nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira C.P.M.S.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress and hepatic mitochondria play a role in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of the disease. Fatty liver was induced in Wistar rats with a choline-deficient diet (CD; N = 7 or a high-fat diet enriched with PUFAs-omega-3 (H; N = 7 for 4 weeks. The control group (N = 7 was fed a standard diet. Liver mitochondrial oxidation and phosphorylation were measured polarographically and oxidative stress was estimated on the basis of malondialdehyde and glutathione concentrations. Moderate macrovacuolar liver steatosis was observed in the CD group and mild liver steatosis was observed in the periportal area in the H group. There was an increase in the oxygen consumption rate by liver mitochondria in respiratory state 4 (S4 and a decrease in respiratory control rate (RCR in the CD group (S4: 32.70 ± 3.35; RCR: 2.55 ± 0.15 ng atoms of O2 min-1 mg protein-1 when compared to the H and control groups (S4: 23.09 ± 1.53, 17.04 ± 2.03, RCR: 3.15 ± 0.15, 3.68 ± 0.15 ng atoms of O2 min-1 mg protein-1, respectively, P < 0.05. Hepatic lipoperoxide concentrations were significantly increased and the concentration of reduced glutathione was significantly reduced in the CD group. A choline-deficient diet causes moderate steatosis with disruption of liver mitochondrial function and increased oxidative stress. These data suggest that lipid peroxidation products can impair the flow of electrons along the respiratory chain, causing overreduction of respiratory chain components and enhanced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species. These findings are important in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

  6. Cellular senescence in livers from children with end stage liver disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Gutierrez-Reyes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Senescent cells occur in adults with cirrhotic livers independent of the etiology. AIM: Investigate the presence rate of cellular senescence and expression of cell cycle check points in livers from children with end stage disease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Livers of five children aged three years or less undergoing liver transplantation due to tyrosinemia (n = 1, biliary atresia (n = 2, or fulminant hepatitis (n = 2 were analyzed for senescence associated beta-galactosidase (SA-betagal activity and p16INK4a, p21cip1 and p53. All livers displayed positive cellular staining for SA-betagal in the canals of Hering and interlobular biliary ducts. In the presence of cirrhosis (3/5 cases SA-betagal was found at the cholangioles and hepatocytes surrounding the regenerative nodules. Children with fulminant hepatic failure without cirrhosis had significant ductular transformation with intense SA-betagal activity. No SA-betagal activity was evident in the fibrous septa. Staining for p53 had a similar distribution to that observed for SA-betagal. Staining for p16(INK4a and p21(cip1 was positive in the explanted liver of the patient with tyrosinemia, in the hepatocytes, the canals of Hering, cholangioles and interlobular bile ducts. In the livers with fulminant hepatitis, p21(cip1 staining occurred in the areas of ductular transformation and in the interlobular bile ducts. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Cellular senescence in livers of children with end stage disease is associated with damage rather than corresponding to an age dependent phenomenon. Further studies are needed to support the hypothesis that these senescence markers correlate with disease progression.

  7. The association of coffee intake with liver cancer incidence and chronic liver disease mortality in male smokers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lai, G Y; Weinstein, S J; Albanes, D; Taylor, P R; McGlynn, K A; Virtamo, J; Sinha, R; Freedman, N D

    2013-01-01

    Coffee intake is associated with reduced risk of liver cancer and chronic liver disease as reported in previous studies, including prospective ones conducted in Asian populations where hepatitis B viruses (HBVs...

  8. Serum apolipoprotein A1 and haptoglobin, in patients with suspected drug-induced liver injury (DILI as biomarkers of recovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Peta

    Full Text Available There is a clear need for better biomarkers of drug-induced-liver-injury (DILI.We aimed to evaluate the possible prognostic value of ActiTest and FibroTest proteins apoliprotein-A1, haptoglobin and alpha-2-macroglobulin, in patients with DILI.We analyzed cases and controls included in the IMI-SAFE-T-DILI European project, from which serum samples had been stored in a dedicated biobank. The analyses of ActiTest and FibroTest had been prospectively scheduled. The primary objective was to analyze the performance (AUROC of ActiTest components as predictors of recovery outcome defined as an ALT <2x the upper limit of normal (ULN, and BILI <2x ULN.After adjudication, 154 patients were considered to have DILI and 22 were considered to have acute liver injury without DILI. A multivariate regression analysis (ActiTest-DILI patent pending combining the ActiTest components without BILI and ALT (used as references, apolipoprotein-A1, haptoglobin, alpha-2-macroglobulin and GGT, age and gender, resulted in a significant prediction of recovery with 67.0% accuracy (77/115 and an AUROC of 0.724 (P<0.001 vs. no prediction 0.500. Repeated apolipoprotein-A1 and haptoglobin remained significantly higher in the DILI cases that recovered (n = 65 versus those that did not (n = 16, at inclusion, at 4-8 weeks and at 8-12 weeks. The same results were observed after stratification on APAP cases and non-APAP cases.We identified that apolipoprotein-A1 and haptoglobin had significant predictive values for the prediction of recovery at 12 weeks in DILI, enabling the construction of a new prognostic panel, the DILI-ActiTest, which needs to be independently validated.

  9. Current management of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisboa, Quelson Coelho; Costa, Silvia Marinho Ferolla; Couto, Cláudia Alves

    2016-12-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by hepatic accumulation of lipid in patients who do not consume alcohol in amounts generally considered harmful to the liver. NAFLD is becoming a major liver disease in Eastern countries and it is related to insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome. Treatment has focused on improving insulin sensitivity, protecting the liver from oxidative stress, decreasing obesity and improving diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, hepatic inflammation and fibrosis. Lifestyle modification involving diet and enhanced physical activity associated with the treatment of underlying metabolic are the main stain in the current management of NAFLD. Insulin-sensitizing agents and antioxidants, especially thiazolidinediones and vitamin E, seem to be the most promising pharmacologic treatment for non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, but further long-term multicenter studies to assess safety are recommended.

  10. Current management of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    QUELSON COELHO LISBOA

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is characterized by hepatic accumulation of lipid in patients who do not consume alcohol in amounts generally considered harmful to the liver. NAFLD is becoming a major liver disease in Eastern countries and it is related to insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome. Treatment has focused on improving insulin sensitivity, protecting the liver from oxidative stress, decreasing obesity and improving diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, hepatic inflammation and fibrosis. Lifestyle modification involving diet and enhanced physical activity associated with the treatment of underlying metabolic are the main stain in the current management of NAFLD. Insulin-sensitizing agents and antioxidants, especially thiazolidinediones and vitamin E, seem to be the most promising pharmacologic treatment for non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, but further long-term multicenter studies to assess safety are recommended.

  11. Minimal hepatic encephalopathy amongst chronic liver disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: The mean age of the patients was 39.66± 9.86years. The types of CLD identified were chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The mean time for the NCT-A was 37.18secs and 62.02secs, and for NCT-B was 58.88secs and 135.51secs, each for the controls and patients respectively (p- 0.000) ...

  12. Obesity, Nutrition and Liver Disease in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Feldstein, Ariel E; Patton-Ku, Dana; Boutelle, Kerri N.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of childhood obesity has reached epidemic proportions in the US and many other parts of the world. With obesity comes a variety of adverse health outcomes and metabolic complications. The liver in particular seems to be significantly impacted by fat deposition in the presence of obesity. In this article we discuss several aspects of childhood obesity from epidemiology and associated metabolic complications, to management strategies and therapy with particular attention to the i...

  13. Spontaneous Rupture of the Liver in Hypertensive Disease of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This is a case of spontaneous rupture of the liver in a 34-year old G5P4+0 (3 alive) with hypertensive disease of pregnancy at gestational age of 34weeks. This case is reported because the condition is a recognized but rare complication of hypertensive disease of pregnancy. The typical features of this condition as ...

  14. Associations between liver histology and cortisol secretion in subjects with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Targher, Giovanni; Bertolini, Lorenzo; Rodella, Stefano; Zoppini, Giacomo; Zenari, Luciano; Falezza, Giancarlo

    2006-03-01

    To assess associations between the activity of hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and liver histology in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). In a cross-sectional study, we enrolled 50 consecutive, overweight, NAFLD patients and 40 control subjects who were comparable for age, sex and body mass index (BMI). NAFLD (by liver biopsy), HPA axis activity (by 24-hour urinary free cortisol [UFC] excretion and serum cortisol levels after 1 mg dexamethasone), insulin resistance (by homeostasis model assessment: HOMA-IR), and metabolic syndrome (MetS) features. NAFLD patients had markedly higher (P fibrosis stage (P fibrosis, but not necroinflammation, after adjustment for potential confounders. These results suggest that NAFLD patients have a subtle, chronic overactivity in the HPA axis (that is closely associated with the severity of liver histopathology) leading to subclinical hypercortisolism that might be implicated in the development of NAFLD.

  15. Functions of autophagy in normal and diseased liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaja, Mark J.; Ding, Wen-Xing; Donohue, Terrence M.; Friedman, Scott L.; Kim, Jae-Sung; Komatsu, Masaaki; Lemasters, John J.; Lemoine, Antoinette; Lin, Jiandie D.; Ou, Jing-hsiung James; Perlmutter, David H.; Randall, Glenn; Ray, Ratna B.; Tsung, Allan; Yin, Xiao-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy has emerged as a critical lysosomal pathway that maintains cell function and survival through the degradation of cellular components such as organelles and proteins. Investigations specifically employing the liver or hepatocytes as experimental models have contributed significantly to our current knowledge of autophagic regulation and function. The diverse cellular functions of autophagy, along with unique features of the liver and its principal cell type the hepatocyte, suggest that the liver is highly dependent on autophagy for both normal function and to prevent the development of disease states. However, instances have also been identified in which autophagy promotes pathological changes such as the development of hepatic fibrosis. Considerable evidence has accumulated that alterations in autophagy are an underlying mechanism of a number of common hepatic diseases including toxin-, drug- and ischemia/reperfusion-induced liver injury, fatty liver, viral hepatitis and hepatocellular carcinoma. This review summarizes recent advances in understanding the roles that autophagy plays in normal hepatic physiology and pathophysiology with the intent of furthering the development of autophagy-based therapies for human liver diseases. PMID:23774882

  16. Fibrosis Assessment in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) in 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaswala, Dharmesh H; Lai, Michelle; Afdhal, Nezam H

    2016-05-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a spectrum of liver pathologies characterized by hepatic steatosis with a history of little to no alcohol consumption or secondary causes of hepatic steatosis. The prevalence of NAFLD is 20-25 % of the general population in the Western countries and is associated with metabolic risk factors such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia. The spectrum of disease ranges from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis. Advanced fibrosis is the most significant predictor of mortality in NAFLD. It is crucial to assess for the presence and degree of hepatic fibrosis in order to make therapeutic decisions and predict clinical outcomes. Liver biopsy, the current gold standard to assess the liver fibrosis, has a number of drawbacks such as invasiveness, sampling error, cost, and inter-/intra-observer variability. There are currently available a number of noninvasive tests as an alternative to liver biopsy for fibrosis staging. These noninvasive fibrosis tests are increasingly used to rule out advanced fibrosis and help guide disease management. While these noninvasive tests perform relatively well for ruling out advanced fibrosis, they also have limitations. Understanding the strengths and limitations of liver biopsy and the noninvasive tests is necessary for deciding when to use the appropriate tests in the evaluation of patients with NAFLD.

  17. The effect of liver disease on the cardiovascular system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik; Møller, Søren

    2007-01-01

    THE encyclopedic guide to hepatology - for consultation by clinicians and basic scientistsPreviously the Oxford Textbook of Clinical Hepatology, this two-volume textbook is now with Blackwell Publishing. It covers basic, clinical and translational science (converting basic science discoveries int...... and discusses new areas in more depth such as stem cells, genetics, genomics, proteomics, transplantation, mathematics and much more.Plus, it comes with a fully searchable CD ROM of the entire content....... into the practical applications to benefit people).Edited by ten leading experts in the liver and biliary tract and their diseases, along with outstanding contributions from over 200 international clinicians, this text has global references, evidence and extensive subject matter - giving you the best science...... and clinical practice discussed by the best authors.It includes unique sections on: Symptoms and signs in liver diseaseIndustrial diseases affecting the liverThe effects of diseases of other systems on the liverThe effects of liver diseases on other systemsIt 's bigger and more extensive than other books...

  18. [Advances in the pathogenesis of non alcoholic fatty liver disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pár, Alajos; Pár, Gabriella

    2017-06-01

    Non alcoholic fatty liver disease is the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome, and the most common liver disease. Its more aggressive form is the non alcoholic steatohepatitis. Multiple genetic and environmental factors lead to the accumulation of triglicerides and the inflammatory cascade. High fat diet, obesity, adipocyte dysfunction with cytokine production, insulin resistance and increased lipolysis with free fatty acid flux into the liver - all are the drivers of liver cell injury. Activation of inflammasome by damage- or pathogen-associated molecular patterns results in "steril inflammation" and immune response, while the hepatic stellate cells and progenitor cells lead to fibrogenesis. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and gut dysbiosis are also of pivotal importance in the inflammation. Among the susceptible genetic factors, mutations of patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 3 and the transmembrane 6 superfamily 2 genes play a role in the development and progression of the disease, similarly as do epigenetic regulators such as microRNAs and extracellular vesicles. Better understanding of the pathogenesis of non alcoholic fatty liver disease may identify novel therapeutic agents that improve the outcome of the disease. Orv Hetil. 2017; 158(23): 882-894.

  19. Clinical approaches to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenger, Katherine JP; Allard, Johane P

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) ranges from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), leading to fibrosis and potentially cirrhosis, and it is one of the most common causes of liver disease worldwide. NAFLD is associated with other medical conditions such as metabolic syndrome, obesity, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. NASH can only be diagnosed through liver biopsy, but noninvasive techniques have been developed to identify patients who are most likely to have NASH or fibrosis, reducing the need for liver biopsy and risk to patients. Disease progression varies between individuals and is linked to a number of risk factors. Mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis are associated with diet and lifestyle, influx of free fatty acids to the liver from adipose tissue due to insulin resistance, hepatic oxidative stress, cytokines production, reduced very low-density lipoprotein secretion and intestinal microbiome. Weight loss through improved diet and increased physical activity has been the cornerstone therapy of NAFLD. Recent therapies such as pioglitazone and vitamin E have been shown to be beneficial. Omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and statins may offer additional benefits. Bariatric surgery should be considered in morbidly obese patients. More research is needed to assess the impact of these treatments on a long-term basis. The objective of this article is to briefly review the diagnosis, management and treatment of this disease in order to aid clinicians in managing these patients. PMID:24587650

  20. [Adult-onset Still's disease with liver failure requiring liver transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terán, Alvaro; Casafont, Fernando; Fábrega, Emilio; Martínez-Taboada, Víctor Manuel; Rodríguez-Valverde, Vicente; Pons-Romero, Fernando

    2009-12-01

    We present the case of a 23-year-old man with fever of unknown origin, who developed acute liver failure 2 months after symptom onset, requiring an urgent liver transplantation. The diagnosis of adult-onset Still's disease was established after the reappearance of symptoms after transplantation, and high doses of corticosteroids were used to control disease activity. Subsequently, given the impossibility of tapering the steroid dose, interleukin-1 receptor blocking treatment was started with satisfactory outcome. We also review the published literature.

