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Sample records for suspect-involved genes fall

  1. De novo characterization of fall dormant and nondormant alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) leaf transcriptome and identification of candidate genes related to fall dormancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Senhao; Shi, Yinghua; Cheng, Ningning; Du, Hongqi; Fan, Wenna; Wang, Chengzhang

    2015-01-01

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is one of the most widely cultivated perennial forage legumes worldwide. Fall dormancy is an adaptive character related to the biomass production and winter survival in alfalfa. The physiological, biochemical and molecular mechanisms causing fall dormancy and the related genes have not been well studied. In this study, we sequenced two standard varieties of alfalfa (dormant and non-dormant) at two time points and generated approximately 160 million high quality paired-end sequence reads using sequencing by synthesis (SBS) technology. The de novo transcriptome assembly generated a set of 192,875 transcripts with an average length of 856 bp representing about 165.1 Mb of the alfalfa leaf transcriptome. After assembly, 111,062 (57.6%) transcripts were annotated against the NCBI non-redundant database. A total of 30,165 (15.6%) transcripts were mapped to 323 Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways. We also identified 41,973 simple sequence repeats, which can be used to generate markers for alfalfa, and 1,541 transcription factors were identified across 1,350 transcripts. Gene expression between dormant and non-dormant alfalfa at different time points were performed, and we identified several differentially expressed genes potentially related to fall dormancy. The Gene Ontology and pathways information were also identified. We sequenced and assembled the leaf transcriptome of alfalfa related to fall dormancy, and also identified some genes of interest involved in the fall dormancy mechanism. Thus, our research focused on studying fall dormancy in alfalfa through transcriptome sequencing. The sequencing and gene expression data generated in this study may be used further to elucidate the complete mechanisms governing fall dormancy in alfalfa.

  2. De Novo Characterization of Fall Dormant and Nondormant Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) Leaf Transcriptome and Identification of Candidate Genes Related to Fall Dormancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ningning; Du, Hongqi; Fan, Wenna; Wang, Chengzhang

    2015-01-01

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is one of the most widely cultivated perennial forage legumes worldwide. Fall dormancy is an adaptive character related to the biomass production and winter survival in alfalfa. The physiological, biochemical and molecular mechanisms causing fall dormancy and the related genes have not been well studied. In this study, we sequenced two standard varieties of alfalfa (dormant and non-dormant) at two time points and generated approximately 160 million high quality paired-end sequence reads using sequencing by synthesis (SBS) technology. The de novo transcriptome assembly generated a set of 192,875 transcripts with an average length of 856 bp representing about 165.1 Mb of the alfalfa leaf transcriptome. After assembly, 111,062 (57.6%) transcripts were annotated against the NCBI non-redundant database. A total of 30,165 (15.6%) transcripts were mapped to 323 Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways. We also identified 41,973 simple sequence repeats, which can be used to generate markers for alfalfa, and 1,541 transcription factors were identified across 1,350 transcripts. Gene expression between dormant and non-dormant alfalfa at different time points were performed, and we identified several differentially expressed genes potentially related to fall dormancy. The Gene Ontology and pathways information were also identified. We sequenced and assembled the leaf transcriptome of alfalfa related to fall dormancy, and also identified some genes of interest involved in the fall dormancy mechanism. Thus, our research focused on studying fall dormancy in alfalfa through transcriptome sequencing. The sequencing and gene expression data generated in this study may be used further to elucidate the complete mechanisms governing fall dormancy in alfalfa. PMID:25799491

  3. Falling giants and the rise of gene editing: ethics, private interests and the public good.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capps, Benjamin; Chadwick, Ruth; Joly, Yann; Mulvihill, John J; Lysaght, Tamra; Zwart, Hub

    2017-08-29

    This paper considers the tensions created in genomic research by public and private for-profit ideals. Our intent is to strengthen the public good at a time when doing science is strongly motivated by market possibilities and opportunities. Focusing on the emergence of gene editing, and in particular CRISPR, we consider how commercialisation encourages hype and hope-a sense that only promise and idealism can achieve progress. At this rate, genomic research reinforces structures that promote, above all else, private interests, but that may attenuate conditions for the public good of science. In the first part, we situate genomics using the aphorism that 'on the shoulders of giants we see farther'; these giants are infrastructures and research cultures rather than individual 'heroes' of science. In this respect, private initiatives are not the only pivot for successful discovery, and indeed, fascination in those could impinge upon the fundamental role of public-supported discovery. To redress these circumstances, we define the extent to which progress presupposes research strategies that are for the public good. In the second part, we use a 'falling giant' narrative to illustrate the risks of over-indulging for-profit initiatives. We therefore offer a counterpoint to commercialised science, using three identifiable 'giants'-scientists, publics and cultures-to illustrate how the public good contributes to genomic discovery.

  4. [Assessment of fall risk and fall prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Atsushi

    2012-06-01

    Typical risk factors for falls include a history of falling, decreased walking ability, and taking certain drugs. Serum vitamin D concentration is associated with falls, and vitamin D administration decreases falls. Fall prevention methods include exercise intervention, interventions other than exercise, and multifaceted interventions. However, the scientific evidence for whether fall prevention prevents fractures is poor. Fracture prevention with the use of hip protectors is effective in nursing facility dwellers, but not in elderly people living at home.

  5. Fall Protection Introduction, #33462

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chochoms, Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-23

    The proper use of fall prevention and fall protection controls can reduce the risk of deaths and injuries caused by falls. This course, Fall Protection Introduction (#33462), is designed as an introduction to various types of recognized fall prevention and fall protection systems at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), including guardrail systems, safety net systems, fall restraint systems, and fall arrest systems. Special emphasis is given to the components, inspection, care, and storage of personal fall arrest systems (PFASs). This course also presents controls for falling object hazards and emergency planning considerations for persons who have fallen.

  6. Home Improvements Prevent Falls

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adults / How Can Older Adults Prevent Falls? / Home Improvements Prevent Falls Winter 2014 Issue: Volume 8 Number 4 Page 16-17 MedlinePlus | Subscribe | Magazine Information | Contact Us | Viewers & Players Friends of the National Library of Medicine (FNLM)

  7. FCJ-210 Falling Robots

    OpenAIRE

    Lian Loke

    2016-01-01

    Falling is not usually viewed as a desirable act for humanoid robots, as it can lead to damage and injury of people, things and the robot itself. This article explores how falling can be viewed as an aesthetic, creative act, through positioning it within dance. Strategies for falling safely in dance are compared with engineering approaches to controlling falling for bipedal robots, through the language of automatic reflex, righting reaction and equilibrium response patterns in relation to gra...

  8. Peralta Facts: Fall 1983.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta Community Coll. District, Oakland, CA. Office of Research, Planning and Development.

    Data were collected in fall 1983 to provide a profile of the student population of the Peralta Community College District (PCCD). The data revealed: (1) total student enrollment declined by 12% from fall 1982 (N=38,976) to fall 1983 (N=34,183); (2) 57% of the students whose sex was identified were women; (3) minorities constituted 58% of the…

  9. Falls in Parkinson's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grimbergen, Y.A.M.; Munneke, M.; Bloem, B.R.

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To summarize the latest insights into the clinical significance, assessment, pathophysiology and treatment of falls in Parkinson's disease. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent studies have shown that falls are common in Parkinson's disease, even when compared with other fall-prone

  10. Fall Prevention: Simple Tips to Prevent Falls

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... physical therapist. The physical therapist can create a custom exercise program aimed at improving your balance, flexibility, ... healthy-lifestyle/healthy-aging/in-depth/fall-prevention/art-20047358 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and Terms ...

  11. Pre-impact fall detection

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Xinyao; Qu, Xingda

    2016-01-01

    Pre-impact fall detection has been proposed to be an effective fall prevention strategy. In particular, it can help activate on-demand fall injury prevention systems (e.g. inflatable hip protectors) prior to fall impacts, and thus directly prevent the fall-related physical injuries. This paper gave a systematical review on pre-impact fall detection, and focused on the following aspects of the existing pre-impact fall detection research: fall detection apparatus, fall detection indicators, fal...

  12. Meteorite falls in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khiri, Fouad; Ibhi, Abderrahmane; Saint-Gerant, Thierry; Medjkane, Mohand; Ouknine, Lahcen

    2017-10-01

    The study of meteorites provides insight into the earliest history of our solar system. From 1800, about the year meteorites were first recognized as objects falling from the sky, until December 2014, 158 observed meteorite falls were recorded in Africa. Their collected mass ranges from 1.4 g to 175 kg with the 1-10 kg cases predominant. The average rate of African falls is low with only one fall recovery per 1.35-year time interval (or 0.023 per year per million km2). This African collection is dominated by ordinary chondrites (78%) just like in the worldwide falls. The seventeen achondrites include three Martian meteorite falls (Nakhla of Egypt, Tissint of Morocco and Zagami of Nigeria). Observed Iron meteorite falls are relatively rare and represent only 5%. The falls' rate in Africa is variable in time and in space. The number of falls continues to grow since 1860, 80% of which were recovered during the period between 1910 and 2014. Most of these documented meteorite falls have been recovered from North-Western Africa, Eastern Africa and Southern Africa. They are concentrated in countries which have a large surface area and a large population with a uniform distribution. Other factors are also favorable for observing and collecting meteorite falls across the African territory, such as: a genuine meteorite education, a semi-arid to arid climate (clear sky throughout the year most of the time), croplands or sparse grasslands and possible access to the fall location with a low percentage of forest cover and dense road network.

  13. Fall Leaf Portraits

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how students can create a stunning as well as economical mosaic utilizing fall's brilliantly colored leaves, preserved at their peak in color. Start by choosing a beautiful fall day to take students on a nature walk to collect a variety of leaves in different shapes, sizes, and colors. Focus on collecting a…

  14. Fall prevention conceptual framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Sam

    2011-01-01

    Falls can have lasting psychological and physical consequences, particularly fractures and slow-healing processes, and patients may also lose confidence in walking. Injuries from falls lead to functional decline, institutionalization, higher health care costs, and decreased quality of life. The process related to the problem of patient falls in the hospital, using the nursing model developed by the theorist, Ida Jean Orlando, is explained in this article. The useful tool that provides guidance to marketers in this endeavor is Maslow's hierarchy of needs. During acute illness, individuals are greatly in need of satisfying their physiological needs. If these needs are not met, patients leave the hospital lacking a positive experience. Initial fall risk assessment is critical to plan intervention and individualize care plan. Interventions depend on the severity of fall risk factors.

  15. YB-1 gene expression is kept constant during myocyte differentiation through replacement of different transcription factors and then falls gradually under the control of neural activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Shunsuke; Tanaka, Toru; Moue, Masamitsu; Ohashi, Sachiyo; Nishikawa, Taishi

    2015-11-01

    We have previously reported that translation of acetylcholine receptor α-subunit (AChR α) mRNA in skeletal muscle cells is regulated by Y-box binding protein 1 (YB-1) in response to neural activity, and that in the postnatal mouse developmental changes in the amount of YB-1 mRNA are similar to those of AChR α mRNA, which is known to be regulated by myogenic transcription factors. Here, we examined transcriptional regulation of the YB-1 gene in mouse skeletal muscle and differentiating C2C12 myocytes. Although neither YB-1 nor AChR α was detected at either the mRNA or protein level in adult hind limb muscle, YB-1 expression was transiently activated in response to denervation of the sciatic nerve and completely paralleled that of AChR α, suggesting that these genes are regulated by the same transcription factors. However, during differentiation of C2C12 cells to myotubes, the level of YB-1 remained constant even though the level of AChR α increased markedly. Reporter gene, gel mobility shift and ChIP assays revealed that in the initial stage of myocyte differentiation, transcription of the YB-1 gene was regulated by E2F1 and Sp1, and was then gradually replaced under the control of both MyoD and myogenin through an E-box sequence in the proximal region of the YB-1 gene promoter. These results suggest that transcription factors for the YB-1 gene are exchanged during skeletal muscle cell differentiation, perhaps playing a role in translational control of mRNAs by YB-1 in both myotube formation and the response of skeletal muscle tissues to neural stimulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Laboratory evaluation of transgenic Populus davidiana×Populus bolleana expressing Cry1Ac + SCK, Cry1Ah3, and Cry9Aa3 genes against gypsy moth and fall webworm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Liping; Chen, Yajuan; Wei, Xiaoli; Ni, Mi; Zhang, Jiewei; Wang, Hongzhi; Zhu, Zhen; Wei, Jianhua

    2017-01-01

    Transgenic poplar lines 'Shanxin' (Populus davidiana×Populus bolleana) were generated via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The transgenic lines carried the expression cassettes of Cry1Ac + SCK, Cry1Ah3, and Cry9Aa3, respectively. The expression levels of the exogenous insect resistance genes in the transgenic lines were determined by Q-PCR and Western blot. Leaves of the transgenic lines were used for insect feeding bioassays on first instar larvae of the gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) and fall webworm (Hyphantria cunea). At 5 d of feeding, the mean mortalities of larvae feeding on Cry1Ac + SCK and Cry1Ah3 transgenic poplars leaves were 97% and 91%, while mortality on Cry9Aa3 transgenic lines was about 49%. All gypsy moth and fall webworm larvae were killed in 7-9 days after feeding on leaves from Cry1Ac + SCK or Cry1Ah3 transgenic poplars, while all the fall webworm larvae were killed in 11 days and about 80% of gypsy moth larvae were dead in 14 days after feeding on those from Cry9Aa3 transgenic lines. It was concluded that the transgenic lines of Cry1Ac + SCK and Cry1Ah3 were highly toxic to larvae of both insect species while lines with Cry9Aa3 had lower toxicity,and H. cunea larvae are more sensitive to the insecticidal proteins compared to L. dispar. Transgenic poplar lines toxic to L. dispar and H. cunea could be used to provide Lepidoptera pest resistance to selected strains of poplar trees.

  17. Fall Bottom Trawl Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The standardized NEFSC Fall Bottom Trawl Survey was initiated in 1963 and covered an area from Hudson Canyon, NY to Nova Scotia, Canada. Throughout the years,...

  18. Falls in the Aging Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khow, Kareeann S F; Visvanathan, Renuka

    2017-08-01

    The number of people living beyond 65 years of age is increasing rapidly, and they are at increased risk of falls. Falls-related injuries and hospitalizations are steadily increasing. Falls can lead to fear of falling, loss of independence, institutionalization, and death, inevitably posing a significant burden to the health care system. Therefore, screening of people at risk of falls and comprehensive assessment of older people at high risk of falls are critical steps toward prevention. This review evaluates the current knowledge relating to falls, with particular focus on rapid screening, assessment, and strategies to prevent falls in the community. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Falls and fall prevention in community-dwelling older adults

    OpenAIRE

    Tuvemo Johnson, Susanna

    2018-01-01

    Falls are the primary cause of injuries among older adults, and accidents that result from falls can lead to personal suffering and extensive societal burdens. The overall aims of this thesis were to explore and describe falls and fall prevention strategies in community-dwelling older adults and to evaluate a fall prevention home exercise program, the Otago Exercise Program (OEP), with or without motivational interviewing (MI). Methods: Qualitative and quantitative research methods were uses....

  20. Fall 1982 Retention Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta Community Coll. District, Oakland, CA. Office of Research, Planning and Development.

    In fall 1982, a study was conducted in the Peralta Community College District (PCCD) using withdrawal and grade distribution data to analyze student retention patterns. Successful retention rates were based on the percentage of students who received a passing grade, while total retention rates were based on the percentage of students who received…

  1. Fall 1984 Retention Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta Community Coll. District, Oakland, CA. Office of Research, Planning and Development.

    A study was conducted of the retention patterns of students enrolled in the Peralta Community College District (PCCD) in fall 1984 using college reports on withdrawals and grade distributions. The study focused on successful retention (i.e., all students who received a passing grade) and on total retention (i.e., all students who received any…

  2. Editors' Fall Picks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilbrun, Margaret; McCormack, Heather; Katterjohn, Anna; Kuzyk, Raya; Roncevic, Mirela; Fox, Bette-Lee; Hoffert, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    "Library Journal's" review editors select fall titles readers won't want to miss--"Waiting on a Train: The Embattled Future of Passenger Rail Service" (James McCommons); "Happy" (Alex Lemon); "Free for All: Joe Papp, the Public, and the Greatest Theater Story Ever Told" (Kenneth Turan & Joseph Papp); "In My Father's Shadow: A Daughter Remembers…

  3. Falls following discharge after an in-hospital fall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kessler Lori A

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Falls are among the most common adverse events reported in hospitalized patients. While there is a growing body of literature on fall prevention in the hospital, the data examining the fall rate and risk factors for falls in the immediate post-hospitalization period has not been well described. The objectives of the present study were to determine the fall rate of in-hospital fallers at home and to explore the risk factors for falls during the immediate post-hospitalization period. Methods We identified patients who sustained a fall on one of 16 medical/surgical nursing units during an inpatient admission to an urban community teaching hospital. After discharge, falls were ascertained using weekly telephone surveillance for 4 weeks post-discharge. Patients were followed until death, loss to follow up or end of study (four weeks. Time spent rehospitalized or institutionalized was censored in rate calculations. Results Of 95 hospitalized patients who fell during recruitment, 65 (68% met inclusion criteria and agreed to participate. These subjects contributed 1498 person-days to the study (mean duration of follow-up = 23 days. Seventy-five percent were African-American and 43% were women. Sixteen patients (25% had multiple falls during hospitalization and 23 patients (35% suffered a fall-related injury during hospitalization. Nineteen patients (29% experienced 38 falls at their homes, yielding a fall rate of 25.4/1,000 person-days (95% CI: 17.3-33.4. Twenty-three patients (35% were readmitted and 3(5% died. One patient experienced a hip fracture. In exploratory univariate analysis, persons who were likely to fall at home were those who sustained multiple falls in the hospital (p = 0.008. Conclusion Patients who fall during hospitalization, especially on more than one occasion, are at high risk for falling at home following hospital discharge. Interventions to reduce falls would be appropriate to test in this high-risk population.

  4. The Resource. Fall 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Adams, Director of Scientific Visualization, initiated a Bring Your Own Data ( BYOD ) workshop for MSRC users. The first workshop was held June 25-26 in...leverage these assets in their future work. The first BYOD workshop was definitely a benefit to the users. Chris Stone, in particular was able to...publications 28 ERDC MSRC The Resource, Fall 2001 ac ro ny m s AG Access Grid AMR Adaptive Mesh Refinement BYOD Bring Your Own Data CDC Control Data

  5. Urban fall traps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lucia de Almeida Valsecchi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the repercussion of falls in the elderly peoplewho live in the city of São Paulo and address - though synthetically- some questions regarding the city and its relation to aging and thequality of life of the elderly. Methods: This is a qualitative study. As fordata collection, “in-depth individual interviews” were applied. Selectionof subjects was guided by a procedure named as “network”. Results:Ten interviews were performed, nine with elderly individuals who werevictims of falls and one with a public authority representative. Dataresulting from interviews confirmed that significant changes occurin live of the elderly, who are victims of what has been called “urbantraps”, and that, by extrapolating mobility and dependence contexts,invade feelings, emotions and desires. The inappropriate environmentprovided by the city of São Paulo is confirmed by absence of adequateurban planning and lack of commitment of public authorities. It alsorevealed that the particular way of being old and living an elderlylife, in addition to right to citizenship, is reflected by major or lesserdifficulties imposed to the elderly to fight for their rights and have theirpublic space respected. Conclusion: The city of São Paulo is not anideal locus for an older person to live in. To the traps that are found inpublic places one can add those that are found in private places andthat contribute to the hard experience of falls among the elderly, anexperience that is sometimes fatal. In Brazil, the attention is basicallyfocused on the consequences of falls and not on prevention, by meansof urban planning that should meet the needs of the most vulnerablegroups - the physically disabled and the elderly.

  6. Fall prevention walker during rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, Kian Sek; E, Chun Zhi; Saim, Hashim; Zakaria, Wan Nurshazwani Wan; Khialdin, Safinaz Binti Mohd; Isa, Hazlita; Awad, M. I.; Soon, Chin Fhong

    2017-09-01

    This paper proposes on the design of a walker for the prevention of falling among elderlies or patients during rehabilitation whenever they use a walker to assist them. Fall happens due to impaired balance or gait problem. The assistive device is designed by applying stability concept and an accelerometric fall detection system is included. The accelerometric fall detection system acts as an alerting device that acquires body accelerometric data and detect fall. Recorded accelerometric data could be useful for further assessment. Structural strength of the walker was verified via iterations of simulation using finite element analysis, before being fabricated. Experiments were conducted to identify the fall patterns using accelerometric data. The design process and detection of fall pattern demonstrates the design of a walker that could support the user without fail and alerts the helper, thus salvaging the users from injuries due to fall and unattended situation.

  7. Fall prevention in older persons

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    including stroke and Parkinson's disease, which lead to poor balance and muscle weakness are important causes of falls. Dementia and delirium are also associated with increased risk of falls.[3]. Building on the risk factor evidence base, interventions for fall prevention began to be evaluated in randomised trials in the.

  8. The falls and the fear of falling among elderly institutionalized

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Almeida

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study it is intended to characterize the history of falls and to evaluate the fear to fall in aged institutionalized. The sample is composed for 113 institutionalized aged people, 32 men and 81 women with a average 82,96 ± 7,03 age of years. The data had been collected by means of a questionnaire and statistical analyzed (descriptive statistics, parametric tests - Test T and Anova - Test U-Mann Whitney, and Test of Kruskal-Wallis – and the Test of Tukey. The results point in the direction of that the women present a bigger number of falls (24.8% and greater fear to fall (Med=55. The falls had occurred in its majority in the context of the room of the institutions. It was verified that people who had at least a fall experience present greater fear to fall comparatively (Med=55 with that they had not the same had no incident of fall in period of time (Med=77. Our results come to strengthen the hypothesis of the changeable sex to be able to be considered a factor of fall risk. Aged that they present a history of falls seems to be more vulnerable to develop the fear to fall.

  9. Falls and the falls efficacy scale in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Alissa A; Rogers, Jennifer M; Amick, Melissa M; Friedman, Joseph H

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between fear of falling and fall frequency among patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD). One hundred-two participants with idiopathic PD were interviewed and examined. Participants reported the number of falls they had experienced in the preceding 3 months. They completed a mini-mental state exam (MMSE) and the falls efficacy scale (FES) questionnaire. Disease severity was determined by clinical examination using the Hoehn-Yahr staging system. Excluding two outliers who fell more than once each day, the subjects fell an average of 1.2 times in a 3 month period. There was a positive correlation between the number of falls, freezing of gait and Hoehn-Yahr score, and a negative correlation with the MMSE. In a post-hoc analysis the participants were divided into four groups based on fall frequency. The outliers had the lowest FES scores on average, similar to the scores seen in the rare fallers group. This study suggests that many factors are associated with fear of falling, including fall frequency, disease severity, and mental status. In the present study, the patients who fell the most often did not report the most fear. The lack of fear of falling but frequent falls in this small subgroup may suggest that special techniques to instill suitable caution to prevent falls are necessary, or may make training of these patients impossible.

  10. Falling Liquid Films

    CERN Document Server

    Kalliadasis, S; Scheid, B

    2012-01-01

    This research monograph gives a detailed review of the state-of-the-art theoretical methodologies for the analysis of dissipative wave dynamics and pattern formation on the surface of a film falling down a planar, inclined substrate. This prototype is an open-flow hydrodynamic instability representing an excellent paradigm for the study of complexity in active nonlinear media with energy supply, dissipation and dispersion. Whenever possible, the link between theory and experiments is illustrated and the development of order-of-magnitude estimates and scaling arguments is used to facilitate the

  11. Collective Fall Protection for Construction Workers

    OpenAIRE

    Sulowski, A. C.

    2014-01-01

    Construction safety regulations require protection of workers against falls from elevations. The collective fall protection systems, in most cases, allow workers to move freely without wearing individual fall protection gear. The collective systems which prevent falls are preferred over the fall arrest systems. The latter are employed only if prevention of falls is not feasible. Arresting a fall always carries with it a residual risk of injury to the fall victim. The collective fall arrest sy...

  12. Falls and comorbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Terese Sara Høj; Hansen, Annette Højmann; Sahlberg, Marie

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: To compare nationwide time trends and mortality in hip and proximal humeral fractures; to explore associations between incidences of falls risk related comorbidities (FRICs) and incidence of fractures. METHODS: The study is a retrospective cohort study using nationwide Danish administrative...... registries from 2000 through 2009. Individuals aged 65 years or older who experienced a hip or a proximal humeral fracture were included. Incidence of hip and of proximal humeral fractures, incidence of FRICs (ischemic heart disease, COPD, dementia, depression, diabetes, heart failure, osteoporosis......, Parkinson's disease and stroke) and incidence rate ratios (IRR) for fractures in patients with FRICs, and all-cause mortality up to 10 years after a hip or a proximal humeral fracture were analysed. RESULTS: A total of 89,150 patients experienced hip fractures and 48,581 proximal humeral fractures. From...

  13. Fall prevention in nursing homes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Mette; Hauge, Johnny

    2014-01-01

    that the number of hospitalization after a fall injury will become an even greater task for the Danish hospitals, The aim of the study was to show if there is a relationship between physically frail elderly nursing home resident’s subjective evaluation of fall-risk and an objective evaluation of their balance....... Further, to suggest tools for fall prevention in nursing home settings on the basis of the results of this study and the literature. A quantitative method inspired by the survey method was used to give an overview of fall patterns, subjective and objective evaluations of fallrisk. Participants were 16...... physically frail elderly nursing home residents from three different nursing homes. Measures: a small staff-questionnaire about incidences and places where the participants had falling-episodes during a 12 month period, The Falls Effi cacy Scale Swedish version (FES(S)) and Berg Balance Scale (BBS) Results...

  14. A piece of paper falling faster than free fall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, F.; Rivera, R.

    2011-09-01

    We report a simple experiment that clearly demonstrates a common error in the explanation of the classic experiment where a small piece of paper is put over a book and the system is let fall. This classic demonstration is used in introductory physics courses to show that after eliminating the friction force with the air, the piece of paper falls with acceleration g. To test if the paper falls behind the book in a nearly free fall motion or if it is dragged by the book, we designed a version of this experiment that includes a ball and a piece of paper over a book that is forced to fall using elastic cords. We recorded a video of our experiment using a high-speed video camera at 300 frames per second that shows that the book and the paper fall faster than the ball, which falls well behind the book with an acceleration approximately equal to g. Our experiment shows that the piece of paper is dragged behind the book and therefore the paper and book demonstration should not be used to show that all objects fall with acceleration g independently of their mass.

  15. A piece of paper falling faster than free fall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vera, F; Rivera, R, E-mail: fvera@ucv.cl [Instituto de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de ValparaIso, Av. Universidad 330, Curauma, ValparaIso (Chile)

    2011-09-15

    We report a simple experiment that clearly demonstrates a common error in the explanation of the classic experiment where a small piece of paper is put over a book and the system is let fall. This classic demonstration is used in introductory physics courses to show that after eliminating the friction force with the air, the piece of paper falls with acceleration g. To test if the paper falls behind the book in a nearly free fall motion or if it is dragged by the book, we designed a version of this experiment that includes a ball and a piece of paper over a book that is forced to fall using elastic cords. We recorded a video of our experiment using a high-speed video camera at 300 frames per second that shows that the book and the paper fall faster than the ball, which falls well behind the book with an acceleration approximately equal to g. Our experiment shows that the piece of paper is dragged behind the book and therefore the paper and book demonstration should not be used to show that all objects fall with acceleration g independently of their mass.

  16. Fall Meeting Hydrology Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bales, Roger

    The AGU 1992 Fall Meeting in San Francisco offered the full range of subjects represented by the Hydrology Section's technical committees. The total number of papers was double the number of just 4 years ago. Sessions were well attended. The following highlights were prepared from material written by session organizers.There were 3 full days of papers on snow, ice, and permafrost. One highlight was the special session on new developments in glacier mass-balance studies, which was organized to compare existing methods and examine new techniques for assessing changes in ice mass of the polar ice sheets and alpine glaciers. Current methods for assessing mass change of the ice sheets include satellite laser altimetry to detect surface-elevation changes, surface-based control volume methods to determine net ice flux in a region, and ice-shelf melting and iceberg calving to determine mass loss from the ice sheet. Using these techniques, it is difficult to tell whether the ice sheet is gaining or losing mass. Methods that use drainage basin inputs/outputs indicate a net mass increase, whereas methods that emphasize oceanographic estimates of ice-shelf melting suggest a net mass decrease and estimates based on satellite altimetry are equivocal.

  17. Automatic Fall Monitoring: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natthapon Pannurat

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Falls and fall-related injuries are major incidents, especially for elderly people, which often mark the onset of major deterioration of health. More than one-third of home-dwelling people aged 65 or above and two-thirds of those in residential care fall once or more each year. Reliable fall detection, as well as prevention, is an important research topic for monitoring elderly living alone in residential or hospital units. The aim of this study is to review the existing fall detection systems and some of the key research challenges faced by the research community in this field. We categorize the existing platforms into two groups: wearable and ambient devices; the classification methods are divided into rule-based and machine learning techniques. The relative merit and potential drawbacks are discussed, and we also outline some of the outstanding research challenges that emerging new platforms need to address.

