WorldWideScience

Sample records for suspected human carcinogen

  1. Animal carcinogenicity studies: 1. Poor human predictivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Andrew; Bailey, Jarrod; Balcombe, Jonathan

    2006-02-01

    The regulation of human exposure to potentially carcinogenic chemicals constitutes society's most important use of animal carcinogenicity data. Environmental contaminants of greatest concern within the USA are listed in the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) chemicals database. However, of the 160 IRIS chemicals lacking even limited human exposure data but possessing animal data that had received a human carcinogenicity assessment by 1 January 2004, we found that in most cases (58.1%; 93/160), the EPA considered animal carcinogenicity data inadequate to support a classification of probable human carcinogen or non-carcinogen. For the 128 chemicals with human or animal data also assessed by the World Health Organisation's International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), human carcinogenicity classifications were compatible with EPA classifications only for those 17 having at least limited human data (p = 0.5896). For those 111 primarily reliant on animal data, the EPA was much more likely than the IARC to assign carcinogenicity classifications indicative of greater human risk (p leading international authority on carcinogenicity assessments, and its significantly different human carcinogenicity classifications of identical chemicals indicate that: 1) in the absence of significant human data, the EPA is over-reliant on animal carcinogenicity data; 2) as a result, the EPA tends to over-predict carcinogenic risk; and 3) the true predictivity for human carcinogenicity of animal data is even poorer than is indicated by EPA figures alone. The EPA policy of erroneously assuming that tumours in animals are indicative of human carcinogenicity is implicated as a primary cause of these errors.

  2. On the International Agency for Research on Cancer classification of glyphosate as a probable human carcinogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarone, Robert E

    2017-11-08

    The recent classification by International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) of the herbicide glyphosate as a probable human carcinogen has generated considerable discussion. The classification is at variance with evaluations of the carcinogenic potential of glyphosate by several national and international regulatory bodies. The basis for the IARC classification is examined under the assumptions that the IARC criteria are reasonable and that the body of scientific studies determined by IARC staff to be relevant to the evaluation of glyphosate by the Monograph Working Group is sufficiently complete. It is shown that the classification of glyphosate as a probable human carcinogen was the result of a flawed and incomplete summary of the experimental evidence evaluated by the Working Group. Rational and effective cancer prevention activities depend on scientifically sound and unbiased assessments of the carcinogenic potential of suspected agents. Implications of the erroneous classification of glyphosate with respect to the IARC Monograph Working Group deliberative process are discussed.

  3. Binding of chemical carcinogens to macromolecules in cultured human colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Autrup, Herman; Harris, C.C.; Stoner, G.D.

    1977-01-01

    Metabolic activation of different chemical classes of carcinogens was studied in cultured human colon epithelia. Human colon epithelia were maintained in explant culture up to 4 days. Binding of benzo(a)pyrene, dimethylnitrosamine, and 1,2- dimethylhydrazine was found in both cell DNA and protein...

  4. IARC Monographs: 40 Years of Evaluating Carcinogenic Hazards to Humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pearce, Neil; Blair, Aaron; Vineis, Paolo; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Andersen, Aage; Anto, Josep M.; Armstrong, Bruce K.; Baccarelli, Andrea A.; Beland, Frederick A.; Berrington, Amy; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Birnbaum, Linda S.; Brownson, Ross C.; Bucher, John R.; Cantor, Kenneth P.; Cardis, Elisabeth; Cherrie, John W.; Christiani, David C.; Cocco, Pierluigi; Coggon, David; Comba, Pietro; Demers, Paul A.; Dement, John M.; Douwes, Jeroen; Eisen, Ellen A.; Engel, Lawrence S.; Fenske, Richard A.; Fleming, Lora E.; Fletcher, Tony; Fontham, Elizabeth; Forastiere, Francesco; Frentzel-Beyme, Rainer; Fritschi, Lin; Gerin, Michel; Goldberg, Marcel; Grandjean, Philippe; Grimsrud, Tom K.; Gustavsson, Per; Haines, Andy; Hartge, Patricia; Hansen, Johnni; Hauptmann, Michael; Heederik, Dick; Hemminki, Kari; Hemon, Denis; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Hoppin, Jane A.; Huff, James; Jarvholm, Bengt; Kang, Daehee; Karagas, Margaret R.; Kjaerheim, Kristina; Kjuus, Helge; Kogevinas, Manolis; Kriebel, David; Kristensen, Petter; Kromhout, Hans; Laden, Francine; Lebailly, Pierre; LeMasters, Grace; Lubin, Jay H.; Lynch, Charles F.; Lynge, Elsebeth; 't Mannetje, Andrea; McMichael, Anthony J.; McLaughlin, John R.; Marrett, Loraine; Martuzzi, Marco; Merchant, James A.; Merler, Enzo; Merletti, Franco; Miller, Anthony; Mirer, Franklin E.; Monson, Richard; Nordby, Karl-Cristian; Olshan, Andrew F.; Parent, Marie-Elise; Perera, Frederica P.; Perry, Melissa J.; Pesatori, Angela Cecilia; Pirastu, Roberta; Porta, Miquel; Pukkala, Eero; Rice, Carol; Richardson, David B.; Ritter, Leonard; Ritz, Beate; Ronckers, Cecile M.; Rushton, Lesley; Rusiecki, Jennifer A.; Rusyn, Ivan; Samet, Jonathan M.; Sandler, Dale P.; de Sanjose, Silvia; Schernhammer, Eva; Costantini, Adele Seniori; Seixas, Noah; Shy, Carl; Siemiatycki, Jack; Silverman, Debra T.; Simonato, Lorenzo; Smith, Allan H.; Smith, Martyn T.; Spinelli, John J.; Spitz, Margaret R.; Stallones, Lorann; Stayner, Leslie T.; Steenland, Kyle; Stenzel, Mark; Stewart, Bernard W.; Stewart, Patricia A.; Symanski, Elaine; Terracini, Benedetto; Tolbert, Paige E.; Vainio, Harri; Vena, John; Vermeulen, Roel; Victora, Cesar G.; Ward, Elizabeth M.; Weinberg, Clarice R.; Weisenburger, Dennis; Wesseling, Catharina; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Zahm, Shelia Hoar

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Programme for the Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks to Humans has been criticized for several of its evaluations, and also for the approach used to perform these evaluations. Some critics have claimed that failures of IARC Working

  5. IARC Monographs: 40 Years of Evaluating Carcinogenic Hazards to Humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pearce, Neil E; Blair, Aaron; Vineis, Paolo; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Andersen, Aage; Anto, Josep M; Armstrong, Bruce K; Baccarelli, Andrea A; Beland, Frederick A; Berrington, Amy; Bertazzi, Pier A; Birnbaum, Linda S; Brownson, Ross C; Bucher, John R; Cantor, Kenneth P; Cardis, Elisabeth; Cherrie, John W; Christiani, David C; Cocco, Pierluigi; Coggon, David; Comba, Pietro; Demers, Paul A; Dement, John M; Douwes, Jeroen; Eisen, Ellen A; Engel, Lawrence S; Fenske, Richard A; Fleming, Lora E; Fletcher, Tony; Fontham, Elizabeth; Forastiere, Francesco; Frentzel-Beyme, Rainer; Fritschi, Lin; Gerin, Michel; Goldberg, Marcel; Grandjean, Philippe; Grimsrud, Tom K; Gustavsson, Per; Haines, Andy; Hartge, Patricia; Hansen, Johnni; Hauptmann, Michael; Heederik, Dick; Hemminki, Kari; Hemon, Denis; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Hoppin, Jane A; Huff, James; Jarvholm, Bengt; Kang, Daehee; Karagas, Margaret R; Kjaerheim, Kristina; Kjuus, Helge; Kogevinas, Manolis; Kriebel, David; Kristensen, Petter; Kromhout, Hans; Laden, Francine; Lebailly, Pierre; LeMasters, Grace; Lubin, Jay H; Lynch, Charles F; Lynge, Elsebeth; 't Mannetje, Andrea; McMichael, Anthony J; McLaughlin, John R; Marrett, Loraine; Martuzzi, Marco; Merchant, James A; Merler, Enzo; Merletti, Franco; Miller, Anthony; Mirer, Franklin E; Monson, Richard; Nordby, Karl-Kristian; Olshan, Andrew F; Parent, Marie-Elise; Perera, Frederica P; Perry, Melissa J; Pesatori, Angela C; Pirastu, Roberta; Porta, Miquel; Pukkala, Eero; Rice, Carol; Richardson, David B; Ritter, Leonard; Ritz, Beate; Ronckers, Cecile M; Rushton, Lesley; Rusiecki, Jennifer A; Rusyn, Ivan; Samet, Jonathan M; Sandler, Dale P; de Sanjose, Silvia; Schernhammer, Eva; Seniori Constantini, Adele; Seixas, Noah; Shy, Carl; Siemiatycki, Jack; Silvermann, Debra T; Simonato, Lorenzo; Smith, Allan H; Smith, Martyn T; Spinelli, John J; Spitz, Margaret R; Stallones, Lorann; Stayner, Leslie T; Steenland, Kyle; Stenzel, Mark; Stewart, Bernard W; Stewart, Patricia A; Symanski, Elaine; Terracini, Benedetto; Tolbert, Paige E; Vainio, Harri; Vena, John; Vermeulen, Roel; Victora, Cesar G; Ward, Elizabeth M; Weinberg, Clarice R; Weisenburger, Dennis; Wesseling, Catharina; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Zahm, Shelia H

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recently the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Programme for the Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks to Humans has been criticized for several of its evaluations, and also the approach used to perform these evaluations. Some critics have claimed that IARC Working Groups'

  6. Mycotoxins as human carcinogens-the IARC Monographs classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostry, Vladimir; Malir, Frantisek; Toman, Jakub; Grosse, Yann

    2017-02-01

    Humans are constantly exposed to mycotoxins (e.g. aflatoxins, ochratoxins), mainly via food intake of plant and animal origin. The health risks stemming from mycotoxins may result from their toxicity, in particular their carcinogenicity. In order to prevent these risks, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) in Lyon (France)-through its IARC Monographs programme-has performed the carcinogenic hazard assessment of some mycotoxins in humans, on the basis of epidemiological data, studies of cancer in experimental animals and mechanistic studies. The present article summarizes the carcinogenic hazard assessments of those mycotoxins, especially aflatoxins (aflatoxin B1, B2, G1, G2 and M1), fumonisins (fumonisin B1 and B2) and ochratoxin A (OTA). New information regarding the genotoxicity of OTA (formation of OTA-DNA adducts), the role of OTA in oxidative stress and the identification of epigenetic factors involved in OTA carcinogenesis-should they indeed provide strong evidence that OTA carcinogenicity is mediated by a mechanism that also operates in humans-could lead to the reclassification of OTA.

  7. Monitoring human exposure to 2-hydroxyethylating carcinogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farmer, P.B.; Cordero, Rosa; Autrup, Herman

    1996-01-01

    It is known that human hemoglobin contains low levels of N-terminal N-(2-hydroxyethyl)valine. Possible sources of this modified amino acid are exposure to ethylene oxide or other 2-hydroxy-ethylating agents. Although such processes are likely to occur endogenously, the exogenous contribution to t...

  8. Heterocyclic amines: human carcinogens in cooked food?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfau, W; Knasmueller, S; Glatt, H R; Frandsen, H; Alexander, J; Murkovic, M; Sontag, G; Galceran, T; Edenharder, R; Skog, K

    2001-08-01

    During the frying of meat and fish, genotoxic heterocyclic amines (HCAs) are formed. The dietary exposure to HCAs may be implicated in the aetiology of human cancer, but there may be other factors in our diet that prevent the genotoxic effects of these compounds. Within the project described here, we plan to identify regional and individual cooking habits that affect HCA-levels in our food. These are determined with a validated analytical method and the exposure to HCAs is estimated by dietary assessment. Biomarker analysis will be employed to estimate recent or long-term exposure to HCAs. In order to identify genetically determined risk factors in humans, cell lines are genetically engineered expressing allelic variants of acetyl- and sulfotransferases implicated in HCA metabolism. Species differences of metabolism and toxicity of HCAs are assessed and the influence of the intestinal microflora on HCA-induced toxicity is evaluated. Dietary constituents that may reduce the genotoxicity of HCAs are screened for potential protective effects in in vitro and in vivo model systems. Finally, we will aim at human intervention studies to investigate if these protective factors are relevant for man. The objectives of this project are to estimate and possibly reduce the exposure levels to HCAs in Europe, to identify populations highly susceptible to HCA toxicity, and to reduce the toxic effects of HCAs by protective factors.

  9. Human gastric cancer, Helicobacter pylori and bracken carcinogens: A connecting hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveros-Bastidas, Alberto; Calcagno-Pissarelli, María Pía; Naya, Marlene; Ávila-Núñez, Jorge Luis; Alonso-Amelot, Miguel E

    2016-03-01

    Long term infection of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) virulent strains is a key factor in the genesis of human gastric cancer, and so are certain dietary proinflammatory and genotoxic compounds. Carcinogenic bracken fern (Pteridium spp.) is one of these. Toxins from this plant are consumed as bracken culinary preparations, through milk and meat of bracken-exposed livestock, and drain waters from bracken swards. Bracken toxin ptaquiloside (PtQ), a suspected human carcinogen, elicits complex responses in animals leading to death. PtQ and Hp might cooperate in gastric pathologies. This paper presents an hypothesis on PtQ-Hp association leading to the enhancement of carcinogenesis in the human gastric environment that might explain the high gastric cancer incidence and death rates among Hp-infected people living in bracken zones at two levels: (1) The macroscopic scale comprising the flow of PtQ in the human diet. (2) the microscopic scale encompassing (A) gastric luminal medium; (B) gastric mucus structure and mucin degradation elicited by Hp; (C) bacterial pH gradient modification of the gastric mucosa that favors PtQ survival and its penetration into epithelial tissue; (D) combined PtQ/Hp effects on gastric immune and inflammatory responses; (E) PtQ-Hp complementary activity at selected cell signaling cascades and genome disturbance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. IARC monographs: 40 years of evaluating carcinogenic hazards to humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Neil; Blair, Aaron; Vineis, Paolo; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Andersen, Aage; Anto, Josep M; Armstrong, Bruce K; Baccarelli, Andrea A; Beland, Frederick A; Berrington, Amy; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Birnbaum, Linda S; Brownson, Ross C; Bucher, John R; Cantor, Kenneth P; Cardis, Elisabeth; Cherrie, John W; Christiani, David C; Cocco, Pierluigi; Coggon, David; Comba, Pietro; Demers, Paul A; Dement, John M; Douwes, Jeroen; Eisen, Ellen A; Engel, Lawrence S; Fenske, Richard A; Fleming, Lora E; Fletcher, Tony; Fontham, Elizabeth; Forastiere, Francesco; Frentzel-Beyme, Rainer; Fritschi, Lin; Gerin, Michel; Goldberg, Marcel; Grandjean, Philippe; Grimsrud, Tom K; Gustavsson, Per; Haines, Andy; Hartge, Patricia; Hansen, Johnni; Hauptmann, Michael; Heederik, Dick; Hemminki, Kari; Hemon, Denis; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Hoppin, Jane A; Huff, James; Jarvholm, Bengt; Kang, Daehee; Karagas, Margaret R; Kjaerheim, Kristina; Kjuus, Helge; Kogevinas, Manolis; Kriebel, David; Kristensen, Petter; Kromhout, Hans; Laden, Francine; Lebailly, Pierre; LeMasters, Grace; Lubin, Jay H; Lynch, Charles F; Lynge, Elsebeth; 't Mannetje, Andrea; McMichael, Anthony J; McLaughlin, John R; Marrett, Loraine; Martuzzi, Marco; Merchant, James A; Merler, Enzo; Merletti, Franco; Miller, Anthony; Mirer, Franklin E; Monson, Richard; Nordby, Karl-Cristian; Olshan, Andrew F; Parent, Marie-Elise; Perera, Frederica P; Perry, Melissa J; Pesatori, Angela Cecilia; Pirastu, Roberta; Porta, Miquel; Pukkala, Eero; Rice, Carol; Richardson, David B; Ritter, Leonard; Ritz, Beate; Ronckers, Cecile M; Rushton, Lesley; Rusiecki, Jennifer A; Rusyn, Ivan; Samet, Jonathan M; Sandler, Dale P; de Sanjose, Silvia; Schernhammer, Eva; Costantini, Adele Seniori; Seixas, Noah; Shy, Carl; Siemiatycki, Jack; Silverman, Debra T; Simonato, Lorenzo; Smith, Allan H; Smith, Martyn T; Spinelli, John J; Spitz, Margaret R; Stallones, Lorann; Stayner, Leslie T; Steenland, Kyle; Stenzel, Mark; Stewart, Bernard W; Stewart, Patricia A; Symanski, Elaine; Terracini, Benedetto; Tolbert, Paige E; Vainio, Harri; Vena, John; Vermeulen, Roel; Victora, Cesar G; Ward, Elizabeth M; Weinberg, Clarice R; Weisenburger, Dennis; Wesseling, Catharina; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Zahm, Shelia Hoar

    2015-06-01

    Recently, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Programme for the Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks to Humans has been criticized for several of its evaluations, and also for the approach used to perform these evaluations. Some critics have claimed that failures of IARC Working Groups to recognize study weaknesses and biases of Working Group members have led to inappropriate classification of a number of agents as carcinogenic to humans. The authors of this Commentary are scientists from various disciplines relevant to the identification and hazard evaluation of human carcinogens. We examined criticisms of the IARC classification process to determine the validity of these concerns. Here, we present the results of that examination, review the history of IARC evaluations, and describe how the IARC evaluations are performed. We concluded that these recent criticisms are unconvincing. The procedures employed by IARC to assemble Working Groups of scientists from the various disciplines and the techniques followed to review the literature and perform hazard assessment of various agents provide a balanced evaluation and an appropriate indication of the weight of the evidence. Some disagreement by individual scientists to some evaluations is not evidence of process failure. The review process has been modified over time and will undoubtedly be altered in the future to improve the process. Any process can in theory be improved, and we would support continued review and improvement of the IARC processes. This does not mean, however, that the current procedures are flawed. The IARC Monographs have made, and continue to make, major contributions to the scientific underpinning for societal actions to improve the public's health.

  11. Identifying potential exposure reduction priorities using regional rankings based on emissions of known and suspected carcinogens to outdoor air in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setton, Eleanor M; Veerman, Basil; Erickson, Anders; Deschenes, Steeve; Cheasley, Roz; Poplawski, Karla; Demers, Paul A; Keller, C Peter

    2015-08-22

    Emissions inventories aid in understanding the sources of hazardous air pollutants and how these vary regionally, supporting targeted reduction actions. Integrating information on the relative toxicity of emitted pollutants with respect to cancer in humans helps to further refine reduction actions or recommendations, but few national programs exist in North America that use emissions estimates in this way. The CAREX Canada Emissions Mapping Project provides key regional indicators of emissions (total annual and total annual toxic equivalent, circa 2011) of 21 selected known and suspected carcinogens. The indicators were calculated from industrial emissions reported to the National Pollutant Release Inventory (NPRI) and estimates of emissions from transportation (airports, trains, and car and truck traffic) and residential heating (oil, gas and wood), in conjunction with human toxicity potential factors. We also include substance-specific annual emissions in toxic equivalent kilograms and annual emissions in kilograms, to allow for ranking substances within any region. For provinces and territories in Canada, the indicators suggest the top five substances contributing to the total toxic equivalent emissions in any region could be prioritized for further investigation. Residents of Quebec and New Brunswick may be more at risk of exposure to industrial emissions than those in other regions, suggesting that a more detailed study of exposure to industrial emissions in these provinces is warranted. Residential wood smoke may be an important emission to control, particularly in the north and eastern regions of Canada. Residential oil and gas heating, along with rail emissions contribute little to regional emissions and therefore may not be an immediate regional priority. The developed indicators support the identification of pollutants and sources for additional investigation when planning exposure reduction actions among Canadian provinces and territories, but have

  12. IARC Monographs: 40 Years of Evaluating Carcinogenic Hazards to Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Aaron; Vineis, Paolo; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Andersen, Aage; Anto, Josep M.; Armstrong, Bruce K.; Baccarelli, Andrea A.; Beland, Frederick A.; Berrington, Amy; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Birnbaum, Linda S.; Brownson, Ross C.; Bucher, John R.; Cantor, Kenneth P.; Cardis, Elisabeth; Cherrie, John W.; Christiani, David C.; Cocco, Pierluigi; Coggon, David; Comba, Pietro; Demers, Paul A.; Dement, John M.; Douwes, Jeroen; Eisen, Ellen A.; Engel, Lawrence S.; Fenske, Richard A.; Fleming, Lora E.; Fletcher, Tony; Fontham, Elizabeth; Forastiere, Francesco; Frentzel-Beyme, Rainer; Fritschi, Lin; Gerin, Michel; Goldberg, Marcel; Grandjean, Philippe; Grimsrud, Tom K.; Gustavsson, Per; Haines, Andy; Hartge, Patricia; Hansen, Johnni; Hauptmann, Michael; Heederik, Dick; Hemminki, Kari; Hemon, Denis; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Hoppin, Jane A.; Huff, James; Jarvholm, Bengt; Kang, Daehee; Karagas, Margaret R.; Kjaerheim, Kristina; Kjuus, Helge; Kogevinas, Manolis; Kriebel, David; Kristensen, Petter; Kromhout, Hans; Laden, Francine; Lebailly, Pierre; LeMasters, Grace; Lubin, Jay H.; Lynch, Charles F.; Lynge, Elsebeth; ‘t Mannetje, Andrea; McMichael, Anthony J.; McLaughlin, John R.; Marrett, Loraine; Martuzzi, Marco; Merchant, James A.; Merler, Enzo; Merletti, Franco; Miller, Anthony; Mirer, Franklin E.; Monson, Richard; Nordby, Karl-Cristian; Olshan, Andrew F.; Parent, Marie-Elise; Perera, Frederica P.; Perry, Melissa J.; Pesatori, Angela Cecilia; Pirastu, Roberta; Porta, Miquel; Pukkala, Eero; Rice, Carol; Richardson, David B.; Ritter, Leonard; Ritz, Beate; Ronckers, Cecile M.; Rushton, Lesley; Rusiecki, Jennifer A.; Rusyn, Ivan; Samet, Jonathan M.; Sandler, Dale P.; de Sanjose, Silvia; Schernhammer, Eva; Costantini, Adele Seniori; Seixas, Noah; Shy, Carl; Siemiatycki, Jack; Silverman, Debra T.; Simonato, Lorenzo; Smith, Allan H.; Smith, Martyn T.; Spinelli, John J.; Spitz, Margaret R.; Stallones, Lorann; Stayner, Leslie T.; Steenland, Kyle; Stenzel, Mark; Stewart, Bernard W.; Stewart, Patricia A.; Symanski, Elaine; Terracini, Benedetto; Tolbert, Paige E.; Vainio, Harri; Vena, John; Vermeulen, Roel; Victora, Cesar G.; Ward, Elizabeth M.; Weinberg, Clarice R.; Weisenburger, Dennis; Wesseling, Catharina; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Zahm, Shelia Hoar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recently, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Programme for the Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks to Humans has been criticized for several of its evaluations, and also for the approach used to perform these evaluations. Some critics have claimed that failures of IARC Working Groups to recognize study weaknesses and biases of Working Group members have led to inappropriate classification of a number of agents as carcinogenic to humans. Objectives: The authors of this Commentary are scientists from various disciplines relevant to the identification and hazard evaluation of human carcinogens. We examined criticisms of the IARC classification process to determine the validity of these concerns. Here, we present the results of that examination, review the history of IARC evaluations, and describe how the IARC evaluations are performed. Discussion: We concluded that these recent criticisms are unconvincing. The procedures employed by IARC to assemble Working Groups of scientists from the various disciplines and the techniques followed to review the literature and perform hazard assessment of various agents provide a balanced evaluation and an appropriate indication of the weight of the evidence. Some disagreement by individual scientists to some evaluations is not evidence of process failure. The review process has been modified over time and will undoubtedly be altered in the future to improve the process. Any process can in theory be improved, and we would support continued review and improvement of the IARC processes. This does not mean, however, that the current procedures are flawed. Conclusions: The IARC Monographs have made, and continue to make, major contributions to the scientific underpinning for societal actions to improve the public’s health. Citation: Pearce N, Blair A, Vineis P, Ahrens W, Andersen A, Anto JM, Armstrong BK, Baccarelli AA, Beland FA, Berrington A, Bertazzi PA, Birnbaum LS, Brownson RC, Bucher JR, Cantor KP

  13. Human papillomavirus: often harmless but in some cases carcinogenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    (1) Globally, papillomavirus infections are very widespread in the general population worldwide. More than 100 genotypes of human papillomavirus (HPV) have been identified; they differ in targeted tissue and carcinogenic activity. (2) This article describes the clinical manifestations, prevalence and modes of transmission of human papillomavirus infections, and the role of HPV in human cancer. A systematic literature review was carried out to answer these questions based on methods developed by Prescrire. (3) The most frequent clinical manifestations of human papillomavirus infection are cutaneous and anogenital growths such as warts, papillomata and condylomata. The HPV genotypes linked to skin infections differ from those infecting the anogenital area. Genotypes HPV-16 and HPV-18 are frequently associated with high-grade cervical dysplasia. (4) The frequency of HPV infections varies widely from one population to another. HPV (usually genotype 16) is found in 1.5% to 44% of cervical smears. In the 1990s, 25% of women between 20 and 29 years of age in the United States were seropositive for HPV-16. (5) Papillomavirus is highly persistent in the environment, on contaminated objects, linen, floors. Skin infections can occur through indirect or direct contact. Most anogenital infections are sexually transmitted. (6) Most papillomavirus infections are asymptomatic, latent or transient. Various factors, especially immunosuppression, increase the persistence and severity of infections, and can promote progression to cancer. (7) The DNA of some highly carcinogenic HPV genotypes (especially HPV-16 and HPV-18) is present in 95% to 100% of cervical epidermoid tumours. Malignant transformation of lesions due to HPV seems to be facilitated by HPV persistence, a high HPV viral load in the cervix, and immunosuppression. (8) However, HPV infection rarely leads to progression to cancer. Only a minority of infections persist for several years, and only about 10% of low

  14. The Food and Beverage Occurrence of Furfuryl Alcohol and Myrcene—Two Emerging Potential Human Carcinogens?

    OpenAIRE

    Okaru, Alex O.; Lachenmeier, Dirk W.

    2017-01-01

    For decades, compounds present in foods and beverages have been implicated in the etiology of human cancers. The World Health Organization (WHO) International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) continues to classify such agents regarding their potential carcinogenicity in humans based on new evidence from animal and human studies. Furfuryl alcohol and β-myrcene are potential human carcinogens due to be evaluated. The major source of furfuryl alcohol in foods is thermal processing and ageing...

  15. Can creatine supplementation form carcinogenic heterocyclic amines in humans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Renato Tavares dos Santos; Dörr, Felipe Augusto; Pinto, Ernani; Solis, Marina Yazigi; Artioli, Guilherme Giannini; Fernandes, Alan Lins; Murai, Igor Hisashi; Dantas, Wagner Silva; Seguro, Antônio Carlos; Santinho, Mirela Aparecida Rodrigues; Roschel, Hamilton; Carpentier, Alain; Poortmans, Jacques Remi; Gualano, Bruno

    2015-09-01

    There is a long-standing concern that creatine supplementation could be associated with cancer, possibly by facilitating the formation of carcinogenic heterocyclic amines (HCAs). This study provides compelling evidence that both low and high doses of creatine supplementation, given either acutely or chronically, does not cause a significant increase in HCA formation. HCAs detection was unrelated to creatine supplementation. Diet was likely to be the main factor responsible for HCAs formation after either placebo (n = 6) or creatine supplementation (n = 3). These results directly challenge the recently suggested biological plausibility for the association between creatine use and risk of testicular germ cell cancer. Creatine supplementation has been associated with increased cancer risk. In fact, there is evidence indicating that creatine and/or creatinine are important precursors of carcinogenic heterocyclic amines (HCAs). The present study aimed to investigate the acute and chronic effects of low- and high-dose creatine supplementation on the production of HCAs in healthy humans (i.e. 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (8-MeIQx), 2-amino-(1,6-dimethylfuro[3,2-e]imidazo[4,5-b])pyridine (IFP) and 2-amino-3,4,8-trimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (4,8-DiMeIQx)). This was a non-counterbalanced single-blind crossover study divided into two phases, in which low- and high-dose creatine protocols were tested. After acute (1 day) and chronic supplementation (30 days), the HCAs PhIP, 8-MeIQx, IFP and 4,8-DiMeIQx were assessed through a newly developed HPLC-MS/MS method. Dietary HCA intake and blood and urinary creatinine were also evaluated. Out of 576 assessments performed (from 149 urine samples), only nine (3 from creatine and 6 from placebo) showed quantifiable levels of HCAs (8-MeIQx: n = 3; 4,8-DiMeIQx: n = 2; PhIP: n = 4). Individual analyses revealed that diet rather than creatine supplementation was

  16. Infection with the carcinogenic human liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smout, Michael J.; Sripa, Banchob; Laha, Thewarach; Mulvenna, Jason; Gasser, Robin B.; Young, Neil D.; Bethony, Jeffrey M.; Brindley, Paul J.; Loukas, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Summary Throughout Southeast Asia there is a strikingly high incidence of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA - hepatic cancer of the bile duct epithelium), particularly in people from rural settings in Laos and Northeast Thailand who are infected with the liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini, one of only three carcinogenic eukaryotic pathogens. More ubiquitous carcinogenic microbes, such as Helicobacter pylori, induce cancer in less than 1% of infected people, while as many as one-sixth of people with opisthorchiasis will develop CCA. The mechanisms by which O. viverrini causes cancer are multi-factorial, involving mechanical irritation from the activities and movements of the flukes, immunopathology, dietary nitrosamines and the secretion of parasite proteins that promote a tumourigenic environment. Genomic and proteomic studies of the liver fluke secretome have accelerated the discovery of parasite proteins with known/potential roles in pathogenesis and tumourigenesis, establishing a framework towards understanding, and ultimately preventing, the morbidity and mortality attributed to this highly carcinogenic parasite. PMID:21311794

  17. Classification of weakly carcinogenic human papillomavirus types: addressing the limits of epidemiology at the borderline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buonaguro Franco M

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Virtually all cases of cervical cancer are caused by persistent infections with a restricted set of human papillomaviruses (HPV. Some HPV types, like HPV16 and HPV18, are clear and powerful carcinogens. However, the categorization of the most weakly carcinogenic HPV types is extremely challenging. The decisions are important for screening test and vaccine development. This article describes for open discussion an approach recently taken by a World Health Organization International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC Monographs Working Group to re-assess the carcinogenicity of different HPV types.

  18. Classification of weakly carcinogenic human papillomavirus types: addressing the limits of epidemiology at the borderline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffman, Mark; Clifford, Gary; Buonaguro, Franco M

    2009-01-01

    Virtually all cases of cervical cancer are caused by persistent infections with a restricted set of human papillomaviruses (HPV). Some HPV types, like HPV16 and HPV18, are clear and powerful carcinogens. However, the categorization of the most weakly carcinogenic HPV types is extremely challenging. The decisions are important for screening test and vaccine development. This article describes for open discussion an approach recently taken by a World Health Organization International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Monographs Working Group to re-assess the carcinogenicity of different HPV types. PMID:19486508

  19. Suspected side effects to the quadrivalent human papilloma vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinth, Louise; Theibel, Ann Cathrine; Pors, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The quadrivalent vaccine that protects against human papilloma virus types 6, 11, 16 and 18 (Q-HPV vaccine, Gardasil) was included into the Danish childhood vaccination programme in 2009. During the past years, a collection of symptoms primarily consistent with sympathetic nervous...... system dysfunction have been described as suspected side effects to the Q-HPV vaccine. METHODS: We present a description of suspected side effects to the Q-HPV vaccine in 53 patients referred to our Syncope Unit for tilt table test and evaluation of autonomic nervous system function. RESULTS: All...... consistency in the reported symptoms as well as between our findings and those described by others. Our findings neither confirm nor dismiss a causal link to the Q-HPV vaccine, but they suggest that further research is urgently warranted to clarify the pathophysiology behind the symptoms experienced...

  20. Suspected side effects to the quadrivalent human papilloma vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinth, Louise; Theibel, Ann Cathrine; Pors, Kirsten; Mehlsen, Jesper

    2015-04-01

    The quadrivalent vaccine that protects against human papilloma virus types 6, 11, 16 and 18 (Q-HPV vaccine, Gardasil) was included into the Danish childhood vaccination programme in 2009. During the past years, a collection of symptoms primarily consistent with sympathetic nervous system dysfunction have been described as suspected side effects to the Q-HPV vaccine. We present a description of suspected side effects to the Q-HPV vaccine in 53 patients referred to our Syncope Unit for tilt table test and evaluation of autonomic nervous system function. All patients had symptoms consistent with pronounced autonomic dysfunction including different degrees of orthostatic intolerance, severe non-migraine-like headache, excessive fatigue, cognitive dysfunction, gastrointestinal discomfort and widespread pain of a neuropathic character. We found consistency in the reported symptoms as well as between our findings and those described by others. Our findings neither confirm nor dismiss a causal link to the Q-HPV vaccine, but they suggest that further research is urgently warranted to clarify the pathophysiology behind the symptoms experienced in these patients and to evaluate the possibility and the nature of any causal link and hopefully establish targeted treatment options. not relevant. not relevant.

  1. Detection of rare and possibly carcinogenic human papillomavirus genotypes as single infections in invasive cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraets, Daan; Alemany, Laia; Guimera, Nuria; de Sanjose, Silvia; de Koning, Maurits; Molijn, Anco; Jenkins, David; Bosch, Xavier; Quint, Wim

    2012-12-01

    The contribution of carcinogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) types to the burden of cervical cancer has been well established. However, the role and contribution of phylogenetically related HPV genotypes and rare variants remains uncertain. In a recent global study of 8977 HPV-positive invasive cervical carcinomas (ICCs), the genotype remained unidentified in 3.7% by the HPV SPF10 PCR-DEIA-LiPA25 (version 1) algorithm. The 331 ICC specimens with unknown genotype were analysed by a novel sequence methodology, using multiple selected short regions in L1. This demonstrated HPV genotypes that have infrequently or never been detected in ICC, ie HPV26, 30, 61, 67, 68, 69, 73 and 82, and rare variants of HPV16, 18, 26, 30, 34, 39, 56, 67, 68, 69, 82 and 91. These are not identified individually by LiPA25 and only to some extent by other HPV genotyping assays. Most identified genotypes have a close phylogenetic relationship with established carcinogenic HPVs and have been classified as possibly carcinogenic by IARC. Except for HPV85, all genotypes in α-species 5, 6, 7, 9 and 11 were encountered as single infections in ICCs. These species of established and possibly carcinogenic HPV types form an evolutionary clade. We have shown that the possibly carcinogenic types were detected only in squamous cell carcinomas, which were often keratinizing and diagnosed at a relatively higher mean age (55.3 years) than those associated with established carcinogenic types (50.9 years). The individual frequency of the possibly carcinogenic types in ICCs is low, but together they are associated with 2.25% of the 8338 included ICCs with a single HPV type. This fraction is greater than seven of the established carcinogenic types individually. This study provides evidence that possibly carcinogenic HPV types occur as single infections in invasive cervical cancer, strengthening the circumstantial evidence of a carcinogenic role. Copyright © 2012 Pathological Society of Great Britain and

  2. Gene discovery for the carcinogenic human liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gasser Robin B

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA – cancer of the bile ducts – is associated with chronic infection with the liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini. Despite being the only eukaryote that is designated as a 'class I carcinogen' by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, little is known about its genome. Results Approximately 5,000 randomly selected cDNAs from the adult stage of O. viverrini were characterized and accounted for 1,932 contigs, representing ~14% of the entire transcriptome, and, presently, the largest sequence dataset for any species of liver fluke. Twenty percent of contigs were assigned GO classifications. Abundantly represented protein families included those involved in physiological functions that are essential to parasitism, such as anaerobic respiration, reproduction, detoxification, surface maintenance and feeding. GO assignments were well conserved in relation to other parasitic flukes, however, some categories were over-represented in O. viverrini, such as structural and motor proteins. An assessment of evolutionary relationships showed that O. viverrini was more similar to other parasitic (Clonorchis sinensis and Schistosoma japonicum than to free-living (Schmidtea mediterranea flatworms, and 105 sequences had close homologues in both parasitic species but not in S. mediterranea. A total of 164 O. viverrini contigs contained ORFs with signal sequences, many of which were platyhelminth-specific. Examples of convergent evolution between host and parasite secreted/membrane proteins were identified as were homologues of vaccine antigens from other helminths. Finally, ORFs representing secreted proteins with known roles in tumorigenesis were identified, and these might play roles in the pathogenesis of O. viverrini-induced CCA. Conclusion This gene discovery effort for O. viverrini should expedite molecular studies of cholangiocarcinogenesis and accelerate research focused on developing new interventions

  3. An Evaluation of the Human Carcinogenic Potential of Ethylene Glycol Butyl Ether (Egbe)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This position paper, An Evaluation of the Human Carcinogenic Potential of Ethylene Glycol Butyl Ether, was developed in support of the EPA's evaluation of a petition from the American Chemistry Council requesting to delist EGBE per the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA), Titl...

  4. Evaluation of human health risks posed by carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic multiple contaminants associated with consumption of fish from Taihu Lake, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yingxin; Wang, Xinxin; Yang, Dan; Lei, Bingli; Zhang, Xiaolan; Zhang, Xinyu

    2014-07-01

    The present study estimated the human daily intake and uptake of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and toxic trace elements [mercury (Hg), chromium (Cr), cadmium (Cd), and arsenic (As)] due to consumption of fish from Taihu Lake, China, and the associated potential health risks posed by these contaminants. The health risks posed by the contaminants were assessed using a risk quotient of the fish consumption rate to the maximum allowable fish consumption rate considering the contaminants for carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic effect endpoints. The results showed that fish consumption would not pose non-cancer risks. However, some species would cause a cancer risk. Relative risks of the contaminants were calculated to investigate the contaminant which posed the highest risk to humans. As a result, in view of the contaminants for carcinogenic effects, As was the contaminant which posed the highest risk to humans. However, when non-carcinogenic effects of the contaminants were considered, Hg posed the highest risk. The risk caused by PBDEs was negligible. The results demonstrated that traditional contaminants, such as As, Hg, DDTs (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and its metabolites), and PCBs, require more attention in Taihu Lake than the other target contaminants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of chemical mutagens and carcinogens on gene expression profiles in human TK6 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lode Godderis

    Full Text Available Characterization of toxicogenomic signatures of carcinogen exposure holds significant promise for mechanistic and predictive toxicology. In vitro transcriptomic studies allow the comparison of the response to chemicals with diverse mode of actions under controlled experimental conditions. We conducted an in vitro study in TK6 cells to characterize gene expression signatures of exposure to 15 genotoxic carcinogens frequently used in European industries. We also examined the dose-responsive changes in gene expression, and perturbation of biochemical pathways in response to these carcinogens. TK6 cells were exposed at 3 dose levels for 24 h with and without S9 human metabolic mix. Since S9 had an impact on gene expression (885 genes, we analyzed the gene expression data from cells cultures incubated with S9 and without S9 independently. The ribosome pathway was affected by all chemical-dose combinations. However in general, no similar gene expression was observed among carcinogens. Further, pathways, i.e. cell cycle, DNA repair mechanisms, RNA degradation, that were common within sets of chemical-dose combination were suggested by clustergram. Linear trends in dose-response of gene expression were observed for Trichloroethylene, Benz[a]anthracene, Epichlorohydrin, Benzene, and Hydroquinone. The significantly altered genes were involved in the regulation of (anti- apoptosis, maintenance of cell survival, tumor necrosis factor-related pathways and immune response, in agreement with several other studies. Similarly in S9+ cultures, Benz[a]pyrene, Styrene and Trichloroethylene each modified over 1000 genes at high concentrations. Our findings expand our understanding of the transcriptomic response to genotoxic carcinogens, revealing the alteration of diverse sets of genes and pathways involved in cellular homeostasis and cell cycle control.

  6. The function and significance of SELENBP1 downregulation in human bronchial epithelial carcinogenic process.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu-Qing Zeng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Our quantitative proteomic study showed that selenium-binding protein 1 (SELENBP1 was progressively decreased in human bronchial epithelial carcinogenic process. However, there is little information on expression and function of SELENBP1 during human lung squamous cell cancer (LSCC carcinogenesis. METHODS: iTRAQ-tagging combined with 2D LC-MS/MS analysis was used to identify differentially expressed proteins in the human bronchial epithelial carcinogenic process. SELENBP1, member of selenoproteins family and progressively downregulated in this process, was selected to further study. Both Western blotting and immunohistochemistry were performed to detect SELENBP1 expression in independent sets of tissues of bronchial epithelial carcinogenesis, and ability of SELENBP1 for discriminating NBE (normal bronchial epithelium from preneoplastic lesions from invasive LSCC was evaluated. The effects of SELENBP1 downregulation on the susceptibility of benzo(apyrene (B[a]P-induced human bronchial epithelial cell transformation were determined. RESULTS: 102 differentially expressed proteins were identified by quantitative proteomics, and SELENBP1 was found and confirmed being progressively decreased in the human bronchial epithelial carcinogenic process. The sensitivity and specificity of SELENBP1 were 80% and 79% in discriminating NBE from preneoplastic lesions, 79% and 82% in discriminating NBE from invasive LSCC, and 77% and 71% in discriminating preneoplastic lesions from invasive LSCC, respectively. Furthermore, knockdown of SELENBP1 in immortalized human bronchial epithelial cell line 16HBE cells significantly increased the efficiency of B[a]P-induced cell transformation. CONCLUSIONS: The present data shows for the first time that decreased SELENBP1 is an early event in LSCC, increases B[a]P-induced human bronchial epithelial cell transformation, and might serve as a novel potential biomarker for early detection of LSCC.

  7. Formation and Human Risk of Carcinogenic Heterocyclic Amines Formed from Natural Precursors in Meat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knize, M G; Felton, J S

    2004-11-22

    A group of heterocyclic amines that are mutagens and rodent carcinogens form when meat is cooked to medium and well-done states. The precursors of these compounds are natural meat components: creatinine, amino acids and sugars. Defined model systems of dry-heated precursors mimic the amounts and proportions of heterocyclic amines found in meat. Results from model systems and cooking experiments suggest ways to reduce their formation and, thus, to reduce human intake. Human cancer epidemiology studies related to consumption of well-done meat products are listed and compared.

  8. Investigating the epigenetic effects of a prototype smoke-derived carcinogen in human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Tommasi

    Full Text Available Global loss of DNA methylation and locus/gene-specific gain of DNA methylation are two distinct hallmarks of carcinogenesis. Aberrant DNA methylation is implicated in smoking-related lung cancer. In this study, we have comprehensively investigated the modulation of DNA methylation consequent to chronic exposure to a prototype smoke-derived carcinogen, benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide (B[a]PDE, in genomic regions of significance in lung cancer, in normal human cells. We have used a pulldown assay for enrichment of the CpG methylated fraction of cellular DNA combined with microarray platforms, followed by extensive validation through conventional bisulfite-based analysis. Here, we demonstrate strikingly similar patterns of DNA methylation in non-transformed B[a]PDE-treated cells vs control using high-throughput microarray-based DNA methylation profiling confirmed by conventional bisulfite-based DNA methylation analysis. The absence of aberrant DNA methylation in our model system within a timeframe that precedes cellular transformation suggests that following carcinogen exposure, other as yet unknown factors (secondary to carcinogen treatment may help initiate global loss of DNA methylation and region-specific gain of DNA methylation, which can, in turn, contribute to lung cancer development. Unveiling the initiating events that cause aberrant DNA methylation in lung cancer has tremendous public health relevance, as it can help define future strategies for early detection and prevention of this highly lethal disease.

  9. The Food and Beverage Occurrence of Furfuryl Alcohol and Myrcene—Two Emerging Potential Human Carcinogens?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex O. Okaru

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available For decades, compounds present in foods and beverages have been implicated in the etiology of human cancers. The World Health Organization (WHO International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC continues to classify such agents regarding their potential carcinogenicity in humans based on new evidence from animal and human studies. Furfuryl alcohol and β-myrcene are potential human carcinogens due to be evaluated. The major source of furfuryl alcohol in foods is thermal processing and ageing of alcoholic beverages, while β-myrcene occurs naturally as a constituent of the essential oils of plants such as hops, lemongrass, and derived products. This study aimed to summarize the occurrence of furfuryl alcohol and β-myrcene in foods and beverages using literature review data. Additionally, results of furfuryl alcohol occurrence from our own nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR analysis are included. The highest content of furfuryl alcohol was found in coffee beans (>100 mg/kg and in some fish products (about 10 mg/kg, while among beverages, wines contained between 1 and 10 mg/L, with 8 mg/L in pineapple juice. The content of β-myrcene was highest in hops. In conclusion, the data about the occurrence of the two agents is currently judged as insufficient for exposure and risk assessment. The results of this study point out the food and beverage groups that may be considered for future monitoring of furfuryl alcohol and β-myrcene.

  10. The Food and Beverage Occurrence of Furfuryl Alcohol and Myrcene-Two Emerging Potential Human Carcinogens?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okaru, Alex O; Lachenmeier, Dirk W

    2017-03-11

    For decades, compounds present in foods and beverages have been implicated in the etiology of human cancers. The World Health Organization (WHO) International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) continues to classify such agents regarding their potential carcinogenicity in humans based on new evidence from animal and human studies. Furfuryl alcohol and β-myrcene are potential human carcinogens due to be evaluated. The major source of furfuryl alcohol in foods is thermal processing and ageing of alcoholic beverages, while β-myrcene occurs naturally as a constituent of the essential oils of plants such as hops, lemongrass, and derived products. This study aimed to summarize the occurrence of furfuryl alcohol and β-myrcene in foods and beverages using literature review data. Additionally, results of furfuryl alcohol occurrence from our own nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis are included. The highest content of furfuryl alcohol was found in coffee beans (>100 mg/kg) and in some fish products (about 10 mg/kg), while among beverages, wines contained between 1 and 10 mg/L, with 8 mg/L in pineapple juice. The content of β-myrcene was highest in hops. In conclusion, the data about the occurrence of the two agents is currently judged as insufficient for exposure and risk assessment. The results of this study point out the food and beverage groups that may be considered for future monitoring of furfuryl alcohol and β-myrcene.

  11. Aparasitemic serological suspects in Trypanosoma brucei gambiense human African trypanosomiasis : a potential human reservoir of parasites ?

    OpenAIRE

    Koffi, Mathurin; Solano, Philippe; Denizot, M.; Courtin, D.; Garcia, André; Lejon, V.; Buscher, P.; Cuny, Gérard; Jamonneau, Vincent

    2006-01-01

    The serological and parasitological tests used for Trypanosoma brucei gambiense human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) diagnosis have low specificity and sensitivity, respectively, and in the field, control program teams are faced with subjects with positive serology but negative parasitology who remain untreated. The aim of this work was to explore, using PCR tool, the significance of these aparasitemic serological suspects. Since discordant PCR results have been observed earlier with different...

  12. Carcinogenic ability quantification of human papilloma virus subtypes in eastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xinxing; Liu, Haiyan; Wu, Hongguang; Liu, Wensheng; Yin, Likui; Sun, Xueqing

    2015-12-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) infection is a precursor of cervical cancer. This study aimed to introduce a method to quantify the risk of cervical cancer resulting from infection by different HPV subtypes, to help guide patient treatment. Nucleic acid molecule flow-through hybridization and gene chip technology were used to test 6,510 non-cervical cancer healthy volunteers (≤CIN-I) and 204 cervical cancer patients (≥CIN-III) from Dongying City for 21 HPV subtypes (HPV-16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58, 59, 68, 6, 11, 42, 43, 44, 53, 66 and CP8304) in exfoliated cervical cells. The positive proportion of HPV subtypes was calculated, excluding or including patients with multiple subtype infections. The lower (L) and upper (H) limits of the carcinogenic risk score range were calculated, respectively. The values of carcinogenic index ± uncertainty in the carcinogenic ability (CI ± U) were also calculated. CI = (H + L)/2 represents the carcinogenic risk of the different subtypes, and U =(H - L)/2 represents the probability of each subtype being present in multiple infections. Infection rates were 15.87 and 96.57%, and HPV subtypes with high infection rates were HPV-16, 52, 58, 33, 18, and 31 and HPV-16, 31, 58, 18, 68, and 33 in the non-cervical cancer and cervical cancer groups, respectively. HPV subtypes with high risk of cervical cancer were HPV-31 (3.71 ± 0.68), 51 (2.65 ± 0.44), 18 (2.03 ± 0.43), 68 (1.76 ± 0.40), 58 (1.68 ± 0.49), and 16 (1.39 ± 0.33). We have provided a quantitative method for expressing HPV subtype carcinogenic risk. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Environmental exposure to human carcinogens in teenagers and the association with DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franken, Carmen; Koppen, Gudrun; Lambrechts, Nathalie; Govarts, Eva; Bruckers, Liesbeth; Den Hond, Elly; Loots, Ilse; Nelen, Vera; Sioen, Isabelle; Nawrot, Tim S; Baeyens, Willy; Van Larebeke, Nicolas; Boonen, Francis; Ooms, Daniëlla; Wevers, Mai; Jacobs, Griet; Covaci, Adrian; Schettgen, Thomas; Schoeters, Greet

    2017-01-01

    We investigated whether human environmental exposure to chemicals that are labeled as (potential) carcinogens leads to increased (oxidative) damage to DNA in adolescents. Six hundred 14-15-year-old youngsters were recruited all over Flanders (Belgium) and in two areas with important industrial activities. DNA damage was assessed by alkaline and formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (Fpg) modified comet assays in peripheral blood cells and analysis of urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) levels. Personal exposure to potentially carcinogenic compounds was measured in urine, namely: chromium, cadmium, nickel, 1-hydroxypyrene as a proxy for exposure to other carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), t,t-muconic acid as a metabolite of benzene, 2,5-dichlorophenol (2,5-DCP), organophosphate pesticide metabolites, and di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) metabolites. In blood, arsenic, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners 118 and 156, hexachlorobenzene (HCB), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) were analyzed. Levels of methylmercury (MeHg) were measured in hair. Multiple linear regression models were used to establish exposure-response relationships. Biomarkers of exposure to PAHs and urinary chromium were associated with higher levels of both 8-OHdG in urine and DNA damage detected by the alkaline comet assay. Concentrations of 8-OHdG in urine increased in relation with increasing concentrations of urinary t,t-muconic acid, cadmium, nickel, 2,5-DCP, and DEHP metabolites. Increased concentrations of PFOA in blood were associated with higher levels of DNA damage measured by the alkaline comet assay, whereas DDT was associated in the same direction with the Fpg-modified comet assay. Inverse associations were observed between blood arsenic, hair MeHg, PCB 156 and HCB, and urinary 8-OHdG. The latter exposure biomarkers were also associated with higher fish intake. Urinary nickel and t,t-muconic acid were inversely associated

  14. Fate of the teratogenic and carcinogenic ochratoxin A in human perfused placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Chit Shing Jackson; Partanen, Heidi; Myllynen, Päivi; Vähäkangas, Kirsi; El-Nezami, Hani

    2012-01-05

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is one of the most frequent mycotoxins detected in human blood worldwide. Apart from its well known nephrotoxicity, OTA-induced teratogenicity and carcinogenicity proven in animals are potential effects also in humans. Pregnant women have been exposed to this food contaminant via dietary exposure in a continuous and widespread manner. Although the transplacental transfer of OTA has been demonstrated in laboratory animals and the presence of OTA in human fetal samples has been reported, little is known about the role of human placenta in OTA toxicokinetics. In this study, human perfused placenta was used to reveal the actual placental toxicokinetics of OTA using concentrations found in serum of pregnant women. Moreover, the effect of protein concentration and biological significance of placental transporters on the OTA transfer in human placenta were also determined. Our study is the first to pursue the transfer of OTA through perfused human placenta. The transfer of OTA through term human placenta was barely detectable in all perfusions. Inhibitors of neither ABCG2 nor ABCC2 increased the transport of OTA to fetal circulation in placental perfusion, and thus these transporters apparently do not have biological significance in inhibiting transplacental transfer of OTA. Human albumin has inhibited OTA transfer through a tight monolayer of BeWo b30 cells. Finding from this study clearly contradict the existing epidemiological studies reporting higher OTA levels in fetal than in maternal circulation in vivo. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Rapid genotyping of carcinogenic human papillomavirus by loop-mediated isothermal amplification using a new automated DNA test (Clinichip HPV™).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Toyomi; Matsumoto, Koji; Fujii, Takuma; Sato, Osamu; Gemma, Nobuhiro; Onuki, Mamiko; Saito, Hiroshi; Aoki, Daisuke; Hirai, Yasuo; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki

    2013-03-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the Clinichip HPV test, a new DNA test that detects carcinogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) rapidly by loop-mediated isothermal amplification and performs genotyping of all 13 carcinogenic types using automated DNA chip technology with an assay time 2.5h. Using this test, 247 Japanese women (109 with normal cytology, 43 with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 1, 60 with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2/3 and 35 with invasive cervical cancer) were tested for carcinogenic HPV genotypes. The results were compared to those obtained by the polymerase chain reaction-amplified DNA sequencing using 13 type-specific primers. Overall, there was very good agreement for the detection of carcinogenic HPV between the Clinichip test and direct sequencing, with 95.5% total agreement and a kappa value of 0.91. Comparison of the detection of individual HPV types shows that the overall agreement was also high (range: 96.8-100%). In women with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or worse, the detection rate of carcinogenic HPV was 95.7% by both the Clinichip test and the direct-sequencing method, indicating complete agreement between the two methods. In conclusion, it was found that the Clinichip test is a promising new laboratory method for genotyping of carcinogenic HPV. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A review of potential human carcinogenicity of the chlorophenoxy herbicides MCPA, MCPP, and 2,4-DP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, G G; Rossbacher, R

    1993-01-01

    For the purpose of assessing the human carcinogenic potential of the chlorophenoxy herbicides MCPA, MCPP, and 2,4-DP, the relevant epidemiological and toxicological evidence is reviewed. These compounds have not produced tumours in animal studies conducted under current test guidelines, giving no reason to predict that they would be carcinogenic to humans. Epidemiological studies have been conducted on three continents; greater emphasis is placed on the studies reported from western Europe, however, as this has been the area of more use. Although several of these studies provide suggestive evidence of associations between exposure to chlorophenoxy compounds and increased risks for some uncommon cancers, it is inconsistent and far from conclusive. None of the evidence specifically implicates MCPA, MCPP, or 2,4-DP as human carcinogens. PMID:8494774

  17. Human biological monitoring of suspected endocrine-disrupting compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faniband, Moosa; Lindh, Christian H; Jönsson, Bo AG

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine-disrupting compounds are exogenous agents that interfere with the natural hormones of the body. Human biological monitoring is a powerful method for monitoring exposure to endocrine disrupting compounds. In this review, we describe human biological monitoring systems for different groups of endocrine disrupting compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls, brominated flame retardants, phthalates, alkylphenols, pesticides, metals, perfluronated compounds, parabens, ultraviolet filters, and organic solvents. The aspects discussed are origin to exposure, metabolism, matrices to analyse, analytical determination methods, determinants, and time trends. PMID:24369128

  18. Novel Transgenic Mouse Model for Studying Human Serum Albumin as a Biomarker of Carcinogenic Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Jonathan; Wang, Yi; Turesky, Robert J; Kluetzman, Kerri; Zhang, Qing-Yu; Ding, Xinxin

    2016-05-16

    Albumin is a commonly used serum protein for studying human exposure to xenobiotic compounds, including therapeutics and environmental pollutants. Often, the reactivity of albumin with xenobiotic compounds is studied ex vivo with human albumin or plasma/serum samples. Some studies have characterized the reactivity of albumin with chemicals in rodent models; however, differences between the orthologous peptide sequences of human and rodent albumins can result in the formation of different types of chemical-protein adducts with different interaction sites or peptide sequences. Our goal is to generate a human albumin transgenic mouse model that can be used to establish human protein biomarkers of exposure to hazardous xenobiotics for human risk assessment via animal studies. We have developed a human albumin transgenic mouse model and characterized the genotype and phenotype of the transgenic mice. The presence of the human albumin gene in the genome of the model mouse was confirmed by genomic PCR analysis, whereas liver-specific expression of the transgenic human albumin mRNA was validated by RT-PCR analysis. Further immunoblot and mass spectrometry analyses indicated that the transgenic human albumin protein is a full-length, mature protein, which is less abundant than the endogenous mouse albumin that coexists in the serum of the transgenic mouse. The transgenic protein was able to form ex vivo adducts with a genotoxic metabolite of 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine, a procarcinogenic heterocyclic aromatic amine formed in cooked meat. This novel human albumin transgenic mouse model will facilitate the development and validation of albumin-carcinogen adducts as biomarkers of xenobiotic exposure and/or toxicity in humans.

  19. Human biological monitoring of suspected endocrine-disrupting compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moosa Faniband

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine-disrupting compounds are exogenous agents that interfere with the natural hormones of the body. Human biological monitoring is a powerful method for monitoring exposure to endocrine disrupting compounds. In this review, we describe human biological monitoring systems for different groups of endocrine disrupting compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls, brominated flame retardants, phthalates, alkylphenols, pesticides, metals, perfluronated compounds, parabens, ultraviolet filters, and organic solvents. The aspects discussed are origin to exposure, metabolism, matrices to analyse, analytical determination methods, determinants, and time trends.

  20. Critical review on the carcinogenic potential of pesticides used in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sangjun

    2014-01-01

    Pesticides used in Korea are grouped by four classes of hazard (extremely, highly, moderately and slightly hazardous) based on acute oral and dermal toxicity in the rat. However, there is little information of carcinogenic effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate potential carcinogenicity for active ingredients of pesticides used in Korea. A total of 1,283 pesticide items were registered under the Pesticide Control Act of which 987 were commercially available. Of these 987 items, 360 active ingredients not duplicated were evaluated for carcinogenicity using the carcinogen list established by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Some 25 out of 360 ingredients were classified as likely to be carcinogenic (probable) to humans and 52 had suggestive evidence of carcinogenic potential (suspected) based on the US EPA classification. Some 31% of 987 items contained probable or suspected human carcinogenic ingredients. Carcinogenic pesticides accounted for 24% (5,856/24,795 tons) of the total volume of consumption in Korea. Interestingly, pesticides with lower acute toxicity were found to have higher carcinogenic potential. Based on these findings, the study suggests that it is important to provide information on long-term toxicity to farmers, in addition to acute toxicity data.

  1. Clinical and biochemical studies support smokeless tobacco's carcinogenic potential in the human oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallery, Susan R; Tong, Meng; Michaels, Gregory C; Kiyani, Amber R; Hecht, Stephen S

    2014-01-01

    In 2007, the International Agency for Research on Cancer presented compelling evidence that linked smokeless tobacco use to the development of human oral cancer. Although these findings imply vigorous local carcinogen metabolism, little is known about levels and distribution of phase I, II, and III (drug egress) enzymes in human oral mucosa. In this study here, we integrated clinical data, and imaging and histopathologic analyses of an oral squamous cell carcinoma that arose at the site of smokeless tobacco quid placement in a patient. Immunoblot and immunohistochemical (IHC) analyses were used to identify tumor and normal human oral mucosal smokeless tobacco-associated metabolic activation and detoxification enzymes. Human oral epithelium contains every known phase I enzyme associated with nitrosamine oxidative bioactivation with approximately 2-fold interdonor differences in protein levels. Previous studies have confirmed approximately 3.5-fold interdonor variations in intraepithelial phase II enzymes. Unlike the superficially located enzymes in nonreplicating esophageal surface epithelium, IHC studies confirmed that oral mucosal nitrosamine metabolizing enzymes reside in the basilar and suprabasilar region, which notably is the site of ongoing keratinocyte DNA replication. Clearly, variations in product composition, nitrosamine metabolism, and exposure duration will modulate clinical outcomes. The data presented here form a coherent picture consistent with the abundant experimental data that link tobacco-specific nitrosamines to human oral cancer. ©2013 AACR.

  2. Human cytochrome P450 enzymes of importance for the bioactivation of methyleugenol to the proximate carcinogen 1′-hydroxymethyleugenol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeurissen, S.M.F.; Bogaards, J.J.P.; Boersma, M.G.; Horst, J.P.F. ter; Awad, H.M.; Fiamegos, Y.C.; Beek, T.A. van; Alink, G.M.; Sudhölter, E.J.R.; Cnubben, N.H.P.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2006-01-01

    In vitro studies were performed to elucidate the human cytochrome P450 enzymes involved in the bioactivation of methyleugenol to its proximate carcinogen 1′-hydroxymethyleugenol. Incubations with Supersomes, expressing individual P450 enzymes to a high level, revealed that P450 1A2, 2A6, 2C9, 2C19,

  3. Human cytochrome P450 enzyme specificity for bioactivation of safrole to the proximate carcinogen 1′-hydroxysafrole

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeurissen, S.M.F.; Bogaards, J.J.P.; Awad, H.M.; Boersma, M.G.; Brand, W.; Fiamegos, Y.C.; Beek, T.A. van; Alink, G.M.; Sudhölter, E.J.R.; Cnubben, N.H.P.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, the cytochrome P450 mediated bioactivation of safrole to its proximate carcinogenic metabolite, 1′-hydroxysafrole, has been investigated for the purpose of identifying the human P450 enzymes involved. The 1′-hydroxylation of safrole was characterized in a variety of in vitro

  4. Incidence and persistence of carcinogenic genital human papillomavirus infections in young women with or without Chlamydia trachomatis co-infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vriend, Henrike J.; Bogaards, Johannes A.; van Bergen, Jan E. A. M.; Brink, Antoinette A. T. P.; van den Broek, Ingrid V. F.; Hoebe, Christian J. P. A.; King, Audrey J.; van der Sande, Marianne A. B.; Wolffs, Petra F. G.; de Melker, Hester E.

    2015-01-01

    We assessed whether infection with chlamydia increases the incidence of carcinogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) infections and if HPV persistence is affected by chlamydia co-infection. For 1982 women (16-29 years-old) participating in two consecutive rounds of a chlamydia screening implementation

  5. Evaluating the mechanistic evidence and key data gaps in assessing the potential carcinogenicity of carbon nanotubes and nanofibers in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuempel, Eileen D; Jaurand, Marie-Claude; Møller, Peter; Morimoto, Yasuo; Kobayashi, Norihiro; Pinkerton, Kent E; Sargent, Linda M; Vermeulen, Roel C H|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/216532620; Fubini, Bice; Kane, Agnes B

    2017-01-01

    In an evaluation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for the IARC Monograph 111, the Mechanisms Subgroup was tasked with assessing the strength of evidence on the potential carcinogenicity of CNTs in humans. The mechanistic evidence was considered to be not strong enough to alter the evaluations based on the

  6. Changing the field of carcinogenicity testing of human pharmaceuticals by emphasizing mode of action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laan, J.W. van der; Duijndam, B.; Hoorn, T. van den; Woutersen, R.; Water, B. van de

    2017-01-01

    Lifetime testing for carcinogenicity of pharmaceuticals in rodents has been a controversial issue since the start of the International Conference on Harmonisation in 1990. Since 2010 the debate reached a new level following the proposal that a negative outcome of carcinogenicity studies can be

  7. Carcinogenic compounds in alcoholic beverages: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pflaum, Tabea; Hausler, Thomas; Baumung, Claudia; Ackermann, Svenja; Kuballa, Thomas; Rehm, Jürgen; Lachenmeier, Dirk W

    2016-10-01

    The consumption of alcoholic beverages has been classified as carcinogenic to humans by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) since 1988. More recently, in 2010, ethanol as the major constituent of alcoholic beverages and its metabolite acetaldehyde were also classified as carcinogenic to humans. Alcoholic beverages as multi-component mixtures may additionally contain further known or suspected human carcinogens as constituent or contaminant. This review will discuss the occurrence and toxicology of eighteen carcinogenic compounds (acetaldehyde, acrylamide, aflatoxins, arsenic, benzene, cadmium, ethanol, ethyl carbamate, formaldehyde, furan, glyphosate, lead, 3-MCPD, 4-methylimidazole, N-nitrosodimethylamine, pulegone, ochratoxin A, safrole) occurring in alcoholic beverages as identified based on monograph reviews by the IARC. For most of the compounds of alcoholic beverages, quantitative risk assessment provided evidence for only a very low risk (such as margins of exposure above 10,000). The highest risk was found for ethanol, which may reach exposures in ranges known to increase the cancer risk even at moderate drinking (margin of exposure around 1). Other constituents that could pose a risk to the drinker were inorganic lead, arsenic, acetaldehyde, cadmium and ethyl carbamate, for most of which mitigation by good manufacturing practices is possible. Nevertheless, due to the major effect of ethanol, the cancer burden due to alcohol consumption can only be reduced by reducing alcohol consumption in general or by lowering the alcoholic strength of beverages.

  8. [Safety concentration of genotoxic carcinogens in water pollution accident based on human health risk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jin-Hong; Zheng, Bing-Hui; Fu, Qing; Hung, Min-Sheng

    2012-02-01

    It was an urgent problem to determine short-term exposure safety concentration of genetic carcinogens in water pollution accident in China. Based on the hypothesis that the relationship between exposure dosage and carcinogenic risk was linear, the calculation process of genetic carcinogens safety concentration was put forwarded, and the method using life-time exposed safety concentration to calculate short-term exposure safety concentration was set up. Based on the statistical result of water pollution accident occurred in china during 2000-2010, arsenic was a major characteristic contaminate in water pollution accident. According to the method of short-term exposure safety concentration of genotoxic carcinogens, the safety concentration of arsenic was 0.5 mg x L(-1), it showed that the method was feasible in emergence management of water pollution accident.

  9. Distribution of Carcinogenic Human Papillomavirus Genotypes and Association to Cervical Lesions among Women in Fez (Morocco).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souho, Tiatou; El Fatemi, Hinde; Karim, Safae; El Rhazi, Karima; Bouchikhi, Chahrazed; Banani, Abdelaziz; Melhouf, Moulay Abdelilah; Benlemlih, Mohamed; Bennani, Bahia

    2016-01-01

    To determine the distribution of cervical high-risk human papillomavirus genotypes and their association to cellular abnormalities in women from Fez and its neighborhood. Women attending the Hassan II University Hospital for cervical pap smears were recruited after an informed consent. Interviews and two cervical samples were performed for each woman. Cervical samples were used for cytological analysis and HPV DNA detection. HPV was typed using a method based on multiplex PCR with fluorescently labeled specific primers followed by capillary electrophoresis. The study was approved by the ethics committee of the Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy of Fez. The HPV prevalence in the studied population was 43.1% and the most prevalent types were HPV 53 (23 cases); HPV 16 (20 cases); HPV 35 (18 cases); HPV 51 (10 cases) and HPV 56 (7 cases). From the 619 confirmed pap smears, 20% were abnormal. The cytological abnormalities were significantly associated to HPV infection, women age, number of pregnancies and parity (p < 0.05). More attention should be given to HPV in Morocco because it represents an important public health concern. The distribution of carcinogenic HPV types in the studied population is different from the data in other regions but epidemiological studies in other Moroccan regions are required.

  10. New Approaches for Biomonitoring Exposure to the Human Carcinogen Aristolochic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Byeong Hwa; Sidorenko, Viktoriya S; Rosenquist, Thomas A; Dickman, Kathleen G; Grollman, Arthur P; Turesky, Robert J

    2015-07-01

    Aristolochic acids (AA) are found in all Aristolochia herbaceous plants, many of which have been used worldwide for medicinal purposes for centuries. AA are causal agents of the chronic kidney disease entity termed aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN) and potent upper urinary tract carcinogens in humans. AAN and upper urinary tract cancers are endemic in rural areas of Croatia and other Balkan countries where exposure to AA occurs through the ingestion of home-baked bread contaminated with Aristolochia seeds. In Asia, exposure to AA occurs through usage of traditional Chinese medicinal herbs containing Aristolochia. Despite warnings from regulatory agencies, traditional Chinese herbs containing AA continue to be used world-wide. In this review, we highlight novel approaches to quantify exposure to AA, by analysis of aristolactam (AL) DNA adducts, employing ultraperformance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization/multistage mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI/MSn). DNA adducts are a measure of internal exposure to AA and serve as an important end point for cross-species extrapolation of toxicity data and human risk assessment. The level of sensitivity of UPLC-ESI/MSn surpasses the limits of detection of AL-DNA adducts obtained by 32P-postlabeling techniques, the most widely employed methods for detecting putative DNA adducts in humans. AL-DNA adducts can be measured by UPLC-ESI/MS3, not only in fresh frozen renal tissue, but also in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples, an underutilized biospecimen for assessing chemical exposures, and in exfoliated urinary cells, a non-invasive approach. The frequent detection of AL DNA adducts in renal tissues, combined with the characteristic mutational spectrum induced by AA in TP53 and other genes provides compelling data for a role of AA in upper urothelial tract cancer.

  11. Human health risk due to consumption of vegetables contaminated with carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Sardar [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen (China). Inst. of Urban Environment; Peshawar Univ. (Pakistan). Dept. of Environmental Science; Cao, Qing [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Research Center for Eco-Environemntal Sciences

    2012-02-15

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are persistent, toxic, and carcinogenic contaminants present in soil ecosystem globally. These pollutants are gradually accumulating in wastewater-irrigated soils and lead to the contamination of vegetables. Food chain contamination with PAH is considered as one of the major pathways for human exposure. This study was aimed to investigate the concentrations of PAH in soils and vegetables collected from wastewater-irrigated fields from metropolitan areas of Beijing, China. Origin of PAH, daily intake, and health risks of PAH through consumption of contaminated vegetables were studied. Soil samples were collected from the upper horizon (0-20 cm) of both wastewater-irrigated and reference sites and sieved (<2 mm mesh) and then followed by freeze-drying at -50 C and 123 {+-} 2 Pa. Standing vegetables were also collected from the same sites used for soil sampling and divided into roots and shoots, thoroughly washed with deionized water, and freeze-dried. PAH were extracted using the Soxhlet method with 200 mL DCM for 24 h, and the extracts were cleaned with silica adsorption chromatography prepared with silica gel, alumina, and capped with anhydrous sodium. The final concentrated extracts (soil and vegetable) were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Agilent 6890). Bioaccumulation factors, daily intake of PAH, and carcinogenicity of PAH were calculated by different statistical equations. Results indicate that the soils and grown vegetables were contaminated with all possible carcinogenic PAH (declared by USEPA 2002) except indeno[1,2,3-c,d]pyrene. The highest concentration (242.9 {mu}g kg{sup -1}) was found for benzo(k)fluoranthene (BkF), while lowest (79.12 {mu}g kg{sup -1}) for benzo[a]pyrene (BaP). The emission sources of PAH were both pyrogenic and petrogenic in nature. However, the total concentrations of PAH were lower than the permissible limits set by different countries like Canada, Denmark and Germany

  12. Human exposure to carcinogens in ambient air in Denmark, Finland and Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauser, P.; Ketzel, M.; Becker, T.; Plejdrup, M. S.; Brandt, J.; Gidhagen, L.; Omstedt, G.; Skårman, T.; Bartonova, A.; Schwarze, P.; Karvosenoja, N.; Paunu, V.-V.; Kukkonen, J.; Karppinen, A.

    2017-10-01

    The concentrations of seventeen pollutants (particulate mass fractions PM2.5 and PM10, a range of metals, inorganic gases and organic compounds) are for the first time analyzed in a screening of the carcinogenic risk at a resolution of 1 × 1 km2 in ambient air in three Nordic countries. Modelled annual mean air concentrations in 2010 show no exceedances of the EU air quality limit, guideline or target values. The only modelled exceedance of US-EPA 1:100,000 cancer risk concentrations (0.12 ng/m3, US-EPA IRIS, 2015) occurs for B(a)P in Denmark, for approximately 80% of the Danish population. However, the EU target value threshold of 1 ng/m3 for B(a)P is not exceeded in the modelled values in any parts of Denmark. No emission data for B(a)P were available for the whole domain of the other two considered Nordic countries and important uncertainties are still related to the emissions. Long-range transport is significant for the concentrations of all of the considered pollutants, except for B(a)P that commonly originates mostly from local residential wood combustion. The ambient air concentrations of NOx, SO2, Cd, Cr and Pb also have significant contributions from national sources; 45-65% for NOx and SO2, and for the metals from 15 to 60% in urban areas and from 1 to 20% in rural areas, within the considered Nordic area. High national contributions occur especially in urban air, due to primarily road traffic, residential wood combustion, energy production and industrial point sources. It is recommended to monitor the influence from residential wood combustion more extensively, and to analyze longer time trends for long-term human exposure.

