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Sample records for suspected black death

  1. What caused the Black Death?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, C J; Scott, S

    2005-05-01

    For the whole of the 20th century it was believed that the Black Death and all the plagues of Europe (1347-1670) were epidemics of bubonic plague. This review presents evidence that this view is incorrect and that the disease was a viral haemorrhagic fever, characterised by a long incubation period of 32 days, which allowed it to be spread widely even with the limited transport of the Middle Ages. It is suggested that haemorrhagic plague emerged from its animal host in Ethiopia and struck repeatedly at European/Asian civilisations, before appearing as the Black Death. The CCR5-Delta32 mutation confers protection against HIV-1 in an average of 10% of the people of European origin today. It is suggested that all the Deltaccr5 alleles originated from a single mutation event that occurred before 1000 BC and the subsequent epidemics of haemorrhagic plague gently forced up its frequency to 5 x 10(-5) at the time of the Black Death. Epidemics of haemorrhagic plague over the next three centuries then steadily raised the frequency in Europe (but not elsewhere) to present day values.

  2. Sudden Suspected Death in Emergency Department: Autopsy Results

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    Mehtap GURGER

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY: Objectives: Sudden deaths occur within 24 hours after symptoms' onset and are caused by cardiac, neurological and pulmonary diseases. Autopsy is the gold standard in determining cause of death. In this study, death's etiology was evaluated in cases applied to our department that underwent autopsy with sudden death indication. Methods: This study included cases aged 18 or older with sudden, suspected, non-traumatic death applying to our department between 2008 and 2012. Patients' age, sex, death time, co-morbid diseases, initial signs, cardiac rhythm, and autopsy findings were recorded after reviewing patient charts. Results: The study included 46 patients. Mean age was 45.73±19.6. Of the cases, 84.78% applied to emergency with cardiopulmonary arrest. Thirty-two cases (69.6% were male. The most frequent cause of death was cardiovascular diseases (52.2%, followed by central nervous system disorders (21.7%, intoxications (15.2%, and respiratory diseases (10.9%. The most common diseases were myocardial infarction (45.7%, subarachnoid hemorrhage (8.7%, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. There were three drug ingestions, three carbon monoxide intoxications, and one corrosive material ingestion among the intoxication cases. Conclusions: Sudden deaths are rarely encountered. Emergency clinicians should consider cause in differential diagnosis and provide appropriate approaches at first evaluation. ÖZET: Amaç: Ani ölümler semptomlar başladıktan sonra 24 saat içerisinde oluşur. En yaygın nedenleri kardiyak, nörolojik ve pulmoner hastalıkları içerir. Otopsi bu ölümlerin nedenini tespit etmede altın standarttır. Bu çalışmada acil servisimize başvuran ani ölüm olgularının otopsi bulgularına göre ölüm nedenlerini değerlendirdik. Gereç ve Yöntem: Bu retrospektif çalışmaya 2008–2012 yılları arasında acil servisimize başvuran, yaşları 18 ve üzeri olan, nontravmatik, ani, şüpheli ölüm vakaları al

  3. Saint Sebastian and the Black Death.

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    Gelpi, A P

    1998-06-01

    The martyrdom of Saint Sebastian is one of the most enduring themes in Western religious art. The execution scene so often portrayed - with the Saint transfixed with arrows - is based on the legend about his life and death during the reign of the Roman emperor, Diocletian. However, it is the symbolic association of arrows with the Black Death - during the Middle Ages and during the Renaissance - which identifies Sebastian as the patron saint of plague victims. After more than four centuries of recurrent epidemics, the plague died out in Europe; but the image of St. Sebastian continued to inspire artists until the end of the 19th century.

  4. Black Humor in the Face of Death

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    Margot Coppin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dying subjects that resort to humor, whom we shall call "humorants", question themselves and especially us. How could they possibly allow themselves such an outrage at this precise moment of their existence?  When they do so, it is through the particular and rather crude form of black humor. On the basis of Freud's and Lacan's contributions regarding the question of death and of the clinical exercise of palliative care, the article addresses the expression of a linguistic jouissance on the part of subjects who are on the way to that which will forever calm their drives - the place in which the joint influence of capitalist and scientific discourse make it possible to affirm the accidental nature of death in our modern world. In this sense, "humorants" seem to be responding to the anxious perplexity of many dying patients when confronted by the traumatic real.

  5. Young, Black, and Sentenced To Die: Black Males and the Death Penalty.

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    Joseph, Janice

    1996-01-01

    Explores the death penalty as imposed on young black males in the United States and examines the disparity in death penalty rates for homicides with black offenders and white victims. States continue to impose the death penalty rather than viewing youth violence as a failure of the social system. (SLD)

  6. Distinct clones of Yersinia pestis caused the black death

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Haensch, Stephanie; Bianucci, Raffaella; Signoli, Michel; Rajerison, Minoarisoa; Schultz, Michael; Kacki, Sacha; Vermunt, Marco; Weston, Darlene A; Hurst, Derek; Achtman, Mark; Carniel, Elisabeth; Bramanti, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    From AD 1347 to AD 1353, the Black Death killed tens of millions of people in Europe, leaving misery and devastation in its wake, with successive epidemics ravaging the continent until the 18(th) century...

  7. Distinct clones of Yersinia pestis caused the black death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Haensch

    Full Text Available From AD 1347 to AD 1353, the Black Death killed tens of millions of people in Europe, leaving misery and devastation in its wake, with successive epidemics ravaging the continent until the 18(th century. The etiology of this disease has remained highly controversial, ranging from claims based on genetics and the historical descriptions of symptoms that it was caused by Yersinia pestis to conclusions that it must have been caused by other pathogens. It has also been disputed whether plague had the same etiology in northern and southern Europe. Here we identified DNA and protein signatures specific for Y. pestis in human skeletons from mass graves in northern, central and southern Europe that were associated archaeologically with the Black Death and subsequent resurgences. We confirm that Y. pestis caused the Black Death and later epidemics on the entire European continent over the course of four centuries. Furthermore, on the basis of 17 single nucleotide polymorphisms plus the absence of a deletion in glpD gene, our aDNA results identified two previously unknown but related clades of Y. pestis associated with distinct medieval mass graves. These findings suggest that plague was imported to Europe on two or more occasions, each following a distinct route. These two clades are ancestral to modern isolates of Y. pestis biovars Orientalis and Medievalis. Our results clarify the etiology of the Black Death and provide a paradigm for a detailed historical reconstruction of the infection routes followed by this disease.

  8. Distinct clones of Yersinia pestis caused the black death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haensch, Stephanie; Bianucci, Raffaella; Signoli, Michel; Rajerison, Minoarisoa; Schultz, Michael; Kacki, Sacha; Vermunt, Marco; Weston, Darlene A; Hurst, Derek; Achtman, Mark; Carniel, Elisabeth; Bramanti, Barbara

    2010-10-07

    From AD 1347 to AD 1353, the Black Death killed tens of millions of people in Europe, leaving misery and devastation in its wake, with successive epidemics ravaging the continent until the 18(th) century. The etiology of this disease has remained highly controversial, ranging from claims based on genetics and the historical descriptions of symptoms that it was caused by Yersinia pestis to conclusions that it must have been caused by other pathogens. It has also been disputed whether plague had the same etiology in northern and southern Europe. Here we identified DNA and protein signatures specific for Y. pestis in human skeletons from mass graves in northern, central and southern Europe that were associated archaeologically with the Black Death and subsequent resurgences. We confirm that Y. pestis caused the Black Death and later epidemics on the entire European continent over the course of four centuries. Furthermore, on the basis of 17 single nucleotide polymorphisms plus the absence of a deletion in glpD gene, our aDNA results identified two previously unknown but related clades of Y. pestis associated with distinct medieval mass graves. These findings suggest that plague was imported to Europe on two or more occasions, each following a distinct route. These two clades are ancestral to modern isolates of Y. pestis biovars Orientalis and Medievalis. Our results clarify the etiology of the Black Death and provide a paradigm for a detailed historical reconstruction of the infection routes followed by this disease.

  9. Distinct Clones of Yersinia pestis Caused the Black Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haensch, Stephanie; Bianucci, Raffaella; Signoli, Michel; Rajerison, Minoarisoa; Schultz, Michael; Kacki, Sacha; Vermunt, Marco; Weston, Darlene A.; Hurst, Derek; Achtman, Mark; Carniel, Elisabeth; Bramanti, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    From AD 1347 to AD 1353, the Black Death killed tens of millions of people in Europe, leaving misery and devastation in its wake, with successive epidemics ravaging the continent until the 18th century. The etiology of this disease has remained highly controversial, ranging from claims based on genetics and the historical descriptions of symptoms that it was caused by Yersinia pestis to conclusions that it must have been caused by other pathogens. It has also been disputed whether plague had the same etiology in northern and southern Europe. Here we identified DNA and protein signatures specific for Y. pestis in human skeletons from mass graves in northern, central and southern Europe that were associated archaeologically with the Black Death and subsequent resurgences. We confirm that Y. pestis caused the Black Death and later epidemics on the entire European continent over the course of four centuries. Furthermore, on the basis of 17 single nucleotide polymorphisms plus the absence of a deletion in glpD gene, our aDNA results identified two previously unknown but related clades of Y. pestis associated with distinct medieval mass graves. These findings suggest that plague was imported to Europe on two or more occasions, each following a distinct route. These two clades are ancestral to modern isolates of Y. pestis biovars Orientalis and Medievalis. Our results clarify the etiology of the Black Death and provide a paradigm for a detailed historical reconstruction of the infection routes followed by this disease. PMID:20949072

  10. Was the black death in India and China?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, George D

    2011-01-01

    Firsthand accounts of the Black Death in Europe and the Middle East and many subsequent historians have assumed that the pandemic originated in Asia and ravaged China and India before reaching the West. One reason for this conviction among modern historians is that the plague in the nineteenth century originated and did its worst damage in these countries. But a close examination of the sources on the Delhi Sultanate and the Yuan Dynasty provides no evidence of any serious epidemic in fourteenth-century India and no specific evidence of plague among the many troubles that afflicted fourteenth-century China.

  11. Validation of inverse seasonal peak mortality in medieval plagues, including the Black Death, in comparison to modern Yersinia pestis-variant diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welford, Mark R; Bossak, Brian H

    2009-12-22

    Recent studies have noted myriad qualitative and quantitative inconsistencies between the medieval Black Death (and subsequent "plagues") and modern empirical Y. pestis plague data, most of which is derived from the Indian and Chinese plague outbreaks of A.D. 1900+/-15 years. Previous works have noted apparent differences in seasonal mortality peaks during Black Death outbreaks versus peaks of bubonic and pneumonic plagues attributed to Y. pestis infection, but have not provided spatiotemporal statistical support. Our objective here was to validate individual observations of this seasonal discrepancy in peak mortality between historical epidemics and modern empirical data. We compiled and aggregated multiple daily, weekly and monthly datasets of both Y. pestis plague epidemics and suspected Black Death epidemics to compare seasonal differences in mortality peaks at a monthly resolution. Statistical and time series analyses of the epidemic data indicate that a seasonal inversion in peak mortality does exist between known Y. pestis plague and suspected Black Death epidemics. We provide possible explanations for this seasonal inversion. These results add further evidence of inconsistency between historical plagues, including the Black Death, and our current understanding of Y. pestis-variant disease. We expect that the line of inquiry into the disputed cause of the greatest recorded epidemic will continue to intensify. Given the rapid pace of environmental change in the modern world, it is crucial that we understand past lethal outbreaks as fully as possible in order to prepare for future deadly pandemics.

  12. Validation of inverse seasonal peak mortality in medieval plagues, including the Black Death, in comparison to modern Yersinia pestis-variant diseases.

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    Mark R Welford

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent studies have noted myriad qualitative and quantitative inconsistencies between the medieval Black Death (and subsequent "plagues" and modern empirical Y. pestis plague data, most of which is derived from the Indian and Chinese plague outbreaks of A.D. 1900+/-15 years. Previous works have noted apparent differences in seasonal mortality peaks during Black Death outbreaks versus peaks of bubonic and pneumonic plagues attributed to Y. pestis infection, but have not provided spatiotemporal statistical support. Our objective here was to validate individual observations of this seasonal discrepancy in peak mortality between historical epidemics and modern empirical data. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We compiled and aggregated multiple daily, weekly and monthly datasets of both Y. pestis plague epidemics and suspected Black Death epidemics to compare seasonal differences in mortality peaks at a monthly resolution. Statistical and time series analyses of the epidemic data indicate that a seasonal inversion in peak mortality does exist between known Y. pestis plague and suspected Black Death epidemics. We provide possible explanations for this seasonal inversion. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results add further evidence of inconsistency between historical plagues, including the Black Death, and our current understanding of Y. pestis-variant disease. We expect that the line of inquiry into the disputed cause of the greatest recorded epidemic will continue to intensify. Given the rapid pace of environmental change in the modern world, it is crucial that we understand past lethal outbreaks as fully as possible in order to prepare for future deadly pandemics.

  13. East to West or West to East: Plague Spread after the Black Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujun Cui

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The Black Death, one of the most destructive pandemics in human history, has claimed millions of lives and considerably influenced human civilization. Following the Black Death, plague outbreaks in Europe lasted for several hundred years until late the 18th century. It is generally presumed that the Black Death was caused by Yersinia pestis (Y. pestis and spread from China to Europe in one or more waves. However, because of the lack of etiological research during the medieval period and absence of a natural plague focus in Europe today, the causative agent of this pandemic and its transmission has led to long-term debate among researchers. Thus, several questions remain including whether Y. pestis actually caused the Black Death, whether a natural plague focus existed in medieval Europe and led to post-Black Death plague outbreaks, and whether the Europe plague focus played a role in the spread and evolution of Y. pestis.

  14. American Clinical Neurophysiology Society Guideline 6: Minimum Technical Standards for EEG Recording in Suspected Cerebral Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecker, Mark M; Sabau, Dragos; Sullivan, Lucy R; Das, Rohit R; Selioutski, Olga; Drislane, Frank W; Tsuchida, Tammy N; Tatum, William O

    2016-01-01

    This revision to the EEG Guidelines is an update incorporating current EEG technology and practice. The role of the EEG in making the determination of brain death is discussed as are suggested technical criteria for making the diagnosis of electrocerebral inactivity.

  15. The temporal dynamics of the fourteenth-century Black Death: new evidence from English ecclesiastical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, James W; Ferrell, Rebecca J; Dewitte-Aviña, Sharon N

    2003-08-01

    Recent research has questioned whether the European Black Death of 1347-1351 could possibly have been caused by the bubonic plague bacillus Yersinia pestis, as has been assumed for over a century. Central to the arguments both for and against involvement of Y. pestis has been a comparison of the temporal dynamics observed in confirmed outbreaks of bubonic plague in early-20th-century India, versus those reconstructed for the Black Death from English church records--specifically, from lists of institutions (appointments) to vacated benefices contained in surviving bishops' registers. This comparison is, however, based on a statistical error arising from the fact that most of the bishops' registers give only the dates of institution and not the dates of death. Failure to correct for a distributed (as opposed to constant) lag time from death to institution has made it look as if the Black Death passed slowly through specific localities. This error is compounded by a failure to disaggregate the information from the bishops' registers to a geographical level that is genuinely comparable to the modern data. A sample of 235 deaths from the bishop's register of Coventry and Lichfield, the only English register to list both date of death and date of institution, shows that the Black Death swept through local areas much more rapidly than has previously been thought. This finding is consistent with those of earlier studies showing that the Black Death spread too rapidly between locales to have been a zoonosis such as bubonic plague. A further analysis of the determinants of the lag between death and institution, designed to provide a basis for reexamining other bishops' registers that do not provide information on date of death, shows that the distribution of lags could vary significantly by time and space even during a single epidemic outbreak.

  16. Mortality risk and survival in the aftermath of the medieval Black Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitte, Sharon N

    2014-01-01

    The medieval Black Death (c. 1347-1351) was one of the most devastating epidemics in human history. It killed tens of millions of Europeans, and recent analyses have shown that the disease targeted elderly adults and individuals who had been previously exposed to physiological stressors. Following the epidemic, there were improvements in standards of living, particularly in dietary quality for all socioeconomic strata. This study investigates whether the combination of the selective mortality of the Black Death and post-epidemic improvements in standards of living had detectable effects on survival and mortality in London. Samples are drawn from several pre- and post-Black Death London cemeteries. The pre-Black Death sample comes from the Guildhall Yard (n = 75) and St. Nicholas Shambles (n = 246) cemeteries, which date to the 11th-12th centuries, and from two phases within the St. Mary Spital cemetery, which date to between 1120-1300 (n = 143). The St. Mary Graces cemetery (n = 133) was in use from 1350-1538 and thus represents post-epidemic demographic conditions. By applying Kaplan-Meier analysis and the Gompertz hazard model to transition analysis age estimates, and controlling for changes in birth rates, this study examines differences in survivorship and mortality risk between the pre- and post-Black Death populations of London. The results indicate that there are significant differences in survival and mortality risk, but not birth rates, between the two time periods, which suggest improvements in health following the Black Death, despite repeated outbreaks of plague in the centuries after the Black Death.

  17. Mortality risk and survival in the aftermath of the medieval Black Death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon N DeWitte

    Full Text Available The medieval Black Death (c. 1347-1351 was one of the most devastating epidemics in human history. It killed tens of millions of Europeans, and recent analyses have shown that the disease targeted elderly adults and individuals who had been previously exposed to physiological stressors. Following the epidemic, there were improvements in standards of living, particularly in dietary quality for all socioeconomic strata. This study investigates whether the combination of the selective mortality of the Black Death and post-epidemic improvements in standards of living had detectable effects on survival and mortality in London. Samples are drawn from several pre- and post-Black Death London cemeteries. The pre-Black Death sample comes from the Guildhall Yard (n = 75 and St. Nicholas Shambles (n = 246 cemeteries, which date to the 11th-12th centuries, and from two phases within the St. Mary Spital cemetery, which date to between 1120-1300 (n = 143. The St. Mary Graces cemetery (n = 133 was in use from 1350-1538 and thus represents post-epidemic demographic conditions. By applying Kaplan-Meier analysis and the Gompertz hazard model to transition analysis age estimates, and controlling for changes in birth rates, this study examines differences in survivorship and mortality risk between the pre- and post-Black Death populations of London. The results indicate that there are significant differences in survival and mortality risk, but not birth rates, between the two time periods, which suggest improvements in health following the Black Death, despite repeated outbreaks of plague in the centuries after the Black Death.

  18. Setting the stage for medieval plague: Pre-black death trends in survival and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitte, Sharon N

    2015-11-01

    The 14(th) -century Black Death was one of the most devastating epidemics in human history, killing tens of millions of people in a short period of time. It is not clear why mortality rates during the epidemic were so high. One possibility is that the affected human populations were particularly stressed in the 14(th) century, perhaps as a result of repeated famines in areas such as England. This project examines survival and mortality in two pre-Black Death time periods, 11-12(th) centuries vs 13(th) century CE, to determine if demographic conditions were deteriorating before the epidemic occurred. This study is done using a sample of individuals from several London cemeteries that have been dated, in whole or in part, either to the 11-12(th) centuries (n = 339) or 13(th) century (n = 258). Temporal trends in survivorship and mortality are assessed via Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and by modeling time period as a covariate affecting the Gompertz hazard of adult mortality. The age-at-death distributions from the two pre-Black Death time periods are significantly different, with fewer older adults in 13(th) century. The results of Kaplan-Meier survival analysis indicate reductions in survival before the Black Death, with significantly lower survival in the 13(th) century (Mantel Cox p Black Death. Together, these results suggest that health in general was declining in the 13(th) century, and this might have led to high mortality during the Black Death. This highlights the importance of considering human context to understand disease in past and living human populations. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Epidemiology of infant death among black and white non-Hispanic populations in Hampton Roads, Virginia.

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    Emuren, Leonard; Chauhan, Suneet; Vroman, Richard; Beydoun, Hind

    2012-05-01

    To evaluate the presence of racial disparities in infant mortality rates and assess risk factors for infant death among black and white populations in Hampton Roads, Virginia. A retrospective study with secondary analyses of linked birth/death certificate data was conducted using a sample of 201,610 live-born infants and 1659 infant deaths identified between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 2008 in Hampton Roads. Infant, neonatal, and postneonatal mortality rates were significantly (P deformations, and chromosomal abnormalities (P efforts should target prenatal care, preterm delivery, and low-birth-weight infants and neonates to reduce infant mortality rates.

  20. Death Rituals Reported by White, Black, and Hispanic Parents Following the ICU Death of an Infant or Child

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    Brooten, Dorothy; Youngblut, JoAnne M.; Charles, Donna; Roche, Rosa; Hidalgo, Ivette; Malkawi, Fatima

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To examine rituals (disposing remains, wakes, funerals/burials, celebrations) of White, Black, Hispanic parents post ICU infant/child death. Design and methods Qualitative design, 63 parents completed English or Spanish semi-structured interviews at 7 & 13 months after infant’s/child’s death. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and entered into Atlas.ti for analysis. An inductive approach to thematization was used to develop codes. Results Parents: mean age 35.1 years (SD = 9.03); 33% Black, 27% White, 40% Hispanic; from 17 countries. Three themes emerged: immediately after death - shock and stress, needing help with arrangements, decisions on burial or cremation (conflicts due to finances, religion, culture), when and where to hold wakes, funerals/burials. Wakes and funerals - who prepares child’s body, appropriate dress (deceased child, mourners), who can come (cultural restrictions),-variations by child age, parent choice, culture, religion, country. After burial/cremation - being with family, milestone celebrations. Conclusion Child death is devastating for parents, other children, grandparents, and family members. Practice Implications. Rituals after child death require decisions about the child’s remains, wakes, funerals/burials at time of great pain for parents. This is especially true for newly immigrated parents and those with language barriers where making arrangements is especially hard and often very isolating. Health professionals who provide support need to be cognizant of practice differences based on religion, culture, economics, family traditions, and individual preference and provide as much support and resource as possible. A list of religious leaders representing the community’s cultures and funeral service providers who may provide lower cost burials/cremations is helpful. PMID:26639773

  1. Coping with Catastrophe: The Black Death of the 14th Century. A Unit of Study for Grades 7-12.

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    Chapman, Anne

    This unit of study explains the causes, course, characteristics, and results of the Black Death during the 14th century. The Black Death, also known as the bubonic plague, left virtually no one untouched in Europe, Asia, and Northern Africa. Europe lost a third or more of its population. In a broader context, study of the unit alerts students to…

  2. The sex-selective impact of the Black Death and recurring plagues in the Southern Netherlands, 1349–1450

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Curtis, Daniel; Roosen, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413320901

    2017-01-01

    Although recent work has begun to establish that early modern plagues had selective mortality effects, it was generally accepted that the initial outbreak of Black Death in 1347-52 was a “universal killer.” Recent bioarchaeological work, however, has argued that the Black Death was also selective

  3. Stress, sex, and plague: Patterns of developmental stress and survival in pre- and post-Black Death London.

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    DeWitte, Sharon N

    2017-10-26

    Previous research revealed declines in survivorship in London before the Black Death (c. 1346-1353), and improvements in survivorship following the epidemic. These trends indicate that there were declines in general levels of health before the Black Death and improvements thereof afterwards. This study expands on previous research by examining whether changes in survivorship were consistent between the sexes, and how patterns of developmental stress markers changed before and after the Black Death. This study uses samples from London cemeteries dated to one of three periods: Early Pre-Black Death (1000-1200 AD, n = 255), Late Pre-Black Death (1200-1250 AD, n = 247), or Post-Black Death (1350-1540 AD n = 329). Temporal trends in survivorship are assessed via Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, and trends in tibial length (as a proxy for stature) and linear enamel hypoplasia (LEH) are assessed using t-tests and Chi-square tests, respectively. Survivorship for both sexes decreased before the Black Death and increased afterwards. For males, LEH frequencies increased and stature decreased before the epidemic, and LEH declined and stature increased after the Black Death. For females, the only significant change with respect to developmental stress markers was a decrease in stature after the Black Death. These results might reflect variation between the sexes in sensitivity to stressors, the effects of nutrition on pubertal timing, disproportionate access to dietary resources for males in the aftermath of the Black Death, the disproportionate deaths of frail individuals during the epidemic, or some combination of these factors. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Ridiculed death and the dead: Black humor on the epitaphs and epigrams of the ancient Greece

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    Stevanović Lađa

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Theories about black humor usually regard that it as a contemporary phenomenon and a culmination of the literary modernism and beginning of post-modernism. My intent in this paper is to refute the thesis that the black humor is a modern invention. I am going to prove its existence still in Greek antiquity, quoting and analyzing humorous epitaphs and black humor epigrams. Putting in relation black humor with the joy and humor in religious (fertility and funeral rituals, I am also going to set a question about the attitude to death and life inherent for this kind of humor, arguing that its origin should be searched in the folk tradition.

  5. [Cutaneous melanoma - "black death" of modern times? Traces in contemporary literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahmer, F A; Bahmer, J A

    2013-11-01

    Cutaneous melanoma, sometimes labeled as "black skin cancer", is increasing in frequency and becoming a more common literary motive. In US literature, Sylvia Plath and Charles Bukowski depicted melanoma more than 50 years ago, later Stephen King and Thomas C. Boyle. In German literature, Charlotte Roche shortly mentioned this tumor. Jörg Pönnighaus, both poet and dermatologist, intensively deals in his poems with the effects melanoma has on patients and doctors alike. Melanoma definitely is not the "Black Death" of modern times. However, the perception of this tumor as extremely malignant and as life-threatening makes melanoma a metaphor of the deadly danger of cancer.

  6. Epidemic waves of the Black Death in the Byzantine Empire (1347-1453 AD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiamis, Costas; Poulakou-Rebelakou, Effie; Tsakris, Athanassios; Petridou, Eleni

    2011-09-01

    The lack of valid demographic data and the literary ambiguities of the Byzantine chroniclers raise questions about the actual size and mortality rate of the Black Death in the Byzantine Empire. This study presents for the first time a quantitative overview of the Black Death in Byzantium for the period 1347-1453. Our data were obtained from descriptions of the plague, by prominent Byzantine historians and scholars, grouped by time of appearance and geographical spread. During the period 1347-1453, a total of 61 plague reports were noted, which can be distinguished in nine major epidemic waves, 11 local outbreaks and 16 disease-free periods. The capital Constantinople and the Venetian colonies of the Ionian and Aegean Sea were the areas most affected by the plague. The epidemic waves of the Black Death in Byzantium had a total average duration of 3.2 years. Scientific ignorance of the nature of the disease, a turbulent period of warfare and an organized maritime network seem to have contributed to the spread of the disease. Employing quantitative analysis, our multidisciplinary study sheds light from various standpoints on the evolution and dynamic of the plague in the South-eastern Mediterranean during the 14th and 15th centuries, despite the lack of sound morbidity and mortality data.

  7. A draft genome of Yersinia pestis from victims of the Black Death.

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    Bos, Kirsten I; Schuenemann, Verena J; Golding, G Brian; Burbano, Hernán A; Waglechner, Nicholas; Coombes, Brian K; McPhee, Joseph B; DeWitte, Sharon N; Meyer, Matthias; Schmedes, Sarah; Wood, James; Earn, David J D; Herring, D Ann; Bauer, Peter; Poinar, Hendrik N; Krause, Johannes

    2011-10-12

    Technological advances in DNA recovery and sequencing have drastically expanded the scope of genetic analyses of ancient specimens to the extent that full genomic investigations are now feasible and are quickly becoming standard. This trend has important implications for infectious disease research because genomic data from ancient microbes may help to elucidate mechanisms of pathogen evolution and adaptation for emerging and re-emerging infections. Here we report a reconstructed ancient genome of Yersinia pestis at 30-fold average coverage from Black Death victims securely dated to episodes of pestilence-associated mortality in London, England, 1348-1350. Genetic architecture and phylogenetic analysis indicate that the ancient organism is ancestral to most extant strains and sits very close to the ancestral node of all Y. pestis commonly associated with human infection. Temporal estimates suggest that the Black Death of 1347-1351 was the main historical event responsible for the introduction and widespread dissemination of the ancestor to all currently circulating Y. pestis strains pathogenic to humans, and further indicates that contemporary Y. pestis epidemics have their origins in the medieval era. Comparisons against modern genomes reveal no unique derived positions in the medieval organism, indicating that the perceived increased virulence of the disease during the Black Death may not have been due to bacterial phenotype. These findings support the notion that factors other than microbial genetics, such as environment, vector dynamics and host susceptibility, should be at the forefront of epidemiological discussions regarding emerging Y. pestis infections.

  8. Recent results on the spatiotemporal modelling and comparative analysis of Black Death and bubonic plague epidemics

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    Christakos, G.; Olea, R.A.; Yu, H.-L.

    2007-01-01

    Background: This work demonstrates the importance of spatiotemporal stochastic modelling in constructing maps of major epidemics from fragmentary information, assessing population impacts, searching for possible etiologies, and performing comparative analysis of epidemics. Methods: Based on the theory previously published by the authors and incorporating new knowledge bases, informative maps of the composite space-time distributions were generated for important characteristics of two major epidemics: Black Death (14th century Western Europe) and bubonic plague (19th-20th century Indian subcontinent). Results: The comparative spatiotemporal analysis of the epidemics led to a number of interesting findings: (1) the two epidemics exhibited certain differences in their spatiotemporal characteristics (correlation structures, trends, occurrence patterns and propagation speeds) that need to be explained by means of an interdisciplinary effort; (2) geographical epidemic indicators confirmed in a rigorous quantitative manner the partial findings of isolated reports and time series that Black Death mortality was two orders of magnitude higher than that of bubonic plague; (3) modern bubonic plague is a rural disease hitting harder the small villages in the countryside whereas Black Death was a devastating epidemic that indiscriminately attacked large urban centres and the countryside, and while the epidemic in India lasted uninterruptedly for five decades, in Western Europe it lasted three and a half years; (4) the epidemics had reverse areal extension features in response to annual seasonal variations. Temperature increase at the end of winter led to an expansion of infected geographical area for Black Death and a reduction for bubonic plague, reaching a climax at the end of spring when the infected area in Western Europe was always larger than in India. Conversely, without exception, the infected area during winter was larger for the Indian bubonic plague; (5) during the

  9. Recent results on the spatiotemporal modelling and comparative analysis of Black Death and bubonic plague epidemics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christakos, G; Olea, R A; Yu, H-L

    2007-09-01

    This work demonstrates the importance of spatiotemporal stochastic modelling in constructing maps of major epidemics from fragmentary information, assessing population impacts, searching for possible etiologies, and performing comparative analysis of epidemics. Based on the theory previously published by the authors and incorporating new knowledge bases, informative maps of the composite space-time distributions were generated for important characteristics of two major epidemics: Black Death (14th century Western Europe) and bubonic plague (19th-20th century Indian subcontinent). The comparative spatiotemporal analysis of the epidemics led to a number of interesting findings: (1) the two epidemics exhibited certain differences in their spatiotemporal characteristics (correlation structures, trends, occurrence patterns and propagation speeds) that need to be explained by means of an interdisciplinary effort; (2) geographical epidemic indicators confirmed in a rigorous quantitative manner the partial findings of isolated reports and time series that Black Death mortality was two orders of magnitude higher than that of bubonic plague; (3) modern bubonic plague is a rural disease hitting harder the small villages in the countryside whereas Black Death was a devastating epidemic that indiscriminately attacked large urban centres and the countryside, and while the epidemic in India lasted uninterruptedly for five decades, in Western Europe it lasted three and a half years; (4) the epidemics had reverse areal extension features in response to annual seasonal variations. Temperature increase at the end of winter led to an expansion of infected geographical area for Black Death and a reduction for bubonic plague, reaching a climax at the end of spring when the infected area in Western Europe was always larger than in India. Conversely, without exception, the infected area during winter was larger for the Indian bubonic plague; (5) during the Indian epidemic, the disease

  10. Suggested cut-off values for vitamin D as a risk marker for total and cardiac death in patients with suspected acute coronary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrycja Anna Naesgaard

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several studies have demonstrated an association between low vitamin D levels and cardiovascular risk. Vitamin D cut off levels are still under debate. Objectives: To assess two cut-off levels, 40 nmol/L and 70 nmol/L, respectively, for vitamin D measured as 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OHD] in chest pain patients with suspected acute coronary syndrome.Methods: We investigated 1853 patients from coastal-Norway and inland Northern-Argentina. A similar database was used for pooling of data. 2-year follow-up data including all-cause mortality, cardiac death and sudden cardiac death in the total patient population were analyzed, applying univariate and multivariable analysis. Results: 255 patients with known vitamin D concentrations died. In the multivariable analysis, there was a decrease in total mortality above a cut-off level of 40 nmol/L and a decrease in cardiac death above a cut-off level of 70 nmol/L, [HRs of 0.66 (95% CI, 0.50 – 0.88, p = 0.004 and 0.46 (95% CI, 0.22 – 0.94, p = 0.034, respectively].Conclusion: Vitamin D cut-off levels of 40 nmol/L and 70 nmol/L, were related to total mortality and cardiac death, respectively.

  11. Suggested Cut-Off Values for Vitamin D as a Risk Marker for Total and Cardiac Death in Patients with Suspected Acute Coronary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naesgaard, Patrycja A; León de la Fuente, Ricardo A; Nilsen, Stein Tore; Pönitz, Volker; Brügger-Andersen, Trygve; Grundt, Heidi; Staines, Harry; Nilsen, Dennis W T

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated an association between low vitamin D levels and cardiovascular risk. Vitamin D cut-off levels are still under debate. To assess two cut-off levels, 40 and 70 nmol/L, respectively, for vitamin D measured as 25-hydroxyvitamin D in chest pain patients with suspected acute coronary syndrome. We investigated 1853 patients from coastal-Norway and inland Northern-Argentina. A similar database was used for pooling of data. Two-year follow-up data including all-cause mortality, cardiac death, and sudden cardiac death in the total patient population were analyzed, applying univariate and multivariable analysis. Two hundred fifty-five patients with known vitamin D concentrations died. In the multivariable analysis, there was a decrease in total mortality above a cut-off level of 40 nmol/L and a decrease in cardiac death above a cut-off level of 70 nmol/L [HRs of 0.66 (95% CI, 0.50-0.88), p = 0.004 and 0.46 (95% CI, 0.22-0.94), p = 0.034, respectively]. Vitamin D cut-off levels of 40 and 70 nmol/L were related to total mortality and cardiac death, respectively.

  12. Historical Y. pestis Genomes Reveal the European Black Death as the Source of Ancient and Modern Plague Pandemics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spyrou, Maria A; Tukhbatova, Rezeda I; Feldman, Michal; Drath, Joanna; Kacki, Sacha; Beltrán de Heredia, Julia; Arnold, Susanne; Sitdikov, Airat G; Castex, Dominique; Wahl, Joachim; Gazimzyanov, Ilgizar R; Nurgaliev, Danis K; Herbig, Alexander; Bos, Kirsten I; Krause, Johannes

    2016-06-08

    Ancient DNA analysis has revealed an involvement of the bacterial pathogen Yersinia pestis in several historical pandemics, including the second plague pandemic (Europe, mid-14(th) century Black Death until the mid-18(th) century AD). Here we present reconstructed Y. pestis genomes from plague victims of the Black Death and two subsequent historical outbreaks spanning Europe and its vicinity, namely Barcelona, Spain (1300-1420 cal AD), Bolgar City, Russia (1362-1400 AD), and Ellwangen, Germany (1485-1627 cal AD). Our results provide support for (1) a single entry of Y. pestis in Europe during the Black Death, (2) a wave of plague that traveled toward Asia to later become the source population for contemporary worldwide epidemics, and (3) the presence of an historical European plague focus involved in post-Black Death outbreaks that is now likely extinct. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The Impact of the Black Death on the Golden Horde: Politics, Economy, Society, Civilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uli Schamiloglu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Research objectives and materials: This essay offers an overview of the political, economic, social, and cultural consequences of the Black Death (the epidemic of bubonic plague cause by the bacteria Yersinia pestis in the territories of the Golden Horde in the 14th–15th centuries. It considers the framework which has been developed for medieval Europe and the Middle East. It considers whether there was a medieval growth in population in the Golden Horde prior to the arrival of the Black Death in the mid-14th century. It considers the level of depopulation and how it led to political instability. It notes how bubonic plague was used as a weapon by the Mongol armies. It considers economic consequences such as the decline in certain professions and crafts, the threat to the food supply, and the rising cost of labor which led to inflation. It also considers the social crisis brought about by the sudden death of substantial portions of the population. Results and novelty of the research: The rise in urbanization in the 13th to mid-14th century was followed by a collapse in the population and decline in urban centers beginning in the second half of the 14th century. The Black Death also led to population pressure as most sedentary centers declined, while at the same time certain sedentary areas escaped the plague, as could many nomadic populations who were less susceptible to disease. It also examines the decline in literary languages and the growth in religiosity. Finally, it considers the recovery in the population beginning in the mid-15th century.

  14. Paleoseismology of the Southern Section of the Black Mountains and Southern Death Valley Fault Zones, Death Valley, United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Marsha S.; Knott, Jeffrey R.; Mahan, Shannon

    2014-01-01

    The Death Valley Fault System (DVFS) is part of the southern Walker Lane–eastern California shear zone. The normal Black Mountains Fault Zone (BMFZ) and the right-lateral Southern Death Valley Fault Zone (SDVFZ) are two components of the DVFS. Estimates of late Pleistocene-Holocene slip rates and recurrence intervals for these two fault zones are uncertain owing to poor relative age control. The BMFZ southernmost section (Section 1W) steps basinward and preserves multiple scarps in the Quaternary alluvial fans. We present optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dates ranging from 27 to 4 ka of fluvial and eolian sand lenses interbedded with alluvial-fan deposits offset by the BMFZ. By cross-cutting relations, we infer that there were three separate ground-rupturing earthquakes on BMFZ Section 1W with vertical displacement between 5.5 m and 2.75 m. The slip-rate estimate is ∼0.2 to 1.8 mm/yr, with an earthquake recurrence interval of 4,500 to 2,000 years. Slip-per-event measurements indicate Mw 7.0 to 7.2 earthquakes. The 27–4-ka OSL-dated alluvial fans also overlie the putative Cinder Hill tephra layer. Cinder Hill is offset ∼213 m by SDVFZ, which yields a tentative slip rate of 1 to 8 mm/yr for the SDVFZ.

  15. Neonatal death suspected to be from sepsis was found to be kernicterus with G6PD deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Robert D; Yaish, Hassan M; Wiedmeier, Susan E; Reading, N Scott; Pysher, Theodore J; Palmer, Cheryl Ann; Prchal, Josef T

    2013-12-01

    We cared for a term male infant born to Burmese immigrants. At about 24 hours a total serum bilirubin (TSB) was 9.3 mg/dL, and phototherapy was begun. It was stopped 48 hours later, with a TSB of 10.9 mg/dL, and he was discharged from the hospital with an appointment for a repeat TSB check 48 hours later. A few hours before the appointment he became listless and apneic, and his parents took him to the emergency department of the regional children's hospital, where sepsis was suspected. The TSB was 41 mg/dL. He died 4 hours later, despite intensive care efforts, with opisthotonus and refractory hypotension. Blood drawn before the exchange transfusion had low glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) enzymatic activity, and sequencing of the G6PD gene revealed the G6PD Mahidol mutation (c.487G>A). Cultures and postmortem examination did not demonstrate an infectious process, but kernicterus was present. Acute kernicterus can mimic septic shock.

  16. Signatures of Energy Flux in Particle Production: A Black Hole Birth Cry and Death Gasp

    CERN Document Server

    Good, Michael R R

    2015-01-01

    It is recently argued that if the Hawking radiation process is unitary, then a black hole's mass cannot be monotonically decreasing. We examine the time dependent particle count and negative energy flux in the non-trivial conformal vacuum via the moving mirror approach. A new, exactly unitary solution is presented which emits a characteristic above-thermal positive energy burst, a thermal plateau, and negative energy flux. It is found that the characteristic positive energy flare and thermal plateau is observed in the particle outflow. However, the results of time dependent particle production show no overt indication of negative energy flux. Therefore, a black hole's birth cry is detectable by asymptotic observers via particle count, whereas its death gasp is not.

  17. Predictors of positive blood culture and deaths among neonates with suspected neonatal sepsis in a tertiary hospital, Mwanza- Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremiah Seni

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neonatal sepsis is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in neonates. Appropriate clinical diagnosis and empirical treatment in a given setting is crucial as pathogens of bacterial sepsis and antibiotic sensitivity pattern can considerably vary in different settings. This study was conducted at Bugando Medical Centre (BMC, Tanzania to determine the prevalence of neonatal sepsis, predictors of positive blood culture, deaths and antimicrobial susceptibility, thus providing essential information to formulate a policy for management of neonatal sepsis. Methods This was a prospective cross sectional study involving 300 neonates admitted at BMC neonatal unit between March and November 2009. Standard data collection form was used to collect all demographic data and clinical characteristics of neonates. Blood culture was done on Brain Heart Infusion broth followed by identification of isolates using conventional methods and testing for their susceptibility to antimicrobial agents using the disc diffusion method. Results Among 770 neonates admitted during the study period; 300 (38.9% neonates were diagnosed to have neonatal sepsis by WHO criteria. Of 300 neonates with clinical neonatal sepsis 121(40% and 179(60% had early and late onset sepsis respectively. Positive blood culture was found in 57 (47.1% and 92 (51.4% among neonates with early and late onset neonatal sepsis respectively (p = 0.466. Predictors of positive blood culture in both early and late onset neonatal sepsis were inability to feed, lethargy, cyanosis, meconium stained liquor, premature rupture of the membrane and convulsion. About 49% of gram negatives isolates were resistant to third generation cephalosporins and 28% of Staphylococcus aureus were found to be Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. Deaths occurred in 57 (19% of neonates. Factors that predicted deaths were positive blood culture (p = 0.0001, gram negative sepsis (p = 0.0001 and

  18. Predictors of positive blood culture and deaths among neonates with suspected neonatal sepsis in a tertiary hospital, Mwanza-Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayange, Neema; Kamugisha, Erasmus; Mwizamholya, Damas L; Jeremiah, Seni; Mshana, Stephen E

    2010-06-04

    Neonatal sepsis is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in neonates. Appropriate clinical diagnosis and empirical treatment in a given setting is crucial as pathogens of bacterial sepsis and antibiotic sensitivity pattern can considerably vary in different settings. This study was conducted at Bugando Medical Centre (BMC), Tanzania to determine the prevalence of neonatal sepsis, predictors of positive blood culture, deaths and antimicrobial susceptibility, thus providing essential information to formulate a policy for management of neonatal sepsis. This was a prospective cross sectional study involving 300 neonates admitted at BMC neonatal unit between March and November 2009. Standard data collection form was used to collect all demographic data and clinical characteristics of neonates. Blood culture was done on Brain Heart Infusion broth followed by identification of isolates using conventional methods and testing for their susceptibility to antimicrobial agents using the disc diffusion method. Among 770 neonates admitted during the study period; 300 (38.9%) neonates were diagnosed to have neonatal sepsis by WHO criteria. Of 300 neonates with clinical neonatal sepsis 121(40%) and 179(60%) had early and late onset sepsis respectively. Positive blood culture was found in 57 (47.1%) and 92 (51.4%) among neonates with early and late onset neonatal sepsis respectively (p = 0.466). Predictors of positive blood culture in both early and late onset neonatal sepsis were inability to feed, lethargy, cyanosis, meconium stained liquor, premature rupture of the membrane and convulsion. About 49% of gram negatives isolates were resistant to third generation cephalosporins and 28% of Staphylococcus aureus were found to be Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Deaths occurred in 57 (19%) of neonates. Factors that predicted deaths were positive blood culture (p = 0.0001), gram negative sepsis (p = 0.0001) and infection with ESBL (p = 0.008) or MRSA (p = 0

  19. [The Black Death as a cause of the massacres of Jews: a myth of medical history?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritzmann, I

    1998-01-01

    In the middle of the 14th century, most towns in German-speaking territories and beyond massacred their Jewish communities. Thousands of Jews were burnt, often connected with accusations of well-poisoning. Medical and socio-historical literature usually attributes these massacres to the anxiety created by the Black Death, which was sweeping over Europe during this period. This article argues that there is no direct link between the massacres and the plague. How other researchers showed before, far from acts of plague-terrified, frenzied mobs, the massacres were the carefully planned and executed work of the Christian local governments. In addition, the slaughtering of Jews began long before the Black Death broke out in Europe. No relation can be found between the intensity of the disease and the violence of the murderers, even though there were wide regional differences. Causes of the persecutions other than the effects of plague seem evident, mainly religious fears fueled by the Church, financial profit, and political interests. This article wants to draw the attention to a myth in the history of medicine, the myth of the plague as the main cause of the massacres in the 14th century. It also raises the question, whether the plague as a trigger for the massacres really was a basic requirement.

  20. Molecular identification by "suicide PCR" of Yersinia pestis as the agent of medieval black death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raoult, D; Aboudharam, G; Crubézy, E; Larrouy, G; Ludes, B; Drancourt, M

    2000-11-07

    Medieval Black Death is believed to have killed up to one-third of the Western European population during the 14th century. It was identified as plague at this time, but recently the causative organism was debated because no definitive evidence has been obtained to confirm the role of Yersinia pestis as the agent of plague. We obtained the teeth of a child and two adults from a 14th century grave in France, disrupted them to obtain the pulp, and applied the new "suicide PCR" protocol in which the primers are used only once. There were no positive controls: Neither Yersinia nor Yersinia DNA were introduced in the laboratory. A negative result is followed by a new test using other primers; a positive result is followed by sequencing. The second and third primer pair used, coding for a part of the pla gene, generated amplicons whose sequence confirmed that it was Y. pestis in 1 tooth from the child and 19/19 teeth from the adults. Negative controls were negative. Attempts to detect the putative alternative etiologic agents Bacillus anthracis and Rickettsia prowazekii failed. Suicide PCR avoids any risk of contamination as it uses a single-shot primer-its specificity is absolute. We believe that we can end the controversy: Medieval Black Death was plague.

  1. Contribution of volcanic forcing to the initiation of the Black Death Epidemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fell, Henry; Baldini, James; Dodds, Ben

    2017-04-01

    The 14th Century plague epidemic, commonly termed the Black Death, coincided with the tumultuous climatic shift from the relative stability of the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA) to the initiation of the Little Ice Age (LIA). Plague is predominantly a vector borne disease that is spread through the transmission of the Yersinia pestis bacteria. This bacterium may have originated in the rodent populations of the Tibetan Plateau and later spread rapidly westward though Eurasia after vector transmission to humans. Several studies have determined that Asian rodent and vector populations are highly sensitive to climatic perturbations. The Samalas eruption of 1257 was the largest injection of aerosols in the Common Era and therefore probably had a significant climatic effect. Through a range of proxy records across Eurasia we reconstruct the climate for the period immediately preceding the outbreak of plague. This study investigates the interaction between the Samalas eruption of 1257, the climatic response to the event and the potential effect on the initiation of the Black Death epidemic which shaped population and culture across Eurasia for centuries.

  2. Bed sharing among black infants and sudden infant death syndrome: interactions with other known risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Linda Y; Moon, Rachel Y; Hauck, Fern R

    2010-01-01

    Bed sharing has been associated with sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and may contribute to the racial disparity seen in infant mortality. It is unclear how bed sharing interacts with other factors to impact SIDS risk. We aimed to measure the effects of bed sharing on risk of SIDS in blacks and to determine whether the risk is modified by other characteristics of the sleep environment. Characteristics of 195 black infants who died of SIDS were compared with matched controls. The moderating influence of known SIDS risk factors on the effect of bed sharing on risk of SIDS was examined using logistic regression. Almost half (47.4%) of the study population bed shared during the last/reference sleep (58% cases and 37% controls). Bed sharing was associated with 2 times greater risk of SIDS compared with not bed sharing. The deleterious effect of bed sharing was more pronounced with a soft sleep surface, pillow use, maternal smoking, and younger infant age. However, bed sharing was still associated with an increased risk of SIDS, even when the infant was not using a pillow or sleeping on a firm surface. The strongest predictors of SIDS among bed-sharing infants were soft sleep surface, nonuse of a pacifier, and maternal smoking during pregnancy. Bed sharing is a common practice among black infants. It is associated with a clear and strong increased risk of SIDS, which is even greater when combined with other known risk factors for SIDS. This practice likely contributes to the excess incidence of SIDS among blacks, and culturally competent education methods must be developed to target this high-risk group. Copyright © 2010 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. "To look at death another way": Black teenage males' perspectives on second-lines and regular funerals in New Orleans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordere, Tashel C

    The purpose of this study was to describe how Black adolescent males understand "second-line" (musical processions) and "regular"/traditional funeral rituals in New Orleans following the violent deaths of significant persons in their lives. In-depth interviews were conducted with 10 Black males between the ages of 12 and 15 using descriptive phenomenology methodology. Findings revealed that these participants understood death as a cause for celebration, remembrance, and unity related to their experiences with the second-line ritual. Three elements of the life world of Black teenage males were descriptive of second lines, including: a) observed locations of second lines; b) dancing to good music; and c) observed messages conveyed through t-shirts. Participants provided gender-based descriptions of perceived spoken and unspoken rights in grieving at the two distinct rituals. Related to their second-line experience, the teens reflect on ways in which they wish to have their deaths ritualized.

  4. The death of mourning: from Victorian crepe to the little black dress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedikian, Sonia A

    2008-01-01

    Mourning is a natural response to loss. In the late eighteenth century and throughout the nineteenth century, in England and France, the bereaved was expected to follow a complex set of rules, particularly among the upper classes, with women more bound to adhere to these customs than men. Such customs involved wearing heavy, concealing, black costume and the use of black crepe veils. Special black caps and bonnets were worn with these ensembles. Widows were expected to wear these clothes up to four years after their loss to show their grief. Jewelry often made of dark black jet or the hair of the deceased was used. To remove the costume earlier was thought disrespectful to the deceased. Formal mourning culminated during the reign of Queen Victoria. Her prolonged grief over the death of her husband, Prince Albert, had much to do with the practice. During the succeeding Edwardian rule, the fashions began to be more functional and less restrictive, but the dress protocol for men and women, including that for the period of mourning, was still rigidly adhered to. When World War I began, many women joined the workforce. Most widows attempted to maintain the traditional conventions of mourning, but with an increase in the number of casualties, it became impractical for them to interrupt their work in order to observe the seclusion called for by formal mourning etiquette. Never had the code of mourning been less strictly applied than during this period. The mourning outfits of the time were modest and made of practical materials. Little jewelry and few other accessories were used. Certain aspects of traditional mourning were still followed, such as the use of jet beading, crepe trim, and widows' caps. However, the hemlines fell above the ankle, the veil was used to frame the face instead of cover it, and the v-neckline left the chest and neck bare. During the following decades, gradually the rules were relaxed further and it became acceptable for both sexes to dress in

  5. The sex-selective impact of the Black Death and recurring plagues in the Southern Netherlands, 1349-1450.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Daniel R; Roosen, Joris

    2017-10-01

    Although recent work has begun to establish that early modern plagues had selective mortality effects, it was generally accepted that the initial outbreak of Black Death in 1347-52 was a "universal killer." Recent bioarchaeological work, however, has argued that the Black Death was also selective with regard to age and pre-plague health status. The issue of the Black Death's potential sex selectivity is less clear. Bioarchaeological research hypothesizes that sex-selection in mortality was possible during the initial Black Death outbreak, and we present evidence from historical sources to test this notion. To determine whether the Black Death and recurring plagues in the period 1349-1450 had a sex-selective mortality effect. We present a newly compiled database of mortality information taken from mortmain records in Hainaut, Belgium, in the period 1349-1450, which not only is an important new source of information on medieval mortality, but also allows for sex-disaggregation. We find that the Black Death period of 1349-51, as well as recurring plagues in the 100 years up to 1450, often had a sex-selective effect-killing more women than in "non-plague years." Although much research tends to suggest that men are more susceptible to a variety of diseases caused by bacteria, viruses and parasites, we cannot assume that the same direction of sex-selection in mortality applied to diseases in the distant past such as Second Pandemic plagues. While the exact reasons for the sex-selective effect of late-medieval plague are unclear in the absence of further data, we suggest that simple inequities between the sexes in exposure to the disease may not have been a key driver. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Climate-driven introduction of the Black Death and successive plague reintroductions into Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Boris V; Büntgen, Ulf; Easterday, W Ryan; Ginzler, Christian; Walløe, Lars; Bramanti, Barbara; Stenseth, Nils Chr

    2015-03-10

    The Black Death, originating in Asia, arrived in the Mediterranean harbors of Europe in 1347 CE, via the land and sea trade routes of the ancient Silk Road system. This epidemic marked the start of the second plague pandemic, which lasted in Europe until the early 19th century. This pandemic is generally understood as the consequence of a singular introduction of Yersinia pestis, after which the disease established itself in European rodents over four centuries. To locate these putative plague reservoirs, we studied the climate fluctuations that preceded regional plague epidemics, based on a dataset of 7,711 georeferenced historical plague outbreaks and 15 annually resolved tree-ring records from Europe and Asia. We provide evidence for repeated climate-driven reintroductions of the bacterium into European harbors from reservoirs in Asia, with a delay of 15 ± 1 y. Our analysis finds no support for the existence of permanent plague reservoirs in medieval Europe.