  18. Fall prevention in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungar, Andrea; Rafanelli, Martina; Iacomelli, Iacopo; Brunetti, Maria Angela; Ceccofiglio, Alice; Tesi, Francesca; Marchionni, Niccolò

    2013-05-01

    Falls are frequent in the elderly and affect mortality, morbidity, loss of functional capacity and institutionalization. In the older patient the incidence of falls can sometimes be underestimated, even in the absence of a clear cognitive impairment, because it is often difficult to reconstruct the dynamics. It is quite common that forms due to syncope are associated with retrograde amnesia and in 40 to 60% of the cases falls happen in the absence of witnesses. The pathogenesis of falls is often multifactorial, due to physiological age-related changes or more properly pathological factors, or due to the environment. The identification of risk factors is essential in the planning of preventive measures. Syncope is one of major causes of falls. About 20% of cardiovascular syncope in patients older than 70 appears as a fall and more than 20% of older people with Carotid Sinus Syndrome complain of falls as well as syncope. These data clearly state that older patients with history of falls should undergo a cardiovascular and neuroautonomic assessment besides the survey of other risk factors. Multifactorial assessment requires a synergy of various specialists. The geriatrician coordinates the multidisciplinary intervention in order to make the most effective evaluation of the risk of falling, searching for all predisposing factors, aiming towards a program of prevention. In clear pathological conditions it is possible to enact a specific treatment. Particular attention must indeed be paid to the re-evaluation of drug therapy, with dose adjustments or withdrawal especially for antihypertensive, diuretics and benzodiazepines. The Guidelines of the American Geriatrics Society recommend modification of environmental hazards, training paths, hip protectors and appropriate use of support tools (sticks, walkers), which can be effective elements of a multifactorial intervention program. Balance exercises are also recommended. In conclusion, an initial assessment, supported by a

  19. Cowlitz Falls Fish Passage.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The upper Cowlitz was once home to native salmon and steelhead. But the combined impacts of overharvest, farming, logging and road building hammered fish runs. And in the 1960s, a pair of hydroelectric dams blocked the migration path of ocean-returning and ocean-going fish. The lower Cowlitz still supports hatchery runs of chinook, coho and steelhead. But some 200 river miles in the upper river basin--much of it prime spawning and rearing habitat--have been virtually cut off from the ocean for over 26 years. Now the idea is to trap-and-haul salmon and steelhead both ways and bypass previously impassable obstacles in the path of anadromous fish. The plan can be summarized, for the sake of explanation, in three steps: (1) trap and haul adult fish--collect ocean-returning adult fish at the lowermost Cowlitz dam, and truck them upstream; (2) reseed--release the ripe adults above the uppermost dam, and let them spawn naturally, at the same time, supplement these runs with hatchery born fry that are reared and imprinted in ponds and net pens in the watershed; (3) trap and haul smolts--collection the new generation of young fish as they arrive at the uppermost Cowlitz dam, truck them past the three dams, and release them to continue their downstream migration to the sea. The critical part of any fish-collection system is the method of fish attraction. Scientists have to find the best combination of attraction system and screens that will guide young fish to the right spot, away from the turbine intakes. In the spring of 1994 a test was made of a prototype system of baffles and slots on the upriver face of the Cowlitz Falls Dam. The prototype worked at 90% efficiency in early tests, and it worked without the kind of expensive screening devices that have been installed on other dams. Now that the success of the attraction system has been verified, Harza engineers and consultants will design and build the appropriate collection part of the system.

  20. Preventing Falls and Related Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ages. Many of us know someone who has fallen and broken a bone. While healing, the fracture ... break after every fall, the person who has fallen and broken a bone nearly always becomes fearful ...

  1. Gene

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Gene integrates information from a wide range of species. A record may include nomenclature, Reference Sequences (RefSeqs), maps, pathways, variations, phenotypes,...

  2. Catching a Falling Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-07-01

    . Comets are another important source of meteoroids and perhaps the most spectacular. After many visits near the Sun, a comet "dirty-snowball" nucleus of ice and dust decays and fragments, leaving a trail of meteoroids along its orbit. Some "meteoroid streams" cross the earth's orbit and when our planet passes through them, some of these particles will enter the atmosphere. The outcome is a meteor shower - the most famous being the "Perseids" in the month of August [2] and the "Leonids" in November. Thus, although meteors are referred to as "shooting" or "falling stars" in many languages, they are of a very different nature. More information The research presented in this paper is published in the journal Meteoritics and Planetary Science, Vol. 39, Nr. 4, p. 1, 2004 ("Spectroscopic anatomy of a meteor trail cross section with the ESO Very Large Telescope", by P. Jenniskens et al.). Notes [1] The team is composed of Peter Jenniskens (SETI Institute, USA), Emmanuël Jehin (ESO), Remi Cabanac (Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile), Christophe Laux (Ecole Centrale de Paris, France), and Iain Boyd (University of Michigan, USA). [2] The maximum of the Perseids is expected on August 12 after sunset and should be easily seen.

  3. A Piece of Paper Falling Faster than Free Fall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, F.; Rivera, R.

    2011-01-01

    We report a simple experiment that clearly demonstrates a common error in the explanation of the classic experiment where a small piece of paper is put over a book and the system is let fall. This classic demonstration is used in introductory physics courses to show that after eliminating the friction force with the air, the piece of paper falls…

  4. Falls prevention for the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balzer, Katrin; Bremer, Martina; Schramm, Susanne; Lühmann, Dagmar; Raspe, Heiner

    2012-01-01

    An ageing population, a growing prevalence of chronic diseases and limited financial resources for health care underpin the importance of prevention of disabling health disorders and care dependency in the elderly. A wide variety of measures is generally available for the prevention of falls and fall-related injuries. The spectrum ranges from diagnostic procedures for identifying individuals at risk of falling to complex interventions for the removal or reduction of identified risk factors. However, the clinical and economic effectiveness of the majority of recommended strategies for fall prevention is unclear. Against this background, the literature analyses in this HTA report aim to support decision-making for effective and efficient fall prevention. The pivotal research question addresses the effectiveness of single interventions and complex programmes for the prevention of falls and fall-related injuries. The target population are the elderly (> 60 years), living in their own housing or in long term care facilities. Further research questions refer to the cost-effectiveness of fall prevention measures, and their ethical, social and legal implications. Systematic literature searches were performed in 31 databases covering the publication period from January 2003 to January 2010. While the effectiveness of interventions is solely assessed on the basis of randomised controlled trials (RCT), the assessment of the effectiveness of diagnostic procedures also considers prospective accuracy studies. In order to clarify social, ethical and legal aspects all studies deemed relevant with regard to content were taken into consideration, irrespective of their study design. Study selection and critical appraisal were conducted by two independent assessors. Due to clinical heterogeneity of the studies no meta-analyses were performed. Out of 12,000 references retrieved by literature searches, 184 meet the inclusion criteria. However, to a variable degree the validity of their

  5. Falls prevention for the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmar Lühmann

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: An ageing population, a growing prevalence of chronic diseases and limited financial resources for health care underpin the importance of prevention of disabling health disorders and care dependency in the elderly. A wide variety of measures is generally available for the prevention of falls and fall-related injuries. The spectrum ranges from diagnostic procedures for identifying individuals at risk of falling to complex interventions for the removal or reduction of identified risk factors. However, the clinical and economic effectiveness of the majority of recommended strategies for fall prevention is unclear. Against this background, the literature analyses in this HTA report aim to support decision-making for effective and efficient fall prevention.Research questions: The pivotal research question addresses the effectiveness of single interventions and complex programmes for the prevention of falls and fall-related injuries. The target population are the elderly (> 60 years, living in their own housing or in long term care facilities. Further research questions refer to the cost-effectiveness of fall prevention measures, and their ethical, social and legal implications. Methods: Systematic literature searches were performed in 31 databases covering the publication period from January 2003 to January 2010. While the effectiveness of interventions is solely assessed on the basis of randomised controlled trials (RCT, the assessment of the effectiveness of diagnostic procedures also considers prospective accuracy studies. In order to clarify social, ethical and legal aspects all studies deemed relevant with regard to content were taken into consideration, irrespective of their study design. Study selection and critical appraisal were conducted by two independent assessors. Due to clinical heterogeneity of the studies no meta-analyses were performed.Results: Out of 12,000 references retrieved by literature searches, 184 meet the

  6. Fall risk in an active elderly population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Læssøe, Uffe; Hoeck, Hans C.; Simonsen, Ole

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Falls amongst elderly people are often associated with fractures. Training of balance and physical performance can reduce fall risk; however, it remains a challenge to identify individuals at increased risk of falling to whom this training should be offered. It is believed that fall...... risk can be assessed by testing balance performance. In this study a test battery of physiological parameters related to balance and falls was designed to address fall risk in a community dwelling elderly population. RESULTS: Ninety-four elderly males and females between 70 and 80 years of age were...... of community dwelling elderly. Falling is a complex phenomenon of multifactorial origin. The crucial factor in relation to fall risk is the redundancy of balance capacity against the balance demands of the individuals levels of fall-risky lifestyle and behavior. This calls for an approach to fall risk...

  7. NOVA Fall 2000 Teacher's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransick, Kristina; Rosene, Dale; Sammons, Fran Lyons; Sammons, James

    This teacher's guide complements six programs that aired on the Public Broadcasting System (PBS) in the fall of 2000. Programs include: (1) "Lincoln's Secret Weapon"; (2) "Hitler's Lost Sub"; (3) "Runaway Universe"; (4) "Garden of Eden"; (5) "Dying to Be Thin"; and (6) "Japan's Secret…

  8. Finding Rising and Falling Words

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjong Kim Sang, E.

    2016-01-01

    We examine two different methods for finding rising words (among which neologisms) and falling words (among which archaisms) in decades of magazine texts (millions of words) and in years of tweets (billions of words): one based on correlation coefficients of relative frequencies and time, and one

  9. Falls Prevention Process in Assisted Living Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, DaRae; Nordman-Oliveira, Susan E; Schlaak, Mary; Ford, James H

    2017-12-01

    Falls are a significant issue for older adults, and many older adults who once received care in nursing homes now reside in assisted living communities (ALCs). ALC staff needs to address resident falls prevention; however, federal or state requirements or oversight are limited. This research explores falls prevention in Wisconsin ALCs in the context of the Kotter Change Model to identify strategies and inform efforts to establish a more consistent, proactive falls prevention process for ALCs. A mixed methods approach demonstrated inconsistency and variability in the use of falls risk assessments and prevention programs, which led to the development of standardized, proactive falls prevention process flowcharts. This process, as delineated, provides ALCs with an approach to organize a comprehensive falls reduction strategy. Findings highlight the importance of educating staff regarding assessments, resident motivation, falls prevention programs, and feedback, all key components of the falls prevention process.

  10. Osteoarthritis and falls in the older person.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Chin Teck; Tan, Maw Pin

    2013-09-01

    Osteoarthritis and falls are common conditions affecting older individuals which are associated with disability and escalating health expenditure. It has been widely assumed that osteoarthritis is an established risk factor for falls in older people. The relationship between osteoarthritis and falls has, quite surprisingly, not been adequately elucidated, and published reports have been conflicting. Our review of the existing literature has found limited evidence supporting the current assumption that the presence of osteoarthritis is associated with increased risk of falls with suggestions that osteoarthritis may actually be protective against falls related fractures. In addition, joint arthroplasty appears to increase the risk of falls in individuals with osteoarthritis.

  11. A wearable airbag to prevent fall injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Toshiyo; Yoshimura, Takumi; Sekine, Masaki; Uchida, Mitsuo; Tanaka, Osamu

    2009-11-01

    We have developed a wearable airbag that incorporates a fall-detection system that uses both acceleration and angular velocity signals to trigger inflation of the airbag. The fall-detection algorithm was devised using a thresholding technique with an accelerometer and gyro sensor. Sixteen subjects mimicked falls, and their acceleration waveforms were monitored. Then, we developed a fall-detection algorithm that could detect signals 300 ms before the fall. This signal was used as a trigger to inflate the airbag to a capacity of 2.4 L. Although the proposed system can help to prevent fall-related injuries, further development is needed to miniaturize the inflation system.

  12. Associated Factors for Falls, Recurrent Falls, and Injurious Falls in Aged Men Living in Taiwan Veterans Homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Chiou Ku

    2013-06-01

    Conclusion: This study demonstrated that the advanced age, depression status, stroke, gouty arthritis, and cataract are independent variables for predicting falls; depression is the only clinical factor capable of predicting the recurrent falls. These variables were potential targets for effective prevention of falls.

  13. A simple strategy for fall events detection

    KAUST Repository

    Harrou, Fouzi

    2017-01-20

    The paper concerns the detection of fall events based on human silhouette shape variations. The detection of fall events is addressed from the statistical point of view as an anomaly detection problem. Specifically, the paper investigates the multivariate exponentially weighted moving average (MEWMA) control chart to detect fall events. Towards this end, a set of ratios for five partial occupancy areas of the human body for each frame are collected and used as the input data to MEWMA chart. The MEWMA fall detection scheme has been successfully applied to two publicly available fall detection databases, the UR fall detection dataset (URFD) and the fall detection dataset (FDD). The monitoring strategy developed was able to provide early alert mechanisms in the event of fall situations.

  14. Preventing Falls: Great Help for Older Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adults / How Can Older Adults Prevent Falls? / Home Improvements Prevent Falls Winter 2014 Issue: Volume 8 Number 4 Page 14 MedlinePlus | Subscribe | Magazine Information | Contact Us | Viewers & Players Friends of the National Library of Medicine (FNLM)

  15. How Can Older Adults Prevent Falls?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adults / How Can Older Adults Prevent Falls? / Home Improvements Prevent Falls Winter 2014 Issue: Volume 8 Number 4 Page 15 MedlinePlus | Subscribe | Magazine Information | Contact Us | Viewers & Players Friends of the National Library of Medicine (FNLM)

  16. Factors inducing falling in schizophrenia patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Yoko; Akezaki, Yoshiteru; Mori, Kohei; Yuri, Yoshimi; Katsumura, Hitomi; Hara, Tomihiro; Usui, Yuki; Fujino, Yoritaka; Nomura, Takuo; Hirao, Fumio

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study is to investigate the factors causing falling among patients with schizophrenia hospitalized in psychiatric hospitals. [Subjects and Methods] The study subjects were divided into either those having experienced a fall within the past one year (Fall group, 12 patients) and those not having experienced a fall (Non-fall group, 7 patients), and we examined differences between the two groups. Assessment items measured included muscle strength, balance ability, flexibility, body composition assessment, Global Assessment of Functioning scale (GAF), the antipsychotic drug intake, and Drug Induced Extra-Pyramidal Symptoms Scale (DIEPSS). [Results] As a result, significant differences were observed in regard to One leg standing time with eyes open, Time Up and Go Test (TUGT), and DIEPSS Sialorrhea between the Fall group and the Non-fall group. [Conclusion] These results suggest that a decrease in balance ability was significantly correlated with falling in schizophrenia patients. PMID:28356628

  17. Measuring fall risk and predicting who will fall: clinimetric properties of four fall risk assessment tools for residential aged care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Anna L; Nitz, Jennifer C; Low Choy, Nancy L; Haines, Terry

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this prospective cohort study was to describe the clinimetric evaluation of four fall risk assessment tools (FRATs) recommended in best practice guidelines for use in residential aged care (RAC). Eighty-seven residents, mean age 81.59 years (SD +/-10.69), participated. The Falls Assessment Risk and Management Tool (FARAM), Peninsula Health Fall Risk Assessment Tool (PHFRAT), Queensland Fall Risk Assessment Tool (QFRAT), and Melbourne Fall Risk Assessment Tool (MFRAT) were completed at baseline, and 2 and 4 months, and falls occurring in the 6 months after the baseline assessment were recorded. Interrater agreement (kappa), predictive accuracy (survival analysis and Youden Index), and fit to the Rasch model were examined. Twelve-month fall history formed the predictive accuracy reference. Interrater risk classification agreement was high for the PHFRAT (small ka, Cyrillic = .84) and FARAM (small ka, Cyrillic = .81), and low for the QFRAT (small ka, Cyrillic = .51) and MFRAT (small ka, Cyrillic = .21). Survival analysis identified that 43%-66% of risk factors on each tool had no (p > .10) association with falls. No tool had higher predictive accuracy (Youden index) than the question, "has the resident fallen in past 12 months?" (p > .05). All tools did not exhibit fit to the Rasch model, invalidating summing of risk factor scores to provide an overall risk score. The studied tools have poor clinimetric properties, casting doubt about their usefulness for identifying fall risk factors for those most at risk for falling and measuring fall risk in RAC.

  18. Intrinsic Risk Factors of Falls in Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmin Amatullah

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Falls are common geriatric problems. The risk factors of falls are the intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors. Studies on falls are scarcely conducted in Indonesia, especially in Bandung. Therefore, this study was conducted to identify the intrinsic risk factors of falls among elderly. Methods: A descriptive study was carried out from August to October 2013 at the Geriatric Clinic of Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung. Fifty three participants were selected according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria using consecutive sampling. The determined variables in this study were classification of the risk of falls, demographic profile, history of falls, disease, and medications. After the selection, the participants were tested by Timed up-and-go test (TUGT. Moreover, an interview and analysis of medical records were carried out to discover the risk factors of falls. The collected data were analyzed and presented in the form of percentages shown in tables. Results: From 53 patients, women (35.66% were considered to have higher risk of fall than men (18.34%. The majority of patients (66% with the risk of fall were from the age group 60–74 years. The major diseases suffered by patients were hypertension, osteoarthritis and diabetes mellitus. Drugs that were widely used were antihypertensive drugs; analgesic and antipyretic drugs and antidiabetic drugs. Conclusions: There are various intrinsic risk factors of falls in elderly and each of the elderly has more than one intrinsic risk factor of falls.

  19. Relationship between subjective fall risk assessment and falls and fall-related fractures in frail elderly people

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Objective measurements can be used to identify people with risks of falls, but many frail elderly adults cannot complete physical performance tests. The study examined the relationship between a subjective risk rating of specific tasks (SRRST) to screen for fall risks and falls and fall-related fractures in frail elderly people. Methods The SRRST was investigated in 5,062 individuals aged 65 years or older who were utilized day-care services. The SRRST comprised 7 dichotomous questions to screen for fall risks during movements and behaviours such as walking, transferring, and wandering. The history of falls and fall-related fractures during the previous year was reported by participants or determined from an interview with the participant's family and care staff. Results All SRRST items showed significant differences between the participants with and without falls and fall-related fractures. In multiple logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, diseases, and behavioural variables, the SRRST score was independently associated with history of falls and fractures. Odds ratios for those in the high-risk SRRST group (≥ 5 points) compared with the no risk SRRST group (0 point) were 6.15 (p elderly, however, these preliminary results require confirmation in further prospective research. PMID:21838891

  20. Internship Progress Summary: Fall 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiser, Ralph S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Valencia, Matthew John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-12-13

    This fall I had the opportunity to work at Los Alamos National Laboratory for the Technology Applications engineering group. I assisted two main projects during my appointment, both related to the Lab’s mission statement: “To solve national security challenges through scientific excellence.” My first project, a thermal source transfer unit, involved skills such as mechanical design, heat transfer simulation, and design analysis. The goal was to create a container that could protect a heat source and regulate its temperature during transit. I generated several designs, performed heat transfer simulations, and chose a design for prototyping. The second project was a soil drying unit for use in post blast sample analysis. To ensure fast and accurate sample processing, agents in the field wanted a system that could process wet dirt and turn it into dry powder. We designed a system of commercially available parts, and we tested the systems to determine the best methods and processes.

  1. [Fear of falling in older people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkodo Mekongo, Y P; De Breucker, S; Delvaux, N; Pepersack, T

    2007-01-01

    Fear of falling and poor physical performance are prominent symptoms in many older people. The prevalence of fear of falling in community-living elderly ranges between 12 % and 65 %, and is higher in women than men. It commonly occurs after falls, but it also occurs without a previous fall history. One of the major consequences of fear of falling is the restriction and avoidance of activities. However, not all elderly with fear of falling avoid activities in daily life. Some elderly only become cautious, which may be functional in preventing falls. Only a small percentage of elderly show a pattern of excessive fear and restriction of activities. The consequences of this pattern may, however, be debilitating and devastating. Excessive fear and avoidance may compromise the quality of life, and may result in a decline of physical capabilities and, ultimately, in an increased risk of falls, which may further fuel fear and avoidance. Future research should investigate whether individualised intervention strategies are efficient in preventing falls and activity-related fear of falling within this population in order to improve her quality of life.

  2. Characteristics of Falls Among Institutionalized Elderly People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Ali Akbari Kamrani

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Falls by elderly people area frequent cause of morbidity and mortality, especially in institutionalized elders. to describe the features of falls among institutionalized elderly people. Methods & Materials: characteristics of falls in the preceding six months (March 2006 - September 2006 that occurred among elder lies (aged over 60years with normal physical function and cognitive status, who lived at Kahrizak Institute, along term nursing home in Tehran, were surveyed and analyzed. Results: The mean age of the patients with falls was 76.9 yrs. These numbers of falls had occurred among 29 elders that 48.3% were women and 51.7% were men. 57.6% off alls were simple and elders could standup immediately independently. 42.4% of falls needed to help for standup, 2 elder person (2.6% had sever consequence of fall and had fractures. (Skull fracture, head trauma & hip fracture 30.3% of falls occurred in yard, 28.9% at room, 18.4%inhallway, 14.5% at WC, .3.9%at bathroom, and 3.9% at lunch saloon. Analysis of the time of falls showed: 45.3% of falls occurred at 7bl2 am, 13.2% at the lunch time (12bI4, 17% at 14b19, 11.3%at night (19b4 am, and 13.2% at 4b7 am. Conclusion: falls among elder lies occur mainly outside of room. And occur at the time of maximum activities, for example at morning; also falls have been happened more in subjects older, and occasionally result in sever injury such as head trauma, skull fracture, femur and pelvis fracture and cause more mortality and morbidity. Control of environmental risk factors could be protective factors against falls.

  3. Dogs and cats as environmental fall hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Judy A; Teh, S L; Haileyesus, Tadesse

    2010-02-01

    Falls are the leading cause of non-fatal injuries in the United States. This study assessed the prevalence of fall injuries associated with cats and dogs in the United States and describes the types of injuries sustained, the location, activity, and circumstances under which they occurred. Data were from a nationally representative sample of emergency department visits from January 1, 2001 to December 31, 2006, available through the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System All Injury Program (NEISS-AIP). Based on 7,456 cases, an estimated 86,629 fall injuries each year were associated with cats and dogs, for an injury rate of 29.7. There were 7.5 times as many injuries involving dogs as cats and females were 2.1 times more likely to be injured than males. Injury rates were highest among people aged >/=75, but pets were a fall hazard for all ages. Fractures and contusions or abrasions were the most common injuries; the highest rates were for injuries to the extremities. About 66.4% of falls associated with cats and 31.3 % of falls associated with dogs were caused by falling or tripping over the pet. An additional 21.2% of falls related to dogs were caused by being pushed or pulled. Although pets were associated with fall injuries, this risk can be reduced by increasing public awareness about situations that can lead to falls, such as dog-walking and chasing pets, and by calling attention to the importance of obedience training for dogs to minimize hazardous behaviors such as pulling and pushing. Fall injuries represent a burden to individuals, our society and our health care system. Increasing public awareness and implementing basic prevention strategies can help people of all ages enjoy their pets, reduce their chances of experiencing pet-related falls, and lessen the impact of fall injuries on our health care system. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Prediction of falls and/or near falls in people with mild Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Lindholm

    Full Text Available To determine factors associated with future falls and/or near falls in people with mild PD.The study included 141 participants with PD. Mean (SD age and PD-duration were 68 (9.7 and 4 years (3.9, respectively. Their median (q1-q3 UPDRS III score was 13 (8-18. Those >80 years of age, requiring support in standing or unable to understand instructions were excluded. Self-administered questionnaires targeted freezing of gait, turning hesitations, walking difficulties in daily life, fatigue, fear of falling, independence in activities of daily living, dyskinesia, demographics, falls/near falls history, balance problems while dual tasking and pain. Clinical assessments addressed functional balance performance, retropulsion, comfortable gait speed, motor symptoms and cognition. All falls and near falls were subsequently registered in a diary during a six-month period. Risk factors for prospective falls and/or near falls were determined using logistic regression.Sixty-three participants (45% experienced ≥ 1 fall and/or near fall. Three factors were independent predictors of falls and/or near falls: fear of falling (OR = 1.032, p<0.001 history of near falls (OR = 3.475, p = 0.009 and retropulsion (OR = 2.813, p = 0.035. The strongest contributing factor was fear of falling, followed by a history of near falls and retropulsion.Fear of falling seems to be an important issue to address already in mild PD as well as asking about prior near falls.

  5. Red meat consumption and cancer: reasons to suspect involvement of bovine infectious factors in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    zur Hausen, Harald

    2012-06-01

    An increased risk for colorectal cancer has been consistently reported for long-time consumption of cooked and processed red meat. This has frequently been attributed to chemical carcinogens arising during the cooking process of meat. Long-time fish or poultry consumption apparently does not increase the risk, although similar or higher concentrations of chemical carcinogens were recorded in their preparation for consumption. The geographic epidemiology of colorectal cancer seems to correspond to regions with a high rate of beef consumption. Countries with a virtual absence of beef in the diet (India) or where preferably lamb or goat meat is consumed (several Arabic countries) reveal low rates of colorectal cancer. In China, pork consumption has a long tradition, with an intermediate colorectal cancer rate. In Japan and Korea, large scale beef and pork imports started after World War II or after the Korean War. A steep rise in colorectal cancer incidence was noted after 1970 in Japan and 1990 in Korea. The consumption of undercooked beef (e.g., shabu-shabu, Korean yukhoe and Japanese yukke) became very popular in both countries. The available data are compatible with the interpretation that a specific beef factor, suspected to be one or more thermoresistant potentially oncogenic bovine viruses (e.g., polyoma-, papilloma- or possibly single-stranded DNA viruses) may contaminate beef preparations and lead to latent infections in the colorectal tract. Preceding, concomitant or subsequent exposure to chemical carcinogens arising during cooking procedures should result in increased risk for colorectal cancer synergistic with these infections. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  6. Masculinity and preventing falls: insights from the fall experiences of men aged 70 years and over.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddle, J L M; Lovarini, Meryl; Clemson, Lindy M; Jang, Haeyoung; Lord, Stephen R; Sherrington, Catherine; Willis, Karen

    2018-01-11

    To explore men's fall experiences through the lens of masculine identities so as to assist health professionals better engage men in fall prevention programs. Twenty-five men, aged 70-93 years who had experienced a recent fall, participated in a qualitative semi-structured interview. Men's willingness to engage in fall prevention programs taking account of individual contexts and expressions of masculinity, were conceptualised using constant comparative methods. Men's willingness to engage in fall prevention programs was related to their perceptions of the preventability of falls; personal relevance of falls; and age, health, and capability as well as problem-solving styles to prevent falls. Fall prevention advice was rarely given when men accessed the health system at the time of a fall. Contrary to dominant expectations about masculine identity, many men acknowledged fall vulnerability indicating they would attend or consider attending, a fall prevention program. Health professionals can better engage men by providing consistent messages that falls can be prevented; tailoring advice, understanding men are at different stages in their awareness of fall risk and preferences for action; and by being aware of their own assumptions that can act as barriers to speaking with men about fall prevention. Implications for rehabilitation Men accessing the health system at the time of the fall, and during rehabilitation following a fall represent prime opportunities for health professionals to speak with men about preventing falls and make appropriate referrals to community programs. Tailored advice will take account of individual men's perceptions of preventability; personal relevance; perceptions of age, health and capability; and problem-solving styles.

  7. Gait, mobility, and falls in older people

    OpenAIRE

    Gschwind, Yves Josef

    2012-01-01

    My doctoral thesis contributes to the understanding of gait, mobility, and falls in older people. All presented projects investigated the most prominent and sensitive markers for fall-related gait changes, that is gait velocity and gait variability. Based on the measurement of these spatio-temporal gait parameters, particularly when using a change-sensitive dual task paradigm, it is possible to make conclusions regarding walking, balance, activities of daily living, and falls in o...

