WorldWideScience

Sample records for suspected lead poisoning

  1. Lead Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lead is a metal that occurs naturally in the earth's crust. Lead can be found in all parts of our ... from human activities such as mining and manufacturing. Lead used to be in paint; older houses may ...

  2. Lead poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or dust from lead-based paint. Toys and furniture painted before 1976. Painted toys and decorations made ... by decades of car exhaust or years of house paint scrapings. Lead is more common in soil ...

  3. Lead Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a hard, durable surface. In 1977, federal regulations banned lead from paint for general use. But homes ... OTHERS: Lead has recently been found in some plastic mini-blinds and vertical blinds which were made ...

  4. Lead Poisoning: A Need for Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipnickey, Susan Cross

    1981-01-01

    Each year approximately 200 children die of lead poisoning. Especially vulnerable to the toxic effects of lead poisoning are the nervous system, kidneys, and the bones. Physiological effects of lead on the school-age child, screening processes, and roles of school personnel in dealing with suspected victims of lead poisoning are discussed. (JN)

  5. Lead Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... has also been associated with juvenile delinquency and criminal behavior. In adults, lead can increase blood pressure ... and-forth manner, but rather from left to right (or vise-versa), or from the top of ...

  6. Lead Poisoning (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Needs a Kidney Transplant Vision Facts and Myths Lead Poisoning KidsHealth > For Parents > Lead Poisoning Print A ... Family en español La intoxicación por plomo About Lead Poisoning If you have young kids, it's important ...

  7. Lead Poisoning in Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pueschel, Siegfried M., Ed.; Linakis, James G., Ed.; Anderson, Angela C., Ed.

    The magnitude of childhood lead poisoning has been inexplicably neglected by modern medicine and by legislators. However, since the 1970s, increased attention has been focused on lead poisoning, and advances have been made in several areas, including understanding of the neurodevelopmental and behavioral ramifications of lead poisoning, and…

  8. Lead poisoning: An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendel, Neil

    1993-01-01

    A problem that should be of great concern to all of us is the lead poisoning of children. First, I would like to present a short overview concerning the reasons everyone should care about lead poisoning, then discuss the history of lead poisoning, what is happening today across the country, and the future.

  9. Lead Poisoning in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, A. H., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Early symptoms of lead poisoning in children are often overlooked. Lead poisoning has its greatest effects on the brain and nervous system. The obvious long-term solution to the lead poisoning problem is removal of harmful forms of the metal from the environment. (JN)

  10. Suspected lead poisoning in two captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus jubatus in South Africa, in 2008 and 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle A. North

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Whilst lead poisoning in raptors, scavenging birds and waterfowl is well studied and common knowledge, there is surprisingly little literature detailing the risk to mammalian scavengers and captive carnivores fed hunted meat. This case report describes the death of two captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus jubatus following acute onset of nervous symptoms. Clinical signs included hyper-excitability, seizures, arched back, tail held abnormally high and hyper-salivation. Necropsy findings included bullets or a bullet in their stomachs. Kidney and liver lead levels from one cheetah (15.6 ppm and 17 ppm respectively were consistent with a diagnosis of lead poisoning; liver from the second cheetah was not available for testing. Both animals were routinely fed hunted antelope or game birds. This is the first report of oral lead poisoning in captive large carnivores, although these are unlikely to be the first cases. Without awareness of the risks of feeding hunted game, lead exposure will continue to be an underdiagnosed reality in the rehabilitation of endangered carnivores.

  11. Suspected lead poisoning in two captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus jubatus) in South Africa, in 2008 and 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Michelle A; Lane, Emily P; Marnewick, Kelly; Caldwell, Peter; Carlisle, Glen; Hoffman, Louw C

    2015-08-13

    Whilst lead poisoning in raptors, scavenging birds and waterfowl is well studied and common knowledge, there is surprisingly little literature detailing the risk to mammalian scavengers and captive carnivores fed hunted meat. This case report describes the death of two captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus jubatus) following acute onset of nervous symptoms. Clinical signs included hyper-excitability, seizures, arched back, tail held abnormally high and hyper-salivation. Necropsy findings included bullets or a bullet in their stomachs. Kidney and liver lead levels from one cheetah (15.6 ppm and 17 ppm respectively) were consistent with a diagnosis of lead poisoning; liver from the second cheetah was not available for testing. Both animals were routinely fed hunted antelope or game birds. This is the first report of oral lead poisoning in captive large carnivores, although these are unlikely to be the first cases. Without awareness of the risks of feeding hunted game, lead exposure will continue to be an underdiagnosed reality in the rehabilitation of endangered carnivores.

  12. Suspected poisoning of domestic animals by pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caloni, Francesca; Cortinovis, Cristina; Rivolta, Marina; Davanzo, Franca

    2016-01-01

    A retrospective study was carried out by reviewing all suspected cases of domestic animal poisoning attributed to pesticides, reported to the Milan Poison Control Centre (MPCC) between January 2011 and December 2013. During this period, pesticides were found to be responsible for 37.3% of all suspected poisoning enquiries received (815). The most commonly species involved was the dog (71.1% of calls) followed by the cat (15.8%), while a limited number of cases involved horses, goats and sheep. Most cases of exposure (47.1%) resulted in mild to moderate clinical signs. The outcome was reported in 59.9% of these cases, with death occurring in 10.4% of them. Insecticides (40.8%) proved to be the most common group of pesticides involved and exposure to pyrethrins-pyrethroids accounted for the majority of calls. According to the MPCC data, there has been a decrease in the number of suspected poisonings cases attributed to pesticides that have been banned by the EU, including aldicarb, carbofuran, endosulfan and paraquat. In contrast, there has been an increase of suspected poisoning cases attributed to the neonicotinoids, imidacloprid and acetamiprid, probably due to their widespread use in recent years. Cases of suspected poisoning that involved exposure to rodenticides accounted for 27.6% of calls received by the MPCC and anticoagulant rodenticides were the primary cause of calls, with many cases involving brodifacoum and bromadiolone. Herbicides were involved in 14.2% of calls related to pesticides and glyphosate was the main culprit in cases involving dogs, cats, horses, goats and sheep. As far as exposure to molluscicides (11.5%) and fungicides (5.9%), most of the cases involved dogs and the suspected poisoning agents were metaldehyde and copper compounds respectively. The data collected are useful in determining trends in poisoning episodes and identifying newly emerging toxicants, thus demonstrating the prevalence of pesticides as causative agents in animal

  13. Lead Poisoning in Wild Birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahner, Lesanna L.; Franson, J. Christian

    2009-01-01

    Lead in its various forms has been used for thousands of years, originally in cooking utensils and glazes and more recently in many industrial and commercial applications. However, lead is a potent, potentially deadly toxin that damages many organs in the body and can affect all animals, including humans. By the mid 1990s, lead had been removed from many products in the United States, such as paint and fuel, but it is still commonly used in ammunition for hunting upland game birds, small mammals, and large game animals, as well as in fishing tackle. Wild birds, such as mourning doves, bald eagles, California condors, and loons, can die from the ingestion of one lead shot, bullet fragment, or sinker. According to a recent study on loon mortality, nearly half of adult loons found sick or dead during the breeding season in New England were diagnosed with confirmed or suspected lead poisoning from ingestion of lead fishing weights. Recent regulations in some states have restricted the use of lead ammunition on certain upland game hunting areas, as well as lead fishing tackle in areas frequented by common loons and trumpeter swans. A variety of alternatives to lead are available for use in hunting, shooting sports, and fishing activities.

  14. Lead poisoning from Ayurvedic medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Rayji S; Van Schalkwyk, Johan; Spriggs, David

    2013-05-10

    A case of lead poisoning with established exposure to Ayurvedic medicines is presented. This patient migrated from India to New Zealand 8 years previously. He regularly visits India where he purchases "herbal remedies" for his wellbeing.

  15. Lead poisoning in woodpeckers in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mörner, T; Petersson, L

    1999-10-01

    Lead poisoning was demonstrated in two gray-headed woodpeckers (Picus canus) and one white-backed woodpecker (Dendrocopus leucotos) in Sweden; they had liver lead levels between 9.4 and 26.2 mg(-1) wet weight. At necropsy one gray-headed woodpecker showed signs of emaciation and the other one had severe traumatic injuries, caused by a cat. The white-backed woodpecker died in the transportation box during a translocation program. The source of the lead could not be determined, but it was suspected that it may have originated from lead pellets shot into trees and picked out by the woodpeckers during food search.

  16. Lead Poisoning Prevention Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or removed safely. How are children exposed to lead? Lead-based paint and lead contaminated dust are ... What can be done to prevent exposure to lead? It is important to determine the construction year ...

  17. Lead poisoning from souvenir earthenware.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellström-Lindberg, Eva; Björklund, Andreas; Karlson-Stiber, Christine; Harper, Pauline; Seldén, Anders I

    2006-02-01

    A case of massive lead poisoning from juice contained in a Greek earthenware jug as well as six satellite cases of high lead exposure of similar origin is reported. The intoxicated patient was successfully treated with dimercaptosuccinic acid. Ceramic producers should adhere to the longstanding European legislation.

  18. Childhood lead poisoning: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hon, K L; Fung, C K; Leung, A Kc

    2017-12-01

    Childhood lead poisoning is a major public health concern in many countries. In 2015, the Hong Kong SAR Government and its citizens faced a major public health crisis due to the presence of lead in the drinking water of a number of public housing estates. Fortunately, no child was diagnosed with lead poisoning that required treatment with chelation. Lead is a ubiquitous, naturally occurring material that exists in air, dust, soil, and water. It is also widely present in industrial products including petrol, paints, ceramics, food cans, candies, cosmetics, traditional remedies, batteries, solder, stained glass, crystal vessels, ammunition, ceramic glazes, jewellry, and toys. It can also be found in human milk. There is no safe blood lead level and it may be impossible to completely eliminate lead from any city. Hence routine measurement of blood lead levels is not considered useful. Acute poisoning, especially with encephalopathy, deserves immediate medical treatment in hospital. Chelation therapy is recommended if blood lead level is 45 μg/dL or higher. For blood levels between 20 and 45 μg/dL, treatment is indicated if the child is symptomatic. For blood levels below 20 μg/dL in otherwise asymptomatic children, the principle of treatment is to provide long-term neurodevelopmental follow-up and counselling. In all cases, immediate removal of the source of lead exposure is vital. Even low levels of lead exposure can significantly impair learning, educational attainment, and neurodevelopment.

  19. Helping Parents Prevent Lead Poisoning. ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binns, Helen J.; Ricks, Omar Benton

    Children are at greater risk than adults for lead poisoning because children absorb lead more readily than adults, and a small amount of lead in children's bodies can do a great deal of harm. Some of the causes and effects of childhood lead poisoning and suggests some lead poisoning prevention strategies that parent educators can share with…

  20. Acute abdominal pain and constipation due to lead poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mongolu, S; Sharp, P

    2013-01-01

    Although uncommon, lead poisoning should be considered as a differential diagnosis in cases of unexplained acute abdominal pain in both adults and children. We present the case of a 35-year-old Asian male who presented with abdominal pain and constipation secondary to lead poisoning. Initially, the source of lead exposure was not apparent; this was later found to be due to ingestion of an Ayurvedic herbal medicine for the treatment of infertility. Lead poisoning due to the ingestion of Ayurvedic remedies is well described. We discuss the diagnosis, pathophysiology and treatment of lead poisoning. This case illustrates one of the rarer medical causes of acute abdominal pain and emphasizes the need to take a thorough history (including specific questioning regarding the use of over-the-counter and traditional/ herbal remedies) in cases of suspected poisoning or drug toxicity.

  1. Some Lead Poisoning Tests May Be Faulty

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_165668.html Some Lead Poisoning Tests May Be Faulty But the majority of ... More Health News on Children's Health Laboratory Tests Lead Poisoning Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Children's ...

  2. Chronic lead poisoning in horses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knight, H.D.; Burau, R.G.

    1973-05-01

    Chronic lead poisoning in horses was manifested as anorexia, loss of body weight, muscular weakness, anemia, laryngeal hemiplegia, and, terminally, inhalation pneumonia. Some deaths were sudden and unexplained. The lead content in liver specimens from 10 horses was greater than that considered indicative of lead intoxication; however, the lead content of blood was equivocal. The most conclusive laboratory finding was increased urine lead concentration after chelation therapy. The concentration of lead in a sample of vegetation considered to be representative of what a horse would eat if he was grazing in the area sampled was 325 ppM (oven-dry basis). It was determined that a 450-kg horse grazing grass of this lead content would consume 2.9 Gm of lead daily (6.4 mg/kg of body weight), an amount considered toxic for horses. Leaching lowered the calcium content of the forage but failed to reduce the lead concentration of the plants significantly, thus opening the possibility that winter rains might have influenced the onset of poisoning. Airborne fallout from a nearby lead smelter was proposed as the primary mode of pasture contamination.

  3. Is Your Child Safe from Lead Poisoning?

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-10-02

    In this podcast, Dr. Mary Jean Brown, chief of CDC's Lead Poisoning and Prevention Program, discusses the importance of testing children for lead poisoning, who should be tested, and what parents can do to prevent lead poisoning.  Created: 10/2/2008 by National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH).   Date Released: 10/2/2008.

  4. Childhood Lead Poisoning: Blueprint for Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochow, K. W. James; Rapuano, Maria

    Current programs to deal with childhood lead poisoning, the primary environmental disease of U.S. children, screen individual children, treat those with serious cases of lead poisoning, and subsequently return children to hazardous environments. This approach has led to repeated diagnoses of lead poisoning. This handbook is designed to convince…

  5. Lead poisoning in children: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouhadi, Zineb; Bensabbahia, Dalal; Chafiq, Fouad; Oukkache, Bouchra; Guebessi, Nisrine Bennani; Abdellah, El Abidi; Najib, Jilali

    2016-01-01

    Lead colic is a rare cause of abdominal pain. The diagnosis of lead poisoning is most often mentioned in at risk populations (children, psychotic). We report the case of a 2 year old child that was presented for acute abdomen. Abdominal plain radiograph showed multiple intra-colonic metallic particles and suggested lead poisoning diagnosis. Anamnesis found a notion of pica and consumption of peeling paint. Elevated blood lead levels (BLL) confirmed the diagnosis. The lead poisoning is a public health problem especially in children, but its manifestation by a lead colic is rare and could simulate an acute abdomen table.

  6. Lead poisoning in captive wild animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zook, B.C.; Sauer, R.M.; Garner, F.M.

    1972-07-01

    Lead poisoning was diagnosed post-mortem in 34 simian primates, 11 parrots, and 3 Australian fruit bats at the National Zoological Park. Diagnoses were made by the finding of acid-fast intranuclear inclusion bodies in renal epithelia or hepatocytes and, in most cases, by finding excess lead in samples of liver. The estimated prevalence of lead intoxication among autopsied primates and parrots was 44% and 50% respectively. Leaded paint was found in many animal enclosures at this zoo and it was available to all the lead-poisoned animals in this study. The finding of renal intranuclear inclusion bodies in animals at several zoos, scattered reports of lead intoxication of animals dwelling in various zoos, the occurrence of leaded paint in many zoos and the high incidence of lead poisoning at this zoo, indicated that lead poisoning of zoo animals is much more common than was previously thought.

  7. Lead Poisoning in Remodeling of Old Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Bart

    1973-01-01

    An article based on Dr. Muriel D. Wolf's study of elevated blood lead levels in children and adults present during the remodeling of old homes. Lead poisoning examples, symptoms, and precautions are given. (ST)

  8. Childhood Lead Poisoning: Resources for Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance to End Childhood Lead Poisoning, Washington, DC.

    The current approach to dealing with childhood lead poisoning has led to repeated diagnoses of poisoning because such children are treated and then returned to their hazardous environments. This handbook, the third in a three-volume set, provides examples of specific materials currently or recently used in ongoing state and local childhood lead…

  9. Hypogonadism in chronically lead-poisoned men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunstein, G D; Dahlgren, J; Loriaux, D L

    1978-01-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis was evaluated in 10 men with occupational lead exposure, 9 of whom had noted a decrease in libido and frequency of intercourse following this exposure. 6 of these men had clinically apparent lead poisoning while 4 were classified as being only lead-exposed. Results of the endocrine evaluation of these patients were compared to those obtained on 9 age and socioeconomically matched control patients. Both lead poisoned and lead-exposed patients had reduced basal serum testosterone levels and normal basal serum testosterone-estradiol-binding globulin capacity, estradiol, LH, FSH, and prolactin levels. Both groups demonstrated an appropriate rise in serum testosterone following hCG stimulation and a normal increment in serum FSH in response to clomiphene citrate and gonadotropin-releasing hormone in comparison to the control group. The lead poisoned patients demonstrated a significantly reduced increment in serum LH after clomiphene citrate and gonadotropin-releasing hormone administration while the lead-exposed patients had normal LH dynamics. Testicular biopsies carried out on the 2 most severely lead-poisoned men showed peritubular fibrosis, oligospermia, and vacuolization of the Sertoli cells. These results suggest that lead poisoning may lead to a pituitary-hypothalamic defect in LH secretion and may also result in direct testicular seminiferous tubular injury.

  10. Lead poisoning in six captive avian species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, W. Nelson; Spann, James W.; Sileo, Louis; Franson, J. Christian

    1988-01-01

    Red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus), brown-headed cowbirds (Molothrus ater), common grackles (Quiscalus quiscula), mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), northern bobwhites (Colinus virginianus), and eastern screech-owls (Otus asio) were poisoned with a concentration of lead (Pb) acetate in the diet which was increased by 60% each week until half of the birds in each treatment group died; surviving birds and all control birds except screech-owis were then killed by euthanasia. An additional group of mallards was poisoned with Pb shot. The gizzards of mallards poisoned either way usually were stained with bile; some of these birds also had proventricular impaction. Most poisoned birds of the other species were emaciated but lacked other gross lesions caused by Pb poisoning. In birds other than mallards, Pb poisoning could not be diagnosed without histological or hematological examinations or analysis of tissues. Poisoned birds of all six species could be reliably separated from control birds by an increase in the protoporphyrin concentrations in the blood and by a decrease in the activity of delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) in red blood cells. Hepatic iron (Fe) concentrations varied so much among individual birds that even though median hepatic Fe concentrations increased in poisoned birds, hepatic Fe concentrations were not useful in identifying poisoned birds. Renal intranuclear inclusion bodies occurred in 83% of all birds dying from Pb poisoning. Nephrosis, myocardial necrosis, and arterial fibrinoid necrosis were occasionally present. Median hepatic Pb concentrations varied from 20 ppm (wet wt) in male red-winged blackbirds to 111 ppm in female northern bobwhites. Median renal Pb concentrations varied from 22 ppm in redwinged blackbirds to 190 ppm in female northern bobwhites. Hepatic and renal Pb concentrations varied substantially among birds within each species. Median hepatic and renal Pb concentrations of birds that died were not statistically

  11. Lead poisoning of a marbled godwit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, L.N.; Smith, M.R.; Windingstad, R.M.; Martin, S.J.

    1991-01-01

    A thin adult female marbled godwit (Limosa fedoa) found dead at Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Montana, was found to have 17 ingested lead shot in its gizzard. Its liver contained 51.7 ppm lead (wet weight). Based on these necropsy findings a diagnosis of lead poisoning was made.

  12. Acute Lead Poisoning In an Infant

    OpenAIRE

    Madhusudhanan, M.; Lall, S.B.

    2007-01-01

    A case of acute lead poisoning in an infant without overt clinical manifestations of encephalopathy is reported for the first time in Oman. The case was diagnosed at Rustaq Hospital on the basis of (i) history by the mother of giving the child a traditional remedy for treating constipation (ii) X-ray of abdomen showing radio-opaque speckles and (iii) detection of high blood lead levels (83.3 µg/dL) at the toxicology laboratory of the poison control centre. The source of lead was confirmed by ...

  13. Selected Bibliography on Lead Poisoning in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin-Fu, Jane S., Comp.

    This comprehensive bibliography was prepared in response to the growing interest in the problem of childhood lead poisoning. Most of the papers noted are from the pediatric literature and include only those published in English. A limited number of papers on experiments in laboratory animals are cited. Documents are grouped under several general…

  14. Recent Advances in the Clinical Management of Lead Poisoning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kianoush, Sina; Sadeghi, Mahmood; Balali-Mood, Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    .... This review deals mainly with recent developments in the management of lead poisoning. Sources of lead exposure are introduced, and methods for the primary prevention of lead poisoning are discussed...

  15. Lead poisoning after gunshot wound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto de Madureira

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Despite the absence of symptoms in the majority of patients carrying lead bullet fragments in their bodies, there needs to be an awareness of the possible signs and symptoms of lead intoxication when bullets are lodged in large joints like knees, hips and shoulders. Such patients merit closer follow-up, and even surgical procedure for removing the fragments. OBJECTIVE: To describe a patient who developed clinical lead intoxication several years after a gunshot wound. DESIGN: Case report. CASE REPORT: A single white 23-year-old male, regular job as a bricklayer, with a history of chronic alcohol abuse, showed up at the emergency department complaining of abdominal pain with colic, weakness, vomiting and diarrhea with black feces. All the symptoms had a duration of two to three weeks, and had been recurrent for the last two years, with calming during interval periods of two to three weeks. Abdominal radiograms showed a bullet lodged in the left hip, with a neat bursogram of the whole synovial capsule. A course of chelating treatment using calcium versenate (EDTACaNa2 intravenously was started. After the chelation therapy the patient had recurrence of his symptoms and a radical solution for the chronic mobilization of lead was considered. A hip arthroplasty procedure was performed, leading to complete substitution of the left hip.

  16. Asymptomatic congenital lead poisoning - case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnakaruppan, Nachammai R; Marcus, Steven Matthew

    2010-07-01

    Congenital lead poisoning is uncommon and there is no consensus on the management of the newborn. A female infant was born to a lead-burdened woman identified by screening just prior to delivery. Maternal blood lead level (BLL) was 58 μg/dL. The infant's BLL on the second day of life was 72 μg/dL with a free erythrocyte protoporphyrin level of 175 μg/dL. The child was managed by an exchange transfusion followed by chelation. The BLL 6 h after exchange transfusion was 11.4 μg/dL. Follow-up 2 years later showed a BLL of 9 μg/dL and normal development. We present the details of a case of congenital lead poisoning treated aggressively which appears to have resulted in a favorable outcome.

  17. Acute lead poisoning in an infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhusudhanan, M; Lall, S B

    2007-10-01

    A case of acute lead poisoning in an infant without overt clinical manifestations of encephalopathy is reported for the first time in Oman. The case was diagnosed at Rustaq Hospital on the basis of (i) history by the mother of giving the child a traditional remedy for treating constipation (ii) X-ray of abdomen showing radio-opaque speckles and (iii) detection of high blood lead levels (83.3 µg/dL) at the toxicology laboratory of the poison control centre. The source of lead was confirmed by high content of inorganic lead (20.2%) found in the sample of the traditional remedy (bint al dahab). The blood lead levels significantly decreased, after the intravenous calcium edetate (EDTA) therapy was given to the baby. The case highlights that early detection and treatment of acute lead poisoning in children can prevent morbidity and sequelae associated with encephalopathy. It also indicated the need for awareness and prevention programme for parents on this issue.

  18. Undue Lead Absorption and Lead Poisoning in Children: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin-Fu, J. S.

    The toxic effects of lead, a useful metal ubiquitous in the human environment, have long been known. The occupational hazards of lead poisoning were well established by the early 19th century, but plumbism in children caused by paint ingestion was not reported until the turn of the century. Even in 1924, the child was said to live in a "lead…

  19. Get the Lead Out: Facts about Childhood Lead Poisoning [and] Housekeeping Tips To Reduce Lead Exposure [and] Nutrition and Lead Poisoning [and] The Medical Consequences of Lead Poisoning [and] Lead Poisoning for Health Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois State Dept. of Public Health, Springfield.

    This document is comprised of five fact sheets from the Illinois Department of Public Health regarding childhood lead poisoning. Recent studies claim that childhood lead poisoning can contribute to problems later in life, such as academic failure, juvenile delinquency, and high blood pressure. Directed to parents, caregivers, and health care…

  20. Appendectomy due to lead poisoning: a case-report

    OpenAIRE

    Aghilinejad M; AH Mehrparvar; Mohammadi S

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Lead poisoning is a common occupational health hazard in developing countries and many misdiagnoses and malpractices may occur due to unawareness of lead poisoning symptoms. Case presentation We report a case of occupational lead poisoning in an adult battery worker with abdominal colic who initially underwent appendectomy with removal of normal appendix. Later on he was diagnosed with lead poisoning and was treated appropriately with lead chelator (CaNa2EDTA). Conclusion ...

  1. Statistics and Epidemiology of Lead Poisoning (FY 72-L1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, John H., Jr.; And Others

    This report is the first in a quarterly series which will contain statistics and epidemiologic notes on lead poisoning at both the national and local levels. This report contains (a) statistics on childhood lead poisoning; (b) a status report on the Community Lead Poisoning Data System, which was designed to assist local lead control programs and…

  2. Eliminating Childhood Lead Poisoning: A Federal Strategy Targeting Lead Paint Hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    Noting that lead poisoning is a preventable disease, this report details a coordinated federal program to eliminate childhood lead poisoning in the United States. The report describes how lead poisoning harms children, how pervasive lead poisoning is, and how lead paint hazards in housing could be eliminated in 10 years. Following information on…

  3. Lead Poisoning at an Indoor Firing Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Kyung Wook; Park, Won Ju

    2017-10-01

    In March 2014, a 39-year-old Korean male presented with a 6-month history of various nonspecific symptoms including dizziness, fatigue, asthenia, irritability, elevated blood pressure, palpitation, eyestrain, and tinnitus. His occupational history revealed that he had been working as an indoor firing range manager for 13 months; therefore, he was subjected to a blood lead level (BLL) test. The test results showed a BLL of 64 μg/dL; hence, he was diagnosed with lead poisoning and immediately withdrawn from work. As evident from the workplace environmental monitoring, the level of lead exposure in the air exceeded its limit (0.015-0.387 mg/m³). He received chelation treatment with calcium-disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (1 g/day) for 5 days without any adverse effects. In the follow-up results after 2 months, the BLL had decreased to 9.7 μg/dL and the symptoms resolved. This report represents the first occupational case of lead poisoning in firing ranges in Korea, and this necessitates institutional management to prevent the recurrence of poisoning through this route. Workplace environmental monitoring should be implemented for indoor firing ranges, and the workers should undergo regularly scheduled special health examinations. In clinical practice, it is essential to question the patient about his occupational history. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  4. Recent Advances in the Clinical Management of Lead Poisoning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina Kianoush

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Lead poisoning is a historic universal disease. Acute or chronic lead exposure may cause reversible or even permanent damages in human beings. Environmental lead exposure is a global health concern in children. Occupational lead poisoning is still a health issue, particularly in developing countries. During the last decades, new methods and medications have been advocated for the prevention and treatment of lead poisoning. This review deals mainly with recent developments in the management of lead poisoning. Sources of lead exposure are introduced, and methods for the primary prevention of lead poisoning are discussed. Details for the screening of adults and children are also explained to serve as a practical guideline for the secondary prevention. Standard chelation therapy in different groups and up-to-date less toxic new medications for the treatment of lead poisoning are finally discussed. Our published clinical research on the therapeutic effects of garlic tablets in mild to moderate occupational lead poisoning will also be discussed.

  5. Recent Advances in the Clinical Management of Lead Poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kianoush, Sina; Sadeghi, Mahmood; Balali-Mood, Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Lead poisoning is a historic universal disease. Acute or chronic lead exposure may cause reversible or even permanent damages in human beings. Environmental lead exposure is a global health concern in children. Occupational lead poisoning is still a health issue, particularly in developing countries. During the last decades, new methods and medications have been advocated for the prevention and treatment of lead poisoning. This review deals mainly with recent developments in the management of lead poisoning. Sources of lead exposure are introduced, and methods for the primary prevention of lead poisoning are discussed. Details for the screening of adults and children are also explained to serve as a practical guideline for the secondary prevention. Standard chelation therapy in different groups and up-to-date less toxic new medications for the treatment of lead poisoning are finally discussed. Our published clinical research on the therapeutic effects of garlic tablets in mild to moderate occupational lead poisoning will also be discussed.

  6. Lead poisoning and brain cell function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, G.W. (Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (USA) Kennedy Institute, Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1990-11-01

    Exposure to excessive amounts of inorganic lead during the toddler years may produce lasting adverse effects upon brain function. Maximal ingestion of lead occurs at an age when major changes are occurring in the density of brain synaptic connections. The developmental reorganization of synapses is, in part, mediated by protein kinases, and these enzymes are particularly sensitive to stimulation by lead. By inappropriately activating specific protein kinases, lead poisoning may disrupt the development of neural networks without producing overt pathological alterations. The blood-brain barrier is another potential vulnerable site for the neurotoxic action of lead. protein kinases appear to regulate the development of brain capillaries and the expression of the blood-brain barrier properties. Stimulation of protein kinase by lead may disrupt barrier development and alter the precise regulation of the neuronal environment that is required for normal brain function. Together, these findings suggest that the sensitivity of protein kinases to lead may in part underlie the brain dysfunction observed in children poisoned by this toxicant.

  7. Lead Poisoning Due to Herbal Medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambial, Shailja; Bhardwaj, Pankaj; Mahdi, Abbas Ali; Sharma, Praveen

    2017-06-01

    Lead ranks as one of the most serious environmental poisons all over the world amongst toxic heavy metals with no known biological function useful for the human body. A case of lead toxicity due to consumption of herbal medicine is being discussed. The case presented with gastrointestinal complaints and history of intake of herbal medicines for diabetes control for past 8 months. The analysis of the powdered herbal medicine procured from ayurveda practitioner was found to have high content of lead responsible for the lead toxicity. The patient is under regular followup. He has improved symptomatically on chelating therapy and blood lead levels have gradually improved. Regular awareness programs should be conducted in the population regarding possible exposure through home made herbal remedies so that general public can be made aware of the dangerous side effects of lead and other heavy metals on health.

  8. Childhood Lead Poisoning: Developing Prevention Programs and Mobilizing Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochow, K. W. James

    The current approach to dealing with childhood lead poisoning has led to repeated diagnoses of poisoning because such children are treated and then returned to their hazardous environments. This handbook describes in detail the program requirements for effective childhood lead poisoning prevention programs at the local level based on the…

  9. Indigenous tooth powders = covert lead poisoning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Sapna; Shubha, A B; Rao, B Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to measure the concentration of lead in various indigenous preparations of tooth powders available and used locally in and around Udaipur, Rajasthan, India. Seven different brands of tooth powders manufactured and/or marketed locally were obtained from stores all over Udaipur city. Some home-made powders commonly used for cleaning teeth were also collected. The tooth powders were analyzed for lead content by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. All tooth powders tested were found to contain high levels of lead ranging from 21 ppm to 82 ppm, above the maximum permissible level of 20 ppm prescribed by the Bureau of Indian Standards. Indigenous tooth powders contain high levels of lead and thus may be a source of lead poisoning that is often overlooked.

  10. A Preliminary Investigation On Suspected Plant Poisoning In The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    they have been reported before to have toxic effects. These were botanically identified as Ranunculus multifidus Forsk, Cassia didymobotrya Fres, Ricinus communis L., Datura stramonium L. and Momordica foetida Schum. It is concluded that some of these plants may be responsible for the poisoning and further studies on ...

  11. Ayurvedic herbal medicine and lead poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunturu, Krishna S; Nagarajan, Priyadharsini; McPhedran, Peter; Goodman, Thomas R; Hodsdon, Michael E; Strout, Matthew P

    2011-12-20

    Although the majority of published cases of lead poisoning come from occupational exposures, some traditional remedies may also contain toxic amounts of lead. Ayurveda is a system of traditional medicine that is native to India and is used in many parts of world as an alternative to standard treatment regimens. Here, we report the case of a 58-year-old woman who presented with abdominal pain, anemia, liver function abnormalities, and an elevated blood lead level. The patient was found to have been taking the Ayurvedic medicine Jambrulin prior to presentation. Chemical analysis of the medication showed high levels of lead. Following treatment with an oral chelating agent, the patient's symptoms resolved and laboratory abnormalities normalized. This case highlights the need for increased awareness that some Ayurvedic medicines may contain potentially harmful levels of heavy metals and people who use them are at risk of developing associated toxicities.

  12. Ayurvedic herbal medicine and lead poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunturu Krishna S

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although the majority of published cases of lead poisoning come from occupational exposures, some traditional remedies may also contain toxic amounts of lead. Ayurveda is a system of traditional medicine that is native to India and is used in many parts of world as an alternative to standard treatment regimens. Here, we report the case of a 58-year-old woman who presented with abdominal pain, anemia, liver function abnormalities, and an elevated blood lead level. The patient was found to have been taking the Ayurvedic medicine Jambrulin prior to presentation. Chemical analysis of the medication showed high levels of lead. Following treatment with an oral chelating agent, the patient's symptoms resolved and laboratory abnormalities normalized. This case highlights the need for increased awareness that some Ayurvedic medicines may contain potentially harmful levels of heavy metals and people who use them are at risk of developing associated toxicities.

  13. Lead poisoning in an adult: lead mobilization by pregnancy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riess, Matthias L; Halm, Josiah K

    2007-08-01

    We report a case of acute lead poisoning in an adult female who had last been exposed to lead 7 years ago. She presented with abdominal pain, knee pain, and neurological symptoms, hypertension, chronic kidney disease, and anemia with basophilic stippling and lead gum lines. Compared to during her recent pregnancy, her lead level had almost tripled in 5 months to 81 mcg/dL. Chelation therapy was initiated and improved the patient's symptoms and lead level significantly. In the absence of any new lead exposure or other reasons for increased bone turnover, this acute lead increase was likely due to skeletal mobilization caused by increased resorption from mineralized tissue during and after her pregnancy. This case report illustrates the seriousness of long-term health effects associated with lead poisoning at a multi-organ level, even years after the initial exposure. Thus, patient care should not be limited to the acute treatment of increased lead levels, but also include prevention of increased mobilization and bone turnover and appropriate patient education. In this context, we review various aspects of lead toxicity, especially during pregnancy and lactation.

  14. Appendectomy due to lead poisoning: a case-report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aghilinejad M

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lead poisoning is a common occupational health hazard in developing countries and many misdiagnoses and malpractices may occur due to unawareness of lead poisoning symptoms. Case presentation We report a case of occupational lead poisoning in an adult battery worker with abdominal colic who initially underwent appendectomy with removal of normal appendix. Later on he was diagnosed with lead poisoning and was treated appropriately with lead chelator (CaNa2EDTA. Conclusion Lead poisoning is frequently overlooked as the differential diagnosis of acute abdomen which may result in unnecessary surgery. Appropriate occupational history taking is helpful in making a correct diagnosis. Occupational lead poisoning is a preventable disorder and a serious challenge for the health and labor authorities in developing countries.

  15. Two cases of methemoglobinaemia caused by suspected sodium nitrite poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osvaldo Matteucci

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Among the causes of acute methemo-globinaemia are the ingestion and inhalation of over 40 oxidising substances, including nitrite, nitrate, carbon monoxide, some medicines, chlorine. The authors describe a case of acute methemoglobinaemia in two people that most probably suffered from food poisoning resulting from the consumption of a preparation of a dish called turkey alla canzanese that contained significant amounts of sodium nitrite. Both subjects who were treated promptly with methylene blue and hyperbaric oxygen therapy room recovered fully. Epidemiological investigations performed to clarify the dynamics of the episode suggested that among the causes of contamination were the swapping of products at the time of sale and the non-compliance to rules for the preparation of foods for human consumption.

  16. Anatomy of lead poisoning | Duru | Research Journal of Health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Lead poisoning and lead toxicity is usually often interchangeably used by different Scientists. The Anatomy of lead poisoning encompasses its effects on different organ-systems of different species of organisms. It also includes environmental, functional and biochemical components associated with most heavy ...

  17. Suspected lead toxicosis in a bald eagle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, E.; Carpenter, J.W.; Novilla, M.

    1977-01-01

    An immature bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) was submitted to the University of Maryland, College Park, for clinical examination. The bird was thin, had green watery feces, and was unable to maintain itself in upright posture. Following radiography, the bird went into respiratory distress and died. Numerous lead shot were recovered from the gizzard, and chemical analysis of liver and kidney tissue revealed 22.9 and 11.3 ppm lead, respectively. The clinical signs, necropsy findings, and chemical analysis of the eagle were compatible with lead toxicosis.

  18. Childhood Lead Poisoning: Rhode Island Kids Count Issue Brief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhode Island KIDS COUNT, Providence.

    Noting that childhood lead poisoning is one of the most common preventable pediatric health problems, this report examines lead poisoning as a health problem to which infants and young children are most susceptible and as a housing problem directly related to a shortage of safe, affordable housing. The report details screening rates in Rhode…

  19. Strategic Plan for Preventing Childhood Lead Poisoning in Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois State Dept. of Public Health, Springfield.

    The severity of the silent epidemic of lead poisoning and its long range effects on young children in impairment of intellectual ability, short-term memory, concentration, and reaction time have been recognized. A 3-year strategic plan for preventing childhood lead poisoning in Illinois was developed by a planning committee working through four…

  20. 78 FR 40743 - Advisory Committee on Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention (ACCLPP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-08

    ... childhood lead poisoning prevention efforts. The committee also reviews and reports regularly on childhood lead poisoning prevention practices and recommends improvements in national childhood lead poisoning... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Advisory Committee on Childhood Lead...

  1. 76 FR 62071 - Advisory Committee on Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention(ACCLPP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Advisory Committee on Childhood Lead Poisoning... developments and their practical implications for childhood lead poisoning prevention efforts. The committee also reviews and reports regularly on childhood lead poisoning prevention practices and recommends...

  2. [Abdominal pain as a presentation by lead poisoning. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottiera, Daniel M; Cargnel, Elda

    2017-04-01

    Acute lead poisoning is not a common pathology seen in the pediatrician's office. Lead poisoning symptoms can be digestive or neurological, and they can be confused with other pathologies. That is the reason why it should be considered and, in case of doubt, complementary studies to confirm lead poisoning should be requested. This is the case of a nine-year-old child that comes to the office with a strong abdominal pain and vomiting, and after a close physical examination and a detailed anamnesis, a suspicious diagnosis of "acute" lead poisoning is obtained. Therefore, the infant is hospitalized, and after taking a venous sampling to confirm the lead level, a chelation therapy is performed under the toxicology expert's supervision. Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría.

  3. Case report: Coccidiosis and lead poisoning in Canada geese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, L.N.; Bagley, George E.

    1967-01-01

    Four dead Canada geese (Branta canadensis L.) collected at the Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge, Delaware were found to have both marked duodenal lesions of coccidiosis and high levels of lead in the liver. Although only one goose had lead shot in the gizzard, all four had levels of lead in the liver suggestive of lead poisoning.

  4. Strategic Plan for the Elimination of Childhood Lead Poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Sue; Falk, Henry

    This document describes an agenda for the first 5 years of a comprehensive effort to eliminate childhood lead poisoning. In 1984, between 3 and 4 million children were estimated to have blood lead levels high enough to adversely affect intelligence and behavior. Lead in the home environment, especially lead-based paint, is the major source of lead…

  5. Guidelines for the Detection and Management of Lead Poisoning for Physicians and Health Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois State Dept. of Public Health, Springfield.

    These Illinois guidelines provide information on the medical management and treatment of children with lead poisoning, based on Federal guidelines (revised in 1991) for determining lead poisoning at lower levels. The guidelines outline the effects of lead poisoning, sources of lead, estimated incidence of lead poisoning in Illinois, screening…

  6. Lead poisoning in children: a case report | Jouhadi | Pan African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lead colic is a rare cause of abdominal pain. The diagnosis of lead poisoning is most often mentioned in at risk populations (children, psychotic). We report the case of a 2 year old child that was presented for acute abdomen. Abdominal plain radiograph showed multiple intra-colonic metallic particles and suggested lead ...

  7. [Characterization of language disorders in children with lead poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahyva, Dáphine Luciana Costa; Crenitte, Patrícia de Abreu Pinheiro; Caldana, Magali de Lourdes; Hage, Simone Rocha de Vasconcellos

    2008-01-01

    lead poisoning can have a negative impact on the neuropsychological functions, including language, due to the damage it causes to the development of the Central Nervous System. to verify the occurrence of language disorders in children who suffered from led poisoning and to verify the correlation between the lead concentration level in the blood and the language disorders presented by the children. language evaluation of 20 preschoolers, with lead concentration level in the blood above 10 microg/dl. 13 children presented language impairment involving only phonology or more than one language subsystem. The statistical analysis indicated that no correlation exists between the severity of the language impairment and the concentration levels of lead. the number of children with language impairment indicates lead poisoning as a risk factor for the present alterations, even though other risk factors for language disorders were found and the absence of correlation between the investigated variables.

  8. 24 CFR 965.701 - Lead-based paint poisoning prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lead-based paint poisoning... URBAN DEVELOPMENT PHA-OWNED OR LEASED PROJECTS-GENERAL PROVISIONS Lead-Based Paint Poisoning Prevention § 965.701 Lead-based paint poisoning prevention. The requirements of the Lead-Based Paint Poisoning...

  9. 76 FR 78263 - Advisory Committee on Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention (ACCLPP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-16

    ... childhood lead poisoning prevention efforts. The committee also reviews and reports regularly on childhood lead poisoning prevention practices and recommends improvements in national childhood lead poisoning... Healthy Homes and Lead Poisoning Prevention Branch at (770) 488-3300 or Barry Brooks at (770) 488-3641...

  10. [Weight loss, abdominal pain and anemia after a holiday abroad--case report of lead poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchgatterer, A; Rammer, M; Knoflach, P

    2005-10-07

    A 58-year-old woman with type 1 diabetes and coronary artery disease was admitted to hospital because of diminished appetite, weight loss, abdominal pain and anemia. Earlier treatment of duodenal ulcer and cholecystectomy had not achieved sustained relief. On physical examination paleness and general weakness was noted. Laboratory tests showed a normocytic, normochromic anemia, anisocytosis, polychromasia and basophilic stippling of erythrocytes. Bone marrow examination revealed a hyperreactive erythropoesis with basophilic stippling of erythrocytes and incomplete differentiation of erythroid progenitor cells. Inherited or acquired enzymopathies of erythrocytes were ruled out. Urinary collection showed remarkable elevation of porphyrin concentration. Suspected poisoning was confirmed by elevated lead concentrations in whole-blood (85.8 microg/dl) and urine (106.3 microg/l). A souvenir of Rhodes, a ceramic mug with lead-containing glaze, was identified as the source of the lead poisoning, the lead dissolving into hot tea put in the mug. Treatment with D-penicillamine was begun, and within five weeks anemia disappeared and the patient achieved complete resolution of symptoms. Recognition of the cause of lead poisoning is of critical importance. This case report demonstrates difficulties in diagnosing and identifying the source of poisoning.

  11. Outbreak of fatal childhood lead poisoning related to artisanal gold mining in northwestern Nigeria, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooyema, Carrie A; Neri, Antonio; Lo, Yi-Chun; Durant, James; Dargan, Paul I; Swarthout, Todd; Biya, Oladayo; Gidado, Saheed O; Haladu, Suleiman; Sani-Gwarzo, Nasir; Nguku, Patrick M; Akpan, Henry; Idris, Sa'ad; Bashir, Abdullahi M; Brown, Mary Jean

    2012-04-01

    In May 2010, a team of national and international organizations was assembled to investigate children's deaths due to lead poisoning in villages in northwestern Nigeria. Our goal was to determine the cause of the childhood lead poisoning outbreak, investigate risk factors for child mortality, and identify children Gold ore was processed inside two-thirds of the family compounds surveyed. In multivariate modeling, significant risk factors for death in the previous year from suspected lead poisoning included the age of the child, the mother's work at ore-processing activities, community well as primary water source, and the soil lead concentration in the compound. The high levels of environmental contamination, percentage of children 45 µg/dL), and incidence of convulsions among children before death (82%) suggest that most of the recent childhood deaths in the two surveyed villages were caused by acute lead poisoning from gold ore-processing activities. Control measures included environmental remediation, chelation therapy, public health education, and control of mining activities.

  12. Get the Lead Out: Illinois Childhood Lead Poisoning Surveillance Report, 1997-1998.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois State Dept. of Public Health, Springfield.

    In an effort to highlight the importance of identifying children who have been lead poisoned, the Illinois Department of Public Health produces its surveillance report to alert the community to the geographical risk of lead poisoning and to report on screening results. The hope is that increased public awareness will result in less harm to…

  13. Lead poisoning by intradiscal firearm bullet: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristante, Alexandre F; de Souza, Fabiano I; Barros Filho, Tarcisio E P; Oliveira, Reginaldo P; Marcon, Raphael M

    2010-02-15

    The report of a rare case of lead poisoning by an intradiscal firearm bullet is presented. To describe and discuss the clinical and radiologic features (by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging) of a gunshot wound in the L2-L3 space which caused lead poisoning 5 years afterwards. Lead poisoning from firearm bullets is rare, but the possibility should be investigated in the case of bullets lodged in the joints. A 30-year-old man presented to the emergency room with an intense lumbar pain complaint, colic, intestinal constipation, insomnia, and progressive headache for 20 days. He had a history of a gunshot wound 5 years previously, and the bullet was left in situ, in the intravertebral disc between L2 and L3, as confirmed by radiographs, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. The hypothesis of lead poisoning was confirmed by the laboratory results. Chelation treatment with calcium versenate (disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetate, or CaNa (2) EDTA) was indicated. The patient was admitted and treated once again, before surgical removal of the bullet. After removal of the bullet, the patient had an episode of recurrence, and a new chelation cycle was performed, with complete resolution. Lead poisoning can result in severe clinical disorders that require rapid treatment. In this case, both clinical and surgical treatments led to complete resolution of the symptoms.

  14. Are Local Laws the Key to Ending Childhood Lead Poisoning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korfmacher, Katrina S.; Hanley, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    Although lead paint was banned by federal law in 1978, it continues to poison children living in homes built before that time. The lifelong effects of childhood exposure to even small amounts of lead are well established by medical research and include learning and behavior problems, hypertension, osteoporosis, and kidney disease. Federal and state laws have reduced rates of lead poisoning significantly in the past three decades. However, pockets of high rates of lead poisoning remain, primarily in low-income urban neighborhoods with older housing stock. Recently, several municipalities have passed local lead laws in an attempt to reduce lead hazards in these remaining areas. There has been no systematic attempt to compare the design and effectiveness of these local policies. To address this gap, we conducted comparative case studies of eight innovative lead laws promulgated since 2010. The laws used a wide variety of legal structures and tools, although certain elements were common. The impact of the policies was intertwined with local housing, economic, and legal environments. While data do not yet exist to systematically evaluate the impact on lead poisoning rates, our analysis suggests that local laws hold great promise for reducing lead hazards in children’s homes. PMID:23645870

  15. [Outbreak of lead poisoning associated with Ayurvedic medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Sara; Pollio, Gerónimo-Antonio; Domínguez, Verónica; Nogué, Santiago; Torra, Mercè; Cardellach, Francesc

    2015-02-20

    Lead poisoning is normally caused by repeated occupational inhalation of lead. However, lead may also be absorbed through the digestive route. Some alternative medical treatments, such as Ayurvedic medicine, can also contain lead and may result in poisoning. We collected cases of lead poisoning related to Ayurvedic treatments attended at the Hospital Clinic of Barcelona. Two female patients, aged 45 and 57 years, respectively, who initiated Ayurvedic treatments which involved the ingestion of various medicaments, were included. The first patient presented with anemia and abdominal pain. The lead level was 74μg/dL and free erythrocyte protoporphyrin was 163μg/dL. She was treated with intravenous calcium disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (CaNa2EDTA) and later with oral dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) with a good evolution. The second patient presented with abdominal pain and a Burton's line. The lead level was 52μg/dL and free erythrocyte protoporphyrin was 262μg/dL. She was treated with oral DMSA and evolved favorably. Lead concentrations in some of the tablets supplied to the patients reached 2,003 and 19,650μg/g of tablet. Lead poisoning may result from treatments based on Ayurvedic medicine and may reach epidemic proportions. Health control of alternative medicines is necessary. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Urban Youth Knowledge and Attitudes Regarding Lead Poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogar, Sandra; Szabo, Aniko; Woodruff, Shane; Johnson, Sheri

    2017-12-01

    Environmental health literacy (EHL) is a promising and evolving field of research that could benefit from youth engagement. Yet studies focused on youths' environmental health awareness and concerns are limited. For example, although lead exposure remains a threat to youth development in urban environments, no published studies have measured urban youth's knowledge of lead poisoning. A CBPR partnership established a youth advisory council (YAC) who helped to design, interpret and disseminate a mixed methods study exploring environmental health perceptions among urban youths ages 10-18. Surveys assessed awareness, attitudes, and knowledge regarding lead poisoning and five environmental health issues determined by the YAC. Focus group questions further contextualized youths' lead knowledge and understanding of youths' environmental health concerns. A majority of youth could identify specific sources of lead exposure but had minimal knowledge of prevention strategies, and focus group data revealed misinformation regarding lead sources and consequences. Survey and focus group respondents' level of awareness and concern regarding YAC-selected EH issues was high in comparison to lead poisoning. In particular, job opportunities and police brutality were endorsed as both neighborhood concerns and priorities. Awareness and knowledge of environmental health issues among urban youth have not been well described. These findings reinforce the importance of addressing problems of local relevance. Moving forward, lead poisoning prevention education for youth and youth EHL partnerships may benefit from incorporating an ecological approach wherein connections to the social and economic context are made explicit.

  17. LEAD POISONING IN ANCIENT ROME 1. INTRODUCTION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of organic lead compounds such as tetra-ethyl lead, found in modern .... organic bone matrix. An adjustment formula taking the age of the adult into consideration is therefore necessary. There is no difference in bone lead content between men and women ... architect, Vitruvius (viii.6.10, 11), tells us that water from clay pipes.

  18. LEAD POISONING IN ANCIENT ROME 1. INTRODUCTION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    development of the region and the course of its history. 2. THE LEAD INDUSTRY IN ANCIENT ROME. 2.1 Lead production. From the 5th millennium BC ... production of olive oil were often made of or lined with lead (Cato,. De re rustica cv, lxvi). The wine fermentation process, too, often made use of casks or containers lined ...

  19. Pediatric lead poisoning from folk prescription for treating epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Xiao-Lan; Xu, Jian; Markowitz, Morri; Yan, Chong-Huai

    2016-10-01

    A case of lead poisoning resulting from the ingestion of a folk remedy for treating epilepsy is reported. The initial blood lead concentration of this 6-y-old boy was 63.6μg/dl upon admission. He presented with abdominal pain, constipation, and irritability. The patient's liver function tests were significantly increased. Through chelation therapy, the blood lead concentration dropped markedly and clinical symptoms greatly improved. His blood and urine samples were collected for the kinetic analysis of lead elimination. Folk prescriptions for epilepsy should be considered as potential sources of lead intoxication. Lead poisoning should be taken into consideration for unknown causes of abdominal pain. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. LEAD POISONING: AN OVERLOOKED DIAGNOSIS IN CLINICAL PRACTICE

    OpenAIRE

    Amol S. Kadu; Amit R. Nampalliwar; Anurag G. Pandey; Anita Sharma; Vinod kumar Gothecha

    2012-01-01

    Lead is a natural element that is persistent in water and soil. Human exposure occurs primarily through diet, air, drinking water and ingestion of paint chips. Absorption is increased in persons suffering from iron and calcium deficiency. Lead is a multitargated toxicant, causing effects in the gastrointestinal tract, hematopoietic system, cardiovascular system, central and peripheral nervous systems, kidneys, immune system, and reproductive system. Lead poisoning is a common environmental he...

  1. Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention: A Resource Directory. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Washington, DC.

    This resource directory lists states and localities with childhood lead poisoning prevention programs, along with the contact person(s) for each program area (such as screening, medical treatment, paint chip testing, home inspection, and abatement.) Information is provided for 47 states (New Mexico, West Virginia, and Wyoming reported no lead…

  2. Renovate Right: Prevent Lead Poisoning in Children

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-10-02

    In this podcast, Dr. Maria Doa, Director of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) National Program Chemicals Division, discusses EPA's new rule for renovations, repairs, and painting activities. The new rule includes information on lead-safe work practices when conducting renovations, repairs, and painting in pre-1978 homes and schools to prevent the spread of lead dust.  Created: 10/2/2008 by National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH).   Date Released: 10/2/2008.

  3. [Acute inorganic lead poisoning in workers employed on building renovation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberatori, Roberta; Romeo, R; Restieri, Rosetta; Sarrini, Daniela; Parducci, A D; Puccetti, Monica; Loi, F; Sartorelli, P

    2010-01-01

    Occupationally, there are a number of work processes that constitute a long-term risk as sources of exposure to lead. In these processes the presence of lead is not evident but represents a hidden risk of poisoning. Study of two cases of hidden exposure to lead that were discovered during renovation work on a historical building. Acute lead poisoning symptoms appeared in the 2 workers. The current protocol for treatment of lead poisoning was applied, which consisted in administration of a chelating agent (EDTA), with subsequent monitoring of indicators of dose (PbB. blood lead level, PbU: urinary lead level) and indicators of effect (erythrocyte Protoporphyrin IX, urinary delta-aminolevulinic acid (ALA-U), urinary coproporphyrins). The lead colic and anaemia appeared at PbB values (102 microg/dl e 104 microg/dl) that were higher than the PbB action value (40 microg/dl) and higher than the limit value (60 microg/dl). The gravity of the symptoms, the high number of persons potentially involved, the difficulty of reclamation and probable urban contamination, with relative consequences concerning particularly infants and women infertile age, are sufficient grounds to require effective legislative action and improvement in the services available at the hospitals involved.

  4. Child Care Lead Poisoning Prevention. Training Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Dept. of Health Services, Oakland. Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Branch.

    In an effort to address young children's substantial risk for exposure to lead in out-of-home child care programs, outreach and training were developed for child care providers. This workshop curriculum consists of training activities and materials appropriate for child care providers in centers or homes for the purpose of educating them about the…

  5. Antimony poisoning in lead-acid batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhnstedt, W.; Radel, C.; Scholten, F.

    Linear potential sweep measurements were conducted using rotating lead-disc electrodes in sulfuric acid electrolyte containing antimony. Within the range investigated hydrogen evolution at the negative electrode is shown to be a monotonic function of the quantity of antimony deposited on the electrode surface. In the potential range -950 mV to -1150 mV versus Hg/Hg 2SO 4 the antimony deposition on lead electrodes is time dependent only; at more negative potentials the deposition rate decreases with over-voltage. At potentials antimony purging occurs. Various additives to the electrolyte were investigated to determine their ability to suppress the hydrogen evolution; aromatic aldehydes and wood flour were found to be effective. A possible mechanism is discussed.

