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Sample records for suspected idiopathic epilepsy

  1. International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force's current understanding of idiopathic epilepsy of genetic or suspected genetic origin in purebred dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hülsmeyer, Velia-Isabel; Fischer, Andrea; Mandigers, Paul J J; DeRisio, Luisa; Berendt, Mette; Rusbridge, Clare; Bhatti, Sofie F M; Pakozdy, Akos; Patterson, Edward E; Platt, Simon; Packer, Rowena M A; Volk, Holger A

    2015-08-28

    Canine idiopathic epilepsy is a common neurological disease affecting both purebred and crossbred dogs. Various breed-specific cohort, epidemiological and genetic studies have been conducted to date, which all improved our knowledge and general understanding of canine idiopathic epilepsy, and in particular our knowledge of those breeds studied. However, these studies also frequently revealed differences between the investigated breeds with respect to clinical features, inheritance and prevalence rates. Awareness and observation of breed-specific differences is important for successful management of the dog with epilepsy in everyday clinical practice and furthermore may promote canine epilepsy research. The following manuscript reviews the evidence available for breeds which have been identified as being predisposed to idiopathic epilepsy with a proven or suspected genetic background, and highlights different breed specific clinical features (e.g. age at onset, sex, seizure type), treatment response, prevalence rates and proposed inheritance reported in the literature. In addition, certain breed-specific diseases that may act as potential differentials for idiopathic epilepsy are highlighted.

  2. International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force's current understanding of idiopathic epilepsy of genetic or suspected genetic origin in purebred dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hülsmeyer, Velia-Isabel; Fischer, Andrea; Mandigers, Paul J J; DeRisio, Luisa; Berendt, Mette; Rusbridge, Clare; Bhatti, Sofie F M; Pakozdy, Akos; Patterson, Edward E; Platt, Simon; Packer, Rowena M A; Volk, Holger A

    2015-01-01

    Canine idiopathic epilepsy is a common neurological disease affecting both purebred and crossbred dogs. Various breed-specific cohort, epidemiological and genetic studies have been conducted to date, which all improved our knowledge and general understanding of canine idiopathic epilepsy, and in

  3. International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force's current understanding of idiopathic epilepsy of genetic or suspected genetic origin in purebred dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Hülsmeyer, V I; A. Fischer; Mandigers, P.J.J.; De Risio, L.; Berendt, M.; Rusbridge, C; Bhatti, S F M; Pakozdy, A; Patterson, E E; Platt, S.; Packer, R M A; Volk, H. A.

    2015-01-01

    Canine idiopathic epilepsy is a common neurological disease affecting both purebred and crossbred dogs. Various breed-specific cohort, epidemiological and genetic studies have been conducted to date, which all improved our knowledge and general understanding of canine idiopathic epilepsy, and in particular our knowledge of those breeds studied. However, these studies also frequently revealed differences between the investigated breeds with respect to clinical features, inheritance and prevale...

  4. ADHD in idiopathic epilepsy

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    Marcos H. C. Duran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Our aim was to clarify the correlation of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD with epilepsy and behavior problems. This was a cross-sectional study. Sixty children with idiopathic epilepsy were interviewed using the MTA-SNAP IV Teacher and Parent Rating Scale, Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales and Conners’ Rating Scales. We used the chi-square test to analyze the correlation of epilepsy variables in patients with and without ADHD with a significance level of 0.05. Eight patients had ADHD symptoms (13%, seven had the inattentive ADHD subtype and only three had behavioral problems. When epileptic patients with and without ADHD symptoms were compared we found no significant difference in regard to epilepsy variables. All patients were controlled and 43% were either without AED or undergoing withdrawal. Our study revealed a low comorbidity of ADHD symptoms and epilepsy due to low interference of seizures and drug treatment on the comorbid condition.

  5. Pregabalin as an adjunct to phenobarbital, potassium bromide, or a combination of phenobarbital and potassium bromide for treatment of dogs with suspected idiopathic epilepsy.

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    Dewey, Curtis W; Cerda-Gonzalez, Sofia; Levine, Jonathan M; Badgley, Britton L; Ducoté, Julie M; Silver, Gena M; Cooper, Jocelyn J; Packer, Rebecca A; Lavely, James A

    2009-12-15

    To assess tolerability and short-term efficacy of oral administration of pregabalin as an adjunct to phenobarbital, potassium bromide, or a combination of phenobarbital and potassium bromide for treatment of dogs with poorly controlled suspected idiopathic epilepsy. Open-label, noncomparative clinical trial. 11 client-owned dogs suspected of having idiopathic epilepsy that was inadequately controlled with phenobarbital, potassium bromide, or a combination of these 2 drugs. Dogs were treated with pregabalin (3 to 4 mg/kg [1.4 to 1.8 mg/lb], PO, q 8 h) for 3 months. Number of generalized seizures in the 3 months before and after initiation of pregabalin treatment was recorded. Number of responders (>or= 50% reduction in seizure frequency) was recorded, and seizure frequency before and after initiation of pregabalin treatment was compared by use of a nonparametric Wilcoxon signed rank test. Seizures were significantly reduced (mean, 57%; median, 50%) after pregabalin administration in the 9 dogs that completed the study; 7 were considered responders with mean and median seizure reductions of 64% and 58%, respectively. Adverse effects for pregabalin were reported in 10 dogs. Mean and median plasma pregabalin concentrations for all dogs were 6.4 and 7.3 microg/mL, respectively. Pregabalin may hold promise as a safe and effective adjunct anticonvulsant drug for epileptic dogs poorly controlled with the standard drugs phenobarbital or potassium bromide. Adverse effects of pregabalin appeared to be mild. Additional studies with larger numbers of dogs and longer follow-up intervals are warranted.

  6. Qualitative Dermatoglyphics In Idiopathic Epilepsy

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    Ranganath Priya

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic aetiology has been proposed for both idiopathic epilepsy and dermatoglyphics. Hence, the present study has been undertaken to find out the existence of any correlation between dermatoglyphics and idiopathic epilepsy. Material consisted of 100 patients (58 males and 42 females and 100 controls (52 males and 48 females. Patient′s age ranged from 5 to 40 years and controls were between 18 and 25 years. Dermatoglyphics were obtained by painting method. Qualitative parameters observed were percentage frequency of fingerprint patterns (loops, whorls and arches,, patterns in hypothenar area/ interdigital are and flexion creases (Simian crease, sydney line. On comparison with controls, in males, with hands combined, loops (52.24% and arches (7.93% were increased and whorls (39.83% were decreased (p<0.05. In females, with hands combined, arches (13.1% and whorls (36.43% were increased and loops (50.48% were decreased (p< 0.03. Significant differences have not been observed for the patterns in hypothenar area /interdigital area and flexion creases. These dermatoglyphics features could be used as additional markers to evaluate patients of epilepsy.

  7. Rare genetic risk factors in common idiopathic epilepsy syndromes

    OpenAIRE

    Lal, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders characterized by recurrent unprovoked seizures due to increased neuronal hyperexcitability and abnormal synchronization. I have explored the genetic architecture of the most common types of idiopathic epilepsies, the idiopathic generalized epilepsies (IGEs) and the spectrum of idiopathic focal epilepsies related to rolandic epilepsies (REs). Both groups are distinguishable by the leading seizure types, age-dependent onset and electroen...

  8. Spectrum of Idiopathic Rolandic Epilepsy Syndromes and Behavioral Correlates

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-01-01

    The natural history of benign childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BCECTS), BCECTS Plus syndromes, Rolandic epilepsy-related syndromes, and idiopathic benign childhood epilepsy with occipital spikes (Panayiotopoulos syndrome) is reviewed by researchers at Maggiore Hospital, Bologna, Italy.

  9. Zonisamide monotherapy for idiopathic epilepsy in dogs.

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    Chung, J Y; Hwang, C Y; Chae, J S; Ahn, J O; Kim, T H; Seo, K W; Lee, S Y; Youn, H Y

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of zonisamide as a monotherapy in dogs with idiopathic epileptic seizure. The experiment was conducted on 10 dogs with idiopathic epilepsy that were treated at the Seoul National University Hospital for Animals. A diagnosis was conducted based on physical and neurologic examination, complete blood count and chemical analysis, magnetic resonance imaging and cerebrospinal fluid analyses. Idiopathic epilepsy was diagnosed when all of these examinations were normal. Oral zonisamide was administrated to 10 dogs with idiopathic epilepsy at 5-15 mg/kg per os every 12 h to achieve a concentration of zonisamide in serum of 10-40 μg/mL. The frequency of seizures before and after the administration of zonisamide therapy was recorded and the concentrations of zonisamide in serum were measured. Six (60%) of the dogs were favourable responders to treatment, showing a ≥50% reduction in monthly frequency of seizures. Of the remaining four, two dogs did not show a reduction and the other two showed an increase in frequency of seizures. The mean dosage of zonisamide for favourable responders was 7.92 (SD 3.79) mg/kg, which was administered orally twice a day. Only one dog, which was one of the unfavourable responders in the whole study, experienced mild side effects. Among the dogs treated with oral zonisamide, 60% responded favourably. The effect of zonisamide as an anticonvulsant drug was demonstrated in this study. Based on these results, zonisamide monotherapy is effective in some dogs with idiopathic epilepsy.

  10. Neocortical gamma oscillations in idiopathic generalized epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedek, Krisztina; Berenyi, Antal; Gombkoto, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Absence seizures in patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) may in part be explained by a decrease in phasic GABAA (type-A c-aminobutyric acid) receptor function, but the mechanisms are only partly understood. Here we studied the relation between ictal and interictal spike-...

  11. Natural evolution from idiopathic photosensitive occipital lobe epilepsy to idiopathic generalized epilepsy in an untreated young patient.

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    Bonini, Francesca; Egeo, Gabriella; Fattouch, Jinan; Fanella, Martina; Morano, Alessandra; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; di Bonaventura, Carlo

    2014-04-01

    Idiopathic photosensitive occipital lobe epilepsy (IPOE) is an idiopathic localization-related epilepsy characterized by age-related onset, specific mode of precipitation, occipital photic-induced seizures--frequently consisting of visual symptoms--and good prognosis. This uncommon epilepsy, which usually starts in childhood or adolescence, has rarely been observed in families in which idiopathic generalized epilepsy also affects other members. We describe a nuclear family in which the proband showed electro-clinical features of idiopathic photosensitive occipital lobe epilepsy in childhood, which subsequently evolved into absences and a single generalized tonico-clonic seizure in early adolescence. His mother had features suggestive of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. This case illustrates a continuum between focal and generalized entities in the spectrum of the so-called idiopathic (genetically determined) epileptic syndromes. Copyright © 2013 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Idiopathic focal epilepsies: the "lost tribe".

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    Pal, Deb K; Ferrie, Colin; Addis, Laura; Akiyama, Tomoyuki; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Caraballo, Roberto; de Saint-Martin, Anne; Fejerman, Natalio; Guerrini, Renzo; Hamandi, Khalid; Helbig, Ingo; Ioannides, Andreas A; Kobayashi, Katsuhiro; Lal, Dennis; Lesca, Gaetan; Muhle, Hiltrud; Neubauer, Bernd A; Pisano, Tiziana; Rudolf, Gabrielle; Seegmuller, Caroline; Shibata, Takashi; Smith, Anna; Striano, Pasquale; Strug, Lisa J; Szepetowski, Pierre; Valeta, Thalia; Yoshinaga, Harumi; Koutroumanidis, Michalis

    2016-09-01

    The term idiopathic focal epilepsies of childhood (IFE) is not formally recognised by the ILAE in its 2010 revision (Berg et al., 2010), nor are its members and boundaries precisely delineated. The IFEs are amongst the most commonly encountered epilepsy syndromes affecting children. They are fascinating disorders that hold many "treats" for both clinicians and researchers. For example, the IFEs pose many of the most interesting questions central to epileptology: how are functional brain networks involved in the manifestation of epilepsy? What are the shared mechanisms of comorbidity between epilepsy and neurodevelopmental disorders? How do focal EEG discharges impact cognitive functioning? What explains the age-related expression of these syndromes? Why are EEG discharges and seizures so tightly locked to slow-wave sleep? In the last few decades, the clinical symptomatology and the respective courses of many IFEs have been described, although they are still not widely appreciated beyond the specialist community. Most neurologists would recognise the core syndromes of IFE to comprise: benign epilepsy of childhood with centro-temporal spikes or Rolandic epilepsy (BECTS/RE); Panayiotopoulos syndrome; and the idiopathic occipital epilepsies (Gastaut and photosensitive types). The Landau-Kleffner syndrome and the related (idiopathic) epilepsy with continuous spikes and waves in sleep (CSWS or ESES) are also often included, both as a consequence of the shared morphology of the interictal discharges and their potential evolution from core syndromes, for example, CSWS from BECTS. Atypical benign focal epilepsy of childhood also has shared electro-clinical features warranting inclusion. In addition, a number of less well-defined syndromes of IFE have been proposed, including benign childhood seizures with affective symptoms, benign childhood epilepsy with parietal spikes, benign childhood seizures with frontal or midline spikes, and benign focal seizures of adolescence. The

  13. Mutations in GRIN2A cause idiopathic focal epilepsy with rolandic spikes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemke, Johannes R; Lal, Dennis; Reinthaler, Eva M

    2013-01-01

    Idiopathic focal epilepsy (IFE) with rolandic spikes is the most common childhood epilepsy, comprising a phenotypic spectrum from rolandic epilepsy (also benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes, BECTS) to atypical benign partial epilepsy (ABPE), Landau-Kleffner syndrome (LKS) and epileptic...

  14. Idiopathic epilepsy in dogs and cats.

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    Thomas, William B

    2010-01-01

    Idiopathic epilepsy is the most common brain disease in dogs and also occurs in cats. Optimal management entails an accurate diagnosis and appropriate drug therapy. In dogs, either phenobarbital or bromide is appropriate as initial therapy. Phenobarbital is the drug of choice for cats. Several other drugs including zonisamide and levetiracetam have the advantage of fewer side effects and are being increasingly used in veterinary medicine. Treatment is successful in most cases, allowing the pet and client to enjoy a good quality of life.

  15. Comparison of monocyte gene expression among patients with neurocysticercosis-associated epilepsy, Idiopathic Epilepsy and idiopathic headaches in India.

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    Prabhakaran, Vasudevan; Drevets, Douglas A; Ramajayam, Govindan; Manoj, Josephine J; Anderson, Michael P; Hanas, Jay S; Rajshekhar, Vedantam; Oommen, Anna; Carabin, Hélène

    2017-06-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC), a neglected tropical disease, inflicts substantial health and economic costs on people living in endemic areas such as India. Nevertheless, accurate diagnosis using brain imaging remains poorly accessible and too costly in endemic countries. The goal of this study was to test if blood monocyte gene expression could distinguish patients with NCC-associated epilepsy, from NCC-negative imaging lesion-free patients presenting with idiopathic epilepsy or idiopathic headaches. Patients aged 18 to 51 were recruited from the Department of Neurological Sciences, Christian Medical College and Hospital, Vellore, India, between January 2013 and October 2014. mRNA from CD14+ blood monocytes was isolated from 76 patients with NCC, 10 Recovered NCC (RNCC), 29 idiopathic epilepsy and 17 idiopathic headaches patients. A preliminary microarray analysis was performed on six NCC, six idiopathic epilepsy and four idiopathic headaches patients to identify genes differentially expressed in NCC-associated epilepsy compared with other groups. This analysis identified 1411 upregulated and 733 downregulated genes in patients with NCC compared to Idiopathic Epilepsy. Fifteen genes up-regulated in NCC patients compared with other groups were selected based on possible relevance to NCC, and analyzed by qPCR in all patients' samples. Differential gene expression among patients was assessed using linear regression models. qPCR analysis of 15 selected genes showed generally higher gene expression among NCC patients, followed by RNCC, idiopathic headaches and Idiopathic Epilepsy. Gene expression was also generally higher among NCC patients with single cyst granulomas, followed by mixed lesions and single calcifications. Expression of certain genes in blood monocytes can distinguish patients with NCC-related epilepsy from patients with active Idiopathic Epilepsy and idiopathic headaches. These findings are significant because they may lead to the development of new tools to

  16. Genetic Variation in Calcium Channel Gene in Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsies

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    J Gordon Millichap

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Researchers at Women's And Children's Hospital, North Adelaide, and other centers in Australia and Canada screened 240 individuals from 167 families with idiopathic generalized epilepsy and generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS + and 95 controls for variants in the CACNA1H gene.

  17. [Effects of temporal lobe epilepsy and idiopathic epilepsy on cognitive function and emotion in children].

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    Yang, Xiao-Yan; Long, Li-Li; Xiao, Bo

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the effects of temporal lobe epilepsy and idiopathic epilepsy on cognitive function and emotion in children and the risk factors for cognitive impairment. A retrospective analysis was performed for the clinical data of 38 children with temporal lobe epilepsy and 40 children with idiopathic epilepsy. The controls were 42 healthy children. All subjects received the following neuropsychological tests: Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) scale, verbal fluency test, digit span test, block design test, Social Anxiety Scale for Children (SASC), and Depression Self-rating Scale for Children (DSRSC). Compared with the control group, the temporal lobe epilepsy and idiopathic epilepsy groups showed significantly lower scores of MoCA, verbal fluency, digit span, and block design (Pepilepsy group, the temporal lobe epilepsy group showed significantly lower scores of MoCA, verbal fluency, digit span, and block design (Ptemporal lobe epilepsy group, MoCA score was negatively correlated with SASC score, DSRSC score, and seizure frequency (r=-0.571, -0.529, and -0.545 respectively; Pepilepsy group, MoCA score was also negatively correlated with SASC score, DSRSC score, and seizure frequency (r=-0.542, -0.487, and -0.555 respectively; Ptemporal lobe epilepsy and idiopathic epilepsy show impaired whole cognition, verbal fluency, memory, and executive function and have anxiety and depression, which are more significant in children with temporal lobe epilepsy. High levels of anxiety, depression, and seizure frequency are risk factors for impaired cognitive function.

  18. Functional neuroimaging abnormalities in idiopathic generalized epilepsy

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    Megan L. McGill

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI techniques have been used to quantitatively assess focal and network abnormalities. Idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE is characterized by bilateral synchronous spike–wave discharges on electroencephalography (EEG but normal clinical MRI. Dysfunctions involving the neocortex, particularly the prefrontal cortex, and thalamus likely contribute to seizure activity. To identify possible morphometric and functional differences in the brains of IGE patients and normal controls, we employed measures of thalamic volumes, cortical thickness, gray–white blurring, fractional anisotropy (FA measures from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI and fractional amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (fALFF in thalamic subregions from resting state functional MRI. Data from 27 patients with IGE and 27 age- and sex-matched controls showed similar thalamic volumes, cortical thickness and gray–white contrast. There were no differences in FA values on DTI in tracts connecting the thalamus and prefrontal cortex. Functional analysis revealed decreased fALFF in the prefrontal cortex (PFC subregion of the thalamus in patients with IGE. We provide minimum detectable effect sizes for each measure used in the study. Our analysis indicates that fMRI-based methods are more sensitive than quantitative structural techniques for characterizing brain abnormalities in IGE.

  19. Ictal epileptic headache as "subtle" symptom in generalized idiopathic epilepsy.

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    Fanella, Martina; Fattouch, Jinane; Casciato, Sara; Lapenta, Leonardo; Morano, Alessandra; Egeo, Gabriella; Manfredi, Mario; Prencipe, Massimiliano; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; Di Bonaventura, Carlo

    2012-04-01

    Epilepsy and migraine are common neurologic chronic disorders with episodic manifestations characterized by recurrent attacks and a return to baseline conditions between attacks. Epilepsy and migraine are frequently observed in comorbidity, with the occurrence of one disorder increasing the probability of the other: Migraine occurs in about one-fourth of patients with epilepsy, whereas epilepsy is present in 8-15% of patients with migraine. The link between headache and seizures is controversial and multifactorial. In epilepsy, headache can be seen as a preictal, ictal, or postictal phenomenon. In this report, we describe a case of a 37-year-old patient, affected by both drug-resistant generalized idiopathic epilepsy and headache, who displayed the sudden onset of a headache attack referred during a 24-h electroencephalography (EEG). The EEG tracing during this event revealed the activation of subcontinuous epileptic activity consisting of generalized spike-wave discharges (GSWDs) and generalized polyspike and wave discharges (GPSWDs) that persisted for 60 min, that is, until the disappearance of the headache. The case we describe appears to be original in that it represents one of the few EEG-documented ictal epileptic headaches in generalized idiopathic epilepsy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2012 International League Against Epilepsy.

  20. EEG features of absence seizures in idiopathic generalized epilepsy: Impact of syndrome, age, and state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadleir, L.G.; Scheffer, I.E.; Smith, S.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Factors influencing the electroencephalography (EEG) features of absence seizures in newly presenting children with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) have not been rigorously studied. We examined how specific factors such as state, provocation, age, and epilepsy syndrome affect the E...

  1. Candidate genes for idiopathic epilepsy in four dog breeds

    OpenAIRE

    Mickelson James R; Minor Katie M; Patterson Edward E; Ekenstedt Kari J

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Idiopathic epilepsy (IE) is a naturally occurring and significant seizure disorder affecting all dog breeds. Because dog breeds are genetically isolated populations, it is possible that IE is attributable to common founders and is genetically homogenous within breeds. In humans, a number of mutations, the majority of which are genes encoding ion channels, neurotransmitters, or their regulatory subunits, have been discovered to cause rare, specific types of IE. It was hypot...

  2. Perampanel for tonic-clonic seizures in idiopathic generalized epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    French, Jacqueline A.; Krauss, Gregory L.; Wechsler, Robert T.; Wang, Xue-feng; DiVentura, Bree; Brandt, Christian; Trinka, Eugen; O?Brien, Terence J.; Laurenza, Antonio; Patten, Anna; Bibbiani, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess efficacy and safety of adjunctive perampanel in patients with drug-resistant, primary generalized tonic-clonic (PGTC) seizures in idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE). Methods: In this multicenter, double-blind study (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01393743; funded by Eisai Inc.), patients 12 years or older with PGTC seizures and IGE were randomized to placebo or perampanel during a 4-week titration period (perampanel uptitrated from 2 to 8 mg/d, or highest tolerated ...

  3. EEG after sleep deprivation is a sensitive tool in the first diagnosis of idiopathic generalized but not focal epilepsy.

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    Renzel, Roland; Baumann, Christian R; Poryazova, Rositsa

    2016-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is an essential tool in the diagnosis of epilepsy. EEG after sleep deprivation might increase the likelihood of finding specific epileptiform abnormalities. However conflicting data exist concerning the sensitivity and specificity of this method. We aimed to evaluate the role of EEG after sleep deprivation in the first diagnosis of epilepsy. We analyzed retrospectively the medical histories of patients who underwent at least one unspecific standard EEG and a subsequent EEG after sleep deprivation during the time period from 2001 to 2014 at the University Hospital Zurich because of suspected epilepsy. Out of 237 patients who fulfilled all inclusion criteria, 69 were finally diagnosed with epilepsy. Seventeen of them showed interictal epileptiform patterns in EEGs after sleep deprivation, giving this method an overall sensitivity of 25%. Sensitivity of EEG after sleep deprivation was superior in patients with primary generalized epilepsies compared to patients with focal epilepsies (64% vs. 17%, p=0.0011). Overall EEG after sleep deprivation was not more sensitive than a subsequent repeated standard EEG in a subgroup of 55 patients (22% vs. 9%; p=0.065). After an unspecific standard EEG, EEG after sleep deprivation is a useful tool to increase diagnostic sensitivity in patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy but not in those with focal epilepsy. This study provides further evidence about the usefulness of EEG after sleep deprivation as an additional diagnostic tool in epilepsy. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Ethnic variation of genetic (idiopathic) generalized epilepsy in Malaysia.

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    Lim, Kheng Seang; Ng, Ching Ching; Chan, Chung Kin; Foo, Wee Shean; Low, Joyce Siew Yong; Tan, Chong Tin

    2017-02-01

    Ethnic variation in epilepsy classification was reported in the Epilepsy Phenome/Genome Project. This study aimed to determine the ethnic variation in the prevalence of genetic (idiopathic) generalized epilepsy (GGE) and GGE with family history in a multi-ethnic Asian population in Malaysia. In this cross-sectional study, 392 patients with a clinical diagnosis of GGE were recruited in the neurology outpatient clinic, University of Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC), from January 2011 till April 2016. In our epilepsy cohort (n=2100), 18.7% were diagnosed to have GGE. Of those, 28.6% >(N=112) had family history of epilepsy with a mean age of seizure onset of 16.5 years old, and 42.0% had myoclonic seizures (N=47). The lifetime prevalence of epilepsy among first-degree relative of those with GGE and positive family history was 15.0%. Analysis according to ethnicity showed that Malaysian Chinese had the lowest percentage of GGE among those with epilepsy (12.3%), as compared with Indian and Malay (25.3% and 21.3%, p<0.001). In addition, 32.1% of these Indian patients with GGE had positive family history, which is more than the Malay (26.4%) and Chinese (27.5%) ethnic groups. Consanguineous marriage was noted in 5 Indian families with positive family history (9.6%). There was ethnic variation in the prevalence of GGE, whereby the Malaysian Chinese had the lowest percentage of GGE as compared with Indian and Malay. A substantial proportion of GGE had positive family history among the three ethnics groups. Copyright © 2016 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Quality-of-life aspects in idiopathic epilepsy in dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Wessmann, A; Volk, H. A.; Packer, R M A; Ortega, M.; Anderson, T. J.

    2016-01-01

    Quality of life (QoL) plays a significant role in the treatment of dogs with idiopathic epilepsy (IE), yet is so far understudied. This study describes the outcome evaluation of an online questionnaire based on the carer's perception focusing on 62 QoL questions in 159 dogs with IE. Results showed that seizure frequency, but not seizure severity or presence of cluster seizures, was significantly associated with carer-perceived dog's QoL. Dogs receiving third-line antiepileptic drugs had a sig...

  6. A study of idiopathic generalised epilepsy in an Irish population.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mullins, G M

    2012-02-03

    Idiopathic generalised epilepsy (IGE) is subdivided into syndromes based on clinical and EEG features. PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to characterise all cases of IGE with supportive EEG abnormalities in terms of gender differences, seizure types reported, IGE syndromes, family history of epilepsy and EEG findings. We also calculated the limited duration prevalence of IGE in our cohort. METHODS: Data on abnormal EEGs were collected retrospectively from two EEG databases at two tertiary referral centres for neurology. Clinical information was obtained from EEG request forms, standardised EEG questionnaires and medical notes of patients. RESULTS: two hundred twenty-three patients met our inclusion criteria, 89 (39.9%) male and 134 (60.1%) females. Tonic clonic seizures were the most common seizure type reported, 162 (72.65%) having a generalised tonic clonic seizure (GTCS) at some time. IGE with GTCS only (EGTCSA) was the most common syndrome in our cohort being present in 94 patients (34 male, 60 female), with 42 (15 male, 27 female) patients diagnosed with Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME), 23 (9 male, 14 female) with Juvenile absence epilepsy (JAE) and 20 (9 male, 11 female) with childhood absence epilepsy (CAE). EEG studies in all patients showed generalised epileptiform activity. CONCLUSIONS: More women than men were diagnosed with generalised epilepsy. Tonic clonic seizures were the most common seizure type reported. EGTCSA was the most frequent syndrome seen. Gender differences were evident for JAE and JME as previously reported and for EGTCSA, which was not reported to date, and reached statistical significance for EGTCA and JME.

  7. Obesity and its association with generalised epilepsy, idiopathic syndrome, and family history of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladino, Lady D; Hernández-Ronquillo, Lizbeth; Téllez-Zenteno, José F

    2014-09-01

    Aim. Previous studies support the concept that obesity is a common comorbid condition in patients with epilepsy (PWE). In this study, we present the body mass index (BMI) and data from a survey to assess physical activity in a sample of PWE from an epilepsy clinic. Methods. Between June of 2011 and January of 2013, 100 PWE from an adult epilepsy clinic were included. We obtained BMI, waist circumference, and information regarding physical activity using a standardised questionnaire. Clinical, demographic, electrographic, and imaging parameters were collected from charts. Results. Mean age of patients was 40 ± 14 (18-77) years. The BMI distribution was as follows: 2 patients (2%) underweight, 26 (26%) normal weight, 34 (34%) overweight, 25 (25%) obese, and 13 (13%) with morbid obesity. In our study, obesity was defined as having a BMI ≥ 30. We found 38 (38%) patients in this range. There was no difference in the rate of drug-resistant epilepsy between obese and non-obese patients (55 vs. 55%; p=0.05). Leisure time habit was reported in 82% of obese patients and 79% of patients without obesity. Overall, the most frequent activity was walking (70%). Factors associated with obesity were generalised epilepsy (OR: 2.7, 1.1-6.6; p=0.012), idiopathic syndrome (OR: 2.7, 1.04-7; p=0.018), and family history of epilepsy (OR: 6.1, 1.5-24.2; p=0.002). Conclusion. Our study suggests an association between obesity, idiopathic generalised epilepsy, and family history of epilepsy. Our study shows that PWE are physically active and there is no clear relation between exercise and obesity. We could not identify any association between drug-resistant epilepsy and obesity. Absence of direct comparison with a control non-epileptic population; a cross-sectional design not allowing evaluation of a causal association among variables; and reliance on self-reported physical activity are to be considered as limitations of the present study.

  8. Prevalence and characteristics of visual aura in idiopathic generalized epilepsy.

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    Gungor-Tuncer, Ozlem; Baykan, Betul; Altindag, Ebru; Bebek, Nerses; Gurses, Candan; Gokyigit, Aysen

    2012-12-01

    Some patients with idiopathic/genetic generalized epilepsy (IGE) experience visual aura, which can confuse the diagnosis. We sought to determine the frequency and characteristics of visual auras in IGE patients. Among the 176 IGE patients, 4 men and 7 women reported visual auras (mean age - 24 years). Syndromic diagnoses were juvenile myoclonic epilepsy in four, eyelid myoclonia with absences (EMA) in three, juvenile absence epilepsy in three, and other in one. Visual auras consisted of flashing lights, macropsia, illusional movements, and blindness. Eyelid myoclonia with absences was significantly more common in the group with visual aura (3 of 11 patients vs. 8 of 165 IGE patients; P=0.02). Furthermore, photosensitivity was found significantly more common in IGE patients with visual aura (90% vs 46% of the total IGE patients) (P=0.004). In conclusion, the visual auras do not exclude a diagnosis of IGE. The presence of visual aura in the EMA syndrome is also remarkable. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Candidate genes for idiopathic epilepsy in four dog breeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mickelson James R

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Idiopathic epilepsy (IE is a naturally occurring and significant seizure disorder affecting all dog breeds. Because dog breeds are genetically isolated populations, it is possible that IE is attributable to common founders and is genetically homogenous within breeds. In humans, a number of mutations, the majority of which are genes encoding ion channels, neurotransmitters, or their regulatory subunits, have been discovered to cause rare, specific types of IE. It was hypothesized that there are simple genetic bases for IE in some purebred dog breeds, specifically in Vizslas, English Springer Spaniels (ESS, Greater Swiss Mountain Dogs (GSMD, and Beagles, and that the gene(s responsible may, in some cases, be the same as those already discovered in humans. Results Candidate genes known to be involved in human epilepsy, along with selected additional genes in the same gene families that are involved in murine epilepsy or are expressed in neural tissue, were examined in populations of affected and unaffected dogs. Microsatellite markers in close proximity to each candidate gene were genotyped and subjected to two-point linkage in Vizslas, and association analysis in ESS, GSMD and Beagles. Conclusions Most of these candidate genes were not significantly associated with IE in these four dog breeds, while a few genes remained inconclusive. Other genes not included in this study may still be causing monogenic IE in these breeds or, like many cases of human IE, the disease in dogs may be likewise polygenic.

  10. Candidate genes for idiopathic epilepsy in four dog breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekenstedt, Kari J; Patterson, Edward E; Minor, Katie M; Mickelson, James R

    2011-04-25

    Idiopathic epilepsy (IE) is a naturally occurring and significant seizure disorder affecting all dog breeds. Because dog breeds are genetically isolated populations, it is possible that IE is attributable to common founders and is genetically homogenous within breeds. In humans, a number of mutations, the majority of which are genes encoding ion channels, neurotransmitters, or their regulatory subunits, have been discovered to cause rare, specific types of IE. It was hypothesized that there are simple genetic bases for IE in some purebred dog breeds, specifically in Vizslas, English Springer Spaniels (ESS), Greater Swiss Mountain Dogs (GSMD), and Beagles, and that the gene(s) responsible may, in some cases, be the same as those already discovered in humans. Candidate genes known to be involved in human epilepsy, along with selected additional genes in the same gene families that are involved in murine epilepsy or are expressed in neural tissue, were examined in populations of affected and unaffected dogs. Microsatellite markers in close proximity to each candidate gene were genotyped and subjected to two-point linkage in Vizslas, and association analysis in ESS, GSMD and Beagles. Most of these candidate genes were not significantly associated with IE in these four dog breeds, while a few genes remained inconclusive. Other genes not included in this study may still be causing monogenic IE in these breeds or, like many cases of human IE, the disease in dogs may be likewise polygenic.

  11. Evaluation of quality of life in dogs with idiopathic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessmann, A; Volk, H A; Parkin, T; Ortega, M; Anderson, T J

    2014-01-01

    The impact of epilepsy and its treatment on the quality of life (QoL) is considered an important part of treatment supervision in human epilepsy. To develop a list of key questions evaluating QoL in dogs with idiopathic epilepsy (IE) and their carers. One hundred fifty-nine dogs with IE. Cross-sectional study. An online project questionnaire was developed containing 90 QoL-associated questions that were initially allocated to 14 themes representing specific areas associated with the treatment and care of an epileptic dog. Principal component analysis was applied with the aim of refining the questionnaire to the least number of questions representing useful themes without loss of descriptive value. Carers were recruited by paper mail, primary practices, and canine epilepsy websites. Data were acquired from January to November 2011. Principal component analysis removed 54 questions, leaving 7 themes with 36 questions with a minimum Cronbach's alpha value of 0.7 indicating a good internal consistency: "Seizure severity and frequency", "Adverse effects of antiepileptic drug (AED)", "Restrictions on the carer's life", "Frustrations over caring for a dog with IE", "Carer distaste of AED adverse effects", "Carer anxiety around the seizure event", "Perceptions on rectal diazepam use". Principal component analysis successfully reduced the number of questions without loss in descriptive value. The remaining questions correlate well with each other in capturing valuable details about aspects of QoL and represent valuable key questions (EpiQoL) in the assessment of QoL for the carers of dogs with IE. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  12. White matter microstructural changes of thalamocortical networks in photosensitivity and idiopathic generalized epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groppa, Sergiu; Moeller, Friederike; Siebner, Hartwig

    2012-01-01

    Photosensitivity or photoparoxysmal response (PPR) is an electroencephalography trait that is highly associated with idiopathic generalized epilepsies (IGEs) and characterized by changes in cortical excitability in response to photic stimulation. Studying functional and structural changes of PPR ...

  13. Tilt table testing in patients with suspected epilepsy1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edfors, R.; Erdal, J.; Rogvi-Hansen, B.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Approximately 20-30% of patients with epilepsy are misdiagnosed and syncope often seems to be the mistaken cause. We re-evaluated patients referred to an epilepsy clinic where suspicion of neurally mediated (reflex) syncope were raised using tilt table testing (HUT). METHODS: HUT...... laboratory results and medical records of 120 consecutive patients were reviewed retrospectively over a period of 27 months. RESULTS: HUT was positive in 59 (49%) patients. Seventeen of 38 (45%) patients previously diagnosed with epilepsy and taking antiepileptic drugs were found to be misdiagnosed. Four...... of 21 patients with epilepsy (19%) had dual diagnoses of reflex syncope and epilepsy. CONCLUSION: HUT is an informative investigation when suspicions of reflex syncope are raised in patients referred to an epilepsy clinic. Reflex syncope is an important and common differential diagnosis of epilepsy...

  14. Levetiracetam in idiopathic generalised epilepsy and porphyria cutanea tarda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilo, Leonilda; Meo, Roberta; Fulvia de Leva, Maria

    2006-01-01

    We report the case of a 50-year-old male patient with idiopathic generalised epilepsy and porphyria cutanea tarda. Valproic acid and phenobarbital monotherapy controlled seizures but exacerbated porphyric symptomatology, while clobazam, clonazepam and lamotrigine monotherapy were well tolerated as regards porphyric disturbances but did not completely control seizures. Tonic- clonic seizures were eventually controlled by a combination of clonazepam (9 mg/day) and lamotrigine (150 mg/day), but absences persisted and this treatment caused significant adverse effects consisting of sedation and memory disturbances. Levetiracetam monotherapy (3 g/day) was accompanied by complete control of seizures; memory disturbances and sedation also resolved, and no porphyrinogenetic activity of levetiracetam was observed. This is the first report of the safe use of levetiracetam in porphyria cutanea tarda.

  15. Clinical characteristics and inheritance of idiopathic epilepsy in Vizslas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Edward E; Mickelson, James R; Da, Yang; Roberts, Monica C; McVey, Alistair S; O'Brien, Dennis P; Johnson, Gary S; Armstrong, P Jane

    2003-01-01

    Medical record, seizure survey, and telephone interview information was obtained for 29 Vizslas with idiopathic epilepsy (IE), 74 unaffected siblings, and 41 parents to determine the common clinical characteristics and most likely mode of inheritance. IE was diagnosed on the basis of the age of seizure onset, laboratory results, and neurologic examination findings. Computerized tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis was required for the inclusion of dogs with an age of seizure onset of 5 years. Simple segregation analysis was performed with an ascertainment correction and chi-square analysis. IE appeared to be familial in these pedigrees, with 79% of affected Vizslas exhibiting partial onset seizures. Partial seizure signs included a combination of limb tremors, staring, pupillary dilatation, or salivation without loss of consciousness in > 50% of the dogs with partial signs. The estimated segregation frequency of P = .22 (95% CI, P = .08 to .36) was consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance; however, polygenic inheritance could not be excluded as a possibility. Simulated linkage with FASTSLINK estimated that the average logarithm of odds (LOD) score would be 3.23 with a 10-centimorgan (cM) whole-genome scan for these families, indicating that these families would be useful for a whole-genome scan to potentially find the chromosomal segment(s) containing the epilepsy gene or genes. We conclude that IE in Vizslas appears to be primarily a partial onset seizure disorder that may be inherited as an autosomal recessive trait.

  16. Auditory verbal memory and psychosocial symptoms are related in children with idiopathic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Yael; Ben Zeev, Bruria; Cohen, Roni; Shuper, Avinoam; Geva, Ronny

    2015-07-01

    Idiopathic epilepsies are considered to have relatively good prognoses and normal or near normal developmental outcomes. Nevertheless, accumulating studies demonstrate memory and psychosocial deficits in this population, and the prevalence, severity and relationships between these domains are still not well defined. We aimed to assess memory, psychosocial function, and the relationships between these two domains among children with idiopathic epilepsy syndromes using an extended neuropsychological battery and psychosocial questionnaires. Cognitive abilities, neuropsychological performance, and socioemotional behavior of 33 early adolescent children, diagnosed with idiopathic epilepsy, ages 9-14years, were assessed and compared with 27 age- and education-matched healthy controls. Compared to controls, patients with stabilized idiopathic epilepsy exhibited higher risks for short-term memory deficits (auditory verbal and visual) (pmemory deficits (pmemory deficits (pmemory deficits was related to severity of psychosocial symptoms among the children with epilepsy but not in the healthy controls. Results suggest that deficient auditory verbal memory may be compromising psychosocial functioning in children with idiopathic epilepsy, possibly underscoring that cognitive variables, such as auditory verbal memory, should be assessed and treated in this population to prevent secondary symptoms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Risk factors for cluster seizures in canine idiopathic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, Rowena M A; Shihab, Nadia K; Torres, Bruno B J; Volk, Holger A

    2016-04-01

    Cluster seizures (CS), two or more seizures within a 24-hour period, are reported in 38-77% of dogs with idiopathic epilepsy (IE). Negative outcomes associated with CS include a reduced likelihood of achieving seizure freedom, decreased survival time and increased likelihood of euthanasia. Previous studies have found factors including breed, sex and neuter status are associated with CS in dogs with IE; however, only one UK study in a multi-breed study of CS in IE patients exists to the author's knowledge, and thus further data is required to confirm these results. Data from 384 dogs treated at a multi-breed canine specific epilepsy clinic were retrospectively collected from electronic patient records. 384 dogs were included in the study, of which nearly half had a history of CS (49.1%). Dogs with a history of CS had a younger age at onset than those without (p = 0.033). In a multivariate model, three variables predicted risk of CS: a history of status epilepticus (p = 0.047), age at seizure onset (p = 0.066) and breed (German Shepherd Dog) (p Dogs with a history of status epilepticus and dogs with an older age at seizure onset were less likely to be affected by cluster seizures. German Shepherd Dogs (71% experiencing CS) were significantly more likely to suffer from CS compared to Labrador Retrievers (25%) (p < 0.001). There was no association between sex, neuter status, body size and CS. Further studies into the pathophysiology and genetics of CS are required to further understand this phenomenon. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Quality-of-life aspects in idiopathic epilepsy in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessmann, A; Volk, H A; Packer, R M A; Ortega, M; Anderson, T J

    2016-09-03

    Quality of life (QoL) plays a significant role in the treatment of dogs with idiopathic epilepsy (IE), yet is so far understudied. This study describes the outcome evaluation of an online questionnaire based on the carer's perception focusing on 62 QoL questions in 159 dogs with IE. Results showed that seizure frequency, but not seizure severity or presence of cluster seizures, was significantly associated with carer-perceived dog's QoL. Dogs receiving third-line antiepileptic drugs had a significantly lower perceived QoL than those that did not. Generalised linear mixed model analysis demonstrated that severity of the side effects sleeping more and ataxia were significantly associated with carer-perceived dog's QoL, with higher severities predicting lower QoL scores. The degree of carer acceptability of seizure frequency and severity was significantly associated with the dog's reported seizure frequency and severity. Moreover, there was a significant association between IE-related QoL changes of the dog and the carer, with reductions in perceived canine QoL scores associated with reductions in carer QoL, and vice versa. In conclusion, aspects of canine IE can affect both the carer and their dog's QoL. This has implications for the management and requires consideration when treatment options and outcomes are discussed. British Veterinary Association.

  19. Association between estrus and onset of seizures in dogs with idiopathic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Meervenne, S A E; Volk, H A; Van Ham, L M L

    2015-01-01

    Catamenial epilepsy in humans is defined as changes in seizure frequency over the course of the menstrual cycle. Three hormonally based patterns of seizure exacerbation have been determined. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether there is an association between onset of seizures and the estrous cycle in intact bitches with presumptive idiopathic epilepsy and whether a pattern to the onset of seizures could be recognized. Forty-five intact female dogs from a hospital population with a presumptive diagnosis of idiopathic epilepsy. In a retrospective study, the database of a small animal hospital in Sweden was searched for medical records of intact female dogs diagnosed with epilepsy or seizures. The stage of the estrous cycle as reported either by the owner or the veterinarian at the time of the first seizure was noted. Of the 45 dogs with idiopathic epilepsy, 17 (38%) had their first seizure when in heat and six dogs (13%) had their first seizure 1-3 months after heat. Nine dogs (20%) had seizures reoccurring in relation to their estrous cycle. These findings suggest an association between estrus and onset of seizures in intact bitches with presumptive idiopathic epilepsy. Two hormonally based patterns could be recognized: one during heat and one during a specific time point at the end of diestrus. This could be explained by the proconvulsive effects of estrogen or loss of protective effect against seizures of progesterone, respectively. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  20. Perampanel for tonic-clonic seizures in idiopathic generalized epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Gregory L.; Wechsler, Robert T.; Wang, Xue-Feng; DiVentura, Bree; Brandt, Christian; Trinka, Eugen; O'Brien, Terence J.; Laurenza, Antonio; Patten, Anna; Bibbiani, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess efficacy and safety of adjunctive perampanel in patients with drug-resistant, primary generalized tonic-clonic (PGTC) seizures in idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE). Methods: In this multicenter, double-blind study (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01393743; funded by Eisai Inc.), patients 12 years or older with PGTC seizures and IGE were randomized to placebo or perampanel during a 4-week titration period (perampanel uptitrated from 2 to 8 mg/d, or highest tolerated dose) and 13-week maintenance period. The primary endpoint was percent change in PGTC seizure frequency per 28 days (titration plus maintenance vs baseline). The key secondary endpoint (primary endpoint for European Union registration) was 50% PGTC seizure responder rate (patients achieving ≥50% reduction in PGTC seizure frequency; maintenance vs baseline). Treatment-emergent adverse events were monitored. Results: Of 164 randomized patients, 162 comprised the full analysis set (placebo, 81; perampanel, 81). Compared with placebo, perampanel conferred a greater median percent change in PGTC seizure frequency per 28 days (−38.4% vs −76.5%; p seizure responder rate (39.5% vs 64.2%; p = 0.0019). During maintenance, 12.3% of placebo-treated patients and 30.9% of perampanel-treated patients achieved PGTC seizure freedom. For the safety analysis (placebo, 82; perampanel, 81), the most frequent treatment-emergent adverse events with perampanel were dizziness (32.1%) and fatigue (14.8%). Conclusions: Adjunctive perampanel was well tolerated and improved control of drug-resistant PGTC seizures in patients with IGE. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class I evidence that adjunctive perampanel reduces PGTC seizure frequency, compared with placebo, in patients with drug-resistant PGTC seizures in IGE. PMID:26296511

  1. A retrospective study of carbamazepine therapy in the treatment of idiopathic generalised epilepsy

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, G

    2011-05-01

    Objective: The exacerbation of idiopathic generalised epilepsy (IGE) by some anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) such as carbamazepine (CBZ) has been well documented. However, it is unclear whether IGE is always worsened by the use of CBZ, or whether some patients with IGE benefit from its use. \\r\

  2. Prevalence of Hypopigmented and Cafe-Au-Lait Spots in Idiopathic Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available The prevalences of hypopigmented maculae and cafe-au-lait spots were investigated in 210 children with idiopathic epilepsy, between 2 and 17 years of age, and 2754 health controls children, at the Departments of Pediatrics and Dermatology, Hacettepe University and Inonu University Medical Schools, Turkey.

  3. ADAM23 is a common risk gene for canine idiopathic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, Lotta L E; Seppälä, Eija H; Weissl, Jutta; Jokinen, Tarja S; Viitmaa, Ranno; Hänninen, Reetta L; Quignon, Pascale; Fischer, Andrea; André, Catherine; Lohi, Hannes

    2017-01-31

    Idiopathic or genetic adult-onset epilepsy is a common neurological disorder in domestic dogs. Genetic association has been reported only with ADAM23 on CFA 37 in few breeds. To identify novel epilepsy genes, we performed genome-wide association (GWA) analyses in four new breeds, and investigated the association of the previously reported ADAM23 haplotype with the epilepsy phenotype in eight breeds. GWA analysis did not reveal new epilepsy loci. ADAM23 association (p epilepsy with low penetrance. The lack of findings in the GWA analyses points towards inefficient capture of genetic variation by the current SNP arrays, causal variant(s) with low penetrance and possible phenocopies. Future work will include studies on ADAM23 function and expression in canine neurons, as well as whole-genome sequencing in order to identify additional IE genes.

  4. Clinical and neuropsychological assessment of attention and ADHD comorbidity in a sample of children and adolescents with idiopathic epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celia Regina Carvalho Machado da Costa

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Children with epilepsy present significant problems concerning attention and comorbidity with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. Objective To determine the prevalence of attention complaints, ADHD diagnosis and attention profile in a sample of children and adolescents with idiopathic epilepsy. Method 36 children and adolescents with idiopathic epilepsy and 37 genre and age matched healthy controls underwent several procedures to diagnose their neuropsychological profile and comorbidity with ADHD. Results The prevalence of ADHD was higher in patients with epilepsy [χ2= 4.1, p = 0.043, 6 (16.7% vs 1 (2.7%], with worse results in attention related WISC items and factors in patients with epilepsy comparing to the controls, but not between patients with and without ADHD. Clinical characteristics did not influence those results. Conclusion This study found a greater prevalence of problems wih attention in pediatric patients with idiopathic epilepsy, but not a distinct profile between those with or without ADHD.

  5. Genome-wide copy number variation in epilepsy: novel susceptibility loci in idiopathic generalized and focal epilepsies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather C Mefford

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders in humans with a prevalence of 1% and a lifetime incidence of 3%. Several genes have been identified in rare autosomal dominant and severe sporadic forms of epilepsy, but the genetic cause is unknown in the vast majority of cases. Copy number variants (CNVs are known to play an important role in the genetic etiology of many neurodevelopmental disorders, including intellectual disability (ID, autism, and schizophrenia. Genome-wide studies of copy number variation in epilepsy have not been performed. We have applied whole-genome oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization to a cohort of 517 individuals with various idiopathic, non-lesional epilepsies. We detected one or more rare genic CNVs in 8.9% of affected individuals that are not present in 2,493 controls; five individuals had two rare CNVs. We identified CNVs in genes previously implicated in other neurodevelopmental disorders, including two deletions in AUTS2 and one deletion in CNTNAP2. Therefore, our findings indicate that rare CNVs are likely to contribute to a broad range of generalized and focal epilepsies. In addition, we find that 2.9% of patients carry deletions at 15q11.2, 15q13.3, or 16p13.11, genomic hotspots previously associated with ID, autism, or schizophrenia. In summary, our findings suggest common etiological factors for seemingly diverse diseases such as ID, autism, schizophrenia, and epilepsy.

  6. Identification of a novel idiopathic epilepsy locus in Belgian Shepherd dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seppälä, Eija H; Koskinen, Lotta L E; Gulløv, Christina H; Jokinen, Päivi; Karlskov-Mortensen, Peter; Bergamasco, Luciana; Baranowska Körberg, Izabella; Cizinauskas, Sigitas; Oberbauer, Anita M; Berendt, Mette; Fredholm, Merete; Lohi, Hannes

    2012-01-01

    Epilepsy is the most common neurological disorder in dogs, with an incidence ranging from 0.5% to up to 20% in particular breeds. Canine epilepsy can be etiologically defined as idiopathic or symptomatic. Epileptic seizures may be classified as focal with or without secondary generalization, or as primary generalized. Nine genes have been identified for symptomatic (storage diseases) and one for idiopathic epilepsy in different breeds. However, the genetic background of common canine epilepsies remains unknown. We have studied the clinical and genetic background of epilepsy in Belgian Shepherds. We collected 159 cases and 148 controls and confirmed the presence of epilepsy through epilepsy questionnaires and clinical examinations. The MRI was normal while interictal EEG revealed abnormalities and variable foci in the clinically examined affected dogs. A genome-wide association study using Affymetrix 50K SNP arrays in 40 cases and 44 controls mapped the epilepsy locus on CFA37, which was replicated in an independent cohort (81 cases and 88 controls; combined p = 9.70×10⁻¹⁰, OR = 3.3). Fine mapping study defined a ∼1 Mb region including 12 genes of which none are known epilepsy genes or encode ion channels. Exonic sequencing was performed for two candidate genes, KLF7 and ADAM23. No variation was found in KLF7 but a highly-associated non-synonymous variant, G1203A (R387H) was present in the ADAM23 gene (p = 3.7×10⁻⁸, OR = 3.9 for homozygosity). Homozygosity for a two-SNP haplotype within the ADAM23 gene conferred the highest risk for epilepsy (p = 6.28×10⁻¹¹, OR = 7.4). ADAM23 interacts with known epilepsy proteins LGI1 and LGI2. However, our data suggests that the ADAM23 variant is a polymorphism and we have initiated a targeted re-sequencing study across the locus to identify the causative mutation. It would establish the affected breed as a novel therapeutic model, help to develop a DNA test for breeding purposes and

  7. Identification of a novel idiopathic epilepsy locus in Belgian Shepherd dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eija H Seppälä

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is the most common neurological disorder in dogs, with an incidence ranging from 0.5% to up to 20% in particular breeds. Canine epilepsy can be etiologically defined as idiopathic or symptomatic. Epileptic seizures may be classified as focal with or without secondary generalization, or as primary generalized. Nine genes have been identified for symptomatic (storage diseases and one for idiopathic epilepsy in different breeds. However, the genetic background of common canine epilepsies remains unknown. We have studied the clinical and genetic background of epilepsy in Belgian Shepherds. We collected 159 cases and 148 controls and confirmed the presence of epilepsy through epilepsy questionnaires and clinical examinations. The MRI was normal while interictal EEG revealed abnormalities and variable foci in the clinically examined affected dogs. A genome-wide association study using Affymetrix 50K SNP arrays in 40 cases and 44 controls mapped the epilepsy locus on CFA37, which was replicated in an independent cohort (81 cases and 88 controls; combined p = 9.70×10⁻¹⁰, OR = 3.3. Fine mapping study defined a ∼1 Mb region including 12 genes of which none are known epilepsy genes or encode ion channels. Exonic sequencing was performed for two candidate genes, KLF7 and ADAM23. No variation was found in KLF7 but a highly-associated non-synonymous variant, G1203A (R387H was present in the ADAM23 gene (p = 3.7×10⁻⁸, OR = 3.9 for homozygosity. Homozygosity for a two-SNP haplotype within the ADAM23 gene conferred the highest risk for epilepsy (p = 6.28×10⁻¹¹, OR = 7.4. ADAM23 interacts with known epilepsy proteins LGI1 and LGI2. However, our data suggests that the ADAM23 variant is a polymorphism and we have initiated a targeted re-sequencing study across the locus to identify the causative mutation. It would establish the affected breed as a novel therapeutic model, help to develop a DNA test for breeding

  8. Identification of a common risk haplotype for canine idiopathic epilepsy in the ADAM23 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, Lotta L E; Seppälä, Eija H; Belanger, Janelle M; Arumilli, Meharji; Hakosalo, Osmo; Jokinen, Päivi; Nevalainen, Elisa M; Viitmaa, Ranno; Jokinen, Tarja S; Oberbauer, Anita M; Lohi, Hannes

    2015-06-18

    Idiopathic epilepsy is a common neurological disease in human and domestic dogs but relatively few risk genes have been identified to date. The seizure characteristics, including focal and generalised seizures, are similar between the two species, with gene discovery facilitated by the reduced genetic heterogeneity of purebred dogs. We have recently identified a risk locus for idiopathic epilepsy in the Belgian Shepherd breed on a 4.4 megabase region on CFA37. We have expanded a previous study replicating the association with a combined analysis of 157 cases and 179 controls in three additional breeds: Schipperke, Finnish Spitz and Beagle (p(c) = 2.9e-07, p(GWAS) = 1.74E-02). A targeted resequencing of the 4.4 megabase region in twelve Belgian Shepherd cases and twelve controls with opposite haplotypes identified 37 case-specific variants within the ADAM23 gene. Twenty-seven variants were validated in 285 cases and 355 controls from four breeds, resulting in a strong replication of the ADAM23 locus (p(raw) = 2.76e-15) and the identification of a common 28 kb-risk haplotype in all four breeds. Risk haplotype was present in frequencies of 0.49-0.7 in the breeds, suggesting that ADAM23 is a low penetrance risk gene for canine epilepsy. These results implicate ADAM23 in common canine idiopathic epilepsy, although the causative variant remains yet to be identified. ADAM23 plays a role in synaptic transmission and interacts with known epilepsy genes, LGI1 and LGI2, and should be considered as a candidate gene for human epilepsies.

  9. Carbamazepine treatment of generalized tonic-clonic seizures in idiopathic generalized epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Katharine; Mintzer, Scott; Nei, Maromi

    2014-03-01

    Evaluate the efficacy of carbamazepine in the treatment of idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE). The response of five patients with IGE, who experienced primarily generalized tonic-clonic seizures which were refractory to multiple antiepileptic drugs, is reported. Carbamazepine controlled multiple seizure types and did not induce or increase the frequency of myoclonic or absence seizures in these patients. Many family members also responded favorably to carbamazepine. Carbamazepine can be used with caution as an alternative treatment option for refractory IGE, especially in cases in which the main seizure type is generalized tonic-clonic. Copyright © 2013 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. 15q13.3 microdeletions increase risk of idiopathic generalized epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helbig, Ingo; Mefford, Heather C; Sharp, Andrew J

    2009-01-01

    We identified 15q13.3 microdeletions encompassing the CHRNA7 gene in 12 of 1,223 individuals with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE), which were not detected in 3,699 controls (joint P = 5.32 x 10(-8)). Most deletion carriers showed common IGE syndromes without other features previously...... associated with 15q13.3 microdeletions, such as intellectual disability, autism or schizophrenia. Our results indicate that 15q13.3 microdeletions constitute the most prevalent risk factor for common epilepsies identified to date....

  11. Prevalence of celiac disease in children with idiopathic epilepsy in southeast Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Işıkay, Sedat; Kocamaz, Halil

    2014-05-01

    We examined the prevalence of celiac disease in children with idiopathic epilepsy. Patients were screened for celiac disease using the immunoglobulin A anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and small intestinal biopsy were offered to all antibody-positive patients. The control group consisted of 400 healthy children. A total of 600 patients (332 boys, 268 girls; 8 months-15 years; 9.40 ± 4.09 years) were studied. In 38 patients, the diagnosis was childhood partial epilepsy with occipital paroxysms. Six of the 38 patients with childhood partial epilepsy with occipital paroxysms (15.7%) had positive immunoglobulin A anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody. The frequency of biopsy-proven celiac disease was 15.7% (6/38) among children with childhood partial epilepsy with occipital paroxysms. None of the control patients had positive immunoglobulin A anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody results. These findings suggest that the prevalence of celiac disease in children with partial epilepsy with occipital paroxysms may be higher than with other types of epilepsies. It may be reasonable to screen individuals with this type of epilepsy for celiac disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of essential fatty acid supplementation in dogs with idiopathic epilepsy: a clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Helen; Granger, Nicolas; Wood, James; Skelly, Barbara

    2012-03-01

    The effects of essential fatty acid supplementation (EFA) on the control of idiopathic epilepsy in dogs were investigated in a blinded, placebo-controlled trial. Fifteen dogs were treated with triple purified Ω-3 oil containing 400 mg eicosapentaenoic acid, 250 mg docosahexaenoic acid and 22 mg vitamin E per 1.5 mL at a dose of 1.5 mL/10 kg once daily for 12 weeks, followed by a 12 week placebo period of supplementation with olive oil. Owners recorded seizure frequency and severity and any adverse events. EFA supplementation did not reduce seizure frequency or severity in dogs with idiopathic epilepsy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Epileptic seizures during childbirth in a patient with idiopathic generalised epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voermans, N C; Zwarts, M J; Renier, W O; Bloem, B R

    2005-06-18

    During her first pregnancy, a 37-year-old woman with idiopathic generalised epilepsy that was adequately controlled with lamotrigine experienced a series of epileptic seizures following an elective caesarean section. The attacks were terminated with diazepam. The following day, she developed EEG-confirmed status epilepticus, for which midazolam was administered intravenously. No further attacks were observed and the patient was later discharged in good condition with a healthy newborn son. She remained on lamotrigine therapy. At the end of her second pregnancy, the patient again experienced tonic-clonic seizures. The dosage of lamotrigine was increased and the patient received clonazepam intravenously, but a new seizure quickly occurred. Following an emergency caesarean section with midazolam treatment, a healthy daughter was born. No further attacks were observed. This case history illustrates the occurrence of adult idiopathic generalised epilepsy and highlights the problems that can arise late in pregnancy and during childbirth.

  14. Transient neuromyopathy after bromide intoxication in a dog with idiopathic epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Steinmetz Sonja; Tipold Andrea; Bilzer Thomas; Schenk Henning

    2012-01-01

    Abstract A seven-year old Australian Shepherd, suffering from idiopathic epilepsy under treatment with phenobarbitone and potassium bromide, was presented with generalised lower motor neuron signs. Electrophysiology and muscle-nerve biopsies revealed a neuromyopathy. The serum bromide concentration was increased more than two-fold above the upper reference value. Clinical signs disappeared after applying diuretics and reducing the potassium bromide dose rate. This is the first case report des...

  15. Epilepsie aktuell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berendt, Mette; Hüelsmeyer, Velia-Isabel; Bhatti, Sofie F. M.

    2016-01-01

    of the consensus statements “IVETF consensus report on epilepsy definition, classification and terminology in companion animals” and “IVETF’s current understanding of idiopathic epilepsy of genetic or suspected genetic origin in purebred dogs” in German language to inform German veterinarians and professional...... circles about new knowledge and innovations in these fields. In the first part of the article, it is explained, why a new classification system of epilepsy and a common language to describe the disease is necessary. The proposals of the IVETF regarding the classification system and the terminology...... Richtlinien zur Klassifikation und Empfehlungen zu allen Aspekten der Epilepsie bei Hund und Katze in englischer Sprache publiziert (IVETF, 2015a, b). Im vorliegenden Artikel werden die Inhalte der Konsenspapiere „IVETF consensus report on epilepsy definition, classification and terminology in companion...

  16. Social cognition dysfunctions in patients with epilepsy: Evidence from patients with temporal lobe and idiopathic generalized epilepsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Realmuto, Sabrina; Zummo, Leila; Cerami, Chiara; Agrò, Luigi; Dodich, Alessandra; Canessa, Nicola; Zizzo, Andrea; Fierro, Brigida; Daniele, Ornella

    2015-06-01

    Despite an extensive literature on cognitive impairments in focal and generalized epilepsy, only a few number of studies specifically explored social cognition disorders in epilepsy syndromes. The aim of our study was to investigate social cognition abilities in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and in patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE). Thirty-nine patients (21 patients with TLE and 18 patients with IGE) and 21 matched healthy controls (HCs) were recruited. All subjects underwent a basic neuropsychological battery plus two experimental tasks evaluating emotion recognition from facial expression (Ekman-60-Faces test, Ek-60F) and mental state attribution (Story-based Empathy Task, SET). In particular, the latter is a newly developed task that assesses the ability to infer others' intentions (i.e., intention attribution - IA) and emotions (i.e., emotion attribution - EA) compared with a control condition of physical causality (i.e., causal inferences - CI). Compared with HCs, patients with TLE showed significantly lower performances on both social cognition tasks. In particular, all SET subconditions as well as the recognition of negative emotions were significantly impaired in patients with TLE vs. HCs. On the contrary, patients with IGE showed impairments on anger recognition only without any deficit at the SET task. Emotion recognition deficits occur in patients with epilepsy, possibly because of a global disruption of a pathway involving frontal, temporal, and limbic regions. Impairments of mental state attribution specifically characterize the neuropsychological profile of patients with TLE in the context of the in-depth temporal dysfunction typical of such patients. Impairments of socioemotional processing have to be considered as part of the neuropsychological assessment in both TLE and IGE in view of a correct management and for future therapeutic interventions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Behavioral changes in dogs associated with the development of idiopathic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shihab, Nadia; Bowen, Jon; Volk, Holger A

    2011-06-01

    The aim of the study was to demonstrate behavioral changes with the development of epilepsy in dogs, a species proposed as a naturally occurring animal model for human epilepsy. Owners of dogs diagnosed with idiopathic epilepsy (n=80) completed a modified, previously-validated behavioral and seizure questionnaire. Principal axis factor analysis identified behavioral factors, the scores for which were compared before and after the development of epilepsy. Drug-naïve dogs showed an increase in the behavior factors Fear/Anxiety, Defensive Aggression, and Abnormal Perception. In dogs receiving antiepileptic medication, there were still increases in Fear/Anxiety and Abnormal Perception, but no longer in Defensive Aggression. Additional increases were observed in Abnormal Reactivity, Attachment Disorder, Demented Behavior, and Apathetic Behavior. Pharmacoresistant dogs had larger increases in Controlling Aggression, Abnormal Perception, and Demented Behavior than drug responders. Our data suggest that dogs, like humans and rodents, exhibit neurobehavioral comorbidities with the development of epilepsy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Clinical signs, risk factors, and outcomes associated with bromide toxicosis (bromism) in dogs with idiopathic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossmeisl, John H; Inzana, Karen D

    2009-06-01

    To evaluate clinical signs, risk factors, and outcomes associated with bromide toxicosis (bromism) in dogs with idiopathic epilepsy treated with potassium or sodium bromide. Retrospective case-control study. 83 clinically ill epileptic dogs with (cases; n = 31) and without (controls; 52) bromism. Medical records were reviewed for information regarding signalment, epilepsy history, treatment, diet, clinicopathologic test results, concurrent diseases, clinical signs, and outcome. Case and control dogs were matched by the veterinary hospitals from which they were referred and by month of admission. A presumptive diagnosis of bromism was made in case dogs when treatment for primary clinical signs was limited to induction of diuresis or reduction in the dose of bromide administered, and this diagnosis was supported by serum bromide concentrations. Potential risk factors for bromism were identified via univariate and subsequent multivariate logistic regression analyses. Common clinical signs of bromism included alterations in consciousness, ataxia, and upper and lower motor neuron tetraparesis and paraparesis. The multivariate analysis identified bromide dose at admission to the hospital as the only factor significantly associated with bromism. In all dogs with bromism, treatment via dose reduction or facilitated renal excretion of bromide resulted in rapid clinical improvement, although breakthrough seizures happened during treatment in 8 of 31 (26%) dogs. Bromism is a clinically heterogeneous, dose-dependent neurotoxicosis that is largely reversible with treatment. Regular serial monitoring of serum bromide concentrations is recommended to optimize anticonvulsant treatment in dogs with idiopathic epilepsy.

