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Sample records for suspected disability including

  1. Including a learner with physical disabilities: stressful for teachers?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Eloff

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Learners with physical disabilities have been entering mainstream schools for some years now. Whereas early research on inclusive education necessitated a strong focus on the needs of the learners, there has also been a recent interest in the role of the teachers in inclusive education. By adopting constructivism as the paradigm for inquiry a study was undertaken to establish the stress factors for teachers who have to include a learner with a physical disability in their mainstream classes. The rationale for the study is threefold: i Learners with physical disabilities are entering mainstream schools increasingly, ii it is often assumed that inclusive education is too stressful for teachers to cope with, and iii related research has shown that increased contact with individuals with disabilities has a positive effect on attitudes towards individuals with disabilities. In accordance with the dialectical methodology of constructivism, the Teacher Stress and Coping Questionnaire and in-depth interviews were utilised to establish the stress factors and the extent of the stress factors that may be present. The aim of the constructivist inquiry process is to promote understanding and reconstruction. In this article the quantitative results indicate overall low or non-existent levels of stress in teachers who have to include a learner with a physical disability, and the results therefore contribute to our understanding of this situation. The qualitative results reconstruct the meanings that these teachers attach to the inclusion of a learner with a physical disability and reveal some albeit limited concerns about the communication processes between parents and teachers and a perceived lack of pre-service training.

  2. Including Students with Severe Disabilities in General Education Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewski, Lech; Alper, Sandra

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents five systematic phases for bringing about successful regular education inclusion of students with severe disabilities. Phases include develop networks within the community, assess school and community resources, review strategies for integration, install strategies that lead to integration, and develop a system of feedback and…

  3. 78 FR 68907 - Agency Information Collection (Foot (Including Flatfeet (pes planus)) Conditions Disability...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    ... planus)) Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire). Type of Review: New data collection. Abstract... (Including Flatfeet (pes planus)) Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Under OMB Review AGENCY...)) Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire)'' in any correspondence. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT...

  4. Self-reported care needs of Dutch homeless people with and without a suspected intellectual disability: a 1.5-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Straaten, Barbara; Rodenburg, Gerda; Van der Laan, Jorien; Boersma, Sandra N; Wolf, Judith R L M; Van de Mheen, Dike

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is a prevalent problem among the homeless and seems related to more psychosocial problems. However, little is known about the care needs of the subgroup of homeless people with an intellectual disability compared to those without an intellectual disability and how their care needs develop over time. This study explores self-reported care needs within a broad range of life domains among Dutch homeless people with and without a suspected intellectual disability to gain insight into the transition of self-reported care needs from baseline to follow-up in both subgroups. This longitudinal study is part of a cohort study among homeless people who had been accepted for an individual programme plan in four major Dutch cities. The initial cohort consisted of 513 participants who were interviewed in 2011. At 1.5-year follow-up, 336 participants (65.5%) were also interviewed and screened for intellectual disability. Of these participants, 31% (95% CI 26.2-36.1) had a suspected intellectual disability. For both groups, between baseline and follow-up, the number of 'unmet care needs' decreased significantly and the number of 'no care needs' increased significantly, while at follow-up, participants with a suspected intellectual disability reported 'no care needs' on significantly fewer life domains than those without a suspected intellectual disability (mean numbers 16.4 vs. 17.5). Between baseline and follow-up, 'met care needs' decreased significantly on housing for both groups, and increased on finances and dental care for participants with a suspected intellectual disability. At follow-up, participants with a suspected intellectual disability more often preferred housing support available by appointment than those without a suspected intellectual disability. These findings suggest that homeless people who had been accepted for an individual programme plan with a suspected intellectual disability have care needs for a longer period of time than those

  5. Music-based Autism Diagnostics (MUSAD) - A newly developed diagnostic measure for adults with intellectual developmental disabilities suspected of autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Thomas; Sappok, Tanja; Diefenbacher, Albert; Dames, Sibylle; Heinrich, Manuel; Ziegler, Matthias; Dziobek, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    The MUSAD was developed as a diagnostic observational instrument in an interactional music framework. It is based on the ICD-10/DSM-5 criteria for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and was designed to assess adults on a lower level of functioning, including individuals with severe language impairments. This study aimed to evaluate the psychometric properties of the newly developed instrument. Calculations were based on a consecutive clinical sample of N=76 adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) suspected of ASD. Objectivity, test-retest reliability, and construct validity were calculated and a confirmatory factor analysis was applied to verify a reduced and optimized test version. The structural model showed a good fit, while internal consistency of the subscales was excellent (ω>.92). Item difficulties ranged between .04≤pi≤.82 and item-total correlation from .21 to .85. Objectivity was assessed by comparing the scorings of two external raters based on a subsample of n=12; interrater agreement was .71 (ICC 2, 1). Reliability was calculated for four test repetitions: the average ICC (3, 1) was .69. Convergent ASD measures correlated significantly with the MUSAD, while the discriminant Modified Overt Aggression Scale (MOAS) showed no significant overlap. Confirmation of factorial structure and acceptable psychometric properties suggest that the MUSAD is a promising new instrument for diagnosing ASD in adults with IDD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Including People with Intellectual Disabilities in Qualitative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Sarah A.

    2013-01-01

    The voice of people with intellectual disabilities (ID) is needed in the literature to best understand their unique experiences and perspectives. Researchers face challenges in conducting interviews with people with ID who are limited in conceptual and verbal language skills. It can also be difficult to obtain participants with ID because of…

  7. Using Photovoice to Include People with Profound and Multiple Learning Disabilities in Inclusive Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cluley, Victoria

    2017-01-01

    Background: It is now expected that projects addressing the lives of people with learning disabilities include people with learning disabilities in the research process. In the past, such research often excluded people with learning disabilities, favouring the opinions of family members, carers and professionals. The inclusion of the voices of…

  8. Setting Global Research Priorities for Developmental Disabilities, Including Intellectual Disabilities and Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, M.; Yasamy, M. T.; Emerson, E.; Officer, A.; Richler, D.; Saxena, S.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The prevalence of intellectual disabilities (ID) has been estimated at 10.4/1000 worldwide with higher rates among children and adolescents in lower income countries. The objective of this paper is to address research priorities for development disabilities, notably ID and autism, at the global level and to propose the more rational…

  9. Food Insecurity in U.S. Households That Include Children with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonik, Rajan; Parish, Susan L.; Ghosh, Subharati; Igdalsky, Leah

    2016-01-01

    The authors examined food insecurity in households including children with disabilities, analyzing data from the 2004 and 2008 panels of the Survey of Income and Program Participation, which included 24,729 households with children, 3,948 of which had children with disabilities. Logistic regression models were used to estimate the likelihood of…

  10. Conducting Accessible Research: Including People With Disabilities in Public Health, Epidemiological, and Outcomes Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, Dianne; Magasi, Susan; Novak, Catherine; Harniss, Mark

    2016-12-01

    People with disabilities are largely absent from mainstream health research. Exclusion of people with disabilities may be explicit, attributable to poorly justified exclusion criteria, or implicit, attributable to inaccessible study documents, interventions, or research measures. Meanwhile, people with disabilities experience poorer health, greater incidence of chronic conditions, and higher health care expenditure than people without disabilities. We outline our approach to "accessible research design"-research accessible to and inclusive of people with disabilities. We describe a model that includes 3 tiers: universal design, accommodations, and modifications. Through our work on several large-scale research studies, we provide pragmatic examples of accessible research design. Making efforts to include people with disabilities in public health, epidemiological, and outcomes studies will enhance the interpretability of findings for a significant patient population.

  11. Visual Impairments, "Including Blindness." NICHCY Disability Fact Sheet #13

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Vision is one of the five senses. Being able to see gives tremendous access to learning about the world around--people's faces and the subtleties of expression, what different things look like and how big they are, and the physical environments, including approaching hazards. When a child has a visual impairment, it is cause for immediate…

  12. Music for All: Including young people with intellectual disability in a university environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickson, Daphne; Warren, Penny

    2017-01-01

    We investigated a continuing education course in creative music making, initiated to promote the inclusion of young people with intellectual disability in a university setting. Despite organizers' attempts to foster diversity within the student cohort, enrolments were almost exclusively from students who had intellectual disability. Being in the university environment, and in a place of higher learning, seemed to be valued by some. However, students' main focus was on group musicking in a dedicated music room rather than interacting with the wider university community. Those who did not identify as disabled believed it was important to continue to address the barriers to wider inclusion. While acknowledging the risks around mediating the social interactions of young people with intellectual disability, we argue that future courses should include activities specifically designed to bring them to classes with typical students and to the wider activities of the university.

  13. An Initial Look at the Quality of Life of Malaysian Families That Include Children with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, M.; Brown, R.; Karrapaya, R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: While there is a growing body of literature in the quality of life of families that include children with disabilities, the majority of research has been conducted in western countries. The present study provides an initial exploration of the quality of life of Malaysian families that include children with developmental/intellectual…

  14. The phenotypic spectrum of ARHGEF9 includes intellectual disability, focal epilepsy and febrile seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Karl Martin; Pendziwiat, Manuela; Eilam, Anda; Gilad, Ronit; Blatt, Ilan; Rosenow, Felix; Kanaan, Moien; Helbig, Ingo; Afawi, Zaid

    2017-07-01

    Mutations or structural genomic alterations of the X-chromosomal gene ARHGEF9 have been described in male and female patients with intellectual disability. Hyperekplexia and epilepsy were observed to a variable degree, but incompletely described. Here, we expand the phenotypic spectrum of ARHGEF9 by describing a large Ethiopian-Jewish family with epilepsy and intellectual disability. The four affected male siblings, their unaffected parents and two unaffected female siblings were recruited and phenotyped. Parametric linkage analysis was performed using SNP microarrays. Variants from exome sequencing in two affected individuals were confirmed by Sanger sequencing. All affected male siblings had febrile seizures from age 2-3 years and intellectual disability. Three developed afebrile seizures between age 7-17 years. Three showed focal seizure semiology. None had hyperekplexia. A novel ARHGEF9 variant (c.967G>A, p.G323R, NM_015185.2) was hemizygous in all affected male siblings and heterozygous in the mother. This family reveals that the phenotypic spectrum of ARHGEF9 is broader than commonly assumed and includes febrile seizures and focal epilepsy with intellectual disability in the absence of hyperekplexia or other clinically distinguishing features. Our findings suggest that pathogenic variants in ARHGEF9 may be more common than previously assumed in patients with intellectual disability and mild epilepsy.

  15. Including Students with Disabilities in Common Non-Summative Assessments. NCEO Brief. Number 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Center on Educational Outcomes, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Inclusive large-scale assessments have become the norm in states across the U.S. Participation rates of students with disabilities in these assessments have increased dramatically since the mid-1990s. As consortia of states move toward the development and implementation of assessment systems that include both non-summative assessments and…

  16. Evaluating and Using Literature Including People with Disabilities in All Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oslick, Mary Ellen; Pearson, Mary

    2016-01-01

    To help students see their worlds differently and to expand those views beyond their own backyards, educators can expose them to quality multicultural children's literature. In this article, we focus on a subtopic within the genre of multicultural children's literature: literature including people with disabilities. We chose seven recent texts…

  17. Policies for including disabled people in education. obstacles and facilitating factors for their implementation: Bucaramanga, 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia P. Serrano R

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to explore the factors enabling or hindering the implementation of inclusive education policies for the disabled population of Bucaramanga. Methodology: a descriptive study, involving representatives from governmental agencies (EG, members of the faculty boards of educational institutions (DIE and guardians of disabled individuals (APSD. Physical, social, and political obstacles and facilitating factors that could potentially determine the implementation of these policies were analyzed. Data was collected through interviews. Results: there was a total of 2, 32, and 34 participants from the EG, DIE, and APSD groups respectively. Identified obstacles included: lack of strategies to support educational institutions, poor or limited teacher training, high tuition fees, and negative attitude towards disability. The facilitating factors included: availability of places, inclusion of this issue in the political agenda, and desire of the disabled individuals’ families to provide them with education. Discussion: These findings provide useful information for further research on this issue and show how action has been taken, as well as how urgent it is to establish a direct relationship between academia and the public sector to propose strategies for assessing and modifying these policies.

  18. Low-Income Parents' Warmth and Parent-Child Activities for Children with Disabilities, Suspected Delays and Biological Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshbaugh, Elaine M.; Peterson, Carla A.; Wall, Shavaun; Carta, Judith J.; Luze, Gayle; Swanson, Mark; Jeon, Hyun-Joo

    2011-01-01

    Warm and responsive parenting is optimal for child development, but this style of parenting may be difficult for some parents to achieve. This study examines how parents' observed warmth and their reported frequency of parent-child activities were related to children's classifications as having biological risks or a range of disability indicators.…

  19. Examining the Outcomes of Including Students with Disabilities in a Bullying/Victimization Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graybill, Emily C.; Vinoski, Erin; Black, Mary; Varjas, Kris; Henrich, Christopher; Meyers, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Students with disabilities are bullied at rates disproportionate to their typically developing peers, yet we know little about effective interventions to reduce the rates of victimization among students with disabilities across all disability categories. This study examined the effectiveness of the inclusive Bullying/Victimization Intervention…

  20. A Case Study of Tack Tiles[R] Literacy Instruction for a Student with Multiple Disabilities Including Congenital Blindness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klenk, Jessicia A.; Pufpaff, Lisa A.

    2011-01-01

    Research on literacy instruction for students with multiple disabilities is limited. Empirical research on braille instruction for students with multiple disabilities that include congenital blindness is virtually nonexistent. This case study offers initial insight into possible methods of early braille literacy instruction for a student with…

  1. Risk Factors for Pressure Ulcers Including Suspected Deep Tissue Injury in Nursing Home Facility Residents: Analysis of National Minimum Data Set 3.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Hyochol; Cowan, Linda; Garvan, Cynthia; Lyon, Debra; Stechmiller, Joyce

    2016-04-01

    To provide information on risk factors associated with pressure ulcers (PrUs), including suspected deep tissue injury (sDTI), in nursing home residents in the United States. This continuing education activity is intended for physicians and nurses with an interest in skin and wound care. After participating in this educational activity, the participant should be better able to:1. Examine the literature related to risk factors for the development of PrUs.2. Compare risk factors associated with the prevalence of PrUs and sDTI from the revised Minimum Data Set 3.0 2012 using a modified Defloor's conceptual model of PrUs as a theoretical framework. This study aims to characterize and compare risk factors associated with pressure ulcers (PrUs), including suspected deep tissue injury (sDTI), in nursing home (NH) residents in the United States. Secondary analysis of the 2012 Minimum Data Set (MDS 3.0). Medicare- or Medicaid-certified NHs in the United States. Nursing home residents (n = 2,936,146) 18 years or older with complete PrU data, who received comprehensive assessments from January to December 2012. Pressure ulcer by stage was the outcome variable. Explanatory variables (age, gender, race and ethnicity, body mass index, skin integrity, system failure, disease, infection, mobility, and cognition) from the MDS 3.0 were aligned with the 4 elements of Defloor's conceptual model: compressive forces, shearing forces, tissue tolerance for pressure, and tissue tolerance for oxygen. Of 2,936,146 NH residents who had complete data for PrU, 89.9% had no PrU; 8.4% had a Stage 2, 3, or 4 or unstagable PrU; and 1.7% had an sDTI. The MDS variables corresponding to the 4 elements of Defloor's model were significantly predictive of both PrU and sDTI. Black residents had the highest risk of any-stage PrU, and Hispanic residents had the highest risk of sDTI. Skin integrity, system failure, infection, and disease risk factors had larger effect sizes for sDTI than for other PrU stages

  2. Hybridising Sport Education and Teaching for Personal and Social Responsibility to Include Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menendez, Jose Ignacio; Fernandez-Rio, Javier

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to explore the impact of the combination of two pedagogical models, Sport Education and Teaching for Personal and Social Responsibility, for learners with disabilities experiencing a contactless kickboxing learning unit. Twelve secondary education students agreed to participate. Five had disabilities (intellectual and…

  3. Cerebellar abnormalities contribute to disability including cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Weier

    Full Text Available The cerebellum is known to be involved not only in motor but also cognitive and affective processes. Structural changes in the cerebellum in relation to cognitive dysfunction are an emerging topic in the field of neuro-psychiatric disorders. In Multiple Sclerosis (MS cerebellar motor and cognitive dysfunction occur in parallel, early in the onset of the disease, and the cerebellum is one of the predilection sites of atrophy. This study is aimed at determining the relationship between cerebellar volumes, clinical cerebellar signs, cognitive functioning and fatigue in MS. Cerebellar volumetry was conducted using T1-weighted MPRAGE magnetic resonance imaging of 172 MS patients. All patients underwent a clinical and brief neuropsychological assessment (information processing speed, working memory, including fatigue testing. Patients with and without cerebellar signs differed significantly regarding normalized cerebellar total volume (nTCV, normalized brain volume (nBV and whole brain T2 lesion volume (LV. Patients with cerebellar dysfunction likewise performed worse in cognitive tests. A regression analysis indicated that age and nTCV explained 26.3% of the variance in SDMT (symbol digit modalities test performance. However, only age, T2 LV and nBV remained predictors in the full model (r(2 = 0.36. The full model for the prediction of PASAT (Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test scores (r(2 = 0.23 included age, cerebellar and T2 LV. In the case of fatigue, only age and nBV (r(2 = 0.17 emerged as significant predictors. These data support the view that cerebellar abnormalities contribute to disability, including cognitive impairment in MS. However, this contribution does not seem to be independent of, and may even be dominated by wider spread MS pathology as reflected by nBV and T2 LV.

  4. The comparative capacity of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2) and MMPI-2 Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) validity scales to detect suspected malingering in a disability claimant sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewski, Michael; Zhu, Jiani; Burchett, Danielle; Bury, Alison S; Bagby, R Michael

    2017-02-01

    The current study expands on past research examining the comparative capacity of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2; Butcher et al., 2001) and MMPI-2 Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF; Ben-Porath & Tellegen, 2008/2011) overreporting validity scales to detect suspected malingering, as assessed by the Miller Forensic Assessment of Symptoms Test (M-FAST; Miller, 2001), in a sample of public insurance disability claimants (N = 742) who were considered to have potential incentives to malinger. Results provide support for the capacity of both the MMPI-2 and the MMPI-2-RF overreporting validity scales to predict suspected malingering of psychopathology. The MMPI-2-RF overreporting validity scales proved to be modestly better predictors of suspected psychopathology malingering-compared with the MMPI-2 overreporting scales-in dimensional predictive models and categorical classification accuracy analyses. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Forgotten, excluded or included? Students with disabilities: A case study at the University of Mauritius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pudaruth, Sameerchand; Gunputh, Rajendra P; Singh, Upasana G

    2017-01-01

    Students with disabilities in the tertiary education sector are more than a just a phenomenon, they are a reality. In general, little attention is devoted to their needs despite the fact that they need more care and attention. This paper, through a case study at the University of Mauritius, sought to answer some pertinent questions regarding students with disabilities. Does the University of Mauritius have sufficient facilities to support these students? Are students aware of existing facilities? What additional structures need to be put in place so that students with any form of disability are neither victimised, nor their education undermined? Are there any local laws about students with disabilities in higher education? To answer these questions and others, an online questionnaire was sent to 500 students and the responses were then analysed and discussed. The response rate was 24.4% which showed that students were not reticent to participate in this study. Our survey revealed that most students were not aware of existing facilities and were often neglected in terms of supporting structures and resources. ICT facilities were found to be the best support that is provided at the University of Mauritius. The right legal framework for tertiary education was also missing. Ideally, students with disabilities should have access to special facilities to facilitate their learning experiences at tertiary institutions. Awareness about existing facilities must also be raised in order to offer equal opportunities to them and to enable a seamless inclusion.

  6. Spooky Suspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacifici, Lara

    2011-01-01

    This activity presents an option for covering biology content while engaging students in an investigation that highlights the spirit of Halloween. Students are engaged in the story line and have fun trying to solve the mystery kidnapping by using science skills to examine the evidence and eliminate some ghoulish suspects. (Contains 1 figure.)

  7. 4-H Programs with a Focus on Including Youth with Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpf, Mitzi; Henderson, Karla; Luken, Karen; Bialeschki, Deb; Casey, Mary, II

    2002-01-01

    Intentionally Inclusive 4-H Club Programs is a pilot project intended to create accessible 4-H environments for people with disabilities. An experiential curriculum for 9-12 year-olds was developed and used in three North Carolina counties. Formative evaluation showed how 4-H staff are raising awareness and involving youth and volunteers with…

  8. Issues concerning scientific production of including people with disabilities at work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, B M; Martins, L B; Barkokébas Junior, B

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the results of a survey carried out on leading periodicals in the areas of Ergonomics, Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy, the aim of which was to identify scientific publications on the inclusion at work of people with disabilities. The survey of articles published on this topic in the following journals was conducted in December 2010: Applied Ergonomics, Ergonomics, the International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics, Disability and Rehabilitation, and the Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation. The survey covered issues published between 2000 and 2010 and was conducted electronically using the CAPES Periodicals Portal. To collect the articles, it was necessary to check the articles published in each of the issues of each volume of these periodicals. This is how the articles on the topic in question were found. There were 27 articles on the topic of inclusion at work of people with disabilities, of which 13 were published in the Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation and 12 in Disability and Rehabilitation. Thus, it is clear that the issue in question is still a subject that is seldom dealt with in these publications and it is noted that only two articles were published in Ergonomics journals in this period, thus confirming the paucity of scientific publications on this subject.

  9. Effects of Leisure Education Programme Including Sportive Activities on Perceived Freedom in Leisure of Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertuzun, Ezgi

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this experimental study is to determine the effect of leisure education programme including sportive activities on the perceived freedom in leisure of adolescents with mild intellectual disabilities. The research was designed with an experimental group (n = 37) and a control group (n = 34), and was conducted among a total of 71…

  10. Using assistive technology adaptations to include students with learning disabilities in cooperative learning activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, D P; Bryant, B R

    1998-01-01

    Cooperative learning (CL) is a common instructional arrangement that is used by classroom teachers to foster academic achievement and social acceptance of students with and without learning disabilities. Cooperative learning is appealing to classroom teachers because it can provide an opportunity for more instruction and feedback by peers than can be provided by teachers to individual students who require extra assistance. Recent studies suggest that students with LD may need adaptations during cooperative learning activities. The use of assistive technology adaptations may be necessary to help some students with LD compensate for their specific learning difficulties so that they can engage more readily in cooperative learning activities. A process for integrating technology adaptations into cooperative learning activities is discussed in terms of three components: selecting adaptations, monitoring the use of the adaptations during cooperative learning activities, and evaluating the adaptations' effectiveness. The article concludes with comments regarding barriers to and support systems for technology integration, technology and effective instructional practices, and the need to consider technology adaptations for students who have learning disabilities.

  11. Quality of life and self-determination in students with disabilities included in regular classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Miguel Muñoz Cantero

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available At present, quality of life and self-determination begin to position itself as a key axis in interventions aimed at students with disabilities, motivating the interest of researchers and professionals to know their general well-being. This article evaluates the quality of life and self-determination of students with intellectual and developmental disabilities enrolled in regular schools. A case study methodology, descriptive-interpretative, is used through mixed data collection methods. The instruments used are Questionnaire for Assessment the Quality of Life in Teen Students (CCVA and ARC-INICO Scale for Assessment Self-Determination (for 14 students and interviews (for four teachers. A descriptive statistical analysis, contextualized by the extracted information from the interviews, was conducted. The results show high scores in different domains of quality of life, apart from emotional well-being, community inclusion and self-determination that are improvable. Adequate perception of students is observed about their ability to make decisions, choices and a good predisposition take control in different areas of their life. It is necessary to continue inquiring about the impact of educational environment, attitude and perception of teachers and the opportunities offered to students to act self-determined and increase their quality of life.

  12. "If We Are Going to Include Them We Have to Do It before We Die": Norwegian Seniors' Views of Including Seniors with Intellectual Disability in Senior Centres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingvaldsen, Anne Kristin; Balandin, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Background: Concepts of inclusion and participation are at the core of both international and Norwegian policy for people with intellectual disability. The aim of this study was to identify senior centre users' views of the barriers and solutions to the inclusion of seniors with intellectual disability in community senior centres. Method: Thirty…

  13. The extent to which students with disabilities are included in elite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In educational context inclusion can be defined as including a number of key perspectives, policies and practices (such as reducing barriers) to learning and ... It was evident that students at higher education institutions should be encouraged to participate in sport or any related physical and recreational activity that can ...

  14. Including Youth with Intellectual Disabilities in Health Promotion Research: Development and Reliability of a Structured Interview to Assess the Correlates of Physical Activity among Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtin, Carol; Bandini, Linda G.; Must, Aviva; Phillips, Sarah; Maslin, Melissa C. T.; Lo, Charmaine; Gleason, James M.; Fleming, Richard K.; Stanish, Heidi I.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The input of youth with intellectual disabilities in health promotion and health disparities research is essential for understanding their needs and preferences. Regular physical activity (PA) is vital for health and well-being, but levels are low in youth generally, including those with intellectual disabilities. Understanding the…

  15. To Include or Not to Include--This Is the Question: Attitudes of Inclusive Teachers toward the Inclusion of Pupils with Intellectual Disabilities in Elementary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malki, Sharon; Einat, Tomer

    2018-01-01

    Numerous studies have emphasized the relationship between success of policies of inclusion and acceptance and accommodation of students with intellectual disabilities in mainstream settings and teachers' positive attitudes toward them. Using semi-structured interviews and interpretive and constructivist strategies, the present study qualitatively…

  16. Microdeletions including FMR1 in three female patients with intellectual disability - further delineation of the phenotype and expression studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zink, A M; Wohlleber, E; Engels, H

    2014-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is one of the most common causes of intellectual disability/developmental delay (ID/DD), especially in males. It is caused most often by CGG trinucleotide repeat expansions, and less frequently by point mutations and partial or full deletions of the FMR1 gene. The wide...... clinical spectrum of affected females partly depends on their X-inactivation status. Only few female ID/DD patients with microdeletions including FMR1 have been reported. We describe 3 female patients with 3.5-, 4.2- and 9.2-Mb de novo microdeletions in Xq27.3-q28 containing FMR1. X-inactivation was random...

  17. The impact of including children with intellectual disability in general education classrooms on the academic achievement of their low-, average-, and high-achieving peers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sermier Dessemontet, Rachel; Bless, Gérard

    2013-03-01

    This study aimed at assessing the impact of including children with intellectual disability (ID) in general education classrooms with support on the academic achievement of their low-, average-, and high-achieving peers without disability. A quasi-experimental study was conducted with an experimental group of 202 pupils from classrooms with an included child with mild or moderate ID, and a control group of 202 pupils from classrooms with no included children with special educational needs (matched pairs sample). The progress of these 2 groups in their academic achievement was compared over a period of 1 school year. No significant difference was found in the progress of the low-, average-, or high-achieving pupils from classrooms with or without inclusion. The results suggest that including children with ID in primary general education classrooms with support does not have a negative impact on the progress of pupils without disability.

  18. iStimulation: Apple iPad Use with Children Who Are Visually Impaired, Including Those with Multiple Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campaña, Laura V.; Ouimet, Donald A.

    2015-01-01

    Since its creation in the early 1980s, Light Box, a product developed by the American Printing House for the Blind (APH) that is designed for working on functional vision tasks with children who have visual impairments or multiple disabilities, has been an effective tool to help teach children with visual impairments to locate and track items…

  19. Expectations and Anticipations of Middle and High School Special Education Teachers in Preparing Their Students with Intellectual Disability for Future Adult Roles Including Those as Partner and Parent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Mette

    2012-01-01

    Through a series of individual ethnographic interviews and focus groups, I explored the expectations and anticipations of middle and high school special education teachers as they carry out their professional charge of educating their students with intellectual disability for lives in the least restrictive environment, including possible adult…

  20. The Effects of a Family Support Program Including Respite Care on Parenting Stress and Family Quality of Life Perceived by Primary Caregivers of Children with Disabilities in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Minjung; Park, Jiyeon

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a family support program was carried out for primary caregivers of children with disabilities. The program included respite care, recreation programs, counseling, and social support coordination based on individual needs of each family. In order to verify the intervention effects, parenting stress and family quality of life were…

  1. Including the people with disabilities at work: a case study of the job of bricklayer in civil construction in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, L B; Barkokébas Junior, B; Guimarães, B M

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the results of the evaluation of the job of bricklayer in the construction industry to determine the profile of workers with disabilities who could perform this function and what adjustments are needed. The methods and techniques used in the field study were: direct observation of the activities and the environment, interviews with bricklayers on building sites, a video and photographic record of tasks being carried out to analyze the job of bricklayer, software resources were used. This study set out the disabilities most commonly caused by work accidents in the civil construction industry and simulated the conditions of the individuals to determine whether they could perform the activities of this function and what adaptations are needed. It was observed that workers with hearing impairments could perform activities without any change in the workplace and individuals who had had a leg or foot amputated need to use appropriate prostheses to perform the activities of the function. Thus, it was shown that the activity of professionals with experience in Ergonomics is essential since, by the activity of gathering data and analysing the physical, cognitive and organizational requirements of jobs and by collecting data on and analysing the functional capabilities of the worker with a disability, adaptations to jobs can be adequately defined.

  2. Using patient reported outcome measures in health services: A qualitative study on including people with low literacy skills and learning disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahagirdar Deepa

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patient reported outcome measures (PROMs are self-report measures of health status increasingly promoted for use in healthcare quality improvement. However people with low literacy skills or learning disabilities may find PROMs hard to complete. Our study investigated stakeholder views on the accessibility and use of PROMs to develop suggestions for more inclusive practice. Methods Taking PROMs recommended for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD as an example, we conducted 8 interviews with people with low literacy skills and/or learning disabilities, and 4 focus groups with 20 health professionals and people with COPD. Discussions covered the format and delivery of PROMs using the EQ-5D and St George Respiratory Questionnaire as prompts. Thematic framework analysis focused on three main themes: Accessibility, Ease of Use, and Contextual factors. Results Accessibility included issues concerning the questionnaire format, and suggestions for improvement included larger font sizes and more white space. Ease of Use included discussion about PROMs’ administration. While health professionals suggested PROMs could be completed in waiting rooms, patients preferred settings with more privacy and where they could access help from people they know. Contextual Factors included other challenges and wider issues associated with completing PROMs. While health professionals highlighted difficulties created by the system in managing patients with low literacy/learning disabilities, patient participants stressed that understanding the purpose of PROMs was important to reduce intimidation. Conclusions Adjusting PROMs’ format, giving an explicit choice of where patients can complete them, and clearly conveying PROMs’ purpose and benefit to patients may help to prevent inequality when using PROMs in health services.

  3. International Suspect Screening: NORMAN Suspect Exchange meets the US EPA CompTox Chemistry Dashboard (ICCE 2017 Oslo)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Members of the European NORMAN Network of Environmental Laboratories (www.norman-network.com) have many substance lists, including targets, suspects, surfactants, perfluorinated substances and regulated, partially confidential data sets of complex mixtures. The NORMAN Suspect Lis...

  4. Spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging in suspected multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lycklama a Nijeholt, G.J.; Bergers, E.; Castelijns, J.A.; Barkhof, F.; Uitdehaag, B.M.J.; Polman, C.H.

    2000-01-01

    We examined the value of spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnostic work-up of multiple sclerosis (MS). Forty patients suspected of having MS were examined within 24 months after the start of symptoms. Disability was assessed, and symptoms were categorized as either brain or spinal cord. Work-up further included cerebrospinal fluid analysis and standard proton-density, T2-, and T1-weighted gadolinium-enhanced brain and spinal cord MRI. Patients were categorized as either clinically definite MS (n = 13), laboratory-supported definite MS (n = 14), or clinically probable MS (n = 4); four patients had clinically probable MS, and in nine MS was suspected. Spinal cord abnormalities were found in 35 of 40 patients (87.5 %), consisting of focal lesions in 31, only diffuse abnormalities in two, and both in two. Asymptomatic spinal cord lesions occurred in six patients. All patients with diffuse spinal cord abnormality had clear spinal cord symptoms and a primary progressive disease course. In clinically definite MS, the inclusion of spinal imaging increased the sensitivity of MRI to 100 %. Seven patients without a definite diagnosis had clinically isolated syndromes involving the spinal cord. Brain MRI was inconclusive, while all had focal spinal cord lesions which explained symptoms and ruled out other causes. Two other patients had atypical brain abnormalities suggesting ischemic/vascular disease. No spinal cord abnormalities were found, and during follow-up MS was ruled out. Spinal cord abnormalities are common in suspected MS, and may occur asymptomatic. Although diagnostic classification is seldom changed, spinal cord imaging increases diagnostic sensitivity of MRI in patients with suspected MS. In addition, patients with primary progressive MS may possibly be earlier diagnosed. Finally, differentiation with atypical lesions may be improved. (orig.)

  5. A de novo 1q22q23.1 Interstitial Microdeletion in a Girl with Intellectual Disability and Multiple Congenital Anomalies Including Congenital Heart Defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksiūnienė, Beata; Preiksaitiene, Egle; Morkūnienė, Aušra; Ambrozaitytė, Laima; Utkus, Algirdas

    2018-01-01

    Many studies have shown that molecular karyotyping is an effective diagnostic tool in individuals with developmental delay/intellectual disability. We report on a de novo interstitial 1q22q23.1 microdeletion, 1.6 Mb in size, detected in a patient with short stature, microcephaly, hypoplastic corpus callosum, cleft palate, minor facial anomalies, congenital heart defect, camptodactyly of the 4-5th fingers, and intellectual disability. Chromosomal microarray analysis revealed a 1.6-Mb deletion in the 1q22q23.1 region, arr[GRCh37] 1q22q23.1(155630752_157193893)×1. Real-time PCR analysis confirmed its de novo origin. The deleted region encompasses 50 protein-coding genes, including the morbid genes APOA1BP, ARHGEF2, LAMTOR2, LMNA, NTRK1, PRCC, RIT1, SEMA4A, and YY1AP1. Although the unique phenotype observed in our patient can arise from the haploinsufficiency of the dosage-sensitive LMNA gene, the dosage imbalance of other genes implicated in the rearrangement could also contribute to the phenotype. Further studies are required for the delineation of the phenotype associated with this rare chromosomal alteration and elucidation of the critical genes for manifestation of the specific clinical features. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Adapting Art Instruction for Students with Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Jennifer M.; Janeczko, Donna

    1991-01-01

    This article presents adaptations for teaching art to students with disabilities. Various techniques, methods, and materials are described by category of disability, including students with mental disabilities, visual impairments, hearing impairments, learning disabilities, emotional disabilities, and physical disabilities. (JDD)

  7. De novo 14q24.2q24.3 microdeletion including IFT43 is associated with intellectual disability, skeletal anomalies, cardiac anomalies, and myopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokman, Marijn F; Oud, Machteld M; van Binsbergen, Ellen; Slaats, Gisela G; Nicolaou, Nayia; Renkema, Kirsten Y; Nijman, Isaac J; Roepman, Ronald; Giles, Rachel H; Arts, Heleen H; Knoers, Nine V A M; van Haelst, Mieke M

    2016-06-01

    We report an 11-year-old girl with mild intellectual disability, skeletal anomalies, congenital heart defect, myopia, and facial dysmorphisms including an extra incisor, cup-shaped ears, and a preauricular skin tag. Array comparative genomic hybridization analysis identified a de novo 4.5-Mb microdeletion on chromosome 14q24.2q24.3. The deleted region and phenotype partially overlap with previously reported patients. Here, we provide an overview of the literature on 14q24 microdeletions and further delineate the associated phenotype. We performed exome sequencing to examine other causes for the phenotype and queried genes present in the 14q24.2q24.3 microdeletion that are associated with recessive disease for variants in the non-deleted allele. The deleted region contains 65 protein-coding genes, including the ciliary gene IFT43. Although Sanger and exome sequencing did not identify variants in the second IFT43 allele or in other IFT complex A-protein-encoding genes, immunocytochemistry showed increased accumulation of IFT-B proteins at the ciliary tip in patient-derived fibroblasts compared to control cells, demonstrating defective retrograde ciliary transport. This could suggest a ciliary defect in the pathogenesis of this disorder. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Yearly Data for Asian & Pacific Islander Language Preferences of Supplemental Security Income Blind and Disabled Applicants (FY 2016, including 53rd week)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — This dataset provides annual volumes for API language preferences at the national level of individuals filing claims for SSI Blind and Disabled benefits for federal...

  9. Disability Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About CDC.gov . Disability & Health Home Disability Overview Disability Inclusion Barriers to Inclusion Inclusion Strategies Inclusion in Programs & Activities Resources Healthy Living Disability & Physical Activity Disability & Obesity Disability & Smoking Disability & Breast ...

  10. GLUT1 deficiency syndrome as a cause of encephalopathy that includes cognitive disability, treatment-resistant infantile epilepsy and a complex movement disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, John M

    2012-05-01

    Glucose transporter-1 (GLUT1) deficiency syndrome is caused by heterozygous mutations in the SLC2A1 gene, resulting in impaired glucose transport into the brain. It is characterized by a low glucose concentration in the cerebrospinal fluid (hypoglycorrhachia) in the absence of hypoglycemia, in combination with low to normal lactate in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). It often results in treatment-resistant infantile epilepsy with progressive developmental disabilities and a complex movement disorder. Recognizing GLUT1 deficiency syndrome is important, since initiation of a ketogenic diet can reduce the frequency of seizures and the severity of the movement disorder. There can be a considerable delay in diagnosing GLUT1 deficiency syndrome, and this point is illustrated by the natural history of this disorder in a 21-year-old woman with severe, progressive neurological disabilities. Her encephalopathy consisted of treatment-resistant seizures, a complex movement disorder, progressive intellectual disability, and deceleration of her head growth after late infancy. Focused evaluation at age 21 revealed GLUT1 deficiency caused by a novel heterozygous missence mutation in exon 7 (c.938C > A; p.Ser313Try) in SLC2A1 as the cause for her disabilities. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. The Effectiveness of Combining Tangible Symbols with the Picture Exchange Communication System to Teach Requesting Skills to Children with Multiple Disabilities Including Visual Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Emad

    2009-01-01

    The Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) is an augmentative and alternative communication program (Frost & Bondy, 2002). Although PECS has been effectively used to teach functional requesting skills for children with autism, mental retardation, visual impairment, and physical disabilities (e.g., Anderson, Moore, & Bourne, 2007; Chambers &…

  12. Effectiveness of Combining Tangible Symbols with the Picture Exchange Communication System to Teach Requesting Skills to Children with Multiple Disabilities Including Visual Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Emad; MacFarland, Stephanie Z.; Umbreit, John

    2011-01-01

    The Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) is an augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) program used to teach functional requesting and commenting skills to people with disabilities (Bondy & Frost, 1993; Frost & Bondy, 2002). In this study, tangible symbols were added to PECS in teaching requesting to four students (ages 7-14) with…

  13. Using patient reported outcome measures in health services: A qualitative study on including people with low literacy skills and learning disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jahagirdar, D.; Kroll, T.; Ritchie, K.; Wyke, S.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) are self-report measures of health status increasingly promoted for use in healthcare quality improvement. However people with low literacy skills or learning disabilities may find PROMs hard to complete. Our study investigated

  14. Presentation of suspected pediatric uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Muhammad Usman; Raza, Syed Hamid; Goyal, Sudeshna; Cleary, Gavin; Newman, William David; Chandna, Arvind

    2014-01-01

    Presentation of suspected pediatric uveitis: Pediatric uveitis is usually managed in specialized ophthalmic centers in the UK. Meaningful data acquisition in these clinics may be helpful in clinical governance, and healthcare planning in a specialty that is gradually changing due to changes in treatment choices. Retrospective analysis of prospectively acquired data in the Liverpool pediatric uveitis database was performed. Analysis of our data, based on 147 patients, with a mean age of 10 years, indicated a female to male ratio of 2:1. 99% of patients were Caucasian. Our data indicates 86% of all patients attending the uveitis clinic were diagnosed with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, followed by intermediate uveitis 5% and idiopathic uveitis 4%. 46% of patients required treatment. Systemic treatment included methotrexate (34%), prednisolone (14%), etanercept (6%), ciclosporin (6%), mycophenolate (3%), and infliximab (1%). Severe visual loss (defined by counting fingers or below vision) was seen in 10 eyes despite appropriately treated chronic uveitis. Our data shows uveitis-related ocular morbidity in a predominantly pediatric Caucasian population. Patients with severe and chronic uveitis may experience significant uveitis-related complications and subsequent visual loss despite aggressive treatment.

  15. Identification and assessment of students with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reschly, D J

    1996-01-01

    Students with disabilities or suspected disabilities are evaluated by schools to determine whether they are eligible for special education services and, if eligible, to determine what services will be provided. In many states, the results of this evaluation also affect how much funding assistance the school will receive to meet the students' special needs. Special education classification is not uniform across states or regions. Students with identical characteristics can be diagnosed as disabled in one state but not in another and may be reclassified when they move across state or school district lines. Most disabilities with a clear medical basis are recognized by the child's physician or parents soon after birth or during the preschool years. In contrast, the majority of students with disabilities are initially referred for evaluation by their classroom teacher (or parents) because of severe and chronic achievement or behavioral problems. There is evidence that the prevalence of some disabilities varies by age, the high-incidence disabilities such as learning disabilities and speech-language disabilities occur primarily at the mild level, the mild disabilities exist on broad continua in which there are no clear demarcations between those who have and those who do not have the disability, and even "mild" disabilities may constitute formidable barriers to academic progress and significantly limit career opportunities. Problems with the current classification system include stigma to the child, low reliability, poor correlation between categorization and treatment, obsolete assumptions still in use in treatment, and disproportionate representation of minority students. Both African-American and Hispanic students are disproportionately represented in special education but in opposite directions. The disproportionately high number of African Americans in special education reflects the fact that more African-American students than white students are diagnosed with

  16. Suspected ectopic pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeber, Beata E; Barnhart, Kurt T

    2006-02-01

    Women who present with pain and bleeding in the first trimester are at risk for ectopic pregnancy, a life-threatening condition. Conditions that predispose a woman to ectopic pregnancy are damaged fallopian tubes from prior tubal surgery or previous pelvic infection, smoking, and conception using assisted reproduction. Many women without risk factors can develop an ectopic pregnancy. A diagnostic algorithm that includes the use of transvaginal ultrasonography, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) concentrations, and, sometimes, uterine curettage can definitively diagnose women at risk in a timely manner. The absence of an intrauterine pregnancy above an established cut point of hCG is consistent with an abnormal pregnancy but does not distinguish a miscarriage from an ectopic pregnancy. When the initial hCG value is low, serial hCG values can be used to determine whether a gestation is potentially viable or spontaneously resolving. The minimal rise in hCG for a viable pregnancy is 53% in 2 days. The minimal decline of a spontaneous abortion is 21-35% in 2 days, depending on the initial level. A rise or fall in serial hCG values that is slower than this is suggestive of an ectopic pregnancy. Women diagnosed with an unruptured ectopic pregnancy are potential candidates for medical management with methotrexate. Intramuscular injection with methotrexate can be used to safely treat an ectopic pregnancy with success rates, tubal patency rates, and future fertility that are similar to those obtained with conservative surgery. Success rates using methotrexate are inversely rated to baseline hCG values and are higher using "multidose" compared with "single-dose" regimens. Surgical treatment may be conservative or definitive and should be attempted in most cases via laparoscopy.

  17. Prime Suspect, Second Row Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, Ellen A.

    2011-01-01

    His father had been hacked to death in his own bed with an ax the previous November. His mother was similarly brutalized and left for dead with her husband but survived. On the last Monday of that August, after several months and many investigative twists, turns, and fumbles, there sat the son--the prime suspect--in Ellen Laird's literature class,…

  18. Interrogated with Intellectual Disabilities: The Risks of False Confession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatz, Samson J

    2018-02-01

    False confessions happen. At least 245 people have been exonerated from convictions in cases featuring confessions that were simply not true. Confessions offer a narrative that allows law enforcement, and society in general, to neatly resolve cases with apparent clarity and closure. And yet the pressures officers place on suspects to provide that closure weigh disproportionately on the vulnerable, including individuals with intellectual disabilities. These individuals are disadvantaged at every step of the custodial interrogation, and they face heightened risks of falsely confessing. Moreover, the principal judicial safeguards against false confessions--assessing a suspect's Miranda waiver and determining whether a confession was voluntarily given within the bounds of the Fourteenth Amendment’s Due Process Clause--provide little protection for the innocent with intellectual disabilities. Few pieces of scholarship focus specifically on the heightened risks faced by individuals with intellectual disabilities throughout the process of police interrogation. This Note describes the various ways these individuals are disadvantaged. And it offers an additional data point illustrating the vulnerability of people with intellectual disabilities. This Note analyzes the 245 individuals (as of June 2, 2017) on the National Registry of Exonerations who have falsely confessed. Over one-quarter of them display indicia of intellectual disability. This percentage dwarfs the prevalence of people with intellectual disabilities in the general population and even exceeds most estimates of the proportion of the prison population suffering from intellectual disabilities. This Note concludes with several policy and doctrinal suggestions to better protect individuals with intellectual disabilities from the risks of false confession.

  19. Interventions for suspected placenta praevia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilson, J P

    2003-01-01

    Because placenta praevia is implanted unusually low in the uterus, it may cause major, and/or repeated, antepartum haemorrhage. The traditional policy of care of women with symptomatic placenta praevia includes prolonged stay in hospital and delivery by caesarean section. To assess the impact of any clinical intervention applied specifically because of a perceived likelihood that a pregnant woman might have placenta praevia. A comprehensive electronic search was performed to identify relevant literature. Searched databases included the Trials Register maintained by the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group (August 2002), and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (The Cochrane Library, Issue 2, 2002). Any controlled clinical trial that has assessed the impact of an intervention in women diagnosed as having, or being likely to have, placenta praevia. Data were extracted, unblinded, by the author without consideration of results. Three trials were included, involving a total of 114 women. Both tested interventions (home versus hospitalisation and cervical cerclage versus no cerclage) were associated with reduced lengths of stay in hospital antenatally: weighted mean difference (WMD) respectively -18.50 days (95% confidence interval (CI) -26.83 to -10.17), -4.80 days (95% CI -6.37 to -3.23). Otherwise, there was little evidence of any clear advantage or disadvantage to a policy of home versus hospital care. The one woman who had a haemorrhage severe enough to require immediate transfusion and delivery was in the home care group. Cervical cerclage may reduce the risk of delivery before 34 weeks: relative risk (RR) 0.45 (95% CI 0.23 to 0.87), or the birth of a baby weighing less than two kilograms RR 0.34 (0.14 to 0.83) or having a low five minute Apgar score RR 0.19 (0.04 to 1.00). In general, these possible benefits were more evident in the trial of lower methodological quality. There are insufficient data from trials to recommend any change in clinical practice

  20. SSA Disability Claim Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The dataset includes fiscal year data for initial claims for SSA disability benefits that were referred to a state agency for a disability determination. Specific...

  1. Method for detection of a suspect viral deoxyribonucleic acid in an acellular biological fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berninger, M S

    1982-10-06

    A method for evaluating an acellular biological fluid for the presence of a suspect viral DNA, such as DNA of the Hepatitis-B virus, is described. The acellular biological fluid is treated to immobilize in denatured form the DNAs including the suspect viral DNA on a solid substrate. This substrate is contacted with a solution including radioisotopically-labelled suspect viral denatured DNA to renature the immobilized suspect viral native DNA. The solid substrate is then evaluated for radioisotopically-labelled suspect viral renatured DNA.

  2. Method for detection of a suspect viral deoxyribonucleic acid in an acellular biological fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berninger, M.S.

    1982-01-01

    A method for evaluating an acellular biological fluid for the presence of a suspect viral DNA, such as DNA of the Hepatitis-B virus, is described. The acellular biological fluid is treated to immobilize in denatured form the DNAs including the suspect viral DNA on a solid substrate. This substrate is contacted with a solution including radioisotopically-labelled suspect viral denatured DNA to renature the immobilized suspect viral native DNA. The solid substrate is then evaluated for radioisotopically-labelled suspect viral renatured DNA. (author)

  3. Deletions in 16p13 including GRIN2A in patients with intellectual disability, various dysmorphic features, and seizure disorders of the rolandic region.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reutlinger, C.; Helbig, I.; Gawelczyk, B.; Subero, J.I.; Tonnies, H.; Muhle, H.; Finsterwalder, K.; Vermeer, S.; Pfundt, R.; Sperner, J.; Stefanova, I.; Gillessen-Kaesbach, G.; Spiczak, S. von; Baalen, A. van; Boor, R.; Siebert, R.; Stephani, U.; Caliebe, A.

    2010-01-01

    Seizure disorders of the rolandic region comprise a spectrum of different epilepsy syndromes ranging from benign rolandic epilepsy to more severe seizure disorders including atypical benign partial epilepsy/pseudo-Lennox syndrome,electrical status epilepticus during sleep, and Landau-Kleffner

  4. Teacher Perceptions about the Importance of Parental Involvement for Included Students with Learning Disabilities in New York Metropolitan Area Orthodox Yeshivas and Day Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Goldie Eichorn

    2010-01-01

    The population of students attending Jewish day schools includes an increasing number of students with exceptional needs. How Jewish schools meet the needs of these students is an important question. Inclusive education is a service model predicated on legal and philosophical mores as well as pedagogical and psychological findings. The quality of…

  5. Vascular factors in suspected normal pressure hydrocephalus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agerskov, Simon; Rabiei, Katrin; Marlow, Thomas; Jensen, Christer; Guo, Xinxin; Kern, Silke; Wikkelsø, Carsten; Skoog, Ingmar

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We examined clinical and imaging findings of suspected idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) in relation to vascular risk factors and white matter lesions (WMLs), using a nested case-control design in a representative, population-based sample. Methods: From a population-based sample, 1,235 persons aged 70 years or older were examined with CT of the brain between 1986 and 2000. We identified 55 persons with hydrocephalic ventricular enlargement, i.e., radiologic findings consistent with iNPH. Among these, 26 had clinical signs that fulfilled international guideline criteria for probable iNPH. These cases were labeled suspected iNPH. Each case was matched to 5 controls from the same sample, based on age, sex, and study cohort. Data on risk factors were obtained from clinical examinations and the Swedish Hospital Discharge Register. History of hypertension, diabetes mellitus (DM), smoking, overweight, history of coronary artery disease, stroke/TIA, and WMLs on CT were examined. Risk factors associated with iNPH with a p value <0.1 in χ2 tests were included in conditional logistic regression models. Results: In the regression analyses, suspected iNPH was related to moderate to severe WMLs (odds ratio [OR] 5.2; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.5–17.6), while hydrocephalic ventricular enlargement was related to hypertension (OR 2.7; 95% CI: 1.1–6.8), moderate to severe WMLs (OR 6.5; 95% CI: 2.1–20.3), and DM (OR 4.3; 95% CI: 1.1–16.3). Conclusions: Hypertension, WMLs, and DM were related to clinical and imaging features of iNPH, suggesting that vascular mechanisms are involved in the pathophysiology. These findings might have implications for understanding disease mechanisms in iNPH and possibly prevention. PMID:26773072

  6. Pre-admission antibiotics for suspected cases of meningococcal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudarsanam, Thambu D; Rupali, Priscilla; Tharyan, Prathap; Abraham, Ooriapadickal Cherian; Thomas, Kurien

    2017-06-14

    Meningococcal disease can lead to death or disability within hours after onset. Pre-admission antibiotics aim to reduce the risk of serious disease and death by preventing delays in starting therapy before confirmation of the diagnosis. To study the effectiveness and safety of pre-admission antibiotics versus no pre-admission antibiotics or placebo, and different pre-admission antibiotic regimens in decreasing mortality, clinical failure, and morbidity in people suspected of meningococcal disease. We searched CENTRAL (6 January 2017), MEDLINE (1966 to 6 January 2017), Embase (1980 to 6 January 2017), Web of Science (1985 to 6 January 2017), LILACS (1982 to 6 January 2017), and prospective trial registries to January 2017. We previously searched CAB Abstracts from 1985 to June 2015, but did not update this search in January 2017. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-RCTs comparing antibiotics versus placebo or no intervention, in people with suspected meningococcal infection, or different antibiotics administered before admission to hospital or confirmation of the diagnosis. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data from the search results. We calculated the risk ratio (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for dichotomous data. We included only one trial and so did not perform data synthesis. We assessed the overall quality of the evidence using the GRADE approach. We found no RCTs comparing pre-admission antibiotics versus no pre-admission antibiotics or placebo. We included one open-label, non-inferiority RCT with 510 participants, conducted during an epidemic in Niger, evaluating a single dose of intramuscular ceftriaxone versus a single dose of intramuscular long-acting (oily) chloramphenicol. Ceftriaxone was not inferior to chloramphenicol in reducing mortality (RR 1.21, 95% CI 0.57 to 2.56; N = 503; 308 confirmed meningococcal meningitis; 26 deaths; moderate-quality evidence), clinical failures (RR 0.83, 95% CI 0.32 to

  7. Including People with Disabilities: An Indigenous Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevan-Brown, Jill

    2013-01-01

    Being victims of racial prejudice, religious intolerance, poverty, disempowerment and language loss it could be expected that indigenous people would be supportive of the Inclusion Movement with its philosophy of valuing and acceptance of all people. This supposition is examined for Maori, the indigenous people of Aotearoa/New Zealand. In…

  8. Guidelines for identifying suspect/counterfeit material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    These guidelines are intended to assist users of products in identifying: substandard, misrepresented, or fraudulently marked items. The guidelines provide information about such topics as: precautions, inspection and testing, dispositioning identified items, installed inspection and reporting suspect/counterfeit materials. These guidelines apply to users who are developing procurement documents, product acceptance/verification methods, company procedures, work instructions, etc. The intent of these SM guidelines in relation to the Quality Assurance Program Description (QAPD) and implementing company Management Control Procedures is not to substitute or replace existing requirements, as defined in either the QAPD or company implementing instructions (Management Control Procedures). Instead, the guidelines are intended to provide a consolidated source of information addressing the issue of Suspect/Counterfeit materials. These guidelines provide an extensive suspect component listing and suspect indications listing. Users can quickly check their suspect items against the list of manufacturers products (i.e., type, LD. number, and nameplate information) by consulting either of these listings.

  9. Book Review: Placing the Suspect behind the Keyboard: Using Digital Forensics and Investigative Techniques to Identify Cybercrime Suspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Nash

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Shavers, B. (2013. Placing the Suspect behind the Keyboard: Using Digital Forensics and Investigative Techniques to Identify Cybercrime Suspects. Waltham, MA: Elsevier, 290 pages, ISBN-978-1-59749-985-9, US$51.56. Includes bibliographical references and index.Reviewed by Detective Corporal Thomas Nash (tnash@bpdvt.org, Burlington Vermont Police Department, Internet Crime against Children Task Force. Adjunct Instructor, Champlain College, Burlington VT.In this must read for any aspiring novice cybercrime investigator as well as the seasoned professional computer guru alike, Brett Shaver takes the reader into the ever changing and dynamic world of Cybercrime investigation.  Shaver, an experienced criminal investigator, lays out the details and intricacies of a computer related crime investigation in a clear and concise manner in his new easy to read publication, Placing the Suspect behind the Keyboard. Using Digital Forensics and Investigative techniques to Identify Cybercrime Suspects. Shaver takes the reader from start to finish through each step of the investigative process in well organized and easy to follow sections, with real case file examples to reach the ultimate goal of any investigation: identifying the suspect and proving their guilt in the crime. Do not be fooled by the title. This excellent, easily accessible reference is beneficial to both criminal as well as civil investigations and should be in every investigator’s library regardless of their respective criminal or civil investigative responsibilities.(see PDF for full review

  10. Mothers with intellectual disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Kolarič, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    For the theoretical part of this master's thesis foreign literature and finished foreign researches were studied. In this part of the thesis the characteristics of mothers with intellectual disabilities; factors, which influence the success of carrying out their mother role; and the rights of people with intellectual disabilities as parents, all based on Slovene legislation are included. We listed reasons for limiting reproduction for women with intellectual disabilities and issues concerning...

  11. Disability and global development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durocher, Joan; Lord, Janet; Defranco, Allison

    2012-07-01

    The United States invests billions of taxpayer dollars each year into foreign assistance programs that foster international diplomacy and development directed toward improving the quality of life for people around the world. These programs develop economies and combat poverty, promote democracy and governance, build new infrastructure, advance and protect human rights, among other development goals. The United States cannot effectively accomplish the goals of foreign assistance programs unless it undertakes measures to ensure that the programs are accessible to and inclusive of people with disabilities. The United States has been a leader in advancing the rights of people with disabilities and must continue to promote disability rights through its international development work. Overseas economic development will not be successful unless people with disabilities are included. Because of the significant number of people with disabilities in developing countries, if they are not included, the very economic growth the United States is trying to foster will be hindered. The goals of democracy and governance programs cannot be achieved without the inclusion of people with disabilities. In many countries, domestic law contains blatant discriminatory provisions for people with disabilities that undermine access to justice and full participation in society. The provisions that discriminate against people with disabilities include arbitrary exclusions in electoral codes, sweeping plenary guardianship laws with no due-process protections, discriminatory banking practices, and inaccessible court proceedings. National disability legal frameworks remain underdeveloped throughout the world. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. 2017 Annual Disability Statistics Supplement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, E. A; Houtenville, A. J.