  1. A new clinical tool for the quantification of myocardial CT perfusion imaging in patients with suspected Ischemic Heart Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz Muñoz, A.; Dux-Santoy Hurtado, L.; Rodriguez Palomares, J.L.; Piella Fenoy, G.

    2016-07-01

    In the clinical practice, the evaluation of myocardial perfusion by using Computed Tomography (CT) Imaging is usually performed visually or semi-quantitatively. The scarcity of quantitative perfusion data not always allows a proper diagnose of patients which are suspected of suffering from some diseases, such as Ischemic Heart Disease (IHD). In this work, a clinical tool for the automatic quantification of myocardial perfusion in patients with suspected IHD is proposed. Myocardial perfusion is assessed based on a combined diagnosis protocol (CT/CTP protocol) which involves the acquisition of two contrastenhanced CT images, one obtained at rest and another acquired under pharmacological stress. The clinical tool allows the automatic quantification of perfusion in different myocardial segments defined according to the 16-AHA-segmentation model of the left ventricle, by providing the mean of Hounsfield Units in those regions. Based on this analysis, the clinicians can compare the values at baseline and at hyperemia, and they can better determine hypoperfusion defects in patients with IHD. The validation of the clinical tool was performed by comparing automatic and manual perfusion measurements of 10 patients with suspected IHD who were previously assessed with Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) for perfusion analysis. A strong linear correlation was found between the automatic and manual results. Afterwards, perfusion defects obtained from CT/CTP protocol were compared to perfusion defects from SPECT, to assess the applicability of this clinical tool for the diagnosis of IHD. (Author)

  2. Direct access exercise electrocardiography: a new service that improves the management of suspected ischaemic heart disease in the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClements, B. M.; Campbell, N. P.; Cochrane, D.; Stockman, S.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess the safety and value of an exercise electrocardiography service for the diagnosis of suspected ischaemic heart disease to which general practitioners have direct access. DESIGN--Direct access to a hospital exercise electrocardiography service was offered on a trial basis to 122 general practitioners in a defined urban area. Maximal exercise tests were performed according to the modified Bruce protocol and the results were dispatched promptly to the referring doctors who were responsible for the subsequent management of their patients. SETTING--All general practices in north and west Belfast (combined list size about 180,000) and the regional medical cardiology centre. PATIENTS--212 request forms were received in a two year period and 192 eligible patients attended for exercise testing. All patients were suspected to have pain due to myocardial ischaemia, were aged electrocardiography for patients with suspected ischaemic heart disease is safe, feasible, and helpful to general practitioners. This service seems to reduce the number of patients referred to cardiology outpatient clinics and to facilitate the management of these patients in the community. PMID:8043332

  3. Association of fetuin B with markers of liver fibrosis in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Thomas; Linder, Nicolas; Schaudinn, Alexander; Busse, Harald; Berger, Joachim; Lichtinghagen, Ralf; Keim, Volker; Wiegand, Johannes; Karlas, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    The liver-derived plasma protein fetuin B is associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and impaired glucose homeostasis in mice. However, its association with non-invasive ultrasound- and magnetic resonance (MR)-based markers of liver fibrosis and steatosis, the enhanced liver fibrosis (ELF) score, liver biopsy, as well as rs738409 in PNPLA3, has not been elucidated in NAFLD, so far. The association of circulating fetuin B and transient elastography (TE), controlled attenuation parameter (CAP), (1)H-MR-spectroscopy, the ELF score, liver biopsy, as well as risk alleles in rs738409 in PNPLA3, was studied in 101 NAFLD patients as compared to 15 healthy controls. Serum fetuin B levels did not differ between NAFLD patients and controls (p = 0.863). Fetuin B was independently and negatively associated with transient elastography liver stiffness measurement (LSM) (p = 0.002), but not with the steatosis markers CAP or (1)H-MR-spectroscopy. Fetuin B serum concentrations were significantly lower in individuals with LSM > 7.0 kPa as compared to patients with LSM B. Moreover, serum fetuin B significantly depended on number of rs738409 risk alleles (p = 0.026). Fetuin B is independently and negatively associated with non-invasive markers of liver fibrosis and PNPLA3 status in NAFLD patients but does not show a correlation with the hepatic lipid content. Future studies need to elucidate the pathophysiological significance of fetuin B in NAFLD and its potential value as predictor for disease severity.

  4. 18F-fluoride Positron Emission Tomography Measurements of Regional Bone Formation in Hemodialysis Patients with Suspected Adynamic Bone Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Frost, Michelle L.; Compston, Juliet E.; Goldsmith, David; Moore, Amelia; Blake, Glen M; Siddique, Musib; Skingle, Linda; Fogelman, Ignac

    2013-01-01

    18F-fluoride positron emission tomography ((18)F-PET) allows the assessment of regional bone formation and could have a role in the diagnosis of adynamic bone disease (ABD) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The purpose of this study was to examine bone formation at multiple sites of the skeleton in hemodialysis patients (CKD5D) and assess the correlation with bone biopsy. Seven CKD5D patients with suspected ABD and 12 osteoporotic postmenopausal women underwent an (18)F-PET scan,...

  5. Focal inflammatory diseases of the liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oto, Aytekin; Akhan, Okan; Oezmen, Mustafa

    1999-10-01

    Inflammatory lesions constitute an important subgroup of focal liver lesions. They may mimic primary or metastatic neoplastic lesions and their differentiation from neoplasia is clinically very important since management of the patient significantly changes. Radiologists should have an important role in both the diagnosis and therapy of these lesions by performing percutaneous aspirations and drainages. In this review we discussed the radiological findings of pyogenic abscesses, amebic abscesses, candidiasis, tuberculosis, hydatic cysts, fascioliasis, ascariasis, schistosomiasis, and sarcoidosis with a special emphasis on US, CT and MR characteristics.

  6. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and dyslipidemia: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsiki, Niki; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Mantzoros, Christos S

    2016-08-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease worldwide, progressing from simple steatosis to necroinflammation and fibrosis (leading to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, NASH), and in some cases to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Inflammation, oxidative stress and insulin resistance are involved in NAFLD development and progression. NAFLD has been associated with several cardiovascular (CV) risk factors including obesity, dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, hypertension and smoking. NAFLD is also characterized by atherogenic dyslipidemia, postprandial lipemia and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) dysfunction. Most importantly, NAFLD patients have an increased risk for both liver and CV disease (CVD) morbidity and mortality. In this narrative review, the associations between NAFLD, dyslipidemia and vascular disease in NAFLD patients are discussed. NAFLD treatment is also reviewed with a focus on lipid-lowering drugs. Finally, future perspectives in terms of both NAFLD diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets are considered. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Vitamin D supplementation for chronic liver diseases in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjelakovic, Goran; Nikolova, Dimitrinka; Bjelakovic, Marko

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vitamin D deficiency is often reported in people with chronic liver diseases. Therefore, improving vitamin D status could have a beneficial effect on people with chronic liver diseases. OBJECTIVES: To assess the beneficial and harmful effects of vitamin D supplementation in people...... that compared vitamin D at any dose, duration, and route of administration versus placebo or no intervention in adults with chronic liver diseases. Vitamin D could have been administered as supplemental vitamin D (vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) or vitamin D2 (ergocalciferol)), or an active form of vitamin D (1α...... in the remaining nine trials were vitamin D insufficient (less than 20 ng/mL). All trials administered vitamin D orally. Mean duration of vitamin D supplementation was 0.5 years and follow-up was 0.6 years. Eleven trials (831 participants; 40% women; mean age 52 years) tested vitamin D3, one trial (18 men; mean...

  8. Anesthetic Management for Prolonged Incidental Surgery in Advanced Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Riddhi; Subramaniam, Rajeshwari; Sardar, Arijit

    2017-01-01

    In spite of advances in perioperative management, operative procedures in patients with chronic liver disease pose a significant challenge for the anesthesiologist due to multisystem involvement, high risk of postoperative hepatic decompensation, and mortality. We describe the anesthetic management of an elderly patient with advanced liver disease (model for end-stage liver disease 16) for prolonged abdominal surgery. The use of invasive hemodynamic monitoring, point-of-care biochemical, and hematological surveillance coupled with prompt correction of all abnormalities was responsible for good outcome. The patient's inguinal swellings turned out to be extensions of a large peritoneal mesothelioma, necessitating a large abdominal incision and blood loss. Analgesia was provided by bilateral transversus abdominis plane blocks, which helped to reduce opioid use and rapid extubation.

  9. Evaluation of Chronic Liver Disease: Does Ultrasound Scoring Criteria Help?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaista Afzal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Noninvasive approaches for assessment of liver histology include routine laboratory tests and radiological evaluation. The purpose of our study was to determine the utility of a simplified scoring system based on routinely evaluated ultrasound features for the evaluation of chronic liver disease and correlate it with the histological findings. For this cross-sectional analytical study the data was collected prospectively by nonprobability purposive sampling technique. The ultrasound variables/parameters and their assigned scoring system that was a modified version adopted from published literature were evaluated. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of the liver morphological score and combined score of liver morphology and sizes was determined using stage and grade as reference standard. Our results show a high sensitivity and PPV of liver morphological sonographic evaluation for the staging and grading of CLD respectively thus supporting it as a screening diagnostic strategy. Of the three liver morphology variables, specificity of liver surface evaluation was highest for the stage of fibrosis and grade of inflammation. The simplified ultrasound scoring system evaluated in our study is clinically relevant and reproducible for differentiating patients with CLD with mild or no fibrosis from moderate to severe fibrosis.

  10. Plasma fibronectin concentrations in patients with liver diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, C; Dejgaard, A; Clemmensen, I

    1983-01-01

    Plasma, obtained just prior to diagnostic liver biopsy in 71 patients with various liver diseases, was examined by electroimmunoassay using immunoglobulin against human fibronectin and purified plasma fibronectin as standard. The plasma fibronectin concentration was not significantly different from...... age- and sex-matched healthy controls in patients with chronic persistent or chronic active hepatitis (n = 7), primary biliary cirrhosis (n = 8), alcoholic fatty liver (n = 9), alcoholic hepatitis (n = 10), and alcoholic cirrhosis (n = 16). Patients with acute viral hepatitis (type A (n = 2); type B...... (n = 7); type non A, non B (n = 1] had significantly (P less than 0.01) raised plasma fibronectin concentrations (median 506 mg/l (range 339-804] compared to controls (median 399 mg/l (range 304-462]. Morbidly obese patients with fatty liver (n = 11) had significantly (P less than 0.001) raised...

  11. Coexistence of Cardiomyopathy and Chronic Liver Disease in Non-Moderate Drinkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mani Prasad Gautam

    2013-03-01

    Conclusions:Our study showed a strongly positive relationship on the coexistence of chronic liver disease and cardiomyopathy among the non-moderate drinkers. Non-moderate drinkers with chronic liver disease have a high likelihood of having a concurrent clinical or sub-clinical heart muscle disease and vice versa. Keywords: alcohol; chronic liver disease; heart muscle disease; non-moderate drinking.

  12. Treatment and follow-up of children with common chronic liver diseases in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LYU Xintong

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Chronic liver diseases in children greatly affect their growth and development and quality of life in future. There are many causes of chronic liver diseases in children, and such causes, diet, and treatment guidance are closely associated with prognosis. This article discusses the guidance and follow-up of common chronic liver diseases in children, such as infantile cholestatic liver disease, chronic hepatitis B, hepatolenticular degeneration, and nonalcoholic fatter liver disease, in order to deepen the understanding of these diseases among patients, raise the awareness of follow-up in medical staff, and improve the cure rate of liver diseases with different causes and children’s quality of life.

  13. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Metabolic Syndrome after Liver Transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitto, Stefano; Villa, Erica

    2016-04-02

    Liver transplant is the unique curative therapy for patients with acute liver failure or end-stage liver disease, with or without hepatocellular carcinoma. Increase of body weight, onset of insulin resistance and drug-induced alterations of metabolism are reported in liver transplant recipients. In this context, post-transplant diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, and arterial hypertension can be often diagnosed. Multifactorial illnesses occurring in the post-transplant period represent significant causes of morbidity and mortality. This is especially true for metabolic syndrome. Non-alcoholic steatosis and steatohepatitis are hepatic manifestations of metabolic syndrome and after liver transplant both recurrent and de novo steatosis can be found. Usually, post-transplant steatosis shows an indolent outcome with few cases of fibrosis progression. However, in the post-transplant setting, both metabolic syndrome and steatosis might play a key role in the stratification of morbidity and mortality risk, being commonly associated with cardiovascular disease. The single components of metabolic syndrome can be treated with targeted drugs while lifestyle intervention is the only reasonable therapeutic approach for transplant patients with non-alcoholic steatosis or steatohepatitis.

  14. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Metabolic Syndrome after Liver Transplant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Gitto

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Liver transplant is the unique curative therapy for patients with acute liver failure or end-stage liver disease, with or without hepatocellular carcinoma. Increase of body weight, onset of insulin resistance and drug-induced alterations of metabolism are reported in liver transplant recipients. In this context, post-transplant diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, and arterial hypertension can be often diagnosed. Multifactorial illnesses occurring in the post-transplant period represent significant causes of morbidity and mortality. This is especially true for metabolic syndrome. Non-alcoholic steatosis and steatohepatitis are hepatic manifestations of metabolic syndrome and after liver transplant both recurrent and de novo steatosis can be found. Usually, post-transplant steatosis shows an indolent outcome with few cases of fibrosis progression. However, in the post-transplant setting, both metabolic syndrome and steatosis might play a key role in the stratification of morbidity and mortality risk, being commonly associated with cardiovascular disease. The single components of metabolic syndrome can be treated with targeted drugs while lifestyle intervention is the only reasonable therapeutic approach for transplant patients with non-alcoholic steatosis or steatohepatitis.

  15. Resolving blood stasis to improve liver microcirculation and treat chronic liver diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XU Lieming

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic liver diseases are frequently accompanied by changes in the organ′s microcirculatory system. Changes in the vascular architecture can affect the rate of blood flow, which in turn may promote the underlying pathogenic etiology; for example, recent studies have indicated that decreased blood flow in the liver can suppress the clearance rate of pathogenic agents (such as hepatitis virus, enhance localized inflammation and or fibrosis-related injury, or increase pressure in the portal vein. The phenomenon of obstructed liver microcirculation in modern medicine is similar to the pathogenic concept of blood stasis in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM. Thus, TCM decoctions or methods that promote blood circulation, and have been historically applied to remove blood stasis, may prove useful for treating liver diseases. In this review of the promising TCM agents and treatment modalities, we discuss not only the reported outcomes of pharmacological applications in both humans and animal models but also the molecular mechanisms related to the beneficial effects. Future studies should continue to investigate the clinical efficacy of resolving blood stasis to treat portal hypertension, liver fibrosis, and cirrhosis.

