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Sample records for suspected community-acquired pneumonia

  1. Reliability of Examination Findings in Suspected Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florin, Todd A; Ambroggio, Lilliam; Brokamp, Cole; Rattan, Mantosh S; Crotty, Eric J; Kachelmeyer, Andrea; Ruddy, Richard M; Shah, Samir S

    2017-09-01

    The authors of national guidelines emphasize the use of history and examination findings to diagnose community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in outpatient children. Little is known about the interrater reliability of the physical examination in children with suspected CAP. This was a prospective cohort study of children with suspected CAP presenting to a pediatric emergency department from July 2013 to May 2016. Children aged 3 months to 18 years with lower respiratory signs or symptoms who received a chest radiograph were included. We excluded children hospitalized ≤14 days before the study visit and those with a chronic medical condition or aspiration. Two clinicians performed independent examinations and completed identical forms reporting examination findings. Interrater reliability for each finding was reported by using Fleiss' kappa (κ) for categorical variables and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for continuous variables. No examination finding had substantial agreement (κ/ICC > 0.8). Two findings (retractions, wheezing) had moderate to substantial agreement (κ/ICC = 0.6-0.8). Nine findings (abdominal pain, pleuritic pain, nasal flaring, skin color, overall impression, cool extremities, tachypnea, respiratory rate, and crackles/rales) had fair to moderate agreement (κ/ICC = 0.4-0.6). Eight findings (capillary refill time, cough, rhonchi, head bobbing, behavior, grunting, general appearance, and decreased breath sounds) had poor to fair reliability (κ/ICC = 0-0.4). Only 3 examination findings had acceptable agreement, with the lower 95% confidence limit >0.4: wheezing, retractions, and respiratory rate. In this study, we found fair to moderate reliability of many findings used to diagnose CAP. Only 3 findings had acceptable levels of reliability. These findings must be considered in the clinical management and research of pediatric CAP. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  2. Pneumonia - children - community acquired

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronchopneumonia - children; Community-acquired pneumonia - children; CAP - children ... Viruses are the most common cause of pneumonia in infants and children. Ways your child can get CAP include: Bacteria and viruses living in the nose, sinuses, or mouth may spread ...

  3. Community-acquired pneumonia.

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    Falguera, M; Ramírez, M F

    2015-11-01

    This article not only reviews the essential aspects of community-acquired pneumonia for daily clinical practice, but also highlights the controversial issues and provides the newest available information. Community-acquired pneumonia is considered in a broad sense, without excluding certain variants that, in recent years, a number of authors have managed to delineate, such as healthcare-associated pneumonia. The latter form is nothing more than the same disease that affects more frail patients, with a greater number of risk factors, both sharing an overall common approach. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  4. Predictors of Bacteraemia in Patients with Suspected Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

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    Cornelis H van Werkhoven

    Full Text Available The diagnostic yield of blood cultures is limited in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. Yet, positive blood culture results provide important information for antibiotic treatment and for monitoring epidemiologic trends. We investigated the potential of clinical predictors to improve the cost-benefit ratio of obtaining blood cultures.Data from two prospective cohort studies of adults with suspected CAP, admitted to non-ICU wards, were combined. Two models were created, one using readily available parameters and one additionally including laboratory parameters.3,786 patients were included (2,626 (69% with X-ray confirmed CAP. Blood cultures were obtained from 2,977 (79% patients (and from 2,107 (80% with X-ray confirmed CAP. 266 (8.9% of the patients with a blood culture had bacteraemia. Clinical predictors of bacteraemia were absence of pre-admission antibiotic treatment, pleuritic pain, gastro-intestinal symptoms, tachycardia, tachypnea, hypotension and absence of hypoxia. After including laboratory results in the model, younger age, C-reactive protein, leukocytosis or leukopenia, low thrombocyte count, low sodium level, elevated urea and elevated arterial pH were added, while gastro-intestinal symptoms and hypotension were no longer significant. The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve was 0.66 (95% confidence interval 0.63-0.70 for the first model and 0.76 (95% confidence interval 0.73-0.79 for the second model.In conclusion, in patients hospitalized with CAP, bacteraemia was moderately predictable using clinical parameters only. We recommend against the use of a risk prediction model for the decision to obtain blood cultures.

  5. Antibiotic Treatment Strategies for Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Adults

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    Postma, Douwe F.; Van Werkhoven, Cornelis H.; Van Elden, Leontine J R; Thijsen, Steven F T; Hoepelman, Andy I M; Kluytmans, Jan A J W; Boersma, Wim G.; Compaijen, Clara J.; Van Der Wall, Eva; Prins, Jan M.; Oosterheert, Jan J.; Bonten, Marc J M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The choice of empirical antibiotic treatment for patients with clinically suspected community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) who are admitted to non-intensive care unit (ICU) hospital wards is complicated by the limited availability of evidence. We compared strategies of empirical treatment

  6. Immunomodulation in community-acquired pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remmelts, H.H.F.

    2013-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common disease with considerable morbidity and mortality, despite effective antibiotic treatment. In this thesis, we showed that the major causative microorganisms in CAP trigger distinct inflammatory response profiles in the host. While an inflammatory

  7. Computed tomography in children with community-acquired pneumonia

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    Andronikou, Savvas [Bristol Royal Hospital for Children and the University of Bristol, Department of Paediatric Radiology, Bristol (United Kingdom); University of Cape Town, Department of Radiology, Cape Town (South Africa); Goussard, Pierre [Tygerberg Hospital, Stellenbosch University, Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, Cape Town (South Africa); Sorantin, Erich [Medical University Graz, Department of Radiology, Graz (Austria)

    2017-10-15

    Diagnostic imaging plays a significant role in both the diagnosis and treatment of complications of pneumonia in children and chest radiography is the imaging modality of choice. Computed tomography (CT) on the other hand, is not currently a first-line imaging tool for children with suspected uncomplicated community-acquired pneumonia and is largely reserved for when complications of pneumonia are suspected or there is difficulty in differentiating pneumonia from other pathology. This review outlines the situations where CT needs to be considered in children with pneumonia, describes the imaging features of the parenchymal and pleural complications of pneumonia, discusses how CT may have a wider role in developing countries where human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and tuberculosis are prevalent, makes note of the role of CT scanning for identifying missed foreign body aspiration and, lastly, addresses radiation concerns. (orig.)

  8. Community-acquired pneumonia among smokers.

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    Almirall, Jordi; Blanquer, José; Bello, Salvador

    2014-06-01

    Recent studies have left absolutely no doubt that tobacco increases susceptibility to bacterial lung infection, even in passive smokers. This relationship also shows a dose-response effect, since the risk reduces spectacularly 10 years after giving up smoking, returning to the level of non-smokers. Streptococcus pneumoniae is the causative microorganism responsible for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) most frequently associated with smoking, particularly in invasive pneumococcal disease and septic shock. It is not clear how it acts on the progress of pneumonia, but there is evidence to suggest that the prognosis for pneumococcal pneumonia is worse. In CAP caused by Legionella pneumophila, it has also been observed that smoking is the most important risk factor, with the risk rising 121% for each pack of cigarettes smoked a day. Tobacco use may also favor diseases that are also known risk factors for CAP, such as periodontal disease and upper respiratory viral infections. By way of prevention, while giving up smoking should always be proposed, the use of the pneumococcal vaccine is also recommended, regardless of the presence of other comorbidities. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Endemic mycoses: overlooked causes of community acquired pneumonia.

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    Hage, Chadi A; Knox, Kenneth S; Wheat, Lawrence J

    2012-06-01

    The endemic mycoses are important but often overlooked causes for community acquired pneumonia. Delays in recognition, diagnosis and proper treatment often lead to disastrous outcomes. This topic is not usually discussed in reviews and guidelines addressing the subject of community acquired pneumonia. In this review we discuss the three major endemic mycoses in North America that present as community acquired pneumonias; Coccidioidomycosis, Histoplasmosis and Blastomycosis. We discuss their epidemiology, clinical presentations, methods of diagnosis and current treatment strategies. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Community-acquired pneumonia; Ambulant erworbene Pneumonien

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    Poetter-Lang, S.; Herold, C.J. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Allgemeines Krankenhaus, Wien (Austria)

    2017-01-15

    The diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is often not possible based only on the clinical symptoms and biochemical parameters. For every patient with the suspicion of CAP, a chest radiograph in two planes should be carried out. Additionally, a risk stratification for the decision between outpatient therapy or hospitalization is recommended. Based on the evaluation of the different radiological patterns as well as their extent and distribution, a rough allocation to so-called pathogen groups as well as a differentiation between viral and bacterial infections are possible; however, because different pathogens cause different patterns an accurate correlation is not feasible by relying purely on imaging. The radiological findings serve as proof or exclusion of pneumonia and can also be used to evaluate the extent of the disease (e.g. monolobular, multilobular, unilateral or bilateral). In cases of prolonged disease, suspicion of complications (e.g. pleural effusion or empyema, necrotizing pneumonia or abscess) or comorbid conditions (e.g. underlying pulmonary or mediastinal diseases) computed tomography is an important diagnostic tool in addition to chest radiography. Ultrasound is often used to diagnose pleural processes (e.g. parapneumonic effusion or pleural empyema). (orig.) [German] Anhand der klinischen Symptome und laborchemischen Befundkonstellation alleine ist es oft nicht moeglich, die Diagnose einer ambulant erworbenen Pneumonie (''community-acquired pneumonia'', CAP) zu stellen. Bei jedem Patienten mit Verdacht auf CAP sollte eine Roentgenthoraxaufnahme in 2 Ebenen angefertigt werden. Weiter muss eine Risikostratifizierung im Sinne der Entscheidung ambulante Therapie vs. Hospitalisierung erfolgen. Anhand der Analyse radiologischer Muster sowie deren Verteilung und Ausdehnung koennen eine grobe Zuordnung zu sogenannten Erregergruppen sowie eine Differenzierung zwischen viralen und bakteriellen Infektionen gelingen. Da

  11. Biomarkers in Pediatric Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

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    Principi, Nicola; Esposito, Susanna

    2017-02-19

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is an infectious disease caused by bacteria, viruses, or a combination of these infectious agents. The severity of the clinical manifestations of CAP varies significantly. Consequently, both the differentiation of viral from bacterial CAP cases and the accurate assessment and prediction of disease severity are critical for effectively managing individuals with CAP. To solve questionable cases, several biomarkers indicating the etiology and severity of CAP have been studied. Unfortunately, only a few studies have examined the roles of these biomarkers in pediatric practice. The main aim of this paper is to detail current knowledge regarding the use of biomarkers to diagnose and treat CAP in children, analyzing the most recently published relevant studies. Despite several attempts, the etiologic diagnosis of pediatric CAP and the estimation of the potential outcome remain unsolved problems in most cases. Among traditional biomarkers, procalcitonin (PCT) appears to be the most effective for both selecting bacterial cases and evaluating the severity. However, a precise cut-off separating bacterial from viral and mild from severe cases has not been defined. The three-host protein assay based on C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), plasma interferon-γ protein-10 (IP-10), and micro-array-based whole genome expression arrays might offer more advantages in comparison with former biomarkers. However, further studies are needed before the routine use of those presently in development can be recommended.

  12. Outpatient management of community-acquired pneumonia.

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    Froes, Filipe; Pereira, João Gonçalves; Póvoa, Pedro

    2018-01-25

    The first guidelines on community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) were published in 1993, but since then many of the challenges regarding the outpatient management of CAP persist. These include the difficulty in establishing the initial clinical diagnosis, its risk stratification, which will dictate the place of treatment, the empirical choice of antibiotics, the relative scarcity of novel antibiotics and the importance of knowing local microbiological susceptibility patterns. New molecular biology methods have changed the etiologic perspective of CAP, especially the contribution of virus. Lung ultrasound and biomarkers might aid diagnosis and severity stratification in the outpatient setting. Antibiotic resistance is a growing problem that reinforces the importance of novel antibiotics. And finally, prevention and the use of anti-pneumococcal vaccine are instrumental in reducing the burden of disease. Most of CAP cases are managed in the community; however, most research comes from hospitalized severe patients. New and awaited advances might contribute to aid diagnosis, cause and assessment of patients with CAP in the community. This knowledge might prove decisive in the execution of stewardship programmes that maintain current antibiotics, safeguard future ones and reinforce prevention.

  13. [Differential diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis and community-acquired pneumonia].

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    Deĭkina, O N; Mishin, V Iu; Demikhova, O V

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to enhance the efficiency of differential diagnosis of pneumonia and pulmonary tuberculosis. A hundred and fifty-nine adult patients were examined. These included 78 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and 81 with community-acquired p neumonia. The clinical features of infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis (n = 48) and mild community-acquired pneumonia (n = 51) were compared. The course of caseous pneumonia (n = 30) was compared with that of moderate and severe community-acquired pneumonia (n = 30). Significant differences in the manifestations of the intoxication and bronchopulmonary syndrome were not found in patients with community-acquired pneumonia and infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis. Physical studies showed that in patients with community-acquired pneumonia, moist rale (54.9%) and crepitation (11.8%) were prevalent, but in those with infiltrative tuberculosis rale was absent in 60.4% of cases and the pattern of respiration was unchanged in 79.2%. Chest X-ray studies indicated that in patients with community-acquired pneumonia, lower lobar inflammatory changes were predominant in 62.8% of cases whereas in those with infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis the process was mainly bilateral (43.8%) with the presence of destructive changes (83.3%) and bronchogenic dissemination (66.7%). In patients with caseous pneumonia, the intoxication syndrome was more significant than in those with severe community-acquired pneumonia. Chest X-ray studies demonstrated that in patients with caseous pneumonia, specific changes were bilateral with the involvement of 2 lobes or more, with destruction and bronchogenic dissemination while in those with community-acquired pneumonia, the pulmonary processes were predominantly bilateral (76.6%) at the lower lobar site (36.7%).

  14. Mortality predictors in community-acquired pneumonia | Tanimowo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acquired pneumonia to themedicalwards of Ladoke Akintola University ofTeaching Hospital between Jan. 2003 andDec. 2005. The case notes of 65 patients admitted for community-acquired pneumoniawere studiedwith respect to their admission ...

  15. community acquired pneumonia among children admitted

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-09-01

    Sep 1, 2012 ... treated without seeing a doctor, the WHO defines clinical pneumonia simply as an acute episode of cough or difficulty in breathing associated with an increased respiratory rate (1). In the low – income countries, over one quarter of children under five years have an episode of clinical pneumonia each year.

  16. Diagnosis and Treatment of Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Children

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    I.A. Karymdzhanov

    2016-02-01

    The initial antibiotic therapy of community-acquired pneumonia is carried out empirically. In the treatment of severe community-acquired pneumonia in children from 2 months to 5 years, the drug of choice is amoxicillin orally. Macrolides are the drugs of choice for children aged 5 to 16 years. In severe pneumonia, drugs of choice are amoxicillin clavulanate, 2nd–4th generation cephalosporins. In general, the duration of antibiotic therapy in the community-acquired pneumonia caused by typical bacteria is 7–10 days, by atypical bacteria — 10–14 days. In the real clinical practice, the errors associated with the choice of drug, route of administration, dosage, regimen of application, length of treatment are frequent during antibacterial therapy.

  17. [Community-acquired pneumonia in the elderly].

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    Füri, Julia; Oestmann, Andreas; Repond, Fernand

    2016-04-13

    We report the case of a 88 years old patient with cough and new onset confusion. Delirium was caused by a necrotizing Methicillin-sensible staphylococcus aureus pneumonia with bacteremia. Despite antibiotic therapy for several weeks and fall of inflammatory markers the patient died from consequences of delirium.

  18. [Anti-inflammatory drugs and community-acquired pneumonia].

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    Dirou, S; Voiriot, G

    2015-10-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are commonly used in ambulatory medicine for their analgesic and antipyretic properties and are often used as self-medication. Their use in community-acquired pneumonia is associated with an increased risk of loco-regional complications, especially pleural empyema. Appropriate therapeutic care and hospital admissions are often delayed because of initial improvement of symptoms with NSAIDs. Despite worrying observational data, a causal link remains to be established. Currently, there is no recommendation cautioning against the use of NSAIDs in the management of community-acquired pneumonia. Copyright © 2015 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Current and future etiologic therapy of bacterial pneumonia. 1. Antibiotic therapy for community-acquired pneumonia

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    А.Е. Abaturov

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The progressive increase in the prevalence of respiratory infections caused by multiresistant pathogenic agents is a serious problem requiring strict indications and development of algorithms for prescribing antibacterial drugs for pneumonia treatment. Amoxicillin is a drug of choice for the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia with a mild and uncomplicated course in children. The indications for prescribing macrolides are the patient’s allergy to β-lactam antibiotics or suspect mycoplasmal or chlamydial etiology of pneumonia. The choice of amoxicillin/clavulanate or cephalosporins for oral administration is proved by the laboratory data or a clinical suspicion of pneumonia caused by pathogens producing β-lactamases. The treatment strategy with the use of non-antibiotic agents for antibiotic-associated diseases therapy is being actively developed currently.

  20. Management and Prognosis of Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Adults

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    Postma, D.F.

    2016-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In this thesis, different aspects of both management and prognosis of adults admitted with CAP have been addressed in separate parts. In the first part, we evaluated empirical antibiotic therapy and statins as

  1. Pattern of Community Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia in Kano, North ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of the study was to determine the clinical pattern of bacterial community acquired pneumonia amongst patients admitted into medical wards in Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Kano. The study was a descriptive prospective study incorporating consecutive adult patients aged fifteen years and above admitted ...

  2. Aetiology and outcome of severe community-acquired pneumonia in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To determine the aetiological agents and outcome of severe community-acquired pneumonia (SCAP) in children admitted to the paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) at Kalafong Hospital, Pretoria. Patients and methods. An audit was done after a protocol was implemented to identify the aetiological agents in ...

  3. [National consensus for management of community acquired pneumonia in adults].

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    Saldías P, Fernando; Pérez C, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    Community acquired pneumonia (CAP) is an acute respiratory infection that affects pulmonary parenchyma, and is caused by community acquired microorganisms. In Chile, pneumonia represents the main cause of death due to infectious diseases and is the third specific cause of mortality in adults. In 1999, an experts committee in representation of "Sociedad Chilena de Enfermedades Respiratorias", presented the first National Guidelines for the Treatment of Adult Community Acquired Pneumonia, mainly based in foreign experience and documents, and adapted it to our National Health System Organization. During the last decade, impressive epidemiological and technological changes have occurred, making the update of guidelines for treatment of NAC by several international scientific societies, necessary. These changes include: new respiratory pathogens that are being identified in CAP and affect adult patients (Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila); the increasing senescent adult population that carries multiple co-morbidities; the emergence of antimicrobial resistance among respiratory pathogens associated to massive antibiotic prescription; the development by the pharmaceutical industry of new drugs that are effective for pneumonia treatment (macrolides, ketolides and respiratory fluorquinolones); and the development of new diagnostic techniques for detection of antigens, antibodies, and bacterial DNA by molecular biology, useful in respiratory infections. Based on these antecedents, an Advisory Committee of "Sociedad Chilena de Enfermedades Respiratorias" and "Sociedad Chilena de Infectología" has reviewed the national and international evidence about CAP management in adults in order to update clinical recommendations for our country.

  4. [Ceftaroline fosamil in community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia].

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    Calbo, Esther; Zaragoza, Rafael

    2014-03-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common infection in developed countries and causes a large number of hospital admissions and deaths. In recent years, the incidence of this disease has increased, caused by progressive population aging. Following the introduction of the conjugate vaccine against Streptococcus pneumoniae, there have been significant epidemiological changes that require close monitoring because of the possible emergence of new patterns of resistance. This article aims to review the role of ceftaroline fosamil, a new parenteral cephalosporin with antibacterial activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive pathogens, in the treatment of pneumonia. Several in vitro and in vivo studies have shown the efficacy of ceftaroline fosamil against penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Additionally, ceftaroline has shown similar efficacy and safety to ceftriaxone in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia with severe prognosis (prognostic severity index III and IV) in two phase III clinical trials. Although a non-inferiority design was used for these clinical trials, some data suggest a superior efficacy of ceftaroline, with earlier clinical response and higher cure rate in infections caused by S. pneumoniae, making this drug particularly interesting for critically-ill patients admitted to the intensive care unit. Ceftaroline may also be considered for empirical and directed treatment of MRSA pneumonia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  5. Prognostic factors of mortality in elderly with community acquired pneumonia

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    Đordjević Ivanka

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Community acquired pneumonia in elderly has specific clinical aspect and higher mortality in relation to younger patients. According to specific pneumonia severity assessment on admission and its importance in proper prediction of clinical course and outcome, the aim of this study was defining prognostic factors of mortality. Methods. This study included 240 patients aged ≥ 65 years with community acquired pneumonia. On admission, demographic characteristics, underlying diseases, physical symptoms and findings, laboratory values, chest radiography and oxygen blood saturation (SaO2 were analyzed. Multivariate analysis was used to identify characteristic prognostic factors which showed a statistical significance in relation to mortality. Results. Altered mental status, respiratory frequency ≥ 23/min and the presence of bilateral pneumonic infiltrates were defined as the most important prognostic factors of mortality (p < 0.001. These factors displayed 57.89% sensitivity, 100% specificity and 93.33% accuracy. Conclusion. The presence of identified characteristic prognostic factors on admission pointed out an adverse clinical course and outcome of community acquired pneumonia in elderly. Age and sex were not significantly associated with mortality.

  6. Changing bacteriological profile and mortality trends in community acquired pneumonia

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    Sagar Khadanga

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There are very few and conflicting Indian data regarding the bacteriological etiology of community acquired pneumonia (CAP. Adding to this agony, there is no credible data from the eastern part of India. This is a cross-sectional study and descriptive in nature over a period of 1-year. Of the 464 cases of the study population, we could isolate aerobic bacteria in 149 patients (32.1%. Streptococcus pneumoniae has been identified as the most common organism causing CAP (68/149. Gram-negative bacilli (GNB as a group exceeded marginally over S. pneumoniae (69/149. Among GNB, Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the most common organism (31/69, followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (29/69. Staphylococcus aureus was identified in (12/149 cases. Co-amoxyclav is still the most sensitive drug for S. pneumoniae. P. aeruginosa was most sensitive to imipenam followed by piperacillin-tazobactam.

  7. Тhe features of severe community acquired pneumonia

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    Avramenko I.V.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on data from a prospective analysis for the year of observation, the article presents information about the features of severe community acquired pneumonia in patients who were hospitalized at the department of pulmonology (or therapy, as well as department of the intensive care from three teaching hospitals in Dnepropetrovsk, namely "Dnipropetrovsk City Hospital №6», "Dnipropetrovsk City Hospital №2», "Dnipropetrovsk City Hospital №16», which are the clinical ones of "Dnepropetrovsk Medical Academy of the Ministry of Health Ukraine". Dependence of the severity of the condition shown on duration of illness before admission, features of season character of disease. The effect of breathing exercises on the course of the disease. The results can be the basis for a more personal approach to the development of diagnostic and therapeutic programs for patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia.

  8. Comparative study of community-acquired pneumonia caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila or Chlamydia pneumoniae.

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    Sopena, Nieves; Pedro-Botet, Maria Luisa; Sabrià, Miquel; García-Parés, Delia; Reynaga, Esteban; García-Nuñez, Marian

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare epidemiological data and clinical presentation of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila or Chlamydia pneumoniae. From May 1994 to February 1996, 157 patients with S. pneumoniae (n = 68), L. pneumophila (n = 48) and C. pneumoniae (n = 41) pneumonia with definitive diagnosis, were prospectively studied. The following comparisons showed differences at a level of at least p pneumoniae pneumonia had more frequently underlying diseases (HIV infection and neoplasm) and those with C. pneumoniae pneumonia were older and had a higher frequency of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), while L. pneumophila pneumonia prevailed in patients without comorbidity, but with alcohol intake. Presentation with cough and expectoration were significantly more frequent in patients with S. pneumoniae or C. pneumoniae pneumonia, while headache, diarrhoea and no response to betalactam antibiotics prevailed in L. pneumophila pneumonia. However, duration of symptoms > or = 7 d was more frequent in C. pneumoniae pneumonia. Patients with CAP caused by L. pneumophila presented hyponatraemia and an increase in CK more frequently, while AST elevation prevailed in L. pneumophila and C. pneumoniae pneumonia. In conclusion, some risk factors and clinical characteristics of patients with CAP may help to broaden empirical therapy against atypical pathogens until rapid diagnostic tests are available.

  9. [Topical problems of empiric therapy of community-acquired pneumonia in outpatient practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanova, I I; Chorbinskaya, S A; Baryshnikonva, G A; Nikiforova, N V; Pokutniy, N F; Zverkov, I V; Maslovskyi, L V; Kotenko, K V

    2016-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia is one of prevalent infectious respiratory diseases. Adequate treatment of community-acquired pneumonia, with consideration of the disease severity and microbial resistence, remains extremely topical. The article covers contemporary views of community-acquired pneumonia treatment standards. The authors described results of personal research aimed to study antibacterial treatment for community-acquired pneumonia on outpatient basis over 2004-2012, evaluated correspondence of the treatment to the national clinical recommendations.

  10. Chlamydia sp. in hospitalised children with community acquired pneumonia.

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    Jain, R; Jain, A; Agarwal, J; Awasthi, S

    2007-03-01

    Our aim was to document the prevalence of chlamydial infection in children less than five years of age with Community Acquired Pneumonia (CAP). Seventy three children, 1 month to 5 years of age, hospitalized with CAP were enrolled over a period of one year. Microimmunofluorescence (MIF) was done to detect IgM antibodies against Chlamydia sp. in sera of all patients; PCR was performed to detect C. pneumoniae DNA in nasopharyngeal aspirates. The prevalence of Chlamydia species infection in CAP in children pneumoniae antibodies and one case was positive for C. pneumoniae DNA. Chlamydia sp. have an important role in CAP in children < 5 years and for early diagnosis of infection, use of more than one method i.e. PCR and serology both is advisable.

  11. Immunomodulatory adjuvant therapy in severe community-acquired pneumonia.

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    Morton, Ben; Pennington, Shaun Harry; Gordon, Stephen B

    2014-10-01

    Severe pneumonia has a high mortality (38.2%) despite evidence-based therapy. Rising rates of antimicrobial resistance increase the urgency to develop new treatment strategies. Multiple adjuvant therapies for pneumonia have been investigated but none are currently licensed. Profound immune dysregulation occurs in patients with severe infection. An initial hyper-inflammatory response is followed by a secondary hypo-inflammatory response with 'immune-paralysis'. There is focus on the development of immunostimulatory agents to improve host ability to combat primary infection and reduce secondary infections. Successful treatments must be targeted to immune response; promising biomarkers exist but have not yet reached common bedside practice. We explore evidence for adjuvant therapies in community-acquired pneumonia. We highlight novel potential treatment strategies using a broad-based search strategy to include publications in pneumonia and severe sepsis. We explore reasons for the failure to develop effective adjuvant therapies and highlight the need for targeted therapy specific to immune activity.

  12. Severe Community-acquired Pneumonia Due to Legionella pneumophila Serogroup 6

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    Chung-Yu Chen

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is a common cause of sporadic community-acquired pneumonia, but culture-proven legionellosis is rarely diagnosed. There is no laboratory test for Legionnaires' disease that can detect all patients with the disease. Culture is the standard diagnostic method and should be initiated as soon as possible in suspected cases. We describe a rare case of community-acquired pneumonia caused by L. pneumophila serogroup 6. A 77-year-old man was admitted to a tertiary care hospital because of high fever, productive cough, and progressive dyspnea. Chest radiography showed bilateral pneumonia, which led to respiratory failure necessitating mechanical ventilatory support. Despite antibiotic therapy, his condition continued to deteriorate and acute renal failure also developed. Urine was negative for L. pneumophila. Culture of the sputum yielded L. pneumophila serogroup 6, although there was no elevation of the serum antibody titer. Pneumonia resolved gradually and he was extubated after treatment with levofloxacin followed by erythromycin. L. pneumophila other than serogroup 1 should be included in the differential diagnosis of patients with suspected atypical community-acquired pneumonia.

  13. Community-acquired pneumonia in older patients: does age influence systemic cytokine levels in community-acquired pneumonia?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, Emer

    2009-03-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a major cause of death in the elderly. The age-related increase in comorbid illnesses plays a part but the effect of aging on the immune response may be equally important. We aimed to evaluate patients with CAP for evidence of a muted response to infection in elderly patients admitted to hospital compared with a younger patient group.

  14. [Clinical features and antimicrobial resistance of community-acquired pneumonia caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae in infants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Li-Yun; Wang, Ying-Jian; Li, Ji-Mei

    2012-11-01

    To study the clinical features and antimicrobial resistance of community-acquired pneumonia caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae in infants. The clinical data of 65 infants with community-acquired pneumonia caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae between 2007 and 2011 were retrospectively studied. Of the 65 infants, 37 cases (57%) were aged ≤3 months, 17 cases (26%) over 4 months, 7 cases (11%) over 7 months and 4 cases (6%) between 13 and 24 months. There were no significant differences in clinical manifestations and chest X-ray features between the infants with community-acquired pneumonia caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae and those with other bacterial pneumonia. Forty strains (62%) of ESBLs-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae were detected. Klebsiella pneumoniae was 100% sensitive to imipenem, meropenem and amikacin but resistant to penicillins and cephalosporins. The resistance rates of ESBLs-producing strains to penicillins, cephalosporins, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, ampicillin/sulbactam, compound sulfamethoxazole, gentamycin, ciprofloxacin and aztreonam were significantly higher than for non-ESBLs-producing strains. ESBLs-producing strains also showed multiple-drug resistance. Community-acquired pneumonia caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae is common in infants aged ≤3 months. ESBLs-producing strains are prevalent in community-acquired pneumonia caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae and demonstrate both high rates of drug resistance and multiple-drug resistance.

  15. Point-of-care lung ultrasound in children with community acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Hayri Levent; Özkaya, Ahmet Kağan; Sarı Gökay, Sinem; Tolu Kendir, Özlem; Şenol, Hande

    2017-07-01

    To present lung ultrasound findings in children assessed with suspected pneumonia in the emergency department and to show the benefit of lung ultrasound in diagnosing pneumonia in comparison with chest X-rays. This observational prospective study was performed in the pediatric emergency department of a single center. Point of care lung ultrasound was performed on each child by an independent sonographer blinded to the patient's clinical and chest X-ray findings. Community acquired pneumonia was established as a final diagnosis by two clinicians based on the recommendations in the British Thoracic Society guideline. One hundred sixty children with a mean age of 3.3±4years and a median age of 1.4years (min-max 0.08-17.5years) were investigated. Final diagnosis in 149 children was community-acquired pneumonia. Lung ultrasound findings were compatible with pneumonia in 142 (95.3%) of these 149 children, while chest X-ray findings were compatible with pneumonia in 132 (88.5%). Pneumonia was confirmed with lung ultrasound in 15 of the 17 patients (11.4%) not evaluated as compatible with pneumonia at chest X-ray. While pneumonia could not be confirmed with lung ultrasound in seven (4.6%) patients, findings compatible with pneumonia were not determined at chest X-ray in two of these patients. When lung ultrasound and chest X-ray were compared as diagnostic tools, a significant difference was observed between them (p=0.041). This study shows that lung ultrasound is at least as useful as chest X-ray in diagnosing children with community-acquired pneumonia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Etiology of community-acquired pneumonia in 1500 hospitalized children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oumei, Hao; Xuefeng, Wang; Jianping, Liu; Kunling, Shen; Rong, Ma; Zhenze, Cui; Li, Deng; Huimin, Yan; Lining, Wang; Zhaolan, Liu; Xinmin, Li; Hua, Xu; Zhiyan, Jiang; Yanning, Li; Yan, Huang; Baoqing, Zhang; Xiaochun, Feng; Chunhui, He; Yonghong, Jiang; Xue, Zhao; Wei, Wei; Zi, Wang

    2018-03-01

    Childhood community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common illness; however, comprehensive studies of hospitalizations for CAP among children in China based on prospective and multicenter data collection are limited. The aim of this investigation was to determine the respiratory pathogens responsible for CAP in hospitalized children. From January to December 2015, oropharyngeal swabs and blood serum were collected from hospitalized children with CAP symptoms ranging in age from 6 months to 14 years at 10 hospitals across China. We used immunofluorescence to detect antibodies for eight respiratory viruses and passive agglutination to detect specific IgM against Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M. pneumoniae). Of 1500 children presenting with CAP, 691 (46.1%) tested positive for at least one pathogen (virus or M. pneumoniae). M. pneumoniae (32.4%) was detected most frequently, followed by respiratory syncytial virus (11.5%), adenovirus (5.0%), influenza A virus (4.1 %), influenza B virus (3.4%), parainfluenza virus types 2 and 3 type (3.1 %), parainfluenza virus type 1 (2.9%), and human metapneumovirus (0.3%). Co-infections were identified in 128 (18.5%) of the 691 cases. These data provide a better understanding of viral etiology and M. pneumoniae in CAP in children between 6 months and 14 years in China. More study of the etiologic investigations that would further aid the management of pneumonia is required. With effective immunization for RSV, ADV, and M. pneumoniae infections, more than one-half of the pneumonia cases in this study could have been prevented. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. C. pneumoniae community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in mimicking Mycoplasma pneumoniae meningoencephalitis complicated by asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Burke A; Pherez, Francisco M

    2009-01-01

    Chlamydophila (Chlamydia) pneumoniae is a common, non-zoonotic cause of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in ambulatory young adults. C. pneumoniae clinically presents as a mycoplasma-like illness frequently accompanied by laryngitis. C. pneumoniae CAP may also cause nursing home outbreaks in the elderly. Similar to Mycoplasma pneumoniae in immunocompetent hosts, C. pneumoniae CAP usually manifests as a mild/moderately severe CAP. In contrast with Legionnaire's disease, central nervous system involvement is usually not a feature of C. pneumoniae CAP. M. pneumoniae may rarely present with meningoencephalitis accompanied by high cold agglutinin titers. We present the case of a young man who presented with M. pneumoniae-like illness and was hospitalized for severe CAP that was accompanied by a pertussis-like cough and severe headache. Although his chest x-ray showed a right upper lobe infiltrate, a lumbar puncture was performed to rule out meningitis, but his cerebrospinal fluid profile was unremarkable. Titers for non-zoonotic atypical pneumonia pathogens were negative except for a highly elevated C. pneumoniae immunoglobulin-M titer (1:320). Testing for legionella and pertussis was negative. Q fever and adenoviral titers were also negative. Cold agglutinin titers were repeatedly negative. The patient was successfully treated with moxifloxacin but developed permanent asthma after C. pneumoniae CAP. This case is unusual in several aspects. First, C. pneumoniae usually presents as a mild to moderate CAP, but in this case it was severe. Second, hoarseness was absent, which would have suggested C. pneumoniae. Third, wheezing was an important clue to the diagnosis of C. pneumoniae, which is not a clinical finding with other causes of CAP. Fourth, permanent asthma may follow C. pneumoniae, as well as M. pneumoniae CAP. Fifth, severe headache mimicking M. pneumoniae meningoencephalitis may rarely accompany C. pneumoniae CAP.

  18. [Guidelines for management of community-acquired pneumonia in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopardo, Gustavo; Basombrío, Adriana; Clara, Liliana; Desse, Javier; De Vedia, Lautaro; Di Libero, Eugenia; Gañete, Marcelo; López Furst, María José; Mykietiuk, Analía; Nemirovsky, Corina; Osuna, Carolina; Pensotti, Claudia; Scapellato, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia in adults is a common cause of morbidity and mortality particularly in the elderly and in patients with comorbidities. Most episodes are of bacterial origin, Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most frequently isolated pathogen. Epidemiological surveillance provides information about changes in microorganisms and their susceptibility. In recent years there has been an increase in cases caused by community-acquired meticillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Legionella sp. The chest radiograph is essential as a diagnostic tool. CURB-65 score and pulse oximetry allow stratifying patients into those who require outpatient care, general hospital room or admission to intensive care unit. Diagnostic studies and empirical antimicrobial therapy are also based on this stratification. The use of biomarkers such as procalcitonin or C-reactive protein is not part of the initial evaluation because its use has not been shown to modify the initial approach. We recommend treatment with amoxicillin for outpatients under 65 year old and without comorbidities, for patients 65 years or more or with comorbidities amoxicillin-clavulanic/sulbactam, for patients hospitalized in general ward ampicillin-sulbactam with or without the addition of clarithromycin, and for patients admitted to intensive care unit ampicillin-sulbactam plus clarithromycin. Suggested treatment duration is 5 to 7 days for outpatients and 7 to 10 for those who are hospitalized. During the influenza season addition of oseltamivir for hospitalized patients and for those with comorbidities is suggested.

  19. Undiagnosed Diabetes Mellitus in Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Andreas Vestergaard; Faurholt-Jepsen, Daniel; Egelund, Gertrud Baunbæk

    2017-01-01

    diabetes mellitus. Results: Fifteen percent of patients had known diabetes mellitus. Among patients without known diabetes mellitus, 5.0% had undiagnosed diabetes mellitus and 37.5% had prediabetes. Male sex (odds ratio [OR], 2.45 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.35-4.45]), body mass index ≥25 kg/m2 (OR, 2.......64 [95% CI, 1.48-4.72]), and hyperglycemia at admission (6-11 mM: OR, 2.93 [95% CI, 1.54-5.60] and ≥11 mM: OR, 44.76 [95% CI, 17.58-113.98]) were associated with undiagnosed diabetes mellitus. Patients with undiagnosed diabetes mellitus had a higher 180-day mortality rate compared to patients without......Background: Diabetes mellitus is an important risk factor for community-acquired pneumonia, whereas the prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes mellitus and prediabetes in patients with community-acquired pneumonia is largely unknown. We aimed to determine the prevalence of prediabetes, undiagnosed...

  20. Severe community-acquired pneumonia caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae in young female patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milačić Nena

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma pneumonia is common agent causing community acquired pneumonia in younger population. However, the course of illness is usually benign and is rarely associated with pulmonary complications. We report a 27 years old female patient with unilateral pneumonia followed by pleural effusion and adhesions on the same side. This potential source of infection should be considered in young patients where resolution of symptoms from pneumonia is delayed.

  1. Community acquired pneumonia with shock, severe hypoxemia and leucopenia: Is the etiology methicillin resistant Staphylococci?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garima Kapoor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A young, male presented to the emergency department with respiratory signs and symptoms along with shock and leucopenia. The suspected diagnosis of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA necrotizing pneumonia was confirmed later radiographically and microbiologically. This entity is common in childhood, but rarely reported in adults. This form of pneumonia affects young individuals without any comorbid illness. This is the first reported case of necrotizing pneumonia caused by community acquired-MRSA from Indian subcontinent. The probability to predict etiology of pneumonia from clinical signs is low; yet in the presence of shock, severe hypoxemia and leucopenia suspicion of MRSA should be kept high and hence that prompt initiation of appropriate antimicrobials may reduce mortality.

  2. The impact of blood glucose on community-acquired pneumonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Andreas Vestergaard; Egelund, Gertrud Baunbæk; Andersen, Stine Bang

    2017-01-01

    Hyperglycaemia is common in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and is a predictor of severe outcomes. Data are scarce regarding whether this association is affected by diabetes mellitus (DM) and also regarding its importance for severe outcomes in hospital. We determined the impact...... of blood glucose on severe outcomes of CAP in hospital. We studied 1318 adult CAP patients hospitalised at three Danish hospitals. The association between blood glucose and DM status and severe clinical outcome (admission to an intensive care unit (ICU) and/or in-hospital mortality) was assessed...... by logistic regression. Models were adjusted for CURB-65 score and comorbidities. 12% of patients had DM. In patients without DM an increase in admission blood glucose was associated with risk for ICU admittance (OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.13-1.39), but not significantly associated with in-hospital mortality (OR 1...

  3. Hospital Resource Utilisation by Patients with Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCarthy, S

    2017-09-01

    Little data is available on the resource utilisation of patients admitted with Community-Acquired Pneumonia (CAP) in Ireland. A retrospective review of 50 randomly-selected patients admitted to Beaumont Hospital with CAP was undertaken. The mean length of stay of patients with CAP was 12 days (+\\/- 16 days). All patients were emergency admissions, all had a chest x-ray, a C-reactive protein blood test, and occupied a public bed at some point during admission. Common antimicrobial therapies were intravenous (IV) amoxicillin\\/clavulanic acid and oral clarithromycin; 60% received physiotherapy. The estimated mean cost of CAP per patient was €14,802.17. Costs arising from admission to hospital with CAP are substantial, but efforts can be undertaken to ensure that resources are used efficiently to improve patient care such as discharge planning and fewer in-hospital ward transfers

  4. Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Children: A Multidisciplinary Consensus Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald E Low

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is common among children and may have viral, bacterial or, occasionally, other causes. The etiology is complex, with age-related trends, and differs from that in adult CAP, necessitating different management guidelines. There is an absence of current guidelines for the management of pediatric CAP (PCAP that take into account changing etiologies, antimicrobial-resistance issues and the use of newly licensed antimicrobials. The present review does not provide specific guidelines, but it reviews the literature and presents currrent approaches to the treatment of PCAP. To compile the review, an expert panel was convened to provide a consensus. The review discusses the etiology, diagnosis and antimicrobial treatment of PCAP as well as indications for referral to a hospital emergency department. The goal of the review is to provide those involved with treatment of PCAP in the community setting with information that can be used to make effective treatment choices.

  5. Role of Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae in children with community-acquired pneumonia in Istanbul, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somer, Ayper; Salman, Nuran; Yalçin, Işik; Ağaçfidan, Ali

    2006-06-01

    To investigate the role of Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae infection in pediatric pneumonia, in Istanbul, Turkey, we conducted a prospective study covering all the children between 2 months and 15 years hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia. A total of 140 children (85 males, median age 2.5 years) with community-acquired pneumonia were enrolled. Acute and convalescent sera were tested for IgM and IgG antibodies to M. pneumoniae (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Serion ELISA classic) and for IgM and IgG antibodies to C. pneumoniae (microimmunofluorescence, Savyon, Israel). Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection was diagnosed in 38 patients (27%) and C. pneumoniae infection in 7 (5%). In 2 children M. pneumoniae and C. pneumoniae co infection was observed. The average age of the M. pneumoniae cases was 5.3 years and that of the C. pneumoniae was 1.5 years. The average age of pneumonia cases caused by other pathogens was 3.4 years (ppneumoniae and C. pneumoniae infection and in those without M. pneumoniae and C. pneumoniae infection. The results of this study suggest a remarkable role for M. pneumoniae and C. pneumoniae in childhood community-acquired pneumonia, and the knowledge of the true prevalence of these two types of infections discovered in the community might lead to modifications in the present empirical treatment of bacterial pneumonia.

  6. The impact of community-acquired pneumonia on the health-related quality-of-life in elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangen, Marie-Josée J; Huijts, Susanne M; Bonten, Marc J M; de Wit, G Ardine

    2017-03-14

    The sustained health-related quality-of-life of patients surviving community-acquired pneumonia has not been accurately quantified. The aim of the current study was to quantify differences in health-related quality-of-life of community-dwelling elderly with and without community-acquired pneumonia during a 12-month follow-up period. In a matched cohort study design, nested in a prospective randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial on the efficacy of the 13-valent pneumococcal vaccine in community-dwelling persons of ≥65 years, health-related quality-of-life was assessed in 562 subjects hospitalized with suspected community-acquired pneumonia (i.e. diseased cohort) and 1145 unaffected persons (i.e. non-diseased cohort) matched to pneumonia cases on age, sex, and health status (EQ-5D-3L-index). Health-related quality-of-life was determined 1-2 weeks after hospital discharge/inclusion and 1, 6 and 12 months thereafter, using Euroqol EQ-5D-3L and Short Form-36 Health survey questionnaires. One-year quality-adjusted life years (QALY) were estimated for both diseased and non-diseased cohorts. Separate analyses were performed for pneumonia cases with and without radiologically confirmed community-acquired pneumonia. The one-year excess QALY loss attributed to community-acquired pneumonia was 0.13. Mortality in the post-discharge follow-up year was 8.4% in community-acquired pneumonia patients and 1.2% in non-diseased persons (p pneumonia patients, compared to non-diseased persons, but differences in health-related quality-of-life between radiologically confirmed and non-confirmed community-acquired pneumonia cases were not statistically significant. Community-acquired pneumonia was associated with a six-fold increased mortality and 16% lower quality-of-life in the post-discharge year among patients surviving hospitalization for community-acquired pneumonia, compared to non-diseased persons. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00812084 .

  7. Comparison of Severity Scoring Systems in Community-Acquired Pneumonia

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    İbrahim Onur Alıcı

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the ability of CURB-65, pneumonia severity index and SMART-COP systems to predict 30-day mortality and the need for intensive respiratory and vasopressor support (IVRS. Methods: We included 84 cases with community acquired pneumonia (CAP and followed up for 30 days. The scores were calculated at admission and associated with the 30-day mortality and the need for intensive respiratory and vasopressor support. Results: The mean age of patients was 58.6±18.7 years. The 30-day mortality level for CAP was 7.1%. Fourteen of 84 patients (16.7% with CAP were followed in ICU. The area under curve (AUC values of the three systems (CURB-65, PSI, and SMART-COP for 30-day mortality were 0.89, 0.89 and 0.91, respectively, and for the need for IRVS was 0.88, 0.91 and 0.93, respectively. Conclusion: The three systems accurately detected the need for IRVS and the 30-day mortality, but none individually demonstrated any advantage over the others.

  8. Surfactant protein D (SP-D) serum levels in patients with community-acquired pneumonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth-Larsen, Rikke; Nordenbaek, Claudia; Tornoe, Ida

    2003-01-01

    blood samples from 61 patients hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia of suspected bacterial origin. On the day of admission to the hospital the serum SP-D concentration was significantly lower than that in healthy subjects. On day 5, the SP-D concentration had increased on average three times...... the concentration on admission and then slowly declined toward normal levels. CRP was measured simultaneously but no correlation was observed between concentrations of SP-D and CRP. The results show a wide range of serum SP-D concentration in healthy volunteers and indicate that significant changes occur during...

  9. [Nutritional status and mortality in community acquired pneumonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Pecci, María Soledad; Carlson, Damián; Montero-Tinnirello, Javier; Parodi, Roberto L; Montero, Antonio; Greca, Alcides A

    2010-01-01

    Pneumonias are a major cause of morbidity and mortality and their prognosis depends on many factors including nutritional status. This study analyzed the relationship between malnutrition and the risk of death in Community Acquired Pneumonia (CAP) patients. This is a prospective observational study. The Subjective Global Assessment (SGA) was used as a screening tool to appraise the nutritional status. Ninety-eight patients with CAP requiring hospitalization were included consecutively from October 2004 to September 2006. The clinical, bacteriological and laboratory features were recorded. Patient's nutritional condition was assessed using the SGA. The monitoring was performed until discharge, death or shunt. Persistent cough or fever, the presence of pleural effusion, malignancies or long hospitalization were associated with worse prognosis. Mortality increased in proportion to the degree of malnutrition. Thirty two CAP patients (32.65%) were classified as SGA-category A; 44 (44.90%) as SGA-B, and 22 (22.45%) as SGA-C. Pneumonia resulted in death in 3/32 SGA-A (9.37%), 8/44 SGA-B (18.18%) and 10/22 SGA-C patients. SGA-C patients showed significantly higher odds ratios for death in comparison to SGA-A patients (OR = 6.085, CI95%: 1.071-34.591; p = 0.042). Considering death as the outcome variable, SGA-A class had the highest negative predictive value (0.906), while SGA-C class showed the highest positive predictive value (0.455). These results link the nutritional status to the NAC evolution prognostic. SGA provides a simple estimation of the nutritional status and it is a good predictor of the risk of death in CAP patients.

  10. ABIFLOX EFFICACY IN COMPLEX THERAPY OF PATIENTS WITH COMMUNITY ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. I. Lyadova

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of the study, during which the efficacy of levofloxacin in the treatment of patients with community-acquired pneumonia was evaluated. It was found that levofloxacin is a highly effective treatment for patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

  11. Guidelines for severe community-acquired pneumonia in the western world

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vegelin, AL; Bissumbhar, P; Joore, JCA; Lammers, JWJ; Hoepelman, IM

    Background: Recently, several guidelines (ATS 1993/LDSA 1998; ERS 1998; SWAB 1998) have been issued for the initial therapy of patients with community-acquired pneumonia. In patients who fulfil the criteria for severe community-acquired pneumonia (SCAP), it was advised to start with a macrolide

  12. [Community acquired pneumonia in children: Outpatient treatment and prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Pérez, D; Andrés Martín, A; Tagarro García, A; Escribano Montaner, A; Figuerola Mulet, J; García García, J J; Moreno-Galdó, A; Rodrigo Gonzalo de Lliria, C; Ruiz Contreras, J; Saavedra Lozano, J

    2015-12-01

    There have been significant changes in community acquired pneumonia (CAP) in children in the last decade. These changes relate to epidemiology and clinical presentation. Resistance to antibiotics is also a changing issue. These all have to be considered when treating CAP. In this document, two of the main Spanish pediatric societies involved in the treatment of CAP in children, propose a consensus concerning therapeutic approach. These societies are the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases and the Spanish Society of Paediatric Chest Diseases. The Advisory Committee on Vaccines of the Spanish Association of Paediatrics (CAV-AEP) has also been involved in the prevention of CAP. An attempt is made to provide up-to-date guidelines to all paediatricians. The first part of the statement presents the approach to ambulatory, previously healthy children. We also review the prevention with currently available vaccines. In a next second part, special situations and complicated forms will be addressed. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Professions and Working Conditions Associated With Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almirall, Jordi; Serra-Prat, Mateu; Bolíbar, Ignasi; Palomera, Elisabet; Roig, Jordi; Boixeda, Ramon; Bartolomé, Maria; de la Torre, Mari; Parra, Olga; Torres, Antoni

    2015-12-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is not considered a professional disease, and the effect of different occupations and working conditions on susceptibility to CAP is unknown. The aim of this study is to determine whether different jobs and certain working conditions are risk factors for CAP. Over a 1-year period, all radiologically confirmed cases of CAP (n=1,336) and age- and sex-matched controls (n=1,326) were enrolled in a population-based case-control study. A questionnaire on CAP risk factors, including work-related questions, was administered to all participants during an in-person interview. The bivariate analysis showed that office work is a protective factor against CAP, while building work, contact with dust and sudden changes of temperature in the workplace were risk factors for CAP. The occupational factor disappeared when the multivariate analysis was adjusted for working conditions. Contact with dust (previous month) and sudden changes of temperature (previous 3 months) were risk factors for CAP, irrespective of the number of years spent working in these conditions, suggesting reversibility. Some recent working conditions such as exposure to dust and sudden changes of temperature in the workplace are risk factors for CAP. Both factors are reversible and preventable. Copyright © 2014 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Community-acquired pneumonia in an intensive care unit

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    M. Raquel Marques

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is the leading cause of sepsis in adult critical care.We present a retrospective study of patients admitted to a polyvalent intensive care unit with CAP from 1st June 2004 – 31st December 2006.We analysed 76 patients with a mean age of 62.88 (18.75 years. Mean APACHE II score was 24.88 (9.75. Mean SAPS II was 51.18 (18.05, with a predicted mortality of 47.27%. Aetiology was identified in 42.1% of the patients. Streptococcus pneumoniae was the most frequent aetiological agent, but the group of aetiological agents more frequently identified was Gram-negative enteric bacilli.Levofloxacine was the most frequently previously used antibio tic. The most frequently used antibiotherapy scheme was the association ceftriaxone – azithromicine. It was possible to evaluate suitability of treatment in 32 patients; 27 were on suitable antibiotherapy regimes. 66 patients (86.8% were on respirators, with a median length of 4 days. The median length of stay was 5.3 days. ICU mortality was 36.8% and hospital mortality 55.26%.SAPS II, CRP (C-reactive protein, potassium and initial unsuitable antibiotherapy were related to mortality. After multivariate analysis, only SAPS II maintained statistical significance.Use of antibiotics should be judicious, taking the most frequent agents and their susceptibility into consideration. Resumo: A pneumonia adquirida na comunidade (PAC é a principal causa de sépsis em cuidados intensivos de adultos. Com o objectivo de caracterizar o quadro clínico de PAC em cuidados intensivos, tratamento e avaliação de factores prognósticos, com especial relevância para a antibioterapia, realizou-se um estudo retrospectivo dos doentes admitidos numa UCI polivalente com PAC, de 1 de Junho de 2004 a 31 de Dezembro de 2006. Analisaram-se 76 doentes com uma idade média de 62,88 (18,75 anos. O APACHE II médio de 24,88 (9,75 e o SAPS 2 médio era de 51,18 (18,05, com mortalidade

  15. Variability in Antibiotic Prescribing for Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handy, Lori K; Bryan, Matthew; Gerber, Jeffrey S; Zaoutis, Theoklis; Feemster, Kristen A

    2017-04-01

    Published guidelines recommend amoxicillin for most children with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), yet macrolides and broad-spectrum antibiotics are more commonly prescribed. We aimed to determine the patient and clinician characteristics associated with the prescription of amoxicillin versus macrolide or broad-spectrum antibiotics for CAP. Retrospective cohort study in an outpatient pediatric primary care network from July 1, 2009 to June 30, 2013. Patients prescribed amoxicillin, macrolides, or a broad-spectrum antibiotic (amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, cephalosporin, or fluoroquinolone) for CAP were included. Multivariable logistic regression models were implemented to identify predictors of antibiotic choice for CAP based on patient- and clinician-level characteristics, controlling for practice. Of 10 414 children, 4239 (40.7%) received amoxicillin, 4430 (42.5%) received macrolides and 1745 (16.8%) received broad-spectrum antibiotics. The factors associated with an increased odds of receipt of macrolides compared with amoxicillin included patient age ≥5 years (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 6.18; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 5.53-6.91), previous antibiotic receipt (aOR: 1.79; 95% CI: 1.56-2.04), and private insurance (aOR: 1.47; 95% CI: 1.28-1.70). The predicted probability of a child being prescribed a macrolide ranged significantly between 0.22 and 0.83 across clinics. The nonclinical characteristics associated with an increased odds of receipt of broad-spectrum antibiotics compared with amoxicillin included suburban practice (aOR: 7.50; 95% CI: 4.16-13.55) and private insurance (aOR: 1.42; 95% CI: 1.18-1.71). Antibiotic choice for CAP varied widely across practices. Factors unlikely related to the microbiologic etiology of CAP were significant drivers of antibiotic choice. Understanding drivers of off-guideline prescribing can inform targeted antimicrobial stewardship initiatives. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  16. Determinants for hospitalization in " low-risk" community acquired pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliyu Muktar H

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A variable decision in managing community acquired pneumonia (CAP is the initial site of care; in-patient versus outpatient. These variations persist despite comprehensive practice guidelines. Patients with a Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI score lower than seventy have low risk for complications and outpatient antibiotic management is recommended in this group. These patients are generally below the age of fifty years, non-nursing home residents, HIV negative and have no major cardiac, hepatic, renal or malignant diseases. Methods A retrospective analysis of 296 low-risk CAP patients evaluated within a year one period at St. Agnes Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland was undertaken. All patients were assigned a PSI score. 208 (70% were evaluated and discharged from the emergency department (E.D. to complete outpatient antibiotic therapy, while 88 (30% were hospitalized. Patients were sub-stratified into classes I-V according to PSI. A comparison of demographic, clinical, social and financial parameters was made between the E.D. discharged and hospitalized groups. Results Statistically significant differences in favor of the hospitalized group were noted for female gender (CI: 1.46-5.89, p= 0.0018, African Americans (CI: 0.31-0.73, p= 0.004, insurance coverage (CI: 0.19-0.63, p= 0.0034, temperature (CI: 0.04-0.09, p= 0.0001 and pulse rate (CI: 0.03-0.14, p= 0.0001. No statistically significant differences were observed between the two groups for altered mental status, hypotension, tachypnea, laboratory/radiological parameters and social indicators (p>0.05. The average length of stay for in-patients was 3.5 days at about eight time's higher cost than outpatient management. There was no difference in mortality or treatment failures between the two groups. The documentation rate and justifications for hospitalizing low risk CAP patients by admitting physicians was less than optimal. Conclusions High fever, tachycardia, female gender

  17. PROGRESS - prospective observational study on hospitalized community acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahnert, Peter; Creutz, Petra; Scholz, Markus; Schütte, Hartwig; Engel, Christoph; Hossain, Hamid; Chakraborty, Trinad; Bauer, Michael; Kiehntopf, Michael; Völker, Uwe; Hammerschmidt, Sven; Loeffler, Markus; Suttorp, Norbert

    2016-07-28

    Community acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a high incidence disease resulting in about 260,000 hospital admissions per year in Germany, more than myocardial infarction or stroke. Worldwide, CAP is the most frequent infectious disease with high lethality ranging from 1.2 % in those 20-29 years old to over 10 % in patients older than 70 years, even in industrial nations. CAP poses numerous medical challenges, which the PROGRESS (Pneumonia Research Network on Genetic Resistance and Susceptibility for the Evolution of Severe Sepsis) network aims to tackle: Operationalization of disease severity throughout the course of disease, outcome prediction for hospitalized patients and prediction of transitions from uncomplicated CAP to severe CAP, and finally, to CAP with sepsis and organ failure as a life-threatening condition. It is a major aim of PROGRESS to understand and predict patient heterogeneity regarding outcome in the hospital and to develop novel treatment concepts. PROGRESS was designed as a clinical, observational, multi-center study of patients with CAP requiring hospitalization. More than 1600 patients selected for low burden of co-morbidities have been enrolled, aiming at a total of 3000. Course of disease, along with therapy, was closely monitored by daily assessments and long-term follow-up. Daily blood samples allow in depth molecular-genetic characterization of patients. We established a well-organized workflow for sample logistics and a comprehensive data management system to collect and manage data from more than 50 study centers in Germany and Austria. Samples are stored in a central biobank and clinical data are stored in a central data base which also integrates all data from molecular assessments. With the PROGRESS study, we established a comprehensive data base of high quality clinical and molecular data allowing investigation of pressing research questions regarding CAP. In-depth molecular characterization will contribute to the discovery of disease

  18. [Ability of procalcitonin to predict bacteremia in patients with community acquired pneumonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julián-Jiménez, Agustín; Timón Zapata, Jesús; Laserna Mendieta, Emilio José; Parejo Miguez, Raquel; Flores Chacartegui, Manuel; Gallardo Schall, Pablo

    2014-04-07

    To analyze the usefulness and ability of procalcitonin (PCT) to predict the presence of bacteremia in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae) or other bacteria. This is an observational, prospective and descriptive study involving patients who were diagnosed with CAP in our Emergency Department. Data collected included socio-demographic and comorbidity variables, Charlson index, stage in the Pneumonia Severity Index and criteria of severe NAC, microbiologic studies and biomarker determinations (PCT and C reactive protein). The follow-up was carried out during 30 days to calculate the predictive power and the diagnostic performance for bacteremia caused or not by S. pneumoniae. Four hundred and seventy-four patients were finally included in the study. Blood cultures were positive in 85 individuals (17.9%) and S. pneumoniae was identified as the responsible pathogen in 75 of them (88.4%) (in 5 cases together with another agent). The area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve for PCT to predict bacteremia (caused by S. pneumoniae or not) was 0.988 (95% confidence interval 0.908-0.995; P98% and>10, respectively. The most frequently isolated serotypes of S. pneumoniae were 19A, 7F, 1 and 3. The highest mean levels of PCT were found in serotypes 7F, 19A, 3 and 1, which showed statistically significant differences with regard to the others serotypes considered (P=.008). Serotypes associated with the highest percentage of severe sepsis-septic shock, 30-days mortality and multi-lobe or bilateral affection were 3, 1 and 19A; 1, 3 and 19A; and 3, 19A and 6A, respectively. PCT had a remarkable diagnostic ability to discard or suspect bacteremia and to guide the etiology of CAP caused by S. pneumoniae. Serotypes 1, 3, 19A and 7F showed greater frequency, systemic inflammatory response and clinical severity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  19. A prediction model for community-acquired Chlamydia pneumoniae pneumonia in hospitalized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socan, M; Kosmelj, K; Marinic-Fiser, N; Vidmar, L

    2004-08-01

    The objective of the study was to identify factors that help to predict community-acquired Chlamydia pneumoniae pneumonia in hospitalized patients. Clinical data of 83 patients with serologically confirmed C. pneumoniae pneumonia were compared with the data obtained from 72 patients with bacterial pneumonia. The criteria of bacterial pneumonia included positive blood and/or sputum cultures and negative serology for Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia psittaci, Chlamydia pneumoniae and Coxiella burnetii. The data collected included demographics, chronic diseases, pre- and post-hospitalization course of pneumonia, clinical data on admission and laboratory findings. Descriptive statistical analysis, involving numerous variables, was followed by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis. Two different situations, one including demographic data and information on the pre-hospitalization course of pneumonia, and another based on clinical information on admission and on laboratory results, were modeled using multivariate logistic regression. Several variables selected from these two models were incorporated into the third model, and the following four variables were found to have the highest predictive value of C. pneumoniae pneumonia: nursing home residence (odds ratio [OD] 3.73, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.39-10.06), low c-reactive protein (CRP) levels (OD 5.99, 95% CI 1.82-19.67), nonproductive cough (OD 0.32, 95% CI 0.14-0.73), and a normal urinalysis (OD 0.38, 95% CI 0.17-0.83). Our findings seem to allow for a more reliable differentiation between C. pneumoniae pneumonia and other bacterial pneumonias, but further investigations will be needed to validate the proposed model.

  20. PNEUMOCOCCAL CAPSULAR ANTIGEN-DETECTION AND PNEUMOCOCCAL SEROLOGY IN PATIENTS WITH COMMUNITY ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BOERSMA, WG; LOWENBERG, A; HOLLOWAY, Y; KUTTSCHRUTTER, H; SNIJDER, JAM; KOETER, GH

    1991-01-01

    Background Methods to determine the microbial cause of community acquired pneumonia include detection of pneumococcal antigen and measurement of pneumococcal capsular antibody response. Their usefulness compared with conventional microbiological techniques was investigated in patients with

  1. Antimicrobial treatment failures in patients with community-acquired pneumonia: causes and prognostic implications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Arancibia, F; Ewig, S; Martinez, J A; Ruiz, M; Bauer, T; Marcos, M A; Mensa, J; Torres, A

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the causes and prognostic implications of antimicrobial treatment failures in patients with nonresponding and progressive life-threatening, community-acquired pneumonia...

  2. The role of procalcitonin in adult patients with community-acquired pneumonia--a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Peter; Lindhardt, Bjarne Ørskov

    2012-01-01

    Promising results in relation to severity assessment and treatment of patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) have recently been presented from the study of procalcitonin (PCT) levels in these patients....

  3. Characteristics of Colon Microbiocenosis in Toddlers with Community-Acquired Pneumonia Associated with Iron Deficiency Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.I. Smiyan

    2014-02-01

    Thus, impaired bowel microbiota in children with community-acquired pneumonia associated with iron deficiency anemia may be a reason to include probiotic preparation into the complex of pathogenetic therapy.

  4. A Molecular Biomarker to Diagnose Community-acquired Pneumonia on Intensive Care Unit Admission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scicluna, Brendon P; Klein Klouwenberg, Peter M C; van Vught, Lonneke A; Wiewel, Maryse A; Ong, David S Y; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Franitza, Marek; Toliat, Mohammad R; Nürnberg, Peter; Hoogendijk, Arie J; Horn, Janneke; Cremer, Olaf L; Schultz, Marcus J; Bonten, Marc J; van der Poll, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) accounts for a major proportion of intensive care unit (ICU) admissions for respiratory failure and sepsis. Diagnostic uncertainty complicates case management, which may delay appropriate cause-specific treatment. Objectives: To characterize the blood

  5. Serotypes and antibiotic susceptibility of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pasquale, Marta; Aliberti, Stefano; Azzari, Chara; Moriondo, Maria; Nieddu, Francesco; Blasi, Francesco; Mantero, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Pneumonia remain an important public health problem. The primary objective was to determine the proportion of community-acquired pneumonia that is attributable to Streptococcus pneumoniae infection; secondary objectives were the description of community-acquired pneumonia attributable to Streptococcus pneumoniae according to socio-demographic and clinical variables, the clinical evolution of community-acquired pneumonia and the description of the serotype distribution of vaccine-preventable disease and antibiotic resistance rate of pneumococcal infections. An observational, prospective study was conducted on consecutive patients coming from the community, who were hospitalized with pneumonia. Data on admission, at discharge and 30 days after discharge were collected. Logistic regression models were used to evaluate the risk factors independently associated with pneumococcal pneumonia. Among the 193 patients enrolled in the study, the etiology of community-acquired pneumonia was identified in 60 patients (33%) and 35 (18%) of evaluable patients had community-acquired pneumonia due to Streptococcus pneumoniae. Of all clinical characteristics, if no previous antibiotic treatment was performed, there was a 13-fold higher risk of presenting community-acquired pneumonia due to Streptococcus pneumoniae (odds ratio, 12.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.42-117.9). Moreover, the most frequent isolated serotypes were 35F, 3 and 24 (29%, 23% and 16%, respectively). The most frequent serotypes in pneumococcal community-acquired pneumonia are 35F, 3, 24, 6 and 7A, and thus almost 50% of Streptococcus pneumoniae strains could be covered by pneumococcal conjugate vaccine 13 in adult patients with risk factors for pneumococcal infections.

  6. Significance of anaerobes and oral bacteria in community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Kei; Kawanami, Toshinori; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Fukuda, Kazumasa; Noguchi, Shingo; Nagata, Shuya; Nishida, Chinatsu; Kido, Takashi; Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Taniguchi, Hatsumi; Mukae, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Molecular biological modalities with better detection rates have been applied to identify the bacteria causing infectious diseases. Approximately 10-48% of bacterial pathogens causing community-acquired pneumonia are not identified using conventional cultivation methods. This study evaluated the bacteriological causes of community-acquired pneumonia using a cultivation-independent clone library analysis of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene of bronchoalveolar lavage specimens, and compared the results with those of conventional cultivation methods. Patients with community-acquired pneumonia were enrolled based on their clinical and radiological findings. Bronchoalveolar lavage specimens were collected from pulmonary pathological lesions using bronchoscopy and evaluated by both a culture-independent molecular method and conventional cultivation methods. For the culture-independent molecular method, approximately 600 base pairs of 16S ribosomal RNA genes were amplified using polymerase chain reaction with universal primers, followed by the construction of clone libraries. The nucleotide sequences of 96 clones randomly chosen for each specimen were determined, and bacterial homology was searched. Conventional cultivation methods, including anaerobic cultures, were also performed using the same specimens. In addition to known common pathogens of community-acquired pneumonia [Streptococcus pneumoniae (18.8%), Haemophilus influenzae (18.8%), Mycoplasma pneumoniae (17.2%)], molecular analysis of specimens from 64 patients with community-acquired pneumonia showed relatively higher rates of anaerobes (15.6%) and oral bacteria (15.6%) than previous reports. Our findings suggest that anaerobes and oral bacteria are more frequently detected in patients with community-acquired pneumonia than previously believed. It is possible that these bacteria may play more important roles in community-acquired pneumonia.

  7. Significance of anaerobes and oral bacteria in community-acquired pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei Yamasaki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Molecular biological modalities with better detection rates have been applied to identify the bacteria causing infectious diseases. Approximately 10-48% of bacterial pathogens causing community-acquired pneumonia are not identified using conventional cultivation methods. This study evaluated the bacteriological causes of community-acquired pneumonia using a cultivation-independent clone library analysis of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene of bronchoalveolar lavage specimens, and compared the results with those of conventional cultivation methods. METHODS: Patients with community-acquired pneumonia were enrolled based on their clinical and radiological findings. Bronchoalveolar lavage specimens were collected from pulmonary pathological lesions using bronchoscopy and evaluated by both a culture-independent molecular method and conventional cultivation methods. For the culture-independent molecular method, approximately 600 base pairs of 16S ribosomal RNA genes were amplified using polymerase chain reaction with universal primers, followed by the construction of clone libraries. The nucleotide sequences of 96 clones randomly chosen for each specimen were determined, and bacterial homology was searched. Conventional cultivation methods, including anaerobic cultures, were also performed using the same specimens. RESULTS: In addition to known common pathogens of community-acquired pneumonia [Streptococcus pneumoniae (18.8%, Haemophilus influenzae (18.8%, Mycoplasma pneumoniae (17.2%], molecular analysis of specimens from 64 patients with community-acquired pneumonia showed relatively higher rates of anaerobes (15.6% and oral bacteria (15.6% than previous reports. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that anaerobes and oral bacteria are more frequently detected in patients with community-acquired pneumonia than previously believed. It is possible that these bacteria may play more important roles in community-acquired pneumonia.

  8. Moxifloxacin pharmacokinetic profile and efficacy evaluation in empiric treatment of community-acquired pneumonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öbrink-Hansen, Kristina; Hardlei, Tore Forsingdal; Brock, Birgitte

    2015-01-01

    that caution must be taken when moxifloxacin is used as monotherapy to treat community-acquired pneumonia caused by L. pneumophila. In conclusion, this report reveals key information relevant to the empirical treatment of community-acquired pneumonia while highlighting the robust and flexible nature...... the pharmacokinetic (PK) profile of moxifloxacin at 400 mg/day in 18 patients treated empirically for community-acquired pneumonia. We developed a population pharmacokinetic model to assess the potential efficacy of moxifloxacin and to simulate the maximal MICs for which recommended pharmacokinetic...... for each patient were evaluated against epidemiological cutoff MIC values for Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Legionella pneumophila. PK-PD targets adopted were a Cmax/MIC of ≥12.2 for all pathogens, an fAUC0-24/MIC of >34 for S. pneumoniae, and an fAUC0-24/MIC of >75 for H...

  9. Pneumonia associated with health care versus community acquired pneumonia: different entities, distinct approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Guimarães

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP is now identified as a unique entity that differs from community-acquired pneumonia (CAP, and in many ways is similar to nosocomial pneumonia (NP.Patients with the diagnosis of CAP and HCAP admitted to our Pneumology Unit during one year were retrospectively analysed. The objective was to compare the characteristics and the approach of these two entities.197 patients were included, 144 with CAP and 53 with HCAP. Sex, age, comorbilities, Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI score, radiological involvement, bacteriology, treatment and outcomes were analysed in the 2 groups.Compared to CAP, HCAP was associated with more severe disease, a higher mortality rate and greater length of hospitalization. HCAP differed from CAP mainly in bacteriology and outcomes. Resumo: A Pneumonia associada a cuidados de saúde (PACS está identificada como uma entidade única que difere da pneumonia adquirida na comunidade (PAC e que, em muitos aspectos, se assemelha à pneumonia nosocomial (PN.Os autores apresentam um estudo retrospectivo, que inclui doentes internados no Serviço de Pneumologia do Centro Hospitalar de Coimbra com o diagnóstico de PAC e PACS, durante o período de um ano, cujo objectivo foi comparar as características e a abordagem destas duas entidades.Foram incluídos 197 pacientes, 144 com o diagnóstico de PAC e 53 de PACS. Nos dois grupos foram analisados sexo, idade, co-morbilidades, Índice de gravidade de PSI (Pneumonia Severity Index, envolvimento radiológico, bacteriologia, tratamento e evolução. Quando comparada com a PAC, a PACS esteve associada a maior severidade, maior taxa de mortalidade e internamentos mais longos; A PACS diferiu da PAC principalmente nos microorganismos causadores na sua evolução. Keywords: Community-acquired pneumonia, Healthcare-associated pneumonia, epidemiology, Palavras-chave: Pneumonia adquirida na comunidade, Pneumonia associada a cuidados de saúde, epidemiologia

  10. Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia spp. infection in community-acquired pneumonia, Germany, 2011-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumke, Roger; Schnee, Christiane; Pletz, Mathias W; Rupp, Jan; Jacobs, Enno; Sachse, Konrad; Rohde, Gernot

    2015-03-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia spp., which are associated with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), are difficult to propagate, and can cause clinically indistinguishable disease patterns. During 2011-2012, we used molecular methods to test adult patients in Germany with confirmed CAP for infection with these 2 pathogens. Overall, 12.3% (96/783) of samples were positive for M. pneumoniae and 3.9% (31/794) were positive for Chlamydia spp.; C. psittaci (2.1%) was detected more frequently than C. pneumoniae (1.4%). M. pneumoniae P1 type 1 predominated, and levels of macrolide resistance were low (3.1%). Quarterly rates of M. pneumoniae-positive samples ranged from 1.5% to 27.3%, showing a strong epidemic peak for these infections, but of Chlamydia spp. detection was consistent throughout the year. M. pneumoniae-positive patients were younger and more frequently female, had fewer co-occurring conditions, and experienced milder disease than did patients who tested negative. Clinicians should be aware of the epidemiology of these pathogens in CAP.