    2018-01-01

    The "Annual Disability Statistics Supplement" is a companion report to the "Annual Disability Statistics Compendium." The "Supplement" presents statistics on the same topics as the "Compendium," with additional categorizations by demographic characteristics including age, gender and race/ethnicity. In…

  13. Variability in a three-generation family with Pierre Robin sequence, acampomelic campomelic dysplasia, and intellectual disability due to a novel ∼1 Mb deletion upstream of SOX9, and including KCNJ2 and KCNJ16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castori, Marco; Bottillo, Irene; Morlino, Silvia; Barone, Chiara; Cascone, Piero; Grammatico, Paola; Laino, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Campomelic dysplasia and acampomelic campomelic dysplasia (ACD) are allelic disorders due to heterozygous mutations in or around SOX9. Translocations and deletions involving the SOX9 5' regulatory region are rare causes of these disorders, as well as Pierre Robin sequence (PRS) and 46,XY gonadal dysgenesis. Genotype-phenotype correlations are not straightforward due to the complex epigenetic regulation of SOX9 expression during development. We report a three-generation pedigree with a novel ∼1 Mb deletion upstream of SOX9 and including KCNJ2 and KCNJ16, and ascertained for dominant transmission of PRS. Further characterization of the family identified subtle appendicular anomalies and a variable constellation of axial skeletal features evocative of ACD in several members. Affected males showed learning disability. The identified deletion was smaller than all other chromosome rearrangements associated with ACD. Comparison with other reported translocations and deletions involving this region allowed further refining of genotype-phenotype correlations and an update of the smallest regions of overlap associated with the different phenotypes. Intrafamilial variability in this pedigree suggests a phenotypic continuity between ACD and PRS in patients carrying mutations in the SOX9 5' regulatory region. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Handbook for Response to Suspect Radioactive Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cliff, William C.; Pappas, Richard A.; Arthur, Richard J.

    2005-01-01

    This document provides response actions to be performed following the initial port, airport, or border crossing discovery of material that is suspected of being radioactive. The purpose of this guide is to provide actions appropriate for handling radioactive material

  15. Disability and Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About CDC.gov . Disability & Health Home Disability Overview Disability Inclusion Barriers to Inclusion Inclusion Strategies Inclusion in Programs & Activities Resources Healthy Living Disability & Physical Activity Disability & Obesity Disability & Smoking Disability & Breast ...

  16. Learning Disabilities and ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of illnesses and disabilities Learning disabilities and ADHD Learning disabilities and ADHD Learning disabilities affect how you ... ADHD. Learning disabilities Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) Learning disabilities top Having a learning disability does not ...

  17. MRI for clinically suspected pediatric appendicitis: case interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, Michael M.; Brian, James M.; Methratta, Sosamma T.; Hulse, Michael A.; Choudhary, Arabinda K.; Eggli, Kathleen D.; Boal, Danielle K.B.

    2014-01-01

    As utilization of MRI for clinically suspected pediatric appendicitis becomes more common, there will be increased focus on case interpretation. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to share our institution's case interpretation experience. MRI findings of appendicitis include appendicoliths, tip appendicitis, intraluminal fluid-debris level, pitfalls of size measurements, and complications including abscesses. The normal appendix and inguinal appendix are also discussed. (orig.)

  18. MRI for clinically suspected pediatric appendicitis: case interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Michael M.; Brian, James M.; Methratta, Sosamma T.; Hulse, Michael A.; Choudhary, Arabinda K.; Eggli, Kathleen D.; Boal, Danielle K.B. [Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, Hershey, PA (United States)

    2014-05-15

    As utilization of MRI for clinically suspected pediatric appendicitis becomes more common, there will be increased focus on case interpretation. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to share our institution's case interpretation experience. MRI findings of appendicitis include appendicoliths, tip appendicitis, intraluminal fluid-debris level, pitfalls of size measurements, and complications including abscesses. The normal appendix and inguinal appendix are also discussed. (orig.)

  19. Comparison of clinically suspected injuries with injuries detected at whole-body CT in suspected multi-trauma victims

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shannon, L.; Peachey, T.; Skipper, N.; Adiotomre, E.; Chopra, A.; Marappan, B.; Kotnis, N.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To assess the accuracy of the trauma team leader's clinical suspicion of injury in patients who have undergone whole-body computed tomography (WBCT) for suspected polytrauma, and to assess the frequency of unsuspected injuries and specific patterns of injury at WBCT. Materials and methods: Requests for patients who underwent WBCT for suspected polytrauma from April 2011 to March 2014 were reviewed and each body area that was clinically suspected to be injured was recorded. Body areas were divided into the following groups based on anatomical regions covered in each segment of the WBCT examination: head (including facial bones); neck (including cervical spine); chest (including thoracic spine); and abdomen/pelvis (including lumbar spine). The formal radiology report for each study was reviewed and injuries found at CT were grouped into the same body areas. For each patient, the number of clinically suspected injured areas was compared to the number of confirmed injured areas at WBCT. Results: Five hundred and eighty-eight patients were included in the study. Thirty-two percent (186/588) had a normal scan. Ninety-three percent (546/588) had fewer injured body areas at WBCT than suspected. Four percent (27/588) had the equivalent number of injured areas at WBCT as suspected. Three percent (15/588) had more injured areas at WBCT than suspected. Fifty percent (263/527) with clinically suspected chest injuries were confirmed to have chest injuries at WBCT. This was lower for other areas: abdomen/pelvis 31% (165/535); head 29% (155/533); neck 13% (66/513). Four percent of (24/588) patients had unsuspected injuries found at WBCT. Seventy-five percent (18/24) of unsuspected injuries were considered as serious, where failure to treat would have the potential for significant morbidity. Most of these patients had severe injuries to other body areas that were correctly suspected. Of the 165 with abdominal/pelvic region injuries, there were associated injuries in the

  20. Processing Disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Jasmine

    2015-01-01

    This Article argues that the practice of holding so many adjudicative proceedings related to disability in private settings (e.g., guardianship, special education due process, civil commitment, and social security) relative to our strong normative presumption of public access to adjudication may cultivate and perpetuate stigma in contravention of the goals of inclusion and enhanced agency set forth in antidiscrimination laws. Descriptively, the law has a complicated history with disability--initially rendering disability invisible; later, underwriting particular narratives of disability synonymous with incapacity; and, in recent history, promoting the full socio-economic visibility of people with disabilities. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the marquee civil rights legislation for people with disabilities (about to enter its twenty-fifth year), expresses a national approach to disability that recognizes the role of society in its construction, maintenance, and potential remedy. However, the ADA’s mission is incomplete. It has not generated the types of interactions between people with disabilities and nondisabled people empirically shown to deconstruct deeply entrenched social stigma. Prescriptively, procedural design can act as an "ntistigma agent"to resist and mitigate disability stigma. This Article focuses on one element of institutional design--public access to adjudication--as a potential tool to construct and disseminate counter-narratives of disability. The unique substantive focus in disability adjudication on questions of agency provides a potential public space for the negotiation of nuanced definitions of disability and capacity more reflective of the human condition.

  1. Predictors of disability retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, N; Lynch, J; Kaplan, G A; Cohen, R D; Goldberg, D E; Salonen, J T

    1997-12-01

    Disability retirement may increase as the work force ages, but there is little information on factors associated with retirement because of disability. This is the first prospective population-based study of predictors of disability retirement including information on workplace, socioeconomic, behavioral, and health-related factors. The subjects were 1038 Finnish men who were enrolled in the Kuopio Ischemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study, who were 42, 48, 54, or 60 years of age at the beginning of the study, and who participated in a 4-year follow-up medical examination. Various job characteristics predicted disability retirement. Heavy work, work in uncomfortable positions, long workhours, noise at work, physical job strain, musculoskeletal strain, repetitive or continuous muscle strain, mental job strain, and job dissatisfaction were all significantly associated with the incidence of disability retirement. The ability to communicate with fellow workers and social support from supervisors tended to reduce the risk of disability retirement. The relationships persisted after control for socioeconomic factors, prevalent disease, and health behavior, which were also associated with disability retirement. The strong associations found between workplace factors and the incidence of disability retirement link the problem of disability retirement to the problem of poor work conditions.

  2. Ecological Congruence and the Identification of Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddle, Shayna

    2017-01-01

    Background: In the debate about how to evaluate students suspected of having a learning disability, the role of context in learning has been consistently minimized in the United States. Objective: This article explores the implications of the current, deficit-based approach to the definition and assessment of learning disabilities and offers a…

  3. Rounding up the usual suspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimitrov, Dimitar; Benevidas, Ligia R.; Arnedo, Miquel A.

    2017-01-01

    We test the limits of the spider superfamily Araneoidea and reconstruct its interfamilial relationships using standard molecular markers. The taxon sample (363 terminals) comprises for the first time representatives of all araneoid families, including the first molecular data of the family Synaph...

  4. The Application of a Communication Model to the Problems of Learning Disabled Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florio-Forslund, Evelyn

    This paper examines the problems of learning disabled children and discusses possibilities for improving their self-concept and attitude toward school. It first notes the suspected link between juvenile delinquency and learning disabilities and suggests that initial efforts to help learning disabled children be directed at the lower-class urban…

  5. Disability and Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... risk behaviors and higher rates of premature death. Secondary conditions Secondary conditions occur in addition to (and ... Provide evidence-based guidelines for assessment and treatment. Data and research Include people with disabilities in health ...

  6. Suspected synthetic cannabinoid toxicosis in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Keysa; Wells, Raegan J; McLean, Mary Kay

    2015-01-01

    To describe the effects of suspected synthetic cannabinoid (SC) toxicosis and the response to intravenous lipid emulsion (ILE) therapy in a dog. A 2-year-8-month-old male Boxer dog was evaluated at an emergency hospital for progressive ataxia and inappropriate mentation. The initial physical examination identified marked hypothermia (32.7°C [90.9°F]), intermittent sinus bradycardia (60/min), stuporous mentation with intermittent aggression, and severe ataxia. Neurologic status deteriorated to comatose mentation within 2 hours of presentation. The initial diagnostic evaluation (eg, CBC, serum biochemistry profile, venous blood gas, and electrolyte determination) revealed a respiratory acidosis and thrombocytopenia. The owner reported that the dog was exposed to an SC containing Damiana leaf, Marshmallow leaf, and Athaea leaves. Initial treatment included IV fluids and supplemental oxygen. Mechanical ventilation was provided due to hypoventilation and periods of apnea. Intravenous lipid emulsion therapy was administered as a bolus (1.5 mL/kg) and continued as a continuous rate infusion (0.5 mL/kg/h) for a total of 6 hours. The dog became rousable and was weaned from mechanical ventilation approximately 15 hours following presentation. The dog was eating and walking with no ataxia, had a normal mentation at approximately 33 hours following presentation, and was discharged home at that time. Communication with the owners 5 days following discharge revealed that the dog was apparently normal. Based on this case and other reports in the literature regarding human exposures, SC ingestion may result in more severe clinical signs than marijuana ingestion in dogs. Significant clinical intervention may be necessary. Intravenous lipid emulsion treatment may be beneficial due to the lipophilicity of SC. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2015.

  7. Incidence of clinically suspected venous thromboembolism in British Indian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, B M; Patel, M S; Rudge, S; Best, A; Mangwani, J

    2018-05-01

    Introduction Venous thromboembolism (VTE) remains a major public health issue around the world. Ethnicity is known to alter the incidence of VTE. To our knowledge, there are no reports in the literature investigating the incidence of VTE in British Indians. The aim of this study was to investigate the rates of symptomatic VTE in British Indian patients in the UK. Methods Patients referred to our institution between January 2011 and August 2013 with clinically suspected VTE were eligible for inclusion in the study. Those not of British Indian or Caucasian ethnicity were excluded. A retrospective review of these two cohorts was conducted. Results Overall, 15,529 cases were referred to our institution for suspected VTE. This included 1,498 individuals of British Indian ethnicity. Of these, 182 (12%) had confirmed VTE episodes. A further 13,159 of the patients with suspected VTE were coded as Caucasian, including 2,412 (16%) who had confirmed VTE events. VTE rates were a third lower in British Indians with clinically suspected VTE than in the equivalent Caucasian group. The British Indian cohort presented with VTE at a much earlier age than Caucasians (mean 57.0 vs 68.0 years). Conclusions This study suggests that British Indian patients have a lower incidence of VTE and are more likely to present at an earlier age than Caucasians. There was no significant difference in VTE type (deep vein thrombosis vs pulmonary embolism) among the ethnic groups. Clinicians should be aware of variations within ethnicities but should continue to adhere to existing VTE prevention guidance.

  8. Percutaneous cholecystocentesis in cats with suspected hepatobiliary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byfield, Victoria L; Callahan Clark, Julie E; Turek, Bradley J; Bradley, Charles W; Rondeau, Mark P

    2017-12-01

    Objectives The objective was to evaluate the safety and diagnostic utility of percutaneous ultrasound-guided cholecystocentesis (PUC) in cats with suspected hepatobiliary disease. Methods Medical records of 83 cats with suspected hepatobiliary disease that underwent PUC were retrospectively reviewed. Results At the time of PUC, at least one additional procedure was performed in 79/83 cats, including hepatic aspiration and/or biopsy (n = 75) and splenic aspiration (n = 18). Complications were noted in 14/83 cases, including increased abdominal fluid (n = 11), needle-tip occlusion (n = 1), failed first attempt to penetrate the gall bladder wall (n = 1) and pneumoperitoneum (n = 1). There were no reports of gall bladder rupture, bile peritonitis or hypotension necessitating treatment with vasopressor medication. Blood products were administered to 7/83 (8%) cats. Seventy-two cats (87%) survived to discharge. Of the cats that were euthanized (9/83) or died (2/83), none were reported as a definitive consequence of PUC. Bacteria were identified cytologically in 10/71 samples (14%); all 10 had a positive aerobic bacterial culture. Bile culture was positive in 11/80 samples (14%). Of the cases with a positive bile culture, cytological description of bacteria corresponded to the organism cultured in fewer than 50% of cases. The most common cytologic diagnosis was hepatic lipidosis (49/66). The most common histopathologic diagnosis was cholangitis (10/21). Conclusions and relevance PUC was safe in this group of cats with suspected hepatobiliary disease. Complications were likely associated with ancillary procedures performed at the time of PUC. Bile analysis yielded an abnormal result in nearly one-third of cats with suspected hepatobiliary disease. Complete agreement between bile cytology and culture was lacking. Further evaluation of the correlation between bile cytology and bile culture is warranted.

  9. Suspected Child Maltreatment: Recognize and Respond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemple, Kristen Mary; Kim, Hae Kyoung

    2011-01-01

    Early childhood educators spend extensive amounts of time with young children, so they are often the first adults to notice signs that a child may be abused or neglected. All educators are required by law to report suspected maltreatment, and can play an important role in preventing and responding to abuse and neglect of young children. What is…

  10. Suspecting Neurological Dysfunction From E Mail Messages ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A non medical person suspected and confirmed neurological dysfunction in an individual, based only on e mail messages sent by the individual. With email communication becoming rampant “peculiar” email messages may raise the suspicion of neurological dysfunction. Organic pathology explaining the abnormal email ...

  11. Anesthesia for intellectually disabled

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapil Chaudhary

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Anesthetizing an intellectually disabled patient is a challenge due to lack of cognition and communication which makes perioperative evaluation difficult. The presence of associated medical problems and lack of cooperation further complicates the anesthetic technique. An online literature search was performed using keywords anesthesia, intellectually disabled, and mentally retarded and relevant articles were included for review. There is scarcity of literature dealing with intellectually disabled patients. The present review highlights the anesthetic challenges, their relevant evidence-based management, and the role of caretakers in the perioperative period. Proper understanding of the associated problems along with a considerate and unhurried approach are the essentials of anesthetic management of these patients.

  12. Police officers' perceptions and experiences with mentally disordered suspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxburgh, Laura; Gabbert, Fiona; Milne, Rebecca; Cherryman, Julie

    Despite mentally disordered suspects being over-represented within the criminal justice system, there is a dearth of published literature that examines police officers' perceptions when interviewing this vulnerable group. This is concerning given that police officers are increasingly the first point of contact with these individuals. Using a Grounded Theory approach, this study examined 35 police officers' perceptions and experiences when interviewing mentally disordered suspects. Current safeguards, such as Appropriate Adults, and their experiences of any training they received were also explored. A specially designed questionnaire was developed and distributed across six police forces in England and Wales. Nine conceptual categories emerged from the data that highlighted how police officers' level of experience impacted upon their perceptions when dealing with this cohort. As a consequence, a new model grounded within Schema Theory has emerged termed Police Experience Transitional Model. Implications include the treatment and outcome of mentally disordered suspects being heavily dependent on whom they encounter within the criminal justice system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. MRI for clinically suspected pediatric appendicitis: an implemented program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Michael M.; Gustas, Cristy N.; Choudhary, Arabinda K.; Methratta, Sosamma T.; Hulse, Michael A.; Eggli, Kathleen D.; Boal, Danielle K.B. [Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Mail Code H066, 500 University Drive, P.O. Box 850, Hershey, PA (United States); Geeting, Glenn [Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Department of Emergency Medicine, Hershey, PA (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Emergent MRI is now a viable alternative to CT for evaluating appendicitis while avoiding the detrimental effects of ionizing radiation. However, primary employment of MRI in the setting of clinically suspected pediatric appendicitis has remained significantly underutilized. To describe our institution's development and the results of a fully implemented clinical program using MRI as the primary imaging evaluation for children with suspected appendicitis. A four-sequence MRI protocol consisting of coronal and axial single-shot turbo spin-echo (SS-TSE) T2, coronal spectral adiabatic inversion recovery (SPAIR), and axial SS-TSE T2 with fat saturation was performed on 208 children, ages 3 to 17 years, with clinically suspected appendicitis. No intravenous or oral contrast material was administered. No sedation was administered. Data collection includes two separate areas: time parameter analysis and MRI diagnostic results. Diagnostic accuracy of MRI for pediatric appendicitis indicated a sensitivity of 97.6% (CI: 87.1-99.9%), specificity 97.0% (CI: 93.2-99.0%), positive predictive value 88.9% (CI: 76.0-96.3%), and negative predictive value 99.4% (CI: 96.6-99.9%). Time parameter analysis indicated clinical feasibility, with time requested to first sequence obtained mean of 78.7 +/- 52.5 min, median 65 min; first-to-last sequence time stamp mean 14.2 +/- 8.8 min, median 12 min; last sequence to report mean 57.4 +/- 35.2 min, median 46 min. Mean age was 11.2 +/- 3.6 years old. Girls represented 57% of patients. MRI is an effective and efficient method of imaging children with clinically suspected appendicitis. Using an expedited four-sequence protocol, sensitivity and specificity are comparable to CT while avoiding the detrimental effects of ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  14. Infertility: Inability or Disability?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abha Khetarpal

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Disability is a complex phenomenon. It reflects an interaction between features of a person’s body and features of the society in which he or she lives. International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF, lays stress on the functional as well as the structural problem of a person. All the definitions of disability also include the disorders of the reproductive and endocrine system. So infertility and impotency should also be included in the category of disability. It affects the participation in areas of life and can have a disabling affect on an individual. Like any other disability the couple has to adapt and integrate infertility in their sense of self thus infertility comes as a major life crisis. Medically, infertility, in most cases, is considered to be the result of a physical impairment or a genetic abnormality. Socially, couples are incapable of their reproductive or parental roles. On social level, infertility in most cultures remains associated with social stigma and taboo just like the social model of disability. Couples who are unable to reproduce may be looked down upon due to social stigmatisation. Infertility can lead to divorces and separation leading to a broken family life. Without labelling infertility as a disability, it is difficult for the people to access services and welfare benefits offered by the government. Infertility treatments are highly sophisticated so they are very expensive and are even not covered by insurance and government aid.In the light of all this it becomes imperative to categorise infertility as disability.

  15. Suspects in criminal investigations of rape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinković Darko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigations of sexual assaults mostly focus on victims and their credibility, which may cause lack of firm evidence in relation to suspects. Given the fact that the criminal offence of rape is characterised by a high incidence of false reports and accusations, frequently indicating specific persons as the perpetrators, certain caution is necessary in the investigation in order to avoid false accusations and/or convictions. As regards the personality of the rapist and motives for committing a forcible sexual act, certain types or rather certain categories of perpetrators can be distinguished, although it should be noted that a large number of rapists do not belong to one category only, but rather combine characteristics of several different types. During a criminal investigation it is of vital importance to differentiate between a rape as a surprise attack and a rape as abuse of trust, as they are compatible with the nature of the suspect's defence. The suspect shall be subjected to a forensic examination in the course of the investigation in order to find traces which prove vaginal, anal or oral penetration, coerced sexual intercourse and identity of the rapist. While conducting an interrogation of a suspected rapist, a crime investigating officer shall use either factual or emotional approach to his interviewee, depending on his psychological and motivational characteristics. In this regard, the factual approach is believed to be more efficient with anger rapists and sadistic rapists, whereas the compassionate approach gives good results with the gentlemen-rapists and partly with the power asserting rapists.

  16. Magnetic resonance angiography in suspected cerebral vasculitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demaerel, Philippe; De Ruyter, Nele; Wilms, Guido; Maes, Frederik; Velghe, Beatrijs

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the technical capacity and diagnostic accuracy of 3D time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in suspected cerebral vasculitis in a retrospective analysis of MRA and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in 14 young patients with clinical and/or radiological suspicion of cerebral vasculitis. A total of nine arteries were evaluated in each patient. Consensus review of DSA by three observers was the reference standard. The sensitivity for detecting a stenosis varied from 62 to 79% for MRA and from 76 to 94% for DSA, depending on the observer. The specificity for detecting a stenosis varied from 83 to 87% for MRA and from 83 to 97% for DSA. Using the criterion ''more than two stenoses in at least two separate vascular distributions'' to consider the examination as being true positive, the false-positive rates for MRA and DSA were comparable. MRA plays a role as the first angiographical examination in the diagnostic work-up of suspected cerebral vasculitis. When more than two stenoses in at least two separate vascular distributions are depicted on MRA, DSA is not expected to add a significant diagnostic contribution in a patient with suspected cerebral vasculitis. DSA remains necessary when MRA is normal or when less than three stenoses are seen. (orig.)

  17. Magnetic resonance angiography in suspected cerebral vasculitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demaerel, Philippe; De Ruyter, Nele; Wilms, Guido [Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis, KU Leuven, 3000, Leuven (Belgium); Maes, Frederik [Department of Medical Imaging Computing, Universitair Ziekenhuis, KU Leuven, 3000, Leuven (Belgium); Velghe, Beatrijs [Department of Radiology, Ziekenhuis Oost-Limburg, Schiepse Bos 6, 3600, Genk (Belgium)

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the technical capacity and diagnostic accuracy of 3D time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in suspected cerebral vasculitis in a retrospective analysis of MRA and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in 14 young patients with clinical and/or radiological suspicion of cerebral vasculitis. A total of nine arteries were evaluated in each patient. Consensus review of DSA by three observers was the reference standard. The sensitivity for detecting a stenosis varied from 62 to 79% for MRA and from 76 to 94% for DSA, depending on the observer. The specificity for detecting a stenosis varied from 83 to 87% for MRA and from 83 to 97% for DSA. Using the criterion ''more than two stenoses in at least two separate vascular distributions'' to consider the examination as being true positive, the false-positive rates for MRA and DSA were comparable. MRA plays a role as the first angiographical examination in the diagnostic work-up of suspected cerebral vasculitis. When more than two stenoses in at least two separate vascular distributions are depicted on MRA, DSA is not expected to add a significant diagnostic contribution in a patient with suspected cerebral vasculitis. DSA remains necessary when MRA is normal or when less than three stenoses are seen. (orig.)

  18. Disability Case Review of Administrative Law Judge Hearing Decisions

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Disability Case Review is a post-effectuation quality review of administrative law judge (ALJ) disability hearing decisions. This dataset includes results from...

  19. Disability as Cultural Difference: Implications for Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasiou, Dimitris; Kauffman, James M.

    2012-01-01

    This article critiques the treatment of disability as cultural difference by the theorists of the "social model" and "minority group model" of disability. Both models include all of the various disabling conditions under one term--disability--and fail to distinguish disabilities from cultural differences (e.g., race, ethnicity, or gender…

  20. Nuclear Pedigree Criteria of Suspected HNPCC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kładny Józef

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The criteria for the diagnosis of HNPCC established by the ICG-HNPCC are very restrictive as they do not allow for the diagnosis of a large number of "suspected HNPCC" cases - these are families which do no fulfill the strict diagnostic "Amsterdam criteria", but do present with several pedigree and clinical features characteristic for HNPCC. Several series of families suspected of harboring germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes have been studied for germline changes in DNA mismatch repair genes and a mutation rate of somewhere between 8-60% was found. Therefore a subgroup of members of the ICG-HNPCC has been working on pedigree/clinical diagnostic criteria for suspected HNPCC. Materials and methods Part I The study was based on two series of colorectal cancer (CRC cases: 1 HNPCC - this group comprised 190 patients affected by CRC from randomly selected families which fulfilled the Amsterdam II criteria registered in Düsseldorf, Germany (102 cases of CRC, Denmark (18 CRCs, Leiden, Holland (23 CRCs and Szczecin, Poland (47 CRCs. 2 Consecutive CRCs - this group comprised 629 (78.0% of 806 individuals with CRC diagnosed in 1991-1997 in the city of Szczecin (ca. 400,000 of inhabitants, Poland. Nuclear pedigrees in both groups were compared for frequency of occurrence of clinical features, that have been shown to be associated with HNPCC. Part II 52 consecutive CRC cases from Szczecin, matching the criteria recognized in part I as appropriate for diagnosis of cases "suspected of HNPCC" were studied for the occurrence of germline hMSH2/hMLH1 constitutional mutations using "exon by exon" sequencing. Results The combination of features - i.e. the occurrence of an HNPCC associated cancer (CRC or cancer of the endometrium, small bowel or urinary tract in a 1st degree relative of a CRC patient; at least one of the patients being diagnosed under age of 50 - appeared to be strongly associated to HNPCC with an OR - 161. Constitutional

  1. Intellectual disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... below average Development way below that of peers Intelligence quotient (IQ) score below 70 on a standardized ... Social. Nutrition programs can reduce disability associated with malnutrition. Early intervention in situations involving abuse and poverty ...

  2. Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NICHD) See all related organizations Publications Problemas de aprendizaje Order NINDS Publications Patient Organizations CHADD - Children and ... NICHD) See all related organizations Publications Problemas de aprendizaje Order NINDS Publications Definition Learning disabilities are disorders ...

  3. Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... books. While his friends were meeting for pickup soccer games after school, he was back home in ... sometimes thought to contribute to learning disabilities. Poor nutrition early in life also may lead to learning ...

  4. Sports and disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Pamela E; Clayton, Gerald H

    2010-03-01

    Participation in recreational and competitive sports at an early age has long been touted as a positive influence on growth and development, and for fostering lifelong healthy lifestyles. The benefits of an active lifestyle include not only fitness, but the promotion of a sense of inclusion and improved self-esteem. These benefits are well documented in all populations, and their importance has been summarized in the recent Healthy People 2010 guidelines. The American Academy of Pediatrics has recently produced a summary statement on the benefits of activity for disabled children. They note that children with disabilities tend to have an overall lower level of fitness and an increased level of obesity. For this population, developing a lifelong desire to be active can be a simple means for limiting illness and much of the morbidity associated with sedentary lifestyles often associated with disability. For disabled youth, participation in disabled sports programs available nationally and internationally can be an effective means to promote such precepts. The goal of this focused review is to improve the learner's knowledge of the positive impact that active lifestyles can have on overall health in the disabled youth population and, as a result, modify their practice by incorporating recreational and competitive sport activities as part of improving overall patient care. Copyright 2010 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Herbal hepatotoxicity: suspected cases assessed for alternative causes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teschke, Rolf; Schulze, Johannes; Schwarzenboeck, Alexander; Eickhoff, Axel; Frenzel, Christian

    2013-09-01

    Alternative explanations are common in suspected drug-induced liver injury (DILI) and account for up to 47.1% of analyzed cases. This raised the question of whether a similar frequency may prevail in cases of assumed herb-induced liver injury (HILI). We searched the Medline database for the following terms: herbs, herbal drugs, herbal dietary supplements, hepatotoxic herbs, herbal hepatotoxicity, and herb-induced liver injury. Additional terms specifically addressed single herbs and herbal products: black cohosh, Greater Celandine, green tea, Herbalife products, Hydroxycut, kava, and Pelargonium sidoides. We retrieved 23 published case series and regulatory assessments related to hepatotoxicity by herbs and herbal dietary supplements with alternative causes. The 23 publications comprised 573 cases of initially suspected HILI; alternative causes were evident in 278/573 cases (48.5%). Among them were hepatitis by various viruses (9.7%), autoimmune diseases (10.4%), nonalcoholic and alcoholic liver diseases (5.4%), liver injury by comedication (DILI and other HILI) (43.9%), and liver involvement in infectious diseases (4.7%). Biliary and pancreatic diseases were frequent alternative diagnoses (11.5%), raising therapeutic problems if specific treatment is withheld; pre-existing liver diseases including cirrhosis (9.7%) were additional confounding variables. Other diagnoses were rare, but possibly relevant for the individual patient. In 573 cases of initially assumed HILI, 48.5% showed alternative causes unrelated to the initially incriminated herb, herbal drug, or herbal dietary supplement, calling for thorough clinical evaluations and appropriate causality assessments in future cases of suspected HILI.

  6. Disability and Health: Healthy Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About CDC.gov . Disability & Health Home Disability Overview Disability Inclusion Barriers to Inclusion Inclusion Strategies Inclusion in Programs & Activities Resources Healthy Living Disability & Physical Activity Disability & Obesity Disability & Smoking Disability & Breast ...

  7. Believable Suspect Agents: Response and Interpersonal Style Selection for an Artificial Suspect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijnes, Merijn

    2016-01-01

    The social skills necessary to properly and successfully conduct a police interrogation can and need to be trained. In the thesis I will describe the steps I took towards a virtual character that can play the role of a suspect in a police interrogation training. Students of the police academy will

  8. Colorado Learning Disabilities Research Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFries, J. C.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Results obtained from the center's six research projects are reviewed, including research on psychometric assessment of twins with reading disabilities, reading and language processes, attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder and executive functions, linkage analysis and physical mapping, computer-based remediation of reading disabilities, and…

  9. The role of MRI in suspected inner ear malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koesling, S.; Juettemann, S.; Amaya, B.; Rasinski, C.; Bloching, M.; Koenig, E.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: This is a prospective analysis of the value of MRI in suspected inner ear malformations. Materials and Methods: In 50 patients (43 children and young adults, 7 adults) with suspected inner ear malformation MRI (1.5 T) was performed. In addition, 42 of these patients underwent CT. For the analysis of the inner ear structures, the constructive interference in steady state (CISS) sequence with 0.7 mm slice thickness was used. Functional tests revealed a sensorineural hearing loss or deafness in 82 temporal bones (TB) and a combined hearing loss in 4 TB. The hearing loss was unilateral in 14 patients. MRI and CT findings were compared. Results: Imaging findings were normal in 58 TB. The pathological findings included inner ear malformations (35 TB), inflammatory changes (4 TB), partial obliteration of labyrinth (2 TB) and congenital aural atresia (1 TB). An isolated absence of the cochlear nerve (1 TB) could only be found by MRI. In the remaining cases, an inner ear malformation was diagnosed by MRI and CT with the same confidence but MRI was superior in displaying the fine details. Conclusions: MRI will become the method of choice in the diagnosis of inner ear malformations. (orig.) [de

  10. Early diagnosis of dengue virus infection in clinically suspected cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afridi, N.K.; Ahmed, S.; Ali, N.; Khan, S.A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Comparison of real time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RTPCR) and immunoglobulin M (IgM) capture enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for diagnosis of dengue virus infection in first week of illness in clinically suspected patients of dengue fever. Study Design: Cross sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of haematology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP) Rawalpindi from Jan 2013 to Nov 2013. Material and Methods: A cross sectional study including 68 clinically suspected patients of dengue fever according to the World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. IgM capture ELISA and RT PCR for dengue virus ribonucleic acid (RNA) was performed on samples collected from patients having fever for 1 to 7 days. These were divided into two groups. Patients in group 1 presented with fever of 4 days or less, patients in group 2 had fever of 5 to 7 days duration. Results: In group 1, 72 percent of the patients were positive by RT PCR while 31 percent were positive by IgM capture ELISA. In group 2, 43 percent of the patients were positive by RT PCR while 97 percent were positive by ELISA. Conclusion: RT PCR can be used for early detection of dengue virus infection in the first few days of fever while IgM ELISA is diagnostic afterwards. (author)

  11. MRI diagnosis of suspected atlanto-occipital dissociation in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grabb, B.C.; Frye, T.A.; Hedlund, G.L.; Vaid, Y.N.; Royal, S.A.; Grabb, P.A.

    1999-01-01

    Objective. To demonstrate the utility of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the diagnosis of complete and partial ligamentous injuries in patients with suspected atlanto-occipital dissociation (AOD). Materials and methods. Five patients with suspected AOD had MR imaging performed within an average of 4 days after injury. MR scans were reviewed with specific analysis of craniocervical ligamentous structures. Charts were reviewed to obtain clinical information regarding presentation, treatment, hospital course, and outcome. Results. Two patients demonstrated MR evidence of complete AOD. One had disruption of all visualized major ligamentous structures at the craniocervical junction with anterolisthesis and evidence of cord damage. The second had injuries to the tectorial membrane, superior band of the cruciform ligament, apical ligament, and interspinous ligament at C 1-2. The remaining three patients sustained incomplete severance of the ligamentous structures at the craniocervical junction. All patients demonstrated subtle radiographic findings suggestive of AOD, including soft tissue swelling at the craniocervical junction without fracture. The two patients with complete AOD died. The three patients with partial AOD were treated with stabilization. On follow-up, these three children were asymptomatic following their craniocervical injury. Conclusion. MR imaging of acute AOD provides accurate identification of the craniocervical ligaments injured, classification of full versus partial ligamentous disruption, and analysis of accompanying spinal cord injury. This information is important for early appropriate neurosurgical management and preservation of neurologic function in survivors. (orig.)

  12. Exome Sequencing in Suspected Monogenic Dyslipidemias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stitziel, Nathan O.; Peloso, Gina M.; Abifadel, Marianne; Cefalu, Angelo B.; Fouchier, Sigrid; Motazacker, M. Mahdi; Tada, Hayato; Larach, Daniel B.; Awan, Zuhier; Haller, Jorge F.; Pullinger, Clive R.; Varret, Mathilde; Rabès, Jean-Pierre; Noto, Davide; Tarugi, Patrizia; Kawashiri, Masa-aki; Nohara, Atsushi; Yamagishi, Masakazu; Risman, Marjorie; Deo, Rahul; Ruel, Isabelle; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Wilson, James G.; Rich, Stephen S.; Gupta, Namrata; Farlow, Deborah N.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Daly, Mark J.; Kane, John P.; Freeman, Mason W.; Genest, Jacques; Rader, Daniel J.; Mabuchi, Hiroshi; Kastelein, John J.P.; Hovingh, G. Kees; Averna, Maurizio R.; Gabriel, Stacey; Boileau, Catherine; Kathiresan, Sekar

    2015-01-01

    Background Exome sequencing is a promising tool for gene mapping in Mendelian disorders. We utilized this technique in an attempt to identify novel genes underlying monogenic dyslipidemias. Methods and Results We performed exome sequencing on 213 selected family members from 41 kindreds with suspected Mendelian inheritance of extreme levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (after candidate gene sequencing excluded known genetic causes for high LDL cholesterol families) or high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. We used standard analytic approaches to identify candidate variants and also assigned a polygenic score to each individual in order to account for their burden of common genetic variants known to influence lipid levels. In nine families, we identified likely pathogenic variants in known lipid genes (ABCA1, APOB, APOE, LDLR, LIPA, and PCSK9); however, we were unable to identify obvious genetic etiologies in the remaining 32 families despite follow-up analyses. We identified three factors that limited novel gene discovery: (1) imperfect sequencing coverage across the exome hid potentially causal variants; (2) large numbers of shared rare alleles within families obfuscated causal variant identification; and (3) individuals from 15% of families carried a significant burden of common lipid-related alleles, suggesting complex inheritance can masquerade as monogenic disease. Conclusions We identified the genetic basis of disease in nine of 41 families; however, none of these represented novel gene discoveries. Our results highlight the promise and limitations of exome sequencing as a discovery technique in suspected monogenic dyslipidemias. Considering the confounders identified may inform the design of future exome sequencing studies. PMID:25632026

  13. Identification of Learning Disabled Bilingual Hispanic Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala, Jesus; Mims, Joan

    1983-01-01

    The study compared 10 learning disabled and 10 non-learning disabled limited English proficient Mexican American elementary grade children. Six tests were identified as predicting learning disabilities including the Prueba de Lectura y Lenguaje Escrito and the Test of Nonverbal Intelligence. (Author/DB)

  14. Violence Exposure among Children with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Patricia M.

    2009-01-01

    The focus of this paper is children with disabilities exposed to a broad range of violence types including child maltreatment, domestic violence, community violence, and war and terrorism. Because disability research must be interpreted on the basis of the definitional paradigm employed, definitions of disability status and current prevalence…

  15. Disability disclosure and workplace accommodations among youth with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Sally; Cagliostro, Elaine; Leck, Joanne; Shen, Winny; Stinson, Jennifer

    2018-03-20

    Many youths with disabilities find it challenging to disclose their medical condition and request workplace accommodations. Our objective was to explore when and how young people with disabilities disclose their condition and request workplace accommodations. We conducted 17 in-depth interviews (11 females, six males) with youth with disabilities aged 15-34 (mean age 26). We analyzed our data using an interpretive, qualitative, and thematic approach. Our results showed the timing of when youth disclosed their disability to their employer depended on disability type and severity, comfort level, type of job, and industry. Youth's strategies and reasons for disclosure included advocating for their needs, being knowledgeable about workplace rights, and accommodation solutions. Facilitators for disclosure included job preparation, self-confidence, and self-advocacy skills, and having an inclusive work environment. Challenges to disability disclosure included the fear of stigma and discrimination, lack of employer's knowledge about disability and accommodations, negative past experiences of disclosing, and not disclosing on your own terms. Our findings highlight that youth encounter several challenges and barriers to disclosing their condition and requesting workplace accommodations. The timing and process for disclosing is complex and further work is needed to help support youth with disclosing their condition. Implications for rehabilitation Clinicians, educators, and employers should emphasize the importance of mentoring and leadership programs to give youth the confidence and self-advocacy skills needed to disclose and ask for accommodations in the workplace. Clinicians should advocate for the inclusion of youth with disabilities in the workforce and educate employers on the importance of doing so. Youth with disabilities need more opportunities for employment training and particularly how to disclose their disability and request workplace accommodations.

  16. Video Game Effects--Confirmed, Suspected, and Speculative: A Review of the Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlett, Christopher P.; Anderson, Craig A.; Swing, Edward L.

    2009-01-01

    This literature review focuses on the confirmed, suspected, and speculative effects of violent and non-violent video game exposure on negative and positive outcomes. Negative outcomes include aggressive feelings, aggressive thoughts, aggressive behavior, physiological arousal, and desensitization, whereas positive outcomes include various types of…

  17. Learning Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuwirth, Sharyn

    This booklet uses hypothetical case examples to illustrate the definition, causal theories, and specific types of learning disabilities (LD). The cognitive and language performance of students with LD is compared to standard developmental milestones, and common approaches to the identification and education of children with LD are outlined.…

  18. A Risk Prediction Model for In-hospital Mortality in Patients with Suspected Myocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Duo; Zhao, Ruo-Chi; Gao, Wen-Hui; Cui, Han-Bin

    2017-04-05

    Myocarditis is an inflammatory disease of the myocardium that may lead to cardiac death in some patients. However, little is known about the predictors of in-hospital mortality in patients with suspected myocarditis. Thus, the aim of this study was to identify the independent risk factors for in-hospital mortality in patients with suspected myocarditis by establishing a risk prediction model. A retrospective study was performed to analyze the clinical medical records of 403 consecutive patients with suspected myocarditis who were admitted to Ningbo First Hospital between January 2003 and December 2013. A total of 238 males (59%) and 165 females (41%) were enrolled in this study. We divided the above patients into two subgroups (survival and nonsurvival), according to their clinical in-hospital outcomes. To maximize the effectiveness of the prediction model, we first identified the potential risk factors for in-hospital mortality among patients with suspected myocarditis, based on data pertaining to previously established risk factors and basic patient characteristics. We subsequently established a regression model for predicting in-hospital mortality using univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Finally, we identified the independent risk factors for in-hospital mortality using our risk prediction model. The following prediction model for in-hospital mortality in patients with suspected myocarditis, including creatinine clearance rate (Ccr), age, ventricular tachycardia (VT), New York Heart Association (NYHA) classification, gender and cardiac troponin T (cTnT), was established in the study: P = ea/(1 + ea) (where e is the exponential function, P is the probability of in-hospital death, and a = -7.34 + 2.99 × [Ccr model demonstrated that a Ccr prediction model for in-hospital mortality in patients with suspected myocarditis. In addition, sufficient life support during the early stage of the disease might improve the prognoses of patients with

  19. Characterization of waste streams and suspect waste from largest Los Alamos National Laboratory generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soukup, J.D.; Erpenbeck, G.J.

    1995-01-01

    A detailed waste stream characterization of 4 primary generators of low level waste at LANL was performed to aid in waste minimization efforts. Data was compiled for these four generators from 1988 to the present for analyses. Prior waste minimization efforts have focused on identifying waste stream processes and performing source materials substitutions or reductions where applicable. In this historical survey, the generators surveyed included an accelerator facility, the plutonium facility, a chemistry and metallurgy research facility, and a radiochemistry research facility. Of particular interest in waste minimization efforts was the composition of suspect low level waste in which no radioactivity is detected through initial survey. Ultimately, this waste is disposed of in the LANL low level permitted waste disposal pits (thus filling a scarce and expensive resource with sanitary waste). Detailed analyses of the waste streams from these 4 facilities, have revealed that suspect low level waste comprises approximately 50% of the low level waste by volume and 47% by weight. However, there are significant differences in suspect waste density when one considers the radioactive contamination. For the 2 facilities that deal primarily with beta emitting activation and spallation products (the radiochemistry and accelerator facilities), the suspect waste is much lower density than all low level waste coming from those facilities. For the 2 facilities that perform research on transuranics (the chemistry and metallurgy research and plutonium facilities), suspect waste is higher in density than all the low level waste from those facilities. It is theorized that the low density suspect waste is composed primarily of compactable lab trash, most of which is not contaminated but can be easily surveyed. The high density waste is theorized to be contaminated with alpha emitting radionuclides, and in this case, the suspect waste demonstrates fundamental limits in detection

  20. Lineup composition, suspect position, and the sequential lineup advantage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Curt A; Gronlund, Scott D; Clark, Steven E

    2008-06-01

    N. M. Steblay, J. Dysart, S. Fulero, and R. C. L. Lindsay (2001) argued that sequential lineups reduce the likelihood of mistaken eyewitness identification. Experiment 1 replicated the design of R. C. L. Lindsay and G. L. Wells (1985), the first study to show the sequential lineup advantage. However, the innocent suspect was chosen at a lower rate in the simultaneous lineup, and no sequential lineup advantage was found. This led the authors to hypothesize that protection from a sequential lineup might emerge only when an innocent suspect stands out from the other lineup members. In Experiment 2, participants viewed a simultaneous or sequential lineup with either the guilty suspect or 1 of 3 innocent suspects. Lineup fairness was varied to influence the degree to which a suspect stood out. A sequential lineup advantage was found only for the unfair lineups. Additional analyses of suspect position in the sequential lineups showed an increase in the diagnosticity of suspect identifications as the suspect was placed later in the sequential lineup. These results suggest that the sequential lineup advantage is dependent on lineup composition and suspect position. (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved

  1. Comparison of Body Image between Disabled Athletes, Disabled Non-Athletes and Non-Disable Non-Athletes Males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdollah Ghasemi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this research was to compare the body image between disabled athletes with disabled and non-disabled non- athletes. Materials & Methods: In this cross sectional and comparative study, fifty disabled athletes from the handicapped sports club, fifty disabled non athletes from Kahrizak disabled rest house and fifty non athlete healthy persons from governmental administrations were selected randomly by classified clustered method and their body image were compared. Data collection tools included a personal information questionnaire and a physical self description questionnaire (PSDQ which included 11 sub-scales such as power, endurance, coordination, general health, flexibility, self-esteem, athletic competence, fat, body appearance, body activity and the global physical. The statistical procedures used in this study comprised one way ANOVA and the Newman-keuls test. Results: Body image of disabled athletes in the sub-scales of power, endurance, coordination, flexibility, self-esteem, athletic competence, body activity were higher than disabled and non-disabled individuals who were not athletes (P&le0.001. In addition the sub-scales of the body fat (P=0.012, body appearance (P=0.002 and general health (P=0.001, the results showed that a higher significance for the disabled athletes, however, there wasn’t significant difference for the non-disabled athletes. Conclusion: Thus the result showed that the attitude of the disabled and non-disabled individual in due to their continuous physical activity in that the disabled athletes have got better body images as compared to the disabled and non-disabled individual who have not physical activity.

  2. Science Careers and Disabled Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagoda, Sue; Cremer, Bob

    1981-01-01

    Summarizes proceedings and student experiences at the 1980 Science Career Workshop for Physically Disabled Students at the Lawrence Hall of Science (University of California). Includes a description of the key-note speaker's topics, and other workshop activities. (DS)

  3. Theme: Serving Individuals with Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frick, Marty; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Includes "Reviewing Commitment to Individuals with Disabilities" (Frick); "Modifying Laboratory Equipment" (Silletto); "Equine Facilitated Therapy" (Hoover et al.); "Horticultural Therapy" (Rees, Iverson); "How Accessible Is Your Agriculture Program? (Delks, Sillery); "Agricultural Education for…

  4. About Learning Disabilities and NF

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... complica- tions of NF1 include: • Learning disabilities: Although intelligence is usually within the normal range, 50-60% ... and the ability to access meaning from the printed word. 5 Recent findings suggest that a high ...

  5. Association between QRS duration on prehospital ECG and mortality in patients with suspected STEMI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rikke; Frydland, Martin; Møller-Helgestad, Ole Kristian

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: QRS duration has previously shown association with mortality in patients with acute myocardial infarction treated with thrombolytics, less is known in patients with suspected ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) when assessing QRS duration on prehospital ECG. Thus......, the objective was to investigate the prognostic effect of QRS duration on prehospital ECG and presence of classic left and right bundle branch block (LBBB/RBBB) for all-cause mortality in patients with suspected STEMI. METHOD: In total 2105 consecutive patients (mean age 64±13years, 72% men) with suspected...... STEMI were prospectively included. QRS duration was registered from automated QRS measurement on prehospital ECG and patients were divided according to quartiles of QRS duration (111ms). Primary endpoint was all-cause 30-day mortality. Predictors of all-cause mortality were...

  6. The clinical course of patients with suspected pulmonary embolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beek, E. J.; Kuijer, P. M.; Büller, H. R.; Brandjes, D. P.; Bossuyt, P. M.; ten Cate, J. W.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The outcome of patients with suspected pulmonary embolism is known to a limited extent only. OBJECTIVE: To address this limited knowledge in a cohort in whom pulmonary embolism was proved or ruled out. METHODS: Consecutive patients with clinically suspected pulmonary embolism underwent

  7. 48 CFR 403.303 - Reporting suspected antitrust violations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Antitrust Violations 403.303 Reporting suspected antitrust violations. Contracting officers shall report the circumstances of suspected violations of antitrust laws to the Office of Inspector General in accordance with... antitrust violations. 403.303 Section 403.303 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF...

  8. 48 CFR 1403.303 - Reporting suspected antitrust violations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Antitrust Violations 1403.303 Reporting suspected antitrust violations. (a) Reports on suspected violations of antitrust laws as required by FAR 3.303 shall be prepared by the CO, reviewed by the SOL, and... antitrust violations. 1403.303 Section 1403.303 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  9. Detection of Rabies antigen in brains of suspected Rabid dogs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To detect the presence of rabies antigen in brains of suspected rabid dogs. Materials and Methods: Ninety six (96) brain specimens from suspected rabid dogs were examined for the presence of rabies antigen using Seller's staining technique and enzyme immunoassay. Results: The two techniques were both ...

  10. Selecting foils for identification lineups: matching suspects or descriptions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunnicliff, J L; Clark, S E

    2000-04-01

    Two experiments directly compare two methods of selecting foils for identification lineups. The suspect-matched method selects foils based on their match to the suspect, whereas the description-matched method selects foils based on their match to the witness's description of the perpetrator. Theoretical analyses and previous results predict an advantage for description-matched lineups both in terms of correctly identifying the perpetrator and minimizing false identification of innocent suspects. The advantage for description-matched lineups should be particularly pronounced if the foils selected in suspect-matched lineups are too similar to the suspect. In Experiment 1, the lineups were created by trained police officers, and in Experiment 2, the lineups were constructed by undergraduate college students. The results of both experiments showed higher suspect-to-foil similarity for suspect-matched lineups than for description-matched lineups. However, neither experiment showed a difference in correct or false identification rates. Both experiments did, however, show that there may be an advantage for suspect-matched lineups in terms of no-pick and rejection responses. From these results, the endorsement of one method over the other seems premature.

  11. Arthroscintigraphy in suspected rotator cuff rupture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gratz, S.; Behr, T.; Becker, W.; Koester, G.; Vosshenrich, R.; Grabbe, E.

    1998-01-01

    Aim: In order to evaluate the diagnostic efficiency of arthroscintigraphy in suspected rotator cuff ruptures this new imaging procedure was performed 20 times in 17 patients with clinical signs of a rotator cuff lesion. The scintigraphic results were compared with sonography (n=20), contrast arthrography (n=20) and arthroscopy (n=10) of the shoulder joint. Methods: After performing a standard bone scintigraphy with intravenous application of 300 MBq 99m-Tc-methylene diphosphonate (MDP) for landmarking of the shoulder region arthroscintigraphy was performed after an intraarticular injection of 99m-Tc microcolloid (ALBU-RES 400 μCi/5 ml). The application was performed either in direct combination with contrast arthrography (n=10) or ultrasound conducted mixed with a local anesthetic (n=10). Findings at arthroscopical surgery (n=10) were used as the gold standard. Results: In case of complete rotator cuff rupture (n=5), arthroscintigraphy and radiographic arthrography were identical in 5/5. In one patient with advanced degenerative alterations of the shoulder joint radiographic arthrography incorrectly showed a complete rupture which was not seen by arthroscintigraphy and endoscopy. In 3 patients with incomplete rupture, 2/3 results were consistant. A difference was seen in one patient with a rotator cuff, that has been already revised in the past and that suffered of capsulitis and calcification. Conclusion: Arthroscinitgraphy is a sensitive technique for detection of rotator cuff ruptures. Because of the lower viscosity of the active compound, small ruptures can be easily detected, offering additional value over radiographic arthrography and ultrasound, especially for evaluation of incomplete cuff ruptures. (orig.) [de

  12. Seasonal variation among tuberculosis suspects in four countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mabaera, Biggie; Naranbat, Nymadawa; Katamba, Achilles

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the study was to analyze monthly trends across a calendar year in tuberculosis suspects and sputum smear-positive cases based on nationally representative samples of tuberculosis laboratory registers from Moldova, Mongolia, Uganda and Zimbabwe. Out of the 47 140 suspects registered...... in the tuberculosis laboratory registers, 13.4% (6312) were cases. The proportion varied from country to country, Moldova having the lowest (9%) and Uganda the highest (21%). From the monthly proportion of suspects and cases among total suspects and cases, seasonal variations were most marked in Mongolia which, among...... attendance to diagnostic laboratory services, evidenced by the contrasting findings of Mongolia (extreme continental northern climate) compared to Uganda (equatorial climate). A combination of external and possibly endogenous factors seems to determine whether tuberculosis suspects and cases present...

  13. Reliability of Examination Findings in Suspected Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florin, Todd A; Ambroggio, Lilliam; Brokamp, Cole; Rattan, Mantosh S; Crotty, Eric J; Kachelmeyer, Andrea; Ruddy, Richard M; Shah, Samir S

    2017-09-01

    The authors of national guidelines emphasize the use of history and examination findings to diagnose community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in outpatient children. Little is known about the interrater reliability of the physical examination in children with suspected CAP. This was a prospective cohort study of children with suspected CAP presenting to a pediatric emergency department from July 2013 to May 2016. Children aged 3 months to 18 years with lower respiratory signs or symptoms who received a chest radiograph were included. We excluded children hospitalized ≤14 days before the study visit and those with a chronic medical condition or aspiration. Two clinicians performed independent examinations and completed identical forms reporting examination findings. Interrater reliability for each finding was reported by using Fleiss' kappa (κ) for categorical variables and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for continuous variables. No examination finding had substantial agreement (κ/ICC > 0.8). Two findings (retractions, wheezing) had moderate to substantial agreement (κ/ICC = 0.6-0.8). Nine findings (abdominal pain, pleuritic pain, nasal flaring, skin color, overall impression, cool extremities, tachypnea, respiratory rate, and crackles/rales) had fair to moderate agreement (κ/ICC = 0.4-0.6). Eight findings (capillary refill time, cough, rhonchi, head bobbing, behavior, grunting, general appearance, and decreased breath sounds) had poor to fair reliability (κ/ICC = 0-0.4). Only 3 examination findings had acceptable agreement, with the lower 95% confidence limit >0.4: wheezing, retractions, and respiratory rate. In this study, we found fair to moderate reliability of many findings used to diagnose CAP. Only 3 findings had acceptable levels of reliability. These findings must be considered in the clinical management and research of pediatric CAP. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  14. Cost-effectiveness of routine imaging of suspected appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, N; Marsden, M; Bottomley, S; Nagarajah, N; Scutt, F; Toh, S

    2018-01-01

    Introduction The misdiagnosis of appendicitis and consequent removal of a normal appendix occurs in one in five patients in the UK. On the contrary, in healthcare systems with routine cross-sectional imaging of suspected appendicitis, the negative appendicectomy rate is around 5%. If we could reduce the rate in the UK to similar numbers, would this be cost effective? This study aimed to calculate the financial impact of negative appendicectomy at the Queen Alexandra Hospital and to explore whether a policy of routine imaging of such patients could reduce hospital costs. Materials and methods We performed a retrospective analysis of all appendicectomies over a 1-year period at our institution. Data were extracted on outcomes including appendix histology, operative time and length of stay to calculate the negative appendicectomy rate and to analyse costs. Results A total of 531 patients over 5 years of age had an appendicectomy. The negative appendicectomy rate was 22% (115/531). The additional financial costs of negative appendicectomy to the hospital during this period were £270,861. Universal imaging of all patients with right iliac fossa pain that could result in a 5% negative appendicectomy rate would cost between £67,200 and £165,600 per year but could save £33,896 (magnetic resonance imaging), £105,896 (computed tomography) or £132,296 (ultrasound) depending on imaging modality used. Conclusions Negative appendicectomy is still too frequent and results in additional financial burden to the health service. Routine imaging of patients with suspected appendicitis would not only reduce the negative appendicectomy rate but could lead to cost savings and a better service for our patients.

  15. 32 CFR 644.530 - Conditions in conveying land suspected of contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... contamination. 644.530 Section 644.530 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... Contamination from Proposed Excess Land and Improvements § 644.530 Conditions in conveying land suspected of contamination. The following conditions, appropriately modified to conform to local law, will be included in...

  16. Neurohormonal activation and diagnostic value of cardiac peptides in patients with suspected mild heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Kirsten V.; Bie, Peter; Møller, Jacob E.

    2006-01-01

    accuracy of cardiac peptides to detect any left ventricular dysfunction (LVD) in patients referred from primary care with suspected HF before institution of medical therapy. METHODS: Of 166 referred patients 150 were consecutively included (14 were excluded and two refused consent). Echocardiography...

  17. An Analysis Of The UK Disability Discrimination Act And The Inadequacy Of Its Definitions Of Disability And Disabled Person

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatimah Alzughaibi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract My research will focus on some of the more pertinent changes that need to take place on a societal level in order to better serve disabled people and allow them to participate in all facets of community life. I will argue that three of the most significant changes that must take place include educating society on disabilities and disabled persons creating and enforcing better laws that truly help disabled persons and expanding the definitions of disability and disabled person to include a broader spectrum of ailments inflictions and handicaps. The changes which I support will be presented in a research-driven paper. I will highlight the current UK disability laws in place and point out some of their shortcomings. Then I will explore the worldview of society as a whole as it pertains to disabled peoples and suggest changes that need to take place and how educators can help facilitate these changes. Finally I will explain the shortcomings of the most common definitions used for disability and disabled persons and offer alternatives that incorporate a broader range of people and ailments. My audience will be any citizen whose political jurisdiction is under the UK disability mandate although anyone from any society would benefit from reading my paper due to the universality of this topic.