  16. Gut–Liver Axis Derangement in Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Poeta

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is the most frequent type of chronic liver disease in the pediatric age group, paralleling an obesity pandemic. A “multiple-hit” hypothesis has been invoked to explain its pathogenesis. The “first hit” is liver lipid accumulation in obese children with insulin resistance. In the absence of significant lifestyle modifications leading to weight loss and increased physical activity, other factors may act as “second hits” implicated in liver damage progression leading to more severe forms of inflammation and hepatic fibrosis. In this regard, the gut–liver axis (GLA seems to play a central role. Principal players are the gut microbiota, its bacterial products, and the intestinal barrier. A derangement of GLA (namely, dysbiosis and altered intestinal permeability may promote bacteria/bacterial product translocation into portal circulation, activation of inflammation via toll-like receptors signaling in hepatocytes, and progression from simple steatosis to non-alcoholic steato-hepatitis (NASH. Among other factors a relevant role has been attributed to the farnesoid X receptor, a nuclear transcriptional factor activated from bile acids chemically modified by gut microbiota (GM enzymes. The individuation and elucidation of GLA derangement in NAFLD pathomechanisms is of interest at all ages and especially in pediatrics to identify new therapeutic approaches in patients recalcitrant to lifestyle changes. Specific targeting of gut microbiota via pre-/probiotic supplementation, feces transplantation, and farnesoid X receptor modulation appear promising.

  17. Medical History for Prognostic Risk Assessment and Diagnosis of Stable Patients with Suspected Coronary Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, James K.; Dunning, Allison; Gransar, Heidi; Achenbach, Stephan; Lin, Fay Y.; Al-Mallah, Mouaz; Budoff, Matthew J.; Callister, Tracy Q.; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Cademartiri, Filippo; Chinnaiyan, Kavitha; Chow, Benjamin J. W.; D’Agostino, Ralph; DeLago, Augustin; Friedman, John; Hadamitzky, Martin; Hausleiter, Joerg; Hayes, Sean; Kaufmann, Philipp; Raff, Gilbert L.; Shaw, Leslee J.; Thomson, Louise; Villines, Todd; Cury, Ricardo C.; Feuchtner, Gudrun; Kim, Yong-Jin; Leipsic, Jonathon; Berman, Daniel S.; Pencina, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Aims To develop a clinical cardiac risk algorithm for stable patients with suspected CAD based upon angina typicality and CAD risk factors. Methods and Results Between 2004 and 2011, 14,004 adults with suspected CAD referred for cardiac imaging were followed: 1) 9,093 patients for CCTA (CCTA-1) followed for 2.0 years; 2) 2,132 patients for CCTA (CCTA-2) followed for 1·6 years, and 3) 2,779 patients for exercise myocardial perfusion scintigraphy followed for 5.0 years. A best-fit model from CCTA-1 for prediction of death or myocardial infarction (MI) was developed, with integer values proportional to regression coefficients. Discrimination was assessed using C-statistic. The validated model was also tested for estimation of the likelihood of obstructive CAD, defined as ≥50% stenosis, as compared to method of Diamond and Forrester (D-F). Primary outcomes included all-cause mortality and non-fatal MI. Secondary outcomes included prevalence of angiographically obstructive CAD. In CCTA-1, best-fit model discriminated individuals at risk of death or MI (C-statistic 0·76). The integer model ranged from 3-13, and corresponded to 3-year death risk or MI of 0·25% to 53·8%. When applied to the CCTA-2 and MPS, the model demonstrated C-statistics of 0·71 and 0·77. Both best-fit (C=0·76, 95% CI 0·746-0·771) and integer model (C=0·71, 95% CI 0·693-0·719) performed better than D-F (C=0·64; 95% CI, 0·628-0·659) for estimating obstructive CAD. Conclusions For stable symptomatic patients with suspected CAD, we developed a history-based method for prediction of death and obstructive CAD. PMID:25865923

  18. Caroli's disease and outcomes after liver transplantation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Millwala, Farida; Segev, Dorry L; Thuluvath, Paul J

    2008-01-01

    Caroli's disease is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by intrahepatic cystic dilatation of the bile ducts that, when progressive, leads to intrahepatic stones, recurrent cholangitis...

  19. Neuroinflammation and neurological alterations in chronic liver diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmina Montoliu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Several million people with chronic liver diseases (cirrhosis, hepatitis show neurological alterations, named hepatic encephalopathy (HE with cognitive and motor alterations that impair quality of life and reduces life span. Inflammation acts synergistically with hyperammonemia to induce cognitive and motor alterations in patients with chronic liver disease and minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE. Previous studies in animal models have suggested that neuroinflammation is a major player in HE. This would also be the case in patients with liver cirrhosis or hepatitis C with HE. Rats with MHE show microglial activation and neuroinflammation that is associated with cognitive impairment and hypokinesia. The anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen reduces microglial activation and neuroinflammation and restores cognitive and motor functions in rats with MHE. Chronic hyperammonemia per se induces neuroinflammation. Both peripheral inflammation and hyperammonemia would contribute to neuroinflammation in chronic liver failure. Therefore, neuroinflammation may be a key therapeutic target to improve the cognitive and motor alterations in MHE and overt HE. Identifying new targets to reduce neuroinflammation in MHE without inducing secondary effects would serve to develop new therapeutic tools to reverse the cognitive and motor alterations in patients with HE associated with chronic liver diseases.

  20. Gut Microbiota and Host Reaction in Liver Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Fukui

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Although alcohol feeding produces evident intestinal microbial changes in animals, only some alcoholics show evident intestinal dysbiosis, a decrease in Bacteroidetes and an increase in Proteobacteria. Gut dysbiosis is related to intestinal hyperpermeability and endotoxemia in alcoholic patients. Alcoholics further exhibit reduced numbers of the beneficial Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium. Large amounts of endotoxins translocated from the gut strongly activate Toll-like receptor 4 in the liver and play an important role in the progression of alcoholic liver disease (ALD, especially in severe alcoholic liver injury. Gut microbiota and bacterial endotoxins are further involved in some of the mechanisms of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD and its progression to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH. There is experimental evidence that a high-fat diet causes characteristic dysbiosis of NAFLD, with a decrease in Bacteroidetes and increases in Firmicutes and Proteobacteria, and gut dysbiosis itself can induce hepatic steatosis and metabolic syndrome. Clinical data support the above dysbiosis, but the details are variable. Intestinal dysbiosis and endotoxemia greatly affect the cirrhotics in relation to major complications and prognosis. Metagenomic approaches to dysbiosis may be promising for the analysis of deranged host metabolism in NASH and cirrhosis. Management of dysbiosis may become a cornerstone for the future treatment of liver diseases.

  1. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD): Approach in the Adolescent Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Eve A; Yap, Jason

    2006-09-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a spectrum of liver disease whose hallmark is the accumulation of large-droplet fat in hepatocytes. This metabolic disorder occurs mainly in overweight or obese individuals. The disease mechanism involves hyperinsulinemia and hepatic insulin resistance, not ethanol abuse. NAFLD may be the hepatic manifestation of the "metabolic syndrome" classically associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. NAFLD ranges from simple steatosis, which is the least rapidly progressing disorder, to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis to cirrhosis, which can evolve to chronic liver failure. The high prevalence of NAFLD in children has been recognized only in the past 5 to 10 years, as rates of childhood obesity have soared. Accordingly, the best strategies for diagnosis and treatment of childhood NAFLD are a work in progress and remain controversial. Weight reduction through a healthy diet and regular medium-intensity exercise is the mainstay of current treatment. Few research data are available to guide pharmacologic therapy. Certain points regarding management of childhood NAFLD require emphasis: It is a serious liver disease that requires detailed clinical investigation. Other liver diseases causing fatty liver and/or abnormal liver tests, notably Wilson disease and chronic viral hepatitis, need to be excluded. Liver biopsy can provide critical diagnostic and staging information. Associated genetic or endocrine disorders need to be identified. Treatment should begin with a low-glycemic index diet that provides adequate nutrients but is low in harmful fats and eliminates foods causing postprandial hyperglycemia. Initially, this can target two to three problem foods so that it is easy for the adolescent to follow. Regular exercise suited to the capabilities and interests of the teenager should be added to the daily routine. Where possible, a team approach, including a dietician and psychologist, should be utilized, as

  2. Serum adipokines might predict liver histology findings in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamali, Raika; Razavizade, Mohsen; Arj, Abbas; Aarabi, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-06-07

    To assess significance of serum adipokines to determine the histological severity of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Patients with persistent elevation in serum aminotransferase levels and well-defined characteristics of fatty liver at ultrasound were enrolled. Individuals with a history of alcohol consumption, hepatotoxic medication, viral hepatitis or known liver disease were excluded. Liver biopsy was performed to confirm non-alcoholic liver disease (NAFLD). The degrees of liver steatosis, lobular inflammation and fibrosis were determined based on the non-alcoholic fatty liver activity score (NAS) by a single expert pathologist. Patients with a NAS of five or higher were considered to have steatohepatitis. Those with a NAS of two or lower were defined as simple fatty liver. Binary logistic regression was used to determine the independent association of adipokines with histological findings. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was employed to determine cut-off values of serum adipokines to discriminate the grades of liver steatosis, lobular inflammation and fibrosis. Fifty-four participants aged 37.02 ± 9.82 were enrolled in the study. Higher serum levels of visfatin, IL-8, TNF-α levels were associated independently with steatosis grade of more than 33% [β = 1.08 (95%CI: 1.03-1.14), 1.04 (95%CI: 1.008-1.07), 1.04 (95%CI: 1.004-1.08), P < 0.05]. Elevated serum IL-6 and IL-8 levels were associated independently with advanced lobular inflammation [β = 1.4 (95%CI: 1.09-1.8), 1.07 (95%CI: 1.003-1.15), P < 0.05]. Similarly, higher TNF-α, resistin, and hepcidin levels were associated independently with advanced fibrosis stage [β = 1.06 (95%CI: 1.002-1.12), 19.86 (95%CI: 2.79-141.19), 560.72 (95%CI: 5.98-5255.33), P < 0.05]. Serum IL-8 and TNF-α values were associated independently with the NAS score, considering a NAS score of 5 as the reference value [β = 1.05 (95%CI: 1.01-1.1), 1.13 (95%CI: 1.04-1.22), P < 0.05]. Certain adipokines may

  3. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease--The Clinician's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Swastik; Duseja, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    Non alcoholic fatty liver (NAFLD) is a common cause of liver disease worldwide with prevalence ranging from 10-30%. It encompasses a spectrum ranging from simple steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) which can progress to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in some patients. The diagnosis of hepatic steatosis can be made reliably by imaging. Differentiating simple steatosis from NASH usually requires liver biopsy although various non-invasive methods are under evaluation. Similarly, liver biopsy is the gold standard for staging of fibrosis but NAFLD fibrosis score and transient elastography are now validated for non-invasive assessment of fibrosis in patients with NAFLD. Liver biopsy should be reserved for patients at high risk of having NASH or advanced fibrosis, those needing evaluation of competing diagnoses or those enrolled in therapeutic trials. Treatment can be directed against various pathophysiological aspects of NAFLD and includes management of obesity, insulin resistance, hyperlipidemia and oxidative stress, suppression of inflammation and modulation of gut bacteria. Lifestyle modification with diet, exercise and weight loss is the cornerstone of therapy. Pharmacological treatment of NAFLD is still evolving with vitamin E and pioglitazone being the only approved drugs as of now. Bariatric surgery can lead to improvement in NASH in morbidly obese patients. Optimal therapy of NAFLD includes a multidisciplinary approach involving management of metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease. Management of NASH related cirrhosis and HCC is like that of other etiologies. Indications and outcomes of liver transplantation in patients with NASH are same as for other etiologies of liver disease.

  4. Alzheimer Disease Signature Neurodegeneration and APOE Genotype in Mild Cognitive Impairment With Suspected Non-Alzheimer Disease Pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Stefanie; Schreiber, Frank; Lockhart, Samuel N; Horng, Andy; Bejanin, Alexandre; Landau, Susan M; Jagust, William J

    2017-06-01

    There are conflicting results claiming that Alzheimer disease signature neurodegeneration may be more, less, or similarly advanced in individuals with β-amyloid peptide (Aβ)-negative (Aβ-) suspected non-Alzheimer disease pathophysiology (SNAP) than in Aβ-positive (Aβ+) counterparts. To examine patterns of neurodegeneration in individuals with SNAP compared with their Aβ+ counterparts. A longitudinal cohort study was conducted among individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and cognitively normal individuals receiving care at Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative sites in the United States and Canada for a mean follow-up period of 30.5 months from August 1, 2005, to June 30, 2015. Several neurodegeneration biomarkers and longitudinal cognitive function were compared between patients with distinct SNAP (Aβ- and neurodegeneration-positive [Aβ-N+]) subtypes and their Aβ+N+ counterparts. Participants were classified according to the results of their florbetapir F-18 (Aβ) positron emission tomography and their Alzheimer disease-associated neurodegeneration status (temporoparietal glucose metabolism determined by fluorodeoxyglucose F 18 [FDG]-labeled positron emission tomography and/or hippocampal volume [HV] determined by magnetic resonance imaging: participants with subthreshold HV values were regarded as exhibiting hippocampal volume atrophy [HV+], while subthreshold mean FDG values were considered as FDG hypometabolism [FDG+]). The study comprised 265 cognitively normal individuals (135 women and 130 men; mean [SD] age, 75.5 [6.7] years) and 522 patients with MCI (225 women and 297 men; mean [SD] age, 72.6 [7.8] years). A total of 469 individuals with MCI had data on neurodegeneration biomarkers; of these patients, 107 were Aβ-N+ (22.8%; 63 FDG+, 82 HV+, and 38 FDG+HV+) and 187 were Aβ+N+ (39.9%; 135 FDG+, 147 HV+, and 95 FDG+HV+ cases). A total of 209 cognitively normal participants had data on neurodegeneration biomarkers; of these, 52 were

  5. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: The diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El-Kader, Shehab M; El-Den Ashmawy, Eman M Salah

    2015-04-28

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is now the most frequent chronic liver disease that occurs across all age groups and is recognized to occur in 14%-30% of the general population, representing a serious and growing clinical problem due to the growing prevalence of obesity and overweight. Histologically, it resembles alcoholic liver injury but occurs in patients who deny significant alcohol consumption. NAFLD encompasses a spectrum of conditions, ranging from benign hepatocellular steatosis to inflammatory nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis. The majority of hepatocellular lipids are stored as triglycerides, but other lipid metabolites, such as free fatty acids, cholesterol, and phospholipids, may also be present and play a role in disease progression. NAFLD is associated with obesity and insulin resistance and is considered the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome, a combination of medical conditions including type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and visceral adiposity. Confirmation of the diagnosis of NAFLD can usually be achieved by imaging studies; however, staging the disease requires a liver biopsy. Current treatment relies on weight loss and exercise, although various insulin-sensitizing agents, antioxidants and medications appear promising. The aim of this review is to highlight the current information regarding epidemiology, diagnosis, and management of NAFLD as well as new information about pathogenesis, diagnosis and management of this disease.

  6. Orthotopic liver transplantation for patients with Caroli's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen-Xia; Yan, Lu-Nan; Li, Bo; Zeng, Yong; Wen, Tian-Fu; Wang, Wen-Tao

    2008-02-01

    Caroli's disease, a rare congenital hepatic disease, has a poor prognosis, especially in patients with diffuse dilatation of the bile ducts. But liver transplantation has been a curative option. The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility and rationality of orthotopic liver transplantation as an indication for patients with diffuse Caroli's disease. The data from 3 patients with diffuse Caroli's disease who had undergone orthotopic liver transplantation in our unit were analyzed retrospectively. On postoperative day 7, patient 1 had acute rejection which was relieved after pulse treatment with methylprednisolone. He was discharged from hospital on postoperative day 27 and has been in good health for 82 months. Patient 2 had no acute rejection or severe complications, but died of chronic graft dysfunction 34 months postoperatively. Patient 3 had acute rejection on postoperative days 10 and 35, complicated with pulmonary infection, pleural effusion and opportunistic infection. After successful treatment, she resumed work and has been followed up for 47 months. Her condition is good. Liver transplantation can offer an effective therapy for patients with diffuse Caroli's disease, and can provide satisfactory long-term results.