  6. Oral opium: an unusual cause of lead poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meybodi, Farid Aghaee; Eslick, Guy D; Sasani, Sanaz; Abdolhoseyni, Mohammad; Sazegar, Sasan; Ebrahimi, Farzaneh

    2012-06-01

    The number of cases of lead poisoning (LP), a widely known disease with various aetiologies, being reported globally has decreased over the years due to both limited domestic applications of lead and enforcement of stringent safety measures. However, a new presentation of lead poisoning, lead-contaminated opium (LCO), is gradually emerging in our region. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and clinical effects of lead toxicity associated with opium use. Between November 2006 and December 2007, all patients diagnosed with LP at a central laboratory in Tehran, Iran, were assessed for potential causes of poisoning. Patients with a history of LCO abuse were evaluated and recruited for the study. Overall, there were 240 patients with LP, and poisoning from LCO was diagnosed in 25 patients. The duration of addiction was between three months and 40 years, and the duration of symptoms was 28.1 ± 17.7 days. Mean blood lead levels of the patients were 145 ± 61 (range 61-323) μg/dL. The average creatinine and haemoglobin levels were 77.4 ± 8.1 μmol/L and 105 ± 25 g/L, respectively. The association between the duration of addiction and levels of lead in blood was not statistically significant (r = -0.142, p = 0.54). The most common symptoms were gastrointestinal complaints, followed by musculoskeletal complaints with muscle weakness (92%). Anorexia was also a leading complaint. The results of our study suggest that the possibility of LP should be considered with high suspicion among opium users presenting with acute abdominal symptoms.

  7. Suspected metaldehyde slug bait poisoning in dogs: a retrospective analysis of cases reported to the Veterinary Poisons Information Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, N S; Sutton, N M; Campbell, A

    2012-09-29

    A retrospective analysis of telephone enquiries to the Veterinary Poisons Information Service found 772 cases with follow-up concerning suspected metaldehyde slug bait ingestion in dogs between 1985 and 2010. Half the enquiries occurred in the summer months. The amount and strength of the slug bait ingested was rarely known. In 56, cases the quantity consumed was estimated and was on average 229.6 grams of bait. Clinical signs developed in 77.3 per cent of dogs; common signs were convulsions, hypersalivation, twitching, hyperaesthesia, tremor, vomiting, hyperthermia and ataxia. Only 4.6 per cent of dogs developed hepatic changes, and only one developed renal impairment. The average time to onset of signs was 2.9 hours post-ingestion, with 50.3 per cent of dogs developing effects within one hour. Increased muscle activity (twitching, convulsions) lasted on average 15.2 hours. Recovery time was reported in 61 cases and occurred on average at 39.3 hours. Common treatments were gut decontamination, anticonvulsants, anaesthetics and intravenous fluids. Of the dogs that were treated with sedatives, 45.8 per cent required more than one sedative or anaesthetic agent. Methocarbamol was rarely used, probably due to unavailability. The outcome was reported in 762 dogs; 21.7 per cent remained asymptomatic, 61.7 per cent recovered and 16 per cent of dogs died or were euthanased. Where known (only six cases), the fatal dose of bait ranged from 4.2 to 26.7 g/kg (average 11.8 g/kg).

  8. Childhood lead poisoning and the new Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines for lead exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnur, Julie; John, Rita Marie

    2014-05-01

    This article will give a brief history, review the latest guidelines, discuss risk factors and sources, and discuss screening, diagnosis, and management of lead poisoning in children. Additionally, the role of the nurse practitioner (NP) caring for children will be reviewed. Review of published literature on lead poisoning and the 2012 lead prevention guidelines of the Advisory Committee on Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention (ACCLPP) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). While lead poisoning levels have decreased over the past several decades, newer research has shown that even low levels of lead in the blood can have negative effects on children's intelligence and neurodevelopment. As a result, ACCLPP of the CDC issued new, stricter lead prevention guidelines in 2012. Lead exposure and lead poisoning are pediatric public health risks. Studies have shown that no level of lead is considered safe, and the emphasis has shifted to primary prevention of lead exposure. Despite the focus on primary prevention, the NP must remain vigilant in history taking, exploring risk factors, and screening children in order to assure the best possible outcome. ©2014 The Author(s) ©2014 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  9. Lead Poisoning: Awareness in Medical and Non-Medical Population of Karachi

    OpenAIRE

    Sarfaraz, Sana Ahmed; Naz, Aqsa; Shahid, Amber; Qayyum, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Lead is a heavy element, also termed as nerve poison. Lead interferes with a variety of body processes and is toxic to many organs and tissues, including the central nervous system. The purpose of this study is to evaluate awareness regarding lead poisoning, factors that cause lead poisoning, symptoms, effect on enzymes, treatment and preventive measure that can be adopted to reduce lead poisoning in our population. It is a descriptive cross sectional survey based study consisting of 300 indi...

  10. Lead poisoning in China: a health and human rights crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jane E; Amon, Joseph J

    2012-12-15

    Acute and chronic lead poisoning is occurring throughout China and is a major cause of childhood morbidity. The Chinese government's emphasis on industrial development and poverty reduction has, over the past three decades, decreased by 500 million the number of people surviving on less than one dollar per day, but has caused significant environmental degradation that threatens public health. Drawing upon in-depth interviews conducted in 2009 and 2010 with families affected by lead poisoning, environmental activists, journalists, government and civil society organization officials in Shaanxi, Henan, Hunan, and Yunnan provinces, as well as a review of scientific and Chinese media, and health and environmental legal and policy analysis, we examine the intersection of civil, political, economic, and social rights related to access to information, screening, treatment, and remediation related to lead poisoning. In-depth interviews in each province uncovered: censorship and intimidation of journalists, environmental activists, and parents seeking information about sources and prevention of lead poisoning; denial of screening for lead poisoning, often based upon arbitrary eligibility criteria; and inadequate and inappropriate treatment being promoted and provided by health facilities. Over the past decade, the Chinese government has prioritized health care and invested billions of dollars towards universal health coverage, and strengthened environmental to address industrial pollution and guarantee access to information on the environment. Yet, despite these reforms, information remains constrained and citizens seeking information and redress are sometimes arrested, in violation of Chinese and international law. Local government officials and national environmental policies continue to prioritize economic development over environmental protection. To effectively address lead poisoning requires an emphasis on prevention, and to combat industrial pollution requires

  11. Acute lead poisoning in two users of illicit methamphetamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allcott, J.V. III; Barnhart, R.A.; Mooney, L.A.

    1987-07-31

    Acute lead poisoning can present a difficult diagnostic dilemma, with symptoms that mimic those of hepatitis, nephritis, and encephalopathy. The authors report two cases in intravenous methamphetamine users who presented with abnormal liver function values, low hematocrit values, basophilic stippling of red blood cells, and elevated blood lead levels. Both patients excreted large amounts of lead in their urine after treatment with edetic acid, followed by resolution of their symptoms. Lead contamination was proved in one drug sample. Basophilic stippling of the red blood cells was the one key laboratory result that led to the definitive diagnosis in both cases.

  12. NWHL Final Report 1983-84 Lead Poisoning Monitoring Program Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Lead poisoning was demonstrated to occur in Canada geese using Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge during the 1983-84 Lead Poisoning Monitoring Program. Necropsies...

  13. Lead poisoning from complementary and alternative medicine in multiple sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, A; Le Couteur, D.G.

    2000-01-01

    A patient with multiple sclerosis is described who was treated for neurological symptoms thought to be a progression of his disease but subsequently found to be caused by lead poisoning secondary to the use of alternative medicine. His clinical signs improved with oral chelation therapy. Neurologists should consider asking about the use of complementary and alternative medicine before simply attributing symptoms and signs to exacerbation of multiple sclerosis.



  14. Lead poisoning: an alarming public health problem in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Amal K; Haque, Akhlaque; Islam, Manirul; Bashar, S A M K

    2009-01-01

    To assess the risk of lead poisoning among preschool and school-aged children in Bangladesh, 345 children were screened for blood lead levels (BLLs) from one rural and two urban areas in Bangladesh from September 2007 through January 2008. An urban industrial area at Tongi was identified as a disaster area, where 99% (104/105) of those tested had BLLs >or= 10 microg/dL. Industrial emissions and use of leaded gasoline by two-stroke engine vehicles were identified as possible sources of lead in that area. A rural nonindustrial area at Chirirbandar, Dinajpur was identified as another high-risk area, where 14% of the children screened had BLLs >or= 10 microg/dL. BLLs at the urban industrial area were significantly higher than those at the rural and urban nonindustrial areas (24.58 +/- 10.32, 7.24 +/- 6.31, and 2.47 +/- 3.32 microg/dL, respectively; p lead causes health problems. In conclusion, the problem of lead poisoning in children was found to be high in both urban and rural Bangladesh. A universal lead screening for preschool and school-aged children and a lead education program for parents are recommended for implementation in Bangladesh.

  15. Group and insidious tetraethyl lead poisoning occurred in industry of plastic weaving: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Bai, Ying; Zhu, Baoli; Zhu, Wenjing; Ye, Mingxian

    2016-05-01

    Tetraethyl lead (TEL) poisoning has declined sharply with decreasing consumption of gasoil and other chemicals contained TEL. Here we reported group TEL poisoning in the plastic weaving factory. We investigated 16 cases with the typical nerves disorder which is similar to organotin poisoning, and the result suggested that the poisoning may cause by applied "white oil" contented TEL. Despite its rareness, our cases emphasize that clinicians should pay attention to the difference from the treatment of organic tin poisoning.

  16. Imported occupational lead poisoning: report of four cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petracca, M; Scafa, F; Boeri, R; Flachi, Daniela; Candura, S M

    2013-01-01

    In most industrialized countries, occupational lead poisoning has become increasingly rare, however this metal remains a serious health hazard in the rest of the world. We observedfour male patients (aged 35 / 54 years) who had suffered recurrent abdominal pain due to recent lead exposure (for 7 to 13 months) in two Chinese battery recycling plants. On their return to Italy, three of them presented normocytic, normochromic anaemia. The diagnosis was confirmed by high lead levels in the blood and urine, decreased erythrocyte delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALA-D), raised erythrocyte zinc protoporphyrin (ZP), and elevated urinary excretion of b-aminolevulinic acid (ALA-U) and porphyrins. Chelation with EDTA resulted in increased urinary lead excretion, improvement of the clinical picture, decreased ZP, and progressive normalization of the other lead biomarkers (Pb-B, ALA-D, ALA-U, urinary porphyrins). Temporary work in developing countries may result in imported lead poisoning. Differential diagnosis of this unusual condition requires careful medical history collection and specific toxicological analysis. Preventive measures for workers going abroad are needed.

  17. Buyers beware: lead poisoning due to Ayurvedic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, J Matthew R; Estrada, Carlos A; Mathews, Ronnie E

    2012-10-01

    A 29-year-old man, who recently emigrated from India, presented with a 2-week history of abdominal pain, as well as nausea, constipation, and fatigue. He underwent removal of a parathyroid adenoma 6 weeks prior to admission and received a locally made Indian traditional medicine (Ayurveda) for pain control; however, this information was not initially available. He was instructed to take approximately 15 g/day. Initial evaluation revealed a normocytic anemia, but other workup including imaging and endoscopy was unrevealing. Given his recent use of Ayurvedic medicines, we tested for lead poisoning and found a blood lead level of 72 mcg/dl. We sent his medicine for analysis and found it had a high lead concentration of 36,000 mcg/g, which is over 25,000 times the maximum daily dose. He improved with cessation of the medicine and treatment with succimer. Lead poisoning can present with a variety of nonspecific signs and symptoms, including abdominal pain and anemia. Ayurvedic medicines, as well as traditional medicines from other cultures, may be a source of lead or other heavy metals. It is essential for physicians to be aware of adverse effects of Ayurvedic medicines as they are easily available and increasing in popularity.

  18. Get the Lead Out: Illinois Childhood Lead Poisoning Surveillance Report, 2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois State Dept. of Public Health, Springfield.

    In order to highlight the importance of identifying children with elevated blood lead levels, the Illinois Department of Public Health produces its surveillance report to present state and county level data on the number of children screened for and identified with lead poisoning. In Illinois, all children between 6 and 84 months of age must be…

  19. Get the Lead Out: Illinois Childhood Lead Poisoning Surveillance Report, 1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois State Dept. of Public Health, Springfield.

    In order to highlight the importance of identifying children with elevated blood lead levels, the Illinois Department of Public Health produces its surveillance report to present state and county level data on the number of children screened for and identified with lead poisoning. In Illinois, all children between 6 and 84 months of age must be…

  20. Get the Lead Out: Illinois Childhood Lead Poisoning Surveillance Report, 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois State Dept. of Public Health, Springfield.

    In order to highlight the importance of identifying children with elevated blood lead levels, the Illinois Department of Public Health produces its surveillance report to present state and county level data on the number of children screened for and identified with lead poisoning. In Illinois, all children between 6 and 84 months of age must be…

  1. Case reports of lead poisoning in dogs from the National Animal Poison Control Center and the Centre National D'Informations Toxicologiques, Veterinaires: anecdotes or reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berny, P J; Cote, L M; Buck, W B

    1992-02-01

    This paper presents case reports of lead toxicoses from 2 major animal poison control centers in Europe and North America, gathered from 1985 through 1989. All results examined here involved cases assessed as "toxicosis" or "suspected toxicosis" by the National Animal Poison Control Center (NAPCC) or the Centre National d'Informations Toxicologiques Veterinaries (CNITV). 537 cases were reported to the NAPCC, most of them concerning dogs (59%). In France, most of the 362 cases involved cattle (57.2%). There was an increased number of cases reported during late summer and early fall, and a decreased number of cases in November and December, in both centers. Dogs intoxicated were predominantly young animals (60% were less than 2 years old). No sex difference was noted. Pure bred dogs appeared more often involved than mixed-breed ones, but the breed distribution closely resembles dog breed distribution in the US. The source of lead was usually unknown and, when information was available, paint seemed to be the most common cause of poisoning. Clinical signs reported to the animal poison control centers involved the CNS and GI tract. Results from the French and the American database showed similar trends. They are compared to data from veterinary clinics and veterinary colleges in the US and Australia. In each case, data are very similar to what was reported to the CNITV and the NAPCC. It is concluded that animal poison control centers databases can provide a useful tool for better knowledge of animal poisoning. They can also help identify unexpected toxicologic problems related to drug administration or pesticide use.

  2. Do the same houses poison many children? An investigation of lead poisoning in Rochester, New York, 1993-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korfmacher, Katrina Smith; Kuholski, Kate

    2007-01-01

    In several cities, researchers have found that a discrete number of properties owned by a small number of owners house multiple lead poisoned children over time. The purpose of this study was to determine whether or not a small number of properties were implicated in the poisoning of multiple children in Rochester, New York, between 1993 and 2004. We analyzed the patterns of ownership and repeated positive environmental investigations (i.e., documented lead hazards) in homes of lead poisoned children using county health department data during a 12-year period. A small percentage (14.8%) of properties in which the health department found a lead hazard had previously documented lead hazards. When a second positive investigation occurred, the average elapsed time between investigations was a little less than three years. Only four property owners owned more than two properties that had multiple positive investigations. In some cities, a small number of properties or property owners provide housing for a large percentage of lead poisoned children. However, this situation is not universal. In Rochester, a relatively small percentage of homes that housed a child with an elevated blood lead level have a history of housing lead poisoned children. In cities like Rochester, lead hazard reduction resources should focus on high-risk housing stock determined by factors such as age, value, and condition, rather than on those with a prior record of housing lead poisoned children.

  3. Lead Poisoning: An Alarming Public Health Problem in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. M. K. Bashar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available To assess the risk of lead poisoning among preschool and school-aged children in Bangladesh, 345 children were screened for blood lead levels (BLLs from one rural and two urban areas in Bangladesh from September 2007 through January 2008. An urban industrial area at Tongi was identified as a disaster area, where 99% (104/105 of those tested had BLLs ≥10 µg/dL. Industrial emissions and use of leaded gasoline by two-stroke engine vehicles were identified as possible sources of lead in that area. A rural nonindustrial area at Chirirbandar, Dinajpur was identified as another high-risk area, where 14% of the children screened had BLLs ≥10 µg/dL. BLLs at the urban industrial area were significantly higher than those at the rural and urban nonindustrial areas (24.58 ± 10.32, 7.24 ± 6.31, and 2.47 ± 3.32 µg/dL, respectively; p <0.001. Weight-for-age z-scores of the urban children were significantly lower than that of the rural children (-1.41 ± 1.88 vs. 0.20 ± 1.16, p <0.001. Children with elevated BLLs had poorer nutritional status (p = 0.05 than those with normal BLLs. Over 90% of the parents did not know that lead causes health problems. In conclusion, the problem of lead poisoning in children was found to be high in both urban and rural Bangladesh. A universal lead screening for preschool and school-aged children and a lead education program for parents are recommended for implementation in Bangladesh.

  4. Lead poisoning due to bullets lodged in the human body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstner Garcés, Juan Bernardo; Manotas Artuz, Rafael Ignacio

    2012-07-01

    With the increased violence and use of firearms in Colombia, we may see more cases of lead poisoning in our environment, and must be prepared to diagnose and treat them. Subtle signs and symptoms as unexplained anemia, gastro-intestinal discomfort and abdominal cramps, as well as severe signs such as changes in behavior and neurological status, nephropathy, and unexplained death, may be associated with a history of gunshot wounds and bullets in the human body. We must offer the patient knowledge and management strategies of pathology.

  5. Lead poisoning and marginalization in newborns of Morelos, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha María Téllez-Rojo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine the prevalence of lead (Pb poi- soning at birth in Morelos, analyze its distribution by social marginalization level, and estimate the association with the use of lead glazed ceramics (LGC. Materials and methods. Blood lead level (BLL in umbilical cord was measured in a representative sample of 300 randomly selected births at the Morelos Health Services and state IMSS. Results. The prevalence of Pb poisoning at birth (BLL> 5µg/dL was 14.7%(95%CI: 11.1, 19.3 and 22.2% (95%CI: 14.4, 32.5 in the most socially marginalized municipalities. 57.1% (95%CI: 51.3, 62.7of the mothers used LGC during pregnancy, and the frequency of use was significantly associated with BLL. Conclusion. This is the first study to document the proportion of new- borns with Pb poisoning who are at risk of experiencing the related adverse effects. It is recommended to monitor BLL at birth and take action to reduce this exposure, especially in socially marginalized populations.

  6. A cluster of lead poisoning among consumers of Ayurvedic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breeher, Laura; Mikulski, Marek A; Czeczok, Thomas; Leinenkugel, Kathy; Fuortes, Laurence J

    2015-01-01

    Use of alternative medications and herbal remedies is widespread in the United States and across the globe. These traditional medications can be contaminated with toxic metals. Despite several case reports of poisoning from such contamination, the epidemiological data are still limited. To report on a cluster of lead and mercury toxicity cases in 2011 among a community of adherents of traditional medical practice of Ayurveda. Adherents of Ayurveda were offered heavy metals screening following the identification of the index case. Forty-six of 115 participants (40%) had elevated blood lead levels (BLLs) of 10 μg/dl or above, with 9.6% of BLLs at or above 50 μg/dl. This is the largest cluster of lead and mercury toxicity following use of Ayurvedic supplements described in the literature in the US. Contamination of herbal products is a public health issue of global significance. There are few regulations addressing contamination of "natural" products or supplements.

  7. Healthy Beginnings: Lead Safe Families. An English as a Second Language Curriculum on Lead Poisoning Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Education Development Center, Inc., Newton, MA.

    The materials are designed to help teachers of English as a Second Language (ESL) at all levels educate adult students about hazards and prevention of lead poisoning, and to encourage use of English within the context of daily living situations. The materials consist of: a teacher's guide that describes the instructional units and lists resources…

  8. Prohepcidin Levels in Refractory Anaemia Caused by Lead Poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayantha Arnold

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent research evidence suggests a central role for hepcidin in iron homeostasis. Hepcidin is a hormone synthesized in the liver. Hepcidin is also thought to play a vital role in the pathogenic mechanism of anaemia in patients with inflammation or chronic disease. A 38-year-old female who presented with recurrent abdominal pain was found to have raised urinary porphyrins and a blood lead level of 779 µg/l. Her haemoglobin level was 8.3 g/dl. Her MCV was normal. Serum ferritin, B12 and folate were normal. Her serum prohepcidin level was 2,489 ng/ml (normal <450 ng/ml . To our knowledge, this is the first report of raised prohepcidin levels in a patient with anaemia of chronic disease resulting from lead poisoning.

  9. Public health implications of lead poisoning in backyard chickens and cattle: four cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roegner A

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Amber Roegner,1 Federico Giannitti,2 Leslie W Woods,2 Asli Mete,2 Birgit Puschner1,2 1Department of Molecular Biosciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA, USA; 2California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory System, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA, USA Abstract: Lead intoxication in livestock has historically been associated with cattle turned out to pasture and accidental ingestion of lead from drinking crankcase oil, licking grease from machinery, chewing on plumbing or batteries, or drinking water contaminated from leaching materials. Even with the decrease in manufactured items produced with lead, contaminants persist in the landscape and may enter the food supply through animal products. Changing patterns of open range herds moving to new pasture and the increased popularity of urban/suburban backyard chickens or other livestock necessitates public awareness about the clinical signs of lead intoxication, the potential for subclinical animals, public health concerns, particularly for exposure in children, and testing options available. Cases of lead intoxication in livestock demand a thorough case work-up to identify all sources of lead, address subclinical cases, evaluate risk to consumers, and make management suggestions for future prevention. We discuss four recent cases of confirmed lead poisoning in backyard chickens and open range cattle and assess the public health implications therein. Taken as a whole and considering the potential of the remaining herd or flock to be affected without necessarily showing signs, public health officials and veterinarians should be prepared to advise clients on case work-up and management and prevention considerations. Backyard chickens and cattle may not present for suspected lead poisoning as in several of the cases discussed herein yet may still contain concerning tissue or blood levels. The authors believe increased

  10. Canine Cyanotoxin Poisonings in the United States (1920s–2012: Review of Suspected and Confirmed Cases from Three Data Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tegwin K. Taylor

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria (also called blue-green algae are ubiquitous in aquatic environments. Some species produce potent toxins that can sicken or kill people, domestic animals, and wildlife. Dogs are particularly vulnerable to cyanotoxin poisoning because of their tendency to swim in and drink contaminated water during algal blooms or to ingestalgal mats.. Here, we summarize reports of suspected or confirmed canine cyanotoxin poisonings in the U.S. from three sources: (1 The Harmful Algal Bloom-related Illness Surveillance System (HABISS of the National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC; (2 Retrospective case files from a large, regional veterinary hospital in California; and (3 Publicly available scientific and medical manuscripts; written media; and web-based reports from pet owners, veterinarians, and other individuals. We identified 231 discreet cyanobacteria harmful algal bloom (cyanoHAB events and 368 cases of cyanotoxin poisoning associated with dogs throughout the U.S. between the late 1920s and 2012. The canine cyanotoxin poisoning events reviewed here likely represent a small fraction of cases that occur throughout the U.S. each year.

  11. VIGILANCE POISON: Illegal poisoning and lead intoxication are the main factors affecting avian scavenger survival in the Pyrenees (France).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berny, Philippe; Vilagines, Lydia; Cugnasse, Jean-Marc; Mastain, Olivier; Chollet, Jean-Yves; Joncour, Guy; Razin, Martine

    2015-08-01

    A specific surveillance program has been set up to monitor avian scavenger populations in the French Pyrenean Mountains, hosting a high proportion of the French populations. The two main purposes of the study were to identify all causes of death and to investigate poisoning cases. All 170 birds found dead during the 7-year program were submitted to full necropsy, X-Ray, parasitological investigations and consistent analytical toxicology screenings (Cholinesterase inhibitors, anticoagulant rodenticides, organochlorine insecticides, Pb, Cd). Over the study period, 8 Bearded Vultures, 120 Griffon Vultures, 8 Egyptian Vultures and 34 Red kites were eventually collected. Mortality events were often multifactorial, but poisoning was by far the most common cause of death (24.1%), followed by trauma/fall (12%), bacterial diseases and starvation (8%) and electrocution (6%). Illicit use of banned pesticides was identified as a common cause of poisoning (53% of all poisoning cases) and lead poisoning was also identified as a significant toxicant issue (17% of all poisoning cases). Lead isotopic signature could be associated primarily with ammunition. Last, a positive association between trauma and lead contamination was detected, indicating that lead could be a significant contributor to different causes of death. These results urge for severe restrictions on the use of lead ammunition to prevent scavengers from detrimental exposure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluating Oral Fluid as a Screening Tool for Lead Poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Sher Lynn; Geller, Robert J; Hannigan, Robyn; Sun, Yu; Mangla, Anil

    2016-11-01

    Screening for lead poisoning is necessary in young children, but obtaining the needed blood sample is unpleasant and sometimes very difficult. Use of an alternative screening method that is less unpleasant and less difficult would likely help to increase the percent of children receiving screening. To evaluate the correlation of oral fluid and blood lead in a clinical setting, and to ascertain the acceptability and feasibility of obtaining oral fluid from a young child in the clinical setting. Oral fluid samples were collected from a convenience sample of 431 children aged 6 months to 5 years already due to receive a blood lead test in a primary care clinic. Blood lead results obtained at the same time were available for 407 children. The results of the two tests were compared with the blood lead test considered to be the "gold standard". Data analysis used Pearson correlations, scatter plots, linear regression, ANOVA and Bland-Altman analysis. 431 patients had oral fluid samples available for analysis, and 407 patients had blood samples available. Patients who had both blood concentrations lead values less than the value recommended for further intervention occurred in 176; no patients had elevated blood lead values with below-intervention oral fluid values. The negative predictive value of an oral fluid lead below the screening cutoff value was 100%. The use of oral fluid to screen for elevated body burdens of lead instead of the usual blood lead sample is feasible with a negative predictive value of 100%, while eliminating the need for blood for lead screening in more than half of these children. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Modeling the effect of succimer (DMSA; dimercaptosuccinic acid) chelation therapy in patients poisoned by lead

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijkeren, Jan C H; Olie, J. Daniël N; Bradberry, Sally M; Vale, J Allister; de Vries, Irma|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/41398625X; Clewell, Harvey J.; Meulenbelt, Jan; Hunault, Claudine C|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/297757849

    CONTEXT: Kinetic models could assist clinicians potentially in managing cases of lead poisoning. Several models exist that can simulate lead kinetics but none of them can predict the effect of chelation in lead poisoning. Our aim was to devise a model to predict the effect of succimer

  14. Un-Leaded Only: Toward a Safer City for Children. A 2002 Report on Childhood Lead Paint Poisoning in Philadelphia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, Colleen; Yanoff, Shelly D.; Fynes, Steven E.

    As part of its work in improving the lives and life changes of children in the Philadelphia region, the Philadelphia Citizens for Children and Youth examined the problem of local childhood lead paint poisoning. This report describes their efforts, beginning with a description of the impact of lead poisoning on children's health and a discussion of…

  15. Childhood lead poisoning associated with gold ore processing: a village-level investigation-Zamfara State, Nigeria, October-November 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Yi-Chun; Dooyema, Carrie A; Neri, Antonio; Durant, James; Jefferies, Taran; Medina-Marino, Andrew; de Ravello, Lori; Thoroughman, Douglas; Davis, Lora; Dankoli, Raymond S; Samson, Matthias Y; Ibrahim, Luka M; Okechukwu, Ossai; Umar-Tsafe, Nasir T; Dama, Alhassan H; Brown, Mary Jean

    2012-10-01

    During May-June 2010, a childhood lead poisoning outbreak related to gold ore processing was confirmed in two villages in Zamfara State, Nigeria. During June-September of that year, villages with suspected or confirmed childhood lead poisoning continued to be identified in Zamfara State. We investigated the extent of childhood lead poisoning [≥ 1 child with a blood lead level (BLL) ≥ 10 µg/dL] and lead contamination (≥ 1 soil/dust sample with a lead level > 400 parts per million) among villages in Zamfara State and identified villages that should be prioritized for urgent interventions. We used chain-referral sampling to identify villages of interest, defined as villages suspected of participation in gold ore processing during the previous 12 months. We interviewed villagers, determined BLLs among children lead. We identified 131 villages of interest and visited 74 (56%) villages in three local government areas. Fifty-four (77%) of 70 villages that completed the survey reported gold ore processing. Ore-processing villages were more likely to have ≥ 1 child lead poisoning (68% vs. 50%, p = 0.17) or death following convulsions (74% vs. 44%, p = 0.02). Soil/dust contamination and BLL ≥ 45 µg/dL were identified in ore-processing villages only [50% (p lead poisoning or lead contamination was 3.5 times as high in ore-processing villages than the other villages (95% confidence interval: 1.1, 11.3). Childhood lead poisoning and lead contamination were widespread in surveyed areas, particularly among villages that had processed ore recently. Urgent interventions are required to reduce lead exposure, morbidity, and mortality in affected communities.

  16. Childhood Lead Poisoning Associated with Gold Ore Processing: a Village-Level Investigation—Zamfara State, Nigeria, October–November 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Yi-Chun; Dooyema, Carrie A.; Neri, Antonio; Durant, James; Jefferies, Taran; Medina-Marino, Andrew; de Ravello, Lori; Thoroughman, Douglas; Davis, Lora; Dankoli, Raymond S.; Samson, Matthias Y.; Ibrahim, Luka M.; Okechukwu, Ossai; Umar-Tsafe, Nasir T.; Dama, Alhassan H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: During May–June 2010, a childhood lead poisoning outbreak related to gold ore processing was confirmed in two villages in Zamfara State, Nigeria. During June–September of that year, villages with suspected or confirmed childhood lead poisoning continued to be identified in Zamfara State. Objectives: We investigated the extent of childhood lead poisoning [≥ 1 child with a blood lead level (BLL) ≥ 10 µg/dL] and lead contamination (≥ 1 soil/dust sample with a lead level > 400 parts per million) among villages in Zamfara State and identified villages that should be prioritized for urgent interventions. Methods: We used chain-referral sampling to identify villages of interest, defined as villages suspected of participation in gold ore processing during the previous 12 months. We interviewed villagers, determined BLLs among children lead. Results: We identified 131 villages of interest and visited 74 (56%) villages in three local government areas. Fifty-four (77%) of 70 villages that completed the survey reported gold ore processing. Ore-processing villages were more likely to have ≥ 1 child lead poisoning (68% vs. 50%, p = 0.17) or death following convulsions (74% vs. 44%, p = 0.02). Soil/dust contamination and BLL ≥ 45 µg/dL were identified in ore-processing villages only [50% (p lead poisoning or lead contamination was 3.5 times as high in ore-processing villages than the other villages (95% confidence interval: 1.1, 11.3). Conclusion: Childhood lead poisoning and lead contamination were widespread in surveyed areas, particularly among villages that had processed ore recently. Urgent interventions are required to reduce lead exposure, morbidity, and mortality in affected communities. PMID:22766030

  17. Guillain-Barré-like syndrome in a child with lead poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toto, Maddalena; De Giacomo, Andrea; Petruzzelli, Maria Giuseppina; Dicuonzo, Franca; Santoro, Nicola; Del Vecchio, Giovanni Carlo; Craig, Francesco; Margari, Lucia

    2012-08-01

    Lead poisoning is a medical condition caused by increased levels of the heavy metal lead in the body, generally resulting from environmental exposure. Lead poisoning can cause a variety of symptoms which vary depending on the individual and the duration of lead exposure; lead poisoning is more noxious to children than adults, because it can damage the brain and nerve development of children.We report a case of lead poisoning in a 5-year-old girl caused by accidental ingestion of a metal ring. Simultaneously, the child showed anemia, encephalopathy, and peripheral neuropathy with albuminocytological dissociation mimicking Guillain-Barré syndrome.This case suggests that anemia with signs of peripheral and central nervous system damage could be considered as a possible manifestation of lead poisoning in children. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  18. [Environmental lead poisoning from lead-glazed earthenware used for storing drinks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabouraud, S; Coppéré, B; Rousseau, C; Testud, F; Pulce, C; Tholly, F; Blanc, M; Culoma, F; Facchin, A; Ninet, J; Chambon, P; Medina, B; Descotes, J

    2009-12-01

    Current unusual environmental sources of lead exposure mainly include traditional medicines, either ayurvedic remedies or others, traditional cosmetics (kohl, surma), and the use of traditional earthenware, for storage or cooking. We report two cases of lead poisoning in adults initially identified by paroxysmal abdominal pain or anemia. In both cases, the environmental investigation evidenced one main source of lead exposure, namely a lead-glazed earthenware jug in which a drink was stored, "kefir" in the first case, and "kombucha" tea in the second one. It is recommended to search for lead intoxication in patients with unexplained anemia. Environmental sources of lead can be multiple. Their relative importance has to be ranked during the environmental investigation and among these, lead-glazed earthenware must be considered as a source of high lead exposure when drinks are stored inside and thus can soak.

  19. Canine Cyanotoxin Poisonings in the United States (1920s–2012): Review of Suspected and Confirmed Cases from Three Data Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backer, Lorraine C.; Landsberg, Jan H.; Miller, Melissa; Keel, Kevin; Taylor, Tegwin K.

    2013-01-01

    Cyanobacteria (also called blue-green algae) are ubiquitous in aquatic environments. Some species produce potent toxins that can sicken or kill people, domestic animals, and wildlife. Dogs are particularly vulnerable to cyanotoxin poisoning because of their tendency to swim in and drink contaminated water during algal blooms or to ingestalgal mats.. Here, we summarize reports of suspected or confirmed canine cyanotoxin poisonings in the U.S. from three sources: (1) The Harmful Algal Bloom-related Illness Surveillance System (HABISS) of the National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC); (2) Retrospective case files from a large, regional veterinary hospital in California; and (3) Publicly available scientific and medical manuscripts; written media; and web-based reports from pet owners, veterinarians, and other individuals. We identified 231 discreet cyanobacteria harmful algal bloom (cyanoHAB) events and 368 cases of cyanotoxinpoisoning associated with dogs throughout the U.S. between the late 1920s and 2012. The canine cyanotoxin poisoning events reviewed here likely represent a small fraction of cases that occur throughout the U.S. each year. PMID:24064718

  20. 24 CFR 242.81 - Lead-based paint poisoning prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lead-based paint poisoning prevention. 242.81 Section 242.81 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban... AUTHORITIES MORTGAGE INSURANCE FOR HOSPITALS Miscellaneous Requirements § 242.81 Lead-based paint poisoning...

  1. 24 CFR 200.77 - Lead-based paint poisoning prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lead-based paint poisoning... Programs; and Continuing Eligibility Requirements for Existing Projects Property Requirements § 200.77 Lead-based paint poisoning prevention. Requirements set forth in 24 CFR part 35 apply to these programs. ...

  2. A Penny and a Half and a Pool: Lead Poisoning and Its Impact on Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrman, Matthew Paul

    2011-01-01

    Lead is a neurotoxin that has been shown to have a long and lasting impact on the brains, bodies, and behaviors of those who are poisoned. It also has a greater presence in communities with high levels of poverty and minority populations. Compounded over time, the effects of lead poisoning, even at low levels of exposure, impact a child's…

  3. 76 FR 65728 - Advisory Committee on Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention (ACCLPP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-24

    ... INFORMATION: Claudine Johnson, Program Operation Assistant or Tiffany Turner, Healthy Homes and Lead Poisoning... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Advisory Committee on Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention (ACCLPP) Correction: This notice was published in the Federal Register on October 6...

  4. Como ayudar a los padres a prevenir el envenenamiento por plomo (Helping Parents Prevent Lead Poisoning). ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binns, Helen J.; Ricks, Omar Benton

    Children are at greater risk than adults for lead poisoning because children absorb lead more readily than adults, and a small amount of lead in children's bodies can do a great deal of harm. This Spanish-language Digest summarizes some of the causes and effects of childhood lead poisoning and suggests some lead poisoning prevention strategies…

  5. First report of suspected ethylene glycol poisoning in 2 dogs in South Africa : clinical communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Keller

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Ethylene glycol (anti-freeze toxicity is a serious emergency in both veterinary and human medicine. Ethylene glycol (E/G is the active anti-freeze principle in radiator water additives. It is odourless, colourless and has a sweet taste. As little as 5 mℓ or 20 mℓ is sufficient to kill a cat or a dog, respectively. Ethylene glycol is rapidly absorbed and metabolised in the liver to oxalate, which is deposited as calcium oxalate in the kidneys causing irreversible damage. This report describes 2 dogs that were suspected to have ingested ethylene glycol. The report contains a description of the 3 stages of ethylene glycol toxicity as well as a short discussion of the treatment. Public awareness about the dangers of anti-freeze will help in limiting exposure of pets and humans to this potentially fatal toxin. Veterinarians need to be aware of anti-freeze toxicity as delayed recognition and treatment will lead to the death of the patient.

  6. Childhood lead poisoning from the smelter in Torreon, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto-Jimenez, Martin F., E-mail: martin@ola.icmyl.unam.mx [Unidad Academica Mazatlan, Instituto de Ciencias del Mar y Limnologia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UAM-ICMyL-UNAM), Apdo. Postal 811, Mazatlan 82040, Sinaloa (Mexico); Flegal, Arthur R. [WIGS, Microbiology and Environmental Toxicology, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2011-05-15

    Lead concentrations and isotopic compositions in blood samples of 34 children (ages 2-17 years) living within a 113 km{sup 2} area of a silver-zinc-lead smelter plant in Torreon, Mexico were compared to those of associated environmental samples (soil, aerosols, and outdoor and indoor dust) to identify the principal source(s) of environmental and human lead contamination in the area. Lead concentrations of soil and outdoor dust ranged 130-12,050 and 150-14,365 {mu}g g{sup -1}, respectively. Concentrations were greatest near the smelter, with the highest levels corresponding with the prevailing wind direction, and orders of magnitude above background concentrations of 7.3-33.3 {mu}g g{sup -1}. Atmospheric lead depositions in the city varied between 130 and 1350 {mu}g m{sup -2} d{sup -1}, again with highest rates <1 km from the smelter. Blood lead (PbB) concentrations (11.0{+-}5.3 {mu}g dl{sup -1}) levels in the children ranged 5.0-25.8 {mu}g dl{sup -1}, which is 3-14 times higher than the current average (1.9 {mu}g dl{sup -1}) of children (ages 1-5 years) in the US. Lead isotopic ratios ({sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb, {sup 208}Pb/{sup 207}Pb) of the urban dust and soil (1.200{+-}0.009, 2.467{+-}0.003), aerosols (1.200{+-}0.002, 2.466{+-}0.002), and PbB (1.199{+-}0.001, 2.468{+-}0.002) were indistinguishable from each other, as well as those of the lead ores processed at the smelter (1.199{+-}0.007, 2.473{+-}0.007). Consequently, an elevated PbB concentrations of the children in Torreon, as well as in their environment, are still dominated by industrial emissions from the smelter located within the city, in spite of new controls on atmospheric releases from the facility. - Highlights: {yields} Pb contents in environmental samples evidenced chronic Pb pollution in Torreon. {yields} Pb stable isotopes evidenced contemporary emissions from the Ag-Cod-Pb-Zn smelter. {yields} Pb urban dust and soil account for most of the childhood lead poisoning in Torreon.{yields} Levels of

  7. [Acute lead poisoning: a singular case of hemolytic anemia and lead colic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradi, M; Goldoni, M; Sabbadini, F; Mutti, A

    2011-01-01

    Acute lead poisoning due to food intake is exceptional in adults and often associated with mental illness to describe a case report of acute lead intoxication with haemolytic anemia and lead colic. A 41-year old male patient was admitted to hospital for abdominal pain and persistent constipation. Abdominal X-ray showed a radiopaque mass in the caecum and progressive anaemia was observed The patient was discharged with a diagnosis of bowel obstruction. Due to persistence of the symptoms he was again hospitalized; abdominal X-ray showed diffuse radiopaque particles in the colon and haemoglobin (hb) had dropped to 8.7 g/dl. Blood levels of lead and zinc protoporphryin were 106.7 microg/dl and 6.6 microg/gHb, respectively. The timely start of chelating therapy led to a rapid return to normal peripheral blood counts and a decline in blood lead levels. Although acute lead poisoning due to intake with food is exceptional in adults and often associated with mental illness, in this case, it was not possible to clarify the route and vehicle of ingestion of the toxic. Lead body burden was shown as a caecal mass, probably as a result of ingesting a single bolus of lead dust which, considering the size and density of the mass, was estimated as weighing several grammes. This acute lead intake induced an acute haemolysis due to enhanced fragility of the erythrocyte membrane. In the course of acute lead intoxication, the critical organ is not the bone marrow, but rather the red blood cell, leading to haemolysis and anaemia.

  8. Sources, symptoms and characteristics of childhood lead poisoning: experience from a lead specialty clinic in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Xiao-Lan; Gao, Zhen-Yan; Yan, Jin; Zhang, Meng; Wang, Ju; Xu, Jian; Markowitz, Morri; Yan, Chong-Huai

    2017-10-27

    This study explored the sources of lead exposure, identified patients' geographic distribution and evaluated the symptoms of children with elevated blood lead levels (BLLs) referred to a pediatric lead specialty clinic in China. Data were collected from 515 consecutive outpatients attending the Pediatric Lead Poisoning Clinic in Xinhua Hospital, Shanghai, China, between 2011 and 2016, referred for BLLs ≥5 μg/dL. Atomic absorption spectrometry was used to measure venous BLLs. The mean ± standard deviation age of the patients was 4.1 ± 3.2 years. Their BLLs ranged from 5 to 126 μg/dL. The geometric mean and median BLLs were 24 and 26 μg/dL, respectively. Two hundred and twenty-two children (43.1%) were exposed to industrial lead pollution-mainly from Zhejiang, Jiangsu, Hunan, Henan and Anhui provinces; whereas, 41.4% (213 cases) were induced by folk medicines used widely throughout China. Other nonindustrial sources of lead exposure included lead-containing tinfoil and tin pots. Household lead paint was a rare source. Most patients exhibited nonspecific symptoms, such as hyperactivity, attention difficulty, aggressiveness, constipation and anorexia. Industrial pollution and folk medicines are important sources of lead exposure in China. Childhood lead poisoning may be difficult to diagnose clinically as symptoms are nonspecific. Thus, blood lead screening may be necessary to identify children at high risk of exposure. Education to raise the awareness of potential sources of exposure resulting in their elimination would be expected to decrease the incidence of children with elevated BLLs.

  9. NWHL Final Report 1983-84 Lead Poisoning Monitoring Program Desoto National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Evidence of lead exposure, but no evidence of lead poisoning mortality, was demonstrated in waterfowl using Desoto National Wildlife Refuge by examination of tissues...

  10. Comparison of blood lead and blood and plasma δ-aminolevulinic acid concentrations as biomarkers for lead poisoning in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hwan Goo; Bischoff, Karyn; Ebel, Joseph G; Cha, Sang Ho; McCardle, James; Choi, Cheong Up

    2010-11-01

    Lead (Pb) concentrations in whole blood and δ-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) concentrations in plasma and whole blood from 37 cattle with suspected Pb exposure were determined in order to investigate the usefulness of ALA as a biological indicator for Pb poisoning in cattle. Cows were divided into 4 groups based on blood Pb, as follows: 300 ppb (group 4). The derivatization reaction for ALA was improved by a greater than 2-fold measure in whole blood and by a 10-fold measure in plasma by adding 75 and 50 µl of 0.1 N HCl, respectively. Blood Pb concentrations ranged from 50 ppb Pb. Delta-aminolevulinic acid concentrations in whole blood and plasma ranged from lead concentrations in any group. Increase in plasma ALA concentration was dependent on blood Pb concentration. There was no correlation between blood Pb concentration and plasma ALA concentration in group 2 (n  =  4), but correlation coefficients were 0.736 in group 3 and 0.807 in group 4, respectively. The correlation coefficient was increased to 0.851 when groups 3 and 4 were combined. Based on these observations, in cattle, plasma ALA is a more reliable biological biomarker for Pb exposure than is blood ALA.

  11. Guidelines for evaluation and treatment of lead poisoning of wild raptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallon, Jesse A.; Redig, Patrick; Miller, Tricia A.; Lanzone, Michael; Katzner, Todd

    2017-01-01

    Lead poisoning is a threat to birds, particularly scavenging birds of prey. With the availability of portable lead-testing kits, an increasing number of field researchers are testing wild-caught birds, in situ, for lead poisoning. We describe guidelines for evaluation of lead toxicity in wild raptors by outlining field testing of blood-lead concentrations, presenting criteria for removing a lead-poisoned bird from the wild for treatment, and suggesting strategies for effective treatment of lead intoxicated raptors. Field testing of birds is most commonly accomplished via portable electrochemical analysis of blood; visual observation of condition alone may provide insufficient evidence upon which to make a decision about lead poisoning. Our intended audience is not only the avian research community, but also rehabilitation facilities that may receive apparently uninjured birds. Best practices suggest that birds whose blood-lead levels are lead levels between 40 μg/dL and 60 μg/dL should be made based on the presence of clinical signs of poisoning and relevant biological characteristics (e.g., breeding status). Finally, birds with blood-lead levels >60 μg/dL are potentially lethally poisoned and best served if removed from the wild for appropriate treatment at a licensed rehabilitation facility and later released. We present guidelines for decision-making when treating lead poisoning of wild raptors. Future work based on experimental studies will clarify the role of lead poisoning for specific species and be important to refine these guidelines to improve effectiveness.

  12. Another Link in the Chain: State Policies and Practices for Case Management and Environmental Investigation for Lead-Poisoned Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, Anne M.; McLaine, Pat

    Policy and practice for screening children for lead poisoning have dominated the dialogue about the health care system's role in lead poisoning prevention, with little attention directed to how the health care system responds to a lead-poisoned child once identified. This report details a study of the case management and environmental…

  13. Lead Poisoning From a Ceramic Jug Presenting as Recurrent Abdominal Pain and Jaundice

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed, Mahmod; Ugarte-Torres, Alejandra; Groshaus, Horacio; Rioux, Kevin; Yarema, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Lead poisoning may present with non-specific symptoms that may result in unnecessary investigations. We report a case of acute lead poisoning in a previously healthy 28-year-old man who presented with recurrent abdominal pain, jaundice, constipation, and weight loss. An extensive diagnostic work-up was completed with inconclusive results. A detailed history revealed an unusual source of lead exposure. Chelation therapy resulted in substantial clinical and biochemical improvement.

  14. Alcohol Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... unconscious or can't be awakened is at risk of dying. Alcohol poisoning is an emergency If you suspect that ... a short period of time, the greater your risk of alcohol poisoning. One drink is defined as: 12 ounces ( ...

  15. Lead poisoning among internally displaced Roma, Ashkali and Egyptian children in the United Nations-Administered Province of Kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Mary Jean; McWeeney, Gerry; Kim, Rokho; Tahirukaj, Ardita; Bulat, Petar; Syla, Skender; Savic, Zoran; Amitai, Yona; Dignam, Timothy; Kaluski, Dorit Nitzan

    2010-06-01

    This study assessed the association between lead poisoning prevention activities and blood lead levels (BLLs) among children living in lead-contaminated camps for internally displaced persons in the United Nations-Administered Province of Kosovo. We conducted a population-based study to examine the relationship among geometric mean BLLs in children (i) born before any lead poisoning prevention activities were instituted, (ii) born when specific interim interventions were instituted and (iii) born after relocation and medical therapy were available. The study population consisted of 145 of the 186 children born in the camps between December 1999 and July 2007. Lower mean BLLs were found in children born following implementation of the interventions as compared with the children born before the interventions. However, this decrease in mean BLLs was attenuated in children born into families suspected of informal lead smelting. Despite lower BLLs following interventions, children living in these camps have BLLs that remain unacceptably high. Further efforts are urgently needed to control or eliminate lead exposure in this population. Continued blood lead monitoring of the population is also warranted.

  16. Acute lead poisoning in western Canadian cattle - A 16-year retrospective study of diagnostic case records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Vanessa; Blakley, Barry

    2016-04-01

    This study describes the epidemiology of acute lead poisoning in western Canadian cattle over the 16-year period of 1998 to 2013 and reports background bovine tissue lead concentrations. Case records from Prairie Diagnostic Services, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, identified 525 cases of acute lead toxicity over the investigational period. Poisonings were influenced by year (P poisoned (53.5%; P poisoned. Mean toxic lead concentrations (mg/kg wet weight) in the blood, liver, and kidney were 1.30 ± 1.70 (n = 301), 33.5 ± 80.5 (n = 172), and 56.3 ± 39.7 (n = 61). Mean normal lead concentrations in the blood, liver, and kidney were 0.036 ± 0.003 mg/kg (n= 1081), 0.16 ± 0.63 mg/kg (n = 382), and 0.41 ± 0.62 mg/kg (n = 64).

  17. Forensic case of lead poisoning from a battery manufacturing company in Nakuru, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbaria, James M; Ochodo, C; Nguta, Joseph Mwanzia

    2013-02-01

    Acute sickness involving dairy cattle (n = 5) with a morbidity of 100% occurred in a farm in Nakuru, Kenya. A case study was undertaken with the objective of establishing the cause of the sickness. Samples of blood, soil and industrial waste contained high levels of lead. The symptoms, results of postmortem and history of the case were used to establish the diagnosis of acute lead poisoning. This is a forensic case in court between the owner of the animals and a lead recycling company that dumped the industrial waste that was associated with the poisoning. There could be many unreported cases of lead poisoning in Kenya areas with heavy industrial activities since data on of lead poisoning in Kenya is scanty.

  18. World's leading physics lab shut for poisoning water

    CERN Multimedia

    Popham, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Gran Sasso National Laboratory, the most advanced laboratory in the world for underground research into astroparticle physics, has been shut after polluting the environment. The laboratory, deep beneath the Apenninnes is said to have poisoned an aqueduct with waste from its equipment and committed numerous other infringements and ommissions (1 page)

  19. NWIL Final Report 1983-84 Lead Poisoning Monitoring Program White River National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Evidence of lead poisoning at White River National Wildlife Refuge was demonstrated by examination of tissues from hunter-killed and trapped waterfowl. Elevated...

  20. NWHL final report 1984 [ to ] 1985 lead poisoning monitoring program Modoc National Wildlife Refuge California

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Twelve carcasses were submitted for necropsy from Modoc National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) during the 1984-85 Lead Poisoning Monitoring Program; one Canada goose was...

  1. Suspected flunixin poisoning of a wild Eurasian Griffon Vulture from Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorrilla, Irene; Martinez, Rosa; Taggart, Mark A; Richards, Ngaio

    2015-04-01

    Exposure to residues of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) diclofenac present in livestock carcasses has caused extensive declines in 3 Gyps vulture species across Asia. The carcass of a wild Eurasian Griffon Vulture (Gyps fulvus) was found in 2012 on an Andalucian (Spain) game hunting reserve and examined forensically. The bird had severe visceral gout, a finding consistent with Gyps vultures from Asia that have been poisoned by diclofenac. Liver and kidney samples from this Eurasian Griffon Vulture contained elevated flunixin (an NSAID) levels (median = 2.70 and 6.50 mg/kg, respectively). This is the first reported case of a wild vulture being exposed to and apparently killed by an NSAID outside Asia. It is also the first reported instance of mortality in the wild resulting from environmental exposure to an NSAID other than diclofenac. © 2014 Society for Conservation Biology.

  2. ALA-D AS AN INDICATOR OF LEAD POISONING AMONG HUNTED BIRDS

    OpenAIRE

    Łukasz Jakub Binkowski; Bartłomiej Zyśk; Marek Guzik; Robert Stawarz; Tomasz Łaciak; Włodzimierz Wojtaś; Grzegorz Formicki; Agnieszka Greń

    2013-01-01

    The major causes of lead (Pb) poisoning in waterbirds (mostly Anseriformes) are lead pellets from ammunition sources and fishing sinkers which may be ingested by the mistake by birds during foraging. They are being dissolved and got into the bloodstream causing a poisoning. To evaluate this exposition of particular specimens, biomarkers as the activity of δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase in blood can be used. These measurements may be done in blood samples taken from birds during the ringing...

  3. Lead Poisoning Can Be Easily Misdiagnosed as Acute Porphyria and Nonspecific Abdominal Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Ming-Ta Tsai; Shi-Yu Huang; Shih-Yu Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Lead poisoning (LP) is less commonly encountered in emergency departments (ED). However, lead exposure still occurs, and new sources of poisoning have emerged. LP often goes unrecognized due to a low index of suspicion and nonspecific symptoms. We present a case of a 48-year-old man who had recurring abdominal pain with anemia that was misdiagnosed. His condition was initially diagnosed as nonspecific abdominal pain and acute porphyria. Acute porphyria-like symptoms with a positive urine porp...

  4. Modeling the effect of succimer (DMSA; dimercaptosuccinic acid) chelation therapy in patients poisoned by lead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eijkeren, Jan C H; Olie, J Daniël N; Bradberry, Sally M; Vale, J Allister; de Vries, Irma; Clewell, Harvey J; Meulenbelt, Jan; Hunault, Claudine C

    2017-02-01

    Kinetic models could assist clinicians potentially in managing cases of lead poisoning. Several models exist that can simulate lead kinetics but none of them can predict the effect of chelation in lead poisoning. Our aim was to devise a model to predict the effect of succimer (dimercaptosuccinic acid; DMSA) chelation therapy on blood lead concentrations. We integrated a two-compartment kinetic succimer model into an existing PBPK lead model and produced a Chelation Lead Therapy (CLT) model. The accuracy of the model's predictions was assessed by simulating clinical observations in patients poisoned by lead and treated with succimer. The CLT model calculates blood lead concentrations as the sum of the background exposure and the acute or chronic lead poisoning. The latter was due either to ingestion of traditional remedies or occupational exposure to lead-polluted ambient air. The exposure duration was known. The blood lead concentrations predicted by the CLT model were compared to the measured blood lead concentrations. Pre-chelation blood lead concentrations ranged between 99 and 150 μg/dL. The model was able to simulate accurately the blood lead concentrations during and after succimer treatment. The pattern of urine lead excretion was successfully predicted in some patients, while poorly predicted in others. Our model is able to predict blood lead concentrations after succimer therapy, at least, in situations where the duration of lead exposure is known.

  5. [Lead poisoning. A surprising cause of constipation, abdominal pain and anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmanová, Iva; Kačírková, Petra; Kučerová, Irena; Ševčík, Rudolf; Sánchez, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    This article reports on patient that has been presented with sudden onset of constipation, abdominal pain and normocytic anemia. Gastroscopy and colonoscopy ruled out an organic diseases. In peripheral blood and bone marrow aspirates mears, coarse basophilic stippling of erythrocyte (and erythroblasts) point out a possibility of heavy metal poisoning. The level of plumbemia exceeded 8.4 times the maximal permitted value for common (non-professional) population. A source of poisoning was indentified from a glaze on a ceramic jug, from which the patient had drank tea with lemon for three months. A lead concentration in the tea extract was 227 mg/kg. In developed countries, lead poisoning is a rare diagnosis. As the symptoms are nonspecific, missed diagnoses could occur, especially in sporadic, non-occupational exposure. However, a microscopic evaluation of the peripheral bloods mear with finding of predominantly coarse basophilic stippling of erythrocyte mayle ad to suspicion of lead poisoning.