  19. Evaluation of creative thinking in children with idiopathic epilepsy (absence epilepsy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Filippo, T; Parisi, L; Roccella, M

    2012-02-01

    Creativity represents the silent character of human behaviour. In children with epilepsy, cognitive performance of has mainly been investigated under the assumption that the disorder represents a risk factor for the development of intellectual function. In subjects with different forms of epilepsy, neuropsychologic disorders have been detected even when cognitive-global functioning is unimpaired. The cognitive functions of subjects with epilepsy have been widely studied, but their creativity has been never evaluated to date. The aim of this study was to describe the development of creative thinking in a group of children with absence epilepsy. The test battery included: the Torrance Test of Creative Thinking (TTCT), the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-revised (WISC-R) and the Goodenough Human Figure Drawing Test. Statistical analysis (Mann-Whitney test) showed a statistically significant difference (P children with epilesy vs control group), with higher scores for figure originality, figure fluidity and figure elaboration in the control group. There was a significant correlation (Spearman's rho) between verbal IQ and verbal fluidity and verbal flexibility subscale scores and between performance IQ and figure elaboration, between total IQ and verbal fluidity and verbal flexibility subscales (P 0.30). Low scores on the figure originality subscales seem to confirm the hypothesis that adverse psychodynamic and relational factors impoverish autonomy, flexibility and manipulator interests. The communication channels between subjects with epilepsy and their family members were affected by the disorder, as were the type of emotional dynamics and affective flux.

  20. Clinical and neuropsychological assessment of executive function in a sample of children and adolescents with idiopathic epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Bandeira de Lima

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To compare the executive functions of children and adolescents with idiopathic epilepsy with a control group and to correlate with clinical data, intelligence and academic performance. Method Cross-sectional, descriptive and analytical study. Thirty-one cases and thirty-five controls were evaluated by the WCST (Wisconsin Card Sorting Test.The results were compared with clinical data (seizure type and frequency, disease duration and number of antiepileptic drugs used, IQ (WISC-III and academic performance (APT. Results Patients with epilepsy had poorer executive function scores. There was no positive linear correlation between test scores and epilepsy variables. There was a positive association between academic performance and some executive function results. Conclusion Children with well controlled idiopathic epilepsy may show deficits in executive functions in spite of clinical variables. Those deficits may influence academic performance.

  1. Developmental dyscalculia in children and adolescents with idiopathic epilepsies in a Brazilian sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ursula Thomé

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is one of the most prevalent chronic disorders of childhood which can threaten child development and mental health. Among cognitive disorders, dyscalculia is one of the most important. In this study, 39 children and adolescents with idiopathic epilepsy underwent clinical and neuropsychological assessment to determine the intellectual level, math skills, reading and writing performance and neuropsychological profile. It was observed that the mathematical ability was below schooling expectations in a higher frequency than expected. There were no significant differences in mathematical performance among groups divided by number of antiepileptic drugs used, duration of disease and types and frequency of seizures. There was a positive correlation with intelligence quotient and attentional and reading level. These results suggest the existence not only of dyscalculia, but the concurrence of attentional and reading problems for the poor mathematical performance in this population.

  2. Developmental dyscalculia in children and adolescents with idiopathic epilepsies in a Brazilian sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomé, Ursula; Paixão Alves, Sandra Regina da; Guerreiro, Sabrina Mendonça; Machado da Costa, Célia Regina Carvalho; Souza Moreira, Fernanda de; Bandeira Lima, Andrea; Ferreira Tavares, Maria Rita; Souza Maia Filho, Heber

    2014-04-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most prevalent chronic disorders of childhood which can threaten child development and mental health. Among cognitive disorders, dyscalculia is one of the most important. In this study, 39 children and adolescents with idiopathic epilepsy underwent clinical and neuropsychological assessment to determine the intellectual level, math skills, reading and writing performance and neuropsychological profile. It was observed that the mathematical ability was below schooling expectations in a higher frequency than expected. There were no significant differences in mathematical performance among groups divided by number of antiepileptic drugs used, duration of disease and types and frequency of seizures. There was a positive correlation with intelligence quotient and attentional and reading level. These results suggest the existence not only of dyscalculia, but the concurrence of attentional and reading problems for the poor mathematical performance in this population.

  3. Transient neuromyopathy after bromide intoxication in a dog with idiopathic epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steinmetz Sonja

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A seven-year old Australian Shepherd, suffering from idiopathic epilepsy under treatment with phenobarbitone and potassium bromide, was presented with generalised lower motor neuron signs. Electrophysiology and muscle-nerve biopsies revealed a neuromyopathy. The serum bromide concentration was increased more than two-fold above the upper reference value. Clinical signs disappeared after applying diuretics and reducing the potassium bromide dose rate. This is the first case report describing electrophysiological and histopathological findings associated with bromide induced lower motor neuron dysfunction in a dog.

  4. Narcolepsy Type 1 and Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy: Diagnostic and Therapeutic Challenges in Dual Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiardi, Simone; Vandi, Stefano; Pizza, Fabio; Alvisi, Lara; Toscani, Lucia; Zambrelli, Elena; Tinuper, Paolo; Mayer, Geert; Plazzi, Giuseppe

    2015-11-15

    The aim of this study is to describe the possible co-occurrence of narcolepsy type 1 and generalized epilepsy, focusing on diagnostic challenge and safety of dual treatments. Four patients with comorbidity for narcolepsy type 1 and idiopathic generalized epilepsy are reported: in three cases the onset of epilepsy preceded narcolepsy type 1 appearance, whereas in one case epileptic spells onset was subsequent. Patients presented with absences, myoclonic and tonic-clonic seizure type: in the patient with tonic-clonic seizures the dual pathology was easily recognized, in the other cases the first diagnosis caused the comorbid disease to be overlooked, independent of the time-course sequence. All four patients underwent neurological examination, video-electroencephalogram during which ictal and interictal epileptic discharges were recorded, and sleep polysomnographic studies. Repeated sleep onset rapid eye movement periods (SOREMPs) were documented with the multiple sleep latency test (MLST) in all the four cases. All patients had unremarkable brain magnetic resonance imaging studies and cerebrospinal hypocretin-1 was assessed in two patients, revealing undetectable levels. The association of antiepileptic drugs and substances currently used to treat narcolepsy type 1, including sodium oxybate, was effective in improving seizures, sleep disturbance, and cataplexy. Narcolepsy type 1 may occur in association with idiopathic generalized epilepsy, leading to remarkable diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Electrophysiological studies as well as a comprehensive somnologic interview can help confirm the diagnosis in patients with ambiguous neurological history. Sodium oxybate in combination with antiepileptic drugs is safe and effective in treating cataplexy and excessive daytime sleepiness. © 2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  5. Idiopathic generalized epilepsy: Phenotypic and electroencephalographic observations in a large cohort from South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjib Sinha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We studied the phenotype and electroencephalographic (EEG features, and therapeutic aspects of idiopathic generalized epilepsies (IGEs in South Indian population. Patients and Methods: This prospective cross-sectional hospital-based study was carried out on non-consecutive 287 patients (age 22.2 ± 7.7 years; M:F = 139:148 with IGE syndrome. Their clinical and EEG observations were analyzed. Results: Majority of the patients had onset of seizures <20 years of age (n = 178; 62%. Thirty one patients (10.8% had family history of epilepsy. Nearly half of them (49.9% had <5 years of duration of seizures. The type of IGEs included Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME: 115 (40.1%; IGE with generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS only: 102 (39.02%; childhood absence epilepsy (CAE: 35 (12.2%; GTCS on awakening: 15 (5.2%; Juvenile absence epilepsy (JAE: 11 (3.8%; and unclassified seizures: 9 (3.1%. The triggering factors noted in 45% were sleep deprivation (20%, non-compliance and stress in 5% each. The EEG (n = 280 showed epileptiform discharges in about 50% of patients. Epileptiform discharges during activation was observed in 40/249 patients (16.1%: Hyperventilation in 32 (12.8% and photic stimulation in 19 (7.6%. The seizures were well controlled with anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs in 232 (80.8% patients and among them, 225 (78.4% patients were on monotherapy. Valproate (n = 131 was the most frequently prescribed as monotherapy. Conclusions: This is one of the largest cohort of patients with IGE. This study reiterates the importance of segregating IGE syndrome and such analysis will aid to the current understanding and management.

  6. Familial and sporadic 15q13.3 microdeletions in idiopathic generalized epilepsy: precedent for disorders with complex inheritance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dibbens, Leanne M; Mullen, Saul; Helbig, Ingo

    2009-01-01

    Microdeletion at chromosomal position 15q13.3 has been described in intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorders, schizophrenia and recently in idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE). Using independent IGE cohorts, we first aimed to confirm the association of 15q13.3 deletions and IGE. We th...

  7. Disease progression and treatment response of idiopathic epilepsy in Australian Shepherd dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissl, J; Hülsmeyer, V; Brauer, C; Tipold, A; Koskinen, L L; Kyöstilä, K; Lohi, H; Sauter-Louis, C; Wolf, M; Fischer, A

    2012-01-01

    Idiopathic epilepsy (IE) in Australian Shepherds (ASs) occurs worldwide but there is a lack of description of the epilepsy syndrome in this breed. The ABCB1-1Δ mutation is more prevalent in ASs than in many other dog breeds. Australian Shepherds suffer from a poorly controlled IE syndrome with prevailing severe courses. Seizure control and ABCB1-1Δ mutation might be related in this breed. Fifty ASs diagnosed with IE and 50 unaffected ASs. Predominant study design is a longitudinal cohort study. Pedigrees, medical records, seizure, and treatment data of ASs with IE were analyzed descriptively. Sex, color, and the ABCB1-1Δ genotype were compared between case and control groups and ASs with poorly or well-controlled seizures. Differences in survival times were assessed by logrank tests and Cox regression analysis. Idiopathic epilepsy in ASs is dominated by moderate and severe clinical courses with the occurrence of cluster seizures and status epilepticus and a high seizure frequency. Poor seizure control and a high initial seizure frequency (≥10 seizure days/first 6 months) are associated with shorter survival times (P < .05). Poor seizure control, unrelated to the ABCB1(MDR1) genotype, is evident in 56% of epileptic ASs. Pedigree analysis suggests a genetic basis. Frequent severe clinical courses, poor seizure control unrelated to the ABCB1(MDR1) genotype, and a young age at death compromise animal welfare and warrant further genetic studies to unravel the underlaying molecular mechanisms of IE and seizure control in the breed. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  8. Effect of lamotrigine on cerebral blood flow in patients with idiopathic generalised epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Eun Yeon; Hong, Seung Bong; Tae, Woo Suk; Han, Sun Jung; Seo, Dae Won; Lee, Kyung-Han; Lee, Mann Hyung

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the new anti-epileptic drug, lamotrigine, on cerebral blood flow by performing (99m)Tc-ethylcysteinate dimer (ECD) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) before and after medication in patients with drug-naive idiopathic generalised epilepsy. Interictal (99m)Tc-ECD brain SPECT was performed before drug treatment started and then repeated after lamotrigine medication for 4-5 months in 30 patients with generalised epilepsy (M/F=14/16, 19.3+/-3.4 years). Seizure types were generalised tonic-clonic seizure in 23 patients and myoclonic seizures in seven. The mean lamotrigine dose used was 214.1+/-29.1 mg/day. For SPM analysis, all SPECT images were spatially normalised to the standard SPECT template and then smoothed using a 12-mm full-width at half-maximum Gaussian kernel. The paired t test was used to compare pre- and post-lamotrigine SPECT images. SPM analysis of pre- and post-lamotrigine brain SPECT images showed decreased perfusion in bilateral dorsomedial nuclei of thalami, bilateral uncus, right amygdala, left subcallosal gyrus, right superior and inferior frontal gyri, right precentral gyrus, bilateral superior and inferior temporal gyri and brainstem (pons, medulla) after lamotrigine medication at a false discovery rate-corrected plamotrigine administration. Our study demonstrates for the first time the effect of lamotrigine on interictal cerebral perfusion in drug-naive idiopathic generalised epilepsy patients. In summary, lamotrigine medication was found to reduce perfusion in cortico-thalamo-limbic areas, the orbitofrontal cortex, and brainstem.

  9. Clinical course and seizure outcome of idiopathic childhood epilepsy: determinants of early and long-term prognosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Idiopathic epilepsies and epileptic syndromes predominate childhood and adolescence epilepsy. The aim of the present study was to investigate the clinical course and outcome of idiopathic childhood epilepsy and identify variables determining both early and long-term prognosis. Methods We followed 303 children with newly diagnosed idiopathic epilepsy aged 1–14 years old, both prospectively and retrospectively. Outcome was defined at one, 2 and 4 years of follow-up, as well as at the end of the study period for all patients. Based on the data collected, patients were classified in four patterns of clinical course: “excellent”, “improving”, “relapsing” and “poor”. Variables defined at intake and after the initial year of treatment were analyzed for their prognostic relevance towards the clinical course and outcome of the patients. Results The mean age at seizure onset was 6,7 years and the mean duration of follow-up was 8,3 years (range 2,0-22,0,SD 4,24). During the initial year of treatment, 70,3% of patients were seizure-free. The course of epilepsy was “excellent” in 53,1% of the subjects, “improving” in 22,8%, “relapsing” in 22,1% whereas only 6 children with idiopathic epilepsy (2%) had a “poor” clinical course exhibiting drug-resistance. After multivariate analysis, variables predictive of a poor initial response to therapy were early seizure onset, multiple seizure types and history of status epilepticus. At the end of follow-up, early response to treatment was of significant positive predictive value, while the presence of multiple seizure types and the history of migraine had a negative impact on prognosis. Conclusions In the vast majority of children, the long-term prognosis of idiopathic epilepsy is favorable. More than half of the patients attain seizure freedom immediately and their clinical course is considered “excellent”. About one fifth exhibit either an improving or a fluctuating course. Early

  10. Clinical course and seizure outcome of idiopathic childhood epilepsy: determinants of early and long-term prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragoumi, Pinelopi; Tzetzi, Olga; Vargiami, Efthimia; Pavlou, Evangelos; Krikonis, Konstantinos; Kontopoulos, Eleftherios; Zafeiriou, Dimitrios I

    2013-12-18

    Idiopathic epilepsies and epileptic syndromes predominate childhood and adolescence epilepsy. The aim of the present study was to investigate the clinical course and outcome of idiopathic childhood epilepsy and identify variables determining both early and long-term prognosis. We followed 303 children with newly diagnosed idiopathic epilepsy aged 1-14 years old, both prospectively and retrospectively. Outcome was defined at one, 2 and 4 years of follow-up, as well as at the end of the study period for all patients. Based on the data collected, patients were classified in four patterns of clinical course: "excellent", "improving", "relapsing" and "poor". Variables defined at intake and after the initial year of treatment were analyzed for their prognostic relevance towards the clinical course and outcome of the patients. The mean age at seizure onset was 6.7 years and the mean duration of follow-up was 8.3 years (range 2,0-22,0,SD 4,24). During the initial year of treatment, 70,3% of patients were seizure-free. The course of epilepsy was "excellent" in 53,1% of the subjects, "improving" in 22,8%, "relapsing" in 22,1% whereas only 6 children with idiopathic epilepsy (2%) had a "poor" clinical course exhibiting drug-resistance. After multivariate analysis, variables predictive of a poor initial response to therapy were early seizure onset, multiple seizure types and history of status epilepticus. At the end of follow-up, early response to treatment was of significant positive predictive value, while the presence of multiple seizure types and the history of migraine had a negative impact on prognosis. In the vast majority of children, the long-term prognosis of idiopathic epilepsy is favorable. More than half of the patients attain seizure freedom immediately and their clinical course is considered "excellent". About one fifth exhibit either an improving or a fluctuating course. Early seizure onset, multiple seizure types and status epilepticus are predictive of an

  11. Effects of a ketogenic diet on ADHD-like behavior in dogs with idiopathic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, Rowena M A; Law, Tsz Hong; Davies, Emma; Zanghi, Brian; Pan, Yuanlong; Volk, Holger A

    2016-02-01

    Epilepsy in humans and rodent models of epilepsy can be associated with behavioral comorbidities including an increased prevalence of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms and seizure frequency have been successfully reduced in humans and rodents using a ketogenic diet (KD). The aims of this study were (i) to describe the behavioral profile of dogs with idiopathic epilepsy (IE) while on a standardized nonketogenic placebo diet, to determine whether ADHD-like behaviors are present, and (ii) to examine the effect of a ketogenic medium chain triglyceride diet (MCTD) on the behavioral profile of dogs with idiopathic epilepsy (IE) compared with the standardized placebo control diet, including ADHD-like behaviors. A 6-month prospective, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, crossover dietary trial comparing the effects of the MCTD with a standardized placebo diet on canine behavior was carried out. Dogs diagnosed with IE, with a seizure frequency of at least 3 seizures in the past 3months (n=21), were fed the MCTD or placebo diet for 3months and were then switched to the alternative diet for 3months. Owners completed a validated behavioral questionnaire to measure 11 defined behavioral factors at the end of each diet period to report their dogs' behavior, with three specific behaviors hypothesized to be related to ADHD: excitability, chasing, and trainability. The highest scoring behavioral factors in the placebo and MCTD periods were excitability (mean±SE: 1.910±0.127) and chasing (mean±SE: 1.824±0.210). A markedly lower trainability score (mean±SE: 0.437±0.125) than that of previously studied canine populations was observed. The MCTD resulted in a significant improvement in the ADHD-related behavioral factor chasing and a reduction in stranger-directed fear (pdiet. The latter effect may be attributed to previously described anxiolytic effects of a KD. These data support the supposition that

  12. Bedside Optic Nerve Sheath Diameter Assessment in the Identification of Increased Intracranial Pressure in Suspected Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irazuzta, Jose E; Brown, Martha E; Akhtar, Javed

    2016-01-01

    We determined whether the bedside assessment of the optic nerve sheath diameter could identify elevated intracranial pressure in individuals with suspected idiopathic intracranial hypertension. This was a single-center, prospective, rater-blinded study performed in a freestanding pediatric teaching hospital. Patients aged 12 to 18 years scheduled for an elective lumbar puncture with the suspicion of idiopathic intracranial hypertension were eligible to participate. Optic nerve sheath diameter was measured via ultrasonography before performing a sedated lumbar puncture for measuring cerebrospinal fluid opening pressure. Abnormal measurements were predefined as optic nerve sheath diameter ≥4.5 mm and a cerebrospinal fluid opening pressure greater than 20 cmH2O. Thirteen patients participated in the study, 10 of whom had elevated intracranial pressure. Optic nerve sheath diameter was able to predict or rule out elevated intracranial pressure in all patients. Noninvasive assessment of the optic nerve sheath diameter could help to identify patients with elevated intracranial pressure when idiopathic intracranial hypertension is suspected. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Revealing a brain network endophenotype in families with idiopathic generalised epilepsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahmida A Chowdhury

    Full Text Available Idiopathic generalised epilepsy (IGE has a genetic basis. The mechanism of seizure expression is not fully known, but is assumed to involve large-scale brain networks. We hypothesised that abnormal brain network properties would be detected using EEG in patients with IGE, and would be manifest as a familial endophenotype in their unaffected first-degree relatives. We studied 117 participants: 35 patients with IGE, 42 unaffected first-degree relatives, and 40 normal controls, using scalp EEG. Graph theory was used to describe brain network topology in five frequency bands for each subject. Frequency bands were chosen based on a published Spectral Factor Analysis study which demonstrated these bands to be optimally robust and independent. Groups were compared, using Bonferroni correction to account for nonindependent measures and multiple groups. Degree distribution variance was greater in patients and relatives than controls in the 6-9 Hz band (p = 0.0005, p = 0.0009 respectively. Mean degree was greater in patients than healthy controls in the 6-9 Hz band (p = 0.0064. Clustering coefficient was higher in patients and relatives than controls in the 6-9 Hz band (p = 0.0025, p = 0.0013. Characteristic path length did not differ between groups. No differences were found between patients and unaffected relatives. These findings suggest brain network topology differs between patients with IGE and normal controls, and that some of these network measures show similar deviations in patients and in unaffected relatives who do not have epilepsy. This suggests brain network topology may be an inherited endophenotype of IGE, present in unaffected relatives who do not have epilepsy, as well as in affected patients. We propose that abnormal brain network topology may be an endophenotype of IGE, though not in itself sufficient to cause epilepsy.

  14. Added diagnostic value of magnetoencephalography (MEG) in patients suspected for epilepsy, where previous, extensive EEG workup was unrevealing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duez, Lene; Beniczky, Sándor; Tankisi, Hatice

    2016-01-01

    normal EEGs, including sleep-EEG, were prospectively analyzed. The reference standard was inferred from the diagnosis obtained from the medical charts, after at least one-year follow-up. MEG (306-channel, whole-head) and simultaneous EEG (MEG-EEG) was recorded for one hour. The added sensitivity of MEG......OBJECTIVE: To elucidate the possible additional diagnostic yield of MEG in the workup of patients with suspected epilepsy, where repeated EEGs, including sleep-recordings failed to identify abnormalities. METHODS: Fifty-two consecutive patients with clinical suspicion of epilepsy and at least three...

  15. Investigating the potential of the anti-epileptic drug imepitoin as a treatment for co-morbid anxiety in dogs with idiopathic epilepsy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rowena M A Packer; Luisa De Risio; Holger A Volk

    2017-01-01

    Background Behavioural changes associated with idiopathic epilepsy (IE) have been identified in dogs, with fear and anxiety-related problems seen in both drug-naive dogs and dogs treated with anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs...

  16. Effect of lamotrigine on cerebral blood flow in patients with idiopathic generalised epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Eun Yeon [Ewha Womans University, Department of Neurology, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Hong, Seung Bong; Tae, Woo Suk; Han, Sun Jung; Seo, Dae Won [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Samsung Medical Center and Center for Clinical Medicine, SBRI, Gangnam-Gu, Seoul (Korea); Lee, Kyung-Han [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Samsung Medical Center and Center for Clinical Medicine, SBRI, Gangnam-Gu, Seoul (Korea); Lee, Mann Hyung [Catholic University of Daegu, College of Pharmacy, Gyeongbuk (Korea)

    2006-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the new anti-epileptic drug, lamotrigine, on cerebral blood flow by performing {sup 99m}Tc-ethylcysteinate dimer (ECD) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) before and after medication in patients with drug-naive idiopathic generalised epilepsy. Interictal {sup 99m}Tc-ECD brain SPECT was performed before drug treatment started and then repeated after lamotrigine medication for 4-5 months in 30 patients with generalised epilepsy (M/F=14/16, 19.3{+-}3.4 years). Seizure types were generalised tonic-clonic seizure in 23 patients and myoclonic seizures in seven. The mean lamotrigine dose used was 214.1{+-}29.1 mg/day. For SPM analysis, all SPECT images were spatially normalised to the standard SPECT template and then smoothed using a 12-mm full-width at half-maximum Gaussian kernel. The paired t test was used to compare pre- and post-lamotrigine SPECT images. SPM analysis of pre- and post-lamotrigine brain SPECT images showed decreased perfusion in bilateral dorsomedial nuclei of thalami, bilateral uncus, right amygdala, left subcallosal gyrus, right superior and inferior frontal gyri, right precentral gyrus, bilateral superior and inferior temporal gyri and brainstem (pons, medulla) after lamotrigine medication at a false discovery rate-corrected p<0.05. No brain region showed increased perfusion after lamotrigine administration. (orig.)

  17. Perampanel for the treatment of primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures in idiopathic generalized epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohracher, Alexandra; Brigo, Francesco; Höfler, Julia; Kalss, Gudrun; Neuray, Caroline; Dobesberger, Judith; Kuchukhidze, Giorgi; Leitinger, Markus; Trinka, Eugen

    2016-07-01

    The non-competitive α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) - receptor antagonist perampanel (PER) was approved in 2015 for treatment of primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures (pGTCS). The aim of this narrative review is to summarize available data on pharmacological properties, efficacy and tolerability of PER in pGTCs. Data sources included MEDLINE, EMBASE, Google Scholar and ClinicalTrials.gov, conference proceedings of the ILAE congresses and the most recent conference proceedings of the American Epilepsy Society (2013 to 2015). A placebo-controlled clinical phase III study including 164 patients (≥ 12 years) with pGTCS in idiopathic generalized epilepsies (IGE) demonstrated efficacy of PER in reducing pGTCS with good tolerability profile, and without aggravating absence seizures or myoclonic seizures. Dizziness, the main adverse event (AE), can be avoided by bedtime administration. Psychiatric AEs ranging from mild depression to aggression and suicidal attempts should be especially monitored in patients with a history of psychiatric disorders. Co-administration of enzyme inducing antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) might decrease PER plasma levels and make dose adjustment necessary. A reduced efficacy of progesterone-containing oral contraceptives should be considered when administering PER to young women. There is lack of evidence on PER treatment in pregnancy. Although no teratogenic effects were observed in animal models, PER is not recommended for women of childbearing age without contraception.

  18. Clinical evaluation of a combination therapy of imepitoin with phenobarbital in dogs with refractory idiopathic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neßler, Jasmin; Rundfeldt, Chris; Löscher, Wolfgang; Kostic, Draginja; Keefe, Thomas; Tipold, Andrea

    2017-01-25

    Imepitoin was tested as a combination treatment with phenobarbital in an open-label mono-centre cohort study in dogs with drug-resistant epilepsy. Diagnosis of idiopathic epilepsy was based on clinical findings, magnetic resonance imaging and cerebrospinal fluid analysis. Three cohorts were treated. In cohort A, dogs not responding to phenobarbital with or without established add-on treatment of potassium bromide or levetiracetam were treated add-on with imepitoin, starting at 10 mg/kg BID, with titration allowed to 30 mg/kg BID. In cohort B, the only difference to cohort A was that the starting dose of imepitoin was reduced to 5 mg/kg BID. In cohort C, animals not responding to imepitoin at >20 mg/kg BID were treated with phenobarbital add-on starting at 0.5 mg/kg BID. The add-on treatment resulted in a reduction in monthly seizure frequency (MSF) in all three cohorts. A reduction of ≥50% was obtained in 36-42% of all animals, without significant difference between cohorts. The lower starting dose of 5 mg/kg BID imepitoin was better tolerated, and an up-titration to on average of 15 mg/kg BID was sufficient in cohort A and B. In cohort C, a mean add-on dose of 1.5 mg/kg BID phenobarbital was sufficient to achieve a clinically meaningful effect. Six dogs developed a clinically meaningful increase in MSF of ≥ 50%, mostly in cohort A. Neither imepitoin nor phenobarbital add-on treatment was capable of suppressing cluster seizure activity, making cluster seizure activity an important predictor for drug-resistance. A combination treatment of imepitoin and phenobarbital is a useful treatment option for a subpopulation of dogs with drug-resistant epilepsy, a low starting dose with 5 mg/kg BID is recommended.

  19. Idiopathic epilepsy with generalized tonic-clonic seizures only versus idiopathic epilepsy with phantom absences and generalized tonic-clonic seizures: one or two syndromes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutroumanidis, Michael; Aggelakis, Konstantinos; Panayiotopoulos, Chrysostomos P

    2008-12-01

    To define the relationship between two syndromes of idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) with apparently similar phenotypes: The form with generalized tonic-clonic seizures only (IGE-GTCS) and that with phantom absences (IGE-PA). We compared the electroclinical features of 33 consecutive patients with GTCS and generalized spike wave (GSW); 18 had only GTCS and were diagnosed as IGE-GTCS, and 15 had hitherto unnoticed mild absences on the electroencephalography (EEG) and were diagnosed as IGE-PA. All patients were subjected to the same diagnostic workout, including video EEG during hyperventilation with breath counting (HBC). Patients with a clinical history of absences or myoclonic seizures were excluded. PA were easily identified with the first or second EEG in 14 of 15 patients with IGE-PA and always with sleep-deprived EEGs; conversely, PA did not occur in the IGE-GTCS patients despite using more EEGs. GTCS were twice as frequent in the IGE-GTCS group and tended to occur on awakening, whereas episodes of absence status affected twice as many patients with IGE-PA. The hereditary risk was 30% in the IGE-GTCS and 6.7% in IGE-PA. GSW had a strong polyspike component in IGE-PA and were briefer in IGE-GTCS. There is no evidence for a maturational influence on the duration of GSW in either syndrome. Our findings clearly indicate that IGE-GTCS and IGE-PA are two distinct IGE syndromes and emphasize the role of PA for patients' diagnosis and management and for syndromic classification. They also appear to validate HBC as a simple, sensitive, and pragmatic method for the clinical identification of typical absences.

  20. Recurrent microdeletions at 15q11.2 and 16p13.11 predispose to idiopathic generalized epilepsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Kovel, Carolien G F; Trucks, Holger; Helbig, Ingo

    2010-01-01

    at 1q21.1, 15q11.2, 15q13.3, 16p11.2, 16p13.11 and 22q11.2 in various neuropsychiatric disorders including autism, intellectual disability and schizophrenia. Microdeletions at 15q13.3 have recently been shown to constitute a strong genetic risk factor for common idiopathic generalized epilepsy...

  1. Idiopathic Epilepsy in the Italian Spinone in the United Kingdom: Prevalence, Clinical Characteristics, and Predictors of Survival and Seizure Remission

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    De Risio, L; Newton, R; Freeman, J; Shea, A

    2015-01-01

    ... among multiple genes and environmental factors. Idiopathic epilepsy is the most common chronic neurologic disorder in dogs, reported at a prevalence of between 0.5 and 5% in a nonreferral population and of 1–2.6% in a referral hospital population. Breed‐ and country‐specific prevalence of IE ranges from 1.3 to 18.3%. Dogs with IE typica...

  2. Phenotype, inheritance characteristics, and risk factors for idiopathic epilepsy in Finnish Spitz dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viitmaa, Ranno; Cizinauskas, Sigitas; Orro, Toomas; Niilo-Rämä, Meri; Gordin, Emilia; Lohi, Hannes; Seppälä, Eija H; Bragge, Hanna; Snellman, Marjatta

    2013-10-01

    To determine the phenotype, inheritance characteristics, and risk factors for idiopathic epilepsy (IE) in Finnish Spitz dogs (FSDs). Prospective epidemiological study. 2,141 FSDs. From 2003 to 2004, questionnaires (n = 5,960) were sent to all owners of 1-to 10-year-old FSDs in Finland. Phone interviews were performed 1 to 2 years later. Estimated prevalence of IE was 5.36% (111/2,069 of FSDs that were still alive). Males were predisposed to IE. The median age of onset was 3 years (range, 0.6 to 10 years). The median seizure frequency was 2 seizures/y (range, 0.5 to 48 seizures/y), and the median duration of the seizure episode was 11.75 minutes (range, 1.5 to 90 minutes). The majority (85%) of the seizures had a focal onset, and 54% were characterized as generalized secondary. A generalized seizure phase was determined to be a risk factor for development of progressive disease. Factors associated with the occurrence of a generalized phase were the age of onset, duration of the seizure, number of feeding times per day, and whether the dog was used for hunting. The seizures were not progressing in 678% of the dogs and were easily controlled by antiepileptic treatment in 78.9% of the dogs. The heritability estimate of IE in FSDs was 0.22; IE was best explained as a polygenic trait. In the present study conducted in Finland, complex focal seizures were the most common seizure type for FSDs with IE, and a generalized seizure phase was a risk factor for progression of the disease. Results suggested a benign course of epilepsy in FSDs.

  3. Functional Network Connectivity Patterns between Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy with Myoclonic and Absence Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qifu Li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The extensive cerebral cortex and subcortical structures are considered as the major regions related to the generalized epileptiform discharges in idiopathic generalized epilepsy. However, various clinical syndromes and electroencephalogram (EEG signs exist across generalized seizures, such as the loss of consciousness during absence seizures (AS and the jerk of limbs during myoclonic seizures (MS. It is presumed that various functional systems affected by discharges lead to the difference in syndromes of these seizures. Twenty epileptic patients with MS, 21 patients with AS, and 21 healthy controls were recruited in this study. The functional network connectivity was analyzed based on the resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans. The statistical analysis was performed in three groups to assess the difference in the functional brain networks in two types of generalized seizures. Twelve resting-state networks were identified in three groups. Both patient groups showed common abnormalities, including decreased functional connectivity in salience network (SN, cerebellum network, and primary perceptional networks and decreased connection between SN and visual network, compared with healthy controls. Interestingly, the frontal part of high-level cognitive resting-state networks showed increased functional connectivity (FC in patients with MS, but decreased FC in patients with AS. Moreover, patients with MS showed decreased negative connections between high-level cognitive networks and primary system. The common alteration in both patient groups, including SN, might reflect a similar mechanism associated with the loss of consciousness during generalized seizures. This study provided the evidence of brain network in generalized epilepsy to understand the difference between MS and AS.

  4. Long-term efficacy of imepitoin in the treatment of naive dogs affected by idiopathic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallucci, A; Gagliardo, T; Menchetti, M; Bianchi, E; Bucci, D; Gandini, G

    2017-08-05

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term (12 months) efficacy and tolerability of imepitoin as first-choice treatment in 56 dogs suffering from idiopathic epilepsy and identify possible factors affecting the outcome. Primary treatment success (PTS) was defined as the achievement of a seizure-free interval three times longer than the pretreatment interictal interval (at least three months). Secondary treatment success (STS) was achieved by a decrease in seizure frequency ≥50 per cent compared with the pretreatment frequency. In the long-term follow-up, PTS was recorded in 14 (25 per cent) dogs and responder-dogs (PTS+STS) were 30 (54 per cent) showing significant reduction in the monthly average number of seizures (PDogs with cluster seizures were significantly reduced (P=0.02). PTS at three and six months was associated with PTS (P=0.006 and dogs (P=0.002) at 12-month follow-up. Dogs aged >36 months at the start of imepitoin treatment had a positive association to become responder dogs (Pdogs (29 per cent) discontinued imepitoin due to its inefficacy. The receiver operator curve highlighted ≥19 mg/kg twice a day as the most effective minimal dosage. Mild and transient side effects were observed in 16 dogs (29 per cent). British Veterinary Association.

  5. Sleep onset uncovers thalamic abnormalities in patients with idiopathic generalised epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew P. Bagshaw

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The thalamus is crucial for sleep regulation and the pathophysiology of idiopathic generalised epilepsy (IGE, and may serve as the underlying basis for the links between the two. We investigated this using EEG-fMRI and a specific emphasis on the role and functional connectivity (FC of the thalamus. We defined three types of thalamic FC: thalamocortical, inter-hemispheric thalamic, and intra-hemispheric thalamic. Patients and controls differed in all three measures, and during wakefulness and sleep, indicating disorder-dependent and state-dependent modification of thalamic FC. Inter-hemispheric thalamic FC differed between patients and controls in somatosensory regions during wakefulness, and occipital regions during sleep. Intra-hemispheric thalamic FC was significantly higher in patients than controls following sleep onset, and disorder-dependent alterations to FC were seen in several thalamic regions always involving somatomotor and occipital regions. As interactions between thalamic sub-regions are indirect and mediated by the inhibitory thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN, the results suggest abnormal TRN function in patients with IGE, with a regional distribution which could suggest a link with the thalamocortical networks involved in the generation of alpha rhythms. Intra-thalamic FC could be a more widely applicable marker beyond patients with IGE.

  6. Frequency-Specific Alterations of Local Synchronization in Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jue; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Ji, Gong-Jun; Xu, Qiang; Huang, Yubin; Wang, Zhengge; Jiao, Qing; Yang, Fang; Zang, Yu-Feng; Liao, Wei; Lu, Guangming

    2015-08-01

    Recurrently and abnormally hypersynchronous discharge is a striking feature of idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE). Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging has revealed aberrant spontaneous brain synchronization, predominately in low-frequency range (synchronization across different frequency bands. We examined alterations to frequency-specific local synchronization in terms of spontaneous blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) fluctuations across 5 bands, spanning 0 to 0.25 Hz. Specifically, we compared brain activity in a large cohort of IGE patients (n = 86) to age- and sex-matched normal controls (n = 86). IGE patients showed decreased local synchronization in low frequency (synchronization in high-frequency (>0.073 Hz) in a "conscious perception network," which is anchored by the pregenual and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, as well as the bilateral insular cortices, possibly contributing to impaired consciousness. Furthermore, we found frequency-specific alternating local synchronization in the posterior portion of the DMN relative to the anterior part, suggesting an interaction between the disease and frequency bands. Importantly, the aberrant high-frequency local synchronization in the middle cingulate cortex was associated with disease duration, thus linking BOLD frequency changes to disease severity. These findings provide an overview of frequency-specific local synchronization of BOLD fluctuations, and may be helpful in uncovering abnormal synchronous neuronal activity in patients with IGE at specific frequency bands.

  7. International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force's current understanding of idiopathic epilepsy of genetic or suspected genetic origin in purebred dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hülsmeyer, Velia-Isabel; Fischer, Andrea; Mandigers, Paul J. J.

    2015-01-01

    , and in particular our knowledge of those breeds studied. However, these studies also frequently revealed differences between the investigated breeds with respect to clinical features, inheritance and prevalence rates. Awareness and observation of breed-specific differences is important for successful management...

  8. Imepitoin as novel treatment option for canine idiopathic epilepsy: pharmacokinetics, distribution, and metabolism in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rundfeldt, C; Gasparic, A; Wlaź, P

    2014-10-01

    Imepitoin is a novel anti-epileptic licensed in the European Union for the treatment of canine idiopathic epilepsy. The aim of this study was to characterize the pharmacokinetics of imepitoin in dogs and to evaluate the interaction with drug metabolizing enzymes. Upon administration of imepitoin tablets at a dose of 30 mg/kg to beagle dogs, high plasma levels were observed within 30 min following oral dosing, with maximal plasma concentrations of 14.9-17.2 μg/mL reached after 2-3 h. In a crossover study, co-administration of imepitoin tablets with food reduced the total AUC by 30%, but it did not result in significant changes in Tmax and Cmax , indicating lack of clinical relevance. No clinically relevant effects of sex and no accumulation or metabolic tolerance were observed upon twice daily dosing. Following single dose administration of 10-100 mg/kg, dose linearity was found. Administering [(14) C] imepitoin, high enteral absorption of 92% and primary fecal excretion were identified. Plasma protein binding was only 55%. At therapeutic plasma concentrations, imepitoin did not inhibit microsomal cytochrome P450 family liver enzymes in vitro. In rats, no relevant induction of liver enzymes was found. Therefore, protein binding or metabolism-derived drug-drug interactions are unlikely. Based on these data, imepitoin can be dosed twice daily, but the timing of tablet administration in relation to feeding should be kept consistent. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Perampanel for tonic-clonic seizures in idiopathic generalized epilepsy A randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Jacqueline A; Krauss, Gregory L; Wechsler, Robert T; Wang, Xue-Feng; DiVentura, Bree; Brandt, Christian; Trinka, Eugen; O'Brien, Terence J; Laurenza, Antonio; Patten, Anna; Bibbiani, Francesco

    2015-09-15

    To assess efficacy and safety of adjunctive perampanel in patients with drug-resistant, primary generalized tonic-clonic (PGTC) seizures in idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE). In this multicenter, double-blind study (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01393743; funded by Eisai Inc.), patients 12 years or older with PGTC seizures and IGE were randomized to placebo or perampanel during a 4-week titration period (perampanel up titrated from 2 to 8 mg/d, or highest tolerated dose) and 13-week maintenance period. The primary endpoint was percent change in PGTC seizure frequency per 28 days (titration plus maintenance vs baseline). The key secondary endpoint (primary endpoint for European Union registration) was 50% PGTC seizure responder rate (patients achieving $50% reduction in PGTC seizure frequency; maintenance vs baseline). Treatment-emergent adverse events were monitored. Of 164 randomized patients, 162 comprised the full analysis set (placebo, 81; perampanel, 81). Compared with placebo, perampanel conferred a greater median percent change in PGTC seizure frequency per 28 days (238.4%vs 276.5%; p , 0.0001) and greater 50%PGTC seizure responder rate (39.5% vs 64.2%; p 5 0.0019). During maintenance, 12.3% of placebo treated patients and 30.9%of perampanel-treated patients achieved PGTC seizure freedom. For the safety analysis (placebo, 82; perampanel, 81), the most frequent treatment-emergent adverse events with perampanel were dizziness (32.1%) and fatigue (14.8%). Adjunctive perampanel was well tolerated and improved control of drug-resistant PGTC seizures in patients with IGE. This study provides Class I evidence that adjunctive perampanel reduces PGTC seizure frequency, compared with placebo, in patients with drug-resistant PGTC seizures in IGE.

  10. Genetics of Childhood Epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2000-01-01

    Genetic epilepsies are classified according to the mechanism of inheritance in three major groups: 1) Mendelian idiopathic epilepsies; 2) Non-Mendelian or “complex” epilepsies; and 3) Chromosomal disorders.

  11. Prevalence of lateral ventricle asymmetry in brain MRI studies of neurologically normal dogs and dogs with idiopathic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivetta, Mauro; De Risio, Luisa; Newton, Richard; Dennis, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    Asymmetry of the cerebral lateral ventricles is a common finding in cross-sectional imaging of otherwise normal canine brains and has been assumed to be incidental. The purpose of this retrospective study was to compare the prevalence of ventricular asymmetry in brain MRI studies of normal dogs and dogs with idiopathic epilepsy. Brain MRI archives were searched for 100 neurologically normal dogs (Group 1) and 100 dogs with idiopathic epilepsy (Group 2). For each dog, asymmetry of the lateral ventricles was subjectively classified as absent, mild, moderate, and severe based on a consensus of two observers who were unaware of group status. Ventricular areas were measured from transverse T1W images at the level of the interthalamic adhesion. An asymmetry ratio was calculated as the ratio of the larger to smaller ventricular transverse area. There was excellent agreement between subjective assessments of ventricular asymmetry and quantitative assessments using asymmetry ratios (k = 0.995). The prevalence of asymmetry was 38% in Group 1 dogs and 44% in Group 2 dogs. Assymmetry was scored as mild in the majority of Group 2 dogs. There was no significant association between presence/absence and degree of ventricular asymmetry vs. dog group, age, gender, or skull conformation. Findings from the current study supported previously published assumptions that asymmetry of the lateral cerebral ventricles is an incidental finding in MRI studies of the canine brain. © 2013 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  12. A randomised trial of a medium-chain TAG diet as treatment for dogs with idiopathic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Tsz Hong; Davies, Emma S S; Pan, Yuanlong; Zanghi, Brian; Want, Elizabeth; Volk, Holger A

    2015-11-14

    Despite appropriate antiepileptic drug treatment, approximately one-third of humans and dogs with epilepsy continue experiencing seizures, emphasising the importance for new treatment strategies to improve the quality of life of people or dogs with epilepsy. A 6-month prospective, randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled cross-over dietary trial was designed to compare a ketogenic medium-chain TAG diet (MCTD) with a standardised placebo diet in chronically antiepileptic drug-treated dogs with idiopathic epilepsy. Dogs were fed either MCTD or placebo diet for 3 months followed by a subsequent respective switch of diet for a further 3 months. Seizure frequency, clinical and laboratory data were collected and evaluated for twenty-one dogs completing the study. Seizure frequency was significantly lower when dogs were fed the MCTD (2·31/month, 0-9·89/month) in comparison with the placebo diet (2·67/month, 0·33-22·92/month, P=0·020); three dogs achieved seizure freedom, seven additional dogs had ≥50 % reduction in seizure frequency, five had an overall dogs were fed the MCTD (1·63/month, 0-7·58/month) in comparison with the placebo diet (1·69/month, 0·33-13·82/month, P=0·022). Consumption of the MCTD also resulted in significant elevation of blood β-hydroxybutyrate concentrations in comparison with placebo diet (0·041 (sd 0·004) v. 0·031 (sd 0·016) mmol/l, P=0·028). There were no significant changes in serum concentrations of glucose (P=0·903), phenobarbital (P=0·422), potassium bromide (P=0·404) and weight (P=0·300) between diet groups. In conclusion, the data show antiepileptic properties associated with ketogenic diets and provide evidence for the efficacy of the MCTD used in this study as a therapeutic option for epilepsy treatment.

  13. The effective and ethical use of voluntary induction of psychogenic drop attacks in a patient with idiopathic generalized epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilner, Asher; Keezer, Mark R; Andermann, Frederick

    2010-04-01

    A woman known to have never fully controlled idiopathic generalized epilepsy presented at 47 years of age with a new onset of drop attacks. After clinical investigations, including prolonged video/EEG telemetry, tilt-table testing, and multiple sleep latency tests, the etiology of her drop attacks remained elusive. Subsequently we were able to demonstrate that her drop attacks may be provoked by her voluntary recollection of memories of past sexual abuse. This case study highlights the need to consider psychological factors when evaluating otherwise unexplained drop attacks. In addition, we propose a seizure-provoking technique that may be used both effectively and ethically in the diagnosis of psychogenic drop attacks as well as nonepileptic seizures. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. An auricular acupuncture treatment for idiopathic canine epilepsy: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzer, R B; Chrisman, C L

    1994-01-01

    A new canine auricular acupuncture point for the treatment for epilepsy is introduced. The new acupoint was used with a previously reported canine auricular acupoint (van Neikerk and Eckersley, 1988) for the treatment of epilepsy in five dogs. The testimonial results of these five cases indicate that the technique is worthy of scientific investigation, and controlled research is proposed. Only testimonial evidence currently supports its application, yet this innocuous treatment is recommended for use in all cases of canine epilepsy. The traditional Chinese medical explanation for the treatment is described, and hypothetical Western physiology is presented.

  15. Idiopathic epilepsy in the Italian Spinone in the United Kingdom: prevalence, clinical characteristics, and predictors of survival and seizure remission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Risio, L; Newton, R; Freeman, J; Shea, A

    2015-01-01

    There is lack of data on idiopathic epilepsy (IE) in the Italian Spinone (IS). To estimate the prevalence of IE in the IS in the United Kingdom (UK) and to investigate predictors of survival and seizure remission. The target population consisted of 3331 IS born between 2000 and 2011 and registered with the UK Kennel Club (KC). The owners of 1192 dogs returned phase I questionnaire. Sixty-three IS had IE. Population survey. The owners of all UK KC-registered IS were invited to complete the phase I questionnaire. Information from the phase I questionnaire and veterinary medical records was used to identify IS with IE and obtain data on treatment and survival. Additional information was obtained from owners of epileptic IS who completed the phase II questionnaire. The prevalence of IE in the IS in the UK was estimated as 5.3% (95% CI, 4.03-6.57%). Survival time was significantly shorter in IS euthanized because of poorly controlled IE compared with epileptic IS that died of unrelated disorders (P = 0.001). Survival was significantly longer in IS with no cluster seizures (CS) (P = 0.040) and in IS in which antiepileptic medication was initiated after the second seizure rather than after ≥3 seizures (P = 0.044). Seizure remission occurred only in 3 IS. The prevalence of IE in IS (5.3%) is higher than in dogs (0.6%) in the UK. Idiopathic epilepsy in IS has a severe phenotype. Antiepileptic medication initiation after the second seizure and aggressive treatment of CS may improve survival. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  16. Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epilepsy is a brain disorder that causes people to have recurring seizures. The seizures happen when clusters ... may have violent muscle spasms or lose consciousness. Epilepsy has many possible causes, including illness, brain injury, ...

  17. Identification of a novel idiopathic epilepsy locus in Belgian Shepherd dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seppälä, Eija H.; Koskinen, Lotta L.E.; Gulløv, Christina Hedal

    2012-01-01

    50K SNP arrays in 40 cases and 44 controls mapped the epilepsy locus on CFA37, which was replicated in an independent cohort (81 cases and 88 controls; combined p¿=¿9.70×10¿¹°, OR¿=¿3.3). Fine mapping study defined a ~1 Mb region including 12 genes of which none are known epilepsy genes or encode ion...

  18. Encephalopathy with status epilepticus during sleep (ESES) induced by oxcarbazepine in idiopathic focal epilepsy in childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pavlidis, Elena; Rubboli, Guido; Nikanorova, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Encephalopathy with status epilepticus during sleep (ESES) is an age-related disorder characterized by neuropsychological regression, epilepsy and a typical EEG pattern of continuous epileptiform activity (> 85%) during NREM sleep. Cases of worsening or induction of ESES with phenytoin, carbamaze......Encephalopathy with status epilepticus during sleep (ESES) is an age-related disorder characterized by neuropsychological regression, epilepsy and a typical EEG pattern of continuous epileptiform activity (> 85%) during NREM sleep. Cases of worsening or induction of ESES with phenytoin...

  19. Epilepsi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabers, Anne; Kjær, Troels W

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy affects around 33,000 people in Denmark. The classification of the epilepsies is currently under revision and the clinical course of the disease depends on the underlying aetiology. Diagnostic evaluation includes EEG and often long-term video-EEG monitoring to ensure the diagnosis and clas......-sification. More than two thirds of patients with epilepsy can obtain complete seizure control. The remainders, counting around 12.000 patients in Denmark, having medical refractory epilepsy should be considered for other treatment options; epilepsy surgery or other non-pharmacological treatment....

  20. Patterns of Gray Matter Abnormalities in Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy: A Meta-Analysis of Voxel-Based Morphology Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Bin

    Full Text Available We aimed to identify the consistent regions of gray matter volume (GMV abnormalities in idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE, and to study the difference of GMV abnormalities among IGE subsyndromes by applying activation likelihood estimation (ALE meta-analysis.A systematic review of VBM studies on GMV of patients with absence epilepsy (AE, juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME, IGE and controls indexed in PubMed and ScienceDirect from January 1999 to June 2016 was conducted. A total of 12 IGE studies, including 7 JME and 3 AE studies, were selected. Meta-analysis was performed on these studies by using the pooled and within-subtypes analysis (www.brainmap.org. Based on the above results, between-subtypes contrast analysis was carried out to detect the abnormal GMV regions common in and unique to each subtype as well.IGE demonstrated significant GMV increase in right ventral lateral nucleus (VL and right medial frontal gyrus, and significant GMV decrease in bilateral pulvinar. For JME, significant GMV increase was seen in right medial frontal gyrus, right anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, while significant GMV decrease was found in right pulvinar. In AE, the most significant GMV increase was found in right VL, and slight GMV reduction was seen in right medial dorsal nucleus, right subcallosal gyrus, left caudate and left precuneus. No overlapped and unique regions with significant GMV abnormalities were found between JME and AE.This meta-analysis demonstrated that thalamo-frontal network was a structure with significant GMV abnormality in IGE, and the IGE subsyndromes showed different GMV abnormal regions. These observations may provide instructions on the clinical diagnosis of IGE.

  1. High incidence of pediatric idiopathic epilepsy is associated with familial and autosomal dominant disease in Eastern Newfoundland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Krista; Buckley, David; Alam, Muhammed; Penney, Sharon; Young, Terry-Lynn; Parfrey, Patrick; Moore, Susan J

    2012-02-01

    To describe the incidence and epidemiology of pediatric idiopathic epilepsy (IE) in Newfoundland and Labrador. All children in Newfoundland and Labrador aged 0-15 years with IE were ascertained through the provincial neurology clinic at the Janeway Child Health Centre. Family history, medical history and blood samples were obtained from probands and relatives. Two genes, SCN1A and KCNQ2, were screened for mutations by direct sequencing. The mean annual incidence of IE for the population of children living in the Avalon region of Newfoundland from 2000 to 2004 was 107 per 100,000. This rate is approximately three-fold greater than rates reported in other developed countries. Of 117 families with IE eligible for study, 86 (74%) provided detailed pedigree data. Multiple different epilepsy phenotypes were identified. Fifty-five families (64%) had a positive family history. Eight of these had family histories compatible with autosomal dominant (AD) inheritance and these families lived in five different geographic isolates. DNA was obtained from 21 families (79 individuals). The two previously identified mutations in Newfoundland families with epilepsy were sequenced and excluded as pathogenic sites in all but one family which had a mutation in SCN1A. The incidence of IE is high in the Avalon Peninsula of Newfoundland and the rate of familial disease is high throughout the province of Newfoundland and Labrador. The distribution of familial and AD IE in different geographic isolates, together with the clinical heterogeneity of disease suggests substantial genetic heterogeneity. It is likely that other novel mutations will be identified in this population. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A prospective study of the modified Atkins diet for adults with idiopathic generalized epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kverneland, Magnhild; Selmer, Kaja K; Nakken, Karl O; Iversen, Per O; Taubøll, Erik

    2015-12-01

    For children with pharmacoresistant epilepsy, the ketogenic diet is an established treatment option worldwide. However, for adults, this treatment is less frequently offered, and its efficacy less well-documented. The aim of this study was to examine efficacy and tolerability of such a diet as an adjuvant therapy to antiepileptic drugs for adult patients with pharmacoresistant generalized epilepsy. Thirteen patients (12 women) aged 16-57 years were included prospectively. They were treated with a modified Atkins diet for 12 weeks. Nine of the 13 participants had juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME), two had childhood absence epilepsy, one had Jeavons syndrome, and one had generalized epilepsy of unknown type. Six participants, all with JME, completed the 12-week study period. Among these six, four had >50% seizure reduction. Their seizure severity, using the revised Liverpool Seizure Severity Scale, was reduced by 1, 5, 57.5, and 70 points, respectively (scale: 1-100 points). In three of these four responders, quality of life, assessed by QOLIE-89, increased more than 20 points (scale: 0-100 points). Mean reduction of body weight after 12 weeks on diet was 6.5 (range: 4.3-8.1) kg. Lack of motivation, poor compliance, and seizure aggravation were the main reasons for premature termination of the diet. Apart from one patient who developed gallstones when ending the treatment after 10 months, no adverse effects were noted. In conclusion, using a modified Atkins diet for 12 weeks led to a clinically relevant reduction of seizure frequency in four of thirteen adult patients with pharmacoresistant generalized epilepsy. All responders were diagnosed with JME. In three of the four, the benefits of diet were so considerable that they chose to continue the treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Baseline Cognition, Behavior, and Motor Skills in Children with New-Onset, Idiopathic Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhise, Vikram V.; Burack, Gail D.; Mandelbaum, David E.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Epilepsy is associated with difficulties in cognition and behavior in children. These problems have been attributed to genetics, ongoing seizures, psychosocial issues, underlying abnormality of the brain, and/or antiepileptic drugs. In a previous study, we found baseline cognitive differences between children with partial versus generalized…

  4. Resting-state connectivity of the sustained attention network correlates with disease duration in idiopathic generalized epilepsy.

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    Mona Maneshi

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE, a normal electroencephalogram between generalized spike and wave (GSW discharges is believed to reflect normal brain function. However, some studies indicate that even excluding GSW-related errors, IGE patients perform poorly on sustained attention task, the deficit being worse as a function of disease duration. We hypothesized that at least in a subset of structures which are normally involved in sustained attention, resting-state functional connectivity (FC is different in IGE patients compared to controls and that some of the changes are related to disease duration. METHOD: Seeds were selected based on a sustained attention study in controls. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI data was obtained from 14 IGE patients and 14 matched controls. After physiological noise removal, the mean time-series of each seed was used as a regressor in a general linear model to detect regions that showed correlation with the seed. In patients, duration factor was defined based on epilepsy duration. Between-group differences weighted by the duration factor were evaluated with mixed-effects model. Correlation was then evaluated in IGE patients between the FC, averaged over each significant cluster, and the duration factor. RESULTS: Eight of 18 seeds showed significant difference in FC across groups. However, only for seeds in the medial superior frontal and precentral gyri and in the medial prefrontal area, average FC taken over significant clusters showed high correlation with the duration factor. These 3 seeds showed changes in FC respectively with the premotor and superior frontal gyrus, the dorsal premotor, and the supplementary motor area plus precentral gyrus. CONCLUSION: Alterations of FC in IGE patients are not limited to the frontal areas. However, as indicated by specificity analysis, patients with long history of disease show changes in FC mainly within the frontal areas.

  5. Hereditary epilepsy syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Callenbach, PMC; Brouwer, OF

    This paper reviews the present knowledge on the genetics of the epilepsies. Main clinical features, gene localization and pattern of inheritance of the idiopathic epilepsies, the progressive myoclonus epilepsies, and some other genetic disorders often associated with epilepsy, are described. (C)

  6. Comparing the effects of first-line antiepileptic drugs on the gait of dogs with idiopathic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suiter, E J; Packer, R M A; Volk, H A

    2016-06-25

    Idiopathic epilepsy (IE) is a common chronic neurological disease of the dog. Previous studies of anti-epileptic drug (AED) treatment have indicated that acceptable AED adverse effects are as important to owners as reductions in seizure frequency. AEDs in both dogs and human beings are frequently associated with the adverse-effect ataxia. The aim of this study was to compare ataxia levels in dogs with IE treated chronically with phenobarbitone or imepitoin, the two currently available first-line AED treatments. The gait of 6 imepitoin-treated dogs, 8 phenobarbitone-treated dogs and 10 age-matched healthy control dogs were compared. Fifty strides from a walking gait were analysed for each dog, quantifying ataxia via the variability in six established gait parameters. Three variables differed significantly between groups: lateral distance between (i) pelvic paw placements, (ii) thoracic paw placements and (iii) stance time, which were significantly more variable in the phenobarbitone-treated dogs than imepitoin-treated or control dogs. These results indicate that dogs treated with phenobarbitone experience ataxia compared with controls and imepitoin-treated dogs. Conversely, there was no difference between imepitoin-treated dogs and controls. These results along with further research are needed to quantify AEDs adverse effects, to help vets and owners make more informed drug-choices. British Veterinary Association.

  7. Cerebellum abnormalities in idiopathic generalized epilepsy with generalized tonic-clonic seizures revealed by diffusion tensor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yonghui; Du, Hanjian; Xie, Bing; Wu, Nan; Wang, Jian; Wu, Guocai; Feng, Hua; Jiang, Tianzi

    2010-12-21

    Although there is increasing evidence suggesting that there may be subtle abnormalities in idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) patients using modern neuroimaging techniques, most of these previous studies focused on the brain grey matter, leaving the underlying white matter abnormalities in IGE largely unknown, which baffles the treatment as well as the understanding of IGE. In this work, we adopted multiple methods from different levels based on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to analyze the white matter abnormalities in 14 young male IGE patients with generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS) only, comparing with 29 age-matched male healthy controls. First, we performed a voxel-based analysis (VBA) of the fractional anisotropy (FA) images derived from DTI. Second, we used a tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) method to explore the alterations within the white matter skeleton of the patients. Third, we adopted region-of-interest (ROI) analyses based on the findings of VBA and TBSS to further confirm abnormal brain regions in the patients. At last, considering the convergent evidences we found by VBA, TBSS and ROI analyses, a subsequent probabilistic fiber tractography study was performed to investigate the abnormal white matter connectivity in the patients. Significantly decreased FA values were consistently observed in the cerebellum of patients, providing fresh evidence and new clues for the important role of cerebellum in IGE with GTCS.

  8. Cerebellum abnormalities in idiopathic generalized epilepsy with generalized tonic-clonic seizures revealed by diffusion tensor imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghui Li

    Full Text Available Although there is increasing evidence suggesting that there may be subtle abnormalities in idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE patients using modern neuroimaging techniques, most of these previous studies focused on the brain grey matter, leaving the underlying white matter abnormalities in IGE largely unknown, which baffles the treatment as well as the understanding of IGE. In this work, we adopted multiple methods from different levels based on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI to analyze the white matter abnormalities in 14 young male IGE patients with generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS only, comparing with 29 age-matched male healthy controls. First, we performed a voxel-based analysis (VBA of the fractional anisotropy (FA images derived from DTI. Second, we used a tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS method to explore the alterations within the white matter skeleton of the patients. Third, we adopted region-of-interest (ROI analyses based on the findings of VBA and TBSS to further confirm abnormal brain regions in the patients. At last, considering the convergent evidences we found by VBA, TBSS and ROI analyses, a subsequent probabilistic fiber tractography study was performed to investigate the abnormal white matter connectivity in the patients. Significantly decreased FA values were consistently observed in the cerebellum of patients, providing fresh evidence and new clues for the important role of cerebellum in IGE with GTCS.

  9. Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... like staring at a computer screen or playing video games for too long) fever certain medications hyperventilation (breathing ... will check for epilepsy or other conditions. In addition to doing a physical examination , the neurologist will ...

  10. Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... psychological responses to living with epilepsy. Contact: NINDS Brain Resource and Information Network, PO Box 5801 Bethesda, MD 20824, (800) ... Department of Health and Human Services | USA.gov | Grants.gov Page Last Updated ...

  11. Giant subcortical high-frequency SEPs in idiopathic generalized epilepsy: a protective mechanism against seizures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restuccia, Domenico; Valeriani, Massimiliano; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2007-01-01

    Recently, we found that high-frequency somatosensory evoked potentials (HF-SEPs), which are modulated by arousal-related structures, were abnormally enhanced during N-REM sleep in two seizure-free IGE patients [Restuccia D, Rubino M, Valeriani M, Della Marca G. Increase of brainstem high-frequency SEP subcomponents during light sleep in seizure-free epileptic patients. Clin Neurophysiol 2005; 116: 1774-1778]. Here, we aimed at verifying whether similar HF-SEP abnormalities were significantly correlated to the clinical outcome in a larger population of untreated IGE patients. Patients were classified as Juvenile Myoclonic epilepsy (JME; six patients) and Childhood or Juvenile Absence epilepsy (CAE and JAE, six patients). They were untreated because newly diagnosed, or because seizure-free. HF-SEPs from patients were compared with those obtained from 21 healthy volunteers. HF-SEPs were abnormally enhanced in all seizure-free CAE-JAE patients, whereas they were normal in all JME patients and in CAE-JAE patients with frequent seizures. Not only scalp distribution, but also dipolar source analysis suggested a subcortical origin for these enhanced subcomponents, possibly in the brainstem. The enhancement of HF-SEPs might reflect the hyperactivity of arousal-related brainstem structures; such an enhancement was found in all seizure-free CAE-JAE patients, while it was never observed in JME patients. We speculate that the hyperactivity of arousal-related brainstem structures might account for the different clinical outcome among IGE subsyndromes.