  13. The lifetime feeding study in mice and rats--an examination of its validity as a bioassay for human carcinogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salsburg, D

    1983-01-01

    Currently used designs for carcinogenic bioassay (lifetime feeding studies in mice or rats using maximum tolerated doses of the test compound) are examined to see if they meet the requirements of a bioassay, using the results of 170 compounds reported on as of June, 1980, by the National Cancer Institute. It is concluded that the lifetime feeding study has never been subjected to proper validation as an assay for human carcinogens. When an attempt is made to validate it on the basis of these reported studies and those in the literature, it appears to lack acceptable specificity and sensitivity. It is suggested that a drastically different design is needed and that such redesigning of the assay will require proper validation.

  14. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-DNA adducts in cervix of women infected with carcinogenic human papillomavirus types: An immunohistochemistry study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratt, M. Margaret [Carcinogen-DNA Interactions Section, LCBG, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD (United States)], E-mail: prattm@mail.nih.gov; Sirajuddin, Paul; Poirier, Miriam C. [Carcinogen-DNA Interactions Section, LCBG, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD (United States); Schiffman, Mark [Hormonal and Reproductive Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD (United States); Glass, Andrew G.; Scott, David R.; Rush, Brenda B. [Northwest Kaiser Permanente, Portland, OR (United States); Olivero, Ofelia A. [Carcinogen-DNA Interactions Section, LCBG, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD (United States); Castle, Philip E. [Hormonal and Reproductive Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2007-11-01

    Among women infected with carcinogenic human papillomavirus (HPV), there is a two- to five-fold increased risk of cervical precancer and cancer in women who smoke compared to those who do not smoke. Because tobacco smoke contains carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), it was of interest to examine human cervical tissue for PAH-DNA adduct formation. Here, we measured PAH-DNA adduct formation in cervical biopsies collected in follow-up among women who tested positive for carcinogenic HPV at baseline. A semi-quantitative immunohistochemistry (IHC) method using antiserum elicited against DNA modified with r7,t8-dihydroxy-t-9,10-oxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydrobenzo[a]pyrene (BPDE) was used to measure nuclear PAH-DNA adduct formation. Cultured human cervical keratinocytes exposed to 0, 0.153, or 0.331 {mu}M BPDE showed dose-dependent increases in r7,t8,t9-trihydroxy-c-10-(N{sup 2}deoxyguanosyl)-7,8,9, 10-tetrahydro-benzo[a]pyrene (BPdG) adducts. For BPdG adduct analysis, paraffin-embedded keratinocytes were stained by IHC with analysis of nuclear color intensity by Automated Cellular Imaging System (ACIS) and, in parallel cultures, extracted DNA was assayed by quantitative BPDE-DNA chemiluminescence immunoassay (CIA). For paraffin-embedded samples from carcinogenic HPV-infected women, normal-appearing cervical squamous epithelium suitable for scoring was found in samples from 75 of the 114 individuals, including 29 cases of cervical precancer or cancer and 46 controls. With a lower limit of detection of 20 adducts/10{sup 8} nucleotides, detectable PAH-DNA adduct values ranged from 25 to 191/10{sup 8} nucleotides, with a median of 75/10{sup 8} nucleotides. PAH-DNA adduct values above 150/10{sup 8} nucleotides were found in eight samples, and in three samples adducts were non-detectable. There was no correlation between PAH-DNA adduct formation and either smoking or case status. Therefore, PAH-DNA adduct formation as measured by this methodology did not appear

  15. Chemical Carcinogen (Hydrazine et al.) Induced Carcinogenesis of Human Diploid Cells in Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-07

    Chsaactariaane a/lthe Transformed C4110. essential amino acids. IX euenstial amino acida.,USAq 2.0 mM giutamine, IX vitamina , 0.2% sodium Taumor omnk in...subcutaneous injection of *&mino acids. 2.0 mM glusamine. IX vitamina , SX 10’ carcinogen-treazed or control cells ssa. 0.2% sodium bicarbonate. S iAg/ml

  16. Isolation & characterization of Brucella melitensis isolated from patients suspected for human brucellosis in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barua, Anita; Kumar, Ashu; Thavaselvam, Duraipandian; Mangalgi, Smita; Prakash, Archana; Tiwari, Sapana; Arora, Sonia; Sathyaseelan, Kannusamy

    2016-05-01

    Brucellosis is endemic in the southern part of India. A combination of biochemical, serological and molecular methods is required for identification and biotyping of Brucella. The present study describes the isolation and biochemical, molecular characterization of Brucella melitensis from patients suspected for human brucellosis. The blood samples were collected from febrile patients suspected to have brucellosis. A total of 18 isolates were obtained from 102 blood samples subjected to culture. The characterization of these 18 isolates was done by growth on Brucella specific medium, biochemical reactions, CO2 requirement, H2S production, agglutination with A and M mono-specific antiserum, dye sensitivity to basic fuchsin and thionin. Further, molecular characterization of the isolates was done by amplification of B. melitensis species specific IS 711 repetitive DNA fragment and 16S (rRNA) sequence analysis. PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of omp2 locus and IS711 gene was also done for molecular characterization. All 102 suspected samples were subjected to bacteria isolation and of these, 18 isolates could be recovered on blood culture. The biochemical, PCR and PCR-RFLP and 16s rRNA sequencing revealed that all isolates were of B. melitensis and matched exactly with reference strain B. melitensis 16M. The present study showed an overall isolation rate of 17.64 per cent for B. melitensis. There is a need to establish facilities for isolation and characterization of Brucella species for effective clinical management of the disease among patients as well as surveillance and control of infection in domestic animals. Further studies are needed from different geographical areas of the country with different level of endemicity to plan and execute control strategies against human brucellosis.

  17. Do environmental carcinogenic substances cause human cancer. ; What quantitative risk evaluation tells. Kankyo hatsugan busshitsu wa jingan hassei no yoin ka. ; Teiryoteki kikendo hyoka kara wakaru koto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, S. (Kobe University, Kobe (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1993-01-25

    This paper enumerates different kinds of substances that are believed to cause cancer, and discusses how they behave in their quantitative evaluation on carcinogenic effects in human bodies. About 600 carcinogenic substances have been discovered from experimental animals, of which about 50 substances have been identified to clearly cause human cancer. The quantitative risk evaluation is performed by combining mainly two items; information of intensities of carcinogenic effects and human intake of the substances. An amount of a substance that raises a carcinogenic frequency by as much as a one million fraction when lifetime experimental animals are dosed with the substance is called a virtually safe dosage (VSD). According to calculations, the amount of BHA, a food additive for example, that is taken by Japanese people from different kinds of oils is 1/70 of the VSD, a very small contribution to occurrences of human cancer. Carcinogenic substances cannot explain, with very few exceptions, the occurrence of human cancer quantitatively. Living practices should rather be changed and improved. 5 refs.

  18. Incidence and persistence of carcinogenic genital human papillomavirus infections in young women with or without Chlamydia trachomatis co-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vriend, Henrike J; Bogaards, Johannes A; van Bergen, Jan E A M; Brink, Antoinette A T P; van den Broek, Ingrid V F; Hoebe, Christian J P A; King, Audrey J; van der Sande, Marianne A B; Wolffs, Petra F G; de Melker, Hester E

    2015-10-01

    We assessed whether infection with chlamydia increases the incidence of carcinogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) infections and if HPV persistence is affected by chlamydia co-infection. For 1982 women (16-29 years-old) participating in two consecutive rounds of a chlamydia screening implementation trial, swabs were polymerase chain reaction tested to detect chlamydia and 14 carcinogenic HPV genotypes. HPV type-specific incidence and persistence rates were stratified for chlamydia positivity at follow-up. Associations were assessed by multilevel logistic regression analyses with correction for sexual risk factors. HPV type-specific incidence ranged from 1.4% to 8.9% and persistence from 22.7% to 59.4% after a median follow-up of 11 months (interquartile range: 11-12). Differences in 1-year HPV persistence rates between chlamydia -infected and noninfected women were less distinct than differences in HPV incidence rates (pooled adjusted odds ratios of 1.17 [95% CI: 0.69-1.96] and 1.84 [95% CI: 1.36-2.47], respectively). The effect of chlamydia co-infection on HPV-infection risk did not significantly differ by HPV genotype. In conclusion, infection with chlamydia increases the risk of infection by carcinogenic HPV types and may enhance persistence of some HPV types. Although these findings could reflect residual confounding through unobserved risk factors, our results do give reason to explore more fully the association between chlamydia and HPV type-specific acquisition and persistence. © 2015 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. CPDB: Carcinogenic Potency Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Roberta Bronson

    2008-01-01

    The Carcinogenic Potency Database reports analyses of animal cancer tests on 1,547 chemicals. These tests are used in support of cancer risk assessments for humans. Results are searchable and are made available via the National Library of Medicine's (NLM) TOXNET system. This column will provide background information on the database, as well as present search basics.

  20. Environmental exposure to human carcinogens in teenagers and the association with DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franken, Carmen; Koppen, Gudrun; Lambrechts, Nathalie

    2017-01-01

    was measured in urine, namely: chromium, cadmium, nickel, 1-hydroxypyrene as a proxy for exposure to other carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), t,t-muconic acid as a metabolite of benzene, 2,5-dichlorophenol (2,5-DCP), organophosphate pesticide metabolites, and di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP...... exposure-response relationships. Results Biomarkers of exposure to PAHs and urinary chromium were associated with higher levels of both 8-OHdG in urine and DNA damage detected by the alkaline comet assay. Concentrations of 8-OHdG in urine increased in relation with increasing concentrations of urinary t......,t-muconic acid, cadmium, nickel, 2,5-DCP, and DEHP metabolites. Increased concentrations of PFOA in blood were associated with higher levels of DNA damage measured by the alkaline comet assay, whereas DDT was associated in the same direction with the Fpg-modified comet assay. Inverse associations were observed...

  1. The effect of exposure to carcinogenic metals on histone tail modifications and gene expression in human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arita, Adriana; Shamy, Magdy Y; Chervona, Yana; Clancy, Harriet A; Sun, Hong; Hall, Megan N; Qu, Qingshan; Gamble, Mary V; Costa, Max

    2012-06-01

    The precise mechanisms by which nickel and arsenic compounds exert their carcinogenic properties are not completely understood. In recent years, alterations of epigenetic mechanisms have been implicated in the carcinogenesis of compounds of these two metals. In vitro exposure to certain nickel or arsenic compounds induces changes in both DNA methylation patterns, as well as, in the levels of posttranslational modifications of histone tails. Changes in DNA methylation patterns have been reported in human subjects exposed to arsenic. Here we review our recent reports on the alterations in global levels of posttranslational histone modifications in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of subjects with occupational exposure to nickel and subjects exposed to arsenic in their drinking water. Occupational exposure to nickel was associated with an increase in H3K4me3 and decrease in H3K9me2. A global increase in H3K9me2 and decrease in H3K9ac was found in subjects exposed to arsenic. Additionally, exposure to arsenic resulted in opposite changes in a number of histone modifications in males when compared with females in the arsenic population. The results of these two studies suggest that exposure to nickel or arsenic compounds, and possibly other carcinogenic metal compounds, can induce changes in global levels of posttranslational histone modifications in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Metabolic activation of diesel exhaust carcinogens in primary and immortalized human TP53 knock-in (Hupki) mouse embryo fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucab, Jill E; Phillips, David H; Arlt, Volker M

    2012-04-01

    Approximately 50% of human tumors have a mutation in TP53. The pattern and spectra of TP53 mutations often differ between cancer types, perhaps due to different etiological factors. The Hupki (human TP53 knock-in) mouse embryo fibroblast (HUF) immortalization assay is useful for studying mutagenesis in the human TP53 gene by environmental carcinogens. Prior to initiating an immortalization assay, carcinogen treatment conditions must be optimized, which can require a large number of cells. As primary HUF cultures senesce within 2 weeks, restricting their use, we investigated whether immortalized HUFs retaining wild-type TP53 can be surrogates for primary HUFs in initial treatment optimization. DNA damage by eight compounds found in diesel exhaust, benzo[a]pyrene, 3-nitrobenzanthrone, 1-nitropyrene, 1,3-dinitropyrene, 1,6-dinitropyrene, 1,8-dinitropyrene, 6-nitrochrysene, and 3-nitrofluorene, was assessed by (32) P-postlabeling and the alkaline comet assay in primary HUFs and in an immortal HUF cell line J201. For most compounds, higher levels of DNA adducts accumulated in J201 cells than in primary HUFs. This difference was not reflected in the comet assay or by cell viability changes. Experiments in three additional immortal HUF cell lines (AAI49, U56, and E2-143) confirmed strong differences in DNA adduct levels compared with primary HUFs. However, these did not correlate with the protein expression of Nqo1 or Nat1/2, or with gene expression of Cyp1a1 or Cyp1b1. Our results show that using immortal HUFs as surrogates for primary HUFs in genotoxicity screening has limitations and that DNA adduct formation is the best measure of genotoxicity of the nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons tested in HUFs. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in umbilical cord blood of human neonates from Guiyu, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Yongyong; Huo, Xia [Analytic Cytology Laboratory and the Key Immunopathology Laboratory of Guangdong Province, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou (China); Wu, Kusheng [Analytic Cytology Laboratory and the Key Immunopathology Laboratory of Guangdong Province, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou (China); Department of Preventive Medicine, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou (China); Liu, Junxiao; Zhang, Yuling [Analytic Cytology Laboratory and the Key Immunopathology Laboratory of Guangdong Province, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou (China); Xu, Xijin, E-mail: xuxj@stu.edu.cn [Analytic Cytology Laboratory and the Key Immunopathology Laboratory of Guangdong Province, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou (China); Department of Cell Biology and Genetics, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou (China)

    2012-06-15

    Unregulated electronic-waste recycling results in serious environmental pollution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Guiyu, China. We evaluated the body burden of seven carcinogenic PAHs and potential health risks for neonates. Umbilical cord blood (UCB) samples were collected from Guiyu (n = 103), and the control area of Chaonan (n = 80), China. PAHs in UCB were determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The median N-Ary-Summation 7c-PAH concentration was 108.05 ppb in UCB samples from Guiyu, vs. 79.36 ppb in samples from Chaonan. Residence in Guiyu and longer cooking time of food during the gestation period were significant factors contributing to the N-Ary-Summation 7c-PAH level. Benzo[a]anthracene (BaA), chrysene (Chr), and benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) were found to correlate with reduced neonatal height and gestational age. Infants experiencing adverse birth outcomes, on the whole, displayed higher BaA, Chr, and BaP levels compared to those with normal outcomes. We conclude that maternal PAH exposure results in fetal accumulation of toxic PAHs, and that such prenatal exposure correlates with adverse effects on neonatal health.

  4. Chromosomal aberrations in lymphocytes predict human cancer independently of exposure to carcinogens. European Study Group on Cytogenetic Biomarkers and Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonassi, S; Hagmar, L; Strömberg, U

    2000-01-01

    played by exposure to carcinogens is still uncertain because of the requisite information concerning occupation and lifestyle was lacking. We evaluated in the present study whether CAs predicted cancer because they were the result of past exposure to carcinogens or because they were an intermediate end...... in the regression model. The risk for high versus low levels of CAs was similar in subjects heavily exposed to carcinogens and in those who had never, to their knowledge, been exposed to any major carcinogenic agent during their lifetime, supporting the idea that chromosome damage itself is involved in the pathway...

  5. Frequency and risk factors for prevalent, incident, and persistent genital carcinogenic human papillomavirus infection in sexually active women: community based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakeshott, Pippa; Aghaizu, Adamma; Reid, Fiona; Howell-Jones, Rebecca; Hay, Phillip E; Sadiq, S Tariq; Lacey, Charles J; Beddows, Simon; Soldan, Kate

    2012-06-22

    To investigate frequency and risk factors for prevalent, incident, and persistent carcinogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) in young women before the introduction of immunisation against HPV types 16 and 18 for schoolgirls. Cohort study 20 London universities and further education colleges. 2185 sexually active female students, mean age 21 years (range 16-27), 38% from ethnic minorities, who took part in the POPI (prevention of pelvic infection) chlamydia screening trial in 2004-08 and who provided duplicate, self taken vaginal swabs and completed questionnaires at baseline. At follow-up, a median of 16 months later, 821 women (38%) returned repeat vaginal swabs by post. In 2009-10, stored samples were tested for HPV. Samples from 404/2185 (18.5% (95% CI 16.9% to 20.2%)) of the cohort were positive for carcinogenic HPV at baseline, including 15.0% (327) positive for non-vaccine carcinogenic genotypes. Reporting two or more sexual partners in the previous year and concurrent Chlamydia trachomatis or bacterial vaginosis were independent risk factors for prevalent vaginal HPV infection. Infection with one or more new HPV types was found in 17.7% (145/821) of follow-up samples, giving an estimated annual incidence of carcinogenic HPV infection of 12.9% (95% CI 11.0% to 15.0%). Incident infection was more common in women reporting two or more partners in the previous year, agedcarcinogenic HPV infection, 20 (14% (8.3% to 19.7%) had infection with the same carcinogenic HPV type(s) detected after 12-28 months. Of these women, 13 (65%) had redetected infection with HPV 16 or 18, and nine (45%) with non-vaccine carcinogenic HPV genotypes. In the first UK cohort study of carcinogenic HPV in young women in the community, multiple sexual partners was an independent predictor of both prevalent and incident infection. Infection with non-vaccine carcinogenic genotypes was common. Although current HPV vaccines offer partial cross protection against some non-vaccine carcinogenic HPV

  6. Swedish review strengthens grounds for concluding that radiation from cellular and cordless phones is a probable human carcinogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Devra Lee; Kesari, Santosh; Soskolne, Colin L; Miller, Anthony B; Stein, Yael

    2013-04-01

    With 5.9 billion reported users, mobile phones constitute a new, ubiquitous and rapidly growing exposure worldwide. Mobile phones are two-way microwave radios that also emit low levels of electromagnetic radiation. Inconsistent results have been published on potential risks of brain tumors tied with mobile phone use as a result of important methodological differences in study design and statistical power. Some studies have examined mobile phone users for periods of time that are too short to detect an increased risk of brain cancer, while others have misclassified exposures by placing those with exposures to microwave radiation from cordless phones in the control group, or failing to attribute such exposures in the cases. In 2011, the World Health Organization, International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) advised that electromagnetic radiation from mobile phone and other wireless devices constitutes a "possible human carcinogen," 2B. Recent analyses not considered in the IARC review that take into account these methodological shortcomings from a number of authors find that brain tumor risk is significantly elevated for those who have used mobile phones for at least a decade. Studies carried out in Sweden indicate that those who begin using either cordless or mobile phones regularly before age 20 have greater than a fourfold increased risk of ipsilateral glioma. Given that treatment for a single case of brain cancer can cost between $100,000 for radiation therapy alone and up to $1 million depending on drug costs, resources to address this illness are already in short supply and not universally available in either developing or developed countries. Significant additional shortages in oncology services are expected at the current growth of cancer. No other environmental carcinogen has produced evidence of an increased risk in just one decade. Empirical data have shown a difference in the dielectric properties of tissues as a function of age, mostly due to the

  7. Interpretation of recurring weak associations obtained from epidemiologic studies of suspected human teratogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, M J; James, L M; Flanders, W D; Erickson, J D

    1992-07-01

    Epidemiological studies of suspected human teratogens not infrequently lead to recurring weak or moderate associations (relative risks or odds ratios ranging from greater than 1 to 3 for adverse effects and from 1/3 to less than 1 for protective effects) between specific defects and prenatal exposures. Examples of such associations include cigarette smoking and oral clefts (odds ratios between 1 and 2) and periconceptional multivitamin/folic acid supplementation and neural tube defects (odds ratios from 1/3 to 1). In this paper, we illustrate that low relative risk recurring in well-designed studies may reflect underlying biologic mechanisms and should not be readily dismissed. Low relative risks could be the result of a combination of the following factors: 1) unmeasured confounding, 2) exposure misclassification (often related to the inability to pinpoint relevant dose and timing), 3) outcome misclassification (related to the etiologic heterogeneity of birth defects), 4) biologic interactions (related to teratogenic effects in population subgroups defined by genetic susceptibility or the presence of other exposures), and 5) differential prenatal survival (related to the combined impact of the exposure and the defect on prenatal survival). These issues can be addressed in epidemiologic studies by using biological markers of exposure and susceptibility, dysmorphologic evaluation of affected infants, subgroup analysis for etiologic heterogeneity, a search for biologic interactions, and the use of prospective cohort studies. Finally, low relative risks in the face of common exposures can reflect an important public health contribution of the exposure to the occurrence of the defect in the population.

  8. Human bronchus-mediated mutagenesis of mammalian cells by carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hsu, Ih Chang; Stoner, Gary D.; Autrup, Herman

    1978-01-01

    Cultured human bronchial explants activated benzo[alpha]pyrene (BzaP) into electrophilic metabolites that bind to DNA in bronchial epithelial cells. Promutagenic and mutagenic metabolites of BzaP were also released into the culture medium. An increase in mutation frequency for ouabain resistance ...

  9. Chemical Carcinogen-Induced Changes in tRNA Metabolism in Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-11-01

    the resolution and quantitation of modified ucleosides in the urine of cancer patients would not be particularly useful for the cell culture studies...Comparison of nucleic acid catabolism by normal human fibroblasts and fibroblasts transformed with methylazoxymethyl alcohol ( MAMA ),an activated...catabolite in long-term, pulse-chase experiments. However, the kinetics of catabolism differed, in that only the MAMA -transformed cells had generated

  10. Chemical Carcinogen-Induced Changes in tRNA Metabolism in Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-11-30

    observation consistent with our original hypothesis. Investigations into tRNA modifications within the anticodon region have led to the identification of an...altered tiM Isoaccepting species to translate disparate mR A’s more efficiently. As we have now found, 7-mthylguanlne does inhibit tiM transglycosylase from...guanine into tRMA, J. Biol. Chem. 253:9082 (1978). 20. R. Glaser, M. Nonoyama, R. T. Szymanowski and W. Graham, Human nasopharyugeal carcinoma positiv

  11. THE EFFECT OF EXPOSURE TO CARCINOGENIC METALS ON HISTONE TAIL MODIFICATIONS AND GENE EXPRESSION IN HUMAN SUBJECTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arita, Adriana; Shamy, Magdy Y.; Chervona, Yana; Clancy, Harriet A.; Sun, Hong; Hall, Megan N.; Qu, Qingshan; Gamble, Mary V.; Costa, Max

    2013-01-01

    The precise mechanisms for the carcinogenesis of nickel and arsenic compounds are not completely understood. In recent years, alterations of epigenetic mechanisms have been implicated in the carcinogenesis of these two metal compounds. In vitro exposure to nickel or arsenic induces changes in both DNA methylation patterns, as well as, in the levels of posttranslational modifications of histone tails. Changes in DNA methylation patterns have been reported in human subjects exposed to arsenic. Here we review our recent reports on the alterations in global levels of posttranslational histone modifications in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of subjects with occupational exposure to nickel and subjects exposed to arsenic in their drinking water. Occupational exposure to nickel was associated with an increase in H3K4me3 and decrease in H3K9me2. A global increase in H3K9me2 and decrease in H3K9ac was found in subjects exposed to arsenic. Additionally, exposure to arsenic resulted in opposite changes in a number of histone modifications in males compared to females. The results of these two studies suggest that exposure to nickel or arsenic compounds, and possibly other carcinogenic metal compounds, can induce changes in global levels of posttranslational histone modifications in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. PMID:22633395

  12. Amelioratory effect of coenzyme Q10 on potential human carcinogen Microcystin-LR induced toxicity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lone, Yaqoob; Bhide, Mangla; Koiri, Raj Kumar

    2017-04-01

    Microcystins are a group of cyclic heptapeptide toxins produced by cyanobacteria. More than 100 microcystin analogues have been detected, among which microcystin-LR is the most abundant and toxic variant. Present study was designed to reveal whether potential human carcinogen microcystin-LR could imbalance the glycolytic-oxidative-nitrosative status of heart, kidney and spleen of mice and also to explore the amelioratory effect of coenzyme Q10 on microcystin-LR induced toxicity. Microcystin-LR was administered at a dose of 10 μg/kg bw/day, ip for 14 days in male mice. In microcystin-LR treated mice as compared to control, significant increase in the level of lipid peroxidation, hydrogen peroxide, lactate dehydrogenase, nitric oxide with a concomitant decrease in the level of glutathione was observed, suggesting microcystin-LR induced toxicity via induction of oxidative-nitrosative-glycolytic pathway. Although several studies have evaluated numerous antioxidants but still there is no effective chemoprotectant against microcystin-LR induced toxicity. When microcystin-LR treated mice were co-administered coenzyme Q10 (10 mg/kg bw/day, im) for 14 days, it was observed that coenzyme Q10 ameliorates microcystin-LR induced toxicity via modulation of glycolytic-oxidative-nitrosative stress pathway. Thus, the results suggest that coenzyme Q10 has a potential to be developed as preventive agent against microcystin-LR induced toxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Metabolism of benzo(a)pyrene, N-nitrosomethylamine, and N-nitrosopyrrolidine and identification of the major carcinogen-DNA adducts formed in cultured human esophagus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harris, Curtis C.; Autrup, Herman; Stoner, Gary D.

    1979-01-01

    (a)pyrene (BP), N-nitrosodimethylamine (DMN), and A/-nitrosopyrrolidine in cultured nontumorous esophagus from two patients with and six patients without esophageal carcinoma. Esophageal explants were cultured in a chemically defined medium for 7 days prior to adding [3H]BP (1.5 JUM),[14C]DMN (100 /IM), or [14C......]Nnitrosopyrrolidine (100 /¿M)for 24 hr. Radioactivity was found bound to both mucosal protein (BP, DMN, and A/-nitrosopyrrolidine) and DMA (BP and DMN). The major carcinogen-DNA adducts were: (a) with BP, N2-[10/?-(7/?,8a,9a-trihydroxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydrobenzo(a)pyrenyl)]deoxyguanosine; and (fa) with DMN, 7-methylguanine......%), and glutathione conjugates (24 to 66%)] and of organic-extractable metabolites were similar in all patients. Whether or not quantitative differences in carcinogen metabolism and in carcinogen bound to esophageal DNA will play a role in human susceptibility to environmental chemical carcinogens is not as yet known....

  14. DNA Repair in Human Cells Exposed to Combinations of Carcinogenic Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setlow, R. B.; Ahmed, F. E.

    1980-01-01

    Normal human and XP2 fibroblasts were treated with UV plus UV-mimetic chemicals. The UV dose used was sufficient to saturate the UV excision repair system. Excision repair after combined treatments was estimated by unscheduled DNA synthesis, BrdUrd photolysis, and the loss of sites sensitive to a UV specific endonuclease. Since the repair of damage from UV and its mimetics is coordinately controlled we expected that there would be similar rate-limiting steps in the repair of UV and chemical damage and that after a combined treatment the total amount of repair would be the same as from UV or the chemicals separately. The expectation was not fulfilled. In normal cells repair after a combined treatment was additive whereas in XP cells repair after a combined treatment was usually less than after either agent separately. The chemicals tested were AAAF, DMBA-epoxide, 4NQO, and ICR-170.

  15. Laser diagnostics of native cervix dabs with human papilloma virus in high carcinogenic risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peresunko, O. P.; Karpenko, Ju. G.; Burkovets, D. N.; Ivashko, P. V.; Nikorych, A. V.; Yermolenko, S. B.; Gruia, Ion; Gruia, M. J.

    2015-11-01

    The results of experimental studies of coordinate distributions of Mueller matrix elements of the following types of cervical scraping tissue are presented: rate- low-grade - highly differentiated dysplasia (CIN1-CIN3) - adenocarcinoma of high, medium and low levels of differentiation (G1-G3). The rationale for the choice of statistical points 1-4 orders polarized coherent radiation field, transformed as a result of interaction with the oncologic modified biological layers "epithelium-stroma" as a quantitative criterion of polarimetric optical differentiation state of human biological tissues are shown here. The analysis of the obtained Mueller matrix elements and statistical correlation methods, the systematized by types studied tissues is accomplished. The results of research images of Mueller matrix elements m34 for this type of pathology as low-grade dysplasia (CIN2), the results of its statistical and correlation analysis are presented.

  16. Carcinogenic effects of oil dispersants: A KEGG pathway-based RNA-seq study of human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yao-Zhong; Zhang, Lei; Roy-Engel, Astrid M; Saito, Shigeki; Lasky, Joseph A; Wang, Guangdi; Wang, He

    2017-02-20

    The health impacts of the BP oil spill are yet to be further revealed as the toxicological effects of oil products and dispersants on human respiratory system may be latent and complex, and hence difficult to study and follow up. Here we performed RNA-seq analyses of a system of human airway epithelial cells treated with the BP crude oil and/or dispersants Corexit 9500 and Corexit 9527 that were used to help break up the oil spill. Based on the RNA-seq data, we then systemically analyzed the transcriptomic perturbations of the cells at the KEGG pathway level using two pathway-based analysis tools, GAGE (generally applicable gene set enrichment) and GSNCA (Gene Sets Net Correlations Analysis). Our results suggested a pattern of change towards carcinogenesis for the treated cells marked by upregulation of ribosomal biosynthesis (hsa03008) (p=1.97E-13), protein processing (hsa04141) (p=4.09E-7), Wnt signaling (hsa04310) (p=6.76E-3), neurotrophin signaling (hsa04722) (p=7.73E-3) and insulin signaling (hsa04910) (p=1.16E-2) pathways under the dispersant Corexit 9527 treatment, as identified by GAGE analysis. Furthermore, through GSNCA analysis, we identified gene co-expression changes for several KEGG cancer pathways, including small cell lung cancer pathway (hsa05222, p=9.99E-5), under various treatments of oil/dispersant, especially the mixture of oil and Corexit 9527. Overall, our results suggested carcinogenic effects of dispersants (in particular Corexit 9527) and their mixtures with the BP crude oil, and provided further support for more stringent safety precautions and regulations for operations involving long-term respiratory exposure to oil and dispersants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Characteristics of carcinogenic human papillomavirus infection in Suzhou: Epidemiology, vaccine evaluation, and associated diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen Jing; Xu, Hong Xing; Chen, Zhao Hua; Xu, Wei Dong; Wu, Yuan Jian

    2017-05-01

    Human papillomavirus infection is a major health problem and caused substantial benign and malignancy diseases among female and male worldwide. We aim to investigate the epidemiology of high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) and related diseases in Suzhou population. As well as evaluating the potential benefit of a nine-valent HPV vaccine (regardless of HPV-6 and -11) in Suzhou. A total of 40,108 people aged 13-89 years were retrospectively examined by database retrieval from 2010 to 2015. Thirteen genotypes (16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58, 59, and 66) of HR-HPV were detected using Tellgenplex™ xMAP™ HPV DNA Test assay. The overall prevalence of HR-HPV was 21.1%, the female and male account for 96.4% and 3.6%, respectively. The infection rate among male (25.6%, 367/1,432) was significantly higher than that among female (20.9%, 8,100/38,676), X 2  = 17.341 (P < 0.001), with OR = 1.293, 95% CI (1.146-1.460). The five most frequent HR-HPV genotypes were HPV-16 (5.12%), -52 (5.07%), -58 (3.02%), -39 (2.00%), and -18 (1.74%). HR-HPV infection rate was peak in person aged <20 years, and second higher in person aged 51-60 years. Infection modes as HPV-16, -18, -31, -33, -45, -52, -58 alone or mixed accounted for 63.2%. The top three prevalent diseases in HR-HPV infected women were cervicitis, vaginitis, and cervical lesions, and in men were verruca, urethritis, and balanitis, respectively. This is the first study to demonstrate HPV infection status in Suzhou population. Both women and men had a large burden of HPV infection. The nine-valent HPV prophylactic vaccines may potentially prevent 63.2% HR-HPV infection in Suzhou. J. Med. Virol. 89:895-901, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Smoking related carcinogen-DNA adducts in biopsy samples of human urinary bladder: Identification of N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-4-aminobiphenyl as a major adduct

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talaska, G. (National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR (United States) Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States)); Al-Juburi, A.Z.S.S. (John A. McClellan Memorial Veterans Administration Hospital, Little Rock, AR (United States)); Kadlubar, F.F. (National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR (United States))

    1991-06-15

    The prevalence of covalent modifications to DNA (carcinogen-DNA adducts) in 42 human urinary bladder biopsy samples was investigated by {sup 32}P-postlabeling methods, with enhancement by both nuclease P1 treatment and 1-butanol extraction. Total mean carcinogen-DNA adduct levels and the mean levels of several specific adducts were significantly elevated in DNA samples of 13 current smokers, as opposed to 9 never smokers or 20 ex-smokers (5 years abstinence). There was no significant difference between the latter two groups. Several DNA adducts enhanced by nuclease P1 treatment were chromatographically similar to putative hydrocarbon DNA adducts reported earlier for placenta and lung DNA samples obtained from cigarette smokers. Putative aromatic amine adducts were detected by 1-butanol extraction that were not present when the samples were treated with nuclease P1. One of these displayed chromatographic behavior identical to the predominant adduct induced by the human urinary bladder carcinogen, 4-aminobiphenyl, which is present in cigarette smoke. This adduct comigrated in several thin-layer chromatographic systems with a synthetic N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-4-amino(2,2{prime}-{sup 3}H)biphenyl-3{prime},5{prime}-bisphosphate marker. These data reinforce an association between cigarette smoking and DNA damage and suggest a molecular basis for the initiation of human urinary bladder cancer by cigarette smoke.

  19. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL1RN) is associated with suppression of early carcinogenic events in human oral malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiiba, Masashi; Saito, Kengo; Yamagami, Hitomi; Nakashima, Dai; Higo, Morihiro; Kasamatsu, Atsushi; Sakamoto, Yosuke; Ogawara, Katsunori; Uzawa, Katsuhiro; Takiguchi, Yuichi; Tanzawa, Hideki

    2015-05-01

    Inflammatory abnormalities have been implicated in the pathogenesis of various human diseases, including cancer. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL1RN) is a potent anti-inflammatory molecule that modulates the biological activity of the proinflammatory cytokine, interleukin-1. The aim of this study was to examine the expression of IL1RN in oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs), and to determine its clinical significance. Expression levels of IL1RN in matched normal and tumor specimens from 39 OSCCs were evaluated using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction methods, and immunohistochemical analysis. Protein expression of IL1RN was also examined in 18 oral premalignant lesions (OPLs). Expression of IL1RN mRNA was significantly downregulated in OSCCs compared with normal tissues. Decreased expression of IL1RN protein was also observed in OPLs and OSCCs. The IL1RN expression level was lower in the OPL cases with severe dysplasia compared to those with mild/moderate dysplasia. Significantly downregulated IL1RN expression was observed in all OSCC lesion sites examined when compared with the matched normal tissues. However, the decreased level of IL1RN expression did not correspond with tumor progression. Noteworthy, IL1RN expression was higher in the advanced OSCC cases (T3/T4) compared to early cases (T1/T2). Among OSCC samples, relatively higher IL1RN expression was associated with active tumor development in the OSCCs occurring in the buccal mucosa, oral floor, fauces and gingiva, but not the tongue. These data suggest that IL1RN may exhibit opposing characteristics in oral malignancies depending on the stage of cancer development, suppressing early carcinogenic events, yet promoting tumor development in some lesion sites. Thus, IL1RN could represent a reliable biomarker for the early diagnosis of OSCCs. Furthermore, IL1RN may possess unknown and complex functions in the developed OSCC.

  20. Comparison of INNO-LiPA genotyping extra and hybrid capture 2 assays for detection of carcinogenic human papillomavirus genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzon, Luisa; Militello, Valentina; Pagni, Silvana; Palù, Giorgio

    2012-11-01

    Accurate HPV detection and genotyping tests are useful for management of women with HPV infection and for monitoring HPV vaccine efficacy. To evaluate the performance of the INNO-LiPA HPV Genotyping Extra assay (SPF10-LiPA) for the detection of carcinogenic HPV types in women referred for opportunistic cervical cancer screening by comparison with the Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2) assay. Cross-sectional analysis from baseline data of HC2 and SPF10-LiPA testing in cervical specimens collected from 1580 consecutive women and correlation with cervical cytology and histology data, when available. The two assays showed a good agreement for detection of carcinogenic HPV types and reported the same prevalence of carcinogenic HPV infections in different age groups. Stratification of study subjects by cervical cytology interpretation and histology results demonstrated that the two tests gave very similar results in the different cytology interpretation groups and in CIN2 and CIN3 samples, while in carcinogenic HPV-positive results than the HC2 test. A comparative analysis of the two assay for individual HPV types showed that HC2 identified as positive between 73% and 100% of specimens with carcinogenic HPV types detected by SPF10-LiPA and, in particular, approximately 90% and 80% of HPV16- and HPV18-positive samples, respectively. A good agreement was observed between HC2 and SPF10-LiPA for carcinogenic HPV type detection, that supports further evaluation of the clinical performance of the new version of SPF10-LiPA in cervical cancer screening protocols. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Prediction of the Carcinogenic Potential of Human Pharmaceuticals Using Repeated Dose Toxicity Data and Their Pharmacological Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Laan, Jan Willem; Buitenhuis, Wenny H W; Wagenaar, Laura; Soffers, Ans E M F; van Someren, Eugene P; Krul, Cyrille A M; Woutersen, Ruud A

    2016-01-01

    In an exercise designed to reduce animal use, we analyzed the results of rat subchronic toxicity studies from 289 pharmaceutical compounds with the aim to predict the tumor outcome of carcinogenicity studies in this species. The results were obtained from the assessment reports available at the Medicines Evaluation Board of the Netherlands for 289 pharmaceutical compounds that had been shown to be non-genotoxic. One hundred forty-three of the 239 compounds not inducing putative preneoplastic lesions in the subchronic study did not induce tumors in the carcinogenicity study [true negatives (TNs)], whereas 96 compounds were categorized as false negatives (FNs) because tumors were observed in the carcinogenicity study. Of the remaining 50 compounds, 31 showed preneoplastic lesions in the subchronic study and tumors in the carcinogenicity study [true positives (TPs)], and 19 only showed preneoplastic lesions in subchronic studies but no tumors in the carcinogenicity study [false positives (FPs)]. In addition, we then re-assessed the prediction of the tumor outcome by integrating the pharmacological properties of these compounds. These pharmacological properties were evaluated with respect to the presence or absence of a direct or indirect proliferative action. We found support for the absence of cellular proliferation for 204 compounds (TN). For 67 compounds, the presence of cellular hyperplasia as evidence for proliferative action could be found (TP). Therefore, this approach resulted in an ability to predict non-carcinogens at a success rate of 92% and the ability to detect carcinogens at 98%. The combined evaluation of pharmacological and histopathological endpoints eventually led to only 18 unknown outcomes (17 categorized as FN and 1 as FP), thereby enhancing both the negative and positive predictivity of an evaluation based upon histopathological evaluation only. The data show the added value of a consideration of the pharmacological properties of compounds in

  2. Prediction of the carcinogenic potential of human pharmaceuticals using repeated dose toxicity data and their pharmacological properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Willem Van Der Laan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In an exercise designed to reduce animal use, we analysed the results of rat sub-chronic toxicity studies from 289 pharmaceutical compounds with the aim to predict the tumour outcome of carcinogenicity studies in this species. The results were obtained from the assessment reports available at the Medicines Evaluation Board of the Netherlands for 289 pharmaceutical compounds that had been shown to be non-genotoxic. One hundred and forty-three of the 239 compounds not inducing putative preneoplastic lesions in the sub-chronic study did not induce tumours in the carcinogenicity study (True Negatives - TN, whereas 96 compounds were categorised as False Negatives (FN, because tumours were observed in the carcinogenicity study. For the remaining 50 compounds, 31 showed preneoplastic lesions in the subchronic study and tumours in the carcinogenicity study (True positives - TP, and 19 only showed preneoplastic lesions in subchronic studies but no tumours in the carcinogenicity study (False positives - FP. In addition, we then re-assessed the prediction of the tumour outcome by integrating the pharmacological properties of these compounds. These pharmacological properties were evaluated with respect to the presence or absence of a direct or indirect proliferative action. We found support for the absence of cellular proliferation for 204 compounds (TN. For 67 compounds the presence of cellular hyperplasia as evidence for proliferative action could be found (TP. Therefore, this approach resulted in an ability to predict non-carcinogens at a success rate of 92 % and the ability to detect carcinogens at 98 %. The combined evaluation of pharmacological and histopathological endpoints eventually led to only 18 unknown outcomes (17 categorised as FN. 1 as FP, thereby enhancing both the negative and positive predictivity of an evaluation based upon histopathological evaluation only. The data show the added value of a consideration of the pharmacological

  3. A computational method for the identification of new candidate carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Chu, Chen; Lu, Jing; Kong, Xiangyin; Huang, Tao; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2015-09-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of human death. Based on current knowledge, one of the causes of cancer is exposure to toxic chemical compounds, including radioactive compounds, dioxin, and arsenic. The identification of new carcinogenic chemicals may warn us of potential danger and help to identify new ways to prevent cancer. In this study, a computational method was proposed to identify potential carcinogenic chemicals, as well as non-carcinogenic chemicals. According to the current validated carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic chemicals from the CPDB (Carcinogenic Potency Database), the candidate chemicals were searched in a weighted chemical network constructed according to chemical-chemical interactions. Then, the obtained candidate chemicals were further selected by a randomization test and information on chemical interactions and structures. The analyses identified several candidate carcinogenic chemicals, while those candidates identified as non-carcinogenic were supported by a literature search. In addition, several candidate carcinogenic/non-carcinogenic chemicals exhibit structural dissimilarity with validated carcinogenic/non-carcinogenic chemicals.

  4. Vaccinia virus, herpes simplex virus, and carcinogens induce DNA amplification in a human cell line and support replication of a helpervirus dependent parvovirus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlehofer, J.R.; Ehrbar, M.; zur Hausen, H.

    1986-07-15

    The SV40-transformed human kidney cell line, NB-E, amplifies integrated as well as episomal SV40 DNA upon treatment with chemical (DMBA) or physical (uv irradiation) carcinogens (initiators) as well as after infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 or with vaccinia virus. In addition it is shown that vaccinia virus induces SV40 DNA amplification also in the SV40-transformed Chinese hamster embryo cell line, CO631. These findings demonstrate that human cells similar to Chinese hamster cells amplify integrated DNA sequences after treatment with carcinogens or infection with specific viruses. Furthermore, a poxvirus--vaccinia virus--similar to herpes group viruses induces DNA amplification. As reported for other systems, the vaccinia virus-induced DNA amplification in NB-E cells is inhibited by coinfection with adeno-associated virus (AAV) type 5. This is in line with previous studies on inhibition of carcinogen- or HSV-induced DNA amplification in CO631 cells. The experiments also demonstrate that vaccinia virus, in addition to herpes and adenoviruses acts as a helper virus for replication and structural antigen synthesis of AAV-5 in NB-E cells.

  5. Chronic occupational exposure to arsenic induces carcinogenic gene signaling networks and neoplastic transformation in human lung epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stueckle, Todd A., E-mail: tstueckle@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Lu, Yongju, E-mail: yongju6@hotmail.com [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Davis, Mary E., E-mail: mdavis@wvu.edu [Department of Physiology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Wang, Liying, E-mail: lmw6@cdc.gov [Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Jiang, Bing-Hua, E-mail: bhjiang@jefferson.edu [Department of Pathology, Anatomy and Cell Biology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Holaskova, Ida, E-mail: iholaskova@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Schafer, Rosana, E-mail: rschafer@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Barnett, John B., E-mail: jbarnett@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Rojanasakul, Yon, E-mail: yrojan@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure remains a human health risk; however a clear mode of action to understand gene signaling-driven arsenic carcinogenesis is currently lacking. This study chronically exposed human lung epithelial BEAS-2B cells to low-dose arsenic trioxide to elucidate cancer promoting gene signaling networks associated with arsenic-transformed (B-As) cells. Following a 6 month exposure, exposed cells were assessed for enhanced cell proliferation, colony formation, invasion ability and in vivo tumor formation compared to control cell lines. Collected mRNA was subjected to whole genome expression microarray profiling followed by in silico Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) to identify lung carcinogenesis modes of action. B-As cells displayed significant increases in proliferation, colony formation and invasion ability compared to BEAS-2B cells. B-As injections into nude mice resulted in development of primary and secondary metastatic tumors. Arsenic exposure resulted in widespread up-regulation of genes associated with mitochondrial metabolism and increased reactive oxygen species protection suggesting mitochondrial dysfunction. Carcinogenic initiation via reactive oxygen species and epigenetic mechanisms was further supported by altered DNA repair, histone, and ROS-sensitive signaling. NF-κB, MAPK and NCOR1 signaling disrupted PPARα/δ-mediated lipid homeostasis. A ‘pro-cancer’ gene signaling network identified increased survival, proliferation, inflammation, metabolism, anti-apoptosis and mobility signaling. IPA-ranked signaling networks identified altered p21, EF1α, Akt, MAPK, and NF-κB signaling networks promoting genetic disorder, altered cell cycle, cancer and changes in nucleic acid and energy metabolism. In conclusion, transformed B-As cells with their whole genome expression profile provide an in vitro arsenic model for future lung cancer signaling research and data for chronic arsenic exposure risk assessment. Highlights: ► Chronic As{sub 2}O

  6. The carcinogenicity of acrylamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Jerry M

    2005-02-07

    Acrylamide is carcinogenic to experimental mice and rats, causing tumors at multiple organ sites in both species when given in drinking water or by other means. In mice, acrylamide increases the incidence of alveologenic lung tumors and initiates skin tumors after dermal exposures. In two bioassays in rats, acrylamide administered in drinking water consistently induced peritesticular mesotheliomas, thyroid follicular cell tumors, and mammary gland tumors, as well as primary brain tumors when all such tumors were included in data analysis. In one of the rat bioassays, increased numbers of adrenal pheochromocytomas, adenomas of pituitary and clitoral glands, papillomas of the oral cavity, and adenocarcinomas of the uterus also occurred. In both humans and experimental animals, a significant fraction of ingested acrylamide is converted metabolically to the chemically reactive and genotoxic epoxide, glycidamide, which is likely to play an important role in the carcinogenicity of acrylamide. No studies on the carcinogenicity of glycidamide have been published, but bioassays of this compound are in progress. Epidemiologic studies of possible health effects from exposures to acrylamide have not produced consistent evidence of increased cancer risk, in either occupationally exposed workers or the general populations of several countries in which acrylamide is present in certain foods and beverages. A doubling of risk for pancreatic cancer was observed in the most highly exposed workers within the largest industrial cohort, but no consistent exposure-response relationships were identified. Retrospective re-analyses of previously conducted case-control studies of cancer incidence in several European populations have identified no causal relationship between consumption of foods or beverages that contain acrylamide and the incidence of cancers at various sites including kidney, large bowel, urinary bladder, oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, esophagus, breast, and ovary. These

  7. Environmental exposure to carcinogens in northwestern Cameroon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In developing countries, 6% of deaths are due to cancer but cancer prevention is not practiced. Humans can prevent themselves from a number of workplace and environmental carcinogens. Objectives: To assess exposure to carcinogens, risky behaviours and associated preventive methods. Methods: A ...

  8. The environmental pollutant and carcinogen 3-nitrobenzanthrone and its human metabolite 3-aminobenzanthrone are potent inducers of rat hepatic cytochromes P450 1A1 and -1A2 and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiborová, Marie; Dracínská, Helena; Hájková, Jana; Kaderábková, Pavla; Frei, Eva; Schmeiser, Heinz H; Soucek, Pavel; Phillips, David H; Arlt, Volker M

    2006-08-01

    3-Nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA), a suspected human carcinogen occurring in diesel exhaust and air pollution, and its human metabolite 3-aminobenzanthrone (3-ABA) were investigated for their ability to induce biotransformation enzymes in rat liver and the influence of such induction on DNA adduct formation by the compounds. Rats were treated (i.p.) with 0.4, 4, or 40 mg/kg body weight 3-NBA or 3-ABA. When hepatic cytosolic fractions from rats treated with 40 mg/kg body weight 3-NBA or 3-ABA were incubated with 3-NBA, DNA adduct formation, measured by 32P-postlabeling analysis, was 10-fold higher in incubations with cytosols from pretreated rats than with controls. The increase in 3-NBA-derived DNA adduct formation corresponded to a dose-dependent increase in protein levels and enzymatic activity of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1). NQO1 is the major enzyme reducing 3-NBA in human and rat livers. Incubations of 3-ABA with hepatic microsomes of rats treated with 3-NBA or 3-ABA (40 mg/kg body weight) led to as much as a 12-fold increase in 3-ABA-derived DNA adduct formation compared with controls. The observed stimulation of DNA adduct formation by both compounds was attributed to their potential to induce protein expression and enzymatic activity of cytochromes P450 1A1 and/or -1A2 (CYP1A1/2), the major enzymes responsible for 3-ABA activation in human and rat livers. Collectively, these results demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, that by inducing hepatic NQO1 and CYP1A1/2, both 3-NBA and 3-ABA increase the enzymatic activation of these two compounds to reactive DNA adduct-forming species, thereby enhancing their own genotoxic potential.

  9. Carcinogenic nickel silences gene expression by chromatin condensation and DNA methylation: a new model for epigenetic carcinogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y W; Klein, C B; Kargacin, B; Salnikow, K; Kitahara, J; Dowjat, K; Zhitkovich, A; Christie, N T; Costa, M

    1995-05-01

    A transgenic gpt+ Chinese hamster cell line (G12) was found to be susceptible to carcinogenic nickel-induced inactivation of gpt expression without mutagenesis or deletion of the transgene. Many nickel-induced 6-thioguanine-resistant variants spontaneously reverted to actively express gpt, as indicated by both reversion assays and direct enzyme measurements. Since reversion was enhanced in many of the nickel-induced variant cell lines following 24-h treatment with the demethylating agent 5-azacytidine, the involvement of DNA methylation in silencing gpt expression was suspected. This was confirmed by demonstrations of increased DNA methylation, as well as by evidence indicating condensed chromatin and heterochromatinization of the gpt integration site in 6-thioguanine-resistant cells. Upon reversion to active gpt expression, DNA methylation and condensation are lost. We propose that DNA condensation and methylation result in heterochromatinization of the gpt sequence with subsequent inheritance of the now silenced gene. This mechanism is supported by direct evidence showing that acute nickel treatment of cultured cells, and of isolated nuclei in vitro, can indeed facilitate gpt sequence-specific chromatin condensation. Epigenetic mechanisms have been implicated in the actions of some nonmutagenic carcinogens, and DNA methylation changes are now known to be important in carcinogenesis. This paper further supports the emerging theory that nickel is a human carcinogen that can alter gene expression by enhanced DNA methylation and compaction, rather than by mutagenic mechanisms.

  10. Spooky Suspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacifici, Lara

    2011-01-01

    This activity presents an option for covering biology content while engaging students in an investigation that highlights the spirit of Halloween. Students are engaged in the story line and have fun trying to solve the mystery kidnapping by using science skills to examine the evidence and eliminate some ghoulish suspects. (Contains 1 figure.)

  11. Risk assessment of carcinogens in food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Susan; Schlatter, Josef

    2010-03-01

    Approaches for the risk assessment of carcinogens in food have evolved as scientific knowledge has advanced. Early methods allowed little more than hazard identification and an indication of carcinogenic potency. Evaluation of the modes of action of carcinogens and their broad division into genotoxic and epigenetic (non-genotoxic, non-DNA reactive) carcinogens have played an increasing role in determining the approach followed and provide possibilities for more detailed risk characterisation, including provision of quantitative estimates of risk. Reliance on experimental animal data for the majority of risk assessments and the fact that human exposures to dietary carcinogens are often orders of magnitude below doses used in experimental studies has provided a fertile ground for discussion and diverging views on the most appropriate way to offer risk assessment advice. Approaches used by national and international bodies differ, with some offering numerical estimates of potential risks to human health, while others express considerable reservations about the validity of quantitative approaches requiring extrapolation of dose-response data below the observed range and instead offer qualitative advice. Recognising that qualitative advice alone does not provide risk managers with information on which to prioritise the need for risk management actions, a "margin of exposure" approach for substances that are both genotoxic and carcinogenic has been developed, which is now being used by the World Health Organization and the European Food Safety Authority. This review describes the evolution of risk assessment advice on carcinogens and discusses examples of ways in which carcinogens in food have been assessed in Europe.

  12. trans-11 18:1 Vaccenic Acid (TVA Has a Direct Anti-Carcinogenic Effect on MCF-7 Human Mammary Adenocarcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Na Lim

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Trans vaccenic acid (TVA; trans-11 18:1 is a positional and geometric isomer of oleic acid and it is the predominant trans isomer found in ruminant fats. TVA can be converted into cis-9, trans-11 conjugated linoleic acid (c9, t11-CLA, a CLA isomer that has many beneficial effects, by stearoyl CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1 in the mammary gland. The health benefits associated with CLA are well documented, but it is unclear whether trans fatty acids (TFAs from ruminant products have healthy effects. Therefore, the effects of TVA on the proliferation of MCF-7 human breast adenocarcinoma cells and MCF-10A human breast epithelial cells were investigated in the present study. Results showed that TVA inhibited the proliferation of MCF-7 cells but not MCF-10A cells by down-regulating the expression of Bcl-2 as well as procaspase-9. In addition, the suppressive effect of TVA was confirmed in SCD1-depleted MCF-7 cells. Our results suggested that TVA exerts a direct anti-carcinogenic effect on MCF-7 cells. These findings provided a better understanding of the research on the anti-carcinogenic effects of TVA and this may facilitate the manufacture of TVA/c9, t11-CLA fortified ruminant products.

  13. Community Health Seeking Behavior for Suspected Human and Animal Rabies Cases, Gomma District, Southwest Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    G/hiwot, Tsegaye Tewelde; Sime, Abiot Girma; Deresa, Benti; Tafese, Wubit; Hajito, Kifle Weldemichael; Gemeda, Desta Hiko

    2016-01-01

    Timely presentation to appropriate health service provider of sick animals/humans from zoonotic diseases like rabies is important for early case/outbreak detection and management. However, data on community's health seeking practice for rabies in Ethiopia is limited. Therefore the objective of this study was to determine community's health seeking behavior on rabies, Southwest Ethiopia. A cross-sectional survey was conducted from January 16-February 14, 2015 to collect data from 808 respondents where the respondents were selected using multistage sampling technique. Data were collected using interviewer administered structured questionnaire by trained epidemiology graduate level students. Data were entered to Epidata version 3.1 and analyzed using SPSS version 20 for windows. Eight hundred three (99.4%) respondents participated in the study. Out of 28 respondents who reported their family members' exposure to rabies, 8 of them replied that the exposed family members sought treatment from traditional healers. More than nine in ten respondents perceived that humans and domestic animals with rabies exposure should seek help of which 85% of them suggested modern health care facilities as the preferred management option for the sick humans and domestic animals. However, among those who reported sick domestic animals, near to 72% of them had either slaughtered for human consumption, sold immediately, visited traditional healer, given home care or did nothing for the sick domestic animals. Majority of the respondents had favorable perception of seeking treatment from modern health care facilities for rabies. However, significant number of them had managed inappropriately for the sick domestic animals from rabies. Hence, raising awareness of the community about management of sick domestic animals from rabies and the need for reporting to both human and animal health service providers is needed.

  14. Community Health Seeking Behavior for Suspected Human and Animal Rabies Cases, Gomma District, Southwest Ethiopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsegaye Tewelde G/hiwot

    Full Text Available Timely presentation to appropriate health service provider of sick animals/humans from zoonotic diseases like rabies is important for early case/outbreak detection and management. However, data on community's health seeking practice for rabies in Ethiopia is limited. Therefore the objective of this study was to determine community's health seeking behavior on rabies, Southwest Ethiopia.A cross-sectional survey was conducted from January 16-February 14, 2015 to collect data from 808 respondents where the respondents were selected using multistage sampling technique. Data were collected using interviewer administered structured questionnaire by trained epidemiology graduate level students. Data were entered to Epidata version 3.1 and analyzed using SPSS version 20 for windows.Eight hundred three (99.4% respondents participated in the study. Out of 28 respondents who reported their family members' exposure to rabies, 8 of them replied that the exposed family members sought treatment from traditional healers. More than nine in ten respondents perceived that humans and domestic animals with rabies exposure should seek help of which 85% of them suggested modern health care facilities as the preferred management option for the sick humans and domestic animals. However, among those who reported sick domestic animals, near to 72% of them had either slaughtered for human consumption, sold immediately, visited traditional healer, given home care or did nothing for the sick domestic animals.Majority of the respondents had favorable perception of seeking treatment from modern health care facilities for rabies. However, significant number of them had managed inappropriately for the sick domestic animals from rabies. Hence, raising awareness of the community about management of sick domestic animals from rabies and the need for reporting to both human and animal health service providers is needed.

  15. [QUANTITATIVE DNA EVALUATION OF THE HIGH CARCINOGENIC RISK OF HUMAN PAPILLOMA VIRUSES AND HUMAN HERPES VIRUSES IN MALES WITH FERTILITY DISORDERS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evdokimov, V V; Naumenko, V A; Tulenev, Yu A; Kurilo, L F; Kovalyk, V P; Sorokina, T M; Lebedeva, A L; Gomberg, M A; Kushch, A A

    2016-01-01

    Infertility is an actual medical and social problem. In 50% of couples it is associated with the male factor and in more than 50% of cases the etiology of the infertility remains insufficiently understood. The goal of this work was to study the prevalence and to perform quantitative analysis of the human herpes viruses (HHV) and high carcinogenic risk papilloma viruses (HR HPV) in males with infertility, as well as to assess the impact of these infections on sperm parameters. Ejaculate samples obtained from 196 males fall into 3 groups. Group 1 included men with the infertility of unknown etiology (n = 112); group 2, patients who had female partners with the history of spontaneous abortion (n = 63); group 3 (control), healthy men (n = 21). HHV and HR HPV DNA in the ejaculates were detected in a total of 42/196 (21.4%) males: in 31 and 11 patients in groups 1 and 2, respectively (p > 0.05) and in none of healthy males. HHV were detected in 24/42; HR HPV, in 18/42 males (p > 0.05) without significant difference between the groups. Among HR HPV genotypes of the clade A9 in ejaculate were more frequent (14/18, p = 0.04). Comparative analysis of the sperm parameters showed that in the ejaculates of the infected patients sperm motility as well as the number of morphologically normal cells were significantly reduced compared with the healthy men. The quantification of the viral DNA revealed that in 31% of the male ejaculates the viral load was high: > 3 Ig10/100000 cells. Conclusion. The detection of HHV and HR HPV in the ejaculate is associated with male infertility. Quantification of the viral DNA in the ejaculate is a useful indicator for monitoring viral infections in infertility and for decision to start therapy.

  16. Asbestos and metals as carcinogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norseth, T

    1980-01-01

    Increased incidences of lung carcinoma and pleural mesothelioma in humans exposed to asbestos have been irrefutably established. Different forms of asbestos may have different tumorigenic activities, depending on surface properties, durability, and size of the fibers. A number of metals, such as nickel, chromium, and arsenic, are known to be carcinogenic to humans; for beryllium and cadmium the epidemiologic evidence is less extensive. All these metals also induce genetic toxicity in vitro. For chromium the molecular mechanism of metal tumorigenesis has been extensively investigated; the hexavalent form is generally a much more potent mutagen than is chromium (III). Solubility seems to be necessary for the genotoxicity of nickel. At present it cannot be concluded that all metals act by the same carcinogenic mechanism, even though direct modification of DNA seems to be the common experimental finding.

  17. Carcinogenicity of consumption of red meat and processed meat: A review of scientific news since the IARC decision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo, José L; Nadal, Martí

    2017-07-01

    In October 2015, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) issued a press release on the results of the evaluation of the carcinogenicity of red and processed meat. Based on the accumulated scientific literature, the consumption of red meat was classified as "probably carcinogenic to humans" and processed meat as "carcinogenic to humans". Given the importance of this topic, this review was aimed at revising the current state-of-the-art on the carcinogenicity of red and processed meat, some time after the IARC decision. Some new epidemiological studies and new reviews clearly supporting the IARC decision have been published during these months. However, a number of gaps still exist. It is basic to establish the mechanisms leading to the increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) and other cancers arising from red and processed meat consumption. Another important pending issue is to establish the role of known/suspected carcinogens contained in uncooked or unprocessed meats, as well as the influence of cooking. Finally, it would be highly recommended to conduct new epidemiological studies to elucidate whether the consumption of white meat, such as pork and/or poultry, are -positively or inversely-associated with an increased risk of CRC and other types of cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A review of the established and suspected causes of variations in human sex ratio at birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, William H; Grech, Victor

    2017-06-01

    The human sex ratio (proportion male) at birth (SRB) varies with many variables. Some of this variation has an established proximate cause. For instance, low SRB (more females) at birth are associated with various forms of stressful events or circumstances during or prior to pregnancy. These low SRB are almost certainly mainly caused by maternal-stress-induced male foetal loss. Other types of SRB variation are thought to be caused by hormonal variation in either or both parents around the time of conception. One or other of these two types of proximate cause seems to be responsible for most of the established variation of SRB. This will be illustrated here in respect of some selected forms of SRB variation. It seems likely that a clarification of the hormonal causes of SRB variation will also help explain the striking (apparent) inconsistencies in the results of reported tests of the influential Trivers-Willard hypothesis. It is further proposed that an appreciation of the evidence that parental hormones influence SRB may enhance understanding of several important pathologies (hepatitis B, toxoplasmosis, testicular cancer, prostate cancer and autism). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Morpho-chemical characterization and surface properties of carcinogenic zeolite fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattioli, Michele, E-mail: michele.mattioli@uniurb.it [Department of Earth, Life and Environment Sciences, University of Urbino, 61029 Urbino (Italy); Giordani, Matteo [Department of Earth, Life and Environment Sciences, University of Urbino, 61029 Urbino (Italy); Dogan, Meral [Geological Engineering Department, Hacettepe University, Beytepe, Ankara, Turkey & Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Cangiotti, Michela; Avella, Giuseppe [Department of Earth, Life and Environment Sciences, University of Urbino, 61029 Urbino (Italy); Giorgi, Rodorico [Department of Chemistry, University of Florence, 50019 Firenze (Italy); Dogan, A. Umran [Chemical and Biochemical Engineering Department & Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Ottaviani, Maria Francesca, E-mail: maria.ottaviani@uniurb.it [Department of Earth, Life and Environment Sciences, University of Urbino, 61029 Urbino (Italy)

    2016-04-05

    Highlights: • Differently carcinogenic zeolite fibers were investigated combining physico-chemical methods. • For the first time, zeolite fibers were studied by means of the EPR technique using different spin probes. • The structural properties and the adsorption capability are function of different types and distributions of adsorption sites. • The interacting ability of erionite is higher than that of other fibrous zeolites. • The surface interacting properties may be related with the carcinogenicity of the zeolite fibers. - Abstract: Erionite belonging to the zeolite family is a human health-hazard, since it was demonstrated to be carcinogenic. Conversely, offretite family zeolites were suspected carcinogenic. Mineralogical, morphological, chemical, and surface characterizations were performed on two erionites (GF1, MD8) and one offretite (BV12) fibrous samples and, for comparison, one scolecite (SC1) sample. The specific surface area analysis indicated a larger availability of surface sites for the adsorption onto GF1, while SC1 shows the lowest one and the presence of large pores in the poorly fibrous zeolite aggregates. Selected spin probes revealed a high adsorption capacity of GF1 compared to the other zeolites, but the polar/charged interacting sites were well distributed, intercalated by less polar sites (Si–O–Si). MD8 surface is less homogeneous and the polar/charged sites are more interacting and closer to each other compared to GF1. The interacting ability of BV12 surface is much lower than that found for GF1 and MD8 and the probes are trapped in small pores into the fibrous aggregates. In comparison with the other zeolites, the non-carcinogenic SC1 shows a poor interacting ability and a lower surface polarity. These results helped to clarify the chemical properties and the surface interacting ability of these zeolite fibers which may be related to their carcinogenicity.

  20. Ultrasensitive High-Resolution Mass Spectrometric Analysis of a DNA Adduct of the Carcinogen Benzo[a]pyrene in Human Lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalta, Peter W; Hochalter, J Bradley; Hecht, Stephen S

    2017-12-05

    Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), an archetypical polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, is classified as "carcinogenic to humans" and is ubiquitous in the environment, as evident by the measurable levels of BaP metabolites in virtually all human urine samples examined. BaP carcinogenicity is believed to occur mainly through its covalent modification of DNA, resulting in the formation of BPDE-N2-dG, an adduct formed between deoxyguanosine and a diol epoxide metabolite of BaP, with subsequent mutation of critical growth control genes. In spite of the liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)-based detection of BPDE-N2-dG in BaP-treated rodents, and indirectly through high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-fluorescence detection of BaP-7,8,9,10-tetraols released from human DNA upon acid hydrolysis, BPDE-N2-dG adducts have rarely if ever been observed directly in human samples using LC-MS techniques, even though sophisticated methodologies have been employed which should have had sufficient sensitivity. With this in mind, we developed a liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) methodology employing high-resolution/accurate mass analysis for detecting ultratrace levels of these adducts. These efforts are directly translatable to the development of sensitive detection of other small molecules using trap-based LC-ESI-MS/MS detection. The developed methodology had a limit of detection (LOD) of 1 amol of BPDE-N2-dG on-column, corresponding to 1 BPDE-N2-dG adduct per 1011 nucleotides (1 adduct per 10 human lung cells) using 40 μg of human lung DNA. To our knowledge, this is the most sensitive DNA adduct quantitation method yet reported, exceeding the sensitivity of the 32P-postlabeling assay (∼1 adduct per 1010 nucleotides). Twenty-nine human lung DNA samples resulted in 20 positive measurements above the LOD, with smoker and nonsmoker DNA containing 3.1 and 1.3 BPDE-N2-dG adducts per 1011 nucleotides, respectively.

  1. Morpho-chemical characterization and surface properties of carcinogenic zeolite fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattioli, Michele; Giordani, Matteo; Dogan, Meral; Cangiotti, Michela; Avella, Giuseppe; Giorgi, Rodorico; Dogan, A Umran; Ottaviani, Maria Francesca

    2016-04-05

    Erionite belonging to the zeolite family is a human health-hazard, since it was demonstrated to be carcinogenic. Conversely, offretite family zeolites were suspected carcinogenic. Mineralogical, morphological, chemical, and surface characterizations were performed on two erionites (GF1, MD8) and one offretite (BV12) fibrous samples and, for comparison, one scolecite (SC1) sample. The specific surface area analysis indicated a larger availability of surface sites for the adsorption onto GF1, while SC1 shows the lowest one and the presence of large pores in the poorly fibrous zeolite aggregates. Selected spin probes revealed a high adsorption capacity of GF1 compared to the other zeolites, but the polar/charged interacting sites were well distributed, intercalated by less polar sites (Si-O-Si). MD8 surface is less homogeneous and the polar/charged sites are more interacting and closer to each other compared to GF1. The interacting ability of BV12 surface is much lower than that found for GF1 and MD8 and the probes are trapped in small pores into the fibrous aggregates. In comparison with the other zeolites, the non-carcinogenic SC1 shows a poor interacting ability and a lower surface polarity. These results helped to clarify the chemical properties and the surface interacting ability of these zeolite fibers which may be related to their carcinogenicity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Land management of bracken needs to account for bracken carcinogens - a case study from Britain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lars Holm; Donnelly, Eric; Strobel, Bjarne W.

    2015-01-01

    Bracken ferns are some of the most widespread ferns in the World causing immense problems for land managers, foresters and rangers. Bracken is suspected of causing cancer in Humans due to its content of the carcinogen ptaquiloside. Ingestion of bracken, or food and drinking water contaminated....... The ptaquiloside content in fronds ranged between 50 and 5790 mg/g orresponding to a ptaquiloside load in the standing biomass of up to 590 mg/m2 in mature fronds. Ptaquiloside was also found in the underground rhizome system (11e657 mg/g) and in decaying litter (0.1 - 5.8 mg/g). The amount of ptaquiloside present...

  3. Prospective comparison of hybrid capture 2 and SPF₁₀-LiPA for carcinogenic human papillomavirus detection and risk prediction of cervical cancer: a population-based cohort study in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Li; Feng, Rui Mei; Zhang, Li; Xu, Xiao Qian; Zhao, Xue Lian; Wang, Margaret Zhuoer; Qiao, You Lin; Zhao, Fang Hui

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the extent of the cross-reactivity of hybrid capture 2 (HC2) assay and evaluate the potential effect of cross-reactivity on the long-term risk for cervical cancer and precancers. Based on the Shanxi Province Cervical Cancer Screening Study-I (SPOCCS-I) cohort from 2005 to 2014 in Shanxi, China, SPF₁₀-line probe assay (LiPA) was performed in all 598 HC2 positive and 300 random-selected HC2 negative cervical specimens. Ten-year cumulative incidence rate (CIR) of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or worse (CIN2+) of these two tests was evaluated using Kaplan-Meier methods. Possible human papillomavirus (HPV) types to be cross-reacted by HC2 were also analyzed. The overall agreement between HC2 and SPF₁₀-LiPA for detecting carcinogenic HPV was 73.27%. The highest 10-year cumulative risk of CIN2+ was observed in both HC2 positive and LiPA-carcinogenic HPV positive women (25.70%; 95% confidence interval [CI]=23.55%-27.91%), followed by HC2 positive but LiPA-non-carcinogenic HPV positive women (9.97%; 95% CI=8.57%-11.50%), HC2 negative but LiPA-carcinogenic HPV positive (2.56%; 95% CI=2.44%-2.70%) and HC2 positive but LiPA-HPV negative (1.85%; 95% CI=1.78%-1.92%) women. The proportion of cross-reactivity of HC2 with untargeted carcinogenic types was 8.9%, most of which were attributable to HPV26, 73, 82, 69, 71, 53, 11, 43, and 54. The noticeable high risk of CIN2+ in women infected with cross-reacted non-carcinogenic HPV and low risk in those with miss-to-detective carcinogenic HPV supported an overall good clinical performance of HC2 for a general cervical cancer screening.

  4. High seroprevalence of Borrelia miyamotoi antibodies in forestry workers and individuals suspected of human granulocytic anaplasmosis in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Jahfari

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Substantial exposure to Borrelia miyamotoi occurs through bites from Ixodes ricinus ticks in the Netherlands, which also transmit Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato and Anaplasma phagocytophilum. Direct evidence for B. miyamotoi infection in European populations is scarce. A flu-like illness with high fever, resembling human granulocytic anaplasmosis, has been attributed to B. miyamotoi infections in relatively small groups. Borrelia miyamotoi infections associated with chronic meningoencephalitis have also been described in case reports. Assuming that an IgG antibody response against B. miyamotoi antigens reflects (endured infection, the seroprevalence in different risk groups was examined. Sera from nine out of ten confirmed B. miyamotoi infections from Russia were found to be positive with the recombinant antigen used, and no significant cross-reactivity was observed in secondary syphilis patients. The seroprevalence in blood donors was set at 2.0% (95% CI 0.4–5.7%. Elevated seroprevalences in individuals with serologically confirmed, 7.4% (2.0–17.9%, or unconfirmed, 8.6% (1.8–23%, Lyme neuroborreliosis were not significantly different from those in blood donors. The prevalence of anti-B. miyamotoi antibodies among forestry workers was 10% (5.3–16.8% and in patients with serologically unconfirmed but suspected human granulocytic anaplasmosis was 14.6% (9.0–21.8%; these were significantly higher compared with the seroprevalence in blood donors. Our findings indicate that infections with B. miyamotoi occur in tick-exposed individuals in the Netherlands. In addition, B. miyamotoi infections should be considered in patients reporting tick bites and febrile illness with unresolved aetiology in the Netherlands, and other countries where I. ricinus ticks are endemic.

  5. [Environmental carcinogenic agents and cancer prevention: risk assessment and management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2013-11-01

    Many agents in our environment have been established as being carcinogenic, and in most cases, the carcinogenic properties of these agents were identified because of high-dose occupational or accidental exposure. Risk characterization, taking into account the dose-response relationship, and exposure assessment are essential for risk assessment and subsequent cancer prevention. Based on scientific risk assessment, risk management should be conducted practically by considering the economic, social, political, and other technical issues and by balancing the risks and benefits. Asbestos and environmental tobacco smoke are typical examples of established carcinogenic agents in the general environment, contributing to low-dose exposure. Further epidemiological studies are required to investigate the carcinogenicity of low-dose exposure to known carcinogenic agents such as arsenic and cadmium through dietary intake, radiation via medical and natural exposure, and air pollution due to diesel exhaust. In contrast, occupational chemical exposure to 1,2-dichloropropane and/or dichloromethane, whose carcinogenicity had not been established, was suggested to cause cholangiocarcinoma among workers involved in offset color proof-printing only after a rare situation of high-dose exposure was unveiled. Continuous monitoring of unusual cancer occurrences in target populations such as workers in occupational and regional settings as well as exposure reduction to suspected carcinogenic agents to levels as low as reasonably achievable is essential for reducing the risk of cancer due to environmental carcinogens.