  6. Peeling Lead Paint Turns into Poisonous Dust. Guess Where It Ends Up? A Media Campaign to Prevent Childhood Lead Poisoning in New York City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Danielle; Tehranifar, Parisa; DeMartini, Diana P.; Faciano, Andrew; Nagin, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Successful public health media campaigns promote messages, increase awareness, engage the public, and encourage behavior change. Between 2004 and 2006, the Lead Poisoning Prevention Program of the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene conducted a media campaign grounded in social learning theory and the social marketing model to…

  7. A Case of Lead Poisoning due to a Mixture of Talisman Ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Han Hui; Jeong, Jae Uk; Baek, Nak Joon; Choi, Chang Yul; Jeon, Man Joong; Sakong, Joon

    2013-11-28

    Lead is a metal that has no biological function useful for the human body. In Korea, non-occupational exposure to lead has mostly occurred through taking oriental medicine. However, in this paper we report a case of lead poisoning caused by ingesting talisman material. A 16-year-old male patient complained of severe abdominal pain after taking cinnabar, a talisman material. He was diagnosed with lead poisoning accompanied by acute hepatitis. We confirmed that the cinnabar the patient took contained about 10% elemental lead. After symptom management, the patients' symptoms, liver function test results, and blood lead concentration level improved. Lead poisoning can be accompanied by hepatitis, although rarely. As we have confirmed that cinnabar as a talisman material is harmful to the human body, measures to prevent its misuse are needed.

  8. The Status of Childhood Lead Poisoning and Prevention in Nevada, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne M. Rothweiler

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the first steps in addressing the problem of childhood lead poisoning is to identify the possible sources of exposure in specific communities and target high-risk populations with appropriate interventions. Due to several factors, such as lack of funding and lack of blood lead reporting, little information exists regarding the occurrence of childhood lead poisoning and the prevalence of potential exposure sources in the state of Nevada. Following the recent establishment of a Nevada-based Lead Poisoning Program, we compiled the most current information available on Nevadans, and use this knowledge to suggest future research objectives and outreach activities for the state. Accordingly, we identify the characteristics of the vulnerable Nevada populations, explore possible sources of lead exposure unique to Nevada, and summarize the existing data on childhood lead poisoning. Emerging data indicates that Nevada is an area of rapid population growth, characterized by increasing immigration from Latin America, increasing numbers of children from low-income families with no health insurance. Also, childhood lead poisoning may arise from exposure to non-paint sources of lead. After presenting the Nevada statistics, we propose and recommend a set of research and outreach strategies that best suit the needs of Nevada residents.

  9. Comparison of abuse, suspected suicidal intent, and fatalities related to the 7-day buprenorphine transdermal patch versus other opioid analgesics in the National Poison Data System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplan, Paul M; Sessler, Nelson E; Harikrishnan, Venkatesh; Singh, Richa; Perkel, Charles

    2017-01-01

    Prescription opioid related abuse, suicide and death are significant public health problems. This study compares rates of poison center calls categorized as intentional abuse, suspected suicidal intent or fatality for the 7-day buprenorphine transdermal system/patch (BTDS) with other extended-release and long-acting (ER/LA) opioids indicated for chronic pain. Retrospective 24-month cohort study using National Poison Data System data from July 2012 through June 2014. BTDS was introduced in the United States in January 2011. Numbers and rates of calls of intentional abuse, suspected suicidal intent and fatalities were evaluated for BTDS, ER morphine, ER oxycodone, fentanyl patch, ER oxymorphone and methadone tablets/capsules, using prescription adjustment to account for community availability. Rate ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. Absolute numbers and prescription-adjusted rates of intentional abuse and suspected suicidal intent with BTDS were significantly lower (p opioid analgesics examined. No fatalities associated with BTDS exposure were reported. This post-marketing evaluation of BTDS indicates infrequent poison center calls for intentional abuse and suspected suicidal intent events, suggesting lower rates of these risks with BTDS compared to other ER/LA opioids.

  10. Deaths related to lead poisoning in the United States, 1979-1998.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Rachel B; Staes, Catherine J; Matte, Thomas D

    2003-02-01

    This study was conducted to describe trends in US lead poisoning-related deaths between 1979 and 1998. The predictive value of relevant ICD-9 codes was also evaluated. Multiple cause-of-death files were searched for records containing relevant ICD-9 codes, and underlying causes and demographic characteristics were assessed. For 1979-1988, death certificates were reviewed; lead source information was abstracted and accuracy of coding was determined. An estimated 200 lead poisoning-related deaths occurred from 1979 to 1998. Most were among males (74%), Blacks (67%), adults of age >/=45 years (76%), and Southerners (70%). The death rate was significantly lower in more recent years. An alcohol-related code was a contributing cause for 28% of adults. Only three of nine ICD-9 codes for lead poisoning were highly predictive of lead poisoning-related deaths. In conclusion, lead poisoning-related death rates have dropped dramatically since earlier decades and are continuing to decline. However, the findings imply that moonshine ingestion remains a source of high-dose lead exposure in adults.

  11. Childhood lead poisoning associated with lead dust contamination of family vehicles and child safety seats - Maine, 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-21

    Persons employed in high-risk lead-related occupations can transport lead dust home from a worksite through clothing, shoes, tools, or vehicles. During 2008, the Maine Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program (MCLPPP) identified 55 new cases of elevated (>or=15 microg/dL) venous blood lead levels (BLLs) among children aged lead poisoning cases in Maine during 2003-2007 had been linked to lead hazards in the child's home, no lead-based paint or dust or water with elevated lead levels were found inside the homes associated with six of the 2008 cases (i.e., five families, including one family with two affected siblings). An expanded environmental investigation determined that these six children were exposed to lead dust in the family vehicles and in child safety seats. The sources of the lead dust were likely household contacts who worked in high-risk lead exposure occupations. Current recommendations for identifying and reducing risk from take-home lead poisoning include 1) ensuring that children with elevated BLLs are identified through targeted blood lead testing, 2) directing prevention activities to at-risk workers and employers, and 3) improving employer safety protocols. State and federal prevention programs also should consider, when appropriate, expanded environmental lead dust testing to include vehicles and child safety seats.

  12. Antioxidant and micronutrient-rich milk formula reduces lead poisoning and related oxidative damage in lead-exposed mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Li, Qingqing; Liu, Xiaojie; Zhu, Hui; Song, Aihua; Jiao, Jingjing

    2013-07-01

    Lead poisoning is a global environmental disease that induces lifelong adverse health effects. The effect of a milk formula consisting of antioxidant of bamboo leaves (AOB), vitamin C (Vc), calcium lactate (CaLac), ferrous sulfate (FeSO₄) and zinc sulfate (ZnSO₄) on the reduction of lead and lead-induced oxidative damage in lead-exposed mice was studied. The lead-reducing effect of milk formula was investigated via a 7-week toxicokinetics study and a tissue distribution level examination. The ameliorating effect of milk formula on lead-induced oxidative damage was investigated. Results demonstrated current milk formula could effectively reduce blood lead levels (BLLs) and lead distribution levels of liver, kidneys, thighbones and brain in mice based on metal ion-mediated antagonism and chelation mechanisms. This milk formula could not only protect lead-susceptible tissues against lead poisoning, but also maintain normal absorption and distribution of essential elements in vivo. Meanwhile, current milk formula could prevent the reduction of δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (δ-ALAD) activity and enhancement of free erythrocyte protoporphyrins (FEP) levels in blood erythrocytes of mice. Also, this formula could indirectly protect blood cell membranes against lead-induced lipid peroxidation. We conclude that current optimized milk formula effectively reduces lead poisoning and lead-induced in vivo oxidative damage in lead-exposed mice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Lead poisoning in upland-foraging birds of prey in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, A J; Scheuhammer, A M

    2003-01-01

    We examined the degree of lead exposure, based on tissue-lead concentrations, in 184 raptors of 16 species found dead across Canada. The most prevalent species available for examination were Red-tailed hawks, Great horned owls, and Golden eagles (n = 131). The majority of individuals examined had very low lead accumulation, however 3-4% of total mortality in these 3 most commonly encountered species was attributed to lead poisoning. In addition, 1 of 9 Bald Eagles found dead far from aquatic environments was lead poisoned; and a single Turkey Vulture had a highly elevated bone-lead concentration (58 microg/g dry weight). Evidence from our study, along with other published research, indicates that upland-foraging birds of prey and scavengers that typically include game birds and mammals in their diets, are at risk for lead poisoning from the ingestion of lead projectiles from ammunition used in upland hunting. The use of non-lead ammunition for hunting upland game would effectively remove the only serious source of high lead exposure and lead poisoning for upland-foraging raptors.

  14. The Risk Factors of Child Lead Poisoning in China: A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: To investigate the risk factors of child lead poisoning in China. Methods: A document retrieval was performed using MeSH (Medical subject heading terms and key words. The Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS was used to assess the quality of the studies, and the pooled odd ratios with a 95% confidence interval were used to identify the risk factors. We employed Review Manager 5.2 and Stata 10.0 to analyze the data. Heterogeneity was assessed by both the Chi-square and I2 tests, and publication bias was evaluated using a funnel plot and Egger’s test. Results: Thirty-four articles reporting 13,587 lead-poisoned children met the inclusion criteria. Unhealthy lifestyle and behaviors, environmental pollution around the home and potential for parents’ occupational exposure to lead were risk factors of child lead poisoning in the pooled analyses. Our assessments yielded no severe publication biases. Conclusions: Seventeen risk factors are associated with child lead poisoning, which can be used to identify high-risk children. Health education and promotion campaigns should be designed in order to minimize or prevent child lead poisoning in China.

  15. Osteosclerotic metaphyseal dysplasia: a skeletal dysplasia that may mimic lead poisoning in a child with hypotonia and seizures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mennel, Emilie A. [University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Dallas, Texas (United States); John, Susan D. [Department of Radiology, University of Texas-Houston Medical School, 6431 Fannin-MSB2.100, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2003-01-01

    We report the case of a 23-month-old male with hypotonia, developmental delay, and complex seizures. Radiographs revealed profound sclerosis of the metaphyses and epiphyses of the long and short bones in the extremities, with a unique pattern of distribution. Sclerosis also involved the anterior ribs, iliac crests, talus, and calcaneus. The skull and vertebral bodies appeared unaffected. Blood lead levels were normal. We believe that this constellation of clinical and radiographic abnormalities closely resembles osteosclerotic metaphyseal dysplasia (OMD) due to an autosomal recessive defect. Characteristic skeletal findings were instrumental in determining the diagnosis. OMD is a very rare sclerosing bone disorder, first described in 1993. The syndrome is characterized clinically by developmental delay of a progressive nature, hypotonia, elevated alkaline phosphatase, and late-onset spastic paraplegia. We encountered a young child with these neurologic symptoms who displayed sclerotic metaphyseal changes on hand radiographs obtained to determine the bone age. Lead poisoning, a known cause of metaphyseal sclerosis, was initially suspected. Careful analysis of the metaphyseal bone changes helped to distinguish this bone dysplasia from lead poisoning and other causes of metaphyseal sclerosis. (orig.)

  16. Long-term lead elimination from plasma and whole blood after poisoning

    OpenAIRE

    Rentschler, Gerda; Broberg, K.; Lundh, T.; Skerfving, S

    2011-01-01

    Objective Blood lead (B–Pb), one of the most used toxicological biomarker all kind, has serious limitations. Thus, the objective is to evaluate whether plasma lead (P–Pb) is more adequate. Methods A long-term follow-up study of five cases of lead poisoning. P–Pb was analysed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Kinetics after end of exposure was modelled. Results P–Pb at severe poisoning was about 20 μg/L; haematological effects at about 5 μg/L. Biological half-time of P–Pb was ab...

  17. Infantile lead poisoning from an Asian tongue powder: a case report & subsequent public health inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Alan D; Hussain, Javed; McCullough, Laura; Petranovic, Milena; Chomchai, Chulathida

    2008-11-01

    Lead poisoning from novel environmental sources continues to present a challenge to clinicians who treat infants and children. A 12 month old infant of Thai parents was found during well child care to have a venous blood lead concentration of 61 mcg/dL. He was hospitalized for parenteral chelation with CaNa2EDTA and subsequently managed as an outpatient with oral succimer, with a reduction in blood lead concentration to 23 mcg/dL. Chronic lead poisoning was attributed to the use of a Thai tongue powder by the parents for the first seven months of the infant's life. This ethnic remedy was applied to the tongue to absorb toxins, reduce white patches present after milk feedings, and preserve the infant's health. Lead contaminated the powder at 109,000 ppm as measured by x-ray fluorescence spectrometry. Two poison centers in Thailand were contacted and initiated a public health inquiry with the Thai Food & Drug Administration (Thai FDA) to remove contaminated products from the marketplace. Their investigation found six additional contaminated tongue powders (of 10 tested) in a Bangkok shop offering Chinese remedies, some with lead levels > 9000 ppm. These products, unregistered with the Thai FDA, were confiscated and the shop closed. Local media attention and case-finding activities of health officials identified one additional infant suffering from lead poisoning due to tongue powders. Asian tongue powders can be a source of lead poisoning. Medical toxicologists, poison centers, and public health agencies can work together internationally to accomplish effective post-marketing product surveillance.

  18. Lead poisoning in shooting-range workers in Gauteng Province, South Africa: Two case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathee, A; De Jager, P; Naidoo, S; Naicker, N

    2017-03-29

    Lead exposure constitutes a major public health concern globally. Relative to developed nations, lead exposure is understudied and poorly addressed in Africa, and there is a dearth of information available to inform lead poisoning prevention strategies, even in high-risk groups such as workers in shooting ranges who are potentially exposed to lead daily. Two workers at a private shooting range in Gauteng, South Africa (SA), had blood lead levels and exposure histories taken. Workers had highly elevated blood lead levels and clinical symptoms associated with elevated blood lead levels. Workers in private SA shooting ranges are vulnerable to lead exposure and poisoning, and scaled-up action is required to protect them and their families, as well as shooting-range users, from lead and the related health risks.

  19. Lead poisoning in shooting-range workers in Gauteng Province, South Africa: Two case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Naidoo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. Lead exposure constitutes a major public health concern globally. Relative to developed nations, lead exposure is understudied and poorly addressed in Africa, and there is a dearth of information available to inform lead poisoning prevention strategies, even in high-risk groups such as workers in shooting ranges who are potentially exposed to lead daily. Methods. Two workers at a private shooting range in Gauteng, South Africa (SA, had blood lead levels and exposure histories taken. Results. Workers had highly elevated blood lead levels and clinical symptoms associated with elevated blood lead levels. Conclusion. Workers in private SA shooting ranges are vulnerable to lead exposure and poisoning, and scaled-up action is required to protect them and their families, as well as shooting-range users, from lead and the related health risks.

  20. The lead-poisoned genius: saturnism in famous artists across five centuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes-Santiago, Julio

    2013-01-01

    Lead poisoning (saturnism) has been present throughout the history of mankind. In addition to possible ingestion from contaminated food, one of the most important ways in which poisoning caused morbid processes was by occupational exposure. This exposition was pandemic in the Roman Empire, and it has been claimed that it contributed to its fall, but it also caused numerous epidemics in Western countries until the nineteenth century. In the case of artists, and since the Renaissance period, this toxicity has been called painter's colic or painter's madness. The latter term is partly due to the mental disorders displayed by some of the great masters, including Michelangelo and Caravaggio, although it was long recognized that even house and industrial painters were prone to the disorder. This chapter examines the historical evidence of recognition of such toxicity and discusses the controversies raised by the possibility of professional lead poisoning in great artists. In addition to those mentioned above, many other artists across several centuries will be discussed, some being Rubens, Goya, Fortuny, Van Gogh, Renoir, Dufy, Klee, Frida Kahlo, and Portinari. This chapter also briefly mentions the possibility of lead poisoning in two famous composers: Beethoven and Handel. Whether suffering from lead poisoning or not, about which we cannot always be sure, we should still highlight and admire such geniuses fighting their disorders to bequeath us their immortals works. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Preventing Lead Poisoning in Young Children: A Statement by the Center for Disease Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Disease Control (DHEW/PHS), Atlanta, GA.

    The purpose of this statement by the Center for Disease Control is to reflect new data available from clinical, epidemiological and experimental studies by making revised recommendations regarding the screening, diagnosis, treatment, and followup of children with undue lead absorption and lead poisoning. The ultimate preventive goal is…

  2. Screening Young Children for Lead Poisoning: Guidance for State and Local Public Health Officials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (DHHS/PHS), Atlanta, GA.

    Noting that too many children with elevated lead levels are not being identified in the United States, this report presents policy guidelines for increasing screening and follow-up care of children who most need these services, and for helping communities pursue the most appropriate approach to preventing childhood lead poisoning. Following an…

  3. Lead poisoning associated with Ayurvedic drug presenting as intestinal obstruction: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Nikhil; Goswami, Binita; Singh, Nahar; B C Koner; Garg, Ramesh

    2011-01-14

    Lead poisoning is most commonly caused by occupational exposure. It presents with a myriad of signs and symptoms ranging from mild anemia to frank encephalopathy, depending on the blood lead levels as well as the duration of exposure. Intake of herbal/Ayurvedic medicine may also lead to plumbism as heavy metals are often incorporated in such medications with the belief that such metals have medicinal properties. We report a case of lead poisoning caused by Ayurvedic medication. The patient presented with symptoms of intestinal obstruction to the surgical casualty. The patient presented with symptoms that mimicked intestinal obstruction. No specific etiology could be determined. Serum lead levels were determined and diagnosis of lead poisoning ascertained. The lead content of the medicine was analyzed and it contained 30% w/w lead. The diagnosis of heavy metal poisoning consequent to intake of alternative medicine must be kept in mind when a patient presents with vague complaints. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Childhood lead poisoning associated with traditional Chinese medicine: a case report and the subsequent lead source inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Guo-zhen; Wu, Fei; Yan, Chong-huai; Li, Ke; Liu, Xiang-yi

    2012-07-11

    Traditional medicines or ethnic remedies, such as Ayurvedic drug of India, have been reported in numerous cases to be one of the main exposure risks for severe lead poisoning. We describe the poisoning of 2 young children from a Chinese family in Guangzhou as a result of the use of traditional Chinese medicine instead of baby powder. A 3-y-old boy with blood lead levels (BLLs) of 303 μg/l and his 6-month-old sister with BLLs of 385 μg/l were hospitalized. Laboratory tests showed that the powder, which was purchased in Ganzhou during a family visit, contained a lead concentration of 214,000 mg/kg. A subsequent inspection revealed that the lead contamination was in fact achieved by the addition of Hongdan to talcum. In Ganzhou, it was a popular practice for young children to apply this leaded powder on their skins in order to treat and prevent dermatitis. We sampled 16 Hongdans and observed an average lead content of 817,000 mg/kg that was comprised mainly of lead tetraoxide (Pb(3)O(4)). Lead tetraoxide is also an accessible raw material for paint and battery industries. The health authority of China should reevaluate the safety of such traditional remedy and weigh its toxicity versus its potential benefits. Clinicians should be aware of this leaded powder when treating a lead poisoning case that shows no explainable cause. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Linking geology and health sciences to assess childhood lead poisoning from artisanal gold mining in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Durant, James T.; Morman, Suzette A.; Neri, Antonio; Wolf, Ruth E.; Dooyema, Carrie A.; Hageman, Philip L.; Lowers, Heather; Fernette, Gregory L.; Meeker, Gregory P.; Benzel, William M.; Driscoll, Rhonda L.; Berry, Cyrus J.; Crock, James G.; Goldstein, Harland L.; Adams, Monique; Bartrem, Casey L.; Tirima, Simba; Behrooz, Behbod; von Lindern, Ian; Brown, Mary Jean

    2013-01-01

    Background: In 2010, Médecins Sans Frontières discovered a lead poisoning outbreak linked to artisanal gold processing in northwestern Nigeria. The outbreak has killed approximately 400 young children and affected thousands more. Objectives: Our aim was to undertake an interdisciplinary geological- and health-science assessment to clarify lead sources and exposure pathways, identify additional toxicants of concern and populations at risk, and examine potential for similar lead poisoning globally. Methods: We applied diverse analytical methods to ore samples, soil and sweep samples from villages and family compounds, and plant foodstuff samples. Results: Natural weathering of lead-rich gold ores before mining formed abundant, highly gastric-bioaccessible lead carbonates. The same fingerprint of lead minerals found in all sample types confirms that ore processing caused extreme contamination, with up to 185,000 ppm lead in soils/sweep samples and up to 145 ppm lead in plant foodstuffs. Incidental ingestion of soils via hand-to-mouth transmission and of dusts cleared from the respiratory tract is the dominant exposure pathway. Consumption of water and foodstuffs contaminated by the processing is likely lesser, but these are still significant exposure pathways. Although young children suffered the most immediate and severe consequences, results indicate that older children, adult workers, pregnant women, and breastfed infants are also at risk for lead poisoning. Mercury, arsenic, manganese, antimony, and crystalline silica exposures pose additional health threats. Conclusions: Results inform ongoing efforts in Nigeria to assess lead contamination and poisoning, treat victims, mitigate exposures, and remediate contamination. Ore deposit geology, pre-mining weathering, and burgeoning artisanal mining may combine to cause similar lead poisoning disasters elsewhere globally.

  6. Linking geological and health sciences to assess childhood lead poisoning from artisanal gold mining in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumlee, Geoffrey S; Durant, James T; Morman, Suzette A; Neri, Antonio; Wolf, Ruth E; Dooyema, Carrie A; Hageman, Philip L; Lowers, Heather A; Fernette, Gregory L; Meeker, Gregory P; Benzel, William M; Driscoll, Rhonda L; Berry, Cyrus J; Crock, James G; Goldstein, Harland L; Adams, Monique; Bartrem, Casey L; Tirima, Simba; Behbod, Behrooz; von Lindern, Ian; Brown, Mary Jean

    2013-06-01

    In 2010, Médecins Sans Frontières discovered a lead poisoning outbreak linked to artisanal gold processing in northwestern Nigeria. The outbreak has killed approximately 400 young children and affected thousands more. Our aim was to undertake an interdisciplinary geological- and health-science assessment to clarify lead sources and exposure pathways, identify additional toxicants of concern and populations at risk, and examine potential for similar lead poisoning globally. We applied diverse analytical methods to ore samples, soil and sweep samples from villages and family compounds, and plant foodstuff samples. Natural weathering of lead-rich gold ores before mining formed abundant, highly gastric-bioaccessible lead carbonates. The same fingerprint of lead minerals found in all sample types confirms that ore processing caused extreme contamination, with up to 185,000 ppm lead in soils/sweep samples and up to 145 ppm lead in plant foodstuffs. Incidental ingestion of soils via hand-to-mouth transmission and of dusts cleared from the respiratory tract is the dominant exposure pathway. Consumption of water and foodstuffs contaminated by the processing is likely lesser, but these are still significant exposure pathways. Although young children suffered the most immediate and severe consequences, results indicate that older children, adult workers, pregnant women, and breastfed infants are also at risk for lead poisoning. Mercury, arsenic, manganese, antimony, and crystalline silica exposures pose additional health threats. Results inform ongoing efforts in Nigeria to assess lead contamination and poisoning, treat victims, mitigate exposures, and remediate contamination. Ore deposit geology, pre-mining weathering, and burgeoning artisanal mining may combine to cause similar lead poisoning disasters elsewhere globally.

  7. Linking Geological and Health Sciences to Assess Childhood Lead Poisoning from Artisanal Gold Mining in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durant, James T.; Morman, Suzette A.; Neri, Antonio; Wolf, Ruth E.; Dooyema, Carrie A.; Hageman, Philip L.; Lowers, Heather A.; Fernette, Gregory L.; Meeker, Gregory P.; Benzel, William M.; Driscoll, Rhonda L.; Berry, Cyrus J.; Crock, James G.; Goldstein, Harland L.; Adams, Monique; Bartrem, Casey L.; Tirima, Simba; Behbod, Behrooz; von Lindern, Ian; Brown, Mary Jean

    2013-01-01

    Background: In 2010, Médecins Sans Frontières discovered a lead poisoning outbreak linked to artisanal gold processing in northwestern Nigeria. The outbreak has killed approximately 400 young children and affected thousands more. Objectives: Our aim was to undertake an interdisciplinary geological- and health-science assessment to clarify lead sources and exposure pathways, identify additional toxicants of concern and populations at risk, and examine potential for similar lead poisoning globally. Methods: We applied diverse analytical methods to ore samples, soil and sweep samples from villages and family compounds, and plant foodstuff samples. Results: Natural weathering of lead-rich gold ores before mining formed abundant, highly gastric-bioaccessible lead carbonates. The same fingerprint of lead minerals found in all sample types confirms that ore processing caused extreme contamination, with up to 185,000 ppm lead in soils/sweep samples and up to 145 ppm lead in plant foodstuffs. Incidental ingestion of soils via hand-to-mouth transmission and of dusts cleared from the respiratory tract is the dominant exposure pathway. Consumption of water and foodstuffs contaminated by the processing is likely lesser, but these are still significant exposure pathways. Although young children suffered the most immediate and severe consequences, results indicate that older children, adult workers, pregnant women, and breastfed infants are also at risk for lead poisoning. Mercury, arsenic, manganese, antimony, and crystalline silica exposures pose additional health threats. Conclusions: Results inform ongoing efforts in Nigeria to assess lead contamination and poisoning, treat victims, mitigate exposures, and remediate contamination. Ore deposit geology, pre-mining weathering, and burgeoning artisanal mining may combine to cause similar lead poisoning disasters elsewhere globally. PMID:23524139

  8. Lead poisoning in ancient Rome | Retief | Acta Theologica

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lead was known to the ancients from at least the 4th millennium BC, but its use increased markedly during Roman times, to the extent that it became a health hazard. Mines and foundry furnaces caused air pollution; lead was extensively used in plumbing; domestic utensils were made of lead and pewter, and lead salts ...

  9. Lead poisoning and marginalization in newborns of Morelos, Mexico

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Martha María Téllez-Rojo; Luis F Bautista-Arredondo; Vesta Richardson; Daniel Estrada-Sánchez; Laura Ávila-Jiménez; Camilo Ríos; Alejandra Cantoral-Preciado; Martín Romero-Martínez; Delia Flores-Pimentel; Maria del Carmen Melo-Zurita; Anita Romero-Ramírez; Marco Antonio León-Mazón; Sergio Montes; Richard Fuller; Mauricio Hernández-Avila

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To determine the prevalence of lead (Pb) poi- soning at birth in Morelos, analyze its distribution by social marginalization level, and estimate the association with the use of lead glazed ceramics (LGC...

  10. 24 CFR 1000.40 - Do lead-based paint poisoning prevention requirements apply to affordable housing activities...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Do lead-based paint poisoning... AMERICAN HOUSING ACTIVITIES General § 1000.40 Do lead-based paint poisoning prevention requirements apply to affordable housing activities under NAHASDA? Yes, lead-based paint requirements apply to housing...

  11. Childhood Lead Poisoning. Current Perspectives. Proceedings of the National Conference (Indianapolis, Indiana, December 1-3, 1987).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health Resources and Services Administration (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD. Bureau of Maternal and Child Health and Resources Development.

    Since childhood lead poisoning first gained recognition as an important public health problem, the concept of lead poisoning has been examined and revised repeatedly. This national conference was convened to review and examine the current state of the problem, prevention activities, and recent studies on the toxic effects of lead at very low…

  12. Lead Poisoning Due to Lead-Pellet Ingestion in Griffon Vultures ( Gyps fulvus ) From the Iberian Peninsula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvm, Manuela A Carneiro; Oliveira, Paula A; Brandão, Ricardo; Francisco, Olga Nicolas; Velarde, Roser; Lavín, Santiago; Colaço, Bruno

    2016-09-01

    Avian scavengers that typically include game birds and mammals in their diets are at risk of lead poisoning from ingestion of carcasses with fragmented or residual lead ammunition that is used in hunting. Thus, lead may be one of the threats that the griffon vulture ( Gyps fulvus ) faces in the Iberian Peninsula and particularly in Portugal, where their conservation status is considered to be near-threatened. This is the first report that details 3 cases of lead poisoning, associated with the ingestion of lead shot, in adult female griffon vultures found in the Iberian Peninsula. The birds were found prostrate and immediately transferred to a wildlife rehabilitation center, where they died within 24 hours after supportive treatment. Necropsy and histopathologic examinations were done in 2 birds and metal analyses were done in all birds to determine the birds' causes of death. In one vulture, 9 uneroded lead pellets were recovered from the stomach, and moderate to severe hemosiderosis was seen histologically in the liver, lungs, and kidneys. Diagnosis of lead poisoning was confirmed by results of metal analyses, which revealed extremely high lead concentrations in blood (969-1384 μg/dL), liver (309-1077 μg/g dry weight), and kidneys (36-100 μg/g dry weight) for all 3 vultures. To prevent lead poisoning in vultures and preserve their populations in the Iberian Peninsula, more resources are needed for diagnosis and treatment of wildlife in rehabilitation centers, new regulations enabling the abandonment of fallen stock in the field must be approved, and lead ammunition must be prohibited in big-game hunting.

  13. Lead Paint Poisonings: How Can Innovative Technology Make a Difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lead is a toxic metal that may cause a range of health effects, from behavioral problems and learning disabilities, to seizures and death. Children six years old and under are most at risk. Exposure to lead usually occurs due to the presence of deteriorating lead-based paint (LBP...

  14. Exploring spatially varying relationships between children's lead poisoning and environmental factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Liyang; Zhang, Lianjun; Zhen, Zhen

    2017-09-01

    Children's lead poisoning continues to compromise children's health and development, particularly in the inner cities of the United States. We applied a global Poisson model, a Poisson with random effects model, and a geographically weighted Poisson regression (GWPR) model to deal with the spatial dependence and heterogeneity of the number of children's lead poisoning cases in Syracuse, New York. We used three environmental factors-the building year (i.e., the year of construction) of houses, the town taxable value of houses, and the soil lead concentration-averaged at the census block level to explore the spatially varying relationships between children's lead poisoning and environmental factors. The results indicated that GWPR not only produced better model fitting and reduced the spatial dependence and heterogeneity in the model residuals but also improved the model predictions for the spatial clusters, or hot spots, of children's lead poisoning across inner city neighborhoods. Furthermore, the spatially varying model coefficients and their associated statistical tests were visualized using geographical information system maps to show the high-risk areas for the impacts of the environmental factors on the response variable. This information can provide valuable insights for public health agencies to make better decisions on lead hazard intervention, mitigation, and control programs. © 2017 New York Academy of Sciences.

  15. Lead Poisoning Can Be Easily Misdiagnosed as Acute Porphyria and Nonspecific Abdominal Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ming-Ta; Huang, Shi-Yu; Cheng, Shih-Yu

    2017-01-01

    Lead poisoning (LP) is less commonly encountered in emergency departments (ED). However, lead exposure still occurs, and new sources of poisoning have emerged. LP often goes unrecognized due to a low index of suspicion and nonspecific symptoms. We present a case of a 48-year-old man who had recurring abdominal pain with anemia that was misdiagnosed. His condition was initially diagnosed as nonspecific abdominal pain and acute porphyria. Acute porphyria-like symptoms with a positive urine porphyrin test result led to the misdiagnosis; testing for heme precursors in urine is the key to the differential diagnosis between LP and acute porphyria. The final definitive diagnosis of lead toxicity was confirmed based on high blood lead levels after detailed medical history taking. The lead poisoning was caused by traditional Chinese herbal pills. The abdominal pain disappeared after a course of chelating treatment. The triad for the diagnosis of lead poisoning should be a history of medicine intake, anemia with basophilic stippling, and recurrent abdominal pain.

  16. Lead poisoning of waterfowl by contaminated sediment in the Coeur D'Alene River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sileo, L.; Creekmore, L.H.; Audet, D.J.; Snyder, M.R.; Meteyer, C.U.; Franson, J. Christian; Locke, L.N.; Smith, M.R.; Finley, D.L.

    2001-01-01

    The Coeur d'Alene River basin in Idaho has been contaminated by mine tailings that have impaired the health of wildlife since the early 1900s. In other parts of the world, virtually all lead poisoning of waterfowl is caused by the ingestion of manmade lead artifacts, primarily spent lead shotshell pellets or, occasionally, fishing sinkers. However, in the Coeur d'Alene River basin in Idaho, nonartifactual lead poisoning was the ultimate cause of death of most of 219 (77%) of 285 waterfowl carcasses that had been found sick or dead from 1992 through 1997. The majority of these 219 waterfowl (172 tundra swans [Cygnus columbianus], 33 Canada geese [Branta canadensis], and 14 other species) were poisoned by ingesting river sediment that was contaminated with lead. The next most common cause of death (20 instances, 7%) was lead poisoning accompanied by ingested shotshell pellets. The remaining 46 waterfowl succumbed to trauma, infectious diseases (aspergillosis, avian cholera, tuberculosis), or miscellaneous problems, or the cause of death was not determined.

  17. Lead Poisoning Can Be Easily Misdiagnosed as Acute Porphyria and Nonspecific Abdominal Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Ta Tsai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lead poisoning (LP is less commonly encountered in emergency departments (ED. However, lead exposure still occurs, and new sources of poisoning have emerged. LP often goes unrecognized due to a low index of suspicion and nonspecific symptoms. We present a case of a 48-year-old man who had recurring abdominal pain with anemia that was misdiagnosed. His condition was initially diagnosed as nonspecific abdominal pain and acute porphyria. Acute porphyria-like symptoms with a positive urine porphyrin test result led to the misdiagnosis; testing for heme precursors in urine is the key to the differential diagnosis between LP and acute porphyria. The final definitive diagnosis of lead toxicity was confirmed based on high blood lead levels after detailed medical history taking. The lead poisoning was caused by traditional Chinese herbal pills. The abdominal pain disappeared after a course of chelating treatment. The triad for the diagnosis of lead poisoning should be a history of medicine intake, anemia with basophilic stippling, and recurrent abdominal pain.

  18. Evaluating the effectiveness of state specific lead-based paint hazard risk reduction laws in preventing recurring incidences of lead poisoning in children☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Chinaro; Lordo, Robert; Sucosky, Marissa Scalia; Boehm, Rona; Brown, Mary Jean

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite significant progress made in recent decades in preventing childhood lead poisoning in the United States through the control or elimination of lead sources in the environment, it continues to be an issue in many communities, primarily in low-income communities with a large percentage of deteriorating housing built before the elimination of lead in residential paint. The purpose of this study is to determine whether state laws aimed at preventing childhood lead poisoning are also effective in preventing recurring lead poisoning among children previously poisoned. Methods An evaluation was conducted to determine whether laws in two representative states, Massachusetts and Ohio, have been effective in preventing recurrent lead poisoning among children less than 72 months of age previously poisoned, compared to a representative state (Mississippi) which at the time of the study had yet to develop legislation to prevent childhood lead poisoning. Results Compared to no legislation, unadjusted estimates showed children less than 72 months old, living in Massachusetts, previously identified as being lead poisoned, were 73% less likely to develop recurrent lead poisoning. However, this statistically significant association did not remain after controlling for other confounding variables. We did not find such a significant association when analyzing data from Ohio. Conclusions While findings from unadjusted estimates indicated that state lead laws such as those in Massachusetts may be effective at preventing recurrent lead poisoning among young children, small numbers may have attenuated the power to obtain statistical significance during multivariate analysis. Our findings did not provide evidence that state lead laws, such as those in Ohio, were effective in preventing recurrent lead poisoning among young children. Further studies may be needed to confirm these findings. PMID:26472219

  19. Evaluating the effectiveness of state specific lead-based paint hazard risk reduction laws in preventing recurring incidences of lead poisoning in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Chinaro; Lordo, Robert; Sucosky, Marissa Scalia; Boehm, Rona; Brown, Mary Jean

    2016-01-01

    Despite significant progress made in recent decades in preventing childhood lead poisoning in the United States through the control or elimination of lead sources in the environment, it continues to be an issue in many communities, primarily in low-income communities with a large percentage of deteriorating housing built before the elimination of lead in residential paint. The purpose of this study is to determine whether state laws aimed at preventing childhood lead poisoning are also effective in preventing recurring lead poisoning among children previously poisoned. An evaluation was conducted to determine whether laws in two representative states, Massachusetts and Ohio, have been effective in preventing recurrent lead poisoning among children less than 72 months of age previously poisoned, compared to a representative state (Mississippi) which at the time of the study had yet to develop legislation to prevent childhood lead poisoning. Compared to no legislation, unadjusted estimates showed children less than 72 months old, living in Massachusetts, previously identified as being lead poisoned, were 73% less likely to develop recurrent lead poisoning. However, this statistically significant association did not remain after controlling for other confounding variables. We did not find such a significant association when analyzing data from Ohio. While findings from unadjusted estimates indicated that state lead laws such as those in Massachusetts may be effective at preventing recurrent lead poisoning among young children, small numbers may have attenuated the power to obtain statistical significance during multivariate analysis. Our findings did not provide evidence that state lead laws, such as those in Ohio, were effective in preventing recurrent lead poisoning among young children. Further studies may be needed to confirm these findings. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  20. Screening for childhood lead poisoning in the industrial region of Fez, Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouftini, S; Bahhou, J; Lelievre, B; de la Barca, J M Chao; Turcant, A; Diquet, B; Abourazzak, S; Chaouki, S; Hida, M; Khattabi, A; Nejjari, C; Amarti, A; Achour, S

    2015-04-01

    The study objectives were to estimate lead poisoning prevalence among children living next to an industrial area, to compare it to that in a control population, and to establish clinical and biological follow-up of the poisoned children. This is a descriptive cross-sectional study including 150 children (exposed and unexposed) performed between January 2012 and April 2013. It was meant to determine blood lead levels (BLLs) in children considered to be an exposed population (EP N 90), living in the industrial area Ain Nokb Fez compared with BLLs of children of other areas belonging to the same city supposed to be unexposed [UP (N = 60)]. A sociodemographic questionnaire was obtained, and a blood lead analysis was performed. Clinical and biological follow-up has been performed of poisoned children. The sample consisted of 90 EP children with an average age of 6.82 ± 3.32 years and male-to-female sex ratio (SR) of 1.5 and 60 UP children with an average age of 6.45 ± 3.29 years and an SR of 1.2. Among the 150 children recruited, the average of BLLs was 58.21 ± 36 µg/L (18-202.3 μg/L). The average of BLLs in EP children (71 ± 40 µg/L) was statistically greater (p poisoned children belonged to the EP group at a prevalence of 21.1 %. The clinical and biological examinations of poisoned children showed a few perturbations such as anemia, hypocalcaemia, and deficiencies in magnesium and iron. No renal disease or objective neurological disorders were observed. In the follow-up of the children with BLL ≥100 µg/L (19 cases). BLL monitoring showed a significant decrease in average of blood concentration ranging from 136.75 ± 32.59 to 104.58 ± 32.73 µg/L (p lead poisoning prevalence (p lead poisoning (21.1 %) in EP children. The relocation of the industrial site associated with corrective and preventive measures has contributed to a decrease of exposure and lead poisoning prevalence in the aforementioned population.

  1. [Lead poisoning: towards a paleo-epidemiologic re-interpretation?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdieu, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Lead is a major public health issue. Its use has been increasing since Neolithic times, climaxing in the Ancient Rome and the nineteenth century. Defining the frequency of plumbism before modern times proves to be a difficult matter because of its various and delayed symptoms, and of diagenetic processes affecting bones. After reviewing various methods of lead measurement in bone and tooth, we will expose ways to ascertain lead measurement interpretation in order to estimate the epidemiology of plumbism in ancient times.

  2. Lead Poisoning: Historical Aspects of a Paradigmatic “Occupational and Environmental Disease”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Augusto Riva

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Lead poisoning is one of the earliest identified and most known occupational disease. Its acute effects have been recognized from antiquity when this condition principally afflicted manual workers and slaves, actually scarcely considered by the medicine of that time. The Industrial Revolution caused an epidemic of metal intoxication, urging scientists and physician of that period to study and identify specific symptoms and organ alterations related to chronic lead poisoning. During the 20th century, the acknowledgment of occupational and environmental toxicity of lead fostered public awareness and legislation to protect health. More recently, the identification of sub-clinical effects have greatly modified the concept of lead poisoning and the approaches of medicine towards this condition. Nowadays, lead poisoning is rarely seen in developed countries, but it still represents a major environmental problem in certain areas. Consequently, it may appear as a paradigm of “occupational and environmental disease,” and the history of this condition seems to parallel the historical development of modern “Occupational and Environmental Health” as a more complete medical discipline.

  3. Lead poisoning in a sample of Maryland mourning doves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, L.N.; Bagley, George E.

    1967-01-01

    A sick mourning dove (Zenuidura macroura) collected in Maryland with 2 lead shot in the gizzard showed acid-fast intranuclear inclusion bodies in the kidney tubular cells. The liver and the tibia contained 72 ppm and 187 ppm lead (wet weight) respectively. Four gizzards from 62 doves killed by hunters contained lead shot. The lead content of 43 dove livers ranged from 0.4-14.0 ppm (wet weight); 40 of these doves were collected by hunters, and the other 3 were dying of trichomoniasis.

  4. Lead poisoning in a sample of Maryland mourning doves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Locke, L.N.; Bagley, G.E.

    1967-07-01

    A sick mourning dove (Zenaidura macroura) collected in Maryland with 2 lead shot in the gizzard showed acid-fast intranuclear inclusion bodies in the kidney tubular cells. The liver and the tibia contained 72 ppm and 187 ppm lead (wet weight) respectively. Four gizzards from 62 doves killed by hunters contained lead shot. The lead content of 43 dove livers ranged from 0.4-14.0 ppm (wet weight); 40 of these doves were collected by hunters, and the other 3 were dying of trichomoniasis.

  5. Lead poisoning from drinking Kombucha tea brewed in a ceramic pot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, T G; Estell, J; Duggin, G; Beer, I; Smith, D; Ferson, M J

    Kombucha tea is an alternative therapy that is gaining popularity as a remedy for a diverse range of ailments. We report two cases of symptomatic lead poisoning requiring chelation therapy in a married couple who had been drinking Kombucha tea for six months, brewing the tea in a ceramic pot. We postulate that acids in the tea eluted lead from the glaze pigment used in the ceramic pot, in a manner analogous to elution of lead from crystal decanters by wine and spirits.

  6. Dactylifera L) on the biochemical indicators of lead poisoning in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study is conducted to examine the effect of the oral administration of pectin of dates on perturbation of the biochemical parameters induced by lead. Male rats were exposed to lead acetate at 350mg/Kg for one month, after this period, rats treated during one month with the pectin of date at 3%. Rats were sacrificed, the ...

  7. Control of Lead Poisoning in Children. (Pre-Publication Draft).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Public Health Service (DHEW), Washington, DC. Bureau of Community Environmental Management.

    This document presents information about aspects of the lead pollution problem that relate to children, suggests a community action program for controlling lead hazards, estimates the staff and other costs involved in developing such a program, and tells how to synthesize the program components for maximum effectiveness. The seven parts of the…

  8. Are children still at risk for lead poisoning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, James R; Allen, Cindy L; Ligon, Colin; Reigart, J Routt

    2013-02-01

    The prevalence of elevated blood lead levels (EBLLs) has decreased nationally, creating challenges in identifying children at risk. In a community known to have lead hazards, we screened children with a field-administered capillary blood lead test and asked parents to complete a questionnaire about lead risk factors. Of the 77 child-parent pairs screened with a blood lead test and a parental questionnaire, 4 had finger stick blood lead levels of ≥10 µg/dL. Of these, one child had a confirmatory venous blood lead level >10 µg/dL (1.3%; 95% CI = 0.0%-4.7%), which is near the US prevalence but less than the historic prevalence for this region. A median of 2 risk factors for each of the environmental, behavioral, and knowledge/awareness domains were noted. Despite a low prevalence of children with EBLL, parental report suggested that approximately 29% of children had lead-based paint in their home environment.

  9. Primary prevention of lead poisoning: protecting children from unsafe housing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Michelle L; Lucht, James A; Sylvaria, Alyssa J; Cigna, Jessica; Vanderslice, Robert; Vivier, Patrick M

    2014-08-01

    We examined the effects of changes in Rhode Island's Lead Hazard Mitigation Law in 2005 on children's blood lead levels. We used 2005 to 2009 data from Rhode Island's Lead Elimination Surveillance System; city tax assessor records in Central Falls, Pawtucket, Providence, and Woonsocket, Rhode Island; and records of conformance to the state's lead hazard mitigation law, to assess the extent to which legislation changes resulted in minimizing children's exposure to lead. During the 5-year study, the proportion of properties that complied with the new law increased for properties that housed young children. However, the majority of rental properties did not comply with the law. Children's lead levels declined by approximately 1 microgram per deciliter on average in properties that did comply, demonstrating that the law could have a protective effect for children. Legislation changes increased the proportion of properties that were certified as nonhazardous, leading to decreased blood lead levels for children living in these properties. However, legislation cannot be a highly effective primary prevention strategy if it does not cover all properties where children live and is not strictly enforced.

  10. Loss of consciousness secondary to lead poisoning--case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moharari, Reza Shariat; Khajavi, Mohammad Reza; Panahkhahi, Mahdi; Mojtahedzadeh, Mojtaba; Najafi, Atabak

    2009-10-01

    Diagnosis of lead toxicity could be difficult in IC setting because of overlap of signs and symptoms with other diseases. This is a report of two Iranian patients (father and son) with severe level of whole blood lead concentration, developing into unconsciousness.

  11. Lead poisoning in shooting-range workers in Gauteng Province ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    private indoor shooting range in greater Johannesburg. Blood lead levels were determined using a LeadCare II (Magellan Diagnostics,. USA) portable testing system, with a 50 μL aliquot of whole blood obtained from a finger prick following the thorough washing of hands with soap and water. Ethical approval for this work, ...

  12. Peeling lead paint turns into poisonous dust. Guess where it ends up? A media campaign to prevent childhood lead poisoning in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Danielle; Tehranifar, Parisa; DeMartini, Diana P; Faciano, Andrew; Nagin, Deborah

    2015-06-01

    Successful public health media campaigns promote messages, increase awareness, engage the public, and encourage behavior change. Between 2004 and 2006, the Lead Poisoning Prevention Program of the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene conducted a media campaign grounded in social learning theory and the social marketing model to increase parents' awareness of childhood lead poisoning, ways to protect their children, and property owners' legal responsibility to fix peeling lead paint safely, and increase awareness of regulatory changes and encourage enforcement of New York City's Local Law 1 of 2004. Campaign materials were focus group tested and the campaign was refined annually. The campaign ran city-wide and in targeted high-risk neighborhoods. Neighborhoods and media venue (bus, train, kiosk, and store) changed annually, based on population risk factors and venue availability. Exposure to the campaign, campaign-related knowledge, and behavior were assessed using pre- and postcampaign street intercept surveys. Results showed that campaign reached the targeted population, and had an impact on knowledge of lead poisoning prevention measures as evidenced by increased knowledge of lead paint exposures sources in one year and increased knowledge of preventive behaviors in another year; these improvements were observed for both genders and most ethnic, primary language, educational attainment, and age groups in each year. Lessons learned indicate that well-targeted media campaigns, designed with audience participation, can reach parents through various venues, and improve key knowledge areas. Evaluation challenges faced include high levels of knowledge at baseline, competing media messages, and balancing between program needs and evaluation design. © 2015 Society for Public Health Education.

  13. Primary prevention of lead poisoning in children: a cross-sectional study to evaluate state specific lead-based paint risk reduction laws in preventing lead poisoning in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Chinaro; Lordo, Robert; Sucosky, Marissa Scalia; Boehm, Rona; Brown, Mary Jean

    2014-11-07

    Children younger than 72 months are most at risk of environmental exposure to lead from ingestion through normal mouthing behavior. Young children are more vulnerable to lead poisoning than adults because lead is absorbed more readily in a child's gastrointestinal tract. Our focus in this study was to determine the extent to which state mandated lead laws have helped decrease the number of new cases of elevated blood-lead levels (EBLL) in homes where an index case had been identified. A cross-sectional study was conducted to compare 682 residential addresses, identified between 2000 and 2009, in two states with and one state without laws to prevent childhood lead poisoning among children younger than 72 months, to determine whether the laws were effective in preventing subsequent cases of lead poisoning detected in residential addresses after the identification of an index case. In this study, childhood lead poisoning was defined as the blood lead level (BLL) that would have triggered an environmental investigation in the residence. The two states with lead laws, Massachusetts (MA) and Ohio (OH), had trigger levels of ≥25 μg/dL and ≥15 μg/dL respectively. In Mississippi (MS), the state without legislation, the trigger level was ≥15 μg/dL. The two states with lead laws, MA and OH, were 79% less likely than the one without legislation, MS, to have residential addresses with subsequent lead poisoning cases among children younger than 72 months, adjusted OR = 0.21, 95% CI (0.08-0.54). For the three states studied, the evidence suggests that lead laws such as those studied herein effectively reduced primary exposure to lead among young children living in residential addresses that may have had lead contaminants.

  14. Lead poisoning and chelation in a mother-neonate pair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, B Z; Mirkin, D B

    2001-01-01

    We report the case of a pregnant woman with chronic lead toxicity and a blood lead of 57 microg/dL (2.7 micromol/L) who gave birth to a healthy-appearing neonate with a cord blood lead of 126 microg/dL (6.08 micromol/L). The mother was prescribed a single course of oral succimer late in the third trimester of pregnancy, without any appreciable change in her blood lead. The neonate was initially treated with intramuscular dimercaprol and intravenous edetate calcium disodium. After 3 days, the neonate was then switched to oral 2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid because the blood lead had declined. The child received two 19-day courses of 2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid and had a blood lead level of 21.5 microg/dL (1.04 micromol/L) at 5 months of age. Despite extensive investigation, the precise source of the mother's lead toxicity remained undetermined.

  15. Lead Poisoning Caused by Traditional Chinese Medicine: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Guangmin; Tu, Xiang; Feng, Ping

    2017-10-01

    Traditional Chinese herbal medicine is widely used for primary health care worldwide as it mostly consists of herbs or herbal extracts known to be safe. However, owing to the intentional or unintentional addition to herbs of lead-containing bases or pastes, lead poisoning from traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) remains a serious issue. We report here a case of lead poisoning caused by long-term use of homemade TCM. A 66-year-old man was admitted for periumbilical pain and constipation. A detailed medication history revealed that the patient had been using homemade TCM for the past 8 months. Screening for heavy metals showed that the patient had a blood lead level of 657 μg/L and his wife, who was asymptomatic, had a blood lead level of 488 μg/L. Chemical analysis confirmed a lead concentration of more than 4,000 mg/kg in the TCM. Both individuals were advised to discontinue the medications and chelation treatment was immediately initiated for the husband. The patient's periumbilical pain was noticeably relieved after treatment, and blood lead levels returned to normal after three treatment rounds. We also review here the literature to summarize the usual reasons for taking TCM and common features of lead poisoning. Our findings suggest that potential exposure to lead from TCM treatment must be considered when diagnosing unexplained cases of abdominal colic in China. The Chinese health authority should speed up legislation to improve the regulatory framework of TCM, especially regarding small private clinics.

  16. Lead poisoning in dogs at the University of Pennsylvania Veterinary Hospital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalczyk, D.F.

    1976-03-01

    Twenty-seven dogs with lead poisoning were admitted to the University of Pennsylvania Veterinary Hospital from July, 1963, to April, 1975. The major source of the lead was paint. A common history was ingestion of plaster or paint scrapings during room renovation. Most of the dogs were less than 1 year old and had clinical signs referable to the gastrointestinal or the nervous system, or both. The gastrointestinal signs, in order of frequency, were vomiting, anorexia, tender abdomen, diarrhea, and constipation. The neurologic signs, in order of frequency, were hysteria, convulsions, ataxia, blindness, and mydriasis. The finding of many nucleated erythrocytes without severe anemia was nearly pathognomonic for lead poisoning. Of 14 affected dogs subjected to abdominal radiography, 9 had evidence of ingested radiopaque material. A mean blood lead concentration of 18.8 ..mu..g/100 ml, with a range of 0 to 50 ..mu..g/100 ml, was found for 26 dogs that were hospitalized for problems unrelated to lead poisoning. Of the 27 dogs with lead poisoning, 22 had their blood analyzed for lead. This group had blood lead values ranging from 40 to 530 ..mu..g/100 ml. Seven of the affected dogs were monitored throughout their period of treatment with calcium ethylene-diaminetetraacetate. The concentration of lead in the blood decreased quickly after the initiation and treatment but leveled off after 2 or 3 days. The initial rapid phase probably corresponded to the removal of weakly bound or extracellular lead, whereas the slow phase probably corresponded to strongly bound or intracellular lead. 22 references.

  17. The Surgeon General's Policy Statement on Medical Aspects of Childhood Lead Poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinfeld, Jesse L.

    This document is a policy statement written by the Bureau of Community Environmental Management and approved by the Surgeon General of the U.S. Public Health Service. Its purpose is to assist in the development and implementation of programs for the control of lead poisoning in children. Information included covers the medical aspects of…

  18. An exploratory analysis to determine priority areas for lead poisoning prevention education programs in Missouri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, Kaitlyn; Cummings, Madeline; Visker, Joseph; Cox, Carol

    2015-03-01

    Lead is a strong poison and toxic to many vital organs and body systems especially in the central nervous system of children, who are more vulnerable to lead poisoning than adults. The purpose of the study described in this article was to examine the relationship between elevated blood lead level (BLL) cases of children in the state of Missouri and pre-1980 home construction, lead mine proximity, and median household income and to determine counties and areas for statewide prevention education. Results of the regression analysis indicated that these combined variables were significant predictors (F[3,111] = 19.106, p lead cases. In addition to screening in identified counties, Missouri's statewide plan should expand to include prevention education in all low-income counties.

  19. [Change of T cell TCR-CD3 complex-mediated gene expression pattern in lead poisoning patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lin; Lin, Qiu-yue; Liu, Si-chu; Shen, Qi; Li, Bo; Zhou, Jing-dong; Yu, Wei; Liu, Wei-wei

    2013-03-01

    In order to study the feature of T cell TCR-CD3 complex-mediated gene in lead poisoning patients. Real-time PCR with SYBR Green I technique was used for determination of the expression levels of CD3 genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 46 cases lead poisoning patients (11 cases in observation group and 35 cases in mild lead poisoning group) and 31 cases in control group. The median expression levels of CD3γ gene in observation group and mild lead poisoning group (6.89%, 5.87 %) were higher than the control group (P lead poisoning group (0.54%, 0.70%) were lower than the control group (P lead poisoning group (10.22%, 6.08%) were higher than the control group (P lead poisoning patients. A significant negative correlation was found between CD3ε and blood ZPP, urea δ-ALA (r = -0.358, P lead, urea lead. The expression levels of CD3 genes prove to be a descending order of CD3γ, CD3ε, CD3δ in control group, while it was changed for CD3ε, CD3γ, CD3δ in the observation group as well as in mild lead poisoning group. Expression of T cell TCR-CD3 complex-mediated gene was changed in lead poisoning patients, it might be related to the body immunodeficiency. The expression level of CD3ε gene can be used as sensitive immune function screening indicator in Lead poisoning patients.

  20. 77 FR 64997 - Advisory Committee on Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... guidance to the Secretary; the Assistant Secretary for Health; and the Director, CDC, regarding new...; Federal agency updates; HUD Guidelines (Second Edition); Lead-based paint/hazards standard review; Spot...

  1. The cost of environmental lead (Pb) poisoning in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The pervasiveness of human health impacts and ecosystem effects of lead (Pb) is not controversial, but there are serious arguments about the pace at which Pb should be eliminated from consumer products. Presumably, these arguments can be resolved by converting costs and benefits of Pb use to similar units, ...