  12. Prospective study of zonisamide therapy for refractory idiopathic epilepsy in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Klopmann, T; Rambeck, B; Tipold, A

    2007-03-01

    Investigation of the efficacy of zonisamide as an add-on therapy in dogs with refractory epilepsy. Thirteen dogs fulfilled the inclusion criteria of poor seizure control despite adequate serum levels of phenobarbital, potassium bromide or both. One further dog was treated with zonisamide as monotherapy because of severe blood dyscrasia due to phenobarbital treatment. Various seizure parameters were evaluated retrospectively for a four month period without zonisamide and prospectively for the same time period under zonisamide add-on therapy. The study time period was extended by up to 17 months to evaluate long-term outcome. Data of 11 dogs could be evaluated: nine of them were responders. The median reduction of seizure frequency of all dogs on zonisamide add-on therapy was 70 per cent (range 14 to 100 per cent). Only transient central nervous system side effects were reported. No further increase of liver enzymes occurred. In three of the responder dogs, seizure control subsided after individual time periods (between 69 days and seven months). In dogs with refractory epilepsy, zonisamide may have a beneficial effect on seizure control. In three responder dogs, seizure activity relapsed possibly because of an induction of tolerance. Limiting factors are the high costs.

  13. First-drug treatment failures in 42 Turkish children with idiopathic childhood occipital epilepsies

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    Faruk Incecik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The early and late benign occipital epilepsies of childhood (BOEC are described as two discrete electro-clinical syndromes, eponymously known as Panayiotopoulos and Gastaut syndromes. The purpose of this study was to identify predictors of failure to respond to the initial antiepileptic drug (AED. Materials and Methods: A total of 42 children with BOEC were enrolled. Predictive factors were analyzed by survival methods. Results: Among the 42, 25 patients (59.5% were boys and 17 (40.5% were girls and the mean age at the seizure onset was 7.46 ± 2.65 years (4-14 years. Of the 42 patients, 34 (81.0% were treated relatively successfully with the first AED treatment, and 8 (19.0% were not responded initial AED treatment. There was no correlation between response to initial AED treatment and sex, consanguinity, epilepsy history of family, age of seizure onset, frequency of seizures, history of status epilepticus, duration of starting first treatment, findings on electroencephalogram. However, history of febrile seizure and type of BOEC were significantly associated with failure risk. Conclusions: Factors predicting failure to respond to the AED were history of febrile seizure and type of BOEC in children with BOEC.

  14. Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marson, Anthony G; Maguire, Melissa; Ramaratnam, Sridharan

    2009-01-28

    About 3% of people will be diagnosed with epilepsy during their lifetime, but about 70% of people with epilepsy eventually go into remission. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the benefits and risks of starting anti-epileptic drug treatment following a single seizure? What are the effects of monotherapy in newly diagnosed partial epilepsy, and in newly diagnosed generalised epilepsy (tonic clonic type)? What are the effects of additional treatments in people with drug-resistant partial epilepsy? Which people in remission from seizures are at risk of relapse on withdrawal of drug treatment? What are the effects of behavioural and psychological treatments for people with epilepsy? What are the effects of surgery in people with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to April 2007 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 59 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: addition of second-line drugs (gabapentin, levetiracetam, lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine, tiagabine, topiramate, vigabatrin, or zonisamide), amygdalohippocampectomy, anti-epileptic drug withdrawal for people in remission, anti-epileptic drugs after a single seizure, biofeedback, carbamazepine, cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), educational programmes, family counselling, hemispherectomy, lesionectomy, phenobarbital, phenytoin, relaxation therapy (alone or plus

  15. Comparison of background EEG activity of different groups of patients with idiopathic epilepsy using Shannon spectral entropy and cluster-based permutation statistical testing.

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    Jose Antonio Urigüen

    Full Text Available Idiopathic epilepsy is characterized by generalized seizures with no apparent cause. One of its main problems is the lack of biomarkers to monitor the evolution of patients. The only tools they can use are limited to inspecting the amount of seizures during previous periods of time and assessing the existence of interictal discharges. As a result, there is a need for improving the tools to assist the diagnosis and follow up of these patients. The goal of the present study is to compare and find a way to differentiate between two groups of patients suffering from idiopathic epilepsy, one group that could be followed-up by means of specific electroencephalographic (EEG signatures (intercritical activity present, and another one that could not due to the absence of these markers. To do that, we analyzed the background EEG activity of each in the absence of seizures and epileptic intercritical activity. We used the Shannon spectral entropy (SSE as a metric to discriminate between the two groups and performed permutation-based statistical tests to detect the set of frequencies that show significant differences. By constraining the spectral entropy estimation to the [6.25-12.89 Hz range, we detect statistical differences (at below 0.05 alpha-level between both types of epileptic patients at all available recording channels. Interestingly, entropy values follow a trend that is inversely related to the elapsed time from the last seizure. Indeed, this trend shows asymptotical convergence to the SSE values measured in a group of healthy subjects, which present SSE values lower than any of the two groups of patients. All these results suggest that the SSE, measured in a specific range of frequencies, could serve to follow up the evolution of patients suffering from idiopathic epilepsy. Future studies remain to be conducted in order to assess the predictive value of this approach for the anticipation of seizures.

  16. [Idiopathic generalized epilepsies with absence seizures with valproic acid treatment: neuropsychological disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde-Guzon, P A; Cancho-Candela, R

    2012-07-16

    To analyze the neuropsychological profile of children with absence seizures treated with valproate. Sample of 34 children from 7 to 12 years with absence seizures treated with valproate (median dose: 30 mg/kg/day) and 28 controls. We get the neuropsychological profile by applying the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised (WISC-R) and Luria-DNI Battery. Children with absence seizures manifest verbal IQ significantly lower (p grammar. This is a serious deterioration profile in the areas of logical memory, short-term memory, arithmetic, numerical structure, reading, writing, naming, and articulation. Children with absence seizures have a significant memory deficit. Memory profile measured with the Luria-DNI Battery and the WISC-R appears generally deteriorated when compared with the control group (p < 0.001) although there is a paradoxical preservation of shape memory. The short-term auditory and visual memory and logical memory are particularly affected. In the epileptic group, the attentional profile (estimated by the 'third factor of the WISC-R') is generally deteriorated when compared with the control group. We consider in children with this diagnosis and treatment, the neuropsychological profile described to strengthen deficient neuropsychological and psychoeducational areas. Above, we claim the need, in the consultations of neuropediatrics, the neuropsychlogists to ensure the systematic analysis of neuropsychological and cognitive difficulties both at the time of the diagnosis and follow-up of epilepsy.

  17. Electroencephalographic recordings in dogs suffering from idiopathic and symptomatic epilepsy: diagnostic value of interictal short time EEG protocols supplemented by two activation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauer, Christina; Kästner, Sabine B R; Rohn, Karl; Schenk, Henning C; Tünsmeyer, Julia; Tipold, Andrea

    2012-07-01

    The diagnostic value of interictal short time electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings in epileptic dogs under general anaesthesia with propofol and the muscle relaxant rocuronium bromide was investigated. Two activation techniques, namely photic stimulation and hyperventilation, were evaluated for their potential to enhance the diagnostic validity of these recordings. Sixty-one dogs suffering from idiopathic epilepsy and 28 dogs suffering from symptomatic epilepsy were included. Electroencephalograms were recorded using five subdermal EEG electrodes (F3, F4, Cz, O1 and O2). All 89 EEGs were analysed visually and 61 were also evaluated quantitatively with fast Fourier transformation. Interictal paroxysmal epileptiform activity was found in 25% of idiopathic and in 29% of symptomatic epileptic dogs. Quantitative analysis of the EEGs (qEEGs) detected significant differences of frequency analysis in single reading points without any continuous changes of frequency bands. A comparison between healthy and affected brain hemispheres in seven dogs with focal lesions of one hemisphere did not show any significant differences in qEEG analysis. qEEG was not more sensitive than visual evaluation. Despite the use of activation techniques, the results showed that short time EEG recordings in epileptic dogs can detect interictal epileptic activity in less than one third of all seizuring dogs and is not a useful screening method. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A Subset of Dogs with Presumptive Idiopathic Epilepsy Show Hippocampal Asymmetry: A Volumetric Comparison with Non-Epileptic Dogs Using MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estey, Chelsie M; Dewey, Curtis W; Rishniw, Mark; Lin, David M; Bouma, Jennifer; Sackman, Joseph; Burkland, Erica

    2017-01-01

    MRI-acquired volumetric measurements from 100 dogs with presumptive idiopathic epilepsy (IE) and 41 non-epileptic (non-IE) dogs were used to determine if hippocampal asymmetry exists in the IE as compared to the non-IE dogs. MRI databases from three institutions were searched for dogs that underwent MRI of the brain and were determined to have IE and those that were considered non-IE dogs. Volumes of the right and left hippocampi were measured using Mimics® software. Median hippocampal volumes of IE and non-IE dogs were 0.47 and 0.53 cm3, respectively. There was no significant difference in overall hippocampal volume between IE and non-IE dogs; however, IE dogs had greater hippocampal asymmetry than non-IE dogs (P dogs had a hippocampal ratio >1.16. Asymmetry was not associated with any particular hemisphere (P = 0.67). Our study indicates that hippocampal asymmetry occurs in a subset of dogs with presumptive idiopathic/genetic epilepsy, suggesting a structural etiology to some cases of IE.

  19. A Subset of Dogs with Presumptive Idiopathic Epilepsy Show Hippocampal Asymmetry: A Volumetric Comparison with Non-Epileptic Dogs Using MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsie M. Estey

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available MRI-acquired volumetric measurements from 100 dogs with presumptive idiopathic epilepsy (IE and 41 non-epileptic (non-IE dogs were used to determine if hippocampal asymmetry exists in the IE as compared to the non-IE dogs. MRI databases from three institutions were searched for dogs that underwent MRI of the brain and were determined to have IE and those that were considered non-IE dogs. Volumes of the right and left hippocampi were measured using Mimics® software. Median hippocampal volumes of IE and non-IE dogs were 0.47 and 0.53 cm3, respectively. There was no significant difference in overall hippocampal volume between IE and non-IE dogs; however, IE dogs had greater hippocampal asymmetry than non-IE dogs (P < 0.012. A threshold value of 1.16 from the hippocampal ratio had an 85% specificity for identifying IE-associated asymmetry. Thirty five percent of IE dogs had a hippocampal ratio >1.16. Asymmetry was not associated with any particular hemisphere (P = 0.67. Our study indicates that hippocampal asymmetry occurs in a subset of dogs with presumptive idiopathic/genetic epilepsy, suggesting a structural etiology to some cases of IE.

  20. Epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, R.S.; Frost, J.J. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1991-04-01

    As surgical treatments for adult and pediatric forms of epilepsy have become more refined, methods for noninvasive localization of epileptogenic foci have become increasingly important. Detection of focal brain metabolic or flow abnormalities is now well recognized as an essential step in the presurgical evaluation of many patients with epilepsy. Positron emission tomography (PET) scanning is most beneficial when used in the context of the total clinical evaluation of patients, including scalp EEG, invasive EEG, neuropsychologic testing, etc. Metabolic PET studies also give insight into pathophysiologic mechanisms of epilepsy. The dynamic nature of the interictal hypometabolism observed with 18(F)FDG in some patients suggests that excitatory or inhibitory neurotransmitters and their receptors may be involved. An exciting current application of PET scanning is the use of tracers for neurotransmitter receptors in the study of epilepsy patients. Mu and non-mu opiate receptors have been extensively studied and are beginning to give new insights into this disorder. Increased labeling of mu receptors in temporal neocortex using 11C-carfentanil has been demonstrated and, in some patients, supplements the clinical localization information from 18(F)FDG studies. Increased mu opiate receptor number or affinity is thought to play a role in anticonvulsant mechanisms. Specificity of increased mu receptors is supported by the absence of significant changes in non-mu opiate receptors. Other brain receptors are also of interest for future studies, particularly those for excitatory neurotransmitters. Combined studies of flow, metabolism, and neuroreceptors may elucidate the factors responsible for initiation and termination of seizures, thus improving patient treatment.95 references.

  1. Suspected accelerated disease progression after discontinuation of nintedanib in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: Two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamori, Satoshi; Asakura, Takanori; Masuzawa, Keita; Yasuda, Hiroyuki; Kamata, Hirofumi; Ishii, Makoto; Betsuyaku, Tomoko

    2017-12-01

    The efficacy of nintedanib, a multitarget receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has been demonstrated in recent randomized controlled trials involving patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). However, accelerated disease progression after nintedanib discontinuation has never been reported. We report 2 cases involving patients with a history of IPF who presented with respiratory deterioration at 3 weeks after the discontinuation of nintedanib therapy for IPF. Neither patient fulfilled the definition of "acute exacerbation of IPF" on unilateral computed tomography. Accelerated disease progression after the discontinuation of nintedanib therapy for IPF. One patient received steroid therapy. The other patient refused to undergo steroid therapy. The first patient showed that the affected lobe exhibited volume loss with traction bronchiectasis after receiving steroid therapy, and succumbed to pneumothorax after 3 months. The other patient was transferred to another hospital because of a decline in his general condition. To our knowledge, this report is the first to document accelerated disease progression after the discontinuation of nintedanib therapy for IPF. Although the accurate mechanism remains unclear, the effects of nintedanib against vascular endothelial growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor receptor may play a role. Our findings suggest that physicians should carefully monitor patients with IPF after nintedanib discontinuation.

  2. A prospective observational longitudinal study of new-onset seizures and newly diagnosed epilepsy in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredsø, N; Toft, N; Sabers, A; Berendt, M

    2017-02-16

    Seizures are common in dogs and can be caused by non-epileptic conditions or epilepsy. The clinical course of newly diagnosed epilepsy is sparsely documented. The objective of this study was to prospectively investigate causes for seizures (epileptic and non-epileptic) in a cohort of dogs with new-onset untreated seizures, and for those dogs with newly diagnosed epilepsy to investigate epilepsy type, seizure type and the course of disease over time, including the risk of seizure recurrence. Untreated client-owned dogs experiencing new-onset seizures were prospectively enrolled in a longitudinal observational study including clinical investigations and long-term monitoring at the Copenhagen University Hospital for Companion Animals. A baseline clinical assessment was followed by investigator/owner contact every eight weeks from inclusion to death or end of study. Inclusion of dogs was conducted from November 2010 to September 2012, and the study terminated in June 2014. One hundred and six dogs were included in the study. Seventy-nine dogs (74.5%) were diagnosed with epilepsy: 61 dogs (77.2%) with idiopathic epilepsy, 13 dogs (16.5%) with structural epilepsy and five dogs (6.3%) with suspected structural epilepsy. A non-epileptic cause for seizures was identified in 13 dogs and suspected in 10 dogs. Four dogs in which no cause for seizures was identified experienced only one seizure during the study. In dogs with idiopathic epilepsy 60% had their second epileptic seizure within three months of seizure onset. Twenty-six dogs with idiopathic epilepsy (43%) completed the study without receiving antiepileptic treatment. The natural course of idiopathic epilepsy (uninfluenced by drugs) was illustrated by highly individual and fluctuating seizure patterns, including long periods of remission. Cluster seizures motivated early treatment. In a few dogs with a high seizure frequency owners declined treatment against the investigators advice. Epilepsy is the most likely

  3. Feline Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes Heller, Heidi

    2018-01-01

    Seizures occur commonly in cats and can be classified as idiopathic epilepsy, structural epilepsy, or reactive seizures. Pursuit of a diagnosis may include a complete blood count, serum biochemistry, brain MRI, and cerebrospinal fluid analysis as indicated. Antiepileptic drugs should be considered if a cat is having frequent seizures, or any 1 seizure longer than 5 minutes. Phenobarbital is often the drug of choice; however, levetiracetam may be more useful for certain types of epilepsy in cats. Long-term prognosis depends on the underlying diagnosis and response to therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Phenobarbital or potassium bromide as an add-on antiepileptic drug for the management of canine idiopathic epilepsy refractory to imepitoin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royaux, E; Van Ham, L; Broeckx, B J G; Van Soens, I; Gielen, I; Deforce, D; Bhatti, S F M

    2017-02-01

    Imepitoin has recently been approved in Europe for the management of dogs with idiopathic epilepsy. Currently, there is no evidence-based information available on the efficacy of antiepileptic drugs used as additions to the therapeutic regimen in dogs with idiopathic epilepsy that are not well controlled with imepitoin. The goal of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of phenobarbital or potassium bromide (KBr) as add-on antiepileptic drugs for controlling dogs refractory to a maximum dose of imepitoin (30 mg/kg twice daily). The study was performed as a prospective, randomised, controlled clinical trial. The efficacy of phenobarbital and KBr was evaluated by comparing monthly seizure frequency (MSF), monthly seizure day frequency (MSDF), the presence of cluster seizures during a retrospective 2-month period with a prospective follow-up of 6 months, and the overall responder rate. Twenty-seven dogs were included in the study, 14 dogs in the phenobarbital group and 13 dogs in the KBr group. Both median MSF and MSDF decreased in the phenobarbital group (both P = 0.001) and in the KBr group (P = 0.004 and P = 0.003, respectively). Overall, the number of dogs with cluster seizures decreased (P = 0.0005). The responder rate was 79% vs. 69% in the phenobarbital and KBr groups, respectively. We conclude that phenobarbital or KBr add-on treatment decreases median MSF and MSDF in epileptic dogs refractory to a maximum dose of imepitoin. Combination therapy was generally well tolerated and resulted in an improvement in seizure management in the majority of the dogs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Increased interhemispheric resting-state in idiopathic generalized epilepsy with generalized tonic-clonic seizures: a resting-state fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tianhua; Ren, Jiechuan; Li, Qifu; Li, Lei; Lei, Du; Gong, Qiyong; Zhou, Dong

    2014-10-01

    The aim is to examine the resting state functional connectivity (RSFC) between the two hemispheres and its relationships with clinical characteristic in idiopathic generalized epilepsy with generalized tonic-clonic seizures only (IGE-GTCS) patients using a technique called "voxel-mirrored homotopic connectivity (VMHC)". The resting-state functional MRI (Rs-fMRI) was used to measure the RSFC in patients with IGE-GTC and age-gender matched healthy subjects. The between-group difference in interhemispheric RSFC was examined after the interhemispheric RSFC map was obtained by an automated VMHC approach. Compared to the controls, the IGE-GTCS patients showed significant increases in VMHC in the bilateral anterior cingulate and medial prefrontal gyrus. No areas showed decreased VMHC in patients. Moreover, the VMHC in bilateral thalamus, orbital frontal cortex as well as cerebellum showed significant negative correlations with the illness duration. The current findings provide preliminary evidence of increased interhemispheric RSFC in patients with IGE-GTCS during the interictal period. These VMHC deficits in these regions and the inverse relations between VMHC and clinical characteristic may play an important role in the pathophysiology of IGE-GTCS. Our study may contribute to the understanding of neuro-pathophysiological mechanism of epilepsy and psychosocial function impairments in patients with IGE-GTCS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Submikroskopiske kromosomforandringer disponerer til epilepsi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Rikke Steensbjerre; Hjalgrim, Helle

    2011-01-01

    Idiopathic generalised epilepsies (IGEs) affect up to 0.3% of the general population. Genetic factors play a predominant role in the aetiology of IGEs. Molecular genetic studies have mainly identified causative gene mutations in rare monogenic forms of idiopathic epilepsies. However, the genetic ...

  7. Auditory aura in nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy: a red flag to suspect an extra-frontal epileptogenic zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Lorenzo; Bisulli, Francesca; Nobili, Lino; Tassi, Laura; Licchetta, Laura; Mostacci, Barbara; Stipa, Carlotta; Mainieri, Greta; Bernabè, Giorgia; Provini, Federica; Tinuper, Paolo

    2014-11-01

    To describe the anatomo-electro-clinical findings of patients with nocturnal hypermotor seizures (NHS) preceded by auditory symptoms, to evaluate the localizing value of auditory aura. Our database of 165 patients with nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (NFLE) diagnosis confirmed by videopolysomnography (VPSG) was reviewed, selecting those who reported an auditory aura as the initial ictal symptom in at least two NHS during their lifetime. Eleven patients were selected (seven males, four females). According to the anatomo-electro-clinical data, three groups were identified. Group 1 [defined epileptogenic zone (EZ)]: three subjects were studied with stereo-EEG. The EZ lay in the left superior temporal gyrus in two cases, whereas in the third case seizures arose from a dysplastic lesion located in the left temporal lobe. One of these three patients underwent left Heschl's gyrus resection, and is currently seizure-free. Group 2 (presumed EZ): three cases in which a presumed EZ was identified; in the left temporal lobe in two cases and in the left temporal lobe extending to the insula in one subject. Group 3 (uncertain EZ): five cases had anatomo-electro-clinical correlations discordant. This work suggests that auditory aura may be a helpful anamnestic feature suggesting an extra-frontal seizure origin. This finding could guide secondary investigations to improve diagnostic definition and selection of candidates for surgical treatment. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Community-based epidemiological study of epilepsy in the Qena governorate in Upper Egypt, a door-to-door survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawi, Gharib; Khedr, Eman M; El-Fetoh, Noha Abo; Thabit, Mohamed N; Abbass, Mohamed A; Zaki, Ahmad F

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study is to estimate the epidemiological features of epilepsy in a representative governorate of Upper Egypt. A door-to-door community-based survey study was performed using a sample of 10 areas among various districts of the Qena governorate in Upper Egypt. Six were classified as rural areas, and the remaining four were classified as urban areas, with a total population of 8027 inhabitants. The population was screened using an epilepsy-screening questionnaire. Positive cases with suspected epilepsy were referred to Qena University Hospital to be further evaluated by a qualified neurologist and for further investigations, such as neuroimaging and electroencephalography. One hundred patients had a confirmed diagnosis of epilepsy, with a lifetime prevalence of 12.46/1000. The active prevalence rate of epilepsy was 2.12/1000, while the incidence rate was 123/100000. Seventy-six percent of the patients had idiopathic epilepsies, while 24% had symptomatic epilepsy. Generalized epilepsies were more common (70.1%) than partial epilepsy (26.3%), meanwhile epilepsies with mixed seizure types were 2.6%. The most common seizure type was generalized tonic clonic seizures (51.8%). The age-specific prevalence rate of epilepsy was much higher in infancy and early childhood (62.5 and 37.04/1000, respectively), which regressed steadily with age. Idiopathic epilepsies were significantly more common in urban areas than in rural areas (P=0.01), while symptomatic epilepsies were more common in rural areas than in urban areas (Pepilepsy and epilepsy-related medical service, and more cultural education should be directed to those areas in Egypt. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Long-Term Social Outcomes in Childhood Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Population-based longitudinal and cross-sectional studies of social outcomes of children with epilepsy in different countries are reviewed by researchers at Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.Epilepsy, Chronic Disease, Idiopathic Epilepsy.

  10. Epilepsy - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seizure disorder - children; Convulsion - childhood epilepsy; Medically refractory childhood epilepsy; Anticonvulsant - childhood epilepsy; Antiepileptic drug - childhood epilepsy; AED - childhood epilepsy

  11. Management of multifactorial idiopathic epilepsy in EL mice with caloric restriction and the ketogenic diet: role of glucose and ketone bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mantis John G

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The high fat, low carbohydrate ketogenic diet (KD was developed as an alternative to fasting for seizure management. While the mechanisms by which fasting and the KD inhibit seizures remain speculative, alterations in brain energy metabolism are likely involved. We previously showed that caloric restriction (CR inhibits seizure susceptibility by reducing blood glucose in the epileptic EL mouse, a natural model for human multifactorial idiopathic epilepsy. In this study, we compared the antiepileptic and anticonvulsant efficacy of the KD with that of CR in adult EL mice with active epilepsy. EL mice that experienced at least 15 recurrent complex partial seizures were fed either a standard diet unrestricted (SD-UR or restricted (SD-R, and either a KD unrestricted (KD-UR or restricted (KD-R. All mice were fasted for 14 hrs prior to diet initiation. A new experimental design was used where each mouse in the diet-restricted groups served as its own control to achieve a 20–23% body weight reduction. Seizure susceptibility, body weights, and the levels of plasma glucose and β-hydroxybutyrate were measured once/week over a nine-week treatment period. Results Body weights and blood glucose levels remained high over the testing period in the SD-UR and the KD-UR groups, but were significantly (p Conclusions The results indicate that seizure susceptibility in EL mice is dependent on plasma glucose levels and that seizure control is more associated with the amount than with the origin of dietary calories. Also, CR underlies the antiepileptic and anticonvulsant action of the KD in EL mice. A transition from glucose to ketone bodies for energy is predicted to manage EL epileptic seizures through multiple integrated changes of inhibitory and excitatory neural systems.

  12. Familial partial epilepsy with variable foci in a Dutch family : Clinical characteristics and confirmation of linkage to chromosome 22q

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Callenbach, PMC; van den Maagdenberg, AMJM; Hottenga, JJ; van den Boogerd, EH; de Coo, RFM; Lindhout, D; Frants, RR; Sandkuijl, LA; Brouwer, OF

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: Three forms of idiopathic partial epilepsy with autosomal dominant inheritance have been described: (a) autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (ADNFLE); (b) autosomal dominant lateral temporal epilepsy (ADLTE) or partial epilepsy with auditory features (ADPEAF); and (c) familial

  13. Investigating the potential of the anti-epileptic drug imepitoin as a treatment for co-morbid anxiety in dogs with idiopathic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, Rowena M A; De Risio, Luisa; Volk, Holger A

    2017-04-07

    Behavioural changes associated with idiopathic epilepsy (IE) have been identified in dogs, with fear and anxiety-related problems seen in both drug-naïve dogs and dogs treated with anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs). Treating anxiety-related behaviour in dogs with IE may be challenging, as seizures are a contraindication for many conventional anxiolytic drugs. In addition, many dogs with IE are already treated with AEDs to reduce their seizure frequency, which may have negative effects if used in polytherapy. Imepitoin is low-affinity partial agonist at the benzodiazepine (BDZ) site of the GABA A receptor, and has been demonstrated to have both anticonvulsant and anxiolytic effects in laboratory rodents. Imepitoin has been developed for the treatment of IE in dogs, with demonstrated anticonvulsant effects and high tolerability and safety. To date, imepitoin's potential to reduce anxiety in dogs with IE has not been investigated. An online survey was conducted to investigate the effect of imepitoin on fear and anxiety-related behaviours in dogs with IE. Eighty-five valid responses were received from owners of dogs with IE currently treated with imepitoin. Anxiety-related behaviour was quantified before and during imepitoin treatment using a validated questionnaire tool (C-BARQ). No differences were observed in the five fear/anxiety-related measures between the two time periods (before vs. during treatment) for dog directed fear, stranger directed fear, non-social fear, pain sensitivity and separation related behaviour. A median 45% reduction in seizure frequency/month was observed following imepitoin treatment; however, imepitoin did not appear effective in reducing seizure frequency in a minority of cases. Polyphagia was the most common chronic side effect, and more side effects were reported in polytherapy cases. Imepitoin does not appear to improve anxiety-related behaviour in dogs with IE treated with this medication for its anti-epileptic effects. Investigating the

  14. High frequency of a single nucleotide substitution (c.-6-180T>G) of the canine MDR1/ABCB1 gene associated with phenobarbital-resistant idiopathic epilepsy in Border Collie dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizukami, Keijiro; Yabuki, Akira; Chang, Hye-Sook; Uddin, Mohammad Mejbah; Rahman, Mohammad Mahbubur; Kushida, Kazuya; Kohyama, Moeko; Yamato, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    A single nucleotide substitution (c.-6-180T>G) associated with resistance to phenobarbital therapy has been found in the canine MDR1/ABCB1 gene in Border Collies with idiopathic epilepsy. In the present study, a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism assay was developed for genotyping this mutation, and a genotyping survey was carried out in a population of 472 Border Collies in Japan to determine the current allele frequency. The survey demonstrated the frequencies of the T/T wild type, T/G heterozygote, and G/G mutant homozygote to be 60.0%, 30.3%, and 9.8%, respectively, indicating that the frequency of the mutant G allele is extremely high (24.9%) in Border Collies. The results suggest that this high mutation frequency of the mutation is likely to cause a high prevalence of phenobarbital-resistant epilepsy in Border Collies.

  15. Loss of function of the retinoid-related nuclear receptor (RORB) gene and epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudolf, Gabrielle; Lesca, Gaetan; Mehrjouy, Mana M

    2016-01-01

    Genetic generalized epilepsy (GGE), formerly known as idiopathic generalized epilepsy, is the most common form of epilepsy and is thought to have predominant genetic etiology. GGE are clinically characterized by absence, myoclonic, or generalized tonic-clonic seizures with electroencephalographic...

  16. Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy: Under-diagnosed syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Božić Ksenija; Gebauer-Bukurov Ksenija; Slankamenac Petar; Knežević-Pogančev Marija; Sekulić Slobodan

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy is an idiopathic, hereditary form of epilepsy. Although juvenile myoclonic epilepsy is a well defined clinical syndrome, attempts at diagnosing it commonly fail. Etiopathogenesis. The exact cause of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy remains unknown. Clinical, morphological and metabolic data suggest a preferential role for frontal regions in this syndrome. Several major genes for juvenile myoclonic epilepsy have been identified, but these genes accoun...

  17. About Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Care » Epilepsy Centers of Excellence » About Epilepsy Epilepsy Centers of Excellence Menu Menu Epilepsy Centers of ... ZIP code here Enter ZIP code here About Epilepsy What is epilepsy? What are seizures? Epilepsy vs ...

  18. Aplicación del nuevo esquema diagnóstico en niños con epilepsias focales idiopáticas Application of the new diagnostic scheme for children with idiopathic focal epilepsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albia J. Pozo Alonso

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Nos propusimos con este trabajo aplicar, en 101 niños con epilepsias focales idiopáticas, el nuevo esquema diagnóstico propuesto para personas con crisis epilépticas y epilepsia, correspondiente al año 2001. La edad promedio de inicio de la epilepsia focal fue de 6,4 años. Las crisis epilépticas focales más frecuentes fueron las secundariamente generalizadas (35,6 %, seguidas por las crisis motoras (30,7 % y las sensoriales (20,8 %. Entre las crisis focales motoras predominaron las de signos motores clónicos elementales (48,4 %, y a continuación las crisis motoras tónicas asimétricas (35,5 %. En las crisis focales sensoriales predominaron las crisis con síntomas elementales (95,2 %. El síndrome epiléptico que se identificó con más frecuencia fue la epilepsia benigna de la infancia con puntas centrotemporales (10,9 %, seguido por las crisis infantiles benignas de la infancia no familiares (5 %. El trazado electroencefalográfico inicial interictal anormal más frecuente fue el focal (36,4 %. La aplicación de este nuevo esquema diagnóstico resultó útil en niños con epilepsias focales idiopáticasThe aim of this paper was to apply in 101 children with focal idiopathic epilepsies, the new diagnostic scheme proposed for persons with epilepsy seizures and epilepsy in 2001. The average age at the onset of focal epilepsy was 6.4 years old. The most frequent focal epileptic seizures were the secondarily generalized (35.6 %, followed by the motor seizures (30.7 % and the sensory seizures (20.8 %. Among the focal motor seizures, it was observed a predominance of those of elementary clonic motor signs (48.4 % and of the asymmetric tonic motor seizures (35.5 %. As regards the focal sensory seizures, there was a prevalence of the seizures with elementary symptoms (95.2 %. The most commonly identified epileptic syndrome was the infantile benign epilepsy with centrotemporal points (10.9 %, followed by the non-family infantile benign

  19. Partial Epilepsy with Auditory Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available The clinical characteristics of 53 sporadic (S cases of idiopathic partial epilepsy with auditory features (IPEAF were analyzed and compared to previously reported familial (F cases of autosomal dominant partial epilepsy with auditory features (ADPEAF in a study at the University of Bologna, Italy.

  20. Rolandic epilepsy and dyslexia

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira,Ecila P.; Neri,Marina L.; Capelatto, Lívia L; Guimarães,Catarina A.; Guerreiro, Marilisa M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Although benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS) is an idiopathic, age-related epilepsy syndrome with favorable outcome, recent studies have shown impairment in specific neuropsychological tests. The objective of this study was to analyze the comorbidity between dyslexia and BECTS. Method Thirty-one patients with clinical and electroencephalographic diagnosis of BECTS (group A) and 31 paired children (group B) underwent a language and neuropsychological assessment perfo...

  1. Epilepsy and Sleep Disorders: a Clinical Review | Sunmonu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sleep disorders could be misdiagnosed as epilepsy and also worsen epilepsy. We searched Medline and Pubmed between 1962-2012, using the following search terms 'sleep', 'epilepsy', 'parasomnia', 'Obstructive Sleep apnea', 'restless legs' 'idiopathic generalized epilepsy'. One hundred and eighteen relevant studies ...

  2. The concept of symptomatic epilepsy and the complexities of assigning cause in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorvon, Simon

    2014-03-01

    The concept of symptomatic epilepsy and the difficulties in assigning cause in epilepsy are described. A historical review is given, emphasizing aspects of the history which are relevant today. The historical review is divided into three approximately semicentenial periods (1860-1910, 1910-1960, 1960-present). A definition of symptomatic epilepsy and this is followed by listing of causes of symptomatic epilepsy. The fact that not all the causes of idiopathic epilepsy are genetic is discussed. A category of provoked epilepsy is proposed. The complexities in assigning cause include the following: the multifactorial nature of epilepsy, the distinction between remote and proximate causes, the role of nongenetic factors in idiopathic epilepsy, the role of investigation in determining the range of causes, the fact that not all symptomatic epilepsy is acquired, the nosological position of provoked epilepsy and the view of epilepsy as a process, and the differentiation of new-onset and established epilepsy. The newly proposed ILAE classification of epilepsy and its changes in terminologies and the difficulties in the concept of acute symptomatic epilepsy are discussed, including the inconsistencies and gray areas and the distinction between idiopathic, symptomatic, and provoked epilepsies. Points to be considered in future work are listed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. An approach to epilepsy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The key to understanding and managing epilepsy is to decide whether seizures are genetic/idiopathic or caused by focal brain pathology. ..... Generalised 3 Hz spike and wave. Focal. EEG = electroencephalogram. Table 3. Differences between Generalised Tonic-Clonic and Focal-onset Seizures evolving to Generalised ...

  4. Imaging of the epilepsies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbach, H. [University of Bonn Medical Center, Department of Radiology/Neuroradiology, Bonn (Germany)

    2005-03-01

    Imaging of epilepsy patients is challenging, since epileptogenic lesions (defined as structural lesions causally related to the epilepsy syndrome) may be small and often do not change during life. Prior clinical information about the epilepsy syndrome and the semiology of the seizures is needed in order to plan the examination properly. The effort to detect an epileptogenic lesion is directed to partial (focal) epilepsy syndromes whereas - by definition - no lesion is identified in idiopathic epilepsies. Most patients with partial epilepsies suffer from mesial temporal lobe epilepsies. In these patients, 2- to 3-mm-thick T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) fast spin echo slices along or perpendicular to the temporal lobe length axis have the highest diagnostic efficacy. In contrast, in patients with extratemporal lobe epilepsies perpendicular FLAIR slices through the anatomic region, from which, due to clinical and EEG criteria, the seizures are likely to originate, are preferred. The imaging features of common epileptogenic lesions (hippocampal sclerosis, long-term epilepsy-associated tumours, focal cortical dysplasias, vascular malformations, encephalitis including limbic and Rasmussen's encephalitis, gyral scarring including ulegyria) are detailed in the second section of this paper. (orig.)

  5. Canine epilepsy genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekenstedt, Kari J; Patterson, Edward E; Mickelson, James R

    2012-02-01

    There has been much interest in utilizing the dog as a genetic model for common human diseases. Both dogs and humans suffer from naturally occurring epilepsies that share many clinical characteristics. Investigations of inherited human epilepsies have led to the discovery of several mutated genes involved in this disease; however, the vast majority of human epilepsies remain unexplained. Mouse models of epilepsy exist, including single-gene spontaneous and knockout models, but, similar to humans, other, polygenic models have been more difficult to discern. This appears to also be the case in canine epilepsy genetics. There are two forms of canine epilepsies for which gene mutations have been described to date: the progressive myoclonic epilepsies (PMEs) and idiopathic epilepsy (IE). Gene discovery in the PMEs has been more successful, with eight known genes; six of these are orthologous to corresponding human disorders, while two are novel genes that can now be used as candidates for human studies. Only one IE gene has been described in dogs, an LGI2 mutation in Lagotto Romagnolos with a focal, juvenile remitting epilepsy. This gene is also a novel candidate for human remitting childhood epilepsy studies. The majority of studies of dog breeds with IE, however, have either failed to identify any genes or loci of interest, or, as in complex mouse and human IEs, have identified multiple QTLs. There is still tremendous promise in the ongoing canine epilepsy studies, but if canine IEs prove to be as genetically complex as human and murine IEs, then deciphering the bases of these canine epilepsies will continue to be challenging.

  6. Learning and Memory in Children with Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The relation between learning and memory and epilepsy in school children with recently diagnosed idiopathic and/or cryptogenic seizures was evaluated at Wilhelmina Children’s Hospital, the Netherlands.

  7. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yri, Hanne M; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: The aims of this article are to characterize the headache in idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) and to field-test the ICHD diagnostic criteria for headache attributed to IIH. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We included 44 patients with new-onset IIH. Thirty-four patients with suspected...... tinnitus may suggest intracranial hypertension. Based on data from a well-defined IIH cohort, we propose a revision of the ICDH-3 beta diagnostic criteria with improved clinical applicability and increased sensitivity and specificity....

  8. The WAG/Rij strain: A genetic animal model of absence epilepsy with comorbidity of depressiony

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarkisova, K.Y.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van

    2011-01-01

    A great number of clinical observations show a relationship between epilepsy and depression. Idiopathic generalized epilepsy, including absence epilepsy, has a genetic basis. The review provides evidence that WAG/Rij rats can be regarded as a valid genetic animal model of absence epilepsy with

  9. International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force consensus proposal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhatti, Sofie F M; De Risio, Luisa; Muñana, Karen

    2015-01-01

    with the initial drug is unsatisfactory, and 4) when treatment changes should be considered. In this consensus proposal, an overview is given on the aim of AED treatment, when to start long-term treatment in canine epilepsy and which veterinary AEDs are currently in use for dogs. The consensus proposal for drug...... for the management of canine idiopathic epilepsy. Furthermore, for the management of structural epilepsy AEDs are inevitable in addition to treating the underlying cause, if possible....

  10. Spooky Suspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacifici, Lara

    2011-01-01

    This activity presents an option for covering biology content while engaging students in an investigation that highlights the spirit of Halloween. Students are engaged in the story line and have fun trying to solve the mystery kidnapping by using science skills to examine the evidence and eliminate some ghoulish suspects. (Contains 1 figure.)

  11. No relation between EFHC2 gene polymorphism and Idiopathic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) is an epilepsy form without an underlying brain lesion or neurological indication or symptom. Recent investigations on the genetic origins of IGE and its subtypes report that certain mutations of various ion and non-ion channels genes in the central nervous system may be ...

  12. Idiopathic Anaphylaxis

    OpenAIRE

    Nwaru, Bright; Dhami, Sangeeta; Sheikh, Aziz

    2017-01-01

    Opinion statement Idiopathic anaphylaxis is a rare life-threatening disorder with symptoms similar to other forms of anaphylaxis. There is lack of a robust evidence base underpinning the treatment of anaphylaxis and even less so for idiopathic anaphylaxis. Much of the evidence therefore comes from relatively small case series and expert opinion. Idiopathic anaphylaxis is a diagnosis of exclusion, requiring a thorough history and careful diagnostic work-up investigating possible triggers and u...

  13. Parental Infertility, Fertility Treatment, and Childhood Epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kettner, Laura O.; Ramlau-Hansen, Cecilia H.; Kesmodel, Ulrik S.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A few studies have indicated an increased risk of epilepsy in children conceived by fertility treatment possibly due to characteristics of the infertile couple rather than the treatment. We therefore aimed to investigate the association between parental infertility, fertility treatment......, and epilepsy in the offspring, including the subtypes of epilepsy; idiopathic generalised epilepsy and focal epilepsy. METHODS: This cohort included all pregnancies resulting in liveborn singletons from the Aarhus Birth Cohort, Denmark (1995-2013). Information on time to pregnancy and fertility treatment....... RESULTS: A total of 60 440 pregnancies were included, and 0.8% of the children developed epilepsy.The primary analyses showed no association between parental infertility or fertility treatment, and the overall risk of childhood epilepsy (hazard rate ratios (HRs); 95% confidence intervals (CIs): 1.08 (0...

  14. International veterinary epilepsy task force consensus proposal: diagnostic approach to epilepsy in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Risio, Luisa; Bhatti, Sofie; Muñana, Karen; Penderis, Jacques; Stein, Veronika; Tipold, Andrea; Berendt, Mette; Farqhuar, Robyn; Fischer, Andrea; Long, Sam; Mandigers, Paul J J; Matiasek, Kaspar; Packer, Rowena M A; Pakozdy, Akos; Patterson, Ned; Platt, Simon; Podell, Michael; Potschka, Heidrun; Batlle, Martí Pumarola; Rusbridge, Clare; Volk, Holger A

    2015-08-28

    This article outlines the consensus proposal on diagnosis of epilepsy in dogs by the International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force. The aim of this consensus proposal is to improve consistency in the diagnosis of epilepsy in the clinical and research settings. The diagnostic approach to the patient presenting with a history of suspected epileptic seizures incorporates two fundamental steps: to establish if the events the animal is demonstrating truly represent epileptic seizures and if so, to identify their underlying cause. Differentiation of epileptic seizures from other non-epileptic episodic paroxysmal events can be challenging. Criteria that can be used to make this differentiation are presented in detail and discussed. Criteria for the diagnosis of idiopathic epilepsy (IE) are described in a three-tier system. Tier I confidence level for the diagnosis of IE is based on a history of two or more unprovoked epileptic seizures occurring at least 24 h apart, age at epileptic seizure onset of between six months and six years, unremarkable inter-ictal physical and neurological examination, and no significant abnormalities on minimum data base blood tests and urinalysis. Tier II confidence level for the diagnosis of IE is based on the factors listed in tier I and unremarkable fasting and post-prandial bile acids, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain (based on an epilepsy-specific brain MRI protocol) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis. Tier III confidence level for the diagnosis of IE is based on the factors listed in tier I and II and identification of electroencephalographic abnormalities characteristic for seizure disorders. The authors recommend performing MRI of the brain and routine CSF analysis, after exclusion of reactive seizures, in dogs with age at epileptic seizure onset 6 years, inter-ictal neurological abnormalities consistent with intracranial neurolocalisation, status epilepticus or cluster seizure at epileptic seizure onset, or a previous

  15. When antiepileptic drugs aggravate epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genton, P

    2000-03-01

    Paradoxically, an antiepileptic drug (AED) may aggravate epilepsy. The number of AEDs is steadily increasing, and the occurrence of paradoxical aggravation will probably become a frequent problem. The overall status of the patient treated for epilepsy can be altered due to maladjustment to the diagnosis of epilepsy, to unwanted side-effects, to overdosage and to the occurrence of tolerance. However, the main mechanism of aggravation is the occurrence of an inverse pharmacodynamic effect. The specific effect of the AED is such that it controls epilepsy in most cases and increases seizures in other cases. Idiopathic generalised epilepsies (IGE) are particularly prone to pharmacodynamic aggravation: typical absences are constantly increased by carbamazepine (CBZ), vigabatrin, tiagabine, gabapentin, while phenytoin (PHT) is less aggravating. Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy is often aggravated by CBZ, less constantly by PHT and other AEDs. Generalised tonic-clonic seizures found in IGEs may respond to AEDs that aggravate the other seizure types. In symptomatic generalised epilepsies, patients have often several seizure types that respond differently to AEDs: myoclonias are generally aggravated by the same drugs that aggravated IGEs; tonic seizures in the Lennox-Gastaut syndrome respond to CBZ, which may however aggravate atypical absences. In severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy, there is a nearly constant aggravating effect of lamotrigine. In some patients with benign rolandic epilepsy, a clear aggravation may be produced by CBZ, with occurrence of negative myoclonias, atypical absences, drop attacks, and at the maximum evolution into a state of electrical status epilepticus during sleep. It is much more difficult to pinpoint specific pharmacological sensitivity in other focal epilepsies, but aggravation clearly occurs. When treating epilepsy, the clinician should act according to seizure type, or, better, to epilepsy type. Patients are usually aware of aggravation before

  16. Neuropsychological-EEG Activation in Genetic Generalized Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Investigators from Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, evaluated the effects of neuropsychological activation (NPA tasks on epileptiform discharges (ED in adolescents with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE and in comparison with hyperventilation and photic stimulation.

  17. Comparison of concentrations of γ-aminobutyric acid and glutamate in cerebrospinal fluid of dogs with idiopathic epilepsy with and without seizure-related magnetic resonance imaging hyperintense areas in the limbic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creevy, Kate E; Gagnepain, John F; Platt, Simon R; Edwards, Gaylen L; Kent, Marc

    2013-08-01

    To investigate differences in CSF concentrations of excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters in dogs with and without T2-weighted (T2W) MRI hyperintense areas in the limbic system. Archived CSF samples and stored brain MRI images of 5 healthy research dogs (group 1), 8 dogs with idiopathic epilepsy (IE) with no abnormal MRI findings (group 2), and 4 dogs with IE with hyperintense areas in the limbic system detected by means of T2W MRI (group 3). Archived CSF samples and stored MRI images obtained from all dogs were evaluated. Dogs in groups 2 and 3 were matched on the basis of age and breed. High-performance liquid chromatography was used to evaluate glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentrations in CSF samples. Glutamate concentrations were higher in CSF of both groups of dogs with IE than in healthy dogs. However, glutamate concentrations in CSF were not significantly higher in dogs with IE and with hyperintense areas than in dogs with IE but no abnormal MRI findings. Concentrations of GABA in CSF were higher in group 3 than in group 2 and in group 2 than in group 1. No significant difference was evident between glutamate concentrations in CSF of dogs with IE and with and without hyperintense areas detected by means of T2W MRI. However, glutamate concentrations typically were higher in CSF of dogs with IE and MRI hyperintense areas. Future studies with larger sample sizes should be conducted to confirm this finding and to determine the clinical importance of high glutamate concentrations in CSF of dogs with IE.

  18. Fahr's syndrome - Idiopathic Bilateral Striopallidodentate Calcinosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fahr's syndrome - Idiopathic Bilateral Striopallidodentate Calcinosis: a rare cause of seizures in a young African adolescent girl. ... cerebellum.1 The average age at onset of symptoms is 40 to 60 years.2 Hoque et al reported a case of Fahr's disease presenting with epilepsy, an uncommon presentation of this condition, in a ...

  19. The role of SLC2A1 in early onset and childhood absence epilepsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muhle, Hiltrud; Helbig, Ingo; Frøslev, Tobias Guldberg

    2013-01-01

    Early Onset Absence Epilepsy constitutes an Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy with absences starting before the age of four years. Mutations in SLC2A1, encoding the glucose transporter, account for approximately 10% of EOAE cases. The role of SLC2A1 mutations in absence epilepsies with a later onset...

  20. Risk Factors for Survival in a University Hospital Population of Dogs with Epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredso, N.; Koch, B. C.; Toft, Nils

    2014-01-01

    BackgroundAlthough a common neurological disorder in dogs, long-term outcome of epilepsy is sparsely documented. ObjectivesTo investigate risk factors for survival and duration of survival in a population of dogs with idiopathic epilepsy or epilepsy associated with a known intracranial cause. Ani...

  1. [Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy: under-diagnosed syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozić, Ksenija; Bukurov, Ksenija Gebauer; Slankamenac, Petar; Pogancev, Marija Knezević; Sekulić, Slobodan

    2011-01-01

    Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy is an idiopathic, hereditary form of epilepsy. Although juvenile myoclonic epilepsy is a well defined clinical syndrome, attempts at diagnosing it commonly fail. ETIOPATHOGENESIS: The exact cause of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy remains unknown. Clinical, morphological and metabolic data suggest a preferential role for frontal regions in this syndrome. Several major genes for juvenile myoclonic epilepsy have been identified, but these genes account for only a small proportions of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy cases, suggesting multifactorial or complex inheritance in most. Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy is characterized by the triad of myoclonic jerks on awakening (all patients), generalized tonic-clonic seizures (> 90% of patients) and typical absences (about one third of patients). Seizures have an age-related onset, circadian distribution and are frequently precipitated by sleep deprivation, fatigue and alcohol intake. Intelligence is normal. Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy diagnosis is based upon clinical criteria and typical electroencephalographic findings (generalized pattern of spikes and/or polyspikes and waves). All other tests are normal. Both medical treatment and counselling are important in the management of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. Mono-therapy with valproate is the preferred treatment. Some of the newer antiepileptic drugs have been suggested as possible alternatives. Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy has a good prognosis. Lifelong treatment is usually considered necessary in vast majority of patients due to the increased risk of relapse if treatment is discontinued. Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy is a common, although under-diagnosed epileptic syndrome. The clinician should study the occurrence of myoclonic jerks and should consider atypical presentations.

  2. Idiopathic granulomatous mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Erkan; Akin, Murat; Can, Mehmet F; Ozerhan, Ismail; Kurt, Bulent; Yagci, Gokhan; Tufan, Turgut

    2009-01-01

    To discuss the clinical and radiological features and treatment approaches in 14 patients diagnosed with idiopathic granulomatous mastitis (GM). We retrospectively evaluated the clinical features, radiological findings, and treatment approaches in 14 patients with idiopathic GM in the General Surgery Department, Gulhane School of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey between April 2000 and June 2006. The mean age of the patients was 34.5 years (range 27-41 years). The complaints at admission were a mass in the breast in 7 (50%) patients, an abscess and a mass in 6 (42.8%), and a skin fistula in one (7.2%). Granulomatous mastitis was unilateral in all subjects (on the right in 5 patients and on the left in 9). All of the patients underwent ultrasonographic evaluation. Mammography was performed in 8 and magnetic resonance imaging in 5 patients. Seven patients (50%) were suspected to have breast carcinoma according to radiological findings. We performed large excision in 11, incisional biopsy plus abscess drainage in one, and incisional biopsy plus abscess drainage plus medical treatment (prednisolone, methotrexate) in 2 patients. Due to the development of abscess after 9 months, drainage and large excision were also performed in one patient who received medical treatment. Idiopathic GM is a disease that generally affects young women of reproductive age and may be mistaken for breast carcinoma in clinical and radiological evaluations. The gold standard for the diagnosis is histopathologic evaluation.

  3. Rolandic epilepsy and dyslexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ecila P. Oliveira

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective Although benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS is an idiopathic, age-related epilepsy syndrome with favorable outcome, recent studies have shown impairment in specific neuropsychological tests. The objective of this study was to analyze the comorbidity between dyslexia and BECTS. Method Thirty-one patients with clinical and electroencephalographic diagnosis of BECTS (group A and 31 paired children (group B underwent a language and neuropsychological assessment performed with several standardized protocols. Our findings were categorized as: a dyslexia; b other difficulties; c without difficulties. Our results were compared and statistically analyzed. Results Our data showed that dyslexia occurred in 19.4% and other difficulties in 74.2% of our patients. This was highly significant when compared with the control group (p<0.001. Phonological awareness, writing, reading, arithmetic, and memory tests showed a statistically significant difference when comparing both groups. Conclusion Our findings show significant evidence of the occurrence of dyslexia in patients with BECTS.

  4. Rolandic epilepsy and dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Ecila P; Neri, Marina L; Capelatto, Lívia L; Guimarães, Catarina A; Guerreiro, Marilisa M

    2014-11-01

    Although benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS) is an idiopathic, age-related epilepsy syndrome with favorable outcome, recent studies have shown impairment in specific neuropsychological tests. The objective of this study was to analyze the comorbidity between dyslexia and BECTS. Thirty-one patients with clinical and electroencephalographic diagnosis of BECTS (group A) and 31 paired children (group B) underwent a language and neuropsychological assessment performed with several standardized protocols. Our findings were categorized as: a) dyslexia; b) other difficulties; c) without difficulties. Our results were compared and statistically analyzed. Our data showed that dyslexia occurred in 19.4% and other difficulties in 74.2% of our patients. This was highly significant when compared with the control group (pdyslexia in patients with BECTS.

  5. Unexplained childhood anaemia: idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, K K; Li, Rever; Lam, S Y

    2015-04-01

    This report demonstrates pulmonary haemorrhage as a differential cause of anaemia. Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis is a rare disease in children; it is classically described as a triad of haemoptysis, pulmonary infiltrates on chest radiograph, and iron-deficiency anaemia. However, anaemia may be the only presenting feature of idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis in children due to occult pulmonary haemorrhage. In addition, the serum ferritin is falsely high in idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis which increases the diagnostic difficulty. We recommend that pulmonary haemorrhage be suspected in any child presenting with iron-deficiency anaemia and persistent bilateral pulmonary infiltrates.

  6. Risk factors for survival in a university hospital population of dogs with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredsø, N; Koch, B C; Toft, N; Berendt, M

    2014-01-01

    Although a common neurological disorder in dogs, long-term outcome of epilepsy is sparsely documented. To investigate risk factors for survival and duration of survival in a population of dogs with idiopathic epilepsy or epilepsy associated with a known intracranial cause. One hundred and two client owned dogs; 78 dogs with idiopathic epilepsy and 24 dogs with epilepsy associated with a known intracranial cause. A retrospective hospital based study with follow-up. Dogs diagnosed with epilepsy between 2002 and 2008 were enrolled in the study. Owners were interviewed by telephone using a structured questionnaire addressing epilepsy status, treatment, death/alive, and cause of death. Median life span was 7.6 years, 9.2 years, and 5.8 years for all dogs, and dogs with idiopathic epilepsy or dogs with epilepsy associated with a known intracranial cause (P dogs with idiopathic epilepsy was significantly (P = .0030) decreased for dogs euthanized because of epilepsy (median: 35 months) compared to dogs euthanized for other reasons (median: 67.5 months). Neutered male dogs with idiopathic epilepsy had a significant (P = .031) shorter survival (median: 38.5 months) after index seizure compared to intact male dogs (median: 71 months). Treatment with two antiepileptic drugs (AED's) did not negatively influence survival (P = .056). Dogs with idiopathic epilepsy can in many cases expect a life span close to what is reported for dogs in general. In dogs where mono-therapy is not sufficient, the need for treatment with two AED's is not linked to a poor prognosis. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  7. Transition to seizure in photosensitive epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopes da Silva, F.H.; Harding, G.F.A.

    2011-01-01

    Photosensitive epilepsy (PSE) offers a highly reproducible model to investigate whether changes in neuronal activity preceding the transition to an epileptic photoparoxysmal response (PPR) may be detected. We investigated this possibility in patients with idiopathic PSE using MEG, as well as normal

  8. International veterinary epilepsy task force consensus proposal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Risio, Luisa; Bhatti, Sofie; Muñana, Karen

    2015-01-01

    This article outlines the consensus proposal on diagnosis of epilepsy in dogs by the International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force. The aim of this consensus proposal is to improve consistency in the diagnosis of epilepsy in the clinical and research settings. The diagnostic approach to the patient...... paroxysmal events can be challenging. Criteria that can be used to make this differentiation are presented in detail and discussed. Criteria for the diagnosis of idiopathic epilepsy (IE) are described in a three-tier system. Tier I confidence level for the diagnosis of IE is based on a history of two or more...... for the diagnosis of IE is based on the factors listed in tier I and unremarkable fasting and post-prandial bile acids, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain (based on an epilepsy-specific brain MRI protocol) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis. Tier III confidence level for the diagnosis of IE is based...

  9. [Controversies and problems in the diagnosis of benign occipital epilepsies in infancy, childhood and adolescence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, J

    2006-10-10

    To review the changes introduced by the new proposal of diagnostic scheme for people with epilepsy made by the International League Against Epilepsy in the categorization of the idiopathic occipital epilepsies of childhood and the diagnostic challenges of these disorders. The term occipital paroxysms has disappeared and two major forms are distinguished: one with early onset or Panayiotopoulos type, officially recognized as a syndrome, and one with late onset or Gastaut type. To these entities we have to add the recently described idiopathic photosensitive occipital lobe epilepsy, also included in the new list of syndromes. Detailed electroencephalogram investigations are crucial to reveal all the neurophysiological diagnostic aspects of these disorders. These investigations may suggest a close relationship with rolandic epilepsies. The characterization of the Panayiotopoulos' syndrome as a focal occipital epilepsy has been questioned. The limits of the idiopathic photosensitive epilepsy with other photosensitive epilepsies are not well defined yet. The variant of Gastaut might be sometimes difficult to distinguish from migraine with visual aura. Its long term prognosis is not clear yet, in part because this overlap with other entities. The persistence of seizures beyond adolescence in some patients and the development of learning disorders and mild cognitive dysfunction cast some doubts about its good prognosis. The characterization of the idiopathic occipital epilepsies and its relationships with other childhood epilepsies are a fascinating area of development in epileptology. Further research is necessary to define the limits of these disorders and their long-term prognosis.

  10. Investigation of GRIN2A in common epilepsy phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lal, Dennis; Steinbrücker, Sandra; Schubert, Julian

    2015-01-01

    Recently, mutations and deletions in the GRIN2A gene have been identified to predispose to benign and severe idiopathic focal epilepsies (IFE), revealing a higher incidence of GRIN2A alterations among the more severe phenotypes. This study aimed to explore the phenotypic boundaries of GRIN2A...... mutations by investigating patients with the two most common epilepsy syndromes: (i) idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) and (ii) temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Whole exome sequencing data of 238 patients with IGE as well as Sanger sequencing of 84 patients with TLE were evaluated for GRIN2A sequence...... alterations. Two additional independent cohorts comprising 1469 IGE and 330 TLE patients were screened for structural deletions (>40kb) involving GRIN2A. Apart from a presumably benign, non-segregating variant in a patient with juvenile absence epilepsy, neither mutations nor deletions were detected in either...

  11. Long-term outcome of medically treated epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sillanpää, M; Schmidt, D

    2017-01-01

    To review the long-term outcome of epilepsy in population-based studies. Analysis of population-based studies. About two of three patients with new-onset epilepsy will, in the long run, enter five-year terminal remission. Chances for remission are best for those with idiopathic or cryptogenic epilepsy. It is unclear whether the seizure outcome has improved over the last several decades. Social outcome, however, may have become better because of the improved level of knowledge on and public attitudes toward people with epilepsy, and possibly fewer prejudices at home, daycare, school, military and labor market. While we still do not have a cure for epilepsy for all patients, relief of the medical and social consequences is available for many and hope is on the horizon for people with epilepsy. Copyright © 2016 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Idiopathic Anaphylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwaru, Bright I; Dhami, Sangeeta; Sheikh, Aziz

    2017-01-01

    Idiopathic anaphylaxis is a rare life-threatening disorder with symptoms similar to other forms of anaphylaxis. There is lack of a robust evidence base underpinning the treatment of anaphylaxis and even less so for idiopathic anaphylaxis. Much of the evidence therefore comes from relatively small case series and expert opinion. Idiopathic anaphylaxis is a diagnosis of exclusion, requiring a thorough history and careful diagnostic work-up investigating possible triggers and underlying predisposing factors. Key diagnostic tests include skin-prick testing, tests for specific-IgE, component-resolved diagnostics, and in some cases for allergen challenge tests. Other recognized causes of anaphylaxis, such as foods, medications, insect stings, latex, and exercise, should all be considered, as should differential diagnoses such as asthma. While the cause of idiopathic anaphylaxis remains unknown, prompt treatment with intramuscular epinephrine (adrenaline) administered into the anterolateral aspect of the thigh is associated with good prognosis. There may also be a role for H1-antihistamines and corticosteroids as second-line agents. Patients need to be carefully monitored for signs of deterioration and/or a possible protracted or biphasic reaction. Patients with frequent episodes of anaphylaxis (e.g., six or more episodes/year) should be considered for preventive therapy, which may include corticosteroids, H1- and H2-antihistamines, and, in some cases, mast cell stabilizers such as ketotifen. Alternative immune-suppressants (e.g., methotrexate) and anti-IgE may rarely also need to be considered. In many cases, the frequency of anaphylaxis declines such that regular use of corticosteroids can be discontinued after 9-12 months. Pediatric patients should be treated with similar regimens as adults, but with appropriate dose adjustments. Patients should carry their self-injectable epinephrine and other emergency medications at all times in order to deal with emergency

  13. Idiopathic Scoliosis

    OpenAIRE

    Jens Ivar Brox

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Idiopathic scoliosis is a structural and lateral curvature of the spine for which a currently recognizable cause has not been found and there is no basic evidence for physical and radiographic pathology. Complications. Scoliosis could be a cause of the back pain, deformities, respiratory and cardiology problems. There is a higher risk for decreasing of bone mineral density. Diagnosis and Management. Physical examination, radiography and stereophotogrametry are used in diag...

  14. Extending the phenotypic spectrum of RBFOX1 deletions: Sporadic focal epilepsy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lal, Dennis; Pernhorst, Katharina; Klein, Karl Martin; Reif, Philipp; Tozzi, Rossana; Toliat, Mohammad R; Winterer, Georg; Neubauer, Bernd; Nürnberg, Peter; Rosenow, Felix; Becker, Felicitas; Lerche, Holger; Kunz, Wolfram S; Kurki, Mitja I; Hoffmann, Per; Becker, Albert J; Perucca, Emilio; Zara, Federico; Sander, Thomas; Weber, Yvonne G

    2015-01-01

    Partial deletions of the RBFOX 1 gene encoding the neuronal splicing regulator have been reported in a range of neurodevelopmental diseases including idiopathic/genetic generalized epilepsy ( IGE / GGE...

  15. Analytic information processing style in epilepsy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonfiglio, Marzia; Di Sabato, Francesco; Mandillo, Silvia; Albini, Mariarita; Di Bonaventura, Carlo; Giallonardo, Annateresa; Avanzini, Giuliano

    2017-08-01

    Relevant to the study of epileptogenesis is learning processing, given the pivotal role that neuroplasticity assumes in both mechanisms. Recently, evoked potential analyses showed a link between analytic cognitive style and altered neural excitability in both migraine and healthy subjects, regardless of cognitive impairment or psychological disorders. In this study we evaluated analytic/global and visual/auditory perceptual dimensions of cognitive style in patients with epilepsy. Twenty-five cryptogenic temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients matched with 25 idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) sufferers and 25 healthy volunteers were recruited and participated in three cognitive style tests: "Sternberg-Wagner Self-Assessment Inventory", the C. Cornoldi test series called AMOS, and the Mariani Learning style Questionnaire. Our results demonstrate a significant association between analytic cognitive style and both IGE and TLE and respectively a predominant auditory and visual analytic style (ANOVA: p values style and its neurophysiological correlates in epilepsy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Epilepsy - overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... at any age. There may be a family history of seizures or epilepsy. ... if a seizure occurs. People with poorly controlled epilepsy should not drive. Check your state's law about which people with a history of seizures are allowed to drive. DO NOT ...