  8. [Falls and renal function: a dangerous association].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Giorgi, Alfredo; Fabbian, Fabio; Pala, Marco; Mallozzi Menegatti, Alessandra; Misurati, Elisa; Manfredini, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Falls are an important health problem and the risk of falling increases with age. The costs due to falls are related to the progressive decline of patients' clinical conditions, with functional inability inducing increasing social costs, morbidity and mortality. Renal dysfunction is mostly present in elderly people who often have several comorbidities. Risk factors for falls have been classified as intrinsic and extrinsic, and renal dysfunction is included among the former. Chronic kidney disease per se is an important risk factor for falls, and the risk correlates negatively with creatinine clearance. Vitamin D deficiency, dysfunction of muscles and bones, nerve degeneration, cognitive decline, electrolyte imbalance, anemia, and metabolic acidosis have been reported to be associated with falls. Falls seem to be very frequent in dialysis patients: 44% of subjects on hemodialysis fall at least once a year with a 1-year mortality due to fractures of 64%. Male sex, comorbidities, predialysis hypotension, and a history of previous falls are the main risk factors, together with events directly related to renal replacement therapy such as biocompatibility of the dialysis membrane, arrhythmias, fluid overload and length of dialysis treatment. Peripheral nerve degeneration and demyelination as well as altered nerve conduction resulting in muscular weakness and loss of peripheral sensitivity are frequent when the glomerular filtration rate is less than 12 mL/min. Moreover, depression and sleep disorders can also increase the risk of falls. Kidney function is an important parameter to consider when evaluating the risk of falls in the elderly, and the development of specific guidelines for preventing falls in the uremic population should be considered.

  9. Cathode fall measurements in fluorescent lamps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nachtrieb, Robert [Lutron Electronics Co Inc., 7200 Suter Rd., Coopersburg, PA 18036 (United States); Khan, Farheen [Lutron Electronics Co Inc., 7200 Suter Rd., Coopersburg, PA 18036 (United States); Waymouth, John F [Consultant, 16 Bennett Rd. Marblehead, MA 01945 (United States)

    2005-09-07

    We describe an improved method and apparatus for making capacitive measurements of the cathode fall in fluorescent lamps employing known behaviour of anode oscillations to provide a zero-of-potential reference, placing the entire cathode and anode fall waveform on an absolute rather than relative scale. The improved method is applicable to any diameter of fluorescent lamp currently manufactured. We also describe a method and apparatus for making spectroscopic measurements of the cathode fall in fluorescent lamps. This uses the abrupt onset of emission of certain selected spectral lines of the rare gas filling as a signal that the cathode fall has exceeded the excitation potentials of the spectral lines in question.

  10. How Do Community-Dwelling Persons with Alzheimer Disease Fall Falls in the FINALEX Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niko M. Perttila

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: People with dementia are at high risk for falls. However, little is known of the features causing falls in Alzheimer disease (AD. Our aim was to investigate how participants with AD fall. Methods: In the FINALEX (Finnish Alzheimer Disease Exercise Trial study, participants’ (n = 194 falls were followed up for 1 year by diaries kept by their spouses. Results: The most common reason for falls (n = 355 was stumbling (n = 61. Of the falls, 123 led to injuries, 50 to emergency department visits, and 13 to fractures. The participants without falls (n = 103 were younger and had milder dementia than those with 1 (n = 34 or ≥2 falls (n = 57. Participants with a Mini Mental State Examination score of around 10 points were most prone to fall. In adjusted regression models, good nutritional status, good physical functioning, and use of antihypertensive medication (incident rate ratio [IRR] 0.68, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.54–0.85 protected against falls, whereas fall history (IRR 2.71, 95% CI 2.13–3.44, osteoarthritis, diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, higher number of drugs, drugs with anticholinergic properties, psychotropics, and opioids (IRR 4.27, 95% CI 2.92–6.24 were risk factors for falls. Conclusions: Our study provides a detailed account on how and why people with AD fall, suggesting several risk and protective factors.

  11. Dementia as a risk factor for falls and fall injuries among nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Doorn, Carol; Gruber-Baldini, Ann L; Zimmerman, Sheryl; Hebel, J Richard; Port, Cynthia L; Baumgarten, Mona; Quinn, Charlene C; Taler, George; May, Conrad; Magaziner, Jay

    2003-09-01

    To compare rates of falling between nursing home residents with and without dementia and to examine dementia as an independent risk factor for falls and fall injuries. Prospective cohort study with 2 years of follow-up. Fifty-nine randomly selected nursing homes in Maryland, stratified by geographic region and facility size. Two thousand fifteen newly admitted residents aged 65 and older. During 2 years after nursing home admission, fall data were collected from nursing home charts and hospital discharge summaries. The unadjusted fall rate for residents in the nursing home with dementia was 4.05 per year, compared with 2.33 falls per year for residents without dementia (Pinjurious falls was higher than for residents without dementia. Dementia is an independent risk factor for falling. Although most falls do not result in injury, the fact that residents with dementia fall more often than their counterparts without dementia leaves them with a higher overall risk of sustaining injurious falls over time. Nursing home residents with dementia should be considered important candidates for fall-prevention and fall-injury-prevention strategies.

  12. Falling into Salvation in Cioran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Acquisto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available While, at first glance, there seems to be very little room in the thought of E.M. Cioran for the notion of salvation, a closer look reveals that Cioran returns constantly to the vocabulary and the concept of redemption. This article teases out Cioran’s complex use of the topos of salvation throughout his works, with special emphasis on his middle period. I begin by tracing Cioran’s notion of humanity’s fall into time and language, from which he claims there can be no salvation in the traditional Christian sense. Nonetheless, he retains the concept, claiming at various points that there is a kind of salvation to be found in suicide, music, silence, and skepticism. Ultimately, however, each of these provides only false salvation, since the only permanent solution to the problem of existence for Cioran would be either to cease to exist or to lose our human nature in exchange for a plant-like life. Since this is impossible, we are left with our human means of seeking deliverance. While Cioran generally condemns human attempts at creation or procreation, he takes a different approach to the act of writing. In his reflections on writing we see that salvation for Cioran is always temporary, provisional, and threatened by our next bout of lucidity, but at the same time, eternally renewable with each new act of writing.

  13. Klamath Falls geothermal field, Oregon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lienau, P.J.; Culver, G.; Lund, J.W.

    1989-09-01

    Klamath Falls, Oregon, is located in a Known Geothermal Resource Area which has been used by residents, principally to obtain geothermal fluids for space heating, at least since the turn of the century. Over 500 shallow-depth wells ranging from 90 to 2,000 ft (27 to 610 m) in depth are used to heat (35 MWt) over 600 structures. This utilization includes the heating of homes, apartments, schools, commercial buildings, hospital, county jail, YMCA, and swimming pools by individual wells and three district heating systems. Geothermal well temperatures range from 100 to 230{degree}F (38 to 110{degree}C) and the most common practice is to use downhole heat exchangers with city water as the circulating fluid. Larger facilities and district heating systems use lineshaft vertical turbine pumps and plate heat exchangers. Well water chemistry indicates approximately 800 ppM dissolved solids, with sodium sulfate having the highest concentration. Some scaling and corrosion does occur on the downhole heat exchangers (black iron pipe) and on heating systems where the geo-fluid is used directly. 73 refs., 49 figs., 6 tabs.

  14. Approach to Fall in Elderly Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Ilkin Naharci

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Falls are one of the geriatric syndromes which occur commonly and significantly increase morbidity and mortality rates in elderly. The incidence of falls increases with age. Falls usually occur when impairments in cognitive, behavioral, and executive function begin. The incidence of fall is between 30 and 40 percent of community-dwelling people and approximately 50 percent of individuals in the long-term care setting over the age of 65 years. Fracture (hip, arm, wrist, pelvis, head trauma or major lacerations, as defined serious wounding, occur 10-25% of elderly cases. Fall is overlooked in clinical examination due to various reasons; the patient never mentions the event to a doctor; there is no injury at the time of the fall; the doctor fails to ask the patient about a history of falls; or either doctor or patient erroneously believes that falls are an inevitable part of the aging process. Elderly give not usually any self-information about fall, for this reason, all older patients should be asked at least once per year about falls and should be assessed in terms of balance and gait disorders. There are many distinct causes for falls in old people. Falls in older individuals occur when a threat to the normal homeostatic mechanisms that maintain postural stability is superimposed on underlying age-related declines in balance, ambulation, and cardiovascular function. This factor may be an acute illness (eg, fever, water loss, arrhythmia, a new medication, an environmental stress (eg, unfamiliar surrounding, or an unsafe walking surface. The elderly person can not cope with happened additional stress. To prevent and decrease the frequency of falls, effective approaches are medical interventions, environmental modifications, education-exercise programs, and assisted device. Detection and amelioration of risk factors can significantly reduce the rate of future falls. The assessment of fall, causing mobility restriction, use of nursing home, and

  15. Dance movement therapy and falls prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronese, Nicola; Maggi, Stefania; Schofield, Patricia; Stubbs, Brendon

    2017-08-01

    Falls are a leading cause of morbidity, healthcare use and mortality. Dance is a popular form of physical activity among older people and previous research has suggested that it may improve various health outcomes in this population, including balance, gait and muscle performance. A systematic review of the potential benefits of dance on falls and fear of falling is lacking. Thus, we conducted a systematic review considering all randomized controls trials (RCTs) investigating if dance can reduce falls and improve fear of falling in older adults. Major databases were searched from inception until 1 March 2017 and a total of 10 RCTs were identified, which included a total of 680 people (n=356 dance, n=324 control). Overall, the mean age of the samples was 69.4 years, and 75.2% were female. Across four RCTs, dance therapy reduced falls versus usual care in only one study. Dance therapy improved fear of falling in two out of three included RCTs. There were no serious adverse events reported in the RCTs. In summary, we found a paucity of studies investigating the effect of dance on falls and fear of falling and the evidence base is preliminary and equivocal. Given the heterogeneity of the included samples and interventions, in addition to the short-term follow-up, no firm conclusions can be drawn. However, dance appears to be safe and, given its popularity and demonstrated benefits on other health/wellbeing outcomes in older adults, it is important that future research considers its potential benefits on falls/fear of falling in older age. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Nurses' Job Satisfaction and Patient Falls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia D. Alvarez, DNP, RN

    2007-09-01

    Results and Conclusion: No significant relationship was found between overall nurses' job satisfaction and patient fall rate. MD–RN interactions (r = .65 and decision-making (r = .57 were the job satisfaction subscales that showed a significant positive correlation with patient fall rate (p < .05. Recommendations for future research are provided.

  17. How Fast Does a Building Fall?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Mark

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the time required for a tower block to collapse is calculated. The tower collapses progressively, with one floor falling onto the floor below, causing it to fall. The rate of collapse is found to be not much slower than freefall. The calculation is an engaging and relevant application of Newton's laws, suitable for undergraduate…

  18. Osteosarcopenic obesity and fall prevention strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hita-Contreras, Fidel; Martínez-Amat, Antonio; Cruz-Díaz, David; Pérez-López, Faustino R

    2015-02-01

    Sarcopenia, obesity, and osteoporosis are three interrelated entities which may share common pathophysiological factors. In the last decades, overall survival has drastically increased. Postmenopausal women, due to their estrogen depletion, are at higher risk of developing any of these three conditions or the three, which is termed osteosarcopenic obesity. One of the most common health problems among these patients is the elevated risk of falls and fractures. Falls and fall-related injuries are one of the major causes of mortality and morbidity in older adults, and have a significant impact on social, economical and health-related costs. Several extrinsic and intrinsic risk factors have been described that play a role in the etiology of falls. A therapeutic approach to osteosarcopenic obesity aimed at the prevention of falls must include several factors, and act on those risk elements which can be effectively modified. An adequate weight-loss diet and a good nutritional intake, with an appropriate amount of vitamin D and the right protein/carbohydrates ratio, may contribute to the prevention of falls. The recommendation of physical exercise, both traditional (resistance or aerobic training) and more recent varieties (Tai Chi, Pilates, body vibration), can improve balance and positively contribute to fall prevention, whether by itself or in combination with other therapeutic strategies. Finally, a pharmacological approach, especially one focused on hormone therapy, has shown to have a positive effect on postmenopausal women's balance, leading to a decreased risk of falls. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Falls and stumbles in myotonic dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiles, C M; Busse, M E; Sampson, C M; Rogers, M T; Fenton-May, J; van Deursen, R

    2006-03-01

    To investigate falls and risk factors in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) compared with healthy volunteers. 13 sequential patients with DM1 from different kindreds were compared with 12 healthy volunteers. All subjects were evaluated using the Rivermead Mobility Index, Performance Oriented Mobility Assessment, and modified Activities Specific Balance Confidence scale. Measures of lower limb muscle strength, gait speed, and 7-day ambulatory activity monitoring were recorded. Subjects returned a weekly card detailing stumbles and falls. 11 of 13 patients (mean age 46.5 years, seven female) had 127 stumbles and 34 falls over the 13 weeks, compared with 10 of 12 healthy subjects (34.4 years, seven female) who had 26 stumbles and three falls. Patients were less active than healthy subjects but had more falls and stumbles per 5000 right steps taken (mean (SD) events, 0.21 (0.29) v 0.02 (0.02), p = 0.007). Patients who fell (n = 6) had on average a lower Rivermead Mobility score, slower self selected gait speed, and higher depression scores than those who did not. DM1 patients stumble or fall about 10 times more often than healthy volunteers. Routine inquiry about falls and stumbles is justified. A study of multidisciplinary intervention to reduce the risk of falls seems warranted.

  20. [Fear of falling in a fall clinic for geriatric patients: a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dautzenberg, P.L.; Buurman, B.H.; Loonen, A.J.; Wouters, C.J.; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In this pilot study we want to determine how often fear of falling occurs in geriatric patients visiting a fall clinic and to study the characteristics of fear of falling and its consequences. DESIGN: Retrospective study of patient's records. METHOD: A random sample of 100 medical records

  1. History of falls, gait, balance, and fall risks in older cancer survivors living in the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Min H; Shilling, Tracy; Miller, Kara A; Smith, Kristin; LaVictoire, Kayle

    2015-01-01

    Older cancer survivors may be predisposed to falls because cancer-related sequelae affect virtually all body systems. The use of a history of falls, gait speed, and balance tests to assess fall risks remains to be investigated in this population. This study examined the relationship of previous falls, gait, and balance with falls in community-dwelling older cancer survivors. At the baseline, demographics, health information, and the history of falls in the past year were obtained through interviewing. Participants performed tests including gait speed, Balance Evaluation Systems Test, and short-version of Activities-specific Balance Confidence scale. Falls were tracked by mailing of monthly reports for 6 months. A "faller" was a person with ≥1 fall during follow-up. Univariate analyses, including independent sample t-tests and Fisher's exact tests, compared baseline demographics, gait speed, and balance between fallers and non-fallers. For univariate analyses, Bonferroni correction was applied for multiple comparisons. Baseline variables with Panalysis was Pinformation, history of falls, gaits speed, and balance tests did not differ significantly between fallers and non-fallers. Forward logistic regression revealed that a history of falls was a significant predictor of falls in the final model (odds ratio =6.81; 95% confidence interval =1.594-29.074) (Prisk of falling.

  2. Prospective study of falls and risk factors for falls in adults with advanced cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Stone, Carol A

    2012-06-10

    Retrospective studies of inpatients with cancer suggest that a cancer diagnosis confers a high risk of falls. In adults with advanced cancer, we aimed to prospectively document the incidence of falls, identify the risk factors, and determine if falls in this population occur predominantly in older patients.

  3. Falls and falls efficacy: the role of sustained attention in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Halloran, Aisling M; Pénard, Nils; Galli, Alessandra; Fan, Chie Wei; Robertson, Ian H; Kenny, Rose Anne

    2011-12-19

    Previous evidence indicates that older people allocate more of their attentional resources toward their gait and that the attention-related changes that occur during aging increase the risk of falls. The aim of this study was to investigate whether performance and variability in sustained attention is associated with falls and falls efficacy in older adults. 458 community-dwelling adults aged ≥ 60 years underwent a comprehensive geriatric assessment. Mean and variability of reaction time (RT), commission errors and omission errors were recorded during a fixed version of the Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART). RT variability was decomposed using the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) procedure, to help characterise variability associated with the arousal and vigilance aspects of sustained attention.The number of self-reported falls in the previous twelve months, and falls efficacy (Modified Falls Efficacy Scale) were also recorded. Significant increases in the mean and variability of reaction time on the SART were significantly associated with both falls (p older adults. An increase in omission errors was also associated with falls (p attention was a retrospective predictor of falling (p attention is strongly correlated with retrospective falls and to a lesser degree with reduced falls efficacy. This cognitive measure may provide a novel and valuable biomarker for falls in older adults, potentially allowing for early detection and the implementation of preventative intervention strategies.

  4. Risk Factors for Falls and Fall-related Fractures in the Elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Ziere (Gijsbertus)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractFalls are among the most common and serious problems facing older persons and are associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. They often lead to reduced functioning and nursing home admissions. The incidence of falls as well as the severity of fall-related complications rises

  5. Selective attentional processing to fall-relevant stimuli among older adults who fear falling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lesley A; White, Patti; Doan, Jonathan B; de Bruin, Natalie

    2011-05-01

    Fear of falling is known to affect more than half of community-dwelling older adults over 60 years of age. This fear is associated with physical and psychological effects that increase the risk of falling. The authors' theory is that attentional processing biases may exist in this population that serve to perpetuate fear of falling and subsequently increase fall risk. As a starting point in testing this proposition, the authors examined selective attentional processing bias to fall-relevant stimuli among older adults. Thirty older adult participants (M(age) = 70.8 ± 5.8), self-categorized to be Fearful of Falling (FF, n = 15) or Non-Fearful of Falling (NF, n = 15) completed a visual dot-probe paradigm to determine detection latencies to fall-threatening and general-threat stimuli. Attentional processing was defined using three index scores: attentional bias, congruency index, and incongruency index. Bias indicates capture of attention, whereas congruency and incongruency imply vigilance and disengagement difficulty, respectively. Both groups showed an attentional bias to fall-threat words but those who were fearful of falling also showed an incongruency effect for fall-threat words. These findings confirm that selective attentional processing profiles for fall-relevant stimuli differ between older adults who exhibit fear of falling and those who do not have this fear. Moreover, in accordance with current interpretations of selective attentional processing, the incongruency effect noted among fall-fearful older adults presents a possibility for a difficulty disengaging from fall-threatening stimuli.

  6. Falls and falls efficacy: the role of sustained attention in older adults

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Halloran, Aisling M

    2011-12-19

    Abstract Background Previous evidence indicates that older people allocate more of their attentional resources toward their gait and that the attention-related changes that occur during aging increase the risk of falls. The aim of this study was to investigate whether performance and variability in sustained attention is associated with falls and falls efficacy in older adults. Methods 458 community-dwelling adults aged ≥ 60 years underwent a comprehensive geriatric assessment. Mean and variability of reaction time (RT), commission errors and omission errors were recorded during a fixed version of the Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART). RT variability was decomposed using the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) procedure, to help characterise variability associated with the arousal and vigilance aspects of sustained attention. The number of self-reported falls in the previous twelve months, and falls efficacy (Modified Falls Efficacy Scale) were also recorded. Results Significant increases in the mean and variability of reaction time on the SART were significantly associated with both falls (p < 0.01) and reduced falls efficacy (p < 0.05) in older adults. An increase in omission errors was also associated with falls (p < 0.01) and reduced falls efficacy (p < 0.05). Upon controlling for age and gender affects, logistic regression modelling revealed that increasing variability associated with the vigilance (top-down) aspect of sustained attention was a retrospective predictor of falling (p < 0.01, OR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.03 - 1.26) in the previous year and was weakly correlated with reduced falls efficacy in non-fallers (p = 0.07). Conclusions Greater variability in sustained attention is strongly correlated with retrospective falls and to a lesser degree with reduced falls efficacy. This cognitive measure may provide a novel and valuable biomarker for falls in older adults, potentially allowing for early detection and the implementation of preventative intervention

  7. Falls risk assessment outcomes and factors associated with falls for older Indigenous Australians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Keith D; Flicker, Leon; LoGiudice, Dina; Smith, Kate; Atkinson, David; Hyde, Zoë; Fenner, Stephen; Skeaf, Linda; Malay, Roslyn; Boyle, Eileen

    2016-12-01

    To describe the prevalence of falls and associated risk factors in older Indigenous Australians, and compare the accuracy of validated falls risk screening and assessment tools in this population in classifying fall status. Cross-sectional study of 289 Indigenous Australians aged ≥45 years from the Kimberley region of Western Australia who had a detailed assessment including self-reported falls in the past year (n=289), the adapted Elderly Falls Screening Tool (EFST; n=255), and the Falls Risk for Older People-Community (FROP-Com) screening tool (3 items, n=74) and FROP-Com falls assessment tool (n=74). 32% of participants had ≥1 fall in the preceding year, and 37.3% were classified high falls risk using the EFST (cut-off ≥2). In contrast, for the 74 participants assessed with the FROP-Com, only 14.9% were rated high risk, 35.8% moderate risk, and 49.3% low risk. The FROP-Com screen and assessment tools had the highest classification accuracy for identifying fallers in the preceding year (area under curve >0.85), with sensitivity/specificity highest for the FROP-Com assessment (cut-off ≥12), sensitivity=0.84 and specificity=0.73. Falls are common in older Indigenous Australians. The FROP-Com falls risk assessment tool appears useful in this population, and this research suggests changes that may improve its utility further. © 2016 Public Health Association of Australia.

  8. Exercise for falls prevention in Parkinson disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrington, Catherine; Lord, Stephen R.; Close, Jacqueline C.T.; Heritier, Stephane; Heller, Gillian Z.; Howard, Kirsten; Allen, Natalie E.; Latt, Mark D.; Murray, Susan M.; O'Rourke, Sandra D.; Paul, Serene S.; Song, Jooeun; Fung, Victor S.C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether falls can be prevented with minimally supervised exercise targeting potentially remediable fall risk factors, i.e., poor balance, reduced leg muscle strength, and freezing of gait, in people with Parkinson disease. Methods: Two hundred thirty-one people with Parkinson disease were randomized into exercise or usual-care control groups. Exercises were practiced for 40 to 60 minutes, 3 times weekly for 6 months. Primary outcomes were fall rates and proportion of fallers during the intervention period. Secondary outcomes were physical (balance, mobility, freezing of gait, habitual physical activity), psychological (fear of falling, affect), and quality-of-life measures. Results: There was no significant difference between groups in the rate of falls (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 0.73, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.45–1.17, p = 0.18) or proportion of fallers (p = 0.45). Preplanned subgroup analysis revealed a significant interaction for disease severity (p exercise group compared with controls (IRR = 0.31, 95% CI 0.15–0.62, p exercise group (IRR = 1.61, 95% CI 0.86–3.03, p = 0.13). Postintervention, the exercise group scored significantly (p exercise program targeting balance, leg strength, and freezing of gait did not reduce falls but improved physical and psychological health. Falls were reduced in people with milder disease but not in those with more severe Parkinson disease. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class III evidence that for patients with Parkinson disease, a minimally supervised exercise program does not reduce fall risk. This study lacked the precision to exclude a moderate reduction or modest increase in fall risk from exercise. Trial registration: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN12608000303347). PMID:25552576

  9. Collective Fall Protection for Construction Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulowski, A. C.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Construction safety regulations require protection of workers against falls from elevations. The collective fall protection systems, in most cases, allow workers to move freely without wearing individual fall protection gear. The collective systems which prevent falls are preferred over the fall arrest systems. The latter are employed only if prevention of falls is not feasible. Arresting a fall always carries with it a residual risk of injury to the fall victim. The collective fall arrest systems are employed primarily during construction of electricity or telecomm towers. The aim of this paper has been a review of the collective FPS employed in the construction industry.Las normas de seguridad en la construcción requieren de protección para los trabajadores contra las caídas desde altura. Los Sistemas de Protección contra Caídas (FPS, por sus siglas en inglés colectivos, en la mayoría de los casos, permiten que los trabajadores se muevan libremente sin usar un equipo de protección contra caídas individual. Los sistemas colectivos de prevención de caídas son preferibles a los sistemas de detención de caídas, estos últimos se emplean sólo si la prevención de las caídas no es factible. La detención de una caída siempre lleva consigo un riesgo residual de lesiones en la víctima accidentada. Los sistemas colectivos de detención de caídas se emplean principalmente en la construcción de torres de electricidad o telecomunicaciones. El objetivo de este trabajo ha sido la revisión de los sistemas colectivos de protección contra caídas empleados en la industria de la construcción.

  10. The extra resource burden of in-hospital falls: a cost of falls study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morello, Renata T; Barker, Anna L; Watts, Jennifer J; Haines, Terry; Zavarsek, Silva S; Hill, Keith D; Brand, Caroline; Sherrington, Catherine; Wolfe, Rory; Bohensky, Megan A; Stoelwinder, Johannes U

    2015-11-02

    To quantify the additional hospital length of stay (LOS) and costs associated with in-hospital falls and fall injuries in acute hospitals in Australia. A multisite prospective cohort study conducted during 2011-2013 in the control wards of a falls prevention trial (6-PACK). The trial included all admissions to 12 acute medical and surgical wards of six Australian hospitals. In-hospital falls data were collected from medical record reviews, daily verbal reports by ward nurse unit managers, and hospital incident reporting and administrative databases. Clinical costing data were linked for three of the six participating hospitals to calculate patient-level costs. Hospital LOS and costs associated with in-hospital falls and fall injuries for each patient admission. We found that 966 of a total of 27 026 hospital admissions (3.6%) involved at least one fall, and 313 (1.2%) at least one fall injury, a total of 1330 falls and 418 fall injuries. After adjustment for age, sex, cognitive impairment, admission type, comorbidity and clustering by hospital, patients who had an in-hospital fall had a mean increase in LOS of 8 days (95% CI, 5.8-10.4; P costs of $6669 (95% CI, $3888-$9450; P costs (mean, $4727; 95% CI, -$568 to $10 022; P = 0.080). Patients who experience an in-hospital fall have significantly longer hospital stays and higher costs. Programs need to target the prevention of all falls, not just the reduction of fall-related injuries.

  11. A Multicomponent Fall Prevention Strategy Reduces Falls at an Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, Dan; Slayton, Jenny; Moore, Sonya; Domenico, Henry; Matthews, Julia; Steaban, Robin L; Choma, Neesha

    2017-09-01

    While the reduction in fall rates has not kept pace with the reduction of other hospital-acquired conditions, patient safety research and quality improvement (QI) initiatives at the system and hospital levels have achieved positive results and provide insights into potentially effective risk reduction strategies. An academic medical center developed a QI-based multicomponent strategy for fall prevention and pilot tested it for six months in three high-risk units-the Neuroscience Acute Care Unit, the Myelosuppression/Stem Cell Transplant Unit, and the Acute Care for the Elderly Unit-before implementing and evaluating the strategy hospitalwide. The multicomponent fall strategy was evaluated using a pre-post study design. The main outcome measures were falls and falls with harm measured in events per 1,000 patient-days. Fall rates were monitored and compared for three classes of falls: (1) accidental, (2) anticipated physiologic, and (3) unanticipated physiologic. Statistical process control charts showed that the pilot units had achieved significant reductions in falls with harm during the last five months of data collection. Wald test and segmented regression analyses revealed significant improvements in pooled postintervention fall rates, stratified by fall type. The hospitalwide implementation of the program resulted in a 47% overall reduction in falls in the postintervention period. A fall prevention strategy that targeted the spectrum of risk factors produced measurable improvement in fall rates and rates of patient harm. Hospitals must continue developing, rigorously testing, and sharing their results and experiences in implementing and sustaining multicomponent fall prevention strategies. Copyright © 2017 The Joint Commission. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Increased concern is protective for falls in Chinese older people: the chopstix fall risk study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Marcella M S; Tsang, William W N; Lin, Sang-I; Greenaway, Mark; Close, Jacqueline C T; Lord, Stephen R

    2013-08-01

    Chinese older people have approximately half the risk of falling as their white counterparts, but no studies to date have explained why such a disparity exists. A total of 692 Chinese and 764 white community-dwelling older people participated in a multicohort study conducted in Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Australia. Baseline measurements included sociodemographic, psychological, and physical measures; concern about falling (Falls Efficacy Scale-International scores); and physical activity levels. Falls were monitored prospectively for 12-24 months. The standardized annual fall rates for the 3 Chinese cohorts were 0.26 ± 0.47 in Taiwan, 0.21 ± 0.57 in Hong Kong, and 0.36 ± 0.80 in Australia, which were significantly lower than that of the white cohort at 0.70 ± 1.15. The fall rates for the Taiwan and Hong Kong cohorts were also significantly lower than that of the Australian Chinese cohort. The difference in fall rates was not due to better physical ability in the Chinese cohorts. However, the Chinese cohorts did more planned activity and expressed more concern about falling. Negative binomial regression analysis revealed a significant Cohort × Falls Efficacy Scale-International score interaction. After adjusting for this interaction, Falls Efficacy Scale-International scores, other predictors, and confounders, the incidence rate ratios comparing the cohorts were no longer statistically significant. Low fall rates in Chinese cohorts appear to be due to increased concern about falling as manifest in high Falls Efficacy Scale-International scores. These findings suggest that the Chinese cohorts are more likely to adapt their behaviors to lessen fall risk and that such adaptations are partially lost in Chinese people who have migrated to a "Westernized" country.