  7. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: The diagnosis and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El-Kader, Shehab M; El-Den Ashmawy, Eman M Salah

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is now the most frequent chronic liver disease that occurs across all age groups and is recognized to occur in 14%-30% of the general population, representing a serious and growing clinical problem due to the growing prevalence of obesity and overweight. Histologically, it resembles alcoholic liver injury but occurs in patients who deny significant alcohol consumption. NAFLD encompasses a spectrum of conditions, ranging from benign hepatocellular steatosis to inflammatory nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis. The majority of hepatocellular lipids are stored as triglycerides, but other lipid metabolites, such as free fatty acids, cholesterol, and phospholipids, may also be present and play a role in disease progression. NAFLD is associated with obesity and insulin resistance and is considered the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome, a combination of medical conditions including type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and visceral adiposity. Confirmation of the diagnosis of NAFLD can usually be achieved by imaging studies; however, staging the disease requires a liver biopsy. Current treatment relies on weight loss and exercise, although various insulin-sensitizing agents, antioxidants and medications appear promising. The aim of this review is to highlight the current information regarding epidemiology, diagnosis, and management of NAFLD as well as new information about pathogenesis, diagnosis and management of this disease. PMID:25937862

  8. Increased risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease after diagnosis of celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Norelle R; Lebwohl, Benjamin; Hultcrantz, Rolf; Green, Peter H R; Ludvigsson, Jonas F

    2015-06-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is a common cause of chronic liver disease. Celiac disease alters intestinal permeability and treatment with a gluten-free diet often causes weight gain, but so far there are few reports of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in patients with celiac disease. Population-based cohort study. We compared the risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease diagnosed from 1997 to 2009 in individuals with celiac disease (n = 26,816) to matched reference individuals (n = 130,051). Patients with any liver disease prior to celiac disease were excluded, as were individuals with a lifetime diagnosis of alcohol-related disorder to minimize misclassification of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Cox regression estimated hazard ratios for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease were determined. During 246,559 person-years of follow-up, 53 individuals with celiac disease had a diagnosis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (21/100,000 person-years). In comparison, we identified 85 reference individuals diagnosed with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease during 1,488,413 person-years (6/100,000 person-years). This corresponded to a hazard ratio of 2.8 (95% CI 2.0-3.8), with the highest risk estimates seen in children (HR = 4.6; 95% CI 2.3-9.1). The risk increase in the first year after celiac disease diagnosis was 13.3 (95% CI 3.5-50.3) but remained significantly elevated even beyond 15 years after the diagnosis of celiac disease (HR = 2.5; 95% CI 1.0-5.9). Individuals with celiac disease are at increased risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease compared to the general population. Excess risks were highest in the first year after celiac disease diagnosis, but persisted through 15 years after diagnosis with celiac disease. Copyright © 2015 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Alcoholic Liver Disease | Badenhorst | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    % of men and 30% of women consuming alcohol on a regular basis, alcohol related disease accounted for up to 7% of the total disease burden in South Africa. Nearly 20% of unintentional and 40.9% of intentional injuries is related to alcohol ...

  10. Clinical and liver biopsy pathological features in military patients with liver diseases: An analysis of 231 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-ling SUN

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To explore epidemiological, serological and histopathological (by liver biopsy features of liver diseases, and clinical manifestations in patients of the Chinese armed forces. Methods  The clinical data of 231 cases of military patients with liver diseases in our hospital were retrospectively analyzed in terms of their age, gender, location of enlistment, services, official rank, clinical manifestation, and laboratory examination, and also pathological characteristics of liver biopsy. Results  Among the 231 hospitalized military patients, 202 were male and 29 were female. The age at onset of the disease ranged from 18 to 73 years (mean age 29.7±9.1. Higher morbidity (48.1% was found in the 18-25 year age bracket, while lower (only about 7.4% in above 55-year-old age bracket. Virus infection accounted for 68.0% and non-virus infection accounted for 32.0%. About 64.9% of the patients suffered from chronic liver disease, while 35.1% from acute liver disease. In addition, the prevalence of liver disease was as high as 47.2% in the soldiers, slightly higher than that in the officers (about 38.1%. Transmission of the disease between comrades in arms accounted approximately for 14.0%. Conclusions  The mean age of onset of liver disease in military personnel is younger, ranging from 18 to 25 years old predominantly, and the incidence is gradually decreased along with the age. The prevalence of liver disease may be higher in soldiers than in officers. There is a higher percentage of virus infection-associated liver ailment and chronic liver ailment. For acute liver ailment, pathological diagnosis by liver biopsy should be made, and timely therapeutic measures should be taken to prevent transformation of acute to chronic stage.

  11. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, association with cardiovascular disease and treatment. (I). Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and its association with cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brea, Ángel; Pintó, Xavier; Ascaso, Juan F; Blasco, Mariano; Díaz, Ángel; González-Santos, Pedro; Hernández Mijares, Antonio; Mantilla, Teresa; Millán, Jesús; Pedro-Botet, Juan

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) comprises a series of histologically lesions similar to those induced by alcohol consumption in people with very little or no liver damage. The importance of NAFLD is its high prevalence in the Western world and, from the point of view of the liver, in its gradual progression from steatosis to steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, and liver cancer. During the last decade it has been observed that NAFLD leads to an increased cardiovascular risk with acceleration of arteriosclerosis and events related to it, being the main cause of its morbidity and mortality. This review, updated to January 2016, consists of two parts, with the first part analysing the association of NAFLD with cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Anatomical analysis of incidental left atrial diverticula in patients with suspected coronary artery disease using 64-channel multidetector CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, S.Y. [Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, S.H., E-mail: Kwon98@khu.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Oh, J.H. [Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    Aim: To describe and evaluate anatomical characterizations of incidental left atrial (LA) diverticula in patients with suspected coronary artery disease using 64-channel multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). Materials and methods: From October 2008 to June 2009, 2059 patients with suspected coronary artery disease underwent electrocardiogram-gated 64-channel MDCT. Five hundred and thirty-two LA diverticula were identified in 377 patients (18.3%, male to female ratio: 216:161, mean age 59 {+-} 10.89 years, range from 20 to 91 years). Two radiologists retrospectively analysed the number (single or multiple), size (diameter and length), shape (cystiform or tubiform), surface (smooth or irregular), and location (right or mid or left/upper or lower/lateral or posterior). If the length/diameter was <1.5, the diverticular shape was considered to be cystiform. Results: Among 532 LA diverticula, single (270/532, 51.1%), cystiform (411/532, 77.3%), and smooth (332/532, 62.4%) diverticula were found. The right upper region (255/532, 47.9%) was the most common location, followed by the left lateral area (172/532, 32.3%). The average diameter was 4.7 {+-} 2 mm (range from 1-19 mm), and the average length was 4.7 {+-} 2.1 mm (range 1-13 mm). The average ratio of length to diameter was 1.15 (range 0.25-1.45). The average number of diverticula was 2 {+-} 1.06 (range 1-5). Conclusion: Incidental LA diverticulum is not an uncommon finding in patients with suspected coronary artery disease. MDCT can provide anatomical details of LA diverticula. However, further studies are needed to determine their clinical significance.

  13. Correlation between liver morphology and portal pressure in alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsgaard, K; Gluud, C; Henriksen, J H

    1984-01-01

    evaluation of liver biopsies, no significant correlation was found between mean hepatocyte volume or relative sinusoidal vascular volume and portal pressure. To test whether an increase in hepatocyte volume compresses the vascular structures and causes portal hypertension, the ratio of relative sinusoidal...... volume. The present findings are in accordance with the hypothesis that elevated hepatic vascular resistance and portal pressure in alcoholic liver disease are in part determined by the severity of the hepatic architectural destruction and subsequent distorsion and compression of the efferent vein system...

  14. Diagnosis of alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency by DNA analysis of children with liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De TOMMASO Adriana Maria Alves

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Background - Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency is a genetic disorder which is transmitted in a co-dominant, autosomal form. Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency affects mainly the lungs and the liver leading, in the latter case, to neonatal cholestasis, chronic hepatitis or cirrhosis. A precise diagnosis of Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency may be obtained by biochemical or molecular analysis. Objective - The purpose of this study was to use DNA analysis to examine the presence of an alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency in 12 children suspected of having this deficiency and who showed laboratory and clinical characteristics of the disease. Patients and Methods - Twelve patients, aged 3 months to 19 years, who had serum alpha-1-antitrypsin levels lower than normal and/or had hepatic disease of undefined etiology were studied. The mutant alleles S and Z of the alpha-1-antitrypsin gene were investigated in the 12 children. Alpha-1-antitrypsin gene organization was analyzed by amplification of genoma through the polymerase chain reaction and digestion with the restriction enzymes Xmnl (S allele and Taq 1 (Z allele. Results - Seven of the 12 patients had chronic liver disease of undefined etiology and the other five patients had low serum levels of alpha-1-antitrypsin as well as a diagnosis of neonatal cholestasis and/or chronic liver disease of undefined etiology. Five of the 12 patients were homozygous for the Z allele (ZZ and two had the S allele with another allele (*S different from Z. Conclusion - These results show that alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency is relatively frequent in children with chronic hepatic disease of undefined etiology and/or low alpha-1-antitrypsin levels (41.6%. A correct diagnosis is important for effective clinical follow-up and for genetic counseling.

  15. Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: East Versus West

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Swastik; Duseja, Ajay K

    2012-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an important cause of liver disease worldwide with prevalence ranging from 10% to 30% in various countries. It has become an important cause of unexplained rise in transaminases, cryptogenic cirrhosis, and cryptogenic hepatocellular carcinoma. Pathogenesis is related to obesity, insulin resistance, oxidative stress, lipotoxicity, and resultant inflammation in the liver progressing to fibrosis. Pharmacological treatment in patients with NAFLD is still evolving and the treatment of these patients rests upon lifestyle modification with diet and exercise being the cornerstones of therapy. While there are many similarities between patients with NAFLD from Asia and the West, there are certain features which make the patients with NAFLD from Asia stand apart. This review highlights the data on NAFLD from Asia comparing it with the data from the West. PMID:25755421

  16. [Research advances in nutritional assessment methods in children with chronic liver diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Shuai; Zhu, Yu; Wan, Chao-Min

    2017-05-01

    Malnutrition is commonly seen in children with chronic liver diseases, and there are interactions between them. Chronic liver diseases can cause malnutrition and this can affect the prognosis of children with chronic liver diseases. Due to the complexity of nutritional assessment in children with chronic liver diseases, there are still no unified standards for the diagnosis of malnutrition. Early identification of malnutrition and related intervention helps to improve the prognosis of children with chronic liver diseases. This article reviews the features of nutrition in children with chronic liver diseases and related nutritional assessment methods.

  17. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and polycystic ovary syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilatou, Evangeline

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in the Western world comprising a spectrum of liver damage from fatty liver infiltration to end-stage liver disease, in patients without significant alcohol consumption. Increased prevalence of NAFLD has been reported in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), one of the most common endocrinopathies in premenopausal women, which has been redefined as a reproductive and metabolic disorder after the recognition of the important role of insulin resistance in the pathophysiology of the syndrome. Obesity, in particular central adiposity and insulin resistance are considered as the main factors related to NAFLD in PCOS. Moreover, existing data support that androgen excess, which is the main feature of PCOS and is interrelated to insulin resistance, may be an additional contributing factor to the development of NAFLD. Although the natural history of NAFLD remains unclear and hepatic steatosis seems to be a relatively benign condition in most patients, limited data imply that advanced stage of liver disease is possibly more frequent in obese PCOS patients with NAFLD. PCOS patients, particularly obese patients with features of the metabolic syndrome, should be submitted to screening for NAFLD comprising assessment of serum aminotransferase levels and of hepatic steatosis by abdominal ultrasound. Lifestyle modifications including diet, weight loss and exercise are the most appropriate initial therapeutic interventions for PCOS patients with NAFLD. When pharmacologic therapy is considered, metformin may be used, although currently there is no medical therapy of proven benefit for NAFLD. Long-term follow up studies are needed to clarify clinical implications and guide appropriate diagnostic evaluation, follow-up protocol and optimal treatment for PCOS patients with NAFLD. PMID:25024594

  18. A non-invasive method to assess cerebral perfusion pressure in geriatric patients with suspected cerebrovascular disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Liu

    Full Text Available Cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP can adversely impact cerebrovascular hemodynamics but cannot be practically measured in most clinical settings. Here, we aimed to establish a representative mathematical model for CPP in geriatric patients with suspected cerebrovascular disease.A total of 100 patients (54 males and 46 females between 60-80 years of age with suspected cerebrovascular disease and no obvious cerebrovascular stenosis were selected for invasive CPP monitoring via catheterization of the middle segment of the common carotid arteries and openings of the vertebral arteries bilaterally. Curves were function-fitted using MATLAB 7.0, and data was statistically processed by SPSS 20.0.MATLAB 7.0 constructed eighth-order Fourier functions that fit all recorded CPP curves. Since the coefficients of the 100 functions were significantly different, all functions were standardized to derive one representative function. By manipulating the heart rate and maximum/minimum CPP of the representative function, estimated CPP curves can be constructed for patients with differing heart rates, intracranial pressures (ICPs and blood pressures.CPP can be well-modeled through an eighth-order Fourier function that can be constructed from a patient's brachial artery blood pressure (BABP, ICP and heart rate. This function is representative of geriatric patients with cerebrovascular disease and can be used in the future study of cerebral hemodynamics.