  11. Low prevalence of Chlamydia pneumoniae in adults with community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellinghausen, Nele; Straube, Eberhard; Freidank, Heike; von Baum, Heike; Marre, Reinhard; Essig, Andreas

    2006-11-01

    The incidence of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) due to Chlamydia pneumoniae was determined in a prospective study of 546 adult patients with CAP included in the German CAP Competence Network (CAPNETZ) project. Three different PCR protocols for detection of C. pneumoniae in respiratory specimens were compared by a multicenter, inter-laboratory comparison involving three laboratories. A case was defined as a patient with a respiratory sample positive by PCR in at least two laboratories. CAP was caused by C. pneumoniae in 5/546 cases (0.9%). Antibody testing by microimmunofluorescence was done in 376 of 546 patients. All patients were negative for IgM antibodies. In the five PCR-positive patients, neither specific IgG nor IgA antibodies were found. Patients with CAP caused by C. pneumoniae had a lower median age (36 years) than the general study population (62 years). C. pneumoniae is currently a rare cause of CAP in adult patients in Germany. Analysis of a single serum sample is not useful for diagnosis of acute C. pneumoniae infection in CAP.

  12. Clinical predictors for Legionella in patients presenting with community-acquired pneumonia to the emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frei Reno

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Legionella species cause severe forms of pneumonia with high mortality and complication rates. Accurate clinical predictors to assess the likelihood of Legionella community-acquired pneumonia (CAP in patients presenting to the emergency department are lacking. Methods We retrospectively compared clinical and laboratory data of 82 consecutive patients with Legionella CAP with 368 consecutive patients with non-Legionella CAP included in two studies at the same institution. Results In multivariate logistic regression analysis we identified six parameters, namely high body temperature (OR 1.67, p Legionella CAP. Using optimal cut off values of these six parameters, we calculated a diagnostic score for Legionella CAP. The median score was significantly higher in Legionella CAP as compared to patients without Legionella (4 (IQR 3–4 vs 2 (IQR 1–2, p Legionella pneumonia. Conversely, of the 73 patients (16% with ≥4 points, 66% of patients had Legionella CAP. Conclusion Six clinical and laboratory parameters embedded in a simple diagnostic score accurately identified patients with Legionella CAP. If validated in future studies, this score might aid in the management of suspected Legionella CAP.

  13. Outcome of community-acquired pneumonia with cardiac complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Eman Shebl

    2015-07-01

    Conclusions: Cardiac complications are common in the admitted patients with pneumonia and they are associated with increased pneumonia severity and increased cardiovascular risk, these complications adds to the risk of mortality, so optimal management of these events may reduce the burden of death associated with this infection.

  14. Clinical characteristics and innate immunity in patients with community-acquired pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Endeman, H.

    2009-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is the most common infectious disease requiring hospitalisation in the Western world. In spite of improving antibiotic regiments, CAP still has significant mortality. In non-immune compromised patients, Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most frequently isolated

  15. Community-Acquired Cavitary Pseudomonas Pneumonia Linked to Use of a Home Humidifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Woods

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that rarely causes pneumonia in otherwise healthy patients. We describe a case of community-acquired P. aeruginosa pneumonia in a previously healthy individual who likely acquired the infection from a home humidifier.

  16. Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia spp. Infection in Community-Acquired Pneumonia, Germany, 2011–2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumke, Roger; Schnee, Christiane; Pletz, Mathias W.; Rupp, Jan; Jacobs, Enno; Sachse, Konrad; Group, CAPNETZ Study

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia spp., which are associated with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), are difficult to propagate, and can cause clinically indistinguishable disease patterns. During 2011–2012, we used molecular methods to test adult patients in Germany with confirmed CAP for infection with these 2 pathogens. Overall, 12.3% (96/783) of samples were positive for M. pneumoniae and 3.9% (31/794) were positive for Chlamydia spp.; C. psittaci (2.1%) was detected more frequently than C. pneumoniae (1.4%). M. pneumoniae P1 type 1 predominated, and levels of macrolide resistance were low (3.1%). Quarterly rates of M. pneumoniae–positive samples ranged from 1.5% to 27.3%, showing a strong epidemic peak for these infections, but of Chlamydia spp. detection was consistent throughout the year. M. pneumoniae–positive patients were younger and more frequently female, had fewer co-occurring conditions, and experienced milder disease than did patients who tested negative. Clinicians should be aware of the epidemiology of these pathogens in CAP. PMID:25693633

  17. [Community-acquired pneumonia in the elderly: clinical and nutritional aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riquelme O, Raúl; Riquelme O, Mauricio; Rioseco Z, María Luisa; Gómez M, Valeria; Cárdenas, Gloria; Torres, Claudia

    2008-05-01

    Community acquired pneumonia (CAP) in the elderly has unique features and there is little information about the effects of nutrition status on its outcome. To assess the clinical manifestations and prognostic factors of CAP in immunocompetent elderly patients requiring hospitalization. Prospective study of all patients with CAP, admitted to Puerto Montt Hospital, Chile over one year. Epidemiológica! and clinical information and laboratory results were recorded. A nutritional assessment was also performed. Outcomes of elderly (>65 years) and young patients were compared. Two hundred patients aged 63+/- 19 years were studied. Of these, 109 were older than 65 years (78.4+/-8 years) and 91 were younger than 65 years (45.5+/-11 years). Multiple associated diseases, altered mental status, absence of fever, malnutrition and mortality were more common in the older group. Suspected aspiration pneumonia was more common in younger patients, probably related to alcoholism. Malnutrition was associated with longer hospital stay and mortality at any age. An univariate analysis showed that a low serum albumin (<3.4 g/dl) and a mid arm muscle circumference below the 25th percentile were associated with higher mortality. CAP in the elderly has specific features and malnutrition is associated with a worse prognosis in young and elderly patients.

  18. Clinical presentations and outcome of severe community-acquired pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousa Elshamly

    2016-10-01

    Conclusion: SCAP occurs more frequently in those with comorbidities. The most frequent isolated causative organism of SCAP is S. pneumoniae, Influenza H1N1 and S. aureus. SCAP is associated with significant mortality, early recognition and prompt treatment may improve outcome.

  19. Community-acquired pneumonia - a clinical approach to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    risk factors for pneumonia such as cardio-respiratory disease, immune compromise and smoking may be present, no obvious predisposing cause is apparent in the majority of cases of CAP. .... circumstances, such as the patient's wishes, home support system, and factors such as substance abuse or homelessness need to.

  20. Guidelines for the use of chest radiographs in community-acquired pneumonia in children and adolescents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andronikou, Savvas; Lambert, Elena; Hilder, Lucy [University of Bristol, Department of Paediatric Radiology, Bristol Royal Hospital for Children, Bristol (United Kingdom); CRICBristol, Bristol (United Kingdom); Halton, Jarred; Crumley, Iona; Kosack, Cara [Medecins Sans Frontieres, Diagnostic Network, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lyttle, Mark D. [Bristol Royal Hospital for Children, Emergency Department, Bristol (United Kingdom); University of the West of England, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2017-10-15

    National guidance from the United Kingdom and the United States on community-acquired pneumonia in children states that chest radiographs are not recommended routinely in uncomplicated cases. The main reason in the ambulatory setting is that there is no evidence of a substantial impact on clinical outcomes. However clinical practice and adherence to guidance is multifactorial and includes the clinical context (developed vs. developing world), the confidence of the attending physician, the changing incidence of complications (according to the success of immunisation programs), the availability of alternative imaging (and its relationship to perceived risks of radiation) and the reliability of the interpretation of imaging. In practice, chest radiographs are performed frequently for suspected pneumonia in children. Time pressures facing clinicians at the front line, difficulties in distinguishing which children require admission, restricted bed numbers for admissions, imaging-resource limitations, perceptions regarding risk from procedures, novel imaging modalities and the probability of other causes for the child's presentation all need to be factored into a guideline. Other drivers that often weigh in, depending on the setting, include cost-effectiveness and the fear of litigation. Not all guidelines designed for the developed world can therefore be applied to the developing world, and practice guidelines require regular review in the context of new information. In addition, radiologists must improve radiographic diagnosis of pneumonia, reach consensus on the interpretive terminology that clarifies their confidence regarding the presence of pneumonia and act to replace one imaging technique with another whenever there is proof of improved accuracy or reliability. (orig.)

  1. Pneumonia estafilocócica adquirida na comunidade Community-acquired staphylococcal pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Wellington Alves dos Santos

    2008-09-01

    . METHODS: A retrospective and descriptive study was conducted in patients admitted to our hospital between January of 1992 and December of 2003. All of he patients included had been diagnosed with community-acquired pneumonia caused by Staphylococcus aureus. All were older than 14 years of age, and none were intravenous drug users. RESULTS: Community-acquired pneumonia was identified in 332 cases, of which 24 (7.3% were identified as cases of staphylococcal pneumonia. Age ranged from 14 to 89 years. Fifteen patients were male, and nine were female. Twelve patients met the criteria for severe pneumonia. Chest X-rays showed unilateral consolidation in 14 cases, bilateral consolidation in 10, pleural effusion in 15, rapid radiological progression of pulmonary lesions in 14, cavitation in 6 and pneumothorax in 1. Most of the patients presented comorbidities, of which diabetes mellitus was the most common. Twelve patients presented complications such as empyema and septic shock. Four patients died, translating to a mortality rate of 16.6% in our sample. CONCLUSIONS: The clinical presentation of pneumonia caused by S. aureus is similar to that of pneumonia caused by other etiological agents. Radiological findings, epidemiological data and risk factors provide important clues to the diagnosis. These factors are important for clinical suspicion, since S. aureus is not typically addressed in empirical treatment.

  2. Role of Chlamydia pneumoniae in community-acquired pneumonia in hospitalized Jordanian adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Aydie, Suzan N; Obeidat, Nathir M; Al-Younes, Hesham M

    2016-03-31

    This study investigated the role of Chlamydia pneumoniae in the etiology of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in Jordanian adults. Eighty hospitalized CAP patients and 110 healthy adults were enrolled. Overall prevalences of C. pneumoniae IgG antibodies in sera and the rate of acute infection were estimated, using the microimmunofluorescence method (MIF), at titers of 1:16 and 1:512, respectively. Moreover, a nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to detect C. pneumoniae DNA in nasopharyngeal and blood Buffy coat samples. Overall chlamydial IgG prevalence was higher in CAP cases than controls (70% versus 61.8%). Similarly, higher rate of acute infection was found in patients than in controls (16.3% versus 5.5%). By focusing on subjects testing positive at 1:16, acute infection was detectable in 23.2% of CAP cases, compared with 8.8% of seropositive controls. Chlamydial DNA was confirmed in 8.2% and 8.8% of nasopharyngeal specimens from controls and patients, respectively. Moreover, 10.9% and 7.5% of Buffy coats from controls and cases, respectively, were PCR-positive. When performances of both assays for detection of the pathogen were assessed, the sensitivities of MIF and PCR were low and comparable. However, MIF demonstrated higher specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value than PCR. MIF-based data indicate that C. pneumoniae could be a potential causal agent of CAP in Jordan. This study may serve as a basis to elucidate the exact role C. pneumoniae and other co-infecting pathogens in the etiology of respiratory tract disease.

  3. Rapidly fatal community-acquired pneumonia due to Klebsiella pneumoniae complicated with acute myocarditis and accelerated idioventricular rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Tzu-Yi; Lin, Chou-Jui; Lee, Shih-Wei; Chuang, Chun-Pin; Jong, Yuh-Shiun; Chen, Wen-Jone; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2012-08-01

    We describe a previously healthy 52-year-old man with rapidly fatal community-acquired pneumonia caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae. The patient developed acute renal dysfunction, accelerated idioventricular rhythm (acute myocarditis), lactic acidosis and septic shock. He died within 15 hours after admission despite intravenous levofloxacin (750 mg daily) and aggressive medical treatment. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. The role of Streptococcus pneumoniae in community-acquired pneumonia among adults in Europe : a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozenbaum, M.H.; Pechlivanoglou, P.; Van Der Werf, T.S.; Lo-Ten-Foe, J.R.; Postma, M.J.; Hak, E.

    The primary objective of this meta-analysis was to estimate the prevalence of adult community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae in Europe, adjusted for possible independent covariates. Two reviewers conducted a systematic literature search using PubMed on English-language

  5. Features of severe community acquired pneumonia in hiv-infected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bielosludtseva K.O.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Questions of management of patients with severe community acquired pneumonia (CAP in HIV-infected are particularly acute. Pneumonia etiology, identification and treatment on the background of immune deficiency, its clinical and diagnostic features and tactics are still not clearly described, this significantly increases mortality from CAP in general clinical practice. That is why the aim of the work was to determine clinical features, etiology, severity of systemic inflammation and cellular immunity status of severe pneumonia in HIV-infected individuals. For this, 62 patients with verified severe CAP were observed, after express testing the main group included 11 (17.7% persons with severe CAP and identified HIV-infection who underwent identification of respiratory pathogens, determination of serum levels of markers of systemic inflammation (procalcitonin (PCT and C-reactive protein (CRP, count of CD4, CD8, CD4/CD8 lymphocyte subpopulations. According to the results of causative agent identification in the study group pneumonia caused by Pneumocystis jirivecii (in 9 (81.8% of cases dominated, whereas in 2 other patients (18.2% Streptococcus pneumonia was identified. According to the results of objective examination it turned out that the peculiarities of severe CAP in HIV infected patients is non-manifestal atypical clinical set of symptoms with predominance of respiratory distress syndrome over general intoxication, due to Pneumocystis pathogenetic mechanisms of lung injury (BR in the study group was at 37,5±0,1 per 1 min. of oxygen saturation 79,2±3,0%, and with following minimal inflammatory processes (maximum level of PCT in patients with pneumocystis pneumonia corresponded 0.555 ng/ml. According to the study of cellular immunitit it was found that of study group patients had CD4 count 65% less than in the control group. It turned out that in cases of suspected severe CAP in HIV-infectsd patients sputum PCR method allows to quickly detect

  6. Atypical coverage in community-acquired pneumonia after outpatient beta-lactam monotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Werkhoven, Cornelis H.; van de Garde, Ewoudt M.W.; Oosterheert, Jan Jelrik; Postma, Douwe F.; Bonten, Marc J M

    2017-01-01

    Introduction In adults hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) after >48 h of outpatient beta-lactam monotherapy, coverage of atypical pathogens is recommended based on expert opinion. Methods In a post-hoc analysis of a large study of CAP treatment we included patients who received

  7. Elderly patients with community-acquired pneumonia are not treated according to current guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardt Damsgaard, Tove; Klausen, Henrik Hedegaard; Christiansen, Christina

    2013-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in elderly patients, and the most important cause of death in the developed world. Optimised treatment and care will benefit patients as well as the health economy. This study investigated in-hospital compliance...

  8. PNEUMOCOCCAL ANTIGEN PERSISTENCE IN SPUTUM FROM PATIENTS WITH COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BOERSMA, WG; LOWENBERG, A; HOLLOWAY, Y; KUTTSCHRUTTER, H; SNIJDER, JAM; KOETER, GH

    The purpose of this study was to establish the diagnostic value of pneumococcal capsular antigen by comparing this with the results of Gram stain and culture in representative and nonrepresentative sputa during follow-up in patients with community-acquired pneumonia. Antigen was detected by a latex

  9. Aetiology and resistance patterns of community-acquired pneumonia in León, Nicaragua

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matute, A J; Brouwer, W P; Hak, E; Delgado, E; Alonso, E; Hoepelman, I M

    2006-01-01

    We conducted a prevalence study to gain greater insight into the aetiology, bacterial resistance and risk factors for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in the region of León, Nicaragua. During the period from July 2002 to January 2005, all consecutive patients with signs and symptoms suggestive of

  10. Elderly patients with community-acquired pneumonia are not treated according to current guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardt Damsgaard, Tove; Klausen, Henrik Hedegaard; Christiansen, Christina

    2013-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in elderly patients, and the most important cause of death in the developed world. Optimised treatment and care will benefit patients as well as the health economy. This study investigated in-hospital compliance...... with guidelines for treatment and care of patients with CAP....

  11. Revised SWAB guidelines for antimicrobial therapy of community-acquired pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, JA; Prins, JM; Bonten, MJ; Degener, J; Janknegt, RE; Hollander, JMR; Jonkers, RE; Wijnands, WJ; Verheij, TJ; Sachs, APE; Kullberg, BJ

    The Dutch Working Party on Antibiotic Policy (SWAB) develops evidence-based guidelines, aimed at optimalisation of antibiotic use and limitation of the spread of antimicrobial resistance. A revision of the SWAB guideline for the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), published in 1998, was

  12. Diagnostic and prognostic accuracy of clinical and laboratory parameters in community-acquired pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nusbaumer Charly

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is the most frequent infection-related cause of death. The reference standard to diagnose CAP is a new infiltrate on chest radiograph in the presence of recently acquired respiratory signs and symptoms. This study aims to evaluate the diagnostic and prognostic accuracy of clinical signs and symptoms and laboratory biomarkers for CAP. Methods 545 patients with suspected lower respiratory tract infection, admitted to the emergency department of a university hospital were included in a pre-planned post-hoc analysis of two controlled intervention trials. Baseline assessment included history, clinical examination, radiography and measurements of procalcitonin (PCT, highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP and leukocyte count. Results Of the 545 patients, 373 had CAP, 132 other respiratory tract infections, and 40 other final diagnoses. The AUC of a clinical model including standard clinical signs and symptoms (i.e. fever, cough, sputum production, abnormal chest auscultation and dyspnea to diagnose CAP was 0.79 [95% CI, 0.75–0.83]. This AUC was significantly improved by including PCT and hsCRP (0.92 [0.89–0.94]; p Conclusion PCT, and to a lesser degree hsCRP, improve the accuracy of currently recommended approaches for the diagnosis of CAP, thereby complementing clinical signs and symptoms. PCT is useful in the severity assessment of CAP.

  13. [Site of care provision, etiology and treatment of community-acquired pneumonia in Palma de Mallorca].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos de Unamuno, C; Llorente San Martín, M A; Carandell Jäger, E; Gutiérrez García, M; Riera Jaume, M; Ramírez Rosales, A; Pareja Bezares, A; Corrales Nadal, A

    1998-03-07

    It is not common that community-acquired pneumonias studies include patients non treated in hospital. The objectives were: to determine the cases managed in the ambulatory setting; to describe the clinical features; to identify the aetiological agents, and to describe the treatment, comparing inpatients with outpatients. Observational prospective study. Population attended at three teaching primary care centers of Palma de Mallorca (60,450 habitants). Patients (> 14 years) were investigated when diagnosticated of community-acquired pneumoniae, from November 1992 to December 1994. Exclussions: HIV infection, patients living in a nursing home and tuberculosis. Data were collected in both Hospital and primary health care centers. Epidemiological, clinical, radiological and laboratory findings were recorded at the initial visit and 21 days after. 91 cases were investigated. 57% were managed at the primary care centers exclusively, 63.3% of the patients who went initially to the hospital were admitted in; but only 10.9% of those who went initially to the primary care centers (p < 0.005). 24 patients were hospitalized. 56 microbiological agents were identified in 48 patients (52.7%): Mycoplasma pneumoniae (10); Streptococcus pneumoniae (9); Influenza B (8); Chlamydia psittacci (7); Influenza A (7); Coxiella burnetii (5); Chlamydia pneumoniae (4); Legionella (3); Adenovirus (2); and Parainfluenza 3 (1). Mycoplasma was predominant in outpatients: 9 cases. S. pneumoniae in inpatients: 5 cases. Eritromycin was the most common treatment prescribed (76.9% of patients), alone or in combination with other antibiotics. Monotherapy was most common at primary care yield (96.7%) than at the hospital (45.2%) (p < 0.005). Most of the patients with community-acquired pneumonias are managed at primary health care centers. M. pneumoniae is the predominant microbiological agent in outpatients and S. pneumoniae in inpatients. Erithromycin is the most used antibiotic in both groups of

  14. A european-wide study on the role of streptococcus pneumoniae in community-acquired pneumonia among adults: A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pechlivanoglou, P.; Rozenbaum, M.; Van Der Werf, T.; Lo-Ten-Foe, J.; Postma, M.; Hak, E.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Community-acquired pneumococcal pneumonia is an important cause of hospitalization and death among adults, but figures on the prevalence of Streptococcus pneumoniae largely vary. We aimed to identify the prevalence of Streptococcus pneumoniae by systematically reviewing all available

  15. The etiology of viral respiratory infections in infants with community-acquired pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Bogdanova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Community-acquired pneumonia can be caused by both bacterial and viral pathogens. The differential diagnosis based only on clinical data is not always feasible. The use of C-reactive protein (CRP and procalcitonin might give some additional information for treatment decision-making.Aim: To evaluate the structure and rates of viral isolation in community-acquired pneumonia in hospitalized infants and changes in CRP and procalcitonin levels.Materials and methods: Seventy five infants at the age of up to 11 months and 29 days, who were hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia confirmed by chest X-ray from March 2015 till February 2016, were included into the study. CRP and procalcitonin levels were measured. Detection of viruses in nasopharyngeal swabs was performed by a  real-time polymerase chain reaction.Results: Nucleic acids of respiratory viruses were isolated in 72% (54/75 of infants. The most common were respiratory syncytial virus (in 70.4%, 38/54 and human rhinovirus (in 16.6%, 9/54. Median of white blood cell count in pneumonia associated with respiratory viruses was 10.95 (9; 14.1×109 /L, CRP level, 1.95 (0.5; 7 mg/L, procalcitonin level, 0.087 (0.067; 0.17 ng/mL.Conclusion: The study showed a high prevalence of respiratory viruses in community-acquired pneumonia in infants. There was no increase in CRP and procalcitonin levels in pneumonia associated with respiratory viruses.

  16. Bacteremic community-acquired pneumonia due to Klebsiella pneumoniae: clinical and microbiological characteristics in Taiwan, 2001-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Tsung; Jeng, Yuan-Yu; Chen, Te-Li; Fung, Chang-Phone

    2010-10-25

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is the major cause of community-acquired pyogenic infections in Taiwan. This retrospective study evaluated the clinical and microbiological characteristics of bacteremic community-acquired pneumonia due to K. pneumoniae in Taiwanese adults. The clinical characteristics of bacteremic community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in adults due to K. pneumoniae were compared to those of adults with bacteremic CAP due to Streptococcus pneumoniae at a tertiary medical center in Taiwan from 2001-2008. Risk factors for mortality of bacteremic CAP due to K. pneumoniae were analyzed. All clinical isolates of K. pneumoniae were examined for capsular serotypes, hypermucoviscosity phenotype, aerobactin and rmpA gene. K. pneumoniae was the dominant cause of bacteremic CAP and was associated with a more fulminant course and a worse prognosis than bacteremic CAP due to Streptococcus pneumoniae. Initial presentation with septic shock and respiratory failure were independent risk factors for both early and total mortality. Serotype K1 and K2 comprised around half of all isolates. There were no significant differences in the clinical characteristics of patients with bacteremic CAP due to K1/K2 and non-K1/K2 isolates. Hypermucoviscosity phenotype as well as the aerobactin and rmpA genes were highly prevalent in the K. pneumoniae isolates. K. pneumoniae continued to be the dominant cause of bacteremic CAP in Taiwanese adults during 2001-2008. Initial presentation with septic shock and respiratory failure were independent risk factors for both early and total mortality from K. pneumoniae bacteremic CAP. Serotypes K1/K2 comprised around half of all isolates, but did not predispose patients to a poor clinical outcome. Physicians should be aware of the poor prognosis of any patient with bacteremic K. pneumoniae CAP and monitor these patients more closely.

  17. Predictive value of copeptin as a severity marker of community-acquired pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed, Gamal Baheeg; Saed, Madeha Abdellah; Abdelhakeem, Abdelhakeem Abdelmohsen; Salah, Kalid; Saed, Abdelrahman Mamdouh

    2017-01-01

    Background Pneumonia is the leading cause of death in children. Few studies have explored the predictive value of copeptin in pediatric pneumonia. Aim This study aimed to assess the role of copeptin as a marker of severity of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Methods This prospective case-control study was carried out at Minia University Children?s Hospital in Minia (Egypt) from January to December 2016. Eighty children aged from 2 months to 42 months were enrolled in this study and were cl...

  18. Community-acquired pneumonia management and outcomes in the era of health information technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecham, Ian D; Vines, Caroline; Dean, Nathan C

    2017-11-01

    Pneumonia continues to be a leading cause of hospitalization and mortality. Implementation of health information technology (HIT) can lead to cost savings and improved care. In this review, we examine the literature on the use of HIT in the management of community-acquired pneumonia. We also discuss barriers to adoption of technology in managing pneumonia, the reliability and quality of electronic health data in pneumonia research, how technology has assisted pneumonia diagnosis and outcomes research. The goal of using HIT is to develop and deploy generalizable, real-time, computerized clinical decision support integrated into usual pneumonia care. A friendly user interface that does not disrupt efficiency and demonstrates improved clinical outcomes should result in widespread adoption. © 2017 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  19. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation for Adult Community-Acquired Pneumonia: Outcomes and Predictors of Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Kollengode; Tan, Chuen Seng; Rycus, Peter; MacLaren, Graeme

    2017-05-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation is a rescue therapy used to support severe cardiorespiratory failure. Data on outcomes from severe community-acquired pneumonia in adults receiving rescue extracorporeal membrane oxygenation are mainly confined to single-center experiences or specific pathogens. We examined data from the Extracorporeal Life Support Organisation registry to identify risk factors for poor outcomes in adult patients with community-acquired pneumonia. Retrospective data analysis. Extracorporeal Life Support Organization Registry database. We collected deidentified data on adult patients (> 18 yr) receiving extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for community-acquired pneumonia between 2002 and 2012. Patients with incomplete data or brain death were excluded. The primary outcome measure was in-hospital mortality. Other measurements included demographic information, pre-extracorporeal membrane oxygenation mechanical ventilation and biochemical variables, inotrope requirements, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation mode, duration, and complications. Initial univariate analysis assessed potential associations between survival and various pre-extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation factors. Variables with p values of less than 0.1 were considered for logistic regression analysis to identify predictors of mortality. None. One thousand fifty-five patients, who satisfied inclusion criteria, were included in the final analysis. There was an increase in the number of patients cannulated per annum over the 10-year period studied. Univariate analysis identified pre-extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation variables associated with high mortality. Further multiple regression analysis identified certain pre-extracorporeal membrane oxygenation factors as predictors of mortality, including duration of mechanical ventilation prior to extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, lower arterial pressure, fungal

  20. Causes of non-adherence to therapeutic guidelines in severe community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattarello, Simone; Ramírez, Sergio; Almarales, José Rafael; Borgatta, Bárbara; Lagunes, Leonel; Encina, Belén; Rello, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    To assess the adherence to Infectious Disease Society of America/American Thoracic Society guidelines and the causes of lack of adherence during empirical antibiotic prescription in severe pneumonia in Latin America. A clinical questionnaire was submitted to 36 physicians from Latin America; they were asked to indicate the empirical treatment in two fictitious cases of severe respiratory infection: community-acquired pneumonia and nosocomial pneumonia. In the case of community acquired pneumonia, 11 prescriptions of 36 (30.6%) were compliant with international guidelines. The causes for non-compliant treatment were monotherapy (16.0%), the unnecessary prescription of broad-spectrum antibiotics (40.0%) and the use of non-recommended antibiotics (44.0%). In the case of nosocomial pneumonia, the rate of adherence to the Infectious Disease Society of America/American Thoracic Society guidelines was 2.8% (1 patient of 36). The reasons for lack of compliance were monotherapy (14.3%) and a lack of dual antibiotic coverage against Pseudomonas aeruginosa (85.7%). If monotherapy with an antipseudomonal antibiotic was considered adequate, the antibiotic treatment would be adequate in 100% of the total prescriptions. The compliance rate with the Infectious Disease Society of America/American Thoracic Society guidelines in the community-acquired pneumonia scenario was 30.6%; the most frequent cause of lack of compliance was the indication of monotherapy. In the case of nosocomial pneumonia, the compliance rate with the guidelines was 2.8%, and the most important cause of non-adherence was lack of combined antipseudomonal therapy. If the use of monotherapy with an antipseudomonal antibiotic was considered the correct option, the treatment would be adequate in 100% of the prescriptions.

  1. Predictive value of copeptin as a severity marker of community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Gamal Baheeg; Saed, Madeha Abdellah; Abdelhakeem, Abdelhakeem Abdelmohsen; Salah, Kalid; Saed, Abdelrahman Mamdouh

    2017-07-01

    Pneumonia is the leading cause of death in children. Few studies have explored the predictive value of copeptin in pediatric pneumonia. This study aimed to assess the role of copeptin as a marker of severity of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). This prospective case-control study was carried out at Minia University Children's Hospital in Minia (Egypt) from January to December 2016. Eighty children aged from 2 months to 42 months were enrolled in this study and were classified into group 1 (40 children with clinical, laboratory and radiological evidence of pneumonia) and group 2 (40 apparently healthy control). Serum copeptin level was assayed for all enrolled children. Mean serum copeptin level was significantly higher in pneumonic patients (985.7±619) pg/ml compared to controls (519±308.2) pg/ml (pcopeptin was significantly elevated in survivors of pneumonia more than non-survivors (p=0.001). Also, copeptin was significantly higher in the group of non-survivors (1811.8±327.1) compared to 745.4±472.5 for survivors (p=0.01). There was a significant positive correlation between serum copeptin levels and the degree of respiratory distress (p=0.02). Copeptin seems a reliable and available predictor marker for assessing the severity and prognosis of pediatric community acquired pneumonia.

  2. Advances in the causes and management of community acquired pneumonia in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderink, Richard G; Waterer, Grant

    2017-07-10

    Community acquired pneumonia remains a common cause of morbidity and mortality. Usually, the causal organism is not identified and treatment remains empiric. Recent computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging studies have challenged the accuracy of the clinical diagnosis of pneumonia, and epidemiologic studies are changing our perspective of what causes community acquired pneumonia, especially the role of viral pathogens and the frequent finding of multiple pathogens. The past decade has seen increasing overuse of empiric coverage of meticillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus and antibiotic resistant Gram negative pathogens owing to inappropriate application of guidelines for healthcare associated pneumonia. Optimal treatment remains a matter for debate, especially in very sick patients, including the role of combination antibiotic therapy and corticosteroids. Pneumonia care bundles are being defined to improve outcomes. Increased recognition of both acute and long term cardiac complications is shifting our concept of pneumonia from an acute lung disease to a multisystem problem with adverse chronic health consequences. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  3. Are Pathogenic Leptospira Species Agents of Community-Acquired Pneumonia? Case Reports of Leptospirosis Presenting as Pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gasem, M. Hussein; Farida, Helmia; Ahmed, Ahmed; Severin, Juliţte A.; Suryanto, Agus; Isbandrio, Bambang; Verbrugh, Henri A.; Hartskeerl, Rudy A.; van den Broek, Peterhans J.

    2016-01-01

    We report four Indonesian cases meeting the clinical and radiological criteria for community-acquired pneumonia and other findings suggestive of leptospirosis. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) analyses of serum and urine samples and serology confirmed the diagnosis of leptospirosis in each. Results of qPCR

  4. Are pathogenic leptospira species agents of community-acquired pneumonia? case reports of leptospirosis presenting as pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.H. Gasem; H. Farida (Helmia); A. Ahmed (Ahmed); J.A. Severin (Juliëtte); A. Suryanto (Agus); B. Isbandrio; H.A. Verbrugh (Henri); R.A. Hartskeerl (Rudy); P.J. Van Den Broek (Peterhans J.)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractWe report four Indonesian cases meeting the clinical and radiological criteria for community-acquired pneumonia and other findings suggestive of leptospirosis. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) analyses of serum and urine samples and serology confirmed the diagnosis of leptospirosis in each.

  5. The Clinical Significance of FilmArray Respiratory Panel in Diagnosing Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Huanzhu; Weng, Huilan; Lin, Meirui; He, Ping; Li, Yazhen; Xie, Qingdong; Ke, Changwen; Jiao, Xiaoyang

    2017-01-01

    Aim. FilmArray Respiratory Panel (FilmArray RP) test is an emerging diagnostic method in fast detecting multiple respiratory pathogens; the methodology and clinical significance of FilmArray RP in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) diagnosis were evaluated in this study. Methods. Specimens from 74 patients with CAP were analyzed and compared using FilmArray RP, traditional multiple PCR assay, bacterial (or fungal) culture, and serological detection. Results. FilmArray RP and multiplex PCR sho...

  6. Soluble RAGE as a severity marker in community acquired pneumonia associated sepsis

    OpenAIRE

    Narvaez-Rivera Rodrigo M; Rendon Adrian; Salinas-Carmona Mario C; Rosas-Taraco Adrian G

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is considered the most important cause of death from infectious disease in developed countries. Severity assessment scores partially address the difficulties in identifying high-risk patients. A lack of specific and valid pathophysiologic severity markers affect early and effective sepsis therapy. HMGB-1, sRAGE and RAGE have been involved in sepsis and their potential as severity markers has been proposed. The aim of this study was to eva...

  7. Biomarkers in community-acquired pneumonia: A state-of-the-art review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Seligman

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP exhibits mortality rates, between 20% and 50% in severe cases. Biomarkers are useful tools for searching for antibiotic therapy modifications and for CAP diagnosis, prognosis and follow-up treatment. This non-systematic state-of-the-art review presents the biological and clinical features of biomarkers in CAP patients, including procalcitonin, C-reactive protein, copeptin, pro-ANP (atrial natriuretic peptide, adrenomedullin, cortisol and D-dimers.

  8. Serum levels of immunoglobulins and severity of community-acquired pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    de la Torre, Mari C; Tor?n, Pere; Serra-Prat, Mateu; Palomera, Elisabet; G?ell, Estel; Vendrell, Ester; Y?benes, Joan Carles; Torres, Antoni; Almirall, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Instruction There is evidence of a relationship between severity of infection and inflammatory response of the immune system. The objective is to assess serum levels of immunoglobulins and to establish its relationship with severity of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and clinical outcome. Methods This was an observational and cross-sectional study in which 3 groups of patients diagnosed with CAP were compared: patients treated in the outpatient setting (n=54), patients requiring in-patient...

  9. Risk factors for community-acquired pneumonia in pre-school-aged children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Cameron C; Emery, Diane; Milne, Tania; Coster, Gregor; Forrest, Christopher B; Wall, Clare R; Scragg, Robert; Aickin, Richard; Crengle, Sue; Leversha, Alison; Tukuitonga, Colin; Robinson, Elizabeth M

    2012-05-01

    To identify risk factors for children developing and being hospitalised with community-acquired pneumonia. Children pneumonia, children hospitalised with pneumonia (n= 289) plus children with pneumonia discharged from the Emergency Department (n= 139) were compared with a random community sample of children without pneumonia (n= 351). To assess risk of hospitalisation, children hospitalised with pneumonia were compared with the children discharged from the Emergency Department. Adjusted odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to estimate the risk of pneumonia and hospitalisation with pneumonia. After adjustment for season, age and ethnicity there was an increased risk of pneumonia associated with lower weight for height (OR 1.28, 95% CI 1.10-1.51), spending less time outside (1.96, 1.11-3.47), previous chest infections (2.31, 1.55-3.43) and mould in the child's bedroom (1.93, 1.24-3.02). There was an increased risk of pneumonia hospitalisation associated with maternal history of pneumonia (4.03, 1.25-16.18), living in a more crowded household (2.87, 1.33-6.41) and one with cigarette smokers (1.99, 1.05-3.81), and mould in the child's bedroom (2.39, 1.25-4.72). Lower quality living environments increase the risk of pneumonia and hospitalisation with pneumonia in New Zealand. Poorer nutritional status may also increase the risk of pneumonia. Improving housing quality, decreased cigarette smoke exposure and early childhood nutrition may reduce pneumonia disease burden in New Zealand. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2011 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  10. Androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer and the risk of hospitalisation for community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Blánaid M; Yin, Hui; Bladou, Franck; Ernst, Pierre; Azoulay, Laurent

    2017-07-01

    Androgens have been shown to influence both the immune system and lung tissue, raising the hypothesis that androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer may increase the risk of pneumonia. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine whether ADT is associated with an increased risk of hospitalisation for community-acquired pneumonia in patients with prostate cancer. This was a population-based cohort study using the United Kingdom Clinical Practice Research Datalink linked to the Hospital Episode Statistics repository. The cohort consisted of 20 310 men newly diagnosed with non-metastatic prostate cancer between 1 April 1998 and 31 March 2015. Time-dependent Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate adjusted HRs and 95% CIs for hospitalisation for community-acquired pneumonia associated with current and past use of ADT compared with non-use. During a mean follow-up of 4.3 years, there were 621 incident hospitalisations for community-acquired pneumonia (incidence rate: 7.2/1000 person-years). Current ADT use was associated with an 81% increased risk of hospitalisation for community-acquired pneumonia (12.1 vs 3.8 per 1000 person-years, respectively; HR 1.81, 95% CI 1.47 to 2.23). The association was observed within the first six months of use (HR 1.73, 95% CI 1.23 to 2.42) and remained elevated with increasing durations of use (≥25 months; HR 1.79, 95% CI 1.39 to 2.30). In contrast, past ADT use was not associated with an increased risk (HR 1.23, 95% CI 0.95 to 1.60). The use of ADT is associated with an increased risk of hospitalisation for community-acquired pneumonia in men with prostate cancer. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  11. [Increasing incidence of community-acquired pneumonia caused by atypical microorganisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazón-Varela, M A; Alonso-Valle, H; Muñoz-Cacho, P; Gallo-Terán, J; Piris-García, X; Pérez-Mier, L A

    2017-09-01

    Knowing the most common microorganisms in our environment can help us to make proper empirical treatment decisions. The aim is to identify those microorganisms causing community-acquired pneumonia. An observational, descriptive and prospective study was conducted, including patients over 14 years with a clinical and radiographic diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia during a 383 consecutive day period. A record was made of sociodemographic variables, personal history, prognostic severity scales, progress, and pathogenic agents. The aetiological diagnosis was made using blood cultures, detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila urinary antigens, sputum culture, influenza virus and Streptococcus pyogenes detection. Categorical variables are presented as absolute values and percentages, and continuous variables as their means and standard deviations. Of the 287 patients included in the study (42% women, mean age 66±22 years), 10.45% died and 70% required hospital admission. An aetiological diagnosis was achieved in 43 patients (14.98%), with 16 microorganisms found in 59 positive samples. The most frequently isolated pathogen was Streptococcus pneumonia (24/59, 41%), followed by gram-negative enteric bacilli, Klebsiella pneumonia, Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens and Enterobacter cloacae isolated in 20% of the samples (12/59), influenza virus (5/59, 9%), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (3/59, 5%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (2/59, 3%), Moraxella catarrhalis (2/59, 3%), Legionella pneumophila (2/59, 3%), and Haemophilus influenza (2/59, 3%). Polymicrobial infections accounted for 14% (8/59). A high percentage of atypical microorganisms causing community-acquired pneumonia were found. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Community-acquired Klebsiella pneumoniae liver abscess: an emerging infection in Ireland and Europe.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moore, R

    2013-02-05

    INTRODUCTION: Klebsiella pneumoniae has emerged as a predominant cause of community-acquired mono-microbial pyogenic liver abscess. This was first described in Taiwan and has been widely reported in Asia. This infectious entity has been described in Europe, with single case reports predominating. METHODS: We present three cases in one year from our institution in Ireland and review the European literature to date. RESULTS\\/CONCLUSION: Klebsiella pneumoniae invasive liver abscess syndrome is now emerging in Europe and notably is not restricted to individuals of Asian descent.

  13. Non-HIV Pneumocystis pneumonia: do conventional community-acquired pneumonia guidelines under estimate its severity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asai Nobuhiro

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-HIV Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP can occur in immunosuppressed patients having malignancy or on immunosuppressive agents. To classify severity, the A-DROP scale proposed by the Japanese Respiratory Society (JRS, the CURB-65 score of the British Respiratory Society (BTS and the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA are widely used in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP in Japan. To evaluate how correctly these conventional prognostic guidelines for CAP reflect the severity of non-HIV PCP, we retrospectively analyzed 21 patients with non-HIV PCP. Methods A total of 21 patients were diagnosed by conventional staining and polymerase chain reaction (PCR for respiratory samples with chest x-ray and computed tomography (CT findings. We compared the severity of 21 patients with PCP classified by A-DROP, CURB-65, and PSI. Also, patients’ characteristics, clinical pictures, laboratory results at first visit or admission and intervals from diagnosis to start of specific-PCP therapy were evaluated in both survivor and non-survivor groups. Results Based on A-DROP, 18 patients were classified as mild or moderate; respiratory failure developed in 15 of these 18 (83.3%, and 7/15 (46.7% died. Based on CURB-65, 19 patients were classified as mild or moderate; respiratory failure developed in 16/19 (84.2%, and 8 of the 16 (50% died. In contrast, PSI classified 14 as severe or extremely severe; all of the 14 (100% developed respiratory failure and 8/14 (57.1% died. There were no significant differences in laboratory results in these groups. The time between the initial visit and diagnosis, and the time between the initial visit and starting of specific-PCP therapy were statistically shorter in the survivor group than in the non-survivor group. Conclusions Conventional prognostic guidelines for CAP could underestimate the severity of non-HIV PCP, resulting in a therapeutic delay

  14. Utility of blood cultures in children admitted to hospital with community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Tessa R; Evans, Hannah R; Murtas, Jennifer; Weisman, Aimee; Francis, J Lynn; Khan, Ahmed

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the utility of blood cultures in children admitted to hospital with community-acquired pneumonia. The primary outcome was the number of positive blood culture results, and secondary outcomes included the effect of positive blood culture results on management, and the identification of other clinical/biochemical variables that could predict blood culture results or the course of illness. A retrospective data analysis was carried out on all children admitted to Gosford Hospital during the 2-year period from July 2013 to June 2015. Included were patients under 16 years old who had a diagnosis-related group code of pneumonia. A review of blood culture results, chest X-ray, serology, C-reactive protein and white cell count and clinical outcomes were analysed. There were 215 paediatric admissions with a diagnosis of pneumonia during the 2-year study period. A blood culture was collected in 82.3% (177/215). Although seven had a positive blood culture, only two of these were finally reported as true positives and both were Streptococcus pneumoniae. Both patients were treated with a cephalosporin and demonstrated clinical improvement. No changes were made to their treatment based on the blood culture results. Blood cultures have a low yield and do not appear to be helpful when collected in all patients admitted to hospital with community-acquired pneumonia. © 2016 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  15. Clinical evaluation of the role of ceftaroline in the management of community acquired bacterial pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maselli DJ

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Diego J Maselli1, Juan F Fernandez1, Christine Y Whong2, Kelly Echevarria1,3, Anoop M Nambiar1,3, Antonio Anzueto1,3, Marcos I Restrepo1,3,41University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas, 2Memorial Hermann – Texas Medical Center, Houston, TX, 3South Texas Veterans Health Care System Audie l Murphy Division, San Antonio, TX, 4Veterans Evidence Research Dissemination and Implementation Center (VERDICT, San Antonio, TX, USAAbstract: Ceftaroline fosamil (ceftaroline was recently approved for the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP and complicated skin infections. This newly developed cephalosporin possesses a broad spectrum of activity against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Most importantly, ceftaroline demonstrates potent in vitro antimicrobial activity against multi-drug resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and methicillin-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus. In two Phase III, double-blinded, randomized, prospective trials (FOCUS 1 and FOCUS 2, ceftaroline was shown to be non-inferior to ceftriaxone for the treatment of CAP in hospitalized patients. Ceftaroline exhibits low resistance rates and a safety profile similar to that of other cephalosporins. In this review, we will evaluate the pharmacological characteristics, safety, antimicrobial properties, and efficacy of ceftaroline and its applications in the treatment of CAP.Keywords: s. pneumoniae, s. aureus, cephalosporins, pneumonia, ceftaroline, community acquired pneumonia

  16. The role of haloaerosolotherapy in immunorehabilitation of convalescents after community acquired pneumonia

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    Olha Lemko

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Investigation of the peculiarities of different haloaerosoltherapy regimes influence (treatment with different intensity of haloaerosol load upon non-specific defense and cellular immunity at convalescents after community acquired pneumonia. Objectives: patients with community acquired pneumonia in the early convalescence period (after completing antibiotic therapy, who received treatment in conditions of artificial rock salt aerosol medium (haloaerosoltherapy. Material and Methods. 42 patients with non-severe community acquired pneumonia were examined in the early convalescence period before and after the course of haloaerosoltherapy, which was prescribed after antibacterial therapy. Immunological studies included: evaluation of phagocytic activity of neutrophils (PhAN - the percentage of phagocytic neutrophils, phagocytic number (PhN - average number of latex particles absorbed by a neutrophil; metabolism of neutrophils in the test with nitroblue tetrasolium (NBT-test spontaneous and induced, which allowed to assess the functional reserve of neutrophils (FR; calculation of cytochemical coefficient (CCC for lysosomal cationic proteins (LCP and for myeloperoxidase (MPO of neutrophils; number of T- and B-lymphocytes and their subpopulations (CD3+ -, CD4+ -, CD8+ -, CD22+ - lymphocytes, calculation the number of 0- lymphocytes and the ratio of CD4+ /CD8+ lymphocytes. Laboratory examinations were also conducted in 21 practically healthy individuals (control group. Two regimes of haloaerosoltherapy were used in recovery treatment of patients with community acquired pneumonia: treating complex №1 (TC-1 with standard haloaerosol load and with increased haloaerosol load (TC-2. Results. After completion the antibiotic therapy at patients with community acquired pneumonia the moderate inhibition of phagocytic activity of neutrophils (47,6±0,58% to 55,5±1,14% in control group remained and was accompanied with a decrease in neutrophil bactericidal

  17. The impact of community-acquired pneumonia on the health-related quality-of-life in elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mangen, Marie-Josée J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/217293964; Huijts, Susanne M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/33793083X; Bonten, Marc J M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/123144337; de Wit, G Ardine|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/167546589

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The sustained health-related quality-of-life of patients surviving community-acquired pneumonia has not been accurately quantified. The aim of the current study was to quantify differences in health-related quality-of-life of community-dwelling elderly with and without community-acquired

  18. Severe virus influenza A H1N1 related pneumonia and community-acquired pneumonia: differences in the evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardocci, Paula; Gullo, Caio Eduardo; Lobo, Suzana Margareth

    2013-01-01

    Objective To analyze the clinical, laboratory and evolution data of patients with severe influenza A H1N1 pneumonia and compare the data with that of patients with severe community-acquired bacterial pneumonia. Methods Cohort and retrospective study. All patients admitted to the intensive care unit between May 2009 and December 2010 with a diagnosis of severe pneumonia caused by the influenza A H1N1 virus were included in the study. Thirty patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia admitted within the same period were used as a control group. Severe community-acquired pneumonia was defined as the presence of at least one major severity criteria (ventilator or vasopressor use) or two minor criteria. Results The data of 45 patients were evaluated. Of these patients, 15 were infected with H1N1. When compared to the group with community-acquired pneumonia, patients from the H1N1 group had significantly lower leukocyte counts on admission (6,728±4,070 versus 16,038±7,863; p<0.05) and lower C-reactive protein levels (Day 2: 15.1±8.1 versus 22.1±10.9 mg/dL; p<0.05). The PaO2/FiO2 ratio values were lower in the first week in patients with H1N1. Patients who did not survive the H1N1 severe pneumonia had significantly higher levels of C-reactive protein and higher serum creatinine levels compared with patients who survived. The mortality rate was significantly higher in the H1N1 group than in the control group (53% versus 20%; p=0.056, respectivelly). Conclusion Differences in the leukocyte count, C-reactive protein concentrations and oxygenation profiles may contribute to the diagnosis and prognosis of patients with severe influenza A H1N1 virus-related pneumonia and community-acquired pneumonia. PMID:23917977

  19. Prognostic implications of aspiration pneumonia in patients with community acquired pneumonia: A systematic review with meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komiya, Kosaku; Rubin, Bruce K.; Kadota, Jun-ichi; Mukae, Hiroshi; Akaba, Tomohiro; Moro, Hiroshi; Aoki, Nobumasa; Tsukada, Hiroki; Noguchi, Shingo; Shime, Nobuaki; Takahashi, Osamu; Kohno, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Aspiration pneumonia is thought to be associated with a poor outcome in patients with community acquired pneumonia (CAP). However, there has been no systematic review regarding the impact of aspiration pneumonia on the outcomes in patients with CAP. This review was conducted using the MOOSE guidelines: Patients: patients defined CAP. Exposure: aspiration pneumonia defined as pneumonia in patients who have aspiration risk. Comparison: confirmed pneumonia in patients who were not considered to be at high risk for oral aspiration. Outcomes: mortality, hospital readmission or recurrent pneumonia. Three investigators independently identified published cohort studies from PubMed, CENTRAL database, and EMBASE. Nineteen studies were included for this systematic review. Aspiration pneumonia increased in-hospital mortality (relative risk, 3.62; 95% CI, 2.65–4.96; P pneumonia was associated with decreased ICU mortality (relative risk, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.26–0.60; P pneumonia, and hospital readmission, the few reported studies suggest that aspiration pneumonia is also associated with these poor outcomes. In conclusion, aspiration pneumonia was associated with both higher in-hospital and 30-day mortality in patients with CAP outside ICU settings. PMID:27924871

  20. Long-Term Cognitive Impairment after Hospitalization for Community-Acquired Pneumonia: a Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Timothy D; Self, Wesley H; Edwards, Kathryn M; Grijalva, Carlos G; Zhu, Yuwei; Williams, Derek J; Jain, Seema; Jackson, James C

    2018-01-26

    Recent studies suggest older patients hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia are at risk for new-onset cognitive impairment. The characteristics of long-term cognitive impairment after pneumonia, however, have not been elucidated. To characterize long-term cognitive impairment among adults of all ages hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia. Prospective cohort study. Adults without severe preexisting cognitive impairment who were hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia. At enrollment, we estimated baseline cognitive function with the Short Informant Questionnaire on Cognitive Decline in the Elderly (IQCODE). At 2- and 12-month follow-up, we assessed cognition using the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS) and tests of executive function, diagnosing cognitive impairment when results were ≥ 1.5 standard deviations below published age-adjusted means for the general population. We also identified subtypes of mild cognitive impairment using standard definitions. We assessed 58 (73%) of 80 patients who survived to 2-month follow-up and 57 (77%) of 74 who survived to 12-month follow-up. The median [range] age of survivors tested was 57 [19-97] years. Only 8 (12%) had evidence of mild cognitive impairment at baseline according to the Short IQCODE, but 21 (38%) at 2 months and 17 (30%) at 12 months had mild cognitive impairment per the RBANS. Moderate-to-severe cognitive impairment was common among adults ≥ 65 years [4/13 (31%) and 5/13 (38%) at 2 and 12 months, respectively] but also affected many of those impairment in multiple cognitive domains affected one-third of patients ≥ 65 years old and 20% of younger patients, and another third of survivors had mild cognitive impairment.

  1. Analysis of the effectiveness of physical rehabilitation according spirographic indicators in community-acquired pneumonia during convalescence

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    Kalmykova Y.S.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : to make a program of physical rehabilitation for convalescents after community-acquired pneumonia, promotes normalization of respiratory function. The objectives of the study was to evaluate the dynamics spirographic indicators during convalescence community-acquired pneumonia. Material: the study involved 28 women aged 19 to 24 years with a diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia after convalescent. Results: the positive influence of physiotherapy based dance aerobics; morning hygienic gymnastics; therapeutic massage and physical therapy on indicators of lung volumes, ventilation and bronchial patency according spirographic research. Conclusion: in community-acquired pneumonia during the convalescence period recommended physical rehabilitation, which includes curative gymnastics based on dance aerobics, morning hygienic gymnastics, massage therapy, physiotherapy. It improves the functionality of the cardiorespiratory system, nonspecific immunity and overall physical performance level.

  2. Analysis of the effectiveness of physical rehabilitation according spirographic indicators in community-acquired pneumonia during convalescence

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    Y. S. Kalmykova

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : to make a program of physical rehabilitation for convalescents after community-acquired pneumonia, promotes normalization of respiratory function. The objectives of the study was to evaluate the dynamics spirographic indicators during convalescence community-acquired pneumonia. Material: the study involved 28 women aged 19 to 24 years with a diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia after convalescent. Results: the positive influence of physiotherapy based dance aerobics; morning hygienic gymnastics; therapeutic massage and physical therapy on indicators of lung volumes, ventilation and bronchial patency according spirographic research. Conclusion: in community-acquired pneumonia during the convalescence period recommended physical rehabilitation, which includes curative gymnastics based on dance aerobics, morning hygienic gymnastics, massage therapy, physiotherapy. It improves the functionality of the cardiorespiratory system, nonspecific immunity and overall physical performance level.

  3. Fluorocycline TP-271 Is Potent against Complicated Community-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyfe, Corey; O’Brien, William; Hackel, Meredith; Minyard, Mary Beth; Waites, Ken B.; Dubois, Jacques; Murphy, Timothy M.; Slee, Andrew M.; Weiss, William J.; Sutcliffe, Joyce A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT TP-271 is a novel, fully synthetic fluorocycline antibiotic in clinical development for the treatment of respiratory infections caused by susceptible and multidrug-resistant pathogens. TP-271 was active in MIC assays against key community respiratory Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens, including Streptococcus pneumoniae (MIC90 = 0.03 µg/ml), methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA; MIC90 = 0.25 µg/ml), methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA; MIC90 = 0.12 µg/ml), Streptococcus pyogenes (MIC90 = 0.03 µg/ml), Haemophilus influenzae (MIC90 = 0.12 µg/ml), and Moraxella catarrhalis (MIC90 ≤0.016 µg/ml). TP-271 showed activity (MIC90 = 0.12 µg/ml) against community-acquired MRSA expressing Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL). MIC90 values against Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila, and Chlamydia pneumoniae were 0.004, 1, and 4 µg/ml, respectively. TP-271 was efficacious in neutropenic and immunocompetent animal pneumonia models, generally showing, compared to the burden at the start of dosing, ~2 to 5 log10 CFU reductions against MRSA, S. pneumoniae, and H. influenzae infections when given intravenously (i.v.) and ~1 to 4 log10 CFU reductions when given orally (p.o.). TP-271 was potent against key community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) pathogens and was minimally affected, or unaffected, by tetracycline-specific resistance mechanisms and fluoroquinolone or macrolide drug resistance phenotypes. IMPORTANCE Rising resistance rates for macrolides, fluoroquinolones, and β-lactams in the most common pathogens associated with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) are of concern, especially for cases of moderate to severe infections in vulnerable populations such as the very young and the elderly. New antibiotics that are active against multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus are needed for use in the empirical treatment of the most severe forms of this disease. TP-271 is a promising

  4. Etiology of childhood community acquired pneumonia and its implications for vaccination

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    Nascimento-Carvalho Cristiana M.C.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Pneumonia is an important cause of morbidity and mortality among children throughout the world. Vaccines are available for some organisms, but they are underutilized and/or still in development. To evaluate the potential impact of vaccines, we review studies in which the etiology of childhood community-acquired pneumonia was recorded. In North America and Europe (9 studies, the etiology of pneumonia was established in 62% of studied children (range 43%-88% by use of noninvasive specific methods for microbiologic diagnosis. The most often identified agents were S. pneumoniae (22%, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV (20%, Haemophilus influenzae (7%, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae (15%. In Africa and South America (8 studies, bacteria were recovered from 56% (range 32%-68% of severely ill children studied by lung aspirate. The most often isolated bacteria were Streptococcus pneumoniae (33% and Haemophilus influenzae (21%. A high percentage of H. influenzae strains were not serotype b. Throughout the world, children requiring hospitalization were most likely to have infection caused by pneumococcus H. influenzae or RSV. Out patients also had Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Countries in Africa and Asia recorded 2 to 10 times more children with pneumonia (7 to 40/100 annually than in the USA. Widespread use of pneumococcal and H. influenzae type b conjugate vaccines could reduce the frequency of childhood pneumonia by one-third. Further reduction will require development of non-type b H. influenzae, RSV and M. pneumoniae vaccines. This could result in a > 50% reduction of pneumonia in children. This goal should be sought and achieved as soon as possible.

  5. The clinical impact of the detection of potential etiologic pathogens of community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfer, Gita; Leggett, James; Myers, Jillian; Wang, Luan; Gilbert, David N

    2015-12-01

    The etiology of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is determined in less than half of the patients based on cultures of sputum and blood plus testing urine for the antigens of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila. This study added nasal polymerase chain reaction (PCR) probes for S. pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, and respiratory viruses. Serum procalcitonin (PCT) levels were measured. Pathogens were identified in 78% of the patients. For detection of viruses, patients were randomized to either a 5-virus laboratory-generated PCR bundle or the 17-virus FilmArray PCR platform. The FilmArray PCR platform detected more viruses than the laboratory-generated bundle and did so in less than 2 hours. There were fewer days of antibiotic therapy, P = 0.003, in CAP patients with viral infections and a low serum PCT levels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. An audit of empiric antibiotic choice in the inpatient management of community-acquired pneumonia

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Delaney, F

    2017-04-01

    Adherence to antimicrobial guidelines for empiric antibiotic prescribing in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) has been reported to be worryingly low. We conducted a review of empiric antibiotic prescribing for sixty consecutive adult patients admitted to the Mercy University Hospital with a diagnosis of CAP. When analysed against local antimicrobial guidelines, guideline concordant empiric antibiotics were given in only 48% of cases, lower than the average rate in comparable studies. Concordance was 100% in cases where the CURB-65 pneumonia severity assessment score, on which the guidelines are based, was documented in the medical notes. The use of excessively broad spectrum and inappropriate antibiotics is a notable problem. This study supports the theory that lack of knowledge regarding pneumonia severity assessment tools and unfamiliarity with therapeutic guidelines are key barriers to guideline adherence, which remains a significant problem despite increased focus on antimicrobial stewardship programs in Ireland

  7. The Seropositivity Rate of Atypical Agents in Patients with Community-Acquired Pneumonia

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    Ruhan Karakoc Gunes

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the IgM antibody positivities of atypical pneumonia agents in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP, and to compare the results with controls. The serum samples which were collected from 87 adult patients and 21 healthy controls have been investigated by a commercial ELISA (Pneumobact ELISA IgM, Vircell, Spain in which four different atypical pneumonia agents were fixed onto a slide. In the patients group, IgM positivity rates for the agents were as follows, respectively; 2.3% for Legionella pneumophila, 56.3% Chlamydia pneumoniae, 33.3% for Mycoplasma pneumoniae, 9.2% for Coxiella burnetii. The rates of IgM positivities in the control group varied 7% for all of the agents except M. Pneumoniae and C. Pneumoniae and 2 of these controls were positive for L. Pneumophila IgM, one was positive for C. Burnetii IgM. According to the statistical evaluation, there were significant differences for IgM seropositivities to Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia Pneumoniae,between the patient and the control groups (p0.05. We showed that the seropositivity rate of atypical agents in patients with CAP was significantly higher when compared to healthy control group. This result suggests us, atypical agents might be responsible in CAP patients in a great amount. Furthermore, our study also suggests that clinical and radiological findings are not useful for discriminating atypical from typical pneumonia. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2007; 6(4.000: 279-284

  8. The Seropositivity Rate of Atypical Agents in Patients with Community-Acquired Pneumonia

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    Omer Deniz

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the IgM antibody positivities of atypical pneumonia agents in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP, and to compare the results with controls. The serum samples which were collected from 87 adult patients and 21 healthy controls have been investigated by a commercial ELISA (Pneumobact ELISA IgM, Vircell, Spain in which four different atypical pneumonia agents were fixed onto a slide. In the patients group, IgM positivity rates for the agents were as follows, respectively; 2.3% for Legionella pneumophila, 56.3% Chlamydia pneumoniae, 33.3% for Mycoplasma pneumoniae, 9.2% for Coxiella burnetii. The rates of IgM positivities in the control group varied 7% for all of the agents except M. Pneumoniae and C. Pneumoniae and 2 of these controls were positive for L. Pneumophila IgM, one was positive for C. Burnetii IgM. According to the statistical evaluation, there were significant differences for IgM seropositivities to Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia Pneumoniae,between the patient and the control groups (p0.05. We showed that the seropositivity rate of atypical agents in patients with CAP was significantly higher when compared to healthy control group. This result suggests us, atypical agents might be responsible in CAP patients in a great amount. Furthermore, our study also suggests that clinical and radiological findings are not useful for discriminating atypical from typical pneumonia. [TAF Prev Med Bull. 2007; 6(4: 279-284

  9. T cell responses in senior patients with community-acquired pneumonia related to disease severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Lu-Qin; Bi, Ying; Zhou, Shao-Wei; Chen, Zi-Dan; Wen, Jun; Shi, Jin; Mao, Ling; Wang, Ling

    2017-12-01

    Senior individuals older than 65 years of age are at a disproportionally higher risk of developing pneumonia. Impaired capacity to defend against airway infections may be one of the reasons. It is generally believed that weaker regulatory T cell responses may be beneficial to host defense against pathogens. In senior patients with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia, we investigated the frequencies and functions of regulatory T cells. Interestingly, we found that compared to age- and sex-matched healthy controls, senior pneumonia patients presented lower frequencies of Foxp3-expressing and Helios-expressing CD4+ T cells. The quantity of Foxp3 and Helios being expressed, measured by their mRNA transcription levels, was also lower in CD4+ T cells from pneumonia patients. Furthermore, following TCR and TGF-β stimulation, pneumonia patients presented impaired capacity to upregulate Foxp3 and Helios. Functional analyses revealed that CD4+ T cells from pneumonia patients secreted lower amounts of IL-10 and TGF-β, two cytokines critical to regulatory T cell-mediated suppression. Also, the expression of granzyme B and perforin, which were cytolytic molecules potentially utilized by regulatory T cells to mediate the elimination of antigen-presenting cells and effector T cells, were reduced in CD4+CD25+ T cells from senior pneumonia patients. In addition, the CD4+CD25+ T cells from senior pneumonia patients presented reduced capacity to suppress effector CD4+ and CD8+ T cell proliferation. Moreover, the value of pneumonia severity index was inversely correlated with several parameters of regulatory T cell function. Together, our results demonstrated that senior pneumonia patients presented a counterintuitive impairment in regulatory T cell responses that was associated with worse prognosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Community-acquired pneumonia and positive urinary antigen tests: Factors associated with targeted antibiotic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mothes, A; Léotard, S; Nicolle, I; Smets, A; Chirio, D; Rotomondo, C; Tiger, F; Del Giudice, P; Perrin, C; Néri, D; Foucault, C; Della Guardia, M; Hyvernat, H; Roger, P-M

    2016-10-01

    The use of rapid microbiological tests is supported by antimicrobial stewardship policies. Targeted antibiotic therapy (TAT) for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) with positive urinary antigen test (UAT) has been associated with a favorable impact on outcome. We aimed to determine the factors associated with TAT prescription. We conducted a retrospective multicenter study including all patients presenting with CAP and positive UAT for Streptococcus pneumoniae or Legionella pneumophila from January 2010 to December 2013. Patients presenting with aspiration pneumonia, coinfection, and neutropenia were excluded. CAP severity was assessed using the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI). TAT was defined as the administration of amoxicillin for pneumococcal infection and either macrolides or fluoroquinolones (inactive against S. pneumoniae) for Legionella infection. A total of 861 patients were included, including 687 pneumococcal infections and 174 legionellosis from eight facilities and 37 medical departments. TAT was prescribed to 273 patients (32%). Four factors were found independently associated with a lower rate of TAT: a PSI score≥4 (OR 0.37), Hospital A (OR 0.41), hospitalization in the intensive care unit (OR 0.44), and cardiac comorbidities (OR 0.60). Four other factors were associated with a high rate of TAT: positive blood culture for S. pneumoniae (OR 2.32), Hospitals B (OR 2.34), E (OR 2.68), and H (OR 9.32). TAT in CAP with positive UAT was related to the hospitals as well as to patient characteristics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Chest physiotherapy in paediatric patients hospitalised with community-acquired pneumonia: a randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukrafka, Janice Luisa; Fuchs, Sandra C; Fischer, Gilberto Bueno; Flores, José A; Fachel, Jandira M; Castro-Rodriguez, Jose A

    2012-11-01

    Chest physiotherapy has been used to treat children hospitalised with pneumonia with no clear scientific evidence to support a beneficial effect. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the efficacy of chest physiotherapy as an adjuvant treatment in children hospitalised with acute community-acquired pneumonia. Children (aged 1-12 years) with a clinical and confirmed radiological diagnosis of pneumonia sequentially admitted to a tertiary children hospital were eligible for this study. Participants were randomly selected to receive a standardised respiratory physiotherapy (positioning, thoracic vibration, thoracic compression, positive expiratory pressure, breathing exercises and forced exhalation with the glottis open or 'huffing') three times daily in the 'intervention group' or a non-mandatory request to breathe deeply, expectorate the sputum and maintain a lateral body position once a day in the 'control group'. The primary outcomes were reduction in respiratory rate and severity score (respiratory rate, recession, fever, oxygen saturation and chest x-ray) from baseline to discharge. Secondary outcome was duration of hospitalisation. In all, 72 patients were randomly allocated to the intervention (n=35) or control (n=37) groups. There were no differences at admission on severity of pneumonia between groups. Respiratory rate and severity score significant decreased between admission to discharge within each group; however, there were no differences when comparing groups. Also, there was no significant difference in duration of hospitalisation between the control and intervention groups (6 vs 8 days, p=0.11, respectively). This clinical trial suggests that, in children hospitalised with moderate community-acquired pneumonia, chest physiotherapy did not have clinical benefits in comparison to control group.

  12. Health related quality of life in patients with community-acquired pneumococcal pneumonia in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Luiz Flavio; Saba, Grèce; Ricard, Jean-Damien; Messika, Jonathan; Gaillat, Jacques; Bonnin, Pierre; Chidiac, Christian; Illes, Hajnal-Gabriela; Laurichesse, Henri; Detournay, Bruno; Petitpretz, Patrick; de Pouvourville, Gérard

    2018-02-02

    Community Acquired Pneumococcal Pneumonia is a lung infection that causes serious health problems and can lead to complications and death. The aim of this study was to observe and analyze health related quality of life after a hospital episode for patients with community acquired pneumococcal pneumonia in France. A total of 524 individuals were enrolled prospectively in the study and were followed for 12 months after hospital discharge. Presence of streptococcus pneumoniae was confirmed by microbiological sampling. Quality of life was reported at four different points of time with the EQ-5D-3 L health states using the French reference tariff. Complete data on all four periods was available for 269 patients. We used descriptive and econometric analysis to assess quality of life over time during follow-up, and to identify factors that impact the utility indexes and their evolution through time. We used Tobit panel data estimators to deal with the bounded nature of utility values. Average age of patients was 63 and 55% of patients were men. Negative predictors of quality of life were the severity of the initial event, history of pneumonia, smokers, age and being male. On average, quality of life improved in the first 6 months after discharge and stabilized beyond. At month 1, mean utility index was 0.53 (SD: 0.34) for men and 0.45 (SD: 0.34) for women, versus mean of 0.69 (SD: 0.33) and 0.70 (SD: 0.35) at Month 12. "Usual activities" was the dimension the most impacted by the disease episode. Utilities for men were significantly higher than for women, although male patients were more severe. Individuals over 85 years old did not improve quality of life during follow-up, and quality of life did not improve or deteriorated for 34% of patients. We found that length of hospital stay was negatively correlated with quality of life immediately after discharge. This study provides with evidence that quality of life after an episode of community acquired pneumococcal

  13. CHLAMYDIA PNEUMONIAE – THE PREVALENCE OF ANTIBODIES IN HEALTHY POPULATION AND IN PATIENTS WITH COMMUNITY ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darja Keše

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. To determinate the prevalence rates of Chlamydia pneumoniae infections in Slovenia and to evaluate the importance of C. pneumoniae infections at patients with community acquired pneumonia (CAP.Materials and methods. With the microimmunofluorescence test (micro-IF we evaluated the presence of C. pneumoniae specific antibodies in 1036 healthy subjects, in two periods of time, in 1991–93 and 1997–1998. We also tested the pair sera collected from 2118 patients with CAP between 1993–1999.Results. We demonstrated that C. pneumoniae infections are common in our population, as we detected IgG antibodies in 43.1% of healthy population. The prevalence rate of C. pneumoniae infections statistically significant increased in two periods of time. Acute C. pneumoniae infections were proved in 15.9% of all patients with CAP.Conclusions. C. pneumoniae is important respiratory pathogen also in our community. The infections are more common in older patients. Because C. pneumoniae like other Chlamydia species has tendency to cause chronic disease, it is reasonable to diagnose this bacterium in respiratory patients. It is also recommended to test convalescent sera at serologic laboratory diagnosis.

  14. Adherence to Therapeutic Guidelines for Patients with Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Australian Hospitals

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    N.R. Adler

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, particularly in elderly patients, and is associated with a considerable economic burden on the healthcare system. The combination of high incidence and substantial financial costs necessitate accurate diagnosis and appropriate management of patients admitted with CAP. This article will discuss the rates of adherence to clinical guidelines, the use of severity scoring tools and the appropriateness of antimicrobial prescribing for patients diagnosed with CAP. The authors maintain that awareness of national and hospital guidelines is imperative to complement the physicians’ clinical judgment with evidence-based recommendations. Increased use of pneumonia severity assessment tools and greater adherence to therapeutic guidelines will enhance concordant antimicrobial prescribing for patients with CAP. A robust and multifaceted educational intervention, in combination with antimicrobial stewardship programs, may enhance compliance of CAP guidelines in clinical practice in Australia.

  15. Chlamydia-like bacteria in respiratory samples of community-acquired pneumonia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Susanne; Collingro, Astrid; Walochnik, Julia; Wagner, Michael; Horn, Matthias

    2008-04-01

    Chlamydia-like bacteria, obligate intracellular relatives of Chlamydia trachomatis and Chlamydophila pneumoniae, are widely distributed in nature. Using a two-step nested and semi-nested PCR approach targeting the 16S rRNA gene, we found DNA of Chlamydia-like bacteria in respiratory samples from patients with community-acquired pneumonia. Of 387 cases tested, four (1.03%) tested positive if only sequences showing less than 99.9% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to known Chlamydiae were considered. These included for the first time Protochlamydia amoebophila, Waddlia chondrophila, and 'Candidatus Rhabdochlamydia porcellionis'-related sequences. This study extends previous findings suggesting an association of Chlamydia-like bacteria with respiratory disease, but a causal link between these microorganisms and respiratory tract infections has yet to be established.

  16. Necrotizing community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia: an emerging problem in correctional facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohli, Nita; Kochie, Mary; Harber, Philip

    2011-03-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) skin infections have been common in prisons for more than a decade. However, CA-MRSA as a cause of pneumonia has been reported infrequently. This infection can present with flu-like symptoms and rapidly progress, possibly leading to death in a matter of days. Two cases of MRSA community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) associated with influenza-like illness in correctional officers employed in two separate prisons within the California prison system are presented. Both individuals were previously healthy, but one died of this disease. MRSA is an uncommon, but now recognized, cause of CAP. These cases are notable for their unique presentation and occurrence in non-health care, occupational settings. Prompt diagnosis and intervention by occupational health nurses and physicians are critical to improving outcomes, especially in high-risk settings such as prisons. These worksites need an effective occupational health program to manage MRSA, with adequate training for both employees and inmates.