  13. Falls and Fall-Related Injuries among Community-Dwelling Adults in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Santosh K.; Willetts, Joanna L.; Corns, Helen L.; Marucci-Wellman, Helen R.; Lombardi, David A.; Courtney, Theodore K.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Falls are the leading cause of unintentional injuries in the U.S.; however, national estimates for all community-dwelling adults are lacking. This study estimated the national incidence of falls and fall-related injuries among community-dwelling U.S. adults by age and gender and the trends in fall-related injuries across the adult life span. Methods Nationally representative data from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) 2008 Balance and Dizziness supplement was used to develop national estimates of falls, and pooled data from the NHIS was used to calculate estimates of fall-related injuries in the U.S. and related trends from 2004–2013. Costs of unintentional fall-related injuries were extracted from the CDC’s Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System. Results Twelve percent of community-dwelling U.S. adults reported falling in the previous year for a total estimate of 80 million falls at a rate of 37.2 falls per 100 person-years. On average, 9.9 million fall-related injuries occurred each year with a rate of 4.38 fall-related injuries per 100 person-years. In the previous three months, 2.0% of older adults (65+), 1.1% of middle-aged adults (45–64) and 0.7% of young adults (18–44) reported a fall-related injury. Of all fall-related injuries among community-dwelling adults, 32.3% occurred among older adults, 35.3% among middle-aged adults and 32.3% among younger adults. The age-adjusted rate of fall-related injuries increased 4% per year among older women (95% CI 1%–7%) from 2004 to 2013. Among U.S. adults, the total lifetime cost of annual unintentional fall-related injuries that resulted in a fatality, hospitalization or treatment in an emergency department was 111 billion U.S. dollars in 2010. Conclusions Falls and fall-related injuries represent a significant health and safety problem for adults of all ages. The findings suggest that adult fall prevention efforts should consider the entire adult lifespan to ensure a

  14. Relevance of vitamin D in fall prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff-Ferrari, Heike A

    2017-03-01

    This review will summarize recent clinical studies and meta-analyses on the effect of vitamin D supplementation on fall prevention. As fall prevention is fundamental in fracture prevention at older age, we discuss if and to what extend the vitamin D effect on muscle modulates hip fracture risk. Further, to explain the effect of vitamin D on fall prevention, we will review the mechanistic evidence linking vitamin D to muscle health and the potentially selective effect of vitamin D on type II fast muscle fibers.

  15. Unexplained Falls Are Frequent in Patients with Fall-Related Injury Admitted to Orthopaedic Wards: The UFO Study (Unexplained Falls in Older Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mussi Chiara

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the incidence of unexplained falls in elderly patients affected by fall-related fractures admitted to orthopaedic wards, we recruited 246 consecutive patients older than 65 (mean age 82±7 years, range 65–101. Falls were defined “accidental” (fall explained by a definite accidental cause, “medical” (fall caused directly by a specific medical disease, “dementia-related” (fall in patients affected by moderate-severe dementia, and “unexplained” (nonaccidental falls, not related to a clear medical or drug-induced cause or with no apparent cause. According to the anamnestic features of the event, older patients had a lower tendency to remember the fall. Patients with accidental fall remember more often the event. Unexplained falls were frequent in both groups of age. Accidental falls were more frequent in younger patients, while dementia-related falls were more common in the older ones. Patients with unexplained falls showed a higher number of depressive symptoms. In a multivariate analysis a higher GDS and syncopal spells were independent predictors of unexplained falls. In conclusion, more than one third of all falls in patients hospitalized in orthopaedic wards were unexplained, particularly in patients with depressive symptoms and syncopal spells. The identification of fall causes must be evaluated in older patients with a fall-related injury.

  16. Unexplained Falls Are Frequent in Patients with Fall-Related Injury Admitted to Orthopaedic Wards: The UFO Study (Unexplained Falls in Older Patients).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiara, Mussi; Gianluigi, Galizia; Pasquale, Abete; Alessandro, Morrione; Alice, Maraviglia; Gabriele, Noro; Paolo, Cavagnaro; Loredana, Ghirelli; Giovanni, Tava; Franco, Rengo; Giulio, Masotti; Gianfranco, Salvioli; Niccolò, Marchionni; Andrea, Ungar

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence of unexplained falls in elderly patients affected by fall-related fractures admitted to orthopaedic wards, we recruited 246 consecutive patients older than 65 (mean age 82 ± 7 years, range 65-101). Falls were defined "accidental" (fall explained by a definite accidental cause), "medical" (fall caused directly by a specific medical disease), "dementia-related" (fall in patients affected by moderate-severe dementia), and "unexplained" (nonaccidental falls, not related to a clear medical or drug-induced cause or with no apparent cause). According to the anamnestic features of the event, older patients had a lower tendency to remember the fall. Patients with accidental fall remember more often the event. Unexplained falls were frequent in both groups of age. Accidental falls were more frequent in younger patients, while dementia-related falls were more common in the older ones. Patients with unexplained falls showed a higher number of depressive symptoms. In a multivariate analysis a higher GDS and syncopal spells were independent predictors of unexplained falls. In conclusion, more than one third of all falls in patients hospitalized in orthopaedic wards were unexplained, particularly in patients with depressive symptoms and syncopal spells. The identification of fall causes must be evaluated in older patients with a fall-related injury.

  17. History of falls, gait, balance, and fall risks in older cancer survivors living in the community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang MH

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Min H Huang, Tracy Shilling, Kara A Miller, Kristin Smith, Kayle LaVictoire Physical Therapy Department, School of Health Professions and Studies, University of Michigan–Flint, Flint, MI, USA Abstract: Older cancer survivors may be predisposed to falls because cancer-related sequelae affect virtually all body systems. The use of a history of falls, gait speed, and balance tests to assess fall risks remains to be investigated in this population. This study examined the relationship of previous falls, gait, and balance with falls in community-dwelling older cancer survivors. At the baseline, demographics, health information, and the history of falls in the past year were obtained through interviewing. Participants performed tests including gait speed, Balance Evaluation Systems Test, and short-version of Activities-specific Balance Confidence scale. Falls were tracked by mailing of monthly reports for 6 months. A “faller” was a person with ≥1 fall during follow-up. Univariate analyses, including independent sample t-tests and Fisher’s exact tests, compared baseline demographics, gait speed, and balance between fallers and non-fallers. For univariate analyses, Bonferroni correction was applied for multiple comparisons. Baseline variables with P<0.15 were included in a forward logistic regression model to identify factors predictive of falls with age as covariate. Sensitivity and specificity of each predictor of falls in the model were calculated. Significance level for the regression analysis was P<0.05. During follow-up, 59% of participants had one or more falls. Baseline demographics, health information, history of falls, gaits speed, and balance tests did not differ significantly between fallers and non-fallers. Forward logistic regression revealed that a history of falls was a significant predictor of falls in the final model (odds ratio =6.81; 95% confidence interval =1.594–29.074 (P<0.05. Sensitivity and specificity for correctly

  18. Falls and falls efficacy: the role of sustained attention in older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Halloran Aisling M

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous evidence indicates that older people allocate more of their attentional resources toward their gait and that the attention-related changes that occur during aging increase the risk of falls. The aim of this study was to investigate whether performance and variability in sustained attention is associated with falls and falls efficacy in older adults. Methods 458 community-dwelling adults aged ≥ 60 years underwent a comprehensive geriatric assessment. Mean and variability of reaction time (RT, commission errors and omission errors were recorded during a fixed version of the Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART. RT variability was decomposed using the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT procedure, to help characterise variability associated with the arousal and vigilance aspects of sustained attention. The number of self-reported falls in the previous twelve months, and falls efficacy (Modified Falls Efficacy Scale were also recorded. Results Significant increases in the mean and variability of reaction time on the SART were significantly associated with both falls (p Conclusions Greater variability in sustained attention is strongly correlated with retrospective falls and to a lesser degree with reduced falls efficacy. This cognitive measure may provide a novel and valuable biomarker for falls in older adults, potentially allowing for early detection and the implementation of preventative intervention strategies.

  19. Falls in institutions for older adults: characterization of fall occurrences and associated risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Rosa Soares Lavareda Baixinho

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Falls are the main accident for older adults, with consequences on functionality. Older adults impose restrictions or have restrictions imposed on their activities for fear of new falls. This prospective longitudinal study was conducted with 104 institutionalized older adults during six months with the following goals: to determine the prevalence of falls, to characterize the falls according to place, time, resulting injuries, supervision of the older adult, action performed at the time of the fall, and to relate the occurrence of the fall to the risk of falling, medical diagnoses, number of medications in use, type of medication, degree of dependency, age, and gender. The prevalence of falls was 37.5%, and they happened mostly in the bedroom, while walking after getting up from the bed. Those under risk in the Morse Fall Scale (p=0.034 and on sedatives (p=0.007 face a higher prevalence of falls. This study enables the possibility of making suggestions for practice, training and investigation.

  20. Falls Among Older Adults: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of traumatic brain injuries (TBI). 9 Adjusted for inflation, the direct medical costs for fall injuries are $ ... OIG 1600 Clifton Road Atlanta , GA 30329-4027 USA 800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636) , TTY: 888- ...

  1. Performances: "Aufstieg und Fall der Stadt Mahagonny"

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gonzales, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The January 26, 2008, performance of Kurt Weill's "Aufstieg und Fall der Stadt Mahagonny" featuring Astrid Kropp under director Barrie Kosky and conductor Stefan Soltesz at the Musiktheater in Essen...

  2. Effect of free fall on higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, S. A.

    1973-01-01

    The influence of exposure to the free-fall state on the orientation, morphogenesis, physiology, and radiation response of higher plants is briefly summarized. It is proposed that the duration of the space-flight experiments has been to brief to permit meaningful effects of free fall on general biochemistry, growth, and development to appear. However, two types of significant effect did occur. The first is on differential growth - i.e., tropism and epinasty - resulting from the absence of a normal geostimulus. For these phenomena it is suggested that ground-based experiments with the clinostat would suffice to mimic the effect of the free-fall state. The second is an apparent interaction between the radiation response and some flight condition, yielding an enhanced microspore abortion, a disturbed spindle function, and a stunting of stamen hairs. It is suggested that this apparent interaction may be derived from a shift in the rhythm of the cell cycle, induced by the free fall.

  3. Impact of Fall Prevention on Nurses and Care of Fall Risk Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Barbara; Pecanac, Kristen; Krupp, Anna; Liebzeit, Daniel; Mahoney, Jane

    2016-12-23

    Falls are common events for hospitalized older adults, resulting in negative outcomes both for patients and hospitals. The Center for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) has placed pressure on hospital administrators by identifying falls as a "never event", resulting in a zero falls goal for many hospitals. Staff nurses are responsible for providing direct care to patients and for meeting the hospital no falls goal. Little is known about the impact of "zero falls" on nurses, patients and the organization. A qualitative study, using Grounded Dimensional Analysis (GDA) was conducted to explore nurses' experiences with fall prevention in hospital settings and the impact of those experiences on how nurses provide care to fall risk patients. Twenty-seven registered nurses and certified nursing assistants participated in in-depth interviews. Open, axial and selective coding was used to analyze data. A conceptual model which illustrates the impact of intense messaging from nursing administration to prevent patient falls on nurses, actions nurses take to address the message and the consequences to nurses, older adult patients and to the organization was developed. Intense messaging from hospital administration to achieve zero falls resulted in nurses developing a fear of falls, protecting self and unit, and restricting fall risk patients as a way to stop messages and meet the hospital goal. Results of this study identify unintended consequences of fall prevention message on nurses and older adult patients. Further research is needed understand how nurse care for fall risk patients. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Isolation and characterization of the fall Chinook aquareovirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhsous, Negar; Jensen, Nicole L.; Haman, Katherine H.; Batts, William N.; Jerome, Keith R.; Winton, James; Greninger, Alexander L.

    2017-01-01

    BackgroundSalmon are paramount to the economy, ecology, and history of the Pacific Northwest. Viruses constitute one of the major threats to salmon health and well-being, with more than twenty known virus species that infect salmon. Here, we describe the isolation and characterization of the fall Chinook aquareovirus, a divergent member of the species Aquareovirus B within the family Reoviridae.MethodsThe virus was first found in 2014 as part of a routine adult broodstock screening program in which kidney and spleen tissue samples from healthy-appearing, adult fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to a hatchery in Washington State produced cytopathic effects when inoculated onto a Chinook salmon embryo cell line (CHSE-214). The virus was not able to be confirmed by an RT-PCR assay using existing aquareovirus pan-species primers, and instead was identified by metagenomic next-generation sequencing. Metagenomic next-generation sequencing was used to recover the full genome and completed using 3′ RACE.ResultsThe genome of the fall Chinook aquareovirus contains 11 segments of double-stranded RNA totaling 23.3 kb, with each segment flanked by the canonical sequence termini found in the aquareoviruses. Sequence comparisons and a phylogenetic analysis revealed a nucleotide identity of 63.2% in the VP7 gene with the Green River Chinook virus, placing the new isolate in the species Aquareovirus B. A qRT-PCR assay was developed targeting the VP2, which showed rapid growth of the isolate during the initial 5 days in culture using CHSE-214 cells.ConclusionsThis sequence represents the first complete genome of an Aquareovirus B species. Future studies will be required to understand the potential pathogenicity and epidemiology of the fall Chinook aquareovirus.

  5. Isolation and characterization of the fall Chinook aquareovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhsous, Negar; Jensen, Nicole L; Haman, Katherine H; Batts, William N; Jerome, Keith R; Winton, James R; Greninger, Alexander L

    2017-09-05

    Salmon are paramount to the economy, ecology, and history of the Pacific Northwest. Viruses constitute one of the major threats to salmon health and well-being, with more than twenty known virus species that infect salmon. Here, we describe the isolation and characterization of the fall Chinook aquareovirus, a divergent member of the species Aquareovirus B within the family Reoviridae. The virus was first found in 2014 as part of a routine adult broodstock screening program in which kidney and spleen tissue samples from healthy-appearing, adult fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to a hatchery in Washington State produced cytopathic effects when inoculated onto a Chinook salmon embryo cell line (CHSE-214). The virus was not able to be confirmed by an RT-PCR assay using existing aquareovirus pan-species primers, and instead was identified by metagenomic next-generation sequencing. Metagenomic next-generation sequencing was used to recover the full genome and completed using 3' RACE. The genome of the fall Chinook aquareovirus contains 11 segments of double-stranded RNA totaling 23.3 kb, with each segment flanked by the canonical sequence termini found in the aquareoviruses. Sequence comparisons and a phylogenetic analysis revealed a nucleotide identity of 63.2% in the VP7 gene with the Green River Chinook virus, placing the new isolate in the species Aquareovirus B. A qRT-PCR assay was developed targeting the VP2, which showed rapid growth of the isolate during the initial 5 days in culture using CHSE-214 cells. This sequence represents the first complete genome of an Aquareovirus B species. Future studies will be required to understand the potential pathogenicity and epidemiology of the fall Chinook aquareovirus.

  6. Quantifying Temperature Effects on Fall Chinook Salmon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jager, Yetta [ORNL

    2011-11-01

    The motivation for this study was to recommend relationships for use in a model of San Joaquin fall Chinook salmon. This report reviews literature pertaining to relationships between water temperature and fall Chinook salmon. The report is organized into three sections that deal with temperature effects on development and timing of freshwater life stages, temperature effects on incubation survival for eggs and alevin, and temperature effects on juvenile survival. Recommendations are made for modeling temperature influences for all three life stages.

  7. Evaluation of accelerometer-based fall detection algorithms on real-world falls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Bagalà

    Full Text Available Despite extensive preventive efforts, falls continue to be a major source of morbidity and mortality among elderly. Real-time detection of falls and their urgent communication to a telecare center may enable rapid medical assistance, thus increasing the sense of security of the elderly and reducing some of the negative consequences of falls. Many different approaches have been explored to automatically detect a fall using inertial sensors. Although previously published algorithms report high sensitivity (SE and high specificity (SP, they have usually been tested on simulated falls performed by healthy volunteers. We recently collected acceleration data during a number of real-world falls among a patient population with a high-fall-risk as part of the SensAction-AAL European project. The aim of the present study is to benchmark the performance of thirteen published fall-detection algorithms when they are applied to the database of 29 real-world falls. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first systematic comparison of fall detection algorithms tested on real-world falls. We found that the SP average of the thirteen algorithms, was (mean ± std 83.0% ± 30.3% (maximum value = 98%. The SE was considerably lower (SE = 57.0% ± 27.3%, maximum value = 82.8%, much lower than the values obtained on simulated falls. The number of false alarms generated by the algorithms during 1-day monitoring of three representative fallers ranged from 3 to 85. The factors that affect the performance of the published algorithms, when they are applied to the real-world falls, are also discussed. These findings indicate the importance of testing fall-detection algorithms in real-life conditions in order to produce more effective automated alarm systems with higher acceptance. Further, the present results support the idea that a large, shared real-world fall database could, potentially, provide an enhanced understanding of the fall process and the information needed

  8. Evaluation of accelerometer-based fall detection algorithms on real-world falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagalà, Fabio; Becker, Clemens; Cappello, Angelo; Chiari, Lorenzo; Aminian, Kamiar; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M; Zijlstra, Wiebren; Klenk, Jochen

    2012-01-01

    Despite extensive preventive efforts, falls continue to be a major source of morbidity and mortality among elderly. Real-time detection of falls and their urgent communication to a telecare center may enable rapid medical assistance, thus increasing the sense of security of the elderly and reducing some of the negative consequences of falls. Many different approaches have been explored to automatically detect a fall using inertial sensors. Although previously published algorithms report high sensitivity (SE) and high specificity (SP), they have usually been tested on simulated falls performed by healthy volunteers. We recently collected acceleration data during a number of real-world falls among a patient population with a high-fall-risk as part of the SensAction-AAL European project. The aim of the present study is to benchmark the performance of thirteen published fall-detection algorithms when they are applied to the database of 29 real-world falls. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first systematic comparison of fall detection algorithms tested on real-world falls. We found that the SP average of the thirteen algorithms, was (mean ± std) 83.0% ± 30.3% (maximum value = 98%). The SE was considerably lower (SE = 57.0% ± 27.3%, maximum value = 82.8%), much lower than the values obtained on simulated falls. The number of false alarms generated by the algorithms during 1-day monitoring of three representative fallers ranged from 3 to 85. The factors that affect the performance of the published algorithms, when they are applied to the real-world falls, are also discussed. These findings indicate the importance of testing fall-detection algorithms in real-life conditions in order to produce more effective automated alarm systems with higher acceptance. Further, the present results support the idea that a large, shared real-world fall database could, potentially, provide an enhanced understanding of the fall process and the information needed to design and

  9. Depression and Outcome of Fear of Falling in a Falls Prevention Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaboni, Andrea; Banez, Carol; Lam, Robert; Jones, Simon A; Maki, Brian E; Liu, Barbara A; Flint, Alastair J

    2015-10-01

    To examine whether depression predicts less improvement in fear of falling and falls efficacy in older adults attending a falls prevention program (FPP). Using a prospective observational design in an academic medical center, the authors studied 69 nondemented adults aged 55 years or older (mean age: 77.8±8.9 years) who had experienced at least one fall in the previous year and who attended the FPP. The primary outcome variable was change in severity of fear of falling during the FPP. Secondary outcome variables were change in falls efficacy and fear-related restriction of activities during the FPP. Independent variables were baseline depressive disorders and depressive symptom severity. Twenty-one of 69 study participants (30.4%) had a depressive disorder at baseline. Depressive disorder and depressive symptoms were not associated with change in severity of fear of falling or restriction of activity. On the other hand, depressive disorder was associated with improvement in falls efficacy, although this finding was not significant in multivariate analysis. Among participants with a depressive disorder, improvement in falls efficacy was significantly correlated with improvement in depressive symptoms. There was no association between baseline depression and change in fear of falling in this FPP. The correlation between improvement in depressive symptoms and improvement in falls efficacy raises the question as to whether a cognitive-behavioral intervention that simultaneously targets both depression and falls efficacy would be a useful component of a FPP. Copyright © 2015 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Central and peripheral visual impairment and the risk of falls and falls with injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patino, Cecilia M; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Azen, Stanley P; Allison, Jessica Chung; Choudhury, Farzana; Varma, Rohit

    2010-02-01

    To evaluate whether central (CVI) and peripheral visual impairment (PVI) are independent risk factors for falls and falls with injury 4 years later. Population-based, prospective cohort study. A population-based sample of 3203 adult Latinos. Baseline presenting binocular central distance acuity was measured and impairment was classified as mild (20/40-20/63) or moderate/severe (Peripheral visual impairment was classified as mild (-6 dB injury in the past 12 months were assessed by self-report at the 4-year follow-up visit. Out of 3203 individuals, 19% reported falls and 10% falls with injury 4 years after the baseline examination; participants with falls were more likely to be >or=60 years of age, be female, report lower income, have >2 comorbidities, report alcohol use, report wearing bifocal glasses, and report obesity. Among those who reported falls, 7% had CVI (visual acuity >20/40) compared with 4% who did not report falls; and 49% had PVI (mean deviation injury (OR, 2.76; 95% CI, 1.10-7.02; P(value) = 0.03; and OR, 1.40; 95% CI, 0.94-2.05 P(trend) = 0.04, respectively). Both CVI and PVI were independently associated with increased risk for falls and falls with injury 4 years after the initial examination in a dose-response manner. Although vision-related interventions for preventing falls have mainly focused on correcting CVI, this study suggests that targeting both central and peripheral components may be necessary to effectively reduce rates of falls and falls with injury related to vision loss. Copyright (c) 2010 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Feasibility of Assessing Falls Risk and Promoting Falls Prevention in Beauty Salons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arandia, Gabriela; Hargrove, Jennifer L; Shubert, Tiffany E; Bangdiwala, Shrikant I; Linnan, Laura A

    2017-12-01

    Falls are a major public health risk and a leading cause of emergency room visits for people of all ages. Finding ways to increase access to information and evidence-based falls prevention strategies is critically important across the lifespan. We tested the feasibility of conducting a falls risk assessment and awareness program among customers who attend beauty salons. We enrolled 78 customers from 2 beauty salons who completed a written questionnaire as well as several biometric and functional balance tests designed to assess falls risk. On average, enrolled participants were 56 years of age (range: 19-90), female (n = 70, 91%), and Black (n = 47, 62%). Eleven percent of enrolled customers were classified as at high risk of falls because they had reported two or more falls in the last 6 months. We found that younger age, higher education, employment, moderate physical activity, and decreased frequency of salon visits were associated with fewer falls. Results demonstrated initial interest in, and the feasibility of recruiting and enrolling customers into a beauty salon-based falls risk assessment and awareness program. Beauty salons, which are in all communities, represent an innovative setting for reaching people of all ages with life-saving falls prevention information and services.

  12. Fall arrest characteristics of a scissor lift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, James R; Powers, John R; Pan, Christopher S; Boehler, Brad

    2010-06-01

    Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI) data indicate 306 aerial lift fatalities between 1992-2003. Seventy-eight of these fatalities specifically involved scissor lifts. Members of standards committees have requested that NIOSH conduct research to determine the effects of safety-control practices related to using fall-protection systems for scissor lifts. This research examined the structural and dynamic stability of a scissor lift subjected to fall arrest forces. This was accomplished by conducting drop tests from a scissor lift. Anchorage locations evaluated included manufacturer-supplied anchorage points on the scissor lift platform as well as mid-rail and top-rail locations. Preliminary drop tests determined that a 2400 lb maximum arrest force (MAF) could be generated by dropping 169 lb through a fall height of 36" using Nystron rope as a lanyard. The scissor lift maintained structural and dynamic stability for all drop tests when fully extended and on an incline. Anchoring a fall arrest system to either the mid-rail or top-rail is not a recommended practice by the scissor lift manufacturer. Anchor points are provided on the platform floor of the scissor lift for this purpose. However, our results demonstrate that the mid-rail and top-rail absorb substantial energy from an arrested fall and may have potential as appropriate anchorage points. Employers and workers should consider implementing fall arrest systems when using scissor lifts as part of their overall risk mitigation plan for fall injury prevention. (c) 2010 National Safety Council. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Predictors of falling in elderly hospital patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, Raja I; Lord, Stephen R; Ehrlich, Frederick; Janji, Nabil; Rahman, Abdur

    2004-01-01

    A prospective study was conducted to determine whether a brief clinical assessment conducted soon after admission can accurately identify older people who fall while staying in an acute hospital. Eighty-eight non-bedfast patients aged 80-99 years took part in the study. Within 3 days of admission, these patients were assessed for the following measures: impaired orientation on the MMSE, psychoactive medication use, evidence of stroke, and impaired ability on the Get-Up-and-Go-test. The major presenting condition for each patient was also recorded. Patients were then followed up to determine whether they fell while in hospital. Impaired orientation on the MMSE, evidence of previous cerebrovascular accident, and major presenting conditions of falls and confusion were significantly associated with falls while in hospital. There was also a trend indicating that psychoactive medication use was elevated in the fallers. In contrast, there was no difference in the proportion of fallers and non-fallers who had impaired ability in the Get-Up-and-Go-test. Of the 15 patients who fell, 13 had two or more risk factors, and after controlling for possible confounding factors of age, sex and length of stay, the presence of two-plus risk factors remained strongly and significantly associated with falls (adjusted OR = 13.43; 95% CI = 1.91 - 94.40). The findings indicate that a simple screening protocol can accurately identify patients at risk of falling while in hospital.

  14. Accidents due to falls from roof slabs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Alves Rudelli

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE Falls from the roof slabs of houses are accidents of high potential severity that occur in large Brazilian cities and often affect children and adolescents. The aims of this study were to characterize the factors that predispose towards this type of fall involving children and adolescents, quantify the severity of associated lesions and suggest preventive measures. DESIGN AND SETTING Descriptive observational prospective longitudinal study in two hospitals in the metropolitan region of São Paulo. METHODS Data were collected from 29 cases of falls from roof slabs involving children and adolescents between October 2008 and October 2009. RESULTS Cases involving males were more prevalent, accounting for 84%. The predominant age group was schoolchildren (7 to 12 years old; 44%. Leisure activities were most frequently being practiced on the roof slab at the time of the fall (86%, and flying a kite was the most prevalent game (37.9%. In 72% of the cases, the children were unaccompanied by an adult responsible for them. Severe conditions such as multiple trauma and traumatic brain injuries resulted from 79% of the accidents. CONCLUSION Falls from roof slabs are accidents of high potential severity, and preventive measures aimed towards informing parents and guardians about the dangers and risk factors associated with this type of accident are needed, along with physical protective measures, such as low walls around the slab and gates with locks to restrict free access to these places.

  15. Fall-Prone Older People's Attitudes towards the Use of Virtual Reality Technology for Fall Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dockx, Kim; Alcock, Lisa; Bekkers, Esther; Ginis, Pieter; Reelick, Miriam; Pelosin, Elisa; Lagravinese, Giovanna; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M; Mirelman, Anat; Rochester, Lynn; Nieuwboer, Alice

    2017-01-01

    Virtual reality (VR) technology is a relatively new rehabilitation tool that can deliver a combination of cognitive and motor training for fall prevention. The attitudes of older people to such training are currently unclear. This study aimed to investigate: (1) the attitudes of fall-prone older people towards fall prevention exercise with and without VR; (2) attitudinal changes after intervention with and without VR; and (3) user satisfaction following fall prevention exercise with and without VR. A total of 281 fall-prone older people were randomly assigned to an experimental group receiving treadmill training augmented by VR (TT+VR, n = 144) or a control group receiving treadmill training alone (TT, n = 137). Two questionnaires were used to measure (1) attitudes towards fall prevention exercise with and without VR (AQ); and (2) user satisfaction (USQ). AQ was evaluated at baseline and after intervention. USQ was measured after intervention only. The AQ revealed that most participants had positive attitudes towards fall prevention exercise at baseline (82.2%) and after intervention (80.6%; p = 0.144). In contrast, only 53.6% were enthusiastic about fall prevention exercise with VR at baseline. These attitudes positively changed after intervention (83.1%; p experience. From the perspective of the user, VR is an attractive training mode, and thus improving service provision for older people is important. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Evaluation of Accelerometer-Based Fall Detection Algorithms on Real-World Falls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bagala, Fabio; Becker, Clemens; Cappello, Angelo; Chiari, Lorenzo; Aminian, Kamiar; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M.; Zijlstra, Wiebren; Klenk, Jochen

    2012-01-01

    Despite extensive preventive efforts, falls continue to be a major source of morbidity and mortality among elders. Real-time detection of falls and their urgent communication to a telecare center may enable rapid medical assistance, thus increasing the sense of security of the elderly and reducing

  17. Martial arts fall techniques decrease the impact forces at the hip during sideways falling.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, B.E.; Weerdesteijn, V.G.M.; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2007-01-01

    Falls to the side and those with impact on the hip are risky for hip fractures in the elderly. A previous study has indicated that martial arts (MA) fall techniques can reduce hip impact force, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. Furthermore, the high impact forces at the hand used to break the

  18. Case study on possible falling patterns of a fatal fall from stairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Hisao

    2014-01-01

    Considering a fatal case of an aged individual, who died due to falling down stairs, the cause of the fatal fall was investigated through experiments. A witness, who was with the victim, when the fatal accident occurred, stated that the aged individual had miss-footed, lost balance at the top of the stairs, and fell accidently from an upper floor to a lower floor. It was very questionable whether or not this witness's statements were true. The true cause of the fatal fall was unclear, because of the witness's inconsistent statements, which showed discrepancies between the initial and later statements. The cause of a fatal fall can be presumed from external and internal damages to the body and other circumstantial evidences. But it was difficult to prove the true cause of a fatal fall only from the results of the autopsy and investigation of circumstantial evidences. The author was officially requested to conduct experiments to elucidate possible falling patterns. Judging from the experimental results, deep questions about the witness's statements arose. These experimental methods and analyses in this paper could be applied to elucidate possible falling patterns of fatal falls from stairs where the fatal causes are controversial.