  6. [THE COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF RESULTS OF DETECTION OF CARCINOGENIC TYPES OF HUMAN PAPILLOMA VIRUS BY QUALITATIVE AND QUANTITATIVE TESTS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmenko, E T; Labigina, A V; Leshenko, O Ya; Rusanov, D N; Kuzmenko, V V; Fedko, L P; Pak, I P

    2015-05-01

    The analysis of results of screening (n = 3208; sexually active citizen aged from 18 to 59 years) was carried out to detect oncogene types of human papilloma virus in using qualitative (1150 females and 720 males) and quantitative (polymerase chain reaction in real-time (843 females and 115 males) techniques. The human papilloma virus of high oncogene type was detected in 65% and 68.4% of females and in 48.6% and 53% of males correspondingly. Among 12 types of human papilloma virus the most frequently diagnosed was human papilloma virus 16 independently of gender of examined and technique of analysis. In females, under application of qualitative tests rate of human papilloma virus 16 made up to 18.3% (n = 280) and under application of quantitative tests Rte of human papilloma virus made up to 14.9% (n = 126; p ≤ 0.05). Under examination of males using qualitative tests rate of human papilloma virus 16 made up to 8.3% (n = 60) and under application of qualitative tests made up to 12.2% (n = 14; p ≥ 0.05). Under application of qualitative tests rate of detection on the rest ofoncogene types of human papilloma virus varied in females from 3.4% to 8.4% and in males from 1.8% to 5.9%. Under application of qualitative tests to females rate of human papilloma virus with high viral load made up to 68.4%, with medium viral load - 2.85% (n = 24) and with low viral load -0.24% (n = 2). Under application of quantitative tests in males rate of detection of types of human papilloma virus made up to 53% and at that in all high viral load was established. In females, the most of oncogene types of human papilloma virus (except for 31, 39, 59) are detected significantly more often than in males.

  7. Whole-genome gene expression modifications associated with nitrosamine exposure and micronucleus frequency in human blood cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hebels, Dennie G A J; Jennen, Danyel G J; van Herwijnen, Marcel H M

    2011-01-01

    N-nitroso compounds (NOCs) are suspected human carcinogens and relevant in human exposure. NOCs also induce micronuclei (MN) formation in vivo. Since lymphocytic MN represent a validated biomarker of human cancer risk, establishing a link between NOC exposure and MN frequency in humans...... and concurrently investigating associated transcriptomic responses may provide crucial information on underlying molecular mechanisms that predispose to carcinogenicity. We used lymphocytes, from adult females participating in the pan-European biomarker research project NewGeneris, as a surrogate tissue...... for future investigations into the potential carcinogenic risk associated with NOC exposure in humans....

  8. Food derived carcinogenic amnoimidazoazaarenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Henrik

    found to be multiple organ carcinogens. The aminoimidazoazaarenes are metabolically activated by hydroxylation of the exocyclic aminogroup to the N-hydroxyamino derivative. The resultant proximate mutagens often need further activation by phase II transferases for formation of reactive species that form...

  9. Assessment of the DNA Damage in Human Sperm and Lymphocytes Exposed to the Carcinogen Food Contaminant Furan with Comet Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek Pandir

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThe aim of this work was to assess the damage of DNA in human blood cell and spermin vitro under the influence of furan. These cells were administered 0-600 μM of furan at 37 and 32oC for 30 and 60 min, respectively. A significant increase in tail DNA%, tail length and moment indicating DNA damage was observed at increasing doses when compared to the controls. The treatment with 300 and 600 μM of furan showed a maximum increase of 86.74 ± 2.43 and 93.29 ± 8.68 compared to the control tail DNA% in lymphocytes. However, only 600 μM of furan showed a maximum increase of 94.71 ± 6.24 compared to the control tail DNA% in sperm. The results suggested that furan caused DNA damage in lymphocytes at increasing doses, but appeared to have not the same effect on human sperm at the low doses. Genotoxic activity had an impact on the risk assessment of furan formed on the food for human cells. Therefore, it would be important to further investigate these properties of furan as the food mutagen.

  10. SHORT COMMUNICATION CARCINOGENIC POTENCY OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    were used to compute the carcinogenic risk potency of the PAHs relative to benzo(a)pyrene (reference carcinogen). .... The health risk assessment methodology provided the basis for estimation of ..... IRIS, Integrated Risk Information System.

  11. Evaluating Pesticides for Carcinogenic Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA reviews pesticides for potential carcinogenicity. Learn about EPA's guidelines for evaluating a chemical's potential carcinogenicity and updates to EPA's guidelines to reflect increased understanding of ways chemicals may cause cancer.

  12. Chemical Carcinogen (Hydrazine, Polynuclear Hydrocarbon and/or Synthetic Jet Fuel Components) Induced Carcinogenesis of Human Cells, In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    Yohn. D. S. Alterations of enzymesouis long-term replication of feline leukemia virtu5 associated with plasmat membranes and cellular fFeLVI in an...environment to the nucleus of the cell. B[a]P is transported into human foreskin fibroblasts from the plasma membrane to the nucleus by binding as the...transport across the nuclear membrane is temperature dependent. When the temperature of the cultures is dropped from 370C to 40C BP is not found in the

  13. T24 human bladder carcinoma cells with activated Ha-ras protooncogene: nontumorigenic cells susceptible to malignant transformation with carcinogen.

    OpenAIRE

    Senger, D. R.; Perruzzi, C A; Ali, I U

    1988-01-01

    A comparative analysis of T24 human bladder carcinoma cells and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MeNNG)-transformed derivatives (MeNNG-T24 cells) revealed the following: (i) The presence of an activated c-Ha-ras gene (in the absence of the normal allele) is insufficient to confer upon T24 cells a tumor-associated phenotype. (ii) MeNNG-transformed T24 cells not only acquire tumor-associated (in vitro) traits (growth in soft agar and rhodamine retention) but, are highly tumorigenic in nude...

  14. Ethanol and the tobacco-specific carcinogen, NNK, contribute to signaling in immortalized human pancreatic duct epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askari, Minoo D F; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Cekanova, Maria; Schuller, Hildegard M

    2006-07-01

    Smoking is a well-documented risk factor for pancreatic cancer. The tobacco-specific nitrosamine, NNK (4-[methylnitrosamino]-1-[3-pyridyl]-1-butanone), significantly induces pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas in laboratory rodents. Recent observations suggest that ethanol enhances the tumorigenic effects of smoking. Ethanol consumption is associated with the development of chronic pancreatitis, also considered a predisposing factor for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Because the precise role of ethanol in pancreatic carcinogenesis is not known, this study sought to elucidate the cumulative effects of ethanol and NNK on particular signal transduction pathways that might play a role in cell proliferation in immortalized human pancreatic duct epithelial cells. The HPDE6-c7 cells are developed from pancreatic duct epithelial cells, which are the putative cells of origin of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Cell proliferation assays, Western blot, and cyclic adenosine monophosphate assays were used to demonstrate the effects of ethanol and NNK treatments on these cells. Ethanol cotreatments enhanced the NNK-induced proliferation of these cells. This response was inhibited by the adenylyl cyclase, protein kinase A, mitogen-activated protein kinase (p42/p44), and epidermal growth factor receptor-specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Cotreatments of NNK and ethanol also increased cyclic adenosine monophosphate accumulation, cAMP response element-binding family of proteins and mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation, and protein kinase A activation. These findings suggest a potential role for these pathways contributing to the development of smoking- and alcohol-related pancreatic carcinogenesis.

  15. The Non-carcinogenic Risk of Cadmium in Bottled Water in Different Age Groups Humans: Bandar Abbas City, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhri, Yadolah; Jafarzadeh, Saeedeh; Moradi, Bigard; Zandsalimi, Yahya; Langarizadeh, Ghazaleh; Amirhajeloo, Leila Rasouli; Mirzaei, Maryam

    2015-02-01

    The presence of heavy metals such as cadmium in drinking water resources can be dangerous for human because of toxicity and biological accumulation. The consumption of water which contains Cd in high concentration can lead to Bone and Kidney diseases. In this present study, the researcher collected 432 samples of bottled water in the popular marks in summer and winter from the surface of Bandar Abbas. The cadmium concentration was measured by atomic absorption Spectrophotometer in model DR2800 through the Dithizone method. CDI, R and HQ which are caused by Cd for adult men, women and children, have been calculated and evaluated through the equations of EPA and WHO. Mean of 1.73±0.19 µg/l (M±SE) is lower than the standard of WHO and EPA. However, 33.2% of all the samples have concentrations more than the standard limit of WHO, and the concentrations of 22.4% of the samples are more than EPA's standard. The CDI for different age groups is as following manner; Children>adult women>adult men. The CDI in children is more than twice as much as in the CDI for adult men and women. The mean of HQ order for different age groups is children>adult men>adult women. Since HQ of adult men (34E-5), adult women (31E-5) and children (84E-5), is lower than 1. It can be said that the population of Bandar Abbas is in a safe area regarding the HQ of the bottled water's cadmium.

  16. The carcinogenicity of chromium

    OpenAIRE

    Norseth, Tor

    1981-01-01

    The carcinogenicity of chromium compounds is reviewed with specific attention to the gaps in knowledge for risk estimation and research needs. The most important problems at present are whether trivalent chromium compounds cause cancer, and whether there is a difference in cancer causing effects between the soluble and the slightly soluble hexavalent compounds in the practical exposure situation. Dose estimates for risk estimation based on epidemiological investigations are also lacking. Pres...

  17. Prospective comparison of hybrid capture 2 and SPF10-LiPA for carcinogenic human papillomavirus detection and risk prediction of cervical cancer: a population-based cohort study in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Li; Feng, Rui-mei; Zhang, Li; Xu, Xiao-qian; Zhao, Xue-lian; Wang, Margaret Zhuoer

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the extent of the cross-reactivity of hybrid capture 2 (HC2) assay and evaluate the potential effect of cross-reactivity on the long-term risk for cervical cancer and precancers. Methods Based on the Shanxi Province Cervical Cancer Screening Study-I (SPOCCS-I) cohort from 2005 to 2014 in Shanxi, China, SPF10-line probe assay (LiPA) was performed in all 598 HC2 positive and 300 random-selected HC2 negative cervical specimens. Ten-year cumulative incidence rate (CIR) of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or worse (CIN2+) of these two tests was evaluated using Kaplan-Meier methods. Possible human papillomavirus (HPV) types to be cross-reacted by HC2 were also analyzed. Results The overall agreement between HC2 and SPF10-LiPA for detecting carcinogenic HPV was 73.27%. The highest 10-year cumulative risk of CIN2+ was observed in both HC2 positive and LiPA-carcinogenic HPV positive women (25.70%; 95% confidence interval [CI]=23.55%–27.91%), followed by HC2 positive but LiPA-non-carcinogenic HPV positive women (9.97%; 95% CI=8.57%–11.50%), HC2 negative but LiPA-carcinogenic HPV positive (2.56%; 95% CI=2.44%–2.70%) and HC2 positive but LiPA-HPV negative (1.85%; 95% CI=1.78%–1.92%) women. The proportion of cross-reactivity of HC2 with untargeted carcinogenic types was 8.9%, most of which were attributable to HPV26, 73, 82, 69, 71, 53, 11, 43, and 54. Conclusion The noticeable high risk of CIN2+ in women infected with cross-reacted non-carcinogenic HPV and low risk in those with miss-to-detective carcinogenic HPV supported an overall good clinical performance of HC2 for a general cervical cancer screening. PMID:28657227

  18. Polypropylene mesh: evidence for lack of carcinogenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moalli, Pamela; Brown, Bryan; Reitman, Maureen T. F.

    2016-01-01

    Tumors related to the implantation of surgical grade polypropylene in humans have never been reported. In this commentary we present a balanced review of the information on what is known regarding the host response to polypropylene and provide data as to why the potential for carcinogenicity of polypropylene mesh is exceedingly small. PMID:24614956

  19. Isolation and Characterization of Human Intestinal Bacteria Capable of Transforming the Dietary Carcinogen 2-Amino-1-Methyl-6-Phenylimidazo[4,5-b]Pyridine▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhaecke, Lynn; Vercruysse, Filip; Boon, Nico; Verstraete, Willy; Cleenwerck, Ilse; De Wachter, Marjan; De Vos, Paul; van de Wiele, Tom

    2008-01-01

    2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) is a carcinogenic heterocyclic aromatic amine formed in meat products during cooking. Although the formation of hazardous PhIP metabolites by mammalian enzymes has been extensively reported, research on the putative involvement of the human intestinal microbiota in PhIP metabolism remains scarce. In this study, the in vitro conversion of PhIP into its microbial derivate, 7-hydroxy-5-methyl-3-phenyl-6,7,8,9-tetrahydropyrido[3′,2′:4,5]imidazo[1,2-a]pyrimidin-5-ium chloride (PhIP-M1), by fecal samples from 18 human volunteers was investigated. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis showed that all human fecal samples transformed PhIP but with efficiencies ranging from 1.8 to 96% after 72 h of incubation. Two PhIP-transforming strains, PhIP-M1-a and PhIP-M1-b, were isolated from human feces and identified by fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism and pheS sequence analyses as Enterococcus faecium strains. Some strains from culture collections belonging to the species E. durans, E. avium, E. faecium, and Lactobacillus reuteri were also able to perform this transformation. Yeast extract, special peptone, and meat extract supported PhIP transformation by the enriched E. faecium strains, while tryptone, monomeric sugars, starch, and cellulose did not. Glycerol was identified as a fecal matrix constituent required for PhIP transformation. Abiotic synthesis of PhIP-M1 and quantification of the glycerol metabolite 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde (3-HPA) confirmed that the anaerobic fermentation of glycerol via 3-HPA is the critical bacterial transformation process responsible for the formation of PhIP-M1. Whether it is a detoxification is still a matter of debate, since PhIP-M1 has been shown to be cytotoxic toward Caco-2 cells but is not mutagenic in the Ames assay. PMID:18192423

  20. PreTect HPV-Proofer: real-time detection and typing of E6/E7 mRNA from carcinogenic human papillomaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molden, Tor; Kraus, Irene; Skomedal, Hanne; Nordstrøm, Trine; Karlsen, Frank

    2007-06-01

    Monitoring human papillomavirus (HPV) E6/E7 mRNA expression may provide an accurate and informative diagnostic approach for detection of oncogene activity related to the development of severe dysplasia or cervical carcinoma. A multiplex nucleic acid sequence based amplification (NASBA) assay, utilizing molecular beacon probes for real-time detection was developed for the identification of E6/E7 mRNA from HPV types 16, 18, 31, 33 and 45. The assay is called PreTect HPV-Proofer and this report describes the development and the analytical performance of the assay. The reproducibility of PreTect HPV-Proofer with regard to a positive result was found to be between 96 and 100%, depending on HPV type. The melting temperature for the different molecular beacons was in the range of 48-55 degrees C, indicating conformational stability, i.e. the molecular beacons will not get activated by the 41 degrees C annealing temperature, but will be activated by the annealing to the target itself. The limit of detection for HPV 16 was ten SiHa or CaSki cells and for HPV 18 one HeLa cell. No cross reactivity was observed with E6/E7 mRNA from the other tested HPV types. mRNA from cervical cells was also successfully amplified after more than one year of storage. In conclusion, the PreTect HPV-Proofer assay, individually identifying E6/E7 mRNA expression from five carcinogenic HPV types, is a reproducible assay that may serve as a valuable tool in monitoring HPV infections producing proteins with a transforming potential.

  1. Flavonoids targeting of IκB phosphorylation abrogates carcinogen-induced MMP-9 and COX-2 expression in human brain endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahanian E

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth Tahanian¹, Luis Arguello Sanchez¹, Tze Chieh Shiao², René Roy², Borhane Annabi¹¹Centre de Recherche BioMED, ²Centre de Recherche PharmaQAM, Département de chimie, Université du Québec à Montréal, QC, CanadaAbstract: Brain endothelial cells play an essential role as structural and functional components of the blood–brain barrier (BBB. Increased BBB breakdown and brain injury are associated with neuroinflammation and are thought to trigger mechanisms involving matrix metalloproteinase upregulation. Emerging evidence also indicates that cyclooxygenase (COX inhibition limits BBB disruption, but the mechanisms linking metalloproteinase to COX remain unknown. In this study, we sought to investigate the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB signaling pathway, a common pathway in both the regulation of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 and COX-2 expression, and the inhibitory properties of several chemopreventive flavonoids. Human brain microvascular endothelial cells were treated with a combination of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA, a carcinogen documented to increase MMP-9 and COX-2 through NF-κB, and several naturally occurring flavonoids. Among the molecules tested, we found that fisetin, apigenin, and luteolin specifically and dose-dependently antagonized PMA-induced COX-2 and MMP-9 gene and protein expressions as assessed by qRT-PCR, immunoblotting, and zymography respectively. We further demonstrate that flavonoids impact on IκK-mediated phosphorylation activity as demonstrated by the inhibition of PMA-induced IκB phosphorylation levels. Our results suggest that BBB disruption during neuroinflammation could be pharmacologically reduced by a specific class of flavonoids acting as NF-κB signal transduction inhibitors.Keywords: blood–brain barrier, flavonoids, neuroinflammation, NF-κB signal transduction inhibitors

  2. Comparative risk assessment of carcinogens in alcoholic beverages using the margin of exposure approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachenmeier, Dirk W; Przybylski, Maria C; Rehm, Jürgen

    2012-09-15

    Alcoholic beverages have been classified as carcinogenic to humans. As alcoholic beverages are multicomponent mixtures containing several carcinogenic compounds, a quantitative approach is necessary to compare the risks. Fifteen known and suspected human carcinogens (acetaldehyde, acrylamide, aflatoxins, arsenic, benzene, cadmium, ethanol, ethyl carbamate, formaldehyde, furan, lead, 4-methylimidazole, N-nitrosodimethylamine, ochratoxin A and safrole) occurring in alcoholic beverages were identified based on monograph reviews by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. The margin of exposure (MOE) approach was used for comparative risk assessment. MOE compares a toxicological threshold with the exposure. MOEs above 10,000 are judged as low priority for risk management action. MOEs were calculated for different drinking scenarios (low risk and heavy drinking) and different levels of contamination for four beverage groups (beer, wine, spirits and unrecorded alcohol). The lowest MOEs were found for ethanol (3.1 for low risk and 0.8 for heavy drinking). Inorganic lead and arsenic have average MOEs between 10 and 300, followed by acetaldehyde, cadmium and ethyl carbamate between 1,000 and 10,000. All other compounds had average MOEs above 10,000 independent of beverage type. Ethanol was identified as the most important carcinogen in alcoholic beverages, with clear dose response. Some other compounds (lead, arsenic, ethyl carbamate, acetaldehyde) may pose risks below thresholds normally tolerated for food contaminants, but from a cost-effectiveness point of view, the focus should be on reducing alcohol consumption in general rather than on mitigative measures for some contaminants that contribute only to a limited extent (if at all) to the total health risk. Copyright © 2012 UICC.

  3. Carcinogenicity of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Types in HIV-Positive Women: A Meta-Analysis From HPV Infection to Cervical Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Gary M; Tully, Stephen; Franceschi, Silvia

    2017-05-01

    Data on the relative carcinogenic potential of human papillomavirus (HPV) types among women infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) (WHIV) are needed to inform prevention programs for this population. A systematic literature review and meta-analysis of high-risk HPV-type distribution in 19883 HIV-positive women was performed. The women, from 86 studies worldwide, included 11739 with normal cytological findings; 1784 with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS); 2173 with low-grade and 1282 with high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSILs) diagnosed cytologically; 1198 with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 1 (CIN1), 456 with CIN2, and 455 with CIN3 diagnosed histologically; and 796 with invasive cervical cancers (ICCs). A large proportion of WHIV, and almost all with ICCs, were from Africa. In Africa, HPV 16 accounted for 13% of HPV-positive WHIV with normal cytological findings, but this proportion increased through ASCUS, low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions, CIN1, and CIN2 (18%-25%), up to 41%-47% for CIN3 and ICCs. Only HPV 16, HPV 18, and HPV 45 accounted for a greater proportion of HPV infections in ICCs compared with normal cytological findings (ICC:normal ratios, 3.68, 2.47, and 2.55, respectively). Other high-risk types accounted for important proportions of low- and/or high-grade lesions, but their contribution dropped in ICCs, with ICC:normal ratios in Africa ranging from 0.79 for HPV 33 down to 0.38 for HPV 56. Findings for HPV 16 and HPV 18 in Europe/North America, Asia, and Latin America were compatible with those from Africa. HPV 16 and HPV 18 in particular, but also HPV 45, at least in Africa, warrant special attention in WHIV. Broad consistency of findings with those in HIV-uninfected population would suggest that the risk stratification offered by partial HPV genotyping tests also have relevance for HIV-positive women.

  4. Evaluation of the carcinogenicity of gallium arsenide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomhard, Ernst M; Gelbke, Heinz-Peter; Schenk, Hermann; Williams, Gary M; Cohen, Samuel M

    2013-05-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs) is an important semiconductor material. In 2-year inhalation studies, GaAs increased the incidence of lung tumors in female rats, but not in male rats or male and female mice. Alveolar proteinosis followed by chronic active inflammation was the predominant non-neoplastic pulmonary findings. IARC classified GaAs as carcinogenic to humans (group 1) based on the assumption that As and Ga ions are bioavailable. The European Chemical Agency Risk Assessment Committee concluded that GaAs should be classified into Carcinogenicity Category 1B (presumed to have carcinogenic potential for humans; ECHA). We evaluate whether these classifications are justified. Physico-chemical properties of GaAs particles and the degree of mechanical treatment are critical in this evaluation. The available data on mode of action (MOA), genotoxicity and bioavailability do not support the contribution of As or Ga ions to the lung tumors in female rats. Most toxicological studies utilized small particles produced by strong mechanical treatment, destroying the crystalline structure. The resulting amorphous GaAs is not relevant to crystalline GaAs at production and processing sites. The likely tumorigenic MOA is lung toxicity related to particulate-induced inflammation and increased proliferation. It is concluded that there is no evidence for a primary carcinogenic effect of GaAs.

  5. Carcinogens formed when Meat is Cooked

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felton, J S; Salmon, C P; Knize, M G

    2003-05-30

    Diet has been associated with varying cancer rates in human populations for many years, yet the causes of the observed variation in cancer patterns have not been adequately explained (Wynder et al. 1977). Along with the effect of diet on human cancer incidence is the strong evidence that mutations are the initiating events in the cancer process (Vogelstein et al. 1992). Foods, when heated, are a good source of genotoxic carcinogens that very likely are a cause for some of these events(Doll et al. 1981). These carcinogens fall into two chemical classes: heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAA) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). There is ample evidence that many of these compounds are complete carcinogens in rodents(El-Bayoumy et al. 1995; Ohgaki et al. 1991). Heterocyclic aromatic amines are among the most potent mutagenic substances ever tested in the Ames/Salmonella mutagenicity test (Wakabayashi et al. 1992). Both classes of carcinogen cause tumors in rodents at multiple sites, (El-Bayoumy et al. 1995; Ohgaki et al. 1991) many of which are common tumor sites in people on a Western diet. An HAA, PhIP (2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine), and a PAH, B[a]P (benzo[a]pyrene), of comparable carcinogenic potency caused mammary gland tumors in a feeding study in female rats (El-Bayoumy et al. 1995). In addition, PhIP has recently been shown to cause carcinomas in the prostate of the male rat (Shirai et al. 1997). Complementing the rodent cancer studies are numerous human case-control and prospective studies suggesting a relationship between overheated beef, chicken, and lamb, and cancer of the colon, breast, prostate, and stomach (Sinha et al. 1999; Ward et al. 1997; Zheng et al. 1998).

  6. Law nº 13.344/2016 and the new techniques for the localization of human trafficking victims and suspects: effectiveness, legality and constitutional adequacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleopas Isaías Santos

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The Law no. 13.344/2016 brought important repercussions to the Brazilian criminal investigation, among which the most significant one was the possibility of police authorities requesting from telephone companies the necessary technical means to locate victims and/or suspects of human trafficking. This localization is made through the identification of mobile devices, like cell phones. This article aims to answer the following issue: are the available and commonly used technical means effective in the localization of human trafficking victims and suspects? For this purpose, it is assumed that the technical means typically used in this process are not effective. In light of this, it is suggested the use of the GPS tool, which technically does not qualify as a "signal" and presumes the license of data network with financial costs. Therefore, it is analyzed who must bear said costs - the State, the companies or the consumers, as well as the legality and constitutionality of the use of this technique. The subject will be approached mostly through the deductive method.

  7. Immunologic methods for monitoring carcinogen exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santella, Regina M.; Perera, Frederica P.; Zhang, Yu J.; Chen, Chen J.; Young, Tie L.

    1993-03-01

    Immunologic methods have been developed for monitoring human exposure to environmental and occupational carcinogens. These methods involve the development of monoclonal and polyclonal antisera which specifically recognize the carcinogens themselves or their DNA or protein adducts. Antisera recognizing the DNA adducts of several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon diol epoxides have been used in competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays to monitor adducts in tissue or blood samples. Elevated levels of DNA adducts have been seen in mononuclear cells of smokers and in total white blood cells of foundry and coke oven workers. Environmental exposure to PAH has been measured in individuals living in a highly polluted region of Poland. Antisera recognizing PAH-DNA adducts have also been used in immunohistochemical studies to monitor adducts in specific cells of biopsy samples. The DNA adducts of aflatoxin B1 have been monitored in liver tissue of hepatocellular carcinoma patients in Taiwan. Detectable adducts were seen in 50 - 70% of the patients suggesting that dietary exposure to this carcinogen may be a risk factor for cancer induction. Thus, immunoassays for monitoring exposure to carcinogens are an important tool in epidemiologic studies.

  8. Epidemiological Mapping of Human Onchocerciasis in Transmission Suspected Districts of Bale, Borena, and West Arsi Zones of Eastern Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sindew Mekasha Feleke

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Onchocerciasis is mainly found in western part of Ethiopia and there is no evidence of transmission in the east ward. However, some zones (Bale, Borena, and West Arsi are suspected for transmission given the area has fast flowing rivers and is covered with vegetation. Therefore, this study was conducted to map onchocerciasis transmission in those zones. About 19 villages were selected based on proximity to the rivers, representation of districts, zones, and vegetation covers, whereas the study participants, all village residents of age > 5 years with good health condition, were skin sniped and examined using microscopy. In this study a total of 2560 study participants were surveyed of which 1332 were female (52% and 122 were male (48%. The age group of 21–30 years was highest (34.4% and that of age > 51 years was the lowest (3.1% study participants. The survey result revealed that none of the study participants regardless of age, sex, and location demonstrated skin snip Onchocerca microfilariae. The prevalence of microfilariae and community microfilarial load (CMFL were 0% and 0 mf/s, respectively. The finding implied that there is no onchocerciasis in the area and, therefore, there is no need for interventions. Black fly distribution, cytotaxonomic study, and intraborder cross transmission monitoring are recommended.

  9. Trace elements and carcinogenicity: a subject in review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulware, Stephen Juma

    2013-04-01

    Cancer is known to be a multi-step process, which involves different stages including initiation, promotion, progression and metastasis. Chemical carcinogens including most trace elements can change any of these processes to induce their carcinogenic effects. Various studies confirm that cancer arises from the accumulation of irreversible DNA damage, which results from multiple mutations in critical genes in the body organ. Chemical carcinogens most often directly or after xenobiotic metabolism, act as genotoxic causes to induce DNA damage. Genotoxic carcinogen refers to a group of chemicals capable of producing cancer by directly altering the genetic material of target cells. Other carcinogens are however classified as non-genotoxic, which represents chemicals that are capable of producing cancer by some secondary mechanism not related to direct gene damage. They act as tumor promoters, endocrine-modifiers, receptor mediators, immunosuppressant, or inducers of tissue-specific toxicity and inflammatory responses. The diversity of modes of action, of non-genotoxic carcinogens, the tissue and species specificity and the absence of genotoxicity makes it extremely hard to predict their carcinogenic potential. The roles of trace metals (some of which are either genotoxic or non-genotoxic) in cancer development and inhibition have a complex character and have raised many questions because of their essential and toxic effects on people's health. Trace metals such as cadmium, nickel, arsenic, beryllium and chromium (VI) have been recognized as human or animal carcinogens by International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). The Carcinogenic capability of these metals depends mainly on factors such as oxidation states and chemical structures. The oxidative concept in metal carcinogenesis proposes that complexes formed by these metals, in vivo, in the vicinity of DNA, catalyze redox reactions, which in turn oxidize DNA. The most significant effect of reactive oxygen species

  10. Towards incorporating epigenetic mechanisms into carcinogen identification and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herceg, Zdenko; Lambert, Marie-Pierre; van Veldhoven, Karin; Demetriou, Christiana; Vineis, Paolo; Smith, Martyn T; Straif, Kurt; Wild, Christopher P

    2013-09-01

    Remarkable progress in the field of epigenetics has turned academic, medical and public attention to the potential applications of these new advances in medicine and various fields of biomedical research. The result is a broader appreciation of epigenetic phenomena in the a etiology of common human diseases, most notably cancer. These advances also represent an exciting opportunity to incorporate epigenetics and epigenomics into carcinogen identification and safety assessment. Current epigenetic studies, including major international sequencing projects, are expected to generate information for establishing the 'normal' epigenome of tissues and cell types as well as the physiological variability of the epigenome against which carcinogen exposure can be assessed. Recently, epigenetic events have emerged as key mechanisms in cancer development, and while our search of the Monograph Volume 100 revealed that epigenetics have played a modest role in evaluating human carcinogens by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Monographs so far, epigenetic data might play a pivotal role in the future. Here, we review (i) the current status of incorporation of epigenetics in carcinogen evaluation in the IARC Monographs Programme, (ii) potential modes of action for epigenetic carcinogens, (iii) current in vivo and in vitro technologies to detect epigenetic carcinogens, (iv) genomic regions and epigenetic modifications and their biological consequences and (v) critical technological and biological issues in assessment of epigenetic carcinogens. We also discuss the issues related to opportunities and challenges in the application of epigenetic testing in carcinogen identification and evaluation. Although the application of epigenetic assays in carcinogen evaluation is still in its infancy, important data are being generated and valuable scientific resources are being established that should catalyse future applications of epigenetic testing.

  11. Towards incorporating epigenetic mechanisms into carcinogen identification and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herceg, Zdenko

    2013-01-01

    Remarkable progress in the field of epigenetics has turned academic, medical and public attention to the potential applications of these new advances in medicine and various fields of biomedical research. The result is a broader appreciation of epigenetic phenomena in the a etiology of common human diseases, most notably cancer. These advances also represent an exciting opportunity to incorporate epigenetics and epigenomics into carcinogen identification and safety assessment. Current epigenetic studies, including major international sequencing projects, are expected to generate information for establishing the ‘normal’ epigenome of tissues and cell types as well as the physiological variability of the epigenome against which carcinogen exposure can be assessed. Recently, epigenetic events have emerged as key mechanisms in cancer development, and while our search of the Monograph Volume 100 revealed that epigenetics have played a modest role in evaluating human carcinogens by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Monographs so far, epigenetic data might play a pivotal role in the future. Here, we review (i) the current status of incorporation of epigenetics in carcinogen evaluation in the IARC Monographs Programme, (ii) potential modes of action for epigenetic carcinogens, (iii) current in vivo and in vitro technologies to detect epigenetic carcinogens, (iv) genomic regions and epigenetic modifications and their biological consequences and (v) critical technological and biological issues in assessment of epigenetic carcinogens. We also discuss the issues related to opportunities and challenges in the application of epigenetic testing in carcinogen identification and evaluation. Although the application of epigenetic assays in carcinogen evaluation is still in its infancy, important data are being generated and valuable scientific resources are being established that should catalyse future applications of epigenetic testing. PMID:23749751

  12. Oxidative Stress in the Carcinogenicity of Chemical Carcinogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Wanibuchi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This review highlights several in vivo studies utilizing non-genotoxic and genotoxic chemical carcinogens, and the mechanisms of their high and low dose carcinogenicities with respect to formation of oxidative stress. Here, we survey the examples and discuss possible mechanisms of hormetic effects with cytochrome P450 inducers, such as phenobarbital, a-benzene hexachloride and 1,1-bis(p-chlorophenyl-2,2,2-trichloroethane. Epigenetic processes differentially can be affected by agents that impinge on oxidative DNA damage, repair, apoptosis, cell proliferation, intracellular communication and cell signaling. Non-genotoxic carcinogens may target nuclear receptors and induce post-translational modifications at the protein level, thereby impacting on the stability or activity of key regulatory proteins, including oncoproteins and tumor suppressor proteins. We further discuss role of oxidative stress focusing on the low dose carcinogenicities of several genotoxic carcinogens such as a hepatocarcinogen contained in seared fish and meat, 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline, arsenic and its metabolites, and the kidney carcinogen potassium bromate.

  13. Oxidative Stress in the Carcinogenicity of Chemical Carcinogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakehashi, Anna; Wei, Min [Department of Pathology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-4-3 Asahi-machi, Abeno-Ku, Osaka 545-8585 (Japan); Fukushima, Shoji [Japan Bioassay Research Center, Japan Industrial Safety and Health Association, 2445 Hirasawa, Hadano, Kanagawa 257-0015 (Japan); Wanibuchi, Hideki, E-mail: wani@med.osaka-cu.ac.jp [Department of Pathology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-4-3 Asahi-machi, Abeno-Ku, Osaka 545-8585 (Japan)

    2013-10-28

    This review highlights several in vivo studies utilizing non-genotoxic and genotoxic chemical carcinogens, and the mechanisms of their high and low dose carcinogenicities with respect to formation of oxidative stress. Here, we survey the examples and discuss possible mechanisms of hormetic effects with cytochrome P{sub 450} inducers, such as phenobarbital, α-benzene hexachloride and 1,1-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-2,2,2-trichloroethane. Epigenetic processes differentially can be affected by agents that impinge on oxidative DNA damage, repair, apoptosis, cell proliferation, intracellular communication and cell signaling. Non-genotoxic carcinogens may target nuclear receptors and induce post-translational modifications at the protein level, thereby impacting on the stability or activity of key regulatory proteins, including oncoproteins and tumor suppressor proteins. We further discuss role of oxidative stress focusing on the low dose carcinogenicities of several genotoxic carcinogens such as a hepatocarcinogen contained in seared fish and meat, 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline, arsenic and its metabolites, and the kidney carcinogen potassium bromate.

  14. Genotoxic and carcinogenic products arising from reductive transformations of the azo dye, Disperse Yellow 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Vimal K; Shirin, Salma; Aman, Ahmed M; de Solla, Shane R; Mathieu-Denoncourt, Justine; Langlois, Valerie S

    2016-03-01

    Selected aromatic azo and benzidine based dyes are priority compounds under the Government of Canada's Chemical Management Plan (CMP) for environmental risk assessments. Organic compounds undergo chemical and biological transformations when they interact with environmental matrices and biotic species; identifying the transformation products is thus a critical component of the risk assessment process. Here, we used zero valent iron (ZVI) to initiate the reduction of the diazo compound dye Disperse Yellow 7 (DY 7). Using state-of-the-art accurate mass Liquid Chromatography-Quadrupole Time of Flight-Mass Spectroscopy (LC-QToF-MS), four transformation products were conclusively identified, while a fifth product was tentatively ascertained. The conclusively established transformation products included p-phenylenediamine (p-PDA, a known genotoxin), 4-aminoazobenzene (4-AAB, a category 2 carcinogen) and 4-aminobiphenyl (4-ABP, a category 1 human carcinogen). 4-ABP is thought to form via a benzidine rearrangement; this is the first report of DY 7 undergoing a benzidine rearrangement. Given the importance of reduction processes in the metabolism of organic contaminants by aquatic species, we used LC-MS/MS to analyze sediment samples that had been generated previously upon exposure of Western clawed frogs (Silurana tropicalis) to DY 7 (at exposure levels where cellular stress was observed in S. tropicalis). We found p-PDA, 4-AAB, and 4-ABP were present in all exposures, but not in any of the sediment controls, demonstrating that upon release of DY 7 to the aquatic environment, sediment dwelling organisms will metabolize DY 7 to generate known (and suspected) human carcinogens, including through a previously unreported in vivo benzidine rearrangement to produce 4-ABP. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Suspected limited mobility of a Middle Pleistocene woman from Southern Italy: strontium isotopes of a human deciduous tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugli, Federico; Cipriani, Anna; Arnaud, Julie; Arzarello, Marta; Peretto, Carlo; Benazzi, Stefano

    2017-08-17

    We present the Sr isotopic composition of enamel of the most ancient deciduous tooth ever discovered in Italy to assess human mobility in Middle Pleistocene. Reconstructing ancient mobility is crucial for understanding human strategy at exploiting temporally and spatially patchy resources, with most studies focusing on indirect evidences, ultimately affecting our interpretation on hominin territoriality and energetic costs invested by hominin groups. Here, we use the high spatial resolution and micro-destructivity options offered by the Laser Ablation Multi-Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry technique, to determine the 87Sr/ 86Sr intra-tooth variability of a human deciduous incisor from the Middle Pleistocene layers of the Isernia La Pineta site (Italy). We compared these data with the Sr isotopic signature of local micro-mammals, the broadest home-range of the macro-mammals and with modern plant samples. Our study reveals that while macro-mammals have possibly migrated through the landscape for up to 50 km, the pregnant woman from Isernia was probably local, given that the isotopic ratio of the enamel falls within the local range and is comparable with the signature of the local plants in a radius of 10 km. This is the first case study of Sr isotopic composition determination in such ancient deciduous tooth.

  16. Human Microdosing with Carcinogenic Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: In Vivo Pharmacokinetics of Dibenzo[ def,p ]chrysene and Metabolites by UPLC Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madeen, Erin P.; Ognibene, Ted J.; Corley, Richard A.; McQuistan, Tammie J.; Henderson, Marilyn C.; Baird, William M.; Bench, Graham; Turteltaub, Ken W.; Williams, David E.

    2016-10-17

    Metabolism is a key health risk factor following exposures to pro-carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) such as dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBC), an IARC classified 2A probable human carcinogen. Human exposure to PAHs occurs primarily from the diet in non-smokers. However, little data is available on the metabolism and pharmacokinetics in humans of high molecular weight PAHs (≥4 aromatic rings), including DBC. We previously determined the pharmacokinetics of DBC in human volunteers orally administered a micro-dose (29 ng; 5 nCi) of [14C]-DBC by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) analysis of total [14C] in plasma and urine. In the current study, we utilized a novel “moving wire” interface between ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) and AMS to detect and quantify parent DBC and its major metabolites. The major [14C] product identified in plasma was unmetabolized [14C]-DBC itself, (Cmax= 18.5 ± 15.9 fg/mL, Tmax= 2.1 ± 1.0 h), whereas the major metabolite was identified as [14C]-(+/-)-DBC-11,12-diol (Cmax= 2.5 ± 1.3 fg/mL, Tmax= 1.8 h). Several minor species of [14C]-DBC metabolites were also detected for which no reference standards were available. Free and conjugated metabolites were detected in urine with [14C]-(+/-)-DBC-11,12,13,14-tetraol isomers identified as the major metabolites, 56.3% of which were conjugated (Cmax= 35.8 ± 23.0 pg/pool, Tmax= 6-12 h pool). [14C]-DBC-11,12-diol, of which 97.5% was conjugated, was also identified in urine (Cmax= 29.4 ± 11.6 pg/pool, Tmax= 6-12 h pool). Parent [14C]-DBC was not detected in urine. This is the first dataset to assess metabolite profiles and associated pharmacokinetics of a carcinogenic PAH in human volunteers at an environmentally relevant dose, providing the data necessary for translation of high dose animal models to humans for translation of environmental health risk assessment.

  17. [Neuro-neutrophilic disease suspected by human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing and brain biopsy: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Etsuro; Sawamura, Masanori; Maruhama, Shinichiro; Yamada, Hiroshi; Kim, Gan; Harada, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    In a 72-year-old female, subacute right hemiplegia and aphasia appeared in late May 2011. The results of hematology, a cerebrospinal fluid test, (13)F-FDG-PET, and cephalic MRI suggested intravascular/malignant lymphoma. Brain biopsy was performed. Pathological findings did not suggest a malignant tumor. In the perivascular space, the infiltration of neutrophils or histiocytes was observed. The patient was referred to the Department of Neurology. Based on the results of various examinations, infection was ruled out, and steroid therapy was conducted. Marked improvement was achieved. Subsequently, the results of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing showed B54/Cw1. As dermal findings were absent, it was impossible to make a definitive diagnosis of neuro-Sweet disease, but the disorder was regarded as a neuro-neutrophilic disease, which is a more comprehensive entity. Few studies have reported brain tissue findings of active neuro-neutrophilic disease. We report the present case, which will contribute to future research.

  18. Report on carcinogens monograph on cumene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    The National Toxicology Program conducted a cancer evaluation on cumene for possible listing in the Report on Carcinogens (RoC). The cancer evaluation is captured in the RoC monograph, which was peer reviewed in a public forum. The monograph consists of two components: (Part 1) the cancer evaluation, which reviews the relevant scientific information, assesses its quality, applies the RoC listing criteria to the scientific information, and provides the NTP recommendation for listing status for cumene in the RoC, and (Part 2) the substance profile proposed for the RoC, containing the NTP's listing status recommendation, a summary of the scientific evidence considered key to reaching that decision, and data on properties, use, production, exposure, and Federal regulations and guidelines to reduce exposure to cumene. This monograph provides an assessment of the available scientific information on cumene, including human exposure and properties, disposition and toxicokinetics, cancer studies in experimental animals, and studies of mechanisms and other related effects, including relevant toxicological effects, genetic toxicology, and mechanisms of carcinogenicity. From this assessment, the NTP recommended that cumene be listed as reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen in the RoC based on sufficient evidence from studies in experimental animals, which found that cumene exposure caused lung tumors in male and female mice and liver tumors in female mice. Several proposed mechanisms of carcinogenesis support the relevance to humans of the lung and liver tumors observed in experimental animals. Specifically, there is evidence that humans and experimental animals metabolize cumene through similar metabolic pathways. In addition, mutations of the K-ras oncogene and p53 tumor-suppressor gene observed in cumene-induced lung tumors in mice, along with altered expression of many other genes, resemble molecular alterations found in human lung and other cancers.

  19. Genotoxicity and carcinogenicity risk of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyokuni, Shinya

    2013-12-01

    Novel materials are often commercialized without a complete assessment of the risks they pose to human health because such assessments are costly and time-consuming; additionally, sometimes the methodology needed for such an assessment does not exist. Carbon nanotubes have the potential for widespread application in engineering, materials science and medicine. However, due to the needle-like shape and high durability of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), concerns have been raised that they may induce asbestos-like pathogenicity when inhaled. Indeed, experiments in rodents supported this hypothesis. Notably, the genetic alterations in MWCNT-induced rat malignant mesothelioma were similar to those induced by asbestos. Single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) cause mitotic disturbances in cultured cells, but thus far, there has been no report that SWCNTs are carcinogenic. This review summarizes the recent noteworthy publications on the genotoxicity and carcinogenicity of CNTs and explains the possible molecular mechanisms responsible for this carcinogenicity. The nanoscale size and needle-like rigid structure of CNTs appear to be associated with their pathogenicity in mammalian cells, where carbon atoms are major components in the backbone of many biomolecules. Publishing adverse events associated with novel materials is critically important for alerting people exposed to such materials. CNTs still have a bright future with superb economic and medical merits. However, appropriate regulation of the production, distribution and secondary manufacturing processes is required, at least to protect the workers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Two azole fungicides (carcinogenic triadimefon and non-carcinogenic myclobutanil) exhibit different hepatic cytochrome P450 activities in medaka fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chun-Hung [Department of Agricultural Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chou, Pei-Hsin [Department of Environmental Engineering, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Chen, Pei-Jen, E-mail: chenpj@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Agricultural Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2014-07-30

    Highlights: • We assess ecotoxicological impact of azole fungicides in the aquatic environment. • Carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic azoles show different CYP activities in medaka. • We compare azole-induced CYP expression and carcinogenesis between fish and rodents. • Liver CYP-enzyme induction is a key event in conazole-induced tumorigenesis. • We suggest toxicity evaluation methods for azole fungicides using medaka fish. - Abstract: Conazoles are a class of imidazole- or triazole-containing drugs commonly used as fungicides in agriculture and medicine. The broad application of azole drugs has led to the contamination of surface aquifers receiving the effluent of municipal or hospital wastewater or agricultural runoff. Several triazoles are rodent carcinogens; azole pollution is a concern to environmental safety and human health. However, the carcinogenic mechanisms associated with cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) of conazoles remain unclear. We exposed adult medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) to continuous aqueous solutions of carcinogenic triadimefon and non-carcinogenic myclobutanil for 7 to 20 days at sub-lethal or environmentally relevant concentrations and assessed hepatic CYP activity and gene expression associated with CYP-mediated toxicity. Both triadimefon and myclobutanil induced hepatic CYP3A activity, but only triadimefon enhanced CYP1A activity. The gene expression of cyp3a38, cyp3a40, pregnane x receptor (pxr), cyp26b, retinoid acid receptor γ1 (rarγ1) and p53 was higher with triadimefon than myclobutanil. As well, yeast-based reporter gene assay revealed that 4 tested conazoles were weak agonists of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). We reveal differential CYP gene expression with carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic conazoles in a lower vertebrate, medaka fish. Liver CYP-enzyme induction may be a key event in conazole-induced tumorigenesis. This information is essential to evaluate the potential threat of conazoles to human health and fish

  1. Occupational hazards of chemical carcinogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Indulski, J.; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, N.

    1984-01-01

    Current problems are presented resulting from the evaluation of occupational risk of chemical carcinogens in the national economy. In addition, conditions and activities facilitating the actual evaluation of exposure, i.e. one of the indirect purposes of the control program of work-induced cancer, undertaken within the Government Program PR-6 ''Cancer Control'', the problem ''Work Environment Cancerogenesis'', have been indicated. The numbers of those occupationally exposed to specific carcinogens, based on the data from sanitary-epidemiological stations, demonstrated great differences in professional preparation and technological capabilities of regional supervision authorities in the field concerned.

  2. First evidence that parasite infecting apparent aparasitemic serological suspects in human African trypanosomiasis are Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and are similar to those found in patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaboré, Jacques; Koffi, Mathurin; Bucheton, Bruno; MacLeod, Annette; Duffy, Craig; Ilboudo, Hamidou; Camara, Mamadou; De Meeûs, Thierry; Belem, Adrien Marie Gaston; Jamonneau, Vincent

    2011-08-01

    Thanks to its sensitivity and its ease of use in the field, the card agglutination test for trypanosomiasis (CATT) is widely used for serological screening of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense human African trypanosomiasis (HAT). Positive subjects are then examined by microscopy to confirm the disease. However, the CATT exhibits false-positive results raising the question of whether CATT-positive subjects who are not confirmed by microscopic detection of trypanosomes (SERO) are truly exposed to T.b. gambiense infection. For this purpose, we applied microsatellite genotyping on DNA extracted from blood of both HAT confirmed patients and SERO subjects in Guinea and Côte d'Ivoire since microsatellite genotyping has proved useful for the study of T.b. gambiense genetic diversity. Problems of amplification failures raise the question of the sensitivity of microsatellite markers when applied on biological samples especially from SERO subjects for who low blood parasitaemia are suspected. Nevertheless, we have shown that the trypanosomes from SERO individuals that have been genotyped belong to T.b. gambiense group 1 and were identical to those found in HAT patients. These results constitute the first evidences that at least some SERO are indeed infected by T.b. gambiense group 1 and that they may constitute a human reservoir of parasite in HAT foci. Whether these individuals should undergo treatment remains an open question as long as their role in HAT transmission is unknown. Our results strongly recommend the follow-up of such subjects to improve control strategies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The Regulation of Carcinogenic Hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gori, Gio Batta

    1980-01-01

    It is suggested that a system of relative standards be formulated which would compare utility of substances to their relative risk as carcinogens. This would define a range of use restrictions. Substances intended for specific uses would then be regulated according to these standards. (Author/RE)

  4. SHORT COMMUNICATION CARCINOGENIC POTENCY OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. Carcinogenic potency of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soils obtained from seven different sampling locations in Effurun metropolis and its environs of Niger Delta Area of Nigeria were evaluated. The 16 US EPA priority PAHs were determined with GC-MS. The concentrations of individual PAHs ...

  5. Glyphosate rodent carcinogenicity bioassay expert panel review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gary M; Berry, Colin; Burns, Michele; de Camargo, Joao Lauro Viana; Greim, Helmut

    2016-09-01

    Glyphosate has been rigorously and extensively tested for carcinogenicity by administration to mice (five studies) and to rats (nine studies). Most authorities have concluded that the evidence does not indicate a cancer risk to humans. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), however, evaluated some of the available data and concluded that glyphosate probably is carcinogenic to humans. The expert panel convened by Intertek assessed the findings used by IARC, as well as the full body of evidence and found the following: (1) the renal neoplastic effects in males of one mouse study are not associated with glyphosate exposure, because they lack statistical significance, strength, consistency, specificity, lack a dose-response pattern, plausibility, and coherence; (2) the strength of association of liver hemangiosarcomas in a different mouse study is absent, lacking consistency, and a dose-response effect and having in high dose males only a significant incidence increase which is within the historical control range; (3) pancreatic islet-cell adenomas (non-significant incidence increase), in two studies of male SD rats did not progress to carcinomas and lacked a dose-response pattern (the highest incidence is in the low dose followed by the high dose); (4) in one of two studies, a non-significant positive trend in the incidence of hepatocellular adenomas in male rats did not lead to progression to carcinomas; (5) in one of two studies, the non-significant positive trend in the incidence of thyroid C-cell adenomas in female rats was not present and there was no progression of adenomas to carcinomas at the end of the study. Application of criteria for causality considerations to the above mentioned tumor types and given the overall weight-of-evidence (WoE), the expert panel concluded that glyphosate is not a carcinogen in laboratory animals.

  6. The influence of Lactobacillus rhamnosus LC705 together with Propionibacterium freudenreichii ssp. shermanii JS on potentially carcinogenic bacterial activity in human colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakka, Katja; Holma, Reetta; El-Nezami, Hani; Suomalainen, Tarja; Kuisma, Minna; Saxelin, Maija; Poussa, Tuija; Mykkänen, Hannu; Korpela, Riitta

    2008-12-10

    The bacterial enzymes beta-glucosidase, beta-glucuronidase, and urease may contribute to the development of colon cancer by generating carcinogens. A reduction in the activity of these enzymes by certain lactic acid bacteria is considered to be beneficial. This study examined fecal beta-glucosidase, beta-glucuronidase, and urease activities during administration of Lactobacillus rhamnosus LC705 (LC705) together with Propionibacterium freudenreichii ssp shermanii JS (PJS). Thirty-eight healthy men participated in this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, two-period crossover study with treatment periods of 4 weeks. Subjects consumed daily bacterial or placebo capsules. Bacterial capsules contained viable LC705 and PJS (2x10(10) CFU of each strain daily). The activities of beta-glucosidase, beta-glucuronidase and urease, recovery of LC705 and PJS, and counts of total lactobacilli and propionibacteria were determined from feces. The mean fecal counts of total lactobacilli and propionibacteria as well as strains LC705 and PJS were significantly increased during the administration of bacteria (3.5-, 13-, 80- and 11-fold, respectively). beta-glucosidase activity decreased by 10% (P=0.18) and urease activity by 13% (P=0.16) during bacterial supplementation versus placebo. The change in beta-glucosidase activity was negatively correlated with the change in propionibacteria counts (R=-0.350, P=0.039), being -2.68 versus 0.94 nmol/min/mg protein in subjects with increased and unchanged/decreased propionibacteria, respectively (P=0.003). To conclude, the administration of LC705 and PJS was followed by an increase in the fecal counts of lactobacilli and propionibacteria and a decrease in the activity of beta-glucosidase with increasing counts of propionibacteria.

  7. Cell-surface nucleolin acts as a central mediator for carcinogenic, anti-carcinogenic, and disease-related ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiki, Hirota; Watanabe, Tatsuro; Suganuma, Masami

    2014-05-01

    Cell-surface nucleolin in human gastric cancer cell lines is a receptor for TNF-α-inducing protein (Tipα) of Helicobacter pylori. The binding complex of nucleolin and Tipα is internalized into the cells and then induces tumor progression of human gastric cancer. Surface nucleolin is also a receptor of human immunodeficiency virus-1, and the anti-HIV pseudopeptide (HB-19) showed anti-carcinogenic activity in vivo. Surface nucleolin has dual functions depending on the ligands: In order to understand the mechanisms of surface nucleolin, it is necessary to review surface nucleolin and its relation to carcinogenic ligands and anti-carcinogenic ligands. Other ligands can be grouped among disease-related ligands, which is an important new topic for the prevention of various ailments. This paper mainly deals with two ligands of surface nucleolin, Tipα and pseudopeptide HB-19. The binding complex of nucleolin and Tipα induces expression of TNF-α and chemokine genes and activates NF-κB in gastric cancer cells of humans and mice. However, when human gastric cancer cell line MKN-1 was transfected with nucleolin-targeted siRNA, the result was inhibition of cell migration and elongation induced by Tipα. The amount of surface nucleolin was reduced in membrane fraction of the nucleolin knockdown MKN-1 cells, but the amount of nucleolin in the cytosol or nuclear fractions of the cells did not change. The results indicate that surface nucleolin acts as a carcinogenic mediator for Tipα of H. pylori. In contrast, both the viral external envelop glycoprotein gp120 of HIV and the anti-HIV pseudopeptide HB-19 bind to surface nucleolin. Through this binding, treatment with HB-19 inhibited tumor development in human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 and rhabdoid tumor cell line derived from Wilms's tumor in xenograft nude mouse models. The results show that surface nucleolin acts as an anti-carcinogenic mediator for HB-19. Based on these discrete functions of surface nucleolin

  8. An Incomplete Inventory of Suspected Human-Induced Surface Deformation in North America Detected by Satellite Interferometric Synthetic-Aperture Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alana G. Semple

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We used satellite interferometric synthetic-aperture radar (InSAR data to document ground deformation across North America suspected to be caused by human activities. We showed that anthropogenic deformation can be measured from space across the continent and thus satellite observations should be collected routinely to characterize this deformation. We included results from the literature as well as new analysis of more than 5000 interferograms from the European Remote Sensing (ERS satellite, Envisat, the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS, and other satellites, collectively spanning the period 1992–2015. This compilation, while not complete in terms of spatial or temporal coverage nor uniform in quality over the region, contains 263 different areas of likely anthropogenic ground deformation, including 65 that were previously unreported. The sources can be attributed to groundwater extraction (50%, geothermal sites (6%, hydrocarbon production (20%, mining (21%, and other sources (3% such as lake level changes driven by human activities and tunneling. In a few areas, the source of deformation is ambiguous. We found at least 80 global positioning system (GPS stations within 20 km of of these areas that could be contaminated by the anthropogenic deformation. At sites where we performed a full time series analysis, we found a mix of steady and time-variable deformation rates. For example, at the East Mesa Geothermal Field in California, we found an area that changed from subsidence to uplift around 2006, even though publicly available records of pumping and injection showed no change during that time. We illustrate selected non-detections from wastewater injection in Oklahoma and eastern Texas, where we found that the detection threshold with available data is >0.5 cm/yr. This places into doubt previous results claiming detection below this threshold in eastern Texas. However, we found likely injection-induced uplift in a different area of

  9. 78 FR 4419 - Draft Report on Carcinogens Monographs for 1-Bromopropane and Cumene; Availability of Documents...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Draft Report on Carcinogens Monographs for 1-Bromopropane... meeting of the Draft Report on Carcinogens (RoC) Monographs for 1-Bromopropane and Cumene. These documents....m. until adjournment, approximately 2:00 p.m. EDT. Document Availability: Draft monographs will be...

  10. The carcinogenicity of dietary acrylamide intake: A comparative discussion of epidemiological and experimental animal research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogervorst, J.G.F.; Baars, B.-J.; Schouten, L.J.; Konings, E.J.M.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2010-01-01

    Since 2002, it is known that the probable human carcinogen acrylamide is present in commonly consumed carbohydrate-rich foods, such as French fries and potato chips. In this review, the authors discuss the body of evidence on acrylamide carcinogenicity from both epidemiological and rodent studies,

  11. Medical Devices; Immunology and Microbiology Devices; Classification of the Device To Detect and Measure Non-Microbial Analyte(s) in Human Clinical Specimens To Aid in Assessment of Patients With Suspected Sepsis. Final order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-24

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or we) is classifying the device to detect and measure non-microbial analyte(s) in human clinical specimens to aid in assessment of patients with suspected sepsis into class II (special controls). The special controls that apply to the device type are identified in this order and will be part of the codified language for the device to detect and measure non-microbial analyte(s) in human clinical specimens to aid in assessment of patients with suspected sepsis's classification. We are taking this action because we have determined that classifying the device into class II (special controls) will provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device. We believe this action will also enhance patients' access to beneficial innovative devices, in part by reducing regulatory burdens.

  12. Comparative DNA damage and oxidative effects of carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic sediment-bound PAHs in the gills of a bivalve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Marta; Costa, Pedro M; Ferreira, Ana M; Costa, Maria H

    2013-10-15

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) regarded as carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic to humans are ubiquitous hydrophobic pollutants that tend to be trapped in aquatic sediments. As a consequence of their acknowledged toxicity and pro-mutagenic or even carcinogenic potential, PAHs are deemed prioritary in biomonitoring programmes. Still, the differences between the toxicity of carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic PAHs are poorly known especially, when aquatic organisms are exposed to ecologically-relevant concentrations of these compounds in sediments. Laboratory bioassays with sediments spiked with phenanthrene (Phe) and benzo[b]fluoranthene (B[b]F), non-carcinogenic and carcinogenic PAH, respectively, were conducted and the effects of exposure (related to DNA damage and oxidative stress) were analyzed in the gills of a burrowing clam, Ruditapes decussatus (Bivalvia, Veneridae). To ensure ecological relevance, two contaminant concentrations (termed "low" and "high") were selected in accordance with available PAH sediment quality guidelines. The results showed that, even in "low" concentrations, both compounds caused a likely genotoxic effect in the gills, which is in accordance with the link between PAHs in water. Glutathione S-transferase activity and glutathione biosynthesis appear to be associated with limited lipid peroxidation even though they were insufficient to prevent higher and faster genotoxicity induced by exposure to the carcinogenic B[b]F, comparative to Phe. Overall the findings indicate that low concentrations of sediment-bound PAHs, carcinogenic or not, may be rendered significantly bioavailable to benthic filter-feeders as to induce genotoxicity, revealing that even PAHs considered non-carcinogenic to humans detain a latent, albeit significant, pro-mutagenic hazard to bivalve molluscs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Pediatric glaucoma suspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kooner K

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Karanjit Kooner,1 Matthew Harrison,1 Zohra Prasla,1 Mohannad Albdour,1 Beverley Adams-Huet21Department of Ophthalmology, 2Department of Clinical Sciences, Division of Biostatistics, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USAPurpose: To report demographic and ocular features of pediatric glaucoma suspects in an ethnically diverse population of North Central Texas.Design: Retrospective cross-sectional chart review.Participants: Subjects included 75 (136 eyes pediatric glaucoma suspects. Patients with one or more of the following risk factors were included: cup-to disc (C/D ratio of ≥0.6; intraocular pressure (IOP ≥21 mmHg; family history of glaucoma; congenital glaucoma in the opposite eye; history of blunt trauma to either eye; and presence of either Sturge–Weber or Axenfeld–Rieger syndrome, or oculodermal melanocytosis.Methods: Data were extracted from electronic patient medical records. Patient records with incomplete data were excluded. The main outcome measures were race, sex, age, IOP, C/D, family history of glaucoma; and glaucoma treatment.Results: Subjects included 28 (37.3% Hispanics, 20 (26.6% African Americans, 20 (26.6% Caucasians, and seven (9.3% Asians. Forty (53.3% of the patients were male. Suspicious optic disc was seen in 57 (76%; elevated IOP in 25 (33.3%; presence of family history in 13 (17.3%, and Sturge–Weber syndrome in nine (12% patients. The average C/D ratio was 0.58±0.2. The C/D ratios of African American (0.65±0.2, Hispanic (0.63±0.2, and Asian (0.62±0.15 patients were significantly greater than those of Caucasians (0.43±0.18; P=0.0004, 0.0003, and 0.0139, respectively. Caucasian patients were the youngest (7.9±4.8 years. Eleven cases (14.7% required medication.Conclusion: Thirty-three point seven percent of patients seen in the glaucoma clinic were glaucoma suspects. The most common risk factors for suspected glaucoma were suspicious optic discs, elevated IOP, and family history

  14. Hepatic metabolism of carcinogenic β-asarone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartus, Alexander T; Stegmüller, Simone; Simson, Nadine; Wahl, Andrea; Neef, Sylvia; Kelm, Harald; Schrenk, Dieter

    2015-09-21

    β-Asarone (1) belongs to the group of naturally occurring phenylpropenes like eugenol or anethole. Compound 1 is found in several plants, e.g., Acorus calamus or Asarum europaeum. Compound 1-containing plant materials and essential oils thereof are used to flavor foods and alcoholic beverages and as ingredients of many drugs in traditional phytomedicines. Although 1 has been claimed to have several positive pharmacological effects, it was found to be genotoxic and carcinogenic in rodents (liver and small intestine). The mechanism of action of carcinogenic allylic phenylpropenes consists of the metabolic activation via cytochrome P450 enzymes and sulfotransferases. In vivo experiments suggested that this pathway does not play a major role in the carcinogenicity of the propenylic compound 1 as is the case for other propenylic compounds, e.g., anethole. Since the metabolic pathways of 1 have not been investigated and its carcinogenic mode of action is unknown, we investigated the metabolism of 1 in liver microsomes of rats, bovines, porcines, and humans using (1)H NMR, HPLC-DAD, and LC-ESI-MS/MS techniques. We synthesized the majority of identified metabolites which were used as reference compounds for the quantification and final verification of metabolites. Microsomal epoxidation of the side chain of 1 presumably yielded (Z)-asarone-1',2'-epoxide (8a) which instantly was hydrolyzed to the corresponding erythro- and threo-configurated diols (9b, 9a) and the ketone 2,4,5-trimethoxyphenylacetone (13). This was the main metabolic pathway in the metabolism of 1 in all investigated liver microsomes. Hydroxylation of the side chain of 1 led to the formation of three alcohols at total yields of less than 30%: 1'-hydroxyasarone (2), (E)- and (Z)-3'-hydroxyasarone (4 and 6), with 6 being the mainly formed alcohol and 2 being detectable only in liver microsomes of Aroclor 1254-pretreated rats. Small amounts of 4 and 6 were further oxidized to the corresponding carbonyl

  15. Two azole fungicides (carcinogenic triadimefon and non-carcinogenic myclobutanil) exhibit different hepatic cytochrome P450 activities in medaka fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chun-Hung; Chou, Pei-Hsin; Chen, Pei-Jen

    2014-07-30

    Conazoles are a class of imidazole- or triazole-containing drugs commonly used as fungicides in agriculture and medicine. The broad application of azole drugs has led to the contamination of surface aquifers receiving the effluent of municipal or hospital wastewater or agricultural runoff. Several triazoles are rodent carcinogens; azole pollution is a concern to environmental safety and human health. However, the carcinogenic mechanisms associated with cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) of conazoles remain unclear. We exposed adult medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) to continuous aqueous solutions of carcinogenic triadimefon and non-carcinogenic myclobutanil for 7 to 20 days at sub-lethal or environmentally relevant concentrations and assessed hepatic CYP activity and gene expression associated with CYP-mediated toxicity. Both triadimefon and myclobutanil induced hepatic CYP3A activity, but only triadimefon enhanced CYP1A activity. The gene expression of cyp3a38, cyp3a40, pregnane x receptor (pxr), cyp26b, retinoid acid receptor γ1 (rarγ1) and p53 was higher with triadimefon than myclobutanil. As well, yeast-based reporter gene assay revealed that 4 tested conazoles were weak agonists of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). We reveal differential CYP gene expression with carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic conazoles in a lower vertebrate, medaka fish. Liver CYP-enzyme induction may be a key event in conazole-induced tumorigenesis. This information is essential to evaluate the potential threat of conazoles to human health and fish populations in the aquatic environment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A call to expand regulation to all carcinogenic fibrous minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, F.; Steele, I.; Ambrosi, J.; Carbone, M.

    2013-05-01

    vitro and in vivo studies have shown its toxic and carcinogenic properties; 2) the carcinogenic properties of erionite have been demonstrated, and erionite has been associated with a mesothelioma epidemic in Anatolia, Turkey. Erionite is also widespread in areas of north central USA, where it is contained in gravel paving stone, and is cause for concern due to increased commercial traffic. Numerous studies have shown that non-regulated fibrous materials pose similar health hazards to regulated "asbestos". An increase in human activities in areas where these fibrous minerals are present, such as in surficial rock and soil, will result in the generation of airborne dust, exposing people to carcinogenic fibers. The current limited regulation leads people to believe that only the six mineral fibers referred to as "asbestos" are dangerous. We propose that fibrous minerals should be regulated as a single group, as they have similar deleterious effects on the human body. Regulations would be simplified and more effective if they embrace all carcinogenic fibrous minerals.

  17. Evaluation of carcinogenic potential of the herbicide glyphosate, drawing on tumor incidence data from fourteen chronic/carcinogenicity rodent studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greim, Helmut; Saltmiras, David; Mostert, Volker; Strupp, Christian

    2015-03-01

    Abstract Glyphosate, an herbicidal derivative of the amino acid glycine, was introduced to agriculture in the 1970s. Glyphosate targets and blocks a plant metabolic pathway not found in animals, the shikimate pathway, required for the synthesis of aromatic amino acids in plants. After almost forty years of commercial use, and multiple regulatory approvals including toxicology evaluations, literature reviews, and numerous human health risk assessments, the clear and consistent conclusions are that glyphosate is of low toxicological concern, and no concerns exist with respect to glyphosate use and cancer in humans. This manuscript discusses the basis for these conclusions. Most toxicological studies informing regulatory evaluations are of commercial interest and are proprietary in nature. Given the widespread attention to this molecule, the authors gained access to carcinogenicity data submitted to regulatory agencies and present overviews of each study, followed by a weight of evidence evaluation of tumor incidence data. Fourteen carcinogenicity studies (nine rat and five mouse) are evaluated for their individual reliability, and select neoplasms are identified for further evaluation across the data base. The original tumor incidence data from study reports are presented in the online data supplement. There was no evidence of a carcinogenic effect related to glyphosate treatment. The lack of a plausible mechanism, along with published epidemiology studies, which fail to demonstrate clear, statistically significant, unbiased and non-confounded associations between glyphosate and cancer of any single etiology, and a compelling weight of evidence, support the conclusion that glyphosate does not present concern with respect to carcinogenic potential in humans.

  18. NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase expression in Cyp1a-knockout and CYP1A-humanized mouse lines and its effect on bioactivation of the carcinogen aristolochic acid I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levova, Katerina; Moserova, Michaela [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); Nebert, Daniel W. [Department of Environmental Health, University of Cincinnati Medical Center, Cincinnati (United States); Phillips, David H. [Analytical and Environmental Sciences Division, MRC-HPA Centre for Environment and Health, King' s College London, London (United Kingdom); Frei, Eva [Division of Preventive Oncology, National Center for Tumor Diseases, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Schmeiser, Heinz H. [Research Group Genetic Alterations in Carcinogenesis, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Arlt, Volker M. [Analytical and Environmental Sciences Division, MRC-HPA Centre for Environment and Health, King' s College London, London (United Kingdom); Stiborova, Marie, E-mail: stiborov@natur.cuni.cz [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2012-12-15

    Aristolochic acid causes a specific nephropathy (AAN), Balkan endemic nephropathy, and urothelial malignancies. Using Western blotting suitable to determine protein expression, we investigated in several transgenic mouse lines expression of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1)—the most efficient cytosolic enzyme that reductively activates aristolochic acid I (AAI). The mouse tissues used were from previous studies [Arlt et al., Chem. Res. Toxicol. 24 (2011) 1710; Stiborova et al., Toxicol. Sci. 125 (2012) 345], in which the role of microsomal cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in AAI metabolism in vivo had been determined. We found that NQO1 levels in liver, kidney and lung of Cyp1a1(−/−), Cyp1a2(−/−) and Cyp1a1/1a2(−/−) knockout mouse lines, as well as in two CYP1A-humanized mouse lines harboring functional human CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 and lacking the mouse Cyp1a1/1a2 orthologs, differed from NQO1 levels in wild-type mice. NQO1 protein and enzymic activity were induced in hepatic and renal cytosolic fractions isolated from AAI-pretreated mice, compared with those in untreated mice. Furthermore, this increase in hepatic NQO1 enzyme activity was associated with bioactivation of AAI and elevated AAI-DNA adduct levels in ex vivo incubations of cytosolic fractions with DNA and AAI. In conclusion, AAI appears to increase its own metabolic activation by inducing NQO1, thereby enhancing its own genotoxic potential. Highlights: ► NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase expression in Cyp1a knockout and humanized CYP1A mice ► Reductive activation of the nephrotoxic and carcinogenic aristolochic acid I (AAI) ► NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase is induced in mice treated with AAI. ► Induced hepatic enzyme activity resulted in elevated AAI-DNA adduct levels.

  19. Excretory/secretory products of the carcinogenic liver fluke are endocytosed by human cholangiocytes and drive cell proliferation and IL6 production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiyadet, Sujittra; Smout, Michael; Johnson, Michael; Whitchurch, Cynthia; Turnbull, Lynne; Kaewkes, Sasithorn; Sotillo, Javier; Loukas, Alex; Sripa, Banchob

    2015-10-01

    Liver fluke infection caused by Opisthorchis viverrini remains a major public health problem in many parts of Asia including Thailand, Lao PDR, Vietnam and Cambodia, where there is a strikingly high incidence of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA - hepatic cancer of the bile duct epithelium). Among other factors, uptake of O. viverrini excretory/secretory products (OvES) by biliary epithelial cells has been postulated to be responsible for chronic inflammation and proliferation of cholangiocytes, but the mechanisms by which cells internalise O. viverrini excretory/secretory products are still unknown. Herein we incubated normal human cholangiocytes (H69), human cholangiocarcinoma cells (KKU-100, KKU-M156) and human colon cancer (Caco-2) cells with O. viverrini excretory/secretory products and analysed the effects of different endocytic inhibitors to address the mechanism of cellular uptake of ES proteins. Opisthorchis viverrini excretory/secretory products was internalised preferentially by liver cell lines, and most efficiently/rapidly by H69 cells. There was no evidence for trafficking of ES proteins to cholangiocyte organelles, and most of the fluorescence was detected in the cytoplasm. Pretreatment with clathrin inhibitors significantly reduced the uptake of O. viverrini excretory/secretory products, particularly by H69 cells. Opisthorchis viverrini excretory/secretory products induced proliferation of liver cells (H69 and CCA lines) but not intestinal (Caco-2) cells, and proliferation was blocked using inhibitors of the classical endocytic pathways (clathrin and caveolae). Opisthorchis viverrini excretory/secretory products drove IL6 secretion by H69 cells but not Caco-2 cells, and cytokine secretion was significantly reduced by endocytosis inhibitors. This the first known study to address the endocytosis of helminth ES proteins by host epithelial cells and sheds light on the pathways by which this parasite causes one of the most devastating forms of cancer in south

  20. Carcinogenic metal compounds: recent insight into molecular and cellular mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyersmann, Detmar [University of Bremen (Germany). Biochemistry, Department of Biology and Chemistry; Hartwig, Andrea [Technical University of Berlin (Germany). Institute of Food Technology and Food Chemistry

    2008-08-15

    Mechanisms of carcinogenicity are discussed for metals and their compounds, classified as carcinogenic to humans or considered to be carcinogenic to humans: arsenic, antimony, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, lead, nickel and vanadium. Physicochemical properties govern uptake, intracellular distribution and binding of metal compounds. Interactions with proteins (e.g., with zinc finger structures) appear to be more relevant for metal carcinogenicity than binding to DNA. In general, metal genotoxicity is caused by indirect mechanisms. In spite of diverse physicochemical properties of metal compounds, three predominant mechanisms emerge: (1) interference with cellular redox regulation and induction of oxidative stress, which may cause oxidative DNA damage or trigger signaling cascades leading to stimulation of cell growth; (2) inhibition of major DNA repair systems resulting in genomic instability and accumulation of critical mutations; (3) deregulation of cell proliferation by induction of signaling pathways or inactivation of growth controls such as tumor suppressor genes. In addition, specific metal compounds exhibit unique mechanisms such as interruption of cell-cell adhesion by cadmium, direct DNA binding of trivalent chromium, and interaction of vanadate with phosphate binding sites of protein phosphatases. (orig.)