  7. Climate-driven introduction of the Black Death and successive plague reintroductions into Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büntgen, Ulf; Easterday, W. Ryan; Ginzler, Christian; Walløe, Lars; Bramanti, Barbara; Stenseth, Nils Chr.

    2015-01-01

    The Black Death, originating in Asia, arrived in the Mediterranean harbors of Europe in 1347 CE, via the land and sea trade routes of the ancient Silk Road system. This epidemic marked the start of the second plague pandemic, which lasted in Europe until the early 19th century. This pandemic is generally understood as the consequence of a singular introduction of Yersinia pestis, after which the disease established itself in European rodents over four centuries. To locate these putative plague reservoirs, we studied the climate fluctuations that preceded regional plague epidemics, based on a dataset of 7,711 georeferenced historical plague outbreaks and 15 annually resolved tree-ring records from Europe and Asia. We provide evidence for repeated climate-driven reintroductions of the bacterium into European harbors from reservoirs in Asia, with a delay of 15 ± 1 y. Our analysis finds no support for the existence of permanent plague reservoirs in medieval Europe. PMID:25713390

  8. Strategy for sensitive and specific detection of Yersinia pestis in skeletons of the black death pandemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Lisa; Harbeck, Michaela; Thomas, Astrid; Hoke, Nadja; Zöller, Lothar; Wiechmann, Ingrid; Grupe, Gisela; Scholz, Holger C; Riehm, Julia M

    2013-01-01

    Yersinia pestis has been identified as the causative agent of the Black Death pandemic in the 14(th) century. However, retrospective diagnostics in human skeletons after more than 600 years are critical. We describe a strategy following a modern diagnostic algorithm and working under strict ancient DNA regime for the identification of medieval human plague victims. An initial screening and DNA quantification assay detected the Y. pestis specific pla gene of the high copy number plasmid pPCP1. Results were confirmed by conventional PCR and sequence analysis targeting both Y. pestis specific virulence plasmids pPCP1 and pMT1. All assays were meticulously validated according to human clinical diagnostics requirements (ISO 15189) regarding efficiency, sensitivity, specificity, and limit of detection (LOD). Assay specificity was 100% tested on 41 clinically relevant bacteria and 29 Y. pseudotuberculosis strains as well as for DNA of 22 Y. pestis strains and 30 previously confirmed clinical human plague samples. The optimized LOD was down to 4 gene copies. 29 individuals from three different multiple inhumations were initially assessed as possible victims of the Black Death pandemic. 7 samples (24%) were positive in the pPCP1 specific screening assay. Confirmation through second target pMT1 specific PCR was successful for 4 of the positive individuals (14%). A maximum of 700 and 560 copies per µl aDNA were quantified in two of the samples. Those were positive in all assays including all repetitions, and are candidates for future continuative investigations such as whole genome sequencing. We discuss that all precautions taken here for the work with aDNA are sufficient to prevent external sample contamination and fulfill the criteria of authenticity. With regard to retrospective diagnostics of a human pathogen and the uniqueness of ancient material we strongly recommend using a careful strategy and validated assays as presented in our study.

  9. Strategy for sensitive and specific detection of Yersinia pestis in skeletons of the black death pandemic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Seifert

    Full Text Available Yersinia pestis has been identified as the causative agent of the Black Death pandemic in the 14(th century. However, retrospective diagnostics in human skeletons after more than 600 years are critical. We describe a strategy following a modern diagnostic algorithm and working under strict ancient DNA regime for the identification of medieval human plague victims. An initial screening and DNA quantification assay detected the Y. pestis specific pla gene of the high copy number plasmid pPCP1. Results were confirmed by conventional PCR and sequence analysis targeting both Y. pestis specific virulence plasmids pPCP1 and pMT1. All assays were meticulously validated according to human clinical diagnostics requirements (ISO 15189 regarding efficiency, sensitivity, specificity, and limit of detection (LOD. Assay specificity was 100% tested on 41 clinically relevant bacteria and 29 Y. pseudotuberculosis strains as well as for DNA of 22 Y. pestis strains and 30 previously confirmed clinical human plague samples. The optimized LOD was down to 4 gene copies. 29 individuals from three different multiple inhumations were initially assessed as possible victims of the Black Death pandemic. 7 samples (24% were positive in the pPCP1 specific screening assay. Confirmation through second target pMT1 specific PCR was successful for 4 of the positive individuals (14%. A maximum of 700 and 560 copies per µl aDNA were quantified in two of the samples. Those were positive in all assays including all repetitions, and are candidates for future continuative investigations such as whole genome sequencing. We discuss that all precautions taken here for the work with aDNA are sufficient to prevent external sample contamination and fulfill the criteria of authenticity. With regard to retrospective diagnostics of a human pathogen and the uniqueness of ancient material we strongly recommend using a careful strategy and validated assays as presented in our study.

  10. Strategy for Sensitive and Specific Detection of Yersinia pestis in Skeletons of the Black Death Pandemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Lisa; Harbeck, Michaela; Thomas, Astrid; Hoke, Nadja; Zöller, Lothar; Wiechmann, Ingrid; Grupe, Gisela; Scholz, Holger C.; Riehm, Julia M.

    2013-01-01

    Yersinia pestis has been identified as the causative agent of the Black Death pandemic in the 14th century. However, retrospective diagnostics in human skeletons after more than 600 years are critical. We describe a strategy following a modern diagnostic algorithm and working under strict ancient DNA regime for the identification of medieval human plague victims. An initial screening and DNA quantification assay detected the Y. pestis specific pla gene of the high copy number plasmid pPCP1. Results were confirmed by conventional PCR and sequence analysis targeting both Y. pestis specific virulence plasmids pPCP1 and pMT1. All assays were meticulously validated according to human clinical diagnostics requirements (ISO 15189) regarding efficiency, sensitivity, specificity, and limit of detection (LOD). Assay specificity was 100% tested on 41 clinically relevant bacteria and 29 Y. pseudotuberculosis strains as well as for DNA of 22 Y. pestis strains and 30 previously confirmed clinical human plague samples. The optimized LOD was down to 4 gene copies. 29 individuals from three different multiple inhumations were initially assessed as possible victims of the Black Death pandemic. 7 samples (24%) were positive in the pPCP1 specific screening assay. Confirmation through second target pMT1 specific PCR was successful for 4 of the positive individuals (14%). A maximum of 700 and 560 copies per µl aDNA were quantified in two of the samples. Those were positive in all assays including all repetitions, and are candidates for future continuative investigations such as whole genome sequencing. We discuss that all precautions taken here for the work with aDNA are sufficient to prevent external sample contamination and fulfill the criteria of authenticity. With regard to retrospective diagnostics of a human pathogen and the uniqueness of ancient material we strongly recommend using a careful strategy and validated assays as presented in our study. PMID:24069445

  11. Menthol and Nonmenthol Cigarette Smoking: All-Cause Deaths, Cardiovascular Disease Deaths, and Other Causes of Death Among Blacks and Whites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Heather M; Tarone, Robert E; Wang, Thomas J; Blot, William J

    2016-05-10

    In contrast to whites, black smokers prefer menthol cigarettes over nonmenthol cigarettes by a large margin and tend to have higher mortality from several smoking-related diseases than whites, raising the possibility that menthol cigarettes contribute to racial disparities in risk. Evidence for differential associations between menthol and nonmenthol cigarettes indicates lower cancer risk for menthol smokers, but for cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality, evidence has been inconsistent. Cox proportional hazards models were used to compute hazard ratios and accompanying 95% confidence intervals for all-cause and CVD mortality for menthol compared with nonmenthol cigarette smokers among 65 600 participants in the Southern Community Cohort Study, an ongoing community-based cohort with the largest number of menthol smokers being traced. Among the 27 619 current cigarette smokers, 4224 died during follow-up, with 1130 deaths attributed to CVD. Both all-cause (hazard ratio=0.93; 95% confidence interval=0.86-1.01; P=0.10) and CVD (hazard ratio=0.88; 95% confidence interval=0.76-1.03; P=0.10) mortality risks were similar in menthol compared with nonmenthol cigarette smokers. Smoking regardless of cigarette type is hazardous to health, but these results do not indicate that menthol cigarettes are associated with greater CVD risks than nonmenthol cigarettes. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Exploring the birth and death of black holes and other creatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márka, Szabolcs

    2012-07-01

    Astronomers and physicists of diverse interest are teaming up to study enigmatic cosmic phenomena, such as the life cycle of black holes. A "disruptive innovation" is about to emerge during the next decade: Advanced gravitational-wave observatories. The emergence of gravitational-wave physics as a viable observational channel is expected to improve our understanding of the Universe in unprecedented and plausibly unexpected ways, and to enhance the capabilities of the astrophysics community. Detecting cosmic counterparts to gravitational-wave events would revolutionize our understanding of violent astrophysical processes, such as the birth and death of black holes and neutron stars. Although the vanguard of joint observational work with electromagnetic observatories has already rewarded us with a glimpse of the power of gravitational-wave astronomy, the most interesting science is yet to come. Many sources of gravitational-waves are expected to be observable through a broad set of messengers, including γ-rays, X-rays, optical, radio, and neutrino emission. Multimessenger investigations may be crucial for the first detection of gravitational-waves, and could provide the broadest scientific impact afterwards. This paper outlines some exciting aspects of transient multimessenger astronomy with gravitational-waves and highlights open questions that might be resolvable by Advanced or third generation gravitational-wave detector networks. In addition, we will use examples from current research to illustrate that the toolkit of fundamental research can enrich other fields, and that synergistic science can expand horizons here on Earth. © 2012 New York Academy of Sciences.

  13. Suicides, homicides, accidents, and other external causes of death among blacks and whites in the Southern Community Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer S Sonderman

    Full Text Available Prior studies of risk factors associated with external causes of death have been limited in the number of covariates investigated and external causes examined. Herein, associations between numerous demographic, lifestyle, and health-related factors and the major causes of external mortality, such as suicide, homicide, and accident, were assessed prospectively among 73,422 black and white participants in the Southern Community Cohort Study (SCCS. Hazard ratios (HR and 95% confidence intervals (CI were calculated in multivariate regression analyses using the Cox proportional hazards model. Men compared with women (HR = 2.32; 95% CI: 1.87-2.89, current smokers (HR = 1.74; 95% CI: 1.40-2.17, and unemployed/never employed participants at the time of enrollment (HR = 1.67; 95% CI 1.38-2.02 had increased risk of dying from all external causes, with similarly elevated HRs for suicide, homicide, and accidental death among both blacks and whites. Blacks compared with whites had lower risk of accidental death (HR = 0.46; 95% CI: 0.38-0.57 and suicide (HR = 0.55; 95% CI: 0.31-0.99. Blacks and whites in the SCCS had comparable risks of homicide death (HR = 1.05; 95% CI: 0.63-1.76; however, whites in the SCCS had unusually high homicide rates compared with all whites who were resident in the 12 SCCS states, while black SCCS participants had homicide rates similar to those of all blacks residing in the SCCS states. Depression was the strongest risk factor for suicide, while being married was protective against death from homicide in both races. Being overweight/obese at enrollment was associated with reduced risks in all external causes of death, and the number of comorbid conditions was a risk factor for iatrogenic deaths. Most risk factors identified in earlier studies of external causes of death were confirmed in the SCCS cohort, in spite of the low SES of SCCS participants. Results from other epidemiologic cohorts are needed to confirm the novel findings

  14. Network theory may explain the vulnerability of medieval human settlements to the Black Death pandemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, José M; Verdú, Miguel

    2017-03-06

    Epidemics can spread across large regions becoming pandemics by flowing along transportation and social networks. Two network attributes, transitivity (when a node is connected to two other nodes that are also directly connected between them) and centrality (the number and intensity of connections with the other nodes in the network), are widely associated with the dynamics of transmission of pathogens. Here we investigate how network centrality and transitivity influence vulnerability to diseases of human populations by examining one of the most devastating pandemic in human history, the fourteenth century plague pandemic called Black Death. We found that, after controlling for the city spatial location and the disease arrival time, cities with higher values of both centrality and transitivity were more severely affected by the plague. A simulation study indicates that this association was due to central cities with high transitivity undergo more exogenous re-infections. Our study provides an easy method to identify hotspots in epidemic networks. Focusing our effort in those vulnerable nodes may save time and resources by improving our ability of controlling deadly epidemics.

  15. Modelling the black death. A historical case study and implications for the epidemiology of bubonic plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monecke, Stefan; Monecke, Hannelore; Monecke, Jochen

    2009-12-01

    We analysed a plague outbreak in the mining town of Freiberg in Saxony which started in May 1613 and ended in February 1614. This epidemic was selected for study because of the high quality of contemporary sources. It was possible to identify 1400 individual victims meaning that more than 10% of the population of the city perished. The outbreak was modelled by 9 differential equations describing flea, rat, and human populations. This resulted in a close fit to the historical records of this outbreak. An interesting implication of the model is that the introduction of even a small number of immune rats into an otherwise unchanged setting results in an abortive outbreak with very few human victims. Hence, the percentage of immune rats directly influences the magnitude of a human epidemic by diverting search activities of the fleas. Thus, we conclude that the spread of Rattus norvegicus, which might acquire partial herd immunity by exposure to soil- or water-borne Yersinia species due to its preference for wet habitats, contributed to the disappearance of Black Death epidemics from Europe in the 18th century. In order to prove whether or not the parameter values obtained by fitting a given outbreak are also applicable to other cases, we modelled the plague outbreak in Bombay 1905/06 using the same parameter values except for the number of humans as well as of immune and susceptible rats.

  16. Spooky Suspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacifici, Lara

    2011-01-01

    This activity presents an option for covering biology content while engaging students in an investigation that highlights the spirit of Halloween. Students are engaged in the story line and have fun trying to solve the mystery kidnapping by using science skills to examine the evidence and eliminate some ghoulish suspects. (Contains 1 figure.)

  17. Black-White differences in the effect of baseline depressive symptoms on deaths due to renal diseases: 25 year follow up of a nationally representative community sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assari, Shervin; Burgard, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    More studies are needed to examine whether race moderates the effect of baseline depressive symptoms on cause-specific mortality including deaths due to renal diseases in the United States. The present longitudinal study compared Blacks and Whites for the effect of baseline depressive symptoms on deaths due to renal diseases over a 25-year period in a nationally representative community sample. Data came from the Americans' Changing Lives (ACL) study, a nationally representative cohort that followed 3361 Black (n = 1156) or White (n = 2205) adults 25 and older for up to 25 years from 1986 to 2011. Month, year and cause of death were extracted from death certificates or national death index reports and coded based on ICD-9 or ICD-10 codes, depending on the year of death. We used Cox proportional hazards models for data analysis. Time to death due to renal diseases over a 25-year period was the outcome, baseline depressive symptoms (11-item Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression [CES-D]) was the predictor, demographic characteristics, socio-economic status and chronic medical conditions (CMC) (hypertension, diabetes, chronic lung disease, heart disease, stroke, cancer, and arthritis) at baseline were controls, and race was the focal moderator. In the pooled sample, race and baseline depressive symptoms showed a significant interaction, suggesting a stronger effect of baseline depressive symptoms on deaths due to renal diseases for Whites compared to Blacks. In race-specific models, high depressive symptoms at baseline increased risk of death due to renal diseases among Whites but not Blacks. The Black-White difference in the predictive role of baseline depressive symptoms on deaths due to renal diseases over a 25-year period found here provides support for the Black-White health paradox.

  18. Suggested Cut-Off Values for Vitamin D as a Risk Marker for Total and Cardiac Death in Patients with Suspected Acute Coronary Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Naesgaard, Patrycja A.; Ricardo A. León de la Fuente; Nilsen, Stein Tore; Pönitz, Volker; Brügger-Andersen, Trygve; Grundt, Heidi; Staines, Harry; Nilsen, Dennis W.T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Several studies have demonstrated an association between low vitamin D levels and cardiovascular risk. Vitamin D cut-off levels are still under debate. Objectives To assess two cut-off levels, 40 and 70 nmol/L, respectively, for vitamin D measured as 25-hydroxyvitamin D in chest pain patients with suspected acute coronary syndrome. Methods We investigated 1853 patients from coastal-Norway and inland Northern-Argentina. A similar database was used for pooling of d...

  19. Stellar Death by Black Hole: How Tidal Disruption Events Unveil the High Energy Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Eric Robert

    2017-08-01

    When a star comes very close to a supermassive black hole, the tidal field of the hole can be strong enough to deform and stretch the star into a stream of debris. Half of this stellar debris stream returns to the black hole and forms an accretion disk, briefly lighting up the black hole and, in the most extreme cases, launching relativistic jets. These ``tidal disruption events,'' from the initial stellar destruction to the eventual jet production, are the focus of my thesis, and during this talk I will describe some of the theoretical advances we have made in understanding them. I will also discuss more recent work that shows how this relatively simple picture can be more complicated when the disrupting black hole is part of a binary system. Despite the added complexity, I will argue that there is a timescale over which one expects to see variation in the luminosity of a tidal disruption event from a binary supermassive black hole system. Using these predictions and a set of simulations, I will motivate such an interpretation for the superluminous supernova ASASSN-15lh.

  20. Leading Causes of Death Contributing to Decrease in Life Expectancy Gap Between Black and White Populations: United States, 1999-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochanek, Kenneth D; Anderson, Robert N; Arias, Elizabeth

    2015-11-01

    Life expectancy at birth has increased steadily since 1900 to a record 78.8 years in 2013. But differences in life expectancy between the white and black populations still exist, despite a decrease in the life expectancy gap from 5.9 years in 1999 to 3.6 years in 2013. Differences in the change over time in the leading causes of death for the black and white populations have contributed to this decrease in the gap in life expectancy. Between 1999 and 2013, the decrease in the life expectancy gap between the black and white populations was mostly due to greater decreases in mortality from heart disease, cancer, HIV disease, unintentional injuries, and perinatal conditions among the black population. Similarly, the decrease in the gap between black and white male life expectancy was due to greater decreases in death rates for HIV disease, cancer, unintentional injuries, heart disease, and perinatal conditions in black males. For black females, greater decreases in diabetes death rates, combined with decreased rates for heart disease and HIV disease, were the major causes contributing to the decrease in the life expectancy gap with white females. The decrease in the gap in life expectancy between the white and black populations would have been larger than 3.6 years if not for increases in death rates for the black population for aortic aneurysm, Alzheimer’s disease, and maternal conditions. For black males, the causes that showed increases in death rates over white males were hypertension, aortic aneurysm, diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease, and kidney disease, while the causes that showed increases in death rates for black females were Alzheimer’s disease, maternal conditions, and atherosclerosis. This NCHS Data Brief is the second in a series of data briefs that explore the causes of death contributing to differences in life expectancy between detailed ethnic and racial populations in the United States. The first data brief focused on the racial differences in life

  1. Health in post-Black Death London (1350-1538): age patterns of periosteal new bone formation in a post-epidemic population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitte, Sharon N

    2014-10-01

    Previous research has shown that the Black Death targeted older adults and individuals who had been previously exposed to physiological stressors. This project investigates whether this selectivity of the Black Death, combined with post-epidemic rising standards of living, led to significant improvements in patterns of skeletal stress markers, and by inference in health, among survivors and their descendants. Patterns of periosteal lesions (which have been previously shown, using hazard analysis, to be associated with elevated risks of mortality in medieval London) are compared between samples from pre-Black Death (c. 1,000-1,300, n = 464) and post-Black Death (c. 1,350-1,538, n = 133) London cemeteries. To avoid the assumptions that stress markers alone provide a direct measure of health and that a change in frequencies of the stress marker by itself indicates changes in health, this study assesses age-patterns of the stress marker to obtain a more nuanced understanding of the population-level effects of an epidemic disease. Age-at-death in these samples is estimated using transition analysis, which provides point estimates of age even for the oldest adults in these samples and thus allows for an examination of physiological stress across the lifespan. The frequency of lesions is significantly higher in the post-Black Death sample, which, at face value, might indicate a general decline in health. However, a significant positive association between age and periosteal lesions, as well as a significantly higher number of older adults in the post-Black Death sample more likely suggests improvements in health following the epidemic. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Medical Care or Disciplinary Discourses? Preventive Measures against the Black Death in Late Medieval Paris: A Brief Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yong Jin; Park, Sam Hun

    2017-03-01

    This paper examined the political and social implications of the Compendium de epidemia prescription written by the Masters of the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Paris in the mid-14th century during the Black Death. This study aimed to examine how the effects of power as a discourse owned by medical knowledge are revealed. This paper outlines the composition of the contents based on the 1888 edition edited and translated by Émile H. Rébouis and notes the features of the prescription examined by the existing study of medical history rather than the causes of diseases. Compendium de epidemia seems to have been written primarily for the royal family and nobles who ordered them when looking at prescription-related technologies. At the same time, under the influence of Islamic-Arabic academia, it clearly distinguishes the world of faith and the world of academia (intelligence), explaining the pathogenesis and infection pathways based on causality. The onset substrate is due to heat and humidity, and the prescription is to prevent the two from overdoing in the body. In particular, issues related to heat are criticized in connection with the value of life of knight-noblesse . This is in response to political criticism of the ineffectual French royal family and nobility at the beginning of the Hundred Years' War and shows why this tract sets the utilitas publica at the forefront as an important purpose. The conclusion has shown how medical knowledge produced on the Black Death pandemic how they function as discourses that have a sort of power effect on the value of life of knight-noblesse. It is necessary to conduct if these phenomena can be found in other contemporary medical writings.

  3. Black to Black

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkjær, Michael Alexander

    2012-01-01

    , menace, sensual spur, and associations with death along with an assertive presence is seen with black-clad pop performers. This becomes especially clear when comparing the distinctive stage-styles of Siouxsie Sioux (born 1957, UK) and Janelle Monáe (born 1985, USA). Siouxsie Sioux’s late 1970’s black......Pop musicians performing in black stage costume take advantage of cultural traditions relating to matters black. Stylistically, black is a paradoxical color: although a symbol of melancholy, pessimism, and renunciation, black also expresses minimalist modernity and signifies exclusivity (as...... is hinted by Rudyard Kipling’s illustration of ‘The [Black] Cat That Walked by Himself’ in his classic children’s tale). It was well understood by uniformed Anarchists, Fascists and the SS that there is an assertive presence connected with the black-clad figure. The paradox of black’s abstract elegance...

  4. SOME REASONS OF DISPLACES OF THE NOMADIC TRIBES IN EURASIA AND EXAMPLE OF THE BLACK DEATH IN CAFFA, 1346

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assoc. Prof. Dr. Mehmet TEZCAN

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The nomadic tribes in Eurasian steppes, adopted a manner oflife in nomadism, were scarcely abandoning their own residences, towhich caused some factors like generally epidemics, famines, locustattacks, or dangerous foreign threats just as oppressions by theXiongnu (to the Yuezhi or the Chinese (to the Xiongnu etc. Beingone of the reasons which led the nomadic tribes as far as to theWestern Asia and the Middle Europe, the epidemics appeared also inEurasia from the very beginnings of the history and during the MiddleAges, and spread out in the Central Asia that was on the greatcommercial routes, through the great Silk Roads in general.The epidemic named as “Black Death” appeared north of theBlack Sea in Caffa in 1346 and very influenced Medieval Europenegatively, which, there existed the period of the “Hundred Years’War”. However, there is not any exact information about its origin.According to the available information and the report by Gabriele de’Mussi, it occurred first in China in 1320s, and expanded into the NearEast rapidly through the invasion routes of the Mongol armies andcommercial ones. When Janibek Khan, the khan of the Golden Hordebegan again to besiege Caffa in 1345, the Black Death occurredamong the Mongol army. And the two Genoese ships, departed fromCaffa and came in the Mediterranean Sea in 1347, caused itsexpansion to the whole European countries, except for only Polandand Czechoslovakia, in 1348-49, and then, to Russia in 1351-53.Consequently, thirty per cent of the European population perished.As to how the epidemic influenced the nomadic world inEurasia, there is not enough information about it. However, thanks toit, we can reach to some interesting valuable data about Mongolstrategies of warfare: upon that many Mongolian soldiers of theMongolian army died due to this epidemic, the Mongol khan heldresponsible the Genoese in Caffa for the death. He made their corpses thrown into the citadel by catapults, and then

  5. Unequal burdens of loss: examining the frequency and timing of homicide deaths experienced by young Black men across the life course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jocelyn R

    2015-07-01

    I examined the frequency and developmental timing of traumatic loss resulting from the health disparity of homicide among young Black men in Baltimore, Maryland. Using a modified grounded theory approach, I conducted in-depth semistructured interviews with 40 Black men (aged 18-24 years) from January 2012 to June 2013. I also constructed adapted life history calendar tools using chronologies of loss, and (1) provided a comprehensive history of loss, (2) determined a specific frequency of homicide deaths, (3) indicated participants' relationship to the decedents, and (4) identified the developmental timing of deaths. On average, participants knew 3 homicide victims who were overwhelmingly peers. Participant experiences of homicide death started in early childhood, peaked in adolescence, and persisted into emerging adulthood. The traumatic loss of peer homicide was a significant developmental turning point and disrupted participants' social networks. The traumatic loss of peer homicide was a prevalent life course experience for young Black men and identified the need for trauma- and grief-informed interventions. Future research is needed to examine the physical and psychosocial consequences, coping resources and strategies, and developmental implications of traumatic loss for young Black men in urban contexts.

  6. Mobility, mortality, and the middle ages: identification of migrant individuals in a 14th century black death cemetery population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, E J; Montgomery, J; Evans, J A; Stantis, C; Mueller, V

    2013-02-01

    Mobility and migration patterns of groups and individuals have long been a topic of interest to archaeologists, used for broad explanatory models of cultural change as well as illustrations of historical particularism. The 14th century AD was a tumultuous period of history in Britain, with severely erratic weather patterns, the Great Famine of 1315-1322, the Scottish Wars of Independence, and the Hundred Years' War providing additional migration pressures to the ordinary economic issues drawing individuals to their capital under more stable conditions. East Smithfield Black Death Cemetery (Royal Mint) had a documented use period of only 2 years (AD 1348-1350), providing a precise historical context (∼50 years) for data. Adults (n = 30) from the East Smithfield site were sampled for strontium and oxygen stable isotope analyses of tooth enamel. Five individuals were demonstrated to be statistical outliers through the combined strontium and oxygen isotope data. Potential origins for migrants ranged from London's surrounding hinterlands to distant portions of northern and western Britain. Historic food sourcing practices for London were found to be an important factor for consideration in a broader than expected (87) Sr/(86) Sr range reflected in a comparison of enamel samples from three London datasets. The pooled dataset demonstrated a high level of consistency between site data, divergent from the geologically predicted range. We argue that this supports the premise that isotope data in human populations must be approached as a complex interaction between behavior and environment and thus should be interpreted cautiously with the aid of alternate lines of evidence. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. The Black Death

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results. From 1987-2001, the World Health Organization reported an annual average of 38,876 cases of the plague with 2847 ... to Mexico. Most human cases in the United States occur in two regions: 1) northern New Mexico, northern Arizona, and southern Colorado; and 2) California, southern .... destructive war weapon.

  8. Post-death cloning of endangered Jeju black cattle (Korean native cattle): fertility and serum chemistry in a cloned bull and cow and their offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Young; Song, Dong Hwan; Park, Min Jee; Park, Hyo Young; Lee, Seung Eun; Choi, Hyun Yong; Moon, Jeremiah Jiman; Kim, Young Hoon; Mun, Seong Ho; Oh, Chang Eon; Ko, Moon Suck; Lee, Dong Sun; Riu, Key Zung; Park, Se Pill

    2013-12-17

    To preserve Jeju black cattle (JBC; endangered native Korean cattle), a pair of cattle, namely a post-death cloned JBC bull and cow, were produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) in a previous study. In the present study, we examined the in vitro fertilization and reproductive potentials of these post-death cloned animals. Sperm motility, in vitro fertilization and developmental capacity were examined in a post-death cloned bull (Heuk Oll Dolee) and an extinct nuclear donor bull (BK94-13). We assessed reproductive ability in another post-death cloned cow (Heuk Woo Sunee) using cloned sperm for artificial insemination (AI). There were no differences in sperm motility or developmental potential of in vitro fertilized embryos between the post-death cloned bull and its extinct nuclear donor bull; however, the embryo development ratio was slightly higher in the cloned sperm group than in the nuclear donor sperm group. After one attempt at AI, the post-death cloned JBC cow became pregnant, and gestation proceeded normally until day 287. From this post-death cloned sire and dam, a JBC male calf (Heuk Woo Dolee) was delivered naturally (weight, 25 kg). The genetic paternity/maternity of the cloned JBC bull and cow with regard to their offspring was confirmed using International Society for Animal Genetics standard microsatellite markers. Presently, Heuk Woo Dolee is 5 months of age and growing normally. In addition, there were no significant differences in blood chemistry among the post-death cloned JBC bull, the cow, their offspring and cattle bred by AI. This is the first report showing that a pair of cattle, namely, a post-death cloned JBC bull and cow, had normal fertility. Therefore, SCNT can be used effectively to increase the population of endangered JBC.

  9. The Death of Imhotep: A Hermeneutical Framework for Understanding the Lack of Black Males in STEM Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocombe, Paul C.

    2018-01-01

    In Afrocentric circles in the United States, ancient Kemetic (Egyptian) scientist Imhotep is considered the Black father of medicine. In this article, I use his name in the title as an allusion to highlight the lack of Black males matriculating in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) programs or fields in the United States. The…

  10. Did medieval trade activity and a viral etiology control the spatial extent and seasonal distribution of Black Death mortality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossak, Brian H; Welford, Mark R

    2009-06-01

    Recent research into the world's greatest recorded epidemic, the Medieval Black Death (MBD), has cast doubt on Bubonic Plague as the etiologic agent. Prior research has recently culminated in outstanding advances in our understanding of the spatio-temporal pattern of MBD mortality, and a characterization of the incubation, latent, infectious, and symptomatic periods of the MBD. However, until now, several mysteries remained unexplained, including perhaps the biggest quandary of all: why did the MBD exhibit inverse seasonal peaks in mortality from diseases recorded in modern times, such as seasonal Influenza or the Indian Plague Epidemics of the early 1900 s? Although some have argued that climate changes likely explain the observed differences between modern clinical Bubonic Plague seasonality and MBD mortality accounts, we believe that another factor explains these dissimilarities. Here, we provide a synthetic hypothesis which builds upon previous theories developed in the last ten years or so. Our all-encompassing theory explains the causation, dissemination, and lethality of the MBD. We theorize that the MBD was a human-to-human transmitted virus, originating in East-Central Asia and not Africa (as some recent work has proposed), and that its areal extent during the first great epidemic wave of 1347-1350 was controlled hierarchically by proximity to trade routes. We also propose that the seasonality of medieval trade controlled the warm-weather mortality peaks witnessed during 1347-1350; during the time of greatest market activity, traders, fairgoers, and religious pilgrims served as unintentional vectors of a lethal virus with an incubation period of approximately 32 days, including a largely asymptomatic yet infectious period of roughly three weeks. We include a description of the rigorous research agenda that we have proposed in order to subject our theory to scientific scrutiny and a description of our plans to generate the first publicly available

  11. Pattern Electroretinography in Glaucoma Suspects and Early Primary Open Angle Glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Jafarzadehpour

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To explore retinal ganglion cell (RGC dysfunction in glaucoma suspects and patients with early primary open angle glaucoma (POAG using pattern electroretinography (PERG. Methods: Twenty glaucoma suspects (glaucomatous optic disc appearance, 15 early POAG (based on abnormal discs and abnormal visual fields and 16 normal controls were enrolled. Transient PERG was recorded in response to 0.8΀ and 16΀ black and white checkerboard stimuli. Amplitude and peak time (latency of the P50 and N95 components of the PERG response, and the ratio of N95 amplitude in response to 0.8΀ and 16΀ checks were measured. Results: N95 peak time (latency was significantly increased in both early manifest POAG and glaucoma suspects as compared to normal controls (P<0.001. In early POAG, N95 amplitude in response to small (0.8΀ checks and the small/large check ratio were reduced in comparison to normal eyes (P<0.05. However, in glaucoma suspects no significant N95 amplitude reduction was observed. No significant difference was observed among the study groups in terms of P50 amplitude or peak time. Conclusion: The N95 PERG response demonstrated uncoupled peak time and amplitude alterations in glaucoma. N95 peak time was significantly increased both in glaucoma suspects and early POAG; N95 amplitude reduction was present only in early POAG. PERG may detect RGC dysfunction (increased latency before cell death (decreased amplitude occurs.

  12. Congenital Malaria Among Newborns Admitted for Suspected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    None of the clinical feature had good sensitivity, specificity or predictive value for congenital malaria, and only 1.6% death was recorded in a baby with high parasite density. Conclusion: Congenital malaria is common in newborns with suspected neonatal sepsis. History of peripartum pyrexia, prematurity and intrauterine ...

  13. Targeted enrichment of ancient pathogens yielding the pPCP1 plasmid of Yersinia pestis from victims of the Black Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuenemann, Verena J; Bos, Kirsten; DeWitte, Sharon; Schmedes, Sarah; Jamieson, Joslyn; Mittnik, Alissa; Forrest, Stephen; Coombes, Brian K; Wood, James W; Earn, David J D; White, William; Krause, Johannes; Poinar, Hendrik N

    2011-09-20

    Although investigations of medieval plague victims have identified Yersinia pestis as the putative etiologic agent of the pandemic, methodological limitations have prevented large-scale genomic investigations to evaluate changes in the pathogen's virulence over time. We screened over 100 skeletal remains from Black Death victims of the East Smithfield mass burial site (1348-1350, London, England). Recent methods of DNA enrichment coupled with high-throughput DNA sequencing subsequently permitted reconstruction of ten full human mitochondrial genomes (16 kb each) and the full pPCP1 (9.6 kb) virulence-associated plasmid at high coverage. Comparisons of molecular damage profiles between endogenous human and Y. pestis DNA confirmed its authenticity as an ancient pathogen, thus representing the longest contiguous genomic sequence for an ancient pathogen to date. Comparison of our reconstructed plasmid against modern Y. pestis shows identity with several isolates matching the Medievalis biovar; however, our chromosomal sequences indicate the victims were infected with a Y. pestis variant that has not been previously reported. Our data reveal that the Black Death in medieval Europe was caused by a variant of Y. pestis that may no longer exist, and genetic data carried on its pPCP1 plasmid were not responsible for the purported epidemiological differences between ancient and modern forms of Y. pestis infections.

  14. "I 'See' Trayvon Martin": What Teachers Can Learn from the Tragic Death of a Young Black Male

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Bettina L.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this article is to examine the racially hostile environment of U.S. public schooling towards Black males. Drawing on the work of Foucault ("Discipline and punish. The birth of the prison," Penguin Books, London, 1977; "Michel Foucault: beyond structuralism and hermeneutics," The Harvester Press, Brighton, 1982)…

  15. Effect of a sudden infant death syndrome risk reduction education program on risk factor compliance and information sources in primarily black urban communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasinski, Kenneth A; Kuby, Alma; Bzdusek, Stefanie A; Silvestri, Jean M; Weese-Mayer, Debra E

    2003-04-01

    In the US, a higher incidence of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and a slower decline in the incidence of SIDS has been found among blacks when compared with white infants. The continued racial disparity in SIDS is thought to be attributable to lack of compliance with SIDS risk reduction recommendations. To better understand the disparities in SIDS risk reduction behaviors, we sought to study compliance and information sources related to SIDS among primarily black communities in a city with a high SIDS incidence rate before and after a targeted educational campaign. Pre- and post-SIDS Risk Reduction Education Program telephone surveys were performed in targeted Chicago communities with at least 86% blacks. Data collection for Survey 1 was from September 22 to November 4, 1999. Data collection for Survey 2 was from November 17, 2001, to January 12, 2002, 24 months after the aggressive implementation of a comprehensive, ethnically sensitive risk reduction program. Survey 1 analyzed data from 480 mothers with an infant <12 months of age (327 black, 66 white, and 87 Hispanic) and Survey 2 had 472 mothers (305 black, 77 white, and 90 Hispanic). The incidence of nighttime prone sleeping at Survey 1 was 25% among black respondents, 17% in whites, and 12% in Hispanics and decreased (but not significantly) among all groups by Survey 2. Overall, in Survey 2 compared with Survey 1, fewer mothers reported putting their infants on an adult bed, sofa, or cot both during the day and at night, with the biggest change seen in black mothers for daytime naps. Despite the same educational initiative, blacks increased the use of pillows, stuffed toys, and soft bedding in the sleep environment as compared with whites. More mothers in Survey 2 than in Survey 1 said that they noticed their infants sleeping on their back during the newborn hospitalization. Significantly more black and white mothers in Survey 2 compared with Survey 1 reported that a doctor or nurse had told them what

  16. Black hole horizon as an entanglement shield: implication from the life and death of quantum entanglement in three accelerating qubits coupled with scalar fields

    CERN Document Server

    Dai, Yue; Shi, Yu

    2015-01-01

    We consider quantum entanglement of three accelerating qubits, each of which is locally coupled with a real scalar field, without causal influence among the qubits or among the fields. The initial state is assumed to be the GHZ or the W state, the two representative three-partite entangled states. For each initial state, we study how various kinds of entanglement depend on the accelerations of the three qubits. All kinds of entanglement eventually suddenly die if at least two of three qubits have large enough accelerations. This result implies eventual sudden death of all kinds of entanglement among field-coupled particles sufficiently close to the horizon of a black hole, which is thus an entanglement shield.

  17. Using the distribution of the CCR5-Δ32 allele in third-generation Maltese citizens to disprove the Black Death hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, B; Schembri-Wismayer, P

    2011-04-01

    Malta was under Norman rule for over 400 years and has had three major documented plague outbreaks (and a number of minor ones) since the 14th century with death tolls of 5-15% of the population at the time. This makes the Maltese population ideal for testing the hypothesis that the Black Death (particularly that of 1346-52) was responsible for a genetic shift that spread the CCR5-Δ32 allele. By enrolling 300 blood donors to determine the percentage of the Maltese population resistant to HIV-1 (which uses the CCR5-receptor to infect cells), it was established that the CCR5-Δ32 allele frequency is almost zero in third-generation Maltese citizens and sequencing showed that the deletion observed in the region of interest is the 32-base deletion expected. Thus, despite the extensive Norman occupation and the repeated plague cullings, the CCR5-Δ32 allele frequency is extremely low. This provides a basis for the discussion of conflicting hypotheses regarding the possible origin, function and spread of the CCR5-Δ32 deletion. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Pediatric glaucoma suspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kooner K

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Karanjit Kooner,1 Matthew Harrison,1 Zohra Prasla,1 Mohannad Albdour,1 Beverley Adams-Huet21Department of Ophthalmology, 2Department of Clinical Sciences, Division of Biostatistics, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USAPurpose: To report demographic and ocular features of pediatric glaucoma suspects in an ethnically diverse population of North Central Texas.Design: Retrospective cross-sectional chart review.Participants: Subjects included 75 (136 eyes pediatric glaucoma suspects. Patients with one or more of the following risk factors were included: cup-to disc (C/D ratio of ≥0.6; intraocular pressure (IOP ≥21 mmHg; family history of glaucoma; congenital glaucoma in the opposite eye; history of blunt trauma to either eye; and presence of either Sturge–Weber or Axenfeld–Rieger syndrome, or oculodermal melanocytosis.Methods: Data were extracted from electronic patient medical records. Patient records with incomplete data were excluded. The main outcome measures were race, sex, age, IOP, C/D, family history of glaucoma; and glaucoma treatment.Results: Subjects included 28 (37.3% Hispanics, 20 (26.6% African Americans, 20 (26.6% Caucasians, and seven (9.3% Asians. Forty (53.3% of the patients were male. Suspicious optic disc was seen in 57 (76%; elevated IOP in 25 (33.3%; presence of family history in 13 (17.3%, and Sturge–Weber syndrome in nine (12% patients. The average C/D ratio was 0.58±0.2. The C/D ratios of African American (0.65±0.2, Hispanic (0.63±0.2, and Asian (0.62±0.15 patients were significantly greater than those of Caucasians (0.43±0.18; P=0.0004, 0.0003, and 0.0139, respectively. Caucasian patients were the youngest (7.9±4.8 years. Eleven cases (14.7% required medication.Conclusion: Thirty-three point seven percent of patients seen in the glaucoma clinic were glaucoma suspects. The most common risk factors for suspected glaucoma were suspicious optic discs, elevated IOP, and family history

  19. Banting Memorial Lecture 2010^. Type 2 diabetes as an 'infectious' disease: is this the Black Death of the 21st century?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, D R; Matthews, P C

    2011-01-01

    We are currently facing a global pandemic of obesity and Type 2 diabetes. In some settings, the population prevalence of Type 2 diabetes is 50%, and half of those affected will die from diabetes-related complications. Eight centuries ago, an epidemic of bubonic plague swept across Europe, killing at least half of its victims. We here draw comparisons between these two pandemics, proposing close analogies between the 'Black Death' of the 14th century and the modern-day equivalent of Type 2 diabetes. Both diseases can be considered in terms of an aetiological agent, a reservoir, a vector and a predisposing toxic environment; populations can be considered as highly susceptible to the transmissable agents of Type 2 diabetes in the setting of calorie excess, inadequate food labelling, poorly regulated advertising and sedentary lifestyles. As for tackling a pandemic of a contagious microbial pathogen, we believe that breaking the cycle of transmission in the diabetes epidemic must be underpinned by political will and prompt, decisive legislation backed by the medical community. Far from fearing that such measures edge us towards a 'nanny state', we believe individuals should expect a responsible government to safeguard them from the toxic milieu that puts them at risk of obesity and its complications, and that communities and populations have the right to have their health protected. © 2010 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2010 Diabetes UK.

  20. Camphor—A Fumigant during the Black Death and a Coveted Fragrant Wood in Ancient Egypt and Babylon—A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Viljoen

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The fragrant camphor tree (Cinnamomum camphora and its products, such as camphor oil, have been coveted since ancient times. Having a rich history of traditional use, it was particularly used as a fumigant during the era of the Black Death and considered as a valuable ingredient in both perfume and embalming fluid. Camphor has been widely used as a fragrance in cosmetics, as a food flavourant, as a common ingredient in household cleaners, as well as in topically applied analgesics and rubefacients for the treatment of minor muscle aches and pains. Camphor, traditionally obtained through the distillation of the wood of the camphor tree, is a major essential oil component of many aromatic plant species, as it is biosynthetically synthesised; it can also be chemically synthesised using mainly turpentine as a starting material. Camphor exhibits a number of biological properties such as insecticidal, antimicrobial, antiviral, anticoccidial, anti-nociceptive, anticancer and antitussive activities, in addition to its use as a skin penetration enhancer. However, camphor is a very toxic substance and numerous cases of camphor poisoning have been documented. This review briefly summarises the uses and synthesis of camphor and discusses the biological properties and toxicity of this valuable molecule.

  1. Camphor--a fumigant during the Black Death and a coveted fragrant wood in ancient Egypt and Babylon--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weiyang; Vermaak, Ilze; Viljoen, Alvaro

    2013-05-10

    The fragrant camphor tree (Cinnamomum camphora) and its products, such as camphor oil, have been coveted since ancient times. Having a rich history of traditional use, it was particularly used as a fumigant during the era of the Black Death and considered as a valuable ingredient in both perfume and embalming fluid. Camphor has been widely used as a fragrance in cosmetics, as a food flavourant, as a common ingredient in household cleaners, as well as in topically applied analgesics and rubefacients for the treatment of minor muscle aches and pains. Camphor, traditionally obtained through the distillation of the wood of the camphor tree, is a major essential oil component of many aromatic plant species, as it is biosynthetically synthesised; it can also be chemically synthesised using mainly turpentine as a starting material. Camphor exhibits a number of biological properties such as insecticidal, antimicrobial, antiviral, anticoccidial, anti-nociceptive, anticancer and antitussive activities, in addition to its use as a skin penetration enhancer. However, camphor is a very toxic substance and numerous cases of camphor poisoning have been documented. This review briefly summarises the uses and synthesis of camphor and discusses the biological properties and toxicity of this valuable molecule.

  2. Life After Death

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Joshua E Keating

    2013-01-01

    .... The effect is usually temporary. But the population shock of the Black Death was so dramatic that it caused a permanent increase in incomes -- an estimated 30% in Western Europe between 1500 and 1700.

  3. Death and Death Anxiety

    OpenAIRE

    Gonca Karakus; Zehra Ozturk; Lut Tamam

    2012-01-01

    Although death and life concepts seem so different from each other, some believe that death and life as a whole that death is accepted as the goal of life and death completes life. In different cultures, societies and disciplines, there have been very different definitions of death which changes according to personality, age, religion and cultural status of the individual. Attitudes towards death vary dramatically according to individuals. As for the death anxiety, it is a feeling which start...

  4. Technology and the Glaucoma Suspect

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Blumberg, Dana M; De Moraes, Carlos Gustavo; Liebmann, Jeffrey M; Garg, Reena; Chen, Cynthia; Theventhiran, Alex; Hood, Donald C

    2016-01-01

    ...), stereoscopic disc photographs, and automated perimetry as assessed by a group of glaucoma specialists in differentiating individuals with early glaucoma from suspects. Forty-six eyes (46 patients...

  5. Suspected poisoning of domestic animals by pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caloni, Francesca; Cortinovis, Cristina; Rivolta, Marina; Davanzo, Franca

    2016-01-01

    A retrospective study was carried out by reviewing all suspected cases of domestic animal poisoning attributed to pesticides, reported to the Milan Poison Control Centre (MPCC) between January 2011 and December 2013. During this period, pesticides were found to be responsible for 37.3% of all suspected poisoning enquiries received (815). The most commonly species involved was the dog (71.1% of calls) followed by the cat (15.8%), while a limited number of cases involved horses, goats and sheep. Most cases of exposure (47.1%) resulted in mild to moderate clinical signs. The outcome was reported in 59.9% of these cases, with death occurring in 10.4% of them. Insecticides (40.8%) proved to be the most common group of pesticides involved and exposure to pyrethrins-pyrethroids accounted for the majority of calls. According to the MPCC data, there has been a decrease in the number of suspected poisonings cases attributed to pesticides that have been banned by the EU, including aldicarb, carbofuran, endosulfan and paraquat. In contrast, there has been an increase of suspected poisoning cases attributed to the neonicotinoids, imidacloprid and acetamiprid, probably due to their widespread use in recent years. Cases of suspected poisoning that involved exposure to rodenticides accounted for 27.6% of calls received by the MPCC and anticoagulant rodenticides were the primary cause of calls, with many cases involving brodifacoum and bromadiolone. Herbicides were involved in 14.2% of calls related to pesticides and glyphosate was the main culprit in cases involving dogs, cats, horses, goats and sheep. As far as exposure to molluscicides (11.5%) and fungicides (5.9%), most of the cases involved dogs and the suspected poisoning agents were metaldehyde and copper compounds respectively. The data collected are useful in determining trends in poisoning episodes and identifying newly emerging toxicants, thus demonstrating the prevalence of pesticides as causative agents in animal

  6. Death and Death Anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonca Karakus

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Although death and life concepts seem so different from each other, some believe that death and life as a whole that death is accepted as the goal of life and death completes life. In different cultures, societies and disciplines, there have been very different definitions of death which changes according to personality, age, religion and cultural status of the individual. Attitudes towards death vary dramatically according to individuals. As for the death anxiety, it is a feeling which starts right after birth, lasts a whole life, is the underlying basis of all fears, have an impact on character development and is formed after realization that the person will no longer exist, can lose the world and everything is actually meaningless. The aim of this review is to overview death and death anxiety, the components of death anxiety, approaches about death anxiety, scales that are used to evaluate the death anxiety and the local and international research on that subject. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2012; 21(1.000: 42-79

  7. Health Issues Facing Black Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Inez Smith

    Black women in the United States experience a high incidence of serious health problems and, as a group, receive insufficient and inadequate medical care. The death rate for black women suffering from breast cancer has increased substantially since 1950. Also of great concern is the high incidence of cervical cancer in low income black women…

  8. Death and Death Anxiety

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gonca Karakus; Zehra Ozturk; Lut Tamam

    2012-01-01

    .... In different cultures, societies and disciplines, there have been very different definitions of death which changes according to personality, age, religion and cultural status of the individual...

  9. Black Americans and HIV/AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... any cause) in 2015. 21 The number of deaths among Blacks with an HIV diagnosis decreased 12% between 2011 ... declines, HIV was the 6th leading cause of death for Black men 20-44 and 4th for Black women ...

  10. The combined risks of reduced or increased function variants in cell death pathway genes differentially influence cervical cancer risk and herpes simplex virus type 2 infection among black Africans and the Mixed Ancestry population of South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Koushik; Williamson, Anna-Lise; Hazra, Annapurna; Dandara, Collet

    2015-10-12

    Cervical cancer is one of the most important cancers worldwide with a high incident and mortality rate and is caused by the human papilloma virus (HPV). Among sexually active women who get infected with human papillomavirus (HPV), a small fraction progresses to cervical cancer disease pointing to possible roles of additional risk factors in development of the disease which include host genetic factors and other infections such as HSV-2. Since cellular apoptosis plays a role in controlling the spread of virus-infections in cells, gene variants altering the function of proteins involved in cell death pathways might be associated with the clearing of virus infections. Activity altering polymorphisms in FasR (-1377G > A and -670A > G), FasL (-844 T > C) and CASP8 (-652 6 N ins/del) genes have been shown to alter the mechanism of apoptosis by modifying the level of expression of their correspondent proteins. In the present study, we set out to investigate the combined risks of CASP8, FasR, and FasL polymorphisms in cervical cancer, pre-cancerous lesions, HPV infection and HSV-2 infection. Participants were 442 South African women of black African and mixed-ancestry origin with invasive cervical cancer and 278 control women matched by age, ethnicity and domicile status. FasR and FasL polymorphisms were genotyped by TaqMan and CASP8 polymorphism by PCR-RFLP. The results were analysed with R using haplo.stats software version 1.5.2. CASP8 -652 6 N del + FasR-670A was associated with a reduced risk (P = 0.019, Combined Polymorphism Score (CPS) = -2.34) and CASP8 -652 6 N ins + FasR-1377G was associated with a marginal increased risk (P = 0.047, CPS = 1.99) of cervical cancer among black Africans. When compared within the control group, CASP8 -652 6 N ins + FasR-1377A showed a reduced risk (P = 0.023, CPS = -2.28) of HSV-2 infection in both black African and mixed-ancestry population. Our results show that the combined risks of

  11. The development in the understanding of the concept of death among black South African learners from the Eastern Cape, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilze van der Merwe

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Thirty-one learners aged 6–16 were selected using purposive sampling, with the aim of investigating their understanding of death. Opsomming Een-en-dertig leerders tussen 6 en 16 jaar is geselekteer met die doel om hulle begrip van dood te ondersoek. *Please note: This is a reduced version of the abstract. Please refer to PDF for full text.