  2. Lead in housing paints: an exposure source still not taken seriously for children lead poisoning in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, G Z; Peng, R F; Chen, Q; Wu, Z G; Du, L

    2009-01-01

    After prohibitions on lead gasoline additives, which have proved to be a public health accomplishment world wide, many countries focus on other exposure source of children lead poisoning. Removing lead from paints is one of the important measures. Although there have been regulatory limits on lead in paints in China, evidence reported in this article indicates that lead-based paints were very common in new paints available for housing and in existing residential paints. Twenty-nine of 58 new paint samples (50%) had lead content equal to or exceeding 600 ppm, including 14 (24%) equal to or exceeding 5000 ppm. The highest sample contained 153,000 ppm lead, about 15% of the paint weight. Thirty-two new paints (55%) contained "soluble" lead exceeding 90 ppm, the current lead limit on paints in China. Of the existing paints, 16 of 28 samples of existing paint (57%) collected from 24 kindergartens and primary schools had lead concentrations equal to or exceeding 600 ppm, including six samples (21%) equal to or exceeding 5000 ppm. The highest concentration sample contained 51,800 ppm lead, accounting for 5.2% of the paint weight. It has been shown in many areas that paint lead is a major exposure source for lead poisoning in children. This is particularly true after the phasing out of lead from gasoline. Effective limitation on lead content in new paint, and lead hazard control measures directed towards existing paint, could reduce children blood lead levels (BLLs). There has been a lead standard for paints in China since 1986 and a stricter limit was introduced in recent years. Governments should take it seriously and enforce regulations, commit a long-term challenge to eliminate paint lead as it is the threat to current and the next generation.

  3. Lead and eagles: demographic and pathological characteristics of poisoning, and exposure levels associated with other causes of mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franson, J. Christian; Russell, Robin E.

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a retrospective analysis to evaluate demographic and pathologic characteristics in 484 bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) and 68 golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) diagnosed with lead poisoning at the U.S. Geological Survey National Wildlife Health Center. As part of our analysis, we compared characteristics of lead poisoned eagles with those that died of other causes. Odds of lead poisoning were greater for bald eagles versus golden eagles, females versus males, adults versus juveniles, and eagles from the Mississippi and Central flyways versus the Atlantic and Pacific flyways. In addition to spatial, species, and demographic associations, we detected a distinct temporal trend in the collection date of lead poisoned bald eagle carcasses. These carcasses were found at greater frequency in late autumn and winter than spring and summer. Lesions in lead poisoned birds included emaciation, evidence of bile stasis, myocardial degeneration and necrosis, and renal tubular nephrosis and necrosis. Ingested lead ammunition or fragments were found in 14.2 % of bald eagles and 11.8 % of golden eagles. The overall mean liver lead concentration (wet weight basis) for eagles diagnosed with lead poisoning was 28.9 ± 0.69 SE mg/kg in bald eagles and 19.4 ± 1.84 SE mg/kg in golden eagles. In eagles diagnosed with collision trauma, electrocution, poisoning (other than lead), emaciation, infectious disease, trapping death, other, and undetermined causes, average liver lead concentrations were low (lead exposure of eagles predisposed them to other causes of mortality.

  4. Lead and eagles: demographic and pathological characteristics of poisoning, and exposure levels associated with other causes of mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franson, J Christian; Russell, Robin E

    2014-11-01

    We conducted a retrospective analysis to evaluate demographic and pathologic characteristics in 484 bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) and 68 golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) diagnosed with lead poisoning at the U.S. Geological Survey National Wildlife Health Center. As part of our analysis, we compared characteristics of lead poisoned eagles with those that died of other causes. Odds of lead poisoning were greater for bald eagles versus golden eagles, females versus males, adults versus juveniles, and eagles from the Mississippi and Central flyways versus the Atlantic and Pacific flyways. In addition to spatial, species, and demographic associations, we detected a distinct temporal trend in the collection date of lead poisoned bald eagle carcasses. These carcasses were found at greater frequency in late autumn and winter than spring and summer. Lesions in lead poisoned birds included emaciation, evidence of bile stasis, myocardial degeneration and necrosis, and renal tubular nephrosis and necrosis. Ingested lead ammunition or fragments were found in 14.2% of bald eagles and 11.8% of golden eagles. The overall mean liver lead concentration (wet weight basis) for eagles diagnosed with lead poisoning was 28.9 ± 0.69 SE mg/kg in bald eagles and 19.4 ± 1.84 SE mg/kg in golden eagles. In eagles diagnosed with collision trauma, electrocution, poisoning (other than lead), emaciation, infectious disease, trapping death, other, and undetermined causes, average liver lead concentrations were low (lead exposure of eagles predisposed them to other causes of mortality.

  5. Ineffectiveness of acid-fast inclusions in diagnosis of lead poisoning in Canada geese

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Locke, L.N.; Bagley, G.E.; Young, L.T.

    1967-10-01

    Kidney tissues have been examined from Canada geese that succumbed to lead poisoning in two separate outbreaks. The frequency of occurrence of acid-fast intranuclear inclusions in these birds was quite low. In cases in which coccidiosis and lead poisoning both were involved, acid-fast inclusions were found in the kidneys of only one of three geese although all had significant levels of lead in the liver. Results from various cases indicated that Canada geese receiving a large exposure to lead may succumb without the formation of intranuclear acid-fast inclusions in the kidneys. It was concluded that a period of exposure of several days was required before the bird could respond by producing these inclusions. Definite diagnosis is based on a chemical analysis of the tissues. 1 table.

  6. Lead poisoning due to gunshot bullet in contact with cerebrospinal fluid: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madureira, Paulo Roberto de; De Capitani, Eduardo Mello; Vieira, Ronan José; Sakuma, Alice Momoyo; Toledo, Adriana Safioti; Mello, Suely Moreira

    2009-01-01

    Lead poisoning due to retained gunshot bullets is a well-known clinical problem that is fairly frequently described in the literature. The risk factors for this occurrence relate mainly to whether the lead bullet is in contact with the joint fluid or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The treatment for these cases entails chelation therapy while symptoms are shown and definitive surgical removal of the bullet as a potential source of lead. The aim of this paper is to describe a clinical case of lead poisoning due to a retained gunshot bullet in contact with CSF. A 42-year-old male was hit by gunshot bullets during a holdup, and one of them was retained in the spinal cord. Six years later, he developed intense low back pain and underwent laminectomy. Nine years later, he then underwent arthrodesis on L5-S1, but he developed intense abdominal pain after the surgical procedure. For five years, he was treated with calcium versenate in five-day cycles, with a good response. The chelation therapy cycles showed great efficacy during symptomatic periods, thus reducing the symptoms and signs of poisoning and promoting great amounts of lead excretion, thereby reducing the total lead burden responsible for the symptoms. Fortunately, over the last four years, the symptoms have improved and the urine levels of aminolevulinic acid (ALA) have declined, to reach complete normalization. This shows that a healing process is probably taking place on the spinal wound, thereby isolating the bullet fragments from CSF contact.

  7. [Relationship between XRCC3 gene polymorphism and susceptibility to lead poisoning in male lead-exposed workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiang-quan; Zhang, Zhong

    2013-06-01

    To investigate the relationship between genetic polymorphism of X-ray repair cross-complementing gene 3 (XRCC3) and susceptibility to lead poisoning in male lead-exposed workers. Peripheral venous blood and morning urine samples were collected from 326 male lead-exposed workers in a storage battery factory in Fuzhou. Blood lead, urine lead, blood zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP), blood calcium, and blood iron were measured. The genotype of XRCC3 was determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. The relationship between XRCC3 gene polymorphism and susceptibility to lead poisoning in male lead-exposed workers was analyzed. Genetic polymorphism of XRCC3 was seen in the 326 subjects. The frequency distribution of XRCC3 genotypes, XRCC3-241CC (wild type), XRCC3-241CT (heterozygous mutation), and XRCC3-241TT (homozygous mutation), was in accordance with the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (P > 0.05). There were no significant differences in urine lead, blood ZPP, blood calcium, and blood iron between the lead-exposed workers with different XRCC3 genotypes (P > 0.05). The workers with XRCC3-241CT/TT had a significantly higher mean blood lead level than those with XRCC3-241CC (P lead level of 1.90 µmol/L as the cutoff value, the chi-square test and logistic regression analysis showed that the proportion of workers with XRCC3-241CT/TT was significantly higher than that of workers with XRCC3-241CC in the subjects with high blood leads (P lead was significantly higher in the workers with XRCC3-241CT/TT than in those with XRCC3-241CC (OR = 2.34, 95%CI = 1.61 ∼ 5.13); the multivariate linear regression analysis showed that the workers with XRCC3-241CT/TT had high blood lead levels (β = 0.116, P lead absorption (β = 0.188, P lead absorption (β = -0.247, P lead levels (β = -0.145, P lead at workplace, the workers with XRCC3-241CT/TT have a significantly higher blood lead level than those with XRCC3-241CC, so the genotype of XRCC3-241CT

  8. Should all patients with unexplained anaemia be screened for chronic lead poisoning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawarammana, I B; Dargan, P I; Woodcock, S; Sculley, M; House, I M; Wood, D M; Jones, A L

    2006-11-01

    The global prevalence of lead poisoning is declining. However, the prevalence of lead poisoning in patients with either microcytic or normocytic anaemia is unknown. Blood samples from anaemic patients residing in south-east London without an obvious cause for anaemia had their blood lead concentration (BLC) analysed. A batch of 988 samples was analysed for BLC using atomic absorption spectroscopy. Median haemoglobin was 10.3 g/dL (range: 4.2-10.9) in females, 10.6 g/dL (range: 5.2-11.4) in males and 10.7 g/dL (range: 6.7-10.9) in children. Median BLC was 2.63 microg/dL (0.21-24.0 microg/dL; 95th centile 7.54 microg/dL). Fifteen samples (1.5%) had a BLC > 10.0 microg/dL, five samples (1%) > 15.0 microg/dL and one sample (0.1%) > 20.0 micrg/L. In the 106 children, median BLC was 2.34 microg/dL (0.5-14.5 microg/dL; 95th centile 6.12 microg/ dL). Only one child (14.5 microg/L) had a BLC > 10.0 pg/dL. There was a poor correlation between haemoglobin and BLC (r2 = 0.08). Routine screening for lead poisoning cannot be justified in all patients with unexplained anaemia, unless there is a history or clinical features to suggest lead toxicity. Additionally, we have shown that in this former high-risk area for lead exposure, there is a low point prevalence of significant lead poisoning, even in an anaemic population.

  9. NWHL Final Report 1983-84 Lead Poisoning Monitoring Program Upper Mississippi River National Fish and Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Exposure of waterfowl to lead vas detected at the Potters Marsh Unit of the Upper Mississippi National Wildlife Refuge during the 1983-84 Lead Poisoning Monitoring...

  10. Childhood lead poisoning data for California by county, age, and blood lead level for the years 2007-2009; and age of housing data for 2000.

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Environmental Health Tracking Program — This dataset contains counts and percentages of blood lead levels among children tested for lead poisoning during 2007-2009 within California . The data are...

  11. Long-term lead elimination from plasma and whole blood after poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentschler, Gerda; Broberg, K; Lundh, T; Skerfving, S

    2012-04-01

    Blood lead (B-Pb), one of the most used toxicological biomarker all kind, has serious limitations. Thus, the objective is to evaluate whether plasma lead (P-Pb) is more adequate. A long-term follow-up study of five cases of lead poisoning. P-Pb was analysed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Kinetics after end of exposure was modelled. P-Pb at severe poisoning was about 20 μg/L; haematological effects at about 5 μg/L. Biological half-time of P-Pb was about 1 month; B-Pb decay was much slower. P-Pb is a valuable biomarker of exposure to and risk, particularly at high exposure.

  12. A clinical study of the effects of lead poisoning on the intelligence and neurobehavioral abilities of children

    OpenAIRE

    Hou,Shuangxing; Yuan, Lianfang; Jin, Pengpeng; Ding, Bojun; Qin, Na; Li, Li; Liu, Xuedong; Wu, Zhongliang; Zhao, Gang; Deng, Yanchun

    2013-01-01

    Background Lead is a heavy metal and important environmental toxicant and nerve poison that can destruction many functions of the nervous system. Lead poisoning is a medical condition caused by increased levels of lead in the body. Lead interferes with a variety of body processes and is toxic to many organs and issues, including the central nervous system. It interferes with the development of the nervous system, and is therefore particularly toxic to children, causing potentially permanent n...

  13. Using the current Brazilian value for the biological exposure limit applied to blood lead level as a lead poisoning diagnostic criterion

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    Cordeiro Ricardo

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available In general, biological exposure limits are only used for the promotion and preservation of workers' health and are not applied for diagnostic purposes. However, the issue is controversial for certain types of occupational poisoning. This paper proposes the utilization of biological exposure limits currently applied to blood lead levels in Brazil as an important criterion for diagnosing occupational lead poisoning. The author argues that contrary to the traditional clinical criterion, one should deal with the diagnostic problem of lead poisoning from an epidemiological perspective, using the current Brazilian value for the biological exposure limit applied to blood lead level as an indicator of high relative risk.

  14. Using the current Brazilian value for the biological exposure limit applied to blood lead level as a lead poisoning diagnostic criterion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Cordeiro

    Full Text Available In general, biological exposure limits are only used for the promotion and preservation of workers' health and are not applied for diagnostic purposes. However, the issue is controversial for certain types of occupational poisoning. This paper proposes the utilization of biological exposure limits currently applied to blood lead levels in Brazil as an important criterion for diagnosing occupational lead poisoning. The author argues that contrary to the traditional clinical criterion, one should deal with the diagnostic problem of lead poisoning from an epidemiological perspective, using the current Brazilian value for the biological exposure limit applied to blood lead level as an indicator of high relative risk.

  15. The Effect of Humic Acid Substances on the Thyroid Function and Structure in Lead Poisoning

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    A Sahin

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Lead (Pb is a heavy metal, which adversely affects thyroid gland function and structure. Due to its high molecular weight and abundant functional groups, humic acid substances (HAS can form chelates with heavy metals. The experiment was conducted to evaluate the prophylactic effect of HAS on thyroid hormone levels and histopathological lesions of laying hens exposed to lead (Pb poisoning. After a week of adaptation, 192 Lohmann White laying hens (25 weeks of age were fed one of four diets: a basal diet (BD or the BD with HAS (0.15%, with Pb (0.3 g/kg, or with both. Experimental groups were replicated in 12 cages, with four hens each. Pb poisoning did not alter triiodothyronine (FT3; 3.22 ± 0.20 ng/dL or thyroxine (FT4; 0.71 ± 0.08 ng/dL concentrations, but caused a 167% increase in thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH concentration. HAS supplementation returned the high TSH levels of hens exposed to Pb poisoning to normal values. Degenerative changes in the epithelial cells of the thyroid gland of the hens exposed to Pb poisoning were evidenced. Connective tissue cells in the interfollicular area and total amount of colloids with partially atrophic follicles were observed. These histopathological findings were less severe when HAS was added to the diet. In conclusion, HAS alleviates the effects of Pb poisoning on thyroid gland function and structure, possibly preventing its internalization by the tissue by forming chelates and exerting anti-inflammatory effects.

  16. Lead poisoning in the globally threatened marbled teal and white-headed duck in Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Mateo, Rafael; Green, Andy J; Jeske, Clinton W.; Urios, Vicente; Gerique, Cati

    2001-01-01

    Marbled teal (Marmaronetta angustirostris) and white-headed duck (Oxyura leucocephala) are the two European ducks threatened with global extinction. We investigated lead (Pb) poisoning in stifftails (Oxyura spp., n = 83) and marbled teal (n = 80) shot or found dead or moribund in Spanish wetlands via gizzard examination and liver, bone, and blood Pb analysis. Ingested Pb shot was present in 32% of shot stifftails and 70 and 43% of dead or moribund stifftails and marbled teal,...

  17. Highlights of the Midwest and Eastern Regional Conferences on Childhood Lead Poisoning; Chicago, Illinois, May 10-11, 1972 and Wilmington, Delaware, June 2-3, 1972.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Edward B., Ed.; Challop, Roger S., Ed.

    Various aspects of lead poisoning and its control are the focus of this document which consists of edited speeches presented at childhood lead poisoning conferences in Wilmington, Delaware and Chicago, Illinois. Among the topics discussed are a) the role of Federal and State governments in lead poison control; b) the local government role,…

  18. Lead, mercury, and arsenic poisoning due to topical use of traditional Chinese medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ming-Ling; Deng, Jou-Fang; Lin, Kon-Ping; Tsai, Wei-Jen

    2013-05-01

    Metal poisonings through a mucocutaneous route are reported rarely in the literature. We report 2 cases of heavy metal intoxication from inappropriate use of Chinese mineral medicines confirmed by toxicologic investigations. A 51-year-old man developed perianal gangrene and a high fever after a 2-week anal use of hong-dan herbal mixtures for anal fistula. He presented gastrointestinal and constitutional symptoms, followed by skin rash, anemia, hair loss, peripheral neuropathy, and muscle atrophy. Elevated urine arsenic and mercury confirmed the heavy metal poisonings. The hong-dan mixture contained lead tetraoxide, arsenic, and mercury. He was treated with 2,3-dimercapto-1-propanesulfonic acid, with partial improvement, but peripheral neuropathy persists 4 years later. A 75-year-old man developed anorexia, weight loss, headache, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, constipation, weakness, and anemia after a 3-month use of an herbal patch for chronic leg ulcer. His blood lead concentration was 226 μg/dL, and the lead content of the herbal patch was 517 mg/g. Chelation with ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid and dimercaptosuccinic acid was followed by clinical recovery. These cases documented serious systemic poisoning after the short-term use of traditional Chinese medicines containing heavy metals in damaged or infected tissue. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Environmental lead poisoning among children in Porto Alegre state, Southern Brazil

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    Mariana Maleronka Ferron

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence of lead poisoning in children and to identify associated factors, as well as possible local sources of contamination. METHODS: A cross-sectional prevalence study conducted in 2006 with a random sample of 97 children age zero to five years from a neighborhood in Porto Alegre, Southern Brazil. Blood lead levels were measured and a questionnaire administered to collect information on sociodemographics, recycling and dwelling. A preliminary environmental evaluation was carried out with direct analysis of soil and indirect analysis of air pollution with bioindicators to identify possible sources of contamination. To analyze lead concentrations from the different collection sites, for each type of material studied, ANOVA was performed with a Brown-Forsythe adjustment for heteroscedasticity and with Dunnett's T3 procedure for multiple comparisons of unequal variances. RESULTS: Blood lead levels > 10.0 µg/dL was found in 16.5% of children. Recycling of waste at home, low father's education level, and increased age of children were associated with increase blood lead levels. High lead levels were found in soil, and there was little indication of lead air pollution. CONCLUSIONS: A high prevalence of lead poisoning was identified, and the potential sources of contamination in this community appear related to waste recylcing activities. Studies should be conducted with other populations of Brazilian children and evaluate potential sources of local and general contamination, to accurately characterize this issue in Brazil.

  20. Environmental lead poisoning among children in Porto Alegre state, Southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferron, Mariana Maleronka; Lima, André Klafke de; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento; Gouveia, Nelson

    2012-04-01

    To estimate the prevalence of lead poisoning in children and to identify associated factors, as well as possible local sources of contamination. A cross-sectional prevalence study conducted in 2006 with a random sample of 97 children age zero to five years from a neighborhood in Porto Alegre, Southern Brazil. Blood lead levels were measured and a questionnaire administered to collect information on sociodemographics, recycling and dwelling. A preliminary environmental evaluation was carried out with direct analysis of soil and indirect analysis of air pollution with bioindicators to identify possible sources of contamination. To analyze lead concentrations from the different collection sites, for each type of material studied, ANOVA was performed with a Brown-Forsythe adjustment for heteroscedasticity and with Dunnett's T3 procedure for multiple comparisons of unequal variances. Blood lead levels > 10.0 µg/dL was found in 16.5% of children. Recycling of waste at home, low father's education level, and increased age of children were associated with increase blood lead levels. High lead levels were found in soil, and there was little indication of lead air pollution. A high prevalence of lead poisoning was identified, and the potential sources of contamination in this community appear related to waste recylcing activities. Studies should be conducted with other populations of Brazilian children and evaluate potential sources of local and general contamination, to accurately characterize this issue in Brazil.

  1. Acute lead poisoning in western Canadian cattle — A 16-year retrospective study of diagnostic case records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Vanessa; Blakley, Barry

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the epidemiology of acute lead poisoning in western Canadian cattle over the 16-year period of 1998 to 2013 and reports background bovine tissue lead concentrations. Case records from Prairie Diagnostic Services, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, identified 525 cases of acute lead toxicity over the investigational period. Poisonings were influenced by year (P poisoned (53.5%; P poisoned. Mean toxic lead concentrations (mg/kg wet weight) in the blood, liver, and kidney were 1.30 ± 1.70 (n = 301), 33.5 ± 80.5 (n = 172), and 56.3 ± 39.7 (n = 61). Mean normal lead concentrations in the blood, liver, and kidney were 0.036 ± 0.003 mg/kg (n= 1081), 0.16 ± 0.63 mg/kg (n = 382), and 0.41 ± 0.62 mg/kg (n = 64). PMID:27041761

  2. Lead poisoning among opium users in Iran: an emerging health hazard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayatbakhsh, Mohammad Mahdi; Oghabian, Zohreh; Conlon, Elvira; Nakhaee, Samaneh; Amirabadizadeh, Ali Reza; Zahedi, Mohammad Javad; Darvish Moghadam, Sodief; Ahmadi, Bighan; Soroush, Somayeh; Aaseth, Jan; Mehrpour, Omid

    2017-10-05

    Lead (Pb) poisoning among people using opium has been an increasing problem in Iran. The present study highlights the clinical effects of lead toxicity associated with opium use in Iran, Kerman province. Between January 2016 and June 2016, patients with signs and symptoms of Pb poisoning were questioned to assess whether they had a history of opium dependency. In total, 249 patients were enrolled onto this cross-sectional study, all were opium dependent. Para-clinical data including blood lead level (BLL), demographic information, user preferences, and symptoms were obtained. The patients used either opium (83.9%), refined opium (6.4%) or a combination of both (9.7%) via ingestion (71.9%), smoking (8.4%) or a combination of both (19.7%). The overall median BLL was 80.0 μg/dL [IQR: 51.7-119.0]. The median BLL did not differ significantly between opium and refined opium users. Further, BLL was not significantly affected by the type of substance, route of use, duration of use, or daily quantity consumed. Common symptoms included abdominal pain (86.9%), constipation (75.8%), anorexia (71.5%) and nausea (54.7%). Linear regression analysis showed log of BLL was significantly associated with abdominal pain, myalgia and anorexia. The study unravelled an increase in opium-related Pb poisoning in the Kerman province. Raised awareness of this emerging Pb source and investigation of its aetiology is recommended. Pb poisoning should be considered among the primary differential diagnosis of opium users with gastrointestinal symptoms.

  3. Environmental Remediation to Address Childhood Lead Poisoning Epidemic due to Artisanal Gold Mining in Zamfara, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirima, Simba; Bartrem, Casey; von Lindern, Ian; von Braun, Margrit; Lind, Douglas; Anka, Shehu Mohammed; Abdullahi, Aishat

    2016-09-01

    From 2010 through 2013, integrated health and environmental responses addressed an unprecedented epidemic lead poisoning in Zamfara State, northern Nigeria. Artisanal gold mining caused widespread contamination resulting in the deaths of > 400 children. Socioeconomic, logistic, and security challenges required remediation and medical protocols within the context of local resources, labor practices, and cultural traditions. Our aim was to implement emergency environmental remediation to abate exposures to 17,000 lead poisoned villagers, to facilitate chelation treatment of children ≤ 5 years old, and to establish local technical capacity and lead health advocacy programs to prevent future disasters. U.S. hazardous waste removal protocols were modified to accommodate local agricultural practices. Remediation was conducted over 4 years in three phases, progressing from an emergency response by international personnel to comprehensive cleanup funded and accomplished by the Nigerian government. More than 27,000 m3 of contaminated soils and mining waste were removed from 820 residences and ore processing areas in eight villages, largely by hand labor, and disposed in constructed landfills. Excavated areas were capped with clean soils (≤ 25 mg/kg lead), decreasing soil lead concentrations by 89%, and 2,349 children received chelation treatment. Pre-chelation geometric mean blood lead levels for children ≤ 5 years old decreased from 149 μg/dL to 15 μg/dL over the 4-year remedial program. The unprecedented outbreak and response demonstrate that, given sufficient political will and modest investment, the world's most challenging environmental health crises can be addressed by adapting proven response protocols to the capabilities of host countries. Tirima S, Bartrem C, von Lindern I, von Braun M, Lind D, Anka SM, Abdullahi A. 2016. Environmental remediation to address childhood lead poisoning epidemic due to artisanal gold mining in Zamfara, Nigeria. Environ Health

  4. Lead poisoning due to hai ge fen. The porphyrin content of individual erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowitz, S B; Nunez, C M; Klitzman, S; Munshi, A A; Kim, W S; Eisinger, J; Landrigan, P J

    A 45-year-old Korean man developed abdominal colic, muscle pain, and fatigue. Following a 3-week hospitalization, acute intermittent porphyria was diagnosed based on the symptoms and a high level of urinary delta-aminolevulinic acid (378 mumol/L [4.95 mg/dL]). However, discovery of an elevated blood lead level (3.7 mumol/L [76 micrograms/dL]) subsequently led to the correct diagnosis. No occupational source of lead exposure was identified. The patient reported ingesting a Chinese herbal preparation for 4 weeks prior to becoming ill. A public health investigation revealed that the source of lead exposure was hai ge fen (clamshell powder), one of the 36 ingredients of the Chinese herbal medicine. We used fluorescence image-based cytometry to determine the frequency distribution of the zinc protoporphyrin content in circulating red blood cells and found that 70% of the patient's cells contained elevated levels of zinc protoporphyrin, consistent with the duration of lead exposure and effect of lead on heme synthesis. Analysis of zinc protoporphyrin content in circulating red blood cell distributions may be useful in the diagnosis, therapy, and kinetic modeling of lead poisoning. Environmental lead poisoning is best addressed through the close collaboration of clinicians, public health specialists, and laboratory scientists.

  5. Follow-up of children suffering from lead poisoning or at risk of lead poisoning in Greater Paris, 1992--2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollin, L; Carré, N; Garnier, R

    2008-12-01

    It is essential for children suffering from or at risk of lead poisoning to have regular follow-up, and specifically for their blood lead (Pb) levels to be monitored. The present study assessed the occurrence of late follow-up testing of blood lead levels in children in Greater Paris, and factors related to such delays. Since 1992, the SSSIILF has been systematically recording data on lead levels in blood tests conducted for screening and follow-up in Greater Paris. For Pb greater or equal to 45 microg/dL (Group 4), a further blood lead test has to be done within three weeks. For levels of 25 microg/dL poisoning), a second test is required within 6 to 12 months. Children aged 1 to 6 years who were screened between 1992 and 2002 were selected. The occurrence of late follow-up testing was estimated, and the independent effect of each variable associated with a delay was measured using a logistic regression model. Delays in re-testing were reported for 66.9% of Group 4 children (n=356), 45.3% of Group 3 children (n=921), 74.1% of Group 2 children (n=5,466), and 88.7% of Group 1 children (n=15,612). In the three groups with Pb greater or equal to 10 microg/dL, there was better follow-up (i.e. less delay to re-testing) for children screened most recently, those whose initial blood lead test results were elevated, those who lived in sub-standard housing built before 1949, and those who lived in suburban districts of Paris. The delay was longer for children aged 4 to 6 compared to younger children. When the size of the group was large enough, these differences were significant. In Group 1, similar results were observed except for a home address in a suburban district. Furthermore, follow-up was better for children of Sub-Saharan African parents, children whose initial prescription had been issued by a "PMI" mother/child healthcare centre and children from large families. Despite substantial delays in carrying out follow-up blood lead level testing, these delays were

  6. Utility of Different Electrocardiographical Leads during Diagnostic Ajmaline Test for Suspected Brugada Syndrome

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    Batchvarov V. N.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to compare the value of different leads and lead combinations to detect the signature Brugada type ECG pattern, we analysed digital 10-second, 15-lead ECGs (12 standard leads + leads V1 to V3 from 3rd intercostal (i.c. space, V1h to V3h acquired during diagnostic Ajmaline testing in 128 patients (80 men, age 37±15 years with suspected Brugada syndrome (BS (patient group, 15-lead resting ECGs of 108 healthy subjects (53 men, age 31.9±10.5 years (control group A and standard 12-lead resting ECGs of 229 healthy subjects (111 men, age 33±4 years (control group B. Bipolar leads between V2 (positive pole and V4 or V5 (leads V2-4V2-5 were derived by subtracting leads V4 and V5 from V2 (custom-made program. The 6 peripheral, 6 right precordial leads (V1 to V3, V1h to V3h and leads V2-4 and V2-5 of the patients group, leads V1h to V3h of control group A, and leads V2-4 and V2-5 of control group B were analysed for the presence of type 1 Brugada pattern. There were 21 (16.4% positive and 107 (83.6% negative Ajmaline tests. In 7 positive tests (33%, type 1 pattern appeared only in leads V1h to V3h, whereas in 14 tests 67% it appeared in both V1 to V3 and V1h to V3h. Lead V2 displayed type 1 pattern during 10 positive tests; in all of them, plus 10 other positive tests type 1 was also noted in lead V2h (n=20, 95.2%. In all 10 cases, in which lead V2 exhibited type 1 pattern (n=10, lead V2-4 and/or V2-5 also exhibited type 1-like pattern. During 7 positive tests, in which lead V2h but not V2 exhibited type 1 pattern, lead V2-4 and/or V2-5 also demonstrated type 1 pattern. Type 1 pattern was observed in leads V3 and V3h during 1 (5% and 5 (24% positive tests, in 0 ECGs (0% in control group A and in 1 ECG (0.4% in control group B. In conclusion, the "high" V1 and V2 leads (3rd i.c. space detect more sensitively Brugada type 1 pattern than the standard V1 and V2 leads (4th i.c. space; leads V3 and V3h are not essential for the diagnosis of BS

  7. Occupational lead poisoning in workers of traditional tile factories in Mashhad, Northeast of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balali-Mood, M; Shademanfar, S; Rastegar Moghadam, J; Afshari, R; Namaei Ghassemi, M; Allah Nemati, H; Keramati, M R; Neghabian, J; Balali-Mood, B; Zare, G

    2010-01-01

    Occupational lead poisoning is a health problem in Iran. It has not previously been studied in traditional tile makers. To determine the prevalence of lead poisoning and its complications in traditional tile workers in Mashhad, Northwest of Iran. We visited workers in two traditional tile factories and collected data by direct history taking and physical examination. Blood and urine lead concentrations were measured by heated graphite atomization technique. Overall, 108 men with mean±SD age of 37±7.8 years were studied. The mean±SD length of daily lead exposure was 9.8±6 years. The mean±SD blood lead concentration was 520.5±323.2 μg/L. The main objective clinical findings were the presence of lead line (64.8%), peripheral neuropathy of the upper extremities (37%), depressed deep tendon reflexes in the upper extremities (25.7%), tremor (23.3%), peripheral neuropathy of the lower extremities (17%) and abdominal tenderness (15.1%). The subjective findings were mainly attributed to the central nervous system and included loss of memory (57%), moodiness (56.1%), agitation (47.7%), drowsiness (36.4%) and headache (29.9%). There was no statistically significant correlation between the blood lead concentration and glomerular filtration rate. However, there were significant correlations between the blood lead concentration and each of the urine lead concentration (p<0.001), diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.04), serum triglyceride level (p = 0.043), high density lipoprotein level (p = 0.012), and basophilic stippling (p = 0.048). Blood lead level, however, did not have any significant correlation with the presence of lead line. In traditional tile workers, lead toxicity is not uncommon and the toxic effects of lead were found more often on the teeth (bone), central and peripheral nervous system, hematological and lipid profiles than on the renal function.

  8. Lead poisoning due to gunshot bullet in contact with cerebrospinal fluid: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto de Madureira

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Lead poisoning due to retained gunshot bullets is a well-known clinical problem that is fairly frequently described in the literature. The risk factors for this occurrence relate mainly to whether the lead bullet is in contact with the joint fluid or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. The treatment for these cases entails chelation therapy while symptoms are shown and definitive surgical removal of the bullet as a potential source of lead. The aim of this paper is to describe a clinical case of lead poisoning due to a retained gunshot bullet in contact with CSF. CASE REPORT: A 42-year-old male was hit by gunshot bullets during a holdup, and one of them was retained in the spinal cord. Six years later, he developed intense low back pain and underwent laminectomy. Nine years later, he then underwent arthrodesis on L5-S1, but he developed intense abdominal pain after the surgical procedure. For five years, he was treated with calcium versenate in five-day cycles, with a good response. The chelation therapy cycles showed great efficacy during symptomatic periods, thus reducing the symptoms and signs of poisoning and promoting great amounts of lead excretion, thereby reducing the total lead burden responsible for the symptoms. Fortunately, over the last four years, the symptoms have improved and the urine levels of aminolevulinic acid (ALA have declined, to reach complete normalization. This shows that a healing process is probably taking place on the spinal wound, thereby isolating the bullet fragments from CSF contact.

  9. [Brief history of lead poisoning: from Egyptian civilization to the Renaissance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles-Osorio, María Ludivina; Sabath, Ernesto

    2014-01-01

    The exposition to lead in the Antiquity is one of the first environmental health risks in the history of the mankind. In the ancient cultures of Egypt, Crete and Sumer there was no reports of an important exposition to this metal. The first clinical data is described in the Corpus Hipocraticcus, however was Nicandrus of Colophon the first to make a thorough description of the clinical manifestations of this disease. There was an increase in the exposition to this metal in times of the Roman empire and even some researchers propose that Julius Cesar and Octavio had clinical manifestations associated with lead poisoning. Paul of Aegina in the 7th century (a.C.) describes the first epidemic associated with lead intoxication, however in the Middle Ages the use of lead decrease until the Renaissance period in which lead poisoning affects mostly painters, metal-smithers and miners. Some studies done in the ice-layers of Greenland showed that the environmental pollution by lead during the Roman empire and the Renaissance was important.

  10. Lead poisoning among Arab American and African American children in the Detroit metropolitan area, Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nriagu, Jerome; Senthamarai-Kannan, Raghavendra; Jamil, Hikmet; Fakhori, Monty; Korponic, Summer

    2011-09-01

    This study explored the hypothesis that acculturation is a risk factor for childhood lead poisoning in the Detroit area of Michigan. Blood lead levels (BLLs) were determined in 429 Arab American and African American children, aged 6 months to 15 years, who were receiving well-child examination in three Women, Infant, and Children (WIC) clinics in the city. Mean BLL was 3.8 ± 2.3 μg/dL (range: 1-18 μg/dL) and 3.3% of the children tested had blood lead values above the 10 μg/dL level of concern. Neither the age of the dwelling units nor ethnicity of the child was significantly associated with the BLL. Multivariable analyses instead identified a number of acculturation-related factors that are associated with elevation in blood lead including paternal education, language spoken at home (English only, English and Arabic, or Arabic only), home ownership, smoking in the home, and exposure of child to home health remedies. The difference in blood lead between Arab American children from families where Arabic only versus Arabic and English is spoken at home was found to be statistically significant. This study provides information showing that immigrant children are at heightened risk of being poisoned by lead which can be useful in identifying groups at risk of atypical exposures.

  11. Lead poisoning in United States-bound refugee children: Thailand-Burma border, 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Tarissa; Jentes, Emily; Ortega, Luis; Scalia Sucosky, Marissa; Jefferies, Taran; Bajcevic, Predrag; Parr, Valentina; Jones, Warren; Brown, Mary Jean; Painter, John

    2012-02-01

    Elevated blood lead levels lead to permanent neurocognitive sequelae in children. Resettled refugee children in the United States are considered at high risk for elevated blood lead levels, but the prevalence of and risk factors for elevated blood lead levels before resettlement have not been described. Blood samples from children aged 6 months to 14 years from refugee camps in Thailand were tested for lead and hemoglobin. Sixty-seven children with elevated blood lead levels (venous ≥10 µg/dL) or undetectable (capillary lead levels participated in a case-control study. Of 642 children, 33 (5.1%) had elevated blood lead levels. Children aged lead levels risk factors included hemoglobin lead levels among tested US-bound Burmese refugee children was higher than the current US prevalence, and was especially high among children lead levels. A population-specific understanding of preexisting lead exposures can enhance postarrival lead-poisoning prevention efforts, based on Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommendations for resettled refugee children, and can lead to remediation efforts overseas.

  12. [A Case of Lead Poisoning with Drug-induced Liver Injury after Ingestion of Herbal Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Gi Jung; Park, Jong Ha; Kim, Min Sung; Yu, Jong Won; Park, Jae Hyun; Kim, Min Sik

    2015-06-01

    A 61-year-old male patient was admitted because of unexplained abdominal pain and anemia. His past medical history was unremarkable except for having taken herbal medicine to treat facial palsy two months ago. The result of health examination performed about a month ago showed increased serum aspartate and alanine aminotransferase level, and he was diagnosed with toxic hepatitis by herbal medicine. When the patient presented to the outpatient department three weeks ago, follow-up liver function test results showed improvement but he complained of abdominal pain. Despite extensive blood chemistry tests and computed tomography, the cause of pain could not be found. After much deliberation, serum lead level and herbal medicines analysis was performed based on the fact that he took herbal medicine two months ago, and he could finally be diagnosed with lead poisoning. Since the serum lead level was high enough to be indicated for lead chelating therapy, conservative management was given. When a patient with toxic hepatitis due to herbal medication presents with abdominal pain, the possibility of lead poisoning should always be taken into consideration.

  13. Lead poisoning and asthma among low-income and African American children in Saginaw, Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh Smith, Pamela; Nriagu, Jerome O

    2011-01-01

    We sought to ascertain whether asthmatic children are more likely to have elevated blood lead levels (EBLLs), BLLs ≥ 10 μg/dL, than non-asthmatic children. Household risk factors associated with both lead and asthma were examined. We undertook a cross-sectional study involving children residing in mainly low-income and minority households in Michigan which were identified by the Statewide Systemic Tracking of Elevated Lead Levels and Remediation database (STELLAR) (n=356 children). Of the 356 index children, 19% had EBLLs and 15% were doctor-diagnosed asthmatic. After adjusting for confounders known to be related to lead poisoning and/or asthma, association remained between asthmatic children and EBLL children (AOR: 5.17; 95% CI (1.25-21.37)). The results of our study show that asthmatic children are over 5 times more likely to have EBLLs than non-asthmatics (AOR: 5.17; 95% CI (1.25-21.37)). Intervention strategies designed to address lead poisoning prevention may be effective in reducing incidence of asthma. Further study is required. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Retrospective Investigation of a Lead Poisoning Outbreak from the Consumption of an Ayurvedic Medicine: Durban, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Mathee

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Ayurvedic medicines have been gaining in popularity around the world in recent decades, but have also been associated with lead contamination and poisoning. In 2012 in Durban, South Africa, a lead poisoning outbreak among adolescents was associated with the consumption of an Ayurvedic medicine for the treatment of skin conditions. In 2014 eight individuals (out of 12 affected were traced and interviewed. Questionnaires were administered; blood samples were taken for lead content analysis; and medical records were reviewed. Samples of the implicated medicines were analyzed to determine lead levels. Blood lead levels during the acute phase ranged from 34 to 116 µg/dL; and during the current study (two years later from 13 to 34 µg/dL. The implicated lead capsules had a lead content of 125,235 µg/g. Participants suffered a wide range of non-specific ill health symptoms; and there was a significant delay in the diagnosis of lead poisoning. This study highlights the potential for lead poisoning outbreaks from the consumption of Ayurvedic medicines in African settings. There were weaknesses with regard to the diagnosis of and response to the outbreak, for which measures need to be put in place to ensure greater awareness of the role of Ayurvedic medicine in lead poisoning, and prompt diagnosis and treatment of future cases.

  15. Retrospective Investigation of a Lead Poisoning Outbreak from the Consumption of an Ayurvedic Medicine: Durban, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathee, Angela; Naicker, Nisha; Teare, June

    2015-07-10

    Ayurvedic medicines have been gaining in popularity around the world in recent decades, but have also been associated with lead contamination and poisoning. In 2012 in Durban, South Africa, a lead poisoning outbreak among adolescents was associated with the consumption of an Ayurvedic medicine for the treatment of skin conditions. In 2014 eight individuals (out of 12 affected) were traced and interviewed. Questionnaires were administered; blood samples were taken for lead content analysis; and medical records were reviewed. Samples of the implicated medicines were analyzed to determine lead levels. Blood lead levels during the acute phase ranged from 34 to 116 µg/dL; and during the current study (two years later) from 13 to 34 µg/dL. The implicated lead capsules had a lead content of 125,235 µg/g. Participants suffered a wide range of non-specific ill health symptoms; and there was a significant delay in the diagnosis of lead poisoning. This study highlights the potential for lead poisoning outbreaks from the consumption of Ayurvedic medicines in African settings. There were weaknesses with regard to the diagnosis of and response to the outbreak, for which measures need to be put in place to ensure greater awareness of the role of Ayurvedic medicine in lead poisoning, and prompt diagnosis and treatment of future cases.

  16. The influence of environmental conditions on lead transfer from spent gunshot to sediments and water: Other routes for Pb poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binkowski, Łukasz J

    2017-11-01

    Lead (Pb) from spent gunshot and fishing sinkers is recognized as the main source of Pb poisoning among waterfowl. It is also suspected to directly pollute water and sediments, but no appropriate, comprehensive evaluation of this issue has so far been carried out. An experiment on Pb pellets in microcosms (n = 160) with two sediment types (mud and gravel), three water pH values (4, 7 and 9) and two wind levels (wind and windless simulation) was therefore run. Substantial differences in Pb transfer (measured with ICP-OES) between sediment types and pH levels of water were observed. Simulated wind conditions were a significant factor only for some variables and circumstances. The strongest Pb deposit to water and sediments occurred in mud microcosms with water of pH value of 4. Median pellet erosion during the experiment differed little between sediment types. The experiment revealed that Pb transfer from spent gunshot to the environment occurs only in specific environmental conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A clinical study of the effects of lead poisoning on the intelligence and neurobehavioral abilities of children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Shuangxing; Yuan, Lianfang; Jin, Pengpeng; Ding, Bojun; Qin, Na; Li, Li; Liu, Xuedong; Wu, Zhongliang; Zhao, Gang; Deng, Yanchun

    2013-02-18

    Lead is a heavy metal and important environmental toxicant and nerve poison that can destruction many functions of the nervous system. Lead poisoning is a medical condition caused by increased levels of lead in the body. Lead interferes with a variety of body processes and is toxic to many organs and issues, including the central nervous system. It interferes with the development of the nervous system, and is therefore particularly toxic to children, causing potentially permanent neural and cognitive impairments. In this study, we investigated the relationship between lead poisoning and the intellectual and neurobehavioral capabilities of children. The background characteristics of the research subjects were collected by questionnaire survey. Blood lead levels were detected by differential potentiometric stripping analysis (DPSA). Intelligence was assessed using the Gesell Developmental Scale. The Achenbach Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) was used to evaluate each child's behavior. Blood lead levels were significantly negatively correlated with the developmental quotients of adaptive behavior, gross motor performance, fine motor performance, language development, and individual social behavior (P lead poisoning had abnormal behaviors, especially social withdrawal, depression, and atypical body movements, aggressions and destruction. Lead poisoning has adverse effects on the behavior and mental development of 2-4-year-old children, prescribing positive and effective precautionary measures.

  18. Lead poisoning in a 16-year-old girl: a case report and a review of the literature (CARE compliant).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mărginean, Cristina Oana; Meliţ, Lorena Elena; Moldovan, Horaţiu; Lupu, Vasile Valeriu; Mărginean, Maria Oana

    2016-09-01

    Lead is a toxic element of the environment which leads to major complications once it enters the blood stream, affecting multiple organs and systems of the body. We present the case of a 16-year-old girl, diagnosed with lead poisoning after occupational exposure due to the fact that the girl was actively involved in the family's pottery business.History revealed that the girl participated in the process of pottery, her father was also diagnosed with lead poisoning 2 years before. The patient's personal history underlined that approximately 1 year ago she presented with severe abdominal pain, being diagnosed with acute appendicitis and she underwent appendectomy, but the pain persisted, thus due to family history of lead poisoning, the suspicion of saturnine colic rose, and she was diagnosed with lead poisoning. The main symptoms and signs were severe abdominal pain, vomiting, and arterial hypertension. The clinical evolution was favorable under symptomatic treatment and chelation therapy. Lead toxicity is a life-threatening condition because of its severe acute and chronic complications. In children, there is no safe blood lead level, prevention methods are, therefore, very important in order to avoid toxic multiorganic effects of this metal. Even though the diagnosis of lead poisoning remains difficult in children, it must also be taken into consideration by the clinician facing a child with gastrointestinal or neurological involvement.

  19. Association between Polymorphism of Exportin-5 and Susceptibility to Lead Poisoning in a Chinese Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hengdong; Xu, Ming; Zhao, Qiuni; Sun, Kai; Gong, Wei; Zhang, Qiaoyun; Zhu, Baoli; An, Yan

    2016-12-31

    Lead (Pb) is one of the major contaminants in many industries, and imposes hazardous effects on multiple human organs and systems. Studies have shown that lead is able to induce the alteration of microRNA (miRNA) expression in serum and organs. In this study we investigated whether polymorphisms in miRNA-regulating genes were associated with the risk of lead exposure. We genotyped seven single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 113 lead-sensitive and 113 lead-resistant lead-related Chinese workers by Taqman analysis. The lead-sensitive group showed a significantly higher blood lead level (BLL) than the resistant group based on unconditional logistic regression results. One SNP in XPO5 extron (rs2257082) was significantly associated with lead-poisoning (p = 0.022, odds rate (OR) = 1.63, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.07-2.47 in the C allele compared to the T allele). There were no significant associations between the other six SNPs and the blood lead levels. Therefore, polymorphism rs2257082 could be used to distinguish lead-resistant and lead-susceptible populations, and to develop more specific and accurate preventions.

  20. Biological fractionation of lead isotopes in Sprague-Dawley rats lead poisoned via the respiratory tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing; Liu, Duojian; Xie, Qing; Wang, Jingyu

    2012-01-01

    It was considered that lead isotope ratios did not change during physical, chemical, or biological processes. Thus, lead isotope ratios have been used as fingerprints to identify possible lead sources. However, recent evidence has shown that the lead isotope ratios among different biological samples in human are not always identical from its lead origins in vitro. An animal experiment was conducted to explore the biological fractionation of lead isotopes in biological systems. 24 male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were divided into groups that received acute lead exposure (0, 0.02, 0.2, or 2 mg/kg body weight of lead acetate) via the respiratory route every day for 5 days. Biological samples (i.e., blood, urine, and feces) were collected for comparison with the lead acetate (test substance) and the low-lead animal feed (diet) administered to the rats. The lead isotope ratios were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). There are significant differences (pisotope ratios between blood, urine, and feces. Moreover, a nonlinear relationship between the blood lead concentration and the blood lead isotope ratios was observed. There is also a threshold effect to the fractionation function. Only the blood isotope ratio of (204)Pb/(206)Pb matches the test substance well. As for feces, when (204)Pb/(206)Pb ratio is considered, there is no significant difference between feces-test substance pairs in medium and high dose group. The biological fractionation of lead isotopes in SD rats was observed. Moreover, there might be a threshold for the biological fractionation of lead isotopes which is depending on whole blood lead level. It is considered to be more reliable that we compared the isotope ratios of potential lead hazards with both blood and feces lead fingerprints especially for (204)Pb/(206)Pb ratio under high-dose exposure.

  1. Use of oral dimercaptosuccinic acid (succimer) in adult patients with inorganic lead poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradberry, S; Sheehan, T; Vale, A

    2009-10-01

    Chelation therapy has been used as a means of reducing the body burden of lead for five decades. Intravenous sodium calcium edetate has been the preferred agent, but there is increasing evidence that dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) is also a potent chelator of lead. Oral DMSA 30 mg/kg/day was administered to adults with blood lead concentrations > or = 50 microg/dl. The impact of DMSA on urine lead excretion, on blood lead concentrations and on symptoms was observed. The incidence and severity of adverse effects was also recorded. Thirty-five courses were given to 17 patients. DMSA significantly (P lead excretion and significantly (P lead concentrations. Mean daily urine lead excretion exceeded the pre-treatment value by a median of 12-fold with wide variation in response (IQR 8.9-14.8, 95% CI 10.1-14.6). Pre-treatment blood lead concentrations correlated well with 5-day urine lead excretion. Headache, lethargy and constipation improved or resolved in over half the patients within the first 2 days of chelation. DMSA was generally well tolerated, but one course was discontinued due to a severe mucocutaneous reaction. There was a transient increase in alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity during 14% of chelations. DMSA caused a significant increase in urine copper (P lead poisoning, though there is a wide inter- and intra-individual variation in response.

  2. Lead poisoning in cattle and chickens in the state of Pará, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Diomedes Barbosa

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study describes the occurrence of lead poisoning in cattle and chickens in Pará, Brazil. In a lot composed of 80 calves from a dairy herd, 10 animals became sick and nine died, but one animal recovered after being removed from the paddock. Upon inspection of this paddock, the presence of truck batteries used to store energy captured by solar panels was found. The clinical signs observed in calves included difficult breathing, nasal discharge, excessive salivation, corneal opacity, pushing of the head against objects and recumbency. The chickens had decreased oviposition and produced eggs with thin or malformed shells. The necropsy findings of the cattle, as well as the histopathological changes observed, were of little significance except for one animal that showed mild astrocytosis histopathology in the cerebral cortex. In one of the chickens, renal histopathology showed mild multifocal acute tubular necrosis. The mean lead concentrations in the livers and kidneys of the cattle were 93.91mg/kg and 209.76mg/kg, respectively, and the mean concentration detected in chicken livers was 105.02mg/kg. It was concluded that the source of lead poisoning in these calves and chickens were the truck battery plates, which were within reach of the animals.

  3. [Gout in the age of Justinian - a consequence of lead poisoning?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trier, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Compared to other chronic conditions, gout has a remarkable position in medical, historical and other texts from the Byzantine Empire in the sixth century AD - the age of emperor Justinian. The disease and its treatment is thoroughly described in the medical literature, and an effective and still applied drug for treatment of acute attacks - colchicine - was invented already in the fourth century by Byzantine physicians. The disease was apparently accumulated among Byzantine emperors, and according to one source, Justinian was a patient himself. Also, gout may have been common among the citizens of Constantinople. As gout can be due to lead poisoning, a contributing cause for this accumulation may have been exposure to high levels of lead, originating from water pipes, wine containers and cooking pots used for producing the sweetening grape syrup sapa. Although gout seems to have been a significant, widespread and invalidating disease, its influence on the Byzantine society is uncertain. The position of the disease can be interpreted as an indication that lead poisoning was a common condition, thus contributing to other and possibly more important effects on the population and the society.

  4. Lead poisoning from metallic teapots traditionally used by North African populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, D.; Claeys, F.; Sykes, C.; Noefnet, Y.

    2003-05-01

    When children are found in Brussels with high blood lead level (PbB), over 200 μg/l, the LICB conducts an environmental study to determine the source of lead responsible for the intoxication. The study consists in filling a risk questionnaire, followed by a family interview and an investigation of the housing. Standard samples of lead sources are collected (dust, paint chips and water). If this first investigation is negative, further investigations are carried out. In one particular case of lead intoxication, which concerned in a family of Moroccan origin, no standard source could be identified. Our case study finally concluded that tea infusions prepared in a traditional North-African metallic teapot had caused lead poisoning. This investigation began with a single intoxication case of a young child (age 18 months, PbB 495 μg/l). However, it quickly appeared that 18 other members of his family had also been contaminated (PbB 3 ranged from 155 to 455 μg/l). Faced with this relative unknown lead hazard, the LICB decided to collect and analyse the leachability and content in lead of this kind of vessel (8 teapots from different origin were tested). The lead contents measured in the metallic teapots ranged from 3.2% to 84%. The lead concentrations found in brewed tea varied from 230 to 5070 μg/l in function of the lead teapot content and of number of daily preparation.

  5. Relation of waterfowl poisoning to sediment lead concentrations in the Coeur d'Alene River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, W.N.; Audet, D.J.; Heinz, G.H.; Hoffman, D.J.; Day, D.

    2000-01-01

    For many years, waterfowl have been poisoned by lead after ingesting contaminated sediment in the Coeur d'Alene River Basin, in Idaho. Results of studies on waterfowl experimentally fed this sediment were combined with results from field studies conducted in the Basin to relate sediment lead concentration to injury to waterfowl. The first step in the model estimated exposure as the relation of sediment lead concentration to blood lead concentration in mute swans (Cygnus olor), ingesting 22% sediment in a rice diet. That rate corresponded to the 90th percentile of sediment ingestion estimated from analyses of feces of tundra swans (Olor columbianus) in the Basin. Then, with additional laboratory studies on Canada geese (Branta canadensis) and mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) fed the sediment, we developed the general relation of blood lead to injury in waterfowl. Injury was quantified by blood lead concentrations, ALAD (-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase) activity, protoporphyrin concentrations, hemoglobin concentrations, hepatic lead concentrations, and the prevalence of renal nuclear inclusion bodies. Putting the exposure and injury relations together provided a powerful tool for assessing hazards to wildlife in the Basin. The no effect concentration of sediment lead was estimated as 24 mg/kg and the lowest effect level as 530 mg/kg. By combining our exposure equation with data on blood lead concentrations measured in moribund tundra swans in the Basin, we estimated that some mortality would occur at a sediment lead concentration as low as 1800 mg/kg.

  6. "What do you know?"--knowledge among village doctors of lead poisoning in children in rural China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ruixue; Ning, Huacheng; Baum, Carl R; Chen, Lei; Hsiao, Allen

    2017-11-23

    This study evaluates the extent of village doctors' knowledge of lead poisoning in children in rural China and assesses the characteristics associated with possessing accurate knowledge. A cross-sectional, questionnaire-based survey of 297 village doctors in Fenghuang County, Hunan Province, China was conducted. All village doctors were interviewed face-to-face using a "What do you know" test questionnaire focusing on prevention strategies and lead sources in rural children. A total of 287 (96.6%) village doctors completed the survey in full. Most village doctors had an appropriate degree of general knowledge of lead poisoning; however, they had relatively poor knowledge of lead sources and prevention measures. Village doctors with an undergraduate level education scored an average of 2.7 points higher than those who had a junior college level education (p = 0.033). Village doctors with an annual income ≤ 10,000 RMB yuan scored 1.03 points lower than those whose income was >10,001 RMB yuan. Ethnic Han village doctors scored 1.12 points higher, on average, than ethnic Tujia village doctors (p = 0.027). This study identified important gaps in knowledge concerning lead poisoning in children among a rural population of village doctors. There is a clear need for multifaceted interventions that target village doctors to improve their knowledge regarding lead poisoning in children. The "What do you know" questionnaire is a new tool to evaluate lead poisoning knowledge and education projects.

  7. Acute lead poisoning with eosinophilic meningoencephalitis in calves on a farm receiving land application of sewage sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorn, C.R.; Tuomari, D.; Reddy, C.; Logan, T.J.