  18. The Global Context of Disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine O'Rourke - Lang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This issue of Global Education Review examines the global context of disability and how in different geographic locations, socioeconomic factors, domestic policy, and disability perspectives impact access to special education services, and the types of resources and interventions available to individuals with diverse learning needs. Practices in countries including India, Singapore, South Korea, Hong Kong, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Liberia, and Kenya were studied and implications for meeting the special education needs for children and adults with disabilities and their families are discussed

  19. Optimisation of the MR protocol in pregnant women with suspected acute appendicitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Ilah; Chung, Yong Eun; An, Chansik; Kim, Honsoul; Lim, Joon Seok; Kim, Myeong-Jin [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hye Sun [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Research Affairs, Biostatistics Collaboration Unit, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2018-02-15

    To investigate the optimal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging protocol in pregnant women suspected of having acute appendicitis. One hundred and forty-six pregnant women with suspected appendicitis were included. MR images were reviewed by two radiologists in three separate sessions. In session 1, only axial single-shot turbo spin echo (SSH-TSE) T2-weighted images (WI) were included with other routine sequences. In sessions 2 and 3, coronal and sagittal T2WI were sequentially added. The visibility of the appendix and diagnostic confidence of appendicitis were evaluated in each session using a 5-point grading scale. If diseases other than appendicitis were suspected, specific diagnosis with a 5-point confidence scale was recorded. Diagnostic performance for appendicitis and other diseases were evaluated. Twenty-five patients (17.1%) were diagnosed with appendicitis. Among the patients with normal appendix, 28 were diagnosed with other disease. Diagnostic performance including sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and area under the curve values for diagnosing appendicitis and other diseases showed no significant difference among sets for both reviewers (p>0.05). Diagnostic performance of MR in pregnant patients with suspected appendicitis can be preserved with omission of sagittal or both coronal and sagittal SSH-T2WI. (orig.)

  20. Optimisation of the MR protocol in pregnant women with suspected acute appendicitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Ilah; Chung, Yong Eun; An, Chansik; Kim, Honsoul; Lim, Joon Seok; Kim, Myeong-Jin; Lee, Hye Sun

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the optimal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging protocol in pregnant women suspected of having acute appendicitis. One hundred and forty-six pregnant women with suspected appendicitis were included. MR images were reviewed by two radiologists in three separate sessions. In session 1, only axial single-shot turbo spin echo (SSH-TSE) T2-weighted images (WI) were included with other routine sequences. In sessions 2 and 3, coronal and sagittal T2WI were sequentially added. The visibility of the appendix and diagnostic confidence of appendicitis were evaluated in each session using a 5-point grading scale. If diseases other than appendicitis were suspected, specific diagnosis with a 5-point confidence scale was recorded. Diagnostic performance for appendicitis and other diseases were evaluated. Twenty-five patients (17.1%) were diagnosed with appendicitis. Among the patients with normal appendix, 28 were diagnosed with other disease. Diagnostic performance including sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and area under the curve values for diagnosing appendicitis and other diseases showed no significant difference among sets for both reviewers (p>0.05). Diagnostic performance of MR in pregnant patients with suspected appendicitis can be preserved with omission of sagittal or both coronal and sagittal SSH-T2WI. (orig.)

  1. Disability history: suggested readings--an annotated bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Susan

    2005-01-01

    Scholars in Disability history and Disability studies have produced a substantive corpus of works in the last two decades. The range of topics represent the diverse nature of this field. This essay is intended as an introductory historiography, and thus presents only a narrow sampling of books. It includes general works in both Disability history and Disability studies, focusing primarily on three topics in Disability history: representation, science/technology/eugenics, and memoirs.

  2. Supporting Children with Learning Disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    John k. McNamara

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a prevention model for supporting children with learning disabilities. The model holds that children can be identified as at-risk for learning disabilities by identifying and supporting potential academic failure early in their elementary years. A prevention model includes two elements, identification and instruction. Identification entails recognizing those children at-risk for poor achievement in the early primary grades. The second component of the model is to...

  3. GIS Application Management for Disabled People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tongkaw, Sasalak

    2017-08-01

    This research aimed to develop and design Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for facilitating disabled people by presenting some useful disabled information on the Google Map. The map could provide information about disabled types of people such as blind, deaf and physical movement. This research employed the Multiview 2 theory and method to plan and find out the problems in real world situation. This research used many designing data structure methods such as Data Flow Diagram, and ER-Diagram. The research focused into two parts: server site and client site which included the interface for Web-based application. The clear information of disable people on the map was useful for facilitating disabled people to find some useful information. In addition, it provided specialized data for company and government officers for managing and planning local facilities for disabled people in the cities. The disable could access the system through the Internet access at any time by using mobile or portable devices.

  4. Including the Disabled : The Chiminike Interactive Learning Center in Honduras

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Valéria Pena; Barbara Brakarz

    2003-01-01

    In the aftermath of Hurricane Mitch in 1998, the Honduras Interactive Environmental Learning and Science Promotion Project "Profuturo" was launched as a multi-sectoral effort designed to encourage and expand scientific, environmental, and cultural knowledge and management in the context of Honduras' sustainable development needs and ethnic diversity. Profuturo benefits Hondurans by providi...

  5. When Supporting Children with Disabilities is Both Including and Excluding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engsig, Thomas Thyrring

    A recent political decree in Denmark outlined an ambitious goal regarding the inclusion of students with special needs in the general education. 97% of the country’s students are to receive their education in the public school’s general education by 2020. Research indicates that the use of in......-class support is a central pedagogical approach towards a more inclusive school, and that in-class supportive practices can entail positive implications for students with special educational needs. However, research also indicates that the application of in-class support may lead to more negative consequences...... for these students (Alborz, 2009; Blatchford et al., 2009; Blatchford, Bassett, Brown, & Webster, 2009; Dyssegaard & Larsen, 2013). The traditional understandings and definitions of inclusive education in a Danish educational context seem to be inadequate due to the fact, that the student’s subjective experience...

  6. Modifying Anti-Bullying Programs to Include Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raskauskas, Juliana; Modell, Scott

    2011-01-01

    "Bullying" is defined as any aggressive behavior with the intent to harm that involves a real or perceived power imbalance. Bullying is identified as one of the most predominant problems faced by children in the United States education system, as well as one of the most significant health risks to children. Exactly how prevalent this issue is…

  7. Small-Bowel Capsule Endoscopy in Patients with Suspected Crohn's Disease—Diagnostic Value and Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Pedro; Almeida, Nuno; Lopes, Sandra; Duque, Gabriela; Freire, Paulo; Lérias, Clotilde; Gouveia, Hermano; Sofia, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Background. The aim of this work was to assess the value of capsule enteroscopy in the diagnosis of patients with suspected Crohn's Disease (CD). Methods. This was a retrospective study in a single tertiary care centre involving patients undergoing capsule enteroscopy for suspected CD. Patients taking nonsteroidal anti inflammatory drugs during the thirty preceding days or with a follow-up period of less than six months were excluded. Results. Seventy eight patients were included. The endoscopic findings included mucosal breaks in 50%, ulcerated stenosis in 5%, and villous atrophy in 4%. The diagnosis of CD was established in 31 patients. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value of the endoscopic findings were 93%, 80%, 77%, and 94%, respectively. Capsule retention occurred in four patients (5%). The presence of ulcerated stenosis was significantly more frequent in patients with positive inflammatory markers. The diagnostic yield of capsule enteroscopy in patients with negative ileoscopy was 56%, with a diagnostic acuity of 93%. Conclusions. Small bowel capsule endoscopy is a safe and valid technique for assessing patients with suspected CD. Capsule retention is more frequent in patients with positive inflammatory markers. Patients with negative ileoscopy and suspected CD should be submitted to capsule enteroscopy. PMID:20811612

  8. Small-Bowel Capsule Endoscopy in Patients with Suspected Crohn's Disease—Diagnostic Value and Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Figueiredo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of this work was to assess the value of capsule enteroscopy in the diagnosis of patients with suspected Crohn's Disease (CD. Methods. This was a retrospective study in a single tertiary care centre involving patients undergoing capsule enteroscopy for suspected CD. Patients taking nonsteroidal anti inflammatory drugs during the thirty preceding days or with a follow-up period of less than six months were excluded. Results. Seventy eight patients were included. The endoscopic findings included mucosal breaks in 50%, ulcerated stenosis in 5%, and villous atrophy in 4%. The diagnosis of CD was established in 31 patients. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value of the endoscopic findings were 93%, 80%, 77%, and 94%, respectively. Capsule retention occurred in four patients (5%. The presence of ulcerated stenosis was significantly more frequent in patients with positive inflammatory markers. The diagnostic yield of capsule enteroscopy in patients with negative ileoscopy was 56%, with a diagnostic acuity of 93%. Conclusions. Small bowel capsule endoscopy is a safe and valid technique for assessing patients with suspected CD. Capsule retention is more frequent in patients with positive inflammatory markers. Patients with negative ileoscopy and suspected CD should be submitted to capsule enteroscopy.

  9. Small-bowel capsule endoscopy in patients with suspected Crohn's disease-diagnostic value and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Pedro; Almeida, Nuno; Lopes, Sandra; Duque, Gabriela; Freire, Paulo; Lérias, Clotilde; Gouveia, Hermano; Sofia, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the value of capsule enteroscopy in the diagnosis of patients with suspected Crohn's Disease (CD). Methods. This was a retrospective study in a single tertiary care centre involving patients undergoing capsule enteroscopy for suspected CD. Patients taking nonsteroidal anti inflammatory drugs during the thirty preceding days or with a follow-up period of less than six months were excluded. Results. Seventy eight patients were included. The endoscopic findings included mucosal breaks in 50%, ulcerated stenosis in 5%, and villous atrophy in 4%. The diagnosis of CD was established in 31 patients. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value of the endoscopic findings were 93%, 80%, 77%, and 94%, respectively. Capsule retention occurred in four patients (5%). The presence of ulcerated stenosis was significantly more frequent in patients with positive inflammatory markers. The diagnostic yield of capsule enteroscopy in patients with negative ileoscopy was 56%, with a diagnostic acuity of 93%. Small bowel capsule endoscopy is a safe and valid technique for assessing patients with suspected CD. Capsule retention is more frequent in patients with positive inflammatory markers. Patients with negative ileoscopy and suspected CD should be submitted to capsule enteroscopy.

  10. Analysis of suspected wildlife crimes submitted for forensic examinations in Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millins, Caroline; Howie, Fiona; Everitt, Charles; Shand, Michael; Lamm, Catherine

    2014-09-01

    This study describes the occurrence of suspected wildlife crimes submitted for forensic examination in Scotland in 2010. The study aims were to determine which types of crimes were committed, which species were targeted, and the outcome of investigations, in order to assess the contribution of forensic examinations in the prosecution of wildlife crimes. Information on suspected wildlife crimes submitted between January 1 and December 31, 2010 to the SAC Consulting: Veterinary Services Disease Surveillance Centers, Science and Advice for Scottish Agriculture, and to the University of Glasgow, was used. The location of suspected crimes, the species targeted, cause of death, and types of the 188 submitted wildlife crimes were summarized. More information regarding cases involving birds were submitted than cases involving mammals, and included 114 raptors, 14 waterfowl, and 22 "other bird species." Mammal cases (n = 38) included 12 badgers, 8 foxes, 7 deer, 4 hares, and 7 "other mammals." The cause of death was determined in 124 suspected crimes; malicious or accidental trauma was the most likely cause of death in 72, and 33 were poisoned. Forensic evidence supporting criminal activity was found in 53 cases, and poisoning was the most frequent crime recorded. At least five individuals were successfully prosecuted, representing 2.7 % of submissions. It was challenging to track cases from submission through to prosecution and laboratories conducting forensic investigations were often not informed of the outcome of prosecutions or court decisions.

  11. Shakespeare on old age and disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covey, H

    2000-01-01

    The plays of William Shakespeare were reviewed for references to disabilities, aging and disability, and older characters with disabilities. Shakespeare's references draw from traditional cultural notions about older people with disabilities. These traditional notions include people with physical disabilities being evil, the entertainment value of disabilty, and those who were mentally ill being wild and animal-like. He viewed the aging process as disabling and old age as a time when individuals lost some abilities to function, particularly when it came to mental capacity and physical mobility. His writings show that he used disability as a literary tool to add dimension to characters and set them apart. Contemporary literature continues to share some of Shakespeare's view on aging and disability but also departs from them in important ways. For example, contemporary treatment of disabilities and aging places more emphasis on the human side of the affects of aging and disabilities. Disabilities and aging are not cast in the same negative terms as Shakespeare used.

  12. Using Internet Artifacts to Profile a Child Pornography Suspect

    OpenAIRE

    Marcus K. Rogers; Kathryn C. Seigfried-Spellar

    2014-01-01

    Digital evidence plays a crucial role in child pornography investigations. However, in the following case study, the authors argue that the behavioral analysis or “profiling” of digital evidence can also play a vital role in child pornography investigations. The following case study assessed the Internet Browsing History (Internet Explorer Bookmarks, Mozilla Bookmarks, and Mozilla History) from a suspected child pornography user’s computer. The suspect in this case claimed to be conducting an...

  13. Talking heads : interviewing suspects from a cultural perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Beune, K.

    2009-01-01

    Although the literature on the interviewing of suspects has increased over the past decade, research on the use and effectiveness of police strategies and their boundary conditions is very rare. The present dissertation aims to fill this void by identifying behaviors that appeal to and persuade suspects to talk (i.e., influencing behavior), focusing on the effects of such behaviors and their dependency on cultural context (low-context vs. high-context). In doing so, we depart from a theoretic...

  14. Interviewing strategically to elicit admissions from guilty suspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekin, Serra; Granhag, Pär Anders; Strömwall, Leif; Giolla, Erik Mac; Vrij, Aldert; Hartwig, Maria

    2015-06-01

    In this article we introduce a novel interviewing tactic to elicit admissions from guilty suspects. By influencing the suspects' perception of the amount of evidence the interviewer holds against them, we aimed to shift the suspects' counterinterrogation strategies from less to more forthcoming. The proposed tactic (SUE-Confrontation) is a development of the Strategic Use of Evidence (SUE) framework and aims to affect the suspects' perception by confronting them with statement-evidence inconsistencies. Participants (N = 90) were asked to perform several mock criminal tasks before being interviewed using 1 of 3 interview techniques: (a) SUE-Confrontation, (b) Early Disclosure of Evidence, or (c) No Disclosure of Evidence. As predicted, the SUE-Confrontation interview generated more statement-evidence inconsistencies from suspects than the Early Disclosure interview. Importantly, suspects in the SUE-Confrontation condition (vs. Early and No disclosure conditions) admitted more self-incriminating information and also perceived the interviewer to have had more information about the critical phase of the crime (the phase where the interviewer lacked evidence). The findings show the adaptability of the SUE-technique and how it may be used as a tool for eliciting admissions. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. RETRIEVING SUSPECT TRANSURANIC WASTE FROM THE HANFORD BURIAL GROUNDS PROGRESS PLANS AND CHALLENGES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FRENCH, M.S.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the scope and status of the program for retrieval of suspect transuranic (TRU) waste stored in the Hanford Site low-level burial grounds. Beginning in 1970 and continuing until the late 1980's, waste suspected of containing significant quantities of transuranic isotopes was placed in ''retrievable'' storage in designated modules in the Hanford burial grounds, with the intent that the waste would be retrieved when a national repository for disposal of such waste became operational. Approximately 15,000 cubic meters of waste, suspected of being TRU, was placed in storage modules in four burial grounds. With the availability of the national repository (the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant), retrieval of the suspect TRU waste is now underway. Retrieval efforts, to date, have been conducted in storage modules that contain waste, which is in general, contact-handled, relatively new (1980's and later), is stacked in neat, engineered configurations, and has a relatively good record of waste characteristics. Even with these optimum conditions, retrieval personnel have had to deal with a large number of structurally degraded containers, radioactive contamination issues, and industrial hazards (including organic vapors). Future retrieval efforts in older, less engineered modules are expected to present additional hazards and difficult challenges

  16. Unexpected MRI findings in clinically suspected Legg-Calve-Perthes disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobert, Philip F.; Dillman, Jonathan R.; Strouse, Peter J.; Hernandez, Ramiro J. [University of Michigan Health System, Department of Radiology, Section of Pediatric Radiology, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital/F3503, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2011-03-15

    In the setting of clinically suspected Legg-Calve-Perthes (LCP) disease and negative/equivocal radiographs, contrast-enhanced MRI can be performed to confirm the diagnosis. To determine the frequency of unexpected causes of hip pain as identified by MRI in children with clinically suspected LCP disease and negative/equivocal radiographs. All pediatric contrast-enhanced MRI examinations of the pelvis and hips performed between January 2000 and February 2009 to evaluate for possible LCP disease in the setting of negative/equivocal radiographs were identified. MRI examinations performed to evaluate for secondary avascular necrosis were excluded. Imaging reports were retrospectively reviewed for unexpected clinically important causes of hip pain. Thirty-six pediatric patients underwent contrast-enhanced MRI examinations for clinically suspected LCP disease in the setting of negative/equivocal radiographs. Twenty-two (61%) imaging studies were normal, while four (11%) imaging studies demonstrated findings consistent with LCP disease. Ten (28%) imaging studies revealed unexpected clinically important causes of hip pain, including nonspecific unilateral joint effusion and synovitis (n = 7, juvenile chronic arthritis was eventually diagnosed in 3 patients), sacral fracture (n = 1), apophyseal injury (n = 1), and femoral head subluxation (n = 1). MRI frequently reveals unexpected clinically important causes of hip pain in children with suspected LCP disease and negative/equivocal radiographs. (orig.)

  17. SOCIAL JUSTICE FOR DISABLED PEOPLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazire Diker

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to question the living conditions of disabled people in the 21st century from  the framework of social justice. The concept of “social justice” has a long history, influenced  by the works of numerous writers including Rawls (1971, Miller (1999, Reeves (2005, Fainstein (2009, Marcuse (2009 and Harvey (1992, 2009 and by the recent debates on  inequality, diversity, segregation, exclusion, and discrimination. The debates on segregation, exclusion and discrimination are generally focused on inequalities in terms of economic,  ethnic and gender dimensions; however, in these debates, there is very little reference to unequal opportunities of disabled people. On the other hand, the diversity issue is generally discussed with respect to ethnic and cultural elements, again with very little concern for the  rights of disabled people. In many developing countries, including Turkey, a legal framework  for addressing disability issues has started to be put in place. Awareness among governments and society of the needs and rights of people with disabilities is growing. In the  last decade in Turkey, the difficulties faced by disabled people have started to be taken into  consideration seriously. Before that, the only information about the disabled population could  be obtained from General Population Census in Turkey. In 2002 “Turkey Disability Survey” was carried out collectively by the State Institute of Statistics and the Presidency of  Administration on Disabled People. In this survey, it has been targeted to estimate the number of disabled people and comprehend their socio-economic characteristics, their  problems in social life, expectations, types and causes of disability, regional differences and also the proportion of population having chronic illnesses. After this survey, many projects  have started to be realized in order to propose strategies for eliminating discrimination in  Turkey. In this paper, we will

  18. Cost analysis of inappropriate treatments for suspected dermatomycoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuela Fiammenghi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Superficial mycoses are estimated to affect more than 20-25% of the world’s population with a consistent increase over the years. Most patients referred to our clinic for suspected dermatomycoses have already been treated with pharmacotherapy, without a previous mycological examination and many show changes in the clinical manifestations. Indeed, some medications, such as steroids, antiviral, antibiotics and antihistamines are not able to erase a fungal infection, but also they can cause atypical clinical manifestations. The consequences of inappropriate treatment include delayed diagnosis, prolonged healing time, and additional costs. The aims of this study were (1 to evaluate the incidence of increased costs attributable to inappropriate therapy sustained by the National Health Service and patients and (2 to highlight the importance of mycological evaluation before starting treatment, in order to improve diagnostic accuracy. An observational retrospective and prospective study was performed from September 2013 to February 2014, in 765 patients referred to our center (University Hospital “ Federico II” in Naples, Italy, for suspected mycological infection. The following treatments (alone or in combination were defined as inappropriate: (1 cortisone in a patient with at least one positive site; (2 antifungals in (a patients with all negative sites or (b ineffective antifungal treatment (in terms of drug chosen, dose or duration in those with all positive sites; or (3 antibiotics; (4 antivirals or (5 antihistamines, in patients with ≥ 1 positive site. Five hundred and fifty patients were using medications before the assessment visit. The total amount of avoidable costs related to inappropriate previous treatments was € 121,417, representing 74% of the total treatment costs. 253/550 patients received drugs also after the visit. For these patients, the cost of treatment prescribed after mycological testing was € 42,952, with a decrease

  19. Amnioinfusion for potential or suspected umbilical cord compression in labour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeyr, G Justus; Lawrie, Theresa A

    2012-01-18

    Amnioinfusion aims to prevent or relieve umbilical cord compression during labour by infusing a solution into the uterine cavity. To assess the effects of amnioinfusion for potential or suspected umbilical cord compression on maternal and perinatal outcome . We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (31 October 2011). Randomised trials of amnioinfusion compared with no amnioinfusion in women with babies at risk of umbilical cord compression in labour. The original review had one author only (Justus Hofmeyr (GJH)). For this update, two authors (GJH and T Lawrie) assessed 13 additional trial reports for eligibility and quality. We extracted data and checked for accuracy. We have included 19 studies, with all but two studies having fewer than 200 participants. Transcervical amnioinfusion for potential or suspected umbilical cord compression was associated with the following reductions: caesarean section overall (13 trials, 1493 participants; average risk ratio (RR) 0.62, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.46 to 0.83); fetal heart rate (FHR) decelerations (seven trials, 1006 participants; average RR 0.53, 95% CI 0.38 to 0.74); Apgar score less than seven at five minutes (12 trials, 1804 participants; average RR 0.47, 95% CI 0.30 to 0.72); meconium below the vocal cords (three trials, 674 participants, RR 0.53, 95% CI 0.31 to 0.92); postpartum endometritis (six trials, 767 participants; RR 0.45, 95% CI 0.25 to 0.81) and maternal hospital stay greater than three days (four trials, 1051 participants; average RR 0.45, 95% CI 0.25 to 0.78). Transabdominal amnioinfusion showed similar trends, though numbers studied were small.Mean cord umbilical artery pH was higher in the amnioinfusion group (seven trials, 855 participants; average mean difference 0.03, 95% CI 0.00 to 0.06) and there was a trend toward fewer neonates with a low cord arterial pH (less than 7.2 or as defined by trial authors) in the amnioinfusion group (eight trials, 972

  20. Three suspected cases of sugammadex-induced anaphylactic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takazawa, Tomonori; Tomita, Yukinari; Yoshida, Nagahide; Tomioka, Akihiro; Horiuchi, Tatsuo; Nagata, Chie; Orihara, Masaki; Yamada, Makiko Hardy; Saito, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    Sugammadex has a unique mechanism of action and is widely used because of its safety and efficacy. A few recent reports have described allergic reactions to clinical doses of sugammadex. We hereby describe another series of cases of possible anaphylaxis to sugammadex. We present three suspected cases of sugammadex-induced anaphylactic shock, including a 13-year-old boy who underwent laparoscopic appendectomy, a 75-year-old woman who underwent left knee arthroplasty, and a 34-year-old man who underwent left pansinectomy for sinobronchitis. All three patients received general anesthesia with rocuronium and their tracheas were intubated. Shortly after injection of sugammadex for reversal of rocuronium, all of them experienced a decrease in blood pressure along with mucocutaneous erythema. In the most severe case, reintubation after extubation was required due to difficulty in manual ventilation. All patients recovered with anti-allergic therapy. On later investigation, all three patients had a positive skin reaction to sugammadex. Our results suggest that physicians using sugammadex should be aware of the possibility of sugammadex-induced anaphylaxis.

  1. Control of Suspect/Counterfeit and Defective Items

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheriff, Marnelle L.

    2013-09-03

    This procedure implements portions of the requirements of MSC-MP-599, Quality Assurance Program Description. It establishes the Mission Support Alliance (MSA) practices for minimizing the introduction of and identifying, documenting, dispositioning, reporting, controlling, and disposing of suspect/counterfeit and defective items (S/CIs). employees whose work scope relates to Safety Systems (i.e., Safety Class [SC] or Safety Significant [SS] items), non-safety systems and other applications (i.e., General Service [GS]) where engineering has determined that their use could result in a potential safety hazard. MSA implements an effective Quality Assurance (QA) Program providing a comprehensive network of controls and verification providing defense-in-depth by preventing the introduction of S/CIs through the design, procurement, construction, operation, maintenance, and modification of processes. This procedure focuses on those safety systems, and other systems, including critical load paths of lifting equipment, where the introduction of S/CIs would have the greatest potential for creating unsafe conditions.

  2. Respiratory viral infections in infants with clinically suspected pertussis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferronato, Angela E; Gilio, Alfredo E; Vieira, Sandra E

    2013-01-01

    to evaluate the frequency of respiratory viral infections in hospitalized infants with clinical suspicion of pertussis, and to analyze their characteristics at hospital admission and clinical outcomes. a historical cohort study was performed in a reference service for pertussis, in which the research of respiratory viruses was also a routine for infants hospitalized with respiratory problems. All infants reported as suspected cases of pertussis were included. Tests for Bordetella pertussis (BP) (polymerase chain reaction/culture) and for respiratory viruses (RVs) (immunofluorescence) were performed. Patients who received macrolides before hospitalization were excluded. Clinical data were obtained from medical records. Among the 67 patients studied, BP tests were positive in 44%, and 26% were positive for RV. There was no etiological identification in 35%, and RV combined with BP was identified in 5%. All patients had similar demographic characteristics. Cough followed by inspiratory stridor or cyanosis was a strong predictor of pertussis, as well as prominent leukocytosis and lymphocytosis. Rhinorrhea and dyspnea were more frequent in viral infections. Macrolides were discontinued in 40% of patients who tested positive for RV and negative for BP. the results suggest that viral infection can be present in hospitalized infants with clinical suspicion of pertussis, and etiological tests may enable a reduction in the use of macrolides in some cases. However, the etiological diagnosis of respiratory virus infection, by itself, does not exclude the possibility of infection with BP. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  3. Understanding suicide and disability through three major disabling conditions: Intellectual disability, spinal cord injury, and multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannini, Margaret J; Bergmark, Brian; Kreshover, Samantha; Elias, Eileen; Plummer, Caitlin; O'Keefe, Eileen

    2010-04-01

    Disability is not a category of disease but rather relates to the physical, sensory, cognitive, and/or mental disorders that substantially limit one or more major life activities. These functional limitations have been found to be predictive of suicide, with psychiatric comorbidities increasing the risk for suicide. Enormous gaps exist in the understanding of the relationship between disability and suicide. We reviewed the current literature addressing the prevalence of and risk factors for suicide among persons with three major disabling conditions and identify priorities for future research. We performed a literature review investigating the relationship between three major disabilities (intellectual disability, spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis) and suicide. To ensure thorough evaluation of the available literature, we searched PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and Google Scholar with terms including "suicide," "disability," "intellectual disability," "spinal cord injury," "multiple sclerosis," and permutations thereof. By this method we evaluated 110 articles and included 21 in the review. Suicide rates are significantly higher among persons with multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury than in the general population. A more nuanced picture of suicide rates and risk factors exists for the intellectual disability population, in which it appears that rates of suicide risk factors are higher than among the general population while suicide rates may be lower. The highest rates of suicide are reported among study populations of persons with multiple sclerosis, followed by persons with spinal cord injury, and then individuals with intellectual disability. Suicide among persons with disabilities is a complex and pressing public health concern. Urgent research priorities include (1) valid estimates of suicide rates among persons with disabilities by age cohort; (2) assessment of the predictive importance of suicide risk factors; and (3) determination of best

  4. Independent oversight review of the Department of Energy Quality Assurance Program for suspect/counterfeit parts. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    To address the potential threat that suspect/counterfeit parts could pose to DOE workers and the public, the Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Oversight initiated a number of activities beginning in mid-1995. Oversight placed increased emphasis on the field's quality assurance-suspect/counterfeit parts programs during safety management evaluations, in keeping with the Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH) oversight responsibilities, which include oversight of the Department's quality assurance (QA) programs. In addition, Oversight reviewed relevant policy documents and occurrence reports to determine the nature and magnitude of the problem within the Department. The results of that review, contained in an Office of Oversight report, Independent Oversight Analysis of Suspect/Counterfeit Parts Within the Department of Energy (November 1995), indicate a lack of consistency and comprehensiveness in the Department's QA-suspect/counterfeit parts program. A detailed analysis of the causes and impacts of the problem was recommended. In response, this review was initiated to determine the effectiveness of the Department's QA program for suspect/counterfeit parts. This study goes beyond merely assessing and reporting the status of the program, however. It is the authors intention to highlight the complex issues associated with suspect/counterfeit parts in the Department today and to present approaches that DOE managers might consider to address these issues

  5. Independent oversight review of the Department of Energy Quality Assurance Program for suspect/counterfeit parts. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    To address the potential threat that suspect/counterfeit parts could pose to DOE workers and the public, the Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Oversight initiated a number of activities beginning in mid-1995. Oversight placed increased emphasis on the field`s quality assurance-suspect/counterfeit parts programs during safety management evaluations, in keeping with the Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH) oversight responsibilities, which include oversight of the Department`s quality assurance (QA) programs. In addition, Oversight reviewed relevant policy documents and occurrence reports to determine the nature and magnitude of the problem within the Department. The results of that review, contained in an Office of Oversight report, Independent Oversight Analysis of Suspect/Counterfeit Parts Within the Department of Energy (November 1995), indicate a lack of consistency and comprehensiveness in the Department`s QA-suspect/counterfeit parts program. A detailed analysis of the causes and impacts of the problem was recommended. In response, this review was initiated to determine the effectiveness of the Department`s QA program for suspect/counterfeit parts. This study goes beyond merely assessing and reporting the status of the program, however. It is the authors intention to highlight the complex issues associated with suspect/counterfeit parts in the Department today and to present approaches that DOE managers might consider to address these issues.

  6. Features of integrated professional training for physically disabled ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-07-11

    Jul 11, 2009 ... Methods: This retrospective survey included all physically disabled people admitted to two rehabilitation centres in Congo between 1996 and ..... borders in Congo, physically disabled people are exempt from paying taxes.

  7. Mood disorders in intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Anne D

    2006-09-01

    This article examines reviews and research on the diagnosis and treatment of mood disorders in people with intellectual disability published from September 2004 to December 2005. Patients with intellectual disability have limitations in verbal ability, and with increasing levels of disability may have an atypical clinical presentation. Thus, methods to diagnose mood disorders were a major research focus. Informant-rating scales and two self-report instruments provided data on thought patterns, aberrant behavior, appetite, and suicidality. Behavioral symptoms such as aggression were frequently associated with mood disorders. Pharmacotherapy and electroconvulsive therapy were found to be effective treatments. Mood disorders were frequently identified in people with intellectual disability, although suicide was still quite rare. Patients with milder levels of disability can use self-report measures and can be diagnosed using standard criteria with little modification. For those with more severe disability, diagnosis is challenging and often requires the use of residual categories. Atypical clinical presentation, including maladaptive behaviors, lent support for 'behavioral equivalent' substitutes of standard criteria. Typical pharmacological agents were effective for depression and electroconvulsive therapy for treatment-resistant bipolar disorder.

  8. Facing up to disability

    OpenAIRE

    Tom Shakespeare

    2013-01-01

    Ways of thinking about and responding to disability have radically changed in recent decades. Traditionally, disability was regarded in terms of sin, karma, or divine punishment. More recently, disability was made a medical issue and defined in terms of shortcomings of body or mind, which had to be prevented or cured at all costs. In the late 20th century, people with disabilities worldwide became more organised and created national and international disabled people’s organisations. They succ...

  9. Chronic Temporomandibular Disorders: disability, pain intensity and fear of movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Martínez, Alfonso; Grande-Alonso, Mónica; López-de-Uralde-Villanueva, Ibai; López-López, Almudena; Fernández-Carnero, Josué; La Touche, Roy

    2016-12-01

    The objective was to compare and correlate disability, pain intensity, the impact of headache on daily life and the fear of movement between subgroups of patients with chronic temporomandibular disorder (TMD). A cross-sectional study was conducted in patients diagnosed with chronic painful TMD. Patients were divided into: 1) joint pain (JP); 2) muscle pain (MP); and 3) mixed pain. The following measures were included: Craniomandibular pain and disability (Craniofacial pain and disability inventory), neck disability (Neck Dsiability Index), pain intensity (Visual Analogue Scale), impact of headache (Headache Impact Test 6) and kinesiophobia (Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia-11). A total of 154 patients were recruited. The mixed pain group showed significant differences compared with the JP group or MP group in neck disability (p craniomandibular pain and disability (p Neck disability was a significant covariate (37 % of variance) of craniomandibular pain and disability for the MP group (β = 0.62; p neck disability (β = 0.40; p craniomandibular pain and disability. Mixed chronic pain patients show greater craniomandibular and neck disability than patients diagnosed with chronic JP or MP. Neck disability predicted the variance of craniofacial pain and disability for patients with MP. Neck disability and kinesiophobia predicted the variance of craniofacial pain and disability for those with chronic mixed pain.

  10. Inclusion of disability-related content in nurse practitioner curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeltzer, Suzanne C; Blunt, Elizabeth; Marozsan, Heather; Wetzel-Effinger, Lisa

    2015-04-01

    To examine the integration of disability-content in a national sample of nurse practitioner curricula. Responses of National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties (NONPF) members to an online 34-item survey designed to assess disability-related content included in nurse practitioner (NP) curricula; populations of people with disabilities addressed; models of disability; and resources used to teach about disability, facilitators and barriers to inclusion of disability, and respondents' assessment of the adequacy of coverage of disability in their programs. A survey used previously to assess integration of disability content in undergraduate nursing programs was modified to make it relevant to NP curricula. Nursing faculty and people with disability validated the survey to ensure its completeness and sensitivity to the disability community. Participating programs represent 111 (33.6%) NP programs. Lack of disability-related content reported by NP faculty in the majority of programs suggests that there is considerable room for improvement in efforts to address this often vulnerable population. Because people with disabilities can be found in any setting where health care is provided, all NPs need to be prepared to care for people with disabilities across the life span. Strategies need to be developed and implemented to increase the awareness of NP faculty about the health issues of people with disabilities and integration of disability-related content without disrupting existing overloaded NP curricula. © 2014 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  11. Suspect/Counterfeit Items Information Guide for Subcontractors/Suppliers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tessmar, Nancy D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Salazar, Michael J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-09-18

    Counterfeiting of industrial and commercial grade items is an international problem that places worker safety, program objectives, expensive equipment, and security at risk. In order to prevent the introduction of Suspect/Counterfeit Items (S/CI), this information sheet is being made available as a guide to assist in the implementation of S/CI awareness and controls, in conjunction with subcontractor's/supplier's quality assurance programs. When it comes to counterfeit goods, including industrial materials, items, and equipment, no market is immune. Some manufactures have been known to misrepresent their products and intentionally use inferior materials and processes to manufacture substandard items, whose properties can significantly cart from established standards and specifications. These substandard items termed by the Department of Energy (DOE) as S/CI, pose immediate and potential threats to the safety of DOE and contractor workers, the public, and the environment. Failure of certain systems and processes caused by an S/CI could also have national security implications at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Nuclear Safety Rules (federal Laws), DOE Orders, and other regulations set forth requirements for DOE contractors to implement effective controls to assure that items and services meet specified requirements. This includes techniques to implement and thereby minimizing the potential threat of entry of S/CI to LANL. As a qualified supplier of goods or services to the LANL, your company will be required to establish and maintain effective controls to prevent the introduction of S/CI to LANL. This will require that your company warrant that all items (including their subassemblies, components, and parts) sold to LANL are genuine (i.e. not counterfeit), new, and unused, and conform to the requirements of the LANL purchase orders/contracts unless otherwise approved in writing to the Los Alamos National Security (LANS) contract administrator

  12. Managing specific learning disability in schools in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karande, Sunil; Sholapurwala, Rukhshana; Kulkarni, Madhuri

    2011-07-01

    Specific learning disability (dyslexia, dysgraphia, and dyscalculia) afflicts 5-15% of school-going children. Over the last decade; awareness about this invisible handicap has grown in India. However, much needs to be done to ensure that each afflicted child gets an opportunity to achieve his or her full academic potential in regular mainstream schools. In order to achieve this ideal scenario, all regular classroom teachers should be sensitized to suspect, and trained to screen for this disability when the child is in primary school. School managements should become proactive to set up resource rooms and employ special educators to ensure that these children receive regular and affordable remedial education; and be diligent in ensuring that these children get the mandatory provisions both during school and board examinations. Once specific learning disability is recognized as a disability by the Government of India, these children with the backing of the Right to Education Act, would be able to benefit significantly.

  13. Situational leadership and persons with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubero, Christopher G

    2007-01-01

    Does situational leadership style impact workers with disabilities? Situational leadership as a model and style of organizational management is defined. With a concentration on workers with disabilities, employer and employee perceptions of the workplace environment are analyzed as a contributing factor to the choice of leadership styles. Leadership style and its potential impact on workers with disabilities are included. Advantages of situational leadership style as an organizational model for managers that matches the intricate needs of workers with disabilities are argued. Methods for increasing awareness of the needs of persons with disabilities in the workplace and improving leadership models are discussed. Implications and potential outcomes for workers with disabilities based on the use of situational leadership by managers are discussed.

  14. Psychotherapy with people with developmental disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Zafošnik

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available People with developmental disabilities can experience any psychological abnormalitiy and psychiatric illness as do people without developmental disabilities. Due to different diagnostic criteria, assessment procedures and instruments, we lack definite prevalence rates for people with developmental disabilities, also suffering from mental health problems, eventhough most studies place the rate at 20 to 40%. One of the possible treatment alternatives for augmenting psychological well-being is psychotherapy, but is extremely rarely used for people with severe and profound disabilities, where speech cannot be the main therapeutic medium. So, those that are included in the psychotherapuetic process are predominantly clients with mild developmental disabilities, and they are mostly in cognitive-behavioral therapy. Recently, two models of (psychotherapy for persons with severe and profound developmental disabilities were developed: developmental-dynamic relationship therapy and attachment-based behaviour therapy for children. Conceptually, they both originate form developmental psychoanalytic theories.

  15. Sexuality among People with Physical Disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgul Elbozan Cumurcu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Physical disability is termed as disturbance or defect which impede or eliminate human body’s ability by disturbing human structure and shape. Physical disability may occur due to neonatal, natal or postnatal causes. People with physical disability have some natural needs as everyone. They are known to have difficulties in many areas of life. In society, sexual lives of these individuals are treated as an unknown and ignored issue, and moreover it has been assumed that they have no such needs. Disabled patients experience many troubles in their life domains including sexuality. This article provides information about physical disability and sexuality, and difficulties with which disabled people faces in their sexual life and overviews literature on this topic.

  16. Suspect online sellers and contraceptive access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Bryan A; Mackey, Tim K; Lovett, Kimberly M

    2012-11-01

    Issues surrounding contraception access have been a national focus. During this debate, adolescent and adult women may seek these products online. Due to safety concerns, including potential counterfeit forms, we wished to assess whether online "no prescription" contraceptives were available. We assessed online availability of reversible, prescription contraceptive methods resulting in online pharmacy marketing is shifting from direct search engine access to social media (Facebook, Twitter, Slidehare, flickr). Online contraceptive sales represent patient safety risks and a parallel system of high-risk product access absent professional guidance. Providers should educate patients, while policy makers employ legal strategies to address these systemic risks. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Percentage compensation arrangements: suspect, but not illegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedor, F P

    2001-01-01

    Percentage compensation arrangements, in which a service is outsourced to a contractor that is paid in accordance with the level of its performance, are widely used in many business sectors. The HHS Office of Inspector General (OIG) has shown concern that these arrangements in the healthcare industry may offer incentives for the performance of unnecessary services or cause false claims to be made to Federal healthcare programs in violation of the antikickback statute and the False Claims Act. Percentage compensation arrangements can work and need not run afoul of the law as long as the healthcare organization carefully oversees the arrangement and sets specific safeguards in place. These safeguards include screening contractors, carefully evaluating their compliance programs, and obligating them contractually to perform within the limits of the law.

  18. Women with Disabilities and Breast Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About CDC.gov . Disability & Health Home Disability Overview Disability Inclusion Barriers to Inclusion Inclusion Strategies Inclusion in Programs & Activities Resources Healthy Living Disability & Physical Activity Disability & Obesity Disability & Smoking Disability & Breast ...

  19. Would Rethinking Learning Disabilities Benefit Kuwait?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazna, Maysaa; Reid, D. Kim

    2009-01-01

    Learning disabilities education in Kuwait grew from Kuwaiti's wholesale importation of the Western, medical model of disability--a model basically incompatible with Kuwaiti culture. Conflicting factors include its problematic normal/abnormal binary, its assumption that the "deficit" is located in the student and the segregation of…

  20. A Belgian Approach to Learning Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Cheryl W.

    The paper reviews Belgian philosophy toward the education of learning disabled students and cites the differences between American behaviorally-oriented theory and Belgian emphasis on identifying the underlying causes of the disability. Academic methods observed in Belgium (including psychodrama and perceptual motor training) are discussed and are…

  1. Neurogenetic and Neurodevelopmental Pathways to Learning Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzocco, Michele M. M.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    This paper reviews ongoing research designed to specify the cognitive, behavioral, and neuroanatomical phenotypes of specific genetic etiologies of learning disability. The genetic disorders at the focus of the research include reading disability, neurofibromatosis type 1, Tourette syndrome, and fragile X syndrome. Implications for identifying…

  2. Adaptive Technologies for Accommodating Persons with Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berliss, Jane; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Eight articles review the progress achieved in making library computing technologies and library services accessible to people with disabilities. Adaptive technologies, automated conversion into Braille, and successful programs that demonstrate compliance with the American with Disabilities Act are described. A resource list is included. (EA)

  3. The role of the follow-up chest radiograph in suspected non-accidental injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anilkumar, Adikesavalu; Fender, Laura J; Broderick, Nigel J; Somers, John M; Halliday, Katharine E [Nottingham University Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, Queen' s Medical Centre, Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2006-03-15

    Rib fractures in children under the age of 2 years have a strong correlation with non-accidental injury (NAI). Follow-up radiographs can improve detection. To evaluate the value of the follow-up chest radiograph in suspected non-accidental injury. The study included all children less than 2 years of age who were investigated for suspected NAI in our institution between January 1998 and October 2003. Prior to January 2000, only selected patients were asked to attend for a follow-up chest radiograph. From January 2000 onwards all children were asked to reattend. Of 200 children included in the study, 59 (29.5%) reattended for a follow-up chest radiograph. The follow-up film provided useful additional information in 7 (12%) of the 59 children. In two children rib fractures were noted only on the follow-up chest radiograph. In a further two patients additional rib fractures were noted. Additional dating information was obtained for two patients. For one child both additional fractures and dating information were noted. The follow-up chest radiograph provides useful information in children with suspected NAI and it is recommended that it should be included routinely in the imaging investigations of these children. (orig.)

  4. The role of the follow-up chest radiograph in suspected non-accidental injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anilkumar, Adikesavalu; Fender, Laura J.; Broderick, Nigel J.; Somers, John M.; Halliday, Katharine E.

    2006-01-01

    Rib fractures in children under the age of 2 years have a strong correlation with non-accidental injury (NAI). Follow-up radiographs can improve detection. To evaluate the value of the follow-up chest radiograph in suspected non-accidental injury. The study included all children less than 2 years of age who were investigated for suspected NAI in our institution between January 1998 and October 2003. Prior to January 2000, only selected patients were asked to attend for a follow-up chest radiograph. From January 2000 onwards all children were asked to reattend. Of 200 children included in the study, 59 (29.5%) reattended for a follow-up chest radiograph. The follow-up film provided useful additional information in 7 (12%) of the 59 children. In two children rib fractures were noted only on the follow-up chest radiograph. In a further two patients additional rib fractures were noted. Additional dating information was obtained for two patients. For one child both additional fractures and dating information were noted. The follow-up chest radiograph provides useful information in children with suspected NAI and it is recommended that it should be included routinely in the imaging investigations of these children. (orig.)

  5. The use of psychoactive prescription drugs among DUI suspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karjalainen, Karoliina; Haukka, Jari; Lintonen, Tomi; Joukamaa, Matti; Lillsunde, Pirjo

    2015-10-01

    The study seeks to increase understanding of the use of psychoactive prescription drugs among persons suspected of driving under the influence (DUI). We studied whether the use of prescribed psychoactive medication was associated with DUI, and examined the difference in the use of prescription drugs between DUI recidivists and those arrested only once. In this register-based study, persons suspected of DUI (n=29470) were drawn from the Register of DUI suspects, and an age- and gender-matched reference population (n=30043) was drawn from the Finnish general population. Data on prescription drug use was obtained by linkage to the National Prescription Register. The associations of DUI arrest and use of psychoactive prescription drugs in different DUI groups (findings for alcohol only, prescription drugs, prescription drugs and alcohol, illicit drugs) were estimated by using mixed-effect logistic regression. The use of psychoactive prescription drugs and DUI appeared to be strongly associated, with DUI suspects significantly more likely to use psychoactive prescription drugs compared to the reference population. Gender differences existed, with the use of benzodiazepines being more common among female DUI suspects. Moreover, DUI recidivists were more likely to use psychoactive prescription drugs compared to those arrested only once. In addition to alcohol and/or illicit drug use, a significant proportion of DUI suspects were using psychoactive prescription drugs. When prescribing psychoactive medication, especially benzodiazepines, physicians are challenged to screen for possible substance use problems and also to monitor for patients' alcohol or illicit drug use while being medicated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Second malignancies in children: the usual suspects?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moppett, John; Oakhill, Anthony E-mail: anthony.oakhill@nildram.co.uk; Duncan, Andrew W

    2001-06-01

    The aim of this article is to provide an up to date review of second malignant neoplasms (SMN's) following treatment for childhood cancer, referring to their incidence, the role of genetic factors, and how the primary malignancy and treatment received influence the type, site and prognosis of SMN's. The role of genetic factors will be discussed as far as they impact upon a predisposition to later development of SMN's. The primary malignancies that have important associations with SMN's will then be discussed, in particular Hodgkin's disease, retinoblastoma and acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. The important second malignancies will be highlighted, including tumours of the CNS and thyroid, osteosarcoma, secondary acute myeloid leukaemia and melanoma. Emphasis will be put upon identifying which patients are most likely to suffer from these tumours. An important part of the article are case histories. These are provided in combination with illustrations as a useful adjunct to the text, with a particular emphasis on radiological features, diagnosis and screening. Finally, the important but different roles of causal agents, in particular chemotherapy and radiotherapy are highlighted.

  7. [Analysis on the role of Sirius combined topography and tomography system in screening for suspect keratoconus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y; Chen, Y G; Yang, H Y; Xia, Y J; Zhao, R

    2018-01-11

    Objective: To evaluate the role of Sirius combined topography and tomography system in screening for suspect keratoconus among the corneal refractive surgery candidates. Methods: Retrospective case series study. Eight hundred and sixteen consecutive ametropic patients (1 632 eyes) who underwent routine examinations before corneal refractive surgery at Peking University Third Hospital from January 2016 to September 2016 were reviewed. All the cases were analyzed with Sirius combined topography and tomography system. Fifty-nine eyes of 37 patients, aged (28.9±7.4) years, classified as suspect keratoconus by the system were enrolled in the suspect group, including 25 females (40 eyes) and 12 males (19 eyes). A random eye of the first 59 patients, aged (27.1±6.4)years, whose both eyes were classified as normal by Sirius system were enrolled in the control group, including 38 females and 21 males. The corneal anterior surface, posterior surface and minimum thickness data of the suspect group were analyzed and then compared with the control group. The classified results were further verified by Pentacam system. Independent-samples t test and Mann-Whitney U test were applied to analyze the normal distribution and non-normal distribution data respectively. Results: The medians of anterior surface and posterior surface symmetry index and Baiocchi Calossi Versaci index of anterior surface and posterior surface of the suspect group were 0.84, 0.22, 0.58 and 0.51 D, and that of the control group were 0.05, 0.04, 0.09 and 0.06 D, and the differences were of statistical significance ( Z=- 18.764, -8.351, -12.248, -10.709, Ptopography and tomography and its integral automatic classification system is capable to screen out the suspect keratoconus simply and effectively. These indices maybe arranged in descending order in terms of the sensitivity as corneal posterior surface, followed by corneal anterior surface and then corneal thinnest point thickness. (Chin J Ophthalmol, 2018

  8. [Breath tests in children with suspected lactose intolerance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, P Ángela; Furió, C Simone; Arancibia, A Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Up to 70% of the world population is lactose intolerance. However, there are no epidemiological studies among Chilean pediatric population affected by this condition. Clinical characterization of a series of children who underwent the lactose intolerance breath test for lactose intolerance study, establishing intolerance and malabsorption frequencies, the most frequent symptoms, and test performance depending on the origin. Patients under 18 years old who took the lactose intolerance breath test in the Gastroenterology Laboratory of the Catholic University of Chile, and who were admitted due to clinically suspected lactose intolerance. Malabsorption was considered when there was as an increase of ≥20ppm above the baseline (H2) or ≥34ppm of H2 and methane (CH4) combined. Intolerance was considered when the above was associated with a symptom intensity score ≥7 during registration. The analysis included194 patients aged 1 to17 years of age. Of these, 102 (53%) presented with malabsorption, and 53 (27%) were intolerant. The frequency of lactose intolerance varied from 7.1 to 45.4%, and it occurred more frequently at older ages. The most common reported symptoms were abdominal pain, bloating and rumbling. Lactose malabsorption and intolerance can be investigated from the first years of life using the lactose breath test plus a symptom questionnaire. An increase in the frequency of intolerance with age, and a greater number of positive tests, if they were requested by a gastroenterologist, were observed. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Unenhanced MR Imaging in adults with clinically suspected acute appendicitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chabanova, Elizaveta, E-mail: elcha@heh.regionh.dk [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev (Denmark); Balslev, Ingegerd, E-mail: inbal@heh.regionh.dk [Department of Pathology, Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev (Denmark); Achiam, Michael, E-mail: micach01@heh.regionh.dk [Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev (Denmark); Nielsen, Yousef W., E-mail: yujwni01@heh.regionh.dk [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev (Denmark); Adamsen, Sven, E-mail: svad@heh.regionh.dk [Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev (Denmark); Gocht-Jensen, Peter, E-mail: petgoc01@heh.reginh.dk [Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev (Denmark); Brisling, Steffen K., E-mail: stkibr01@heh.regionh.dk [Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev (Denmark); Logager, Vibeke B., E-mail: viloe@heh.regionh.dk [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev (Denmark); Thomsen, Henrik S., E-mail: heth@heh.regionh.dk [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev (Denmark)

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to evaluate unenhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for the diagnosis of appendicitis or another surgery-requiring condition in an adult population scheduled for emergency appendectomy based on a clinical diagnosis of suspected acute appendicitis. Materials and methods: The prospective study included 48 consecutive patients (29 female, 19 male, 18-70 years old, mean age = 37.1 years). MRI examination was designed to be comfortable and fast; no contrast was administered. The sequences were performed during quiet respiration. The MRI findings were reviewed by two radiologists and one surgeon independent of each other and compared with surgical and pathological records. Results: According to the surgical and histopathological findings 30 of 48 patients (63%) had acute appendicitis. Of the remaining 18 patients, 4 patients had no reasons for the clinical symptoms and 14 patients had other pathology. For the three reviewers the performance of MRI in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis showed the following sensitivity, specificity and accuracy ranges: 83-93%, 50-83% and 77-83%. Moderate ({kappa} = 0.51) and fair ({kappa} = 0.31) interobserver agreements in the MR diagnosis of acute appendicitis were found between the reviewers. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy values for overall performance of MRI in detecting pelvic abnormalities were 100%, 75% (3 of 4 healthy patients were identified by MRI) and 98%, respectively. Conclusion: Unenhanced fast MRI is feasible as an additional fast screening before the appendectomy. It may prevent unnecessary surgeries. The fast MRI examination can be adequately performed on an MRI unit of broad range of field strengths.

  10. 75 FR 9821 - Disability Determinations by State Agency Disability Examiners

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-04

    ... Disabled Under the Statutory Definition? Under the Act, we have full power and authority to make rules and.... Sections 205(a), 702(a)(5), and 1631(d)(1). In addition, we have the power to promulgate regulations that... How we evaluate symptoms, including pain. * * * * * (b) * * * In cases decided by a State agency...

  11. Teaching Disability Employment Discrimination Law: Accommodating Physical and Mental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulow, Marianne DelPo

    2012-01-01

    Disability employment discrimination is often treated summarily in legal environment courses. This is actually a topic with significant practical application in the workplace since managers are often those who are confronted with accommodation requests. It is therefore desirable to include a class with hands-on exercises for students to begin to…

  12. Providing for Disabled Students: University of Grenoble, France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    PEB Exchange, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Examines how France's University of Grenoble provides for its disabled students in its residence halls, including a description of the university's service for disabled service. A hospital/education center where disabled students can receive care and physiotherapy while attending school is highlighted. (GR)

  13. Effect of vertical oscillatory pressure on disability of patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    research into how to reduce the disability caused by LBP. ... they include osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis and low back pain (LBP). LBP results in significant levels of disability, producing significant restrictions on usual activity and ... disability, and a careful history and physical examination are vital to ...

  14. Review of Mathematics Interventions for Secondary Students with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marita, Samantha; Hord, Casey

    2017-01-01

    Recent educational policy has raised the standards that all students, including students with disabilities, must meet in mathematics. To examine the strategies currently used to support students with learning disabilities, the authors reviewed literature from 2006 to 2014 on mathematics interventions for students with learning disabilities. The 12…

  15. Disability Income Insurance

    OpenAIRE

    Hayhoe, Celia Ray; Smith, Mike, CPF

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of disability income insurance is to partially replace your income if you are unable to work because of sickness or an accident. This guide reviews the types of disability insurance, important terms and concepts and employer provided benefits.

  16. Disability and Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Over a billion people, about 15% of the world's population, have some form of disability. Between 110 million ... disability. This corresponds to about 15% of the world's population. Between 110 million (2.2%) and 190 million ( ...

  17. Differential Diagnosis of Children with Suspected Childhood Apraxia of Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Elizabeth; McCabe, Patricia; Heard, Robert; Ballard, Kirrie J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The gold standard for diagnosing childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) is expert judgment of perceptual features. The aim of this study was to identify a set of objective measures that differentiate CAS from other speech disorders. Method: Seventy-two children (4-12 years of age) diagnosed with suspected CAS by community speech-language…

  18. Use of budesonide Turbuhaler in young children suspected of asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H; Pedersen, S; Nikander, K

    1994-01-01

    The question addressed in this study was the ability of young children to use a dry-powder inhaler, Turbuhaler. One hundred and sixty five children suspected of asthma, equally distributed in one year age-groups from 6 months to 8 yrs, inhaled from a Pulmicort Turbuhaler, 200 micrograms budesonide...

  19. Spatial epidemiology of suspected clinical leptospirosis in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, C; Nelson, T A; Stephen, C

    2012-04-01

    Leptospirosis is one of the most widespread zoonoses in the world. A large outbreak of suspected human leptospirosis began in Sri Lanka during 2008. This study investigated spatial variables associated with suspected leptospirosis risk during endemic and outbreak periods. Data were obtained for monthly numbers of reported cases of suspected clinical leptospirosis for 2005-2009 for all of Sri Lanka. Space-time scan statistics were combined with regression modelling to test associations during endemic and outbreak periods. The cross-correlation function was used to test association between rainfall and leptospirosis at four locations. During the endemic period (2005-2007), leptospirosis risk was positively associated with shorter average distance to rivers and with higher percentage of agriculture made up of farms <0·20 hectares. Temporal correlation analysis of suspected leptospirosis cases and rainfall revealed a 2-month lag in rainfall-case association during the baseline period. Outbreak locations in 2008 were characterized by shorter distance to rivers and higher population density. The analysis suggests the possibility of household transmission in densely populated semi-urban villages as a defining characteristic of the outbreak. The role of rainfall in the outbreak remains to be investigated, although analysis here suggests a more complex relationship than simple correlation.

  20. PMS2 Involvement in Patients Suspected of Lynch Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niessen, Renee C.; Kleibeuker, Jan H.; Westers, Helga; Jager, Paul O. J.; Rozeveld, Dennie; Bos, Krista K.; Boersma-van Ek, Wytske; Hollema, Harry; Sijmons, Rolf H.; Hofstra, Robert M. W.

    It is well-established that germline mutations in the mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 cause Lynch syndrome. However, mutations in these three genes do not account for all Lynch syndrome (suspected) families. Recently, it was shown that germline mutations in another mismatch repair gene,

  1. Correlates and Suspected Causes of Obesity in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crothers, Laura M.; Kehle, Thomas J.; Bray, Melissa A.; Theodore, Lea A.

    2009-01-01

    The correlates and suspected causes of the intractable condition obesity are complex and involve environmental and heritable, psychological and physical variables. Overall, the factors associated with and possible causes of it are not clearly understood. Although there exists some ambiguity in the research regarding the degree of happiness in…

  2. 48 CFR 3.303 - Reporting suspected antitrust violations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... suspect. Paragraph (c) below identifies behavior patterns that are often associated with antitrust... offers; (2) A sudden change from competitive bidding to identical bidding; (3) Simultaneous price... turn in sequence as low bidder, or so that certain competitors bid low only on some sizes of contracts...

  3. Is extended biopsy protocol justified in all patients with suspected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the significance of an extended 10-core transrectal biopsy protocol in different categories of patients with suspected prostate cancer using digital guidance. Materials and Methods: We studied 125 men who were being evaluated for prostate cancer. They all had an extended 10-core digitally guided ...