  1. Systematic network assessment of the carcinogenic activities of cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peizhan; Duan, Xiaohua; Li, Mian; Huang, Chao; Li, Jingquan; Chu, Ruiai; Ying, Hao; Song, Haiyun; Jia, Xudong; Ba, Qian; Wang, Hui

    2016-11-01

    Cadmium has been defined as type I carcinogen for humans, but the underlying mechanisms of its carcinogenic activity and its influence on protein-protein interactions in cells are not fully elucidated. The aim of the current study was to evaluate, systematically, the carcinogenic activity of cadmium with systems biology approaches. From a literature search of 209 studies that performed with cellular models, 208 proteins influenced by cadmium exposure were identified. All of these were assessed by Western blotting and were recognized as key nodes in network analyses. The protein-protein functional interaction networks were constructed with NetBox software and visualized with Cytoscape software. These cadmium-rewired genes were used to construct a scale-free, highly connected biological protein interaction network with 850 nodes and 8770 edges. Of the network, nine key modules were identified and 60 key signaling pathways, including the estrogen, RAS, PI3K-Akt, NF-κB, HIF-1α, Jak-STAT, and TGF-β signaling pathways, were significantly enriched. With breast cancer, colorectal and prostate cancer cellular models, we validated the key node genes in the network that had been previously reported or inferred form the network by Western blotting methods, including STAT3, JNK, p38, SMAD2/3, P65, AKT1, and HIF-1α. These results suggested the established network was robust and provided a systematic view of the carcinogenic activities of cadmium in human. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Carcinogenic metal compounds: recent insight into molecular and cellular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyersmann, Detmar; Hartwig, Andrea

    2008-08-01

    Mechanisms of carcinogenicity are discussed for metals and their compounds, classified as carcinogenic to humans or considered to be carcinogenic to humans: arsenic, antimony, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, lead, nickel and vanadium. Physicochemical properties govern uptake, intracellular distribution and binding of metal compounds. Interactions with proteins (e.g., with zinc finger structures) appear to be more relevant for metal carcinogenicity than binding to DNA. In general, metal genotoxicity is caused by indirect mechanisms. In spite of diverse physicochemical properties of metal compounds, three predominant mechanisms emerge: (1) interference with cellular redox regulation and induction of oxidative stress, which may cause oxidative DNA damage or trigger signaling cascades leading to stimulation of cell growth; (2) inhibition of major DNA repair systems resulting in genomic instability and accumulation of critical mutations; (3) deregulation of cell proliferation by induction of signaling pathways or inactivation of growth controls such as tumor suppressor genes. In addition, specific metal compounds exhibit unique mechanisms such as interruption of cell-cell adhesion by cadmium, direct DNA binding of trivalent chromium, and interaction of vanadate with phosphate binding sites of protein phosphatases.

  3. Urinary Metabolites of the Dietary Carcinogen PhIP are Predictive of Colon DNA Adducts After a Low Dose Exposure in Humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malfatti, M; Dingley, K; Nowell, S; Ubick, E; Mulakken, N; Nelson, D; Lang, N; Felton, J; Turteltaub, K

    2006-04-28

    Epidemiologic evidence indicates that exposure to heterocyclic amines (HAs) in the diet is an important risk factor for the development of colon cancer. Well-done cooked meats contain significant levels of HAs which have been shown to cause cancer in laboratory animals. To better understand the mechanisms of HA bioactivation in humans, the most mass abundant HA, 2-amino-l-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), was used to assess the relationship between PhIP metabolism and DNA adduct formation. Ten human volunteers were administered a dietary relevant dose of [{sup 14}C]PhIP 48-72 h prior to surgery to remove colon tumors. Urine was collected for 24 h after dosing for metabolite analysis, and DNA was extracted from colon tissue and analyzed by accelerator mass spectrometry for DNA adducts. All ten subjects were phenotyped for CYP1A2, NAT2, and SULT1A1 enzyme activity. Twelve PhIP metabolites were detected in the urine samples. The most abundant metabolite in all volunteers was N-hydroxy-PhIP-N{sup 2}-glucuronide. Metabolite levels varied significantly between the volunteers. Interindividual differences in colon DNA adducts levels were observed between each individual. The data showed that individuals with a rapid CYP1A2 phenotype and high levels of urinary N-hydroxy-PhIP-N{sup 2}-glucuronide, had the lowest level of colon PhIP-DNA adducts. This suggests that glucuronidation plays a significant role in detoxifying N-hydroxy-PhIP. The levels of urinary N-hydroxy-PhIP-N{sup 2}-glucuronide were negatively correlated to colon DNA adduct levels. Although it is difficult to make definite conclusions from a small data set, the results from this pilot study have encouraged further investigations using a much larger study group.

  4. 76 FR 71037 - Proposed National Toxicology Program (NTP) Review Process for the Report on Carcinogens: Request...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Proposed National Toxicology Program (NTP) Review Process for the Report on Carcinogens... Toxicology Program (DNTP), National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS); National Institutes... (see ADDRESSES). Dated: November 8, 2011. John R. Bucher, Associate Director, National Toxicology...

  5. Carcinogen inducibility in vivo and down-regulation of DMBT1 during breast carcinogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollenhauer, Jan; Helmke, Burkhard; Medina, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    of the carcinogen 7,12-dimethybenz(alpha)anthracene prior to the onset of tumorigenesis or other histopathological changes. DMBT1 displayed significant up-regulation in human tumor-flanking tissues compared to in normal breast tissues (P

  6. Mechanism of Error-Free Bypass of the Environmental Carcinogen N-(2'-Deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-3-aminobenzanthrone Adduct by Human DNA Polymerase η.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Amritraj; Politica, Dustin A; Chatterjee, Arindom; Tokarsky, E John; Suo, Zucai; Basu, Ashis K; Stone, Michael P; Egli, Martin

    2016-11-03

    The environmental pollutant 3-nitrobenzanthrone produces bulky aminobenzanthrone (ABA) DNA adducts with both guanine and adenine nucleobases. A major product occurs at the C8 position of guanine (C8-dG-ABA). These adducts present a strong block to replicative polymerases but, remarkably, can be bypassed in a largely error-free manner by the human Y-family polymerase η (hPol η). Here, we report the crystal structure of a ternary Pol⋅DNA⋅dCTP complex between a C8-dG-ABA-containing template:primer duplex and hPol η. The complex was captured at the insertion stage and provides crucial insight into the mechanism of error-free bypass of this bulky lesion. Specifically, bypass involves accommodation of the ABA moiety inside a hydrophobic cleft to the side of the enzyme active site and formation of an intra-nucleotide hydrogen bond between the phosphate and ABA amino moiety, allowing the adducted guanine to form a standard Watson-Crick pair with the incoming dCTP. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. [Contribution of immunoglobulin assays to the diagnosis of human African trypanosomiasis in patients immunologically suspect (immunofluorescence and ELISA). A preliminary report (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangenot, M; Chaize, J; Haase, M; Desfontaine, M; Duvallet, G; Moreau, J P

    1979-01-01

    Can the diagnosis of sleeping sickness in patients immunologically suspect, without seeing the parasite, be obtained by dosing IgG and IgM? The authors demonstrate that two groups of people with positive immunodiagnosis, one parasitologically confirmed and the other not confirmed, do not show significant difference when dosing immunoglobulins. These two groups respectively show a significant difference when compared with a parasitologically and immunologicaly negative group. The simultaneous increase in IgG and IgM might confirm the immunodiagnosis.

  8. Low intracellular ATP levels exacerbate carcinogen-induced inflammatory stress response and inhibit in vitro tubulogenesis in human brain endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Tahanian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth Tahanian, Sabrina Peiro, Borhane AnnabiLaboratoire d'Oncologie Moléculaire, Centre de Recherche BioMED, Département de Chimie, Université du Québec à Montréal, Montréal, Québec, CanadaAbstract: Solid tumor development requires angiogenesis and is correlated to the expression of inflammatory markers through cellular metabolic and energetic adaptation. While high glycolysis rates enable the cancer cell compartment to generate adenosine triphosphate (ATP, very little is known about the impact of low intracellular ATP concentrations within the vascular endothelial cell compartment, which is responsible for tumor angiogenesis. Here, we investigated the effect of 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG, a glucose analog that inhibits glycolysis through intracellular ATP depletion, on human brain microvascular endothelial cell (HBMEC angiogenic properties. While preformed capillaries remained unaffected, we found that in vitro tubulogenesis was dose-dependently decreased by 2-DG and that this correlated with reduced intracellular ATP levels. Procarcinogenic signaling was induced with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA and found to trigger the proinflammatory marker cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 and endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress marker GRP78 expression, whose inductions were potentiated when PMA was combined with 2-DG treatment. Inversely, PMA-induced matrix-metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 gene expression and protein secretion were abrogated in the presence of 2-DG, and this can be partially explained by reduced nuclear factor-κB signaling. Collectively, we provide evidence for an intracellular ATP requirement in order for tubulogenesis to occur, and we link increases in ER stress to inflammation. A better understanding of the metabolic adaptations of the vascular endothelial cells that mediate tumor vascularization will help the development of new drugs and therapies.Keywords: endoplasmic reticulum stress, MMP-9, COX-2, 2-deoxy-D-glucose, endothelial

  9. Prediction of carcinogenic potential of chemicals using repeated-dose (13-week) toxicity data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woutersen, Ruud A; Soffers, Ans E M F; Kroese, E Dinant; Krul, Cyrille A M; van der Laan, Jan Willem; van Benthem, Jan; Luijten, Mirjam

    2016-11-01

    Sub-chronic toxicity studies of 163 non-genotoxic chemicals were evaluated in order to predict the tumour outcome of 24-month rat carcinogenicity studies obtained from the EFSA and ToxRef databases. Hundred eleven of the 148 chemicals that did not induce putative preneoplastic lesions in the sub-chronic study also did not induce tumours in the carcinogenicity study (True Negatives). Cellular hypertrophy appeared to be an unreliable predictor of carcinogenicity. The negative predictivity, the measure of the compounds evaluated that did not show any putative preneoplastic lesion in de sub-chronic studies and were negative in the carcinogenicity studies, was 75%, whereas the sensitivity, a measure of the sub-chronic study to predict a positive carcinogenicity outcome was only 5%. The specificity, the accuracy of the sub-chronic study to correctly identify non-carcinogens was 90%. When the chemicals which induced tumours generally considered not relevant for humans (33 out of 37 False Negatives) are classified as True Negatives, the negative predictivity amounts to 97%. Overall, the results of this retrospective study support the concept that chemicals showing no histopathological risk factors for neoplasia in a sub-chronic study in rats may be considered non-carcinogenic and do not require further testing in a carcinogenicity study. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Exposure to carcinogens for defined job categories in Norway's offshore petroleum industry, 1970 to 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinsvåg, Kjersti; Bråtveit, Magne; Moen, Bente E

    2007-04-01

    To identify and describe the exposure to selected known and suspected carcinogenic agents, mixtures and exposure circumstances for defined job categories in Norway's offshore petroleum industry from 1970 to 2005, in order to provide exposure information for a planned cohort study on cancer. Background information on possible exposure was obtained through company visits, including interviewing key personnel (n = 83) and collecting monitoring reports (n = 118) and other relevant documents (n = 329). On the basis of a previous questionnaire administered to present and former offshore employees in 1998, 27 job categories were defined. This study indicated possible exposure to 18 known and suspected carcinogenic agents, mixtures or exposure circumstances. Monitoring reports were obtained on seven agents (benzene, mineral oil mist and vapour, respirable and total dust, asbestos fibres, refractory ceramic fibres, formaldehyde and tetrachloroethylene). The mean exposure level of 367 personal samples of benzene was 0.037 ppm (range: less than the limit of detection to 2.6 ppm). Asbestos fibres were detected (0.03 fibres/cm3) when asbestos-containing brake bands were used in drilling draw work in 1988. Personal samples of formaldehyde in the process area ranged from 0.06 to 0.29 mg/m3. Descriptions of products containing known and suspected carcinogens, exposure sources and processes were extracted from the collected documentation and the interviews of key personnel. This study described exposure to 18 known and suspected carcinogenic agents, mixtures and exposure circumstances for 27 job categories in Norway's offshore petroleum industry. For a planned cohort study on cancer, quantitative estimates of exposure to benzene, and mineral oil mist and vapour might be developed. For the other agents, information in the present study can be used for further assessment of exposure, for instance, by expert judgement. More systematic exposure surveillance is needed in this industry

  11. On the issue of higher human sensitivity to carcinogenic substances in early childhood; Zur Frage einer hoeheren Empfindlichkeit von Kindern gegenueber krebserzeugenden Stoffen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, K. [comp.

    1998-09-01

    Age-dependent carcinogenesis in humans has been proven with high probability for a number of substances investigated within one or several model systems. Sometimes, very high tumor incidence after short exposure time was observed. Extreme differences were found in some models. (A) Vinyl chloride, Maltoni et al.,1981: 6000 ppm, hepatic angiosarcoma incidence: - Exposure for 4 weeks, from day 1: 40.5 %, - exposure for 4 weeks, from week 13: 0%, - exposure for 52 weeks, from week 13: 22%. Hepatoma incidence: - Exposure for 4 weeks, from day 1: 47.6%, exposure for 4 weeks, from week 13: 0%, exposure for 52 weeks, from week 13: 1.7%. (B) Diethyl nitrosamine, Dyroff et al., 1986: (DEN + phenobarbital), hepatic carcinoma after exposure of rats for 6 weeks: - as from 4 weeks of age: 100% incidence, - as from 8 weeks of age: 0% incidence. (C) Benzopyrene, Vesselinovitch et al., 1975: Hepatic tumor incidence after single, parenteral administration to rats: - at day 1: males: 81%, females: 18%, - at day 42: males: 9%, females: 0%. As is shown by the study on vinyl chloride by Maltoni et al., the same exposure concentration may lead to higher tumor incidence in young animals after short exposure times than it does in long-term experiments with adult animals. Genetic toxicity was detected for all substances, except for saccharin. So it can be assumed that the mechanism of carcinogenesis has an essential influence on the age-dependence. This conclusion agrees well with mechanistic approaches. (orig./CB) [German] Fuer eine Reihe von Schadstoffen ist eine Altersabhaengigkeit der Kanzerogenese mit hoher Wahrscheinlichkeit in einem oder mehreren Modellsystemen gezeigt worden. Dabei wurden zum Teil bereits nach kurzer Expositionszeit sehr hohe Tumorausbeuten erzielt. Extreme Unterschiede wurden in folgenden Modellen beobachtet. (A) Vinylchlorid, Maltoni et al., 1981: 6000 ppm, Inzidenz Leberangiosarkome: - Exposition ueber 4 Wochen ab Tag 1: 40,5%, - Exposition ueber 4 Wochen ab 13

  12. Circulating mitochondrial DNA as biomarker linking environmental chemical exposure to early preclinical lesions elevation of mtDNA in human serum after exposure to carcinogenic halo-alkane-based pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budnik, Lygia T; Kloth, Stefan; Baur, Xaver; Preisser, Alexandra M; Schwarzenbach, Heidi

    2013-01-01

    There is a need for a panel of suitable biomarkers for detection of environmental chemical exposure leading to the initiation or progression of degenerative diseases or potentially, to cancer. As the peripheral blood may contain increased levels of circulating cell-free DNA in diseased individuals, we aimed to evaluate this DNA as effect biomarker recognizing vulnerability after exposure to environmental chemicals. We recruited 164 individuals presumably exposed to halo-alkane-based pesticides. Exposure evaluation was based on human biomonitoring analysis; as biomarker of exposure parent halo-methanes, -ethanes and their metabolites, as well as the hemoglobin-adducts methyl valine and hydroxyl ethyl valine in blood were used, complemented by expert evaluation of exposure and clinical intoxication symptoms as well as a questionnaire. Assessment showed exposures to halo alkanes in the concentration range being higher than non-cancer reference doses (RfD) but (mostly) lower than the occupational exposure limits. We quantified circulating DNA in serum from 86 individuals with confirmed exposure to off-gassing halo-alkane pesticides (in storage facilities or in home environment) and 30 non-exposed controls, and found that exposure was significantly associated with elevated serum levels of circulating mitochondrial DNA (in size of 79 bp, mtDNA-79, p = 0.0001). The decreased integrity of mtDNA (mtDNA-230/mtDNA-79) in exposed individuals implicates apoptotic processes (p = 0.015). The relative amounts of mtDNA-79 in serum were positively associated with the lag-time after intoxication to these chemicals (r = 0.99, pvulnerable risk groups after exposure to toxic/carcinogenic chemicals.

  13. Circulating mitochondrial DNA as biomarker linking environmental chemical exposure to early preclinical lesions elevation of mtDNA in human serum after exposure to carcinogenic halo-alkane-based pesticides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lygia T Budnik

    Full Text Available There is a need for a panel of suitable biomarkers for detection of environmental chemical exposure leading to the initiation or progression of degenerative diseases or potentially, to cancer. As the peripheral blood may contain increased levels of circulating cell-free DNA in diseased individuals, we aimed to evaluate this DNA as effect biomarker recognizing vulnerability after exposure to environmental chemicals. We recruited 164 individuals presumably exposed to halo-alkane-based pesticides. Exposure evaluation was based on human biomonitoring analysis; as biomarker of exposure parent halo-methanes, -ethanes and their metabolites, as well as the hemoglobin-adducts methyl valine and hydroxyl ethyl valine in blood were used, complemented by expert evaluation of exposure and clinical intoxication symptoms as well as a questionnaire. Assessment showed exposures to halo alkanes in the concentration range being higher than non-cancer reference doses (RfD but (mostly lower than the occupational exposure limits. We quantified circulating DNA in serum from 86 individuals with confirmed exposure to off-gassing halo-alkane pesticides (in storage facilities or in home environment and 30 non-exposed controls, and found that exposure was significantly associated with elevated serum levels of circulating mitochondrial DNA (in size of 79 bp, mtDNA-79, p = 0.0001. The decreased integrity of mtDNA (mtDNA-230/mtDNA-79 in exposed individuals implicates apoptotic processes (p = 0.015. The relative amounts of mtDNA-79 in serum were positively associated with the lag-time after intoxication to these chemicals (r = 0.99, p<0.0001. Several months of post-exposure the specificity of this biomarker increased from 30% to 97% in patients with intoxication symptoms. Our findings indicate that mitochondrial DNA has a potential to serve as a biomarker recognizing vulnerable risk groups after exposure to toxic/carcinogenic chemicals.

  14. Technology and the Glaucoma Suspect

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Blumberg, Dana M; De Moraes, Carlos Gustavo; Liebmann, Jeffrey M; Garg, Reena; Chen, Cynthia; Theventhiran, Alex; Hood, Donald C

    2016-01-01

    ...), stereoscopic disc photographs, and automated perimetry as assessed by a group of glaucoma specialists in differentiating individuals with early glaucoma from suspects. Forty-six eyes (46 patients...

  15. DNA methylation, heterochromatin and epigenetic carcinogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, C B; Costa, M

    1997-04-01

    This paper will explore emerging concepts related to alternative carcinogenic mechanisms of 'non-mutagenic,' and hence epigenetic, carcinogens that may heritably alter DNA methylation without changing the underlying DNA sequence. In this review, we will touch on the basic concepts of DNA methylation, and will elaborate in greater detail on related topics including chromatin condensation, and heterochromatin spreading that is well known to induce gene silencing by position effect variegation in Drosophila and other species. Data from our model transgenic G12 cell system will be presented to support our hypothesis that certain carcinogens, such as nickel, may be carcinogenic not primarily because of their overt mutability, but rather as the result of their ability to promote DNA hypermethylation of important cancer-related genes. We will conclude with a discussion of the broader relevance of our findings and its application to other so-called 'epigenetic' carcinogens.

  16. The IARC Monographs on the carcinogenicity of crystalline silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Neela; Straif, Kurt; Benbrahim-Tallaa, Lamia

    2011-01-01

    Through extensive review of the published literature, two independent expert panels convened by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Monographs Programme have classified crystalline silica as carcinogenic to humans while amorphous silica was not classifiable as to its carcinogenicity in humans. The panel remarked that crystalline silica in the form of quartz or cristobalite dust causes lung cancer in humans. We discuss the literature and rationale used to support the IARC evaluations of silica. A critical review, with a focus on lung tumors, was conducted of the pertinent literature on the carcinogenic effects of crystalline silica in humans and experimental animals as well as supportive mechanistic evidence. The strongest supportive evidence comes from pooled and meta-analyses that employed quantitative exposure assessment, focused on silicotics, accounted for potential confounding and demonstrated exposure-response trends. Consistency of the effect was observed despite some heterogeneity between individual studies. Tumor site concordance was observed with rodents and further supported by mechanistic data. Several million workers worldwide are exposed to crystalline silica. Silicosis and lung cancer in these workers are completely preventable diseases. The IARC evaluations are critical to supporting public health interventions to protect persons at high-risk.

  17. The food-derived carcinogen 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine activates S-phase checkpoint and apoptosis, and induces gene mutation in human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, H; Boobis, A R; Gooderham, N J

    2000-03-01

    The mutagenic heterocyclic amine, 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-blpyridine (PhIP) is formed at parts per billion levels when meat is cooked. It is efficiently absorbed from cooked food and extensively activated to its genotoxic N-hydroxy derivative by human cytochrome P4501A enzymes. It is also a rodent carcinogen. To better understand the genetic toxicity of PhIP, we have examined its effect on the cell cycle and gene mutation frequency using human lymphoblastoid cells (TK6) as a model. Because TK6 cells are unable to activate PhIP, we have cultured the cells in the presence of irradiated Chinese hamster XEMh1A2-MZ cells that have been genetically engineered to express human CYP1A2. Asynchronized TK6 cells were harvested at various times after treatment with PhIP (1.25-10 microg/ml), fixed and stained with propidium iodide for the examination of cell cycle by fluorescence-activated flow cytometry. After 20 h of PhIP treatment, a slight S-phase delay of the cell cycle was observed. Normal cell cycle recovered after the cells were washed and further cultured in the absence of PhIP for 5 days. However, PhIP treatment for 40 h induced a more pronounced S-phase arrest that was accompanied by a decrease in the level of cyclin A, an S-phase cyclin. This was followed by the appearance of a sub-G1 population (indicative of apoptotic cell death), range from 13 to 54% with PhIP concentrations from 1.25 to 10 microg/ml, compared with 5% in the vehicle control. A concomitant increase of mutation frequency at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus, assessed by colony formation assay in the presence of 6-thioguanine, was detected after 40 h-range, 16 to 45 x 10(-6) compared with 12 x 10(-6) in cultures without PhIP. In G1-enriched cell populations (synchronized culture), although PhIP induced S-phase delay, the induction of sub-G1 cells was substantially decreased. Our studies show that in TK6 cells, PhIP activates S-phase checkpoint, yet eludes

  18. A Review of the Carcinogenic Potential of Bisphenol A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seachrist, Darcie D; Bonk, Kristen W.; Ho, Shuk-Mei; Prins, Gail S.; Soto, Ana M.; Keri, Ruth A.

    2015-01-01

    The estrogenic properties of bisphenol A (BPA), a ubiquitous synthetic monomer that can leach into the food and water supply, have prompted considerable research into exposure-associated health risks in humans. Endocrine-disrupting properties of BPA suggest it may impact developmental plasticity during early life, predisposing individuals to disease at doses below the oral reference dose (RfD) established by the Environmental Protection Agency in 1982. Herein, we review the current in vivo literature evaluating the carcinogenic properties of BPA. We conclude that there is substantial evidence from rodent studies indicating that early-life BPA exposures below the RfD lead to increased susceptibility to mammary and prostate cancer. Based on the definitions of “carcinogen” put forth by the International Agency for Research on Cancer and the National Toxicology Program, we propose that BPA may be reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen in the breast and prostate due to its tumor promoting properties. PMID:26493093

  19. Biomonitoring human exposure to environmental carcinogenic chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farmer, P.B.; Sepai, O.; Lawrence, R.

    1996-01-01

    effects (mutation and cytogenetic damage). Adduct detection at the level of DNA or protein (haemoglobin) was carried out by 32P-postlabelling, immunochemical, HPLC or mass spectrometric methods. Urinary excretion products resulting from DNA damage were also estimated (immunochemical assay, mass......A coordinated study was carried out on the development, evaluation and application of biomonitoring procedures for populations exposed to environmental genotoxic pollutants. The procedures used involved both direct measurement of DNA or protein damage (adducts) and assessment of second biological...... aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges) and mutation frequency was estimated at a number of loci including the hprt gene and genes involving in cancer development. Blood and urine samples from individuals exposed to urban pollution were collected. Populations exposed through occupational or medical...

  20. Biomonitoring human exposure to environmental carcinogenic chemicals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farmer, P.B.; Sepai, O.; Lawrence, R.; Autrup, H.; Nielsen, P.S.; Baan, R.A.; Delft, J.H.M. van; Steenwinkel, M.J.S.T.; et al.

    1996-01-01

    A coordinated study was carried out on the development, evaluation and application of biomonitoring procedures for populations exposed to environmental genotoxic pollutants. The procedures used involved both direct measurement of DNA or protein damage (adducts) and assessment of secondary biological

  1. Identifying carcinogens: the tobacco industry and regulatory politics in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Daniel M; Bero, Lisa A

    2006-01-01

    The process of identifying carcinogens for purposes of health and safety regulation has been contested internationally. The U.S. government produces a "Report on Carcinogens" every two years, which lists known and likely human carcinogenic substances. In the late 1990s the tobacco industry responded to the proposed listing of secondhand smoke with a multi-part strategy. Despite industry efforts to challenge both the substance of the report and the agency procedures, environmental tobacco smoke was declared by the agency in 2000 to be a known human carcinogen. A subsequent lawsuit, launched by chemical interests but linked to the tobacco industry, failed, but it produced a particular legal precedent of judicial review that is favorable to all regulated industries. The authors argue that, in this case, tobacco industry regulation contradicts academic expectations of business regulatory victories. However, the tobacco industry's participation in the regulatory process influenced the process in favor of all regulated industry.

  2. 78 FR 67371 - Draft Report on Carcinogens Monographs for ortho-Toluidine and Pentachlorophenol and By-products...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Draft Report on Carcinogens Monographs for ortho-Toluidine... Report on Carcinogens (RoC) Monographs for ortho-Toluidine and Pentachlorophenol and By-products of its... a.m. until adjournment, approximately 11:30 a.m. Document Availability: Draft monographs are...

  3. 78 FR 51733 - Draft Report on Carcinogens Monographs for ortho-Toluidine and Pentachlorophenol and By-Products...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Draft Report on Carcinogens Monographs for ortho-Toluidine... Carcinogens (RoC) Monographs for ortho-Toluidine and Pentachlorophenol and By-products of its Synthesis.... Document Availability: Draft monographs will be available by August 28, 2013, at http://ntp.niehs.nih.gov...

  4. 75 FR 79320 - Animal Drugs, Feeds, and Related Products; Regulation of Carcinogenic Compounds in Food-Producing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 500 Animal Drugs, Feeds, and Related Products; Regulation of Carcinogenic Compounds in Food-Producing Animals AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... regulations regarding compounds of carcinogenic concern used in food-producing animals. Specifically, the...

  5. 77 FR 50591 - Animal Drugs, Feeds, and Related Products; Regulation of Carcinogenic Compounds in Food-Producing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 500 Animal Drugs, Feeds, and Related Products; Regulation of Carcinogenic Compounds in Food-Producing Animals AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... compounds of carcinogenic concern used in food- producing animals. Specifically, the Agency is clarifying...

  6. Comparison of simulated human dermal bitemarks possessing three-dimensional attributes to suspected biters using a proprietary three-dimensional comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-de-las-Heras, Stella; Tafur, Daniel

    2009-09-10

    The infliction of a bite is a four-dimensional space-time event that is ideally analyzed with three-dimensional (3-D) technology. Comparison of 2-D images (photographs) of a bitemark with a 3-D replica of a suspect's dentition is challenging. The authors present a technique that produces 3-D images of indented marks and dentitions for comparisons. Study models and corresponding dental-wax bites were digitized by 3-D scanning, and comparison overlays were generated using DentalPrint software. The effectiveness of the method was analyzed by determining the area under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and the sensitivity, specificity and 95% confidence interval (CI) for each cut-off point. An area under the ROC curve of 0.953 (SE=0.029; 95% CI=0.893-0.985) and high sensitivity and specificity values were obtained for 104 comparisons made by an expert examiner, who correctly identified 92.3% of matching dentitions and 98.7% of non-matching dentitions. This technique can be considered a highly accurate method of bitemark analysis, although indentations must be present in the injury, limiting the cases that can be resolved. A comparative study of the same dentitions using 2-D bitemark photography confirmed the superiority of the new approach.

  7. Analysis of key GO terms and KEGG pathways associated with carcinogenic chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jing; Zhang, Ying

    2017-12-18

    Cancer is one of the serious disease that causes several human deaths every year. Up to now, we have spent lots of time and money to investigate this disease, thereby designing effective treatments. Previous studies mainly focus on studying genetic background of different subtypes of cancer and neglect another important factor, environmental factor. Carcinogenic chemical is one of the type of environmental factor, exposure of such chemical may definitely initiate and promote the tumorigenesis. In this study, we tried to partly describe the differences between carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic chemicals using gene ontology (GO) terms and KEGG pathways. The carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic chemicals that were retrieved from Carcinogenic Potency Database (CPDB) were encoded into numeric vectors using the enrichment theories of GO terms and KEGG pathways. Then, the minimal redundancy maximal relevance (mRMR) method was adopted to analyze all features, resulting in some important GO terms and KEGG pathways. The extensive analysis of the identified GO terms and KEGG pathways indicate that they all play roles during the tumorigenesis, inducing that they can be key indicator for identification of carcinogenic chemicals. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. A review of the carcinogenic potential of bisphenol A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seachrist, Darcie D; Bonk, Kristen W; Ho, Shuk-Mei; Prins, Gail S; Soto, Ana M; Keri, Ruth A

    2016-01-01

    The estrogenic properties of bisphenol A (BPA), a ubiquitous synthetic monomer that can leach into the food and water supply, have prompted considerable research into exposure-associated health risks in humans. Endocrine-disrupting properties of BPA suggest it may impact developmental plasticity during early life, predisposing individuals to disease at doses below the oral reference dose (RfD) established by the Environmental Protection Agency in 1982. Herein, we review the current in vivo literature evaluating the carcinogenic properties of BPA. We conclude that there is substantial evidence from rodent studies indicating that early-life BPA exposures below the RfD lead to increased susceptibility to mammary and prostate cancer. Based on the definitions of "carcinogen" put forth by the International Agency for Research on Cancer and the National Toxicology Program, we propose that BPA may be reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen in the breast and prostate due to its tumor promoting properties. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Determination of carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Determination of carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (pahs), anthracene in different variety of fish samples in the Bangsai river of Bangladesh. F Yeasmin, SMM Rahman, S Rana, KJ Fatema, MA Hossain ...

  10. Predictive Models for Carcinogenicity and Mutagenicity ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutagenicity and carcinogenicity are endpoints of major environmental and regulatory concern. These endpoints are also important targets for development of alternative methods for screening and prediction due to the large number of chemicals of potential concern and the tremendous cost (in time, money, animals) of rodent carcinogenicity bioassays. Both mutagenicity and carcinogenicity involve complex, cellular processes that are only partially understood. Advances in technologies and generation of new data will permit a much deeper understanding. In silico methods for predicting mutagenicity and rodent carcinogenicity based on chemical structural features, along with current mutagenicity and carcinogenicity data sets, have performed well for local prediction (i.e., within specific chemical classes), but are less successful for global prediction (i.e., for a broad range of chemicals). The predictivity of in silico methods can be improved by improving the quality of the data base and endpoints used for modelling. In particular, in vitro assays for clastogenicity need to be improved to reduce false positives (relative to rodent carcinogenicity) and to detect compounds that do not interact directly with DNA or have epigenetic activities. New assays emerging to complement or replace some of the standard assays include VitotoxTM, GreenScreenGC, and RadarScreen. The needs of industry and regulators to assess thousands of compounds necessitate the development of high-t

  11. Evaluation of carcinogenic effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayazit, Vahdettin; Bayram, Banu; Pala, Zeydin; Atan, Ozkan

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the carcinogenic effects of electromagnetic fields on human. There are many effects of electromagnetic fields on human such as cancer, epidemiology, acute and chronic effects. These effects vary according to the field strength and environmental conditions. There have been many instances of harmful effects of electromagnetic fields from such seemingly innocuous devices as mobile phones, computers, power lines and domestic wiring. The balance of epidemiologic evidence indicates that mobile phone use of less than 10 years does not pose any increased risk of brain tumour or acoustic neuroma. For long-term use, data are sparse, and the following conclusions are therefore uncertain and tentative.

  12. A review of biosensing techniques for detection of trace carcinogen contamination in food products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhanming; Yu, Yue; Li, Zhiliang; Wu, Tao

    2015-04-01

    Carcinogen contaminations in the food chain, for example heavy metal ions, pesticides, acrylamide, and mycotoxins, have caused serious health problems. A major objective of food-safety research is the identification and prevention of exposure to these carcinogens, because of their impossible-to-reverse tumorigenic effects. However, carcinogen detection is difficult because of their trace-level presence in food. Thus, reliable and accurate separation and determination methods are essential to protect food safety and human health. This paper summarizes the state of the art in separation and determination methods for analyzing carcinogen contamination, especially the advances in biosensing methods. Furthermore, the application of promising technology including nanomaterials, imprinted polymers, and microdevices is detailed. Challenges and perspectives are also discussed.

  13. Artificial sweeteners--do they bear a carcinogenic risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weihrauch, M R; Diehl, V

    2004-10-01

    Artificial sweeteners are added to a wide variety of food, drinks, drugs and hygiene products. Since their introduction, the mass media have reported about potential cancer risks, which has contributed to undermine the public's sense of security. It can be assumed that every citizen of Western countries uses artificial sweeteners, knowingly or not. A cancer-inducing activity of one of these substances would mean a health risk to an entire population. We performed several PubMed searches of the National Library of Medicine for articles in English about artificial sweeteners. These articles included 'first generation' sweeteners such as saccharin, cyclamate and aspartame, as well as 'new generation' sweeteners such as acesulfame-K, sucralose, alitame and neotame. Epidemiological studies in humans did not find the bladder cancer-inducing effects of saccharin and cyclamate that had been reported from animal studies in rats. Despite some rather unscientific assumptions, there is no evidence that aspartame is carcinogenic. Case-control studies showed an elevated relative risk of 1.3 for heavy artificial sweetener use (no specific substances specified) of >1.7 g/day. For new generation sweeteners, it is too early to establish any epidemiological evidence about possible carcinogenic risks. As many artificial sweeteners are combined in today's products, the carcinogenic risk of a single substance is difficult to assess. However, according to the current literature, the possible risk of artificial sweeteners to induce cancer seems to be negligible.

  14. Prevention of Carcinogen-Induced Oral Cancer by Sulforaphane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, Julie E; Zang, Yan; Sen, Malabika; Li, Changyou; Wang, Lin; Egner, Patricia A; Fahey, Jed W; Normolle, Daniel P; Grandis, Jennifer R; Kensler, Thomas W; Johnson, Daniel E

    2016-07-01

    Chronic exposure to carcinogens represents the major risk factor for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Beverages derived from broccoli sprout extracts (BSE) that are rich in glucoraphanin and its bioactive metabolite sulforaphane promote detoxication of airborne pollutants in humans. Herein, we investigated the potential chemopreventive activity of sulforaphane using in vitro models of normal and malignant mucosal epithelial cells and an in vivo model of murine oral cancer resulting from the carcinogen 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO). Sulforaphane treatment of Het-1A, a normal mucosal epithelial cell line, and 4 HNSCC cell lines led to dose- and time-dependent induction of NRF2 and the NRF2 target genes NQO1 and GCLC, known mediators of carcinogen detoxication. Sulforaphane also promoted NRF2-independent dephosphorylation/inactivation of pSTAT3, a key oncogenic factor in HNSCC. Compared with vehicle, sulforaphane significantly reduced the incidence and size of 4NQO-induced tongue tumors in mice. A pilot clinical trial in 10 healthy volunteers evaluated the bioavailability and pharmacodynamic activity of three different BSE regimens, based upon urinary sulforaphane metabolites and NQO1 transcripts in buccal scrapings, respectively. Ingestion of sulforaphane-rich BSE demonstrated the greatest, most consistent bioavailability. Mucosal bioactivity, defined as 2-fold or greater upregulation of NQO1 mRNA, was observed in 6 of 9 evaluable participants ingesting glucoraphanin-rich BSE; 3 of 6 ingesting sulforaphane-rich BSE; and 3 of 9 after topical-only exposure to sulforaphane-rich BSE. Together, our findings demonstrate preclinical chemopreventive activity of sulforaphane against carcinogen-induced oral cancer, and support further mechanistic and clinical investigation of sulforaphane as a chemopreventive agent against tobacco-related HNSCC. Cancer Prev Res; 9(7); 547-57. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. Do regulations protect workers from occupational exposures to carcinogenic, mutagenic and reprotoxic (CMR) agents in France?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havet, Nathalie; Penot, Alexis; Plantier, Morgane; Charbotel, Barbara; Morelle, Magali; Fervers, Béatrice

    2017-12-09

    This article explores the impact of regulations on the implementation of collective protections in France to occupational exposure to carcinogenic, mutagenic and reprotoxic (CMR) agents. Individual data from the French national cross-sectional survey of occupational hazards conducted in 2010 were analysed. We investigated whether stricter regulations and longer exposures were associated with higher level of collective protection using multivariate logistic regressions. General ventilation, for which effect is limited as collective protection for CMR products, was present in 19% of situations involving CMR agents while isolation chambers, the most effective form of protection, were only very rarely implemented. Multilevel logistic regressions show that exposure situations to products classified as category 1 or 2 by the European Union do not have a higher probability of benefiting from a collective protection measures. Exposures to products with a Binding Occupational Exposure Limit Value selectively benefited from a better level of protection. Exposures to agents entered on the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) list of proven or probable carcinogens benefited more from effective collective protections than products suspected to be carcinogens but not yet classified by IARC. These results suggest that the dissemination of evaluations of carcinogens by the IARC translate into improved protective measures even though the IARC classification has no mandatory impact on regulations. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons In Edible Mushrooms from Niger Delta, Nigeria: Carcinogenic and Non-Carcinogenic Health Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igbiri, Sorbari; Udowelle, Nnaemeka Arinze; Ekhator, Osazuwa Clinton; Asomugha, Rose Ngozi; Igweze, Zelinjo Nkeiruka; Orisakwe, Orish Ebere

    2017-01-01

    In the oil-rich Niger Delta, hydrocarbon pollution and oil spillages, gas flaring and sundry anthropogenic activities constitute sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), with food contamination playing a major role in human exposure. In this study we assessed PAH levels in wild and cultivated edible mushroom species consumed by the general population from the oil producing Niger Delta, Nigeria. The concentrations of USEPA-16 PAHs were determined by gas chromatography and carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic health risks were calculated. The concentrations of USEPA-16 PAHs ranged from 0.02 mg/kg – 3.37 mg/kg. The dietary intake of carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic USEPA-16 PAHs (Naphthalene, Acenaphthylene, Acenaphthene, Anthracene, Phenanthrene, Flourene, Flouranthene, Pyrene, Benzo[a]Anthracene, Chrysene, Benzo[a]Pyrene, Benzo[b]Flouranthene, Benzo[K]Flouranthene, Benzo[g, h, i]Perylene, Dibenz[a, h]Anthracene and Ideno[1,2,3-cd]Pyrene) for adults, adolescents and seniors ranged from 0.00 – 0.05 mg/kg/day, 0.00 – 0.06 mg/kg/day and 0.00 – 0.07 mg/kg/day. The BaPeq ranged from 0.02 – 2.76 with margin of exposure MOE values of BaP ranging from 3,500,000 to 700,000, 3,500,000 and 3,500,000 to 7,000,000 for adults, adolescents and seniors indicating very insignificant health risk. The incremental lifetime cancer risk was within the safe range of 1.56x10-8 – 1.73x10-6 with the highest calculated risk found for wild Pleurotus ostreatus mushroom species from the study area. PMID:28345827

  17. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons In Edible Mushrooms from Niger Delta, Nigeria: Carcinogenic and Non-Carcinogenic Health Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igbiri, Sorbari; Udowelle, Nnaemeka Arinze; Ekhator, Osazuwa Clinton; Asomugha, Rose Ngozi; Igweze, Zelinjo Nkeiruka; Orisakwe, Orish Ebere

    2017-02-01

    In the oil-rich Niger Delta, hydrocarbon pollution and oil spillages, gas flaring and sundry anthropogenic activities constitute sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), with food contamination playing a major role in human exposure. In this study we assessed PAH levels in wild and cultivated edible mushroom species consumed by the general population from the oil producing Niger Delta, Nigeria. The concentrations of USEPA-16 PAHs were determined by gas chromatography and carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic health risks were calculated. The concentrations of USEPA-16 PAHs ranged from 0.02 mg/kg – 3.37 mg/kg. The dietary intake of carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic USEPA-16 PAHs (Naphthalene, Acenaphthylene, Acenaphthene, Anthracene, Phenanthrene, Flourene, Flouranthene, Pyrene, Benzo[a]Anthracene, Chrysene, Benzo[a]Pyrene, Benzo[b]Flouranthene, Benzo[K]Flouranthene, Benzo[g,h,i] Perylene, Dibenz[a,h]Anthracene and Ideno[1,2,3-cd]Pyrene) for adults, adolescents and seniors ranged from 0.00 – 0.05 mg/kg/day, 0.00 – 0.06 mg/kg/day and 0.00 – 0.07 mg/kg/day. The BaPeq ranged from 0.02 – 2.76 with margin of exposure MOE values of BaP ranging from 3,500,000 to 700,000, 3,500,000 and 3,500,000 to 7,000,000 for adults, adolescents and seniors indicating very insignificant health risk. The incremental lifetime cancer risk was within the safe range of 1.56x10-8 – 1.73x10-6 with the highest calculated risk found for wild Pleurotus ostreatus mushroom species from the study area. Creative Commons Attribution License

  18. Quantitative correlation of mutagenic and carcinogenic potencies for heterocyclic amines from cooked foods and additional aromatic amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, F T; Knize, M G; Moore, D H; Felton, J S

    1992-06-01

    Aromatic amines have long been recognized as animal and human carcinogens. Recently heterocyclic aromatic amines (thermic amines) have been found in small amounts in cooked foods, primarily meats, and have proven to be potent mutagens and rodent carcinogens. Availability of quantitative databases for mutagenic potency in Salmonella and for carcinogenic potency in rodents has made possible a study of ten heterocyclic thermic amines and 24 aromatic amines. Potencies on mutagenic and carcinogenic scales were significantly correlated. By multiple linear regression analysis and multivariate analysis of variance, two descriptive structural factors were found to modulate the two modes of biological response. These factors were number of rings and methyl substitution at carbon atoms. The quantitative correlation between mutagenic and carcinogenic potencies and the modulating structural factors suggest a significant similarity of molecular mechanisms and support the utility of the short-term bacterial assay in evaluating hazard levels.

  19. Comment on the significance of positive carcinogenicity studies using gavage as the route of exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perera, F.; Brennan, T.; Fouts, J.R. (Columbia Univ. School of Public Health, New York, NY (USA))

    1989-02-01

    There is continuing controversy, extending into regulatory matters, over the significance to human health of positive results in carcinogenicity studies in animals using the gavage technique as the route of exposure. This review of a nonrandom sample of 117 chemicals or chemical processes listed as known or reasonably anticipated to be carcinogenic in the National Toxicology Program's Third Annual Report on Carcinogens provides support for the validity of the gavage route in such studies. Twenty-three chemicals among the 117 substances and processes listed were positive by gavage. Twenty of these 23 chemicals were also appropriately studied by at least one other route of exposure. Nineteen or (95%) of the twenty chemicals were positive for carcinogenicity by at least one other nongavage route in carcinogenicity bioassays. All of the 23 gavage-positive chemicals induced tumors distal to the site of administration in at least one study, as did all 15 chemicals which were also positive by subcutaneous injection. The authors emphasize, however, the limited scope of the survey. Despite this limitation, the review suggests that, although gavage may not be the general method of choice for chemical administration, the results of studies wherein this route was employed are meaningful as a basis for assessing potential carcinogenic hazards.

  20. 78 FR 68849 - Draft Current Intelligence Bulletin “Update of NIOSH Carcinogen Classification and Target Risk...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Draft Current Intelligence Bulletin ``Update... following draft document for public comment entitled ``Current Intelligence Bulletin: Update of NIOSH... obtain comments on the draft document, ``Current Intelligence Bulletin: Update of NIOSH Carcinogen...

  1. [Occupational exposure to carcinogens: analysis of the application of the CAREX information system to Catalonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Grado Andrés, Adolfo; Molinero Ruiz, Emilia; van der Haar, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to estimate occupational exposures to human carcinogens in Catalonia in 2009, taking as a reference the CAREX ESP 2007 information system, and to evaluate the suitability of extrapolating these data to Catalonia. The reference population is the number of people registered with the Social Security system in Catalonia in 2009. Carcinogens considered are those which the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classified into groups 1 and 2A and are related to occupational exposures. The exposure prevalences from the CAREX ESP 2007, adapted to the Catalonian Industrial Classification (CCAE 09), were used. Technical survey reports from the Occupational Safety and Health Centers of the Catalonian local government, and related databases were consulted. The most frequent occupational exposures to human carcinogens were solar radiation, crystalline silica, diesel exhaust, radon and wood dust, although based mainly on data not considered adequate for extrapolation to Catalonia. Around 217 exposure situations for 25 carcinogens, not previously considered in CAREX ESP 2007, were identified. The estimated number of workers exposed to human carcinogens in Catalonia in 2009 based on the CAREX ESP 2007 system could differ from the real situation. Development of a CAREX CAT system that incorporates exposure data from Catalonia is recommended. Copyright belongs to the Societat Catalana de Seguretat i Medicina del Treball.

  2. Comprehensive review of epidemiological and animal studies on the potential carcinogenic effects of nicotine per se.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haussmann, Hans-Juergen; Fariss, Marc W

    2016-09-01

    The effects of long-term use of nicotine per se on cancer risk, in the absence of tobacco extract or smoke, are not clearly understood. This review evaluates the strength of published scientific evidence, in both epidemiological and animal studies, for the potential carcinogenic effects of nicotine per se; that is to act as a complete carcinogen or as a modulator of carcinogenesis. For human studies, there appears to be inadequate evidence for an association between nicotine exposure and the presence of or lack of a carcinogenic effect due to the limited information available. In animal studies, limited evidence suggests an association between long-term nicotine exposure and a lack of a complete carcinogenic effect. Conclusive studies using current bioassay guidelines, however, are missing. In studies using chemical/physical carcinogens or transgenic models, there appears to be inadequate evidence for an association between nicotine exposure and the presence of or lack of a modulating (stimulating) effect on carcinogenesis. This is primarily due to the large number of conflicting studies. In contrast, a majority of studies provides sufficient evidence for an association between nicotine exposure and enhanced carcinogenesis of cancer cells inoculated in mice. This modulating effect was especially prominent in immunocompromized mice. Overall, taking the human and animal studies into consideration, there appears to be inadequate evidence to conclude that nicotine per se does or does not cause or modulate carcinogenesis in humans. This conclusion is in agreement with the recent US Surgeon General's 2014 report on the health consequences of nicotine exposure.

  3. Antibody response to a major human Pneumocystis carinii surface antigen in patients without evidence of immunosuppression and in patients with suspected atypical pneumonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Bettina; Lebech, M; Lind, K

    1993-01-01

    IgG and IgM antibodies to a purified human Pneumocystis carinii surface antigen (gp95) were measured in 694 serum specimens from two different population groups using an EIA technique. In a population of 441 patients with no evidence of immunosuppression, the percentage of persons positive for Ig......G antibodies to gp95 was significantly lower in the age group 1 to 9 years (30%, 23/77) compared to persons 10 to 19 years old (56%, 49/88). In the age group 1 to 14 years there was a significant correlation between the percentage of persons with IgG antibodies to gp95 and age. In 106 consecutive patients...... under evaluation due to atypical pneumonia, 76 patients showed no change in the titre of antibodies to Legionella spp. or Mycoplasma pneumoniae in two consecutive serum samples. Three of these 76 patients (4%) demonstrated an increase in the level of IgG antibodies to gp95 in the paired samples. One...

  4. Dietary Carcinogens and Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-07-01

    detected by autoradiography on X-ray film with intensifying screens at - 70 0C. Using this TLC separation system, we have observed one abundant adduct...report in Science, published earlier this year, showed that resveratrol (a phytochemical found in many plant species) inhibited both cyclooxygenase I...the dietary phytochemical resveratrol significantly inhibits PhIP-DNA adduct formation in primary cultures of human mammary epithelial cells. From

  5. Toxic Potential of Carcinogenic Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. GODSON

    Toxic Potential of Carcinogenic Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (cPAHs) and Heavy. Metal in Crude Oil from Gokana Area, Rivers State, Nigeria. *1. IWUOHA, G;. 1. ORUBITE, O;. 1. OKITE I. 1Department of Pure and Industrial Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of Port Harcourt. ABSTRACT: This article is focused ...

  6. Toxic Potential of Carcinogenic Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article is focused on ascertaining the toxic potentials of heavy metals and the levels of PAHs and cPAHs in crude oil samples from Gokana area and using the data to determine the carcinogenicity (toxicity) of the cPAHs in the crude oil. All the cPAHs namely; benzo (a) pyrene, benzo (a) Anthracene, benzo (b) ...

  7. Influence of traffic emissions on the carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in outdoor breathable particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slezakova, Klara; Castro, Dionísia; Pereira, Maria C; Moralis, Simone; Delerue-Matos, Cristina; Alvim-Ferraz, Maria C

    2010-04-01

    Because polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been proven to be toxic, mutagenic, and/or carcinogenic, there is widespread interest in analyzing and evaluating exposure to PAHs in atmospheric environments influenced by different emission sources. Because traffic emissions are one of the biggest sources of fine particles, more information on carcinogenic PAHs associated with fine particles needs to be provided. Aiming to further understand the impact of traffic particulate matter (PM) on human health, this study evaluated the influence of traffic on PM10 (PM with aerodynamic diameter carcinogenic PAHs. Samples were collected at one site influenced by traffic emissions and at one reference site using low-volume samplers. Analysis of PAHs was performed by microwave-assisted extraction combined with liquid chromatography (MAE-LC); 17 PAHs, including 9 carcinogenic ones, were quantified. At the site influenced by traffic emissions, PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations were, respectively, 380 and 390% higher than at the background site. When influenced by traffic emissions, the total concentration of nine carcinogenic compounds (naphthalene, chrysene, benzo(a)anthracene, benzo(b) fluoranthene, benzo(k)fluoranthene, benzo(a)pyrene, dibenzo(a,h)anthracene, indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene, and dibenzo(a,l)pyrene) was increased by 2400 and 3000% in PM10 and PM2.5, respectively; these nine carcinogenic compounds represented 68 and 74% of total PAHs (sigma(PAHs)) for PM10 and PM2.5, respectively. All PAHs, including the carcinogenic compounds, were mainly present in fine particles. Considering the strong influence of these fine particles on human health, these conclusions are relevant for the development of strategies to protect public health.

  8. EPA's evaluation of the carcinogenic potential of glyphosate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recently, several international agencies have evaluated the carcinogenic potential of glyphosate. In March 2015, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), a subdivision of the World Health Organization (WHO), determined that glyphosate was a probable carcinogen (gro...

  9. Childhood cancer: Overview of incidence trends and environmental carcinogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahm, S.H.; Devesa, S.S. [National Cancer Inst., Rockville, MD (United States)

    1995-09-01

    An estimated 8000 children 0 to 14 years of age are diagnosed annually with cancer in the United States. Leukemia and brain tumors are the most common childhood malignancies, accounting for 30 and 20% of newly diagnosed cases, respectively. From 1975 to 1978 to 1987 to 1990, cancer among white children increased slightly from 12.8 to 14.1/100,000. Increases are suggested for leukemia, gliomas, and, to a much lesser extent, Wilms` tumor. There are a few well-established environmental causes of childhood cancer such as radiation, chemotherapeutic agents, and diethylstilbestrol. Many other agents such as electromagnetic fields, pesticides, and some parental occupational exposures are suspected of playing roles, but the evidence is not conclusive at this time. Some childhood exposures such as secondhand cigarette smoke may contribute to cancers that develop many years after childhood. For some exposures such as radiation and pesticides data suggest that children may be more susceptible to the carcinogenic effects than similarly exposed adults. 143 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  10. Performance of carcinogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) testing and HPV16 or HPV18 genotyping for cervical cancer screening of women aged 25 years and older: a subanalysis of the ATHENA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Philip E; Stoler, Mark H; Wright, Thomas C; Sharma, Abha; Wright, Teresa L; Behrens, Catherine M

    2011-09-01

    The ATHENA study was designed to assess the performance of carcinogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) testing and HPV16 or HPV18 genotyping compared with liquid-based cytology for cervical cancer screening in a large US population aged 21 years and older. We did a subanalysis of this population to compare the screening performance of the cobas HPV test versus liquid-based cytology in women aged 25 years and older, and assess management strategies for HPV-positive women. Women aged 25 years or older who were attending routine cervical screening were enrolled from 61 clinical centres in 23 US states. Cervical specimens were obtained for liquid-based cytology and HPV DNA testing with two first-generation assays (Amplicor HPV test and Linear Array HPV genotyping test) and the second-generation cobas HPV test (with individual HPV16 and HPV18 detection). Colposcopy and diagnostic biopsies were done on women with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US) or worse cytology, those who tested positive with either first-generation HPV test, and a random sample of women who tested negative for HPV and cytology. All women not selected for colposcopy received their results and exited the study. Participants and colposcopists were masked to cytology and HPV test results until the colposcopy visit was completed. The primary endpoint for this substudy was histologically confirmed cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 (CIN3) or worse. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00709891; the study is in the follow-up phase, which is due to be completed in December, 2012. From May 27, 2008, to Aug 27, 2009, 47,208 women were enrolled, of whom 41,955 met our eligibility criteria. Valid cobas HPV and liquid-based cytology test results were available for 40,901 women (97%), who were included in this analysis. Of these, 4275 women (10%) tested cobas HPV positive and 2617 (6%) had abnormal cytology. 431 women were diagnosed with CIN2 or worse and 274

  11. Metformin prevents tobacco carcinogen-induced lung tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memmott, Regan M.; Mercado, Jose R.; Maier, Colleen R.; Kawabata, Shigeru; Fox, Stephen D.; Dennis, Phillip A.

    2011-01-01

    Activation of the mTOR pathway is an important and early event in tobacco carcinogen-induced lung tumorigenesis, and therapies that target mTOR could be effective in the prevention or treatment of lung cancer. The biguanide metformin, which is widely prescribed for the treatment of type II diabetes, might be a good candidate for lung cancer chemoprevention because it activates AMPK, which can inhibit the mTOR pathway. To test this, A/J mice were treated with oral metformin after exposure to the tobacco carcinogen NNK. Metformin reduced lung tumor burden by up to 53% at steady-state plasma concentrations that are achievable in humans. mTOR was inhibited in lung tumors but only modestly. To test whether intraperitoneal administration of metformin might improve mTOR inhibition, we injected mice and assessed biomarkers in liver and lung tissues. Plasma levels of metformin were significantly higher after injection than oral administration. In liver tissue, metformin activated AMPK and inhibited mTOR. In lung tissue, metformin did not activate AMPK but inhibited phosphorylation of IGF-IR/IR, Akt, ERK, and mTOR. This suggested that metformin indirectly inhibited mTOR in lung tissue by decreasing activation of IGF-1R/IR and Akt upstream of mTOR. Based on these data, we repeated the NNK-induced lung tumorigenesis study using intraperitoneal administration of metformin. Metformin decreased tumor burden by 72%, which correlated with decreased cellular proliferation and marked inhibition of mTOR in tumors. These studies show that metformin prevents tobacco carcinogen-induced lung tumorigenesis, and support clinical testing of metformin as a chemopreventive agent. PMID:20810672

  12. Cross-sectional study of genital carcinogenic HPV infections in Paramaribo, Suriname: prevalence and determinants in an ethnically diverse population of women in a pre-vaccination era

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geraets, Daan T.; Grünberg, Antoon W.; van der Helm, Jannie J.; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F.; Quint, Koen D.; Sabajo, Leslie O. A.; de Vries, Henry J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer is caused by carcinogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) infections. Prior to the introduction of HPV vaccination in Suriname, we performed a cross-sectional study to estimate the prevalence of and determinants for genital carcinogenic HPV infections. Women were recruited at a family

  13. RADON AND CARCINOGENIC RISK IN MOSCOW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Golovanev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: comparative evaluation of carcinogenic risk inMoscowfrom radon in indoor and atmospheric pollutants.Materials and methods: the lung cancer incidence in Moscow; radiation-hygienic passport of the territory; .U.S. EPA estimated average age at all and radon induced deaths, years of life lost; Report of UNSCEAR 2006 and WHO handbook on indoor radon, 2009. Trend analysis of incidence; evaluation of the excess relative risk; assessment of ratio radon-induced population risk and published values оf total population carcinogenic risk from chemical carcinogens.Results: it is shown that the 304 cases of lung cancer per year (1. 85 10-3 on average from 2006 to 2011 (21280diseases for 70 years in addition to background level induced by radon; the differences in average trends of all lungcancer incidence in the districts can exceed 25%.Conclusion. The potential of risk reduction by measures of mitigation radon concentration exceeds 5 times the cost efficiency to reduce emissions from vehicles and can reduce cancer incidence, on average 236 cases per year; population risk 16520 cases over 70 years or save not less than 2832 person-years of life per year. The annual effect of reducing losses from not-survival of 12 years as a result of radon-induced lung cancer deaths exceeds 14160000 dollars. The evaluating of the carcinogenic risk from radon in accordance with the definition of population risk increases the predictive evaluation of the effectiveness of preventive measures more than twice.

  14. Evaluation of the carcinogenic risks at the influence of POPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazhmetdinova, Aiman; Kassymbayev, Adlet; Chalginbayeva, Altinay

    2017-12-20

    Kazakhstan is included in the list of environmentally vulnerable countries and Kyzylorda oblast in particular. This is due to its geographical, spatial and temporal and socioeconomic features. As part of the program "Integrated approaches in the management of public health in the Aral region", we have carried out an expertise on many samples of natural environments and products. Samples were selected in accordance with sampling procedures according to regulatory documents by specialists of the Pesticide Toxicology Laboratory. It is accredited by the State Standard of the Republic of Kazakhstan, for compliance with ST RK ISO/IEC 17025-2007 "General requirements for the competence of test and calibration laboratories". Gas chromatograph was used for the determination of residues of organochlorine pesticides. For the determination of dioxins, polychlorinated biphenyl was conducted on the gas chromatomass spectrometer with quadruple detector produce by Agilent Company, USA. To assess the risk, we carried out the mathematical calculations according to the risk of chemicals polluting (No P 2.1.10.1920-04, Russia). Calculation of the carcinogenic risk was carried out with the use of data on the size of the exposure and meanings of carcinogenic potential factors (slope factor and unit risk). The evaluation of persistent organic pollutants (POPs), based on the previous results of the research concerning water, soil and food products, was held in five population settlements in Kyzylorda oblast villages: Ayteke bi, Zhalagash, Zhosaly, Shieli and Aralsk town. Pollution with the POPs in the environmental objects by means of exposition and evaluation of the carcinogenic risk to human health is confirmed by the data of the statistical reporting about some morbidity in Kyzylorda oblast, such as skin diseases and subcutaneous tissue, endocrine system diseases, pregnancy complications etc. The received levels of carcinogenic risks, which were first carried out in the Republic of

  15. [Using CAREX data base system for occupational exposure to carcinogens in Estonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riazanov, V; Kauppinen, T; Veĭdebaum, T

    2003-01-01

    CAREX (CARcinogen EXposure) is international information system on occupational exposure to know and suspected carcinogens. The CAREX database provides selected exposure data and documented estimates of the number of exposed by workers by country, carcinogen, and industry. CAREX includes data on 139 agents evaluated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, displayed across the 55 industrial classes of the United Nations system (ISIC Revision 2). In 1999-2000, CAREX approach was applied to Estonian, Latvian, Lithuanian and Czech exposure situation in 1997. According to the preliminary estimates, there were about 180,000 workers (29% of the employed) exposed to the agents covered by CAREX in Estonia in 1997. The number of the exposures was approximately 240,000. The most common exposure were solar radiation (62,000 workers), wood dust (34,000 exposed), environmental tobacco smoke (31,000), diesel engine exhaust (21,000 exposed), crystalline silica (19,000), radon and its decay products (14,000), formaldehyde (9000) benzene (7000), ethylene dibromide (6400), lead and inorganic compounds (6200), and glasswool (4300).

  16. Testing chemical carcinogenicity by using a transcriptomics HepaRG-based model?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doktorova, T Y; Yildirimman, Reha; Ceelen, Liesbeth; Vilardell, Mireia; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Vinken, Mathieu; Ates, Gamze; Heymans, Anja; Gmuender, Hans; Bort, Roque; Corvi, Raffaella; Phrakonkham, Pascal; Li, Ruoya; Mouchet, Nicolas; Chesne, Christophe; van Delft, Joost; Kleinjans, Jos; Castell, Jose; Herwig, Ralf; Rogiers, Vera

    2014-01-01

    The EU FP6 project carcinoGENOMICS explored the combination of toxicogenomics and in vitro cell culture models for identifying organotypical genotoxic- and non-genotoxic carcinogen-specific gene signatures. Here the performance of its gene classifier, derived from exposure of metabolically competent human HepaRG cells to prototypical non-carcinogens (10 compounds) and hepatocarcinogens (20 compounds), is reported. Analysis of the data at the gene and the pathway level by using independent biostatistical approaches showed a distinct separation of genotoxic from non-genotoxic hepatocarcinogens and non-carcinogens (up to 88 % correct prediction). The most characteristic pathway responding to genotoxic exposure was DNA damage. Interlaboratory reproducibility was assessed by blindly testing of three compounds, from the set of 30 compounds, by three independent laboratories. Subsequent classification of these compounds resulted in correct prediction of the genotoxicants. As expected, results on the non-genotoxic carcinogens and the non-carcinogens were less predictive. In conclusion, the combination of transcriptomics with the HepaRG in vitro cell model provides a potential weight of evidence approach for the evaluation of the genotoxic potential of chemical substances.

  17. Testing chemical carcinogenicity by using a transcriptomics HepaRG-based model?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doktorova, T. Y.; Yildirimman, Reha; Ceelen, Liesbeth; Vilardell, Mireia; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Vinken, Mathieu; Ates, Gamze; Heymans, Anja; Gmuender, Hans; Bort, Roque; Corvi, Raffaella; Phrakonkham, Pascal; Li, Ruoya; Mouchet, Nicolas; Chesne, Christophe; van Delft, Joost; Kleinjans, Jos; Castell, Jose; Herwig, Ralf; Rogiers, Vera

    2014-01-01

    The EU FP6 project carcinoGENOMICS explored the combination of toxicogenomics and in vitro cell culture models for identifying organotypical genotoxic- and non-genotoxic carcinogen-specific gene signatures. Here the performance of its gene classifier, derived from exposure of metabolically competent human HepaRG cells to prototypical non-carcinogens (10 compounds) and hepatocarcinogens (20 compounds), is reported. Analysis of the data at the gene and the pathway level by using independent biostatistical approaches showed a distinct separation of genotoxic from non-genotoxic hepatocarcinogens and non-carcinogens (up to 88 % correct prediction). The most characteristic pathway responding to genotoxic exposure was DNA damage. Interlaboratory reproducibility was assessed by blindly testing of three compounds, from the set of 30 compounds, by three independent laboratories. Subsequent classification of these compounds resulted in correct prediction of the genotoxicants. As expected, results on the non-genotoxic carcinogens and the non-carcinogens were less predictive. In conclusion, the combination of transcriptomics with the HepaRG in vitro cell model provides a potential weight of evidence approach for the evaluation of the genotoxic potential of chemical substances. PMID:26417288

  18. An Overview of Carcinogenic Heavy Metal: Molecular Toxicity Mechanism and Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Soo; Kim, Yeo Jin; Seo, Young Rok

    2015-12-01

    Almost all heavy metals are serious toxicants as carcinogens. However, due to their chemical and physiological properties, heavy metals are useful in industrial areas including alloy, smelting and production of commercial products. Such applications increase the opportunity for heavy metal exposure. Waste from industrial processes is also a major source of environmental contamination and accumulation in the human body. Arsenic, cadmium, chromium, and nickel are classified as group 1 carcinogens by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, and are utilized commercially. In this review, we used molecular pathway analysis to understand the toxicity and carcinogenic mechanisms of these metals. Our analyzed data showed that above-mentioned metallic substances induce oxidative stress, DNA damage, and cell death processes, resulting in increase the risk of cancer and cancer-related diseases. Thus, we might think phytochelatin molecules and antioxidative phytochemical substances are helpful for prevention of heavy metal-induced cancer.

  19. Molecular basis of carcinogenicity of tungsten alloy particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Robert M.; Williams, Tim D.; Waring, Rosemary H.; Hodges, Nikolas J., E-mail: n.hodges@bham.ac.uk

    2015-03-15

    The tungsten alloy of 91% tungsten, 6% nickel and 3% cobalt (WNC 91–6–3) induces rhabdomyosarcoma when implanted into a rat thigh muscle. To investigate whether this effect is species-specific human HSkMc primary muscle cells were exposed to WNC 91–6–3 particles and responses were compared with those from a rat skeletal muscle cell line (L6-C11). Toxicity was assessed by the adenylate kinase assay and microscopy, DNA damage by the Comet assay. Caspase 3 enzyme activity was measured and oligonucleotide microarrays were used for transcriptional profiling. WNC 91–6–3 particles caused toxicity in cells adjacent to the particles and also increased DNA strand breaks. Inhibition of caspase 3 by WNC 91–6–3 occurred in rat but not in human cells. In both rat and human cells, the transcriptional response to WNC 91–6–3 showed repression of transcripts encoding muscle-specific proteins with induction of glycolysis, hypoxia, stress responses and transcripts associated with DNA damage and cell death. In human cells, genes encoding metallothioneins were also induced, together with genes related to angiogenesis, dysregulation of apoptosis and proliferation consistent with pre-neoplastic changes. An alloy containing iron, WNF 97–2–1, which is non-carcinogenic in vivo in rats, did not show these transcriptional changes in vitro in either species while the corresponding cobalt-containing alloy, WNC 97–2–1 elicited similar responses to WNC 91–6–3. Tungsten alloys containing both nickel and cobalt therefore have the potential to be carcinogenic in man and in vitro assays coupled with transcriptomics can be used to identify alloys, which may lead to tumour formation, by dysregulation of biochemical processes. - Highlights: • Use of transcriptomics to identify likely carcinogenic tungsten alloys in vitro • Cobalt containing alloys cause oxidative stress, DNA-damage and perturb apoptosis. • Presence of cobalt causes changes in gene expression

  20. Formaldehyde in dentistry: a review of mutagenic and carcinogenic potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, B.B.; Chestner, S.B.

    1981-09-01

    For many years there has been controversy over the value of antimicrobial drugs for intracanal dressings in endodontics. Formocresol, a formaldehyde compound, has evolved as the preferred drug for routine endodontic procedures, as well as pediatric endodontics. The increase in the use of formaldehyde has been complicated by the introduction of paraformaldehyde pastes for filling root canals. Neither of these formulas has ever been standardized. The doses are arbitrary, and the common dose of formocresol has been shown to be many times greater than the minimum dose needed for effect. The efficacy of paraformaldehyde pastes is questionable and remains clouded by inconclusive evidence, conflicting research, inadequate terminology, and a lack of convincing statistical evidence. The clinical use and delivery of formocresol and paraformaldehyde pastes remain arbitrary and unscientific. Formaldehyde has a known toxic mutagenic and carcinogenic potential. Many investigations have been conducted to measure the risk of exposure to formaldehyde; it is clear that formaldehyde poses a carcinogenic risk in humans. There is a need to reevaluate the rationale underlying the use of formaldehyde in dentistry particularly in light of its deleterious effects.

  1. Carcinogenic effects of circadian disruption: an epigenetic viewpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salavaty, Abbas

    2015-08-08

    Circadian rhythms refer to the endogenous rhythms that are generated to synchronize physiology and behavior with 24-h environmental cues. These rhythms are regulated by both external cues and molecular clock mechanisms in almost all cells. Disruption of circadian rhythms, which is called circadian disruption, affects many biological processes within the body and results in different long-term diseases, including cancer. Circadian regulatory pathways result in rhythmic epigenetic modifications and the formation of circadian epigenomes. Aberrant epigenetic modifications, such as hypermethylation, due to circadian disruption may be involved in the transformation of normal cells into cancer cells. Several studies have indicated an epigenetic basis for the carcinogenic effects of circadian disruption. In this review, I first discuss some of the circadian genes and regulatory proteins. Then, I summarize the current evidence related to the epigenetic modifications that result in circadian disruption. In addition, I explain the carcinogenic effects of circadian disruption and highlight its potential role in different human cancers using an epigenetic viewpoint. Finally, the importance of chronotherapy in cancer treatment is highlighted.

  2. Carcinogenic risk of emerging persistent organic pollutant perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS): A proposal of classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrieta-Cortes, Ricardo; Farias, Paulina; Hoyo-Vadillo, Carlos; Kleiche-Dray, Mina

    2017-02-01

    Perfluoroalkyls are stable synthetic chemicals, able to repel oils, fats and water. These compounds have been used in the manufacturing of products such as Teflon®, lubricants, paints, fire-fighting foams, coatings for pans, carpets, clothes, and paperboard for packaging, among others. It is believed that populations are exposed constantly to them. Its regulation in the world is under development and several controversies are in the course of litigation. One occupational study shows bladder cancer risk. This paper intends to review scientific information on the most critical perfluoroalkyl compound and proposes a procedure to get a cancer-risk categorization which PFOS can cause to populations. As a guiding axis, we used the IARC process for developing monographs of carcinogenic risks. We used the SIGN guides for evaluating the quality of studies in human populations; and finally, we used the Squire method for evaluating studies in laboratory animals. Inadequate evidence of carcinogenicity was found in human studies mainly due to chance, threshold effect and confounders. In experimental animal studies, inadequate evidence of carcinogenicity was found in view of the number of affected species, different types of neoplasms, dose-response relationship and genotoxicity found in in-vivo and in-vitro studies. In this proposal, we concluded that cancer risk for PFOS, according to the IARC method, is not classifiable as carcinogenic to humans (group 3). Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Emissions and air exposure of carcinogens and co-carcinogens in four Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fauser, Patrik; Plejdrup, Marlene Schmidt; Ketzel, Matthias

    . A list of carcinogenic andco-carcinogenic pollutants (particles, heavy metals and organic compounds) emittedfrom energy production, industrial activities, road transport, navigation, agriculture, residential heating and product use was compiled. Pollutant emissions levels for 2010and trends for 1990...... to 2010 were compiled and discussed, and modelled andmeasured atmospheric concentrations for 2010 were compiled on regional, urbanand local scales. Nordic maps of emissions and air concentrations of PM2.5, PM10, NOx,NMVOC, benzene, BaP, dioxin, cadmium and nickel were compiled for allaggregated main...