  17. Idiopathic Scoliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Ivar Brox

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic scoliosis (IS is a lifetime condition and is defined as a structural, lateral rotated curvature of the spine of >10° on standing coronal plane radiographs. It should be distinguished from other causes of scoliosis. It can be classified as infantile, juvenile, and adolescent according to age. As a rule of thumb, about 80% of all curves are idiopathic, right convex thoracic, and present in otherwise healthy girls at the beginning of puberty. A family member most commonly detects scoliosis. The structural asymmetry of the spine is best observed by asking the patient to bend forward. IS is often seen in more than one member of a family, but the aetiology remains unknown. Multiple genes are likely to be involved with incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity. Early detection by screening allows for monitoring curve progression and timely initiation of bracing, but school screening is controversial and practises vary worldwide. Most patients have minor scoliosis and treatment is generally not recommended for patients with curves 45°. Scoliosis surgery was not successful until the introduction of Harrington’s instrumentation in the 1960s. Modern instrumentation has evolved from the Cotrel-Dubousset system in the 1980s, and a variety of methods are available today. Although scoliosis may be a burden, long-term studies suggest that a good quality of life is maintained in most patients.

  18. Linkage and association analysis of CACNG3 in childhood absence epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Everett, Kate V.; Chioza, Barry; Aicardi, Jean; Aschauer, Harald; Brouwer, Oebele; Callenbach, Petra; Covanis, Athanasios; Dulac, Olivier; Eeg-Olofsson, Orvar; Feucht, Martha; Friis, Mogens; Goutieres, Francoise; Guerrini, Renzo; Heils, Armin; Kjeldsen, Marianne; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina; Makoff, Andrew; Nabbout, Rima; Olsson, Ingrid; Sander, Thomas; Siren, Auli; McKeigue, Paul; Robinson, Robert; Taske, Nichole; Rees, Michele; Gardiner, Mark

    Childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) is an idiopathic generalised epilepsy characterised by absence seizures manifested by transitory loss of awareness with 2.5 - 4 Hz spike - wave complexes on ictal EEG. A genetic component to aetiology is established but the mechanism of inheritance and the genes

  19. 16p11.2 600 kb Duplications confer risk for typical and atypical Rolandic epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinthaler, Eva M; Lal, Dennis; Lebon, Sebastien

    2014-01-01

    Rolandic epilepsy (RE) is the most common idiopathic focal childhood epilepsy. Its molecular basis is largely unknown and a complex genetic etiology is assumed in the majority of affected individuals. The present study tested whether six large recurrent copy number variants at 1q21, 15q11.2, 15q1...

  20. Epilepsy (generalised).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Melissa; Marson, Anthony G; Ramaratnam, Sridharan

    2012-02-20

    About 3% of people will be diagnosed with epilepsy during their lifetime, but about 70% of people with epilepsy eventually go into remission. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of monotherapy in newly diagnosed generalised epilepsy (tonic clonic type)? What are the effects of additional treatments in people with drug-resistant generalised epilepsy? What are the effects of surgery in people with drug-resistant generalised epilepsy? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to August 2011 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 8 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: monotherapy using carbamazepine, gabapentin, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, phenobarbital, phenytoin, sodium valproate, or topiramate; addition of second-line drugs (lamotrigine or levetiracetam) for drug-resistant epilepsy; and hemispherectomy for drug-resistant epilepsy.

  1. A predictive risk model for medical intractability in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lisu; Li, Shi; He, Dake; Bao, Weiqun; Li, Ling

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate early predictors (6 months after diagnosis) of medical intractability in epilepsy. All children models were performed to determine the risk factors for developing medical intractability. Receiver operating characteristic curve was applied to fit the best compounded predictive model. A total of 649 patients were identified, out of which 119 (18%) met the study definition of intractable epilepsy at 2 years after diagnosis, and the rate of intractable epilepsy in patients with idiopathic syndromes was 12%. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that neurodevelopmental delay, symptomatic etiology, partial seizures, and more than 10 seizures before diagnosis were significant and independent risk factors for intractable epilepsy. The best model to predict medical intractability in epilepsy comprised neurological physical abnormality, age at onset of epilepsy under 1 year, more than 10 seizures before diagnosis, and partial epilepsy, and the area under receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.7797. This model also fitted best in patients with idiopathic syndromes. A predictive model of medically intractable epilepsy composed of only four characteristics is established. This model is comparatively accurate and simple to apply clinically. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Cingulate Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkawadri, Rafeed; So, Norman K.; Van Ness, Paul C.; Alexopoulos, Andreas V.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The literature on cingulate gyrus epilepsy in the magnetic resonance imaging era is limited to case reports and small case series. To our knowledge, this is the largest study of surgically confirmed epilepsy arising from the anterior or posterior cingulate region. OBJECTIVE To characterize the clinical and electrophysiological findings of epilepsies arising from the anterior and posterior cingulate gyrus. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS We studied consecutive cingulate gyrus epilepsy cases identified retrospectively from the Cleveland Clinic and University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center epilepsy databases from 1992 to 2009. Participants included 14 consecutive cases of cingulate gyrus epilepsies confirmed by restricted magnetic resonance image lesions and seizure freedom or marked improvement following lesionectomy. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The main outcome measure was improvement in seizure frequency following surgery. The clinical, video electroencephalography, neuroimaging, pathology, and surgical outcome data were reviewed. RESULTS All 14 patients had cingulate epilepsy confirmed by restricted magnetic resonance image lesions and seizure freedom or marked improvement following lesionectomy. They were divided into 3 groups based on anatomical location of the lesion and corresponding seizure semiology. In the posterior cingulate group, all 4 patients had electroclinical findings suggestive of temporal origin of the epilepsy. The anterior cingulate cases were divided into a typical (Bancaud) group (6 cases with hypermotor seizures and infrequent generalization with the presence of fear, laughter, or severe interictal personality changes) and an atypical group (4 cases presenting with simple motor seizures and a tendency for more frequent generalization and less-favorable long-term surgical outcome). All atypical cases were associated with an underlying infiltrative astrocytoma. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Posterior cingulate gyrus epilepsy may

  3. Employees with Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Home | Accommodation and Compliance Series: Employees with Epilepsy By Melanie Whetzel, M. A. Preface Introduction Information ... SOAR) at http://AskJAN.org/soar. Information about Epilepsy What is Epilepsy? Epilepsy is a chronic, neurological ...

  4. Impact of a family history of epilepsy on the diagnosis of epilepsy in Southern Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babtain, Fawzi A

    2013-09-01

    Epilepsy can develop at any age for reasons that remain poorly understood. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of a family history of epilepsy (FHE) on the incidence and recurrence of seizures. This retrospective study was conducted in Aseer central hospital, Abha, Saudi Arabia between January and June 2012. The medical records of 420 patients were analyzed to test the impact of FHE on the risk factors, etiology and diagnosis of epilepsy determined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and electroencephalography (EEG). 420 patients were studied. Idiopathic epilepsy was seen in 140 patients (33%), symptomatic in 152 (36%), and cryptogenic in 128 patients (30%). FHE was seen in 113 patients (27%), which was associated with younger at the disease onset (15 years vs 20 years, pepilepsy was seen more in patients with FHE (43% vs 30%, p value epilepsy or younger age at epilepsy onset. FHE has a significant impact on epilepsy, its classifications, and the EEG findings, and may underlie the presence of a genetic etiology, which could be related to a high incidence of consanguinity seen in our population. Temporal epileptic discharges were the best predictor for FHE, which may suggest the presence of familial TLE. Copyright © 2013 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Epilepsy in Irish Wolfhounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casal, Margret L.; Munuve, Richard M.; Janis, M. Anne; Werner, Petra; Henthorn, Paula S.

    2012-01-01

    During the last 15 years, breeders have reported an increase in the proportion of Irish Wolfhounds with seizure disorders. Clinical data and pedigrees from closely related Irish Wolfhounds were collected retrospectively and analyzed. Idiopathic epilepsy was diagnosed, by exclusion of other causes for seizures, in 146 (18.3%) of 796 Irish Wolfhounds from 115 litters. The first seizure occurred by the age of 3 years in 73% of all dogs. Males were more commonly affected than females (61.6% versus 38.4%), with males having a later average age of seizure onset. The life expectancy of affected dogs was decreased by 2 years when compared with the average Irish Wolfhound population. The heritability index for the affected dogs, their littermates, and unaffected parents was 0.87. No simple mode of inheritance explains the pattern of affected dogs in pedigrees. Hallmarks of dominant and sex-linked inheritance were notably absent, and the segregation ratio was less than would be expected for simple autosomal recessive inheritance. Assuming all affected dogs have the same form of epilepsy, the simplest description of the complex pattern of inheritance observed is autosomal recessive, with incomplete penetrance and male dogs at increased risk. PMID:16496932

  6. [Neuropsychology and epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Castelló, J; Campos-Soler, S

    The epileptic child has three times more risk of presenting cognitive disorders than other children with no neurological pathology, in accordance with three essential facts: 1. The effect exerted by the actual epilepsy. 2. Any associated previously-existing neuropsychosocial deficits. 3. The side effects of the antiepileptic drug (AED). A certain amount of deterioration is universally accepted, without defining the factors involved in its production, but which are multifactorial according to computer studies. From this point of view, we analyse the relation between neuropsychology and epilepsy in Paediatrics. The relation between epilepsy and behaviour must be seen as an exception and not the rule, unless there are coexisting personality disorders and/or mental deficiency. The cognitive effects of AED depend on the drug, the doses used and on the polypharmacy, and these effects may be both adverse and beneficial. The differences from one drug to another are questionable due to the methodology used in the different studies and it should be remembered that with suitable doses the side effects are generally moderate, and AED monitoring is useful in this case. We recommend the use of MEDDRA assessment to obtain a more reliable definition of side effects, which in turn will allow them to be better evaluated. Scaling time in the introduction of the drug is important, especially with some of the new AED. The mechanisms governing the production of the side effects vary, but both the classical and the new ones, which are well used owing to the greater knowledge we have of their mechanism of action, improve cognitive functioning by controlling the seizures. In infancy, idiopathic cognitive reactions are produced. In childhood, the main disorders are a diminished reaction and information processing time with alterations affecting memory, attention and language. Epilepsy is associated to a number of different, generally mild, cognitive problems. The age of onset of epilepsy

  7. Targeting Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and seizures in some developing countries and some immigrant populations in the United States. Environmental Approaches Improving ... increase understanding about this condition and to reduce stigma. Past 3 Percentage of Adults with Active Epilepsy ...

  8. Epilepsy Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to the frontal lobe may affect behavior, including motivation, attention or concentration, as well as impulse control, ... July 17, 2015. Schacter SC. Overview of the management of epilepsy in adults. http://www.uptodate.com/ ...

  9. Epilepsy Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... if the seizure occurs during a bath or swimming Brain damage from prolonged seizures Sudden death, a ... a candidate for epilepsy surgery, your pre-surgical evaluation may include: Baseline electroencephalogram (EEG). In this test, ...

  10. Managing Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... go to school, drive, and take part in social activities. When seizures are not controlled, it increases the risk of Injury. Depression. Anxiety. In some cases, death. Sometimes even epilepsy treatment can cause problems such as feeling tired. Self- ...

  11. Parental Infertility, Fertility Treatment, and Childhood Epilepsy: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettner, Laura O; Ramlau-Hansen, Cecilia H; Kesmodel, Ulrik S; Bay, Bjørn; Matthiesen, Niels B; Henriksen, Tine B

    2016-09-01

    A few studies have indicated an increased risk of epilepsy in children conceived by fertility treatment possibly due to characteristics of the infertile couple rather than the treatment. We therefore aimed to investigate the association between parental infertility, fertility treatment, and epilepsy in the offspring, including the subtypes of epilepsy; idiopathic generalised epilepsy and focal epilepsy. This cohort included all pregnancies resulting in liveborn singletons from the Aarhus Birth Cohort, Denmark (1995-2013). Information on time to pregnancy and fertility treatment was obtained from pregnancy questionnaires in early pregnancy. Children developing epilepsy were identified from the Danish National Patient Register and the Danish National Prescription Registry until 2013. Data were analysed using Cox proportional hazards regression adjusted for potential confounders. A total of 60 440 pregnancies were included, and 0.8% of the children developed epilepsy.The primary analyses showed no association between parental infertility or fertility treatment, and the overall risk of childhood epilepsy (hazard rate ratios (HRs); 95% confidence intervals (CIs): 1.08 (0.73, 1.60) and 1.04 (0.71, 1.52)). In secondary analyses, both parental infertility and fertility treatment were associated with an increased risk of idiopathic generalised epilepsy (HRs and 95% CIs: 2.25 (1.10, 4.58) and 2.45 (1.26, 4.75)). No association was seen for focal epilepsy. Parental infertility or fertility treatment was not associated with an overall risk of childhood epilepsy. Parental infertility may be associated with an increased risk of idiopathic generalised epilepsy; a subtype of epilepsy believed to be of genetic origin. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Prevalence of epilepsy in rural Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablah, Elizabeth; Hesdorffer, Dale C; Liu, Yi; Paschal, Angelia M; Hawley, Suzanne; Thurman, David; Hauser, W Allen

    2014-05-01

    To determine the prevalence of active epilepsy in two southeastern rural Kansas counties. Medical records were abstracted from the emergency rooms, out- and inpatient services and clinics of 9 hospitals, from 10 doctors' offices, and 1 nursing home in and surrounding the two counties. Letters were mailed from hospitals and doctors' offices to invite their potentially eligible patients to participate in an interview. Medical record information and the interview, when available, were used for the final determination of active epilepsy, seizure type, etiology, syndrome, age, and gender in consensus conferences. Prevalence of epilepsy was calculated, and capture-recapture methodology, which estimates prevalence based on what is known about the population, was employed to assess active epilepsy in the two counties. This study identified 404 individuals with active prevalent epilepsy who visited at least one of the 20 facilities during the observation period. The overall prevalence of active epilepsy was 7.2 per 1000. The seizure type for 71.3% of prevalent cases was unknown; among the 76 cases with known and classifiable seizure type, 55.3% had focal with secondary generalized seizures. Among the 222 cases with classifiable etiology, 53.1% were idiopathic/cryptogenic. About 75% (n=301) were captured at only one center, 72% (n=75) of the remaining 103 patients were captured at two centers, and 28 patients were identified at three or more centers. The capture-recapture assessment yielded an estimation of 982 prevalent patients. The overall estimated prevalence of epilepsy in the two Kansas counties using capture-recapture was 17 per 1000. The crude prevalence of epilepsy, using medical record survey methods, was similar to, but on the high end, of other total population prevalence studies in the United States. The capture-recapture assessment suggested that epilepsy prevalence might be considerably higher than the crude prevalence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All

  13. Epidemiological Study of Epilepsy in Yazd-Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Vakili

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder. This study was aimed to investigate the epidemiological features of epilepsy patients admitted to neurology ward of Shahid Saddoughi hospital, Yazd, Iran.  Methods: In an epidemiological descriptive study the data of 121 epilepsy patients admitted in neurology ward of hospital during 2015 and 2016 was gathered from hospital records and telephone contacts with patients or their families in some cases. The gathered data was analyzed trough SPSS16 and by using descriptive statistics. Results: 50.4% of studied patients were in the age group below 10 years old and 57% of them were female. The majority of research sample (84.3% had less than high school education. The type of disease was generalized tonic-colonic epilepsy in 76% of patients. In 49.6% of studied patients, epilepsy was idiopathic and 87.7% of them had been admitted in hospital due to seizure. Also a single drug treatment had been prescribed for 60.3% of studied patients. Conclusion: Based on our results in the studied population the prevalence of epilepsy is more common among children, females and people with lower education. Also, the general and idiopathic types of epilepsy are more common. 

  14. Idiopathic oedema and diuretics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunnigan, M. G.; Denning, D. W.; Henry, J. A.; de Wolff, F. A.

    1987-01-01

    Diuretic abuse has been invoked as the cause of idiopathic oedema. In this study, eight patients with idiopathic oedema were studied. Symptoms and weight variation continued despite the proven absence of diuretics in seven of them as determined by urinary chromatograms. Idiopathic oedema cannot therefore be attributed to diuretic use alone. PMID:3671223

  15. Persistent idiopathic facial pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoliel, Rafael; Gaul, Charly

    2017-06-01

    Background Persistent idiopathic facial pain (PIFP) is a chronic disorder recurring daily for more than two hours per day over more than three months, in the absence of clinical neurological deficit. PIFP is the current terminology for Atypical Facial Pain and is characterized by daily or near daily pain that is initially confined but may subsequently spread. Pain cannot be attributed to any pathological process, although traumatic neuropathic mechanisms are suspected. When present intraorally, PIFP has been termed 'Atypical Odontalgia', and this entity is discussed in a separate article in this special issue. PIFP is often a difficult but important differential diagnosis among chronic facial pain syndromes. Aim To summarize current knowledge on diagnostic criteria, differential diagnosis, pathophysiology and management of PIFP. Methods We present a narrative review reporting current literature and personal experience. Additionally, we discuss and differentiate the common differential diagnoses associated with PIFP including traumatic trigeminal neuropathies, regional myofascial pain, atypical neurovascular pains and atypical trigeminal neuropathic pains. Results and conclusion The underlying pathophysiology in PIFP is still enigmatic, however neuropathic mechanisms may be relevant. PIFP needs interdisciplinary collaboration to rule out and manage secondary causes, psychiatric comorbidities and other facial pain syndromes, particularly trigeminal neuralgia. Burden of disease and psychiatric comorbidity screening is recommended at an early stage of disease, and should be addressed in the management plan. Future research is needed to establish clear diagnostic criteria and treatment strategies based on clinical findings and individual pathophysiology.

  16. International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force recommendations for a veterinary epilepsy-specific MRI protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusbridge, Clare; Long, Sam; Jovanovik, Jelena; Milne, Marjorie; Berendt, Mette; Bhatti, Sofie F M; De Risio, Luisa; Farqhuar, Robyn G; Fischer, Andrea; Matiasek, Kaspar; Muñana, Karen; Patterson, Edward E; Pakozdy, Akos; Penderis, Jacques; Platt, Simon; Podell, Michael; Potschka, Heidrun; Stein, Veronika M; Tipold, Andrea; Volk, Holger A

    2015-08-28

    Epilepsy is one of the most common chronic neurological diseases in veterinary practice. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is regarded as an important diagnostic test to reach the diagnosis of idiopathic epilepsy. However, given that the diagnosis requires the exclusion of other differentials for seizures, the parameters for MRI examination should allow the detection of subtle lesions which may not be obvious with existing techniques. In addition, there are several differentials for idiopathic epilepsy in humans, for example some focal cortical dysplasias, which may only apparent with special sequences, imaging planes and/or particular techniques used in performing the MRI scan. As a result, there is a need to standardize MRI examination in veterinary patients with techniques that reliably diagnose subtle lesions, identify post-seizure changes, and which will allow for future identification of underlying causes of seizures not yet apparent in the veterinary literature.There is a need for a standardized veterinary epilepsy-specific MRI protocol which will facilitate more detailed examination of areas susceptible to generating and perpetuating seizures, is cost efficient, simple to perform and can be adapted for both low and high field scanners. Standardisation of imaging will improve clinical communication and uniformity of case definition between research studies. A 6-7 sequence epilepsy-specific MRI protocol for veterinary patients is proposed and further advanced MR and functional imaging is reviewed.

  17. Investigation of GRIN2A in common epilepsy phenotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lal, Dennis; Steinbrücker, Sandra; Schubert, Julian; Sander, Thomas; Becker, Felicitas; Weber, Yvonne; Lerche, Holger; Thiele, Holger; Krause, Roland; Lehesjoki, Anna Elina; Nürnberg, Peter; Palotie, Aarno; Neubauer, Bernd A.; Muhle, Hiltrud; Stephani, Ulrich; Helbig, Ingo; Becker, Albert J.; Schoch, Susanne; Hansen, Jörg; Dorn, Thomas; Hohl, Christin; Lüscher, Nicole; von Spiczak, Sarah; Lemke, Johannes R.; Zimprich, Fritz; Feucht, Martha; Suls, Arvid; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Claes, Lieve; Deprez, Liesbet; Smets, Katrien; Dyck, Tine Van; Deconinck, Tine; De Jonghe, Peter; Møller, Rikke S.; Klitten, Laura L.; Hjalgrim, Helle; Campus, Kiel; Ostertag, Philipp; Trucks, Hol ger; Elger, Christian E.; Kleefuß-Lie, Ailing A.; Kunz, Wolfram S.; Surges, Rainer; Gaus, Verena; Janz, Dieter; Schmitz, Bettina; Klein, Karl Martin; Reif, Philipp S.; Oertel, Wolfgang H.; Hamer, Hajo M.; Rosenow, Felix; Kapser, Claudia; Schankin, Christoph J.; Koeleman, Bobby P C; de Kovel, Carolien; Lindhout, Dick; Reinthaler, Eva M.; Steinboeck, Hannelore; Neo-phytou, Birgit; Geldner, Julia; Gruber-Sedlmayr, Ursula; Haberlandt, Edda; Ronen, Gabriel M.; Altmueller, Janine; Nuernberg, Peter; Neubauer, Bernd; Sirén, Auli

    2015-01-01

    Recently, mutations and deletions in the GRIN2A gene have been identified to predispose to benign and severe idiopathic focal epilepsies (IFE), revealing a higher incidence of GRIN2A alterations among the more severe phenotypes. This study aimed to explore the phenotypic boundaries of GRIN2A

  18. Frequency and Etiology of ADHD in New Onset Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence, complications and etiology of ADHD were determined in 75 children (age 8-18 years with new/recent onset idiopathic epilepsy nd 62 healthy first-degree cousin controls, in a study at University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI; and Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, North Chicago, IL.

  19. History of epilepsy: nosological concepts and classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Peter

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide insight into the development of the nosological views of the epilepsies, from prehistoric times to the present, and highlight how these views are reflected by terminology and classification. Even the earliest written documents reveal awareness that there are multiple forms of epilepsy, and it is surprising that they should be included under the same disease concept, perhaps because the generalised tonic-clonic seizure served as a common denominator. The Hippocratic doctrine that the seat of epilepsy is in the brain may be rooted in earlier knowledge of traumatic seizures. Galenus differentiated cases where the brain was the primary site of origin from others where epilepsy was concomitant with illness in other parts of the body. This laid the fundament for the distinction between idiopathic and symptomatic epilepsies, the definition of which changed considerably over time. The description of the multiple seizure types as they are known at present started in the late 18th century. Attempts to classify seizure types began in the late 19th century, when Jackson formulated a comprehensive pathophysiological definition of epilepsy. Electroencephalography supported a second dichotomy, between seizures with localised onset and others with immediate involvement of both hemispheres which became known as "generalised". In recent years, advanced methods of studying brain function in vivo, including the generation of both spontaneous and reflex epileptic seizures, have revolutionised our understanding of focal and "generalised" human ictogenesis. Both involve complex neuronal networks which are currently being investigated.

  20. The history of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genton, Pierre; Gelisse, Philippe

    2013-07-01

    Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) has been the subject of intensive research over the past 25years. It was discovered stepwise in Switzerland and France in the 19th century, adequately described in Germany and Uruguay in the 1950s, and rediscovered in North America in the early 1980s. Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy represents the most common idiopathic epilepsy syndrome. As a tribute to the primary author of the first extensive and detailed clinical description of JME, it is also called the Janz syndrome. Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy is an archetypical epileptic syndrome, with a fairly homogenous presentation and a still largely unknown etiology. Its clinical spectrum now includes cognitive and psychiatric symptoms as significant copathologies, and the elucidation of its probably multiple genetic mechanisms is an ongoing process. Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy may not qualify as a "benign" epilepsy, but seizures in most patients can be managed adequately and patients will not suffer severe limitations in their lifetime expectations. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force recommendations for a veterinary epilepsy-specific MRI protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rusbridge, Clare; Long, Sam; Jovanovik, Jelena

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common chronic neurological diseases in veterinary practice. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is regarded as an important diagnostic test to reach the diagnosis of idiopathic epilepsy. However, given that the diagnosis requires the exclusion of other differentials...... sequences, imaging planes and/or particular techniques used in performing the MRI scan. As a result, there is a need to standardize MRI examination in veterinary patients with techniques that reliably diagnose subtle lesions, identify post-seizure changes, and which will allow for future identification...

  2. Antiepileptic drug withdrawal in dogs with epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Kaspar Gesell

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders in dogs and is treated by chronic administration of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs. In humans with epilepsy, it is common clinical practice to consider drug withdrawal after a patient has been in remission (seizure free for three or more years, but withdrawal is associated with the risk of relapse. In the present study, the consequences of AED withdrawal were studied in dogs with epilepsy. Therefore, 200 owners of dogs with idiopathic or presumed idiopathic epilepsy were contacted by telephone interview, 138 cases could be enrolled. In 11 cases the therapy had been stopped after the dogs had become seizure free for a median time of 1 year. Reasons for AED withdrawal were appearance or fear of adverse side effects, financial aspects and the idea that the medication could be unnecessary. Following AED withdrawal, 4 of these dogs remained seizure free, 7 dogs suffered from seizure recurrence, of which only 3 dogs could regain seizure freedom after resuming AED therapy. Due to the restricted case number, an exact percentage of dogs with seizure recurrence after AED withdrawal cannot be given. However, the present study gives a hint that similar numbers as in human patients are found, and the data can help owners of epileptic dogs and the responsible clinician to decide when and why to stop antiepileptic medication.

  3. Antiepileptic Drug Withdrawal in Dogs with Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesell, Felix Kaspar; Hoppe, Sonja; Löscher, Wolfgang; Tipold, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders in dogs and is treated by chronic administration of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). In human beings with epilepsy, it is common clinical practice to consider drug withdrawal after a patient has been in remission (seizure free) for three or more years, but withdrawal is associated with the risk of relapse. In the present study, the consequences of AED withdrawal were studied in dogs with epilepsy. Therefore, 200 owners of dogs with idiopathic or presumed idiopathic epilepsy were contacted by telephone interview, 138 cases could be enrolled. In 11 cases, the therapy had been stopped after the dogs had become seizure free for a median time of 1 year. Reasons for AED withdrawal were appearance or fear of adverse side effects, financial aspects, and the idea that the medication could be unnecessary. Following AED withdrawal, four of these dogs remained seizure free, seven dogs suffered from seizure recurrence, of which only three dogs could regain seizure freedom after resuming AED therapy. Due to the restricted case number, an exact percentage of dogs with seizure recurrence after AED withdrawal cannot be given. However, the present study gives a hint that similar numbers as in human patients are found, and the data can help owners of epileptic dogs and the responsible clinician to decide when and why to stop antiepileptic medication.

  4. Association of Family History of Epilepsy with Earlier Age Onset of Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, Mohammad Reza; Najafi, Mohammad Amin; Safaei, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) is supposedly the most frequent subtype of idiopathic generalized epilepsies (IGE). The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of JME and comparison of patients' demographics as well as timeline of the disease between positive family history epileptic patients (PFHE) and negative family history epileptic patients (NFHE) among sample of Iranian epileptic patients. From Feb. 2006 to Oct. 2009, 1915 definite epileptic patients (873 females) referred to epilepsy clinics in Isfahan, central Iran, were surveyed and among them, 194 JME patients were diagnosed. JME was diagnosed by its specific clinical and EEG criteria. Patients were divided into two groups as PFHE and NFHE and data were compared between them. JME was responsible for 10% (194 patients) of all types of epilepsies. Of JME patients, 53% were female. In terms of family history of epilepsy, 40% were positive. No significant differences was found between PFHE and NFHE groups as for gender (P>0.05). Age of epilepsy onset was significantly earlier in PFHE patients (15 vs. 22 yr, Phistory of epilepsy might be associated with an earlier age of onset in patients with JME.

  5. Epilepsy diagnostic and treatment needs identified with a collaborative database involving tertiary centers in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipaux, Mathilde; Szurhaj, William; Vercueil, Laurent; Milh, Mathieu; Villeneuve, Nathalie; Cances, Claude; Auvin, Stéphane; Chassagnon, Serge; Napuri, Sylvia; Allaire, Catherine; Derambure, Philippe; Marchal, Cécile; Caubel, Isabelle; Ricard-Mousnier, Brigitte; N'Guyen The Tich, Sylvie; Pinard, Jean-Marc; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; de Baracé, Claire; Kahane, Philippe; Gautier, Agnès; Hamelin, Sophie; Coste-Zeitoun, Delphine; Rosenberg, Sarah-Dominique; Clerson, Pierre; Nabbout, Rima; Kuchenbuch, Mathieu; Picot, Marie-Christine; Kaminska, Anna

    2016-05-01

    To obtain perspective on epilepsy in patients referred to tertiary centers in France, and describe etiology, epilepsy syndromes, and identify factors of drug resistance and comorbidities. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of the characteristics of 5,794 pediatric and adult patients with epilepsy included in a collaborative database in France between 2007 and 2013. Comparisons between groups used Student's t-test or Fisher's exact test for binary or categorical variables. Factors associated with drug resistance and intellectual disability were evaluated in multi-adjusted logistic regression models. Mean age at inclusion was 17.9 years; children accounted for 67%. Epilepsy was unclassified in 20% of patients, and etiology was unknown in 65%, including those with idiopathic epilepsies. Etiologies differed significantly in adult- when compared to pediatric-onset epilepsy; however, among focal structural epilepsies, mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis began as often in the pediatric as in adult age range. Drug resistance concerned 53% of 4,210 patients evaluable for seizure control and was highest in progressive myoclonic epilepsy (89%), metabolic diseases (84%), focal cortical dysplasia (70%), other cortical malformations (69%), and mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (67%). Fifty-nine percent of patients with focal structural epilepsy and 69% with epileptic encephalopathies were drug resistant; however, 40-50% of patients with West syndrome and epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spike-and-waves during sleep were seizure-free. Ages at onset in infancy and in young adults shared the highest risk of drug resistance. Epilepsy onset in infancy comprised the highest risk of intellectual disability, whereas specific cognitive impairment affected 36% of children with idiopathic focal epilepsy. Our study provides a snapshot on epilepsy in patients referred to tertiary centers and discloses needs for diagnosis and treatment

  6. Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Jason A; Schweder, Patrick M; Mews, Peter J; Patel, Rakesh; Law, Andrew J J

    2010-09-01

    Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome is a severe childhood epilepsy syndrome characterised by the diagnostic triad of a slow spike and wave pattern on electroencephalogram, multiple seizure types and developmental delay. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is a syndrome characterised by raised cerebrospinal fluid pressure in the absence of an intracranial mass lesion or ventricular dilatation and often headache. We present the first reported case of Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome associated with symptomatic idiopathic intracranial hypertension in a 15 year old male, requiring cerebrospinal fluid diversion by means of ventriculoperitoneal shunting. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Seizure precipitants (triggering factors) in patients with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferlisi, Monica; Shorvon, Simon

    2014-04-01

    adult epilepsy clinic population: (a) to identify the frequency of seizure precipitants (triggering factors) and their relative frequency in those with psychiatric disorders, and in those in remission or with active epilepsy, differences in frequency with regard to gender, seizure duration, number of drugs taken; (b) to determine which precipitants patients most commonly report; and (c) to identify differences in the distribution of precipitants among generalized, temporal, and extratemporal epilepsies. Consecutive patients attending a tertiary-care epilepsy clinic were prospectively and an open personal interview to identify and characterize seizure precipitants. Information about the epilepsy and clinical characteristics of patients was collected during the interview and from medical records. Of 104 patients, 97% cited at least one precipitant. Stress, sleep deprivation, and fatigue were the most frequently reported precipitants. Patients with psychological comorbidities reported a greater percentage of seizures with seizure precipitants. Patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy seemed to be more sensitive to seizures during awakening and sleep deprivation, patients with extratemporal epilepsy reported more frequent seizures during sleep. There were no differences in frequency or type of seizure precipitants with regard to gender, seizure duration or frequency, and the number of antiepileptic drugs taken. The findings may have implications for the better management of epilepsy by increasing a focus on nonpharmacological therapy. The implications of the findings for nosology and causation of epilepsy are also briefly discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Intellectual functioning in children with epilepsy: Frontal lobe epilepsy, childhood absence epilepsy and benign epilepsy with centro-temporal spikes

    OpenAIRE

    Lopes, Ana Filipa; Simões, Mário R.; Monteiro, José Paulo; Fonseca, Maria José; Martins, Cristina; Ventosa, Lurdes; Lourenço, Laura; Robalo, Conceição

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of our study is to describe intellectual functioning in three common childhood epilepsy syndromes - frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE), childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) and benign epilepsy with centro-temporal spikes (BECTS). And also to determine the influence of epilepsy related variables, type of epilepsy, age at epilepsy onset, duration and frequency of epilepsy, and treatment on the scores.

  9. Idiopathic lymphocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholamin, Mehran; Bazi, Ali; Abbaszadegan, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic CD4⁺ lymphocytopenia (ICL) is defined by the reduction of the main lymphocyte subtype in peripheral blood and CD4⁺ T cells below 300/μl in the absence of any secondary known causes of lymphopenia, including viral causes. The present review aims to state the latest available data on clinical, pathological and therapeutic aspects related to ICL, published from 1990 to 2014. The last observed clinical presentation and complications of ICL patients are described. The latest findings and possible mechanisms involved in the development of ICL features are included in the present review; however, pathogenesis of ICL has remained mainly obscured. Finally, recent therapeutic efforts considered in ICL patients are discussed. In spite of the serious complications ICL has on the patients' quality of life, data on clinical, etiopathological and therapeutic behavior for ICL are very limited. On one side, an abnormal blood cell count may be the sole presentation; however, occurrence of disseminated malignant tumors is not uncommon in patients. Recent findings highlight the role of cytokines, especially interleukin-2, on features such as phenotype severity and responsiveness of the condition to therapy. In addition, some studies have suggested that a defect in hematopoietic stem cells may be involved in disease progression, an idea that is supported by the success of bone marrow transplantation in acquiring persistent remissions in ICL patients. ICL is a hematologic condition of increasing importance due to its diverse clinical and pathological spectrum. Molecular studies have shown the presence of mutations involved in lymphocyte development as potential factors that may contribute to ICL occurrence. ICL patients could present either with common infections or really serious malignant conditions. The role of cytokines, especially interleukin-2, has emerged as one of the main possible mechanisms involved in clinical and pathological behavior of ICL. Today, the main

  10. [Efficacy of topiramate in childhood epilepsies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Masao; Oyazato, Yoshinobu; Nishiyama, Atsushi; Murase, Masanori; Ishida, Akihito

    2010-09-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of topiramate (TPM) for the treatment of children with epilepsies, we introduced TPM to 45 patients whose epilepsy began in childhood and whose ages ranged from 4 months to 30 years old (mean age: 11 years 7 months). Thirteen of these patients had been diagnosed with generalized epilepsy (GE) (1 cryptogenic, 12 symptomatic), 30 with localization-related epilepsy (LRE) (7 idiopathic, 23 symptomatic), and 2 with unclassified epilepsy [1 case of severe myoclonic epilepsy in infancy (SMEI), 1 case of epilepsy with continuous spikes and waves during slow sleep (CSWS)]. The initial dose of TPM was 1.97 +/- 0.45 mg/kg/day, followed by a slow titration to the maximum dose of 7.32 +/- 1.32 mg/kg/day. After a mean treatment period of 13.5 months (range 4-20 months), the rate of reduction in seizure frequency by more than 50% [50% responder rate (50% RR)] and the rate of complete remission (seizure-free) were 53.8% and 23.1%, respectively, in patients with GE, and 73.3% and 23.3%, respectively, in patients with LRE. TPM was significantly effective against many seizure types including tonic, clonic, complex partial, myoclonic, and atypical absence seizures. Adverse effects included sleepiness in 13 cases (28.9%), weight loss in 6 cases (13.3%), and metabolic acidosis in 2 cases (4.4%); all of these effects were both mild and transient. In conclusion, TPM is effective and safe for the treatment of pediatric epilepsies.

  11. Antiarrhythmic drugs and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowicz, Kinga K; Banach, Monika

    2014-08-01

    For a long time it has been suspected that epilepsy and cardiac arrhythmia may have common molecular background. Furthermore, seizures can affect function of the central autonomic control centers leading to short- and long-term alterations of cardiac rhythm. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) has most likely a cardiac mechanism. Common elements of pathogenesis create a basis for the assumption that antiarrhythmic drugs (AADs) may affect seizure phenomena and interact with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Numerous studies have demonstrated anticonvulsant effects of AADs. Among class I AADs (sodium channel blockers), phenytoin is an established antiepileptic drug. Propafenone exerted low anti-electroshock activity in rats. Lidocaine and mexiletine showed the anticonvulsant activity not only in animal models, but also in patients with partial seizures. Among beta-blockers (class II AADs), propranolol was anticonvulsant in models for generalized tonic-clonic and complex partial seizures, but not for myoclonic convulsions. Metoprolol and pindolol antagonized tonic-clonic seizures in DBA/2 mice. Timolol reversed the epileptiform activity of pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) in the brain. Furthermore, amiodarone, the representative of class III AADs, inhibited PTZ- and caffeine-induced convulsions in mice. In the group of class IV AADs, verapamil protected mice against PTZ-induced seizures and inhibited epileptogenesis in amygdala-kindled rats. Verapamil and diltiazem showed moderate anticonvulsant activity in genetically epilepsy prone rats. Additionally, numerous AADs potentiated the anticonvulsant action of AEDs in both experimental and clinical conditions. It should be mentioned, however, that many AADs showed proconvulsant effects in overdose. Moreover, intravenous esmolol and intra-arterial verapamil induced seizures even at therapeutic dose ranges. Copyright © 2014 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o

  12. Familial risks for epilepsy among siblings based on hospitalizations in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemminki, Kari; Li, Xinjun; Johansson, Sven-Erik; Sundquist, Kristina; Sundquist, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common disabling condition, with high heritability according to twin studies. Characterization of familial risks for common subtypes of epilepsy will advance the search for the heritable causes of these conditions and their underlying mechanisms. We aim at defining familial risks for siblings to be hospitalized because of epilepsy. A nationwide ad hoc epilepsy database was constructed by linking the Multigeneration Register on 0- to 69-year-old siblings to the Hospital Discharge Register for data on epilepsies covering the years 1987-2001. Standardized risk ratios (SIRs) were calculated for affected sibling pairs by comparing them to those whose siblings had no epilepsy. Among a total of 26,799 hospitalized cases, 598 affected siblings were identified with a familial SIR of 2.35; the SIR was highest at ages 0-4 years (6.82). Infantile spasms showed the highest risk for any subtype (10.45), when a co-sibling was diagnosed with any epilepsy. When both siblings were diagnosed with a concordant (same) subtype of epilepsy, the SIRs were high, i.e. 8.43 for generalized idiopathic epilepsy, 2.56 for partial epilepsy, 24.72 for status epilepticus and 24.39 for other epilepsies. Generalized idiopathic epilepsy was also associated with grand mal (4.06) and other epilepsies (7.61). The numbers of cases were small but concordant diagnoses always showing higher SIRs compared with discordant diagnoses. Within the limits of the present sample size, our results suggest high familial aggregation for certain subtypes of epilepsy for which distinct genetic mechanisms may underlie.

  13. American Epilepsy Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Coding Episodes of Care Practice Management Course Quality Measures PRACTICE TOOLS Cognitive Behavior Employment Resources Medications that provoke seizures Transition Tools: Adolescents Women with Epilepsy EPILEPSY MONITORING UNITS EMU FAQs EMU Safety Find an Epilepsy Center ...

  14. Epilepsy or seizures - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000128.htm Epilepsy or seizures - discharge To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You have epilepsy . People with epilepsy have seizures. A seizure is ...

  15. A Population-Based Study of Long-term Outcomes of Cryptogenic Focal Epilepsy in Childhood: Cryptogenic Epilepsy is NOT Probably Symptomatic Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirrell, Elaine C; Grossardt, Brandon R; So, Elson L; Nickels, Katherine C

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To compare long-term outcome in a population-based group of children with cryptogenic vs symptomatic focal epilepsy diagnosed from 1980–2004 and to define the course of epilepsy in the cryptogenic group. Methods We identified all children residing in Olmsted County, MN, 1 month through 17 years with newly diagnosed, non-idiopathic focal epilepsy from 1980–2004. Children with idiopathic partial epilepsy syndromes were excluded. Medical records were reviewed to determine etiology, results of imaging and EEG studies, treatments used, and long-term outcome. Children were defined as having symptomatic epilepsy if they had a known genetic or structural/metabolic etiology, and as cryptogenic if they did not. Key Findings Of 359 children with newly-diagnosed epilepsy, 215 (60%) had non-idiopathic focal epilepsy. Of these, 206 (96%) were followed for more than 12 months. Ninety five children (46%) were classified as symptomatic. Median follow-up from diagnosis was similar in both groups, being 157 months (25%ile, 75%ile 89, 233) in the cryptogenic group vs 134 months (25%ile, 75%ile 78, 220) in the symptomatic group (p=0.26). Of 111 cryptogenic cases, 66% had normal cognition. Long-term outcome was significantly better in those with cryptogenic vs symptomatic etiology (intractable epilepsy at last follow-up, 7% vs 40%, p<0.001; seizure-freedom at last follow-up, 81% vs 55%, p<0.001). Of those who achieved seizure-freedom at final follow-up, 68% of the cryptogenic group versus only 46% of the symptomatic group were off antiepileptic medications (p=0.01). One third of the cryptogenic group had a remarkably benign disorder, with no seizures seen after initiation of medication, or in those who were untreated, after the second afebrile seizure. A further 5% had seizures within the first year but remained seizure-free thereafter. With the exception of perinatal complications, which predicted against seizure remission, no other factors were found to significantly

  16. Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (Pseudotumor Cerebri)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (Pseudotumor Cerebri) En Español Read in Chinese What is idiopathic intracranial hypertension? Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a disorder that ...

  17. Idiopathic arterial calcification in childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Maya [Department of Paediatric Radiology, Red Cross Children' s Hospital, Cape Town (South Africa); Red Cross Children' s Hospital, School of Child and Adolescent Health, University of Cape Town, Klipfontein Road, Rondebosch, Cape Town (South Africa); Andronikou, Savvas; Solomon, Rustum; Sinclair, Paul; McCulloch, Mignon [Department of Paediatric Radiology, Red Cross Children' s Hospital, Cape Town (South Africa)

    2004-08-01

    Idiopathic arterial calcification in infancy is usually fatal with death in early life and diagnosis at post mortem. This report describes a unique, late presentation with hypertension and cardiac failure in a child aged 33 months, found to have widespread arterial calcification at radiological imaging. The calcium-phosphate axis was normal and there was no other demonstrable cause for calcification. Additionally, the histological features of arterial calcification at renal biopsy paralleled the findings in infants with this disorder. The late presentation in this case is unusual and has not been previously reported. Ultrasound and CT are sensitive for calcification, and the disease should be suspected in children presenting with cardiac or respiratory manifestations and features of arterial calcification, where no metabolic cause is established. (orig.)

  18. Posterior asymmetry and idiopathic scoliosis

    CERN Document Server

    Rousie, D L; Berthoz, A

    2009-01-01

    Study design Are there neuro-anatomical abnormalities associated with idiopathic scoliosis (IS)? Posterior Basicranium (PBA) reflects cerebellum growth and contains vestibular organs, two structures suspected to be involved in scoliosis. Objective The aim of this study was to compare posterior basicranium asymmetry (PBA) in Idiopathic scoliosis (IS) and normal subjects. Method: To measure the shape of PBA in 3D, we defined an intra-cranial frame of reference based on CNS and guided by embryology of the neural tube. Measurements concerned three directions of space referred to a specific intra cranial referential. Data acquisition was performed with T2 MRI (G.E. Excite 1.5T, mode Fiesta). We explored a scoliosis group of 76 women and 20 men with a mean age of 17, 2 and a control group of 26 women and 16 men, with a mean age of 27, 7. Results: IS revealed a significant asymmetry of PBA (Pr>|t|<.0001) in 3 directions of space compared to the control group. This asymmetry was more pronounced in antero-posterior...

  19. The electroclinical-semiology of generalized tonic-clonic seizures among different epilepsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, S P; Wang, F; Zhang, Y; Wang, J

    2015-11-01

    The study reported here discusses the duration of the generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS) among frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE), medial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) and idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE). The study was done by analyzing the data from patients who had undergone video-EEG in 2009 and had GTCS during the monitoring. The patients were selected for the frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE), medial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE), and idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE). Once they met the criteria, the durations of all the phases were measured, then discussed if there were any difference in duration for different epilepsies. On comparison of the total duration of various types of seizures it was found that the duration of FLE (177 ± 212.6 sec.) was significantly different from the duration of MTLE (104.6 ± 51.8 sec.) and IGE (63.9 ± 28.2 sec.). It can be found in the comparison of GTCS that the duration of phase 6,7 of FLE (63.5 ± 30.9 sec.) was statistically significant compared with MTLE (37.3 ± 13.8 sec.) and IGE (46.4 ± 30.1 sec.). The duration of various types of epilepsy in the generalized tonic-clonic period was not statistically significant. Through this study, we found the differences of the duration of different types of epilepsies that provide the clinical basis for further studies of seizure mechanism and neural network conduction.

  20. Importance of genetic factors in the occurrence of epilepsy syndrome type: a twin study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corey, Linda A; Pellock, John M; Kjeldsen, Marianne J; Nakken, Karl Otto

    2011-11-01

    Although there is strong evidence that genetic factors contribute to risk for epilepsy, their role in the determination of syndrome type is less clear. This study was undertaken to address this question. Information related to epilepsy was obtained from twins included in 455 monozygotic and 868 dizygotic pairs ascertained from population-based twin registries in Denmark, Norway and the United States. Syndrome type was determined based on medical record information and detailed clinical interviews and classified using the International Classification Systems for the Epilepsies and Epileptic Syndromes. Concordance rates were significantly increased in monozygotic versus dizygotic pairs for all major syndrome groups except localization-related cryptogenic epilepsy. Among generalized epilepsies, genetic factors were found to play an important role in the determination of childhood absence, juvenile absence, juvenile myoclonic, and idiopathic generalized epilepsy; and to a lesser degree for epilepsies with grand mal seizures on awakening. Among localization-related epilepsies, genetic factors contributed to risk for localization-related idiopathic and symptomatic syndromes overall, but did not appear to play an important role in determining risk for frontal, occipital or temporal lobe epilepsy. These results suggest that, while genetic factors contribute to risk for major syndrome types, determined when possible, their contribution to risk for localization-related syndrome sub-types, as defined by specific focality, may be modest. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Idiopathic Opticochiasmatic Arachnoiditis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lessell, Simmons; E. Grzybowski, Andrzej

    A critical review of the literature indicates that idiopathic opticochiasmatic arachnoiditis, once considered an important consideration in patients with otherwise unexplained optic atrophy, is not a...

  2. Vagus nerve stimulation in the treatment of drug-resistant epilepsy in 29 children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodin, Emilie; Le Moing, Anne-Gaëlle; Bourel-Ponchel, Emilie; Querne, Laurent; Toussaint, Patrick; Berquin, Patrick

    2016-05-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) has been demonstrated to be safe and effective for adults and children with drug-resistant epilepsy and is able to improve most types of epilepsy. The aim of this study, in a paediatric population, was to assess the overall efficacy of vagus nerve stimulation on seizures, to assess tolerability and quality of life. This single-centre, retrospective study reviewed the files of 29 children in whom a vagus nerve stimulator was implanted between 1995 and 2012. The response rate (greater than 50% reduction of the seizure frequency), antiepileptic efficacy according to the type of epilepsy or age at implantation or age at onset of epilepsy, the time-course of seizures, adverse effects, overall quality of life and number of hospitalisations were studied. In our population, vagus nerve stimulation achieved a significant reduction in the seizure frequency throughout follow-up (p = 0.015). Response rates were 59% at 3 months, and 66% at 6 months, and the response rate then remained stable at about 70%. Stimulation tended to be more effective in patients with non-idiopathic partial epilepsy than in patients with non-idiopathic and idiopathic generalised epilepsy (0.01 Vagus nerve stimulation is a safe and effective treatment option in children with drug-resistant epilepsy who are not candidates for surgery. Copyright © 2016 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [Lamotrigine in refractory epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Escrivà, A; López-Hernández, N; Alvarez-Saúco, M; Pampliega-Pérez, A; Oliver-Navarrete, C; Asensio-Asensio, M; Moltó-Jordá, J M; Palao-Sánchez, A

    Lamotrigine (LTG) is a new antiepileptic drug indicated in all kinds of partial and generalised clonic-tonic seizures, both in monotherapy and polytherapy. Between 20 and 30% of epileptic patients have poor control over their seizures despite adequate treatment. We report on our experience regarding the long-term efficacy and tolerability of LTG in refractory seizures. We conducted a consecutive 10-year study of patients who began LTG therapy following poor control of their seizures, in spite of being treated with two or more antiepileptic drugs in monotherapy or in combination. Both their epidemiological and clinical data were collected for study. We studied the efficacy of the treatment, differentiating between remission (absence of seizures), improvement (reduction>50% of the seizures), inefficacy (reductionepilepsy, in 28.5% it was symptomatic and in the remaining 28.5% it was idiopathic. EEG readings and neuroimaging scans were pathological in 53.8% and 43.6%, respectively. After beginning therapy with LTG, 33% remained free of seizures, 43.6% improved, in 18.3% it was seen to be ineffective and 5.1% got worse. Dropout rate was 56.4%:23.1% due to insufficient control over the seizures, 17.9% owing to side effects and 15.4% because of non-compliance. Treatment with LTG offers a high degree of efficacy in the control of seizures in patients with refractory epilepsy, although it is limited by a high dropout rate.

  4. Idiopathic head tremor in English bulldogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevar, Julien; De Decker, Steven; Van Ham, Luc M L; Fischer, Andrea; Volk, Holger A

    2014-02-01

    Idiopathic head tremor (IHT) syndrome is a recognized but poorly characterized movement disorder in English bulldogs (EBs). The data analyzed were collected via a detailed online questionnaire and video recordings. Thirty-eight percent of the population demonstrated IHT. The first presentation was early in life. There was no sex or neutered status predisposition. The condition disappeared with time in 50% of the cases. The direction of the head movement was vertical or horizontal. The number of episodes per day and the duration of the episodes were greatly variable. The majority of episodes occurred at rest. Most of the episodes were unpredictable. And there was no alteration of the mental status for most dogs during the episodes. Stress has been reported as a suspected trigger factor. IHT in EBs can be considered an idiopathic paroxysmal movement disorder. © 2013 Movement Disorder Society.

  5. A case of idiopathic omental hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshimitsu Hosotani

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available With the exception of trauma, intraperitoneal hemorrhage in young women is caused by the high frequency of ectopic pregnancy and ovarian bleeding. Here, we describe a case of idiopathic omental hemorrhage, which is a rare cause of intraperitoneal hemorrhage. Intraperitoneal hemorrhage was suspected in a 38-year-old Japanese woman based on contrast-enhanced computed tomography. Her last menstrual period was 23 days prior, and ovarian bleeding was considered based on bloody ascites revealed by culdocentesis. She underwent emergency surgery for hypovolemic shock. Although both ovaries were of normal size and no abnormal findings were observed, we performed a partial omentectomy because multiple clots were attached only to the greater omentum. Postoperatively, no rebleeding occurred, and she was discharged 11 days after the surgery. Because she did not have a clear history of trauma and underlying disease, idiopathic omental hemorrhage was diagnosed.

  6. Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis

    OpenAIRE

    Sunilkumar, B M; Sathishkumar, K M; Somashekhar, A R; Maiya, P P

    2010-01-01

    Recurrent or chronic pulmonary hemorrhage is rare in children. Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis (IPH) manifests as hemoptysis, diffuse parenchymal infiltrates on chest radiographs and microcytic hypochromic anemia. The hemoptysis present may be mistaken for more common diseases, delaying the diagnosis and further management. Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis is a disorder of unknown etiology. Treatment of IPH includes immunosuppressive drugs along with supportive measures.

  7. Ego functions in epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, A S; Hansen, H; Høgenhaven, H

    1988-01-01

    Two groups of epilepsy patients (28 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and 15 patients with primary generalized epilepsy) entered a study of personality traits related to epilepsy, based on a modification of Bellak's semistructured interview for assessment of ego strength. Two groups of subjects...... than 15 years when the disease began. The number of anticonvulsants administered did not influence the results. No difference on adaptive level of ego functioning was found between the group with primary generalized epilepsy and the group with temporal lobe epilepsy. Similarly, the temporal lobe...... epilepsy group with predominantly right-sided and left-sided EEG changes, respectively, showed similar adaptive levels of ego functioning....

  8. Childhood epilepsy and sleep

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed A Al-Biltagi

    2014-01-01

    Sleep and epilepsy are two well recognized conditions that interact with each other in a complex bi-directional way. Some types of epilepsies have increased activity during sleep disturbing it; while sleep deprivation aggravates epilepsy due to decreased seizure threshold. Epilepsy can deteriorate the sleep-related disorders and at the same time; the parasomnias can worsen the epilepsy. The secretion of sleep-related hormones can also be affected by the occurrence of seizures and supplementat...

  9. Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis complicated by Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hirofumi; Ayusawa, Mamoru; Kato, Masataka; Chou, Ami; Komori, Akiko; Abe, Yuriko; Matsumura, Masaharu; Kamiyama, Hiroshi; Izumi, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Shori

    2015-10-01

    We report the case of a 9-year-old girl with Down syndrome (DS) diagnosed with idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis (IPH). Although acute pneumonia complicated by hemolytic anemia was suspected, IPH was finally diagnosed on bronchoscopy. Treatment with prednisolone achieved good clinical response. An association between IPH and DS was not able to be identified, but immunological issues in DS may contribute to the onset of IPH. Recurrent and intractable respiratory symptoms with marked infiltrative shadows in the bilateral lungs and complicated by severe anemia in patients with DS should suggest IPH. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  10. Pediatric glaucoma suspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kooner K

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Karanjit Kooner,1 Matthew Harrison,1 Zohra Prasla,1 Mohannad Albdour,1 Beverley Adams-Huet21Department of Ophthalmology, 2Department of Clinical Sciences, Division of Biostatistics, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USAPurpose: To report demographic and ocular features of pediatric glaucoma suspects in an ethnically diverse population of North Central Texas.Design: Retrospective cross-sectional chart review.Participants: Subjects included 75 (136 eyes pediatric glaucoma suspects. Patients with one or more of the following risk factors were included: cup-to disc (C/D ratio of ≥0.6; intraocular pressure (IOP ≥21 mmHg; family history of glaucoma; congenital glaucoma in the opposite eye; history of blunt trauma to either eye; and presence of either Sturge–Weber or Axenfeld–Rieger syndrome, or oculodermal melanocytosis.Methods: Data were extracted from electronic patient medical records. Patient records with incomplete data were excluded. The main outcome measures were race, sex, age, IOP, C/D, family history of glaucoma; and glaucoma treatment.Results: Subjects included 28 (37.3% Hispanics, 20 (26.6% African Americans, 20 (26.6% Caucasians, and seven (9.3% Asians. Forty (53.3% of the patients were male. Suspicious optic disc was seen in 57 (76%; elevated IOP in 25 (33.3%; presence of family history in 13 (17.3%, and Sturge–Weber syndrome in nine (12% patients. The average C/D ratio was 0.58±0.2. The C/D ratios of African American (0.65±0.2, Hispanic (0.63±0.2, and Asian (0.62±0.15 patients were significantly greater than those of Caucasians (0.43±0.18; P=0.0004, 0.0003, and 0.0139, respectively. Caucasian patients were the youngest (7.9±4.8 years. Eleven cases (14.7% required medication.Conclusion: Thirty-three point seven percent of patients seen in the glaucoma clinic were glaucoma suspects. The most common risk factors for suspected glaucoma were suspicious optic discs, elevated IOP, and family history

  11. Seizure-related injuries in children and adolescents with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagunju, IkeOluwa A; Oyinlade, Alexander O; Babatunde, Olubusayo D

    2016-01-01

    Children with epilepsy are reported to be at a greater risk of injuries compared with their peers who do not have epilepsy. We set out to determine the frequency and pattern of seizure-related injuries in children with epilepsy seen at the University College Hospital (UCH), Ibadan, Nigeria. Consecutive cases of epilepsy seen at the pediatric neurology clinic of the UCH, Ibadan over a period of 6months were evaluated for injuries in the preceding 12months using a structured questionnaire. These were compared with age- and sex-matched controls. A total of 125 children with epilepsy and 125 age- and sex-matched controls were studied. Injuries occurred more frequently in children with epilepsy than in their peers (p=0.01, OR 1.935, 95% CI 1.142-3.280). Epilepsy was generalized in 80 (64.0%), and localization-related in 45 (36.0%). Idiopathic epilepsy accounted for 74 (59.2%), and the remaining 51 (40.8%) had remote symptomatic epilepsy. Fifty-seven (45.6%) children had suffered seizure-related injuries with multiple injuries in 31 (24.8%). The most frequent were skin/soft tissue lacerations (26.4%), injuries to the tongue and soft tissues of the mouth (19.2%), minor head injuries (15.2%), and dental injuries with tooth loss (8.0%). There was a statistically significant association between seizure frequency and seizure-related injuries (p=0.002). Children on polytherapy had a significantly higher frequency of seizure-related injuries (pinjuries in childhood. High seizure frequency increases the risk of multiple injuries in children with epilepsy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Do antipsychotic drugs increase seizure frequency in epilepsy patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Mitsutoshi; Adachi, Naoto; Akanuma, Nozomi; Hara, Koichiro; Ito, Masumi; Kato, Masaaki; Onuma, Teiichi

    2014-11-01

    To investigate whether addition of antipsychotic drugs (APD) would increase seizure frequency in epilepsy patients who were already treated with anti-epileptic drugs (AED), we compared a one-year seizure control outcome in 150 epilepsy patients with APD treatment for psychiatric conditions and 309 epilepsy patients without APD treatment matched for ages at epilepsy onset and the baseline evaluation and types of epilepsy. The seizure frequency was recorded at the baseline (immediately before the start of APD) and after the 1st, 3rd, 6th and 12th months. The seizure outcome at each of the four follow-up points was compared with the baseline. The seizure outcome was compared between the two groups as a whole and according to the types of epilepsy (idiopathic generalized and partial epilepsies). In the APD group, the seizure outcome was also analyzed according to the types of APD (first and second generation APD and combination of first and second generation APD) and the types of psychiatric conditions (psychosis and non-psychosis). The seizure outcome was significantly better in the APD group than control group at all the four follow-up points. According to the epilepsy types, the improvement in the seizure outcome was only observed in the patients with partial epilepsy. Of the APD group, there was no significant difference in the seizure outcome according to the types of APD or the psychiatric conditions. In epilepsy patients who are already treated with AED, APD treatment seems safe in seizure control outcome for treatment of psychiatric conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  13. Seizure and Psychosocial Outcomes of Childhood and Juvenile Onset Generalized Epilepsies: Wolf in Sheep's Clothing, or Well-Dressed Wolf?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickels, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Studies of generalized electroclinical syndromes can provide guidance regarding long-term seizure, cognitive, and psychosocial outcomes. Childhood absence epilepsy, juvenile absence epilepsy, juvenile myoclonic epilepsy, and idiopathic generalized epilepsy with generalized tonic-clonic seizures alone are electroclinical syndromes typically associated with normal intellect and good response to antiseizure medications. However, studies have demonstrated significantly poorer psychosocial outcomes than expected for these syndromes, regardless of seizure control. Potential causes for this include underlying abnormalities in social skills, social stigma, and underlying abnormalities in brain development and maturation.

  14. Intellectual functioning in children with epilepsy: Frontal lobe epilepsy, childhood absence epilepsy and benign epilepsy with centro-temporal spikes

    OpenAIRE

    Lopes, Ana Filipa; Simões, Mário Rodrigues; Monteiro, José Paulo; Fonseca, Maria José; Martins, Cristina; Ventosa, Lurdes; Lourenço, Laura; Robalo, Conceição

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of our study is to describe intellectual functioning in three common childhood epilepsy syndromes – frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE), childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) and benign epilepsy with centro-temporal spikes (BECTS). And also to determine the influence of epilepsy related variables, type of epilepsy, age at epilepsy onset, duration and frequency of epilepsy, and treatment on the scores. Methods Intellectual functioning was examined in a group of 90 children wit...

  15. Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy--neuroimaging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koepp, Matthias J; Woermann, Friedrich; Savic, Ivanka; Wandschneider, Britta

    2013-07-01

    Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) has been classified as a syndrome of idiopathic generalized epilepsy and is characterized by specific types of seizures, showing a lack of pathology using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography scanning. However, JME is associated with a particular personality profile, and behavioral and neuropsychological studies have suggested the possible involvement of frontal lobe dysfunction. The development of highly sensitive neuroimaging techniques has provided a means of elucidating the underlying mechanisms of JME. Positron emission tomography demonstrated metabolic and neurotransmitter changes in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex reflecting the particular cognitive and behavioral profile of JME patients. (1)H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy has shown evidence of thalamic dysfunction, which appears to be progressive. Such techniques provide evidence of multi-focal disease mechanisms, suggesting that JME is a frontal lobe variant of a multi-regional, thalamocortical 'network' epilepsy, rather than a generalized epilepsy syndrome. Quantitative MRI revealed significant abnormalities of cortical gray matter in medial frontal areas close to the supplementary motor area and diffusion abnormalities with increased functional coupling between the motor and prefrontal cognitive systems. This altered structural connectivity of the supplementary motor area provides an explanatory framework for the particular imaging findings, seizure type, and seizure-provoking mechanisms in JME. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Nonverbal dichotic test in patients with epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Zazo Ortiz

    Full Text Available Abstract Auditory processing during childhood may be altered if there is any predisposing factor during the course of development. Neurological disorders are among the risk factors for auditory processing disorders. Some studies have shown verbal auditory processing disorder in children with epilepsy. Objective: To verify the performance of children with epilepsy on a nonverbal dichotic test. Methods: Thirty-eight subjects, 23 female and 15 male, ranging from 7 to 16 years of age with neurological diagnosis of idiopathic epilepsy, without clinical or imaging evidence of cerebral lesion were evaluated. Patients were divided into two groups: 23 patients diagnosed with partial seizures and 15 patients with generalized seizures. Illiterate children, children with hearing thresholds exceeding the normal range and with brain lesions confirmed either clinically or by imaging tests were excluded from the study group. Results: Analysis of the performance of epileptic patients with partial and generalized seizures on the Nonverbal Dichotic Test revealed that the majority of patients with epilepsy showed impairments in the test, with no significant differences related to seizure type, generalized or partial. Although patients with partial and generalized seizures performed similarly, all the epileptic patients showed different performance to a normal population. Conclusions: This study revealed a high prevalence of impairments among epileptic patients in relation to nonverbal processing in a dichotic paradigm.