    1986-03-01

    A total of 3 cases of acute lead poisoning in calves was confirmed by atomic absorption spectrophotometric analysis of biological samples, presence of an acute lead exposure source, clinical signs of impaired vision in one case and eosinophilic meningoencephalitis in another case. One of two other calves which died approximately 2 months earlier had nervous signs and it is likely that they also had lead poisoning. Dams of two of the cases did not have elevated lead levels. Municipal sewage sludge had been applied to most fields on the farm during the preceding 5 year period. There had been approximately a doubling of the lead content in the soil; however, the foodstuffs produced on the farm had low lead concentrations. The extremely high lead levels in the abomasal contents and feces of calves eliminated sludge as the source of the lead in this acute poisoning episode. The contents of oil filters, accessible to calves but not to adult cattle, had lead levels as high as 26,922 micrograms/g and was the most likely lead source responsible for this lead intoxication. It appears that the manifestation of eosinophilic meningoencephalitis in lead poisoning cases may occur in young calves as well as in cows and in acute as well as in chronic intoxications.

  8. The persistent problem of lead poisoning in birds from ammunition and fishing tackle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haig, Susan M.; D'Elia, Jesse; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Fair, Jeanne M.; Gervais, Jennifer; Herring, Garth; Rivers, James W.; Schulz, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Lead (Pb) is a metabolic poison that can negatively influence biological processes, leading to illness and mortality across a large spectrum of North American avifauna (>120 species) and other organisms. Pb poisoning can result from numerous sources, including ingestion of bullet fragments and shot pellets left in animal carcasses, spent ammunition left in the field, lost fishing tackle, Pb-based paints, large-scale mining, and Pb smelting activities. Although Pb shot has been banned for waterfowl hunting in the United States (since 1991) and Canada (since 1999), Pb exposure remains a problem for many avian species. Despite a large body of scientific literature on exposure to Pb and its toxicological effects on birds, controversy still exists regarding its impacts at a population level. We explore these issues and highlight areas in need of investigation: (1) variation in sensitivity to Pb exposure among bird species; (2) spatial extent and sources of Pb contamination in habitats in relation to bird exposure in those same locations; and (3) interactions between avian Pb exposure and other landscape-level stressors that synergistically affect bird demography. We explore multiple paths taken to reduce Pb exposure in birds that (1) recognize common ground among a range of affected interests; (2) have been applied at local to national scales; and (3) engage governmental agencies, interest groups, and professional societies to communicate the impacts of Pb ammunition and fishing tackle, and to describe approaches for reducing their availability to birds. As they have in previous times, users of fish and wildlife will play a key role in resolving the Pb poisoning issue.

  9. [Occurrence of lead poisoning during follow-up of children at risk with initial screening lead blood levels below 100 microg/L].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tararbit, K; Carré, N; Garnier, R

    2009-08-01

    Follow-up is recommended for children initially screened with a lead blood level below the threshold for lead poisoning of 10 microg/dL when they have one or more risk factors. At first, the frequency of a follow-up lead blood test was calculated in children at risk for lead poisoning. In second time, we calculated the rate of occurrence and independent factors for lead poisoning in the follow-up group. Since 1992, the Greater Paris lead poisoning monitoring system (SSSIILF) has been systematically recording data on lead levels in blood tests conducted for screening and follow-up in Greater Paris. Children initially screened before the age of seven whose blood lead level was inferior to 10 microg/dL and who had one or more risk factors were selected. The association between qualitative variables and a follow-up lead blood test was compared using the Chi(2) test. For children given follow-up, the association between qualitative variables and occurrence of lead poisoning was compared using the Chi(2) test; independent factors for lead poisoning were estimated by logistic regression. A follow-up lead blood test was more frequent and the difference was statistically significant, for children with one or more of the following risk factors identified at the time of screening: home address in Seine Saint-Denis or central Paris, screened in mother/child healthcare centers (PMI) or through a private physician, a blood lead level 5 microg/dL on initial screening, young age (lead poisoning during follow-up was 25.9% for children screened between 1992 to 1994 and decrease to 5.1% for children screened in 2004 to 2005 (plead poisoning (plead blood level below 10 microg/dL, especially those initially screened before the age of 24 months. Local action on home environment could also be needed when the initial blood lead level is 5 microg/dL and more than one risk factor has been identified.

  10. Antagonistic Effect of Laver, Pyropia yezonensis and P. haitanensis, on Subchronic Lead Poisoning in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yingying; Gu, Xiaohui; Jiang, Yanhua; Zhu, Wenjia; Yao, Lin; Liu, Zhantao; Gao, Hua; Wang, Lianzhu

    2017-06-03

    Lead, one of the most harmful heavy metals, can cause various hazardous effects on living organisms. This study was undertaken to evaluate the antagonistic and protective effects of two economically important laver species, Pyropia yezoensis and P. haitanensis, against subchronic lead poisoning in rats by a 30-day feeding test. Sixty-four healthy Wistar rats were randomly divided into eight groups with eight rats (4♂ + 4♀) per group, among which, one group was served as the control, the others were respectively treated with lead acetate (5 mg/kg b w), and a combination of lead acetate and P. yezoensis or P. haitanensis at different dosages. Weight gain of rats was observed and recorded. Changes in antioxidant indexes, and liver and renal function markers were determined to evaluate the antagonistic effect. Lead content in rats was determined to investigate lead excretion effect of laver. The results showed that exposure to lead caused lead accumulation in kidney and liver, thus leading to significant oxidative damage and impaired liver and renal function compared to the control group. The co-treatment of laver slightly increased body weight compared to the lead-treated group. The co-administration of laver restored liver and renal function of rats by preventing the increment in the activities of alanine transaminase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and aspartate transaminase (AST), and the levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine (Cr). The increasing of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities, and lowering of the enhanced malondialdehyde (MDA) contents of rats were observed in the laver co-treated groups, which indicated that laver enhanced the antioxidative capacity of rats. The laver also enhanced lead content in feces and reduced it in liver and kidney. The results indicated that P. yezoensis and P. haitanensis could maintain or promote the normal physiological and biochemical function of lead

  11. Relationship between oxidative stress, pathology, and behavioral signs of lead poisoning in mallards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo, R.; Beyer, W.N.; Spann, J.W.; Hoffman, D.J.; Ramis, A.

    2003-01-01

    Some of the adverse effects of lead (Pb) may be associated with oxidative damage of lipids, proteins or DNA. In a previous study a linkage was observed between the susceptibilities of waterfowl species to Pb poisoning with oxidative stress. To investigate this relationship among the individuals of a single species, four groups of 12 mallards were fed for three weeks diets containing high or low levels of vitamin E (20 or 220 UI/kg) and high or low levels of Pb (0 or 2 g/kg). During the first week of Pb exposure, mallards developed hemolytic anemia, and during the second week, signs of neurological impairment. Histological findings in the Pb exposed mallards were hemosiderosis, demyelinization of sciatic and brachial nerves, and tumefaction of renal tubular epithelium with the presence of intranuclear inclusion bodies. Lipid peroxidation increased with Pb exposure in blood, liver, bile and brain, but decreased in nerves. Glutathione (GSH) increased with Pb exposure in liver and bile, and its oxidized/reduced ratio only increased in bile. Pb exposure inhibited GSH peroxidase activity (GPX) in plasma, liver and brain, and decreased protein thiols (PSH) in blood and liver. Vitamin E significantly prevented lipid peroxidation in nerves, but did not alleviate any sign of Pb poisoning. Pb-induced pathological changes associated with hepatic and nervous functions were significantly correlated with lower GPX activity and PSH concentrations in these tissues rather than lipid peroxidation. Data suggest that inhibition of antioxidant enzymes and interaction with sulfhydryl groups of proteins may play a more important role in Pb poisoning of waterfowl than lipid peroxidation.

  12. Blood lead levels and cumulative blood lead index (CBLI) as predictors of late neurodevelopment in lead poisoned children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Linda H.; Wright, Robert O.; Bellinger, David C.; Hussain, Javed; Amarasiriwardena, Chitra; Chettle, David R.; Pejović-Milić, Ana; woolf, Alan; Shannon, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Objective To find the best lead exposure assessment marker for children. Methods We recruited 11 children, calculated a cumulative blood lead index (CBLI) for the children, measured their concurrent BLL, assessed their development, and measured their bone lead level. Results Nine of 11 children had clinically significant neurodevelopment problems. CBLI and current blood lead level, but not the peak lead level, were significantly or marginally negatively associated with the full-scale IQ score. Conclusion Lead exposure at younger age significantly impacts a child’s later neurodevelopment. CBLI may be a better predictor of neurodevelopment than are current or peak blood lead levels. PMID:21827276

  13. Neurophysiologic and neurocognitive case profiles of Andean patients with chronic environmental lead poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counter, S Allen; Buchanan, Leo H; Ortega, Fernando

    2009-01-01

    This report presents case profiles of three siblings in a family of lead (Pb) glazing workers living in a Pb-contaminated Andean village who presented with extreme plumbism (blood Pb levels: 47 to 128 microg/dl) from childhood to adolescence. These cases are examples of persons who have chronic Pb poisoning as a result of prolonged occupational and environmental exposure in a Pb-glazing ceramic cottage industry in the study area. Using behavioral and physiological techniques for measuring the integrity of the peripheral and central auditory systems, including otoacoustic emissions, and replicated auditory brainstem electrophysiological potentials, the authors found normal auditory neurosensory function in each patient, thus ruling out hearing impairment as a basis for adverse neurocognitive outcomes. This finding is contrary to the prevailing view regarding the detrimental effects of Pb poisoning on the cochlear and auditory brainstem of children. Performance on tests of visual spatial intelligence and auditory memory/attention was below average in these patients, which may underlie their reported learning disabilities. In two of the cases, there was an improvement in cognitive performance following a lowering of PbB levels from chelation therapy and Pb prevention education, suggesting some level of reversibility of their neurocognitive deficits. Nevertheless, these case profiles suggest that if the patients persist in Pb-glazing activities, in spite of repeated chelation therapy and family counseling, they may continue to be re-intoxicated and remain at risk for learning disabilities and other neurological impairments.

  14. Investigation of Childhood Lead Poisoning from Parental Take-Home Exposure from an Electronic Scrap Recycling Facility — Ohio, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Nick; Jones, Camille; Page, Elena; Ceballos, Diana; Oza, Aalok

    2015-07-17

    Lead affects the developing nervous system of children, and no safe blood lead level (BLL) in children has been identified. Elevated BLLs in childhood are associated with hyperactivity, attention problems, conduct problems, and impairment in cognition. Young children are at higher risk for environmental lead exposure from putting their hands or contaminated objects in their mouth. Although deteriorating lead paint in pre-1979 housing is the most common source of lead exposure in children, data indicate that ≥30% of children with elevated BLLs were exposed through a source other than paint. Take-home contamination occurs when lead dust is transferred from the workplace on employees' skin, clothing, shoes, and other personal items to their car and home. Recycling of used electronics (e-scrap) is a relatively recent source of exposure to developmental neurotoxicants, including lead. In 2010, the Cincinnati Health Department and Cincinnati Children's Hospital Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Unit (PEHSU) investigated two cases of childhood lead poisoning in a single family. In 2012, CDC's National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) learned about the lead poisonings during an evaluation of the e-scrap recycling facility where the father of the two children with lead poisoning worked. This report summarizes the case investigation. Pediatricians should ask about parents' occupations and hobbies that might involve lead when evaluating elevated BLLs in children, in routine lead screening questionnaires, and in evaluating children with signs or symptoms of lead exposure.

  15. [Lead poisoning caused by prolonged use of kohl, an underestimated cause in French-speaking countries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Caluwé, J-P

    2009-09-01

    Use of kohl (called surma in India and Pakistan) as an eye cosmetic is very common, especially among women, children, and babies, not only in North Africa (Morocco, Algeria, Egypt), but also in the Near East and the Middle East, as well in India and Pakistan. This practice has now become widespread in European countries and North America. The cultural custom is very old and has been in use in Egypt since the Ancient Empire. In a great number of kohls available on the free market, lead sulfide is the main component and the very high lead concentration is a risk, particularly for women and children. We report the observation of a case of lead poisoning in a young Moroccan woman caused by prolonged use of a kohl and provide a review of the published literature. This case study should draw the attention of ophthalmologists in French-speaking areas to a public health problem, largely ignored, although real, considering the high lead concentrations found in the majority of kohls. Actions such as prohibition (importation and sale of eye cosmetics made of lead sulfide) have proved to be inadequate. Appropriate educational campaigns directed toward populations using eye cosmetics will be more effective over the long term.

  16. Characterizing N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and N-acetylcysteine amide (NACA) binding for lead poisoning treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weiqing; Ercal, Nuran; Huynh, Tien; Volkov, Anatoliy; Chusuei, Charles C

    2012-04-01

    Using antioxidants is an important means of treating lead poisoning. Prior in vivo studies showed marked differences between various chelator antioxidants in their ability to decrease both blood Pb(II) levels and oxidative stress resulting from lead poisoning. The comparative abilities of NAC and NACA to Pb(II) were studied in vitro, for the first time, to examine the role of the -OH/-NH(2) functional group in antioxidant binding behavior. To assay the antioxidant-divalent metal interaction, the antioxidants were probed as solid surfaces, adsorbing Pb(II) onto them. Surface characterization was carried out using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis to quantify Pb(II) in the resulting adducts. XPS of the Pb 4f orbitals showed that more Pb(II) was chemically bound to NACA than NAC. In addition, the antioxidant surfaces probed via point-of-zero charge (PZC) measurements of NAC and NACA were obtained to gain further insight into the Pb-NAC and Pb-NACA binding, showing that Coulombic interactions played a partial role in facilitating complex formation. The data correlated well with solution analysis of metal-ligand complexation. UV-vis spectroscopy was used to probe complexation behavior. NACA was found to have the higher binding affinity as shown by free Pb(II) available in the solution after complexation from HPLC data. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) was applied to delineate the structures of Pb-antioxidant complexes. Experimental results were further supported by density functional theory (DFT) calculations of supermolecular interaction energies (E(inter)) showing a greater interaction of Pb(II) with NACA than NAC. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Encephalopathy from lead poisoning masquerading as a flu-like syndrome in an autistic child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Mathew; Heeney, Matthew M; Woolf, Alan D

    2010-05-01

    Acute encephalopathy from childhood lead poisoning is fortunately rare. However, in pediatric patients with developmental disabilities and pica, there is a risk of lead exposure at a dose commensurate with encephalopathy, coupled with a risk of delayed diagnosis because of difficulty in distinguishing between baseline and altered behavior. We report here a 4-year old autistic boy who presented to the pediatrician's office with gastrointestinal symptoms and behavioral changes and was at first thought to have a viral syndrome. He returned 2 days later with a worsening illness; increasing pallor, vomiting, abdominal colic, and changes in consciousness were recognized in the emergency department as lead-induced anemia and encephalopathy, associated with a positive abdominal film for paint chips and a blood lead level equal to 216 microg/dL (10.43 micromol/L) (reference, <10 microg/dL or 0.483 micromol/L). As this case illustrates, prompt recognition is dependent on the skills and suspicions of an astute clinician, especially in the busy emergency department.

  18. Saturnismo: a propósito de un caso Lead poisoning: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Honorio Labanda Urbano

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Profesora de pintura sobre vidrio y restauración de vidrieras de 65 años acude a la Unidad Médica de Valoración de Incapacidades del Instituto Nacional de la Seguridad Social (INSS con diagnóstico de exposición laboral a plomo. La paciente ha permanecido en Incapacidad Temporal por astenia durante varios meses, y se le detecta tras una reincorporación al trabajo plumbemia elevada, asociada a otros síntomas típicos de la intoxicación por plomo, por lo que se la separa de su ambiente de trabajo. Finalmente, el Equipo de Valoración de Incapacidades, reunido para valorar su caso resuelve Incapacidad Laboral Permanente Total derivada de enfermedad profesional para trabajos en que haya exposición a plomo y otros ototóxicos, exposición a ruidos de riesgo, y para aquellos trabajos en que sea necesaria una comunicación verbal fluida en frecuencias conversacionales normales. Con este caso clínico pretendemos revisar los síntomas del cuadro clínico de saturnismo, así como hacer una reflexión sobre los efectos de la prevención de riesgos para el trabajador.Lead poisoning is most commonly caused by occupational exposure. We report a case of a 65-year-old woman, paint teacher, which was working in reparation of stained glass window. She consults the Medical Incapacity Valoration Unit of National Institute of Social Security with diagnosis of lead occupational intoxication. The patient was not able to word for several months because of presenting asthenia. After reporting for work high lead blood levels were detected, in association with physical symptoms. She was evaluated by a tribunal which settled total long sick-leave due to occupational lead exposure and was restricted for loud works and other ones that need verbal communication in conversational frequencies. With this clinical case we try to check the symptoms of lead poisoning, as well as to think about the effects of prevention of occupational hazards.

  19. Including a Service Learning Educational Research Project in a Biology Course-I: Assessing Community Awareness of Childhood Lead Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Shakra, Amal; Saliim, Eric

    2012-01-01

    A university course project was developed and implemented in a biology course, focusing on environmental problems, to assess community awareness of childhood lead poisoning. A set of 385 questionnaires was generated and distributed in an urban community in North Carolina, USA. The completed questionnaires were sorted first into yes and no sets…

  20. Chronic lead poisoning magnifies bone detrimental effects in an ovariectomized rat model of postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ching Ming; Terrizzi, Antonela Romina; Bozzini, Clarisa; Piñeiro, Adriana Emilce; Conti, María Inés; Martínez, María Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Lead (Pb) is a persistent environmental contaminant that is mainly stored in bones being an important source of endogenous lead exposure during periods of increased bone resorption as occurs in menopause. As no evidence exists of which bone biomechanical properties are impaired in those elderly women who had been exposed to Pb during their lifetime, the aim of the present study is to discern whether chronic lead poisoning magnifies the deterioration of bone biology that occurs in later stages of life. We investigated the effect of Pb in the femora of ovariectomized (OVX) female Wistar rats who had been intoxicated with 1000 ppm of Pb acetate in drinking water for 8 months. Structural properties were determined using a three-point bending mechanical test, and geometrical and material properties were evaluated after obtaining the load/deformation curve. Areal Bone Mineral Density (BMD) was estimated using a bone densitometer. Femoral histomorphometry was carried out on slices dyed with H&E (Hematoxylin and Eosin). Pb and OVX decreased all structural properties with a higher effect when both treatments were applied together. Medullar and cortical area of femurs under OVX increased, allowing the bone to accommodate its architecture, which was not observed under Pb intoxication. Pb and OVX significantly decreased BMD, showing lead treated ovariectomized rats (PbOVX) animals the lowest BMD levels. Trabecular bone volume per total volume (BV/TV%) was decreased in OVX and PbOVX animals in 54% compared to the control animals (plead intoxication in bone biology in elderly women. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Modeling with uncertain science: estimating mitigation credits from abating lead poisoning in Golden Eagles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitts Cochrane, Jean; Lonsdorf, Eric; Allison, Taber D; Sanders-Reed, Carol A

    2015-09-01

    Challenges arise when renewable energy development triggers "no net loss" policies for protected species, such as where wind energy facilities affect Golden Eagles in the western United States. When established mitigation approaches are insufficient to fully avoid or offset losses, conservation goals may still be achievable through experimental implementation of unproven mitigation methods provided they are analyzed within a framework that deals transparently and rigorously with uncertainty. We developed an approach to quantify and analyze compensatory mitigation that (1) relies on expert opinion elicited in a thoughtful and structured process to design the analysis (models) and supplement available data, (2) builds computational models as hypotheses about cause-effect relationships, (3) represents scientific uncertainty in stochastic model simulations, (4) provides probabilistic predictions of "relative" mortality with and without mitigation, (5) presents results in clear formats useful to applying risk management preferences (regulatory standards) and selecting strategies and levels of mitigation for immediate action, and (6) defines predictive parameters in units that could be monitored effectively, to support experimental adaptive management and reduction in uncertainty. We illustrate the approach with a case study characterized by high uncertainty about underlying biological processes and high conservation interest: estimating the quantitative effects of voluntary strategies to abate lead poisoning in Golden Eagles in Wyoming due to ingestion of spent game hunting ammunition.

  2. EDITORIAL POISONING PATTERN Human poisoning with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pharm-chem

    Thus, in chronic poisoning, it is difficult to establish definitive cause-effect ... This is the most stressful period when young people are trying to come into terms ... Typical examples of "Police cases" include suicide, suspected homicide, death.

  3. Understanding childhood lead poisoning preventive behaviors: the roles of self-efficacy, subjective norms, and perceived benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bland, Angela D; Kegler, Michelle C; Escoffery, Cam; Halinka Malcoe, Lorraine

    2005-07-01

    Understanding individual and social influences on behaviors commonly recommended to prevent lead poisoning in children can guide more effective educational interventions. In-person interviews were conducted with primary caregivers (n = 380) of American Indian and White children aged 1 to 6 living in or near the Tar Creek Superfund site in northeastern Oklahoma. Caregivers' perceived health benefits, self-efficacy, and subjective norms were assessed for four lead poisoning prevention behaviors (i.e., annual blood lead testing, playing in safe areas, washing hands before eating, and dusting with a damp cloth). Caregivers spoke with their own mothers, spouses, and other female family members most often when they had concerns or worries about taking care of their children. In multivariate models, subjective norms, perceived benefits, and self-efficacy were positively associated with the hand-washing and damp-dusting behaviors, while only self-efficacy was associated with playing in safe areas. None of the variables were found to have significant influence on the blood lead testing behavior. Education programs should address individual level factors such as self-efficacy and perceived health benefits but also consider new strategies that incorporate a normative dimension to lead poisoning prevention.

  4. Impaired hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis activity, spermatogenesis, and sperm function promote infertility in males with lead poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Jason; Hernandez, Rafael J; Chen, Andrew; Smith, Noel L; Sheynkin, Yefim R; Joshi, Gargi; Khan, Sardar Ali

    2017-04-01

    Lead poisoning is a stealthy threat to human physiological systems as chronic exposure can remain asymptomatic for long periods of time before symptoms manifest. We presently review the biophysical mechanisms of lead poisoning that contribute to male infertility. Environmental and occupational exposure of lead may adversely affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis, impairing the induction of spermatogenesis. Dysfunction at the reproductive axis, namely testosterone suppression, is most susceptible and irreversible during pubertal development. Lead poisoning also appears to directly impair the process of spermatogenesis itself as well as sperm function. Spermatogenesis issues may manifest as low sperm count and stem from reproductive axis dysfunction or testicular degeneration. Generation of excessive reactive oxygen species due to lead-associated oxidative stress can potentially affect sperm viability, motility, DNA fragmentation, membrane lipid peroxidation, capacitation, hyperactivation, acrosome reaction, and chemotaxis for sperm-oocyte fusion, all of which can contribute to deter fertilization. Reproductive toxicity has been tested through cross-sectional analysis studies in humans as well as in vivo and in vitro studies in animals.

  5. The trend of lead poisoning rate in Chinese population aged 0-18 years old: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min-ming; Cao, Jia; Gao, Zhen-yan; Shen, Xiao-ming; Yan, Chong-huai

    2015-08-06

    Childhood lead poisoning is a public health problem gained widely attention for the health damage caused by lead exposure. Pediatrics defines lead poisoning as BLL of or higher than 10 μg/dL, which leads to harmful effects in nervous system, hematological system and urinary system. This study investigates the percentage of 0-18 year old Chinese population with blood lead level (BLL) ≥10 μg/dL during 1990-2012 by searching epidemiologic studies from electronic database focused on BLL in mainland China. Epidemiologic studies about BLL in China mainland between January 1990 and October 2012 were searched from electronic databases including CNKI, CBM disc, Wanfang Data, Pubmed and Medline. Data extraction, data analysis and risk of bias assessments were performed. Fifty-five articles were included in analysis containing 200,002 subjects, covering 19 provinces, autonomous regions and municipalities. The corrected pooled rate by trim and fill method under random effect model was 9 % (95 CI: 6 %, 12 %). The corrected pooled lead poisoning rate by trim and fill method was 28.1 % (95 % CI: 21.6 %, 34.6 %) from data published during 1990-2000, much higher than the rate during 2001-2005 (10.5 %, 95 % CI: 6.4 %, 14.5 %) and the rate during 2006-2012 (5.3 %, 95 % CI: 3.7 %, 7 %). The corrected pooled lead poisoning percentage in eastern zone (4.3 %, 95 % CI: 2 %, 6.6 %) was slightly lower than that in western zone (5.8 %, 95 % CI: 3.2 %, 8.5 %) and much lower than in central zone (8.5 %, 95 % CI: 4.9 %, 12.1 %). The corrected pooled rate of population living around mining area (70 %, 95 % CI: 62.7 %, 77.3 %) was much higher than that of population in urban area (9.6 %, 95 % CI: 7.1 %, 12.1 %), suburban area (23.6 %, 95 % CI: 17 %, 30.3 %), rural area (23.8 %, 95 % CI: 6.7 %, 40.9 %) and industrial area (57.5 %, 95 % CI: 28 %, 86.9 %). In male population, the corrected pooled rate (10 %, 95 % CI: 7 %, 13 %) was slightly higher than that in female population (7.7 %, 95 % CI

  6. A flatline Lead I in a neonate with suspected congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riniker, Kristy; Rigales, Luis; Hoffman, Irwin

    In a neonate with bradycardia and hypoxia, and clinical concern for critical congenital heart disease (CCHD), highly unusual ECG findings were present. These included a flatline Lead 1, and identical Leads 2, 3, and AVF. These abnormalities were due to bilateral arm to leg lead exchanges and not to heart disease. Complete cardiac workup including echocardiogram was normal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. XRF-measured bone lead (Pb) as a biomarker for Pb exposure and toxicity among children diagnosed with Pb poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specht, Aaron J; Lin, Yanfen; Weisskopf, Marc; Yan, Chonghuai; Hu, Howard; Xu, Jian; Nie, Linda H

    2016-01-01

    Childhood lead (Pb) poisoning remains a global issue, especially in industrial areas. In this study, 115 children with average age 5.7 years were recruited as either patient diagnosed with Pb poisoning or controls at Xinhua Hospital in China. The subjects' bone Pb was measured with a K-shell X-ray fluorescence (KXRF) and a portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) system. A significant correlation between KXRF bone Pb and blood Pb and portable XRF and KXRF measurements were observed. The half-life of blood-lead was calculated to be 9.96 ± 3.92 d. Our results indicate that bone is a useful biomarker for Pb in children.

  8. Benzylation Reactions in DMF Lead to an Impurity Which Acts as an Organocatalyst Poison in Thiourea-Catalyzed Glycosylations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgan, Avene C; Müller-Bunz, Helge; McGarrigle, Eoghan M

    2016-11-18

    The benzylation of alcohols with the commonly used combination of benzyl bromide and sodium hydride in DMF can lead to the formation of an amine side product, N,N'-dimethyl-1-phenyl-1-(o-tolyl)methanamine. This amine coeluted with benzylated galactal during column chromatography and was found to be a catalyst poison in thiourea-catalyzed glycosylations of galactals. It may also be problematic for other base-sensitive reactions involving benzylated substrates. Solutions to this problem are described.

  9. Lead poisoning in pregnant women who used Ayurvedic medications from India--New York City, 2011-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-24

    Lead poisoning still occurs in the United States despite extensive prevention efforts and strict regulations. Exposure to lead can damage the brain, kidneys, and nervous and reproductive systems. Fetal exposure to lead can adversely affect neurodevelopment, decrease fetal growth, and increase the risk for premature birth and miscarriage. During 2011-2012, the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) investigated six cases of lead poisoning associated with the use of 10 oral Ayurvedic medications made in India. All six cases were in foreign-born pregnant women assessed for lead exposure risk by health-care providers during prenatal visits, as required by New York state law. Their blood lead levels (BLLs) ranged from 16 to 64 µg/dL. Lead concentrations of the medications were as high as 2.4%; several medications also contained mercury or arsenic, which also can have adverse health effects. DOHMH distributed information about the medications to health-care providers, product manufacturers, and government agencies in the United States and abroad, via postal and electronic mail. DOHMH also ordered a local business selling contaminated products to cease sales. Health-care providers should ask patients, especially foreign-born or pregnant patients, about any use of foreign health products, supplements, and remedies such as Ayurvedic medications. Public health professionals should consider these types of products when investigating heavy metal exposures and raise awareness among health-care providers and the public regarding the health risks posed by such products.

  10. Increased Incidence and Altered Risk Demographics of Childhood Lead Poisoning: Predicting the Impacts of the CDC’s 5 µg/dL Reference Value in Massachusetts (USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Brabander

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In May 2012, the CDC adopted a new sliding scale reference value for childhood lead poisoning, reducing the former 10 µg/dL benchmark by half. Using Massachusetts (MA as a model state, we estimated the change in the population of 9–47 month-olds at risk for lead poisoning. We then examined the impact of the 5 µg/dL reference value on the demographic characteristics of lead risk in MA communities. We find that the new CDC benchmark will lead to a 1470% increase in childhood lead poisoning cases among 9–47 month-olds in MA, with nearly 50% of the examined communities experiencing an increased prevalence of lead poisoning. Further, the top 10 MA communities with BLLs ≥5 µg/dL have significantly fewer foreign-born residents and significantly larger white populations than the highest risk communities formerly identified by the MA Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program. The CDC’s new 5 µg/dL lead poisoning benchmark will drastically increase the number of children with elevated BLLs and alter the distribution and demographics high-risk communities in MA.

  11. Increased Incidence and Altered Risk Demographics of Childhood Lead Poisoning: Predicting the Impacts of the CDC’s 5 µg/dL Reference Value in Massachusetts (USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handler, Phoebe; Brabander, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    In May 2012, the CDC adopted a new sliding scale reference value for childhood lead poisoning, reducing the former 10 µg/dL benchmark by half. Using Massachusetts (MA) as a model state, we estimated the change in the population of 9–47 month-olds at risk for lead poisoning. We then examined the impact of the 5 µg/dL reference value on the demographic characteristics of lead risk in MA communities. We find that the new CDC benchmark will lead to a 1470% increase in childhood lead poisoning cases among 9–47 month-olds in MA, with nearly 50% of the examined communities experiencing an increased prevalence of lead poisoning. Further, the top 10 MA communities with BLLs ≥5 µg/dL have significantly fewer foreign-born residents and significantly larger white populations than the highest risk communities formerly identified by the MA Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program. The CDC’s new 5 µg/dL lead poisoning benchmark will drastically increase the number of children with elevated BLLs and alter the distribution and demographics high-risk communities in MA. PMID:23202824

  12. Detergent poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... acids, including benzalkonium chloride Simple soap Symptoms Detergent poisoning can cause symptoms in many parts of the body. BLOOD Severe change in acid level of blood (pH balance), which leads to damage in all of the body organs ...

  13. Lead poisoning in cattle, horses, cats, and dogs as reported by 11 colleges of veterinary medicine in the United States and Canada from July, 1968, through June 1972

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priester, W.A.; Hayes, H.M.

    1974-04-01

    During the 4-year period July 1, 1968, through June 30, 1972, 162 diagnoses of lead poisoning in domesticated animals were made at 11 colleges of veterinary medicine in the US and Canada. Although significant differences were not seen in relative frequency of lead poisoning among the 4 years included, there were significant differences between the 11 schools; however, a regular pattern of geographic distribution was not identified.

  14. Can Ingestion of Lead Shot and Poisons Change Population Trends of Three European Birds: Grey Partridge, Common Buzzard, and Red Kite?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn B Meyer

    Full Text Available Little is known about the magnitude of the effects of lead shot ingestion alone or combined with poisons (e.g., in bait or seeds/granules containing pesticides on population size, growth, and extinction of non-waterbird avian species that ingest these substances. We used population models to create example scenarios demonstrating how changes in these parameters might affect three susceptible species: grey partridge (Perdix perdix, common buzzard (Buteo buteo, and red kite (Milvus milvus. We added or subtracted estimates of mortality due to lead shot ingestion (4-16% of mortality, depending on species and poisons (4-46% of mortality reported in the UK or France to observed mortality of studied populations after models were calibrated to observed population trends. Observed trends were decreasing for partridge (in continental Europe, stable for buzzard (in Germany, and increasing for red kite (in Wales. Although lead shot ingestion and poison at modeled levels did not change the trend direction for the three species, they reduced population size and slowed population growth. Lead shot ingestion at modeled rates reduced population size of partridges by 10%, and when combined with bait and pesticide poisons, by 18%. For buzzards, decrease in mean population size by lead shot and poisons combined was much smaller (≤ 1%. The red kite population has been recovering; however, modeled lead shot ingestion reduced its annual growth rate from 6.5% to 4%, slowing recovery. If mortality from poisoned baits could be removed, the kite population could potentially increase at a rapid annual rate of 12%. The effects are somewhat higher if ingestion of these substances additionally causes sublethal reproductive impairment. These results have uncertainty but suggest that declining or recovering populations are most sensitive to lead shot or poison ingestion, and removal of poisoned baits can have a positive impact on recovering raptor populations that frequently

  15. Lead exposure and poisoning of songbirds using the Coeur d'Alene River Basin, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, James A.; Audet, Daniel; Spears, Brian L.; Healy, Kate A.; Brazzle, Roy E.; Hoffman, David J.; Dailey, Anne; Beyer, W. Nelson

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have found widespread Pb poisoning of waterfowl in the Coeur d'Alene River Basin in northern Idaho, USA, which has been contaminated by mining and smelting activities. We studied the exposure of ground-feeding songbirds to Pb, sampling 204 American robins (Turdus migratorius), song sparrows (Melospiza melodia), and Swainson's thrushes (Catharus ustulatus) throughout the basin. These songbirds had mean blood Pb concentrations (mg/kg, dry weight) of less than 0.19 at a reference area (25 mg Pb/kg soil), 1.09 at moderately contaminated sites (170 to 1300 mg Pb/kg soil), and 2.06 at highly contaminated sites (2000 to 5000 mg Pb/kg soil). Based on guidelines for evaluating blood Pb in birds, 6% of robins from the highly contaminated sites had background concentrations, 24% were subclinically poisoned, 52% were clinically poisoned, and 18% were severely clinically poisoned with Pb. Blood Pb concentrations were lower in song sparrows than in robins and lowest in Swainson's thrushes. More than half of the robins and song sparrows from all contaminated sites and more than half of the Swainson's thrushes from highly contaminated sites showed at least 50% inhibition of the activity of the enzyme δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD), commonly used as a measure of exposure to Pb. The highest hepatic Pb concentration of 61 mg/kg (dry weight) was detected in a song sparrow. Using Al as a marker for soil in songbird ingesta, we estimated average soil ingestion rates as 20% in robins, 17% in song sparrows, and 0.7% in Swainson's thrushes. Soil Pb in ingesta accounted for almost all of the songbirds' exposure to Pb. Based on these results, it is recommended that ecological risk assessments of ground-feeding songbirds at contaminated sites include soil ingestion as a pathway of exposure to Pb.

  16. Lead exposure and poisoning of songbirds using the Coeur d'Alene River Basin, Idaho, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, James A; Audet, Daniel; Spears, Brian L; Healy, Kate A; Brazzle, Roy E; Hoffman, David J; Dailey, Anne; Beyer, W Nelson

    2011-10-01

    Previous studies have found widespread Pb poisoning of waterfowl in the Coeur d'Alene River Basin in northern Idaho, USA, which has been contaminated by mining and smelting activities. We studied the exposure of ground-feeding songbirds to Pb, sampling 204 American robins (Turdus migratorius), song sparrows (Melospiza melodia), and Swainson's thrushes (Catharus ustulatus) throughout the basin. These songbirds had mean blood Pb concentrations (mg/kg, dry weight) of less than 0.19 at a reference area (25 mg Pb/kg soil), 1.09 at moderately contaminated sites (170 to 1300 mg Pb/kg soil), and 2.06 at highly contaminated sites (2000 to 5000 mg Pb/kg soil). Based on guidelines for evaluating blood Pb in birds, 6% of robins from the highly contaminated sites had background concentrations, 24% were subclinically poisoned, 52% were clinically poisoned, and 18% were severely clinically poisoned with Pb. Blood Pb concentrations were lower in song sparrows than in robins and lowest in Swainson's thrushes. More than half of the robins and song sparrows from all contaminated sites and more than half of the Swainson's thrushes from highly contaminated sites showed at least 50% inhibition of the activity of the enzyme δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD), commonly used as a measure of exposure to Pb. The highest hepatic Pb concentration of 61 mg/kg (dry weight) was detected in a song sparrow. Using Al as a marker for soil in songbird ingesta, we estimated average soil ingestion rates as 20% in robins, 17% in song sparrows, and 0.7% in Swainson's thrushes. Soil Pb in ingesta accounted for almost all of the songbirds' exposure to Pb. Based on these results, it is recommended that ecological risk assessments of ground-feeding songbirds at contaminated sites include soil ingestion as a pathway of exposure to Pb. Copyright © 2011 SETAC.

  17. [Discovery and follow-up of a lead-poisoning outbreak in a shantytown of Le Port, Reunion Island].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solet, J-L; Renault, P; Denys, J-C; Teulé, G; Dennemont, R-M; Domonte, F; Garnier, C; Aubert, L; Filleul, L; Polycarpe, D

    2013-08-01

    A national survey conducted in 2008-2009 by the French Institute for Public Health Surveillance for detection of lead impact in childhood identified a high blood lead level in a young boy living in the town of "Le Port", Reunion Island. Previously, cases of lead-poisoning on the island had been exceptional; only a dozen cases were reported in the 1980s in adults, related to the use of lead-containing instruments for food preparations. The family of the index case was invited to participate in screening tests and an environmental investigation was conducted using a standardized questionnaire. Screening was then broadened to the neighborhood of the index case and samples of soil outside the home and in the immediate vicinity were taken. The environmental survey was then extended with soil samples taken from the entire geographical area. Information was then provided to local inhabitants (87 families and 287 people) in order to encourage lead blood testing for all children under six years and all pregnant women living in the area. The index case lived in the neighborhood of "The Oasis", a shantytown of Le Port. The results of soil analysis revealed heterogeneous pollution of superficial soils by lead throughout the area of the shantytown, the highest level recorded (5200mg/kg) reached more than 300 times the background level of the natural soils of the island. The screening identified 76 cases of childhood lead-poisoning (blood lead level greater or equal to 100μg/L) among 148 samples (51%). All cases of blood poisoning involved children under the age of 15 years. The median age of children with a positive test was 5.6 years; the median blood lead level was 196μg/L [102-392μg/L]. The main hypothesis to explain the contamination of the soil in the area of the shantytown is the presence of waste deposits (car batteries) and diffuse activities of metal recovery. The authorities managed to remove all the families from the environmental exposure to lead by

  18. Association of blood lead level with neurological features in 972 children affected by an acute severe lead poisoning outbreak in Zamfara State, northern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greig, Jane; Thurtle, Natalie; Cooney, Lauren; Ariti, Cono; Ahmed, Abdulkadir Ola; Ashagre, Teshome; Ayela, Anthony; Chukwumalu, Kingsley; Criado-Perez, Alison; Gómez-Restrepo, Camilo; Meredith, Caitlin; Neri, Antonio; Stellmach, Darryl; Sani-Gwarzo, Nasir; Nasidi, Abdulsalami; Shanks, Leslie; Dargan, Paul I

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) investigated reports of high mortality in young children in Zamfara State, Nigeria, leading to confirmation of villages with widespread acute severe lead poisoning. In a retrospective analysis, we aimed to determine venous blood lead level (VBLL) thresholds and risk factors for encephalopathy using MSF programmatic data from the first year of the outbreak response. We included children aged ≤5 years with VBLL ≥45 µg/dL before any chelation and recorded neurological status. Odds ratios (OR) for neurological features were estimated; the final model was adjusted for age and baseline VBLL, using random effects for village of residence. 972 children met inclusion criteria: 885 (91%) had no neurological features; 34 (4%) had severe features; 47 (5%) had reported recent seizures; and six (1%) had other neurological abnormalities. The geometric mean VBLLs for all groups with neurological features were >100 µg/dL vs 65.9 µg/dL for those without neurological features. The adjusted OR for neurological features increased with increasing VBLL: from 2.75, 95%CI 1.27-5.98 (80-99.9 µg/dL) to 22.95, 95%CI 10.54-49.96 (≥120 µg/dL). Neurological features were associated with younger age (OR 4.77 [95% CI 2.50-9.11] for 1-lead poisoning in prioritising therapy and developing chelation protocols.

  19. Therapeutic efficiency of succimer used with calcium and ascorbic acid in the treatment of mild lead-poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yaping; Yu, Fei; Liao, Yingjun; Liu, Shaoxia; Liu, Meimei; Xu, Jianhong; Yang, Jun

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore therapeutic efficiency of succimer used with calcium and ascorbic acid in the treatment of mildly lead-poisoned mice and preschool children. Mice were exposed to lead by drinking water, and then treated with saline solution, 50mg/kg body weight (b.w.) succimer, 100mg/kg b.w. succimer, or 50mg/kg b.w. succimer plus calcium and ascorbic acid by gavage. Seventy-two children aged 48-72 months were randomly assigned into combined treatment or nutritional intervention group. Lead levels in blood and bone were analyzed by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Activities of aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) in blood were determined by colorimetric method. Results of animal experiment showed that succimer used alone could reduce lead levels in blood and bone and reverse activities of ALAD in blood, however, a better therapeutic efficiency in mobilizing bone lead could be achieved by succimer used with calcium and ascorbic acid. Findings from the clinical study showed that reduction of blood lead levels (BLLs) between the end and initiation of therapy in the combined treatment group was significantly greater than that in the nutritional intervention group. Percentage of children with BLLs less than 10μg/dL at the end of therapy and the eighth week after therapy in the combined treatment group was significantly higher than that in the nutritional intervention group. In conclusion, combined use of succimer with calcium and ascorbic acid seemed to be a choice in the treatment of mildly lead poisoned children. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. POISONS AND POISONING IN THE REPUBLIC OF DUBROVNIK

    OpenAIRE

    Šundrica, Zdravko

    2000-01-01

    Dubrovnik authorities occasionally resorted to poisoning as a means of resolving state affairs. A number of the Republic’s enemies and undesirable prisoners were removed or suspected to have been eliminated by poisoning. Poison was used as a protective measure in times of war, when the Ragusans contaminated the water tanks in the area. Dubrovnik archives reveal a variety of poisoning cases among Ragusan citizens over the centuries, only to prove that, if uncommon, this method was not looked u...

  1. Infant lead poisoning associated with use of tiro, an eye cosmetic from Nigeria--Boston, Massachusetts, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-03

    Lead is highly toxic and can damage the brain, kidneys, bone marrow, and other body systems; high levels can cause convulsions, coma, and death. Young children are especially susceptible to lead exposures because of their floor-hand-mouth activity, greater gut absorption, and developing central nervous systems. In June 2011, a male infant aged 6 months of Nigerian descent was referred to the Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Unit (PEHSU) at Boston Children's Hospital because of an elevated blood lead level (BLL). An investigation found no lead exposure except for "tiro," a Nigerian cosmetic that also is used as a folk remedy to promote visual development. The tiro applied to the infant's eyelids contained 82.6% lead. Products similar to tiro, such as "surma" and "kajal" in Asia and kohl in the Middle East, also might contain lead. This case adds to the medical literature documenting nonpaint lead sources as causes of elevated BLLs in children and highlights persons of certain immigrant populations as a risk group. Educational efforts are needed to inform immigrants from Africa, Asia, and the Middle East that tiro and similar products can cause lead poisoning in children. Health-care providers and public health workers should ask about eye cosmetics and folk remedies when seeking a source of exposure in children with elevated BLLs from certain immigrant populations.

  2. Treatment of Lead Poisoning: A Comparison between the Effects of Sodium Calciumedetate and Penicillamine Administered Orally and Intravenously1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selander, Stig

    1967-01-01

    In 16 workers with lead poisoning of varying degrees, a comparison was made between the therapeutic efficacy of sodium calciumedetate (Ca-EDTA) and penicillamine (PCA), administered intravenously and orally. The question of comparable dosages of ligands, forming metal complexes in different ways, is discussed. With the dosages given, intravenous Ca-EDTA promoted the greatest output of lead in the urine, followed by intravenous and oral PCA. These three agents also had a very satisfactory effect on the output δ-aminolaevulinic acid (ALA) in urine. Oral Ca-EDTA was found to be greatly inferior in both these respects. In order to study the absorption of the agents and the renal excretion of the formed lead complexes, the urine was collected quantitatively and fractionated in consecutive 4-hour periods, after which the lead excretion during each period was determined. It was found that the oral absorption of PCA was rapid and quantitatively great, whereas the oral absorption of Ca-EDTA was very slow and quantitatively small. The possible resorption of ligand-lead complexes is discussed and indications were found of resorption of the Ca-EDTA-lead complex but not of the PCA-lead complex. The renal excretion of the different ligand-lead complexes was very effective and reached its maximal level within four hours. However, in some subjects excretion of the Ca-EDTA-lead complex showed some delay. An investigation, in four subjects, of a blocking effect of probenecid on the renal excretion of PCA and/or PCA-lead complexes gave no conclusive results. It is concluded that oral PCA is satisfactory in most cases of lead poisoning. However, in more severe cases intravenous treatment is preferable. Which agent should be chosen, Ca-EDTA or PCA, appears to be unimportant as both are quite satisfactory from the point of view of treatment, but it seems that Ca-EDTA may cause more serious side-effects. Oral Ca-EDTA is quite unsatisfactory and there is good evidence to indicate that

  3. Role of chelation in the treatment of lead poisoning: discussion of the Treatment of Lead-Exposed Children Trial (TLC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Charles A

    2013-12-01

    Lead exposure in children is one component leading to cognitive impairment. The Treatment of Lead-Exposed Children Trial (1994-2004) studied the effect of succimer in treating low levels of lead exposure (20-44 mcg/dL) in children 12 to 33 months old. While succimer was effective in reducing blood lead concentrations in the short term, treatment of blood lead levels did not result in any detectable improvement in a wide variety of measurements of cognitive or behavioral function. Furthermore, blood lead concentrations were not distinguishable between chelated and non-chelated individuals at 1 year. The most important treatment strategy is identification and termination of major sources of lead exposure.

  4. Lead poisoning from use of bronze drinking vessels during the late Chinese Shang dynasty: an in vitro experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Alan D; Law, Terence; Yu, Hoi-Ying Elsie; Woolf, Nicholas; Kellogg, Mark

    2010-08-01

    Bronze drinking vessels famous for their intricate carvings and used by the aristocracy in the Chinese Shang dynasty (1555-1145 BCE) are known to have been fabricated with alloys containing soft metallic lead. The contribution of lead leaching from such vessels into the fermented grain wines drunk by the Chinese nobility in ancient times has not been previously estimated. Three bronze vessels containing 8% lead by weight were fabricated to resemble the late Shang bronze goblets. Shaoxing drinking rice wine was purchased locally and placed in the vessels, using a white grape wine and water as comparisons. Sampling was performed at baseline, 2 min, and then at days 1, 2, 4, and 7. Lead concentrations in the liquid matrix were measured using atomic absorption spectroscopy. Significant amounts of lead leached into the liquid within one day: 13,900 μg/L in water, 45,900 μg/L in rice wine, and 116,000 μg/L in white wine. Lead continued to leach into both the grape and rice wines with the passage of time. Significant lead contamination of Shaoxing rice wine was detected when it was left in bronze goblets fabricated to resemble the Shang dynasty vessels. If a liter of contaminated wine was drunk daily, the daily intake of lead could have been as high as 85 mg. Such a high degree of contamination could cause chronic lead poisoning, affecting the health of the Shang nobility who used bronze beverage containers, before lead was excluded from the manufacture of bronze.

  5. Lead poisoning in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus): oxidant and antioxidant relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanekhy, Mahmoud

    2015-04-01

    Selenium and vitamin E are very effective antioxidant agents which play important roles in improving and development of aquaculture sector. This study was conducted to determine the protective and treatment effects of vitamin E and selenium against lead toxicity. Administration of both vitamin E and selenium ameliorated the adverse effects of lead acetate toxicity through significant increase in hemoglobin, packed cell volume, RBC count, WBC count, and lymphocytes compared to lead acetate-exposed groups especially after the 10th week. Also, it is revealed that severe decrease of total protein, calcium, phosphorous, and magnesium in lead acetate intoxicated group. On contrary, significant increase of blood parameters upon addition of vitamin E and selenium combined with/without lead. On the other hand, insignificant decreases of sAST, sALT, urea, and creatinine in group fed on vitamin E and selenium, while increase in lead acetate intoxicated group. Lead acetate caused increasing of lipid peroxidation level (malondialdehyde) and decreasing of superoxide dismutase activity and reduced glutathione level. From these results, it is concluded that exposure to lead acetate is considered as hepatotoxic environmental pollutant. Exposure to lead acetate induced significant effects on antioxidant status. Antioxidants (vitamin E and selenium) showed important roles to protect body against lipid peroxidation, which considered as the first step of cell membrane damage, in addition to the improvement of the endogenous antioxidant enzyme activities.

  6. The predictive value of self-report questions in a clinical decision rule for pediatric lead poisoning screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplowitz, Stan A; Perlstadt, Harry; D'Onofrio, Gail; Melnick, Edward R; Baum, Carl R; Kirrane, Barbara M; Post, Lori A

    2012-01-01

    We derived a clinical decision rule for determining which young children need testing for lead poisoning. We developed an equation that combines lead exposure self-report questions with the child's census-block housing and socioeconomic characteristics, personal demographic characteristics, and Medicaid status. This equation better predicts elevated blood lead level (EBLL) than one using ZIP code and Medicaid status. A survey regarding potential lead exposure was administered from October 2001 to January 2003 to Michigan parents at pediatric clinics (n=3,396). These self-report survey data were linked to a statewide clinical registry of blood lead level (BLL) tests. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated and then used to estimate the cost-effectiveness of the equation. The census-block group prediction equation explained 18.1% of the variance in BLLs. Replacing block group characteristics with the self-report questions and dichotomized ZIP code risk explained only 12.6% of the variance. Adding three self-report questions to the census-block group model increased the variance explained to 19.9% and increased specificity with no loss in sensitivity in detecting EBLLs of ≥ 10 micrograms per deciliter. Relying solely on self-reports of lead exposure predicted BLL less effectively than the block group model. However, adding three of 13 self-report questions to our clinical decision rule significantly improved prediction of which children require a BLL test. Using the equation as the clinical decision rule would annually eliminate more than 7,200 unnecessary tests in Michigan and save more than $220,000.

  7. The attributable annual health costs of U.S. occupational lead poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Ronnie

    2016-04-01

    U.S. occupational lead standards have not changed for decades, while knowledge about lead's health effects has grown substantially. The objective of this analysis was twofold: to estimate the attributable annual societal costs of health damages associated with occupationally lead-exposed U.S. workers and, more broadly, to develop methods for a fuller valuation of health damages. I combined data voluntarily reported to NIOSH on the number of highly exposed workers with published literature on the health effects of lead in adults to estimate the potential health benefits of lowering the U.S. occupational limit. I developed simple algorithms for monetizing more fully both the direct medical and indirect (productivity) damages associated with those high lead exposures. I estimated direct medical costs of $141 million (2014US$) per year for 16 categories of health endpoints, and combined direct and indirect costs of over $392 million (2014US$) per year for the 10,000 or so U.S. workers with high occupational lead exposures. Reducing allowable occupational lead limits produces annual societal benefits of almost $40,000 per highly exposed worker. Given underreporting of actual exposures and the omission of important health effects, this is likely a severe underestimate.

  8. LEAD POISONING OF WATERFOWL AS INDICATORS OF WATER POLLUTION BY HEAVY METALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhmud M.E.

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of lead shot in waterfowl gizzards, surveyed in 1969-1985 years was considered in the south ofWestern Siberia and in the southern Ukraine. The gastric contents were investigated of 1722 birds of 13 species. ForMallard, Garganey, Eurasian Teal, and Common Pochard the lead shot was detected in the coastal areas of theDanube Delta. Maximum infestation was registered for Garganey (33,3% and Common Pochard (25,0%. Theresults are compared with data for other European countries. The necessity and effectiveness of interventions aimedat reducing the extent of lead contamination of waterfowl was discussed.

  9. "Another Link in the Chain" Update: State Policies and Practices for Case Management and Environmental Investigation for Lead-Poisoned Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaine, Pat; Gaitens, Joanna

    This report details a national survey, conducted in 2000, to document changes since 1998 in policies and practices for case management and environmental investigation for lead poisoned children; the study also investigated the impact of the previous national survey in precipitating change. Participating in the survey were program directors or…

  10. Evaluation of Symptoms and Characteristic Features of Lead Poisoning and their Assistance in Clinical Decision Making

    OpenAIRE

    D'souza HS; Menezes G; Dsouza SA; Venkatesh T

    2015-01-01

    Aim of the present study is to evaluate the symptoms and characteristics features in lead based industrial workers and accessing their reliability in clinical decision making and diagnosing lead toxicity. Study involves 15 industrial workers (exposed) and 15 non-exposed individuals, matched for age, sex and nationality selected from Bangalore, India. Association of various symptoms and characteristic features in exposed and non-exposed groups were evaluated and their association with high ...

  11. Substance and device for the absorption of catalyst poisoning gases out of the oxyhydrogen gas produced by lead-acid storage batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahme, N.W.; Sassmannshausen, G.C.

    1977-09-13

    A substance, a method of producing it, and a device for using the substance in the absorption of catalyst-poisoning gases out of the oxyhydrogen gas mixture produced by lead--acid storage batteries are described. The substance causes the oxidation of the unstable catalyst-poisoning gases SbH/sub 3/ and AsH/sub 3/ to produce hydrolysis-resistant intermetallic compounds. As absorbing substances they are usable heavy-metal manganites, heavy-metal oxides, and catalytic agents. As a device, the absorbing substance is combined with an oxygen and hydrogen recombination unit. 1 figure.

  12. Food Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Food Poisoning KidsHealth / For Kids / Food Poisoning What's in ... find out how to avoid it. What Is Food Poisoning? Food poisoning comes from eating foods that ...

  13. Childhood lead poisoning from the smelter in Torreón, México.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Jiménez, Martin F; Flegal, Arthur R

    2011-05-01

    Lead concentrations and isotopic compositions in blood samples of 34 children (ages 2-17 years) living within a 113 km(2) area of a silver-zinc-lead smelter plant in Torreón, México were compared to those of associated environmental samples (soil, aerosols, and outdoor and indoor dust) to identify the principal source(s) of environmental and human lead contamination in the area. Lead concentrations of soil and outdoor dust ranged 130-12,050 and 150-14,365 μg g(-1), respectively. Concentrations were greatest near the smelter, with the highest levels corresponding with the prevailing wind direction, and orders of magnitude above background concentrations of 7.3-33.3 μg g(-1). Atmospheric lead depositions in the city varied between 130 and 1350 μg m(-2) d(-1), again with highest rates lead (PbB) concentrations (11.0±5.3 μg dl(-1)) levels in the children ranged 5.0-25.8 μg dl(-1), which is 3-14 times higher than the current average (1.9 μg dl(-1)) of children (ages 1-5 years) in the US. Lead isotopic ratios ((206)Pb/(207)Pb, (208)Pb/(207)Pb) of the urban dust and soil (1.200±0.009, 2.467±0.003), aerosols (1.200±0.002, 2.466±0.002), and PbB (1.199±0.001, 2.468±0.002) were indistinguishable from each other, as well as those of the lead ores processed at the smelter (1.199±0.007, 2.473±0.007). Consequently, an elevated PbB concentrations of the children in Torreón, as well as in their environment, are still dominated by industrial emissions from the smelter located within the city, in spite of new controls on atmospheric releases from the facility. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. LEAD POISONING OF WATERFOWL AS INDICATORS OF WATER POLLUTION BY HEAVY METALS

    OpenAIRE

    Zhmud M.E.; Koshelev A. I.