  12. From "brute" to "thug:" the demonization and criminalization of unarmed Black male victims in America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiley, CalvinJohn; Fakunle, David

    The synonymy of Blackness with criminality is not a new phenomenon in America. Documented historical accounts have shown how myths, stereotypes, and racist ideologies led to discriminatory policies and court rulings that fueled racial violence in a post-Reconstruction era and has culminated in the exponential increase of Black male incarceration today. Misconceptions and prejudices manufactured and disseminated through various channels such as the media included references to a " brute " image of Black males. In the 21 st century, this negative imagery of Black males has frequently utilized the negative connotation of the terminology " thug ." In recent years, law enforcement agencies have unreasonably used deadly force on Black males allegedly considered to be "suspects" or "persons of interest." The exploitation of these often-targeted victims' criminal records, physical appearances, or misperceived attributes has been used to justify their unlawful deaths. Despite the connection between disproportionate criminality and Black masculinity, little research has been done on how unarmed Black male victims, particularly but not exclusively at the hands of law enforcement, have been posthumously criminalized. This paper investigates the historical criminalization of Black males and its connection to contemporary unarmed victims of law enforcement. Action research methodology in the data collection process is utilized to interpret how Black male victims are portrayed by traditional mass media, particularly through the use of language, in ways that marginalize and de-victimize these individuals. This study also aims to elucidate a contemporary understanding of race relations, racism, and the plight of the Black male in a 21-century "post-racial" America.

  13. Differences among the coloured, white, black, and other South African populations in smoking-attributed mortality at ages 35-74 years: a case-control study of 481,640 deaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitas, Freddy; Egger, Sam; Bradshaw, Debbie; Groenewald, Pam; Laubscher, Ria; Kielkowski, Danuta; Peto, Richard

    2013-08-24

    The full eventual effects of current smoking patterns cannot yet be seen in Africa. In South Africa, however, men and women in the coloured (mixed black and white ancestry) population have smoked for many decades. We assess mortality from smoking in the coloured, white, and black (African) population groups. In this case-control study, 481,640 South African notifications of death at ages 35-74 years between 1999 and 2007 yielded information about age, sex, population group, education, smoking 5 years ago (yes or no), and underlying disease. Cases were deaths from diseases expected to be affected by smoking; controls were deaths from selected other diseases, excluding only HIV, cirrhosis, unknown causes, external causes, and mental disorders. Disease-specific case-control comparisons yielded smoking-associated relative risks (RRs; diluted by combining some ex-smokers with the never-smokers). These RRs, when combined with national mortality rates, yielded smoking-attributed mortality rates. Summation yielded RRs and smoking-attributed numbers for overall mortality. In the coloured population, smoking prevalence was high in both sexes and smokers had about 50% higher overall mortality than did otherwise similar non-smokers or ex-smokers (men, RR 1·55, 95% CI 1·43-1·67; women, 1·49, 1·38-1·60). RRs were similar in the white population (men, 1·37, 1·29-1·46; women, 1·51, 1·40-1·62), but lower among Africans (men, 1·17, 1·15-1·19; women, 1·16, 1·13-1·20). If these associations are largely causal, smoking-attributed proportions for overall male deaths at ages 35-74 years were 27% (5608/20,767) in the coloured, 14% (3913/28,951) in the white, and 8% (20,398/264,011) in the African population. For female deaths, these proportions were 17% (2728/15,593) in the coloured, 12% (2084/17,899) in the white, and 2% (4038/205,623) in the African population. Because national mortality rates were also substantially higher in the coloured than in the white population

  14. Death Cafe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Lizzy; Corr, Charles A

    2017-06-01

    This article explains the meaning of the phrase Death Cafe and describes what typically occurs at a Death Cafe gathering. The article traces the history of the Death Cafe movement, explores some reasons why people take part in a Death Cafe gathering, and gives examples of what individuals think they might derive from their participation. In addition, this article notes similarities between the Death Cafe movement and three other developments in the field of death, dying, and bereavement. Finally, this article identifies two provisional lessons that can be drawn from Death Cafe gatherings and the Death Cafe movement itself.

  15. Radiological (scintigraphic) evaluation of patients with suspected pulmonar thromboembolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biello, D.R.

    1987-06-19

    The optimal strategy for diagnostic evaluation of patients with suspected pulmonary thromboembolism (PE) is subject of controversial and often conflicting opinions. If untreated, as many as 30% of patients with PE may die. Conversely, anticoagulant therapy significantly decreases mortality from PE, but bleeding complications occur. Underdiagnosis may result in a preventable death, and overdiagnosis may lead to significant hemorrhage from unnecessary anticoagulant therapy. This article outlines a practical guide for the use of pulmonary ventilation-perfusion (V-P) scintigraphy in patients with suspected PE. Perfusion imaging involves the intravenous injection of radiolabeled particles ranging from 10 to 60 ..mu..m in diameter (technetium Tc 99m macroaggregated albumin or technetium Tc 99m serum albumin microspheres); these particles are trapped in the capillaries and precapillary arterioles of the lung. The radiolabeled particles are distributed to the lungs in proportion to regional pulmonary blood flow. The correspondence of perfusion defects to bronchopulmonary segments is best appreciated in the posterior oblique views.

  16. Adolescent Deaths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgül Tüzün

    1997-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to find out the examination of adolescent deaths included in forensic cases and the effects of behavior peculiarities of this period on the cause and origin of deaths. 564 cases aged 11-20 years autopsied at the Morgue Department of İstanbul, Turkey in 1994-96 were examined. In 534 cases, the cause of death was determined and included in the study, but 26 cases left outside of this study because the cause of death was not determined. The 76.8 percent of the 538 cases was males and 23.2 percent was females. Accidental deaths(%4l.3 occupied the majority of the adolescent deaths. Homicidal deaths(%36.2 and suicidal deaths (%17.6 were the other origins of deaths. Manner of death'was not determined in 25 cases. Unnatural deaths (%93-l were found to be the most common cause of death. Firearm deaths (%18.4 occupied the majority of all unnatural deaths. The following causes of unnatural deaths were stab and incised wounds (%14.8 and hanging (%13.6. The results demonstrated that the causes of adolescent deaths in forensic cases almost reflected the violence based behavior pecularities of this age group. Key Words: Child, Adolescent, Violence, Death.

  17. Surveillance for violent deaths--national violent death reporting system, 16 States, 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karch, Debra L; Dahlberg, Linda L; Patel, Nimesh; Davis, Terry W; Logan, Joseph E; Hill, Holly A; Ortega, Lavonne

    2009-03-20

    An estimated 50,000 persons die annually in the United States as a result of violence-related injuries. This report summarizes data from CDC's National Violent Death Reporting System (NVDRS) regarding violent deaths from 16 U.S. states for 2006. Results are reported by sex, age group, race/ethnicity, marital status, location of injury, method of injury, circumstances of injury, and other selected characteristics. 2006. NVDRS collects data regarding violent deaths obtained from death certificates, coroner/medical examiner reports, and law enforcement reports. NVDRS began operation in 2003 with seven states (Alaska, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Oregon, South Carolina, and Virginia) participating; six states (Colorado, Georgia, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, and Wisconsin) joined in 2004 and four (California, Kentucky, New Mexico, and Utah) in 2005, for a total of 17 states. This report includes data from 16 states that collected statewide data; data from California are not included in this report because NVDRS has been implemented only in a limited number of California cities and counties rather than statewide. For 2006, a total of 15,007 fatal incidents involving 15,395 violent deaths occurred in the 16 NVDRS states included in this report. The majority (55.9%) of deaths were suicides, followed by homicides and deaths involving legal intervention (e.g. a suspect is killed by a law enforcement officer in the line of duty)(28.2%), violent deaths of undetermined intent (15.1%), and unintentional firearm deaths (0.7%). Suicides occurred at higher rates among males, American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/ANs), non-Hispanic whites, and persons aged 45--54 years and occurred most often in a house or apartment and involved the use of firearms. Suicides were precipitated primarily by mental-health, intimate-partner, or physical-health problems or by a crisis during the preceding 2 weeks. Homicides occurred at higher rates among males and persons aged 20

  18. An examination of pregnancy- related deaths among adolescents

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    maternal deaths (direct maternal causes of death) and pregnancy- related deaths (all deaths ... An estimated 1 164 deaths have been recorded among pregnant adolescents between 2006 and 2012. Adolescent maternal and ..... Solarin I, Black V. 'They told me to come back': Women's antenatal care booking experience in ...

  19. Suspected levamisole intoxication in calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, K R; Dwyer, C

    2016-07-01

    A group of 32 Friesian and four Hereford calves, 3-4 months old with body weights between 100-120 kg, were purchased from a weaner sale. On arrival at the property the Hereford calves were treated with a combination anthelmintic containing 2 g/L abamectin and 80 g/L levamisole hydrochloride. Shortly afterwards they developed tremors and frothing from the mouth, and two died overnight. The Friesian calves were treated with the same anthelmintic on the following day, when some showed hypersalivation and frothing from the mouth. Examination of the three most severely affected Friesian calves revealed severe nicotinic-type symptoms including hypersalivation, frothing from the mouth, muscle tremors, recumbency, rapid respiration, hyperaesthesia, and central nervous system depression. Other calves showed mild to moderate signs of intoxication including restlessness, tail switching, salivation, tremors, frequent defaecation, mild colic and jaw chomping. Two calves died shortly afterwards. An adverse drug event investigation revealed that the formulation and quality of the anthelmintic was within the correct specification, and that the drench gun was functioning correctly. Suspected levamisole intoxication due to a combination of possible overdosing, dehydration, and stress caused by transportation and prolonged yarding. Susceptibility to levamisole toxicity in New Zealand calves can be increased if factors like dehydration or stress are present. Levamisole has a narrow margin of safety, and overdosing in calves can easily occur if the dose rate is not based on their actual weight or health status.

  20. Compensating Scientism through "The Black Hole."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Lane

    The focal image of the film "The Black Hole" functions as a visual metaphor for the sacred, order, unity, and eternal time. The black hole is a symbol that unites the antinomic pairs of conscious/unconscious, water/fire, immersion/emersion, death/rebirth, and hell/heaven. The black hole is further associated with the quest for…

  1. Prisons of light : black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Kitty

    What is a black hole? Could we survive a visit to one -- perhaps even venture inside? Have we yet discovered any real black holes? And what do black holes teach us about the mysteries of our Universe? These are just a few of the tantalizing questions examined in this tour-de-force, jargon-free review of one of the most fascinating topics in modern science. In search of the answers, we trace a star from its birth to its death throes, take a hypothetical journey to the border of a black hole and beyond, spend time with some of the world's leading theoretical physicists and astronomers, and take a whimsical look at some of the wild ideas black holes have inspired. Prisons of Light - Black Holes is comprehensive and detailed. Yet Kitty Ferguson's lightness of touch and down-to-earth analogies set this book apart from all others on black holes and make it a wonderfully stimulating and entertaining read.

  2. Black Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Angela Khristin

    2013-01-01

    The migration of blacks in North America through slavery became united. The population of blacks passed down a tradition of artist through art to native born citizens. The art tradition involved telling stories to each generation in black families. The black culture elevated by tradition created hope to determine their personal freedom to escape…

  3. Black Alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Thomas D.; Wright, Roosevelt

    1988-01-01

    Examines some aspects of the problem of alcoholism among Blacks, asserting that Black alcoholism can best be considered in an ecological, environmental, sociocultural, and public health context. Notes need for further research on alcoholism among Blacks and for action to reduce the problem of Black alcoholism. (NB)

  4. Peering into the black hole - the quality of black mortality data in Por ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the year ending 30 June 1989, 26,8% of 5345 deaths in the Port Elizabeth area were classified as ill-defined. A study was undertaken in an attempt to identify the reasons for the high proportion of such deaths. Copies of all death notifications and death register forms of black people in the area served by the Port Elizabeth ...

  5. Black Saturn

    OpenAIRE

    Elvang, Henriette; Figueras, Pau

    2007-01-01

    Using the inverse scattering method we construct an exact stationary asymptotically flat 4+1-dimensional vacuum solution describing Black Saturn: a spherical black hole surrounded by a black ring. Angular momentum keeps the configuration in equilibrium. Black saturn reveals a number of interesting gravitational phenomena: (1) The balanced solution exhibits 2-fold continuous non-uniqueness for fixed mass and angular momentum; (2) Remarkably, the 4+1d Schwarzschild black hole is not unique, sin...

  6. Tarantula bite leads to death and gangrene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banerjee Kalyan

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Chilobrachys hardwikii-giant black hairy spider bite produced two deaths, one case of gangrene of the foot and urticarial rashes in another person in a remote village of Churulia 30 km from Asansol.

  7. Ten Leading Causes of Death and Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PDF 36KB] (color) 2007 [PDF 34KB] (black and white) 2006 [PDF37KB] (color) Charts also available in GIF and JPEG format Causes of Injury Death: Highlighting Unintentional Injury 2015 [PDF 93KB] (color) ...

  8. A case of suspect “cyanosis”

    OpenAIRE

    Elisabetta Antonucci; Matteo Conte; Michele Di Pumpo; Giuseppe Antonucci

    2013-01-01

    CLINICAL CASE A 70-year old woman was admitted to our hospital because of fever, asthenia and a suspected stroke. Her medical history showed a congenital cardiopathy (Patent Foramen Ovale, PFO). Skin and oral mucosa pigmentation, orthostatic hypotension, hypoglycemia and hyponatriemia arose the suspect of Addison’s disease. The diagnosis was confirmed by the evaluation of basal levels of plasma ACTH and serum cortisol, and serum cortisol levels after ACTH stimulation. Abdominal CT scan showed...

  9. Black Psyllium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black psyllium is a weed that grows aggressively throughout the world. The plant was spread with the colonization of ... make medicine. Be careful not to confuse black psyllium with other forms of psyllium including blond psyllium. ...

  10. Black Tea

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of black tea is LIKELY SAFE for most adults. Drinking too much black tea, such as more than ... reduce some of the heart health benefits of drinking tea. Milk might bind with the antioxidants in tea and ...

  11. Brain death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beresford, H R

    1999-05-01

    Current law in the United States authorizes physicians to diagnose brain death by applying generally accepted neurologic criteria for determining loss of function of the entire brain. This article offers a medical-legal perspective on problems that may arise with respect to the determination of brain death. These include the possibility of diagnostic error, conceptual disagreements that may constrain the use of neurologic criteria to diagnose death, and the conflation of brain death and loss of consciousness. This article also addresses legal aspects of the debate over whether to expand the definition of brain death to include permanent unconsciousness. Although existing laws draw a clear distinction between brain death and the persistent vegetative state, many courts have authorized removal of life support from individuals whose unconsciousness is believed to be permanent on proof that removal accords with preferences expressed before sentience was lost.

  12. Herbal hepatotoxicity: suspected cases assessed for alternative causes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teschke, Rolf; Schulze, Johannes; Schwarzenboeck, Alexander; Eickhoff, Axel; Frenzel, Christian

    2013-09-01

    Alternative explanations are common in suspected drug-induced liver injury (DILI) and account for up to 47.1% of analyzed cases. This raised the question of whether a similar frequency may prevail in cases of assumed herb-induced liver injury (HILI). We searched the Medline database for the following terms: herbs, herbal drugs, herbal dietary supplements, hepatotoxic herbs, herbal hepatotoxicity, and herb-induced liver injury. Additional terms specifically addressed single herbs and herbal products: black cohosh, Greater Celandine, green tea, Herbalife products, Hydroxycut, kava, and Pelargonium sidoides. We retrieved 23 published case series and regulatory assessments related to hepatotoxicity by herbs and herbal dietary supplements with alternative causes. The 23 publications comprised 573 cases of initially suspected HILI; alternative causes were evident in 278/573 cases (48.5%). Among them were hepatitis by various viruses (9.7%), autoimmune diseases (10.4%), nonalcoholic and alcoholic liver diseases (5.4%), liver injury by comedication (DILI and other HILI) (43.9%), and liver involvement in infectious diseases (4.7%). Biliary and pancreatic diseases were frequent alternative diagnoses (11.5%), raising therapeutic problems if specific treatment is withheld; pre-existing liver diseases including cirrhosis (9.7%) were additional confounding variables. Other diagnoses were rare, but possibly relevant for the individual patient. In 573 cases of initially assumed HILI, 48.5% showed alternative causes unrelated to the initially incriminated herb, herbal drug, or herbal dietary supplement, calling for thorough clinical evaluations and appropriate causality assessments in future cases of suspected HILI.

  13. The Superstrong Black Mother.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Sinikka; Reid, Megan

    Baltimore mother Toya Graham became a viral video sensation after being filmed yelling at and hitting her teen son. Graham, who is Black, was trying to stop her son from joining the protests following Freddie Gray's death in police custody in Baltimore in April 2015. Dubbed "mother of the year," news outlets applauded Graham for her fierce determination to keep her son out of harm's way by any means necessary. The media and ensuing public response to the video are illuminating for what they say about cultural notions of Black motherhood: the good Black mom should be superstrong to protect her children, but she is also responsible for controlling her children and preventing them from getting into trouble. In celebrating Graham, the media was implicitly condemning all the other mothers whose children participated in the protests-that is, the mothers who did not prevent their children from "senseless" rioting against institutional racism in policing.

  14. Widening 'Race Gap' in U.S. Infant Deaths

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of progress, there's been a recent rise in deaths for black babies, study finds To use the sharing features ... 2017 MONDAY, July 3, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The death rate for black infants in the United States has risen in ...

  15. The phenomenology of specialization of criminal suspects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Tumminello

    Full Text Available A criminal career can be either general, with the criminal committing different types of crimes, or specialized, with the criminal committing a specific type of crime. A central problem in the study of crime specialization is to determine, from the perspective of the criminal, which crimes should be considered similar and which crimes should be considered distinct. We study a large set of Swedish suspects to empirically investigate generalist and specialist behavior in crime. We show that there is a large group of suspects who can be described as generalists. At the same time, we observe a non-trivial pattern of specialization across age and gender of suspects. Women are less prone to commit crimes of certain types, and, for instance, are more prone to specialize in crimes related to fraud. We also find evidence of temporal specialization of suspects. Older persons are more specialized than younger ones, and some crime types are preferentially committed by suspects of different ages.

  16. How Did Cause of Death Contribute to Racial Differences in Life Expectancy in the United States in 2010?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of 1.117 years in life expectancy for black males. Lower death rates for black males due to suicide, unintentional ... of 0.995 years in life expectancy for black females. Lower death rates for black females due to Chronic lower ...

  17. Death during police interrogation: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atanasijević Tatjana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cases of sudden and unexpected deaths of criminal suspects in presence of police always have special forensic medical approach. Often, such deaths are preceded by a state of extreme psychophysical activity (excitated delirium of suspects, when they may injure themselves. Police attempts to prevent that can inevitably lead to struggle. Immediately after the struggle ends (but also during a struggle, they abruptly become unresponsive, and develop cardiopulmonary arrest and death. Presence of drugs significantly intensifies the harmful effect of such state and leads to death. Case outline. We present a case of death of a young man brought into custody during police interrogation. Autopsy showed injuries and presence of MDMA, with suspicion that death was preceded by the state of excitated delirium. After thorough analysis of the case (complete autopsy, toxicological screening, microscopic survey of all organs, circumstances of death etc., our conclusion is that death was related to drug consumption - ecstasy. Concentration of ecstasy found in kidneys is the minimum concentration possible that could lead to heart malfunction and death. Conclusion. Our opinion is that there are no medical data by which we could determine if, and in what dosage, undesirable effects of ecstasy were enhanced by the circumstances of the case. .

  18. Prisons of Light - Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Kitty

    1998-05-01

    In this jargon-free review of one of the most fascinating topics in modern science, acclaimed science writer Kitty Ferguson examines the discovery of black holes, their nature, and what they can teach us about the mysteries of the universe. In search of the answers, we trace a star from its birth to its death throes, take a hypothetical journey to the border of a black hole and beyond, spend time with some of the world's leading theoretical physicists and astronomers, and take a whimsical look at some of the wild ideas black holes have inspired. Prisons of Light--Black Holes is comprehensive and detailed. Yet Kitty Ferguson's lightness of touch and down-to-earth analogies set this book apart from all others on black holes and make it a wonderfully stimulating and entertaining read.

  19. A case of suspect “cyanosis”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Antonucci

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available CLINICAL CASE A 70-year old woman was admitted to our hospital because of fever, asthenia and a suspected stroke. Her medical history showed a congenital cardiopathy (Patent Foramen Ovale, PFO. Skin and oral mucosa pigmentation, orthostatic hypotension, hypoglycemia and hyponatriemia arose the suspect of Addison’s disease. The diagnosis was confirmed by the evaluation of basal levels of plasma ACTH and serum cortisol, and serum cortisol levels after ACTH stimulation. Abdominal CT scan showed atrophy and calcification of adrenal glands. CONCLUSIONS In most cases, Addison’s disease is provoked by autoimmune destruction of the adrenal cortex; however, in our reported patient, tuberculosis could be a possible cause.

  20. Neonatal Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a premature baby include pneumonia (a lung infection), sepsis (a blood infection) and meningitis (an infection in the fluid around the brain and spinal cord). What birth defects most often cause neonatal death? The most common birth defects that cause ...

  1. Clinicopathological review of hepatocellular carcinoma in black ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Saharan Africa. The tumour runs a particularly fulminant course and is a major cause of deaths from cancer in the sub-continent. In most Black African patients, hepatocellular carcinoma presents clinically with typical symptoms and physical findings.

  2. Apis’s men: The black hand conspirators after the Great war

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakić Dragan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The activities of Colonel Dragutin Dimitrijević Apis and his clandestine Black Hand organisation in Serbia have long been scrutinised in connection with the assassination of Franz Ferdinand in Sarajevo in 1914 and the outbreak of the First World War. Regent Alexander and the Pašić government dealt severely with the Black Hand in the Salonica show trial in 1917 when Apis and two of his friends were sentenced to death, a number of officers sentenced to prison and other Black Handers purged from the civilian and military authorities. The rest of Black Handers, particularly those more prominent, who survived the war found themselves in a position of pariah in the newly-founded Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes (Yugoslavia. They were constantly under the watchful eye of the authorities and suspected of plotting subversive activities. To be sure, the Black Handers remained in close contact and sought to bring about a “revision” of the Salonica trial and rehabilitate themselves and their dead comrades. This paper focuses on three particular Black Handers, Božin Simić, Radoje Janković and Mustafa Golubić - although their other friends are also mentioned in connection with them - who offered stiff resistance to the regime that had condemned them. Their cases demonstrate that some of former Apis’s associates in time came to terms with the authorities in order to secure peaceful existence or even obtain a prominent status, whereas other remained staunch opponents of King Alexander and their frustration took the shape of a left-wing opposition ranging from republicanism to outright communism. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 177011: History of political ideas and institutions in the Balkans in the 19th and 20th centuries

  3. Black Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Khristin Brown

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The migration of blacks in North America through slavery became united.  The population of blacks past downs a tradition of artist through art to native born citizens. The art tradition involved telling stories to each generation in black families. The black culture elevated by tradition created hope to determine their personal freedom to escape from poverty of enslavement and to establish a way of life through tradition. A way of personal freedoms was through getting a good education that lead to a better foundation and a better way of life.

  4. Congenital Malaria Among Newborns Admitted for Suspected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Signs and symptoms of congenital malaria do not differ much from those of neonatal sepsis: both can co-exist, and most times very difficult to differentiate clinically. Objective: To document the prevalence, risk factors for congeni tal malar ia among neonates admitted for suspected neonatal sepsis, and ...

  5. MRI for clinically suspected appendicitis during pregnancy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cobben, L.P.; Groot, I.; Haans, L.; Blickman, J.G.; Puylaert, J.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether MRI can be used to accurately diagnose or exclude appendicitis in pregnant patients with clinically suspected appendicitis. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that MRI is helpful in the examination and diagnosis of acute appendicitis in

  6. Biomechanical properties of keratoconus suspect eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Alain; Lteif, Yara; Azan, Elodie; Gatinel, Damien

    2010-06-01

    Measuring corneal biomechanical properties may help detect keratoconus suspect corneas and eliminate the risk of ectasia after LASIK. Data of 504 eyes separated into three groups were retrospectively reviewed: normal (n = 252), keratoconus suspect (n = 80), and keratoconus (n = 172). Corneal hysteresis (CH) and corneal resistance factor (CRF) were measured with an ocular biomechanics analyzer. Mean corneal hysteresis was 10.6 +/- 1.4 (SD) mm Hg in the normal group, compared with 10.0 +/- 1.6 mm Hg in the keratoconus suspect group and 8.1 +/- 1.4 mm Hg in the keratoconus group. The mean CRF was 10.6 +/- 1.6 mm Hg in the normal group compared with 9.7 +/- 1.7 in the keratoconus suspect group and 7.1 +/- 1.6 mm Hg in the keratoconus group. Mean CH and CRF were significantly different between the three groups (P corneas. Analyzing signal curves obtained with the biomechanics analyzer may provide additional valuable information for selecting qualified patients for refractive surgery.

  7. Characterization of suspected illegal skin whitening cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmedt, B; Van Hoeck, E; Rogiers, V; Courselle, P; De Beer, J O; De Paepe, K; Deconinck, E

    2014-03-01

    An important group of suspected illegal cosmetics consists of skin bleaching products, which are usually applied to the skin of the face, hands and décolleté for local depigmentation of hyper pigmented regions or more importantly, for a generalized reduction of the skin tone. These cosmetic products are suspected to contain illegal active substances that may provoke as well local as systemic toxic effects, being the reason for their banning from the EU market. In that respect, illegal and restricted substances in cosmetics, known to have bleaching properties, are in particular hydroquinone, tretinoin and corticosteroids. From a legislative point of view, all cosmetic products containing a prohibited whitening agent are illegal and must be taken off the EU market. A newly developed screening method using ultra high performance liquid chromatography-time off flight-mass spectrometry allows routine analysis of suspected products. 163 suspected skin whitening cosmetics, collected by Belgian inspectors at high risk sites such as airports and so-called ethnic cosmetic shops, were analyzed and 59% were classified as illegal. The whitening agents mostly detected were clobetasol propionate and hydroquinone, which represent a serious health risk when repeatedly and abundantly applied to the skin. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Suspecting Neurological Dysfunction From E Mail Messages ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A non medical person suspected and confirmed neurological dysfunction in an individual, based only on e mail messages sent by the individual. With email communication becoming rampant “peculiar” email messages may raise the suspicion of neurological dysfunction. Organic pathology explaining the abnormal email ...

  9. Clinical characteristics of black asthmatic children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A prospective study of 455 black asthmatic children (277 boys) attending ... In black children in South Africa, in whom both pneumonia and tuberculosis remain significant problems,3,4 failure to recognise asthma may not only result in continued ..... Gie R, Klein M. Wesley A. Death from pneumonia in young children - time for.

  10. Investigation of Canine-Mediated Human Rabies Death, Haiti, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Cuc H; Etheart, Melissa D; Andrecy, Lesly L; Augustin, Pierre Dilius; Kligerman, Maxwell; Crowdis, Kelly; Adrien, Paul; Dismer, Amber; Blanton, Jesse D; Millien, Max; Wallace, Ryan M

    2018-01-01

    In Haiti, an investigation occurred after the death of a 4-year-old girl with suspected rabies. With tips provided by community members, the investigation led to the identification of 2 probable rabies-related deaths and 16 persons bitten by rabid dogs, 75% of which chose postexposure prophylaxis. Community engagement can bolster rabies control.

  11. Investigation of Canine-Mediated Human Rabies Death, Haiti, 2015

    OpenAIRE

    Tran, Cuc H.; Etheart, Melissa D.; Andrecy, Lesly L.; Augustin, Pierre Dilius; Kligerman, Maxwell; Crowdis, Kelly; Adrien, Paul; Dismer, Amber; Blanton, Jesse D.; Millien, Max; Wallace, Ryan M.

    2018-01-01

    In Haiti, an investigation occurred after the death of a 4-year-old girl with suspected rabies. With tips provided by community members, the investigation led to the identification of 2 probable rabies-related deaths and 16 persons bitten by rabid dogs, 75% of which chose postexposure prophylaxis. Community engagement can bolster rabies control.

  12. Surviving death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerstroem, Anna

    2013-01-01

    such phases. The aim of this paper is to explore how an organization’s identity is re-constructed after organizational death. Based on interviews with members of a bankrupted bank who narrate their bankruptcy experiences, the paper explores how legacy organizational identity is constructed after...... organizational death. The paper shows how members draw on their legacy organizational identity to justify their past interpretations and responses to the intensifying bankruptcy threats. Members refer to their firm belief in the bank’s solid and robust identity claim when they explain how they disregarded...

  13. "Spectacular Death"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Michael Hviid

    2016-01-01

    be labelled ‘spectacular death’ in which death, dying and mourning have increasingly become spectacles. Moreover, the author proposes that what is currently happening in contemporary Western society can be interpreted as an expression of a ‘partial re-reversal’ of ‘forbidden death’ to some...

  14. FIVE DEATHS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sahara. African countries still bear the greatest burden in the world. Many of these deaths occur as a result of preventable diseases such as pneumonia, malaria, measles and malnutrition. This has been witnessed in the six partnership districts of ...

  15. Death cap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudbæk, Torsten R; Kofoed, Pernille Bouteloup; Bove, Jeppe

    2014-01-01

    Death cap (Amanita phalloides) is commonly found and is one of the five most toxic fungi in Denmark. Toxicity is due to amatoxin, and poisoning is a serious medical condition, causing organ failure with potential fatal outcome. Acknowledgement and clarification of exposure, symptomatic and focused...

  16. The evaluation of suspected child physical abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Cindy W

    2015-05-01

    Child physical abuse is an important cause of pediatric morbidity and mortality and is associated with major physical and mental health problems that can extend into adulthood. Pediatricians are in a unique position to identify and prevent child abuse, and this clinical report provides guidance to the practitioner regarding indicators and evaluation of suspected physical abuse of children. The role of the physician may include identifying abused children with suspicious injuries who present for care, reporting suspected abuse to the child protection agency for investigation, supporting families who are affected by child abuse, coordinating with other professionals and community agencies to provide immediate and long-term treatment to victimized children, providing court testimony when necessary, providing preventive care and anticipatory guidance in the office, and advocating for policies and programs that support families and protect vulnerable children. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  17. Cause of death affects racial classification on death certificates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Noymer

    Full Text Available Recent research suggests racial classification is responsive to social stereotypes, but how this affects racial classification in national vital statistics is unknown. This study examines whether cause of death influences racial classification on death certificates. We analyze the racial classifications from a nationally representative sample of death certificates and subsequent interviews with the decedents' next of kin and find notable discrepancies between the two racial classifications by cause of death. Cirrhosis decedents are more likely to be recorded as American Indian on their death certificates, and homicide victims are more likely to be recorded as Black; these results remain net of controls for followback survey racial classification, indicating that the relationship we reveal is not simply a restatement of the fact that these causes of death are more prevalent among certain groups. Our findings suggest that seemingly non-racial characteristics, such as cause of death, affect how people are racially perceived by others and thus shape U.S. official statistics.

  18. Suspects in criminal investigations of rape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinković Darko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigations of sexual assaults mostly focus on victims and their credibility, which may cause lack of firm evidence in relation to suspects. Given the fact that the criminal offence of rape is characterised by a high incidence of false reports and accusations, frequently indicating specific persons as the perpetrators, certain caution is necessary in the investigation in order to avoid false accusations and/or convictions. As regards the personality of the rapist and motives for committing a forcible sexual act, certain types or rather certain categories of perpetrators can be distinguished, although it should be noted that a large number of rapists do not belong to one category only, but rather combine characteristics of several different types. During a criminal investigation it is of vital importance to differentiate between a rape as a surprise attack and a rape as abuse of trust, as they are compatible with the nature of the suspect's defence. The suspect shall be subjected to a forensic examination in the course of the investigation in order to find traces which prove vaginal, anal or oral penetration, coerced sexual intercourse and identity of the rapist. While conducting an interrogation of a suspected rapist, a crime investigating officer shall use either factual or emotional approach to his interviewee, depending on his psychological and motivational characteristics. In this regard, the factual approach is believed to be more efficient with anger rapists and sadistic rapists, whereas the compassionate approach gives good results with the gentlemen-rapists and partly with the power asserting rapists.

  19. Historically Black

    OpenAIRE

    Pennington, Whitney

    2012-01-01

    Historically Black is a short documentary that looks at recruitment of non-black students at Texas Southern University, one of the nation’s largest Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). By chronicling Texas Southern’s efforts to diversify and its impact on the campus community, the film explores the changing role of HBCUs in post-segregated America and addresses what this might mean for the future of these deep-rooted institutions. 

  20. Glaucoma suspect & Humphrey Field Analyzer a correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Dahal

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Glaucoma originally meant "clouded", in Greek.The term glaucoma refers to a group of diseases that have in common characteristic optic neuropathy with associated visual field loss for which elevated intraocular pressure is one of the primary risk factor. The purpose of the study is to correlate the clinically diagnosed cases of glaucoma suspect with the Humphrey Field Analyzer (HFA. Fifty cases of glaucoma suspect who attended the glaucoma clinic of Nepal Eye Hospital Tripureswor, Kathmandu, Nepal and who meets at least two criteria, among the four types of glaucoma suspects were advised for the HFA for the study. In this study out of 50 patient, 36 (72% patients had normal visual field. 14 (28% patients had thinning of the neural retinal rim (NRR in both eyes. The significant relation with thinning of neural retina rim and glaucomatous hemifield test was found in the study. Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal,2012,Vol-8,No-1, 23-28 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v8i1.6822

  1. Tocolytics for suspected intrapartum fetal distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulier, R; Hofmeyr, G J

    2000-01-01

    Prophylactic tocolysis with betamimetics and other agents has become widespread as a treatment for fetal distress. Uterine relaxation may improve placental blood flow and therefore fetal oxygenation. However there may also be adverse maternal cardiovascular effects. The objective of this review was to assess the effects of tocolytic therapy for suspected fetal distress on fetal, maternal and perinatal outcomes. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group trials register and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register. Date of last search: February 1999. Randomised trials comparing tocolytic therapy with no treatment or treatment with another tocolytic agent for suspected fetal distress. Two reviewers assessed trial quality and extracted data. Three studies were included. Compared with no treatment, there were fewer failed improvements in fetal heart rate abnormalities with tocolytic therapy (relative risk 0.26, 95% 0.13 to 0.53). Betamimetic therapy compared with magnesium sulphate showed a non-significant trend towards reduced uterine activity (relative risk 0.07, 95% confidence interval 0.00 to 1.10). Betamimetic therapy appears to be able to reduce the number of fetal heart rate abnormalities and perhaps reduce uterine activity. However there is not enough evidence based on clinically important outcomes to evaluate the use of betamimetics for suspected fetal distress.

  2. Black Cohosh

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... symptoms of liver trouble, such as abdominal pain, dark urine, or jaundice, while taking black cohosh should ... hard-of-hearing callers): 1-866-464-3615 Web site: nccih.nih.gov E-mail: info@nccih. ...

  3. High mortality among people suspected of drunk-driving. An 18-year register-based follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Impinen, Antti; Mäkelä, Pia; Karjalainen, Karoliina; Rahkonen, Ossi; Lintonen, Tomi; Lillsunde, Pirjo; Ostamo, Aini

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the overall and cause-specific mortality of DUI arrestees compared to a reference population with no history of DUI and to recognize the risk factors of premature death. The data used were a register of all DUI arrestees between April 1988 and December 2006. All drivers with drug-positive samples were excluded. DUI arrestees were compared to a reference population with no previous history of DUI. Overall and cause-specific hazard ratios were calculated and risk factors were estimated. Alcohol causes, diseases of the circulatory system and accidents constituted the most common causes of death among DUI arrestees. Suspected DUI was linked with higher mortality in every observed cause of death. The risk of death by alcohol-related or external cause was especially high. Among women DUI arrests caused sharper increase to the risk of death than increase found among male arrestees. Within the group of DUI arrestees the risk of death was affected by age, sex, marital status, education, multiple arrests as well as time and observed blood alcohol level of the arrest. Half of the suspected DUI cases and one in five of the references had alcohol as a contributing factor to death. Arrest on suspicion of drunk-driving is an indicator for elevated risk of death. Alcohol is often related to deaths of DUI arrestees. Drunk-drivers should be efficiently guided with respect to evaluations and treatments for harmful drinking. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Brain death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijdicks, Eelco F M

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis of brain death should be based on a simple premise. If every possible confounder has been excluded and all possible treatments have been tried or considered, irreversible loss of brain function is clinically recognized as the absence of brainstem reflexes, verified apnea, loss of vascular tone, invariant heart rate, and, eventually, cardiac standstill. This condition cannot be reversed - not even partly - by medical or surgical intervention, and thus is final. Many countries in the world have introduced laws that acknowledge that a patient can be declared brain-dead by neurologic standards. The U.S. law differs substantially from all other brain death legislation in the world because the U.S. law does not spell out details of the neurologic examination. Evidence-based practice guidelines serve as a standard. In this chapter, I discuss the history of development of the criteria, the current clinical examination, and some of the ethical and legal issues that have emerged. Generally, the concept of brain death has been accepted by all major religions. But patients' families may have different ideas and are mostly influenced by cultural attitudes, traditional customs, and personal beliefs. Suggestions are offered to support these families. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The Superstrong Black Mother

    OpenAIRE

    Elliott, Sinikka; Reid, Megan

    2016-01-01

    Baltimore mother Toya Graham became a viral video sensation after being filmed yelling at and hitting her teen son. Graham, who is Black, was trying to stop her son from joining the protests following Freddie Gray’s death in police custody in Baltimore in April 2015. Dubbed “mother of the year,” news outlets applauded Graham for her fierce determination to keep her son out of harm’s way by any means necessary. The media and ensuing public response to the video are illuminating for what they s...

  6. Peering into the black hole - the quality of black mortality data in Por ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-04-20

    Apr 20, 1991 ... Peering into the black hole - the quality of black mortality data in Por~ Elizabeth and the rest of South Africa. S. VAN DER MERWE, D. YACH, C. A. METCALF. -. Summary. In the year ending 30 June 1989, 26,8% of 5345 deaths in the. Port Elizabeth area were classified as ill-defined. A study was.

  7. Pre-admission antibiotics for suspected cases of meningococcal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudarsanam, Thambu D; Rupali, Priscilla; Tharyan, Prathap; Abraham, Ooriapadickal Cherian; Thomas, Kurien

    2013-08-02

    Meningococcal disease can lead to death or disability within hours after onset. Pre-admission antibiotics aim to reduce the risk of serious disease and death by preventing delays in starting therapy before confirmation of the diagnosis. To study the effectiveness and safety of pre-admission antibiotics versus no pre-admission antibiotics or placebo, and different pre-admission antibiotic regimens in decreasing mortality, clinical failure and morbidity in people suspected of meningococcal disease. We updated searches of CENTRAL (2013, Issue 4), MEDLINE (1966 to April week 4, 2013), EMBASE (1980 to May 2013), Web of Science (1985 to May 2013), CAB Abstracts (1985 to May 2013), LILACS (1982 to May 2013) and prospective trials registries to May 2013. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-RCTs comparing antibiotics versus placebo or no intervention, in people with suspected meningococcal infection, or different antibiotics administered before admission to hospital or confirmation of the diagnosis. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data from the search results. We calculated the risk ratio (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for dichotomous data. We included only one trial so data synthesis was not performed. We assessed the overall quality of the evidence using the GRADE approach. We found no RCTs that compared pre-admission antibiotics versus no pre-admission antibiotics or placebo. One open-label, non-inferiority RCT, conducted during an epidemic in Niger, evaluated a single dose of intramuscular ceftriaxone versus a single dose of intramuscular long-acting (oily) chloramphenicol. Ceftriaxone was not inferior to chloramphenicol in reducing mortality (RR 1.2, 95% CI 0.6 to 2.6; N = 503; 308 confirmed meningococcal meningitis; 26 deaths; moderate-quality evidence), clinical failures (RR 0.8, 95% CI 0.3 to 2.2; N = 477, 18 clinical failures; moderate-quality evidence) or neurological sequelae (RR 1.3, 95% CI 0.6 to 2.6; N

  8. Prevalence of glaucoma suspects and pattern of intra-ocular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Glaucoma is the commonest cause of irreversible blindness in the world. Some glaucoma patients start out as glaucoma suspects for years. Aim: To determine the prevalence of glaucoma suspects and pattern of intra-ocular pressure distribution in glaucoma suspects. Methods: This survey was carried out in ...

  9. Parents' Acute Illnesses, Hospitalizations, and Medication Changes During the Difficult First Year After Infant or Child NICU/PICU Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooten, Dorothy; Youngblut, JoAnne M; Caicedo, Carmen; Del Moral, Teresa; Cantwell, G Patricia; Totapally, Balagangadhar

    2016-01-01

    Infant/child death is described as a most stressful life event; however, there are few reports of effects on parent physical health during the first year after the death. The study's purpose is to examine the patterns of parent acute illnesses, hospitalizations, and medication changes over 1 to 13 months after neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) or pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) infant/child death in 3 racial/ethnic groups. Secondary analyses were conducted with longitudinal data on parent health and functioning 1 to 13 months after infant/child NICU/PICU death. Parents (176 mothers, 73 fathers; 44% Hispanic, 35% black non-Hispanic, and 21% white non-Hispanic) of deceased infants/children were recruited from 4 children's hospitals and state death records. Inclusion criteria-parents understood English or Spanish and had a deceased neonate/child ≤ 18. Exclusion criteria -deceased newborn from multiple gestation pregnancy, child in foster care, child's injury due to suspected abuse, or parent death in illness/injury event. Parents reported numbers and types of acute illnesses, hospitalizations, and medication changes 1 to 13 months postdeath. Parents' acute illnesses, hospitalizations, and medication changes were greatest between months 1 and 6, with relative quiescence in months 7 to 10, and an increase in months 11 to 13. Mothers (aged 32 ± 7.8 years) reported 300 acute illnesses (primarily colds/flu, headaches, anxiety/depression, and infections) and 89 hospitalizations (primarily infections, chest pain, and gastrointestinal problems). Fathers (aged 37 ± 8.8 years) reported 104 acute illnesses (colds/flu and headaches) and 9 hospitalizations. After infant/child NICU/PICU death, mothers had greater morbidity than fathers, with no significant differences by race/ethnicity. Parents' health needs to be monitored in months 1 to 6 and months 11 to 13, and interventions targeted to parents in these months.

  10. Nuclear Pedigree Criteria of Suspected HNPCC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kładny Józef

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The criteria for the diagnosis of HNPCC established by the ICG-HNPCC are very restrictive as they do not allow for the diagnosis of a large number of "suspected HNPCC" cases - these are families which do no fulfill the strict diagnostic "Amsterdam criteria", but do present with several pedigree and clinical features characteristic for HNPCC. Several series of families suspected of harboring germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes have been studied for germline changes in DNA mismatch repair genes and a mutation rate of somewhere between 8-60% was found. Therefore a subgroup of members of the ICG-HNPCC has been working on pedigree/clinical diagnostic criteria for suspected HNPCC. Materials and methods Part I The study was based on two series of colorectal cancer (CRC cases: 1 HNPCC - this group comprised 190 patients affected by CRC from randomly selected families which fulfilled the Amsterdam II criteria registered in Düsseldorf, Germany (102 cases of CRC, Denmark (18 CRCs, Leiden, Holland (23 CRCs and Szczecin, Poland (47 CRCs. 2 Consecutive CRCs - this group comprised 629 (78.0% of 806 individuals with CRC diagnosed in 1991-1997 in the city of Szczecin (ca. 400,000 of inhabitants, Poland. Nuclear pedigrees in both groups were compared for frequency of occurrence of clinical features, that have been shown to be associated with HNPCC. Part II 52 consecutive CRC cases from Szczecin, matching the criteria recognized in part I as appropriate for diagnosis of cases "suspected of HNPCC" were studied for the occurrence of germline hMSH2/hMLH1 constitutional mutations using "exon by exon" sequencing. Results The combination of features - i.e. the occurrence of an HNPCC associated cancer (CRC or cancer of the endometrium, small bowel or urinary tract in a 1st degree relative of a CRC patient; at least one of the patients being diagnosed under age of 50 - appeared to be strongly associated to HNPCC with an OR - 161. Constitutional

  11. Black esophagus - case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Slobodan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Diseases of the gastrointestinal system, and especially diseases of esophagus, are a rare cause of sudden unexpected death in any age group. Black esophagus is an acute necrotizing inflammation of the mucosa of the lower parts of esophagus, diffusely affecting its entire circumference. This inflammation could be a source of profuse bleeding and cause sudden unexpected death. Case Outline. A case of 76-year-old male was presented herein. He has been treated for hypertension and diabetes for several years. As a consequence of stroke, which happened several months prior to death, he had been hemiplegic and immobilized. He died in hospital, suddenly and unexpectedly. The autopsy showed the acute necrotizing esophagitis, as well as the acute gastric and duodenal erosions of mucosa. These were the causes of fatal blood loss. Conclusion. Acute necrotizing esophagitis should be recognized during autopsy and related to the immediate cause of death as well as to concomitant diseases of other organs, which either potentiate or facilitate presentation of this disease. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 45005

  12. [Accompany death].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador Borrell, Montserrat

    2010-11-01

    One of the roles of nursing is to take care of the patients in terminal situation. The time, the experience, the formation, and the personal and professional attitudes that the nurse has will propitiate that taking care of moribund patients might turn into one of the more rewarding human experiences in life. There for, it is indispensable that nurses assume death as a natural and inevitable reality to achieve. The principal aim of the study is to evaluate the competence of confrontation and the autoefficiency of the welfare among nurses who work with adult patients at the end of the life. Descriptive study realized in the units of Oncology, Hametology and Palliative Care of the following centers: La Fe, Clínico, Dr. Peset, H. General, Arnau de Vilanova and Dr. Moliner de Portacoelli in Valencia (Spain). The following instruments were used: the Bugen Scale of confrontation of the Death (1980-1981) and the Robbins Scale of Autoefficiency (1992). Data suggests that major coping gives major autoeffciency and vice versa. The realized study opens numerous questions, specially related with training and the burden of preparation along the whole professional career, in order to achieve competence for coping and autoefficiency.

  13. WARPED DISK AROUND A BRIGHT BLACK HOLE (ARTWORK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    This diagram shows the geometry of a warped disk of dust surrounding a suspected black hole in the active galaxy NGC 6251. The diagram is based on NASA Hubble Space Telescope images of the disk which reveal that only one side reflects light emitted from a suspected black hole, hence the disk is warped. Such a warp could be due to gravitational perturbations in the galaxy's nucleus that keep the disk from being perfectly flat, or from precession of the rotation axis of the black hole relative to the rotation axis of the galaxy. Perpendicular to the disk is a jet of high-energy particles blasted into space along the black hole's spin axis. Illustration: James Gitlin (Space Telescope Science Institute)

  14. Births and deaths including fetal deaths

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Access to a variety of United States birth and death files including fetal deaths: Birth Files, 1968-2009; 1995-2005; Fetal death file, 1982-2005; Mortality files,...

  15. Using Our Voices, Losing Our Bodies: Michael Brown, Trayvon Martin, and the Spirit Murders of Black Male Professors in the Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Lamar; Bryan, Nathaniel

    2017-01-01

    The recent deaths of Michael Brown, Trayvon Martin, and other Black males have generated new civil rights urgencies in Black communities and spirited academic discourses in higher education regarding the educational and social plight of Black males in America. Connecting the deaths of Black males to our lived experiences in the academy, we use a…

  16. Premature death rates diverge in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    An NCI press release on a study that shows premature death rates have declined in the United States among Hispanics, blacks, and Asian/Pacific Islanders but increased among whites and American Indian/Alaska Natives.

  17. Medical History for Prognostic Risk Assessment and Diagnosis of Stable Patients with Suspected Coronary Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, James K.; Dunning, Allison; Gransar, Heidi; Achenbach, Stephan; Lin, Fay Y.; Al-Mallah, Mouaz; Budoff, Matthew J.; Callister, Tracy Q.; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Cademartiri, Filippo; Chinnaiyan, Kavitha; Chow, Benjamin J. W.; D’Agostino, Ralph; DeLago, Augustin; Friedman, John; Hadamitzky, Martin; Hausleiter, Joerg; Hayes, Sean; Kaufmann, Philipp; Raff, Gilbert L.; Shaw, Leslee J.; Thomson, Louise; Villines, Todd; Cury, Ricardo C.; Feuchtner, Gudrun; Kim, Yong-Jin; Leipsic, Jonathon; Berman, Daniel S.; Pencina, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Aims To develop a clinical cardiac risk algorithm for stable patients with suspected CAD based upon angina typicality and CAD risk factors. Methods and Results Between 2004 and 2011, 14,004 adults with suspected CAD referred for cardiac imaging were followed: 1) 9,093 patients for CCTA (CCTA-1) followed for 2.0 years; 2) 2,132 patients for CCTA (CCTA-2) followed for 1·6 years, and 3) 2,779 patients for exercise myocardial perfusion scintigraphy followed for 5.0 years. A best-fit model from CCTA-1 for prediction of death or myocardial infarction (MI) was developed, with integer values proportional to regression coefficients. Discrimination was assessed using C-statistic. The validated model was also tested for estimation of the likelihood of obstructive CAD, defined as ≥50% stenosis, as compared to method of Diamond and Forrester (D-F). Primary outcomes included all-cause mortality and non-fatal MI. Secondary outcomes included prevalence of angiographically obstructive CAD. In CCTA-1, best-fit model discriminated individuals at risk of death or MI (C-statistic 0·76). The integer model ranged from 3-13, and corresponded to 3-year death risk or MI of 0·25% to 53·8%. When applied to the CCTA-2 and MPS, the model demonstrated C-statistics of 0·71 and 0·77. Both best-fit (C=0·76, 95% CI 0·746-0·771) and integer model (C=0·71, 95% CI 0·693-0·719) performed better than D-F (C=0·64; 95% CI, 0·628-0·659) for estimating obstructive CAD. Conclusions For stable symptomatic patients with suspected CAD, we developed a history-based method for prediction of death and obstructive CAD. PMID:25865923

  18. Quantum black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Calmet, Xavier; Winstanley, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Written by foremost experts, this short book gives a clear description of the physics of quantum black holes. The reader will learn about quantum black holes in four and higher dimensions, primordial black holes, the production of black holes in high energy particle collisions, Hawking radiation, black holes in models of low scale quantum gravity and quantum gravitational aspects of black holes.

  19. Validation of the Group-Based Medical Mistrust Scale Among Urban Black Men

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shelton, Rachel C; Winkel, Gary; Davis, Stacy N; Roberts, Nicole; Valdimarsdottir, Heiddis; Hall, Simon J; Thompson, Hayley S

    2010-01-01

    Socioculturally relevant measures of medical mistrust are needed to better address health disparities, especially among Black men, a group with lower life expectancy and higher death rates compared...

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of suspected atrial tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menegus, M A; Greenberg, M A; Spindola-Franco, H; Fayemi, A

    1992-05-01

    Two-dimensional echocardiography has become the standard technique for evaluation of cardiac and paracardiac mass lesions. We have used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as an independent assessment of cardiac-associated masses in patients with echocardiograms demonstrating sessile atrial tumors. MRI was performed in seven patients, ages 33 to 84, whose echocardiographic diagnoses included left atrial mass (five), right atrial mass (one), and interatrial mass (one). In four of the patients with a diagnosis of left atrial mass, MRI showed extracardiac compression of the atrium, simulating a tumor (hiatal hernia, tortuous descending aorta, bronchogenic cyst). MRI was entirely normal in one patient with an apparent left atrial mass. MRI elucidated extension of an extracavitary mass into the interatrial septum in two patients. One of these patients with an echocardiographic right atrial mass had extension of a lipoma into the interatrial septum without atrial tumor. MRI confirmed the echocardiographic diagnosis of an interatrial mass in the other patient. We conclude that MRI, because of its ability to define anatomic relationships and tissue characteristics, is a powerful noninvasive tool for evaluating suspected cardiac mass lesions. Although echocardiography remains the primary screening test for the detection of cardiac masses, MRI is a more specific modality for precise diagnosis. Correct MRI interpretation may obviate the need for invasive studies or surgery.

  1. Racial Characteristics and the Imposition of the Death Penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radelet, Michael L.

    1981-01-01

    Data from Florida from 1976-77 show that those accused of murdering Whites are more likely to be sentenced to death than those accused of murdering Blacks. If victim's race is controlled, however, data do not clearly support the hypothesis that defendant's race is strongly associated with imposition of the death penalty. (Author/GC)

  2. Cardiac Potassium Channel Dysfunction in Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Rhodes, Troy E.; Abraham, Robert A.; Welch, Richard C.; Vanoye, Carlos G.; Crotti, Lia; Arnestad, Marianne; Insolia, Roberto; Pedrazzini, Matteo; Ferrandi, Chiara; Vege, Ashild; Rognum, Torleiv; Roden, Dan M.; Schwartz, Peter J.; George, Alfred L.