  4. A suspected case of Addison's disease in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambacher, Bianca; Wittek, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    A 4.75-year old Simmental cow was presented with symptoms of colic and ileus. The clinical signs and blood analysis resulted in the diagnosis of suspected primary hypoadrenocorticism (Addison's disease). Although Addison's disease has been frequently described in other domestic mammals, to our knowledge, this disease has not previously been reported in cattle.

  5. Talking heads : interviewing suspects from a cultural perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beune, K.

    2009-01-01

    Although the literature on the interviewing of suspects has increased over the past decade, research on the use and effectiveness of police strategies and their boundary conditions is very rare. The present dissertation aims to fill this void by identifying behaviors that appeal to and persuade

  6. 48 CFR 903.303 - Reporting suspected antitrust violations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... as described in FAR 3.301, and antitrust law violations as described in FAR 3.303, evidenced in bids... antitrust violations. 903.303 Section 903.303 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Reports of Suspected Antitrust...

  7. Suspected infection in afebrile patients : Are they septic?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martins, Fernanda de Souza; Guedes, Gisele Giuliane; Santos, Thiago Martins; de Carvalho-Filho, Marco A

    We prospectively evaluated afebrile patients admitted to an emergency department (ED), with suspected infection and only tachycardia or tachypnea.The white blood cell count (WBC) was obtained, and patients were considered septic if leukocyte count was >12,000 μL-1 or <4000 μL-1 or with >10% of band

  8. Cognitive Linguistic Performances of Multilingual University Students Suspected of Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Signe-Anita; Laine, Matti

    2011-01-01

    High-performing adults with compensated dyslexia pose particular challenges to dyslexia diagnostics. We compared the performance of 20 multilingual Finnish university students with suspected dyslexia with 20 age-matched and education-matched controls on an extensive test battery. The battery tapped various aspects of reading, writing, word…

  9. Lineup Composition, Suspect Position, and the Sequential Lineup Advantage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Curt A.; Gronlund, Scott D.; Clark, Steven E.

    2008-01-01

    N. M. Steblay, J. Dysart, S. Fulero, and R. C. L. Lindsay (2001) argued that sequential lineups reduce the likelihood of mistaken eyewitness identification. Experiment 1 replicated the design of R. C. L. Lindsay and G. L. Wells (1985), the first study to show the sequential lineup advantage. However, the innocent suspect was chosen at a lower rate…

  10. Pathologically confirmed autoimmune encephalitis in suspected Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maat, P.; de Beukelaar, J.W.; Jansen, C.; Schuur, M.; van Duijn, C.M.; van Coevorden, M.H.; de Graaff, E.; Titulaer, E.; Rozemuller, A.J.M.; Sillevis Smitt, P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the clinical features and presence in CSF of antineuronal antibodies in patients with pathologically proven autoimmune encephalitis derived from a cohort of patients with suspected Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Methods: The Dutch Surveillance Centre for Prion Diseases

  11. DNA typing from vaginal smear slides in suspected rape cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayse Aparecida da Silva

    Full Text Available In an investigation of suspected rape, proof of sexual assault with penetration is required. In view of this, detailed descriptions of the genitalia, the thighs and pubic region are made within the forensic medical service. In addition, vaginal swabs are taken from the rape victim and some of the biological material collected is then transferred to glass slides. In this report, we describe two rape cases solved using DNA typing from cells recovered from vaginal smear slides. In 1999, two young women informed the Rio de Janeiro Police Department that they had been victims of sexual assaults. A suspect was arrested and the victims identified him as the offender. The suspect maintained that he was innocent. In order to elucidate these crimes, vaginal smear slides were sent to the DNA Diagnostic Laboratory for DNA analysis three months after the crimes, as unique forensic evidence. To get enough epithelial and sperm cells to perform DNA analysis, we used protocols modified from the previously standard protocols used for DNA extraction from biological material fixed on glass slides. The quantity of cells was sufficient to perform human DNA typing using nine short tandem repeat (STR loci. It was 3.3 billion times more probable that it was the examined suspect who had left sperm cells in the victims, rather than any other individual in the population of Rio de Janeiro.

  12. Risk Factors and Bacterial Profile of Suspected Neonatal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Neonatal septicaemia is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries and a major health concern. The aim of this study is to evaluate the bacterial profile, antibiotics susceptibility pattern and associated risk factors of suspected septicaemia in neonates in this locality. Five hundred and forty seven ...

  13. Is extended biopsy protocol justified in all patients with suspected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-01-03

    Jan 3, 2012 ... Objective: To determine the significance of an extended 10-core transrectal biopsy protocol in different categories of patients with suspected prostate cancer using digital guidance. Materials and Methods: We studied 125 men who were being evaluated for prostate cancer. They all had an extended.

  14. Suspected pulmonary tuberculosis in rural South Africa - Sputum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three (125%) of the 24 patients with a discharge diagnosis other than TB (17 pneumonia, 3 old TB, 2 carcinoma of the lung, 1 bronchiectasis) turned out to have TB within the follow-up period; 2 of those had extrapulmonary TB Conclusion, SI produced a positive smear result in 29% of patients with suspected TB who had ...

  15. Personality patterns and vocational interests of learning disabled and nonlearning disabled high school students

    OpenAIRE

    Ivy, Robert J.

    1991-01-01

    There is a lack of research based data in the field of learning disabilities, especially at the secondary level. The purpose of this study was to evaluate personality configuration patterns and vocational interests through the administration of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, Abbreviated Version (AV) and the Self-Directed Search, Form E (EASY) for learning disabled (LD) and non-learning disabled (NLD) students. The sample included 90 LD students and 100 Non-LD stud...

  16. Evaluating groups in learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, S H

    Groupwork can be effective in meeting a range of needs presented by students with profound learning disabilities. This article describes the process involved in setting up groups for these students, and includes examples of a group session and methods for evaluating groupwork.

  17. The Danish Neck Disability Index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Henrik Hein; O'Neill, Lotte; Kongsted, Alice

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To (1) translate and culturally adapt and (2) determine the clinimetric properties of the Danish 8-item Neck Disability Index (NDI-8) in primary sector patients (PSPs) and secondary sector patients (SSPs). Methods: Analyses included 326 patients with neck pain. Validity and reliability...

  18. The Relation between Self Esteem Levels and Life Quality Levels of Disabled and Non-Disabled Tennis Sportsmen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civan, Adem

    2015-01-01

    This research was carried out to determine the self-esteem and life quality levels of disabled and non-disabled tennis sportsmen; and also to set forth the relation between their self-esteem and life quality levels. The research group consists of total 44 sportsmen including 22 disabled tennis sportsmen (n[subscript (female)]=9, n[subscript…

  19. Determination of neuronal antibodies in suspected and definite Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau-Rivera, Oriol; Sánchez-Valle, Raquel; Saiz, Albert; Molinuevo, José Luis; Bernabé, Reyes; Munteis, Elvira; Pujadas, Francesc; Salvador, Antoni; Saura, Júlia; Ugarte, Antonio; Titulaer, Maarten; Dalmau, Josep; Graus, Francesc

    2014-01-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and autoimmune encephalitis with antibodies against neuronal surface antigens (NSA-abs) may present with similar clinical features. Establishing the correct diagnosis has practical implications in the management of care for these patients. To determine the frequency of NSA-abs in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with suspected CJD and in patients with pathologically confirmed (ie, definite) CJD. A mixed prospective (suspected) and retrospective (definite) CJD cohort study was conducted in a reference center for detection of NSA-abs. The population included 346 patients with suspected CJD and 49 patients with definite CJD. Analysis of NSA-abs in cerebrospinal fluid with brain immunohistochemistry optimized for cell-surface antigens was performed. Positive cases in the suspected CJD group were further studied for antigen specificity using cell-based assays. All definite CJD cases were comprehensively tested for NSA-abs, with cell-based assays used for leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1), contactin-associated protein-like 2 (CASPR2), N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA), and glycine (GlY) receptors. Neuronal surface antigens were detected in 6 of 346 patients (1.7%) with rapid neurologic deterioration suggestive of CJD. None of these 6 patients fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for probable or possible CJD. The target antigens included CASPR2, LGI1, NMDAR, aquaporin 4, Tr (DNER [δ/notch-like epidermal growth factor-related receptor]), and an unknown protein. Four of the patients developed rapidly progressive dementia, and the other 2 patients had cerebellar ataxia or seizures that were initially considered to be myoclonus without cognitive decline. The patient with Tr-abs had a positive 14-3-3 test result. Small cell lung carcinoma was diagnosed in the patient with antibodies against an unknown antigen. All patients improved or stabilized after appropriate treatment. None of the 49 patients with definite CJD had NSA-abs. A low, but

  20. Dating persons with physical disabilities: the perceptions of South Africans without disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Xanthe; Swartz, Leslie; Carew, Mark Thomas; Braathen, Stine Hellum; Chiwaula, Mussa; Rohleder, Poul

    2018-02-01

    There is good reason to believe that the attitudes of persons without disability towards dating a person with a physical disability might be unfavourable. However, in general, and in the Global South in particular, there is a dearth of research in this area. This study sought to take the first step in addressing this lack of enquiry, by surveying the attitudes of a general population sample in South Africa towards dating people with physical disabilities, using a vignette. Data from 1723 survey respondents were analysed thematically. Findings reveal largely negative attitudes towards people with physical disabilities. Respondents without disability perceived numerous barriers to dating a person with a physical disability, including social stigma, anxiety and concerns about the burden of care they believed such a relationship would place upon them. However, there was some evidence to suggest that some positive attitudes do exist, and a few respondents were open to dating a person with physical disabilities. Findings contribute to a nuancing and expanding of the 'myth of asexuality' among physically disabled people by showing that people with physical disabilities are actively desexualised by persons without disability. Future research is needed to explore how the inclusive attitudes, of which we did find evidence here, can be further cultivated.

  1. Optimizing imaging in suspected appendicitis (OPTIMAP-study: A multicenter diagnostic accuracy study of MRI in patients with suspected acute appendicitis. Study Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bossuyt Patrick MM

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In patients with clinically suspected appendicitis, imaging is needed to substantiate the clinical diagnosis. Imaging accuracy of ultrasonography (US is suboptimal, while the most accurate technique (CT is associated with cancer related deaths through exposure to ionizing radiation. MRI is a potential replacement, without associated ionizing radiation and no need for contrast medium administration. If MRI is proven to be sufficiently accurate, it could be introduced in the diagnostic pathway of patients with suspected appendicitis, increasing diagnostic accuracy and improving clinical outcomes, without the risk of radiation induced cancer or iodinated contrast medium-related drawbacks. The multicenter OPTIMAP study was designed to estimate the diagnostic accuracy of MRI in patients with suspected acute appendicitis in the general population. Methods/Design Eligible for this study are consecutive patients presenting with clinically suspected appendicitis at the emergency department in six centers. All patients will undergo imaging according to the Dutch guideline for acute appendicitis: initial ultrasonography in all and subsequent CT whenever US does not confirm acute appendicitis. Then MRI is performed in all patients, but the results are not used for patient management. A final diagnosis assigned by an expert panel, based on all available information including 3-months follow-up, except MRI findings, is used as the reference standard in estimating accuracy. We will calculate the sensitivity, specificity, predictive values and inter-observer agreement of MRI, and aim to include 230 patients. Patient acceptance and total imaging costs will also be evaluated. Discussion If MRI is found to be sufficiently accurate, it could replace CT in some or all patients. This will limit or obviate the ionizing radiation exposure associated risk of cancer induction and contrast medium induced nephropathy with CT, preventing the burden and

  2. Disability in Fibromyalgia Associates with Symptom Severity and Occupation Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzcharles, Mary-Ann; Ste-Marie, Peter A; Rampakakis, Emmanouil; Sampalis, John S; Shir, Yoram

    2016-05-01

    It is intuitive that disability caused by illness should be reflected in illness severity. Because disability rates for fibromyalgia (FM) are high in the developed world, we have examined disease and work characteristics for patients with FM who were working, unemployed, or receiving disability payments for disability as a result of FM. Of the 248 participants in a tertiary care cohort study of patients with FM, 90 were employed, 81 were not employed and not receiving disability payments, and 77 were not working and currently receiving disability payments awarded for disability caused by FM. Demographic, occupation, and disease characteristics were compared among the groups. The prevalence of disability caused by FM was 30.8%. There were no demographic differences among the working, unemployed, or disabled patients. With the exception of measures for anxiety and depression, all measurements for disease severity differed significantly among the groups, with greater severity reported for the disabled group, which used more medications and participated less in physical activity. Disabled patients were more likely previously employed in manual professions or the service industry, whereas employed patients were more commonly working in non-manual jobs that included clerical, managerial, or professional occupations (p = 0.005). The one-third rate of disability for this Canadian cohort of patients with FM is in line with other reports from the western world. Associations of disability compensation were observed for subjective report of symptom severity, increased use of medications, and previous employment in more physically demanding jobs.

  3. The Prevalence of Autistic Spectrum Disorders in People Using a Community Learning Disabilities Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Dougal Julian; Chapman, Melanie; Fraser, Janelle; Gore, Sarah; Burton, Mark

    2003-01-01

    A survey of service providers for people with learning disabilities in the Manchester (England) region identified a total of 174 people with either a confirmed or a suspected autistic spectrum disorder. Discussion of current and historical factors in estimating incidence suggests that the usual 10% of service users represents the lowest estimate…

  4. Usefulness of unenhanced helical CT in patients with suspected ureteral colic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bong Soo; Nam Kung, Sook; Kim, Heung Cheol; Hwang, Woo Chul; Lee, In Sun; Hwang, Im Kyung; Kim, Ho Chul; Bae, Sang Hoon; Lee, Sang Kon; Lee, Seong Ho [College of Medicine, Hallym Univ., Chunchon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    To determine the usefulness of unenhanced helical CT in patients with suspected renal colic. One hundred and fourteen patients with suspected ureteral colic, referred by physicians, underwent unenhanced helical CT. Two radiologists prospectively interpreted the results, determining the presence or absence of ureter stone and other diseases the arise outside the urinary tract. In cases of ureteral stone, we retrospectively sought secondary signs of hydronephrosis, perinephric fat stranding, thickening of renal fascia, renal enlargement, and the tissue rim sign. Among the 114 patients, 57 were confirmed as having ureter stones. Unenhanced helical CT depicted 57 of 58 stones in 57 patients, producing one false-negative and one false-positive result. Overall, the results showed 98% sensitivity, 95% specificity, 98% positive predictive value, 95% negative predictive value, and 97% accuracy. The frequencies of secondary signs were as follows: hydronephrosis, 95%(54/57); perinephric fat stranding, 81% (46/57); thickening of renal fascia, 77% (44/57); renal enlargement , 65%(37/57); and the tissure rim sign 72%(21/29). In 20 patients, the diagnoses were not related to stone disease and included one false-negative diagnosis of pyonephrosis. Unenhanced helical CT provides information which is valuable in the accurate diagnosis of ureteral stone as well as other diseases that arise outside the urinary tract in patients with suspected renal colic.

  5. Usefulness of the Negative Multidetector CT Angiography in Patients with Suspected Pulmonary Embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holguin Holguin, Alfonso Jose; Lombana, Milton; Collazos, Giovanny; Bravo, Hector; Abella Calle, Jose

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study is to evaluate alternative findings in pulmonary CT angiography using MDCT reported as negative in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism. Material and method: Cross sectional study with 178 patients. We recognized other findings reported in pulmonary CT angiography using MDCT whose result was negative. Subsequently these findings were classified into six different categories of clinical relevance and their association with clinical scenario was analyzed. Results: from November 2004 to June 2007 we requested 231 pulmonary CT angiography using MDCT in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism. 217 patients were included in the final analysis. Of these, 39 (185) were positive for pulmonary embolism. The 178 remaining negative studies, 8.43% were normal, 53.37% were classified as category A, 20.79% category B, 14.04% category C; category D 1.12% and 2.25% were not interpretable. The most frequent diagnoses were pneumonia, interstitial lung disease and cardiogenic pulmonary edema. It was less likely to find a normal report whether the study was requested in the hospital department in emergency patients (OR = 0.38 95% 0.16 to 0.88, p = 0.0007). No differences were found in other categories or between patients younger or older than 65 years (p = 0.436). Conclusion: Pulmonary CT angiography as first line imaging tool in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism is useful, offering alternative diagnoses in hospitalized and emergency room patients, regardless of their age and clinical findings.

  6. Patch testing in Israeli children with suspected allergic contact dermatitis: A retrospective study and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafrir, Yaron; Trattner, Akiva; Hodak, Emmillia; Eldar, Oren; Lapidoth, Moshe; Ben Amitai, Dan

    2018-01-01

    Childhood allergic contact dermatitis is recognized as a significant clinical problem. The objective was to evaluate the rate of positive patch tests in Israeli children with clinically suspected allergic contact dermatitis, identify possible sex and age differences, compare results with those in Israeli adults, and review pediatric studies in the literature. The study sample included 343 children and adolescents (197 female, 146 male; 1-18 years of age, mean age 11.8 years) with clinically suspected allergic contact dermatitis who underwent patch testing with a standard pediatric series of 23 allergens at a tertiary medical center from 1999 to 2012. Data on clinical characteristics and test results were collected retrospectively from the medical files. Ninety-eight subjects (28.6%) (75 girls [38.1%], 23 boys [15.8%]) had at least one positive reaction. The most frequent reactions were to nickel sulfate, followed by potassium dichromate and cobalt chloride. Nickel sulfate sensitivity was more common in girls, especially those younger than 3 years and older than 12 years. The prevalence of contact sensitization was similar in subjects with and without atopic dermatitis (50% and 51%, respectively). Nickel is the most common allergen in Israeli children, especially girls. Patch testing should be performed in children with clinically suspected allergic contact dermatitis regardless of atopic background. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Diagnostic accuracy and patient acceptance of MRI in children with suspected appendicitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thieme, Mai E.; Valdehueza, Zaldy D.; Wiarda, Bart M. [Medical Centre Alkmaar, Department of Radiology, Alkmaar (Netherlands); Leeuwenburgh, Marjolein M.N. [Academic Medical Centre Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Academic Medical Centre Amsterdam, Department of Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bouman, Donald E. [Medical Spectrum Twente, Department of Radiology, Enschede (Netherlands); Bruin, Ivar G.J.M. de; Schreurs, W.H.; Houdijk, Alexander P.J. [Medical Centre Alkmaar, Department of Surgery, Alkmaar (Netherlands); Stoker, Jaap [Academic Medical Centre Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-03-15

    To compare magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound in children with suspected appendicitis. In a single-centre diagnostic accuracy study, children with suspected appendicitis were prospectively identified at the emergency department. All underwent abdominal ultrasound and MRI within 2 h, with the reader blinded to other imaging findings. An expert panel established the final diagnosis after 3 months. We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of three imaging strategies: ultrasound only, conditional MRI after negative or inconclusive ultrasound, and MRI only. Significance between sensitivity and specificity was calculated using McNemar's test statistic. Between April and December 2009 we included 104 consecutive children (47 male, mean age 12). According to the expert panel, 58 patients had appendicitis. The sensitivity of MRI only and conditional MRI was 100 % (95 % confidence interval 92-100), that of ultrasound was significantly lower (76 %; 63-85, P < 0.001). Specificity was comparable among the three investigated strategies; ultrasound only 89 % (77-95), conditional MRI 80 % (67-89), MRI only 89 % (77-95) (P values 0.13, 0.13 and 1.00). In children with suspected appendicitis, strategies with MRI (MRI only, conditional MRI) had a higher sensitivity for appendicitis compared with a strategy with ultrasound only, while specificity was comparable. (orig.)

  8. Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography Vessel Density in Healthy, Glaucoma Suspect, and Glaucoma Eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarmohammadi, Adeleh; Zangwill, Linda M.; Diniz-Filho, Alberto; Suh, Min Hee; Manalastas, Patricia Isabel; Fatehee, Naeem; Yousefi, Siamak; Belghith, Akram; Saunders, Luke J.; Medeiros, Felipe A.; Huang, David; Weinreb, Robert N.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness and optical coherence tomography angiography (OCT-A) retinal vasculature measurements in healthy, glaucoma suspect, and glaucoma patients. Methods Two hundred sixty-one eyes of 164 healthy, glaucoma suspect, and open-angle glaucoma (OAG) participants from the Diagnostic Innovations in Glaucoma Study with good quality OCT-A images were included. Retinal vasculature information was summarized as a vessel density map and as vessel density (%), which is the proportion of flowing vessel area over the total area evaluated. Two vessel density measurements extracted from the RNFL were analyzed: (1) circumpapillary vessel density (cpVD) measured in a 750-μm-wide elliptical annulus around the disc and (2) whole image vessel density (wiVD) measured over the entire image. Areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUROC) were used to evaluate diagnostic accuracy. Results Age-adjusted mean vessel density was significantly lower in OAG eyes compared with glaucoma suspects and healthy eyes. (cpVD: 55.1 ± 7%, 60.3 ± 5%, and 64.2 ± 3%, respectively; P glaucoma and healthy eyes, the age-adjusted AUROC was highest for wiVD (0.94), followed by RNFL thickness (0.92) and cpVD (0.83). The AUROCs for differentiating between healthy and glaucoma suspect eyes were highest for wiVD (0.70), followed by cpVD (0.65) and RNFL thickness (0.65). Conclusions Optical coherence tomography angiography vessel density had similar diagnostic accuracy to RNFL thickness measurements for differentiating between healthy and glaucoma eyes. These results suggest that OCT-A measurements reflect damage to tissues relevant to the pathophysiology of OAG. PMID:27409505

  9. Prevalence of vulvovaginitis and relation to physical findings in girls assessed for suspected child sexual abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Gisel; Ocampo, Dolores; Rubinstein, Anahí; Risso, Paula

    2015-10-01

    The presence of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in patients with suspected sexual abuse is uncommon in the field of pediatrics. To establish the prevalence of anogenital findings and their relation to the presence of STIs in girls referred for suspected child sexual abuse. Retrospective study conducted between January 1st, 2003 and December 31st, 2013. Physical findings and detection of STIs in girls with suspected child sexual abuse were analyzed. One thousand thirty-four patients were included. Their median age was 7.9 years old. Anogenital findings were classified as class I (normal):38.4%, class II (nonspecific):38.1%, class III (specific):19.9% and class IV (definitive):3.6%. STIs were observed in 42 patients (4.1%). A relation was established between STIs and the classification of physical findings: 10 (class II: 9; class III: 1) Neisseria gonorrhoeae, 17 (class I: 2; class II: 8; class III: 7) Chlamydia trachomatis, 15 (class I: 2; class II: 10; class III: 3) Trichomonas vaginalis. Statistically significant differences for Trichomonas vaginalis (p= 0.01) and Neisseria gonorrhoeae (p < 0.0001) were observed, with predominance of nonspecific clinical signs. Both nonspecific and specific findings were similarly observed for Chlamydia trachomatis (p= 0.03). Most cases of girls with suspected child sexual abuse had normal or nonspecific anogenital findings. The prevalence of STIs in these girls is low. Trichomonas vaginalis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae were related to nonspecific findings, while both nonspecific and specific findings were observed for Chlamydia trachomatis.

  10. The yield of high-detail radiographic skeletal surveys in suspected infant abuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, Ignasi; Perez-Rossello, Jeannette M.; Kleinman, Paul K.; Wilson, Celeste R.

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal surveys are routinely performed in cases of suspected child abuse, but there are limited data regarding the yield of high-detail skeletal surveys in infants. To determine the diagnostic yield of high-detail radiographic skeletal surveys in suspected infant abuse. We reviewed the high-detail American College of Radiology standardized skeletal surveys performed for suspected abuse in 567 infants (median: 4.4 months, SD 3.47; range: 4 days-12 months) at a large urban children's hospital between 2005 and 2013. Skeletal survey images, radiology reports and medical records were reviewed. A skeletal survey was considered positive when it showed at least one unsuspected fracture. In 313 of 567 infants (55%), 1,029 definite fractures were found. Twenty-one percent (119/567) of the patients had a positive skeletal survey with a total of 789 (77%) unsuspected fractures. Long-bone fractures were the most common injuries, present in 145 children (26%). The skull was the site of fracture in 138 infants (24%); rib cage in 77 (14%), clavicle in 24 (4.2%) and uncommon fractures (including spine, scapula, hands and feet and pelvis) were noted in 26 infants (4.6%). Of the 425 infants with neuroimaging, 154 (36%) had intracranial injury. No significant correlation between positive skeletal survey and associated intracranial injury was found. Scapular fractures and complex skull fractures showed a statistically significant correlation with intracranial injury (P = 0.029, P = 0.007, respectively). Previously unsuspected fractures are noted on skeletal surveys in 20% of cases of suspected infant abuse. These data may be helpful in the design and optimization of global skeletal imaging in this vulnerable population. (orig.)

  11. The yield of high-detail radiographic skeletal surveys in suspected infant abuse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barber, Ignasi [Hospital Vall d' Hebron, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Pediatric Radiology Department, Barcelona (Spain); Perez-Rossello, Jeannette M.; Kleinman, Paul K. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Radiology Department, Boston, MA (United States); Wilson, Celeste R. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Division of General Pediatrics, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-07-06

    Skeletal surveys are routinely performed in cases of suspected child abuse, but there are limited data regarding the yield of high-detail skeletal surveys in infants. To determine the diagnostic yield of high-detail radiographic skeletal surveys in suspected infant abuse. We reviewed the high-detail American College of Radiology standardized skeletal surveys performed for suspected abuse in 567 infants (median: 4.4 months, SD 3.47; range: 4 days-12 months) at a large urban children's hospital between 2005 and 2013. Skeletal survey images, radiology reports and medical records were reviewed. A skeletal survey was considered positive when it showed at least one unsuspected fracture. In 313 of 567 infants (55%), 1,029 definite fractures were found. Twenty-one percent (119/567) of the patients had a positive skeletal survey with a total of 789 (77%) unsuspected fractures. Long-bone fractures were the most common injuries, present in 145 children (26%). The skull was the site of fracture in 138 infants (24%); rib cage in 77 (14%), clavicle in 24 (4.2%) and uncommon fractures (including spine, scapula, hands and feet and pelvis) were noted in 26 infants (4.6%). Of the 425 infants with neuroimaging, 154 (36%) had intracranial injury. No significant correlation between positive skeletal survey and associated intracranial injury was found. Scapular fractures and complex skull fractures showed a statistically significant correlation with intracranial injury (P = 0.029, P = 0.007, respectively). Previously unsuspected fractures are noted on skeletal surveys in 20% of cases of suspected infant abuse. These data may be helpful in the design and optimization of global skeletal imaging in this vulnerable population. (orig.)

  12. Disability as diversity in Fortune 100 companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Phoebe; Monaco, Gregory; Schmeling, James; Schartz, Helen; Blanck, Peter

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the inclusion of people with disabilities in the diversity policies of the most successful businesses in the United States, we examined the publicly available workforce and supplier diversity policies of the top 100 companies on Fortune Magazine's 2003 list of the 500 most profitable companies in the nation. The majority of these companies have extensive information about their diversity policies and practices available on their corporate website. The information was used to categorize the policies into those that include people with disabilities, do not define diversity, and enumerate what is meant by diversity (e.g. in terms of race or gender) but do not expressly mention disability. In addition, we looked beyond the diversity policies to information available on corporate websites relating to a variety of diversity initiatives. Findings suggest that the majority of the companies that top the Fortune 500 list have developed and implemented diversity policies. Of these, 42% have diversity policies that include people with disabilities in the definition of a diverse workforce. Furthermore, 47% of companies with workplace diversity policies discuss diversity in a way that neither expressly includes nor excludes people with disabilities. Far fewer (15%) supplier diversity policies include disability in the definition of diversity, but a significant number of companies use criteria that allow a business owner with a disability to benefit from the company's supplier diversity program. 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Detecting special nuclear materials in suspect containers using high-energy gamma rays emitted by fission products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Eric B [Oakland, CA; Prussin, Stanley G [Kensington, CA

    2009-01-27

    A method and a system for detecting the presence of special nuclear materials in a suspect container. The system and its method include irradiating the suspect container with a beam of neutrons, so as to induce a thermal fission in a portion of the special nuclear materials, detecting the gamma rays that are emitted from the fission products formed by the thermal fission, to produce a detector signal, comparing the detector signal with a threshold value to form a comparison, and detecting the presence of the special nuclear materials using the comparison.

  14. Integrated Disability Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Angeloni

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This article sets out to increase awareness regarding the wide and universal significance of disability, as well as the important benefits of an Integrated Disability Management (IDM approach. The scientific basis for IDM is explored in the first place through an analysis of its relationship to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF. The conceptual paradigm of the ICF shares an ideological position with the IDM approach in that they are both underpinned by dynamic and multidimensional constructions of disability, which imply equally holistic and interdisciplinary responses. The IDM approach can be applied across a diversity of human situations to provide solutions that reflect the multifaceted and widespread nature of disability. The IDM approach is intended as a strategy capable of handling: inclusion of people with disabilities, active aging of human resources, health and safety in the workplace, prevention of disabilities and various diseases, return-to-work, absenteeism, and presenteeism.

  15. Facing up to disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Shakespeare

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Ways of thinking about and responding to disability have radically changed in recent decades. Traditionally, disability was regarded in terms of sin, karma, or divine punishment. More recently, disability was made a medical issue and defined in terms of shortcomings of body or mind, which had to be prevented or cured at all costs. In the late 20th century, people with disabilities worldwide became more organised and created national and international disabled people’s organisations. They successfully demanded that disability be seen as a matter of equal opportunities and human rights, a shift which has now been described in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. This is a global treaty which has so far been signed by 155 states and passed into law by 127.

  16. Early Intervention in Children with Developmental Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beena Johnson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Developmental disabilities consist of conditions that delay or impair the physical, cognitive, and/or psychological development of children. If not intervened at the earliest, these disabilities will cause significant negative impact on multiple domains of functioning such as learning, language, self-care and capacity for independent living. Common developmental disabilities include autism spectrum disorders, intellectual disabilities, developmental delay and cerebral palsy. About one fourth of young children in developing countries are at risk for or have developmental delay or disabilities. Inadequate stimulation has significant negative impact on physical, socioemotional and cognitive development of children. Hence early scientific intervention programs are necessary in the management of children at risk for developmental delay.

  17. Suspected herniated lumbar disc - computed tomography in differential diagnosis of non-disc-related sciatica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, T.; Koehler, D.; Treisch, J.; Claussen, C.; Felix, R.

    1984-01-01

    The most common reason a patient is referred for spinal CT examination is to exclude a ruptured intervertebral disc. Besides nerve root entrapment due to herniated disc, a number of unusual for unexpected conditions have been encountered in the course of CT lumbar spine studies. These include spondylolisthesis, spinal dysraphism, Paget's disease, and inflammatory, neoplastic, or metastatic lesions. The application of spinal (small-circle) target imaging includes the risk to overlook soft tissue lesions that extend beyond the reconstruction circle. Therefore, complete (large-circle) circumferential abdominal scanning is recommended in case of a suspected extraspinal cause of sciatica. (orig.) [de

  18. Suspected herniated lumbar disc - computed tomography in differential diagnosis of non-disc-related sciatica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, T.; Koehler, D.; Treisch, J.; Claussen, C.; Felix, R.

    1984-07-01

    The most common reason a patient is referred for spinal CT examination is to exclude a ruptured intervertebral disc. Besides nerve root entrapment due to herniated disc, a number of unusual or unexpected conditions have been encountered in the course of CT lumbar spine studies. These include spondylolisthesis, spinal dysraphism, Paget's disease, and inflammatory, neoplastic, or metastatic lesions. The application of spinal (small-circle) target imaging includes the risk of overlooking soft tissue lesions that extend beyond the reconstruction circle. Therefore, complete (large-circle) circumferential abdominal scanning is recommended in case of a suspected extraspinal cause of sciatica.

  19. Mainstreaming disability in education beyond 2015

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hennie

    2015-02-14

    Feb 14, 2015 ... business owners in sustainable development activities could serve as an anchor for mainstreaming disability beyond .... includes the story of Hephaestus, a Greek god with .... advancement of technology, especially in remote.

  20. Contribution of co-registered PET/CT for patients with suspected recurrence of colo-rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garin, E.; Devillers, A.; Prigent, F.; Girault, S.; Herry, J.Y.; Bourguet, P.; Bouriel, C.; Boudjema, K.; Campion, J.P.; Meunier, B.; Boucher, E.; Raoul, J.L.

    2003-01-01

    Positron emission tomography using 18 F fluorodeoxyglucose (PET) has proved to offer advantages for patients presenting with suspected recurrence of colo-rectal cancer. However; this examination is confronted with two disadvantages: the lack of anatomical reference marks and the presence of physiological uptake that can be difficult to locate. We carried out a retrospective study on 30 patients with suspected recurrence of Colo-rectal cancer in order to evaluate the diagnostic and therapeutic impact of PET/CT fusion images compared with PET alone. PET/CT acquisitions were performed on a prototype Positrace or on a double-detection head gamma camera in coincidence Hawkeye. PET/CT fusion images had a formal diagnostic impact for 6 patients out of 30 (20%), including 5 patients out of 12 (41%) having a suspected pelvic recurrence. In five cases, it allowed us to resolve ambiguities about whether the site of recurrence was located in the bone or the soft tissues. Furthermore, in one case we were able to locate an intra-abdominal uptake focus at the level of the liver. The PET/CT fusion images had a probable diagnostic impact for three additional patients. For two patients, the PET/CT fusion images allowed us to identify an ambiguous uptake focus as being related to physiological renal uptake. For 4 patients out of 30 (13%), the PET/CT fusion images had a clear additional therapeutic impact, including 4/12 (33%) for whom a pelvic recurrence could be suspected. The present study shows that PET/CT fusion images have an important diagnostic and therapeutic impact for patients with suspected recurrence of colorectal cancer; the impact becoming major for the subgroup of patients having a suspected pelvic recurrence. (author)

  1. Changes in ocular biometry and anterior chamber parameters after pharmacologic mydriasis and peripheral iridotomy in primary angle closure suspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Razeghinejad

    2016-07-01

    Conclusions: This study showed no change in the ocular biometric and anterior chamber parameters including iridocorneal angle after PI and/or pharmacologic mydriasis except for increments in anterior chamber volume. This factor has the potential to be used as a numerical proxy for iris position in evaluating and monitoring patients with primary angle closure suspects after PI.

  2. Population pharmacokinetic characteristics of amikacin in suspected cases of neonatal sepsis in a low-resource African setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amponsah, Seth K; Adjei, George O; Enweronu-Laryea, Christabel C

    2017-01-01

    of amikacin, and explore the influence of selected covariates, including coadministration with aminophylline, on amikacin disposition in neonates of African origin. METHODS: Neonates with suspected sepsis admitted to an intensive care unit in Accra, Ghana, and treated with amikacin (15 mg/kg loading followed...

  3. Aged and Dependency Ratios among Autism, Intellectual Disability and Other Disabilities: 10-Year Trend Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jin-Ding; Lin, Lan-Ping; Sung, Chang-Lin; Wu, Jia-Ling

    2011-01-01

    Dependency ratios are useful as general indicators of future economic and social health. The present paper focuses on the description of dependency ratios and over time change in different kind of disability which include autism, intellectual disability, vision, hearing, and limb impairments. We analyzed data mainly from the public web-access…

  4. Methods for Characterisation of unknown Suspect Radioactive Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahagia, M.; Grigorescu, E.L.; Luca, A.; Razdolescu, A.C.; Ivan, C.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The paper presents various identification and measurement methods, used for the expertise of a wide variety of suspect radioactive materials, whose circulation was not legally stated. The main types of examined samples were: radioactive sources, illegally trafficked; suspect radioactive materials or radioactively contaminated devices; uranium tablets; fire detectors containing 241 Am sources; osmium samples containing radioactive 185 Os or enriched 187 Os. The types of analyses and determination methods were as follows: the chemical composition was determined by using identification reagents or by neutron activation analysis; the radionuclide composition was determined by using gamma-ray spectrometry; the activity and particle emission rates were determined by using calibrated radiometric equipment; the absorbed dose rate at the wall of all types of containers and samples was determined by using calibrated dose ratemeters. The radiation exposure risk for population, due to these radioactive materials, was evaluated for every case. (author)

  5. Cholescintigraphy and ultrasonography in patients suspected of having acute cholecystitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, K B; Sommer, W; Hahn, L

    1988-01-01

    The diagnostic power of combined cholescintigraphy and ultrasonography was tested in 67 patients suspected of having acute cholecystitis; of these, 42 (63%) had acute cholecystitis. The predictive value of a positive scintigraphy (PVpos) was 95% and that of a negative (PVneg) was 91% (n = 67......). The PVpos and PVneg of ultrasonography were 89% and 75%, respectively (n = 54), and these values did not achieve statistical significance when compared with those for scintigraphy. Inconclusive tests were 10% and 11%, respectively, but in no patient were both scintigraphy and ultrasonography inconclusive...... that in patients suspected of having acute cholecystitis cholescintigraphy should be the first diagnostic procedure performed. If the scintigraphy is positive, additional ultrasonographic detection of gallstones makes the diagnosis almost certain. If one diagnostic modality is inconclusive, the other makes a fair...

  6. Interdisciplinary action of nurses to children with suspected sexual abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lia Leão Ciuffo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Understanding the role of nurses as members of interdisciplinary teams in the care of children with suspected sexual abuse. Methodology. This is a qualitative research based on the sociological phenomenology of Alfred Schutz. In 2008 were interviewed eleven nurses who worked in reference institutions for the care of child victims of sexual abuse in Rio de Janeiro. Results. The category called 'Interacting with other professionals in child care' emerged from the analysis of performance of professionals. The intersubjective relations between the nurses and the interdisciplinary team will enable to understand the intent of care from the perspective of social, emotional and psychological needs of children and their families. Conclusion. Interdisciplinarity favored the development of actions based on acceptance, listening and agreements on possible solutions in the care of children with suspected sexual abuse.

  7. Interviewing strategically to elicit admissions from guilty suspects

    OpenAIRE

    Tekin, Serra; Granhag, Pär Anders; Strömwall, Leif; Giolla, Erik Mac; Vrij, Aldert; Hartwig, Maria

    2015-01-01

    In this article we introduce a novel interviewing tactic to elicit admissions from guilty suspects. By influencing the suspects’ perception of the amount of evidence the interviewer holds against them, we aimed to shift the suspects’ counterinterrogation strategies from less to more forthcoming. The proposed tactic (SUE-Confrontation) is a development of the Strategic Use of Evidence (SUE) framework and aims to affect the suspects’ perception by confronting them with statement-evidence incons...

  8. Creating fair lineups for suspects with distinctive features

    OpenAIRE

    Zarkadi, Theodora; Wade, Kimberley A.; Stewart, Neil

    2009-01-01

    In their descriptions, eyewitnesses often refer to a culprit's distinctive facial features. However, in a police lineup, selecting the only member with the described distinctive feature is unfair to the suspect and provides the police with little further information. For fair and informative lineups, the distinctive feature should be either replicated across foils or concealed on the target. In the present experiments, replication produced more correct identifications in target-present lineup...

  9. Disability in the Classroom: Current Trends and Impacts on Music Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramo, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    This article covers current trends in disability rights and raises questions about how society's views of disability influence the music education of students in need of special education services. Brief overviews of the disability-rights movement in the United States and of federal laws pertaining to disabilities and education are included. Next,…

  10. How to ensure equitable access to eye health for children with disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Kuper

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available All children need access to good quality eye care, and this must include children with disabilities. Childhood disability is very common. The World Health Organization (WHO estimates that there are at least 93 million children with disabilities worldwide, which equates to one in twenty children.1 Childhood disability is particularly common in low- and middle-income countries.

  11. The economics of cardiac biomarker testing in suspected myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodacre, Steve; Thokala, Praveen

    2015-03-01

    Suspected myocardial infarction (MI) is a common reason for emergency hospital attendance and admission. Cardiac biomarker measurement is an essential element of diagnostic assessment of suspected MI. Although the cost of a routinely available biomarker may be small, the large patient population and consequences in terms of hospital admission and investigation mean that the economic impact of cardiac biomarker testing is substantial. Economic evaluation involves comparing the estimated costs and effectiveness (outcomes) of two or more interventions or care alternatives. This process creates some difficulties with respect to cardiac biomarkers. Estimating the effectiveness of cardiac biomarkers involves identifying how they help to improve health and how we can measure this improvement. Comparison to an appropriate alternative is also problematic. New biomarkers may be promoted on the basis of reducing hospital admission or length of stay, but hospital admission for low risk patients may incur significant costs while providing very little benefit, making it an inappropriate comparator. Finally, economic evaluation may conclude that a more sensitive biomarker strategy is more effective but, by detecting and treating more cases, is also more expensive. In these circumstances it is unclear whether we should use the more effective or the cheaper option. This article provides an introduction to health economics and addresses the specific issues relevant to cardiac biomarkers. It describes the key concepts relevant to economic evaluation of cardiac biomarkers in suspected MI and highlights key areas of uncertainty and controversy. Copyright © 2014 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Does this adult patient with suspected bacteremia require blood cultures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coburn, Bryan; Morris, Andrew M; Tomlinson, George; Detsky, Allan S

    2012-08-01

    Clinicians order blood cultures liberally among patients in whom bacteremia is suspected, though a small proportion of blood cultures yield true-positive results. Ordering blood cultures inappropriately may be both wasteful and harmful. To review the accuracy of easily obtained clinical and laboratory findings to inform the decision to obtain blood cultures in suspected bacteremia. A MEDLINE and EMBASE search (inception to April 2012) yielded 35 studies that met inclusion criteria for evaluating the accuracy of clinical variables for bacteremia in adult immunocompetent patients, representing 4566 bacteremia and 25,946 negative blood culture episodes. Data were extracted to determine the prevalence and likelihood ratios (LRs) of findings for bacteremia. The pretest probability of bacteremia varies depending on the clinical context, from low (eg, cellulitis: 2%) to high (eg, septic shock: 69%). Elevated temperatures alone do not accurately predict bacteremia (for ≥38°C [>100.3°F], LR, 1.9 [95% CI, 1.4-2.4]; for ≥38.5°C [>101.2°F], LR, 1.4 [95% CI, 1.1-2.0]), nor does isolated leukocytosis (LR, cultures should not be ordered for adult patients with isolated fever or leukocytosis without considering the pretest probability. SIRS and the decision rule may be helpful in identifying patients who do not need blood cultures. These conclusions do not apply to immunocompromised patients or when endocarditis is suspected.

  13. Autism spectrum disorder symptoms in juvenile suspects of sex offenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    't Hart-Kerkhoffs, Lisette A; Jansen, Lucres M; Doreleijers, Theo A; Vermeiren, Robert; Minderaa, Ruud B; Hartman, Catharina A

    2009-02-01

    To investigate autism spectrum disorder (ASD) symptoms in juvenile suspects of sex offenses. A group of 175 juvenile suspected sex offenders (all males, mean +/- SD age = 14.9 +/- 1.4 years) was compared with a matched healthy control group (N = 500, mean +/- SD age = 14.0 +/- 1.4 years) and a group of children with DSM-IV-diagnosed ASD (N = 114, mean +/- SD age = 14.2 +/- 1.9 years) with respect to autistic symptoms as measured by means of a standardized questionnaire, the Children's Social Behavior Questionnaire. Furthermore, specific subgroups of sexual offenders, i.e., child molesters, solo peer offenders, and group offenders, were compared with regard to levels of ASD symptoms. The study was conducted from May 2003 to December 2006. Significantly higher levels of ASD symptoms were found in juvenile sex offenders than in healthy controls, while levels were lower than in the ASD group (F = 148.259, p symptoms than group offenders (F = 5.127, p symptoms are higher in juvenile suspects of sex offenses as compared to the healthy population, which argues for considering specific diagnostic assessment in this population, especially in solo offenders and child molesters. Copyright 2009 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  14. [Suspected Alzheimer's disease. Selection of outpatients for neuropsychological assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, S A; Henry, M; Deike, R; Ebert, A D; Wallesch, C-W

    2008-04-01

    Incipient Alzheimer's disease (AD) is frequently suspected by neurologists and psychiatrists, but diagnosis is difficult to establish. The aim of this report was to analyse to what extent suspicion is confirmed by a comprehensive neuropsychological examination intended to distinguish different types of dementia. Descriptive data analysis was used for investigating the differential diagnoses of 47 outpatients with suspected AD referred to a department of neuropsychology by physicians in private practice. Data analysis was based upon the NINCDS-ADRDA diagnostic criteria of AD. Only 38% of the outpatients examined with suspected AD met the NINCDS-ADRDA diagnostic criteria for AD or mixed dementia from a neuropsychological point of view, whereas 22% met criteria for other types of dementia. The remaining patients met criteria for distinct differential diagnoses (23%) or lacked pathological findings in neuropsychological functions (17%). Neuropsychology is an essential part in the differential diagnosis of mild to moderate dementias. It can aid in differential therapeutic considerations concerning the treatment of dementia, for example in selecting appropriate treatments or avoiding expensive but inappropriate ones.

  15. How useful is gastroesophageal reflux scintigraphy in suspected childhood aspiration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fawcett, H.D.; Adams, J.C.; Hayden, C.K.; Swischuk, L.E.

    1988-05-01

    It has been suggested that gastroesophageal reflux scintigraphy might be useful in assisting one in determining therapy for patients suspected of aspirating or becoming apneic secondary to gastroesophageal reflux. This, however, has not been our experience and in reviewing 23 patients with recurrent pneumonia and/or apnea who had gastroesophageal reflux scintigraphy, we were able to detect aspiration in only one. This was especially significant since 13 (59%) of these patients had demonstrable reflux, and of these, eight were treated successfully for suspected aspiration even though none was demonstrated isotopically. To be sure, the demonstration of pulmonary aspiration with gastroesophageal reflux scintigraphy had little influence on patient selection and response to therapy. For this reason we feel there is little justification in depending on the GRS for the specific purpose of trying to document pulmonary aspiration in infants and children who are refluxing. One of the more serious complications of gastroesophageal (GE) reflux is aspiration leading to recurrent pulmonary infections and/or apnea. However, it always has been difficult to demonstrate actual aspiration into the lungs, and to be sure, barium studies of the upper GI tract seldom reveal this complication. Recently, however, considerable interest has been generated in gastroesophageal scintigraphy (GRS) as a possible means of documenting such aspiration. Rationale for this stems from the fact that suspected patients can be studied over a longer period of time and in addition, delayed and overnight images can be obtained. However, our experience does not support GRS as being an adequate method for demonstrating aspiration.

  16. Thoracic computed tomography in patients with suspected malignant pleural effusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traill, Zoee C.; Davies, Robert J.O.; Gleeson, Fergus V.

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To assess the role of contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) prospectively in patients with suspected malignant pleural effusions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty consecutive patients referred for the investigation of a suspected malignant pleural effusion had contrast-enhanced thoracic CT, thoracoscopy, thoraco-centesis and pleural biopsy, either percutaneously or at thoracoscopy. Final diagnoses were based on histopathological or cytological analysis (n = 30), autopsy findings (n = 3) or clinical follow-up (n = 7). The pleural surfaces were classified at contrast-enhanced CT as normal or abnormal and, if abnormal, as benign or malignant in appearance using previously established CT criteria for malignant pleural thickening by two observers unaware of the pathological diagnosis. RESULTS: Pleural effusions were malignant in 32 patients and benign in eight patients. Pleural surfaces assessed at CT showed features of malignancy in 27 out of 32 patients with a malignant effusion (sensitivity 84%, specificity 100%). Overall, CT appearances indicated the presence of malignancy in 28 of 32 (87%) patients. All eight patients with benign pleural disease were correctly diagnosed by CT. CONCLUSION: Contrast-enhanced CT is of value in patients with suspected malignant pleural effusions. The previously established criteria for malignant pleural thickening of nodularity, irregularity and pleural thickness >1 cm are reliable in the presence of a pleural effusion. Traill, Z.C. et al. (2001)

  17. From Impairment to Empowerment: A Longitudinal Medical School Curriculum on Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmiento, Cristina; Miller, Sonya R; Chang, Eleanor; Zazove, Philip; Kumagai, Arno K

    2016-07-01

    All physicians will care for individuals with disabilities; however, education about disabilities is lacking at most medical schools. Most of the schools that do include such education exclusively teach the medical model, in which disability is viewed as an impairment to be overcome. Disability advocates contest this approach because it overlooks the social and societal contexts of disability. A collaboration between individuals with disabilities, educators, and physicians to design a medical school curriculum on disabilities could overcome these differences. A curriculum on disabilities for first- and second-year medical students was developed during the 2013-2014 academic year and involved a major collaboration between a medical student, medical educators, disability advocates, and academic disability specialists. The guiding principle of the project was the Disability Rights Movement motto, "Nothing about us without us." Two small-group sessions were created, one for each medical school class. They included discussions about different models of disability, video and in-person narratives of individuals with disabilities, and explorations of concepts central to social perceptions of disability, such as power relationships, naming and stigmatization, and disability as identity. According to evaluations conducted after each session, students reported positive feedback about both sessions. Through this curriculum, first- and second-year medical students learned about the obstacles faced by individuals with disabilities and became better equipped to understand and address the concerns, hopes, and societal challenges of their future patients. This inclusive approach may be used to design additional curricula about disabilities for the clinical and postgraduate years.

  18. An integrative conceptual framework of disability. New directions for research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Denise G; Pledger, Constance

    2003-04-01

    Advances in research on disability and rehabilitation are essential to creating equal opportunity, economic self-sufficiency, and full participation for persons with disabilities. Historically, such initiatives have focused on separate and specific areas, including neuroscience, molecular biology and genetics, gerontology, engineering and physical sciences, and social and behavioral sciences. Research on persons with disabilities should examine the broader context and trends of society that affect the total environment of persons with disabilities. This article examines the various disability paradigms across time, assessing the relative contribution of the socioecological perspective in guiding research designed to improve the lives of persons with disabilities. The authors recommend new research directions that include a focus on life span issues, biomedicine, biotechnology, the efficacy and effectiveness of current interventions, an emphasis on consumer-driven investigations within a socioecological perspective of disability, and the implications for research and practice.

  19. Effectiveness of a fluid chart in outpatient management of suspected dengue fever: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Nazrila Hairin; Mohamad, Mohazmi; Lum, Lucy Chai See; Ng, Chirk Jenn

    2017-01-01

    Dengue infection is the fastest spreading mosquito-borne viral disease in the world. One of the complications of dengue is dehydration which, if not carefully monitored and treated, may lead to shock, particularly in those with dengue haemorrhagic fever. WHO has recommended oral fluid intake of five glasses or more for adults who are suspected to have dengue fever. However, there have been no published studies looking at self-care intervention measures to improve oral fluid intake among patients suspected of dengue fever. To assess the feasibility and effectiveness of using a fluid chart to improve oral fluid intake in patients with suspected dengue fever in a primary care setting. This feasibility study used a randomized controlled study design. The data was collected over two months at a primary care clinic in a teaching hospital. The inclusion criteria were: age > 12 years, patients who were suspected to have dengue fever based on the assessment by the primary healthcare clinician, fever for > three days, and thrombocytopenia (platelets dengue home care card. The intervention group received the fluid chart and a cup (200ml). Baseline clinical and laboratory data, 24-hour fluid recall (control group), and fluid chart were collected. The main outcomes were: hospitalization rates, intravenous fluid requirement and total oral fluid intake. Among the 138 participants who were included in the final analysis, there were fewer hospital admissions in the intervention group (n = 7, 10.0%) than the control group (n = 12, 17.6%) (p = 0.192). Similarly, fewer patients (n = 9, 12.9%) in the intervention group required intravenous fluid compared to the control group (n = 15, 22.1%), (p = 0.154). There was an increase in the amount of daily oral fluid intake in the intervention group (about 3,000 ml) compared to the control group (about 2,500 ml, p = 0.521). However, these differences did not reach statistical significance. This is a feasible and acceptable study to perform in

  20. Dentists' intention to report suspected violence: a cross-sectional study in eight Arab countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Tantawi, Maha; Gaffar, Balgis; Arheiam, Arheiam; AbdelAziz, Wafaa; Al-Batayneh, Ola B; Alhoti, Mansur F; Al-Maweri, Sadeq; Dama, Mai A; Zaghez, Mounir; Hassan, Khalid Saddiq; Al-Sane, Mona; AbdelSalam, Maha; Sabbah, Wael; Owais, Arwa I; Abdelgawad, Fatma; Aldhelai, Thiyezen Abdullah; El Meligy, Omar Abd El Sadek; AlHumaid, Jehan; Al-Harbi, Fahad

    2018-03-30

    This study assessed dentists' intention in eight Arab countries to report suspected exposure to violence among patients and factors associated with this intention based on the theory of planned behaviour. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2016 including a convenience sample of dentists practising in public, private and academic sectors in Algeria, Egypt, Jordan, Kuwait, Libya, Palestine, Saudi Arabia and Yemen. Respondents answered a self-administered questionnaire collecting information about personal and professional background and perceived ability to identify victims of violence. The questionnaire assessed (on a scale from 1 to 10 using six negative statements) dentists' perception of healthcare system mandated reporting of suspected violence. Six statements were used to assess professional attitude towards reporting suspected violence. Logistic regression was used to assess the association between intention to report suspected violence and perceived ability, perception and attitude adjusting for confounders. The response rate was 65.2% (n=2936/4506) from general practitioners (70.9%) of mean age=31 years with 56.7% women. Of those, 68.8% intended to report and 52.2% considered themselves able to identify violence victims. The mean (SD) negative perception score=5.3/10 (2.1) and the mean (SD) professional attitude score=7.5/10 (1.9). In multivariate regression, intention to report was associated with professional attitude (OR 1.08, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.14), ability to identify violence victims (OR 1.76, 95% CI 1.45 to 2.12) and negative perception that reporting is not mandated (OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.85 to 0.94). Significant differences existed among countries in intention to report. Most dentists intended to report suspected violence and their intention could be explained by the theory of planned behaviour which offers a framework for professional development to support violence victims. Sharing of training resources, policies and guidelines is needed to ensure

  1. Dentists’ intention to report suspected violence: a cross-sectional study in eight Arab countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffar, Balgis; Arheiam, Arheiam; AbdelAziz, Wafaa; Al-Batayneh, Ola B; Alhoti, Mansur F; Al-Maweri, Sadeq; Dama, Mai A; Zaghez, Mounir; Hassan, Khalid Saddiq; Al-Sane, Mona; AbdelSalam, Maha; Sabbah, Wael; Owais, Arwa I; Abdelgawad, Fatma; Aldhelai, Thiyezen Abdullah; El Meligy, Omar Abd El Sadek; AlHumaid, Jehan; Al-Harbi, Fahad

    2018-01-01

    Objectives This study assessed dentists’ intention in eight Arab countries to report suspected exposure to violence among patients and factors associated with this intention based on the theory of planned behaviour. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2016 including a convenience sample of dentists practising in public, private and academic sectors in Algeria, Egypt, Jordan, Kuwait, Libya, Palestine, Saudi Arabia and Yemen. Respondents answered a self-administered questionnaire collecting information about personal and professional background and perceived ability to identify victims of violence. The questionnaire assessed (on a scale from 1 to 10 using six negative statements) dentists’ perception of healthcare system mandated reporting of suspected violence. Six statements were used to assess professional attitude towards reporting suspected violence. Logistic regression was used to assess the association between intention to report suspected violence and perceived ability, perception and attitude adjusting for confounders. Results The response rate was 65.2% (n=2936/4506) from general practitioners (70.9%) of mean age=31 years with 56.7% women. Of those, 68.8% intended to report and 52.2% considered themselves able to identify violence victims. The mean (SD) negative perception score=5.3/10 (2.1) and the mean (SD) professional attitude score=7.5/10 (1.9). In multivariate regression, intention to report was associated with professional attitude (OR 1.08, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.14), ability to identify violence victims (OR 1.76, 95% CI 1.45 to 2.12) and negative perception that reporting is not mandated (OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.85 to 0.94). Significant differences existed among countries in intention to report. Conclusion Most dentists intended to report suspected violence and their intention could be explained by the theory of planned behaviour which offers a framework for professional development to support violence victims. Sharing of training resources

  2. Imaging trends in suspected appendicitis-a Canadian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Victoria F; Patlas, Michael N; Katz, Douglas S

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of our study was to assess trends in the imaging of suspected appendicitis in adult patients in emergency departments of academic centers in Canada. A questionnaire was sent to all 17 academic centers in Canada to be completed by a radiologist who works in emergency radiology. The questionnaires were sent and collected over a period of 4 months from October 2015 to February 2016. Sixteen centers (94%) responded to the questionnaire. Eleven respondents (73%) use IV contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) as the imaging modality of choice for all patients with suspected appendicitis. Thirteen respondents (81%) use ultrasound as the first modality of choice in imaging pregnant patients with suspected appendicitis. Eleven respondents (69%) use ultrasound (US) as the first modality of choice in patients younger than 40 years of age. Ten respondents (67%) use ultrasound as the first imaging modality in female patients younger than 40 years of age. When CT is used, 81% use non-focused CT of the abdomen and pelvis, and 44% of centers use oral contrast. Thirteen centers (81%) have ultrasound available 24 h a day/7 days a week. At 12 centers (75%), ultrasound is performed by ultrasound technologists. Four centers (40%) perform magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in suspected appendicitis in adult patients at the discretion of the attending radiologist. Eleven centers (69%) have MRI available 24/7. All 16 centers (100%) use unenhanced MRI. Various imaging modalities are available for the work-up of suspected appendicitis. Although there are North American societal guidelines and recommendations regarding the appropriateness of the multiple imaging modalities, significant heterogeneity in the first-line modalities exist, which vary depending on the patient demographics and resource availability. Imaging trends in the use of the first-line modalities should be considered in order to plan for the availability of the imaging examinations and to consider plans for

  3. Assessment of Integration of Disability Content into Social Work Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogden, Lydia; McAllister, Carolyn; Neely-Barnes, Susan

    2017-01-01

    Three hundred members of the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) responded to a survey regarding the inclusion of disability content in social work courses and supports needed to increase disability content. Although respondents generally agreed that disability content is important in social work education, its inclusion is inconsistent, with most frequent inclusion in courses on diversity and least frequent inclusion in courses on research. Respondents identified barriers to increasing disability content, including lack of resources for teaching, lack of relevant faculty expertise, and an overcrowded curriculum. Strategies and resources for infusing disability content into social work education are discussed.