    2011-01-01

    The occurrence of lead shot in waterfowl gizzards, surveyed in 1969-1985 years was considered in the south ofWestern Siberia and in the southern Ukraine. The gastric contents were investigated of 1722 birds of 13 species. ForMallard, Garganey, Eurasian Teal, and Common Pochard the lead shot was detected in the coastal areas of theDanube Delta. Maximum infestation was registered for Garganey (33,3%) and Common Pochard (25,0%). Theresults are compared with data for other European countries. The...

  15. Lead poisoning associated with malaria in children of urban areas of Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nriagu, Jerome; Afeiche, Myriam; Linder, Aaron; Arowolo, Toyin; Ana, Godson; Sridhar, Mynepalli K C; Oloruntoba, E O; Obi, Ejeatulu; Ebenebe, Joy C; Orisakwe, Orish E; Adesina, Adesuwa

    2008-10-01

    The principal objectives of this study are to (a) investigate the prevalence of elevated blood lead levels (EBLLs) in children of three major cities of Nigeria with different levels of industrial pollution; (b) identify the environmental, social and behavioral risk factors for the EBLLs in the children; and (c) explore the association between malaria (endemic in the study areas) and EBLLs in the pediatric population. The study involved 653 children aged 2-9 years (average, 3.7 years). The mean blood lead level (BLL) for the children was 8.9+/-4.8microg/dL, the median value was 7.8microg/dL, and the range was 1-52microg/dL. About 25% of the children had BLL greater than 10microg/dL. There were important differences in BLLs across the three cities, with the average value in Ibadan (9.9+/-5.2microg/dL) and Nnewi (8.3+/-3.5microg/dL) being higher than that in Port Harcourt (4.7+/-2.2micro/dL). Significant positive associations were found between BLL and a child's town of residence (psymptoms. The shared environmental and socio-demographic risks factors for lead exposure and Plasmodium (most common malaria parasites) infection in urban areas of Nigeria are discussed along with possible ways that lead exposure may influence the host response to infection with malarial parasites.

  16. A comparison of sodium calcium edetate (edetate calcium disodium) and succimer (DMSA) in the treatment of inorganic lead poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradberry, Sally; Vale, Allister

    2009-11-01

    This article reviews the experimental and clinical studies that have compared the efficacy (impact on urine lead excretion, blood and tissue lead concentrations, resolution of features and survival) of sodium calcium edetate (edetate calcium disodium) and succimer (DMSA) in the treatment of inorganic lead poisoning. It also summarizes the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic aspects and the adverse effects of treatment. Medline, Toxline, and Embase were searched for all available years to June 2009. PHARMACOKINETICS AND PHARMACODYNAMICS: The absorption of oral DMSA is more complete than sodium calcium edetate; the latter has to be administered parenterally. Both antidotes are distributed predominantly extracellularly. Sodium calcium edetate is not metabolized, whereas DMSA is extensively metabolized to mixed disulfides of cysteine. The two antidotes have elimination half-lives of less than 60 min. There is no evidence that either antidote crosses the blood-brain barrier to any major extent. Sodium calcium edetate chelates lead by displacement of the central Ca2+ ion with Pb2+. The nature of the DMSA-lead chelate is less clearly defined. There is evidence that the mixed disulfides of cysteine are the active chelating moiety in humans. If this is the case, this suggests that chelation occurs principally, if not exclusively, in the kidney. The primary source of lead mobilized by sodium calcium edetate is bone with an additional contribution from kidney and liver. Comparison of the experimental studies is complicated by substantial variations in study design, particularly the antidote dose, the route and duration of treatment, the amount and duration of lead dosing, and lack of direct comparison between antidotes (comparison was usually made with control). In experimental studies that used equimolar and clinically relevant antidote doses and assessed the impact of DMSA and sodium calcium edetate on urine lead excretion and/or blood lead concentrations, similar results

  17. [Lead poisoning in children from the industrial region of Silesia--markers of chronic intoxication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sada-Cieślar, M; Mazur, B; Buszman, Z; Cieślar, G

    1994-08-01

    In the paper the degree of lead micro-intoxication was assessed in school children from the region of emissions of the Mining-Ironworks Complex "Bolesław" in Bukowno. The study included 323 children of either sex aged from 7 to 14 years. In these children the levels of selected lead intoxication markers were determined--concentration of zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) in the erythrocytes and concentration of delta-amino-laevulinic acid (ALA) in urine. The obtained results were compared with corresponding results in the control group which consisted of 163 children of the same age, living in a control area without exposure to heavy metals. In the studied group in all age subgroups, significantly higher ALA concentrations in urine were observed in comparison to the control group. At the same time, exceeding of upper acceptable range of ALA concentration in the organism was five times more frequent in this group. On the other hand, the concentration of ZnPP in the erythrocytes failed to show any significant differences between the compared groups in any of the analysed age subgroups. On the basis of the obtained results it was demonstrated that the school children living in the region of emissions of the MIC "Bolesław" had biochemical features of long-term lead microintoxication. As it seems, the concentration of ALA in urine is of greater diagnostic value in comparison to the concentration of ZnPP in the erythrocytes in screening examinations in these children.

  18. Biological and societal dimensions of lead poisoning in birds in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, Milton; Franson, J. Christian; Anderson, William L.

    2008-01-01

    The ingestion of spent lead shot was known to cause mortality in wild waterfowl in the US a century before the implementation of nontoxic shot regulations began in 1972. The biological foundation for this transition was strongly supported by both field observations and structured scientific investigations. Despite the overwhelming evidence, various societal factors forestalled the full transition to nontoxic shot for waterfowl hunting until 1991. Now, nearly 20 years later, these same factors weigh heavily in current debates about nontoxic shot requirements for hunting other game birds, requiring nontoxic bullets for big game hunting in California Condor range and for restricting the use of small lead sinkers and jig heads for sport-fishing. As with waterfowl, a strong science-based foundation is requisite for further transitions to nontoxic ammunition and fishing weights. Our experiences have taught us that the societal aspects of this transition are as important as the biological components and must be adequately addressed before alternatives to toxic lead ammunition, fishing weights, and other materials will be accepted as an investment in wildlife conservation.

  19. Manioc flour consumption as a risk factor for lead poisoning in the Brazilian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Maria Fernanda Hornos; Evangelista, Fabio Sidonio de B; Barbosa, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies reported elevated blood lead (Pb) levels in riparian populations of the Amazon. For this reason, the aim of the present study was to assess the risk to riparians in the Brazilian Amazon to Pb exposure due to the intake of contaminated manioc flour. Lead levels were determined in whole blood (n = 74) and in manioc flour samples (n = 30) in three different communities. Mean blood Pb levels were 16.8 μg/dl, with individuals living in Açaituba presenting the highest mean blood Pb level (22.4 μg/dl), followed by Nova Canaã (17.3 μg/dl) and Santa Cruz (9.8 μg/dl). The minimum blood Pb level found was 0.83 μg/dl and the maximum was 44.3 μg/dl. The estimated daily intake (EDI) was calculated and compared to the benchmark dose lower confidence limit (BMDL) for neurotoxicity. Mean Pb in manioc flour was 0.34 μg/g while EDI was 79 μg/d, corresponding to 260% of the BMDL (varying from 168 to 308%). This finding is of great importance since this high EDI may exert adverse effects on the nervous system of this population. Manioc flour intake may thus present considerable risk of Pb exposure in this region. Risk management strategies and further studies on adverse effects in this population are needed.

  20. Benjamin Franklin's risk factors for gout and stones: from genes and diet to possible lead poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, Stanley; Hagemann, Ian S

    2008-06-01

    Benjamin Franklin's medical history shows that he suffered from repeated attacks of gout and a large bladder stone. These conditions caused him considerable pain, markedly decreased his mobility, and likely contributed in indirect ways to his decline and eventual death from a pulmonary disorder. This article examines Franklin's risk factors for gout and stones, both as Franklin understood them and as we know them today. Significantly, both of these disorders are associated with high blood levels of uric acid, a metabolic by-product. Franklin's risk factors included his gender, genetics, diet, drinking, advanced age, psoriasis, and exposure to lead. Although it is impossible to assign a weight to each of these factors, it can be shown that a number of factors, each capable of raising uric acid levels, converged and conspired against him.

  1. [Lead poisoning in children from the industrial region of Silesia--hematologic indices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sada-Cieślar, M; Mazur, B; Buszman, Z; Cieślar, G

    1994-08-01

    In the paper, the basic parameters of blood morphologic pattern were assessed in school children exposed to toxic heavy metal emission. The studies included 323 children aged from 7 to 14 years, living in the region of emissions of the Mining-Ironworks Complex "Bolesław" in Bukowno. In these children haemoglobin concentration, haematocrit and erythrocyte and leucocyte counts were determined using routine laboratory tests. The obtained results were compared with corresponding results in the control group which consisted of 163 children of either sex living in a control region without exposure to heavy metals. In the studied group in most age subgroups significant decreases of erythrocyte count haemoglobin concentration and increases of haematocrit value were observed in comparison to the control group. At the same time, in these children, ten times higher, in relation to the control group, incidence was found of haemoglobin concentrations below 120 g/l, characteristic of anaemia. As it seems, one of important factors causing the decrease of the value of the parameters of blood morphologic pattern in the studied children is chronic microintoxication with lead, manifesting itself as significantly increased concentration of delta-amino-laevulinic acid in urine which is a sensitive marker of this intoxication.

  2. Risk assessment of lead poisoning and pesticide exposure in the declining population of red-breasted goose (Branta ruficollis) wintering in Eastern Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Mateo, Rafael; Petkov, Nikolai; Lopez-Antia, Ana; Rodriguez-Estival, Jaime; Green, Andy J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: The red-breasted goose Branta ruficollis is a globally threatened species (IUCN Vulnerable) and the only European goose species currently in decline. Working on the wintering grounds on the Black Sea Coast, we address two potential causes of decline of this species for the first time: lead poisoning, and contamination from pesticides. We quantified the densities of spent Pb shot in three wetlands used by the geese in north-east Bulgaria, and analysed the Pb concentration in the faec...

  3. Evaluation of nanoselenium (Nano-Se) effect on hematological and serum biochemical parameters of rat in experimentally lead poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehkordi, A Jafari; Mohebbi, A N; Aslani, M R; Ghoreyshi, S M

    2017-04-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of nanoselenium (Nano-Se) on hematological and biochemical parameters of rats experimentally intoxicated with lead (Pb). Thirty male rats were randomly divided into six groups as follows: the control, selenite, Nano-Se, Pb group, Pb + selenite, and Pb + Nano-Se groups. After 35 days, blood was collected from rats and hematology and serum biochemical parameters of oxidative stress were measured. The thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) level of Pb group was significantly higher than other groups. Also, TBARS level was significantly lower in the Pb + Nano-Se group than Pb + selenite group. The serum superoxide dismutase activities were significantly lower in Pb group than the control, Pb + selenite, and Pb + Nano-Se groups. The catalase activities in the Pb group showed no significant change when compared to other groups. In the Pb group, packed cell volume was lower than the control group. A significant difference was observed between the control group and the Pb, Pb + selenite, and Pb + Nano-Se groups. In the Pb group, the numbers of white blood cell (WBC) decreased in comparison with the control group. Also, there was significant increase in WBC counts in the Pb + Nano-Se and Pb + selenite groups in comparison with Pb group. The number of lymphocytes in the Pb group decreased in comparison with the control group. By comparing the means of the Pb + Nano-Se and Pb + selenite groups together, it was determined that there were significant differences in the lymphocytes and neutrophil counts. In conclusion, usage of selenium compounds particularly Nano-Se particles inhibits the adverse effects of Pb on antioxidant activity and immune system function in the Pb poisoning.

  4. Educational Case: Lead Poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara E. C. Knollmann-Ritschel MD

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The following fictional case is intended as a learning tool within the Pathology Competencies for Medical Education (PCME, a set of national standards for teaching pathology. These are divided into three basic competencies: Disease Mechanisms and Processes, Organ System Pathology, and Diagnostic Medicine and Therapeutic Pathology. For additional information, and a full list of learning objectives for all three competencies, see http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/2374289517715040 .

  5. Evaluation of blood lead level in methamphetamine users in Tehran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafazadeh, Babak; Shadnia, Shahin; Tavakkoli, Mohammad Ali; Khoddami Vishteh, Hamid Reza

    2017-02-22

    Given the increasing number of lead poisoning in opioids users and since no study has been conducted so far to review lead poisoning in methamphetamine (crystal) users, this study aimed to investigate blood lead level in methamphetamine addicts. This study was conducted on 20 patients with methamphetamine poisoning and their blood lead level was measured. The subjects were selected from among patients with a history of continuous use of methamphetamine, without a history of using opiates in the past 6 months confirmed by a negative urine tests, and without a history of heavy metal poisoning. Of all, 18 patients were male and the mean age was 32 ± 10 years; 17 patients were abusing the drug via inhalation and three persons via oral administration. The mean blood lead level was 2.3 ± 1.1 μg/dL and poisoning was not observed in any of the cases. Blood lead level was not associated with age, sex, dosage, and route of administration. Although blood lead level was not at poisoning level in people who only used methamphetamine in Iran, due to the simultaneous use of other substances and because of non-specific symptoms, lead poisoning must be suspected in all cases of substances poisoning.

  6. The role of clinical laboratories in lead exposure: from diagnosis of acute poisonings to neonatal screening? A report on two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena García-González

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The role of clinical laboratories in lead exposure has traditionally focused on the diagnosis of poisonings that pose a risk to human health. However, the last decades of the twentieth century saw an increase in public awareness of lead exposure, which prompted the banning of both lead-containing paint and petrol. As a result, acute lead poisonings are increasingly rare in industrialized countries. However, this is always a latent danger that clinicians should be aware of. As an example of this we describe two cases that we recently diagnosed at our laboratory.Even more worrying is confirming the harmful effects of lead on children, even at concentrations hitherto considered safe. This has renewed interest in the determination of this element in clinical laboratories in order to find and control all those pregnant women and children who might have blood lead levels above a suitable threshold value, which is currently set at 50 μg L-1 for both populations. If this situation becomes the norm, the role of clinical laboratories with respect to lead determination will undergo a major change. This possibility is discussed in this paper, together with a pilot program developed at our hospital for such purpose.

  7. Manejo de la intoxicación por plomo en la niñez Managing childhood lead poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morri E Markowitz

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available El presente artículo hace una revisión del manejo clínico de la intoxicación por plomo en la niñez. Se menciona las definiciones de las diferentes técnicas de medición usadas para la determinación de plomo, y se destacan sus ventajas y posibles limitaciones. La medición de los niveles de plomo sanguíneo puede realizarse utilizando muestra de sangre anticoagulada por espectrofotometría de absorción atómica voltametría anódica. Sin embargo, un método más eficiente para medir las concentraciones de plomo en hueso es mediante fluorescencia de Rayos X o para la determinación sistémica en un nivel bioquímico una técnica adecuada es la determinación de los niveles de plomo en orina. El tratamiento incluye la eliminación de la fuente de exposición, cambios en los hábitos de los niños y una dieta adecuada en calcio y hierro. La quelación con edetato de calcio y succimer elimina el plomo del esqueleto, el cual es eliminado por riñón; puede salvar vidas cuando la intoxicación es importante, y existe una reducción a corto plazo seguida de un aumento subsecuente de los niveles de plomo sanguíneo. En casos graves suele requerirse de dosis repetidas. La terapia de quelación puede ser necesaria en casos de niveles de plomo sanguíneo por arriba de 45 µg/dl. La quelación reduce los niveles de plomo sanguíneo y los síntomas asociados, sin embargo, la disminución cognoscitiva puede ser irreversible, por lo que la utilización de medidas preventivas es mucho mejor que las de curación.This paper reviews the clinical management of children with lead poisoning. A first step is to define the measures to be used in their assessment and be aware of the limitations. Measurements of blood lead levels can be made on anti-coagulated whole blood samples using either: atomic absorption spectroscopy or anodic stripping voltametry. However a more accurate method is fluorescent RX'ray of the skeleton or systematic biochemical tests of lead

  8. Lead Poisoning and Children. Hearing Before the Subcommittee on Health and the Environment of the Committee on Energy and Commerce. House of Representatives, Ninety-Seventh Congress, Second Session (December 2, 1982).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Energy and Commerce.

    These hearings examine the problem of lead poisoning in children and explore the consequences of the transfer of funds for lead-screening efforts to the maternal child health block grant. Lead toxicity is described as probably the most significant and pervasive environmental illness in the United States. Testimony asserts that the effect of the…

  9. Food poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, David T; Dobmeier, Stephen G; Bechtel, Laura K; Holstege, Christopher P

    2007-05-01

    Food poisoning is encountered throughout the world. Many of the toxins responsible for specific food poisoning syndromes are no longer limited to isolated geographic locations. With increased travel and the ease of transporting food products, it is likely that a patient may present to any emergency department with the clinical effects of food poisoning. Recognizing specific food poisoning syndromes allows emergency health care providers not only to initiate appropriate treatment rapidly but also to notify health departments early and thereby prevent further poisoning cases. This article reviews several potential food-borne poisons and describes each agent's mechanism of toxicity, expected clinical presentation, and currently accepted treatment.

  10. Traditional medicine: a rare cause of lead poisoning in Western countries [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/2c6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halima Muller

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A 42-year-old man from Bhutan was admitted to the emergency department with a 5-day history of abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. Enhanced abdominal CT scan was found negative, however laboratory tests showed hemolytic anemia and basophilic stippling which are often seen in lead and heavy metal poisoning. Additional tests revealed a high level of lead in blood and urine. The patient was administered a chelator treatment with rapid improvement of the symptoms. A detailed interview revealed that the patient had been taking daily Bhutanese traditional medicines to treat a Bell’s palsy from which he had been suffering for a few months. The analysis of these medicines confirmed the presence of a high level of lead.

  11. Lead levels - blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blood lead levels ... is used to screen people at risk for lead poisoning. This may include industrial workers and children ... also used to measure how well treatment for lead poisoning is working. Lead is common in the ...

  12. Zinc and lead poisoning in wild birds in the tri-state mining district (Oklahoma, Kansas, and Missouri).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, W N; Dalgarn, J; Dudding, S; French, J B; Mateo, R; Miesner, J; Sileo, L; Spann, J

    2005-01-01

    The Tri-State Mining District (Oklahoma, Kansas, and Missouri) is contaminated with Pb, Cd, and Zn from mining, milling and smelting. Metals have been dispersed heterogeneously throughout the District in the form of milled mine waste ("chat"), as flotation tailings and from smelters as aerial deposition or slag. This study was conducted to determine if the habitat has been contaminated to the extent that the assessment populations of wild birds are exposed to toxic concentrations of metals. American robins (Turdus migratorius), northern cardinals (Cardinalis cardinalis), and waterfowl had increased Pb tissue concentrations (p birds, and the exposure of songbirds to Pb was comparable with that of birds observed at other sites severely contaminated with Pb. Mean activities of the Pb-sensitive enzyme delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) were decreased by >50% in red blood cells in these birds (p birds had tissue concentrations of Pb that have been associated with impaired biological functions and external signs of poisoning. Cadmium was increased in kidneys of songbirds (p birds have been found to be suffering severe effects of Zn poisoning.

  13. Zinc and lead poisoning in wild birds in the Tri-State Mining District (Oklahoma, Kansas, Missouri)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, W.N.; Dalgam, J.; Dudding, S.; French, J.B.; Mateo, R.; Miesner, J.; Sileo, L.; Spann, J.

    2004-01-01

    contaminated with Pb, Cd, and Zn from mining, milling and smelting. Metals have been dispersed heterogeneously throughout the District in the form of milled mine waste ('chat'), as flotation tailings and from smelters as aerial deposition or slag. This study was conducted to determine if the habitat has been contaminated to the extent that the assessment populations of wild birds are exposed to toxic concentrations of metals. American robins (Turdus migratorius), northern cardinals (Cardinalis cardinalis), and waterfowl had increased Pb tissue concentrations (p birds, and the exposure of songbirds to Pb was comparable with that of birds observed at other sites severely contaminated with Pb. Mean activities of the Pb-sensitive enzyme delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) were decreased by >50% in red blood cells in these birds (p birds had tissue concentrations of Pb that have been associated with impaired biological functions and external signs of poisoning. Cadmium was increased in kidneys of songbirds (p birds have been found to be suffering severe effects of Zn poisoning.

  14. Ethanol poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002644.htm Ethanol poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Ethanol poisoning is caused by drinking too much alcohol. ...

  15. Poison Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Safety & Prevention Immunizations All Around At Home At Play On ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Poison Prevention Page Content Article Body Post the Poison Help ...

  16. Poisonous Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH POISONOUS PLANTS Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Photo courtesy ... U.S. Department of Agriculture Many native and exotic plants are poisonous to humans when ingested or if ...

  17. Starch poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooking starch poisoning; Laundry starch poisoning ... Cooking and laundry starch are both made from vegetable products, most commonly: Corn Potatoes Rice Wheat Both are usually considered nonpoisonous (nontoxic), but ...

  18. Cologne poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ingredients in cologne can be poisonous: Ethyl alcohol (ethanol) Isopropyl alcohol (isopropanol) There may be other poisonous ... D, Hovda KE. Methanol, ethylene glycol, and other toxic alcohols. In: Shannon MW, Borron SW, Burns MJ, ...

  19. Methanol poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... reverse the effect of the poison (fomepizole or ethanol) Tube through the nose to remove remaining poison, ... Elsevier Churchill Livingstone; 2015:chap 29. White SR. Toxic alcohols. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, ...

  20. Copper poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Poisoning and Drug Overdose . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2007:chap 75. Holland MG. Pulmonary toxicology. ... Poisoning and Drug Overdose . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2007:chap 9. Jones AL, Dargan PI. ...

  1. Insecticide poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Poisoning and Drug Overdose . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2007:chap 76. Borron SW. Pyrethins, repellants, ... Poisoning and Drug Overdose . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2007:chap 77. Cannon RD, Ruha A- ...

  2. [Mushroom poisonings: syndromic diagnosis and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The major syndromes of mushroom poisoning can be divided by presentation timing: Early syndromes (symptom onset 6 hrs after ingestion) are life-threatening due to liver- and renal failure. Patients who are jaundiced after an acute gastrointestinal episode, are suspected to be poisoned with Amatoxins. Patients with flank pain, hematuria, polyuria or oliguria in the absence of jaundice are suspected to have an intoxication with Cortinarius mushrooms. In both cases an intensive care management is indicated.

  3. Spooky Suspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacifici, Lara

    2011-01-01

    This activity presents an option for covering biology content while engaging students in an investigation that highlights the spirit of Halloween. Students are engaged in the story line and have fun trying to solve the mystery kidnapping by using science skills to examine the evidence and eliminate some ghoulish suspects. (Contains 1 figure.)

  4. Gastrolobium spp. poisoning in sheep: A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report describes the history and investigation of a suspected plant poisoning event in Western Australia where fifteen sheep died. One of the poisoned sheep was necropsied and gross and microscopic pathology of the poisoned sheep is described. Monofluoroacetate was detected in rumen contents ...

  5. [Poisonings with Amanita phalloides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferenc, Tomasz; Lukasiewicz, Beata; Ciećwierz, Julita; Kowalczyk, Edward

    2009-01-01

    Amanita phalloides is the most dangerous, poisonous mushroom species in our climatic conditions. It is the cause of 90-95% of all deaths due to mushroom poisoning, a-Amanitin, a polymerase RNA II inhibitor, is mainly responsible for the Amanita phalloides toxic property. Inhibition of polymerase RNA II functioning in a transcription process is connected with inhibition biosynthesis of structural and enzymatic proteins in cells. A lethal dose of a-amanitin is 0.1 mg/kg b.w. for humans. One of the medical problems in Amanita phalloides poisonings is a relatively prolonged latency period (8-24 h) from mushroom ingestion, at the same time the cytotropic action of absorbed toxins is revealed. In severe cases, multi organ failure, renal and hepatitis failure can occur. Deaths in a-amanitin poising cases follows between 6-16 days after intoxication. Mortality in this group of patients is still high and amounts to approximately 20-30% in adults and exceeds 50% in children. If mushroom poisoning occurs, it is best treated with pharmacological agents, extracorporeal methods for toxin removal and liver transplantation. Recent high expectations concerning liver albumin dialysis (based on MARS) should support liver regeneration and will also help with possible liver transplantation. In a medical community it is generally believed that every suspected Amanita phalloides poisoning should be referred to a specialized health center.

  6. Carbon monoxide poisoning

    OpenAIRE

    Dolan, Michael C.

    1985-01-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning is a significant cause of illness and death. Its protean symptoms probably lead to a gross underestimation of its true incidence. Low levels of carbon monoxide aggravate chronic cardiopulmonary problems, and high levels are associated with cardiac arrhythmias and cerebral edema. Patients who survive acute poisoning are at risk of delayed neurologic sequelae. The measurement of carboxyhemoglobin levels does not reveal the tissue levels of carbon monoxide but is useful...

  7. Acute arsenic poisoning diagnosed late.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumy, Farzana; Anam, Ahmad Mursel; Kamruzzaman, A K M; Amin, Md Robed; Chowdhury, M A Jalil

    2016-04-01

    Acute arsenicosis, although having a 'historical' background, is not common in our times. This report describes a case of acute arsenic poisoning, missed initially due to its gastroenteritis-like presentation, but suspected and confirmed much later, when the patient sought medical help for delayed complications after about 2 months. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Correlation analysis of the long latency auditory evoked potential N2 and cognitive P3 with the level of lead poisoning in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvarenga, Kátia de Freitas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The effects of lead on children's health have been widely studied. Aim: To analyze the correlation between the long latency auditory evoked potential N2 and cognitive P3 with the level of lead poisoning in Brazilian children. Methods: This retrospective study evaluated 20 children ranging in age from 7 to 14 years at the time of audiological and electrophysiological evaluations. We performed periodic surveys of the lead concentration in the blood and basic audiological evaluations. Furthermore, we studied the auditory evoked potential long latency N2 and cognitive P3 by analyzing the absolute latency of the N2 and P3 potentials and the P3 amplitude recorded at Cz. At the time of audiological and electrophysiological evaluations, the average concentration of lead in the blood was less than 10 ug/dL. Results: In conventional audiologic evaluations, all children had hearing thresholds below 20 dBHL for the frequencies tested and normal tympanometry findings; the auditory evoked potential long latency N2 and cognitive P3 were present in 95% of children. No significant correlations were found between the blood lead concentration and latency (p = 0.821 or amplitude (p = 0.411 of the P3 potential. However, the latency of the N2 potential increased with the concentration of lead in the blood, with a significant correlation (p = 0.030. Conclusion: Among Brazilian children with low lead exposure, a significant correlation was found between blood lead levels and the average latency of the auditory evoked potential long latency N2; however, a significant correlation was not observed for the amplitude and latency of the cognitive potential P3.

  9. Frequency of Cardiac Arrhythmias in Patients with Aluminum Phosphide Poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umair Aziz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiac failure is the major lethal consequence of aluminum phosphide (AlP poisoning. This study was designed to determine the frequency of cardiac arrhythmias in patients with AlP poisoning. Methods: In this prospective cross-sectional study, patients with definitive history of AlP poisoning treated at emergency department of Allied Hospital Faisalabad, Faisalabad, Pakistan, from July 2013 to November 2014 were included. On admission, twelve-lead electrocardiogram (ECG was performed for all patients. During admission, all patients underwent continuous cardiac monitoring using a cardiac monitor. If an arrhythmia was suspected on the cardiac monitor, another ECG was obtained immediately.  Results: During the study period, 100 patients with AlP poisoning (63% men were treated at Allied Hospital Faisalabad. Mean age of the patients was 26.7 ± 7.9 years ranging from 16 to 54 years. Tachycardia was detected in 68 patients and bradycardia in 12 patients. Hypotension was observed in 75 patients. Eighty patients developed cardiac arrhythmia. The most frequent arrhythmia was atrial fibrillation (31% of patients followed by ventricular fibrillation (20%, ventricular tachycardia (17%, 3rd degree AV block (7% and 2nd degree AV block (5%. In total, 78 patients died, depicting a 78% mortality rate following wheat pill poisoning. Among those who died, seventy-one patients had cardiac arrhythmia. Comparison of death rate between patients with and without cardiac arrhythmia showed a significant difference (71/80 (88.8% vs. 7/20 (35%; P < 0.001.  Conclusion: Wheat pill poisoning causes a very high mortality, and circulatory collapse is the major cause of death among these patients. Most of the patients with AlP poisoning develop cardiac arrhythmias which are invariably life threatening. Early detection of cardiac disorders and proper management of arrhythmias may reduce mortalities.

  10. Prallethrin poisoning: A diagnostic dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alka Chandra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyrethroid insecticides are very widely used in agriculture and household due to their high effectiveness and low toxicity in humans. Despite their extensive worldwide use, there are a few reports of human pyrethroid poisoning. The poisoning has a varied presentation and its symptoms overlap with those of other compounds, which can lead to misdiagnosis. We present a case of poisoning with prallethrin, a pyrethroid compound, commonly available as All-Out.

  11. Prallethrin poisoning: A diagnostic dilemma

    OpenAIRE

    Alka Chandra; Dixit, Madhu B.; Banavaliker, Jayant N

    2013-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides are very widely used in agriculture and household due to their high effectiveness and low toxicity in humans. Despite their extensive worldwide use, there are a few reports of human pyrethroid poisoning. The poisoning has a varied presentation and its symptoms overlap with those of other compounds, which can lead to misdiagnosis. We present a case of poisoning with prallethrin, a pyrethroid compound, commonly available as All-Out.

  12. Food Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-05-16

    enterotoxemia and other bacterial enterotoxemias due to contamination of food by preformed toxins, botulism, mushroom poisoning and "other poisons of...Preformed Toxins of Bacterial Origin Enterotoxemia Protein toxins produced during the growth of Staphylococcal aureus in food cause the most common...NUMBER 2. GOVT ACCESSION NO. 3. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER 4. TITLE (and Subttl*e) 5. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Food Poisoning AD A 1 2 A- S

  13. Revisiting Nonresidential Environmental Exposures and Childhood Lead Poisoning in the US: Findings from Kansas, 2000–2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Ann Brink

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although blood lead levels (BLLs in US children have dramatically declined over the past 40 years, there remain pockets of children living in areas with elevated BLLs. While some increases (≥10 μg/dL may be associated with legacy lead paint, ambient air lead may be contributing to the problem. A deidentified dataset of information on over 60,000 Kansas children under 3 years of age who were tested for BLL was provided through the Kansas Environmental Public Health Tracking Network for the period 2000–2005. Using ArcGIS, we calculated distance (in miles from a lead-emitting industry referred to as a toxic release inventory (TRI site. The USEPA TRI database tracks the management of certain toxic chemicals that may pose a threat to human health. US facilities in different industry sectors must report annually amount of substances like lead into the environment including their exact location. Distance from a TRI site was inversely related to BLL after controlling for area-level poverty and pre-1950 housing. The results of our evaluation indicate there is a significant relationship between proximity to lead industry and childhood BLLs. Proximity to sources of lead emissions should be evaluated as a possible factor when identifying children for targeted BLL testing.

  14. Cascading impacts of anthropogenically driven habitat loss: deforestation, flooding, and possible lead poisoning in howler monkeys (Alouatta pigra).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serio-Silva, Juan Carlos; Olguín, Eugenia J; Garcia-Feria, Luis; Tapia-Fierro, Karla; Chapman, Colin A

    2015-01-01

    To construct informed conservation plans, researchers must go beyond understanding readily apparent threats such as habitat loss and bush-meat hunting. They must predict subtle and cascading effects of anthropogenic environmental modifications. This study considered a potential cascading effect of deforestation on the howler monkeys (Alouatta pigra) of Balancán, Mexico. Deforestation intensifies flooding. Thus, we predicted that increased flooding of the Usumacinta River, which creates large bodies of water that slowly evaporate, would produce increased lead content in the soils and plants, resulting in lead exposure in the howler monkeys. The average lead levels were 18.18 ± 6.76 ppm in the soils and 5.85 ± 4.37 ppm in the plants. However, the average lead content of the hair of 13 captured howler monkeys was 24.12 ± 5.84 ppm. The lead levels in the animals were correlated with 2 of 15 blood traits (lactate dehydrogenase and total bilirubin) previously documented to be associated with exposure to lead. Our research illustrates the urgent need to set reference values indicating when adverse impacts of high environmental lead levels occur, whether anthropogenic or natural, and the need to evaluate possible cascading effects of deforestation on primates.

  15. [A nitrite poisoning event associated with intentional chemical releases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Li, Bin; Lin, Lin; Zhang, Mao-tang; Liu, Qu; Huang, Wei; Xie, Xian-qing; Chen, Lin; Zhang, Shun-xiang

    2013-04-01

    To compare the field epidemiological investigation and the criminal investigation on a nitrite poisoning event caused by deliberate contamination. Cases were searched according to the definition of the disease. Information on the histories of onset and diet of all the cases and normal population on site, were investigated face to face. Information as ingredients, processing and sales of foods was also gathered. Samples were collected and nitrite detection were performed. Relevant materials were searched, cases were interviewed and data related to criminal results were collected. Poisoned persons were staff of a big company in Longgang district of Shenzhen. The overall attack rate was 56.25% (63/112), with suspected and confirmed rates as 41.96% and 14.28%, respectively. The fatality rate was 3.17% (2/63). Clinical manifestation and effect of treatment were in accordance with the characteristics of an episode related to acute nitrite food poisoning in terms of factors as the time of onset, involving different age, sex and jobs of the patients. A total of 191 samples, including vomits from patients and seven batches of food and environment samples, were collected, with a positive detected rate of nitrite as 18.84%. Information gathered from the field environment, food distribution and processing supported the assumption that this was an incident of nitrite poisoning event with intention. from the criminal investigation showed that the suspect stemmed from the market management rivalry, bought nitrite, dissolved and spread on food stalls F9 and F10. This event of intentional nitrite release resulting in food contamination which further leading to food poisoning, was completely proved by the joint efforts of the teams and expertise from the field epidemiology survey and the criminal investigation.

  16. Evaluation of the source and extent of lead poisoning at Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge, Bennett County, South Dakota

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The presence of lead shot at levels which would warrant remediation were not identified on any of the study plots. However, trumpeter swans and at least in prior...

  17. Mushroom poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erguven, M; Yilmaz, O; Deveci, M; Aksu, N; Dursun, F; Pelit, M; Cebeci, N

    2007-09-01

    We aimed to review characteristics of mushrooms and mushroom poisoning and compare clinical picture, laboratory data, treatment modalities and prognostic factors in children with amanita intoxication and non-amanita mushroom poisoning. We analyzed 39 pediatric patients through 1994-2004, retrospectively from the patient files and evaluated the patients in two groups as patients with amanita intoxication and patients with non-amanita mushroom poisoning. All of the cases were admitted to the hospital in autumn. Twenty three (59%) of the patients were female and 16 (41%) were male. Mean age of the patients was 8.05 +/- 2.10 years. Amanita phalloides toxin was detected in the serum in 8 patients. Eleven (28%) of the cases were strongly suggestive of amanita poisoning but alpha amanitin level could not be studied. The average time of appearance of symptoms after mushroom consumption, duration of symptoms, hospital stay, serum AST, ALT, PT and creatinine levels were significantly higher in patients with amanita poisoning (pamanita poisoning (30%), totally 7 patients died of hepatic coma. The average time of admission to hospital, mean AST, ALT, creatinine and PT values at 3rd day were significantly higher in patients who died of hepatic coma. Prognosis was better in case of early admittance to hospital in patients with amanita poisoning. Early diagnosis and treatment in mushroom poisoning can be life saving. Public awareness is very important in prevention of intoxication as well as encouraging early admission to hospitals.

  18. Alternative drugs go global: possible lead and/ or mercury intoxication from imported natural health products and a need for scientifically evaluated poisoning monitoring from environmental exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budnik, Lygia Therese; Baur, Xaver; Harth, Volker; Hahn, Axel

    2016-01-01

    With increases in globalization, cultural remedies from Chinese, Ayurvedic, Arab and other traditions have become more available to international consumers, offering unfamiliar "Natural Health Products" (NHP), used as alternative medicine or supplementary medicine. Contamination with toxic ingredients including lead, mercury, arsenic, and other toxic elements has been documented in several of these products from various parts of the globe, particularly from some parts of Asia and the Orient. We have been following this development in the last 6 years and have analyzed n = 20 such products (60 analyses) from patients with intoxication symptoms in a pilot study, showing alarming high concentrations of mercury and/or lead (the first one in "therapeutic" doses). 82 % of the studied NHP contained lead concentrations above the EU limit for dietary supplements. 62 % of the samples exceeded the limit values for mercury. Elevated blood lead and mercury levels in patients along with clinical intoxication symptoms corroborate the causal assumption of intoxication (s). We present one detailed clinical case report of severe lead and mercury intoxications and give an overview about blood concentration related symptoms and signs of n = 41 case reports of mercury intoxications of the German monitoring BfR-DocCenter. For NHP there is evidence on a distinct toxicological risk with alarming low awareness for a possible intoxication which prevents potentially life-saving diagnostic steps in affected cases. In many cases patients do not communicate the events to their physicians or the local health authority so that case reports (e.g. the BfR-DocCentre) are missing. Thus, there is an urgent need to raise awareness and to initiate more suitable monitory systems (e.g. National Monitoring of Poisonings) and control practice protecting the public.

  19. Lead poisoning mortality in wild passeriformes and its detection in free-range chicken eggs in Southern Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NRS Martins

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The mortality of passerines native of Southern Minas Gerais, Brazil, in August 2006 and the examination of sentinel free-range chicken eggs in August 2007 in an area surrounding a car battery lead smelter plant is described. The high levels of lead, as detected in the passerines (4.80-12.74 mg/kg at the onset of mortality and at the follow-up sampling of the free-range chicken eggs (25.02-35.21 mg/kg in shells, 0.41-1.36 mg/kg in yolks and 0.40-0.75 mg/kg in the albumins, used as environmental sentinels, indicated the continuing lead pollution.

  20. Lead Poisoning and Anemia Associated with Use of Ayurvedic Medications Purchased on the Internet--Wisconsin, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiman, Jon; Thiboldeaux, Robert; Anderson, Henry

    2015-08-21

    On April 30, 2015, the Wisconsin Division of Public Health (WDPH) was notified by a local health department of an elevated blood lead level (BLL) in a female patient aged 64 years. All Wisconsin laboratories are required to provide BLL testing results performed on any state resident to WDPH, and WDPH and local health departments are statutorily mandated to investigate any single BLL ≥20 µg/dL or BLLs that are persistently ≥15 µg/dL. Review of medical records revealed that the patient had developed progressive fatigue and shortness of breath during a period of multiple weeks that prompted inpatient medical evaluation. Hemoglobin level was 8.3 g/dL (normal range for age and sex of patient = 12.5-15.0 g/dL), and peripheral blood smear showed normochromic, normocytic red blood cells with basophilic stippling. A BLL was obtained and found to be 85.8 µg/dL. Urine toxic metals tests revealed mercury and aluminum levels in the normal range. Combined methylated and inorganic urine arsenic levels were slightly elevated at 53.3 µg/L (normal = lead chelation therapy with oral meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid.

  1. Menthol poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menthol is used to add peppermint flavor to candy and other products. It is also used in certain skin lotions and ointments. This article discusses menthol poisoning from swallowing pure menthol. This article is ...

  2. Chlorine poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlorine is a chemical that prevents bacteria from growing. Chlorine poisoning occurs when someone swallows or breathes in (inhales) chlorine. This article is for information only. Do NOT use it to ...

  3. Acetone poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002480.htm Acetone poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acetone is a chemical used in many household products. ...

  4. Paradichlorobenzene poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... amounts are usually swallowed. References Holland MG. Occupational toxicology. In: Shannon MW, Borron SW, Burns MJ, eds. ... and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Pesticides Read more Poisoning Read more NIH MedlinePlus Magazine ...

  5. Gasoline poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002806.htm Gasoline poisoning To use the sharing features on this ... This article discusses the harmful effects from swallowing gasoline or breathing in its fumes. This article is ...

  6. Refrigerant poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Severe abdominal pain Vomiting Burns of the food pipe (esophagus) Vomiting blood Blood in the stool HEART ... effect of the poison Washing of the skin (irrigation), perhaps every few hours for several days Skin ...

  7. Yew poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... poison is in most parts of the yew plant, but the highest amount is in the seeds. ... or irregular or fast heartbeat Blue-colored lips Breathing difficulty ... Muscle weakness Nausea and vomiting Stomach pain Diarrhea

  8. DISASTROUS/HAZARDOUS ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCE EXPLOITATION: MASS LEAD-POISONING AND MORTALITY OF CHRONICALLY-POOR ARTISANAL GOLD MINERS’ CHILDREN IN NORTHERN NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. INGWE

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Disastrous/hazardous environmental resource exploitation: mass lead-poisoning and mortality of chronically-poor artisanal gold miners’ children in northern Nigeria.The claim that poverty is one of three motivations of the nearly half a decade-long terrorist war waged by Northern Nigeria’s Islamic-sectarians, Boko Haram, call to question the extent to which sociological aspects of the critical social theory -emphasizing participation of various strata of the population in the rational society have been fulfilled in the sub-national region. The presentation of over 90 percent of Nigeria’s population (total: about 170 million classified as poor (earning/spending less than US$2 a day, vulnerable to socio-economic hazards, -with poverty in northern Nigeria reportedly surpassing levels in the rest of Nigeria’s federation makes questioning of geographers’ political-economic perspectives of critical social theoretical equally urgent. One of many dimensions of this challenge is its indication of Northern Nigeria’s leadership’s failure to seriously apply public resources towards resolving social welfare problems at both central and sub-national regional scales since the attainment of independence in 1960. The recent resort to insurgency represents mistakes of political gladiators during the post-independence era (over 50 years to properly manage natural resources –including solid minerals in northern Nigeria and the rest of the country. Here, we undertake a discourse of hazards (risks and vulnerabilities and disasters associated with recent resort of northern Nigeria’s poor to artisanal/unregulated mining of gold in northern Nigerian communities: cases of deleterious consequences (deaths, illnesses, etc., of this alternative “livelihood” of coping with socio-economic challenges posed by chronic poverty, unemployment, under-employment, among other adversities in the sub-national region were also highlighted. Government’s failure to

  9. Drain opener poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drain opener poisoning can cause symptoms in many parts of the body. BLOOD Severe change in acid level of blood (pH balance), which leads to damage in all of the body organs EYES, EARS, NOSE, AND THROAT Burns to the eyes, which ...

  10. Chlorinated lime poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlorinated lime poisoning can cause symptoms in many parts of the body. BLOOD Severe change in the acid level in the blood (pH balance), which leads to damage in all of the body organs EYES, EARS, NOSE, AND THROAT Loss of vision Severe pain ...

  11. Carbon monoxide poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Animals can also be poisoned by carbon monoxide. People who have pets at home may notice that their animals become ... or unresponsive from carbon monoxide exposure. Often the pets will ... these conditions. This can lead to a delay in getting help.

  12. OCCUPATIONAL CARBAMATE POISONING IN THAILAND.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tongpoo, Achara; Sriapha, Charuwan; Wongvisawakorn, Sunun; Rittilert, Panee; Trakulsrichai, Satariya; Wananukul, Winai

    2015-07-01

    Carbamate insecticide is a leading cause of poisoning in Thailand. The objective of this study was to characterize the clinical manifestations and modes of occupational exposure in carbamate poisoning cases. We retrospectively studied all the cases of carbamate poisoning due to occupational exposure recorded in the Ramathibodi Poison Center Toxic Exposure Surveillance system during 2005 to 2010. Demographic data, clinical manifestations and severity were analyzed statistically. During the study period, 3,183 cases were identified, of which 170 (5.3%) were deemed to be due to occupational exposure. Ninety-six cases (56.5%) and 35 cases (20.6%) were poisoned by carbofuran and methomyl, respectively. Carbofuran is sold as a 3% grain and applied by sowing; methomyl is sold as a liquid and is applied by spraying. The majority of poisoned patients did not wear personal protective equipment (PPE) while applying the carbamates. The clinical manifestations of occupational carbofuran poisoning recorded were nausea and vomiting (82.3%), headaches (56.3%) and miosis (19.8%). The clinical manifestations of methomyl poisoning were nausea and vomiting (74.3%), headaches (57.1%) and palpitations (11.4%). Most patients in both groups had mild symptoms. Only one case in each group required endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation support. There were no deaths and the lengths of hospitalization ranged from 2 hours to 2 days. Occupational carbamate poisoning cases in our series were mostly mild and the patients recovered quickly. There were only rare cases of serious symptoms. Lack of knowledge and inadequate PPE were the major factors contributing to occupational poisoning. Educating agricultural workers about correct precautions and pesticide use could minimize this type of poisoning.

  13. Lead Poisoning. Hearings before the Subcommittee on Health and the Environment of the Committee on Energy and Commerce. House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session (April 25 and July 26, 1991). Including H.R. 2840, a Bill To Amend the Public Health Service Act To Reduce Human Exposure to Lead in Residences, Schools for Young Children, and Day Care Centers, Including Exposure to Lead in Drinking Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Energy and Commerce.

    On April 25, 1991, a hearing examined the problem of lead poisoning and reviewed the actions taken by the Environmental Protection Agency and other agencies to address the problem. Many of those who gave testimony considered the actions to be inadequate. The detrimental effects of lead on human health, and especially children's health and…

  14. Risk assessment of lead poisoning and pesticide exposure in the declining population of red-breasted goose (Branta ruficollis) wintering in Eastern Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo, Rafael; Petkov, Nikolai; Lopez-Antia, Ana; Rodríguez-Estival, Jaime; Green, Andy J

    2016-11-01

    The red-breasted goose Branta ruficollis is a globally threatened species (IUCN Vulnerable) and the only European goose species currently in decline. Working on the wintering grounds on the Black Sea Coast, we address two potential causes of decline of this species for the first time: lead poisoning, and contamination from pesticides. We quantified the densities of spent Pb shot in three wetlands used by the geese in north-east Bulgaria, and analysed the Pb concentration in the faeces of red-breasted geese and the more abundant greater white-fronted geese Anser albifrons, using Al concentration as an indicator of soil ingestion. Pb shot densities in sediments were low, and we found no evidence for Pb shot ingestion in red-breasted geese. On the other hand, we found that the geese were feeding on wheat whose seeds were treated with four fungicides: thiram, tebuconazole, difenoconazole and fludioxonil, and the two first were even detected in geese faecal samples. Using data on the daily food intake, we estimated the exposure levels of the geese to these fungicides, both by measuring the concentrations remaining on seeds and by estimating the amount used to coat the seeds at the time of sowing. We found that the exposure rates estimated during the sowing period for both geese species can exceed the recognized hazardous doses for thiram, and to a lesser extent for tebuconazole, which indicates that some pesticides may be playing a previously overlooked role in the decline of red-breasted geese. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A medical mystery. Lead poisoning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. van der Klooster

    2004-01-01

    textabstractA 25-year-old schizophrenic man presented with abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, weight loss and anaemia. He was noted to be malnourished with generalised muscle atrophy. Laboratory investigations showed Hb 4.7 mmol/L, MCV 80fl, bilirubin 75 micromol/L and reticulocyte

  16. Carbon monoxide poisoning in two workers using an LPG forklift truck within a coldstore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, F; Mason, H J

    2004-10-01

    This report describes carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning in two workers using a hired forklift truck within a coldstore. The diagnosis was not considered until day 6 of the incident, and so measurements of blood or breath CO at the time of acute illness were unavailable. To determine whether CO poisoning may be diagnosed retrospectively, where blood or breath CO measurements are unavailable, in the context of this particular incident. Detailed clinical histories were obtained. Estimation of possible levels of CO exposure were made based on computer biokinetic modelling based on the Coburn-Foster-Kane equation. The combined method used supports the diagnosis of CO poisoning in these two cases. Clinical assessment, in combination with mathematical exposure modelling, may lead to successful retrospective diagnosis of CO poisoning and identify putative work activities. CO poisoning should be suspected whenever internal combustion engines are used within buildings and workers complain of relevant symptoms. Hospital departments should maintain a high level of vigilance towards such incidents as this, and should routinely undertake a direct measure of the saturation of haemoglobin by CO, i.e. blood carboxyhaemoglobin or breath CO.

  17. Lead Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... poison you. Most lead is present as an inorganic compound and does not move well through the ... D. R., Editors (© 2006). Contemporary Practice in Clinical Chemistry: AACC Press, Washington, DC. Pp 474. Wu, A. (© ...

  18. Lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is serious about making sure companies that break the law are held accountable In the past year, EPA ... the health effects of lead in drinking water The law mandates no-lead products for drinking water after ...

  19. Plastic casting resin poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epoxy poisoning; Resin poisoning ... Epoxy and resin can be poisonous if they are swallowed or their fumes are breathed in. ... Plastic casting resins are found in various plastic casting resin products.

  20. Poison Control Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1222 immediately. Name State American Association of Poison Control Centers Address AAPCC Central Office NOT A POISON ... not for emergency use. Arkansas ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center Address 1717 S. Philo Road, Suite 36 Urbana, ...

  1. Amanita phalloides-Type Mushroom Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healey, Kathy; Woo, Olga F.; Olson, Kent R.; Pond, Susan M.; Seward, James; Becker, Charles E.

    1982-01-01

    In the fall of 1981 the San Francisco Bay Area Regional Poison Control Center received more than 100 calls regarding wild mushroom ingestion. Ten cases, including three fatalities, had all the features of Amanita phalloides poisoning. Encephalopathy, coma and renal insufficiency occurred in all three patients who died, but did not occur in those who survived. Two of the three patients who died arrived at the hospital late in the course of their illness, and severe gastroenteritis with accompanying dehydration probably contributed to their deaths. The poison control center promoted public awareness of the mushroom hazard through newspaper and television stories and by notifying local health departments. It also has devised a simple form to improve the quality of data collection and to assist in later verification of suspected A phalloides poisoning. PMID:7179945

  2. Protecting Yourself from Poisonous Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NIOSH NIOSH Fast Facts: Protecting Yourself from Poisonous Plants Language: English Español (Spanish) Kreyol Haitien (Hatian Creole) ... outdoors is at risk of exposure to poisonous plants, such as poison ivy, poison oak, and poison ...

  3. Hemlock (Conium Maculatum) Poisoning In A Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konca, Capan; Kahramaner, Zelal; Bosnak, Mehmet; Kocamaz, Halil

    2014-03-01

    Poison hemlock (Conium maculatum) is a plant that is poisonous for humans and animals. Accidental ingestion of the plant may result in central nervous system depression, respiratory failure, acute rhabdomyolysis, acute renal failure and even death. The main treatment of hemlock poisoning is supportive care. The case of a 6-year-old girl who was admitted to the emergency department with complaints of burning sensation in mouth, hypersalivation, tremor in hands and ataxia after ingestion of poison hemlock is presented here with clinical and laboratory features. In this case, we aim to report that accidental ingestion of plants resembling vegetables that are consumed daily can lead to serious complications and even death.

  4. Description of 3,180 courses of chelation with dimercaptosuccinic acid in children ≤ 5 y with severe lead poisoning in Zamfara, Northern Nigeria: a retrospective analysis of programme data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurtle, Natalie; Greig, Jane; Cooney, Lauren; Amitai, Yona; Ariti, Cono; Brown, Mary Jean; Kosnett, Michael J; Moussally, Krystel; Sani-Gwarzo, Nasir; Akpan, Henry; Shanks, Leslie; Dargan, Paul I

    2014-10-01

    In 2010, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) discovered extensive lead poisoning impacting several thousand children in rural northern Nigeria. An estimated 400 fatalities had occurred over 3 mo. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) confirmed widespread contamination from lead-rich ore being processed for gold, and environmental management was begun. MSF commenced a medical management programme that included treatment with the oral chelating agent 2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA, succimer). Here we describe and evaluate the changes in venous blood lead level (VBLL) associated with DMSA treatment in the largest cohort of children ≤ 5 y of age with severe paediatric lead intoxication reported to date to our knowledge. In a retrospective analysis of programme data, we describe change in VBLL after DMSA treatment courses in a cohort of 1,156 children ≤ 5 y of age who underwent between one and 15 courses of chelation treatment. Courses of DMSA of 19 or 28 d duration administered to children with VBLL ≥ 45 µg/dl were included. Impact of DMSA was calculated as end-course VBLL as a percentage of pre-course VBLL (ECP). Mixed model regression with nested random effects was used to evaluate the relative associations of covariates with ECP. Of 3,180 treatment courses administered, 36% and 6% of courses commenced with VBLL ≥ 80 µg/dl and ≥ 120 µg/dl, respectively. Overall mean ECP was 74.5% (95% CI 69.7%-79.7%); among 159 inpatient courses, ECP was 47.7% (95% CI 39.7%-57.3%). ECP after 19-d courses (n = 2,262) was lower in older children, first-ever courses, courses with a longer interval since a previous course, courses with more directly observed doses, and courses with higher pre-course VBLLs. Low haemoglobin was associated with higher ECP. Twenty children aged ≤ 5 y who commenced chelation died during the period studied, with lead poisoning a primary factor in six deaths. Monitoring of alanine transaminase (ALT), creatinine, and full blood

  5. Lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Test Safety Alert: Learn about CDC Recommendations Second Informational Call (CDC-RFA-17-1701PPHF17), April 5, 2017, ... CLPPP CAP Healthy Homes Assessment Tools Lead Health Literacy Initiative Refugee Tool Kit Resources Healthy Homes and ...