  17. A Multicenter Collaborative to Improve Care of Community Acquired Pneumonia in Hospitalized Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Kavita; Biondi, Eric; Nazif, Joanne; Wasif, Faiza; Williams, Derek J; Nichols, Elizabeth; Ralston, Shawn

    2017-03-01

    The Value in Inpatient Pediatrics Network sponsored the Improving Care in Community Acquired Pneumonia collaborative with the goal of increasing evidence-based management of children hospitalized with community acquired pneumonia (CAP). Project aims included: increasing use of narrow-spectrum antibiotics, decreasing use of macrolides, and decreasing concurrent treatment of pneumonia and asthma. Data were collected through chart review across emergency department (ED), inpatient, and discharge settings. Sites reviewed up to 20 charts in each of 6 3-month cycles. Analysis of means with 3-σ control limits was the primary method of assessment for change. The expert panel developed project measures, goals, and interventions. A change package of evidence-based tools to promote judicious use of antibiotics and raise awareness of asthma and pneumonia codiagnosis was disseminated through webinars. Peer coaching and periodic benchmarking were used to motivate change. Fifty-three hospitals enrolled and 48 (91%) completed the 1-year project (July 2014-June 2015). A total of 3802 charts were reviewed for the project; 1842 during baseline cycles and 1960 during postintervention cycles. The median before and after use of narrow-spectrum antibiotics in the collaborative increased by 67% in the ED, 43% in the inpatient setting, and 25% at discharge. Median before and after use of macrolides decreased by 22% in the ED and 27% in the inpatient setting. A decrease in asthma and CAP codiagnosis was noted, but the change was not sustained. Low-cost strategies, including collaborative sharing, peer benchmarking, and coaching, increased judicious use of antibiotics in a diverse range of hospitals for pediatric CAP. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  18. Is gentamicin safe and effective for severe community acquired pneumonia? an 8 year retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brereton, Christopher J; Lennon, Daniel; Browning, Sarah; Dunn, Emily; Ferguson, John K; Davis, Joshua S

    2018-02-02

    Gram-negative bacilli are the causative organisms for a significant proportion of patients with severe community acquired pneumonia (CAP) admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). Clinical guidelines recommend broad spectrum antimicrobials for empiric treatment despite alarming global trends in antimicrobial resistance. We aimed to assess the safety and efficacy of gentamicin, an aminoglycoside with potent bactericidal activity, for empiric Gram-negative cover of severe CAP admitted to ICU. We performed a retrospective cohort study at a university teaching hospital where the severe CAP guideline recommends penicillin, azithromycin and gentamicin as empiric cover. Ceftriaxone plus azithromycin is used as an alternative. We included adults with radiologically-confirmed severe community-acquired pneumonia, comparing those who received gentamicin in the first 72 hours of admission with those who did not. Participants were identified using ICD-10 codes for bacterial pneumonia and data manually extracted from electronic medical records. 117 of 148 patients admitted with severe pneumonia were given at least one dose of gentamicin while the remaining 31 were not. The two groups were well matched in terms of demographics, comorbidities and disease severity. There was no significant difference in the incidence of acute kidney injury (59/117 [51%] versus 16/31 [52%] in the gentamicin and no gentamicin groups respectively), hospital mortality (20/117 [17%] versus 7/31 [23%]) and secondary outcomes including relapse and length of hospital stay. Gentamicin is safe and has similar outcomes to alternative Gram-negative antimicrobial regimens for empiric cover in severe CAP admitted to ICU. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Outcome of children hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia treated with aqueous penicillin G

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Simbalista

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the evolution and outcome of children hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia receiving penicillin. METHODS: A search was carried out for all hospitalized community-acquired pneumonia cases in a 37-month period. Inclusion criteria comprised age >2 months, intravenous penicillin G use at 200,000 IU/kg/day for >48 h and chest x-ray results. Confounders leading to exclusion included underlying debilitating or chronic pulmonary illnesses, nosocomial pneumonia or transference to another hospital. Pneumonia was confirmed if a pulmonary infiltrate or pleural effusion was described by an independent radiologist blind to the clinical information. Data on admission and evolution were entered on a standardized form. RESULTS: Of 154 studied cases, 123 (80% and 40 (26% had pulmonary infiltrate or pleural effusion, respectively. Penicilli was substituted by other antibiotics in 28 (18% patients, in whom the sole significant decrease was in the frequency of tachypnea from the first to the second day of treatment (86% vs. 50%, p = 0.008. Among patients treated exclusively with penicillin G, fever (46% vs. 26%, p = 0.002, tachypnea (74% vs. 59%, p = 0.003, chest indrawing (29% vs. 13%, p<0.001 and nasal flaring (10% vs. 1.6%, p = 0.001 frequencies significantly decreased from admission to the first day of treatment. Patients treated with other antimicrobial agents stayed longer in the hospital than those treated solely with penicillin G (16±6 vs. 8±4 days, p<0.001, mean difference (95% confidence interval 8 (6-10. None of the studied patients died. CONCLUSION: Penicillin G successfully treated 82% (126/154 of the study group and improvement was marked on the first day of treatment.

  20. Nasopharyngeal bacterial carriage and antimicrobial resistance in underfive children with community acquired pneumonia

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    Cissy B. Kartasasmita

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Lung puncture is the best way to determine the etiology of pneumonia since it yields the highest rate of positive cultures. However, this procedure is difficult, especially for a study in the community. According to WHO, isolates to be tested for antimicrobial resistance in the community should be obtained from nasopharyngeal (NP swabs. Previous studies support the use of NP isolates to determine antimicrobial resistance patterns of isolates from children with pneumonia. The aim of our study was to know the bacterial patterns of the nasopharynx in underfive children with community acquired pneumonia and their antimicrobial resistance. The study was carried out in 4 Primary Health Clinics in Majalaya sub-district, Bandung, Indonesia. All underfives with cough or difficult breathing and classified as having non-severe pneumonia (WHO guidelines, were included in the study. Nasopharyngeal swabs (CDC/WHO Manual were obtained by the doctor, the swabs were placed in Amies transport medium and stored in a sterile jar before taken to the laboratory in the same day. All children were treated with co-trimoxazole. During the nine month study, 698 children with clinical signs of non-severe pneumonia were enrolled. About 25% of the nasopharyngeal specimens yielded bacterial isolates; the two most frequently found were S. pneumoniae and S. epidermidis. The antimicrobial resistance test to co-trimoxazole showed 48.2% S. pneumoniae strain had full resistance and 32.7% showed intermediate resistance to co-trimoxazole. This result is almost similar to other studies from Asian countries. It seems that H. influenzae is not a problem in the study area; however, further studies are needed.

  1. Predictors of in-hospital mortality of older patients admitted for community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hon Ming; Tang, Wing Han; Woo, Jean

    2011-11-01

    there were a few studies on the case mortality of pneumonia in older people, of which results were conflicting. this study aimed to identify risk factors associated with in-hospital mortality in older patients admitted for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). a prospective cohort study. hospital sample. during the 1-year study period (from October 2009 to September 2010), 488 older patients aged 65 or above were recruited. demographic characteristics, medical illnesses (Charlson's comorbidity index (CCI)), premorbid functional status (Katz's index) and baseline blood tests were recorded. The outcome was in-hospital mortality. in this cohort of patients, the mean age was 81.0 years (±7.9) and 282 (57.8%) were male. Nursing home residents accounted for 23.8% (116/488) of study subjects. The median CCI was 2 (inter-quartile range (IQR): 1-3); 60 (12.3%) patients succumbed during hospital stay. Logistic regression showed that comorbidities, mid-arm circumference, serum albumin level and severity of pneumonia (Confusion, blood Urea nitrogen, Respiratory rate and low Blood pressure (CURB) score) were independent predictors of in-hospital mortality of pneumonia. in keeping with previous studies, CURB score and comorbidities were the most significant independent predictors of mortality of CAP in older patients. Our study concluded that nutritional status was also an important factor affecting their survival. This study failed to demonstrate functional status as a predictor of mortality due to limitation of Katz's index.

  2. Necrotizing Pseudomonas aeruginosa Community-Acquired Pneumonia: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish Maharaj

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cavities are not typically associated with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. CAP due to P. aeruginosa is rare and even less commonly causes necrotizing pneumonia. We report a case of P. aeruginosa CAP that progressed to necrotizing pneumonia and was eventually fatal. Procalcitonin (PCT has been well investigated in guiding antibiotic therapy (especially CAP in adults. In this case, PCT at presentation and sequentially was negative. We discuss this caveat and present hypotheses as to the sensitivity and specificity of PCT and C-reactive protein (CRP in these patients. To better characterize P. aeruginosa CAP, we undertook a review of cases indexed in PubMed from 2001 to 2016 (n=9. The data reveal that risk factors for P. aeruginosa CAP include smoking, alcohol use, obstructive lung disease, sinusitis, and hot tub use. The route of infection for P. aeruginosa CAP remains unknown. One of the most interesting findings on reviewing cases was that P. aeruginosa CAP involves the right upper lobe in the vast majority. We suggest that when physicians in the community see patients with distinctly upper lobe necrotizing or cavitary pneumonia, they should consider P. aeruginosa in their differential diagnosis. Further studies are needed to clarify route of infection, role of PCT and CRP, and optimal therapy including drug and duration.

  3. Outcomes in elderly Danish citizens admitted with community-acquired pneumonia. Regional differences, in a public healthcare system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard Klausen, Henrik; Petersen, J; Lindhardt, T

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate regional differences in and risk factors for admission, length of stay, mortality, and readmission for community-acquired pneumonia in elderly Danish patients. METHODS: National registry study on elderly Danish citizens with an acute admission in 2009 owing to community....... RESULTS: A total of 11,332 elderly citizens were admitted with community-acquired pneumonia. Mortality during admission and 30-days from discharge were 11.6% and 16.2%, respectively. Readmission rates within 30 days of discharge were 12.3%. There were significantly differences between hospitals in length...... for death and readmission within 30 days of discharge. CONCLUSIONS: Length of stay, rate of admission, mortality and readmission in elderly Danish patients with community-acquired pneumonia follows international findings. There are regional differences between hospitals. In depth investigation in regional...

  4. THE OUTCOME OF ANTIBIOTIC THERAPY AMONG CHILDREN WITH SEVERE COMMUNITY ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Usman

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The effect of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV status on the evolution of community acquired pneumonia (CAP is still controversial. There are controversies regarding antibiotic treatment outcome of CAP in HIV infected children. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate possible differences in hospital outcomes, with compared the outcome of the treatment in severe CAP among HIV infected and HIV uninfected children which had an empiric antibiotic therapy. Methods: A case control study of 80 patients with severe CAP in Department of Child Health, Sanglah General Hospital, Bali-Indonesia. We evaluated clinical features for seeing the effectiveness of the antibiotic therapy according to Department of Child Health, Sanglah General Hospital’s clinical pathway for severe pneumonia between HIV infected and HIV uninfected patients. Results: 58% patients in failure treatment and 45% patients in favorable treatment were HIV infected. There were similar characteristics from both groups, except malnutrition condition was statistically significant contribute the outcome (OR 2.87 (95% CI 1.098 to 7.500, p= 0.031. There was no significantly statistic difference of the outcome in HIV infected as compared to HIV uninfected patients with severe CAP (OR 1.65 (95% CI 0.683 to 4.002, p= 0.263. Conclusion: HIV infection was not gave an effect on the outcome of severe CAP patients which had an antibiotic therapy based on Department of Child Health, Sanglah General Hospital’s clinical pathway for severe pneumonia.

  5. Predictors of Severe Sepsis among Patients Hospitalized for Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Antoni; Reyes, Soledad; Méndez, Raúl; Zalacaín, Rafael; Capelastegui, Alberto; Rajas, Olga; Borderías, Luis; Martin-Villasclaras, Juan; Bello, Salvador; Alfageme, Inmaculada; Rodríguez de Castro, Felipe; Rello, Jordi; Molinos, Luis; Ruiz-Manzano, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe sepsis, may be present on hospital arrival in approximately one-third of patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Objective To determine the host characteristics and micro-organisms associated with severe sepsis in patients hospitalized with CAP. Results We performed a prospective multicenter cohort study in 13 Spanish hospital, on 4070 hospitalized CAP patients, 1529 of whom (37.6%) presented with severe sepsis. Severe sepsis CAP was independently associated with older age (>65 years), alcohol abuse (OR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.07–1.61), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (OR, 1.75; 95% CI, 1.50–2.04) and renal disease (OR, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.21–2.03), whereas prior antibiotic treatment was a protective factor (OR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.52–0.73). Bacteremia (OR, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.05–1.79), S pneumoniae (OR, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.31–1.95) and mixed microbial etiology (OR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.10–2.49) were associated with severe sepsis CAP. Conclusions CAP patients with COPD, renal disease and alcohol abuse, as well as those with CAP due to S pneumonia or mixed micro-organisms are more likely to present to the hospital with severe sepsis. PMID:26727202

  6. Community acquired pneumonia in diabetic and non-diabetic hospitalized patients: presentation, causative pathogens and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saibal, M A A; Rahman, S H Z; Nishat, L; Sikder, N H; Begum, S A; Islam, M J; Uddin, K N

    2012-12-01

    Both community acquired pneumonia (CAP) and diabetes mellitus are common in Bangladesh. Though hospitalization of diabetic patients with CAP is increasing, data regarding their clinical presentation, microbial characteristics, antimicrobial susceptibility and outcome are lacking. This study was aimed at finding any difference in clinical presentation, bacterial causes, antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of isolated bacteria and outcome in diabetic and non-diabetic hospitalized patients with CAP. In this study total 47 diabetic and 43 non-diabetic adult hospitalized patients with CAP were enrolled. Clinical presentation of CAP differed in diabetics and non-diabetics. Frequency of atypical presentation and CURB-65 score were significantly higher in diabetics. Pleural effusion with multilobar infiltration was also common feature for CAP in diabetic patients. Klebsiella pneumoniae was the most frequent causative pathogen for CAP in diabetic patients, whereas Streptococcus pneumoniae was the most frequent causative agent for non-diabetic patients. Bacteria isolated from sputum sample of diabetic patients with CAP were resistant to almost all recommended antibiotics used for CAP but 100% of isolates were sensitive to Carbapenems. Pulmonary complications were relatively more in diabetics than in non-diabetics. Hospitalized diabetics with CAP required referral to intensive care unit more than that of non-diabetics. So, diabetic patients with CAP need extra attention.

  7. Lung scintigraphy in differential diagnosis of peripheral lung cancer and community-acquired pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivonogov, Nikolay G.; Efimova, Nataliya Y.; Zavadovsky, Konstantin W.; Lishmanov, Yuri B.

    2016-08-01

    Ventilation/perfusion lung scintigraphy was performed in 39 patients with verified diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and in 14 patients with peripheral lung cancer. Ventilation/perfusion ratio, apical-basal gradients of ventilation (U/L(V)) and lung perfusion (U/L(P)), and alveolar capillary permeability of radionuclide aerosol were determined based on scintigraphy data. The study demonstrated that main signs of CAP were increases in ventilation/perfusion ratio, perfusion and ventilation gradient on a side of the diseased lung, and two-side increase in alveolar capillary permeability rate for radionuclide aerosol. Unlike this, scintigraphic signs of peripheral lung cancer comprise an increase in ventilation/perfusion ratio over 1.0 on a side of the diseased lung with its simultaneous decrease on a contralateral side, normal values of perfusion and ventilation gradients of both lungs, and delayed alveolar capillary clearance in the diseased lung compared with the intact lung.

  8. Determining best outcomes from community-acquired pneumonia and how to achieve them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadfield, Jane; Bennett, Lesley

    2018-02-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common acute medical illness with a standard, effective treatment that was introduced before the evidenced-based medicine era. Mortality rates have improved in recent decades but improvements have been minimal when compared to other conditions such as acute coronary syndromes. The standardized approach to treatment makes CAP a target for comparative performance and outcome measures. While easy to collect, simplistic outcomes such as mortality, readmission and length of stay are difficult to interpret as they can be affected by subjective choices and health care resources. Proposed clinical- and patient-reported outcomes are discussed below and include measures such as the time to clinical stability (TTCS) and patient satisfaction, which can be compared between health institutions. Strategies to improve these outcomes include use of a risk stratification tool, local antimicrobial guidelines with antibiotic stewardship and care bundles to include early administration of antibiotics and early mobilization. © 2017 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  9. Community-Acquired Pneumonia and Empyema Caused by Citrobacter koseri in an Immunocompetent Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Angel Ariza-Prota

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Citrobacter species, belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae, are environmental organisms commonly found in soil, water, and the intestinal tracts of animals and humans. Citrobacter koseri is known to be an uncommon but serious cause of both sporadic and epidemic septicemia and meningitis in neonates and young infants. Most cases reported have occurred in immunocompromised hosts. The infections caused by Citrobacter are difficult to treat with usual broad spectrum antibiotics owing to rapid generation of mutants and have been associated with high death rates in the past. We believe this is the first case described in the literature of a community-acquired pneumonia and empyema caused by Citrobacter koseri in an immunocompetent adult patient.

  10. Penicillin treatment for patients with Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egelund, Gertrud Baunbæk; Jensen, Andreas Vestergaard; Andersen, Stine Bang

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a severe infection, with high mortality. Antibiotic strategies for CAP differ across Europe. The objective of the study was to describe the epidemiology of CAP in Denmark and evaluate the prognosis of patients empirically treated with penicillin...... penicillin-G/V using logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: We included 1320 patients. The incidence of hospitalized CAP was 3.1/1000 inhabitants. Median age was 71 years (IQR; 58-81) and in-hospital mortality was 8%. Median duration of antibiotic treatment was 10 days (IQR; 8-12). In total 45% were treated...... with penicillin-G/V as empiric monotherapy and they did not have a higher mortality compared to patients treated with broader-spectrum antibiotics (OR 0.92, CI 95% 0.55-1.53). CONCLUSION: The duration of treatment exceeded recommendations in European guidelines. Empiric monotherapy with penicillin...

  11. Lung scintigraphy in differential diagnosis of peripheral lung cancer and community-acquired pneumonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krivonogov, Nikolay G., E-mail: kng@cardio-tomsk.ru [Research Institute of Cardiology, Kievskaya Street 111a, Tomsk, 634012 (Russian Federation); Efimova, Nataliya Y., E-mail: efimova@cardio-tomsk.ru; Zavadovsky, Konstantin W.; Lishmanov, Yuri B. [Research Institute of Cardiology, Kievskaya Street 111a, Tomsk, 634012 (Russian Federation); Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenin Avenue 30, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-02

    Ventilation/perfusion lung scintigraphy was performed in 39 patients with verified diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and in 14 patients with peripheral lung cancer. Ventilation/perfusion ratio, apical-basal gradients of ventilation (U/L(V)) and lung perfusion (U/L(P)), and alveolar capillary permeability of radionuclide aerosol were determined based on scintigraphy data. The study demonstrated that main signs of CAP were increases in ventilation/perfusion ratio, perfusion and ventilation gradient on a side of the diseased lung, and two-side increase in alveolar capillary permeability rate for radionuclide aerosol. Unlike this, scintigraphic signs of peripheral lung cancer comprise an increase in ventilation/perfusion ratio over 1.0 on a side of the diseased lung with its simultaneous decrease on a contralateral side, normal values of perfusion and ventilation gradients of both lungs, and delayed alveolar capillary clearance in the diseased lung compared with the intact lung.

  12. Impact of procalcitonin-guided therapy for hospitalized community-acquired pneumonia on reducing antibiotic consumption and costs in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Akihiro; Ishida, Tadashi; Tokumasu, Hironobu; Washio, Yasuyoshi; Yamazaki, Akio; Ito, Yuhei; Tachibana, Hiromasa

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the usefulness of procalcitonin-guided therapy in hospitalized community-acquired pneumonia patients to reduce antibiotic duration and costs without worsening prognosis. 352 hospitalized community-acquired pneumonia patients in an observational cohort study in which procalcitonin was measured three times serially, on admission (Day 1) and 2-3 days (Day 3) and 6-8 days (Day 7) after admission, between October 2010 and February 2016 were reviewed retrospectively. Antibiotics could be stopped if Day 7 procalcitonin was pneumonia by theoretical procalcitonin guidance for community-acquired pneumonia treatment. Using theoretical procalcitonin guidance, antibiotic duration could be reduced from 12.6 to 8.6 days (P pneumonia severity using A-DROP, CURB-65, and PSI between two groups. Procalcitonin-guided therapy may be useful in hospitalized community-acquired pneumonia patients to reduce antibiotic duration and costs without worsening the prognosis. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Environmental risk factors for community-acquired pneumonia hospitalization in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeb, Mark; Neupane, Binod; Walter, Stephen D; Hanning, Rhona; Carusone, Soo Chan; Lewis, David; Krueger, Paul; Simor, Andrew E; Nicolle, Lindsay; Marrie, Thomas J

    2009-06-01

    To investigate the risk of hospitalization for pneumonia in older adults in relation to biophysical environmental factors. Population-based case control study with collection of personal interview data. Hamilton, Ontario, and Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Seven hundred seventeen people aged 65 and older hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) from September 2002 to April 2005 and 867 controls aged 65 and older randomly selected from the same communities as the cases. Odds ratios (ORs) for risk of pneumonia in relation to environmental and other variables. Exposure to secondhand smoke in the previous month (OR=1.73, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.04-2.90); poor nutritional score (OR=1.83, 95% CI=1.19-2.80); alcohol use per month (per gram; OR=1.69, 95% CI=1.08-2.61); history of regular exposure to gases, fumes, or chemicals at work (OR=3.69, 95% CI=2.37-5.75); history of regular exposure to fumes from solvents, paints, or gasoline at home (OR=3.31, 95% CI=1.59-6.87); and non-English language spoken at home (OR=5.31, 95% CI=2.60-10.87) were associated with a greater risk of pneumonia hospitalization in multivariable analysis. Age, congestive heart failure, chronic obstructive lung disease, dysphagia, renal disease, functional status, use of immunosuppressive disease medications, and lifetime history of smoking of more than 100 cigarettes were other variables associated with hospitalization for pneumonia. In elderly people, present and past exposures in the physical environmental are associated with hospitalization for CAP.

  14. Etiology and anti-microbial sensitivity of organisms causing community acquired pneumonia: A single hospital study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Resmi U Menon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to identify the common etiological pathogens causing community acquired pneumonia (CAP in our hospital and sensitivity patterns to the common antibiotics used. Materials and Methods: This study was undertaken in a 750 bedded multi-specialty referral hospital in Kerala catering to both urban and semi-urban populations. It is a prospective study of patients who attended the medical out-patient department and those admitted with a clinical diagnosis of CAP, during the year 2009. Data were collected based on detailed patient interview, clinical examination and laboratory investigations. The latter included sputum culture and sensitivity pattern. These were tabulated and percentage incidence of etiological pathogens calculated. The antimicrobial sensitivity pattern was also classified by percentage and expressed as bar diagram. Results: The study showed Streptococcus pneumoniae to be the most common etiological agent for CAP, in our hospital setting. The other organisms isolated in order of frequency were Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Alpha hemolytic streptococci, Escherichia coli, Beta hemolytic streptococci and atypical coli. S. pneumoniae was most sensitive to linezolid, followed by amoxicillin-clavulanate (augmentin, cloxacillin and ceftriaxone. Overall, the common pathogens causing CAP showed highest sensitivity to amikacin, followed by ofloxacin, gentamycin, amoxicillin-clavulanate (augmentin, ceftriaxone and linezolid. The least sensitivity rates were shown to amoxicillin and cefoperazone. Conclusion: In a hospital setting, empirical management for cases of CAP is not advisable. The present study has shown S. pneumoniae as the most likely pathogen and either linezolid or amikacin as the most likely effective antimicrobial in cases of CAP, in our setting.

  15. The comparative development of elevated resistance to macrolides in community-acquired pneumonia caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae

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    Yayan J

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Josef Yayan Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Sleep Medicine, Saarland University Medical Center, Homburg/Saar, Germany Background: Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is an acute inflammation of the lungs, which is often caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae. CAP is the leading cause of death by infectious disease in industrialized countries. Therefore, an immediate and effective antibiotic therapy is of great importance for the nonfatal outcome of the disease. The literature contains increasing data about the development of resistance to antibiotics that are used for the treatment of CAP caused by S. pneumoniae; this article also examines the possible development of resistance to antibiotics in S. pneumoniae in recent years.Methods: Within the study period of 2004–2014, all hospital charts from patients with CAP caused by S. pneumoniae were collected from the Department of Internal Medicine, Saarland University Medical Center, Homburg/Saar, Germany. The tracheal secretions of S. pneumoniae in CAP patients were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage; bronchial aspirates were obtained through flexible bronchoscopy and directly from sputum, and blood cultures were examined microbiologically for microorganisms.Results: From a total of 100 patients with CAP caused by S. pneumoniae, 23 (53.49% [34.78% female], 95% confidence interval, 38.58–68.4 patients with a mean age of 59.78±15.77 years met the inclusion criteria of this investigation. These patients were compared to a total of 20 (46.51% [35% female], 95% confidence interval, 31.6–61.42 patients with a mean age of 58.9±13.36 years with CAP who were infested with S. pneumoniae. In the latter group, the streptococcal antigen was detected in pulmonary aspirations by bronchoscopy or in urine using polymerase chain reaction and a rapid pneumococcal test. Penicillin G and vancomycin had a high rate of sensitivity on the antibiogram for S. pneumoniae, which was

  16. [Cross-cultural adaptation of the community-acquired pneumonia score questionnaire in patients with mild-to-moderate pneumonia in Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal-Vargas, Mónica Alejandra; Cortés, Jorge Alberto; Sánchez, Ricardo

    2017-01-24

    One of the strategies for the rational use of antibiotics is the use of the score for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP Score). This instrument clinically evaluates patients with community-acquired pneumonia, thereby facilitating decision making regarding the early and safe withdrawal of antibiotics. To generate a translation and cross-cultural adaptation of the Community-Acquired Pneumonia (CAP) Score questionnaire in Spanish. Authorization for cross-cultural adaptation of the Community-Acquired Pneumonia (CAP) Score questionnaire was obtained; the recommendations of the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR) and the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) were carried out through the following stages: forward translation, reconciliation, backward translation, harmonization, obtaining a provisional questionnaire, and applying the questionnaire in a pilot test. The pilot test was conducted at a second-level public hospital in Bogotá after the study was approved by the ethics and research institutional boards. The changes suggested by the forward translators were applied. There were no discrepancies between the backward and forward translations, consequently, no revisions were necessary. Five items had modifications based on suggestions made by eleven patients hospitalized with a diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia during the pilot test. A Spanish version of the Community-Acquired Pneumonia (CAP) Score was crossculturally adapted and is now available.

  17. Improving antibiotic prescribing for adults with community acquired pneumonia: Does a computerised decision support system achieve more than academic detailing alone?--A time series analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Buising, Kirsty L; Thursky, Karin A; Black, James F; MacGregor, Lachlan; Street, Alan C; Kennedy, Marcus P; Brown, Graham V

    2008-01-01

    ...) on clinicians' prescribing behaviour for patients with community acquired pneumonia (CAP). The management of all patients presenting to the emergency department over three successive time periods was evaluated...

  18. Azithromycin is not associated with QT prolongation in hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Lee Hilary; Gabin, Ahmad; Fawaz, Abdallah; Freedberg, Nahum Adam; Schwartz, Naama; Elias, Mazen; Saliba, Walid

    2015-10-01

    Large data-based studies have reported excess cardiovascular mortality in high-risk patients treated with azithromycin, but whether or not azithromycin causes QT prolongation remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to examine the association of azithromycin treatment on QT prolongation in a cohort of patients hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) METHODS: One-hundred twenty-two hospitalized patients with CAP were enrolled in the study. We compared the baseline QTc, with daily post antibiotic QTc. Other risk factors for QT prolongation such as medication or electrolyte abnormalities were recorded. Ninety (73.8%) patients were treated with azithromycin (usually in combination with ceftriaxone), and 32 (26.2%) patients with other antibiotics (ampicillin-clavulanate, chloramphenicol, doxcycline, or ceftriaxone); 72.1% (88) of the cohort experienced QT lengthening; 72.7% with QT lengthening had a normal baseline QTc. Azithromycin was not associated with the post-antibiotic QTc. Wide (pathological) post-antibiotic QTc was associated with the pneumonia score. Every 10-point increase in the pneumonia score raised the risk for a pathological post antibiotic QTc by 1.249 (95%CI: 1.050-1.486). Analysis of patients with non-pathological baseline QTc revealed that pathological post-antibiotic QTc was only associated with previous stroke and not with the type of antibiotic. Azithromycin treatment was not associated with QT prolongation in patients with severe CAP. Nonetheless, in a large majority of hospitalized CAP patients, QT prolongation and pathological QTc develop regardless of the antibiotic used, especially in patients with previous stroke or a higher pneumonia score. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Lung ultrasound in the diagnosis and monitoring of community acquired pneumonia in children.

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    Urbankowska, Emilia; Krenke, Katarzyna; Drobczyński, Łukasz; Korczyński, Piotr; Urbankowski, Tomasz; Krawiec, Marta; Kraj, Grażyna; Brzewski, Michał; Kulus, Marek

    2015-09-01

    Lung ultrasound (LUS) is as an easily accessible, radiation-free imaging technique that might be used as a diagnostic tool in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). The aim of the study was to evaluate the usefulness and accuracy of LUS in the diagnosis and monitoring of childhood CAP. One hundred six consecutive children aged between 1 and 213 (median 52.5) months referred to the hospital with suspicion of CAP were enrolled. All patients underwent LUS on the day of admission, followed by chest radiograph (CXR). Lung ultrasound was also performed in 25 children between 5th-7th and 31 children between 10th-14th day after admission. Radiographic signs of pneumonia were demonstrated in 76 children, while lung ultrasound revealed pulmonary abnormalities consistent with pneumonia in 71 children. LUS gave false negative results in 5 patients with parahilar pulmonary infiltrates demonstrated by CXR. Almost perfect overall agreement between LUS and CXR was found in terms of pneumonia diagnosis (Cohen kappa coefficient of 0.89). The diagnostic performance of LUS in demonstration of lung involvement was as follows: sensitivity of 93.4%, specificity of 100%, positive predictive value of 100%, negative predictive value of 85.7% and accuracy of 95.3%. Our study showed that LUS is a sensitive and highly specific diagnostic method in children with CAP. Therefore, LUS may be considered as the first imaging test in children with suspicion of CAP. A diagnostic algorithm of CAP which includes LUS should be validated in prospective studies. Lung ultrasound can also be used to follow-up resolution of pneumonic lesions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Linezolid has unique immunomodulatory effects in post-influenza community acquired MRSA pneumonia.

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    Urvashi Bhan

    Full Text Available Post influenza pneumonia is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity, with mortality rates approaching 60% when bacterial infections are secondary to multi-drug resistant (MDR pathogens. Staphylococcus aureus, in particular community acquired MRSA (cMRSA, has emerged as a leading cause of post influenza pneumonia.Linezolid (LZD prevents acute lung injury in murine model of post influenza bacterial pneumonia.Mice were infected with HINI strain of influenza and then challenged with cMRSA at day 7, treated with antibiotics (LZD or Vanco or vehicle 6 hours post bacterial challenge and lungs and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL harvested at 24 hours for bacterial clearance, inflammatory cell influx, cytokine/chemokine analysis and assessment of lung injury.Mice treated with LZD or Vanco had lower bacterial burden in the lung and no systemic dissemination, as compared to the control (no antibiotic group at 24 hours post bacterial challenge. As compared to animals receiving Vanco, LZD group had significantly lower numbers of neutrophils in the BAL (9×10(3 vs. 2.3×10(4, p < 0.01, which was associated with reduced levels of chemotactic chemokines and inflammatory cytokines KC, MIP-2, IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-1β in the BAL. Interestingly, LZD treatment also protected mice from lung injury, as assessed by albumin concentration in the BAL post treatment with H1N1 and cMRSA when compared to vanco treatment. Moreover, treatment with LZD was associated with significantly lower levels of PVL toxin in lungs.Linezolid has unique immunomodulatory effects on host inflammatory response and lung injury in a murine model of post-viral cMRSA pneumonia.

  1. Ceftaroline in the management of complicated skin and soft tissue infections and community acquired pneumonia

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    Mpenge MA

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mbiye A Mpenge,1 Alasdair P MacGowan2 1Department of Medical Microbiology, University Hospitals Bristol NHS Trust, Bristol Royal Infirmary, Bristol, England; 2Department of Medical Microbiology, North Bristol NHS Trust, Southmead Hospital, Bristol, England Abstract: Ceftaroline is a new parenteral cephalosporin approved by the European Medicines Agency (EMA and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA for the treatment of complicated skin and soft tissue infections (cSSTIs including those due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. Ceftaroline has broad-spectrum activity against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria and exerts its bactericidal effects by binding to penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs, resulting in inhibition of bacterial cell wall synthesis. It binds to PBP 2a of MRSA with high affinity and also binds to all six PBPs in Streptococcus pneumoniae. In in vitro studies, ceftaroline demonstrated potent activity against Staphylococcus aureus (including MRSA and vancomycin-intermediate isolates, Streptococcus pneumoniae (including multidrug resistant isolates, Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, and many common gram-negative pathogens, excluding extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In Phase II and Phase III clinical trials, ceftaroline was noninferior to its comparator agents and demonstrated high clinical cure rates in the treatment of cSSTIs and CAP. It demonstrated favorable outcomes in patients treated for both regulatory-approved indications and unlicensed indications in a retrospective analysis. Ceftaroline is a safe and effective option for treatment in specific patient populations in which its efficacy and safety have been proven. This article reviews the challenges in the treatment of cSSTI and CAP, ceftaroline and its microbiology, pharmacology, efficacy, and safety data which support its use in

  2. Guidelines for community-acquired pneumonia: are they reflected in practice?

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    Flanders, Scott A; Halm, Ethan A

    2004-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is common, costly, and clinically serious. Several national and international practice guidelines have been developed to promote more appropriate, cost-effective care for patients with CAP. This article compares and contrasts eight international practice guidelines for the management of CAP, describes the extent to which recommendations are reflected in practice, and proposes explanations for non-adherence to guidelines. We found consistency in recommendations across all the guidelines for the management of patients with CAP requiring intensive care. In this setting, all guidelines recommend chest radiography, sputum Gram stain and culture, blood cultures, testing for Legionella pneumophila, and timely administration of antibiotics active against both typical (i.e. Streptococcus pneumoniae, Hemophilus influenzae) and atypical organisms (i.e. Legionella spp., Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Chlamydia pneumoniae). Recommendations for the management of the average inpatient with pneumonia were more variable, with the greatest differences between the North American and European guidelines. The North American guidelines (in contrast to European ones), recommended empiric treatment of typical and atypical organisms in all inpatients. There were also differences in policies regarding the necessity of chest radiography, sputum studies, and serologic testing. Some guidelines explicitly embrace the use of prediction rules to inform the decision to hospitalize, while others do not. Some of these admission decision algorithms focus on identifying low risk patients, while others are most concerned with high risk patients. There was also considerable variation in the specificity and operationalization of clinical criteria for switching from parenteral to oral antibiotics or judging appropriateness for discharge. Many recommendations for key management decisions tended to lack explicit, objective, and actionable criteria that could be easily

  3. Prospective evaluation of clinical lung ultrasonography in the diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia in a pediatric emergency department.

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    Samson, Frédéric; Gorostiza, Iñigo; González, Andrés; Landa, María; Ruiz, Lucía; Grau, Miguel

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate the applicability and utility of point-of-care lung ultrasonography (POCLUS) for the diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in a pediatric emergency department. A prospective observational study on children with suspected CAP was carried out in a pediatric emergency department from August to December 2014. The evaluation of the chest radiography (CR) by two independent radiologists was considered as a reference standard. POCLUS was performed by pediatricians who were blinded to CR results. Following the WHO criteria, typical CAP was defined as an alveolar consolidation or infiltrate in CR and a visualization of lung consolidation with sonographic air bronchograms in POCLUS. The diagnostic accuracy of POCLUS (sensitivity, specificity, positive, and negative predictive values) was established using CR as a gold standard. We enrolled 200 children with a median age of 29.5 months (interquartile range, 18.5-52.5); 58.1% were males and 42.0% had focal decreased breath sounds and/or crackles. The prevalence of typical CAP according to the radiologist's evaluation was 42.5% (end-point consolidation and/or pleural effusion 56.5%, alveolar infiltrate 43.5%). The sensitivity and specificity of POCLUS were 87.1% [95% confidence interval (CI) 78.0-93.4] and 94.8% (95% CI 89.0-98.1), respectively. The positive and negative predictive values were 92.5% (95% CI 84.4-97.2) and 90.8% (95% CI 84.2-95.3), respectively. POCLUS performed by an emergency pediatrician with a limited experience in ultrasonography enables the diagnosis of pneumonia with high accuracy. POCLUS could become a feasible and promising alternative to CR in the diagnosis of suspected CAP, leading to a relevant decrease in children's exposure to ionizing radiations. Further studies specifically carried out in the pediatric outpatient setting are needed.

  4. [Study on epidemic characteristics and etiology of community acquired pneumonia in Guangzhou from 2009 to 2012].

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    Liu, Hui; Xiao, Xin-cai; Lu, Jian-yun; Chen, Zong-qiu; Luo, Lei; Yang, Zhi-cong

    2013-12-01

    To investigate the epidemic characteristics and pathogenic spectrum of community acquired pneumonia (CAP) in Guangzhou from 2009 to 2012. 14 major comprehensive hospitals were selected from 11 districts as sentinel hospitals for CAP cases surveillance, including 18 982 223 in total during the 4 years. The characteristics of pathogenic spectrum of CAP were stratified and analyzed by year, age and season. 18 982 223 cases were included in the surveillance from year 2009 to 2012, in which 56 618 cases were CAP. The number of CAP cases increased from 8677 in year 2009 to 19 947 in year 2012 in Guangzhou; while the percentage of visits for CAP raised from 0.22% (8677/3 893 800) to 0.41% (19 947/4 839 766). The difference showed statistical significance (χ(2) = 2693.00, P 66 years old. The percentage of cases infected by a single pathogen was 88.11% (14 613/16 585), while co-infected cases accounted for 4.17% (691/16 585). Bacteria accounted for the largest proportion of 65.25% (10 821/16 585) as a single pathogen, followed by mycoplasma 13.54% (2245/16 585), virus 9.01% (1494/16 585) and chlamydia 0.32% (53/16 585). The proportion of virus infection was increasing from 4.74% to 11.64%. The difference showed statistical significance (χ(2) = 135.32, P causes for CAP cases in all age groups; however the percentage increased with the increasing of ages. The rate of bacterial infection was increased from 48.35% (2993/6191) among children aged ≤ 5 years old to 81.31% (3873/4763) among adults aged over 65 years (χ(2) = 1632.00, P pneumonia was rising in Guangzhou from 2009 to 2012. Bacteria was the dominant pathogen. Children and old people were the high-risk population of community acquired pneumonia; while co-infection was still at low level.

  5. Klebsiella pneumoniae related community-acquired acute lower respiratory infections in Cambodia: Clinical characteristics and treatment

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    Rammaert Blandine

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In many Asian countries, Klebsiella pneumoniae (KP is the second pathogen responsible for community-acquired pneumonia. Yet, very little is known about KP etiology in ALRI in Cambodia, a country that has one of the weakest medical infrastructures in the region. We present here the first clinico-radiological description of KP community-acquired ALRI in hospitalized Cambodian patients. Methods Through ALRI surveillance in two provincial hospitals, KP was isolated from sputum and blood cultures, and identified by API20E gallery from patients ≥ 5 years-old with fever and respiratory symptoms onset ≤14 days. Antibiotics susceptibility testing was provided systematically to clinicians when bacteria were isolated. We collected patients' clinical, radiological and microbiological data and their outcome 3 months after discharge. We also compared KP-related with other bacteria-related ALRI to determine risk factors for KP infection. Results From April 2007 to December 2009, 2315 ALRI patients ≥ 5 years-old were enrolled including 587 whose bacterial etiology could be assigned. Of these, 47 (8.0% had KP infection; their median age was 55 years and 68.1% were females. Reported prior medication was high (42.5%. Patients' chest radiographs showed pneumonia (61.3% including 39% that were necrotizing, preexisting parenchyma lesions (29.5% and pleural effusions alone (4.5% and normal parenchyma (4.5%. Five patients had severe conditions on admission and one patient died during hospitalization. Of the 39 patients that were hospital discharged, 14 died including 12 within 1 month after discharge. Only 13 patients (28% received an appropriate antibiotherapy. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL - producing strains were found in 8 (17.0% patients. Female gender (Odds ratio (OR 2.1; p = 0.04 and diabetes mellitus (OR 3.1; p = 0.03 were independent risk factors for KP-related ALRI. Conclusions KP ALRI in Cambodia has high fatality rate

  6. The Clinical Significance of FilmArray Respiratory Panel in Diagnosing Community-Acquired Pneumonia

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    Huanzhu Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. FilmArray Respiratory Panel (FilmArray RP test is an emerging diagnostic method in fast detecting multiple respiratory pathogens; the methodology and clinical significance of FilmArray RP in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP diagnosis were evaluated in this study. Methods. Specimens from 74 patients with CAP were analyzed and compared using FilmArray RP, traditional multiple PCR assay, bacterial (or fungal culture, and serological detection. Results. FilmArray RP and multiplex PCR showed 100% coincidence rate in detecting coronaviruses 229E, OC43, HKU1, and NL63, human metapneumovirus, influenza A and B, and parainfluenza viruses (PIV1, PIV2, and PIV4. There were 15 viral specimens tested as disagreement positive results. FilmArray RP had higher detection rate in detecting dual viral and Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. The positive bacteria (or fungi were found in 25 specimens. Conclusions. This study demonstrated the capability of FilmArray RP for simultaneous detection of broad-spectrum respiratory pathogens and potential use in facilitating better patient care.

  7. The Clinical Significance of FilmArray Respiratory Panel in Diagnosing Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

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    Chen, Huanzhu; Weng, Huilan; Lin, Meirui; He, Ping; Li, Yazhen; Xie, Qingdong; Ke, Changwen; Jiao, Xiaoyang

    2017-01-01

    FilmArray Respiratory Panel (FilmArray RP) test is an emerging diagnostic method in fast detecting multiple respiratory pathogens; the methodology and clinical significance of FilmArray RP in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) diagnosis were evaluated in this study. Specimens from 74 patients with CAP were analyzed and compared using FilmArray RP, traditional multiple PCR assay, bacterial (or fungal) culture, and serological detection. FilmArray RP and multiplex PCR showed 100% coincidence rate in detecting coronaviruses 229E, OC43, HKU1, and NL63, human metapneumovirus, influenza A and B, and parainfluenza viruses (PIV1, PIV2, and PIV4). There were 15 viral specimens tested as disagreement positive results. FilmArray RP had higher detection rate in detecting dual viral and Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. The positive bacteria (or fungi) were found in 25 specimens. This study demonstrated the capability of FilmArray RP for simultaneous detection of broad-spectrum respiratory pathogens and potential use in facilitating better patient care.

  8. Penicillin treatment for patients with Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Denmark: a retrospective cohort study.

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    Egelund, Gertrud Baunbæk; Jensen, Andreas Vestergaard; Andersen, Stine Bang; Petersen, Pelle Trier; Lindhardt, Bjarne Ørskov; von Plessen, Christian; Rohde, Gernot; Ravn, Pernille

    2017-04-20

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a severe infection, with high mortality. Antibiotic strategies for CAP differ across Europe. The objective of the study was to describe the epidemiology of CAP in Denmark and evaluate the prognosis of patients empirically treated with penicillin-G/V monotherapy. Retrospective cohort study including hospitalized patients with x-ray confirmed CAP. We calculated the population-based incidence, reviewed types of empiric antibiotics and duration of antibiotic treatment. We evaluated the association between mortality and treatment with empiric penicillin-G/V using logistic regression analysis. We included 1320 patients. The incidence of hospitalized CAP was 3.1/1000 inhabitants. Median age was 71 years (IQR; 58-81) and in-hospital mortality was 8%. Median duration of antibiotic treatment was 10 days (IQR; 8-12). In total 45% were treated with penicillin-G/V as empiric monotherapy and they did not have a higher mortality compared to patients treated with broader-spectrum antibiotics (OR 0.92, CI 95% 0.55-1.53). The duration of treatment exceeded recommendations in European guidelines. Empiric monotherapy with penicillin-G/V was commonly used and not associated with increased mortality in patients with mild to moderate pneumonia. Our results are in agreement with current conservative antibiotic strategy as outlined in the Danish guidelines.

  9. Relationship Between Body Mass Index and Outcomes Among Hospitalized Patients With Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

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    Bramley, Anna M; Reed, Carrie; Finelli, Lyn; Self, Wesley H; Ampofo, Krow; Arnold, Sandra R; Williams, Derek J; Grijalva, Carlos G; Anderson, Evan J; Stockmann, Chris; Trabue, Christopher; Fakhran, Sherene; Balk, Robert; McCullers, Jonathan A; Pavia, Andrew T; Edwards, Kathryn M; Wunderink, Richard G; Jain, Seema

    2017-06-15

    The effect of body mass index (BMI) on community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) severity is unclear. We investigated the relationship between BMI and CAP outcomes (hospital length of stay [LOS], intensive care unit [ICU] admission, and invasive mechanical ventilation) in hospitalized CAP patients from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Etiology of Pneumonia in the Community (EPIC) study, adjusting for age, demographics, underlying conditions, and smoking status (adults only). Compared with normal-weight children, odds of ICU admission were higher in children who were overweight (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.7; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-2.8) or obese (aOR, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.4-3.2), and odds of mechanical ventilation were higher in children with obesity (aOR, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.3-5.6). When stratified by asthma (presence/absence), these findings remained significant only in children with asthma. Compared with normal-weight adults, odds of LOS >3 days were higher in adults who were underweight (aOR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.1-2.4), and odds of mechanical ventilation were lowest in adults who were overweight (aOR, 0.5; 95% CI, .3-.9). Children who were overweight or obese, particularly those with asthma, had higher odds of ICU admission or mechanical ventilation. In contrast, adults who were underweight had longer LOS. These results underscore the complex relationship between BMI and CAP outcomes.

  10. Usefulness of Plasma YKL-40 in Management of Community-Acquired Pneumonia Severity in Patients

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    Hsiang-Ling Wang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Plasma YKL-40 level has been reported as playing a significant role in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. However, the correlation between plasma level of YKL-40 and the severity of CAP has not been reported. This study identifies the relationship between plasma level changes of the YKL-40 gene in adult patients hospitalized with CAP. The ELISA was used to measure the plasma YKL-40 level from 61 adult CAP patients before and after antibiotic treatment and from 60 healthy controls. The plasma YKL-40 levels were significantly increased in patients with CAP compared to normal controls. Moreover, the plasma concentration of YKL-40 correlated with the severity of CAP based on the pneumonia severity index (PSI score (r = 0.630, p < 0.001, the CURB-65 (confusion, uremia, respiratory rate, BP, age 65 years score (r = 0.640, p < 0.001, the Acute Physiology And Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II score (r = 0.539, p < 0.001 and length of hospital stay (r = 0.321, p = 0.011, respectively. In conclusion, plasma YKL-40 may play a role in the diagnosis and clinical assessment of CAP severity, which could potentially guide the development of treatment strategies.

  11. Microbiology and prognostic factors of hospital- and community-acquired aspiration pneumonia in respiratory intensive care unit.

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    Wei, Chaojie; Cheng, Zhenshun; Zhang, Li; Yang, Jiong

    2013-10-01

    Incidence of aspiration pneumonia in hospital-acquired pneumonia and community-acquired pneumonia is high; however, many features of this disease remain imprecise. Our objective was to characterize the microbial etiology and their antibiotic resistance and to determine the prognostic factors in aspiration pneumonia among patients admitted to a respiratory intensive care unit (RICU). A prospective survey was conducted in 112 patients exhibiting hospital-or community-acquired aspiration pneumonia in the RICU of a provincial general hospital from 2010-2012. Bronchoalveolar lavage sampling was collected, and then followed by standard culture and drug-sensitive test. Risk factors were analyzed by multivariate logistic analysis. One hundred twenty-eight strains were isolated in 94 patients, gram-negative bacilli (57.8%) was the predominant cultured microorganism, followed by fungus (28.9%) and gram-positive cocci (13.3%). The 5 main isolated bacteria demonstrated high and multiantibiotic resistance. The crude overall mortality was 43.8%, 50%, and 40%, respectively, in hospital- and community-acquired aspiration pneumonia group. Multivariate logistic analysis identified age older than 65 years, use of inotropic support, and ineffective initial therapy as independent risk factors of poor outcome. The predominant pathogenic bacteria of aspiration pneumonia in patients admitted to an RICU were antibiotic-resistant bacteria, and effective initial supportive management secured better prognosis. Copyright © 2013 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Current Aspects of Antibiotic Therapy of Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Children of Early and Preschool Age (Review

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    S.A. Mokiya-Serbina

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article we analyzed current antibiotic resistance of S.pneumoniae. We showed local (region data on sensitivity of pneumococcus to aminopenicillins, macrolides and cephalosporines traditionally used in schemes of empirical antibiotic therapy of community-acquired pneumonia in children under 5 years. We laid basic principles of rational antibiotic therapy based on the analysis of current national and foreign guidelines on the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia. Insignificant differences in the schemes of empirical antibiotic therapy are marked due to peculiarities of local resistance of S.pneumoniae in different countries. We discussed propriety of some positions of empirical antibiotic therapy in children of early and preschool age.

  13. Prolonged Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection in an elderly patient with community-acquired pneumonia.

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    Takahashi, Takashi; Morozumi, Miyuki; Okada, Takafumi; Chiba, Naoko; Asami, Ryoko; Murayama, Somay Y; Ubukata, Kimiko

    2009-08-01

    An 81-year-old woman with no underlying systemic illness was hospitalized with fever, muscle weakness, and sputum without cough for 2 days. Chest imaging showed consolidation in the left lower lobe. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for six respiratory bacteria and 12 respiratory viruses performed on sputum obtained on admission showed Mycoplasma pneumoniae DNA, with no evidence of other pathogens. M. pneumoniae was confirmed to be the causative agent by serologic data. Variation of mycoplasma quantity in subsequent sputa was analyzed because of persistent sputum production despite treatment with minocycline. Mycoplasma DNA gradually decreased, becoming undetectable 1 week after the completion of 2 weeks of minocycline therapy. Two weeks after the completion of the minocycline therapy, mycoplasma DNA in sputum was strongly detectable again, and oral treatment with clarithromycin was initiated. No pathogen DNA was detected during 2 weeks of clarithromycin therapy or at 2 weeks after completion of this therapy. Although susceptibility tests on three isolates (on admission, 1 week after starting minocycline, and 2 weeks after minocycline cessation), showed no resistance to minocycline or clarithromycin, the infection was, nonetheless, prolonged. Some elderly subjects with mycoplasma pneumonia may show a longer course than that in young persons with pneumonia.

  14. Clinical symptoms and signs for the diagnosis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae in children and adolescents with community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kay; Gill, Peter; Perera, Rafael; Thomson, Anne; Mant, David; Harnden, Anthony

    2012-10-17

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M. pneumoniae) is a significant cause of community-acquired pneumonia in children and adolescents. Treatment with macrolide antibiotics is recommended. However, M. pneumoniae is difficult to diagnose based on clinical symptoms and signs. Diagnostic uncertainty can lead to inappropriate antibiotic prescribing, which may worsen clinical prognosis and increase antibiotic resistance. The objectives of this review are (i) to assess the diagnostic accuracy of symptoms and signs in the clinical recognition of M. pneumoniae in children and adolescents with community-acquired pneumonia; and (ii) to assess the influence of potential sources of heterogeneity on the diagnostic accuracy of symptoms and signs in the clinical recognition of M. pneumoniae. We searched MEDLINE (January 1950 to 26 June 2012) and EMBASE (January 1980 to 26 June 2012). We identified additional references by handsearching the reference lists of included articles and snowballing. We searched the reference lists of relevant systematic reviews identified by searching the Medion database, Database of Reviews of Effects 2012, Issue 6 (25 June 2012) and the Cochrane Register of Diagnostic Test Accuracy studies (2 July 2012). Experts in the field reviewed our list of included studies for any obvious omissions. We included peer-reviewed published studies which prospectively and consecutively recruited children with community-acquired pneumonia from any healthcare setting, confirmed the presence of M. pneumoniae using serology with or without other laboratory methods and reported data on clinical symptoms and signs in sufficient detail to construct 2 x 2 tables. One review author scanned titles to exclude obviously irrelevant articles. Two review authors independently scanned the remaining titles and abstracts, reviewed full-text versions of potentially relevant articles, assessed the quality of included articles and extracted data on study characteristics and the following clinical

  15. Community-acquired pneumonia: economics of inpatient medical care vis-à-vis clinical severity,

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    Vojislav Cupurdija

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the direct and indirect costs of diagnosing and treating community-acquired pneumonia (CAP, correlating those costs with CAP severity at diagnosis and identifying the major cost drivers. Methods: This was a prospective cost analysis study using bottom-up costing. Clinical severity and mortality risk were assessed with the pneumonia severity index (PSI and the mental Confusion-Urea-Respiratory rate-Blood pressure-age ≥ 65 years (CURB-65 scale, respectively. The sample comprised 95 inpatients hospitalized for newly diagnosed CAP. The analysis was run from a societal perspective with a time horizon of one year. Results: Expressed as mean ± standard deviation, in Euros, the direct and indirect medical costs per CAP patient were 696 ± 531 and 410 ± 283, respectively, the total per-patient cost therefore being 1,106 ± 657. The combined budget impact of our patient cohort, in Euros, was 105,087 (66,109 and 38,979 in direct and indirect costs, respectively. The major cost drivers, in descending order, were the opportunity cost (lost productivity; diagnosis and treatment of comorbidities; and administration of medications, oxygen, and blood derivatives. The CURB-65 and PSI scores both correlated with the indirect costs of CAP treatment. The PSI score correlated positively with the overall frequency of use of health care services. Neither score showed any clear relationship with the direct costs of CAP treatment. Conclusions: Clinical severity at admission appears to be unrelated to the costs of CAP treatment. This is mostly attributable to unwarranted hospital admission (or unnecessarily long hospital stays in cases of mild pneumonia, as well as to over-prescription of antibiotics. Authorities should strive to improve adherence to guidelines and promote cost-effective prescribing practices among physicians in southeastern Europe.

  16. Impact of antibiotic de-escalation on clinical outcomes in community-acquired pneumococcal pneumonia.

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    Viasus, Diego; Simonetti, Antonella F; Garcia-Vidal, Carolina; Niubó, Jordi; Dorca, Jordi; Carratalà, Jordi

    2017-02-01

    Although antibiotic de-escalation is regarded as a measure that reduces selection pressure, adverse drug effects and costs, evidence supporting this practice in community-acquired pneumococcal pneumonia (CAPP) is lacking. We carried out a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data of a cohort of hospitalized adults with CAPP. Pneumococcal aetiology was established in patients with one or more positive cultures for Streptococcus pneumoniae obtained from blood, sterile fluids or sputum, and/or a positive urinary antigen test. De-escalation therapy was considered when the initial antibiotic therapy was narrowed to penicillin, amoxicillin or amoxicillin/clavulanate within the first 72 h after admission. The primary outcomes were 30 day mortality and length of hospital stay (LOS). Adjustment for confounders was performed with multivariate and propensity score analyses. Of 1410 episodes of CAPP, antibiotic de-escalation within the first 72 h after admission was performed in 166 cases. After adjustment, antibiotic de-escalation was not associated with a higher risk of mortality (OR = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.24-2.81), but it was found to be a protective factor for prolonged LOS (above the median) (OR = 0.46, 95% CI = 0.30-0.70). Similar results were found in patients classified into high-risk pneumonia severity index classes (IV-V), those with clinical instability and those with bacteraemia. No significant differences were documented in adverse drug reactions or readmission (Antibiotic de-escalation seems to be safe and effective in reducing the duration of LOS, and did not adversely affect outcomes of patients with CAPP, even those with bacteraemia and severe disease, and those who were clinically unstable. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Association of adrenal function and disease severity in community-acquired pneumonia.

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    Mueller, Cornelia; Blum, Claudine A; Trummler, Michael; Stolz, Daiana; Bingisser, Roland; Mueller, Christian; Tamm, Michael; Mueller, Beat; Schuetz, Philipp; Christ-Crain, Mirjam

    2014-01-01

    Rapid and accurate risk stratification in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is an unmet clinical need. Cortisol to dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) ratio was put forward as a prognostic marker in sepsis. We herein validated the prognostic value of the adrenal hormones DHEA, DHEA-Sulfate (DHEAS), cortisol/DHEA-, cortisol/DHEAS- and DHEA/DHEAS-ratios in patients with CAP. We assessed severity of illness using the pneumonia severity index (PSI) and measured adrenal hormone concentrations in 179 serum samples of prospectively recruited patients hospitalized with CAP. We calculated spearman rank correlation, logistic regression analysis and Kaplan Meier curves to study associations of adrenal hormones and outcomes. There was a significant correlation between PSI score and total cortisol (r = 0.24, p = 0.001), DHEAS (r = -0.23, p = 0.002), cortisol/DHEA (r = 0.23, p = 0.003), cortisol/DHEAS (r = 0.32, p = DHEA/DHEAS (r = 0.20, p = 0.009). In age and gender adjusted logistic regression analysis, cortisol (OR:2.8, 95% CI: 1.48-5.28) and DHEA (OR: 2.62,95% CI: 1.28-5.34), but not DHEAS and the different ratios were associated with all-cause mortality. The discriminatory accuracy of cortisol and DHEA in ROC analysis (area under the curve) was 0.74 and 0.61. In Kaplan Meier analysis, patients in the highest deciles of cortisol and DHEA (p = 0.005 and p = 0.015), and to a lesser extent of cortisol/DHEAS ratio (p = 0.081) had a higher risk of death. Cortisol, DHEAS and their ratios correlate with CAP severity, and cortisol and DHEA predict mortality. Adrenal function in severe pneumonia may be an important factor for CAP outcomes.

  18. Pediatric Community-Acquired Pneumonia in the United States: Changing Epidemiology, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Challenges, and Areas for Future Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Sophie E; Williams, Derek J

    2018-03-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is one of the most common serious infections in childhood. This review focuses on pediatric CAP in the United States and other industrialized nations, specifically highlighting the changing epidemiology of CAP, diagnostic and therapeutic challenges, and areas for further research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Individualized treatment strategies in community-acquired pneumonia : from initial inflammatory response to long-term prognosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruns, A.H.W.

    2010-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is one of the most important causes of hospital admissions and together with influenza the third leading cause of death worldwide. Moreover, treatment of CAP largely contributes to the global burden of antibiotic resistance. In present thesis, we explored options

  20. Efficacy of a respiratory physiotherapy intervention for intubated and mechanically ventilated adults with community acquired pneumonia: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Lee, Lisa; Hill, Anne-Marie; Patman, Shane

    2017-06-01

    The objective of the review is to map evidence on the efficacy of a respiratory physiotherapy intervention for intubated and mechanically ventilated adults with community acquired pneumonia (CAP). Specifically, the review seeks to investigate if respiratory physiotherapy interventions can achieve the following for intubated and mechanically ventilated adults with CAP.

  1. Computed tomography findings of community-acquired Stenotrophomonas Maltophilia pneumonia in an immunocompetent patient: A case report

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    Cha, Yoon Ki; Kim, Jeung Sook; Park, Seong Yeon; Oh, Jin Young; Kwon, Jae Hyun [Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital, Dongguk University College of Medicine, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (S. maltophilia) is a rare, but globally emerging gram-negative multiple-drug-resistant organism usually found in a nosocomial setting in immunocompromised patients. To our best knowledge, computed tomography (CT) features of community-acquired S. maltophilia pneumonia have not been previously reported in an immunocompetent patient. Herein, we presented the CT findings of a previous healthy 56-year-old male with S. maltophilia pneumonia.

  2. Racial variations in processes of care for patients with community-acquired pneumonia

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    Whittle Jeff

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients hospitalized with community acquired pneumonia (CAP have a substantial risk of death, but there is evidence that adherence to certain processes of care, including antibiotic administration within 8 hours, can decrease this risk. Although national mortality data shows blacks have a substantially increased odds of death due to pneumonia as compared to whites previous studies of short-term mortality have found decreased mortality for blacks. Therefore we examined pneumonia-related processes of care and short-term mortality in a population of patients hospitalized with CAP. Methods We reviewed the records of all identified Medicare beneficiaries hospitalized for pneumonia between 10/1/1998 and 9/30/1999 at one of 101 Pennsylvania hospitals, and randomly selected 60 patients at each hospital for inclusion. We reviewed the medical records to gather process measures of quality, pneumonia severity and demographics. We used Medicare administrative data to identify 30-day mortality. Because only a small proportion of the study population was black, we included all 240 black patients and randomly selected 720 white patients matched on age and gender. We performed a resampling of the white patients 10 times. Results Males were 43% of the cohort, and the median age was 76 years. After controlling for potential confounders, blacks were less likely to receive antibiotics within 8 hours (odds ratio with 95% confidence interval 0.6, 0.4–0.97, but were as likely as whites to have blood cultures obtained prior to receiving antibiotics (0.7, 0.3–1.5, to have oxygenation assessed within 24 hours of presentation (1.6, 0.9–3.0, and to receive guideline concordant antibiotics (OR 0.9, 0.6–1.7. Black patients had a trend towards decreased 30-day mortality (0.4, 0.2 to 1.0. Conclusion Although blacks were less likely to receive optimal care, our findings are consistent with other studies that suggest better risk-adjusted survival

  3. STUDY OF COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED BACTERIAL PNEUMONIAS PRESENTING TO TERTIARY CARE CENTRE

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    Ramakrishna Rachakonda

    2017-11-01

    diagnosed as having gram-positive cocci and nearly 15% gram-negative bacilli. 5.12% had mixed organisms and 28% had normal Gram stain study. 3.20% patients had fungal elements in Gram stain study. 127 out of 156 patients were positive for bacterial pathogens by culture. Commonest organism isolated was Streptococcus pneumonia in 32.69% followed by Staph aureus in 18.59%, Klebsiella in 8.97%, Pseudomonas in 5.76%, Haemophilus influenza in 4.48%, mixed pathogens in 8.97% and Citrobacter in 1.92%. No organism was isolated by culture in 18.58%. Streptococcus pneumonia and Haemophilus influenzae organisms isolated in these patients were sensitive to routine drugs in all these patients. Nearly, 10% of Staphylococci, 7% of Klebsiella and 22% Pseudomonas organisms are found resistant to the routine drugs. Tazobactam-Piperacillin resistance was seen in both Klebsiella and Pseudomonas species and both were sensitive to meropenem. CONCLUSION Community acquired pneumonia occurs in the older age group among the adult population. Smoking has a significant correlation with development of pneumonia. Predominant number of patients are male. Bilateral and bronchopneumonia pattern is the commonest presentation. Comorbidities and initial white blood cell concentration enhance the duration of hospital stay and the values are statistically significant. Commonest organism isolated is Streptococcus pneumonia followed by Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella, Haemophilus and Pseudomonas. Staphylococci, Klebsiella and Pseudomonas species showed resistance. Tazobactam + Piperacillin resistance is seen among Klebsiella and Pseudomonas species isolated in our centre.

  4. A model for predicting bacteremia in patients with community-acquired pneumococcal pneumonia: a retrospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washio, Yasuyoshi; Ito, Akihiro; Kumagai, Shogo; Ishida, Tadashi; Yamazaki, Akio

    2018-01-30

    Pneumococcal pneumonia causes high morbidity and mortality among adults. This study aimed to identify risk factors for bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia, and to construct a prediction model for the development of bacteremia in patients with community-acquired pneumococcal pneumonia. We retrospectively analyzed data from patients hospitalized with community-acquired pneumococcal pneumonia between April 2007 and August 2015. Logistic regression models were applied to detect risk factors for pneumococcal bacteremia, and a receiver operating characteristic curve was used to devise a prediction model. Based on the results of sputum cultures, urine antigen tests, and/or blood cultures, 389 patients were diagnosed with pneumococcal pneumonia, 46 of whom had bacteremia. In the multivariate analysis, age  20 mg/dL were identified as independent risk factors for the development of pneumococcal bacteremia. The bacteremia prediction score based on receiver operating characteristic curve analysis had a sensitivity of 0.74 and a specificity of 0.78 in patients with two risk factors. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.77 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.70-0.85). Age < 65 years, hypoalbuminemia, IRVS, and high C-reactive protein level on admission are independent risk factors for the development of bacteremia in patients with community-acquired pneumococcal pneumonia. A prediction model based on these four risk factors could help to identify patients with community-acquired pneumococcal pneumonia at high risk of developing bacteremia; this can be used to guide antibiotic choices. UMIN-CTR UMIN 000004353 . Registered 7 October 2010. Retrospectively registered.

  5. The Community-Acquired Pneumonia immunization Trial in Adults (CAPiTA) : What is the future of pneumococcal conjugate vaccination in elderly?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Werkhoven, Cornelis H.; Bonten, Marc Jm

    2015-01-01

    Pneumococcal community-acquired pneumonia (PCAP) and invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) are important causes of morbidity and mortality in elderly. In the Community-Acquired Pneumonia immunization Trial in Adults (CAPiTA), a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial of 84,496

  6. The scrutiny of identifying community-acquired pneumonia episodes quantified bias in absolute effect estimation in a population-based pneumococcal vaccination trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Werkhoven, Cornelis H.; Huijts, Susanne M.; Paling, Fleur P.; Bonten, Marc J M

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine the accurateness of detecting community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in the Community-Acquired Pneumonia immunization Trial in Adults (CAPiTA), a community-based, double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial in which the needed to treat (NNT) for prevention of vaccine-type

  7. Immunomodulatory effects of pidotimod in adults with community-acquired pneumonia undergoing standard antibiotic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trabattoni, D; Clerici, M; Centanni, S; Mantero, M; Garziano, M; Blasi, F

    2017-06-01

    The morbidity and mortality of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) are still elevated and two aspects seem to contribute to a worse outcome: an uncontrolled inflammatory reaction and an inadequate immune response. Adjuvants, including corticosteroids and intravenous immunoglobulins, have been proposed to counterbalance these effects but their efficacy is only partial. We examined the immunomodulatory activity of Pidotimod (PDT), a synthetic dipeptide molecule in adult patients hospitalized for CAP. Sixteen patients with a diagnosis of CAP and a PSI score III or IV and/or a CURB-65 0-2 were randomized to receive either levofloxacin 500 mg b.i.d. alone or levofloxacin plus PDT (800mg, 2 daily doses). Blood samples were drawn at baseline (T0), before initiation of therapy, as well as 3 (T3), and 5 (T5) days after initiation of therapy. Immunologic and clinical parameters were analyzed at each time point. Supplementation of antibiotic therapy with PDT resulted in an upregulation of antimicrobial and of immunomodulatory proteins as well as in an increased percentage of Toll like receptor (TLR)2- and TLR4, and of CD80- and CD86-expressing immune cells. Notably, Pidotimod supplementation was also associated with a robust reduction of TNFα-producing immune cells. No significant differences were observed in clinical parameters. These results confirm that supplementation of antibiotic therapy with Pidotimod in patients with CAP results in a potentially beneficial modulation of innate immunity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Clinical Pathway and Monthly Feedback Improve Adherence to Antibiotic Guideline Recommendations for Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

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    Maher Almatar

    Full Text Available Compliance with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP guidelines remains poor despite a substantial body of evidence indicating that guideline-concordant care improves patient outcomes. The aim of this study was to compare the relative effectiveness of a general educational and a targeted emergency department intervention on improving physicians' concordance with CAP guidelines.Two distinct interventions were implemented over specific time periods. The first intervention was educational, focusing on the development of local CAP guidelines and their dissemination through hospital-wide educational programmes. The second intervention was a targeted one for the emergency department, where a clinical pathway for the initial management of CAP patients was introduced, followed by monthly feedback to the emergency department (ED physicians about concordance rates with the guidelines. Data on the concordance rate to CAP guidelines was collected from a retrospective chart review.A total of 398 eligible patient records were reviewed to measure concordance to CAP guidelines over the study period. Concordance rates during the baseline and educational intervention periods were similar (28.1% vs. 31.2%; p > 0.05. Significantly more patients were treated in accordance with the CAP guidelines after the ED focused intervention when compared to the baseline (61.5% vs. 28.1%; p < 0.05 or educational period (61.5% vs. 31.2%; p < 0.05.A targeted intervention with a CAP clinical pathway and monthly feedback was a successful strategy to increase adherence to empirical antibiotic recommendations in CAP guidelines.

  9. Community-acquired pneumonia in patients with and without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinos, L; Clemente, M G; Miranda, B; Alvarez, C; del Busto, B; Cocina, B R; Alvarez, F; Gorostidi, J; Orejas, C

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the possible differences, especially those regarding mortality, between patients hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) with and without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and the risk factors related to mortality in the COPD group. 710 patients with CAP were included in a prospective multicenter observational study. 244 of the patients had COPD confirmed by spirometry. COPD was associated with mortality in patients with CAP (OR=2.62 CI: 1.08-6.39). Patients with COPD and CAP had a significantly higher 30-day mortality rate as compared to patients without COPD. Multivariate analysis showed that PaO(2) or =45 mmHg (OR=4.6; CI: 2.3-15.1); respiratory rate > or =30/min (OR=12.25; CI: 3.45-35.57), pleural effusion (OR=8.6; 95% CI: 2.01-24.7), septic shock (OR=12.6; 95% CI: 3.4-45.66) and renal failure (OR=13.4; 95% CI: 3.2-37.8) were significantly related to mortality. Purulent sputum and fever were considered as protective factors. COPD was an independent risk factor for mortality in patients with CAP. Hypoxemia and hypercapnia are associated with mortality in patients with CAP with and without COPD. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and PaCO(2) value could be useful prognostic factors and should be incorporated in risk stratification in patients with CAP.

  10. Presepsin as a novel diagnostic biomarker for differentiating active pulmonary tuberculosis from bacterial community acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhi-Jiang; Yu, Han; Zhang, Jing; Li, Chun-Sheng

    2018-03-01

    The expression of presepsin in active pulmonary tuberculosis (APTB) is unknown. We observed the expression of presepsin in APTB, and to evaluate the value for discriminating between APTB and bacterial community acquired pneumonia (BCAP). Consecutive APTB patients who were accurately diagnosed by sputum culture and BCAP patients were enrolled from August 2013 to July 2015. Clinical data were collected, and plasma presepsin concentrations were tested. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were performed for diagnostic analysis. In all, 133 healthy individuals, 103 APTB and 202 BCAP patients were enrolled. Presepsin concentrations in APTB group (218.0 [146.0, 368.0] pg/ml) were higher than those in the healthy control group (128.0 [101.5, 176.5] pg/ml, P<0.001), and lower than the concentrations measured in the BCAP group (532.0 [364.0, 852.3] pg/ml, P<0.001). Simple APTB and miliary tuberculosis patients showed no significant differences in presepsin concentrations. Compared with both Gram-positive and negative bacteria, Mycobacterium tuberculosis caused a limited increase of presepsin. With the cut-off value set at 401pg/ml, presepsin demonstrated high positive predictive value, allowing initial discriminating between APTB and BCAP. Presepsin combined with CURB-65 score could significantly improve the discrimination ability. Presepsin concentrations in APTB patients were slightly increased, and may be helpful for initial discrimination between APTB and BCAP. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Impact of antibiotic therapy in severe community-acquired pneumonia: Data from the Infauci study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, J M; Gonçalves-Pereira, J; Ribeiro, O; Baptista, J P; Froes, F; Paiva, J A

    2018-02-01

    Antibiotic therapy (AT) is the cornerstone of the management of severe community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). However, the best treatment strategy is far from being established. To evaluate the impact of different aspects of AT on the outcome of critically ill patients with CAP, we performed a post hoc analysis of all CAP patients enrolled in a prospective, observational, multicentre study. Of the 502 patients included, 76% received combination therapy, mainly a β-lactam with a macrolide (80%). AT was inappropriate in 16% of all microbiologically documented CAP (n=177). Hospital and 6months mortality were 34% and 35%. In adjusted multivariate logistic regression analysis, combination AT with a macrolide was independently associated with a reduction in hospital (OR 0.17, 95%CI 0.06-0.51) and 6months (OR 0.21, 95%CI 0.07-0.57) mortality. Prolonged AT (>7days) was associated with a longer ICU (14 vs. 7days; p7days had no survival benefit and was associated with a longer LOS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Using data-driven rules to predict mortality in severe community acquired pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuang Wu

    Full Text Available Prediction of patient-centered outcomes in hospitals is useful for performance benchmarking, resource allocation, and guidance regarding active treatment and withdrawal of care. Yet, their use by clinicians is limited by the complexity of available tools and amount of data required. We propose to use Disjunctive Normal Forms as a novel approach to predict hospital and 90-day mortality from instance-based patient data, comprising demographic, genetic, and physiologic information in a large cohort of patients admitted with severe community acquired pneumonia. We develop two algorithms to efficiently learn Disjunctive Normal Forms, which yield easy-to-interpret rules that explicitly map data to the outcome of interest. Disjunctive Normal Forms achieve higher prediction performance quality compared to a set of state-of-the-art machine learning models, and unveils insights unavailable with standard methods. Disjunctive Normal Forms constitute an intuitive set of prediction rules that could be easily implemented to predict outcomes and guide criteria-based clinical decision making and clinical trial execution, and thus of greater practical usefulness than currently available prediction tools. The Java implementation of the tool JavaDNF will be publicly available.