  4. Disability prevalence among healthy weight, overweight, and obese adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Brian S; Courtney-Long, Elizabeth A; Campbell, Vincent A; Wethington, Holly R

    2013-04-01

    Obesity is associated with adverse health outcomes in people with and without disabilities. However, little is known about disability prevalence among people who are obese. The purpose of this study is to determine the prevalence and type of disability among adults who are obese. Pooled data from the 2003-2009 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) were analyzed to obtain national prevalence estimates of disability, disability type and obesity. The disability prevalence was stratified by body mass index (BMI): healthy weight (BMI 18.5-reported a disability. In contrast, 26.7% of those with a healthy weight and 28.5% of those who were overweight reported a disability. The most common disabilities among respondents with obesity were movement difficulty (32.5%) and work limitation (16.6%). This research contributes to the literature on obesity by including disability as a demographic in assessing the burden of obesity. Because of the high prevalence of disability among those who are obese, public health programs should consider the needs of those with disabilities when designing obesity prevention and treatment programs. Copyright © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  5. Why Bioethics Needs a Disability Moral Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stramondo, Joseph A

    2016-05-01

    The deeply entrenched, sometimes heated conflict between the disability movement and the profession of bioethics is well known and well documented. Critiques of prenatal diagnosis and selective abortion are probably the most salient and most sophisticated of disability studies scholars' engagements with bioethics, but there are many other topics over which disability activists and scholars have encountered the field of bioethics in an adversarial way, including health care rationing, growth-attenuation interventions, assisted reproduction technology, and physician-assisted suicide. The tension between the analyses of the disabilities studies scholars and mainstream bioethics is not merely a conflict between two insular political groups, however; it is, rather, also an encounter between those who have experienced disability and those who have not. This paper explores that idea. I maintain that it is a mistake to think of this conflict as arising just from a difference in ideology or political commitments because it represents a much deeper difference-one rooted in variations in how human beings perceive and reason about moral problems. These are what I will refer to as variations of moral psychology. The lived experiences of disability produce variations in moral psychology that are at the heart of the moral conflict between the disability movement and mainstream bioethics. I will illustrate this point by exploring how the disability movement and mainstream bioethics come into conflict when perceiving and analyzing the moral problem of physician-assisted suicide via the lens of the principle of respect for autonomy. To reconcile its contemporary and historical conflict with the disability movement, the field of bioethics must engage with and fully consider the two groups' differences in moral perception and reasoning, not just the explicit moral and political arguments of the disability movement. © 2016 The Hastings Center.

  6. Categorizing clients with disabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Lena; Amby, Finn

    Danish governments have continuously proclaimed goals of raising the employment rate for people with disabilities, most recently in the publication “10 goal for social mobility” (Government 2016). In spite of this, the employment rate for people with disabilities has been more than 30 percent less...... than that of people without disabilities for more than a decade (Larsen & Høgelund 2015). An explanation of this difference could be the limited connection between these general goals, the employment laws and the actual implementation of the goals in the job centers (Amby 2015). Earlier Danish studies...... have by large focused on employment and disability at the stage where the client already has been categorized as having a disability (e.g. Møller & Stone 2013). This study offers new insight to the field in a Danish context by exploring the process in which people with disabilities are categorized...

  7. Performance and touch characteristics of disabled and non-disabled participants during a reciprocal tapping task using touch screen technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Curt B; Sesto, Mary E

    2012-11-01

    Touch screens are becoming more prevalent in everyday environments. Therefore, it is important that this technology is accessible to those with varying disabilities. The objective of the current study was to evaluate performance and touch characteristics (forces, impulses, and dwell times) of individuals with and without a movement disorder during a reciprocal tapping touch screen task. Thirty-seven participants with a motor control disability and 15 non-disabled participants participated. Outcome measures include number of correct taps, dwell time, exerted force, and impulse. Results indicate non-disabled participants had 1.8 more taps than participants with fine motor control disabilities and 2.8 times more than those with gross motor impairments (ptouch characteristics exist between those with and without motor control disabilities. Understanding how people (including those with disabilities) interact with touch screens may allow designers and engineers to ultimately improve usability of touch screen technology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  8. Disability testing and retirement

    OpenAIRE

    Cremer, Helmuth; Lozachmeur, Jean-Marie; Pestieau, Pierre

    2006-01-01

    This Paper studies the design of retirement and disability policies. It illustrates the often observed exit from the labour force of healthy workers through disability insurance schemes. Two types of individuals, disabled and leisure-prone ones, have the same disutility for labour and cannot be distinguished. They are not, however, counted in the same way in social welfare. Benefits depend on retirement age and on the (reported) health status. We determine first- and second-best optimal benef...

  9. Disability: a voice in Australian bioethics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Christopher

    2003-06-01

    The rise of research and advocacy over the years to establish a disability voice in Australia with regard to bioethical issues is explored. This includes an analysis of some of the political processes and engagement in mainstream bioethical debate. An understanding of the politics of rejected knowledge is vital in understanding the muted disability voices in Australian bioethics and public policy. It is also suggested that the voices of those who are marginalised or oppressed in society, such as people with disability, have particular contribution to make in fostering critical bioethics.

  10. Suspected adverse reactions to veterinary drugs reported in South Africa (January 1998 - February 2001 : special report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Gehring

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available The Veterinary Pharmacovigilance Centre received 59 reports of suspected adverse drug reactions during the period January 1998 - February 2001. The number of reports received increased after the establishment of a formal procedure for recording and responding to reports. The number of reports received per species was: dogs 19, cats 15, cattle 7, sheep/ goats 6, chickens 4, pigs 3, horses 2 and giraffe 1. Many different types of adverse reactions were reported, including lack of efficacy, hypersensitivity, inappropriate use of products by non-veterinarians, known adverse effects and adverse effects encountered with extra-label use of products.

  11. Histological outcome of duodenal biopsies in patients with clinically suspected celiac disease - a study of 100 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarfraz, T.; Khan, S.A.; Tariq, H.

    2018-01-01

    To see the histological outcome of duodenal biopsies done in patients clinically suspected of celiac disease. Study Design: Prospective descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Histopathology Department, Army Medical College Rawalpindi, from 1 Jan 2017 to 30 Jun 2017. Material and Methods: One hundred (100) cases were included in the study. Duodenal biopsies done in patients clinically suspected of celiac disease were included in the study. Inadequate biopsies were excluded from the study. All the normal and abnormal histological features were noted to make the diagnosis. Data was entered and analyzed by using SPSS version 17. Results: Duodenal biopsies of 100 patients, done in clinically suspected cases of celiac disease were analyzed histologically. Out of these 100 cases, 46 cases (46%) showed histological features consistent with celiac disease, while 38 cases (38%) revealed chronic non specific duodenitis, 2 cases (2%) were of giardiasis, while 14 biopsies (14%) were unremarkable with no significant pathology. Conclusion: A significant number of cases clinically suspected of celiac disease may not be showing histological features consistent with celiac disease on duodenal biopsies. Due to the changing presentation of disease, as well as the recognition of a number of potential clinical and histopathological mimics, communication between pathologists and gastroenterologists is essential for appropriate interpretation of duodenal biopsy specimens. (author)

  12. Working while on a disability pension in Finland: Association of diagnosis and financial factors to employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polvinen, Anu; Laaksonen, Mikko; Rantala, Juha; Hietaniemi, Marjukka; Kannisto, Jari; Kuivalainen, Susan

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to find out whether health and financial factors are associated with engagement in paid work during a disability pension. The data included a 10 per cent sample of Finns aged 20-62 years who were drawing earnings-related full or partial disability pension in 2012 ( n = 14,418). Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate odds ratios for working while on a full or partial disability pension. Fourteen per cent of full disability pensioners and 76 per cent of partial disability pensioners were engaged in paid work. Full disability pensioners due to mental disorders were working less often than full disability pensioners due to other diseases. Partial disability pensioners due to cardiovascular diseases were working more than partial disability pensioners due to other diseases. More recent timing of disability pension was associated with working for both partial and full disability pensioners. Working while on disability pension was more common among those with higher education. Partial disability pensioners with average pension worked more often than those with high pension. By knowing the factors associated with working while on a disability pension, policies could be more efficiently allocated to encourage disability pensioners to take up work. One way would be to support disability pensioners with low education to work more. Another way to increase work among disability pensioners is to support the recently retired in working longer.

  13. The Unusual Suspects: Myths and Misconceptions Associated with PECS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondy, Andy

    2012-01-01

    The Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) is an alternative/augmentative communication protocol designed to help children and adults with autism and related disabilities to engage in functional communication. The protocol was developed over a number of years and was based on Skinner's analysis of verbal behavior. Publications about the…

  14. Disability and the post-2015 development agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardi, Rachele; Njelesani, Janet

    2015-01-01

    The article considers the extent to which disability has been recognized and included in two main documents produced to date as part of the United Nations Post-2015 Development agenda process. This is the process that is defining the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), which will succeed the UN Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) after the latter reach their target date in 2015. The two documents examined in the article are the Outcome Document (July 2014) of the Open Working Group (OWG) on SDGs and the Report (August 2014) of the Intergovernmental Committee of Experts on Sustainable Development Financing (ICESDF). The OWG consisted of 30 seats shared by 70 UN Member States and was in charge of proposing goals and targets for the SDGs. The ICESDF worked in parallel to the OWG and its report proposed options on an effective financing strategy. The article emphasizes the importance of including persons with disabilities in the Post-2015 Agenda, especially in view of the latter's overarching focus on eradicating poverty. The inclusion of persons with disabilities is being recognized in the Post-2015 Agenda discussions as central to achieving sustainable development. Disability has been explicitly mentioned in the OWG and ICESDF documents. Although the results so far have been very good, more work still needs to be done to ensure that these explicit references are maintained in the final version of the SDGs, which will be adopted in September 2015. Furthermore, the new framework needs to have a stronger human rights foundation on which to ground these references and future indicators. Light for the World is an international confederation of national development non-governmental organizations (NGOs) aiming at an inclusive society, where the rights of persons with disabilities are realized without discrimination. Through a rights-based approach, Light for the World supports 175 programs in 25 countries in the areas of prevention of blindness, rehabilitation, inclusive

  15. Preoperative local MRI-staging of patients with a suspected pancreatic mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, U.; Vosshenrich, R.; Salamat, B.; Baum, F.; Grabbe, E. [Department of Radiology, Georg August University, Goettingen (Germany); Horstmann, O.; Becker, H. [Department of Surgery, Georg August University, Goettingen (Germany)

    2002-02-01

    The aim of this study was to define the value of MRI of the pancreas for preoperative local staging of patients with a suspected pancreatic mass. Ninety-four patients (41 women, 53 men; age range 32-87 years) with a suspected pancreatic tumor underwent preoperative staging with MRI on a 1.5-T system. The MRI protocol included breath-hold MR cholangiopancreatography in turbo spin-echo technique, biphasic contrast-enhanced 3D MR angiography, and MRI of the upper abdomen with breath-hold T2-weighted half-Fourier acquired single-shot turbo spin-echo and T1-weighted fast-low-angle-shot (pre- and postcontrast) sequences. Data were collected prospectively and analyzed by two radiologists in agreement modality. Evaluation criteria were vascular involvement, resectability, and a characterization benign vs malignant. Results were compared to histopathology in 78 patients. Sixteen patients were followed-up. In 74 of 94 patients a solid tumor or an inflammation of the pancreas (n=62) or the papilla (n=12) was detected. In this group, MRI had a sensitivity of 98%, a specificity of 92%, and an accuracy of 96% in the characterization of malignant tumors. Regarding only the solid tumors, the positive predictive value of MRI was 87% with respect to resectability. Other pathologic findings included adenoma or inflammation of the duodenum (n=5), carcinoma or benign stenosis of the choledochus duct (n=7) and carcinoma of the gall bladder (n=2). In 6 patients MRI did not depict any pathologic findings, and follow-up confirmed this interpretation. Magnetic resonance imaging allows a local preoperative staging in patients with suspected pancreatic tumor. Limitations, however, concern to the diagnostics of peritoneal and/or liver metastases. (orig.)

  16. Preoperative local MRI-staging of patients with a suspected pancreatic mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, U; Vosshenrich, R; Horstmann, O; Becker, H; Salamat, B; Baum, F; Grabbe, E

    2002-02-01

    The aim of this study was to define the value of MRI of the pancreas for preoperative local staging of patients with a suspected pancreatic mass. Ninety-four patients (41 women, 53 men; age range 32-87 years) with a suspected pancreatic tumor underwent preoperative staging with MRI on a 1.5-T system. The MRI protocol included breath-hold MR cholangiopancreatography in turbo spin-echo technique, biphasic contrast-enhanced 3D MR angiography, and MRI of the upper abdomen with breath-hold T2-weighted half-Fourier acquired single-shot turbo spin-echo and T1-weighted fast-low-angle-shot (pre- and postcontrast) sequences. Data were collected prospectively and analyzed by two radiologists in agreement modality. Evaluation criteria were vascular involvement, resectability, and a characterization benign vs malignant. Results were compared to histopathology in 78 patients. Sixteen patients were followed-up. In 74 of 94 patients a solid tumor or an inflammation of the pancreas ( n=62) or the papilla ( n=12) was detected. In this group, MRI had a sensitivity of 98%, a specificity of 92%, and an accuracy of 96% in the characterization of malignant tumors. Regarding only the solid tumors, the positive predictive value of MRI was 87% with respect to resectability. Other pathologic findings included adenoma or inflammation of the duodenum ( n=5), carcinoma or benign stenosis of the choledochus duct ( n=7) and carcinoma of the gall bladder ( n=2). In 6 patients MRI did not depict any pathologic findings, and follow-up confirmed this interpretation. Magnetic resonance imaging allows a local preoperative staging in patients with suspected pancreatic tumor. Limitations, however, concern to the diagnostics of peritoneal and/or liver metastases.

  17. Preoperative local MRI-staging of patients with a suspected pancreatic mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, U.; Vosshenrich, R.; Salamat, B.; Baum, F.; Grabbe, E.; Horstmann, O.; Becker, H.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to define the value of MRI of the pancreas for preoperative local staging of patients with a suspected pancreatic mass. Ninety-four patients (41 women, 53 men; age range 32-87 years) with a suspected pancreatic tumor underwent preoperative staging with MRI on a 1.5-T system. The MRI protocol included breath-hold MR cholangiopancreatography in turbo spin-echo technique, biphasic contrast-enhanced 3D MR angiography, and MRI of the upper abdomen with breath-hold T2-weighted half-Fourier acquired single-shot turbo spin-echo and T1-weighted fast-low-angle-shot (pre- and postcontrast) sequences. Data were collected prospectively and analyzed by two radiologists in agreement modality. Evaluation criteria were vascular involvement, resectability, and a characterization benign vs malignant. Results were compared to histopathology in 78 patients. Sixteen patients were followed-up. In 74 of 94 patients a solid tumor or an inflammation of the pancreas (n=62) or the papilla (n=12) was detected. In this group, MRI had a sensitivity of 98%, a specificity of 92%, and an accuracy of 96% in the characterization of malignant tumors. Regarding only the solid tumors, the positive predictive value of MRI was 87% with respect to resectability. Other pathologic findings included adenoma or inflammation of the duodenum (n=5), carcinoma or benign stenosis of the choledochus duct (n=7) and carcinoma of the gall bladder (n=2). In 6 patients MRI did not depict any pathologic findings, and follow-up confirmed this interpretation. Magnetic resonance imaging allows a local preoperative staging in patients with suspected pancreatic tumor. Limitations, however, concern to the diagnostics of peritoneal and/or liver metastases. (orig.)

  18. How useful is gastroesophageal reflux scintigraphy in suspected childhood aspiration?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fawcett, H.D.; Adams, J.C.; Hayden, C.K.; Swischuk, L.E.

    1988-01-01

    It has been suggested that gastroesophageal reflux scintigraphy might be useful in assisting one in determining therapy for patients suspected of aspirating or becoming apneic secondary to gastroesophageal reflux. This, however, has not been our experience and in reviewing 23 patients with recurrent pneumonia and/or apnea who had gastroesophageal reflux scintigraphy, we were able to detect aspiration in only one. This was especially significant since 13 (59%) of these patients had demonstrable reflux, and of these, eight were treated successfully for suspected aspiration even though none was demonstrated isotopically. To be sure, the demonstration of pulmonary aspiration with gastroesophageal reflux scintigraphy had little influence on patient selection and response to therapy. For this reason we feel there is little justification in depending on the GRS for the specific purpose of trying to document pulmonary aspiration in infants and children who are refluxing. One of the more serious complications of gastroesophageal (GE) reflux is aspiration leading to recurrent pulmonary infections and/or apnea. However, it always has been difficult to demonstrate actual aspiration into the lungs, and to be sure, barium studies of the upper GI tract seldom reveal this complication. Recently, however, considerable interest has been generated in gastroesophageal scintigraphy (GRS) as a possible means of documenting such aspiration. Rationale for this stems from the fact that suspected patients can be studied over a longer period of time and in addition, delayed and overnight images can be obtained. However, our experience does not support GRS as being an adequate method for demonstrating aspiration. (orig.)

  19. Use of biomarkers in triage of patients with suspected stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanni, Simone; Polidori, Gianluca; Pepe, Giuseppe; Chiarlone, Melisenda; Albani, Alberto; Pagnanelli, Adolfo; Grifoni, Stefano

    2011-05-01

    The absence of a rapidly available and sensitive diagnostic test represents an important limitation in the triage of patients with suspected stroke. The aim of the present study was to investigate the triage accuracy of a novel test that measures blood-borne biomarkers (triage stroke panel, TSP) and to compare its accuracy with that of the Cincinnati Prehospital Stroke Scale (CPSS). Consecutive patients with suspected stroke presenting to the Emergency Departments of three Italian hospitals underwent triage by a trained nurse according to the CPSS and had blood drawn for TSP testing. The TSP simultaneously measures four markers (B-type natriuretic peptide, D-dimer, matrix metalloproteinase-9, and S100β) presenting a single composite result, the Multimarker Index (MMX). Stroke diagnosis was established by an expert committee blinded to MMX and CPSS results. There were 155 patients enrolled, 87 (56%) of whom had a final diagnosis of stroke. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for CPSS was 0.77 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.70-0.84) and that of MMX was 0.74 (95% CI 0.66-0.82) (p = 0.285). Thus, both tests, when used alone, failed to recognize approximately 25% of strokes. The area under the ROC curve of the combination of the two tests (0.86, 95% CI 0.79-0.91) was significantly greater than that of either single test (p = 0.01 vs. CPSS and p vs. TSP). In an emergency care setting, a panel test using multiple biochemical markers showed triage accuracy similar to that of CPSS. Further studies are needed before biomarkers can be introduced in the clinical work-up of patients with suspected stroke. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Excessive online computer use and learning disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Griffiths, MD

    2010-01-01

    Online gaming has become a very popular leisure activity among adolescents. Research suggests that a small minority of adolescents may display problematic gaming behaviour and that some of these individuals may be addicted to online games, including those who have learning disabilities. This article begins by examining a case study of a 15-year old adolescent with a learning disability who appeared to be addicted to various computer and internet applications. Despite the potential negative ef...

  1. Disability, economic globalization and privatization: A case study of India

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hiranandani, Vanmala Sunder

    2012-01-01

    have benefitted middle-class and highly-skilled disabled persons, the majority of people with disabilities have been left out of India's economic affluence. We contend that India's globalized economy and reduced state role necessitate renewed understanding of human rights, including disability rights.......People with disabilities are one of the most disenfranchised groups in India. Standardized measurements of disability in India and internationally have overlooked the linkages between the economy and disability. In recent decades, neo-liberal economic reforms imposed in developing countries, under...... investigates the implications of economic restructuring in the arenas of social programs, education, employment, accessibility, health, agriculture and food security, and water and land acquisition from a disability perspective. Our analysis shows that while increased employment opportunities and accessibility...

  2. Perceptions of a disability sport unit in general physical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenier, Michelle; Collins, Karen; Wright, Steven; Kearns, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to assess the effectiveness of a disability sport unit in shaping perceptions of disability. Data from interviews, observations, and documents were collected on 87 elementary-aged students, one physical education teacher, and one teaching intern. Comparisons were drawn between fifth graders engaged in a five-week disability sport unit to fourth graders participating in their standard physical education curriculum. Findings revealed differences in the way fourth and fifth graders came to view individuals with disabilities. The results support an analysis of curriculum development that underscores the significance of the social model in positively impacting constructions of disability. Recommendations include the use of disability sports in physical education as an effective strategy for educating students in game play, knowledge of the Paralympics, and the inclusion of individuals with disabilities in a variety of sporting venues.

  3. Children with intellectual disability and hospice utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindley, Lisa C; Colman, Mari Beth; Meadows, John T

    2017-02-01

    Over 42,000 children die each year in the United States, including those with intellectual disability (ID). Survival is often reduced when children with intellectual disability also suffer from significant motor dysfunction, progressive congenital conditions, and comorbidities. Yet, little is known about hospice care for children with intellectual disability. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between intellectual disability and hospice utilization. Additionally, we explored whether intellectual disability combined with motor dysfunction, progressive congenital conditions, and comorbidities influenced pediatric hospice utilization. Using a retrospective cohort design and data from the 2009 to 2010 California Medicaid claims files, we conducted a multivariate analysis of hospice utilization. This study shows that intellectual disability was negatively related to hospice enrollment and length of stay. We also found that when children had both intellectual disability and comorbidities, there was a positive association with enrolling in hospice care. A number of clinical implications can be drawn from the study findings that hospice and palliative care nurses use to improve their clinical practice of caring for children with ID and their families at end of life.

  4. Sexual Health of Polish Athletes with Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryszard Plinta

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine sexual functioning of Polish athletes with disabilities (including paralympians. The study encompassed 218 people with physical disabilities, aged between 18 and 45 (149 men and 69 women. The entire research population was divided into three groups: Polish paralympians (n = 45, athletes with disabilities (n = 126 and non-athletes with disabilities (n = 47. The quality of sexual life of Polish paralympians was measured by using the Polish version of Female Sexual Function Index and International Index of Erectile Function. Clinically significant erectile dysfunctions were most often diagnosed in non-athletes (83.33% with 50% result of severe erectile dysfunctions, followed by athletes and paralympians with comparable results of 56.98% and 54.17% respectively (p = 0.00388. Statistically significant clinical sexual dysfunctions concerned lubrication, orgasm as well as pain domains, and prevailed among female non-athletes (68.42%, 68.42% and 57.89%. Practising sports at the highest level has a favourable effect on the sexuality of men and women with physical disabilities. Men with physical disabilities manifest more sexual disorders than women, an aspect which should be considered by health-care professionals working with people with disabilities.

  5. A Suspected Pelvic Aneurysmal Bone Cyst in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rayan Elkattah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Albeit rare, the majority of identified bone lesions in pregnancy spare the pelvis. Once encountered with a pelvic bone lesion in pregnancy, the obstetrician may face a challenging situation as it is difficult to determine and predict the effects that labor and parturition impart on the pelvic bones. Bone changes and pelvic bone fractures have been well documented during childbirth. The data regarding clinical outcomes and management of pregnancies complicated by pelvic ABCs is scant. Highly suspected to represent an aneurysmal bone cyst, the clinical evaluation of a pelvic lesion in the ilium of a pregnant individual is presented, and modes of delivery in such a scenario are discussed.

  6. Investigation of suspected TRALI cases in 2006–2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjeta Maček Kvanka

    2012-12-01

    Methods: In 2006–2011, eight suspected TRALI cases that met consensus clinical criteria and had chest radiograph were investigated in the Blood Transfusion Center of Slovenia. Patients and all donors of blood components transfused within 6 hours before the onset of acute respiratory distress were investigated for leukocyte antibodies against HLA class I and II antigens, and antibodies against neutrophil antigens HNA. All cases were investigated for patient, donor and blood component characteristics. In cooperation with clinicians, chest radiographs and alternative risk factors for acute lung injury (ALI were evaluated.

  7. Creating fair lineups for suspects with distinctive features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarkadi, Theodora; Wade, Kimberley A; Stewart, Neil

    2009-12-01

    In their descriptions, eyewitnesses often refer to a culprit's distinctive facial features. However, in a police lineup, selecting the only member with the described distinctive feature is unfair to the suspect and provides the police with little further information. For fair and informative lineups, the distinctive feature should be either replicated across foils or concealed on the target. In the present experiments, replication produced more correct identifications in target-present lineups--without increasing the incorrect identification of foils in target-absent lineups--than did concealment. This pattern, and only this pattern, is predicted by the hybrid-similarity model of recognition.

  8. Cytogenetic dosimetry in suspected cases of ionizing radiation occupational exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramalho, Adriana T.; Costa, Maria Lucia P.; Oliveira, Monica S.; Silva, Francisco Cesar A. da

    2001-01-01

    Cytogenetic dosimetry is very useful in routine as well as in serious accident situations in which exposed individuals do not wear physical dosimeters. Since 1984, the technique of cytogenetic dosimetry has been used as a routine in our laboratory at IRD/CNEN to complement the data of physical dosimetry. In the period from 1984 to 2000, 138 cases of occupational overexposure of individual dosimeters were investigated by us. In total, only in 36 of the 138 cases investigated the overexposure was confirmed by cytogenetic dosimetry. The data indicates a total confirmation index of just 26% of the suspected cases.(author)

  9. Media portrayal of elite athletes with disability - a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Leanne; Robinson, Priscilla; Shields, Nora

    2017-11-10

    The media plays an important role in shaping society's beliefs about disability and sport. The aim of this systematic review is to identify how elite athletes with disability are portrayed in the media. Six electronic databases were searched from 2001 to March 2017 for quantitative or qualitative content analysis of media coverage of elite athletes with disability: SportsDiscus, CINAHL, PsychInfo, Medline 1996-, Embase, and Proquest. Quality assessment and data extraction were performed by two independent assessors. Seventeen moderate quality articles were included. Six themes emerged from the data such as frequency of articles and photos about elite athletes with disability; athlete gender; athlete nationality; disability; athleticism; and Olympic Games versus Paralympic Games. Our results show that elite athletes with disability are less visible in the media than their nondisabled counterparts; female athletes received less coverage than male; the media favored domestic athletes and certain types of disability; and, although there was a focus on athleticism, this was underpinned by a "supercrip" narrative and a medicalised description of disability. Although there has been a positive shift in the narrative around elite athletes with disability in media, relative absence and differing portrayal is present. Considering the power of media shaping society's perceptions of disability, further investigation is warranted. Implications for Rehabilitation Media has a role in how elite athletes with disability are portrayed and consequently perceived by the public. Elite athletes with disability rarely feature in media. Images of disability are minimized, and certain types of disabilities are favored. An athletic narrative is emerging; however, a medicalised description of athletes remains, shifting the focus from athleticism. "Supercrip" and "Superhuman" terms are commonly used, but may negatively impact the broader disability community.

  10. Returning to work after disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, P Roger

    2002-06-01

    After a workplace injury or disability, there is a period of hardship and adjustment for the injured party as well as all stakeholders in the workers' compensation process. Ultimately, however, return to work is considered. The author reviews this often challenging exercise from the Canadian perspective and stresses the need for timely intervention, honest communication, the coordination of information and resources--and the need for flexibility. A case study on low back pain is included.

  11. Negotiating hearing disability and hearing disabled identities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke Hindhede, Anette

    2012-01-01

        Using disability theory as a framework and social science theories of identity to strengthen the arguments, this paper explores empirically how working-age adults confront the medical diagnosis of hearing impairment. For most participants hearing impairment threatens the stability of social...... interaction and the construction of hearing disabled identities is seen as shaped in the interaction with the hearing impaired person‟s surroundings. In order to overcome the potential stigmatisation the „passing‟ as normal becomes predominant. For many the diagnosis provokes radical redefinitions of the self....... The discursively produced categorisation and subjectivity of senescence mean that rehabilitation technologies such as hearing aids identify a particular life-style (disabled) which determines their social significance. Thus wearing a hearing aid works against the contemporary attempt to create socially ideal...

  12. Disability Employment 101

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Department of Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Business is about productivity and maintaining a competitive advantage. To do this, business needs qualified workers. Hiring people with disabilities adds value to a business and will attract new customers. Disability is not inability. Employers can make sound business decisions and gain a competitive advantage by using this guide to increase the…

  13. Introduction: Childhood and Disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Erica K

    2017-09-01

    From growth attenuation therapy for severely developmentally disabled children to the post-natal management of infants with trisomy 13 and 18, pediatric treatment decisions regularly involve assessments of the probability and severity of a child's disability. Because these decisions are almost always made by surrogate decision-makers (parents and caregivers) and because these decision-makers must often make decisions based on both prognostic guesses and potentially biased quality of life judgments, they are among the most ethically complex in pediatric care. As the introduction to HEC Forum's special thematic issue on Childhood and Disability, this article orients the reader to the history of bioethics' relationship to both pediatric ethics and disability studies and introduces the issue's five manuscripts. As clinicians, disability scholars, philosophers and clinical ethicists writing on various aspects of pediatric disability, the articles' authors all invite readers to dig beneath an overly-simplified version of what disability might mean to children and families and instead embrace a posture of genuine humility, recognizing both the limits and harms of traditional medical and bioethical responses (or indifferences) to the disabled child.

  14. Disciplining Students with Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Kevin P.

    This report discusses disciplining children with disabilities in schools, in the context of the legal requirements of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Practical concepts are explained in terms of the school's responsibility to: (1) maintain a safe environment; (2) teach a code of discipline to all students; (3) use the…

  15. The Disabled: Media's Monster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdan, Robert; And Others

    1982-01-01

    From the early nineteenth century to the present, horror, gangster, and adventure films, television, the comics, and newspapers have shown physical and mental disabilities to connote murder, violence, and danger. Such false portrayals have promoted negative public attitudes toward people with disabilities. (Author/MJL)

  16. Creating a disability mythology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, S E

    1992-01-01

    People with disabilities have, for the most part, failed to identify with each other as a group. This has been detrimental because it has built a sense of isolation when a camaraderie based upon existing commonalities could have been developed. During the past ten to twenty years, there has been a great deal of discussion about appropriate language to use when discussing disability issues. This discussion has been a part of a larger debate concerning the existence of a disability culture. I believe that there is indeed a disability culture and I am a proponent of identifying and passing on stories which contribute to that culture. I have chosen to use mythology to convey this message and have begun with a focus on heroes - people who do something out of the ordinary. It is contended that almost all people with disabilities have performed heroic activities because of the pervasive discrimination encountered by each individual with a disability. Creating a disability mythology is an attempt to recognize and promote heroes within the disabled community and to advocate the importance of telling other people how positive change has occurred through instances of individual heroism.

  17. Senior and Disabilities Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    State Employees Division of Senior and Disabilities Services DHSS State of Alaska Home Divisions and ; Assistance Senior Benefits Program Medicare Substance Abuse Treatment Alaska Tribal Child Welfare Compact ; Senior and Disabilities Services Page Content Director Duane Mayes photo image. Duane Mayes Director

  18. Beauty and Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, David W.

    2015-01-01

    People often hold stereotypical notions about disability, assuming people with significant disabilities offer little in terms of friendship or contribution. Some are even repulsed by that person's physical appearance. Such responses, evident within the Christian community as well, fail to acknowledge the inherent worth of the person as created in…

  19. Abdominal CT Does Not Improve Outcome for Children with Suspected Acute Appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle I. Miano

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acute appendicitis in children is a clinical diagnosis, which often requires preoperative confirmation with either ultrasound (US or computed tomography (CT studies. CTs expose children to radiation, which may increase the lifetime risk of developing malignancy. US in the pediatric population with appropriate clinical follow up and serial exam may be an effective diagnostic modality for many children without incurring the risk of radiation. The objective of the study was to compare the rate of appendiceal rupture and negative appendectomies between children with and without abdominal CTs; and to evaluate the same outcomes for children with and without USs to determine if there were any associations between imaging modalities and outcomes. Methods: We conducted a retrospective chart review including emergency department (ED and inpatient records from 1/1/2009–2/31/2010 and included patients with suspected acute appendicitis. Results: 1,493 children, aged less than one year to 20 years, were identified in the ED with suspected appendicitis. These patients presented with abdominal pain who had either a surgical consult or an abdominal imaging study to evaluate for appendicitis, or were transferred from an outside hospital or primary care physician office with the stated suspicion of acute appendicitis. Of these patients, 739 were sent home following evaluation in the ED and did not return within the subsequent two weeks and were therefore presumed not to have appendicitis. A total of 754 were admitted and form the study population, of which 20% received a CT, 53% US, and 8% received both. Of these 57%, 95% CI [53.5,60.5] had pathology-proven appendicitis. Appendicitis rates were similar for children with a CT (57%, 95% CI [49.6,64.4] compared to those without (57%, 95% CI [52.9,61.0]. Children with perforation were similar between those with a CT (18%, 95% CI [12.3,23.7] and those without (13%, 95% CI [10.3,15.7]. The proportion of

  20. Defining Disability: Understandings of and Attitudes Towards Ableism and Disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carli Friedman

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Disabled people, amidst political and social gains, continue to experience discrimination in multiple areas. Understanding how such discrimination, named here as ableism, operates is important and may require studying perspectives of people who do not claim a disability identity.  Ableism may be expressed in a number of ways, and examining how a particular group, in this case siblings of disabled people, understand and value disability may contribute to overall understandings about how ableism works. Thus, the purpose of this study is to explore relationships between siblings of disabled people's broad societal understandings of disability and their attitudes towards it. In order to tease out this relationship further we have also examined factors that impact how people define disability. Using both social psychological and sociological approaches, we have contextualized individual attitudes as providing additional new information about social meanings of disability, and set this study's results against the larger backdrops of debates over meanings of disability within Disability Studies. In our research, participants revealed complex understandings of disability, but most often defined disability as preventing or slowing action, as an atypical function, a lack of independence, and as a socially constructed obstacle. Participants' unconscious (implicit disability attitudes significantly related to their understandings of disability as lacking independence, impairment, and/or in relation to the norm, and their conscious (explicit disability attitudes. Moreover, longer employment in a disability-related industry was correlated with defining disability as a general difference, rather than as slowing or limiting of tasks.

  1. A case of suspected 'Bickerstaff's encephalitis' and its CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moto, Atsufumi; Endo, Shunro; Ohmori, Tomoaki; Oka, Nobuo; Takaku, Akira

    1985-01-01

    A case of suspected ''Bickerstaff's encephalitis'' was presented with special reference to the CT findings. A 4-year-old girl exhibited fever and nausea after the beginning of December, 1983, followed by unsteady gait on January 1, 1984. She was admitted to another hospital and diagnosed by means of a spinalfluid examination as having aseptic meningitis. Her symptoms subsided transiently, but then she began again to suffer recurrently from unsteady gait on January 27. After that she developed dysarthria and dysphagia, a disturbance of eye movement was observed, and she became lethargic and disoriented. On February 6, she was transferred to our hospital. Plain CT scan on admission revealed a low-density area on the left cerebellar peduncle and the inferior medial part of the left temporal lobe. Moreover, the low-density area was heterogenously enhanced with the contrast medium. Angiography showed no abnormal findings. Considering these CT findings, we suspected a pontine tumor. Four days after her admission, however, her symptoms and signs began rapidly to subside, and also the abnormal findings on the CT scan diminished gradually as the symptoms were relieved. On March 2, she was discharged without any neurological abnormality. (author)

  2. PMS2 involvement in patients suspected of Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niessen, Renée C; Kleibeuker, Jan H; Westers, Helga; Jager, Paul O J; Rozeveld, Dennie; Bos, Krista K; Boersma-van Ek, Wytske; Hollema, Harry; Sijmons, Rolf H; Hofstra, Robert M W

    2009-04-01

    It is well-established that germline mutations in the mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 cause Lynch syndrome. However, mutations in these three genes do not account for all Lynch syndrome (suspected) families. Recently, it was shown that germline mutations in another mismatch repair gene, PMS2, play a far more important role in Lynch syndrome than initially thought. To explore this further, we determined the prevalence of pathogenic germline PMS2 mutations in a series of Lynch syndrome-suspected patients. Ninety-seven patients who had early-onset microsatellite instable colorectal or endometrial cancer, or multiple Lynch syndrome-associated tumors and/or were from an Amsterdam Criteria II-positive family were selected for this study. These patients carried no pathogenic germline mutation in MLH1, MSH2, or MSH6. When available, tumors were investigated for immunohistochemical staining (IHC) for PMS2. PMS2 was screened in all patients by exon-by-exon sequencing. We identified four patients with a pathogenic PMS2 mutation (4%) among the 97 patients we selected. IHC of PMS2 was informative in one of the mutation carriers, and in this case, the tumor showed loss of PMS2 expression. In conclusion, our study confirms the finding of previous studies that PMS2 is more frequently involved in Lynch syndrome than originally expected.

  3. Investigation of suspected chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owe, Jone Furlund; Næss, Halvor; Gjerde, Ivar Otto; Bødtker, Jørn Eilert; Tysnes, Ole-Bjørn

    2016-02-09

    Chronic fatigue is a frequently occurring problem in both the primary and specialist health services. The Department of Neurology at Haukeland University Hospital has established a standard assessment for patients referred with suspected CFS/ME. This study reports diagnoses and findings upon assessment, and considers the benefit of supplementary examinations. Diagnoses and findings from examinations of 365 patients assessed for suspected CFS/ME are retrospectively reported. A total of 48 patients (13.2%) were diagnosed with CFS/ME, while a further 18 patients (4.9%) were diagnosed with post-infectious fatigue. Mental and behavioural disorders were diagnosed in 169 patients (46.3%), and these represented by far the largest group. Serious, but unrecognised somatic illness was discovered in two patients, while changes of uncertain significance were identified by MRI and lumbar puncture in a few patients. Fatigue is a frequently occurring symptom in the population. Thorough somatic and psychiatric investigation is necessary before referral to the specialist health services. Mental disorders and reactions to life crises are common and important differential diagnoses for CFS/ME. Long waiting times in the specialist health services may result in delayed diagnosis for these patients.

  4. CT coronary angiographic evaluation of suspected anginal chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Alastair J; Newby, David E

    2016-02-15

    Non-invasive imaging plays a critical role in the assessment of patients presenting with suspected angina chest pain. However, wide variations in practice across Europe and North America highlight the lack of consensus in selecting the appropriate first-line test for the investigation of coronary artery disease (CAD). CT coronary angiography (CTCA) has a high negative predictive value for excluding the presence of CAD. As such, it serves as a potential 'gatekeeper' to downstream testing by reducing the rate of inappropriate invasive coronary angiography. Two recent large multicentre randomised control trials have provided insights into whether CTCA can be incorporated into chest pain care pathways to improve risk stratification of CAD. They demonstrate that using CTCA enhances diagnostic certainty and improves the targeting of appropriate invasive investigations and therapeutic interventions. Importantly, reductions in cardiac death and non-fatal myocardial infarction appear to be attained through the more appropriate use of preventative therapy and coronary revascularisation when guided by CTCA. With this increasing portfolio of evidence, CTCA should be considered the non-invasive investigation of choice in the evaluation of patients with suspected angina pectoris due to coronary heart disease. NCT01149590, post-results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  5. Value of noncontrast spiral CT for suspected acute appendicitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Pil Yeob; Lee, Sang Wook; Kwon, Jae Soo; Sung, Young Soon; Rho, Myoung Ho; Chang, Jeong A.

    1998-01-01

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy and clinical efficacy of noncontrast spiral CT in patients with suspected acute appendicitis. Over a six-month period, 100 patients with suspected acute appendicitis were prospectively evaluated with noncontrast spiral CT. All scans were obtained from the lower body of L3 to the symphysis pubis, with 5mm or 10mm collimation and pitch of 1 or 1.5, and without intravenous or oral contrast material. Diagnosis was established by means of surgical or clinical follow-up. Prospective diagnosis based on CT findings was compared with surgical results and clinical follow-up. Acute appendicitis was confirmed in 47 of 100 patients. On the basis of the Ct findings, SI patients were prospectively interpreted as positive for appendicitis, but in six the diagnosis was false-positive. Two of the 47 with acute appendicitis were prospectively interpreted as normal. The preoperative diagnosis of acute appendicitis was, thus, 45 true-positive, 47 true-negative, six false-positive and two false-negative yielding a sensitivity of 96%, a specificity of 89%, an accuracy of 92%, a positive predictive value of 88%, and a negative predictive value of 96%. Using CT, an alternative diagnosis was established in 14 patients. Noncontrast spiral CT is a useful technique for diagnosing acute appendicitis. =20

  6. New seismograph includes filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-11-02

    The new Nimbus ES-1210 multichannel signal enhancement seismograph from EG and G geometrics has recently been redesigned to include multimode signal fillers on each amplifier. The ES-1210F is a shallow exploration seismograph for near subsurface exploration such as in depth-to-bedrock, geological hazard location, mineral exploration, and landslide investigations.

  7. The reality of disability: Multidimensional poverty of people with disability and their families in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinilla-Roncancio, Mónica

    2017-12-30

    Disability and poverty are interconnected and although this relationship has been recognised, there is a lack of empirical evidence to support any possible causal relationship in this topic, particularly in the context of Latin America (LA). This study tests the hypothesis "Disability increases the risk of multidimensional poverty of people living with disabilities and their families". Using national census data from Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica and Mexico, the Global Multidimensional Poverty Index (Global MPI) was calculated with the aim of measuring and comparing the levels of multidimensional poverty of people living in households with and without disabled members in the five countries. We found that in the five countries people with disabilities and their families had higher incidence, intensity and levels of multidimensional poverty compared with people living in other households. Their levels of deprivation were also higher for all the indicators included in the Global MPI and the contribution of this group to the national MPI was higher than their share of the population, thus people with disabilities and their families are overrepresented in those living in multidimensional poverty. People with disabilities and their families are in worse conditions than poor households without disabled members and social policies should aim to reduce their high levels of multidimensional poverty and deprivation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Endosonography for suspected obstructive jaundice with no definite pathology on ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Hua; Yang, Chi-Chieh; Yeh, Yung-Hsiang; Yang, Tsang; Chung, Tieh-Chi

    2015-09-01

    Ultrasonography (US) cannot demonstrate all the etiologies of biliary tract dilatation in patients with jaundice. Thus, we evaluated the etiologic yield of endosonography (EUS) for suspected obstructive jaundice when no definite pathology was found on US. Additionally, we sought to identify the predictors of the most common etiologies. We performed a retrospective review of 123 consecutive patients who had undergone EUS for suspected obstructive jaundice when no definite pathology was identified on US. The most common diagnoses included no pathological obstruction (n = 43), pancreatobiliary malignancy (n = 41), and choledocholithiasis (n = 28). Pancreatobiliary malignancy was associated with common bile duct (CBD) dilatation, and fever and elevated alanine aminotransferase were predictors of choledocholithiasis (p jaundice, 100% (40/40) for no pathological finding, 100% (23/23) for ampullary cancer, 100% (13/13) for pancreatic cancer, 75% (3/4) for CBD cancer, and 92.9% (26/28) for choledocholithiasis, respectively. Besides the two patients with focal chronic pancreatitis misdiagnosed as with pancreatic cancer, EUS missed the lesions in one CBD cancer patient and two patients with choledocholithiasis. The overall accuracy of EUS in ascertaining pancreatobiliary malignancy and choledocholithiasis was comparable (97.6%, 40/41 vs. 92.9%, 26/28; p > 0.05). Marked CBD dilatation (≥12 mm) should remind us of the high risk of malignancy, and the presence of CBD dilatation and fever is suggestive of choledocholithiasis. Negative EUS findings cannot assure any pathological obstruction in patients with clinically suspected obstructive jaundice. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Low-Dose CT for Evaluation of Suspected Urolithiasis: Diagnostic Yield for Assessment of Alternative Diagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinrich, Julius Matthias; Bannas, Peter; Regier, Marc; Keller, Sarah; Kluth, Luis; Adam, Gerhard; Henes, Frank Oliver

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the diagnostic yield of low-dose (LD) CT for alternative diagnoses in patients with suspected urolithiasis. In this retrospective study, we included 776 consecutive patients who underwent unenhanced abdominal CT for evaluation of suspected urolithiasis. All examinations were performed with an LD CT protocol; images were reconstructed using iterative reconstruction. The leading LD CT diagnosis was recorded for each patient and compared with the final clinical diagnosis, which served as the reference standard. The mean (± SD) effective dose of CT was 1.9 ± 0.6 mSv. The frequency of urolithiasis was 82.5% (640/776). LD CT reached a sensitivity of 94.1% (602/640), a specificity of 100.0% (136/136), and an accuracy of 95.1% (738/776) for the detection of urolithiasis. In 93 of 136 patients (68.4%) without urolithiasis, alternative diagnoses were established as the final clinical diagnoses. Alternative diagnoses were most commonly located in the genitourinary (n = 53) and gastrointestinal (n = 18) tracts. LD CT correctly provided alternative diagnoses for 57 patients (61.3%) and was false-negative for five patients (5.4%). The most common clinical alternative diagnoses were urinary tract infections (n = 22). Seven diagnoses missed at LD CT were located outside the FOV. For 43 of all 776 patients (5.5%), neither LD CT nor clinical workup could establish a final diagnosis. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of LD CT for the detection of alternative diagnoses were 91.9% (57/62), 95.6% (43/45), and 93.5% (100/107), respectively. LD CT enables the diagnosis of most alternative diagnoses in the setting of suspected urolithiasis. The most frequent alternative diagnoses missed by LD CT are urinary tract infections or diagnoses located outside the FOV of the abdominopelvic CT scan.

  10. Efficacy of Patient Selection for Diagnostic Coronary Angiography in Suspected Coronary Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Flávio Costa Filho

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground:Guidelines recommend that in suspected stable coronary artery disease (CAD, a clinical (non-invasive evaluation should be performed before coronary angiography.Objective:We assessed the efficacy of patient selection for coronary angiography in suspected stable CAD.Methods:We prospectively selected consecutive patients without known CAD, referred to a high-volume tertiary center. Demographic characteristics, risk factors, symptoms and non-invasive test results were correlated to the presence of obstructive CAD. We estimated the CAD probability based on available clinical data and the incremental diagnostic value of previous non-invasive tests.Results:A total of 830 patients were included; median age was 61 years, 49.3% were males, 81% had hypertension and 35.5% were diabetics. Non-invasive tests were performed in 64.8% of the patients. At coronary angiography, 23.8% of the patients had obstructive CAD. The independent predictors for obstructive CAD were: male gender (odds ratio [OR], 3.95; confidence interval [CI] 95%, 2.70 - 5.77, age (OR for 5 years increment, 1.15; CI 95%, 1.06 - 1.26, diabetes (OR, 2.01; CI 95%, 1.40 - 2.90, dyslipidemia (OR, 2.02; CI 95%, 1.32 - 3.07, typical angina (OR, 2.92; CI 95%, 1.77 - 4.83 and previous non-invasive test (OR 1.54; CI 95% 1.05 - 2.27.Conclusions:In this study, less than a quarter of the patients referred for coronary angiography with suspected CAD had the diagnosis confirmed. A better clinical and non-invasive assessment is necessary, to improve the efficacy of patient selection for coronary angiography.

  11. Consensus statement of the International Summit on Intellectual Disability and Dementia on valuing the perspectives of persons with intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watchman, Karen; Janicki, Matthew P; Udell, Leslie; Hogan, Mary; Quinn, Sam; Beránková, Anna

    2018-01-01

    The International Summit on Intellectual Disability and Dementia covered a range of issues related to dementia and intellectual disability, including the dearth of personal reflections of persons with intellectual disability affected by dementia. This article reflects on this deficiency and explores some of the personal perspectives gleaned from the literature, from the Summit attendees and from the experiences of persons with intellectual disability recorded or scribed in advance of the two-day Summit meeting. Systemic recommendations included reinforcing the value of the involvement of persons with intellectual disability in (a) research alongside removing barriers to inclusion posed by institutional/ethics review boards, (b) planning groups that establish supports for dementia and (c) peer support. Practice recommendations included (a) valuing personal perspectives in decision-making, (b) enabling peer-to-peer support models, (c) supporting choice in community-dwelling arrangements and (d) broadening availability of materials for persons with intellectual disability that would promote understanding of dementia.

  12. Adults with suspected central nervous system infection: A prospective study of diagnostic accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatib, Ula; van de Beek, Diederik; Lees, John A; Brouwer, Matthijs C

    2017-01-01

    To study the diagnostic accuracy of clinical and laboratory features in the diagnosis of central nervous system (CNS) infection and bacterial meningitis. We included consecutive adult episodes with suspected CNS infection who underwent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination. The reference standard was the diagnosis classified into five categories: 1) CNS infection; 2) CNS inflammation without infection; 3) other neurological disorder; 4) non-neurological infection; and 5) other systemic disorder. Between 2012 and 2015, 363 episodes of suspected CNS infection were included. CSF examination showed leucocyte count >5/mm 3 in 47% of episodes. Overall, 89 of 363 episodes were categorized as CNS infection (25%; most commonly viral meningitis [7%], bacterial meningitis [7%], and viral encephalitis [4%]), 36 (10%) episodes as CNS inflammatory disorder, 111 (31%) as systemic infection, in 119 (33%) as other neurological disorder, and 8 (2%) as other systemic disorders. Diagnostic accuracy of individual clinical characteristics and blood tests for the diagnosis of CNS infection or bacterial meningitis was low. CSF leucocytosis differentiated best between bacterial meningitis and other diagnoses (area under the curve [AUC] 0.95) or any neurological infection versus other diagnoses (AUC 0.93). Clinical characteristics fail to differentiate between neurological infections and other diagnoses, and CSF analysis is the main contributor to the final diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Diagnostic limitations of 10 mm thickness single-slice computed tomography for patients with suspected appendicitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaidu, Motoki; Oyamatu, Manabu; Sato, Kenji; Saitou, Akira; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Yoshimura, Norihiko; Sasai, Keisuke

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective analysis was to evaluate the accuracy of 10 mm thickness single helical computed tomography (CT) examination for confirming the diagnosis of appendicitis or providing a diagnosis other than appendicitis, including underlying periappendical neoplasms. From April 1, 2001 to March 30, 2005, a total of 272 patients with suspected appendicitis underwent CT examinations. Of the 272 patients, 106 (39%) underwent surgery. Seven CT examinations for seven patients were excluded because of inconsistency of the CT protocol. We therefore reviewed 99 CT images (99 patients) with correlation to surgical-pathological findings to clarify the diagnostic accuracy of CT examinations. We compared the postoperative diagnosis with the preoperative CT report. The final diagnoses were confirmed by macroscopic findings at surgery and pathological evaluations if necessary. Of the 99 patients, 87 had acute appendicitis at surgery. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of CT were 98.9%, 75.0%, and 96.0%, respectively. The positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 96.6% and 90.0%, respectively. Among nine patients in the true-negative category, five had colon cancers; and among three patients in the false-positive category, two had cancer of the cecal-appendiceal region as the underlying disease. CT examination is useful for patients with suspected appendicitis, but radiologists should be aware of the limitation of thick-sliced single helical CT. They should also be aware of the possibility of other diseases, including coincident abdominal neoplasms and underlying cecal-appendiceal cancer. (author)

  14. Analytic device including nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.; Fratalocchi, Andrea; Totero Gongora, Juan Sebastian; Coluccio, Maria Laura; Candeloro, Patrizio; Cuda, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    A device for detecting an analyte in a sample comprising: an array including a plurality of pixels, each pixel including a nanochain comprising: a first nanostructure, a second nanostructure, and a third nanostructure, wherein size of the first nanostructure is larger than that of the second nanostructure, and size of the second nanostructure is larger than that of the third nanostructure, and wherein the first nanostructure, the second nanostructure, and the third nanostructure are positioned on a substrate such that when the nanochain is excited by an energy, an optical field between the second nanostructure and the third nanostructure is stronger than an optical field between the first nanostructure and the second nanostructure, wherein the array is configured to receive a sample; and a detector arranged to collect spectral data from a plurality of pixels of the array.

  15. Saskatchewan resources. [including uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-09-01

    The production of chemicals and minerals for the chemical industry in Saskatchewan are featured, with some discussion of resource taxation. The commodities mentioned include potash, fatty amines, uranium, heavy oil, sodium sulfate, chlorine, sodium hydroxide, sodium chlorate and bentonite. Following the successful outcome of the Cluff Lake inquiry, the uranium industry is booming. Some developments and production figures for Gulf Minerals, Amok, Cenex and Eldorado are mentioned.

  16. Unfair Lineups Make Witnesses More Likely to Confuse Innocent and Guilty Suspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colloff, Melissa F; Wade, Kimberley A; Strange, Deryn

    2016-09-01

    Eyewitness-identification studies have focused on the idea that unfair lineups (i.e., ones in which the police suspect stands out) make witnesses more willing to identify the police suspect. We examined whether unfair lineups also influence subjects' ability to distinguish between innocent and guilty suspects and their ability to judge the accuracy of their identification. In a single experiment (N = 8,925), we compared three fair-lineup techniques used by the police with unfair lineups in which we did nothing to prevent distinctive suspects from standing out. Compared with the fair lineups, doing nothing not only increased subjects' willingness to identify the suspect but also markedly impaired subjects' ability to distinguish between innocent and guilty suspects. Accuracy was also reduced at every level of confidence. These results advance theory on witnesses' identification performance and have important practical implications for how police should construct lineups when suspects have distinctive features. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. The economic costs of childhood disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabile, Mark; Allin, Sara

    2012-01-01

    that the cost estimates on which they base their calculation vary widely depending on the methodology, jurisdiction, and data used. Because their calculations do not include all costs, notably medical costs covered through health insurance, they represent a lower bound. On that basis, Stabile and Allin argue that many expensive interventions to prevent and reduce childhood disability might well be justified by a cost-benefit calculation.

  18. Supporting Students with Disabilities during School Crises: A Teacher's Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Laura S.; Embury, Dusty Columbia; Jones, Ruth E.; Yssel, Nina

    2014-01-01

    Most schools have crisis plans to support student safety, but few plans address the complex needs of students with disabilities. School supports should include analysis of school plans and student strengths and needs to ensure that students with disabilities have the best opportunity to be safe in school crises. Recommendations include developing…

  19. Using Internet Artifacts to Profile a Child Pornography Suspect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus K. Rogers

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Digital evidence plays a crucial role in child pornography investigations. However, in the following case study, the authors argue that the behavioral analysis or “profiling” of digital evidence can also play a vital role in child pornography investigations. The following case study assessed the Internet Browsing History (Internet Explorer Bookmarks, Mozilla Bookmarks, and Mozilla History from a suspected child pornography user’s computer. The suspect in this case claimed to be conducting an ad hoc law enforcement investigation. After the URLs were classified (Neutral; Adult Porn; Child Porn; Adult Dating sites; Pictures from Social Networking Profiles; Chat Sessions; Bestiality; Data Cleaning; Gay Porn, the Internet history files were statistically analyzed to determine prevalence and trends in Internet browsing. First, a frequency analysis was used to determine a baseline of online behavior. Results showed 54% (n = 3205 of the URLs were classified as “neutral” and 38.8% (n = 2265 of the URLs were classified as a porn website. Only 10.8% of the URLs were classified as child pornography websites. However when the IE history file was analyzed by visit, or “hit,” count, the Pictures/Profiles (31.5% category had the highest visit count followed by Neutral (19.3%, Gay Porn (17%, and Child Porn (16.6%. When comparing the frequency of URLs to the Hit Count for each pornography type, it was noted that the accused was accessing gay porn, child porn, chat rooms, and picture profiles (i.e., from Facebook more often than adult porn and neutral websites. The authors concluded that the suspect in this case was in fact a child pornography user and not an ad hoc investigator, and the findings from the behavioral analysis were admitted as evidence in the sentencing hearing for this case. The authors believe this case study illustrates the ability to conduct a behavioral analysis of digital evidence. More work is required to further validate the

  20. Geriatic Disability Related Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Adib Hajbagheri

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Reports are indicating of increasing trend of aging and disability in the developing countries while such disabilities are decreasing within the developed countries. This study designed to evaluate the disability and some of its related factors among the elderly population (65 and older in Kashan, Iran. Methods & Materials: A cross-sectional analytical study was conducted on a multi-stage random sample of 350 elderly people (65 year and older in Kashan. The WHO-DAS-II was used as the generic disability measure. The questionnair had 48 questions. The range of score could be between 0-144. Chi-square, t-test analysis and ANOVA were utilized to check significant differences between subgroups. Results: 61% were men and 12% were living lonely. One fourth had some type of addiction, the majority were ilitrate and two thired had not regular phisycal activity.Twenty percent of the old people had a modereate disability and 4.3% were extremely disabled. A significant relationship was found between the disability and variables such as sex, age, living style, needing help, marriage status, living location, addiction, job, level of physical activity, education, and having multiple diseases. Conclusion: In conclusion, geriatric population in Iran, has a lower levels of disability in compare to those of other developed countries. Need of geriatric cares must be be increasing, since the populationpattern of elderly people is increasing in Iran. Female and ilitrate elders were sufering of more disability. These findings indicated the nessesity to more attention to these voulnarable subgroups of population.