  6. [Mercury poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensefa-Colas, L; Andujar, P; Descatha, A

    2011-07-01

    Mercury is a widespread heavy metal with potential severe impacts on human health. Exposure conditions to mercury and profile of toxicity among humans depend on the chemical forms of the mercury: elemental or metallic mercury, inorganic or organic mercury compounds. This article aims to reviewing and synthesizing the main knowledge of the mercury toxicity and its organic compounds that clinicians should know. Acute inhalation of metallic or inorganic mercury vapours mainly induces pulmonary diseases, whereas chronic inhalation rather induces neurological or renal disorders (encephalopathy and interstitial or glomerular nephritis). Methylmercury poisonings from intoxicated food occurred among some populations resulting in neurological disorders and developmental troubles for children exposed in utero. Treatment using chelating agents is recommended in case of symptomatic acute mercury intoxication; sometimes it improves the clinical effects of chronic mercury poisoning. Although it is currently rare to encounter situations of severe intoxication, efforts remain necessary to decrease the mercury concentration in the environment and to reduce risk on human health due to low level exposure (dental amalgam, fish contamination by organic mercury compounds…). In case of occupational exposure to mercury and its compounds, some disorders could be compensated in France. Clinicians should work with toxicologists for the diagnosis and treatment of mercury intoxication. Copyright © 2010 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Aconite poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Thomas Y K

    2009-04-01

    Aconitine and related alkaloids found in the Aconitum species are highly toxic cardiotoxins and neurotoxins. The wild plant (especially the roots and root tubers) is extremely toxic. Severe aconite poisoning can occur after accidental ingestion of the wild plant or consumption of an herbal decoction made from aconite roots. In traditional Chinese medicine, aconite roots are used only after processing to reduce the toxic alkaloid content. Soaking and boiling during processing or decoction preparation will hydrolyze aconite alkaloids into less toxic and non-toxic derivatives. However, the use of a larger than recommended dose and inadequate processing increases the risk of poisoning. A Medline search (1963-February 2009) was conducted. Key articles with information on the use of aconite roots in traditional medicine, active (toxic) ingredients, mechanisms of toxicity, toxicokinetics of Aconitum alkaloids, and clinical features and management of aconite poisoning were reviewed. The cardiotoxicity and neurotoxicity of aconitine and related alkaloids are due to their actions on the voltage-sensitive sodium channels of the cell membranes of excitable tissues, including the myocardium, nerves, and muscles. Aconitine and mesaconitine bind with high affinity to the open state of the voltage-sensitive sodium channels at site 2, thereby causing a persistent activation of the sodium channels, which become refractory to excitation. The electrophysiological mechanism of arrhythmia induction is triggered activity due to delayed after-depolarization and early after-depolarization. The arrhythmogenic properties of aconitine are in part due to its cholinolytic (anticholinergic) effects mediated by the vagus nerve. Aconitine has a positive inotropic effect by prolonging sodium influx during the action potential. It has hypotensive and bradycardic actions due to activation of the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus. Through its action on voltage-sensitive sodium channels in the

  8. [Arsenic poisoning: a special gastroenteritis...].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganster, F; Kuteifan, K; Mootien, Y; Harry, P; Guiot, P

    2009-06-01

    Arsenic (As) intoxication is nowadays extremely rare. Two cases of acute and chronic As criminal poisoning leading to death of a couple of retired people, are reported. Clinical presentation was simulating a gastro-enteritidis with fast evolution to refractory shock. Toxicological analysis confirmed this diagnostic, with respectively blood As concentrations at 579 and 21 765 microg/l for our two patients.

  9. The Poisoning of America's Children: Lead Exposure, Children's Brains, and the Ability To Learn. National Health/Education Consortium Occasional Paper #6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needleman, Herbert L.

    Despite years of concern about the toxic effects of high lead exposure and recent knowledge about the less apparent effects of exposure to low doses of lead, a total of 3 to 4 million children in the United States are still being exposed to concentrations of lead that could compromise their cognitive and social development. This paper discusses:…

  10. Transdermal carbamate poisoning – a case of misuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalit Kumar Rajbanshi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute pesticide poisoning is a common mode of intentional self harm. Oral ingestion is the usual mode of poisoning. However, inhalation, accidental or occupational transdermal exposure leading to acute or chronic poisoning can be the other route of poisoning. It has been seen that the purpose of poising is suicidal intensity in most of the cases. We report an unusual case where the victim had acute pesticide poisoning through transdermal route that was intended for non suicidal purpose. The patient was managed successfully with immediate decontamination and adequate antidote.

  11. Intoxicação por chumbo e cádmio em trabalhadores de oficinas para reforma de baterias em Salvador, Brasil Lead and cadmium poisoning among workers in small establishments for repairing batteries in Salvador, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Martins Carvalho

    1985-10-01

    cadmium poisoning among workers from the sector engaged in repairing batteries for motor vehicles was carried out. Thirty-nine workers from 19 small establishments, existent in the urban area of Salvador City, State of Bahia, Brazil, were studied. Conditions of hygiene at work place, biological characterization of the workforce and workers' perception of occupational hazards were evaluated and related to blood levels of cadmium, lead, erythroprotoporphyrin and hematocrit. Concentrations of cadmium and lead in blood were determined by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry techniques. Thirty-six (92.3% out of the 39 workers mentioned that their job could be hazardous to their health. Brazilian legislation on safety, hygiene and occupational medicine considers lead and cadmium poisoning as being professional diseases when occurring among people working on repairing batteries. However, only 7 (17.9% out the 39 workers knew that they were potentially eligible for benefits from present legislation. None of the 39 workers knew that they had been exposed to cadmium nor about the occupational risks arising from this exposure. Geometric mean and standard deviation of cadmium in blood levels was extremely high (0.074; 2.3 µmol/1, with 97.4% of the working population exceeding the reference limit of 0.009 µmol/1. Mean level of lead in blood was 2.06; 1.4 µmol/l. Only one worker presented blood lead level higher than 3.36 mmol/1, which placed him at a higher risk of presenting clinical lead poisoning. Mean level of erythroprotoporphyrin was 0.86; 3.1 µmol/l. Two workers had low hematocrit levels : 37 and 38%, respectively. In the whole group, hematocrit levels were poorly correlated with lead or with cadmium levels in blood. A brief, oriented clinical examination did not reveal any clear cases of lead or cadmium poisoning. Higher levels of cadmium and lead in blood were associated with workers' ages above 19 years of age, with amount of time spent in the

  12. Rhubarb leaves poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002876.htm Rhubarb leaves poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Rhubarb leaves poisoning occurs when someone eats pieces of leaves ...

  13. Bubble bath soap poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002762.htm Bubble bath soap poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Bubble bath soap poisoning occurs when someone swallows bubble bath soap. ...

  14. Poisoning - fish and shellfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... poisonings are heat stable, so no amount of cooking will prevent you from becoming poisoned if you ... R. Blaser MJ, eds. Mandell, Douglas and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious Disease, Updated Edition . 8th ...

  15. Poisoning first aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... containers, even if they are labeled. Most nonfood substances are poisonous if taken in large doses. If you are concerned that industrial poisons might be polluting nearby land or water, report your concerns to ...

  16. Hair dye poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002703.htm Hair dye poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hair dye poisoning occurs when someone swallows dye or tint ...

  17. Plant fertilizer poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant fertilizers and household plant foods are used to improve plant growth. Poisoning can occur if someone swallows these products. Plant fertilizers are mildly poisonous if small amounts are swallowed. ...

  18. Bug spray poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that mosquitos spread. Some of these are malaria, dengue fever, and West Nile virus. Other less effective ... you have any questions about poisoning or poison prevention. It does NOT need to be an emergency. ...

  19. Description of 3,180 courses of chelation with dimercaptosuccinic acid in children ≤ 5 y with severe lead poisoning in Zamfara, Northern Nigeria: a retrospective analysis of programme data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Thurtle

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In 2010, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF discovered extensive lead poisoning impacting several thousand children in rural northern Nigeria. An estimated 400 fatalities had occurred over 3 mo. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC confirmed widespread contamination from lead-rich ore being processed for gold, and environmental management was begun. MSF commenced a medical management programme that included treatment with the oral chelating agent 2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA, succimer. Here we describe and evaluate the changes in venous blood lead level (VBLL associated with DMSA treatment in the largest cohort of children ≤ 5 y of age with severe paediatric lead intoxication reported to date to our knowledge. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In a retrospective analysis of programme data, we describe change in VBLL after DMSA treatment courses in a cohort of 1,156 children ≤ 5 y of age who underwent between one and 15 courses of chelation treatment. Courses of DMSA of 19 or 28 d duration administered to children with VBLL ≥ 45 µg/dl were included. Impact of DMSA was calculated as end-course VBLL as a percentage of pre-course VBLL (ECP. Mixed model regression with nested random effects was used to evaluate the relative associations of covariates with ECP. Of 3,180 treatment courses administered, 36% and 6% of courses commenced with VBLL ≥ 80 µg/dl and ≥ 120 µg/dl, respectively. Overall mean ECP was 74.5% (95% CI 69.7%-79.7%; among 159 inpatient courses, ECP was 47.7% (95% CI 39.7%-57.3%. ECP after 19-d courses (n = 2,262 was lower in older children, first-ever courses, courses with a longer interval since a previous course, courses with more directly observed doses, and courses with higher pre-course VBLLs. Low haemoglobin was associated with higher ECP. Twenty children aged ≤ 5 y who commenced chelation died during the period studied, with lead poisoning a primary factor in six deaths. Monitoring of alanine

  20. EDITORIAL POISONING PATTERN Human poisoning with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pharm-chem

    Bioaccumulation of methylmercury then occurred in fish which were eventually eaten by humans. Thallium poisoning is characterized by alopecia often seen one to two weeks later when the patient is about to be discharged from hospital. Thus, in chronic poisoning, it is difficult to establish definitive cause-effect relationship.

  1. Evaluation Of Methadone Poisoning in Hospitalized Children: A Short Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamali Maamouri

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Upload poisoning is one of the most dangerous and common poisoning in Iranian children. Depression of the respiratory and central nervous systems may lead to significant toxicity. Even low doses of uploads are dangerous in pediatrics under 6 years old. Methadone is the most toxic of the uploads; small doses as low as a single tablet can lead to death. According to this information we decided to evaluate methadone poisoning in Hospitalized Children

  2. Adherence to international recommendations for gastric lavage in medical drug poisonings in Denmark 2007-2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergaard, Bo; Høgberg, Lotte Christine Groth; Groenlykke, Thor Buch

    2012-01-01

    Recent reviews strongly discourage the routine use of gastric lavage in oral poisonings, but the authors suspected that gastric lavage might still be in widespread use in Denmark. We wished to estimate the extent to which gastric lavage in cases of medical drug poisoning, reported in inquiries...... to the Danish Poison Information Centre (DPIC) from 2007 to 2010, was performed according to international recommendations and whether adherence to recommendations improved over the period....

  3. Poison Ivy Rash

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... leaves and can grow as a bush or tree. Unlike poison ivy and poison oak, it doesn't grow in a three-leaf-per-stem pattern. Poison ivy rash is a type of allergic contact dermatitis caused by an oily resin called urushiol. It's found in the leaves, stems ...

  4. Pesticide Poisoning of Honeybees: A Review of Symptoms, Incident Classification, and Causes of Poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiljanek Tomasz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available During the 2000s, the problem of pesticide poisoning of honeybees seemed to be almost solved. The number of cases has decreased in comparison to the 1970s. The problem of acute honeybee poisoning, however, has not disappeared, but instead has transformed into a problem of poisoning from ‘traditional’ pesticides like organophosphorus pesticides or pyrethroids, to poisoning from additional sources of ‘modern’ systemic neonicotinoids and fipronil. In this article, the biological activity of pesticides was reviewed. The poisoning symptoms, incident definitions, and monitoring systems, as well as the interpretation of the analytical results, were also reviewed. The range of pesticides, and the detected concentrations of pesticides in poisoned honeybee samples, were reviewed. And, for the first time, cases of poisoning related to neonicotinoids were reviewed. The latter especially is of practical importance and could be helpful to analysts and investigators of honeybee poisoning incidents. It is assumed that secondary poisoning induced by plant collected materials contaminated with systemic pesticides occurs. Food stored in a hive and contaminated with systemic pesticides consumed continuously by the same generation of winter bees, may result in sub-lethal intoxication. This leads to abnormal behaviour identified during acute intoxication. The final result is that the bees discontinue their social role in the honeybee colony super organism, and colony collapse disorder (CCD takes place. The process described above refers primarily to robust and strong colonies that were able to collect plenty of food due to effective plant protection.

  5. Chronic arsenic poisoning following ayurvedic medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Benzeeta; Goyal, Palvi; Flora, S J S; Gill, K D; Singh, Surjit

    2014-12-01

    Ayurveda, Indian traditional system of medicine, is practiced commonly in South East Asia and in many parts of the world. Many ayurvedic drugs contain heavy metals and may lead to metal toxicity. Of these, chronic lead poisoning is the most common. Chronic arsenic poisoning following the use of ayurvedic medication, though reported, is rare. We describe three patients who presented with features of chronic arsenic poisoning following prolonged ayurvedic medication use. The diagnosis of chronic arsenic poisoning was confirmed by high arsenic levels in the blood, urine, hair, and nails in all the three patients and in ayurvedic drug in two patients. The ayurvedic medication was discontinued and treatment with D-penicillamine started. At 6 months after treatment, blood arsenic levels returned to normal with clinical recovery in all of them. Arsenic poisoning following ayurvedic medication is much less common than lead poisoning, though mineral ayurvedic medicines may lead to it. We used D-penicillamine as chelator and all of them recovered. Whether withdrawal of medication alone or D-penicillamine also played a role in recovery is unclear and needs to be assessed.

  6. Lithium Poisoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baird-Gunning, Jonathan; Lea-Henry, Tom; Hoegberg, Lotte C G

    2017-01-01

    , there are observational data in its favor, without evidence from randomized controlled trials (none have been performed), which may lead to conservative practices and potentially unnecessary interventions in some circumstances. More data are required to define the risk-benefit of extracorporeal treatments and their use...

  7. Amanita phalloides poisoning and treatment with silibinin in the Australian Capital Territory and New South Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Darren M; Hall, Michael J; Falkland, Morna M; Strasser, Simone I; Buckley, Nick A

    2013-01-21

    To report the frequency and clinical outcomes of Amanita phalloides poisoning in the Australian Capital Territory and New South Wales, and the treatments used (including silibinin). Retrospective case series of patients admitted to public hospitals in Canberra and Sydney for suspected A. phalloides poisoning between 1999 and 2012 (identified from hospital records and calls to the New South Wales Poisons Information Centre). Frequency of poisoning and the clinical outcomes. Twelve patients presented with a history suggesting A. phalloides poisoning, 10 with probable poisoning and two with possible poisoning. Eight of those with probable poisoning developed significant hepatotoxicity and four died. Silibinin was administered to nine of those with probable poisoning (the other presented before 2005). Maintaining silibinin supply became a challenge during two clusters of poisoning. Eight of the patients with probable poisoning were not long-term residents of the ACT, and six were immigrants from Asia. The mortality rate due to A. phalloides poisoning in this case series was high despite treatment according to current standards, including use of silibinin, and the frequency of hepatotoxicity was more than double that for the previous decade. Ongoing public health campaigns are required.

  8. [Seafood poisonings. Part II. Fish poisonings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciszowski, Krzysztof; Mietka-Ciszowska, Aneta

    2012-01-01

    Fish plays a significant role in human life, mainly as part of a balanced healthy diet and a good source of many of nutrients. However, contact with fish may be harmful or even life-threatening to man. Toxic effects, that fish exerts toward men (ichthyotoxism), result from envenomations by poison. ous fish equipped in venom apparatus (ichthyoacanthotoxism), direct contact with venom produced by skin glandules (ichthyocrinotoxism), or consuming fish containing toxins for nutritional purposes (ichthyosarcotoxism). In the present review, different fish-borne food poisonings are presented including their etiology, pathogenesis, symptomatology and treatment. In fact, the majority of fish poisonings are intoxications with toxins primary produced by bacteria, cyanobacteria and algae. These are consumed and accumulated in the food chain by herbivorous and predatory fish, that in turn may be a cause of poisonings in humans.

  9. Hemlock (Conium Maculatum Poisoning In A Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capan KONCA

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Poison hemlock (Conium maculatum is a plant that is poisonous for humans and animals. Accidental ingestion of the plant may result in central nervous system depression, respiratory failure, acute rhabdomyolysis, acute renal failure and even death. The main treatment of hemlock poisoning is supportive care. The case of a 6-year-old girl who was admitted to the emergency department with complaints of burning sensation in mouth, hypersalivation, tremor in hands and ataxia after ingestion of poison hemlock is presented here with clinical and laboratory features. In this case, we aim to report that accidental ingestion of plants resembling vegetables that are consumed daily can lead to serious complications and even death.

  10. Extracorporeal treatment for valproic acid poisoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghannoum, Marc; Laliberté, Martin; Nolin, Thomas D

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The EXtracorporeal TReatments In Poisoning (EXTRIP) workgroup presents its systematic review and clinical recommendations on the use of extracorporeal treatment (ECTR) in valproic acid (VPA) poisoning. METHODS: The lead authors reviewed all of the articles from a systematic literature....... The workgroup concluded that VPA is moderately dialyzable (level of evidence = B) and made the following recommendations: ECTR is recommended in severe VPA poisoning (1D); recommendations for ECTR include a VPA concentration > 1300 mg/L (9000 μmol/L)(1D), the presence of cerebral edema (1D) or shock (1D...... 50 and 100 mg/L (350-700 μmol/L)(2D). Intermittent hemodialysis is the preferred ECTR in VPA poisoning (1D). If hemodialysis is not available, then intermittent hemoperfusion (1D) or continuous renal replacement therapy (2D) is an acceptable alternative. CONCLUSIONS: VPA is moderately dialyzable...

  11. [Cortinarius poisoning. Analysis of cases in the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saviuc, P; Garon, D; Danel, V; Richard, J M

    2001-01-01

    Cortinarius spp. poisoning is characterized by a delayed acute renal failure (ARF). The main features of this severe poisoning are still poorly known and often overlooked. The aim of this review of the literature was a better description of Cortinarius spp. poisoning. The main medical databases were searched and analysed. 245 cases were collected and 90 cases could be analysed in details. Gastrointestinal disorders appeared a few days after the ingestion of the mushrooms (median: three days). The renal phase is delayed (median: 8.5 days). Hepatic failure and muscular lesions are highly questionable. Treatment is supportive in half of the cases, ARF progressed towards chronic renal failure, which progressed in 70% of the cases towards terminal renal failure. Cortinarius spp. poisoning is severe. Ingestion of Cortinarius species must be systematically suspected whenever tubulo-interstitial nephritis is diagnosed.

  12. Toxidrome-based Approach to Common Poisonings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Mégarbane

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Poisoning remains a major cause of hospital admission into the emergency department and intensive care unit. Proper diagnosis is the cornerstone for optimal management of poisoned patients. Since the definitive analytical confirmation of the nature of the toxicant involved in the poisoning cannot be rapidly obtained in the majority of healthcare facilities, diagnosis relies on the medical history and the rigorous clinical examination of the patients well as results of the routine biological tests and the electrocardiogram. Identification of the toxidromes addresses not only the correct diagnosis but also rules out other differential diagnoses. Despite no definitive predictive value, this clinical approach facilitates making decision on empirical treatments and emergent antidotes. Pharmacodynamic tests using specific antidotes including naloxone for opioids and flumazenil for benzodiazepines and its analogues are also helpful to assess the final diagnosis in comatose patients. The objective of this article is to review the toxidrome-based approach to common poisonings before toxicological analysis enables the confirmation of the initially suspected toxic etiology.

  13. Intoxicação por chumbo em crianças e o discurso da imprensa Lead poisoning in children and media discourse analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilce Emy Tomita

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Houve ampla divulgação na mídia sobre a descoberta e interdição de uma fábrica de baterias com elevada emissão de chumbo, no município de Bauru (SP, em 2002, dada a relevância do assunto para a saúde pública. O objetivo deste estudo é avaliar as publicações na imprensa relativas à contaminação ambiental por chumbo em uma área residencial, sua repercussão sobre a saúde infantil e as iniciativas do poder público para enfrentamento desta questão. A análise do discurso da imprensa escrita é realizada mediante a leitura de notícias publicadas no ano de 2002, utilizando ferramentas de análise qualitativa. A partir da abordagem da imprensa sobre esta sucessão de acontecimentos, esta reflexão constitui uma contribuição à elaboração de programas educativos que têm como foco os cuidados com o meio ambiente e as suas repercussões sobre a saúde da população.The finding and interdiction of a battery factory with high lead emission got massive media coverage in the city of Bauru (SP, in 2002, given the relevance of this issue to public health. Aiming at evaluating the publications in the press related to lead environmental contamination in a residential area, its repercussion on infantile health and the initiatives of government to face this subject, the present study has been delineated. The analysis of the press discourse is accomplished by the reading of news published in the year of 2002, using tools of qualitative analysis. Starting from the approach of the press on this sequence of events, this reflection represents a contribution to the elaboration of educational programs that focus on the care of the environment and its impact on public health.

  14. Lead and the Romans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Aravind; Braun, Charles L.

    2010-01-01

    Lead poisoning has been a problem since early history and continues into modern times. An appealing characteristic of lead is that many lead salts are sweet. In the absence of cane and beet sugars, early Romans used "sugar of lead" (lead acetate) to sweeten desserts, fruits, and sour wine. People most at risk would have been those who…

  15. Coordination chemistry of two heavy metals: I, Ligand preferences in lead(II) complexation, toward the development of therapeutic agents for lead poisoning: II, Plutonium solubility and speciation relevant to the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neu, Mary Patricia [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-11-01

    The coordination chemistry and solution behavior of the toxic ions lead(II) and plutonium(IV, V, VI) have been investigated. The ligand pKas and ligand-lead(II) stability constants of one hydroxamic acid and four thiohydroaxamic acids were determined. Solution thermodynamic results indicate that thiohydroxamic acids are more acidic and slightly better lead chelators than hydroxamates, e.g., N-methylthioaceto-hydroxamic acid, pKa = 5.94, logβ120 = 10.92; acetohydroxamic acid, pKa = 9.34, logβ120 = 9.52. The syntheses of lead complexes of two bulky hydroxamate ligands are presented. The X-ray crystal structures show the lead hydroxamates are di-bridged dimers with irregular five-coordinate geometry about the metal atom and a stereochemically active lone pair of electrons. Molecular orbital calculations of a lead hydroxamate and a highly symmetric pseudo octahedral lead complex were performed. The thermodynamic stability of plutonium(IV) complexes of the siderophore, desferrioxamine B (DFO), and two octadentate derivatives of DFO were investigated using competition spectrophotometric titrations. The stability constant measured for the plutonium(IV) complex of DFO-methylterephthalamide is logβ120 = 41.7. The solubility limited speciation of 242Pu as a function of time in near neutral carbonate solution was measured. Individual solutions of plutonium in a single oxidation state were added to individual solutions at pH = 6.0, T = 30.0, 1.93 mM dissolved carbonate, and sampled over intervals up to 150 days. Plutonium solubility was measured, and speciation was investigated using laser photoacoustic spectroscopy and chemical methods.

  16. Aconite poisoning in camouflage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, W T; Lai, C K; Ching, C K; Tse, K Y; So, Y C; Chan, Y C; Hau, L M; Mak, T W L; Chan, A Y W

    2006-12-01

    The Toxicology Reference Laboratory has confirmed 10 cases of aconite poisoning from March 2004 to May 2006. In four of these 10 cases, the aconite herb was not listed in the written prescription. We report these four cases to highlight the problem of 'hidden' aconite poisoning.

  17. DRUG POISONING IN SLOVENIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miran Brvar

    2008-01-01

    Poisoning by drugs for the nervous system, particularly benzodiazepines, is the most commonform of poisoning by drugs in Slovenia. It would be necessary to report all acutelypoisoned patients to the Register of Intoxications, since we need data about all poisoningin Slovenia to improve their prophylaxis and treatment

  18. Poison ivy - oak - sumac

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Poison ivy, oak, or sumac poisoning is an allergic reaction that results from touching the sap of these plants. The sap may be on the plant, in the ashes of burned plants, on an animal, or on other objects that came in contact ...

  19. Clinical studies on mercury poisoning in cattle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonoda, M.; Nakamura, R.; Too, K.; Matsuhashi, A.; Ishimoto, H.; Sasaki, R.; Ishida, K.; Takahashi, M.

    1956-01-01

    A sporadic outbreak of an unknown disease occurred among dairy cattle, from early February to late May 1955, in Japan. The characteristic symptoms of this disease were dyspnea and depilation; out of 29 cases, 8 died while 2 were slaughtered. Clinical studies have disclosed that the symptoms were similar to those found in cases of mercury poisoning as described by others. So the animals' feed was suspected of being the cause of the sickness. It was confirmed that the incident was due to poisoning resulting from ingestion of linseed meal treated with a mercurial fungicide. From the results of the testing anamnesis, it was found that 171 cattle were fed with the meal and 29 cases were affected. In veiw of the wide use of mercurial preparations for treating seed grains against fungi infection, a further experimental study was made on the effects of the feed and fungicide upon calves.

  20. Pediatric glaucoma suspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kooner K

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Karanjit Kooner,1 Matthew Harrison,1 Zohra Prasla,1 Mohannad Albdour,1 Beverley Adams-Huet21Department of Ophthalmology, 2Department of Clinical Sciences, Division of Biostatistics, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USAPurpose: To report demographic and ocular features of pediatric glaucoma suspects in an ethnically diverse population of North Central Texas.Design: Retrospective cross-sectional chart review.Participants: Subjects included 75 (136 eyes pediatric glaucoma suspects. Patients with one or more of the following risk factors were included: cup-to disc (C/D ratio of ≥0.6; intraocular pressure (IOP ≥21 mmHg; family history of glaucoma; congenital glaucoma in the opposite eye; history of blunt trauma to either eye; and presence of either Sturge–Weber or Axenfeld–Rieger syndrome, or oculodermal melanocytosis.Methods: Data were extracted from electronic patient medical records. Patient records with incomplete data were excluded. The main outcome measures were race, sex, age, IOP, C/D, family history of glaucoma; and glaucoma treatment.Results: Subjects included 28 (37.3% Hispanics, 20 (26.6% African Americans, 20 (26.6% Caucasians, and seven (9.3% Asians. Forty (53.3% of the patients were male. Suspicious optic disc was seen in 57 (76%; elevated IOP in 25 (33.3%; presence of family history in 13 (17.3%, and Sturge–Weber syndrome in nine (12% patients. The average C/D ratio was 0.58±0.2. The C/D ratios of African American (0.65±0.2, Hispanic (0.63±0.2, and Asian (0.62±0.15 patients were significantly greater than those of Caucasians (0.43±0.18; P=0.0004, 0.0003, and 0.0139, respectively. Caucasian patients were the youngest (7.9±4.8 years. Eleven cases (14.7% required medication.Conclusion: Thirty-three point seven percent of patients seen in the glaucoma clinic were glaucoma suspects. The most common risk factors for suspected glaucoma were suspicious optic discs, elevated IOP, and family history

  1. Transport signatures of quasiparticle poisoning in a Majorana island

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrecht, S. M.; Hansen, E. B.; Higginbotham, A. P.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate effects of quasiparticle poisoning in a Majorana island with strong tunnel coupling to normal-metal leads. In addition to the main Coulomb blockade diamonds, "shadow" diamonds appear, shifted by 1e in gate voltage, consistent with transport through an excited (poisoned) state...

  2. Outsmarting Poison Ivy and Other Poisonous Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and cannot further spread the rash. Tips for Prevention Learn what poison ivy, oak, and sumac plants ... View FDA photos on Flickr FDA Archive Combination Products Advisory ... Popular Content Home Latest Recalls Report an Adverse Event MedWatch Safety Alerts News ...

  3. Lead in food and food containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, A.O. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-04-01

    We investigated food and food containers suspected of containing high levels of lead. Food containers investigated were bought in Northern California and were linked to several cases of lead poisoning in children and adults. Coffee mugs and Mexican pottery were leached with acetic and citric acid, respectively. The amount of lead leached from the lip and rim area of eleven coffee mugs ranged from non detectable to 79 ppm. Lead leached from Mexican potteries ranged from non detectable to 584 ppm of lead. Although there are no regulations pertaining to the amount of lead in the lip and rim area of ceramic ware, under California proposition 65 vendors are required to warn consumers of the presence of toxic materials in consumer products. Foods analyzed for lead content were candy and beans. A sample of tamarindo candy taken from the center of its storage container, a mexican clay pot, was found to contain 1.0 ppm of lead, while the candy in contact with the glaze contained 16 ppm of lead. Beans cooked in Mexican clay cooking pots contained lead ranging from 2.8 to 9.2 ppm. Two-thirds of the food containers investigated and the food analyzed did not meet the provisional Total Tolerable Daily Intake level let by the U.S. FDA, assuming a reasonable amount of liquid and food was ingested.

  4. Histamine fish poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Nosić

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Histamine fish poisoning is a chemical intoxication associated with intake of fishes with high histamine content. Histamine is developed in fish tissue post mortem due to bacterial decarboxilation of free amino-acid histidine. This paper deals with causes of histamine development in fish meat and with histamine influence on human health. Prevention of histamine fish poisoning would also be discussed. The case histories of histamine food poisoning in our country and in the world would be described. Histamine levels used in Regulation would be presented.

  5. Indigenous tooth powders = Covert lead poisoning?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hegde, Sapna; Shubha, A; Rao, B

    2013-01-01

    .../almond shell, coconut shell and its sheath, wood, coal and other powders (sand, common salt-powder and crystalline, brick and tile powder, tobacco, areca nut). [4] In addition, a variety of indigenous tooth powders are marketed which are very popular with the local people. Many of these age-old formulations of tooth powders may contain ha...

  6. Paracetamol poisoning among immigrants in a department of hepatology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, L E; Dalhoff, K P

    2001-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: An increased incidence of suicides and suicidal behaviour among immigrants has been described in other countries. In Denmark, misuse of paracetamol is suspected in some foreign-born minority groups, although no data have been produced to substantiate this suspicion. METHODOLOGY......: A retrospective study of the incidence of paracetamol poisoning in patients admitted to a specialised department of hepatology from 1994 to 1999 was carried out. RESULTS: Of a total of 580 patients, 56 (9.7%; 95%-confidence interval 7.2-12.1%) were immigrants, among whom a significant overrepresentation was found......: The study demonstrates an overrepresentation of immigrants among patients admitted with paracetamol poisoning in Denmark....

  7. Histamine Food Poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirone, Maria; Visciano, Pierina; Tofalo, Rosanna; Suzzi, Giovanna

    2017-01-01

    The consumption of food containing high amounts of histamine and other biogenic amines can cause food poisoning with different symptoms linked to the individual sensitivity and the detoxification activity. Histamine is the only biogenic amine with regulatory limits set by the European Commission in fish and fishery products, because it can lead to a fatal outcome. However, also fermented foods can be involved in outbreaks and sporadic cases of intoxication. The factors affecting the presence of histamine in food are variable and product specific including the availability of the precursor amino acid, the presence of microorganisms producing decarboxylases, and the conditions allowing their growth and enzyme production. Generally, the good quality of raw material and hygienic practices during food processing as well as the use of histidine decarboxylase-negative starter cultures can minimize the occurrence of histamine. Further studies are necessary to estimate the human exposure and the relationship between the total amount of the biogenic amines ingested with food and health effects.

  8. Uso de los datos de plumbemia para evaluar y prevenir el envenenamiento infantil por plomo en Latinoamérica Use of blood lead data in epidemiological studies to assess and prevent childhood lead poisoning in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Romieu

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available La exposición al plomo es una amenaza seria para la salud de los niños, que se encuentra ampliamente distribuida en la Región de América Latina. Los funcionarios de salud pública necesitan identificar fuentes de exposición al plomo, así como sus efectos en la salud, para poder diseñar, implantar y evaluar las actividades preventivas y de control. Para evaluar la magnitud del problema del plomo es necesario definir tres elementos clave: a las fuentes potenciales de exposición, b los indicadores que se utilizarán para evaluar los efectos en la salud y la exposición en el medio ambiente, y c las estrategias de muestreo de la población en riesgo. Se pueden utilizar varias estrategias con el fin de seleccionar la población blanco dependiendo de los objetivos del estudio, el tiempo límite y los recursos disponibles. Si el objetivo es evaluar la magnitud y las fuentes del problema pueden emplearse los siguientes métodos de muestreo: a el muestreo al azar basado en la población; b el muestreo al azar basado en las facilidades dentro de los hospitales, las guarderías o las escuelas; c el muestreo objetivo de los grupos de alto riesgo; d el muestreo de conveniencia (de voluntarios, y e el reporte de los casos (éste puede conducir a la identificación de las poblaciones en riesgo, además de las fuentes de exposición. Para todos los diseños de muestreo, la información debe incluir tanto el uso de un cuestionario para el informe general de los participantes y de las fuentes potenciales locales de exposición, como la recolección de las muestras biológicas. En la interpretación de los datos se debe considerar el tipo de muestreo utilizado, el porcentaje de falta de respuesta y los factores que pueden influir en las mediciones del plomo en sangre, como la edad y la variación de la temporada. Las mediciones del plomo en la sangre se deben integrar dentro de una estrategia general para la prevención de toxicidad.Exposure to lead is a

  9. Photographic fixative poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Photographic fixatives are chemicals used to develop photographs. This article discusses poisoning from swallowing such chemicals. This article is for information only. DO NOT use it to treat or manage an ...

  10. Asphalt cement poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... petroleum material that hardens when it cools. Asphalt cement poisoning occurs when someone swallows asphalt. If hot ... found in: Road paving materials Roofing materials Tile cements Asphalt may also be used for other purposes.

  11. Overview of Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Newspaper Paint (water color or water-based) Perfumes Petroleum jelly Plant food (household) Polyethylene glycols, such as ... reduces the severity of poisonings, particularly with acetaminophen , aspirin , or ibuprofen . The identifying marks printed on pills ...

  12. Cold wave lotion poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002693.htm Cold wave lotion poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cold wave lotion is a hair care product used ...

  13. Cedar leaf oil poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedar leaf oil is made from some types of cedar trees. Cedar leaf oil poisoning occurs when someone swallows this substance. ... The substance in cedar leaf oil that can be harmful is thujone (a hydrocarbon).

  14. Nail polish poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002722.htm Nail polish poisoning To use the sharing features on this ... is from swallowing or breathing in (inhaling) nail polish. This article is for information only. DO NOT ...

  15. Metal cleaner poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metal cleaners are very strong chemical products that contain acids. This article discusses poisoning from swallowing or ... Metal cleaners contain organic compounds called hydrocarbons, including: 1,2-butylene oxide Boric acid Cocoyl sarcosine Dicarboxylic ...

  16. Bracken fern poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracken fern (Pteridium aquilinum) has worldwide distribution and in some areas dominated plant communities replacing desirable forages. Poisoning is identified as enzootic hematuria, bright blindness, and bracken staggers. This chapter reviews updates new information on the plant, the various poi...

  17. Pine oil poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... K. General approach to the poisoned patient. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et al, eds. ... Saunders; 2014:chap 147. Lee DC. Hydrocarbons. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et al, eds. ...

  18. Hydroxocobalamin in cyanide poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, John P; Marrs, Timothy C

    2012-12-01

    On theoretical grounds, hydroxocobalamin is an attractive antidote for cyanide poisoning as cobalt compounds have the ability to bind and detoxify cyanide. This paper reviews the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic aspects of hydroxocobalamin, its efficacy in human cyanide poisoning and its adverse effects. PubMed was searched for the period 1952 to April 2012. A total of 71 papers were identified in this way; and none was excluded. PHARMACOKINETICS AND PHARMACODYNAMICS: Pharmacokinetic studies in dogs and humans suggest a two-compartment model, with first order elimination kinetics. Pharmacodynamic studies in animals suggest that hydroxocobalamin would be a satisfactory antidote for human cyanide poisoning. EFFICACY IN HUMAN POISONING: There is limited evidence that hydroxocobalamin alone is effective in severe poisoning by cyanide salts. The evidence for the efficacy of hydroxocobalamin in smoke inhalation is complicated by lack of evidence for the importance of cyanide exposure in fires and the effects of other chemicals as well as confounding effects of other therapeutic measures, including hyperbaric oxygen. Evidence that hydroxocobalamin is effective in poisoning due to hydrogen cyanide alone is lacking; extrapolation of efficacy from poisoning by ingested cyanide salts may not be valid. The rate of absorption may be greater with inhaled hydrogen cyanide and the recommended slow intravenous administration of hydroxocobalamin may severely limit its clinical effectiveness in these circumstances. Both animal and human data suggest that hydroxocobalamin is lacking in clinically significant adverse effects. However, in one human volunteer study, delayed but prolonged rashes were observed in one-sixth of subjects, appearing 7 to 25 days after administration of 5 g or more of hydroxocobalamin. Rare adverse effects have included dyspnoea, facial oedema, and urticaria. Limited data on human poisonings with cyanide salts suggest that hydroxocobalamin is an effective

  19. Carbon monoxide poisoning (acute)

    OpenAIRE

    Olson, Kent; Smollin, Craig

    2008-01-01

    The main symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning are non-specific in nature and relate to effects on the brain and heart. The symptoms correlate poorly with serum carboxyhaemoglobin levels. People with comorbidity, the elderly or very young, and pregnant women are most susceptible.Carbon monoxide is produced by the incomplete combustion of carbon fuels, including inadequately ventilated heaters and car exhausts, or from chemicals such as methylene chloride paint stripper.Poisoning is conside...

  20. Carbon monoxide poisoning (acute)

    OpenAIRE

    Smollin, Craig; Olson, Kent

    2010-01-01

    The main symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning are non-specific in nature and relate to effects on the brain and heart. The symptoms correlate poorly with serum carboxyhaemoglobin levels. People with comorbidity, elderly or very young people, and pregnant women are most susceptible.Carbon monoxide is produced by the incomplete combustion of carbon fuels, including inadequately ventilated heaters and car exhausts, or from chemicals such as methylene chloride paint stripper.Poisoning is cons...

  1. Protect the Ones You Love From Poisoning

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-12-10

    This podcast, developed as part of the Protect the Ones You Love initiative, discusses steps parents can take to help protect their children from poisoning, one of the leading causes of child injury.  Created: 12/10/2008 by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC).   Date Released: 12/10/2008.

  2. Diarrhetic Shellfish Poisoning, Washington, USA, 2011

    OpenAIRE

    Lloyd, Jennifer K.; Duchin, Jeffrey S.; Borchert, Jerry; Quintana, Harold Flores; Robertson, Alison

    2013-01-01

    Diarrhetic shellfish poisoning is a gastrointestinal illness caused by consumption of bivalves contaminated with dinophysistoxins. We report an illness cluster in the United States in which toxins were confirmed in shellfish from a commercial harvest area, leading to product recall. Ongoing surveillance is needed to prevent similar illness outbreaks.

  3. Toilet bowl cleaners and deodorizers poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Below are symptoms of this type of poisoning in different parts of the body. BLOOD Severe change in blood acid level (can lead to organ damage) EYES, EARS, NOSE, AND THROAT Loss of vision Severe pain in the throat Severe pain ...

  4. Carbon monoxide poisoning in Jerusalem: epidemiology and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salameh, Shaden; Amitai, Yona; Antopolsky, Meir; Rott, David; Stalnicowicz, Ruth

    2009-02-01

    To describe the epidemiology of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning in Jerusalem and identify risk factors for such poisoning. A retrospective descriptive analysis of patients with CO poisoning who presented to the Hadassah hospitals in Jerusalem from 1994 to 2006. All patients with suspected CO poisoning were examined and those with confirmed cases [carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) level >5%] were included. Sources of exposure, seasonal variation, and demographic characteristics were analyzed. There were 292 patients (49% males) with 40 family clusters that accounted for 149 patients (51%); 230 patients (79%) presented during the winter months. All but one had unintentional CO intoxication. The main sources of exposure were faulty gas heaters (n = 135), fire (n = 102), and other residential heating systems (n = 40). The estimated annual incidence of CO poisoning decreased from 6.45 per 100,000 in 1994-2000 to 3.53 per 100,000 in 2001-2006. High-risk intoxication (COHb level >25%) occurred in 84 patients (29%). Factors associated with severe intoxication were male gender, individual patients (compared with those in clusters), and faulty gas heaters (compared with other sources). Males exposed to CO may have a more severe intoxication. The lower risk in patients presenting in clusters could be explained by the assumption that severe presentation in one patient alerts the others who are less severely affected. The implementation of safer standards for residential heating systems and CO detectors together with the public education may explain the decline in the incidence of CO poisoning.

  5. Main features of Cortinarius spp. poisoning: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danel, V C; Saviuc, P F; Garon, D

    2001-07-01

    Cortinarius spp. poisoning is characterized by a delayed acute renal failure. The main features of this severe poisoning are still poorly known and often overlooked. The aim of this literature review is a better description of Cortinarius spp. poisoning. The main medical databases were searched: Abstracts of Mycology, Current Contents, Medline, Pascal, Micromedex Poisindex, Toxicology abstracts, Toxline. All case reports that included a description of the clinical features of Cortinarius spp. poisoning were studied. 245 cases were collected and 90 cases could be analyzed in details. Gastrointestinal disorders are the main symptoms of the prerenal phase of the poisoning. They appear a few days after the ingestion of the mushrooms (median 3 days). The renal phase is delayed (median 8.5 days). Moderate and transient hepatic abnormalities have been reported. A severe hepatic failure can be ruled out. Muscular lesions are highly questionable. Treatment is supportive. No specific treatment can be recommended. Acute renal failure progressed towards chronic renal failure in half of the cases; intermittent hemodialysis or kidney transplantations were necessary in 70% of those cases. Cortinarius spp. poisoning is severe. Ingestion of Cortinarius species must be systematically suspected whenever tubulo-interstitial nephritis is diagnosed, especially as mushrooms may have been ingested 1-2 weeks before.

  6. Human Melia azedarach poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phua, Dong Haur; Tsai, Wei-Jen; Ger, Jiin; Deng, Jou-Fang; Yang, Chen-Chang

    2008-12-01

    In traditional Chinese medicine, Melia azedarach (Ku-lian) is used orally and topically as an antiparasitic and antifungal agent. Although toxicity of this plant has been widely described in veterinary literature, human poisoning is rarely reported. We describe five patients with M. azedarach poisoning who recovered with supportive care. Five patients were identified retrospectively from the database of the Taiwan National Poison Center at the Taipei Veterans General Hospital. Three cases were on-site patients, and two were telephone consultations from outside hospitals. Neurological symptoms were the major manifestation in four cases: weakness, myalgia, numbness, and ptosis. Treatment was symptomatic and supportive; all patients recovered without sequelae. It is not known which limonoids are responsible for human toxicity. In the Chinese medical literature, human M. azedarach poisoning is said to occur if six to nine fruits, 30 to 40 seeds, or 400 g of the bark is consumed. Onset of symptoms typically occurs within 4-6 h, but as short as 0.5 h had been documented. In our patients, the onset of M. azedarach poisoning was variable, ranging from a few hours to up to 3 weeks after consumption of the herb. M. azedarach poisoning may result in gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, respiratory, or neurological effects, and death in severe cases.

  7. Pancreatitis in wild zinc-poisoned waterfowl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sileo, Louis; Beyer, W. Nelson; Mateo, Rafael

    2003-01-01

    Four waterfowl were collected in the TriState Mining District (Oklahoma, Kansas and Missouri, USA), an area known to be contaminated with lead, cadmium and zinc (Zn). They were part of a larger group of 20 waterfowl collected to determine the exposure of birds to metal contamination at the site. The four waterfowl (three Branta canadensis, one Anas platyrhynchos) had mild to severe degenerative abnormalities of the exocrine pancreas, as well as tissue (pancreas, liver) concentrations of Zn that were considered toxic. The mildest condition was characterized by generalized atrophy of exocrine cells that exhibited cytoplasmic vacuoles and a relative lack of zymogen. The most severe condition was characterized by acini with distended lumens and hyperplastic exocrine tissue that completely lacked zymogen; these acini were widely separated by immature fibrous tissue. Because the lesions were nearly identical to the lesions reported in chickens and captive waterfowl that had been poisoned with ingested Zn, and because the concentrations of Zn in the pancreas and liver of the four birds were consistent with the concentrations measured in Zn-poisoned birds, we concluded that these waterfowl were poisoned by Zn. This may be the first reported case of zinc poisoning in free-ranging wild birds poisoned by environmental Zn.

  8. Technology and the Glaucoma Suspect

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Blumberg, Dana M; De Moraes, Carlos Gustavo; Liebmann, Jeffrey M; Garg, Reena; Chen, Cynthia; Theventhiran, Alex; Hood, Donald C

    2016-01-01

    ...), stereoscopic disc photographs, and automated perimetry as assessed by a group of glaucoma specialists in differentiating individuals with early glaucoma from suspects. Forty-six eyes (46 patients...

  9. [Repeated poisoning episodes: Alarm sign of risk situations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García González, Elsa; Trenchs Sainz de la Maza, Victoria; Martínez Sánchez, Lidia; Ferrer Bosch, Nuria; Luaces Cubells, Carles

    2017-11-01

    Prevention is an essential aspect in paediatric poisonings, especially when recurrent episodes are detected. The aims of this article are to detect the recurrence rate for suspected poisoning in emergency consultations, as well as to identify the cases in which specific preventive measures are indicated, and to determine whether the creation of a specific item for recurrent episodes in the computerised medical records system facilitates its detection. A retrospective study was conducted on patients less than 18 years of age treated in the emergency room due to suspected poisoning during 2013 and 2014. Patients were divided according to the presence or absence of previous episodes. From January 2014, a specific item is present in the computerised medical records of the poisoned patient, where the history of previous episodes is registered. The preventive measures used between both groups were compared. A total of 731 consultations were recorded for suspected poisoning. A history of previous episodes was detected in 9% of cases. Medical injury reports and follow-up in outpatient clinics were more often performed in patients with recurrent episodes than in patients without them (28.8% vs 18.0%, P=.034, and 65.2% vs. 18.8%, P<.001, respectively). In 2013, the recurrence rate was 5.9% vs 12% in 2014 (P=.004). The recurrence rate observed is significant. Although preventive measures are more frequently indicated in these patients, their application is low. The creation of a specific item for recurrent episodes in a computerised medical records system facilitates their detection. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Benzodiazepine poisoning in elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukcević, Natasa Perković; Ercegović, Gordana Vuković; Segrt, Zoran; Djordjević, Snezana; Stosić, Jasmina Jović

    2016-03-01

    Benzodiazepines are among the most frequently ingested drugs in self-poisonings. Elderly may be at greater risk compared with younger individuals due to impaired metabolism and increased sensitivity to benzodiazepines. The aim of this study was to assess toxicity of benzodiazepines in elderly attempted suicide. A retrospective study of consecutive presentations to hospital after self-poisoning with benzodiazepines was done. Collected data consisted of patient's characteristics (age, gender), benzodiazepine ingested with its blood concentrations at admission, clinical findings including vital signs and Glasgow coma score, routine blood chemistry, complications of poisoning, details of management, length of hospital stay and outcome. According the age, patients are classified as young (15-40-year old), middle aged (41-65-year old) and elderly (older than 65). During a 2-year observational period 387 patients were admitted because of pure benzodiazepine poisoning. The most frequently ingested drug was bromazepam, the second was diazepam. The incidence of coma was significantly higher, and the length of hospital stay significantly longer in elderly. Respiratory failure and aspiration pneumonia occurred more frequently in old age. Also, flumazenil was more frequently required in the group of elderly patients. Massive benzodiazepines overdose in elderly may be associated with a significant morbidity, including deep coma with aspiration pneumonia, respiratory failure, and even death. Flumazenil is indicated more often to reduce CNS depression and prevent complications of prolonged unconsciousness, but supportive treatment and proper airway management of comatose patients is the mainstay of the treatment of acute benzodiazepine poisoning.

  11. Developmental Effects of Lead Exposure in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesman, Johanna Rich; Hills, Amanda

    1994-01-01

    This report presents an overview of research on childhood lead exposure and poisoning, and the related social issues. The report first summarizes the history of lead poisoning and its prevalence in the United States, and discusses the basis for recent changes in guidelines for lead exposure by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). The report then…

  12. Lead toxicity in battery workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qasim, Saeeda Fouzia; Baloch, Malka

    2014-11-01

    Lead poisoning is a medical condition caused by increased levels of lead in the body. Routes of exposure include contaminated air, water, soil, food and consumer products. Occupational exposure is the main cause of lead poisoning in the adults. Two cases of occupational lead poisoning in adult battery workers are hereby presented. Both male patients had initial non-specific symptoms of intermittent abdominal pain, fatigue and headache for 6 - 8 years. Later on, they developed psychosis, slurred speech, tremors of hands and initially underwent treatment for Parkinsonism and Wilson's disease because of clinical misdiagnosis. They were diagnosed with lead poisoning later and were treated successfully with lead chelator (CaNa2 EDTA).

  13. [Acute renal failure as a sequela of mushroom poisoning with Cortinarius speciocissimus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münstermann, Susanne; Heinicke, Hans-Jürgen; Kayser, Marten; Nüsslein, Hubert

    2002-02-15

    Poisoning with the mushroom Cortinarius speciocissimus is a rare event. Within 2-17 days after ingestion unspecific symptoms appear. Characteristically, this state is soon followed by irreversible kidney damage which finally requires chronic hemodialysis. A 46-year-old man was admitted with nausea, vomiting and acute anuria 9 days after he had eaten Cortinarius speciocissimus. Hemodialysis had to be started. Kidney biopsy revealed an interstitial nephritis. This finding corresponds to earlier case reports about intoxication with orellanine, the poison of Cortinarius speciocissimus. 6 months later the kidney function had not recovered leaving the patient to chronic hemodialysis. The prognosis of poisoning with that mushroom is poor. The amount of ingested poison is crucial. Monitoring of kidney function is mandatory when poisoning is suspected. Therapy is directed to symptoms. Usually dialysis has to be commenced. To rule out other causes for kidney damage, a kidney biopsy is required.

  14. Mushroom poisoning in Ireland: the collaboration between the National Poisons Information Centre and expert mycologists.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cassidy, Nicola

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Occasionally, mycologist assistance is requested to reliably identify mushroom species in symptomatic cases where there is a concern that a toxic species is involved. The aim of this study was to describe the epidemiology of mushroom poisoning in Ireland, to describe the working arrangement between the National Poisons Information Centre (NPIC) and professional mycologists and to present a case series detailing the circumstances when mycologists were consulted. METHODS: Computerised records from 1 January 2004 to 31 December 2009 were retrospectively reviewed and data on patient demographics, circumstances, and mushroom species collated. In 1999, the NPIC established a national registry of volunteer professional mycologists who are available 24 h\\/day for mushroom identification. The NPIC staff liaises directly with the mycologist and arranges transport of mushroom material. Digital photographic images are requested if there is likely to be a delay in arranging transportation of mushroom material, and the images are subsequently emailed to a mycologist. Five cases of suspected mushroom poisoning were chosen to demonstrate the inter-professional collaboration between the NPIC and mycologists. RESULTS: From 2004 to 2009, the NPIC was consulted about 70 cases of suspected mushroom exposures. Forty-five children ingested unknown mushrooms, 12 adults and 2 children ingested hallucinogenic mushrooms and 11 adults ingested wild toxic mushrooms that were incorrectly identified or confused with edible species. The mycologists were consulted 10 times since 1999. In this series, Amanita species were identified in two cases. In three cases, the species identified were Clitocybe nebularis, Coprinus comatus and Panaeolina foenisecii, respectively, and serious poisoning was excluded. Incorrect mushroom identification by a health care professional using the Internet occurred in two cases. The mycologists assisted Poisons Information Centres in Northern Ireland and the

  15. Mushroom poisoning in Ireland: The collaboration between the National Poisons Information Centre and expert mycologists.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cassidy, Nicola

    2011-03-01

    Background. Occasionally, mycologist assistance is requested to reliably identify mushroom species in symptomatic cases where there is a concern that a toxic species is involved. The aim of this study was to describe the epidemiology of mushroom poisoning in Ireland, to describe the working arrangement between the National Poisons Information Centre (NPIC) and professional mycologists and to present a case series detailing the circumstances when mycologists were consulted. Methods. Computerised records from 1 January 2004 to 31 December 2009 were retrospectively reviewed and data on patient demographics, circumstances, and mushroom species collated. In 1999, the NPIC established a national registry of volunteer professional mycologists who are available 24 h\\/day for mushroom identification. The NPIC staff liaises directly with the mycologist and arranges transport of mushroom material. Digital photographic images are requested if there is likely to be a delay in arranging transportation of mushroom material, and the images are subsequently emailed to a mycologist. Five cases of suspected mushroom poisoning were chosen to demonstrate the inter-professional collaboration between the NPIC and mycologists. Results. From 2004 to 2009, the NPIC was consulted about 70 cases of suspected mushroom exposures. Forty-five children ingested unknown mushrooms, 12 adults and 2 children ingested hallucinogenic mushrooms and 11 adults ingested wild toxic mushrooms that were incorrectly identified or confused with edible species. The mycologists were consulted 10 times since 1999. In this series, Amanita species were identified in two cases. In three cases, the species identified were Clitocybe nebularis, Coprinus comatus and Panaeolina foenisecii, respectively, and serious poisoning was excluded. Incorrect mushroom identification by a health care professional using the Internet occurred in two cases. The mycologists assisted Poisons Information Centres in Northern Ireland

  16. Mushroom poisoning in Ireland: the collaboration between the National Poisons Information Centre and expert mycologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Nicola; Duggan, Edel; Tracey, Joseph A

    2011-03-01

    Occasionally, mycologist assistance is requested to reliably identify mushroom species in symptomatic cases where there is a concern that a toxic species is involved. The aim of this study was to describe the epidemiology of mushroom poisoning in Ireland, to describe the working arrangement between the National Poisons Information Centre (NPIC) and professional mycologists and to present a case series detailing the circumstances when mycologists were consulted. Computerised records from 1 January 2004 to 31 December 2009 were retrospectively reviewed and data on patient demographics, circumstances, and mushroom species collated. In 1999, the NPIC established a national registry of volunteer professional mycologists who are available 24 h/day for mushroom identification. The NPIC staff liaises directly with the mycologist and arranges transport of mushroom material. Digital photographic images are requested if there is likely to be a delay in arranging transportation of mushroom material, and the images are subsequently emailed to a mycologist. Five cases of suspected mushroom poisoning were chosen to demonstrate the inter-professional collaboration between the NPIC and mycologists. From 2004 to 2009, the NPIC was consulted about 70 cases of suspected mushroom exposures. Forty-five children ingested unknown mushrooms, 12 adults and 2 children ingested hallucinogenic mushrooms and 11 adults ingested wild toxic mushrooms that were incorrectly identified or confused with edible species. The mycologists were consulted 10 times since 1999. In this series, Amanita species were identified in two cases. In three cases, the species identified were Clitocybe nebularis, Coprinus comatus and Panaeolina foenisecii, respectively, and serious poisoning was excluded. Incorrect mushroom identification by a health care professional using the Internet occurred in two cases. The mycologists assisted Poisons Information Centres in Northern Ireland and the United Kingdom in two cases

  17. Extracorporeal treatment for thallium poisoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghannoum, Marc; Nolin, Thomas D; Goldfarb, David S

    2012-01-01

    The EXtracorporeal TReatments In Poisoning (EXTRIP) workgroup was formed to provide recommendations on the use of extracorporeal treatment (ECTR) in poisoning. To test and validate its methods, the workgroup reviewed data for thallium (Tl)....

  18. Childhood pesticide poisoning in Zhejiang, China: a retrospective analysis from 2006 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yimaer, Aziguli; Chen, Guangdi; Zhang, Meibian; Zhou, Lifang; Fang, Xinglin; Jiang, Wei

    2017-06-28

    Pesticide poisoning in children has been a serious public health issue around the world, especially in the developing countries where agriculture is still one of the largest economic sectors. The purpose of this study was to analyze epidemiological characteristics of acute pesticide poisoning in children from Zhejiang province, China. The pesticide poisoning cases for children were retrieved from Occupational Disease Surveillance and Reporting System, Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, China. The incident cases, deaths, and fatality rate of child pesticide poisoning from 2006 through 2015 were calculated. During the study period, totally 2952 children were poisoned by pesticides, with 66 deaths, resulting in a fatality rate of 2.24%. Among them, there were 1607 male cases with 28 deaths, and 1345 female cases with 38 deaths. Most of the cases occurred in preschool children (1349) and adolescent age group (1269). Organophosphate and carbamate insecticides were the cause of most poisonings (1130), leading to 34 deaths. The highest fatality rate (3.13%) was due to poisoning by herbicides and fungicides, causing 14 deaths out of 448 cases. Poisoning occurred mostly in rural areas (78%). And most pesticide poisoning occurred in the summer (896) and fall (811), while fewest poisoning cases in the winter (483) but with the highest fatality rate (3.52%). This study shows that pesticide poisoning of children is a major health problem in Zhejiang, suggesting preventive strategies should be conducted to control childhood pesticide poisoning.