  13. Acquired hemophilia A in a patient associated with community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Qiansong; Yu, Guohui; Ye, Yongqing

    2013-10-01

    Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is a rare disease induced by autoantibodies to factor VIII (FVIII) and may be correlated with pregnancy, underlying malignancies, autoimmune diseases or drug administration. An 81-year-old man who presented with cough, expectoration, hemoptysis and multiple ecchymoses was diagnosed with community-acquired pneumonia by computed tomography scan. Respiratory symptoms were ameliorated after the application of antibiotics. Despite repeated infusion of fresh frozen plasma and cryoprecipitate, his prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) maintained in the 75-110-s range and ecchymoses were not ameliorated. Then, he was transferred to the department of hematology. Based on a prolonged APTT, decreased level of FVIII and presence of antibodies against FVIII, the patient was diagnosed with AHA. Then the patient was treated with activated prothrombin complex concentrates, prednisone and intravenous immunoglobulin, resulting in a complete remission of the bleeding, recovering the FVIII level and negativity for FVIII antibody titers. Here, we investigate this novel case retrospectively and review the relevant literature.

  14. Rapid diagnostic testing for community-acquired pneumonia: can innovative technology for clinical microbiology be exploited?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Victor L; Stout, Janet E

    2009-12-01

    Two nonsynchronous events have affected the management of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP): spiraling empiricism for CAP and the "golden era" of clinical microbiology. The development of broad-spectrum antibiotics has led to widespread empiric use without ascertaining the etiology of the infecting microbe. Unfortunately, this approach clashes with the second event, which is the advent of molecular-based microbiology that can identify the causative pathogen rapidly at the point of care. The urinary antigen is a most effective rapid test that has allowed targeted therapy for Legionnaire disease at the point of care. The high specificity (> 90%) allows the clinician to administer appropriate anti-Legionella therapy based on a single rapid test; however, its low sensitivity (76%) means that a notable number of cases of Legionnaire disease will go undiagnosed if other tests, especially culture, are not performed. Further, culture for Legionella is not readily available. If a culture is not performed, epidemiologic identification of the source of the bacterium cannot be ascertained by molecular fingerprinting of the patient and the putative source strain. We recommend resurrection of the basic principles of infectious disease, which are to identify the microbial etiology of the infection and to use narrow, targeted antimicrobial therapy. To reduce antimicrobial overuse with subsequent antimicrobial resistance, these basic principles must be applied in concert with traditional and newer tests in the clinical microbiology laboratory.

  15. Vitamin D Level and Risk of Community-Acquired Pneumonia and Sepsis

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    Anna J. Jovanovich

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has reported reduced serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OHD levels is associated with acute infectious illness. The relationship between vitamin D status, measured prior to acute infectious illness, with risk of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP and sepsis has not been examined. Community-living individuals hospitalized with CAP or sepsis were age-, sex-, race-, and season-matched with controls. ICD-9 codes identified CAP and sepsis; chest radiograph confirmed CAP. Serum 25(OHD levels were measured up to 15 months prior to hospitalization. Regression models adjusted for diabetes, renal disease, and peripheral vascular disease evaluated the association of 25(OHD levels with CAP or sepsis risk. A total of 132 CAP patients and controls were 60 ± 17 years, 71% female, and 86% Caucasian. The 25(OHD levels <37 nmol/L (adjusted odds ratio (OR 2.57, 95% CI 1.08–6.08 were strongly associated with increased odds of CAP hospitalization. A total of 422 sepsis patients and controls were 65 ± 14 years, 59% female, and 91% Caucasian. The 25(OHD levels <37 nmol/L (adjusted OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.11–2.77 were associated with increased odds of sepsis hospitalization. Vitamin D status was inversely associated with risk of CAP and sepsis hospitalization in a community-living adult population. Further clinical trials are needed to evaluate whether vitamin D supplementation can reduce risk of infections, including CAP and sepsis.

  16. Gene expression profiling of mononuclear cells from patients with sepsis secondary to community-acquired pneumonia

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    Patricia Severino

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mechanisms governing the inflammatory response during sepsis involve crosstalk between diverse signaling pathways, but current knowledge provides an incomplete picture of the syndrome. Microarray-based expression profiling is a powerful approach for the investigation of complex clinical conditions such as sepsis. In this study, we investigated whole-genome expression profiles in mononuclear cells from septic patients admitted in intensive care units with community-acquired pneumonia. Blood samples were collected at the time of sepsis diagnosis and seven days later since we aimed to evaluate the role of biological processes or genes possibly involved in patient recovery. Here we provide a detailed description of the study design, including clinical information, experimental methods and procedures regarding data analysis. Metadata corresponding to microarray results deposited in the database Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO under the accession number GSE48080 are also described in this report. Our dataset allows the identification of genes possibly associated with host defense to infection as well as gene expression patterns associated with patient outcome.

  17. Obesity paradox in patients with community-acquired pneumonia: Is inflammation the missing link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Nina; Hoess, Claus; Kutz, Alexander; Christ-Crain, Mirjam; Thomann, Robert; Henzen, Christoph; Zimmerli, Werner; Mueller, Beat; Schuetz, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    Positive associations between body mass index (BMI) and clinical outcomes have been found and are called "the obesity survival paradox." However, whether obesity has protective effects or if this paradox is because of confounding remains unclear. Herein, we analyzed the effects of weight on long-term mortality in a large cohort of patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and investigated whether the differential effects of obesity on inflammation pathways accounted for mortality differences. For this secondary analysis, we followed prospectively for 6 y 763 CAP patients who were previously included in a multicenter trial (the ProHOSP Trial). To assess associations of BMI with mortality and with several inflammatory biomarker levels, we calculated three regression models adjusted for severity: the pneumonia severity index (PSI); fully adjusted for PSI, age, sex, metabolic factors, cardiovascular diseases, and other comorbidities; and fully adjusted including biomarker levels. Within the 763 patients studied, all-cause 6-y mortality was significantly lower in obese patients (BMI >30 kg/m2) compared with normal-weight patients (BMI 18.5-25 kg/m2), with a severity-adjusted hazard ratio of 0.641 (95% confidence interval 0.462-0.889) and robust results in fully adjusted and fully adjusted plus biomarker models. No associations of increased BMI and C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, or white blood cell count were found, but BMI > 30 kg/m2 was associated with higher proadrenomedullin levels. Over a 6-y long-term follow-up, we found obesity to be associated with lower all-cause mortality in CAP patients, confirming the obesity paradox in this population. However, differences in inflammatory pathways did not explain these findings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Statin Use and Hospital Length of Stay Among Adults Hospitalized With Community-acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havers, Fiona; Bramley, Anna M; Finelli, Lyn; Reed, Carrie; Self, Wesley H; Trabue, Christopher; Fakhran, Sherene; Balk, Robert; Courtney, D Mark; Girard, Timothy D; Anderson, Evan J; Grijalva, Carlos G; Edwards, Kathryn M; Wunderink, Richard G; Jain, Seema

    2016-06-15

    Prior retrospective studies suggest that statins may benefit patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) due to antiinflammatory and immunomodulatory effects. However, prospective studies of the impact of statins on CAP outcomes are needed. We determined whether statin use was associated with improved outcomes in adults hospitalized with CAP. Adults aged ≥18 years hospitalized with CAP were prospectively enrolled at 3 hospitals in Chicago, Illinois, and 2 hospitals in Nashville, Tennessee, from January 2010-June 2012. Adults receiving statins before and throughout hospitalization (statin users) were compared with those who did not receive statins (nonusers). Proportional subdistribution hazards models were used to examine the association between statin use and hospital length of stay (LOS). In-hospital mortality was a secondary outcome. We also compared groups matched on propensity score. Of 2016 adults enrolled, 483 (24%) were statin users; 1533 (76%) were nonusers. Statin users were significantly older, had more comorbidities, had more years of education, and were more likely to have health insurance than nonusers. Multivariable regression demonstrated that statin users and nonusers had similar LOS (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 0.99; 95% confidence interval [CI], .88-1.12), as did those in the propensity-matched groups (HR, 1.03; 95% CI, .88-1.21). No significant associations were found between statin use and LOS or in-hospital mortality, even when stratified by pneumonia severity. In a large prospective study of adults hospitalized with CAP, we found no evidence to suggest that statin use before and during hospitalization improved LOS or in-hospital mortality. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  19. Challenges of Empirical Antibiotic Therapy for Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Charlene M C

    2017-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality globally, responsible for more than 14% of deaths in children younger than 5 years of age. Due to difficulties with pathogen identification and diagnostics of CAP in children, targeted antimicrobial therapy is not possible, hence the widespread use of empirical antibiotics, in particular penicillins, cephalosporin, and macrolides. This review aimed to address medical, societal, and political issues associated with the widespread use of empirical antibiotics for CAP in the United Kingdom, India, and Nigeria. A literature review was performed identifying the challenges pertaining to the use of widespread empirical antibiotics for CAP in children. A qualitative analysis of included studies identified relevant themes. Empirical guidance was based on guidelines from the World Health Organization, British Thoracic Society, and Infectious Diseases Society of America, used in both industrialized and resource-poor settings. In the United Kingdom there was poor adherence to antibiotics guidelines. There was developing antibiotic resistance to penicillins and macrolides in both developing and industrialized regions. There were difficulties accessing the care and treatment when needed in Nigeria. Prevention strategies with vaccination against Streptococcus pneumonia, Haemophilus influenza, and measles are particularly important in these regions. Effective and timely treatment is required for CAP and empirical antibiotics are evidence-based and appropriate in most settings. However, better diagnostics and education to target treatment may help to prevent antibiotic resistance. Ensuring the secure financing of clean food and water, sanitation, and public health infrastructure are also required to reduce the burden of disease in children in developing countries.

  20. [Economic cost of Streptococcus pneumoniae community-acquired pneumonia, meningitis and bacteremia in an adult population that required hospitalization in Bogotá, Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón, Claudia; Dennis, Rodolfo

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae infection in adults is related to pneumonia, meningitis and bacteremia. Its care costs in adults are not well documented in Colombia and it has a greater impact in people over 45 years old. The aims of this study were to analyze the associated costs of pneumonia, bacteremia and meningitis in invasive S. pneumoniae infection in Colombia among hospitalized adults and to estimate outpatient costs for community-acquired pneumonia. Additionally, we wanted to serve as a starting point for future economic evaluations. We performed a direct cost study associated with S. pneumoniae outpatient community-acquired pneumonia, bacteremia and meningitis costs confirmed by cultures. A cohort of hospitalized adults treated between January 2010 and June 2011 in three third level hospitals in Bogotá was analyzed. We evaluated 107 records and 60 bills charged to the payer. The data were classified according to care and treatment costs. We performed an estimate of direct costs for community-acquired pneumonia for outpatient cases through Delphi methodology using expert clinicians. The average direct costs associated with pneumococcal disease were US$ 6,283, US$ 3,886, and US$ 4,768 for pneumonia, meningitis and bacteremia, respectively (exchange rate 1 US$ = Col$ 1,938.34; average variation between 2010 and 2011). Pneumonia cases were 70% men and 30% women; the distribution for meningitis was the same for both genders (50%); and for bacteremia we had 67% men and 33% women. Outpatient cost of community-acquired pneumonia was estimated at US$ 82.2 ( Col $ 159,280 ) in adults. For special cases, direct cost increased to US$ 142 ( Col $ 274,427). The management of S. pneumoniae infection in people over 45 years old represents a high cost due to the use of drugs and hospitalization, which has a direct impact on health resources. Prevention and early treatment for pneumonia can reduce the cost and the burden of the disease.

  1. Imaging of community-acquired pneumonia: Roles of imaging examinations, imaging diagnosis of specific pathogens and discrimination from noninfectious diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambu, Atsushi; Ozawa, Katsura; Kobayashi, Noriko; Tago, Masao

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews roles of imaging examinations in the management of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), imaging diagnosis of specific CAP and discrimination between CAP and noninfectious diseases. Chest radiography is usually enough to confirm the diagnosis of CAP, whereas computed tomography is required to suggest specific pathogens and to discriminate from noninfectious diseases. Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia, tuberculosis, Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia and some cases of viral pneumonia sometimes show specific imaging findings. Peribronchial nodules, especially tree-in-bud appearance, are fairly specific for infection. Evidences of organization, such as concavity of the opacities, traction bronchiectasis, visualization of air bronchograms over the entire length of the bronchi, or mild parenchymal distortion are suggestive of organizing pneumonia. We will introduce tips to effectively make use of imaging examinations in the management of CAP. PMID:25349662

  2. Severe community-acquired pneumonia and positive urinary antigen test for S. pneumoniae: amoxicillin is associated with a favourable outcome.

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    Blanc, V; Mothes, A; Smetz, A; Timontin, I; Guardia, M D; Billiemaz, A; Dellamonica, J; Vassallo, M; Néri, D; Chadapaud, S; Toyer, A-L; Del Guidice, P; Fribourg, A; Léotard, S; Nicolle, I; Roger, P-M

    2015-12-01

    Positive urinary antigen tests (UAT) for pneumococcal infection in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) may lead to targeted antibiotic therapy. We report an audit aimed at defining the link between mortality and targeted therapy. We conducted a retrospective multicentre audit of patients with severe CAP for whom a UAT was positive for S. pneumoniae. Patients admitted from January 2010 to December 2013 to 8 medical centres (from A to H) were included. Co-morbidities were defined by the specific treatment administered before hospital care, or if the diagnosis was newly established during the hospital stay. We used the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI) to assess disease severity. Only patients with PSI > 90 were included. Antibiotic treatments and the PSI were extracted from patients' charts. Amoxicillin had to be prescribed as a targeted antibiotic treatment or at the time of antibiotic reassessment. A total of 389 patients were included. The mean (±STD) PSI score was 128 ± 29; 38.9% of the patients had a class 5 PSI score. Intensive care was required for 36.6% of the patients. Amoxicillin was initially prescribed in 47 cases (12.1%) and in 34 cases after reassessment (8.7%). In logistic regression analysis, we found three parameters associated with mortality: being hospitalised in institution D, class 5 PSI score, and metastatic cancer. In contrast, three antibiotic regimens were protective factors, including targeted therapy: OR = 0.09, p < 0.001. In the context of severe CAP with positive UAT for S. pneumoniae, targeted therapy was associated with a reduction in mortality.

  3. Association of adrenal function and disease severity in community-acquired pneumonia.

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    Cornelia Mueller

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Rapid and accurate risk stratification in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is an unmet clinical need. Cortisol to dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA ratio was put forward as a prognostic marker in sepsis. We herein validated the prognostic value of the adrenal hormones DHEA, DHEA-Sulfate (DHEAS, cortisol/DHEA-, cortisol/DHEAS- and DHEA/DHEAS-ratios in patients with CAP. METHODS: We assessed severity of illness using the pneumonia severity index (PSI and measured adrenal hormone concentrations in 179 serum samples of prospectively recruited patients hospitalized with CAP. We calculated spearman rank correlation, logistic regression analysis and Kaplan Meier curves to study associations of adrenal hormones and outcomes. RESULTS: There was a significant correlation between PSI score and total cortisol (r = 0.24, p = 0.001, DHEAS (r = -0.23, p = 0.002, cortisol/DHEA (r = 0.23, p = 0.003, cortisol/DHEAS (r = 0.32, p = <0.0001 and DHEA/DHEAS (r = 0.20, p = 0.009. In age and gender adjusted logistic regression analysis, cortisol (OR:2.8, 95% CI: 1.48-5.28 and DHEA (OR: 2.62,95% CI: 1.28-5.34, but not DHEAS and the different ratios were associated with all-cause mortality. The discriminatory accuracy of cortisol and DHEA in ROC analysis (area under the curve was 0.74 and 0.61. In Kaplan Meier analysis, patients in the highest deciles of cortisol and DHEA (p = 0.005 and p = 0.015, and to a lesser extent of cortisol/DHEAS ratio (p = 0.081 had a higher risk of death. CONCLUSION: Cortisol, DHEAS and their ratios correlate with CAP severity, and cortisol and DHEA predict mortality. Adrenal function in severe pneumonia may be an important factor for CAP outcomes.

  4. Are there any differences in the community acquired pneumonias admitted to hospital over the past decade?

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    Cláudia Calado

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The past few years have seen a decline in community acquired pneumonia (CAP in children in the western world, although this has gone hand-in-hand with more serious cases needing hospital admission. Our study characterises cases of CAP admitted to hospital and compares this data with a 2001 study.We collected data on 63 admissions over a six-month period. The majority were aged 0–2 years old. Chest X-ray showed consolidation/atelectasy in 58 (92.1% and pleural effusion (PE in 17 (27.0%, of which 11 were empyema (17.4% of all admissions. The bacterial agent was isolated in five cases: Streptococcus pyogenes (two, pleural fluid, Streptococcus pneumoniae (two, blood culture and Haemophilus influenzae (one, blood culture. Sixty-one children (96.8% were prescribed antibiotherapy. The median length of hospital stay was five days. Patients with PE were older, had a longer course of fever, higher inflammatory parameters, longer hospital stay and longer course of iv antibiotics. Compared to the prior study we found greater severity of CAP, with higher prevalence of PE and empyema. Nevertheless there was a shorter course of fever during hospital stay and shorter hospital stay. We also noticed less antibiotic prescription prior to admission and greater prescription of ampicillin during hospital stay.In the literature, the higher severity of CAP has been partially attributed to the emergence of more aggressive serotypes of Stretococcus pneumoniae not included in the heptavalent vaccine. There is therefore a greater interest in new vaccines containing them. Complicated CAP should be referred to centres specialising in its diagnosis and management. Resumo: Nos últimos anos tem sido descrita, no mundo ocidental, uma redução da incidência da pneumonia aguda da comunidade (PAC nas crianças, parodoxalmente associada a maior gravidade dos casos internados. O presente estudo pretendeu caracterizar os casos de PAC internados e compará-los com

  5. INFECTION WITH HHV-6 OF MILITARY MEN AFFECTED BY COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA

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    Brusnik SV

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Human herpesvirus, 6 type (HHV-6 was isolated at the end of the 20th century from the blood leukocytes of patients with lymphoproliferative diseases. Serological studies conducted in different countries, indicate ubiquitylation of the HHV-6 and the existence of two antigenic variants - HHV-6A and HHV-6B. Their high tropism is determined in vitro to lymphocytic, nervous and dendritic cells of the CNS. Virus replicates in many cell, primary and passaged cultures of different origins. The reproduction cycle of HHV-6 continues on average 4-5 days forming syncytiums and intracytoplasmic and intranuclear inclusions. Significant destruction and lysis almost 90 % of infected cells is reported after 5-10 day of monitoring. The utility of experimentation investigating the role of HHV-6 in the development of acute and chronic diseases in respiratory tract is caused by the fact that many patients, particularly those with chronic diseases, have complaints to chronic fatigue, decreased performance and low-grade temperature more than 3-6 months. Several studies demonstrate the presence of HHV-6 in saliva, salivary and bronchiolar glands, in swabs from pharyngonasal cavity and gorge. Tropism of HHV-6 to oropharyngeal epithelium with the possibility of finding the virus in the saliva and swabs from pharyngonasal cavity and gorge was found at the end of 20th century. This fact gave the basis for work determining the level of infection by this pathogen in patients with infectious and inflammatory pathology of the respiratory tract. Materials and methods. Serological studies were conducted with 38 soldiers affected by community-acquired pneumonia. Most of the surveyed patients were ranged in age from 20 to 45 years old, middle age (32,5±1,5 years. Patients were in stationary treatment in the Kharkov military hospital. The criteria for inclusion in the study on the infection of HHV-6 were soldiers affected by community-acquired pneumonia with atypical course of

  6. Soluble RAGE as a severity marker in community acquired pneumonia associated sepsis.

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    Narvaez-Rivera, Rodrigo M; Rendon, Adrian; Salinas-Carmona, Mario C; Rosas-Taraco, Adrian G

    2012-01-20

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is considered the most important cause of death from infectious disease in developed countries. Severity assessment scores partially address the difficulties in identifying high-risk patients. A lack of specific and valid pathophysiologic severity markers affect early and effective sepsis therapy. HMGB-1, sRAGE and RAGE have been involved in sepsis and their potential as severity markers has been proposed. The aim of this study was to evaluate HMGB-1, RAGE and sRAGE levels in patients with CAP-associated sepsis and determine their possible association with clinical outcome. We evaluated 33 patients with CAP-associated sepsis admitted to the emergency room and followed in the medical wards. Severity assessment scores (CURB-65, PSI, APACHE II, SOFA) and serologic markers (HMGB-1, RAGE, sRAGE) were evaluated on admission. Thirty patients with a diagnosis of CAP-associated sepsis were enrolled in the study within 24 hours after admission. Fourteen (46.6%) had pandemic (H1N1) influenza A virus, 2 (6.6%) had seasonal influenza A and 14 other diagnoses. Of the patients in the study group, 16 (53.3%) had a fatal outcome. ARDS was observed in 17 (56.6%) and a total of 22 patients had severe sepsis on admission (73%). The SOFA score showed the greatest difference between surviving and non-surviving groups (P = .003) with similar results in ARDS patients (P = .005). sRAGE levels tended to be higher in non-surviving (P = .058) and ARDS patients (P = .058). Logistic regression modeling demonstrated that SOFA (P = .013) and sRAGE (P = .05) were the only variables that modified the probability of a fatal outcome. The association of elevated sRAGE with a fatal outcome suggests that it may have an independent causal effect in CAP. SOFA scores were the only clinical factor with the ability to identify surviving and ARDS patients.

  7. Serum levels of immunoglobulins and severity of community-acquired pneumonia

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    de la Torre, Mari C; Torán, Pere; Serra-Prat, Mateu; Palomera, Elisabet; Güell, Estel; Vendrell, Ester; Yébenes, Joan Carles; Torres, Antoni; Almirall, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Instruction There is evidence of a relationship between severity of infection and inflammatory response of the immune system. The objective is to assess serum levels of immunoglobulins and to establish its relationship with severity of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and clinical outcome. Methods This was an observational and cross-sectional study in which 3 groups of patients diagnosed with CAP were compared: patients treated in the outpatient setting (n=54), patients requiring in-patient care (hospital ward) (n=173), and patients requiring admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) (n=191). Results Serum total IgG (and IgG subclasses IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, IgG4), IgA and IgM were measured at the first clinical visit. Normal cutpoints were defined as the lowest value obtained in controls (≤680, ≤323, ≤154, ≤10, ≤5, ≤30 and ≤50 mg/dL for total IgG, IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, IgG4, IgM and IgA, respectively). Serum immunoglobulin levels decreased in relation to severity of CAP. Low serum levels of total IgG, IgG1 and IgG2 showed a relationship with ICU admission. Low serum level of total IgG was independently associated with ICU admission (OR=2.45, 95% CI 1.4 to 4.2, p=0.002), adjusted by the CURB-65 severity score and comorbidities (chronic respiratory and heart diseases). Low levels of total IgG, IgG1 and IgG2 were significantly associated with 30-day mortality. Conclusions Patients with severe CAP admitted to the ICU showed lower levels of immunoglobulins than non-ICU patients and this increased mortality. PMID:27933180

  8. Ceftaroline fosamil for community-acquired pneumonia and skin and skin structure infections: a systematic review.

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    El Hajj, Maguy Saffouh; Turgeon, Ricky D; Wilby, Kyle John

    2017-02-01

    Background Ceftaroline is a parentally administered cephalosporin that has an in vitro expanded spectrum of activity compared with other cephalosporins yet data is conflicting regarding its place in therapy. Aim of the Review To compare the efficacy and safety of ceftaroline against standard antibiotic regimens for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and complicated skin and skin structure infections (cSSSIs). Method The databases of MEDLINE, EBSCO, and Embase were searched up to June 2016. Manual review of references was completed and experts in the field were contacted for unpublished data. Randomized controlled trials of ceftaroline in CAP or cSSSI populations were included. Outcomes included clinical cure, mortality, adverse events, serious adverse events, and discontinuation due to adverse events. Meta-analysis was used to pool results for these outcomes. We performed subgroup analyses for gram positive infections in CAP and infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in cSSSIs. Risk of bias was assessed for all studies. Results Six trials (three for each indication) were included, each of which had an unclear or high risk of bias in at least one domain. For CAP, ceftaroline was significantly more efficacious in achieving clinical cure than ceftriaxone [risk ratio (RR) 1.11, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04-1.19; I2 = 47%]. For cSSSIs, there was no significant difference in clinical cure between ceftaroline and vancomycin plus aztreonam (RR 1.01, 95% CI 0.97-1.05; I2 = 0%). No differences were found for overall mortality, serious adverse events, discontinuation due to adverse events, and overall adverse events. Conclusion Ceftaroline is a viable therapeutic alternative for patients with CAP and cSSSIs, yet identified risks of bias and poor external validity preclude it from being recommended as a first-line agent.

  9. [Respiratory day hospital care for immunocompetent adult patients with community-acquired pneumonia].

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    Roldán, Rosa T; Torres, María Elena P; Gallardo, Daniel M; Arias, Marisol C; Saldías, Fernando P

    2015-04-01

    Day hospitals can reduce health care costs without increasing the risks of patients with lower respiratory tract infection. To report the experience of a respiratory day hospital care delivered to adult patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in a public hospital. During the fall and winter of 2011 and 2012, adult patients with CAP of intermediate risk categories were assessed in the emergency room, their severity was stratified according to confusion, respiratory rate, blood pressure, 65 years of age or older (CRB-65) score and the Chilean CAP Clinical Guidelines, and were admitted to the respiratory day hospital. One hundred seventeen patients aged 67 ± 16 years, (62% females) with CAP were attended in the respiratory day hospital. Ninety percent had comorbidities, especially chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in 58%, heart disease in 32%, diabetes in 16% and asthma in 13%. Their most important risk factors were age over 65 years in 60%, comorbidities in 88%, failure of antibiotic treatment in 17%, loss of autonomy in 21%, vital sign abnormalities in 60%, mental confusion in 5%, multilobar CAP in 23%, pleural effusion in 15%, hypoxemia in 41% and a serum urea nitrogen over 30 mg/dL in 16%. Patients stayed an average of seven days in the day hospital with oxygen, hydration, chest physiotherapy and third-generation cephalosporins (89%) associated with quinolones (52%) or macrolides (4%). Thirteen patients required noninvasive ventilation, eight patients were hospitalized because of clinical deterioration and three died in hospital. Day hospital care reduced hospital admission rates of patients with lower respiratory tract infections.

  10. Individualization of antibacterial therapy in severe community acquired pneumonia considering systemic inflammation and immune status

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    Pertseva Т.О.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Individualization of antibiotic therapy (ABT of patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is a key issue in the world. Today the role of various biomarkers in ABT individualization in patients with CAP, including markers of systemic inflammation and cellular immunity is vividly discussed. But their variability at different etiological factors of CAP according to the immunological reactivity of patients was not studied at all. That’s why the aim of our study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of marker of systemic inflammation procalcitonin (PCT and marker of cellular immunity CD4+ in patients with severe CAP, considering etiological factor and their role in individualization of antibiotic preparation (ABP choice in these patients. A study group consisted of patients with severe CAP without HIV and identified respiratory pathogen. Comparison group consisted of HIV-positive persons, who accounted nearly 17% of all the patients. According to the results of this work it was revealed that in all patients CAP was accompanied with marked inflammatory response (which is confirmed by 250 times higher than normal serum PCT (level and severe immunodeficiency state, even in HIV absence. The markers changed depending on CAP etiology. In CAP caused by Gr(- pathogens PCT levels was 500 times higher than normal, and the number of CD4+ was less than normal in all patients. Conclusions: 1 reduced number of CD4, less than 200 ml-1 in patients with severe CAP, accompanied by a sharp increase in serum PCT level is a marker of Gr(- respiratory pathogen; 2 the imbalance between clinical symptoms and normal serum PCT level against a sharp decline in CD4+number is an indication to search for HIV and administration of the antipneumocystic therapy.

  11. Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Children Caused by Pneumococci of MLSB- and M-Phenotype: Clinical Cases

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    Natalya A. Ilenkova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The key to effective treatment of a bacterial infection is a rapid and proper selection of antimicrobial therapy. WHO and UNICEF developed the Global Action Plan for the Prevention and Control of Pneumonia and Diarrhoea (GAPPD aimed to elimination of the preventable causes of child death by 2025 by optimizing diagnosis and treatment. The main pneumonia agents are fastidious microorganisms that require special nutrient media and cultivation conditions that are absent in many laboratories. Due to low effectiveness of the etiological diagnosis, the choice of antibiotic therapy for pneumonia in the practice of a pediatrician is usually empirical. The article describes clinical cases of community-acquired pneumonia in children caused by strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae with a multiple antibiotic resistance. The above experience can be used by pediatricians in everyday practice.

  12. Microbial Etiology of Community-Acquired Pneumonia Among Infants and Children Admitted to the Pediatric Hospital, Ain Shams University.

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    El Seify, Magda Yehia; Fouda, Eman Mahmoud; Ibrahim, Hanan Mohamed; Fathy, Maha Muhammad; Husseiny Ahmed, Asmaa Al; Khater, Walaa Shawky; El Deen, Noha Nagi Mohammed Salah; Abouzeid, Heba Galal Mohamed; Hegazy, Nancy Riyad Ahmed; Elbanna, Heba Salah Sayed

    2016-09-29

    While recognizing the etiology of community-acquired pneumonia is necessary for formulating local antimicrobial guidelines, limited data is published about this etiology in Egyptian pediatric patients. To determine the frequency of bacterial and viral pathogens causing community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) among immunocompetent Egyptian infants and preschool children. Ninety infants and preschool-age children admitted to our hospital with CAP were prospectively included in the study. Etiological agents were identified using conventional bacteriological identification methods and IgM antibodies detection against common atypical respiratory bacteria and viruses. An etiology was identified in 59 patients (65.5%). Bacterial pathogens were detected in 43 (47.8%) of the cases while viral pathogens were detected in 23 (25.5%). Coinfection with more than one etiologic agent was evident in seven patients (7.8%). The most common typical bacterial cause of pneumonia was Staphylococcus aureus ( n = 12, 13.3%), followed by Streptococcus pneumoniae and Klebsiella pneumoniae ( n = 7, 7.8%, each). The commonest atypical bacterium was Mycoplasma pneumoniae ( n = 10, 11.1%), whereas the commonest viral etiology was influenza viruses ( n = 11, 12.2%). Although we could not determine the causative agent in some studied cases, this study provides preliminary data regarding the spectrum and frequency of microorganisms causing CAP in Egyptian infants and preschool children.

  13. Clinical and Radiological Characteristics of Tuberculous Pneumonia: Comparison with Typical Pulmonary Tuberculosis and Community-Acquired Pneumonia

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    Lee, Seung Jun; Kim, You Eun; Cho, Yu Ji; Jeong, Yi Yeong; Park, Mi Jung; Jeon, Kyoung Nyeo; Kim, Ho Cheol; Lee, Jong Deog; Kim, Jang Rak; Hwang, Young Sil [College of Medicine, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-15

    To evaluate the clinical and radiological characteristics of tuberculous pneumonia (TBPn). We compared the clinical presentation, pneumonia severity index (PSI), and radiological findings of 51 TBPn patients with those of typical pulmonary tuberculosis (PulTB) and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) patients. The mean age of patients with TBPn was higher than that of patients with CAP or PulTB (66.6 {+-} 15.8 vs. 53.1 {+-} 17.1, 54.9 {+-} 15.7) (p < 0.05). Diabetes mellitus was more common in patients with TB than in those with CAP (24.1% vs. 8.2%) (p < 0.05). The PSI scores for TBPn and CAP were similar (79.5 {+-} 31.1 vs. 71.8 {+-} 28.3, respectively) and were higher than that for PulTB (64 {+-} 26.8) (p < 0.05). The ratio of lower lobe involvement was higher in TBPn and CAP than in PulTB (49% and 75.5% vs. 22.4%, respectively). Cavity formation and centrilobular nodules were more common in TBPn than in CAP (13.7% vs. 6.1% and 74.5% vs. 22.4%, respectively) (p < 0.05). Although TBPn shows a similar clinical presentation to CAP, it is more common in elderly patients and more commonly involves lower lobe involvement with cavity formation and centrilobular nodules. Therefore, in cases in which there may be diagnostic uncertainty, appropriate diagnostic procedures following these findings are required to differentiate these diseases.

  14. Differentiation of bacterial and non-bacterial community-acquired pneumonia by thin-section computed tomography

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    Ito, Isao [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Kurashiki Central Hospital, 1-1-1 Miwa, Kurashiki 710-8602 (Japan); Department of Respiratory Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Shogoin-kawaharacho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)], E-mail: isaoito@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Ishida, Tadashi [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Kurashiki Central Hospital, 1-1-1 Miwa, Kurashiki 710-8602 (Japan)], E-mail: ishidat@kchnet.or.jp; Togashi, Kaori [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Shogoin-kawaharacho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)], E-mail: ktogashi@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Niimi, Akio [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Shogoin-kawaharacho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)], E-mail: niimi@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Koyama, Hiroshi [General Internal Medicine, National Hospital Organization Kyoto Medical Center, 1-1 Fukakusa-Mukohatacho, Fushimi-ku, Kyoto 612-8555 (Japan)], E-mail: hkoyama-kyt@umin.ac.jp; Ishimori, Takayoshi [Department of Radiology, Kurashiki Central Hospital, 1-1-1 Miwa, Kurashiki 710-8602 (Japan)], E-mail: ti10794@kchnet.or.jp; Kobayashi, Hisataka [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Shogoin-kawaharacho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Molecular Imaging Program, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Building 10, Room 1B40, MSC1088, 10 Center Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892-1088 (United States)], E-mail: kobayash@mail.nih.gov; Mishima, Michiaki [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Shogoin-kawaharacho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)], E-mail: mishima@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2009-12-15

    Background and objective: The management of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) depends, in part, on the identification of the causative agents. The objective of this study was to determine the potential of thin-section computed tomography (CT) in differentiating bacterial and non-bacterial pneumonia. Patients and methods: Thin-section CT studies were prospectively examined in hospitalized CAP patients within 2 days of admission, followed by retrospective assessment by two pulmonary radiologists. Thin-section CT findings on the pneumonias caused by each pathogen were examined, and two types of pneumonias were compared. Using multivariate logistic regression analyses, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were produced. Results: Among 183 CAP episodes (181 patients, 125 men and 56 women, mean age {+-} S.D.: 61.1 {+-} 19.7) examined by thin-section CT, the etiologies of 125 were confirmed (94 bacterial pneumonia and 31 non-bacterial pneumonia). Centrilobular nodules were specific for non-bacterial pneumonia and airspace nodules were specific for bacterial pneumonia (specificities of 89% and 94%, respectively) when located in the outer lung areas. When centrilobular nodules were the principal finding, they were specific but lacked sensitivity for non-bacterial pneumonia (specificity 98% and sensitivity 23%). To distinguish the two types of pneumonias, centrilobular nodules, airspace nodules and lobular shadows were found to be important by multivariate analyses. ROC curve analysis discriminated bacterial pneumonia from non-bacterial pneumonia among patients without underlying lung diseases, yielding an optimal point with sensitivity and specificity of 86% and 79%, respectively, but was less effective when all patients were analyzed together (70% and 84%, respectively). Conclusion: Thin-section CT examination was applied for the differentiation of bacterial and non-bacterial pneumonias. Though showing some potential, this examination at the present time would

  15. Community-acquired lobar pneumonia caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in Japan: a case report with histological and immunohistochemical examination.

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    Takajo, Daiji; Iwaya, Keiichi; Katsurada, Yuka; Miyai, Kosuke; Takasu, Akira; Matsubara, Osamu; Sakamoto, Toshihisa; Tamai, Seiichi; Tsuda, Hitoshi

    2014-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common pathogen in nosocomial and/or healthcare-associated pneumonia, but is rare in community-acquired pneumonia. A 50-year-old previously healthy woman was taken to the emergency department because of rapidly progressing dyspnea. Chest radiograph showed consolidation of the entire right upper lobe, a finding suggestive of lobar pneumonia. The patient died of respiratory failure with bronchial bleeding, on the same day of admission. Autopsy revealed that the alveoli throughout the upper right lobe were filled with dense inflammatory cells mainly consisting of macrophages and neutrophils. Immunoreactive bacilli by using an anti-P. aeruginosa antibody were localized within macrophages accumulated in the alveoli as well in the vessel walls. Lobar pneumonia composed of dense neutrophils and bacteria-laden macrophages with total lung congestion and edema may be characteristic for community-acquired P. aeruginosa pneumonia in a healthy adult. © 2014 The Authors. Pathology International © 2014 Japanese Society of Pathology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. Predictors of inhospital mortality and re-hospitalization in older adults with community-acquired pneumonia: a prospective cohort study

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    Marrie Tom

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A better understanding of potentially modifiable predictors of in-hospital mortality and re-admission to the hospital following discharge may help to improve management of community-acquired pneumonia in older adults. We aimed to assess the associations of potentially modifiable factors with mortality and re-hospitalization in older adults hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia. Methods A prospective cohort study was conducted from July 2003 to April 2005 in two Canadian cities. Patients aged 65 years or older hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia were followed up for up to 30 days from initial hospitalization for mortality and these patients who were discharged alive within 30 days of initial hospitalization were followed up to 90 days of initial hospitalization for re-hospitalization. Separate logistic regression analyses were performed identify the predictors of mortality and re-hospitalization. Results Of 717 enrolled patients hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia, 49 (6.8% died within 30 days of hospital admission. Among these patients, 526 were discharged alive within 30 days of hospitalization of whom 58 (11.2% were re-hospitalized within 90 days of initial hospitalization. History of hip fracture (odds ratio (OR = 4.00, 95% confidence interval (CI = (1.46, 10.96, P = .007, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (OR = 2.31, 95% CI = (1.18, 4.50, P = .014, cerebrovascular disease (OR = 2.11, 95% CI = (1.03, 4.31, P = .040 were associated with mortality. Male sex (OR = 2.35, 95% CI = (1.13, 4.85, P = .022 was associated with re-hospitalization while vitamin E supplementation was protective (OR = 0.37 (0.16, 0.90, P = .028. Lower socioeconomic status, prior influenza and pneumococcal vaccinations, appropriate antibiotic prescription upon admission, and lower nutrition risk were not significantly associated with mortality or re-hospitalization. Conclusion Chronic comorbidities appear to be the most

  17. Influence of socioeconomic status on community-acquired pneumonia outcomes in elderly patients requiring hospitalization: a multicenter observational study.

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    Izquierdo, Conchita; Oviedo, Manuel; Ruiz, Laura; Sintes, Xavier; Vera, Isabel; Nebot, Manel; Bayas, Jose-María; Carratalà, Jordi; Varona, Wenceslao; Sousa, Dolores; Celorrio, Jose-Miguel; Salleras, Luis; Domínguez, Angela

    2010-07-15

    The associations between socioeconomic status and community-acquired pneumonia outcomes in adults have been studied although studies did not always document a relationship.The aim of this multicenter observational study was to determine the association between socioeconomic status and community-acquired pneumonia outcomes in the elderly, in the context of a public health system providing universal free care to the whole population. A total of 651 patients aged > or =65 years hospitalized due to community-acquired pneumonia through the emergency departments of five Spanish public hospitals were recruited and followed up between May 2005 and January 2007. The primary outcomes studied were: length of stay, intensive care unit admission, overall mortality and readmission. Socioeconomic status was measured using both individual and community data: occupation [categorized in six social groups (I, II, III, IVa, IVb and V)], educational level (level or > or = secondary level) and disposable family income of the municipality or district of residence [>12,500 euro (high municipality family income) and income)]. The six social groups were further categorized as upper/middle social class (groups I-IVb) and lower class (group V).Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed. OR and their 95% confidence intervals were calculated. All statistical tests were two tailed and statistical significance was established as p high municipality family income and 63.6% were upper/middle social class (I-IVb). Only 15.7% of patients had a secondary education. The adjusted analysis showed no association between pneumonia outcomes and social class, educational level or municipality family income. However, length of stay increased significantly in patients in whom the factors, living alone and being a smoker or ex-smoker coincided (p educational level or municipality family income and the variables of pneumonia outcomes. The lack of differences between social classes supports the provision

  18. Emergency Medicine Evaluation of Community-Acquired Pneumonia: History, Examination, Imaging and Laboratory Assessment, and Risk Scores.

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    Long, Brit; Long, Drew; Koyfman, Alex

    2017-11-01

    Pneumonia is a common infection, accounting for approximately one million hospitalizations in the United States annually. This potentially life-threatening disease is commonly diagnosed based on history, physical examination, and chest radiograph. To investigate emergency medicine evaluation of community-acquired pneumonia including history, physical examination, imaging, and the use of risk scores in patient assessment. Pneumonia is the number one cause of death from infectious disease. The condition is broken into several categories, the most common being community-acquired pneumonia. Diagnosis centers on history, physical examination, and chest radiograph. However, all are unreliable when used alone, and misdiagnosis occurs in up to one-third of patients. Chest radiograph has a sensitivity of 46-77%, and biomarkers including white blood cell count, procalcitonin, and C-reactive protein provide little benefit in diagnosis. Biomarkers may assist admitting teams, but require further study for use in the emergency department. Ultrasound has shown utility in correctly identifying pneumonia. Clinical gestalt demonstrates greater ability to diagnose pneumonia. Clinical scores including Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI); Confusion, blood Urea nitrogen, Respiratory rate, Blood pressure, age 65 score (CURB-65); and several others may be helpful for disposition, but should supplement, not replace, clinical judgment. Patient socioeconomic status must be considered in disposition decisions. The diagnosis of pneumonia requires clinical gestalt using a combination of history and physical examination. Chest radiograph may be negative, particularly in patients presenting early in disease course and elderly patients. Clinical scores can supplement clinical gestalt and assist in disposition when used appropriately. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Soluble RAGE as a severity marker in community acquired pneumonia associated sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narvaez-Rivera Rodrigo M

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is considered the most important cause of death from infectious disease in developed countries. Severity assessment scores partially address the difficulties in identifying high-risk patients. A lack of specific and valid pathophysiologic severity markers affect early and effective sepsis therapy. HMGB-1, sRAGE and RAGE have been involved in sepsis and their potential as severity markers has been proposed. The aim of this study was to evaluate HMGB-1, RAGE and sRAGE levels in patients with CAP-associated sepsis and determine their possible association with clinical outcome. Method We evaluated 33 patients with CAP-associated sepsis admitted to the emergency room and followed in the medical wards. Severity assessment scores (CURB-65, PSI, APACHE II, SOFA and serologic markers (HMGB-1, RAGE, sRAGE were evaluated on admission. Results Thirty patients with a diagnosis of CAP-associated sepsis were enrolled in the study within 24 hours after admission. Fourteen (46.6% had pandemic (H1N1 influenza A virus, 2 (6.6% had seasonal influenza A and 14 other diagnoses. Of the patients in the study group, 16 (53.3% had a fatal outcome. ARDS was observed in 17 (56.6% and a total of 22 patients had severe sepsis on admission (73%. The SOFA score showed the greatest difference between surviving and non-surviving groups (P = .003 with similar results in ARDS patients (P = .005. sRAGE levels tended to be higher in non-surviving (P = .058 and ARDS patients (P = .058. Logistic regression modeling demonstrated that SOFA (P = .013 and sRAGE (P = .05 were the only variables that modified the probability of a fatal outcome. Conclusion The association of elevated sRAGE with a fatal outcome suggests that it may have an independent causal effect in CAP. SOFA scores were the only clinical factor with the ability to identify surviving and ARDS patients.

  20. [Analysis of the efficiency of antimicrobial treatment for community-acquired pneumonia in clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukova, O V; Ruina, O V; Kononova, S V; Konyshkina, T M

    To analyze actual drug consumption based on the defined daily dose (DDD analysis) and to analyze the utilization of drugs based on their proportion of the total defined daily doses (DU90% analysis) for the antimicrobial therapy of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in clinical practice at a hospital in Russia. The investigation materials were the data of 117 case histories of male (51.3%) and female (48.7%) patients hospitalized with CAP at Nizhny Novgorod City Clinical Hospital Five in 2015. The investigation enrolled all the patients admitted to the hospital over the analyzed period. DDD analysis and DU90% analysis were used as study methods. DDD analysis and DU90% analysis of antimicrobial therapy for CAP were carried out at the hospital in clinical practice during a year. The annual number of defined daily doses (NDDD) for antimicrobial drugs, the number of defined daily doses per 100 bed-days (NDDD/100 bed-days), and a drug load (g) per 1000 CAP patients per day and per CAP patient per year were determined. The largest NDDD/year for CAP treatment with ceftriaxone was 376 g, or 43.43 NDDD/100 bed-days, which is much higher than that with other antimicrobial agents. The daily drug load of ceftriaxone per 1,000 CAP patients was 8.8 g, which exceeds that of moxifloxacin by 18.7 times, azithromycin and levofloxacin by 5 times, and ampicillin/sulbactam by 2.3 times. The daily drug load of ceftriaxone per CAP patient was 3.2 g, which exceeds that of of ampicillin/sulbactam by 2.3 times, levofloxacin and azithromycin by 5 times, and moxifloxacin by 19 times. It may be recommended that the proportion of cephalosporins as drugs that promote the rise of resistance in microbes and their production of extended-spectrum β-lactamases should be further limited, the proportion of penicillins be extended, and the administered ampicillin/sulbactam be added, for example, by amoxicillin/clavulanate. Penicillins contribute to the rise of resistance to a lesser degree, and the use

  1. Antimicrobial susceptibility in community-acquired bacterial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Bacterial isolates were obtained from adults suspected to have community-acquired pneumonia and who sought treatment at two city council clinics in Nairobi, Kenya. Susceptibility to antimicrobial agents was performed using a microdilution broth method, according to the criteria set ...

  2. New Sepsis Definition (Sepsis-3) and Community-acquired Pneumonia Mortality. A Validation and Clinical Decision-Making Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranzani, Otavio T; Prina, Elena; Menéndez, Rosario; Ceccato, Adrian; Cilloniz, Catia; Méndez, Raul; Gabarrus, Albert; Barbeta, Enric; Bassi, Gianluigi Li; Ferrer, Miquel; Torres, Antoni

    2017-11-15

    The Sepsis-3 Task Force updated the clinical criteria for sepsis, excluding the need for systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria. The clinical implications of the proposed flowchart including the quick Sequential (Sepsis-related) Organ Failure Assessment (qSOFA) and SOFA scores are unknown. To perform a clinical decision-making analysis of Sepsis-3 in patients with community-acquired pneumonia. This was a cohort study including adult patients with community-acquired pneumonia from two Spanish university hospitals. SIRS, qSOFA, the Confusion, Respiratory Rate and Blood Pressure (CRB) score, modified SOFA (mSOFA), the Confusion, Urea, Respiratory Rate, Blood Pressure and Age (CURB-65) score, and Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI) were calculated with data from the emergency department. We used decision-curve analysis to evaluate the clinical usefulness of each score and the primary outcome was in-hospital mortality. Of 6,874 patients, 442 (6.4%) died in-hospital. SIRS presented the worst discrimination, followed by qSOFA, CRB, mSOFA, CURB-65, and PSI. Overall, overestimation of in-hospital mortality and miscalibration was more evident for qSOFA and mSOFA. SIRS had lower net benefit than qSOFA and CRB, significantly increasing the risk of over-treatment and being comparable with the "treat-all" strategy. PSI had higher net benefit than mSOFA and CURB-65 for mortality, whereas mSOFA seemed more applicable when considering mortality/intensive care unit admission. Sepsis-3 flowchart resulted in better identification of patients at high risk of mortality. qSOFA and CRB outperformed SIRS and presented better clinical usefulness as prompt tools for patients with community-acquired pneumonia in the emergency department. Among the tools for a comprehensive patient assessment, PSI had the best decision-aid tool profile.

  3. Comparison between pathogen directed antibiotic treatment and empirical broad spectrum antibiotic treatment in patients with community acquired pneumonia: a prospective randomised study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Eerden, M. M.; Vlaspolder, F.; de Graaff, C. S.; Groot, T.; Bronsveld, W.; Jansen, H. M.; Boersma, W. G.

    2005-01-01

    Background: There is much controversy about the ideal approach to the management of community acquired pneumonia ( CAP). Recommendations differ from a pathogen directed approach to an empirical strategy with broad spectrum antibiotics. Methods: In a prospective randomised open study performed

  4. Radiological findings of community-acquired methicillin-resistant and methicillin-susceptible staphylococcus aureus pediatric pneumonia in Hawaii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdem, Guliz; Bergert, Lora; Len, Kyra; Melish, Marian [University of Hawaii, John A. Burns School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Honolulu, HI (United States); Kon, Kevin; DiMauro, Robert [Kapiolani Medical Center for Women and Children, Department of Radiology, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus (CA-SA) infections are common among pediatric patients in Hawaii. We wanted to characterize the radiological features of methicillin-susceptible (CA-MSSA) and methicillin-resistant (CA-MRSA) staphylococcal pneumonia in Hawaiian children. We retrospectively reviewed medical records and imaging studies of children with SA pneumonia identified from 1996 through 2007. Of 40 children, 26 (65%) had CA-MRSA pneumonia and 14 patients (35%) had CA-MSSA pneumonia. CA-MRSA patients were significantly younger than CA-MSSA patients (65% younger than 1 year vs. 36% older). In a majority (62%) of CA-MRSA patients, the consolidation was unilateral; in most of the CA-MSSA cases (79%), the consolidation was bilateral. Fifty percent of the patients with CA-MRSA and 21% of those with CA-MSSA had pneumatoceles (P = 0.1). CA-MRSA patients more commonly had pleural effusions (85% vs. 64% for CA-MSSA) and pleural thickening (50% vs. 36% for CA-MSSA). This case series describes the radiologic characteristics of CA-MRSA and CA-MSSA pneumonia in children in a highly endemic area. We found that CA-MRSA pneumonias are unilateral in a majority of pediatric pneumonia cases, are more common in children 1 year or younger, and have higher rates of complications in comparison to CA-MSSA patients. (orig.)

  5. The potential of molecular diagnostics and serum procalcitonin levels to change the antibiotic management of community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, David; Gelfer, Gita; Wang, Lian; Myers, Jillian; Bajema, Kristina; Johnston, Michael; Leggett, James

    2016-09-01

    Two diagnostic bundles were compared in 127 evaluable patients admitted with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Diagnostic modalities in all patients included cultures of sputum (if obtainable) and blood, urine for detection of the antigens of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila, and nasal swabs for PCR probes for S. pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus. At least one procalcitonin level was measured in all patients. For virus detection, patients were randomized to either a 5-virus, lab-generated PCR panel or the broader and faster FilmArray PCR panel. Overall, an etiologic diagnosis was established in 71% of the patients. A respiratory virus was detected in 39%. The potential for improved antibiotic stewardship was evident in 25 patients with only detectable respiratory virus and normal levels of PCT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Prophylaxis of Community-Acquired Pneumonia Outbreaks with Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine. Prospects Analysis for Russian Military Community].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guchev, I A; Klochkov, O I; Sinopalnikov, A I

    2016-01-01

    Pneumococcal pneumonia and other diseases caused by pneumococci still remain the main factors of high morbidity and mortality rates throughout the world. Pneumococci as the leading pathogens of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), acute otitis media and sinusitis also cause a number of other serious systemic disorders including invasive infections with high mortality in spite of the antimicrobial resistance status and adequate antimicrobials choice. Pneumococcal infections are responsible for 5-35% or more of community-acquired pneumonias. The burden of pneumonia (up to 100-200 per thousand) is recorded among military recruits in training centers. Since the specific environment of the soldiers could be carrected, their health protection requires medical surveillance. For these reasons, polysaccharide and more immunogenic conjugated pneumococcal vaccines were developed. There is now an urgent need to understand whether such vaccines are effective in military conscripts. Controversy about the effectiveness and value of the polysaccharide (PPV-23) vaccine as a CAP morbidity restriction measure still persists. There were implemented plenty of metaanalyses of pneumococcal vaccines in adults. Some of them showed that the vaccine was effective against bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia in 'low risk' healthy adults and elders. There have been a number of poor quality observational studies in Russia where 'all pneumonia cases' were considered as an endpoint. It remains controversial whether these observational studies provide adequate evidence to justify the use of the polysaccharide vaccine in the groups of healthy young men for whom it is being advocated. In our analysis we found weak evidence supporting pneumococcal vaccination with PPV-23 for this group. Nevertheless, favorable tendency was found to immunize. It is the reason for a trail to find pharmacoepidemiological support for vaccination by novel conjugated vaccines with better immunogenicity.

  7. Predictors of pneumococcal vaccination among older adults with pneumonia: findings from the Community Acquired Pneumonia Impact Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loeb Mark

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP almost triples for older adults aged 65 years or older. In Canada, CAP is a leading cause of hospital admissions and mortality. Although CAP is very prevalent, complications due to CAP may be reduced with the pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV. The purpose of this study was to identify predictors of pneumococcal vaccination among community-dwelling older adults with clinically diagnosed CAP. Methods A telephone survey was used to collect detailed information from adults aged 60 years and older with clinically diagnosed CAP. This was a community wide study with participants being recruited from all radiology clinics in one Ontario community. Results The most important predictors of pneumococcal vaccination among older adults included: getting an influenza vaccine within the past year (OR 14.5, 95% CI 4.27 to 49.0; at least weekly contact with a friend (OR 3.97, 95% CI 1.71 to 9.24; having one or more co-morbidities/chronic conditions (OR 3.64, 95% CI 1.60 to 8.28; being 70 years of age or older (OR 2.56, 95% CI 1.21 to 5.40; having health problems that limited physical activities (OR 5.37, 95% CI 1.49 to 19.3; having little or no bodily pain (OR 2.90, 95% CI 1.25 to 6.73; and reporting having spiritual values or religious faith (OR 3.47, 95% CI 1.03 to 11.67. Conclusions A wide range of factors, including demographic, co-morbidity, quality of life, social support and lifestyle were found to be associated with pneumococcal vaccination status among older adults with clinically diagnosed CAP. The findings from this study could inform future pneumococcal immunization strategies by identifying individuals who are least likely to receive the PPV.

  8. Risk of heart failure after community acquired pneumonia: prospective controlled study with 10 years of follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eurich, Dean T; Marrie, Thomas J; Minhas-Sandhu, Jasjeet K; Majumdar, Sumit R

    2017-02-13

    Objective To determine the attributable risk of community acquired pneumonia on incidence of heart failure throughout the age range of affected patients and severity of the infection.Design Cohort study.Setting Six hospitals and seven emergency departments in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, 2000-02.Participants 4988 adults with community acquired pneumonia and no history of heart failure were prospectively recruited and matched on age, sex, and setting of treatment (inpatient or outpatient) with up to five adults without pneumonia (controls) or prevalent heart failure (n=23 060).Main outcome measures Risk of hospital admission for incident heart failure or a combined endpoint of heart failure or death up to 2012, evaluated using multivariable Cox proportional hazards analyses.Results The average age of participants was 55 years, 2649 (53.1%) were men, and 63.4% were managed as outpatients. Over a median of 9.9 years (interquartile range 5.9-10.6), 11.9% (n=592) of patients with pneumonia had incident heart failure compared with 7.4% (n=1712) of controls (adjusted hazard ratio 1.61, 95% confidence interval 1.44 to 1.81). Patients with pneumonia aged 65 or less had the lowest absolute increase (but greatest relative risk) of heart failure compared with controls (4.8% v 2.2%; adjusted hazard ratio 1.98, 95% confidence interval 1.5 to 2.53), whereas patients with pneumonia aged more than 65 years had the highest absolute increase (but lowest relative risk) of heart failure (24.8% v 18.9%; adjusted hazard ratio 1.55, 1.36 to 1.77). Results were consistent in the short term (90 days) and intermediate term (one year) and whether patients were treated in hospital or as outpatients.Conclusion Our results show that community acquired pneumonia substantially increases the risk of heart failure across the age and severity range of cases. This should be considered when formulating post-discharge care plans and preventive strategies, and assessing downstream episodes of

  9. Effectiveness of structured discharge process in reducing hospital readmission of adult patients with community acquired pneumonia: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo, Grace Rita R; Reyes, Flordelis C; Thompson, Fay V; Johnson, Pauline M; Shortridge-Baggett, Lillie M

    2012-01-01

    Hospital readmission soon after discharge is common and costly. To date, published studies of effectiveness of structured discharge process addressing reduction of hospital readmission have focused on patients with chronic conditions and complex needs, but not in adult patients with community acquired pneumonia. To examine and synthesise the best available evidence related to effectiveness of structured discharge process in reducing hospital readmission of adult patients with community acquired pneumonia. This review considered studies that included hospitalised adult patients diagnosed with community acquired pneumonia regardless of gender, ethnicity, severity, and co-morbidities.Structured discharge process related to early patient engagement, patient-caregiver dyad intervention, transitional care, coordinated care, and multidisciplinary team approach.The outcome measures included in this review were hospital readmission, emergency room visits, and unscheduled visits to healthcare provider.Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-experimental studies were considered for inclusion. The search strategy aimed to find both published and unpublished studies in English language without date limits. A search of PubMed/MEDLINE, CINAHL, CINAHL Plus, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), PsycINFO, Academic Search Premier, Health Source Nursing/Academic Edition and seven other databases was conducted. Studies were critically appraised by two independent reviewers using the Joanna Briggs Institute's standardised critical appraisal tool. Data were extracted using the standardised Joanna Briggs Institute's data extraction instruments. Statistical pooling in meta-analysis was not appropriate. Findings are presented in a narrative form. Three articles were included in the review, two RCTs and one pseudo-randomised controlled clinical trial. Structured discharge process did not have a positive impact in reducing hospital readmission at 30, 90, and

  10. Spotlight on solithromycin in the treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia: design, development, and potential place in therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald BJ

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Bryan J Donald,1,2 Salim Surani,3–5 Harmeet S Deol,1,6 Uche J Mbadugha,1 George Udeani1,7 1Department of Pharmacy, Corpus Christi Medical Center, Corpus Christi, TX, 2Department of Clinical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Louisiana at Monroe, Monroe, LA, 3Department of Pulmonology/Critical Care, Corpus Christi Medical Center, Corpus Christi, TX, 4Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, Texas A&M University Health Science Center, College Station, TX, 5Department of Medicine, College of Osteopathic Medicine, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Denton, TX, 6Department of Pharmacy Services, Yale New Haven Hospital, New Haven, CT, 7Pharmacy Practice, College of Pharmacy, Texas A&M University Health Science Center, Kingsville, TX, USA Abstract: Community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP is a leading cause of death worldwide. However, antibacterial agents used to treat common pathogens in CABP are marked by adverse drug events and increasing antimicrobial resistance. Solithromycin is a new ketolide antibiotic, based on the macrolide antibiotic structure, being studied for use in CABP. It has efficacy in vitro against the common causative pathogens in CABP including Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and atypical pathogens. In Phase II and Phase III clinical trials, it has been demonstrated efficacious as a single agent for treatment of CABP with an apparently milder adverse event profile than alternative agents. Keywords: solithromycin, macrolide antibiotics, community-acquired bacterial pneumonia, CABP

  11. Community-acquired meningitis caused by a CG86 hypervirulent Klebsiella pneumoniae strain: first case report in the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melot, Bénédicte; Brisse, Sylvain; Breurec, Sébastien; Passet, Virginie; Malpote, Edith; Lamaury, Isabelle; Thiery, Guillaume; Hoen, Bruno

    2016-12-07

    Community-acquired bacterial meningitis due to Klebsiella pneumoniae has mainly been described in Southeast Asia and has a poor prognosis. Severe invasive infections caused by K. pneumoniae, including meningitis, are often due to hypervirulent strains (hvKP), which are characterized by capsular serotypes K1 and K2, a gene responsible for hypermucoviscosity, and the cluster for synthesis of the siderophore aerobactin. A 55 year old man with a history of essential hypertension, benign prostate hyperplasia, hyperlipidemia, obstructive sleep apnea, and chronic alcoholism was admitted for meningitis due to Klebsiella pneumoniae with a wild-type susceptibility profile. Its genomic features were consistent with a capsular K2 strain belonging to clonal group 86 (CG86) displaying the large virulence of Klebsiella plasmid (pLVPK) with heavy metal resistance gene clusters, aerobactin, rmpA. This is the first case of community-acquired meningitis caused by a hypervirulent strain of hvKP ever reported in the Caribbean.

  12. Pneumonia adquirida na comunidade numa unidade de cuidados intensivos Community-acquired pneumonia in an intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Raquel Marques

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A pneumonia adquirida na comunidade (PAC é a principal causa de sépsis em cuidados intensivos de adultos. Com o objectivo de caracterizar o quadro clínico de PAC em cuidados intensivos, tratamento e avaliação de factores prognósticos, com especial relevância para a antibioterapia, realizou-se um estudo retrospectivo dos doentes admitidos numa UCI polivalente com PAC, de 1 de Junho de 2004 a 31 de Dezembro de 2006. Analisaram-se 76 doentes com uma idade média de 62,88 (18,75 anos. O APACHE II médio de 24,88 (9,75 e o SAPS 2 médio era de 51,18 (18,05, com mortalidade prevista de 47,27%. O microrganismo responsável foi identificado em 42,1% dos casos. O agente etiológico mais comum foi o Streptococcus pneumoniae, mas o grupo de agentes etiológicos mais frequentemente identificados foi o dos bacilos entéricos gramnegativos. A antibioterapia prévia mais usada foi a levofloxacina. O esquema de antibioterapia mais usado na admissão foi a associação ceftriaxone com azitromicina. Em 32 doentes em que foi possível avaliar a adequação terapêutica, 27 estavam sob esquemas de antibioterapia adequados. Foram submetidos a ventilação mecânica 66 doentes (86,8%, com uma duração mediana de 4 dias. A demora mediana foi de 5,3 dias. A mortalidade na unidade foi de 36,8% e a hospitalar de 55,26%. O índice SAPS 2, o valor de PCR, o potássio sérico e a antibioterapia inicial não adequada relacionaram-se com maior mortalidade. Após análise multivariada, apenas o índice SAPS II manteve significado estatístico. O uso da antibioterapia deve ser criterioso, tendo em conta os principais agentes e a sua susceptibilidade.Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is the leading cause of sepsis in adult critical care. We present a retrospective study of patients admitted to a polyvalent intensive care unit with CAP from 1st June 2004 - 31st December 2006. We analysed 76 patients with a mean age of 62.88 (18.75 years. Mean APACHE II score was 24.88 (9

  13. Advances in the prevention, management, and treatment of community-acquired pneumonia [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias W. Pletz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is the infectious disease with the highest number of deaths worldwide. Nevertheless, its importance is often underestimated. Large cohorts of patients with CAP have been established worldwide and improved our knowledge about CAP by far. Therefore, current guidelines are much more evidence-based than ever before. This article discusses recent major studies and concepts on CAP such as the role of biomarkers, appropriate risk stratification to identify patients in need of hospitalisation or intensive care, appropriate empiric antibiotic therapy (including the impact of macrolide combination therapy and antibiotic stewardship, and CAP prevention with novel influenza and pneumococcal vaccines.

  14. Clinical presentation and diagnostic workup for community-acquired pneumonia: the Gulf Corporation Council CAP Working Group consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memish, Z A; Arabi, Y M; Ahmed, Q A; Al Jahdali, H; Shibl, A M; Niederman, M S

    2007-10-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is diagnosed on the basis of a suggestive history and compatible physical findings and new infiltrates on a chest radiograph. No criteria or combination of criteria based on history and physical examination have been found to be gold standard. With the rise in elderly Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) residents, CAP is likely to present with non-classical manifestations such as somnolence, new anorexia, and confusion and carries a worse outcome than CAP in their younger counterparts. Tuberculosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of unresolving CAP in the GCC region. Diagnostic work up depends on severity of CAP, clinical course and underlying risk factors.

  15. Viruses and Gram-negative bacilli dominate the etiology of community-acquired pneumonia in Indonesia, a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farida, Helmia; Gasem, M Hussein; Suryanto, Agus; Keuter, Monique; Zulkarnain, Nasirun; Satoto, Bambang; van der Eijk, Annemiek A; Djokomoeljanto, R; Wahyono, Hendro; Verbrugh, Henri A; Severin, Juliëtte A; van den Broek, Peterhans J

    2015-09-01

    Knowledge about the etiology of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is essential for adequate management. Presently, few studies about CAP are available from Southeast Asia. This study aimed to investigate the etiology, severity, and outcome of CAP in the most populous Southeast Asia country, Indonesia. From October 2007 to April 2009, adult patients admitted with CAP to two hospitals in Semarang, Indonesia, were included to detect the etiology of CAP using a full range of diagnostic methods. The severity of disease was classified according to the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI). The outcome was assessed as 30-day mortality. In total, 148 consecutive patients with CAP were included. Influenza virus (18%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (14%), and Streptococcus pneumoniae (13%) were the most common agents identified. Other Gram-negative bacilli, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Chlamydia pneumoniae each accounted for 5%. The bacteria presented wild type antibiotic susceptibility profiles. Forty-four percent of subjects were high-risk patients (PSI class IV-V). The mortality rate (30%) was significantly associated with disease severity score (Pcauses of CAP in this region, more so than S. pneumoniae. Most of the bacteria have wild type susceptibility to antimicrobial agents. Patients with severe disease and those with unknown etiology have a higher mortality risk. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Influence of socioeconomic status on community-acquired pneumonia outcomes in elderly patients requiring hospitalization: a multicenter observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carratalà Jordi

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The associations between socioeconomic status and community-acquired pneumonia outcomes in adults have been studied although studies did not always document a relationship. The aim of this multicenter observational study was to determine the association between socioeconomic status and community-acquired pneumonia outcomes in the elderly, in the context of a public health system providing universal free care to the whole population. Methods A total of 651 patients aged ≥65 years hospitalized due to community-acquired pneumonia through the emergency departments of five Spanish public hospitals were recruited and followed up between May 2005 and January 2007. The primary outcomes studied were: length of stay, intensive care unit admission, overall mortality and readmission. Socioeconomic status was measured using both individual and community data: occupation [categorized in six social groups (I, II, III, IVa, IVb and V], educational level (≤ primary level or ≥ secondary level and disposable family income of the municipality or district of residence [>12,500 € (high municipality family income and ≤12,500 € (low municipality family income]. The six social groups were further categorized as upper/middle social class (groups I-IVb and lower class (group V. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed. OR and their 95% confidence intervals were calculated. All statistical tests were two tailed and statistical significance was established as p Results 17.7% of patients lived in a municipality or district with a high municipality family income and 63.6% were upper/middle social class (I-IVb. Only 15.7% of patients had a secondary education. The adjusted analysis showed no association between pneumonia outcomes and social class, educational level or municipality family income. However, length of stay increased significantly in patients in whom the factors, living alone and being a smoker or ex-smoker coincided (p

  17. Oral Antibiotics for Community acquired Pneumonia with Chest indrawing in Children Aged Below Five Years: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodha, Rakesh; Randev, Shivani; Kabra, Sushil K

    2016-06-08

    To determine the efficacy of oral antibiotics in under-five children with pneumonia and chest indrawing. We included controlled clinical trials (randomized or quasi randomized) that compared the efficacy of oral antibiotics versus parenteral antibiotics for treatment of community acquired pneumonia with chest indrawing (severe pneumonia as defined by the World Health Organizations guidelines) in children below 60 months of age. Data were extracted and managed using RevMan software. Main outcome variables were: treatment failure rate, relapse rate, death rate, need for hospitalization, and severe adverse effects. We identified four randomized controlled trials involving 4400 children who were diagnosed to have severe pneumonia but were feeding well and not hypoxic. Baseline characteristics of children in the two treatment arms (oral and parenteral antibiotics) were similar. In two studies, oral antibiotics were administered on an ambulatory basis, while in two, oral antibiotics were used in hospitalized children. Failure rate in children receiving oral antibiotics was 13% (288/2208) while that in children receiving parenteral antibiotics was 13.8% (302/2183) (OR 0.93; 95% CI 0.78, 1.11). Failure rates were not affected by the type of oral antibiotic, or presence of wheeze. Relapse rates, hospitalization or serious adverse events were similar in the two groups. Children with tachypnea with chest indrawing without signs and symptoms of very severe pneumonia may be treated with oral antibiotics.

  18. Failure of CRP decline within three days of hospitalization is associated with poor prognosis of Community-acquired Pneumonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Stine Bang; Baunbæk Egelund, Gertrud Louise; Jensen, Andreas Vestergaard

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: C-reactive protein (CRP) is a well-known acute phase protein used to monitor the patient's response during treatment in infectious diseases. Mortality from Community-acquired Pneumonia (CAP) remains high, particularly in hospitalized patients. Better risk prediction during hospitaliza......BACKGROUND: C-reactive protein (CRP) is a well-known acute phase protein used to monitor the patient's response during treatment in infectious diseases. Mortality from Community-acquired Pneumonia (CAP) remains high, particularly in hospitalized patients. Better risk prediction during....... Predictive associations of CRP3 (absolute levels and relative decline) and 30 days mortality were analysed using receiver operating characteristics and logistic regression. RESULTS: Eight hundred and fourteen patients were included and 90 (11%) died within 30 days. The area under the curve for CRP3 level...... and decline for predicting 30 days mortality were 0.64 (0.57-0.70) and 0.71 (0.65-0.76). Risk of death was increased in patients with CRP3 level >75 mg/l (OR 2.44; 95%CI 1.36-4.37) and in patients with a CRP3 decline

  19. Community-acquired pneumonia in children. A changing spectrum of disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Roux, David M. [Red Cross War Memorial Children' s Hospital, Cape Town (South Africa); New Somerset Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Cape Town (South Africa); Zar, Heather J. [Red Cross War Memorial Children' s Hospital, Cape Town (South Africa)

    2017-10-15

    Pneumonia remains the leading cause of death in children outside the neonatal period, despite advances in prevention and management. Over the last 20 years, there has been a substantial decrease in the incidence of childhood pneumonia and pneumonia-associated mortality. New conjugate vaccines against Haemophilus influenzae type b and Streptococcus pneumoniae have contributed to decreases in radiologic, clinical and complicated pneumonia cases and have reduced hospitalization and mortality. The importance of co-infections with multiple pathogens and the predominance of viral-associated disease are emerging. Better access to effective preventative and management strategies is needed in low- and middle-income countries, while new strategies are needed to address the residual burden of disease once these have been implemented. (orig.)

  20. Signs and symptoms indicative of community-acquired pneumonia in infants under six months

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    Maria de Fátima Bazhuni Pombo March

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Evaluation of the clinical signs and symptoms predicting bacterial and viral pneumonia, in accordance with the Brazilian National Control Program for Acute Respiratory (ARI. METHODS: Observational prospective study. Seventy-six children from birth to six months of age who had pneumonia were studied in the emergency room. The patients were subdivided into two groups, based on radiological findings (gold-standard: 47 had bacterial pneumonia, and 29 had viral pneumonia. The frequencies, sensitivities, and specificities of the signs and symptoms were evaluated. RESULTS: The sensibilities and sensitivities of general findings in bacterial pneumonia were, respectively: fever 53.2%/40.0%; hypoactivity 68.4%/55.6% and prostration detected by the doctor 72.7%/55.0%. The same findings in viral pneumonias showed, respectively: 37.9%/40.0%, 66.7%/55.6% and 66.7%/55.6%. The sensibilities and sensitivities of respiratory findings in bacterial pneumonia were, respectively: coughing 66.0/38.1%, Respiratory rate = 50 ripm 76.6%/38.1%, altered respiratory auscultation 91.3%/10.5%, and chest indrawing 46.7%/80.0%. The same findings in viral pneumonias were, respectively: 69.0%/38.1%, 86.2%/38.1%, 85.7%/10.5% and 44.8%/80.0%. CONCLUSION: Analysis of signs and symptoms in each group did not distinguish bacterial from viral pneumonia. Our findings reinforce the adequacy of the ARI program in Brazil, which gives an early diagnosis of pneumonia, independent of its etiology.

  1. Community-acquired necrotizing pneumonia caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST30-SCCmecIVc-spat019-PVL positive in San Antonio de Areco, Argentina

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    Silvina Fernández

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is the first cause of skin and soft tissue infections, but can also produce severe diseases such as bacteremia, osteomyelitis and necrotizing pneumonia. Some S. aureus lineages have been described in cases of necrotizing pneumonia worldwide, usually in young, previously healthy patients. In this work, we describe a fatal case of necrotizing pneumonia due to community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus clone ST30-SCCmecIVc-spat019-PVL positive in an immunocompetent adult patient.

  2. [To evaluate the auxiliary diagnostic value of Japanese respiratory society scoring system for the rapid diagnosis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia in inpatients with community acquired pneumonia].