  1. Disability impact and coping in mothers of children with intellectual disabilities and multiple disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishore, M Thomas

    2011-12-01

    Understanding the disability impact on parenting and caregiving is important for intervention. The present study was designed to understand the differences in perceived disability impact and related coping in mothers having children with intellectual disabilities alone compared to those having children with intellectual disabilities and additional disabilities. Accordingly, 30 mothers of children with intellectual disabilities and 30 mothers of children with intellectual and additional disabilities were assessed for disability impact and coping. Group differences for disability impact were present in specific domains but not overall. Despite variations in coping pattern, both positive and negative coping strategies were observed in both groups. The results may imply that the impact of intellectual disability is so pervasive that except in certain domains mothers may not perceive the further impact of additional disabilities. Positive coping does not rule out negative coping strategies. These findings have specific relevance to service delivery in a cultural context.

  2. Which dimensions of disability does the HIV Disability Questionnaire (HDQ) measure? A factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Kelly K; Bayoumi, Ahmed M; Stratford, Paul; Solomon, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    to understand the impact of HIV and its comorbidities. The HIV Disability Questionnaire (HDQ) is a self-administered questionnaire developed to describe the presence, severity and episodic nature of disability experienced by people living with HIV. The HDQ is comprised of six domains of disability including: physical symptoms and impairments (20 items); cognitive symptoms and impairments (3 items); mental and emotional health symptoms and impairments (11 items); uncertainty (14 items); difficulties with day-to-day activities (9 items) and challenges to social inclusion (12 items). These domains represent the dimensions of disability measured by the HDQ. The HDQ is the first known HIV-specific disability measure for adults living with HIV. The HDQ may be used by clinicians and researchers to assess disability experienced by adults living with HIV.

  3. Sexual rights and disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Nucci, Ezio

    2011-03-01

    This paper argues against Appel's recent proposal-in this journal-that there is a fundamental human right to sexual pleasure, and that therefore the sexual pleasure of severely disabled people should be publicly funded-by thereby partially legalising prostitution. An alternative is proposed that does not need to pose a new positive human right; does not need public funding; does not need the legalisation of prostitution; and that would offer a better experience to the severely disabled: charitable non-profit organisations whose members would voluntarily and freely provide sexual pleasure to the severely disabled.

  4. Risk factors for disability discharge in enlisted active duty Army soldiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccirillo, Amanda L; Packnett, Elizabeth R; Cowan, David N; Boivin, Michael R

    2016-04-01

    The rate of permanent disability retirement in U.S. Army soldiers and the prevalence of combat-related disabilities have significantly increased over time. Prior research on risk factors associated with disability retirement included soldiers retired prior to conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. To identify risk factors for disability discharge among soldiers enlisted in the U.S. Army during military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. In this case-control study, cases included active duty soldiers evaluated for disability discharge. Controls, randomly selected from soldiers with no history of disability evaluation, were matched to cases based on enlistment year and sex. Conditional logistic regression models calculated odds of disability discharge. Attributable fractions estimated burden of disability for specific pre-existing condition categories. Poisson regression models compared risk of disability discharge related to common disability types by deployment and combat status. Characteristics at military enlistment with increased odds of disability discharge included a pre-existing condition, increased age or body mass index, white race, and being divorced. Musculoskeletal conditions and overweight contributed the largest proportion of disabilities. Deployment was protective against disability discharge or receiving a musculoskeletal-related disability, but significantly increased the risk of disability related to a psychiatric or neurological condition. Soldiers with a pre-existing condition at enlistment, particularly a musculoskeletal condition, had increased odds of disability discharge. Risk of disability was dependent on condition category when stratified by deployment and combat status. Additional research examining conditions during pre-disability hospitalizations could provide insight on specific conditions that commonly lead to disability discharge. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Being Included and Excluded

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korzenevica, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Following the civil war of 1996–2006, there was a dramatic increase in the labor mobility of young men and the inclusion of young women in formal education, which led to the transformation of the political landscape of rural Nepal. Mobility and schooling represent a level of prestige that rural...... politics. It analyzes how formal education and mobility either challenge or reinforce traditional gendered norms which dictate a lowly position for young married women in the household and their absence from community politics. The article concludes that women are simultaneously excluded and included from...... community politics. On the one hand, their mobility and decision-making powers decrease with the increase in the labor mobility of men and their newly gained education is politically devalued when compared to the informal education that men gain through mobility, but on the other hand, schooling strengthens...

  6. What is an Intellectual Disability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Educators Search English Español What Is an Intellectual Disability? KidsHealth / For Kids / What Is an Intellectual Disability? ... learning and becoming an independent person. What Causes Intellectual Disabilities? Intellectual disabilities happen because the brain gets injured ...

  7. Distemper in raccoons and foxes suspected of having rabies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habermann, R.T.; Herman, C.M.; Williams, F.P.

    1958-01-01

    1) Twenty-one raccoons and 3 red foxes were collected from areas where suspected rabies occurred. All were found to be nonrabid. 2) Distemper was diagnosed in 14 of the 21 raccoons by demonstrating intracytoplasmic and intranuclear inclusions in the brain and visceral tissues. Two of the 3 foxes were considered to have distemper; the clinical signs were typical and mouse inoculation tests were negative for rabies. 3) Deaths of the other 7 raccoons were attributed to: leishmaniasis 1, gastritis 1, bronchopneumonia 1, parasitism 2, car injury 1; 1 showed no significant lesions. The death of 1 fox was attributed to parasitism. 4) Distemper may be a frequent cause of death in raccoons and foxes, in epizootics which simulate rabies.

  8. Diagnosis of suspected venous thromboembolic disease in pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarsbrook, A.F.; Evans, A.L.; Owen, A.R.; Gleeson, F.V.

    2006-01-01

    Venous thromboembolic disease is a leading cause of maternal mortality during pregnancy. Early and accurate radiological diagnosis is essential as anticoagulation is not without risk and clinical diagnosis is unreliable. Although the disorder is potentially treatable, unnecessary treatment should be avoided. Most of the diagnostic imaging techniques involve ionizing radiation which exposes both the mother and fetus to finite radiation risks. There is a relative lack of evidence in the literature to guide clinicians and radiologists on the most appropriate method of assessing this group of patients. This article will review the role of imaging of suspected venous thromboembolic disease in pregnant patients, highlight contentious issues such as radiation risk, intravenous contrast use in pregnancy and discuss the published guidelines, as well as suggesting an appropriate imaging algorithm based on the available evidence

  9. Strength training for a child with suspected developmental coordination disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menz, Stacy M; Hatten, Kristin; Grant-Beuttler, Marybeth

    2013-01-01

    Children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) demonstrate difficulty with feedforward motor control and use varied compensatory strategies. To examine gross motor function changes following strength training in a child with motor control difficulties. A girl aged 6 years 11 months, with apraxia and hypotonia, and demonstrating motor delays consistent with DCD. Twenty-four strength training sessions were completed using a universal exercise unit. Postintervention scores significantly improved on the Bruininks-Oseretsky test of motor proficiency, second edition, and the Canadian occupational performance measure scores and raised the developmental coordination disorder questionnaire, revised 2007, scores above the range where DCD is suspected. Nonsignificant changes in strength were observed. Improved function and significant gains in manual coordination were observed following blocked practice of isolated, simple joint movements during strength training. Improved motor skills may be because of effective use of feedforward control and improved stabilization. Strength training does not rehearse skills using momentum, explaining nonsignificant changes in locomotor or locomotion areas.

  10. Management of suspected monogenic lung fibrosis in a specialised centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael Borie

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available At least 10% of patients with interstitial lung disease present monogenic lung fibrosis suspected on familial aggregation of pulmonary fibrosis, specific syndromes or early age of diagnosis. Approximately 25% of families have an identified mutation in genes mostly involved in telomere homeostasis, and more rarely in surfactant homeostasis. Beyond pathophysiological knowledge, detection of these mutations has practical consequence for patients. For instance, mutations involved in telomere homeostasis are associated with haematological complications after lung transplantation and may require adapted immunosuppression. Moreover, relatives may benefit from a clinical and genetic evaluation that should be specifically managed. The field of genetics of pulmonary fibrosis has made great progress in the last 10 years, raising specific problems that should be addressed by a specialised team.

  11. Bile acid aspiration in suspected ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu-Chung; Hsu, Po-Kuei; Su, Kang-Cheng; Liu, Lung-Yu; Tsai, Cheng-Chien; Tsai, Shu-Ho; Hsu, Wen-Hu; Lee, Yu-Chin; Perng, Diahn-Warng

    2009-07-01

    The aims of this study were to measure the levels of bile acids in patients with suspected ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) and provide a possible pathway for neutrophilic inflammation to explain its proinflammatory effect on the airway. Bile acid levels were measured by spectrophotometric enzymatic assay, and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry was used to quantify the major bile acids. Alveolar cells were grown on modified air-liquid interface culture inserts, and bile acids were then employed to stimulate the cells. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western blots were used to determine the involved gene expression and protein levels. The mean (+/- SE) concentration of total bile acids in tracheal aspirates was 6.2 +/- 2.1 and 1.1 +/- 0.4 mumol/L/g sputum, respectively, for patients with and without VAP (p VAP group (p aspiration may reduce the intensity of neutrophilic inflammation in intubated and mechanically ventilated patients in the ICU.

  12. [Diagnostic strategy in patients with clinically suspected deep vein thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mantoni, Margit Yvonne; Kristensen, M.; Brogaard, M.H.

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The standard method for diagnosing deep vein thrombosis (DVT) involves determination of D-dimer and ultrasound scanning. In an attempt to reduce the number of ultrasound examinations we have supplemented this with a clinical probability estimate for DVT (DVT-score) over one year....... MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 508 consecutive patients presenting in the emergency room with suspected DVT had D-dimer and DVT-score performed. Patients with non-elevated D-dimer and a low or moderate DVT score received no treatment. The remainder had ultrasound scanning from the groin to the popliteal...... patients with normal D-dimer had high DVT-scores, none had DVT, so that the benefit from determining DVT-scores was modest. Ultrasound scanning revealed DVT in 85 out of 397 patients with elevated D-dimer. A repeat examination was performed in 91 patients with persisting symptoms, and disclosed DVT in two...

  13. Suspected seminal vesiculitis in an Asian elephant (Elephas maximus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilburn, Jennifer J; Velguth, Karen E; Backues, Kay A

    2011-09-01

    A 32-year-old male Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) underwent routine transrectal stimulation for semen collection as part of an artificial insemination program. The procedure consisted of a preinsemination semen collection followed by two consecutive days of semen collections for artificial insemination. The second day's sample contained large numbers of inflammatory cells, intracellular bacteria, and phagocytized sperm. Semen was submitted for culture and sensitivity. Culture revealed Acinetobacter lwoffii, Staphylococcus intermedius, Kocuria roseus, and an unidentified gram-positive organism. Empirical antibiotic therapy with trimethoprim sulfa was initiated and then changed to enrofloxacin based on sensitivity panel results for a total of 28 days of treatment. Diagnostic semen collections were performed during treatment and 2 wk posttreatment to determine the success of therapy. Posttreatment collections revealed resolution of the inflammation. The origin of the infection was suspected to be the seminal vesicles.

  14. Unenhanced MR Imaging in adults with clinically suspected acute appendicitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chabanova, Elizaveta; Balslev, Ingegerd; Achiam, Michael

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of the study was to evaluate unenhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for the diagnosis of appendicitis or another surgery-requiring condition in an adult population scheduled for emergency appendectomy based on a clinical diagnosis of suspected acute appendicitis. MATERIALS...... radiologists and one surgeon independent of each other and compared with surgical and pathological records. RESULTS: According to the surgical and histopathological findings 30 of 48 patients (63%) had acute appendicitis. Of the remaining 18 patients, 4 patients had no reasons for the clinical symptoms and 14...... patients had other pathology. For the three reviewers the performance of MRI in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis showed the following sensitivity, specificity and accuracy ranges: 83-93%, 50-83% and 77-83%. Moderate (kappa=0.51) and fair (kappa=0.31) interobserver agreements in the MR diagnosis of acute...

  15. Optical spectroscopy of known and suspected Herbig-Haro objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, M.; Fuller, G.A.; California Univ., Berkeley)

    1985-01-01

    Optical spectra of a number of suspected Herbig-Haro objects are presented. From these, the nature of these nebulosities are determined. Several of the nebulae are of very high density, perhaps due to their extreme youth. Extinctions measured toward DG Tau HH and the L1551 IRS 5 optical jet are in each case substantially less than the stellar values. It is suggested that this phenomenon reflects the existence of appreciably thick circumstellar dust disks around these, and two additional, exciting stars. Shock model diagnostics suggest that the emission lines in these Herbig-Haro nebulae arise in modest velocity shocks with sizable preshock densities in several cases. Radial velocities enable lower limits to be placed on the mass loss rates of those stars that have been detected in the radio continuum. 39 references

  16. Dark-lumen magnetic resonance colonography in patients with suspected sigmoid diverticulitis: a feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajaj, Waleed; Lauenstein, Thomas; Goehde, Susanne; Kuehle, Christiane; Herborn, Christoph U.; Ruehm, Stefan G.; Langhorst, Jost; Zoepf, Thomas; Gerken, Guido; Goyen, Mathias

    2005-01-01

    To assess dark-lumen magnetic resonance colonography (MRC) for the evaluation of patients with suspected sigmoid diverticulitis. Forty patients with suspected sigmoid diverticulitis underwent MRC within 72 h prior to conventional colonoscopy (CC). A three-dimensional T1-weighted volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination sequence was acquired after an aqueous enema and intravenous administration of gadolinium-based contrast agents. All MRC data were evaluated by two radiologists. Based on wall thickness and focal uptake of contrast material and pericolic reaction including mesenteric infiltration on T1-weighted sequence the sigmoid colon was assessed for the presence of diverticulitis. MRC classified 17 of the 40 patients as normal with regard to sigmoid diverticulitis. However, CC confirmed the presence of light inflammatory signs in four patients which were missed in MRC. MRC correctly identified wall thickness and contrast uptake of the sigmoid colon in the other 23 patients. In three of these patients false-positive findings were observed, and MRC classified the inflammation of the sigmoid colon as diverticulitis whereas CC and histopathology confirmed invasive carcinoma. MRC detected additionally relevant pathologies of the entire colon and could be performed in cases where CC was incomplete. MRC may be considered a promising alternative to CC for the detection of sigmoid diverticulitis. (orig.)

  17. Validity of total leucocytes count and neutrophil count (differential leucocytes) in diagnosing suspected acute appendicitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anwar, M.W.; Abid, I.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare the diagnostic accuracy of Total Leucocytes Count (TLC) with Neutrophil count; Differential Leucocytes Count (DLC) in diagnosing cases of suspected acute appendicitis. Study design: Validation study. Place and duration of the study: Department of Surgery, Combined Military Hospital (CMH) Rawalpindi, from April 2008 to October 2008. Method: A total of 100 patients of Pain right iliac fossae who underwent appendicectomy were included. Detailed history of all the patients was taken for pain in right lower abdomen, its severity, its nature, relieving or provoking factors. Clinical examination was done in detail. Total and Differential Leucocytes Count was done. Every patient's appendix was examined grossly after appendicectomy for evidence of appendicitis. Diagnostic measures of TLC and DLC were calculated by standard formulas. Results: Sensitivity and specificity of TLC is 86.9% and 81.25% respectively and that of DLC is 82% and 68.75% respectively. Accuracy was 86% for TLC and 80% for DLC. Conclusion: TLC is more sensitive, specific and accurate test as compared to DLC and it should be used as diagnostic aid for suspected acute appendicitis cases. (author)

  18. Intraoperative ultrasonography in nine dogs with intra-abdominal neoplasm suspect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniella Matos da Silva

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Intraoperative ultrasonography (IOUS is used in medicine for diagnosis and guidance during oncologic surgery. The aims of this study were to assess the performance, feasibility, advantages and difficulties of the IOUS technique in dogs with suspected intra-abdominal tumors. The study included nine client-owed dogs that had suspected intra-abdominal tumors (spleen, liver or bowel based on transabdominal ultrasound examination and that were subsequently referred for exploratory laparotomy surgery. During surgery, IOUS was performed; results of preoperative transabdominal ultrasonography, inspection by the surgeon and IOUS were compared on a case-by-case basis. IOUS was helpful in determining lesion resection in all cases. Lesions detected solely by the use of IOUS were observed in seven out of nine cases. Analysis of these cases demonstrated that IOUS can be a tool to assist during oncology surgery on the liver, spleen or bowel. Dogs with hepatic tumors can have small non-palpable intraparenchymal nodules, which may be visible by IOUS.

  19. Diagnostic and prognostic value of non-invasive imaging in known or suspected coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuijf, J.D.; Poldermans, D.; Shaw, L.J.; Jukema, J.W.; Wall, E.E. van der; Lamb, H.J.; Roos, A. de; Wijns, W.; Bax, J.J.

    2006-01-01

    The role of non-invasive imaging techniques in the evaluation of patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease (CAD) has increased exponentially over the past decade. The traditionally available imaging modalities, including nuclear imaging, stress echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), have relied on detection of CAD by visualisation of its functional consequences (i.e. ischaemia). However, extensive research is being invested in the development of non-invasive anatomical imaging using computed tomography or MRI to allow detection of (significant) atherosclerosis, eventually at a preclinical stage. In addition to establishing the presence of or excluding CAD, identification of patients at high risk for cardiac events is of paramount importance to determine post-test management, and the majority of non-invasive imaging tests can also be used for this purpose. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the available non-invasive imaging modalities and their merits for the diagnostic and prognostic work-up in patients with suspected or known CAD. (orig.)

  20. Diagnostic impact of digital tomosynthesis in oncologic patients with suspected pulmonary lesions on chest radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaia, Emilio; Baratella, Elisa; Poillucci, Gabriele; Gennari, Antonio Giulio; Cova, Maria Assunta

    2016-08-01

    To assess the actual diagnostic impact of digital tomosynthesis (DTS) in oncologic patients with suspected pulmonary lesions on chest radiography (CXR). A total of 237 patients (135 male, 102 female; age, 70.8 ± 10.4 years) with a known primary malignancy and suspected pulmonary lesion(s) on CXR and who underwent DTS were retrospectively identified. Two radiologists (experience, 10 and 15 years) analysed in consensus CXR and DTS images and proposed a diagnosis according to a confidence score: 1 or 2 = definitely or probably benign pulmonary or extrapulmonary lesion, or pseudolesion; 3 = indeterminate; 4 or 5 = probably or definitely pulmonary lesion. DTS findings were proven by CT (n = 114 patients), CXR during follow-up (n = 105) or histology (n = 18). Final diagnoses included 77 pulmonary opacities, 26 pulmonary scars, 12 pleural lesions and 122 pulmonary pseudolesions. DTS vs CXR presented a higher (P chest radiography (CXR) in oncologic patients. • DTS improves confidence of CXR in oncologic patients. • DTS allowed avoidance of CT in about 50 % of oncologic patients.

  1. Total quality management for addressing suspect parts at the Oak Ridge High Flux Isotope Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendrix, K.A.; Tulay, M.P.

    1993-01-01

    Martin Marietta Energy System (MMES) Research Reactors Division (RRD), operator of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) recently embarked on an aggressive Program to address the issue of suspect Parts and to enhance their procurement process. Through the application of TQM process improvement, RRD has already achieved improved efficiency in specifying, procuring, and accepting replacement items for its largest research reactor. These process improvements have significantly decreased the risk of installing suspect parts in the HFIR safety systems. To date, a systematic plan has been implemented, which includes the following elements: Process assessment and procedure review; Procedural enhancements; On-site training and technology transfer; Enhanced receiving inspections; Performance supplier evaluations and source verifications integrated processes for utilizing commercial grade products in nuclear safety-related applications. This paper will describe the above elements, how a partnership between MMES and Gilbert/Commonwealth facilitated the execution of the plan, and how process enhancements were applied. We will also present measures for improved efficiency and productivity, that MMES intends to continually address with Quality Action Teams

  2. Prevalence of IgE sensitization in Danish children with suspected asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann-Petersen, Benjamin; Høst, Arne; Larsen, Kirsten Toksvig

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this article was to estimate the prevalence of IgE sensitization in Danish children with suspected asthma and to characterize the pattern of sensitization. STUDY DESIGN: We performed a cross-sectional study including 1744 children from 0 to 15 yr suspected of asthma who were...... referred to pediatric outpatient clinics in the region of southern Denmark from 2003 to 2005. The children were subjected to an extensive questionnaire-based interview, clinical examination, and both skin prick testing (SPT) and IgE measurements for 17 allergens. RESULTS: Asthma was confirmed in 1024...... of the 1744 children. Among the children in whom the asthma diagnosis was confirmed, sensitization to one or more of the 17 allergens tested was found in 67.5% by either SPT or s-IgE ≥ class 2. Sensitization to any food allergen was found in 31.1%, to any outdoor allergen in 36.2%, and to any indoor allergen...

  3. The efficiency of sonography in diagnosing volvulus in neonates with suspected intestinal malrotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenhua; Sun, Hongjun; Luo, Fangqiong

    2017-10-01

    This study is to prospectively evaluate the efficiency of sonography for volvulus diagnosis in neonates with clinically suspected intestinal malrotation.A total of 83 patients with suspected intestinal malrotation who underwent detailed abdominal sonography and upper gastrointestinal contrast study were included. Malrotation was characterized by inversion of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and superior mesenteric vein (SMV) in sonographic examination. The "whirlpool sign" of Color Doppler Sonography was recognized as a characteristic for malrotation with volvulus. The degrees of rotation of the SMV winding around SMA were also detected by sonography. Surgery was performed in patients with sonography diagnosed malrotation.A total of 39 patients were sonographically diagnosed as malrotation which was subsequently confirmed by surgery. The sensitivity and positive predictive value of the sonographic diagnosis were both 100% (39/39). The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of "whirlpool sign" for the detection of midgut volvulus were 95.2% (20/21), 88.9% (16/18), and 92.3% (36/39), respectively. Greater degrees of rotation (equal or greater than 720°) showed higher risk (odds ratio, 5.0; P volvulus may be used as a potential indicator for intestinal necrosis. In addition, sonography can exclude malrotation and may help the diagnosis of other diseases, such as annular pancreas and duodenal atresia.

  4. High prevalence of smoking among patients with suspected tuberculosis in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunet, L; Pai, M; Davids, V; Ling, D; Paradis, G; Lenders, L; Meldau, R; van Zyl Smit, R; Calligaro, G; Allwood, B; Dawson, R; Dheda, K

    2011-07-01

    There is growing evidence that tobacco smoking is an important risk factor for tuberculosis (TB). There are no data validating the accuracy of self-reported smoking in TB patients and limited data about the prevalence of smoking in TB patients from high-burden settings. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of 500 patients with suspected TB in Cape Town, South Africa. All underwent comprehensive diagnostic testing. The accuracy of their self-reported smoking status was determined against serum cotinine levels. Of the 424 patients included in the study, 56 and 60% of those with active and latent TB infection (LTBI), respectively, were current smokers. Using plasma cotinine as a reference standard, the sensitivity of self-reported smoking was 89%. No statistically significant association could be found between smoking and active TB or LTBI. In Cape Town, the prevalence of smoking among patients with suspected and confirmed TB was much higher than in the general South African population. Self-reporting is an accurate measure of smoking status. These results suggest the need to actively incorporate tobacco cessation programmes into TB services in South Africa.

  5. Investigating suspected acute pulmonary embolism - what are hospital clinicians thinking?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McQueen, A.S.; Worthy, S.; Keir, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    Aims: To assess local clinical knowledge of the appropriate investigation of suspected acute pulmonary embolism (PE) and this compare with the 2003 British Thoracic Society (BTS) guidelines as a national reference standard. Methods: A clinical questionnaire was produced based on the BTS guidelines. One hundred and eight-six participants completed the questionnaires at educational sessions for clinicians of all grades, within a single NHS Trust. The level of experience amongst participants ranged from final year medical students to consultant physicians. Results: The clinicians were divided into four groups based on seniority: Pre-registration, Junior, Middle, and Senior. Forty-six point eight percent of all the clinicians correctly identified three major risk factors for PE and 25.8% recognized the definition of the recommended clinical probability score from two alternatives. Statements regarding the sensitivity of isotope lung imaging and computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) received correct responses from 41.4 and 43% of participants, respectively, whilst 81.2% recognized that an indeterminate ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy (V/Q) study requires further imaging. The majority of clinicians correctly answered three clinical scenario questions regarding use of D-dimers and imaging (78, 85, and 57.5%). There was no statistically significant difference between the four groups for any of the eight questions. Conclusions: The recommended clinical probability score was unfamiliar to all four groups of clinicians in the present study, and the majority of doctors did not agree that a negative CTPA or isotope lung scintigraphy reliably excluded PE. However, questions based on clinical scenarios received considerably higher rates of correct responses. The results indicate that various aspects of the national guidelines on suspected acute pulmonary embolism are unfamiliar to many UK hospital clinicians. Further research is needed to identify methods to improve

  6. The impact of ultrasound in suspected acute appendicitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gracey, D.; McClure, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate prospectively the impact of an appendix ultrasound (US) service on the clinical management of patients presenting with suspected acute appendicitis. Materials and methods: The referring clinician completed a proforma for patients presenting with suspected acute appendicitis. Two visual analogue scales assessed clinical suspicion before and after knowledge of laboratory results. The clinician also indicated if they intended to operate had US been unavailable. During a 3-year period, 327 patients were examined by graded-compression US and diagnosed 'positive' or 'negative' for acute appendicitis. Findings were correlated with histopathology results. The referring clinician completed a retrospective audit questionnaire to assess user satisfaction. Results: Clinical suspicion was altered by knowledge of laboratory results. The decision to operate if US had been unavailable, was 'yes' in 70 cases (group A), 'no' in 231 (group B), and incomplete in 26 (group C). In group A, 31 patients (44.3%) had a negative US and 25 avoided surgery. US identified 39 cases of appendicitis and 37 appendicectomies confirmed appendicitis in 34 cases. In group B, 72 (31.2%) patients had a positive US and 66 appendicectomies confirmed 51 cases of appendicitis. The sensitivity of US was 94.7% in group A, 93.3% in group B and 93.8% overall. Specificity was 90.6% in group A, 91.2% in group B and 91.3% overall. US findings were contrary to intended surgical management in 103 cases. Management was altered in 97 cases (32.2%), with a positive outcome in 85 (28.2%). The referrers found US of appendix very useful in planning appropriate management. Conclusion: US of the appendix increases diagnostic accuracy, alters management and is more sensitive and specific than clinical impression, either alone, or in conjunction with laboratory results

  7. Results of photorefractive keratectomy in keratoconus suspects at 4 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgihan, K; Ozdek, S C; Konuk, O; Akata, F; Hasanreisoglu, B

    2000-01-01

    We studied the long-term results of photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) in keratoconus suspects detected by videokeratography (TMS). Bilateral inferior corneal steepening was detected in 6 candidates for PRK presenting with moderate myopia or astigmatism. Mean follow-up was 44.5 +/- 4.4 months (range, 38 to 54 mo). Mean spherical equivalent refraction was -5.18 +/- 1.60 D (mean sphere, -4.73 D; mean cyclinder, -0.92 D) which was stable for at least the preceding year. The quantitative measurement of inferior corneal steepening (I-S value) was greater than +1.60 (mean, 1.83 +/- 0.11) in all eyes. An Aesculap Meditec Mel 60 excimer laser was used for the PRK procedures and mean follow-up was 44.5 months. Postoperative pachymetric measurements were also performed in 6 eyes. Postoperative uncorrected visual acuity was 20/20 in 8 eyes (66.6%) and 20/32 or better in all eyes with a mean postoperative spherical equivalent refraction of -0.70 +/- 0.74 D (mean sphere, -0.63 D; mean cyclinder, -0.39 D). Five eyes (41.6%) were within +/- 0.50 D spherical equivalent refraction. Inferior steepening was associated with thinning of the inferior cornea which was statistically significantly thinner than the superior thickness (Student's t-test, P < .05). There were no wound healing problems or any sign that the excimer laser adversely affected the cornea during follow-up. Photorefractive keratectomy seems to be a safe procedure for reducing or eliminating myopia or astigmatism in keratoconus suspect eyes-most probably forme fruste keratoconus-with a stable refraction, but this may be different in eyes with early keratoconus, known to be a progressive disease.

  8. Evaluation of basophil activation test in suspected food hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignatti, Patrizia; Yacoub, Mona-Rita; Testoni, Claudia; Pala, Gianni; Corsetti, Maura; Colombo, Giselda; Meriggi, Antonio; Moscato, Gianna

    2017-07-01

    Food hypersensitivity is characterized by a wide range of symptoms. The relationship between symptoms and food is more frequently suspected than objectively proven. Basophil activation test (BAT) is based on the evaluation of activation markers on blood basophils in vitro stimulated with drugs or allergens. The aim of the study was to evaluate the usefulness of BAT when introduced in the routine work-up of suspected food hypersensitivity. BAT was requested in subjects with food adverse reactions when a discrepancy existed among history and skin prick test (SPT) and/or specific IgE. Data from 150 subjects were analysed using CD63 as basophil activation marker. Thirty controls were evaluated for cut-offs. Immunoblots was performed with the sera of representative subjects positive for BAT and negative for SPT and sIgE. 1,024 BAT were carried out, the agreement (positive/positive and negative/negative) was 78.5% for BAT vs. SPT and 78.3% for BAT vs. IgE. Atopic patients, but not atopic controls, more frequently had a positive BAT than non-atopic patients (P tested food) and both negative sIgE and SPT. Immunoblots revealed the presence of sIgE for the tested foods in representative patients with positive BAT, negative SPT and sIgE. Introduction of BAT in routine of food hypersensitivity, limited to subjects with a discrepancy between history and traditional tests, might be useful particularly when total IgE are low. © 2015 International Clinical Cytometry Society. © 2015 International Clinical Cytometry Society.

  9. Considering the culture of disability in cultural competence education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddey, Gary E; Robey, Kenneth L

    2005-07-01

    Cultural competence extends beyond understanding those values, beliefs, and needs that are associated with patients' age or gender or with their racial, ethnic, or religious backgrounds. People hold many simultaneous cultural associations, and each have implications for the care process. The "culture of disability" is a pan-ethnic culture for which a set of physician competencies are required to ensure appropriate, culturally sensitive care to persons with congenital or acquired disabilities. Such competencies include communicating with patients who have deficits in verbal communication and avoidance of infantilizing speech; understanding the values and needs of persons with disabilities; the ability to encourage self-advocacy skills of patients and families; acknowledging the core values of disability culture including the emphasis on interdependence rather than independence; and feeling comfortable with patients with complex disabilities. Medical schools have developed programs to increase students' exposure to persons with disabilities and it is suggested that such programs are most effective when they are the result of collaboration with community-based facilities or organizations that serve persons with disabilities in the natural environment. Combining lecture-based instruction and structured experiences with the opportunity for students to interact with patients in their natural environments may facilitate development of competencies with respect to patients with disabilities. The culture of disability should be included as one of the many cultures addressed in cultural competence initiatives in medical school and residency curricula.

  10. Who occupies disability?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Pollard

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Locating occupational therapy within gendered and racialized systems of power, the authors consider the intersectional nature of critical disability studies discourse and the need for occupational therapy to incorporate such values into practice. This article discusses ways in which occupational therapy as a profession and individual therapists can align with or resist the economic determination which has come to dominate medical systems. It considers some of the political background to the history of the profession and its relationship with power. This positioning of the profession is explored against the impact of neoliberal economic policy on health, rights, service delivery and disability, and against some key issues, the pressure of ageing populations and the positon of occupational therapists as women professionals. Current policies present a critical challenge to central occupational therapy tenets. Occupational therapists may find themselves working both in alliance with disabled people and disability activists, and against them.

  11. In-house (disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safak Pavey

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In May 2007 UNHCR established an internal working group to look at developing in-house policies for people with disabilities both for the benefit of people of concern to us and for staff members.

  12. Disabilities and Health

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-05-22

    In this podcast for kids, the Kidtastics talk about learning more about kids who have disabilities.  Created: 5/22/2014 by National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH).   Date Released: 5/22/2014.

  13. Disabilities - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page, please enable JavaScript. Arabic (العربية) Chinese, Traditional (Cantonese ... Iraqi Health Outreach Project: Social Security Disability (SSD) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) ...

  14. Living with a disability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Louise Norman; Michelsen, Susan Ishøy; Tjørnhøj-thomsen, Tine

    2018-01-01

    highlighted as affecting quality of life. The use of social tactics to avoid confrontation with certain aspects of their disability was common among participants. Conclusions: Across disabilities, caregiving, dependency, understanding and acceptance, and discrimination and prejudice were all important aspects......Purpose: We explored which shared aspects of social relations were considered important to the quality of life of persons between the ages of 10 and 40 years living with a disability. We examined how social relations were experienced as affecting quality of life and social participation. Materials...... and methods: Fifteen focus groups involving 48 persons with disabilities were conducted using photo elicitation, preference ranking and props. Focus group interviews were supplemented with seven individual interviews with individuals unable to participate in focus groups. All focus group interviews...

  15. Facts about Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... play, learn, speak, behave, and move (for example, crawling and walking). Children develop at their own pace, ... person’s lifetime. Most developmental disabilities begin before a baby is born, but some can happen after birth ...

  16. 34 CFR 361.49 - Scope of vocational rehabilitation services for groups of individuals with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... seeking to employ individuals with disabilities. (5) In the case of any small business enterprise operated..., including enterprises established under the Randolph-Sheppard program, management services and supervision... and improve small business enterprises operated by individuals with significant disabilities...

  17. Functional disability in elderly with dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tainã Alves Fagundes

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dementia represents one of the major causes of disability and dependence in old age and can affect functional capacity in all areas of occupational performance, including basic and instrumental activities of daily living (BADL and IADL, respectively, leisure, social participation and others. Objectives: To characterize the functional disability level in elderly people with dementia and verify the existence of correlation between functionality and the stage or type of dementia. Method: Quantitative, exploratory, cross-sectional study, with a sample of 25 caregivers of elderly with dementia. For the characterization of the participants were used structured questionnaires and to assess functional disability, the Disability Assessment Scale for Dementia - DAD was applied. Results: Greater incapacity was observed in the IADL sub item. This finding is compatible with the literature on the hierarchy in functional decline in the elderly: decline begins in IADL, while BADL remain unaffected for a longer period. There was no significant correlation between the type of dementia, age or gender and disability. It was verified through the Spearman coefficient (rho = 0.87, a significant correlation of high magnitude between functional disability and stage of dementia (p = 0.0001. Conclusion: Such findings reiterate the importance of giving priority to early detection and prevention of the functional decline, which is the manifestation of vulnerability among the elderly.

  18. Imaging the child with right lower quadrant pain and suspected appendicitis: current concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivit, Carlos J. [Departments of Radiology and Pediatrics, Rainbow Babies and Childrens Hospital of the University Hospitals of Cleveland and Case Western Reserve School of Medicine, Euclid Avenue, 11100, 44106-5056, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2004-06-01

    Acute appendicitis is the most common condition presenting with right lower quadrant pain requiring acute surgical intervention in childhood. The clinical diagnosis of acute appendicitis is often not straightforward and can be challenging. Approximately one-third of children with the condition have atypical clinical findings and are initially managed non-operatively. Complications usually result from perforation and include abscess formation, peritonitis, sepsis, bowel obstruction and death. Cross-sectional imaging with sonography and computed tomography (CT) have proven useful for the evaluation of suspected acute appendicitis in children. The principal advantages of sonography are its lower cost, lack of ionizing radiation, and ability to precisely delineate gynecologic disease. The principal advantages of CT are its operator independency with resultant higher diagnostic accuracy, enhanced delineation of disease extent in perforated appendicitis, and improved patient outcomes including decreased negative laparotomy and perforation rates. (orig.)

  19. Compilation of data concerning know and suspected water hammer events in nuclear power plants, CY 1969

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, R.L.; Christensen, D.D.; Dafoe, R.E.; Hanner, O.M.; Wells, M.E.

    1981-05-01

    This report compiles data concerning known and suspected water hammer events reported by BWR and PWR power plants in the United States from January 1, 1969, to May 1, 1981. This information is summarized for each event and is tabulated for all events by plant, plant type, year of occurrence, type of water hammer, system affected, basis/cause for the event, and damage incurred. Information is also included from other events not specifically identified as water hammer related. These other events involved vibration and/or system components similar to those involved in the water hammer events. The other events are included to ensure completeness of the report, but are not used to point out particular facts or trends. This report does not evaluate findings abstracted from the data

  20. Suicide Attempts Among Adolescents with Self-Reported Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Tally

    2018-06-01

    This study examines the relative risk for suicide attempts (SA) among high-school students self-identifying with one or more disability classifications (nine); assesses the extent to which youth with disabilities are disproportionately vulnerable to risk factors that predict suicidal behavior among all adolescents; and explores whether disability status adds to risk for SA after accounting for a comprehensive set of known risk and protective factors for SA. Analyses using Wisconsin's 2012 Dane County Youth Assessment Survey data found that youth in each disability category were 3-9 times more likely to report suicide attempt(s) relative to peers, and the endorsement of multiple disabilities tripled the risk SA relative to youth reporting a single disability. Some disability sub-groups, including youth reporting autism spectrum disorder, hearing, and vision impairments reported surprisingly high rates of SA. While youth with disabilities reported disproportionate exposure to adversity in every life domain examined, similar to youth reporting SA, disability status added unique risk for suicidal behavior. This suggests that disability may be a 'fundamental cause' of suicidal behavior, a question that requires further investigation.

  1. Estimating the extra cost of living with disability in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minh, Hoang Van; Giang, Kim Bao; Liem, Nguyen Thanh; Palmer, Michael; Thao, Nguyen Phuong; Duong, Le Bach

    2015-01-01

    Disability is shown to be both a cause and a consequence of poverty. However, relatively little research has investigated the economic cost of living with a disability. This study reports the results of a study on the extra cost of living with disability in Vietnam in 2011. The study was carried out in eight cities/provinces in Vietnam, including Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh cities (two major metropolitan in Vietnam) and six provinces from each of the six socio-economic regions in Vietnam. Costs are estimated using the standard of living approach whereby the difference in incomes between people with disability and those without disability for a given standard of living serves as a proxy for the cost of living with disability. The extra cost of living with disability in Vietnam accounted for about 8.8-9.5% of annual household income, or valued about US$200-218. Communication difficulty was shown to result in highest additional cost of living with disability and self-care difficulty was shown to lead to the lowest levels of extra of living cost. The extra cost of living with disability increased as people had more severe impairment. Interventions to promote the economic security of livelihood for people with disabilities are needed.

  2. Respiratory viral infections in infants with clinically suspected pertussis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela E. Ferronato

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the frequency of respiratory viral infections in hospitalized infants with clinical suspicion of pertussis, and to analyze their characteristics at hospital admission and clinical outcomes. Methods: a historical cohort study was performed in a reference service for pertussis, in which the research of respiratory viruses was also a routine for infants hospitalized with respiratory problems. All infants reported as suspected cases of pertussis were included. Tests for Bordetella pertussis (BP (polymerase chain reaction/culture and for respiratory viruses (RVs (immunofluorescence were performed. Patients who received macrolides before hospitalization were excluded. Clinical data were obtained from medical records. Results: Among the 67 patients studied, BP tests were positive in 44%, and 26% were positive for RV. There was no etiological identification in 35%, and RV combined with BP was identified in 5%. All patients had similar demographic characteristics. Cough followed by inspiratory stridor or cyanosis was a strong predictor of pertussis, as well as prominent leukocytosis and lymphocytosis. Rhinorrhea and dyspnea were more frequent in viral infections. Macrolides were discontinued in 40% of patients who tested positive for RV and negative for BP. Conclusion: the results suggest that viral infection can be present in hospitalized infants with clinical suspicion of pertussis, and etiological tests may enable a reduction in the use of macrolides in some cases. However, the etiological diagnosis of respiratory virus infection, by itself, does not exclude the possibility of infection with BP. Resumo: Objetivo: avaliar a frequência das infecções por vírus respiratórios em lactentes hospitalizados com suspeita clínica de coqueluche e analisar suas características admissionais e evolutivas. Métodos: foi realizado um estudo de coorte histórica, em um serviço sentinela para coqueluche, no qual a pesquisa de v

  3. Jordanian Parents' Beliefs about the Causes of Disability and the Progress of Their Children with Disabilities: Insights on Mainstream Schools and Segregated Centres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dababneh, Kholoud Adeeb; Al-Zboon, Eman K.; Baibers, Haitham

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to identify the beliefs of Jordanian parents of children with disabilities (CWD), including intellectual disabilities, specific learning disorders and Autism Spectrum Disorder: both in terms of the causes of these disabilities, and the ability of their children to make progress. A qualitative interpretive methodology was employed.…

  4. A Preliminary Examination of Identity Exploration and Commitment among Polish Adolescents with and without Motor Disability: Does Disability Constitute Diversity in Identity Development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominiak-Kochanek, Monika

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to define whether, and to what extent identity formation in late adolescence is disability specific. Ninety-eight adolescents participated in this study, including 43 students with motor disability and 55 students without disability. Identity exploration and commitment was measured by the Utrecht-Groningen Identity…

  5. Canadian Disability Policies in a World of Inequalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Stienstra

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Canadian disability-related policies are shaped within a global system of inequalities, including colonialism and neoliberalism. Using a critical theory framework, this article examines the complicated material inequalities experienced by people with disabilities and evident in the intersections of disability, gender, Indigenousness, race, and age. The collectively held ideas that give context to disability policies are at odds. Human rights protections are found in the foundational documents of Canadian society and part of its international commitments, yet these commitments often become window-dressing for a pervasive logic that it is better to be dead than disabled, and medical assistance in dying legislation supports this choice. While human rights protections are essential, they are not sufficient for decolonizing inclusion. Constructive actions between Indigenous peoples and settlers may help to find new ways of addressing disability and inclusion in Canada.

  6. Nurses with disabilities: self-reported experiences as hospital employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matt, Susan B

    2008-11-01

    Since enactment of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, U.S. employers have been mandated to provide reasonable accommodation for employees with disabilities. Nurses with disabilities have described their experiences, reflecting occurrences that might be noncompliant with these mandates. There is little information available regarding the work experience of nurses with disabilities practicing in hospitals. How these workers view their work world and how they perceive the way others within that environment think of them and their contributions to patient care is important because these individuals must be included as equal participants in a profession that relies on teamwork to function effectively. An exploratory study was conducted to gain a context-based understanding of the lived experiences of hospital-employed nurses with disabilities. Grounded theory methodology was used to uncover themes and to identify factors comprising "disability climate"; such factors might inform the future development of workplace policies supportive of all nurses.

  7. Rehabilitation as a Disability Equality Issue: A Conceptual Shift for Disability Studies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Shakespeare

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Rehabilitation is a controversial subject in disability studies, often discussed in terms of oppression, normalisation, and unwanted intrusion. While there may be good reasons for positioning rehabilitation in this way, this has also meant that, as a lived experience, it is under-researched and neglected in disabilities literature, as we show by surveying leading disability studies journals. With some notable exceptions, rehabilitation research has remained the preserve of the rehabilitation sciences, and such studies have rarely included the voices of disabled people themselves, as we also demonstrate by surveying a cross-section of rehabilitation science literature. Next, drawing on new research, we argue for reframing access to rehabilitation as a disability equality issue. Through in-depth discussion of two case studies, we demonstrate that rehabilitation can be a tool for inclusion and for supporting an equal life. Indeed, we contend that rehabilitation merits disability researchers’ sustained engagement, precisely to ensure that a ‘right-based rehabilitation’ policy and practice can be developed, which is not oppressive, but reflects the views and experiences of the disabled people who rehabilitation should serve.

  8. Maltreatment of children with disabilities: the breaking point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Nancy

    2011-08-01

    The maltreatment of children with disabilities is a serious public health issue. Children with disabilities are 3 to 4 times more likely to be abused or neglected than are their typically developing peers. When maltreated, they are more likely to be seriously injured or harmed. As alarming as these numbers are, they likely underestimate the problem. Children with disabilities encounter all 4 types of abuse: physical, sexual, neglect, and emotional. Here, the author discusses risk factors associated with the maltreatment of children with disabilities, which, as expected, include both child and family factors.

  9. Disability, Procreation, and Justice in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Mutcherson

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Parenting and procreation have long been contested legal terrain in the United States as exemplified by a history of abuses against marginalized populations including people with disabilities. While some of the most egregious abuses, such as state sponsored sterilization programs, are relics of the past, it remains true that people with disabilities face distinct and at times insurmountable roadblocks to procreation and parenting. This article details ongoing forms of procreative discrimination against people with disabilities, rejects common justifications for that discrimination, and offers proposals for better protecting the rights to procreate and parent for disabled people.

  10. Trajectories of Work Disability and Economic Insecurity Approaching Retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuey, Kim M; Willson, Andrea E

    2017-07-08

    In this article, we examine the connection between trajectories of work disability and economic precarity in late midlife. We conceptualize work disability as a possible mechanism linking early and later life economic disadvantage. We model trajectories of work disability characterized by timing and stability for a cohort of Baby Boomers (22-32 in 1981) using 32 years of data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics and latent class analysis. Measures of childhood disadvantage are included as predictors of work disability trajectories, which are subsequently included in logistic regression models predicting four economic outcomes (poverty, asset poverty, home ownership, and pension ownership) at ages 54-64. Childhood disadvantage selected individuals into five distinct classes of work disability that differed in timing and stability. All of the disability trajectories were associated with an increased risk of economic insecurity in late midlife compared to the never work disabled. This study contributes to the aging literature through its incorporation of the early life origins of pathways of disability and their links to economic outcomes approaching retirement. Findings suggest work disability is anchored in early life disadvantage and is associated with economic insecurity later in life. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Unfair lineups make witnesses more likely to confuse innocent and guilty suspects

    OpenAIRE

    Colloff, Melissa F.; Wade, Kimberley A.; Strange, D.

    2016-01-01

    Eyewitness-identification studies have focused on the idea that unfair lineups (i.e., ones in which the police suspect stands out) make witnesses more willing to identify the police suspect. We examined whether unfair lineups also influence subjects’ ability to distinguish between innocent and guilty suspects and their ability to judge the accuracy of their identification. In a single experiment (N = 8,925), we compared three fair-lineup techniques used by the police with unfair lineups in wh...

  12. [Colorectal Carcinoma with Suspected Lynch Syndrome: A Multidisciplinary Algorithm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, R; Schneider, C; Büttner, R; Reinacher-Schick, A; Tannapfel, A; Fürst, A; Rüschoff, J; Jakobeit, C; Royer-Pokora, B; Möslein, G

    2015-12-01

    Lynch syndrome is the most frequent hereditary cancer syndrome, accounting for approximately 3-5 % of all colorectal cancers. In addition, it is the most frequent predisposing hereditary cause of endometrial cancer and is also associated with gastric cancer, ovarian cancer, cancer of the urinary tract as well as several other cancers. In clinical practise Lynch syndrome is frequently not detected and many clinicians admit uncertainties regarding diagnostic procedures. Also, counselling of patients is considered difficult regarding therapeutic - especially prophylactic surgical and chemopreventive options and recommendations. Based on a review of available literature we discuss optimized strategies for improved detection of suspected Lynch syndrome patients. The aim of this review is to establish a clinical algorithm of how to proceed on a diagnostic level and to discuss surgical options at the time of a colorectal cancer. In order to identify patients with Lynch syndrome, family history should be ascertained and evaluated in regards to fulfilment of the Amsterdam-II- and/or the revised Bethesda criteria. Subsequently immunohistochemical staining for the mismatch-repair-genes, BRAF testing for MLH1 loss of expression, as well as testing for microsatellite instability in some, followed by genetic counselling and mutation analysis when indicated, is recommended. Pathological identification of suspected Lynch syndrome is readily feasible and straightforward. However, the need of performing these analyses in the tumor biopsy at the time of (gastroenterological) diagnosis of CRC neoplasia is essential, in order to offer patients the option of a prophylactically extended surgery and - as recommended in the German S3 guidelines - to discuss the option of a merely prophylactical hysterectomy and oophorectomy (if postmenopausal) in women. Close cooperation between gastroenterologists, pathologists and surgeons is warranted, so that patients may benefit from options of

  13. Stethoscope vs. ultrasound probe - which is more reliable in children with suspected pneumonia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovrenski, Jovan; Petrović, Slobodanka; Balj-Barbir, Svetlana; Jokić, Radoica; Vilotijević-Dautović, Gordana

    2016-05-01

    To compare lung ultrasound (LUS) with auscultation findings in children with clinical suspicion of pneumonia. A prospective study including 95 patients (age: from 2 months to 17.5 years; mean age: 5.1 y, SD 4.5 y) with referral diagnosis of suspected pneumonia. In all patients LUS and auscultatory examinations were performed within an hour. These findings were compared separately in each hemithorax. The radiologist performing LUS was blinded to the patient's clinical information. Positive auscultatory findings included: crackles and/or abnormal breath sounds (decreased, asymmetric, absent, or bronchial). For LUS examinations a combined transthoracic - transabdominal approach was used. A pneumonia-positive LUS finding included subpleural consolidation with air-bronchogram, or an adjacent area of interstitial edema. For each subpleural consolidation the cranio-caudal (CC) diameter was measured, and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of the sizes of subpleural consolidations for positive and negative auscultatory findings were compared. The p-value between LUS and auscultation was calculated using McNemar's test. LUS and auscultation showed pneumonia-positive findings in 98 and 64 hemithoraces, i.e. in 67 and 45 patients respectively. In positive auscultatory findings the CI for CC diameters of subpleural consolidations ranged from 32.46 to 54.14 mm, and in negative auscultatory findings the CI was between 16.52 and 29.83 mm, which showed a statistically significant difference. McNemar's test showed a statistically significant difference between LUS and auscultation. LUS showed positive findings in more hemithoraces than auscultation in children with suspected pneumonia. A cranio-caudal size of subpleural consolidation of less than 30 mm significantly reduces the possibility of auscultatory detection. Copyright © 2016 by Academy of Sciences and Arts of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

  14. Stethoscope vs. ultrasound probe - which is more reliable in children with suspected pneumonia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovan Lovrenski

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare lung ultrasound (LUS with auscultation findings in children with clinical suspicion of pneumonia. Patients and methods. A prospective study including 95 patients (age: from 2 months to 17.5 years; mean age: 5.1 y, SD 4.5 y with referral diagnosis of suspected pneumonia. In all patients LUS and auscultatory examinations were performed within an hour. These findings were compared separately in each hemithorax. The radiologist performing LUS was blinded to the patient’s clinical information. Positive auscultatory findings included: crackles and/or abnormal breath sounds (decreased, asymmetric, absent, or bronchial. For LUS examinations a combined transthoracic – transabdominal approach was used. A pneumonia-positive LUS finding included subpleural consolidation with air-bronchogram, or an adjacent area of interstitial edema. For each subpleural consolidation the cranio-caudal (CC diameter was measured, and 95% confidence intervals (CI of the sizes of subpleural consolidations for positive and negative auscultatory findings were compared. The p-value between LUS and auscultation was calculated using McNemar’s test. Results. LUS and auscultation showed pneumonia-positive findings in 98 and 64 hemithoraces, i.e. in 67 and 45 patients respectively. In positive auscultatory findings the CI for CC diameters of subpleural consolidations ranged from 32.46 to 54.14 mm, and in negative auscultatory findings the CI was between 16.52 and 29.83 mm, which showed a statistically significant difference. McNemar’s test showed a statistically significant difference between LUS and auscultation. Conclusions. LUS showed positive findings in more hemithoraces than auscultation in children with suspected pneumonia. A cranio-caudal size of subpleural consolidation of less than 30 mm significantly reduces the possibility of auscultatory detection.

  15. Combat sports for persons with disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasum Goran

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In literature, the term adapted sport indicates sports activities, modified and adapted to persons with disabilities. In spite of their highly prominent values, combat sports are underrepresented among persons with disabilities in Serbia. The benefits of combat sports practicing are numerous, and at some international hospitals, martial sports and arts already have an important role in the treatment of traumatized and disabled persons. Currently, the programme of Paralympic Games includes only two sports, these are fencing and judo, in male and female competition. Almost certainly, karate will also be included in the programme of Paralympic Games, and there are similar ambitions in the case of taekwondo as well. In addition to these sports, some martial arts, especially aikido, thai-chi-chuan and qigong, have obtained significant representation and interest among persons with disabilities. The reasons for weaker interest in other martial sports and arts, should be sought in the fact that they are underrepresented among this population, and that these persons are not offered the possibility of organized practice of such sports. Orientation towards a combat sport brings great refreshment and powerful emotional experience to each practitioner, and this fact has special significance to persons with disabilities. In Serbia, combat sports are not widely represented among persons with disabilities, and only the wrestlers with impaired hearing have achieved significant success on the international stage. On the other hand, the popularity of combat sports among persons with disabilities in the world is significantly growing. It is necessary to take concrete steps to make it so in Serbia as well.

  16. Impact of round-the-clock CSF Gram stain on empirical therapy for suspected central nervous system infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tissot, F; Prod'hom, G; Manuel, O; Greub, G

    2015-09-01

    The impact of round-the-clock cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Gram stain on overnight empirical therapy for suspected central nervous system (CNS) infections was investigated. All consecutive overnight CSF Gram stains between 2006 and 2011 were included. The impact of a positive or a negative test on empirical therapy was evaluated and compared to other clinical and biological indications based on institutional guidelines. Bacterial CNS infection was documented in 51/241 suspected cases. Overnight CSF Gram stain was positive in 24/51. Upon validation, there were two false-positive and one false-negative results. The sensitivity and specificity were 41 and 99 %, respectively. All patients but one had other indications for empirical therapy than Gram stain alone. Upon obtaining the Gram result, empirical therapy was modified in 7/24, including the addition of an appropriate agent (1), addition of unnecessary agents (3) and simplification of unnecessary combination therapy (3/11). Among 74 cases with a negative CSF Gram stain and without formal indication for empirical therapy, antibiotics were withheld in only 29. Round-the-clock CSF Gram stain had a low impact on overnight empirical therapy for suspected CNS infections and was associated with several misinterpretation errors. Clinicians showed little confidence in CSF direct examination for simplifying or withholding therapy before definite microbiological results.

  17. Generalist genes and learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plomin, Robert; Kovas, Yulia

    2005-07-01

    The authors reviewed recent quantitative genetic research on learning disabilities that led to the conclusion that genetic diagnoses differ from traditional diagnoses in that the effects of relevant genes are largely general rather than specific. This research suggests that most genes associated with common learning disabilities--language impairment, reading disability, and mathematics disability--are generalists in 3 ways. First, genes that affect common learning disabilities are largely the same genes responsible for normal variation in learning abilities. Second, genes that affect any aspect of a learning disability affect other aspects of the disability. Third, genes that affect one learning disability are also likely to affect other learning disabilities. These quantitative genetic findings have far-reaching implications for molecular genetics and neuroscience as well as psychology. Copyright 2005 APA, all rights reserved.

  18. Are maternal social networks and perceptions of trust associated with suspected autism spectrum disorder in offspring? A population-based study in Japan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeo Fujiwara

    Full Text Available To investigate the associations of maternal social networks and perceptions of trust with the prevalence of suspected autism spectrum disorders in 18-month-old offspring in Japan.Questionnaires included measurements of maternal social networks (number of relatives or friends they could call upon for assistance, maternal perceptions of trust, mutual assistance (i.e. individual measures of "cognitive social capital", and social participation (i.e. individual measures of "structural social capital" as well as the Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers to detect suspected autism spectrum disorder (ASD. These tools were mailed to all families with 18-month-old toddlers in Chiba, a city near Tokyo (N = 6061; response rate: 64%. The association between social capital or social network indicators and suspected ASD were analyzed, adjusted for covariates by logistic regression analysis.Low maternal social trust was found to be significantly positively associated with suspected ASD in toddlers compared with high maternal social trust (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 1.82, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.38 to 2.40; mutual aid was also significantly positively related (low vs. high: OR, 2.08, 95% CI: 1.59 to 2.73 [corrected]. However, maternal community participation showed U-shape association with suspected ASD of offspring. Maternal social network showed consistent inverse associations with suspected ASD of offspring, regardless of the type of social connection (e.g., relatives, neighbors, or friends living outside of their neighborhood.Mothers' cognitive social capital and social networks, but not structural social capital, might be associated with suspected ASD in offspring.