    2007-01-01

    Life-threatening arrhythmias have been suspected as one cause of the sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), and this hypothesis is supported by the observation that mutations in arrhythmia susceptibility genes occur in 5–10% of cases. However, the functional consequences of cardiac potassium channel gene mutations associated with SIDS and how these alleles might mechanistically predispose to sudden death are unknown. To address these questions, we studied four missense KCNH2 (encoding HERG) var...

  3. Detection of Rabies antigen in brains of suspected Rabid dogs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To detect the presence of rabies antigen in brains of suspected rabid dogs. Materials and Methods: Ninety six (96) brain specimens from suspected rabid dogs were examined for the presence of rabies antigen using Seller's staining technique and enzyme immunoassay. Results: The two techniques were both ...

  4. 48 CFR 803.806 - Processing suspected violations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Limitation on the Payment of Funds to Influence Federal Transactions 803.806 Processing suspected violations. A VA employee must report suspected violations of 31 U.S.C. 1352, Limitation on Use of Appropriated Funds to Influence Certain Federal...

  5. The clinical course of patients with suspected pulmonary embolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beek, E. J.; Kuijer, P. M.; Büller, H. R.; Brandjes, D. P.; Bossuyt, P. M.; ten Cate, J. W.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The outcome of patients with suspected pulmonary embolism is known to a limited extent only. OBJECTIVE: To address this limited knowledge in a cohort in whom pulmonary embolism was proved or ruled out. METHODS: Consecutive patients with clinically suspected pulmonary embolism underwent

  6. Seasonal variation among tuberculosis suspects in four countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mabaera, Biggie; Naranbat, Nymadawa; Katamba, Achilles

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the study was to analyze monthly trends across a calendar year in tuberculosis suspects and sputum smear-positive cases based on nationally representative samples of tuberculosis laboratory registers from Moldova, Mongolia, Uganda and Zimbabwe. Out of the 47 140 suspects registered...... in the tuberculosis laboratory registers, 13.4% (6312) were cases. The proportion varied from country to country, Moldova having the lowest (9%) and Uganda the highest (21%). From the monthly proportion of suspects and cases among total suspects and cases, seasonal variations were most marked in Mongolia which, among...... attendance to diagnostic laboratory services, evidenced by the contrasting findings of Mongolia (extreme continental northern climate) compared to Uganda (equatorial climate). A combination of external and possibly endogenous factors seems to determine whether tuberculosis suspects and cases present...

  7. Stroke incidence rates among black residents of Harare - a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    S Afr Med J 1997; 87: 606-609. Cerebrovascular disease, which is reported to be the third commonest cause of death in the developed world1.2 and among black Americans,3 is no longer thought to be a rare diagnostic curiosity in black populations south of the. Sahara. While stroke incidence and mortalITy' in developed.

  8. FOOD OF THE BLACK-BACKED JACKAL: A PRELIMINARY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The black-backed jackal Canis mesomelas has long been known to include a wide range of food items in its normal ... The black-backed jackal's ability to survive as one of the last of the bigger carnivores ..... of highly poisoned bait has in the past caused the death of many animals other than the vermin it was intended to kill.

  9. Responding to the challenge of Black Theology: Liberating Ministry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-08-05

    Aug 5, 2016 ... South Africa (1988) and Kritzinger's PhD thesis Black Theology: A Challenge to Mission (1988). These individuals ... submitted for the Centre of Public Theology at the University of Pretoria symposium 'Black Theology of Liberation Twenty One Years Later'. .... death of a six-year-old boy and other civilians.

  10. Suspected citrus pulp toxicosis in dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, G K; Blodgett, D J; Hutchins, T A; Prater, R M; Robertson, J L; Friday, P A; Scarratt, W K

    2000-05-01

    Thirteen lactating dairy cows from a herd of 650 died over a 6-week period. Most animals were down in milk production at 1 milking and were found dead at the next milking. Two cows had elevated heart rate and enlarged mandibular lymph nodes. Two others had azotemia, elevated heart rate, hyperglycemia, and weight loss. Necropsy of 10 cows revealed hemorrhages on the intestinal serosa and epicardium, lymphadenopathy, interstitial nephritis, small intestinal hemorrhage, and interstitial pneumonia. Histopathology showed lymphocytic to lymphogranulomatous inflammation in the heart, spleen, kidney, lymph nodes, liver, lung, pancreas, and adrenal gland. Phlebitis was present in 2 livers. The lesions resembled those of hairy vetch toxicosis, but no vetch was being fed. Similar lesions have been reported with the feeding of citrus pulp. Citrus pulp was being fed to the lactating cows and had been added to the diet 6 weeks before the first death. The syndrome resolved with elimination of citrus pulp from the diet.

  11. Hurricane Katrina deaths, Louisiana, 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunkard, Joan; Namulanda, Gonza; Ratard, Raoult

    2008-12-01

    Hurricane Katrina struck the US Gulf Coast on August 29, 2005, causing unprecedented damage to numerous communities in Louisiana and Mississippi. Our objectives were to verify, document, and characterize Katrina-related mortality in Louisiana and help identify strategies to reduce mortality in future disasters. We assessed Hurricane Katrina mortality data sources received in 2007, including Louisiana and out-of-state death certificates for deaths occurring from August 27 to October 31, 2005, and the Disaster Mortuary Operational Response Team's confirmed victims' database. We calculated age-, race-, and sex-specific mortality rates for Orleans, St Bernard, and Jefferson Parishes, where 95% of Katrina victims resided and conducted stratified analyses by parish of residence to compare differences between observed proportions of victim demographic characteristics and expected values based on 2000 US Census data, using Pearson chi square and Fisher exact tests. We identified 971 Katrina-related deaths in Louisiana and 15 deaths among Katrina evacuees in other states. Drowning (40%), injury and trauma (25%), and heart conditions (11%) were the major causes of death among Louisiana victims. Forty-nine percent of victims were people 75 years old and older. Fifty-three percent of victims were men; 51% were black; and 42% were white. In Orleans Parish, the mortality rate among blacks was 1.7 to 4 times higher than that among whites for all people 18 years old and older. People 75 years old and older were significantly more likely to be storm victims (P Hurricane Katrina was the deadliest hurricane to strike the US Gulf Coast since 1928. Drowning was the major cause of death and people 75 years old and older were the most affected population cohort. Future disaster preparedness efforts must focus on evacuating and caring for vulnerable populations, including those in hospitals, long-term care facilities, and personal residences. Improving mortality reporting timeliness will

  12. Outcomes associated to serum phosphate levels in patients with suspected acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hong; Evans, Marie; Gasparini, Alessandro; Szummer, Karolina; Spaak, Jonas; Ärnlöv, Johan; Lindholm, Bengt; Jernberg, Tomas; Carrero, Juan Jesús

    2017-10-15

    We investigated the association between phosphate and the risk of adverse clinical outcomes in patients with manifest cardiovascular disease (CVD). Observational study of patients hospitalized during 2006-2011 in Stockholm, Sweden, because of suspected acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The exposure was serum phosphate during the hospitalization. We modeled the association between phosphate and in-hospital death or in-hospital events (composite of myocardial infarction, cardiogenic shock, resuscitated cardiac arrest, atrial fibrillation, or atrioventricular block) as well as the one-year post-discharge risk of death or cardiovascular event (composite of myocardial re-infarction, heart failure and stroke). Confounders included demographics, comorbidities, kidney function, diagnoses, in-hospital procedures and therapies. Included were 2547 patients (68% men, mean age 67±14years) with median phosphate of 1.10 (range 0.14-4.20) mmol/L. During hospitalization, 198 patients died and 328 suffered an adverse event. Within one year post-discharge, further 381 deaths and 632 CVD events occurred. The associations of phosphate with mortality and CVD were J-shaped, with highest risk magnitudes at higher phosphate levels. For instance, compared to patients in the 50th percentile of phosphate distribution, those above the 75th percentile (1.3mmol/L, normal range) had significantly higher odds for in-hospital death [odds ratio 1.36, 95% confidence interval (CI) (1.08-1.71)] and of CVD post-discharge [sub-hazard ratios 1.17 (1.03-1.33)]. In patients with suspected ACS, both higher and lower phosphate levels associated with increased risk of adverse outcomes during the index hospitalization and within one year post-discharge. The risk association was present already within normal-range serum phosphate values. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Black Urine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahim Vakili

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A 2-year-old boy was born at term of healthy, non-consanguineous Iranian parents. His mother attended in the clinic with the history of sometimes discoloration of diapers after passing urine. She noticed that first at the age of one month with intensified in recent months. His Physical examination and growth parameters were normal. His mother denied taking any medication (sorbitol, nitrofurantoin, metronidazole, methocarbamol, sena and methyldopa (5. Qualitative urine examination showed dark black discoloration. By this history, alkaptonuria was the most clinical suspicious. A 24-hour-urine sample was collected and sent for quantitative measurements. The urine sample was highly positive for homogentisic acid and negative for porphyrin metabolites.

  14. Blackness: faith, culture, ideology and discourse*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abdul JanMohammed describes as "the generation of realism".10. By old perspectives, I am speaking intrinsically of contradictory notions bound up in one era, mainly those of cultural self-assertion with occasional slips into the notion of cultural death-wish, when black was simply not beautiful, when, to use the words of.

  15. Prediction of Suspect Location Based on Spatiotemporal Semantics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lian Duan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The prediction of suspect location enables proactive experiences for crime investigations and offers essential intelligence for crime prevention. However, existing studies have failed to capture the complex social location transition patterns of suspects and lack the capacity to address the issue of data sparsity. This paper proposes a novel location prediction model called CMoB (Crime Multi-order Bayes model based on the spatiotemporal semantics to enhance the prediction performance. In particular, the model groups suspects with similar spatiotemporal semantics as one target suspect. Then, their mobility data are applied to estimate Markov transition probabilities of unobserved locations based on a KDE (kernel density estimating smoothing method. Finally, by integrating the total transition probabilities, which are derived from the multi-order property of the Markov transition matrix, into a Bayesian-based formula, it is able to realize multi-step location prediction for the individual suspect. Experiments with the mobility dataset covering 210 suspects and their 18,754 location records from January to June 2012 in Wuhan City show that the proposed CMoB model significantly outperforms state-of-the-art algorithms for suspect location prediction in the context of data sparsity.

  16. Family presence during brain death evaluation: a randomized controlled trial*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawil, Isaac; Brown, Lawrence H; Comfort, David; Crandall, Cameron S; West, Sonlee D; Rollstin, Amber D; Dettmer, Todd S; Malkoff, Marc D; Marinaro, Jonathan

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate if a family presence educational intervention during brain death evaluation improves understanding of brain death without affecting psychological distress. Randomized controlled trial. Four ICUs at an academic tertiary care center. Immediate family members of patients suspected to have suffered brain death. Subjects were group randomized to presence or absence at bedside throughout the brain death evaluation with a trained chaperone. All randomized subjects were administered a validated "understanding brain death" survey before and after the intervention. Subjects were assessed for psychological well-being between 30 and 90 days after the intervention. Follow-up assessment of psychological well-being was performed using the Impact of Event Scale and General Health Questionnaire. Brain death understanding, Impact of Event Scale, and General Health Questionnaire scores were analyzed using Wilcoxon nonparametric tests. Analyses were adjusted for within family correlation. Fifty-eight family members of 17 patients undergoing brain death evaluation were enrolled: 38 family members were present for 11 brain death evaluations and 20 family members were absent for six brain death evaluations. Baseline understanding scores were similar between groups (median 3.0 [presence group] vs 2.5 [control], p = 0.482). Scores increased by a median of 2 (interquartile range, 1-2) if present versus 0 (interquartile range, 0-0) if absent (p Family presence during brain death evaluation improves understanding of brain death with no apparent adverse impact on psychological well-being. Family presence during brain death evaluation is feasible and safe.

  17. Fever in pregnancy and risk of fetal death: a cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo; Vastrup, Pernille; Wohlfahrt, Jan

    2002-01-01

    Hyperthermia acts as a teratogen in some animals where it can induce resorption of the fetus and fetal death. Fever during pregnancy, especially in the period of embryogenesis, is also suspected as being a risk factor for fetal death in human beings. We did a large cohort study in Denmark...

  18. 77 FR 19455 - Regulations Implementing the Byrd Amendments to the Black Lung Benefits Act: Determining Coal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-30

    ... benefits at the time of death. The Department first promulgated it after enactment of the Black Lung... and 725 Regulations Implementing the Byrd Amendments to the Black Lung Benefits Act: Determining Coal... Programs 20 CFR Parts 718 and 725 RIN 1240-AA04 Regulations Implementing the Byrd Amendments to the Black...

  19. B Plant/WESF suspect/counterfeit parts identification program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mertz, D.W.

    1996-01-12

    This document describes a suspect/counterfeit parts inspection program required by DOE conducted in accordance with Internal Memo 16710-94-DWM-048, J.A. O`Brien to J. N. Nansen, B Plant Suspect/ Counterfeit Parts Action Plan, dated May 24, 1994. The program included: physical inspection of all spare parts inventories within the plant; screening of installed B Plant/WESF (Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility) systems for applications where the use and subsequent potential failure of suspect/counterfeit parts could have critical consequences; and a physical inspection based upon this screening.

  20. Stopping and Questioning Suspected Shoplifters Without Creating Civil Liability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Jack R., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Legal problems concerned with shoplifting suspects are addressed, including common law, criminal penalties, and the merchant's liability. Tangential questions and answers are presented along with discussion of pertinent court cases. (LBH)

  1. ALGORITHM OF MANAGEMENT OF PATIENTS WITH SUSPECTED BLUNT CARDIAC TRAUMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Gilarevsky

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Contemporary algorithm of diagnostic examination of patients with suspected blunt cardiac trauma is presented. General aspects of monitoring and treatment of such patients are also discussed. 

  2. Suspect confession of child sexual abuse to investigators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippert, Tonya; Cross, Theodore P; Jones, Lisa; Walsh, Wendy

    2010-05-01

    Increasing the number of suspects who give true confessions of sexual abuse serves justice and reduces the burden of the criminal justice process on child victims. With data from four communities, this study examined confession rates and predictors of confession of child sexual abuse over the course of criminal investigations (final N = 282). Overall, 30% of suspects confessed partially or fully to the crime. This rate was consistent across the communities and is very similar to the rates of suspect confession of child sexual abuse found by previous research, although lower than that from a study focused on a community with a vigorous practice of polygraph testing. In a multivariate analysis, confession was more likely when suspects were younger and when more evidence of abuse was available, particularly child disclosure and corroborative evidence. These results suggest the difficulty of obtaining confession but also the value of methods that facilitate child disclosure and seek corroborative evidence, for increasing the odds of confession.

  3. Black Silicon Solar Cells with Black Ribbons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Rasmus Schmidt; Tang, Peter Torben; Mizushima, Io

    2016-01-01

    We present the combination of mask-less reactive ion etch (RIE) texturing and blackened interconnecting ribbons as a method for obtaining all-black solar panels, while using conventional, front-contacted solar cells. Black silicon made by mask-less reactive ion etching has total, average...... in the range 15.7-16.3%. The KOH-textured reference cell had an efficiency of 17.9%. The combination of black Si and black interconnecting ribbons may result in aesthetic, all-black panels based on conventional, front-contacted silicon solar cells....... reflectance below 0.5% across a 156x156 mm2 silicon (Si) wafer. Black interconnecting ribbons were realized by oxidizing copper resulting in reflectance below 3% in the visible wavelength range. Screen-printed Si solar cells were realized on 156x156 mm2 black Si substrates with resulting efficiencies...

  4. Black Heterogeneity in Cancer Mortality: US-Blacks, Haitians, and Jamaicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Paulo S; Callahan, Karen E; Ragin, Camille; Hage, Robert W; Hylton, Tara; Kobetz, Erin N

    2016-10-01

    The quantitative intraracial burden of cancer incidence, survival and mortality within black populations in the United States is virtually unknown. We computed cancer mortality rates of US- and Caribbean-born residents of Florida, specifically focusing on black populations (United States, Haiti, Jamaica) and compared them using age-adjusted mortality ratios obtained from Poisson regression models. We compared the mortality of Haitians and Jamaicans residing in Florida to populations in their countries of origin using Globocan. We analyzed 185,113 cancer deaths from 2008 to 2012, of which 20,312 occurred in black populations. The overall risk of death from cancer was 2.1 (95% CI: 1.97-2.17) and 1.6 (95% CI: 1.55-1.71) times higher for US-born blacks than black Caribbean men and women, respectively (P < .001). Race alone is not a determinant of cancer mortality. Among all analyzed races and ethnicities, including Whites and Hispanics, US-born blacks had the highest mortality rates while black Caribbeans had the lowest. The biggest intraracial difference was observed for lung cancer, for which US-blacks had nearly 4 times greater mortality risk than black Caribbeans. Migration from the islands of Haiti and Jamaica to Florida resulted in lower cancer mortality for most cancers including cervical, stomach, and prostate, but increased or stable mortality for 2 obesity-related cancers, colorectal and endometrial cancers. Mortality results in Florida suggest that US-born blacks have the highest incidence rate of "aggressive" prostate cancer in the world, rather than Caribbean men.

  5. 20 CFR 410.471 - Conclusion by physician regarding miner's disability or death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... disability or death. 410.471 Section 410.471 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, TITLE IV-BLACK LUNG BENEFITS (1969- ) Total Disability or Death Due to Pneumoconiosis § 410.471 Conclusion by physician regarding miner's disability or death. The...

  6. 20 CFR 410.450 - Death due to pneumoconiosis, including statutory presumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Death due to pneumoconiosis, including... COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, TITLE IV-BLACK LUNG BENEFITS (1969- ) Total Disability or Death Due to Pneumoconiosis § 410.450 Death due to pneumoconiosis, including statutory presumption...

  7. An erroneous opinion on a cause of death in a forensic autopsy: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To highlight the problem of accuracy in determining the cause of death in forensic autopsy. Case history: A 19- ... and manner of death. Conclusion: An erroneous opinion was reached regarding cause and manner of death in this autopsy report. ..... covered with black ink in the sketch diagram. Conflict of interest.

  8. 20 CFR 410.458 - Irrebuttable presumption of death due to pneumoconiosis-survivor's claim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Irrebuttable presumption of death due to... FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, TITLE IV-BLACK LUNG BENEFITS (1969- ) Total Disability or Death Due to Pneumoconiosis § 410.458 Irrebuttable presumption of death due to pneumoconiosis—survivor's...

  9. Prediction of the academic success of children with suspected neurological impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, P; Berk, R A

    1979-07-01

    Explored a multivariate approach to the prediction of 8-year academic achievement. Ss were black, of low socioeconomic status, and had been diagnosed as suspect neurologically impaired at age 7. A serial array of early predictors that included maternal education, sex, birth weight, 8-month and 4-year intelligence, and 3-year speech, hearing, and language were entered into multiple regression analyses to determine their value in predicting 8-year academic achievement in word recognition, arithmetic, spelling, and oral reading. The 4-year intelligence measure was the best overall predictor, although maternal education, sex, and birth weight contributed slightly to the predictions. The resulting equations, however, could not be used to predict accurately 8-year academic achievement.

  10. Suspect aggression and victim resistance in multiple perpetrator rapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhams, Jessica; Cooke, Claire

    2013-11-01

    Several research studies have reported an elevated level of aggression in rapes committed by multiple perpetrators compared to rapes committed by lone suspects. Several factors that have been linked to elevated aggression in generic samples of rape were examined for the first time with a sample of multiple perpetrator rapes. Factors that might be associated with victim resistance were also investigated. Victim and offender characteristics, as well as the behaviors displayed by victims and offenders, were extracted from the police files of 89 multiple perpetrator stranger rapes perpetrated against female victims in the United Kingdom. These behaviors were rated for their level of suspect (non-sexual) aggression and victim resistance, respectively. Degree of victim resistance was significantly and positively associated with suspect aggression. Older victims were the recipients of significantly higher levels of suspect aggression. Victims who were incapacitated from drugs and/or alcohol were less likely to be the recipients of suspect aggression. Group leaders displayed more aggression towards the victim than the followers in the groups. The number of perpetrators was significantly related to the degree of resistance displayed by the victim with offences perpetrated by fewer suspects being characterized by more victim resistance. Research regarding cognitive appraisal during criminal interactions and the respective roles of offenders is referred to in considering these relationships.

  11. Interviewing strategically to elicit admissions from guilty suspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekin, Serra; Granhag, Pär Anders; Strömwall, Leif; Giolla, Erik Mac; Vrij, Aldert; Hartwig, Maria

    2015-06-01

    In this article we introduce a novel interviewing tactic to elicit admissions from guilty suspects. By influencing the suspects' perception of the amount of evidence the interviewer holds against them, we aimed to shift the suspects' counterinterrogation strategies from less to more forthcoming. The proposed tactic (SUE-Confrontation) is a development of the Strategic Use of Evidence (SUE) framework and aims to affect the suspects' perception by confronting them with statement-evidence inconsistencies. Participants (N = 90) were asked to perform several mock criminal tasks before being interviewed using 1 of 3 interview techniques: (a) SUE-Confrontation, (b) Early Disclosure of Evidence, or (c) No Disclosure of Evidence. As predicted, the SUE-Confrontation interview generated more statement-evidence inconsistencies from suspects than the Early Disclosure interview. Importantly, suspects in the SUE-Confrontation condition (vs. Early and No disclosure conditions) admitted more self-incriminating information and also perceived the interviewer to have had more information about the critical phase of the crime (the phase where the interviewer lacked evidence). The findings show the adaptability of the SUE-technique and how it may be used as a tool for eliciting admissions. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Optimizing imaging in suspected appendicitis (OPTIMAP-study: A multicenter diagnostic accuracy study of MRI in patients with suspected acute appendicitis. Study Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bossuyt Patrick MM

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In patients with clinically suspected appendicitis, imaging is needed to substantiate the clinical diagnosis. Imaging accuracy of ultrasonography (US is suboptimal, while the most accurate technique (CT is associated with cancer related deaths through exposure to ionizing radiation. MRI is a potential replacement, without associated ionizing radiation and no need for contrast medium administration. If MRI is proven to be sufficiently accurate, it could be introduced in the diagnostic pathway of patients with suspected appendicitis, increasing diagnostic accuracy and improving clinical outcomes, without the risk of radiation induced cancer or iodinated contrast medium-related drawbacks. The multicenter OPTIMAP study was designed to estimate the diagnostic accuracy of MRI in patients with suspected acute appendicitis in the general population. Methods/Design Eligible for this study are consecutive patients presenting with clinically suspected appendicitis at the emergency department in six centers. All patients will undergo imaging according to the Dutch guideline for acute appendicitis: initial ultrasonography in all and subsequent CT whenever US does not confirm acute appendicitis. Then MRI is performed in all patients, but the results are not used for patient management. A final diagnosis assigned by an expert panel, based on all available information including 3-months follow-up, except MRI findings, is used as the reference standard in estimating accuracy. We will calculate the sensitivity, specificity, predictive values and inter-observer agreement of MRI, and aim to include 230 patients. Patient acceptance and total imaging costs will also be evaluated. Discussion If MRI is found to be sufficiently accurate, it could replace CT in some or all patients. This will limit or obviate the ionizing radiation exposure associated risk of cancer induction and contrast medium induced nephropathy with CT, preventing the burden and

  13. Infectious causes of sudden infant death syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfelali, Mohammad; Khandaker, Gulam

    2014-12-01

    Investigators have long suspected the role of infection in sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Evidence of infectious associations with SIDS is accentuated through the presence of markers of infection and inflammation on autopsy of SIDS infants and isolates of some bacteria and viruses. Several observational studies have looked into the relation between seasonality and incidence of SIDS, which often showed a winter peak. These all may suggest an infectious aetiology of SIDS. In this review we have summarised the current literature on infectious aetiologies of SIDS by looking at viral, bacterial, genetic and environmental factors which are believed to be associated with SIDS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Exogenous pigment in Peyer patches of children suspected of having IBD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, Thalia Z; Kindermann, Angelika; Stokkers, Pieter C F; Benninga, Marc A; ten Kate, Fiebo J W

    2014-04-01

    The base of human Peyer patches of the terminal ileum has been noted to contain black granular pigment deposits, composed of titanium dioxide and aluminosilicate, which are food additives typically present in a Western diet, and pharmaceuticals. In the present study, we investigated the distribution of exogenous pigment throughout the gastrointestinal tract of children suspected of having inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), the correlation between their age and the presence and amount of pigment in Peyer patches, and its relation to pediatric IBD. Biopsies (upper and lower gastrointestinal tract) from children suspected of having IBD who underwent endoscopy, were reassessed by a blinded, expert pathologist. The amount of pigment in biopsies was scored using a semiquantitative scale (range 0 to +++). A total of 151 children were included: 62 with Crohn disease (CD), 26 with ulcerative colitis, and 63 with non-IBD. In 63 children (42%), deposits of black pigment were found only in biopsies from the terminal ileum, located in Peyer patches. A significant correlation was found between increasing age and the amount of pigment (P = 0.004). Pigment deposits were found significantly less in the patients with CD compared with those in patients with ulcerative colitis and those with non-IBD (26% vs 62% and 49%, P = 0.002). These results provide support for the hypothesis that the amount of pigment, only present in Peyer patches in the terminal ileum, becomes denser with increasing age. Absence of pigment in Peyer patches in a higher number of patients with CD suggests that microparticles may have become involved in the inflammatory process, possibly because of disrupted autophagy.

  15. Presumed prevalence analysis on suspected and highly suspected breast cancer lesions in São Paulo using BIRADS® criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian Milani

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Breast cancer screening programs are critical for early detection of breast cancer. Early detection is essential for diagnosing, treating and possibly curing breast cancer. Since there are no data on the incidence of breast cancer, nationally or regionally in Brazil, our aim was to assess women by means of mammography, to determine the prevalence of this disease. DESIGN AND SETTING: The study protocol was designed in collaboration between the Department of Diagnostic Imaging (DDI, Institute of Diagnostic Imaging (IDI and São Paulo Municipal Health Program. METHODS: A total of 139,945 Brazilian women were assessed by means of mammography between April 2002 and September 2004. Using the American College of Radiology (ACR criteria (Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System, BIRADS®, the prevalence of suspected and highly suspected breast lesions were determined. RESULTS: The prevalence of suspected (BIRADS® 4 and highly suspected (BIRADS® 5 lesions increased with age, especially after the fourth decade. Accordingly, BIRADS® 4 and BIRADS® 5 lesions were more prevalent in the fourth, fifth, sixth and seventh decades. CONCLUSION: The presumed prevalence of suspected and highly suspected breast cancer lesions in the population of São Paulo was 0.6% and it is similar to the prevalence of breast cancer observed in other populations.

  16. Racial Discrimination in Criminal Sentencing: A Critical Evaluation of the Evidence with Additional Evidence on the Death Penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleck, Gary

    1981-01-01

    Reevaluation of published research on racial bias in criminal sentencing, and data on execution rates (1930-67) and death sentencing rates (1967-78), contradict a hypothesis of overt discrimination against Black defendants. One possible explanation of relatively lenient sentencing of Black defendants is the devalued status of Black crime victims.…

  17. National Death Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Death Index (NDI) is a centralized database of death record information on file in state vital statistics offices. Working with these state offices, the...

  18. Preventing Stroke Deaths

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Press Kit Read the MMWR Science Clips Preventing Stroke Deaths Progress Stalled Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) ... 4 states. 80% of strokes are preventable. Problem Stroke deaths have stopped declining. Strokes are common and ...

  19. Sudden infant death syndrome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adams, Stephen M; Ward, Chad E; Garcia, Karla L

    2015-01-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the sudden unexpected death of a child younger than one year during sleep that cannot be explained after a postmortem evaluation including autopsy, a thorough history, and scene evaluation...

  20. Sudden infant death syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... required by law into an unexplained cause of death may make these feelings more painful. A member of a local chapter of the National Foundation for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome may assist with counseling and reassurance to ...

  1. Our broken death penalty

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fletcher, William A

    2014-01-01

      A lecture entitled Our Broken Death Penalty is presented. But the title is misleading, for it suggests that America's death penalty might, at some earlier time, have been something other than broken...

  2. Sudden death victims

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ceelen, Manon; van der Werf, Christian; Hendrix, Anneke; Naujocks, Tatjana; Woonink, Frits; de Vries, Philip; van der Wal, Allard; Das, Kees

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to ascertain accordance between cause of death established by the forensic physician and autopsy results in young sudden death victims in the Netherlands. Sudden death victims aged 1-45 years examined by forensic physicians operating in the participating regions which also

  3. Separation, Part I: Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Anne Devereaux

    1997-01-01

    Contends literature is the one place where death still abides, where grief is felt and consolation can be sought. States that young readers can gain a recognition in books that death is natural. Discusses death in folk and fairy tales, in 17th-century didactic children's books and in modern and contemporary literature. Outlines characteristics of…

  4. Death Education: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, James M.; St. Pierre, Richard W.

    A review of the literature of death education reveals a lack of consensus among authors concerning the exact scope and sequence of an ideal death education program. Most authors feel, however, that death education should be a subject of immediate concern to all health educators, and that it is important to determine how children respond to various…

  5. Colorectal cancer in South Africa: A heritable cause suspected in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Colorectal carcinoma (CRC) has a low incidence among the black African population. Largely unrecognised in the scientific literature is the fact that a disproportionately large number of young black patients (<50 years old) present with CRC. Objectives. To analyse those tumours, which we propose may link ...

  6. The use of psychoactive prescription drugs among DUI suspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karjalainen, Karoliina; Haukka, Jari; Lintonen, Tomi; Joukamaa, Matti; Lillsunde, Pirjo

    2015-10-01

    The study seeks to increase understanding of the use of psychoactive prescription drugs among persons suspected of driving under the influence (DUI). We studied whether the use of prescribed psychoactive medication was associated with DUI, and examined the difference in the use of prescription drugs between DUI recidivists and those arrested only once. In this register-based study, persons suspected of DUI (n=29470) were drawn from the Register of DUI suspects, and an age- and gender-matched reference population (n=30043) was drawn from the Finnish general population. Data on prescription drug use was obtained by linkage to the National Prescription Register. The associations of DUI arrest and use of psychoactive prescription drugs in different DUI groups (findings for alcohol only, prescription drugs, prescription drugs and alcohol, illicit drugs) were estimated by using mixed-effect logistic regression. The use of psychoactive prescription drugs and DUI appeared to be strongly associated, with DUI suspects significantly more likely to use psychoactive prescription drugs compared to the reference population. Gender differences existed, with the use of benzodiazepines being more common among female DUI suspects. Moreover, DUI recidivists were more likely to use psychoactive prescription drugs compared to those arrested only once. In addition to alcohol and/or illicit drug use, a significant proportion of DUI suspects were using psychoactive prescription drugs. When prescribing psychoactive medication, especially benzodiazepines, physicians are challenged to screen for possible substance use problems and also to monitor for patients' alcohol or illicit drug use while being medicated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Book Review: Placing the Suspect behind the Keyboard: Using Digital Forensics and Investigative Techniques to Identify Cybercrime Suspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Nash

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Shavers, B. (2013. Placing the Suspect behind the Keyboard: Using Digital Forensics and Investigative Techniques to Identify Cybercrime Suspects. Waltham, MA: Elsevier, 290 pages, ISBN-978-1-59749-985-9, US$51.56. Includes bibliographical references and index.Reviewed by Detective Corporal Thomas Nash (tnash@bpdvt.org, Burlington Vermont Police Department, Internet Crime against Children Task Force. Adjunct Instructor, Champlain College, Burlington VT.In this must read for any aspiring novice cybercrime investigator as well as the seasoned professional computer guru alike, Brett Shaver takes the reader into the ever changing and dynamic world of Cybercrime investigation.  Shaver, an experienced criminal investigator, lays out the details and intricacies of a computer related crime investigation in a clear and concise manner in his new easy to read publication, Placing the Suspect behind the Keyboard. Using Digital Forensics and Investigative techniques to Identify Cybercrime Suspects. Shaver takes the reader from start to finish through each step of the investigative process in well organized and easy to follow sections, with real case file examples to reach the ultimate goal of any investigation: identifying the suspect and proving their guilt in the crime. Do not be fooled by the title. This excellent, easily accessible reference is beneficial to both criminal as well as civil investigations and should be in every investigator’s library regardless of their respective criminal or civil investigative responsibilities.(see PDF for full review

  8. Suspected Rhinolithiasis Associated With Endodontic Disease in a Cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Kevin; Fiani, Nadine; Peralta, Santiago

    2017-12-01

    Rhinoliths are rare, intranasal, mineralized masses formed via the precipitation of mineral salts around an intranasal nidus. Clinical signs are typically consistent with inflammatory rhinitis and nasal obstruction, but asymptomatic cases are possible. Rhinoliths may be classified as exogenous or endogenous depending on the origin of the nidus, with endogenous rhinoliths reportedly being less common. This case report describes a suspected case of endogenous rhinolithiasis in a cat which was detected as an incidental finding during radiographic assessment of a maxillary canine tooth with endodontic disease. Treatment consisted of removal of the suspected rhinolith via a transalveolar approach after surgical extraction of the maxillary canine tooth.

  9. Cholescintigraphy and ultrasonography in patients suspected of having acute cholecystitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, K B; Sommer, W; Hahn, L

    1988-01-01

    The diagnostic power of combined cholescintigraphy and ultrasonography was tested in 67 patients suspected of having acute cholecystitis; of these, 42 (63%) had acute cholecystitis. The predictive value of a positive scintigraphy (PVpos) was 95% and that of a negative (PVneg) was 91% (n = 67...... that in patients suspected of having acute cholecystitis cholescintigraphy should be the first diagnostic procedure performed. If the scintigraphy is positive, additional ultrasonographic detection of gallstones makes the diagnosis almost certain. If one diagnostic modality is inconclusive, the other makes a fair...

  10. Symptomatic Patency Capsule Retention in Suspected Crohn's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Bjørn; Nathan, Torben; Jensen, Michael Dam

    2016-01-01

    The main limitation of capsule endoscopy is the risk of capsule retention. In patients with suspected Crohn's disease, however, this complication is rare, and if a small bowel stenosis is not reliably excluded, small bowel patency can be confirmed with the Pillcam patency capsule. We present two...... patients examined for suspected Crohn's disease who experienced significant symptoms from a retained patency capsule. Both patients had Crohn's disease located in the terminal ileum. In one patient, the patency capsule caused abdominal pain and vomiting and was visualized at magnetic resonance enterography...

  11. Black-Body Radiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Black-body radiation; thermal radiation; heat; electromagnetic radiation; Stefan's Law; Stefan–Boltzmann Law; Wien's Law; Rayleigh–Jeans Law; black-body spectrum; ultraviolet catastrophe; zero point energy; photon.

  12. Higher spin black holes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gutperle, Michael; Kraus, Per

    2011-01-01

    .... We find solutions that generalize the BTZ black hole and carry spin-3 charge. The black hole entropy formula yields a result for the asymptotic growth of the partition function at finite spin-3 chemical potential...

  13. Eyelid closure at death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A D Macleod

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To observe the incidence of full or partial eyelid closure at death. Materials and Methods: The presence of ptosis was recorded in 100 consecutive hospice patient deaths. Results: Majority (63% of the patients died with their eyes fully closed, however, 37% had bilateral ptosis at death, with incomplete eye closure. In this study, central nervous system tumor involvement and/or acute hepatic encephalopathy appeared to be pre-mortem risk factors of bilateral ptosis at death. Conclusion: Organicity and not psychogenicity is, therefore, the likely etiology of failure of full eyelid closure at death.

  14. Demography and diffusion in epidemics: malaria and black death spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudart, J; Ghassani, M; Mintsa, J; Rachdi, M; Waku, J; Demongeot, J

    2010-09-01

    The classical models of epidemics dynamics by Ross and McKendrick have to be revisited in order to incorporate elements coming from the demography (fecundity, mortality and migration) both of host and vector populations and from the diffusion and mutation of infectious agents. The classical approach is indeed dealing with populations supposed to be constant during the epidemic wave, but the presently observed pandemics show duration of their spread during years imposing to take into account the host and vector population changes as well as the transient or permanent migration and diffusion of hosts (susceptible or infected), as well as vectors and infectious agents. Two examples are presented, one concerning the malaria in Mali and the other the plague at the middle-age.

  15. [The "Black Death" : Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiemer, Dorothea

    2015-07-01

    The Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a tick-borne viral disease that has been known for centuries. In the last years more frequent cases reflect the effects of climate change, globalization and the increasing encroachment of humans into previously unexploited areas. Humans acquire the infection by tick bites or through the slaughtering and processing of infected animals. The course of the disease can be severe and the average mortality reaches up to 30 %. It is transmissible from human to human and there is no causal treatment. Thus, CCHF meets the criteria for a highly contagious life-threatening disease. In the following current data on the virus, its vector, the distribution and transmission will be presented, as well as information on the diagnosis, the disease, the underlying pathophysiology and consequences in dealing with patients and deceased.

  16. The Black Death | Matemu | Dar Es Salaam Medical Students' Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    occurred in Vietnam, India, Algeria, Madagascar, and the northeastern part of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. [2] During 2000-2001, 95% of the world's cases occurred in Africa. Bubonic plague has a 1-15% mortality rate in treated cases and a 40-60% mortality rate in untreated cases. Conclusions Bubonic plague is ...

  17. Distinct clones of Yersinia pestis caused the black death

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Haensch, Stephanie; Bianucci, Raffaella; Signoli, Michel; Rajerison, Minoarisoa; Schultz, Michael; Kacki, Sacha; Vermunt, Marco; Weston, Darlene A; Hurst, Derek; Achtman, Mark; Carniel, Elisabeth; Bramanti, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    .... The etiology of this disease has remained highly controversial, ranging from claims based on genetics and the historical descriptions of symptoms that it was caused by Yersinia pestis to conclusions...

  18. Sensitivity and Specificity of Suspected Case Definition Used during West Africa Ebola Epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Christopher H; Champaloux, Steven W; Keïta, Sakoba; Martel, Lise; Bilivogui, Pepe; Knust, Barbara; McCollum, Andrea M

    2018-01-01

    Rapid early detection and control of Ebola virus disease (EVD) is contingent on accurate case definitions. Using an epidemic surveillance dataset from Guinea, we analyzed an EVD case definition developed by the World Health Organization (WHO) and used in Guinea. We used the surveillance dataset (March-October 2014; n = 2,847 persons) to identify patients who satisfied or did not satisfy case definition criteria. Laboratory confirmation determined cases from noncases, and we calculated sensitivity, specificity and predictive values. The sensitivity of the defintion was 68.9%, and the specificity of the definition was 49.6%. The presence of epidemiologic risk factors (i.e., recent contact with a known or suspected EVD case-patient) had the highest sensitivity (74.7%), and unexplained deaths had the highest specificity (92.8%). Results for case definition analyses were statistically significant (pdefinition used in Guinea contributed to improved overall sensitivity and specificity.

  19. Imaging the child with right lower quadrant pain and suspected appendicitis: current concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivit, Carlos J. [Departments of Radiology and Pediatrics, Rainbow Babies and Childrens Hospital of the University Hospitals of Cleveland and Case Western Reserve School of Medicine, Euclid Avenue, 11100, 44106-5056, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2004-06-01

    Acute appendicitis is the most common condition presenting with right lower quadrant pain requiring acute surgical intervention in childhood. The clinical diagnosis of acute appendicitis is often not straightforward and can be challenging. Approximately one-third of children with the condition have atypical clinical findings and are initially managed non-operatively. Complications usually result from perforation and include abscess formation, peritonitis, sepsis, bowel obstruction and death. Cross-sectional imaging with sonography and computed tomography (CT) have proven useful for the evaluation of suspected acute appendicitis in children. The principal advantages of sonography are its lower cost, lack of ionizing radiation, and ability to precisely delineate gynecologic disease. The principal advantages of CT are its operator independency with resultant higher diagnostic accuracy, enhanced delineation of disease extent in perforated appendicitis, and improved patient outcomes including decreased negative laparotomy and perforation rates. (orig.)

  20. Life inside black holes

    OpenAIRE

    Dokuchaev, V. I.

    2012-01-01

    We consider test planet and photon orbits of the third kind inside a black hole, which are stable, periodic and neither come out of the black hole nor terminate at the singularity. Interiors of supermassive black holes may be inhabited by advanced civilizations living on planets with the third-kind orbits. In principle, one can get information from the interiors of black holes by observing their white hole counterparts.

  1. Factors associated with late presentation of suspected tuberculosis cases to tuberculosis management facilities: The case in Dagoretti district, Nairobi, Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njau, Irene Wambui; Karanja, Simon Muturi; Wanzala, Peter; Omolo, Jared Odhiambo

    2012-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis is a highly contagious disease accounting for a high number of deaths in the developing countries; its control can be effectively achieved if individuals with the disease receive adequate and timely treatment. The objective of this study was to determine the factors associated with late presentation of suspects to tuberculosis management facilities in Dagoretti district in Nairobi, Kenya. Method A cross sectional study was conducted on patients aged 18 years and above attending TB clinics in Dagoretti District, Nairobi Kenya. A total of 426 TB suspects were interviewed. The study covered 8 clinics in Dagoretti district. Analysis was done using SPSS version 16.0 and Epi info version 6, this included Chi Square for Bivariate analysis and Binary Logistic Regression for Multivariate Analysis. Results Out of the 426 tuberculosis suspects, 248 (58.2%) suspects had delayed in seeking medical care. In Bivariate analysis male gender (P = 0.039, O.R = 1.51; 95% Confidence Interval; 1.00- 2.27), level of education (Primary class 5-8) (P = 0.001, O.R= 2.06; 95% C.I 1.34-3.19) and place of first medical care (drug store) (P= 0.013, O.R = 1.63; 95% C.I 1.09-2.46) were all significantly associated with late presentation. After multivariate logistic regression, gender (P = 0,019, OR = 1.6), level of education (p = 0.029, OR = 1.26) and place of first medical care (P= 0.01 OR = 1.27), were found to be significantly associated with late presentation. Conclusion This study shows that age, level of education and place of first medical care are the factors associated with late presentation of suspects to tuberculosis management facilities. PMID:23077714

  2. Monopole black hole skyrmions

    OpenAIRE

    Moss, I.G.; Shiiki, N.; Winstanley, E.

    2000-01-01

    Charged black hole solutions with pion hair are discussed. These can be\\ud used to study monopole black hole catalysis of proton decay.\\ud There also exist\\ud multi-black hole skyrmion solutions with BPS monopole behaviour.

  3. 76 FR 62503 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 12-Month Finding on a Petition To List the Black...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-07

    ...). Annual adult death rates for the black-footed albatross are normally very low, on the order of 3 to 8... Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 12-Month Finding on a Petition To List the Black-footed Albatross as... Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 12-Month Finding on a Petition To List the Black-footed Albatross as...

  4. Black holes in binary stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijers, R.A.M.J.

    1996-01-01

    Introduction Distinguishing neutron stars and black holes Optical companions and dynamical masses X-ray signatures of the nature of a compact object Structure and evolution of black-hole binaries High-mass black-hole binaries Low-mass black-hole binaries Low-mass black holes Formation of black holes

  5. Surveillance of deaths caused by arboviruses in Brazil: from dengue to chikungunya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, Luciano Pamplona de Góes; Freitas, André Ricardo Ribas; Brasil, Patrícia; da Cunha, Rivaldo Venâncio

    2017-01-01

    Did death occur DUE TO dengue, or in a patient WITH dengue virus infection? It seems a matter of semantics, but in fact, it underscores how challenging it is to distinguish whether the disease contributed to death, or was itself the underlying cause of death. Can a death be attributed to chikungunya virus, when some deaths occur after the acute phase? Did the virus decompensate the underlying diseases, leading to death? Did prolonged hospitalisation lead to infection, resulting in the patient’s progression to death? Were there iatrogenic complications during patient care? The dengue question, for which there has not yet been a definitive response, resurfaces prominently under the chikungunya surveillance scenario. We are facing an epidemic of a disease that seems to be more lethal than previously thought. The major challenge ahead is to investigate deaths suspected of occurring due to arbovirus infections and to understand the role of each infection in the unfavourable outcome. PMID:28767985

  6. PMS2 Involvement in Patients Suspected of Lynch Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niessen, Renee C.; Kleibeuker, Jan H.; Westers, Helga; Jager, Paul O. J.; Rozeveld, Dennie; Bos, Krista K.; Boersma-van Ek, Wytske; Hollema, Harry; Sijmons, Rolf H.; Hofstra, Robert M. W.

    It is well-established that germline mutations in the mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 cause Lynch syndrome. However, mutations in these three genes do not account for all Lynch syndrome (suspected) families. Recently, it was shown that germline mutations in another mismatch repair gene,

  7. Faecal Calprotectin in Suspected Paediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Degraeuwe, Pieter L. J.; Beld, Monique P. A.; Ashorn, Merja; Canani, Roberto Berni; Day, Andrew S.; Diamanti, Antonella; Fagerberg, Ulrika L.; Henderson, Paul; Kolho, Kaija-Leena; Van de Vijver, Els; van Rheenen, Patrick F.; Wilson, David C.; Kessels, Alfons G. H.

    Objectives: The diagnostic accuracy of faecal calprotectin (FC) concentration for paediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is well described at the population level, but not at the individual level. We reassessed the diagnostic accuracy of FC in children with suspected IBD and developed an

  8. Stabilization of the spine in patients with suspected cervical spine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stabilization of the spine in patients with suspected cervical spine injury in Mulago Hospital. BM Ndeleva, T Beyeza. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/eaoj.v5i1.67487 · AJOL African Journals ...

  9. Talking heads : interviewing suspects from a cultural perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beune, K.

    2009-01-01

    Although the literature on the interviewing of suspects has increased over the past decade, research on the use and effectiveness of police strategies and their boundary conditions is very rare. The present dissertation aims to fill this void by identifying behaviors that appeal to and persuade

  10. Nonreferral of Nursing Home Patients With Suspected Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamaker, Marije E.; Hamelinck, Victoria C.; van Munster, Barbara C.; Bastiaannet, Esther; Smorenburg, Carolien H.; Achterberg, Wilco P.; Liefers, Gerrit-Jan; de Rooij, Sophia E.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: People with suspected breast cancer who are not referred for diagnostic testing remain unregistered and are not included in cancer statistics. Little is known about the extent of and motivation for nonreferral of these patients. Methods: A Web-based survey was sent to all elderly care

  11. DNA typing from vaginal smear slides in suspected rape cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayse Aparecida da Silva

    Full Text Available In an investigation of suspected rape, proof of sexual assault with penetration is required. In view of this, detailed descriptions of the genitalia, the thighs and pubic region are made within the forensic medical service. In addition, vaginal swabs are taken from the rape victim and some of the biological material collected is then transferred to glass slides. In this report, we describe two rape cases solved using DNA typing from cells recovered from vaginal smear slides. In 1999, two young women informed the Rio de Janeiro Police Department that they had been victims of sexual assaults. A suspect was arrested and the victims identified him as the offender. The suspect maintained that he was innocent. In order to elucidate these crimes, vaginal smear slides were sent to the DNA Diagnostic Laboratory for DNA analysis three months after the crimes, as unique forensic evidence. To get enough epithelial and sperm cells to perform DNA analysis, we used protocols modified from the previously standard protocols used for DNA extraction from biological material fixed on glass slides. The quantity of cells was sufficient to perform human DNA typing using nine short tandem repeat (STR loci. It was 3.3 billion times more probable that it was the examined suspect who had left sperm cells in the victims, rather than any other individual in the population of Rio de Janeiro.

  12. Cognitive Linguistic Performances of Multilingual University Students Suspected of Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Signe-Anita; Laine, Matti

    2011-01-01

    High-performing adults with compensated dyslexia pose particular challenges to dyslexia diagnostics. We compared the performance of 20 multilingual Finnish university students with suspected dyslexia with 20 age-matched and education-matched controls on an extensive test battery. The battery tapped various aspects of reading, writing, word…

  13. Differential Diagnosis of Children with Suspected Childhood Apraxia of Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Elizabeth; McCabe, Patricia; Heard, Robert; Ballard, Kirrie J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The gold standard for diagnosing childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) is expert judgment of perceptual features. The aim of this study was to identify a set of objective measures that differentiate CAS from other speech disorders. Method: Seventy-two children (4-12 years of age) diagnosed with suspected CAS by community speech-language…

  14. A suspected case of Addison’s disease in cattle

    OpenAIRE

    Lambacher, Bianca; Wittek, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    A 4.75-year old Simmental cow was presented with symptoms of colic and ileus. The clinical signs and blood analysis resulted in the diagnosis of suspected primary hypoadrenocorticism (Addison’s disease). Although Addison’s disease has been frequently described in other domestic mammals, to our knowledge, this disease has not previously been reported in cattle.

  15. Is extended biopsy protocol justified in all patients with suspected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the significance of an extended 10-core transrectal biopsy protocol in different categories of patients with suspected prostate cancer using digital guidance. Materials and Methods: We studied 125 men who were being evaluated for prostate cancer. They all had an extended 10-core digitally guided ...

  16. Correlates and Suspected Causes of Obesity in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crothers, Laura M.; Kehle, Thomas J.; Bray, Melissa A.; Theodore, Lea A.

    2009-01-01

    The correlates and suspected causes of the intractable condition obesity are complex and involve environmental and heritable, psychological and physical variables. Overall, the factors associated with and possible causes of it are not clearly understood. Although there exists some ambiguity in the research regarding the degree of happiness in…

  17. Medical Evaluation of Suspected Child Sexual Abuse: 2011 Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Joyce A.

    2011-01-01

    The medical evaluation of children with suspected sexual abuse includes more than just the physical examination of the child. The importance of taking a detailed medical history from the parents and a history from the child about physical sensations following sexual contact has been emphasized in other articles in the medical literature. The…

  18. Selective screening in neonates suspected to have inborn errors of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) have a high morbidity and mortality in neonates. Unfortunately, there is no nationwide neonatal screen in Egypt, so several cases may be missed. Objective: The aim of this work was to detect the prevalence of IEM among neonates with suspected IEM, and to diagnose IEM as ...

  19. Sexual Health Before Treatment in Women with Suspected Gynecologic Malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretschneider, C Emi; Doll, Kemi M; Bensen, Jeannette T; Gehrig, Paola A; Wu, Jennifer M; Geller, Elizabeth J

    2017-08-22

    Sexual health in survivors of gynecologic cancer has been studied; however, sexual health in these women before treatment has not been thoroughly evaluated. The objective of our study was to describe the pretreatment characteristics of sexual health of women with suspected gynecologic cancer before cancer treatment. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of women with a suspected gynecologic cancer, who were prospectively enrolled in a hospital-based cancer survivorship cohort from August 2012 to June 2013. Subjects completed the validated Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Sexual Function and Satisfaction Questionnaire. Pretreatment sexual health was assessed in terms of sexual interest, desire, lubrication, discomfort, orgasm, enjoyment, and satisfaction. Of 186 eligible women with suspected gynecologic cancer, 154 (82%) completed the questionnaire pretreatment. Mean age was 58.1 ± 13.3 years. Sexual health was poor: 68.3% reported no sexual activity, and 54.7% had no interest in sexual activity. When comparing our study population to the general U.S. population, the mean pretreatment scores for the subdomains of lubrication and vaginal discomfort were similar, while sexual interest was significantly lower and global satisfaction was higher. In a linear regression model, controlling for cancer site, age remained significantly associated with sexual function while cancer site did not. Problems with sexual health are prevalent in women with suspected gynecologic malignancies before cancer treatment. Increasing awareness of the importance of sexual health in this population will improve quality of life for these women.

  20. Use of budesonide Turbuhaler in young children suspected of asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H; Pedersen, S; Nikander, K

    1994-01-01

    The question addressed in this study was the ability of young children to use a dry-powder inhaler, Turbuhaler. One hundred and sixty five children suspected of asthma, equally distributed in one year age-groups from 6 months to 8 yrs, inhaled from a Pulmicort Turbuhaler, 200 micrograms budesonid...

  1. Doppler ultrasound in the assessment of suspected intra-uterine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ramakantb

    obesity with hypertension and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.[3] In this review, a brief discussion about the ultrasound diagnosis of suspected IUGR, and thereafter about the use of Doppler ultrasound in the diagnosis of IUGR, will be ... before that, all fetuses have relatively larger heads, which will mask the brain-.