  17. Guidelines for imaging infants and children with recent-onset epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaillard, W.D. [Department of Neuroscience, Children' s National Medical Center, George Washington University, Washington DC (United States); Chiron, C. [Inserm, Hopital Necker-Enfants Malades, Universite Rene Descartes, Paris (France); Cross, H. [Neurosciences Unit, Institute of Child Health, and GreatOrmondStreet Hospital for Children, London (United Kingdom); Harvey, S. [Department of Neurology, Royal Children' s Hospital, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Kuzniecky, R. [Department of Neurology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (US); Hertz-Pannier, L. [Department of Radiology, Hopital Necker-Enfants Malades, Universite Descartes, Paris (FR); CEA-DSV-I2BM-Neurospin, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (FR)

    2009-07-01

    The International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) Subcommittee for Pediatric Neuroimaging examined the usefulness of, and indications for, neuroimaging in the evaluation of children with newly diagnosed epilepsy. The retrospective and prospective published series with n {>=} 30 utilizing computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (1.5 T) that evaluated children with new-onset seizure(s) were reviewed. Nearly 50% of individual imaging studies in children with localization-related new-onset seizure(s) were reported to be abnormal; 15-20% of imaging studies provided useful information on etiology or and seizure focus, and 2-4% provided information that potentially altered immediate medical management. A significant imaging abnormality in the absence of a history of a localization-related seizure, abnormal neurologic examination, or focal electro-encephalography (EEG) is rare. Imaging studies in childhood absence epilepsy, juvenile absence epilepsy, juvenile myoclonic epilepsy, and benign childhood epilepsy with centro-temporal spikes (BECTS) do not identify significant structural abnormalities. Imaging provides important contributions to establishing etiology, providing prognostic information, and directing treatment in children with recently diagnosed epilepsy. Imaging is recommended when localization-related epilepsy is known or suspected, when the epilepsy classification is in doubt, or when an epilepsy syndrome with remote symptomatic cause is suspected. When available, MRI is preferred to CT because of its superior resolution, versatility, and lack of radiation. (authors)

  18. Myoclonic occipital photosensitive epilepsy with dystonia (MOPED): A familial epilepsy syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadleir, Lynette G; Paterson, Sarah; Smith, Katherine R; Redshaw, Natalie; Ranta, Annemarei; Kalnins, Renate; Berkovic, Samuel F; Bahlo, Melanie; Hildebrand, Michael S; Scheffer, Ingrid E

    2015-08-01

    To describe clinical and EEG phenotypes of a family with an unusual familial epilepsy syndrome characterized by myoclonus and dystonia. Family members underwent electroclinical phenotyping including review of EEGs and MRI. DNA from family members was genotyped using Illumina OmniExpress genotyping arrays. Parametric and nonparametric linkage analyses were performed using MERLIN. The disorder followed autosomal dominant (AD) inheritance and affected seven individuals over two generations. Seizures began at a mean of 14.5 years. Six individuals had spontaneous myoclonic seizures, of which five also had photic-induced myoclonus and four had photic-induced occipital seizures. Six individuals had convulsive seizures; generalized in two and focal in four. Photosensitivity was prominent with generalized spike wave and polyspike wave in four individuals of which two also had occipital spikes. MRI scans were normal in the four individuals tested. Extensive metabolic investigation was normal. Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) occurred in two; and JME overlapping with idiopathic photosensitive epilepsy (IPOE) in four individuals. All three affected males had a more severe disorder than the four affected females. Two males had a progressive neurological disorder with progressive myoclonus epilepsy and deterioration in their early 30s. They developed episodes of paroxysmal cervical dystonia with cognitive decline during periods of poor seizure control. One plateaued after years of poor seizure control but remained intractable with periods of deterioration. The other deteriorated with episodes of status dystonicus and status epilepticus, ataxia and a progressive ophthalmoplegia before succumbing at 38 years. Parametric linkage analysis identified three peaks achieving a maximum LOD score of 1.21. Nonparametric analysis identified eight peaks achieving LOD scores above 0.80. These were not statistically significant. This is a novel autosomal dominant familial epilepsy syndrome

  19. Relation between sexual dysfunctions and epilepsy, type of epilepsy, type of antiepileptic drugs: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavone, Carlo; Giacalone, Ninfa; Vella, Marco; Urso, Lidia; Zummo, Leila; Fierro, Brigida

    2017-04-28

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of sexual dysfunctions in males with epilepsy, the type of epilepsy, the frequency of seizures, the type of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), the serum hormonal profile and the presence of psychiatric comorbidity. Sixty-one patients focused on type of epilepsy, frequency of seizures, AEDs, hormonal profile and presence of mood disorders. We excluded all patients with severe neurologic and psychiatric impairment and patient who were not able to fill questionnaires. Mean age was 31.2 years (range 18-50 years); 31 patients (50.8%) had an idiopathic generalised epilepsy and 30 (49.2%) a focal epilepsy; among them, latter 18 (60%) had probably symptomatic type and 12 (40%) symptomatic type. Sexual functions were evaluated by "International Inventory of Erectile Function" questionnaire. Out of 61 enrolled patients, 22 (36.7%) showed sexual dysfunctions: erectile dysfunctions in 14 (23%), orgasmic dysfunctions in (11.5%) and sexual drive dysfunctions in 12 (19.7%). Out of 61 patients, 36 were subjected to blood measurement of sexual hormones and 21 (58.3%) showed hormonal modifications. Sexual dysfunction are present in 36.7% of enrolled males with epilepsy; there is any association between sexual dysfunctions and various AEDs in the treatment, except for carbamazepine (CBZ); there is not any association between sexual dysfunctions and frequency of seizures; hormonal changes are associated with sexual dysfunction in males with epilepsy treated with AEDs but not with the orgasmic dysfunction; there is not any association between hormonal changes and type of AEDs, except for CBZ; depression is associated with sexual dysfunctions.

  20. Idiopathic opticochiasmatic arachnoiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessell, Simmons; E Grzybowski, Andrzej

    2014-09-01

    : A critical review of the literature indicates that idiopathic opticochiasmatic arachnoiditis, once considered an important consideration in patients with otherwise unexplained optic atrophy, is not a valid disease entity.

  1. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teens With Diabetes Protecting Your Online Identity and Reputation ADHD Medicines Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) KidsHealth > For ... you find foods that have a higher nutritional value to make up for having a poor appetite. ...

  2. Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safak Ekinci

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Scoliosis is called idiopathic when no other underlying disease can be identified. The etiology of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS is still unknown despite many years of research effort. Theories on AIS's etiology have included mechanical, hormonal, metabolic, neuromuscular, growth, and genetic abnormalities. Skeletally immature patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis are at risk of curve progression. The adolescent onset of severe idiopathic scoliosis has traditionally been evaluated using standing posteroanterior radiographs of the full spine to assess lateral curvature with the Cobb method. Scoliosis in children of school age and above primarily occurs in girls. The therapeutic goal in children is to prevent progression. In children, scoliosis of 20 and deg; or more should be treated with a brace, and scoliosis of 45 and deg; or more with surgery. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2014; 3(3.000: 174-182

  3. [Non-structural abnormalities of CNS function resulting in coincidence of endocrinopathies, epilepsy and psychoneurologic disorders in children and adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starzyk, Jerzy; Pituch-Noworolska, Anna; Pietrzyk, Jacek A; Urbanik, Andrzej; Kroczka, Sławomir; Drozdz, Ryszard; Wójcik, Małgorzata

    2010-01-01

    In the population of children and adolescents, epilepsy affects approximately 1% of cases, nonepileptic seizures are seen in approximately 3%, and endocrine disorders are several times more common. For this reason, coincidence of endocrine disorders and epilepsy and psychoneurologic disorders is frequent. Much less common are structural abnormalities (tumors, developmental abnormalities), and especially non-structural CNS abnormalities, resulting in coincidence of both disorders. There are no reports available in the literature that would address the problem. 1) Assessment of the frequency of coincidental epilepsy and endocrine disorders in patients without structural CSN abnormalities treated as outpatients and inpatients of Department of Endocrinology University Children's Hospital of Krakow. 2) Presentation of diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties in these patients, and 3) An attempt at defining the common etiology of both disorders. On the basis of ICD code patients with coincidance of endocrine disorders, epilepsy and psychoneurologic disorders were selected from several thousands of children treated between 2000 and 2009 in Pediatric Endocrinology Department. The neurologic disorders were diagnosed and treated in Chair and Department of Children's and Adolescents Neurology or in another pediatric neurology center. Various forms of epilepsy (symptomatic or idiopathic) and other psychoneurological disorders (disorders of behavior and emotions, obsession-compulsion syndromes, stereotypias, aggression, autoaggression, or hypothalamic obesity) coincident with one or more endocrine disorders, such as growth disorders, disorders of pubertal development, obesity, thyroid diseases, adrenal diseases, hyperprolactinemia, hypoparathyroidism and ion metabolism disorders were diagnosed in 49 patients. The group included: i) children after cranial irradiation and chemotherapy due to medulloblastoma (3 patients), oligodenroglioma (1 patient), ependymoma (1 patient), optic

  4. Contemplating stem cell therapy for epilepsy-induced neuropsychiatric symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao G

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Gautam Rao, Sherwin Mashkouri, David Aum, Paul Marcet, Cesar V Borlongan Department of Neurosurgery and Brain Repair, Center of Excellence for Aging and Brain Repair, University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine, Tampa, FL, USA Abstract: Epilepsy is a debilitating disease that impacts millions of people worldwide. While unprovoked seizures characterize its cardinal symptom, an important aspect of epilepsy that remains to be addressed is the neuropsychiatric component. It has been documented for millennia in paintings and literature that those with epilepsy can suffer from bouts of aggression, depression, and other psychiatric ailments. Current treatments for epilepsy include the use of antiepileptic drugs and surgical resection. Antiepileptic drugs reduce the overall firing of the brain to mitigate the rate of seizure occurrence. Surgery aims to remove a portion of the brain that is suspected to be the source of aberrant firing that leads to seizures. Both options treat the seizure-generating neurological aspect of epilepsy, but fail to directly address the neuropsychiatric components. A promising new treatment for epilepsy is the use of stem cells to treat both the biological and psychiatric components. Stem cell therapy has been shown efficacious in treating experimental models of neurological disorders, including Parkinson’s disease, and neuropsychiatric diseases, such as depression. Additional research is necessary to see if stem cells can treat both neurological and neuropsychiatric aspects of epilepsy. Currently, there is no animal model that recapitulates all the clinical hallmarks of epilepsy. This could be due to difficulty in characterizing the neuropsychiatric component of the disease. In advancing stem cell therapy for treating epilepsy, experimental testing of the safety and efficacy of allogeneic and autologous transplantation will require the optimization of cell dosage, delivery, and timing of transplantation in a

  5. Gender Differences in Epilepsy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Christensen, Jakob; Kjeldsen, Marianne Juel; Andersen, Henning; Friis, Mogens Laue; Sidenius, Per

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to look at gender differences in unselected populations of patients with epilepsy classified according to the 1989 International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) criteria. Methods...

  6. EPILEPSY AND GENETICS

    OpenAIRE

    Kvernmo, Nadja Anette Myrvik

    2006-01-01

    The genetic component of epilepsy has been known for over two millennia. The most commonly reported types of genetic epilepsy show simple Mendelian inheritance. Autosomal dominant inheritance has been found within many families with epilepsy, often with decreased penetrance. Many specific mutations have been discovered involving different channels and receptors, and some may affect other mechanisms. Still, the specific mutations for most types of epilepsies are not known. The present pape...

  7. Genetic and epigenetic mechanisms of epilepsy: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tian; Giri, Mohan; Xia, Zhenyi; Subedi, Yadu Nanda; Li, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common episodic neurological disorder or condition characterized by recurrent epileptic seizures, and genetics seems to play a key role in its etiology. Early linkage studies have localized multiple loci that may harbor susceptibility genes to epilepsy, and mutational analyses have detected a number of mutations involved in both ion channel and nonion channel genes in patients with idiopathic epilepsy. Genome-wide studies of epilepsy have found copy number variants at 2q24.2-q24.3, 7q11.22, 15q11.2-q13.3, and 16p13.11-p13.2, some of which disrupt multiple genes, such as NRXN1, AUTS2, NLGN1, CNTNAP2, GRIN2A, PRRT2, NIPA2, and BMP5, implicated for neurodevelopmental disorders, including intellectual disability and autism. Unfortunately, only a few common genetic variants have been associated with epilepsy. Recent exome-sequencing studies have found some genetic mutations, most of which are located in nonion channel genes such as the LGI1, PRRT2, EFHC1, PRICKLE, RBFOX1, and DEPDC5 and in probands with rare forms of familial epilepsy, and some of these genes are involved with the neurodevelopment. Since epigenetics plays a role in neuronal function from embryogenesis and early brain development to tissue-specific gene expression, epigenetic regulation may contribute to the genetic mechanism of neurodevelopment through which a gene and the environment interacting with each other affect the development of epilepsy. This review focused on the analytic tools used to identify epilepsy and then provided a summary of recent linkage and association findings, indicating the existence of novel genes on several chromosomes for further understanding of the biology of epilepsy. PMID:28761347

  8. Epileptische aanvallen in het kraambed bij een patiënte met idiopathische gegeneraliseerde epilepsie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voermans, N.C.; Zwarts, M.J.; Renier, W.O.; Bloem, B.R.

    2005-01-01

    During her first pregnancy, a 37-year-old woman with idiopathic generalised epilepsy that was adequately controlled with lamotrigine experienced a series of epileptic seizures following an elective caesarean section. The attacks were terminated with diazepam. The following day, she developed

  9. Memory functioning in children with epilepsy: frontal lobe epilepsy, childhood absence epilepsy, and benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Filipa Lopes; José Paulo Monteiro; Maria José Fonseca; Conceição Robalo; Mário Rodrigues Simões

    2014-01-01

    Specific cognitive deficits have been identified in children with epilepsy irrespective of results on intelligence tests. Memory deficits are traditionally attributed to temporal lobe epilepsy, whereas the impact of frontal lobe epilepsy on memory functions has remained controversial. The aim of this study was the examination of memory abilities in other childhood common epilepsy syndromes (frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE), childhood absence epilepsy (CAE), and benign epilepsy with centrotemporal ...

  10. A cohort study of epilepsy among 665,000 insured dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heske, L.; Nødtvedt, A.; Jäderlund, K. Hultin

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to estimate the incidence and mortality rates of epilepsy in a large population of insured dogs and to evaluate the importance of a variety of risk factors. Survival time after a diagnosis of epilepsy was also investigated. The Swedish animal insurance database...... used in this study has previously been helpful in canine epidemiological investigations. More than 2,000,000 dog-years at-risk (DYAR) were available in the insurance database. In total, 5013 dogs had at least one veterinary care claim for epilepsy, and 2327 dogs were euthanased or died because...... of epilepsy. Based on veterinary care claims the incidence rate of epilepsy (including both idiopathic and symptomatic cases) was estimated to be 18 per 10,000 DYAR. Dogs were followed up until they were 10 (for life insurance claims) or 12 years of age (veterinary care claims). Among the 35 most common...

  11. Orofacial reflex myocloni. Definition, relation to epilepsy syndromes, nosological and prognosis significance. A focused review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacubian, Elza Márcia; Wolf, Peter

    2015-08-01

    There is increasing awareness that reflex epileptic mechanisms provide unique insight into ictogenesis in human epilepsies. Among the complex triggers of seizures, this review considers orofacial reflex myocloni (ORM) from the aspects of history and delineation, clinical and electroencephalographic presentation, syndromatic relations, prevalence, mechanisms of ictogenesis and nosological implications, treatment and prognosis. We reviewed all published articles and case reports on ORM in order to clarify clinical and electroencephalographic findings, treatment and outcome. ORM, besides Reading Epilepsy (RE), is closely related to idiopathic generalized epilepsies especially Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy (JME) where hyperexcitability of the network supporting linguistic communication seems to provide the precondition for eliciting reflex myocloni in the perioral muscles active in the precipitating task. The conclusions on ictogenesis derived from ORM support the concept of both, RE and JME, as system disorders of the brain. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Oxcarbazepine-induced myoclonic status epilepticus in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanella, Martina; Egeo, Gabriella; Fattouch, Jinane; Casciato, Sara; Lapenta, Leonardo; Morano, Alessandra; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; Di Bonaventura, Carlo

    2013-06-01

    Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) is a frequent idiopathic generalised epilepsy syndrome with typical clinical and EEG features that can usually be controlled by valproate monotherapy. JME may be underdiagnosed or misdiagnosed; in the latter case, it may be mistaken for partial epilepsy. The incorrect diagnosis of JME is likely to result in inappropriate therapy, which may, in turn, worsen the seizures. While a number of studies have documented that carbamazepine aggravates idiopathic generalised epilepsy, few have shown a worsening of symptoms following the administration of oxcarbazepine (OXC). We report the case of a 44-year-old male affected by JME in which the inappropriate use of OXC precipitated a dramatic worsening of myoclonic seizures. In this case, video-EEG monitoring documented myoclonic status epilepticus with positive and negative myoclonus, correlating with repetitive, continuous, rhythmic, generalised polyspike-and-wave discharges. This is the first case of myoclonic status epilepticus induced by OXC in a patient with JME which is clearly documented by video-EEG. A review of the literature with regards to OXC-induced worsening of seizures is also presented. [Published with video sequences].

  13. CLINICAL AND ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHIC CHANGES IN JUVENILE MYOCLONIC EPILEPSY (A LECTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Yu. Mukhin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME is a form of idiopathic generalized epilepsy characterized by adolescent onset with massive myoclonicseizures and, in most cases, convulsive seizures occurring mainly on awakening. According to the Proposed Diagnostic Schema for Peoplewith Epileptic Seizures and with Epilepsy (2001, JME is classified into a group of idiopathic generalized epilepsy with a variable phenotype. The authors give the genetic bases of the disease, describe its clinical picture in detail, including the atypical course of JME, and consider diagnostic criteria, approaches to patient management, and principles of medical therapy. By taking into account the most common precipitating factors, along with drug therapy, the sleep and wake regimen must be strictly adhered to and household photo stimulation be avoided. Complete medical remission is achieved in about 90 % of patients (on correctly chosen therapy, in most cases on monotherapy. However, the problem resides in high recurrence rates after withdrawal of antiepileptic drugs. The major predictors of increased risk for a recurrence aftertherapy discontinuation are considered.

  14. Seizure semiology of occipital lobe epilepsy in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Hout, B M; Van der Meij, W; Wieneke, G H; Van Huffelen, A C; Van Nieuwenhuizen, O

    1997-11-01

    Occipital lobe epilepsy in children occurs as an idiopathic form, i.e., Benign Epilepsy with Occipital Paroxysms (BEOP), and a symptomatic form. This study attempted to determine whether seizure semiology could distinguish between the two forms. Fifty children (34 boys, 16 girls) with clinical seizures and interictal EEGs presenting occipital spikes were included consecutively in the study. Seizure onset was between the ages of 2 months and 15 years. Epilepsy was considered symptomatic when psychomotor retardation and/or abnormalities at neurological and/or neuroradiological examination were found: 17 children were classified as idiopathic, and the remaining 33 children were classified as symptomatic. Seizure semiology was assessed by means of a structured interview of the children and their parents, using a detailed questionnaire. Seizure semiology was determined to comprise motor (versive or other movements of the eyes, versive movements of the head, (hemiconvulsions), visual, other signs (e.g. vomiting and headache), and impairment of consciousness. There were no statistically significant differences in seizure semiology between the two groups. Seizure semiology cannot distinguish between different forms of occipital lobe epilepsy: Further clinical examination, clinical neurophysiological investigations, and neuroimaging studies are needed for a correct classification.

  15. Epilepsy and Mood Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sermin Kesebir

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Mood disorders are the most common psychiatric comorbid disorder that affects quality of life and prognosis in epilepsy. The relation between depression and epilepsy is bidirectional. Not only the risk of having a depression among epilepsy cases is more than the healthy control cases, but also the risk of having epilepsy among depressive cases is more than the healthy control cases. People diagnosed with epilepsy are five times more likely than their peers to commit suicide. Moreover it seems that some epilepsy types like temporal lobe epilepsy have a much higher risk (25 times for suicide. Risk of suicide in epilepsy, which is independent from depression, increases more with the presence of depression. The common pathway between epilepsy, depression and suicide is hypofrontality and irregularity of serotonin metabolism. Contrary to depression, data on relationship between bipolar disorder and epilepsy is limited. However, mood disorder, mixed episodes with irritable character and mania are more frequent than assumed. As a matter of fact, both disorders share some common features. Both are episodic and can become chronic. Kindling phenomenon, irregularities in neurotransmitters, irregularities in voltage gate ion channels and irregularities in secondary messenger systems are variables that are presented in the etiologies of both disorders. Anticonvulsant drugs with mood regulatory effects are the common points of treatment. Understanding their mechanisms of action will clarify the pathophysiological processes. In this article, the relationhip between epilepsy and mood disorders, comorbidity, secondary states and treatment options in both cases have been discussed.

  16. Technology and the Glaucoma Suspect

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Blumberg, Dana M; De Moraes, Carlos Gustavo; Liebmann, Jeffrey M; Garg, Reena; Chen, Cynthia; Theventhiran, Alex; Hood, Donald C

    2016-01-01

    ...), stereoscopic disc photographs, and automated perimetry as assessed by a group of glaucoma specialists in differentiating individuals with early glaucoma from suspects. Forty-six eyes (46 patients...

  17. Ego functions in epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, A S; Hansen, H; Høgenhaven, H

    1988-01-01

    Two groups of epilepsy patients (28 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and 15 patients with primary generalized epilepsy) entered a study of personality traits related to epilepsy, based on a modification of Bellak's semistructured interview for assessment of ego strength. Two groups of subjects...... served as controls: 15 patients with a non-neurological but relapsing disorder, psoriasis, and 15 healthy volunteers. Compared with the group of healthy volunteers, a decreased adaptive level of ego functioning was found in the epilepsy groups, regardless of seizure types and EEG findings, and...... than 15 years when the disease began. The number of anticonvulsants administered did not influence the results. No difference on adaptive level of ego functioning was found between the group with primary generalized epilepsy and the group with temporal lobe epilepsy. Similarly, the temporal lobe...

  18. Understanding idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markey, Keira A; Mollan, Susan P; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is a disorder characterised by raised intracranial pressure that predominantly affects young, obese women. Pathogenesis has not been fully elucidated, but several causal factors have been proposed. Symptoms can include headaches, visual loss, pulsatile tinnitus...... of the Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial (IIHTT) reported beneficial effects of acetazolamide in patients with mild visual loss. Studies have also established weight loss as an effective disease-modifying treatment, and further clinical trials to investigate new treatments are underway....... The incidence of idiopathic intracranial hypertension is expected to increase as rates of obesity increase; efforts to reduce diagnostic delays and identify new, effective approaches to treatment will be key to meeting the needs of a growing number of patients....

  19. Idiopathic late-onset absence status epilepticus: a case report with an electroclinical 14 years follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pro, Stefano; Vicenzini, Edoardo; Randi, Franco; Pulitano, Patrizia; Mecarelli, Oriano

    2011-10-01

    Late-onset absence status epilepticus (ASE) may be observed in adult and elderly patients as a late complication of idiopathic generalized epilepsy or de novo, usually related to benzodiazepines withdrawal, alcohol intoxication or psychotropic drugs initiation, but without history of epilepsy. EEG may be highly heterogeneous, varying from the 3 to 3.5 Hz spike-wave discharges typical of idiopathic generalized epilepsy to asymmetric irregular sharp and slow wave complexes. We report the clinical and neurophysiologic 14 years follow-up of a now 86 years-old woman, in whom we observed--at the age of 72--an idiopathic late-onset ASE, with a good clinical response to lamotrigine monotherapy, but with the persistence over years of the same interictal 3-3.5 Hz spike-wave epileptic activity at EEG. This case is singular because, with the available long follow-up, indicates that idiopathic generalized epilepsy may also occur in the elderly, with a late-onset ASE presentation. In this condition, it is particularly important to underline the essential role of EEG (urgent and ambulatory) for the diagnosis, management and monitoring of the disease. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [Idiopathic Addison's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodasevich, L S; Sukhanov, S G

    1988-01-01

    Two cases of idiopathic Addison's disease affecting heterozygous twins who died from addisonian crisis at the ages of 7 and 10 years, are described, including descriptions of histologic findings in the adrenals, thymus, hypophysis, kidneys, esophagus, upper respiratory tract, and other viscera. The authors believe that autoimmunization in children with idiopathic Addison's disease develops in the presence of congenitally defective immunity and propose that activation of the juxtaglomerular complex and hypergranulation of interstitial cells in the inner renal medulla may be used as morphologic criteria in the diagnosis of addisonian crisis.

  1. Idiopathic 20-nail dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Camilla; Bygum, Anette

    2016-01-01

    Twenty-nail dystrophy is a rare disease, typically with all 20 nails affected, which normally occurs as an idiopathic condition in childhood but can be linked to other diseases. We report a case of a 7-year-old girl with a 3-year history of 20-nail dystrophy and no associated diseases or family...... history of skin or nail diseases. She was followed and treated conservatively and, after 6 years of follow-up, we found a marked improvement and almost full resolution of her nail dystrophy. The aim of this report is to show that idiopathic 20-nail dystrophy in children is a self-limiting condition...

  2. To treat or not to treat drug-refractory epilepsy by the ketogenic diet? That is the question

    OpenAIRE

    Marzena Ułamek-Kozioł; Ryszard Pluta; Anna Bogucka-Kocka; Stanisław J. Czuczwar

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is a serious neurologic disorder worldwide which affects about 1% of the population (ca. 50 million people), the highest prevalence occurring in both children and elderly. Apart from idiopathic forms, etiology of the disease involves multiple brain risk factors – the most frequent being cerebrovascular diseases, tumours and traumatic injuries. Several treatment options exist, including, for instance, pharmacotherapy, vagal nerve stimulation or epilepsy surgery. In spite of treatment,...

  3. Inherited epilepsy in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekenstedt, Kari J; Oberbauer, Anita M

    2013-05-01

    Epilepsy is the most common neurologic disease in dogs and many forms are considered to have a genetic basis. In contrast, some seizure disorders are also heritable, but are not technically defined as epilepsy. Investigation of true canine epilepsies has uncovered genetic associations in some cases, however, many remain unexplained. Gene mutations have been described for 2 forms of canine epilepsy: primary epilepsy (PE) and progressive myoclonic epilepsies. To date, 9 genes have been described to underlie progressive myoclonic epilepsies in several dog breeds. Investigations into genetic PE have been less successful, with only 1 causative gene described. Genetic testing as an aid to diagnosis, prognosis, and breeding decisions is available for these 10 forms. Additional studies utilizing genome-wide tools have identified PE loci of interest; however, specific genetic tests are not yet developed. Many studies of dog breeds with PE have failed to identify genes or loci of interest, suggesting that, similar to what is seen in many human genetic epilepsies, inheritance is likely complex, involving several or many genes, and reflective of environmental interactions. An individual dog's response to therapeutic intervention for epilepsy may also be genetically complex. Although the field of inherited epilepsy has faced challenges, particularly with PE, newer technologies contribute to further advances. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Epilepsy: Is there hope?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. M. Guerreiro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a highly prevalent chronic neurologic disorder and leads to social, behavioural, health and economic consequences. 'Treatment gap' varies from 10 per cent in developed countries to 75 per cent in low-income countries. Stigma and discrimination related to epilepsy are prevalent worldwide. Electroencephalography (EEG is considered the most important tool for evaluating the patient with epilepsy. Video-EEG monitoring is an important tool for confirming the seizure type and estimating the epileptogenic zone in the brain. Neuroimaging evaluation is important to determine the aetiology of the epilepsies. Genetic testing has increased the probability of identifying the causes of some types of epilepsies. Epilepsy can be treated in an affordable way with low-cost medications. Refractory epilepsies occur in approximately one-third of recently diagnosed patients with epilepsy. For this group of patients, there are options of surgical treatment, diets and neurostimulation to improve seizure control and quality of life. In poorly organized societies, there is a lack of prioritization of epilepsy in national health policies, limited resources for trained personnel and a shortage of basic antiepileptic medications. There is evidence of improvement in the understanding of epilepsy and a clear progress in the management of epileptic seizures in recent times.

  5. Epilepsy coexisting with depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Błaszczyk, Barbara; Czuczwar, Stanisław J

    2016-10-01

    Depression episodes in epilepsy is the most common commorbidity, affecting between 11% and 62% of patients with epilepsy. Although researchers have documented a strong association between epilepsy and psychiatric comorbidities, the nature of this relationship is poorly understood. The manifestation of depression in epilepsy is a complex issue having many interacting neurobiological and psychosocial determinants, including clinical features of epilepsy (seizure frequency, type, foci, or lateralization of foci) and neurochemical or iatrogenic mechanisms. Other risk factors are a family history of psychiatric illness, particularly depression, a lack of control over the seizures and iatrogenic causes (pharmacologic and surgical). In addition, treatment with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) as well as social coping and adaptation skills have also been recognised as risk factors of depression associated with epilepsy. Epilepsy may foster the development of depression through being exposed to chronic stress. The uncertainty and unpredictability of seizures may instigate sadness, loneliness, despair, low self-esteem, and self-reproach in patients with epilepsy and lead to social isolation, stigmatization, or disability. Often, depression is viewed as a reaction to epilepsy's stigma and the associated poor quality of life. Moreover, patients with epilepsy display a 4-5 higher rate of depression and suicide compared with healthy population. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o.

  6. Ketogenic diets in the treatment of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elia, Maurizio; Klepper, Joerg; Leiendecker, Baerbel; Hartmann, Hans

    2017-08-09

    Although a larger number of antiepileptic drugs became available in the last decades, epilepsy remains drug-resistant in approximately a third of patients. Ketogenic diet (KD), first proposed at the beginning of the last century, is complex and has anticonvulsant effects, yet not completely understood. Over the last decades, different types of ketogenic diets (KDs) have been developed, namely classical KD and modified Atkins diet (MAD). They offer an effective alternative for children and adults with drug-resistant epilepsies. We review several papers on KDs as an adjunctive treatment of refractory epilepsy of children and adults, discussing its efficacy and adverse events. Because of the heterogenous, uncontrolled nature of the studies, we analyzed all studies individually, without a meta-analysis. KDs may be considered first choice treatment in some specific metabolic conditions, such as glucose-transporter type 1 and pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiencies, and mitochondrial complex I defects. Preliminary findings indicate that KDs may be specifically effective in some epileptic syndromes, such as West syndrome, severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy, myoclonic-astatic epilepsy, febrile infection related epileptic syndrome, and drug-resistant idiopathic generalized epilepsies or refractory status epilepticus. Short term adverse events are usually mild in both children and adults, including gastrointestinal symptoms, hyperlipidemia, and hypercalciuria; potential long term adverse effects include nephrolitiasis, decreased bone density, and liver steatosis. Possible atherosclerotic effects remain a concern. Patients on KDs should be carefully monitored in specialized centers during initiation, maintenance and withdrawal periods, in order to minimize such adverse events, and to improve compliance. Although the majority of KD trials on children and adults with drug-resistant epilepsies are open-label, uncontrolled studies based on small samples, an increasing number of

  7. Idiopathic ophthalmodynia and idiopathic rhinalgia: two topographic facial pain syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Juan A; Cuadrado, María L; Porta-Etessam, Jesús; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; Gili, Pablo; Caminero, Ana B; Cebrián, José L

    2010-09-01

    To describe 2 topographic facial pain conditions with the pain clearly localized in the eye (idiopathic ophthalmodynia) or in the nose (idiopathic rhinalgia), and to propose their distinction from persistent idiopathic facial pain. Persistent idiopathic facial pain, burning mouth syndrome, atypical odontalgia, and facial arthromyalgia are idiopathic facial pain syndromes that have been separated according to topographical criteria. Still, some other facial pain syndromes might have been veiled under the broad term of persistent idiopathic facial pain. Through a 10-year period we have studied all patients referred to our neurological clinic because of facial pain of unknown etiology that might deviate from all well-characterized facial pain syndromes. In a group of patients we have identified 2 consistent clinical pictures with pain precisely located either in the eye (n=11) or in the nose (n=7). Clinical features resembled those of other localized idiopathic facial syndromes, the key differences relying on the topographic distribution of the pain. Both idiopathic ophthalmodynia and idiopathic rhinalgia seem specific pain syndromes with a distinctive location, and may deserve a nosologic status just as other focal pain syndromes of the face. Whether all such focal syndromes are topographic variants of persistent idiopathic facial pain or independent disorders remains a controversial issue.

  8. Idiopathic benign breast calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, Alissa M; Svensson, William E; Shousha, Sami

    2004-01-01

    A 56-year-old woman who came in for screening mammography was found to have extensive unilateral calcification of her left breast which had developed since her previous screening mammogram. The calcification had a ductal and lobular appearance. Possible known etiologies are discussed, but these do not explain the appearance in this case, implying that the cause is idiopathic.

  9. Idiopathic granulomatous orbital inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mombaerts, I.; Schlingemann, R. O.; Goldschmeding, R.; Koornneef, L.

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE: Granulomatous orbital inflammation may occur as an isolated condition of unknown origin. These idiopathic granulomatous lesions are believed to belong to the orbital pseudotumor group by some authors, whereas others consider them sarcoidosis limited to the orbit. The aim of this study is to

  10. Idiopathic Interstitial Pneumonias

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Most Often Affected Percentage of Affected People Who Smoke Cigarettes Treatment Outlook Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis More frequently, men ... HealthDay Vitamin D Linked to Lower Risk of Respiratory Infections News HealthDay Remede System Approved for Sleep Apnea News HealthDay Nasal Swab ...

  11. Idiopathic Retroperitoneal Hematoma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the early stages it typically presents as generalized abdominal pain, nausea, anorexia. The symptoms and signs of hypovolemic shock normally present late. As management of idiopathic retroperitoneal hematoma is usually conservative, early diagnosis can save the patient an unnecessary exploration. This will improve.

  12. Prevalence and risk factors of seizure clusters in adult patients with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Baibing; Choi, Hyunmi; Hirsch, Lawrence J; Katz, Austen; Legge, Alexander; Wong, Rebecca A; Jiang, Alfred; Kato, Kenneth; Buchsbaum, Richard; Detyniecki, Kamil

    2017-07-01

    In the current study, we explored the prevalence of physician-confirmed seizure clusters. We also investigated potential clinical factors associated with the occurrence of seizure clusters overall and by epilepsy type. We reviewed medical records of 4116 adult (≥16years old) outpatients with epilepsy at our centers for documentation of seizure clusters. Variables including patient demographics, epilepsy details, medical and psychiatric history, AED history, and epilepsy risk factors were then tested against history of seizure clusters. Patients were then divided into focal epilepsy, idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE), or symptomatic generalized epilepsy (SGE), and the same analysis was run. Overall, seizure clusters were independently associated with earlier age of seizure onset, symptomatic generalized epilepsy (SGE), central nervous system (CNS) infection, cortical dysplasia, status epilepticus, absence of 1-year seizure freedom, and having failed 2 or more AEDs (Pclusters than patients with focal epilepsy (16.3%) and IGE (7.4%; all Pclustering in patients across all 3 epilepsy types. In patients with SGE, clusters were associated with perinatal/congenital brain injury. In patients with focal epilepsy, clusters were associated with younger age of seizure onset, complex partial seizures, cortical dysplasia, status epilepticus, CNS infection, and having failed 2 or more AEDs. In patients with IGE, clusters were associated with presence of an aura. Only 43.5% of patients with seizure clusters were prescribed rescue medications. Patients with intractable epilepsy are at a higher risk of developing seizure clusters. Factors such as having SGE, CNS infection, cortical dysplasia, status epilepticus or an early seizure onset, can also independently increase one's chance of having seizure clusters. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Epilepsy after Febrile Seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seinfeld, S. A.; Pellock, J M; Kjeldsen, Lone Marianne Juel

    2016-01-01

    Background A history of complex febrile seizures can increase the risk of epilepsy, but the role of genetic factors is unclear. This analysis evaluated the relationship between febrile seizures and epilepsy. Methods Information on the history of seizures was obtained by a questionnaire from twin...... epilepticus. There were 78 twins who developed epilepsy. The highest rate of epilepsy (22.2%) occurred in the febrile status epilepticus group. Concordance was highest in simple group. Conclusion A twin with febrile status epilepticus is at the highest risk of developing epilepsy, but simple febrile seizures...... and emotional burden. It is currently not possible to accurately identify which children will develop recurrent febrile seizures, epilepsy, or neuropsychological comorbidities. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved....

  14. Personality characteristics and epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, A S; Hansen, H; Andersen, R

    1989-01-01

    Patients with a long history of temporal lobe epilepsy or primary generalized epilepsy entered a questionnaire study of personality characteristics, based on a modification of the Bear-Fedio inventory for temporal lobe behavioural syndrome. Psoriasis patients and healthy volunteers served as cont...... dysfunction in the epilepsy group, the mere presence of a chronic disorder with potential social stigmatization influences personality.......Patients with a long history of temporal lobe epilepsy or primary generalized epilepsy entered a questionnaire study of personality characteristics, based on a modification of the Bear-Fedio inventory for temporal lobe behavioural syndrome. Psoriasis patients and healthy volunteers served...... as controls. Four clinical meaningful dimensions of included personality traits were identified: ixoide, ideational, obsessive-compulsive and affective features. Analyses based on the Rasch model approved of all dimensions except for affective features. The epilepsy group obtained the highest scores on all 3...

  15. Health perception and socioeconomic status following childhood-onset epilepsy: the Dutch study of epilepsy in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geerts, Ada; Brouwer, Oebele; van Donselaar, Cees; Stroink, Hans; Peters, Boudewijn; Peeters, Els; Arts, Willem F

    2011-12-01

    Epilepsy may have far-reaching consequences for patients, other than having seizures and medication. At 15 years after diagnosis, this study investigates health perception, restrictions due to epilepsy, living arrangements (including marital status and offspring), and the educational and occupational attainment of patients with childhood-onset epilepsy. A total of 453 patients with epilepsy had a 5-year follow-up since diagnosis with regular visits and data collection. Ten years later, a questionnaire addressing epilepsy was completed by 413 patients, resulting in a mean follow-up of 15 years. Subjects were compared with age peers of the Dutch population for each etiologic group separately, and also for subjects with/without a 5-year terminal remission regardless of treatment. Age-adjusted standardized incidence rates were calculated for each variable. Subjects with normal intelligence had a health perception comparable with that of the general population, but significantly more subjects without remission had a worse health perception, especially those still using medication. Restrictions and symptoms due to epilepsy were reported by 14% of the subjects, mainly by those without remission or with ongoing medication. The living arrangement of subjects with idiopathic or cryptogenic etiology was similar to that of Dutch persons of the same age (age peers). Subjects with remote symptomatic etiology less often lived independently or with a partner, and more frequently resided in an institution or living group for the disabled. Those with and without remission were more often part of another household, mainly due (in both groups) to having a remote symptomatic etiology. Rates of having a partner and offspring were significantly reduced only for subjects with remote symptomatic etiology. Fewer students with idiopathic/remote symptomatic etiology and students in remission followed higher vocational or scientific education. In these latter groups, the highest attained

  16. Idiopathic neuralgic amyotrophy in children. Case report, 4 year follow up and review of the literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høst, Christian; Skov, Liselotte

    2010-01-01

    Idiopathic neuralgic amyotrophy (INA) is a neurological disorder with a suspected autoimmune cause, and is characterized by a sudden onset of pain and subsequent atrophies of the arm and shoulder muscles. It has rarely been documented in children, but it has been suggested that the prognostic...

  17. Idiopathic neuralgic amyotrophy in children. Case report, 4 year follow up and review of the literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høst, Christian; Skov, Liselotte

    2010-01-01

    Idiopathic neuralgic amyotrophy (INA) is a neurological disorder with a suspected autoimmune cause, and is characterized by a sudden onset of pain and subsequent atrophies of the arm and shoulder muscles. It has rarely been documented in children, but it has been suggested that the prognostic out...

  18. [New treatments in epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo, S

    1999-12-01

    In recent years the treatment of epilepsies has significantly evolved. The launching of six new antiepileptic drugs--vigabatrin, lamotrigine, felbamate, gabapentin, topiramate and tiagabin--has considerably increased the available therapeutic options. On the other hand, the use of no pharmacologic treatments such as surgery of epilepsy, the implantation of the vagal stimulator or cetogenic diets has increased. In the next decade new antiepileptic drugs will probably be available with different mechanisms of actions which will improve the treatment of epilepsy.

  19. Identification of Pharmacoresistant Epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Berg, Anne T.

    2009-01-01

    There is no single definition of pharmacoresistant (intractable, refractory) epilepsy. Prospective identification of pharmacoresistance is complicated by the variability of its appearance across different types of epilepsy as well as the variability of seizure control within a given patient over time. Failure of informative trials of two appropriate antiepileptic drugs has been recommended as a threshold that should trigger referral for evaluation at a comprehensive epilepsy center. Maximizin...

  20. Epilepsy: Indian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandanavana Subbareddy Santhosh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There are 50 million people living with epilepsy worldwide, and most of them reside in developing countries. About 10 million persons with epilepsy are there in India. Many people with active epilepsy do not receive appropriate treatment for their condition, leading to large treatment gap. The lack of knowledge of antiepileptic drugs, poverty, cultural beliefs, stigma, poor health infrastructure, and shortage of trained professionals contribute for the treatment gap. Infectious diseases play an important role in seizures and long-term burden causing both new-onset epilepsy and status epilepticus. Proper education and appropriate health care services can make tremendous change in a country like India. There have been many original researches in various aspects of epilepsy across India. Some of the geographically specific epilepsies occur only in certain regions of our country which have been highlighted by authors. Even the pre-surgical evaluation and epilepsy surgery in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy is available in many centers in our country. This article attempts to provide a complete preview of epilepsy in India.

  1. Approaches to refractory epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerome Engel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is one of the most common serious neurological conditions, and 30 to 40% of people with epilepsy have seizures that are not controlled by medication. Patients are considered to have refractory epilepsy if disabling seizures continue despite appropriate trials of two antiseizure drugs, either alone or in combination. At this point, patients should be referred to multidisciplinary epilepsy centers that perform specialized diagnostic testing to first determine whether they are, in fact, pharmacoresistant, and then, if so, offer alternative treatments. Apparent pharmacoresistance can result from a variety of situations, including noncompliance, seizures that are not epileptic, misdiagnosis of the seizure type or epilepsy syndrome, inappropriate use of medication, and lifestyle issues. For patients who are pharmacoresistant, surgical treatment offers the best opportunity for complete freedom from seizures. Surgically remediable epilepsy syndromes have been identified, but patients with more complicated epilepsy can also benefit from surgical treatment and require more specialized evaluation, including intracranial EEG monitoring. For patients who are not surgical candidates, or who are unwilling to consider surgery, a variety of other alternative treatments can be considered, including peripheral or central neurostimulation, ketogenic diet, and complementary and alternative approaches. When such alternative treatments are not appropriate or effective, quality of life can still be greatly improved by the psychological and social support services offered by multidisciplinary epilepsy centers. A major obstacle remains the fact that only a small proportion of patients with refractory epilepsy are referred for expert evaluation and treatment.

  2. Benign Epilepsy in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sook-Cheng Chan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of benign epilepsy syndrome should meet the following criteria: age-related and self-limited; good response to medication; and no obvious neurological sequelae after seizure. However, the current concept of benign epilepsy syndrome has been challenged because of the advancements in genetic studies, neuroimaging, and molecular techniques. Many studies have revealed that the prevalence of behavioral problems and learning difficulties as well as subtle cognitive deficits is higher among patients with benign epilepsy, compared with the normal population. Here, we review updated results of these studies to show the latest and broad comprehensive knowledge of benign epilepsy in children.

  3. Personality characteristics and epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, A S; Hansen, H; Andersen, R

    1989-01-01

    Patients with a long history of temporal lobe epilepsy or primary generalized epilepsy entered a questionnaire study of personality characteristics, based on a modification of the Bear-Fedio inventory for temporal lobe behavioural syndrome. Psoriasis patients and healthy volunteers served...... as controls. Four clinical meaningful dimensions of included personality traits were identified: ixoide, ideational, obsessive-compulsive and affective features. Analyses based on the Rasch model approved of all dimensions except for affective features. The epilepsy group obtained the highest scores on all 3...... dysfunction in the epilepsy group, the mere presence of a chronic disorder with potential social stigmatization influences personality....

  4. An appraisal of the new operational definition of epilepsy--then and now.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkan, Ashish; Beran, Roy G

    2014-12-01

    The focus to define epilepsy in the newly proposed classification has shifted from the conceptual perspective to practical application thought to better reflect that which is happening to the patient. Within the new definition, a single unprovoked or reflex seizure can be considered as epilepsy if the recurrence risk is similar to that following two unprovoked seizures. Epilepsy is considered to be resolved if the individual had an age-dependent epilepsy syndrome and has passed the applicable age or if the person has remained seizure-free for the last ten years without seizure medications for the last five years. This new operational definition of epilepsy may change the epileptologist's approach regarding when and how long to treat patients with seizures. The new definition also has significant psychosocial and employment-related implications for the patients. With regard to etiology, the terms idiopathic, symptomatic, and cryptogenic have been replaced by genetic, structural/metabolic, and unknown. This reflects a better understanding of the underlying cause of epilepsy based on genetic tests and better neuroimaging. The terms 'simple partial' and 'complex partial' seizures have been replaced by 'focal motor/sensory' and 'focal dyscognitive' seizures, thereby ending the ambiguity associated with the former terms and the difficulty encountered with definitions of altered states of consciousness. These changes, reflective of a better insight into the pathogenesis of seizures and epilepsy, are expected to be more pragmatic and assist when managing patients with epilepsy. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Clinical risk factors associated with anti-epileptic drug responsiveness in canine epilepsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowena M A Packer

    Full Text Available The nature and occurrence of remission, and conversely, pharmacoresistance following epilepsy treatment is still not fully understood in human or veterinary medicine. As such, predicting which patients will have good or poor treatment outcomes is imprecise, impeding patient management. In the present study, we use a naturally occurring animal model of pharmacoresistant epilepsy to investigate clinical risk factors associated with treatment outcome. Dogs with idiopathic epilepsy, for which no underlying cause was identified, were treated at a canine epilepsy clinic and monitored following discharge from a small animal referral hospital. Clinical data was gained via standardised owner questionnaires and longitudinal follow up data was gained via telephone interview with the dogs' owners. At follow up, 14% of treated dogs were in seizure-free remission. Dogs that did not achieve remission were more likely to be male, and to have previously experienced cluster seizures. Seizure frequency or the total number of seizures prior to treatment were not significant predictors of pharmacoresistance, demonstrating that seizure density, that is, the temporal pattern of seizure activity, is a more influential predictor of pharmacoresistance. These results are in line with clinical studies of human epilepsy, and experimental rodent models of epilepsy, that patients experiencing episodes of high seizure density (cluster seizures, not just a high seizure frequency pre-treatment, are at an increased risk of drug-refractoriness. These data provide further evidence that the dog could be a useful naturally occurring epilepsy model in the study of pharmacoresistant epilepsy.

  6. Sleep disturbances in children with epilepsy compared with their nearest-aged siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirrell, Elaine; Blackman, Marlene; Barlow, Karen; Mah, Jean; Hamiwka, Lorie

    2005-11-01

    The aim of the study was to compare sleep patterns in children with epilepsy with those of their non-epileptic siblings and to determine which epilepsy-specific factors predict greater sleep disturbance. We conducted a case-control study of 55 children with epilepsy (mean age 10y, range 4 to 16y; 27 males, 28 females) and their nearest-aged non-epileptic sibling (mean age 10y, range 4 to 18y; 26 males, 29 females). Epilepsy was idiopathic generalized in eight children (15%), symptomatic generalized in seven (13%), and focal in 40 (73%); the mean duration was 5 years 8 months. Parents or caregivers completed the Sleep Behavior Questionnaire (SBQ) and Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) for patients and controls, and the Quality of Life in Childhood Epilepsy (QOLCE) for patients. Patients had a higher (more adverse) Total Sleep score (p<0.001) and scored worse than controls on nearly all subscales of the SBQ. In patients, higher Total Sleep scores were correlated with higher scores on the Withdrawn, Somatic complaints, Social problems, and Attention subscales of the CBCL, and significantly lower Total Quality of Life Scores. Refractory epilepsy, mental retardation, and remote symptomatic etiology predicted greater sleep problems in those with epilepsy. We conclude that children with epilepsy in this current study had significantly greater sleep problems than their non-epileptic siblings.

  7. Clinical risk factors associated with anti-epileptic drug responsiveness in canine epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, Rowena M A; Shihab, Nadia K; Torres, Bruno B J; Volk, Holger A

    2014-01-01

    The nature and occurrence of remission, and conversely, pharmacoresistance following epilepsy treatment is still not fully understood in human or veterinary medicine. As such, predicting which patients will have good or poor treatment outcomes is imprecise, impeding patient management. In the present study, we use a naturally occurring animal model of pharmacoresistant epilepsy to investigate clinical risk factors associated with treatment outcome. Dogs with idiopathic epilepsy, for which no underlying cause was identified, were treated at a canine epilepsy clinic and monitored following discharge from a small animal referral hospital. Clinical data was gained via standardised owner questionnaires and longitudinal follow up data was gained via telephone interview with the dogs' owners. At follow up, 14% of treated dogs were in seizure-free remission. Dogs that did not achieve remission were more likely to be male, and to have previously experienced cluster seizures. Seizure frequency or the total number of seizures prior to treatment were not significant predictors of pharmacoresistance, demonstrating that seizure density, that is, the temporal pattern of seizure activity, is a more influential predictor of pharmacoresistance. These results are in line with clinical studies of human epilepsy, and experimental rodent models of epilepsy, that patients experiencing episodes of high seizure density (cluster seizures), not just a high seizure frequency pre-treatment, are at an increased risk of drug-refractoriness. These data provide further evidence that the dog could be a useful naturally occurring epilepsy model in the study of pharmacoresistant epilepsy.

  8. Genetic determinants of common epilepsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    and insufficient power. We aimed to identify risk loci through meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies for all epilepsy and the two largest clinical subtypes (genetic generalised epilepsy and focal epilepsy). METHODS: We combined genome-wide association data from 12 cohorts of individuals with epilepsy...... and controls from population-based datasets. Controls were ethnically matched with cases. We phenotyped individuals with epilepsy into categories of genetic generalised epilepsy, focal epilepsy, or unclassified epilepsy. After standardised filtering for quality control and imputation to account for different...... genotyping platforms across sites, investigators at each site conducted a linear mixed-model association analysis for each dataset. Combining summary statistics, we conducted fixed-effects meta-analyses of all epilepsy, focal epilepsy, and genetic generalised epilepsy. We set the genome-wide significance...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter Home Health Conditions Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a chronic, progressive lung disease. This condition ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is an abnormal curvature of the spine that ...

  11. Extracorporeal life support for a 5-week-old infant with idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Sherrill; Shaw, Susanna; Huseni, Shehlanoor; Sachdeva, Shagun; Costello, John P; Basu, Sonali; Nath, Dilip S; Klugman, Darren

    2014-12-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis is a rare disease defined by the triad of iron deficiency anemia, hemoptysis, and diffuse pulmonary infiltrates on chest radiograph. Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis is known to cause dyspnea and, in some cases, acute onset of massive pulmonary hemorrhage which is traditionally treated with conventional mechanical ventilation or high-frequency oscillation in conjunction with immunosuppressive therapy. In this case report, we describe a 5-week-old infant presenting with hemoptysis, massive pulmonary hemorrhage, and significant hypercapnic respiratory failure. The patient failed conventional ventilation but responded well to extracorporeal life support that was initiated early in his course. Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis was suspected in light of his response to high-dose steroids and was confirmed by subsequent lung biopsies. Patients with severe pulmonary hemorrhage secondary to idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis can be safely supported with extracorporeal life support when conventional therapies have been exhausted.

  12. Epilepsy: Asia versus Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Devender; Tchalla, Achille Edem; Marin, Benoît; Ngoungou, Edgard Brice; Tan, Chong Tin; Preux, Pierre-Marie

    2014-09-01

    Is epilepsy truly an "African ailment"? We aimed to determine this, since international health agencies often refer to epilepsy as an African disease and the scientific literature has spoken the same tone. Various published materials, mainly reports, articles, were used to gather Asian and African evidence on various aspects of epilepsy and many of its risk and associated factors. Our results suggest that in no way can epilepsy be considered as an African ailment and such characterization is most likely based on popular beliefs rather than scientific evidence. In comparison to Africa, Asia has a 5.0% greater burden from all diseases, and is 17.0% more affected from neuropsychiatric disorders (that include epilepsy). Given that more countries in Asia are transitioning, there may be large demographic and lifestyle changes in the near future. However these changes are nowhere close to those expected in Africa. Moreover, 23 million Asians have epilepsy in comparison to 3.3 million Africans and 1.2 million sub-Saharan Africans. In comparison to Africa, Asia has more untreated patients, 55.0% more additional epilepsy cases every year, because of its larger population, with greater treatment cost and possibly higher premature mortality. Of several associated factors discussed herein, many have more importance for Asia than Africa. The current state of epilepsy in Asia is far less than ideal and there is an urgent need to recognize and accept the importance of epilepsy in Asia. In no way can epilepsy be considered as an African ailment. This is most likely based on popular beliefs rather than scientific evidence. A PowerPoint slide summarizing this article is available for download in the Supporting Information section here. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 International League Against Epilepsy.

  13. Reading epilepsy from the dominant temporo-occipital region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavaret, Martine; Guedj, Eric; Koessler, Laurent; Trébuchon-Da Fonseca, Agnès; Aubert, Sandrine; Mundler, Olivier; Chauvel, Patrick; Bartolomei, Fabrice

    2010-07-01

    Reading epilepsy is a rare form of epilepsy, classified among idiopathic, age- and localisation-related (partial) epilepsies as a reflex epilepsy syndrome. Seizures usually consist of myoclonic jerks restricted to the jaw. However, distinct ictal features including visual symptoms and paroxysmal a- or dyslexia are described in some patients. The anatomical substrate of ictogenesis in reading epilepsy remains poorly understood. The authors report here the case of a primary reading epilepsy for which ictal semiology was characterised by visual symptoms and dyslexia, investigated by MRI, interictal high-resolution EEG and PET, ictal video-EEG and SPECT. Brain MRI was normal. Interictal high-resolution EEG was performed with 64 scalp channels, a realistic head model and different algorithms to solve the inverse problem. Interictal source localisations highlighted the left occipito-temporal junction. Interictal PET demonstrated bilateral occipito-temporal hypometabolism with left-sided predominance. Ictal EEG showed a rhythmic discharge in left temporo-parieto-occipital junction channels, with left occipito-temporal predominance. MRI fusion of the coregistered subtraction between ictal and interictal SPECT individualised relative hyperperfusion affecting (a) the left occipito-parietal junction area, (b) the left lateral middle and inferior temporal gyri and (c) the left inferior frontal area. Besides reading-induced myoclonic jerks of the jaw, a second variant of reading epilepsy exists with clearly partial seizures manifested by visual symptoms and a- or dyslexia. These seizures originate from the occipito-temporal region of the dominant hemisphere, corresponding to the posterior part of the neural network that underlies the function of reading.

  14. Acute Idiopathic Scrotal Edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micheál Breen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of acute idiopathic scrotal edema (AISE in a 4-year-old boy who presented with acute scrotal pain and erythema. The clinical features, ultrasound appearance, and natural history of this rare diagnosis are reviewed. In this report, we highlight the importance of good ultrasound technique in differentiating the etiology of the acute scrotum and demonstrate the color Doppler “Fountain Sign” that is highly suggestive of AISE.

  15. Genotypic and phenotypic spectrum of pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy (ALDH7A1 deficiency)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mills, Philippa B; Footitt, Emma J; Mills, Kevin A

    2010-01-01

    with suspected or clinically proven pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy and to characterize further the phenotypic spectrum of antiquitin deficiency. Urinary L-alpha-aminoadipic semialdehyde concentration was determined by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. When this was above the normal range, DNA...... to pyridoxine. These findings support the use of biochemical and DNA tests for antiquitin deficiency and a clinical trial of pyridoxine in infants and children with epilepsy across a broad range of clinical scenarios....

  16. Potential years lost and life expectancy in adults with newly diagnosed epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granbichler, Claudia A; Zimmermann, Georg; Oberaigner, Willi; Kuchukhidze, Giorgi; Ndayisaba, Jean-Pierre; Taylor, Alexandra; Luef, Gerhard; Bathke, Arne C; Trinka, Eugen

    2017-11-01

    Studies using relative measures, such as standardized mortality ratios, have shown that patients with epilepsy have an increased mortality. Reports on more direct and absolute measure such as life expectancy are sparse. We report potential years lost and how life expectancy has changed over 40 years in a cohort of patients with newly diagnosed epilepsy. We analyzed life expectancy in a cohort of adult patients diagnosed with definite epilepsy between 1970 and 2010. Those with brain tumor as cause of epilepsy were excluded. By retrospective probabilistic record linkage, living or death status was derived from the national death registry. We estimated life expectancy by a Weibull regression model using gender, age at diagnosis, epilepsy etiology, and year of diagnosis as covariates at time of epilepsy diagnosis, and 5, 10, 15, and 20 years after diagnosis. Results were compared to the general population, and 95% confidence intervals are given. There were 249 deaths (105 women, age at death 19.0-104.0 years) in 1,112 patients (11,978.4 person-years, 474 women, 638 men). A substantial decrease in life expectancy was observed for only a few subgroups, strongly depending on epilepsy etiology and time of diagnosis: time of life lost was highest in patients with symptomatic epilepsy diagnosed between 1970 and 1980; the impact declined with increasing time from diagnosis. Over half of the analyzed subgroups did not differ significantly from the general population. This effect was reversed in the later decades, and life expectancy was prolonged in some subgroups, reaching a maximum in those with newly diagnosed idiopathic and cryptogenic epilepsy between 2001 and 2010. Life expectancy is reduced in symptomatic epilepsies. However, in other subgroups, a prolonged life expectancy was found, which has not been reported previously. Reasons may be manifold and call for further study. © 2017 The Authors. Epilepsia published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International

  17. Toxoplasmosis and epilepsy--systematic review and meta analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngoungou, Edgard B; Bhalla, Devender; Nzoghe, Amandine; Dardé, Marie-Laure; Preux, Pierre-Marie

    2015-02-01

    Toxoplasmosis is an important, widespread, parasitic infection caused by Toxoplasma gondii. The chronic infection in immunocompetent patients, usually considered as asymptomatic, is now suspected to be a risk factor for various neurological disorders, including epilepsy. We aimed to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of the available literature to estimate the risk of epilepsy due to toxoplasmosis. A systematic literature search was conducted of several databases and journals to identify studies published in English or French, without date restriction, which looked at toxoplasmosis (as exposure) and epilepsy (as disease) and met certain other inclusion criteria. The search was based on keywords and suitable combinations in English and French. Fixed and random effects models were used to determine odds ratios, and statistical significance was set at 5.0%. Six studies were identified, with an estimated total of 2888 subjects, of whom 1280 had epilepsy (477 positive for toxoplasmosis) and 1608 did not (503 positive for toxoplasmosis). The common odds ratio (calculated) by random effects model was 2.25 (95% CI 1.27-3.9), p = 0.005. Despite the limited number of studies, and a lack of high-quality data, toxoplasmosis should continue to be regarded as an epilepsy risk factor. More and better studies are needed to determine the real impact of this parasite on the occurrence of epilepsy.

  18. Genes, Seizures & Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Alica M.

    2006-01-01

    The chance that someone will develop any disease is influenced by heredity and environment. Epilepsy is not an exception. Everybody inherits a unique degree of susceptibility to seizures. About 3 percent of the United States population is prone to seizures and will get epilepsy at some point of their lives (1). Two thirds of the people with…

  19. Surgical management of epilepsy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    brain, or to disconnect it and thereby prevent spread to other parts of the brain. In cases ... Certain types of epilepsy are better controlled with specific tech- niques, e.g. ... epilepsy.[8] In this procedure a DBS electrode is placed into the anterior.

  20. Management of refractory epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñana, Karen R

    2013-05-01

    The term refractory epilepsy is utilized in veterinary medicine to describe a condition in which an animal with epilepsy fails to attain satisfactory seizure control or suffers intolerable side effects despite appropriate therapy with conventional antiepileptic drugs. Refractory epilepsy is an important problem in small animal practice as it occurs in approximately one-third of dogs with epilepsy. Consequently, there is much interest in identifying ways to more effectively treat this population of animals. More than a dozen new antiepileptic drugs have been approved for humans over the last 2 decades, and several of these drugs, including gabapentin, zonisamide, levetiracetam, and pregabalin, have been evaluated for the treatment of refractory seizures in veterinary patients. Nonmedical methods to treat poorly controlled epilepsy are also being explored. The 2 alternative forms of therapy that have shown the most promise in humans with epilepsy are electrical stimulation of the brain and dietary modification, both of which have also been evaluated in dogs. This overview summarizes the available data on pharmacologic as well as nonmedical treatment options for dogs and cats with refractory epilepsy. Although many forms of therapy are currently being utilized in clinical practice, our knowledge of the safety and efficacy of these treatments is limited. Additional randomized controlled trials are needed to better evaluate these novel therapies for refractory epilepsy in dogs and cats. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Epilepsy and pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, C L; Henriksen, T B; Ostergaard, J R

    2000-01-01

    . SETTING: Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: One hundred and ninety-three singleton pregnancies in women with epilepsy were compared with 24,094 singleton pregnancies in women without epilepsy. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Preterm delivery, small...

  2. Stress and childhood epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campen, J.S. van

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common chronic diseases in childhood, characterized by the enduring predisposition to generate epileptic seizures. Children with epilepsy and their parents often report seizures precipitated by stress. In order to increase our understanding of the pathophysiological

  3. Epilepsy and driving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matej Mavrič

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy poses a risk for all participants in road traffic; therefore people with epilepsy do not meet the criteria for an unlimited driving license. Their driving is affected not only by epileptic seizures causing impaired consciousness and involuntary movements, but also by antiepileptic drugs with their many unwanted affects. The experts have not yet agreed on whether people with epilepsy have an increased risk of experiencing a road traffic accident. However, recent data suggests that the overall risk is lower compared to other medical conditions. Scientific evidence forms the basis of legislation, which by limiting people with epilepsy, enables all participants in road traffic to drive in the safest possible environment. The legislation that governs epilepsy and driving in Slovenia has been recently thoroughly reformed and thus allows a less discriminatory management of people with epilepsy. Although people with epilepsy experience many issues in their daily life, including their personal relationships and employment, they often list the need for driving as a top concern in surveys. General physicians play an important role in managing the issues of people with epilepsy.

  4. Epilepsy treatment and creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubkov, Sarah; Friedman, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Creativity can be defined as the ability to understand, develop, and express, in a systematic fashion, novel orderly relationships. It is sometimes difficult to separate cognitive skills requisite for the creative process from the drive that generates unique new ideas and associations. Epilepsy itself may affect the creative process. The treatment of epilepsy and its comorbidities, by altering or disrupting the same neural networks through antiseizure drugs (ASDs), treatment of epilepsy comorbidities, ablative surgery, or neurostimulation may also affect creativity. In this review, we discuss the potential mechanisms by which treatment can influence the creative process and review the literature on the consequences of therapy on different aspects of creativity in people with epilepsy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Epilepsy, Art, and Creativity". Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Sex, epilepsy, and epigenetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Irfan A.; Mehler, Mark F.