  4. The carcinogenic potential of nanomaterials, their release from products and options for regulating them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Heidi; Herzberg, Frank; Schulte, Agnes; Kolossa-Gehring, Marike

    2011-06-01

    A summary of a critical review by a working group of the German Federal Environment Agency and the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment on the carcinogenic potential of nanomaterials is presented. After a critical review of the available data, we conclude that the potential carcinogenic risk of nanomaterials can currently be assessed only on a case-by-case basis. There is certain evidence that different forms of CNTs (carbon nanotubes) and nanoscale TiO(2) particles may induce tumours in sensitive animal models. It is assumed that the mode of action of the inhalation toxicity of asbestos-like fibres and of inhalable fractions of biopersistent fine dusts of low toxicity (nano-TiO(2)) is linked to chronic inflammatory processes. Existing epidemiological studies on carcinogenicity for these manufactured nanomaterials are not sufficiently conclusive. Generally speaking, the database is not adequate for an assessment of the carcinogenic potential of nanomaterials. Whereas a number of studies provide evidence of a nano-specific potential to induce tumours, other studies did not. This is possibly due to insufficient characterisation of the test material, difference in the experimental design, the use of different animal models and species and/or differences in dosimetry (both with regard to the appropriate dose metric and the estimated effective dose quantities). An assessment of the carcinogenic potential and its relevance for humans are currently fraught with uncertainty. Furthermore, the nano-specificity of the carcinogenic effects observed cannot be conclusively evaluated. Specific carcinogenic effects of nanomaterials may be both quantitative and qualitative. In quantitative terms, the carcinogenic effects of nanoparticles are thought to be simply more pronounced compared to the corresponding bulk material (due, for example, to the considerably larger surface area and higher number of particles relative to the mass concentration). On the other hand, certain

  5. Development of a two-dimensional high-performance liquid chromatography system coupled with on-line reduction as a new efficient analytical method of 3-nitrobenzanthrone, a potential human carcinogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasei, Tomohiro; Nakanishi, Haruka; Toda, Yumiko; Watanabe, Tetsushi

    2012-08-31

    3-Nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA) is an extremely strong mutagen and carcinogen in rats inducing squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. We developed a new sensitive analytical method, a two-dimensional HPLC system coupled with on-line reduction, to quantify non-fluorescent 3-NBA as fluorescent 3-aminobenzanthrone (3-ABA). The two-dimensional HPLC system consisted of reversed-phase HPLC and normal-phase HPLC, which were connected with a switch valve. 3-NBA was purified by reversed-phase HPLC and reduced to 3-ABA with a catalyst column, packed with alumina coated with platinum, in ethanol. An alcoholic solvent is necessary for reduction of 3-NBA, but 3-ABA is not fluorescent in the alcoholic solvent. Therefore, 3-ABA was separated from alcohol and impurities by normal-phase HPLC and detected with a fluorescence detector. Extracts from surface soil, airborne particles, classified airborne particles, and incinerator dust were applied to the two-dimensional HPLC system after clean-up with a silica gel column. 3-NBA, detected as 3-ABA, in the extracts was found as a single peak on the chromatograms without any interfering peaks. 3-NBA was detected in 4 incinerator dust samples (n=5). When classified airborne particles, that is, those 7.0 μm in size, were applied to the two-dimensional HPLC system after purified using a silica gel column, 3-NBA was detected in those particles with particle sizes <1.1 and 1.1-2.0 μm and the particle-size distribution ratios were 84% and 16%, respectively. This is the first report on the particle-size distribution of 3-NBA in airborne particles and the detection of 3-NBA in incinerator dust. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Carcinogenicity of Embedded Tungsten Alloys in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    2010 ProofNo: 1 UN CO RR EC TE D PR OO F 228 cating that the observed DU effects were not the result of foreign-body carcinogen- esis ( Brand et al...describing adverse health effects due to exposure to tungsten and tungsten-based materials. As part of an initiation rite, a French artillery...soldier drank 250 ml of a beer and wine mixture that had been used to rinse a gun barrel. Shortly after, he suffered seizures and was comatose for 24 h

  7. Carcinogenic and mutagenic risk associated to airborne particle-phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: A source apportionment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masiol, Mauro; Hofer, Angelika; Squizzato, Stefania; Piazza, Rossano; Rampazzo, Giancarlo; Pavoni, Bruno

    2012-12-01

    Conventional risk assessment studies provide no detailed information about the role of specific sources determining the total carcinogenic and mutagenic potencies of PAH mixtures on humans health. In this study, the main emission sources of 11 particle-phase PAHs listed as carcinogenic and mutagenic agents by the IARC were identified by a risk apportionment method. The contribution of sources to the total concentration of PAHs in the study area was also quantified. A receptor model based on factor and multiple linear regression analyses was applied to estimate the source-specific risk associated to PAH inhalation in an urban background area of a large city (Venice-Mestre, Northern Italy). The proposed approach has discriminated the sources of mutagenic and carcinogenic congeners and their role in determining a serious hazard for human health. Results, interpreted on the basis of seasonal variations and atmospheric conditions, have shown that even though domestic heating is the main source of total PAHs in winter, a background pollution including traffic mainly accounts for the carcinogenic and mutagenic risk during the whole year. The findings of this work and the approach used can be easily applied to other geographic areas and provide useful information for local and regional air pollution control strategies.

  8. Current cytogenetic methods for detecting exposure and effects of mutagens and carcinogens.

    OpenAIRE

    Natarajan, A T; Boei, J J; Darroudi, F; Van Diemen, P C; Dulout, F; Hande, M P; Ramalho, A T

    1996-01-01

    Most mutagens and genotoxic carcinogens are efficient inducers of chromosomal alterations in exposed cells. Two important classes of aberrations, namely structural and numerical, are recognized and both types of aberrations are associated with congenital abnormalities and neoplasia in humans. These alterations can be easily detected and quantified in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Conventional staining techniques can be used to detect these aberrations; this technique was used to estimat...

  9. Carcinogenic activity of coltsfoot, Tussilago farfara l.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirono, I; Mori, H; Culvenor, C C

    1976-02-01

    The carcinogenicity of young, pre-blooming flowers of coltsfoot, Tussilago farfara L., which is a herb of the tribe Senecioneae, family Compositae, and widely used as a herbal remedy, was studied in inbred strain ACI rats. Rats were divided into 4 groups: Group I received 32% coltsfoot diet for 4 days, and subsequently 16% diet until the termination of experiment. Groups II and III respectively received 8% and 4% coltsfoot diet for 600 days. Group IV was fed a normal diet as a control group. The experiments were terminated 600 days after the start of administration of coltsfoot diet. All the rats in Group I survived beyond 380 days after the start of feeding and 8 out of 12 rats developed hemangioendothelial sarcoma in the liver, whereas only one out of 10 rats developed the tumor in Group II, and no tumors were observed in Group III. Chemical studies on the dried, young flowers used in this experiment suggested that the carcinogenicity of coltsfoot is most probably due to senkirkine, a hepatotoxic pyrrolizidine alkaloid.

  10. Stromal contributions to the carcinogenic process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaw, Mark; Anant, Shrikant; Thomas, Sufi Mary

    2017-04-01

    Tumor-associated stromal cells are dynamic characters that endorse the carcinogenic process in a multitude of ways. The tumor microenvironment plays a crucial role throughout the tumor progression, which includes initiation, growth, invasion, and metastasis. The tumor microenvironment consists of cellular and non-cellular components. Tumor-associated stromal cell types include the microbiome, immune cells including macrophages, dendritic and T-cells, cells associated with blood and lymphatic vessels including pericytes and endothelial cells, fibroblasts, neuronal cells, and adipocytes. The non-cellular components of the microenvironment include matrix proteins and secreted factors. The development of therapies that target the mechanisms by which stromal cells contribute to successful tumorigenesis is major goal of upcoming cancer research. The purpose of this review is to present a comprehensive discussion of the role of each of the tumor-associated stromal cell types in the carcinogenic process with a special focus on target development and therapeutic intervention. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Carcinogenicity/tumour promotion by NDL PCB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schrenk, D. [Kaiserslautern Univ. (Germany). Food Chemistry and Environmental Toxicology

    2004-09-15

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) belong to the group of persistent environmental pollutants exhibiting neurotoxic, teratogenic and tumour-promoting effects in experimental animal models. PCB congeners can be divided into 'dioxinlike' and 'non-dioxinlike' congeners on the basis of their ability to act as aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists. Like the most toxic dioxin congener 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) 'dioxinlike' PCBs bind to the AhR and show characteristic effects on the expression of AhR-regulated genes including the induction of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1. On the other hand, 'non-dioxinlike' PCB congeners have a lower or no binding affinity to the AhR, but exhibit a 'phenobarbital-type' induction of CYP 2B1/2 activity. A carcinogenic potential of PCBs has been demonstrated with technical mixtures such as Aroclors or Clophens. In these studies the liver and the thyroid gland were found to be the principal target organs of PCB-mediated carcinogenesis in rodents. No studies have been published, however, on the carcinogenicity of individual congeners. In two-stage initiation-promotion protocols in rats, both technical mixtures and individual 'dioxinlike' and 'non-dioxinlike' congeners were reported to act as liver tumour promoters.

  12. Prediction of Chemical Carcinogenicity in Rodents from in vitro Genetic Toxicity Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennant, Raymond W.; Margolin, Barry H.; Shelby, Michael D.; Zeiger, Errol; Haseman, Joseph K.; Spalding, Judson; Caspary, William; Resnick, Michael; Stasiewicz, Stanley; Anderson, Beth; Minor, Robert

    1987-05-01

    imperative that there be documentation by a substantial set of systematically acquired test results on well-defined rodent carcinogens and noncarcinogens (36). The current study represents a prototype of the evaluative effort needed for such documentation. Results of the current study focus attention on two questions involving discordances between carcinogenicity and genotoxicity test results: (i) Do nongenotoxic rodent carcinogens pose the same carcinogenic risk to humans as those that are genotoxic? (ii) Can the apparent high frequency of in vitro genotoxic rodent noncarcinogens be explained as a combination of artifacts arising from extremely high dosing in in vitro tests or the failure of many bona fide in vitro genotoxins to express their genetic toxicity in whole animals? Until these questions are resolved, chemicals that show mutagenic effects, particularly if such effects are observed in vivo, must be initially considered to pose human health risks as long as the somatic mutation theory of cancer remains a viable explanation for the etiology of some chemically induced cancers.

  13. Consumption of organic meat does not diminish the carcinogenic potential associated with the intake of persistent organic pollutants (POPs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Ángel Rodríguez; Boada, Luis D; Mendoza, Zenaida; Ruiz-Suárez, Norberto; Valerón, Pilar F; Camacho, María; Zumbado, Manuel; Almeida-González, Maira; Henríquez-Hernández, Luis A; Luzardo, Octavio P

    2017-02-01

    Numerous studies have shown an epidemiological link between meat consumption and the incidence of cancer, and it has been suggested that this relationship may be motivated by the presence of carcinogenic contaminants on it. Among the most frequently detected contaminants in meat are several types of persistent organic pollutants (POPs), and it is well known that many of them are carcinogenic. On the other hand, an increasing number of consumers choose to feed on what are perceived as healthier foods. Thus, the number of consumers of organic food is growing. However, environmental contamination by POPs is ubiquitous, and it is therefore unlikely that the practices of organic food production are able to prevent this contamination. To test this hypothesis, we acquired 76 samples of meat (beef, chicken, and lamb) of two modes of production (organic and conventional) and quantified their levels of 33 carcinogenic POPs. On this basis, we determined the human meat-related daily dietary exposure to these carcinogens using as a model a population with a high consumption of meat, such as the Spanish population. The maximum allowable meat consumption for this population and the carcinogenic risk quotients associated with the current pattern of consumption were calculated. As expected, no sample was completely free of carcinogenic contaminants, and the differences between organically and conventionally produced meats were minimal. According to these results, the current pattern of meat consumption exceeded the maximum limits, which are set according to the levels of contaminations, and this is associated with a relevant carcinogenic risk. Strikingly, the consumption of organically produced meat does not diminish this carcinogenic risk, but on the contrary, it seems to be even higher, especially that associated with lamb consumption.

  14. Suspected levamisole intoxication in calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, K R; Dwyer, C

    2016-07-01

    A group of 32 Friesian and four Hereford calves, 3-4 months old with body weights between 100-120 kg, were purchased from a weaner sale. On arrival at the property the Hereford calves were treated with a combination anthelmintic containing 2 g/L abamectin and 80 g/L levamisole hydrochloride. Shortly afterwards they developed tremors and frothing from the mouth, and two died overnight. The Friesian calves were treated with the same anthelmintic on the following day, when some showed hypersalivation and frothing from the mouth. Examination of the three most severely affected Friesian calves revealed severe nicotinic-type symptoms including hypersalivation, frothing from the mouth, muscle tremors, recumbency, rapid respiration, hyperaesthesia, and central nervous system depression. Other calves showed mild to moderate signs of intoxication including restlessness, tail switching, salivation, tremors, frequent defaecation, mild colic and jaw chomping. Two calves died shortly afterwards. An adverse drug event investigation revealed that the formulation and quality of the anthelmintic was within the correct specification, and that the drench gun was functioning correctly. Suspected levamisole intoxication due to a combination of possible overdosing, dehydration, and stress caused by transportation and prolonged yarding. Susceptibility to levamisole toxicity in New Zealand calves can be increased if factors like dehydration or stress are present. Levamisole has a narrow margin of safety, and overdosing in calves can easily occur if the dose rate is not based on their actual weight or health status.

  15. Interaction between carcinogenic and anti-carcinogenic trace elements in the scalp hair samples of different types of Pakistani female cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhwa, Sham Kumar; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Talpur, Farah Naz; Naeemullah

    2015-01-15

    It was investigated that carcinogenic processes are linked with the imbalances of essential trace and toxic elements in body fluid and tissues of human. In this study, the relationship between carcinogenic elements, arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), and nickel (Ni), and anti-carcinogenic elements, selenium (Se) and zinc (Zn), in the scalp hair of different female cancer patients (breast, cervix, mouth and ovarian) was studied. The scalp hair samples were collected from cancer patients and referent female subjects of the same age group and socioeconomic status. The scalp hair samples were oxidized by 65% nitric acid and 30% hydrogen peroxide by microwave oven and analyzed by atomic absorption spectrometry. The validity and accuracy of the methodology were checked using certified reference material of human hair (BCR 397). The mean concentrations of As, Cd, and Ni were found to be significantly higher in the scalp hair samples of cancerous patients as compared to referents, while reverse results were obtained in the case of Zn and Se (p<0.01). The study revealed that low level of trace elements (Se, Zn) and high level of heavy elements (As, Cd, and Ni) were associated with increased risk of cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Carcinogens in the Workplace: A Scientific, Political and Social Problem

    OpenAIRE

    Atherley, Gordon; Whiting, Robert

    1982-01-01

    Investigation, assessment, and management of carcinogenic risks are not only scientific but also political responsibilities. In Canada, this becomes cumbersome, since local, provincial and federal policies are involved. The process also involves workers and management. This article outlines Canadian legislative experience, the principles involved, the methods of risk assessment, and the classification of carcinogens in the workplace.

  17. Workshop on problem areas associated with developing carcinogen guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-06-01

    A workshop was conducted to discuss problem areas associated with developing carcinogen guidelines. Session topics included (1) definition of a carcinogen for regulatory purposes; (2) potency; (3) risk assessment; (4) uncertainties; (5) de minimis quantity; and (6) legal and regulatory issues. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual papers. (ACR)

  18. Method for converting asbestos to non-carcinogenic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selby, Thomas W.

    1996-01-01

    Hazardous and carcinogenic asbestos waste characterized by a crystalline fibrous structure is transformed into non-carcinogenic, relatively nonhazardous, and non-crystalline solid compounds and gaseous compounds which have commercial utilization. The asbestos waste is so transformed by the complete fluorination of the crystalline fibrous silicate mineral defining the asbestos.

  19. Metabolic dephenylation of the rubber antioxidant N-phenyl-2-naphthylamine to carcinogenic 2-naphthylamine in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Tobias; Bolt, Hermann M; Schlüter, Gerhard; Koslitz, Stephan; Taeger, Dirk; Welge, Peter; Brüning, Thomas

    2013-07-01

    N-Phenyl-2-naphthylamine (P2NA) was widely used as oxidation inhibitor, particularly in rubber manufacturing. Technical-grade P2NA was contaminated with carcinogenic 2-naphthylamine (2NA), and bladder cancer risk in exposed workers was attributed to this impurity. Investigations in humans and mammalian species revealed that small amounts of 2NA are excreted into urine after exposure to P2NA. However, since 2NA per se is not carcinogenic and main downstream metabolites of 2NA have not been found in urine so far, it remained uncertain if 2NA derived from P2NA dephenylation is further activated to carcinogenic downstream metabolites. An experimental animal study was therefore designed to indicate if, and if yes to which extent, 2NA from P2NA dephenylation is accessible to the metabolic pathway that is held responsible for the carcinogenicity of 2NA. Groups of 5 male and female CD rats were dosed with P2NA (2-550 mg/kg b.w.) and 2NA (0.075-75 mg/kg b.w.); 2NA-haemoglobin adducts and urinary 2NA excretion were determined applying GC-MS/MS. 2NA haemoglobin adducts originated dose-dependently after 2NA and P2NA dosing. To induce identical adduct concentrations, an approximately 100-200-fold higher dose of P2NA was necessary compared to 2NA. Since haemoglobin adducts are formed by the same pathway (N-hydroxylation) as the ultimate carcinogens from 2NA, the comparison of adduct concentrations after 2NA and P2NA dosage permits a quantitative estimate of the carcinogenicity of P2NA. The results show that 2NA derived from dephenylation of P2NA enters the carcinogenic downstream pathway of 2NA in rats. Hence, the bladder cancer risk after human exposures to P2NA must be re-evaluated.

  20. Investigations on in vitro anti-carcinogenic potential of L-carnosine in liver cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Minghui; Jiao, Guihua; Shi, Haizhou; Chen, Yanrong

    2017-07-27

    This study was carried out to investigate the anti-carcinogenic effect of L-carnosine in human carcinoma cells (SNU-423). The SNU-423 cancer cells were cultured at a density of 2 × 104 cells/well in Dulbecco modified Eagle medium. After 24 h of adherence, the cells were treated with L-carnosine (0.2 and 1 mg/mL) for 48 h. Then, cell viability was assessed by sulforhodamine assay, while mitochondrial dysfunction was measured by fluorescence microscopy using chromatin-specific dye Hoechst 33258. Intracellular levels of ROS were assayed by fluorescence spectroscopy with 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFDA). L-Carnosine significantly inhibited the growth of the SNU-423 cells (p carcinogenic effects in human liver cancer cells.

  1. Toxico-Cheminformatics and QSPR Modeling of the Carcinogenic Potency Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report on the development of a tiered, confirmatory scheme for prediction of chemical carcinogenicity based on QSAR studies of compounds with available mutagenic and carcinogenic data. For 693 such compounds from the Carcinogenic Potency Database characterized molecular topologic...

  2. DNA typing from vaginal smear slides in suspected rape cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayse Aparecida da Silva

    Full Text Available In an investigation of suspected rape, proof of sexual assault with penetration is required. In view of this, detailed descriptions of the genitalia, the thighs and pubic region are made within the forensic medical service. In addition, vaginal swabs are taken from the rape victim and some of the biological material collected is then transferred to glass slides. In this report, we describe two rape cases solved using DNA typing from cells recovered from vaginal smear slides. In 1999, two young women informed the Rio de Janeiro Police Department that they had been victims of sexual assaults. A suspect was arrested and the victims identified him as the offender. The suspect maintained that he was innocent. In order to elucidate these crimes, vaginal smear slides were sent to the DNA Diagnostic Laboratory for DNA analysis three months after the crimes, as unique forensic evidence. To get enough epithelial and sperm cells to perform DNA analysis, we used protocols modified from the previously standard protocols used for DNA extraction from biological material fixed on glass slides. The quantity of cells was sufficient to perform human DNA typing using nine short tandem repeat (STR loci. It was 3.3 billion times more probable that it was the examined suspect who had left sperm cells in the victims, rather than any other individual in the population of Rio de Janeiro.

  3. An estimation of the carcinogenic risk associated with the intake of multiple relevant carcinogens found in meat and charcuterie products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Ángel Rodríguez; Boada, Luis D; Almeida-González, Maira; Mendoza, Zenaida; Ruiz-Suárez, Norberto; Valeron, Pilar F; Camacho, María; Zumbado, Manuel; Henríquez-Hernández, Luis A; Luzardo, Octavio P

    2015-05-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies have demonstrated a link between excessive meat consumption and the incidence of various cancers, especially colorectal cancer, and it has been suggested that environmental carcinogens present in meat might be related to the increased risk of cancer associated with this food. However, there are no studies evaluating the carcinogenic potential of meat in relation to its content of carcinogens. Our purpose was to emphasize the relevance of environmental carcinogens existing in meat as a determinant of the association between cancer and meat consumption. Because within Europe, Spain shows high consumption of meat and charcuterie, we performed this study focusing on Spanish population. Based on the preferences of consumers we acquired 100 samples of meat and charcuterie that reflect the variety available in the European market. We quantified in these samples the concentration of 33 chemicals with calculated carcinogenic potential (PAHs, organochlorine pesticides, and dioxin-like PCBs). The carcinogenic risk of these contaminants was assessed for each food using a risk ratio based on the current consumption of meat and charcuterie and the maximum tolerable intake of these foods depending on the level of contamination by the carcinogens they contain. Our results indicate that the current consumption of beef, pork, lamb, chicken, and "chorizo", represents a relevant carcinogenic risk for consumers (carcinogenic risk quotient between 1.33 and 13.98). In order to reduce carcinogenic risk, the study population should halve the monthly consumption of these foods, and also not to surpass the number of 5 servings of beef/pork/chicken (considered together). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Radiotherapy in three suspect cases of feline thymoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaser-Hotz, B; Rohrer, C R; Fidel, J L; Nett, C S; Hörauf, A; Hauser, B

    2001-01-01

    Radiation therapy for three cases of suspect feline thymoma is described. The thymoma was controlled for 4 years in case no. 1. Case no. 2 responded well to radiation therapy but was euthanized after 2 months because of a nasal adenocarcinoma. Case no. 3 continues to do well more than 8 months after radiotherapy. Difficulties in diagnosing feline thymomas are discussed, and biological behavior as well as different treatment modalities of feline and human thymomas are compared.

  5. Limitation of personal freedom by detention of suspect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knežević Saša

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The right of personal freedom is one of the most important right from the set of basic human rights and freedoms, contained in the most important acts of international legal character, and the constitutions of states based on the rule of law. This right is directly related to the very human existence, and, therefore, it is necessary to make its legal articulation. Personal freedom means the right to security of the citizen, that he will not be arrested and detained in prison by the state authorities, as well as the right to be free to move and inhabit. However, from the very nature of Criminal Law protection of social values, arises the need to limit the right to personal freedom in exceptional circumstances, including the detention of the suspect. Keeping the suspect is a measure of procedural compulsion, by which, through the police decision, detained prison is temporarily imprisoned, for gathering information and hearing. The basic principles of humanity require that the detained suspect retains all the rights, derived from the principle of personal liberty.

  6. Association between photodynamic and carcinogenic activities in polycyclic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epstein, S.S.; Small, M.; Falk, H.L.; Mantel, N.

    1964-06-01

    The photodynamic activities of 157 polycyclic compounds of wide structural range were determined, with the use of Paramecium caudatum. High photodynamic activity was largely confined to polycyclic compounds, either homocyclic or heterocyclic, with four or five fused rings. Significant absorption of light was shown to be prerequisite but not sufficient for high photodynamic activity. A significant statistical association between photodynamic activity and carcinogenicity was demonstrated. It was shown that compounds with high photodynamic activity had 4 times greater odds of being carcinogenic than compounds with low activity. However, the photodynamic assay cannot identify a particular polycyclic compound as being carcinogenic or noncarcinogenic.

  7. Key Characteristics of Carcinogens as a Basis for Organizing Data on Mechanisms of Carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Martyn T.; Guyton, Kathryn Z.; Gibbons, Catherine F.; Fritz, Jason M.; Portier, Christopher J.; Rusyn, Ivan; DeMarini, David M.; Caldwell, Jane C.; Kavlock, Robert J.; Lambert, Paul F.; Hecht, Stephen S.; Bucher, John R.; Stewart, Bernard W.; Baan, Robert A.; Cogliano, Vincent J.; Straif, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    Background: A recent review by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) updated the assessments of the > 100 agents classified as Group 1, carcinogenic to humans (IARC Monographs Volume 100, parts A–F). This exercise was complicated by the absence of a broadly accepted, systematic method for evaluating mechanistic data to support conclusions regarding human hazard from exposure to carcinogens. Objectives and Methods: IARC therefore convened two workshops in which an international Working Group of experts identified 10 key characteristics, one or more of which are commonly exhibited by established human carcinogens. Discussion: These characteristics provide the basis for an objective approach to identifying and organizing results from pertinent mechanistic studies. The 10 characteristics are the abilities of an agent to 1) act as an electrophile either directly or after metabolic activation; 2) be genotoxic; 3) alter DNA repair or cause genomic instability; 4) induce epigenetic alterations; 5) induce oxidative stress; 6) induce chronic inflammation; 7) be immunosuppressive; 8) modulate receptor-mediated effects; 9) cause immortalization; and 10) alter cell proliferation, cell death, or nutrient supply. Conclusion: We describe the use of the 10 key characteristics to conduct a systematic literature search focused on relevant end points and construct a graphical representation of the identified mechanistic information. Next, we use benzene and polychlorinated biphenyls as examples to illustrate how this approach may work in practice. The approach described is similar in many respects to those currently being implemented by the U.S. EPA’s Integrated Risk Information System Program and the U.S. National Toxicology Program. Citation: Smith MT, Guyton KZ, Gibbons CF, Fritz JM, Portier CJ, Rusyn I, DeMarini DM, Caldwell JC, Kavlock RJ, Lambert P, Hecht SS, Bucher JR, Stewart BW, Baan R, Cogliano VJ, Straif K. 2016. Key characteristics of carcinogens as a

  8. A case of suspect “cyanosis”

    OpenAIRE

    Elisabetta Antonucci; Matteo Conte; Michele Di Pumpo; Giuseppe Antonucci

    2013-01-01

    CLINICAL CASE A 70-year old woman was admitted to our hospital because of fever, asthenia and a suspected stroke. Her medical history showed a congenital cardiopathy (Patent Foramen Ovale, PFO). Skin and oral mucosa pigmentation, orthostatic hypotension, hypoglycemia and hyponatriemia arose the suspect of Addison’s disease. The diagnosis was confirmed by the evaluation of basal levels of plasma ACTH and serum cortisol, and serum cortisol levels after ACTH stimulation. Abdominal CT scan showed...

  9. Exposure to individual and multiple carcinogenic metals during paediatric age: an experience from an Italian urban scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protano, C; Astolfi, M L; Canepari, S; Andreoli, R; Mutti, A; Valeriani, F; Romano Spica, V; Antonucci, A; Mattei, V; Martellucci, S; Vitali, M

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to single and multiple carcinogenic metals and/or semimetals represents a major environmental risk factor for public health. In particular, children are more susceptible to environmental pollutants than adults, but specific studies are still limited. The aims of the present study were: 1) to trace the exposure and co-exposure profiles to eight known or suspected carcinogenic metals and semimetals (As, Be, Cd, Co, Cr, Ni, Pb, and Sb); and: 2) to evaluate the influence of some possible interfering/confounding factors on the exposure to these elements during childhood. Cross-sectional study. We recruited 159 healthy Italian children attending a primary school of the urban area of Rome, Italy. Selected metals were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry on urinary samples collected at the end of a "typical" day (one sample for each child), while information about possible confounding/interfering factors were collected via questionnaires. The great part of the studied children resulted co-exposed to the monitored metals: 83.2%, 69.2%, 51.0% and 29.3% of the participants were concurrently exposed to at least two, three, four and five trace elements, respectively. Gender was the only one among the investigated variable that significantly influenced the co-exposure, with females resulting at lower risk (OR = 0.392; 95 IC = 0.156 - 0.989; p carcinogenic metals, especially when they occur simultaneously, other researches in this field are strongly recommended.

  10. 77 FR 1707 - National Toxicology Program (NTP) Final Process for Preparation of the Report on Carcinogens (RoC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Toxicology Program (NTP) Final Process for Preparation of the Report on Carcinogens (RoC) AGENCY: Division of the National Toxicology Program (DNTP...: December 21, 2011. John R. Bucher, Associate Director, National Toxicology Program. BILLING CODE 4140-01-P ...

  11. A rational clinical approach to suspected insulin allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødtger, Uffe; Wittrup, M

    2005-01-01

    AIMS: Allergy to recombinant human (rDNA) insulin preparations is a rare complication of insulin therapy. However, insulin preparations contain several allergens, and several disorders can resemble insulin allergy. Studies evaluating the diagnostic procedures on suspected insulin allergy...... technique (n = 5), skin disease (n = 3) and other systemic allergy (n = 1). Nine other patients were found to be allergic to protamine (n = 3) or rDNA insulin (n = 6), and specific treatment was associated with relief in 8 patients (89%). Four patients had local reactions of unknown causes but symptom...... relief was obtained in three cases by unspecific therapy. Overall, 20 (91%) reported relief of symptoms. CONCLUSION: Our standardized investigative procedure of suspected insulin preparation (IP) allergy was associated with relief of symptoms in > 90% of patients. IP allergy was diagnosed in 41...

  12. COMPARATIVE GENOTOXIC RESPONSES TO ARSENITE IN GUINEA PIG, MOUSE, RAT AND HUMAN LYMPHOCYTES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comparative genotoxic responses to arsenite in guinea pig, mouse, rat and human lymphocytes.Inorganic arsenic is a known human carcinogen causing skin, lung, and bladder cancer following chronic exposures. Yet, long-term laboratory animal carcinogenicity studies have ...

  13. Food as a source of polycyclic aromatic carcinogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillén, M D; Sopelana, P; Partearroyo, M A

    1997-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) belong to a large chemical family comprising many different compounds with important biological activity in mutagenic and carcinogenic processes. PAH have been detected in both raw and processed foods. The presence of PAH in non-processed foods is associated with environmental pollution from both human and industrial activities, whereas contamination of processed foods can be caused by certain preservation and processing procedures. Both toxicological and epidemiological studies have shown a relation between such compounds and tumor development. The data indicate that PAH must undergo a biotransformation process that causes the formation of biologically active metabolites. In this process, the presence of an enzyme complex that is induced by different xenobiotics is implied, making the toxicity of such compounds hard to predict. As setting a threshold limit below which toxicity could be considered negligible is difficult, the presence of PAH in foodstuffs should be reduced to as low as possible by controlling environmental contamination and all procedures that could cause PAH contamination during food processing, preserving, and packaging.

  14. Advances in Carcinogenic Metal Toxicity and Potential Molecular Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeyaporn Koedrith

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Metal compounds such as arsenic, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, lead, mercury, and nickel are classified as carcinogens affecting human health through occupational and environmental exposure. However, the underlying mechanisms involved in tumor formation are not well clarified. Interference of metal homeostasis may result in oxidative stress which represents an imbalance between production of free radicals and the system’s ability to readily detoxify reactive intermediates. This event consequently causes DNA damage, lipid peroxidation, protein modification, and possibly symptomatic effects for various diseases including cancer. This review discusses predominant modes of action and numerous molecular markers. Attention is paid to metal-induced generation of free radicals, the phenomenon of oxidative stress, damage to DNA, lipid, and proteins, responsive signal transduction pathways with major roles in cell growth and development, and roles of antioxidant enzymatic and DNA repair systems. Interaction of non-enzymatic antioxidants (carotenoids, flavonoids, glutathione, selenium, vitamin C, vitamin E, and others with cellular oxidative stress markers (catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase as well as certain regulatory factors, including AP-1, NF-κB, Ref-1, and p53 is also reviewed. Dysregulation of protective pathways, including cellular antioxidant network against free radicals as well as DNA repair deficiency is related to oncogenic stimulation. These observations provide evidence that emerging oxidative stress-responsive regulatory factors and DNA repair proteins are putative predictive factors for tumor initiation and progression.

  15. Advances in carcinogenic metal toxicity and potential molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koedrith, Preeyaporn; Seo, Young Rok

    2011-01-01

    Metal compounds such as arsenic, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, lead, mercury, and nickel are classified as carcinogens affecting human health through occupational and environmental exposure. However, the underlying mechanisms involved in tumor formation are not well clarified. Interference of metal homeostasis may result in oxidative stress which represents an imbalance between production of free radicals and the system's ability to readily detoxify reactive intermediates. This event consequently causes DNA damage, lipid peroxidation, protein modification, and possibly symptomatic effects for various diseases including cancer. This review discusses predominant modes of action and numerous molecular markers. Attention is paid to metal-induced generation of free radicals, the phenomenon of oxidative stress, damage to DNA, lipid, and proteins, responsive signal transduction pathways with major roles in cell growth and development, and roles of antioxidant enzymatic and DNA repair systems. Interaction of non-enzymatic antioxidants (carotenoids, flavonoids, glutathione, selenium, vitamin C, vitamin E, and others) with cellular oxidative stress markers (catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase) as well as certain regulatory factors, including AP-1, NF-κB, Ref-1, and p53 is also reviewed. Dysregulation of protective pathways, including cellular antioxidant network against free radicals as well as DNA repair deficiency is related to oncogenic stimulation. These observations provide evidence that emerging oxidative stress-responsive regulatory factors and DNA repair proteins are putative predictive factors for tumor initiation and progression.

  16. Advances in Carcinogenic Metal Toxicity and Potential Molecular Markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koedrith, Preeyaporn; Seo, Young Rok

    2011-01-01

    Metal compounds such as arsenic, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, lead, mercury, and nickel are classified as carcinogens affecting human health through occupational and environmental exposure. However, the underlying mechanisms involved in tumor formation are not well clarified. Interference of metal homeostasis may result in oxidative stress which represents an imbalance between production of free radicals and the system’s ability to readily detoxify reactive intermediates. This event consequently causes DNA damage, lipid peroxidation, protein modification, and possibly symptomatic effects for various diseases including cancer. This review discusses predominant modes of action and numerous molecular markers. Attention is paid to metal-induced generation of free radicals, the phenomenon of oxidative stress, damage to DNA, lipid, and proteins, responsive signal transduction pathways with major roles in cell growth and development, and roles of antioxidant enzymatic and DNA repair systems. Interaction of non-enzymatic antioxidants (carotenoids, flavonoids, glutathione, selenium, vitamin C, vitamin E, and others) with cellular oxidative stress markers (catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase) as well as certain regulatory factors, including AP-1, NF-κB, Ref-1, and p53 is also reviewed. Dysregulation of protective pathways, including cellular antioxidant network against free radicals as well as DNA repair deficiency is related to oncogenic stimulation. These observations provide evidence that emerging oxidative stress-responsive regulatory factors and DNA repair proteins are putative predictive factors for tumor initiation and progression. PMID:22272150

  17. Bioavailability and potential carcinogenicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from wood combustion particulate matter in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauggel-Lewandowski, Susanne; Heussner, Alexandra H; Steinberg, Pablo; Pieterse, Bart; van der Burg, Bart; Dietrich, Daniel R

    2013-11-25

    Due to increasing energy demand and limited fossil fuels, renewable energy sources have gained in importance. Particulate matter (PM) in general, but also PM from the combustion of wood is known to exert adverse health effects in human. These are often related to specific toxic compounds adsorbed to the PM surface, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), of which some are known human carcinogens. This study focused on the bioavailability of PAHs and on the tumor initiation potential of wood combustion PM, using the PAH CALUX® reporter gene assay and the BALB/c 3T3 cell transformation assay, respectively. For this, both cell assays were exposed to PM and their respective organic extracts from varying degrees of combustion. The PAH CALUX® experiments demonstrated a concentration-response relationship matching the PAHs detected in the samples. Contrary to expectations, PM samples from complete (CC) and incomplete combustion (IC) provided for a stronger and weaker response, respectively, suggesting that PAH were more readily bioavailable in PM from CC. These findings were corroborated via PAH spiking experiments indicating that IC PM contains organic components that strongly adsorb PAH thereby reducing their bioavailability. The results obtained with organic extracts in the cell transformation assay presented the highest potential for carcinogenicity in samples with high PAH contents, albeit PM from CC also demonstrated a carcinogenic potential. In conclusion, the in vitro assays employed emphasize that CC produces PM with low PAH content however with a general higher bioavailability and thus with a nearly similar carcinogenic potential than IC PM. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Indian women with higher serum concentrations of folate and vitamin B12 are significantly less likely to be infected with carcinogenic or high-risk (HR types of human papillomaviruses (HPVs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrika J Piyathilake

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Chandrika J Piyathilake1, Suguna Badiga1, Proma Paul2, Vijayaraghavan K3, Haripriya Vedantham3, Mrudula Sudula3, Pavani Sowjanya3, Gayatri Ramakrishna4, Keerti V Shah5, Edward E Partridge6, Patti E Gravitt21Department of Nutrition Sciences, The University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB, Birmingham, AL, USA; 2Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA; 3SHARE INDIA, Mediciti Institute of Medical Sciences, Ghanpur, India; 4Center for DNA Fingerprinting and Diagnostics, Hyderabad, India; 5Department of Molecular biology and Immunology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD USA; 6UAB Comprehensive Cancer Center, The University of Alabama Birmingham (UAB, Birmingham, AL, USABackground: Studies conducted in the USA have demonstrated that micronutrients such as folate and vitamin B12 play a significant role in modifying the natural history of high-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPVs, the causative agent for developing invasive cervical cancer (CC and its precursor lesions.Objective: The purpose of the current study was to investigate whether these micronutrients have similar effects on HR-HPV infections in Indian women.Methods: The associations between serum concentrations of folate and vitamin B12 and HR-HPV infections were evaluated in 724 women who participated in a CC screening study in the southern state of Andhra Pradesh, India. Serum folate and vitamin B12 concentrations were measured by using a competitive radio-binding assay. Digene hybrid capture 2 (HC2 assay results were used to categorize women into two groups, positive or negative for HR-HPVs. Unconditional logistic regression models specified a binary indicator of HC2 (positive/negative as the dependent variable and serum folate concentrations combined with serum vitamin B12 concentrations as the independent predictor of primary interest. Models were fitted, adjusting for age, education, marital status, parity

  19. Detection of genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens in Xpc{sup −/−}p53{sup +/−} mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melis, Joost P.M. [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden (Netherlands); Speksnijder, Ewoud N. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden (Netherlands); Kuiper, Raoul V. [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Dutch Molecular Pathology Center, Department of Pathobiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands); Salvatori, Daniela C.F. [Leiden University Medical Center, Central Animal Facility, Leiden (Netherlands); Schaap, Mirjam M. [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden (Netherlands); Maas, Saskia [Leiden University Medical Center, Central Animal Facility, Leiden (Netherlands); Robinson, Joke; Verhoef, Aart; Benthem, Jan van; Luijten, Mirjam [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Steeg, Harry van, E-mail: Harry.van.Steeg@rivm.nl [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2013-01-15

    An accurate assessment of the carcinogenic potential of chemicals and pharmaceutical drugs is essential to protect humans and the environment. Therefore, substances are extensively tested before they are marketed to the public. Currently, the rodent two-year bioassay is still routinely used to assess the carcinogenic potential of substances. However, over time it has become clear that this assay yields false positive results and also has several economic and ethical drawbacks including the use of large numbers of animals, the long duration, and the high cost. The need for a suitable alternative assay is therefore high. Previously, we have proposed the Xpa*p53 mouse model as a very suitable alternative to the two-year bioassay. We now show that the Xpc*p53 mouse model preserves all the beneficial traits of the Xpa*p53 model for sub-chronic carcinogen identification and can identify both genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens. Moreover, Xpc*p53 mice appear to be more responsive than Xpa*p53 mice towards several genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens. Furthermore, Xpc*p53 mice are far less sensitive than Xpa*p53 mice for the toxic activity of DNA damaging agents and as such clearly respond in a similar way as wild type mice do. These advantageous traits of the Xpc*p53 model make it a better alternative for in vivo carcinogen testing than Xpa*p53. This pilot study suggests that Xpc*p53 mice are suited for routine sub-chronic testing of both genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens and as such represent a suitable alternative to possibly replace the murine life time cancer bioassay. Highlights: ► The Xpc*p53 mouse model is able to identify genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens. ► Time, animals and cost can be significantly reduced compared to the 2-year bioassay. ► Xpc*p53 mice are more advantageous for carcinogen identification than Xpa*p53 mice. ► Xpc*p53 mice exhibit a wild type response upon exposure to genotoxicants.

  20. Factors affecting the prevalence of strongly and weakly carcinogenic and lower-risk human papillomaviruses in anal specimens in a cohort of men who have sex with men (MSM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothy J Wiley

    Full Text Available MSM are at higher risk for invasive anal cancer. Twelve human papillomaviruses (HPVs cause cervical cancer in women (Group 1 high-risk HPVs (hrHPVs and 13 HPVs are probable/possible causes (Group 2 hrHPVs of cervical malignancy. HPVs rarely associated with malignancy are classified as lower-risk HPVs (lrHPVs.Dacron-swab anal-cytology specimens were collected from and data complete for 97% (1262/1296 of Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS men tested for HPVs using the Linear Array assay. Multivariate Poisson regression analyses estimated adjusted prevalence ratios for Group 1/2 hrHPVs and lrHPVs, controlling for the effects of age, race, ethnicity, sexual partnerships, smoking; HIV-infection characteristics, treatment, and immune status among HIV-infected men.HIV-infected men showed 35-90% higher prevalence of Group 1/2 hrHPVs and lrHPVs than HIV-uninfected men, and higher prevalence of multi-Type, and multiple risk-group infections. CD4+ T-cell count was inversely associated with HPV Group 2 prevalence (p<0.0001. The number of receptive anal intercourse (RAI partners reported in the 24 months preceding HPV testing predicted higher prevalence of Group 1/2 hrHPVs. Men reporting ≥30 lifetime male sex partners before their first MACS visit and men reporting ≥1 RAI partners during the 24 months before HPV testing showed 17-24% and 13-17% higher prevalence of lrHPVs (p-values ≤0.05. Men reporting smoking between MACS visit 1 and 24 months before HPV testing showed 1.2-fold higher prevalence of Group 2 hrHPVs (p = 0.03. Both complete adherence to CART (p = 0.02 and HIV load <50 copies/mL (p = 0.04 were protective for Group 1 hrHPVs among HIV-infected men.HIV-infected men more often show multi-type and multi-group HPV infections HIV-uninfected men. Long-term mutual monogamy and smoking cessation, generally, and CART-adherence that promotes (HIV viremia control and prevents immunosuppression, specifically among HIV-infected MSM, are

  1. The phenomenology of specialization of criminal suspects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Tumminello

    Full Text Available A criminal career can be either general, with the criminal committing different types of crimes, or specialized, with the criminal committing a specific type of crime. A central problem in the study of crime specialization is to determine, from the perspective of the criminal, which crimes should be considered similar and which crimes should be considered distinct. We study a large set of Swedish suspects to empirically investigate generalist and specialist behavior in crime. We show that there is a large group of suspects who can be described as generalists. At the same time, we observe a non-trivial pattern of specialization across age and gender of suspects. Women are less prone to commit crimes of certain types, and, for instance, are more prone to specialize in crimes related to fraud. We also find evidence of temporal specialization of suspects. Older persons are more specialized than younger ones, and some crime types are preferentially committed by suspects of different ages.

  2. [EVALUATION OF THE CARCINOGENIC RISK OF LEAD IN THE COHORT STUDY OF MALE WORKERS OCCUPATIONALLY EXPOSED TO INORGANIC LEAD IN 27 MOSCOW PRINTING-HOUSES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilychova, S A; Zaridze, D G

    2015-01-01

    As millions of people worldwide are expoed to inorganic lead, both in the workplace and in general environment, its potential carcinogenicity is an important health problem. Although lead has been shown to be carcinogenic in laboratory animals, epidemiological studies have been inconclusive, and the relationship between lead and human cancer is still unclear. There were several limitations that complicated the analysis and evaluation of the carcinogenic potential of lead compounds. In particular, many of the cohort studies of lead and cancer, mostly among heavily lead-exposed workers, have been limited by a failure to identify and control for covariates, especially co-exposures to other metals such as arsenic, cadmium, and chromium, which have been shown to be carcinogenic. Most of the epidemiological studies unfortunately do not have data on dose-response. The scientific merit of our study is the virtual absence of confounding by other known carcinogens. Another advantage of our study is the presence of three occupational sub-cohorts with different levels and routes of lead exposure. Most previous studies have data on dose-response provided only by comparisons of exposed to unexposed persons. In summary, the results of this cohort study suggest that occupational exposure to lead may increase the risk of cancers of the pancreas, kidney and rectum. In conclusion, despite several limitations, the results of our study add to the evidence that carcinogenicity to humans may be an additional adverse health effect of lead.

  3. Potential carcinogenic erionite from Lessini Mounts, NE Italy: Morphological, mineralogical and chemical characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordani, Matteo; Mattioli, Michele; Dogan, Meral; Dogan, Ahmet Umran

    2016-01-01

    Exposure of humans to erionite fibers of suitable morphology and dimension has been unambiguously linked to the occurrence of malignant mesothelioma. For this reason, a morphological, morphometrical, mineralogical, and chemical investigation was performed on two representative samples of potential carcinogenic, fibrous erionite from Lessini Mounts, northeastern (NE) Italy, which has not apparently been examined previously. The first sample is erionite-Ca with an extremely fibrous, hair-like and flexible appearance, and growth in intimate association with levyne. The second sample is erionite-Ca with prismatic to acicular crystals and rigid behavior, enriched in K(+) and Ca(2+) extra-framework cations. Although erionite is a nominally Fe-free phase, iron (Fe) was detected in low amounts in all the analyzed crystals. In both the investigated samples, erionite is present as individual fibers of respirable size. Considering that the toxicity and carcinogenic potential of erionite is associated with its size parameters, together with its in vivo durability and high surface area, most of the investigated fibers may also be potentially carcinogenic. The presence of erionite in extensively quarried and largely employed volcanic rocks, suggesting the need for detailed health-based studies in the region.

  4. Occurrence of Pineal Gland Tumors in Combined Chronic Toxicity/Carcinogenicity Studies in Wistar Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treumann, Silke; Buesen, Roland; Gröters, Sibylle; Eichler, Jens-Olaf; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard

    2015-08-01

    Pineal gland tumors are very rare brain lesions in rats as well as in other species including humans. A total of 8 (out of 1,360 examined) Wistar rats from 3 different combined chronic toxicity/carcinogenicity or mere carcinogenicity studies revealed pineal gland tumors. The tumors were regarded to be spontaneous and unrelated to treatment. The morphology and immunohistochemical evaluation led to the diagnosis malignant pinealoma. The main characteristics that were variably developed within the tumors were the following: cellular atypia, high mitotic index, giant cells, necrosis, Homer Wright rosettes, Flexner-Wintersteiner rosettes and pseudorosettes, positive immunohistochemical reaction for synaptophysin, and neuron-specific enolase. The pineal gland is not a protocol organ for histopathological examination in carcinogenicity studies. Nevertheless, the pineal gland can occasionally be encountered on the routine brain section or if it is the origin of a tumor protruding into the brain, the finding will be recorded. Therefore, although known to be a rare tumor in rats, pineal neoplasms should be included in the list of possible differential diagnoses for brain tumors, especially when the tumor is located in the region of the pineal body. © 2015 by The Author(s).

  5. A review of the carcinogenic potential of glyphosate by four independent expert panels and comparison to the IARC assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gary M; Aardema, Marilyn; Acquavella, John; Berry, Sir Colin; Brusick, David; Burns, Michele M; de Camargo, Joao Lauro Viana; Garabrant, David; Greim, Helmut A; Kier, Larry D; Kirkland, David J; Marsh, Gary; Solomon, Keith R; Sorahan, Tom; Roberts, Ashley; Weed, Douglas L

    2016-09-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) published a monograph in 2015 concluding that glyphosate is "probably carcinogenic to humans" (Group 2A) based on limited evidence in humans and sufficient evidence in experimental animals. It was also concluded that there was strong evidence of genotoxicity and oxidative stress. Four Expert Panels have been convened for the purpose of conducting a detailed critique of the evidence in light of IARC's assessment and to review all relevant information pertaining to glyphosate exposure, animal carcinogenicity, genotoxicity, and epidemiologic studies. Two of the Panels (animal bioassay and genetic toxicology) also provided a critique of the IARC position with respect to conclusions made in these areas. The incidences of neoplasms in the animal bioassays were found not to be associated with glyphosate exposure on the basis that they lacked statistical strength, were inconsistent across studies, lacked dose-response relationships, were not associated with preneoplasia, and/or were not plausible from a mechanistic perspective. The overall weight of evidence from the genetic toxicology data supports a conclusion that glyphosate (including GBFs and AMPA) does not pose a genotoxic hazard and therefore, should not be considered support for the classification of glyphosate as a genotoxic carcinogen. The assessment of the epidemiological data found that the data do not support a causal relationship between glyphosate exposure and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma while the data were judged to be too sparse to assess a potential relationship between glyphosate exposure and multiple myeloma. As a result, following the review of the totality of the evidence, the Panels concluded that the data do not support IARC's conclusion that glyphosate is a "probable human carcinogen" and, consistent with previous regulatory assessments, further concluded that glyphosate is unlikely to pose a carcinogenic risk to humans.

  6. Ten-day observation of live rabies suspected dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepsumethanon, V; Wilde, H; Sitprija, V

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed at analyzing a ten-day observation period of rabies suspected dogs and cats according to six criteria. Dogs and cats suspected of being rabid were brought for observation when they had either bitten a person or another animal or when abnormal behaviour or unusual illness was observed. Between 1985 and 2005, retrospective and prospective data from 1,222 dogs and 303 cats was collected during the ten-day observation period. If an animal had died, brain examination using fluorescent antibody testing was routinely performed. If an animal had survived for > or =10 days, it was released to its owner or transferred to the municipal dog shelter. A total of 644 dogs and 58 cats found rabid died within 10 days of observation. In addition, for 208 dogs confirmed rabid with laboratory tests between 1997 and 2005, six criteria were analysed from the day of submission. This experience with the implemented 10-day observation period confirms the WHO recommendation on identifying suspected rabid dogs or cats under veterinary supervision following a human exposure.

  7. A case of suspect “cyanosis”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Antonucci

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available CLINICAL CASE A 70-year old woman was admitted to our hospital because of fever, asthenia and a suspected stroke. Her medical history showed a congenital cardiopathy (Patent Foramen Ovale, PFO. Skin and oral mucosa pigmentation, orthostatic hypotension, hypoglycemia and hyponatriemia arose the suspect of Addison’s disease. The diagnosis was confirmed by the evaluation of basal levels of plasma ACTH and serum cortisol, and serum cortisol levels after ACTH stimulation. Abdominal CT scan showed atrophy and calcification of adrenal glands. CONCLUSIONS In most cases, Addison’s disease is provoked by autoimmune destruction of the adrenal cortex; however, in our reported patient, tuberculosis could be a possible cause.

  8. Comparison of in vivo genotoxic and carcinogenic potency to augment mode of action analysis: Case study with hexavalent chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Chad M; Bichteler, Anne; Rager, Julia E; Suh, Mina; Proctor, Deborah M; Haws, Laurie C; Harris, Mark A

    2016-04-01

    Recent analyses-highlighted by the International Workshops on Genotoxicity Testing Working Group on Quantitative Approaches to Genetic Toxicology Risk Assessment-have identified a correlation between (log) estimates of a carcinogen's in vivo genotoxic potency and in vivo carcinogenic potency in typical laboratory animal models, even when the underlying data have not been matched for tissue, species, or strain. Such a correlation could have important implications for risk assessment, including informing the mode of action (MOA) of specific carcinogens. When in vivo genotoxic potency is weak relative to carcinogenic potency, MOAs other than genotoxicity (e.g., endocrine disruption or regenerative hyperplasia) may be operational. Herein, we review recent in vivo genotoxicity and carcinogenicity data for hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)), following oral ingestion, in relevant tissues and species in the context of the aforementioned correlation. Potency estimates were generated using benchmark doses, or no-observable-adverse-effect-levels when data were not amenable to dose-response modeling. While the ratio between log values for carcinogenic and genotoxic potency was ≥1 for many compounds, the ratios for several Cr(VI) datasets (including in target tissue) were less than unity. In fact, the ratios for Cr(VI) clustered closely with ratios for chloroform and diethanolamine, two chemicals posited to have non-genotoxic MOAs. These findings suggest that genotoxicity may not play a major role in the cancers observed in rodents following exposure to high concentrations of Cr(VI) in drinking water-a finding consistent with recent MOA and adverse outcome pathway (AOP) analyses concerning Cr(VI). This semi-quantitative analysis, therefore, may be useful to augment traditional MOA and AOP analyses. More case examples will be needed to further explore the general applicability and validity of this approach for human health risk assessment. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by

  9. Congenital Malaria Among Newborns Admitted for Suspected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Signs and symptoms of congenital malaria do not differ much from those of neonatal sepsis: both can co-exist, and most times very difficult to differentiate clinically. Objective: To document the prevalence, risk factors for congeni tal malar ia among neonates admitted for suspected neonatal sepsis, and ...

  10. Congenital Malaria Among Newborns Admitted for Suspected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    None of the clinical feature had good sensitivity, specificity or predictive value for congenital malaria, and only 1.6% death was recorded in a baby with high parasite density. Conclusion: Congenital malaria is common in newborns with suspected neonatal sepsis. History of peripartum pyrexia, prematurity and intrauterine ...

  11. MRI for clinically suspected appendicitis during pregnancy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cobben, L.P.; Groot, I.; Haans, L.; Blickman, J.G.; Puylaert, J.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether MRI can be used to accurately diagnose or exclude appendicitis in pregnant patients with clinically suspected appendicitis. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that MRI is helpful in the examination and diagnosis of acute appendicitis in

  12. Biomechanical properties of keratoconus suspect eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Alain; Lteif, Yara; Azan, Elodie; Gatinel, Damien

    2010-06-01

    Measuring corneal biomechanical properties may help detect keratoconus suspect corneas and eliminate the risk of ectasia after LASIK. Data of 504 eyes separated into three groups were retrospectively reviewed: normal (n = 252), keratoconus suspect (n = 80), and keratoconus (n = 172). Corneal hysteresis (CH) and corneal resistance factor (CRF) were measured with an ocular biomechanics analyzer. Mean corneal hysteresis was 10.6 +/- 1.4 (SD) mm Hg in the normal group, compared with 10.0 +/- 1.6 mm Hg in the keratoconus suspect group and 8.1 +/- 1.4 mm Hg in the keratoconus group. The mean CRF was 10.6 +/- 1.6 mm Hg in the normal group compared with 9.7 +/- 1.7 in the keratoconus suspect group and 7.1 +/- 1.6 mm Hg in the keratoconus group. Mean CH and CRF were significantly different between the three groups (P corneas. Analyzing signal curves obtained with the biomechanics analyzer may provide additional valuable information for selecting qualified patients for refractive surgery.

  13. Characterization of suspected illegal skin whitening cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmedt, B; Van Hoeck, E; Rogiers, V; Courselle, P; De Beer, J O; De Paepe, K; Deconinck, E

    2014-03-01

    An important group of suspected illegal cosmetics consists of skin bleaching products, which are usually applied to the skin of the face, hands and décolleté for local depigmentation of hyper pigmented regions or more importantly, for a generalized reduction of the skin tone. These cosmetic products are suspected to contain illegal active substances that may provoke as well local as systemic toxic effects, being the reason for their banning from the EU market. In that respect, illegal and restricted substances in cosmetics, known to have bleaching properties, are in particular hydroquinone, tretinoin and corticosteroids. From a legislative point of view, all cosmetic products containing a prohibited whitening agent are illegal and must be taken off the EU market. A newly developed screening method using ultra high performance liquid chromatography-time off flight-mass spectrometry allows routine analysis of suspected products. 163 suspected skin whitening cosmetics, collected by Belgian inspectors at high risk sites such as airports and so-called ethnic cosmetic shops, were analyzed and 59% were classified as illegal. The whitening agents mostly detected were clobetasol propionate and hydroquinone, which represent a serious health risk when repeatedly and abundantly applied to the skin. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Suspecting Neurological Dysfunction From E Mail Messages ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A non medical person suspected and confirmed neurological dysfunction in an individual, based only on e mail messages sent by the individual. With email communication becoming rampant “peculiar” email messages may raise the suspicion of neurological dysfunction. Organic pathology explaining the abnormal email ...

  15. Biomonitoring of complex occupational exposures to carcinogens: The case of sewage workers in Paris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiberguent Aziz

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sewage workers provide an essential service in the protection of public and environmental health. However, they are exposed to varied mixtures of chemicals; some are known or suspected to be genotoxics or carcinogens. Thus, trying to relate adverse outcomes to single toxicant is inappropriate. We aim to investigate if sewage workers are at increased carcinogenic risk as evaluated by biomarkers of exposure and early biological effects. Methods/design This cross sectional study will compare exposed sewage workers to non-exposed office workers. Both are voluntaries from Paris municipality, males, aged (20–60 years, non-smokers since at least six months, with no history of chronic or recent illness, and have similar socioeconomic status. After at least 3 days of consecutive work, blood sample and a 24-hour urine will be collected. A caffeine test will be performed, by administering coffee and collecting urines three hours after. Subjects will fill in self-administered questionnaires; one covering the professional and lifestyle habits while the a second one is alimentary. The blood sample will be used to assess DNA adducts in peripheral lymphocytes. The 24-hour urine to assess urinary 8-oxo-7, 8-dihydro-2'-deoxy-Guanosine (8-oxo-dG, and the in vitro genotoxicity tests (comet and micronucleus using HeLa S3 or HepG2 cells. In parallel, occupational air sampling will be conducted for some Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Volatile Organic Compounds. A weekly sampling chronology at the offices of occupational medicine in Paris city during the regular medical visits will be followed. This protocol has been accepted by the French Est III Ethical Comitee with the number 2007-A00685-48. Discussion Biomarkers of exposure and of early biological effects may help overcome the limitations of environmental exposure assessment in very complex occupational or environmental settings.

  16. Multi-endpoint biological monitoring in combined, carcinogenic occupational exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szendi, Katalin; Hornyák, László; Varga, Csaba

    2017-10-01

    We aimed to develop a relevant multi-endpoint biomonitoring system by studying different genotoxicity biomarkers in complex carcinogenic exposures under occupational situations. Altogether 109 workers were followed in five different workplaces. The combined carcinogenic exposures were monitored in the urine and peripheral blood samples using Ames mutagenicity test and cytogenetic analyzes. The different genotoxicity endpoints studied showed different results in the same carcinogenic exposure situations. The urinary mutagenicity tests provided more information and proved to be more sensitive compared to the cytogenetic tests in the majority of cases. In complex exposures multistep biomonitoring panel should be applied, because the exact mechanisms of the combination of single exposing agents are not known. Such a panel should involve monitoring different endpoints, e.g. point mutations, chromosomal mutations. A relatively affordable and rapid testing panel was developed using validated tests as Ames and cytogenetic assays, but its practical use should be confirmed by further investigations.

  17. Carcinogenic adducts induce distinct DNA polymerase binding orientations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrtis, Kyle B.; Markiewicz, Radoslaw P.; Romano, Louis J.; Rueda, David

    2013-01-01

    DNA polymerases must accurately replicate DNA to maintain genome integrity. Carcinogenic adducts, such as 2-aminofluorene (AF) and N-acetyl-2-aminofluorene (AAF), covalently bind DNA bases and promote mutagenesis near the adduct site. The mechanism by which carcinogenic adducts inhibit DNA synthesis and cause mutagenesis remains unclear. Here, we measure interactions between a DNA polymerase and carcinogenic DNA adducts in real-time by single-molecule fluorescence. We find the degree to which an adduct affects polymerase binding to the DNA depends on the adduct location with respect to the primer terminus, the adduct structure and the nucleotides present in the solution. Not only do the adducts influence the polymerase dwell time on the DNA but also its binding position and orientation. Finally, we have directly observed an adduct- and mismatch-induced intermediate state, which may be an obligatory step in the DNA polymerase proofreading mechanism. PMID:23814187

  18. Carcinogens in Israeli milk: a study in regulatory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westin, J B

    1993-01-01

    The potential danger to humans of exposure to chemicals shown to be carcinogenic in animals has become increasingly clear in the last 20 years. A gap still exists, however, between the appreciation of the risk by scientists and the willingness of public health authorities to reduce it. Three pesticides, shown repeatedly to produce over a dozen different types of cancer in rats and mice, were discovered in inordinately high concentrations in Israeli milk and dairy products. The three pesticides--alpha-BHC, gamma-BHC (lindane), and DDT--had been shown to be present for ten years or more at mean concentrations up to 100 times those found in U.S. dairy products--with resultant concentrations in breast milk being possibly 800 times greater than those in the United States--yet neither the Ministry of Health nor the Israel Cancer Association made any apparent moves either to warn the public or to rectify the situation. A small consumer organization, Consumer Shield, brought the issue into the open. Through public pressure, court action, and the threat of further legal redress--and despite repeated attacks in the media by the milk producers, the Ministry, and the Cancer Association--Consumer Shield forced the authorities to outlaw the use of alpha-BHC and lindane (DDT no longer being in general use). The ban resulted in a precipitous drop in the concentrations of these substances in Israeli milk. Recent epidemiological and laboratory findings suggest that the dramatic drop in breast cancer mortality rates subsequent to the pesticide ban could be a direct result of that ban.

  19. Effects of carcinogenic versus non-carcinogenic AHR-active PAHs and their mixtures: lessons from ecological relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Marta; Santos, José M; Diniz, Mário S; Ferreira, Ana M; Costa, Maria H; Costa, Pedro M

    2015-04-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are priority environmental mutagens and carcinogens that occur in the aquatic environment as mixtures rather than the individual compounds for which guidelines are issued. The present work aimed at understanding the interaction effects between carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic PAHs in a model marine fish (Dicentrarchus labrax) in realistic scenarios. Laboratory assays under ecologically-relevant parameters were conducted for 28 days with sediments spiked with low-moderate concentrations (250-800ngg(-1)) of two model PAHs, phenanthrene (non-carcinogenic) and benzo[b]fluoranthene (carcinogenic to experimental animals). Both PAHs induced hepatic histopathological changes that indicate metabolic failure and inflammation, especially in animals exposed to mixtures. Phenanthrene elicited biochemical changes better related to oxidative stress (lipid peroxidation, glutathione and glutathione S-transferase activity) and CYP function, whereas B[b]F disrupted metabolic responses and defences to toxicological challenge. Conversely, mixed PAHs yielded lesions and responses that, altogether, are compatible with the AHR dependent pathway (the basis of PAH mutagenicity), potentially generating supra-additive effects. Nonetheless, the low, ecologically-relevant, concentrations of PAHs diluted dose and time-response relations. Overall, although seemingly predicting the risk of individual PAHs, environmental guidelines may not apply to mixtures by underestimating adverse effects, which calls for a redefinition of standards when determining the true risk of toxicants under realistic circumstances. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Is phenylbutazone a genotoxic carcinogen? A weight-of-evidence assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combes, Robert D

    2013-07-01

    Published in silico, in vitro, in vivo laboratory animal and human data, together with information on biotransformation and data from structure-activity analyses with two decision-tree systems (ACToR and Toxtree), have been used in a weight-of-evidence (WoE) assessment to determine whether phenylbutazone (PBZ) is a genotoxic or a non-genotoxic carcinogen. This was undertaken to facilitate the risk assessment of human exposure to this veterinary drug via the consumption of horsemeat from treated animals. Despite problems with data interpretation at all tiers of the database, it was concluded that PBZ behaves like a genotoxic carcinogen with a threshold dose. This conclusion is based mainly on the results of a definitive rodent bioassay, and on the following observations: a) that PBZ has weak in vitro activity only at high concentrations in some genotoxicity assays, accompanied by high levels of cytotoxicity; b) that it (and a major metabolite) is able to cause sister chromatid exchanges in vivo in rodents; and c) that it can induce cytogenetic effects in vivo in humans. It also takes into account the known and predicted activities of the parent drug, some of its metabolites and two structural analogues, and, importantly, several of the drug's other biochemical effects that are unrelated to toxicity. However, this conclusion is not fully supported by all the evidence, and much of the information is based on old papers. Therefore, more studies are required to establish whether the concentration thresholds seen in vitro would translate to dose thresholds for carcinogenicity, such that a safe dose-level could be defined for the purposes of assessing risk. It was disappointing that a WoE approach to evaluating all of the available hazard data, as is increasingly being advocated to improve the hazard identification paradigm, was unable to provide definitive answers in this case, particularly in view of the large numbers of animals that had been used to provide much of the

  1. Red meat consumption and cancer: reasons to suspect involvement of bovine infectious factors in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    zur Hausen, Harald

    2012-06-01

    An increased risk for colorectal cancer has been consistently reported for long-time consumption of cooked and processed red meat. This has frequently been attributed to chemical carcinogens arising during the cooking process of meat. Long-time fish or poultry consumption apparently does not increase the risk, although similar or higher concentrations of chemical carcinogens were recorded in their preparation for consumption. The geographic epidemiology of colorectal cancer seems to correspond to regions with a high rate of beef consumption. Countries with a virtual absence of beef in the diet (India) or where preferably lamb or goat meat is consumed (several Arabic countries) reveal low rates of colorectal cancer. In China, pork consumption has a long tradition, with an intermediate colorectal cancer rate. In Japan and Korea, large scale beef and pork imports started after World War II or after the Korean War. A steep rise in colorectal cancer incidence was noted after 1970 in Japan and 1990 in Korea. The consumption of undercooked beef (e.g., shabu-shabu, Korean yukhoe and Japanese yukke) became very popular in both countries. The available data are compatible with the interpretation that a specific beef factor, suspected to be one or more thermoresistant potentially oncogenic bovine viruses (e.g., polyoma-, papilloma- or possibly single-stranded DNA viruses) may contaminate beef preparations and lead to latent infections in the colorectal tract. Preceding, concomitant or subsequent exposure to chemical carcinogens arising during cooking procedures should result in increased risk for colorectal cancer synergistic with these infections. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  2. Cannabis and tobacco smoke are not equally carcinogenic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melamede Robert

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract More people are using the cannabis plant as modern basic and clinical science reaffirms and extends its medicinal uses. Concomitantly, concern and opposition to smoked medicine has occurred, in part due to the known carcinogenic consequences of smoking tobacco. Are these reactions justified? While chemically very similar, there are fundamental differences in the pharmacological properties between cannabis and tobacco smoke. Cannabis smoke contains cannabinoids whereas tobacco smoke contains nicotine. Available scientific data, that examines the carcinogenic properties of inhaling smoke and its biological consequences, suggests reasons why tobacco smoke, but not cannabis smoke, may result in lung cancer.

  3. Inhalation carcinogenicity of dichloromethane in rats and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiso, Shigetoshi; Take, Makoto; Kasai, Tatsuya; Senoh, Hideki; Umeda, Yumi; Matsumoto, Michiharu; Fukushima, Shoji

    2014-07-01

    The carcinogenicity of inhaled dichloromethane (DCM) was examined by exposing groups of 50 F344/DuCrj rats and 50 Crj: BDF1 mice of both sexes to 0, 1000, 2000, or 4000 ppm (w/w) DCM-containing aerosol for 2 years. Inhalation of DCM resulted in increased incidences of subcutis fibromas, mammary gland fibroadenoma, and peritoneum mesotheliomas in male rats; mammary gland fibroadenomas in female rats; and bronchiolar-alveolar adenomas and carcinomas in the lung and hepatocellular adenomas and carcinomas in male and female mice. These results clearly indicate that inhaled DCM is carcinogenic in F344/DuCrj (SPF) rats and Crj: BDF1 (SPF) mice.

  4. An evaluation of the mode of action framework for mutagenic carcinogens case study: Cyclophosphamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarroll, Nancy; Keshava, Nagalakshmi; Cimino, Michael; Chu, Margaret; Dearfield, Kerry; Keshava, Channa; Kligerman, Andrew; Owen, Russell; Protzel, Alberto; Putzrath, Resha; Schoeny, Rita

    2008-03-01

    In response to the 2005 revised US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Cancer Guidelines, a Risk Assessment Forum's Technical Panel has devised a strategy in which genetic toxicology data combined with other information are assessed to determine whether a carcinogen operates through a mutagenic mode of action (MOA). This information is necessary for EPA to decide whether age-dependent adjustment factors (ADAFs) should be applied to the cancer risk assessment. A decision tree has been developed as a part of this approach and outlines the critical steps for analyzing a compound for carcinogenicity through a mutagenic MOA (e.g., data analysis, determination of mutagenicity in animals and in humans). Agents, showing mutagenicity in animals and humans, proceed through the Agency's framework analysis for MOAs. Cyclophosphamide (CP), an antineoplastic agent, which is carcinogenic in animals and humans and mutagenic in vitro and in vivo, was selected as a case study to illustrate how the framework analysis would be applied to prove that a carcinogen operates through a mutagenic MOA. Consistent positive results have been seen for mutagenic activity in numerous in vitro assays, in animals (mice, rats, and hamsters) and in humans. Accordingly, CP was processed through the framework analysis and key steps leading to tumor formation were identified as follows: metabolism of the parent compound to alkylating metabolites, DNA damage followed by induction of multiple adverse genetic events, cell proliferation, and bladder tumors. Genetic changes in rats (sister chromatid exchanges at 0.62 mg/kg) can commence within 30 min and in cancer patients, chromosome aberrations at 35 mg/kg are seen by 1 hr, well within the timeframe and tumorigenic dose range for early events. Supporting evidence is also found for cell proliferation, indicating that mutagenicity, associated with cytotoxicity, leads to a proliferative response, which occurs early (48 hr) in the process of tumor induction

  5. A theoretical concept of low level/low LET radiation carcinogenic risk (LLCR) projection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filyushkin, I.V. [Laboratory of Theoretical Radiobiology, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1992-06-01

    Carcinogenic risk to humans resulting from low level/low LET radiation exposure (LLLCR) has not been observed directly because epidemiological observations have not yet provided statistically significant data on risk values. However, these values are of great interest for radiation health science and radiation protection practice under both normal conditions and emergency situations. This report presents a theoretical contribution to the validation of dose and dose rate efficiency factors (DDREF) transforming cocinogenic risk coefficients from those revealed in A-bomb survivors to factors appropriate for the projection of the risk resulting from very low levels of low LET radiation.

  6. Suspected poisoning of domestic animals by pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caloni, Francesca; Cortinovis, Cristina; Rivolta, Marina; Davanzo, Franca

    2016-01-01

    A retrospective study was carried out by reviewing all suspected cases of domestic animal poisoning attributed to pesticides, reported to the Milan Poison Control Centre (MPCC) between January 2011 and December 2013. During this period, pesticides were found to be responsible for 37.3% of all suspected poisoning enquiries received (815). The most commonly species involved was the dog (71.1% of calls) followed by the cat (15.8%), while a limited number of cases involved horses, goats and sheep. Most cases of exposure (47.1%) resulted in mild to moderate clinical signs. The outcome was reported in 59.9% of these cases, with death occurring in 10.4% of them. Insecticides (40.8%) proved to be the most common group of pesticides involved and exposure to pyrethrins-pyrethroids accounted for the majority of calls. According to the MPCC data, there has been a decrease in the number of suspected poisonings cases attributed to pesticides that have been banned by the EU, including aldicarb, carbofuran, endosulfan and paraquat. In contrast, there has been an increase of suspected poisoning cases attributed to the neonicotinoids, imidacloprid and acetamiprid, probably due to their widespread use in recent years. Cases of suspected poisoning that involved exposure to rodenticides accounted for 27.6% of calls received by the MPCC and anticoagulant rodenticides were the primary cause of calls, with many cases involving brodifacoum and bromadiolone. Herbicides were involved in 14.2% of calls related to pesticides and glyphosate was the main culprit in cases involving dogs, cats, horses, goats and sheep. As far as exposure to molluscicides (11.5%) and fungicides (5.9%), most of the cases involved dogs and the suspected poisoning agents were metaldehyde and copper compounds respectively. The data collected are useful in determining trends in poisoning episodes and identifying newly emerging toxicants, thus demonstrating the prevalence of pesticides as causative agents in animal

  7. Dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloid toxicity, cytotoxicity, and carcinogenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehyro-pyrrolizidine alkaloid (PA)-containing plants compose about 5% of the world’s flowering plants and they commonly poison livestock, wildlife and humans. Previous work has produced considerable understanding of PA toxicity, species susceptibility, conditions and routes of exposure, toxin metab...

  8. Activation and detoxification metabolism of urban air pollutants 2-nitrobenzanthrone and carcinogenic 3-nitrobenzanthrone by rat and mouse hepatic microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiborova, Marie; Cechova, Tereza; Borek-Dohalska, Lucie; Moserova, Michaela; Frei, Eva; Schmeiser, Heinz H; Paca, Jan; Arlt, Volker M

    2012-01-01

    2-Nitrobenzanthrone (2-NBA) has recently been detected in ambient air particulate matter. Its isomer 3-nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA) is a potent mutagen and suspected human carcinogen identified in diesel exhaust. Understanding which enzymes are involved in metabolism of these toxicants is important in the assessment of individual susceptibility. Here, metabolism of 2-NBA and 3-NBA by rat and mouse hepatic microsomes containing cytochromes P450 (CYPs), their reductase (NADPH:CYP reductase), and NADH:cytochrome b5 reductase was investigated under anaerobic and aerobic conditions. In addition, using the same microsomal systems, 2-NBA and 3-NBA were evaluated to be enzymatically activated under anaerobic conditions to species generating 2-NBA- and 3-NBA-derived DNA adducts. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with ultraviolet (UV) detection was employed for the separation and characterization of 2-NBA and 3-NBA metabolites formed by hepatic microsomes of rats and mice under the anaerobic and aerobic conditions. Microsomal systems isolated from the liver of the control (untreated) rats and rats pretreated with Sudan I, β-naphthoflavone (β-NF), phenobarbital (PB), ethanol and pregnenolon 16α-carbonitrile (PCN), the inducers of cytochromes P450 (CYP) 1A1, 1A1/2, 2B, 2E1 and 3A, respectively, were used in this study. Microsomes of mouse models, a control mouse line (wild-type, WT) and Hepatic Cytochrome P450 Reductase Null (HRN) mice with deleted gene of NADPH:CYP reductase in the liver, thus absenting this enzyme in their livers, were also employed. To detect and quantify the 2-NBA- and 3-NBA-derived DNA adducts, the 32P postlabeling technique was used. Both reductive metabolite of 3-NBA, 3-aminobenzanthrone (3-ABA), found to be formed predominantly under the anaerobic conditions, and two 3-NBA oxidative metabolites, whose structures have not yet been investigated, were formed by several microsomal systems used in the study. Whereas a 3-NBA reductive metabolite

  9. Exposure to dust-bound PAHs and associated carcinogenic risk in primitive and traditional cooking practices in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Atif; Malik, Riffat Naseem; Martellini, Tania; Cincinelli, Alessandra

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the abundance and distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in dust samples collected from the selected professional cooking workplaces (WCs) and residential household cooking areas (WRs), where traditional and primitive cooking practices are still prevelent. Another aim of this study was to investigate the carcinogenic risk for Pakistani human exposure to dust-bound PAHs via the routes of inhalation, ingestion, and dermal contact. Generally, the concentration of individual congeners of PAHs in surface dust samples of WC sites was higher than those measured in WR sites (p carcinogenic compound, was present in the dust samples from WC sites in the highest mean concentration (630 ng g(-1) dry weight (d.w.)). The BaP mean concentration in WC workplaces was almost eight times higher than the mean value found in WR exposure sites. Moreover, the average concentration of ∑PAHs, combustion origin PAHs (∑COMB) and sum total of 7-carcinogenic PAHs (∑7-carcinogens) were also significantly higher in WC dusts samples than that in WR workplaces. Principal component analysis (PCA) and diagnostic ratios suggested coal/wood combustion as major PAH emission sources in both exposure sites. The average incremental lifetime cancer risk (ILCR) suggested a moderate to potential high cancer risk for adults and children exposed to dust-bound PAHs in both exposure sites, in particular via both dermal and ingestion contact pathways.