  19. Are maternal social networks and perceptions of trust associated with suspected autism spectrum disorder in offspring? A population-based study in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Takeo; Kawachi, Ichiro

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the associations of maternal social networks and perceptions of trust with the prevalence of suspected autism spectrum disorders in 18-month-old offspring in Japan. Questionnaires included measurements of maternal social networks (number of relatives or friends they could call upon for assistance), maternal perceptions of trust, mutual assistance (i.e. individual measures of "cognitive social capital"), and social participation (i.e. individual measures of "structural social capital") as well as the Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers to detect suspected autism spectrum disorder (ASD). These tools were mailed to all families with 18-month-old toddlers in Chiba, a city near Tokyo (N = 6061; response rate: 64%). The association between social capital or social network indicators and suspected ASD were analyzed, adjusted for covariates by logistic regression analysis. Low maternal social trust was found to be significantly positively associated with suspected ASD in toddlers compared with high maternal social trust (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 1.82, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.38 to 2.40); mutual aid was also significantly positively related (low vs. high: OR, 2.08, 95% CI: 1.59 to 2.73 [corrected]). However, maternal community participation showed U-shape association with suspected ASD of offspring. Maternal social network showed consistent inverse associations with suspected ASD of offspring, regardless of the type of social connection (e.g., relatives, neighbors, or friends living outside of their neighborhood). Mothers' cognitive social capital and social networks, but not structural social capital, might be associated with suspected ASD in offspring.

  20. Gender differences in functional disability and self-care among seniors in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tareque, Md Ismail; Tiedt, Andrew D; Islam, Towfiqua Mahfuza; Begum, Sharifa; Saito, Yasuhiko

    2017-08-08

    Disability among older adults is a public health concern. To date there are no in-depth and comprehensive analyses on older adults' disabilities in Bangladesh. This study investigated gender differences in the prevalence of disability and the socio-demographic factors associated with disability among older adults in Bangladesh. This research used a sample of 4176 elderly males and females aged 60 years and over from a nationally representative data set- Bangladesh's 2010 Household Income and Expenditure Survey. The study used both household level and individual level data and applied a wealth index, which was constructed based on household assets using principal component analysis. The Washington Group's short set of questions on disability were used to measure disability. Chi-square tests and ordinal logistic regression models were fit. Forty-two percent of older had some form of functional disability, including 5% of elderly with severe/extreme functional disability. Seven percent of older adults had a self-care disability, including 3% of elderly with a severe/extreme form of self-care disability. Elderly females suffered from all the studied disabilities, including functional and self-care disabilities in higher percentages, and had higher odds ratios of having both functional disability and self-care disability compared to elderly males. The study also identified some significant factors affecting functional disability and self-care disability, namely age, having a chronic condition, wealth status and place of residence, including divisional differences. Programs aimed at reducing functional disability among seniors, particularly elderly females, should be granted the highest priority in Bangladesh.

  1. Conversations with God: Prayer and Bargaining in Adjustment to Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Valerie J.; Glover-Graf, Noreen M.; Blanco, E. Lisette

    2013-01-01

    The role of religiosity and spirituality in the process of adjustment to disability is of increasing interest to rehabilitation professionals. Beginning with the Kubler-Ross models of grief and adjustment to disability and terminal illness, a number of stage models have included spiritual and religious interactions as a part of the adjustment…

  2. Unanticipated Effects of Children with Learning Disabilities on Their Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Lily

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the unanticipated effects that children with learning disabilities have on the life of their families. Eleven parents of students aged 8 to 16 years old participated in two separate focus group interviews. Findings showed that children with learning disabilities had a range of effects on their families. These included family…

  3. Intellectual Disability and Space: Critical Narratives of Exclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabel, Susan L.; Cohen, Carie J.; Kotel, Kathleen; Pearson, Holly

    2013-01-01

    The language of intellectual disability is rife with spatial terms. Students labeled with intellectual disability are "placed in" special education where they may be "self-contained," "segregated," "excluded," or "included." Conversations ensue about where to seat them, "next" to whom, and at what distance "from" the teacher and other students. In…

  4. Employment of People with Disabilities in Malaysia: Drivers and Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Melissa Ng; Abdullah, Yen; Mey, See Ching

    2011-01-01

    This study attempts to identify the drivers and inhibitors of employment for people with disabilities in Malaysia. It explores the skills and psychological traits needed by people with disabilities in order to get jobs and the barriers to their employment. Data include interviews detailing the viewpoints of 24 teachers with visual impairments.…

  5. Inclusion through Infusion: Disability Awareness Training for Elementary Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassiere, Amanda Rose

    2017-01-01

    Evidence consistently reveals that taking part in an inclusion classroom does not guarantee that children with disabilities will be accepted, valued, or included (Lindsay & Edwards, 2012; Rillota & Nettelbeck, 2007; Ison et al., 2010). Children with disabilities have been reported to have significantly less friendships and overall social…

  6. ESL Instruction and Adults with Learning Disabilities. ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Robin; Terrill, Lynda

    This digest reviews what is known about adult English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) learners and learning disabilities, suggests ways to identify and assess ESL adults who may have learning disabilities, and offers practical methods for both instruction and teacher training. Topics covered in some detail include identifying and diagnosing learning…

  7. What Is Right? Ethics in Intellectual Disabilities Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Katherine E.; Kidney, Colleen A.

    2012-01-01

    There are important benefits to including adults with intellectual disabilities in research. Calls for their increased participation in research co-occur with notable discussion about how to conduct ethically strong research with adults with intellectual disabilities, a population widely considered vulnerable in the context of research. The…

  8. An Integrative Conceptual Framework of Disability: New Directions for Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Denise G.; Pledger, Constance

    2003-01-01

    Examines various disability paradigms across time, assessing the relative contribution of the socioecological perspective in guiding research designed to improve the lives of people with disabilities. Recommends new research directions that include a focus on life span issues, biomedicine, biotechnology, the efficacy and effectiveness of current…

  9. 34 CFR 303.16 - Infants and toddlers with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... more of the following areas: (i) Cognitive development. (ii) Physical development, including vision and... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Infants and toddlers with disabilities. 303.16 Section... INFANTS AND TODDLERS WITH DISABILITIES General Purpose, Eligibility, and Other General Provisions § 303.16...

  10. Dimensions of Parenting in Families Having Children with Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Robert H.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This study examined relationships between parenting, severity of disability, and 5 aspects of family ecology for 83 preschool and 69 elementary school children with disabilities. Family ecology variables included socioeconomic status, coping styles, social support, stressful life events, and marital quality. Results showed positive correlations…

  11. Disability Evaluation Systems Analysis and Research Annual Report 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-10

    benefits occurs when a service member is found unfit for duty , but the condition is determined to have occurred as a result of misconduct, negligence ...service members evaluated for disability Hospitalization records received by AMSARA include data on direct care inpatient visits among active duty ...hospitalization among active duty service members evaluated for disability .......... 58 Database Limitations

  12. Clinical value of FDG-PET/CT in suspected paraneoplastic syndromes: a retrospective analysis of 137 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjoern Kristensen, Stine; Hess, Soeren; Petersen, Henrik; Hoeilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming [Odense University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Odense (Denmark)

    2015-12-15

    Paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS) are relatively infrequent manifestations appearing before or after a cancer declares itself. Autoimmune mechanisms may be involved, but their cause and pathogenesis are often unknown. Due to disparity of symptoms, PNS remain a major diagnostic challenge. We examined the value of FDG-PET/CT for ruling in or out malignancy in a heterogeneous group of patients with suspected PNS. We retrospectively extracted data from all patients referred 2009-2013 with suspected PNS. Data included age, sex, follow-up period, scan report, further diagnostic procedures, and final clinical diagnosis. Conclusions of the scan reports were compared to the final follow-up outcome as determined during an average follow-up of 31 months (range 6-51.5) in patients who were not diagnosed with cancer in immediate continuation of a positive PET/CT scan. A total of 137 patients were included. Main causes for referral were neurological (n = 67), rheumatological (n = 25), dermatological (n = 18), nephrological (n = 6), haematological (n = 2), abnormal biochemistry (n = 11), and others (n = 8). The cancer prevalence was 8.8 %. The FDG-PET/CT results were as follows: nine true positives, 22 false positives, 103 true negatives, and three false negatives. Corresponding diagnostic values were: sensitivity 75 %, specificity 82 %, accuracy 82 %, and positive and negative predictive values of 29 % and 97 %, respectively. FDG-PET/CT has in patients with suspected PNS an impressively high negative predictive value and may be of value in ruling out PNS, the more so, the more the number of false positives can be minimized or used in differential diagnosis. We believe that FDG-PET/CT may become an important adjunct to the work-up and triage of patients with suspected PNS. (orig.)

  13. Stress Perfusion Coronary Flow Reserve Versus Cardiac Magnetic Resonance for Known or Suspected CAD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Shingo; Saito, Naka; Nakachi, Tatsuya; Fukui, Kazuki; Iwasawa, Tae; Taguri, Masataka; Kosuge, Masami; Kimura, Kazuo

    2017-08-15

    Phase-contrast (PC) cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the coronary sinus is a noninvasive method to quantify coronary flow reserve (CFR). This study sought to compare the prognostic value of CFR by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) and stress perfusion CMR to predict major adverse cardiac events (MACE). Participants included 276 patients with known coronary artery disease (CAD) and 400 with suspected CAD. CFR was calculated as myocardial blood flow during adenosine triphosphate infusion divided by myocardial blood flow at rest using PC cine MRI of the coronary sinus. During a median follow-up of 2.3 years, 47 patients (7%) experienced MACE. Impaired CFR (10% ischemia on stress perfusion CMR were significantly associated with MACE in patients with known CAD (hazard ratio [HR]: 5.17 and HR: 5.10, respectively) and suspected CAD (HR: 14.16 and HR: 6.50, respectively). The area under the curve for predicting MACE was 0.773 for CFR and 0.731 for stress perfusion CMR (p = 0.58) for patients with known CAD, and 0.885 for CFR and 0.776 for stress perfusion CMR (p = 0.059) in the group with suspected CAD. In patients with known CAD, sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values to predict MACE were 64%, 91%, 38%, and 97%, respectively, for CFR, and 82%, 59%, 15%, and 97%, respectively, for stress perfusion CMR. In the suspected CAD group, these values were 65%, 99%, 80%, and 97%, respectively, for CFR, and 72%, 83%, 22%, and 98%, respectively, for stress perfusion CMR. The predictive values of CFR and stress perfusion CMR for MACE were comparable in patients with known CAD. In patients with suspected CAD, CFR showed higher HRs and areas under the curve than stress perfusion CMR, suggesting that CFR assessment by PC cine MRI might provide better risk stratification for patients with suspected CAD. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Disability and the education system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aron, Laudan; Loprest, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    Education is important for all children, but even more so for children with disabilities, whose social and economic opportunities may be limited. In this article, Laudan Aron and Pamela Loprest assess how well the nation's education system is serving students with disabilities. Aron and Loprest trace the evolution of the special education system in the United States from its origins in the civil rights movement of the mid-twentieth century. They note the dual character of federal legislation, which both guarantees eligible children with disabilities the right to a "free, appropriate public education in the least restrictive setting" and establishes a federal funding program to help meet this goal. They then review the types of services and accommodations these children receive from infancy through young adulthood. The special education system has given children with disabilities much greater access to public education, established an infrastructure for educating them, helped with the earlier identification of disabilities, and promoted greater inclusion of these children alongside their nondisabled peers. Despite these advances, many problems remain, including the over- and underidentification of certain subgroups of students, delays in identifying and serving students, and bureaucratic, regulatory, and financial barriers that complicate the program for everyone involved. More important, the authors show that special education students still lag behind their nondisabled peers in educational achievements, are often held to lower expectations, are less likely to take the full academic curriculum in high school, and are more likely to drop out of school. Only limited evidence is available on the effectiveness of specific special education services or on how to improve student achievement for this important subgroup of students. Improving the system will require better ways of understanding and measuring both ends of the special education continuum, namely, what

  15. Disability in post-earthquake Haiti: prevalence and inequality in access to services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danquah, Lisa; Polack, Sarah; Brus, Aude; Mactaggart, Islay; Houdon, Claire Perrin; Senia, Patrick; Gallien, Pierre; Kuper, Hannah

    2015-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of disability and service needs in post-earthquake Haiti, and to compare the inclusion and living conditions of people with disabilities to those without disabilities. A population-based prevalence survey of disability was undertaken in 2012 in Port-au-Prince region, which was at the centre of the earthquake in 2010. Sixty clusters of 50 people aged 5 + years were selected with probability proportionate to size sampling and screened for disability (Washington Group short set questionnaire). A case-control study was undertaken, nested within the survey, matching cases to controls by age, gender and cluster. There was additional case finding to identify further children with disabilities. Information was collected on: socioeconomic status, education, livelihood, health, activities, participation and barriers. The prevalence of disability was 4.1% (3.4-4.7%) across 3132 eligible individuals. The earthquake was the second leading cause of disability. Disability was more common with increasing age, but unrelated to poverty. Large gaps existed in access of services for people with disabilities. Adults with disabilities were less likely to be literate or work and more likely to visit health services than adults without disabilities. Children with disabilities were less likely to be currently enrolled at school compared to controls. Children and adults with disabilities reported more activity limitations and participation restriction. Further focus is needed to improve inclusion of people with disabilities in post-earthquake Haiti to ensure that their rights are fulfilled. Almost one in six households in this region of Haiti included a person with a disability, and the earthquake was the second leading cause of disability. Fewer than half of people who reported needing medical rehabilitation had received this service. The leading reported barriers to the uptake of health services included financial constraints (50%) and difficulties with

  16. Disability training in the genetic counseling curricula: bridging the gap between genetic counselors and the disability community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanborn, Erica; Patterson, Annette R

    2014-08-01

    Over the past two decades, disability activists, ethicists, and genetic counselors have examined the moral complexities inherent in prenatal genetic counseling and considered whether and in what ways genetic counseling may negatively affect individuals in the disability community. Many have expressed concerns about defining disability in the context of prenatal decision-making, as the definition presented may influence prenatal choices. In the past few years, publications have begun to explore the responsibility of counselors in presenting a balanced view of disability and have questioned the preparedness of counselors for this duty. Currently, the Accreditation Council for Genetic Counseling (ACGC) only minimally includes disability training in their competencies for genetic counselors, and in their accreditation requirements for training programs. In an attempt to describe current practice, this article details two studies that assess disability training in ABGC-accredited genetic counseling programs. Results from these studies demonstrate that experience with disability is not required by the majority of programs prior to matriculation. Though most program directors agree on the importance of including disability training in the curriculum, there is wide variability in the amount and types of training students receive. Hours dedicated to disability exposure among programs ranged from 10 to 600 hours. Eighty-five percent of program directors surveyed agree that skills for addressing disability should be added to the core competencies. Establishing a set of disability competencies would help to ensure that all graduates have the skills necessary to provide patients with an accurate understanding of disability that facilitates informed decision-making. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Differential diagnosis of Mendelian and mitochondrial disorders in patients with suspected multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz Sand, Ilana B.; Honce, Justin M.; Lublin, Fred D.

    2015-01-01

    Several single gene disorders share clinical and radiologic characteristics with multiple sclerosis and have the potential to be overlooked in the differential diagnostic evaluation of both adult and paediatric patients with multiple sclerosis. This group includes lysosomal storage disorders, various mitochondrial diseases, other neurometabolic disorders, and several other miscellaneous disorders. Recognition of a single-gene disorder as causal for a patient’s ‘multiple sclerosis-like’ phenotype is critically important for accurate direction of patient management, and evokes broader genetic counselling implications for affected families. Here we review single gene disorders that have the potential to mimic multiple sclerosis, provide an overview of clinical and investigational characteristics of each disorder, and present guidelines for when clinicians should suspect an underlying heritable disorder that requires diagnostic confirmation in a patient with a definite or probable diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. PMID:25636970

  18. Sporotrichosis in Iran: A mini review of reported cases in patients suspected to cutaneous leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    shahram mahmoudi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Sporotrichosis is a chronic subcutaneous fungal infection with global distribution. It is a rare fungal infection with nine reported cases in Iran, including eight humans and one animal, within the past 30 years. Among the human cases, seven were of the fixed cutaneous type of sporotrichosis and one had sporotrichoid lymphocutaneous. The reported patients were within the age range of 23-60 years, and six of them were female. The most frequent sites of infection were forearms and hands, as well as the face and legs. In addition, the majority of the cases had previously been suspected of leishmaniasis and received treatment. Sporotrichosis is not a well-known condition in Iran and is often misdiagnosed and erroneously treated for other cutaneous parasitic or bacterial infections with similar clinical manifestations. Therefore, sporotrichosis should be taken into account in the differential diagnosis of nodular-ulcerative skin lesions.

  19. Sporotrichosis in Iran: A mini review of reported cases in patients suspected to cutaneous leishmaniasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudi, S; Zaini, F

    2015-01-01

    Sporotrichosis is a chronic subcutaneous fungal infection with global distribution. It is a rare fungal infection with nine reported cases in Iran, including eight humans and one animal, within the past 30 years. Among the human cases, seven were of the fixed cutaneous type of sporotrichosis and one had sporotrichoid lymphocutaneous. The reported patients were within the age range of 23-60 years, and six of them were female. The most frequent sites of infection were forearms and hands, as well as the face and legs. In addition, the majority of the cases had previously been suspected of leishmaniasis and received treatment. Sporotrichosis is not a well-known condition in Iran and is often misdiagnosed and erroneously treated for other cutaneous parasitic or bacterial infections with similar clinical manifestations. Therefore, sporotrichosis should be taken into account in the differential diagnosis of nodular-ulcerative skin lesions. PMID:28680987

  20. PATIENTS WITH SUSPECTED METAL IMPLANT ALLERGY: POTENTIAL CLINICAL PICTURES AND ALLERGOLOGICAL DIAGNOSTIC APPROACH (REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this review are allergic complications following insertion of metallic orthopedic implants. Such potential allergic reactions encompass eczema, impaired wound and fracture healing, infection-mimicking reactions, effusions, pain and loosening. Nickel, cobalt and chromium seem to be the predominant eliciting allergens. Allergy might be considered prior to planned orthopaedic surgery or in patients with complications following arthroplasty We recommend, that differential diagnoses - in particular infection -should always be excluded in cooperation with surgery collegues. The clinical work up of a patient suspected of suffering from metal implant allergy should include a combined evaluation of medical history, clinical findings, patch testing and histology In vitro testing, namely the lymphocyte transformation test (LTT, can indicate metal sensitization, but needs careful interpretation.

  1. Analysis of chromosomal aberration in seven medical staffs suspected with exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Lin; Zhao Fengling; Wang Xi'ai; Wang Ping; Jiang Feng; Lu Yumin

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the chromosomal aberrations in seven medical staffs suspected with exposure to ionizing radiation and to speculate its possible causation. Methods: The hospital staffs, including 6 females and 1 male,worked in a clinical laboratory where a CT room was located downstairs. The thickness of precast slab between these two rooms was 6 cm. Peripheral blood lymphocytes of seven staffs were examined for conventional chromosomal aberrations. Results: The frequencies of dicentrics in the peripheral lymphocytes of 4 females were from 0.40% to 1.60% that was significantly higher than the spontaneous frequency of dicentrics (0.03%, χ 2 =36.79, P<0.05). The translocation was observed in the lymphocytes from all subjects with frequencies from 0.33% to 1.20%, obviously higher than its spontaneous frequency of 0.01% (χ 2 =42.90, P<0.05). Conclusion: These staffs suffer from ionizing radiation. (authors)

  2. Shortening Isolation of Patients With Suspected Tuberculosis by Using Polymerase Chain Reaction Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fløe, Andreas; Hilberg, Ole; Thomsen, Vibeke Østergaard

    2015-01-01

    Background. Isolation of patients suspected for pulmonary tuberculosis is guided by serial sputum smears. This can result in isolation for days for patients with noncontagious tuberculosis. To determine whether a single sample negative for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex at polymerase chain...... reaction (PCR) can guide isolation. Methods. We retrospectively evaluated sputum samples analyzed for M. tuberculosis complex at the International Reference Laboratory of Mycobacteriology, Copenhagen, Denmark in 2002–2011. We selected culture-confirmed tuberculosis cases with ≥3 samples within 14 days...... before or after the initial culture-positive sample. We repeated the process for those with ≥2 samples within 28 days. The primary outcome was PCR-negative, smear-positive patients. Results. We included 53 533 sputum samples from 20 928 individuals; 1636 had culture-confirmed tuberculosis. Of these, 856...

  3. Dairy cow disability weights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnel, Craig S; McNeil, Ashleigh A; Hadrich, Joleen C; Lombard, Jason E; Garry, Franklyn B; Heller, Jane

    2017-08-01

    Over the past 175 years, data related to human disease and death have progressed to a summary measure of population health, the Disability-Adjusted Life Year (DALY). As dairies have intensified there has been no equivalent measure of the impact of disease on the productive life and well-being of animals. The development of a disease-adjusted metric requires a consistent set of disability weights that reflect the relative severity of important diseases. The objective of this study was to use an international survey of dairy authorities to derive disability weights for primary disease categories recorded on dairies. National and international dairy health and management authorities were contacted through professional organizations, dairy industry publications and conferences, and industry contacts. Estimates of minimum, most likely, and maximum disability weights were derived for 12 common dairy cow diseases. Survey participants were asked to estimate the impact of each disease on overall health and milk production. Diseases were classified from 1 (minimal adverse effects) to 10 (death). The data was modelled using BetaPERT distributions to demonstrate the variation in these dynamic disease processes, and to identify the most likely aggregated disability weights for each disease classification. A single disability weight was assigned to each disease using the average of the combined medians for the minimum, most likely, and maximum severity scores. A total of 96 respondents provided estimates of disability weights. The final disability weight values resulted in the following order from least to most severe: retained placenta, diarrhea, ketosis, metritis, mastitis, milk fever, lame (hoof only), calving trauma, left displaced abomasum, pneumonia, musculoskeletal injury (leg, hip, back), and right displaced abomasum. The peaks of the probability density functions indicated that for certain disease states such as retained placenta there was a relatively narrow range of

  4. Not the usual suspects: addressing layers of vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Florencia; Vanderpoel, Sheryl

    2013-07-01

    This paper challenges the traditional account of vulnerability in healthcare which conceptualizes vulnerability as a list of identifiable subpopulations. This list of 'usual suspects', focusing on groups from lower resource settings, is a narrow account of vulnerability. In this article we argue that in certain circumstances middle-class individuals can be also rendered vulnerable. We propose a relational and layered account of vulnerability and explore this concept using the case study of cord blood (CB) banking. In the first section, two different approaches to 'vulnerability' are contrasted: categorical versus layered. In the second section, we describe CB banking and present a case study of CB banking in Argentina. We examine the types of pressure that middle-class pregnant women feel when considering CB collection and storage. In section three, we use the CB banking case study to critique the categorical approach to vulnerability: this model is unable to account for the ways in which these women are vulnerable. A layered account of vulnerability identifies several ways in which middle-class women are vulnerable. Finally, by utilizing the layered approach, this paper suggests how public health policies could be designed to overcome vulnerabilities. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. 111indium-antimyosin immunoscintigraphy in suspected myocarditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, T.; Schuemichen, C.; Joseph, A.; Moser, E.; Zeiher, A.

    1991-01-01

    111 Indium-monoclonal antimyosin scans were carried out in 21 patients with suspected myocarditis, confirmed by reduced ejection volume, pericardial effusion and clinical follow up in 12 patients. Coronary heart disease was excluded angiographically in all cases. Quantitative evaluation of myocardial 111 In-antimyosin accumulation 48 hours after injection showed a pathological uptake in 10/12 patients with increased heart/lung ratios (Q 48 >1,58). Ratios were also elevated in 2 patients with cardiomyopathy, 2 suffering from vasculitis and 1 with dermatomyositis. Four patients without proven cardiac disease had normal ratios (Q 48 ≤1,58). Examination after 24 hours was of limited value, depending on the residual blood pool activity. Visual analysis of the scans showed a high interobserver variation despite a positive correlation with quantitative analysis (48 h p.i.: r=0,72; p 111 In-antimyosin scan as a screening method prior to myocardial biopsy. However, scintigraphy cannot definitely elucidate the cause of myocardial damage. Therefore, myocardial biopsy is still recommended after positive antimyosin scans. (orig.) [de

  6. Acute aortic dissection in patient with suspected pheochromocytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lešanović Jelena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Aortic dissection is one of the most fatal vascular emergencies. Almost 40% of the patients do not reach hospital in time while more than quarter die in the first 24 hours after the dissection begins. Case Report: A 37-year old man was admitted to our hospital with severe anterior chest pain which had lasted for over a week. Suspected aortic dissection was rapidly confirmed using imaging modalities - MDCT chest scan and TTE, followed by an urgent surgical management - Bentall procedure. MDCT chest scan also discovered adrenal incidentaloma defined as malignant, pheochromocytoma like mass. Due to the critical state of the patient, there was not enough time for further endocrinologic testing. Discussion and conclusion: When treating patients with pheochromocytoma and acute aortic disection, it is crucial to obtain a stable hemodynamic state before the surgery, since they can trigger a severe hypertensive crisis due to high levels of cathecholamines induced chronic vasoconctriction. The most vulnerable periods are the induction of anesthesia and perioperative hemodynamic oscillations, so treating patients with short acting alpha- 1 adrenergic blocking agents preoperatively has proven to be helpful - Phentolamine. Both dissection of aorta and pheochromocytoma present challenges for anesthesiologists and early recognition of symptoms is essential in establishing the diagnosis and reducing the mortality rate.

  7. Suspected invasive placenta: evaluation with magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bour, Laurence; Place, Vinciane; Bendavid, Sandra; Fargeaudou, Yann; Portal, Jean-Jacques; Ricbourg, Aude; Sebbag, Delphine; Dohan, Anthony; Soyer, Philippe; Vicaut, Eric

    2014-01-01

    To determine the utility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in diagnosing invasive placenta (IP). MRI findings in 32 women with suspected IP were evaluated independently by four readers. Interobserver agreement was calculated with kappa (κ) statistics. Associations between MRI findings and IP were assessed by univariate and multivariate analyses. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of MRI for the diagnosis of IP were estimated. Sixteen women (16/32; 50 %) had confirmed IP. Interobserver correlation for the diagnosis of IP was fair (κ = 0.40). Univariate analysis revealed that thinning or focal defect of the uteroplacental interface (P < 0.0001) was the most discriminating MRI variable in the differentiation between normal and IP. Overall sensitivity and specificity of MRI for the diagnosis of IP were 84 % [95 % CI: 75-94 %] and 80 % [95 % CI: 66-93 %], respectively. Thinning or focal defect of the uteroplacental interface was the most accurate finding (88 %) in the diagnosis of IP. Multivariate analysis revealed that thinning or focal defect of the uteroplacental interface was the single independent predictor of IP (P = 0.0006; OR = 64.99). MR imaging has 84 % sensitivity [95 % CI: 75-94 %] and 80 % specificity [95 % CI: 66-93 %] for the diagnosis of IP. Thinning or focal defect of the uteroplacental interface is the most discriminating independent MR variable in differentiating between normal placenta and IP. (orig.)

  8. Managing suspect and counterfeit items in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-08-01

    Some manufacturers and suppliers use inferior materials and processes to make substandard supplies whose properties can vary significantly from established standards and specifications. Other suppliers distribute items that they know do not meet the purchase requirements or provide documentation that misrepresent actual conformance to established specifications and standards. These substandard supplies, or suspect/counterfeit items (S/CIs), pose potential threats to the safety of workers, the public and the environment and may also have a detrimental effect on security and operations at nuclear facilities. Nuclear facilities often procure and use commercial-grade items and the quality assurance policies/procedures and procurement methods are not always properly applied to avoid the entry of S/Cls into those facilities. This publication offers practical guidance on how to apply existing quality assurance programmes to effectively prevent the procurement and use of S/Cls. In particular, it provides a practical method of applying the requirements and guidance contained in the IAEA Safety Series 50-C/SG-Q: Code and Safety Guides on Quality Assurance for Safety in Nuclear Power Plants and other Nuclear Installations (1996), to the S/CIs issue

  9. [Suspected pathogenic mutation identified in two cases with oculocutaneous albinism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiangmei; Zheng, Meiling; Zhang, Guilin; Hua, Ailing

    2015-08-01

    To detect potential mutations in genes related with non-syndromic oculocutaneous albinism I-IV and ocular albinism type I in two couples who had given births to children with albinism. All exons of the non-syndromic albinism related genes TYR, OCA2, TYRP-1, MITF, SLC45A2 and GPR143 were subjected to deep sequencing. The results were verified with Sanger sequencing. For the two female carriers, the coding region of the TYR gene was found to harbor a frameshift mutation c.925_926insC, which was also suspected to have been pathogenic. In one of the male partners, a nonsense mutations c.832C>T was found, which was also known to be pathogenic. Another male partner was found to harbor a TYR gene mutation c.346C>T, which was also known to be a pathogenic nonsense mutation. The coding region of the TYR gene c.925_926insC (p.Thr309ThrfsX9) probably underlies the OCA1 disease phenotype.

  10. Suspected zonisamide-related anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collinet, Audrey; Sammut, Veronique

    2017-12-15

    CASE DESCRIPTION A 2-year-old neutered male domestic shorthair cat was evaluated for sudden onset of cluster seizures. CLINICAL FINDINGS At an emergency clinic, the cat had hyperimmunoglobulinemia and thrombocytopenia. On referral, treatment with levetiracetam, zonisamide, and phenobarbital initially provided good control of cluster seizure activity (attributable to epilepsy of unknow origin). Two weeks later, assessments revealed that serum phenobarbital concentration was within the ideal range but serum zonisamide concentration exceeded the recommended therapeutic range. The dosage of zonisamide was therefore decreased. Four days after dosage reduction, the cat developed generalized lymphadenopathy. Cytologic analysis of lymph node aspirate samples revealed a heterogeneous population of well-differentiated lymphocytes, interpreted as marked reactivity. Although neoplasia could not be ruled out, hypersensitivity to phenobarbital was suspected, and this treatment was discontinued. TREATMENT AND OUTCOME Despite cessation of phenobarbital administration, generalized peripheral lymphadenopathy progressed and hyperglobulinemia and cytopenias developed. These abnormalities resolved after discontinuation of zonisamide administration. The cat remained seizure free with no recurrence of the aforementioned concerns after reinstitution of phenobarbital treatment. CLINICAL RELEVANCE To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of zonisamide-related lymphadenopathy, hyperglobulinemia, and cytopenias in a cat. Anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome is well documented in human medicine, but little information has been published in the veterinary medical literature. Although the effects of anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome in this cat were serious, these effects were reversible with treatment discontinuation.

  11. Suspected fetal skeletal malformations or bone diseases: how to explore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassart, Marie

    2010-01-01

    Skeletal dysplasias are a heterogeneous and complex group of conditions that affect bone growth and development and result in various anomalies in shape and size of the skeleton. Although US has proved reliable for the prenatal detection of skeletal abnormalities, the precise diagnosis of a dysplasia is often difficult to make before birth (especially in the absence of a familial history) due to their various phenotypic presentations, the variability in the time at which they manifest and often, the lack of precise molecular diagnosis. In addition to the accuracy of the antenatal diagnosis, it is very important to establish a prognosis. This is a clinically relevant issue as skeletal dysplasias may be associated with severe disability and may even be lethal. We will therefore describe the respective role of two-dimensional (2-D) US, three-dimensional (3-D) US and CT in the antenatal assessment of skeletal malformations. (orig.)

  12. Detection of suspected placental invasion by MRI: Do the results depend on observer’ experience?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alamo, Leonor, E-mail: leonor.alamo@chuv.ch [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne (Switzerland); Anaye, Anass; Rey, Jannick; Denys, Alban [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne (Switzerland); Bongartz, Georg [Universitätsspital Basel (Switzerland); Terraz, Sylvain [Hôpitaux Universitaires Genève (Switzerland); Artemisia, Simona; Meuli, Reto; Schmidt, Sabine [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic value of previously described MR features used for detecting suspected placental invasion according to observers’ experience. Materials and methods: Our population included 25 pregnant women (mean age 35.16) investigated by prenatal MRI (1.5 T, T1- and T2-weighted MR-sequences without i.v. contrast), among them 12 with histopathologically proven placental invasion and 13 women (52%) without placental invasion used as control group. Two senior and two junior radiologists blindly and independently reviewed MR-examinations in view of 6 previously defined MR-features indicating presence and degree of placental invasion (placenta increta, accreta or percreta). For each reader the sensibility, specificity, and receiver operating curve (ROC) were calculated. Interobserver agreements between senior and junior readers were determined. Stepwise logistic regression was performed including the 6 MR-features predictive of placental invasion. Results: Demographics between both groups were statistically equivalent. Overall sensitivity and specificity for placental invasion was 90.9% and 75.0% for seniors and 81.8% and 61.8% for juniors, respectively. The best single MR-feature indicating placental invasion was T2-hypointense placental bands (r{sup 2} = 0.28), followed by focally interrupted myometrial border, infiltration of pelvic organs and tenting of the bladder (r{sup 2} = 0.36). Interobserver agreement for detecting placental invasion was 0.64 for seniors and 0.41 for juniors, thus substantial and moderate, respectively. Seniors detected placental invasion and depth of infiltration with significantly higher diagnostic certitude than juniors (p = 0.0002 and p = 0.0282, respectively). Conclusion: MRI can be a reliable and reproducible tool for the detection of suspected placental invasion, but the diagnostic value significantly depends on observers’ experience.

  13. Herbal medicine use and linked suspected adverse drug reactions in a prospective cohort of Ugandan inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiguba, Ronald; Ononge, Sam; Karamagi, Charles; Bird, Sheila M

    2016-05-26

    Clinical history-taking can be employed as a standardized approach to elucidate the use of herbal medicines and their linked suspected adverse drug reactions (ADRs) among hospitalized patients. We sought to identify herbal medicines nominated by Ugandan inpatients; compare nomination rates by ward and gender; confirm the herbs' known pharmacological properties from published literature; and identify ADRs linked to pre-admission use of herbal medicines. Prospective cohort of consented adult inpatients designed to assess medication use and ADRs on one gynaecological and three medical wards of 1790-bed Mulago National Referral Hospital. Baseline and follow-up data were obtained on patients' characteristics, including pre-admission use of herbal medicines. Fourteen percent (26/191) of females in Gynaecology nominated at least one specific herbal medicine compared with 20 % (114/571) of inpatients on medical wards [20 % (69/343) of females; 20 % (45/228) of males]. Frequent nominations were Persea americana (30), Mumbwa/multiple-herb clay rods (23), Aloe barbadensis (22), Beta vulgaris (12), Vernonia amygdalina (11), Commelina africana (7), Bidens pilosa (7), Hoslundia opposita (6), Mangifera indica (4), and Dicliptera laxata (4). Four inpatients experienced 10 suspected ADRs linked to pre-admission herbal medicine use including Commelina africana (4), multiple-herb-mumbwa (1), or unspecified local-herbs (5): three ADR-cases were abortion-related and one kidney-related. The named herbal medicines and their nomination rates generally differed by specialized ward, probably guided by local folklore knowledge of their use. Clinical elicitation from inpatients can generate valuable safety data on herbal medicine use. However, larger routine studies might increase the utility of our method to assess herbal medicine use and detect herb-linked ADRs. Future studies should take testable samples of ADR-implicated herbal medicines for further analysis.

  14. Bedside Ultrasound in the Emergency Department to Detect Hydronephrosis for the Evaluation of Suspected Ureteric Colic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, R; Shakya, R M; Khan A, A

    2016-01-01

    Background Renal colic is a common emergency department presentation. Hydronephrosis is indirect sign of urinary obstruction which may be due to obstructing ureteric calculus and can be detected easily by bedside ultrasound with minimal training. Objective To compare the accuracy of detection of hydronephrosis performed by the emergency physician with that of radiologist's in suspected renal colic cases. Method This was a prospective observational study performed over a period of 6 months. Patients >8 years with provisional diagnosis of renal colic with both the bedside ultrasound and the formal ultrasound performed were included. Presence of hydronephrosis in both ultrasounds and size and location of ureteric stone if present in formal ultrasound was recorded. The accuracy of the emergency physician detection of hydronephrosis was determined using the scan reported by the radiologists as the "gold standard" as computed tomography was unavailable. Statistical analysis was executed using SPSS 17.0. Result Among the 111 included patients, 56.7% had ureteric stone detected in formal ultrasound. The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of bedside ultrasound performed by emergency physician for detection of hydronephrosis with that of formal ultrasound performed by radiologist was 90.8%., 78.3%, 85.5% and 85.7% respectively. Bedside ultrasound and formal ultrasound both detected hydronephrosis more often in patients with larger stones and the difference was statistically significant (p=.000). Conclusion Bedside ultrasound can be potentially used as an important tool in detecting clinically significant hydronephrosis in emergency to evaluate suspected ureteric colic. Focused training in ultrasound could greatly improve the emergency management of these patients.

  15. Do technical parameters affect the diagnostic accuracy of virtual bronchoscopy in patients with suspected airways stenosis?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Catherine M.; Athanasiou, Thanos; Nair, Sujit; Aziz, Omer; Purkayastha, Sanjay; Konstantinos, Vlachos; Paraskeva, Paraskevas; Casula, Roberto; Glenville, Brian; Darzi, Ara

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Virtual bronchoscopy has gained popularity over the past decade as an alternative investigation to conventional bronchoscopy in the diagnosis, grading and monitoring of airway disease. The effect of technical parameters on diagnostic outcome from virtual bronchoscopy has not been determined. This meta-analysis aims to estimate accuracy of virtual compared to conventional bronchoscopy in patients with suspected airway stenosis, and evaluate the influence of technical parameters. Materials and methods: A MEDLINE search was used to identify relevant published studies. The primary endpoint was the 'correct diagnosis' of stenotic lesions on virtual compared to conventional bronchoscopy. Secondary endpoints included the effects of the technical parameters (pitch, collimation, reconstruction interval, rendering method, and scanner type), and date of publication on the diagnostic accuracy of virtual bronchoscopy. Results: Thirteen studies containing 454 patients were identified. Meta-analysis showed good overall diagnostic performance with 85% calculated pooled sensitivity (95% CI 77-91%), 87% specificity (95% CI 81-92%) and area under the curve (AUC) of 0.947. Subgroups included collimation of 3 mm or more (AUC 0.948), pitch of 1 (AUC 0.955), surface rendering technique (AUC 0.935), and reconstruction interval of more than 1.25 mm (AUC 0.914). There was no significant difference in accuracy accounting for publication date, scanner type or any of the above variables. Weighted regression analysis confirmed none of these variables could significantly account for study heterogeneity. Conclusion: Virtual bronchoscopy performs well in the investigation of patients with suspected airway stenosis. Overall sensitivity and specificity and diagnostic odds ratio for diagnosis of airway stenosis were high. The effects of pitch, collimation, reconstruction interval, rendering technique, scanner type, and publication date on diagnostic accuracy were not significant

  16. Prognostic value of atherosclerotic burden and coronary vascular function in patients with suspected coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assante, Roberta; Zampella, Emilia; Nappi, Carmela; Mainolfi, Ciro Gabriele; Cuocolo, Alberto [University Federico II, Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Naples (Italy); Acampa, Wanda [University Federico II, Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Naples (Italy); Institute of Biostructure and Bioimaging, National Council of Research, Naples (Italy); Arumugam, Parthiban; Tonge, Christine M. [Central Manchester University Teaching Hospitals, Nuclear Medicine Center, Manchester (United Kingdom); Gaudieri, Valeria; Panico, Mariarosaria; Magliulo, Mario [Institute of Biostructure and Bioimaging, National Council of Research, Naples (Italy); Petretta, Mario [University Federico II, Department of Translational Medical Sciences, Naples (Italy)

    2017-12-15

    To evaluate the prognostic value of coronary atherosclerotic burden, assessed by coronary artery calcium (CAC) score, and coronary vascular function, assessed by coronary flow reserve (CFR) in patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). We studied 436 patients undergoing hybrid {sup 82}Rb positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging. CAC score was measured according to the Agatston method, and patients were categorized into three groups (0, <400, and ≥400). CFR was calculated as the ratio of hyperemic to baseline myocardial blood flow, and it was considered reduced when <2. Follow-up was 94% complete during a mean period of 47±15 months. During follow-up, 17 events occurred (4% cumulative event rate). Event-free survival decreased with worsening of CAC score category (p < 0.001) and in patients with reduced CFR (p < 0.005). At multivariable analysis, CAC score ≥400 (p < 0.01) and CFR (p < 0.005) were independent predictors of events. Including CFR in the prognostic model, continuous net reclassification improvement was 0.51 (0.14 in patients with events and 0.37 in those without). At classification and regression tree analysis, the initial split was on CAC score. For patients with a CAC score < 400, no further split was performed, while patients with a CAC score ≥400 were further stratified by CFR values. Decision curve analyses indicate that the model including CFR resulted in a higher net benefit across a wide range of decision threshold probabilities. In patients with suspected CAD, CFR provides significant incremental risk stratification over established cardiac risk factors and CAC score for prediction of adverse cardiac events. (orig.)

  17. Detection of suspected placental invasion by MRI: Do the results depend on observer’ experience?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alamo, Leonor; Anaye, Anass; Rey, Jannick; Denys, Alban; Bongartz, Georg; Terraz, Sylvain; Artemisia, Simona; Meuli, Reto; Schmidt, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic value of previously described MR features used for detecting suspected placental invasion according to observers’ experience. Materials and methods: Our population included 25 pregnant women (mean age 35.16) investigated by prenatal MRI (1.5 T, T1- and T2-weighted MR-sequences without i.v. contrast), among them 12 with histopathologically proven placental invasion and 13 women (52%) without placental invasion used as control group. Two senior and two junior radiologists blindly and independently reviewed MR-examinations in view of 6 previously defined MR-features indicating presence and degree of placental invasion (placenta increta, accreta or percreta). For each reader the sensibility, specificity, and receiver operating curve (ROC) were calculated. Interobserver agreements between senior and junior readers were determined. Stepwise logistic regression was performed including the 6 MR-features predictive of placental invasion. Results: Demographics between both groups were statistically equivalent. Overall sensitivity and specificity for placental invasion was 90.9% and 75.0% for seniors and 81.8% and 61.8% for juniors, respectively. The best single MR-feature indicating placental invasion was T2-hypointense placental bands (r 2 = 0.28), followed by focally interrupted myometrial border, infiltration of pelvic organs and tenting of the bladder (r 2 = 0.36). Interobserver agreement for detecting placental invasion was 0.64 for seniors and 0.41 for juniors, thus substantial and moderate, respectively. Seniors detected placental invasion and depth of infiltration with significantly higher diagnostic certitude than juniors (p = 0.0002 and p = 0.0282, respectively). Conclusion: MRI can be a reliable and reproducible tool for the detection of suspected placental invasion, but the diagnostic value significantly depends on observers’ experience

  18. Disability and the Services for the Disabled in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seval Cambaz Ulas

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In Turkey there are approximately 8.5 million (% 12.3 disabled people. While the ratio of orthopedic, visual, auditory, speech, and talking disabilities and mental disability is 2.6%, the ratio of the people who have chronic diseases is 9.7% In our country, by the beginning of 1982 Constitution, there have been a lot of legal regulations. If the services for disabled persons considered as social security-related legislation for care, healthcare, education, employment and practices; the legal regulation on the year 2005 (The Disability Law no. 5378 has covered many blankness and also evolved the services to the disabled people. However, despite these recent legal regulation it is questionable that if the services for the disabled are adequate or not. In this review, the services, which offered to the disabled people, are evaluated as the topics mentioned above. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2012; 11(4.000: 483-488

  19. International Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disability: Disability Inclusive Development and International Development Cooperation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozue Kay Nagata

    2007-09-01

    -based society for persons with disabilities, together with a regional guidelines composed of several priorities and implementation mechanisms (including poverty alleviation of persons with disabilities, and regional and inter-regional cooperation.This article describes, form development cooperation perspective, the developmental characteristics of the Convention and highlights the convergence among the Convention, MDGs and the ESCAP decade’s goals contained in the Biwako Millennium Framework for Action (BMF.

  20. Madness as disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilman, Sander L

    2014-12-01

    How does society imagine mental illness? Does this shift radically over time and with different social attitudes as well as scientific discoveries about the origins and meanings of mental illness? What happens when we begin to think about mental illness as madness, as a malleable concept constantly shifting its meaning? We thus look at the meanings associated with 'general paralysis of the insane' in the nineteenth century and autism today in regard to disability. In this case study we examine the claims by scholars such as the anthropologist Emily Martin and the psychiatrist Kay Jamison as to the relationship between mental illness, disability and creativity. Today, the health sciences have become concerned with mental illness as a form of disability. How does this change the meaning of madness for practitioners and patients? © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Disability and 'care'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mik-Meyer, Nanna

    2016-01-01

    This study explores how the ‘care’ of able-bodied employees and managers (observers) affects their relationships with colleagues with cerebral palsy. Disability researchers have established that ‘help’ and ‘care’ may cause feelings of dependency with the recipient. However, few workplace studies...... have investigated the potential negative consequences of ‘caring for’ colleagues with disabilities. Through open-ended interviews conducted in 2013 in 13 Danish work organizations with 13 employees with cerebral palsy and 62 observers, the study examines how the relational aspect of ‘care’ may result...... in relationships between colleagues of ‘parent–child’ or ‘helper–helpless’. The study thus clarifies the inherent contradictions embedded in the dynamics of organizational behaviour in relation to employees with disabilities, namely that workplaces may hire a person with physical limitations (perhaps to deflect...

  2. Readiness of primary school teachers to accept disabled children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đević Rajka

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of the research with the basic goal to study the readiness of primary school teachers to accept disabled students. Research participants were 205 teachers from primary schools at the territory of Serbia. The goal was accomplished through: (a studying attitudes towards joint education of disabled students and their peers; (b studying teachers' experiences in working with disabled students; and (c studying teachers' readiness to accept disabled students, depending on their involvement/non-involvement in projects of inclusive education. Teachers express supportive attitudes towards joint schooling, but more than one half of them think that a selective approach is necessary in that process, according to the kind and degree of developmental disability. They support joint schooling from the humanistic point of view, but express concerns about the academic achievement of classes that include disabled students. The majority of teachers had experience in working with disabled students and based on that provided interesting suggestions for improving joint schooling. Higher readiness for accepting disabled students was demonstrated by teachers whose schools were involved in the projects of inclusive education. That implies the need for involving schools in similar projects and enabling teachers' immediate contact with students with developmental disabilities.

  3. Sexuality and Intellectual Disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Jodi; Downes, Alison; Blum, Nathan; Augustyn, Marilyn

    Amad is a wonderful 16-year-old young man from Syria who has recently relocated to the United States from his war-torn native country. In his last few years in Syria, he was primarily at home with his mother, and they sought refuge with a maternal aunt in the United States seeking asylum and treatment of Amad's disability.At 8 years of age, he had intelligence testing in the United Arab Emirates, which showed a verbal intelligence score on the Wechsler intelligence scale for children (WISC) of 68 and a performance of 64. His working memory was 67 and his processing speed was 65. On arrival in the United States, his achievement was roughly at a third-grade level in Arabic. In the year and a half that he has been in the United States, he quickly improved his English skills, which he learned as a toddler. His father remains in Syria unable to safely immigrate and his mother is raising him alone in the United States with the help of her sister.They come to you for an urgent care visit because Amad recently was accused of sexual harassment by two girls at his high school. He is in a substantially separate program but is included for lunch and technology. While in the computer laboratory, he repeatedly approached the girls and asks them to "date" him, and on 1 occasion sat behind 1 girl and repeatedly reached out to stroke her long blonde hair.His mother is distraught because she recently found out that Amad also has a Facebook page and had been attempting to contact the same two girls on social media. The girls' parents recently threatened to file criminal harassment charges and Amad's mother comes to you asking for help with making Amad stop this activity. What would you do next?

  4. Major trauma from suspected child abuse: a profile of the patient pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Ffion C; Lecky, Fiona E; Fisher, Ross; Fragoso-Iiguez, Marisol; Coats, Tim J

    2017-09-01

    Networked organised systems of care for patients with major trauma now exist in many countries, designed around the needs of the majority of patients (90% adults). Non-accidental injury is a significant cause of paediatric major trauma and has a different injury and age profile from accidental injury (AI). This paper compares the prehospital and inhospital phases of the patient pathway for children with suspected abuse, with those accidentally injured. The paediatric database of the national trauma registry of England and Wales, Trauma Audit and Research Network, was interrogated from April 2012 (the launch of the major trauma networks) to June 2015, comparing the patient pathway for cases of suspected child abuse (SCA) with AI. In the study population of 7825 children, 7344 (94%) were classified as AI and 481 (6%) as SCA. SCA cases were younger (median 0.4 years vs 7 years for AI), had a higher Injury Severity Score (median 16vs9 for AI), and had nearly three times higher mortality (5.7%vs2.2% for AI). Other differences included presentation to hospital evenly throughout the day and year, arrival by non-ambulance means to hospital (74%) and delayed presentation to hospital from the time of injury (median 8 hours vs 1.8 hours for AI). Despite more severe injuries, these infants were less likely to receive key interventions in a timely manner. Only 20% arrived to a designated paediatric-capable major trauma centre. Secondary transfer to specialist care, if needed, took a median of 21.6 hours from injury(vs 13.8 hours for AI). These data show that children with major trauma that is inflicted rather than accidental follow a different pathway through the trauma system. The current model of major trauma care is not a good fit for the way in which child victims of suspected abuse present to healthcare. To achieve better care, awareness of this patient profile needs to increase, and trauma networks should adjust their conventional responses. © Article author

  5. Cerebrospinal Fluid Lumbar Tapping Utilization for Suspected Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt Under-Drainage Malfunctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Beom; Ahn, Ho-Young; Lee, Hong-Jae; Yang, Ji-Ho; Yi, Jin-Seok; Lee, Il-Woo

    2017-01-01

    The diagnosis of shunt malfunction can be challenging since neuroimaging results are not always correlated with clinical outcomes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a simple, minimally invasive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lumbar tapping test that predicts shunt under-drainage in hydrocephalus patients. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical and radiological features of 48 patients who underwent routine CSF lumbar tapping after ventriculoperitoneal shunt (VPS) operation using a programmable shunting device. We compared shunt valve opening pressure and CSF lumbar tapping pressure to check under-drainage. The mean pressure difference between valve opening pressure and CSF lumbar tapping pressure of all patients were 2.21±24.57 mmH 2 O. The frequency of CSF lumbar tapping was 2.06±1.26 times. Eighty five times lumbar tapping of 41 patients showed that their VPS function was normal which was consistent with clinical improvement and decreased ventricle size on computed tomography scan. The mean pressure difference in these patients was -3.69±19.20 mmH 2 O. The mean frequency of CSF lumbar tapping was 2.07±1.25 times. Fourteen cases of 10 patients revealed suspected VPS malfunction which were consistent with radiological results and clinical symptoms, defined as changes in ventricle size and no clinical improvement. The mean pressure difference was 38.07±23.58 mmH 2 O. The mean frequency of CSF lumbar tapping was 1.44±1.01 times. Pressure difference greater than 35 mmH 2 O was shown in 2.35% of the normal VPS function group (2 of 85) whereas it was shown in 64.29% of the suspected VPS malfunction group (9 of 14). The difference was statistically significant ( p =0.000001). Among 10 patients with under-drainage, 5 patients underwent shunt revision. The causes of the shunt malfunction included 3 cases of proximal occlusion and 2 cases of distal obstruction and valve malfunction. Under-drainage of CSF should be suspected if CSF lumbar tapping

  6. Disability Studies, Disabled People and the Struggle for Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Mike; Barnes, Colin

    2010-01-01

    This paper traces the relationship between the emergence of disability studies and the struggle for meaningful inclusion for disabled people with particular reference to the work of a pivotal figure in these developments: Len Barton. It is argued that the links between disability activism and the academy were responsible for the emergence of…

  7. Encouraging the Development of Disability Allies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Nancy J.; Assadi, Jennifer L.; Herriott, Todd K.

    2005-01-01

    The authors advocate for a constructionist interpretation of disability, grounded in a social justice perspective, by discussing disability paradigms, factors that influence attitudes and attitude change regarding disability, and disability ally development and behaviors.

  8. Prevalence of Intestinal Parasites and Associated Factors among Pulmonary Tuberculosis Suspected Patients Attending University of Gondar Hospital, Gondar, Northwest Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegegne, Yalewayker; Wondmagegn, Tadelo; Worku, Ligabaw; Jejaw Zeleke, Ayalew

    2018-01-01

    Intestinal parasitic infections are among the major public health problems in developing countries. Hence, it is significant to explore coinfection with intestinal parasites and pulmonary tuberculosis because coinfection increases the complexity of control and prevention of pulmonary tuberculosis and parasitic diseases. To assess the prevalence of intestinal parasites among pulmonary tuberculosis suspected patients. Institutional based cross-sectional study was conducted at University of Gondar Hospital from March to May, 2017. Stool samples were taken from each participant and examined by direct microscopy and concentration technique. Descriptive statistics was performed and chi-square test was used to show the association between variables. P values of Intestinal parasites were detected in 50 (19.6%) among a total of 256 pulmonary tuberculosis suspected patients who were included in the study, whereas the prevalence of pulmonary tuberculosis was 16.8% (43/256). Pulmonary tuberculosis and intestinal parasite coinfection was detected in 5 (2.0%) of the participants. The most prevalent intestinal parasites infection in this study was Ascaris lumbricoides, 15 (5.85%), followed by Entamoeba histolytica/dispar, 14 (5.46%), and Hookworm, 13 (5.1%). The prevalence of intestinal parasites and their coinfection rate with pulmonary tuberculosis among pulmonary tuberculosis suspected patients were considerable.

  9. Unenhanced multidetector CT (CT KUB) in the initial imaging of suspected acute renal colic: evaluating a new service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhury, F.U.; Kotwal, S.; Raghunathan, G.; Wah, T.M.; Joyce, A.; Irving, H.C.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate a new imaging pathway for the investigation of patients presenting with suspected acute renal colic. Materials and methods: A retrospective review of 500 consecutive cases of suspected acute renal colic was undertaken to evaluate the initial results of a new imaging pathway introduced at our institution, which completely replaced the intravenous urogram (IVU) with unenhanced multidetector CT (CT KUB). Results: The positive rate for urolithiasis was 44% (221/500), the negative rate 46% (229/500) and the rate of other significant findings was 12% (59/500). Female patients had a low positive rate compared with male patients (27.5 versus 57.5%; p < 0.001). Urological intervention was required in 28% (61/221) and these patients had a larger average stone size (6.6 versus 3.7 mm; p < 0.001) and the stone was located more proximally. Out-of-hours imaging was performed in 37% (186/500), and these patients had a higher positive rate (52 versus 40%; p < 0.001). Other findings included a wide range of acute non-urological conditions. Conclusion: The feasibility of replacing the acute IVU with CT KUB in the initial assessment of suspected acute renal colic was demonstrated in the present study. The technique enables rapid diagnosis of urolithiasis, stratification of patients likely to proceed to urological intervention, and prompt diagnosis of a variety of other acute pathological conditions

  10. Percutaneous transhepatic vs. endoscopic retrograde biliary drainage for suspected malignant hilar obstruction: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kawas, Firas; Aslanian, Harry; Baillie, John; Banovac, Filip; Buscaglia, Jonathan M; Buxbaum, James; Chak, Amitabh; Chong, Bradford; Coté, Gregory A; Draganov, Peter V; Dua, Kulwinder; Durkalski, Valerie; Elmunzer, B Joseph; Foster, Lydia D; Gardner, Timothy B; Geller, Brian S; Jamidar, Priya; Jamil, Laith H; Keswani, Rajesh N; Khashab, Mouen A; Lang, Gabriel D; Law, Ryan; Lichtenstein, David; Lo, Simon K; McCarthy, Sean; Melo, Silvio; Mullady, Daniel; Nieto, Jose; Bayne Selby, J; Singh, Vikesh K; Spitzer, Rebecca L; Strife, Brian; Tarnaksy, Paul; Taylor, Jason R; Tokar, Jeffrey; Wang, Andrew Y; Williams, April; Willingham, Field; Yachimski, Patrick

    2018-02-14

    The optimal approach to the drainage of malignant obstruction at the liver hilum remains uncertain. We aim to compare percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) to endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC) as the first intervention in patients with cholestasis due to suspected malignant hilar obstruction (MHO). The INTERCPT trial is a multi-center, comparative effectiveness, randomized, superiority trial of PTBD vs. ERC for decompression of suspected MHO. One hundred and eighty-four eligible patients across medical centers in the United States, who provide informed consent, will be randomly assigned in 1:1 fashion via a web-based electronic randomization system to either ERC or PTBD as the initial drainage and, if indicated, diagnostic procedure. All subsequent clinical interventions, including crossover to the alternative procedure, will be dictated by treating physicians per usual clinical care. Enrolled subjects will be assessed for successful biliary drainage (primary outcome measure), adequate tissue diagnosis, adverse events, the need for additional procedures, hospitalizations, and oncological outcomes over a 6-month follow-up period. Subjects, treating clinicians and outcome assessors will not be blinded. The INTERCPT trial is designed to determine whether PTBD or ERC is the better initial approach when managing a patient with suspected MHO, a common clinical dilemma that has never been investigated in a randomized trial. ClinicalTrials.gov, Identifier: NCT03172832 . Registered on 1 June 2017.