  19. Older people's perception of and coping with falling, and their motivation for fall-prevention programmes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høst, Dorte; Hendriksen, Carsten; Borup, Ina

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to investigate older people's perceptions of and coping with falls, and what motivates them to join such programmes.......This study aims to investigate older people's perceptions of and coping with falls, and what motivates them to join such programmes....

  20. Falls study: Proprioception, postural stability, and slips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Jeehoon; Kim, Sukwon

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated effects of exercise training on the proprioception sensitivity, postural stability, and the likelihood of slip-induced falls. Eighteen older adults (6 in balance, 6 in weight, and 6 in control groups) participated in this study. Three groups met three times per week over the course of eight weeks. Ankle and knee proprioception sensitivities and postural stability were measured. Slip-induced events were introduced for all participants before and after training. The results indicated that, overall, strength and postural stability were improved only in the training group, although proprioception sensitivity was improved in all groups. Training for older adults resulted in decreased likelihood of slip-induced falls. The study suggested that proprioception can be improved by simply being active, however, the results suggested that training would aid older adults in reducing the likelihood of slip-induced falls.

  1. Research on patient safety: falls and medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boddice, Sandra Dawn; Kogan, Polina

    2009-10-01

    Below you will find summaries of published research describing investigations into patient safety issues related to falls and medications. The first summary provides details on the incidence of falls associated with the use of walkers and canes. This is followed by a summary of a fall-prevention intervention study that evaluated the effectiveness of widespread dissemination of evidence-based strategies in a community in Connecticut. The third write up provides information on three classes of medications that are associated with a significant number of emergency room visits. The last summary describes a pharmacist-managed medication reconciliation intervention pilot program. For additional details about the study findings and interventions, we encourage readers to review the original articles.

  2. Electrostatic demonstration of free-fall weightlessness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balukovic, Jasmina; Slisko, Josip; Corona Cruz, Adrian

    2015-05-01

    The phenomena of free-fall weightlessness have been demonstrated to students for many years in a number of different ways. The essential basis of all these demonstrations is the fact that in free-falling, gravitationally accelerated systems, the weight force and weight-related forces (for example, friction and hydrostatic forces) disappear. In this article, an original electrostatic demonstration of weightlessness is presented. A charged balloon fixed at the opening of a plastic container cannot lift a light styrofoam sphere sitting on the bottom when the container is at rest. However, while the system is in free-fall, the sphere becomes weightless and the charged balloon is able to lift it electrostatically.

  3. Nocturia Is Associated with Slipping and Falling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Young Kim

    Full Text Available Several reports have demonstrated associations between falls and nocturia in the elderly. However, little information is available regarding other age groups. This study evaluated the relationship between the frequency of nocturia and falls in men using a large, population-based survey in Korea, and the results were adjusted for various confounding factors. Data from a 2011 Korean community health survey (KCHS were retrieved for 92,660 men aged 19 to 103 years. Information regarding the history of slips or falls in the past year was collected. The frequency of nocturia was classified as 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, and ≥ 5 instances a night. Walking during the day, education, income, body mass index (BMI, smoking, alcohol consumption, sleep time, stress level and medical histories of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, cerebral stroke, angina or myocardial infarction, arthritis, and osteoporosis were adjusted using multiple logistic regression analysis with complex sampling. A subgroup analysis was conducted for young (19-30 years, middle-aged (31-60 years, and elderly individuals (61+ years. Approximately 14.6% of the men had a history of falls. Their mean age was 42.9 years, which was significantly higher than that of the non-faller group (P < 0.001. An increased frequency of nocturia was associated with increased adjusted odds ratio (AOR for falls (AOR for 1 instance of nocturia/night = 1.41 [95% confidence interval, 1.33-1.50]; AOR for 2 instances = 1.41 [1.33-1.50]; AOR for 3 instances = 2.00 [1.75-2.28]; AOR for 4 instances = 2.12 [1.73-2.61]; AOR for ≥ 5 instances = 2.02 [1.74-2.36], P < 0.001. In the subgroup analysis, the AORs for falls significantly increased in all age groups as the frequency of nocturia increased.

  4. Maxillofacial Trauma Following Road Accidents and Falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einy, Shmuel; Abdel Rahman, Nura; Siman-Tov, Maya; Aizenbud, Dror; Peleg, Kobi

    2016-06-01

    Motor vehicle accidents (MVA) and falls are major causes of maxillofacial injuries posing real challenges for the medical staff. To describe the demographic and injury characteristics, as well as the treatment procedures of casualties diagnosed with maxillofacial injuries. The investigators implemented a multicenter retrospective study composed of hospitalized maxillofacial trauma patients recorded in the Israel Trauma Registry for 2000 to 2011. The predictor variable was mechanism of injury and the outcome variable was type of injury, severity, and hospital resources utilization. Descriptive and bivariate statistics with P values was set at 0.05. The study included 11,592 reported hospitalized maxillofacial trauma patients (39.4% of them were MVA, 33.5% were falls), with a male predominance of a 3:1 ratio. The high-risk age groups were the first 3 decades of life in both etiologies, while age groups above 75 years were also frequent in falls. Severity of maxillofacial injuries, multiple injuries, admission to intensive care units, hospitalization for more than 15 days, inpatient mortality, and rehabilitation after discharge was significantly higher in MVA compared with falls. Conversely, maxillofacial surgeries were performed slightly more among patients injured in falls (34.1% and 31.1% respectively), as tongue and mouth are more prone targets in falls, compared with zygoma, maxilla, mandible, and teeth in MVA. The results of this study suggest that the etiologies present an entire separate pattern of trauma. A better understanding and proper identification of their high-risk groups should lead to appropriate prevention programs and treatment protocols.

  5. Planet Earth week featured at Fall Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Fall Meeting has been dubbed “Planet Earth Week,” in part to salute the upcoming 7-week PBS television series and university course that will be previewed at the meeting. At least four of the seven 1-hour segments of “Planet Earth” will be shown daily at the the Fall Meeting. AGU provided some of the seed money for the new series, which will have its television premiere on Wednesday, January 22, 1986, on PBS at 9 P.M. EST.

  6. Retrospective analysis of free-fall fractures with regard to height and cause of fall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petaros, Anja; Slaus, Mario; Coklo, Miran; Sosa, Ivan; Cengija, Morana; Bosnar, Alan

    2013-03-10

    Free-fall fractures represent a specific form of blunt force trauma that can be hard to interpret because of the numerous factors that affect it. The aim of this study is to focus on skeletal injury patterns resulting from free-falls and to analyse the relationship between specific skeletal fractures, and the height and cause (accidental vs. suicidal) of the fall. A total of 179 autopsy reports of fatal free-falls from known heights were analysed at the Department of Forensic Medicine and Criminalistics, in Rijeka, Croatia. The location, type and frequency of fractures, as well as the number and distribution of fractured regions were analysed with regard to height and cause of fall. Height was found to be the major factor influencing fracture patterns in free-falls. In our sample, the frequencies of thoracic fractures, fractures to the extremities and those to the pelvis increased with height. Head fractures show no such relationship. However, types of fractures recorded in different anatomical regions, including the cranium, differ between height groups suggesting different injury mechanisms in each. Victims of falls generally sustained fractures in more than one body region, and the number of injured regions correlates significantly with height. Although no statistical difference was found in the number of fractured regions or frequency of fractures between accidental fallers and suicidal jumpers, jumpers showed a significantly higher number of bilateral extremity fractures when compared to victims of accidental falls. Logistic regression analyses also demonstrate a significant relationship between lower extremity fractures, and the cause of the fall. Our results highlight the need for further investigations of the influence that behaviour and height have in free-fall fractures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. What Are Ways to Prevent Falls and Related Fractures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Falls Osteoporosis and Falls(繁體中文) Caídas y fracturas (Falls and Fractures) Partner Resources Falls and Fractures (NIA) Caídas y fracturas (NIA) Home Bone Basics Osteoporosis Osteogenesis Imperfecta Paget’s ...

  8. Protect the Ones You Love From Falls

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-12-10

    This podcast, developed as part of the Protect the Ones You Love initiative, discusses steps parents can take to help protect their children from falls, one of the leading causes of child injury.  Created: 12/10/2008 by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC).   Date Released: 12/10/2008.

  9. The 2015 AAAI Fall Symposium Series Reports

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed, N.; Bello, P.; Bringsjord, S.; Clark, M.; Hayes, B.; Kolobov, A.; Miller, C.; Oliehoek, F.; Stein, F.; Spaan, M.

    2016-01-01

    The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence presented the 2015 Fall Symposium Series, on Thursday through Saturday, November 12-14, at the Westin Arlington Gateway in Arlington, Virginia. The titles of the six symposia were as follows: AI for Human-Robot Interaction, Cognitive

  10. NOVA[R] Fall 2001 Teacher's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    WGBH-TV, Boston, MA.

    This teacher guide includes activity information for the program NOVA, Fall 2001. Background for each activity is provided along with its correlation to the national science standards. Activities include: (1) "Search for a Safe Cigarette"; (2) "18 Ways To Make a Baby"; (3) "Secrets of Mind"; (4) "Neanderthals on…

  11. Artists Paint ... Fall: Grades K-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herberholz, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Artists often paint the different seasonal activities people engage in and the way the world looks as changes take place. The weather for each of the four seasons is different. Farmers plant crops and gardens in the spring and harvest their crops in the fall, just like "The Harvesters" by Pieter Bruegel the Elder. To begin, children will observe…

  12. Montana Advanced Biofuels Great Falls Approval

    Science.gov (United States)

    This November 20, 2015 letter from EPA approves the petition from Montana Advanced Biofuels, LLC, Great Falls facility, regarding ethanol produced through a dry mill process, qualifying under the Clean Air Act for advanced biofuel (D-code 5) and renewable

  13. A new view on falling aprons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, H.J.; Van der Hoeven, M.; Thiel, B.

    2003-01-01

    In a flume of BallastHam Dredging a falling apron model has been constructed and loaded by current. The tests have been done with different rock sizes, different layer thickness of the top storage of the apron and two different gradings. In summary it was found that for both the narrow graded rock

  14. Preventing Older Adult Falls and TBI

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-03-05

    This podcast provides tips on how older adults can prevent falls and related injuries, such as traumatic brain injuries (TBI).  Created: 3/5/2008 by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC).   Date Released: 3/7/2008.

  15. How to catch a falling fruit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marantan, Andrew; Mahadevan, Lakshminarayanan

    2015-03-01

    A variety of fish engage in complex hunting behaviors involving catching airborne prey falling to the surface of the water. In principle this requires that the fish develop internal models describing both the falling prey and its own motion relative to that prey. However learning such models is complicated by the fact that the fish must also account for noise in optical measurements and the refraction occurring at the air/water interface. Inspired by experimental observations, we describe how one such species (Brycon guatemalensis) might feasibly overcome these obstacles and learn a model accurate enough to catch falling fruit. Instead of learning a model for how the fruit falls and a model for how it moves in the water and a model accounting for refraction, we argue that the fish could instead learn one approximate linear model relating a set of measured inputs to a set of measured outputs valid in a limited domain of initial conditions. The fish could then make its control decisions based on the outcome predicted by this combined linear model. We also discuss how the fish can leverage neural transformations of raw data to learn a model with a larger domain of validity and yet more sensitive to noise due to nontrivial Jacobians arising from the neural transformations.

  16. Engineering and Technician Enrollments--Fall 1969.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engineers Joint Council, New York, NY. Engineering Manpower Commission.

    Engineering and technician enrollments for Fall 1969 are reported for associate and bachelor's degree programs in engineering technology and industrial technology, and for engineering degrees at the bachelor's, master's, and doctor's levels. Statistical tables were produced by a computer analysis of data from 269 engineering schools and 558 other…

  17. Student Time Usage during Fall Reading Week

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Ken; Pschibul, Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigated the time usage and levels of perceived stress, academic workload, and recreation time for 177 students at the University of Windsor before, during, and after Fall Reading Week (FRW). Over a three-week span (at various times of the day), students received a message to their smartphone to complete a 20-second survey…

  18. Have a Safe and Healthy Fall

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-10-14

    Fall is a great time to try new and healthy activities with your parents! Have a food tasting or a leaf raking contest! Whatever your plans, make sure to have fun and be safe!  Created: 10/14/2010 by CDC Office of Women’s Health.   Date Released: 10/14/2010.

  19. Bodies Falling with Air Resistance: Computer Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vest, Floyd

    1982-01-01

    Two models are presented. The first assumes that air resistance is proportional to the velocity of the falling body. The second assumes that air resistance is proportional to the square of the velocity. A program written in BASIC that simulates the second model is presented. (MP)

  20. PREDICTIVE VALUE OF THE MORSE FALL SCALE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Bóriková

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The goal of this study was to analyse relevant research studies focusing on the testing of the predictive value of the Morse Fall Scale measuring device on hospitalized patients. Design: Literature review. Method: Search for full text research studies in Web of Science, Scopus, ScienceDirect, and Summon Discovery Tool (licensed electronic information databases, based on pre-established criteria, and key words, from 1989 to 2016. Results: Sensitivity values ranged from 31% to 98%, and specificity values ranged from 8% to 97% in 14 analysed studies. The predictive value of the tool in validation studies varies depending on the tested cut-off value, the type of clinical ward, the frequency of assessment, the size and age of the sample, and the length of hospitalisation; therefore, the validity of the results from one study cannot by extrapolated to the entire hospitalized population of patients. Conclusion: The predictive values of the Morse Fall Scale are not stable; they vary in clinical conditions according to various factors. When implementing a tool for a specific clinical ward, an optimum cut-off score must be established to ensure that preventative strategies do not require unnecessary effort on the part of the staff, and do not increase hospital costs. Keywords: falls, hospital, Morse Fall Scale, sensitivity, specificity, review.

  1. AAAI 1991 Fall Symposium Series Reports

    OpenAIRE

    AAAI,

    1992-01-01

    The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence held its 1991 Fall Symposium Series on November 15-17 at the Asilomar Conference Center, Pacific Grove, California. This article contains summaries of the four symposia: Discourse Structure in Natural Language Understanding and Generation, Knowledge and Action at Social and Organizational Levels, Principles of Hybrid Reasoning, Sensory Aspects of Robotic Intelligence.

  2. Falls, old age and mental illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorete Reis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective Falls in older people living in the community are an important health problem particularly when in cases of hospitalization. Having a multifactorial etiology, its severity and costs requires preventive intervention. The impact on functionality and quality of life and high socioeconomic costs, are recognized. Aims: to identify the prevalence of falls in older people and characterize clinically, functionally and socially the elderly involved in an episode of urgency in a psychiatric hospital. Methods: this was a quantitative, correlational cross-sectional study. We studied the prevalence of falls and associated factors. The sample consisted of 99 elderly people involved in an episode of urgency in the biennium 2012/2013 including a psychiatric hospital in the north of Portugal. Results: suggest a prevalence of 38% of falls in an aging population. The mental disorder and addiction factors are highlighted. Conclusions: A complex interaction between multiple personal, social and environmental factors in the etiology of decline suggests the importance of prevention and monitoring programs of the risk associated with it.

  3. Gait and cognitive impairments in multiple sclerosis: the specific contribution of falls and fear of falling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalron, Alon; Allali, Gilles

    2017-11-01

    Our goal was to identify the specific contribution of fear of falling (FoF) and falls with quantitative gait impairments and cognition capabilities in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Patients were separated into four individual subgroups as to the presence of FoF and falls (i.e., fearless/non-fallers, fearless/fallers, FoF/non-fallers and FoF/fallers). The Falls Efficacy Scale International questionnaire was used to assess the level of concern of falling. Participants were defined as "fallers" and "non-fallers" based on their fall history. Spatio-temporal parameters of gait were analyzed using an electronic mat. Cognitive performance was assessed by a computerized cognitive battery of tests. The study included 540 MS patients, 47% were defined as fallers and 61.9% reported a FoF. Non-significant differences were found between the fearless/non-fallers and fearless/fallers in all clinical, gait and cognitive scores. FoF/non-fallers walked significantly slower compared to fearless MS individuals who had previously fallen. Furthermore, the same patient group exhibited a poorer performance in the motor skills cognitive subdomain. A significant reverse relationship was found between FoF and cognitive motor skills in the fallers and non-fallers groups. FoF characterizes a more disabling symptom than falling in the MS population.

  4. Maxillofacial Fractures due to Falls: does Fall Modality Determine the Pattern of Injury?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Roccia

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: In several epidemiological studies of maxillofacial trauma, falls were one of the most frequent causes of facial injury. The aim of this study is to analyse the patterns of fall-related maxillofacial injuries based on the height of the fall. Material and Methods: Using a systematic computer-assisted database of patients hospitalised with maxillofacial fractures, only those with fall-related injuries were considered. The falls were divided into four groups: falls from slipping, tripping or stumbling (STSF, loss of consciousness (LOCF, stairs (SAF, and height (HF. Data on the age, gender, fracture site, Facial Injury Severity Scale (FISS, facial lacerations, associated lesions, type of treatment, and length of hospital stay were also analysed. Results: This study included 557 patients (338 males, 219 females; average age 51.5 years [range 4 - 99 years]. In the over 60 age group, females were more prevalent in STSF than males. According to aetiology, STSF was the most frequent cause of maxillofacial fractures (315 patients; 56.5% followed by LOCF (157; 28.2%, HF (55; 9.9%, and SAF (30; 5.4%. The middle third of the face was affected most frequently. After LOCF, however, the inferior third was prevalently involved. The majority of associated fractures, as well as the most severe injuries and greatest rate of facial lacerations, occurred secondary to HF. Conclusions: This study showed that fracture severity and site are influenced not only by patient age, but also by the nature of the fall.

  5. Impact of falls and fear of falling on health-related quality of life in patients with Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grimbergen, Y.A.M.; Schrag, A.; Mazibrada, G.; Borm, G.F.; Bloem, B.R.

    2013-01-01

    Postural instability, recurrent falls and fear of falling are common in advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). We examined the impact of fall frequency, fear of falling, balance confidence and objectively measured balance impairment (using Tinetti's Mobility Index) on health-related quality of life

  6. The history of falls and the association of the timed up and go test to falls and near-falls in older adults with hip osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faulkner Robert A

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Falling accounts for a significant number of hospital and long-term care admissions in older adults. Many adults with the combination of advancing age and functional decline associated with lower extremity osteoarthritis (OA, are at an even greater risk. The purpose of this study was to describe fall and near-fall history, location, circumstances and injuries from falls in a community-dwelling population of adults over aged 65 with hip OA and to determine the ability of the timed up and go test (TUG to classify fallers and near-fallers. Method A retrospective observational study of 106 older men and women with hip pain for six months or longer, meeting a clinical criteria for the presence of hip OA at one or both hips. An interview for fall and near-fall history and administration of the TUG were administered on one occasion. Results Forty-five percent of the sample had at least one fall in the past year, seventy-seven percent reported occasional or frequent near-falls. The majority of falls occurred during ambulation and ascending or descending steps. Forty percent experienced an injury from the fall. The TUG was not associated with history of falls, but was associated with near-falls. Higher TUG scores occurred for those who were older, less mobile, and with greater number of co-morbidities. Conclusion A high percentage of older adults with hip OA experience falls and near-falls which may be attributed to gait impairments related to hip OA. The TUG could be a useful screening instrument to predict those who have frequent near-falls, and thus might be useful in predicting risk of future falls in this population.

  7. Impact of fear of falling and fall history on disability incidence among older adults: Prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, Keitaro; Makizako, Hyuma; Doi, Takehiko; Tsutsumimoto, Kota; Hotta, Ryo; Nakakubo, Sho; Suzuki, Takao; Shimada, Hiroyuki

    2017-12-12

    Fear of falling (FOF) is a major health problem for older adults, present not just in fallers, but also nonfallers. This study examined the impact of FOF and fall history on disability incidence among community-dwelling older adults from a prospective cohort study. A total of 5104 older adults living in community settings participated in baseline assessment and were followed up for about 4 years (median 52 mo, range 49-55 mo). At baseline, participants were assessed the presence of FOF and their fall history, and divided into 4 groups: Fall (-) FOF (-), Fall (+) FOF (-), Fall (-) FOF (+), and Fall (+) FOF (+). Disability incidence was defined as national long-term care insurance certification for personal support or care. During the follow-up period, 429 participants (9.9%) were newly certified as having a disability and needing personal support for long-term care insurance. Fall (-) FOF (+) group and Fall (+) FOF (+) group showed a significantly higher risk of disability incidence than Fall (-) FOF (-) group even after adjusting for covariates (Fall (-) FOF (+): hazard ratio 1.28, 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.62, Fall (+) FOF (+): hazard ratio 1.44, 95% confidence interval, 1.05-1.98). Fear of falling could be a simple and useful predictor of disability incidence in community-dwelling older adults. Identifying and decreasing fall risk factors may prevent fall-related injuries, but excessive FOF may be associated with increased risk of disability incidence. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Monitoring Emperor Goose Populations by Aerial Counts and the Fall Age Ratio - Fall 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In 2003, we photographed flocks of emperor geese (Chen canagica) during fall migration at lagoons along the north side of the Alaska Peninsula for the 19th...

  9. Elderly fall risk prediction using static posturography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Howcroft

    Full Text Available Maintaining and controlling postural balance is important for activities of daily living, with poor postural balance being predictive of future falls. This study investigated eyes open and eyes closed standing posturography with elderly adults to identify differences and determine appropriate outcome measure cut-off scores for prospective faller, single-faller, multi-faller, and non-faller classifications. 100 older adults (75.5 ± 6.7 years stood quietly with eyes open and then eyes closed while Wii Balance Board data were collected. Range in anterior-posterior (AP and medial-lateral (ML center of pressure (CoP motion; AP and ML CoP root mean square distance from mean (RMS; and AP, ML, and vector sum magnitude (VSM CoP velocity were calculated. Romberg Quotients (RQ were calculated for all parameters. Participants reported six-month fall history and six-month post-assessment fall occurrence. Groups were retrospective fallers (24, prospective all fallers (42, prospective fallers (22 single, 6 multiple, and prospective non-fallers (47. Non-faller RQ AP range and RQ AP RMS differed from prospective all fallers, fallers, and single fallers. Non-faller eyes closed AP velocity, eyes closed VSM velocity, RQ AP velocity, and RQ VSM velocity differed from multi-fallers. RQ calculations were particularly relevant for elderly fall risk assessments. Cut-off scores from Clinical Cut-off Score, ROC curves, and discriminant functions were clinically viable for multi-faller classification and provided better accuracy than single-faller classification. RQ AP range with cut-off score 1.64 could be used to screen for older people who may fall once. Prospective multi-faller classification with a discriminant function (-1.481 + 0.146 x Eyes Closed AP Velocity-0.114 x Eyes Closed Vector Sum Magnitude Velocity-2.027 x RQ AP Velocity + 2.877 x RQ Vector Sum Magnitude Velocity and cut-off score 0.541 achieved an accuracy of 84.9% and is viable as a screening tool for

  10. Enhancing the safety of hospitalization by reducing patient falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Janice M

    2002-10-01

    The iatrogenic nature of hospitalization places patients at risk of falling, injury, and death. In this article, the major principles of providing protective and preventive interventions are outlined. The principles are the establishment of a multifaceted fall prevention program that targets fall interventions according to each etiologic factor; the recognition that fall protective and prevention interventions are distinct and serve a different function; the use of the fall monitoring system comprehensively; the creation of a clinical nurse specialist position, responsible for fall intervention; and a conscious and individualized approach to fall prevention. The process and problems of the varying nature of providing fall protection and fall prevention are discussed; for example, use of a side rail as a protective strategy may be successful with one patient but considered a hazard when used with a different patient.

  11. Circumstances and consequences of falls in polio survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickerstaffe, Alice; Beelen, Anita; Nollet, Frans

    2010-11-01

    Many polio survivors have symptoms that are known risk factors for falls in elderly people. This study aims to determine the: (i) frequency; (ii) consequences; (iii) circumstances; and (iv) factors associated with falls in polio survivors. A survey was conducted among 376 polio survivors. Participants completed a falls history questionnaire and additional information was obtained from their medical files. Of the 305 respondents, 74% reported at least one fall in the past year and 60% two or more. Sixteen percent of fallers described a major injury after a fall in the last year and 69% reported fear of falling. One-third of fallers had reduced the amount they walked because of their fear of falling. Most reported falls in a familiar environment (86%), during ambulation (72%) and in the afternoon (50%). Quadriceps weakness of the weakest leg (Medical Research Council (MRC) ≤ 3), fear of falling and complaints of problems maintaining balance were independently associated with both falls and recurrent falls, while increasing age and medication use were not. The high rate of falls and consequences thereof, merit the implementation of fall intervention strategies. To maximize effect, they should be tailor-made and target the fall mechanisms specific to polio survivors.

  12. A Wavelet-Based Approach to Fall Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Palmerini

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Falls among older people are a widely documented public health problem. Automatic fall detection has recently gained huge importance because it could allow for the immediate communication of falls to medical assistance. The aim of this work is to present a novel wavelet-based approach to fall detection, focusing on the impact phase and using a dataset of real-world falls. Since recorded falls result in a non-stationary signal, a wavelet transform was chosen to examine fall patterns. The idea is to consider the average fall pattern as the “prototype fall”.In order to detect falls, every acceleration signal can be compared to this prototype through wavelet analysis. The similarity of the recorded signal with the prototype fall is a feature that can be used in order to determine the difference between falls and daily activities. The discriminative ability of this feature is evaluated on real-world data. It outperforms other features that are commonly used in fall detection studies, with an Area Under the Curve of 0.918. This result suggests that the proposed wavelet-based feature is promising and future studies could use this feature (in combination with others considering different fall phases in order to improve the performance of fall detection algorithms.

  13. Survey on Fall Detection and Fall Prevention Using Wearable and External Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueng Santiago Delahoz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available According to nihseniorhealth.gov (a website for older adults, falling represents a great threat as people get older, and providing mechanisms to detect and prevent falls is critical to improve people’s lives. Over 1.6 million U.S. adults are treated for fall-related injuries in emergency rooms every year suffering fractures, loss of independence, and even death. It is clear then, that this problem must be addressed in a prompt manner, and the use of pervasive computing plays a key role to achieve this. Fall detection (FD and fall prevention (FP are research areas that have been active for over a decade, and they both strive for improving people’s lives through the use of pervasive computing. This paper surveys the state of the art in FD and FP systems, including qualitative comparisons among various studies. It aims to serve as a point of reference for future research on the mentioned systems. A general description of FD and FP systems is provided, including the different types of sensors used in both approaches. Challenges and current solutions are presented and described in great detail. A 3-level taxonomy associated with the risk factors of a fall is proposed. Finally, cutting edge FD and FP systems are thoroughly reviewed and qualitatively compared, in terms of design issues and other parameters.

  14. Fall Meeting abstract submission inspires science poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2011-08-01

    When the 4 August deadline for submitting Fall Meeting abstracts passed, AGU had received more than 20,000 abstracts, a record-breaking number. The submission process had an unexpected by-product: It inspired some scientists to write haiku on Twitter. (Haiku is a form of Japanese poetry typically having three lines, the first with five syllables, the second with seven, and the third with five.) The following are examples of the haiku tweets, with the hashtag #AGU11AbstractHaiku. (For those who want to keep updated about the Fall Meeting on Twitter, the hashtag is #AGU11.) For more information about the meeting, including registration and housing, visit http://sites.agu.org/fallmeeting/.

  15. [Severe dyspnoea in children following a fall].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuurmond-Tromp, Karen A; Klinkenberg, Theo J; Dikkers, Freek G; Koppelman, Gerard H; de Weerd, Willemien

    2009-01-01

    A 12-year-old boy fell off his bicycle, hitting his neck on the handle-bars. He sustained a tracheal rupture, which required surgical treatment. Two other patients, a 4-year-old and a 2-year-old boy, also suffered laryngeal injuries following a fall. Both were treated conservatively, the 2-year-old boy needed endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation. Blunt neck trauma can cause life-threatening complications, which are difficult to diagnose.

  16. Modeling seasonal migration of fall armyworm moths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, J. K.; Nagoshi, R. N.; Meagher, R. L.; Fleischer, S. J.; Jairam, S.