  10. The evaluation of suspected child physical abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Cindy W

    2015-05-01

    Child physical abuse is an important cause of pediatric morbidity and mortality and is associated with major physical and mental health problems that can extend into adulthood. Pediatricians are in a unique position to identify and prevent child abuse, and this clinical report provides guidance to the practitioner regarding indicators and evaluation of suspected physical abuse of children. The role of the physician may include identifying abused children with suspicious injuries who present for care, reporting suspected abuse to the child protection agency for investigation, supporting families who are affected by child abuse, coordinating with other professionals and community agencies to provide immediate and long-term treatment to victimized children, providing court testimony when necessary, providing preventive care and anticipatory guidance in the office, and advocating for policies and programs that support families and protect vulnerable children. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  11. The carcinogenic risks of low-LET and high-LET ionizing radiations. Revision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabrikant, J.I. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)]|[California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1991-08-01

    This report presents a discussion on risk from ionizing radiations to human populations. Important new information on human beings has come mainly from further follow-up of existing epidemiological studies, notably the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and the ankylosing spondylitis patients; from new epidemiological surveys, such as the patients treated for cancer of the uterine cervix; and from combined surveys, including workers exposed in underground mines. Since the numerous and complex differences among the different study populations introduce factors that influence the risk estimates derived in ways that are not completely understood, it is not clear how to combine the different risk estimates obtained. These factors involve complex biological and physical variables distributed over time. Because such carcinogenic effects occur too infrequently to be demonstrated at low doses, the risks of low-dose radiation can be estimated only by interpolation from observations at high doses on the basis of theoretical concepts, mathematical models and available empirical evidence, primarily the epidemiological surveys of large populations exposed to ionizing radiation. In spite of a considerable amount of research, only recently has there has been efforts to apply the extensive laboratory data in animals to define the dose-incidence relationship in the low dose region. There simply are insufficient data in the epidemiological studies of large human populations to estimate risk coefficients directly from exposure to low doses. The risk estimates for the carcinogenic effects of radiation have been, in the past, somewhat low and reassessment of the numerical values is now necessary.

  12. The carcinogenic risks of low-LET and high-LET ionizing radiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabrikant, J.I. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States) California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States))

    1991-08-01

    This report presents a discussion on risk from ionizing radiations to human populations. Important new information on human beings has come mainly from further follow-up of existing epidemiological studies, notably the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and the ankylosing spondylitis patients; from new epidemiological surveys, such as the patients treated for cancer of the uterine cervix; and from combined surveys, including workers exposed in underground mines. Since the numerous and complex differences among the different study populations introduce factors that influence the risk estimates derived in ways that are not completely understood, it is not clear how to combine the different risk estimates obtained. These factors involve complex biological and physical variables distributed over time. Because such carcinogenic effects occur too infrequently to be demonstrated at low doses, the risks of low-dose radiation can be estimated only by interpolation from observations at high doses on the basis of theoretical concepts, mathematical models and available empirical evidence, primarily the epidemiological surveys of large populations exposed to ionizing radiation. In spite of a considerable amount of research, only recently has there has been efforts to apply the extensive laboratory data in animals to define the dose-incidence relationship in the low dose region. There simply are insufficient data in the epidemiological studies of large human populations to estimate risk coefficients directly from exposure to low doses. The risk estimates for the carcinogenic effects of radiation have been, in the past, somewhat low and reassessment of the numerical values is now necessary.

  13. Impact of Environmental Exposures on the Mutagenicity/Carcinogenicity of Heterocyclic Amines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felton, J S; Knize, M G; Bennett, L M; Malfatti, M A; Colvin, M E; Kulp, K S

    2003-12-19

    Carcinogenic heterocyclic amines are produced from overcooked foods and are highly mutagenic in most short-term test systems. One of the most abundant of these amines, 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), induces breast, colon and prostate tumors in rats. Human dietary epidemiology studies suggest a strong correlation between either meat consumption or well-done muscle meat consumption and cancers of the colon, breast, stomach, lung and esophagus. For over 20 years our laboratory has helped define the human exposure to these dietary carcinogens. In this report we describe how various environmental exposures may modulate the risk from exposure to heterocyclic amines, especially PhIP. To assess the impact of foods on PhIP metabolism in humans, we developed an LC/MS/MS method to analyze the four major PhIP urinary metabolites following the consumption of a single portion of grilled chicken. Adding broccoli to the volunteers' diet altered the kinetics of PhIP metabolism. At the cellular level we have found that PhIP itself stimulates a significant estrogenic response in MCF-7 cells, but even more interestingly, co-incubation of the cells with herbal teas appear to enhance the response. Numerous environmental chemicals found in food or the atmosphere can impact the exposure, metabolism, and cell proliferation response of heterocyclic amines.

  14. Suspects in criminal investigations of rape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinković Darko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigations of sexual assaults mostly focus on victims and their credibility, which may cause lack of firm evidence in relation to suspects. Given the fact that the criminal offence of rape is characterised by a high incidence of false reports and accusations, frequently indicating specific persons as the perpetrators, certain caution is necessary in the investigation in order to avoid false accusations and/or convictions. As regards the personality of the rapist and motives for committing a forcible sexual act, certain types or rather certain categories of perpetrators can be distinguished, although it should be noted that a large number of rapists do not belong to one category only, but rather combine characteristics of several different types. During a criminal investigation it is of vital importance to differentiate between a rape as a surprise attack and a rape as abuse of trust, as they are compatible with the nature of the suspect's defence. The suspect shall be subjected to a forensic examination in the course of the investigation in order to find traces which prove vaginal, anal or oral penetration, coerced sexual intercourse and identity of the rapist. While conducting an interrogation of a suspected rapist, a crime investigating officer shall use either factual or emotional approach to his interviewee, depending on his psychological and motivational characteristics. In this regard, the factual approach is believed to be more efficient with anger rapists and sadistic rapists, whereas the compassionate approach gives good results with the gentlemen-rapists and partly with the power asserting rapists.

  15. Glaucoma suspect & Humphrey Field Analyzer a correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Dahal

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Glaucoma originally meant "clouded", in Greek.The term glaucoma refers to a group of diseases that have in common characteristic optic neuropathy with associated visual field loss for which elevated intraocular pressure is one of the primary risk factor. The purpose of the study is to correlate the clinically diagnosed cases of glaucoma suspect with the Humphrey Field Analyzer (HFA. Fifty cases of glaucoma suspect who attended the glaucoma clinic of Nepal Eye Hospital Tripureswor, Kathmandu, Nepal and who meets at least two criteria, among the four types of glaucoma suspects were advised for the HFA for the study. In this study out of 50 patient, 36 (72% patients had normal visual field. 14 (28% patients had thinning of the neural retinal rim (NRR in both eyes. The significant relation with thinning of neural retina rim and glaucomatous hemifield test was found in the study. Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal,2012,Vol-8,No-1, 23-28 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v8i1.6822

  16. Tocolytics for suspected intrapartum fetal distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulier, R; Hofmeyr, G J

    2000-01-01

    Prophylactic tocolysis with betamimetics and other agents has become widespread as a treatment for fetal distress. Uterine relaxation may improve placental blood flow and therefore fetal oxygenation. However there may also be adverse maternal cardiovascular effects. The objective of this review was to assess the effects of tocolytic therapy for suspected fetal distress on fetal, maternal and perinatal outcomes. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group trials register and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register. Date of last search: February 1999. Randomised trials comparing tocolytic therapy with no treatment or treatment with another tocolytic agent for suspected fetal distress. Two reviewers assessed trial quality and extracted data. Three studies were included. Compared with no treatment, there were fewer failed improvements in fetal heart rate abnormalities with tocolytic therapy (relative risk 0.26, 95% 0.13 to 0.53). Betamimetic therapy compared with magnesium sulphate showed a non-significant trend towards reduced uterine activity (relative risk 0.07, 95% confidence interval 0.00 to 1.10). Betamimetic therapy appears to be able to reduce the number of fetal heart rate abnormalities and perhaps reduce uterine activity. However there is not enough evidence based on clinically important outcomes to evaluate the use of betamimetics for suspected fetal distress.

  17. Chronic toxicity and carcinogenicity study of erythritol in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lina, B.A.R.; Bos-Kuijpers, M.H.M.; Til, H.P.; Bär, A.

    1996-01-01

    The potential toxicity and carcinogenicity of erythritol, a low-calorie sugar substitute, were examined in Wistar Crl:(WI) WU BR rats. Groups of 50 rats of each sex consumed diets with 0, 2, 5, or 10% erythritol, or 10% mannitol, for a period of 104-107 weeks. To each of these main groups, two

  18. Carcinogenic nitrosamines in traditional beer as the cause of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tumorigenic effect for approximately 30 - 40 years for a tumour to manifest, a cause was sought ... It is suggested that carcinogenic N-nitrosamines in traditional beer are a major factor in the causation of SCC of the oesophagus in black. South Africans. .... represented a negative established free energy of binding (–4.92 ...

  19. Model for the epigenetic mechanism of action of nongenotoxic carcinogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, M

    1995-03-01

    On the basis of studies with carcinogenic nickel compounds, we propose a new model of how epigenetic carcinogens might act. This model is based on the fact that nickel compounds induce an increase in chromatin condensation, causing neighboring genes that are actively expressed in euchromatin to be condensed into heterochromatin. Such redistribution in condensation of chromatin would probably only be transient were it not for the DNA cytosine methyl transferase enzyme, which through de novo methylation can cause genes to be inherited in an active state. Actively expressed genes have less cytosine methylation in their promoter whereas hypermethylation of cytosine in promoters is characteristic of inactive genes. Therefore, nickel, through induction of an enhanced condensation state of chromatin that results in the incorporation of critical genes such as the senescence and tumor suppressor genes into heterochromatin (ie, thread on a spool) and the subsequent methylation of this DNA, silences the genetic activity that might be essential for maintenance of a normal cell. This model is consistent with the literature on cytosine methylation and is also consistent with studies of nickel carcinogenesis showing that it increases cytosine methylation. It is also consistent with nickel carcinogenesis being synergistic with many other mutagenic carcinogens (ie, x rays, benzopyrene, or ultraviolet light), which has always suggested that it has a unique component that is not part of the mechanism of these mutagenic carcinogens.

  20. Determination of some carcinogenic PAHs with toxic equivalency ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    mental health risk associated with exposure to airborne mixtures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs);. Chemosphere 32 639–648. Pufulete M, Battershill J, Boobis A and Fielder R 2004. Approaches to carcinogenic risk assessment for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: A UK perspective; Regulatory. Toxicology and ...

  1. Cell-mediated mutagenesis and cell transformation by chemical carcinogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huberman, E.; Langenbach, R.

    1977-01-01

    Results are reported from studies that showed that mutagenesis of mammalian cells can be achieved by carcinogenic polycyclic hydrocarbons, nitrosamines, and aflatoxins when tested in the presence of fibroblasts and hepatocytes which are able to metabolize these carcinogens. Further, we have found that there is a relationship between the degree of mutant induction and the degree of carcinogenicity of the different chemicals tested. By simultaneously measuring the frequency of cell transformation and the frequency of mutation at one locus (ouabain resistance) in the same cell system, it was possible to estimate the genetic target site for cell transformation. The results indicated that the target site for transformation is approximately 20 times larger than that determined for ouabain resistance. The results suggest that cell transformation may be due to a mutational event and the mutation can occur in one out of a small number of the same or different genes, and that the cell-mediated mutagenesis approach may be a valuable means of detecting tissue-specific carcinogens.

  2. CARCINOGENIC EFFECTS OF LOW DOSES OF IONIZING RADIATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcinogenic Effects of Low Doses of Ionizing RadiationR Julian Preston, Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, NHEERL, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711The form of the dose-response curve for radiation-induced cancers, particu...

  3. Classification of carcinogenic and mutagenic properties using machine learning method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moorthy, N. S.Hari Narayana; Kumar, Surendra; Poongavanam, Vasanthanathan

    2017-01-01

    An accurate calculation of carcinogenicity of chemicals became a serious challenge for the health assessment authority around the globe because of not only increased cost for experiments but also various ethical issues exist using animal models. In this study, we provide machine learning...

  4. Carcinogenic mechanisms of endometrial cancer: involvement of genetics and epigenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banno, Kouji; Yanokura, Megumi; Iida, Miho; Masuda, Kenta; Aoki, Daisuke

    2014-08-01

    Endometrial cancer is increasing worldwide and the number of patients with this disease is likely to continue to grow, including younger patients. Many endometrial cancers show estrogen-dependent proliferation, but the carcinogenic mechanisms are unknown or not completely explained beyond mutations of single oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Possible carcinogenic mechanisms include imbalance between endometrial proliferation by unopposed estrogen and the mismatch repair (MMR) system; hypermethylation of the MMR gene hMLH1; mutation of PTEN, β-catenin and K-ras genes in type I endometrial cancer and of HER-2/neu and p53 genes in type II endometrial cancer; hypermethylation of SPRY2, RASSF1A, RSK4, CHFR and CDH1; and methylation of tumor suppressor microRNAs, including miR-124, miR-126, miR-137, miR-491, miR-129-2 and miR-152. Thus, it is likely that the carcinogenic mechanisms of endometrial cancer involve both genetic and epigenetic changes. Mutations and methylation of MMR genes induce various oncogenic changes that cause carcinogenesis, and both MMR mutation in germ cells and methylation patterns may be inherited over generations and cause familial tumorigenesis. Determination of the detailed carcinogenic mechanisms will be useful for prevention and diagnosis of endometrial cancer, risk assessment, and development of new treatment strategies targeting MMR genes. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2014 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  5. An Alternative to Formaldehyde. Avoiding the Carcinogenic Risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ealy, Julie B.

    1991-01-01

    Demonstrations in which glyoxal may be substituted for formaldehyde, a known carcinogen, are presented. An acid-base clock reaction and a copper mirror on the inside of a test tube are described. Directions for the demonstrations and safety precautions are included. (KR)

  6. Trichloroethylene: Mechanistic, epidemiologic and other supporting evidence of carcinogenic hazard

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusyn, Ivan; Chiu, Weihsueh A.; Lash, Lawrence H.; Kromhout, Hans; Hansen, Johnni; Guyton, Kathryn Z.

    2014-01-01

    The chlorinated solvent trichloroethylene (TCE) is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant. The carcinogenic hazard of TCE was the subject of a 2012 evaluation by a Working Group of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Information on exposures, relevant data from epidemiologic

  7. Carcinogenic nitrosamines in traditional beer as the cause of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the 1930s the annual frequency rose. A dietary cause was sought, the staple diet of black people having changed from sorghum to maize. (corn), with traditional beer being brewed from maize. Carcinogenic N-nitrosamines in traditional beer were suggested as a cause of SCC of the oesophagus, with Fusarium moniliforme, ...

  8. Occupational exposure to carcinogens in Australian road transport workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Si, Si; Carey, Renee; Reid, Alison; Peters, Susan|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304822930; Glass, Deborah D; Driscoll, Timothy; Darcey, Ellie; Fritschi, Lin

    BACKGROUND: Road transport workers (RTWs) are at high risk of exposure to several occupational carcinogens. However, there are gaps in knowledge regarding the extent and the circumstances of exposure. As a sub-study of the Australian Work Exposures Study, this study investigated the prevalence of

  9. carcinogenic potency of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soil

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Carcinogenic potency of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soils obtained from seven different sampling locations in Effurun metropolis and its environs of Niger Delta Area of Nigeria were evaluated. The 16 US EPA priority PAHs were determined with GC-MS. The concentrations of individual PAHs observed were ...

  10. Lifetime carcinogenicity study of 1- and 2-naphthylamine in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purchase, I. F.; Kalinowski, A. E.; Ishmael, J.; Wilson, J.; Gore, C. W.; Chart, I. S.

    1981-01-01

    Groups of male and female beagle dogs were given daily doses of 400 mg of various mixtures of naphthylamines for up to 109 months. Survivors were killed at 128 months. A variety of pathological conditions was diagnosed, but the only effect related to treatment was the induction of bladder neoplasms. All dogs which received pure 2-naphthylamine developed transitional-cell carcinomas of the bladder within 34 months. Two of 8 dogs receiving 6% 2-naphthylamine in 1-naphthylamine developed early carcinoma and 2/8 dogs receiving 0.5% 2-naphthylamine in 1-naphthylamine developed haemangioma of the bladder. Some of the dogs receiving 1-naphthylamine (total dose 950 g) and the controls had focal cystitis or hyperplasia, but no neoplasia of the bladder. These results confirm the carcinogenicity of 2-naphthylamine to dogs. No carcinogenic effect of 1-naphthylamine was observed, indicating that it is at least 200 times less potent as a carcinogen than 2-naphthylamine. The incidence of bladder cancer in dogs fed mixtures of both naphthylamines explains why previous experimental and epidemiological studies of impure 1-naphthylamine have revealed carcinogenicity. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7326199

  11. Genetic Manipulation of Helicobacter pylori Virulence Function by Host Carcinogenic Phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Giovanni; Romero-Gallo, Judith; Sierra, Johanna C; Piazuelo, M Blanca; Krishna, Uma S; Gomez, Martin A; Wilson, Keith T; Peek, Richard M

    2017-05-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the strongest risk factor for gastric adenocarcinoma, yet only a minority of infected persons ever develop this malignancy. One cancer-linked locus is the cag type 4 secretion system (cagT4SS), which translocates an oncoprotein into host cells. A structural component of the cagT4SS is CagY, which becomes rapidly altered during in vivo adaptation in mice and rhesus monkeys, rendering the cagT4SS nonfunctional; however, these models rarely develop gastric cancer. We previously demonstrated that the H. pylori cag+ strain 7.13 rapidly induces gastric cancer in Mongolian gerbils. We now use this model, in conjunction with samples from patients with premalignant lesions, to define the effects of a carcinogenic host environment on the virulence phenotype of H. pylori to understand how only a subset of infected individuals develop cancer. H. pylori cagY sequence differences and cagT4SS function were directly related to the severity of inflammation in human gastric mucosa in either a synchronous or metachronous manner. Serial infections of Mongolian gerbils with H. pylori strain 7.13 identified an oscillating pattern of cagT4SS function. The development of dysplasia or cancer selected for attenuated virulence phenotypes, but robust cagT4SS function could be restored upon infection of new hosts. Changes in the genetic composition of cagY mirrored cagT4SS function, although the mechanisms of cagY alterations differed in human isolates (mutations) versus gerbil isolates (addition/deletion of motifs). These results indicate that host carcinogenic phenotypes modify cagT4SS function via altering cagY, allowing the bacteria to persist and induce carcinogenic consequences in the gastric niche. Cancer Res; 77(9); 2401-12. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. The carcinogenic potential of tacrolimus ointment beyond immune suppression: a hypothesis creating case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vetter Claudia S

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since tacrolimus ointment was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA as a promising treatment for atopic dermatitis, it has been approved in more than 30 additional countries, including numerous European Union member nations. Moreover, in the current clinical routine the use of this drug is no longer restricted to the approved indication, but has been extended to a wide variety of inflammatory skin diseases including some with the potential of malignant transformation. So far, the side-effects reported from the topical use of tacrolimus have been relatively minor (e.g. burning, pruritus, erythema. Recently, however, the FDA reviewed the safety of topical tacrolimus, which resulted in a warning that the use of calcineurin inhibitors may be associated with an increased risk of cancer. Case presentation Oral lichen planus (OLP was diagnosed in a 56-year-old women in February 1999. After several ineffective local and systemic therapeutic measures an off-label treatment of this recalcitrant condition using Tacrolimus 0.1% ointment was initiated in May 2002. After a few weeks of treatment most of the lesions ameliorated, with the exception of the plaques on the sides of the tongue. Nevertheless, the patient became free of symptoms which, however, reoccurred once tacrolimus was weaned, as a consequence treatment was maintained. In April 2005, the plaques on the left side of the tongue appeared increasingly compact and a biopsy specimen confirmed the suspected diagnosis of an oral squamous cell carcinoma. Conclusion The suspected causal relationship between topical use of tacrolimus and the development of a squamous cell carcinoma prompted us to test the notion that the carcinogenicity of tacrolimus may go beyond mere immune suppression. To this end, tacrolimus has been shown to have an impact on cancer signalling pathways such as the MAPK and the p53 pathway. In the given case, we were able to demonstrate that these

  13. The mode of carcinogenic action of saccharin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayson, D B

    1984-03-01

    It is suggested that the induction of bladder cancer in male rats by saccharin is related to the integrity of the urothelial permeability barrier and that, in the Sprague-Dawley rat, saccharin is unable to attain a sufficient concentration in the urothelium if the barrier remains intact. The effect of saccharin, once it enters the urothelium, may be mediated by its ability to inhibit certain enzymes or by other mechanisms. The importance of the permeability barrier concept is explored as a means of identifying a human subpopulation possibly at an increased risk of saccharin-induced bladder cancer.

  14. Evaluation of the E mu-pim-1 transgenic mouse model for short-term carcinogenicity testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Kreijl, C. F.; van Oordt, C. W. V.; Kroese, E. D.

    1998-01-01

    The value of the chronic rodent carcinogenicity assay in adequately predicting cancer risk in humans has become a matter of debate over the past few years. Therefore, more rapid and accurate alternative tests are urgently needed. Transgenic mouse models, those harboring genetic changes that are r......The value of the chronic rodent carcinogenicity assay in adequately predicting cancer risk in humans has become a matter of debate over the past few years. Therefore, more rapid and accurate alternative tests are urgently needed. Transgenic mouse models, those harboring genetic changes...... that are relevant to the multistage cancer process, may provide such alternative tests. Transgenic E mu-pim-1 mice, developed by Berns and coworkers in 1989, contain the pim-1 oncogene, which is expressed at elevated levels in their lymphoid compartments. As a result, these mice are predisposed to the development...

  15. Nutrition in adult and childhood cancer: role of carcinogens and anti-carcinogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosby, Terezie T; Cosgrove, Maeve; Sarkardei, Samiramis; Platt, Karl L; Kaina, Bernd

    2012-10-01

    There is no doubt that diet is one of the main modifiable risk factors for many degenerative diseases, including cancer. More than 30% of adult cancers can be prevented or delayed by diet, being physically active and having a healthy body weight. Plant-based foods, including fruit, vegetables, and whole grains, a favorable omega-6/omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids ratio, and fish consumption have a protective effect against cancer. On the contrary, a low intake of fruit and vegetables, high intake of red and processed meat, high intake of sodium, alcohol consumption, a diet rich in refined carbohydrates, and a high intake of total fat may increase risk of cancer. Furthermore, calorie restriction and having a body/mass index on the lower end of the normal range can significantly decrease or delay the onset of cancers. Most studies were performed on adults and thus the role of diet in childhood cancer is less well-understood. In the past, diet was not considered to play any role in its etiology in children. However, nowadays there is a growing body of evidence that prolonged and frequent breastfeeding, the maternal diet during pregnancy and vitamin intake during pregnancy, may impart benefit for reduced cancer risk in children. Usually, decades of healthy dietary habits are needed to see significant difference in cancer risk. Therefore, diet choices and diet preparation starting early in life deserve more attention. Here we review data focusing on which dietary factors, including food-borne carcinogens, affect the onset of cancers in adults and stress out the potential role of diet in childhood cancer prevention.

  16. The mouse carcinogenicity study is no longer a scientifically justifiable core data requirement for the safety assessment of pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billington, Richard; Lewis, Richard W; Mehta, Jyotigna M; Dewhurst, Ian

    2010-01-01

    Regulatory tests investigating pesticide carcinogenicity potential routinely comprise a battery of in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity studies and two cancer bioassays, one in rats and one in mice. The genotoxicity testing strategy essentially ensures that genotoxic compounds are eliminated, and any carcinogens identified in subsequent lifetime studies are probably nongenotoxic in character. Assessment of 202 pesticide evaluations from the European Union review programme under Directive 91/414/EEC indicated that the mouse carcinogenicity study contributed little or nothing to either derivation of an acceptable daily intake (ADI) for assessment of chronic risk to humans, or hazard classification for labelling purposes. From a pesticide approval perspective, the mouse study did not influence a single outcome. From a risk assessment perspective, the ADI for just one pesticide was based on tumours in mice and this would have barely changed if the mouse data had not been available. In total, only 10 (5%) pesticide ADIs were based solely on the mouse carcinogenicity study and even in these few cases, a similar value would have been identified from other studies if the mouse study had not been available. For pesticides with treatment-related tumours only in mice, just three, or 1.5%, were classified as carcinogens and all were in the lowest category, Category 3 (R40). For pesticides with treatment-related tumours in mice and rats, the mouse data were probably the main, if not the only, cause for another three cases of R40 classification. Absence of the mouse studies would not have influenced assignment of the higher, Category 2 (R45), cancer classification for any substance with treatment-related tumours in both species as all decisions for these substances were limited to Category 3 or 'unclassified' outcomes. Over 100,000 mice were used to test these pesticides. This review shows that the mouse carcinogenicity studies did not provide significant information over and above

  17. Current cytogenetic methods for detecting exposure and effects of mutagens and carcinogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, A T; Boei, J J; Darroudi, F; Van Diemen, P C; Dulout, F; Hande, M P; Ramalho, A T

    1996-05-01

    Most mutagens and genotoxic carcinogens are efficient inducers of chromosomal alterations in exposed cells. Two important classes of aberrations, namely structural and numerical, are recognized and both types of aberrations are associated with congenital abnormalities and neoplasia in humans. These alterations can be easily detected and quantified in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Conventional staining techniques can be used to detect these aberrations; this technique was used to estimate absorbed dose in the case of a radiation accident in Goiania, Brazil. A recently introduced fluorescent in situ hybridization technique (FISH) using DNA probes has increased the sensitivity and ease of detecting chromosome aberrations, especially stable chromosome aberrations. This technique allows, to some extent, the estimation of absorbed radiation dose from past exposures. Numerical aberrations can be directly estimated in metaphases by counting the number of FISH-painted chromosomes. Micronuclei are formed by lagging chromosome fragments or whole chromosomes during the anaphase stage of cell division. The nature of micronuclei as to whether they possess a centromere can be determined either by CREST staining (calcinosis, Raynoud's phenomenon, esophageal dysmotility, sclerodactyly, telangiectasia) or FISH with centromere-specific DNA probes. In several carcinogen-exposed populations, such as heavy smokers or people exposed to arsenic, aneuploidy appears to be more common than structural aberrations. In victims of radiation accidents, aneuploidy (hyperploidy) has been found to be common in addition to structural aberrations.

  18. Evaluation of carcinogenic hazard of diesel engine exhaust needs to consider revolutionary changes in diesel technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClellan, Roger O; Hesterberg, Thomas W; Wall, John C

    2012-07-01

    Diesel engines, a special type of internal combustion engine, use heat of compression, rather than electric spark, to ignite hydrocarbon fuels injected into the combustion chamber. Diesel engines have high thermal efficiency and thus, high fuel efficiency. They are widely used in commerce prompting continuous improvement in diesel engines and fuels. Concern for health effects from exposure to diesel exhaust arose in the mid-1900s and stimulated development of emissions regulations and research to improve the technology and characterize potential health hazards. This included epidemiological, controlled human exposure, laboratory animal and mechanistic studies to evaluate potential hazards of whole diesel exhaust. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (1989) classified whole diesel exhaust as - "probably carcinogenic to humans". This classification stimulated even more stringent regulations for particulate matter that required further technological developments. These included improved engine control, improved fuel injection system, enhanced exhaust cooling, use of ultra low sulfur fuel, wall-flow high-efficiency exhaust particulate filters, exhaust catalysts, and crankcase ventilation filtration. The composition of New Technology Diesel Exhaust (NTDE) is qualitatively different and the concentrations of particulate constituents are more than 90% lower than for Traditional Diesel Exhaust (TDE). We recommend that future reviews of carcinogenic hazards of diesel exhaust evaluate NTDE separately from TDE. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Prevalence of glaucoma suspects and pattern of intra-ocular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Glaucoma is the commonest cause of irreversible blindness in the world. Some glaucoma patients start out as glaucoma suspects for years. Aim: To determine the prevalence of glaucoma suspects and pattern of intra-ocular pressure distribution in glaucoma suspects. Methods: This survey was carried out in ...

  20. Nuclear Pedigree Criteria of Suspected HNPCC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kładny Józef

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The criteria for the diagnosis of HNPCC established by the ICG-HNPCC are very restrictive as they do not allow for the diagnosis of a large number of "suspected HNPCC" cases - these are families which do no fulfill the strict diagnostic "Amsterdam criteria", but do present with several pedigree and clinical features characteristic for HNPCC. Several series of families suspected of harboring germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes have been studied for germline changes in DNA mismatch repair genes and a mutation rate of somewhere between 8-60% was found. Therefore a subgroup of members of the ICG-HNPCC has been working on pedigree/clinical diagnostic criteria for suspected HNPCC. Materials and methods Part I The study was based on two series of colorectal cancer (CRC cases: 1 HNPCC - this group comprised 190 patients affected by CRC from randomly selected families which fulfilled the Amsterdam II criteria registered in Düsseldorf, Germany (102 cases of CRC, Denmark (18 CRCs, Leiden, Holland (23 CRCs and Szczecin, Poland (47 CRCs. 2 Consecutive CRCs - this group comprised 629 (78.0% of 806 individuals with CRC diagnosed in 1991-1997 in the city of Szczecin (ca. 400,000 of inhabitants, Poland. Nuclear pedigrees in both groups were compared for frequency of occurrence of clinical features, that have been shown to be associated with HNPCC. Part II 52 consecutive CRC cases from Szczecin, matching the criteria recognized in part I as appropriate for diagnosis of cases "suspected of HNPCC" were studied for the occurrence of germline hMSH2/hMLH1 constitutional mutations using "exon by exon" sequencing. Results The combination of features - i.e. the occurrence of an HNPCC associated cancer (CRC or cancer of the endometrium, small bowel or urinary tract in a 1st degree relative of a CRC patient; at least one of the patients being diagnosed under age of 50 - appeared to be strongly associated to HNPCC with an OR - 161. Constitutional

  1. [Principles of establishing occupational exposure limits for carcinogens in Poland and in other EU countries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowroń, Jolanta; Czerczak, Slawomir

    2013-01-01

    The principles of determining exposure limits for carcinogens adopted in Poland, the European Union and in other selected countries of the EC are discussed in this article. Carcinogens and/or mutagens pose a direct health risk to people exposed to them. If carcinogens cannot be eliminated from the work and living environments, their exposure should be kept at the lowest possible level. To assess health risk for carcinogens it is necessary to determine the probability of developing a disease or of death from cancer as a result of occupational exposure to carcinogenic substances.

  2. Principles of establishing occupational exposure limits for carcinogens in Poland and in other EU countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Skowroń

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The principles of determining exposure limits for carcinogens adopted in Poland, the European Union and in other selected countries of the EC are discussed in this article. Carcinogens and/or mutagens pose a direct health risk to people exposed to them. If carcinogens cannot be eliminated from the work and living environments, their exposure should be kept at the lowest possible level. To assess health risk for carcinogens it is necessary to determine the probability of developing a disease or of death from cancer as a result of occupational exposure to carcinogenic substances. Med Pr 2013;64(4:541–563

  3. Hypocholesterolemia and nonregenerative, suspected immune-mediated, anemia: Report of 3 canine cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Rachel; Viviano, Katrina R

    2017-10-01

    This report describes hypocholesterolemia in 3 dogs with nonregenerative, suspected immune-mediated anemias. Common causes of hypocholesterolemia were ruled out, raising suspicion for a mechanistic link between anemia and hypocholesterolemia in dogs. As observed in humans with concurrent anemia and hypocholesterolemia, cholesterol concentrations increased to within the reference interval once the dogs' anemia resolved.

  4. Threshold and non-threshold chemical carcinogens: A survey of the present regulatory landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevan, Ruth J; Harrison, Paul T C

    2017-08-01

    For the proper regulation of a carcinogenic material it is necessary to fully understand its mode of action, and in particular whether it demonstrates a threshold of effect. This paper explores our present understanding of carcinogenicity and the mechanisms underlying the carcinogenic response. The concepts of genotoxic and non-genotoxic and threshold and non-threshold carcinogens are fully described. We provide summary tables of the types of cancer considered to be associated with exposure to a number of carcinogens and the available evidence relating to whether carcinogenicity occurs through a threshold or non-threshold mechanism. In light of these observations we consider how different regulatory bodies approach the question of chemical carcinogenesis, looking in particular at the definitions and methodologies used to derive Occupational Exposure Levels (OELs) for carcinogens. We conclude that unless proper differentiation is made between threshold and non-threshold carcinogens, inappropriate risk management measures may be put in place - and lead also to difficulties in translating carcinogenicity research findings into appropriate health policies. We recommend that clear differentiation between threshold and non-threshold carcinogens should be made by all expert groups and regulatory bodies dealing with carcinogen classification and risk assessment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Biomarkers for exposure to ambient air pollution - Comparison of carcinogen-DNA adduct levels with other exposure markers and markers for oxidative stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Autrup, Herman; Daneshvar, Bahram; Dragsted, Lars Ove

    1999-01-01

    Human exposure to genotoxic compounds present in ambient air has been studied using selected biomarkers in nonsmoking Danish bus drivers and postal workers. A large interindividual variation in biomarker levels was observed. Significantly higher levels of bulky carcinogen-DNA adducts (75.42 adducts...... correlations were observed between bulky carcinogen-DNA adduct and PAM-albumin levels (p = 0.005), and between DNA adduct and gamma-glutamyl semialdehyde (GGS) in hemoglobin (p = 0.11). Highly significant correlations were found between PAM-albumin adducts and AAS in plasma (r = 0.001) and GGS in hemoglobin (p...... in the combined group. A significant negative correlation was only observed between bulky carcinogen-DNA adducts and PAM-albumin adducts (p = 0.02) and between DNA adduct and urinary mutagenic activity (p = 0.02) in the GSTM1 null group, bur not in the workers who were homozygotes or heterozygotes for GSTM1. Our...

  6. Biomarkers for Exposure to Ambient Air Pollution - Comparison of Carcinogen-DNA Adduct Levels with Other Exposure Markers and Markers for Oxidative Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Autrup, Herman; Daneshvar, Bahram; Dragsted, Lars Ove

    1999-01-01

    Human exposure to genotoxic compounds present in ambient air has been studied using selected biomarkers in nonsmoking Danish bus drivers and postal workers. A large interindividual variation in biomarker levels was observed. Significantly higher levels of bulky carcinogen-DNA adducts (75.42 adducts...... correlations were observed between bulky carcinogen-DNA adduct and PAH-albumin levels (p = 0.005), and between DNA adduct and [gamma]-glutamyl semialdehyde (GGS) in hemoglobin (p = 0.11). Highly significant correlations were found between PAH-albumin adducts and AAS in plasma (p = 0.001) and GGS in hemoglobin...... in the combined group. A significant negative correlation was only observed between bulky carcinogen-DNA adducts and PAH-albumin adducts (p = 0.02) and between DNA adduct and urinary mutagenic activity (p = 0.02) in the GSTM1 null group, but not in the workers who were homozygotes or heterozygotes for GSTM1. Our...

  7. Exposure and Metabolic Activation Biomarkers of Carcinogenic Tobacco-Specific Nitrosamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Stephen S; Stepanov, Irina; Carmella, Steven G

    2016-01-19

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the world, and cigarette smoking is its main cause. Oral cavity cancer is another debilitating and often fatal cancer closely linked to tobacco product use. While great strides have been made in decreasing tobacco use in the United States and some other countries, there are still an estimated 1 billion men and 250 million women in the world who are cigarette smokers and there are hundreds of millions of smokeless tobacco users, all at risk for cancer. Worldwide, lung cancer kills about three people per minute. This Account focuses on metabolites and biomarkers of two powerful tobacco-specific nitrosamine carcinogens, 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) and N'-nitrosonornicotine (NNN), considered to be among the main causes of lung cancer and oral cavity cancer in people who use tobacco products. Three properties of NNK and NNN are critical for successful biomarker studies: they are present in all tobacco products, they are tobacco-specific and are not found in any other product, and they are strong carcinogens. NNK and NNN are converted in humans to urinary metabolites that can be quantified by mass spectrometry as biomarkers of exposure to these carcinogens. They are also metabolized to diazonium ions and related electrophiles that react with DNA to form addition products that can be detected and quantified by mass spectrometry. These urinary metabolites and DNA addition products can serve as biomarkers of exposure and metabolic activation, respectively. The biomarkers of exposure, in particular the urinary NNK metabolites 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (NNAL) and its glucuronides, have been extensively applied to document tobacco-specific lung carcinogen uptake in smokers and nonsmokers exposed to secondhand tobacco smoke. Highly sensitive mass spectrometric methods have been developed for quantitative analysis of these NNK metabolites as well as metabolites of NNN in human urine

  8. Detection of carcinogenic metals in kidney stones using ultraviolet laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Ahmed Asaad I; Gondal, Mohammed A; Shemis, Mohamed; Khan, Irfan S

    2015-03-10

    The UV single-pulsed (SP) laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) system was developed to detect the carcinogenic metals in human kidney stones extracted through the surgical operation. A neodymium yttrium aluminium garnet laser operating at 266 nm wavelength and 20 Hz repetition rate along with a spectrometer interfaced with an intensified CCD (ICCD) was applied for spectral analysis of kidney stones. The ICCD camera shutter was synchronized with the laser-trigger pulse and the effect of laser energy and delay time on LIBS signal intensity was investigated. The experimental parameters were optimized to obtain the LIBS plasma in local thermodynamic equilibrium. Laser energy was varied from 25 to 50 mJ in order to enhance the LIBS signal intensity and attain the best signal to noise ratio. The parametric dependence studies were important to improve the limit of detection of trace amounts of toxic elements present inside stones. The carcinogenic metals detected in kidney stones were chromium, cadmium, lead, zinc, phosphate, and vanadium. The results achieved from LIBS system were also compared with the inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry analysis and the concentration detected with both techniques was in very good agreement. The plasma parameters (electron temperature and density) for SP-LIBS system were also studied and their dependence on incident laser energy and delay time was investigated as well.

  9. Uncertainties of testing methods: What do we (want to) know about carcinogenicity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paparella, Martin; Colacci, Annamaria; Jacobs, Miriam N

    2017-01-01

    An approach to systematically describe the uncertainties and complexity of the standard animal testing and assessment approach for carcinogenicity is explored by using a OECD Guidance Document that was originally developed for reporting defined in vitro approaches to testing and assessment. The format is suitable for this re-purposing and it appears that the potential multitude of approaches for integrating and interpreting data from standard animal testing may ultimately be conceptually similar to the challenge of integrating relevant in vitro and in silico data. This structured approach shall allow 1) fostering interest in developing improved defined in silico and in vitro approaches; 2) the definition of what type of effects should be predicted by the new approach; 3) selection of the most suitable reference data and assessments; 4) definition of the weight that the standard animal reference data should have compared to human reference data and mechanistic information in the context of assessing the fitness of the new in vitro and in silico approach; 5) definition of a benchmark for the minimum performance of the new approach, based on a conceptual recognition that correlation of alternative assessment results with reference animal results is limited by the uncertainties and complexity of the latter. A longer term perspective is indicated for evolving the definition of adversity for classification and regulatory purposes. This work will be further discussed and developed within the OECD expert group on non-genotoxic carcinogenicity IATA development.

  10. Carcinogenic risk and Bisphenol A exposure: A focus on molecular aspects in endoderm derived glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuomo, Danila; Porreca, Immacolata; Cobellis, Gilda; Tarallo, Roberta; Nassa, Giovanni; Falco, Geppino; Nardone, Antonio; Rizzo, Francesca; Mallardo, Massimo; Ambrosino, Concetta

    2017-12-05

    Epidemiological and experimental evidence associates the exposure to Bisphenol A with the increase of cancer risk in several organs, including prostate. BPA targets different pathways involved in carcinogenicity including the Nuclear Receptors (i.e. estrogen and androgen receptors), stress regulated proteins and, finally, epigenetic changes. Here, we analyse BPA-dependent carcinogenesis in endoderm-derived glands, thyroid, liver, pancreas and prostate focusing on cell signalling, DNA damage repair pathways and epigenetic modifications. Mainly, we gather molecular data evidencing harmful effects at doses relevant for human risk (low-doses). Since few molecular data are available, above all for the pancreas, we analysed transcriptomic data generated in our laboratory to suggest possible mechanisms of BPA carcinogenicity in endoderm-derived glands, discussing the role of nuclear receptors and stress/NF-kB pathways. We evidence that an in vitro toxicogenomic approach might suggest mechanisms of toxicity applicable to cells having the same developmental origin. Although we cannot draw firm conclusions, published data summarized in this review suggest that exposure to BPA, primarily during the developmental stages, represents a risk for carcinogenesis of endoderm-derived glands. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. O vírus linfotrópico de células T humanos tipo 1 (HTLV-1: Quando suspeitar da infecção? Human T cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV1: When should infection be suspected?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Cláudio Ferreira Romanelli

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A infecção pelo vírus linfotrópico de células T humanas (HTLV ocorre há milhares de anos. No entanto, o conhecimento sobre a sua patogênese é recente. Esse vírus é endêmico em várias regiões do mundo. No Brasil encontra-se presente em todos os estados, com prevalências variadas, sendo estimado cerca de 2,5 milhões de infectados. Fatores genéticos e imunológicos do hospedeiro são os principais responsáveis pelas manifestações clínicas associadas, que podem ser divididas em três categorias: neoplásicas, inflamatórias e infecciosas. Destacam-se a mielopatia associada ao HTLV (HAM/TSP e a leucemia/linfoma de células T do adulto (ATLL como as primeiras doenças associadas a esse retrovírus. Posteriormente, inúmeras outras doenças têm sido correlacionadas a esse vírus. Esta revisão atualiza conhecimentos epidemiológicos, fisiopatológicos, terapêuticos e principalmente diagnósticos do HTLV. O objetivo é permitir a suspeita etiológica do HTLV em suas diversas manifestações clínicas, hoje pouco correlacionadas com este agente.Human T Lymphotropic Virus (HTLV infection has occurred for thousands of years. However, knowledge about this pathogenesis is recent. This virus is endemic worldwide. In Brazil it is present throughout the country , with different prevalence and about 2 5 million infected. Genetic and immunologic characteristics of the host are chiefly responsible for clinically associated manifestations which may be: neoplasic, inflammatory and infectious diseases. HTLV associated myelopathy (TSP/ HAM and adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL stand out as the first diseases associated to this retrovirus. Further, several diseases have been correlated to this virus. This review updates epidemiologic, physiopathologic, therapeutic and diagnostic knowledge of HTLV. The purose is to orient suspicion of HTLV etiology and several clinically associated manifestations, which currenty are seldom correlated with this

  12. Carcinogenic nickel silences gene expression by chromatin condensation and DNA methylation: a new model for epigenetic carcinogens.

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Y.W.; Klein, C B; Kargacin, B; Salnikow, K; Kitahara, J; Dowjat, K; Zhitkovich, A; Christie, N T; Costa, M.

    1995-01-01

    A transgenic gpt+ Chinese hamster cell line (G12) was found to be susceptible to carcinogenic nickel-induced inactivation of gpt expression without mutagenesis or deletion of the transgene. Many nickel-induced 6-thioguanine-resistant variants spontaneously reverted to actively express gpt, as indicated by both reversion assays and direct enzyme measurements. Since reversion was enhanced in many of the nickel-induced variant cell lines following 24-h treatment with the demethylating agent 5-az...

  13. Carcinogenic nitrosamines in traditional beer as the cause of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma in black South Africans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillay, Viness; Isaacson, Charles; Mothobi, Pride; Hale, Martin; Tomar, Lomas Kumar; Tyagi, Charu; Altini, Mario; Choonara, Yahya Essop; Kumar, Pradeep

    2015-09-21

    Before the 1930s, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oesophagus was almost unknown among black South Africans. From the 1930s the annual frequency rose. A dietary cause was sought, the staple diet of black people having changed from sorghum to maize (corn), with traditional beer being brewed from maize. Carcinogenic N-nitrosamines in traditional beer were suggested as a cause of SCC of the oesophagus, with Fusarium moniliforme, a corn saprophyte, thought to play a role. To confirm the presence of N-nitrosamines in traditional beer and demonstrate a mechanism for the oncogenesis of oesophageal carcinoma. Analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography was conducted for the identification of nitrosamines in traditional beer samples, and molecular docking studies were employed to predict the affinity between N-nitrosamines and the S100A2 protein. Carcinogenic N-nitrosamines were identified in all six samples of traditional beer examined (N=18 analyses), and docking studies confirmed a high affinity of the nitrosamine N-nitrosopyrrolidone with the S100A2 protein. This may result in the altered expression of the S100A2 protein, leading to tumour progression and prognosis. It is suggested that carcinogenic N-nitrosamines in traditional beer are a major factor in the causation of SCC of the oesophagus in black South Africans. N-nitrosamines have been shown to produce cancer experimentally, but there has not been conclusive epidemiological evidence that N-nitrosamines are carcinogenic to humans. This study is the first to demonstrate the potential link between N-nitrosamines and a human tumour.

  14. Assessment of chronic toxicity and carcinogenicity in an accelerated cancer bioassay in rats of Nifurtimox, an antitrypanosomiasis drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iatropoulos, M J; Wang, C X; von Keutz, E; Williams, G M

    2006-07-01

    The chronic toxicity and carcinogenicity of Nifurtimox (NFX), a 5-nitrofuran derivative used in the treatment of American trypanosomiasis, were studied in male and female Wistar rats in an accelerated cancer bioassay (ACB). The ACB is a mechanistic initiation/promotion chronic toxicity and carcinogenicity bioassay designed to assess potential carcinogenic activity of a test substance in critical organs and tissues of rodents in which human carcinogens are active. The organs studied were liver, lungs, urinary bladder (UB), mammary gland (MG), bone marrow, spleen, kidneys, colon, stomach and any grossly observed lesions. NFX is a genotoxin which has been reported previously to exert a variable degree of carcinogenic activity in rat liver, kidney, UB and MG. The present study was undertaken to assess whether NFX has initiating activity in these four named target sites. In the initiation phase, groups of 20 Wistar rats were given NFX daily in the diet at 0.2% for the first 12 weeks of the study to assess initiating activity, followed by promoters (PROs) for four organs for an additional 24 weeks. NFX was compared to the following known initiators (INs) for each of these four tissues: diethylnitrosamine (DEN) for liver and kidney, N-butyl-N(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN) for UB and 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) for MG. PROs included phenobarbital (PB) for liver and kidney, nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) for UB, and diethylstilbestrol (DES) for MG. NFX was also administered continuously without PROs for 40 weeks. At the end of dosing (40 weeks) and at the end of recovery (52 weeks), animals were sacrificed and subjected to complete gross and histopathological examinations, along with evaluations of body weight gain over time and terminal body weights. Mortality was highest with DEN+PB (group 6) (40%), followed by BBN+NTA (group 7) (15%) and NFX+DES (group 5) and DMBA+DES (group 8) (10% each). The same groups also showed significant reductions in body weight gain

  15. Molecular aspects of neoplasia of Syrian hamster cells transformed in vitro by chemical carcinogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notario, V; DiPaolo, J A

    1998-08-01

    The addition of environmental agents (carcinogens) induces transformation that can be quantitated. Its frequency follows a linear relationship with dose and is consistent with a 'one hit' phenomenon. Transformed colonies produce transformed lines with attributes of neoplastic cells including production of tumors. The results parallel in vivo activity. Although, molecular analysis of most animal assay indicate the presence of activated oncogenes belonging to the ras family, ras activation is a low frequency event in the neoplastic conversion of Syrian hamster cells just as is found with human malignancies. In our analysis of 22 independently derived lines N-ras activation was found only with sodium bisulfite transformed lines. A novel oncogene named carcinogenesis promotion hamster (cph) because its association with the carcinogenic process has been identified. This resulted from focusing on Syrian hamster cells transformed with a single dose of 3-methylcholanthrene (MCA) and cosmid-rescue-techniques from a third-cycle NIH3T3 transformant obtained by sequential transfections of genomic DNA from MCA-initiated hamster fetal cells. cph transforms NIH3T3 cells and acts synergistically with Ha-ras to transform murine fibroblasts. Gene expression analysis using cph genomic fragments from normal and neoplastic cells identifies a number of transcripts including a major mRNA of 2.5 kb as well as several larger transcripts. cph is actively transcribed in different tissues and different species. In the hamster it is a single copy gene localized by FISH to the euchromatic short arm of the X chromosome, at region Xpa7. cph does not have any significant global homology to sequences deposited in date banks, confirming that it is a novel gene. The transforming gene codes for a truncated 246 amino acids whereas the normal cph has a residue of 469 amino acids. In conclusion cph oncogene is activated by a single point-mutation; its activation appears an important mechanism for the

  16. Effects of watercress consumption on metabolism of a tobacco-specific lung carcinogen in smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, S S; Chung, F L; Richie, J P; Akerkar, S A; Borukhova, A; Skowronski, L; Carmella, S G

    1995-12-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that vegetable consumption protects against lung cancer in humans, but the protective constituents have not been identified. Phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), which is release upon chewing of watercress (nasturtium officinale), is a chemopreventive agent against lung cancer induced by the tobacco-specific lung carcinogen 4- (methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl-1-butanone (NNK) in rats and mice. PEITC inhibits the carcinogenicity of NNK by inhibiting its metabolic activation and thereby increasing the levels of detoxified metabolites excreted in urine. In this study, our goal was to determine whether watercress consumption would modify NNK metabolism in smokers. Eleven smokers maintained constant smoking habits and avoided cruciferous vegetables and other sources of isothiocyanates throughout the study. They donated 24-h urine samples on 3 consecutive days (baseline period). One to 3 days later, they consumed 2 ounces (56.8 g) of watercress at each meal for 3 days and donated 24-h urine samples on each of these days (watercress consumption period). One and 2 weeks later, they again donated 24-h urine samples on 2-3 consecutive days (follow-up periods). The samples were analyzed for two metabolites of NNK; 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (NNAL) and [4-methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)but-1-yl]-beta-omega-D-glucosiduro nic acid (NNAL- Gluc). NNAL-Gluc is believed to be a detoxification product of NNK. The urine samples were also analyzed for PEITC-NAC, a metabolite of PEITC. Minimum exposure to PEITC during the watercress consumption period averaged 19-38 mg/day. Seven of the 11 subjects had increased levels of urinary NNAL plus NNAL-Gluc on days 2 and 3 of the watercress consumption period, compared to the baseline period. Overall, the increase in urinary NNAL plus NNAL-Gluc in this period was significant [mean +/- SD 0.924 +/- 1.12 nmol/24 h (33.5%); P < 0.01]. Urinary levels of NNAl plus NNAL-Gluc returned to near baseline

  17. Exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in atmospheric PM1.0 of urban environments: Carcinogenic and mutagenic respiratory health risk by age groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agudelo-Castañeda, Dayana M; Teixeira, Elba C; Schneider, Ismael L; Lara, Sheila Rincón; Silva, Luis F O

    2017-05-01

    We investigated the carcinogenic and mutagenic respiratory health risks related to the exposure to atmospheric PAHs in an urban area. Our study focused in the association of these pollutants and their possible effect in human health, principally respiratory and circulatory diseases. Also, we determined a relationship between the inhalation risk of PAHs and meteorological conditions. We validated the hypothesis that in winter PAHs with high molecular weight associated to submicron particles (PM1) may increase exposure risk, especially for respiratory diseases, bronchitis and pneumonia diseases. Moreover, in our study we verified the relationship between diseases and several carcinogenic PAHs (Ind, BbkF, DahA, BaP, and BghiP). These individual PAHs contributed the most to the potential risk of exposure for inhalation of PM1.0. Even at lower ambient concentrations of BaP and DahA in comparison with individual concentrations of other PAHs associated to PM1.0. Mainly, research suggests to include carcinogenic and mutagenic PAHs in future studies of environmental health risk due to their capacity to associate to PM10. Such carcinogenic and mutagenic PAHs are likely to provide the majority of the human exposure, since they originate from dense traffic urban areas were humans congregate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [Evaluation of carcinogenic risk assessment of metallurgic copper production based on mortality studies and predictive risk values].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russkikh, K Iu; Adrianovskiĭ, V I; Kuz'mina, E A

    2014-01-01

    Comparative evaluation covered carcinogenic jeopardy at metallurgic copper production through studies of the workers' mortality with malignancies and calculation of individual carcinogenic risks. Findings are that the individual carcinogenic risks calucations correspond to the data obtained in epidemiologic study of the mortality with malignancies and could be used for evaluation of carcinogenic jeopardy.

  19. Biomonitoring the Cooked Meat Carcinogen 2-Amino-1-methy-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine in Canine Fur

    OpenAIRE

    Gu, Dan; Neuman, Zachary L.; Modiano, Jaime F.; Turesky, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4, 5-b]pyridine (PhIP) is a heterocyclic aromatic amine (HAA) that is formed during the cooking of meat, poultry, and fish. PhIP is a rodent carcinogen and thought to contribute to several diet-related cancers in humans. PhIP is present in the hair of human omnivores but not in the hair of vegetarians. We have now identified PhIP in the fur of fourteen out of sixteen healthy dogs consuming different brands of commercial pet food. The levels of PhIP in canine f...

  20. A review of mammalian carcinogenicity study design and potential effects of alternate test procedures on the safety evaluation of food ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, A W; Dayan, A D; Hall, W C; Kodell, R L; Williams, G M; Waddell, W D; Slesinski, R S; Kruger, C L

    2011-06-01

    of test procedures, dose selection, histopathology procedures, application of historical control data, statistical evaluations and whether statistical extrapolations are supported by, or are beyond the limits of, the data generated. Without due consideration, there can be result conflicting data interpretations and uncertainty about the relevance of a study's results to human risk. This paper discusses the critical elements of rodent (rat) carcinogenicity studies, particularly with respect to the study of food ingredients. It also highlights study practices and procedures that can detract from the appropriate evaluation of human relevance of results, indicating the importance of adherence to international consensus protocols, such as those detailed by OECD. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Congenic rats with higher arylamine N-acetyltransferase 2 activity exhibit greater carcinogen-induced mammary tumor susceptibility independent of carcinogen metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepp, Marcus W; Doll, Mark A; Samuelson, David J; Sanders, Mary Ann G; States, J Christopher; Hein, David W

    2017-03-31

    Recent investigations suggest role(s) of human arylamine N-acetyltransferase 1 (NAT1) in breast cancer. Rat NAT2 is orthologous to human NAT1 and the gene products are functional homologs. We conducted in vivo studies using F344.WKY-Nat2 rapid/slow rats, congenic at rat Nat2 for high (rapid) and low (slow) arylamine N-acetyltransferase activity, to assess a possible role for rat NAT2 in mammary tumor susceptibility. Mammary carcinogens, methylnitrosourea (MNU) and 7,12-dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA) neither of which is metabolized by N-acetyltransferase, were administered to assess mammary tumors. MNU was administered at 3 or 8 weeks of age. DMBA was administered at 8 weeks of age. NAT2 enzymatic activity and endogenous acetyl-coenzyme A (AcCoA) levels were measured in tissue samples and embryonic fibroblasts isolated from the congenic rats. Tumor latency was shorter in rapid NAT2 rats compared to slow NAT2 rats, with statistical significance for MNU administered at 3 and 8 weeks of age (p = 0.009 and 0.050, respectively). Tumor multiplicity and incidence were higher in rapid NAT2 rats compared to slow NAT2 rats administered MNU or DMBA at 8 weeks of age (MNU, p = 0.050 and 0.035; DMBA, p = 0.004 and 0.027, respectively). Recombinant rat rapid-NAT2, as well as tissue samples and embryonic fibroblasts derived from rapid NAT2 rats, catalyzed p-aminobenzoic acid N-acetyl transfer and folate-dependent acetyl-coenzyme A (AcCoA) hydrolysis at higher rates than those derived from rat slow-NAT2. Embryonic fibroblasts isolated from rapid NAT2 rats displayed lower levels of cellular AcCoA than slow NAT2 rats (p rat NAT2 in mammary cancer was discovered unrelated to carcinogen metabolism, suggesting a role for human NAT1 in breast cancer.

  2. Carcinogenic HPV infection in the cervical squamo-columnar junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirkovic, Jelena; Howitt, Brooke E; Roncarati, Patrick; Demoulin, Stephanie; Suarez-Carmona, Meggy; Hubert, Pascale; McKeon, Frank D; Xian, Wa; Li, Anita; Delvenne, Philippe; Crum, Christopher P; Herfs, Michael

    2015-07-01

    Recent studies have suggested the involvement of a unique population of cells at the cervical squamo-columnar junction (SCJ) in the pathogenesis of early (squamous intraepithelial lesion or SIL) and advanced (squamous cell and adeno-carcinomas) cervical neoplasia. However, there is little evidence to date showing that SCJ cells harbour carcinogenic HPV or are instrumental in the initial phases of neoplasia. This study was designed to (1) determine if normal-appearing SCJ cells contained evidence of carcinogenic HPV infection and (2) trace their transition to early SIL. Sections of cervix from high-risk reproductive age women were selected and SCJ cells were analysed by using several techniques which increasingly implicated HPV infection: HPV DNA (genotyping and in situ hybridization)/RNA (PCR), immunostaining for HPV16 E2 (an early marker of HPV infection), p16(ink4), Ki67, and HPV L1 protein. In 22 cases with a history of SIL and no evidence of preneoplastic lesion in the excision specimen, HPV DNA was isolated from eight of ten with visible SCJ cells, six of which were HPV16/18 DNA-positive. In five of these latter cases, the SCJ cells were positive for p16(ink4) and/or HPV E2. Transcriptionally active HPV infection (E6/E7 mRNAs) was also detected in microdissected SCJ cells. Early squamous atypia associated with the SCJ cells demonstrated in addition diffuse p16(ink4) immunoreactivity, elevated proliferative index, and rare L1 antigen positivity. We present for the first time direct evidence that normal-appearing SCJ cells can be infected by carcinogenic HPV. They initially express HPV E2 and their progression to SIL is heralded by an expanding metaplastic progeny with increased proliferation and p16(ink4) expression. Whether certain SCJs are more vulnerable than others to carcinogenic HPV genotypes and what variables determine transition to high-grade SIL remain unresolved, but the common event appears to be a vulnerable cell at the SCJ. Copyright © 2015

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of suspected atrial tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menegus, M A; Greenberg, M A; Spindola-Franco, H; Fayemi, A

    1992-05-01

    Two-dimensional echocardiography has become the standard technique for evaluation of cardiac and paracardiac mass lesions. We have used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as an independent assessment of cardiac-associated masses in patients with echocardiograms demonstrating sessile atrial tumors. MRI was performed in seven patients, ages 33 to 84, whose echocardiographic diagnoses included left atrial mass (five), right atrial mass (one), and interatrial mass (one). In four of the patients with a diagnosis of left atrial mass, MRI showed extracardiac compression of the atrium, simulating a tumor (hiatal hernia, tortuous descending aorta, bronchogenic cyst). MRI was entirely normal in one patient with an apparent left atrial mass. MRI elucidated extension of an extracavitary mass into the interatrial septum in two patients. One of these patients with an echocardiographic right atrial mass had extension of a lipoma into the interatrial septum without atrial tumor. MRI confirmed the echocardiographic diagnosis of an interatrial mass in the other patient. We conclude that MRI, because of its ability to define anatomic relationships and tissue characteristics, is a powerful noninvasive tool for evaluating suspected cardiac mass lesions. Although echocardiography remains the primary screening test for the detection of cardiac masses, MRI is a more specific modality for precise diagnosis. Correct MRI interpretation may obviate the need for invasive studies or surgery.

  4. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) evaluation of the carcinogenicity of outdoor air pollution: focus on China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomis, Dana; Huang, Wei; Chen, Guosheng

    2014-04-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has classified outdoor air pollution and the particulate matter (PM) in outdoor air pollution as carcinogenic to humans, as based on sufficient evidence of carcinogenicity in humans and experimental animals and strong support by mechanistic studies. The data with important contributions to the evaluation are reviewed, highlighting the data with particular relevance to China, and implications of the evaluation with respect to China are discussed. The air pollution levels in Chinese cities are among the highest observed in the world today and frequently exceed health-based national and international guidelines. Data from high-quality epidemiologic studies in Asia, Europe, and North America consistently show positive associations between lung cancer and PM exposure and other indicators of air pollution, which persist after adjustment for important lung cancer risk factors, such as tobacco smoking. Epidemiologic data from China are limited but nevertheless indicate an increased risk of lung cancer associated with several air pollutants. Excess cancer risk is also observed in experimental animals exposed to polluted outdoor air or extracted PM. The exposure of several species to outdoor air pollution is associated with markers of genetic damage that have been linked to increased cancer risk in humans. Numerous studies from China, especially genetic biomarker studies in exposed populations, support that the polluted air in China is genotoxic and carcinogenic to humans. The evaluation by IARC indicates both the need for further research into the cancer risks associated with exposure to air pollution in China and the urgent need to act to reduce exposure to the population.

  5. Evidence supporting product standards for carcinogens in smokeless tobacco products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatsukami, Dorothy K; Stepanov, Irina; Severson, Herb; Jensen, Joni A; Lindgren, Bruce R; Horn, Kimberly; Khariwala, Samir S; Martin, Julia; Carmella, Steven G; Murphy, Sharon E; Hecht, Stephen S

    2015-01-01

    Smokeless tobacco products sold in the United States vary significantly in yields of nicotine and tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNA). With the passage of the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act, the Food and Drug Administration now has the authority to establish product standards. However, limited data exist determining the relative roles of pattern of smokeless tobacco use versus constituent levels in the smokeless tobacco product in exposure of users to carcinogens. In this study, smokeless tobacco users of brands varying in nicotine and TSNA content were recruited from three different regions in the U.S. Participants underwent two assessment sessions. During these sessions, demographic and smokeless tobacco use history information along with urine samples to assess biomarkers of exposure and effect were collected. During the time between data collection, smokeless tobacco users recorded the amount and duration of smokeless tobacco use on a daily basis using their diary cards. Results showed that independent of pattern of smokeless tobacco use and nicotine yields, levels of TSNA in smokeless tobacco products played a significant role in carcinogen exposure levels. Product standards for reducing levels of TSNA in smokeless tobacco products are necessary to decrease exposure to these toxicants and potentially to reduce risk for cancer. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. MATline: a job-exposure matrix for carcinogenic chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilardi, Luisella; Falcone, Umberto; Santoro, Silvano; Coffano, Elena

    2008-01-01

    MATline is a tool that can be used to predict which industrial processes can be expected to involve the use of a substance that is considered carcinogenic as documented in the literature. The database includes agents carrying risk phrases R45, R49 and R40 according to the method of classification adopted by the EU and/or agents in categories 1, 2A and 2B as classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Each agent is associated with a list of industrial processes coded according to the tariff headings used by the National Institute of Insurance against Occupational Injuries and Diseases (Istituto Nazionale per l'Assicurazione contro gli Infortuni sul Lavoro, INAIL). The main sources of information are the IARC Monographs and databases available through the National Library of Medicine's TOXNET portal. The matrix currently includes 600 carcinogenic agents, 23 classes of agents and some 7000 links between agents and industrial processes. MATline can be viewed on the www.dors.it website.

  7. [Mutagenic Activity of Four Aminoazo Compounds with Different Carcinogenicity for Rat Liver in the Ames Test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolova, T S; Sinitsyna, O I; Kaledin, V I

    2015-01-01

    In this paper in the bacterial Ames test we compared the mutagenicity of four aminoazo compounds, previously studied by other researchers and used for activation of rat liver enzymes, with the carcinogenicity in the rat liver. It was found that in the Ames test they have mutagenic activity, however, this activity does not correlate quantitatively with rat sensitivity to their hepatocarcinogenic action. Thus, the most active carcinogen 3'-methyl-4-dimethylaminoazobenzene causes mutations almost 2.5 times less than weakly carcinogenic ortho-aminoazotoluene, and exactly the same number of mutations as non-carcinogenic N,N-diethyl-4-aminoazobenzene.

  8. Predicting carcinogenicity of diverse chemicals using probabilistic neural network modeling approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Kunwar P., E-mail: kpsingh_52@yahoo.com [Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, New Delhi (India); Environmental Chemistry Division, CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Post Box 80, Mahatma Gandhi Marg, Lucknow 226 001 (India); Gupta, Shikha; Rai, Premanjali [Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, New Delhi (India); Environmental Chemistry Division, CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Post Box 80, Mahatma Gandhi Marg, Lucknow 226 001 (India)

    2013-10-15

    Robust global models capable of discriminating positive and non-positive carcinogens; and predicting carcinogenic potency of chemicals in rodents were developed. The dataset of 834 structurally diverse chemicals extracted from Carcinogenic Potency Database (CPDB) was used which contained 466 positive and 368 non-positive carcinogens. Twelve non-quantum mechanical molecular descriptors were derived. Structural diversity of the chemicals and nonlinearity in the data were evaluated using Tanimoto similarity index and Brock–Dechert–Scheinkman statistics. Probabilistic neural network (PNN) and generalized regression neural network (GRNN) models were constructed for classification and function optimization problems using the carcinogenicity end point in rat. Validation of the models was performed using the internal and external procedures employing a wide series of statistical checks. PNN constructed using five descriptors rendered classification accuracy of 92.09% in complete rat data. The PNN model rendered classification accuracies of 91.77%, 80.70% and 92.08% in mouse, hamster and pesticide data, respectively. The GRNN constructed with nine descriptors yielded correlation coefficient of 0.896 between the measured and predicted carcinogenic potency with mean squared error (MSE) of 0.44 in complete rat data. The rat carcinogenicity model (GRNN) applied to the mouse and hamster data yielded correlation coefficient and MSE of 0.758, 0.71 and 0.760, 0.46, respectively. The results suggest for wide applicability of the inter-species models in predicting carcinogenic potency of chemicals. Both the PNN and GRNN (inter-species) models constructed here can be useful tools in predicting the carcinogenicity of new chemicals for regulatory purposes. - Graphical abstract: Figure (a) shows classification accuracies (positive and non-positive carcinogens) in rat, mouse, hamster, and pesticide data yielded by optimal PNN model. Figure (b) shows generalization and predictive

  9. The in vivo rodent test systems for assessment of carcinogenic potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Laan, Jan-Willem; Spindler, Per

    2002-01-01

    mouse models, the RasH2 and Tg.AC transgenic mouse models, and the neonatal mouse model. The "ICH Guideline S1B on Testing for Carcinogenicity of Pharmaceuticals" advocates that carcinogenicity testing of pharmaceuticals, when needed, might be carried out choosing one 2-year rodent carcinogenicity study...... (rat) plus one other study that supplements the 2-year study and providing additional information that is not readily available from the 2-year study: either (1) a short- or medium-term in vivo rodent test system or (2) a 2-year carcinogenicity study in a second rodent species (mouse). Another topic...

  10. Carcinogenic potential of endosulfan and its metabolites based on a quantum chemical model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bedor, C.N.G., E-mail: cheila.bedor@univasf.edu.br [Universidade Federal do Vale do Sao Francisco, Av. Jose de Sa Manicoba, S/N, Centro, 56304-205, Petrolina, PE (Brazil); Morais, R.J.L.; Cavalcanti, L.S. [Universidade Federal do Vale do Sao Francisco, Av. Jose de Sa Manicoba, S/N, Centro, 56304-205, Petrolina, PE (Brazil); Ferreira, J.V. [Instituto Federal de Alagoas, Rua Mizael Domingues, 75, Poco, 57020-600, Maceio, AL (Brazil); Pavao, A.C. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Av. Prof. Moraes Rego, 1235, Cidade Universitaria, 50670-901, Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2010-11-15

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the carcinogenic potential of endosulfan and its metabolites through electronic parameters that characterize the action of carcinogens, i.e. descriptors such as electron affinity, {Delta} (HOMO-LUMO), dipole moments, electrostatic attraction, formation heat (H{sub f}) and permeability of the cell membrane (c Log P). The results reveal that both endosulfan and its metabolites are electrophilic and have carcinogenic potential. Although there are few data on its carcinogenicity in the literature, the findings of the present study indicate that the use of this pesticide represents a risk to the health of the general population, especially rural workers.

  11. Detection of Rabies antigen in brains of suspected Rabid dogs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To detect the presence of rabies antigen in brains of suspected rabid dogs. Materials and Methods: Ninety six (96) brain specimens from suspected rabid dogs were examined for the presence of rabies antigen using Seller's staining technique and enzyme immunoassay. Results: The two techniques were both ...

  12. 48 CFR 803.806 - Processing suspected violations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Limitation on the Payment of Funds to Influence Federal Transactions 803.806 Processing suspected violations. A VA employee must report suspected violations of 31 U.S.C. 1352, Limitation on Use of Appropriated Funds to Influence Certain Federal...

  13. The clinical course of patients with suspected pulmonary embolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beek, E. J.; Kuijer, P. M.; Büller, H. R.; Brandjes, D. P.; Bossuyt, P. M.; ten Cate, J. W.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The outcome of patients with suspected pulmonary embolism is known to a limited extent only. OBJECTIVE: To address this limited knowledge in a cohort in whom pulmonary embolism was proved or ruled out. METHODS: Consecutive patients with clinically suspected pulmonary embolism underwent

  14. Seasonal variation among tuberculosis suspects in four countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mabaera, Biggie; Naranbat, Nymadawa; Katamba, Achilles

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the study was to analyze monthly trends across a calendar year in tuberculosis suspects and sputum smear-positive cases based on nationally representative samples of tuberculosis laboratory registers from Moldova, Mongolia, Uganda and Zimbabwe. Out of the 47 140 suspects registered...... in the tuberculosis laboratory registers, 13.4% (6312) were cases. The proportion varied from country to country, Moldova having the lowest (9%) and Uganda the highest (21%). From the monthly proportion of suspects and cases among total suspects and cases, seasonal variations were most marked in Mongolia which, among...... attendance to diagnostic laboratory services, evidenced by the contrasting findings of Mongolia (extreme continental northern climate) compared to Uganda (equatorial climate). A combination of external and possibly endogenous factors seems to determine whether tuberculosis suspects and cases present...

  15. Assessment of carcinogenic health risk for population living in monocities and rural settelements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.M. Boev

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Our research goal was to perform assessment of carcinogenic health risk for population living in monocities and rural settlements in Orenburg region including both total and individual carcinogenic risk assessment. We assessed carcinogenic health risks for population living in cities with industrial enterprises as economic bases (Novotroitsk and Mednogorsk and rural settlements (Oktyabrskiy, Ilekskiy, and Tyul'ganskiy districts in Orenburg region. Exposure assessment was based on the data obtained via laboratory research of environmental objects over 2005–2013 (1,265 atmospheric air samples and 1,897 drinking water samples. We determined total carcinogenic risks for population on each territory under multi-environment impacts exerted by chemicals; a share of each chemical in risk formation was also identified. The results we obtained allow us to make a conclusion that monocities' areas are unfavorable in terms of carcinogenic effects on population health. We detected priority carcinogens for each territory in order to work out practical recommendations on lowering carcinogenic risks and on possibility of delayed effects evolvement. Carcinogenic risk caused by chemicals contained in drinking water both in monocities and rural settlements was considered to be acceptable; however, it was 1.5-2 times higher for monocities population. Overall, chromium took the leading role among carcinogens in monocities air; benzene and arsenic occupied the same place in rural settlements air. Chromium, benzpyrene, and arsenic were priority carcinogens contained in drinking water in rural settlements. Our research proves the necessity to work our practical recommendations on lowering carcinogenic risks and on possibility of delayed effects evolvement on regional level.