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy refers to a heterogeneous group of disorders that are associated with a wide range of pathogenic mechanisms, seizure manifestations, comorbidity profiles, and therapeutic responses. These characteristics are all influenced quite significantly by sex. As with other conditions exhibiting such patterns, sex differences in epilepsy are thought to arise—at the most fundamental level—from the “organizational” and “activational” effects of sex hormones as well as from the direct actions of the sex chromosomes. However, our understanding of the specific molecular, cellular, and network level processes responsible for mediating sex differences in epilepsy remains limited. Because increasing evidence suggests that epigenetic mechanisms are involved both in epilepsy and in brain sexual dimorphism, we make the case here that analyzing epigenetic regulation will provide novel insights into the basis for sex differences in epilepsy. PMID:24998474

  6. Epilepsy after stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, T S; Høgenhaven, H; Thage, O

    1987-01-01

    Development of epilepsy was studied prospectively in a group of 77 consecutive stroke patients. Included were stroke patients less than 75 years old admitted within the first 3 days after the stroke. Excluded were patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage, vertebrobasilar stroke, and patients...... with other severe diseases. Cerebral angiography, CT, and EEG were performed in all patients. The patients were followed clinically for 2 to 4 years. Seven patients (9%) developed epilepsy. Of 23 patients with lesions involving the cortex, 6 (26%) developed epilepsy. Of 54 patients in whom the cortex...... was not involved, only 1 (2%) developed epilepsy. Patients with persisting paresis and cortical involvement seem to be at particularly high risk of developing epilepsy, as 50% of such patients (6 of 12) developed the disease....

  7. Nuclear imaging in epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Kyung Ah [Yeungnam University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Correct localization of epileptogenic zone is important for the successful epilepsy surgery. Both ictal perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and interictal F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) can provide useful information in the presurgical localization of intractable partial epilepsy. These imaging modalities have excellent diagnostic sensitivity in medial temporal lobe epilepsy and provide good presurgical information in neocortical epilepsy. Also provide functional information about cellular functions to better understand the neurobiology of epilepsy and to better define the ictal onset zone, symptomatogenic zone, propagation pathways, functional deficit zone and surround inhibition zones. Multimodality imaging and developments in analysis methods of ictal perfusion SPECT and new PET ligand other than FDG help to better define the localization.

  8. Epilepsy and Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell P. Saneto DO, PhD

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a common manifestation of mitochondrial disease. In a large cohort of children and adolescents with mitochondrial disease (n = 180, over 48% of patients developed seizures. The majority (68% of patients were younger than 3 years and medically intractable (90%. The electroencephalographic pattern of multiregional epileptiform discharges over the left and right hemisphere with background slowing occurred in 62%. The epilepsy syndrome, infantile spasms, was seen in 17%. Polymerase γ mutations were the most common genetic etiology of seizures, representing Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome (14%. The severity of disease in those patients with epilepsy was significant, as 13% of patients experienced early death. Simply the loss of energy production cannot explain the development of seizures or all patients with mitochondrial dysfunction would have epilepsy. Until the various aspects of mitochondrial physiology that are involved in proper brain development are understood, epilepsy and its treatment will remain unsatisfactory.

  9. Managing Epilepsy in Pregnancy

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O Dwyer, V

    2017-02-01

    Epilepsy is one of the commonest medical conditions affecting women of childbearing age1. In the most recent triennial report into maternal deaths in Ireland and the UK, two thirds of women who died had a medical condition. In this report, 14 maternal deaths during pregnancy and up to 42 days postpartum were attributable to epilepsy or seizures; a rate of 0.4 per 100,000 maternities. In 12 of these women’ the cause was sudden unexplained death in epilepsy. Thus, epilepsy remains a high-risk condition in pregnancy. The gold standard of care is a multidisciplinary approach involving obstetricians, a neurologist and an epilepsy nurse specialist2. Like other units in Ireland this multidisciplinary service is currently provided in the National Maternity Hospital’s maternal medicine clinic, in conjunction with neurology services in Beaumont Hospital.

  10. International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force consensus proposal: medical treatment of canine epilepsy in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, Sofie F M; De Risio, Luisa; Muñana, Karen; Penderis, Jacques; Stein, Veronika M; Tipold, Andrea; Berendt, Mette; Farquhar, Robyn G; Fischer, Andrea; Long, Sam; Löscher, Wolfgang; Mandigers, Paul J J; Matiasek, Kaspar; Pakozdy, Akos; Patterson, Edward E; Platt, Simon; Podell, Michael; Potschka, Heidrun; Rusbridge, Clare; Volk, Holger A

    2015-08-28

    In Europe, the number of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) licensed for dogs has grown considerably over the last years. Nevertheless, the same questions remain, which include, 1) when to start treatment, 2) which drug is best used initially, 3) which adjunctive AED can be advised if treatment with the initial drug is unsatisfactory, and 4) when treatment changes should be considered. In this consensus proposal, an overview is given on the aim of AED treatment, when to start long-term treatment in canine epilepsy and which veterinary AEDs are currently in use for dogs. The consensus proposal for drug treatment protocols, 1) is based on current published evidence-based literature, 2) considers the current legal framework of the cascade regulation for the prescription of veterinary drugs in Europe, and 3) reflects the authors' experience. With this paper it is aimed to provide a consensus for the management of canine idiopathic epilepsy. Furthermore, for the management of structural epilepsy AEDs are inevitable in addition to treating the underlying cause, if possible.

  11. The Performance of Ictal Brain SPECT Localizing for Epileptogenic Zone in Neocortical Epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Sik; Lee, Dong Soo; Hyun, In Young; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Sang Kun; Chang, Kee Hyun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-09-15

    The epileptogenic zones should be localized precisely before surgical resection of these zones in intractable epilepsy. The localization is more difficult in patients with neocortical epilepsy than in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. This study aimed at evaluation of the usefulness of ictal brain perfusion SPECT for the localization of epileptogenic zones in neocortical epilepsy. We compared the performance of ictal SPECT with MRI referring to ictal scalp electroencephalography (sEEG). Ictal {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO SPECT were done in twenty-one patients. Ictal EEG were also obtained during video monitoring. MRI were reviewed. According to the ictal sEEG and semiology, 8 patients were frontal lobe epilepsy, 7 patients were lateral temporal lobe epilepsy, 2 patients were parietal lobe epilepsy, and 4 patients were occipital lobe epilepsy. Ictal SPECT showed hyperperfusion in 14 patients(67%) in the zones which were suspected to be epileptogenic according to ictal EEG and semiology. MRI found morphologic abnormalities in 9 patients(43%). Among the 12 patients, in whom no epileptogenic zones were revealed by MR1, ictal SPECT found zones of hyperperfusion concordant with ictal sEEG in 9 patients(75%). However, no zones of hyperperfusion were found in 4 among 9 patients who were found to have cerebromalacia, abnormal calcification and migration anomaly in MRI. We thought that ictal SPECT was useful for localization of epileptogenic zones in neocortical epilepsy and especially in patients with negative findings in MRI.

  12. Idiopathic Fascicular Left Ventricular Tachycardia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alahmad, Yaser; Asaad, Nidal Ahmad; Arafa, Salaheddin Omran; Ahmad Khan, Shahul Hameed; Mahmoud, Alsayed

    2017-01-01

    Idiopathic left fascicular ventricular tachycardia (ILFVT) is characterized by right bundle branch block morphology and left axis deviation. We report a case of idiopathic left ventricular fascicular tachycardia in a young 31-year-old male patient presenting with a narrow complex tachycardia.

  13. Idiopathic Fascicular Left Ventricular Tachycardia

    OpenAIRE

    Alahmad, Yaser; Asaad, Nidal Ahmad; Arafa, Salaheddin Omran; Ahmad Khan, Shahul Hameed; Mahmoud, Alsayed

    2017-01-01

    Idiopathic left fascicular ventricular tachycardia (ILFVT) is characterized by right bundle branch block morphology and left axis deviation. We report a case of idiopathic left ventricular fascicular tachycardia in a young 31-year-old male patient presenting with a narrow complex tachycardia.

  14. Mitochondrial disease and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Shamima

    2012-05-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain disorders are relatively common inborn errors of energy metabolism, with a combined prevalence of one in 5000. These disorders typically affect tissues with high energy requirements, and cerebral involvement occurs frequently in childhood, often manifesting in seizures. Mitochondrial diseases are genetically heterogeneous; to date, mutations have been reported in all 37 mitochondrially encoded genes and more than 80 nuclear genes. The major genetic causes of mitochondrial epilepsy are mitochondrial DNA mutations (including those typically associated with the mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes [MELAS] and myoclonic epilepsy with ragged red fibres [MERRF] syndromes); mutations in POLG (classically associated with Alpers syndrome but also presenting as the mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome [MIRAS], spinocerebellar ataxia with epilepsy [SCAE], and myoclonus, epilepsy, myopathy, sensory ataxia [MEMSA] syndromes in older individuals) and other disorders of mitochondrial DNA maintenance; complex I deficiency; disorders of coenzyme Q(10) biosynthesis; and disorders of mitochondrial translation such as RARS2 mutations. It is not clear why some genetic defects, but not others, are particularly associated with seizures. Epilepsy may be the presenting feature of mitochondrial disease but is often part of a multisystem clinical presentation. Mitochondrial epilepsy may be very difficult to manage, and is often a poor prognostic feature. At present there are no curative treatments for mitochondrial disease. Individuals with mitochondrial epilepsy are frequently prescribed multiple anticonvulsants, and the role of vitamins and other nutritional supplements and the ketogenic diet remain unproven. © The Author. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology © 2012 Mac Keith Press.

  15. Art and epilepsy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladino, Lady Diana; Hunter, Gary; Téllez-Zenteno, José Francisco

    2013-10-01

    The impact of health and disease has led many artists to depict these themes for thousands of years. Specifically, epilepsy has been the subject of many famous works, likely because of the dramatic and misunderstood nature of the clinical presentation. It often evokes religious and even mythical processes. Epilepsy surgical treatment has revolutionized the care of selected patients and is a relatively recent advance. Epilepsy surgery has been depicted in very few artistic works. The first portrait showing a potential surgical treatment for patients with epilepsy was painted in the 12th century. During the Renaissance, Bosch famously provided artistic commentary on traditional beliefs in "The stone of madness". Several of these works demonstrate a surgeon extracting a stone from a patient's head, at one time believed to be the source of all "folly", including epileptic seizures, psychosis, intellectual disability, depression, and a variety of other illnesses. There are some contemporary art pieces including themes around epilepsy surgery, all of them depicting ancient Inca Empire procedures such as trepanning. This article reviews the most relevant artistic works related with epilepsy surgery and also its historical context at the time the work was produced. We also present a painting from the Mexican artist Eduardo Urbano Merino that represents the patient's journey through refractory epilepsy, investigations, and ultimately recovery. Through this work, the artist intends to communicate hope and reassurance to patients going through this difficult process. © 2013.

  16. Epilepsy is Dancing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuft, Mia; Gjelsvik, Bergljot; Nakken, Karl O

    2015-10-01

    In "Epilepsy is Dancing", in Antony and the Johnsons' album "The Crying Light"(2009), the lyrics and accompanying music video depicts an epileptic seizure in which the person is transferred to another beautiful and magical world. This may be called "enchanted epilepsy"; i.e., the experience of epilepsy as deeply nourishing and (positively) transforming, is conveyed not only in the lyrics but also the visual and auditory qualities of the video. The seizure in the video gives associations to Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Night's dream". If epilepsy appears in music lyrics, the focus is mostly on negative aspects of the illness, such as horror, fear and repulsive sexuality associated with the fits [1,2]. Contradictory to these lyrics, Anthony and the Johnsons' song is an example of a positive portrayal of epilepsy. It is open to a multitude of meanings, emotional valence and appraisal of epilepsy. By widening the experiential range associated with epileptic seizures, these lyrics highlight the inherently construed nature of epileptic experience. The song stands out in several ways. First, it describes epilepsy in positive terms, prioritising the euphoric, ecstatic, potentially empowering and enhancing aspects of epileptic seizures. Second, the lyrics and accompanying video point to divine experiences associated with epileptic seizures. Through the lyrics and the music video we are, as an audience, able to sense a snicket of an epileptic seizure, but also the universal experience of loosing control. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Linkage and association analysis of CACNG3 in childhood absence epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Everett, Kate V; Chioza, Barry; Aicardi, Jean

    2007-01-01

    Childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) is an idiopathic generalised epilepsy characterised by absence seizures manifested by transitory loss of awareness with 2.5-4 Hz spike-wave complexes on ictal EEG. A genetic component to aetiology is established but the mechanism of inheritance and the genes...... involved are not fully defined. Available evidence suggests that genes encoding brain expressed voltage-gated calcium channels, including CACNG3 on chromosome 16p12-p13.1, may represent susceptibility loci for CAE. The aim of this work was to further evaluate CACNG3 as a susceptibility locus by linkage...

  18. Idiopathic short stature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlaški Jovan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Growth is a complex process and the basic characteristic of child- hood growth monitoring provides insight into the physiological and pathological events in the body. Statistically, the short stature means departure from the values of height for age and sex (in a particular environment, which is below -2 standard deviation score, or less than -2 standard deviation, i.e. below the third percentile. Advances in molecular genetics have contributed to the improvement of diagnostics in endocrinology. Analysis of patients’ genotypes should not be performed before taking a classical history, detailed clinical examination and appropriate tests. In patients with idiopathic short stature specific causes are excluded, such as growth hormone deficiency, Turner syndrome, short stature due to low birth weight, intrauterine growth retardation, small for gestational age, dysmorphology syndromes and chronic childhood diseases. The exclusion of abovementioned conditions leaves a large number of children with short stature whose etiology includes patients with genetic short stature or familial short stature and those who are low in relation to genetic potential, and who could also have some unrecognized endocrine defect. Idiopathic short stature represents a short stature of unknown cause of heterogeneous etiology, and is characterized by a normal response of growth hormone during stimulation tests (>10 ng/ml or 20 mJ/l, without other disorders, of normal body mass and length at birth. In idiopathic short stature standard deviation score rates <-2.25 (-2 to -3 or <1.2 percentile. These are also criteria for the initiation of growth hormone therapy. In children with short stature there is also the presence of psychological and social suffering. Goals of treatment with growth hormone involve achieving normal height and normal growth rate during childhood.

  19. Models of experimental epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Ekici

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is the most common serious neurological conditionin the world, with an estimated prevalence of 1% ofthe population. A large number of experimental modelsof seizure and epilepsy have been developed. These experimentalmodels are elicited by chemical convulsants,electrical stimulation, genetic models, structural lesions,physical stimuli (cold, pressure, hyperthermia, electricalin animals. Well-characterized animal models may allowthe understanding of the basic mechanisms underlyingepileptogenesis (it refers to the alteration of a normalneuronal network into a hyperexcitable network in whichrecurrent, spontaneous seizures occur. Moreover, thesemodels might also prove useful in identifying novel therapeuticapproaches to treatment of epilepsy. J Clin ExpInvest 2011; 2(1: 118-123

  20. Epilepsy and the law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joubert, A F; Verschoor, T; von Rensburg, P H

    1997-01-01

    Epilepsy, and the treatment thereof, has effects on many aspects of life, with far-reaching implications for the patient, his family and the community. Epilepsy causes a great deal of social difficulties and restrictions due to the associated stigma and prejudice. It is not a rare condition and is associated with many other conditions, such as schizophrenia, mental retardation, autism, and terminal Alzheimer's disease. Other associated disorders may include cognitive difficulties, personality disturbances or psychoses of various types and durations. Only by the 1850's was epilepsy defined as a "neurological" disease.

  1. Epilepsy and law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beran, Roy G

    2008-05-01

    Epilepsy can define who one is rather than the diagnosis one has. It may be considered under the rubric of disability with legislative protection against discrimination. Those seeking remedy should investigate alternative dispute resolution in preference to litigation. Many areas of the life of a person with epilepsy deserve examination when considering epilepsy and law. Just some of these include: duty of care; informed consent; driving; research; social interactions; insurance; recreational pursuits; employment; and privacy. This article examines the legal implications and ramifications of these selected topics, acknowledging that the limited scope of the article has only exposed the tip of the iceberg to encourage further exploration.

  2. Association between leisure time, physical activity, and mood disorder levels in individuals with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, Cristiano; de Lira, Claudio Andre Barbosa; Arida, Ricardo Mario; Andersen, Monica Levy; Matos, Gabriela; de Figueiredo Ferreira Guilhoto, Laura Maria; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas; de Albuquerque, Marly; Tufik, Sergio; dos Santos Andrade, Marília; Vancini, Rodrigo Luiz

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between physical activity levels (occupational, sports, and leisure time activities), depression, anxiety, and epilepsy. The behavioral outcomes of individuals with epilepsy (E) were also compared with healthy control subjects (C). The sample included 31 individuals with epilepsy (12 with idiopathic generalized epilepsy and 19 with partial epilepsy) and 31 control subjects. Self-rating questionnaires were used to assess mood (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and Beck Depression Inventory), anxiety, and depression as well as habitual physical activity. Patients with epilepsy were more severely impaired compared to control subjects in both mood questionnaires and presented higher levels of depression (35%), state anxiety (18%), and trait anxiety (12.6%) when compared to the C group. Although physical activity level did not differ significantly between groups, linear regression analyses showed that the physical activity leisure level predicted 31% of depression levels and 26% of anxiety levels in the E group. These data suggest that low levels of physical activity may be considered a risk factor for the development of depression and anxiety and can play an important role in the quality of life of individuals with epilepsy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. PECULIARITIES OF TREATMENT OF EPILEPSY AT GIRLS AND WOMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Pylaeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The epilepsy treatment is to be based on existing general principles and standards of therapy with differential approach to each patient. Besides peculiarities of treatment of different types of seizures and forms of epilepsy there are also differential approaches to special groups of patients. To one of such groups are referred to women of reproductive age. These patients are referred to special group of risk due to the development of certain side effects of antiepileptic drugs (АED. This article focuses in details on peculiarities of treatment of women of reproductive age with epilepsy with accent made on tolerability and safety of the antiepileptic therapy. It is necessary to take into consideration, that at women neuroendocrinal disorders can be caused both by the disease itself – epilepsy (in such case disorders depend on the starting age, form of epilepsy, focal localization, duration of disorder and other factors, referred to the disease, as well as by the undertaken therapy. The articlehereunder considers only issues, referred to the treatment, i. e. AED side effects and its input in the decrease of life quality of women with epilepsy. As women’s reproductive function starts forming long ago before childbearing age, it is necessary for this category to comprise not only women and adolescents, but girls as well. Notwithstanding the fact that so called benign forms of epilepsy pass before the pubescence period (idiopathic focal epilepsies, several forms of idiopathic generalized epilepsy, in many cases the epilepsy, which has started in childhood, continues in the adult age as well. In the same time there can be possible remote negative consequences of the antiepileptic therapy, which can show at a woman of a reproductive age. The data, given in the article, witnesses the need of the right AED selection at women of reproductive age, suffering from epilepsy. The AED should be selected not only depending on the form of the

  4. Genetics Home Reference: juvenile myoclonic epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy is a condition characterized by recurrent seizures (epilepsy). ...

  5. IDIOPATHIC PULMONARY HEMOSIDEROSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yettra, Maurice; Goldenberg, Erwin; Weiner, Herman

    1960-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis is a rare condition manifested by recurrent pulmonary hemorrhage of unknown cause, diffuse radiologic abnormalities, cough, hemoptysis and moderate to severe hypochromic anemia. Diagnosis can be confirmed by iron stains of the sputum or lung aspiration or by biopsy. Prolonged spontaneous remission may occur without the use of corticosteroid therapy. Studies here reported indicated that the anemia is hypochromic and microcytic anemia of blood loss and iron deficiency, in spite of the presence of large amounts of iron in the pulmonary tissue. Correction of the anemia by intensive iron therapy and transfusion is considered an important part of therapy. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3. PMID:13787318

  6. Early juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzan, Katherine Anne B; Shaham, Bracha

    2012-05-01

    Early juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is important to recognize as timely diagnosis and treatment improves prognosis. It is a misconception that complications of JIA arise only from long-standing disease and that children will outgrow it. Early aggressive treatment is the paradigm as early disease activity has long-term consequences. There are predictors of persistent disease and joint erosions that may identify patients at higher risk. Control of disease activity within the first 6 months of onset confers improved clinical course and outcomes. The treatment perspective is thus one of early aggressive treatment for induction of disease control and ultimately remission. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Hypercalcemia in idiopathic myelofibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voss, A; Schmidt, K; Hasselbalch, H

    1992-01-01

    A case of idiopathic myelofibrosis (IMF) presenting with hypercalcemia and hypercalcitriolemia is reported. It is proposed that ectopic production of the active vitamin D metabolite related to ongoing clonal expansion in the bone marrow accounts for the hypercalcemic state. Consistently low levels...... of circulating type I procollagen propeptide (PICP) and lack of progression of the bone marrow fibrosis during almost 6 months of follow-up point to an in vivo inhibition of type I collagen synthesis by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3....

  8. Hippocampal sclerosis and chronic epilepsy following posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapina, Viktoria; Vargas, Maria-Isabel; Wohlrab, Gabriele; Vulliemoz, Serge; Fluss, Joel; Seeck, Margitta

    2013-12-01

    Chronic epilepsy has rarely been reported after posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and the association with hippocampal sclerosis has been suggested only once before. We report the case of a girl admitted at the age of 8 years with idiopathic nephrotic syndrome. On the second day of admission, she presented with focal complex seizures and cerebral MRI showed posterior encephalopathy and no hippocampal sclerosis. MRI after one month confirmed the diagnosis of PRES. The seizures recurred and the girl developed pharmacoresistant epilepsy and was admitted to our hospital for further investigation. Cerebral MRI three years after the diagnosis of PRES showed hippocampal sclerosis which was not present on the initial MRI. We conclude that there is a triggering role of PRES in the development of hippocampal sclerosis. Hippocampal sclerosis may have resulted from seizure-associated damage, alternatively, hypertensive encephalopathy may have led to hippocampal damage via a vascular mechanism.

  9. Memory Functioning in Children with Epilepsy: Frontal Lobe Epilepsy, Childhood Absence Epilepsy, and Benign Epilepsy with Centrotemporal Spikes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Filipa Lopes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Specific cognitive deficits have been identified in children with epilepsy irrespective of results on intelligence tests. Memory deficits are traditionally attributed to temporal lobe epilepsy, whereas the impact of frontal lobe epilepsy on memory functions has remained controversial. The aim of this study was the examination of memory abilities in other childhood common epilepsy syndromes (frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE, childhood absence epilepsy (CAE, and benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS and the influence of epilepsy-related variables. Memory was examined in 90 children with epilepsy (each epilepsy group consisted of 30 children, aged 6–15, and compared with 30 control children. Children with FLE showed significant deficits in verbal and visual memory. In addition, type of epilepsy, earlier age at epilepsy onset, and longer active duration of epilepsy were associated with memory problems. Seizure frequency and treatment, however, did not influence memory performance. This study indicates that children with FLE show greater risk of developing memory deficits than children with CAE or BECTS, thus highlighting the importance of assessing also memory functions in frontal lobe epilepsy.

  10. The idiosyncratic aspects of the epilepsy of Fyodor Dostoevsky.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, John R

    2005-11-01

    The goal of this article is to review the idiosyncratic aspects of the epilepsy of Fyodor Dostoevsky, one of the greatest writers of all time. The onset of his seizures is controversial, with some evidence pointing to his childhood and other reports that would place the onset in his teens or his twenties. His life in prison in Siberia and then in the Russian army is reviewed. His lifestyle included many factors that exacerbated his epilepsy, especially stress and sleep deprivation. His compulsion for gambling played an important role in producing great stress in his life, as he tried to reverse his poverty in the casinos. The most idiosyncratic aspect of his epilepsy was his so-called ecstatic aura. The etiology of his seizures was probably inherited as revealed by the seizures of his father and the status epilepticus and death of his young son. This great writer died from lung hemorrhages in 1891. Discussed in this review is that he did not likely have an aura of ecstasy; only a few such possible cases can be found in the world literature. For those few cases, evidence from electrical self-stimulation studies in animals and humans, investigating "pleasure centers," can be found to involve the limbic system, especially the septal nucleus. Data from the human amygdala provide evidence why almost all auras are, in fact, unpleasant and not pleasant. A review of recent data on the risks to offspring of epileptic fathers confirms that the etiology of Dostoevsky's epilepsy was probably inherited and that he probably had an idiopathic generalized epilepsy with minor involvement of the temporal lobe. A relationship is seen between his severe obsession with gambling and his epilepsy. Finally, Fyodor Dostoevsky is an excellent example of the "temporal lobe personality."

  11. PREVALENCE OF CELIAC DISEASE IN CHILDREN WITH EPILEPSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo VIEIRA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Context Neurological symptoms have been well-documented in patients with celiac disease, nevertheless, the presumption of a greater prevalence of epilepsy in celiac patients remains controversial. Objectives To determine the frequency of celiac disease in children and adolescents with idiopathic or cryptogenic epilepsy. Methods A cross-sectional study. One hundred pediatric patients with non-symptomatic epilepsy were followed-up at two public pediatric neurology clinics in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. Screening for celiac disease was performed by serial measurements of IgA anti-transglutaminase and IgA anti-endomysium antibodies, followed by bowel biopsy in positive cases. HLA DQ02 and DQ08 were investigated in seropositive individuals, assessing the type of seizures, the number of antiepileptic drugs used and the presence gastrointestinal symptoms. Results Three (3.0% patients tested anti-tTG-positive, two with normal duodenal mucosa (Marsh 0 and one with intraepithelial infiltrate (Marsh I. No villous atrophy of the duodenal mucosa (Marsh III celiac disease was found. Two patients tested positive for HLA DQ02; none were DQ08 positive. Conclusion The present study failed to prove the association between celiac disease and epilepsy.

  12. FMRI in Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo, Dráulio B.; Araújo, David; Rosset, Sara; Wichert-Ana, Lauro; Baffa, Oswaldo; Ceiki Sakamoto, Américo; Pereira Leite, João; Santos, Antônio Carlos

    2004-09-01

    Localization of eloquent areas is of utmost importance in neurosurgical planning, especially in epilepsy surgery. Mass, destructive, or developmental lesions may distort brain anatomy. Functional MRI (fMRI) can localize eloquent areas despite these distortions and provide useful information for the planning of tailored resections. This paper deals with the major issues concerning the use of fMRI in epilepsy surgery, including its limitations. We present results derived from the clinical experience of the Epilepsy Surgery Center at Ribeirão Preto School of Medicine, where typical finger tapping and language fMRI paradigms were applied to 40 patients being considered for resective epilepsy surgery around eloquent cortex. Our results confirmed that although fMRI may not be used as a single tool for surgical planning, in conjunction with other methods it is useful in reducing the surgical time, it improves lesion resection, and prevents functional deficits.

  13. Mesial frontal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unnwongse, Kanjana; Wehner, Tim; Foldvary-Schaefer, Nancy

    2012-10-01

    Mesial frontal lobe epilepsies can be divided into epilepsies arising from the anterior cingulate gyrus and those of the supplementary sensorimotor area. They provide diagnostic challenges because they often lack lateralizing or localizing features on clinical semiology and interictal and ictal scalp electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings. A number of unique semiologic features have been described over the last decade in patients with mesial frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE). There are few reports of applying advanced neurophysiologic techniques such as electrical source imaging, magnetoencephalography, EEG/functional magnetic resonance imaging, or analysis of high-frequency oscillations in patients with mesial FLE. Despite these diagnostic challenges, it seems that patients with mesial FLE benefit from epilepsy surgery to the same extent or even better than patients with FLE do, as a whole.

  14. Treatment of difficult epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTague, A; Appleton, R

    2011-02-01

    Most of the epilepsies that occur in children are relatively straightforward to manage, including suppression of the seizures. However, in at least 30% of children, seizures will not be fully controlled by one or two antiepileptic drugs (AEDs); these children may also have additional physical, educational or behavioural problems. This population is often labelled as having a "difficult" or an "intractable" epilepsy. The approach to these children must always begin with ensuring that the diagnosis of epilepsy is accurate, that the correct seizure type or types and epilepsy syndrome have been identified and that an underlying cause has been considered. Treatment must be holistic, considering the child as a person and not just someone having seizures; the AED regimen must be appropriate and not excessive; and surgery must always be considered a viable option.

  15. Nocturnal Frontal Lobe Epilepsy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ryvlin, Philippe; Rheims, Sylvain; Risse, Gail

    2006-01-01

    Nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (NFLE) is a condition primarily characterized by seizures occurring exclusively or predominantly during sleep, the semiology of which suggest a frontal lobe origin and, more specifically, the involvement...

  16. Epilepsy - children - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... them climb on a jungle gym or perform gymnastics. Ask your child's doctor about your child participating ... Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 593. Read More Brain aneurysm repair Brain surgery Epilepsy - overview Seizures Stereotactic ...

  17. Chromosomal Abnormalties with Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The correlation between specific chromosome abnormalties and various epilepsies was investigated by a study of 76 patients’ records obtained by questionnaires distributed to members of Kyoto Multi-institutional Study Group of Pediatric Neurology.

  18. Personality characteristics and epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, A S; Hansen, H; Andersen, R

    1989-01-01

    Patients with a long history of temporal lobe epilepsy or primary generalized epilepsy entered a questionnaire study of personality characteristics, based on a modification of the Bear-Fedio inventory for temporal lobe behavioural syndrome. Psoriasis patients and healthy volunteers served...... as controls. Four clinical meaningful dimensions of included personality traits were identified: ixoide, ideational, obsessive-compulsive and affective features. Analyses based on the Rasch model approved of all dimensions except for affective features. The epilepsy group obtained the highest scores on all 3...... dimensions, healthy volunteers the lowest, while the psoriasis group repeatedly held an intermediate position in all sets of assessment (subjects, interviewers and relatives). A logistic regression analysis showed ixoide features being most important when the entire epilepsy group was compared with other...

  19. Temporal lobe epilepsy semiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Robert D G

    2012-01-01

    Epilepsy represents a multifaceted group of disorders divided into two broad categories, partial and generalized, based on the seizure onset zone. The identification of the neuroanatomic site of seizure onset depends on delineation of seizure semiology by a careful history together with video-EEG, and a variety of neuroimaging technologies such as MRI, fMRI, FDG-PET, MEG, or invasive intracranial EEG recording. Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the commonest form of focal epilepsy and represents almost 2/3 of cases of intractable epilepsy managed surgically. A history of febrile seizures (especially complex febrile seizures) is common in TLE and is frequently associated with mesial temporal sclerosis (the commonest form of TLE). Seizure auras occur in many TLE patients and often exhibit features that are relatively specific for TLE but few are of lateralizing value. Automatisms, however, often have lateralizing significance. Careful study of seizure semiology remains invaluable in addressing the search for the seizure onset zone.

  20. Medical Marijuana for Epilepsy?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kolikonda, Murali K; Srinivasan, Kavitha; Enja, Manasa; Sagi, Vishwanath; Lippmann, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Treatment-refractory epilepsy remains an important clinical problem. There is considerable recent interest by the public and physicians in using medical marijuana or its derivatives to treat seizures...

  1. Multiplex families with epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afawi, Zaid; Oliver, Karen L.; Kivity, Sara; Mazarib, Aziz; Blatt, Ilan; Neufeld, Miriam Y.; Helbig, Katherine L.; Goldberg-Stern, Hadassa; Misk, Adel J.; Straussberg, Rachel; Walid, Simri; Mahajnah, Muhammad; Lerman-Sagie, Tally; Ben-Zeev, Bruria; Kahana, Esther; Masalha, Rafik; Kramer, Uri; Ekstein, Dana; Shorer, Zamir; Wallace, Robyn H.; Mangelsdorf, Marie; MacPherson, James N.; Carvill, Gemma L.; Mefford, Heather C.; Jackson, Graeme D.; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Bahlo, Melanie; Gecz, Jozef; Heron, Sarah E.; Corbett, Mark; Mulley, John C.; Dibbens, Leanne M.; Korczyn, Amos D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the clinical syndromes and inheritance patterns of multiplex families with epilepsy toward the ultimate aim of uncovering the underlying molecular genetic basis. Methods: Following the referral of families with 2 or more relatives with epilepsy, individuals were classified into epilepsy syndromes. Families were classified into syndromes where at least 2 family members had a specific diagnosis. Pedigrees were analyzed and molecular genetic studies were performed as appropriate. Results: A total of 211 families were ascertained over an 11-year period in Israel. A total of 169 were classified into broad familial epilepsy syndrome groups: 61 generalized, 22 focal, 24 febrile seizure syndromes, 33 special syndromes, and 29 mixed. A total of 42 families remained unclassified. Pathogenic variants were identified in 49/211 families (23%). The majority were found in established epilepsy genes (e.g., SCN1A, KCNQ2, CSTB), but in 11 families, this cohort contributed to the initial discovery (e.g., KCNT1, PCDH19, TBC1D24). We expand the phenotypic spectrum of established epilepsy genes by reporting a familial LAMC3 homozygous variant, where the predominant phenotype was epilepsy with myoclonic-atonic seizures, and a pathogenic SCN1A variant in a family where in 5 siblings the phenotype was broadly consistent with Dravet syndrome, a disorder that usually occurs sporadically. Conclusion: A total of 80% of families were successfully classified, with pathogenic variants identified in 23%. The successful characterization of familial electroclinical and inheritance patterns has highlighted the value of studying multiplex families and their contribution towards uncovering the genetic basis of the epilepsies. PMID:26802095

  2. Pediatric epilepsy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfmüller, Georg; Delalande, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Whereas there is no specific neurosurgical technique in pediatric epilepsy, the frequency of each type of surgery is very different from epilepsy surgery applied in adults, and reflects the underlying etiologies, which are much more diverse in children, with malformations of cortical development and tumors as the prevailing etiologies. Extensive resective or disconnective procedures for extratemporal epilepsy are more frequently performed in infants and younger children, whereas temporo-mesial resection is by far the most common surgical treatment for adults with epilepsy. More recently, less invasive techniques in children with an extensive epileptogenic zone, such as multilobar disconnection, hemispherotomy and other functional hemispherectomy variants, have been introduced in order to reduce duration of surgery, perioperative morbidity and length of hospital stay. Likewise, minimally invasive techniques are utilized, such as the endoscopic disconnection of hypothalamic hamartomas for gelastic epilepsy. This development has been encouraged with the introduction of image-guided navigation systems for the preoperative planning and during surgery. Historically, epilepsy surgery for children has been established much later than for adults. Apart from the particular aspects in perioperative management of younger infants, surgery-related morbidity as well as seizure outcome is in general similar to those in adults, depending rather on each type of surgery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Coeliac disease and epilepsy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cronin, C C

    2012-02-03

    Whether there is an association between coeliac disease and epilepsy is uncertain. Recently, a syndrome of coeliac disease, occipital lobe epilepsy and cerebral calcification has been described, mostly in Italy. We measured the prevalence of coeliac disease in patients attending a seizure clinic, and investigated whether cerebral calcification occurred in patients with both coeliac disease and epilepsy. Screening for coeliac disease was by IgA endomysial antibody, measured by indirect immunofluorescence using sections of human umbilical cord. Of 177 patients screened, four patients were positive. All had small-bowel histology typical of coeliac disease. The overall frequency of coeliac disease in this mixed patient sample was 1 in 44. In a control group of 488 pregnant patients, two serum samples were positive (1 in 244). Sixteen patients with both coeliac disease and epilepsy, who had previously attended this hospital, were identified. No patient had cerebral calcification on CT scanning. Coeliac disease appears to occur with increased frequency in patients with epilepsy, and a high index of suspicion should be maintained. Cerebral calcification is not a feature of our patients with epilepsy and coeliac disease, and may be an ethnically-or geographically-restricted finding.

  4. [Epilepsy and religion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakken, Karl O; Brodtkorb, Eylert

    2011-07-01

    Throughout mankind's history, epilepsy has been perceived as a mysterious and supernatural disorder. People with epileptic seizures were seen either as demonic or holy. Here we present a survey of our current knowledge on the association between epilepsy and religion from a medical viewpoint. The article is based on a non-systematic search of the database PubMed, biographies of Wise-Knut, and the authors' own experiences. A number of people with epilepsy, particularly those with temporal lobe epilepsy, have reported experiencing religious feelings during their seizures. Some experience a feeling of perfect harmony, the presence of God or a state of ecstasy. Insula is probably of importance for the seizure semiology. Postictally, some may develop religious delusions that can last for several days. A subgroup have an interictal personality characterized by a preoccupation with philosophical or religious questions, as well as hypergraphia. Wise-Knut, who lived in the 1800 s, is a well known example of this in Norway. There is now some evidence that a number of religious people, including prophets, saints, and cult founders, may have had temporal lobe seizures. Using epilepsy as a model to explain spiritual experiences is controversial. However, temporal lobe epilepsy has probably influenced our religious and literary history more than has been previously acknowledged.

  5. Epilepsy and physical exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel, José; Tojal, Raquel; Morgado, Joana

    2015-02-01

    Epilepsy is one of the commonest neurologic diseases and has always been associated with stigma. In the interest of safety, the activities of persons with epilepsy (PWE) are often restricted. In keeping with this, physical exercise has often been discouraged. The precise nature of a person's seizures (or whether seizures were provoked or unprovoked) may not have been considered. Although there has been a change in attitude over the last few decades, the exact role of exercise in inducing seizures or aggravating epilepsy still remains a matter of discussion among experts in the field. Based mainly on retrospective, but also on prospective, population and animal-based research, the hypothesis that physical exercise is prejudicial has been slowly replaced by the realization that physical exercise might actually be beneficial for PWE. The benefits are related to improvement of physical and mental health parameters and social integration and reduction in markers of stress, epileptiform activity and the number of seizures. Nowadays, the general consensus is that there should be no restrictions to the practice of physical exercise in people with controlled epilepsy, except for scuba diving, skydiving and other sports at heights. Whilst broader restrictions apply for patients with uncontrolled epilepsy, individual risk assessments taking into account the seizure types, frequency, patterns or triggers may allow PWE to enjoy a wide range of physical activities. Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Idiopathic Calcinosis Cutis over Back

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanveer Shaikh

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Calcinosis Cutis is characterized by the deposition of calcium salts in the skin and subcutaneous tissue. Idiopathic Calcinosis Cutis is a rare condition and hence is usually a diagnosis of exclusion. Idiopathic Calcinosis Cutis occurs in the absence of known trauma, inciting agent or metabolic defect. This is a case report of an adult female presenting with Idiopathic Calcinosis Cutis over the back. The exact mechanism of occurrence of this condition is not known. Patients are usually managed with pharmacotherapy, surgery being reserved for those with pain, recurrent infection and impaired function. The lesions are known to recur and a periodic follow-up of these patients is essential.

  7. Perinatal outcomes of idiopathic polyhydramnios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taskin, Salih; Kanmaz, Ahkam Göksel; Kahraman, Korhan; Kurtay, Gülay

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the perinatal outcomes of cases with idiopathic polyhydramnios. Study Design Retrospective analysis of 160 singleton pregnancies that were under routine surveillance at the department of obstetrics from 2008 to 2010 was performed to assess perinatal outcomes. Finally, 59 cases were included as idiopathic polyhydramnios, and 101 cases were included as controls. Preterm delivery (4000 g), 1- and 5-min APGAR scores polyhydramnios group compared with the control group. Conclusion Although perinatal outcomes are conflicting in literature, idiopathic polyhydramnios warrants close surveillance especially near term. PMID:24265884

  8. Factors affecting epilepsy development and epilepsy prognosis in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mert, Gulen Gul; Incecik, Faruk; Altunbasak, Sakir; Herguner, Ozlem; Mert, Mustafa Kurthan; Kiris, Nurcihan; Unal, Ilker

    2011-08-01

    A study was conducted between November 2006 and October 2009 to determine the factors predicting the presence and prognosis of epilepsy in patients with cerebral palsy. We enrolled 2 groups of patients: 42 with cerebral palsy in group 1 and 56 patients with cerebral palsy and epilepsy in group 2. The subjects in group 2 were considered to have good epilepsy prognosis if they were free of seizures for the previous year; otherwise they were considered to have poor epilepsy prognosis. In group 2, neonatal epilepsy, family history of epilepsy, and moderate to severe mental retardation were significantly higher than in group 1 (P history of epilepsy, and mental retardation were found to be important and independent predictors of development of epilepsy in patients with cerebral palsy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Dysgraphia as a Mild Expression of Dystonia in Children with Absence Epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Renzo Guerrini; Federico Melani; Claudia Brancati; Anna Rita Ferrari; Paola Brovedani; Annibale Biggeri; Laura Grisotto; Simona Pellacani

    2015-01-01

    Background Absence epilepsy (AE) is etiologically heterogeneous and has at times been associated with idiopathic dystonia. Objectives Based on the clinical observation that children with AE often exhibit, interictally, a disorder resembling writer?s cramp but fully definable as dysgraphia, we tested the hypothesis that in this particular population dysgraphia would represent a subtle expression of dystonia. Methods We ascertained the prevalence of dysgraphia in 82 children with AE (mean age 9...

  10. Epilepsy in the Petit Basset Griffon Vendeen: prevalence, semiology, and clinical phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulløv, C H; Toft, N; Baadsager, M M N; Berendt, M

    2011-01-01

    Epilepsy with a genetic background is increasingly being identified. In certain dog breeds, epilepsy occurs with a higher prevalence than the estimate of 1-2% reported in the general dog population. The Petit Basset Griffon Vendeen (PBGV) experiences an increased occurrence of epilepsy compared to the general dog population. The target population consisted of all 876 PBGV dogs registered in the Danish Kennel Club from January 1, 1999 to December 31, 2008. The study population included 820 dogs that met the inclusion criteria. A population study was conducted to estimate the prevalence of epilepsy in the Danish PBGV population. A mailed questionnaire was used to detect possible signs of epilepsy. The information was subsequently validated by telephone interviews of positive and possible positive responders and a negative responder control group, using an extensive questionnaire developed to detect epilepsy. Dogs evaluated as epilepsy positive after the telephone interview were offered a clinical investigation. The prevalence of epilepsy was estimated to be 8.9% (42/471) in the PBGV population. Average age of onset was 26.3 months. Sex and mode of response did not affect the prevalence, but a strong litter effect was seen. Among euthanized dogs, epilepsy was the predominant cause (6/45 = 13.3%). Petit Basset Griffon Vendeen dogs experience an increased risk of epilepsy characterized by a relatively early onset and dominated by focal seizures with and without secondary generalization. With an estimated prevalence of 8.9% and substantial clustering within litters, a genetic factor associated with epilepsy is suspected. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  11. 77 FR 59197 - Epilepsy Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Epilepsy Program AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of Noncompetitive Program Expansion Supplement Award... Program to the Epilepsy Foundation of America (U23MC19824) to support additional evaluation activities...

  12. Socioeconomic outcome of epilepsy surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Poul; Sabers, Anne; Christensen, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Epilepsy surgery has been a standard treatment for refractory epilepsies that cannot be controlled by standard medical treatment. We aimed to evaluate the health and social consequences of resective surgery relative to controls from a study of national data. METHODS: Using the Danish...... National Patient Registry we identified all subjects with an epilepsy diagnosis between 1996 and 2009 and compared them with a group of patients with an epilepsy diagnosis who had had neither epilepsy surgery nor a vagus stimulation diagnosis by the index date, and who were matched by gender, index year...... for epilepsy diagnosis, and index year for epilepsy surgery. We considered all the health and social information available in the Danish health, medication and social registers. The duration of follow-up was three years. RESULTS: 254 epilepsy patients and 989 controls were analyzed. Surgery patients were more...

  13. Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Kayal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP is defined as a hematologic disorder, characterized by isolated thrombocytopenia without a clinically apparent cause. The major causes of accelerated platelet consumption include immune thrombocytopenia, decreased bone marrow production, and increased splenic sequestration. The clinical presentation may be acute with severe bleeding, or insidious with slow development with mild or no symptoms. The initial laboratory tests useful at the first visit to predict future diagnosis were erythrocyte count, leukocyte count, anti-glycoprotein IIb/IIIa antibodies, reticulated platelets, plasma thrombopoietin level. Treatment should be restricted to those patients with moderate or severe thrombocytopenia who are bleeding or at risk of bleeding. We present a case report on ITP with clinical presentation, diagnosis and management.

  14. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krupa H Bhatt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA is the most chronic musculoskeletal disease of pediatric population. The chronic course of disease has a great impact on oral health. Temporomandibular joint is involved in JIA causing limited mouth opening with progressive open bite, retrognathia, microgenia and bird like appearance. Joints of upper and lower extremities are also involved. Effect on upper limb function leads to difficulty with fine motor movements required for brushing and flossing. This increases incidence of caries and periodontal disease in children. The cause of JIA is still poorly understood and none of the available drugs for JIA can cure the disease. However, prognosis has improved as a result of progress in disease classification and management. The dental practitioner should be familiar with the symptoms and oral manifestations of JIA to help manage as multidisciplinary management is essential.

  15. Idiopathic Bilateral Bloody Tearing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emrullah Beyazyıldız

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bloody tear is a rare and distinct clinic phenomenon. We report a case presenting with the complaint of recurrent episodes of bilateral bloody tearing. A 16-year-old girl presented to our clinic with complaint of bloody tearing in both eyes for 3 months. Bloody tearing was not associated with her menses. A blood-stained discharge from the punctum was not observed during the compression of both nasolacrimal ducts. Nasolacrimal passage was not obstructed. Imaging studies such as dacryocystography and gradient-echo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of nasolacrimal canal were normal. Intranasal endoscopic evaluation was normal. We collected samples from bloody tears two times and pathological examination was performed. Pathological analysis showed lots of squamous cells and no endometrial cells; dysplastic cells were found. Further evaluations for underlying causes were unremarkable. No abnormalities were found in ophthalmologic, radiologic, and pathologic investigations. This condition is likely a rare abnormality and the least recognized aetiology for the idiopathic phenomenon.

  16. Idiopathic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basant R. Nassar BS

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH is a potentially reversible neurodegenerative disease commonly characterized by a triad of dementia, gait, and urinary disturbance. Advancements in diagnosis and treatment have aided in properly identifying and improving symptoms in patients. However, a large proportion of iNPH patients remain either undiagnosed or misdiagnosed. Using PubMed search engine of keywords “normal pressure hydrocephalus,” “diagnosis,” “shunt treatment,” “biomarkers,” “gait disturbances,” “cognitive function,” “neuropsychology,” “imaging,” and “pathogenesis,” articles were obtained for this review. The majority of the articles were retrieved from the past 10 years. The purpose of this review article is to aid general practitioners in further understanding current findings on the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of iNPH.

  17. Epilepsy and homicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandya NS

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Neil S Pandya,1 Mirna Vrbancic,2 Lady Diana Ladino,3,4 José F Téllez-Zenteno31Department of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada; 2Department of Clinical Health Psychology, Royal University Hospital, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada; 3Division of Neurology, Department of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada; 4Department of Neurology, College of Medicine, University of Antioquia, Medellin, ColombiaPurpose: We report the rare case of a patient with intractable epilepsy and escalating aggression, resulting in murder, who had complete resolution of her seizures and explosive behavior following a right temporal lobectomy.Patients and methods: We searched the available literature from 1880 to 2013 for cases of epilepsy being used as a court defense for murder and collected information regarding the final sentencing outcomes. We selected 15 papers with a total of 50 homicides.Results: We describe the case of a 47-year-old woman with drug-resistant right temporal epilepsy who developed increasing emotional lability, outbursts of anger and escalating violent behavior culminating in a violent murder. The patient was imprisoned while awaiting trial. In the interim, she underwent a successful temporal lobectomy with full resolution of seizures, interictal rage and aggressive behaviors. After the surgery, her charges were downgraded and she was transferred to a psychiatric facility.Conclusion: The aggressive behavior associated with epilepsy has been described in the literature for over a century. A link between epilepsy and aggression has been disproportionally emphasized. These patients share some common characteristics: they are usually young men with a long history of epilepsy and lower than average intelligence. The violent act is postictal, sudden-onset, more likely to occur after a cluster of seizures and is usually related with alcohol abuse.Keywords: aggression, crime, epilepsy

  18. Mental deterioration in childhood epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Oka, Eiji; Sanada, Satoshi; Asano, Takashi; Ishida, Takashi

    1997-01-01

    Mental retardation is detected in 20-30% of children with epilepsy at hospitals specializing in treatment of childhood epilepsy. However, the incidence of mental deterioration in childhood epilepsy is not high. In this study, mental deterioration was found in 52 (1.8%) of the 2,880 children with epilepsy at Okayama University Hospital. The patients showing mental deterioration mostly suffered from specific epileptic syndromes, such as West syndrome, Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, severe myoclonic e...

  19. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: treatment update.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connell, Oisin J

    2011-11-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is the most common of the idiopathic interstitial pneumonias. Despite multiple recent clinical trials, there is no strong evidence supporting a survival advantage for any agent in the management of patients with IPF. The limited effectiveness of current treatment regimes has led to a search for novel therapies including antifibrotic strategies. This article reviews the evidence supporting the treatments currently used in the management of IPF.

  20. Disruptions in cortico-subcortical covariance networks associated with anxiety in new-onset childhood epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille Garcia-Ramos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Anxiety disorders represent a prevalent psychiatric comorbidity in both adults and children with epilepsy for which the etiology remains controversial. Neurobiological contributions have been suggested, but only limited evidence suggests abnormal brain volumes particularly in children with epilepsy and anxiety. Since the brain develops in an organized fashion, covariance analyses between different brain regions can be investigated as a network and analyzed using graph theory methods. We examined 46 healthy children (HC and youth with recent onset idiopathic epilepsies with (n = 24 and without (n = 62 anxiety disorders. Graph theory (GT analyses based on the covariance between the volumes of 85 cortical/subcortical regions were investigated. Both groups with epilepsy demonstrated less inter-modular relationships in the synchronization of cortical/subcortical volumes compared to controls, with the epilepsy and anxiety group presenting the strongest modular organization. Frontal and occipital regions in non-anxious epilepsy, and areas throughout the brain in children with epilepsy and anxiety, showed the highest centrality compared to controls. Furthermore, most of the nodes correlating to amygdala volumes were subcortical structures, with the exception of the left insula and the right frontal pole, which presented high betweenness centrality (BC; therefore, their influence in the network is not necessarily local but potentially influencing other more distant regions. In conclusion, children with recent onset epilepsy and anxiety demonstrate large scale disruptions in cortical and subcortical brain regions. Network science may not only provide insight into the possible neurobiological correlates of important comorbidities of epilepsy, but also the ways that cortical and subcortical disruption occurs.

  1. Patterns of depressive symptoms in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triantafyllou, Nikolaos I; Gatzonis, Stergios; Kararizou, Evangelia; Papageorgiou, Charalampos C

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the nature and extent of depressive symptoms among patients with epilepsy. Ninety patients were investigated over a three-month period: 42 were suffering from generalized epilepsy, 29 from focal epilepsy and 19 from undetermined epilepsy. All completed the Zung self-rating scale for assessment of the depressive symptoms. Sixty-seven patients felt stigmatized because of epilepsy (67%): 73.6% in the undetermined epilepsy group, 55.1% in the focal epilepsy group and 88% in the generalized epilepsy group. Moreover, among the 90 epileptic patients studied, symptoms of irritability, indecisiveness, personal devaluation and emptiness showed a constant increasing trend for their presence from the undetermined epilepsy group through the generalized epilepsy group to the focal epilepsy group. These findings indicate that although the focal epilepsy patients felt less stigmatized, they did not differ greatly in terms of depressive symptoms, in relation to the undetermined epilepsy and generalized epilepsy patients.

  2. Retrospective epidemiological study of canine epilepsy in Japan using the International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force classification 2015 (2003-2013): etiological distribution, risk factors, survival time, and lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamoto, Yuji; Hasegawa, Daisuke; Mizoguchi, Shunta; Yu, Yoshihiko; Wada, Masae; Kuwabara, Takayuki; Fujiwara-Igarashi, Aki; Fujita, Michio

    2016-11-09

    Epilepsy is the most common neurological disease in veterinary practice. However, contrary to human medicine, epilepsy classification in veterinary medicine had not been clearly defined until recently. A number of reports on canine epilepsy have been published, reflecting in part updated proposals from the human epilepsy organization, the International League Against Epilepsy. In 2015, the International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force (IVETF) published a consensus report on the classification and definition of canine epilepsy. The purpose of this retrospective study was to investigate the etiological distribution, survival time of dogs with idiopathic epilepsy (IdE) and structural epilepsy (StE), and risk factors for survival time, according to the recently published IVETF classification. We investigated canine cases with epilepsy that were referred to our teaching hospital in Japan during the past 10 years, and which encompassed a different breed population from Western countries. A total of 358 dogs with epilepsy satisfied our etiological study criteria. Of these, 172 dogs (48 %) were classified as IdE and 76 dogs (21 %) as StE. Of these dogs, 100 dogs (consisting of 65 with IdE and 35 with StE) were included in our survival study. Median survival time from the initial epileptic seizure in dogs with IdE and StE was 10.4 and 4.5 years, respectively. Median lifespan of dogs with IdE and StE was 13.5 and 10.9 years, respectively. Multivariable analysis demonstrated that risk factors for survival time in IdE were high seizure frequency (≥0.3 seizures/month) and focal epileptic seizures. Focal epileptic seizures were identified as a risk factor for survival time in IdE. Clinicians should carefully differentiate seizure type as it is difficult to identify focal epileptic seizures. With good seizure control, dogs with IdE can survive for nearly the same lifespan as the general dog population. Our results using the IVETF classification are similar to previous

  3. Intravenous immunoglobulins for epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, JinSong; Dong, JianCheng; Li, Youping; Ni, Hengjian; Jiang, Kui; Shi, Li Li; Wang, GuoHua

    2017-07-04

    Epilepsy is a common neurological condition, with an estimated incidence of 50 per 100,000 persons. People with epilepsy may present with various types of immunological abnormalities, such as low serum immunoglobulin A (IgA) levels, lack of the immunoglobulin G (IgG) subclass and identification of certain types of antibodies. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) treatment may represent a valuable approach and its efficacy has important implications for epilepsy management. This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 1, 2011. To examine the effects of IVIg on the frequency and duration of seizures, quality of life and adverse effects when used as monotherapy or as add-on treatment for people with epilepsy. For the latest update, we searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group Specialized Register (2 February 2017), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) via the Cochrane Register of Studies Online (2 February 2017), MEDLINE (Ovid, 1946 to 2 February 2017), Web of Science (1898 to 2 February 2017), ISRCTN registry (2 February 2017), WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP, 2 February 2017), the US National Institutes of Health ClinicalTrials.gov (2 February 2017), and reference lists of articles. Randomized or quasi-randomized controlled trials of IVIg as monotherapy or add-on treatment in people with epilepsy. Two review authors independently assessed the trials for inclusion and extracted data. We contacted study authors for additional information. Outcomes included percentage of people rendered seizure-free, 50% or greater reduction in seizure frequency, adverse effects, treatment withdrawal and quality of life. We included one study (61 participants). The included study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multi-centre trial which compared the treatment efficacy of IVIg as an add-on with a placebo add-on in patients with refractory epilepsy. There was no significant difference between

  4. Epilepsy in Dostoevsky.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iniesta, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Fyodor M. Dostoevsky (Moscow, 1821-Saint Petersburg, 1881) suffered epilepsy throughout his whole literary career. The aim here is to understand his condition in light of his novels, correspondence, and his contemporaries' accounts as well as through the eyes of later generations of neurologists. From Murin (The landlady, 1847) to Smerdyakov (The brothers Karamazov, 1880), Dostoevsky portrayed up to six characters with epilepsy in his literature. The first symptoms of the disease presented in early adulthood, but he was only diagnosed with epilepsy a decade later. In 1863 he went abroad seeking expert advice from the famous neurologists Romberg and Trousseau. Dostoevsky made an intelligent use of epilepsy in his literature (of his experiential auras or dreamy states particularly) and through it found a way to freedom from perpetual military servitude. His case offers an insight into the natural history of epilepsy (a cryptogenic localization related one of either fronto-medial or temporal lobe origin using contemporary medical terms), thus inspiring later generations of writers and neurologists. Furthermore, it illustrates the good use of an ordinary neurological disorder by an extraordinary writer who transformed adversity into opportunity. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension: a possible complication in the natural history of advanced prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valcamonico, Francesca; Arcangeli, Giuseppina; Consoli, Francesca; Nonnis, Daniela; Grisanti, Salvatore; Gatti, Enza; Berruti, Alfredo; Ferrari, Vittorio

    2014-03-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is a variety of intracranial hypertension that is extremely rare in men. Obesity and hypogonadism are the most important predictive factors. Etiological hypotheses include increased central venous pressure, and various hormonal and metabolic changes commonly found in obese patients. We described the case of an obese man with prostate cancer who showed a consistent bodyweight increase during treatment with taxanes and prednisone. He was hospitalized because of a severe loss of vision as a consequence of idiopathic intracranial hypertension. A complete symptom remission was obtained after 3 weeks of anti-edema therapies (steroids, acetazolamide). Castration-resistant prostate cancer is a risk factor for idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Long-term androgen deprivation therapy, bodyweight increase, and fluid retention during chronic steroid administration and taxane chemotherapy might favor the disease onset. This severe complication has a good outcome, and should be suspected in the presence of symptoms and signs of intracranial hypertension. © 2013 The Japanese Urological Association.

  6. Understanding relationships between autism, intelligence, and epilepsy: a cross-disorder approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    VAN EEGHEN, AGNIES M; PULSIFER, MARGARET B; MERKER, VANESSA L; NEUMEYER, ANN M; VAN EEGHEN, ELMER E; THIBERT, RONALD L; COLE, ANDREW J; LEIGH, FAWN A; PLOTKIN, SCOTT R; THIELE, ELIZABETH A

    2014-01-01

    Aim As relationships between autistic traits, epilepsy, and cognitive functioning remain poorly understood, these associations were explored in the biologically related disorders tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), and epilepsy. Method The Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS), a quantitative measure of autistic traits, was distributed to caregivers or companions of patients with TSC, NF1, and childhood-onset epilepsy of unknown cause (EUC), and these results were compared with SRS data from individuals with idiopathic autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and their unaffected siblings. Scores and trait profiles of autistic features were compared with cognitive outcomes, epilepsy variables, and genotype. Results A total of 180 SRS questionnaires were filled out in the TSC, NF1, and EUC outpatient clinics at the Massachusetts General Hospital (90 females, 90 males; mean age 21y, range 4–63y), and SRS data from 210 patients with ASD recruited from an autism research collaboration (167 males, 43 females; mean age 9y range 4–22y) and 130 unaffected siblings were available. Regression models showed a significant association between SRS scores and intelligence outcomes (pautism. Interpretation Our data show that in TSC and childhood-onset epilepsy, the severity and phenotype of autistic features are inextricably linked with intelligence and epilepsy outcomes. Such relationships were weaker for individuals with NF1. Findings suggest that ASDs are not specific for these conditions. PMID:23205844

  7. Understanding relationships between autism, intelligence, and epilepsy: a cross-disorder approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eeghen, Agnies M; Pulsifer, Margaret B; Merker, Vanessa L; Neumeyer, Ann M; van Eeghen, Elmer E; Thibert, Ronald L; Cole, Andrew J; Leigh, Fawn A; Plotkin, Scott R; Thiele, Elizabeth A

    2013-02-01

    As relationships between autistic traits, epilepsy, and cognitive functioning remain poorly understood, these associations were explored in the biologically related disorders tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), and epilepsy. The Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS), a quantitative measure of autistic traits, was distributed to caregivers or companions of patients with TSC, NF1, and childhood-onset epilepsy of unknown cause (EUC), and these results were compared with SRS data from individuals with idiopathic autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and their unaffected siblings. Scores and trait profiles of autistic features were compared with cognitive outcomes, epilepsy variables, and genotype. A total of 180 SRS questionnaires were completed in the TSC, NF1, and EUC outpatient clinics at the Massachusetts General Hospital (90 females, 90 males; mean age 21 y, range 4-63 y), and SRS data from 210 patients with ASD recruited from an autism research collaboration (167 males, 43 females; mean age 9 y, range 4-22 y) and 130 unaffected siblings were available. Regression models showed a significant association between SRS scores and intelligence outcomes (pautism. Our data show that in TSC and childhood-onset epilepsy, the severity and phenotype of autistic features are inextricably linked with intelligence and epilepsy outcomes. Such relationships were weaker for individuals with NF1. Findings suggest that ASDs are not specific in these conditions. © The Authors. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology © 2012 Mac Keith Press.

  8. The Epilepsy Foundation's 4th Biennial Epilepsy Pipeline Update Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Jacqueline A; Schachter, Steven C; Sirven, Joseph; Porter, Roger

    2015-05-01

    On June 5 and 6, 2014, the Epilepsy Foundation held its 4th Biennial Epilepsy Pipeline Update Conference, an initiative of the Epilepsy Therapy Project, which showcased the most promising epilepsy innovations from health-care companies and academic laboratories dedicated to pioneering and advancing drugs, biologics, technologies, devices, and diagnostics for epilepsy. Speakers and attendees included emerging biotech and medical technology companies, major pharmaceutical and device companies, as well as investigators and innovators at the cutting-edge of epilepsy. The program included panel discussions on collaboration between small and large companies, how to get products in need of funding to the marketplace, who is currently funding epilepsy and CNS innovation, and how the NIH facilitates early-stage drug development. Finally, the conference featured the third annual "Shark Tank" competition. The presentations are summarized in this paper, which is followed by a compilation of the meeting poster abstracts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Presentation of adult mitochondrial epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, Josef; Mahjoub, Sinda Zarrouk

    2013-03-01

    Mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) frequently manifest phenotypically as epilepsy (mitochondrial epilepsy). Mitochondrial epilepsy occurs in early-onset as well as late-onset syndromic and non-syndromic MIDs. We were interested in the types of epilepsy, the prevalence of mitochondrial epilepsy, the type and effectiveness of treatment, and in the outcome of adult MID patients with epilepsy. We retrospectively evaluated adult patients with syndromic or non-syndromic MIDs and epilepsy. MIDs were classified according to the modified Walker criteria as definite, probable, and possible. Epilepsy in adult patients with a MID was classified as "structural/metabolic" in two-thirds of the cases and as "genetic" in one-third of the cases. Although all types of seizures may occur in mitochondrial epilepsy, adult patients most frequently presented with generalised tonic-clonic seizures, partial seizures, convulsive status epilepticus, or non-convulsive status epilepticus. Cerebral imaging was normal in one-third of the patients. Two-thirds of the adult patients with mitochondrial epilepsy who took antiepileptic drugs received monotherapy, one-third combination treatment. The antiepileptic drugs most frequently administered included levetiracetam, lamotrigine, valproic acid, and gabapentin. Antiepileptic drugs were usually well tolerated and the outcome favourable. Adult mitochondrial epilepsy appears to be less frequent than previously believed but the prevalence strongly depends on patient selection. Mitochondrial epilepsy is most frequently "structural/metabolic". AEDs recommended for mitochondrial epilepsy include levetiracetam, lamotrigine, gabapentin and lacosamide. The outcome of mitochondrial epilepsy may be more favourable if mitochondrion-toxic AEDs are avoided. Only if non-mitochondrion-toxic AEDs are ineffective, mitochondrion-toxic AEDs may be used. Copyright © 2012 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Neuroimaging of epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cendes, Fernando; Theodore, William H.; Brinkmann, Benjamin H.; Sulc, Vlastimil; Cascino, Gregory D.