    2016-02-01

    Fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith), is a highly mobile insect pest of a wide range of host crops. However, this pest of tropical origin cannot survive extended periods of freezing temperature but must migrate northward each spring if it is to re-infest cropping areas in temperate regions. The northward limit of the winter-breeding region for North America extends to southern regions of Texas and Florida, but infestations are regularly reported as far north as Québec and Ontario provinces in Canada by the end of summer. Recent genetic analyses have characterized migratory pathways from these winter-breeding regions, but knowledge is lacking on the atmosphere's role in influencing the timing, distance, and direction of migratory flights. The Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model was used to simulate migratory flight of fall armyworm moths from distinct winter-breeding source areas. Model simulations identified regions of dominant immigration from the Florida and Texas source areas and overlapping immigrant populations in the Alabama-Georgia and Pennsylvania-Mid-Atlantic regions. This simulated migratory pattern corroborates a previous migratory map based on the distribution of fall armyworm haplotype profiles. We found a significant regression between the simulated first week of moth immigration and first week of moth capture (for locations which captured ≥10 moths), which on average indicated that the model simulated first immigration 2 weeks before first captures in pheromone traps. The results contribute to knowledge of fall armyworm population ecology on a continental scale and will aid in the prediction and interpretation of inter-annual variability of insect migration patterns including those in response to climatic change and adoption rates of transgenic cultivars.

  17. Youth Attitude Tracking Study II, Fall 1983.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    considered along with civilian employment. The notion expressed in - econometric research is that when youth unemployment in the civilian sector is high...young people will find military Service relatively more attractive. Conversely, when youth unemployment is low, young people are more likely to . join...AD-Ri5@ 428 YOUTH ATTITUDE TRACKING STUDY II FALL 1983(U) RESEARCH 1/4 TRIANGLE INST RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK NC M E MARSDEN 1983 DA98-83-C-8172

  18. Predicting channel bed topography in hydraulic falls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Alexander; Yu, Zheng; Kelso, Richard M.; Binder, Benjamin J.

    2015-11-01

    We consider inverse methods for predicting the channel bed topography in experiments of hydraulic falls. Nonlinear solutions and weakly nonlinear approximations from Euler-based models are compared to experimental observations. Accurate predictions are obtained for the maximum height of the topography and its constant horizontal level far downstream using the nonlinear method. The weakly nonlinear approximation is shown only to be a good predictor of the maximum height of the topography. The error in the inverse predictions is examined and discussed.

  19. Meteorite Falls and the Fragmentation of Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momeni, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    In order to understand the fragmentation of objects entering the atmosphere and why some produce more fragments than others, I have searched the Meteoritical Society database for meteorites greater than 20 kilograms that fell in the USA, China, and India. I also studied the video and film records of 21 fireballs that produced meteorites. A spreadsheet was prepared that noted smell, fireball, explosion, whistling, rumbling, the number of fragments, light, and impact sounds. Falls with large numbers of fragments were examined to look for common traits. These were: the Norton County aubrite, explosion and a flare greater than 100 fragments; the Forest City H5 chondrite explosion, a flare, a dust trail, 505 specimens; the Richardton H5 chondrite explosion and light, 71 specimens; the Juancheng H5 chondrite explosion, a rumbling, a flare, a dust trail,1000 specimens; the Tagish Lake C2 chondrite explosion, flare, dust trail, 500 specimens. I conclude that fragmentation is governed by the following: (1) Bigger meteors undergo more stress which results in more specimens; (2) Harder meteorites also require more force to break them up which will cause greater fragmentation; (3) Force and pressure are directly proportional during falls. General observations made were; (1) Meteorites produce fireballs sooner due to high friction; (2) Meteors tend to explode as well because of high stress; (3) Softer meteorites tend to cause dust trails; (4) Some falls produce light as they fall at high velocity. I am grateful to NASA Ames for this opportunity and Derek Sears, Katie Bryson, and Dan Ostrowski for discussions.

  20. A dynamic evidential network for fall detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Paulo Armando Cavalcante; Boudy, Jerome; Istrate, Dan; Dorizzi, Bernadette; Mota, Joao Cesar Moura

    2014-07-01

    This study is part of the development of a remote home healthcare monitoring application designed to detect distress situations through several types of sensors. The multisensor fusion can provide more accurate and reliable information compared to information provided by each sensor separately. Furthermore, data from multiple heterogeneous sensors present in the remote home healthcare monitoring systems have different degrees of imperfection and trust. Among the multisensor fusion methods, Dempster-Shafer theory (DST) is currently considered the most appropriate for representing and processing the imperfect information. Based on a graphical representation of the DST called evidential networks, a structure of heterogeneous data fusion from multiple sensors for fall detection has been proposed. The evidential networks, implemented on our remote medical monitoring platform, are also proposed in this paper to maximize the performance of automatic fall detection and thus make the system more reliable. However, the presence of noise, the variability of recorded signals by the sensors, and the failing or unreliable sensors may thwart the evidential networks performance. In addition, the sensors signals nonstationary nature may degrade the experimental conditions. To compensate the nonstationary effect, the time evolution is considered by introducing the dynamic evidential network which was evaluated by the simulated fall scenarios corresponding to various use cases.

  1. Hospitalisations due to falls in older persons.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carey, D

    2005-06-01

    This paper describes hospitalisations due to falls among people aged 65 years and over resident in the Eastern Region of Ireland. Of the 2,029 hospitalisations recorded for 2002, 78% were female and 68% were aged 75 years and over. Fractures accounted for 1,697 or 84% of cases with nearly half of them (841) sustained to the hip. Females were more likely to have a limb fracture whereas males were more likely to have a head injury. The total inpatient costs of the 2,029 hospitalisations were estimated at 10.6 million euros. Hip fractures were the costliest injuries as they accounted for 7.4 million euros (70%) of inpatient costs. There are also substantial additional costs implications for hip fractures as they constituted the majority (56%) of cases transferred to nursing\\/convalescent homes or long-stay health facilities. In keeping with an ageing population, the problem of injuries in older people is likely to increase over time and as falls are the dominant cause of those injuries, all acute and long-stay health facilities need to develop and implement fall prevention strategies for older people.

  2. Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation : Annual Report 2002.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terra-Berns, Mary

    2003-01-01

    The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group continued to actively engage in implementing wildlife mitigation actions in 2002. Regular Work Group meetings were held to discuss budget concerns affecting the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Program, to present potential acquisition projects, and to discuss and evaluate other issues affecting the Work Group and Project. Work Group members protected 1,386.29 acres of wildlife habitat in 2002. To date, the Albeni Falls project has protected approximately 5,914.31 acres of wildlife habitat. About 21% of the total wildlife habitat lost has been mitigated. Administrative activities have increased as more properties are purchased and continue to center on restoration, operation and maintenance, and monitoring. In 2001, Work Group members focused on development of a monitoring and evaluation program as well as completion of site-specific management plans. This year the Work Group began implementation of the monitoring and evaluation program performing population and plant surveys, data evaluation and storage, and map development as well as developing management plans. Assuming that the current BPA budget restrictions will be lifted in the near future, the Work Group expects to increase mitigation properties this coming year with several potential projects.

  3. Fall Down Detection Under Smart Home System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juang, Li-Hong; Wu, Ming-Ni

    2015-10-01

    Medical technology makes an inevitable trend for the elderly population, therefore the intelligent home care is an important direction for science and technology development, in particular, elderly in-home safety management issues become more and more important. In this research, a low of operation algorithm and using the triangular pattern rule are proposed, then can quickly detect fall-down movements of humanoid by the installation of a robot with camera vision at home that will be able to judge the fall-down movements of in-home elderly people in real time. In this paper, it will present a preliminary design and experimental results of fall-down movements from body posture that utilizes image pre-processing and three triangular-mass-central points to extract the characteristics. The result shows that the proposed method would adopt some characteristic value and the accuracy can reach up to 90 % for a single character posture. Furthermore the accuracy can be up to 100 % when a continuous-time sampling criterion and support vector machine (SVM) classifier are used.

  4. Relativistic theory of the falling retroreflector gravimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, Neil

    2018-02-01

    We develop a relativistic treatment of interference between light reflected from a falling cube retroreflector in the vertical arm of an interferometer, and light in a reference beam in the horizontal arm. Coordinates that are nearly Minkowskian, attached to the falling cube, are used to describe the propagation of light within the cube. Relativistic effects such as the dependence of the coordinate speed of light on gravitational potential, propagation of light along null geodesics, relativity of simultaneity, and Lorentz contraction of the moving cube, are accounted for. The calculation is carried to first order in the gradient of the acceleration of gravity. Analysis of data from a falling cube gravimeter shows that the propagation time of light within the cube itself causes a significant reduction in the value of the acceleration of gravity obtained from measurements, compared to assuming reflection occurs at the face. An expression for the correction to g is derived and found to agree with experiment. Depending on the instrument, the correction can be several microgals, comparable to commonly applied corrections such as those due to polar motion and earth tides. The controversial ‘speed of light’ correction is discussed. Work of the US government, not subject to copyright.

  5. Free fall and the equivalence principle revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendrill, Ann-Marie

    2017-11-01

    Free fall is commonly discussed as an example of the equivalence principle, in the context of a homogeneous gravitational field, which is a reasonable approximation for small test masses falling moderate distances. Newton’s law of gravity provides a generalisation to larger distances, and also brings in an inhomogeneity in the gravitational field. In addition, Newton’s third law of action and reaction causes the Earth to accelerate towards the falling object, bringing in a mass dependence in the time required for an object to reach ground—in spite of the equivalence between inertial and gravitational mass. These aspects are rarely discussed in textbooks when the motion of everyday objects are discussed. Although these effects are extremely small, it may still be important for teachers to make assumptions and approximations explicit, to be aware of small corrections, and also to be prepared to estimate their size. Even if the corrections are not part of regular teaching, some students may reflect on them, and their questions deserve to be taken seriously.

  6. Self-reported preclinical mobility limitation and fall history as predictors of future falls in older women: prospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mänty, Minna Regina; Heinonen, A; Viljanen, A

    2010-01-01

    with preclinical mobility limitation had almost 4-fold (incidence rate ratios 3.77; 95% CI 1.02-13.92) and those with manifest mobility limitation almost 15-fold (14.66; 2.72-79.00) adjusted risk for future falls compared to those with no mobility limitation and no previous falls. Among women without fall history......We studied if self-reported preclinical mobility limitation, described as modification of task performance without perception of difficulty, predicts future falls in older women with and without fall history. Our results suggest that combined measure of self-reported preclinical mobility limitation...... and fall history may offer one possibility for inexpensive fall-risk evaluation in clinical practice. INTRODUCTION: We studied if self-reported preclinical mobility limitation predicts future falls in older women with and without fall history. METHODS: The study population consisted of 428 community...

  7. Renal disease and accidental falls: a review of published evidence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    López-Soto, Pablo Jesús; De Giorgi, Alfredo; Senno, Elisa; Tiseo, Ruana; Ferraresi, Annamaria; Canella, Cinzia; Rodríguez-Borrego, María Aurora; Manfredini, Roberto; Fabbian, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    .... The relationship between renal disease and falls is unclear, and the goal of this study was to collect the available evidence and investigate the relationship between accidental falls and renal dysfunction...

  8. Falls and other geriatric syndromes in Blantyre, Malawi: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. Geriatric syndromes (falls, immobility, intellectual or memory impairment .... were asked to recall all falls using a rigorous definition.19 The number of ... data on this in our study but uncorrected visual impairment, uncorrected pain ...

  9. Depression Often a Precursor to Falls in Elderly People

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_165985.html Depression Often a Precursor to Falls in Elderly People ... 26, 2017 FRIDAY, May 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Depression appears to raise the risk of falls in ...

  10. Focused supervision of high-risk fall dementia patients: a simple method to reduce fall incidence and severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detweiler, Mark B; Kim, Kye Y; Taylor, Brenda Y

    2005-01-01

    Dementia units in nursing homes have a disproportionately high number of demographic risk factors for falls. Many residents have a previous history of falls, the inability to call for assistance, and the inability to remember safety instructions. For interdisciplinary falls review committees, this population may be the most difficult to manage. The Virginia Veterans Care Center (VVCC) Dementia Unit Interdisciplinary Fall Team instituted a novel practice for reducing the number and severity of falls among the highest risk group of dementia patients. Certified nursing assistants (CNAs) were assigned to high-risk residents for focused supervision. The patients received consistent supervision by selected CNAs during the day and evening shifts. Eight residents identified as high risk who continued to have falls despite multiple interventions were selected for the study. A comparison of four months of intervention with the four months prior to the intervention revealed a significant (p = 0. 024) fall reduction during the intervention months. Individually, seven of the eight participants had reduced falls during the intervention period. A 5-point scale for fall severity demonstrated an overall reduction in fall severity during that period. Individually, five of the eight patients had a decreased fall severity, and one had no change. Two patients experienced an increase in fall severity due to ongoing medical problems. While the small number of patients in the study limits the power of the results, this novel intervention of using designated CNAs to supervise high-risk fall residents with dementia may prove helpful for staff in other nursing facilities.

  11. Assessment of muscle mass, risk of falls and fear of falling in elderly people with diabetic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hudson Azevedo Pinheiro

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective : To assess muscle mass, risk of falls and fear of falling in elderly adults with diabetic neuropathy (DNP. Methods : 50 elderly patients with diabetes mellitus (DM and diabetic neuropathy (NPD participated in this study. Risk of falling was assessed using the Berg Balance Scale (BBS. Fear of falling was assessed by means of the Falls Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I. Muscle mass was assessed by tetrapolar bioimpedance analysis (BIA and Janssen's equation. Subjects were divided into two groups: one with a history of falls in the six months before study enrollment (G1 and the other without history of falls (G2. Results : There were statistically significant differences between G1 and G2 regarding lean body mass (p < 0.05, risk of falls as measured by the BBS (p < 0.01, and fear of falling as measured by the FES-I (p < 0.01. In addition, there was a significant correlation between the BBS and BIA (r = 0.45 and p < 0.01, showing that the greater the lean body mass, the lower the risk of falling. Conclusions : We found an association between lean mass, risk of falls and fear of falling in elderly adults with DNP and a history of falls from own height.

  12. Fear of Falling in Women with Fibromyalgia and Its Relation with Number of Falls and Balance Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Collado-Mateo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate fear of falling, number of falls, and balance performance in women with FM and to examine the relationship between these variables and others, such as balance performance, quality of life, age, pain, and impact of fibromyalgia. Methods. A total of 240 women participated in this cross-sectional study. Of these, 125 had fibromyalgia. Several variables were assessed: age, fear of falling from 0 to 100, number of falls, body composition, balance performance, lower limb strength, health-related quality of life, and impact of fibromyalgia. Results. Women with fibromyalgia reported more falls and more fear of falling. Fear of falling was associated with number of falls in the last year, stiffness, perceived balance problems, impact of FM, and HRQoL whereas the number of falls was related to fear of falling, balance performance with eyes closed, pain, tenderness to touch level, anxiety, self-reported balance problems, impact of FM, and HRQoL. Conclusion. FM has an impact on fear of falling, balance performance, and number of falls. Perceived balance problems seem to be more closely associated with fear of falling than objective balance performance.

  13. Can martial arts techniques reduce fall severity? An in vivo study of femoral loading configurations in sideways falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zijden, A M; Groen, B E; Tanck, E; Nienhuis, B; Verdonschot, N; Weerdesteyn, V

    2012-06-01

    Sideways falls onto the hip are a major cause of femoral fractures in the elderly. Martial arts (MA) fall techniques decrease hip impact forces in sideways falls. The femoral fracture risk, however, also depends on the femoral loading configuration (direction and point of application of the force). The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of fall techniques, landing surface and fall height on the impact force and the loading configuration in sideways falls. Twelve experienced judokas performed sideways MA and Block ('natural') falls on a force plate, both with and without a judo mat on top. Kinematic and force data were analysed to determine the hip impact force and the loading configuration. In falls from a kneeling position, the MA technique reduced the impact force by 27%, but did not change the loading configuration. The use of the mat did not change the loading configuration. Falling from a standing changed the force direction. In all conditions, the point of application was distal and posterior to the greater trochanter, but it was less distal and more posterior in falls from standing than from kneeling position. The present decrease in hip impact force with an unchanged loading configuration indicates the potential protective effect of the MA technique on the femoral fracture risk. The change in loading configuration with an increased fall height warrant further studies to examine the effect of MA techniques on fall severity under more natural fall circumstances. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The Effects of the A Matter of Balance Program on Falls and Physical Risk of Falls, Tampa, Florida, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tuo-Yu; Edwards, Jerri D; Janke, Megan C

    2015-09-24

    This study investigated the effects of the A Matter of Balance (MOB) program on falls and physical risk factors of falling among community-dwelling older adults living in Tampa, Florida, in 2013. A total of 110 adults (52 MOB, 58 comparison) were enrolled in this prospective cohort study. Data on falls, physical risk of falling, and other known risk factors of falling were collected at baseline and at the end of the program. Multivariate analysis of covariance with repeated measures and logistic regressions were used to investigate the effects of this program. Participants in the MOB group were less likely to have had a fall and had significant improvements in their physical risk of falling compared with adults in the comparison group. No significant effects of the MOB program on recurrent falls or the number of falls reported were found. This study contributes to our understanding of the MOB program and its effectiveness in reducing falls and the physical risk of falling among older adults. The findings support extended use of this program to reduce falls and physical risk of falling among older adults.

  15. Falls in the community: state of the science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, Amy L; Wei, Feifei

    2013-01-01

    Falls and fall-related injuries among older community-dwelling adults continue to be a major health concern in the US. Falls are the leading cause of disability and trauma-related death in persons over 65 years of age. This article discusses current approaches in community fall management and challenges with these approaches, and offers some insight for community providers regarding this issue. PMID:23776331

  16. INTRODUCTION A fall is a sudden, unintentional change in position ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    publications. Accessed 15/06/08. 21. Hindmarsh J.J., Estes E.H. Jr. Falls in older persons. Causes and interventions. Arch Intem Med. 1989;149:2217-2222. 22. Tinetti M.E., Speechley M. Prevention of Fear of Falling falls among the elderly.

  17. Geriatric fall-related injuries | Hefny | African Health Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Geriatric fall-related injuries. Ashraf F. Hefny, Alaa K. Abbas, Fikri M. Abu-Zidan. Abstract. Background: Falls are the leading cause of geriatric injury. Objectives: We aimed to study the anatomical distribution, severity, and outcome of geriatric fall-related injuries in order to give recommendations regarding their prevention.

  18. 29 CFR 1926.759 - Falling object protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... aloft, shall be secured against accidental displacement. (b) Protection from falling objects other than... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Falling object protection. 1926.759 Section 1926.759 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Steel Erection § 1926.759 Falling object...

  19. The Association of Cardiovascular Disorders and Falls : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Sofie; Bhangu, Jaspreet; de Rooij, Sophia; Daams, Joost; Kenny, Rose Anne; van der Velde, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Cardiovascular disorders are recognized as risk factors for falls in older adults. The aim of this systematic review was to identify cardiovascular disorders that are associated with falls, thus providing angles for optimization of fall-preventive care. Design: Systematic review. Data

  20. [Impact of fall risk and fear of falling on mobility of independently living senior citizens transitioning to frailty: screening results concerning fall prevention in the community].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, J; Dapp, U; Laub, S; von Renteln-Kruse, W

    2007-08-01

    There is a strong relation between mobility, walking safety and living independently in old age. People with walking problems suffer from fear of falling and tend to restrict their mobility and performance level in the community environment--even before falls occur. This study was planned to test the validity and prognostic value of a fall risk screening instrument ("Sturz-Risiko-Check") that has already shown its feasibility, acceptance and reliability, targeting independently living senior citizens. The study sample was recruited from a sheltered housing complex in Hamburg (with written consent). Persons with need of professional care ("Pflegestufe" in Germany) were excluded. The residents were asked to fill in the multidimensional questionnaire ("Sturz-Risiko- Check"). In a second step, a trained nurse asked the participants in a phone call about their competence in the instrumental activities of daily living (I-ADL mod. from Lawton, Brody 1969) and about their usual mobility performance level (e.g. frequency and distance of daily walks, use of public transport). According to the number and weight of self-reported risk factors for falling, three groups: "low fall risk", "medium fall risk" and "high fall risk" were classified. Finally, this classification was re-tested after one year, asking for falls and fall related injuries. A total of 112 senior citizens without need of personal care, living in a sheltered housing facility were asked to participate. Acceptance was high (76.1%). Self-reported data from 79 participants concerning falls, fall-risk, mobility and instrumental activities of daily living were included in the statistical analyses. Mean age was 78 (64 to 93) years and associated by a high percentage of women (75.9%) in this sample. The older participants reported 0 to 13 different factors (mean 5) related to a high risk of future falls. Most participants (78.5%) quit cycling because of fear of falling. There was a high incidence in the study sample

  1. Fall speed measurement and high-resolution multi-angle photography of hydrometeors in free fall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Garrett

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We describe here a new instrument for imaging hydrometeors in free fall. The Multi-Angle Snowflake Camera (MASC captures high-resolution photographs of hydrometeors from three angles while simultaneously measuring their fall speed. Based on the stereoscopic photographs captured over the two months of continuous measurements obtained at a high altitude location within the Wasatch Front in Utah, we derive statistics for fall speed, hydrometeor size, shape, orientation and aspect ratio. From a selection of the photographed hydrometeors, an illustration is provided for how the instrument might be used for making improved microwave scattering calculations. Complex, aggregated snowflake shapes appear to be more strongly forward scattering, at the expense of reduced back-scatter, than heavily rimed graupel particles of similar size.

  2. Fall speed measurement and high-resolution multi-angle photography of hydrometeors in free fall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, T. J.; Fallgatter, C.; Shkurko, K.; Howlett, D.

    2012-11-01

    We describe here a new instrument for imaging hydrometeors in free fall. The Multi-Angle Snowflake Camera (MASC) captures high-resolution photographs of hydrometeors from three angles while simultaneously measuring their fall speed. Based on the stereoscopic photographs captured over the two months of continuous measurements obtained at a high altitude location within the Wasatch Front in Utah, we derive statistics for fall speed, hydrometeor size, shape, orientation and aspect ratio. From a selection of the photographed hydrometeors, an illustration is provided for how the instrument might be used for making improved microwave scattering calculations. Complex, aggregated snowflake shapes appear to be more strongly forward scattering, at the expense of reduced back-scatter, than heavily rimed graupel particles of similar size.

  3. Traumatic Lung Herniation following Skateboard Fall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dafney L. Davare

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung herniation (LH is a rare clinical entity involving the protrusion of lung outside the thoracic cage. It has a variety of etiologies and clinical presentations, making diagnosis difficult. We present a case of a 20-year-old male who reported pleuritic pain after falling from a skateboard. Evaluation through computed tomography (CT scanning of the chest revealed an anterior lung hernia associated with rib fractures. This case emphasizes the need for clinicians to include lung herniation in the differential diagnosis of patients with trauma and inexplicable or persistent pulmonary issues.

  4. Investigation and hazard assessment of the 2003 and 2007 Staircase Falls rock falls, Yosemite National Park, California, USA

    OpenAIRE

    Wieczorek, G. F.; Stock, G. M.; Reichenbach, P.; Snyder, J. B.; Borchers, J. W.; Godt, J. W.

    2008-01-01

    International audience; Since 1857 more than 600 rock falls, rock slides, debris slides, and debris flows have been documented in Yosemite National Park, with rock falls in Yosemite Valley representing the majority of the events. On 26 December 2003, a rock fall originating from west of Glacier Point sent approximately 200 m3 of rock debris down a series of joint-controlled ledges to the floor of Yosemite Valley. The debris impacted talus near the base of Staircase Falls, producing fragments ...

  5. Investigation and hazard assessment of the 2003 and 2007 Staircase Falls rock falls, Yosemite National Park, California, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. F. Wieczorek

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Since 1857 more than 600 rock falls, rock slides, debris slides, and debris flows have been documented in Yosemite National Park, with rock falls in Yosemite Valley representing the majority of the events. On 26 December 2003, a rock fall originating from west of Glacier Point sent approximately 200 m3 of rock debris down a series of joint-controlled ledges to the floor of Yosemite Valley. The debris impacted talus near the base of Staircase Falls, producing fragments of flying rock that struck occupied cabins in Curry Village. Several years later on 9 June 2007, and again on 26 July 2007, smaller rock falls originated from the same source area. The 26 December 2003 event coincided with a severe winter storm and was likely triggered by precipitation and/or frost wedging, but the 9 June and 26 July 2007 events lack recognizable triggering mechanisms. We investigated the geologic and hydrologic factors contributing to the Staircase Falls rock falls, including bedrock lithology, weathering, joint spacing and orientations, and hydrologic processes affecting slope stability. We improved upon previous geomorphic assessment of rock-fall hazards, based on a shadow angle approach, by using STONE, a three-dimensional rock-fall simulation computer program. STONE produced simulated rock-fall runout patterns similar to the mapped extent of the 2003 and 2007 events, allowing us to simulate potential future rock falls from the Staircase Falls detachment area. Observations of recent rock falls, mapping of rock debris, and simulations of rock fall runouts beneath the Staircase Falls detachment area suggest that rock-fall hazard zones extend farther downslope than the extent previously defined by mapped surface talus deposits.

  6. Investigation and hazard assessment of the 2003 and 2007 Staircase Falls rock falls, Yosemite National Park, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, G.F.; Stock, Gregory M.; Reichenbach, P.; Snyder, J.B.; Borchers, J.W.; Godt, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    Since 1857 more than 600 rock falls, rock slides, debris slides, and debris flows have been documented in Yosemite National Park, with rock falls in Yosemite Valley representing the majority of the events. On 26 December 2003, a rock fall originating from west of Glacier Point sent approximately 200 m 3 of rock debris down a series of joint-controlled ledges to the floor of Yosemite Valley. The debris impacted talus near the base of Staircase Falls, producing fragments of flying rock that struck occupied cabins in Curry Village. Several years later on 9 June 2007, and again on 26 July 2007, smaller rock falls originated from the same source area. The 26 December 2003 event coincided with a severe winter storm and was likely triggered by precipitation and/or frost wedging, but the 9 June and 26 July 2007 events lack recognizable triggering mechanisms. We investigated the geologic and hydrologic factors contributing to the Staircase Falls rock falls, including bedrock lithology, weathering, joint spacing and orientations, and hydrologic processes affecting slope stability. We improved upon previous geomorphic assessment of rock-fall hazards, based on a shadow angle approach, by using STONE, a three-dimensional rock-fall simulation computer program. STONE produced simulated rock-fall runout patterns similar to the mapped extent of the 2003 and 2007 events, allowing us to simulate potential future rock falls from the Staircase Falls detachment area. Observations of recent rock falls, mapping of rock debris, and simulations of rock fall runouts beneath the Staircase Falls detachment area suggest that rock-fall hazard zones extend farther downslope than the extent previously defined by mapped surface talus deposits.

  7. Risk factors, incidence, consequences and prevention strategies for falls and fall-injury within older indigenous populations: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukaszyk, Caroline; Harvey, Lara; Sherrington, Cathie; Keay, Lisa; Tiedemann, Anne; Coombes, Julieann; Clemson, Lindy; Ivers, Rebecca

    2016-12-01

    To examine the risk factors, incidence, consequences and existing prevention strategies for falls and fall-related injury in older indigenous people. Relevant literature was identified through searching 14 electronic databases, a range of institutional websites, online search engines and government databases, using search terms pertaining to indigenous status, injury and ageing. Thirteen studies from Australia, the United States, Central America and Canada were identified. Few studies reported on fall rates but two reported that around 30% of indigenous people aged 45 years and above experienced at least one fall during the past year. The most common hospitalised fall injuries among older indigenous people were hip fracture and head injury. Risk factors significantly associated with falls within indigenous populations included poor mobility, a history of stroke, epilepsy, head injury, poor hearing and urinary incontinence. No formally evaluated, indigenous-specific fall prevention interventions were identified. Falls are a significant and growing health issue for older indigenous people worldwide that can lead to severe health consequences and even death. No fully-evaluated, indigenous-specific fall prevention programs were identified. Implications for Public Health: Research into fall patterns and fall-related injury among indigenous people is necessary for the development of appropriate fall prevention interventions. © 2016 Public Health Association of Australia.

  8. Can martial arts techniques reduce fall severity? An in vivo study of femoral loading configurations in sideways falls.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijden, A.M. van der; Groen, B.E.; Tanck, E.J.M.; Nienhuis, B.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.; Weerdesteijn, V.G.M.

    2012-01-01

    Sideways falls onto the hip are a major cause of femoral fractures in the elderly. Martial arts (MA) fall techniques decrease hip impact forces in sideways falls. The femoral fracture risk, however, also depends on the femoral loading configuration (direction and point of application of the force).

  9. The effects of Tai Chi on fall prevention, fear of falling and balance in older people: a meta-analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Logghe, I.H.; Verhagen, A.P.; Rademaker, A.C.; Bierma-Zeinstra, S.M.; Rossum, E. van; Faber, M.J.; Koes, B.W.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Tai Chi (TC) is an exercise training that is becoming increasingly popular as an intervention for single fall prevention. This meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the efficacy of TC on fall rate, fear of falling and balance in older people. METHODS: Randomized controlled trials

  10. Falling into the Light-using music and poetry as complementary modes of understanding falls in old age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evron, Lotte; Clausen, Nina

    Falls in old age have major consequences both for the individual and for society; therefore falls prevention is a priority on the health political agenda. Unfortunately, merely half of the targeted population accepts participating in falls prevention services. Qualitative researchers suggest that...