  16. The effects of environmental chemical carcinogens on the microRNA machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzotti, A; Pulliero, A

    2014-07-01

    The first evidence that microRNA expression is early altered by exposure to environmental chemical carcinogens in still healthy organisms was obtained for cigarette smoke. To date, the cumulative experimental data indicate that similar effects are caused by a variety of environmental carcinogens, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, nitropyrenes, endocrine disruptors, airborne mixtures, carcinogens in food and water, and carcinogenic drugs. Accordingly, the alteration of miRNA expression is a general mechanism that plays an important pathogenic role in linking exposure to environmental toxic agents with their pathological consequences, mainly including cancer development. This review summarizes the existing experimental evidence concerning the effects of chemical carcinogens on the microRNA machinery. For each carcinogen, the specific microRNA alteration signature, as detected in experimental studies, is reported. These data are useful for applying microRNA alterations as early biomarkers of biological effects in healthy organisms exposed to environmental carcinogens. However, microRNA alteration results in carcinogenesis only if accompanied by other molecular damages. As an example, microRNAs altered by chemical carcinogens often inhibits the expression of mutated oncogenes. The long-term exposure to chemical carcinogens causes irreversible suppression of microRNA expression thus allowing the transduction into proteins of mutated oncogenes. This review also analyzes the existing knowledge regarding the mechanisms by which environmental carcinogens alter microRNA expression. The underlying molecular mechanism involves p53-microRNA interconnection, microRNA adduct formation, and alterations of Dicer function. On the whole, reported findings provide evidence that microRNA analysis is a molecular toxicology tool that can elucidate the pathogenic mechanisms activated by environmental carcinogens. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Suspected nasopharyngeal carcinoma in three workers with long-term exposure to sulphuric acid vapour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, C K; Lo, W C; Huang, P H; Wu, M T; Christiani, D C; Lin, C T

    1999-06-01

    Sulphuric acid vapour has been suspected of being an industrial carcinogen. In this study, a cluster is presented of three patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) who worked in the same building of a telecommunications conveyance station in southern Taiwan with long term exposure to sulphuric acid vapour concentrations as high as 0.18 mg/m3. All three workers were diagnosed with NPC within a 5 month period between September 1992, and March 1993. Compared with 19 other healthy workers from the same building, these three workers with NPC had worked significantly longer in this building than had the others (mean (SD) (years): 12.7 (0.6) v 7.4 (4.4); p = 0.01). With an in situ nucleic acid hybridisation and immunostaining method for colocalised Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and secretory component (SC) protein among biopsy specimens of these three patients with NPCs, it was found that some tumour cells did not contain EBV and SC protein staining signals. These results indicate that EBV infection is not the only risk factor for NPC and long term exposure to relatively low concentrations of sulphuric acid vapour may be associated with the development of NPC.

  18. Mechanism of metal-mediated DNA damage induced by metabolites of carcinogenic 2-nitropropane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakano, K; Oikawa, S; Murata, M; Hiraku, Y; Kojima, N; Kawanishi, S

    2001-08-08

    2-Nitropropane (2-NP), a widely used industrial solvent, is carcinogenic to rats. To clarify the mechanism of carcinogenesis by 2-NP, we investigated DNA damage by 2-NP metabolites, N-isopropylhydroxylamine (IPHA) and hydroxylamine-O-sulfonic acid (HAS), using 32P-5'-end-labelled DNA fragments obtained from genes that are relevant to human cancer. In the presence of Fe(III) EDTA, both IPHA and HAS caused DNA damage at every nucleotide position without marked site preference. The damage was inhibited by free hydroxyl radical (-*OH) scavengers, catalase and deferoxamine mesilate, an iron chelating agent. These results suggest that the DNA damage was caused by -*OH generated via H(2)O(2) by both IPHA and HAS. In contrast, in the presence of Cu(II), IPHA frequently caused DNA damage at thymine. The Cu(II)-mediated DNA damage caused by IPHA was inhibited by catalase, methional and bathocuproine, a Cu(I)-specific chelator, suggesting the involvement of H(2)O(2) and Cu(I). These results suggest that the DNA damage induced by IPHA in the presence of Cu(II) was caused by a reactive oxygen species like the Cu(I)-hydroperoxo complex. On the other hand, HAS most frequently induced DNA damage at 5'-TG-3', 5'-GG-3' and 5'-GGG-3' sequences. Catalase and methional only partly inhibited the Cu(II)-mediated DNA damage caused by HAS, suggesting that the reactive oxygen species and another reactive species participate in this process. Formation of 8-oxodG by IPHA or HAS increased in the presence of metal ions. This study suggests that metal-mediated DNA damage caused by 2-NP metabolites plays an important role in the mutagenicity and the carcinogenicity of 2-NP.

  19. Carcinogenic risks associated with radiation pollution. [UV radiation, sunlight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latarjet, R.

    1976-01-01

    The cancerogenic pollution by non-ionizing radiations is limited to the case of solar ultraviolet, whose activity at ground level may be increased as a consequence of the stratospheric depletion of ozone, produced by certain chemical pollutants: nitrogen oxides from supersonic aircrafts, freon. As regards ionizing radiations, the discussion is focused on the fundamental problem of the threshold, and on the means by which one may obtain some quantitative data related to carcinogenesis by small radiation doses in man. A new concept, that of a practical threshold, is proposed. A theory which links radiocancerogenesis, as well as chemical cancerogenesis, to errors produced in the repair of lesions in the DNA is discussed. The rads-equivalent project for chemical mutagens and carcinogens is described.

  20. [Communication of chemical and carcinogen risk at refinery maintenance companies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, O; Loi, A M

    2006-01-01

    This short paper reports a communication experience about chemical/carcinogen risk aimed to characterize and to document different occasions and several ways of exposure of the workers employed in maintenance companies in a petrochemical factory. We utilized different source of information: from risk assessment document (VR) of the petrochemical plant and from job sheets of the companies on contracts of maintenance. Working this way it has been possible to create a database which includes information about chemical agents, length and the way of exposure for every worker. This database allows to improve the level of knowledge of the Occupational Health Doctors, Professionals and of the workers, moreover it is useful to take note of quality and way of exposure in the VR document.

  1. Occurrence of the carcinogenic compound ptaquiloside in the soil environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lars Holm; Kroghsbo, Stine; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2003-01-01

    Bracken (Pteridium aquilinum (L.) Kuhn) is a common fern found on all continents except Antarctica. It is under suspicion of causing cancer among people who utilizes it as food. The main carcinogenic compound is thought to be the water-soluble compound ptaquiloside. Ptaquiloside-uptake may occur...... not only through food, but also via drinking water as ptaquiloside might leach from plant material. The purpose of the study was to identify environmental parameters that correlate with the ptaquiloside-content in fronds, and to quantify the amount of ptaquiloside in the soil environment. The ptaquiloside......-stands determined the ptaquiloside-content in the soil materials while the content in fronds was found to be a function of the frond-height and the light-exposure in the ecosystem....

  2. [Thoughts on carcinogenic pollution caused by ionizing radiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latarjet, R

    1976-01-01

    The pollution phenomenon groups the effects of small doses of radiation on large populations. These effects on Man are not directly accessible. One must: a) consider some epidemiological statistics (cosmic radiation at high altitudes; radioactivity from granitic surroundings); b) extrapolate from datas obtained with high doses; c) extrapolate from datas obtained with low doses in micro-organisms or mammalian cells in vitro. The interpolation scheme of Abrahamson et al. is so available for mutagenicity. The question of a threshold remains theoretical, although radiation-induced carcinogenesis often displays a dose-effects curve with a well market threshold. A new concept, that of a "practical threshold" is developped, which may be of great usefulness. The main genetic considerations are listed upon which the present international admissible doses are based. Finally, in order to establish quantitative comparisons between chemical and radiation carcinogenic pollution, the concept of "rad equivalents" for the main chemical mutagens is stressed.

  3. STATUS GIZI DAN STATUS IODIUM PADA BALITA DENGAN SUSPECT DOWN SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hastin Dyah K.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nutritional status is one of the factor that determines the human resources and quality of life. Toddlers are one of vulnerable groups for nutritional problems. One of the nutrition problem in Indonesia is Iodine deficiency disorder. Clinical manifestations are not only endemic goiter and cretins, but also abortion, stillbirth, and congenital abnormalities. Congenital abnormalities are commonly found in areas ofendemic iodine deficiency disorder such as Down Syndrome. Objectives: This study aims to determine the iodine nutrition status of children under jive with Down Syndrome Suspect in endemic areas ofiodine deficiency disorder. Method: This research is descriptive study with cross sectional design. The study was conducted in Magelang district, which is endemic iodine deficiency disorder. Total sample of30 under jive years old with Down Syndrome Suspect. Result: The result showed that the nutritional status of respondents based on the weight/age index was 50% had good nutritional status. According to height/age index as much as 70% are short and very short. Based on weight/height index was 73,3% with normal nutritional status. At least 33% of children with Down Syndrome Suspect accompanied hypothyroidism.  Keywords: Suspect Down Syndrome, Nutritional Status, Iodine Status

  4. Improved in silico prediction of carcinogenic potency (TD50) and the risk specific dose (RSD) adjusted Threshold of Toxicological Concern (TTC) for genotoxic chemicals and pharmaceutical impurities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contrera, Joseph F

    2011-02-01

    The Threshold of Toxicological Concern (TTC) is a level of exposure to a genotoxic impurity that is considered to represent a negligible risk to humans. The TTC was derived from the results of rodent carcinogenicity TD50 values that are a measure of carcinogenic potency. The TTC currently sets a default limit of 1.5 μg/day in food contact substances and pharmaceuticals for all genotoxic impurities without carcinogenicity data. Bercu et al. (2010) used the QSAR predicted TD50 to calculate a risk specific dose (RSD) which is a carcinogenic potency adjusted TTC for genotoxic impurities. This promising approach is currently limited by the software used, a combination of MC4PC (www.multicase.com) and a Lilly Inc. in-house software (VISDOM) that is not available to the public. In this report the TD50 and RSD were predicted using a commercially available software, SciQSAR (formally MDL-QSAR, www.scimatics.com) employing the same TD50 training data set and external validation test set that was used by Bercu et al. (2010). The results demonstrate the general applicability of QSAR predicted TD50 values to determine the RSDs for genotoxic impurities and the improved performance of SciQSAR for predicting TD50 values. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Ingestion of carcinogenic N-nitrosamines by infants and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westin, J B

    1990-01-01

    Volatile N-nitrosamines are very potent carcinogens. They can be approximately 5 million times more powerful than saccharin. One of two principal methods is generally used when assaying rubber products for nitrosamine content: (1) the German method (aqueous extraction) or (2) the U.S. method (dichloromethane extraction). When 16 types of baby-bottle nipples and children's pacifiers were tested recently, relatively high levels of nitramines, nitrosamines, and nitrosatable precursors were found. Eighty-one percent failed to meet the strict Dutch standards (based on the German method), but only 37.5% would have been banned according to U.S. regulations, which ignore nitrosatable-precursor content. Up to one-third of the nitrosamines present in a rubber nipple may migrate into the milk in the bottle within a few hours. Transfer into infant formula may exceed 40%, and transfer into saliva may be even higher. Thus, a highly contaminated nipple may cause a 5-kg infant who drinks 1 l/d to ingest approximately 2 micrograms/kg body weight.d of nitrosamines. To this, add any exposure resulting from pacifier use or from in vivo nitrosation of precursors. Therefore, daily exposure of infants may, in the worst case, conceivably reach 4-5 micrograms/kg body weight.d. Entire average daily exposure of an American adult to volatile nitrosamines from major sources is estimated to be less than 0.05 micrograms/kg body weight.d. Infants who use products like those tested may, therefore, be exposed daily to less than or equal to 100 times more of these carcinogens than are adults.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Ingestion of carcinogenic N-nitrosamines by infants and children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westin, J.B. (Hebrew Univ.-Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem (Israel))

    1990-11-01

    Volatile N-nitrosamines are very potent carcinogens. They can be approximately 5 million times more powerful than saccharin. One of two principal methods is generally used when assaying rubber products for nitrosamine content: (1) the German method (aqueous extraction) or (2) the U.S. method (dichloromethane extraction). When 16 types of baby-bottle nipples and children's pacifiers were tested recently, relatively high levels of nitramines, nitrosamines, and nitrosatable precursors were found. Eighty-one percent failed to meet the strict Dutch standards (based on the German method), but only 37.5% would have been banned according to U.S. regulations, which ignore nitrosatable-precursor content. Up to one-third of the nitrosamines present in a rubber nipple may migrate into the milk in the bottle within a few hours. Transfer into infant formula may exceed 40%, and transfer into saliva may be even higher. Thus, a highly contaminated nipple may cause a 5-kg infant who drinks 1 l/d to ingest approximately 2 micrograms/kg body weight.d of nitrosamines. To this, add any exposure resulting from pacifier use or from in vivo nitrosation of precursors. Therefore, daily exposure of infants may, in the worst case, conceivably reach 4-5 micrograms/kg body weight.d. Entire average daily exposure of an American adult to volatile nitrosamines from major sources is estimated to be less than 0.05 micrograms/kg body weight.d. Infants who use products like those tested may, therefore, be exposed daily to less than or equal to 100 times more of these carcinogens than are adults.

  7. Prediction of Suspect Location Based on Spatiotemporal Semantics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lian Duan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The prediction of suspect location enables proactive experiences for crime investigations and offers essential intelligence for crime prevention. However, existing studies have failed to capture the complex social location transition patterns of suspects and lack the capacity to address the issue of data sparsity. This paper proposes a novel location prediction model called CMoB (Crime Multi-order Bayes model based on the spatiotemporal semantics to enhance the prediction performance. In particular, the model groups suspects with similar spatiotemporal semantics as one target suspect. Then, their mobility data are applied to estimate Markov transition probabilities of unobserved locations based on a KDE (kernel density estimating smoothing method. Finally, by integrating the total transition probabilities, which are derived from the multi-order property of the Markov transition matrix, into a Bayesian-based formula, it is able to realize multi-step location prediction for the individual suspect. Experiments with the mobility dataset covering 210 suspects and their 18,754 location records from January to June 2012 in Wuhan City show that the proposed CMoB model significantly outperforms state-of-the-art algorithms for suspect location prediction in the context of data sparsity.

  8. Suspected Pulmonary Infection with Trichoderma longibrachiatum after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Akagi, Tomoaki; Kawamura, Chizuko; Terasawa, Norio; Yamaguchi, Kohei; Kubo, Kohmei

    2017-01-01

    Aspergillus and Candida species are the main causative agents of invasive fungal infections in immunocompromised human hosts. However, saprophytic fungi are now increasingly being recognized as serious pathogens. Trichoderma longibrachiatum has recently been described as an emerging pathogen in immunocompromised patients. We herein report a case of isolated suspected invasive pulmonary infection with T. longibrachiatum in a 29-year-old man with severe aplastic anemia who underwent allogeneic ...

  9. The potential effect of patulin on mice bearing melanoma cells: an anti-tumour or carcinogenic effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boussabbeh, Manel; Ben Salem, Intidhar; Rjiba-Touati, Karima; Bouyahya, Chedy; Neffati, Fadwa; Najjar, Mohamed Fadhel; Bacha, Hassen; Abid-Essefi, Salwa

    2016-05-01

    Mycotoxins are bioactive compounds that are noxious to human. Their effects on oncogenesis have been satisfactorily elucidated, and some of mycotoxins have been classified as carcinogenic to humans. Nevertheless, patulin (PAT) is considered by the International Agency of Research on Cancer as 'not carcinogenic to humans'. The present study was designed to understand the effect of this mycotoxin on melanoma cells (B16F10) by measuring cell proliferation and assessing the anti-tumour effect in vivo in Balb/c mice. Our results revealed that intraperitoneally administration of PAT for 20 days significantly induces tumour regression in B16F10 cell-implanted mice. This effect was evidenced by the activation of apoptosis which is supported by the increase in p53 and Bax expressions, the downregulation of the protein levels of Bcl2, and the increase in caspase-3 activity. Moreover, systemic toxicity analysis demonstrated that there is no potential toxicity following PAT treatment unlike untreated melanoma mice which suffer from anaemia, inflammation and liver dysfunction. Remarkably, this is the first published report demonstrating the therapeutic efficacy of PAT in vivo models.

  10. Carcinogenic and mutagenic agents in the workplace, Poland, 2011–2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Pałaszewska-Tkacz

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The objective of the study was the analysis of structure of carcinogenic or mutagenic chemical substances and dusts occurring in Polish enterprises, 2011–2012, including the number of exposed employees reported to the “Central register of data on exposure to carcinogenic or mutagenic chemical substances, mixtures, agents or technological processes”, Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Łódź. In the paper the aims, range and methodology of data collecting by the Central Register are presented. Material and Methods: Qualitative and quantitative analyses of the data on occupational exposure to carcinogenic substances and technological processes reported by employers were carried out. Results: In 2011–2012 approximately 2600 plants reported more than 300 carcinogenic or mutagenic chemical substances annually. The most common occupational chemical carcinogens/mutagens were: benzene, one of the unspecified gasoline, chromium(VI compounds, asbestos, chromium(VI trioxide, ethylene oxide and benzo[a]pyrene. The highest number of employees was exposed to particular polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs. Hardwood dust was the major occupational carcinogen listed in the technological processes inventory with approximately 11 000 employees exposed in about 650 enterprises annually. Conclusions: The amended legislation concerning occupational exposure to carcinogens has not significantly influenced the exposure structure in Poland. Nevertheless it permited to determine the actual total number of the occupationally exposed to carcinogens. Med Pr 2015;66(1:29–38

  11. Dissecting modes of action of non-genotoxic carcinogens in primary mouse hepatocytes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaap, M.M.; Zwart, E.P.; Wackers, P.F.K.; Huijskens, I.; van de Water, B.; Breit, T.M.; van Steeg, H.; Jonker, M.J.; Luijten, M.

    2012-01-01

    Under REACH, the European Community Regulation on chemicals, the testing strategy for carcinogenicity is based on in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity assays. Given that non-genotoxic carcinogens are negative for genotoxicity and chronic bioassays are no longer regularly performed, this class of

  12. Stem cell proliferation patterns as an alternative for in vivo prediction and discrimination of carcinogenic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, An-Sofie; Willems, Maxime; Plusquin, Michelle; Ploem, Jan-Pieter; Winckelmans, Ellen; Artois, Tom; Smeets, Karen

    2017-05-03

    One of the major challenges in the development of alternative carcinogenicity assays is the prediction of non-genotoxic carcinogens. The variety of non-genotoxic cancer pathways complicates the search for reliable parameters expressing their carcinogenicity. As non-genotoxic and genotoxic carcinogens have different cancer risks, the objective of this study was to develop a concept for an in vivo test, based on flatworm stem cell dynamics, to detect and classify carcinogenic compounds. Our methodology entails an exposure to carcinogenic compounds during the animal's regeneration process, which revealed differences in proliferative responses between non-genotoxic and genotoxic carcinogens during the initial stages of the regeneration process. A proof of concept was obtained after an extensive study of proliferation dynamics of a genotoxic and a non-genotoxic compound. A pilot validation with a limited set of compounds showed that the proposed concept not only enabled a simple prediction of genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens, but also had the power to discriminate between both. We further optimized this discrimination by combining stem cell proliferation responses with a phenotypic screening and by using specific knockdowns. In the future, more compounds will be tested to further validate and prove this concept.

  13. Influence of biliary cirrhosis on the detoxification and elimination of a food derived carcinogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dietrich, C. G.; Geier, A.; Wasmuth, H. E.; Matern, S.; Gartung, C.; de Waart, D. R.; Elferink, R. P. J. O.

    2004-01-01

    Background and aims: The liver is the central organ for the detoxification of numerous xenobiotics, including carcinogens. We studied the influence of cholestasis and biliary cirrhosis on the detoxification, elimination, and tissue distribution of a model compound and food derived carcinogen,

  14. Nanostructural point-contact sensors for diagnostics of carcinogenic strains of Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Г. В. Камарчук

    2017-12-01

    a specially developed technique. The sensor response curves were recorded by a measuring complex and original software designed by the authors. Results: A set of 350 active-type TCNQ-based sensors was studied under the influence of a mixture of breath gases. Gas-sensitive sensors based on TCNQ compounds are characterized by a complex response curve with two extrema. Since the temporal variation in electrical conductivity of the sensor correlates well with the dependence of its resistance on the energy of the adsorbed components of the gas mixture, the resulting response curves of point-contact sensors can be called spectral profiles of a complex gas mixture. It is possible to differentiate among the various states of human body caused by the H. pylori bacterium by using spectral profiles of the gas exhaled by different patients. As a result, the developed sensors were shown to be an effective tool for analyzing breath gas exhaled in real time mode. They demonstrated a high sensitivity and selectivity to the products of activity of different H. pylori strains. Conclusions: It was shown that the products of metabolism of carcinogenic H. pylori strains had a dominant influence on electrical conductivity of the sensor and thus shaped the behavior of the features on sensor response curves. As a result, it is possible to differentiate H. pylori strains with respect to their carcinogenic potential using point-contact sensors based on TCNQ compounds. Thus, an effective portable tool was created in this work for the first time to develop innovative screening technologies for non-invasive diagnosis of human body conditions characterized by gastroduodenal pathology and to distinguish carcinogenic strains of H. pylori from tolerant ones.

  15. Use of short-term test systems for the prediction of the hazard represented by potential chemical carcinogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, L.R.; Jones, T.D.; Easterly, C.E.; Walsh, P.J.

    1990-10-01

    It has been hypothesized that results from short-term bioassays will ultimately provide information that will be useful for human health hazard assessment. Historically, the validity of the short-term tests has been assessed using the framework of the epidemiologic/medical screens. In this context, the results of the carcinogen (long-term) bioassay is generally used as the standard. However, this approach is widely recognized as being biased and, because it employs qualitative data, cannot be used to assist in isolating those compounds which may represent a more significant toxicologic hazard than others. In contrast, the goal of this research is to address the problem of evaluating the utility of the short-term tests for hazard assessment using an alternative method of investigation. Chemicals were selected mostly from the list of carcinogens published by the International Agency for Research on Carcinogens (IARC); a few other chemicals commonly recognized as hazardous were included. Tumorigenicity and mutagenicity data on 52 chemicals were obtained from the Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances (RTECS) and were analyzed using a relative potency approach. The data were evaluated in a format which allowed for a comparison of the ranking of the mutagenic relative potencies of the compounds (as estimated using short-term data) vs. the ranking of the tumorigenic relative potencies (as estimated from the chronic bioassays). Although this was a preliminary investigation, it offers evidence that the short-term tests systems may be of utility in ranking the hazards represented by chemicals which may contribute to increased carcinogenesis in humans as a result of occupational or environmental exposures. 177 refs., 8 tabs.

  16. B Plant/WESF suspect/counterfeit parts identification program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mertz, D.W.

    1996-01-12

    This document describes a suspect/counterfeit parts inspection program required by DOE conducted in accordance with Internal Memo 16710-94-DWM-048, J.A. O`Brien to J. N. Nansen, B Plant Suspect/ Counterfeit Parts Action Plan, dated May 24, 1994. The program included: physical inspection of all spare parts inventories within the plant; screening of installed B Plant/WESF (Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility) systems for applications where the use and subsequent potential failure of suspect/counterfeit parts could have critical consequences; and a physical inspection based upon this screening.

  17. CARCINOGENS IN THE WORKPLACE IN THE LIGHT OF POLISH AND EUROPEAN LEGISLATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Skowroń

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The exposure of workers to carcinogens in a workplace is a crucial issue of occupational health and safety. For carcinogens, it is not possible to determine safe levels of exposure, because any contact with them poses a risk to the health of the worker. The differences observed in occupational exposure limits for carcinogens are largely due to the differences in cancer risk levels used. Therefore, it is necessary to provide employers of companies producing, using or processing carcinogens with methods and tools for estimation and qualitative evaluation of exposure to these dangerous substances that are simple to use, but give reliable results. Accelerating work on the review of Directive 2004/37/EC and extending the list of substances with the binding values until 2020 with 50 carcinogenic and/or mutagenic substances, is a priority direction of EU actions in the field of occupational health and safety.

  18. Micro-total envelope system with silicon nanowire separator for safe carcinogenic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ajay K; Ko, Dong-Hyeon; Vishwakarma, Niraj K; Jang, Seungwook; Min, Kyoung-Ik; Kim, Dong-Pyo

    2016-02-26

    Exploration and expansion of the chemistries involving toxic or carcinogenic reagents are severely limited by the health hazards their presence poses. Here, we present a micro-total envelope system (μ-TES) and an automated total process for the generation of the carcinogenic reagent, its purification and its utilization for a desired synthesis that is totally enveloped from being exposed to the carcinogen. A unique microseparator is developed on the basis of SiNWs structure to replace the usual exposure-prone distillation in separating the generated reagent. Chloromethyl methyl ether chemistry is explored as a carcinogenic model in demonstrating the efficiency of the μ-TES that is fully automated so that feeding the ingredients for the generation is all it takes to produce the desired product. Syntheses taking days can be accomplished safely in minutes with excellent yields, which bodes well for elevating the carcinogenic chemistry to new unexplored dimensions.

  19. Investigating the different mechanisms of genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens by a gene set analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won Jun Lee

    Full Text Available Based on the process of carcinogenesis, carcinogens are classified as either genotoxic or non-genotoxic. In contrast to non-genotoxic carcinogens, many genotoxic carcinogens have been reported to cause tumor in carcinogenic bioassays in animals. Thus evaluating the genotoxicity potential of chemicals is important to discriminate genotoxic from non-genotoxic carcinogens for health care and pharmaceutical industry safety. Additionally, investigating the difference between the mechanisms of genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens could provide the foundation for a mechanism-based classification for unknown compounds. In this study, we investigated the gene expression of HepG2 cells treated with genotoxic or non-genotoxic carcinogens and compared their mechanisms of action. To enhance our understanding of the differences in the mechanisms of genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens, we implemented a gene set analysis using 12 compounds for the training set (12, 24, 48 h and validated significant gene sets using 22 compounds for the test set (24, 48 h. For a direct biological translation, we conducted a gene set analysis using Globaltest and selected significant gene sets. To validate the results, training and test compounds were predicted by the significant gene sets using a prediction analysis for microarrays (PAM. Finally, we obtained 6 gene sets, including sets enriched for genes involved in the adherens junction, bladder cancer, p53 signaling pathway, pathways in cancer, peroxisome and RNA degradation. Among the 6 gene sets, the bladder cancer and p53 signaling pathway sets were significant at 12, 24 and 48 h. We also found that the DDB2, RRM2B and GADD45A, genes related to the repair and damage prevention of DNA, were consistently up-regulated for genotoxic carcinogens. Our results suggest that a gene set analysis could provide a robust tool in the investigation of the different mechanisms of genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens and construct

  20. Ptaquiloside, the major carcinogen of bracken fern, in the pooled raw milk of healthy sheep and goats: an underestimated, global concern of food safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virgilio, Antonella; Sinisi, Annamaria; Russo, Valeria; Gerardo, Salvatore; Santoro, Adriano; Galeone, Aldo; Taglialatela-Scafati, Orazio; Roperto, Franco

    2015-05-20

    Bracken fern (Pteridium aquilinum) is a worldwide plant containing toxic substances, which represent an important chemical hazard for animals, including humans. Ptaquiloside, 1, a norsesquiterpenoid glucoside, is the major carcinogen of bracken detected in the food chain, particularly in the milk from farm animals. To date, ptaquiloside has been shown in the milk of cows feeding on a diet containing bracken fern. This is the first study that shows the systematic detection of ptaquiloside, 1, and reports its direct quantitation in pooled raw milk of healthy sheep and goats grazing on bracken. Ptaquiloside, 1, was detected by a sensitive method based on the chemical conversion of ptaquiloside, 1, into bromopterosine, 4, following gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. The presence of ptaquiloside, 1, possibly carcinogenic to humans, in the milk of healthy animals is an unknown potential health risk, thus representing a harmful and potential global concern of food safety.

  1. Stopping and Questioning Suspected Shoplifters Without Creating Civil Liability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Jack R., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Legal problems concerned with shoplifting suspects are addressed, including common law, criminal penalties, and the merchant's liability. Tangential questions and answers are presented along with discussion of pertinent court cases. (LBH)

  2. ALGORITHM OF MANAGEMENT OF PATIENTS WITH SUSPECTED BLUNT CARDIAC TRAUMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Gilarevsky

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Contemporary algorithm of diagnostic examination of patients with suspected blunt cardiac trauma is presented. General aspects of monitoring and treatment of such patients are also discussed. 

  3. Suspect confession of child sexual abuse to investigators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippert, Tonya; Cross, Theodore P; Jones, Lisa; Walsh, Wendy

    2010-05-01

    Increasing the number of suspects who give true confessions of sexual abuse serves justice and reduces the burden of the criminal justice process on child victims. With data from four communities, this study examined confession rates and predictors of confession of child sexual abuse over the course of criminal investigations (final N = 282). Overall, 30% of suspects confessed partially or fully to the crime. This rate was consistent across the communities and is very similar to the rates of suspect confession of child sexual abuse found by previous research, although lower than that from a study focused on a community with a vigorous practice of polygraph testing. In a multivariate analysis, confession was more likely when suspects were younger and when more evidence of abuse was available, particularly child disclosure and corroborative evidence. These results suggest the difficulty of obtaining confession but also the value of methods that facilitate child disclosure and seek corroborative evidence, for increasing the odds of confession.

  4. Cross-sectional study of genital carcinogenic HPV infections in Paramaribo, Suriname: prevalence and determinants in an ethnically diverse population of women in a pre-vaccination era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraets, Daan T; Grünberg, Antoon W; van der Helm, Jannie J; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F; Quint, Koen D; Sabajo, Leslie O A; de Vries, Henry J C

    2014-12-01

    Cervical cancer is caused by carcinogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) infections. Prior to the introduction of HPV vaccination in Suriname, we performed a cross-sectional study to estimate the prevalence of and determinants for genital carcinogenic HPV infections. Women were recruited at a family planning (FP) clinic and a sexually transmitted infections (STI) clinic. Vaginal swabs were used for HPV genotyping by the SPF10 PCR-DEIA-LiPA25 system. Logistic regression was used to identify determinants for carcinogenic HPV infection. The prevalence of any HPV was 54.2% and of carcinogenic HPV was 27.9% among 813 women attending the FP clinic. Among the 188 women attending the STI clinic, the prevalence of any HPV (76.1%) and of carcinogenic HPV (40.4%) was significantly higher. HPV52 was the most prevalent genotype in both clinics. The prevalence of HPV16 and/or 18 was 6.4% in the FP clinic and 12.2% in the STI clinic. The following determinants were independently associated with carcinogenic HPV infection among women visiting the FP clinic: ≥2 recent partners (OR 1.53; 95% CI 1.13 to 2.06), Chlamydia trachomatis co-infection (OR 1.89; 95% CI 1.32 to 2.70), disassortative ethnic sexual mixing (OR 1.50; 95% CI 1.13 to 1.99) and ethnic group (OR 1.90; 95% CI 1.27 to 2.85 for Creole and OR 1.67; 95% CI 1.06 to 2.62 for mixed ethnicity, both compared with Hindustani). No independent determinants were found among women visiting the STI clinic. Carcinogenic HPV is highly prevalent among women in Suriname, and not equally distributed among ethnic groups. These data provide a baseline to assess possible shifts in the prevalence of HPV genotypes following vaccination. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. Development of quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models to predict the carcinogenic potency of chemicals I. Alternative toxicity measures as an estimator of carcinogenic potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatapathy, Raghuraman; Wang, Ching Yi; Bruce, Robert Mark; Moudgal, Chandrika

    2009-01-15

    Determining the carcinogenicity and carcinogenic potency of new chemicals is both a labor-intensive and time-consuming process. In order to expedite the screening process, there is a need to identify alternative toxicity measures that may be used as surrogates for carcinogenic potency. Alternative toxicity measures for carcinogenic potency currently being used in the literature include lethal dose (dose that kills 50% of a study population [LD(50)]), lowest-observed-adverse-effect-level (LOAEL) and maximum tolerated dose (MTD). The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between tumor dose (TD(50)) and three alternative toxicity measures as an estimator of carcinogenic potency. A second aim of this study was to develop a Classification and Regression Tree (CART) between TD(50) and estimated/experimental predictor variables to predict the carcinogenic potency of new chemicals. Rat TD(50)s of 590 structurally diverse chemicals were obtained from the Cancer Potency Database, and the three alternative toxicity measures considered in this study were estimated using TOPKAT, a toxicity estimation software. Though poor correlations were obtained between carcinogenic potency and the three alternative toxicity (both experimental and TOPKAT) measures for the CPDB chemicals, a CART developed using experimental data with no missing values as predictor variables provided reasonable estimates of TD(50) for nine chemicals that were part of an external validation set. However, if experimental values for the three alternative measures, mutagenicity and logP are not available in the literature, then either the CART developed using missing experimental values or estimated values may be used for making a prediction.

  6. Tungsten-induced carcinogenesis in human bronchial epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Laulicht, Freda; Brocato, Jason; Cartularo, Laura; Vaughan, Joshua; Wu, Feng; Kluz, Thomas; Sun, Hong; Oksuz, Betul Akgol; Shen, Steven; Paena, Massimilano; Medici, Serenella; Zoroddu, Maria Antonietta; Costa, Max

    2015-01-01

    Metals such as arsenic, cadmium, beryllium, and nickel are known human carcinogens; however, other transition metals, such as tungsten (W), remain relatively uninvestigated with regard to their potential carcinogenic activity. Tungsten production for industrial and military applications has almost doubled over the past decade and continues to increase. Here, for the first time, we demonstrate tungsten’s ability to induce carcinogenic related endpoints including cell transformation, increased ...

  7. Enzymes oxidizing the azo dye 1-phenylazo-2-naphthol (Sudan I) and their contribution to its genotoxicity and carcinogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiborova, Marie; Schmeiser, Heinz H; Frei, Eva; Hodek, Petr; Martinek, Vaclav

    2014-01-01

    Sudan I [1-(phenylazo)-2-naphthol, C.I. Solvent Yellow 14] is an industrial dye, which was found as a contaminant in numerous foods in several European countries. Because Sudan I has been assigned by the IARC as a Category 3 carcinogen, the European Union decreed that it cannot be utilized as food colorant in any European country. Sudan I induces the malignancies in liver and urinary bladder of rats and mice. This carcinogen has also been found to be a potent mutagen, contact allergen and sensitizer, and exhibits clastogenic properties. The oxidation of Sudan I increases its toxic effects and leads to covalent adducts in DNA. Identification of enzymatic systems that contribute to Sudan I oxidative metabolism to reactive intermediates generating such covalent DNA adducts on the one hand, and to the detoxification of this carcinogen on the other, is necessary to evaluate susceptibility to this toxicant. This review summarizes the identification of such enzymes and the molecular mechanisms of oxidation reactions elucidated to date. Human and animal cytochrome P450 (CYP) and peroxidases are capable of oxidizing Sudan I. Of the CYP enzymes, CYP1A1 is most important both in Sudan I detoxification and its bio-activation. Ring-hydroxylated metabolites and a dimer of this carcinogen were found as detoxification products of Sudan I generated with CYPs and peroxidases, respectively. Oxidative bio-activation of this azo dye catalyzed by CYPs and peroxidases leads to generation of proximate genotoxic metabolites (the CYP-catalyzed formation of the benzenediazonium cation and the peroxidase-mediated generation of one-electron oxidation products), which covalently modify DNA both in vitro and in vivo. The predominant DNA adduct generated with the benzenediazonium cation was characterized to be 8-(phenylazo)guanine. The Sudan I radical species mediated by peroxidases reacts with the -NH2 group in (deoxy)guanosine, generating the 4-[(deoxy)guanosin-N(2)-yl]Sudan I product. Sudan I

  8. Suspect aggression and victim resistance in multiple perpetrator rapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhams, Jessica; Cooke, Claire

    2013-11-01

    Several research studies have reported an elevated level of aggression in rapes committed by multiple perpetrators compared to rapes committed by lone suspects. Several factors that have been linked to elevated aggression in generic samples of rape were examined for the first time with a sample of multiple perpetrator rapes. Factors that might be associated with victim resistance were also investigated. Victim and offender characteristics, as well as the behaviors displayed by victims and offenders, were extracted from the police files of 89 multiple perpetrator stranger rapes perpetrated against female victims in the United Kingdom. These behaviors were rated for their level of suspect (non-sexual) aggression and victim resistance, respectively. Degree of victim resistance was significantly and positively associated with suspect aggression. Older victims were the recipients of significantly higher levels of suspect aggression. Victims who were incapacitated from drugs and/or alcohol were less likely to be the recipients of suspect aggression. Group leaders displayed more aggression towards the victim than the followers in the groups. The number of perpetrators was significantly related to the degree of resistance displayed by the victim with offences perpetrated by fewer suspects being characterized by more victim resistance. Research regarding cognitive appraisal during criminal interactions and the respective roles of offenders is referred to in considering these relationships.

  9. Interviewing strategically to elicit admissions from guilty suspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekin, Serra; Granhag, Pär Anders; Strömwall, Leif; Giolla, Erik Mac; Vrij, Aldert; Hartwig, Maria

    2015-06-01

    In this article we introduce a novel interviewing tactic to elicit admissions from guilty suspects. By influencing the suspects' perception of the amount of evidence the interviewer holds against them, we aimed to shift the suspects' counterinterrogation strategies from less to more forthcoming. The proposed tactic (SUE-Confrontation) is a development of the Strategic Use of Evidence (SUE) framework and aims to affect the suspects' perception by confronting them with statement-evidence inconsistencies. Participants (N = 90) were asked to perform several mock criminal tasks before being interviewed using 1 of 3 interview techniques: (a) SUE-Confrontation, (b) Early Disclosure of Evidence, or (c) No Disclosure of Evidence. As predicted, the SUE-Confrontation interview generated more statement-evidence inconsistencies from suspects than the Early Disclosure interview. Importantly, suspects in the SUE-Confrontation condition (vs. Early and No disclosure conditions) admitted more self-incriminating information and also perceived the interviewer to have had more information about the critical phase of the crime (the phase where the interviewer lacked evidence). The findings show the adaptability of the SUE-technique and how it may be used as a tool for eliciting admissions. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Low‐Dose Bisphenol A Exposure: A Seemingly Instigating Carcinogenic Effect on Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhe

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the fifth most common cause of cancer death in the world and the second most common fatal cancer in women. Epidemiological studies and clinical data have indicated that hormones, including estrogen, progesterone, and prolactin, play important roles in the initiation and progression of breast cancer. Bisphenol A (BPA) is one of the most commonly used and thoroughly studied endocrine disruptors. It can be released from consumer products and deposited in the environment, thus creating potential for human exposure through oral, inhaled, and dermal routes. Some recent reviews have summarized the known mechanisms of endocrine disruptions by BPA in human diseases, including obesity, reproductive disorders, and birth defects. However, large knowledge gaps still exist on the roles BPA may play in cancer initiation and development. Evidence from animal and in vitro studies has suggested an association between increased incidence of breast cancer and BPA exposure at doses below the safe reference doses that are the most environmentally relevant. Most current studies have paid little attention to the cancer‐promoting properties of BPA at low doses. In this review, recent findings on the carcinogenic effects of low‐dose BPA on breast cancer and discussed possible biologic mechanisms are summarized. PMID:28251049

  11. Molecular epidemiology studies on occupational and environmental exposure to mutagens and carcinogens, 1997-1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srám, R J; Binková, B

    2000-01-01

    Molecular epidemiology is a new and evolving area of research, combining laboratory measurement of internal dose, biologically effective dose, biologic effects, and influence of individual susceptibility with epidemiologic methodologies. Biomarkers evaluated were selected according to basic scheme: biomarkers of exposure--metabolites in urine, DNA adducts, protein adducts, and Comet assay parameters; biomarkers of effect--chromosomal aberrations, sister chromatid exchanges, micronuclei, mutations in the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene, and the activation of oncogenes coding for p53 or p21 proteins as measured on protein levels; biomarkers of susceptibility--genetic polymorphisms of genes CYP1A1, GSTM1, GSTT1, NAT2. DNA adducts measured by 32P-postlabeling are the biomarker of choice for the evaluation of exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Protein adducts are useful as a biomarker for exposure to tobacco smoke (4-aminobiphenyl) or to smaller molecules such as acrylonitrile or 1,3-butadiene. Of the biomarkers of effect, the most common are cytogenetic end points. Epidemiologic studies support the use of chromosomal breakage as a relevant biomarker of cancer risk. The use of the Comet assay and methods analyzing oxidative DNA damage needs reliable validation for human biomonitoring. Until now there have not been sufficient data to interpret the relationship between genotypes, biomarkers of exposure, and biomarkers of effect for assessing the risk of human exposure to mutagens and carcinogens. PMID:10698723

  12. Human papillomaviruses and skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smola, Sigrun

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) infect squamous epithelia and can induce hyperproliferative lesions. More than 120 different HPV types have been characterized and classified into five different genera. While mucosal high-risk HPVs have a well-established causal role in anogenital carcinogenesis, the biology of cutaneous HPVs is less well understood. The clinical relevance of genus beta-PV infection has clearly been demonstrated in patients suffering from epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV), a rare inherited disease associated with ahigh rate of skin cancer. In the normal population genus beta-PV are suspected to have an etiologic role in skin carcinogenesis as well but this is still controversially discussed. Their oncogenic potency has been investigated in mouse models and in vitro. In 2009, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classified the genus beta HPV types 5 and 8 as "possible carcinogenic" biological agents (group 2B) in EV disease. This chapter will give an overview on the knowns and unknowns of infections with genus beta-PV and discuss their potential impact on skin carcinogenesis in the general population.

  13. INTEGRATION OF QSAR AND SAR METHODS FOR THE MECHANISTIC INTERPRETATION OF PREDICTIVE MODELS FOR CARCINOGENICITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalja Fjodorova

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge-based Toxtree expert system (SAR approach was integrated with the statistically based counter propagation artificial neural network (CP ANN model (QSAR approach to contribute to a better mechanistic understanding of a carcinogenicity model for non-congeneric chemicals using Dragon descriptors and carcinogenic potency for rats as a response. The transparency of the CP ANN algorithm was demonstrated using intrinsic mapping technique specifically Kohonen maps. Chemical structures were represented by Dragon descriptors that express the structural and electronic features of molecules such as their shape and electronic surrounding related to reactivity of molecules. It was illustrated how the descriptors are correlated with particular structural alerts (SAs for carcinogenicity with recognized mechanistic link to carcinogenic activity. Moreover, the Kohonen mapping technique enables one to examine the separation of carcinogens and non-carcinogens (for rats within a family of chemicals with a particular SA for carcinogenicity. The mechanistic interpretation of models is important for the evaluation of safety of chemicals.

  14. [Carcinogenic and mutagenic agents in the workplace, Poland, 2011-2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pałaszewska-Tkacz, Anna; Czerczak, Sławomir; Konieczko, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study was the analysis of structure of carcinogenic or mutagenic chemical substances and dusts occurring in Polish enterprises, 2011-2012, including the number of exposed employees reported to the "Central register of data on exposure to carcinogenic or mutagenic chemical substances, mixtures, agents or technological processes", Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Łódź. In the paper the aims, range and methodology of data collecting by the Central Register are presented. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of the data on occupational expo- sure to carcinogenic substances and technological processes reported by employers were carried out. In 2011-2012 approximately 2600 plants reported more than 300 carcinogenic or mutageaic chemical substances annually. The most common occupational chemical carcinogens/mutagens were: benzene, one of the unspecified gasoline, chromium(VI) compounds, asbestos, chroniurn(VI) trioxide, ethylene oxide and benzo[a]pyrene. The highest number of employees was exposed to particular polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Hardwood dust was the major occupational carcinogen listed in the technological processes inventory with approximately 11 000 employees exposed in about 650 enterprises annually. The amended legislation concerning occupational exposure to carcinogens has not significantly influenced the exposure structure n Poland. Nevertheless it permited to determine the actual total number of the occupationally exposed to carcinoLens.

  15. Fibrous shape underlies the mutagenic and carcinogenic potential of nanosilver while surface chemistry affects the biosafety of iron oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gábelová, Alena; El Yamani, Naouale; Alonso, Tamara Iglesias; Buliaková, Barbora; Srančíková, Annamária; Bábelová, Andrea; Pran, Elise Runden; Fjellsbø, Lise Marie; Elje, Elisabeth; Yazdani, Mazyar; Silva, Maria João; Dušinská, Mária

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) are increasingly used in a wide range of commercial products and biomedical applications. Despite this, the knowledge of human potential health risk as well as comprehensive biological and toxicological information is still limited. We have investigated the capacity of two frequently used metallic ENMs, nanosilver and magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs), to induce thymidine kinase (Tk +/-) mutations in L5178Y mouse lymphoma cells and transformed foci in Bhas 42 cells. Two types of nanosilver, spherical nanoparticles (AgNM300) and fibrous (AgNM302) nanorods/wires, and MNPs differing in surface modifications [MNPs coated with sodium oleate (SO-MNPs), MNPs coated with SO + polyethylene glycol (SO-PEG-MNPs) and MNPs coated with SO + PEG + poly(lactide-co-glycolic acid) SO-PEG-PLGA-MNPs] were included in this study. Spherical AgNM300 showed neither mutagenic nor carcinogenic potential. In contrast, silver nanorods/wires (AgNM302) increased significantly the number of both gene mutations and transformed foci compared with the control (untreated) cells. Under the same treatment conditions, neither SO-MNPs nor SO-PEG-PLGA-MNPs increased the mutant frequency compared with control cells though an equivocal mutagenic effect was estimated for SO-PEG-MNPs. Although SO-MNPs and SO-PEG-MNPs did not show any carcinogenic potential, SO-PEG-PLGA-MNPs increased concentration dependently the number of transformed foci in Bhas 42 cells compared with the control cells. Our results revealed that fibrous shape underlies the mutagenic and carcinogenic potential of nanosilver while surface chemistry affects the biosafety of MNPs. Considering that both nanosilver and MNPs are prospective ENMs for biomedical applications, further toxicological evaluations are warranted to assess comprehensively the biosafety of these nanomaterials. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the UK Environmental Mutagen Society. All rights reserved

  16. [Viral load test conducive to excluding negative subjects from suspects in HIV antibody detections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hei, Fa-Xin; Zhang, Qi-Yun; Sun, Wei-Dong; Zhang, Qin; Ye, Jing-Rong; Liu, Hai-Lin; Lu, Hong-Yan

    2008-01-01

    To study whether plasma viral load testing is helpful to exclude ones free from Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections from suspects in HIV antibody detections. 19 Specimens, which showed disconcordant results of the two HIV EIA testing (S/CO test, were selected. Viral load of the specimens were detected. A six-month follow up survey in detecting HIV antibody was conducted in these subjects. None of these 19 cases was observed to be positive HIV viral loads and there was no any progress in WB bands development during the follow-up period. The possibility of HIV infection could be excluded. When the specimens react with very low intensity in both EIA and WB, negative viral load result is conducive to exclude negative subjects from suspects in HIV antibody detections.

  17. Presumed prevalence analysis on suspected and highly suspected breast cancer lesions in São Paulo using BIRADS® criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian Milani

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Breast cancer screening programs are critical for early detection of breast cancer. Early detection is essential for diagnosing, treating and possibly curing breast cancer. Since there are no data on the incidence of breast cancer, nationally or regionally in Brazil, our aim was to assess women by means of mammography, to determine the prevalence of this disease. DESIGN AND SETTING: The study protocol was designed in collaboration between the Department of Diagnostic Imaging (DDI, Institute of Diagnostic Imaging (IDI and São Paulo Municipal Health Program. METHODS: A total of 139,945 Brazilian women were assessed by means of mammography between April 2002 and September 2004. Using the American College of Radiology (ACR criteria (Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System, BIRADS®, the prevalence of suspected and highly suspected breast lesions were determined. RESULTS: The prevalence of suspected (BIRADS® 4 and highly suspected (BIRADS® 5 lesions increased with age, especially after the fourth decade. Accordingly, BIRADS® 4 and BIRADS® 5 lesions were more prevalent in the fourth, fifth, sixth and seventh decades. CONCLUSION: The presumed prevalence of suspected and highly suspected breast cancer lesions in the population of São Paulo was 0.6% and it is similar to the prevalence of breast cancer observed in other populations.

  18. Inhibition of aberrant proliferation and induction of apoptosis in pre-neoplastic human mammary epithelial cells by natural phytochemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katdare, M; Osborne, M P; Telang, N T

    1998-01-01

    Aberrant proliferation and modulated apoptosis leading to impaired cellular homeostasis represent crucial early events in the multi-step carcinogenic process. Regulation of these perturbed biomarkers may predict efficacious prevention of cancer development. Present experiments on non-cancerous human mammary epithelial 184-B5 cells were designed to examine whether i) exposure to suspect environmental human carcinogen Benzo (a) pyrene (BP) alters the status of cell proliferation and apoptosis and ii) BP-induced alterations are modulated in response to select natural phytochemicals that inhibit rodent mammary tumorigenesis. Flow cytometric analysis, cellular immunoreactivity to proliferation specific and apoptosis specific gene products and anchorage-dependent colony formation represented quantitative endpoints. Cruciferous glucosinolate indole-3-carbinol (I3C), tea polyphenol (-) epigallo catechin gallate (EGCC) and soy isoflavone genistein (GEN) represented the chemopreventive test compounds. A single 24 h exposure to 39 lM BP resulted in a 50% decrease (P=0.02) in the ratio of quiescent (Q=G0) to proliferative (P=S + M) population in part due to increase in aberrantly proliferative cells. The BP-initiated cells also exhibited an 87.8% inhibition (P=0. 0001) in confluency-associated apoptosis and a concomitant decrease in cellular immunoreactivity to wild-type p53. Simultaneous treatment of cultures with BP + I3C, BP + EGCG and BP + GEN resulted in a 1.8- to 3.4-fold increase (Pp53 immunoreactivity (Pp53 dependent apoptosis.

  19. Urban air carcinogens and their effects on health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lechner, J.F.

    1994-11-01

    Airborne carcinogens may be relevant especially in metropolitan regions with extreme smog as a primary cause of lung cancer. Lung cancer is most common in urban environs and the incidence directly correlates with the size of the city. In addition, several, but not all formal epidemiological studies also suggest a positive correlation between lung cancer incidence and the intensity of air pollution exposure. There is further support for a role of air pollution; as of 1993, 4.4% of all of the bronchogenic adenocarcinoma cancer cases among Mexicans living in industrialized cities are under 40 years of age. It is plausible that chronic inhalation of automobile combustion products, factory emissions, and/or radon is at least partially responsible for the higher incidence of lung cancer exemplified by the never-smoking urban residents. The exceptionally high incidence of lung cancer cases among never-smokers living in highly industrialized Mexican cities offers a unique opportunity to use molecular epidemiology to test whether chronic inhalation of atmospheric pollutants increases the risk for this disease. Overall, the analysis of the genetic alterations in two cancer genes, and possibly the hprt locus should give new insight as to whether the urban never-smokers developed their cancers because of exposure to environmental pollutants.

  20. Activation of the liver carcinogen 2-nitropropane by aryl sulfotransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodum, R S; Sohn, O S; Nie, G; Fiala, E S

    1994-01-01

    8-Aminoguanine had previously been identified as one of the nucleic acid base modifications produced in livers of rats by treatment with the hepatocarcinogen 2-nitropropane (2-NP), and a hypothetical mechanism of activation of 2-NP to hydroxylamine-O-sulfonate or acetate that would lead to NH2+, an aminating species, was proposed [Sodum et al. (1993) Chem. Res. Toxicol. 6, 269-276]. We now present in vivo and in vitro experimental evidence for the activation of 2-NP to an aminating species by rat liver aryl sulfotransferase. Pretreatment of rats with the aryl sulfotransferase inhibitors pentachlorophenol or 2,6-dichloro-4-nitrophenol significantly decreased the levels of liver nucleic acid modifications produced by 2-NP treatment. Furthermore, partially purified rat liver aryl sulfotransferase was shown to activate 2-NP and 2-NP nitronate in vitro at neutral pH and 37 degrees C, to a reactive species that aminated guanosine at the C8 position. This activation was dependent on the presence of the enzyme, its specific cofactor adenosine 3'-phosphate 5'-phosphosulfate, and mercaptoethanol. As in the case of the in vitro studies, pentachlorophenol and 2,6-dichloro-4-nitrophenol inhibited the in vitro formation of 8-aminoguanosine and 8-oxoguanosine. The corresponding primary nitroalkane, 1-nitropropane, which is not mutagenic and does not appear to be carcinogenic, was not a substrate for aryl sulfotransferase in the in vitro amination of guanosine.

  1. Dermal penetration and resorption of beta-naphthylamine and N-phenyl-beta-naphthylamine from lubricants in an ex vivo human skin model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennerlein, Kathrin; Göen, Thomas; Zobel, Melanie; Boos, Anja M; Drexler, Hans; Kilo, Sonja

    2017-10-01

    Dermal Penetration of aromatic amines (AA's), often suspected or known to be carcinogenic, can play an important role in the overall human exposure. However, information on penetration of certain AA's is poor and inconsistent. Penetration of the former lubricant additive N-phenyl-beta-naphthylamine (PBNA) and its contaminant beta-naphthylamine (BNA) a known carcinogen was investigated and the influence of formulation and co-application characterized. Percutaneous penetration of BNA and PBNA through freshly excised human skin (n = 8; 48 h) was investigated using an ex vivo diffusion cell model. Both AA's were applied in a technical-conform lubricant or dissolved in hexane. The amount of BNA and PBNA applied to skin was 0.52 and 259 μg/0.64 cm(2). The analytical determination of AA's was performed by GC-MS. Both, BNA and PBNA penetrated through human skin (38 vs. 5% of applied dose). In contrast to BNA, the percutaneous penetration of PBNA continued beyond the end of exposure. Co-exposure of both AA's increased the intradermal uptake of BNA and PBNA (p penetration (2.9 and 1.9% of applied dose). The results clearly reveal that dermal penetration of both AA's depends strongly on the mode of application. Co-application and formulation alters the penetration of the AA's. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Prediction of carcinogenicity for diverse chemicals based on substructure grouping and SVM modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Kazutoshi; Lučić, Bono; Amić, Dragan; Kurita, Takio; Kaihara, Mikio; Onodera, Natsuo; Suzuki, Takahiro

    2010-11-01

    The Carcinogenicity Reliability Database (CRDB) was constructed by collecting experimental carcinogenicity data on about 1,500 chemicals from six sources, including IARC, and NTP databases, and then by ranking their reliabilities into six unified categories. A wide variety of 911 organic chemicals were selected from the database for QSAR modeling, and 1,504 kinds of different molecular descriptors were calculated, based on their 3D molecular structures as modeled by the Dragon software. Positive (carcinogenic) and negative (non-carcinogenic) chemicals containing various substructures were counted using atom and functional group count descriptors, and the statistical significance of ratios of positives to negatives was tested for those substructures. Very few were judged to be strongly related to carcinogenicity, among substructures known to be responsible for carcinogens as revealed from biomedical studies. In order to develop QSAR models for the prediction of the carcinogenicities of a wide variety of chemicals with a satisfactory performance level, the relationship between the carcinogenicity data with improved reliability and a subset of significant descriptors selected from 1,504 Dragon descriptors was analyzed with a support vector machine (SVM) method: the classification function (SVC) for weighted data in LIBSVM program was used to classify chemicals into two carcinogenic categories (positive or negative), where weights were set depending on the reliabilities of the carcinogenicity data. The quality and stability of the models presented were tested by performing a dual cross-validation procedure. A single SVM model as the first step was developed for all the 911 chemicals using 250 selected descriptors, achieving an overall accuracy level, i.e., positive and negative correct estimate, of about 70%. In order to improve the accuracy of the final model, the 911 chemicals were classified into 20 mutually overlapping subgroups according to contained substructures

  3. Relationships between suspects and victims of sex trafficking. Exploitation of prostitutes and domestic violence parallels in Dutch trafficking cases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, M.; van Gestel, B.; de Jong, D.; Kleemans, E.R.

    2014-01-01

    This article centres on the hypothesis that human trafficking for sexual exploitation is not only an organised crime activity, but a crime of relational nature as well. Therefore this study explores the relationships that exist between suspects and victims of sex trafficking, and examines to what

  4. Suspected ectopic pregnancy: expectant management in patients with negative sonographic findings and low serum hCG concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hajenius, P. J.; Mol, B. W.; Ankum, W. M.; van der Veen, F.; Bossuyt, P. M.; Lammes, F. B.

    1995-01-01

    Between July 1989 and December 1994, we performed a prospective study in 265 patients with suspected ectopic pregnancy to assess the value of expectant management in patients with negative transvaginal sonographic findings and low serum human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) concentrations. All patients

  5. Suspected dog bite associated HIV horizontal transmission in Swaziland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganizani Mlawanda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dog bites may lead to transmission of bacteria and viruses over and above tetanus and rabies. Theoretically human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C may be transmitted after dog bites where transfer of blood from one victim to another occur in clinical practice HIV, Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C are not considered when making treatment decisions, nor adequate patient history taken to consider all potential risks after dog bites in succession.Objective: To present case of suspected HIV transmission after dog bites in close succession involving two HIV sero-discordant victims.Management and outcome: HIV rapid test and/or HIV Ribonucleic acid (RNA polymerasechain reaction (PCR results for the victim(s at presentation and a month later.Results: Two night patrol guards presented to casualty after dog bites in close succession by the same dog. They were managed according to the dog bite protocol. Thinking out of the box, the first victim was found to be HIV positive by rapid test whilst the second victim was negative based on both HIV rapid test and HIV RNA PCR. One month after the dogbites, a case of HIV sero-conversion was confirmed in the second victim despite post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP.Discussion: Although an isolated case, shouldn’t clinicians re-think the significance of HIV transmission after animal bites where there is repeated blood exposure in several people insuccession?Conclusion: Clinicians should be aware of the potential of HIV, Hepatitis B and C transmission, when faced with dog bites in succession. 

  6. The carcinogenic action of crystalline silica: a review of the evidence supporting secondary inflammation-driven genotoxicity as a principal mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borm, Paul J A; Tran, Lang; Donaldson, Ken

    2011-10-01

    In 1987 the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classified crystalline silica (CS) as a probable carcinogen and in 1997 reclassified it as a Group 1 carcinogen, i.e., that there was sufficient evidence for carcinogenicity in experimental animals and sufficient evidence for carcinogenicity in humans. The Working Group noted that "carcinogenicity in humans was not detected in all industrial circumstances studied, carcinogenicity may be dependent on inherent characteristics of the crystalline silica or on external factors affecting its biological activity or distribution of its polymorphs." This unusual statement that the physicochemical form of the CS influences its carcinogenicity is well understood at the toxicological level and arises as a consequence of the fact that CS activity depends on the reactivity of the CS surface, which can be blocked by a number of agents. We reviewed the literature on CS genotoxicity that has been published since the 1997 monograph, with special reference to the mechanism of CS genotoxicity. The mechanism of CS genotoxicity can be primary, a result of direct interaction of CS with target cells, or indirect, as a consequence of inflammation elicited by quartz, where the inflammatory cell-derived oxidants cause the genotoxicity. The review revealed a number of papers supporting the hypothesis that the CS genotoxic and inflammatory hazard is a variable one. In an attempt to attain a quantitative basis for the potential mechanism, we carried out analysis of published data and noted a 5-fold greater dose required to reach a threshold for genotoxic effects than for proinflammatory effects in the same cell line in vitro. When we related the calculated threshold dose at the proximal alveolar region for inflammation in a published study with the threshold dose for genotoxicity in vitro, we noted that a 60-120-fold greater dose was required for direct genotoxic effects in vitro. These data strongly suggests that inflammation is

  7. Prevalidation study of the BALB/c 3T3 cell transformation assay for assessment of carcinogenic potential of chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Noriho; Bohnenberger, Susanne; Kunkelmann, Thorsten; Munaro, Barbara; Ponti, Jessica; Poth, Albrecht; Sabbioni, Enrico; Sakai, Ayako; Salovaara, Susan; Sasaki, Kiyoshi; Thomas, B Claire; Umeda, Makoto

    2012-04-11

    The cell transformation assays (CTAs) have attracted attention within the field of alternative methods due to their potential to reduce the number of animal experiments in the field of carcinogenicity. The CTA using BALB/c 3T3 cells has proved to be able to respond to chemical carcinogens by inducing morphologically transformed foci. Although a considerable amount of data on the performance of the assay has been collected, a formal evaluation focusing particularly on reproducibility, and a standardised protocol were considered important. Therefore the European Centre for the Validation of Alternative Methods (ECVAM) decided to coordinate a prevalidation study of the BALB/c 3T3 CTA. Three different laboratories from Japan and Europe participated. In the study the following modules were assessed stepwise: test definition (Module 1) consisted of the standardisation of the protocol, the selection of the cell lineage, and the preparation of a photo catalogue on the transformed foci. The within-laboratory reproducibility (Module 2) and the transferability (Module 3) were assessed using non-coded and coded 3-methylcholanthrene. Then, five coded chemicals were tested for the assessment of between-laboratory reproducibility (Module 4). All three laboratories obtained positive results with benzo[a]pyrene, phenanthrene and o-toluidine HCl. 2-Acetylaminofluorene was positive in two laboratories and equivocal in one laboratory. Anthracene was negative in all three laboratories. The chemicals except phenanthrene, which is classified by IARC (http://monographs.iarc.fr) as group 3 "not classifiable as to its carcinogenicity to human", were correctly predicted as carcinogens. Further studies on phenanthrene will clarify this discrepancy. Thus, although only a few chemicals were tested, it can be seen that the predictive capacity of the BALB/c 3T3 CTA is satisfactory. On the basis of the outcome of this study, an improved protocol, incorporating some changes related to data

  8. AKT1E¹⁷K Is Oncogenic in Mouse Lung and Cooperates with Chemical Carcinogens in Inducing Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malanga, Donatella; Belmonte, Stefania; Colelli, Fabiana; Scarfò, Marzia; De Marco, Carmela; Oliveira, Duarte Mendes; Mirante, Teresa; Camastra, Caterina; Gagliardi, Monica; Rizzuto, Antonia; Mignogna, Chiara; Paciello, Orlando; Papparella, Serenella; Fagman, Henrik; Viglietto, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The hotspot AKT1E17K mutation in the pleckstrin homology domain of AKT1 occurs in approximately 0.6-2% of human lung cancers. Recently, we have demonstrated that AKT1E17K transforms immortalized human bronchial cells. Here by use of a transgenic Cre-inducible murine strain in the wild type Rosa26 (R26) locus (R26-AKT1E17K mice) we demonstrate that AKT1E17K is a bona-fide oncogene and plays a role in the development of lung cancer in vivo. In fact, we report that mutant AKT1E17K induces bronchial and/or bronchiolar hyperplastic lesions in murine lung epithelium, which progress to frank carcinoma at very low frequency, and accelerates tumor formation induced by chemical carcinogens. In conclusion, AKT1E17K induces hyperplasia of mouse lung epithelium in vivo and cooperates with urethane to induce the fully malignant phenotype.

  9. OSHA Confronts Carcinogens in the Workplace as Inflation Fighters Confront OSHA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Ilene

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the apparently opposing forces of worker safety, as represented by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), and economic inflation spawned by expensive industrial processes needed to limit the emission of carcinogens. (CP)

  10. Determination of potentially carcinogenic compounds in food : trace analysis of vinylchloride, vinylidenechloride, acrylonitrile, epichlorohydrin and diethylpyrocarbonate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lierop, van J.B.H.

    1979-01-01

    Toxicological evidence shows that some monomers present in packaging materials may be carcinogenic. These monomers, notably vinylchloride, vinylidenechloride, acrylonitrile and epichlorohydrin, may migrate from the packaging material into the food. Therefore, severe limits are set to the contents of

  11. Carcinogenicity of syncrudes relative to natural petroleum as assessed by repetative mouse skin application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, J.M.; Whitaker, M.S.; Wesley, J.W.

    1978-01-01

    The relative carcinogenicities of coal and shale derived liquid crudes was compared with a composite blend of natural petroleum using discontinuous exposure of mouse skin. All of the syncrudes were carcinogenic while the natural crude composite was negative following three times weekly application of 50% w/v solutions for 22 wks followed by a 22 wk observation period. In addition to eliciting progressive squamous carcinomas the syncrudes were also capable of inducing persistent ulcerative dermatitis. This inflammatory or necrotizing potential appeared to be inversely proportional to the carcinogenicity of the material. A measure of the relative solubility of the materials in mouse skin was obtained by quantitation of native fluorescence in frozen sections of skin. There appeared to be a general, although non-quantitative association between fluorescence intensity in sebaceous glands and carcinogenicity in epidermal cells, however it will be necessary to examine a greater number of samples to establish such a correlation.

  12. Mechanisms Underlying the Very High Susceptibility of the Immature Mammary Gland to Carcinogenic Initiation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gould, Michael

    2000-01-01

    The overall goal of this project was to explore the toxic effects of physical and chemical carcinogens on the immature mammary gland as compared to the effects on the young adult mammary gland using a rat model. We have: I...

  13. Carcinogenic effects of N-nitroso-3-(substituted phenylimino)-indolin-2-one derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumarasamy, Murali; Theivendren, Panneerselvam; Govindarajan, Rousso; Franzblau, Scott G; Ramalingam, Kirthiga

    2012-07-01

    A novel series of N-nitroso-3-(substituted phenylimino)-indolin-2-one 3a-h was synthesized and tested for carcinogenic effects. The synthesized pyrazole derivatives' chemical structures were proved by means of their infra red (IR), proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H-NMR), and mass,and confirmed by elemental analyses. The carcinogenic activity was assessed by 3-(4,5dimethyl thiazole-2yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide (MTT) cell-viability assay. The results show that most of the synthesized compounds exhibit significant carcinogenic activities. Among the synthesized compounds, N-nitroso-3-(2,4-dinitrophenylimino)-indolin-2-one 3h exhibited the most potent carcinogenic activity. The structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies show that the nature as well as the position of the amine are important for deciding the activity profile of the indolin-2-one derivatives, which reiterates the need for further experimental investigations.

  14. Carcinogenicity evaluation for the application of carbon nanotubes as biomaterials in rasH2 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takanashi, Seiji; Hara, Kazuo; Aoki, Kaoru; Usui, Yuki; Shimizu, Masayuki; Haniu, Hisao; Ogihara, Nobuhide; Ishigaki, Norio; Nakamura, Koichi; Okamoto, Masanori; Kobayashi, Shinsuke; Kato, Hiroyuki; Sano, Kenji; Nishimura, Naoyuki; Tsutsumi, Hideki; Machida, Kazuhiko; Saito, Naoto

    2012-01-01

    The application of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as biomaterials is of wide interest, and studies examining their application in medicine have had considerable significance. Biological safety is the most important factor when considering the clinical application of CNTs as biomaterials, and various toxicity evaluations are required. Among these evaluations, carcinogenicity should be examined with the highest priority; however, no report using transgenic mice to evaluate the carcinogenicity of CNTs has been published to date. Here, we performed a carcinogenicity test by implanting multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs) into the subcutaneous tissue of rasH2 mice, using the carbon black present in black tattoo ink as a reference material for safety. The rasH2 mice did not develop neoplasms after being injected with MWCNTs; instead, MWCNTs showed lower carcinogenicity than carbon black. Such evaluations should facilitate the clinical application and development of CNTs for use in important medical fields.

  15. AI AND SAR APPROACHES FOR PREDICTING CHEMICAL CARCINOGENICITY: SURVEY AND STATUS REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    A wide variety of artificial intelligence (AI) and structure-activity relationship (SAR approaches have been applied to tackling the general problem of predicting rodent chemical carcinogenicity. Given the diversity of chemical structures and mechanisms relative to this endpoin...

  16. The impact of low-dose carcinogens and environmental disruptors on tissue invasion and metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochieng, Josiah; Nangami, Gladys N.; Ogunkua, Olugbemiga; Miousse, Isabelle R.; Koturbash, Igor; Odero-Marah, Valerie; McCawley, Lisa; Nangia-Makker, Pratima; Ahmed, Nuzhat; Luqmani, Yunus; Chen, Zhenbang; Papagerakis, Silvana; Wolf, Gregory T.; Dong, Chenfang; Zhou, Binhua P.; Brown, Dustin G.; Colacci, Annamaria; Hamid, Roslida A.; Mondello, Chiara; Raju, Jayadev; Ryan, Elizabeth P.; Woodrick, Jordan; Scovassi, Ivana; Singh, Neetu; Vaccari, Monica; Roy, Rabindra; Forte, Stefano; Memeo, Lorenzo; Salem, Hosni K.; Amedei, Amedeo; Al-Temaimi, Rabeah; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Bisson, William H.; Eltom, Sakina E.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to stimulate new ideas regarding low-dose environmental mixtures and carcinogens and their potential to promote invasion and metastasis. Whereas a number of chapters in this review are devoted to the role of low-dose environmental mixtures and carcinogens in the promotion of invasion and metastasis in specific tumors such as breast and prostate, the overarching theme is the role of low-dose carcinogens in the progression of cancer stem cells. It is becoming clearer that cancer stem cells in a tumor are the ones that assume invasive properties and colonize distant organs. Therefore, low-dose contaminants that trigger epithelial–mesenchymal transition, for example, in these cells are of particular interest in this review. This we hope will lead to the collaboration between scientists who have dedicated their professional life to the study of carcinogens and those whose interests are exclusively in the arena of tissue invasion and metastasis. PMID:26106135

  17. An investigation of carcinogenic agents at the Mississippi Sandhill Crane National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes a study with the following results: 1. Three of the metals reported as carcinogens, arsenic, chromium, and nickel, were found within the range...

  18. Correlation of levels of volatile versus carcinogenic particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in air samples from smokehouses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Åse Marie; Poulsen, O M; Christensen, J M

    1991-01-01

    In the present study, data on the concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in air samples from fish smokehouses (Nordholm et al. 1986) and meat smokehouses (Hansen et al. submitted for publication) were used to analyze the extent to which six different volatile PAH compounds could...... function as markers for the total concentration of six different carcinogenic particulate PAH compounds. Although a significant positive correlation was observed between the concentration of each of six volatile compounds and the total concentration of carcinogenic PAH compounds, a particularly good...... carcinogenic PAH compounds in air samples from smokehouses, whereas fluoranthene and pyrene displayed the highest specificity. However, when the applicability of the six markers was tested on air samples from iron foundries, only naphthalene and pyrene were useful as markers for the carcinogenic compounds...

  19. Carcinogenic and mutagenic agents in the workplace, Poland, 2011–2012

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Pałaszewska-Tkacz; Sławomir Czerczak; Katarzyna Konieczko

    2015-01-01

    Background: The objective of the study was the analysis of structure of carcinogenic or mutagenic chemical substances and dusts occurring in Polish enterprises, 2011–2012, including the number of exposed employees reported to the “Central register of data on exposure to carcinogenic or mutagenic chemical substances, mixtures, agents or technological processes”, Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Łódź. In the paper the aims, range and methodology of data collecting by the Central Regist...

  20. Varied exposure to carcinogenic, mutagenic, and reprotoxic (CMR) chemicals in occupational settings in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havet, Nathalie; Penot, Alexis; Morelle, Magali; Perrier, Lionel; Charbotel, Barbara; Fervers, Béatrice

    2017-02-01

    To explore varied exposure to carcinogenic, mutagenic, and reprotoxic chemicals (CMR) for French employees. Our study assessed data from the French national cross-sectional survey of occupational risks (SUMER) that was conducted in 2010 in a national representative sample of employees. We selected 28 CMR agents that were classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer or European Union as being known or presumed to have CMR potential in humans. The association of individual and job characteristics with exposure prevalence, duration, and intensity of the CMR agents during a 1-week period was examined using multilevel logistic regression analysis. Overall, 10.4% of employees in 2010 were exposed to one or more CMR agents at their workplace, and 3.4% were subjected to multiple CMR exposures. Blue-collar workers, night-shift workers and workers with short-term employment contracts experienced higher exposure prevalence (p agents (p < 0.001). The presence of a Committee for Health, Safety, and Working Conditions, and intervention by Occupational Health and Safety officers were significantly associated with reduced exposure intensities (p < 0.001 and p < 0.05). Establishment of European CMR regulations and the existence of an applicable substitution principle reduced the exposure duration (p < 0.001) and intensity (p < 0.05). Our results point out disparities in CMR exposure and identify high-priority targets for prevention measures to help reducing social health discrepancies.