  2. Candida meningitis in a suspected immunosuppressive patient - A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Candida meningitis in a suspected immunosuppressive patient - A case report. EO Sanya, NB Ameen, BA Onile. Abstract. No Abstract. West African Journal of Medicine Vol. 25 (1) 2006: pp.79-81. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  3. Ajmaline challenge in young individuals with suspected Brugada syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorgente, A.; Sarkozy, A.; Asmundis, C. de; Chierchia, G.B.; Capulzini, L.; Paparella, G.; Henkens, S.; Brugada, P.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The clinical characteristics and the results of ajmaline challenge in young individuals with suspected Brugada syndrome (BS) have not been systematically investigated. METHODS: Among a larger series of patients included in the BS database of our Department, 179 patients undergoing

  4. A Diagnostic Program for Patients Suspected of Having Lung Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stigt, Jos A.; Uil, Steven M.; Oostdijk, Ad H.; Boers, James E.; van den Berg, Jan-Willem K.; Groen, Harry J. M.

    2012-01-01

    In 297 patients suspected of having lung cancer, invasive diagnostic procedures followed positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET-CT) on the same day. For patients with a diagnosis of malignancy (215/297), investigations were finalized on 1 day in 85%, and bronchoscopy was performed in

  5. Use of Chest Radiography In Patients Suspected of Pulmonary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    may be rushed into treatfng all cases of cough, fever and weight loss with negative sputums as PTB, and other diagnoses may be overlooked. A cheaper, quicker way of screening TB suspects would help con- siderably in this common problem. In Febuary 1991, the Norwegian Government do- nated two Odelka camer;l,s to ...

  6. Opioid analgesic administration in patients with suspected drug use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreling, Maria Clara Giorio Dutra; Mattos-Pimenta, Cibele Andrucioli de

    2017-01-01

    To identify the prevalence of patients suspected of drug use according to the nursing professionals' judgement, and compare the behavior of these professionals in opioid administration when there is or there is no suspicion that patient is a drug user. A cross-sectional study with 507 patients and 199 nursing professionals responsible for administering drugs to these patients. The Chi-Square test, Fisher's Exact and a significance level of 5% were used for the analyzes. The prevalence of suspected patients was 6.7%. The prevalence ratio of administration of opioid analgesics 'if necessary' is twice higher among patients suspected of drug use compared to patients not suspected of drug use (p = 0.037). The prevalence of patients suspected of drug use was similar to that of studies performed in emergency departments. Patients suspected of drug use receive more opioids than patients not suspected of drug use. Identificar a prevalência de pacientes com suspeita de uso de drogas conforme opinião de profissionais de enfermagem e comparar a conduta desses profissionais na administração de opioides quando há ou não suspeita de que o paciente seja usuário de drogas. Estudo transversal com 507 pacientes e 199 profissionais de enfermagem responsáveis pela administração de medicamentos a esses pacientes. Para as análises foram utilizados os testes de Qui-Quadrado, Exato de Fisher e um nível de significância de 5%. A prevalência de pacientes suspeitos foi 6,7%. A razão de prevalência de administração de analgésicos opioides "se necessário" é duas vezes maior entre os pacientes suspeitos em relação aos não suspeitos (p=0,037). A prevalência de suspeitos foi semelhante à de estudos realizados em departamentos de emergência. Os suspeitos de serem usuários de drogas recebem mais opioides do que os não suspeitos.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging versus bone scintigraphy in suspected scaphoid fracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiel-van Buul, M.M.C. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Academic Medical Center, Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Roolker, W. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Academic Medical Center, Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Verbeeten, B.W.B. Jr. [Dept. of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Broekhuizen, A.H. [Dept. of Traumatology, Academic Medical Center, Univ. of Amsredam (Netherlands)

    1996-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become increasingly useful in the evaluation of musculoskeletal problems, including those of the wrist. In patients with a wrist injury, MRI is used mainly to assess vascularity of scaphoid non-union. However, the use of MRI in patients in the acute phase following carpal injury is not common. Three-phase bone scintigraphy is routinely performed from at least 72 h after injury in patients with suspected scaphoid fracture and negative initial radiographs. We evaluated MRI in this patient group. The bone scan was used as the reference method. Nineteen patients were included. Bone scintigraphy was performed in all 19 patients, but MRI could be obtained in only 16 (in three patients, MRI was stopped owing to claustrophobia). In five patients, MRI confirmed a scintigraphically suspected scaphoid fracture. In one patient, a perilunar luxation, without a fracture, was seen on MRI, while bone scintigraphy showed a hot spot in the region of the lunate bone, suspected for fracture. This was confirmed by surgery. In two patients, a hot spot in the scaphoid region was suspected for scaphoid fracture, and immobilization and employed for a period of 12 weeks. MRI was negative in both cases; in one of them a scaphoid fracture was retrospectively proven on the initial X-ray series. In another two patients, a hot spot in the region of MCP I was found with a negative MRI. In both, the therapy was adjusted. In the remaining six patients, both modalities were negative. We conclude that in the diagnostic management of patients with suspected scaphoid fracture and negative initial radiographs, the use of MRI may be promising, but is not superior to three-phase bone scintigraphy. (orig.)

  8. Programmed cell death: Superman meets Dr Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Pascal; Silke, John

    2003-12-01

    This year's Cold Spring Harbor meeting on programmed cell death (September 17-21, 2003), organised by Craig Thompson and Junying Yuan, was proof that the 'golden age' of research in this field is far from over. There was a flurry of fascinating insights into the regulation of diverse apoptotic pathways and unexpected non-apoptotic roles for some of the key apoptotic regulators and effectors. In addition to their role in cell death, components of the apoptotic molecular machinery are now known to also function in a variety of essential cellular processes, such as regulating glucose homeostasis, lipid metabolism, cell proliferation and differentiation.

  9. Charged cosmological black hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Rahim; Stahl, Clément; Firouzjaee, Javad T.; Xue, She-Sheng

    2017-11-01

    The cosmological black holes are black holes living not in an asymptotically flat universe but in an expanding spacetime. They have a rich dynamics especially for their mass and horizon. In this article, we perform a natural step in investigating this new type of black hole: we consider the possibility of a charged cosmological black hole. We derive the general equations of motion governing its dynamics and report a new analytic solution for the special case of the charged Lematre-Tolman-Bondi equations of motion that describe a charged cosmological black hole. We then study various relevant quantities for the characterization of the black hole, such as the C-function, the effect of the charge on the black hole flux, and the nature of the singularity. We also perform numerical investigations to strengthen our results. Finally, we challenge a model of gamma ray burst within our framework.

  10. Existential Concerns About Death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moestrup, Lene; Hansen, Helle Ploug

    2014-01-01

    patients in Danish hospices. The main findings demonstrated how the patients faced the forthcoming death without being anxious of death but sorrowful about leaving life. Furthermore, patients expressed that they avoided thinking about death. However, some had reconstructed specific and positive ideas about...... psychology or Kübler-Ross’ theory about death stages. The complex concerns might be explained using Martin Heidegger’s phenomenological thinking. We aimed to illuminate dying patients´ existential concerns about the impending death through a descriptive analysis of semi-structured interviews with 17 cancer...... afterlife and made accurate decisions for practical aspects of their death. The patients wished to focus on positive aspects in their daily life at hospice. It hereby seems important to have ongoing reflections and to include different theoretical perspectives when providing existential support to dying...

  11. Existential Concerns About Death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moestrup, Lene; Hansen, Helle Ploug

    2015-01-01

    patients in Danish hospices. The main findings demonstrated how the patients faced the forthcoming death without being anxious of death but sorrowful about leaving life. Furthermore, patients expressed that they avoided thinking about death. However, some had reconstructed specific and positive ideas about...... psychology or Kübler-Ross’ theory about death stages. The complex concerns might be explained using Martin Heidegger’s phenomenological thinking. We aimed to illuminate dying patients´ existential concerns about the impending death through a descriptive analysis of semi-structured interviews with 17 cancer...... afterlife and made accurate decisions for practical aspects of their death. The patients wished to focus on positive aspects in their daily life at hospice. It hereby seems important to have ongoing reflections and to include different theoretical perspectives when providing existential support to dying...

  12. Pitfalls in death certification

    OpenAIRE

    England, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Apart from their administrative purpose, death certificate data are a major means of identifying public health problems and evaluating the effectiveness of programs developed to deal with these public health problems. The inaccuracies in death certification are well documented in the international literature. This study aimed to estimate the accuracy in cancer death certification locally, as well as present common types of errors in order to create educational awareness.

  13. "Psychogenic" death: a reappraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, G V; Franke, R H

    1970-01-16

    Social, economic, and medical variables correlated with "psychogenic" death rates across about 30 countries. However, McClelland's psychological motives of achievement, affiliation, and power, determined for each country by content analysis of children's stories, did not. Status integration correlated positively with homicide and negatively with deaths from suicide and ulcers. Low life expectancy, wealth, economic growth, wine consumption, and zinc (cadmium) consumption correlated with deaths from homicide, suicide, ulcers, cirrhosis and hypertension, respectively.

  14. Protecting Trees from Sudden Oak Death before Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. Lee; Y. Valachovic; M. Garbelotto

    2010-01-01

    Phytophthora ramorum, an introduced invasive plant pathogen that causes sudden oak death, has killed over a million tanoak, coast live oak, Shreve oak, and California black oak trees along the California coastal region from Monterey through Humboldt Counties. Most trees infected with P. ramorum will eventually die, including...

  15. Green tea polyphenol induces significant cell death in human lung ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Green tea polyphenol induces significant cell death in human lung cancer cells. Jie Huang, Fa-jiu Li, Shi Chen, Yi Shi, Xiao-jiang Wang, Chuan-hai Wang, Qing- ..... method for the determination of green and black tea polyphenols in biomatrices by high-performance liquid chromatography with coulometric array detection.

  16. Sudden oak death in California: what is the potential?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tara M. Barrett; Demetrios Gatziolis; Jeremy S. Fried; Karen L. Waddell

    2006-01-01

    Sudden oak death, a disease associated with the pathogen Phytophthora ramorum, has a large number of shrub and tree host species. Three of the tree species must susceptible to mortality from the disease, California black oak (Quercus kelloggii), coast live oak (Quercus agrifolia), and tanoak (...

  17. Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) Overview Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the unexplained death, usually during sleep, of a seemingly healthy baby ... year old. SIDS is sometimes known as crib death because the infants often die in their cribs. ...

  18. The effects of switching the camera module from BlackBerry Curve 9360 devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gisolf, F.; Geradts, Z.; Verhoeven, D.; Klaver, C.

    A Photo-Response Non-Uniformity (PRNU) pattern is the 'fingerprint' of a digital camera, which is left in the images acquired with the camera. It can be used to identify the source of suspect images. For a case a BlackBerry phone with a camera was obtained and the question was if this phone was the

  19. Education for Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puolimatka, Tapio; Solasaari, Ulla

    2006-01-01

    Death is an unavoidable fact of human life, which cannot be totally ignored in education. Children reflect on death and raise questions that deserve serious answers. If an educator completely evades the issue, children will seek other conversation partners. It is possible to find arguments both from secular and religious sources, which alleviate…

  20. Death Writ Large

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastenbaum, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Mainstream thanatology has devoted its efforts to improving the understanding, care, and social integration of people who are confronted with life-threatening illness or bereavement. This article suggests that it might now be time to expand the scope and mission to include large-scale death and death that occurs through complex and multi-domain…

  1. Sudden Cardiac Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberger

    1999-08-01

    Great strides have been made in the approach to the management of sudden cardiac death. Patients who have been successfully resuscitated from an episode of sudden cardiac death are at high risk of recurrence. Much larger groups of patients who have not had episodes of sudden cardiac death are also at substantial risk for this event, however. Because the survival rates associated with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest are dismal, these high-risk populations must be targeted for prophylaxis. Beta-blockers have been shown to be an effective pharmacologic therapy in patients who have had myocardial infarction and, most recently, in patients with congestive heart failure. When possible, these agents should be used in these populations. No class I or class III antiarrhythmic drugs, with the possible exception of amiodarone, have been shown to have efficacy as prophylactic agents for the reduction of mortality in these populations. In patients who have hemodynamically significant sustained ventricular tachyarrhythmias or an aborted episode of sudden cardiac death, the current therapy of choice is an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD). For prophylaxis of sudden cardiac death in patients who have not had a previous event, several approaches may be considered. Currently, the best therapeutic approach for prophylaxis of sudden cardiac death seems to be the ICD; however, use of this device can be justified only in patients at substantial risk of sudden cardiac death. Defining the high-risk populations that will benefit from ICDs is critical in managing the problem of sudden cardiac death.

  2. Conflicting Thoughts about Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Paul L.

    2011-01-01

    Most research on children's conception of death has probed their understanding of its biological aspects: its inevitability, irreversibility and terminal impact. Yet many adults subscribe to a religious conception implying that death marks the beginning of a new life. Two recent empirical studies confirm that in the course of development, children…

  3. Death Acceptance through Ritual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Nancy C.

    2011-01-01

    This article summarizes the author's original research, which sought to discover the elements necessary for using death-related ritual as a psychotherapeutic technique for grieving people who experience their grief as "stuck," "unending," "maladaptive," and so on. A "death-related ritual" is defined as a ceremony, directly involving at least 1…

  4. Brain Death and Islam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziad-Miller, Amna; Elamin, Elamin M.

    2014-01-01

    How one defines death may vary. It is important for clinicians to recognize those aspects of a patient’s religious beliefs that may directly influence medical care and how such practices may interface with local laws governing the determination of death. Debate continues about the validity and certainty of brain death criteria within Islamic traditions. A search of PubMed, Scopus, EMBASE, Web of Science, PsycNet, Sociological Abstracts, DIALOGUE ProQuest, Lexus Nexus, Google, and applicable religious texts was conducted to address the question of whether brain death is accepted as true death among Islamic scholars and clinicians and to discuss how divergent opinions may affect clinical care. The results of the literature review inform this discussion. Brain death has been acknowledged as representing true death by many Muslim scholars and medical organizations, including the Islamic Fiqh Academies of the Organization of the Islamic Conference and the Muslim World League, the Islamic Medical Association of North America, and other faith-based medical organizations as well as legal rulings by multiple Islamic nations. However, consensus in the Muslim world is not unanimous, and a sizable minority accepts death by cardiopulmonary criteria only. PMID:25287999

  5. Programmed cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this conference to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on the role programmed cell death plays in normal development and homeostasis of many organisms. This volume contains abstracts of papers in the following areas: invertebrate development; immunology/neurology; bcl-2 family; biochemistry; programmed cell death in viruses; oncogenesis; vertebrate development; and diseases.

  6. Identity after Death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerstrøm, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore how legacy organizational identity and death relate to each other and, thereby, contribute to closing the gap in knowledge on organizational identity constructions in times of death. Design/methodology/approach: The paper opted for an exploratory s...

  7. Characteristics of fetuses evaluated due to suspected anencephaly: a population-based cohort study in southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuele Pelizzari

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Anencephaly is considered to be the most common type of neural tube defect. Our aim was to assess the clinical and gestational features of a cohort of fetuses with suspected anencephaly. DESIGN AND SETTING: Population-based retrospective cohort study in a referral hospital in southern Brazil. METHODS: The sample consisted of fetuses referred due to suspected anencephaly, to the Fetal Medicine Service of Hospital Materno Infantil Presidente Vargas, between January 2005 and September 2013. Clinical, radiological, pathological and survival data were gathered. RESULTS: Our sample was composed of 29 fetuses. The diagnosis of suspected anencephaly was made on average at 21.3 weeks of gestation. Seven fetuses had malformations that affected other organs, and these included oral clefts (n = 4 and congenital heart defects (n = 2. In 16 cases, there was termination of pregnancy (n = 12 or intrauterine death (n = 4. Regarding those who were born alive (n = 13, all of them died in the first week of life. After postnatal evaluation, the diagnosis of anencephaly was confirmed in 22 cases (75.9%. Other conditions included amniotic band disruption complex (6.9%, microhydranencephaly (6.9%, merocrania (3.4% and holoprosencephaly (3.4%. CONCLUSIONS: Different conditions involving the cranial vault may be confused with anencephaly, as seen in our sample. However, these conditions also seem to have a poor prognosis. It seems that folic acid supplementation is not being properly performed.

  8. Gratitude lessens death anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Rosanna W L; Cheng, Sheung-Tak

    2011-09-01

    This study investigated whether a brief gratitude induction could reduce death anxiety. 83 Chinese older adults (mean age = 62.7, SD = 7.13) were randomly assigned into one of three conditions: gratitude, hassle, and neutral, in which they wrote different types of life events before responding to measures of death anxiety and affect. Participants in the gratitude induction reported lower death anxiety than the hassle and the neutral condition, whereas no difference was observed for the latter two conditions. There was no experimental effect on positive affect, and a significant effect on negative affect but which did not favor the gratitude condition. By reexamining life events with a thankful attitude, people may become less fearful of death due to a sense that life has been well-lived. Because gratitude can be induced using a very brief procedure, there are broad applications in clinical and health-care settings for the relief of death anxiety.

  9. Sudden cardiac death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Parakh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sudden cardiac death is one of the most common cause of mortality worldwide. Despite significant advances in the medical science, there is little improvement in the sudden cardiac death related mortality. Coronary artery disease is the most common etiology behind sudden cardiac death, in the above 40 years population. Even in the apparently healthy population, there is a small percentage of patients dying from sudden cardiac death. Given the large denominator, this small percentage contributes to the largest burden of sudden cardiac death. Identification of this at risk group among the apparently healthy individual is a great challenge for the medical fraternity. This article looks into the causes and methods of preventing SCD and at some of the Indian data. Details of Brugada syndrome, Long QT syndrome, Genetics of SCD are discussed. Recent guidelines on many of these causes are summarised.

  10. A rational clinical approach to suspected insulin allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødtger, Uffe; Wittrup, M

    2005-01-01

    AIMS: Allergy to recombinant human (rDNA) insulin preparations is a rare complication of insulin therapy. However, insulin preparations contain several allergens, and several disorders can resemble insulin allergy. Studies evaluating the diagnostic procedures on suspected insulin allergy...... technique (n = 5), skin disease (n = 3) and other systemic allergy (n = 1). Nine other patients were found to be allergic to protamine (n = 3) or rDNA insulin (n = 6), and specific treatment was associated with relief in 8 patients (89%). Four patients had local reactions of unknown causes but symptom...... relief was obtained in three cases by unspecific therapy. Overall, 20 (91%) reported relief of symptoms. CONCLUSION: Our standardized investigative procedure of suspected insulin preparation (IP) allergy was associated with relief of symptoms in > 90% of patients. IP allergy was diagnosed in 41...

  11. Interdisciplinary action of nurses to children with suspected sexual abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lia Leão Ciuffo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Understanding the role of nurses as members of interdisciplinary teams in the care of children with suspected sexual abuse. Methodology. This is a qualitative research based on the sociological phenomenology of Alfred Schutz. In 2008 were interviewed eleven nurses who worked in reference institutions for the care of child victims of sexual abuse in Rio de Janeiro. Results. The category called 'Interacting with other professionals in child care' emerged from the analysis of performance of professionals. The intersubjective relations between the nurses and the interdisciplinary team will enable to understand the intent of care from the perspective of social, emotional and psychological needs of children and their families. Conclusion. Interdisciplinarity favored the development of actions based on acceptance, listening and agreements on possible solutions in the care of children with suspected sexual abuse.

  12. Atlantoaxial subluxation and nasopharyngeal necrosis complicating suspected granulomatosis with polyangiitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Anand; Holekamp, Terrence F; Diaz, Jason A; Zebala, Lukas; Brasington, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Granulomatosis polyangiitis (GPA, formerly Wegener granulomatosis) is a vasculitis that typically involves the upper respiratory tract, lungs, and kidneys. The 2 established methods to confirm a suspicion of GPA are the antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) test and biopsy. However, ANCA-negative cases have been known to occur, and it can be difficult to find biopsy evidence of granulomatous disease.We report a case of suspected granulomatosis with polyangiitis limited to the nasopharynx. With a negative ANCA and no histological evidence, our diagnosis was founded on the exclusion of other diagnoses and the response to cyclophosphamide therapy. This case is unique because the patient's lesion resulted in atlantoaxial instability, which required a posterior spinal fusion at C1-C2. This is the first reported case of suspected GPA producing damage to the cervical spine and threatening the spinal cord.

  13. Suspected side effects to the quadrivalent human papilloma vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinth, Louise; Theibel, Ann Cathrine; Pors, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The quadrivalent vaccine that protects against human papilloma virus types 6, 11, 16 and 18 (Q-HPV vaccine, Gardasil) was included into the Danish childhood vaccination programme in 2009. During the past years, a collection of symptoms primarily consistent with sympathetic nervous...... system dysfunction have been described as suspected side effects to the Q-HPV vaccine. METHODS: We present a description of suspected side effects to the Q-HPV vaccine in 53 patients referred to our Syncope Unit for tilt table test and evaluation of autonomic nervous system function. RESULTS: All...... consistency in the reported symptoms as well as between our findings and those described by others. Our findings neither confirm nor dismiss a causal link to the Q-HPV vaccine, but they suggest that further research is urgently warranted to clarify the pathophysiology behind the symptoms experienced...

  14. Stimulated Black Hole Evaporation

    CERN Document Server

    Spaans, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Black holes are extreme expressions of gravity. Their existence is predicted by Einstein's theory of general relativity and is supported by observations. Black holes obey quantum mechanics and evaporate spontaneously. Here it is shown that a mass rate $R_f\\sim 3\\times 10^{-8} (M_0/M)^{1/2}$ $M_0$ yr$^{-1}$ onto the horizon of a black hole with mass $M$ (in units of solar mass $M_0$) stimulates a black hole into rapid evaporation. Specifically, $\\sim 3 M_0$ black holes can emit a large fraction of their mass, and explode, in $M/R_f \\sim 3\\times 10^7 (M/M_0)^{3/2}$ yr. These stimulated black holes radiate a spectral line power $P \\sim 2\\times 10^{39} (M_0/M)^{1/2}$ erg s$^{-1}$, at a wavelength $\\lambda \\sim 3\\times 10^5 (M/M_0)$ cm. This prediction can be observationally verified.

  15. Black holes an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Raine, Derek

    2005-01-01

    This introduction to the fascinating subject of black holes fills a significant gap in the literature which exists between popular, non-mathematical expositions and advanced textbooks at the research level. It is designed for advanced undergraduates and first year postgraduates as a useful stepping-stone to the advanced literature. The book provides an accessible introduction to the exact solutions of Einstein’s vacuum field equations describing spherical and axisymmetric (rotating) black holes. The geometry and physical properties of these spacetimes are explored through the motion of particles and light. The use of different coordinate systems, maximal extensions and Penrose diagrams is explained. The association of the surface area of a black hole with its entropy is discussed and it is shown that with the introduction of quantum mechanics black holes cease to be black and can radiate. This result allows black holes to satisfy the laws of thermodynamics and thus be consistent with the rest of physics.

  16. Astrophysical black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Gorini, Vittorio; Moschella, Ugo; Treves, Aldo; Colpi, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Based on graduate school lectures in contemporary relativity and gravitational physics, this book gives a complete and unified picture of the present status of theoretical and observational properties of astrophysical black holes. The chapters are written by internationally recognized specialists. They cover general theoretical aspects of black hole astrophysics, the theory of accretion and ejection of gas and jets, stellar-sized black holes observed in the Milky Way, the formation and evolution of supermassive black holes in galactic centers and quasars as well as their influence on the dynamics in galactic nuclei. The final chapter addresses analytical relativity of black holes supporting theoretical understanding of the coalescence of black holes as well as being of great relevance in identifying gravitational wave signals. With its introductory chapters the book is aimed at advanced graduate and post-graduate students, but it will also be useful for specialists.

  17. Death in media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavićević Aleksandra

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the role of media in a construction of public image speech and presentation of death. The main research questions could be posed as follows: does the media discourse confirm a thesis about modern society as the one which intensely avoids encounter with Death, or does it defy it? Frequent images or hints of death in visual media in films informative and entertainment programs-suggest certain changes related to this issue in the past few decades. This analysis focuses on printed media hence the paper assesses numerous issues of the daily journal Politika from 1963, 1972, 1973, 1979, 1985, 1991, 1995, 1999, 2007 and 2008, as well as some other daily journals after 2000. The analysis confirms a strong connection between the current political systems and ideology and speech about death. In addition, it reveals a political usage of this event but also speaks up about cultural and historical models, underlying all other constructions. During the 1960's and 1970's, the presentations, including the speech about death relied on the traditional understandings about inevitability of death and dying, and alternatively on atheistic beliefs related to the progress and wellbeing of the society. In this particular discourse, death was present to a limited degree, serving primarily to glorify socialist order. The end of the 1970's witnessed an increase in the glorification of the death, correlated with the decrease of the dominant political ideology. On the other hand, the 1990's brought about more presence of the national and religious symbolism and glorification of the dead as heroes. After 2000, mercantilism is evident throughout the media. All of the media broadcast drastic images of death and dead, thus providing an answer to the posed question at the beginning of this paper about the relationship of the modern society towards death but nevertheless, this still leaves out many implicit consequences and possible meanings.

  18. Radiotherapy in three suspect cases of feline thymoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaser-Hotz, B; Rohrer, C R; Fidel, J L; Nett, C S; Hörauf, A; Hauser, B

    2001-01-01

    Radiation therapy for three cases of suspect feline thymoma is described. The thymoma was controlled for 4 years in case no. 1. Case no. 2 responded well to radiation therapy but was euthanized after 2 months because of a nasal adenocarcinoma. Case no. 3 continues to do well more than 8 months after radiotherapy. Difficulties in diagnosing feline thymomas are discussed, and biological behavior as well as different treatment modalities of feline and human thymomas are compared.

  19. Percutaneous cholecystocentesis in cats with suspected hepatobiliary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byfield, Victoria L; Callahan Clark, Julie E; Turek, Bradley J; Bradley, Charles W; Rondeau, Mark P

    2017-12-01

    Objectives The objective was to evaluate the safety and diagnostic utility of percutaneous ultrasound-guided cholecystocentesis (PUC) in cats with suspected hepatobiliary disease. Methods Medical records of 83 cats with suspected hepatobiliary disease that underwent PUC were retrospectively reviewed. Results At the time of PUC, at least one additional procedure was performed in 79/83 cats, including hepatic aspiration and/or biopsy (n = 75) and splenic aspiration (n = 18). Complications were noted in 14/83 cases, including increased abdominal fluid (n = 11), needle-tip occlusion (n = 1), failed first attempt to penetrate the gall bladder wall (n = 1) and pneumoperitoneum (n = 1). There were no reports of gall bladder rupture, bile peritonitis or hypotension necessitating treatment with vasopressor medication. Blood products were administered to 7/83 (8%) cats. Seventy-two cats (87%) survived to discharge. Of the cats that were euthanized (9/83) or died (2/83), none were reported as a definitive consequence of PUC. Bacteria were identified cytologically in 10/71 samples (14%); all 10 had a positive aerobic bacterial culture. Bile culture was positive in 11/80 samples (14%). Of the cases with a positive bile culture, cytological description of bacteria corresponded to the organism cultured in fewer than 50% of cases. The most common cytologic diagnosis was hepatic lipidosis (49/66). The most common histopathologic diagnosis was cholangitis (10/21). Conclusions and relevance PUC was safe in this group of cats with suspected hepatobiliary disease. Complications were likely associated with ancillary procedures performed at the time of PUC. Bile analysis yielded an abnormal result in nearly one-third of cats with suspected hepatobiliary disease. Complete agreement between bile cytology and culture was lacking. Further evaluation of the correlation between bile cytology and bile culture is warranted.

  20. Interviewing strategically to elicit admissions from guilty suspects

    OpenAIRE

    Tekin, Serra; Granhag, Pär Anders; Strömwall, Leif; Giolla, Erik Mac; Vrij, Aldert; Hartwig, Maria

    2015-01-01

    In this article we introduce a novel interviewing tactic to elicit admissions from guilty suspects. By influencing the suspects’ perception of the amount of evidence the interviewer holds against them, we aimed to shift the suspects’ counterinterrogation strategies from less to more forthcoming. The proposed tactic (SUE-Confrontation) is a development of the Strategic Use of Evidence (SUE) framework and aims to affect the suspects’ perception by confronting them with statement-evidence incons...

  1. MRI for clinically suspected pediatric appendicitis: case interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Michael M.; Brian, James M.; Methratta, Sosamma T.; Hulse, Michael A.; Choudhary, Arabinda K.; Eggli, Kathleen D.; Boal, Danielle K.B. [Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, Hershey, PA (United States)

    2014-05-15

    As utilization of MRI for clinically suspected pediatric appendicitis becomes more common, there will be increased focus on case interpretation. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to share our institution's case interpretation experience. MRI findings of appendicitis include appendicoliths, tip appendicitis, intraluminal fluid-debris level, pitfalls of size measurements, and complications including abscesses. The normal appendix and inguinal appendix are also discussed. (orig.)

  2. MRI for clinically suspected pediatric appendicitis: an implemented program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Michael M.; Gustas, Cristy N.; Choudhary, Arabinda K.; Methratta, Sosamma T.; Hulse, Michael A.; Eggli, Kathleen D.; Boal, Danielle K.B. [Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Mail Code H066, 500 University Drive, P.O. Box 850, Hershey, PA (United States); Geeting, Glenn [Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Department of Emergency Medicine, Hershey, PA (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Emergent MRI is now a viable alternative to CT for evaluating appendicitis while avoiding the detrimental effects of ionizing radiation. However, primary employment of MRI in the setting of clinically suspected pediatric appendicitis has remained significantly underutilized. To describe our institution's development and the results of a fully implemented clinical program using MRI as the primary imaging evaluation for children with suspected appendicitis. A four-sequence MRI protocol consisting of coronal and axial single-shot turbo spin-echo (SS-TSE) T2, coronal spectral adiabatic inversion recovery (SPAIR), and axial SS-TSE T2 with fat saturation was performed on 208 children, ages 3 to 17 years, with clinically suspected appendicitis. No intravenous or oral contrast material was administered. No sedation was administered. Data collection includes two separate areas: time parameter analysis and MRI diagnostic results. Diagnostic accuracy of MRI for pediatric appendicitis indicated a sensitivity of 97.6% (CI: 87.1-99.9%), specificity 97.0% (CI: 93.2-99.0%), positive predictive value 88.9% (CI: 76.0-96.3%), and negative predictive value 99.4% (CI: 96.6-99.9%). Time parameter analysis indicated clinical feasibility, with time requested to first sequence obtained mean of 78.7 +/- 52.5 min, median 65 min; first-to-last sequence time stamp mean 14.2 +/- 8.8 min, median 12 min; last sequence to report mean 57.4 +/- 35.2 min, median 46 min. Mean age was 11.2 +/- 3.6 years old. Girls represented 57% of patients. MRI is an effective and efficient method of imaging children with clinically suspected appendicitis. Using an expedited four-sequence protocol, sensitivity and specificity are comparable to CT while avoiding the detrimental effects of ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  3. Epidemiology of suspected wrist joint infection versus inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeete, Kshamata; Hess, Erik P; Clark, Tod; Moran, Steven; Kakar, Sanjeev; Rizzo, Marco

    2011-03-01

    To determine the cumulative prevalence of septic arthritis presenting to the emergency department of an academic medical center and evaluate the use of clinical data to diagnose infection versus inflammation. We conducted a records review of a single institution with 80,000 annual emergency room visits. We included a consecutive series of patients with suspected wrist infection from January 1, 2007, to December 31, 2008. Adults complaining of atraumatic wrist pain with either erythema or swelling on physical examination or a final diagnosis of septic arthritis, gout, pseudogout, cellulitis, wrist hematoma/edema, or wrist arthritic flare were suspected to have infection. We collected data using a standardized data abstraction form. We reviewed 804 patient records. A total of 104 patients meeting inclusion criteria for suspected wrist joint infection during the 2-year study period were included. Mean age was 62.5 years (SD, 20.2 y); 63 were men. There were 12 patients with a history of gout, 4 with a history of pseudogout, and 19 with a history of diabetes. Wrist arthrocentesis was performed in 31 patients, and 11 underwent surgical treatment. There were 16 patients with a final diagnosis of gout, 11 with pseudogout, 43 with cellulitis, 13 with upper extremity hematoma/edema, and 15 with wrist arthritic flare. The cumulative prevalence of septic arthritis was 5%. In this series of emergency department patients with suspected wrist joint infection, gout, pseudogout, and cellulitis were the most common etiologies. The cumulative incidence of septic wrist arthritis was low. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Suspected spinocellular carcinoma of the inferior eyelid resulted multiple chalazion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onesti, Maria Giuseppina; Troccola, Antonietta; Maruccia, Michele; Conversi, Andrea; Scuderi, Gianluca

    2013-01-01

    Chalazion is a subacute granulomatous inflammation of the eyelid caused by retention of tarsal gland secretions and it's the most common inflammatory lesion of the eyelid. In cases of doubtful clinical presentation the diagnosis with a biopsy and a histopathological examination is important because it can orientate an appropriate surgical treatment. We report a case of a 64-years-old diabetic man, suspected for a spinocellular lesion of the inferior eyelid of the left eye, it resulted unexpectedly a chalazion.

  5. CT-guided biopsy of suspected malignancy: A potential pitfall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Henderson

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Paragangliomas are rare catecholamine-secreting neuro-endocrine tumours that can arise from sympathetic or parasympathetic tissue. Any manipulation of these tumours, without appropriate medical therapy, can result in excess catecholamine release leading to a catecholamine crisis. Neuro-endocrine tumours must be considered prior to interventional biopsy of an unknown soft-tissue mass, and appropriate biochemical investigations should be performed in suspected cases to prevent catastrophic complications.

  6. Suspected Conn's Syndrome in A Female Adult Hypertensive: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The presentation of adrenal adenoma with ventricular fibrillation and sudden death is rare. Ventricular fibrillation is the most common cause of sudden death. Coronary artery disease, cardiac valvular or myocardial diseases, and non -cardiac abnormalities may also lead to ventricular fibrillation. We present a ...

  7. [Three cases of suspected re-infection of mumps virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatanaka, Akio; Kamada, Tomoko; Honda, Keiji; Tazaki, Akihisa; Kishine, Naomi; Kawashima, Yoshiyuki

    2012-08-01

    A 32-year-old woman, 5-year-old girl, and 33-year-old man visited our otorhinolaryngology outpatient clinic with tumentia of the unilateral parotid gland. A high titer of serum IgG antibodies against the mumps virus was detected. Around the same time, other members of their families had the same parotid tumentia, and they were diagnosed as having their first mumps infection. Therefore, the diagnosis of the three cases was strongly suspected to be re-infection with mumps. In Japan, it was classically believed that the mumps virus infection occurs only once in patients and reinfection doesn't occur. However, some pediatricians in Japan have reported that re-infection with mumps is strongly suspected when high titers of serum IgG antibodies against the mumps virus are found at the initial visit. It is now believed many more examples of mumps re-infection cases have existed than we previously believed. When high titers of serum IgG antibodies against the mumps virus are detected at an initial visit in patients who have had mumps previously, re-infection should be strongly suspected. And to make it certain, we suggest that the mumps IgG antibodies should be checked twice to confirm the diagnosis. If elevation of the IgG antibodies persist, the diagnosis will be much more certain.

  8. Ten-day observation of live rabies suspected dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepsumethanon, V; Wilde, H; Sitprija, V

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed at analyzing a ten-day observation period of rabies suspected dogs and cats according to six criteria. Dogs and cats suspected of being rabid were brought for observation when they had either bitten a person or another animal or when abnormal behaviour or unusual illness was observed. Between 1985 and 2005, retrospective and prospective data from 1,222 dogs and 303 cats was collected during the ten-day observation period. If an animal had died, brain examination using fluorescent antibody testing was routinely performed. If an animal had survived for > or =10 days, it was released to its owner or transferred to the municipal dog shelter. A total of 644 dogs and 58 cats found rabid died within 10 days of observation. In addition, for 208 dogs confirmed rabid with laboratory tests between 1997 and 2005, six criteria were analysed from the day of submission. This experience with the implemented 10-day observation period confirms the WHO recommendation on identifying suspected rabid dogs or cats under veterinary supervision following a human exposure.

  9. MR delayed enhancement imaging findings in suspected acute myocarditis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gahide, Gerald [CHU de Montpellier, Radiologie centrale - Pole Cardiovasculaire et Thoracique, Montpellier (France); Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Montpellier, Hopital A de Villeneuve, Montpellier (France); Bertrand, D.; Dacher, J.N. [CHU de Rouen, Radiologie centrale - Hopital Charles Nicolle, Rouen (France); Roubille, F.; Skaik, S.; Piot, C.; Leclerq, F. [CHU de Montpellier, Departement de Cardiologie - Pole Cardiovasculaire et Thoracique, Montpellier (France); Tron, C.; Cribier, A. [CHU de Rouen, Departement de Cardiologie - Hopital Charles Nicolle, Rouen (France); Vernhet, H. [CHU de Montpellier, Radiologie centrale - Pole Cardiovasculaire et Thoracique, Montpellier (France)

    2010-01-15

    The purpose of the study was to prospectively assess the clinical impact of routinely performed delayed enhancement imaging in suspected acute myocarditis. A two-centre prospective study was performed in patients with suspected acute myocarditis. The protocol included horizontal long axis, vertical long axis and short axis cine MR and delayed enhancement imaging after Gd-DTPA infusion (0.2 mmol/kg). Sixty consecutive patients were enrolled (aged 49.4{+-}17.8 years). MRI demonstrated delayed enhancement sparing the subendocardicardial layer in 51.6% of patients, concordant with the diagnosis of acute myocarditis; 16.7% of patients exhibited delayed enhancement involving the subendocardial layer with irregular margins, concordant with the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction; 31.7% of patients had delayed enhancement imaging that was considered normal. Routine imaging to identify delayed enhancement provided crucial information in suspected acute myocarditis by reinforcing the diagnosis in 51.6% of patients and correcting a misdiagnosed acute myocardial infarction in 16.7% of patients. (orig.)

  10. Low dose computed tomography in suspected acute renal colic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meagher, T; Sukumar, V P; Collingwood, J; Crawley, T; Schofield, D; Henson, J; Lakin, K; Connolly, D; Giles, J

    2001-11-01

    To evaluate whether computed tomography (CT) of the renal tract in suspected renal colic using reduced exposure factors maintains diagnostic accuracy. Prospective multi-centre cohort study. Patients with suspected renal colic were examined using computed tomography (CT) of the renal tract followed by intravenous urography (IVU) in four different centres with five different CT systems. Sixty-nine patients with suspected renal colic had CT of the renal tract followed by IVU. CT was performed with reduced exposure factors, giving a mean CT effective dose of 3.5 (range 2.8-4.5) mSv compared with 1.5 mSv for IVU. Ureteric calculi were detected in 43 patients: CT and IVU detected 40 (93%) ureteric calculi. CT identified other lesions causing symptoms in five patients and identified renal calculi in 24 patients. IVU identified renal calculi in six patients and made false positive diagnosis of renal calculi in seven patients. Mean examination time for CT was 5 minutes and for IVU was 80 minutes. CT examination at reduced exposure factors maintains the diagnostic accuracy recorded in other series. Copyright 2001 The Royal College of Radiologists.

  11. The economics of cardiac biomarker testing in suspected myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodacre, Steve; Thokala, Praveen

    2015-03-01

    Suspected myocardial infarction (MI) is a common reason for emergency hospital attendance and admission. Cardiac biomarker measurement is an essential element of diagnostic assessment of suspected MI. Although the cost of a routinely available biomarker may be small, the large patient population and consequences in terms of hospital admission and investigation mean that the economic impact of cardiac biomarker testing is substantial. Economic evaluation involves comparing the estimated costs and effectiveness (outcomes) of two or more interventions or care alternatives. This process creates some difficulties with respect to cardiac biomarkers. Estimating the effectiveness of cardiac biomarkers involves identifying how they help to improve health and how we can measure this improvement. Comparison to an appropriate alternative is also problematic. New biomarkers may be promoted on the basis of reducing hospital admission or length of stay, but hospital admission for low risk patients may incur significant costs while providing very little benefit, making it an inappropriate comparator. Finally, economic evaluation may conclude that a more sensitive biomarker strategy is more effective but, by detecting and treating more cases, is also more expensive. In these circumstances it is unclear whether we should use the more effective or the cheaper option. This article provides an introduction to health economics and addresses the specific issues relevant to cardiac biomarkers. It describes the key concepts relevant to economic evaluation of cardiac biomarkers in suspected MI and highlights key areas of uncertainty and controversy. Copyright © 2014 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Limitation of personal freedom by detention of suspect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knežević Saša

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The right of personal freedom is one of the most important right from the set of basic human rights and freedoms, contained in the most important acts of international legal character, and the constitutions of states based on the rule of law. This right is directly related to the very human existence, and, therefore, it is necessary to make its legal articulation. Personal freedom means the right to security of the citizen, that he will not be arrested and detained in prison by the state authorities, as well as the right to be free to move and inhabit. However, from the very nature of Criminal Law protection of social values, arises the need to limit the right to personal freedom in exceptional circumstances, including the detention of the suspect. Keeping the suspect is a measure of procedural compulsion, by which, through the police decision, detained prison is temporarily imprisoned, for gathering information and hearing. The basic principles of humanity require that the detained suspect retains all the rights, derived from the principle of personal liberty.

  13. MIBG in the evaluation of suspected pheochromocytoma: Mayo Clinic experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.L.; Sheps, S.G.; Sizemore, G.; Swensen, S.J.; Gharib, H.; Grant, C.S.; van Heerden, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    Work done at the University of Michigan has shown that I-131 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) is an effective agent for the diagnosis and localization of pheochromocytoma. A recent report questioned the sensitivity of this test. In 1983, 40 patients at Mayo Clinic had 42 scans during the workup of suspected spontaneous pheochromocytoma or metastatic pheochromocytoma. All patients were given 500 ..mu..Ci I-131 MIBG supplied by the University of Michigan. The final diagnosis of pheochromocytoma (true positive (TP) and false negative (FN) and false positive (FP)) was made by surgery and pathology. True negative (TN) diagnosis was made by normal plasma and urinary catecholamines, and in many patients CT. There were 15 TP studies (six spontaneous pheochrocytoma, nine metastatic or recurrent pheochromoctyoma), and 22 TN studies. There was one FP study of recurrent paraganglioma near the bladder (CT was also FP) and four FN studies (two spontaneous and two metastatic) where one CT was also FN. This results in a sensitivity of 79%, specificity of 96%, and accuracy of 88%. MIBG is very useful in the workup of patients with known or suspected recurrent or metastatic pheochromocytoma and is helpful in the evaluation of the patient suspected of having a spontaneous pheochromocytoma when CT is normal.

  14. Black Friday = Broget Branding?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Heidi

    2015-01-01

    Black Friday er et godt eksempel på, hvordan ikke kun produktbrands og corporate brands rejser på tværs af landegrænser, men også traditioner som Halloween, Valentines Day og i dette tilfælde den ultimative tilbuds-fredag, som i USA går under navnet Black Friday. Men hvad er Black Friday i Danmark...

  15. Mobilizing Black America

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-04-01

    killed than was an American soldier in Vietnam. The odds are almost two-to-one that these black youths were brought up in a fatherless household. An...odds that this wish will come true are significantly and shockingly reduced if the child happens to be black. Today in America research has shown that a...white baby stands a seventy percent greater chance of reaching its fourth birthday than a black child . The average life expectancy of African

  16. Breast cancer statistics, 2015: Convergence of incidence rates between black and white women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSantis, Carol E; Fedewa, Stacey A; Goding Sauer, Ann; Kramer, Joan L; Smith, Robert A; Jemal, Ahmedin

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the American Cancer Society provides an overview of female breast cancer statistics in the United States, including data on incidence, mortality, survival, and screening. Approximately 231,840 new cases of invasive breast cancer and 40,290 breast cancer deaths are expected to occur among US women in 2015. Breast cancer incidence rates increased among non-Hispanic black (black) and Asian/Pacific Islander women and were stable among non-Hispanic white (white), Hispanic, and American Indian/Alaska Native women from 2008 to 2012. Although white women have historically had higher incidence rates than black women, in 2012, the rates converged. Notably, during 2008 through 2012, incidence rates were significantly higher in black women compared with white women in 7 states, primarily located in the South. From 1989 to 2012, breast cancer death rates decreased by 36%, which translates to 249,000 breast cancer deaths averted in the United States over this period. This decrease in death rates was evident in all racial/ethnic groups except American Indians/Alaska Natives. However, the mortality disparity between black and white women nationwide has continued to widen; and, by 2012, death rates were 42% higher in black women than in white women. During 2003 through 2012, breast cancer death rates declined for white women in all 50 states; but, for black women, declines occurred in 27 of 30 states that had sufficient data to analyze trends. In 3 states (Mississippi, Oklahoma, and Wisconsin), breast cancer death rates in black women were stable during 2003 through 2012. Widening racial disparities in breast cancer mortality are likely to continue, at least in the short term, in view of the increasing trends in breast cancer incidence rates in black women. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  17. Asymptotic black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Pei-Ming

    2017-04-01

    Following earlier works on the KMY model of black-hole formation and evaporation, we construct the metric for a matter sphere in gravitational collapse, with the back-reaction of pre-Hawking radiation taken into consideration. The mass distribution and collapsing velocity of the matter sphere are allowed to have an arbitrary radial dependence. We find that a generic gravitational collapse asymptote to a universal configuration which resembles a black hole but without horizon. This approach clarifies several misunderstandings about black-hole formation and evaporation, and provides a new model for black-hole-like objects in the universe.

  18. A Study on Childhood Death at a Tertiary Care Level in Ernakulam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2005-04-01

    below 12 years those who died in a Teaching Hospital from April 1, 2005 to March 31, 2010. ... the neonatal deaths. Keywords: Asia, Childhood death, Infant, Mortality, Neonatal. Access this article online. Quick Response Code: Website: www.amhsr.org. DOI: ..... Black RE, Morris SS, Bryce J. Where and why are 10 million.

  19. Reflections on trauma and violence-related deaths in Soweto, July ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Davies JCA, Walker AR? We need more accurate data on causes of sickness and death (Opinion). 5 Air Med J 1990; 77: 227-228. 3. Botha JL, Bradshaw D. African vital statistics - a black hole? S Afr Med J 1985;. 67: 977-981. 4. Kielkowski D, Steinberg M. Barron P. Life after death - mortality statistics and the public health.

  20. Structured Discretion, Racial Bias, and the Death Penalty: The First Decade after "Furman" in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekland-Olson, Sheldon

    1988-01-01

    Analyzes data collected in Texas from the first decade of cases sentenced to death after the Furman v. Georgia decision in order to determine any tendency toward being race-linked or victim-based. Found that cases involving White victims more often precipitate the death penalty than those involving Black or Hispanic victims. (KO)

  1. Massive Black Hole Implicated in Stellar Destruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    New results from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Magellan telescopes suggest that a dense stellar remnant has been ripped apart by a black hole a thousand times as massive as the Sun. If confirmed, this discovery would be a cosmic double play: it would be strong evidence for an intermediate mass black hole, which has been a hotly debated topic, and would mark the first time such a black hole has been caught tearing a star apart. This scenario is based on Chandra observations, which revealed an unusually luminous source of X-rays in a dense cluster of old stars, and optical observations that showed a peculiar mix of elements associated with the X-ray emission. Taken together, a case can be made that the X-ray emission is produced by debris from a disrupted white dwarf star that is heated as it falls towards a massive black hole. The optical emission comes from debris further out that is illuminated by these X-rays. The intensity of the X-ray emission places the source in the "ultraluminous X-ray source" or ULX category, meaning that it is more luminous than any known stellar X-ray source, but less luminous than the bright X-ray sources (active galactic nuclei) associated with supermassive black holes in the nuclei of galaxies. The nature of ULXs is a mystery, but one suggestion is that some ULXs are black holes with masses between about a hundred and several thousand times that of the Sun, a range intermediate between stellar-mass black holes and supermassive black holes located in the nuclei of galaxies. This ULX is in a globular cluster, a very old and crowded conglomeration of stars. Astronomers have suspected that globular clusters could contain intermediate-mass black holes, but conclusive evidence for this has been elusive. "Astronomers have made cases for stars being torn apart by supermassive black holes in the centers of galaxies before, but this is the first good evidence for such an event in a globular cluster," said Jimmy Irwin of the University

  2. Do black lives matter in public health research and training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Molly; Ranapurwala, Shabbar I; Townes, Ashley; Bengtson, Angela M

    2017-01-01

    To examine whether investments made in public health research align with the health burdens experienced by white and black Americans. In this cross-sectional study of all deaths in the United States in 2015, we compared the distribution of potential years of life lost (PYLL) across 39 causes of death by race and identified key differences. We examined the relationship between cause-of-death-specific PYLL and key indicators of public health investment (federal funding and number of publications) by race using linear spline models. We also compared the number of courses available at the top schools of public health relevant to the top causes of death contributor to PYLL for black and white Americans. Homicide was the number one contributor to PYLL among black Americans, while ischemic heart disease was the number one contributor to PYLL among white Americans. Firearm-related violence accounted for 88% of black PYLL attributed to homicide and 71% of white PYLL attributed to homicide. Despite the high burden of PYLL, homicide research was the focus of few federal grants or publications. In comparison, ischemic heart disease garnered 341 grants and 594 publications. The number of public health courses available relevant to homicide (n = 9) was similar to those relevant to ischemic heart disease (n = 10). Black Americans are disproportionately affected by homicide, compared to white Americans. For both black and white Americans, the majority of PYLL due to homicide are firearm-related. Yet, homicide research is dramatically underrepresented in public health research investments in terms of grant funding and publications, despite available public health training opportunities. If left unchecked, the observed disproportionate distribution of investments in public health resources threatens to perpetuate a system that disadvantages black Americans.