  19. [Hepatic cell transplantation: a new therapy in liver diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Eugenia; Cortés, Miriam; Martínez, Amparo; Vila, Juan José; López, Rafael; Montalvá, Eva; Calzado, Angeles; Mir, José

    2010-07-01

    Liver transplantation has been remarkably effective in the treatment in patients with end-stage liver disease. However, disparity between solid-organ supply and increased demand is the greatest limitation, resulting in longer waiting times and increase in mortality of transplant recipients. This situation creates the need to seek alternatives to orthotopic liver transplantation.Hepatocyte transplantation or liver cell transplantation has been proposed as the best method to support patients. The procedure consists of transplanting individual cells to a recipient organ in sufficient quantity to survive and restore the function. The capacity of hepatic regeneration is the biological basis of hepatocyte transplantation. This therapeutic option is an experimental procedure in some patients with inborn errors of metabolism, fulminant hepatic failure and acute and chronic liver failure, as a bridge to orthotopic liver transplantation. In the Hospital La Fe of Valencia, we performed the first hepatocyte transplantation in Spain creating a new research work on transplant program. Copyright 2009 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Vitamin D in liver diseases: from mechanisms to clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yuan-Ping; Kong, Ming; Zheng, Sujun; Ren, Yan; Zhu, Longdon; Shi, Hongbo; Duan, Zhongping

    2013-08-01

    Traditionally regarded as a typical vitamin regulating calcium and phosphorus homeostasis, vitamin D is now discovered as a highly versatile molecule with emerging roles in immunity, cancer, infectious diseases, fibrosis, fatty liver diseases, and alcoholic liver diseases. A large body of clinical evidence has demonstrated the prevalence and risks of vitamin D deficiency in various chronic diseases. Biologically active vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxylvitamin D3, is synthesized in two distinct systems. In addition to the classic two-step hydroxylation in the liver and kidneys, 1,25-dihydroxylvitamin D3 can also be produced locally by immune cells in response to infection. The bioactive vitamin D generated in these two pools apparently functions differently: while the former facilitates calcium adsorption and homeostasis, the latter confers immune regulation. The immune regulatory functions of vitamin D are demonstrated by induction of antimicrobial peptides, suppression of innate immune response, induction of Th2 cytokines, and stimulation of T-regulatory T cells. Vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency is overwhelmingly associated with viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, and fatty liver diseases. Recent clinical trials have shown that vitamin D supplements significantly enhance the efficacy of interferon plus ribavirin therapy through sustained virological response. A recent study showed that 25-dihydroxyvitamin D rather than 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D could directly suppress hepatitis C virus assembly. Moreover, clinical evidence has shown that vitamin D deficiency is associated with alcoholic and non-alcoholic fatty liver diseases. In this review, we highlight some recent advances in vitamin D researches and clinical trails. © 2013 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  1. Liver biopsy interpretation in the differential diagnosis of autoimmune liver disease in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Gerosa

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune liver disease  (AILD represents a group of complex inflammatory liver diseases, all characterized by an aberrant autoreactivity against hepatocytes and/or biliary structures. AILD may be subclassified into four major diseases: autoimmune hepatitis (AIH, primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC, primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC, and autoimmune cholangitis (AIC. Recently a new entity frequently associated with autoimmune pancreatitis and defined IgG4-related cholangitis (IgG4-RC,  has been added to the spectrum of AILD. The most frequent autoimmune liver diseases  of the AILD spectrum occurring in children and in young adults are  AIH  and PSC, overlap syndrome between AIH and PSC, also defined as autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis (ASC, representing a frequent finding in pediatric patients. Here,  the morphological findings that may help liver pathologists in the differential diagnosis of AILD in pediatric patients are reviewed, underlying the frequency in liver biopsy interpretation of complex cases in which a precise diagnosis may remain controversial, due to overlap of hepatocytic and bile duct cell lesions. Among the multiple morphological changes typical of AILD,  the detection of an high number of plasma cell clusters in the portal and periportal regions is generally considered one of the main clue for the diagnosis of AIH. The recent report in a 13-year old  boy of IgG4-associated cholangitis, induces  pathologists when detecting a huge number of plasmacells, to consider the differential diagnosis between AIH and IgG4-RC.Proceedings of the 9th International Workshop on Neonatology · Cagliari (Italy · October 23rd-26th, 2013 · Learned lessons, changing practice and cutting-edge research

  2. Predictors of heavy drinking after liver transplantation for alcoholic liver disease in Denmark (1990-2013)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Askgaard, Gro; Tolstrup, Janne S.; Gerds, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Heavy drinking following liver transplantation decreases survival. Little is known of predictors of heavy drinking, which should guide clinicians identifying patients at high risk of return to heavy drinking after transplantation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We calculated the cumulative...... incidence of heavy drinking among patients transplanted for alcoholic liver disease in Denmark 1990-2013. We then analyzed pre-transplant demographic and psychiatric characteristics as predictors of post-transplant heavy drinking. Information was obtained from medical records, from nationwide registries...... and by interview. RESULTS: Among 156 liver-transplanted patients, the cumulative incidence of heavy drinking was 18%, 24% and 27% after 5, 10 and 15 years post-transplant. In univariate analyses of pre-transplant predictors of heavy drinking after transplantation, younger age (p

  3. Liver transplantation in polycystic liver disease: a relevant treatment modality for adults?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krohn, P.S.; Hillingso, J.G.; Kirkegaard, P.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Polycystic liver disease (PLD) is a rare, hereditary, benign disorder. Hepatic failure is uncommon and symptoms are caused by mass effects leading to abdominal distension and pain. Liver transplantation (LTX) offers fully curative treatment, but there is still some controversy about...... whether it is a relevant modality considering the absence of liver failure, relative organ shortage, perioperative risks and lifelong immunosuppression. The purpose of this study was to review our experience of LTX for PLD and to compare the survival with the overall survival of patients who underwent LTX....../kidney transplantation. One patient had undergone kidney transplantation 10 years earlier. RESULTS: Median follow-up was 55 months. One patient who underwent combined transplantation died after 5.4 months because of multiorgan failure after re-LTX, and one patient, with well-functioning grafts, died of lymphoma after 7...

  4. Crosstalk between the gut and the liver via susceptibility loci: Novel advances in inflammatory bowel disease and autoimmune liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinyang; Shen, Jun; Ran, Zhihua

    2017-02-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by chronic, relapsing intestinal inflammation. Autoimmune liver disease (AILD) may be involved in IBD as an extra-intestinal manifestation (EIM). Epidemiologic and anatomic evidence have demonstrated an intimate crosstalk between the gut and the liver. In this review, we briefly introduced nine groups of susceptibility loci shared by inflammatory bowel and autoimmune liver disease for the first time. The genome-wide association studies (GWAS) evidence of pathways involving crosstalk between the gut and the liver is clarified and explained. It has been found that HNF4-α, GPR35, MST1R, CARD9, IL2/IL21/IL2R, BACH2, TNFRSF14, MAdCAM-1, and FUT2 are the genes involved in tight junction formation, macrophage function, T helper cell or Treg cell cycle and function, TNF secretion, lymphocyte homing or intestinal dysbiosis, respectively. The intimate crosstalk between the gut and liver in immunity is also highlighted and discussed in this review. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Chronic liver disease and hepatic encephalopathy: Clinical profile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-03-08

    Mar 8, 2011 ... Background: Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is an important neuropsychiatry complication of liver disease causing significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Efforts at ... Access this article online. Quick Response Code: Website: ... Brain imaging with computerized tomographic scan was done where ...

  6. The Platelet and Platelet Function Testing in Liver Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hugenholtz, Greg G. C.; Porte, Robert J.; Lisman, Ton

    Patients who have liver disease commonly present with alterations in platelet number and function. Recent data have questioned the contribution of these changes to bleeding complications in these patients. Modern tests of platelet function revealed compensatory mechanisms for the decreased platelet

  7. Liver involvement in children with collagen vascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawłowska, Joanna; Naorniakowska, Magdalena; Liber, Anna

    2015-11-01

    Liver injury such as hepatomegaly, splenomegaly and various degrees of biochemical abnormalities are quite common in children with collagen vascular diseases. They may be primary or secondary, particularly due to drug therapy (drug toxicity, fatty infiltration), superadded infections, diabetes or overlap with autoimmune hepatitis.

  8. Sexual function of males with chronic liver disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The current study examines an interesting and important area in urology practice. There is a paucity of literature in this field in Africa, in particular, and all over the world, in general. It has been recognized recently that in patients with liver disease, there is a high prevalence of erectile dysfunction up to as much as 50%.

  9. Pattern of liver disease admissions in a Nigerian tertiary hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-09-19

    Sep 19, 2012 ... aging Baby Boomers. Corr Gastroenterology Rep 2010;12:1‑6. 3. Younossi ZM, Stepaova M, Fang Y, Younossi Y, Mir H, Srihord M. Changes in the prevalence of most common causes of chronic liver diseases in the United. States from 1988 to 2008. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol 2011; 9:524‑30. 4. WHO.

  10. Alcoholism and liver disease in Mexico: Genetic and environmental factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Sonia; Zepeda-Carrillo, Eloy Alfonso; Moreno-Luna, Laura Eugenia; Panduro, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    Alcoholism and cirrhosis, which are two of the most serious health problems worldwide, have a broad spectrum of clinical outcomes. Both diseases are influenced by genetic susceptibility and cultural traits that differ globally but are specific for each population. In contrast to other regions around the world, Mexicans present the highest drinking score and a high mortality rate for alcoholic liver disease with an intermediate category level of per capita alcohol consumption. Mexico has a unique history of alcohol consumption that is linked to profound anthropological and social aspects. The Mexican population has an admixture genome inherited from different races, Caucasian, Amerindian and African, with a heterogeneous distribution within the country. Thus, genes related to alcohol addiction, such as dopamine receptor D2 in the brain, or liver alcohol-metabolizing enzymes, such as alcohol dehydrogenase class I polypeptide B, cytochrome P450 2E1 and aldehyde dehydrogenase class 2, may vary from one individual to another. Furthermore, they may be inherited as risk or non-risk haplogroups that confer susceptibility or resistance either to alcohol addiction or abusive alcohol consumption and possibly liver disease. Thus, in this era of genomics, personalized medicine will benefit patients if it is directed according to individual or population-based data. Additional association studies will be required to establish novel strategies for the prevention, care and treatment of liver disease in Mexico and worldwide. PMID:24307790

  11. Alcoholism and liver disease in Mexico: genetic and environmental factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Sonia; Zepeda-Carrillo, Eloy Alfonso; Moreno-Luna, Laura Eugenia; Panduro, Arturo

    2013-11-28

    Alcoholism and cirrhosis, which are two of the most serious health problems worldwide, have a broad spectrum of clinical outcomes. Both diseases are influenced by genetic susceptibility and cultural traits that differ globally but are specific for each population. In contrast to other regions around the world, Mexicans present the highest drinking score and a high mortality rate for alcoholic liver disease with an intermediate category level of per capita alcohol consumption. Mexico has a unique history of alcohol consumption that is linked to profound anthropological and social aspects. The Mexican population has an admixture genome inherited from different races, Caucasian, Amerindian and African, with a heterogeneous distribution within the country. Thus, genes related to alcohol addiction, such as dopamine receptor D2 in the brain, or liver alcohol-metabolizing enzymes, such as alcohol dehydrogenase class I polypeptide B, cytochrome P450 2E1 and aldehyde dehydrogenase class 2, may vary from one individual to another. Furthermore, they may be inherited as risk or non-risk haplogroups that confer susceptibility or resistance either to alcohol addiction or abusive alcohol consumption and possibly liver disease. Thus, in this era of genomics, personalized medicine will benefit patients if it is directed according to individual or population-based data. Additional association studies will be required to establish novel strategies for the prevention, care and treatment of liver disease in Mexico and worldwide.

  12. Serum resistin levels in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Resistin is a hormone that is linked to the development of insulin resistance (IR), but information on the direct relationship of resistin levels in humans with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and their effect on the histological severity of NAFLD, is lacking. Objective: The aim of the current study is to ...

  13. Role of folate in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sid, Victoria; Siow, Yaw L; O, Karmin

    2017-10-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a spectrum of chronic liver conditions that are characterized by steatosis, inflammation, fibrosis, and liver injury. The global prevalence of NAFLD is rapidly increasing in proportion to the rising incidence of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Because NAFLD is a multifaceted disorder with many underlying metabolic abnormalities, currently, there is no pharmacological agent that is therapeutically approved for the treatment of this disease. Folate is a water-soluble B vitamin that plays an essential role in one-carbon transfer reactions involved in nucleic acid biosynthesis, methylation reactions, and sulfur-containing amino acid metabolism. The liver is the primary organ responsible for storage and metabolism of folates. Low serum folate levels have been observed in patients with obesity and diabetes. It has been reported that a low level of endogenous folates in rodents perturbs folate-dependent one-carbon metabolism, and may be associated with development of metabolic diseases such as NAFLD. This review highlights the biological role of folate in the progression of NAFLD and its associated metabolic complications including obesity and type 2 diabetes. Understanding the role of folate in metabolic disease may position this vitamin as a potential therapeutic for NAFLD.

  14. Coagulation activity in liver disease | Reza | Internet Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patients with advanced hepatic failure may present with the entire spectrum of coagulation factor deficiencies. This study was designed to determine laboratory abnormalities in coagulation in chronic liver disease and the association of these abnormalities with the extent of chronic hepatitis and cirrhosis. Coagulation ...

  15. Alcohol Consumption and Viral Hepatitis in Chronic Liver Disease in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Precise assessment of the risks and interactions of alcohol consumption and viral hepatitis in the aetiology of chronic liver disease [CLD] are not locally available. Methodology: 74 patients with CLD and 74 controls were evaluated for Hepatitis B and C infection [anti-HCV, HBsAg]. The type and amount of ...

  16. Stem Cells and Liver Disease | Akhter | Internet Journal of Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Liver transplantation is the primary treatment for various end-stage hepatic diseases but is hindered by the lack of donor organs, complications associated with rejection and immunosuppression. An increasingly unbridgeable gap exists between the supply and demand of transplantable organs. Hence stem cell research ...

  17. 13 Research Article ABSTRACT Liver diseases in HIV infected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-11-10

    Nov 10, 2016 ... ABSTRACT. Liver diseases in HIV infected persons can occur due to hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus. (HCV) co-infections, chronic alcoholism, and hepatic tuberculosis as well as antiretroviral drugs. Co- infection by HIV and HBV is frequently encountered with negative impact on HIV ...

  18. Chronic liver disease and hepatic encephalopathy: Clinical profile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-03-08

    Mar 8, 2011 ... significant alcohol ingestion, hepatitis B virus infection, and previous jaundice, while other complications of liver disease noted were deepening jaundice, ascites, bleeding tendencies, and renal failure. The identified precipitants for HE were sepsis 6. (29%), electrolyte inbalance 3 (14%), gastrointestinal ...

  19. Mitochondrial alterations in children with chronic liver disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rabah M. Shawky

    Methods: This study was conducted on 26 children and adolescents with chronic liver disease who presented to or were following up .... tion and mitochondrial DNA-PCR assessment of the three groups were tabulated and statistically analyzed using personal computer with SPSS software package. We used repeated mea-.

  20. FastStats: Chronic Liver Disease and Cirrhosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 4.4 MB] Related FastStats Alcohol use Viral hepatitis More data Chronic Liver Disease/Cirrhosis Mortality by State Age-adjusted death rates for selected cause of death by sex, race, and Hispanic origin Health, United States, 2016, table 17 [PDF – 9. ...

  1. NHE1 deficiency in liver: Implications for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, Vikram, E-mail: prasadvm@ucmail.uc.edu [Department of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry, and Microbiology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine (United States); Chirra, Shivani [Department of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry, and Microbiology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine (United States); Kohli, Rohit [Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45267 (United States); Shull, Gary E. [Department of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry, and Microbiology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine (United States)

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • FXR, PGC1α and PPARγ levels are upregulated in NHE1 deficient livers. • NHE1 deficiency downregulates expression of pro-lipogenic genes in liver. • Chronic exposure to high-fat diet upregulates hepatic NHE1 expression. • Loss of NHE1 better preserves hepatic insulin signaling in high-fat diet-fed mice. - Abstract: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease NAFLD is closely associated with the dysregulation of lipid homeostasis. Diet-induced hepatic steatosis, which can initiate NAFLD progression, has been shown to be dramatically reduced in mice lacking the electroneutral Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchanger NHE1 (Slc9a1). In this study, we investigated if NHE1 deficiency had effects in liver that could contribute to the apparent protection against aberrant lipid accumulation. RT-PCR and immunoblot analyses of wild-type and NHE1-null livers revealed an expression profile that strongly suggested attenuation of both de novo lipogenesis and hepatic stellate cell activation, which is implicated in liver fibrosis. This included upregulation of the farnesoid X receptor FXR, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor PPARγ, its co-activator PGC1α, and sestrin 2, an antioxidant protein involved in hepatic metabolic homeostasis. Furthermore, expression levels of the pro-lipogenic liver X receptor LXRα, and acetyl CoA carboxylases 1 and 2 were downregulated. These changes were associated with evidence of reduced cellular stress, which persisted even upon exposure to a high-fat diet, and the better preservation of insulin signaling, as evidenced by protein kinase B/Akt phosphorylation (Ser473). These results indicate that NHE1 deficiency may protect against NAFLD pathogenesis, which is significant given the availability of highly specific NHE1 inhibitors.