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    Yuan, Xin; Jin, Xin; Niu, Wenkai; Cui, Qian; Liu, Huiying; Zheng, Jing; Heng, Zhizhi; Bai, Changqing

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the auxiliary diagnostic value of Japanese respiratory society (JRS) scoring system for the rapid diagnosis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia (MP) in inpatients with community acquired pneumonia (CAP). The clinical data of inpatients with CAP between January 2013 and Novermber 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. The gold standard for identification of MP infection was determined by both positive culture and real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods. Blood and sputum culture were used to detect other bacteria and fungi, and real time PCR to detect Chlamydia and Legionella pneumonia and the common respiratory viruses. Diagnostic test results consistency inspection was performed by Kappa test and continuous variable analysis was performed using t test. Data from 139 CAP inpatients were analyzed. An aetiological diagnosis was made for 61 patients (43.9%). Thirty-five cases (25.2%) were diagnosed as MP infection by the gold standard, while 72 cases (52.0%) by the JRS scoring system. The sensitivity of JRS scoring system for the diagnosis of MP infection was 85.7% (30/35), specificity 59.6% (62/104), positive predictive value 41.7% (30/72)and negative predictive value 92.5% (62/67). According to age, for the patients younger than 40 years old, the sensitivity of JRS routine scoring system for the diagnosis of MP infection was 24/24, specificity was 4/29, positive predictive value 24/49 and negative predictive value was 4/4. The JRS scoring system provides an auxiliary value for the identification of MP pneumonia. It has a high sensitivity and a strong negative predictive value. For patients younger than 40 yrs with low grades of JRS swring system. MP infection can be almost excluded from.

  3. Microbiologic Efficacy of Azithromycin and Susceptibilities to Azithromycin of Isolates of Chlamydia pneumoniae from Adults and Children with Community-Acquired Pneumonia

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    Roblin, Patricia M.; Hammerschlag, Margaret R.

    1998-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae was eradicated from the nasopharynges of 26 of 33 (78.8%) evaluable children and adults with community-acquired pneumonia who were treated with azithromycin. We tested 55 isolates of C. pneumoniae obtained from 46 of these patients against azithromycin. The MIC at which 90% of the isolates were inhibited and the minimal chlamydiacidal concentration at which 90% of strains tested were killed of azithromycin for these isolates were both 0.5 μg/ml. Seven patients remained culture positive after treatment. The MICs of azithromycin for isolates from two patients increased fourfold after therapy. However, all the patients with persistent infection improved clinically. Further studies of treatment of C. pneumoniae infection, utilizing culture, are needed both to assess efficacy and to monitor for the possible development of antibiotic resistance. PMID:9449287

  4. Pattern of community acquired pneumonia in pregnant ladies in Ain Shams University hospitals

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    Aya M. Abdel Dayem

    2012-10-01

    Conclusion: Morbidity and mortality in pregnant patients with pneumonia continue to present a significant challenge. Early recognition of the diseases process and prompt treatment are required to ascertain an optimal outcome. The treatments in the gravid patients generally follow standard guide lines for the treatment of pneumonia in adults. Concern for fetal outcome should not delay treatment as improvement in maternal oxygenation and status is the best way to ensure fetal protection.

  5. Mannose-binding lectin and l-ficolin polymorphisms in patients with community-acquired pneumonia caused by intracellular pathogens.

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    van Kempen, Gijs; Meijvis, Sabine; Endeman, Henrik; Vlaminckx, Bart; Meek, Bob; de Jong, Ben; Rijkers, Ger; Bos, Willem Jan

    2017-05-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is the leading infectious disease requiring hospitalization in the western world. Genetic variability affecting the host response to infection may play a role in susceptibility and outcome in patients with CAP. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and l-ficolin (l-FCN) are two important activators of the complement system and they can enhance phagocytosis by opsonization. In a prospective cohort of 505 Dutch patients with CAP and 227 control participants we studied whether polymorphisms in the MBL (MBL2) and FCN (FCN2) genes influenced susceptibility and outcome. No difference in frequency of these genotypes was found between patients with CAP in general and controls. However, the +6424G>T single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in FCN2 was more common in patients with a Coxiella burnetii pneumonia (P = 0·014). Moreover, the haplotypes coding for the highest MBL serum levels (YA/YA and YA/XA) predisposed to atypical pneumonia (C. burnetii, Legionella or Chlamydia species or Mycoplasma pneumoniae) compared with controls (P = 0·016). Furthermore, patients with these haplotypes were more often bacteraemic (P = 0·019). It can therefore be concluded that MBL2 and FCN2 polymorphisms are not major risk factors for CAP in general, but that the +6424G>T SNP in the FCN2 gene predisposes to C. burnetii pneumonia. In addition, patients with genotypes corresponding with high serum MBL levels are at risk for atypical pneumonia, possibly caused by enhanced phagocytosis, thereby promoting cell entry of these intracellular bacteria. © 2016 The Authors. Immunology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. CTX-M-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae isolated from community-acquired urinary tract infections in Valledupar, Colombia

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    Pedro Martinez

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Describe the presence of CTX-M-1 phylogenetic subgroup extended-spectrum i-lactamases (ESBL, associated with TEM and SHV genes, and the gene encoding cephalosporinase, CMY-2 in Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates from community-acquired urinary tract infections. METHODS: 102 E. coli and 21 K. pneumoniae were collected from patients with culture-proven urinary tract infection (UTI, during February and March, 2011. Antimicrobial susceptibility test was performed by disk diffusion according to the standards of the Clinical Laboratory Standard Institute. Screening for cephalosporins-resistant E. coli and K. pneumoniae was performed by PCR assay for blaTEM, blaSHV, blaCTX-M-1,-2,-8,-9, blaPER-2 and blaCMY-2 genes. Statistical analysis was performed by chi-squared test and multivariate logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: ESBL production was detected in 12 (11.7% E. coli and four (19% K. pneumoniae isolates. TEM ESBLs were detected in seven E. coli and three K. pneumoniae isolates. SHV ESBLs were found in four K. pneumoniae isolates. CTX-M-1 phylogenetic subgroup was positive in seven E. coli and three K. pneumoniae isolates. CMY-2 β-lactamase gene was detected in nine E. coli and one K. pneumoniae isolates. A significant association of ESBL expression in E. coli was observed with resistance to tobramycin (p < 0.001, tetracycline (p = 0.043, and ciprofloxacin (p < 0.001. In K. pneumoniae isolates, significant association was found with resistance to tobramycin and ciprofloxacin (p = 0.006, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (p = 0.043. Multivariate analyses did not show association between ESBL production in E. coli and K. pneumoniae, and resistance to non-β-lactams drugs. CONCLUSIONS: CTX-M ESBL in uropathogens isolated from the community is cause for concern due to the enormous potential for multidrug resistance from strains that produce these enzymes, which could lead to failure of empirically-administered therapies

  7. The order of administration of macrolides and beta-lactams may impact the outcomes of hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia: results from the community-acquired pneumonia organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyrani, Paula; Wiemken, Timothy L; Metersky, Mark L; Arnold, Forest W; Mattingly, William A; Feldman, Charles; Cavallazzi, Rodrigo; Fernandez-Botran, Rafael; Bordon, Jose; Ramirez, Julio A

    2018-01-01

    The beneficial effect of macrolides for the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in combination with beta-lactams may be due to their anti-inflammatory activity. In patients with pneumococcal meningitis, the use of steroids improves outcomes only if they are administered before beta-lactams. The objective of this study was to compare outcomes in hospitalized patients with CAP when macrolides were administered before, simultaneously with, or after beta-lactams. Secondary data analysis of the Community-Acquired Pneumonia Organization (CAPO) International Cohort Study database. Study groups were defined based on the sequence of administration of macrolides and beta-lactams. The study outcomes were time to clinical stability (TCS), length of stay (LOS) and in-hospital mortality. Accelerated failure time models were used to evaluate the adjusted impact of sequential antibiotic administration and time-to-event outcomes, while a logistic regression model was used to evaluate their adjusted impact on mortality. A total of 99 patients were included in the macrolide before group and 305 in the macrolide after group. Administration of a macrolide before a beta-lactam compared to after a beta-lactam reduced TCS (3 vs. 4 days, p = .011), LOS (6 vs. 7 days, p = .002) and mortality (3 vs. 7.2%, p = .228). The administration of macrolides before beta-lactams was associated with a statistically significant decrease in TCS and LOS and a non-statistically significant decrease in mortality. The beneficial effect of macrolides in hospitalized patient with CAP may occur only if administered before beta-lactams.

  8. Community acquired pneumonia in the elderly: the Pneumonia in Italian Acute Care for Elderly units (PIACE study protocol by the Italian Society of Hospital and Community Geriatrics (SIGOT

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    Filippo Luca Fimognari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pneumonia is a frequent cause of hospital admission in elderly patients. Diagnosis of pneumonia in elderly persons with comorbidity may be challenging, due to atypical presentation and complex clinical scenarios. Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP arises out-of-hospital in subjects without previous contact with the healthcare system. Healthcare associated pneumonia (HCAP occurs in patients who have frequent contacts with the healthcare system and should be treated with empiric broad spectrum antibiotic therapy also covering multi-drug resistant (MDR pathogens. Recent findings, however, have questioned this approach, because the worse prognosis of HCAP compared to CAP may better reflect increased level of comorbidity and frailty (poor functional status, older age of HCAP patients, as well as poorer quality of hospital care provided to such patients, rather than pneumonia etiology by MDR pathogens. The Pneumonia in Italian Acute Care for Elderly units (PIACE Study, promoted by the Società Italiana di Geriatria Ospedale e Territorio (SIGOT, is an observational prospective cohort study of patients consecutively admitted because of pneumonia to hospital acute care units of Geriatrics throughout Italy. Detailed information regarding clinical presentation, diagnosis, etiology, comprehensive geriatric assessment, antibiotic therapy, possible complications and comorbidities was recorded to identify factors potentially predicting in-hospital mortality (primary endpoint, 3-month mortality, length of hospital stay, postdischarge rate of institutionalization and other secondary endpoints. This paper describes the rationale and method of PIACE Study and reviews the main evidence on pneumonia in the elderly.

  9. The place of endogenous antimicrobial peptides in the pathogenetic mechanisms of the development of community-acquired pneumonia caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae among infants

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    G.O. Lezhenko

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive survey was carried out in 30 children with community-acquired pneumonia aged 2 months to 3 years old, among them in 18 children the disease was caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, and in the remaining 12 patients — by Gram-negative flora. All children underwent the evaluation of the severity of the condition using the PRESS scale, according to which it was found that most patients had severe course of pneumococcal pneumonia. The analysis showed that the development of pneumococcal pneumonia in children occurred against the background of a decrease in the serum content of vitamin D metabolites and the activity of antimicrobial peptides, in contrast to pneumonia caused by Gram-negative pathogens. In the blood serum of children with pneumococcal pneumonia, there was detected a decrease in the content of β1-defensins by 2.6 times, LL-37 — by 3.7 times and human bactericidal permeability-increasing protein — by 2.8 times in comparison with the control group (p < 0.05. It has been proved that inadequate activation of antimicrobial peptides against the background of a deficiency of vitamin D metabolites in infants with pneumonia caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae is one of the pathogenetic links leading to a severe course of the disease.

  10. Fatores de risco e medidas profiláticas nas pneumonias adquiridas na comunidade Risk factors and prophylaxis of community-acquired pneumonias

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    LUCY GOMES

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo revisa os efeitos do envelhecimento, tabagismo, DPOC, insuficiência cardíaca, colonização da orofaringe, aspiração (micro e macro, alcoolismo, cirrose hepática, deficiência nutricional, imunossupressão e fatores ambientais sobre o risco de adquirir pneumonia na comunidade e sua gravidade. Na segunda parte, é feita revisão sobre a ação profilática das vacinas antiinfluenza e antipneumococo, assim como a ação das drogas antivirais, na profilaxia e tratamento das pneumonias adquiridas na comunidade.This article reviews the effects of aging, tobacco-smoking, chronic bronchitis and emphysema, heart failure, oropharyngeal colonization, aspiration (micro and macro, alcoholism, hepatic cirrhosis, nutritional deficiency, immunosuppression, and environmental factors on the risk of community-acquired pneumonia and its severity. In the second part, the authors review the prophylactic action of anti-influenza and anti-pneumococcus vaccines as well as the role of prevention and treatment of antiviral agents in community-acquired pneumonia.

  11. High incidence of community-acquired pneumonia among rapidly aging population in Japan: a prospective hospital-based surveillance.

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    Takaki, Masahiro; Nakama, Takahiro; Ishida, Masayuki; Morimoto, Hitomi; Nagasaki, Yuka; Shiramizu, Rina; Hamashige, Naohisa; Chikamori, Masayuki; Yoshida, Laymyint; Ariyoshi, Koya; Suzuki, Motoi; Morimoto, Konosuke

    2014-01-01

    The age-group-specific incidence and etiological patterns of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) have not been fully established in Japan. A 2-year prospective surveillance was conducted in Kochi city, Western Japan. All CAP patients aged ≥15 years who visited a community-based hospital were enrolled in the study. Clinical samples were examined by conventional bacterial culture and urinary antigen tests, and 6 bacterial pathogens and 16 respiratory viruses were identified from sputum samples by multiplex polymerase chain reaction assays. The age-group-specific incidence of CAP was estimated using a population-based data set of the total number of outpatients in the whole city. Ninety of the 131 enrolled patients, 68.7% were positive for respiratory pathogens. Streptococcus pneumoniae was the leading bacterial pathogen identified (28.2%). Respiratory viruses were identified in 36 patients (27.5%), and human entero-rhinovirus was the most common (13.3%) among them. The estimated overall incidence of adult CAP in Kochi was 9.6 per 1,000 person-years (PY); the estimated age group-specific incidence was 3.4, 10.7, and 42.9 per 1,000 PY for those aged 15-64, 65-74, and ≥75 years, respectively. The high incidence of CAP in these rural city of Japan, probably reflects the substantial aged population. S. pneumoniae and respiratory viruses play important roles in CAP in all age groups.

  12. Community-acquired Pseudomonas aeruginosa-pneumonia in a previously healthy man occupationally exposed to metalworking fluids

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    Fernando Peixoto Ferraz de Campos

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Although the Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection is well known and frequently found in hospitals and nursing care facilities, many cases are also reported outside these boundaries. In general, this pathogen infects debilitated patients either by comorbidities or by any form of immunodeficiency. In cases of respiratory infection, tobacco abuse seems to play an important role as a risk factor. In previously healthy patients, community-acquired pneumonia (CAP with P. aeruginosa as the etiological agent is extremely rare, and unlike the cases involving immunocompromised or hospitalized patients, the outcome is severe, and is fatal in up to 61.1% of cases. Aerosolized contaminated water or solutions are closely linked to the development of respiratory tract infection. In this setting, metalworking fluids used in factories may be implicated in CAP involving previously healthy people. The authors report the case of a middle-aged man who worked in a metalworking factory and presented a right upper lobar pneumonia with a rapid fatal outcome. P. aeruginosa was cultured from blood and tracheal aspirates. The autopsy findings confirmed a hemorrhagic necrotizing pneumonia with bacteria-invading vasculitis and thrombosis. A culture of the metalworking fluid of the factory was also positive for P. aeruginosa. The pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed that both strains (blood culture and metalworking fluid were genetically indistinguishable. The authors highlight the occupational risk for the development of this P. aeruginosa-infection in healthy people.

  13. Impact of rapid urine antigen tests to determine the etiology of community-acquired pneumonia in adults.

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    Andreo, Felipe; Domínguez, José; Ruiz, Juan; Blanco, Silvia; Arellano, Elisabet; Prat, Cristina; Morera, Josep; Ausina, Vicente

    2006-05-01

    To evaluate the rapid urine antigen tests, including a new rapid immunochromatographic test (ICT) for the detection of the Streptococcus pneumoniae antigen and an enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for the detection of the Legionella antigen, in order to improve the diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in adults. Prospective study. A tertiary hospital in Spain. We consecutively recruited 107 adults with CAP evaluated at our hospital. The analyses included blood and sputum cultures, pleural fluid culture (if present) and serologic studies. The detection of the Legionella pneumophila urinary antigen was performed by EIA, and the detection of S. pneumoniae antigen in urine samples was performed by counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIE) and a rapid ICT. Using conventional microbiologic tests we succeeded in performing the etiologic diagnosis of 39 out of the 107 cases (36.4%). The inclusion of rapid antigen detection techniques increased the percentage of diagnosis to 54.2%, which represents a total increase of 17.8% (P=0.034). The data obtained in this study indicate that rapid urine antigen tests are very useful to determine CAP etiology in adults and, consequently, to quickly identify a group of patients in whom narrow spectrum antibiotics may be used.

  14. Rates and Risk Factors for Recurrent Pneumonia in Patients Hospitalized With Community-Acquired Pneumonia: Population-Based Prospective Cohort Study With 5 Years of Follow-up

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    Dang, T. T.; Eurich, D. T.; Weir, D. L.; Marrie, T. J.; Majumdar, S. R.

    2014-01-01

    Background. The rates and risk factors for developing recurrent pneumonia following hospitalization with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) are poorly understood. Methods. We examined a population-based cohort of patients with CAP who survived hospital admission and who were free of pneumonia for at least 3 months. We collected clinical, functional, and medication-related information and pneumonia severity index (PSI). Using linked databases we followed patients for 5 years and captured any clinical episode of pneumonia 90 days or more post-discharge. We used Cox proportional hazards models (adjusted for age, sex, PSI, functional status, medications) to determine rates and independent correlates of recurrent pneumonia. Results. The final cohort included 2709 inpatients; 43% were 75 years or older, 34% were not fully independent, and 56% had severe pneumonia. Over 5 years of follow–up, 245 (9%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 8%–10%) patients developed recurrent pneumonia, and 156 (64%) of these episodes required hospitalization. Rate of recurrence was 3.0/100 person–years and median time to recurrence was 317 days (interquartile range, 177–569); 32 (13%) patients had 2 or more recurrences. In multivariable analyses only age >75 years (adjusted P = .047) and less than fully independent functional status (12% recurrence rate with impaired functional status vs 7% for fully independent; adjusted hazard ratio, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.3–2.2; P pneumonia. Conclusions. One of 11 patients who survived CAP hospitalization had recurrent pneumonia over 5 years and those with impaired functional status were at particularly high risk. Recurrent pneumonia is common and more attention to preventive strategies at discharge and closer follow-up over the long-term seem warranted. PMID:24729503

  15. Immunomodulatory activity of pidotimod administered with standard antibiotic therapy in children hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Susanna; Garziano, Micaela; Rainone, Veronica; Trabattoni, Daria; Biasin, Mara; Senatore, Laura; Marchisio, Paola; Rossi, Marta; Principi, Nicola; Clerici, Mario

    2015-09-03

    Several attempts to improve immune function in young children have been made and encouraging results have been collected with pidotimod (PDT), a synthetic dipeptide molecule that seems to have immunomodulatory activity on both innate and adaptive responses. Until now, the effects of PDT on the immune system have only been studied in vivo after long-term administration to evaluate whether its immunomodulatory activity might prevent the development of infections. This study was planned to evaluate the immunomodulatory activity of PDT administered together with standard antibiotic therapy in children hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). A total of 20 children hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) were randomized at a 1:1 ratio to receive either standard antibiotics plus pidotimod (PDT) or standard antibiotics alone to evaluate the immunomodulatory activity of PDT. Blood samples for the evaluation of immunological parameters were drawn at the time of recruitment (T0) (i.e., before therapy administration), at T3 and T5 (i.e., 3 and 5 days after the initiation of therapy) as well as at T21 (i.e., 7 days after the therapy ended). Following pneumococcal polysaccharide stimulation, the percentage of dendritic cells (DCs) expressing activation and costimulatory molecules was significantly higher in children receiving PDT plus antibiotics than in the controls. A significant increase in tumor necrosis factor-α and/or interleukin-12 secretion and expression of toll like receptor 2 was observed in PDT-treated children compared with controls; this was followed by an increased release of proinflammatory cytokines by monocytes. In the PDT-treated group, mRNA expression of antimicrobial peptides and genes involved in the inflammatory response were also augmented in comparison with the controls. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that PDT administered together with standard antibiotics is associated with a favorable persistent

  16. Adherence with national guidelines in hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia: results from the CAPO study in Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Gur; Perez, Mario; Rodríguez, Benito; Hernández Voth, Ana; Perez, Jorge; Gnoni, Martin; Kelley, Robert; Wiemken, Timothy; Ramirez, Julio

    2015-04-01

    The Community-Acquired Pneumonia Organization (CAPO) is an international observational study in 130 hospitals, with a total of 31 countries, to assess the current management of hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). 2 Using the centralized database of CAPO was decided to conduct this study with the aim of evaluate the level of adherence with national guidelines in Venezuela, to define in which areas an intervention may be necessary to improve the quality of care of hospitalized patients with CAP. In this observational retrospective study quality indicators were used to evaluate the management of hospitalized patients with CAP in 8 Venezuelan's centers. The care of the patients was evaluated in the areas of: hospitalization, oxygen therapy, empiric antibiotic therapy, switch therapy, etiological studies, blood cultures indication, and prevention. The compliance was rated as good (>90%), intermediate (60% to 90%), or low (total of 454 patients with CAP were enrolled. The empiric treatment administered within 8 hours of the patient arrival to the hospital was good (96%), but the rest of the indicators showed a low level of adherence (<60%). We can say that there are many areas in the management of CAP in Venezuela that are not performed according to the national guidelines of SOVETHORAX.1 In any quality improvement process the first step is to evaluate the difference between what is recommended and what is done in clinical practice. While this study meets this first step, the challenge for the future is to implement the processes necessary to improve the management of CAP in Venezuela. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Decrease in mortality in severe community-acquired pneumococcal pneumonia: impact of improving antibiotic strategies (2000-2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattarello, Simone; Borgatta, Bárbara; Solé-Violán, Jordi; Vallés, Jordi; Vidaur, Loreto; Zaragoza, Rafael; Torres, Antoni; Rello, Jordi

    2014-07-01

    The objective of the present study was to compare antibiotic prescribing practices and survival in the ICU for patients with pneumococcal severe community-acquired pneumonia (SCAP) between 2000 and 2013. This was a matched case-control study of two prospectively recorded cohorts in Europe. Eighty patients from the Community-Acquired Pneumonia en la Unidad de Cuidados Intensivos (CAPUCI) II study (case group) were matched with 80 patients from CAPUCI I (control group) based on the following: shock at admission, need of mechanical ventilation, COPD, immunosuppression, and age. Demographic data were comparable in the two groups. Combined antibiotic therapy increased from 66.2% to 87.5% (P < .01), and the percentage of patients receiving the first dose of antibiotic within 3 h increased from 27.5% to 70.0% (P < .01). ICU mortality was significantly lower (OR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.68-0.98) in cases, both in the whole population and in the subgroups of patients with shock (OR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.50-0.89) or receiving mechanical ventilation (OR, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.55-0.96). In the multivariate analysis, ICU mortality increased in patients requiring mechanical ventilation (OR, 5.23; 95% CI, 1.60-17.17) and decreased in patients receiving early antibiotic treatment (OR, 0.36; 95% CI, 0.15-0.87) and combined therapy (OR, 0.19; 95% CI, 0.07-0.51). In pneumococcal SCAP, early antibiotic prescription and use of combination therapy increased. Both were associated with improved survival.

  18. [Urinary pneumococcal or Legionella antigen detection tests and low-spectrum antibiotic therapy for community-acquired pneumonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, P-M; Risso, K; Hyvernat, H; Landraud, L; Vassallo, M; Dellamonica, J; de Salvador, F; Cua, E; Bernardin, G

    2010-06-01

    We performed urinary antigen tests for pneumococcus and Legionella for patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), to prescribe a documented antibiotic therapy. We report the efficiency of low-spectrum antibiotic treatment, illustrating the inappropriateness of bacteriological respiratory sampling. Patients with CAP were enrolled from three different units; the pneumonia severity index was used to assess the disease. Respiratory samples were also listed. Low-spectrum antibiotic therapy was amoxicillin for pneumococcal infection, and macrolides or non-anti-pneumococcal fluoroquinolone for legionellosis. Six hundred and seventy-five CAP were diagnosed during the study period,, 150 with positive urinary antigen tests (23%), among which 108 pneumococcal infections (73%), 40 legionellosis (26%), and two mixed infections. The pneumonia severity index was 106+/-38. Amoxicillin was prescribed in 108 cases, fluoroquinolone in 24 cases, macrolide in 18 cases. The outcome was favourable for 138 patients (92%). Eighty three respiratory samples allowed identification of a bacterium for 58 patients (39%), among which 24 strains were not in the antibiotic spectrum: Haemophilus influenzae and Pseudmomonas aeruginosa in six cases, Staphylococcus aureus in five cases, Klebsiella pneumoniae in two cases, and another Gram negative bacillus in five cases. These strains were resistant in vitro to the prescribed treatment in 19/24 cases (79%). One out of 12 patients who died had a respiratory sample positive for Enterobacter spp strain resistant to the ongoing antibiotic treatment. The low-spectrum antibiotic therapy based on urinary antigen tests is efficient, and demonstrates respiratory tract colonisation with bacteriological strains usually considered as pathogenic.

  19. [Impact of a multidimensional intervention in elderly patients with community-acquired pneumonia: IMIEPCAP clinical trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Olga Herminia; Gil, Eva; Comas, Maria Teresa; Saez, Maria Encarnación; Clotet, Sandra; Ramirez, Hector David; Mateo, Miriam; Ruiz, Domingo

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to determine whether a multidimensional intervention applied to elderly patients admitted to hospital due to pneumonia reduces re-admissions and emergency department visits in the year after the intervention. This is a single-centre non-pharmacological randomised clinical trial with a parallel design. Three hundred and fourteen patients will be included (157 in each arm). Eligible patients will be ≥65 years old and with a Barthel index ≥60 that are admitted to hospital due to pneumonia. Participants will be randomised to multidimensional intervention or to control group. Two months after hospital discharge the intervention group will receive a geriatric intervention, carried out by a nurse and a physician. It will include assessment of co-morbidities, nutritional, functional and cognitive status, and immunisation. The control group will receive conventional follow-up. The number of re-admissions, visits to the emergency department, functional status, survival, and institutionalisation will be evaluated one year after intervention. If the intervention shows an improvement in the studied outcomes, it would allow us to improve individual outcomes, and indirectly reduce healthcare costs using a relatively simple, standardised tool. Copyright © 2015 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Community-acquired pneumonia caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in critically-ill patients: systematic review

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    Nuria Carballo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Despite methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA having often been associated with nosocomial pneumonia, the condition of some MRSA CAP patients is severe enough to warrant their being admitted to ICU. Objective: The purpose of this study is to conduct a systematic review of the literature on antibiotic treatment of MRSA CAP in critically-ill patients. Material and methods: An online search was conducted for locating articles on MRSA CAP in critically ill patients. Relevant publications were identified in PUBMED, the BestPractice database, UpToDate database and the Cochrane Library for articles published in English within the December 2001 - April 2016 time frame. Results: A total of 70 articles were found to have been published, 13 (18.8% having been included and 57 (81.4% excluded. Cohort studies were predominant, having totaled 16 in number (20.7% as compared to one sole cross-sectional study (3.5%. Conclusions: The experience in the treatment of MRSA CAP in patients requiring admission to ICU is quite limited. Vancomycin or linezolid seem to be the treatments of choice for MRSA CAP, although there not be any specific recommendation in this regard. It may be useful to use alternative routes, such as administration via aerosolized antibiotics, continuous infusion or in association with other antibiotics.

  1. Plasma Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 Level as a Predictor of the Severity of Community-Acquired Pneumonia

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    Kok-Khun Yong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1 increases in the serum of immunocompetent patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. However, the correlation between the circulating level of MCP-1 and severity of CAP remains unclear. This study investigated differential changes in the plasma MCP-1 levels of patients with CAP before and after an antibiotic treatment and further analyzes the association between the CAP severity and MCP-1 levels. We measured the plasma MCP-1 levels of 137 patients with CAP and 74 healthy controls by using a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Upon initial hospitalization, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II; confusion, urea level, respiratory rate, blood pressure, and age of >64 years (CURB-65; and pneumonia severity index (PSI scores were determined for assessing the CAP severity in these patients. The antibiotic treatment reduced the number of white blood cells (WBCs and neutrophils as well as the level of C-reactive protein (CRP and MCP-1. The plasma MCP-1 level, but not the CRP level or WBC count, correlated with the CAP severity according to the PSI (r = 0.509, p < 0.001, CURB-65 (r = 0.468, p < 0.001, and APACHE II (r = 0.360, p < 0.001 scores. We concluded that MCP-1 levels act in the development of CAP and are involved in the severity of CAP.

  2. [Vaccination against community acquired pneumonia in adult patients. A position paper by Neumoexpertos en Prevención].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo, E; Rivero, I; Vargas, D A; Mascarós, E; Díaz-Maroto, J L; Linares, M; Valdepérez, J; Gil, A; Molina, J; Jimeno, I; Ocaña, D; Martinón-Torres, F

    2016-10-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in adults. The annual incidence of CAP in adults in Spain ranges from 3 to 14 cases per 1,000 inhabitants. Current clinical guidelines primarily focus on the therapeutic approach to CAP rather than its prevention. The aim of this study is to develop and propose a practical guide for CAP prevention through vaccination in Spain according to available vaccines and evidence. A literature review and expert opinion. Pneumococcal and influenza vaccines are the main preventive tools available against CAP. Age, chronic diseases, and immunosuppression are risk factors for pneumonia, so these populations should be a priority for vaccination. In addition, influenza and pneumococcal vaccination is considered advisable in healthy adults under 60 years of age, and anyone with risk condition for CAP, irrespective of age. The influenza vaccine will be administered seasonally, while pneumococcal vaccination can be administered at any time of the year. Vaccination against pneumococcus and influenza in adults can help to reduce the burden of CAP and its associated complications. The available evidence supports the priority indications set out in this guide, and it would be advisable to try to achieve a wide circulation and practical implementation of these recommendations. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Clinical response to ertapenem in severe community-acquired pneumonia: a retrospective series in an elderly population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murcia, J M; González-Comeche, J; Marín, A; Barberán, J; Granizo, J J; Aguilar, L; González-Moreno, J; González-Pina, B; López-Dupla, M; Irurzun, J

    2009-11-01

    To evaluate in routine hospital practice the clinical response to ertapenem in comparison with other parenteral antibiotics in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), clinical records from patients with severe CAP treated with ertapenem from July 2002 to June 2006 in seven Spanish hospitals were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were classified according to the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI). Each ertapenem-treated patient was matched with two patients in the same hospital treated with other antibiotics, according to age (difference 76 years). Comorbidities were present in 193 patients (95.5%). No differences were found in median hospital stay (7 days for ertapenem vs. 10 days for comparators, p 0.066). A slightly higher clinical response rate was obtained for ertapenem vs. comparators (88.7% vs. 77.1%; p 0.0465; OR 2.25; 95% CI 0.99-5.12), with significant differences in clinical response in patients coming from nursing homes (95.8% ertapenem vs. 63.8% comparators; p 0.0034) but not in non-institutionalized patients (85.4% ertapenem vs. 84.5% comparators; p 0.929). The higher clinical response to ertapenem vs. comparators in severe CAP was due to its significantly higher efficacy in healthcare-associated CAP in patients coming from nursing homes.

  4. Prevalence and clinical features of respiratory syncytial virus in children hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia in northern Brazil

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    Lamarão Letícia

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Childhood pneumonia and bronchiolitis is a leading cause of illness and death in young children worldwide with Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV as the main viral cause. RSV has been associated with annual respiratory disease outbreaks and bacterial co-infection has also been reported. This study is the first RSV epidemiological study in young children hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP in Belém city, Pará (Northern Brazil. Methods With the objective of determining the prevalence of RSV infection and evaluating the patients’ clinical and epidemiological features, we conducted a prospective study across eight hospitals from November 2006 to October 2007. In this study, 1,050 nasopharyngeal aspirate samples were obtained from hospitalized children up to the age of three years with CAP, and tested for RSV antigen by direct immunofluorescence assay and by Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR for RSV Group identification. Results RSV infection was detected in 243 (23.1% children. The mean age of the RSV-positive group was lower than the RSV-negative group (12.1 months vs 15.5 months, pppppp Conclusion The present study highlights the relevance of RSV infection in hospitalized cases of CAP in our region; our findings warrant the conduct of further investigations which can help design strategies for controlling the disease.

  5. Penicillin as empirical therapy for patients hospitalised with community acquired pneumonia at a Danish hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, O; Glenthøj, Jonathan Peter; Dragsted, Ulrik Bak

    2001-01-01

    and outcome parameters were collected. Three groups were established according to the initial choice of antibiotic(s): penicillin only (n = 160); non-allergic patients starting broader spectrum therapy (n = 54); and patients with suspected penicillin allergy (n = 29). RESULTS: The overall mortality within...... treated with penicillin monotherapy. No differences in clinical outcomes were documented between patients treated empirically with broad-spectrum therapy and penicillin monotherapy. Therefore, penicillin seems to be a reasonable first choice for initial therapy of HCAP in Denmark as in other regions...

  6. Clinical and epidemiological characteristics of severe community-acquired pneumonia in children after introduction of the 10-valent pneumococcal vaccine

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    Lima EJF

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Eduardo JF Lima,1,2 Maria JG Mello,1,2 Maria FPM Albuquerque,3 Maria IL Lopes,4 George HC Serra,2 Maria AZ Abreu-Lima,2 Jailson B Correia1 1Instituto de Medicina Integral Prof. Fernando Figueira - IMIP Recife; 2Faculdade, Pernambucana de Saúde - FPS Recife; 3Centro de Pesquisas Aggeu Magalhães, FIOCRUZ; 4Hospital das Clínicas, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco - UFPE, Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil Background: Pneumonia is an important cause of morbimortality in Brazil, despite the extensive vaccination coverage and the socioeconomic improvement in the past years. Objective: To describe the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of severe community-acquired pneumonia in children after the introduction of the 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV10. Methods: A prospective study included children <5 years old hospitalized for pneumonia between October 2010 and September 2013 in a tertiary hospital. Newborns and children with comorbidities were excluded. Pneumonia classification followed the clinical and radiological criteria established by World Health Organization (WHO. Clinical history, nutritional status, immunizations, diagnosis, disease course, and prognosis were analyzed. Results: Among 452 children, almost 70% were <2 years, with no sex differences, and 10% had weight-for-age z score below than -2.0. Family income was up to one minimum wage in half the households, and 40% of mothers had completed high school. The suitability of both influenza and PCV10 vaccine schedules was ~50%. The first medical care happened later than 72 hours after the onset of symptoms in 42% of cases. Pneumonia was classified as severe or very severe in 83.9% of patients and for 23% as complicated. Global mortality was 1.5%. Hypoxia, diagnosed in 51.5% of children, looked like a better prognosis predictor than the WHO classification. Conclusion: New strategies for health care are necessary, such as the incorporation of peripheral saturometry as the

  7. [Diagnostic and prognostic power of biomarkers to improve the management of community acquired pneumonia in the emergency department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julián-Jiménez, Agustín; Timón Zapata, Jesús; Laserna Mendieta, Emilio José; Sicilia-Bravo, Isabel; Palomo-de Los Reyes, María José; Cabezas-Martínez, Angeles; Laín-Terés, Natividad; Estebaran-Martín, Josefa; Lozano-Ancín, Agustín; Cuena-Boy, Rafael

    2014-04-01

    To analyse the usefulness and performance of several biomarkers [C-reactive protein (CRP), mid-regional pro-adrenomedullin (MR-proADM), procalcitonin (PCT)] and lactate in predicting short- and medium-term mortality compared with the prognostic severity scales (PSS) usually employed for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and in assessing the aetiological suspicion of infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae and bacteraemia. Observational, prospective and analytical study was conducted on patients who were diagnosed with CAP in our emergency department (ED). The data collected included socio-demographic and comorbidity variables, Charlson index, priority level according to the Spanish Triage System (STS), stage in the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI) and in the CURB-65 (confusion, urea, respiratory rate, blood pressure and age ≥65years), criteria of severe CAP, microbiological studies, and biomarkers determinations. The patients were followed-up for 180days to calculate the prognostic power and the diagnostic performance for bacteraemia and aetiology. A total of 127patients were finally enrolled in the study. The 30-day mortality was 10.3% (13), and 22.6% (28) at 180 days. Blood cultures were positive in 29 patients (23%) and S.pneumoniae was identified as the responsible pathogen in 28 cases (22.2%). The area under the ROC curve (AUC-ROC) for lactate and MR-proADM to predict 30-day mortality was 0.898 (95%CI: 0.824-0.973; P0.85ng/ml, the NPV and the LR+ were 96.6% and 5.89%, respectively, to predict a S.pneumoniae infection. MR-proADM and lactate showed a similar or even better performance for 30-day intra-hospital mortality than PSI, CURB-65, STS and CAP severity criteria in patients diagnosed with CAP (P>.05). Furthermore, the MR-proADM capacity to predict 180-day mortality was higher than PSS and the rest of biomarkers (P>.05), and its AUC-ROC increased if it was used in combination with PSI, CURB65 and STS. The determination of PCT has a remarkable diagnostic

  8. Comparative Outcome Analysis of Penicillin-Based Versus Fluoroquinolone-Based Antibiotic Therapy for Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chi-Chuan; Lin, Chia-Hui; Lin, Kuan-Yin; Chuang, Yu-Chung; Sheng, Wang-Huei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common but potentially life-threatening condition, but limited information exists on the effectiveness of fluoroquinolones compared to β-lactams in outpatient settings. We aimed to compare the effectiveness and outcomes of penicillins versus respiratory fluoroquinolones for CAP at outpatient clinics. This was a claim-based retrospective cohort study. Patients aged 20 years or older with at least 1 new pneumonia treatment episode were included, and the index penicillin or respiratory fluoroquinolone therapies for a pneumonia episode were at least 5 days in duration. The 2 groups were matched by propensity scores. Cox proportional hazard models were used to compare the rates of hospitalizations/emergence service visits and 30-day mortality. A logistic model was used to compare the likelihood of treatment failure between the 2 groups. After propensity score matching, 2622 matched pairs were included in the final model. The likelihood of treatment failure of fluoroquinolone-based therapy was lower than that of penicillin-based therapy (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 0.88; 95% confidence interval [95%CI], 0.77–0.99), but no differences were found in hospitalization/emergence service (ES) visits (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.27; 95% CI, 0.92–1.74) and 30-day mortality (adjusted HR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.30–1.62) between the 2 groups. The likelihood of treatment failure of fluoroquinolone-based therapy was lower than that of penicillin-based therapy for CAP on an outpatient clinic basis. However, this effect may be marginal. Further investigation into the comparative effectiveness of these 2 treatment options is warranted. PMID:26871827

  9. Identification of pathogens by comprehensive real-time PCR versus conventional methods in community-acquired pneumonia in Japanese adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshii, Yutaka; Shimizu, Kenichiro; Morozumi, Miyuki; Chiba, Naoko; Ubukata, Kimiko; Uruga, Hironori; Hanada, Shigeo; Wakui, Hiroshi; Ito, Saburo; Takasaka, Naoki; Minagawa, Shunsuke; Kojima, Jun; Numata, Takanori; Hara, Hiromichi; Kawaishi, Makoto; Saito, Keisuke; Araya, Jun; Kaneko, Yumi; Nakayama, Katsutoshi; Kishi, Kazuma; Kuwano, Kazuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) has high morbidity and mortality. Unfortunately, the pathogen detection rate using conventional culture methods is relatively low. We compared comprehensive real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) analysis of nasopharyngeal swab specimens (NPS) and sputum samples against conventional methods for ability to detect causative pathogens of CAP. We prospectively enrolled adult CAP patients, including those with prior antibiotic use, from December 2012 to May 2014. For each patient, causative pathogens were investigated conventionally and by real-time PCR that can identify 6 bacterial and 11 viral pathogens. Patients numbered 92 (mean age, 63 years; 59 male), including 30 (33%) with prior antibiotic use. Considering all patients, identification of causative pathogens by real-time PCR was significantly more frequent than by conventional methods in all patients (72% vs. 57%, p = 0.018). In patients with prior antibiotic use, identification rates also differed significantly (PCR, 77%; conventional, 50%; p = 0.027). Mixed infections were more frequent according to real-time PCR than conventional methods (26% vs. 4%, p real-time PCR, Streptococcus pneumoniae was most frequently identified (38%) as a causative pathogen, followed by Haemophilus influenzae (37%) and Mycoplasma pneumoniae (5%). PCR also identified viral pathogens (21%), with sensitivity enhanced by simultaneous examination of both NPS and sputum samples rather than only NPS samples. Real-time PCR of NPS and sputum samples could better identify bacterial and viral pathogens in CAP than conventional methods, both overall and in patients with prior antibiotic treatment.

  10. Step-Down Antibiotic Therapy of Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Children with Burdened Allergologic History and Concomitant Allergic Pathology: Focus on Cefpodoxime Proxetil

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    Yu.V. Marushko

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of cefpodoxime proxetil in children with community-acquired pneumonia is effective. In patients with burdened history of allergic events and concomitant allergic pathology, use of cefpodoxime proxetil does not cause allergic reactions or worsening of comorbid allergic disease and does not affect the level of total serum immunoglobulin E, indicating safety of the drug usage in such children.

  11. Cause-specific long-term mortality rates in patients recovered from community-acquired pneumonia as compared with the general Dutch population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruns, A. H. W.; Oosterheert, J. J.; Cucciolillo, M. C.; el Moussaoui, R.; Groenwold, R. H. H.; Prins, J. M.; Hoepelman, A. I. M.

    2011-01-01

    Insights into long-term mortality, especially into the cause of death after initial recovery from an episode of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), may help in determining optimal preventive measures in such patients. Prospective observational cohort studies were conducted to compare cause-specific

  12. How good is the evidence for the recommended empirical antimicrobial treatment of patients hospitalized because of community-acquired pneumonia? : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterheert, J J; Bonten, M J M; Hak, E; Schneider, M M E; Hoepelman, I M

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For years, monotherapy with a beta-lactam antibiotic (penicillin, amoxicillin or second-generation cephalosporin) was recommended as empirical therapy for patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). A combination of a beta-lactam and a macrolide antibiotic was only recommended for

  13. Long-term symptom recovery and health-related quality of life in patients with mild-to-moderate-severe community-acquired pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    el Moussaoui, Rachida; Opmeer, Brent C.; de Borgie, Corianne A. J. M.; Nieuwkerk, Pythia; Bossuyt, Patrick M. M.; Speelman, Peter; Prins, Jan M.

    2006-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: The long-term outcomes of patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in terms of symptom resolution and health-related quality of life (HRQL) is unknown. Our objective was to determine the rate of symptom resolution using validated patient-based outcome measures, and to

  14. The value of signs and symptoms in differentiating between bacterial, viral and mixed aetiology in patients with community-acquired pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijskens, Elisabeth G. W.; Koopmans, Marion; Palmen, Fernand M. H.; van Erkel, Adriana J. M.; Mulder, Paul G. H.; Rossen, John W. A.

    Current diagnostics for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) include testing for a wide range of pathogens, which is costly and not always informative. We compared clinical and laboratory parameters of patients with CAP caused by different groups of pathogens to evaluate the potential for targeted

  15. THE METABOLIC ACTIVITY OF THE MICROFLORA OF THE OROPHARYNX IN CHILDREN WITH BRONCHITIS AND COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA

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    E. A. Medvedeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Given a steady increase in the number of children with recurrent  respiratory tract infections, to develop methods of their rehabilitation, it is necessary to evaluate  factors of nonspecific resistance. Aim: To study metabolic activity of oropharyngeal microflora in children  with recurrent bronchitis and community-acquired pneumonia, based on determination of spectrum  of shortchain fatty acids (SCFA. Materials and methods: This prospective  study included  60 children with recurrent  respiratory  tract  infections  aged  from 3 to 7 years, hospitalized  for inpatient  treatment of bronchitis  (n = 30 and pneumonia (n = 30. The oropharyngeal microflora was assessed by classical bacteriological  method (in mucosal smears; SCFA levels in non-stimulated saliva were measured by gas liquid chromatography. Results: There was no significant difference  in qualitative  and  quantitative composition  of the oropharyngeal microflora between children  with  bronchitis  and  pneumonia. However, assessment of metabolic  functions showed some significant differences. Children with   bronchitis  showed  signs of microflora hyperactivation  with total  SCFA production up  to  118.4% (mean from that of the reference range, with predominant activation of aerobic bacteria (anaerobic index 66.8%. In children with pneumonia, microflora was suppressed (68.13% of the normal range, the difference with the bronchitis group being significant, p < 0.05, with predominance of strictly anaerobic  bacteria (anaerobic index 110.35% from the normal range, p < 0.05. Children with recurrent respiratory tract infections had the following common characteristics: prevalence  of bacterial proteolysis (70% of patients and butyric acid deficiency (63% from the normal level in bronchitis and 33%, in pneumonia, p > 0.05. Conclusion: The data obtained could be used to make a decision on the necessity of antibacterial therapy.

  16. Clinical effectiveness of exogenous L-arginine in patients with coronary heart disease after community-acquired pneumonia

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    T. O. Kulynych

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Coronary heart disease and community acquired pneumonia associated with a higher risk for morbidity and mortality. The optimization of treatment of comorbid pathology by medicines which modify endothelium functional state is important. Aim: to study effect of exogenous L-arginine on clinical course of disease, markers of systemic inflammation and endothelial dysfunction in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. Materials and methods. 60 patients with CHD and CAP (the median 72.50 years, range 66.00; 75.00 were included into the study. Patients were randomized in 2 groups: first – 30 patients with basic therapy combined with L-arginine; and second – 30 patients with basic therapy. hs-CRP, neopterin, РАРР-А, NT-proBNP were measured by ELISA-TEST before treatment and 1 month after. Clinical course was assessed during 1 year of follow-up. Results. In the first group the hospitalization rate due to CHD and heart failure decompensation was significantly rare. Biomarkers changes in the 1st group were significant: hs-CRP was significantly decreased by 57.14 % (in the 2nd group – by 28.57 %; neopterin – by 36.57 % (in the 2nd group – by 20.91 %; РАРР-А – by 35.71 % (in the 2nd group – by 4.76 %. There was revealed a significant decreasing of NT-proBNP levels in patients receiving L-arginine by comparing with basic therapy: with the I stage of heart failure (HF – by 50.97 % vs 21.82 %, with the II-A stage of HF – by 43.82 % vs 5.61 % (p < 0.05. After 1 month of therapy patients from the 1st group had significantly lower rates of neopterin – by 16.46 %, and NT-proBNP – by 40.92 % in the subgroup of patients with II-A stage of HF (p < 0.05 compared with patients who received only the basic therapy. Conclusions. Combination of exogenous L-arginine and basic therapy in patients with CHD and CAP was associated with benign clinical course and positive changes of endothelium functional

  17. Community-acquired pneumonia and survival of critically ill acute exacerbation of COPD patients in respiratory intensive care units

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    Lu ZW

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Zhiwei Lu,* Yusheng Cheng,* Xiongwen Tu, Liang Chen, Hu Chen, Jian Yang, Jinyan Wang, Liqin Zhang Department of Respiratory Medicine, Yijishan Hospital of Wannan Medical College, Wuhu, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: The aim of this study was to appraise the effect of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP on inhospital mortality in critically ill acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD patients admitted to a respiratory intensive care unit.Patients and methods: A retrospective observational study was performed. Consecutive critically ill AECOPD patients receiving treatment in a respiratory intensive care unit were reviewed from September 1, 2012, to August 31, 2015. Categorical variables were analyzed using chi-square tests, and continuous variables were analyzed by Mann–Whitney U-test. Kaplan–Meier analysis was used to assess the association of CAP with survival of critically ill AECOPD patients for univariate analysis. Cox’s proportional hazards regression model was performed to identify risk factors for multivariate analysis.Results: A total of 80 consecutive eligible individuals were reviewed. These included 38 patients with CAP and 42 patients without CAP. Patients with CAP had a higher inhospital rate of mortality than patients without CAP (42% vs 33.3%, P<0.05. Kaplan–Meier survival analysis showed that patients with CAP had a worse survival rate than patients without CAP (P<0.05. Clinical characteristics, including Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II score, C-reactive protein, and CAP, were found to be closely associated with survival of AECOPD individuals. Further multivariate Cox regression analysis confirmed that CAP and APACHE II were independent risk factors for inhospital mortality in critically ill AECOPD patients (CAP: hazard ratio, 5.29; 95% CI, 1.50–18.47, P<0.01 and APACHE II: hazard ratio, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.06–1.37, P<0.01.Conclusion: CAP may be

  18. Drug-resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates among Spanish middle aged and older adults with community-acquired pneumonia

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    Raga-Luria Xavier

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pneumococcal diseases remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Updated data on drug-resistance from different populations may be important to recognize changes in disease patterns. This study assessed current levels of penicilin resistance among Streptococcus Pneumoniae causing pneumonia in Spanish middle age and older adults. Methods Antimicrobial susceptibility was tested for 104 consecutive isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae recovered from patients 50 years or older with radiographically confirmed pneumonia in the region of Tarragona (Spain between 2002 and 2007. According to the minimum inhibitory concentration of tested antimicrobials (penicillin, erythromycin, cefotaxime and levofloxacin strains were classified as susceptible or resistant. Antimicrobial resistance was determined for early cases (2002–2004 and contemporary cases (2005–2007. Results Twenty-seven (25.9% were penicillin-resistant strains (19 strains with intermediate resistance and 8 strains with high resistance. Penicillin-resistance was higher in 2002–2004 than in 2005–2007 (39.5% vs 18.2%, p = 0.017. Of 27 penicillin-resistant strains, 10 (37% were resistant to erythromycin, 8 (29.6% to cefotaxime, 2 (7.4% to levofloxacin, and 4 (14.8% were identified as multidrug resistant. Case-fatality rate was higher among those patients who had an infection caused by any penicillin susceptible strain (16.9% than in those with infections due to penicillin-resistant strains. Conclusion Resistance to penicillin among Streptococcus pneumoniae remains high, but such resistance does not result in increased mortality in patients with pneumococcal pneumonia.

  19. Central Hemodynamics and Extravascular Lung Water Index in Varying Degrees of Community-Acquired Pneumonia

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    S. N. Avdeykin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to assess the specific features of central hemodynamics (CH, extravascular lung water index (EVLWI, and pulmonary oxygenizing function in patients with different outcomes of treatment for severe communityacquired pneumonia (CAP.Subjects and methods. The retrospective study enrolled 57 patients with CAP. According to its outcome, there were 2 groups: 1 44 patients (33 men and 11 women, whose disease ended in recovery; 2 13 patients (8 men and 5 women, whose CAP resulted in a fatal out come. The groups did not differ in age (48.1±2.3 and 55.3±4.1 years and overall disease severity according to the APACHE II (21.5±0.8 and 25.2±2.1 scores and SOFA (8.7±0.2 and 9.7±1.0 scores scales (p<0.05. CAP was more severe in Group 2: 3.5±0.1 and 4.4±0.27 CURB65 scores (p>0.05. All the patients received identical antibiotic therapy. They underwent transpulmonary thermodilution according to the standard procedure. The indicators were daily recorded. The data were statistically processed. A corre lation analysis was made calculating the correlation coefficients (r. The significance of differences was estimated by the Student's ttest or Mann-Whitney test.Results. On day 1 of followup, the patients in both groups were prone to arterial hypotension, had tachycardia, lower or nearnormal central venous pressure (CVP. Group 1 versus Group 2 had higher cardiac index (CI (2.9±0.2 and 2.1±0.1 l/min/m2 and global ejection fraction (GEF (22.5±1 and 15.8±1.7% (p<0.05 and lower CVP (4.1±0.2 and 5.6±0.4 mm Hg (p<0.05. On day 3, Group 2 versus Group 1 had higher CVP (p<0.05 and lower CI, GEF, and some other cardiac pump function indicators. Admission EVLWI was virtually equally elevated in both groups. In Group 1, the indicator decreased later on and approached the normal values at 67 days of treatment. In Group 2, EVLWI remained high and did not virtually decrease. The indicator was ascertained to be inversely correlated with GEF on treatment days 1

  20. Adjunctive Systemic Corticosteroids for Hospitalized Community-Acquired Pneumonia: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis 2015 Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horita, Nobuyuki; Otsuka, Tatsuya; Haranaga, Shusaku; Namkoong, Ho; Miki, Makoto; Miyashita, Naoyuki; Higa, Futoshi; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Masahiro; Kohno, Shigeru; Kaneko, Takeshi

    2015-09-16

    Previous randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and meta-analyses evaluated the efficacy and safety of adjunctive corticosteroids for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). However, the results from them had large discrepancies. The eligibility criteria for the current meta-analysis were original RCTs written in English as a full article that evaluated adjunctive systemic corticosteroids adding on antibiotic therapy targeting typical and/or atypical pathogen for treating hospitalized human CAP cases. Four investigators independently searched for eligible articles through PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane databases. Random model was used. The heterogeneity among original studies and subgroups was evaluated with the I(2) statistics. Of 54 articles that met the preliminary criteria, we found 10 eligible RCTs comprising 1780 cases. Our analyses revealed following pooled values by corticosteroids. OR for all-cause death: 0.80 (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.53-1.21) from all studies; 0.41 (95% CI 0.19-0.90) from severe-case subgroup; 0.21 (95% CI 0.0-0.74) from intensive care unit (ICU) subgroup. Length of ICU stay: -1.30 days (95% CI (-3.04)-0.44). Length of hospital stay: -0.98 days (95% CI (-1.26)-(-0.71)). Length to clinical stability: -1.16 days (95% CI (-1.73)-(-0.58)). Serious complications do not seem to largely increase by steroids. In conclusion, adjunctive systemic corticosteroids for hospitalized patients with CAP seems preferred strategies.

  1. Elevated Plasma Stromal-Cell-Derived Factor-1 Protein Levels Correlate with Severity in Patients with Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-Kun Tsai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of this study was to investigate differential changes in plasma levels of stromal-cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1 before and after antibiotic treatment in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP and observe the association between the severity of CAP and the plasma SDF-1 level. Methods. We gathered blood specimens from 61 adult CAP patients before and after antibiotic treatment and from 60 healthy controls to measure the plasma concentrations of SDF-1 by using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results. The plasma SDF-1 concentration was elevated significantly in patients with CAP before receiving treatment compared with the controls and decreased significantly after the patients received treatment. Leukocyte (WBC and neutrophil counts and C-reactive protein (CRP levels decreased significantly after antibiotic treatment. Moreover, differences in the plasma concentration of SDF-1 were significantly correlated with PSI, CURB-65, and APACHE II scores (r=0.389, P=0.002, and n=61; r=0.449, P<0.001, and n=61; and r=0.363, P=0.004, and n=61, resp.. Conclusions. An elevated plasma SDF-1 concentration can be used as a biological marker for the early diagnosis of CAP and for the early detection of its severity.

  2. Development of quality indicators to evaluate antibiotic treatment of patients with community-acquired pneumonia in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farida, Helmia; Rondags, Angelique; Gasem, M Hussein; Leong, Katharina; Adityana, A; van den Broek, Peterhans J; Keuter, Monique; Natsch, Stephanie

    2015-04-01

    To develop an instrument for evaluating the quality of antibiotic management of patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) applicable in a middle-income developing country. A previous study and Indonesian guidelines were reviewed to derive potential quality of care indicators (QIs). An expert panel performed a two-round Delphi consensus procedure on the QI's relevance to patient recovery, reduction of antimicrobial resistance and cost containment. Applicability in practice, including reliability, feasibility and opportunity for improvement, was determined in a data set of 128 patients hospitalised with CAP in Semarang, Indonesia. Fifteen QIs were selected by the consensus procedure. Five QIs did not pass feasibility criteria, because of inappropriate documentation, inefficient laboratory services or patient factors. Three QIs provided minor opportunity for improvement. Two QIs contradicted each other; one of these was considered not valid and excluded. A final set of six QIs was defined for use in the Indonesian setting. Using the Delphi method, we defined a list of QIs for assessing the quality of care, in particular antibiotic treatment, for CAP in Indonesia. For further improvement, a modified Delphi method that includes discussion, a sound medical documentation system, improvement of microbiology laboratory services, and multi-center applicability tests are needed to develop a valid and applicable QI list for the Indonesian setting. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Usefulness and prognostic value of biomarkers in patients with community-acquired pneumonia in the emergency department.

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    Julián-Jiménez, Agustín; González Del Castillo, Juan; Candel, Francisco Javier

    2017-06-07

    Between all patients treated in the Emergency Department (ED), 1.35% are diagnosed with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). CAP is the main cause of death due to infectious disease (10-14%) and the most frequent reason of sepsis-septic shock in the ED. In the last decade, the search for objective tools to help establishing an early diagnosis, bacterial aetiology, severity, suspicion of bacteremia and the prognosis of mortality has increased. Biomarkers have shown their usefulness in this matter. Procalcitonin (obtains the highest accuracy for CAP diagnosis, bacterial aetiology and the presence of bacteremia), lactate (biomarker of hypoxia and tissue hypoperfusion) and proadrenomedullin (which has the greatest accuracy to predict mortality which in combination with the prognostic severity scales obtains even better results). The aim of this review is to highlight recently published scientific evidence and to compare the utility and prognostic accuracy of the biomarkers in CAP patients treated in the ED. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Chlamydia psittaci (psittacosis) as a cause of community-acquired pneumonia: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

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    Hogerwerf, L; DE Gier, B; Baan, B; VAN DER Hoek, W

    2017-11-01

    Psittacosis is a zoonotic infectious disease caused by the transmission of the bacterium Chlamydia psittaci from birds to humans. Infections in humans mainly present as community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). However, most cases of CAP are treated without diagnostic testing, and the importance of C. psittaci infection as a cause of CAP is therefore unclear. In this meta-analysis of published CAP-aetiological studies, we estimate the proportion of CAP caused by C. psittaci infection. The databases MEDLINE and Embase were systematically searched for relevant studies published from 1986 onwards. Only studies that consisted of 100 patients or more were included. In total, 57 studies were selected for the meta-analysis. C. psittaci was the causative pathogen in 1·03% (95% CI 0·79-1·30) of all CAP cases from the included studies combined, with a range between studies from 0 to 6·7%. For burden of disease estimates, it is a reasonable assumption that 1% of incident cases of CAP are caused by psittacosis.

  5. Preventing mismanagement of community-acquired pneumonia at an urban public hospital: implications for institution-specific practice guidelines.

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    Schwartz, D N; Furumoto-Dawson, A; Itokazu, G S; Chinikamwala, M; Levasseur, S; Weinstein, R A

    1998-03-01

    To assess institutional performance of key diagnostic and therapeutic interventions and to identify areas amenable to improvement in the management of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). A chart-based retrospective study. Cook County Hospital, a large, urban, public teaching hospital. Adult inpatients with a hospital discharge diagnosis of CAP. None. Fifty hospital admissions were reviewed. Only 25 patients (50%) had two specimens obtained for blood culture, and sputum was sent for Gram's stain and culture for only 11 patients (22%). Approximately one third of the patients had portable anterior-posterior instead of standard posterior-anterior and lateral chest radiographs performed. Physicians in the emergency department (ED) tended to be less likely to note the presence of multilobar infiltrates or pleural effusions than the attending radiologists. The antibiotic regimens employed in the ED and on the inpatient wards were widely variable. The mean time from hospital entry until administration of the first dose of antibiotics was 5.5 h for the 18 patients for whom treatment was initiated in the ED vs 16.1 h for the 27 patients admitted through the ED for whom therapy was deferred until ward admission (p < 0.001, Student's t test). Institutional variations in the performance of basic diagnostic and therapeutic interventions for patients with CAP may be substantial. The local performance of these key processes of care should be assessed to help direct the formulation of institutional practice guidelines for the management of CAP.

  6. Problems and solutions on issues of medical care quality in community-acquired pneumonia in hospitals of Saratov region

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    Lotsmanov Yu.F.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Qualitative assessment of diagnostics and treatment of patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP was carried out in ten therapeutic departments of urban and district hospitals of Saratov region, using quality indicators (Qls. Each case of CAP was assessed in expert health care quality (HCQ card according to the diagnostic and treatment quality federal standards and the basic Ql. The application of Ql in CAP patients allowed revealing the following: low CAP agent isolation rate; late hospitalization of CAP patients; low frequency of sputum bacteriological and bacterioscopic investigations prior to antibiotic therapy; insufficient frequency of step-by-step introduction of antibiotics. Recommendations on CAP patients dispenserization were not properly prescribed; recommendations on vaccination were absent. The basic measures of HCQ improvement are as follows: organizing for each CAP patient therapeutic and diagnostic quality control according to Ql; quick administrative decisions; using of HCQ expertise during the first 2-3 days of treatment to correct diagnosis and treatment; optimizing hospital diagnostic resources (laboratory and instrumental and rational pharmacotherapy

  7. Community-acquired pneumonia caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in critically-ill patients: systematic review.

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    Carballo, Nuria; De Antonio-Cuscó, Marta; Echeverría-Esnal, Daniel; Luque, Sonia; Salas, Esther; Grau, Santiago

    2017-03-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Despite methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) having often been associated with nosocomial pneumonia, the condition of some MRSA CAP patients is severe enough to warrant their being admitted to ICU. The purpose of this study is to conduct a systematic review of the literature on antibiotic treatment of MRSA CAP in critically-ill patients. An online search was conducted for locating articles on MRSA CAP in critically ill patients. Relevant publications were identified in PUBMED, the BestPractice database, UpToDate database and the Cochrane Library for articles published in English within the December 2001 - April 2016 time frame. A total of 70 articles were found to have been published, 13 (18.8%) having been included and 57 (81.4%) excluded. Cohort studies were predominant, having totaled 16 in number (20.7%) as compared to one sole cross-sectional study (3.5%). The experience in the treatment of MRSA CAP in patients requiring admission to ICU is quite limited. Vancomycin or linezolid seem to be the treatments of choice for MRSA CAP, although there not be any specific recommendation in this regard. It may be useful to use alternative routes, such as administration via aerosolized antibiotics, continuous infusion or in association with other antibiotics. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  8. Impact of antibiotic guideline compliance on duration of mechanical ventilation in critically ill patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

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    Shorr, Andrew F; Bodi, Maria; Rodriguez, Alejandro; Sole-Violan, Jorge; Garnacho-Montero, Jose; Rello, Jordi

    2006-07-01

    Multiple guidelines exist to aid clinicians in choosing antibiotics to treat patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia (SCAP). Our goal was to assess the impact of following these guidelines, such as those from the Infectious Disease Society of America (IDSA), on the duration of mechanical ventilation (MV). Analysis of a prospective registry. Multiple ICUs in Spain. ICU patients with SCAP requiring > or = 24 h of endotracheal intubation and surviving their ICU course. None. Demographics, comorbid diseases, severity of illness, and process of care variables were recorded. The duration of MV in patients receiving an antibiotic regimen consistent with IDSA guidelines was compared to patients with prescriptions not in accordance with IDSA recommendations. In the cohort (n = 199), Streptococcus pneumoniae was the most frequent pathogen, and unadjusted analysis showed that the duration of MV was longer in persons receiving IDSA-noncompliant regimens (11 days vs 10 days). In a multivariate hazard model, two variables were independently associated with greater durations of MV: development of acute renal failure (hazard ratio, 1.47; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02 to 2.12), and prescription of an IDSA-noncompliant regimen (hazard ratio, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.93). Adjusted analysis indicated that patients receiving treatment that was not compliant with IDSA guidelines received MV an added 3 days. Failure to follow antibiotic recommendations for the treatment of SCAP may increase the need for continuing MV. Conversely, guideline compliance could represent a surrogate marker that captures other aspects of clinical care, rather than be the direct factor leading to better outcomes. Nonetheless, given the costs associated with MV, enhanced guideline compliance may represent a means for improving outcomes and enhancing resource utilization.

  9. After-hours respiratory physiotherapy for intubated and mechanically ventilated patients with community-acquired pneumonia: An Australian perspective.

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    van der Lee, Lisa; Hill, Anne-Marie; Patman, Shane

    2017-11-15

    Community acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common reason for admission to an intensive care unit for intubation and mechanical ventilation, and results in high morbidity and mortality. The primary aim of the study was to investigate availability and provision of respiratory physiotherapy, outside of normal business hours, for intubated and mechanically ventilated adults with CAP in Australian hospitals. A cross-sectional, mixed methods online survey was conducted. Participants were senior intensive care unit physiotherapists from 88 public and private hospitals. Main outcome measures included presence and nature of an after-hours physiotherapy service and factors perceived to influence the need for after-hours respiratory physiotherapy intervention, when the service was available, for intubated adult patients with CAP. Data were also collected regarding respiratory intervention provided after-hours by other ICU professionals. Response rate was 72% (n=75). An after-hours physiotherapy service was provided by n=31 (46%) hospitals and onsite after-hours physiotherapy presence was limited (22%), with a combination of onsite and on-call service reported by 19%. Treatment response (83%) was the most frequent factor for referring patients with CAP for after-hours physiotherapy intervention by the treating day-time physiotherapist. Nurses performing respiratory intervention (77%) was significantly associated with no available after-hours physiotherapy service (p=0.04). Physiotherapy after-hours service in Australia is limited, therefore it is common for intubated patients with CAP not to receive any respiratory physiotherapy intervention outside of normal business hours. In the absence of an after-hours physiotherapist, nurses were most likely to perform after-hours respiratory intervention to intubated patients with CAP. Further research is required to determine whether the frequency of respiratory physiotherapy intervention, including after-hours provision of treatment

  10. Neumonia adquirida en la comunidad en dos poblaciones hospitalarias Community-acquired pneumonia in patients from two different hospitals

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    O. J. Caberlotto

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Se estudiaron en forma prospectiva pacientes con diagnóstico de neumonía adquirida en la comunidad que acudieron a la consulta en un hospital general y en un centro especializado en medicina respiratoria ubicados en la provincia de Buenos Aires, y que requirieron internación. Se evaluaron la distribución por sexo y edad, las comorbilidades asociadas, los agentes etiológicos, su incidencia y la mortalidad. Se incluyeron 52 pacientes (marzo 1998-febrero 1999 del Hospital General de Agudos Manuel Belgrano (HMB y 23 pacientes (junio 2000-mayo 2001 del Hospital del Tórax Dr. Antonio A. Cetrángolo (HCET. Se excluyeron pacientes con tuberculosis o micosis pulmonar, neoplasia de pulmón y diagnóstico serológico para HIV. Se completó una historia clínica y se realizaron estudios microbiológicos para gérmenes comunes, virus respiratorios y micobacterias. Para el estudio de los agentes productores de neumonías atípicas (Chlamydia spp, Coxiella burnetii, Mycoplasma pneumoniae y Legionella spp. y como complemento del estudio virológico, se utilizaron pruebas serológicas. No se observaron diferencias por sexo y edad en los dos grupos. En el HMB las comorbilidades más frecuentes fueron EPOC, diabetes e insuficiencia cardíaca, en tanto que en el HCET fueron EPOC, asma y fibrosis pulmonar. Se obtuvo un diagnóstico microbiológico en el 48% y 65.2% de los pacientes para ambos grupos. Los agentes hallados más frecuentemente fueron Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, influenza A y Legionella spp, este último germen con una incidencia del 12% en pacientes que evolucionaron favorablemente y que en su mayoría pertenecían al HMB. La mortalidad fue similar para ambos grupos (13.3%. En el HMB estuvo relacionada con la existencia de comorbilidades en 7 de 8 casos y en el HCET con el agravamiento de la insuficiencia respiratoria crónica.Patients hospitalized with community acquired pneumonia were studied prospectively in two hospitals

  11. Respiratory viruses detected in Mexican children younger than 5 years old with community-acquired pneumonia: a national multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong-Chew, Rosa María; García-León, Miguel L; Noyola, Daniel E; Perez Gonzalez, Luis F; Gaitan Meza, Jesús; Vilaseñor-Sierra, Alberto; Martinez-Aguilar, Gerardo; Rivera-Nuñez, Victor Hugo; Newton-Sánchez, Oscar A; Firo-Reyes, Verónica; Del Río-Almendarez, Carlos N; González-Rodríguez, Alejandra Pamela; Ortiz-García, Enrique R; Navarrete-Navarro, Susana; Soria-Rodríguez, Carmen; Carrasco-Castillo, Adoniram; Sánchez-Medina, Eneida; López-Martínez, Irma; Hernández-Andrade, Teresa; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia M; Santos-Preciado, José I

    2017-09-01

    Acute respiratory infections are the leading cause of mortality in children worldwide, especially in developing countries. Pneumonia accounts for 16% of all deaths of children under 5 years of age and was the cause of death of 935000 children in 2015. Despite its frequency and severity, information regarding its etiology is limited. The aim of this study was to identify respiratory viruses associated with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in children younger than 5 years old. One thousand four hundred and four children younger than 5 years of age with a clinical and/or radiological diagnosis of CAP in 11 hospitals in Mexico were included. Nasal washes were collected, placed in viral medium, and frozen at -70°C until processing. The first 832 samples were processed using the multiplex Bio-Plex/Luminex system and the remaining 572 samples using the Anyplex multiplex RT-PCR. Clinical data regarding diagnosis, clinical signs and symptoms, radiographic pattern, and risk factors were obtained and recorded. Of the samples tested, 81.6% were positive for viruses. Respiratory syncytial virus (types A and B) was found in 23.7%, human enterovirus/rhinovirus in 16.6%, metapneumovirus in 5.7%, parainfluenza virus (types 1-4) in 5.5%, influenza virus (types A and B) in 3.6%, adenovirus in 2.2%, coronavirus (NL63, OC43, 229E, and HKU1) in 2.2%, and bocavirus in 0.4%. Co-infection with two or more viruses was present in 22.1%; 18.4% of the samples were negative. Using biomass for cooking, daycare attendance, absence of breastfeeding, and co-infections were found to be statistically significant risk factors for the presence of severe pneumonia. Respiratory syncytial virus (types A and B), human enterovirus/rhinovirus, and metapneumovirus were the respiratory viruses identified most frequently in children younger than 5 years old with CAP. Co-infection was present in an important proportion of the children. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights

  12. In-hospital mortality risk factors in community acquired pneumonia: evaluation of immunocompetent adult patients without comorbidities

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    Miguel Hernan Vicco

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary Objective: several scores were developed in order to improve the determination of community acquired pneumonia (CAP severity and its management, mainly CURB-65 and SACP score. However, none of them were evaluated for risk assessment of in-hospital mortality, particularly in individuals who were non-immunosuppressed and/or without any comorbidity. In this regard, the present study was carried out. Methods: we performed a cross-sectional study in 272 immunocompetent patients without comorbidities and with a diagnosis of CAP. Performance of CURB- 65 and SCAP scores in predicting in-hospital mortality was evaluated. Also, variables related to death were assessed. Furthermore, in order to design a model of in-hospital mortality prediction, sampled individuals were randomly divided in two groups. The association of the variables with mortality was weighed and, by multiple binary regression, a model was constructed in one of the subgroups. Then, it was validated in the other subgroup. Results: both scores yielded a fair strength of agreement, and CURB-65 showed a better performance in predicting in-hospital mortality. In our casuistry, age, white blood cell counts, serum urea and diastolic blood pressure were related to death. The model constructed with these variables showed a good performance in predicting in-hospital mortality; moreover, only one patient with fatal outcome was not correctly classified in the group where the model was constructed and in the group where it was validated. Conclusion: our findings suggest that a simple model that uses only 4 variables, which are easily accessible and interpretable, can identify seriously ill patients with CAP

  13. Impact of an Educational Program to Reduce Healthcare Resources in Community-Acquired Pneumonia: The EDUCAP Randomized Controlled Trial.

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    Jordi Adamuz

    Full Text Available Additional healthcare visits and rehospitalizations after discharge are frequent among patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP and have a major impact on healthcare costs. We aimed to determine whether the implementation of an individualized educational program for hospitalized patients with CAP would decrease subsequent healthcare visits and readmissions within 30 days of hospital discharge.A multicenter, randomized trial was conducted from January 1, 2011 to October 31, 2014 at three hospitals in Spain. We randomly allocated immunocompetent adults patients hospitalized for CAP to receive either an individualized educational program or conventional information before discharge. The educational program included recommendations regarding fluid intake, adherence to drug therapy and preventive vaccines, knowledge and management of the disease, progressive adaptive physical activity, and counseling for alcohol and smoking cessation. The primary trial endpoint was a composite of the frequency of additional healthcare visits and rehospitalizations within 30 days of hospital discharge. Intention-to-treat analysis was performed.We assigned 102 patients to receive the individualized educational program and 105 to receive conventional information. The frequency of the composite primary end point was 23.5% following the individualized program and 42.9% following the conventional information (difference, -19.4%; 95% confidence interval, -6.5% to -31.2%; P = 0.003.The implementation of an individualized educational program for hospitalized patients with CAP was effective in reducing subsequent healthcare visits and rehospitalizations within 30 days of discharge. Such a strategy may help optimize available healthcare resources and identify post-acute care needs in patients with CAP.Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN39531840.