  11. Home Camera-Based Fall Detection System for the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koldo de Miguel

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Falls are the leading cause of injury and death in elderly individuals. Unfortunately, fall detectors are typically based on wearable devices, and the elderly often forget to wear them. In addition, fall detectors based on artificial vision are not yet available on the market. In this paper, we present a new low-cost fall detector for smart homes based on artificial vision algorithms. Our detector combines several algorithms (background subtraction, Kalman filtering and optical flow as input to a machine learning algorithm with high detection accuracy. Tests conducted on over 50 different fall videos have shown a detection ratio of greater than 96%.

  12. Home Camera-Based Fall Detection System for the Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Miguel, Koldo; Brunete, Alberto; Hernando, Miguel; Gambao, Ernesto

    2017-12-09

    Falls are the leading cause of injury and death in elderly individuals. Unfortunately, fall detectors are typically based on wearable devices, and the elderly often forget to wear them. In addition, fall detectors based on artificial vision are not yet available on the market. In this paper, we present a new low-cost fall detector for smart homes based on artificial vision algorithms. Our detector combines several algorithms (background subtraction, Kalman filtering and optical flow) as input to a machine learning algorithm with high detection accuracy. Tests conducted on over 50 different fall videos have shown a detection ratio of greater than 96%.

  13. Review on prevention of falls in hospital settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Yuan Gu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This review will first cover the root causes of falls, identify preventive measures associated with these falls, and provide an overview of best practice of fall prevention at leading institutions. There is significant benefit in instituting a comprehensive program to reduce falls. After analyzing the results from many successful programs, it is apparent that an integrative program that consists of patient evaluations, environmental modification, and staff training can lead to a significant reduction in the overall prevalence of falls. Such programs can be implemented at a low cost and therefore represent an improvement in care with a high return on investment.

  14. Falling Liquid Films in Absorption Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Toshihiko

    The absorption machines of the lithium bromide-water type have recently been established as heat source equipments for residential and industrial use, which include refrigerating machines, heat pumps, and heat transformers. Several advanced cycle machines have also been proposed and tested. All of the absorption machines consist fundamentally of four kinds of heat exchangers, i.e. evaporator, absorber, generator, and condenser. The horizontal or vertical falling film system is usually applied to these heat exchangers, since the pressure drop which causes an undesirable change in the fluid temperature is relatively small in either system. The horizontal system is popular for the present, while the vertical system is going to be developed promisingly. This may save an installation space and also fit a plan for the Lorentz cycle. The purpose of this paper is to survey the available information for increasing heat and mass transfer rates in the heat exchangers of absorption machines. Emphasis is placed on the hydrodynamic characteristics of falling liquid films in absorbers and generators. The following topics are covered in this paper: 1. Characteristics of thin liquid films over horizontal tubes 2. Characteristics of wavy thin liquid films flowing down the vertical or inclined wall surface 3. Effect of the artificial surface roughness on the heat and mass transfer rates 4. Enhancement in the heat and mass transfer rates by the Marangoni convection 5. Conditions of film breakdown and the minimum wetting rates.

  15. Gene Therapy for Hemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathwani, Amit C; Davidoff, Andrew M; Tuddenham, Edward G D

    2017-10-01

    The best currently available treatments for hemophilia A and B (factor VIII or factor IX deficiency, respectively) require frequent intravenous infusion of highly expensive proteins that have short half-lives. Factor levels follow a saw-tooth pattern that is seldom in the normal range and falls so low that breakthrough bleeding occurs. Most hemophiliacs worldwide do not have access to even this level of care. In stark contrast, gene therapy holds out the hope of a cure by inducing continuous endogenous expression of factor VIII or factor IX following transfer of a functional gene to replace the hemophilic patient's own defective gene. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Falls Risk and Simulated Driving Performance in Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G. Gaspar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Declines in executive function and dual-task performance have been related to falls in older adults, and recent research suggests that older adults at risk for falls also show impairments on real-world tasks, such as crossing a street. The present study examined whether falls risk was associated with driving performance in a high-fidelity simulator. Participants were classified as high or low falls risk using the Physiological Profile Assessment and completed a number of challenging simulated driving assessments in which they responded quickly to unexpected events. High falls risk drivers had slower response times (~2.1 seconds to unexpected events compared to low falls risk drivers (~1.7 seconds. Furthermore, when asked to perform a concurrent cognitive task while driving, high falls risk drivers showed greater costs to secondary task performance than did low falls risk drivers, and low falls risk older adults also outperformed high falls risk older adults on a computer-based measure of dual-task performance. Our results suggest that attentional differences between high and low falls risk older adults extend to simulated driving performance.

  17. Prevention of falls in the elderly: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Magnus K; Vonschewelov, Thord; Karlsson, Caroline; Cöster, Maria; Rosengen, Björn E

    2013-07-01

    Falls often result in soft tissue injuries, dislocations, fractures, longstanding pain and reduced quality of life. Therefore, fall preventive programmes have been developed. In this review, we evaluate programmes that in randomized controlled trials (RCT) have been shown with fall reducing effect. Physical exercise that includes several training modalities, especially balance and strength training, is the only intervention programme that reduces both the number of fallers and the number of falls in community dwellers. Home hazards modification reduces the fall risk in community-living elderly but has the best effects in high risk groups when the programme is led by occupational therapists. Vitamin D supplement in those with low levels of vitamin D, adjustment of psychotropic medication and modification of multi-pharmacy are drug-related programmes that reduce the fall risk. Anti-slip shoe devices in elderly who walk outdoors during icy conditions and multifaceted podiatry to patients with specific foot disability are interventions targeted at the lower extremities with a fall-reducing effect. First eye cataract surgery and pacemakers in patients with cardio-inhibitory carotid sinus hypersensitivity are surgical procedures with fall-reducing effect. Multifactorial standardized preventive programmes that include an exercise component and individually-designed subject-specific programmes also reduce the number of falls. Fall preventive interventions should be provided to elderly by a structured approach, especially to high risk groups, as to reduce the number of falls and fallers.

  18. Doppler radar sensor positioning in a fall detection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liang; Popescu, Mihail; Ho, K C; Skubic, Marjorie; Rantz, Marilyn

    2012-01-01

    Falling is a common health problem for more than a third of the United States population over 65. We are currently developing a Doppler radar based fall detection system that already has showed promising results. In this paper, we study the sensor positioning in the environment with respect to the subject. We investigate three sensor positions, floor, wall and ceiling of the room, in two experimental configurations. Within each system configuration, subjects performed falls towards or across the radar sensors. We collected 90 falls and 341 non falls for the first configuration and 126 falls and 817 non falls for the second one. Radar signature classification was performed using a SVM classifier. Fall detection performance was evaluated using the area under the ROC curves (AUCs) for each sensor deployment. We found that a fall is more likely to be detected if the subject is falling toward or away from the sensor and a ceiling Doppler radar is more reliable for fall detection than a wall mounted one.

  19. Footwear style and risk of falls in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koepsell, Thomas D; Wolf, Marsha E; Buchner, David M; Kukull, Walter A; LaCroix, Andrea Z; Tencer, Allan F; Frankenfeld, Cara L; Tautvydas, Milda; Larson, Eric B

    2004-09-01

    To determine how the risk of a fall in an older adult varies in relation to style of footwear worn. Nested case-control study. Group Health Cooperative, a large health maintenance organization in Washington state. A total of 1,371 adults aged 65 and older were monitored for falls over a 2-year period; 327 qualifying fall cases were compared with 327 controls matched on age and sex. Standardized in-person examinations before fall occurrence, interviews about fall risk factors after the fall occurred, and direct examination of footwear were conducted. Questions for controls referred to the last time they engaged in an activity broadly similar to what the case was doing at the time of the fall. Athletic and canvas shoes (sneakers) were the styles of footwear associated with lowest risk of a fall. Going barefoot or in stocking feet was associated with sharply increased risk, even after controlling for measures of health status (adjusted odds ratio=11.2, 95% confidence interval (CI)=2.4-51.8). Relative to athletic/canvas shoes, other footwear was associated with a 1.3-fold increase in the risk of a fall (95% CI=0.9-1.9), varying somewhat by style. Contrary to findings from gait-laboratory studies, athletic shoes were associated with relatively low risk of a fall in older adults during everyday activities. Fall risk was markedly increased when participants were not wearing shoes. Copyright 2004 American Geriatrics Society

  20. Hypocapnia and its relation to fear of falling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clague, J E; Petrie, P J; Horan, M A

    2000-11-01

    To determine if hypocapnia occurs in patients with fear of falling and to explore potential causes of hypocapnia. Observational study in patients who fall with and without fear of falling. Rehabilitation wards of an elderly care unit. Consecutive fallers with (n = 20) and without (n = 10) fear of falling. End-tidal CO2 (PETCO2) and respiratory rate (RR) responses were measured during sustained isometric muscle contraction (SIMC) (40% of maximum voluntary contraction of quadriceps for 2 min) and during a 5-meter walk. Falls efficacy scale (FES) and Hospital anxiety and depression scale (HAD). Patients with fear of falling had significantly higher FES and HAD scores (p fear of falling (p fear of falling group than in controls (p fear of falling group than in controls (p fear of falling during SIMC and walking. Anxiety seems to be the main cause, but muscle weakness may contribute. Breathing or relaxation techniques and reconditioning may have a role in treating fear of falling in the rehabilitation setting.

  1. Continuous equilibrium scores: factoring in the time before a fall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Scott J; Reschke, Millard F; Owen Black, F

    2012-07-01

    The equilibrium (EQ) score commonly used in computerized dynamic posturography is normalized between 0 and 100, with falls assigned a score of 0. The resulting mixed discrete-continuous distribution limits certain statistical analyses and treats all trials with falls equally. We propose a simple modification of the formula in which peak-to-peak sway data from trials with falls is scaled according the percent of the trial completed to derive a continuous equilibrium (cEQ) score. The cEQ scores for trials without falls remain unchanged from the original methodology. The cEQ factors in the time before a fall and results in a continuous variable retaining the central tendencies of the original EQ distribution. A random set of 5315 Sensory Organization Test trials were pooled that included 81 falls. A comparison of the original and cEQ distributions and their rank ordering demonstrated that trials with falls continue to constitute the lower range of scores with the cEQ methodology. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (0.997) demonstrates that the cEQ retained near-perfect discrimination between trials with and without falls. We conclude that the cEQ score provides the ability to discriminate between ballistic falls from falls that occur later in the trial. This approach of incorporating time and sway magnitude can be easily extended to enhance other balance tests that include fall data or incomplete trials. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A Palliative Approach to Falls in Advanced Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaboni, Andrea; Van Ooteghem, Karen; Marcil, Meghan N; Cockburn, Amy; Flint, Alastair J; Grossman, Daphna; Keren, Ron

    2017-12-11

    Falls are viewed as a preventable cause of injury, functional loss, and death in older adults with dementia, and have been used as a marker of quality of care in long-term care facilities. Despite intensive intervention around fall prevention in these settings, falls and injury remain frequent, particularly among residents in the advanced stages of dementia. In this clinical review, we consider the common challenges and pitfalls in both the management of falls and the provision of palliative care in advanced dementia. We then describe a palliative approach to falls in advanced dementia that involves identifying individuals who would benefit from this care approach, framing falls and loss of mobility as a quality of life issue, and devising an individualized symptom assessment and management plan. A palliative approach can lead to recognition and acceptance that recurrent falls are often symptomatic of advanced dementia, and that not all falls are preventable. We conclude that falls in the advanced stage of dementia can be sentinel events indicating the need for a palliative approach to care. Rather than replace falls prevention activities, a palliative approach to falls prompts us to select dementia stage-appropriate interventions with a focus on symptom management, comfort, and dignity. Copyright © 2017 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Doppler radar fall activity detection using the wavelet transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Bo Yu; Ho, K C; Rantz, Marilyn J; Skubic, Marjorie

    2015-03-01

    We propose in this paper the use of Wavelet transform (WT) to detect human falls using a ceiling mounted Doppler range control radar. The radar senses any motions from falls as well as nonfalls due to the Doppler effect. The WT is very effective in distinguishing the falls from other activities, making it a promising technique for radar fall detection in nonobtrusive inhome elder care applications. The proposed radar fall detector consists of two stages. The prescreen stage uses the coefficients of wavelet decomposition at a given scale to identify the time locations in which fall activities may have occurred. The classification stage extracts the time-frequency content from the wavelet coefficients at many scales to form a feature vector for fall versus nonfall classification. The selection of different wavelet functions is examined to achieve better performance. Experimental results using the data from the laboratory and real inhome environments validate the promising and robust performance of the proposed detector.

  4. Implementation and evaluation of a nursing home fall management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rask, Kimberly; Parmelee, Patricia A; Taylor, Jo A; Green, Diane; Brown, Holly; Hawley, Jonathan; Schild, Laura; Strothers, Harry S; Ouslander, Joseph G

    2007-03-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of a falls management program (FMP) for nursing homes (NHs). A quality improvement project with data collection throughout FMP implementation. NHs in Georgia owned and operated by a single nonprofit organization. All residents of participating NHs. A convenience sample of 19 NHs implemented the FMP. The FMP is a multifaceted quality improvement and culture change intervention. Key components included organizational leadership buy-in and support, a designated facility-based falls coordinator and interdisciplinary team, intensive education and training, and ongoing consultation and oversight by advanced practice nurses with expertise in falls management. Process-of-care documentation using a detailed 24-item audit tool and fall and physical restraint use rates derived from quality improvement software currently used in all Georgia NHs (MyInnerView). Care process documentation related to the assessment and management of fall risk improved significantly during implementation of the FMP. Restraint use decreased substantially during the project period, from 7.9% to 4.4% in the intervention NHs (a relative reduction of 44%), and decreased in the nonintervention NHs from 7.0% to 4.9% (a relative reduction of 30%). Fall rates remained stable in the intervention NHs (17.3 falls/100 residents per month at start and 16.4 falls/100 residents per month at end), whereas fall rates increased 26% in the NHs not implementing the FMP (from 15.0 falls/100 residents/per month to 18.9 falls/100 residents per month). Implementation was associated with significantly improved care process documentation and a stable fall rate during a period of substantial reduction in the use of physical restraints. In contrast, fall rates increased in NHs owned by the same organization that did not implement the FMP. The FMP may be a helpful tool for NHs to manage fall risk while attempting to reduce physical restraint use in response to the Centers for

  5. Falls in the nursing home: are they preventable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Man Quang; Weintraub, Nancy; Rubenstein, Laurence Z

    2004-01-01

    Falls are prevalent in elderly patients residing in nursing homes, with approximately 1.5 falls occurring per nursing home bed-years. Although most are benign and injury-free, 10% to 25% result in hospital admission and/or fractures. Primary care providers for nursing home residents must therefore aim to reduce both the fall rate as well as the rate of fall-related morbidity in the long-term care setting. Interventions have been demonstrated to be successful in reducing falls in community-dwelling elderly patients. However, less evidence supports the efficacy of fall prevention in nursing home residents. The authors conducted a Medline search using the key words Falls and Nursing Homes. Several studies examined the efficacy of multifaceted intervention programs on reducing falls in nursing homes with varied results. Components of these intervention programs include: environmental assessment, assistive device evaluation and modification, medication changes, gait assessment and training, staff education, exercise programs, hip protector use, and blood pressure evaluation. Current literature supports the use of environmental assessment and intervention in reducing falls in nursing homes, and demonstrates an association between certain medications and falls. However, there are no studies that examine the effect of medication adjustments on fall rates. Also, the literature does not strongly suggest that exercise programs are effective in fall reduction. Although not effective in reducing fall rates, the use of hip protectors appears to result in less fall-related morbidity. More studies must be done to clarify the effects of high-risk medication reduction, the optimal nature and intensity of exercise programs, and patient targeting criteria to maximize the effectiveness of nursing home fall prevention programs. Based on the current literature, an effective multifaceted fall prevention program for nursing home residents should include risk factor assessment and

  6. Neurology Falls. Patient Falls Risk Assessment, Neurology Clinic, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-06

    Goal. 2008. Retrieved Aug. 22, from http://www.jointcommission.org/NR/rdonlyres/9EE98FF3-0567- 444D-9C91-424282FF5FCD/0/2008_FAQs_NPSG_0 9. pdf ...Male) i r Any administered antiepileptics (anticonvulsants): 2 r Any administered benzodiazepines : r II. FALL RISK ASSESSMENT IN

  7. Going nuts: Measuring free-fall acceleration by analyzing the sound of falling metal pieces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Jochen; Vogt, Patrik; Theilmann, Florian

    2016-03-01

    Galilei presented the kinematics of a one-dimensional accelerated motion with ease and in terms of elegant geometry. Moreover, he believed, "Philosophy [i.e. physics] is written in this grand book—I mean the universe—which stands continually open to our gaze, but it cannot be understood unless one first learns to comprehend the language and interpret the characters in which it is written. It is written in the language of mathematics, and its characters are triangles, circles, and other geometrical figures, without which it is humanly impossible to understand a single word of it." In classroom practice, however, it can be difficult to reveal this mathematical heart of nature; free fall and other accelerated motions often get obscured by friction or other sources of errors. In this paper, we introduce a method of analyzing free-fall motion indirectly by evaluating the noise of freely falling metal pieces. The method connects a deeper understanding of the mathematical structure of accelerated motion with the possibility to derive a numerical value for the free-fall acceleration g.

  8. Falling Into the Light: About Fall Prevention and Self-development


    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evron, Lotte

    2014-01-01

    It is normal to tell a story about falls focusing on the negative side. It is not normal to talk about the decline in old age as a positive thing that opens up the possibility for a more substantial quality of life and for the courage and zest for life. Nevertheless, it is what I want to write...

  9. Fall-grown oat to extend the fall grazing season for replacement dairy heifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our objective was to assess the pasture productivity and forage characteristics of 2 fall-grown oat (Avena sativa L.) cultivars, specifically for extending the grazing season and reducing reliance on harvested forages by replacement dairy heifers. A total of 160 gravid Holstein heifers (80 heifers/y...

  10. Genes and Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... correctly, a child can have a genetic disorder. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to ... or prevent disease. The most common form of gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene to replace an ...

  11. Falling into the Light-using music and poetry as complementary modes of understanding falls in old age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evron, Lotte; Clausen, Nina

    2015-01-01

    that a broader understanding of falls in old age in the health care system might help health professionals to understand the complexity of falls and by this inspire older persons to prevent falls in different ways. Using poetry and music in our performance we seek to open up for a broader understanding of falls...... prevention. Our hope is to inspire nurses and other health professionals to work with falls prevention in new ways. The performance draw on an interview study with 25 older persons where six different understandings of falls prevention were identified (1). The understandings include falls as a result of......: irresponsible behavior, disease, destiny, desire to remain independent in old age, appearing elegant/aesthetical and being physical active. One of the interviews was selected and transformed it into a poem (2-3). The poem was then translated into music by the second author. First we present the six...

  12. Los Alamos Science, Fall 1983 No. 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, N G [ed.

    1983-10-01

    Topics covered in this issue include: cellular automata, gene expression, gen-bank and its promise for molecular genetics, and frontiers of supercomputing. Abstracts have been prepared for the individual items. (GHT)

  13. Dispersion and fall out of heavier particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Poul

    2016-01-01

    they may like gasses and aerosols be transported more or less far by the wind. The present paper focuses on the growth of plumes of such particles larger and heavier than aerosols and transported by the wind. Implementation in existing decision support puff dispersion programs requires a parameterization......Nuclear accidents have so far been expected to release gasses and aerosols, but other CBRN events and also nuclear accidents with release of core particles can be expected to also release larger particles to the atmosphere. If not so large and heavy, that they fall to the ground immediately...... of this growth, and two reasonable describing parameterizations have been found, one in the literature, one proposed here, and both are compared to experimental work found in the literature. The parameterization from the literature has been implemented in the dispersion program RIMPUFF, which has subsequently...

  14. High Falls Hydroelectric Plant feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diezemann, Gustav A.

    1979-07-01

    This study was made in order to determine if re-activating the retired High Falls Hydro Station in New York would result in a more economical generation of some of the power required in the Central Hudson System than is being obtained with the oil-burning thermal plants. The findings show that the construction of a new plant is more economical than rehabilitation of the existing station. All new construction schemes are marginally unattractive at today's costs but are found to become profitable within a short period as alternative energy sources escalate in price. A new powerhouse with an installed capacity of 2390 kW proved most economical, and its construction is recommended.

  15. Comparison and Characterization of Android-Based Fall Detection Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Luque

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Falls are a foremost source of injuries and hospitalization for seniors. The adoption of automatic fall detection mechanisms can noticeably reduce the response time of the medical staff or caregivers when a fall takes place. Smartphones are being increasingly proposed as wearable, cost-effective and not-intrusive systems for fall detection. The exploitation of smartphones’ potential (and in particular, the Android Operating System can benefit from the wide implantation, the growing computational capabilities and the diversity of communication interfaces and embedded sensors of these personal devices. After revising the state-of-the-art on this matter, this study develops an experimental testbed to assess the performance of different fall detection algorithms that ground their decisions on the analysis of the inertial data registered by the accelerometer of the smartphone. Results obtained in a real testbed with diverse individuals indicate that the accuracy of the accelerometry-based techniques to identify the falls depends strongly on the fall pattern. The performed tests also show the difficulty to set detection acceleration thresholds that allow achieving a good trade-off between false negatives (falls that remain unnoticed and false positives (conventional movements that are erroneously classified as falls. In any case, the study of the evolution of the battery drain reveals that the extra power consumption introduced by the Android monitoring applications cannot be neglected when evaluating the autonomy and even the viability of fall detection systems.

  16. Comparison and characterization of Android-based fall detection systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque, Rafael; Casilari, Eduardo; Morón, María-José; Redondo, Gema

    2014-10-08

    Falls are a foremost source of injuries and hospitalization for seniors. The adoption of automatic fall detection mechanisms can noticeably reduce the response time of the medical staff or caregivers when a fall takes place. Smartphones are being increasingly proposed as wearable, cost-effective and not-intrusive systems for fall detection. The exploitation of smartphones' potential (and in particular, the Android Operating System) can benefit from the wide implantation, the growing computational capabilities and the diversity of communication interfaces and embedded sensors of these personal devices. After revising the state-of-the-art on this matter, this study develops an experimental testbed to assess the performance of different fall detection algorithms that ground their decisions on the analysis of the inertial data registered by the accelerometer of the smartphone. Results obtained in a real testbed with diverse individuals indicate that the accuracy of the accelerometry-based techniques to identify the falls depends strongly on the fall pattern. The performed tests also show the difficulty to set detection acceleration thresholds that allow achieving a good trade-off between false negatives (falls that remain unnoticed) and false positives (conventional movements that are erroneously classified as falls). In any case, the study of the evolution of the battery drain reveals that the extra power consumption introduced by the Android monitoring applications cannot be neglected when evaluating the autonomy and even the viability of fall detection systems.

  17. [Hospital falls, improvement strategy for reducing their incidence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Huete, M Eloisa; Sebastián-Viana, Tomás; Lema-Lorenzo, Isabel; Granados-Martín, Mónica; Buitrago-Lobo, Nuria; Heredia-Reina, M del Pilar; Merino-Ruiz, Margarita; Ventosa-Hernández, Esther; Gutiérrez-Fernández, Carmen; Mota-Boada, M Luisa

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the evolution of falls with the implemented measures to improve the attention of patients at risk and to reduce the number of falls. To know the characteristics of patients who have suffered fall-related injuries. All the falls registered between 2008 and 2013 have been analyzed to determine the evolution of these and to describe the implemented measures through the electronic clinical history at University Hospital of Fuenlabrada. The incidence of falls in hospitalized patients has been estimated and the evolution with the chi square test has been studied. The frequencies of the characteristics of patients who fall has been presented: age, length of stay, performed activity, patient companion, mobility level, state of consciousness. 445 registered falls happened. 2009 is the year with the highest number of falls, 86 patients fell of a total of 15,819 discharged patients (0.55%). The statistic drops until 2013, where 55 patients fell out of 15,052 discharged patients (0.37%). This difference was not statistically significant. The deployment of an assessment about fall risk at admission has helped to identify individualized risk factors. Furthermore, the awareness and alerts to the nursing staff have helped to consider fall prevention as a rutinary procedure, hence appropriate measures can be implemented on the most vulnerable patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Inspection of four-sensor falls detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartłomiej Wójtowicz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The studies presented in this article are the continuation of previous work to develop a mobile fall detector. The algorithm is based on a discrete wavelet transform of the signals from the sensors available at the detector and a linear support vector machine as a classifier. Fisher score method is used for feature selection in the proposed algorithm. As a result of reducing the number of features, the number of support vectors has been also reduced — it has a direct impact on the upper estimate of the classification error. On the basis of the obtained results, the classifier parameters have been calculated. This allows presenting the developed concept in the field of ROCROCROC curves (Receiver Operating Characteristics and their comparison with the results obtained for individual sensors. The developed concept gives much better results than each of the sensors acting independently. The findings of this study have given very good results in comparison with the previous findings, with a significant reduction in the number of required features. Due to the close relationship between the number of training data and the number of support vectors which directly affect the upper estimate of the classification error, the number of features has been reduced. Finally, satisfactory results have been obtained with the reduction of the number of features from 38 to just six, ensuring that the upper estimation of the classification error in the set of the new test data does not exceed 5.3%.[b]Keywords[/b]: falls detection, data fusion, discrete wavelet transform, support vector machine

  19. Hormonal changes when falling in love.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marazziti, Donatella; Canale, Domenico

    2004-08-01

    To fall in love is the first step in pair formation in humans and is a complex process which only recently has become the object of neuroscientific investigation. The little information available in this field prompted us to measure the levels of some pituitary, adrenal and gonadal hormones in a group of 24 subjects of both sexes who had recently (within the previous six months) fallen in love, and to compare them with those of 24 subjects who were single or were part of a long-lasting relationship. The following hormones were evaluated by means of standard techniques: FSH, LH, estradiol, progesterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS), cortisol, testosterone and androstenedione. The results showed that estradiol, progesterone, DHEAS and androstenedione levels did not differ between the groups and were within the normal ranges. Cortisol levels were significantly higher amongst those subjects who had recently fallen in love, as compared with those who had not. FSH and testosterone levels were lower in men in love, while women of the same group presented higher testosterone levels. All hormonal differences were eliminated when the subjects were re-tested from 12 to 24 months later. The increased cortisol and low FSH levels are suggestive of the "stressful" and arousing conditions associated with the initiation of a social contact. The changes of testosterone concentrations, which varied in opposite directions in the two sexes, may reflect changes in behavioural and/or temperamental traits which have yet to be clarified. In conclusion, the findings of the present study would indicate that to fall in love provokes transient hormonal changes some of which seem to be specific to each sex.

  20. Falls in nursing home residents receiving pharmacotherapy for anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reardon G

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Gregory Reardon,1 Naushira Pandya,2 Robert A Bailey31Informagenics, LLC and The Ohio State University College of Pharmacy, Columbus, OH, USA; 2Department of Geriatrics, Nova Southeastern University College of Osteopathic Medicine, Ft Lauderdale, FL, USA; 3Janssen Scientific Affairs, LLC, Horsham, PA, USAPurpose: Falls are common among nursing home residents and have potentially severe consequences, including fracture and other trauma. Recent evidence suggests anemia may be independently related to these falls. This study explores the relationship between the use of anemia-related pharmacotherapies and falls among nursing home residents.Methods: Forty nursing homes in the United States provided data for analysis. All incidents of falls over the 6-month post-index follow-up period were used to identify the outcomes of falls (≥1 fall and recurrent falls (>1 fall. Logistic regression was used to analyze the relationship between falls and recurrent falls with each of the anemia pharmacotherapies after adjusting for potential confounders.Results: A total of 632 residents were eligible for analysis. More than half (57% of residents were identified as anemic (hemoglobin < 12 g/dL females, or <13 g/dL males. Of anemic residents, 50% had been treated with one or more therapies (14% used vitamin B12, 10% folic acid, 38% iron, 0.3% darbepoetin alfa [DARB], and 1.3% epoetin alfa [EPO]. Rates of falls/recurrent falls were 33%/18% for those receiving vitamin B12, 40%/16% for folic acid, 27%/14% for iron, 38%/8% for DARB, 18%/2% for EPO, and 22%/11% for those receiving no therapy. In the adjusted models, use of EPO or DARB was associated with significantly lower odds of recurrent falls (odds ratio = 0.06; P = 0.001. Other significant covariates included psychoactive medication use, age 75–84 years, age 85+ years, worsened balance score, and chronic kidney disease (P < 0.05 for all.Conclusion: Only half of the anemic residents were found to be using anemia

  1. The Ruby Red Slipper Program: an interdisciplinary fall management program in a community academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wexler, Sharon Stahl; D'Amico, Catherine O'Neill; Foster, Norma; Cataldo, Karen A; Brody, Patricia; Huang, Zheng-Bo

    2011-01-01

    Falls are a common, yet serious complication for hospitalized patients. The Ruby Red Slipper Program is an interdisciplinary fall management program that includes development and education of unit-based fall management teams. Initial outcomes demonstrated significant reductions in falls.