    2017-01-01

    Imaging is pivotal in the evaluation and management of patients with seizure disorders. Elegant structural neuroimaging with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may assist in determining the etiology of focal epilepsy and demonstrating the anatomical changes associated with seizure activity. The high diagnostic yield of MRI to identify the common pathological findings in individuals with focal seizures including mesial temporal sclerosis, vascular anomalies, low-grade glial neoplasms and malformations of cortical development has been demonstrated. Positron emission tomography (PET) is the most commonly performed interictal functional neuroimaging technique that may reveal a focal hypometabolic region concordant with seizure onset. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies may assist performance of ictal neuroimaging in patients with pharmacoresistant focal epilepsy being considered for neurosurgical treatment. This chapter highlights neuroimaging developments and innovations, and provides a comprehensive overview of the imaging strategies used to improve the care and management of people with epilepsy. PMID:27430454

  11. Neocortical Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercovici, Eduard; Kumar, Balagobal Santosh; Mirsattari, Seyed M.

    2012-01-01

    Complex partial seizures (CPSs) can present with various semiologies, while mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) is a well-recognized cause of CPS, neocortical temporal lobe epilepsy (nTLE) albeit being less common is increasingly recognized as separate disease entity. Differentiating the two remains a challenge for epileptologists as many symptoms overlap due to reciprocal connections between the neocortical and the mesial temporal regions. Various studies have attempted to correctly localize the seizure focus in nTLE as patients with this disorder may benefit from surgery. While earlier work predicted poor outcomes in this population, recent work challenges those ideas yielding good outcomes in part due to better localization using improved anatomical and functional techniques. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the diagnostic workup, particularly the application of recent advances in electroencephalography and functional brain imaging, in neocortical temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:22953057

  12. Lack of association between the prothrombin rs1799963 polymorphism and juvenile myoclonic epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Paulo Lopes Born

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME accounts for 26% of generalized idiopathic epileptic syndromes. The highest levels of thrombin activity are closely involved in the development of neurological diseases, including epilepsy. The prothrombin c.20210G>A (rs1799963 variation, which alters prothrombin mRNA stability, is associated with high plasma prothrombin levels. Objective : The present study was designed to investigate whether the SNP rs1799963 is a risk factor for JME in the northeastern Brazilian population. Results : The polymorphism was genotyped in 207 controls and 123 patients using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. No significant differences were observed in the genotype and allele frequencies of this polymorphism between cases and controls. Conclusion : These results present no evidence for an association of rs1799963 with JME. Further studies including other types of epilepsy are required to investigate the involvement of prothrombin gene in the genetic susceptibility to chronic seizure.

  13. [Experience with lamictal in the treatment of outpatients with resistant epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perunova, N Iu; Sorokina, E V; Shershever, A S

    2003-01-01

    The article summarizes the results of lamictal treatment in 93 patients with resistant epilepsy. Lamictal was used in a dose of 50-200 mg a day as an auxiliary drug in the treatment with other anticonvulsants. Its therapeutic efficacy was analyzed in relation to the form of epilepsy, the type of seizures, dosage of lamictal duration of therapy, and as patients' sex, age, and social activity. In the total group, 17.2% of the patients have remissions, in 48.4% the frequency of seizures frequency was reduced (> 50%) and 34.4% of the patients exhibited a less pronounced effect (< 50%). When combining lamictal and valproates, the best results were obtained in generalized seizures, especially in idiopathic generalized epilepsy, and in young and middle-age female patients with active social functioning.

  14. The EL mouse: a natural model of autism and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meidenbauer, Joshua J; Mantis, John G; Seyfried, Thomas N

    2011-02-01

    Autism is a multifactorial disorder that involves impairments in social interactions and communication, as well as restricted and repetitive behaviors. About 30% of individuals with autism develop epilepsy by adulthood. The EL mouse has long been studied as a natural model of multifactorial idiopathic generalized epilepsy with complex partial seizures. Because epilepsy is a comorbid trait of autism, we evaluated the EL mouse for behaviors associated with autism. We compared the behavior of EL mice to age-matched control DDY mice, a genetically related nonepileptic strain. The mice were compared in the open field and in the light-dark compartment tests to measure activity, exploratory behavior, and restricted and repetitive behaviors. The social transmission of food preference test was employed to evaluate social communication. Home-cage behavior was also evaluated in EL and DDY mice as a measure of repetitive activity. We found that EL mice displayed several behavioral abnormalities characteristic of autism. Impairments in social interaction and restricted patterns of interest were evident in EL mice. Activity, exploratory behavior, and restricted behavior were significantly greater in EL mice than in DDY mice. EL mice exhibited impairment in the social transmission of food preference assay. In addition, a stereotypic myoclonic jumping behavior was observed in EL mice, but was not seen in DDY mice. It is of interest to note that seizure activity within 24 h of testing exacerbated the autistic behavioral abnormalities found in EL mice. These findings suggest that the EL mouse expresses behavioral abnormalities similar to those seen in persons with autism. We propose that the EL mouse can be utilized as a natural model of autism and epilepsy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2010 International League Against Epilepsy.

  15. ACTH therapy on intractable epilepsy in Hemiconvulsion-Hemiplegia-Epilepsy syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimakawa, Shuichi; Nomura, Shohei; Ogino, Motoko; Fukui, Miho; Kashiwagi, Mitsuru; Tanabe, Takuya; Tamai, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    In the chronic phase of Hemiconvulsion-Hemiplegia-Epilepsy (HHE) syndrome, developing epilepsy may be intractable. Herein, we report a case where adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) ceased an intractable habitual partial seizure in a patient with HHE syndrome. A developmentally normal one-year-old girl presented with left focal motor status epilepticus in the clinical course of rotavirus infection. She was diagnosed with HH syndrome. At 4 months after status epilepticus, she developed partial seizures that occurred daily, and which resulted in a stooped posture, head rotation to the right, and contraction of both upper limbs predominantly in the left arm. At this time, she was diagnosed with idiopathic HHE syndrome. Her seizures were not reduced by sodium valproate, clonazepam, clobazam, zonisamide, phenytoin, phenobarbital, topiramate, lamotrigine, or liposteroid. At the age of 7, ACTH therapy was performed. On the 10th day of ACTH therapy, the habitual seizure was ceased. However, partial seizures characterized by left arm contraction then developed. Treatment with 350 mg/day lamotrigine prevented this emerging seizure. She has been free of both seizure types for more than one year, with no serious adverse effects of ACTH therapy. We suggest that ACTH therapy may be useful for patients with HHE, although further studies are required. Copyright © 2014 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Update on idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Beau B; Biousse, Valérie; Newman, Nancy J

    2011-08-01

    To provide an update on various features of idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Perspective. Selected articles on the epidemiology, clinical and imaging features, natural history, pathophysiology, and treatment of idiopathic intracranial hypertension were reviewed and interpreted in the context of the authors' clinical and research experience. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension primarily is a disease of obese women of childbearing age, but it can affect patients of any weight, sex, and age. Although a relatively rare disorder, idiopathic intracranial hypertension's associated costs in the United States entail hundreds of millions of dollars. Even after treatment, headaches frequently are persistent and may require the continued involvement of a neurologist. Quality-of-life reductions and depression are common among idiopathic intracranial hypertension patients. However, visual dysfunction, especially visual field abnormalities, represents the major morbidity of this disorder, and serial automated perimetry remains the primary method of patient monitoring. Patients who are men, black, very obese, or anemic are at higher risk of visual loss. Vitamin A metabolism, adipose tissue as an actively secreting endocrine tissue, and cerebral venous abnormalities are areas of active study regarding the pathophysiology of idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Treatment studies show that lumbar puncture is a valuable treatment (in addition to its crucial diagnostic role), and that weight management is critical. However, open questions remain regarding the efficacy of acetazolamide, cerebrospinal fluid diversion procedures, and cerebral venous stenting. Many questions remain unanswered about idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Ongoing studies, especially an ongoing National Institutes of Health-funded clinical trial of acetazolamide, should provide more insight into this important, yet poorly understood, syndrome of isolated intracranial hypertension. Copyright © 2011

  17. Seizure disorders and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozuna, J

    2000-01-01

    Seizures are uncontrolled hypersynchronous electrical discharges of neurons in the brain that interfere with normal function. They are a symptom of an underlying disorder. Epilepsy is a condition of recurring seizures that do not have a reversible metabolic cause. Seizures can be confused with a variety of other conditions, so an understanding of seizure manifestations is crucial in making an accurate diagnosis. Drug therapy is the mainstay of epilepsy treatment, but surgery and vagal nerve stimulation are options for selected refractory cases. Psychosocial consequences of recurring seizures are often more significant to patients than the seizures themselves.

  18. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noble Paul W

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF is a non-neoplastic pulmonary disease that is characterized by the formation of scar tissue within the lungs in the absence of any known provocation. IPF is a rare disease which affects approximately 5 million persons worldwide. The prevalence is estimated to be slightly greater in men (20.2/100,000 than in women (13.2/100,000. The mean age at presentation is 66 years. IPF initially manifests with symptoms of exercise-induced breathless and dry coughing. Auscultation of the lungs reveals early inspiratory crackles, predominantly located in the lower posterior lung zones upon physical exam. Clubbing is found in approximately 50% of IPF patients. Cor pulmonale develops in association with end-stage disease. In that case, classic signs of right heart failure may be present. Etiology remains incompletely understood. Some environmental factors may be associated with IPF (cigarette smoking, exposure to silica and livestock. IPF is recognized on high-resolution computed tomography by peripheral, subpleural lower lobe reticular opacities in association with subpleural honeycomb changes. IPF is associated with a pathological lesion known as usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP. The UIP pattern consists of normal lung alternating with patches of dense fibrosis, taking the form of collagen sheets. The diagnosis of IPF requires correlation of the clinical setting with radiographic images and a lung biopsy. In the absence of lung biopsy, the diagnosis of IPF can be made by defined clinical criteria that were published in guidelines endorsed by several professional societies. Differential diagnosis includes other idiopathic interstitial pneumonia, connective tissue diseases (systemic sclerosis, polymyositis, rheumatoid arthritis, forme fruste of autoimmune disorders, chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis and other environmental (sometimes occupational exposures. IPF is typically progressive and leads to significant

  19. Canine epilepsy: an underutilized model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Edward E

    2014-01-01

    The mainstay of comparative research for epilepsy has been rodent models of induced epilepsy. This rodent basic science is essential, but it does not always translate to similar results in people, likely because induced epilepsy is not always similar enough to naturally occurring epilepsy. A good large animal, intermediate model would be very helpful to potentially bridge this translational gap. Epilepsy is the most common medical neurologic disease of dogs. It has been proposed since the 1970s that dogs with naturally occurring epilepsy could potentially be used as a comparative model for people of the underlying basis and therapy of epilepsy. There have been sporadic studies in the decades since then, with a relative surge in the last 10 years. These canine studies in the areas of genetics, drug therapy, dietary therapy, electroencelphalogram research, and devices for epilepsy show proof of concept that canine epilepsy can be a very good model for comparative research for many, but not all, facets of epilepsy. Results of research in canine epilepsy can and have benefited the improvement of treatment for both people and dogs. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute for Laboratory Animal Research. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Idiopathic scoliosis and the vestibular system

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hawasli, Ammar H; Hullar, Timothy E; Dorward, Ian G

    2015-01-01

    ... in the etiology of scoliosis. In this article, we discuss putative mechanisms for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and review the current evidence supporting a role for the vestibular system in adolescent idiopathic...

  1. Idiopathic Thoracic Spinal Deformaties and Compensatory Mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hosman, A.J.F.

    2003-01-01

    Idiopathic scoliotic and kyphotic deformities have been described since Hippocrates. During the early twentieth-century fusion techniques were introduced, but only during the last decades innovations in the operative techniques have improved the surgical outcome of idiopathic spinal deformities.

  2. Idiopathic Retroperitoneal Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyuki Abe

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A 34-year-old female presented with sudden onset of severe abdominal pain in a flank distribution. A large mass was palpable in the right upper quadrant on physical examination. Abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed a well-defined, right-sided, retroperitoneal cystic lesion located between the abdominal aorta and the inferior vena cava (IVC. The tumor size was 55 × 58 mm, and it compressed the gallbladder and the duodenum. Upper gastrointestinal radiography revealed a stricture of the second portion of the duodenum by the tumor. T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging showed that the whole part was hyperintense with hypointense rims, but the inner was partially hypointense. Based on the radiological findings, the preoperative differential diagnosis included retroperitoneal teratoma, Schwannoma, abscess, and primary retroperitoneal tumor. On laparotomy, the tumor was located in the right retroperitoneal cavity. Kocher maneuver and medial visceral rotation, which consists of medial reflection of the upper part of right colon and duodenum by incising their lateral peritoneal attachments, were performed. Although a slight adhesion to the IVC was detected, the tumor was removed safely. Thin-section histopathology examination detected neither tumor tissues nor any tissues such as adrenal gland, ovarian tissue, or endometrial implants. The final pathological diagnosis was idiopathic retroperitoneal hematoma; the origin of the bleeding was unclear. The patient was discharged without any complication 5 days after the operation.

  3. Idiopathic Fascicular Ventricular Tachycardia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Francis

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic fascicular ventricular tachycardia is an important cardiac arrhythmia with specific electrocardiographic features and therapeutic options. It is characterized by relatively narrow QRS complex and right bundle branch block pattern. The QRS axis depends on which fascicle is involved in the re-entry. Left axis deviation is noted with left posterior fascicular tachycardia and right axis deviation with left anterior fascicular tachycardia. A left septal fascicular tachycardia with normal axis has also been described. Fascicular tachycardia is usually seen in individuals without structural heart disease. Response to verapamil is an important feature of fascicular tachycardia. Rare instances of termination with intravenous adenosine have also been noted. A presystolic or diastolic potential preceding the QRS, presumed to originate from the Purkinje fibers can be recorded during sinus rhythm and ventricular tachycardia in many patients with fascicular tachycardia. This potential (P potential has been used as a guide to catheter ablation. Prompt recognition of fascicular tachycardia especially in the emergency department is very important. It is one of the eminently ablatable ventricular tachycardias. Primary ablation has been reported to have a higher success, lesser procedure time and fluoroscopy time

  4. Idiopathic Acute Eosinophilic Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan-Ting Liu

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic acute eosinophilic pneumonia (IAEP is a rare disease but of clinical importance because of its good prognosis if treated promptly and appropriately. The etiology remains unknown and the temporal relationship between IAEP and a history of resent onset of cigarette smoking has been described. We report a typical case of a 21-year-old male with recent onset of smoking, who presented with acute febrile hypoxemic respiratory failure. High-resolution chest computed tomography scan revealed patchy ground glass opacity and ill-defined nodules, diffuse interlobar and interlobular septal thickening, and bilateral small amount of pleural effusion, which mimicked congestive heart failure except that the heart size was within normal limits. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL was performed soon after the patient was admitted and remarkable eosinophilia was noted in BAL fluid. Clinical condition and chest radiographs improved dramatically after cor-ticosteroid treatment. Because effective treatment and prompt institution of therapy can obviate unnecessary morbidity and mortality, IAEP should be kept in mind when treating patients presenting with diffuse parenchymal lung disease and acute respiratory failure. In that case, BAL is valuable and should be performed as soon as possible.

  5. High density scalp EEG in frontal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyissa, Anteneh M; Britton, Jeffrey W; Van Gompel, Jamie; Lagerlund, Terrance L; So, Elson; Wong-Kisiel, Lilly C; Cascino, Gregory C; Brinkman, Benjamin H; Nelson, Cindy L; Watson, Robert; Worrell, Gregory A

    2017-01-01

    Localization of seizures in frontal lobe epilepsy using the 10-20 system scalp EEG is often challenging because neocortical seizure can spread rapidly, significant muscle artifact, and the suboptimal spatial resolution for seizure generators involving mesial frontal lobe cortex. Our aim in this study was to determine the value of visual interpretation of 76 channel high density EEG (hdEEG) monitoring (10-10 system) in patients with suspected frontal lobe epilepsy, and to evaluate concordance with MRI, subtraction ictal SPECT co-registered to MRI (SISCOM), conventional EEG, and intracranial EEG (iEEG). We performed a retrospective cohort study of 14 consecutive patients who underwent hdEEG monitoring for suspected frontal lobe seizures. The gold standard for localization was considered to be iEEG. Concordance of hdEEG findings with MRI, subtraction ictal SPECT co-registered to MRI (SISCOM), conventional 10-20 EEG, and iEEG as well as correlation of hdEEG localization with surgical outcome were examined. hdEEG localization was concordant with iEEG in 12/14 and was superior to conventional EEG 3/14 (pfrontal epilepsy requiring localization of epileptogenic brain. hdEEG may assist in developing a hypothesis for iEEG monitoring and could potentially augment EEG source localization. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Identifying and Analyzing Novel Epilepsy-Related Genes Using Random Walk with Restart Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Guo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As a pathological condition, epilepsy is caused by abnormal neuronal discharge in brain which will temporarily disrupt the cerebral functions. Epilepsy is a chronic disease which occurs in all ages and would seriously affect patients’ personal lives. Thus, it is highly required to develop effective medicines or instruments to treat the disease. Identifying epilepsy-related genes is essential in order to understand and treat the disease because the corresponding proteins encoded by the epilepsy-related genes are candidates of the potential drug targets. In this study, a pioneering computational workflow was proposed to predict novel epilepsy-related genes using the random walk with restart (RWR algorithm. As reported in the literature RWR algorithm often produces a number of false positive genes, and in this study a permutation test and functional association tests were implemented to filter the genes identified by RWR algorithm, which greatly reduce the number of suspected genes and result in only thirty-three novel epilepsy genes. Finally, these novel genes were analyzed based upon some recently published literatures. Our findings implicate that all novel genes were closely related to epilepsy. It is believed that the proposed workflow can also be applied to identify genes related to other diseases and deepen our understanding of the mechanisms of these diseases.

  7. Identifying and Analyzing Novel Epilepsy-Related Genes Using Random Walk with Restart Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wei; Shang, Dong-Mei; Cao, Jing-Hui; Feng, Kaiyan; He, Yi-Chun; Jiang, Yang; Wang, ShaoPeng; Gao, Yu-Fei

    2017-01-01

    As a pathological condition, epilepsy is caused by abnormal neuronal discharge in brain which will temporarily disrupt the cerebral functions. Epilepsy is a chronic disease which occurs in all ages and would seriously affect patients' personal lives. Thus, it is highly required to develop effective medicines or instruments to treat the disease. Identifying epilepsy-related genes is essential in order to understand and treat the disease because the corresponding proteins encoded by the epilepsy-related genes are candidates of the potential drug targets. In this study, a pioneering computational workflow was proposed to predict novel epilepsy-related genes using the random walk with restart (RWR) algorithm. As reported in the literature RWR algorithm often produces a number of false positive genes, and in this study a permutation test and functional association tests were implemented to filter the genes identified by RWR algorithm, which greatly reduce the number of suspected genes and result in only thirty-three novel epilepsy genes. Finally, these novel genes were analyzed based upon some recently published literatures. Our findings implicate that all novel genes were closely related to epilepsy. It is believed that the proposed workflow can also be applied to identify genes related to other diseases and deepen our understanding of the mechanisms of these diseases.

  8. Idiopathic chondrolysl;s, of the hip

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Idiopathic chondrolysl;s, of the hip. ,~. A case report. E. J. SMITH,. D. T. NININ, A. C. KEAYS. Fig. 1. The initial radiograph of the right hip showing the features of idiopathic chondrolysis ... Case report. A report of a case of idiopathic chondrolysis of the ... the right hip, peri-articular osteoporosis, blurring of the femoral head and ...

  9. Epilepsy and Spinocerebellar Ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available A large consanguinous family from Saudi Arabia with 4 affected children presenting with an autosomal recessive ataxia, generalized tonic-clonic epilepsy and mental retardation is reported from the Institut de Genetique, Universite Louis Pasteur, Illkirch, France; Division of Pediatric Neurology, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; and other centers.

  10. Mobile EEG in epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Askamp, Jessica; van Putten, Michel Johannes Antonius Maria

    2014-01-01

    The sensitivity of routine EEG recordings for interictal epileptiform discharges in epilepsy is limited. In some patients, inpatient video-EEG may be performed to increase the likelihood of finding abnormalities. Although many agree that home EEG recordings may provide a cost-effective alternative

  11. Epilepsy in the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu-An Chen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Elderly people are the largest and continuously fastest growing population among patients with epilepsy. Elderly patients with epilepsy are very different from other age groups in many respects and clinicians shouldn’t treat them in the same way as younger adults. Accurate diagnosis of epilepsy in the elderly is much more difficult and atypical manifestations and misdiagnoses are certainly not the exception. Syncope is probably the most important differential diagnosis. High clinical suspicion and proper investigation are the best tools for prompt diagnosis. Etiologies of late-onset epilepsy are mainly symptomatic and cerebrovascular diseases are the most common causes in this age group, followed by degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease. It is appropriate to consider starting antiepileptic drug (AED treatment at the first-ever seizure in elderly patients who have remote symptomatic causes such as stroke and dementia. According to the high recurrence rate of seizure and the good response to AEDs in elderly patients, the proper choice from various AEDs for seizure control is very important. Decision-making for AED choice depends on many different factors, including pharmacological properties, efficacy, tolerability from side effects, drug interactions, and medical comorbidities. The newer AEDs with lesser adverse effects and fewer drug interactions appear to be reasonable treatment options for elderly patients. However, more evidence from clinical trials in this specific age group is warranted.

  12. Angelman Syndrome and Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-six patients with Angelman syndrome (AS, of which 19 had 15ql 1-13 maternal deletion, were studied and followed at the University of San Paulo, Brazil, with particular reference to the prevalence and type of epilepsy and its response to antiepileptic drugs.

  13. Vigabatrin in childhood epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uldall, P; Alving, J; Gram, L

    1995-01-01

    In an retrospective uncontrolled long-term study in 30 children with intractable epilepsy, it was found that treatment with vigabatrin resulted in a seizure reduction of more than 50% at 1-year follow-up in 40% of the children. The responders were all children with partial seizures. Side effects...

  14. Epilepsy and brain tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ENGLOT, DARIO J.; CHANG, EDWARD F.; VECHT, CHARLES J.

    2016-01-01

    Seizures are common in patients with brain tumors, and epilepsy can significantly impact patient quality of life. Therefore, a thorough understanding of rates and predictors of seizures, and the likelihood of seizure freedom after resection, is critical in the treatment of brain tumors. Among all tumor types, seizures are most common with glioneuronal tumors (70–80%), particularly in patients with frontotemporal or insular lesions. Seizures are also common in individuals with glioma, with the highest rates of epilepsy (60–75%) observed in patients with low-grade gliomas located in superficial cortical or insular regions. Approximately 20–50% of patients with meningioma and 20–35% of those with brain metastases also suffer from seizures. After tumor resection, approximately 60–90% are rendered seizure-free, with most favorable seizure outcomes seen in individuals with glioneuronal tumors. Gross total resection, earlier surgical therapy, and a lack of generalized seizures are common predictors of a favorable seizure outcome. With regard to anticonvulsant medication selection, evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of focal epilepsy should be followed, and individual patient factors should also be considered, including patient age, sex, organ dysfunction, comorbidity, or cotherapy. As concomitant chemotherapy commonly forms an essential part of glioma treatment, enzyme-inducing anticonvulsants should be avoided when possible. Seizure freedom is the ultimate goal in the treatment of brain tumor patients with epilepsy, given the adverse effects of seizures on quality of life. PMID:26948360

  15. Hormones and absence epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; Tolmacheva, E.A.; Budziszewska, B.

    2017-01-01

    Hormones have an extremely large impact on seizures and epilepsy. Stress and stress hormones are known to reinforce seizure expression, and gonadal hormones affect the number of seizures and even the seizure type. Moreover, hormonal concentrations change drastically over an individual's lifetime,

  16. Hormones and absence epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; Budziszewska, B.; Tolmacheva, E.A.

    2009-01-01

    Hormones have an extremely large impact on seizures and epilepsy. Stress and stress hormones are known to reinforce seizure expression, and gonadal hormones affect the number of seizures and even the seizure type. Moreover, hormonal concentrations change drastically over an individual's lifetime,

  17. Vigabatrin in childhood epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uldall, P; Alving, J; Gram, L

    1995-01-01

    In an retrospective uncontrolled long-term study in 30 children with intractable epilepsy, it was found that treatment with vigabatrin resulted in a seizure reduction of more than 50% at 1-year follow-up in 40% of the children. The responders were all children with partial seizures. Side effects ...

  18. [Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syvertsen, Marte Roa; Markhus, Rune; Selmer, Kaja Kristine; Nakken, Karl O

    2012-08-07

    Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) is a generalised epilepsy with seizure onset in youth. The aim of this review is to present updated knowledge about the etiology, diagnosis and treatment of JME. The review is based on a judicious selection of original English language articles, meta-analyses, and reviews found in PubMed, and the authors' own experience with the patient group. Seizure onset occurs in adolescence. All have myoclonias, about 90 % have generalized tonic-clonic seizures, and one third have absences. Myoclonic jerks are frequently the debut symptom, while tonic-clonic seizures appear later on. Patients are particularly susceptible to seizures shortly after waking. It is important to ask specifically about myoclonias as most patients do not report jerks spontaneously. The electroencephalograms of 44-81 % of the patients show discharges of 4-6 Hz polyspike waves. Focal EEG abnormalities may be seen in about 30 %. When patients are treated with valproate and seizure-precipitating factors are avoided, especially sleep deprivation, about 80 % become seizure-free. Lamotrigine and levetiracetam are alternative therapies for women of childbearing age. Attempts to taper off the medication after several years of seizure freedom entail a high risk of seizure relapse. As there may be features of focal epilepsy in the seizure semiology and/or the EEGs, it may be difficult to diagnose JME. Thus, many patients are misdiagnosed as having a focal epilepsy and are given antiepileptic drugs that may aggravate the tendency to seizures.

  19. Genetic Aspects of Epilepsy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Schizophrenia and manic-depressive psychosis, also based upon single gene mechanisms, may similarly, in principle, be counter- acted by drugs specifically directed against the genetically determined enzyme ... work in the sphere of epilepsy has not resulted in the .... in line with the thesis of single dominance of Lennox.

  20. Clinical efficacy and safety of lamotrigine monotherapy in newly diagnosed pediatric patients with epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Hye Han

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To verify the efficacy and safety of lamotrigine (LTG monotherapy in newly diagnosed children with epilepsy. Methods : We prospectively enrolled 148 children who had undergone LTG monotherapy at our institution between September 2002 and June 2009. Twenty-nine patients were excluded: 19 due to incomplete data and 10 were lost to follow up. The data of the remaining 119 patients was analyzed. Results : We enrolled 119 pediatric epilepsy patients (aged 2.8-19.3 years; 66 males and 53 females in this study. Out of 119 patients, 29 (25.2% had generalized epilepsy and 90 (74.8% had partial epilepsy. The responses of seizure reduction were as follows: Seizure freedom (no seizure attack for at least 6 months in 87/111 (78.4%, n=111 patients; partial response (reduced seizure frequency compared to baseline in 13 (11.7% patients; and persistent seizure in 11 (9.9% patients. The seizure freedom rate was in 81.6% in patients with partial seizure (75.9% for complex partial seizure and 90.9% for benign rolandic epilepsy and 44.8% in patients with generalized epilepsy (30.0% for absence seizure, 35.7% for juvenile myoclonic epilepsy patients, and 100.0% for idiopathic generalized epilepsy patients. Adverse reactions were reported in 17 (14.3% patients, and 8 patients (6.7% discontinued LTG because of rash and tic. No patient experienced severe adverse reaction such as Stevens-Johnson syndrome. Conclusion : LTG showed excellent therapeutic response and had few significant adverse effects. Our findings report may contribute in promoting the use of LTG monotherapy in epileptic children.

  1. Multiple idiopathic apical root resorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanungo, Manish; Khandelwal, Vishal; Nayak, Ullal Anand; Nayak, Prathibha Anand

    2013-04-23

    Idiopathic external root resorption is a rarely reported condition which has been observed in single or multiple teeth. This is a rare case of multiple idiopathic apical root resorption (MIARR) in a 16-year-old boy. External root resorption of the permanent teeth is a multifactorial process. Well-recognised causes of apical root resorption in permanent teeth include orthodontic therapy, trauma, periapical or periodontal inflammation, tumours, cysts, occlusal stresses, impacted teeth, systemic conditions, endocrine imbalances and dietary habits. When none of these causes are present, it is termed idiopathic root resorption which may be either cervical or apical. MIARR is a rare condition which is usually detected as an incidental radiographic finding. However, it may cause pain and mobility in severe cases.

  2. Idiopathic polyhydramnios and fetal gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanescu, A D; Banica, R; Olaru, G; Ghinda, E; Birdir, Cahit

    2015-05-01

    To determine the relationship between idiopathic polyhydramnios and fetal gender in the absence of fetal or maternal abnormalities. This was a retrospective population-based register study. 295 women with singleton pregnancies complicated by idiopathic polyhydramnios (amniotic fluid index (AFI) higher than 24 cm) who were delivered at our institution from January 2002 till December 2012 were included. Only pregnancies with an uncomplicated outcome were accepted in this study. The incidence of the male to female fetuses was compared with the one in the general population. Among pregnancies complicated by idiopathic polyhydramnios, the following gender distribution was found: 72.9% male and 37.1% female. The distribution in the general population was 51.5% female and 48.5% male. The mean AFI was significantly increased in male fetuses (p polyhydramnios is more frequent in male normal fetuses than in female ones.

  3. Adenosine dysfunction in epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boison, Detlev

    2011-01-01

    Extracellular levels of the brain’s endogenous anticonvulsant and neuroprotectant adenosine largely depend on an astrocyte-based adenosine cycle, comprised of ATP release, rapid degradation of ATP into adenosine, and metabolic reuptake of adenosine through equilibrative nucleoside transporters and phosphorylation by adenosine kinase (ADK). Changes in ADK expression and activity therefore rapidly translate into changes of extracellular adenosine, which exerts its potent anticonvulsive and neuroprotective effects by activation of pre- and postsynaptic adenosine A1 receptors. Increases in ADK increase neuronal excitability, whereas decreases in ADK render the brain resistant to seizures and injury. Importantly, ADK was found to be overexpressed and associated with astrogliosis and spontaneous seizures in rodent models of epilepsy, as well as in human specimen resected from patients with hippocampal sclerosis and temporal lobe epilepsy. Several lines of evidence indicate that overexpression of astroglial ADK and adenosine deficiency are pathological hallmarks of the epileptic brain. Consequently, adenosine augmentation therapies constitute a powerful approach for seizure prevention, which is effective in models of epilepsy that are resistant to conventional antiepileptic drugs. The adenosine kinase hypothesis of epileptogenesis suggests that adenosine dysfunction in epilepsy undergoes a biphasic response: An acute surge of adenosine that can be triggered by any type of injury might contribute to the development of astrogliosis via adenosine receptor –dependent and –independent mechanisms. Astrogliosis in turn is associated with overexpression of ADK, which was shown to be sufficient to trigger spontaneous recurrent electrographic seizures. Thus, ADK emerges as a promising target for the prediction and prevention of epilepsy. PMID:22700220

  4. Hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy syndrome: current understandings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auvin, Stéphane; Bellavoine, Vanina; Merdariu, Dana; Delanoë, Catherine; Elmaleh-Bergés, Monique; Gressens, Pierre; Boespflug-Tanguy, Odile

    2012-09-01

    Hemiconvulsion-Hemiplegia (HH) syndrome is an uncommon consequence of prolonged focal febrile convulsive seizures in infancy and early childhood. It is characterized by the occurrence of prolonged clonic seizures with unilateral predominance occurring in a child and followed by the development of hemiplegia. Neuroradiological studies showed unilateral edematous swelling of the epileptic hemisphere at the time of initial status epilepticus (SE). This acute phase is followed by characteristic cerebral hemiatrophy with subsequent appearance of epilepsy, so called Hemiconvulsion-Hemiplegia-Epilepsy (HHE) syndrome. The etiologies and the underlying mechanisms remain to be understood. Using a review of the literature, we summarized the data of the last 20 years. It appears that idiopathic HH/HHE syndrome is the most common reported form. The basic science data suggest that immature brain is relatively resistant to SE-induced cell injury. Several factors might contribute to the pathogenesis of HH/HHE syndrome: 1. prolonged febrile seizure in which inflammation may worsen the level of cell injury; 2. inflammation and prolonged ictal activity that act on blood-brain-barrier permeability; 3. predisposing factors facilitating prolonged seizure such as genetic factors or focal epileptogenic lesion. However, these factors cannot explain the elective involvement of an entire hemisphere. We draw new hypothesis that may explain the involvement of one hemisphere such as maturation of brain structure such as corpus callosum or genetic factors (CACNA1A gene) that are specifically discussed. An early diagnosis and a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of HHE are needed to improve the outcome of this condition. Copyright © 2012 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Epilepsy Surgery for Individuals with TSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Privacy Policy Sitemap Learn Engage Donate About TSC Epilepsy Surgery for Individuals with TSC In this video ... Aria Fallah, MD, discusses the surgical treatment of epilepsy in children with tuberous sclerosis complex. Epilepsy is ...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy Pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy is a condition that involves seizures beginning in ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... the expand/collapse boxes. Description Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy is a brain disorder characterized by recurrent seizures ( ...

  8. Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... living with epilepsy, the risk of Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP) is an important concern. SUDEP ...

  9. Syphilis mimicking idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yri, Hanne; Wegener, Marianne; Jensen, Rigmor

    2011-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a condition of yet unknown aetiology affecting predominantly obese females of childbearing age. IIH is a diagnosis of exclusion as raised cerebrospinal fluid pressure may occur secondary to numerous other medical conditions. An atypical phenotype...... or an atypical disease course should alert the physician to reevaluate a presumed IIH-diagnosis. The authors report a case of a 32-year-old non-obese male with intracranial hypertension, secondary to a syphilitic central nervous system infection, initially misdiagnosed as being idiopathic. Upon relevant...

  10. Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyanji F

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Firoz MiyanjiBritish Columbia Children's Hospital, Vancouver, BC, CanadaAbstract: Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS remains a common and potentially severe musculoskeletal disorder. Although its etiology is largely unknown, ongoing research endeavors continue to improve our understanding of its potential origin and its natural history. Advances in understanding its true three-dimensional nature have sought to improve classification and management strategies. This review will attempt to highlight and give an overview of the current concepts in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.Keywords: AIS, current, natural history, management strategies

  11. Confronting the stigma of epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev V Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Stigma and resultant psychosocial issues are major hurdles that people with epilepsy confront in their daily life. People with epilepsy, particularly women, living in economically weak countries are often ill equipped to handle the stigma that they experience at multiple levels. This paper offers a systematic review of the research on stigma from sociology and social psychology and details how stigma linked to epilepsy or similar conditions can result in stereotyping, prejudice and discrimination. We also briefly discuss the strategies that are most commonly utilized to mitigate stigma. Neurologists and other health care providers, social workers, support groups and policy makers working with epilepsy need to have a deep understanding of the social and cultural perceptions of epilepsy and the related stigma. It is necessary that societies establish unique determinants of stigma and set up appropriate strategies to mitigate stigma and facilitate the complete inclusion of people with epilepsy as well as mitigating any existing discrimination.

  12. [A study of epilepsy according to the age at onset and monitored for 3 years in a regional reference paediatric neurology unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa-Gómez, Laura; López-Pisón, Javier; Lapresta Moros, Carlos; Fuertes Rodrigo, Cristina; Fernando Martínez, Ruth; Samper-Villagrasa, Pilar; Monge-Galindo, Lorena; Peña-Segura, José Luis; García-Jiménez, María Concepción

    2017-01-01

    A study of epilepsy, according to the age at onset of the crisis and its causes, monitored by a Paediatric Neurology Unit over a period of three years. Historical cohorts study was conducted by reviewing the Paediatric Neurology medical records data base of epileptic children followed-up from 1 January 2008 to 31 December 2010. A total of 4,595 children were attended during the study period. The diagnosis of epilepsy was established in 605 (13.17%): 277 (45.79%) symptomatic, 156 (25.79%) idiopathic, and 172 (28.43%) with cryptogenic epilepsy. Absence epilepsy and benign childhood epilepsy with centro-temporal spikes are the idiopathic epileptic syndromes most prevalent, and the most prevalent symptomatic epilepsies are prenatal encephalopathies. More than one-quarter (26.12%) of epilepsies began in the first year of life, and 67.72% were symptomatic. Refractory epilepsy was observed in 25.29%, 42.46% with cognitive impairment, 26.45% with motor involvement, and 9.92% with an autism spectrum disorder, being more frequent at an earlier age of onset. The absence of a universally accepted classification of epileptic syndromes makes tasks like this difficult, starting with the terminology. A useful classification would be aetiological, with two groups: a large group with established aetiology, or very likely genetic syndromes, and another with no established cause. The age of onset of epilepsy in each aetiological group helps in the prognosis, which is worsened by refractoriness and associated neurodevelopmental disorders, and are generally worse at an earlier onset and in certain aetiologies. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Psychosocial, demographic, and treatment-seeking strategic behavior, including faith healing practices, among patients with epilepsy in northwest India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Surender Kumar; Sharma, Krishan; Prabhakar, Sudesh; Pathak, Ashis

    2008-08-01

    The data on sociocultural, demographic, and psychosocial aspects and types of treatment strategies adopted by families of patients with epilepsy in northwestern India were collected by the interview schedule method from 400 patients (200 idiopathic and 200 symptomatic) at the outpatient department of the Neurology and Epilepsy Clinic of the Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh, India. Epilepsy was classified as idiopathic or symptomatic on the basis of clinical tests (EEG, CT scan, and MRI). It was observed that socioeconomic factors had no bearing on epilepsy in the present sample. Early onset, that is, before 20 years of age, reduced the chances of patients' finding a spouse among those who disclosed the disease information, thereby impacting the nuptial and fertility rates of patients with epilepsy. The present sample of patients was well informed about and sensitized to the efficacy of the modern system of medicine, as 80% of patients sought medical treatment on the very same day as or within a week of onset of seizures. The data were compatible with the framed hypothesis that well-being and safety of the patient would override the stigma burden factor, as 94% of the affected families made no attempt to hide the disease from their neighbors, friends, and colleagues, and teachers of the affected patients. Surprisingly, only 7.5% of the families admitted that they consulted a faith healer. Families did adopt some culturally prevalent methods to control involuntary movements during seizures. It can be concluded that trust in faith healers exists strongly as an undercurrent, but is not overtly admitted by the majority of patients. Some families concurrently visited modern hospitals and occult healers seeking a cure for the disease. The fear of having a child with epilepsy or other abnormalities discouraged married patients from becoming pregnant after developing epilepsy.

  14. Confronting the stigma of epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Sanjeev V.; Aparna Nair

    2011-01-01

    Stigma and resultant psychosocial issues are major hurdles that people with epilepsy confront in their daily life. People with epilepsy, particularly women, living in economically weak countries are often ill equipped to handle the stigma that they experience at multiple levels. This paper offers a systematic review of the research on stigma from sociology and social psychology and details how stigma linked to epilepsy or similar conditions can result in stereotyping, prejudice and discrimina...

  15. Epilepsy: A Call for Help

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatraman Sadanand

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a considerable individual and social economic burden. In properly selected patients, epilepsy surgery can provide significant relief from disease, including remission. However, the surgical treatment of epilepsy lags in terms of knowledge and technology. The problem arises due to its slow adaptation and dissemination. This article explores this issue of a wide treatment gap and its causes. It develops a framework for a rational decision-making process that is appropriate for extant circumstances and will result in the speedy delivery of surgical care for suitable patients with medically intractable epilepsy.

  16. Epilepsy: A Call for Help.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadanand, Venkatraman

    2018-01-28

    Epilepsy is a considerable individual and social economic burden. In properly selected patients, epilepsy surgery can provide significant relief from disease, including remission. However, the surgical treatment of epilepsy lags in terms of knowledge and technology. The problem arises due to its slow adaptation and dissemination. This article explores this issue of a wide treatment gap and its causes. It develops a framework for a rational decision-making process that is appropriate for extant circumstances and will result in the speedy delivery of surgical care for suitable patients with medically intractable epilepsy.

  17. Epilepsy and vaccinations: Italian guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruna, Dario; Balestri, Paolo; Zamponi, Nelia; Grosso, Salvatore; Gobbi, Giuseppe; Romeo, Antonino; Franzoni, Emilio; Osti, Maria; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Longhi, Riccardo; Verrotti, Alberto

    2013-10-01

    Reports of childhood epilepsies in temporal association with vaccination have had a great impact on the acceptance of vaccination programs by health care providers, but little is known about this possible temporal association and about the types of seizures following vaccinations. For these reasons the Italian League Against Epilepsy (LICE), in collaboration with other Italian scientific societies, has decided to generate Guidelines on Vaccinations and Epilepsy. The aim of Guidelines on Vaccinations and Epilepsy is to present recent unequivocal evidence from published reports on the possible relationship between vaccines and epilepsy in order to provide information about contraindications and risks of vaccinations in patients with epilepsy. The following main issues have been addressed: (1) whether contraindications to vaccinations exist in patients with febrile convulsions, epilepsy, and/or epileptic encephalopathies; and (2) whether any vaccinations can cause febrile seizures, epilepsy, and/or epileptic encephalopathies. Diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) vaccination and measles, mumps, and rubella vaccination (MMR) increase significantly the risk of febrile seizures. Recent observations and data about the relationships between vaccination and epileptic encephalopathy show that some cases of apparent vaccine-induced encephalopathy could in fact be caused by an inherent genetic defect with no causal relationship with vaccination. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 International League Against Epilepsy.

  18. Antioxidant therapy in idiopathic oligoasthenoteratozoospermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Majzoub

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Additional randomized controlled studies are required to confirm the efficacy and safety of antioxidant supplementation in the medical treatment of idiopathic male infertility as well as the dosage required to improve semen parameters, fertilization rates, and pregnancy outcomes in iOAT.

  19. Perinatal Outcome in Idiopathic Polyhydramnios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallar, Meenakshi; Anam Ul Haq; Nandal, Rajesh

    2015-10-01

    To study perinatal outcome in idiopathic polyhydramnios. Case-control study was conducted in 500 pregnant women with idiopathic polyhydramnios (study group) and 500 normal pregnant women (control group) attending the outpatient department of SHKM Medical College, Haryana. Perinatal outcomes were recorded in both the groups. Out of 500 cases with idiopathic polyhydramnios, maximum cases were diagnosed between 28 and 36 weeks of pregnancy (84.6 %), and maximum presented with mild polyhydramnios (82 %). In the study and control groups, there were no statistically significant differences in preeclampsia and gestational hypertension (p = 0.445 and p = 0.230). In the study and control groups, 74.6 and 79.6 % women, respectively, had normal vaginal delivery (p = 0.250). The study group recorded much higher number of preterm deliveries than the control group (54 %) (p = 0.000). In the study group, 51.8 % women had maternal complications, while in the control group, 13.6 % women had obstetrical complications. The study group recorded higher perinatal mortality (10.4 %) than the control group. Idiopathic polyhydramnios is associated with higher perinatal morbidity and mortality than normal pregnancy.

  20. Cough in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J.G. Van Manen (Mirjam J.G.); S.S. Birring (Surinder S.); C. Vancheri (Carlo); V. Cottin (Vincent); Renzoni, E.A. (Elisabetta A.); Russell, A.-M. (Anne-Marie); M.S. Wijsenbeek (Marlies)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractMany patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) complain of chronic refractory cough. Chronic cough is a distressing and disabling symptom with a major impact on quality of life. During recent years, progress has been made in gaining insight into the pathogenesis of cough in IPF,

  1. CASE REPORT Idiopathic granulomatous mastitis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. The rare condition of idiopathic granulomatous mastitis (IGM) is presented here, unusually, in a 54-year-old woman. IGM mimics breast carcinoma and further differentials include tuberculosis and fungal infections of the breast together with other chronic granulomatous conditions. Of note is its characteristic ...

  2. Familial idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Lilam

    1979-01-01

    Full Text Available Echocardiographic features of idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis (IHSS are described. Systolic anterior motion (SAM of anterior mitral leaflet and asymetric septal hypertrophy (ASH are considered as the diagnostic criteria of IHSS. Effects of amyl nitrite and propranolol-a beta blocker are studied. Echocardio-graphic screening of family members revealed this as a case of fami-lial IHSS.

  3. Motor co-activation in siblings of patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy: an imaging endophenotype?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandschneider, Britta; Centeno, Maria; Vollmar, Christian; Symms, Mark; Thompson, Pamela J.; Duncan, John S.

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy is a heritable idiopathic generalized epilepsy syndrome, characterized by myoclonic jerks and frequently triggered by cognitive effort. Impairment of frontal lobe cognitive functions has been reported in patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy and their unaffected siblings. In a recent functional magnetic resonance imaging study we reported abnormal co-activation of the motor cortex and increased functional connectivity between the motor system and prefrontal cognitive networks during a working memory paradigm, providing an underlying mechanism for cognitively triggered jerks. In this study, we used the same task in 15 unaffected siblings (10 female; age range 18–65 years, median 40) of 11 of those patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (six female; age range 22–54 years, median 35) and compared functional magnetic resonance imaging activations with 20 age- and gender-matched healthy control subjects (12 female; age range 23–46 years, median 30.5). Unaffected siblings showed abnormal primary motor cortex and supplementary motor area co-activation with increasing cognitive load, as well as increased task-related functional connectivity between motor and prefrontal cognitive networks, with a similar pattern to patients (P siblings suggests that altered motor system activation and functional connectivity is not medication- or seizure-related, but represents a potential underlying mechanism for impairment of frontal lobe functions in both patients and siblings, and so constitutes an endophenotype of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. PMID:25001494

  4. Aetiology and long-term outcome of juvenile epilepsy in 136 dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrol, L; Penderis, J; Garosi, L; Cripps, P; Gutierrez-Quintana, R; Gonçalves, R

    2012-03-01

    The aetiology and outcome of dogs with juvenile-onset seizures were investigated. One hundred and thirty-six dogs whose first seizure occurred before the age of one year were investigated. One hundred and two dogs were diagnosed with idiopathic epilepsy (IE), 23 with symptomatic epilepsy (SE), nine with reactive seizures (RS) and two with probable symptomatic epilepsy (pSE). The outcome was known in 114 dogs; 37 per cent died or were euthanased as a consequence of seizures. The mean survival time of this population of dogs was 7.1 years. Factors that were significantly associated with survival outcome included the diagnosis of SE and the number of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) used before investigation. The use of one AED before investigation and a diagnosis of SE were associated with a negative outcome, whereas receiving no AED medications before referral was associated with a longer survival. For dogs with IE, survival time was shortened if the dog was a border collie or with a history of status epilepticus;receiving no AEDs before referral in the IE group was associated with a positive outcome. Seizure-free status was achieved in 22 per cent of dogs diagnosed with IE. While the survival times were longer than previously reported in canine epilepsy, similar remission rates to those reported in childhood epilepsy, where a 70 per cent remission rate is documented, were not seen in the canine juvenile population.

  5. Brain development in children with new onset epilepsy: a prospective controlled cohort investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Bruce P; Dabbs, Kevin; Becker, Tara; Jones, Jana E; Myers y Gutierrez, Adan; Wendt, Gary; Koehn, Monica A; Sheth, Raj; Seidenberg, Michael

    2010-10-01

    To characterize prospective neurodevelopmental changes in brain structure in children with new and recent-onset epilepsy compared to healthy controls. Thirty-four healthy controls (mean age 12.9 years) and 38 children with new/recent-onset idiopathic epilepsy (mean age 12.9 years) underwent 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at baseline and 2 years later. Prospective changes in total cerebral and lobar gray and white matter volumes were compared within and between groups. Prospective changes in gray matter volume were comparable for the epilepsy and control groups, with significant (p 0.06). The group by white matter volume change interactions were significant for total cerebrum (p = 0.04) and frontal lobe (p = 0.04). Children with new and recent-onset epilepsy exhibit an altered pattern of brain development characterized by delayed age-appropriate increase in white matter volume. These findings may affect cognitive development through reduced brain connectivity and may also be related to the impairments in executive function commonly reported in this population. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2010 International League Against Epilepsy.

  6. EFFICACY AND TOLERABILITY OF LEVETIRACETAM (KEPPRA® IN THE TREATMENT OF EPILEPSY: REVIEW OF LITERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Yu. Mukhin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In spite of substantial progress in epileptology, complete seizure control cannot be achieved in a considerable proportion of patients (about 30 %; in this regard, the synthesis of new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs and rational combinations of available AEDs in view of their mechanisms of action remains relevant. Of particular interest are drugs with different mechanisms of action in relation to other AEDs (these drugs include levetiracetam, lacosamide, perampanel, etc.. The authors provide a literature review dealing with one of the new drugs – levetiracetam (Keppra that has a different mechanism of action, as compared with other AEDs. Levetiracetam has been approved for use as initial monotherapy for partial-onset epilepsy with or without secondary generalization in patients who are at least 16 years of age, as adjunctive treatment of partial-onset seizures with and without secondary generalization in babies who are at least 1 month old (oral solution or in children who are at least 6 years old (tablets, and in patients who are at least 12 years of age as adjunctive treatment of myoclonic seizures in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy and as therapy for generalized tonic-clonic seizures in idiopathic generalized epilepsy. The review details the mechanism of action of levetiracetam, its pharmacokinetics, and data on its efficacy and tolerability in the treatment of epilepsy. The findings have led to the conclusion that levetiracetam is a well-studied and promising drug used in the monoand polytherapy of different forms of epilepsy

  7. Control groups in paediatric epilepsy research: do first-degree cousins show familial effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Melissa; Morrison, Blaise; Jones, Jana E; Jackson, Daren C; Almane, Dace; Seidenberg, Michael; Zhao, Qianqian; Rathouz, Paul J; Hermann, Bruce P

    2017-03-01

    To determine whether first-degree cousins of children with idiopathic focal and genetic generalized epilepsies show any association across measures of cognition, behaviour, and brain structure. The presence/absence of associations addresses the question of whether and to what extent first-degree cousins may serve as unbiased controls in research addressing the cognitive, psychiatric, and neuroimaging features of paediatric epilepsies. Participants were children (aged 8-18) with epilepsy who had at least one first-degree cousin control enrolled in the study (n=37) and all enrolled cousin controls (n=100). Participants underwent neuropsychological assessment and brain imaging (cortical, subcortical, and cerebellar volumes), and parents completed the Child Behaviour Checklist (CBCL). Data (based on 42 outcome measures) from cousin controls were regressed on the corresponding epilepsy cognitive, behavioural, and imaging measures in a linear mixed model and case/control correlations were examined. Of the 42 uncorrected correlations involving cognitive, behavioural, and neuroimaging measures, only two were significant (p0.25). Similar results held for the cognition/behaviour and brain imaging measures separately. Given the lack of association between cases and first-degree cousin performances on measures of cognition, behaviour, and neuroimaging, the results suggest a non-significant genetic influence on control group performance. First-degree cousins appear to be unbiased controls for cognitive, behavioural, and neuroimaging research in paediatric epilepsy.

  8. Burns and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrocal, M

    1997-01-01

    This is a report of the first descriptive analytic study of a group of 183 burn patients, treated in the Burn Unit at the University Hospital of Cartagena, Colombia during the period since January 1985 until December 1990. There is presented experience with the selected group of 24 patients in whom the diagnosis of burn was associated with epilepsy. There is also analysed and described the gravity of the scars sequels, neurological disorders, the complication of the burn and an impact of this problem on the patient, his (her) family and the community. It is very important to report that there was found Neurocisticercosis in 66.6% of the group of burn patients with epilepsy, and it is probably the first risk factor of burn in this group.

  9. Epilepsy in ancient India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manyam, B V

    1992-01-01

    The ancient Indian medical system, Ayurveda, meaning science of life, is the oldest system of medicine in the world. Epilepsy is defined as Apasmara: apa, meaning negation or loss of; smara, meaning recollection or consciousness. Aura was recognized and was called Apasmara Poorva Roopa. A large number of symptoms indicative of aura were listed. Worthy of mention are subjective sensation of sounds, sensation of darkness, feeling of delusion, and dream-like state. An actual attack of Apasmara includes falling down; shaking of the hands, legs, and body; rolling up of the eyes; grinding of the teeth; and foaming at the mouth. Four major types of epilepsy based on the disturbance of doshas (humors) that govern the physiological and physiochemical activities of the body are mentioned. Apasmara is considered a dangerous disease that is chronic and difficult to treat. Several causes are mentioned. Treatment included correcting the etiological factors and dietary regimen and avoiding dangerous places that may result in injuries.

  10. Impaired Consciousness in Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenfeld, Hal

    2013-01-01

    Consciousness is essential to normal human life. In epileptic seizures consciousness is often transiently lost making it impossible for the individual to experience or respond. This has huge consequences for safety, productivity, emotional health and quality of life. To prevent impaired consciousness in epilepsy it is necessary to understand the mechanisms leading to brain dysfunction during seizures. Normally the “consciousness system”—a specialized set of cortical-subcortical structures—maintains alertness, attention and awareness. Recent advances in neuroimaging, electrophysiology and prospective behavioral testing have shed new light on how epileptic seizures disrupt the consciousness system. Diverse seizure types including absence, generalized tonic-clonic and complex partial seizures converge on the same set of anatomical structures through different mechanisms to disrupt consciousness. Understanding these mechanisms may lead to improved treatment strategies to prevent impaired consciousness and improve quality of life in people with epilepsy. PMID:22898735

  11. Epilepsy and videogames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau, Michelle; Hirsch, Edouard; Vigevano, Federico

    2004-01-01

    Since the first case of videogame (VG) epilepsy was reported in 1981, many cases of seizures triggered by VGs were reported, not only in photosensitive, but also in non-photosensitive children and adolescents with epilepsy. We provide an overview of the literature with overall conclusions and recommendations regarding VG playing. Specific preventive measures concerning the physical characteristics of images included in commercially available VGs (flash rate, choice of colors, patterns, and contrast) can lead in the future to a clear decrease of this problem. In addition to the positive effect of such measures, the collaborative studies performed in France and in the rest of Europe have stressed the importance of a safe distance to the screen of > or = 2 m, and the less provocative role of 100-Hz screens.

  12. Legal implications of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beresford, H R

    1988-01-01

    Physicians who care for patients with epilepsy may function as agents or targets of social control. As agents, they may assist in the identification and control of epileptic drivers, may provide information that enables fair and appropriate job placements for epileptic persons, and give testimony that helps the legal system resolve issues relating to the liability of epileptic persons for harm attributed to seizures or interictal behavioral disturbances. As targets, they may be charged with negligent failure to diagnose, treat, or inform about epilepsy or its associated problems, with failure to exercise due care in protecting persons harmed by their patients, or with failure to preserve confidentiality of medical information. Although legislation and judicial decisions have defined some of the physician's legal duties with reasonable clarity, areas of uncertainty remain, particularly regarding the issue of violating medical confidentiality for the benefit of persons other than the patient.

  13. Epigenetics and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido Fontes, L; Quesada Jimenez, P; Mendioroz Iriarte, M

    2015-03-01

    Epigenetics is the study of heritable modifications in gene expression that do not change the DNA nucleotide sequence. Some of the most thoroughly studied epigenetic mechanisms at present are DNA methylation, post-transcriptional modifications of histones, and the effect of non-coding RNA molecules. Gene expression is regulated by means of these mechanisms and disruption of these molecular pathways may elicit development of diseases. We describe the main epigenetic regulatory mechanisms and review the most recent literature about epigenetic mechanisms and how those mechanisms are involved in different epileptic syndromes. Identifying the epigenetic mechanisms involved in epilepsy is a promising line of research that will deliver more in-depth knowledge of epilepsy pathophysiology and treatments. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Suspected levamisole intoxication in calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, K R; Dwyer, C

    2016-07-01

    A group of 32 Friesian and four Hereford calves, 3-4 months old with body weights between 100-120 kg, were purchased from a weaner sale. On arrival at the property the Hereford calves were treated with a combination anthelmintic containing 2 g/L abamectin and 80 g/L levamisole hydrochloride. Shortly afterwards they developed tremors and frothing from the mouth, and two died overnight. The Friesian calves were treated with the same anthelmintic on the following day, when some showed hypersalivation and frothing from the mouth. Examination of the three most severely affected Friesian calves revealed severe nicotinic-type symptoms including hypersalivation, frothing from the mouth, muscle tremors, recumbency, rapid respiration, hyperaesthesia, and central nervous system depression. Other calves showed mild to moderate signs of intoxication including restlessness, tail switching, salivation, tremors, frequent defaecation, mild colic and jaw chomping. Two calves died shortly afterwards. An adverse drug event investigation revealed that the formulation and quality of the anthelmintic was within the correct specification, and that the drench gun was functioning correctly. Suspected levamisole intoxication due to a combination of possible overdosing, dehydration, and stress caused by transportation and prolonged yarding. Susceptibility to levamisole toxicity in New Zealand calves can be increased if factors like dehydration or stress are present. Levamisole has a narrow margin of safety, and overdosing in calves can easily occur if the dose rate is not based on their actual weight or health status.

  15. Citation classics in epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryann Wilson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The impact of a scientific article is proportional to the citations it has received. In this study, we set out to identify the most cited works in epileptology in order to evaluate research trends in this field. METHODS: According to the Web of Science database, articles with more than 400 citations qualify as "citation classics". We conducted a literature search on the ISI Web of Science bibliometric database for scientific articles relevant to epilepsy. RESULTS: We retrieved 67 highly cited articles (400 or more citations, which were published in 31 journals: 17 clinical studies, 42 laboratory studies, 5 reviews and 3 classification articles. Clinical studies consisted of epidemiological analyses (n=3, studies on the clinical phenomenology of epilepsy (n=5 – including behavioral and prognostic aspects – and articles focusing on pharmacological (n=6 and non-pharmacological (n=3 treatment. The laboratory studies dealt with genetics (n=6, animal models (n=27, and neurobiology (n=9 – including both neurophysiology and neuropathology studies. The majority (61% of citation classics on epilepsy were published after 1986, possibly reflecting the expansion of research interest in laboratory studies driven by the development of new methodologies, specifically in the fields of genetics and animal models. Consequently, clinical studies were highly cited both before and after the mid 80s, whilst laboratory researches became widely cited after 1990. CONCLUSIONS: Our study indicates that the main drivers of scientific impact in the field of epileptology have increasingly become genetic and neurobiological studies, along with research on animal models of epilepsy. These articles are able to gain the highest numbers of citations in the time span of a few years and suggest potential directions for future research.

  16. Epilepsy with myoclonic absences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genton, Pierre; Bureau, Michelle

    2006-01-01

    Among the epileptic syndromes that are defined mainly on the basis of a characteristic seizure type, epilepsy with myoclonic absences (EMA) stands out as a somewhat controversial entity. This is because the sound and evident clinical characteristics on which it was identified some 30 years ago have evolved, mostly as a consequence of changes in the practical management of epilepsies and to the description of myoclonic components in a variety of other generalised epilepsies with absences. Myoclonic absences (MA) are described as typical absences with sudden onset and offset that are associated with generalised spike and wave (SW) discharges on the ECG, with distinctive traits. Clinically, absences are associated with axial hypertonia (the subject usually bends forward and slightly raises their shoulders and arms), and jerks synchronous with the SW discharges. Neurophysiologically, axial hypertonia and rhythmic jerks may be recorded on polygraphic surface electromyogram leads in association with the typical SW discharges; as such, despite an ECG, the diagnosis may be missed in the absence of video documentation of the seizure and/or adequate polygraphy. MA need to be distinguished from absences with other types of prominent myoclonic accompaniment (perioral, eyelid, limbs).The prognosis of EMA remains variable. Modern therapeutic combinations, such as valproic acid and ethosuximide, or valproic acid and lamotrigine, are usually effective; however, in a proportion of patients, seizures are resistant to drug treatment. These patients may experience cognitive deterioration and, in some cases, evolution towards a more severe form of epilepsy, including the Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. The more benign cases usually present with MA as the only seizure type, while patients who experience other seizures, especially generalised tonic-clonic seizures, in association with MA may have a less favourable outcome.

  17. Seizure precipitants in a community-based epilepsy cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassenaar, Merel; Kasteleijn-Nolst Trenité, Dorothée G A; de Haan, Gerrit-Jan; Carpay, Johannes A; Leijten, Frans S S

    2014-04-01

    Epileptic seizures can be provoked by several factors. Better understanding of these factors may improve a patient's sense of control and could reduce seizures. In daily practice, the recognition of seizure precipitants relies heavily on clinical or video-EEG evidence, which can be difficult to obtain. Studies of seizure provocation are largely based on selected hospital-based patient populations, which may lead to biased occurrence estimates. Self-reported seizure precipitants are rarely studied, yet are necessary to understand the experiences of patients and improve epilepsy management. We performed a cross-sectional community-based study of 248 epilepsy patients, selected by pharmacy records of anti-epileptic drug use. Self-reported seizure precipitants and potential associated characteristics were assessed using questionnaires. Almost half of all patients (47 %) reported one or more seizure precipitants, of which stress, sleep deprivation, and flickering lights were the most common. In this community-based setting, light-provoked seizures were especially frequent compared to the literature. Idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE), a lower age at seizure onset, and having auras or prodromes were found to be important independent prognostic factors associated with provoked seizures. IGE and a younger age at seizure onset have been linked to provoked seizures in earlier reports. The finding of auras or prodromes as a prognostic factor was unexpected, though case reports have described provoked seizures in patients having auras. Assessment of these factors may facilitate the early recognition of seizure precipitants in daily clinical practice. This is important for the optimization of epilepsy management for a large group of patients, as provoked seizures are expected to occur frequently.

  18. [The neuropsychology of epilepsy: what factors are involved?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Castello, J

    2006-10-10

    The epileptic child is three times more likely to have cognitive problems from other neurological pathologies, depending on three facts: the effect exerted by the epilepsy itself, any associated previously-existing neuropsychosocial deficits, and the side effects of the antiepileptic drug (AED). A certain degree of deterioration is universally accepted, although the factors involved in its production are not specified, but are generally accepted as being due to multiple causes. We analyse the relation between neuropsychology and epilepsy in neuropaediatrics. The relation between epilepsy and behaviour must be seen as the exception rather than the rule, unless there are co-existing personality disorders and/or mental deficiency. The cognitive effects of AED depend on the drug, on the dosages employed and the polypharmacy, and these effects can be both adverse and favourable. The differences observed between one drug and another are open to criticism, although monitored administration of suitable doses generally produces moderate adverse side effects, as evaluated using reliable appraisal methods (MIDDRA). Scaling time in the introduction of the drug is important, especially with some new AED. The mechanisms governing production vary, but an understanding of the mechanism of action improves cognitive functioning thanks to the control over the seizures. In infancy, idiopathic cognitive reactions are produced. The main disorders are a diminished reaction and information processing time with alterations affecting memory, attention and language. Epilepsy is associated to a number of different, generally moderate, cognitive problems. The age of onset, the type of syndrome, its aetiology, the response to treatment and polypharmacy are multifactorial elements conditioning the side effects. There is a need for batteries of tests capable of forecasting the future and controlling the progression of cognition during treatment. The side effects of AED affecting cognition and

  19. [Epilepsy and Driving].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Shunsuke; Matsuura, Masato

    2017-10-01

    In Japan, the Road Traffic Act was amended in 2013, and the revision was enacted in 2014. This revision includes new rules such as the requirement that a driver declare medical conditions on licensing, with a penalty for false statements. There is also a new voluntary notification system that enables doctors to report unlawful drivers. At the same time, the new Criminal Law Act was enacted. This act provides a penalty for causing death or injury to other persons by driving under the influence of specific drugs or diseases, including epilepsy. There is a prison term of up to 15 years for this violation. These new laws are the result of several tragic motor vehicle accidents caused by patients with epilepsy who were unfit to drive, and severe punishments are involved. Japan still requires a longer seizure-free period for licensing of patients with epilepsy (2 or 5 years), as opposed to the shorter periods required by other developed countries (US, 3 to 12 months; EU, 12 months). It is debatable whether harsh punishments are more effective in reducing accidents. Further reevaluation and discussion are needed on this issue because a restrictive policy for handicapped persons should be based on scientific evidence and should not be biased by prejudice and discrimination.