  14. Vitamin D status and community-acquired pneumonia: results from the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

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    Sadeq A Quraishi

    Full Text Available To investigate the association between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OHD] level and history of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP.We identified 16,975 individuals (≥17 years from the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III with documented 25(OHD levels. To investigate the association of 25(OHD with history of CAP in these participants, we developed a multivariable logistic regression model, adjusting for demographic factors (age, sex, race, poverty-to-income ratio, and geographic location, clinical data (body mass index, smoking status, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, congestive heart failure, diabetes mellitus, stroke, chronic kidney disease, neutropenia, and alcohol consumption, and season. Locally weighted scatterplot smoothing (LOWESS was used to depict the relationship between increasing 25(OHD levels and the cumulative frequency of CAP in the study cohort.The median [interquartile range (IQR] serum 25(OHD level was 24 (IQR 18-32 ng/mL. 2.1% [95% confidence interval (CI: 1.9-2.3] of participants reported experiencing a CAP within one year of their participation in the national survey. After adjusting for demographic factors, clinical data, and season, 25(OHD levels <30 ng/mL were associated with 56% higher odds of CAP [odds ratio 1.56; 95% confidence interval: 1.17-2.07] compared to levels ≥30 ng/mL. LOWESS analysis revealed a near linear relationship between vitamin D status and the cumulative frequency of CAP up to 25(OHD levels around 30 ng/mL.Among 16,975 participants in NHANES III, 25(OHD levels were inversely associated with history of CAP. Randomized controlled trials are warranted to determine the effect of optimizing vitamin D status on the risk of CAP.

  15. Relationship between the use of inhaled steroids for chronic respiratory diseases and early outcomes in community-acquired pneumonia.

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    Jordi Almirall

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The role of inhaled steroids in patients with chronic respiratory diseases is a matter of debate due to the potential effect on the development and prognosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. We assessed whether treatment with inhaled steroids in patients with chronic bronchitis, COPD or asthma and CAP may affect early outcome of the acute pneumonic episode. METHODS: Over 1-year period, all population-based cases of CAP in patients with chronic bronchitis, COPD or asthma were registered. Use of inhaled steroids were registered and patients were followed up to 30 days after diagnosis to assess severity of CAP and clinical course (hospital admission, ICU admission and mortality. RESULTS: Of 473 patients who fulfilled the selection criteria, inhaled steroids were regularly used by 109 (23%. In the overall sample, inhaled steroids were associated with a higher risk of hospitalization (OR=1.96, p = 0.002 in the bivariate analysis, but this effect disappeared after adjusting by other severity-related factors (adjusted OR=1.08, p=0.787. This effect on hospitalization also disappeared when considering only patients with asthma (OR=1.38, p=0.542, with COPD alone (OR=4.68, p=0.194, but a protective effect was observed in CB patients (OR=0.15, p=0.027. Inhaled steroids showed no association with ICU admission, days to clinical recovery and mortality in the overall sample and in any disease subgroup. CONCLUSIONS: Treatment with inhaled steroids is not a prognostic factor in COPD and asthmatic patients with CAP, but could prevent hospitalization for CAP in patients with clinical criteria of chronic bronchitis.

  16. Appropriateness of Antibiotic Prescribing for Veterans with Community-Acquired Pneumonia, Sinusitis, or Acute Exacerbations of Chronic Bronchitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobia, Colleen Cook; Aspinall, Sherrie L.; Good, Chester B.; Fine, Michael J.; Hanlon, Joseph T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies evaluating antibiotic appropriateness in bacterial respiratory tract infections have focused only antibiotic choice and ignored other important aspects of prescribing such as dosing, drug-drug interactions, and duration of therapy. Objective The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence and factors associated with inappropriate antibiotic prescribing in outpatients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), sinusitis, or acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis (AECB). Methods This is a retrospective case series of the appropriateness of antibiotic prescribing in 153 outpatients with CAP, sinusitis, or AECB who were evaluated in a Veterans Affairs Emergency Department over a one year period. Data on patient characteristics, diagnosis, comorbidities, concurrent medications, and antibiotic prescribed were collected. Using the reliable and valid Medication Appropriateness Index (MAI), a trained clinical pharmacist assessed antimicrobial appropriateness. The MAI rates the appropriateness of a medication along ten criteria: indication, effectiveness, dosage, directions, practicality, drug-drug interactions, drug-disease interactions, unnecessary duplication, duration, and expensiveness. Results Overall 65% of patients had one or more antibiotic prescribing problems as assessed by the MAI. The most frequently rated problems were with expensiveness (39%), impracticality (21%), and incorrect dosage (10%). Penicillins, quinolones, and macrolides were the most inappropriately prescribed antibiotic classes. A history of alcohol abuse was associated with a lower likelihood of inappropriate prescribing (Adjusted Odds Ratio [Adj. OR] 0.32; 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 0.10-0.98), while patients who were married were more likely to receive inappropriately prescribed antibiotics (Adj. OR 2.64; 95%CI 1.25-5.59). Conclusions Inappropriate antibiotic prescribing is common in patients with bacterial respiratory tract infections and often

  17. IL-6 and TNF-α serum levels are associated with early death in community-acquired pneumonia patients

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    M.R. Bacci

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is amongst the leading causes of death worldwide. As inflammatory markers, cytokines can predict outcomes, if interpreted together with clinical data and scoring systems such as CURB-65, CRB, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of inflammatory biomarkers on the early mortality of hospitalized CAP patients. Twenty-seven CAP patients needing hospitalization were enrolled for the study and samples of interleukin-1 (IL-1 and interleukin-6 (IL-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, C-reactive protein (CRP, and homocystein were collected at the time of admission (day 1 as well as on the seventh day of the treatment. There was a significant reduction in the levels of IL-6 between the first and the second collections. Median IL-6 values decreased from 24 pg/mL (day 1 to 8 pg/mL (day 7 (P=0.016. The median levels of TNF-α were higher in patients: i with acute kidney injury (AKI (P=0.045, ii requiring mechanical ventilation (P=0.040, iii with short hospital stays (P=0.009, iv admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU (P=0.040, v who died early (P=0.003, and vi with worse CRB scores (P=0.013. In summary, IL-6 and TNF-α levels were associated with early mortality of CAP patients. Longer admission levels demonstrated greater likelihood of early death and overall mortality, necessity of mechanical ventilation, and AKI.

  18. IL-6 and TNF-α serum levels are associated with early death in community-acquired pneumonia patients

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    Bacci, M.R.; Leme, R.C.P.; Zing, N.P.C. [Departamento de Cliníca Médica, Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Murad, N. [Departamento de Cardiologia, Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Adami, F.; Hinnig, P.F. [Departamento de Cliníca Médica, Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Feder, D. [Departamento de Farmacologia, Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Chagas, A.C.P. [Departamento de Cardiologia, Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Fonseca, F.L.A. [Departamento de Cliníca Médica, Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil)

    2015-02-24

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is amongst the leading causes of death worldwide. As inflammatory markers, cytokines can predict outcomes, if interpreted together with clinical data and scoring systems such as CURB-65, CRB, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II). The aim of this study was to determine the impact of inflammatory biomarkers on the early mortality of hospitalized CAP patients. Twenty-seven CAP patients needing hospitalization were enrolled for the study and samples of interleukin-1 (IL-1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), C-reactive protein (CRP), and homocystein were collected at the time of admission (day 1) as well as on the seventh day of the treatment. There was a significant reduction in the levels of IL-6 between the first and the second collections. Median IL-6 values decreased from 24 pg/mL (day 1) to 8 pg/mL (day 7) (P=0.016). The median levels of TNF-α were higher in patients: i) with acute kidney injury (AKI) (P=0.045), ii) requiring mechanical ventilation (P=0.040), iii) with short hospital stays (P=0.009), iv) admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) (P=0.040), v) who died early (P=0.003), and vi) with worse CRB scores (P=0.013). In summary, IL-6 and TNF-α levels were associated with early mortality of CAP patients. Longer admission levels demonstrated greater likelihood of early death and overall mortality, necessity of mechanical ventilation, and AKI.

  19. Proton pump inhibitors and the risk of hospitalisation for community-acquired pneumonia: replicated cohort studies with meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filion, Kristian B; Chateau, Dan; Targownik, Laura E; Gershon, Andrea; Durand, Madeleine; Tamim, Hala; Teare, Gary F; Ravani, Pietro; Ernst, Pierre; Dormuth, Colin R

    2014-01-01

    Objective Previous observational studies suggest that the use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) may increase the risk of hospitalisation for community-acquired pneumonia (HCAP). However, the potential presence of confounding and protopathic biases limits the conclusions that can be drawn from these studies. Our objective was, therefore, to examine the risk of HCAP with PPIs prescribed prophylactically in new users of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Design We formed eight restricted cohorts of new users of NSAIDs, aged ≥40 years, using a common protocol in eight databases (Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, Nova Scotia, US MarketScan and the UK's General Practice Research Database (GPRD)). This specific patient population was studied to minimise bias due to unmeasured confounders. High-dimensional propensity scores were used to estimate site-specific adjusted ORs (aORs) for HCAP at 6 months in PPI patients compared with unexposed patients. Fixed-effects meta-analytic models were used to estimate overall effects across databases. Results Of the 4 238 504 new users of NSAIDs, 2.3% also started a PPI. The cumulative 6-month incidence of HCAP was 0.17% among patients prescribed PPIs and 0.12% in unexposed patients. After adjustment, PPIs were not associated with an increased risk of HCAP (aOR=1.05; 95% CI 0.89 to 1.25). Histamine-2 receptor antagonists yielded similar results (aOR=0.95, 95% CI  0.75 to 1.21). Conclusions Our study does not support the proposition of a pharmacological effect of gastric acid suppressors on the risk of HCAP. PMID:23856153

  20. Efficacy of clinical guideline implementation to improve the appropriateness of chest physiotherapy prescription among inpatients with community-acquired pneumonia.

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    Guessous, Idris; Cornuz, Jacques; Stoianov, Rebecca; Burnand, Bernard; Fitting, Jean-William; Yersin, Bertrand; Lamy, Olivier

    2008-09-01

    Although there is no strong evidence of benefit, chest physiotherapy (CP) seems to be commonly used in simple pneumonia. CP requires equipment and frequently involves the assistance of a respiratory therapist, engendering a significant medical workload and cost. To measure and compare the efficacy of two modalities of chest physiotherapy (CP) guideline implementation on the appropriateness of CP prescription among patients hospitalised for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). We measured the CP prescription rate and duration in all consecutive CAP inpatients admitted in a division of general internal medicine at an urban teaching community hospital during three consecutive one-year time periods: (1) before any guideline implementation; (2) after a passive implementation by medical grand rounds and guideline diffusion through mailing; (3) after adding a one-page reminder in the CAP patient's medical chart highlighting our recommendations. Death and recurrent hospitalisation rates within one year after hospitalisation were recorded to assess whether CP prescription reduction, if any, impaired patient outcomes. During the three successive phases, 127, 157, and 147 patients with similar characteristics were included. Among all CAP inpatients, the CP prescription rate decreased from 68% (86/127) to 51% (80/157), and to 48% (71/147), respectively (P for trend <0.01 for trend). A significant reduction in CP duration was observed after the active guideline implementation (12.0, 11.0, 7.0days, respectively) and persisted after adjustment for length of stay. Reductions in CP prescription rate and duration were also observed among CAP patients with COPD CP prescription rate: 97% (30/31), 67% (24/36), 75% (35/47), respectively (P<0.01 for trend). The mean cost of CP per patient was reduced by 56%, from $709 to $481, and to $309, respectively. Neither the in-hospital deaths, the one-year overall recurrent hospitalisation nor the one-year CAP-specific recurrent hospitalisation

  1. Estado nutricional y mortalidad en neumonía de la comunidad Nutritional status and mortality in community acquired pneumonia

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    María Soledad Rodríguez-Pecci

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Las neumonías constituyen una causa mayor de morbimortalidad, y entre los factores de riesgo se incluye el estado nutricional. En el presente estudio se analizó la relación entre malnutrición y mortalidad en Neumonía Aguda de la Comunidad (NAC y se utilizó la Escala de Evaluación Global Subjetiva (EGS como método de valoración del estado nutricional de los pacientes con NAC. En este estudio prospectivo observacional se incluyeron en forma consecutiva 98 pacientes con NAC que requirieron hospitalización, de octubre de 2004 a septiembre de 2006. Se registraron características clínicas, bacteriológicas y de laboratorio y se evaluó nutricionalmente a cada paciente utilizando la EGS. El seguimiento se realizó hasta el alta médica, derivación o muerte. La persistencia de tos o fiebre, la presencia de derrame pleural, neoplasias o larga hospitalización se asociaron a peor pronóstico. La mortalidad aumentó proporcionalmente con el grado de desnutrición. Treinta y dos pacientes (32.65% fueron clasificados como categoría EGS-A; 44 (44.90% como EGS-B, y 22 (22.45% como EGS-C. Fallecieron 3 de 32 EGS-A (9.37%, 8 de 44 EGS-B (18.18% y 10 de 22 EGS-C. El riesgo de muerte fue significativamente mayor en el grupo EGS-C que en el EGS-A; OR = 6.085 (CI95% 1.071- 34.591 p = 0.042. Considerando la muerte como variable de egreso, la categoría EGS-A mostró el mayor valor predictivo negativo (0.906, y EGS-C el mayor valor predictivo positivo (0.455. La EGS realizada al ingreso fue un instrumento útil para identificar el estado nutricional y un buen pronosticador de riesgo de muerte en NAC.Pneumonias are a major cause of morbidity and mortality and their prognosis depends on many factors including nutritional status. This study analyzed the relationship between malnutrition and the risk of death in Community Acquired Pneumonia (CAP patients. This is a prospective observational study. The Subjective Global Assessment (SGA was used as a screening

  2. The incidence rate and economic burden of community-acquired pneumonia in a working-age population.

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    Broulette, Jonah; Yu, Holly; Pyenson, Bruce; Iwasaki, Kosuke; Sato, Reiko

    2013-09-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is frequently associated with the very young and the elderly but is a largely underrecognized burden among working-age adults. Although the burden of CAP among the elderly has been established, there are limited data on the economic burden of CAP in the employed population. To assess the economic impact of CAP in US working-age adults from an employer perspective by estimating the incidence rate and costs of healthcare, sick time, and short-term disability for this patient population. This retrospective cohort study is based on data from 2 Truven Health Analytics databases. The study population consisted of commercially insured active employees aged 18 to 64 years, early retirees aged Descriptive statistics were used to compare healthcare (ie, medical and pharmacy) costs, sick time, and short-term disability costs between the cohorts with and without CAP. Linear regression was used to estimate the average annual incremental healthcare cost in employed patients with inpatient or outpatient CAP versus individuals without CAP. Study eligibility was met by 12,502,017 employed individuals, including 123,920 with CAP and 12,378,097 without CAP; the overall incidence rate of CAP was 10.6 per 1000 person-years. Among individuals with and without CAP, the costs of healthcare, sick time, and short-term disability increased with advancing age and with higher risk status. The mean annual healthcare costs were $20,961 for patients with CAP and $3783 for individuals without CAP. Overall, the mean costs of sick time and short-term disability were $1129 and $1016, respectively, in active employees with CAP, and $853 and $322, respectively, in their counterparts without CAP. Compared with individuals without CAP, the average annual incremental healthcare cost ranged from $39,889 to $113,837 for inpatient management of patients with CAP and from $4170 to $31,524 for outpatient management of patients with CAP, depending on the risk level. CAP is a

  3. "I really should've gone to the doctor": older adults and family caregivers describe their experiences with community-acquired pneumonia

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    Lohfeld Lynne

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Responding to acute illness symptoms can often be challenging for older adults. The primary objective of this study was to describe how community-dwelling older adults and their family members responded to symptoms of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. Methods A qualitative study that used face-to-face semi-structured interviews to collect data from a purposeful sample of seniors aged 60+ and their family members living in a mid-sized Canadian city. Data analysis began with descriptive and interpretive coding, then advanced as the research team repeatedly compared emerging thematic categories to the raw data. Searches for disconfirming evidence and member checking through focus groups provided additional data and helped ensure rigour. Results Community-acquired pneumonia symptoms varied greatly among older adults, making decisions to seek care difficult for them and their family members. Both groups took varying amounts of time as they attempted to sort out what was wrong and then determine how best to respond. Even after they concluded something was wrong, older adults with confirmed pneumonia continued to wait for days, to over a week, before seeking medical care. Participants provided diverse reasons for this delay, including fear, social obligations (work, family, leisure, and accessibility barriers (time, place, systemic. Several older adults and family members regretted their delays in seeking help. Conclusion Treatment-seeking delay is a variable, multi-phased decision-making process that incorporates symptom assessment plus psychosocial and situational factors. Public health and health care professionals need to educate older adults about the potential causes and consequences of unnecessary waits. Such efforts may reduce the severity of community-acquired pneumonia upon presentation at clinics and hospitals, and that, in turn, could potentially improve health outcomes.

  4. Diretrizes brasileiras para pneumonia adquirida na comunidade em adultos imunocompetentes - 2009 Brazilian guidelines for community-acquired pneumonia in immunocompetent adults - 2009

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    Ricardo de Amorim Corrêa

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A pneumonia adquirida na comunidade mantém-se como a doença infecciosa aguda de maior impacto médico-social quanto à morbidade e a custos relacionados ao tratamento. Os grupos etários mais suscetíveis de complicações graves situam-se entre os extremos de idade, fato que tem justificado a adoção de medidas de prevenção dirigidas a esses estratos populacionais. Apesar do avanço no conhecimento no campo da etiologia e da fisiopatologia, assim como no aperfeiçoamento dos métodos propedêuticos e terapêuticos, inúmeros pontos merecem ainda investigação adicional. Isto se deve à diversidade clínica, social, demográfica e estrutural, que são tópicos que não podem ser previstos em sua totalidade. Dessa forma, a publicação de diretrizes visa agrupar de maneira sistematizada o conhecimento atualizado e propor sua aplicação racional na prática médica. Não se trata, portanto, de uma regra rígida a ser seguida, mas, antes, de uma ferramenta para ser utilizada de forma crítica, tendo em vista a variabilidade da resposta biológica e do ser humano, no seu contexto individual e social. Esta diretriz constitui o resultado de uma discussão ampla entre os membros do Conselho Científico e da Comissão de Infecções Respiratórias da Sociedade Brasileira de Pneumologia e Tisiologia. O grupo de trabalho propôs-se a apresentar tópicos considerados relevantes, visando a uma atualização da diretriz anterior. Evitou-se, tanto quanto possível, uma repetição dos conceitos considerados consensuais. O objetivo principal do documento é a apresentação organizada dos avanços proporcionados pela literatura recente e, desta forma, contribuir para a melhora da assistência ao paciente adulto imunocompetente portador de pneumonia adquirida na comunidade.Community-acquired pneumonia continues to be the acute infectious disease that has the greatest medical and social impact regarding morbidity and treatment costs. Children and the

  5. Risk factors for in-hospital mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes complicated by community-acquired Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteremia.

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    Huang, Chung-Huei; Tsai, Jir-Shiong; Chen, I-Wen; Hsu, Brend Ray-Sea; Huang, Miau-Ju; Huang, Yu-Yao

    2015-10-01

    Patients with diabetes are at a high risk of infection-related morbidity and mortality. Klebsiella pneumoniae bacilli are prevalent among diabetic patients, especially in Asian populations. The present study aimed to identify risk factors for in-hospital mortality among diabetic patients complicated by community-acquired K. pneumoniae bacteremia. We evaluated the clinical characteristics of 341 Taiwanese type 2 diabetic patients who were treated for community-acquired K. pneumoniae bacteremia. We then analyzed outcome predictors, and in particular comorbidities and the site of infection. The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 14.1%. Comorbid cancer was the leading factor, accounting for 32.1% of all cases of mortality. Pulmonary infection, primary bacteremia, afebrile or shock presentation and low serum albumin level were risk factors for in-hospital mortality. Regardless of comorbidities, pulmonary infection [odds ratio (OR) 10.74, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.02-57.09] and albumin level (OR 0.15, 95% CI 0.03-0.76) were the main risk predictors. The receiver operating characteristic curve indicated that a serum albumin level lower than 2.4 g/dL (71.1% sensitivity and 77.4% specificity) suggested a poor prognosis in the diabetic patients with K. pneumoniae bacteremia. In patients with pulmonary infection, the capsular serotypes of K. pneumoniae were not related to poor outcomes, and an initial presentation of blunted fever or shock were independent factors for mortality. Cancer, pulmonary infection, and low serum albumin levels were independent indicators of in-hospital mortality in the diabetic patients complicated by K. pneumoniae bacteremia. The sites of infection and host characteristics should always elicit medical attention when treating these patients. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Clinical characteristics of Q fever and etiology of community-acquired pneumonia in a tropical region of southern Taiwan: a prospective observational study.

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    Chung-Hsu Lai

    Full Text Available The clinical characteristics of Q fever are poorly identified in the tropics. Fever with pneumonia or hepatitis are the dominant presentations of acute Q fever, which exhibits geographic variability. In southern Taiwan, which is located in a tropical region, the role of Q fever in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP has never been investigated.During the study period, May 2012 to April 2013, 166 cases of adult CAP and 15 cases of acute Q fever were prospectively investigated. Cultures of clinical specimens, urine antigen tests for Streptococcus pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila, and paired serologic assessments for Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, and Q fever (Coxiella burnetii were used for identifying pathogens associated with CAP. From April 2004 to April 2013 (the pre-study period, 122 cases of acute Q fever were also included retrospectively for analysis. The geographic distribution of Q fever and CAP cases was similar. Q fever cases were identified in warmer seasons and younger ages than CAP. Based on multivariate analysis, male gender, chills, thrombocytopenia, and elevated liver enzymes were independent characteristics associated with Q fever. In patients with Q fever, 95% and 13.5% of cases presented with hepatitis and pneumonia, respectively. Twelve (7.2% cases of CAP were seropositive for C. burnetii antibodies, but none of them had acute Q fever. Among CAP cases, 22.9% had a CURB-65 score ≧2, and 45.8% had identifiable pathogens. Haemophilus parainfluenzae (14.5%, S. pneumoniae (6.6%, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (4.8%, and Klebsiella pneumoniae (3.0% were the most common pathogens identified by cultures or urine antigen tests. Moreover, M. pneumoniae, C. pneumoniae, and co-infection with 2 pathogens accounted for 9.0%, 7.8%, and 1.8%, respectively.In southern Taiwan, Q fever is an endemic disease with hepatitis as the major presentation and is not a common etiology of CAP.

  7. The Impact of Patient Profiles and Procedures on Hospitalization Costs through Length of Stay in Community-Acquired Pneumonia Patients Based on a Japanese Administrative Database.

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    Hironori Uematsu

    Full Text Available Community-acquired pneumonia is a common cause of patient hospitalization, and its burden on health care systems is increasing in aging societies. In this study, we aimed to investigate the factors that affect hospitalization costs in community-acquired pneumonia patients while considering the intermediate influence of patient length of stay.Using a multi-institutional administrative claims database, we analyzed 30,041 patients hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia who had been discharged between April 1, 2012 and September 30, 2013 from 289 acute care hospitals in Japan. Possible factors associated with hospitalization costs were investigated using structural equation modeling with length of stay as an intermediate variable. We calculated the direct, indirect (through length of stay, and total effects of the candidate factors on hospitalization costs in the model. Lastly, we calculated the ratio of indirect effects to direct effects for each factor.The structural equation model showed that higher disease severities (using A-DROP, Barthel Index, and Charlson Comorbidity Index scores, use of mechanical ventilation, and tube feeding were associated with higher hospitalization costs, regardless of the intermediate influence of length of stay. The severity factors were also associated with longer length of stay durations. The ratio of indirect effects to direct effects on total hospitalization costs showed that the former was greater than the latter in the factors, except in the use of mechanical ventilation.Our structural equation modeling analysis indicated that patient profiles and procedures impacted on hospitalization costs both directly and indirectly. Furthermore, the profiles were generally shown to have greater indirect effects (through length of stay on hospitalization costs than direct effects. These findings may be useful in supporting the more appropriate distribution of health care resources.

  8. Pneumonia adquirida na comunidade e derrame pleural parapneumônico relacionados a Mycoplasma pneumoniae em crianças e adolescentes Mycoplasma pneumoniae-related community-acquired pneumonia and parapneumonic pleural effusion in children and adolescents

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    Letícia Alves Vervloet

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar a prevalência e as características da pneumonia adquirida na comunidade (PAC e derrames pleurais parapneumônicos (DPP relacionados a Mycoplasma pneumoniae em um grupo de crianças e adolescentes. MÉTODOS: Estudo observacional retrospectivo com 121 pacientes hospitalizados com PAC e DPP em um hospital de referência terciária, entre 2000 e 2008, divididos em seis grupos (G1 a G6 segundo o agente etiológico: M. pneumoniae com ou sem coinfecção, em 44 pacientes; outros agentes que não M. pneumoniae, em 77; M. pneumoniae sem coinfecção, em 34; Streptococcus pneumoniae, em 36; Staphylococcus aureus, em 31; e coinfecção M. pneumoniae/S. pneumoniae, em 9, respectivamente. RESULTADOS: Na comparação entre os grupos, G1 apresentou frequências maiores em gênero feminino, tosse seca, uso prévio de beta-lactâmicos e na duração dos sintomas até a admissão, assim como menor uso de assistência ventilatória e de drenagem torácica que G2, enquanto G3 teve maiores frequências em uso prévio de beta-lactâmicos e tosse seca, maior duração dos sintomas antes da admissão e menor frequência de uso de drenos torácicos que G4 e G5, ao passo que G3 teve média de idade maior e menor frequência de náuseas/vômitos que G4, assim como menor uso de assistência ventilatória que G5. A coinfecção M. pneumoniae/S. pneumoniae aumentou a duração dos sintomas até a admissão. CONCLUSÕES: Nesta amostra, a prevalência de PAC e DPP por M. pneumoniae foi de 12,75%. Embora a doença apresentasse quadros mais leves que aquela por outros organismos, a evolução foi mais prolongada. Nossos dados sugerem a necessidade de uma maior diligência na investigação de M. pneumoniae em crianças e adolescentes com PAC e DPP em nosso meio.OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence and the characteristics of Mycoplasma pneumoniae-related community-acquired pneumonia (CAP and parapneumonic pleural effusion (PPE in children and adolescents

  9. First report of cavitary pneumonia due to community-acquired Acinetobacter pittii, study of virulence and overview of pathogenesis and treatment.

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    Larcher, Romaric; Pantel, Alix; Arnaud, Erik; Sotto, Albert; Lavigne, Jean-Philippe

    2017-07-06

    Acinetobacter pittii is a nosocomial pathogen rarely involved in community-acquired infections. We report for the first time that A. pittii can be responsible for cavitary community-acquired pneumonia and study its virulence, and discuss its pathogenesis and treatment options. A 45-year-old woman with a history of smoking and systemic lupus was admitted to Nimes University Hospital (France) with coughing and sputum lasting for three weeks. Thoracic CT scanner showed cavitary pneumonia. Broncho-alveolar lavage cultures found community-acquired Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-baumannii complex. The clinical outcome was favourable after twenty-one days of antimicrobial treatment by piperacillin/tazobactam and amikacin then cefepime. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analyses identified an A. pittii ST249. Despite the atypical clinical presentation with an unexpected partial destruction of lung parenchyma, we found very low virulence potential of the A. pittii strain with nematode killing assays and biofilm formation test. The median time required to kill 50% of the nematodes was 7 ± 0.3 days for A. pittii ST249, 7 ± 0.2 days for A. baumanii NAB ST2 and 8 ± 0.2 days for E. coli OP50, (p > 0,05). A. pittii ST249 showed significantly slower biofilm formation than A. baumanii NAB ST2: BFI = 8.83 ± 0.59 vs 3.93 ± 0.27 at 2 h (p < 0.0001), BFI = 6.3 ± 0.17 vs 1.87 ± 0.12 at 3 h (p < 0.0001) and BFI = 3.67 ± 0.41 vs 1.7 ± 0.06 after 4 h of incubation (p < 0.01). Community-acquired A. pittii should be considered as possible cause of sub-acute cavitary pneumonia particularly in a smoking and/or immunocompromised patient despite its low virulence potential.

  10. Efficacy and safety of telithromycin 800 mg once daily for 7 days in community-acquired pneumonia: an open-label, multicenter study

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    Dunbar Lala M

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. Telithromycin (a new ketolide has shown good in vitro activity against the key causative pathogens of CAP, including S pneumoniae resistant to penicillin and/or macrolides. Methods The efficacy and safety of telithromycin 800 mg orally once daily for 7 days in the treatment of CAP were assessed in an open-label, multicenter study of 442 adults. Results Of 149 microbiologically evaluable patients, 57 (9 bacteremic had Streptococcus pneumoniae. Of the 57 S pneumoniae pathogens isolated in these patients, 9 (2 bacteremic were penicillin- or erythromycin-resistant; all 57 were susceptible to telithromycin and were eradicated. Other pathogens and their eradication rates were: Haemophilus influenzae (96%, Moraxella catarrhalis (100%, Staphylococcus aureus (80%, and Legionella spp. (100%. The overall bacteriologic eradication rate was 91.9%. Of the 357 clinically evaluable patients, clinical cure was achieved in 332 (93%. In the 430 patients evaluable for safety, the most common drug-related adverse events were diarrhea (8.1% and nausea (5.8%. Conclusion Telithromycin 800 mg once daily for 7 days is an effective and well-tolerated oral monotherapy and offers a new treatment option for CAP patients, including those with resistant S pneumoniae.

  11. A Prospective Study of Inpatients to Determine Microbial Etiology and Therapeutic Outcome of Antibiotics for Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Pakistan

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    Sahar Rehman

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is among the common diseases that causes illness and death world-wide. Limited data is available for the treatment of patients with CAP and/or medical outcome of CAP patients in Pakistan. This cross-sectional and prospective study was done to determine etiology of CAP patients and to evaluate the therapeutic effects of antibiotics commonly used in treating CAP patients in two different inner-city hospitals, Pakistan. Methods: The study was conducted on 200 hospitalized patients presenting clinical and radiographic evidences of CAP. The patients were assessed for the causative pathogen and their prescriptions were analyzed for the management and treatment of CAP and associated symptoms of pneumonia. Finally the medical outcomes were evaluated. Results: On establishing the microbial etiology of pneumonia among different CAP causing pathogens, K. pneumoniae was found to be the most identified causative agent (30% followed by S. pneumoniae (23%. Majority of the patients received cephalosporin antibiotics (80% followed by aminoglycosides (65% and penicillins (50% either as monotherapy or combination treatment. Therapeutic success was observed to occur in majority of the patients. The recovery of CAP patients occurred probably because they received antibiotics which are recommended by WHO and American Thoracic Society. Another reason for successful therapeutic outcome was found to be the significant patient compliance for treatment. Conclusion: There is a great need for such types of investigational studies to be conducted in developing countries which may guide the empirical therapy and help in defining proper treatment guidelines.

  12. The Impact of Age and Comorbidities on the Mortality of Patients of Different Age Groups Admitted with Community-acquired Pneumonia.

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    Luna, Carlos M; Palma, Ileana; Niederman, Michael S; Membriani, Evangelina; Giovini, Vanina; Wiemken, Timothy L; Peyrani, Paula; Ramirez, Julio

    2016-09-01

    Comorbidities, age, severity of illness, and high risk pathogens are well-known outcome determinants in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). How these factors interact has not yet been clarified. We conducted this study to analyze the complex interaction of comorbidities, age, illness severity, and pathogens in relation to CAP. We performed a secondary analysis of the Community-Acquired Pneumonia Organization database to evaluate the impact of age in different age groups (age 80 years and older. A total of 1,699 pathogens were defined in 1,545 cases; the etiology was the same for all age groups. In the overall population, mortality increased with age, but etiology was not associated with mortality. When we analyzed the patients with one comorbidity or less, we found that mortality was not different between patients younger than 65 old and those 65-79 years old, but it was higher for those aged 80 years and older. The presence of comorbidities is associated with poorer outcomes in CAP. However, when one comorbidity or less was present, we found that being age 80 years or older was a factor that increased mortality. From a clinical standpoint, this study suggests that being age 80 years or older, instead of age 65 years and older, should be considered a risk factor for poor outcome in CAP.

  13. [The influence of low-intensity laser irradiation of blood on the lactoferrin level in the patients presenting with community-acquired pneumonia].

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    Gabueva, A A; Burduli, N M

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to estimate the influence of low-intensity laser irradiation of blood on the levels of lactoferrin in the patients presenting with community-acquired pneumonia. All the patients were divided into two groups. Those comprising the control group received only medicamental therapy. The standard treatment of the patients in the second group was supplemented by intravenous laser irradiation of blood (IVLIB-405 technique). Each irradiation session performed in a continuous mode lasted 5-7 minutes, with the total treatment course consisting of 7 daily procedures. Lactoferrin was determined before and after the treatment by the enzyme immunoassay with the use of "Lactoferrin Strip" kits ("Vektor-Best- Yug" JSC, Russia). Analysis of the results of the study revealed a significant decrease in the blood lactoferrin level down to the normal range in the patients treated with the use of laser therapy. The application of intravenous laser irradiation of blood for the combined treatment of the patients with community-acquired pneumonia was accompanied by normalization of the blood lactoferrin level and the improvement of the clinical course of the disease.

  14. Exame do escarro no manejo clínico dos pacientes com pneumonia adquirida na comunidade Sputum examination in the clinical management of community-acquired pneumonia

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    Leonardo Gilberto Haas Signori

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Este estudo retrospectivo avaliou a freqüência do uso da bacteriologia do escarro no manejo clínico de pacientes com pneumonia adquirida na comunidade (PAC em um hospital geral, e se a utilização deste método modificou a mortalidade. MÉTODOS: Os prontuários de pacientes internados no Hospital Nossa Senhora da Conceição, em Porto Alegre (RS Brasil, para tratamento de PAC entre maio e novembro de 2004 foram revisados quanto aos seguintes aspectos: idade; sexo; gravidade da pneumonia (escore de Fine; presença de expectoração; bacteriologia do escarro; história de tratamento; resposta clínica; troca de tratamento; e mortalidade. RESULTADOS: Foram avaliados 274 pacientes com PAC, sendo 134 do sexo masculino. Dentre os 274 pacientes, 79 (28,8% apresentavam, de acordo com o escore de Fine, classe II; 45 (16,4%, classe III; 97 (35,4%, classe IV; e 53 (19,3%, classe V. Em 92 pacientes (33,6%, uma amostra de escarro foi colhida para exame bacteriológico. Obtivemos amostra válida em 37 casos (13,5% e diagnóstico etiológico em 26 (9,5%, o que resultou em modificação do tratamento em apenas 9 casos (3,3%. A mortalidade geral foi 18,6%. Idade acima de 65 anos, a gravidade da PAC e a ausência de escarro associaram-se à maior mortalidade. A bacteriologia do escarro não influenciou o desfecho clínico, nem a taxa de mortalidade. CONCLUSÃO: O exame do escarro foi uma ferramenta diagnóstica utilizada na minoria dos pacientes, e não trouxe benefício detectável no manejo clínico dos pacientes com PAC tratados em ambiente hospitalar.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the frequency of the use of sputum examination in the clinical management of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP in a general hospital and to determine whether its use has an impact on mortality. METHODS: The medical records of CAP patients treated as inpatients between May and November of 2004 at the Nossa Senhora da Conceição Hospital, located in Porto Alegre, Brazil, were

  15. Comorbidities as a driver of the excess costs of community-acquired pneumonia in U.S. commercially-insured working age adults

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    Polsky Daniel

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adults with certain comorbid conditions have a higher risk of pneumonia than the overall population. If treatment of pneumonia is more costly in certain predictable situations, this would affect the value proposition of populations for pneumonia prevention. We estimate the economic impact of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP for adults with asthma, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and congestive heart failure (CHF in a large U.S. commercially-insured working age population. Methods Data sources consisted of 2003 through 2007 Thomson Reuters MarketScan Commercial Claims and Encounters and Thomson Reuters Health Productivity and Management (HPM databases. Pneumonia episodes and selected comorbidities were identified by ICD-9-CM diagnosis codes. By propensity score matching, controls were identified for pneumonia patients. Excess direct medical costs and excess productivity cost were estimated by generalized linear models (GLM. Results We identified 402,831 patients with CAP between 2003 through 2007, with 25,560, 32,677, 16,343, and 5,062 episodes occurring in patients with asthma, diabetes, COPD and CHF, respectively. Mean excess costs (and standard error, SE of CAP were $14,429 (SE=44 overall. Mean excess costs by comorbidity subgroup were lowest for asthma ($13,307 (SE=123, followed by diabetes ($21,395 (SE=171 and COPD ($23,493 (SE=197; mean excess costs were highest for patients with CHF ($34,436 (SE=549. On average, indirect costs comprised 21% of total excess costs, ranging from 8% for CHF patients to 27% for COPD patients. Conclusions Compared to patients without asthma, diabetes, COPD, or CHF, the excess cost of CAP is nearly twice as high for patients with diabetes and COPD and nearly three times as high for patients with CHF. Indirect costs made up a significant but varying portion of excess CAP costs. Returns on prevention of pneumonia would therefore be higher in adults with these comorbidities.

  16. Independent radiographic prognostic factors in patients with hospital-treated community-acquired pneumonia; Unabhaengige radiologische Prognosefaktoren fuer den letalen Ausgang stationaer behandlungsbeduerftiger ambulant erworbener Pneumonien

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    Wilhelm, K.; Textor, J.; Schild, H. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Radiologische Klinik; Ewig, S.; Luederitz, B. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Medizinische Poliklinik; Krollmann, G. 1

    1999-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the independent prognostic impact of the chest radiograph for mortality from community-acquired pneumonia requiring hospitalization. Methods: Chest radiographs of 67 patients with hospital-treated community-acquired pneumonia were analyzed with regard to the prognostic implications of radiographic patterns, extent and density of infiltrates, and its evolution during treatment. Results: Non-survivors had a significantly higher extent of infiltrates (p=0.008), density of infiltrates (p=0.05), and radiographic spread during follow-up within 48-72 hours (p=0.0001). In multivariate analysis, persistent or progressive infiltrates were associated with a 47fold increase, and persistent or progressive density of infiltrates with an 18fold increase in risk of mortality. The presence of both parameters could correctly predict 96% of survivors and 90% of non-survivors. Conclusions: The chest radiograph is an independent predictor of the severity of pneumonia. Both persistent or progressive infiltrates and persistent or progressive density of infiltrates are independently associated with mortality from community-acquired pneumonia. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Evaluierung der Thoraxuebersichtsaufnahme als unabhaengiger prognostischer Marker fuer den letalen Ausgang der ambulant erworbenen Pneumonie. Material und Methoden: Die Roentgenaufnahmen von 67 Patienten mit stationaer behandlungbeduerftiger ambulant erworbener Pneumonie wurden hinsichtlich der prognostischen Bedeutung von Infiltratmuster, Infiltratgroesse, Infiltratdichte sowie deren Veraenderungen im Krankheitsverlauf in uni- und multivariater Analyse untersucht. Ergebnisse: Fuer die Gruppe der Verstorbenen ergaben sich signifikant hoehere Mittelwerte bei der Infiltratgroesse (p=0,008), der Infiltratdichte (p=0,05) sowie der prozentualen Infiltrat-Groessenzunahme (p=0,0001) im Verlaufsroentgenbild (48-72 Stunden nach Erstaufnahme). In multivariater Analyse waren gleichbleibende oder zunehmende

  17. Short-course versus long-course intravenous therapy with the same antibiotic for severe community-acquired pneumonia in children aged two months to 59 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassi, Zohra S; Imdad, Aamer; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2015-06-16

    Pneumonia remains the single leading cause of childhood mortality, causing an estimated 1.3 million childhood deaths each year in children under the age of five years. The greater burden of disease occurs in low-income countries, where medical resources and hospital-based management are poor. The World Health Organization (WHO) current evidence summaries recommend intravenous antibiotics for five days as first-line treatment for severe pneumonia. Although there is controversy around the specificity of clinical features in the diagnosis of pneumonia, the criteria for the diagnosis of severe pneumonia are better defined and widely used to triage children for referral and second-line therapy.Approximately 120 million new cases of pneumonia occur globally each year in children under five years of age, of which 14 million progress to severe episodes. Hospitalisation for severe pneumonia in children places a significant burden on both patients and their families, including substantial expense, loss of routine and decrease in quality of life. By reducing the duration of treatment in the hospital, this burden could potentially be lessened and possibly lead to better treatment compliance. To evaluate the efficacy of short-course (two to three days) versus long-course (five days) intravenous therapy with the same antibiotic for severe community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in children aged two months to 59 months. We searched CENTRAL (2015, Issue 1), MEDLINE (1966 to January week 4, 2015) and EMBASE (1974 to February 2015). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the efficacy of short-course (two to three days) versus long-course (five days) intravenous antibiotic therapy for severe pneumonia in children aged two months to 59 months. We excluded children with any other debilitating disease, including those infected with HIV and we excluded children with signs and symptoms of very severe pneumonia (i.e. unable to drink or breast feed, vomiting, lethargic, unconscious

  18. Influence of Antibiotics on the Detection of Bacteria by Culture-Based and Culture-Independent Diagnostic Tests in Patients Hospitalized With Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Aaron M; Bramley, Anna M; Jain, Seema; Arnold, Sandra R; Ampofo, Krow; Self, Wesley H; Williams, Derek J; Anderson, Evan J; Grijalva, Carlos G; McCullers, Jonathan A; Pavia, Andrew T; Wunderink, Richard G; Edwards, Kathryn M; Winchell, Jonas M; Hicks, Lauri A

    2017-01-01

    Specimens collected after antibiotic exposure may reduce culture-based bacterial detections. The impact on culture-independent diagnostic tests is unclear. We assessed the effect of antibiotic exposure on both of these test results among patients hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Culture-based bacterial testing included blood cultures and high-quality sputum or endotracheal tube (ET) aspirates; culture-independent testing included urinary antigen testing (adults) for Streptococcus pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal (NP/OP) swabs for Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae. The proportion of bacterial detections was compared between specimens collected before and after either any antibiotic exposure (prehospital and/or inpatient) or only prehospital antibiotics and increasing time after initiation of inpatient antibiotics. Of 4678 CAP patients, 4383 (94%) received antibiotics: 3712 (85%) only inpatient, 642 (15%) both inpatient and prehospital, and 29 (cultures (5.2% vs 2.6%; P cultures (50.0% vs 26.8%; P culture-based tests collected after antibiotics and in culture-independent tests that had longer intervals between antibiotic exposure and specimen collection. Bacterial yield could improve if specimens were collected promptly, preferably before antibiotics, providing data for improved antibiotic selection.

  19. Treatment of severe community-acquired pneumonia with oral amoxicillin in under-five children in developing country: a systematic review.

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    Rashmi Ranjan Das

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the evidence regarding efficacy of oral amoxicillin compared to standard treatment for WHO-defined severe community acquired pneumonia in under-five children in developing country. DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis of data from published Randomized trials (RCTs. DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE (1970- July 2012 via PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, Issue 7, July 2012, and EMBASE (1988- June 2012. METHODS: Eligible trials compared oral amoxicillin administered in ambulatory setting versus standard treatment for WHO-defined severe community acquired pneumonia in children under-five. Primary outcomes were proportion of children developing treatment failure at 48 hr, and day 6. GRADE criteria was used to rate the quality of evidence. RESULTS: Out of 281 full text articles assessed for eligibility, 5 trials including 12364 children were included in the meta-analysis. Oral amoxicillin administered either in hospital or community setting is effective in treatment of severe pneumonia and is not inferior to the standard treatment. None of the clinical predictors of treatment failure by 48 hr (very severe disease, fever and lower chest indrawing, and voluntary with-drawl and loss to follow up was significant between the two groups. The clinical predictors of treatment failure that were significant by day 6 were very severe disease, inability to drink, change of antibiotic, and fever alone. The effect was almost consistent across the studies. CONCLUSION: Though oral amoxicillin is effective in treatment of severe CAP in under-five children in developing country, the evidence generated is of low-quality. More trials with uniform comparators are needed in order to strengthen the evidence.

  20. Treatment of Severe Community-Acquired Pneumonia with Oral Amoxicillin in Under-Five Children in Developing Country: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Rashmi Ranjan; Singh, Meenu

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the evidence regarding efficacy of oral amoxicillin compared to standard treatment for WHO-defined severe community acquired pneumonia in under-five children in developing country. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis of data from published Randomized trials (RCTs). Data sources MEDLINE (1970– July 2012) via PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, Issue 7, July 2012), and EMBASE (1988– June 2012). Methods Eligible trials compared oral amoxicillin administered in ambulatory setting versus standard treatment for WHO-defined severe community acquired pneumonia in children under-five. Primary outcomes were proportion of children developing treatment failure at 48 hr, and day 6. GRADE criteria was used to rate the quality of evidence. Results Out of 281 full text articles assessed for eligibility, 5 trials including 12364 children were included in the meta-analysis. Oral amoxicillin administered either in hospital or community setting is effective in treatment of severe pneumonia and is not inferior to the standard treatment. None of the clinical predictors of treatment failure by 48 hr (very severe disease, fever and lower chest indrawing, and voluntary with-drawl and loss to follow up) was significant between the two groups. The clinical predictors of treatment failure that were significant by day 6 were very severe disease, inability to drink, change of antibiotic, and fever alone. The effect was almost consistent across the studies. Conclusion Though oral amoxicillin is effective in treatment of severe CAP in under-five children in developing country, the evidence generated is of low-quality. More trials with uniform comparators are needed in order to strengthen the evidence. PMID:23825532

  1. TGF-β Blood Levels Distinguish Between Influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 Virus Sepsis and Sepsis due to Other Forms of Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendón-Ramirez, Erick J; Ortiz-Stern, Alejandro; Martinez-Mejia, Corazon; Salinas-Carmona, Mario C; Rendon, Adrian; Mata-Tijerina, Viviana L; Rosas-Taraco, Adrian G

    2015-06-01

    There is a strong interest in finding adequate biomarkers to aid in the diagnosis and prognosis of influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 virus infection. In this study, serum levels of inflammatory cytokines and laboratory markers were evaluated to assess their usefulness as biomarkers of influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 and their association with fatal cases. Serum samples of consecutive patients with a clinical presentation suggestive of influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 and progression to sepsis were evaluated. Serum inflammatory cytokines and routine laboratory tests were performed and correlated with positivity for influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 influenza by real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and the results of three clinical severity scores (Sequential Organ Failure Assessment [SOFA], CURB-65, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II [APACHE II]). High SOFA scores and some of its individual components, but not CURB-65 or APACHE II scores, correlate with fatal cases regardless of etiology. Total and unconjugated bilirubin, Ca(++), Cl(-), prothrombin times, and partial thromboplastin times discriminate influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 from other causes of community-acquired pneumonia. High levels of IL-8, IL-10, and IL-17 were increased in influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 patients when compared with controls (pcauses of community-acquired pneumonia. TGF-β levels were negatively correlated with SOFA on admission in influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 patients. TGF-β levels are a useful tool for differentiating influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 from other causes of pneumonia progressing to sepsis.

  2. Inter-observer variation in the interpretation of chest radiographs for pneumonia in community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections

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    Hopstaken, R.M. E-mail: rogier.hopstaken@hag.unimaas.nl; Witbraad, T.; Engelshoven, J.M.A. van; Dinant, G.J

    2004-08-01

    AIM: To assess inter-observer variation in the interpretation of chest radiographs of individuals with pneumonia versus those without pneumonia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Chest radiographs of out-patients with a lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) were assessed for the presence of infiltrates by radiologists from three local hospitals and were reassessed by one university hospital radiologist. Various measures of inter-observer agreement were calculated. RESULTS: The observed proportional agreement was 218 in 243 patients (89.7%). Kappa was 0.53 (moderate agreement) with a 95% confidence interval of 0.37 to 0.69. The observed positive agreement (59%) was much lower than for negative agreement (94%). Kappa was considerably lower, if chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was present ({kappa}=0.20) or Streptococcus pneumoniae ({kappa}=-0.29) was the infective agent. CONCLUSION: The overall inter-observer agreement adjusted for chance was moderate. Inter-observer agreement in cases with pneumonia was much worse than the agreement in negative (i.e. non-pneumonia) cases. A general practitioner's selection of patients with a higher chance of having pneumonia for chest radiography would thus not improve the observer agreement.

  3. Inpatient rehabilitation improves functional capacity, peripheral muscle strength and quality of life in patients with community-acquired pneumonia: a randomised trial

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    Anderson José

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Question: Among people who are hospitalised for community-acquired pneumonia, does an inpatient exercise-based rehabilitation program improve functional outcomes, symptoms, quality of life and length of hospital stay more than a respiratory physiotherapy regimen? Design: Randomised trial with concealed allocation, intention-to-treat analysis and blinding of some outcomes. Participants: Forty-nine adults hospitalised for community-acquired pneumonia. Intervention: The experimental group (n = 32 underwent a physical training program that included warm-up, stretching, peripheral muscle strength training and walking at a controlled speed for 15 minutes. The control group (n = 17 underwent a respiratory physiotherapy regimen that included percussion, vibrocompression, respiratory exercises and free walking. The intervention regimens lasted 8 days. Outcome measures: The primary outcome was the Glittre Activities of Daily Living test, which assesses the time taken to complete a series of functional tasks (eg, rising from a chair, walking, stairs, lifting and bending. Secondary outcomes were distance walked in the incremental shuttle walk test, peripheral muscle strength, quality of life, dyspnoea, lung function, C-reactive protein and length of hospital stay. Measures were taken 1 day before and 1 day after the intervention period. Results: There was greater improvement in the experimental group than in the control group on the Glittre Activities of Daily Living test (mean between-group difference 39 seconds, 95% CI 20 to 59 and the incremental shuttle walk test (mean between-group difference 130 m, 95% CI 77 to 182. There were also significantly greater improvements in quality of life, dyspnoea and peripheral muscle strength in the experimental group than in the control group. There were no between-group differences in lung function, C-reactive protein or length of hospital stay. Conclusion: The improvement in functional outcomes after an

  4. Observed costs and health care use of children in a prospective cohort study on community-acquired pneumonia in Geneva, Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keitel, K; Alcoba, G; Lacroix, L; Manzano, S; Galetto-Lacour, A; Gervaix, A

    2014-01-01

    Despite various efforts to estimate cost-effectiveness of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines, only scarce information on the cost burden of paediatric community acquired pneumonia (CAP) exists. The objective of this study was to prospectively calculate direct and indirect costs associated with treatment of CAP from a society perspective in children between 2 months and 16 years of age seeking care at a tertiary hospital in Geneva, Switzerland between December 2008 and May 2010. This cost of illness study population comprised children aged from 2 months to 16 years of age seeking care for CAP at the University Children's Hospital Geneva from January 2008 through May 2010 (a subset of patients taken from a larger multicentre prospective cohort). Hospital-associated costs for episodes of pneumonia were computed according to the REKOLE® system. Non-hospital costs were estimated by parental interviews at baseline and follow-up on day 14. The overall cost for one episode of CAP was 11'258 CHF; 23'872 CHF for inpatient treatment and 1009 CHF for outpatient treatment. Severe pneumonia cases per World Health Organisation (WHO) definition used significantly more hospital resources than non-severe cases: 21'842 CHF versus 3'479 CHF (p <0.0001). Childhood CAP results in a significant medical cost burden that may have been underestimated in previous cost-effectiveness analyses of pneumococcal vaccine strategies.

  5. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and toilet bronchoscopy as a bridge to pneumonectomy in severe community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchabhai, Tanmay S; Khabbaza, Joseph E; Raja, Siva; Mehta, Atul C; Hatipoğlu, Umur

    2015-01-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) pneumonia is associated with very high mortality. Though surgical evacuation of necrotic tissue is desirable in patients unresponsive to antimicrobial therapy, most patients are acutely ill precluding surgical intervention. We utilized a combination of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) with frequent toilet bronchoscopies to salvage an unaffected right lung from spillage of necrotic pus from left lung cavitary CA-MRSA pneumonia in a 22-year-old patient. Our patient while on ECMO and after decannulation was positioned with the right lung up at all times with 1-2 toilet bronchoscopies every day for almost 30 days. This time was utilized for ventilator weaning and optimizing the nutritional status prior to extrapleural left pneumonectomy. Prevention of soilage of the unaffected right lung and mitigating volutrauma with ECMO support combined with the subsequent surgical evacuation of necrotic left lung tissue led to a favorable outcome in this case. This strategy could be of value in similar presentations of unilateral suppurative pneumonia, where the progressive disease occurs despite optimal medical therapy.

  6. Viruses and Gram-negative bacilli dominate the etiology of community-acquired pneumonia in Indonesia, a cohort study

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    Helmia Farida

    2015-09-01

    Conclusions: Viruses and Gram-negative bacilli are dominant causes of CAP in this region, more so than S. pneumoniae. Most of the bacteria have wild type susceptibility to antimicrobial agents. Patients with severe disease and those with unknown etiology have a higher mortality risk.

  7. [Health impact and treatment costs of community-acquired pneumonia in children in the first level of public attention in Argentina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernztein, Ricardo; Drake, Ignacio

    2009-04-01

    Community acquired pneumonia in children remains an important cause of childhood deaths throughout the world that can be prevented by the use of antibiotics and access to medical care. Both were reduced in 2001 when Argentina suffered a severe social crisis. Among the responses to the crisis, the Remediar Program provided free essential medicines to the socially vulnerable population. Assess the health impact and costs of the provision of free medicines at the first level of public attention for childhood pneumonia. Three designs: 1. Ecological study with cross comparisons of diagnoses, prescriptions, beneficiaries by individual provinces of Remediar forms. children under 15 years old attended at 6 thousand health centres in Argentina, encompassing 24 Argentine provinces from March 2005 until February 2006. 2. Counterfactual approach. 3. Calculation of drug costs per unit of outcome. Over 15 million prescriptions were identified, 2,420 children under 1 year, 19,205 of 1 to 4 years and 15,977 from 5 to 14 years old with pneumonia. 90% of beneficiaries received antibiotics, most often amoxicillin. In children's under 5 years of age, Remediar coverage was 27.8%, with greater impact in the poorest provinces. The likely impact was 4,322 lives saved or 310,325 years of life lost avoided if mortality without antibiotics was 20%. Indigents who had children with pneumonia saved by medicines 14.3% of their income. Each life saved could have cost US $ 6.46 and each year of life lost averted US $ 0.09. This work highlights the impact of a low-cost health program for the treatment of vulnerable populations with childhood pneumonia in Argentina.

  8. Etiologies and Resistance Profiles of Bacterial Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Cambodian and Neighboring Countries’ Health Care Settings: A Systematic Review (1995 to 2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyet, Sophie; Vlieghe, Erika; Kumar, Varun; Newell, Steven; Moore, Catrin E.; Bousfield, Rachel; Leang, Heng C.; Chuop, Sokheng; Thong, Phe; Rammaert, Blandine; Hem, Sopheak; van Griensven, Johan; Rachmat, Agus; Fassier, Thomas; Lim, Kruy; Tarantola, Arnaud

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Etiological data for Cambodia is scarce. We aimed to describe the main etiological agents causing CAP, and their resistance patterns in Cambodia and the greater Mekong region. Methods A review of bacterial etiologies of CAP and antimicrobial resistance in Cambodia and neighboring countries was conducted via: (1) a systematic review of published literature in all NCBI databases using Pubmed, Google scholar, EMBASE, the World Health Organization and the Cambodian Ministry of Health libraries; (2) a review of unpublished data from Cambodia provided by national and international stakeholders working at different tiers of the healthcare system. Results Twenty three articles and five data sources reported etiologies for 5919 CAP patients diagnosed between May 1995 and December 2012, including 1421 (24.0%), 3571 (60.3%) and 927 (15.7%) from Cambodia, Thailand and Vietnam, respectively. Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae were the most common pathogens ranking among the five most prevalent in 12 and 10 studies, respectively. Gram-negative bacteria such as Burkholderia pseudomallei and Klebsiella pneumoniae were also frequently diagnosed, particularly in bacteremic CAP in Thai adults and Cambodian children. In Thailand and Vietnam, Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae were frequently identified in settings using indirect laboratory testing. Conclusions Based on this analysis, CAP data in Cambodia seems to present etiological and resistance profiles comparable to those of neighboring countries. Findings have been shared with the national authorities upon the revision of the national therapeutic guidelines and were disseminated using a specially created website. PMID:24626053

  9. Epidemiology of community-acquired pneumonia in children of Latin America and the Caribbean: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, Angela; Bardach, Ariel; Ciapponi, Agustín; Garcia-Marti, Sebastian; Aruj, Patricia; Glujovsky, Demian; Calcagno, Juan Ignacio; Mazzoni, Agustina; Colindres, Romulo Ernesto

    2012-01-01

    This systematic review evaluated the incidence, etiology, and use of resources in bacterial, non-tuberculosis community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in immune-competent children aged <5 years. Systematic searches (1980-2008) were performed using MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, LILACS, generic, and academic Internet searches. Regional health ministries, the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), regional proceedings, doctoral theses, and the reference lists of included studies were also searched, and experts were consulted. Arcsine transformations and the DerSimonian-Laird random-effects model were used for proportion meta-analyses. The search yielded 1220 references; 60 were included in the meta-analysis, giving a total 23 854 CAP episodes with an incidence of 919/100 000 child-years in children aged <5 years. Streptococcus pneumoniae was the most frequently isolated agent (11.08%; 95% confidence interval (CI) 7.63-15.08), and pneumococcal serotype 14 was most prevalent (33.00%; 95% CI 25.95-40.45). Other common agents were Haemophilus influenzae and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Health economics data on CAP in the region were scarce. About one-fourth of CAP patients required hospitalization (median length of stay 11 days, range 5-13.5 days). The burden of CAP was substantial, with S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae, and M. pneumoniae being the most common pathogens identified. High quality primary studies on disease incidence, use of health resources, and standardized data collection on disease burden and circulating strains are essential to provide baseline data for the future evaluation of vaccine impact. © 2011 International Society for Infectious Diseases. All rights reserved.

  10. Etiologies and resistance profiles of bacterial community-acquired pneumonia in Cambodian and neighboring countries' health care settings: a systematic review (1995 to 2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyet, Sophie; Vlieghe, Erika; Kumar, Varun; Newell, Steven; Moore, Catrin E; Bousfield, Rachel; Leang, Heng C; Chuop, Sokheng; Thong, Phe; Rammaert, Blandine; Hem, Sopheak; van Griensven, Johan; Rachmat, Agus; Fassier, Thomas; Lim, Kruy; Tarantola, Arnaud

    2014-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Etiological data for Cambodia is scarce. We aimed to describe the main etiological agents causing CAP, and their resistance patterns in Cambodia and the greater Mekong region. A review of bacterial etiologies of CAP and antimicrobial resistance in Cambodia and neighboring countries was conducted via: (1) a systematic review of published literature in all NCBI databases using Pubmed, Google scholar, EMBASE, the World Health Organization and the Cambodian Ministry of Health libraries; (2) a review of unpublished data from Cambodia provided by national and international stakeholders working at different tiers of the healthcare system. Twenty three articles and five data sources reported etiologies for 5919 CAP patients diagnosed between May 1995 and December 2012, including 1421 (24.0%), 3571 (60.3%) and 927 (15.7%) from Cambodia, Thailand and Vietnam, respectively. Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae were the most common pathogens ranking among the five most prevalent in 12 and 10 studies, respectively. Gram-negative bacteria such as Burkholderia pseudomallei and Klebsiella pneumoniae were also frequently diagnosed, particularly in bacteremic CAP in Thai adults and Cambodian children. In Thailand and Vietnam, Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae were frequently identified in settings using indirect laboratory testing. Based on this analysis, CAP data in Cambodia seems to present etiological and resistance profiles comparable to those of neighboring countries. Findings have been shared with the national authorities upon the revision of the national therapeutic guidelines and were disseminated using a specially created website.

  11. Etiologies and resistance profiles of bacterial community-acquired pneumonia in Cambodian and neighboring countries' health care settings: a systematic review (1995 to 2012.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Goyet

    Full Text Available Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Etiological data for Cambodia is scarce. We aimed to describe the main etiological agents causing CAP, and their resistance patterns in Cambodia and the greater Mekong region.A review of bacterial etiologies of CAP and antimicrobial resistance in Cambodia and neighboring countries was conducted via: (1 a systematic review of published literature in all NCBI databases using Pubmed, Google scholar, EMBASE, the World Health Organization and the Cambodian Ministry of Health libraries; (2 a review of unpublished data from Cambodia provided by national and international stakeholders working at different tiers of the healthcare system.Twenty three articles and five data sources reported etiologies for 5919 CAP patients diagnosed between May 1995 and December 2012, including 1421 (24.0%, 3571 (60.3% and 927 (15.7% from Cambodia, Thailand and Vietnam, respectively. Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae were the most common pathogens ranking among the five most prevalent in 12 and 10 studies, respectively. Gram-negative bacteria such as Burkholderia pseudomallei and Klebsiella pneumoniae were also frequently diagnosed, particularly in bacteremic CAP in Thai adults and Cambodian children. In Thailand and Vietnam, Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae were frequently identified in settings using indirect laboratory testing.Based on this analysis, CAP data in Cambodia seems to present etiological and resistance profiles comparable to those of neighboring countries. Findings have been shared with the national authorities upon the revision of the national therapeutic guidelines and were disseminated using a specially created website.

  12. Risk of hospitalization for community acquired pneumonia with renin-angiotensin blockade in elderly patients: a population-based study.

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    Sachin Shah

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To characterize the 90-day risk of hospitalization with pneumonia among patients treated with different anti-hypertensive drug classes. DESIGN: Population based cohort study using five linked databases. PARTICIPANTS: Individuals over the age of 65 who filled a new outpatient prescription for one of four anti-hypertensive medications: ACE inhibitors (n = 86 775, ARBs (n = 33,953, calcium channel blockers (CCB, n = 34,240, beta blockers (BB, n = 35,331 and thiazide diuretics (n = 64 186. PRIMARY OUTCOME: Hospitalization with pneumonia within 90 days of a qualifying prescription. We adjusted for ten a priori selected covariates, including age, sex, diabetes and number of visits to a family doctor. RESULTS: Baseline characteristics of the groups were relatively well matched, except for age, sex, diabetes and frequency of family doctor visits. 128 of the 86 775 patients (0.15% initiated on an ACE inhibitor and 43 of the 33953 patients (0.13% of patients initiated on an ARB were hospitalized with pneumonia in the subsequent 90 days. 135 of 64 186 patients (0.21% initiated on a thiazide, 112 of 35 331 patients (.32% initiated on a BB, and 89 of 34 240 (0.26% patients initiated on a CCB achieved the primary outcome. Compared to calcium channel blockers, ACE inhibitors (adjusted OR 0.61, 95% CI 0.46 to 0.81 and ARBs (adjusted OR 0.52, 95% CI 0.36 to 0.76 were associated with a lower risk of pneumonia. No benefit was seen with thiazides (adjusted OR 0.87, 95% CI 0.66 to 1.14 or beta blockers (adjusted OR 1.21, 95% CI 0.91 to 1.60. CONCLUSION: Initiating medications that block the renin angiotensin system, compared to other anti-hypertensive medications, is associated with a small absolute reduction in the 90 day risk of hospitalization with pneumonia.

  13. The Queensland experience of participation in a national drug use evaluation project, Community-Acquired Pneumonia Towards Improving Outcomes Nationally (CAPTION).

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    Pulver, Lisa K; Tett, Susan E; Coombes, Judith

    2009-08-03

    Multicentre drug use evaluations are described in the literature infrequently and usually publish only the results. The purpose of this paper is to describe the experience of Queensland hospitals participating in the Community-Acquired Pneumonia Towards Improving Outcomes Nationally (CAPTION) project, specifically evaluating the implementation of this project, detailing benefits and drawbacks of involvement in a national drug use evaluation program. Emergency departments from nine hospitals in Queensland, Australia, participated in CAPTION, a national quality improvement project, conducted in 37 Australian hospitals. CAPTION was aimed at optimising prescribing in the management of Community-Acquired Pneumonia according to the recommendations of the Australian Therapeutic Guidelines: Antibiotic 12th edition. The project involved data collection, and evaluation, feedback of results and a suite of targeted educational interventions including audit and feedback, group presentations and academic detailing.A baseline audit and two drug use evaluation cycles were conducted during the 2-year project. The implementation of the project was evaluated using feedback forms after each phase of the project (audit or intervention). At completion a group meeting with the hospital coordinators identified positive and negative elements of the project. Evaluation by hospitals of their participation in CAPTION demonstrated both benefits and drawbacks. The benefits were grouped into the impact on the hospital dynamic such as; improved interdisciplinary working relationships (e.g. between pharmacist and doctor), recognition of the educational/academic role of the pharmacist, creation of ED Pharmacist positions and enhanced involvement with the National Prescribing Service, and personal benefits. Personal benefits included academic detailing training for participants, improved communication skills and opportunities to present at conferences. The principal drawback of participation was the

  14. Cumulative clinical experience from over a decade of use of levofloxacin in community-acquired pneumonia: critical appraisal and role in therapy

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    Noreddin AM

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Ayman M Noreddin1, Walid F Elkhatib2, Kenji M Cunnion3, George G Zhanel41Department of Pharmacy Practice, Hampton University, Hampton, VA, USA; 2Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Ain-Shams University, Cairo, Egypt; 3Department of Pediatrics, East Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, VA, USA; 4Department of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada Abstract: Levofloxacin is the synthetic L-isomer of the racemic fluoroquinolone, ofloxacin. It interferes with critical processes in the bacterial cell such as DNA replication, transcription, repair, and recombination by inhibiting bacterial topoisomerases. Levofloxacin has broad spectrum activity against several causative bacterial pathogens of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. Oral levofloxacin is rapidly absorbed and is bioequivalent to the intravenous formulation such that patients can be conveniently transitioned between these formulations when moving from the inpatient to the outpatient setting. Furthermore, levofloxacin demonstrates excellent safety, and has good tissue penetration maintaining adequate concentrations at the site of infection. The efficacy and tolerability of levofloxacin 500 mg once daily for 10 days in patients with CAP are well established. Furthermore, a high-dose (750 mg and short-course (5 days of once-daily levofloxacin has been approved for use in the US in the treatment of CAP, acute bacterial sinusitis, acute pyelonephritis, and complicated urinary tract infections. The high-dose, short-course levofloxacin regimen maximizes its concentration-dependent antibacterial activity, decreases the potential for drug resistance, and has better patient compliance.Keywords: levofloxacin, community-acquired pneumonia, pharmacodynamics, resistance, pharmacokinetics, clinical use

  15. Influence of HIV infection on the clinical presentation and outcome of adults with acute community-acquired pneumonia in Yaounde, Cameroon: a retrospective hospital-based study

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    Yone Eric Walter

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The impact of HIV infection on the evolution of acute community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is still controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate possible differences in the clinical presentation and in-hospital outcomes of patients with CAP with and without HIV infection in a specialised service in Yaounde. Methods Medical files of 106 patients (51 men aged 15 years and above, admitted to the Pneumology service of the Yaounde Jamot Hospital between January 2008 and May 2012, were retrospectively studied. Results Sixty-two (58.5% patients were HIV infected. The median age of all patients was 40 years (interquartile range: 31.75-53 and there was no difference in the clinical and radiological profile of patients with and without HIV infection. The median leukocyte count (interquartile range was 14,600/mm3 (10,900-20,600 and 10,450/mm3 (6,400-16,850 respectively in HIV negative and HIV positive patients (p = 0.002. Median haemoglobin level (interquartile range was 10.8 g/dl (8.9-12 in HIV negative and 9.7 g/dl (8–11.6 in HIV positive patients (p = 0.025. In-hospital treatment failure on third day (39.5% vs. 25.5.1%, p = 0.137 and mortality rates (9% vs. 14.5%, p = 0.401 were similar between HIV negative and HIV positive patients. Conclusion Clinical and radiological features as well as response to treatment and in hospital fatal outcomes are similar in adult patients hospitalised with acute community-acquired pneumonia in Yaounde. In contrast, HIV infected patients tend to be more anaemic and have lower white cell counts than HIV negative patients. Larger prospective studies are needed to consolidate these findings.

  16. Prognostic performance of MR-pro-adrenomedullin in patients with community acquired pneumonia in the Emergency Department compared to clinical severity scores PSI and CURB.

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    Jacopo Maria Legramante

    Full Text Available (i evaluate the performance of MR-pro-ADM in reflecting the outcome and risk for CAP patients in the emergency department, and (ii compare the prognostic performance of MR-pro-ADM with that of clinical scores PSI and CURB65.Observational prospective, single-center study in patients with suspected community acquired pneumonia (CAP. Eighty one patients underwent full clinical and laboratory assessment as by protocol, and were followed up a 28 days. Primary endpoints measured were: death, death at 14 days, non-invasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV, endotracheal intubation (EI, ICU admission, overall hospital stay >10 days, emergency department stay >4 days. The discriminative performance of MR-pro-ADM and clinical scores was assessed by AUROC analysis.The distribution for MR-pro-ADM followed an upward trend, increasing with the increase of both PSI (p10 days and DE stay >4 days, compared to the PSI and CURB (though difference not statistically significant. For each endpoint measured, the best thresholds values for Mr-pro-ADM were: 1.6 (specificity 76.5%; sensitivity 77.8% for death; 2.5 (specificity 88.9%; sensitivity 80.0% for death at 14 days; 1.5 (specificity 77.0%; sensitivity 87.5% for NIMV; 2.4 (specificity 88.7%; sensitivity 83.3% for endotracheal intubation; 0.9 (specificity 53.5%; sensitivity 70.6% for DE stay greater than 4 days; 1.9 (specificity 82.1%; sensitivity 55.3% for hospital stay greater than 10 days. The AUC for the combination of MR-pro-ADM and PSI was 81.29% [63.41%-99.17%], but not in a statistically significant manner compared to the AUCs of the single predictors. Conversely, the AUC for the combination of MR-pro-ADM and CURB65 was 87.58% [75.54%-99.62%], which was significantly greater than the AUC of CURB65 (p = 0.047 or PSI (p = 0.017 alone.The present study confirms that assessment of MR-pro-ADM levels in CAP patients in addition to CURB scores increases the prognostic accuracy of CURB alone and may help rule out

  17. Comparative effectiveness of ceftriaxone in combination with a macrolide compared with ceftriaxone alone for pediatric patients hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia.

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    Leyenaar, Joanna K; Shieh, Meng-Shiou; Lagu, Tara; Pekow, Penelope S; Lindenauer, Peter K

    2014-04-01

    Guidelines for management of community-acquired pneumonia recommend empiric therapy with a macrolide and beta-lactam when infection with Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a significant consideration. Evidence to support this recommendation is limited. We sought to determine the effectiveness of ceftriaxone alone compared with ceftriaxone combined with a macrolide with respect to length of stay and total hospital costs. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of children 1-17 years with pneumonia, using Poisson regression and propensity score analyses to assess associations between antibiotic and length of stay. Multivariable linear regression and propensity score analyses were used to assess log-treatment costs, adjusting for patient and hospital characteristics and initial tests and therapies. A total of 4701 children received combination therapy and 8892 received ceftriaxone alone. Among children 1-4 years of age, adjusted models revealed no significant difference in length of stay, with significantly higher costs in the combination therapy group [cost ratio: 1.08 (95% confidence interval: 1.05-1.11)]. Among children 5-17 years of age, children receiving combination therapy had a shorter length of stay [relative risk: 0.95 (95% confidence interval: 0.92-0.98)], with no significant difference in costs [cost ratio: 1.01 (95% confidence interval: 0.98-1.04)]. Combination therapy did not appear to benefit preschool children but was associated with higher costs. Among school-aged children, combination therapy was associated with a shorter length of stay without a significant impact on cost. Development of sensitive point-of-care diagnostic tests to identify children with M. pneumoniae infection may allow for more focused prescription of macrolides and enable comparative effectiveness studies of targeted provision of combination therapy.

  18. [Treatment of community-acquired pneumonia by pristinamycin (Pyostacine 500). Results of a non comparative open study].