  3. Imaging trends in suspected appendicitis-a Canadian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Victoria F; Patlas, Michael N; Katz, Douglas S

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of our study was to assess trends in the imaging of suspected appendicitis in adult patients in emergency departments of academic centers in Canada. A questionnaire was sent to all 17 academic centers in Canada to be completed by a radiologist who works in emergency radiology. The questionnaires were sent and collected over a period of 4 months from October 2015 to February 2016. Sixteen centers (94%) responded to the questionnaire. Eleven respondents (73%) use IV contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) as the imaging modality of choice for all patients with suspected appendicitis. Thirteen respondents (81%) use ultrasound as the first modality of choice in imaging pregnant patients with suspected appendicitis. Eleven respondents (69%) use ultrasound (US) as the first modality of choice in patients younger than 40 years of age. Ten respondents (67%) use ultrasound as the first imaging modality in female patients younger than 40 years of age. When CT is used, 81% use non-focused CT of the abdomen and pelvis, and 44% of centers use oral contrast. Thirteen centers (81%) have ultrasound available 24 h a day/7 days a week. At 12 centers (75%), ultrasound is performed by ultrasound technologists. Four centers (40%) perform magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in suspected appendicitis in adult patients at the discretion of the attending radiologist. Eleven centers (69%) have MRI available 24/7. All 16 centers (100%) use unenhanced MRI. Various imaging modalities are available for the work-up of suspected appendicitis. Although there are North American societal guidelines and recommendations regarding the appropriateness of the multiple imaging modalities, significant heterogeneity in the first-line modalities exist, which vary depending on the patient demographics and resource availability. Imaging trends in the use of the first-line modalities should be considered in order to plan for the availability of the imaging examinations and to consider plans for

  4. Predictors of bacteremia in emergency department patients with suspected infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, Maureen; Klasco, Richard S; Joyce, Nina R; Donnino, Michael W; Wolfe, Richard E; Shapiro, Nathan I

    2012-11-01

    The goal of this study is to identify clinical variables associated with bacteremia. Such data could provide a rational basis for blood culture testing in emergency department (ED) patients with suspected infection. This is a secondary analysis of a prospective cohort of ED patients with suspected infection. Data collected included demographics, vital signs, medical history, suspected source of infection, laboratory and blood culture results and outcomes. Bacteremia was defined as a positive blood culture by Centers for Disease Control criteria. Clinical variables associated with bacteremia on univariate logistic regression were entered into a multivariable model. There were 5630 patients enrolled with an average age of 59.9 ± 19.9 years, and 54% were female. Blood cultures were obtained on 3310 (58.8%). There were 409 (12.4%) positive blood cultures, of which 68 (16.6%) were methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and 161 (39.4%) were Gram negatives. Ten covariates (respiratory failure, vasopressor use, neutrophilia, bandemia, thrombocytopenia, indwelling venous catheter, abnormal temperature, suspected line or urinary infection, or endocarditis) were associated with all-cause bacteremia in the final model (c-statistic area under the curve [AUC], 0.71). Additional factors associated with MRSA bacteremia included end-stage renal disease (odds ratio [OR], 3.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.9-7.8) and diabetes (OR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.1-3.6) (AUC, 0.73). Factors strongly associated with Gram-negative bacteremia included vasopressor use in the ED (OR, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.7-4.6), bandemia (OR, 3.5; 95% CI, 2.3-5.3), and suspected urinary infection (OR, 4.0; 95% CI, 2.8-5.8) (AUC, 0.75). This study identified several clinical factors associated with bacteremia as well as MRSA and Gram-negative subtypes, but the magnitude of their associations is limited. Combining these covariates into a multivariable model moderately increases their predictive value. Copyright

  5. Child Mortality after Discharge from a Health Facility following Suspected Pneumonia, Meningitis or Septicaemia in Rural Gambia: A Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhibber, Aakash Varun; Hill, Philip C; Jafali, James; Jasseh, Momodou; Hossain, Mohammad Ilias; Ndiaye, Malick; Pathirana, Jayani C; Greenwood, Brian; Mackenzie, Grant A

    2015-01-01

    To measure mortality and its risk factors among children discharged from a health centre in rural Gambia. We conducted a cohort study between 12 May 2008 and 11 May 2012. Children aged 2-59 months, admitted with suspected pneumonia, sepsis, or meningitis after presenting to primary and secondary care facilities, were followed for 180 days after discharge. We developed models associating post-discharge mortality with clinical syndrome on admission and clinical risk factors. One hundred and five of 3755 (2.8%) children died, 80% within 3 months of discharge. Among children aged 2-11 and 12-59 months, there were 30 and 29 deaths per 1000 children per 180 days respectively, compared to 11 and 5 respectively in the resident population. Children with suspected pneumonia unaccompanied by clinically severe malnutrition (CSM) had the lowest risk of post-discharge mortality. Mortality increased in children with suspected meningitis or septicaemia without CSM (hazard ratio [HR] 2.6 and 2.2 respectively). The risk of mortality greatly increased with CSM on admission: CSM with suspected pneumonia (HR 8.1; 95% confidence interval (CI) 4.4 to 15), suspected sepsis (HR 18.4; 95% CI 11.3 to 30), or suspected meningitis (HR 13.7; 95% CI 4.2 to 45). Independent associations with mortality were: mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC) of 11.5-13.0 cm compared to >13.0 cm (HR 7.2; 95% CI 3.0 to 17.0), MUAC 10.5-11.4 cm (HR 24; 95% CI 9.4 to 62), and MUAC <10.5 cm (HR 44; 95% CI 18 to 108), neck stiffness (HR 10.4; 95% CI 3.1 to 34.8), non-medical discharge (HR 4.7; 95% CI 2.0 to 10.9), dry season discharge (HR 2.0; 95% CI 1.2 to 3.3), while greater haemoglobin (HR 0.82; 0.73 to 0.91), axillary temperature (HR 0.71; 95% CI 0.58 to 0.87), and oxygen saturation (HR 0.96; 95% CI 0.93 to 0.99) were associated with reduced mortality. Gambian children experience increased mortality after discharge from primary and secondary care. Interventions should target both moderately and severely

  6. Effects of Death Education on Conscious and Unconscious Death Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayslip, Bert, Jr.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Adults (n=162) varying in extent of participation in didactic or experiential forms of death education versus those who had no such exposure to death and dying-related issues completed measures of conscious and unconscious death fears. Findings suggest that didactic death education was effective in altering death anxiety, although effects were…

  7. Highly sensitive troponin and coronary computed tomography angiography in the evaluation of suspected acute coronary syndrome in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferencik, Maros; Hoffmann, Udo; Bamberg, Fabian; Januzzi, James L

    2016-08-07

    The evaluation of patients presenting to the emergency department with suspected acute coronary syndrome (ACS) remains a clinical challenge. The traditional assessment includes clinical risk assessment based on cardiovascular risk factors with serial electrocardiograms and cardiac troponin measurements, often followed by advanced cardiac testing as inpatient or outpatient (i.e. stress testing, imaging). Despite this costly and lengthy work-up, there is a non-negligible rate of missed ACS with an increased risk of death. There is a clinical need for diagnostic strategies that will lead to rapid and reliable triage of patients with suspected ACS. We provide an overview of the evidence for the role of highly sensitive troponin (hsTn) in the rapid and efficient evaluation of suspected ACS. Results of recent research studies have led to the introduction of hsTn with rapid rule-in and rule-out protocols into the guidelines. Highly sensitive troponin increases the sensitivity for the detection of myocardial infarction and decreases time to diagnosis; however, it may decrease the specificity, especially when used as a dichotomous variable, rather than continuous variable as recommended by guidelines; this may increase clinician uncertainty. We summarize the evidence for the use of coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) as the rapid diagnostic tool in this population when used with conventional troponin assays. Coronary CTA significantly decreases time to diagnosis and discharge in patients with suspected ACS, while being safe. However, it may lead to increase in invasive procedures and includes radiation exposure. Finally, we outline the opportunities for the combined use of hsTn and coronary CTA that may result in increased efficiency, decreased need for imaging, lower cost, and decreased radiation dose. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Lemierre syndrome and unexpected death in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, John D; Warner, Morgyn S; Byard, Roger W

    2009-11-01

    Lemierre syndrome refers to necrotizing infections of the head due to Fusobacterium necrophorum and has been called the 'forgotten disease' due to its rarity in the antibiotic era. Recently, however, more cases have been documented in the literature suggesting that there has been an increase in incidence. A 10-year-old boy is reported who had a five-day history of ear infection, with the development of fever, drowsiness and ipsilateral neck swelling. Unexpected cardiac arrest occurred soon after medical assessment. At autopsy, right otitis media was demonstrated with extension of suppurative infection into subcutaneous tissues behind the ear and also into the extradural space at the lateral end of the petrous temporal bone. There was also septic thrombophlebitis of the adjacent sigmoid sinus, but no evidence of meningitis. This case demonstrates yet another infectious condition that may be associated with rapid deterioration and unexpected death in childhood. An autopsy approach to suspected sepsis in childhood is outlined.

  9. Maternal Death Reviews of a Tertiary Care Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indira Upadhyaya

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: All pregnant women are at risk of obstetrical complications which occurs during labour and delivary that lead to maternal death. Here to report a 10 year review of maternal mortality ratio in "Paropakar Maternity and Women's Hospital (PMWH" Thapathali Kathmandu, Nepal. Methods: Medical records of 66 maternal deaths were reviewed to study the likely cause of each death over the study period. Results: There were a total of 66 maternal deaths. While 192487 deliveries conducted over the 10 year period. The maternal mortality ratio (MMR was 356.64/100000 live birth. The highest MMR of 74.22/100,000 was observed in 2059 and lowest was 17.42/100,000 in 2068 B.S. Leading cause of MMR was remained hemorrhage accounting for 30.30% followed by eclampsia 24.24%. Sepsis, suspected cases of pulmonary embolism and amniotic fluid embolism each contributing 15.15%, 4.54% and 3.03% respectively. Where as anesthetic complication and abortion constiuates 6.06 % each equally for maternal death. The death noted in older women (30+year were 36.36%. Primipara accounted for more deaths (51.51%. Conclusions: The fall in maternal mortality rate has been observed except for year 2063 BS. Haemorrhage is the main contributing cause behind maternal mortality.

  10. An examination of black/white differences in the rate of age-related mortality increase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Fenelon

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The rate of mortality increase with age among adults is typically used as a measure of the rate of functional decline associated with aging or senescence. While black and white populations differ in the level of mortality, mortality also rises less rapidly with age for blacks than for whites, leading to the well-known black/white mortality "crossover". OBJECTIVE This paper investigates black/white differences in the rate of mortality increase with age for major causes of death in order to examine the factors responsible for the black/white crossover. METHODS The analysis considers two explanations for the crossover: selective survival and age misreporting. Mortality is modeled using a Gompertz model for 11 causes of death from ages 50-84 among blacks and whites by sex. RESULTS Mortality increases more rapidly with age for whites than for blacks for nearly all causes of death considered. The all-cause mortality rate of mortality increase is nearly two percentage points higher for whites. The analysis finds evidence for both selective survival and age misreporting, although age misreporting is a more prominent explanation among women. CONCLUSIONS The black/white mortality crossover reflects large differences in the rate of age-related mortality increase. Instead of reflecting the impact of specific causes of death, this pattern exists across many disparate disease conditions, indicating the need for a broad explanation.

  11. Vital Signs: Racial Disparities in Age-Specific Mortality Among Blacks or African Americans - United States, 1999-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Timothy J; Croft, Janet B; Liu, Yong; Lu, Hua; Eke, Paul I; Giles, Wayne H

    2017-05-05

    Although the overall life expectancy at birth has increased for both blacks and whites and the gap between these populations has narrowed, disparities in life expectancy and the leading causes of death for blacks compared with whites in the United States remain substantial. Understanding how factors that influence these disparities vary across the life span might enhance the targeting of appropriate interventions. Trends during 1999-2015 in mortality rates for the leading causes of death were examined by black and white race and age group. Multiple 2014 and 2015 national data sources were analyzed to compare blacks with whites in selected age groups by sociodemographic characteristics, self-reported health behaviors, health-related quality of life indicators, use of health services, and chronic conditions. During 1999-2015, age-adjusted death rates decreased significantly in both populations, with rates declining more sharply among blacks for most leading causes of death. Thus, the disparity gap in all-cause mortality rates narrowed from 33% in 1999 to 16% in 2015. However, during 2015, blacks still had higher death rates than whites for all-cause mortality in all groups aged blacks in age groups deaths among blacks (especially cardiovascular disease and cancer and their risk factors) across the life span and create equal opportunities for health.

  12. Short and long-term outcomes in children with suspected acute encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Masahiro; Nagase, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Tsukasa; Fujita, Kyoko; Kusumoto, Mayumi; Kajihara, Shinsuke; Yamaguchi, Yoshimichi; Maruyama, Azusa; Takeda, Hiroki; Uetani, Yoshiyuki; Tomioka, Kazumi; Toyoshima, Daisaku; Taniguchi-Ikeda, Mariko; Morioka, Ichiro; Takada, Satoshi; Iijima, Kazumoto

    2016-09-01

    The time-dependent changes that occur in children after acute encephalopathy are not clearly understood. Therefore, we assessed changes in brain function after suspected acute encephalopathy over time. We created a database of children admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit at Kobe Children's Hospital because of convulsions or impaired consciousness with fever between 2002 and 2013. Clinical courses and outcomes were reviewed and patients who met the following criteria were included in the study: (1) 6months to 15years of age, (2) no neurological abnormality before onset, (3) treated for suspected acute encephalopathy, and (4) followed after 1 (0-2) month and 12 (10-17) months of onset. Outcomes were assessed using the Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category (PCPC) scale, with a score of 1 representing normal performance; 2, mild disability; 3, moderate disability; 4, severe disability; 5, vegetative state; and 6, brain death. A total of 78 children (32 male) with a median (range) age at onset of 20 (6-172) months were enrolled. Fifty-one cases scored 1 on the PCPC, 13 scored 2, three scored 3, five scored 4, one scored 5, and five cases scored 6 at discharge. Whereas seven of the 13 cases that scored a 2 on the PCPC recovered normal brain function after 12months, none of the nine cases that scored a 3-5 on the PCPC recovered normal function. Our findings suggest moderate to severe disability caused by acute encephalopathy had lasting consequences on brain function, whereas mild disability might result in improved function. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Sudden Cardiac Death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risgaard, Bjarke; Winkel, Bo Gregers; Jabbari, Reza

    2017-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to describe the use of pharmacotherapy in a nationwide cohort of young patients with sudden cardiac death (SCD). Background Several drugs have been associated with an increased risk of SCD and sudden arrhythmic death syndrome (SADS). It remains unclear how...... pharmacotherapy may contribute to the overall burden of SCD in the general population. Methods This was a nationwide study that included all deaths that occurred between 2000 and 2009 and between 2007 and 2009 in people age 1 to 35 years and 36 to 49 years, respectively. Two physicians identified all SCDs through...... review of death certificates. Autopsy reports were collected. Pharmacotherapy prescribed within 90 days before SCD was identified in the Danish Registry of Medicinal Product Statistics. Results We identified 1,363 SCDs; median age was 38 years (interquartile range: 29 to 45 years), and 72% (n = 975) were men...

  14. Hitler's Death Camps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieser, Paul

    1995-01-01

    Presents a high school lesson on Hitler's death camps and the widespread policy of brutality and oppression against European Jews. Includes student objectives, instructional procedures, and a chart listing the value of used clothing taken from the Jews. (CFR)

  15. Complications and Deaths - National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Complications and deaths - national data. This data set includes national-level data for the hip/knee complication measure, the Agency for Healthcare Research and...

  16. Complications and Deaths - State

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Complications and deaths - state data. This data set includes state-level data for the hip/knee complication measure, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality...

  17. Complications and Deaths - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Complications and deaths - provider data. This data set includes provider data for the hip/knee complication measure, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality...

  18. Eighth Amendment & Death Penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortall, Joseph M.; Merrill, Denise W.

    1987-01-01

    Presents a lesson on capital punishment for juveniles based on three hypothetical cases. The goal of the lesson is to have students understand the complexities of decisions regarding the death penalty for juveniles. (JDH)

  19. Prognostic importance of quantitative echocardiographic evaluation in patients suspected of first non-massive pulmonary embolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergaard, Jesper; Schaadt, Bente Krogsgaard; Lund, Jens Otto

    2008-01-01

    AIMS: Patients suspected of acute pulmonary embolism (PE) frequently undergo echocardiography as a part of the initial work-up. Prognostic implication of routine echocardiography in patients suspected of PE remain to be established. METHODS AND RESULTS: Transthoracic echocardiography, including...

  20. The Meaning of Black Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Donald

    1972-01-01

    Discusses the definition of black music in terms of the history and cultural background of black people, places it within the larger scope of western music, and suggests its survival value with respect to black people. (JM)

  1. The Thermodynamics of Black Holes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Emparan, Roberto; Tinto, Massimo; Barbero G, J Fernando; Heusler, Markus; Rendall, Alan D; Adamo, Timothy M; Liebling, Steven L; Sasaki, Misao; Poisson, Eric; Wald, Robert M; Postnov, Konstantin A; Amendola, Luca; Shibata, Masaru; Tagoshi, Hideyuki; Reall, Harvey S; Kozameh, Carlos; Palenzuela, Carlos; Yungelson, Lev R; Villaseñor, Eduardo J. S; Appleby, Stephen; Taniguchi, Keisuke; Dhurandhar, Sanjeev V; Bacon, David; Newman, Ezra T; Baker, Tessa; Baldi, Marco; Bartolo, Nicola; Blanchard, Alain; Bonvin, Camille; Borgani, Stefano; Branchini, Enzo; Burrage, Clare; Camera, Stefano; Carbone, Carmelita; Casarini, Luciano; Cropper, Mark; de Rham, Claudia; Di Porto, Cinzia; Ealet, Anne; Ferreira, Pedro G; Finelli, Fabio; García-Bellido, Juan; Giannantonio, Tommaso; Guzzo, Luigi; Heavens, Alan; Heisenberg, Lavinia; Heymans, Catherine; Hoekstra, Henk; Hollenstein, Lukas; Holmes, Rory; Horst, Ole; Jahnke, Knud; Kitching, Thomas D; Koivisto, Tomi; Kunz, Martin; La Vacca, Giuseppe; March, Marisa; Majerotto, Elisabetta; Markovic, Katarina; Marsh, David; Marulli, Federico; Massey, Richard; Mellier, Yannick; Mota, David F; Nunes, Nelson J; Percival, Will; Pettorino, Valeria; Porciani, Cristiano; Quercellini, Claudia; Read, Justin; Rinaldi, Massimiliano; Sapone, Domenico; Scaramella, Roberto; Skordis, Constantinos; Simpson, Fergus; Taylor, Andy; Thomas, Shaun; Trotta, Roberto; Verde, Licia; Vernizzi, Filippo; Vollmer, Adrian; Wang, Yun; Weller, Jochen; Zlosnik, Tom

    ...We review the present status of black hole thermodynamics. Our review includes discussion of classical black hole thermodynamics, Hawking radiation from black holes, the generalized second law, and the issue of entropy bounds...

  2. Protecting Black Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Monique W.

    2016-01-01

    Statistics show that black girls in U.S. K-12 public schools are overrepresented among students who face disciplinary approaches (such as suspensions) that exclude or even criminalize them. Morris explains how black girls face conditions that make them vulnerable to a phenomenon she calls "school to confinement pathways"--conditions like…

  3. Black Hole Dynamic Potentials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... In the following paper, certain black hole dynamic potentials have been developed definitively on the lines of classical thermodynamics. These potentials have been refined in view of the small differences in the equations of the laws of black hole dynamics as given by Bekenstein and those of ...

  4. Black hole levitron

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arsiwalla, X.D.; Verlinde, E.P.

    2010-01-01

    We study the problem of spatially stabilizing four dimensional extremal black holes in background electric/magnetic fields. Whilst looking for stationary stable solutions describing black holes placed in external fields we find that taking a continuum limit of Denef et al.’s multicenter

  5. Black holes matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Helge Stjernholm

    2016-01-01

    Review essay, Marcia Bartusiak, Black Hole: How an Idea Abandoned by Newtonians, Hated by Einstein, and Gambled On by Hawking Became Loved (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2015).......Review essay, Marcia Bartusiak, Black Hole: How an Idea Abandoned by Newtonians, Hated by Einstein, and Gambled On by Hawking Became Loved (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2015)....

  6. The Black Woman's Burden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Dianne

    2012-01-01

    Not even the first lady of the most powerful nation in the world is immune to stereotypes that have plagued Black women since first setting foot on American soil. Stereotypes of being the "angry Black woman" and curiosity about differences in appearance still persist from the academy to 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. As African-American women rise in…

  7. Black hole Berry phase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, J.; Papadodimas, K.; Verlinde, E.

    2009-01-01

    Supersymmetric black holes are characterized by a large number of degenerate ground states. We argue that these black holes, like other quantum mechanical systems with such a degeneracy, are subject to a phenomenon which is called the geometric or Berry’s phase: under adiabatic variations of the

  8. Alienation among Black Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfstetter-Kausch, Heidi; Gaier, Eugene L.

    1981-01-01

    A study of alienation among 32 Black high school students of both sexes indicated that the students were alienated from both society and school. The hypothesis that females are less alienated than males was not supported. A reconsideration of the concept of matriarchy, as applied to the Black lower class adolescent is proposed. (Author/CM)

  9. Icare rebound tonometry in children with known and suspected glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemmons, Meghan S; Hsiao, Ya-Chuan; Dzau, Jacqueline; Asrani, Sanjay; Jones, Sarah; Freedman, Sharon F

    2011-04-01

    Accurate intraocular pressure (IOP) measurement, important in managing pediatric glaucoma, often presents challenges. The Icare rebound tonometer shows promise for screening healthy children and has been reported comparable with Goldmann applanation in adults with glaucoma. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Icare tonometer against Goldmann applanation for clinic IOP measurement in pediatric glaucoma. This was a prospective study comparing Icare versus Goldmann tonometry in pediatric glaucoma. Children with known or suspected glaucoma were recruited from scheduled clinic visits. IOP was measured with the Icare tonometer by a clinician and subsequently measured with Goldmann applanation tonometry (GAT) by a different single masked clinician. A total of 71 eyes of 71 children with known or suspected glaucoma were included. IOP by GAT ranged from 9 to 36 mm Hg. Icare readings ranged from 11 to 44 mm Hg. Mean difference between Icare and GAT was 2.3 ± SD 3.7 mm Hg, p IOPs were within ± 3 mm Hg of GAT in 63%. Icare IOPs were ≥GAT IOPs in 75%. The following factors were not associated with Icare IOPs greater than GAT: child's age, glaucoma diagnosis, strabismus, nystagmus, central corneal thickness, Icare instrument-reported reliability, number of glaucoma surgeries or medications, corneal abnormalities, and visual acuity. IOP by Icare tonometry was within 3 mm Hg of IOP by GAT in 63% and greater than GAT in 75%. This device may be reasonable to estimate IOP in selected children with known or suspected glaucoma whose IOP cannot otherwise be obtained in clinic; however, correlation of Icare IOPs with clinical findings must continue to be considered in each case. Copyright © 2011 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Physical fitness and health risk assessment of urban black females ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Whereas coronary heart disease was not a major cause of death among black populations of South Africa in the past, the situation is fast changing. Health and fitness providers should give special attention to the modifiable risk factors of coronary heart disease for all populations. The aim of the present study was to identify ...

  11. Short Communication Retrospective Assessment of Black Leg in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bheema

    Humera veterinary clinic in Tigray region of Ethiopia, from 207/8-2012/13. The result revealed that there was vaccination program against black leg every year in the woreda. At the same time, there was a reduction in diseased animals and death rate from time to time. But there are some cases still existing with high rates of ...

  12. QTc prolongation in Black diabetic subjects with cardiac autonomic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    death. Caucasian studies have shown a definite relationship between QTc prolongation and Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy. (CAN) in diabetic subjects. Objective: To determine the prevalence of prolonged QTc in Black diabetic individuals with CAN and to ascertain how pro- longed QTc correlated with the severity of CAN ...

  13. #BlackLivesMatter: A Call for Transformative Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Terri N.; Rivera-McCutchen, Rosa L.

    2016-01-01

    Michael Pelligrino is a novice principal in a large urban high school. After a rocky yet somewhat successful first year as the principal of Hilltop High School, tensions in the school and surrounding community are at an all-time high. The deaths of unarmed Black men, women, and children by law enforcement agents nationwide have led hundreds of…

  14. Benefits of sonography in diagnosing suspected uncomplicated acute diverticulitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Welfur C; Shuaib, Waqas; Vijayasarathi, Arvind; Fajardo, Carlos G; Cabrera, Waldo E; Costa, Juan L

    2015-01-01

    Despite evidence demonstrating equivalent accuracy of sonography and computed tomography (CT) in the workup of mild/uncomplicated acute diverticulitis, CT is overwhelmingly performed as the initial diagnostic test, particularly in the acute setting. Our study evaluated potential radiation and turnaround time savings associated with performing sonography instead of CT as the initial diagnostic examination in the workup of suspected uncomplicated acute diverticulitis. We retrospectively reviewed medical records from January 2010 to December 2012 for patients presenting with clinical symptoms of acute diverticulitis. Patients were categorized as a whole and subgrouped by age (>40 and 40 years and 121 diverticulitis. © 2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  15. A Suspected Pelvic Aneurysmal Bone Cyst in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rayan Elkattah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Albeit rare, the majority of identified bone lesions in pregnancy spare the pelvis. Once encountered with a pelvic bone lesion in pregnancy, the obstetrician may face a challenging situation as it is difficult to determine and predict the effects that labor and parturition impart on the pelvic bones. Bone changes and pelvic bone fractures have been well documented during childbirth. The data regarding clinical outcomes and management of pregnancies complicated by pelvic ABCs is scant. Highly suspected to represent an aneurysmal bone cyst, the clinical evaluation of a pelvic lesion in the ilium of a pregnant individual is presented, and modes of delivery in such a scenario are discussed.

  16. Patch Testing in Suspected Allergic Contact Dermatitis to Cosmetics

    OpenAIRE

    Pramod Kumar; Rekha Paulose

    2014-01-01

    Background. Increasing use of cosmetics has contributed to a rise in the incidence of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) to cosmetics. It is estimated that 1–5.4% of the population is sensitized to a cosmetic ingredient. Patch testing helps to confirm the presence of an allergy and to identify the actual allergens which are chemical mixtures of various ingredients. Objectives. The aims of this study are to perform patch testing in suspected ACD to cosmetics and to identify the most common alle...

  17. Black hole critical phenomena without black holes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Studying the threshold of black hole formation via numerical evolution has led to the discovery of fascinating nonlinear phenomena. Power-law mass scaling, aspects of universality, and self-similarity have now been found for a large variety of models. However, questions remain. Here I briefly review critical ...

  18. CDC WONDER: Mortality - Infant Deaths

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Mortality - Infant Deaths (from Linked Birth / Infant Death Records) online databases on CDC WONDER provide counts and rates for deaths of children under 1 year...

  19. A New Cosmological Model: Black Hole Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang T. X.

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available A new cosmological model called black hole universe is proposed. According to this model, the universe originated from a hot star-like black hole with several solar masses, and gradually grew up through a supermassive black hole with billion solar masses to the present state with hundred billion-trillion solar masses by accreting ambient mate- rials and merging with other black holes. The entire space is structured with infinite layers hierarchically. The innermost three layers are the universe that we are living, the outside called mother universe, and the inside star-like and supermassive black holes called child universes. The outermost layer is infinite in radius and limits to zero for both the mass density and absolute temperature. The relationships among all layers or universes can be connected by the universe family tree. Mathematically, the entire space can be represented as a set of all universes. A black hole universe is a subset of the en- tire space or a subspace. The child universes are null sets or empty spaces. All layers or universes are governed by the same physics - the Einstein general theory of relativity with the Robertson-walker metric of spacetime - and tend to expand outward physically. The evolution of the space structure is iterative. When one universe expands out, a new similar universe grows up from its inside. The entire life of a universe begins from the birth as a hot star-like or supermassive black hole, passes through the growth and cools down, and expands to the death with infinite large and zero mass density and absolute temperature. The black hole universe model is consistent with the Mach principle, the observations of the universe, and the Einstein general theory of relativity. Its various aspects can be understood with the well-developed physics without any difficulty. The dark energy is not required for the universe to accelerate its expansion. The inflation is not necessary because the black hole universe

  20. Ayanin diacetate-induced cell death is amplified by TRAIL in human leukemia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrero, Maria Teresa; Estevez, Sara; Negrin, Gledy; Quintana, Jose [Departamento de Bioquimica, Unidad Asociada al Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Plaza Dr. Pasteur s/n, 35016 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain); Lopez, Mariana; Perez, Francisco J.; Triana, Jorge [Departamento de Quimica, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Instituto Canario de Investigacion del Cancer, 35017 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain); Leon, Francisco [Instituto de Productos Naturales y Agrobiologia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Avda. Astrofisico F. Sanchez 3, 38206 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Estevez, Francisco, E-mail: festevez@dbbf.ulpgc.es [Departamento de Bioquimica, Unidad Asociada al Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Plaza Dr. Pasteur s/n, 35016 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain)

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ayanin diacetate as apoptotic inducer in leukemia cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell death was prevented by caspase inhibitors and by the overexpression of Bcl-x{sub L}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The intrinsic and the extrinsic pathways are involved in the mechanism of action. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Death receptors are up-regulated and TRAIL enhances apoptotic cell death. -- Abstract: Here we demonstrate that the semi-synthetic flavonoid ayanin diacetate induces cell death selectively in leukemia cells without affecting the proliferation of normal lymphocytes. Incubation of human leukemia cells with ayanin diacetate induced G{sub 2}-M phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis which was prevented by the non-specific caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk and reduced by the overexpression of Bcl-x{sub L}. Ayanin diacetate-induced cell death was found to be associated with: (i) loss of inner mitochondrial membrane potential, (ii) the release of cytochrome c, (iii) the activation of multiple caspases, (iv) cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and (v) the up-regulation of death receptors for TRAIL, DR4 and DR5. Moreover, the combined treatment with ayanin diacetate and TRAIL amplified cell death, compared to single treatments. These results provide a basis for further exploring the potential applications of this combination for the treatment of cancer.

  1. Acts and procedures concerning procedure-related deaths in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Jansen van Vuuren

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The act regarding procedure-related deaths in South Africa has changed recently (in 2007 and comprises a more encompassing description of possible procedure-related deaths. It subsequently includes unnatural deaths in cases where the patient died during aprocedure, or as a result of a procedure, or where it can be shown that any aspect of such a procedure has been a contributory cause. The act does not qualify the ‘procedure’ and by definition includes all procedures, including anaesthesia.Objective: The objective of this article is to bring awareness to general practitioners regarding the legal requirements when dealing with suspected procedure-related deaths, and to outline some of the regulations pertaining to the management of such incidents.Methods: A thorough study, interpretation and clarification of the new legislature on procedure-related deaths were performed.Discussion: The onus of deciding which procedure-related deaths are unnatural has been removed from the doctor as the new act includes all such deaths. Certain aspects of the acts remain difficult to interpret and consultation with the appointed forensic pathologist in your area is still essential in all cases of a suspected procedure-related death. Healthcare workers should acquaint themselves with all these regulations and acts that are readily available in the Government Gazette.

  2. Malnutrition related deaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparre-Sørensen, Maja; Kristensen, Gustav N

    2016-10-01

    Studies have shown that malnutrition increases the risk of morbidity, mortality, the length of hospital stay, and costs in the elderly population. Approximately one third of all patients admitted to geriatric wards in Denmark are malnourished according to the Danish Geriatric database. The aim of this study is to describe and examine the sudden increase in deaths due to malnutrition in the elderly population in Denmark from 1999 and, similarly, the sudden decline in malnutrition related deaths in 2007. A descriptive epidemiologic study was performed. All Danes listed in the national death registry who died from malnutrition in the period from 1994 to 2012 are included. The number of deaths from malnutrition increased significantly during the period from 1999 to 2007, especially in the age group 70 years and over. Additionally, we document a surprising similarity between the development in excess mortality from malnutrition in the five Danish regions during the same period. During the period 1999-2007 malnutrition was the direct cause of 340 extra deaths, and probably ten times more registered under other diseases. This development in excess mortality runs parallel in all five Danish regions over time. Copyright © 2016 European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Precisely Tracking Childhood Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farag, Tamer H; Koplan, Jeffrey P; Breiman, Robert F; Madhi, Shabir A; Heaton, Penny M; Mundel, Trevor; Ordi, Jaume; Bassat, Quique; Menendez, Clara; Dowell, Scott F

    2017-07-01

    Little is known about the specific causes of neonatal and under-five childhood death in high-mortality geographic regions due to a lack of primary data and dependence on inaccurate tools, such as verbal autopsy. To meet the ambitious new Sustainable Development Goal 3.2 to eliminate preventable child mortality in every country, better approaches are needed to precisely determine specific causes of death so that prevention and treatment interventions can be strengthened and focused. Minimally invasive tissue sampling (MITS) is a technique that uses needle-based postmortem sampling, followed by advanced histopathology and microbiology to definitely determine cause of death. The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation is supporting a new surveillance system called the Child Health and Mortality Prevention Surveillance network, which will determine cause of death using MITS in combination with other information, and yield cause-specific population-based mortality rates, eventually in up to 12-15 sites in sub-Saharan Africa and south Asia. However, the Gates Foundation funding alone is not enough. We call on governments, other funders, and international stakeholders to expand the use of pathology-based cause of death determination to provide the information needed to end preventable childhood mortality.

  4. Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura in Black People: Impact of Ethnicity on Survival and Genetic Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Suella; Jamme, Mathieu; Deligny, Christophe; Busson, Marc; Loiseau, Pascale; Azoulay, Elie; Galicier, Lionel; Pène, Frédéric; Provôt, François; Dossier, Antoine; Saheb, Samir; Veyradier, Agnès; Coppo, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Black people are at increased risk of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). Whether clinical presentation of TTP in Black patients has specific features is unknown. We assessed here differences in TTP presentation and outcome between Black and White patients. Clinical presentation was comparable between both ethnic groups. However, prognosis differed with a lower death rate in Black patients than in White patients (2.7% versus 11.6%, respectively, P = .04). Ethnicity, increasing age and neurologic involvement were retained as risk factors for death in a multivariable model (P Black patients had a better survival than White patients (P = .03). Salvage therapies were similarly performed between both groups, suggesting that disease severity was comparable. The comparison of HLA-DRB1*11, -DRB1*04 and -DQB1*03 allele frequencies between Black patients and healthy Black individuals revealed no significant difference. However, the protective allele against TTP, HLA-DRB1*04, was dramatically decreased in Black individuals in comparison with White individuals. Black people with TTP may have a better survival than White patients despite a comparable disease severity. A low natural frequency of HLA-DRB1*04 in Black ethnicity may account for the greater risk of TTP in this population.

  5. Surveillance for violent deaths--National Violent Death Reporting System, 16 states, 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karch, Debra L; Lubell, Keri M; Friday, Jennifer; Patel, Nimesh; Williams, Dionne D

    2008-04-11

    An estimated 50,000 persons die annually in the United States as a result of violence-related injuries. This report summarizes data from CDC's National Violent Death Reporting System (NVDRS) regarding violent deaths from 16 U.S. states for 2005. Results are reported by sex, age group, race/ethnicity, marital status, location of injury, method of injury, circumstances of injury, and other selected characteristics. 2005. NVDRS collects data regarding violent deaths obtained from death certificates, coroner/medical examiner reports, and law enforcement reports. NVDRS began operation in 2003 with seven states (Alaska, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Oregon, South Carolina, and Virginia) participating; six states (Colorado, Georgia, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, and Wisconsin) joined in 2004 and four (California, Kentucky, New Mexico, and Utah) in 2005, for a total of 17 states. This report includes data from 16 states; data from California are not included in this report because NVDRS has been implemented only in a limited number of California cities and counties rather than statewide as in other states. For 2005, a total of 15,495 fatal incidents involving 15,962 violent deaths occurred in the 16 NVDRS states included in this report. The majority (56.1%) of deaths were suicides, followed by homicides and deaths involving legal interventions (29.6%), violent deaths of undetermined intent (13.3%), and unintentional firearm deaths (0.7%). Fatal injury rates varied by sex, race/ethnicity, age group, and method of injury. Rates were substantially higher for males than for females and for American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) and blacks than for whites and Hispanics. Rates were highest for persons aged 20-24 years. For method of injury, the three highest rates were reported for firearms, poisonings, and hanging/strangulation/suffocation. Suicides occurred at higher rates among males, AI/ANs, whites, and older persons and most often involved the use of

  6. Investigation of suspected chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owe, Jone Furlund; Næss, Halvor; Gjerde, Ivar Otto; Bødtker, Jørn Eilert; Tysnes, Ole-Bjørn

    2016-02-09

    Chronic fatigue is a frequently occurring problem in both the primary and specialist health services. The Department of Neurology at Haukeland University Hospital has established a standard assessment for patients referred with suspected CFS/ME. This study reports diagnoses and findings upon assessment, and considers the benefit of supplementary examinations. Diagnoses and findings from examinations of 365 patients assessed for suspected CFS/ME are retrospectively reported. A total of 48 patients (13.2%) were diagnosed with CFS/ME, while a further 18 patients (4.9%) were diagnosed with post-infectious fatigue. Mental and behavioural disorders were diagnosed in 169 patients (46.3%), and these represented by far the largest group. Serious, but unrecognised somatic illness was discovered in two patients, while changes of uncertain significance were identified by MRI and lumbar puncture in a few patients. Fatigue is a frequently occurring symptom in the population. Thorough somatic and psychiatric investigation is necessary before referral to the specialist health services. Mental disorders and reactions to life crises are common and important differential diagnoses for CFS/ME. Long waiting times in the specialist health services may result in delayed diagnosis for these patients.

  7. Perioperative sexual interest in women with suspected gynecologic malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretschneider, C E; Bensen, Jeannette T; Geller, Elizabeth J; Gehrig, Paola A; Wu, Jennifer M; Doll, Kemi M

    2017-07-01

    For women with gynecologic cancer, the impact of surgery on sexual interest and desire in the immediate and later postoperative period is not well characterized. The objective of this study was to report the perioperative trends of changing sexual interest and desire in a cohort of women undergoing surgery for suspected gynecologic malignancies. This is an ancillary analysis of a cohort study analyzing health-related outcomes in women who underwent primary surgical management of a suspected gynecologic malignancy between 10/2013 and 10/2014. Subjects completed the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Sexual Function and Satisfaction Questionnaire (PROMIS-SFQ) preoperatively and questions on sexual interest and desire at one, three, and six months postoperatively. Bivariate tests and multiple linear regression were used to analyze data. Of 231 women who completed a baseline PROMIS-SFQ, 187 (81%) completed one-month, 170 (74%) three-month, and 174 (75%) six-month follow-up interviews. Following surgery, 71% of enrolled subjects were diagnosed with a malignancy. Women age women age >55 (-5.5±1.0 vs -2.3±0.9, p=0.02). In a multivariable analysis, age women of all ages (-5.6, 95% CI: -9.6, -1.5). This study provides new data regarding the timing and magnitude of changes in sexual interest following gynecologic oncology procedures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. MRI diagnosis of suspected atlanto-occipital dissociation in childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grabb, B.C.; Frye, T.A.; Hedlund, G.L.; Vaid, Y.N.; Royal, S.A. [Department of Radiology, The Children`s Hospital of Alabama, Birmingham (United States); Grabb, P.A. [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Alabama at Birmingham (United States)

    1999-04-01

    Objective. To demonstrate the utility of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the diagnosis of complete and partial ligamentous injuries in patients with suspected atlanto-occipital dissociation (AOD). Materials and methods. Five patients with suspected AOD had MR imaging performed within an average of 4 days after injury. MR scans were reviewed with specific analysis of craniocervical ligamentous structures. Charts were reviewed to obtain clinical information regarding presentation, treatment, hospital course, and outcome. Results. Two patients demonstrated MR evidence of complete AOD. One had disruption of all visualized major ligamentous structures at the craniocervical junction with anterolisthesis and evidence of cord damage. The second had injuries to the tectorial membrane, superior band of the cruciform ligament, apical ligament, and interspinous ligament at C 1-2. The remaining three patients sustained incomplete severance of the ligamentous structures at the craniocervical junction. All patients demonstrated subtle radiographic findings suggestive of AOD, including soft tissue swelling at the craniocervical junction without fracture. The two patients with complete AOD died. The three patients with partial AOD were treated with stabilization. On follow-up, these three children were asymptomatic following their craniocervical injury. Conclusion. MR imaging of acute AOD provides accurate identification of the craniocervical ligaments injured, classification of full versus partial ligamentous disruption, and analysis of accompanying spinal cord injury. This information is important for early appropriate neurosurgical management and preservation of neurologic function in survivors. (orig.) With 7 figs., 1 tab., 14 refs.

  9. MRI diagnosis of suspected atlanto-occipital dissociation in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabb, B C; Frye, T A; Hedlund, G L; Vaid, Y N; Grabb, P A; Royal, S A

    1999-04-01

    To demonstrate the utility of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the diagnosis of complete and partial ligamentous injuries in patients with suspected atlanto-occipital dissociation (AOD). Five patients with suspected AOD had MR imaging performed within an average of 4 days after injury. MR scans were reviewed with specific analysis of craniocervical ligamentous structures. Charts were reviewed to obtain clinical information regarding presentation, treatment, hospital course, and outcome. Two patients demonstrated MR evidence of complete AOD. One had disruption of all visualized major ligamentous structures at the craniocervical junction with anterolisthesis and evidence of cord damage. The second had injuries to the tectorial membrane, superior band of the cruciform ligament, apical ligament, and interspinous ligament at C 1-2. The remaining three patients sustained incomplete severance of the ligamentous structures at the craniocervical junction. All patients demonstrated subtle radiographic findings suggestive of AOD, including soft tissue swelling at the craniocervical junction without fracture. The two patients with complete AOD died. The three patients with partial AOD were treated with stabilization. On follow-up, these three children were asymptomatic following their craniocervical injury. MR imaging of acute AOD provides accurate identification of the craniocervical ligaments injured, classification of full versus partial ligamentous disruption, and analysis of accompanying spinal cord injury. This information is important for early appropriate neurosurgical management and preservation of neurologic function in survivors.

  10. CT Pulmonary Angiography and Suspected Acute Pulmonary Embolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enden, T.; Kloew, N.E. [Ullevaal Univ. Hospital, Oslo (Norway). Dept. of Cardiovascular Radiology

    2003-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the use and quality of CT pulmonary angiography in our department, and to relate the findings to clinical parameters and diagnoses. Material and Methods: A retrospective study of 324 consecutive patients referred to CT pulmonary angiography with clinically suspected pulmonary embolism (PE). From the medical records we registered clinical parameters, blood gases, D-dimer, risk factors and the results of other relevant imaging studies. Results: 55 patients (17%) had PE detected on CT. 39 had bilateral PE, and 8 patients had isolated peripheral PE. 87% of the examinations showing PE had satisfactory filling of contrast material including the segmental pulmonary arteries, and 60% of the subsegmental arteries. D-dimer test was performed in 209 patients, 85% were positive. A negative D-dimer ruled out PE detected at CT. Dyspnea and concurrent symptoms or detection of deep vein thrombosis (DVT), contraceptive pills and former venous thromboembolism (VTE) were associated with PE. The presence of only one clinical parameter indicated a negative PE diagnosis (p < 0.017), whereas two or more suggested a positive PE diagnosis (p < 0.002). CT also detected various ancillary findings such as consolidation, pleural effusion, nodule or tumor in nearly half of the patients; however, there was no association with the PE diagnosis. Conclusion: The quality of CT pulmonary angiography was satisfactory as a first-line imaging of PE. CT also showed additional pathology of importance in the chest. Our study confirmed that a negative D-dimer ruled out clinically suspected VTE.

  11. Ocular lesions following suspected lightning injury in a horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Paige M; Armour, Micki D; Dubielzig, Richard R

    2012-07-01

      To describe the gross and histopathological ocular findings in a horse following suspected lightning injury.   The eyes of a 2-year-old thoroughbred gelding were clinically and histopathologically evaluated following a severe lightning storm following euthanasia because of visual impairment.   Severe corneal edema and hydrops were noted clinically oculus dexter. Indirect ophthalmoscopy revealed bilateral symmetrical raised hyporeflective peripapillary geographic lesions. Histopathologic evaluation revealed corneal edema in the right eye with normal corneal endothelium. Posterior segment evaluation revealed localized, pericentral choroidal lesions characterized by the presence of hemorrhage, early fibrosis, and minimal lymphoplasmacytic, neutrophilic, and histiocytic inflammation with spindle cell proliferation. The retinas overlying the choroidal lesions were necrotic and mostly absent. Peripheral to the focal lesion, the retina abruptly returned to normal architecture peripheral to a zone of apoptotic photoreceptors. Centrally, swollen axons extended into the optic disc.   There have been few descriptions of ocular lesions in animals following suspected lightning injury. We believe these findings to be unique because of the type of thermal injury that may be characteristic of lightening injury. We do not know whether these lesions would have progressed over time. © 2011 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  12. Suspected side effects to the quadrivalent human papilloma vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinth, Louise; Theibel, Ann Cathrine; Pors, Kirsten; Mehlsen, Jesper

    2015-04-01

    The quadrivalent vaccine that protects against human papilloma virus types 6, 11, 16 and 18 (Q-HPV vaccine, Gardasil) was included into the Danish childhood vaccination programme in 2009. During the past years, a collection of symptoms primarily consistent with sympathetic nervous system dysfunction have been described as suspected side effects to the Q-HPV vaccine. We present a description of suspected side effects to the Q-HPV vaccine in 53 patients referred to our Syncope Unit for tilt table test and evaluation of autonomic nervous system function. All patients had symptoms consistent with pronounced autonomic dysfunction including different degrees of orthostatic intolerance, severe non-migraine-like headache, excessive fatigue, cognitive dysfunction, gastrointestinal discomfort and widespread pain of a neuropathic character. We found consistency in the reported symptoms as well as between our findings and those described by others. Our findings neither confirm nor dismiss a causal link to the Q-HPV vaccine, but they suggest that further research is urgently warranted to clarify the pathophysiology behind the symptoms experienced in these patients and to evaluate the possibility and the nature of any causal link and hopefully establish targeted treatment options. not relevant. not relevant.

  13. Patch Testing in Suspected Allergic Contact Dermatitis to Cosmetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulose, Rekha

    2014-01-01

    Background. Increasing use of cosmetics has contributed to a rise in the incidence of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) to cosmetics. It is estimated that 1–5.4% of the population is sensitized to a cosmetic ingredient. Patch testing helps to confirm the presence of an allergy and to identify the actual allergens which are chemical mixtures of various ingredients. Objectives. The aims of this study are to perform patch testing in suspected ACD to cosmetics and to identify the most common allergen and cosmetic product causing dermatitis. Methods. Fifty patients with suspected ACD to cosmetics were patch-tested with 38 antigens of the Indian Cosmetic Series and 12 antigens of the Indian Standard Series. Results. The majority (58%) of patients belonged to the 21–40 years age group. The presence of ACD to cosmetics was confirmed in 38 (76%) patients. Face creams (20%), hair dyes (14%), and soaps (12%) were the most commonly implicated. The most common allergens identified were gallate mix (40%), cetrimide (28%), and thiomersal (20%). Out of a total of 2531 patches applied, positive reactions were obtained in 3.75%. Conclusion. Incidence of ACD to cosmetics was greater in females. Face creams and hair dyes were the most common cosmetic products implicated. The principal allergens were gallate mix, cetrimide, and thiomersal. PMID:25295057

  14. Feline toxicological emergencies: when to suspect and what to do.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grave, Tobias W; Boag, Amanda K

    2010-11-01

    Confirmed or suspected intoxications with a wide variety of agents represent a small but important group of feline emergency cases. Generally it is thought that toxicities are less common in cats compared with dogs, with a higher proportion relating to dermal as opposed to oral exposure. Once toxicity is suspected or diagnosed, it must be recognised that treatment regimes may need modification compared with those established for dogs. Different drugs or different dosages may be warranted and the choice of available drugs may be reduced. This review draws on published studies, case reports and clinical experience to summarise key features of the general management of the intoxicated feline patient before describing some of the more serious and common intoxications in more detail. The focus throughout the review is on the peculiarities of feline metabolism and how they may impact on presentation and treatment. The aim is to assist companion animal and feline practitioners, who are in the frontline when it comes to managing these emergency cases. Copyright © 2010 ISFM and AAFP. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Influenza Illness among Case-Patients Hospitalized for Suspected Dengue, El Salvador, 2012.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Chacon

    Full Text Available We estimate the proportion of patients hospitalized for suspected dengue that tested positive for influenza virus in El Salvador during the 2012 influenza season. We tested specimens from 321 hospitalized patients: 198 patients with SARI and 123 patients with suspected dengue. Among 121 hospitalized suspected dengue (two co-infected excluded patients, 28% tested positive for dengue and 19% positive for influenza; among 35 with suspected dengue and respiratory symptoms, 14% were positive for dengue and 39% positive for influenza. One percent presented co-infection between influenza and dengue. Clinicians should consider the diagnosis of influenza among patients with suspected dengue during the influenza season.

  16. Influenza Illness among Case-Patients Hospitalized for Suspected Dengue, El Salvador, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacon, Rafael; Clara, Alexey Wilfrido; Jara, Jorge; Armero, Julio; Lozano, Celina; El Omeiri, Nathalie; Widdowson, Marc-Alain; Azziz-Baumgartner, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    We estimate the proportion of patients hospitalized for suspected dengue that tested positive for influenza virus in El Salvador during the 2012 influenza season. We tested specimens from 321 hospitalized patients: 198 patients with SARI and 123 patients with suspected dengue. Among 121 hospitalized suspected dengue (two co-infected excluded) patients, 28% tested positive for dengue and 19% positive for influenza; among 35 with suspected dengue and respiratory symptoms, 14% were positive for dengue and 39% positive for influenza. One percent presented co-infection between influenza and dengue. Clinicians should consider the diagnosis of influenza among patients with suspected dengue during the influenza season.

  17. Scalarized hairy black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleihaus, Burkhard, E-mail: b.kleihaus@uni-oldenburg.de [Institut für Physik, Universität Oldenburg, Postfach 2503, D-26111 Oldenburg (Germany); Kunz, Jutta [Institut für Physik, Universität Oldenburg, Postfach 2503, D-26111 Oldenburg (Germany); Yazadjiev, Stoytcho [Department of Theoretical Physics, Faculty of Physics, Sofia University, Sofia 1164 (Bulgaria)

    2015-05-11

    In the presence of a complex scalar field scalar–tensor theory allows for scalarized rotating hairy black holes. We exhibit the domain of existence for these scalarized black holes, which is bounded by scalarized rotating boson stars and hairy black holes of General Relativity. We discuss the global properties of these solutions. Like their counterparts in general relativity, their angular momentum may exceed the Kerr bound, and their ergosurfaces may consist of a sphere and a ring, i.e., form an ergo-Saturn.

  18. Scalarized Hairy Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Kleihaus, Burkhard; Yazadjiev, Stoytcho

    2015-01-01

    In the presence of a complex scalar field scalar-tensor theory allows for scalarized rotating hairy black holes. We exhibit the domain of existence for these scalarized black holes, which is bounded by scalarized rotating boson stars and ordinary hairy black holes. We discuss the global properties of these solutions. Like their counterparts in general relativity, their angular momentum may exceed the Kerr bound, and their ergosurfaces may consist of a sphere and a ring, i.e., form an ergo-Saturn.

  19. Black hole uncertainties

    CERN Document Server

    Danielsson, U H

    1993-01-01

    In this work the quantum theory of two dimensional dilaton black holes is studied using the Wheeler De Witt equation. The solutions correspond to wave functions of the black hole. It is found that for an observer inside the horizon, there are uncertainty relations for the black hole mass and a parameter in the metric determining the Hawking flux. Only for a particular value of this parameter, can both be known with arbitrary accuracy. In the generic case there is instead a relation which is very similar to the so called string uncertainty relation.

  20. Black holes new horizons

    CERN Document Server

    Hayward, Sean Alan

    2013-01-01

    Black holes, once just fascinating theoretical predictions of how gravity warps space-time according to Einstein's theory, are now generally accepted as astrophysical realities, formed by post-supernova collapse, or as supermassive black holes mysteriously found at the cores of most galaxies, powering active galactic nuclei, the most powerful objects in the universe. Theoretical understanding has progressed in recent decades with a wider realization that local concepts should characterize black holes, rather than the global concepts found in textbooks. In particular, notions such as trapping h

  1. Scalarized hairy black holes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkhard Kleihaus

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In the presence of a complex scalar field scalar–tensor theory allows for scalarized rotating hairy black holes. We exhibit the domain of existence for these scalarized black holes, which is bounded by scalarized rotating boson stars and hairy black holes of General Relativity. We discuss the global properties of these solutions. Like their counterparts in general relativity, their angular momentum may exceed the Kerr bound, and their ergosurfaces may consist of a sphere and a ring, i.e., form an ergo-Saturn.

  2. Black Hole Shadows of Charged Spinning Black Holes

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Rohta

    2005-01-01

    We propose a method for measuring the black hole charge by imaging a black hole shadow in a galactic center by future interferometers. Even when the black hole is uncharged, it is possible to confirm the charge neutrality by this method. We first derive the analytic formulae of the black hole shadow in an optically thin medium around a charged spinning black hole, and then investigate how contours of the black hole shadow depend on the spin and the charge of the black hole for several inclina...

  3. Risk factors for coronary heart disease in the black population of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-04-20

    Apr 20, 1991 ... tapes used to produce the official reports on death among blacks in South Africa l shows that for the period. 1984 - 1986 circulatory disease accounted for 11,0% of registered mortality in males and 20,0% in females. The marked difference between' sexes in deaths due to external causes. (mainly violence) ...