  20. [Epilepsy and driving].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Masato

    2013-01-01

    The amends to the driving regulations in Japan made in 2002 lifted the absolute ban on driving by persons with epilepsy (PWE) and granted licenses to PWE after a 2-year seizure-free period. In 2010, 3,373 PWE obtained a driving license, 119 had their license withheld for compliance to traffic regulations and to reduce traffic accidents, the Japan Epilepsy Society passed a proposal of more liberal rules for fitness-to-drive on 11th October 2012; according to this proposal, people with a history of epilepsy can be declared fit-to-drive after a one-year seizure-free period. On 25th October 2012, the Japan License Authority introduced new penal regulations for PWE who do not comply with traffic regulations and proposed a voluntary notification system for a physician in charge of a non-compliant PWE. Public acceptance of these new regulations is needed for reconciliation between the attenuation of traffic accidents and the promotion of living rights of PWE in Japan.

  1. Nonpharmacological treatment of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, V S; Nadkarni, V V

    2011-07-01

    Nonpharmacological treatment of epilepsy includes surgery, vagal nerve stimulation, ketogenic diet, and other alternative/complementary therapies, e.g., yoga, Ayurveda, electroencephalography (EEG) biofeedback technique, aerobic exercise, music therapy, transcranial magnetic stimulation, acupuncture, and herbal remedies (traditional Chinese medicine). Alternative therapies, despite the term, should not be considered as an alternative to antiepileptic medication; they complement accepted drug treatment. Alternative therapies like yoga, through techniques that relax the body and mind, reduce stress, improve seizure control, and also improve quality of life. Ketogenic diet is a safe and effective treatment for intractable epilepsies; it has been recommended since 1921. The diet induces ketosis, which may control seizures. The most successful treatment of epilepsy is with modern antiepileptic drugs, which can achieve control of seizures in 70-80% cases. Patients opt for alternative therapies because they may be dissatisfied with antiepileptic drugs due to their unpleasant side effects, the long duration of treatment, failure to achieve control of seizures, cultural beliefs and, in the case of women, because they wish to get pregnant Surgical treatment may lead to physical and psychological sequelae and is an option only for a minority of patients. This article presents supportive evidence from randomized controlled trials done to assess the benefit of non-pharmacological treatment.

  2. The epilepsy of Dostoevsky.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiloh, L G

    1986-01-01

    The evidence in favour of a diagnosis of limbic epilepsy in the case of Dostoevsky is reviewed. Independent records from numerous biographical sources support the widely held view that Dostoevsky had frequent convulsive episodes, that the episodes began in childhood and continued throughout his life and that Dostoevsky himself was able accurately to record the premonitory aura and sequelae of such episodes. In addition the increasing memory impairment he suffered both for recent and remote events from the age of 40 supports the presence of progressive brain damage. This information renders implausible the analytic interpretations of Freud and his followers, that Dostoevsky's epilepsy was hysterical in origin, where epileptiform somatization was presumed to dispose of excessive psychic excitation, and that this process had its roots in Dostoevsky's unconscious hatred of his father and latent homosexuality. Nevertheless, Dostoevsky's neuroticism is clearly supported by his life-long hypochondriasis, obsessionality, paranoid traits, tendency to reactive depressions, and experience of quasi-hallucinatory episodes which were probably not epileptic in origin. Neither his epilepsy nor his neuroticism can explain or detract from the profundity and wisdom of the literary monuments which clearly attest Dostoevsky's ample genius.

  3. Epilepsia fotosensible Photosensitive epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desiderio Rafael Pozo Lauzán

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available La epilepsia fotosensible es una forma de epilepsia refleja que ocurre en pacientes con crisis provocadas por la estimulación luminosa intermitente a variados estímulos (televisión, luz solar, videojuegos u otros. El objetivo fundamental de este trabajo es la presentación de 4 pacientes con las características de esta epilepsia. Se describieron las manifestaciones clínicas de cada uno y su tratamiento. Ningún paciente presentó crisis epilépticas espontáneas. En todos los niños la maniobra de la fotoestimulación fue positiva, pero no provocó crisis epilépticas. Se concluyó que lograr la eliminación de los estímulos que provocan las crisis es más importante que su tratamiento medicamentoso.Photosensitive epilepsy is a kind of reflex epilepsy occurring in patients with crises provoked by the intermittent luminous stimulation to different stimuli (television, sunlight, videogames, etc. The main objective of present paper is the presentation of four patients presenting the features of this type of epilepsy. The clinical manifestations of each and its treatment were described. Any patient had spontaneous epileptic crises. In all children the maneuver of photostimulation was positive, but without epileptic crises. We conclude that the achievement the elimination of stimuli provoking crisis is more important than its drug treatment.

  4. Dietary Therapies for Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric H Kossoff

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Since their introduction in 1921, high-fat, low-carbohydrate "ketogenic" diets have been used worldwide for refractory childhood epilepsy. Approximately half of the children have at least half their seizures reduced, including 15% who are seizure free. The mechanisms of action of dietary therapies are under active investigation and appear to involve mitochondria. Once perceived as a last resort, modifications to initiation and maintenance, as well as the widespread use of pre-made ketogenic formulas have allowed dietary treatment to be used earlier in the course of epilepsy. For infantile spasms (West syndrome specifically, the ketogenic diet is successful about 50% of the time as a first-line treatment. New "alternative" diets such as the modified Atkins diet were created in 2003 and can be started more easily and are less restrictive. They may have particular value for countries in Asia. Side effects include constipation, dyslipidemia, growth slowing, acidosis, and kidney stones. Additionally, neurologists are studying ketogenic diets for conditions other than epilepsy, including Alzheimer's disease, autism, and brain tumors.

  5. Nonpharmacological treatment of epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V S Saxena

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonpharmacological treatment of epilepsy includes surgery, vagal nerve stimulation, ketogenic diet, and other alternative/complementary therapies, e.g., yoga, Ayurveda, electroencephalography (EEG biofeedback technique, aerobic exercise, music therapy, transcranial magnetic stimulation, acupuncture, and herbal remedies (traditional Chinese medicine. Alternative therapies, despite the term, should not be considered as an alternative to antiepileptic medication; they complement accepted drug treatment. Alternative therapies like yoga, through techniques that relax the body and mind, reduce stress, improve seizure control, and also improve quality of life. Ketogenic diet is a safe and effective treatment for intractable epilepsies; it has been recommended since 1921. The diet induces ketosis, which may control seizures. The most successful treatment of epilepsy is with modern antiepileptic drugs, which can achieve control of seizures in 70-80% cases. Patients opt for alternative therapies because they may be dissatisfied with antiepileptic drugs due to their unpleasant side effects, the long duration of treatment, failure to achieve control of seizures, cultural beliefs and, in the case of women, because they wish to get pregnant Surgical treatment may lead to physical and psychological sequelae and is an option only for a minority of patients. This article presents supportive evidence from randomized controlled trials done to assess the benefit of non-pharmacological treatment.

  6. Quantification of perivascular spaces at 7T: A potential MRI biomarker for epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Rebecca Emily; Rutland, John Watson; Fields, Madeline Cara; Marcuse, Lara Vanessa; Pawha, Puneet S; Delman, Bradley Neil; Balchandani, Priti

    2017-11-20

    7T (7T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) facilitates the visualization of the brain with resolution and contrast beyond what is available at conventional clinical field strengths, enabling improved detection and quantification of small structural features such as perivascular spaces (PVSs). The distribution of PVSs, detected in vivo at 7T, may act as a biomarker for the effects of epilepsy. In this work, we systematically quantify the PVSs in the brains of epilepsy patients and compare them to healthy controls. T2-weighted turbo spin echo images were obtained at 7T on 21 epilepsy patients and 17 healthy controls. For all subjects, PVSs were manually marked on Osirix image analysis software. Marked PVSs with diameter≥0.5mm were then mapped by hemisphere and lobe. The asymmetry index (AI) was calculated for each region and the maximum asymmetry index (|AImax|) was reported for each subject. The asymmetry in epilepsy subjects was compared to that of controls, and the region with highest asymmetry was compared to the suspected seizure onset zone. There was a significant difference between the |AImax| in epilepsy subjects and in controls (p=0.016). In 72% of patients, the region or lobe of the brain showing maximum PVS asymmetry was the same as the region containing the suspected seizure onset zone. These findings suggest that epilepsy may be associated with significantly asymmetric distribution of PVSs in the brain. Furthermore, the region of maximal asymmetry of the PVSs may help provide localization or confirmation of the seizure onset zone. Copyright © 2017 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Epileptic encephalopathies (including severe epilepsy syndromes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covanis, Athanasios

    2012-09-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies represent a group of devastating epileptic disorders that appear early in life and are characterized by pharmacoresistant generalized or focal seizures, persistent severe electroencephalography (EEG) abnormalities, and cognitive dysfunction or decline. The ictal and interictal epileptic discharges are age-specific and are the main etiologic factors causing cognitive deterioration. This is most obvious in the idiopathic group. In the symptomatic group, the most common causes are structural, congenital, or acquired and rarely some metabolic disorders. In certain cases, clinical and EEG abnormalities persist and may evolve from one type to another as the child grows older. Various factors trigger and sustain the underlying pathophysiologic process and the ongoing epileptic and epileptiform activity during the most critical periods of brain maturation, perpetuating their deleterious effect on the brain. Immune-mediated mechanisms may have a role, suggested by certain encephalopathies responding to immune-modulating treatments and by the finding of various autoimmune antibodies. The chance of a better cognitive outcome improves with early diagnosis and treatment that is appropriate and effective. Current antiepileptic drugs are, in general, not effective: we urgently need new trials in this very special epileptic category. This article briefly reviews the most common epileptic encephalopathies and analyzes the most important clinical issues. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2012 International League Against Epilepsy.

  8. Focal epilepsies in adult patients attending two epilepsy centers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilioli, Isabella; Vignoli, Aglaia; Visani, Elisa

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To classify the grade of antiepileptic drug (AED) resistance in a cohort of patients with focal epilepsies, to recognize the risk factors for AED resistance, and to estimate the helpfulness of "new-generation" AEDs. METHODS: We included 1,155 adults with focal epilepsies who were observe...

  9. Understanding of Epilepsy by Children and Young People with Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Ann; Parsons, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    There is a striking dearth of studies focusing sensitively and in depth on the mainstream educational experiences of children with epilepsy, as viewed by those children themselves. The one-year project (2006-7) reported here addresses that gap. Children's perceptions about mainstream teachers' understanding of epilepsy and school-based needs are…

  10. The extratemporal lobe epilepsies in the epilepsy monitoring unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Deepa; Tripathi, Manjari

    2014-01-01

    Extratemporal lobe epilepsies (ETLE) are characterized by the epileptogenic foci outside the temporal lobe. They have a wide spectrum of semiological presentation depending upon the site of origin. They can arise from frontal, parietal, occipital lobes and from hypothalamic hamartoma. We discuss in this review the semiology of different types of ETLE encountered in the epilepsy monitoring unit. PMID:24791090

  11. Neuropsychological profiles and outcomes in children with new onset frontal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matricardi, Sara; Deleo, Francesco; Ragona, Francesca; Rinaldi, Victoria Elisa; Pelliccia, Sarah; Coppola, Giangennaro; Verrotti, Alberto

    2016-02-01

    Frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE) is the second most frequent type of localization-related epilepsy, and it may impact neurocognitive functioning with high variability. The prevalence of neurocognitive impairment in affected children remains poorly defined. This report outlines the neuropsychological profiles and outcomes in children with new onset FLE, and the impact of epilepsy-related factors, such as seizure frequency and antiepileptic drug (AED) load, on the neurocognitive development. Twenty-three consecutive children (15 males and 8 females) with newly diagnosed cryptogenic FLE were enrolled; median age at epilepsy onset was 7 years (6-9.6 years). They underwent clinical and laboratory evaluation and neuropsychological assessment before starting AED treatment (time 0) and after one year of treatment (time 1). Twenty age-matched patients affected by idiopathic generalized epilepsy (10 male and 10 females) and eighteen age-matched healthy subjects (9 males and 9 females) were enrolled as controls and underwent the same assessment. All patients with FLE showed a significant difference in almost all assessed cognitive domains compared with controls, mainly in frontal functions and memory. At time 1, patients were divided into two groups according to epilepsy-related factors: group 1 (9 patients) with persisting seizures despite AED polytherapy, and group 2 (14 patients) with good seizure control in monotherapy. A significant difference was highlighted in almost all subtests in group 1 compared with group 2, both at time 0 and at time 1. In children with FLE showing a broad range of neurocognitive impairments, the epilepsy-related factors mostly related to a worse neurocognitive outcome are poor seizure control and the use of AED polytherapy, suggesting that epileptic discharges may have a negative impact on the functioning of the involved cerebral regions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Prevalence, type of epilepsy and use of antiepileptic drugs in primary care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Suárez, Elena; Villa-Estébanez, Rubén; Garcia-Martinez, Alberto; Fidalgo-González, José A; Zanabili Al-Sibbai, Ahmad A; Salas-Puig, Javier

    2015-06-16

    Epilepsy is a disease with great social and economic impact. The prevalence should be used as the most important basis for planning the secondary and tertiary prevention. To identify patients with a diagnosis of epilepsy in a primary care center and determine the prevalence, demographic characteristics, type of epileptic syndrome and the use of antiepileptic drugs. Retrospective cross-sectional descriptive study. Included 196 patients with a diagnosis of epilepsy belonging to a primary care center and review the medical history, studying socio-demographic variables and clinical-pharmacological. The prevalence of epilepsy: 8.4/1000 inhabitants. Mean age: 50.3 years. Sex: 52.6% men. 79.6% urban. Family history of epilepsy: 14.8%. Type of epilepsy: symptomatic focal stroke (14.3%), idiopathic generalized (13.8%), focal cryptogenic (8.7%), not classified (31.1%). Average age at the beginning of seizures: 31.6 years. Neurological and/or psychiatric comorbidity: 62.8%. Last follow-up: 18.9% without antiepileptic treatment, 56.6% monotherapy and 24.5% polytherapy. Seizure-free: 76.5%. Drugs most frequently prescribed: valproic acid, carbamazepine, phenytoin, lamotrigine, levetiracetam. 78.6% without side effects. Exitus: 4.1%. The prevalence of patients with epilepsy was 8.4/1000 inhabitants, most frequent etiology the symptomatic focal stroke. More than half of patients suffered neurological and/or psychiatric comorbidity. At the end of follow-up the great majority were seizure-free without adverse effects of the antiepileptic drug treatment.

  13. Valproate in the treatment of epilepsy in girls and women of childbearing potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomson, Torbjörn; Marson, Anthony; Boon, Paul; Canevini, Maria Paola; Covanis, Athanasios; Gaily, Eija; Kälviäinen, Reetta; Trinka, Eugen

    2015-07-01

    This document provides guidance on the use of valproate in girls and women of childbearing age from a joint Task Force of the Commission on European Affairs of the International League Against Epilepsy (CEA-ILAE) and the European Academy of Neurology (EAN), following strengthened warnings from the Coordination Group for Mutual Recognition and Decentralised Procedures-Human (CMDh) of the European Medicines Agency (EMA), which highlight the risk of malformations and developmental problems in infants who are exposed to valproate in the womb. To produce these recommendations, the Task Force has considered teratogenic risks associated with use of valproate and treatment alternatives, the importance of seizure control and of patient and fetal risks with seizures, and the effectiveness of valproate and treatment alternatives in the treatment of different epilepsies. The Task Force's recommendations include the following: (1) Where possible, valproate should be avoided in women of childbearing potential. (2) The choice of treatment for girls and women of childbearing potential should be based on a shared decision between clinician and patient, and where appropriate, the patient's representatives. Discussions should include a careful risk-benefit assessment of reasonable treatment options for the patient's seizure or epilepsy type. (3) For seizure (or epilepsy) types where valproate is the most effective treatment, the risks and benefits of valproate and other treatment alternatives should be discussed. (4) Valproate should not be prescribed as a first-line treatment for focal epilepsy. (5) Valproate may be offered as a first-line treatment for epilepsy syndromes where it is the most effective treatment, including idiopathic (genetic) generalized syndromes associated with tonic-clonic seizures. (6) Valproate may be offered as a first-line treatment in situations where pregnancy is highly unlikely (e.g., significant intellectual or physical disability). (7) Women and girls

  14. Adult Prevalence of Epilepsy in Spain: EPIBERIA, a Population-Based Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro J. Serrano-Castro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study assesses the lifetime and active prevalence of epilepsy in Spain in people older than 18 years. Methods. EPIBERIA is a population-based epidemiological study of epilepsy prevalence using data from three representative Spanish regions (health districts in Zaragoza, Almería, and Seville between 2012 and 2013. The study consisted of two phases: screening and confirmation. Participants completed a previously validated questionnaire (EPIBERIA questionnaire over the telephone. Results. A total of 1741 valid questionnaires were obtained, including 261 (14.99% raising a suspicion of epilepsy. Of these suspected cases, 216 (82.75% agreed to participate in phase 2. Of the phase 2 participants, 22 met the International League Against Epilepsy’s diagnostic criteria for epilepsy. The estimated lifetime prevalence, adjusted by age and sex per 1,000 people, was 14.87 (95% CI: 9.8–21.9. Active prevalence was 5.79 (95% CI: 2.8–10.6. No significant age, sex, or regional differences in prevalence were detected. Conclusions. EPIBERIA provides the most accurate estimate of epilepsy prevalence in the Mediterranean region based on its original methodology and its adherence to ILAE recommendations. We highlight that the lifetime prevalence and inactive epilepsy prevalence figures observed here were compared to other epidemiological studies.

  15. Electroencephalography in dogs with epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berendt, Martin Ole; Høgenhaven, H; Flagstad, Annette Borgbjerg

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the diagnostic value of electroencephalography (EEG) in dogs with epilepsy, applying human criteria for EEG abnormalities observed with this disorder.......To investigate the diagnostic value of electroencephalography (EEG) in dogs with epilepsy, applying human criteria for EEG abnormalities observed with this disorder....

  16. Epilepsy and Comorbid Mental Retardation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Preventable and unpreventable causes of childhood-onset epilepsy associated with mental retardation were determined in 692 patients with epilepsy onset between 1977 and 1985 in a Nova Scotia population-based cohort studied in the Department of Pediatrics, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada.

  17. Novel approaches to epilepsy treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Andreas T; Kokaia, Merab

    2013-01-01

    The aim of epilepsy treatment is to achieve complete seizure freedom. Nonetheless, numerous side effects and seizure resistance to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) affecting about 30-40% of all patients are main unmet needs in today's epileptology. For this reason, novel approaches to treat epilepsy ar...

  18. The Music Student with Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdock, Matthew C.; Morgan, Joseph A.; Laverghetta, Thomas S.

    2012-01-01

    The teacher-student relationship can afford the music educator an opportunity to be the first to identify behaviors associated with epilepsy. A case of a student with epilepsy, based on the authors' experience, is described in which the music educators were the first and only individuals to become aware of a change in the student's behavior, after…

  19. Intracranial Vascular Malformations and Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josephson, Colin B; Rosenow, Felix; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam

    2015-06-01

    Among the spectrum of intracranial vascular malformations (IVMs), arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), and cavernous malformations (CCMs) are of particular importance for epilepsy. Seizures are a common mode of presentation for both conditions. Seizures may occur de novo or secondary to intracerebral hemorrhage. Timely imaging is thus crucial for patients with seizures and AVMs or CCMs. Patients with a first-ever AVM- or CCM-related seizure can now be considered to have epilepsy according to the International League Against Epilepsy criteria. Observational studies and case series suggest that between 45 to 78% of patients with AVM-related epilepsy and 47 to 60% of patients with CCM-related epilepsy may achieve seizure freedom through antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) alone. Invasive procedures are available although current evidence suggests that epilepsy-specific preintervention evaluations are underused. Randomized controlled trials and population-based studies have demonstrated worse short-term functional outcomes after routine intervention on unruptured AVMs or CCMs when compared with conservative management. The role of invasive therapy for IVM-related epilepsy has yielded mixed results. Case series have reported high estimates of seizure freedom although these results have not been replicated in controlled observational studies. Randomized controlled trials of immediate invasive therapy versus conservative management, in addition to usual care with AEDs and of different types of treatment and their timing, are warranted for AVMs and CCM-related epilepsy. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  20. Lamotrigine. An update of its pharmacology and therapeutic use in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitton, A; Goa, K L

    1995-10-01

    Lamotrigine is an antiepileptic agent which blocks voltage-dependent sodium channels, thereby preventing excitatory neurotransmitter release. Clinical evidence indicates that lamotrigine is effective against partial and secondarily generalised tonic-clonic seizures, as well as idiopathic (primary) generalised epilepsy. As monotherapy, lamotrigine 100 to 300 mg/day has similar medium term (30 to 48 weeks) efficacy to carbamazepine 300 to 1400 mg/day and phenytoin 300 mg/day against partial onset seizures and idiopathic generalised tonic-clonic seizures in adults with newly diagnosed epilepsy, and appears to be better tolerated than the older agents. As adjunctive therapy, lamotrigine (50 to 500 mg/day) has shown efficacy in short term ( epilepsy, reducing total seizure frequency (by or = 50% reduction in seizure frequency) in generalised tonic-clonic seizures are reduced by lamotrigine, with generalised seizures (particularly absence seizures, atonic seizures and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome) tending to be more responsive than partial seizures. This reduction in seizure frequency is sustained on long term ( lamotrigine ( or = 50% reductions in seizure frequency and approximately equal to 10 % achieving abolition of seizures after 3 months' treatment. Generalised seizures, including atypical and typical absence seizures, atonic and tonic seizures and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome are most responsive. The most common adverse events associated with lamotrigine are primarily neurological, gastrointestinal and dermatological. Maculopapular or erythematous skin rash, occasionally severe, occurs in approximately equal to 10% of patients and is the most common cause of treatment withdrawal. The risk of rash can, however, be minimised through adoption of a low, slow dosage titration schedule on initiating therapy. As monotherapy, lamotrigine produces less drowsiness than carbamazepine or phenytoin, and less asthenia and ataxia than phenytoin. Clinical experience would therefore suggest

  1. Epilepsy, language, and social skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Rochelle

    2017-10-04

    Language and social skills are essential for intrapersonal and interpersonal functioning and quality of life. Since epilepsy impacts these important domains of individuals' functioning, understanding the psychosocial and biological factors involved in the relationship among epilepsy, language, and social skills has important theoretical and clinical implications. This review first describes the psychosocial and biological factors involved in the association between language and social behavior in children and in adults and their relevance for epilepsy. It reviews the findings of studies of social skills and the few studies conducted on the inter-relationship of language and social skills in pediatric and adult epilepsy. The paper concludes with suggested future research and clinical directions that will enhance early identification and treatment of epilepsy patients at risk for impaired language and social skills. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Definition and classification of epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jibiki, Itsuki

    2014-05-01

    The concept or definition of epilepsy was mentioned as a chronic disease of the brain consisting of repetitions of EEG paroxysm and clinical seizures caused by excessive discharges of the cerebral neurons, in reference with Gastaut's opinion and the other statements. Further, we referred to diseases to be excluded from epilepsy such as isolated, occasional and subclinical seizures and so on. Next, new classifications of seizures and epilepsies were explained on the basis of revised terminology and concepts for organization of seizures and epilepsies in Report of the ILAE Communication in Classification and Terminology, 2005-09, in comparison with the Classification of Epileptic Seizures in 1981 and the Classification of Epilepsies and Epileptic Syndromes in 1989.

  3. Rationale for treating epilepsy in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guerrini, R; Arzimanoglou, A; Brouwer, O

    2002-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that the effects of antiepileptic drugs on childhood epilepsies are partly linked to the specific type of epilepsy or epilepsy syndrome. Most (but not all) types of epilepsy can be classified into categories that are conceptually meaningful. It is likewise logical to set

  4. The social and economic consequences of epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Poul; Gyllenborg, Jesper; Kjellberg, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    Epilepsy causes a significant burden to patients and to society. We aimed to calculate the factual excess in direct and indirect costs associated with epilepsy.......Epilepsy causes a significant burden to patients and to society. We aimed to calculate the factual excess in direct and indirect costs associated with epilepsy....

  5. 38 CFR 4.122 - Psychomotor epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Psychomotor epilepsy. 4... Psychomotor epilepsy. The term psychomotor epilepsy refers to a condition that is characterized by seizures... psychomotor epilepsy vary from patient to patient and in the same patient from seizure to seizure. (b) A...

  6. A single-blinded phenobarbital-controlled trial of levetiracetam as mono-therapy in dogs with newly diagnosed epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredsø, N.; Sabers, A.; Toft, Nils

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of canine epilepsy is problematic. Few antiepileptic drugs have proven efficacy in dogs and undesirable adverse effects and pharmacoresistance are not uncommon. Consequently, the need for investigation of alternative treatment options is ongoing. The objective of this study was to inves......Treatment of canine epilepsy is problematic. Few antiepileptic drugs have proven efficacy in dogs and undesirable adverse effects and pharmacoresistance are not uncommon. Consequently, the need for investigation of alternative treatment options is ongoing. The objective of this study...... was to investigate the efficacy and tolerability of levetiracetam as mono-therapy in dogs with idiopathic epilepsy. The study used a prospective single-blinded parallel group design. Twelve client-owned dogs were included and were randomised to treatment with levetiracetam (30 mg/kg/day or 60 mg/kg/day divided...... but were more frequent in the phenobarbital group. In this study levetiracetam was well tolerated but was not effective at the given doses as mono therapy in dogs with idiopathic epilepsy. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  7. A Review of Pinealectomy-Induced Melatonin-Deficient Animal Models for the Study of Etiopathogenesis of Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man Gene Chi Wai

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS is a common orthopedic disorder of unknown etiology and pathogenesis. Melatonin and melatonin pathway dysfunction has been widely suspected to play an important role in the pathogenesis. Many different types of animal models have been developed to induce experimental scoliosis mimicking the pathoanatomical features of idiopathic scoliosis in human. The scoliosis deformity was believed to be induced by pinealectomy and mediated through the resulting melatonin-deficiency. However, the lack of upright mechanical spinal loading and inherent rotational instability of the curvature render the similarity of these models to the human counterparts questionable. Different concerns have been raised challenging the scientific validity and limitations of each model. The objectives of this review follow the logical need to re-examine and compare the relevance and appropriateness of each of the animal models that have been used for studying the etiopathogenesis of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis in human in the past 15 to 20 years.

  8. A Review of Pinealectomy-Induced Melatonin-Deficient Animal Models for the Study of Etiopathogenesis of Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wai, Man Gene Chi; Jun, Wang William Wei; Yee, Yim Annie Po; Ho, Wong Jack; Bun, Ng Tzi; Ping, Lam Tsz; Man, Lee Simon Kwong; Wah, Ng Bobby Kin; Chiu, Wang Chi; Yong, Qiu; Yiu, Cheng Jack Chun

    2014-01-01

    Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is a common orthopedic disorder of unknown etiology and pathogenesis. Melatonin and melatonin pathway dysfunction has been widely suspected to play an important role in the pathogenesis. Many different types of animal models have been developed to induce experimental scoliosis mimicking the pathoanatomical features of idiopathic scoliosis in human. The scoliosis deformity was believed to be induced by pinealectomy and mediated through the resulting melatonin-deficiency. However, the lack of upright mechanical spinal loading and inherent rotational instability of the curvature render the similarity of these models to the human counterparts questionable. Different concerns have been raised challenging the scientific validity and limitations of each model. The objectives of this review follow the logical need to re-examine and compare the relevance and appropriateness of each of the animal models that have been used for studying the etiopathogenesis of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis in human in the past 15 to 20 years. PMID:25238413

  9. Atypical idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallner-Blazek, Mirja; Rovira, Alex; Fillipp, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Atypical lesions of a presumably idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating origin present quite variably and may pose diagnostic problems. The subsequent clinical course is also uncertain. We, therefore, wanted to clarify if atypical idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating lesions (AIIDLs) can...... and magnetic resonance imaging data and obtained follow-up (FU) information on 77 of these patients over a mean duration of 4 years. The AIIDLs presented as a single lesion in 72 (80 %) patients and exhibited an infiltrative (n = 35), megacystic (n = 16), Baló (n = 10) or ring-like (n = 16) lesion appearance...... in 77 (86 %) patients. Additional multiple sclerosis (MS)-typical lesions existed in 48 (53 %) patients. During FU, a further clinical attack occurred rarely (23-35 % of patients) except for patients with ring-like AIIDLs (62 %). Further attacks were also significantly more often in patients...

  10. Epidemiology of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ley B

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Brett Ley, Harold R Collard Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA Abstract: Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a chronic fibrotic lung disease of unknown cause that occurs in adults and has a poor prognosis. Its epidemiology has been difficult to study because of its rarity and evolution in diagnostic and coding practices. Though uncommon, it is likely underappreciated both in terms of its occurrence (ie, incidence, prevalence and public health impact (ie, health care costs and resource utilization. Incidence and mortality appear to be on the rise, and prevalence is expected to increase with the aging population. Potential risk factors include occupational and environmental exposures, tobacco smoking, gastroesophageal reflux, and genetic factors. An accurate understanding of its epidemiology is important, especially as novel therapies are emerging. Keywords: idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, epidemiology, incidence, prevalence, mortality, risk factors

  11. Idiopathic chondrolysis of the hip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shefali Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic chondrolysis is a rare condition characterized by the ultimate loss of femoroacetabular articular cartilage seen in a child with no history of trauma, slipped capital femoral epiphysis, infection, prolonged immobilization, or any other previously described disorder. The diagnosis is often delayed secondary to the insidious onset of symptoms, progressive radiographic findings, and the absence of diagnostic laboratory test. Typical radiographic features include localized osteoporosis, subchondral erosions, femoral head changes, and reduction of the joint space. Later changes include complete loss of the joint space, subchondral cysts, trochanteric and epiphyseal physeal closure, osteophytes, and in severe cases, protrusio acetabuli, ankylosis, and osteoarthritis. Magnetic resonance imaging of the hip demonstrates cartilage loss, joint effusion, marrow edema, femoral and acetabular remodeling, significant regional muscle atrophy, and synovial enhancement. We report a case of Idiopathic chondrolysis of the hip in an 11-year-old Indian girl.

  12. RBFOX1 and RBFOX3 mutations in rolandic epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lal, Dennis; Reinthaler, Eva M; Altmüller, Janine

    2013-01-01

    mutation (p.A233Vfs*74) and a hexanucleotide deletion (p.A299_A300del), and a novel nonsense mutation in RBFOX3 (p.Y287*). Although the three variants were inherited from unaffected parents, they were present in all family members exhibiting the RE trait clinically or electroencephalographically with only...... one exception. In contrast, no deleterious mutations of RBFOX1 and RBFOX3 were found in the exomes of 6503 non-RE subjects deposited in the Exome Variant Server database. The observed RBFOX3 exon 3 deletion and nonsense mutation suggest that RBFOX3 represents a novel risk factor for RE, indicating...... that exon deletions and truncating mutations of RBFOX1 and RBFOX3 contribute to the genetic variance of partial and generalized idiopathic epilepsy syndromes....

  13. Yoga for epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaratnam, S; Sridharan, K

    2000-01-01

    Stress is considered an important precipitating factor for seizures. Yoga is believed to induce relaxation and stress reduction. The effect of yoga on the EEG and the autonomic nervous system have been reported. Yoga would be an attractive therapeutic option for epilepsy (if proved effective), in view of its nonpharmacological nature, minimal side effects and international acceptance. To assess the efficacy of yoga in the treatment of patients with epilepsy. We searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group trial register, the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (The Cochrane Library Issue 4, 1998), MEDLINE for articles published up to the middle of 1998, and also registries of the research council for complimentary medicine were searched. In addition, we searched the references of all the identified studies. Finally, we contacted the members of the Neurological Society of India, several neurophysiology institutions and yoga institutes to seek any ongoing studies or studies published in nonindexed journals or unpublished studies. Randomized control trials and controlled clinical trials of treatment of epilepsy with yoga. The data were extracted independently by both reviewers and any discrepancies were resolved by discussion. The main outcomes assessed were percentage of patients rendered seizure free, number of patients with more than 50% reduction in seizure frequency or seizure duration and the overall reduction in seizure frequency. Analyses were on an intention to treat basis. Only one study met the selection criteria, and recruited a total of 32 patients, 10 to sahaja yoga and 22 to control treatments. Antiepileptic drugs were continued in all. Randomization was by roll of a dice. The results of this study are as follows: (i) Four patients treated with yoga were seizure free for six months compared to none in the control groups. The Odds Ratio (OR) (95% Confidence Interval (CI)) for yoga versus sham yoga group was 14.5 (0.7, 316.7) and for yoga versus no treatment

  14. Syphilis mimicking idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yri, Hanne; Wegener, Marianne; Jensen, Rigmor

    2011-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a condition of yet unknown aetiology affecting predominantly obese females of childbearing age. IIH is a diagnosis of exclusion as raised cerebrospinal fluid pressure may occur secondary to numerous other medical conditions. An atypical phenotype or a...... antibiotic treatment, signs and symptoms of elevated intracranial pressure resolved completely. Syphilis is a rare, but very important, differential diagnosis that in this case was clinically indistinguishable from IIH....

  15. Epigenomics of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Ivana V

    2012-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a complex lung disease of unknown etiology. Development of IPF is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. Gene-expression profiling studies have taught us quite a bit about the biology of this fatal disease, but epigenetic marks may be the missing link that connects the environmental exposure in genetically predisposed individuals to transcriptome changes associated with the development of IPF. This review will begin with an introduction to...

  16. Epigenetics of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Ivana V.; Schwartz, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a complex lung disease of unknown etiology. Development of IPF is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. Recent work by our and other groups has identified strong genetic predisposition factors for the development of pulmonary fibrosis while cigarette smoke remains the most strongly associated environmental exposure risk factor. Gene expression profiling studies of IPF lung have taught us quite a bit about the biology of this fatal disease...

  17. Phenobarbitone-induced haematological abnormalities in idiopathic epileptic dogs: prevalence, risk factors, clinical presentation and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersan, E; Volk, H A; Ros, C; De Risio, L

    2014-09-13

    The aim of this retrospective study was to assess prevalence, risk factors, clinical presentation and outcome of phenobarbitone induced haematological abnormalities (PBIHA) in dogs. The medical records of two veterinary referral institutions were searched for dogs diagnosed with idiopathic epilepsy and treated with PB as monotherapy or polytherapy between March 2003 and September 2010. Sixteen dogs had PBIHA; the median age at diagnosis was 69.5 months. Phenobarbitone was administered at a median dose of 3 mg/kg twice a day for a median period of 100.5 days and the median serum phenobarbitone level was 19 μg/ml. Two dogs had neutropenia, three had anaemia and thrombocytopenia, two had anaemia and neutropenia; the remaining nine had pancytopenia. All dogs were referred for non-specific clinical signs. Phenobarbitone was discontinued after diagnosis, and the median time to resolution of PBIHA was 17 days. The prevalence and risk factors for PBIHA were evaluated from a questionnaire survey of referring practices to obtain more detailed follow-up on cases diagnosed with idiopathic epilepsy. The prevalence rate of PBIHA was 4.2%, and the condition occurred in dogs treated with standard therapeutic doses often within the first three months after starting treatment. Serial haematological evaluations should be therefore considered from the beginning of phenobarbitone therapy to allow early diagnosis and treatment of PBIHA. British Veterinary Association.

  18. Papilledema and idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Deborah I

    2014-08-01

    Papilledema is one of the most concerning physical examination findings in neurology: it has a broad differential diagnosis of intracranial (and occasionally spinal) pathology associated with increased intracranial pressure. Papilledema impairs axoplasmic flow within the optic nerves and compresses the optic nerves externally; it may lead to profound visual loss. Thus, detection of papilledema and assessment of visual function are essential to patient management. This article reviews the treatment of papilledema-related visual loss in pseudotumor cerebri syndrome, one of the most common causes of papilledema encountered by neurologists. Results from the Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Trial (IIHTT), the first randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled trial for the treatment of patients with mild visual loss from idiopathic intracranial hypertension, were published in April 2014. The IIHTT provides the first evidence-based treatment recommendations, showing the benefit of acetazolamide and weight loss for improving visual status in patients with mild visual field loss from idiopathic intracranial hypertension. A detailed ophthalmic examination, including perimetry, is critical to the evaluation, treatment, and assessment of treatment response in patients with papilledema.

  19. Canine pododermatitis and idiopathic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breathnach, Rory M; Fanning, Shay; Mulcahy, Grace; Bassett, Hugh F; Jones, Boyd R

    2008-05-01

    Pododermatitis is a common inflammatory skin disease of dogs. As pedal lesions are reported in many canine dermatoses, a methodical series of diagnostic tests is required to establish the underlying aetiology. However, laboratory/ancillary investigations may prove unrewarding, prompting a diagnosis of idiopathic disease. Various hypotheses have been proposed to explain the pathogenesis of idiopathic pododermatitis including pedal conformation, trauma, immunosuppression, bacterial infection, furunculosis and dermal granuloma formation. Idiopathic pododermatitis accounts for 0.5% of all dermatology referrals to the authors' clinic. A sub-group within this population is characterised histopathologically by epidermal hyperplasia, hyperkeratosis, spongiosis, dermal oedema and perivascular aggregates of lymphocytes and plasma cells. The term lymphocytic-plasmacytic pododermatitis (LPP) has previously been proposed to reflect the histological appearance of such lesions. Affected dogs, although systemically well, characteristically have pruritus, erythema, swelling, pain and alopecia of the feet. Although non-responsive to antimicrobial therapy, antiparasitic agents and elimination diets, these dogs typically respond well to immunomodulatory therapy.

  20. [Physical therapy for idiopathic scoliosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffan, K

    2015-11-01

    The objective is the description and summary of the current state of idiopathic scoliosis treatment with physical therapy based on new scientific knowledge and concluded from more than 15 years of experience as a leading physician in two well-known clinics specializing in the conservative treatment of scoliosis. Based on current scientific publications on physical therapy in scoliosis treatment and resulting from the considerable personal experience gained working with conservative treatment and consulting scoliosis patients (as inpatients and outpatients), the current methods of physical therapy have been compared and evaluated. Physical therapy according to Schroth and Vojta therapy are at present the most common and effective methods in the physical treatment of idiopathic scoliosis. These methods can be applied during inpatient or outpatient treatment or intensified in the practice of specialized therapists. As there are only a few scientific studies on this subject, the author's findings are based mainly on his own experiences of the conservative treatment of idiopathic scoliosis. Athough these experiences are the results of over 15 years of working in the field of therapy, and the Schroth method in combination with corrective bracing presents highly promising results, it would nevertheless be desirable to conduct detailed scientific studies to verify the effectiveness of conservative treatment.

  1. Idiopathic polyhydramnios and postnatal findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorleijn, Desirée M J; Cohen-Overbeek, Titia E; Groenendaal, Floris; Bruinse, Hein W; Stoutenbeek, Philip

    2009-04-01

    Our objective was to investigate the outcome of neonates with idiopathic polyhydramnios in the first year after birth. All patients diagnosed in the Erasmus Medical Centre Rotterdam and the University Medical Centre Utrecht between January 2000 and April 2005 with idiopathic polyhydramnios were studied. The outcome variables included mode of delivery, pre-term delivery, birth weight, macrosomia, large-for-gestational-age (weight > p90), neonatal or infant mortality and infant morbidity at 1 year after delivery. These were related to antenatal findings, including the onset of polyhydramnios and ultrasonographic evidence of macrosomia (estimated fetal weight > p90). Polyhydramnios was diagnosed at a mean gestational age (+/- s.d.) of 31.0 +/- 4.9 weeks. The mean gestational age at birth (+/- s.d.) was 37.9 +/- 3.7 weeks. Macrosomia at birth was present in 25.3% (22/88). Sixty-three of 88 infants were in good health 1 year after birth; 20 infants had an abnormality and 5 children had died. Macrosomia and detection of polyhydramnios in the third trimester was associated significantly with a good outcome. In neonates with idiopathic polyhydramnios, abnormalities were detected during the first year of life in 28.4%. Detection of polyhydramnios in the second trimester and low or normal birth weight are risk factors for associated abnormalities.

  2. Epidemiology of epilepsy surgery in India

    OpenAIRE

    Chaturbhuj Rathore; Kurupath Radhakrishnan

    2017-01-01

    Epilepsy surgery in India has seen remarkable advances over the last twenty years. Presently 39 centers are undertaking epilepsy surgeries in India on a regular basis. Out of these, 18 centers have become operational in the last five years. Many of them are well equipped with high end technologies and have expertise to undertake all kinds of epilepsy surgeries. Till July 31st, 2016, approximately 7143 epilepsy surgeries have been performed in India. Presently, 734 epilepsy surgeries are carri...

  3. Epilepsy and anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marly de Albuquerque

    1993-09-01

    Full Text Available We have analyzed 155 subjects with STAI (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory: 75 epileptic patients and 80 normal subjects used as a control group. A higher trait-anxiety score (chronic anxiety than that of controls was found for the epileptic group. For the epileptic group higher levels of the A-trait occurred in patients with EEG abnormalities with left temporal localization. We have also observed that the shorter the epilepsy lasts (less than two years, the higher the trait-anxiety levels. Convulsions and awareness loss during epileptic seizures do not modify state and trait-anxiety scores.

  4. Guidelines for epilepsy management in India classification of seizures and epilepsy syndromes

    OpenAIRE

    Ramaratnam Sridharan; Satishchandra P

    2010-01-01

    This article is part of the Guidelines for Epilepsy management in India. This article reviews the classification systems used for epileptic seizures and epilepsy and present the recommendations based on current evidence. At present, epilepsy is classified according to seizure type and epilepsy syndrome using the universally accepted International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) classification of epileptic seizures and epilepsy syndromes. A multi-axial classification system incorporating ictal ...

  5. Genotypic and phenotypic spectrum of pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy (ALDH7A1 deficiency)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mills, Philippa B; Footitt, Emma J; Mills, Kevin A

    2010-01-01

    Pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy was recently shown to be due to mutations in the ALDH7A1 gene, which encodes antiquitin, an enzyme that catalyses the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent dehydrogenation of l-alpha-aminoadipic semialdehyde/L-Delta1-piperideine 6-carboxylate. However, whilst...... with suspected or clinically proven pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy and to characterize further the phenotypic spectrum of antiquitin deficiency. Urinary L-alpha-aminoadipic semialdehyde concentration was determined by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. When this was above the normal range, DNA......, through abnormal foetal movements and a multisystem neonatal disorder, to the onset of seizures and autistic features after the first year of life. Our relatively large series suggested that clinical diagnosis of pyridoxine dependent epilepsy can be challenging because: (i) there may be some response...

  6. Use of statistical parametric mapping of {sup 18}F-FDG-PET in frontal lobe epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plotkin, M.; Amthauer, H.; Luedemann, L.; Hartkop, E.; Ruf, J.; Gutberlet, M.; Bertram, H.; Felix, R.; Venz, St. [Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Universitaetsklinikum Charite, Med. Fakultaet der Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin (Germany); Merschhemke, M.; Meencke, H.-J. [Epilepsie-Zentrum Berlin-Brandenburg am Ev. Krkh. Koenigin Elisabeth Herzberge, Berlin (Germany)

    2003-10-01

    Aim: Evaluation of the use of statistical parametrical mapping (SPM) of FDG-PET for seizure lateralization in frontal lobe epilepsy. Patients: 38 patients with suspected frontal lobe epilepsy supported by clinical findings and video-EEG monitoring. Method: Statistical parametrical maps were generated by subtraction of individual scans from a control group, formed by 16 patients with negative neurological/psychiatric history and no abnormalities in the MR scan. The scans were also analyzed visually as well as semiquantitatively by manually drawn ROIs. Results: SPM showed a better accordance to the results of surface EEG monitoring compared with visual scan analysis and ROI quantification. In comparison with intracranial EEG recordings, the best performance was achieved by combining the ROI based quantification with SPM analysis. Conclusion: These findings suggest that SPM analysis of FDG-PET data could be a useful as complementary tool in the evaluation of seizure focus lateralization in patients with supposed frontal lobe epilepsy. (orig.)

  7. Epilepsy care in general practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Varley, J

    2009-06-01

    Epilepsy care in Ireland is shared between primary, secondary and tertiary care services with the General Practitioner (GP) managing the process. Barriers to effective epilepsy care in Irish general practice remain undocumented although sub-optimal and fragmented services are frequently anecdotally reported. This survey of Irish GPs reports on such barriers to epilepsy care and on the Information & Communication Technology (ICT) issues potentially relevant to the use of an epilepsy specific Electronic Patient Record (EPR). The response rate was 247\\/700 (35.3%). Respondents supported the concept of shared care for epilepsy 237 (96%) however they were very dissatisfied with existing neurology services, including pathways of referral 207 (84%) and access to specialist neurology advice and investigations 232 (94%). They reported that neurology services and investigations may be accessed more expeditiously by patients with private health insurance than those without 178 (72%). Consequently many patients are referred to the emergency department for assessment and treatment 180 (73%). A deficit in epilepsy care expertise among GPs was acknowledged 86 (35%). While computerisation of GP practices appears widespread 230 (93%), just over half the respondents utilise available electronic functionalities specific to chronic disease management. GP specific electronic systems infrequently link or communicate with external electronic sources 133 (54%). While the current pathways of care for epilepsy in Ireland appear fragmented and inadequate, further investigations to determine the quality and cost effectiveness of the current service are required.

  8. Why epilepsy challenges social life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiger, Bettina K; Jokeit, Hennric

    2017-01-01

    Social bonds are at the center of our daily living and are an essential determinant of our quality of life. In people with epilepsy, numerous factors can impede cognitive and affective functions necessary for smooth social interactions. Psychological and psychiatric complications are common in epilepsy and may hinder the processing of social information. In addition, neuropsychological deficits such as slowed processing speed, memory loss or attentional difficulties may interfere with enjoyable reciprocity of social interactions. We consider societal, psychological, and neuropsychological aspects of social life with particular emphasis on socio-cognitive functions in temporal lobe epilepsy. Deficits in emotion recognition and theory of mind, two main aspects of social cognition, are frequently observed in individuals with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Results from behavioural studies targeting these functions will be presented with a focus on their relevance for patients' daily life. Furthermore, we will broach the issue of pitfalls in current diagnostic tools and potential directions for future research. By giving a broad overview of individual and interpersonal determinants of social functioning in epilepsy, we hope to provide a basis for future research to establish social cognition as a key component in the comprehensive assessment and care of those with epilepsy. Copyright © 2016 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Epilepsy-related brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertürk Çetin, Özdem; İşler, Cihan; Uzan, Mustafa; Özkara, Çiğdem

    2017-01-01

    Seizures are among the most common presentations of brain tumors. Several tumor types can cause seizures in varying rates; neuroglial tumors and the gliomas are the most common ones. Brain tumors are the second most common cause of focal intractable epilepsy in epilepsy surgery series, with the highest frequency being dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors and gangliogliomas. Seizure management is an important part of the treatment of patients with brain tumors. This review discusses clinical features and management of seizures in patients with brain tumors, including, neuroglial tumors, gliomas, meningioma and metastases; with the help of recent literature data. Tumor-related seizures are focal seizures with or without secondary generalization. Seizures may occur either as initial symptom or during the course of the disease. Brain tumors related epilepsy tends to be resistant to antiepileptic drugs and treatment of tumor is main step also for the seizure treatment. Early surgery and extent of the tumor removal are important factors for achieving seizure freedom particularly in neuroglial tumors and low grade gliomas. During selection of the appropriate antiepileptic drug, the general approach to partial epilepsies can be followed. There are several factors influencing epileptogenesis in brain tumor-related epilepsy which also explains clinical heterogeneity of epilepsy among tumor types. Identification of molecular markers may guide future therapeutic approaches and further studies are needed to prove antitumor effects of different antiepileptic drugs. Copyright © 2016 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Recurrence risk of ictal asystole in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampel, Kevin G; Thijs, Roland D; Elger, Christian E; Surges, Rainer

    2017-08-22

    To determine the recurrence risk of ictal asystole (IA) and its determining factors in people with epilepsy. We performed a systematic review of published cases with IA in 3 databases and additionally searched our local database for patients with multiple seizures simultaneously recorded with ECG and EEG and at least one IA. IA recurrence risk was estimated by including all seizures without knowledge of the chronological order. Various clinical features were assessed by an individual patient data meta-analysis. A random mixed effect logistic regression model was applied to estimate the average recurrence risk of IA. Plausibility of the calculated IA recurrence risk was checked by analyzing the local dataset with available information in chronological order. Eighty patients with 182 IA in 537 seizures were included. Recurrence risk of IA amounted to 40% (95% confidence interval [CI] 32%-50%). None of the clinical factors (age, sex, type and duration of epilepsy, hemispheric lateralization, duration of IA per patient) appeared to have a significant effect on the short-term recurrence risk of IA. When considering the local dataset only, IA recurrence risk was estimated to 30% (95% CI 14%-53%). Information whether IA coincided with symptoms (i.e., syncope) or not was given in 60 patients: 100 out of 142 IAs were symptomatic. Our data suggest that in case of clinically suspected IA, the recording of 1 or 2 seizures is not sufficient to rule out IA. Furthermore, the high short-term recurrence risk favors aggressive treatment, including pacemaker implantation if seizure freedom cannot be achieved. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology.

  11. SPECT in Focal Epilepsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roderick Duncan

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain perfusion changes during seizures were first observed in the 1930s. Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT was developed in the 1970s, and tracers suitable for the imaging of regional cerebral perfusion (rCP became available in the 1980s. The method was first used to study rCP in the interictal phase, and this showed areas of low perfusion in a proportion of cases, mainly in patients with temporal lobe epilepsies. However, the trapping paradigm of tracers such as hexamethyl propyleneamine oxime (HMPAO provided a practicable method of studying changes in rCP during seizures, and a literature was established in the late 1980s and early 1990s showing a typical sequence of changes during and after seizures of mesial temporal lobe origin; the ictal phase was associated with large increases in perfusion throughout the temporal lobe, with first the lateral, then the mesial temporal lobe becoming hypoperfused in the postictal phase. Activation and inhibition of other structures, such as the basal ganglia and frontal cortex, were also seen. Studies of seizures originating elsewhere in the brain have shown a variety of patterns of change, according to the structures involved. These changes have been used practically to aid the process of localisation of the epileptogenic zone so that epilepsy surgery can be planned.

  12. Machado de Assis's epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerreiro, C A

    1992-09-01

    Machado de Assis (1839-1908) is considered the most important Brazilian writer and a great universal literary figure. Little is know about his medical, personal and family history. He hid his "disease" as much as possible. Machado referred to "strange things" having happened to him in his childhood. He described seizures as "nervous phenomena", "absenses", "my illness". Laet observed a seizure and described it as: "... when Machado approached us and spoke to me in disconnected words. I looked at him in surprise and found his features altered. Knowing that from time to time he had nervous problems, ... and only permitted Machado take the Laranjeiras Street car, when I saw that he was completely well". A photographically documented seizure is shown. Alencar wrote, "The preoccupation with health was frequent: either he was having the consequences of a fit or was foreboding one". It is clear that Machado presented localized symptomatic epilepsy with complex partial seizures secondarily generalized of unknown etiology. The seizures which began in infancy or childhood had remission in adolescence and then recurred in his thirties and became more frequent in his later years. His depression got markedly worse with age. In our opinion, the greatest consequence of Machado's epilepsy, was his psychological suffering due to the prejudice of the times. Despite this Machado showed all his genius, which is still actual and universal.

  13. Epilepsy in Dostoevsky's novels.

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    Voskuil, Piet H A

    2013-01-01

    Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky (1821-1881) suffered from epilepsy. Some type of psychopathology can be found in about 25% of the characters of his novels. Some of them have seizures. In at least five of them Dostoevsky clearly intends them to have epilepsy. Others are more likely to be created as people with hysteria or sometimes, for instance, possession. In this essay an inventory is given by more or less comprehensive quotes of different types of seizures in five novels. The seizures are named in the novels with a varying vocabulary based on the concepts of nosology in the 19th century, the knowledge of Dostoevsky of these concepts, his own experiences, and problems in translation and transliteration. In the discussion, analysis of the role these factors played in the understanding of what Dostoevsky really expressed is given attention. Special attention is given to the so-called ecstatic aura. This element of focal epileptic seizures is so rare that in the past the description of it raised doubts on its existence as such and therefore the embellishment by Dostoevsky, describing his own experience and/or that of his epileptic characters Kirillov and Myshkin. The consequence of this analytic approach, however, should not be losing one's amazement of the genius polyphonic creativity of Dostoevsky to integrate so many profound aspects of the human and especially the Russian soul in the characters of his novels. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. [Society, law and epilepsy].

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    Villanueva-Gómez, F; Fernández-Miranda, M C

    2002-09-01

    Epilepsy is an important problem from a medical, social and legal point of view. Proof of this is the fact that it constitutes the second most commonly alleged cause for absolution of responsibility in Spain, according to the jurisprudence from the Supreme Court (1976 1995). Throughout history it has been classified as a magical, supernatural disease and has been studied within psychiatry as an endogenous psychosis. It has therefore been considered a form of madness, which has led to court decisions that have taken this concept into account. The supposed dangerousness of suffers from epilepsy must be the exception, and their supposed epileptic characters and personalities that drive them to commit atrocious murders are no longer of any relevance. The problems stemming from epileptic seizures are to be seen in civil, penal, military, canonical and labour law, very often in an exclusive fashion. We think it is worthwhile reviewing these concepts with a view to their undergoing a later modification, which would lead to the full integration of these patients and to their being considered as suffering from a neurological illness.

  15. Epilepsy and sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Linschoten, R; Backx, F J; Mulder, O G; Meinardi, H

    1990-07-01

    Millions of healthy people participate in sport on a regular basis. Moreover, in the last decade patients with chronic disorders have been encouraged to take part in sporting activities as a part of their rehabilitation. Can epileptic patients freely participate in sport or whether they are restricted to a certain extent by their disorder? An important factor is freedom from seizures. If seizures have been controlled for over 2 years the risk of relapse is the same as the risk of a first seizure. The risk of patients drowning or falling, or their epilepsy worsening because they are engaged in sport is thought to be low. Clinical data suggest that the incidence of seizures during sports and exercise is reduced. In the cooling down period, however, seizures tend to occur more frequently. Physicians should encourage epileptic patients to participate in sporting activities to enhance their physical fitness, self-esteem, and social integration. Before giving advice about the most suitable type of sport, the physician should known the patient's medical history, have a good insight into the different types of sport and be able to judge the role and function of sport to the particular patient. With certain precautions virtually all sports are suitable for most epileptic patients and should therefore be encouraged. However, a small minority of hospitalised patients with severe epilepsy need the supervision of qualified trainers, coaches and volunteers.

  16. Prevalence of epilepsy and seizure disorders as causes of apparent life- threatening event (ALTE in children admitted to a tertiary hospital Prevalência de epilepsia e crises epilépticas como causa de eventos com aparente risco de vida (ALTE em crianças internadas em hospital terciário

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Marques dos Anjos

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence and describe clinical characteristics of seizure disorders and epilepsy as causes of apparent life- threatening event (ALTE in children admitted at the emergency and followed in a tertiary hospital. METHOD: Cross-sectional study with prospective data collection using specific guidelines to determine the etiology of ALTE. RESULTS: During the study, 30 (4.2% children admitted to the hospital had a diagnosis of ALTE. There was a predominance of males (73% and term infants (70%. Neonatal neurological disorders and neuropsychomotor development delay were found respectively in 13.4% and 10% of the cases. Etiological investigation revealed that 50% of the cases were idiopathic, and 13.4% were caused by epilepsy or seizure disorders. Although all patients had recurrent ALTE events, epilepsy had not been previously suspected. CONCLUSION: Epilepsy should be included in the differential diagnosis of ALTE, particularly when events are recurrent.OBJETIVO: Determinar a prevalência e características clínicas de crises epilépticas e epilepsia como causa de eventos com aparente risco de vida (ALTE em crianças atendidas na emergência e acompanhadas em hospital terciário. MÉTODO: Estudo transversal com coleta prospectiva de dados através de protocolo específico para identificação da etiologia de ALTE. RESULTADOS: Foram diagnosticadas 30 crianças com ALTE perfazendo 4.2% das crianças internadas no período do estudo. Houve predominância no sexo masculino (73% e em neonatos a termo (70%. História prévia de doenças neurológicas no período neonatal e atraso no desenvolvimento neuropsicomotor ocorreram respectivamente em 13.4% e 10% dos casos. A investigação etiológica identificou 13.4% dos casos relacionados a epilepsia ou crise convulsivas e 50% idiopáticos. Apesar destes pacientes terem apresentados episódios recorrentes em nenhum caso havia a suspeita prévia de epilepsia. CONCLUSÃO: Ao investigar

  17. Genome wide high density SNP-based linkage analysis of childhood absence epilepsy identifies a susceptibility locus on chromosome 3p23-p14

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chioza, Barry A; Aicardi, Jean; Aschauer, Harald

    2009-01-01

    Childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) is an idiopathic generalised epilepsy (IGE) characterised by typical absence seizures manifested by transitory loss of awareness with 2.5-4 Hz spike-wave complexes on ictal EEG. A genetic component to the aetiology is well recognised but the mechanism of inheritance.......1.1 and a susceptibility locus was identified on chromosome 3p23-p14 (Z(mean)=3.9, palpha=0.7). The linked region harbours the functional candidate genes TRAK1 and CACNA2D2. Fine-mapping using a tagSNP approach demonstrated disease association with variants in TRAK1....

  18. Glutamatergic alterations in the cortex of genetic absence epilepsy rats

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    Didier-Bazes Marianne

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In absence epilepsy, the neuronal hyper-excitation and hyper-synchronization, which induce spike and wave discharges in a cortico-thalamic loop are suspected to be due to an imbalance between GABA and glutamate (GLU neurotransmission. In order to elucidate the role played by GLU in disease outcome, we measured cortical and thalamic extracellular levels of GLU and GABA. We used an in vivo quantitative microdialysis approach (no-net-flux method in an animal model of absence epilepsy (GAERS. In addition, by infusing labelled glutamate through the microdialysis probe, we studied in vivo glutamate uptake in the cortex and thalamus in GAERS and non-epileptic control (NEC rats. Expression of the vesicular glutamate transporters VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 and a synaptic component, synaptophysin, was also measured. Results Although extracellular concentrations of GABA and GLU in the cortex and thalamus were not significantly different between GAERS and NEC rats, cortical GLU uptake was significantly decreased in unrestrained awake GAERS. Expression of VGLUT2 and synaptophysin was increased in the cortex of GAERS compared to NEC rats, but no changes were observed in the thalamus. Conclusion The specific decrease in GLU uptake in the cortex of GAERS linked to synaptic changes suggests impairment of the glutamatergic terminal network. These data support the idea that a change in glutamatergic neurotransmission in the cortex could contribute to hyperexcitability in absence epilepsy.

  19. Visual and auditory socio-cognitive perception in unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy in children and adolescents: a prospective controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Agathe; Arzimanoglou, Alexis; Panagiotakaki, Eleni; Sfaello, Ignacio; Kahane, Philippe; Ryvlin, Philippe; Hirsch, Edouard; de Schonen, Scania

    2014-12-01

    A high rate of abnormal social behavioural traits or perceptual deficits is observed in children with unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy. In the present study, perception of auditory and visual social signals, carried by faces and voices, was evaluated in children or adolescents with temporal lobe epilepsy. We prospectively investigated a sample of 62 children with focal non-idiopathic epilepsy early in the course of the disorder. The present analysis included 39 children with a confirmed diagnosis of temporal lobe epilepsy. Control participants (72), distributed across 10 age groups, served as a control group. Our socio-perceptual evaluation protocol comprised three socio-visual tasks (face identity, facial emotion and gaze direction recognition), two socio-auditory tasks (voice identity and emotional prosody recognition), and three control tasks (lip reading, geometrical pattern and linguistic intonation recognition). All 39 patients also benefited from a neuropsychological examination. As a group, children with temporal lobe epilepsy performed at a significantly lower level compared to the control group with regards to recognition of facial identity, direction of eye gaze, and emotional facial expressions. We found no relationship between the type of visual deficit and age at first seizure, duration of epilepsy, or the epilepsy-affected cerebral hemisphere. Deficits in socio-perceptual tasks could be found independently of the presence of deficits in visual or auditory episodic memory, visual non-facial pattern processing (control tasks), or speech perception. A normal FSIQ did not exempt some of the patients from an underlying deficit in some of the socio-perceptual tasks. Temporal lobe epilepsy not only impairs development of emotion recognition, but can also impair development of perception of other socio-perceptual signals in children with or without intellectual deficiency. Prospective studies need to be designed to evaluate the results of appropriate re

  20. A prospective study of direct medical costs in a large cohort of consecutively enrolled patients with refractory epilepsy in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luoni, Chiara; Canevini, Maria Paola; Capovilla, Giuseppe; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Galimberti, Carlo Andrea; Gatti, Giuliana; Guerrini, Renzo; La Neve, Angela; Mazzucchelli, Iolanda; Rosati, Eleonora; Specchio, Luigi Maria; Striano, Salvatore; Tinuper, Paolo; Perucca, Emilio

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate direct medical costs and their predictors in patients with refractory epilepsy enrolled into the SOPHIE study (Study of Outcomes of PHarmacoresistance In Epilepsy) in Italy. Adults and children with refractory epilepsy were enrolled consecutively at 11 tertiary referral centers and followed for 18 months. At entry, all subjects underwent a structured interview and a medical examination, and were asked to keep records of diagnostic examinations, laboratory tests, specialist consultations, treatments, hospital admissions, and day-hospital days during follow-up. Study visits included assessments every 6 months of seizure frequency, health-related quality of life (Quality of Life in Epilepsy Inventory 31), medication-related adverse events (Adverse Event Profile) and mood state (Beck Depression Inventory-II). Cost items were priced by applying Italian tariffs. Cost estimates were adjusted to 2013 values. Of 1,124 enrolled individuals, 1,040 completed follow-up. Average annual cost per patient was € 4,677. The highest cost was for antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment (50%), followed by hospital admissions (29% of overall costs). AED polytherapy, seizure frequency during follow-up, grade III pharmacoresistance, medical and psychiatric comorbidities, and occurrence of status epilepticus during follow-up were identified as significant predictors of higher costs. Age between 6 and 11 years, and genetic (idiopathic) generalized epilepsies were associated with the lowest costs. Costs showed prominent variation across centers, largely due to differences in the clinical characteristics of cohorts enrolled at each center and the prescribing of second-generation AEDs. Individual outliers associated with high costs related to hospital admissions had a major influence on costs in many centers. Refractory epilepsy is associated with high costs that affect individuals and society. Costs differ across centers in relation to the characteristics of patients and the extent of