  1. Development of Urinary Bladder Pre-Neoplasia by Schistosoma haematobium Eggs and Chemical Carcinogen in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chala, Bayissa; Choi, Min-Ho; Moon, Kyung Chul; Kim, Hyung Suk; Kwak, Cheol; Hong, Sung-Tae

    2017-02-01

    Schistosoma haematobium is a biocarcinogen of human urinary bladder (UB). The present study investigated developing UB cancer mouse model by injecting S. haematobium eggs into the bladder wall and introduction of chemical carcinogens. Histopathological findings showed mild hyperplasia to epithelial vacuolar change, and high grade dysplasia. Squamous metaplasia was observed in the S. haematobium eggs+NDMA group at week 12 but not in other groups. Immunohistochemistry revealed significantly high expression of Ki-67 in urothelial epithelial cells of the S. haematobium eggs+BBN group at week 20. The qRT-PCR showed high expression of p53 gene in S. haematobium eggs group at week 4 and S. haematobium eggs+BBN group at week 20. E-cadherin and vimentin showed contrasting expression in S. haematobium eggs+BBN group. Such inverse expression of E-cadherin and vimentin may indicate epithelial mesenchymal transition in the UB tissue. In conclusion, S. haematobium eggs and nitrosamines may transform UB cells into squamous metaplasia and dysplasia in correlation with increased expression of Ki-67. Marked decrease in E-cadherin and increase in p53 and vimentin expressions may support the transformation. The present study introduces a promising modified animal model for UB cancer study using S. haematobium eggs.

  2. Sensibility of polyaniline nanofibers to biomarker of benzene recognized as a carcinogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarika Bukkawar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Alarming situation of toxic substances such as benzene and its analogs in the environment and workplaces, making it important to monitor these chemicals and their metabolites in order to evaluate risk hazards and potential problems caused by exposure to toxic compounds. Benzene is omnipresent in usage across industries. International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC which is a part of World Health Organization (WHO has classified Benzene as a human carcinogen. trans-trans Muconic acid (ttMA is the most important biomarker of benzene for biomonitoring of its low level exposure. In this paper the sensing ability of polyaniline (PANI to ttMA is investigated for development of cheap, portable and effective electrochemical biosensor. To take this ahead for biosensor device application, successful self-assembling of PANI nanofibers of 40–70 nm range on SS 304 working electrode was achieved. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction was used to characterize the chemical structure of PANI. Morphology of sample was observed by field emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM. The detection potential of ttMA in phosphate buffer solution of pH 5.8 acting as a supporting electrolyte was found to be at 0.26 V by linear sweep voltammetry.

  3. Application of muscadine grape (Vitis rotundifolia Michx.) pomace extract to reduce carcinogenic acrylamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Changmou; Yagiz, Yavuz; Marshall, Sara; Li, Zheng; Simonne, Amarat; Lu, Jiang; Marshall, Maurice R

    2015-09-01

    Acrylamide is a byproduct of the Maillard reaction and is formed in a variety of heat-treated commercial starchy foods. It is known to be toxic and potentially carcinogenic to humans. Muscadine grape polyphenols and standard phenolic compounds were examined on the reduction of acrylamide in an equimolar asparagine/glucose chemical model, a potato chip model, and a simulated physiological system. Polyphenols were found to significantly reduce acrylamide in the chemical model, with reduced rates higher than 90% at 100 μg/ml. In the potato chip model, grape polyphenols reduced the acrylamide level by 60.3% as concentration was increased to 0.1%. However, polyphenols exhibited no acrylamide reduction in the simulated physiological system. Results also indicated no significant correlation between the antioxidant activities of polyphenols and their acrylamide inhibition. This study demonstrated muscadine grape extract can mitigate acrylamide formation in the Maillard reaction, which provides a new value-added application for winery pomace waste. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Biochemical and molecular aspects of mammalian susceptibility to aflatoxin B{sub 1} carcinogenicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massey, T.E.; Stewart, R.K. [Queen`s Univ., Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Daniels, J.M. [Environmental Health Centre, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1995-03-01

    Aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}) is a fungal toxin that has been implicated as a causative agent in human hepatic and extrahepatic carcinogenesis. In this review, the mechanisms involved in AFB{sub 1} toxicity are delineated, in order to describe the features that make a specific cell, tissue, or species susceptible to the mycotoxin. Important considerations include: (i) different mechanisms for bioactivation of AFB{sub 1} to its ultimate carcinogenic epoxide metabolite; (ii) the balance between bioactivation to and detoxification of the epoxide; (iii) the interaction of AFB{sub 1} epoxide with DNA and the mutational events leading to neoplastic transformation; (iv) the role of cytotoxicity in AFB{sub 1} carcinogenesis; (v) the significance of nonepoxide metabolites in toxicity; and (vi) the contribution of mycotoxin-unrelated disease processes. Although considerable controversy remains about the importance of specific events, a great deal has been learned about biochemical and molecular actions of AFB{sub 1}. 157 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Possible distinct molecular carcinogenic pathways for bladder cancer in Ukraine, before and after the Chernobyl disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimura, Keiichirou; Romanenko, Alina; Min, Wei; Salim, Elsayed I; Kinoshita, Anna; Wanibuchi, Hideki; Vozianov, Alexander; Fukushima, Shoji

    2004-04-01

    After the Chernobyl accident in 1986, the incidence of urinary bladder cancers in the Ukraine increased gradually from 26.2 to 43.3 per 100,000 people between 1986 and 2001. In the areas of low level but persistent cesium-137 (137Cs) radio-contamination, a unique atypical radiation-related urinary bladder cystitis named 'Chernobyl cystitis', a possible pre-neoplastic condition in humans, has been detected. We have previously documented high incidences of bladder lesions, including severe dysplasias and/or carcinoma in situ, in association with this cystitis and correlating with oxidative DNA damage. To further investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying bladder carcinogenesis with this specific etiology, mutation analysis of p53 gene (exon 5-8) was performed for 11 and 18 paraffin-embedded bladder cancers in Ukrainians, respectively collected before and after the Chernobyl disaster. DNAs were extracted and subjected to nested PCR-single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis followed by direct DNA sequencing, as well as p53 immunohistochemistry (IHC). The incidences of p53 gene mutation were 54.5 and 16.7% for before and after the Chernobyl disaster, respectively, the difference being statistically significant. Also a tendency for higher p53 IHC score was apparent in the earlier group of lesions. No significant difference was noted for the proportions of historical types. These results point to possible distinct molecular carcinogenic pathways of bladder cancer formation, before and after the Chernobyl disaster, on the basis of variation in p53 gene alteration.

  6. Waterpipe smoke: source of toxic and carcinogenic VOCs, phenols and heavy metals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Jens; Müller, Frederic D; Schmidt, Roman; Luch, Andreas; Schulz, Thomas G

    2015-11-01

    The use of the waterpipe, a traditional aid for the consumption of tobacco, has spread worldwide and is steadily increasing especially among the youth. On the other hand, there is a lack of knowledge regarding the composition of mainstream waterpipe smoke and the toxicological risks associated with this kind of smoking habit. Using a standardized machine smoking protocol, mainstream waterpipe smoke was generated and further analyzed for twelve volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and eight phenolic compounds by applying gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection, respectively. Additionally, seventeen elements were analyzed in waterpipe tobacco and charcoal prior to and after smoking, applying inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry to assess the maximum exposure of these elements. For the first time ever, we have been able to show that waterpipe mainstream smoke contains high levels of the human carcinogen benzene. Compared with cigarette smoke yields, the levels were 6.2-fold higher, thus representing a significant health hazard for the waterpipe smoker. Furthermore, we found that waterpipe mainstream smoke contains considerable amounts of catechol, hydroquinone and phenol, each of which causing some health concern at least. The analysis of waterpipe tobacco and charcoal revealed that both matrices contained considerable amounts of the toxic elements nickel, cadmium, lead and chromium. Altogether, the data on VOCs, phenols and elements presented in this study clearly point to the health hazards associated with the consumption of tobacco using waterpipes.

  7. The use of psychoactive prescription drugs among DUI suspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karjalainen, Karoliina; Haukka, Jari; Lintonen, Tomi; Joukamaa, Matti; Lillsunde, Pirjo

    2015-10-01

    The study seeks to increase understanding of the use of psychoactive prescription drugs among persons suspected of driving under the influence (DUI). We studied whether the use of prescribed psychoactive medication was associated with DUI, and examined the difference in the use of prescription drugs between DUI recidivists and those arrested only once. In this register-based study, persons suspected of DUI (n=29470) were drawn from the Register of DUI suspects, and an age- and gender-matched reference population (n=30043) was drawn from the Finnish general population. Data on prescription drug use was obtained by linkage to the National Prescription Register. The associations of DUI arrest and use of psychoactive prescription drugs in different DUI groups (findings for alcohol only, prescription drugs, prescription drugs and alcohol, illicit drugs) were estimated by using mixed-effect logistic regression. The use of psychoactive prescription drugs and DUI appeared to be strongly associated, with DUI suspects significantly more likely to use psychoactive prescription drugs compared to the reference population. Gender differences existed, with the use of benzodiazepines being more common among female DUI suspects. Moreover, DUI recidivists were more likely to use psychoactive prescription drugs compared to those arrested only once. In addition to alcohol and/or illicit drug use, a significant proportion of DUI suspects were using psychoactive prescription drugs. When prescribing psychoactive medication, especially benzodiazepines, physicians are challenged to screen for possible substance use problems and also to monitor for patients' alcohol or illicit drug use while being medicated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Book Review: Placing the Suspect behind the Keyboard: Using Digital Forensics and Investigative Techniques to Identify Cybercrime Suspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Nash

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Shavers, B. (2013. Placing the Suspect behind the Keyboard: Using Digital Forensics and Investigative Techniques to Identify Cybercrime Suspects. Waltham, MA: Elsevier, 290 pages, ISBN-978-1-59749-985-9, US$51.56. Includes bibliographical references and index.Reviewed by Detective Corporal Thomas Nash (tnash@bpdvt.org, Burlington Vermont Police Department, Internet Crime against Children Task Force. Adjunct Instructor, Champlain College, Burlington VT.In this must read for any aspiring novice cybercrime investigator as well as the seasoned professional computer guru alike, Brett Shaver takes the reader into the ever changing and dynamic world of Cybercrime investigation.  Shaver, an experienced criminal investigator, lays out the details and intricacies of a computer related crime investigation in a clear and concise manner in his new easy to read publication, Placing the Suspect behind the Keyboard. Using Digital Forensics and Investigative techniques to Identify Cybercrime Suspects. Shaver takes the reader from start to finish through each step of the investigative process in well organized and easy to follow sections, with real case file examples to reach the ultimate goal of any investigation: identifying the suspect and proving their guilt in the crime. Do not be fooled by the title. This excellent, easily accessible reference is beneficial to both criminal as well as civil investigations and should be in every investigator’s library regardless of their respective criminal or civil investigative responsibilities.(see PDF for full review

  9. Detection of herpes viruses in the cerebrospinal fluid of adults with suspected viral meningitis in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, L A; Kelly, M; Cohen, D; Neuhann, F; Galbraith, S; Mallewa, M; Hopkins, M; Hart, I J; Guiver, M; Lalloo, D G; Heyderman, R S; Solomon, T

    2013-02-01

    We looked for herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2, respectively), varicella zoster virus (VZV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA in Malawian adults with clinically suspected meningitis. We collected cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from consecutive adults admitted with clinically suspected meningitis to Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital (QECH), Blantyre, Malawi, for a period of 3 months. Those with proven bacterial or fungal meningitis were excluded. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed on the CSF for HSV-1 and HSV-2, VZV, EBV and CMV DNA. A total of 183 patients presented with clinically suspected meningitis. Of these, 59 (32 %) had proven meningitis (bacterial, tuberculous or cryptococcal), 39 (21 %) had normal CSF and 14 (8 %) had aseptic meningitis. For the latter group, a herpes virus was detected in 9 (64 %): 7 (50 %) had EBV and 2 (14 %) had CMV, all were human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive. HSV-2 and VZV were not detected. Amongst those with a normal CSF, 8 (21 %) had a detectable herpes virus, of which 7 (88 %) were HIV-positive. The spectrum of causes of herpes viral meningitis in this African population is different to that in Western industrialised settings, with EBV being frequently detected in the CSF. The significance of this needs further investigation.

  10. [Chemical carcinogenic and mutagenic agents in the workplace, Poland, 2008-2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konieczko, Katarzyna; Pałaszewska-Tkacz, Anna; Czerczak, Sławomir

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a concise but comprehensive information on the occurrence of carcinogenic or mutagenic agents in Polish enterprises and the number of workers exposed to those agents reported to the central register by employers. Objectives and responsibilities of the register, as well as the range and methods of data gathering are discussed. Data concerning carcinogenic or mutagenic chemical substances and technological processes reported to central register in 2008-2010 were analyzed. In 2008-2010 more than 300 carcinogenic or mutagenic chemical substances were reported to the register. Approximately 2500 plants reported above 150 000 per-person-exposures annually. Among all technological processes regarded as occupational carcinogens, hardwood dusts exposure (about 660 companies; 11 000-13 000 exposed workers each year) and exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) present in coal products (117-125 plantsl 3000 exposed per year) were reported. The most widespread carcinogenic/mutagenic substances were: benzene, chromium(VI) compounds: potassium dichromate and chromate, chromium(VI) trioxide and other chromium compounds, ethylene oxide, asbestos, benzo[a]pyrene and gasoline. The highest number of men was exposed to particular PAHs and benzene, and the majority of women was exposed to benzene, potassium dichromate and chromate, acrylamide, ethylene oxide and gasoline. The lack of clear-cut definition of occupational exposure to carcinogen creates a problem faced by employers in defining the accurate number of exposed workers.

  11. QSAR Study for Carcinogenic Potency of Aromatic Amines Based on GEP and MLPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fucheng Song

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A new analysis strategy was used to classify the carcinogenicity of aromatic amines. The physical-chemical parameters are closely related to the carcinogenicity of compounds. Quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR is a method of predicting the carcinogenicity of aromatic amine, which can reveal the relationship between carcinogenicity and physical-chemical parameters. This study accessed gene expression programming by APS software, the multilayer perceptrons by Weka software to predict the carcinogenicity of aromatic amines, respectively. All these methods relied on molecular descriptors calculated by CODESSA software and eight molecular descriptors were selected to build function equations. As a remarkable result, the accuracy of gene expression programming in training and test sets are 0.92 and 0.82, the accuracy of multilayer perceptrons in training and test sets are 0.84 and 0.74 respectively. The precision of the gene expression programming is obviously superior to multilayer perceptrons both in training set and test set. The QSAR application in the identification of carcinogenic compounds is a high efficiency method.

  12. Sucralose Non-Carcinogenicity: A Review of the Scientific and Regulatory Rationale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Colin; Brusick, David; Cohen, Samuel M; Hardisty, Jerry F; Grotz, V Lee; Williams, Gary M

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory authorities worldwide have found the nonnutritive sweetener, sucralose, to be noncarcinogenic, based on a range of studies. A review of these and other studies found through a comprehensive search of electronic databases, using appropriate key terms, was conducted and results of that review are reported here. An overview of the types of studies relied upon by regulatory agencies to assess carcinogenicity potential is also provided as context. Physiochemical and pharmacokinetic/toxicokinetic studies confirm stability under conditions of use and reveal no metabolites of carcinogenic potential. In vitro and in vivo assays reveal no confirmed genotoxic activity. Long-term carcinogenicity studies in animal models provide no evidence of carcinogenic potential for sucralose. In studies in healthy adults, sucralose was well-tolerated and without evidence of toxicity or other changes that might suggest a potential for carcinogenic effects. In summary, sucralose does not demonstrate carcinogenic activity even when exposure levels are several orders of magnitude greater than the range of anticipated daily ingestion levels.

  13. Carcinogenic potential of sanguinarine, a phytochemical used in 'therapeutic' black salve and mouthwash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croaker, Andrew; King, Graham J; Pyne, John H; Anoopkumar-Dukie, Shailendra; Simanek, Vilim; Liu, Lei

    2017-10-01

    Black salves are escharotic skin cancer therapies in clinical use since the mid 19th century. Sanguinaria canadensis, a major ingredient of black salve formulations, contains a number of bioactive phytochemicals including the alkaloid sanguinarine. Despite its prolonged history of clinical use, conflicting experimental results have prevented the carcinogenic potential of sanguinarine from being definitively determined. Sanguinarine has a molecular structure similar to known polyaromatic hydrocarbon carcinogens and is a DNA intercalator. Sanguinarine also generates oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stress resulting in the unfolded protein response and the formation of 8-hydroxyguanine genetic lesions. Sanguinarine has been the subject of contradictory in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity and murine carcinogenesis test results that have delayed its carcinogenic classification. Despite this, epidemiological studies have linked mouthwash that contains sanguinarine with the development of oral leukoplakia. Sanguinarine is also proposed as an aetiological agent in gallbladder carcinoma. This literature review investigates the carcinogenic potential of sanguinarine. Reasons for contradictory genotoxicity and carcinogenesis results are explored, knowledge gaps identified and a strategy for determining the carcinogenic potential of sanguinarine especialy relating to black salve are discussed. As patients continue to apply black salve, especially to skin regions suffering from field cancerization and skin malignancies, an understanding of the genotoxic and carcinogenic potential of sanguinarine is of urgent clinical relevance. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. QSAR Study for Carcinogenic Potency of Aromatic Amines Based on GEP and MLPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Fucheng; Zhang, Anling; Liang, Hui; Cui, Lianhua; Li, Wenlian; Si, Hongzong; Duan, Yunbo; Zhai, Honglin

    2016-01-01

    A new analysis strategy was used to classify the carcinogenicity of aromatic amines. The physical-chemical parameters are closely related to the carcinogenicity of compounds. Quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) is a method of predicting the carcinogenicity of aromatic amine, which can reveal the relationship between carcinogenicity and physical-chemical parameters. This study accessed gene expression programming by APS software, the multilayer perceptrons by Weka software to predict the carcinogenicity of aromatic amines, respectively. All these methods relied on molecular descriptors calculated by CODESSA software and eight molecular descriptors were selected to build function equations. As a remarkable result, the accuracy of gene expression programming in training and test sets are 0.92 and 0.82, the accuracy of multilayer perceptrons in training and test sets are 0.84 and 0.74 respectively. The precision of the gene expression programming is obviously superior to multilayer perceptrons both in training set and test set. The QSAR application in the identification of carcinogenic compounds is a high efficiency method. PMID:27854309

  15. Suspected Rhinolithiasis Associated With Endodontic Disease in a Cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Kevin; Fiani, Nadine; Peralta, Santiago

    2017-12-01

    Rhinoliths are rare, intranasal, mineralized masses formed via the precipitation of mineral salts around an intranasal nidus. Clinical signs are typically consistent with inflammatory rhinitis and nasal obstruction, but asymptomatic cases are possible. Rhinoliths may be classified as exogenous or endogenous depending on the origin of the nidus, with endogenous rhinoliths reportedly being less common. This case report describes a suspected case of endogenous rhinolithiasis in a cat which was detected as an incidental finding during radiographic assessment of a maxillary canine tooth with endodontic disease. Treatment consisted of removal of the suspected rhinolith via a transalveolar approach after surgical extraction of the maxillary canine tooth.

  16. Cholescintigraphy and ultrasonography in patients suspected of having acute cholecystitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, K B; Sommer, W; Hahn, L

    1988-01-01

    The diagnostic power of combined cholescintigraphy and ultrasonography was tested in 67 patients suspected of having acute cholecystitis; of these, 42 (63%) had acute cholecystitis. The predictive value of a positive scintigraphy (PVpos) was 95% and that of a negative (PVneg) was 91% (n = 67...... that in patients suspected of having acute cholecystitis cholescintigraphy should be the first diagnostic procedure performed. If the scintigraphy is positive, additional ultrasonographic detection of gallstones makes the diagnosis almost certain. If one diagnostic modality is inconclusive, the other makes a fair...

  17. Symptomatic Patency Capsule Retention in Suspected Crohn's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Bjørn; Nathan, Torben; Jensen, Michael Dam

    2016-01-01

    The main limitation of capsule endoscopy is the risk of capsule retention. In patients with suspected Crohn's disease, however, this complication is rare, and if a small bowel stenosis is not reliably excluded, small bowel patency can be confirmed with the Pillcam patency capsule. We present two...... patients examined for suspected Crohn's disease who experienced significant symptoms from a retained patency capsule. Both patients had Crohn's disease located in the terminal ileum. In one patient, the patency capsule caused abdominal pain and vomiting and was visualized at magnetic resonance enterography...

  18. Comparison of the expression profiles induced by genotoxic and nongenotoxic carcinogens in rat liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellinger-Ziegelbauer, Heidrun [Bayer Healthcare AG, Department of Molecular and Genetic Toxicology, Aprather Weg 18a, 42096 Wuppertal (Germany)]. E-mail: heidrun.ellinger-ziegelbauer@bayerhealthcare.com; Stuart, Barry [Bayer Crop Science, Department of Toxicology, Stilwell, KS (United States); Wahle, Brad [Bayer Crop Science, Department of Toxicology, Stilwell, KS (United States); Bomann, Werner [Bayer Crop Science, Department of Toxicology, Stilwell, KS (United States); Ahr, Hans Juergen [Bayer Healthcare AG, Department of Molecular and Genetic Toxicology, Aprather Weg 18a, 42096 Wuppertal (Germany)

    2005-08-04

    Application of recently developed gene expression techniques using microarrays in toxicological studies (toxicogenomics) facilitate the interpretation of a toxic compound's mode of action and may also allow the prediction of selected toxic effects based on gene expression changes. In order to test this hypothesis, we investigated whether carcinogens at doses known to induce liver tumors in the 2-year rat bioassay deregulate characteristic sets of genes in a short term in vivo study and whether these deregulated genes represent defined biological pathways. Male Wistar rats were dosed with the four nongenotoxic hepatocarcinogens methapyrilene (MPy, 60 mg/kg/day), diethylstilbestrol (DES, 10 mg/kg/day), Wy-14643 (Wy, 60 mg/kg/day), and piperonylbutoxide (PBO, 1200 mg/kg/day). After 1, 3, 7, and 14 days, the livers were taken for histopathological evaluation and for analysis of the gene expression profiles on Affymetrix RG{sub U}34A arrays. The expression profile of the four nongenotoxic carcinogens were compared to the profiles of the four genotoxic carcinogens 2-nitrofluorene (2-NF), dimethylnitrosamine (DMN), 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), and aflatoxin B1 (AB1) from a similar study reported previously. By using statistical and clustering tools characteristically deregulated genes were extracted and functionally classified. Distinct cellular pathways were affected by the nongenotoxic carcinogens compared to the genotoxic carcinogens which at least partly correlated with the two-stage model of carcinogenesis. Characteristic to genotoxic carcinogens were a DNA damage response and the activation of proliferative and survival signaling. Nongenotoxic carcinogens showed responses to oxidative DNA or protein damage, as well as cell cycle progression and signs of regeneration. Many of the gene alterations found with the nongenotoxic carcinogens imply compound-specific mechanisms. Although neither a single gene nor a single pathway will be

  19. PMS2 Involvement in Patients Suspected of Lynch Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niessen, Renee C.; Kleibeuker, Jan H.; Westers, Helga; Jager, Paul O. J.; Rozeveld, Dennie; Bos, Krista K.; Boersma-van Ek, Wytske; Hollema, Harry; Sijmons, Rolf H.; Hofstra, Robert M. W.

    It is well-established that germline mutations in the mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 cause Lynch syndrome. However, mutations in these three genes do not account for all Lynch syndrome (suspected) families. Recently, it was shown that germline mutations in another mismatch repair gene,

  20. Faecal Calprotectin in Suspected Paediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Degraeuwe, Pieter L. J.; Beld, Monique P. A.; Ashorn, Merja; Canani, Roberto Berni; Day, Andrew S.; Diamanti, Antonella; Fagerberg, Ulrika L.; Henderson, Paul; Kolho, Kaija-Leena; Van de Vijver, Els; van Rheenen, Patrick F.; Wilson, David C.; Kessels, Alfons G. H.

    Objectives: The diagnostic accuracy of faecal calprotectin (FC) concentration for paediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is well described at the population level, but not at the individual level. We reassessed the diagnostic accuracy of FC in children with suspected IBD and developed an

  1. Stabilization of the spine in patients with suspected cervical spine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stabilization of the spine in patients with suspected cervical spine injury in Mulago Hospital. BM Ndeleva, T Beyeza. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/eaoj.v5i1.67487 · AJOL African Journals ...

  2. Talking heads : interviewing suspects from a cultural perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beune, K.

    2009-01-01

    Although the literature on the interviewing of suspects has increased over the past decade, research on the use and effectiveness of police strategies and their boundary conditions is very rare. The present dissertation aims to fill this void by identifying behaviors that appeal to and persuade

  3. Nonreferral of Nursing Home Patients With Suspected Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamaker, Marije E.; Hamelinck, Victoria C.; van Munster, Barbara C.; Bastiaannet, Esther; Smorenburg, Carolien H.; Achterberg, Wilco P.; Liefers, Gerrit-Jan; de Rooij, Sophia E.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: People with suspected breast cancer who are not referred for diagnostic testing remain unregistered and are not included in cancer statistics. Little is known about the extent of and motivation for nonreferral of these patients. Methods: A Web-based survey was sent to all elderly care

  4. Cognitive Linguistic Performances of Multilingual University Students Suspected of Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Signe-Anita; Laine, Matti

    2011-01-01

    High-performing adults with compensated dyslexia pose particular challenges to dyslexia diagnostics. We compared the performance of 20 multilingual Finnish university students with suspected dyslexia with 20 age-matched and education-matched controls on an extensive test battery. The battery tapped various aspects of reading, writing, word…

  5. Differential Diagnosis of Children with Suspected Childhood Apraxia of Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Elizabeth; McCabe, Patricia; Heard, Robert; Ballard, Kirrie J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The gold standard for diagnosing childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) is expert judgment of perceptual features. The aim of this study was to identify a set of objective measures that differentiate CAS from other speech disorders. Method: Seventy-two children (4-12 years of age) diagnosed with suspected CAS by community speech-language…

  6. A suspected case of Addison’s disease in cattle

    OpenAIRE

    Lambacher, Bianca; Wittek, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    A 4.75-year old Simmental cow was presented with symptoms of colic and ileus. The clinical signs and blood analysis resulted in the diagnosis of suspected primary hypoadrenocorticism (Addison’s disease). Although Addison’s disease has been frequently described in other domestic mammals, to our knowledge, this disease has not previously been reported in cattle.

  7. Is extended biopsy protocol justified in all patients with suspected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the significance of an extended 10-core transrectal biopsy protocol in different categories of patients with suspected prostate cancer using digital guidance. Materials and Methods: We studied 125 men who were being evaluated for prostate cancer. They all had an extended 10-core digitally guided ...

  8. Correlates and Suspected Causes of Obesity in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crothers, Laura M.; Kehle, Thomas J.; Bray, Melissa A.; Theodore, Lea A.

    2009-01-01

    The correlates and suspected causes of the intractable condition obesity are complex and involve environmental and heritable, psychological and physical variables. Overall, the factors associated with and possible causes of it are not clearly understood. Although there exists some ambiguity in the research regarding the degree of happiness in…

  9. Medical Evaluation of Suspected Child Sexual Abuse: 2011 Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Joyce A.

    2011-01-01

    The medical evaluation of children with suspected sexual abuse includes more than just the physical examination of the child. The importance of taking a detailed medical history from the parents and a history from the child about physical sensations following sexual contact has been emphasized in other articles in the medical literature. The…

  10. Selective screening in neonates suspected to have inborn errors of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) have a high morbidity and mortality in neonates. Unfortunately, there is no nationwide neonatal screen in Egypt, so several cases may be missed. Objective: The aim of this work was to detect the prevalence of IEM among neonates with suspected IEM, and to diagnose IEM as ...

  11. Sexual Health Before Treatment in Women with Suspected Gynecologic Malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretschneider, C Emi; Doll, Kemi M; Bensen, Jeannette T; Gehrig, Paola A; Wu, Jennifer M; Geller, Elizabeth J

    2017-08-22

    Sexual health in survivors of gynecologic cancer has been studied; however, sexual health in these women before treatment has not been thoroughly evaluated. The objective of our study was to describe the pretreatment characteristics of sexual health of women with suspected gynecologic cancer before cancer treatment. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of women with a suspected gynecologic cancer, who were prospectively enrolled in a hospital-based cancer survivorship cohort from August 2012 to June 2013. Subjects completed the validated Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Sexual Function and Satisfaction Questionnaire. Pretreatment sexual health was assessed in terms of sexual interest, desire, lubrication, discomfort, orgasm, enjoyment, and satisfaction. Of 186 eligible women with suspected gynecologic cancer, 154 (82%) completed the questionnaire pretreatment. Mean age was 58.1 ± 13.3 years. Sexual health was poor: 68.3% reported no sexual activity, and 54.7% had no interest in sexual activity. When comparing our study population to the general U.S. population, the mean pretreatment scores for the subdomains of lubrication and vaginal discomfort were similar, while sexual interest was significantly lower and global satisfaction was higher. In a linear regression model, controlling for cancer site, age remained significantly associated with sexual function while cancer site did not. Problems with sexual health are prevalent in women with suspected gynecologic malignancies before cancer treatment. Increasing awareness of the importance of sexual health in this population will improve quality of life for these women.

  12. Use of budesonide Turbuhaler in young children suspected of asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H; Pedersen, S; Nikander, K

    1994-01-01

    The question addressed in this study was the ability of young children to use a dry-powder inhaler, Turbuhaler. One hundred and sixty five children suspected of asthma, equally distributed in one year age-groups from 6 months to 8 yrs, inhaled from a Pulmicort Turbuhaler, 200 micrograms budesonid...

  13. Doppler ultrasound in the assessment of suspected intra-uterine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ramakantb

    obesity with hypertension and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.[3] In this review, a brief discussion about the ultrasound diagnosis of suspected IUGR, and thereafter about the use of Doppler ultrasound in the diagnosis of IUGR, will be ... before that, all fetuses have relatively larger heads, which will mask the brain-.

  14. Candida meningitis in a suspected immunosuppressive patient - A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Candida meningitis in a suspected immunosuppressive patient - A case report. EO Sanya, NB Ameen, BA Onile. Abstract. No Abstract. West African Journal of Medicine Vol. 25 (1) 2006: pp.79-81. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  15. Ajmaline challenge in young individuals with suspected Brugada syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorgente, A.; Sarkozy, A.; Asmundis, C. de; Chierchia, G.B.; Capulzini, L.; Paparella, G.; Henkens, S.; Brugada, P.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The clinical characteristics and the results of ajmaline challenge in young individuals with suspected Brugada syndrome (BS) have not been systematically investigated. METHODS: Among a larger series of patients included in the BS database of our Department, 179 patients undergoing

  16. A Diagnostic Program for Patients Suspected of Having Lung Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stigt, Jos A.; Uil, Steven M.; Oostdijk, Ad H.; Boers, James E.; van den Berg, Jan-Willem K.; Groen, Harry J. M.

    2012-01-01

    In 297 patients suspected of having lung cancer, invasive diagnostic procedures followed positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET-CT) on the same day. For patients with a diagnosis of malignancy (215/297), investigations were finalized on 1 day in 85%, and bronchoscopy was performed in

  17. Use of Chest Radiography In Patients Suspected of Pulmonary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    may be rushed into treatfng all cases of cough, fever and weight loss with negative sputums as PTB, and other diagnoses may be overlooked. A cheaper, quicker way of screening TB suspects would help con- siderably in this common problem. In Febuary 1991, the Norwegian Government do- nated two Odelka camer;l,s to ...

  18. Opioid analgesic administration in patients with suspected drug use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreling, Maria Clara Giorio Dutra; Mattos-Pimenta, Cibele Andrucioli de

    2017-01-01

    To identify the prevalence of patients suspected of drug use according to the nursing professionals' judgement, and compare the behavior of these professionals in opioid administration when there is or there is no suspicion that patient is a drug user. A cross-sectional study with 507 patients and 199 nursing professionals responsible for administering drugs to these patients. The Chi-Square test, Fisher's Exact and a significance level of 5% were used for the analyzes. The prevalence of suspected patients was 6.7%. The prevalence ratio of administration of opioid analgesics 'if necessary' is twice higher among patients suspected of drug use compared to patients not suspected of drug use (p = 0.037). The prevalence of patients suspected of drug use was similar to that of studies performed in emergency departments. Patients suspected of drug use receive more opioids than patients not suspected of drug use. Identificar a prevalência de pacientes com suspeita de uso de drogas conforme opinião de profissionais de enfermagem e comparar a conduta desses profissionais na administração de opioides quando há ou não suspeita de que o paciente seja usuário de drogas. Estudo transversal com 507 pacientes e 199 profissionais de enfermagem responsáveis pela administração de medicamentos a esses pacientes. Para as análises foram utilizados os testes de Qui-Quadrado, Exato de Fisher e um nível de significância de 5%. A prevalência de pacientes suspeitos foi 6,7%. A razão de prevalência de administração de analgésicos opioides "se necessário" é duas vezes maior entre os pacientes suspeitos em relação aos não suspeitos (p=0,037). A prevalência de suspeitos foi semelhante à de estudos realizados em departamentos de emergência. Os suspeitos de serem usuários de drogas recebem mais opioides do que os não suspeitos.

  19. Suspected Pulmonary Infection with Trichoderma longibrachiatum after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akagi, Tomoaki; Kawamura, Chizuko; Terasawa, Norio; Yamaguchi, Kohei; Kubo, Kohmei

    2017-01-01

    Aspergillus and Candida species are the main causative agents of invasive fungal infections in immunocompromised human hosts. However, saprophytic fungi are now increasingly being recognized as serious pathogens. Trichoderma longibrachiatum has recently been described as an emerging pathogen in immunocompromised patients. We herein report a case of isolated suspected invasive pulmonary infection with T. longibrachiatum in a 29-year-old man with severe aplastic anemia who underwent allogeneic stem cell transplantation. A direct microscopic examination of sputum, bronchoaspiration, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples revealed the presence of fungal septate hyphae. The infection was successfully treated with 1 mg/kg/day liposomal amphotericin B.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging versus bone scintigraphy in suspected scaphoid fracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiel-van Buul, M.M.C. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Academic Medical Center, Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Roolker, W. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Academic Medical Center, Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Verbeeten, B.W.B. Jr. [Dept. of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Broekhuizen, A.H. [Dept. of Traumatology, Academic Medical Center, Univ. of Amsredam (Netherlands)

    1996-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become increasingly useful in the evaluation of musculoskeletal problems, including those of the wrist. In patients with a wrist injury, MRI is used mainly to assess vascularity of scaphoid non-union. However, the use of MRI in patients in the acute phase following carpal injury is not common. Three-phase bone scintigraphy is routinely performed from at least 72 h after injury in patients with suspected scaphoid fracture and negative initial radiographs. We evaluated MRI in this patient group. The bone scan was used as the reference method. Nineteen patients were included. Bone scintigraphy was performed in all 19 patients, but MRI could be obtained in only 16 (in three patients, MRI was stopped owing to claustrophobia). In five patients, MRI confirmed a scintigraphically suspected scaphoid fracture. In one patient, a perilunar luxation, without a fracture, was seen on MRI, while bone scintigraphy showed a hot spot in the region of the lunate bone, suspected for fracture. This was confirmed by surgery. In two patients, a hot spot in the scaphoid region was suspected for scaphoid fracture, and immobilization and employed for a period of 12 weeks. MRI was negative in both cases; in one of them a scaphoid fracture was retrospectively proven on the initial X-ray series. In another two patients, a hot spot in the region of MCP I was found with a negative MRI. In both, the therapy was adjusted. In the remaining six patients, both modalities were negative. We conclude that in the diagnostic management of patients with suspected scaphoid fracture and negative initial radiographs, the use of MRI may be promising, but is not superior to three-phase bone scintigraphy. (orig.)

  1. Risk of human health by particulate matter as a source of air pollution--comparison with tobacco smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enomoto, Makoto; Tierney, William J; Nozaki, Kohsuke

    2008-08-01

    Increased air pollution, containing carcinogenic particulate matter smaller than 2.5 microm (PM(2.5)), has gained particular attention in recent years as a causative factor in the increased incidence of respiratory diseases, including lung cancer. Extensive carcinogenicity studies conducted recently under Good Laboratory Practice conditions by National Toxicology Program in the USA, Ramazzini Foundation in Italy or Contract Research Organizations on numerous chemical compounds have demonstrated the importance of considering dose levels, times and duration of exposure in the safety evaluation of carcinogenic as well as classical toxic agents. Data on exposure levels to chemical carcinogens that produce tumor development have contributed to the evaluation of human carcinogens from extrapolation of animal data. A popular held misconception is that the risk from smoking is the result of inhaling assorted particulate matter and by products from burning tobacco rather than the very low ng levels of carcinogens present in smoke. Consider the fact that a piece of toasted bread contains ng levels of the carcinogen urethane (ethyl carbamate). Yet, no one has considered toast to be a human carcinogen. Future human carcinogenic risk assessment should emphasize consideration of inhalation exposure to higher levels of benzo (a) pyrene and other possible carcinogens and particulate matter present in polluted air derived from automobile exhaust, pitch and coal tar on paved roads and asbestos, in addition to other environmental contaminant exposure via the food and drinking water.

  2. Carcinogenicity of individual and a mixture of dioxin-like compounds in female Harlan Sprague Dawley rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, N.; Nyska, A. [National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Crockett, P. [Constella Group, Research Triangle Park, NC (US)] (and others)

    2004-09-15

    The human health risk posed by exposure to persistent organochlorine pollutants (POPs), including polychlorinated-dioxins (PCDDs), -furans (PCDFs) and - biphenyls (PCBs), present in the food and the environment is one of widespread concern throughout the industrialized world. The dioxin Toxic Equivalency Factor (TEF) approach is currently the most feasible interim approach for assessing and managing the risk posed by exposure to mixtures of these compounds and has been formally adopted by regulatory bodies in many countries, the International Programme on Chemical Safety and the World Health Organization. The TEF methodology is a relative potency scheme that estimates the total exposure and biological effects of a mixture of chemicals based on a common mechanism of action involving an initial binding of the compound to the Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). An implicit assumption of the TEF methodology is that the combined risk of effects of the different congeners is dose additive. Therefore, the total dioxin toxic equivalents (TEQs) of a mixture of PCDDs, PCDFs, and PCBs may be estimated by the summation of the mass of each compound in the mixture after adjustment for its potency relative to that of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). While dose additivity is supported for certain mixtures for some biological endpoints in some experimental models, this has never been evaluated for cancer risk. Here we present a summary of four chronic rodent bioassay conducted by the National Toxicology Program (US Department of Health and Human Services) that evaluated the carcinogenicity of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), 3.3',4,4',5- pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB126) and 2,3,4,7,8 pentachlorodibenzofuran (PeCDF) and a mixture of these three dioxin-like compounds in female Harlan Sprague Dawley rats. Data from these studies will be used to test the hypothesis of dose-additivity of carcinogenicity by a defined mixture of dioxin-like compounds.

  3. Racial differences in the relationship between tobacco dependence and nicotine and carcinogen exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Helen, Gideon; Dempsey, Delia; Wilson, Margaret; Jacob, Peyton; Benowitz, Neal L

    2013-03-01

    To investigate the relationships between tobacco dependence, biomarkers of nicotine and carcinogen exposure and biomarkers of nicotine and carcinogen exposure per cigarette in back and white smokers. A total of 204 healthy black (n = 69) and white (n = 135) smokers were enrolled into two clinical studies. Nicotine equivalents (nicotine and its metabolites), 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3)pyridyl-1-butanol (NNAL) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) metabolites were measured in urine. The Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND) and time to first cigarette (TFC) measured tobacco dependence. Average TFC and FTND for blacks and whites were not significantly different. Urine NNAL and nicotine equivalents increased with increasing FTND in whites but did not increase in blacks (race × FTND interaction, both P 15 minutes; high dependence, TFC ≤15 minutes), FTND and TFC were not correlated significantly with urine nicotine equivalents and carcinogen exposure in blacks. We found moderate correlations between FTND and TFC and nicotine equivalents and carcinogen exposure among whites of low dependence and non-significant correlations among whites of high dependence. In the United States, tobacco dependence measures were related linearly to nicotine intake and carcinogen exposure in white but not in black smokers. The relationship between dependence measures and tobacco biomarkers in black smokers regardless of level of dependence resembled highly dependent white smokers. © 2012 The Authors, Addiction © 2012 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  4. ROSC-Pred: web-service for rodent organ-specific carcinogenicity prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagunin, Alexey; Rudik, Anastasia; Druzhilovsky, Dmitry; Filimonov, Dmitry; Poroikov, Vladimir

    2017-10-23

    Identification of rodent carcinogens is an important task in risk assessment of chemicals. SAR methods were proposed to reduce the number of animal experiments. Most of these methods ignore information about organ-specificity of tumorigenesis. Our study was aimed at the creation of classification models and a freely available online service for prediction of rodent carcinogens considering the species (rats, mice), sex, and tissue-specificity from structural formula of compounds. The data from Carcinogenic Potency Database for 1011 organic compounds evaluated on the standard two-year rodent carcinogenicity bioassay was used for the creation of training sets. Structure-activity relationships models for prediction of rodent organ-specific carcinogenicity were created by PASS software, which was based on Bayesian-like approach and MNA (Multilevel Neighborhoods of Atoms) descriptors. The average prediction accuracy (AUC) for training sets calculated by leave-one-out and 10-fold cross-validation was 79% and 78.2%, respectively. Freely available on the web at http://www.way2drug.com/ROSC. alexey.lagunin@ibmc.msk.ru. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  5. A Novel Strategy to Predict Carcinogenicity of Antiparasitics Based on a Combination of DNA Lesions and Bacterial Mutagenicity Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianying Liu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Genotoxicity and carcinogenicity testing of pharmaceuticals prior to commercialization is requested by regulatory agencies. The bacterial mutagenicity test was considered having the highest accuracy of carcinogenic prediction. However, some evidences suggest that it always results in false-positive responses when the bacterial mutagenicity test is used to predict carcinogenicity. Along with major changes made to the International Committee on Harmonization guidance on genotoxicity testing [S2 (R1], the old data (especially the cytotgenetic data may not meet current guidelines. This review provides a compendium of retrievable results of genotoxicity and animal carcinogenicity of 136 antiparasitics. Neither genotoxicity nor carcinogenicity data is available for 84 (61.8%, while 52 (38.2% have been evaluated in at least one genotoxicity or carcinogenicity study, and only 20 (14.7% in both genotoxicity and carcinogenicity studies. Among 33 antiparasitics with at least one old result in in vitro genotoxicity, 15 (45.5% are in agreement with the current ICH S2 (R1 guidance for data acceptance. Compared with other genotoxicity assays, the DNA lesions can significantly increase the accuracy of prediction of carcinogenicity. Together, a combination of DNA lesion and bacterial tests is a more accurate way to predict carcinogenicity.

  6. Identifying carcinogenic activity of methylated and non-methylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) through electronic and topological indices

    CERN Document Server

    Braga, R S; Barone, P M V B

    2000-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a class of planar molecules, abundant in urban environment, which can induce chemical carcinogenesis. Their carcinogenic power varies in a large range, from very strong carcinogens to inactive ones. In a previous study, we proposed a methodology to identify the PAHs carcinogenic activity exploring electronic and topological indices. In the present work, we show that it is possible to simplify that methodology and expand its applicability to include methylated PAHs compounds. Using very simple rules, we can predict their carcinogenic activity with high accuracy (approx 89%).

  7. Interdisciplinary action of nurses to children with suspected sexual abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lia Leão Ciuffo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Understanding the role of nurses as members of interdisciplinary teams in the care of children with suspected sexual abuse. Methodology. This is a qualitative research based on the sociological phenomenology of Alfred Schutz. In 2008 were interviewed eleven nurses who worked in reference institutions for the care of child victims of sexual abuse in Rio de Janeiro. Results. The category called 'Interacting with other professionals in child care' emerged from the analysis of performance of professionals. The intersubjective relations between the nurses and the interdisciplinary team will enable to understand the intent of care from the perspective of social, emotional and psychological needs of children and their families. Conclusion. Interdisciplinarity favored the development of actions based on acceptance, listening and agreements on possible solutions in the care of children with suspected sexual abuse.

  8. Atlantoaxial subluxation and nasopharyngeal necrosis complicating suspected granulomatosis with polyangiitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Anand; Holekamp, Terrence F; Diaz, Jason A; Zebala, Lukas; Brasington, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Granulomatosis polyangiitis (GPA, formerly Wegener granulomatosis) is a vasculitis that typically involves the upper respiratory tract, lungs, and kidneys. The 2 established methods to confirm a suspicion of GPA are the antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) test and biopsy. However, ANCA-negative cases have been known to occur, and it can be difficult to find biopsy evidence of granulomatous disease.We report a case of suspected granulomatosis with polyangiitis limited to the nasopharynx. With a negative ANCA and no histological evidence, our diagnosis was founded on the exclusion of other diagnoses and the response to cyclophosphamide therapy. This case is unique because the patient's lesion resulted in atlantoaxial instability, which required a posterior spinal fusion at C1-C2. This is the first reported case of suspected GPA producing damage to the cervical spine and threatening the spinal cord.

  9. Radiological (scintigraphic) evaluation of patients with suspected pulmonar thromboembolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biello, D.R.

    1987-06-19

    The optimal strategy for diagnostic evaluation of patients with suspected pulmonary thromboembolism (PE) is subject of controversial and often conflicting opinions. If untreated, as many as 30% of patients with PE may die. Conversely, anticoagulant therapy significantly decreases mortality from PE, but bleeding complications occur. Underdiagnosis may result in a preventable death, and overdiagnosis may lead to significant hemorrhage from unnecessary anticoagulant therapy. This article outlines a practical guide for the use of pulmonary ventilation-perfusion (V-P) scintigraphy in patients with suspected PE. Perfusion imaging involves the intravenous injection of radiolabeled particles ranging from 10 to 60 ..mu..m in diameter (technetium Tc 99m macroaggregated albumin or technetium Tc 99m serum albumin microspheres); these particles are trapped in the capillaries and precapillary arterioles of the lung. The radiolabeled particles are distributed to the lungs in proportion to regional pulmonary blood flow. The correspondence of perfusion defects to bronchopulmonary segments is best appreciated in the posterior oblique views.

  10. Percutaneous cholecystocentesis in cats with suspected hepatobiliary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byfield, Victoria L; Callahan Clark, Julie E; Turek, Bradley J; Bradley, Charles W; Rondeau, Mark P

    2017-12-01

    Objectives The objective was to evaluate the safety and diagnostic utility of percutaneous ultrasound-guided cholecystocentesis (PUC) in cats with suspected hepatobiliary disease. Methods Medical records of 83 cats with suspected hepatobiliary disease that underwent PUC were retrospectively reviewed. Results At the time of PUC, at least one additional procedure was performed in 79/83 cats, including hepatic aspiration and/or biopsy (n = 75) and splenic aspiration (n = 18). Complications were noted in 14/83 cases, including increased abdominal fluid (n = 11), needle-tip occlusion (n = 1), failed first attempt to penetrate the gall bladder wall (n = 1) and pneumoperitoneum (n = 1). There were no reports of gall bladder rupture, bile peritonitis or hypotension necessitating treatment with vasopressor medication. Blood products were administered to 7/83 (8%) cats. Seventy-two cats (87%) survived to discharge. Of the cats that were euthanized (9/83) or died (2/83), none were reported as a definitive consequence of PUC. Bacteria were identified cytologically in 10/71 samples (14%); all 10 had a positive aerobic bacterial culture. Bile culture was positive in 11/80 samples (14%). Of the cases with a positive bile culture, cytological description of bacteria corresponded to the organism cultured in fewer than 50% of cases. The most common cytologic diagnosis was hepatic lipidosis (49/66). The most common histopathologic diagnosis was cholangitis (10/21). Conclusions and relevance PUC was safe in this group of cats with suspected hepatobiliary disease. Complications were likely associated with ancillary procedures performed at the time of PUC. Bile analysis yielded an abnormal result in nearly one-third of cats with suspected hepatobiliary disease. Complete agreement between bile cytology and culture was lacking. Further evaluation of the correlation between bile cytology and bile culture is warranted.

  11. Interviewing strategically to elicit admissions from guilty suspects

    OpenAIRE

    Tekin, Serra; Granhag, Pär Anders; Strömwall, Leif; Giolla, Erik Mac; Vrij, Aldert; Hartwig, Maria

    2015-01-01

    In this article we introduce a novel interviewing tactic to elicit admissions from guilty suspects. By influencing the suspects’ perception of the amount of evidence the interviewer holds against them, we aimed to shift the suspects’ counterinterrogation strategies from less to more forthcoming. The proposed tactic (SUE-Confrontation) is a development of the Strategic Use of Evidence (SUE) framework and aims to affect the suspects’ perception by confronting them with statement-evidence incons...

  12. MRI for clinically suspected pediatric appendicitis: case interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Michael M.; Brian, James M.; Methratta, Sosamma T.; Hulse, Michael A.; Choudhary, Arabinda K.; Eggli, Kathleen D.; Boal, Danielle K.B. [Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, Hershey, PA (United States)

    2014-05-15

    As utilization of MRI for clinically suspected pediatric appendicitis becomes more common, there will be increased focus on case interpretation. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to share our institution's case interpretation experience. MRI findings of appendicitis include appendicoliths, tip appendicitis, intraluminal fluid-debris level, pitfalls of size measurements, and complications including abscesses. The normal appendix and inguinal appendix are also discussed. (orig.)

  13. MRI for clinically suspected pediatric appendicitis: an implemented program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Michael M.; Gustas, Cristy N.; Choudhary, Arabinda K.; Methratta, Sosamma T.; Hulse, Michael A.; Eggli, Kathleen D.; Boal, Danielle K.B. [Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Mail Code H066, 500 University Drive, P.O. Box 850, Hershey, PA (United States); Geeting, Glenn [Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Department of Emergency Medicine, Hershey, PA (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Emergent MRI is now a viable alternative to CT for evaluating appendicitis while avoiding the detrimental effects of ionizing radiation. However, primary employment of MRI in the setting of clinically suspected pediatric appendicitis has remained significantly underutilized. To describe our institution's development and the results of a fully implemented clinical program using MRI as the primary imaging evaluation for children with suspected appendicitis. A four-sequence MRI protocol consisting of coronal and axial single-shot turbo spin-echo (SS-TSE) T2, coronal spectral adiabatic inversion recovery (SPAIR), and axial SS-TSE T2 with fat saturation was performed on 208 children, ages 3 to 17 years, with clinically suspected appendicitis. No intravenous or oral contrast material was administered. No sedation was administered. Data collection includes two separate areas: time parameter analysis and MRI diagnostic results. Diagnostic accuracy of MRI for pediatric appendicitis indicated a sensitivity of 97.6% (CI: 87.1-99.9%), specificity 97.0% (CI: 93.2-99.0%), positive predictive value 88.9% (CI: 76.0-96.3%), and negative predictive value 99.4% (CI: 96.6-99.9%). Time parameter analysis indicated clinical feasibility, with time requested to first sequence obtained mean of 78.7 +/- 52.5 min, median 65 min; first-to-last sequence time stamp mean 14.2 +/- 8.8 min, median 12 min; last sequence to report mean 57.4 +/- 35.2 min, median 46 min. Mean age was 11.2 +/- 3.6 years old. Girls represented 57% of patients. MRI is an effective and efficient method of imaging children with clinically suspected appendicitis. Using an expedited four-sequence protocol, sensitivity and specificity are comparable to CT while avoiding the detrimental effects of ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  14. Epidemiology of suspected wrist joint infection versus inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeete, Kshamata; Hess, Erik P; Clark, Tod; Moran, Steven; Kakar, Sanjeev; Rizzo, Marco

    2011-03-01

    To determine the cumulative prevalence of septic arthritis presenting to the emergency department of an academic medical center and evaluate the use of clinical data to diagnose infection versus inflammation. We conducted a records review of a single institution with 80,000 annual emergency room visits. We included a consecutive series of patients with suspected wrist infection from January 1, 2007, to December 31, 2008. Adults complaining of atraumatic wrist pain with either erythema or swelling on physical examination or a final diagnosis of septic arthritis, gout, pseudogout, cellulitis, wrist hematoma/edema, or wrist arthritic flare were suspected to have infection. We collected data using a standardized data abstraction form. We reviewed 804 patient records. A total of 104 patients meeting inclusion criteria for suspected wrist joint infection during the 2-year study period were included. Mean age was 62.5 years (SD, 20.2 y); 63 were men. There were 12 patients with a history of gout, 4 with a history of pseudogout, and 19 with a history of diabetes. Wrist arthrocentesis was performed in 31 patients, and 11 underwent surgical treatment. There were 16 patients with a final diagnosis of gout, 11 with pseudogout, 43 with cellulitis, 13 with upper extremity hematoma/edema, and 15 with wrist arthritic flare. The cumulative prevalence of septic arthritis was 5%. In this series of emergency department patients with suspected wrist joint infection, gout, pseudogout, and cellulitis were the most common etiologies. The cumulative incidence of septic wrist arthritis was low. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Suspected spinocellular carcinoma of the inferior eyelid resulted multiple chalazion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onesti, Maria Giuseppina; Troccola, Antonietta; Maruccia, Michele; Conversi, Andrea; Scuderi, Gianluca

    2013-01-01

    Chalazion is a subacute granulomatous inflammation of the eyelid caused by retention of tarsal gland secretions and it's the most common inflammatory lesion of the eyelid. In cases of doubtful clinical presentation the diagnosis with a biopsy and a histopathological examination is important because it can orientate an appropriate surgical treatment. We report a case of a 64-years-old diabetic man, suspected for a spinocellular lesion of the inferior eyelid of the left eye, it resulted unexpectedly a chalazion.

  16. CT-guided biopsy of suspected malignancy: A potential pitfall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Henderson

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Paragangliomas are rare catecholamine-secreting neuro-endocrine tumours that can arise from sympathetic or parasympathetic tissue. Any manipulation of these tumours, without appropriate medical therapy, can result in excess catecholamine release leading to a catecholamine crisis. Neuro-endocrine tumours must be considered prior to interventional biopsy of an unknown soft-tissue mass, and appropriate biochemical investigations should be performed in suspected cases to prevent catastrophic complications.

  17. [Cardiovascular risk, occupation and exposure to occupational carcinogens in a group of workers in Salamanca].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Sánchez, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Identify the cardiovascular risk factors in a group of workers in the province of Salamanca, protected by external prevention services, as regards exposure to occupational carcinogens, by sector of activity and gender. An observational descriptive epidemiological study was conducted. The sample selection was by stratified random sampling in each entity. The variables collected by questionnaire were, sociodemographic characteristics, exposure to occupational carcinogens, and cardiovascular risk factors (smoking, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes), using the clinical-work histories as a source of information. Statistically significant differences were observed in cardiovascular risk according to the exposure to occupational carcinogens (p cardiovascular risk in the work place. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. The carcinogenicity of 1-methyl-3(p-bromophenyl)-1-nitrosourea (Br-MPNU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warzok, R; Martin, J; Mendel, J; Thust, R; Schwarz, H

    1983-01-01

    In long-term experiments with Hooded rats the carcinogenic potential of 1-methyl-3(p-bromophenyl)-1-nitrosourea (Br-MPNU) could be demonstrated for the first time. Br-MPNU is formed also endogenously after combined administration of 1-methyl-3(p-bromophenyl)-urea (Br-MPU) and sodium nitrite. After repeated intragastric administration of 0.33 mmol Br-MPU and 0.73 mmol NaNO2 per kg b.w. papillomas and carcinomas of the forestomach developed in 83%. After repeated administration of 0.28 mmol Br-MPNU per kg b.w. these neoplasms were observed in 88%. The comparison of results obtained in similar experiments with 1-methyl-3-phenyl-1-nitrosourea shows that bromine substitution led to a reduction of the carcinogenic activity. The present paper is part of a complex program studying the interrelationships between structure, physico-chemical properties, mutagenicity and carcinogenicity of nitrosoureas.

  19. Cell-mediated mutagenesis and cell transformation of mammalian cells by chemical carcinogens. [Rats, hamsters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huberman, E.; Langenbach, R.

    1977-01-01

    We have developed a cell-mediated mutagenesis assay in which cells with the appropriate markers for mutagenesis are co-cultivated with either lethally irradiated rodent embryonic cells that can metabolize carcinogenic hydrocarbons or with primary rat liver cells that can metabolize chemicals carcinogenic to the liver. During co-cultivation, the reactive metabolites of the procarcinogen appear to be transmitted to the mutable cells and induce mutations in them. Assays of this type make it possible to demonstrate a relationship between carcinogenic potency of the chemicals and their ability to induce mutations in mammalian cells. In addition, by simultaneously comparing the frequencies of transformation and mutation induced in normal diploid hamster cells by benzo(a)pyrene (BP) and one of its metabolites, it is possible to estimate the genetic target size for cell transformation in vitro.

  20. Comparative statistical analysis of carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic effects of uranium in groundwater samples from different regions of Punjab, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Komal; Singh, Parminder; Bajwa, Bikramjit Singh

    2016-12-01

    LED flourimeter has been used for microanalysis of uranium concentration in groundwater samples collected from six districts of South West (SW), West (W) and North East (NE) Punjab, India. Average value of uranium content in water samples of SW Punjab is observed to be higher than WHO, USEPA recommended safe limit of 30µgl-1 as well as AERB proposed limit of 60µgl-1. Whereas, for W and NE region of Punjab, average level of uranium concentration was within AERB recommended limit of 60µgl-1. Average value observed in SW Punjab is around 3-4 times the value observed in W Punjab, whereas its value is more than 17 times the average value observed in NE region of Punjab. Statistical analysis of carcinogenic as well as non carcinogenic risks due to uranium have been evaluated for each studied district. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Varied exposure to carcinogenic, mutagenic, and reprotoxic (CMR) chemicals in occupational settings in France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havet, Nathalie [Univ. Claude Bernard Lyon 1 (France). Lab. SAF; Penot, Alexis [Lyon Univ. (France). ENS Lyon, GATE-UMR 5824-CNRS; Morelle, Magali; Perrier, Lionel [Lyon Univ. (France). Direction de la Recherche Clinique et de l' Innovation; Charbotel, Barbara [Univ. Claude Bernard Lyon 1 (France). Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud Service des Maladies Professionnelles; Fervers, Beatrice [Lyon Univ. (France). Dept. Cancer and Environment

    2017-02-15

    To explore varied exposure to carcinogenic, mutagenic, and reprotoxic chemicals (CMR) for French employees. Our study assessed data from the French national cross-sectional survey of occupational risks (SUMER) that was conducted in 2010 in a national representative sample of employees. We selected 28 CMR agents that were classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer or European Union as being known or presumed to have CMR potential in humans. The association of individual and job characteristics with exposure prevalence, duration, and intensity of the CMR agents during a 1-week period was examined using multilevel logistic regression analysis. Overall, 10.4% of employees in 2010 were exposed to one or more CMR agents at their workplace, and 3.4% were subjected to multiple CMR exposures. Blue-collar workers, night-shift workers and workers with short-term employment contracts experienced higher exposure prevalence (p < 0.01) and intensity (p < 0.05). Bluecollar workers and shift workers experienced also longer exposure duration (p < 0.001). Conversely, managers, workers of large companies, and women were less exposed to CMR agents (p < 0.001). The presence of a Committee for Health, Safety, and Working Conditions, and intervention by Occupational Health and Safety officers were significantly associated with reduced exposure intensities (p < 0.001 and p < 0.05). Establishment of European CMR regulations and the existence of an applicable substitution principle reduced the exposure duration (p < 0.001) and intensity (p < 0.05). Our results point out disparities in CMR exposure and identify high-priority targets for prevention measures to help reducing social health discrepancies.

  2. Comparative whole genome sequence analysis of the carcinogenic bacterial model pathogen Helicobacter felis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Isabelle C; Zigova, Zuzana; Holden, Matthew; Lawley, Trevor D; Rad, Roland; Dougan, Gordon; Falkow, Stanley; Bentley, Stephen D; Müller, Anne

    2011-01-01

    The gram-negative bacterium Helicobacter felis naturally colonizes the gastric mucosa of dogs and cats. Due to its ability to persistently infect laboratory mice, H. felis has been used extensively to experimentally model gastric disorders induced in humans by H. pylori. We determined the 1.67 Mb genome sequence of H. felis using combined Solexa and 454 pyrosequencing, annotated the genome, and compared it with multiple previously published Helicobacter genomes. About 1,063 (63.6%) of the 1,671 genes identified in the H. felis genome have orthologues in H. pylori, its closest relative among the fully sequenced Helicobacter species. Many H. pylori virulence factors are shared by H. felis: these include the gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase GGT, the immunomodulator NapA, and the secreted enzymes collagenase and HtrA. Helicobacter felis lacks a Cag pathogenicity island and the vacuolating cytotoxin VacA but possesses a complete comB system conferring natural competence. Remarkable features of the H. felis genome include its paucity of transcriptional regulators and an extraordinary abundance of chemotaxis sensors and restriction/modification systems. Helicobacter felis possesses an episomally replicating 6.7-kb plasmid and harbors three chromosomal regions with deviating GC content. These putative horizontally acquired regions show homology and synteny with the recently isolated H. pylori plasmid pHPPC4 and homology to Campylobacter bacteriophage genes (transposases, structural, and lytic genes), respectively. In summary, the H. felis genome harbors a variety of putative mobile elements that are unique among Helicobacter species and may contribute to this pathogen's carcinogenic properties.

  3. A Comparative Survey on Parameters Influencing on Hexavalent Chromium Measurement as an Occupational Carcinogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Tirgar

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Hexavalent chromium, Cr+6, is a very harmful pollutant and a relatively unstable compound that is present in many industries. It is a known human respiratory carcinogen and occupational exposure to this chemical is associated with different health hazards. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of four parameters including: type of sampling head, sampling height from the surface of electroplating solution, sampling duration, and sample storage duration on Cr+6 mist monitoring.Materials & Methods: To evaluate the influence of the main parameters as an experimental study, the 24 factorial design was applied at constant electroplating condition. A chromium electroplating bath with the ability to produce homogenous mist was used to create Cr+6 mist in laboratory setting. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH method 7600 was used to determine the Cr+6 concentration. Results: The results of 48 Cr+6 mist samples showed that Cr+6 concentration was higher: (1 for sampling by closed-face filter cassettes than for sampling by open-face filter cassettes (P<0.001; (2 for samples collected at 35 cm above the electroplating solution surface than for samples collected at 50 cm (P <0.001; (3 for sampling duration of 30 minutes than for sampling duration of 180 minutes (P <0.001; and, (4 for samples extracted immediately after sampling than for samples with delayed extraction (24 hours after sampling (P <0.001. Conclusion: It is concluded that the accuracy of Cr+6 mist sampling in electroplating shops will be enhanced when: (1 a closed-face filter cassette is used to prevent liquid splash contamination; (2 the sampling height is suitable as determined by further research; (3 the sampling duration is short (approximately 30 minutes; and, (4 the extraction of the Cr+6 sample is performed as soon as the sampling is completed.

  4. [Three cases of suspected re-infection of mumps virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatanaka, Akio; Kamada, Tomoko; Honda, Keiji; Tazaki, Akihisa; Kishine, Naomi; Kawashima, Yoshiyuki

    2012-08-01

    A 32-year-old woman, 5-year-old girl, and 33-year-old man visited our otorhinolaryngology outpatient clinic with tumentia of the unilateral parotid gland. A high titer of serum IgG antibodies against the mumps virus was detected. Around the same time, other members of their families had the same parotid tumentia, and they were diagnosed as having their first mumps infection. Therefore, the diagnosis of the three cases was strongly suspected to be re-infection with mumps. In Japan, it was classically believed that the mumps virus infection occurs only once in patients and reinfection doesn't occur. However, some pediatricians in Japan have reported that re-infection with mumps is strongly suspected when high titers of serum IgG antibodies against the mumps virus are found at the initial visit. It is now believed many more examples of mumps re-infection cases have existed than we previously believed. When high titers of serum IgG antibodies against the mumps virus are detected at an initial visit in patients who have had mumps previously, re-infection should be strongly suspected. And to make it certain, we suggest that the mumps IgG antibodies should be checked twice to confirm the diagnosis. If elevation of the IgG antibodies persist, the diagnosis will be much more certain.

  5. MR delayed enhancement imaging findings in suspected acute myocarditis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gahide, Gerald [CHU de Montpellier, Radiologie centrale - Pole Cardiovasculaire et Thoracique, Montpellier (France); Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Montpellier, Hopital A de Villeneuve, Montpellier (France); Bertrand, D.; Dacher, J.N. [CHU de Rouen, Radiologie centrale - Hopital Charles Nicolle, Rouen (France); Roubille, F.; Skaik, S.; Piot, C.; Leclerq, F. [CHU de Montpellier, Departement de Cardiologie - Pole Cardiovasculaire et Thoracique, Montpellier (France); Tron, C.; Cribier, A. [CHU de Rouen, Departement de Cardiologie - Hopital Charles Nicolle, Rouen (France); Vernhet, H. [CHU de Montpellier, Radiologie centrale - Pole Cardiovasculaire et Thoracique, Montpellier (France)

    2010-01-15

    The purpose of the study was to prospectively assess the clinical impact of routinely performed delayed enhancement imaging in suspected acute myocarditis. A two-centre prospective study was performed in patients with suspected acute myocarditis. The protocol included horizontal long axis, vertical long axis and short axis cine MR and delayed enhancement imaging after Gd-DTPA infusion (0.2 mmol/kg). Sixty consecutive patients were enrolled (aged 49.4{+-}17.8 years). MRI demonstrated delayed enhancement sparing the subendocardicardial layer in 51.6% of patients, concordant with the diagnosis of acute myocarditis; 16.7% of patients exhibited delayed enhancement involving the subendocardial layer with irregular margins, concordant with the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction; 31.7% of patients had delayed enhancement imaging that was considered normal. Routine imaging to identify delayed enhancement provided crucial information in suspected acute myocarditis by reinforcing the diagnosis in 51.6% of patients and correcting a misdiagnosed acute myocardial infarction in 16.7% of patients. (orig.)

  6. Low dose computed tomography in suspected acute renal colic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meagher, T; Sukumar, V P; Collingwood, J; Crawley, T; Schofield, D; Henson, J; Lakin, K; Connolly, D; Giles, J

    2001-11-01

    To evaluate whether computed tomography (CT) of the renal tract in suspected renal colic using reduced exposure factors maintains diagnostic accuracy. Prospective multi-centre cohort study. Patients with suspected renal colic were examined using computed tomography (CT) of the renal tract followed by intravenous urography (IVU) in four different centres with five different CT systems. Sixty-nine patients with suspected renal colic had CT of the renal tract followed by IVU. CT was performed with reduced exposure factors, giving a mean CT effective dose of 3.5 (range 2.8-4.5) mSv compared with 1.5 mSv for IVU. Ureteric calculi were detected in 43 patients: CT and IVU detected 40 (93%) ureteric calculi. CT identified other lesions causing symptoms in five patients and identified renal calculi in 24 patients. IVU identified renal calculi in six patients and made false positive diagnosis of renal calculi in seven patients. Mean examination time for CT was 5 minutes and for IVU was 80 minutes. CT examination at reduced exposure factors maintains the diagnostic accuracy recorded in other series. Copyright 2001 The Royal College of Radiologists.

  7. The economics of cardiac biomarker testing in suspected myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodacre, Steve; Thokala, Praveen

    2015-03-01

    Suspected myocardial infarction (MI) is a common reason for emergency hospital attendance and admission. Cardiac biomarker measurement is an essential element of diagnostic assessment of suspected MI. Although the cost of a routinely available biomarker may be small, the large patient population and consequences in terms of hospital admission and investigation mean that the economic impact of cardiac biomarker testing is substantial. Economic evaluation involves comparing the estimated costs and effectiveness (outcomes) of two or more interventions or care alternatives. This process creates some difficulties with respect to cardiac biomarkers. Estimating the effectiveness of cardiac biomarkers involves identifying how they help to improve health and how we can measure this improvement. Comparison to an appropriate alternative is also problematic. New biomarkers may be promoted on the basis of reducing hospital admission or length of stay, but hospital admission for low risk patients may incur significant costs while providing very little benefit, making it an inappropriate comparator. Finally, economic evaluation may conclude that a more sensitive biomarker strategy is more effective but, by detecting and treating more cases, is also more expensive. In these circumstances it is unclear whether we should use the more effective or the cheaper option. This article provides an introduction to health economics and addresses the specific issues relevant to cardiac biomarkers. It describes the key concepts relevant to economic evaluation of cardiac biomarkers in suspected MI and highlights key areas of uncertainty and controversy. Copyright © 2014 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. MIBG in the evaluation of suspected pheochromocytoma: Mayo Clinic experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.L.; Sheps, S.G.; Sizemore, G.; Swensen, S.J.; Gharib, H.; Grant, C.S.; van Heerden, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    Work done at the University of Michigan has shown that I-131 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) is an effective agent for the diagnosis and localization of pheochromocytoma. A recent report questioned the sensitivity of this test. In 1983, 40 patients at Mayo Clinic had 42 scans during the workup of suspected spontaneous pheochromocytoma or metastatic pheochromocytoma. All patients were given 500 ..mu..Ci I-131 MIBG supplied by the University of Michigan. The final diagnosis of pheochromocytoma (true positive (TP) and false negative (FN) and false positive (FP)) was made by surgery and pathology. True negative (TN) diagnosis was made by normal plasma and urinary catecholamines, and in many patients CT. There were 15 TP studies (six spontaneous pheochrocytoma, nine metastatic or recurrent pheochromoctyoma), and 22 TN studies. There was one FP study of recurrent paraganglioma near the bladder (CT was also FP) and four FN studies (two spontaneous and two metastatic) where one CT was also FN. This results in a sensitivity of 79%, specificity of 96%, and accuracy of 88%. MIBG is very useful in the workup of patients with known or suspected recurrent or metastatic pheochromocytoma and is helpful in the evaluation of the patient suspected of having a spontaneous pheochromocytoma when CT is normal.

  9. Chemical carcinogenic and mutagenic agents in the workplace, Poland, 2008–2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Konieczko

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this paper is to present a concise but comprehensive information on the occurrence of carcinogenic or mutagenic agents in Polish enterprises and the number of workers exposed to those agents reported to the central register by employers. Objectives and responsibilities of the register, as well as the range and methods of data gathering are discussed. Material and Methods: Data concerning carcinogenic or mutagenic chemical substances and technological processes reported to central register in 2008-2010 were analyzed. Results: In 2008-2010 more than 300 carcinogenic or mutagenic chemical substances were reported to the register. Approximately 2500 plants reported above 150 000 per-person-exposures annually. Among all technological processes regarded as occupational carcinogens, hardwood dusts exposure (about 660 companies; 11 000-13 000 exposed workers each year and exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs present in coal products (117-125 plantsl 3000 exposed per year were reported. Conclusions: The most widespread carcinogenic/mutagenic substances were: benzene, chromium(VI compounds: potassium dichromate and chromate, chromium(VI trioxide and other chromium compounds, ethylene oxide, asbestos, benzo[a]pyrene and gasoline. The highest number of men was exposed to particular PAHs and benzene , and the majority of women was exposed to benzene, potassium dichromate and chromate, acrylamide, ethylene oxide and gasoline. The lack of clear-cut definitione of occupational exposure to carcinogen creates a problem faced by employers in defining the accurate number of exposed workers. Med Pr 2013;64(2:181–192

  10. Early life exposure to a rodent carcinogen propiconazole fungicide induces oxidative stress and hepatocarcinogenesis in medaka fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, Tzu-Yi; Hong, Chwan-Yang [Department of Agricultural Chemistry, College of Bio-Resources and Agriculture, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Sasado, Takao [Laboratory of Bioresources, National Institute for Basic Biology, Okazaki (Japan); Kashiwada, Shosaku [Research Center for Life and Environmental Sciences, Department of Life Sciences, the Toyo University, Gunma (Japan); Chen, Pei-Jen, E-mail: chenpj@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Agricultural Chemistry, College of Bio-Resources and Agriculture, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2016-01-15

    Highlights: • Propiconazole initiates ROS-induced oxidative stress and damage in medaka fish. • Early life exposure to propiconazole increases incidence of hepatocarcionogensis in p53{sup −/−} medaka. • Oxidative stress and CYP induction involved in p53 regulation are key events in propiconazole-induced hepatotumorigenesis. • Propiconazole-induced toxic response in medaka is compatible with that in rodents. - Abstract: Conazole pollution is an emerging concern to human health and environmental safety because of the broad use of conazole fungicides in agriculture and medicine and their frequent occurrence in aquifers. The agricultural pesticide propiconazole has received much regulatory interest because it is a known rodent carcinogen with evidence of multiple adverse effects in mammals and non-targeted organisms. However, the carcinogenic effect and associated mechanism of propiconazole in fish under microgram-per-liter leve