  4. Evaluating the prevalence of DNA mixtures found in fingernail samples from victims and suspects in homicide cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurit, Bublil; Anat, Gast; Michal, Shenfeld; Lilach, Front; Maya, Freund

    2011-11-01

    An important aspect of homicide investigations is the identification of the persons that had the last contact with the victim prior to death. Violent crimes are frequently characterized by a struggle between the victim and the perpetrator where biological material can be expected to be exchanged between them. Forensic DNA typing enables the generation of genetic profiles by extraction and amplification of cellular material found under fingernails. The evidential value of these samples may be critical if the secondary contributor found in a DNA mixture, can be matched with a potential suspect, or through a DNA database search. The amount of biological material transferred under the fingernails during "casual" activities is not sufficient to genotype reportable mixtures. This may not be the case with homicide victims that may have struggled and died under violent circumstances. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of DNA mixtures found under the fingernails of both victims and suspected perpetrators of violent deaths. We present a retrospective study of 137 DNA profiles genotyped from fingernail samples of homicide victims and suspects, collected at the Israeli National Center of Forensic Medicine. The majority of the samples produced single source profiles (n=107, 78%) that matched those of the donor's. DNA mixtures (n=30, 22%) were found in increased frequency among victims (n=25/100, 25%) compared to suspects (n=5/37, 13.5%). Mixtures were sub-divided into high level (n=15, 50%), low level (n=9, 30%) and residual (n=6, 20%), according to the number of the foreign contributors' alleles. Thus, this distinctive group of homicide victims was found to express both elevated frequency of DNA mixtures together with highly informative value of the secondary foreign profiles, as compared to other studied populations. These findings support an important aspect for the criminal investigation in murder cases, where a struggle may have ensued and the

  5. The use of eptifibatide for suspected pump thrombus or thrombosis in patients with left ventricular assist devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellor, Bethany R; Smith, Jennifer R; Prasad, Sunil M; Joseph, Susan M; Silvestry, Scott C

    2014-01-01

    Pump thrombosis in patients with left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) continues to present treatment challenges. Anti-coagulation strategies used to treat this complication are empiric and without firm data for guidance. The addition of a platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor to intravenous anti-coagulation has been suggested by several case series and recent guidelines. The aim of this study was to evaluate our use of eptifibatide for the treatment of suspected pump thrombus/thrombosis. This retrospective, single-center cohort study was performed at Barnes-Jewish Hospital. The medical informatics system was queried to identify all LVAD patients who received eptifibatide for suspected pump thrombus/thrombosis from January 1, 2011, through April 30, 2013. A total of 17 patients (16 HeartMate II [Thoratec, Pleasanton, CA], 1 HeartWare [HeartWare International Inc, Framingham, MA]) with 22 separate administration attempts received eptifibatide (dose range, 0.1-2 μg/kg/min) for suspected pump thrombus/thrombosis presenting as one or more of the following findings: elevated lactate dehydrogenase, decreased haptoglobin, elevated plasma free hemoglobin, LVAD dysfunction, or new, persistently high LVAD power. The mean time from device implantation to eptifibatide therapy was 47.34 days (range, 3.88-397.67 days). Of the 22 attempts, 5 (22.7%) resulted in resolution of 1 or more patient-specific indicators of LVAD thrombus/thrombosis. Three patients (17.6%) had resolution of an indicator while also remaining free from continued hemolysis, death, pump exchange, or emergent heart transplant. Bleeding events were common, with 11 patients (64.7%) experiencing bleeding during the infusion. Seven patients (41.2%) died, with intraparenchymal hemorrhage as the cause of death in 2 patients. Pump exchange was performed in 3 patients. Our limited experience indicates the risk of using eptifibatide outweighs the proposed benefit of salvaging the existing LVAD in the setting of

  6. [Reflections on prehospitalisation deaths].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugenschmitt, Delphine; Allonneau, Alexandre; Cesareo, Éric; Gueugniaud, Pierre-Yves; Lefort, Hugues

    2017-12-01

    In the past, death was a family and community affair, but today it is institutional and entrusted to healthcare personnel. Thanks to a questionnaire on their feelings about prehospitalisation deaths, the experience and training needs for healthcare personnel at a mobile emergency and intensive care service were analysed. The majority of these professionals had been confronted with difficulties when faced with prehospitalisation deaths. There is little understanding of religious rites, even though this is an important point in dealing with the situation. There is a strong desire for training. The pedagogical support offered in response to the needs expressed was recognised as being useful and should be more widespread. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Orchestrating an Exceptional Death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anja Marie Bornø

    processes of facing brain death and deciding about organ donation. This study suggests that organ donation should be understood as a ‘strange figure’ challenging traditions and attitudes regarding the boundaries between life and death and the practices surrounding dead human bodies. Simultaneously, organ......, reinterpret and translate death and organ donation into something culturally acceptable and sense making. With chapters focusing analytically on the performance of trust, the transformative practices of hope, the aesthetization of ambiguous bodies, the sociality of exchangeable organs and the organ donation......This Ph.D. thesis explores the experiences of Danish donor families and the context of organ donation in Denmark. Based on comprehensive ethnographic studies at Danish hospitals and interviews with health care professionals and donor families, readers are invited on a journey into the complex...

  8. Amphetamine derivative related deaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lora-Tamayo, C; Tena, T; Rodríguez, A

    1997-02-28

    Amphetamine its methylendioxy (methylendioxyamphetamine methylenedioxymethylamphetamine, methylenedioxyethylamphetamine) and methoxy derivatives (p-methoxyamphetamine and p-methoxymethylamphetamine) are widely abused in Spanish society. We present here the results of a systematic study of all cases of deaths brought to the attention of the Madrid department of the Instituto Nacional de Toxicologia from 1993 to 1995 in which some of these drugs have been found in the cadaveric blood. The cases were divided into three categories: amphetamine and derivatives, amphetamines and alcohol, amphetamines and other drugs. Data on age, sex, clinical symptoms, morphological findings, circumstances of death, when known, and concentration of amphetamine derivatives, alcohol and other drugs in blood are given for each group. The information provided here may prove to be useful for the forensic interpretation of deaths which are directly or indirectly related to abuse of amphetamine derivatives.

  9. Death from obstetrical hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, H

    1972-08-01

    Twelve hundred nineteen maternal deaths occurring from 1957 through 1966 in the State of California have been reviewed by the Maternal Mortality Committee of the California Medical Association and the Bureau of Maternal and Child Welfare of the State of California. In 56 of these deaths the underlying causes were due to disorders of placental separation and placental bed hemostasis. Each of these 56 cases has been analyzed. Profiles of characteristics of patients dying from placenta previa, placenta abruptio, and uterine atony are given. The expected causes of death due to delay in giving adequate amounts of blood and fibrinogen occurred in this series but the most striking results of this study were the findings of (1) a large number of cases of placenta acreta in patients with repeat cesarean sections and (2) the lack of manual exploration of the uterus in many patients dying from uterine atony.

  10. Death Threat and Death Concerns in the College Student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobacyk, Jerome; Eckstein, Daniel

    1980-01-01

    Thanatology students reported significantly lesser death threat and significantly greater death concerns. Trait anxiety was found to be a significant predictor of change in death threat in the Thanatology Group, with lesser anxiety associated with greater decline in death threat. (Author)

  11. Perspectives on Death: An Experiential Course on Death Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, Edwin S.

    1978-01-01

    Describes and evaluates a college psychology course on death education (thanatology). Course objectives were to help students become aware of the feelings involved in facing death, encourage discussion on the subject of death, motivate students to change their attitudes about death, and encourage practical planning for funeral arrangements.…

  12. Competing causes of death: a death certificate study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mackenbach, J. P.; Kunst, A. E.; Lautenbach, H.; Oei, Y. B.; Bijlsma, F.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite the widespread interest in competing causes of death, empirical information on interrelationships between causes of death is scarce. We have used death certificate information to estimate the prevalence of competing causes of death at the moment of dying from specific underlying

  13. Comparison of abuse, suspected suicidal intent, and fatalities related to the 7-day buprenorphine transdermal patch versus other opioid analgesics in the National Poison Data System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplan, Paul M; Sessler, Nelson E; Harikrishnan, Venkatesh; Singh, Richa; Perkel, Charles

    2017-01-01

    Prescription opioid related abuse, suicide and death are significant public health problems. This study compares rates of poison center calls categorized as intentional abuse, suspected suicidal intent or fatality for the 7-day buprenorphine transdermal system/patch (BTDS) with other extended-release and long-acting (ER/LA) opioids indicated for chronic pain. Retrospective 24-month cohort study using National Poison Data System data from July 2012 through June 2014. BTDS was introduced in the United States in January 2011. Numbers and rates of calls of intentional abuse, suspected suicidal intent and fatalities were evaluated for BTDS, ER morphine, ER oxycodone, fentanyl patch, ER oxymorphone and methadone tablets/capsules, using prescription adjustment to account for community availability. Rate ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. Absolute numbers and prescription-adjusted rates of intentional abuse and suspected suicidal intent with BTDS were significantly lower (p opioid analgesics examined. No fatalities associated with BTDS exposure were reported. This post-marketing evaluation of BTDS indicates infrequent poison center calls for intentional abuse and suspected suicidal intent events, suggesting lower rates of these risks with BTDS compared to other ER/LA opioids.

  14. Understanding the Black Aesthetic Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Marvin V.

    1988-01-01

    Discussing the importance of the Black aesthetic experience, Curtis examines Black cultural heritage and participatory style, the spiritual, and the creation and recreation of Black music. Advocating multicultural music education in teacher training, he suggests that Black music be studied for its value and contribution to society. Lists five ways…

  15. Black Managers in White Corporations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, John P.

    The study examines the major determinants of the career patterns of black managers in white businesses and the effects of corporations on their black managers' identities and relationships to the black community. Analyzed were occupational mobility theories; white and black managers' career patterns, goals, and related factors; company employment…

  16. The Thermodynamics of Black Holes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wald Robert M.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We review the present status of black hole thermodynamics. Our review includes discussion of classical black hole thermodynamics, Hawking radiation from black holes, the generalized second law, and the issue of entropy bounds. A brief survey also is given of approaches to the calculation of black hole entropy. We conclude with a discussion of some unresolved open issues.

  17. Black holes with halos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monten, Ruben; Toldo, Chiara

    2018-02-01

    We present new AdS4 black hole solutions in N =2 gauged supergravity coupled to vector and hypermultiplets. We focus on a particular consistent truncation of M-theory on the homogeneous Sasaki–Einstein seven-manifold M 111, characterized by the presence of one Betti vector multiplet. We numerically construct static and spherically symmetric black holes with electric and magnetic charges, corresponding to M2 and M5 branes wrapping non-contractible cycles of the internal manifold. The novel feature characterizing these nonzero temperature configurations is the presence of a massive vector field halo. Moreover, we verify the first law of black hole mechanics and we study the thermodynamics in the canonical ensemble. We analyze the behavior of the massive vector field condensate across the small-large black hole phase transition and we interpret the process in the dual field theory.

  18. Black Rail Pilot Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Aural surveys using tape recorded calls proved to be an efficient and effective way to survey large expanses of shallow marsh for black rails (Laterallus...

  19. Illuminating black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Ian A.; Bull, Anne; O'Brien, Eileen; Drillsma-Milgrom, Katy A.; Milgrom, Lionel R.

    2016-07-01

    Two-dimensional shadows formed by illuminating vortices are shown to be visually analogous to the gravitational action of black holes on light and surrounding matter. They could be useful teaching aids demonstrating some of the consequences of general relativity.

  20. Black Teenage Pregnancy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Loretta I. Winters; Paul C. Winters

    2012-01-01

    .... No difference between Blacks and Whites was found during better economic times. During 2003-2004, the period of greatest economic stress, race was determined to be the only predictor of teenage pregnancy...

  1. Black, Hairy Tongue

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mouthwashes containing irritating oxidizing agents, such as peroxide Tobacco use Drinking excessive amounts of coffee or black tea Excessive alcohol use Eating a soft diet that doesn't help to rub dead skin ...

  2. Black Hole Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    This graphic shows the computer simulation of a black hole from start to finish. Plasma is falling slowly toward the black hole in a (at the upper left). The plasma has a magnetic field, shown by the white lines. It picks up speed as it falls toward the hole in b (at the upper right), c (lower left) and d (lower right). However, the rotating black hole twists up space itself (and the magnetic field lines) and ejects electromagnetic power along the north and south poles above the black hole. The red and white color shows the immense electromagnetic power output, which eventually will pick up particles and form squirting jets. This simulation was conducted using supercomputers at Japan's National Institute for Fusion Science.

  3. Nonsingular black hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamseddine, Ali H.; Mukhanov, Viatcheslav

    2017-03-01

    We consider the Schwarzschild black hole and show how, in a theory with limiting curvature, the physical singularity "inside it" is removed. The resulting spacetime is geodesically complete. The internal structure of this nonsingular black hole is analogous to Russian nesting dolls. Namely, after falling into the black hole of radius rg, an observer, instead of being destroyed at the singularity, gets for a short time into the region with limiting curvature. After that he re-emerges in the near horizon region of a spacetime described by the Schwarzschild metric of a gravitational radius proportional to rg^{1/3}. In the next cycle, after passing the limiting curvature, the observer finds himself within a black hole of even smaller radius proportional to rg^{1/9}, and so on. Finally after a few cycles he will end up in the spacetime where he remains forever at limiting curvature.

  4. Black hole quantum spectrum

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Corda, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Introducing a black hole (BH) effective temperature, which takes into account both the non-strictly thermal character of Hawking radiation and the countable behavior of emissions of subsequent Hawking quanta, we recently re...

  5. Holographic black hole chemistry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Karch, Andreas; Robinson, Brandon

    2015-01-01

    Thermodynamic quantities associated with black holes in Anti-de Sitter space obey an interesting identity when the cosmological constant is included as one of the dynamical variables, the generalized Smarr relation...

  6. Using Internet Artifacts to Profile a Child Pornography Suspect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus K. Rogers

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Digital evidence plays a crucial role in child pornography investigations. However, in the following case study, the authors argue that the behavioral analysis or “profiling” of digital evidence can also play a vital role in child pornography investigations. The following case study assessed the Internet Browsing History (Internet Explorer Bookmarks, Mozilla Bookmarks, and Mozilla History from a suspected child pornography user’s computer. The suspect in this case claimed to be conducting an ad hoc law enforcement investigation. After the URLs were classified (Neutral; Adult Porn; Child Porn; Adult Dating sites; Pictures from Social Networking Profiles; Chat Sessions; Bestiality; Data Cleaning; Gay Porn, the Internet history files were statistically analyzed to determine prevalence and trends in Internet browsing. First, a frequency analysis was used to determine a baseline of online behavior. Results showed 54% (n = 3205 of the URLs were classified as “neutral” and 38.8% (n = 2265 of the URLs were classified as a porn website. Only 10.8% of the URLs were classified as child pornography websites. However when the IE history file was analyzed by visit, or “hit,” count, the Pictures/Profiles (31.5% category had the highest visit count followed by Neutral (19.3%, Gay Porn (17%, and Child Porn (16.6%. When comparing the frequency of URLs to the Hit Count for each pornography type, it was noted that the accused was accessing gay porn, child porn, chat rooms, and picture profiles (i.e., from Facebook more often than adult porn and neutral websites. The authors concluded that the suspect in this case was in fact a child pornography user and not an ad hoc investigator, and the findings from the behavioral analysis were admitted as evidence in the sentencing hearing for this case. The authors believe this case study illustrates the ability to conduct a behavioral analysis of digital evidence. More work is required to further validate the

  7. Teicoplanin versus vancomycin for proven or suspected infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, Alexandre B; Goncalves, Anderson R; Almeida, Claudia S; Bugano, Diogo Dg; Silva, Eliezer

    2010-06-16

    Vancomycin and teicoplanin are commonly used to treat gram-positive infections, particularly those caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). There is uncertainty regarding the effects of teicoplanin compared to vancomycin on kidney function with some previous studies suggesting teicoplanin is less nephrotoxic than vancomycin. To investigate the efficacy and safety of vancomycin versus teicoplanin in patients with proven or suspected infection. We searched the Cochrane Renal Group's Specialised Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, reference lists of nephrology textbooks, review articles with relevant studies and sent letters seeking information about unpublished or incomplete studies to investigators involved in previous studies. We searched for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in any language comparing teicoplanin to vancomycin for patients with proven or suspected infection. Two authors independently evaluated methodological quality and extracted data using standardised data extraction forms. Study investigators were contacted for information not available in the original manuscripts. Random effects model was used to estimate the pooled risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI). We included 24 studies (2,610 patients) in this review. Teicoplanin reduced the risk of nephrotoxicity compared to vancomycin (RR 0.66, 95% CI 0.48 to 0.90).The effects of teicoplanin or vancomycin were similar for clinical cure (RR 1.03, 95% CI 0.98 to 1.08), microbiological cure (RR 0.98, 95% CI 0.93 to 1.03) and mortality (RR 1.02, 95% CI 0.79 to1.30). Six studies reported no cases of acute kidney injury (AKI) needing dialysis. Adverse events were less frequent with teicoplanin including cutaneous rash (RR 0.57, 95% CI 0.35 to 0.92), red man syndrome (RR 0.21, 95% CI 0.08 to 0.59) and total adverse events (RR 0.73, 95% CI 0.53 to 1.00). A lower risk of nephrotoxicity with teicoplanin was observed in patients either with (RR 0.51, 95% CI 0.30 to 0.88) or

  8. Mortality Patterns in the Southern Black Belt: Regional and Racial Comparisons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale W. Wimberley

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available W. E. B. Du Bois coined the term The Black Belt to indicate an area of extreme structural inequality. The Southern Black Belt is a set of U.S. counties with proportionately high African American populations and the Plantation South's social legacy. Previous research revealed the region's serious socioeconomic disadvantages. This article presents the first comprehensive analysis of Black Belt mortality. Both Blacks and Whites in the Black Belt experience substantially worse infant mortality and shorter life expectancy compared to their counterparts in the rest of the South and the rest of the U.S. The study also examines the region's leading causes of death and cause-specific "excess" deaths by race, and considers the findings' policy implications.

  9. The Issue of Death Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisler, Ray, Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Death education can help people learn about death, cope with it, and function resourcefully. A well-designed and carefully considered death education program must be made available to all students. It would be a tragic lost opportunity for our educational system if the schools refused to accept the challenge of death education. (Author)

  10. Death Education and Suicide Potentiality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Nina Ribak

    1983-01-01

    Assessed whether a death education course attracted students with significantly different attitudes toward death. Results indicated that the death education class did attract persons with greater acceptance of suicide and death. The course tended to further decrease avoidance and increase acceptance. Potentiality for committing suicide was not…

  11. Death Anxiety Scales: A Dialogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, David; Templer, Donald

    1993-01-01

    Presents dialog among David Lester, author of first critical survey of death anxiety measures, developer of scales, and researcher about suicide and fear of death; Donald Templer, Death Anxiety Scale (DAS) creator; and journal editor. Lester and Templer discuss origins, uses, results, limitations, and future of death anxiety scales and research on…

  12. Teaching about the Death Penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, John Paul; Eden, John Michael

    1998-01-01

    Examines the reasons for the death penalty, the reasons why the death penalty attracts so much attention, whether the death penalty is applied consistently, and the evidence that the application of the death penalty may be racially biased. Provides an accompanying article on "Teaching Ideas" by Ronald A. Banaszak. (CMK)

  13. Health seeking and access to care for children with suspected dengue in Cambodia: An ethnographic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manderson Lenore

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The continuing contribution of dengue fever to the hospitalization and deaths in hospital of infants and small children in Cambodia is associated with delays in presentation for medical attention, diagnosis and appropriate care. It is important to identify the reasons that influence these delays, in order to develop appropriate interventions to redress the impact of dengue. Methods Data on health seeking were collected during an ethnographic study conducted in two villages in the eastern province of Kampong Cham, Cambodia in 2004. Interviews were conducted with mothers whose children had been infected with suspected dengue fever, or who had been sick for other reasons, in 2003 and 2004. Results Women selected a therapeutic option based on perceptions of the severity of the child's condition, confidence in the particular modality, service or practitioner, and affordability of the therapy. While they knew what type of health care was required, poverty in combination with limited availability and perceptions of the poor quality of care at village health centers and public referral hospitals deterred them from doing so. Women initially used home remedies, then sought advice from public and private providers, shifting from one sector to another in a pragmatic response to the child's illness. Conclusion The lack of availability of financial resources for poor people and their continuing lack of confidence in the care provided by government centres combine to delay help seeking and inappropriate treatment of children sick with dengue.

  14. The clinical role of stress myocardial perfusion imaging in women with suspected coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieres, Jennifer H; Rosman, David R; Shaw, Leslee J

    2004-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the number one cause of mortality for women in the United States, with coronary artery disease (CAD) accounting for 54% of all cardiovascular deaths. CAD claims the lives of more than 250,000 women each year and is therefore the single largest killer of American women. For several decades, the under-representation of women in clinical trials led to both a lack of available sex-specific evidence and a generalized misconception that CAD was a "man's disease." In actuality, not only are women vulnerable to CAD, they typically develop it 10 to 15 years later than men. Furthermore, sex differences exist in the mortality rates of women and men with CAD, such that once CAD is present in women, they have worse outcomes than their male counterparts. Consequently, early and accurate diagnosis of CAD is crucial for reducing mortality rates in women. Stress myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) using contemporary techniques has been shown to have significant value in the diagnosis and prognosis of CAD in women. In the risk assessment of women with an intermediate clinical pretest likelihood of CAD, using MPI with exercise or pharmacologic stress has been shown to add incremental value to clinical variables or exercise electrocardiogram stress testing alone. This review discusses the clinical role of stress MPI in the management of women with suspected CAD.

  15. How to explore and report children with suspected non-accidental trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamsbaum, Catherine [Paris Descartes University, St Vincent de Paul Hospital, Radiology Department, Pediatric Imaging, Paris Cedex 14 (France); Mejean, Nathalie; Merzoug, Valerie [St Vincent de Paul Hospital, Radiology Department, Pediatric Imaging, Paris Cedex 14 (France); Rey-Salmon, Caroline [Hotel Dieu Hospital, AP-HP, Medico-Judicial Unit, Paris (France)

    2010-06-15

    Child abuse is a controversial problem of special concern. Recent reports have focused on the broad variability of reporting to child protection services. Radiologists play a key role in the early diagnosis and imaging of suspected inflicted injury. Imaging must be performed and then interpreted with rigour. The aims of this review are: To review the recent recommended guidelines for imaging in cases of suspicion of abuse. These include a highly detailed complete skeletal survey with centered views, whilst brain CT and/or MRI are mandatory in children younger than 2 years. The use of abdominal imaging is debatable if the child has no symptoms. All siblings younger than 2 years should be assessed in the same way while the diagnosis of abuse is investigated. Body MRI is an interesting modality that remains a ''work-in-progress''. To highlight that dating of both brain and skeletal injuries is imprecise. The main point is, however, to determine if the pattern is of ''age-different'' lesions. This not only provides a strong argument for the diagnosis of abuse, but also indicates repetitive violence with a high risk for further injury and death. To remember that the medical perspective is to protect the child. Thus, radiologists must communicate clearly the suspicion of abuse and the degree of certainty to clinicians to aid reporting or hospitalization. (orig.)

  16. First report of suspected ethylene glycol poisoning in 2 dogs in South Africa : clinical communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Keller

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Ethylene glycol (anti-freeze toxicity is a serious emergency in both veterinary and human medicine. Ethylene glycol (E/G is the active anti-freeze principle in radiator water additives. It is odourless, colourless and has a sweet taste. As little as 5 mℓ or 20 mℓ is sufficient to kill a cat or a dog, respectively. Ethylene glycol is rapidly absorbed and metabolised in the liver to oxalate, which is deposited as calcium oxalate in the kidneys causing irreversible damage. This report describes 2 dogs that were suspected to have ingested ethylene glycol. The report contains a description of the 3 stages of ethylene glycol toxicity as well as a short discussion of the treatment. Public awareness about the dangers of anti-freeze will help in limiting exposure of pets and humans to this potentially fatal toxin. Veterinarians need to be aware of anti-freeze toxicity as delayed recognition and treatment will lead to the death of the patient.

  17. Diagnostic accuracy of placental growth factor in women with suspected preeclampsia: a prospective multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Lucy C; Duckworth, Suzy; Seed, Paul T; Griffin, Melanie; Myers, Jenny; Mackillop, Lucy; Simpson, Nigel; Waugh, Jason; Anumba, Dilly; Kenny, Louise C; Redman, Christopher W G; Shennan, Andrew H

    2013-11-05

    Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy are a major contributor to death and disability for pregnant women and their infants. The diagnosis of preeclampsia by using blood pressure and proteinuria is of limited use because they are tertiary, downstream features of the disease. Placental growth factor (PlGF) is an angiogenic factor, a secondary marker of associated placental dysfunction in preeclampsia, with known low plasma concentrations in the disease. In a prospective multicenter study, we studied the diagnostic accuracy of low plasma PlGF concentration (preeclampsia between 20 and 35 weeks' gestation (and up to 41 weeks' gestation as a secondary analysis). The outcome was delivery for confirmed preeclampsia within 14 days. Of 625 women, 346 (55%) developed confirmed preeclampsia. In 287 women enrolled before 35 weeks' gestation, PlGF preeclampsia within 14 days; specificity was lower (0.55; 0.48-0.61). Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for low PlGF (0.87, standard error 0.03) for predicting preeclampsia within 14 days was greater than all other commonly used tests, singly or in combination (range, 0.58-0.76), in women presenting with suspected preeclampsia (Ppreeclampsia, low PlGF has high sensitivity and negative predictive value for preeclampsia within 14 days, is better than other currently used tests, and presents an innovative adjunct to management of such women.

  18. Charged Galileon black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babichev, Eugeny; Charmousis, Christos [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique (LPT), Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS UMR 8627, F-91405 Orsay (France); Hassaine, Mokhtar, E-mail: eugeny.babichev@th.u-psud.fr, E-mail: christos.charmousis@th.u-psud.fr, E-mail: hassaine@inst-mat.utalca.cl [Instituto de Matemática y Física, Universidad de Talca, Casilla 747, Talca (Chile)

    2015-05-01

    We consider an Abelian gauge field coupled to a particular truncation of Horndeski theory. The Galileon field has translation symmetry and couples non minimally both to the metric and the gauge field. When the gauge-scalar coupling is zero the gauge field reduces to a standard Maxwell field. By taking into account the symmetries of the action, we construct charged black hole solutions. Allowing the scalar field to softly break symmetries of spacetime we construct black holes where the scalar field is regular on the black hole event horizon. Some of these solutions can be interpreted as the equivalent of Reissner-Nordstrom black holes of scalar tensor theories with a non trivial scalar field. A self tuning black hole solution found previously is extended to the presence of dyonic charge without affecting whatsoever the self tuning of a large positive cosmological constant. Finally, for a general shift invariant scalar tensor theory we demonstrate that the scalar field Ansatz and method we employ are mathematically compatible with the field equations. This opens up the possibility for novel searches of hairy black holes in a far more general setting of Horndeski theory.

  19. Optimal Aging and Death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Carl-Johan; Strulik, Holger

    the representative consumer is subject to physiological aging. In modeling aging we draw on recent research in the fields of biology and medicine. The speed of the aging process, and thus the time of death, are endogenously determined by optimal health investments. We calibrate the model to US data and proceed...

  20. Maternal Death Audit Revi

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    transcribed, imported and analyzed using excel. Qualitative data on the contributory factors to the death and recommendations for action on each case were analyzed ..... in the article approved the manuscript. References. 1. Ghana Statistical Service (GSS), Ghana Health Service (GHS), and Macro International, 2009.

  1. Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Henry L.; And Others

    There is a growing body of evidence that Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) victims are not completely normal and healthy, as was once believed. A variety of new information from several disciplines strongly suggests that the infant who dies suddenly and unexpectedly may do so because of subtle developmental, neurologic, cardiorespiratory, and…

  2. KAROSHI (WORK TO DEATH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moh. Toriqul Chaer

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available When the tide of unemployment hit the USA and Europe, in Japan the opposite phenomenon occurs. In 2002, in Japan deaths were recorded because of excessive works. In this country, the phenomenon of death because of excessive works is called Karoshi. Karoshi is common in Japan.  It becomes deadly syndrome as a consequence of long hours works. The debate about deaths from excessive work already sticking out in Japan since the 70s. The first official case of Karoshi was reported in 1969 when a 29-year-old male worker died because of stroke. It is estimated over ten thousand workers died each year due to death by brain and stroke caused by an overload work. Karoshi often happen to male workers dominantly. The main cause of karoshi is stress due to high pressure in the work environment, and work habits of exceeding a  standard of normal working time (8 hours. In addition, their extra time to work is imbalance with and the salary they earn. In its development, the phenomenon of karoshi contributes to the term salaryman and workaholic.

  3. [Death of Napoleon Bonaparte].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camici, M

    2003-06-01

    The causa mortis of Napoleon Bonaparte has been vexata quaestio for a long time. The author tries to outline a picture of Napoleon from a sanitary point of view. From the report of doctor Francesco Antonmarchi who performed the autopsy, the author tries to understans the cause of death: gastric perforation due to malignant ulcer and subsequent peritonitis with pulmonary tubercolosis.

  4. Diagnosis of brain death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calixto Machado

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Brain death (BD should be understood as the ultimate clinical expression of a brain catastrophe characterized by a complete and irreversible neurological stoppage, recognized by irreversible coma, absent brainstem reflexes, and apnea. The most common pattern is manifested by an elevation of intracranial pressure to a point beyond the mean arterial pressure, and hence cerebral perfusion pressure falls and, as a result, no net cerebral blood flow is present, in due course leading to permanent cytotoxic injury of the intracranial neuronal tissue. A second mechanism is an intrinsic injury affecting the nervous tissue at a cellular level which, if extensive and unremitting, can also lead to BD. We review here the methodology of diagnosing death, based on finding any of the signs of death. The irreversible loss of cardio-circulatory and respiratory functions can cause death only when ischemia and anoxia are prolonged enough to produce an irreversible destruction of the brain. The sign of such loss of brain functions, that is to say BD diagnosis, is fully reviewed.

  5. Death and bereavement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, J M

    1991-03-01

    This chapter addresses normal and abnormal grief reactions, the stages of grief and mourning, and the different types of emotional support available to clients who have lost a pet. Also included is a brief list of suggestions for helping the veterinarian counsel those persons who may have an especially difficult task in accepting a pet's death: children and solitary adults.

  6. Disparities in death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molitoris, Joseph John

    2017-01-01

    and accidents, (5) perinatal causes, and (6) unspecified causes. RESULTS The results show that class differentials in nearly all causes of death converged during the demographic transition. The only exception to this was the airborne infectious disease category, for which the gap between white collar...

  7. The Death of Shankar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seeberg, Jens

    2013-01-01

    ) in Bhubaneswar, the capital city of Orissa. The chapter explores the heterogeneous and hierarchical composition of the basti and unfolds the case of the social exclusion and ultimate death of a patient with tuberculosis who belonged to the poorest section of the basti, called Pradhan sahi. The case of both...

  8. Death in Flames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harvig, Lise; Kveiborg, Jacob; Lynnerup, Niels

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents osteoarchaeological analyses of the human skeletal material from a burnt down house in Jutland, Denmark, dated to the first century bc. We describe how the osteological analyses of this complex site were approached and illustrate how we reconstructed the death of the human...

  9. Death Penalty in America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Amie L.

    1997-01-01

    Examines the legal and moral issues, controversies, and unique trial procedures involved with the death penalty. Discusses the 1972 landmark Supreme Court decision that resulted in many states abolishing this punishment, only to reintroduce it later with different provisions. Reviews the controversial case of Sam Sheppard. (MJP)

  10. Death in Contemporary America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feifel, Herman, Ed.

    1982-01-01

    In five articles, considers the history and nature of death in America. Discusses dilemmas that face the helping professions as a consequence of improving medical capability. Highlights the effects of social change upon the mourning experience. Discusses the hospice movement. (RC)

  11. Loss Through Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Louise M.

    1981-01-01

    First in a series of papers dealing with specific counseling issues, this article discusses the theory and thought surrounding the nature of healthy mourning; the factors that may lead to prolonged unhealthy mourning or grief; and gives some practical suggestions to help students cope with death in the family. (Author/MLF)

  12. Bee deaths need analysing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonekamp, P.M.

    2011-01-01

    Alarm bells are ringing all over the world about the death of bee populations. Although it is not known exactly how severe the decline is, it is important to take the problem seriously. The signals are alarming and the bee is important, not just for natural ecosystems but also for the pollination of

  13. The Death Penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crockett, Mark

    1990-01-01

    Provides a lesson plan on the Eighth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution and the imposition of the death penalty. Focuses on the controversy concerning capital punishment and stimulates critical thinking in an analysis and discussion of eight hypothetical situations. Includes suggestions for readings, videotapes, and writing assignments. (NL)

  14. Black Saturn with dipole ring

    OpenAIRE

    Yazadjiev, Stoytcho

    2007-01-01

    We present a new stationary, asymptotically flat solution of 5D Einstein-Maxwell gravity describing a Saturn-like black object: a rotating black hole surrounded by a rotating dipole black ring. The solution is generated by combining the vacuum black Saturn solution and the vacuum black ring solution with appropriately chosen parameters. Some basic properties of the solution are analyzed and the basic quantities are calculated.

  15. Pararenal splenosis encountered during the evaluation of a suspected pheochromocytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Joel D; Kwee, Sandi

    2010-11-01

    The authors describe a patient in whom pararenal splenosis nodules were initially interpreted as probable pheochromocytoma. A 22-year-old man with chronic glomerulonephritis, hypertension and a childhood history of splenectomy was hospitalized for a hypertensive emergency. He did not improve with aggressive antihypertensive therapy. A pheochromocytoma was suspected, and a renal ultrasound and a magnetic resonance imaging showed 2 left pararenal masses. Laboratory evaluation for pheochromocytoma and aldosteronoma were negative. Biopsies of the masses were planned, but the masses were subsequently shown to be splenic tissue by a (99m)technnetium heat-damaged red blood cell scan. Ectopic splenic masses, eg, splenosis or accessory spleens, should be considered in patients with undiagnosed abdominal or kidney masses and a history of splenectomy.

  16. Seroprevalance of brucellosis among suspected cases in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jama'ayah, M Z; Heu, J Y; Norazah, A

    2011-06-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic disease which can be transmitted by direct or indirect contact with infected animal or their products. It is an important public health problem but little is known on brucellosis in the Malaysian population. The aim of this study was to determine the presence of Brucella antibodies using commercial Brucella IgG and IgM ELISA kits (Vircell, SL, Barcelona Spain). A total of 184 sera from suspected patients were received from 16 hospitals in Malaysia over the years 2004 to 2009. Only 10 serum samples (5.4%) were positive for Brucella antibodies in which 5 showed the presence of both IgM and IgG. Most of the positive patients were occupationally involved with animals. This study suggests the seroprevalance of brucellosis among individuals who have contact with infected animals in Malaysia is low.

  17. Unenhanced MR Imaging in adults with clinically suspected acute appendicitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chabanova, Elizaveta; Balslev, Ingegerd; Achiam, Michael

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of the study was to evaluate unenhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for the diagnosis of appendicitis or another surgery-requiring condition in an adult population scheduled for emergency appendectomy based on a clinical diagnosis of suspected acute appendicitis. MATERIALS...... radiologists and one surgeon independent of each other and compared with surgical and pathological records. RESULTS: According to the surgical and histopathological findings 30 of 48 patients (63%) had acute appendicitis. Of the remaining 18 patients, 4 patients had no reasons for the clinical symptoms and 14...... patients had other pathology. For the three reviewers the performance of MRI in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis showed the following sensitivity, specificity and accuracy ranges: 83-93%, 50-83% and 77-83%. Moderate (kappa=0.51) and fair (kappa=0.31) interobserver agreements in the MR diagnosis of acute...

  18. CT diagnosis of suspected acute appendicitis in adult patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamase, Hiroshi; Sahashi, Kiyomi; Kawai, Masayuki; Kishida, Yoshihiko; Sumida, Kei; Kawamura, Ken-ichi [Gifu Syakaihoken Hospital (Japan)

    1998-06-01

    In order to assess the CT diagnosis of suspected acute appendicitis, we performed abdominal contrasted CT measurements in 77 patients from 20 to 86 years old, and of 50 men and 27 women from June 1993 to June 1996. The surgical findings were compared with the preoperative CT findings. By the preoperative CT imaging, we can know the degree and the position of inflammation in appendix vermiformis and the degree and the spread of periappendicular inflammation in the case of appendicitis, and can make a differential diagnosis of diverticulitis or gynecological diseases from appendicitis. It is important to make a preoperative diagnosis by the objectively excellent abdominal CT imaging and to avoid unnecessary surgery. (K.H.)

  19. Cost-effectiveness of routine imaging of suspected appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, N; Marsden, M; Bottomley, S; Nagarajah, N; Scutt, F; Toh, S

    2018-01-01

    Introduction The misdiagnosis of appendicitis and consequent removal of a normal appendix occurs in one in five patients in the UK. On the contrary, in healthcare systems with routine cross-sectional imaging of suspected appendicitis, the negative appendicectomy rate is around 5%. If we could reduce the rate in the UK to similar numbers, would this be cost effective? This study aimed to calculate the financial impact of negative appendicectomy at the Queen Alexandra Hospital and to explore whether a policy of routine imaging of such patients could reduce hospital costs. Materials and methods We performed a retrospective analysis of all appendicectomies over a 1-year period at our institution. Data were extracted on outcomes including appendix histology, operative time and length of stay to calculate the negative appendicectomy rate and to analyse costs. Results A total of 531 patients over 5 years of age had an appendicectomy. The negative appendicectomy rate was 22% (115/531). The additional financial costs of negative appendicectomy to the hospital during this period were £270,861. Universal imaging of all patients with right iliac fossa pain that could result in a 5% negative appendicectomy rate would cost between £67,200 and £165,600 per year but could save £33,896 (magnetic resonance imaging), £105,896 (computed tomography) or £132,296 (ultrasound) depending on imaging modality used. Conclusions Negative appendicectomy is still too frequent and results in additional financial burden to the health service. Routine imaging of patients with suspected appendicitis would not only reduce the negative appendicectomy rate but could lead to cost savings and a better service for our patients.

  20. Reliability of Examination Findings in Suspected Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florin, Todd A; Ambroggio, Lilliam; Brokamp, Cole; Rattan, Mantosh S; Crotty, Eric J; Kachelmeyer, Andrea; Ruddy, Richard M; Shah, Samir S

    2017-09-01

    The authors of national guidelines emphasize the use of history and examination findings to diagnose community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in outpatient children. Little is known about the interrater reliability of the physical examination in children with suspected CAP. This was a prospective cohort study of children with suspected CAP presenting to a pediatric emergency department from July 2013 to May 2016. Children aged 3 months to 18 years with lower respiratory signs or symptoms who received a chest radiograph were included. We excluded children hospitalized ≤14 days before the study visit and those with a chronic medical condition or aspiration. Two clinicians performed independent examinations and completed identical forms reporting examination findings. Interrater reliability for each finding was reported by using Fleiss' kappa (κ) for categorical variables and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for continuous variables. No examination finding had substantial agreement (κ/ICC > 0.8). Two findings (retractions, wheezing) had moderate to substantial agreement (κ/ICC = 0.6-0.8). Nine findings (abdominal pain, pleuritic pain, nasal flaring, skin color, overall impression, cool extremities, tachypnea, respiratory rate, and crackles/rales) had fair to moderate agreement (κ/ICC = 0.4-0.6). Eight findings (capillary refill time, cough, rhonchi, head bobbing, behavior, grunting, general appearance, and decreased breath sounds) had poor to fair reliability (κ/ICC = 0-0.4). Only 3 examination findings had acceptable agreement, with the lower 95% confidence limit >0.4: wheezing, retractions, and respiratory rate. In this study, we found fair to moderate reliability of many findings used to diagnose CAP. Only 3 findings had acceptable levels of reliability. These findings must be considered in the clinical management and research of pediatric CAP. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  1. Investigating suspected acute pulmonary embolism - what are hospital clinicians thinking?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McQueen, A.S. [Department of Radiology, Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom)], E-mail: andrewmcqueen7@hotmail.com; Worthy, S. [Department of Radiology, Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Keir, M.J. [Department of Medical Physics, Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom)

    2008-06-15

    Aims: To assess local clinical knowledge of the appropriate investigation of suspected acute pulmonary embolism (PE) and this compare with the 2003 British Thoracic Society (BTS) guidelines as a national reference standard. Methods: A clinical questionnaire was produced based on the BTS guidelines. One hundred and eight-six participants completed the questionnaires at educational sessions for clinicians of all grades, within a single NHS Trust. The level of experience amongst participants ranged from final year medical students to consultant physicians. Results: The clinicians were divided into four groups based on seniority: Pre-registration, Junior, Middle, and Senior. Forty-six point eight percent of all the clinicians correctly identified three major risk factors for PE and 25.8% recognized the definition of the recommended clinical probability score from two alternatives. Statements regarding the sensitivity of isotope lung imaging and computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) received correct responses from 41.4 and 43% of participants, respectively, whilst 81.2% recognized that an indeterminate ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy (V/Q) study requires further imaging. The majority of clinicians correctly answered three clinical scenario questions regarding use of D-dimers and imaging (78, 85, and 57.5%). There was no statistically significant difference between the four groups for any of the eight questions. Conclusions: The recommended clinical probability score was unfamiliar to all four groups of clinicians in the present study, and the majority of doctors did not agree that a negative CTPA or isotope lung scintigraphy reliably excluded PE. However, questions based on clinical scenarios received considerably higher rates of correct responses. The results indicate that various aspects of the national guidelines on suspected acute pulmonary embolism are unfamiliar to many UK hospital clinicians. Further research is needed to identify methods to improve

  2. Role of DR-70 immunoassay in suspected malignant pleural effusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Amitabha; Saha, Kaushik; Jash, Debraj; Banerjee, Sourindra Nath; Biswas, Nirendra Mohan; Dey, Atin

    2013-01-01

    Context: A good proportion of patients with undiagnosed pleural effusion (PE) turn into malignancy over a period of time. Identification of positive biomarker may help in selecting the individuals who require close follow-up. Aims: The aims of this study were to evaluate the role of DR-70 immunoassay in suspected malignant PE. Settings and Design: We conducted a cross-sectional study among 89 patients of suspected malignant PE and 50 normal subjects (NS) were taken as control. Materials and Methods: Patients with exudative PE; who had pleural fluid lymphocyte count greater than 50% and adenosine deaminase less than 30 U/L were taken as cases. We had selected NSs among relatives of patients having normal blood chemistry and radiological investigations. Sensitivity and specificity of the test to differentiate malignant and non-malignant PE and also to identify PE with underlying malignancy was analyzed. Results: Mean value of DR-70 in NS was found to be 0.83 ± 0.273 mg/L without any significant difference between males (0.82 mg/L) and females (0.85 mg/L). Mean value of DR-70 in PE with underlying cancer was 5.03 ± 3.79 mg/L. Sensitivity (80%) and specificity (77.78%) of the test was maximum in PE with underlying cancer using cut-off value of 2 mg/L. Mean value DR-70 in malignant PE was 5.18 ± 3.75 mg/L and in non-malignant PE was 3.73 ± 3.74 mg/L without any statistically significant difference (P = 0.08). Conclusions: DR-70 assay has high sensitivity in detecting underlying lung cancer, but has no role in differentiating malignant PE from non-malignant PE. PMID:24339491

  3. Is extended biopsy protocol justified in all patients with suspected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-01-03

    Jan 3, 2012 ... of death due to neoplastic diseases and accounts for approximately 10% of all malignant neoplasms in men worldwide.[1] This disease is an age-related pathology and as such destined to be increasingly relevant in an aging general population.[2] The preemptive measures and strategies being developed ...

  4. Administration of ATRA to newly diagnosed patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia is delayed contributing to early hemorrhagic death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, Jessica K; Rademaker, Alfred; Cull, Elizabeth; Weitner, Bing Bing; Ofran, Yishai; Rosenblat, Todd L; Haidau, Augustin; Park, Jae H; Ram, Sharona Lee; Orsini, James M; Sandhu, Sonia; Catchatourian, Rosalind; Trifilio, Steven M; Adel, Nelly G; Frankfurt, Olga; Stein, Eytan M; Mallios, George; Deblasio, Tony; Jurcic, Joseph G; Nimer, Stephen; Peterson, Loann C; Kwaan, Hau C; Rowe, Jacob M; Douer, Dan; Tallman, Martin S

    2013-09-01

    We hypothesized that the high early death rate (EDR) due to bleeding in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is in part attributable to delays in all- trans retinoic acid (ATRA). We conducted a retrospective analysis of the timing of ATRA administration. 204 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed APL between 1992 and 2009 were identified. The EDR was 11%. 44% of early deaths occurred in the first week. Hemorrhage accounted for 61% of early deaths. ATRA was ordered the day APL was suspected in 31% of patients. Delays in ATRA administration led to increases in the percentage of early deaths from hemorrhage. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Black Sea in Bloom

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    This true-color image shows bright, turquoise-colored swirls across the surface of the Black Sea, signifying the presence of a large phytoplankton bloom. Scientists have observed similar blooms recurring annually, roughly this same time of year. The Sea of Azov, which is the smaller body of water located just north of the Black Sea in this image, also shows a high level of biological activity currently ongoing. The brownish pixels in the Azov are probably sediments carried in from high waters upstream. This scene was acquired by the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS), flying aboard the OrbView-2 satellite, on May 4, 2002. According to the Black Sea Environment Programme's Marine Hydrophysical Institute, the Black Sea is 'one of the marine areas of the world most damaged by human activities.' The coastal zone around these Eastern European inland water bodies is densely populated-supporting a permanent population of roughly 16 million people and another 4 million tourists each year. Six countries border with the Black Sea, including Ukraine to the north, Russia and Georgia to the east, Turkey to the south, and Bulgaria and Romania to the west. Because it is isolated from the world's oceans, and because there is an extensive drainage network of rivers that empty into it, the Black Sea has a unique and delicate water balance which is very important for supporting its marine ecosystem. Of particular concern to scientists is the salinity, water level, and nutrient levels of the Black Sea's waters, all of which are, unfortunately, being impacted by human activities. Within the last three decades the combination of increased nutrient loads from human sources together with pollution and over-harvesting of fisheries has resulted in a sharp decline in water quality. Scientists from each of the Black Sea's bordering nations are currently working together to study the issues and formulate a joint, international strategy for saving this unique marine ecosystem

  6. An intermediate-mass black hole in the centre of the globular cluster 47 Tucanae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kızıltan, Bülent; Baumgardt, Holger; Loeb, Abraham

    2017-02-08

    Intermediate-mass black holes should help us to understand the evolutionary connection between stellar-mass and super-massive black holes. However, the existence of intermediate-mass black holes is still uncertain, and their formation process is therefore unknown. It has long been suspected that black holes with masses 100 to 10,000 times that of the Sun should form and reside in dense stellar systems. Therefore, dedicated observational campaigns have targeted globular clusters for many decades, searching for signatures of these elusive objects. All candidate signatures appear radio-dim and do not have the X-ray to radio flux ratios required for accreting black holes. Based on the lack of an electromagnetic counterpart, upper limits of 2,060 and 470 solar masses have been placed on the mass of a putative black hole in 47 Tucanae (NGC 104) from radio and X-ray observations, respectively. Here we show there is evidence for a central black hole in 47 Tucanae with a mass of solar masses when the dynamical state of the globular cluster is probed with pulsars. The existence of an intermediate-mass black hole in the centre of one of the densest clusters with no detectable electromagnetic counterpart suggests that the black hole is not accreting at a sufficient rate to make it electromagnetically bright and therefore, contrary to expectations, is gas-starved. This intermediate-mass black hole might be a member of an electromagnetically invisible population of black holes that grow into supermassive black holes in galaxies.

  7. Black holes and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-02-01

    Belief in the existence of black holes is the ultimate act of faith for a physicist. First suggested by the English clergyman John Michell in the year 1784, the gravitational pull of a black hole is so strong that nothing - not even light - can escape. Gravity might be the weakest of the fundamental forces but black-hole physics is not for the faint-hearted. Black holes present obvious problems for would-be observers because they cannot, by definition, be seen with conventional telescopes - although before the end of the decade gravitational-wave detectors should be able to study collisions between black holes. Until then astronomers can only infer the existence of a black hole from its gravitational influence on other matter, or from the X-rays emitted by gas and dust as they are dragged into the black hole. However, once this material passes through the 'event horizon' that surrounds the black hole, we will never see it again - not even with X-ray specs. Despite these observational problems, most physicists and astronomers believe that black holes do exist. Small black holes a few kilometres across are thought to form when stars weighing more than about two solar masses collapse under the weight of their own gravity, while supermassive black holes weighing millions of solar masses appear to be present at the centre of most galaxies. Moreover, some brave physicists have proposed ways to make black holes - or at least event horizons - in the laboratory. The basic idea behind these 'artificial black holes' is not to compress a large amount of mass into a small volume, but to reduce the speed of light in a moving medium to less than the speed of the medium and so create an event horizon. The parallels with real black holes are not exact but the experiments could shed new light on a variety of phenomena. The first challenge, however, is to get money for the research. One year on from a high-profile meeting on artificial black holes in London, for

  8. METHAPHYSICS OF DEATH PENALTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. E. Gromov

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The paper studies the problem of death penalty justifiableness in terms of democratic society from the metaphysical viewpoint. Philosophical argumentation to justify death penalty is proposed as opposed to the common idea of inhuman and uncivilized nature of court practice of sentencing to death. The essence of the study is not to rehabilitate law-based murder but to explain dialectic relation of the degrees of moral responsibility of criminals and society nourishing evildoers. The author believes that refusal from death penalty under the pretence of rule of humanism is just a liberal façade, plausible excuse for defective moral state of the society which, rejecting its own guiltiness share as for current disregards of the law, does not grow but downgrades proper human dignity. Methodology. The author applies an approach of dialectic reflection being guided by the perception of unity, relativeness and complementarity of evil and good striving to determine efficient way of resolving their contradictions in the context of moral progress of the society. Originality. Proposing philosophic approach to a death penalty problem instead of legal one, the author is not going to discuss the role of horrification, control or cruelty of the measure of restraint; moreover, he does not consider the issue of its efficiency or inefficiency. The author also does not concern vexation of mind of a criminal sentenced to life imprisonment for “humanitarian” reasons. The purpose of the author is to demonstrate that aim of the punishment is to achieve justice which becomes spiritual challenge and moral recompense not only for the criminal but for the whole society. Conclusions. Crime is first of all a problem of a society; thus, criminal behaviour of certain individuals should only be considered through a prism of moral state of the whole community. Attitude to a death penalty is the problem of spirituality and its dramatic sophistication. The author

  9. Increased expression of endothelin ET(B) and angiotensin AT(1) receptors in peripheral resistance arteries of patients with suspected acute coronary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimitrijevic, Ivan; Ekelund, Ulf; Edvinsson, Marie-Louise

    2009-01-01

    of arterial vasoconstrictor endothelin (ET) and angiotensin (AT) receptors. Our aim was to investigate if the arterial expressions of these receptors are changed in patients with suspected but ruled out acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Small subcutaneous arteries (diameter of 100 microm) were surgically removed......Patients who experience chest pain, in which ischemic heart disease has been ruled out, still have an increased risk of future ischemic cardiac events and premature death, possibly due to subclinical endothelial dysfunction. A feature of endothelial dysfunction is an increased expression...... group. There were no significant differences in AT(2) and ET(A) receptor expression between the groups. The results indicate that the expression of arterial smooth muscle ET(B) and AT(1) receptors are increased in patients with suspected but ruled out ACS. These receptor changes could be important...