  11. The evaluation of the patients who admitted to a regional hospital emergency service with suspect of rabies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurettin Tunç

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Rabies is one of the highest mortality ratesinfectious disease. The aim was the evaluation of the patientswho admitted to The Batman Regional State HospitalEmergency Service with suspect of rabies in the datesbetween June 2011 and November 2011.Materials and methods: Totally, 166 cases who admittedto our center was recorded according to the followingdata: place of residence (rural/urban, contact type andwound information, time after the contact, whether vaccineor immunoglobulin is applied or not and also the species,breed and being owned of suspected animal.Results: Our study population consisted of a total of 166cases including 38 women (23%, 128 men (77% withthe mean age of 22.01 ± 17.90 years. Of all subjects, 105(63% lived in urban and 61 (37% lived in rural areas.Eighty-five percent of suspicious animals (51% had anowner, while 81 animals were unattended.Conclusions: Our results showed that all admitted patientswere vaccinated and the ones contacted with petsor had a surface wound were vaccinated with 3 doses.Moreover, since the 49% of our cases were contactedwith animals which cannot be follow-up, our study obviouslyreveals that in our country deficiencies in the controlof waifs still is a public health problem and increases thecost of vaccination. J Clin Exp Invest 2012; 3 (3: 383-386Key words: Rabies, suspected bite, rabies prophylaxis

  12. Prevalence of Intestinal Parasites and Associated Factors among Pulmonary Tuberculosis Suspected Patients Attending University of Gondar Hospital, Gondar, Northwest Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalewayker Tegegne

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Intestinal parasitic infections are among the major public health problems in developing countries. Hence, it is significant to explore coinfection with intestinal parasites and pulmonary tuberculosis because coinfection increases the complexity of control and prevention of pulmonary tuberculosis and parasitic diseases. Objective. To assess the prevalence of intestinal parasites among pulmonary tuberculosis suspected patients. Method. Institutional based cross-sectional study was conducted at University of Gondar Hospital from March to May, 2017. Stool samples were taken from each participant and examined by direct microscopy and concentration technique. Descriptive statistics was performed and chi-square test was used to show the association between variables. P values of <0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results. Intestinal parasites were detected in 50 (19.6% among a total of 256 pulmonary tuberculosis suspected patients who were included in the study, whereas the prevalence of pulmonary tuberculosis was 16.8% (43/256. Pulmonary tuberculosis and intestinal parasite coinfection was detected in 5 (2.0% of the participants. The most prevalent intestinal parasites infection in this study was Ascaris lumbricoides, 15 (5.85%, followed by Entamoeba histolytica/dispar, 14 (5.46%, and Hookworm, 13 (5.1%. Conclusion. The prevalence of intestinal parasites and their coinfection rate with pulmonary tuberculosis among pulmonary tuberculosis suspected patients were considerable.

  13. Abdominal and pelvic CT in cases of suspected abuse: can clinical and laboratory findings guide its use?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trout, Andrew T.; Strouse, Peter J.; Mohr, Bethany A.; Khalatbari, S.; Myles, Jamie D.

    2011-01-01

    Incomplete history and concern for occult injury in suspected child abuse occasionally results in CT screenings of the abdomen and pelvis. At our institution, we noted that these exams were infrequently positive. To identify clinical or laboratory criteria that may predict intra-abdominal injury and guide the use of abdominal and pelvic CT in this population. This retrospective review involved 68 children older than 36 months who had a CT of the abdomen/pelvis for suspected abuse. CT results and patient charts were reviewed for physical exam and historical and laboratory variables. CTs were positive in 16% of patients (11/68). Hypoactive/absent bowel sounds (P = 0.01, specificity = 94.7%) and AST and ALT values greater than twice normal (P = 0.004 and P = 0.003 respectively, NPV = 93.6%) were significantly associated with positive CTs. Multiple abnormal physical exam or laboratory findings were also significantly associated with positive CTs (P = 0.03 and P = 0.002 respectively, specificity = 91.3% and NPV = 93.6% respectively). CTs of the abdomen and pelvis are infrequently positive in cases of suspected abuse. To reduce radiation exposure, CTs should only be ordered if there are findings indicating that they may be positive. In our population, these findings include absent/hypoactive bowel sounds, LFTs greater than twice normal and ≥2 abnormal labs or physical exam findings. (orig.)

  14. Abdominal and pelvic CT in cases of suspected abuse: can clinical and laboratory findings guide its use?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trout, Andrew T.; Strouse, Peter J. [University of Michigan Health System, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Mohr, Bethany A. [University of Michigan Health System, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Khalatbari, S.; Myles, Jamie D. [University of Michigan, Michigan Institute for Clinical and Health Research, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Incomplete history and concern for occult injury in suspected child abuse occasionally results in CT screenings of the abdomen and pelvis. At our institution, we noted that these exams were infrequently positive. To identify clinical or laboratory criteria that may predict intra-abdominal injury and guide the use of abdominal and pelvic CT in this population. This retrospective review involved 68 children older than 36 months who had a CT of the abdomen/pelvis for suspected abuse. CT results and patient charts were reviewed for physical exam and historical and laboratory variables. CTs were positive in 16% of patients (11/68). Hypoactive/absent bowel sounds (P = 0.01, specificity = 94.7%) and AST and ALT values greater than twice normal (P = 0.004 and P = 0.003 respectively, NPV = 93.6%) were significantly associated with positive CTs. Multiple abnormal physical exam or laboratory findings were also significantly associated with positive CTs (P = 0.03 and P = 0.002 respectively, specificity = 91.3% and NPV = 93.6% respectively). CTs of the abdomen and pelvis are infrequently positive in cases of suspected abuse. To reduce radiation exposure, CTs should only be ordered if there are findings indicating that they may be positive. In our population, these findings include absent/hypoactive bowel sounds, LFTs greater than twice normal and {>=}2 abnormal labs or physical exam findings. (orig.)

  15. Is It Worth It? Benefits in Research with Adults with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Katherine E.; Conroy, Nicole E.; Olick, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    Including adults with intellectual disability in research promotes direct benefits to participants and larger societal benefits. Stakeholders may have different views of what count as benefits and their importance. We compared views on benefits in research with adults with intellectual disability among adults with intellectual disability, family…

  16. 76 FR 16478 - Proposed Information Collection (Disability Benefits Questionnaires-Group 2) Activity: Comment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-23

    ... Collection (Disability Benefits Questionnaires--Group 2) Activity: Comment Request AGENCY: Veterans Benefits... Conditions (Vascular Diseases including Varicose Veins) Disability Benefits Questionnaire, VA Form 21-0960A-2. b. Hypertension Disability Benefits Questionnaire, VA Form 21- 0960A-3. c. Non-ischemic Heart...

  17. 76 FR 35950 - Agency Information Collection (Disability Benefits Questionnaires-Group 3) Activity Under OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-20

    ... Collection (Disability Benefits Questionnaires--Group 3) Activity Under OMB Review AGENCY: Veterans Benefits... Questionnaire, VA Form 21-0960C-5. b. Headaches (Including Migraine Headaches), Disability Benefits Questionnaire, VA Form 21-0960C-8. c. Multiple Sclerosis (MS), Disability Benefits Questionnaire, VA Form 21...

  18. 76 FR 8846 - Proposed Information Collection (Disability Benefits Questionnaires-Group 1) Activity: Comment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-15

    ... Collection (Disability Benefits Questionnaires--Group 1) Activity: Comment Request AGENCY: Veterans Benefits... Lymphatic Conditions, Including Leukemia Disability Benefits Questionnaire, VA Form 21-0960B-2. b. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (Lou Gehrig's Disease) Disability Benefits Questionnaire, VA Form 21-0960C-2. c...

  19. 76 FR 33417 - Agency Information Collection (Disability Benefits Questionnaires-Group 2) Activity Under OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-08

    ... Collection (Disability Benefits Questionnaires--Group 2) Activity Under OMB Review AGENCY: Veterans Benefits... Questionnaire, VA Form 21-0960A-2. b. Hypertension Disability Benefits Questionnaire, VA Form 21- 0960A-3. c. Non-ischemic Heart Disease (including Arrhythmias and Surgery, Disability Benefits Questionnaire, VA...

  20. Voyaging on the Seas of Spirit: An Ongoing Journey towards Understanding Disability and Humanity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stienstra, Deborah; Ashcroft, Terri

    2010-01-01

    In an important article in "Disability & Society" Hughes argued that ontology is becoming a "live issue" in disability studies. Different sources, including non-western and aboriginal conceptions of disability and cosmology and the literature on philosophy, religion, palliative and healthcare, suggest that we are missing a critical aspect of…

  1. Testing Students with Disabilities: Practical Strategies for Complying with District and State Requirements. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurlow, Martha L.; Elliott, Judy L.; Ysseldyke, James E.

    This book is intended to facilitate the meaningful inclusion of students with disabilities in district and state assessments as required by the 1997 amendments to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. First, an introductory chapter offers reasons for including students with disabilities in district and statewide accountability systems.…

  2. Access to the Information Superhighway and Emerging Information Technologies by People with Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Council on Disability, Washington, DC.

    This report discusses the growth of the National Information Infrastructure (NII), or the information superhighway, and its implications for people with disabilities. Advantages for people with disabilities include: increasing the ability of individuals with some types of disabilities to access and use information; decreasing personal isolation…

  3. 2009 Division 35 Presidential Address: Feminist Psychology and Women with Disabilities--An Emerging Alliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Martha E.

    2010-01-01

    This article is an application of the "Guidelines for Psychological Practice with Girls and Women" to psychological issues faced by Women with Disabilities. It includes culture-specific issues faced by Women with Disabilities, the multiple roles of Women with Disabilities, the importance of informal support systems, and the intersection between…

  4. Inclusion of Disability Issues in Teaching and Research in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohajunwa, Chioma; Mckenzie, Judith; Hardy, Anneli; Lorenzo, Theresa

    2014-01-01

    Evidence suggests that the lack of inclusion of disability issues in the curricula of higher education institutions may result in the perpetuation of practices that discriminate against disabled people in the broader society. In light of this claim, this article investigates whether and how disability issues are included in the teaching and…

  5. "You Have to Care." Perceptions of Promoting Autonomy in Support Settings for Adults with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petner-Arrey, Jami; Copeland, Susan R.

    2015-01-01

    This study from the south-western United States investigated the perceptions of persons with intellectual disability receiving support and of persons providing support regarding the autonomy of people with intellectual disability. The participants included 10 people with intellectual disability and 10 support workers. Through interviews, this…

  6. The Phenomenon of Legislative Advocacy among Parents of Children with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Meghan M.; Sandman, Linda; Perez, Beatrize; O'Leary, Meghann

    2018-01-01

    Although parents of children with disabilities have forged systemic changes for individuals with disabilities, little is known about the phenomenon of legislative advocacy (LA) including methods and barriers. In this United States-based study, 49 parents of individuals with disabilities participated in focus groups about LA reporting both positive…

  7. Patient-Reported Disability Measures Do Not Correlate with Electrodiagnostic Severity in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob E. Tulipan, MD

    2017-08-01

    Conclusions:. Electrodiagnostic severity grades do not correlate with patient-reported disability, including the DASH and MCS–12 surveys. There is a counterintuitive correlation between more-severe electrodiagnostic findings and decreased physical disability. These findings indicate that disability may not correlate with electrodiagnostic severity of median neuropathy in CTS.

  8. Prospective evaluation of the diagnostic value of sensitive KIT D816V mutation analysis of blood in adults with suspected systemic mastocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kielsgaard Kristensen, Thomas; Vestergaard, H; Bindslev-Jensen, C

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sensitive KIT D816V mutation analysis of blood has been proposed to guide bone marrow (BM) investigation in suspected systemic mastocytosis (SM). The aim of this prospective study was for the first time to compare the D816V status of the "screening blood sample" used to guide BM biopsy...... in suspected SM to the outcome of the subsequent BM investigation. METHODS: Fifty-eight adult patients with suspected SM were included. The outcome of sensitive KIT D816V analysis of blood was compared to the result of the BM investigation. RESULTS: Screening blood samples from 44 of 58 patients tested D816V...... patients did not fulfill any diagnostic SM criteria (excluding tryptase criterion). Of the 48 SM patients, 90% tested D816V-positive. Thirteen SM patients presented with Hymenoptera venom-induced anaphylaxis, no skin lesions, and baseline serum tryptase ≤20 ng/mL. Of these, 92% tested D816V...

  9. The Lawyer in the Dutch Interrogation Room: Influence on Police and Suspect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W-J. Verhoeven (Willem-Jan); L. Stevens (Lonneke)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractIn many European countries, providing a suspect in custody with legal aid before the first police interrogation is a heavily debated issue. In this paper, we report on an exploratory study on the use of coercion by the police and the use of the right to silence by suspects in 70 Dutch

  10. Occurrence of antibodies to Anaplasma phagocytophilum in patients with suspected tick-borne encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana Kalinová

    2015-09-01

    None of the examined patients with suspected TBE had the disease confirmed. Hoever, as shown by the results, the relative risk of occurrence of anaplasmosis is higher in people examined for some another vector-borne disease (in this case TBE. Therefore, the performance of screening examinations in patients suspected of having any tick-borne disease is very important.

  11. Molecular detection of Orientia tsutsugamushi from suspected scrub typhus cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seethalakshmi Srinivasan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Scrub typhus is an acute febrile illness caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi. The disease is under-diagnosed in India, because of low index of suspicion and also due to its nonspecific presentation, and lack of confirmatory diagnostic tests. Aims: This study was undertaken to diagnose scrub typhus in patients with undifferentiated fevers by serology and molecular methods. Materials and Methods: A total of 68 blood samples were collected from patients clinically suspected to have scrub typhus. After transportation to the laboratory, the serum was separated from the blood and subjected to rapid card test. The ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid blood samples were subjected to DNA extraction using QIAamp DNA Mini Kit followed by nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR. Results: 24/68 (35.29% cases showed the presence of antibody against scrub typhus by serology. 6/68 (8.8% patients showed the presence of outer membrane protein antigen gene 56 kDa by nPCR. 5/24 serology positive cases showed the presence of 56 kDa outer membrane protein antigen gene by nPCR. A large number of cases positive by serology were negative by PCR which may indicate a low sensitivity of this test either due to low copy numbers or due to excess host DNA. Conclusion: Delay in treatment may increase disease severity and leads to higher mortality. Thus, molecular methods of diagnosis may aid in the early diagnosis of infection and enable prompt treatment. This is the first report on the diagnosis of scrub typhus in the suburbs of Chennai using molecular methods and reemphasizes the need for increased awareness of rickettsial infections in rural areas.

  12. Molecular detection of Orientia tsutsugamushi from suspected scrub typhus cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Seethalakshmi; Menon, Thangam

    2017-01-01

    Scrub typhus is an acute febrile illness caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi. The disease is under-diagnosed in India, because of low index of suspicion and also due to its nonspecific presentation, and lack of confirmatory diagnostic tests. This study was undertaken to diagnose scrub typhus in patients with undifferentiated fevers by serology and molecular methods. A total of 68 blood samples were collected from patients clinically suspected to have scrub typhus. After transportation to the laboratory, the serum was separated from the blood and subjected to rapid card test. The ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid blood samples were subjected to DNA extraction using QIAamp DNA Mini Kit followed by nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR). 24/68 (35.29%) cases showed the presence of antibody against scrub typhus by serology. 6/68 (8.8%) patients showed the presence of outer membrane protein antigen gene 56 kDa by nPCR. 5/24 serology positive cases showed the presence of 56 kDa outer membrane protein antigen gene by nPCR. A large number of cases positive by serology were negative by PCR which may indicate a low sensitivity of this test either due to low copy numbers or due to excess host DNA. Delay in treatment may increase disease severity and leads to higher mortality. Thus, molecular methods of diagnosis may aid in the early diagnosis of infection and enable prompt treatment. This is the first report on the diagnosis of scrub typhus in the suburbs of Chennai using molecular methods and reemphasizes the need for increased awareness of rickettsial infections in rural areas.

  13. The influence of disability on absenteeism: an empirical analysis using Spanish data

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia-Serrano, Carlos; Malo, Miguel A.

    2008-01-01

    Using data from the European Community Household Panel for Spain covering the period 1995-2001, this paper investigates the influence of disability on absenteeism reported by workers. Results show that workers with disabilities are absent more days than workers without disabilities. This finding holds even when individual’s selfreported health, visits to doctors and nights spent in hospitals are included in the estimations. The total effect of disability on absenteeism amounts to a marginal...

  14. [Temporary disability and its legal implications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Fumadó, Carles; Martí Amengual, Gabriel; Puig Bausili, Lluïsa; Arimany-Manso, Josep

    2014-03-01

    Temporary disability is the condition that workers face when, as the result of illness (common or professional) or accident (work-related or not), they are temporarily prevented from performing their work and require health care. The management of temporary disability is a medical act that involves (in addition to a complex clinical assessment) obvious social, occupational and financial connotations and requires continuing medical follow-up from doctors, as well as responses to medical-legal conflicts. The regulatory framework on the subject is extensive in the Spanish setting and highly diverse in the European setting. Beyond the regulatory framework, the repercussions of temporary disability are self-evident at all levels. Although determining temporary disability is a common medical act for practicing physicians, it is not exempt from risks or difficulties arising from the assessment itself and the characteristics of practicing medical care. Established medical-legal conflicts include the processing of health data and the requirements for transferring information related to workers' temporary disability to their company's medical services. The interest and usefulness demonstrated by the data obtained from forensic medicine for public health require the incorporation of these data into general healthcare information, as it could be essential to the surveillance of worker health. The recommendations established by medical societies, as good practice guidelines, are especially useful in this type of conflict. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  15. Assesment of Disabled Geriatric Health Council Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cem Sahin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: In this study it is aimed to evaluate geriatric patients who apply to health council. Material and Method:The study retrospectively assessed 3112 patients admitted to the disability ward, of which 601 geriatric patients were included in the study. Results: Of the 601 patients, 53.1% were men and 46.9% were women. The mean age of these patients was 60 (std ± 18.35 years. Some of the reasons for admission in the hospital were need for social services (45.6% and determination of disability rate (21.6%. Most common diseases in patients aged %u226565 years were hypertension (21.6%, diabetes (12.6%, and chronic obstructive lung disease and dilated cardiomyopathy (3.7%; p 0.05. Internal disability rate was not statistically significant (p > 0.05, but total disability was statistically significant (p < 0.05. Moreover, prevalence of additional conditions was statistically significant (p < 0.05 in patients aged %u226565 years.Discussion: Rapid increases in life expectancy and number of older people has increased the prevalence of disabilities among older people. Being diagnosed with chronic diseases should not be the end of life for geriatric populations. Their mood, social life, general health, and mental profile should progress. Sufficient attention should be paid to the special needs of older patients thereby leading to a wider use of facilities.

  16. 20 CFR 404.1013 - Included-excluded rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... least one-half of your time in the pay period is in covered work. If you spend most of your time in a... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Included-excluded rule. 404.1013 Section 404.1013 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY...

  17. Disability Inclusion in the Workplace

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-12-28

    People with disabilities in America are twice as likely to be unemployed than people without disabilities – a fact that can be eliminated. Dr. Shannon Griffin-Blake tells us how we can give people with disabilities an opportunity to thrive in the workforce.  Created: 12/28/2016 by National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities (NCBDDD).   Date Released: 12/28/2016.

  18. Understanding Intellectual Disability through Rasopathies

    OpenAIRE

    Alvaro, San Martín; Rafael, Pagani Mario

    2014-01-01

    Intellectual disability, commonly known as mental retardation in the International Classification of Disease from World Health Organization, is the term that describes an intellectual and adaptive cognitive disability that begins in early life during the developmental period. Currently the term intellectual disability is the preferred one. Although our understanding of the physiological basis of learning and learning disability is poor, a general idea is that such condition is quite permanent...

  19. Group Counseling for People with Physical Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livneh, Hanoch; Wilson, Lisa M.; Pullo, Robert E.

    2004-01-01

    Group counseling has been used with a wide range of people who have physical disorders including psychosomatic conditions, sensory (visual and auditory) disabilities, neuromuscular and orthopedic impairments, and life-threatening diseases. The needs and concerns of these people can be generally delineated as physical, psychological, social,…

  20. People with Learning Disabilities and "Active Ageing"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Liam; Boxall, Kathy

    2015-01-01

    Background: People (with and without learning disabilities) are living longer. Demographic ageing creates challenges and the leading policy response to these challenges is "active ageing". "Active" does not just refer to the ability to be physically and economically active, but also includes ongoing social and civic engagement…

  1. Education's Enduring Prejudices: Disability at the Door

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valeo, A.

    2009-01-01

    Ontario's current education system is struggling with the task of fully including children with disabilities in the regular classrooms of their neighbourhood school. While many educators understand that it is wrong to deny admission to publicly funded schools because the child may be Black or female, they nonetheless feel that segregation of…

  2. Life Satisfaction in Persons with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas-Carrasco, Ramona; Salvador-Carulla, Luis

    2012-01-01

    We appraised life satisfaction using the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS), and analysed its psychometric properties in persons with intellectual disability (ID). Ninety-nine persons with ID from four services in Spain participated. A battery of subjective assessments was used, including the SWLS, a Quality of Life measure (WHOQOL-BREF), and…

  3. Aging in Rare Intellectual Disability Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykens, Elisabeth M.

    2013-01-01

    This review highlights several methodological challenges involved in research on aging, health, and mortality in adults with rare intellectual disability syndromes. Few studies have been performed in this area, with research obstacles that include: the ascertainment of older adults with genetic versus clinical diagnoses; likelihood that adults…

  4. Trade Related Reading Packets for Disabled Readers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Beverly; Woodruff, Nancy S.

    Six trade-related reading packets for disabled readers are provided for these trades: assemblers, baking, building maintenance, data entry, interior landscaping, and warehousing. Each packet stresses from 9 to 14 skills. Those skills common to most packets include context clues, fact or opinion, details, following directions, main idea,…

  5. Leisure Education Programs for the Severely Disabled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleien, Stuart J.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The importance of leisure education for severely disabled students is emphasized as a means of enabling them to purposefully use leisure time and to expand social and motor skills that facilitate independent daily living. Sample activities for inclusion in physical education programs are included. (DG)

  6. Health and Disability: Partnerships in Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Jane; McDonald, Rachael

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite awareness of the health inequalities experienced by people with intellectual disability, their health status remains poor. Inequalities in health outcomes are manifest in higher morbidity and rates of premature death. Contributing factors include the barriers encountered in accessing and receiving high-quality health care.…

  7. Safety and injury profile of conducted electrical weapons used by law enforcement officers against criminal suspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozeman, William P; Hauda, William E; Heck, Joseph J; Graham, Derrel D; Martin, Brian P; Winslow, James E

    2009-04-01

    Conducted electrical weapons such as the Taser are commonly used by law enforcement agencies. The safety of these weapons has been the subject of scrutiny and controversy; previous controlled studies in animals and healthy humans may not accurately reflect the risks of conducted electrical weapons used in actual conditions. We seek to determine the safety and injury profile of conducted electrical weapons used against criminal suspects in a field setting. This prospective, multicenter, observational trial tracked a consecutive case series of all conducted electrical weapon uses against criminal suspects at 6 US law enforcement agencies. Mandatory review of each conducted electrical weapon use incorporated physician review of police and medical records. Injuries were classified as mild, moderate, or severe according to a priori definitions. The primary outcome was a composite of moderate and severe injuries, termed significant injuries. Conducted electrical weapons were used against 1,201 subjects during 36 months. One thousand one hundred twenty-five subjects (94%) were men; the median age was 30 years (range 13 to 80 years). Mild or no injuries were observed after conducted electrical weapon use in 1,198 subjects (99.75%; 95% confidence interval 99.3% to 99.9%). Of mild injuries, 83% were superficial puncture wounds from conducted electrical weapon probes. Significant injuries occurred in 3 subjects (0.25%; 95% confidence interval 0.07% to 0.7%), including 2 intracranial injuries from falls and 1 case of rhabdomyolysis. Two subjects died in police custody; medical examiners did not find conducted electrical weapon use to be causal or contributory in either case. To our knowledge, these findings represent the first large, independent, multicenter study of conducted electrical weapon injury epidemiology and suggest that more than 99% of subjects do not experience significant injuries after conducted electrical weapon use.

  8. High-velocity penetrating thoracic trauma with suspected cardiac involvement in a combat support hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez, F.; Gentlesk, P.J.; Eckart, R.E.; Beekley, A.C.; Huffer, L.L.

    2011-01-01

    The most common cardiac injuries in the United States are blunt trauma from motor vehicle accidents or low-velocity trauma from stabbings. During military conflict, high-velocity injuries, including gunshot wounds (GSW) and fragment injury from improvised explosive devices (IED), are relatively more common. This is a retrospective review of cases with high-velocity penetrating injury and suspected myocardial involvement during a 6-month period in Baghdad, Iraq, at a United States Army hospital during Operation Iraqi Freedom. Eleven cases survived to admission (GSW in 5, IED in 6). The mean age of the all-male cohort was 27 years (range, 3-54 years). Eight of the 11 patients (73%) were victims of polytrauma. The entrance involved the right ventricle (n=3), right atrium (n=2), left ventricle (n=1), or mediastinum and pericardial reflections (n=5). Echocardiography was performed in all 11 patients. In 7 patients, no foreign body was identifiable, and in 2 patients the foreign body was identified within the pericardial fat pad. Three patients were identified as having a suspected ventricular septal defect, ranging in size from 2 to 8 mm. The most common electrocardiographic abnormality was atrioventricular block and right bundle branch block. In 4 patients, the management of the chest injury was nonsurgical, and in 1 patient the treatment was a chest tube only. Four of the patients underwent median sternotomy, 1 underwent emergent lateral thoracotomy, and 1 underwent an infradiaphragmatic approach. This case series is too small to draw definitive conclusions; however, a multidisciplinary approach to high-velocity injuries with potential for cardiac involvement augments preoperative assessment for myocardial injury and may allow selective nonoperative management. (author)

  9. Clinical value of somatostatin receptor imaging in patients with suspected head and neck paragangliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Matthias; Dietlein, Markus; Weber, Kerstin; Moka, Detlef; Schicha, Harald [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Universitaet zu Koeln, Joseph-Stelzmann-Strasse 9, 50924 Koeln (Germany); Fischer, Eva; Michel, Olaf; Stennert, Eberhard [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Hals-, Nasen- und Ohrenheilkunde, Universitaet zu Koeln, Koeln (Germany)

    2002-12-01

    Paragangliomas or glomus tumours of the head and neck region are rare somatostatin receptor-expressing neuroendocrine tumours. Precise preoperative diagnosis is of special importance in order to adequately weigh the potential benefit of the operation against the inherent risks of the procedure. In this study, the clinical value of somatostatin receptor imaging was assessed in 19 patients who underwent somatostatin receptor scintigraphy because of known or suspected paraganglioma of the head and neck region. The results were compared with the results of computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging, histology and clinical follow-up. [{sup 111}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1}]-octreotide scintigraphy was performed 4-6 and 24 h after i.v. injection of 140-220 MBq {sup 111}In-octreotide. Whole-body and planar images as well as single-photon emission tomography images were acquired and lesions were graded according to qualitative tracer uptake. Somatostatin receptor imaging was positive in nine patients, identifying paragangliomas for the first time in three patients and recurrent disease in six patients. In one patient, a second, previously unknown paraganglioma site was identified. Negative results were obtained in ten patients. These patients included one suffering from chronic hyperplastic otitis externa, one with granuloma tissue and an organised haematoma, one with an acoustic neuroma, one with an asymmetric internal carotid artery, two with ectasia of the bulbus venae jugularis and one with a jugular vein thrombosis. In two patients with a strong family history of paraganglioma, individual involvement could be excluded. In only one patient did somatostatin receptor imaging and magnetic resonance imaging yield false negative results in respect of recurrent paraganglioma tissue. It is concluded that somatostatin receptor scintigraphy provides important information in patients with suspected paragangliomas of the head and neck region and has a strong impact on further

  10. Clinical utility of magnetic resonance imaging radiographs for suspected organic syndromes in adult psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhart, Stephen M; Young, Alexander S; Marder, Stephen R; Mintz, Jim

    2005-08-01

    In psychiatric practice, adult patients are most commonly referred for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to screen for suspected organic medical diseases of the central nervous system that can mimic psychiatric syndromes. We identified the most common signs and symptoms prompting MRIs to establish the predictive value of these signs and symptoms for clinically pertinent organic syndromes. This study was a retrospective chart review of psychiatric patients at the Veterans Affairs Greater Los Angeles Health Care Center (Los Angeles, Calif.) who were referred for MRI of the brain between 1996 and 2002. Patients referred for evaluation of dementia were excluded. The specific indications leading clinicians to obtain MRI were identified and grouped. In order to offset the uncertain significance of many MRI findings, for this study, the predictive value of each indication was calculated based on the percentage of patients in whom clinical management changed in response to MRI findings rather than on the percentage with any abnormal MRI results. Of 253 patients who had MRIs, 38 (15%) incurred some degree of treatment modification as a result of MRI findings, including 6 patients in whom MRI identified a medical condition that became the focus of treatment. Six indications appeared most likely to prompt clinicians to obtain MRIs. Because pertinent results were associated with each of these indications, statistical evaluation did not reveal significant differences in their predictive values (chi(2) = 4.32, df = 5, p = .505). Unlike prior studies showing no value to screening radioimaging, this study shows MRI can be a useful screening test among patients suspected of having organic psychiatric disorders and that the common indications for MRI employed at one institution were predictive.

  11. Living with disability. Taking care of siblings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Caldin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The birth of a disabled child is a critical event that places all the members of the family in a condition of great vulnerability. When talking about families with a disabled child, attention is usually focused on the parents. Siblings tend to play a marginal role, as shown in the referred literature, in this specific field of investigation. Communicating diagnosis to siblings means involving them in the process of family change, making them active players rather than “spectators” in their own “existential niche”. Communication of diagnosis is a delicate, continuous process that has to be tackled appropriately, using targeted words and educational actions. Children need help in accepting and welcoming their disabled sibling, with all his/her characteristics (and deficits, through a balanced, pondered approach that includes both the dimension of co-development and the acknowledgement of problematic situations.

  12. Genomic investigation of a suspected outbreak of legionella pneumophila st82 reveals undetected heterogeneity by the present gold-standard methods, denmark, july to november 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjørring, Susanne; Stegger, M.; Kjelsø, C.

    2017-01-01

    Between July and November 2014, 15 communityacquired cases of Legionnaires’ disease (LD), including four with Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 sequence type (ST) 82, were diagnosed in Northern Zealand, Denmark. An outbreak was suspected. No ST82 isolates were found in environmental samples and ...

  13. Disability Inclusion in the Workplace

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    People with disabilities in America are twice as likely to be unemployed than people without disabilities – a fact that can be eliminated. Dr. Shannon Griffin-Blake tells us how we can give people with disabilities an opportunity to thrive in the workforce.

  14. 2017 Annual Disability Statistics Compendium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, E. A.; Houtenville, A. J.

    2018-01-01

    The "Annual Disability Statistics Compendium" and its compliment, the "Annual Disability Statistics Supplement," are publications of statistics about people with disabilities and about the government programs which serve them. The "Compendium" and "Supplement" are designed to serve as a summary of government…

  15. Disability Management in Small Firms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, David

    1991-01-01

    Notes that American research has paid relatively little attention to prospects for adapting disability management practices to financial and management environment of smaller employers. Compares large and small firms in terms of employer disability practices and characteristics of disabled workers; discusses barriers to rehabilitation and…

  16. Valores organizacionais e concepções de deficiência: a percepção de pessoas incluídas Valores organizacionales y concepciones de deficiencia: la percepción de las personas incluidas Organizational values and disability conceptions: the point of view of included people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Regina do Carmo Ávila-Vitor

    2012-01-01

    Ds relacionan el prestigio de la empresa a una concepción de discapacidad que no las coloca como un desviante de un estándar normal de ser humano. Además, fue posible identificar aspectos considerados importantes en el proceso de inserción de PcDs, como el reconocimiento de la inclusión como valor organizacional, la necesidad de adecuación de las condiciones de trabajo, el papel de las PcDs en el proceso de inclusión y la importancia de la convivencia con PcDs en un escenario favorable a su desempeño.The aim of this article was to verify in the point of view of people with disabilities (PWDs who are working in the labor market if there was any relation between their organizational values perceptions and the ways that they saw the disability in the workplace. The research took place in a company that is reference in inclusion in Brazil. Two questionnaires were used: the Inventory of Disability Conceptions in Work Situations and the Inventory of Organizational Values. Semi-structured interviews with PWDs, their managers and the coordinators of the inclusion program and interviews with PWDs, their managers and coordinators of the inclusion program were carried out. It was verified a negative correlation between the PWDs perception about prestige and the form as normality is seen by the company, that means that the PWDs connect the prestige of the company to a conception of deficiency that does not place them differently of a normal standard of human being. Moreover, it was possible to identify aspects considered important in the process of insertion of PWDs as the recognition of the inclusion as organizational value, the necessity of adequacy to the work conditions, the role of the PWDs in the inclusion process and the importance of the relationship with PWDs in a scene favorable to their performance.

  17. Coronary vascular age: An alternate means for predicting stress-induced myocardial ischemia in patients with suspected coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nappi, Carmela; Gaudieri, Valeria; Acampa, Wanda; Arumugam, Parthiban; Assante, Roberta; Zampella, Emilia; Mannarino, Teresa; Mainolfi, Ciro Gabriele; Imbriaco, Massimo; Petretta, Mario; Cuocolo, Alberto

    2018-01-22

    Coronary artery calcium (CAC) can be used to estimate vascular age in adults, providing a convenient transformation of CAC from Agatston units into a year's scale. We investigated the role of coronary vascular age in predicting stress-induced myocardial ischemia in subjects with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). A total of 717 subjects referred to CAC scoring and 82 Rb PET/CT stress-rest myocardial perfusion imaging for suspected CAD were studied. CAC score was measured according to the Agatston method and coronary vascular age by equating estimated CAD risk for chronological age and CAC using the formula 39.1 + 7.25 × ln(CAC + 1). Stress-induced ischemia was present in 105 (15%) patients. Mean chronological age, CAC score, and coronary vascular age were higher (all P age was added to clinical variables. Including vascular age in the model, the global Chi square further increased from 68.77 to 106.38 (P age to clinical data, continuous net reclassification improvement (cNRI) was 0.57, while adding vascular age to clinical data and chronological age cNRI was 0.62. At decision curve analysis, the model including vascular age was associated with the highest net benefit compared to the model including only clinical data, to the model including chronological age and clinical data, and to a strategy considering that all patients had ischemia. The model including vascular age also showed the largest reduction in false-positive rate without missing any ischemic patients. In subjects with suspected CAD, coronary vascular age is strongly associated with stress-induced ischemia. The communication of a given vascular age would have a superior emotive impact improving observance of therapies and healthier lifestyles.

  18. Barriers to Participation in Tourism in the Disabled

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaganek Krzysztof

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Physical activity is critical to effective rehabilitation in people with disabilities and, consequently, is of high importance in their lives. However, participation of the disabled in physical activity, including tourism, is a much more complex issue than in the case in able-bodied individuals. Material and methods. This paper aims to fill the gap and familiarise the reader with barriers faced by the disabled who engage in tourism. The study group consisted of randomly selected 460 participants with certificates specifying the degree of their disability. The group included 55 (12% individuals with visual impairments, 203 (44.1% individuals with hearing impairments, and 202 (43.9% individuals with locomotor system disabilities. Results. The data derived from interviews made with people with physical dysfunctions, designed with a view to achieving the aims of the study, were used to develop logistic regression models. Conclusions. On average, the greatest and smallest numbers of barriers were reported by individuals with severe disabilities and those who had large families, respectively. Younger disabled people most often complained about the equipment barriers to participation in tourism. Older respondents were mostly challenged with social barriers. Of all the determinants analysed in the study, the perception of barriers to participation in tourism most often depended on the subjects’ degree of disability.

  19. Measuring disability and its predicting factors in a large database in Taiwan using the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Wen-Chou; Chang, Kwang-Hwa; Escorpizo, Reuben; Yen, Chia-Feng; Liao, Hua-Fang; Chang, Feng-Hang; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Teng, Sue-Wen; Chiu, Wen-Ta; Liou, Tsan-Hon

    2014-11-25

    The definition of disability had been unclear until the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health was promulgated in 2001 by the World Health Organization (WHO). Disability is a critical but relatively neglected public-health concern. We conducted this study to measure disabilities by using the WHO Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0 (WHODAS 2.0) and identify the factors that contribute to disabilities. We obtained and analyzed the data on people who applied to Taiwan's disability registration system between September 2012 and August 2013. A total of 158,174 cases were selected for this study. Among the people included in this study, 53% were male, and the females were on average 3 years older than the males. More males than females were of a low socioeconomic status, but the rate of employment was higher among the males than among the females. Age, sex, place of residence, and types and severity of impairment were all determined to be factors that independently contributed to disability. This study has demonstrated that disability can be measured and compared using WHODAS 2.0. Increasing the public-health attention devoted to disability and identifying the factors associated with disability can promote independence and social participation in people with disabilities.

  20. Measuring Disability and Its Predicting Factors in a Large Database in Taiwan Using the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Chou Chi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The definition of disability had been unclear until the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health was promulgated in 2001 by the World Health Organization (WHO. Disability is a critical but relatively neglected public-health concern. We conducted this study to measure disabilities by using the WHO Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0 (WHODAS 2.0 and identify the factors that contribute to disabilities. We obtained and analyzed the data on people who applied to Taiwan’s disability registration system between September 2012 and August 2013. A total of 158,174 cases were selected for this study. Among the people included in this study, 53% were male, and the females were on average 3 years older than the males. More males than females were of a low socioeconomic status, but the rate of employment was higher among the males than among the females. Age, sex, place of residence, and types and severity of impairment were all determined to be factors that independently contributed to disability. This study has demonstrated that disability can be measured and compared using WHODAS 2.0. Increasing the public-health attention devoted to disability and identifying the factors associated with disability can promote independence and social participation in people with disabilities.

  1. Americans with Disabilities Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaesberg, Mary Ann; Murray, Kenneth T.

    1994-01-01

    Presents a 35-item checklist of practical activities for school district compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The checklist is based on ADA statutes, other civil rights legislation and litigation, as well as pertinent regulations and the legislative history of the act contained in the Congressional Record. (MLF)

  2. Sexuality and Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for loving and fulfilling relationships with others. Individual rights to sexuality, which is essential to human health and well-being, have been denied. This loss has negatively affected people with intellectual disabilities in gender identity, friendships, self-esteem, body image ...

  3. Othering, ableism and disability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mik-Meyer, Nanna

    2016-01-01

    in 13 different work organisations. The primary finding of the study is that observers spontaneously refer to other ‘different’ people (e.g., transvestites, homosexuals, immigrants) when talking about a colleague with impairments. This finding suggests that disability is simultaneously a discursive...... discourses of ableism (which automatically produce difference) and tolerance and inclusiveness (which automatically render it problematic to talk about difference)....

  4. Rural People with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... actually be at an advantage in terms of effective health information exchange in care coordination, due to local ... those patients with a disability had received an exercise recommendation at a doctor ... sponsors health promotion workshops designed to be provided by organizations ...

  5. Dyslexia: Disability or Difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redford, Kyle

    2017-01-01

    Redford, a veteran 5th grade teacher, addresses the question of whether, in the case of students with dyslexia, "it's time to ditch the disability classification and replace it with more positive language that embraces and appreciates [the condition] as a 'neurodifference' instead." Her answer is no--at least in the current education…

  6. Youth with Disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.E. Kooiker

    2006-01-01

    Original title: Jeugd met beperkingen. Taking part in society in an ordinary way is not self-evident for children and young people with a physical or intellectual disability. They often encounter more obstacles in going to school, finding a job and in their leisure time than other people of

  7. State-level prevalence of cigarette smoking and treatment advice, by disability status, United States, 2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Brian S; Campbell, Vincent A; Crews, John E; Malarcher, Ann; Maurice, Emmanuel; Richard, Roland A

    2007-10-01

    To our knowledge, no study has determined whether smoking prevalence is higher among people with disabilities than among people without disabilities across all U.S. states. Neither do we know whether people with disabilities and people without disabilities receive the same quality of advice about tobacco-cessation treatment from medical providers. We analyzed data from the 2004 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System to estimate differences between people with and people without disabilities in smoking prevalence and the receipt of tobacco-cessation treatment advice from medical providers. We found that smoking prevalence for people with disabilities was approximately 50% higher than for people without disabilities. Smokers with disabilities were more likely than smokers without disabilities to have visited a medical provider at least once in the previous 12 months and to have received medical advice to quit. More than 40% of smokers with disabilities who were advised to quit, however, reported not being told about the types of tobacco-cessation treatment available. Ensuring that people with disabilities are included in state-based smoking cessation programs gives states an opportunity to eliminate health disparities and to improve the health and wellness of this group. Ways to reduce unmet preventive health care needs of people with disabilities include provider adoption of the Public Health Service's clinical practice guideline for treating tobacco use and dependence and the provision of smoking cessation services that include counseling and effective pharmaceutical treatment.

  8. The role of learning disability nurses in promoting cervical screening uptake in women with intellectual disabilities: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Jennifer L; Coulson, Neil S

    2014-06-01

    Research suggests that the uptake of cervical screening by women with intellectual disabilities (commonly known as learning disabilities within UK policy frameworks, practice areas and health services) is poor compared to women without intellectual disabilities. The present study explored learning disability nurses' experiences of supporting women with intellectual disabilities to access cervical screening in order to examine their role in promoting attendance and elucidate potential barriers and facilitators to uptake. Ten participants recruited from a specialist learning disability service completed a semi-structured interview and data were analysed using experiential thematic analysis. Identified individual barriers included limited health literacy, negative attitudes and beliefs and competing demands; barriers attributed to primary care professionals included time pressures, limited exposure to people with intellectual disabilities and lack of appropriate knowledge, attitudes and skills. Attendance at cervical screening was facilitated by prolonged preparation work undertaken by learning disability nurses, helpful clinical behaviours in the primary care context and effective joint working. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. Exploration of the academic lives of students with disabilities at South African universities: Lecturers’ perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Mutanga

    2017-03-01

    Methods: In an effort to understand the lives of students with disabilities better, a study which included students with disabilities, lecturers and disability supporting staff was conducted at two South African universities – University of the Free State and University of Venda. The paper takes a snapshot view of four lecturers and their perceptions of the lives of students with disabilities at their respective universities. Results and Conclusion: Although most disability literature report students with disabilities blaming lecturers for their failure to advance their needs, this paper highlights that the education system needs to be supportive to lecturers for the inclusive agenda to be realised. An argument is made for a more comprehensive approach towards a national disability policy in higher education involving many stakeholders. Without a broader understanding of disability, it will be difficult to engage with the complex ways in which inequalities emerge and are sustained.

  10. Time allocation of disabled individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagán, Ricardo

    2013-05-01

    Although some studies have analysed the disability phenomenon and its effect on, for example, labour force participation, wages, job satisfaction, or the use of disability pension, the empirical evidence on how disability steals time (e.g. hours of work) from individuals is very scarce. This article examines how disabled individuals allocate their time to daily activities as compared to their non-disabled counterparts. Using time diary information from the Spanish Time Use Survey (last quarter of 2002 and the first three quarters of 2003), we estimate the determinants of time (minutes per day) spent on four aggregate categories (market work, household production, tertiary activities and leisure) for a sample of 27,687 non-disabled and 5250 disabled individuals and decompose the observed time differential by using the Oaxaca-Blinder methodology. The results show that disabled individuals devote less time to market work (especially females), and more time to household production (e.g. cooking, cleaning, child care), tertiary activities (e.g., sleeping, personal care, medical treatment) and leisure activities. We also find a significant effect of age on the time spent on daily activities and important differences by gender and disability status. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that disability steals time, and reiterate the fact that more public policies are needed to balance working life and health concerns among disabled individuals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Characteristic situation on prevention of nosocomial infection in the hospital for the severely multi-disabled--experiences in care and treatment of 4 kinds of viral hepatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, Y; Tanaka, H; Yano, Y; Yano, T; Yoshida, K

    1997-12-01

    We experienced Hepatitis A, B, C and fulminant hepatitis due to Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) in our hospital for the severely multi-disabled (SMD) who had both severe motor and intellectual disabilities, and some of whom might be further complicated by blindness and/or deafness. In this hospital, 100 SMDs are hospitalized. Case 1: The disabled, 25 year old male, was transmitted Hepatitis A from a nurse. Case 2: The disabled, 60 year old female carrier of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) who has been cared for more than 10 years. Case 3: The disabled, 46 year old male carrier of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) (RNA type 3), has been cared for more than 4 years. Case 4: The disabled, 39 year old male, had a fever of 39 degrees C for 9 days and suddenly died. He was diagnosed as fulminant hepatitis due to HSV-1 by necropsy. The hospitals for SMD are characteristic in prevention of nosocomial infections; 1) The disabled infected is not aware of the fact that he or she is the source of infection and that the other disabled living with him or her are in risk of infection, because of their severe mental condition. 2) All of the disabled need complete or incomplete helps for activities of daily life (ADL), so that the disabled who is the carrier of some pathogen constantly gives risk of infection to staffs, including medical staffs (doctor, nurse and therapist), psychologist and helpers by bloody secretion from wounds, saliva, urine, feces as well as menstrual blood. 3) If a carrier of some pathogen is hospitalized, the staffs should serve under risk of infection involving blood-mediated infectious disease for many years, because SMDs are permitted lifelong stay in the hospitals for SMD, which also play a role of care house or institution, by public expense in Japan. In case of an outbreak of Hepatitis A, nosocomial infection ended in the original case (a nurse), another nurse and a case of the disabled by general treatment and care against communicable diseases of the digestive

  12. Is Disability a Health Problem?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malcolm MacLachlan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We welcome Andrew Haig's critique of our paper, "Disability & Health: A research agenda" in Social Inclusion. Our paper sought to identify research priorities to better understand, provide enhanced services and a better quality of life for people with disabilities, particularly in relation to their health and wellbeing. Haig's critique makes several important points that deserve serious consideration. His comments reflect a view of the relationship between disability and health which is different from the one we have espoused. Specifically, Haig argues that (a disability is a health problem, (b medical rehabilitation should be separated from Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR, and (c the evidence base for medical rehabilitation is much stronger than for CBR. We address each of these points below arguing that while some types of disability clearly result from health problems; often disability is not experienced as a health problem; and sometimes, disability in interaction with restricted access is the cause of health problems.

  13. Comparison of clinical features between suspected familial colorectal cancer type X and Lynch syndrome in Japanese patients with colorectal cancer: a cross-sectional study conducted by the Japanese Society for Cancer of the Colon and Rectum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Tatsuro; Furukawa, Yoichi; Nakamura, Yusuke; Matsubara, Nagahide; Ishikawa, Hideki; Arai, Masami; Tomita, Naohiro; Tamura, Kazuo; Sugano, Kokichi; Ishioka, Chikashi; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Moriya, Yoshihiro; Ishida, Hideyuki; Watanabe, Toshiaki; Sugihara, Kenichi

    2015-02-01

    The characteristics of familial colorectal cancer type X are poorly defined. Here we aimed to clarify the differences in clinical features between suspected familial colorectal cancer type X and Lynch syndrome in Japanese patients. We performed germline mutation analyses of mismatch repair genes in 125 patients. Patients who met the Amsterdam Criteria I but lacked mismatch repair gene mutations were diagnosed with suspected familial colorectal cancer type X. We identified 69 patients with Lynch syndrome and 25 with suspected familial colorectal cancer type X. The frequencies of gastric and extracolonic Lynch syndrome-associated cancers were lower with suspected familial colorectal cancer type X than with Lynch syndrome. The number of organs with Lynch syndrome-associated cancer was significantly lower with suspected familial colorectal cancer type X than with Lynch syndrome. The cumulative incidence of extracolonic Lynch syndrome-associated cancer was significantly lower with suspected familial colorectal cancer type X than with Lynch syndrome. We estimated that the median cancer risk in 60-year-old patients with Lynch syndrome was 89, 36 and 24% for colorectal, endometrial and gastric cancers, respectively. Analyses of family members, including probands, revealed that the median age at diagnosis of extracolonic Lynch syndrome-associated cancer was significantly older with suspected familial colorectal cancer type X than with Lynch syndrome. The frequency of extracolonic Lynch syndrome-associated cancer was significantly lower with suspected familial colorectal cancer type X than with Lynch syndrome. A significant difference in extracolonic Lynch syndrome-associated cancer was evident between suspected familial colorectal cancer type X and Lynch syndrome. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Developing a Telecommunications Curriculum for Students with Physical Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandell, Terry S.; Laufer, Dorothy

    1993-01-01

    A telecommunications curriculum was developed for students (ages 15-21) with physical disabilities. Curriculum content included an internal mailbox program (Mailbox), interactive communication system (Blisscom), bulletin board system (Arctel), and a mainframe system (Compuserv). (JDD)

  15. Provider-initiated HIV testing and counselling for TB patients and suspects in Nairobi, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odhiambo, J; Kizito, W; Njoroge, A; Wambua, N; Nganga, L; Mburu, M; Mansoer, J; Marum, L; Phillips, E; Chakaya, J; De Cock, K M

    2008-03-01

    Integrated tuberculosis (TB) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) services in a resource-constrained setting. Pilot provider-initiated HIV testing and counselling (PITC) for TB patients and suspects. Through partnerships, resources were mobilised to establish and support services. After community sensitisation and staff training, PITC was introduced to TB patients and then to TB suspects from December 2003 to December 2005. Of 5457 TB suspects who received PITC, 89% underwent HIV testing. Although not statistically significant, TB suspects with TB disease had an HIV prevalence of 61% compared to 63% for those without. Of the 614 suspects who declined HIV testing, 402 (65%) had TB disease. Of 2283 patients referred for cotrimoxazole prophylaxis, 1951 (86%) were enrolled, and of 1727 patients assessed for antiretroviral treatment (ART), 1618 (94%) were eligible and 1441 (83%) started treatment. PITC represents a paradigm shift and is feasible and acceptable to TB patients and TB suspects. Clear directives are nevertheless required to change practice. When offered to TB suspects, PITC identifies large numbers of persons requiring HIV care. Community sensitisation, staff training, multitasking and access to HIV care contributed to a high acceptance of HIV testing. Kenya is using this experience to inform national response and advocate wide PITC implementation in settings faced with the TB-HIV epidemic.

  16. The inclusion of disability as a condition for termination of parental rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightfoot, Elizabeth; Hill, Katharine; LaLiberte, Traci

    2010-12-01

    All 50 states and the District of Columbia have statutes outlining the grounds for terminating parental rights (TPR) in relation to child abuse and neglect. Although recent research has found that parents with disabilities are not more likely to maltreat their children than parents without disabilities (Glaun & Brown, 1999; Oyserman, Mowbray, Meares, & Firminger, 2000), studies have found very high rates of TPR of parents with disabilities (Accardo & Whitman, 1989). The objective of this study is to examine how states are including disability in their TPR statutes. This study used legal document analysis, consisting of a comprehensive Boolean search of the state codes of the 50 states and District of Columbia (DC) relating to TPR, using the most recent state code available on Lexis-Nexis in August 2005. TPR and related statutes were searched for contemporary and historical disability related terms and their common cognates, such as: "mental," "disability," "handicap," and "incapacity." Two researchers independently conducted the searches, and the searches were reconciled. A code list was then developed to measure for inclusion of disability, preciseness, scope, use of language, and references to accessibility or fairness. Statutes were then reanalyzed, and groupings developed. Thirty-seven states included disability-related grounds for termination of parental rights, while 14 states did not include disability language as grounds for termination. Many of these state codes used outdated terminology, imprecise definitions, and emphasized disability status rather than behavior. All of the 14 states that do not include disability in TPR grounds allowed for termination based on neglectful parental behavior that may be influenced by a disability. The use of disability language in TPR statutes can put an undue focus on the condition of having a disability, rather than parenting behavior. This paper recommends that states consider removing disability language from their

  17. THE FACE OF DISABILITY IN NIGERIA: A DISABILITY SURVEY IN KOGI AND NIGER STATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Smith

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The Leprosy Mission Nigeria conducted a disability survey in Kogi and Niger States of Nigeria in 2005, investigating the demographic characteristics of people with disabilities, including gender, age, religion, marital, educational, occupational, employment and economic status, understanding of disability and health-seeking behaviour.   Information was gathered from a convenience sample of participants, across 30 randomly selected towns and villages in the two states. Twelve trained bilingual research assistants were used, to translate the English language questionnaire verbally into the local language of each participant.  From the 1093 respondents studied, the most common disabilities involved vision (37%, mobility (32% or hearing (15%. A third of these were less than 21 years of age and had no occupation, and 72% were Muslim. Over half of them had no education, 20% had primary, 8% secondary, 2% tertiary and 18% had Islamic education. Common occupations were begging (16%, studying (14%, farming (11% and trading (8%.The majority were unemployed (61% due to their disability. Over 70% were not able to access disability specific health services and 37% had an assistive device. Services accessed included health - mainstream (90%, traditional (61% and counselling (58%; and other - rehabilitation (30%, assistive device provision (24%, welfare (22%, special education (15%, vocational training (10% and economic empowerment (4%.  These results are comparable with findings in other studies. Disability affects a person’s ability to participate in education, work, family life and religion, influences health-seeking behaviour and contributes to poverty.See supplementary file for Survey Questionnaire.DOI 10.5463/DCID.v1i22.11 

  18. Pressing Issues of Disability Employment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabunova Aleksandra Anatol’evna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Disability employment is a major tool for creating inclusive society. In Russia, the main obstacles to employment of the disabled are imperfect statutory measures aimed at improving competitiveness of this population group in the labor market; low prestige of jobs for people with disabilities; the employers’ unwillingness to hire disabled people. The purpose of this study is to determine the barriers disabled people face on the labor market and to justify the expedience of investing public funds in activities aimed at promoting disabled employment. Works of Russian and foreign authors, national statistics, results of sociological surveys of the population and people with disabilities conducted on the territory of the Vologda Oblast in 2013–2015 represent the information base of the study. The article reviews the impact of employment quotas for the disabled; in particular, it has been established that the number of the employed under such quotas during the period from 2008 to 2014 has declined. Based on the results of domestic research the authors have determined the reasons underlying lack of effectiveness of this social policy tool. One of the problems of promoting disability employment is training and re-training of the disabled. According to official statistics, only 38% of the employed disabled who live in a city are employed in the area of their specialty. At the same time, the results of research h of Russian authors show that training of an expert (even with consideration of their health capacities pays off within 4 years. Using the example of the Vologda Oblast, the authors show that annual tax revenues in employment of the disabled to jobs with wages close to the regional average may reach 33 million rubles. They also estimate the approximate regional cost of workplace equipment for the disabled. Finally, the authors propose a list of key courses of action on increasing competitiveness of the disabled in the labor market

  19. Sleep duration, life satisfaction and disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagan, Ricardo

    2017-04-01

    Although sleep is considered an essential part of individuals' lives, there are no previous studies analysing how sleep duration affects the levels of life satisfaction reported by males and females with disabilities. To analyse and compare the impact of hours of sleep on life satisfaction scores reported by people without and with disabilities (stratified by sex) in Germany. Using data taken from the German Socio-Economic Panel for the period 2008-2013, we estimate life satisfaction equations for males and females (running a fixed-effects model) which include a set of variables measuring the number of sleep hours on workdays and weekends. A higher number of sleep hours on workdays increase life satisfaction for all males and females. However, the contribution of each hour of sleep on workdays is greater for males with disabilities in terms of life satisfaction, whereas for females no significant differences by disability status have been found. Although sleep hours on weekends also increase life satisfaction, the magnitude of the coefficients is relatively higher than that found for the corresponding hours of sleep on workdays, but only for the male sample (disabled or not). The participation and commitment of policymakers, governments, trade unions, employers, and health care professionals are key aspects for developing and formulating new guidelines and specific measures that promote a healthy lifestyle and increase sleep duration. Such guidelines and measures are of essence for people with disabilities who are employed (e.g. using brief sleep opportunities during prolonged work periods, which can contribute to reducing fatigue, stress and anxiety). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Disability identity development: A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forber-Pratt, Anjali J; Lyew, Dominique A; Mueller, Carlyn; Samples, Leah B

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to synthesize existing empirical research on disability identity development. This review is organized to present the demographics of participants and types of disabilities represented in the existing data, measures of disability identity development and theoretical models of disability identity development. Electronic databases (EBSCO, PsycINFO, ERIC, and Sociological Abstracts) were searched for all peer reviewed empirical studies published between 1980 and 2017. Articles were excluded if they were theoretical and/or did not include participants with disabilities, or focused on a disability-specific community identity rather than general disability identity. Empirical articles (N = 41) were included in the final review. An overwhelming majority (75.6%) were qualitative in nature, with only 22% of the articles reviewed being quantitative and only 1 that utilized a mixed methods design. The results suggest that disability identity can be considered a unique phenomenon that shapes persons' ways of seeing themselves, their bodies, and their way of interacting with the world. Disability identity development has the potential to become an important factor in developing effective interventions and/or therapies. Identity development is a fundamentally social process, and identities are formed through mirroring, modeling, and recognition through available identity resources, and so it is imperative that able-bodied professionals (i.e., rehabilitation professionals, therapists, teachers and caregivers) working with individuals with disabilities become aware of this developmental process to be able to better support individuals along this journey. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).