  2. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: An expanded review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Mark; Zhang, Xuchen

    2017-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) encompasses the simple steatosis to more progressive steatosis with associated hepatitis, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and in some cases hepatocellular carcinoma. NAFLD is a growing epidemic, not only in the United States, but worldwide in part due to obesity and insulin resistance leading to liver accumulation of triglycerides and free fatty acids. Numerous risk factors for the development of NAFLD have been espoused with most having some form of metabolic derangement or insulin resistance at the core of its pathophysiology. NAFLD patients are at increased risk of liver-related as well as cardiovascular mortality, and NAFLD is rapidly becoming the leading indication for liver transplantation. Liver biopsy remains the gold standard for definitive diagnosis, but the development of noninvasive advanced imaging, biochemical and genetic tests will no doubt provide future clinicians with a great deal of information and opportunity for enhanced understanding of the pathogenesis and targeted treatment. As it currently stands several medications/supplements are being used in the treatment of NAFLD; however, none seem to be the “magic bullet” in curtailing this growing problem yet. In this review we summarized the current knowledge of NAFLD epidemiology, risk factors, diagnosis, pathogenesis, pathologic changes, natural history, and treatment in order to aid in further understanding this disease and better managing NAFLD patients. PMID:28652891

  3. Association of Hepatic Hydatid Cyst Disease and Liver Tuberculosis

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    Songul Ozyurt

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Hydatid cyst and tuberculosis are common infectious diseases in our country. However, co-incidence of these two diseases is a rare case. This refers to spontaneous emergence of cyst hydatid and tuberculosis lesion in liver which is presented in this paper. Liver tuberculosis can be detected either as a component of miliary tuberculosis or isolated liver tuberculosis. Herein we report a case of 46 year-old male. He applied to the emergency due to the severe right-side pain which coupled with breathing and movement. This was reported to last for 10 days. Lesion compatible to cyst hydatid with a size of 151 x 144 x 128 mm was detected in the right lobe anterior in his abdomen ultrasonography. Echinococcus indirect hemagglutination test resulted in 1/640 positive. The patient had liver cystectomy by general surgery clinic. After microscopic examination of excision material, chronic granulomatous inflamation with caseous necrosis was detected in parenchyma to which cyst hydatid and lesion were attached. PPD result was 16 mm. The patient, whose lungs were normal, received antituberculosis treatment due to primary liver tuberculosis.

  4. Circulating RNA Molecules as Biomarkers in Liver Disease

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    Liviu S. Enache

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Liver disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. As in other fields of medicine, there is a stringent need for non-invasive markers to improve patient diagnostics, monitoring and prognostic ability in liver pathology. Cell-free circulating RNA molecules have been recently acknowledged as an important source of potential medical biomarkers. However, many aspects related to the biology of these molecules remain to be elucidated. In this review, we summarize current concepts related to the origin, transportation and possible functions of cell-free RNA. We outline current development of extracellular RNA-based biomarkers in the main forms of non-inherited liver disease: chronic viral hepatitis, hepatocellular carcinoma, non-alcoholic fatty liver, hepato-toxicity, and liver transplantation. Despite recent technological advances, the lack of standardization in the assessment of these markers makes their adoption into clinical practice difficult. We thus finally review the main factors influencing quantification of circulating RNA. These factors should be considered in the reporting and interpretation of current findings, as well as in the proper planning of future studies, to improve reliability and reproducibility of results.

  5. Management of Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Steatohepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Thuy-Anh; Loomba, Rohit

    2012-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of abnormal liver enzymes and chronic liver disease in the US with expected rise in incidence paralleling the epidemic of obesity. A subset of patients with NAFLD have the progressive form of NAFLD that is termed non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), which is characterized by specific features on liver histology including hepatocellular ballooning degeneration, lobular inflammation, and zone-3 steatosis with or without peri-sinusoidal fibrosis. Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis can progress to cirrhosis and result in liver-related death. Insulin resistance is commonly seen in patients with NASH and often co-exists with other features of the metabolic syndrome including hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and obesity. Although weight loss through lifestyle modifications including dietary changes and increased physical exercise remains the backbone of management of NASH, it has proved challenging for patients to achieve and maintain weight loss goals. Thus, it is often necessary to couple lifestyle changes with another pharmacologic treatment for NASH. Insulin sensitizers including the biguanides (metformin), thiazolidinediones (pioglitazone and rosiglitazone), and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (exenatide) are large groups of medications that have been studied for the treatment of NASH. Other agents with anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, or anti-fibrotic properties which have been studied in NASH include vitamin E, pentoxifylline, betaine, and ursodeoxycholic acid. This review will provide a detailed summary on the clinical data behind the full spectrum of treatments that exist for NASH and suggest management recommendations. PMID:25755424

  6. 25 Ways to Love Your Liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The Progression of Liver Disease Diagnosing Liver DiseaseLiver Biopsy and Liver Function Tests Clinical Trials Liver Transplant ... The Progression of Liver Disease Diagnosing Liver DiseaseLiver Biopsy and Liver Function Tests Clinical Trials Liver Transplant ...

  7. Prevalence and determinants of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in lifelines: A large Dutch population cohort.

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    Eline H van den Berg

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is an increasing health issue that develops rather unnoticed with obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome. We investigated prevalence, determinants and associated metabolic abnormalities of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in the largest population-based cohort to date.Biochemical characteristics, type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome were determined in the Lifelines Cohort Study (N = 167,729, a population-based cohort in the North of the Netherlands. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease was defined as Fatty Liver Index (FLI≥60. Exclusion criteria were age <18 years, immigrants, missing data to assess FLI and metabolic syndrome, excessive alcohol use, previous-diagnosed hepatitis or cirrhosis and non-fasting blood sampling.Out of 37,496 included participants (median age 44 years, 62.1% female, 8,259 (22.0% had a FLI≥60. Individuals with a FLI≥60 were more often male, older, obese, had higher levels of hemoglobinA1c, fasting glucose, liver enzymes, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, c-reactive protein and leucocytes and lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (all P<0.0001. Participants with a FLI≥60 showed higher prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (9.3% vs. 1.4%, metabolic syndrome (54.2% vs. 6.2%, impaired renal function (20.1% vs. 8.7% and cardiovascular disease (4.6% vs. 1.6% (all P<0.0001. Multivariable logistic analysis showed that smoking, hemoglobin, leucocytes, c-reactive protein, platelets, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, albumin, impaired renal function (OR 1.27, 95%CI 1.15-1.41, metabolic syndrome (OR 11.89, 95%CI 11.03-12.82 and its individual components hyperglycemia (OR 2.53, 95%CI 2.34-2.72, hypertension (OR 1.89, 95%CI 1.77-2.01 and reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (OR 3.44, 95%CI 3.22-3.68 were independently associated with suspected non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (all P<0.0001.Twenty

  8. [Bio-ecological control of chronic liver disease and encephalopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengmark, S; Di Cocco, P; Clemente, K; Corona, L; Angelico, R; Manzia, T; Famulari, A; Pisani, F; Orlando, G

    2011-08-01

    Minimal encephalopathy was originally associated with chronic liver disease but is increasingly associated with most other chronic diseases and particularly with diabetes and also chronic disorders in other organs: kidneys, lungs, thyroid and with obesity. It is increasingly with dramatically increased and more or less permanent increase in systemic inflammation, most likely a result of Western lifestyle. Frequent physical exercise and intake of foods rich in vitamins, antioxidants, fibres, lactic acid bacteria etc in combination with reduction in intake of refined and processed foods is known to reduce systemic inflammation and prevent chronic diseases. Some lactic acid bacteria, especially Lb paracasei, lb plantarum and pediococcus pentosaceus have proven effective to reduce inflammation and eliminate encephalopathy. Significant reduction in blood ammonia levels and endotoxin levels were reported in parallel to improvement of liver disease. Subsequent studies with other lactic acid bacteria seem to demonstrate suppression of inflammation and one study also provides evidence of clinical improvement.

  9. Metabolic Disturbances in Children with Chronic Liver Disease

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    A Rezaeian

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Liver disease results in complex pathophysiologic disturbances affecting nutrient digestion, absorption, distribution, storage, and use. This article aimed to present a classification of metabolic disturbances in chronic liver disease in children?   Materials and Methods: In this review study databases including proquest, pubmedcentral, scincedirect, ovid, medlineplus were been searched with keyword words such as” chronic liver disease"  ” metabolic disorder””children” between 1999 to 2014. Finally, 8 related articles have been found.   Results: Metabolic disorder in this population could be categorized in four set: 1carbohydrates, 2proteins,3 fats and 4vitamins. 1 Carbohydrates: Children with CLD are at increased risk for fasting hypoglycemia, because the capacity for glycogen storage and gluconeogenesis is reduced as a result of abnormal hepatocyte function and loss of hepatocyte mass. 2 Proteins: The liver’s capacity for plasma protein synthesis is impaired by reduced substrate availability, impaired hepatocyte function, and increased catabolism. This results in hypoalbuminemia, leading to peripheral edema and contributing to ascites. Reduced synthesis of insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1 and its binding protein IGF-BP3 by the chronically diseased liver results in growth hormone resistance and may contribute to the poor growth observed in these children. 3 Fats: There is increased fat oxidation in children with end-stage liver disease in the fed and fasting states compared with controls, which is probably related to reduced carbohydrate availability. The increased lipolysis results in a decrease in fat stores, which may not be easily replenished in the setting of the fat malabsorption that accompanies cholestasis. Reduced bile delivery to the gut results in impaired fat emulsification, and hence digestion. The products of fat digestion are also poorly absorbed, because bile is also required for micelle formation

  10. Hepatitis A and B Superimposed on Chronic Liver Disease: Vaccine-Preventable Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeffe, Emmet B

    2006-01-01

    A number of studies have demonstrated that the acquisition of hepatitis A or hepatitis B in patients with chronic liver disease is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Superimposition of acute hepatitis A in patients with chronic hepatitis C has been associated with a particularly high mortality rate, and chronic hepatitis B virus coinfection with hepatitis C virus is associated with an accelerated progression of chronic liver disease to cirrhosis, decompensated liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma. With the availability of vaccines against hepatitis B and hepatitis A since 1981 and 1995, respectively, these are vaccine-preventable diseases. Studies have confirmed that hepatitis A and hepatitis B vaccines are safe and immunogenic in patients with mild to moderate chronic liver disease. However, hepatitis A and B vaccination is less effective in patients with advanced liver disease and after liver transplantation. These observations have led to the recommendation that patients undergo hepatitis A and B vaccination early in the natural history of their chronic liver disease. Vaccination rates are low in clinical practice, and public health and educational programs are needed to overcome barriers to facilitate timely implementation of these recommendations. PMID:18528476

  11. Lipoprotein Metabolism, Dyslipidemia and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, David E.; Fisher, Edward A.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease represents the most common cause of death in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD patients exhibit an atherogenic dyslipidemia that is characterized by an increased plasma concentration of triglycerides, reduced concentration of high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and low density lipoprotein (LDL) particles that are smaller and more dense than normal. The pathogenesis of NAFLD-associated atherogenic dyslipidemia is multifaceted, but man...

  12. Modern diagnostics of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: noninvasive research methods

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    N. M. Palibroda

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is increasingly recognized as the most common cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. NAFLD represents a wide spectrum of conditions, ranging from simple benign steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, which sometimes progresses to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The pivotal issue in the management of patients with NAFLD is the diagnosis of steatohepatitis and fibrosis at an early stage. In this review we present recent data on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease evaluation. Although liver biopsy is regarded as the gold standard for assessment of hepatic steatosis and steatohepatitis, its use has several limitations, including the potential risk of sampling errors, intra- and interobserver variability, invasiveness and the stress it causes to patients, the high cost and the potential for complications. In this review a simple and reliable non-invasive alternative with indicated sensitivity and specificity is described. Non-invasive markers should aim ; in primary care settings, to identify the risk of developing NAFLD among individuals with increased metabolic risk; in secondary and tertiary care settings, to identify those with a worse prognosis, e.g. severe steatohepatitis; monitor disease progression; predict response to therapeutic interventions. Achieving these objectives could reduce the need for liver biopsy. Thus, according to the natural history of NAFLD, all patients with a low risk of developing advanced disease, eventually diagnosed by one of above non-invasive parameters, could be referred to primary care, whereas subjects at high risk of developing advanced disease should be sent to specialists for the evaluation of the degree of fibrosis and the choice of specific management. According to the Clinical Practice Guidelines for the management of NAFLD, ultrasound is the preferred first-line diagnostic procedure for imaging of NAFLD, as it provides additional diagnostic information

  13. NON-ALCOHOLIC FATTY LIVER DISEASE AT OUR INSTITUTE

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    Madhavi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION A Correlation clinical observational hospital based clinical study with 50 patients were undertaken to study the Clinical Profile of incidentally detected Non Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease. The cases for the study were selected retrospectively who were diagnosed as fatty liver by ultrasound imaging who attended the Department of General Medicine, Government General Hospital Kakinada Rangaraya Medical College. Data has been enumerated for those who fulfilled the inclusion criteria. This study was conducted between January 2013-January 2015. The study has limitations of observer variant dependent diagnostic ultrasound for inclusion in to study. A BMI of>25 kg/m2 taken as definition for obesity for analysis.

  14. Severity Assessment of Chronic Liver Disease in Children

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    S Tehranian

    2014-04-01

    A total of 106 patients, 53% females and 47% males with the mean age of 68.3±41.8 months participated. The most common clinical finding was hepatomegaly (76%, followed by jaundice and splenomegaly. Jaundice, hepatopulmonary syndrome, cirrhosis and splenomegaly were clearly correlated with PELD score. The increasing of PELD/MELD (model for end-stage liver disease scores were in line with the high level of liver alkaline phosphatase enzyme and there was a significant relation between them (P

  15. A Highly Similar Mathematical Model for Cerebral Blood Flow Velocity in Geriatric Patients with Suspected Cerebrovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Li, Qi; Wang, Jisheng; Xiang, Hu; Ge, Hong; Wang, Hui; Xie, Peng

    2015-10-01

    Cerebral blood flow velocity(CBFV) is an important parameter for study of cerebral hemodynamics. However, a simple and highly similar mathematical model has not yet been established for analyzing CBFV. To alleviate this issue, through TCD examination in 100 geriatric patients with suspected cerebrovascular disease (46 males and 54 females), we established a representative eighth-order Fourier function Vx(t) that simulates the CBFV. The measured TCD waveforms were compared to those derived from Vx(t), an illustrative Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was employed to determine the validity. The results showed that the TCD waves could been reconstructed for patients with different CBFVs by implementing their variable heart rates and the formulated maximum/minimum of Vx(t). Comparisons between derived and measured TCD waveforms suggest that the two waveforms are very similar. The results confirm that CBFV can be well-modeled through an eighth-order Fourier function. This function Vx(t) can be used extensively for a prospective study of cerebral hemodynamics in geriatric patients with suspected cerebrovascular disease.