  10. Diagnostic Performance of Placental Growth Factor in Women With Suspected Preeclampsia Attending Antenatal Facilities in Maputo, Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukah, U Vivian; Mbofana, Francisco; Rocha, Beatriz Manriquez; Loquiha, Osvaldo; Mudenyanga, Chishamiso; Usta, Momade; Urso, Marilena; Drebit, Sharla; Magee, Laura A; von Dadelszen, Peter

    2017-03-01

    In well-resourced settings, reduced circulating maternal-free placental growth factor (PlGF) aids in either predicting or confirming the diagnosis of preeclampsia, fetal growth restriction, stillbirth, preterm birth, and delivery within 14 days of testing when preeclampsia is suspected. This blinded, prospective cohort study of maternal plasma PlGF in women with suspected preeclampsia was conducted in antenatal clinics in Maputo, Mozambique. The primary outcome was the clinic-to-delivery interval. Other outcomes included: confirmed diagnosis of preeclampsia, transfer to higher care, mode of delivery, intrauterine fetal death, preterm birth, and low birth weight. Of 696 women, 95 (13.6%) and 601 (86.4%) women had either low (preeclampsia, higher blood pressure, transfer for higher care, earlier gestational age delivery, delivery within 7 and 14 days, preterm birth, cesarean delivery, lower birth weight, and perinatal loss. In urban Mozambican women with symptoms or signs suggestive of preeclampsia, low maternal plasma PlGF concentrations are associated with increased risks of adverse pregnancy outcomes, whether the diagnosis of preeclampsia is confirmed. Therefore, PlGF should improve the provision of precision medicine to individual women and improve pregnancy outcomes for those with preeclampsia or related placenta-mediated complications. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Death due to asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert L. Sheffer

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence and fatality rate of asthma have increased worldwide. Underdiagnosis and undertreatment of asthma are central to the occurrence of fatal asthma. Atopy is the principal risk factor associated with asthma. However, consideration of the epidemiologic, physiologic, pharmacologic, pathologic and clinical parameters of asthma assessment may provide valuable insight into death due to asthma. Psychologic and socioeconomic factors may further aggravate the asthma status. Ethnic minorities are at increased risk of asthma. The perception of dyspnea may be blunted in asthma sufferers. Slow-onset fatal asthma may be associated with submucosal eosinophilic, whereas sudden-onset may be associated with submucosal neutrophilia. Fatal asthma occurs in patients abusing regular |32-agonist therapy. Peak flow assessment often provides insight into asthma deterioration prior to signs of respiratory distress. Markers of risk of death due to asthma further identify the fatality-prone asthma patient.

  12. Death from Nitrous Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäckström, Björn; Johansson, Bengt; Eriksson, Anders

    2015-11-01

    Nitrous oxide is an inflammable gas that gives no smell or taste. It has a history of abuse as long as its clinical use, and deaths, although rare, have been reported. We describe two cases of accidental deaths related to voluntary inhalation of nitrous oxide, both found dead with a gas mask covering the face. In an attempt to find an explanation to why the victims did not react properly to oncoming hypoxia, we performed experiments where a test person was allowed to breath in a closed system, with or without nitrous oxide added. Vital signs and gas concentrations as well as subjective symptoms were recorded. The experiments indicated that the explanation to the fact that neither of the descendents had reacted to oncoming hypoxia and hypercapnia was due to the inhalation of nitrous oxide. This study raises the question whether nitrous oxide really should be easily, commercially available. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  13. Illness and death literatura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Begoña CANTABRANA

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Patients need to transform their disease into a fiction, and their stories, once sorted out following the creative process and captured in a paper, constitute the disease literature. Illness adds countless components to literature and, in turn, literature gives back a mixture of fiction and reality which enriches and comforts. Related to disease and death of loved ones there are many books written and published with several aims (altruism, to understand the fact of being sick, as a resistance mechanism… and even for professional reasons. Besides, disease divulgation might be accompanied by beneficial effects at social level such as to normalize the illness, to assume death and to favor the patient´s role in a wide sense that includes the promotion of research development and the pressure on treatments reinforcement.

  14. AN AUDIT OF MATERNAL DEATHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basavana Gowda

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: A study of maternal death conducted to evaluate various factors responsible for maternal deaths. To identify complications in pregnancy, a childbirth which result in maternal death, and to identify opportunities for preventive intervention and understand the events leading to death; so that improving maternal health and reducing maternal mortality rate significantly. To analyze the causes and epidemiological amounts maternal mortality e.g. age parity, socioeconomic status and literacy. In order to reduce maternal mortality and to implement safe motherhood program and complications of pregnancy and to find out safe motherhood program. METHODS: The data collected was a retrograde by a proforma containing particulars of the diseased, detailed history and relatives were interviewed for additional information. The data collected was analysed. RESULTS: Maternal mortality rate in our own institution is 200/ 100,000 live births. Among 30 maternal deaths, 56% deaths (17 were among low socio - economic status, groups 60% deaths among unbooked 53.5% deaths more along illiterates evidenced by direct and indirect deaths about 25% of deaths were preventable. CONCLUSION: Maternal death is a great tragedy in the family life. It is crusade to know not just the medical cause of the death but the circumstances what makes these continued tragic death even more unacceptable is that deaths are largely preventable

  15. The composition and extent of coronary artery plaque detected by multislice computed tomographic angiography provides incremental prognostic value in patients with suspected coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miszalski-Jamka, Tomasz; Klimeczek, Piotr; Banyś, Robert; Krupiński, Maciej; Nycz, Krzysztof; Bury, Krzysztof; Lada, Michał; Pelberg, Robert; Kereiakes, Dean; Mazur, Wojciech

    2012-03-01

    Multislice computed tomographic coronary angiography (CTCA) provides accurate noninvasive assessment of coronary artery disease (CAD). However, data on the prognostic value of CTCA in patients with suspected CAD are only beginning to emerge. The aim of the study was to assess the prognostic value of CTCA in patients with suspected CAD. Patients (males = 259, females = 235; mean age 58.2 ± 9.8 years) with suspected CAD who underwent 16- or 64-slice CTCA were followed for 1,308 ± 318 days for cardiac death, nonfatal myocaridal infarction (MI) and late (>90 days after CTCA) revascularization. Patient outcomes were related to clinical and CTCA data. Cox proportional-hazards model was applied in stepwise forward fashion to identify outcome predictors. Coronary artery plaque was found in 340 patients. Cardiac events occurred in 40 patients including cardiac death (n = 9), nonfatal MI (n = 8) and late revascularization (n = 23). A multivariable analysis identified the following independent predictors for adverse cardiac events: obstructive plaque in a proximal coronary artery segment (hazard ratio (HR) 2.73; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.35-5.54; P = 0.005), the number of segments with noncalcified plaque(s) (HR 1.53 per segment; 95%CI: 1.21-1.92; P < 0.001), the number of segments with mixed plaque(s) (HR 1.56 per segment; 95%CI: 1.27-1.92; P < 0.001) and the number of segments with calcified plaque(s) (HR 1.21 per segment; 95%CI: 1.07-1.37; P = 0.002). In patients with suspected CAD, both the extent and composition of atherosclerotic plaque as determined by CTCA are prognostic of subsequent cardiac events.

  16. [Sudden death in athletes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulbertus, H

    2001-05-01

    Sudden death is rare in the young athlete. The causes may vary. In the US, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy plays the predominant role whereas in Europe right ventricular arrhythmogenic dysplasia and atherosclerosis of the coronary arteries are more frequent. Other causes such as congenital anomalies of the coronary vessels, myocarditis, Marfan's disease, the long QT, the Brugada and the Wollf-Parkinson-White syndromes exist, but are rare. Attentive preparticipation screening (clinical history and medical examination) is mandatory in all future young athletes.

  17. Death due to asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Sheffer, Albert L.

    1996-01-01

    The prevalence and fatality rate of asthma have increased worldwide. Underdiagnosis and undertreatment of asthma are central to the occurrence of fatal asthma. Atopy is the principal risk factor associated with asthma. However, consideration of the epidemiologic, physiologic, pharmacologic, pathologic and clinical parameters of asthma assessment may provide valuable insight into death due to asthma. Psychologic and socioeconomic factors may further aggravate the asthma status. Ethnic minoriti...

  18. Death, medicine & bioethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, G

    1994-12-01

    The assumptions of philosophy need scrutiny as much the assumptions of medicine do. Scrutiny shows that the philosophical method of bioethics is compromised, for it shares certain fundamental assumptions with medicine itself. To show this requires an unorthodox style of philosophy--a literary one. To show the compromised status of bioethics the paper discusses some seminal utilitarian discussions of the definition of death, of whether it is a bad thing, and of when it ought to occur.

  19. Surveillance for violent deaths--National Violent Death Reporting System, 16 states, 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karch, Debra L; Logan, Joseph; McDaniel, Dawn; Parks, Sharyn; Patel, Nimesh

    2012-09-14

    occurred at higher rates among males and persons aged 20-24 years; rates were highest among non-Hispanic black males. The majority of homicides involved the use of a firearm and occurred in a house or apartment or on a street/highway. Homicides were preceded primarily by arguments and interpersonal conflicts or in conjunction with another crime. Characteristics associated with other manners of death, circumstances preceding death, and special populations also are highlighted in this report. This report provides a detailed summary of data from NVDRS for 2009. The results indicate that violent deaths resulting from self-inflicted or interpersonal violence disproportionately affected adults aged <55 years, males, and certain racial/ethnic minority populations. For homicides and suicides, relationship problems, interpersonal conflicts, mental health problems, and recent crises were among the primary factors that might have precipitated the fatal injuries. Because additional information might be reported subsequently as participating states update their findings, the data provided in this report are preliminary. For the occurrence of violent deaths in the United States to be better understood and ultimately prevented, accurate, timely, and comprehensive surveillance data are necessary. NVDRS data can be used to monitor the occurrence of violence-related fatal injuries and assist public health authorities in the development, implementation, and evaluation of programs and policies to reduce and prevent violent deaths at the national, state, and local levels. The continued development and expansion of NVDRS is essential to CDC's efforts to reduce the personal, familial, and societal costs of violence. Additional efforts are needed to increase the number of states participating in NVDRS, with an ultimate goal of full national representation.

  20. Merging Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centrella, John

    2009-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes is expected to be the strongest gravitational wave source for ground-based interferometers such as LIGO, VIRGO, and GEO600, as well as the space-based LISA. Observing these sources with gravitational wave detectors requires that we know the radiation waveforms they emit. And, when the black holes merge in the presence of gas and magnetic fields, various types of electromagnetic signals may also be produced. Since these mergers take place in regions of extreme gravity, we need to solve Einstein's equations of general relativity on a computer. For more than 30 years, scientists have tried to compute black hole mergers using the methods of numerical relativity. The resulting computer codes have been plagued by instabilities, causing them to crash well before the black holes in the binary could complete even a single orbit. Within the past few years, however, this situation has changed dramatically, with a series of remarkable breakthroughs. This talk will focus on new simulations that are revealing the dynamics and waveforms of binary black hole mergers, and their applications in gravitational wave detection, testing general relativity, and astrophysics.

  1. A profile of suspected child abuse as a subgroup of major trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Ffion C; Coats, Timothy J; Fisher, Ross; Lawrence, Thomas; Lecky, Fiona E

    2015-12-01

    Non-accidental injury (NAI) in children is an important cause of major injury. The Trauma Audit Research Network (TARN) recently analysed data on the demographics of paediatric trauma and highlighted NAI as a major cause of death and severe injury in children. This paper examined TARN data to characterise accidental versus abusive cases of major injury. The national trauma registry of England and Wales (TARN) database was interrogated for the classification of mechanism of injury in children by intent, from January 2004 to December 2013. Contributing hospitals' submissions were classified into accidental injury (AI), suspected child abuse (SCA) or alleged assault (AA) to enable demographic and injury comparisons. In the study population of 14 845 children, 13 708 (92.3%, CI 91.9% to 92.8%) were classified as accidental injury, 368 as alleged assault (2.5%, CI 2.2% to 2.7%) and 769 as SCA (5.2%, CI 4.8% to 5.5%). Nearly all cases of severely injured children suffering trauma because of SCA occurred in the age group of 0-5 years (751 of 769, 97.7%), with 76.3% occurring in infants under the age of 1 year. Compared with accidental injury, suspected victims of abuse have higher overall injury severity scores, have a higher proportion of head injury and a threefold higher mortality rate of 7.6% (CI 5.51% to 9.68%) vs 2.6% (CI 2.3% to 2.9%). This study highlights that major injury occurring as a result of SCA has a typical demographic pattern. These children tend to be under 12 months of age, with more severe injury. Understanding these demographics could help receiving hospitals identify children with major injuries resulting from abuse and ensure swift transfer to specialist care. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  2. Death in a Mission Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James V Ritchie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Medical missionaries may struggle with the proper understanding of their roles in the death of their patients. To better grasp a biblical concept of death, medical missionaries should understand God’s plan for death and also understand both God’s sovereignty and their own free will. Missionaries should prepare patients and their families for impending death while observing cultural sensitivity. Cultural objections to discussing impending death may be addressed by emphasizing the Christian understanding of earthly death and eternal life, and by honoring the passing of the believing patient.

  3. From Death to Death Certificate: What do the Dead say?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, James R

    2017-03-01

    This is an overview of medicolegal death investigation and death certification. Postmortem toxicological analysis, particularly for ethanol and drugs of abuse, plays a large role in the forensic investigation of natural and unnatural deaths. Postmortem drug concentrations must be interpreted in light of the autopsy findings and circumstances. Interpretations of drug and ethanol concentrations are important for death certification, but they also may be important for other stakeholders such as police, attorneys, public health practitioners, and the next-of-kin.

  4. Black hole gravitohydromagnetics

    CERN Document Server

    Punsly, Brian

    2008-01-01

    Black hole gravitohydromagnetics (GHM) is developed from the rudiments to the frontiers of research in this book. GHM describes plasma interactions that combine the effects of gravity and a strong magnetic field, in the vicinity (ergosphere) of a rapidly rotating black hole. This topic was created in response to the astrophysical quest to understand the central engines of radio loud extragalactic radio sources. The theory describes a "torsional tug of war" between rotating ergospheric plasma and the distant asymptotic plasma that extracts the rotational inertia of the black hole. The recoil from the struggle between electromagnetic and gravitational forces near the event horizon is manifested as a powerful pair of magnetized particle beams (jets) that are ejected at nearly the speed of light. These bipolar jets feed large-scale magnetized plasmoids on scales as large as millions of light years (the radio lobes of extragalactic radio sources). This interaction can initiate jets that transport energy fluxes exc...

  5. Merging Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centrella, Joan

    2012-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes is expected to be the strongest source of gravitational waves for both ground-based detectors such as LIGO and VIRGO, as well as future. space-based detectors. Since the merger takes place in the regime of strong dynamical gravity, computing the resulting gravitational waveforms requires solving the full Einstein equations of general relativity on a computer. For many years, numerical codes designed to simulate black hole mergers were plagued by a host of instabilities. However, recent breakthroughs have conquered these instabilities and opened up this field dramatically. This talk will focus on.the resulting 'gold rush' of new results that is revealing the dynamics and waveforms of binary black hole mergers, and their applications in gravitational wave detection, testing general relativity, and astrophysics

  6. Turbulent black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huan; Zimmerman, Aaron; Lehner, Luis

    2015-02-27

    We demonstrate that rapidly spinning black holes can display a new type of nonlinear parametric instability-which is triggered above a certain perturbation amplitude threshold-akin to the onset of turbulence, with possibly observable consequences. This instability transfers from higher temporal and azimuthal spatial frequencies to lower frequencies-a phenomenon reminiscent of the inverse cascade displayed by (2+1)-dimensional fluids. Our finding provides evidence for the onset of transitory turbulence in astrophysical black holes and predicts observable signatures in black hole binaries with high spins. Furthermore, it gives a gravitational description of this behavior which, through the fluid-gravity duality, can potentially shed new light on the remarkable phenomena of turbulence in fluids.

  7. Braneless Black Holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajaraman, Arvind

    2003-06-02

    It is known that the naive version of D-brane theory is inadequate to explain the black hole entropy in the limit in which the Schwarzschild radius becomes larger than all compactification radii. We present evidence that a more consistent description can be given in terms of strings with rescaled tensions. We show that the rescaling can be interpreted as a redshift of the tension of a fundamental string in the gravitational field of the black hole. An interesting connection is found between the string level number and the Rindler energy. Using this connection, we reproduce the entropies of Schwarzschild black holes in arbitrary dimensions in terms of the entropy of a single string at the Hagedorn temperature.

  8. Suspected vitreous seeding of uveal melanoma: relevance of diagnostic vitrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, Claudia H D; Bornfeld, Norbert; Metz, Klaus A; Gök, Mete

    2016-05-01

    To review all cases of suspected vitreous seeding of treated or untreated uveal melanoma at our clinic and to compare clinical, cytological and histological findings with patients' survival. Retrospective non-randomised study of 23 patients with consecutive uveal melanoma who underwent diagnostic vitrectomy in our clinic between January 2000 and November 2013. Reason for vitrectomy was suspected dissemination of tumour cells inside the eye. Treated as well as treatment-naïve primary uveal melanomas were included in this study. Follow-up data of all patients were collected. The study included 23 patients with a mean age of 66 years. Four patients presented pigmented vitreous debris at initial presentation prior to treatment of the uveal melanoma. All but one of these four patients has been enucleated as a consequence of cytology-proven vitreous spreading of vital melanoma cells. The remaining 19 patients presented pigmented vitreous debris at a mean of 60 months following local tumour treatment. Thirteen of these patients had been treated with a ruthenium plaque (mean scleral dose 1295 Gy, mean apex dose 152 Gy), three with binuclid plaque (mean scleral dose 1005 Gy, mean apex dose 70 Gy) and three with proton beam radiation. Of the 19 patients, 10 showed only melanophages in the vitreous specimen, while the remaining 9 patients had vital tumour cells in vitreous cytology. Four out of these nine patients have been enucleated in the course of follow-up. During follow-up of our cohort of 23 patients, 4 patients died, but only 1 of them due to metastatic disease. The outcome of this small cohort study shows that obtaining a vitreous specimen helps to distinguish melanophages from vital tumour cells. We could not observe an increased risk of metastasis in patients who showed melanoma cell dissemination inside the eye, compared with those patients only showing melanophages. We therefore suggest to carefully re-evaluate the necessity of enucleation in every

  9. Cost analysis of inappropriate treatments for suspected dermatomycoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuela Fiammenghi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Superficial mycoses are estimated to affect more than 20-25% of the world’s population with a consistent increase over the years. Most patients referred to our clinic for suspected dermatomycoses have already been treated with pharmacotherapy, without a previous mycological examination and many show changes in the clinical manifestations. Indeed, some medications, such as steroids, antiviral, antibiotics and antihistamines are not able to erase a fungal infection, but also they can cause atypical clinical manifestations. The consequences of inappropriate treatment include delayed diagnosis, prolonged healing time, and additional costs. The aims of this study were (1 to evaluate the incidence of increased costs attributable to inappropriate therapy sustained by the National Health Service and patients and (2 to highlight the importance of mycological evaluation before starting treatment, in order to improve diagnostic accuracy. An observational retrospective and prospective study was performed from September 2013 to February 2014, in 765 patients referred to our center (University Hospital “ Federico II” in Naples, Italy, for suspected mycological infection. The following treatments (alone or in combination were defined as inappropriate: (1 cortisone in a patient with at least one positive site; (2 antifungals in (a patients with all negative sites or (b ineffective antifungal treatment (in terms of drug chosen, dose or duration in those with all positive sites; or (3 antibiotics; (4 antivirals or (5 antihistamines, in patients with ≥ 1 positive site. Five hundred and fifty patients were using medications before the assessment visit. The total amount of avoidable costs related to inappropriate previous treatments was € 121,417, representing 74% of the total treatment costs. 253/550 patients received drugs also after the visit. For these patients, the cost of treatment prescribed after mycological testing was € 42,952, with a decrease

  10. Still, Nobody Mean More: Engaging Black Feminist Pedagogies on Questions of the Citizen and Human in Anti-Blackqueer Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callier, Durell M.

    2018-01-01

    Still, Nobody Mean More explores how Black youth constructed as queer subjects by state apparatuses and sociocultural institutions encounter, survive, and resist premature death. Engaging with women and queer of color theories this paper interrogates how the queerness of Blackness works to erase certain subjects from contemporary political…

  11. Sudden death in a young patient with atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Tamargo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Sudden cardiac death (SCD in young patients without structural heart disease is frequently due to inherited channelopathies such as long QT syndrome (LQTS, Brugada syndrome or Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia. Accordingly, the addition of genetic testing to clinical data may be useful to identify the cause of the sudden death in this population. Mutations in the KCNQ1 encoded Kv7.1 channel are related to type 1 LQTS, familial atrial fibrillation (AF, short QT syndrome, and SCD. We present a clinical case where the presence of AF after resuscitation in a young man with cardiac arrest was the key clinical data to suspect an inherited disorder and genetic testing was the main determinant for identifying the cause of the cardiac arrest. The KCNQ1 p.Arg231His mutation explained the combined phenotype of AF and susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias. The case highlights the importance of continued research in genetics and molecular mechanisms of channelopathies.

  12. The Global Network Neonatal Cause of Death algorithm for low-resource settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garces, Ana L; McClure, Elizabeth M; Pérez, Wilton; Hambidge, K Michael; Krebs, Nancy F; Figueroa, Lester; Bose, Carl L; Carlo, Waldemar A; Tenge, Constance; Esamai, Fabian; Goudar, Shivaprasad S; Saleem, Sarah; Patel, Archana B; Chiwila, Melody; Chomba, Elwyn; Tshefu, Antoinette; Derman, Richard J; Hibberd, Patricia L; Bucher, Sherri; Liechty, Edward A; Bauserman, Melissa; Moore, Janet L; Koso-Thomas, Marion; Miodovnik, Menachem; Goldenberg, Robert L

    2017-06-01

    This study estimated the causes of neonatal death using an algorithm for low-resource areas, where 98% of the world's neonatal deaths occur. We enrolled women in India, Pakistan, Guatemala, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Kenya and Zambia from 2014 to 2016 and tracked their delivery and newborn outcomes for up to 28 days. Antenatal care and delivery symptoms were collected using a structured questionnaire, clinical observation and/or a physical examination. The Global Network Cause of Death algorithm was used to assign the cause of neonatal death, analysed by country and day of death. One-third (33.1%) of the 3068 neonatal deaths were due to suspected infection, 30.8% to prematurity, 21.2% to asphyxia, 9.5% to congenital anomalies and 5.4% did not have a cause of death assigned. Prematurity and asphyxia-related deaths were more common on the first day of life (46.7% and 52.9%, respectively), while most deaths due to infection occurred after the first day of life (86.9%). The distribution of causes was similar to global data reported by other major studies. The Global Network algorithm provided a reliable cause of neonatal death in low-resource settings and can be used to inform public health strategies to reduce mortality. ©2017 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. A Death in the Family: Death as a Zen Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Helen K.; Rubinstein, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    This study is based on original research that explored family reaction to the death of an elderly husband and father. We interviewed 34 families (a family included a widow and two adult biological children) approximately 6 to 10 months after the death. In one-on-one interviews, we discussed family members' initial reaction to the death, how the…

  14. Death Sentences: A Content Analysis of Children's Death Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poling, Devereaux A.; Hupp, Julie M.

    2008-01-01

    A multidimensional concept of death must include biological, sociocultural, and emotional components. Children glean information about death in many ways, one of which is through books. In this study, the authors compared the 3 dimensions of death-related information (irreversibility, inevitability, nonfunctionality) in 24 young children's picture…

  15. Conditional probability distribution (CPD) method in temperature based death time estimation: Error propagation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubig, Michael; Muggenthaler, Holger; Mall, Gita

    2014-05-01

    Bayesian estimation applied to temperature based death time estimation was recently introduced as conditional probability distribution or CPD-method by Biermann and Potente. The CPD-method is useful, if there is external information that sets the boundaries of the true death time interval (victim last seen alive and found dead). CPD allows computation of probabilities for small time intervals of interest (e.g. no-alibi intervals of suspects) within the large true death time interval. In the light of the importance of the CPD for conviction or acquittal of suspects the present study identifies a potential error source. Deviations in death time estimates will cause errors in the CPD-computed probabilities. We derive formulae to quantify the CPD error as a function of input error. Moreover we observed the paradox, that in cases, in which the small no-alibi time interval is located at the boundary of the true death time interval, adjacent to the erroneous death time estimate, CPD-computed probabilities for that small no-alibi interval will increase with increasing input deviation, else the CPD-computed probabilities will decrease. We therefore advise not to use CPD if there is an indication of an error or a contra-empirical deviation in the death time estimates, that is especially, if the death time estimates fall out of the true death time interval, even if the 95%-confidence intervals of the estimate still overlap the true death time interval. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Characterizing Black Hole Mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John; Boggs, William Darian; Kelly, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Binary black hole mergers are a promising source of gravitational waves for interferometric gravitational wave detectors. Recent advances in numerical relativity have revealed the predictions of General Relativity for the strong burst of radiation generated in the final moments of binary coalescence. We explore features in the merger radiation which characterize the final moments of merger and ringdown. Interpreting the waveforms in terms of an rotating implicit radiation source allows a unified phenomenological description of the system from inspiral through ringdown. Common features in the waveforms allow quantitative description of the merger signal which may provide insights for observations large-mass black hole binaries.

  17. Superfluid Black Holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennigar, Robie A; Mann, Robert B; Tjoa, Erickson

    2017-01-13

    We present what we believe is the first example of a "λ-line" phase transition in black hole thermodynamics. This is a line of (continuous) second order phase transitions which in the case of liquid ^{4}He marks the onset of superfluidity. The phase transition occurs for a class of asymptotically anti-de Sitter hairy black holes in Lovelock gravity where a real scalar field is conformally coupled to gravity. We discuss the origin of this phase transition and outline the circumstances under which it (or generalizations of it) could occur.

  18. Are Black Holes Springy?

    CERN Document Server

    Good, Michael R R

    2014-01-01

    A $(3+1)$-dimensional asymptotically flat Kerr black hole angular speed $\\Omega_+$ can be used to define an effective spring constant, $k=m\\Omega_+^2$. Its maximum value is the Schwarzschild surface gravity, $k = \\kappa $, which rapidly weakens as the black hole spins down and the temperature increases. The Hawking temperature is expressed in terms of the spring constant: $2\\pi T = \\kappa - k$. Hooke's law, in the extremal limit, provides the force $F = 1/4$, which is consistent with the conjecture of maximum force in general relativity.

  19. Surveillance for violent deaths--National Violent Death Reporting System, 16 States, 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karch, Debra L; Dahlberg, Linda L; Patel, Nimesh

    2010-05-14

    mental-health, intimate-partner, or physical-health problems, or by a crisis during the preceding 2 weeks. Homicides occurred at higher rates among males and persons aged 20--24 years; rates were highest among non-Hispanic black males. The majority of homicides involved the use of a firearm and occurred in a house or apartment or on a street/highway. Homicides were precipitated primarily by arguments and interpersonal conflicts or in conjunction with another crime. Other manners of death and special situations or populations also are highlighted in this report. This report provides a detailed summary of data from NVDRS for 2007. The results indicate that violent deaths resulting from self-inflicted or interpersonal violence disproportionately affected adults aged <55 years, males, and certain minority populations. For homicides and suicides, relationship problems, interpersonal conflicts, mental-health problems, and recent crises were among the primary precipitating factors. Because additional information might be reported subsequently as participating states update their findings, the data provided in this report are preliminary. For the occurrence of violent deaths in the United States to be better understood and ultimately prevented, accurate, timely, and comprehensive surveillance data are necessary. NVDRS data can be used to monitor the occurrence of violence-related fatal injuries and assist public health authorities in the development, implementation, and evaluation of programs and policies to reduce and prevent violent deaths at the national, state, and local levels. The continued development and expansion of NVDRS is essential to CDC's efforts to reduce the personal, familial, and societal costs of violence. Further efforts are needed to increase the number of states participating in NVDRS, with an ultimate goal of full national representation.

  20. Surveillance for violent deaths--National Violent Death Reporting System, 16 states, 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karch, Debra L; Logan, Joseph; Patel, Nimesh

    2011-08-26

    by mental health (45.4%), intimate partner (30.9%), or physical health problems (22.6%), or by a crisis during the preceding 2 weeks (27.9%). Homicides occurred at higher rates among males and persons aged 20-24 years; rates were highest among non-Hispanic black males. The majority of homicides involved the use of a firearm (65.8%) and occurred in a house or apartment (52.5%) or on a street/highway (21.3%). Homicides were precipitated primarily by arguments (41.4%) and interpersonal conflicts (18.4%) or in conjunction with another crime (30.2%). Other manners of death and special situations or populations also are highlighted in this report. This report provides a detailed summary of data from NVDRS for 2008. The results indicate that violent deaths resulting from self-inflicted or interpersonal violence disproportionately affected adults aged <55 years, males, and certain minority populations. For homicides and suicides, relationship problems, interpersonal conflicts, mental health problems, and recent crises were among the primary precipitating factors. Because additional information might be reported subsequently as participating states update their findings, the data provided in this report are preliminary. For the occurrence of violent deaths in the United States to be better understood and ultimately prevented, accurate, timely, and comprehensive surveillance data are necessary. NVDRS data can be used to monitor the occurrence of violence-related fatal injuries and assist public health authorities in the development, implementation, and evaluation of programs and policies to reduce and prevent violent deaths at the national, state, and local levels. The continued development and expansion of NVDRS is essential to CDC's efforts to reduce the personal, familial, and societal costs of violence. Further efforts are needed to increase the number of states participating in NVDRS, with an ultimate goal of full national representation.

  1. Readmissions Complications and Deaths - National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Readmissions Complications and Deaths measures - national data. This data set includes national-level data for 30-day death and readmission measures, the hip/knee...

  2. Readmissions Complications and Deaths - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Readmissions, Complications and Deaths - provider data. This data set includes provider data for 30-day death and readmission measures, the hip/knee complication...

  3. Readmissions Complications and Deaths - State

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Readmissions Complications and Deaths measures - state data. This data set includes state-level data for 30-day death and readmission measures, the hip/knee...

  4. [Suspected pathogenic mutation identified in two cases with oculocutaneous albinism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiangmei; Zheng, Meiling; Zhang, Guilin; Hua, Ailing

    2015-08-01

    To detect potential mutations in genes related with non-syndromic oculocutaneous albinism I-IV and ocular albinism type I in two couples who had given births to children with albinism. All exons of the non-syndromic albinism related genes TYR, OCA2, TYRP-1, MITF, SLC45A2 and GPR143 were subjected to deep sequencing. The results were verified with Sanger sequencing. For the two female carriers, the coding region of the TYR gene was found to harbor a frameshift mutation c.925_926insC, which was also suspected to have been pathogenic. In one of the male partners, a nonsense mutations c.832C>T was found, which was also known to be pathogenic. Another male partner was found to harbor a TYR gene mutation c.346C>T, which was also known to be a pathogenic nonsense mutation. The coding region of the TYR gene c.925_926insC (p.Thr309ThrfsX9) probably underlies the OCA1 disease phenotype.

  5. Chest pain and behavior in suspected coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, L D; Barboriak, J J; Anderson, A J

    1988-01-01

    This study assessed behavioral activity, dietary and emotional variables among patient cohorts with angina pectoris, atypical chest pain, and no chest pain in whom coronary disease is suspected. Questionnaire responses of 3,899 employed male patients at the time of coronary arteriography were analyzed. Patients with angina pectoris had high levels of coronary-prone and neurotic attitudes, and fatigue variables including feeling unrested on awakening, easy fatiguability, reducing activity at work and arriving home tired. Atypical chest pain patients showed coronary-prone and neurotic attitudes similar to the angina pectoris group but had less coronary occlusion and lower levels of fatigue variables. Compared to the other groups, atypical chest pain patients were more likely to skip breakfast and showed a trend to eat fast. These findings suggest that including assessment of activity levels, fatiguability, eating behavior, neurotic traits and coronary-prone attitudes at time of coronary arteriography can have some limited value for patients with chest pain who may seek cardiac treatment but could benefit from alternative approaches.

  6. Acute aortic dissection in patient with suspected pheochromocytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lešanović Jelena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Aortic dissection is one of the most fatal vascular emergencies. Almost 40% of the patients do not reach hospital in time while more than quarter die in the first 24 hours after the dissection begins. Case Report: A 37-year old man was admitted to our hospital with severe anterior chest pain which had lasted for over a week. Suspected aortic dissection was rapidly confirmed using imaging modalities - MDCT chest scan and TTE, followed by an urgent surgical management - Bentall procedure. MDCT chest scan also discovered adrenal incidentaloma defined as malignant, pheochromocytoma like mass. Due to the critical state of the patient, there was not enough time for further endocrinologic testing. Discussion and conclusion: When treating patients with pheochromocytoma and acute aortic disection, it is crucial to obtain a stable hemodynamic state before the surgery, since they can trigger a severe hypertensive crisis due to high levels of cathecholamines induced chronic vasoconctriction. The most vulnerable periods are the induction of anesthesia and perioperative hemodynamic oscillations, so treating patients with short acting alpha- 1 adrenergic blocking agents preoperatively has proven to be helpful - Phentolamine. Both dissection of aorta and pheochromocytoma present challenges for anesthesiologists and early recognition of symptoms is essential in establishing the diagnosis and reducing the mortality rate.

  7. [Predictive value of procalcitonin in children with suspected sepsis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustos B, Raúl; Padilla P, Oslando

    2015-01-01

    The use of biomarkers could be a tool for diagnosis, prognosis and stratifying children with sepsis. Our main goal was to analyze the value of procalcitonin (PCT), C reactive protein (CRP) and lactate in predicting mortality, septic shock and the stratification in children with suspected sepsis Prospective study in 81 patients. Plasma levels of PCT, CRP and lactate were measured at admission in the pediatric intensive care unit. Patients were categorized into systemic inflammatory response syndrome, sepsis, severe sepsis and septic shock. Concentrations of PCT (ng/mL) increased significantly according to the severity of sepsis: 0.36 (0-1.2) for systemic inflammatory response syndrome; 1.96 (0.4-3.5) for sepsis; 7.5 (3.9-11.1) for severe sepsis; and 58.9 (35.1-82.7) for septic shock (P<.001). Compared to CRP and lactate, the area under the ROC curve revealed a good discriminative power of PCT to predict septic shock and mortality, 0.91 (95% CI: 0.83-0.97) and 0.80 (95% CI: 0.69-0.88), respectively. In contrast to CRP and lactate, the determination of PCT in pediatric intensive care unit admission is a good predictor of mortality and septic shock and can stratify patients according to severity of sepsis. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. The optimal diagnostic workup for children with suspected food allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berni Canani, Roberto; Di Costanzo, Mara; Troncone, Riccardo

    2011-10-01

    Food allergy is defined as an abnormal immunologic reaction to food proteins that causes an adverse clinical reaction. In addition to well-known acute allergic reactions and anaphylaxis triggered by immunoglobulin E antibody-mediated immune responses to food proteins, there is an increasing recognition of cell-mediated disorders such as eosinophilic esophagitis and food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome. More than 90% of food allergies in childhood are caused by eight foods: cow's milk, hen's egg, soy, peanuts, tree nuts, wheat, fish, and shellfish. The diagnostic workup for a child with suspected food allergy includes a detailed medical history, physical examination, food allergy screening tests, and responses to an elimination diet and an oral food challenge. None of the screening tests, alone or in combination, can definitely diagnose or exclude a food allergy. Novel diagnostic methods including those that focus on immune responses to specific food proteins or epitopes of specific proteins are under active study. Unconventional diagnostic methods are increasingly used, but they lack scientific rationale, standardization, and reproducibility. In selected cases, such as eosinophilic esophageal gastroenteropathies or food protein-induced gastroesophageal reflux disease, invasive procedures are mandatory for an accurate diagnosis. Properly done, an oral food challenge is still the gold standard in the diagnostic workup. An incorrect diagnosis is likely to result in unnecessary dietary restrictions, which, if prolonged, may adversely affect the child's nutritional status and growth. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Control of Suspect/Counterfeit and Defective Items

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheriff, Marnelle L.

    2013-09-03

    This procedure implements portions of the requirements of MSC-MP-599, Quality Assurance Program Description. It establishes the Mission Support Alliance (MSA) practices for minimizing the introduction of and identifying, documenting, dispositioning, reporting, controlling, and disposing of suspect/counterfeit and defective items (S/CIs). employees whose work scope relates to Safety Systems (i.e., Safety Class [SC] or Safety Significant [SS] items), non-safety systems and other applications (i.e., General Service [GS]) where engineering has determined that their use could result in a potential safety hazard. MSA implements an effective Quality Assurance (QA) Program providing a comprehensive network of controls and verification providing defense-in-depth by preventing the introduction of S/CIs through the design, procurement, construction, operation, maintenance, and modification of processes. This procedure focuses on those safety systems, and other systems, including critical load paths of lifting equipment, where the introduction of S/CIs would have the greatest potential for creating unsafe conditions.

  10. The 117 call alert system in Sierra Leone: from rapid Ebola notification to routine death reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpren, Charles; Jalloh, Mohamed F; Kaiser, Reinhard; Diop, Mariam; Kargbo, Sas; Castle, Evelyn; Dafae, Foday; Hersey, Sara; Redd, John T; Jambai, Amara

    2017-01-01

    A toll-free, nationwide phone alert system was established for rapid notification and response during the 2014-2015 Ebola epidemic in Sierra Leone. The system remained in place after the end of the epidemic under a policy of mandatory reporting and Ebola testing for all deaths, and, from June 2016, testing only in case of suspected Ebola. We describe the design, implementation and changes in the system; analyse calling trends during and after the Ebola epidemic; and discuss strengths and limitations of the system and its potential role in efforts to improve death reporting in Sierra Leone. Numbers of calls to report deaths of any cause (death alerts) and persons suspected of having Ebola (live alerts) were analysed by province and district and compared with numbers of Ebola cases reported by the WHO. Nearly 350 000 complete, non-prank calls were made to 117 between September 2014 and December 2016. The maximum number of daily death and live alerts was 9344 (October 2014) and 3031 (December 2014), respectively. Call volumes decreased as Ebola incidence declined and continued to decrease in the post-Ebola period. A national social mobilisation strategy was especially targeted to influential religious leaders, traditional healers and women's groups. The existing infrastructure and experience with the system offer an opportunity to consider long-term use as a death reporting tool for civil registration and mortality surveillance, including rapid detection and control of public health threats. A routine social mobilisation component should be considered to increase usage.

  11. Effects of race and precipitating event on suicide versus non-suicide death classification in a college sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Rheeda L.; Flowers, Kelci C.

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined race group differences in suicide death classification in a sample of 109 Black and White university students. Participants were randomly assigned to read three vignettes for which the vignette subjects’ race (only) varied. The vignettes each described a circumstance (terminal illness, academic failure, or relationship difficulties) that preceded the vignettes subject's ambiguously premature death. Participants were asked to describe “what happened”. Black participants were significantly less likely than White participants to attribute a vignette target's death to suicide and also less likely to report that suicide is acceptable. Implications for future research and prevention efforts are discussed. PMID:21309820

  12. Stress Perfusion CMR in Patients With Known and Suspected CAD: Prognostic Value and Optimal Ischemic Threshold for Revascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincenti, Gabriella; Masci, Pier Giorgio; Monney, Pierre; Rutz, Tobias; Hugelshofer, Sarah; Gaxherri, Mirdita; Muller, Olivier; Iglesias, Juan F; Eeckhout, Eric; Lorenzoni, Valentina; Pellaton, Cyril; Sierro, Christophe; Schwitter, Juerg

    2017-05-01

    This study sought to determine the ischemia threshold and additional prognostic factors that identify patients for safe deferral from revascularizations in a large cohort of all-comer patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). Stress-perfusion cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is increasingly used in daily practice for ischemia detection. However, there is insufficient evidence about the ischemia burden that identifies patients who benefit from revascularization versus those with a good prognosis who receive drugs only. All patients with known or suspected CAD referred to stress-perfusion CMR for myocardial ischemia assessment were prospectively enrolled. The CMR examination included standard functional adenosine stress first-pass perfusion (gadobutrol 0.1 mmol/kg Gadovist, Bayer AG, Zurich, Switzerland) and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) acquisitions. Presence of ischemia and ischemia burden (number of ischemic segments on a 16-segment model), and of scar and scar burden (number and transmurality of scar segments in a 17-segment model) were assessed. The primary endpoint was a composite of cardiac death, nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI), and late coronary revascularization (>90 days post-CMR); the secondary endpoint was a composite of cardiac death and nonfatal MI. During a follow-up of 2.5 ± 1.0 years, 86 and 32 of 1,024 patients (1,103 screened patients) experienced the primary and secondary endpoints, respectively. On Kaplan-Meier curves for the primary and secondary endpoints, patients without ischemia had excellent outcomes that did not differ from patients with <1.5 ischemic segments. In multivariate Cox regression analyses of the entire population and of the subgroups, ischemia burden (threshold: ≥1.5 ischemic segments) was consistently the strongest predictor of the primary and secondary endpoints with hazard ratios (HRs) of 7.42 to 8.72 (p < 0.001), whereas age (≥67 years), left ventricular ejection fraction (≤40%), and

  13. Meer bekend over Black Mold

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duyvesteijn, R.G.E.; Kohrman, E.

    2008-01-01

    In de vollegrondsrozenteelt zorgde Black Mold in 2007 voor een groot aantal mislukte oculaties. In 2008 waren er aanzienlijk minder problemen. Uit onderzoek is meer bekend over de oorzaak en bestrijding van Black Mold.

  14. Black Sea Bass genetic connectivity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Microsatellite analysis of black sea bass was undertaken to determine magnitude and direction of mixing of black seabass across the Hatteras boundary, as well as...

  15. Quantum aspects of black holes

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    Beginning with an overview of the theory of black holes by the editor, this book presents a collection of ten chapters by leading physicists dealing with the variety of quantum mechanical and quantum gravitational effects pertinent to black holes. The contributions address topics such as Hawking radiation, the thermodynamics of black holes, the information paradox and firewalls, Monsters, primordial black holes, self-gravitating Bose-Einstein condensates, the formation of small black holes in high energetic collisions of particles, minimal length effects in black holes and small black holes at the Large Hadron Collider. Viewed as a whole the collection provides stimulating reading for researchers and graduate students seeking a summary of the quantum features of black holes.

  16. Death In The Tropics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor Burnard

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Review of: Mosquito Empires: Ecology and War in the Greater Caribbean, 1620-1914. J.R. Mcneill. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2010. xvi + 371 pp. (Paper US$ 24.99 Medicine in an Age of Commerce and Empire: Britain and its Tropical Colonies 1660-1830. Mark Harrison. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010. x + 353 pp. (Cloth £65.00 Death in the New World: Cross-Cultural Encounters, 1492-1800. Erik R. Seeman. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2010. xii + 372 pp. (Cloth US$ 45.00

  17. Hypokalemia and sudden cardiac death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Keld

    2010-01-01

    Worldwide, approximately three million people suffer sudden cardiac death annually. These deaths often emerge from a complex interplay of substrates and triggers. Disturbed potassium homeostasis among heart cells is an example of such a trigger. Thus, hypokalemia and, also, more transient...... of fatal arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death a patient is, the more attention should be given to the potassium homeostasis....

  18. Deaths: Final Data for 1998.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Sherry L.

    2000-01-01

    This report presents final 1998 data on U.S. deaths and death rates according to demographic and medical characteristics such as age, sex, race, Hispanic origin, marital status, educational attainment, injury at work, state of residence, and cause of death. Trends and patterns in general mortality, life expectancy, and infant and maternal…

  19. Trends, Productivity Losses, and Associated Medical Conditions Among Toxoplasmosis Deaths in the United States, 2000–2010

    OpenAIRE

    Cummings, Patricia L.; Kuo, Tony; Javanbakht, Marjan; Sorvillo, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have quantified toxoplasmosis mortality, associated medical conditions, and productivity losses in the United States. We examined national multiple cause of death data and estimated productivity losses caused by toxoplasmosis during 2000–2010. A matched case–control analysis examined associations between comorbid medical conditions and toxoplasmosis deaths. In total, 789 toxoplasmosis deaths were identified during the 11-year study period. Blacks and Hispanics had the highest toxo...

  20. The Myth of the Black Matriarchy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staples, Robert

    1981-01-01

    Reprint of a 1970 article that describes the oppression of Blacks and the distortion of Black family life throughout United States history. Holds that the myth of Black matriarchy sets back the struggle for Black liberation. (GC)

  1. Black Hole: The Interior Spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Ong, Yen Chin

    2016-01-01

    The information loss paradox is often discussed from the perspective of the observers who stay outside of a black hole. However, the interior spacetime of a black hole can be rather nontrivial. We discuss the open problems regarding the volume of a black hole, and whether it plays any role in information storage. We also emphasize the importance of resolving the black hole singularity, if one were to resolve the information loss paradox.

  2. Black Holes in Higher Dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reall Harvey S.

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available We review black-hole solutions of higher-dimensional vacuum gravity and higher-dimensional supergravity theories. The discussion of vacuum gravity is pedagogical, with detailed reviews of Myers–Perry solutions, black rings, and solution-generating techniques. We discuss black-hole solutions of maximal supergravity theories, including black holes in anti-de Sitter space. General results and open problems are discussed throughout.

  3. Black Pineleaf Scale (FIDL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katharine A. Sheehan; Mario A. Melendez; Shana Westfall

    1998-01-01

    The black pineleaf scale (Nuculaspis californica (Coleman)) belongs to a group of sucking insects called armored scales. Concealed under their protective shells, these scales insert their mouthparts into their hosts, removing sap and, possibly, injecting toxic enzymes secreted in the saliva. Armored scales are important pests of agricultural and ornamental plants;...

  4. Almost BPS black holes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goldstein, K.D.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314132376; Katmadas, S.

    2009-01-01

    We study non-BPS black hole solutions to ungauged supergravity with 8 supercharges coupled to vector multiplets in four and five dimensions. We identify a large class of five dimensional non-BPS solutions, which we call ``almost BPS'', that are supersymmetric on local patches and satisfy a first

  5. Annotated black walnut literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. W. Van Sambeek

    2006-01-01

    Many of our publications on the establishment, management, and utilization of black walnut, butternut, and associated high-value hardwoods are printed in conference proceedings or scientific journals that are not readily available at most public libraries or on the internet. As Chair of the Education Committee, I have tried to summarize for you the relevant findings of...

  6. Gasification of black liquor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, A.L.

    1987-07-28

    A concentrated aqueous black liquor containing carbonaceous material and alkali metal sulfur compounds is treated in a gasifier vessel containing a relatively shallow molten salt pool at its bottom to form a combustible gas and a sulfide-rich melt. The gasifier vessel, which is preferably pressurized, has a black liquor drying zone at its upper part, a black liquor solids gasification zone located below the drying zone, and a molten salt sulfur reduction zone which comprises the molten salt pool. A first portion of an oxygen-containing gas is introduced into the gas space in the gasification zone immediately above the molten salt pool. The remainder of the oxygen-containing gas is introduced into the molten salt pool in an amount sufficient to cause gasification of carbonaceous material entering the pool from the gasification zone but not sufficient to create oxidizing conditions in the pool. The total amount of the oxygen-containing gas introduced both above the pool and into the pool constitutes between 25 and 55% of the amount required for complete combustion of the black liquor feed. A combustible gas is withdrawn from an upper portion of the drying zone, and a melt in which the sulfur content is predominantly in the form of alkali metal sulfide is withdrawn from the molten salt sulfur reduction zone. 2 figs.

  7. Nonsingular black hole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamseddine, Ali H. [American University of Beirut, Physics Department, Beirut (Lebanon); I.H.E.S., Bures-sur-Yvette (France); Mukhanov, Viatcheslav [Niels Bohr Institute, Niels Bohr International Academy, Copenhagen (Denmark); Ludwig-Maximilians University, Theoretical Physics, Munich (Germany); MPI for Physics, Munich (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    We consider the Schwarzschild black hole and show how, in a theory with limiting curvature, the physical singularity ''inside it'' is removed. The resulting spacetime is geodesically complete. The internal structure of this nonsingular black hole is analogous to Russian nesting dolls. Namely, after falling into the black hole of radius r{sub g}, an observer, instead of being destroyed at the singularity, gets for a short time into the region with limiting curvature. After that he re-emerges in the near horizon region of a spacetime described by the Schwarzschild metric of a gravitational radius proportional to r{sub g}{sup 1/3}. In the next cycle, after passing the limiting curvature, the observer finds himself within a black hole of even smaller radius proportional to r{sub g}{sup 1/9}, and so on. Finally after a few cycles he will end up in the spacetime where he remains forever at limiting curvature. (orig.)

  8. Bulletproof Black Man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højer, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Netflix’ kommende serie om den sorte Marvel-helt Luke Cage lander snart – midt i de aktuelle racekonflikter i USA. I GIF-anatomien "Bulletproof Black Man" sætter Henrik Højer serien ind i dens amerikanske kontekst....

  9. When Black Holes Collide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John

    2010-01-01

    Among the fascinating phenomena predicted by General Relativity, Einstein's theory of gravity, black holes and gravitational waves, are particularly important in astronomy. Though once viewed as a mathematical oddity, black holes are now recognized as the central engines of many of astronomy's most energetic cataclysms. Gravitational waves, though weakly interacting with ordinary matter, may be observed with new gravitational wave telescopes, opening a new window to the universe. These observations promise a direct view of the strong gravitational dynamics involving dense, often dark objects, such as black holes. The most powerful of these events may be merger of two colliding black holes. Though dark, these mergers may briefly release more energy that all the stars in the visible universe, in gravitational waves. General relativity makes precise predictions for the gravitational-wave signatures of these events, predictions which we can now calculate with the aid of supercomputer simulations. These results provide a foundation for interpreting expect observations in the emerging field of gravitational wave astronomy.

  10. Annotated black walnut literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. W. Van Sambeek

    2007-01-01

    Many of the publications on establishment, management, and utilization of black walnut and other high-value hardwoods are printed in conference proceedings or scientific journals that are not readily available at most public libraries or on the internet. As Chair of the Education Committee of the Walnut Council, I have tried to summarize the findings from the following...

  11. Training Black Entrepreneurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Earl F.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    The training phases of a pre-business program to prepare a limited number of blacks to enter business is described in four stages: preparation, formal instruction, on the job training, and follow-up training. The program was not successful as a variety of problems arose from participants, budgets, and/or program planning. (AG)

  12. Suburban Black Lives Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis-McCoy, R. L'Heureux

    2018-01-01

    This article explores the range of experiences and meanings of Black life in suburban space. Drawing from educational, historical, and sociological literatures, I argue that an underconsideration of suburban space has left many portraits of educational inequality incomplete. The article outlines the emergence of American suburbs and the formation…

  13. Crohn's Disease Transvaal Blacks

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Crohn's disease is rarely seen in Transvaal Blacks. Three cases are presented. The pathology and radiological features are discussed. The difficulty of diagnosing the extent of the disease in the acute stage both clinically and radiologically is emph,!lsised. The acute case should be. Department of Surgery, Baragwanath ...

  14. String physics and black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susskind, L. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Uglum, J. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1996-02-01

    In these lectures we review the quantum physics of large Schwarzschild black holes. Hawking`s information paradox, the theory of the stretched horizon and the principle of black hole complementarity are covered. We then discuss how the ideas of black hole complementarity may be realized in string theory. Finally, arguments are given that the world may be a hologram. (orig.).

  15. Queering Black Racial Identity Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Alandis A.; Quaye, Stephen John

    2017-01-01

    We used queer theory to encourage readers to think differently about previous theories about Black racial identity development. Queer theory facilitates new and deeper understandings of how Black people develop their racial identities, prompting more fluidity and nuance. Specifically, we present a queered model of Black racial identity development…

  16. The Strengths of Black Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Robert B.

    This report identifies and analyzes five strengths of black families: adaptability roles, strong kinship bonds, strong work orientation, strong religious orientation, and achievement orientation. These five characteristics have been functional for the survival, advancement, and stability of black families. Most discussions of black families tend…

  17. Sexism and the Black Male

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizemore, Barbara A.

    1973-01-01

    Explores the myth'' of matriarchy, compares the status of black women with that of white women in terms of marriage, education, income and political participation, and examines the ideology of several black men in order to analyze the black male's participation in upholding the value of male superiority. (RJ)

  18. Black carbon in marine sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middelburg, J.J.; Nieuwenhuize, J.; Van Breugel, P.

    1999-01-01

    Concentrations of black carbon were determined for a number of marine sediments. A comparison of black carbon based on thermal oxidation and hot concentrated nitric acid pretreatments revealed that the latter significantly overestimates combustion derived carbon phases. Black carbon accounts for

  19. Black-spot poison ivy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schram, Sarah E; Willey, Andrea; Lee, Peter K; Bohjanen, Kimberly A; Warshaw, Erin M

    2008-01-01

    In black-spot poison ivy dermatitis, a black lacquerlike substance forms on the skin when poison ivy resin is exposed to air. Although the Toxicodendron group of plants is estimated to be the most common cause of allergic contact dermatitis in the United States, black-spot poison ivy dermatitis is relatively rare.

  20. Uncovering Black Womanhood in Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Sheree L.; Espino, Michelle M.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the growing research that outlines the experiences of Blacks and women undergraduates in engineering, little is known about Black women in this field. The purpose of this qualitative study was to uncover how eight Black undergraduate women in engineering understood their race and gender identities in a culture that can be oppressive to…