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    Petitpretz, P; Guerin, J C; Nouvet, G; Poirier, R; Portier, F; Vergeret, J; Fraysse, P; Vercken, J B

    1994-01-01

    Activity of natural streptogramin (NSG) appears well adapted to pathogens responsible for CAP. The goal of this multicenter pilot study was to bring first data about efficacy of NSG in treatment of CAP. PATIENTS METHOD: Ten days of a NSG (1 gr b.i.d. or t.i.d.) regimen was administered to 46 hospitalized adult patients for CAP defined with fever > 38 degrees C, respiratory symptoms and X-ray opacity. Severely ill patients were excluded. A broncho-pulmonar sample (expectoration or trantracheal aspiration or protected distal sample) was performed in all patients. two patients were excluded because of pulmonary embolism (n = 1) or tuberculosis (n = 1) and 44 patients were analyzed. 50% of them had associated disease, 20% had failure of prior antibiotherapy. At inclusion, mean fever was 39.2 +/- 0.7 degrees C, respiratory rate was 22 +/- 5/mn, PaO2 was 74 +/- 10 mmHg, chest X-ray showed bilateral opacity in 16%, unilateral in 84% and pleural fluid level in 6 cases. Etiological diagnosis was determined in 70% of cases. Streptococcus pneumoniae (n = 14), Haemophilus influenzae (n = 5), Legionella pneumophila (n = 2), Mycoplasma pneumoniae (n = 2) and Chlamydia psittaci (n = 1) were the most frequent isolated pathogens. 40 patients (91%) were cured with NSG and delay to obtain apyrexia was 4.4 +/- 3.9 days. NSG was stopped in 4 patients: 1 clinical and bacteriological failure (Klebsiella pneumoniae), 2 clinical failures (1 pneumococcus with purulent pleurisy, 1 pneumococcus with worsening of respiratory status), 1 patient with resistant H. influenzae strain in spite of favourable clinical evolution. NSG was well tolerated in 86% of patients. these data invite to carry on evaluation of first line therapy of CAP with NSG.

  19. Severe Hyponatremia due to Levofloxacin Treatment for Pseudomonas aeruginosa Community-Acquired Pneumonia in a Patient with Oropharyngeal Cancer

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    Mihaela Mocan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyponatremia (serum Na levels of <135 mEq/L is the most common electrolyte imbalance encountered in clinical practice, affecting up to 15–28% of hospitalized patients. This case report refers to a middle-aged man with severe hyponatremia due to Syndrome of Inappropriate Antidiuretic Hormone Secretion related to four possible etiological factors: glossopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma, cisplatin treatment, right basal pneumonia with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and the treatment with Levofloxacin. This case report discusses a rare complication of common conditions and of a common treatment. To our knowledge this is the first case of hyponatremia related to Levofloxacin and the second related to fluoroquinolones.

  20. A Culture-Proven Case of Community-Acquired Legionella Pneumonia Apparently Classified as Nosocomial: Diagnostic and Public Health Implications

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    Annalisa Bargellini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of Legionella pneumonia in a 78-year-old patient affected by cerebellar haemangioblastoma continuously hospitalised for 24 days prior to the onset of overt symptoms. According to the established case definition, this woman should have been definitely classified as a nosocomial case (patient spending all of the ten days in hospital before onset of symptoms. Water samples from the oncology ward were negative, notably the patient’s room and the oxygen bubbler, and the revision of the case history induced us to verify possible contamination in water samples collected at home. We found that the clinical strain had identical rep-PCR fingerprint of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 isolated at home. The description of this culture-proven case of Legionnaires’ disease has major clinical, legal, and public health consequences as the complexity of hospitalised patients poses limitations to the rule-of-thumb surveillance definition of nosocomial pneumonia based on 2–10-day incubation period.

  1. A questionnaire study of injections prescribed and dispensed for patients diagnosed with mild/moderate community-acquired pneumonia in Mongolia

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    Gereltuya Dorj

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The study aimed to determine the extent of and factors influencing the prescribing of injections for the treatment of mild/moderate community acquired pneumonia (CAP in Mongolia.Methods. Questionnaires were developed and administered to medication providers (34 Pharmacists, 27 pharmacy technicians and prescribers (22 general doctors and 49 medical specialists working in Mongolia.Results. Cefalosporins were prescribed for patients with mild pneumonia and doctors tended to prescribe injectable cefalosporins (cefazolin rather than oral dosage forms. This was supported by the questionnaire study with pharmacists and pharmacy technicians. Additionally, 23 pharmacists and pharmacy technicians indicated that OTC injectable cefalosporins (37.7% and injectable aminopenicillins (33,9% were frequently sold by pharmacies for the treatment of mild/moderate CAP. Doctors and particularly pharmacists in the questionnaire studies indicated choosing an injection was to avoid non-compliance problems.Conclusion. High levels of injectable prescribing of antibiotics were found in non-hospitalized patients with CAP in Mongolia. This prevalence level indicated that inappropriate injection prescribing is a public health hazard for Mongolia and requires consideration by the appropriate authorities.

  2. RNA viruses in community-acquired childhood pneumonia in semi-urban Nepal; a cross-sectional study

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    Basnet Sudha

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pneumonia is among the main causes of illness and death in children Methods From July 2004 to June 2007, we examined nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPA from 2,230 cases of pneumonia (World Health Organization criteria in children 2 to 35 months old recruited in a randomized trial of zinc supplementation at a field clinic in Bhaktapur, Nepal. The specimens were examined for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, influenza virus type A (InfA and B (InfB, parainfluenza virus types 1, 2 and 3 (PIV1, PIV2, and PIV3, and human metapneumovirus (hMPV using a multiplex reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay. Results We identified 919 virus isolates in 887 (40.0% of the 2,219 NPA specimens with a valid PCR result, of which 334 (15.1% yielded RSV, 164 (7.4% InfA, 129 (5.8% PIV3, 98 (4.4% PIV1, 93 (4.2% hMPV, 84 (3.8% InfB, and 17 (0.8% PIV2. CAP occurred in an epidemic pattern with substantial temporal variation during the three years of study. The largest peaks of pneumonia occurrence coincided with peaks of RSV infection, which occurred in epidemics during the rainy season and in winter. The monthly number of RSV infections was positively correlated with relative humidity (rs = 0.40, P = 0.01, but not with temperature or rainfall. An hMPV epidemic occurred during one of the three winter seasons and the monthly number of hMPV cases was also associated with relative humidity (rs = 0.55, P = 0.0005. Conclusion Respiratory RNA viruses were detected from NPA in 40% of CAP cases in our study. The most commonly isolated viruses were RSV, InfA, and PIV3. RSV infections contributed substantially to the observed CAP epidemics. The occurrence of viral CAP in this community seemed to reflect more or less overlapping micro-epidemics with several respiratory viruses, highlighting the challenges of developing and implementing effective public health control measures.

  3. Etiology of severe community-acquired pneumonia during the 2013 Hajj-part of the MERS-CoV surveillance program.

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    Memish, Ziad A; Almasri, Malak; Turkestani, Abdulhafeez; Al-Shangiti, Ali M; Yezli, Saber

    2014-08-01

    Pneumonia is the leading cause of hospital admission during the annual Islamic pilgrimage (Hajj). The etiology of severe pneumonia is complex and includes the newly emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV). Since 2012, the Saudi Ministry of Health (MoH) has required screening for MERS-CoV for all cases of severe pneumonia requiring hospitalization. We aimed to screen Hajj pilgrims admitted to healthcare facilities in 2013 with severe community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) for MERS-CoV and to determine other etiologies. Sputum samples were collected from all pilgrims admitted to 15 healthcare facilities in the cities of Makkah and Medina, Saudi Arabia, who were diagnosed with severe CAP on admission, presenting with bilateral pneumonia. The medical records were reviewed to collect information on age, gender, nationality, and patient outcome. Samples were screened for MERS-CoV by PCR, and a respiratory multiplex array was used to detect up to 22 other viral and bacterial respiratory pathogens. Thirty-eight patients met the inclusion criteria; they were predominantly elderly (mean age 58.6 years, range 25-83 years) and male (68.4%), and all were from developing countries. Fourteen of the 38 patients died (36.8%). MERS-CoV was not detected in any of the samples. Other respiratory pathogens were detected in 26 (68.4%) samples. Of these, bacterial pathogens were detected in 84.6% (22/26) and viruses in 80.7% (21/26). Twenty-one (80.7%) samples were positive for more than one respiratory pathogen and 17 (65.3%) were positive for both bacteria and viruses. The most common respiratory virus was human rhinovirus, detected in 57.7% of the positive samples, followed by influenza A virus (23.1%) and human coronaviruses (19.2%). Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae were the predominant bacteria, detected in 57.7% and 53.8%, respectively, of the positive samples, followed by Moraxella catarrhalis (36.4%). MERS-CoV was not the cause of severe CAP

  4. Community acquired Staphylococcus aureus meningitis in adults

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    Brouwer, Matthijs C.; Keizerweerd, Gabriella D.; de Gans, Jan; Spanjaard, Lodewijk; van de Beek, Diederik

    2009-01-01

    We present 9 patients with community acquired Staphylococcus aureus meningitis. Foci of infection outside the central nervous system were present in 8 (89%) patients, mostly endocarditis and pneumonia. Cardiorespiratory complications occurred frequently and 6 patients died (67%). Identification and

  5. Plasma levels of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 as a biomarker for disease severity of patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

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    Chang, Pin-Yu; Tsao, Shih-Ming; Chang, Jer-Hwa; Chien, Ming-Hsien; Hung, Wen-Yueh; Huang, Yi-Wen; Yang, Shun-Fa

    2016-12-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is characterized as an acute inflammation of the lung associated with the activation of macrophages and neutrophils. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is an essential adhesion molecule involved in immune cell recruitment in lung inflammation. We investigated whether ICAM-1 is a useful biomarker for assessing the disease severity of hospitalized adult patients with CAP. Plasma soluble ICAM-1 (sICAM-1) levels were measured in 78 patients with CAP and 69 healthy controls by using a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The pneumonia severity index scores were used to determine CAP severity in patients upon initial hospitalization. The sICAM-1 and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels decreased significantly in patients with CAP after antibiotic treatment. The plasma concentration of sICAM-1 alone, but not CRP, was correlated with CAP severity according to the pneumonia severity index scores (r=0.431, p<0.001). The sICAM-1 levels in patients with CAP with high mortality risk were significantly higher than those in patients with CAP with medium or low mortality risk. Moreover, the sICAM-1 level showed a significant correlation with the length of hospital stay (r=0.488, p<0.001). Mechanistic investigations found that bacterial lipopolysaccharide induced upregulation of ICAM-1 expression through the c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathway in RAW264.7 macrophages. Plasma sICAM-1 levels may play a role in the diagnosis and clinical assessment of CAP severity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Effectiveness of 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccination in preventing community-acquired pneumonia hospitalization and severe outcomes in the elderly in Spain.

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    Àngela Domínguez

    Full Text Available Pneumococcal pneumonia is a serious cause of morbidity and mortality in the elderly, but investigation of the etiological agent of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is not possible in most hospitalized patients. The aim of this study was to estimate the effect of pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccination (PPSV23 in preventing CAP hospitalization and reducing the risk of intensive care unit admission (ICU and fatal outcomes in hospitalized people aged ≥65 years. We made a multicenter case-control study in 20 Spanish hospitals during 2013-2014 and 2014-2015. We selected patients aged ≥65 years hospitalized with a diagnosis of pneumonia and controls matched by sex, age and date of hospitalization. Multivariate analysis was performed using conditional logistic regression to estimate vaccine effectiveness and unconditional logistic regression to evaluate the reduction in the risk of severe and fatal outcomes. 1895 cases and 1895 controls were included; 13.7% of cases and 14.4% of controls had received PPSV23 in the last five years. The effectiveness of PPSV23 in preventing CAP hospitalization was 15.2% (95% CI -3.1-30.3. The benefit of PPSV23 in avoiding ICU admission or death was 28.1% (95% CI -14.3-56.9 in all patients, 30.9% (95% CI -32.2-67.4 in immunocompetent patients and 26.9% (95% CI -38.6-64.8 in immunocompromised patients. In conclusion, PPSV23 showed a modest trend to avoidance of hospitalizations due to CAP and to the prevention of death or ICU admission in elderly patients hospitalized with a diagnosis of CAP.

  7. Evidence for short duration of antibiotic treatment for non-severe community acquired pneumonia (CAP in children - are we there yet? A systematic review of randomised controlled trials

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    Shalom Ben-Shimol

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Context: The ideal duration of antibiotic treatment for childhood community acquired pneumonia (CAP has not yet been established. Objective: A literature search was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of shorter than 7 days duration of oral antibiotic treatment for childhood non-severe CAP. Data sources: A systematic literature search was performed using the PubMed database. The search was limited to randomised controlled trials (RCTs conducted between January 1996 and May 2013 in children up to 18 years old. Search terms included pneumonia, treatment, duration, child, children, days, short, respiratory infection and non-severe (nonsevere. Study selection: Only RCTs of oral antibiotic treatment for non-severe CAP in children were included. Data extraction: Independent extraction of articles was done by 3 authors using a preformed questionnaire. Data synthesis: Eight articles meeting the selection criteria were identified: 7 from 2 developing countries (India and Pakistan, and 1 from a developed country (The Netherlands. Studies from developing countries used the World Health Organization clinical criteria for diagnosing CAP, which includes mainly tachypnoea. None of those studies included fever, chest radiography or any laboratory test in their case definition. The Dutch study case definition used laboratory tests and chest radiographies (x-rays in addition to clinical criteria. Five articles concluded that 3 days of treatment are sufficient for non-severe childhood CAP, 2 articles found 5 days treatment to be sufficient, and one article found no difference between 3 days of amoxicillin treatment and placebo. Conclusions: The efficacy of short duration oral antibiotic treatment for non-severe CAP in children has not been established in developed countries. Current RCTs from developing countries used clinical criteria that may have failed to appropriately identify children with true bacterial pneumonia necessitating antibiotic treatment. More RCTs

  8. Focus on JNJ-Q2, a novel fluoroquinolone, for the management of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia and acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections

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    Jones TM

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Travis M Jones,1,2 Steven W Johnson,1,3 V Paul DiMondi,1,4 Dustin T Wilson,1,2 1Department of Pharmacy Practice, College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Campbell University, Buies Creek, 2Department of Pharmacy, Duke University Hospital, Durham, 3Department of Pharmacy, Forsyth Medical Center, Novant Health, Winston-Salem, 4Department of Pharmacy, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA Abstract: JNJ-Q2 is a novel, fifth-generation fluoroquinolone that has excellent in vitro and in vivo activity against a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms. In vitro studies indicate that JNJ-Q2 has potent activity against pathogens responsible for acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI and community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP, such as Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae. JNJ-Q2 also has been shown to have a higher barrier to resistance compared to other agents in the class and it remains highly active against drug-resistant organisms, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus, ciprofloxacin-resistant methicillin-resistant S. aureus, and drug-resistant S. pneumoniae. In two Phase II studies, the efficacy of JNJ-Q2 was comparable to linezolid for ABSSSI and moxifloxacin for CABP. Furthermore, JNJ-Q2 was well tolerated, with adverse event rates similar to or less than other fluoroquinolones. With an expanded spectrum of activity and low potential for resistance, JNJ-Q2 shows promise as an effective treatment option for ABSSSI and CABP. Considering its early stage of development, the definitive role of JNJ-Q2 against these infections and its safety profile will be determined in future Phase III studies. Keywords: JNJ-Q2, fluoroquinolone, ABSSSI, CABP, MRSA

  9. Macrolide-based regimens and mortality in hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

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    Asadi, Leyla; Sligl, Wendy I; Eurich, Dean T; Colmers, Isabelle N; Tjosvold, Lisa; Marrie, Thomas J; Majumdar, Sumit R

    2012-08-01

    Macrolides are used to treat pneumonia despite increasing antimicrobial resistance. However, the immunomodulatory properties of macrolides may have a favorable effect on pneumonia outcomes. Therefore, we systematically reviewed all studies of macrolide use and mortality among patients hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). All randomized control trials (RCTs) and observational studies comparing macrolides to other treatment regimens in adults hospitalized with CAP were identified through electronic databases and gray literature searches. Primary analysis examined any macrolide use and mortality; secondary analysis compared Infectious Diseases Society of America/American Thoracic Society guideline-concordant macrolide/beta-lactam combinations vs respiratory fluoroquinolones. Random effects models were used to generate pooled risk ratios (RRs) and evaluate heterogeneity (I(2)). We included 23 studies and 137,574 patients. Overall, macrolide use was associated with a statistically significant mortality reduction compared with nonmacrolide use (3.7% [1738 of 47,071] vs 6.5% [5861 of 90,503]; RR, 0.78; 95% confidence interval [CI], .64-.95; P = .01; I(2)= 85%). There was no survival advantage and heterogeneity was reduced when analyses were restricted to RCTs (4.6% [22 of 479] vs 4.1% [25 of 613]; RR, 1.13; 95% CI, .65-1.98; P = .66; I(2)= 0%) or to patients treated with guideline-concordant antibiotics (macrolide/beta-lactam, 5.3% [297 of 5574] vs respiratory fluoroquinolones, 5.8% [408 of 7050]; RR, 1.17; 95% CI, .91-1.50; P = .22; I(2)= 43%). In hospitalized patients with CAP, macrolide-based regimens were associated with a significant 22% reduction in mortality compared with nonmacrolides; however, this benefit did not extend to patients studied in RCTs or patients that received guideline-concordant antibiotics. Our findings suggest guideline concordance is more important than choice of antibiotic when treating CAP.

  10. The Queensland experience of participation in a national drug use evaluation project, Community-acquired pneumonia – towards improving outcomes nationally (CAPTION

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    Tett Susan E

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multicentre drug use evaluations are described in the literature infrequently and usually publish only the results. The purpose of this paper is to describe the experience of Queensland hospitals participating in the Community-Acquired Pneumonia Towards Improving Outcomes Nationally (CAPTION project, specifically evaluating the implementation of this project, detailing benefits and drawbacks of involvement in a national drug use evaluation program. Methods Emergency departments from nine hospitals in Queensland, Australia, participated in CAPTION, a national quality improvement project, conducted in 37 Australian hospitals. CAPTION was aimed at optimising prescribing in the management of Community-Acquired Pneumonia according to the recommendations of the Australian Therapeutic Guidelines: Antibiotic 12th edition. The project involved data collection, and evaluation, feedback of results and a suite of targeted educational interventions including audit and feedback, group presentations and academic detailing. A baseline audit and two drug use evaluation cycles were conducted during the 2-year project. The implementation of the project was evaluated using feedback forms after each phase of the project (audit or intervention. At completion a group meeting with the hospital coordinators identified positive and negative elements of the project. Results Evaluation by hospitals of their participation in CAPTION demonstrated both benefits and drawbacks. The benefits were grouped into the impact on the hospital dynamic such as; improved interdisciplinary working relationships (e.g. between pharmacist and doctor, recognition of the educational/academic role of the pharmacist, creation of ED Pharmacist positions and enhanced involvement with the National Prescribing Service, and personal benefits. Personal benefits included academic detailing training for participants, improved communication skills and opportunities to present at

  11. Inpatient rehabilitation improves functional capacity, peripheral muscle strength and quality of life in patients with community-acquired pneumonia: a randomised trial.

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    José, Anderson; Dal Corso, Simone

    2016-04-01

    Among people who are hospitalised for community-acquired pneumonia, does an inpatient exercise-based rehabilitation program improve functional outcomes, symptoms, quality of life and length of hospital stay more than a respiratory physiotherapy regimen? Randomised trial with concealed allocation, intention-to-treat analysis and blinding of some outcomes. Forty-nine adults hospitalised for community-acquired pneumonia. The experimental group (n=32) underwent a physical training program that included warm-up, stretching, peripheral muscle strength training and walking at a controlled speed for 15 minutes. The control group (n=17) underwent a respiratory physiotherapy regimen that included percussion, vibrocompression, respiratory exercises and free walking. The intervention regimens lasted 8 days. The primary outcome was the Glittre Activities of Daily Living test, which assesses the time taken to complete a series of functional tasks (eg, rising from a chair, walking, stairs, lifting and bending). Secondary outcomes were distance walked in the incremental shuttle walk test, peripheral muscle strength, quality of life, dyspnoea, lung function, C-reactive protein and length of hospital stay. Measures were taken 1 day before and 1 day after the intervention period. There was greater improvement in the experimental group than in the control group on the Glittre Activities of Daily Living test (mean between-group difference 39 seconds, 95% CI 20 to 59) and the incremental shuttle walk test (mean between-group difference 130 m, 95% CI 77 to 182). There were also significantly greater improvements in quality of life, dyspnoea and peripheral muscle strength in the experimental group than in the control group. There were no between-group differences in lung function, C-reactive protein or length of hospital stay. The improvement in functional outcomes after an inpatient rehabilitation program was greater than the improvement after standard respiratory physiotherapy. The

  12. Risk of community-acquired pneumonia in patients with a diagnosis of pernicious anemia: a population-based retrospective cohort study.

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    Almario, Christopher V; Metz, David C; Haynes, Kevin; Yang, Yu-Xiao

    2015-11-01

    Pernicious anemia (PA) is an autoimmune disease that causes achlorhydria or profound hypochlorhydria. We conducted a population-based study to determine whether individuals with PA are at an increased risk for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). We performed a retrospective cohort study using The Health Improvement Network (THIN) from the UK (1993-2009). The eligible study cohort included individuals 18 years of age or older, with at least 1 year of THIN follow-up. The exposed group consisted of individuals with a diagnosis code for PA. The unexposed group consisted of individuals without a diagnosis of PA and was frequency matched with the exposed group with respect to age, sex, and practice site. Cox regression analysis was used to determine the hazard ratio with the 95% confidence interval for CAP associated with PA, accounting for a comprehensive list of potential confounders. The study included 13,605 individuals with PA and 50,586 non-PA individuals. The crude incidence rate of CAP was 9.4/1000 person-years for those with PA, versus 6.4/1000 person-years for those without PA. The multivariable adjusted hazard ratio for CAP associated with PA was 1.18 (95% confidence interval 1.08-1.29). In this large population-based cohort study, individuals with PA and presumed chronic achlorhydria were at an increased risk for CAP.

  13. Development of a new resequencing pathogen microarray based assay for detection of broad-spectrum respiratory tract viruses in patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwei Shen

    Full Text Available A Resequencing Pathogen Microarray (RPM is a single, highly multiplexed assay for detecting and differentiating similarly related pathogens by using closely overlapping probe sets to determine a target organism's nucleotide sequence. In this study, a new RPM (RPM-IVDC1 that consisted of 224-bp detector tiles corresponding to 9 influenza A subtypes, 11 rhinoviruses, 28 enteroviruses and 38 other respiratory viruses was developed and optimized to provide individual and simultaneous detection sensitivities ranging from 15 to 750 genomic copies for 16 common respiratory pathogens. A total of 110 consecutive patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP admitted to 5 district general hospitals in Beijing during a 1-year period were assessed using the new assay. Among the children (under age 5 and adult patients (above age 18, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV and rhinovirus (RV were the most common etiological agents, respectively, which is consistent with reference assays. Atypical pathogens that may cause CAP-like illness, including rubella virus, measles virus, influenza type C virus, human herpesvirus (HHV were also detected. The results show the capability of RPM-IVDC1 for the accurate detection and identification of multiple virus types, which may be of significant use in epidemic surveillance and outbreak investigations of atypical pathogens.

  14. Clinical, general, hemocoagulation and pathologicanatomical features of patients with moderate and severe community acquired pneumonia by the data of retrospective analysis

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    Pertseva T.A.

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available According to literature data, patients with community acquired pneumonia (CAP fall into several groups of unfavorable prognostic factors. Development of thrombotic complications is one of causes of mortality of hospitalized patients. In this case systemic inflammation, which is always present in moderate and severe CAP, is the starting mechanism of formation of disorders in the hemostasis system. The aim of our work was to determine anamnestic, clinical, laboratory and pathologic anatomical features in patients with CAP, taking into account markers of systemic inflammation and coagulogram indices, as well as predicting the occurrence of complications. In the course of the work, a retrospective analysis of 151 medical histories of hospitalized patients with CAP was made. We analyzed anthropometric indicators, complaints at the time of hospitalization, results of physical examination, results of the chest X-ray, clinical and laboratory indicators, microbiological sputum analysis and to assess the possibility of thrombotic complications a RAM scale was used. It was found that late asking for medical help, the presence of mixed infection, underestimation of the severity of condition and severe systemic inflammation increase the risk of lethal outcome in patients with CAP. Considering a high risk of thrombosis in patients with CAP, it is necessary to assess the risk of thrombotic complications with the help of special scales, as well as timely detection and correction of disorders from the hemostasis system.

  15. Burden of hospitalized childhood community-acquired pneumonia: A retrospective cross-sectional study in Vietnam, Malaysia, Indonesia and the Republic of Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kah Kee; Dang, Duc Anh; Kim, Ki Hwan; Kartasasmita, Cissy; Kim, Hwang Min; Zhang, Xu-Hao; Shafi, Fakrudeen; Yu, Ta-Wen; Ledesma, Emilio; Meyer, Nadia

    2018-01-02

    Few studies describe the community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) burden in children in Asia. We estimated the proportion of all CAP hospitalizations in children from nine hospitals across the Republic of Korea (high-income), Indonesia, Malaysia (middle-income), and Vietnam (low/middle-income). Over a one or two-year period, children Malaysia (two centers): 1027 CAP episodes were identified with 2.7% (2.6;2.9); 2.6% (2.4;2.8); 0.04% (0.04;0.1) due to S-CAP, C-CAP, and B-CAP, respectively. One child with B-CAP died. Indonesia (one center): 960 CAP episodes identified with 18.0% (17.0;19.1); 16.8% (15.8;17.9); 0.3% (0.2;0.4) due to S-CAP, C-CAP, and B-CAP, respectively. The B-CAP CFR was 20%. Korea (three centers): 3151 CAP episodes were identified with 21.1% (20.4;21.7); 11.8% (11.2;12.3); 2.4% (2.1;2.7) due to S-CAP, C-CAP, and B-CAP, respectively. There were no deaths. CAP-related hospitalization costs were highest for B-CAP episodes: 145.00 (Vietnam) to 1013.3 USD (Korea) per episode. CAP hospitalization causes an important health and cost burden in all four countries studied (NMRR-12-50-10793).

  16. The interrelations of radiologic findings and mechanical ventilation in community acquired pneumonia patients admitted to the intensive care unit: a multicentre retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, Hakan; Kocak-Tufan, Zeliha; Yilmaz, Omer; Karakurt, Zuhal; Cilli, Aykut; Turkan, Hulya; Yazicioglu-Mocin, Ozlem; Adıguzel, Nalan; Gungor, Gokay; Taşcı, Canturk; Yilmaz, Gulden; Oncul, Oral; Dogan-Celik, Aygul; Erdemli, Ozcan; Oztoprak, Nefise; Tomak, Yakup; Inan, Asuman; Tok, Demet; Temur, Sibel; Oksuz, Hafize; Senturk, Ozgur; Buyukkocak, Unase; Yilmaz-Karadag, Fatma; Ozturk-Engin, Derya; Ozcengiz, Dilek; Karakas, Ahmet; Bilgic, Hayati; Leblebicioglu, Hakan

    2014-01-08

    We evaluated patients admitted to the intensive care units with the diagnosis of community acquired pneumonia (CAP) regarding initial radiographic findings. A multicenter retrospective study was held. Chest x ray (CXR) and computerized tomography (CT) findings and also their associations with the need of ventilator support were evaluated. A total of 388 patients were enrolled. Consolidation was the main finding on CXR (89%) and CT (80%) examinations. Of all, 45% had multi-lobar involvement. Bilateral involvement was found in 40% and 44% on CXR and CT respectively. Abscesses and cavitations were rarely found. The highest correlation between CT and CXR findings was observed for interstitial involvement. More than 80% of patients needed ventilator support. Noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIV) requirement was seen to be more common in those with multi-lobar involvement on CXR as 2.4-fold and consolidation on CT as 47-fold compared with those who do not have these findings. Invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) need increased 8-fold in patients with multi-lobar involvement on CT. CXR and CT findings correlate up to a limit in terms of interstitial involvement but not in high percentages in other findings. CAP patients who are admitted to the ICU are severe cases frequently requiring ventilator support. Initial CT and CXR findings may indicate the need for ventilator support, but the assumed ongoing real practice is important and the value of radiologic evaluation beyond clinical findings to predict the mechanical ventilation need is subject for further evaluation with large patient series.

  17. Improving antibiotic prescribing for adults with community acquired pneumonia: Does a computerised decision support system achieve more than academic detailing alone? – a time series analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Black James F

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ideal method to encourage uptake of clinical guidelines in hospitals is not known. Several strategies have been suggested. This study evaluates the impact of academic detailing and a computerised decision support system (CDSS on clinicians' prescribing behaviour for patients with community acquired pneumonia (CAP. Methods The management of all patients presenting to the emergency department over three successive time periods was evaluated; the baseline, academic detailing and CDSS periods. The rate of empiric antibiotic prescribing that was concordant with recommendations was studied over time comparing pre and post periods and using an interrupted time series analysis. Results The odds ratio for concordant therapy in the academic detailing period, after adjustment for age, illness severity and suspicion of aspiration, compared with the baseline period was OR = 2.79 [1.88, 4.14], p Conclusion Deployment of a computerised decision support system was associated with an early improvement in antibiotic prescribing practices which was greater than the changes seen with academic detailing. The sustainability of this intervention requires further evaluation.

  18. CURB-65, PSI, and APACHE II to assess mortality risk in patients with severe sepsis and community acquired pneumonia in PROWESS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Guy; Levy, Howard; Laterre, Pierre-Francois; Feldman, Charles; Woodward, Brad; Bates, Becky M; Qualy, Rebecca L

    2011-01-01

    Patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) comprised 35.6% of the overall phase 3 Recombinant Human Activated Protein C Worldwide Evaluation in Severe Sepsis (PROWESS) study and 33.1% of the placebo arm. We investigated the use of CURB-65, the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI), and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) prediction scores to identify the CAP population from the PROWESS placebo arm at the greatest mortality risk. Patients were classified as having CAP if the lung was the primary infection site and the patient originated from home. The abilities of CURB-65, PSI, and APACHE II scores to determine the 28-day and in-hospital mortality were compared using receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves and the associated areas under the curve. PROWESS enrolled 278 patients with CAP in the placebo arm. The areas under the ROC curves for PSI = 5, CURB-65 ≥ 3, and APACHE II ≥ 25 for predicting 28-day (c = 0.65, 0.66, and 0.64, respectively) and in-hospital mortality (c = 0.65, 0.65, and 0.64, respectively) were not statistically different from each other. The 28-day mortality of patients with a PSI score of 5, CURB-65 ≥ 3, and APACHE II ≥ 25 was 41.6%, 37.9%, and 43.5%, respectively. Despite early diagnosis and appropriate antibiotic therapy, conventionally treated CAP with PSI = 5, CURB-65 3, or APACHE II 25 has an unacceptably high mortality. In this study, PSI, CURB-65, and APACHE II scoring systems perform similarly in predicting the 28-day and in-hospital mortality; however, differences in the categorization of severe CAP were observed and there was a significant mortality in patients with a CURB-65 <3 and PSI <5.

  19. Hospitalisation with community-acquired pneumonia among patients with type 2 diabetes: an observational population-based study in Spain from 2004 to 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-de-Andrés, Ana; de Miguel-Díez, Javier; Jiménez-Trujillo, Isabel; Hernández-Barrera, Valentín; de Miguel-Yanes, José M; Méndez-Bailón, Manuel; Pérez-Farinós, Napoleón; Salinero-Fort, Miguel Á ngel; Jiménez-García, Rodrigo

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To describe trends in the incidence and outcomes of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) hospitalisations among patients with or without diabetes in Spain (2004–2013). Design Retrospective, observational study using the Spanish National Hospital Discharge Database (Conjunto Mínimo Básico de Datos (CMBD)). Setting Spain. Participants We used national hospital discharge data to select all hospital admissions for CAP. Main outcome measures Incidence was calculated overall and stratified by diabetes status: type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and no diabetes. Results We identified 901 136 admissions for CAP (24.8% with T2DM). Incidence rates of CAP increased significantly in patients with T2DM over time. The incidence was higher among people with T2DM for all time periods. Patients with T2DM were older and had higher comorbidity index than non-diabetics. Streptococcus pneumoniae decreased over time for both groups. Time trend analyses showed significant decreases in mortality during admission for CAP for patients with and without T2DM. Factors associated with higher mortality in both groups included: older age, higher comorbidity, mechanical ventilation, red cell transfusion, readmission and Staphylococcus aureus detection. Diabetes was associated with a lower in-hospital mortality (OR 0.92, 95% CI 0.91 to 0.94) after a CAP hospitalisation. Conclusions CAP incidence rates were higher and increased over time at a higher rate among patients with T2DM. Mortality decreased over time in all groups. The presence of diabetes is not a risk factor for death during admission for CAP. PMID:28057653

  20. Atypical aetiology in patients hospitalised with community-acquired pneumonia is associated with age, gender and season; a data-analysis on four Dutch cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeven, Vivian M; Spoorenberg, Simone M C; Boersma, Wim G; van de Garde, Ewoudt M W; Cannegieter, Suzanne C; Voorn, G P Paul; Bos, Willem Jan W; van Steenbergen, Jim E

    2016-06-17

    Microorganisms causing community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) can be categorised into viral, typical and atypical (Legionella species, Coxiella burnetii, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Chlamydia species). Extensive microbiological testing to identify the causative microorganism is not standardly recommended, and empiric treatment does not always cover atypical pathogens. In order to optimize epidemiologic knowledge of CAP and to improve empiric antibiotic choice, we investigated whether atypical microorganisms are associated with a particular season or with the patient characteristics age, gender, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). A data-analysis was performed on databases from four prospective studies, which all included adult patients hospitalised with CAP in the Netherlands (N = 980). All studies performed extensive microbiological testing. A main causative agent was identified in 565/980 (57.7 %) patients. Of these, 117 (20.7 %) were atypical microorganisms. This percentage was 40.4 % (57/141) during the non-respiratory season (week 20 to week 39, early May to early October), and 67.2 % (41/61) for patients under the age of 60 during this season. Factors that were associated with atypical causative agents were: CAP acquired in the non-respiratory season (odds ratio (OR) 4.3, 95 % CI 2.68-6.84), age <60 year (OR 2.9, 95 % CI 1.83-4.66), male gender (OR 1.7, 95 % CI 1.06-2.71) and absence of COPD (OR 0.2, 95 % CI 0.12-0.52). Atypical causative agents in CAP are associated with respectively non-respiratory season, age <60 years, male gender and absence of COPD. Therefore, to maximise its yield, extensive microbiological testing should be considered in patients <60 years old who are admitted with CAP from early May to early October. NCT00471640 , NCT00170196 (numbers of original studies).

  1. Community-acquired bacterial pneumonia in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients: validation of severity criteria. The Grupo Andaluz para el Estudio de las Enfermedades Infecciosas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero, E; Pachón, J; Rivero, A; Girón, J A; Gómez-Mateos, J; Merino, M D; Torres-Tortosa, M; González-Serrano, M; Aliaga, L; Collado, A; Hernández-Quero, J; Barrera, A; Nuño, E

    2000-12-01

    Severity criteria for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) have always excluded patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. A 1-yr, multicenter, prospective observational study of HIV-infected patients with bacterial CAP was done to validate the criteria used in the American Thoracic Society (ATS) guidelines for CAP, and to determine the prognosis-associated factors in the HIV-infected population with bacterial CAP. Overall, 355 cases were included, with an attributable mortality of 9.3%. Patients who met the ATS criteria had a longer hospital stay (p = 0.01), longer duration of fever (p < 0.001), and higher attributable mortality (13.1% versus 3.5%, p = 0.02) than those who did not. Three factors were independently related to mortality: CD4(+) cell count < 100/microl, radiologic progression of disease, and shock. Pleural effusion, cavities, and/or multilobar infiltrates at admission were independently associated with radiologic progression. A prognostic rule based on the five criteria of shock, CD4(+) cell count < 100/microl, pleural effusion, cavities, and multilobar infiltrates had a high negative predictive value for mortality (97.1%). The attributable mortality for severe pneumonia was 11.3%, as compared with 1.3% for nonsevere disease (p = 0.008). The ATS severity criteria are valid in HIV-infected patients with bacterial CAP. Our study provides the basis for identification of patients who may require hospitalization determined by clinical judgment and the five clinical criteria of shock, a CD4(+) cell count < 100/microl, pleural effusion, cavities, and multilobar involvement. These prognostic factors should be validated in independent cohort studies.

  2. Evolution over a 15-year period of the clinical characteristics and outcomes of critically ill patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallés, J; Diaz, E; Martín-Loeches, I; Bacelar, N; Saludes, P; Lema, J; Gallego, M; Fontanals, D; Artigas, A

    2016-05-01

    To study the characteristics and outcomes of patients in the ICU with severe community-acquired pneumonia (SCAP) over a 15-year surveillance period. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of episodes of SCAP, and assessed the epidemiology, etiology, treatment and outcomes of patients admitted to the ICU, comparing three periods (1999-2003, 2004-2008 and 2009-2013). A total of 458 patients were diagnosed with SCAP. The overall cumulative incidence was 37.4 episodes/1000 admissions, with a progressive increase over the three periods (P<0.001). Patients fulfilling the two major IDSA/ATS criteria at admission increased from 64.2% in the first period to 82.5% in the last period (P=0.005). Streptococcus pneumoniae was the prevalent pathogen. The incidence of bacteremia was 23.1%, and a progressive significant reduction in overall incidence was observed over the three periods (P=0.02). Globally, 91% of the patients received appropriate empiric antibiotic treatment, increasing from 78.3% in the first period to 97.7% in the last period (P<0.001). Combination antibiotic therapy (betalactam+macrolide or fluoroquinolone) increased significantly from the first period (61%) to the last period (81.3%) (P<0.001). Global ICU mortality was 25.1%, and decreased over the three periods (P=0.001). Despite a progressively higher incidence and severity of SCAP in our ICU, crude ICU mortality decreased by 18%. The increased use of combined antibiotic therapy and the decreasing rates of bacteremia were associated to improved patient prognosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  3. [Community acquired pneumonia in children: Treatment of complicated cases and risk patients. Consensus statement by the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases (SEIP) and the Spanish Society of Paediatric Chest Diseases (SENP)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Pérez, D; Andrés Martín, A; Tagarro García, A; Escribano Montaner, A; Figuerola Mulet, J; García García, J J; Moreno-Galdó, A; Rodrigo Gonzalo de Lliria, C; Saavedra Lozano, J

    2015-09-01

    The incidence of community-acquired pneumonia complications has increased during the last decade. According to the records from several countries, empyema and necrotizing pneumonia became more frequent during the last few years. The optimal therapeutic approach for such conditions is still controversial. Both pharmacological management (antimicrobials and fibrinolysis), and surgical management (pleural drainage and video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery), are the subject of continuous assessment. In this paper, the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases and the Spanish Society of Paediatric Chest Diseases have reviewed the available evidence. Consensus treatment guidelines are proposed for complications of community-acquired pneumonia in children, focusing on parapneumonic pleural effusion. Recommendations are also provided for the increasing population of patients with underlying diseases and immunosuppression. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Neumonía adquirida en la comunidad en niños y adolescentes Community-acquired pneumonia in children and adolescents

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    Isabel de los Milagros Toledo Rodríguez

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available La neumonía tiene una alta morbilidad y mortalidad en países en desarrollo y en Cuba sigue siendo un problema de salud importante. El propósito de este trabajo es ofrecer información actualizada a los profesionales de la atención primaria de salud acerca de la neumonía en los primeros años de vida. La neumonía adquirida en la comunidad ocurre en sujetos que conviven en ella, por un fallo en los mecanismos de defensa a nivel de las vías aéreas frente diversos agentes infecciosos que difieren según la edad del paciente, siendo Streptococcus pneumoniae el más importante en la infancia. Su diagnóstico es fundamentalmente clínico y la taquipnea es el mejor signo predictor en niños menores de 5 años; las pruebas de laboratorio no son estrictamente necesarias en la atención primaria, donde tampoco están indicados estudios microbiológicos y la radiografía de tórax no debe hacerse de forma rutinaria. Ante complicaciones y otros criterios, el paciente debe ser hospitalizado para su tratamiento y control. Se recomienda tratamiento antibiótico en todos los casos, en función de la edad del paciente. La prevención es de vital importancia en el control de esta enfermedad. Se trata de una enfermedad curable que puede ser fatal, sobre todo en niños, por lo que resulta necesario conocer su importancia como problema de la salud pública y tener un conocimiento actualizado acerca de su etiología, patogenía, diagnóstico y las estrategias para su tratamiento y prevención.Pneumonia brings high morbidity and mortality to developing countries and it is still a substantial health problem in Cuba. The objective of this paper was to provide the primary health care professionals with updated information about pneumonia in the childhood. Community-acquired pneumonia appears in individuals living in the community as a result of a failure in the mechanisms of defense at airways against the action of infective agents that vary with the patient's age

  5. Risk Factors for Long-Term Mortality after Hospitalization for Community-Acquired Pneumonia: A 5-Year Prospective Follow-Up Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holter, Jan C; Ueland, Thor; Jenum, Pål A; Müller, Fredrik; Brunborg, Cathrine; Frøland, Stig S; Aukrust, Pål; Husebye, Einar; Heggelund, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Contributors to long-term mortality in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) remain unclear, with little attention paid to pneumonia etiology. We examined long-term survival, causes of death, and risk factors for long-term mortality in adult patients who had been hospitalized for CAP, with emphasis on demographic, clinical, laboratory, and microbiological characteristics. Two hundred and sixty-seven consecutive patients admitted in 2008-2011 to a general hospital with CAP were prospectively recruited and followed up. Patients who died during hospital stay were excluded. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were collected within 48 hours of admission. Extensive microbiological work-up was performed to establish the etiology of CAP in 63% of patients. Mortality data were obtained from the Norwegian Cause of Death Registry. Cox regression models were used to identify independent risk factors for all-cause mortality. Of 259 hospital survivors of CAP (median age 66 years), 79 (30.5%) died over a median of 1,804 days (range 1-2,520 days). Cumulative 5-year survival rate was 72.9% (95% CI 67.4-78.4%). Standardized mortality ratio was 2.90 for men and 2.05 for women. The main causes of death were chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), vascular diseases, and malignancy. Independent risk factors for death were the following (hazard ratio, 95% CI): age (1.83 per decade, 1.47-2.28), cardiovascular disease (2.63, 1.61-4.32), COPD (2.09, 1.27-3.45), immunocompromization (1.98, 1.17-3.37), and low serum albumin level at admission (0.75 per 5 g/L higher, 0.58-0.96), whereas active smoking was protective (0.32, 0.14-0.74); active smokers were younger than non-smokers (P Pneumonia etiology had no prognostic value, but this remains to be substantiated by further studies using extensive diagnostic microbiological methods in the identification of causative agents of CAP.

  6. Efficacy of high doses of penicillin versus amoxicillin in the treatment of uncomplicated community acquired pneumonia in adults. A non-inferiority controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llor, Carl; Pérez, Almudena; Carandell, Eugenia; García-Sangenís, Anna; Rezola, Javier; Llorente, Marian; Gestoso, Salvador; Bobé, Francesc; Román-Rodríguez, Miguel; Cots, Josep M; Hernández, Silvia; Cortés, Jordi; Miravitlles, Marc; Morros, Rosa

    2017-10-20

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is treated with penicillin in some northern European countries. To evaluate whether high-dose penicillin V is as effective as high-dose amoxicillin for the treatment of non-severe CAP. Multicentre, parallel, double-blind, controlled, randomized clinical trial. 31 primary care centers in Spain. Patients from 18 to 75 years of age with no significant associated comorbidity and with symptoms of lower respiratory tract infection and radiological confirmation of CAP were randomized to receive either penicillin V 1.6 million units, or amoxicillin 1000mg three times per day for 10 days. The main outcome was clinical cure at 14 days, and the primary hypothesis was that penicillin V would be non-inferior to amoxicillin with regard to this outcome, with a margin of 15% for the difference in proportions. EudraCT register 2012-003511-63. A total of 43 subjects (amoxicillin: 28; penicillin: 15) were randomized. Clinical cure was observed in 10 (90.9%) patients assigned to penicillin and in 25 (100%) patients assigned to amoxicillin with a difference of -9.1% (95% CI, -41.3% to 6.4%; p=.951) for non-inferiority. In the intention-to-treat analysis, amoxicillin was found to be 28.6% superior to penicillin (95% CI, 7.3-58.1%; p=.009 for superiority). The number of adverse events was similar in both groups. There was a trend favoring high-dose amoxicillin versus high-dose penicillin in adults with uncomplicated CAP. The main limitation of this trial was the low statistical power due to the low number of patients included. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Beta-lactam plus macrolides or beta-lactam alone for community-acquired pneumonia: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horita, Nobuyuki; Otsuka, Tatsuya; Haranaga, Shusaku; Namkoong, Ho; Miki, Makoto; Miyashita, Naoyuki; Higa, Futoshi; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Masahiro; Kohno, Shigeru; Kaneko, Takeshi

    2016-10-01

    It is unclear whether in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) beta-lactam plus macrolide antibiotics lead to better survival than beta-lactam alone. We report a systematic review and meta-analysis. Trials and observational studies published in English were included, if they provided sufficient data on odds ratio for all-cause mortality for a beta-lactam plus macrolide regimen compared with beta-lactam alone. Two investigators independently searched for eligible articles. Of 514 articles screened, 14 were included: two open-label randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comprising 1975 patients, one non-RCT interventional study comprising 1011 patients and 11 observational studies comprising 33 332 patients. Random-model meta-analysis yielded an odds ratio for all-cause death for beta-lactam plus macrolide compared with beta-lactam alone of 0.80 (95% CI 0.69-0.92, P = 0.002) with substantial heterogeneity (I(2)  = 59%, P for heterogeneity = 0.002). Severity-based subgroup analysis and meta-regression revealed that adding macrolide had a favourable effect on mortality only for severe CAP. Of the two RCTs, one suggested that macrolide plus beta-lactam lead to better outcome compared with beta-lactam alone, while the other did not. Subgrouping based on study design, that is, RCT versus non-RCT, which was almost identical to subgrouping based on severity, revealed substantial inter-subgroup heterogeneity. Compared with beta-lactam alone, beta-lactam plus macrolide may decrease all-cause death only for severe CAP. However, this conclusion is tentative because this was based mainly on observational studies. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  8. Inflammation biomarkers in blood as mortality predictors in community-acquired pneumonia admitted patients: Importance of comparison with neutrophil count percentage or neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio.

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    Jose Curbelo

    Full Text Available The increase and persistence of inflammation in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP patients can lead to higher mortality. Biomarkers capable of measuring this inadequate inflammatory response are likely candidates to be related with a bad outcome. We investigated the association between concentrations of several inflammatory markers and mortality of CAP patients.This was a prospective study of hospitalised CAP patients in a Spanish university hospital. Blood tests upon admittance and in the early-stage evolution (72-120 hours were carried out, where C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, proadrenomedullin, copeptin, white blood cell, Lymphocyte Count Percentage (LCP, Neutrophil Count Percentage (NCP and Neutrophil/Lymphocyte Ratio (NLR were measured. The outcome variable was mortality at 30 and 90 days. Statistical analysis included logistic regression, ROC analysis and area-under-curve test.154 hospitalised CAP patients were included. Patients who died during follow-up had higher levels of procalcitonin, copeptin, proadrenomedullin, lower levels of LCP, and higher of NCP and NLR. Remarkably, multivariate analysis showed a relationship between NCP and mortality, regardless of age, severity of CAP and comorbidities. AUC analysis showed that NLR and NCP at admittance and during early-stage evolution achieved a good diagnostic power. ROC test for NCP and NLR were similar to those of the novel serum biomarkers analysed.NLR and NCP, are promising candidate predictors of mortality for hospitalised CAP patients, and both are cheaper, easier to perform, and at least as reliable as the new serum biomarkers. Future implementation of new biomarkers would require comparison not only with classic inflammatory parameters like White Blood Cell count but also with NLR and NCP.

  9. Effectiveness of Proadrenomedullin Enhanced CURB65 Score Algorithm in Patients with Community-Acquired Pneumonia in “Real Life”, an Observational Quality Control Survey

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    Daniel Widmer

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: An intervention trial found a trend for shorter length of stay (LOS in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP when the CURB65 score was combined with the prognostic biomarker proadrenomedullin (ProADM (CURB65-A. However, the efficacy and safety of CURB65-A in real life situations remains unclear. Methods: From September, 2011, until April, 2012, we performed a post-study prospective observational quality control survey at the cantonal Hospital of Aarau, Switzerland of consecutive adults with CAP. The primary endpoint was length of stay (LOS during the index hospitalization and within 30 days. We compared the results with two well-defined historic cohorts of CAP patients hospitalized in the same hospital with the use of multivariate regression, namely 83 patients in the observation study without ProADM (OPTIMA I and the 169 patients in the intervention study (OPTIMA II RCT. Results: A total of 89 patients with confirmed CAP were included. As compared to patients with CURB65 only observed in the OPTIMA I study, adjusted regression analysis showed a significant shorter initial LOS (7.5 vs. 10.4 days; −2.32; 95% CI, −4.51 to −0.13; p = 0.04 when CURB65-A was used in clinical routine. No significant differences were found for LOS within 30 days. There were no significant differences in safety outcomes in regard to mortality and ICU admission between the cohorts. Conclusion: This post-study survey provides evidence that the use of ProADM in combination with CURB65 (CURB65-A in “real life” situations reduces initial LOS compared to the CURB65 score alone without apparent negative effects on patient safety.

  10. The impact of coagulation parameters on the outcomes of patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia requiring intensive care unit admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salluh, Jorge I F; Rabello, Ligia S C F; Rosolem, Maira M; Soares, Márcio; Bozza, Fernando A; Verdeal, Juan Carlos R; Mello, Gustavo W; Castro Faria Neto, Hugo C; Lapa E Silva, José Roberto; Bozza, Patrícia T

    2011-10-01

    Coagulation abnormalities are frequent in patients with severe infections. However, the predictive value of d-dimer and of the presence of associated coagulation derangements in severe community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) remains to be thoroughly evaluated. The aim of this study was to investigate the predictive value of coagulation parameters in patients with severe CAP admitted to the intensive care unit. d-Dimer, antithrombin, International Society of Thrombosis and Hemostasis score, clinical variables, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA), The Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) and the CURB-65 score were measured in the first 24 hours. Results are shown as median (25%-75% interquartile range). The main outcome measure was hospital mortality. Ninety patients with severe CAP admitted to the intensive care unit were evaluated. Overall hospital mortality was 15.5%. d-Dimer levels in nonsurvivors were higher than those in survivors. In the univariate analysis, d-dimer, SOFA, and APACHE II scores were predictors of death. The discriminative ability of d-dimer (area under receiver operating curve = 0.75 [95% confidence interval, 0.64-0.83]; best cutoff for d-dimer was 1798 ng/mL) for in-hospital mortality was comparable with APACHE II and SOFA and better than C-reactive protein. Moreover, the addition of d-dimer to APACHE II or SOFA score increased the discriminative ability of both scores (area under the receiver operating curve = 0.82 [0.72-0.89] and 0.84 [0.75-0.91], respectively). d-Dimer levels are good predictors of outcome in severe CAP and may augment the predictive ability of scoring systems as APACHE II and SOFA. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Low Levels of Immunoglobulins and Mannose-Binding Lectin Are Not Associated With Etiology, Severity, or Outcome in Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siljan, William W; Holter, Jan C; Nymo, Ståle H; Husebye, Einar; Ueland, Thor; Skattum, Lillemor; Bosnes, Vidar; Garred, Peter; Frøland, Stig S; Mollnes, Tom E; Aukrust, Pål; Heggelund, Lars

    2018-02-01

    Disease severity and outcome in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) depend on the host and on the challenge of the causal microorganism(s). We measured levels of immunoglobulins (Igs) and complement in 257 hospitalized adults with CAP and examined the association of low levels of Igs or complement to microbial etiology, disease severity, and short-term and long-term outcome. Serum Igs were analyzed in blood samples obtained at admission and at 6 weeks postdischarge if admission levels were low. Serum complement deficiencies were screened with a total complement activity enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), with further analyzes performed if justified. Disease severity was assessed by the CURB-65 severity score. Short-term outcome was defined as a composite end point of intensive care unit (ICU) admission and 30-day mortality, and long-term outcome as 5-year all-cause mortality. At admission, 87 (34%) patients had low levels of at least 1 Ig, with low IgG2 as the most prevalent finding (55/21%). IgG levels were lower in bacterial than viral CAP (8.48 vs 9.97 g/L, P = .023), but low Igs were not associated with microbial etiology. Fifty-five (21%) patients had low lectin pathway activity, of which 33 (13%) were mannose-binding lectin (MBL) deficient. Low admission levels of any Ig or MBL were not associated with disease severity, short-term outcome, or long-term outcome. Excluding patients defined as immunocompromised from analysis did not substantially affect these results. In hospitalized adults with CAP, low admission levels of Igs or complement were in general not associated with microbial etiology, disease severity, short-term outcome, or long-term outcome.

  12. Accuracy of Lung Ultrasonography versus Chest Radiography for the Diagnosis of Adult Community-Acquired Pneumonia: Review of the Literature and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiong Ye

    Full Text Available Lung ultrasonography (LUS is being increasingly utilized in emergency and critical settings. We performed a systematic review of the current literature to compare the accuracy of LUS and chest radiography (CR for the diagnosis of adult community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. We searched in Pub Med, EMBASE dealing with both LUS and CR for diagnosis of adult CAP, and conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of LUS in comparison with CR. The diagnostic standard that the index test compared was the hospital discharge diagnosis or the result of chest computed tomography scan as a "gold standard". We calculated pooled sensitivity and specificity using the Mantel-Haenszel method and pooled diagnostic odds ratio using the DerSimonian-Laird method. Five articles met our inclusion criteria and were included in the final analysis. Using hospital discharge diagnosis as reference, LUS had a pooled sensitivity of 0.95 (0.93-0.97 and a specificity of 0.90 (0.86 to 0.94, CR had a pooled sensitivity of 0.77 (0.73 to 0.80 and a specificity of 0.91 (0.87 to 0.94. LUS and CR compared with computed tomography scan in 138 patients in total, the Z statistic of the two summary receiver operating characteristic was 3.093 (P = 0.002, the areas under the curve for LUS and CR were 0.901 and 0.590, respectively. Our study indicates that LUS can help to diagnosis adult CAP by clinicians and the accuracy was better compared with CR using chest computed tomography scan as the gold standard.

  13. Development of a risk-adjusted in-hospital mortality prediction model for community-acquired pneumonia: a retrospective analysis using a Japanese administrative database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uematsu, Hironori; Kunisawa, Susumu; Sasaki, Noriko; Ikai, Hiroshi; Imanaka, Yuichi

    2014-12-16

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common cause of patient hospitalization and death, and its burden on the healthcare system is increasing in aging societies. Here, we develop and internally validate risk-adjustment models and scoring systems for predicting mortality in CAP patients to enable more precise measurements of hospital performance. Using a multicenter administrative claims database, we analyzed 35,297 patients hospitalized for CAP who had been discharged between April 1, 2012 and September 30, 2013 from 303 acute care hospitals in Japan. We developed hierarchical logistic regression models to analyze predictors of in-hospital mortality, and validated the models using the bootstrap method. Discrimination of the models was assessed using c-statistics. Additionally, we developed scoring systems based on predictors identified in the regression models. The 30-day in-hospital mortality rate was 5.8%. Predictors of in-hospital mortality included advanced age, high blood urea nitrogen level or dehydration, orientation disturbance, respiratory failure, low blood pressure, high C-reactive protein levels or high degree of pneumonic infiltration, cancer, and use of mechanical ventilation or vasopressors. Our models showed high levels of discrimination for mortality prediction, with a c-statistic of 0.89 (95% confidence interval: 0.89-0.90) in the bootstrap-corrected model. The scoring system based on 8 selected variables also showed good discrimination, with a c-statistic of 0.87 (95% confidence interval: 0.86-0.88). Our mortality prediction models using administrative data showed good discriminatory power in CAP patients. These risk-adjustment models may support improvements in quality of care through accurate hospital evaluations and inter-hospital comparisons.

  14. Are third-generation cephalosporins unavoidable for empirical therapy of community-acquired pneumonia in adult patients who require ICU admission? A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariri, Geoffroy; Tankovic, Jacques; Boëlle, Pierre-Yves; Dubée, Vincent; Leblanc, Guillaume; Pichereau, Claire; Bourcier, Simon; Bigé, Naike; Baudel, Jean-Luc; Galbois, Arnaud; Ait-Oufella, Hafid; Maury, Eric

    2017-12-01

    Third-generation cephalosporins (3GCs) are recommended for empirical antibiotic therapy of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in patients requiring ICU admission. However, their extensive use could promote the emergence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases-producing Enterobacteriaceae. Our aim was to assess whether the use of 3GCs in patients with CAP requiring ICU admission was justified. We assessed all patients with CAP who required ICU admission during a 7-year period. We recorded empirical and definitive antibiotic therapies and susceptibility of causative pathogens. Amoxicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanate (A/C) susceptibilities as well as amikacin susceptibility of A/C-resistant strains were recorded. From January 2007 to March 2014, 391 patients were included in the study. Empirical 3GCs were used in 215 patients (55%). Among 267 patients with microbiologically documented CAP (68%), 241 received a beta-lactam as definitive therapy, and of those, 3CGs were chosen for 43 patients (18%). Amoxicillin or A/C was active against isolated pathogens in 159 patients (66%), while 39 patients (16%) required a beta-lactam with a broader spectrum than 3GCs. Ninety-four per cent of A/C-resistant strains were amikacin susceptible. In ICU patients with CAP, 3GCs given on an empirical basis are changed, according to microbiological documentation, for another beta-lactam in 82% of cases especially to A/C in the absence of resistance risk factor. In patients evidencing risk factors for A/C-resistant strains infection, 3GCs or antipseudomonal beta-lactams including carbapenem associated with amikacin in the most severe patients seem a relevant empirical antibiotic therapy. This strategy could decrease 3GCs' use.

  15. The National Early Warning Score (NEWS) for outcome prediction in emergency department patients with community-acquired pneumonia: results from a 6-year prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbiti-Rohr, Diana; Kutz, Alexander; Christ-Crain, Mirjam; Thomann, Robert; Zimmerli, Werner; Hoess, Claus; Henzen, Christoph; Mueller, Beat; Schuetz, Philipp

    2016-09-28

    To investigate the accuracy of the National Early Warning Score (NEWS) to predict mortality and adverse clinical outcomes for patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) compared to standard risk scores such as the pneumonia severity index (PSI) and CURB-65. Secondary analysis of patients included in a previous randomised-controlled trial with a median follow-up of 6.1 years. Patients with CAP included on admission to the emergency departments (ED) of 6 tertiary care hospitals in Switzerland. A total of 925 patients with confirmed CAP were included. NEWS, PSI and CURB-65 scores were calculated on admission to the ED based on admission data. Our primary outcome was all-cause mortality within 6 years of follow-up. Secondary outcomes were adverse clinical outcome defined as intensive care unit (ICU) admission, empyema and unplanned hospital readmission all occurring within 30 days after admission. We used regression models to study associations of baseline risk scores and outcomes with the area under the receiver operating curve (AUC) as a measure of discrimination. 6-year overall mortality was 45.1% (n=417) with a stepwise increase with higher NEWS categories. For 30 day and 6-year mortality prediction, NEWS showed only low discrimination (AUC 0.65 and 0.60) inferior compared to PSI and CURB-65. For prediction of ICU admission, NEWS showed moderate discrimination (AUC 0.73) and improved the prognostic accuracy of a regression model, including PSI (AUC from 0.66 to 0.74, p=0.001) and CURB-65 (AUC from 0.64 to 0.73, p=0.015). NEWS was also superior to PSI and CURB-65 for prediction of empyema, but did not well predict rehospitalisation. NEWS provides additional prognostic information with regard to risk of ICU admission and complications and thereby improves traditional clinical-risk scores in the management of patients with CAP in the ED setting. ISRCTN95122877; Post-results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not

  16. [Diagnostic value of serum procalcitonin in identifying the etiology of non-responding community-acquired pneumonia after initial antibiotic therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Xiaoju; Wu, Jizhen; Zhang, Wenping; Kuang, Hongyan; Li, Xiao; Xuan, Weixia; Wang, Kai; Ma, Lijun

    2014-11-01

    This study was to investigate the diagnostic value of serum procalcitonin(PCT) in identifying the etiology of non-responding community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) after initial antibiotic therapy. A retrospective analysis was performed for 232 hospitalized CAP patients admitted to the People's Hospital of Zhengzhou University during June 2013 and January 2014. Early treatment failure was defined as the presence of persistent fever (>38 °C) and/or clinical symptoms (malaise, cough, expectoration, dyspnea) or deterioration after at least 72 h of initial antimicrobial treatment, or development of respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation, or septic shock. Bronchoscopy or transthoracic lung biopsy was performed in case of early treatment failure when indicated. Serum level of PCT was detected by double antibody sandwich method. The differences between 2 or more groups were compared using 2-independent student t test, one-way ANOVA; Mann-Whitney U test, Kruskal-Wallis rank sum test, or χ(2) test. Risk factors and odds ratios for nonresponsiveness were analyzed by setting up a Logistic regression model. The diagnostic values of PCT were determined by receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC curves). Of the 232 CAP patients enrolled, 124 were male and 108 were female, with an average age of (46 ± 20) years. Thirty-six patients failed to respond to the initial antibiotic therapy. As shown by Logistic regression analysis, the risk factors for treatment failure included hypoalbuminemia, type 2 diabetes, previous history of splenectomy , PSI 4-5 grade, and lung infiltration ≥ 3 lobes. The most common causes of non-responsiveness were antimicrobial insufficiency (n = 23), and misdiagnosis of noninfectious mimics of pneumonia (n = 11), with 2 cases of unidentified etiology. The serum PCT level in admission was 0.19 (0.07-0.66) µg/L in the antimicrobial insufficiency subgroup, which was significantly higher than that in the misdiagnosis subgroup [0

  17. Early fiberoptic bronchoscopy during non-invasive ventilation in patients with decompensated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease due to community-acquired-pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scala, Raffaele; Naldi, Mario; Maccari, Uberto

    2010-01-01

    Inefficient clearance of copious respiratory secretion is a cause of non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) failure, especially in chronic respiratory patients with community-acquired-pneumonia (CAP) and impaired consciousness. We postulated that in such a clinical scenario, when intubation and conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV) are strongly recommended, the suction of secretions with fiberoptic bronchoscopy (FBO) may increase the chance of NPPV success. The objective of this pilot study was, firstly, to verify the safety and effectiveness of early FBO during NPPV and, secondly, to compare the hospital outcomes of this strategy versus a CMV-based strategy in patients with decompensated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) due to CAP who are not appropriate candidates for NPPV because of inefficient mucous clearance and hypercapnic encephalopathy (HE). This is a 12-month prospective matched case-control study performed in one respiratory semi-intensive care unit (RSICU) with expertise in NPPV and in one intensive care unit (ICU). Fifteen acutely decompensated COPD patients with copious secretion retention and HE due to CAP undergoing NPPV in RSICU, and 15 controls (matched for arterial blood gases, acute physiology and chronic health evaluation score III, Kelly-Matthay scale, pneumonia extension and severity) receiving CMV in the ICU were studied. Two hours of NPPV significantly improved arterial blood gases, Kelly and cough efficiency scores without FBO-related complications. NPPV avoided intubation in 12/15 patients (80%). Improvement in arterial blood gases was similar in the two groups, except for a greater PaO2/fraction of inspired oxygen ratio with CMV. The rates of overall and septic complications, and of tracheostomy were lower in the NPPV group (20%, 20%, and 0%) versus the CMV group (80%, 60%, and 40%; P < 0.05). Hospital mortality, duration of hospitalisation and duration of ventilation were similar in the two groups. In patients

  18. Pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Coelho, Liana Sousa [UNESP; Do Vale, Simone Alves [UNESP; Godoy, Irma de [UNESP; Tanni, Suzana Erico [UNESP

    2012-01-01

    Pneumonia is an infectious disease with great morbidity and mortality worldwide. According to the current guidelines recommendations the authors reviewed the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and health care-associated pneumonia (HCAP). In this paper will be also presented data about etiology, clinics and diagnostic tools. © Copyright Moreira Jr. Editora.

  19. Pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Coelho, Liana Sousa [UNESP; Tanni, Suzana Erico; Godoy, Irma de [UNESP

    2009-01-01

    Pneumonia is an infectious disease with great morbidity and mortality worldwide. According to the current guidelines recommendations the authors reviewed the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP). In this paper will be presented data about etiology, clinics and diagnostic tools. © Copyright Moreira Jr. Editora.

  20. Efficacy and Safety of Adjunctive Corticosteroids Therapy for Severe Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Adults: An Updated Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Jirui; Yang, Jin; Wang, Ying; Yao, Cijiang; Mei, Jing; Liu, Ying; Cao, Jiyu; Lu, Youjin

    2016-01-01

    Adjunctive corticosteroids therapy is an attractive option for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) treatment. However, the effectiveness of adjunctive corticosteroids on mortality of CAP remains inconsistent, especially in severe CAP. We performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the efficacy and safety of adjunctive corticosteroids in severe CAP patients. Three databases of PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane Library were searched for related studies published in English up to December, 2015. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of corticosteroids in hospitalized adults with severe CAP were included. Meta-analysis was performed by a random-effect model with STATA 11.0 software. We estimated the summary risk ratios (RRs) or effect size (ES) with its corresponding 95% confidence interval (95%CI) to assess the outcomes. We included 8 RCTs enrolling 528 severe CAP patients. Adjunctive corticosteroids significantly reduced all-cause mortality (RR = 0.46, 95%CI: 0.28 to 0.77, p = 0.003), risk of adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) (RR = 0.23, 95%CI: 0.07 to 0.80, p = 0.02) and need for mechanical ventilation (RR = 0.50, 95%CI: 0.27 to 0.92, p = 0.026). Adjunctive corticosteroids did not increase frequency of hyperglycemia requiring treatment (RR = 1.03, 95%CI: 0.61 to 1.72, p = 0.91) or gastrointestinal hemorrhage (RR = 0.66, 95%CI: 0.19 to 2.31, p = 0.52). In subgroup analysis by duration of corticosteroids, we found that prolonged corticosteroids therapy significantly reduced all-cause mortality (RR = 0.41, 95%CI: 0.20 to 0.83, p = 0.01) and length of hospital stay (-4.76 days, 95% CI:-8.13 to -1.40, p = 0.006). Results from this meta-analysis suggested that adjunctive corticosteroids therapy was safe and beneficial for severe CAP. In addition, prolonged corticosteroids therapy was more effective. These results should be confirmed by adequately powered studies in the future.

  1. Risk of community-acquired pneumonia in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease stratified by smoking status: a population-based cohort study in the United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braeken DCW

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Dionne CW Braeken,1–3 Gernot GU Rohde,2 Frits ME Franssen,1,2 Johanna HM Driessen,3–5 Tjeerd P van Staa,3,6 Patrick C Souverein,3 Emiel FM Wouters,1,2 Frank de Vries3,4,7 1Department of Research and Education, CIRO, Horn, 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, Maastricht University Medical Centre (MUMC+, Maastricht, 3Division of Pharmacoepidemiology and Clinical Pharmacology, Utrecht Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Utrecht, 4Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Toxicology, Maastricht University Medical Centre (MUMC+, Maastricht, 5Department of Epidemiology, Care and Public Health Research Institute (CAPHRI, Maastricht, the Netherlands; 6Department of Health eResearch, University of Manchester, Manchester, 7MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton, UK Background: Smoking increases the risk of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP and is associated with the development of COPD. Until now, it is unclear whether CAP in COPD is due to smoking-related effects, or due to COPD pathophysiology itself. Objective: To evaluate the association between COPD and CAP by smoking status. Methods: In total, 62,621 COPD and 191,654 control subjects, matched by year of birth, gender and primary care practice, were extracted from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (2005–2014. Incidence rates (IRs were estimated by dividing the total number of CAP cases by the cumulative person-time at risk. Time-varying Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate the hazard ratios (HRs for CAP in COPD patients versus controls. HRs of CAP by smoking status were calculated by stratified analyses in COPD patients versus controls and within both subgroups with never smoking as reference. Results: IRs of CAP in COPD patients (32.00/1,000 person-years and controls (6.75/1,000 person-years increased with age and female gender. The risk of CAP in COPD patients was higher than in controls (HR 4.51, 95% CI: 4.27–4.77. Current smoking

  2. A survey of clinicians regarding respiratory physiotherapy intervention for intubated and mechanically ventilated patients with community-acquired pneumonia. What is current practice in Australian ICUs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Lee, Lisa; Hill, Anne-Marie; Patman, Shane

    2017-08-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common cause for intensive care unit (ICU) admission resulting in high morbidity and mortality. There is a paucity of evidence regarding respiratory physiotherapy for intubated and mechanically ventilated patients with CAP, and anecdotally clinical practice is variable in this cohort. The aims of this study were to identify the degree of variability in physiotherapy practice for intubated adult patients with CAP and to explore ICU physiotherapist perceptions of current practice for this cohort and factors that influence physiotherapy treatment mode, duration, and frequency. A survey was developed based on common aspects of assessment, clinical rationale, and intervention for intubated and mechanically ventilated patients. Senior ICU physiotherapists across 88 Australian public and private hospitals were recruited. The response rate was 72%. Respondents (n = 75) stated their main rationale for providing a respiratory intervention were improved airway clearance (98%, n = 60/61), alveolar recruitment (74%, n = 45/61), and gas exchange (33%, n = 20/61). Respondents estimated that average intervention lasted between 16 and 30 minutes (70% of respondents, n = 41/59) and would be delivered once (44%) or twice (44%) daily. Results indicated large variability in reported practice; however, trends existed regarding positioning in alternate side-lying (81%, n = 52/64) or affected lung uppermost (83%, n = 53/64) and use of hyperinflation techniques (81%, 52/64). Decisions regarding duration were reported to be based on sputum volume (95%), viscosity (93%) and purulence (88%), cough effectiveness (95%), chest X-ray (87%), and auscultation (84%). Sixty percent reported that workload and staffing affected intervention duration and frequency. Intervention time was more likely increased when there was greater staffing (P = .03). Respiratory physiotherapy treatment varies for intubated patients with CAP. Further research is

  3. Prevalence and correlates of treatment failure among Kenyan children hospitalised with severe community-acquired pneumonia: a prospective study of the clinical effectiveness of WHO pneumonia case management guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agweyu, Ambrose; Kibore, Minnie; Digolo, Lina; Kosgei, Caroline; Maina, Virginia; Mugane, Samson; Muma, Sarah; Wachira, John; Waiyego, Mary; Maleche-Obimbo, Elizabeth

    2014-11-01

    To determine the extent and pattern of treatment failure (TF) among children hospitalised with community-acquired pneumonia at a large tertiary hospital in Kenya. We followed up children aged 2-59 months with WHO-defined severe pneumonia (SP) and very severe pneumonia (VSP) for up to 5 days for TF using two definitions: (i) documentation of pre-defined clinical signs resulting in change of treatment (ii) primary clinician's decision to change treatment with or without documentation of the same pre-defined clinical signs. We enrolled 385 children. The risk of TF varied between 1.8% (95% CI 0.4-5.1) and 12.4% (95% CI 7.9-18.4) for SP and 21.4% (95% CI 15.9-27) and 39.3% (95% CI 32.5-46.4) for VSP depending on the definition applied. Higher rates were associated with early changes in therapy by clinician in the absence of an obvious clinical rationale. Non-adherence to treatment guidelines was observed for 70/169 (41.4%) and 67/201 (33.3%) of children with SP and VSP, respectively. Among children with SP, adherence to treatment guidelines was associated with the presence of wheeze on initial assessment (P = 0.02), while clinician non-adherence to guideline-recommended treatments for VSP tended to occur in children with altered consciousness (P < 0.001). Using propensity score matching to account for imbalance in the distribution of baseline clinical characteristics among children with VSP revealed no difference in TF between those treated with the guideline-recommended regimen vs. more costly broad-spectrum alternatives [risk difference 0.37 (95% CI -0.84 to 0.51)]. Before revising current pneumonia case management guidelines, standardised definitions of TF and appropriate studies of treatment effectiveness of alternative regimens are required. © 2014 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Atypical pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walking pneumonia; Community-acquired pneumonia - atypical ... Bacteria that cause atypical pneumonia include: Mycoplasma pneumonia is caused by the bacteria Mycoplasma pneumoniae . It often affects people younger than age 40. Pneumonia due ...

  5. Some Characteristics of Patients with Community Acquired ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is a dearth of studies relating the information from the history of patients with community-acquired pneumonia to the mortality of the disease. The relationship between age, sex, occupation, marital status, smoking history, alcohol use, concomitant COPD / bronchial asthma, source of referral and the mortality of patients ...