  16. Focus on Therapeutic Strategies of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

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    Marilena Durazzo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is the most common chronic liver disease in the Western world (it affects 30% of the general adult population. The NAFLD encompasses a histological spectrum ranging from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, defined by steatosis, hepatocellular damage, and lobular inflammation in individuals without significant alcohol consumption and negative viral, congenital, and autoimmune liver disease markers. Currently, NAFLD is considered an emerging epidemic in light of the dramatic increase in obesity rates. With the progressive nature of NASH and its rising prevalence there is a significant need for a specific and targeted treatments since to date there has not been any validated therapies for NAFLD other than weight loss, which is well known to have a poor long-term success rate. In recent years, visceral adipose tissue has taken an important role in NAFLD pathogenesis, and current therapeutic approaches aim at reducing visceral obesity and free fatty acid overflow to the liver. This paper is focused on the treatments used for NAFLD and the potential new therapy.

  17. Nitrofurantoin-induced immune-mediated lung and liver disease

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    Milić Rade

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Nitrofurantoin, a furan derivative, introduced in the fifties has widely been used as an effective agent for the treatment and prevention of urinary tract infections (UTI. Spectrum of adverse reactions to nitrofurantoin is wide, ranging from eosinophilic interstitial lung disease, acute hepatitis and granulomatous reaction, to the chronic active hepatitis, a very rare adverse effect, that can lead to cirrhosis and death. Case report. We presented a 55-year-old female patient with eosinophilic interstitial lung disease, severe chronic active hepatitis and several other immune- mediated multisystemic manifestations of prolonged exposure to nitrofurantoin because of the recurrent UTI caused by Escherichia coli. We estimated typical radiographic and laboratory disturbances, also restrictive ventilatory changes, severe reduction of carbon monoxide diffusion capacity and abnormal liver function tests. Lymphocytic-eosinophylic alveolitis was consistent with druginduced reaction. Hepatitis was confirmed by liver biopsy. After withdrawal of nitrofurantoin and application of high dose of glicocorticosteroids, prompt clinical and laboratory recovery was achieved. Conclusion. Adverse drug reactions should be considered in patients with concomitant lung and liver disease. The mainstay of treatment is drug withdrawal and the use of immunosuppressive drugs in severe cases. Consideration should be given to monitor lung and liver function tests during long term nitrofurantoin therapy.

  18. Visualisation of the rectoanal inhibitory reflex with a modified contrast enema in children with suspected Hirschsprung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vult von Steyern, Kristina; Wingren, Pär; Wiklund, Marie; Stenström, Pernilla; Arnbjörnsson, Einar

    2013-08-01

    Patients with Hirschsprung disease lack the normal rectoanal inhibitory reflex, which can be studied with anorectal manometry or US. To see whether the rectoanal inhibitory reflex could be visualised with a modified contrast enema, thereby increasing the diagnostic accuracy of the contrast enema and reducing the number of rectal biopsies. Fifty-nine boys and 42 girls (median age, 12 months) with suspected Hirschsprung disease were examined with a modified contrast enema, supplemented with two injections of cold, water-soluble contrast medium, to induce the reflex. Two paediatric radiologists evaluated the anonymised examinations in consensus. The contrast enema findings were correlated with the results of rectal biopsy or clinical follow-up. Five boys and one girl (median age, 7.5 days) were diagnosed with Hirschsprung disease. The negative predictive value of the rectoanal inhibitory reflex was 100%. A contrast enema with signs of Hirschsprung disease in combination with an absent rectoanal inhibitory reflex had the specificity of 98% and sensitivity of 100% for Hirschsprung disease. The modified contrast enema improves the radiological diagnosis of Hirschsprung disease. By demonstrating the rectoanal inhibitory reflex in children without Hirschsprung disease, we can reduce the proportion of unnecessary rectal biopsies.

  19. Caroli's disease: liver resection and liver transplantation. Experience in 33 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassahun, Woubet Tefera; Kahn, Thomas; Wittekind, Christian; Mössner, Joachim; Caca, Karel; Hauss, Johann; Lamesch, Peter

    2005-11-01

    The aim of this study was to review and discuss our observations on 33 patients who underwent surgical treatment for Caroli's disease (CD), focusing on diagnosis, current surgical management, and long-term outcome. Between May 1993 and June 2004, 642 liver resections and 286 liver transplantations in 252 patients were performed in our department of surgery. Thirty-three patients were referred to our center for diagnostic and therapeutic management of CD. Prior surgical interventions for hepatobiliary disorders, current diagnostic and surgical procedures, procedure-specific complications, duration of hospital stay, duration of follow-up, outpatient information, and long-term outcome were reviewed. Fifteen male and 18 female patients were treated in this study. Initial symptoms and signs of the disease noted in our patients included right upper quadrant pain, fever, and jaundice. In 2 of the 33 patients, we noted clinical evidence of cirrhosis followed by histologic confirmation. One patient suffered from variceal bleeding. In 26 patients, diagnoses were established by a combined endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, ultrasonography, and computed tomographic studies. The disease was localized in 25 and diffuse in 8 patients. Liver resection was carried out in 29 patients. Partial hepatectomies were performed in 27 of these 29 at our institution. Two female patients with the diffuse disease underwent orthotopic liver transplantation. Thirteen of the 31 patients who underwent surgery at our institution had an uneventful postoperative course. Fourteen patients had minor postoperative complications and responded well to medical management. Four patients had major complications that required further surgical treatment. Two patients died of complications related to postoperative hemorrhage and sepsis. Two patients with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma died because of primary tumor progress. One patient with cholangiocarcinoma died 1 year after a successful left

  20. Pediatric nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacifico, Lucia; Nobili, Valerio; Anania, Caterina; Verdecchia, Paola; Chiesa, Claudio

    2011-07-14

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) encompasses a range of liver histology severity and outcomes in the absence of chronic alcohol use. The mildest form is simple steatosis in which triglycerides accumulate within hepatocytes. A more advanced form of NAFLD, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, includes inflammation and liver cell injury, progressive to cryptogenic cirrhosis. NAFLD has become the most common cause of chronic liver disease in children and adolescents. The recent rise in the prevalence rates of overweight and obesity likely explains the NAFLD epidemic worldwide. NAFLD is strongly associated with abdominal obesity, type 2 diabetes, and dyslipidemia, and most patients have evidence of insulin resistance. Thus, NAFLD shares many features of the metabolic syndrome (MetS), a highly atherogenic condition, and this has stimulated interest in the possible role of NAFLD in the development of atherosclerosis. Accumulating evidence suggests that NAFLD is associated with a significantly greater overall mortality than in the general population, as well as with increased prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD), independently of classical atherosclerotic risk factors. Yet, several studies including the pediatric population have reported independent associations between NAFLD and impaired flow-mediated vasodilatation and increased carotid artery intimal medial thickness-two reliable markers of subclinical atherosclerosis-after adjusting for cardiovascular risk factors and MetS. Therefore, the rising prevalence of obesity-related MetS and NAFLD in childhood may lead to a parallel increase in adverse cardiovascular outcomes. In children, the cardiovascular system remains plastic and damage-reversible if early and appropriate interventions are established effectively. Therapeutic goals for NAFLD should address nutrition, physical activity, and avoidance of smoking to prevent not only end-stage liver disease but also CVD.

  1. Lipocalin-2 in Fructose-Induced Fatty Liver Disease

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    Jessica Lambertz

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The intake of excess dietary fructose most often leads to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. Fructose is metabolized mainly in the liver and its chronic consumption results in lipogenic gene expression in this organ. However, precisely how fructose is involved in NAFLD progression is still not fully understood, limiting therapy. Lipocalin-2 (LCN2 is a small secreted transport protein that binds to fatty acids, phospholipids, steroids, retinol, and pheromones. LCN2 regulates lipid and energy metabolism in obesity and is upregulated in response to insulin. We previously discovered that LCN2 has a hepatoprotective effect during hepatic insult, and that its upregulation is a marker of liver damage and inflammation. To investigate if LCN2 has impact on the metabolism of fructose and thereby arising liver damage, we fed wild type and Lcn2−/− mice for 4 or 8 weeks on diets that were enriched in fructose either by adding this sugar to the drinking water (30% w/v, or by feeding a chow containing 60% (w/w fructose. Body weight and daily intake of food and water of these mice was then measured. Fat content in liver sections was visualized using Oil Red O stain, and expression levels of genes involved in fat and sugar metabolism were measured by qRT-PCR and Western blot analysis. We found that fructose-induced steatosis and liver damage was more prominent in female than in male mice, but that the most severe hepatic damage occurred in female mice lacking LCN2. Unexpectedly, consumption of elevated fructose did not induce de novo lipogenesis or fat accumulation. We conclude that LCN2 acts in a lipid-independent manner to protect the liver against fructose-induced damage.

  2. Does vitamin C deficiency promote fatty liver disease development?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ipsen, David Højland; Tveden-Nyborg, Pernille; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and the subsequent reprogramming of the white adipose tissue are linked to human disease-complexes including metabolic syndrome and concurrent non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The dietary imposed dyslipidemia promotes redox imbalance...... by the generation of excess levels of reactive oxygen species and induces adipocyte dysfunction and reprogramming, leading to a low grade systemic inflammation and ectopic lipid deposition, e.g., in the liver, hereby promoting a vicious circle in which dietary factors initiate a metabolic change that further...... exacerbates the negative consequences of an adverse life-style. Large epidemiological studies and findings from controlled in vivo animal studies have provided evidence supporting an association between poor vitamin C (VitC) status and propagation of life-style associated diseases. In addition, overweight per...

  3. Nutrition and Physical Activity in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Claudia P; de Lima Sanches, Priscila; de Abreu-Silva, Erlon Oliveira; Marcadenti, Aline

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease worldwide and it is associated with other medical conditions such as diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, and obesity. The mechanisms of the underlying disease development and progression are not completely established and there is no consensus concerning the pharmacological treatment. In the gold standard treatment for NAFLD weight loss, dietary therapy, and physical activity are included. However, little scientific evidence is available on diet and/or physical activity and NAFLD specifically. Many dietary approaches such as Mediterranean and DASH diet are used for treatment of other cardiometabolic risk factors such as insulin resistance and type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), but on the basis of its components their role in NAFLD has been discussed. In this review, the implications of current dietary and exercise approaches, including Brazilian and other guidelines, are discussed, with a focus on determining the optimal nonpharmacological treatment to prescribe for NAFLD.

  4. Nutrition and Physical Activity in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia P. Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is the most common liver disease worldwide and it is associated with other medical conditions such as diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, and obesity. The mechanisms of the underlying disease development and progression are not completely established and there is no consensus concerning the pharmacological treatment. In the gold standard treatment for NAFLD weight loss, dietary therapy, and physical activity are included. However, little scientific evidence is available on diet and/or physical activity and NAFLD specifically. Many dietary approaches such as Mediterranean and DASH diet are used for treatment of other cardiometabolic risk factors such as insulin resistance and type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, but on the basis of its components their role in NAFLD has been discussed. In this review, the implications of current dietary and exercise approaches, including Brazilian and other guidelines, are discussed, with a focus on determining the optimal nonpharmacological treatment to prescribe for NAFLD.

  5. Probiotics and Alcoholic Liver Disease: Treatment and Potential Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengyuan Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite extensive research, alcohol remains one of the most common causes of liver disease in the United States. Alcoholic liver disease (ALD encompasses a broad spectrum of disorders, including steatosis, steatohepatitis, and cirrhosis. Although many agents and approaches have been tested in patients with ALD and in animals with experimental ALD in the past, there is still no FDA (Food and Drug Administration approved therapy for any stage of ALD. With the increasing recognition of the importance of gut microbiota in the onset and development of a variety of diseases, the potential use of probiotics in ALD is receiving increasing investigative and clinical attention. In this review, we summarize recent studies on probiotic intervention in the prevention and treatment of ALD in experimental animal models and patients. Potential mechanisms underlying the probiotic function are also discussed.

  6. Advances in the treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

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    FENG Gong

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD has become a major liver disease in the world and its prevalence rate continues to increase. As a component of metabolic syndrome, it has become a risk factor for many serious cerebrovascular and cardiovascular diseases. Due to the complex pathogenesis of NAFLD or the combined/mutual effect of pathogenic factors, there are still no widely accepted effective therapies. In recent years, more and more studies have revealed new pathogeneses of NAFLD and the prospects of corresponding treatment. This article introduces the recent advances in the treatment of NAFLD, including lifestyle intervention, drug therapy, integrated traditional Chinese and Western medicine therapy, and bariatric surgery. In the aspect of drug therapy, this article introduces the drugs commonly used in clinical practice and new drugs in phase II and III clinical trials and their therapeutic effects.

  7. Liver fibrosis: a compilation on the biomarkers status and their significance during disease progression

    OpenAIRE

    Nallagangula, Krishna Sumanth; Nagaraj, Shashidhar Kurpad; Venkataswamy, Lakshmaiah; Chandrappa, Muninarayana

    2017-01-01

    Liver fibrosis occurs in response to different etiologies of chronic liver injury. Diagnosing degree of liver fibrosis is a crucial step in evaluation of severity of the disease. An invasive liver biopsy is the gold standard method associated with pain and complications. Biomarkers to detect liver fibrosis include direct markers of extracellular matrix turnover and indirect markers as a reflection of liver dysfunction. Although a single marker may not be useful for successful management, a ma...

  8. Factors associated with number of duodenal samples obtained in suspected celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamban, Leonid; Sorser, Serge; Naydin, Stan; Lebwohl, Benjamin; Shukr, Mousa; Wiemann, Charlotte; Yevsyukov, Daniel; Piper, Michael H; Warren, Bradley; Green, Peter H R

    2017-12-01

     Many people with celiac disease are undiagnosed and there is evidence that insufficient duodenal samples may contribute to underdiagnosis. The aims of this study were to investigate whether more samples leads to a greater likelihood of a diagnosis of celiac disease and to elucidate factors that influence the number of samples collected.  We identified patients from two community hospitals who were undergoing duodenal biopsy for indications (as identified by International Classification of Diseases code) compatible with possible celiac disease. Three cohorts were evaluated: no celiac disease (NCD, normal villi), celiac disease (villous atrophy, Marsh score 3), and possible celiac disease (PCD, Marsh score celiac disease had a median of 4 specimens collected. The percentage of patients diagnosed with celiac disease with one sample was 0.3 % compared with 12.8 % of those with six samples ( P  = 0.001). Patient factors that positively correlated with the number of samples collected were endoscopic features, demographic details, and indication ( P  = 0.001). Endoscopist factors that positively correlated with the number of samples collected were absence of a trainee, pediatric gastroenterologist, and outpatient setting ( P  celiac disease significantly increased with six samples. Multiple factors influenced whether adequate biopsies were taken. Adherence to guidelines may increase the diagnosis rate of celiac disease.