  19. [Electronic poison information management system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabata, Piotr; Waldman, Wojciech; Kaletha, Krystian; Sein Anand, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    We describe deployment of electronic toxicological information database in poison control center of Pomeranian Center of Toxicology. System was based on Google Apps technology, by Google Inc., using electronic, web-based forms and data tables. During first 6 months from system deployment, we used it to archive 1471 poisoning cases, prepare monthly poisoning reports and facilitate statistical analysis of data. Electronic database usage made Poison Center work much easier.

  20. Amitraz poisoning: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Alexander Molina-Bolaños

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Amitraz is an insecticide compound used worldwide for controlling pests, especially in agricultural and livestock areas. However, amitraz poisoning in Colombia is rare. This article reports the case of an 18-year-old female patient who was admitted in the emergency service 3 hours after the intake of an unknown amount of Triatox® (amitraz. The patient presented with a depressed level of consciousness, respiratory distress, hypotension, bradycardia, myosis and metabolic acidosis compensated with respiratory alkalosis. Initial treatment was provided using life support measures in the emergency ward, and subsequent transfer and support in the intensive care unit. She was discharged 24 hours after admission. This case considers the clinical similarity between amitraz poisoning and poisoning caused by other more frequent toxic compounds such as carbamates, organophosphates and opioids, which require different management.

  1. [Acute pesticide poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán-Nah, J J; Collí-Quintal, J

    2000-01-01

    To describe the epidemiologic pattern of acute pesticide poisoning (APP) in a general hospital in Merida, Yucatan, Mexico. From 1994 to 1998, 33 patients 13 years of age or older with diagnosis of APP were studied. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze information. Males were frequently affected (82%), specially those coming from rural areas (60%). The mean age of the group was 34 +/- 15.8 years. In 79% of the cases, pesticides were used to commit suicide and 33% of poisoning cases were due to organophospate pesticides. The mortality rate was 12%. In this small sample, acute poisoning from pesticides in the agricultural setting may be underestimated, since it was less frequent than in the general population. APP was more commonly used by indigent people to commit suicide.

  2. Quadriplegia due to lead-contaminated opium: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baigmohammadi MT

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Lead poisoning could be associated with gastrointestinal renal, hematologic complications and neurologic deficit."n"n Case report: The patient was an opium addict, forty one years old male, to hospital admitted with gastrointestinal signs, constipation, abdominal pain, severe weakness of upper and lower limbs without any sensory impairment and with anemia, leukocytosis, and slightly increased liver function tests. Serum level of lead was more than 200µg/dl. After treatment with dimercaprol (BAL, CaNa2EDTA for two five days sessions that followed with oral succimer for three days, signs and symptoms relieved, all laboratory tests became normal and blood level of lead reduced but the patient was discharged with quadriplegia. There was no fecal or urinary incontinence."n"n Conclusions: Because of irreversibility and severity of lead related neuronal injury, we should suspect to lead poisoning in each patient with neuronal involvement and concurrent GI and hematologic signs."n"n Keywords: Lead poisoning, motor palsy, opium, neuropathy, quadriplegia.

  3. Black-spot poison ivy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schram, Sarah E; Willey, Andrea; Lee, Peter K; Bohjanen, Kimberly A; Warshaw, Erin M

    2008-01-01

    In black-spot poison ivy dermatitis, a black lacquerlike substance forms on the skin when poison ivy resin is exposed to air. Although the Toxicodendron group of plants is estimated to be the most common cause of allergic contact dermatitis in the United States, black-spot poison ivy dermatitis is relatively rare.

  4. On the mechanisms underlying poisoning-induced rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talaie, Haleh; Emam-Hadi, Mohammad; Panahandeh, Reyhaneh; Hassanian-Moghaddam, Hosein; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT The clinical syndrome of rhabdomyolysis is caused by injury of skeletal muscles resulting in release of intracellular muscle constituents. Drug poisoning is one of the causes of severe rhabdomyolysis. Severe electrolyte disorders and acute renal failure may occur in rhabdomyolysis, leading to life-threatening situations. Early initiation of renal replacement therapy can help improve outcome. In the present retrospective study, medical records of 181 patients suspected of rhabdomyolysis from Loghman-Hakim Hospital in the period of 2004 to 2005 were reviewed. A creatinine phosphokinase (CPK) value of greater than five times normal (>/=975 IU/L) was the basis for confirmation of a rhabdomyolysis diagnosis. An increased serum creatinine level of more than 30% was the basis for acute renal failure diagnosis. Out of 156 patients, 100 were male with an age range of 13 to 78 years. One hundred and two (92%) patients had CPK >975 U/L, and 36 patients (28.6%) had a 30% or more increase in their creatinine level during their admission days. Mean fluid intake was the same in patients with renal failure and those without renal failure. In 8.3% of the cases, multiple drug poisoning was observed. The most common compound overdose associated with rhabdomyolysis was opium. It is concluded that fluid therapy alone is not adequate in the management of acute renal failure in rhabdomyolysis. Therefore, other etiological factors are involved that remain to be elucidated by further studies.

  5. Paraquat poisoning: A case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kondle Raghu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Paraquat (1, r-dimethyl-4,4′-bipyridium dichloride, a brown syrupy liquid is an effective herbicide that has low chronic toxicity because of its rapid deactivation on contact with soil. A high dose of paraquat or severe poisoning has a poor prognosis. At present there is no specific antidote to paraquat poisoning, hence the need to focus on prevention and in case of exposure or ingestion, aggressive decontamination to prevent further absorption. Although uncommon, paraquat ingestion can lead to severe and often fatal toxicity. However, despite its widespread availability, reports of this herbicide poisoning in India are uncommon.

  6. Chelation Therapy for Mercury Poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Guan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Chelation therapy has been the major treatment for heavy metal poisoning. Various chelating agents have been developed and tested for treatment of heavy metal intoxications, including mercury poisoning. It has been clearly shown that chelating agents could rescue the toxicity caused by heavy metal intoxication, but the potential preventive role of chelating agents against heavy metal poisoning has not been explored much. Recent paper by Siddiqi and colleagues has suggested a protective role of chelating agents against mercury poisoning, which provides a promising research direction for broader application of chelation therapy in prevention and treatment of mercury poisoning.

  7. Puffer fish poisoning.

    OpenAIRE

    Field, J

    1998-01-01

    Regarded by many as a delicacy, puffer fish (Lagocephalus scleratus) is a lethal source of food poisoning with a high mortality. It contains tetrodotoxin which can cause death by muscular paralysis, respiratory depression, and circulatory failure. A case of mild intoxication is reported and the literature reviewed.

  8. Poisoning with organophosphates

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    with alcohol: 42.4% of patients were poisoned with “agrochemicals”. The overall mortality was low at 1.4%. ... and respiratory tracts and significantly through the skin. Their key action is to inhibit acetylcholinesterase which .... and so would make the situation worse. A careful watch of respiratory function is essential when any ...

  9. [Acute arsenic poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montelescaut, Etienne; Vermeersch, Véronique; Commandeur, Diane; Huynh, Sophie; Danguy des Deserts, Marc; Sapin, Jeanne; Ould-Ahmed, Mehdi; Drouillard, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Acute arsenic poisoning is a rare cause of suicide attempt. It causes a multiple organs failure caused by cardiogenic shock. We report the case of a patient admitted twelve hours after an ingestion of trioxide arsenic having survived thanks to a premature treatment.

  10. Benzodiazepine poisoning in elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perković-Vukčević Nataša

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Benzodiazepines are among the most frequently ingested drugs in self-poisonings. Elderly may be at greater risk compared with younger individuals due to impaired metabolism and increased sensitivity to benzodiazepines. The aim of this study was to assess toxicity of benzodiazepines in elderly attempted suicide. Methods. A retrospective study of consecutive presentations to hospital after self-poisoning with benzodiazepines was done. Collected data consisted of patient's characteristics (age, gender, benzodiazepine ingested with its blood concentrations at admission, clinical findings including vital signs and Glasgow coma score, routine blood chemistry, complications of poisoning, details of management, length of hospital stay and outcome. According the age, patients are classified as young (15-40-year old, middle aged (41-65-year old and elderly (older than 65. Results. During a 2-year observational period 387 patients were admitted because of pure benzodiazepine poisoning. The most frequently ingested drug was bromazepam, the second was diazepam. The incidence of coma was significantly higher, and the length of hospital stay significantly longer in elderly. Respiratory failure and aspiration pneumonia occurred more frequently in old age. Also, flumazenil was more frequently required in the group of elderly patients. Conclusion. Massive benzodiazepines overdose in elderly may be associated with a significant morbidity, including deep coma with aspiration pneumonia, respiratory failure, and even death. Flumazenil is indicated more often to reduce CNS depression and prevent complications of prolonged unconsciousness, but supportive treatment and proper airway management of comatose patients is the mainstay of the treatment of acute benzodiazepine poisoning.

  11. 24 CFR 200.800 - Lead-based paint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lead-based paint. 200.800 Section... DEVELOPMENT GENERAL INTRODUCTION TO FHA PROGRAMS Lead-Based Paint Poisoning Prevention § 200.800 Lead-based paint. The Lead-Based Paint Poisoning Prevention Act (42 U.S.C. 4821-4846), the Residential Lead-Based...

  12. Causes of Acute Poisoning Hospital admission in Shahid Beheshti Hospital of Yasuj, 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Mohammad Hosseini

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: About 7% of patient referred to hospital are various forms of poisoning. This study was performed to determine the major causes of acute poisoning leading to Hospitalization at Shahid Beheshti Hospital of Yasuj, Iran. Methods: This descriptive study was performed from August 2007 to July 2008 on 470 cases of poisonings referred to Shahid Beheshti hospital of Yasuj. Demographic characteristics, time of poisoning, poisoning factor, history of previous poisoning, history of psychiatric disease, medication and other therapeutic intervention based on questionnaires and interviews with patients or companions of patients were recorded. Data were analyzed by Chi-Square Test. Results: Majority of poisoned patients were single females, in the age range of 21-30 years, unemployed, lived in urban areas, and had at least a diploma. The majority of cases were intentional poisoning with a history of depression, previous poisoning and attempted suicide. Significant relationship were seen between poisoning, age, sex, and job, (p0.05. Conclusion: With respect to the results of this study, the majority of these poisonings occurred among young, single and unemployed females due to suicide and drug intoxication. Necessary actions should be done in drug usage and maintenance, taking action against non-prescription drugs and giving proper public education to families.

  13. Xuebijing for paraquat poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jin; Huo, Dongmei; Wu, Qiaoyuan; Zhu, Lin; Liao, Yunhua

    2013-07-29

    At present, there is a lack of effective treatments for paraquat poisoning. Xuebijing injection is a complex traditional Chinese prescription consisting of Flos Carthami, Radix Paeoniae Rubra, Rhizoma Chuanxiong, Radix Salviae Miltiorrhizae and Radix Angelicae Sinensis. Although clinical experience suggests that Xuebijing injection might have potential in the management of paraquat poisoning, there is no conclusion on the effectiveness of this treatment. To assess the effects of Xuebijing injection in patients with paraquat poisoning. We searched the Cochrane Injuries Group's Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE (OvidSP), EMBASE (OvidSP), CINAHL (EBSCO), ISI Web of Science: Science Citation Index Expanded, ISI Web of Science: Conference Proceedings Citation Index-Science, Chinese bio-medical literature and retrieval system (CBM), China National Knowledge Infrastructure Database (CNKI), and the Traditional Chinese Medicine Database. The search was run on the 29th May 2013. We included all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing Xuebijing injection combined with conventional care against conventional care alone. Two or three authors independently selected studies, assessed study quality and extracted data. We calculated the mortality risk ratio (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). Data on all-cause mortality at the end of follow-up were summarised in a meta-analysis. We identified two trials including 84 people. Although there were fewer deaths in people treated with Xuebijing injection, meta-analysis showed that it did not provide a statistically significant benefit in reducing all-cause mortality in people with paraquat poisoning as compared to control (RR 0.71; 95% CI 0.48 to 1.04; P = 0.08). Based on the findings of two small RCTs, Xuebijing injection did not have a statistically significant benefit on reducing all-cause mortality in people with paraquat poisoning. However, both

  14. Evaluation of blood lead level in methamphetamine users in Tehran

    OpenAIRE

    Mostafazadeh, Babak; Shadnia, Shahin; Tavakkoli, Mohammad Ali; Khoddami Vishteh, Hamid Reza

    2017-01-01

    Background Given the increasing number of lead poisoning in opioids users and since no study has been conducted so far to review lead poisoning in methamphetamine (crystal) users, this study aimed to investigate blood lead level in methamphetamine addicts. Methods This study was conducted on 20 patients with methamphetamine poisoning and their blood lead level was measured. The subjects were selected from among patients with a history of continuous use of methamphetamine, without a history of...

  15. An accidental poisoning with mitragynine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karinen, Ritva; Fosen, Jan Toralf; Rogde, Sidsel; Vindenes, Vigdis

    2014-12-01

    An increasing number of drugs of abuse are sold word wide over the internet. Names like "legal highs", "herbal highs" etc. give the impression that these are safe products, although the risk of fatal reactions might be substantial. Leaves from the plant Mitragyna speciosa, contain active compounds like mitragynine and 7-hydroxymitragynine. It has been reported that the potency of 7-hydroxymitragynine at the μ-opioid receptor is 30 times higher than that of mitragynine and 17 times higher than that of morphine. Case reports regarding poisoning with Kratom are reported, but the toxic or lethal ranges for the concentrations of the active substances have not been established, and concentrations of 7-hydroxymitragynine have not been reported previously. We present a case report where a middle aged man was found dead at home. The deceased had a history of drug abuse and mental illness for several years. At autopsy, there were no significant pathological findings. Post-mortem analysis of peripheral blood revealed: zopiclone 0.043mg/L, citalopram 0.36mg/L and lamotrigine 5.4mg/L, i.e. concentrations regularly seen after therapeutic ingestion of these drugs. Additionally mitragynine 1.06mg/L and 7-hydroxymitragynine 0.15mg/L were detected in blood and both also in urine. The high concentrations of mitragynine and 7-hydroxymitragynine indicate that the cause of death is intoxication by these substances; and the circumstances point toward the manner of death being accidental. We recommend that both mitragynine and 7-hydroxymitragynine are analyzed for in cases with suspected Kratom intoxication. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Calcium channel blocker poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miran Brvar

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Calcium channel blockers act at L-type calcium channels in cardiac and vascular smooth muscles by preventing calcium influx into cells with resultant decrease in vascular tone and cardiac inotropy, chronotropy and dromotropy. Poisoning with calcium channel blockers results in reduced cardiac output, bradycardia, atrioventricular block, hypotension and shock. The findings of hypotension and bradycardia should suggest poisoning with calcium channel blockers.Conclusions: Treatment includes immediate gastric lavage and whole-bowel irrigation in case of ingestion of sustainedrelease products. All patients should receive an activated charcoal orally. Specific treatment includes calcium, glucagone and insulin, which proved especially useful in shocked patients. Supportive care including the use of catecholamines is not always effective. In the setting of failure of pharmacological therapy transvenous pacing, balloon pump and cardiopulmonary by-pass may be necessary.

  17. Small dose... big poison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braitberg, George; Oakley, Ed

    2010-11-01

    It is not possible to identify all toxic substances in a single journal article. However, there are some exposures that in small doses are potentially fatal. Many of these exposures are particularly toxic to children. Using data from poison control centres, it is possible to recognise this group of exposures. This article provides information to assist the general practitioner to identify potential toxic substance exposures in children. In this article the authors report the signs and symptoms of toxic exposures and identify the time of onset. Where clear recommendations on the period of observation and known fatal dose are available, these are provided. We do not discuss management or disposition, and advise readers to contact the Poison Information Service or a toxicologist for this advice.

  18. [Poisoning with oleander leaves].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, G A; Mombelli, G

    1990-04-21

    After ingestion of seven leaves of oleander (Nerium oleander) in a suicide attempt, a 37-year-old woman was admitted to hospital with symptoms of digitalis intoxication. The serum digoxin level on arrival was 5.69 nmol/l. The course was uneventful. The usefulness of digoxin radioimmunoassay to demonstrate poisoning with oleander (but not to predict the degree of toxicity) and the potential use of digoxin-specific Fab-antibody fragments in this situation are discussed.

  19. [Toxic alcohol poisonings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulicki, Paweł; Głogowski, Tomasz

    Accidental or intentional poisonings with ethylene glycol or methanol constitute a serious toxicological problem in many countries. Both alcohols are quickly metabolized by alcohol dehydrogenase to toxic metabolites responsible for high anion gap severe metabolic acidosis and profound neurological, cardiopulmonary, renal disturbances and death. In the early period, the competing inhibition the alcohol dehydrogenase with ethanol or fomepizol may successfully prevent the formation of the toxic metabolites. Once severe acidosis develops an emergency hemodialysis is required.

  20. The prognosis following amphetamine poisoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horwitz, Henrik; Dalhoff, Kim P.; Klemp, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Aims: This study investigated the long-term mortality following poisoning by amphetamine or substituted amphetamines. Furthermore, we examined the social problems and somatic and psychiatric co-morbidity related to amphetamine poisoning, and their impact on the long-term survival. Methods: We...... identified amphetamine poisoned patients from the Danish Poison Information Centre database and correlated their personal identification numbers with seven Danish national registries related to different social and health aspects. For each case, we sampled 100 age and gender matched controls from...... the background population. Results: From August 2006 to December 2013 we identified 1444 patients (70% males) who experienced amphetamine poisoning; 52% of the cases were classified as mixed poisonings and the average age at first contact was 24.8 years (SD 8.6). The prevalence of psychiatric disorders, HIV...

  1. Methanol poisoning: characteristic MRI findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Nirdesh; Himanshu, Dandu; Verma, Shailendra Prasad; Parihar, Anit

    2013-01-01

    Acute methanol intoxication is not an unusual poisoning. It can have serious neurological sequelae. We emphasize how neuroimaging can help in distinguishing methanol poisoning from other causes of acute unconsciousness in alcoholic patients such as hypoglycemic brain damage and carbon monoxide poisoning or head injury, which are frequently observed in alcoholic patients and are also responsible for altered sensorium. The most important findings in MR brain imaging in methanol poisoning have been bilateral putaminal hemorrhagic necrosis. Other less common findings are subcortical and deep white matter lesions, cerebral and cerebellar cortical lesions, and midbrain lesions, cerebral and intraventricular hemorrhage, and even enhancement of necrotic lesions, we found almost the entire spectrum of MRI findings in this patient with methanol poisoning. Neurological sequelae can entail the course and prognosis in methanol poisoning. The patient died because of ventilator-associated pneumonia that developed in the course of prolonged hospitalization.

  2. Rhabdomyolysis among acute human poisoning cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talaie, H; Pajouhmand, A; Abdollahi, M; Panahandeh, R; Emami, H; Hajinasrolah, S; Tghaddosinezhad, M

    2007-07-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a clinical and biochemical syndrome occurring when skeletal muscle cells erupt and result in release of creatine phosphokinase (CPK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and myoglobin into the interstitial space and plasma. Mechanical trauma, compression, excessive muscle activity and ischemia are frequent causes, but non-traumatic rhabdomyolysis is usually caused by a toxic reaction to drugs. In this study, 181 patients suspected of rhabdomyolysis were admitted to the poisoning center of Loghman-Hakim Hospital in Tehran during one year (September 2004 to September 2005) were studied. Patients were included on the basis of physical examination and blood analysis for CPK and LDH. Rhabdomyolysis was confirmed if CPK level has been greater than 975 U/L. Out of 181 patients, 64 were female and 117 were male with an age range between 13-78 years. One-hundred and forty-three (79%) patients had CPK greater than 975 U/L. In 6% of the cases, multiple drug poisoning were observed. Two patients (1.1%) had muscle pain, five patients (2.8%) had rigidity and five patients (2.8%) had muscle inflammation. One-hundred and nineteen patients (65.7%) were febrile. The most common cause of rhabdomyolysis was opium. Blood ALT showed an increase in 109 patients (60.9%), AST in 80 patients (44.7%), and LDH in 144 patients (79.6%). Fifty patients (28.2%) had higher blood direct bilirubin and 64 patients (36.4%) showed higher total bilirubin. Six percent of patients had been diagnosed as ARF by indication of creatinine greater than 1.4 mg/dL. Five percent of patients had hypernatremia and 1.1% of patients had hyperkalemia. It is concluded that rhabdomyolysis is a matter of concern in human poisonings and needs special approach to attend.

  3. Occupational lead exposure and renin release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, B C; Beattie, A D; Elliott, H L; Goldberg, A; Moore, M R; Beevers, D G; Tree, M

    1979-01-01

    Hypertension may result from chronic lead exposure. Lead poisoning arising from "moonshine whiskey" drinking has been associated with a rise in plasma renin activity. In the present study, plasma renin concentration following intravenous administration of frusemide was measured in eleven subjects with moderate or severe lead poisoning of industrial origin. The results were compared with those obtained for seven normal, control subjects. There was no significant difference in response obtained in the two groups. Industrial lead poisoning does not appear to affect renin release. The combined insult of lead and alcohol may explain the findings in the previous study.

  4. Chelation Therapy for Mercury Poisoning

    OpenAIRE

    Rong Guan; Han Dai

    2009-01-01

    Chelation therapy has been the major treatment for heavy metal poisoning. Various chelating agents have been developed and tested for treatment of heavy metal intoxications, including mercury poisoning. It has been clearly shown that chelating agents could rescue the toxicity caused by heavy metal intoxication, but the potential preventive role of chelating agents against heavy metal poisoning has not been explored much. Recent paper by Siddiqi and colleagues has suggested a protective role o...

  5. Problem of lead in petrol: The effect of triethyl lead

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roederer, G.

    1985-10-01

    Triethyl lead is a highly toxic derivate of the anti-knock agent tetraethyl lead. Contrary to anorganic lead compounds triethyl lead causes serious disorders in the central nervous system of poisoned mammals leading to dramatic mental changes. Triethyl lead destroys microtubuli in the cells of plants and animals. It is assumed that the neurotoxic effect of triethyl lead is caused by its interacting with the microtubuli of the nerves (neurotubuli) and their subsequent destruction.

  6. An interesting case of suicidal poisoning

    OpenAIRE

    Mohit Sharma; Satish Kumar; Aditi Prashar; Ashok Sharma

    2010-01-01

    Aconite is one of the most poisonous known herbs. It has been known to be used as a homicidal poison from long time in history. However this is rarely known to be used as suicidal poison. Poisoning with aconite is usually fatal and death commonly occurs due to arrhythmias and cardiotoxicity. We report a case of attempted suicidal poisoning by aconite where patient survived in spite of documented cardiotoxic effects of the poison.

  7. An interesting case of suicidal poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohit Sharma

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Aconite is one of the most poisonous known herbs. It has been known to be used as a homicidal poison from long time in history. However this is rarely known to be used as suicidal poison. Poisoning with aconite is usually fatal and death commonly occurs due to arrhythmias and cardiotoxicity. We report a case of attempted suicidal poisoning by aconite where patient survived in spite of documented cardiotoxic effects of the poison.

  8. Effects of Maternal Pb Poisoning during Pregnancy on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of maternal lead poisoning during pregnancy on the development of the jaw (Meckel's cartilage) of rat fetuses by histologic and morphometric methods. Pregnant rats received a single intraperitoneal injection of 2.5 mg of lead acetate/100g body weight on ...

  9. Effects of Maternal Pb 2+ Poisoning during Pregnancy on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of maternal lead poisoning during pregnancy on the development of the jaw (Meckel's cartilage) of rat fetuses by histologic and morphometric methods. Pregnant rats received a single intraperitoneal injection of 2.5 mg of lead acetate/100g body weight on the 10th day ...

  10. Poisoning of domestic animals with heavy metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velev Romel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The term heavy metal refers to a metal that has a relatively high density and is toxic for animal and human organism at low concentrations. Heavy metals are natural components of the Earth's crust. They cannot be degraded or destroyed. To a small extent they enter animal organism via food, drinking water and air. Some heavy metals (e.g cooper, iron, chromium, zinc are essential in very low concentrations for the survival of all forms of life. These are described as essential trace elements. However, when they are present in greater quantities, like the heavy metals lead, cadmium and mercury which are already toxic in very low concentrations, they can cause metabolic anomalies or poisoning. Heavy metal poisoning of domestic animals could result, for instance, from drinking-water contamination, high ambient air concentrations near emission sources, or intake via the food chain. Heavy metals are dangerous because they tend to bioaccumulate in a biological organism over time. Manifestation of toxicity of individual heavy metals varies considerably, depending on dose and time of exposure, species, gender and environmental and nutritional factors. Large differences exist between the effects of a single exposure to a high concentration, and chronic exposures to lower doses. The aim of this work is to present the source of poisoning and toxicity of some heavy metals (lead, mercury, cadmium, thallium, arsenic, as well as new data about effects of those heavy metals on the health of domestic animals. .

  11. The power of poison: pesticide poisoning of Africa's wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogada, Darcy L

    2014-08-01

    Poisons have long been used to kill wildlife throughout the world. An evolution has occurred from the use of plant- and animal-based toxins to synthetic pesticides to kill wildlife, a method that is silent, cheap, easy, and effective. The use of pesticides to poison wildlife began in southern Africa, and predator populations were widely targeted and eliminated. A steep increase has recently been observed in the intensity of wildlife poisonings, with corresponding population declines. However, the majority of poisonings go unreported. Under national laws, it is illegal to hunt wildlife using poisons in 83% of African countries. Pesticide regulations are inadequate, and enforcement of existing legislation is poor. Few countries have forensic field protocols, and most lack storage and testing facilities. Methods used to poison wildlife include baiting carcasses, soaking grains in pesticide solution, mixing pesticides to form salt licks, and tainting waterholes. Carbofuran is the most widely abused pesticide in Africa. Common reasons for poisoning are control of damage-causing animals, harvesting fish and bushmeat, harvesting animals for traditional medicine, poaching for wildlife products, and killing wildlife sentinels (e.g., vultures because their aerial circling alerts authorities to poachers' activities). Populations of scavengers, particularly vultures, have been decimated by poisoning. Recommendations include banning pesticides, improving pesticide regulations and controlling distribution, better enforcement and stiffer penalties for offenders, increasing international support and awareness, and developing regional pesticide centers. © 2014 New York Academy of Sciences.

  12. [Recommendations for the prevention of poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintegi, S; Esparza, M J; González, J C; Rubio, B; Sánchez, F; Vila, J J; Yagüe, F; Benítez, M T

    2015-12-01

    Poisoning is the fifth leading cause of death from unintentional injury in the WHO European region, while Spain is in the group with a lower rate. Most involuntary poisonings occur in young children while they are at the home, due to unintentional ingestion of therapeutic drugs or household products. Of these, a large percentage is stored in non-original containers and/or within reach of children. In this article, the Committee on Safety and Non-Intentional Injury Prevention in Childhood of the Spanish Association of Pediatrics provides a series of recommendations, educational as well as legal, to prevent such cases. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Food poisoning outbreak in Tokyo, Japan caused by Staphylococcus argenteus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yasunori; Kubota, Hiroaki; Ono, Hisaya K; Kobayashi, Makiko; Murauchi, Konomi; Kato, Rei; Hirai, Akihiko; Sadamasu, Kenji

    2017-12-04

    Staphylococcus argenteus is a novel species subdivided from Staphylococcus aureus. Whether this species can cause food poisoning outbreaks is unknown. This study aimed to investigate the enterotoxigenic activities of two food poisoning isolates suspected to be S. argenteus (Tokyo13064 and Tokyo13069). The results for phylogenic trees, constructed via whole genome sequencing, demonstrated that both isolates were more similar to a type strain of S. argenteus (MSHR1132) than any S. aureus strain. Moreover, the representative characteristics of S. argenteus were present in both strains, namely both isolates belong to the CC75 lineage and both lack a crtOPQMN operon. Thus, both were determined to be "S. argenteus." The compositions of the two isolates' accessory elements differed from those of MSHR1132. For example, the seb-related Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity island, SaPIishikawa11, was detected in Tokyo13064 and Tokyo13069 but not in MSHR1132. Both isolates were suggested to belong to distinct lineages that branched off from MSHR1132 lineages in terms of accessory elements. Tokyo13064 and Tokyo13069 expressed high levels of s(arg)eb and produced S(arg)EB protein, indicating that both have the ability to cause food poisoning. Our findings suggest that S. argenteus harboring particular accessory elements can cause staphylococcal diseases such as food poisoning, similarly to S. aureus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Lead and the skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, B.R.; Moore, M.R.; Hunter, J.A.A.

    1975-01-01

    The increasing use of lead will continue to give rise to problems of toxicity. Protective measures have resulted in florid lead poisoning becoming rare. Attention has recently turned to the possibility of prolonged exposure to low doses of lead causing morbidity in the absence of the classical clinical features of poisoning. Lead is absorbed mostly through the lungs and gastrointestinal tract. Some is also absorbed through the skin but with inorganic compounds the amount is small. Shortly after the most widely used compound, tetraethyl lead, was first manufactured, cases of toxicity began to occur. Manufacture was forbidden until plant design produced greater safety. Significant absorption can occur through the skin. The hazard to those handling leaded gasoline in a normal manner is probably small, mainly because 95 percent of a dose applied to the open skin surface evaporates. Hair has been used as a biopsy material to assess lead exposure. The biological effects of lead poisoning are discussed, including the synergistic effects of lead and agents provoking porphyria.

  15. Carbon Monoxide Poisoning in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Hsiun Cho

    2008-08-01

    Conclusion: Children with CO poisoning had good outcomes in this series. Although improperly vented exhaust from water heaters and house fires were the most common causes, intentional poisoning by parents through charcoal burning was also an important factor. Early identification of DNS risk factors might help to provide better care.

  16. Extracorporeal treatment for acetaminophen poisoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gosselin, S; Juurlink, D N; Kielstein, J T

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Extracorporeal Treatments in Poisoning (EXTRIP) workgroup was created to provide evidence-based recommendations on the use of extracorporeal treatments (ECTR) in poisoning and the results are presented here for acetaminophen (APAP). METHODS: After a systematic review of the litera...

  17. Homicidal arsenic poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Andrew; Taylor, Andrew; Leese, Elizabeth; Allen, Sam; Morton, Jackie; McAdam, Julie

    2015-07-01

    The case of a 50-year-old man who died mysteriously after being admitted to hospital is reported. He had raised the possibility of being poisoned prior to his death. A Coroner's post-mortem did not reveal the cause of death but this was subsequently established by post-mortem trace element analysis of liver, urine, blood and hair all of which revealed very high arsenic concentrations. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  18. Study of trends of poisoning in the cases reported to government hospital, Yavatmal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuganti Prabhakar Vaidya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: India is a developing country in south Asia. Rural population of this country is mostly dependant on agriculture. Pesticides, mainly the organophosphorus compounds are the most frequently used substances in agriculture and thus are easily accessible. Animal bites such as snake bite, scorpion bites are also common, as people here are mainly involved in the field work. Aims: This includes, knowing the pattern of poisoning in India along with various parameters, such as mode of poisoning, type of poison, outcome of the poisoning, the most vulnerable age group involved in poisoning, so that the study will help in rapid clinical diagnosis and immediate treatment of the cases leading to decreased mortality and morbidity. Setting and design: Retrospective observational study. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted at Govt. Hospital, Yavatmal. Poisoning cases reported to casualty and post-mortem cases of poisoning brought to the hospital from 01/06/2003 to 30/05/2004 were included in the study. Result: Total 1003 patients studied; acute poisoning in the age group of 21-30 years was the most common with higher frequency in males. Most common mode was suicidal. Most common agent responsible for poisoning was organophosphorus compounds followed by snake bite. Overall mortality due to poisoning was 12%. It was highest in insecticidal poisoning. Conclusion: It was seen that adults between 21 and 30 years of age were more prone to suicidal poisoning with organophosphorous compounds followed by accidental poisoning due to snake bite. Steps are needed to be taken to educate the people, to improve their socioeconomic status and also to provide better treatment facilities at grass root level.

  19. Medical treatment of acute poisoning with organophosphorus and carbamate pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokanović, Milan

    2009-10-28

    Organophosphorus compounds (OPs) are used as pesticides and developed as warfare nerve agents such as tabun, soman, sarin, VX and others. Exposure to even small amounts of an OP can be fatal and death is usually caused by respiratory failure. The mechanism of OP poisoning involves inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) leading to inactivation of the enzyme which has an important role in neurotransmission. AChE inhibition results in the accumulation of acetylcholine at cholinergic receptor sites, producing continuous stimulation of cholinergic fibers throughout the nervous systems. During more than five decades, pyridinium oximes have been developed as therapeutic agents used in the medical treatment of poisoning with OP. They act by reactivation of AChE inhibited by OP. However, they differ in their activity in poisoning with pesticides and warfare nerve agents and there is still no universal broad-spectrum oxime capable of protecting against all known OP. In spite of enormous efforts devoted to development of new pyridinium oximes as potential antidotes against poisoning with OP only four compounds so far have found its application in human medicine. Presently, a combination of an antimuscarinic agent, e.g. atropine, AChE reactivator such as one of the recommended pyridinium oximes (pralidoxime, trimedoxime, obidoxime and HI-6) and diazepam are used for the treatment of OP poisoning in humans. In this article the available data related to medical treatment of poisoning with OP pesticides are reviewed and the current recommendations are presented.

  20. Environmental lead hazard to children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, S K

    1992-01-01

    Clinically evident lead poisoning is rare in Indian children but is more common than in adults. In children, lead poisoning may appear as fever, seizures, anemia, or abdominal pain, while in adults it is more likely to manifest as chronic minor peripheral neuropathy or gum pigmentation. Children with acute lead poisoning can be treated with chelators such as EDTA and BAL, but many are left with permanent brain damage. The most common sources of acute lead poisoning in Indian children are inhalation of fumes from burned car batteries, ingestion of flaking paint, consuming food cooked in cheap aluminum or brass utensils, and eating contaminated soil. The sources of chronic lead poisoning are water from lead pipes and fumes from industrial or automotive exhaust. Another common source in India is application of "kajjal" to children's eyes. Sources of lead in Western countries, such as drinking water, canned food, residential paint, automotive fuel, and ambient air quality, are regulated by law. None of these are regulated in India.

  1. Cleistanthus collinus poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anugrah Chrispal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cleistanthus collinus, a toxic shrub, is used for deliberate self-harm in rural South India. MEDLINE (PUBMED and Google were searched for published papers using the search/ MeSH terms "Cleistanthus collinus," "Euphorbiaceae," "Diphyllin," "Cleistanthin A," Cleistanthin B" and "Oduvanthalai." Non-indexed journals and abstracts were searched by tracing citations in published papers. The toxic principles in the leaf include arylnaphthalene lignan lactones - Diphyllin and its glycoside derivatives Cleistanthin A and B. Toxin effect in animal models demonstrate neuromuscular blockade with muscle weakness, distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA and type 2 respiratory failure with conflicting evidence of cardiac involvement. Studies suggest a likely inhibition of thiol/thiol enzymes by the lignan-lactones, depletion of glutathione and ATPases in tissues. V-type H+ ATPase inhibition in the renal tubule has been demonstrated. Mortality occurs in up to 40% of C. collinus poisonings. Human toxicity results in renal tubular dysfunction, commonly dRTA, with resultant hypokalemia and normal anion gap metabolic acidosis. Aggressive management of these metabolic derangements is crucial. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is seen in severe cases. Cardiac rhythm abnormalities have been demonstrated in a number of clinical studies, though the role of temporary cardiac pacemakers in reducing mortality is uncertain. Consumption of decoctions of C. collinus leaves, hypokalemia, renal failure, severe metabolic acidosis, ARDS and cardiac arrhythmias occur in severe poisonings and predict mortality. Further study is essential to delineate mechanisms of organ injury and interventions, including antidotes, which will reduce mortality.

  2. Description of 3,180 Courses of Chelation with Dimercaptosuccinic Acid in Children ≤5 y with Severe Lead Poisoning in Zamfara, Northern Nigeria: A Retrospective Analysis of Programme Data

    OpenAIRE

    Thurtle, N; Greig, J; Cooney, L; Amitai, Y; Ariti, C; Brown, MJ; Kosnett, MJ; Moussally, K; Sani-Gwarzo, N; Akpan, H; Shanks, L; Dargan, PI

    2014-01-01

    Editors' Summary Background Lead, a toxic metal that occurs naturally in the earth's crust, is now present throughout the environment because of human activities. For many years, lead was added to paint and gasoline and used in solder for water pipes. In addition, the mining, smelting, and refining of some metallic ores releases lead into the environment. Inhalation of contaminated air, consumption of contaminated food and water, and contact with dust that contains lead raises venous blood le...

  3. Hemlock alkaloids from Socrates to poison aloes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Tom

    2005-06-01

    Hemlock (Conium maculatum L. Umbelliferae) has long been known as a poisonous plant. Toxicity is due to a group of piperidine alkaloids of which the representative members are coniine and gamma-coniceine. The latter is the more toxic and is the first formed biosynthetically. Its levels in relation to coniine vary widely according to environmental conditions and to provenance of the plants. Surprisingly, these piperidine alkaloids have turned up in quite unrelated species in the monocotyledons as well as the dicotyledons. Aloes, for instance, important medicinal plants, are not regarded as poisonous although some species are very bitter. Nevertheless a small number of mostly local species contain the alkaloids, especially gamma-coniceine and there have been records of human poisoning. The compounds are recognized by their characteristic mousy smell. Both acute and chronic symptoms have been described. The compounds are neurotoxins and death results from respiratory failure, recalling the effects of curare. Chronic non-lethal ingestion by pregnant livestock leads to foetal malformation. Both acute and chronic toxicity are seen with stock in damp meadows and have been recorded as problems especially in North America. The alkaloids derive biosynthetically from acetate units via the polyketide pathway in contrast to other piperidine alkaloids which derive from lysine.

  4. [Acute renal failure due to Cortinarius poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhbouh, Souad; Haverkamp, Leonie; Kuyper, Thomas W; de Wolff, Frederik A; Barendregt, Jos N M

    2011-01-01

    Ingestion of certain Cortinarius species may lead to renal failure. In the Netherlands, this type of poisoning has not been previously described. A 58-year-old female presented with headache, vomiting and oliguria, preceded by a few days of burning, painful thirst and malaise. She had acute and irreversible renal failure of unknown cause. History revealed that two days before the onset of her symptoms, she had eaten a ragout prepared with mushrooms that were picked in a forest. A renal biopsy demonstrated interstitial nephritis with proximal tubular necrosis. In the leftovers of the ragout two fragments of Cortinarius mushroom, probably belonging to the complex of Cortinarius cinnamomeus (cinnamon webcap), were found. First signs and symptoms, and the course are compatible with those described in the literature on Cortinarius poisoning. Despite haemodialysis and administration of acetylcysteine and glucocorticoids, her renal function did not recover. This case is the first description of mushroom poisoning by a species of the genus Cortinarius in the Netherlands.

  5. Effects of surface poisons on the oxidation of binary alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagan, P.S.; Polizzotti, R.S.; Luckman, G.

    1985-10-01

    A system of reaction-diffusion equations describing the oxidation of binary alloys in environments containing small amounts of surface poisons is analyzed. These poisons reduce the oxygen flux into the alloy, which causes the alloy to oxidize in two stages.During the initial stage, the oxidation reaction occurs in a stationary boundary layer at the alloy surface. Consequently, a thin zone containing a very high concentration of the metal oxide is created at the alloy surface. During the second stage, the oxidation reaction occurs in a moving boundary layer. This leads to a Stefan problem, which is analyzed by using asymptotic and numerical techniques. By comparing the solutions to those of alloys in unpoisoned environments, it is concluded that surface poisons can lead to the formation of protective external oxide scales in alloys which would not normally form such scales. 11 references.

  6. Cannabis Pharmacology: The Usual Suspects and a Few Promising Leads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Ethan B; Marcu, Jahan

    2017-01-01

    The golden age of cannabis pharmacology began in the 1960s as Raphael Mechoulam and his colleagues in Israel isolated and synthesized cannabidiol, tetrahydrocannabinol, and other phytocannabinoids. Initially, THC garnered most research interest with sporadic attention to cannabidiol, which has only rekindled in the last 15 years through a demonstration of its remarkably versatile pharmacology and synergy with THC. Gradually a cognizance of the potential of other phytocannabinoids has developed. Contemporaneous assessment of cannabis pharmacology must be even far more inclusive. Medical and recreational consumers alike have long believed in unique attributes of certain cannabis chemovars despite their similarity in cannabinoid profiles. This has focused additional research on the pharmacological contributions of mono- and sesquiterpenoids to the effects of cannabis flower preparations. Investigation reveals these aromatic compounds to contribute modulatory and therapeutic roles in the cannabis entourage far beyond expectations considering their modest concentrations in the plant. Synergistic relationships of the terpenoids to cannabinoids will be highlighted and include many complementary roles to boost therapeutic efficacy in treatment of pain, psychiatric disorders, cancer, and numerous other areas. Additional parts of the cannabis plant provide a wide and distinct variety of other compounds of pharmacological interest, including the triterpenoid friedelin from the roots, canniprene from the fan leaves, cannabisin from seed coats, and cannflavin A from seed sprouts. This chapter will explore the unique attributes of these agents and demonstrate how cannabis may yet fulfil its potential as Mechoulam's professed "pharmacological treasure trove." © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Genetic susceptibility to lead poisoning—A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Bijoor, Anita R.; Venkatesh, T.

    2007-01-01

    Lead poisoning is well documented in persons occupationally exposed to lead. What is less known is, that even in persons working in lead based industries, the effect of lead and the appearance of signs and symptoms of lead poisoning is genetically determined. Three genes related to lead metabolism, exhibiting polymorphism have already been demonstrated-δALA-dehydratase, Vitamin D receptor gene and Hemochromatosis gene. These alleles determine the susceptibility of the individuals to lead. We ...

  8. [Mushroom poisoning in Portugal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, José Luís; Pinheiro, J; Pinho, D; Correia da Silva, D; Fernandes, E; Fragoso, G; Costa, M I; Silva, A

    2011-12-01

    The renewed interest in mycology has been reflected in growing use of wild mushrooms in culinary, driven by its nutritional, organoleptic and commercial value. However, the international scientific literature describes several syndromes of poisoning by mushrooms. We live, therefore, a paradigm conducive to an increase of mycetism, whose diagnosis requires a high level of suspicion and knowledge of clinical profiles. In Portugal, the real dimension of this problem is unknown. Although some mycetisms, such as the hepatotoxic syndrome, have high morbidity and mortality, their relative incidences are unknown. Add up to the shortage of international scientific literature, often outdated and inappropriate to clinical practice. In this context, this article provides an updated epidemiological and clinical perspective emphasizing a narrative and descriptive information on the forms of presentation, differential diagnosis and therapeutic approach, with the ultimate goal of the elaboration of a national diagram-oriented approach to decision-making diagnosis. We analyzed all the clinical records of patients admitted into ten hospitals between 1990 and 2008, notified with the code 988.1 of GDH (acute poisoning by mushrooms). There were registered demographic data, way of presentation, time between ingestion and onset of symptoms, the annual distribution, clinical profile, clinical and analytical treatment performed and complications. We identified 93 cases of acute poisoning by mushrooms, with equal gender distribution and inclusion of individuals of all age groups (from 1 to 85 years), but with greater representation from 21 to 50 years. There was a bimodal seasonal pattern, with a higher peak between September and December and a second in the spring. The hepatotoxic profile presentation corresponded to 63.4% and 31.7% of the cases to gastroenteritis syndrome. The mortality in cases of hepatotoxicity was 11.8%. The developmental profile of the rate of prothrombin time (PT

  9. Chronic lead intoxication; Chronische Bleiintoxikation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieseler, B.; Leng, G. [Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Hygiene; Lenz, S.; Schultz, C. [Klinikum Remscheid GmbH, Remscheid (Germany); Wilhelm, M. [Bochum Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Hygiene, Sozial- und Umweltmedizin

    1999-02-01

    The case of a female 68 years old patient is described. Here, a chronic lead intoxication was diagnosed after a two year old medical history with increasing attacks of colic-like abdominal pain often described as life-threatening. After repeated hospitalizations and intensive search for the cause of the symptoms, porphyria and anemia was found to be a sign of a chronic lead poisoning. The blood lead concentrations were always about a level of 600 {mu}g/L. The source of exposure could not be found by now. Neither home inspection nor environmental investigations have shown a recent source of lead intake by the patient. However, a possible occupational source of lead exposure at a blast furnace was established by anamnesis for 1952 to 1962. Thus, osteoporosis induced lead mobilisation was suspected. Noticeable are the results of the six abdominal survey radiographies taken during hospitalization within one year; three radiographies were taken following clinical admission and three before discharge of the patient. In comparison, the course shows a chronic relapsing alimentary supply from metallic particles of unknown genesis. The patient was treated with the sodium salt of 2,3-dimercapto-1-propansulfonic acid (DMPS, Dimaval{sup TM}). She was free of complain afterwards. Following therapy, the blood lead concentrations fell under a level of 400 {mu}m/L, but after several weeks the lead level raised up to the original level of 600 {mu}g/L. (orig.) [Deutsch] Es wird eine 68jaehrige Patientin vorgestellt, bei der nach fast zweijaehriger Krankengeschichte, die gekennzeichnet war durch rezidivierende, teils als lebensbedrohlich geschilderte Bauchkoliken, eine chronische Bleiintoxikation diagnostiziert wurde. Erst nach wiederholten stationaeren Krankenhausaufenthalten mit intensiver Suche nach der Krankheitsursache wurden das Krankheitsbild und die Laborwerte durch Zusatzuntersuchungen ergaenzt, so dass sich in der festgestellten Porphyrie und Anaemie die Diagnose der

  10. Alcohol Withdrawal Mimicking Organophosphate Poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nezihat Rana Disel

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Organophosphates, which can cause occupational poisoning due to inappropriate personal protective measures, are widely used insecticides in agricultural regions of southern Turkey. Therefore, the classical clinical findings of this cholinergic poisoning are myosis, excessive secretions, bradicardia and fasciculations are easy to be recognized by local medical stuff. Diseases and conditions related to alcoholism such as mental and social impairments, coma, toxicity, withdrawal, and delirium are frequent causes of emergency visits of chronic alcoholic patients. Here we present a case diagnosed and treated as organophosphate poisoning although it was an alcohol withdrawal in the beginning and became delirium tremens, due to similar symptoms.

  11. POISONING WITH GAMMA-HYDROXYBUTYRATE, GAMMA-BUTYROLACTONE AND 1.4-BUTANDIOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miran Brvar

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB is a popular recreational drug. GHB overdose typically presents with decreased level of consciousness, miosis, bradycardia, respiratory depression and death. Typically, combativeness, confusion and vomiting occur once the patient begins to recover. Gamma-butyrolactone (GBL and 1.4-butandiol (1.4-BD are the prodrugs of GHB and have similar clinical presentation. We present the case of GHB poisoning in Ljubljana.Conclusions. Physicians should suspect GHB poisoning in young ravers who present with CNS depression. Treatment is symptomatic. There is no specific antidote. Gastric lavage is not beneficial but activated charcoal is recommended.

  12. [Ciguatera fish poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehler, Erwan; Bouchut, Jérémie

    2014-09-01

    Ciguatera, an ichtyosarcotoxism linked to the consumption of usually healthy coral fish is a common poisoning in the Pacific, Caribbean and Indian Ocean where it is endemic. However, increased tourism and commercial transportation of tropical fish for consumption make it an unexceptional intoxication in countries away from its endemic area. Environmental stresses such as climate changes also contribute to the expansion of its geographical area. The non-specific clinical symptomatology is characterized by the occurrence of gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, nervous and general signs few hours after eating a ciguatoxic fish. The diagnosis is clinical and relatively easy in endemic areas but much less for physicians who are rarely confronted with, which is a source of prolonged diagnostic delays and a significant increase in spending. Treatment of ciguatera is symptomatic but new treatments, still experimental, give a real hope for the future. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. [Fatal poisoning in the Department of Toxicology in Poznarn in 2008-2012--preliminary analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łukasik-Głebocka, Magdalena; Adamek, Robert

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a preliminary analysis of deaths from acute poisoning, which occurred in the Department of Toxicology in Poznań in 2008-2012. During this period, recorded 31 cases of fatal poisoning, representing 0.38% of all treated cases. In subsequent years the percentage of poisoning deaths ranged from 0.25 to 0.49%. Throughout the period leading cause of fatal poisoning were drugs (38.71%) and non-consumptive alcohols (methanol or ethylene glycol) (38.71%). In subsequent years, however, a decrease in the percentage of drug poisoning (from 75 to 0%) and an increase in the percentage of nonconsumptive alcohol poisoning (from 0% to 100%) were observed. In fatal cases were diagnosed among others olanzapine, carbamazepine, pseudoephedrine, tramadol, benzodiazepines, clozapine, morphine and benzodiazepines, insulin, verapamil, carbon monoxide and smoke fire, cyanide, Amanita phalloides, ethanol and a mixture of drugs with ethanol poisoning. The most common fatal poisoning occurred in people addicted (45.16%), mainly in alcohol dependence syndrome (35.48%). Suicidal poisoning was the cause of 32.26% of the deaths, while accidental of 19.35%. In nine cases, the procedure of diagnosis of death from irreversible cessation of brain stem function was performed in order to qualify donors of organs for transplantation or to terminate the therapy. One of the dead was liver and kidneys, and two were kidneys donors.

  14. Using poison center exposure calls to predict methadone poisoning deaths.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabarun Dasgupta

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: There are more drug overdose deaths in the Untied States than motor vehicle fatalities. Yet the US vital statistics reporting system is of limited value because the data are delayed by four years. Poison centers report data within an hour of the event, but previous studies suggested a small proportion of poisoning deaths are reported to poison centers (PC. In an era of improved electronic surveillance capabilities, exposure calls to PCs may be an alternate indicator of trends in overdose mortality. METHODS: We used PC call counts for methadone that were reported to the Researched Abuse, Diversion and Addiction-Related Surveillance (RADARS® System in 2006 and 2007. US death certificate data were used to identify deaths due to methadone. Linear regression was used to quantify the relationship of deaths and poison center calls. RESULTS: Compared to decedents, poison center callers tended to be younger, more often female, at home and less likely to require medical attention. A strong association was found with PC calls and methadone mortality (b=0.88, se=0.42, t=9.5, df=1, p<0.0001, R(2 =0.77. These findings were robust to large changes in a sensitivity analysis assessing the impact of underreporting of methadone overdose deaths. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that calls to poison centers for methadone are correlated with poisoning mortality as identified on death certificates. Calls received by poison centers may be used for timely surveillance of mortality due to methadone. In the midst of the prescription opioid overdose epidemic, electronic surveillance tools that report in real-time are powerful public health tools.

  15. Aconite poisoning over 5 years: a case series in Hong Kong and lessons towards herbal safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sammy Pak Lam; Ng, Sau Wah; Poon, Wing Tat; Lai, Chi Kong; Ngan, Teresa Man Shan; Tse, Man Li; Chan, Thomas Yan Keung; Chan, Albert Yan Wo; Mak, Tony Wing Lai

    2012-07-01

    Aconite poisoning is a severe, life-threatening poisoning related to the use of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Despite current legislation, repeated poisoning cases are steadily encountered. The aim of the study was to summarize the clinical features and to elucidate the causative and contributory factors leading to aconite poisoning. This study was conducted within the Hospital Authority Toxicology Reference Laboratory, which is the sole tertiary referral clinical toxicology laboratory in Hong Kong. This retrospective study reviewed all confirmed aconite poisoning cases handled by a clinical toxicology laboratory between April 2004 and July 2009. The diagnosis in all cases was confirmed biochemically by detecting aconitum alkaloids in urine specimens. Additionally, herbal specimens were morphologically identified and herbal formulae were studied and transcribed. The cause of poisoning for each case was determined whenever possible. Fifty-two cases were examined in this aconite poisoning case series. Neurological, cardiovascular and gastrointestinal toxicities were encountered in 49 (94.2%), 46 (88.5%) and 31 (59.6%) patients, respectively. The poisoning was severe in 6 (11.5%) patients, moderate in 17 (32.7%) patients and mild in 29 (55.8%) patients. Amongst 44 patients (84.6%) in whom the underlying reasons of poisoning could be determined, four major causes were found. These included overdose - prescription of a higher than recommended dosage of aconite herbs in 17 (32.7%) cases; 'hidden' poisoning (the aconite herb was not prescribed but dispensed inadvertently) in 17 (32.7%) cases; usage of inadequately processed herbs in 7 (13.5%) cases; and dispensary error in 2 (3.9%) cases. No case fatality was recorded. In the majority of cases in this series, the causes of poisoning can be traced to poor-quality herbs, poor quality of prescription practice, or dispensary errors. The quality issues of TCM practice should be critically addressed to minimize this

  16. Hidden aconite poisoning: identification of yunaconitine and related aconitum alkaloids in urine by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chi-Kong; Poon, Wing-Tat; Chan, Yan-Wo

    2006-09-01

    Poisoning from aconite occurs worldwide as a result of misuse of the potent plant. Laboratory investigation into suspected intoxication cases is challenging because the content of toxic aconitum alkaloids varies depending on the plant source, market processing, dosing protocol, hydrolytic degradation, and metabolic transformation. Using a triple-quadrupole tandem mass spectrometer, a group screening method was developed based on the mass-fragmentographic scheme of common aconitum alkaloids. The precursor-ion scans of m/z 105 and 135 permitted selective profiling of 14-O-benzoyl-norditerpenoids and the 14-O-anisoyl-norditerpenoids, respectively. Gradient reversed-phase liquid chromatography minimized coelution of isobaric compounds. The screening protocol was applied to a clinical investigation of suspected herbal poisoning. In total, 15 urine samples were thus screened positive for aconitum alkaloid over 5 years. The diagnoses of aconite poisoning in 11 patients were firmly established based on the known prescription history and the positive urine finding. In four patients, without aconitum herbs being listed in the herbal prescriptions, contamination of the herbal remedies by aconite was suspected to be the hidden cause of their acute poisoning. Yunaconitne, a highly toxic aconitum alkaloid, was thus identified in human urine for the first time. The group screening method of aconitum alkaloids in urine is an important diagnostic aid for acute poisoning by aconites of an unclear origin.

  17. Carbon Monoxide (CO) Poisoning Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Past Emails Carbon Monoxide (CO) Poisoning Prevention Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) ... tornadoes), using alternative sources of power can cause carbon monoxide (CO) to build up in a home and ...

  18. Oil-based paint poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... K. General approach to the poisoned patient. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et al, eds. ... Saunders; 2014:chap 147. Lee DC. Hydrocarbons. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et al, eds. ...

  19. Grass and weed killer poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002838.htm Grass and weed killer poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Many weed killers contain dangerous chemicals that are harmful if ...

  20. Alcohol Poisoning Deaths PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-01-06

    This 60 second Public Service Announcement is based on the January 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. In the United States, an average of six people die every day from alcohol poisoning. Learn what you can do to prevent binge drinking and alcohol poisoning.  Created: 1/6/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 1/6/2015.