  6. Are pre-existing markers of chronic kidney disease associated with short-term mortality following acute community-acquired pneumonia and sepsis? A cohort study among older people with diabetes using electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Helen I; Nitsch, Dorothea; Millett, Elizabeth R C; Sinclair, Alan; Thomas, Sara L

    2015-06-01

    We aimed to examine whether pre-existing impaired estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and proteinuria were associated with mortality following community-acquired pneumonia or sepsis among people aged ≥ 65 years with diabetes mellitus, without end-stage renal disease. Patients were followed up from onset of first community-acquired pneumonia or sepsis episode in a cohort study using large, linked electronic health databases. Follow-up was for up to 90 days, unlimited by hospital discharge. We used generalized linear models with log link, normal distribution and robust standard errors to calculate risk ratios (RRs) for all-cause 28- and 90-day mortality according to two markers of chronic kidney disease: eGFR and proteinuria. All-cause mortality among the 4743 patients with pneumonia was 29.6% after 28 days and 37.4% after 90 days. Among the 1058 patients with sepsis, all-cause 28- and 90-day mortality were 35.6 and 44.2%, respectively. eGFR pneumonia (RR 1.27: 95% CI 1.12-1.43) and sepsis (RR 1.32: 95% CI 1.07-1.64), adjusted for age, sex, socio-economic status, smoking status and co-morbidities. Neither moderately impaired eGFR nor proteinuria were associated with short-term mortality following either infection. People with pre-existing low eGFR but not on dialysis are at higher risk of death following pneumonia and sepsis. This association was not explained by existing co-morbidities. These patients need to be carefully monitored to prevent modifiable causes of death. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA.

  7. Summary of Canadian Guidelines for the Initial Management of Community-Acquired Pneumonia: An Evidence-Based Update by the Canadian Infectious Diseases Society and the Canadian Thoracic Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lionel A Mandell

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is a serious illness with a significant impact on individual patients and society as a whole. Over the past several years, there have been significant advances in our knowledge and understanding of the etiology of the disease, and an appreciation of problems such as mixed infections and increasing antimicrobial resistance. The development of additional fluoroquinolone agents with enhanced activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae has been important as well. It was decided that the time had come to update and modify the previous CAP guidelines, which were published in 1993. The current guidelines represent a joint effort by the Canadian Infectious Disease Society and the Canadian Thoracic Society, and they address the etiology, diagnosis and initial management of CAP. The diagnostic section is based on the site of care, and the treatment section is organized according to whether one is dealing with outpatients, inpatients or nursing home patients.

  8. Summary of Canadian Guidelines for the Initial Management of Community-Acquired Pneumonia: An Evidence-Based Update by the Canadian Infectious Disease Society and the Canadian Thoracic Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lionel A Mandell

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is a serious illness with a significant impact on individual patients and society as a whole. Over the past several years, there have been significant advances in the knowledge and understanding of the etiology of the disease, and an appreciation of problems such as mixed infections and increasing antimicrobial resistance. The development of additional fluoroquinolone agents with enhanced activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae has been important as well. It was decided that the time had come to update and modify the previous CAP guidelines, which were published in 1993. The current guidelines represent a joint effort by the Canadian Infectious Diseases Society and the Canadian Thoracic Society, and they address the etiology, diagnosis and initial management of CAP. The diagnostic section is based on the site of care, and the treatment section is organized according to whether one is dealing with outpatients, inpatients or nursing home patients.

  9. The Usefulness of Confusion, Urea, Respiratory Rate, and Shock Index or Adjusted Shock Index Criteria in Predicting Combined Mortality and/or ICU Admission Compared to CURB-65 in Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtain, James P.; Sankaran, Prasanna; Kamath, Ajay V.; Myint, Phyo K.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives. The study aims to assess the usefulness of age-independent criteria CURSI and temperature adjusted CURSI (CURASI) compared to CURB-65 in predicting community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) mortality. The criteria, CRSI and CRASI, were adapted for use in primary care and compared to CRB-65. Methods. A retrospective analysis of a prospectively identified cohort of community-acquired pneumonia inpatients was conducted. Outcomes were (1) mortality and (2) mortality and/or ICU admission within six weeks. Results. 95 patients (median age = 61 years) were included. All three criteria had similar sensitivity in predicting mortality alone, with CURB-65 having slightly higher specificity. When predicting mortality and/or intensive care admission, CURSI/CURASI showed higher sensitivity and slightly lower specificity. CRSI and CRASI had higher sensitivity and lower specificity when compared with CRB-65 for predicting both primary and secondary outcomes. Results for both analyses had P values >0.05. Conclusions. In a cohort of younger patients CURSI and adjusted CURSI perform at least as well as CURB-65, with a similar trend for CRSI and adjusted CRSI compared to CRB-65. Further studies are needed in different age groups and in primary and secondary care settings. PMID:24024203

  10. The Usefulness of Confusion, Urea, Respiratory Rate, and Shock Index or Adjusted Shock Index Criteria in Predicting Combined Mortality and/or ICU Admission Compared to CURB-65 in Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P. Curtain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives. The study aims to assess the usefulness of age-independent criteria CURSI and temperature adjusted CURSI (CURASI compared to CURB-65 in predicting community-acquired pneumonia (CAP mortality. The criteria, CRSI and CRASI, were adapted for use in primary care and compared to CRB-65. Methods. A retrospective analysis of a prospectively identified cohort of community-acquired pneumonia inpatients was conducted. Outcomes were (1 mortality and (2 mortality and/or ICU admission within six weeks. Results. 95 patients (median age = 61 years were included. All three criteria had similar sensitivity in predicting mortality alone, with CURB-65 having slightly higher specificity. When predicting mortality and/or intensive care admission, CURSI/CURASI showed higher sensitivity and slightly lower specificity. CRSI and CRASI had higher sensitivity and lower specificity when compared with CRB-65 for predicting both primary and secondary outcomes. Results for both analyses had P values >0.05. Conclusions. In a cohort of younger patients CURSI and adjusted CURSI perform at least as well as CURB-65, with a similar trend for CRSI and adjusted CRSI compared to CRB-65. Further studies are needed in different age groups and in primary and secondary care settings.

  11. CPD: Atypical pathogens and challenges in community-acquired ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Atypical organisms such as Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae, and Legionella pneumophila are implicated in up to 40 percent of cases of community-acquired pneumonia. Antibiotic treatment is empiric and includes coverage for both typical and atypical organisms. Doxycycline, a fluoroquinolone with ...

  12. Fatores associados às complicações em crianças pré-escolares com pneumonia adquirida na comunidade Factors associated with complications of community-acquired pneumonia in preschool children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pollyana Garcia Amorim

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Identificar os fatores socioeconômicos e clínicos associados à evolução para complicações em crianças internadas com pneumonia adquirida na comunidade (PAC. MÉTODOS: Estudo longitudinal prospectivo em crianças diagnosticadas com PAC (12-59 meses de idade internadas em enfermarias gerais de pediatria de dois hospitais na região de Campinas (SP. Os critérios de exclusão foram ter fibrose cística, cardiopatia, malformação pulmonar, neuropatias e doenças genéticas. PAC foi diagnosticada por características clínicas e radiológicas. Os dados foram coletados dos prontuários médicos e por um questionário semiestruturado. Os sujeitos foram divididos em dois grupos (PAC complicada e não complicada. Foram comparadas variáveis socioeconômicas e clínicas, e foi realizada análise de regressão logística multivariada. RESULTADOS: Das 63 crianças incluídas, 29 e 34, respectivamente, apresentaram PAC não complicada e PAC complicada. Não houve diferenças estatisticamente significantes entre os grupos quanto a idade na admissão, idade gestacional, peso ao nascer, gênero ou variáveis socioeconômicas. Houve diferenças significantes entre os grupos em relação a pneumonia anterior (p = 0,03, antibioticoterapia prévia (p = 0,004, tempo de início da doença (p = 0,01, duração da febre antes da internação (p OBJECTIVE: To identify socioeconomic factors and clinical factors associated with the development of complications in preschool children hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. METHODS: This was a prospective longitudinal study involving children (12-59 months of age diagnosed with CAP and admitted to the pediatric wards of two hospitals in the metropolitan area of Campinas, Brazil. Children with cystic fibrosis, heart disease, pulmonary malformations, neurological disorders, or genetic diseases were excluded. The diagnosis of CAP was based on clinical and radiological findings. Data were

  13. Prevalence and correlates of treatment failure among Kenyan children hospitalised with severe community-acquired pneumonia: a prospective study of the clinical effectiveness of WHO pneumonia case management guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agweyu, Ambrose; Kibore, Minnie; Digolo, Lina; Kosgei, Caroline; Maina, Virginia; Mugane, Samson; Muma, Sarah; Wachira, John; Waiyego, Mary; Maleche-Obimbo, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the extent and pattern of treatment failure (TF) among children hospitalised with community-acquired pneumonia at a large tertiary hospital in Kenya. Methods We followed up children aged 2–59 months with WHO-defined severe pneumonia (SP) and very severe pneumonia (VSP) for up to 5 days for TF using two definitions: (i) documentation of pre-defined clinical signs resulting in change of treatment (ii) primary clinician's decision to change treatment with or without documentation of the same pre-defined clinical signs. Results We enrolled 385 children. The risk of TF varied between 1.8% (95% CI 0.4–5.1) and 12.4% (95% CI 7.9–18.4) for SP and 21.4% (95% CI 15.9–27) and 39.3% (95% CI 32.5–46.4) for VSP depending on the definition applied. Higher rates were associated with early changes in therapy by clinician in the absence of an obvious clinical rationale. Non-adherence to treatment guidelines was observed for 70/169 (41.4%) and 67/201 (33.3%) of children with SP and VSP, respectively. Among children with SP, adherence to treatment guidelines was associated with the presence of wheeze on initial assessment (P = 0.02), while clinician non-adherence to guideline-recommended treatments for VSP tended to occur in children with altered consciousness (P tratamiento (FT) en niños hospitalizados con una neumonía adquirida en la comunidad, ingresados en un gran hospital terciario de Kenia. Métodos Hemos seguido a niños con edades entre los 2-59 meses con una neumonía severa (NS) y neumonía muy severa (NMS) según definición de la OMS de hasta cinco días para FT utilizando dos definiciones: (a) documentación de signos clínicos pre-definidos que resultaron en un cambio de tratamiento (b) decisión del clínico principal de cambiar el tratamiento con o sin documentación de los mismos signos clínicos pre-definidos. Resultados Incluimos a 385 niños. El riesgo de FT varió entre un 1.8% (IC 95% 0.4 a 5.1) y 12.4% (IC 95% 7.9 a 18

  14. DEMONSTRATION OF CIRCULATING PNEUMOCOCCAL IMMUNOGLOBULIN-G IMMUNE-COMPLEXES IN PATIENTS WITH COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA BY MEANS OF AN ENZYME-LINKED-IMMUNOSORBENT-ASSAY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HOLLOWAY, Y; SNIJDER, JAM; BOERSMA, WG

    1993-01-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was developed for quantitation of circulating immune complexes (CICs) containing specific antipneumococcal immunoglobulin G (IgG). These CICs were detected in 17 (85%) of 20 patients with bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia, 4 (36.4%) of 11 patients with probable

  15. Pneumonia adquirida na comunidade em pacientes tratados ambulatorialmente: aspectos epidemiológicos, clínicos e radiológicos das pneumonias atípicas e não atípicas Community-acquired pneumonia in outpatients: epidemiological, clinical and radiographic features between atypical and non-atypical pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROSALI TEIXEIRA ROCHA

    2000-02-01

    apresentação clínica e a radiológica são similares nos dois grupos.Aim: To evaluated the etiologic percentage of the atypical pneumoniae in outpatients and to identify the epidemiologic, clinical and radiographic features that permit to distinguish between atypical and non-atypical pneumonia. Methods: All patients underwent clinical and radiographic evaluation. Serum and sputum samples were obtained to serological tests including Legionella sp, Chlamydia sp, M. pneumoniae, Influenza A and Influenza B virus, and Gram stain, respectively. These procedures were performed on the first and 21 days after inclusion. Three independent observers reviewed chest X-rays. Results: During 22 months, 129 patients were evaluated. The final population under study comprised 69 patients (46 men ¾ 23 women with a mean age of 37 years. The etiologic diagnosis was defined in 34 (50% of the patients. Etiologic agents included Chlamydia sp, 11 (16% isolated cases; M. pneumoniae 7 (10% cases. Influenza A was the third more frequent agent in 4 (6% patients, and Legionella sp in 4 (6%. Mixed infections were observed with association of Chlamydia sp and M. pneumoniae in 5 (7.3% cases, Chlamydia sp and Influenza B one (1.5% case, and another of M. pneumoniae and Influenza A. The atypical pneumonia and non-atypical pneumonia groups were compared to respiratory symptoms and signs. There were no differences between them. The three independent observers' radiographic evaluation showed disagreement among them as to the type of pneumonia. Radiographic diagnoses of individual observers were compared to the clinical diagnoses, and no significant association was obtained for any observer. Conclusion: Pneumonia caused by "atypical" agents occurs in 50% of the outpatients with community acquired pneumonia. It is not possible to distinguish atypical pneumonia from non-atypical pneumonia. The clinical and radiographic presentations are similar in both groups.

  16. Trend in Antibiotic Resistance of Streptococcus Pneumoniae and Haemophilus Influenzae Strains Isolated from Community Acquired Respiratory Tract Infections in Dakar, Senegal Between 2005 and 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Guèye Ndiaye

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Development of antibiotic resistance among common respiratory pathogens is a major cause of concern worldwide. Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae are among the most common respiratory pathogens. In this study, representative samples obtained from 3 different medical centers in Dakar, Senegal were subjected to antibiotic susceptibility testing. The samples were collected from 2005 to 2008 and the data obtained was compared to establish resistance patterns between the two years (i.e. 2005–2006 to 2007–2008. S. pneumoniae exhibited a significant increase in the resistance to azithromycin and the intermediate susceptibility to penicillin G and cotrimoxazole. H. influenzae also exhibited a significant increase in resistance to azithromycin and intermediate susceptibility to chloramphenicol. None of H. influenzae samples were resistant to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, cephalosporin and fluroquinolones and most of the S. pneumoniae isolates demonstrated high susceptibility to the antibiotics tested. Results from this study will provide greater insights to antibiotic therapy during respiratory tract infections in Dakar, Senegal. This study also establishes the importance of continuous monitoring of antibiotic susceptibility patterns that are often region-specific.

  17. Prevención de la neumonía adquirida en la comunidad PREVENTION OF COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA IN ADULTS

    OpenAIRE

    Manuel Barros M.; Claudia Cartagena S.; Luis Bavestrello F.

    2005-01-01

    La vacuna anti neumocóccica polivalente disponible desde 1983 incluye 23 serotipos de Streptococcus pneumoniae, que representan cerca de 90% de las cepas que ocasionan enfermedad neumocóccica invasora en adultos inmunocompetentes. La vacuna confiere protección contra la enfermedad neumocóccica invasora. Se recomienda vacunar a los adultos sanos sobre 65 años de edad, portadores de enfermedades crónicas (cardiopatías, EPOC, nefropatías, diabetes mellitus, cirrosis hepática, pérdida crónica de ...

  18. Population PK Modeling and Target Attainment Simulations to Support Dosing of Ceftaroline Fosamil in Pediatric Patients With Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections and Community-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccobene, Todd A; Khariton, Tatiana; Knebel, William; Das, Shampa; Li, James; Jandourek, Alena; Carrothers, Timothy J; Bradley, John S

    2017-03-01

    Ceftaroline, the active form of the prodrug ceftaroline fosamil, is approved for use in adults with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) or acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) in the United States and for similar indications in Europe. Pharmacokinetic (PK) data from 5 pediatric (birth to PK data from adults to update a population PK model for ceftaroline and ceftaroline fosamil. This model, based on a data set including 305 children, was used to conduct simulations to estimate ceftaroline exposures and percentage of time that free drug concentrations were above the minimum inhibitory concentration (%fT>MIC) for pediatric dose regimens. With dose regimens of 8 mg/kg every 8 hours (q8h) in children aged 2 months to 90% of children were predicted to achieve a target of 36% fT>MIC at an MIC of 2 mg/L, and >97% were predicted to achieve 44% fT>MIC at an MIC of 1 mg/L. Thus, high PK/pharmacodynamic target attainment would be maintained in children for targets associated with 1-log kill of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae. The predicted ceftaroline exposures for these dose regimens were similar to those in adults given 600 mg q12h ceftaroline fosamil. This work contributed to the approval of dose regimens for children aged 2 months to <18 years by the FDA and EMA, which are presented. © 2016, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  19. Procalcitonin for selecting the antibiotic regimen in outpatients with low-risk community-acquired pneumonia using a rapid point-of-care testing: A single-arm clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mar Masiá

    Full Text Available We aimed to assess the role of procalcitonin (PCT to guide the initial selection of the antibiotic regimen for low-risk community-acquired pneumonia (CAP.A single-arm clinical trial was conducted including outpatients with CAP and Pneumonia Severity Index risk classes I-II. Antimicrobial selection was based on the results of PCT measured with a rapid point-of-care testing. According to serum PCT levels, patients were assigned to two treatment strategies: oral azithromycin if PCT was <0.5 ng/ml, or levofloxacin if levels were ≥0.5 ng/ml. Primary outcome was clinical cure rate. Short-term and long-term outcomes were assessed. Results were compared with those of a historical standard-of-care control-group treated in our centre.Of 253 subjects included, 216 (85.4% were assigned to azithromycin. Pneumococcal infection was diagnosed in 26 (12% and 21 (56.8% patients allocated to azithromycin and levofloxacin groups, respectively. No patients in the azithromycin group developed bacteraemia. Atypical organisms were more common in patients given azithromycin (18.5% vs 8.1%, respectively. The majority (93% of patients with atypical pneumonia had low PCT levels. Clinical cure rates were 95.8% in the azithromycin group, 94.6% in the levofloxacin group, and 94.4% in the historical control group. No 30-day mortality or recurrences were observed, and the 3-year rates of recurrence and mortality were very low in both groups. Adverse events occurrence was also infrequent.A PCT-guided strategy with a rapid point-of-care testing safely allowed selecting empirical narrow-spectrum antibiotics in outpatients with CAP.The study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02600806.

  20. Procalcitonin for selecting the antibiotic regimen in outpatients with low-risk community-acquired pneumonia using a rapid point-of-care testing: A single-arm clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masiá, Mar; Padilla, Sergio; Ortiz de la Tabla, Victoria; González, Matilde; Bas, Cristina; Gutiérrez, Félix

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to assess the role of procalcitonin (PCT) to guide the initial selection of the antibiotic regimen for low-risk community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). A single-arm clinical trial was conducted including outpatients with CAP and Pneumonia Severity Index risk classes I-II. Antimicrobial selection was based on the results of PCT measured with a rapid point-of-care testing. According to serum PCT levels, patients were assigned to two treatment strategies: oral azithromycin if PCT was <0.5 ng/ml, or levofloxacin if levels were ≥0.5 ng/ml. Primary outcome was clinical cure rate. Short-term and long-term outcomes were assessed. Results were compared with those of a historical standard-of-care control-group treated in our centre. Of 253 subjects included, 216 (85.4%) were assigned to azithromycin. Pneumococcal infection was diagnosed in 26 (12%) and 21 (56.8%) patients allocated to azithromycin and levofloxacin groups, respectively. No patients in the azithromycin group developed bacteraemia. Atypical organisms were more common in patients given azithromycin (18.5% vs 8.1%, respectively). The majority (93%) of patients with atypical pneumonia had low PCT levels. Clinical cure rates were 95.8% in the azithromycin group, 94.6% in the levofloxacin group, and 94.4% in the historical control group. No 30-day mortality or recurrences were observed, and the 3-year rates of recurrence and mortality were very low in both groups. Adverse events occurrence was also infrequent. A PCT-guided strategy with a rapid point-of-care testing safely allowed selecting empirical narrow-spectrum antibiotics in outpatients with CAP. The study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02600806.

  1. ‘Presenting CXR phenotype of H1N1’ flu compared with contemporaneous non-H1N1, community acquired pneumonia, during pandemic and post-pandemic outbreaks’

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minns, F.C., E-mail: Fiona.Minns@nhslothian.scot.nhs.uk [Department of Radiology, New Royal Infirmary Edinburgh, 51 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh, EH16 4SA (United Kingdom); Nimhuineachain, A, E-mail: draideen@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, New Royal Infirmary Edinburgh, 51 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh, EH16 4SA (United Kingdom); Beek, E.J.R. van, E-mail: Edwin-vanbeek@ed.ac.uk [Clinical Research Imaging Centre, University of Edinburgh, 47 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh, Midlothian EH16 4TJ (United Kingdom); Ritchie, G., E-mail: drgillritchie@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, New Royal Infirmary Edinburgh, 51 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh, EH16 4SA (United Kingdom); Hill, A., E-mail: adam.hill318@nhs.net [Department of Respiratory Medicine, New Royal Infirmary, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Murchison, J.T., E-mail: john.murchison@nhslothian.scot.nhs.uk [Department of Radiology, New Royal Infirmary Edinburgh, 51 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh, EH16 4SA (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Patients with H1N1 pneumonia demonstrated more opacified zones on chest x-ray than patients with non-H1N1 pneumonias. • A particular ‘phenotype’ of chest x-ray changes was identified in H1N1 patients. • This H1N1 ‘phenotype’ was the same for the two evaluated ‘flu seasons, during both pandemic and post pandemic stages. - Abstract: Aims: To review, phenotype and assess potential prognostic value of initial chest X-ray findings in patients with H1N1 influenza during seasonal outbreaks of 2009 and 2010, in comparison with non-H1N1, community acquired pneumonia (CAP). Methods: We retrospectively identified 72 patients admitted to hospital with pneumonia during the seasons of 2009 and 2010. H1N1 cases were confirmed by virology PCR. Presenting chest X-rays were jointly read by 2 radiologists, who were ‘blinded’ to further patient details and divided into 6 zones. Total number of opacified zones, the pattern and distribution of changes and length of hospital stay were recorded. Results: Patients with H1N1 demonstrated more opacified zones (mean of 2.9 compared with 2.0; p = 0.006), which were bilateral in two-thirds compared with a quarter of those with non-H1N1 CAP (p = 0.001). H1N1 radiographs were more likely to be ‘patchy’ versus ‘confluent’ changes of non-H1N1 CAP (p = 0.03) and more often demonstrated peripheral distribution (p = 0.01). H1N1 patients tended to stay in hospital longer (not significant; p = 0.08). A positive correlation existed between number of affected zones and length of inpatient stay, which was statistically significant for the cohorts combined (p = 0.02). The findings were the same for the two evaluated seasons. Conclusion: H1N1 patients demonstrated more extensive disease, which was more likely bilateral, ‘patchy’, and peripheral in distribution. With increasing global cases of H1N1, knowledge of the typical findings of the H1N1 presenting chest X-ray may assist with early triage of patients

  2. Randomized, Double-Blind, Multicenter Phase 2 Study Comparing the Efficacy and Safety of Oral Solithromycin (CEM-101) to Those of Oral Levofloxacin in the Treatment of Patients with Community-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldach, David; Clark, Kay; Schranz, Jennifer; Das, Anita; Craft, J Carl; Scott, Drusilla; Jamieson, Brian D.

    2013-01-01

    Solithromycin, a new macrolide, and the first fluoroketolide in clinical development, with activity against macrolide-resistant bacteria, was tested in 132 patients with moderate to moderately severe community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) in a multicenter, double-blind, randomized phase 2 study. Patients were enrolled and randomized (1:1) to either 800 mg solithromycin orally (PO) on day 1, followed by 400 mg PO daily on days 2 to 5, or 750 mg levofloxacin PO daily on days 1 to 5. Efficacy outcome rates of clinical success at the test-of-cure visit 4 to 11 days after the last dose of study drug were comparable in the intent-to-treat (ITT) (84.6% for solithromycin versus 86.6% for levofloxacin) and microbiological-intent-to-treat (micro-ITT) (77.8% for solithromycin versus 71.4% for levofloxacin) populations. Early response success rates at day 3, defined as improvement in at least two cardinal symptoms of pneumonia, were also comparable (72.3% for solithromycin versus 71.6% for levofloxacin). More patients treated with levofloxacin than with solithromycin experienced treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) during the study (45.6% versus 29.7%). The majority of TEAEs were mild or moderate gastrointestinal symptoms and included nausea (1.6% for solithromycin; 10.3% for levofloxacin), diarrhea (7.8% for solithromycin; 5.9% for levofloxacin), and vomiting (0% for solithromycin; 4.4% for levofloxacin). Six patients, all of whom received levofloxacin, discontinued the study drug due to an adverse event. Solithromycin demonstrated comparable efficacy and favorable safety relative to levofloxacin. These findings support a phase 3 study of solithromycin for the treatment of CABP. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01168713.) PMID:23507282

  3. CURB-65 and SMRT-CO in the prediction of early transfers to the intensive care unit among patients with community-acquired pneumonia initially admitted to a general ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huaman, Moises A; Diaz-Kuan, Alicia; Hegab, Sara; Brar, Indira; Kaatz, Scott

    2011-11-01

    No study has assessed the ability of pneumonia severity scores to identify the risk for early intensive care unit (ICU) transfer in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) admitted to general wards (GW). We aimed to compare the ability of CURB-65 (confusion, urea level, respiratory rate, blood pressure, and age ≥65 years) and SMRT-CO (systolic blood pressure, multilobar chest radiography involvement, respiratory rate, tachycardia, confusion, and oxygenation) scores to predict early ICU transfers in these patients. Retrospective, case-control study. Cases were defined as patients admitted to GW with CAP that required ICU transfer within 48 hours. Controls were defined as patients admitted to GW with CAP that did not require ICU transfer. CURB-65 and SMRT-CO scores were calculated on presentation to emergency department (ED), and upon admission to GW. Composite scores were calculated combining data from ED and GW. Sensitivities, specificities, likelihood ratios, and areas-under-the-curve (AUC) were calculated for each score. From 2003 to 2009, 115 cases and 345 controls were identified. Both groups had similar baseline characteristics. Composite scores combining data from ED and GW had better sensitivity and AUC than scores calculated only with ED or GW data (P SMRT-CO score ≥2 had 76.5% (95% CI, 67.7 to 83.9) sensitivity, 67.5% (95% CI, 62.3 to 72.4) specificity, and 0.81 (95% CI, 0.77 to 0.85) AUC. A composite CURB-65 score ≥3 had 36.5% (95% CI, 27.7 to 46.0) sensitivity, 86.3% (95% CI, 82.3 to 89.8) specificity, and 0.66 (95% CI, 0.60 to 0.72) AUC to predict early ICU transfers. Composite SMRT-CO had higher sensitivity and AUC (P SMRT-CO had a better combination of sensitivity and specificity than CURB-65 for predicting early ICU transfers. Prospective studies to confirm our findings are needed. Copyright © 2011 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  4. Interobserver agreement in the assessment of pulmonary infiltrates on chest radiography in community-acquired pneumonia; Detektion pneumonischer Infiltrate bei ambulant erworbener Pneumonie: Uebereinstimmung in der Befundung der Roentgen-Thoraxaufnahme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pauls, S.; Billich, C.; Boll, D.; Aschoff, A.J. [Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Universitaetskliniken Ulm (Germany); Krueger, S. [Medizinische Klinik I, Universitaetskliniken RWTH Aachen (Germany); Richter, K.; Marre, R.; Gonschior, S. [Mikrobiologie und Hygiene, Universitaetskliniken Ulm (Germany); Muche, R. [Inst. fuer Biometrie, Univ. Ulm (Germany); Welte, T. [Abt. fuer Pneumologie, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany); Schumann, C. [Medizinische Klinik II, Universitaetskliniken Ulm (Germany); Suttorp, N. [Abt. Innere Medizin, Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany)

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: To assess interobserver agreement (IOA) in the diagnosis of pulmonary infiltrates on chest X-rays for patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Materials and methods: From 7/2002 to 12/2005, 806 adults with CAP were included in the multicenter study 'CAPNETZ' (7 hospitals). Inclusion criteria were clinical signs of pneumonia and pulmonary opacification on chest X-rays. Each X-ray was reevaluated by two radiologists from the university hospital in consensus reading against the interpreter at the referring hospital in regard to: presence of infiltrate (yes/no/equivocal), transparency ({<=}/> 50%), localization, and pattern of infiltrates (alveolar/interstitial). The following parameters were documented: digital or film radiography, hospitalization, fever, findings of auscultation, microbiological findings. Results: The overall IOA concerning the detection of infiltrates was 77.7% (n = 626; Cl 0.75 - 0.81), the infiltrates were not verified in 16.4% (n = 132) by the referring radiologist with equivocal findings in 5.9% (n = 48). The IOA of the different clinical centers varied between 63.2% (n = 38, Cl 0.48 - 0.78) and 92.3% (n = 65, Cl 0.86 - 0.99). The IOA for the diagnosis of infiltrates was significantly higher for inpatients with 82.6% (n = 546; Cl 0.80-0.85) than for outpatients with 55.2% (n = 80; Cl 0.47 - 0.63), p < 0.0001. The IOA of infiltrates with a transparency > 50% was 95.1% (n = 215; Cl 0.92 - 0.98) versus 80.4% (n = 403; Cl 0.77 - 0.84) for infiltrates with a transparency > 50% (p < 0.0001). In patients with positive auscultation, the IOA was higher (p = 0,034). Chest X-rays of patients with antibiotic therapy or an alveolar infiltrate showed more equivocal findings compared to patients without these features. Conclusion: There is considerable interobserver variability in the diagnosis of pulmonary infiltrates on chest radiographs. The IOA is higher in more opaque infiltrates, positive auscultation and inpatients. (orig.)

  5. Community-acquired bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Beek, Diederik; Brouwer, Matthijs; Hasbun, Rodrigo; Koedel, Uwe; Whitney, Cynthia G.; Wijdicks, Eelco

    2016-01-01

    Meningitis is an inflammation of the meninges and subarachnoid space that can also involve the brain cortex and parenchyma. It can be acquired spontaneously in the community - community-acquired bacterial meningitis - or in the hospital as a complication of invasive procedures or head trauma

  6. Etiology and severity of community acquired pneumonia in children from Uruguay: a 4-year study Etiologia e severidade de pneumonia adquirida comunitariamente em crianças uruguaias: um estudo de 4 anos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Hortal

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available The 4-year study (1987-1990 covered the major clinical-epidemiological characteristics of pneumonia in children as diagnosed at the emergency service of the Children's Hospital, as well as etiologies, and factors involved in the most severe cases. Etiology was determined in 47.7% of the 541 pneumonia cases, involving 283 pathogens of which 38.6% were viruses and 12.6% bacteria. Viral and mixed etiologies were more frequent in children under 12 months of age. Bacteria predominated in ages between 6 and 23 months. Among the viruses, respiratory syncytial virus predominated (66%. The bacterial pneumonias accounted for 12.2% of the recognized etiologies. The most important bacterial agents were S. pneumoniae (64% and H. influenzae (19%. H. influenzae and mixed infections had a relevant participation during the 1988 season, pointing to annual variations in the relative participation of pathogens and its possible implication in severity of diseases. Correlation of severity and increased percentage of etiological diagnosis was assessed: patients with respiratory rates over 70 rpm, or pleural effusion and/or extensive pulmonary parenchyma compromise yielded higher positive laboratory results. Various individual and family risk factors were recognized when comparing pneumonia children with healthy controls.O estudo de quatro anos de duração (1987-1990 abarcou as principais características clínico-epidemiológicas de pneumonia em crianças, tal como foi diagnosticado no serviço de emergência do Hospital Infantil, e também as etiologias e fatores implicados nos casos mais severos. Determinou-se a etiologia em 47.7% dos 541 casos de pneumonia, que incluíam 283 patógenos, dos quais 38.6% eram virus e 12.6% bactérias. Observou-se etiologia viral e mista mais freqüentemente nas crianças de menos de 12 meses. A etiologia bacteriana prevaleceu nas idades entre 6 e 23 meses. Com relação aos virus, a predominância foi de RSV com prevalência de 66

  7. Cancer patients with community-acquired pneumonia treated in intensive care have poorer outcomes associated with increased illness severity and septic shock at admission to intensive care: a retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo J José

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP and an underlying diagnosis of cancer have worse outcomes. However, the characteristics of cancer patients with CAP admitted to intensive care units (ICUs are not well established. In a retrospective observational study, patients admitted to a London university hospital ICU between January 2006 and October 2011 with a primary diagnosis of CAP were included. Demographic, clinical, laboratory, and outcome data were collected from the ICU and hospital pathology databases. The analysis included 96 patients with CAP, 19 of whom had an existing diagnosis of cancer. Patients with cancer had a longer median time interval between hospital and ICU admission (1 vs 2 days, p = 0.049. On admission to ICU, there were no differences in white cell count, C-reactive protein, clotting, renal function, liver function, heart rate, temperature, systolic blood pressure or oxygenation index between patients with or without cancer. However, patients with cancer had significantly lower haemoglobin levels (median 8.6 vs 10.0 g/dl, p = 0.010 and lowest diastolic blood pressure (median 40 vs 50 mmHg, p = 0.026, and higher sodium levels (median 142 vs 139 mmol/l, p = 0.020, APACHE II (median 25 vs 20, p = 0.009, SAPS II (median 51 vs 43, p = 0.039 and SOFA (median 12 vs 9, p = 0.018 scores. There were no statistically significant differences in the proportion of patients receiving mechanical ventilation or renal support, the duration of mechanical ventilation or ICU or hospital length of stay. Patients with cancer were more likely to receive vasopressors (89.5% vs 63.6%, p = 0.030 and had increased ICU (68.4% vs 31.2%, p = 0.004 and hospital (78.9% vs 33.8%, p = 0.001 mortality. The limitations of this study are its relatively small sample size and those associated with the retrospective study design. In conclusion, cancer patients with CAP had an increased risk of death that was associated with increased illness severity

  8. Detection of Pneumocystis DNA in samples from patients suspected of bacterial pneumonia--a case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helweg-Larsen, Jannik; Jensen, Jørgen Skov; Dohn, Birthe

    2002-01-01

    Pneumocystis jiroveci (formerly known as P. carinii f.sp. hominis) is an opportunistic fungus that causes Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) in immunocompromised individuals. Pneumocystis jiroveci can be detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). To investigate the clinical importance of a positive P...... Pneumocystis-PCR among HIV-uninfected patients suspected of bacterial pneumonia, a retrospective matched case-control study was conducted....

  9. Detection of Pneumocystis DNA in samples from patients suspected of bacterial pneumonia – a case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helweg-Larsen, J; Jensen, JS; Dohn, G

    2002-01-01

    Pneumocystis jiroveci (formerly known as P. carinii f.sp. hominis) is an opportunistic fungus that causes Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) in immunocompromised individuals. Pneumocystis jiroveci can be detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). To investigate the clinical importance of a positive P...... Pneumocystis-PCR among HIV-uninfected patients suspected of bacterial pneumonia, a retrospective matched case-control study was conducted....

  10. Stethoscope vs. ultrasound probe - which is more reliable in children with suspected pneumonia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovan Lovrenski

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare lung ultrasound (LUS with auscultation findings in children with clinical suspicion of pneumonia. Patients and methods. A prospective study including 95 patients (age: from 2 months to 17.5 years; mean age: 5.1 y, SD 4.5 y with referral diagnosis of suspected pneumonia. In all patients LUS and auscultatory examinations were performed within an hour. These findings were compared separately in each hemithorax. The radiologist performing LUS was blinded to the patient’s clinical information. Positive auscultatory findings included: crackles and/or abnormal breath sounds (decreased, asymmetric, absent, or bronchial. For LUS examinations a combined transthoracic – transabdominal approach was used. A pneumonia-positive LUS finding included subpleural consolidation with air-bronchogram, or an adjacent area of interstitial edema. For each subpleural consolidation the cranio-caudal (CC diameter was measured, and 95% confidence intervals (CI of the sizes of subpleural consolidations for positive and negative auscultatory findings were compared. The p-value between LUS and auscultation was calculated using McNemar’s test. Results. LUS and auscultation showed pneumonia-positive findings in 98 and 64 hemithoraces, i.e. in 67 and 45 patients respectively. In positive auscultatory findings the CI for CC diameters of subpleural consolidations ranged from 32.46 to 54.14 mm, and in negative auscultatory findings the CI was between 16.52 and 29.83 mm, which showed a statistically significant difference. McNemar’s test showed a statistically significant difference between LUS and auscultation. Conclusions. LUS showed positive findings in more hemithoraces than auscultation in children with suspected pneumonia. A cranio-caudal size of subpleural consolidation of less than 30 mm significantly reduces the possibility of auscultatory detection.

  11. Perfil clínico, epidemiológico e etiológico de pacientes com pneumonia adquirida na comunidade internados em um hospital geral da microrregião de Sumaré, SP Clinical, epidemiological, and etiological profile of inpatients with community-acquired pneumonia at a general hospital in the Sumaré microregion of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Rita Donalisio

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar aspectos clínicos, etiológicos e epidemiológicos das pneumonias adquiridas na comunidade (PAC em indivíduos internados. MÉTODOS: Foram estudados prospectivamente 66 pacientes com PAC maiores de 14 anos no Hospital Estadual Sumaré, localizado na cidade de Sumaré (SP, entre outubro de 2005 e setembro de 2007. Coletamos dados sobre história clínica, exame clínico, escore pneumonia severity index (PSI e exames laboratoriais (hemocultura, bacterioscopia/cultura de escarro, sorologias para Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae e Legionella pneumophila, além de antígenos urinários de Legionella sp. e Streptococcus pneumoniae. RESULTADOS: A idade média dos pacientes foi de 53 anos, a maioria tinha baixa escolaridade, e 55,7% apresentavam pelo menos uma comorbidade no momento da internação. O percentual de idosos vacinados contra influenza entre os internados foi significativamente menor que os da comunidade dos municípios da microrregião de Sumaré (52,6% vs. > 70%. A febre foi menos frequente entre os idosos (p OBJECTIVE: To analyze the clinical, etiological, and epidemiological aspects of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP in hospitalized individuals. METHODS: We prospectively studied 66 patients (> 14 years of age with CAP admitted to the Hospital Estadual Sumaré, located in the Sumaré microregion of Brazil, between October of 2005 and September of 2007. We collected data related to clinical history, physical examination, pneumonia severity index (PSI scores, and laboratory tests (blood culture; sputum smear microscopy and culture; serology for Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Legionella pneumophila; and detection of Legionella sp. and Streptococcus pneumoniae antigens in urine. RESULTS: The mean age of patients was 53 years. Most had a low level of education, and 55.7% presented with at least one comorbidity at the time of hospitalization. The proportion of elderly people vaccinated

  12. Hiponatremia como factor de riesgo de muerte en pacientes internados por neumonía adquirida en la comunidad Hyponatremia as a risk factor of death in patients with community-acquired pneumonia requiring hospitalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo E. Barcia

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Investigamos si la hiponatremia es un factor de riesgo de muerte en pacientes internados por neumonía adquirida en la comunidad (NAC y estimamos el peso relativo de otros factores de riesgo de muerte por NAC, en un estudio de cohorte, prospectivo, multicéntrico, en 5 Servicios de Clínica Médica del Area Metropolitana de Buenos Aires. Evaluamos adultos con NAC ingresados entre 21 de marzo de 2000 y 21 de diciembre del mismo año. Los factores de riesgo que mostraron asociación con evolución por análisis univariado, fueron sometidos a análisis de regresión logística, con un nivel de significación de a de 0.05. En 9 meses se internaron 238 pacientes con NAC: 150 (63% varones y 88 (36% mujeres, con edades medias 52.99 (±20.35 y 55.06 (±20.94 años, respectivamente. Fallecieron 25/238 (10.5%. En análisis multivariado, se asociaron significativamente con evolución: enfermedad vascular encefálica (EVE (B: 2.614, pWe investigated whether hyponatremia is a risk factor of death in patients hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP and estimated the relative risk of death by CAP of other risk factors. The design was prospective multicentre cohort study. In 5 centers in Buenos Aires, Argentina, we studied adults hospitalized with CAP between March 21, 2000 and December 21, 2000. Using stepwise logistic regression, we analyzed risk factors that showed a univariate association with mortality; a significance level was 0.05. During a 9-month period, 238 patients were admitted with CAP: 150 (63% male and 88 (36% female, mean age 52.99 (±20.35 and 55.06 (±20.94, respectively. Mortality was 10.5% (25/238. By multivariate analysis, the following variables were statistically associated with evolution: cerebrovascular disease (CD (B: 2.614, p<0.001, RRE: 13.6, IC 95%: 3.7-49.6; hyponatremia at admission or during hospitalization (B: 1.994, p<0.001, RRE: 7.3, IC 95%: 2.5-20.8; and elevated blood urea (B: 0.016, p= 0.003, RRE: 1.016, IC 95

  13. Estarão diferentes as pneumonias agudas adquiridas na comunidade com internamento hospitalar em idade pediátrica na última década? Are there any differences in the community acquired pneumonias admitted to hospital over the past decade?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Calado

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Nos últimos anos tem sido descrita, no mundo ocidental, uma redução da incidência da pneumonia aguda da comunidade (PAC nas crianças, parodoxalmente associada a maior gravidade dos casos internados. O presente estudo pretendeu caracterizar os casos de PAC internados e compará-los com um estudo anterior a 2001. Recolhemos dados referentes a 63 internamentos, durante seis meses. Houve predomínio do grupo dos 0-2 anos. Na radiografia torácica, em 58 casos (92,1% detectou-se condensação/atelectasia e em 17 (27,0% derrame pleural (DP. Onze dos DP corresponderam a empiema (17,4% dos internamentos. Isolou-se agente bacteriano em cinco casos: Streptococcus pyogenes (dois, líquido pleural, Streptococcus pneumoniae (dois, hemocultura e Haemophilus influenzae (um, hemocultura. Foi prescrita antibioticoterapia em 61 (96,8% crianças. A duração mediana de internamento foi de cinco dias. Constatou-se, nos casos de DP, idade superior, maior duração de febre, proteína C reactiva mais alta e maior duração de internamento e de antibioticoterapia endovenosa. Comparativamente com o estudo anterior, constatou-se haver maior gravidade dos casos internados, traduzida por maior incidência de DP e empiema; paradoxalmente, registou-se menor duração da febre em meio hospitalar e menor duração do internamento. No estudo actual houve menor prescrição antibiótica prévia à admissão e maior prescrição de ampicilina durante o internamento. Na literatura, a maior gravidade das pneumonias internadas nos últimos anos tem sido associada à emergência de serotipos mais agressivos de Stretococcus pneumoniae não integrados na vacina heptavalente, assumindo interesse crescente a introdução de vacinas que os incluam. As pneumonias complicadas devem ser orientadas para centros de referência com experiência no seu diagnóstico e tratamento.The past few years have seen a decline in community acquired pneumonia (CAP in children in the western world

  14. Radiology of bacterial pneumonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilar, Jose E-mail: vilar_jlu@gva.es; Domingo, Maria Luisa; Soto, Cristina; Cogollos, Jonathan

    2004-08-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is commonly encountered in clinical practice. Radiology plays a prominent role in the evaluation of pneumonia. Chest radiography is the most commonly used imaging tool in pneumonias due to its availability and excellent cost benefit ratio. CT should be used in unresolved cases or when complications of pneumonia are suspected. The main applications of radiology in pneumonia are oriented to detection, characterisation and follow-up, especially regarding complications. The classical classification of pneumonias into lobar and bronchial pneumonia has been abandoned for a more clinical classification. Thus, bacterial pneumonias are typified into three main groups: Community acquired pneumonia (CAD), Aspiration pneumonia and Nosocomial pneumonia (NP).The usual pattern of CAD is that of the previously called lobar pneumonia; an air-space consolidation limited to one lobe or segment. Nevertheless, the radiographic patterns of CAD may be variable and are often related to the causative agent. Aspiration pneumonia generally involves the lower lobes with bilateral multicentric opacities. Nosocomial Pneumonia (NP) occurs in hospitalised patients. The importance of NP is related to its high mortality and, thus, the need to obtain a prompt diagnosis. The role of imaging in NP is limited but decisive. The most valuable information is when the chest radiographs are negative and rule out pneumonia. The radiographic patterns of NP are very variable, most commonly showing diffuse multifocal involvement and pleural effusion. Imaging plays also an important role in the detection and evaluation of complications of bacterial pneumonias. In many of these cases, especially in hospitalised patients, chest CT must be obtained in order to better depict these associate findings.

  15. Community-Acquired urinary tract infection by pseudomonas oryzihabitans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunita M Bhatawadekar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas oryzihabitans and Chrysomonas luteola has been placed in CDC group Ve2 and Ve1 respectively. These bacteria appear to be emerging pathogens. P. oryzihabitans was isolated from cases of bacteremia, CNS infections, wound infections, peritonitis, sinusitis, catheter associated infections in AIDS patient, and pneumonia. Most of the reports of P. oryzihabitans infection were of nosocomial origin in individuals with some predisposing factors. We report here a case of community acquired UTI by P. oryzihabitans in an immune-competent patient with stricture of urethra.

  16. Neumonía aguda de la comunidad y hemorragia pulmonar por leptospirosis en el área metropolitana Buenos Aires Community acquired pneumonia and pulmonary hemorrhage in leptospirosis in the Buenos Aires metropolitan area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Seijo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del trabajo es comunicar los hallazgos epidemiológicos, clínicos y de diagnóstico de la neumonía y hemorragia pulmonar por leptospirosis, en el período enero 2007 a octubre 2009. Un 64% (20/31 de pacientes con diagnóstico de leptospirosis tuvieron neumonía. Quince de ellos (75% presentaron neumonía grave, de los cuales siete (35% desarrollaron hemorragia pulmonar. En diez enfermos (32% el motivo de consulta e inicio del cuadro clínico fue una gastroenteritis secretoria con fiebre y dolor abdominal. La ictericia sólo se manifestó en once pacientes (35%. La técnica de reacción en cadena de la polimerasa (PCR fue útil para el diagnóstico en muestra obtenida post mortem. De un hemocultivo se aisló una cepa clasificada dentro del serogrupo canicola. Se clasificaron las neumonías en tres tipos: neumonías de curso no grave con escasa repercusión general; neumonías graves asociadas a formas clínicas sistémicas con ictericia, insuficiencia renal, trombocitopenia y hemorragia pulmonar; también de curso grave, no asociada a ictericia, insuficiencia renal o trombocitopenia grave. El tratamiento antibiótico iniciado en los primeros días de enfermedad (promedio 3.2 días no tuvo influencia en la evolución de las neumonías graves. Se plantea además considerar tres formas clínicas de leptospirosis: anictérica, ictérica (con sus variantes evolutivas y hemorragia pulmonar.The aim of this paper is to report the epidemiological, clinical and diagnosis findings of pneumonia and pulmonary hemorrhage observed in patients with leptospirosis in the period January 2007 to October 2009. A 64% (20/31 of patients diagnosed with leptospirosis presented pneumonia. Fifteen of them (75% had severe pneumonia, of which seven (35% were pulmonary hemorrhage. In ten patients (32% reason for consultation and clinical early stage was a secretory gastroenteritis with fever and abdominal pain. Jaundice was only expressed in eleven patients (35

  17. Interstitial pneumonia and pulmonary hypertension associated with suspected ehrlichiosis in a dog

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toom, Marjolein Lisette den; Dobak, Tetyda Paulina; Broens, Els Marion; Valtolina, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In dogs with canine monocytic ehrlichiosis (CME), respiratory signs are uncommon and clinical and radiographic signs of interstitial pneumonia are poorly described. However, in human monocytic ehrlichiosis, respiratory signs are common and signs of interstitial pneumonia are well known.

  18. CSF lactate for accurate diagnosis of community-acquired bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giulieri, S; Chapuis-Taillard, C; Jaton, K; Cometta, A; Chuard, C; Hugli, O; Du Pasquier, R; Bille, J; Meylan, P; Manuel, O; Marchetti, O

    2015-10-01

    CSF lactate measurement is recommended when nosocomial meningitis is suspected, but its value in community-acquired bacterial meningitis is controversial. We evaluated the diagnostic performance of lactate and other CSF parameters in a prospective cohort of adult patients with acute meningitis. Diagnostic accuracy of lactate and other CSF parameters in patients with microbiologically documented episodes was assessed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. The cut-offs with the best diagnostic performance were determined. Forty-five of 61 patients (74%) had a documented bacterial (n = 18; S. pneumoniae, 11; N. meningitidis, 5; other, 2) or viral (n = 27 enterovirus, 21; VZV, 3; other, 3) etiology. CSF parameters were significantly different in bacterial vs. viral meningitis, respectively (p bacterial from viral meningitis, with a cutoff set at 3.5 mmol/l providing 100% sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and efficiency. CSF lactate had the best accuracy for discriminating bacterial from viral meningitis and should be included in the initial diagnostic workup of this condition.

  19. Chlamydia Pneumoniae Pneumonia: An Evolving Clinical Spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Megran

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydia pneumoniae is a recently recognized respiratory tract pathogen. It accounts for 6 to 10% of all cases of community acquired pneumonia requiring admission to hospital. Two patients hospitalized with C pneumoniae pneumonia are presented to illustrate its range of severity and the extrapulmonary manifestations.

  20. Child Mortality after Discharge from a Health Facility following Suspected Pneumonia, Meningitis or Septicaemia in Rural Gambia: A Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhibber, Aakash Varun; Hill, Philip C; Jafali, James; Jasseh, Momodou; Hossain, Mohammad Ilias; Ndiaye, Malick; Pathirana, Jayani C; Greenwood, Brian; Mackenzie, Grant A

    2015-01-01

    To measure mortality and its risk factors among children discharged from a health centre in rural Gambia. We conducted a cohort study between 12 May 2008 and 11 May 2012. Children aged 2-59 months, admitted with suspected pneumonia, sepsis, or meningitis after presenting to primary and secondary care facilities, were followed for 180 days after discharge. We developed models associating post-discharge mortality with clinical syndrome on admission and clinical risk factors. One hundred and five of 3755 (2.8%) children died, 80% within 3 months of discharge. Among children aged 2-11 and 12-59 months, there were 30 and 29 deaths per 1000 children per 180 days respectively, compared to 11 and 5 respectively in the resident population. Children with suspected pneumonia unaccompanied by clinically severe malnutrition (CSM) had the lowest risk of post-discharge mortality. Mortality increased in children with suspected meningitis or septicaemia without CSM (hazard ratio [HR] 2.6 and 2.2 respectively). The risk of mortality greatly increased with CSM on admission: CSM with suspected pneumonia (HR 8.1; 95% confidence interval (CI) 4.4 to 15), suspected sepsis (HR 18.4; 95% CI 11.3 to 30), or suspected meningitis (HR 13.7; 95% CI 4.2 to 45). Independent associations with mortality were: mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC) of 11.5-13.0 cm compared to >13.0 cm (HR 7.2; 95% CI 3.0 to 17.0), MUAC 10.5-11.4 cm (HR 24; 95% CI 9.4 to 62), and MUAC <10.5 cm (HR 44; 95% CI 18 to 108), neck stiffness (HR 10.4; 95% CI 3.1 to 34.8), non-medical discharge (HR 4.7; 95% CI 2.0 to 10.9), dry season discharge (HR 2.0; 95% CI 1.2 to 3.3), while greater haemoglobin (HR 0.82; 0.73 to 0.91), axillary temperature (HR 0.71; 95% CI 0.58 to 0.87), and oxygen saturation (HR 0.96; 95% CI 0.93 to 0.99) were associated with reduced mortality. Gambian children experience increased mortality after discharge from primary and secondary care. Interventions should target both moderately and severely

  1. Community-acquired Clostridium difficile infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penit, A; Bemer, P; Besson, J; Cazet, L; Bourigault, C; Juvin, M-E; Fix, M-H; Bruley des Varannes, S; Boutoille, D; Batard, E; Lepelletier, D

    2016-05-01

    To describe the management and treatment of community-acquired C. difficile infections (CDI) and to evaluate family physicians' (FP) knowledge and practice. Observational study from December 2013 to June 2014. All community-acquired CDI case patients diagnosed in the community or at the University Hospital of Nantes were prospectively included. A questionnaire was mailed to 150 FPs of the area of Nantes. A total of 27 community-acquired CDI case patients were included (incidence: 7.7 case patients/100,000 inhabitants). Mean age was higher among case patients diagnosed at hospital (69years) compared with those diagnosed in the community (44years). Fifteen patients were treated at home (55%) and 22 received a first-line treatment with metronidazole. Only one patient did not receive any prior antibiotic treatment. Amoxicillin-clavulanic acid was mainly prescribed (68%) for respiratory and ENT infections (40%). Twenty-three patients were cured on Day 7 and three had complications (two deaths). Thirty-one of 47 FPs reported to have already managed CDI patients. Twenty-two FPs reported to usually treat patients with uncomplicated CDI at home, 21 to refer patients to a specialist, and three to hospital. Forty-one FPs reported to prescribe a CD toxin test only after recent antibiotic exposure and 30 when patients are at risk of CDI. The incidence and impact of community-acquired CDIs may be underestimated and the unjustified use of antibiotics may promote their emergence. FPs are not used to treat CDIs as more than 50% prefer referring patients to hospital or to a specialist. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Management of community acquired pneumonia (CAP) in children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-06-04

    Jun 4, 2015 ... bacilli are included; Maximum dose of gentamicin should not exceed 120mg; Chloramphenicol is not included in the antibiotic protocol because of its toxicity in the face of effective alternative antibiotics;. *Alternatives: Consider alternatives when first line drugs are not available or applicable or child has not ...

  3. community acquired pneumonia or βhcg - Producing lung tumor

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Paraneoplastic syndromes are common complications of lung cancer and may be the manifestation of the disease or its recurrence. β- human chorionic gonadotropin (βhCG) is commonly produced by germ cell tumors and seldom produced by other tumors. We describe the case of a 28-year old woman who was admitted ...

  4. Management of community acquired pneumonia (CAP) in children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-06-04

    Jun 4, 2015 ... However, the gold standard for sample recovery is lung puncture aspirate from infected region of the lung. Em- phasis should be on the less invasive sampling methods. Although new molecular diagnostic tests are available,. e.g., polymerase chain reaction (PCR), their usefulness in our hospital setting is ...

  5. The Role of Complications of Community Acquired Pneumonia on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hemodynamic changes, lung abscess, lung cavitation, sepsis with attendant shock, and acute respiratory ... patients with CAP seen at the Accident and Emergency unit,. Medical out‑patients unit and medical wards of .... 8 patients respectively followed by septic shock which was seen in six patients. Pleural effusion ranged ...

  6. Antipsychotic drug use and community-acquired pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Trifirò (Gianluca)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAntipsychotics are generally distinguished as atypical and typical agents, which are indicated in the treatment of acute and chronic psychoses and other psychiatric disorders. In April 2005, the US Food and Drug Administration issued a warning about the increased risk of all-cause

  7. Community-acquired Pneumonia in Hospitalized Urban Young ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As part of a comprehensive hospital-based study of acute lower respiratory infections (ALRI) in under-five urban Nigerian children, we sought to identify the ... associated with a significantly higher prevalence of cigarette smoking in the household (p=0.038; RR=1.86; 95%CI=0.93-5.80), grunting respiration (p=0.01), and a ...

  8. A Fatal Case of Community Acquired Cupriavidus Pauculus Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almasy Emoke

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cupriavidus pauculus is a rarely isolated non-fermentative, aerobic bacillus, which occasionally causes severe human infections, especially in immunocompromised patients. Strains have been isolated from various clinical and environmental sources.

  9. Detection of Pneumocystis DNA in samples from patients suspected of bacterial pneumonia- a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benfield Thomas L

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pneumocystis jiroveci (formerly known as P. carinii f.sp. hominis is an opportunistic fungus that causes Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP in immunocompromised individuals. Pneumocystis jiroveci can be detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. To investigate the clinical importance of a positive Pneumocystis-PCR among HIV-uninfected patients suspected of bacterial pneumonia, a retrospective matched case-control study was conducted. Methods Respiratory samples from 367 patients suspected of bacterial pneumonia were analysed by PCR amplification of Pneumocystis jiroveci. To compare clinical factors associated with carriage of P. jiroveci, a case-control study was done. For each PCR-positive case, four PCR-negative controls, randomly chosen from the PCR-negative patients, were matched on sex and date of birth. Results Pneumocystis-DNA was detected in 16 (4.4% of patients. The median age for PCR-positive patients was higher than PCR-negative patients (74 vs. 62 years, p = 0.011. PCR-positive cases had a higher rate of chronic or severe concomitant illness (15 (94% than controls (32 (50% (p = 0.004. Twelve (75% of the 16 PCR positive patients had received corticosteroids, compared to 8 (13% of the 64 PCR-negative controls (p Detection of Pneumocystis-DNA was associated with a worse prognosis: seven (44% of patients with positive PCR died within one month compared to nine (14% of the controls (p = 0.01. None of the nine PCR-positive patients who survived had developed PCP at one year of follow-up. Conclusions Our data suggest that carriage of Pneumocystis jiroveci is associated with old age, concurrent disease and steroid treatment. PCR detection of P. jiroveci has low specificity for diagnosing PCP among patients without established immunodeficiency. Whether overt infection is involved in the poorer prognosis or merely reflects sub-clinical carriage is not clear. Further studies of P. jiroveci in patients receiving systemic treatment

  10. Epidemiology of community-acquired bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van de Beek, Diederik

    2018-01-01

    The epidemiology of bacterial meningitis has been dynamic in the past 30 years following introduction of conjugated vaccines against Haemophilus influenzae type B, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis. The purpose of this review is to describe recent developments in bacterial

  11. Nasal Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) PCR Testing Reduces the Duration of MRSA-Targeted Therapy in Patients with Suspected MRSA Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baby, Nidhu; Faust, Andrew C; Smith, Terri; Sheperd, Lyndsay A; Knoll, Laura; Goodman, Edward L

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of pharmacist-ordered methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) PCR testing on the duration of empirical MRSA-targeted antibiotic therapy in patients with suspected pneumonia. This is a retrospective analysis of patients who received vancomycin or linezolid for suspected pneumonia before and after the implementation of a pharmacist-driven protocol for nasal MRSA PCR testing. Patients were included if they were adults of >18 years of age and initiated on vancomycin or linezolid for suspected MRSA pneumonia. The primary endpoint was the duration of vancomycin or linezolid therapy. After screening 368 patients, 57 patients met inclusion criteria (27 pre-PCR and 30 post-PCR). Baseline characteristics were similar between the two groups, with the majority of patients classified as having health care-associated pneumonia (68.4%). The use of the nasal MRSA PCR test reduced the mean duration of MRSA-targeted therapy by 46.6 h (74.0 ± 48.9 h versus 27.4 ± 18.7 h; 95% confidence interval [CI], 27.3 to 65.8 h; P MRSA PCR testing in patients with suspected MRSA pneumonia reduced the duration of empirical MRSA-targeted therapy by approximately 2 days without increasing adverse clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  12. A case of an immunocompetent young man obtaining community-acquired disseminated Nocardia brasiliensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinna; Cao, Jie; Wu, Yueqing; Wan, Nansheng; Pan, Li; Chen, Yuanbao

    2014-01-01

    Nocardiosis is a rare but severe pyogenic or granulomatous disease and caused by Nocardia that mainly infects immunocompromised patients. We report here a case of an immunocompetent 24-year-old male student with community-acquired pneumonia with asymptomatic disseminated cerebral abscess by Brasiliensis nocardiosis. The patient was fully recovered after receiving optimized antimicrobial therapy without relapse. This case suggests the health professionals such as the physicians of pulmonary, infection, neurology department and et al should always think about unusual cause of community acquired pneumonia, even in immunocompetent patients and when having pulmonary nocardiosis we should do a radiological neurological work up, even with the absence of neurological finding or symptom. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Multicenter randomized study of two once daily regimens in the initial management of community-acquired respiratory tract infections in 163 children: azithromycin versus ceftibuten.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galova, K; Sufliarska, S; Kukova, Z; Danisovicova, A; Hrachova, I; Grausova, S; Marinova, I; Krizan, S; Stopkova, K; Stahorska, A; Durcanska, K; Raskova, J; Krupova, I; Krcméry, V

    1996-01-01

    In a randomized trial, we compared the efficacy and toxicity of azithromycin and ceftibuten once daily in the initial (empiric) therapy of proven or suspected community-acquired respiratory tract infections (CARTI) in 163 pediatric patients: 95.5% of those treated with azithromycin and 83.6% of those treated with ceftibuten were cured or improved. Streptococcus pneumoniae was more frequently eradicated in the azithromycin than in the ceftibuten group, whereas gram-negative bacilli were more susceptible to ceftibuten. Elimination rates for Staphylococcus aureus and Haemophilus influenzae were similar; adverse reactions did not differ in both arms. Thus, azithromycin was more effective but equally safe than ceftibuten in the initial therapy of pediatric CARTI.

  14. Telithromycin: a novel agent for the treatment of community-acquired upper respiratory infections

    OpenAIRE

    Tran, Mai P.

    2004-01-01

    The ketolides are a new subclass of macrolides, and telithromycin is the first of these agents to be approved. Modifications to the basic macrolide structure result in enhanced activity against penicillin- and erythromycin resistant respiratory pathogens. It is therefore an option in the treatment of mild to moderate community-acquired respiratory infections, such as pneumonia, acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis, pharyngitis/tonsillitis, and sinusitis. Telithromycin also offers the adv...

  15. Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... such as hospitals is called hospital-acquired pneumonia . Causes Pneumonia is a common illness that affects millions of ... States. Germs called bacteria, viruses, and fungi may cause pneumonia. In adults, bacteria are the most common cause ...

  16. Epidemiology of community-acquired bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van de Beek, Diederik

    2018-01-01

    Purpose of review The epidemiology of bacterial meningitis has been dynamic in the past 30 years following introduction of conjugated vaccines against Haemophilus influenzae type B, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis. The purpose of this review is to describe recent developments in

  17. Community-acquired infections and their association with myeloid malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titmarsh, Glen J; McMullin, Mary Frances; McShane, Charlene M; Clarke, Mike; Engels, Eric A; Anderson, Lesley A

    2014-02-01

    Antigenic stimulation is a proposed aetiologic mechanism for many haematological malignancies. Limited evidence suggests that community-acquired infections may increase the risk of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). However, associations with other myeloid malignancies including chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) and myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are unknown. Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Result (SEER)-Medicare database, fourteen community-acquired infections were compared between myeloid malignancy patients [AML (n=8489), CML (n=3626) diagnosed 1992-2005; MDS (n=3072) and MPNs (n=2001) diagnosed 2001-2005; and controls (200,000 for AML/CML and 97,681 for MDS/MPN]. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals were adjusted for gender, age and year of selection excluding infections diagnosed in the 13-month period prior to selection to reduce reverse causality. Risk of AML and MDS respectively, were significantly associated with respiratory tract infections, bronchitis (ORs 1.20 [95% CI: 1.14-1.26], 1.25 [95% CI: 1.16-1.36]), influenza (ORs 1.16 [95% CI: 1.07-1.25], 1.29 [95% CI: 1.16-1.44]), pharyngitis (ORs 1.13 [95% CI: 1.06-1.21], 1.22 [95% CI: 1.11-1.35]), pneumonia (ORs 1.28 [95% CI: 1.21-1.36], 1.52 [95% CI: 1.40-1.66]), sinusitis (ORs 1.23 [95% CI: 1.16-1.30], 1.25 [95% CI: 1.15-1.36]) as was cystitis (ORs 1.13 [95% CI: 1.07-1.18], 1.26 [95% CI: 1.17-1.36]). Cellulitis (OR 1.51 [95% CI: 1.39-1.64]), herpes zoster (OR 1.31 [95% CI: 1.14-1.50]) and gastroenteritis (OR 1.38 [95% CI: 1.17-1.64]) were more common in MDS patients than controls. For CML, associations were limited to bronchitis (OR 1.21 [95% CI: 1.12-1.31]), pneumonia (OR 1.49 [95% CI: 1.37-1.62]), sinusitis (OR 1.19 [95% CI: 1.09-1.29]) and cellulitis (OR 1.43 [95% CI: 1.32-1.55]) following Bonferroni correction. Only cellulitis (OR 1.34 [95% CI: 1.21-1.49]) remained significant in MPN patients. Many infections remained elevated when more than 6

  18. Respiratory Review of 2012: Pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, Young-Soon

    2012-01-01

    Pneumonia is the cause of significant morbidity and mortality, despite advances in diagnosis and antibacterial treatment. Pneumonia is often misdiagnosed and mistreated up until recently. Recent classification of pneumonia consists of community-acquired pneumonia, health care-associated pneumonia, hospital-acquired pneumonia, and ventilator-associated pneumonia. The etiology, risk factors, and treatment are different among them. This article briefly introduces new concepts and ideas in biomar...

  19. Measuring (1,3)-β-D-glucan in tracheal aspirate, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and serum for detection of suspected Candida pneumonia in immunocompromised and critically ill patients: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Kang-Cheng; Chou, Kun-Ta; Hsiao, Yi-Han; Tseng, Ching-Min; Su, Vincent Yi-Fong; Lee, Yu-Chin; Perng, Diahn-Warng; Kou, Yu Ru

    2017-04-08

    While Candida pneumonia is life-threatening, biomarker measurements to early detect suspected Candida pneumonia are lacking. This study compared the diagnostic values of measuring levels of (1, 3)-β-D-glucan in endotracheal aspirate, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and serum to detect suspected Candida pneumonia in immunocompromised and critically ill patients. This prospective, observational study enrolled immunocompromised, critically ill, and ventilated patients with suspected fungal pneumonia in mixed intensive care units from November 2010 to October 2011. Patients with D-glucan confounding factors or other fungal infection were excluded. Endotracheal aspirate, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and serum were collected from each patient to perform a fungal smear, culture, and D-glucan assay. After screening 166 patients, 31 patients completed the study and were categorized into non-Candida pneumonia/non-candidemia (n = 18), suspected Candida pneumonia (n = 9), and non-Candida pneumonia/candidemia groups (n = 4). D-glucan levels in endotracheal aspirate or bronchoalveolar lavage were highest in suspected Candida pneumonia, while the serum D-glucan level was highest in non-Candida pneumonia/candidemia. In all patients, the D-glucan value in endotracheal aspirate was positively correlated with that in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. For the detection of suspected Candida pneumonia, the predictive performance (sensitivity/specificity/D-glucan cutoff [pg/ml]) of D-glucan in endotracheal aspirate and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was 67%/82%/120 and 89%/86%/130, respectively, accounting for areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.833 and 0.939 (both P pneumonia in the absence of concurrent candidemia. D-glucan levels in both endotracheal aspirate and bronchoalveolar lavage, but not in serum, provide good diagnostic values to detect suspected Candida pneumonia and to serve as potential biomarkers for early detection in this patient population.

  20. Community-acquired soft-tissue pyogenic abscesses in Mulago ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Clinical practice, for a long time, has dwelt on study and management of pyogenic abscesses without distinction between nosocomial and community-acquired types. This study aimed at identifying the bacteria isolated from community-acquired acute subcutaneous and soft tissue pyogenic abscesses.

  1. [Comparison of clinical presentation of mixed pneumonia with Chlamydia pneumoniae and Streptococcus pneumoniae and S. pneumoniae pneumonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukano, Hiroshi; Miyashita, Naoyuki; Mimura, Kimihiro; Mouri, Keiji; Yoshida, Kouichiro; Kobashi, Yoshihiro; Niki, Yoshihito; Matsushima, Toshiharu

    2004-02-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae is a significant cause of both lower and upper acute respiratory illnesses, including community-acquired pneumonia. Furthermore, C. pneumoniae has been reported to frequently cause pneumonia in association with other respiratory pathogens, mainly Streptococcus pneumoniae. In this study, we investigated the clinical presentation of mixed pneumonia with Chlamydia pneumoniae and S. pneumoniae and compared it with S. pneumoniae pneumonia. A total of 13 cases of mixed pneumonia and 58 cases of S. pneumoniae pneumonia identified at Kawasaki Medical School and related hospitals between April 1996 and March 2001 were analyzed. The diagnosis of C. pneumoniae infection was based on isolation and serologic testing of antibodies by the microimmunofluorescence test. The clinical presentation of mixed pneumonia and S. pneumoniae pneumonia was almost identical and no statistical differences were observed between the two groups. This is the same as what was observed before except eleven out of the 13 of the mixed pneumonia patients responded to treatment with only beta-lactam antibiotics. Our results indicated that C. pneumoniae may not be the primary cause of community-acquired pneumonia but it might descript the normal clearance mechanisms, enabling other pathogens to invade.

  2. Chronic Klebsiella pneumonia: a rare manifestation of Klebsiella pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Boonsarngsuk, Viboon; Thungtitigul, Poungrat; Suwatanapongched, Thitiporn

    2015-01-01

    K. pneumoniae can present as two forms of community-acquired pneumonia, acute and chronic. Although acute pneumonia may turn into necrotizing pneumonia, which results in a prolonged clinical course, it often has a rapidly progressive clinical course. In contrast, chronic Klebsiella pneumonia runs a protracted indolent course that mimics other chronic pulmonary infections and malignancies. Herein, we present two cases of chronic Klebsiella pneumonia. The diagnosis was made by microorganism ide...

  3. Pneumonia: update on diagnosis and management

    OpenAIRE

    Hoare, Zara; Lim, Wei Shen

    2006-01-01

    Prompt diagnosis and management of community acquired pneumonia saves lives. This article summarises the latest key recommendations in the management of pneumonia and is intended for junior doctors managing this common condition

  4. Epidemiology and clinical manifestations of children with macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ping-Sheng; Chang, Luan-Yin; Lin, Hsiao-Chuan; Chi, Hsin; Hsieh, Yu-Chia; Huang, Yi-Chuan; Liu, Ching-Chuan; Huang, Yhu-Chering; Huang, Li-Min

    2013-09-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae accounts for 10-30% of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in children. This study reveals the epidemiology and clinical manifestations of children with macrolide-resistant (ML(r) ) M. pneumoniae pneumonia in Taiwan. Respiratory tract specimens were collected from children hospitalized with CAP for evaluation via PCR followed by DNA sequencing for several point mutations related to the ML(r) character. Of the 412 specimens collected during the study period, 60 (15%) were positive for M. pneumoniae, 14 (23%) of which presented point mutation (all A2063G) in 23S rRNA. Clinical symptoms and chest X-ray findings between the ML(s) and ML(r) groups were not significantly different. However, the ML(r) group had longer mean duration of fever after azithromycin treatment (3.2 days vs. 1.6 days, P = 0.02) and significantly higher percentage of changing antibiotics for suspected ML(r) strain (42% vs. 13%, P = 0.04). Although 58% of children in the ML(r) group did not receive effective antibiotics, all children were discharged without sequelae. In conclusion, 15% of CAP in children is caused by M. pneumoniae and the macrolide-resistance rate is 23% in Taiwan. Despite ineffective antibiotics, children with ML(r) M. pneumoniae pneumonia recover completely. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Pulmonary infiltrates during community acquired Gram-negative bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjeldsøe-Nielsen, Hans; Gjeraa, Kirsten; Berthelsen, Birgitte G

    2013-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to describe the frequency of pulmonary infiltrates on chest X-ray (CXR) during community acquired Gram-negative bacteremia at a single centre in Denmark.......The primary aim of this study was to describe the frequency of pulmonary infiltrates on chest X-ray (CXR) during community acquired Gram-negative bacteremia at a single centre in Denmark....

  6. Cefditoren in upper and lower community-acquired respiratory tract infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Soriano

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Francisco Soriano1, María-José Giménez1,2, Lorenzo Aguilar1,21PRISM-AG, Madrid, Spain; 2Microbiology Department, School of Medicine, University Complutense, Madrid, SpainAbstract: This article reviews and updates published data on cefditoren in the evolving scenario of resistance among the most prevalent isolates from respiratory tract infections in the community (Streptococcus pyogenes, Haemophilus influenzae, and Streptococcus pneumoniae. By relating the in vitro activity of cefditoren (in national and multinational surveillance and against isolates with emerging resistant genotypes/phenotypes to its pharmacokinetics, the cefditoren pharmacodynamic activity predicting efficacy (in humans, animal models, and in vitro simulations is analyzed prior to reviewing clinical studies (tonsillopharyngitis, sinusitis, acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis, and community-acquired pneumonia and the relationship between bacterial eradication and clinical efficacy. The high in vitro activity of cefditoren against the most prevalent respiratory isolates in the community, together with its pharmacokinetics (enabling a twice daily regimen leading to adequate pharmacodynamic indexes covering all S. pyogenes, H. influenzae, and at least 95% S. pneumoniae isolates, makes cefditoren an antibiotic that will play a significant role in the treatment of respiratory tract infections in the community. In the clinical setting, studies carried out with cefditoren showed that treatments with the 400 mg twice daily regimen were associated with high rates of bacteriological response, even against penicillin-nonsusceptible S. pneumoniae, with good correlation between bacteriological efficacy/response and clinical outcome.Keywords: cefditoren, Streptococcus pyogenes, Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, community-acquired respiratory tract infections

  7. Bacteriological profile of community acquired acute bacterial meningitis: A ten-year retrospective study in a tertiary neurocare centre in South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mani R

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Ten years retrospective study to evaluate the bacteriological spectrum of community acquired acute bacterial meningitis (CAABM. Method