  9. Liver Toxicity of Anabolic Androgenic Steroid Use in an Adolescent with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awai, Hannah I; Yu, Elizabeth L; Ellis, Linda S; Schwimmer, Jeffrey B

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity and related morbidities such as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is high among adolescents. Current treatment recommendations for NAFLD focus on lifestyle optimization via nutrition and exercise. After encouraging exercise, many adolescents choose to participate in organized sports, which may lead to use of illicit substances such as anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) to boost athletic performance. Approximately 3,000,000 individuals use non-therapeutic AAS at supra-physiologic doses in the United States.1 In 2012, 5.9% of adolescent boys reported steroid use in the previous year.2 We anticipate adolescents with pre-existing liver disease are at increased risk for AAS induced hepatotoxicity. We present such a case with IRB approval and written individual patient consent. PMID:23568051

  10. Establishment of an alcoholic fatty liver disease model in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Peizhu; Liang, Huan; Nie, Junhui; Diao, Yan; He, Qi; Hou, Baoyu; Zhao, Tingting; Huang, Hui; Li, Yanze; Gao, Xu; Zhou, Lingyun; Liu, Ying

    2017-01-01

    Alcoholic fatty liver disease (AFLD) defines an important stage in the progression of alcoholic liver disease (ALD), which is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. To establish a mouse model of AFLD. Male C57BL/6 mice were divided into the following two groups: (i) a control group, which was allowed free access to food and water and (ii) an alcohol-treated group, which was administered a 15% (v/v) alcohol solution instead of water. After 8-9 months of treatment, serum biochemical indexes, histopathological changes, liver triglyceride content, iron storage, and ferritin light chain protein expression were measured using an automatic biochemical analyzer, hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining, a commercially available kit, Prussian blue staining, and Western blot analysis, respectively. Compared with the control group, the alcohol-treated group displayed increased levels of serum LDH, ALT, and AST, decreased levels of ALB, and no significant change in levels of TP. Additionally, increased levels of serum TG, T-CHO, and LDL and decreased levels of serum GLU and HDL were observed in the alcohol-treated mice. HE staining showed that lipid vacuolization occurred in the livers of alcohol-treated mice. The alcohol-treated mice also exhibited increased liver triglyceride content. Moreover, Prussian blue staining and Western blot analysis demonstrated that chronic alcohol administration caused iron overloading of the liver. Chronic administration of 15% (v/v) alcohol in the drinking water over 8-9 months caused AFLD in mice. Our results establish an AFLD model that represents a promising tool for the future study of the progression of ALD.

  11. Ammonia clearance with haemofiltration in adults with liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, Andrew J; Auzinger, Georg; Willars, Chris; Dew, Tracy; Musto, Rebecca; Corsilli, Daniel; Sherwood, Roy; Wendon, Julia A; Bernal, William

    2014-01-01

    Ammonia is recognized as a toxin central to complications of liver failure. Hyperammonaemia has important clinical consequences, but optimal means to reduce circulating levels are uncertain. In patients with liver disease, continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) with haemofiltration (HF) is often required to treat concurrent kidney injury, but its effects upon ammonia levels are poorly characterized. To evaluate the effect of HF at different treatment intensities on ammonia clearance (AC) and arterial ammonia concentration. Prospective study of adult patients with liver failure and arterial ammonia >100 μmol/L requiring CRRT using veno-venous HF. Arterial ammonia concentration and AC measured at 1 and 24 h after initiation of low (35 ml/kg/h) or high (90 ml/kg/h) filtration volume. Twenty-four patients (10 acute liver failure, 10 chronic liver disease and 4 following liver resection) were studied. Clearance of urea and ammonia solutes correlated closely (r = 0.819, P = 0.007). Ammonia clearance correlated closely with ultrafiltration rate (r = 0.86, P < 0.001). At 1 h, AC was 39 (34-54) ml/min (low volume) vs 85 (62-105) ml/min (high volume) CRRT, (P < 0.001) and at 24 h 44 (34-63) vs 105 (82-109) ml/min, (P = 0.01). Overall, a 22% reduction in median arterial ammonia concentration was observed over 24 h of HF from 156 (137-176) to 122 (85-133) μmol/L, (P ≤ 0.0001). Clinically significant ammonia clearance can be achieved in adult patients with hyperammonaemia utilizing continuous VVHF. Ammonia clearance is closely correlated with ultrafiltration rate. HF was associated with a fall in arterial ammonia concentration. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Haemodynamics and fluid retention in liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik; Møller, Søren

    1998-01-01

    blood volume and systemic vascular resistance are decreased. A systemic and splanchnic vasodilatation is of pathogenic importance to the low systemic vascular resistance and abnormal volume distribution. These are important elements in the development of the low arterial blood pressure and hyperkinetic......, and elevated circulation vasopressin, endothelin-1 may also be implicated in the haemodynamic counter-regulation in cirrhosis. Recent research has focused on the assertion that the haemodynamic and neurohumoral abnormalities in cirrhosis are part of a general circulatory dysfunction, influencing the course...... of the disease with reduction of kidney function and sodium-water retention as the outcome....

  13. Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Beneficial Effects of Flavonoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhlaghi, Masoumeh

    2016-10-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has been known as the hepatic feature of metabolic syndrome. Extra fat depots, especially in visceral areas, develop insulin resistance as a result of mild oxidation and inflammation. Insulin resistance induces lipolysis and releases free fatty acids into the circulation, where they are transported to the liver. In the liver, free fatty acids are converted to triglycerides and accumulate, causing simple steatosis that, if left untreated, can lead to steatohepatitis, and subsequently liver necrosis and cirrhosis.Flavonoids, a group of plant compounds with incredible biological characteristics, have shown advantages in pathological conditions. Beneficial effects of flavonoids against NAFLD and its related disorders have been observed in both animal and human studies. Various mechanisms have been found for their protection. Flavonoids prevent hepatosteatosis by increasing fatty acid oxidation in the liver. They can also reduce caloric intake and decrease body weight and fat deposition in visceral tissues. Flavonoids are unique antioxidants that exert their beneficial effects through inhibition of nuclear factor κB, thereby attenuating release of inflammatory cytokines, which are triggers of insulin resistance. Finally, flavonoids have shown to increase adiponectin, improve insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance, correct dyslipidemia, and reduce blood pressure in patients with NAFLD. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Liver biopsy histopathology for diagnosis of Johne's disease in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S L; Wilson, P R; Collett, M G; Heuer, C; West, D M; Stevenson, M; Chambers, J P

    2014-09-01

    Sheep with Johne's disease develop epithelioid macrophage microgranulomas, specific to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map) infection, in the terminal ileum, mesenteric lymph nodes, and organs distant to the alimentary tract such as the liver. The objectives of this study were to determine whether liver pathology was present in ewes affected by Map and whether liver cores provide adequate tissue for this potential diagnostic marker. One hundred and twenty-six adult, low body condition ewes were euthanized, necropsied, and underwent simulated liver biopsy. Ileal lesions typical of Map were found in 60 ewes. Hepatic epithelioid microgranulomas were observed in all ewes with Type 3b (n = 40) and 82% (n = 11) with Type 3c ileal lesions. None were found in ewes unaffected by Map or with Type 1, 2, or 3a ileal lesions. Liver biopsy core samples provided adequate tissue for histopathology with a sensitivity and specificity of 96% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.87-0.99) and 100% (95% CI, 0.95-1), respectively for detection of types 3b and 3c ileal lesions. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy for Oligometastatic Disease in Liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myungsoo Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Liver metastasis in solid tumors, including colorectal cancer, is the most frequent and lethal complication. The development of systemic therapy has led to prolonged survival. However, in selected patients with a finite number of discrete lesions in liver, defined as oligometastatic state, additional local therapies such as surgical resection, radiofrequency ablation, cryotherapy, and radiotherapy can lead to permanent local disease control and improve survival. Among these, an advance in radiation therapy made it possible to deliver high dose radiation to the tumor more accurately, without impairing the liver function. In recent years, the introduction of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR has offered even more intensive tumor dose escalation in a few fractions with reduced dose to the adjacent normal liver. Many studies have shown that SABR for oligometastases is effective and safe, with local control rates widely ranging from 50% to 100% at one or two years. And actuarial survival at one and two years has been reported ranging from 72% to 94% and from 30% to 62%, respectively, without severe toxicities. In this paper, we described the definition and technical aspects of SABR, clinical outcomes including efficacy and toxicity, and related parameters after SABR in liver oligometastases from colorectal cancer.

  16. Adjusted scaling of FDG positron emission tomography images for statistical evaluation in patients with suspected Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchert, Ralph; Wilke, Florian; Chakrabarti, Bhismadev; Martin, Brigitte; Brenner, Winfried; Mester, Janos; Clausen, Malte

    2005-10-01

    Statistical parametric mapping (SPM) gained increasing acceptance for the voxel-based statistical evaluation of brain positron emission tomography (PET) with the glucose analog 2-[18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) in patients with suspected Alzheimer's disease (AD). To increase the sensitivity for detection of local changes, individual differences of total brain FDG uptake are usually compensated for by proportional scaling. However, in cases of extensive hypometabolic areas, proportional scaling overestimates scaled uptake. This may cause significant underestimation of the extent of hypometabolic areas by the statistical test. To detect this problem, the authors tested for hypermetabolism. In patients with no visual evidence of true focal hypermetabolism, significant clusters of hypermetabolism in the presence of extended hypometabolism were interpreted as false-positive findings, indicating relevant overestimation of scaled uptake. In this case, scaled uptake was reduced step by step until there were no more significant clusters of hypermetabolism. In 22 consecutive patients with suspected AD, proportional scaling resulted in relevant overestimation of scaled uptake in 9 patients. Scaled uptake had to be reduced by 11.1% +/- 5.3% in these cases to eliminate the artifacts. Adjusted scaling resulted in extension of existing and appearance of new clusters of hypometabolism. Total volume of the additional voxels with significant hypometabolism depended linearly on the extent of the additional scaling and was 202 +/- 118 mL on average. Adjusted scaling helps to identify characteristic metabolic patterns in patients with suspected AD. It is expected to increase specificity of FDGPET in this group of patients.

  17. Initial diagnostic errors in children suspected of having heart disease: prevalence and long-term consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Amaral

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To access the incidence of diagnostic errors in the initial evaluation of children with cardiac murmurs. METHODS: We evaluated our 7-years of experience in a public pediatric cardiology outpatient clinic. Of 3692 patients who were sent to the hospital, 2603 presented with a heart murmur and were investigated. Patients for whom a disagreement existed between the initial and final diagnoses were divided into the following 2 groups: G1 (n=17 with an initial diagnosis of an innocent murmur and a final diagnosis of cardiopathy, and G2 (n=161 with an initial diagnosis of cardiopathy and a final diagnosis of a normal heart. RESULTS: In G1, the great majority of patients had cardiac defects with mild hemodynamic repercussions, such as small ventricular septal defect and mild pulmonary stenosis. In G2, the great majority of structural defects were interventricular communication, atrial septal defect and pulmonary valve stenosis. CONCLUSION: A global analysis demonstrated that diagnostic error in the initial evaluation of children with cardiac murmurs is real, reaching approximately 6% of cases. The majority of these misdiagnoses were in patients with an initial diagnosis of cardiopathy, which was not confirmed through later complementary examinations. Clinical cardiovascular examination is an excellent resource in the evaluation of children suspected of having cardiopathy. Immediate outpatient discharge of children with an initial diagnosis of an innocent heart murmur seems to be a suitable approach.

  18. High-resolution myocardial stress perfusion at 3 T in patients with suspected coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Carsten; Strach, Katharina; Thomas, Daniel; Naehle, Claas P.; Schwenger, Ulrich; Schild, Hans H.; Sommer, Torsten [University of Bonn, Department of Radiology, Bonn (Germany); Litt, Harold [University of Pennsylvania Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia (United States); Tiemann, Klaus [University of Bonn, Department of Cardiology, Bonn (United States)

    2008-02-15

    To implement a high-resolution first-pass myocardial perfusion imaging protocol (HRPI) at 3 T, and to evaluate the feasibility, image quality and accuracy of this approach prospectively in patients with suspected CAD. We hypothesized that utilizing the gain in SNR at 3 T to increase spatial resolution would reduce partial volume effects and subendocardial dark rim artifacts in comparison to 1.5 T. HRPI studies were performed on 60 patients using a segmented k-space gradient echo sequence (in plane resolution 1.97 x 1.94 mm{sup 2}). Semiquantitative assessment of dark rim artifacts was performed for the stress studies on a slice-by-slice basis. Qualitative visual analysis was compared to quantitative coronary angiography (QCA) results; hemodynamically significant CAD was defined as stenosis {>=}70% at QCA. Dark rim artifacts appeared in 108 of 180 slices (average extent 1.3 {+-} 1.2 mm representing 11.8 {+-} 10.8% of the transmural myocardial thickness). Sensitivity, specifity, and test accuracy for the detection of significant CAD were 89%,79%, and 85%. HRPI studies at 3 T are feasible in a clinical setting, providing good image quality and high accuracy for detection of significant CAD. The presence of dark rim artifacts does not appear to represent a diagnostic problem when using a HRPI approach. (orig.)

  19. Investigating Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in a Liver-on-a-Chip Microfluidic Device.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuele Gori

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is a chronic liver disease worldwide, ranging from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, which may progress to cirrhosis, eventually leading to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. HCC ranks as the third highest cause of cancer-related death globally, requiring an early diagnosis of NAFLD as a potential risk factor. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying NAFLD are still under investigation. So far, many in vitro studies on NAFLD have been hampered by the limitations of 2D culture systems, in which cells rapidly lose tissue-specific functions. The present liver-on-a-chip approach aims at filling the gap between conventional in vitro models, often scarcely predictive of in vivo conditions, and animal models, potentially biased by their xenogeneic nature.HepG2 cells were cultured into a microfluidically perfused device under free fatty acid (FFA supplementation, namely palmitic and oleic acid, for 24h and 48h. The device mimicked the endothelial-parenchymal interface of a liver sinusoid, allowing the diffusion of nutrients and removal of waste products similar to the hepatic microvasculature. Assessment of intracellular lipid accumulation, cell viability/cytotoxicity and oxidative stress due to the FFA overload, was performed by high-content analysis methodologies using fluorescence-based functional probes.The chip enables gradual and lower intracellular lipid accumulation, higher hepatic cell viability and minimal oxidative stress in microfluidic dynamic vs. 2D static cultures, thus mimicking the chronic condition of steatosis observed in vivo more closely.Overall, the liver-on-a-chip system provides a suitable culture microenvironment, representing a more reliable model compared to 2D cultures for investigating NAFLD pathogenesis. Hence, our system is amongst the first in vitro models of human NAFLD developed within a microfluidic device in a sinusoid-like fashion, endowing a more permissive

  20. Milk thistle for alcoholic and/or hepatitis B or C virus liver diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rambaldi, A; Jacobs, B P; Iaquinto, G

    2005-01-01

    Alcohol and hepatotoxic viruses cause the majority of liver diseases. Randomised clinical trials have assessed whether extracts of milk thistle, Silybum marianum (L) Gaertneri, have any effect in patients with alcoholic and/or hepatitis B or C virus liver diseases.......Alcohol and hepatotoxic viruses cause the majority of liver diseases. Randomised clinical trials have assessed whether extracts of milk thistle, Silybum marianum (L) Gaertneri, have any effect in patients with alcoholic and/or hepatitis B or C virus liver diseases....