  2. Early experience of a fall and fracture prevention clinic at Mayo General Hospital.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hanley, A

    2010-06-01

    Falls in the elderly are a significant public health problem. Previous studies have shown that most falls are multifactorial and an efficacious way of reducing the risk of falling is provided by a falls clinic.

  3. A Falls Wheel in a Large Academic Medical Center: An Intervention to Reduce Patient Falls With Harm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefner, Jennifer L; McAlearney, Ann Scheck; Mansfield, Jerry; Knupp, Amy M; Moffatt-Bruce, Susan D

    2015-01-01

    This article presents an evaluation of a multifaceted fall prevention initiative. The main element of this initiative was the creation and implementation of a Falls Wheel--a visual communication tool of a patient's fall injury risk for all care team members placed on every patient door throughout the health system. The Falls Wheel allows for patient categorization along two dimensions simultaneously: risk of fall and risk of injury from a fall. During the yearlong implementation, the rate of falls with harm dropped by almost 50%. A process audit revealed that there was high fidelity to the intervention components, including displaying the wheel correctly 95% of the time, and the Falls Wheel was updated to match the risk level in the electronic health record 70% of the time. The goal of this article was to share the experience of one health system and encourage others to adopt and rigorously test the Falls Wheel. Replication and extension of this program at other hospitals and health systems will enable staff and empower patients to reduce falls with harm and their unintended consequences.

  4. Geriatric falls in the context of a hospital fall prevention program: delirium, low body mass index, and other risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, Katarzyna; Wilczyński, Krzysztof; Szewieczek, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Inpatient geriatric falls are a frequent complication of hospital care that results in significant morbidity and mortality. Evaluate factors associated with falls in geriatric inpatients after implementation of the fall prevention program. Prospective observational study comprised of 788 consecutive patients aged 79.5±7.6 years ( [Formula: see text] ± standard deviation) (66% women and 34% men) admitted to the subacute geriatric ward. Comprehensive geriatric assessment (including Mini-Mental State Examination, Barthel Index of Activities of Daily Living, and modified Get-up and Go Test) was performed. Confusion Assessment Method was used for diagnosis of delirium. Patients were categorized into low, moderate, or high fall risk groups after clinical and functional assessment. About 15.9%, 21.1%, and 63.1% of participants were classified into low, moderate, and high fall risk groups, respectively. Twenty-seven falls were recorded in 26 patients. Increased fall probability was associated with age ≥76 years (Pgeriatric falls in the context of a hospital fall prevention program. Higher BMI appears to be associated with protection against inpatient geriatric falls.

  5. A Growing Troubling Triad: Diabetes, Aging, and Falls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan T. Crews

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a significant and troubling link between diabetes (DM and falls in the elderly. Individuals with DM are prone to fall for reasons such as decreased sensorimotor function, musculoskeletal/neuromuscular deficits, foot and body pain, pharmacological complications, and specialty (offloading footwear devices. Additionally, there is some concern that DM patients are prone to have more severe problems with falls than non-DM individuals. Fractures, poorer rehabilitation, and increased number of falls are all concerns. Fortunately, efforts to mitigate falls by DM patients show promise. A number of studies have shown that balance, strength, and gait training may be utilized to successfully reduce fall risk in this population. Furthermore, new technologies such as virtual reality proprioceptive training may be able to provide this reduced risk within a safe training environment.

  6. Risk of falls in the rheumatic patient at geriatric age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Prusinowska

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Evaluating the risk of falling of a geriatric rheumatic patient plays an essential role not only in planning and carrying out the physiotherapeutic process. The consequences of falls may be different and, although they do not always result in serious repercussions such as fractures or injuries, it is sufficient that they generate the fear of falling and cause a significant reduction in physical activity. Assessing functional capacity to define the risk of falling is of utmost importance in the case of patients after joint arthroplasty surgeries. The specificity of rheumatic patient’s falls is determined by numerous factors. It is not always possible to avoid them. However, it becomes vital to include fall prevention in the rehabilitation process as well as to prepare the house for the needs of an elderly person so that they are safe and as self-dependent as possible.

  7. Emerging concept: 'central benefit model' of exercise in falls prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu-Ambrose, Teresa; Nagamatsu, Lindsay S; Hsu, Chun Liang; Bolandzadeh, Niousha

    2013-01-01

    Falls are a common geriatric syndrome and are the third leading cause of chonic disability worldwide. Falls are not random events and occur, at least in part, due to impaired physiological function, such as impaired balance, and cognitive impairment. The clinical syndrome of falls is important for Sports and Exercise Medicine Clinicians as there is Level 1 evidence that targeted exercise prescription is an effective intervention strategy. The widely accepted dogma is that improved physical function, balance and muscle strength, underlies the effectiveness of the exercise in reducing falls. However, findings from randomised controlled trials suggest that exercise reduce falls via mechanisms other than improved physiological function. The authors propose that improved cognitive function - specifically, executive functions - and associated functional plasticity may be an important yet underappreciated mechanism by which the exercise reduces falls in older adults.

  8. Risk of falls in the rheumatic patient at geriatric age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prusinowska, Agnieszka; Komorowski, Arkadiusz; Sadura-Sieklucka, Teresa; Księżopolska-Orłowska, Krystyna

    2017-01-01

    Evaluating the risk of falling of a geriatric rheumatic patient plays an essential role not only in planning and carrying out the physiotherapeutic process. The consequences of falls may be different and, although they do not always result in serious repercussions such as fractures or injuries, it is sufficient that they generate the fear of falling and cause a significant reduction in physical activity. Assessing functional capacity to define the risk of falling is of utmost importance in the case of patients after joint arthroplasty surgeries. The specificity of rheumatic patient's falls is determined by numerous factors. It is not always possible to avoid them. However, it becomes vital to include fall prevention in the rehabilitation process as well as to prepare the house for the needs of an elderly person so that they are safe and as self-dependent as possible.

  9. A novel wearable smart button system for fall detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Wei; Sun, Xiang; Zhi, Yueyan; Han, Yue; Mao, Hande

    2017-05-01

    Fall has been the second most cause of accidental injury to death in the world. It has been a serious threat to the physical and mental health of the elders. Therefore, developing wearable node system with fall detecting ability has become increasingly pressing at present. A novel smart button for long-term fall detection is proposed in this paper, which is able to accurately monitor the falling behavior, and sending warning message online as well. The smart button is based on the tri-axis acceleration sensor which is used to collect the body motion signals. By using the statistical metrics of acceleration characteristics, a new SVM classification algorithm with high positive accuracy and stability is proposed so as to classify the falls and activities of daily living, and the results can be real-time displayed on Android based mobile phone. The experiments show that our wearable node system can continuously monitor the falling behavior with positive rate 94.8%.

  10. Falls in Older Adults With Cancer: Evaluation by Oncology Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerard, Emily J; Deal, Allison M; Williams, Grant R; Jolly, Trevor A; Nyrop, Kirsten A; Muss, Hyman B

    2015-11-01

    Falls in older adults are common. Screening for falls is quick, simple, and important because falls increase the risk of morbidity and mortality in older patients with cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate oncology providers' recognition of and response to falls in older patients with cancer. From a sample of older patients with cancer who completed a geriatric assessment blinded to oncology providers, we identified patients who self-reported falls within the past 6 months. Their history and physical and/or clinic notes completed by an oncology provider were reviewed for the following: documentation of falls, gait assessment, referral to geriatrics or physical and/or occupational therapy, and measurement of 25-hydroxy vitamin D level. In our sample of older patients with cancer who reported at least one recent fall (N = 125), the average age was 72 years (range, 65 to 93 years), 78% were female, and 62% had a breast cancer diagnosis. Chart reviews showed that 13 (10%) had falls documented, 25 (20%) had a gait assessment, eight (6%) were referred, and 21 (17%) had vitamin D level measured. We found that only 10% of older patients with cancer who self-reported a recent fall had appropriate medical record documentation. Oncologists are often the primary care providers for older patients and are largely unfamiliar with the frequency and impact of falls in this population. There is a need to increase awareness of falls prevalence and consequences among oncology providers in order to provide timely interventions to reduce the risks associated with falls. Copyright © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  11. Causes of falls of roof in South African collieries

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van der Merwe, JN

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available length, spacing, installation quality, timing of support and A general investigation f the surrounding area, including slips and faults, dimensions, other falls. Following that, the team would reassemble and reach consensus on the cause of the roof... fall. The team would then view specific areas of interest that were found during the detailed individual inspections. Finally, the team tested their diagnosis by establishing why the roof did not fall in the adjacent areas. During the underground...

  12. Rock-fall Hazard In The Yosemite Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzzetti, F.; Reichenbach, P.; Wieczorek, G. F.

    Rock slides and rock falls are the most frequent slope movements in Yosemite Na- tional Park, California. In historical time (1851-2001), more than 400 rock falls and rock slides have been documented in the valley, and some of them have been mapped in detail. We present the preliminary results of an attempt to assess rockfall hazard in the Yosemite Valley using STONE, a 3-dimensional rock-fall simulation computer program. The software computes 3-dimensional rock-fall trajectories starting from a digital terrain model (DTM), the location of rock-fall release points (source areas), and maps of the dynamic rolling coefficient and of the coefficients of normal and tan- gential energy restitution. For each DTM cell the software also calculates the number of rock falls passing through the cell, the maximum rock-fall velocity and the maxi- mum flying height. For the Yosemite Valley, a DTM with a ground resolution of 10 x 10 m was prepared using topographic contour lines from USGS 1:24,000-scale maps. Rock-fall release points were identified as DTM cells having a slope steeper than 60 degrees, an assumption based on the location of historical rock falls. Maps of the nor- mal and tangential energy restitution coefficients and of the rolling friction coefficient were produced from a surficial geologic map. The availability of historical rock falls mapped in detail allowed us to check the computer program performance and to cali- brate the model parameters. Visual and statistical comparison of the model results with the mapped rock falls confirmed the accuracy of the model. The model results are also compared with a geomorphic assessment of rock-fall hazard based on potential energy referred to as a "shadow angle" approach, recently completed for the Yosemite Valley.

  13. Long-term Surveillance Plan for the Falls City Disposal Site, Falls City, Texas. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Falls City disposal site, Falls City, Texas, describes the surveillance activities for the disposal site. The US Department of Energy (DOE) will carry out these activities to ensure that the disposal cell continues to function as designed. This LTSP was prepared as a requirement for acceptance under the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) general license for custody and long-term care of residual radioactive materials. This LTSP documents whether the land and interests are owned by the United States and details how long-term care of the disposal site will be carried out. It is based on the DOE`s Guidance for Implementing the UMTRA Project Long-term Surveillance Program (DOE, 1992a).

  14. Long-term surveillance plan for the Falls City Disposal Site, Falls City, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Falls City disposal site, Falls City, Texas, describes the surveillance activities for the disposal site. DOE will carry out these activities to ensure that the disposal cell continues to function as designed. This LTSP was prepared as a requirement for acceptance under the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) general license for custody and long-term care of residual radioactive materials. This LTSP documents whether the land and interests are owned by the United States and details how long-term care of the disposal site will be carried out. It is based on the DOE`s Guidance for Implementing the UMTRA Project Long-term Surveillance Program (DOE, 1992a).

  15. A canine BCAN microdeletion associated with episodic falling syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Jennifer L; Tsai, Kate L; Krey, Christa; Noorai, Rooksana E; Vanbellinghen, Jean-François; Garosi, Laurent S; Shelton, G Diane; Clark, Leigh Anne; Harvey, Robert J

    2012-01-01

    Episodic falling syndrome (EFS) is a canine paroxysmal hypertonicity disorder found in Cavalier King Charles spaniels. Episodes are triggered by exercise, stress or excitement and characterized by progressive hypertonicity throughout the thoracic and pelvic limbs, resulting in a characteristic 'deer-stalking' position and/or collapse. We used a genome-wide association strategy to map the EFS locus to a 3.48 Mb critical interval on canine chromosome 7. By prioritizing candidate genes on the basis of biological plausibility, we found that a 15.7 kb deletion in BCAN, encoding the brain-specific extracellular matrix proteoglycan brevican, is associated with EFS. This represents a compelling causal mutation for EFS, since brevican has an essential role in the formation of perineuronal nets governing synapse stability and nerve conduction velocity. Mapping of the deletion breakpoint enabled the development of Multiplex PCR and Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) genotyping tests that can accurately distinguish normal, carrier and affected animals. Wider testing of a larger population of CKCS dogs without a history of EFS from the USA revealed that carriers are extremely common (12.9%). The development of molecular genetic tests for the EFS microdeletion will allow the implementation of directed breeding programs aimed at minimizing the number of animals with EFS and enable confirmatory diagnosis and pharmacotherapy of affected dogs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Differences between Gait on Stairs and Flat Surfaces in Relation to Fall Risk and Future Falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kejia; Delbaere, Kim; Brodie, Matthew; Lovell, Nigel; Kark, Lauren; Lord, Stephen; Redmond, Stephen

    2017-03-03

    We used body-worn inertial sensors to quantify differences in semi-free-living gait between stairs and on normal flat ground in older adults, and investigated the utility of assessing gait on these terrains for predicting the occurrence of multiple falls. 82 community-dwelling older adults wore two inertial sensors, on the lower back and the right ankle, during several bouts of walking on flat surfaces and up and down stairs, in between rests and activities of daily living. Derived from the vertical acceleration at the lower back, step rate was calculated from the signal's fundamental frequency. Step rate variability was the width of this fundamental frequency peak from the signal's power spectral density. Movement vigor was calculated at both body locations from the signal variance. Partial Spearman correlations between gait parameters and physiological fall risk factors (components from the Physiological Profile Assessment) were calculated while controlling for age and gender. Overall, anteroposterior vigor at the lower back in stair descent was lower in subjects with longer reaction times. Older adults walked more slowly on stairs, but they were not significantly slower on flat surfaces. Using logistic regression, faster step rate in stair descent was associated with multiple prospective falls over 12 months. No significant associations were shown from gait parameters derived during walking upstairs or on flat surfaces. These results suggest that stair descent gait may provide more insight into fall risk than regular walking and stair ascent, and that further sensor-based investigation into unsupervised gait on different terrains would be valuable.

  17. Development of a Wearable-Sensor-Based Fall Detection System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falin Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fall detection is a major challenge in the public healthcare domain, especially for the elderly as the decline of their physical fitness, and timely and reliable surveillance is necessary to mitigate the negative effects of falls. This paper develops a novel fall detection system based on a wearable device. The system monitors the movements of human body, recognizes a fall from normal daily activities by an effective quaternion algorithm, and automatically sends request for help to the caregivers with the patient’s location.

  18. [Dementia and falls: two related syndromes in old age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puisieux, François; Pardessus, Vinciane; Bombois, Stéphanie

    2005-12-01

    Dementia and cognitive impairment are known as a major risk for falls and subsequent adverse events in the elderly. In addition to result in serious injury, including fractures, falls lead to functional decline due to fear of falling again and self limitation of activity in older adults. All types of dementia and all degrees of severity are involved. Rather than resulting from a single cause, falls are the result of a combination of intrinsic, situational, and environmental factors. The most common risk factors for falls in patients with cognitive impairment and dementia are gait and balance disturbances, behavioral disorders, visual problems, malnutrition, adverse effects of drugs, fear of falling, neurocardiovascular instability (particularly orthostatic hypotension), and environmental hazards. Based on data from studies in cognitively normal people who fall, a multifaceted intervention, including a physical exercise programme and modification of the risk factors may prevent falls in older people with cognitive impairment and dementia. Preliminary research suggests that physiotherapy may have a role for falls prevention in these patients. However, randomized studies need to be performed.

  19. Fall risk factors in community-dwelling elderly people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid Bergland

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Falls are a common and serious problem for older adults. Approximately one-third of older communitydwelling people fall at least once a year. The main purpose of this paper is to present risk factors for fall in older people living at home. The databases used for identifying documentation of risk factors are Cinahl, Eric, ISI Web of Science, Cochrane Medline, Psycinfo and dissertation. Many psychosocial and medical conditions and impairment of sensorimotor function, balance and gait have been shown in large epidemiological studies to be strongly associated with falls. Several of the risk factors are interrelated. The intrinsic-extrinsic distinction seem to be an oversimplification. A better understanding of falls is usually obtained when examining the person in association with the environmental factors. Advanced age, history of falls, ADL limitations, impaired gait and mobility, visual impairment, reduced sensation, muscular weakness, poor reaction time, impaired cognition, diseases as stroke, use of psychoactive medication and use of many medications are risk factors shown to be strongly associated with falls. This means recommendation of multifactorial fall risk assessment must incorporate a range of physiological and mental tests in addition to assessing balance and gait as well as taking multiple chronic diseases and medications into account. These finding underscore the importance of multidimensional fall intervention with special focus on modifiable risk factors

  20. Primary knee osteoarthritis increases the risk of falling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasci Bozbas, Gulnur; Sendur, Omer Faruk; Aydemir, Ali Hakan

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of primary knee osteoarthritis on the risk of falling. One hundred participants (50 with knee osteoarthritis and 50 healthy controls) were included in this study. Primary knee osteoarthritis was diagnosed according to the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria. Patients who were grade 2 or 3 by Kellgren-Lawrence criteria according to weight-bearing knee radiographs were included in this study. The risk of falling was evaluated by the interactive balance and coordination device both in the osteoarthritis and control groups. The functional status and pain were evaluated with respectively Lequesne Index and Visual Analogue Scale. No statistically significant differences were found between the group of primary knee osteoarthritis and control in terms of age, BMI, and gender. The median falling index was 52 in the group with knee OA, whereas it was 31 in the control group. It was determined that primary knee osteoarthritis increased the risk of falling significantly and grade 3 primary knee osteoarthritis was statistically significantly higher than grade 2 (p 0.05). Falling is among the important causes of mortality and morbidity in advanced age. Therefore, assessment of risk factors for falling and the strategies to prevent it are important. Primary knee osteoarthritis is one of the risk factors associated with falling. Therefore, medical approaches, proprioception training, balance-gait training, muscle strengthening exercises, and arrangements to prevent domestic injurious falling should be planned to reduce the risk of falling in the presence of primary knee osteoarthritis.

  1. National Fall Prevention Workshop: stepping up pan-Canadian coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    About one in three Canadian seniors will experience a fall at least once each year. Such falls are the leading cause of injury-related hospitalizations among older people. Apart from causing injury, falls can result in chronic pain, reduced quality of life and, in severe cases, death. Psychological effects of a fall may cause a post-fall syndrome that includes dependence on others for daily activities, loss of autonomy, confusion, immobilization and depression. Falls and the resulting injuries often occur due to a combination of factors, including health conditions associated with aging such as vision problems, osteoporosis, dementia and symptoms of a chronic disease. They can be due to the side effects of medications, environmental hazards and risk-taking behaviours. Fall prevention initiatives and strategies are taking place in all provinces and territories and at the national level. To enhance the collaborative understanding of these initiatives, a National Fall Prevention Workshop was held at the Canadian Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion Conference in Vancouver, British Columbia, on 17 November 2011. The Workshop was co-hosted by the British Columbia Injury Research and Prevention Unit (BCIRPU) and the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC). Fall prevention leads from each province and territory were invited to present their most recent activities and their plans.

  2. Neighborhood Environment and Falls among Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicklett, Emily Joy; Lohman, Matthew C; Smith, Matthew Lee

    2017-02-10

    Background: Falls present a major challenge to active aging, but the relationship between neighborhood factors and falls is poorly understood. This study examined the relationship between fall events and neighborhood factors, including neighborhood social cohesion (sense of belonging, trust, friendliness, and helpfulness) and physical environment (vandalism/graffiti, rubbish, vacant/deserted houses, and perceived safety walking home at night). Methods: Data were analyzed from 9259 participants over four biennial waves (2006-2012) of the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), a nationally representative sample of adults aged 65 and older in the United States. Results: In models adjusting for demographic and health-related covariates, a one-unit increase in neighborhood social cohesion was associated with 4% lower odds of experiencing a single fall (odds ratio (OR): 0.96, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.93-0.99) and 6% lower odds of experiencing multiple falls (OR: 0.94, 95% CI: 0.90-0.98). A one-unit increase in the physical environment scale was associated with 4% lower odds of experiencing a single fall (OR: 0.96, 95% CI: 0.93-0.99) and with 5% lower odds of experiencing multiple falls (OR: 0.95, 95% CI: 0.91-1.00) in adjusted models. Conclusions: The physical and social neighborhood environment may affect fall risk among community-dwelling older adults. Findings support the ongoing need for evidence-based fall prevention programming in community and clinical settings.

  3. Comparison of the validity of four fall-related psychological measures in a community-based falls risk screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Delilah S; Ellis, Rebecca; Kosma, Maria; Fabre, Jennifer M; McCarter, Kevin S; Wood, Robert H

    2011-09-01

    We examined the measurement properties offall-related psychological instruments with a sample of 133 older adults (M age = 74.4 years, SD = 9.4). Measures included the Comprehensive Falls Risk Screening Instrument, Falls-efficacy Scale-International (FES-I), Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC), modified Survey ofActivities and Fear ofFalling in the Elderly (mSAFFE), Consequences of Falling (CoF), Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (PASE), and 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36). The FES-I, ABC, mSAFFE, and CoF were significantly correlated with each othe, with SF-36, and with mobility. The ABC and mSAFFE were significantly correlated with PASE. The ABC differentiated between fallers and nonfallers and predicted total falls risk. Findings can assist with the selection of psychological instruments in a falls risk screening context.

  4. An analysis of the relationship between bodily injury severity and fall height in victims of fatal falls from height

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Teresiński

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study : One of the basic issues discussed in forensic literature regarding falls from a height is determination of fall heights and differentiation between suicidal and accidental falls. The aim of the study was to verify the usefulness of the available methods for the purposes of forensic expertises. Material and methods : The study encompassed fatalities of falls from a height whose autopsies were performed in the Department of Forensic Medicine in Lublin. Results : Similarly to other authors, the severity of injuries was assessed using the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS and injury severity score (ISS. The study findings demonstrated a statistically significant correlation between the fall height and the severity of injuries according to ISS and a statistically significant difference in fall heights between the groups of accidents and suicides.

  5. A sustainable programme to prevent falls and near falls in community dwelling older people: results of a randomised trial

    OpenAIRE

    Steinberg, M; Cartwright, C; Peel, N.; Williams, G

    2000-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE—In the causative mechanism of falls among older community dwellers, slips and trips have been found to be significant precursors. The purpose of the two year trial was to assess the effectiveness of multi-component interventions targeting major risk factors for falls in reducing the incidence of slips, trips and falls among the well, older community.
DESIGN—Four groups with approximately equal numbers of participants were randomly allocated to interventions. The prevention str...

  6. Adoption of Evidence-Based Fall Prevention Practices in Primary Care for Older Adults with a History of Falls

    OpenAIRE

    Phelan, Elizabeth A.; Sally Aerts; David Dowler; Elizabeth Eckstrom; Casey, Colleen M.

    2016-01-01

    A multifactorial approach to assess and manage modifiable risk factors is recommended for older adults with a history of falls. Limited research suggests that this approach does not routinely occur in clinical practice, but most related studies are based on provider self-report, with the last chart audit of United States practice published over a decade ago. We conducted a retrospective chart review to assess the extent to which patients aged 65+ years with a history of repeated falls or fall...

  7. End effects for the falling cylinder viscometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehbeh, Elias G.; Ui, T. J.; Hussey, R. G.

    1993-01-01

    Experimental results are presented for the Stokes velocity of a circular cylinder of radius a and length L moving axially through a viscous fluid contained within a coaxial closed cylindrical tube of radius b and length H. The results cover the intermediate range 0.21 ≤a/b≤0.70 and are found to be consistent with theoretical results for the narrow gap case (a≂b) and with previous experimental results for the wide gap case (a≪b). The fractional difference between the observed drag and the theoretical drag is represented well by 1.67x-0.017, where x=(b-a)(a/b)1/2/L. The negative term is interpreted as representing an effective cylinder length of 0.983L, and the 1.67x term is interpreted qualitatively as a measure of the degree to which the fluid is displaced radially by the falling cylinder. The limitations of our expression for end effects are explored experimentally. Additional experimental results are presented for two cases in which the ends of the cylindrical tube are not closed.

  8. Decadal Oscillation of Fall Temperature in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jau-Ming Chen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study verifies the existence of an evident decadal oscillation in fall (September - November temperature for Taiwan. It has an island-wide spatial pattern and a central frequency of 11 years. Acorresponding decadal-oscillation mode of tropical sea surface temperature (SST is found to be largely responsible for inducing the decadal temperature oscillation for Taiwan via the following regulating processes. On a decadal timescale, periods of decadal warming in Taiwan concur with major cold anomalies in tropical SST over the eastern Indian Ocean and the central Pacific. These cold SST anomalies modulate tropical Walker circulation so as to produce anomalous descending centers in their regions. Meanwhile, the complementary anomalous ascending motion and anomalous low-level convergence center occur near the Maritime continent. These anomalous ascending and descending centers act as tropical forcing sources to evoke a low-level Rossby-wave-like circulation anomaly in the Asian-Pacific regions. Taiwan is surrounded by a low-level anomalous high to its east and an anomalous low to its west. These circulations induce anomalous flows from the south to warm Taiwan via anomalous warm advection. The above regulating processes reverse in polarity during periods of decadal cooling in Taiwan.

  9. Small Sized Drone Fall Recover Mechanism Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    LIU, Tzu-Heng; CHAO, Fang-Lin; LIOU, Jhen-Yuan

    2017-12-01

    Drones uses four motors to rotate clockwise, counter-clockwise, or change in rotational speed to change its status of motion. The problem of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle turnover causes personal loses and harm local environment. Designs of devices that can let falling drones recover are discussed. The models attempt to change the orientation, so that the drone may be able to improve to the point where it can take off again. The design flow included looking for functional elements, using simplify model to estimate primary functional characteristics, and find the appropriate design parameters. For reducing the complexity, we adopted the simple rotate mechanism with rotating arms to change the fuselage angle and reduce the dependence on the extra-components. A rough model was built to verify structure, and then the concept drawing and prototype were constructed. We made the prototype through the integration of mechanical part and the electronic control circuit. The electronic control module that selected is Arduino-mini pro. Through the Bluetooth modules, user can start the rebound mechanism by the motor control signal. Protections frames are added around each propeller to improve the body rotate problem. Limited by current size of Arduino module, motor and rebound mechanism make the main chassis more massive than the commercial product. However, built-in sensor and circuit miniaturization will improve it in future.

  10. [Falls and osteoporotic fractures prevention units: proposed Osteoporosis, Falls and Fractures Group of the Spanish Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duaso, Enric; Casas, Alvaro; Formiga, Francesc; Lázaro Del Nogal, Montserrat; Salvà, Antoni; Marcellán, Teresa; Navarro, Carmen

    2011-01-01

    Since forming the Osteoporosis, Falls and Fractures Group of the Spanish Society (GOCF) of Geriatrics and Gerontology (SEGG) a review was performed of the epidemiology of falls, along with a description of measures that have shown a degree of effectiveness in prevention. We also present the proposal of a common basic model of action in fall prevention units, mainly addressed to the community. Finally, a consensus model falls register is presented, common to community level and institutional areas, with the objective of being useful and easy to fill in at any care level. Copyright © 2011 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. Predictive Factors for Inpatient Falls among Children with Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemdaroğlu, Ebru; Özbudak, Sibel Demir; Mandiroğlu, Sibel; Biçer, Seda Alakoç; Özgirgin, Neşe; Uçan, Halil

    Inpatient falls are of significant concern. The aim of this prospective study was to determine the predictors of inpatient falls among children with cerebral palsy in a rehabilitation hospital. A total of 93 patients with cerebral palsy were assessed based on history, physical findings, the Selective Motor Control Test, the Gross Motor Functional Classification System, the Berg Balance Scale and the Manual Ability Classification System. Previous history of falls/frequent falls, and any falls which occurred during hospitalization, were recorded. Of all 93 patients, 25 (27%) fell and 68 (73%) did not fall. The mean age of the fallers (6.3±2.0 years) was lower than that of the non-fallers (8.1±3.9 years). Behavioral problems according to the mother's statement (OR 26.454), not being able to maintain a long sitting position (OR 10.807), ability to balance on knees without support (OR 9.810), a history of frequent falls (OR 4.893) and a negative Thomas test (OR 4.192 fold) were found to increase the risk of inpatient falls. In these children with cerebral palsy, behavioral problems according to the mother's statement, a history of frequent falls, not being able to maintain a long sitting position, a negative Thomas test, and able to balance on knees without support were associated with the risk of inpatient falls. Children with cerebral palsy may experience inpatient falls. Further studies are required in order to develop prevention programs. For patients diagnosed with cerebral palsy, these results may help identify possible inpatient fallers on hospital admission. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The characteristics and factors of emergency service visits for falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malta, Deborah Carvalho; Silva, Marta Maria Alves da; Mascarenhas, Márcio Dênis Medeiros; Sá, Naíza Nayla Bandeira de; Morais Neto, Otaliba Libânio de; Bernal, Regina Tomie Ivata; Monteiro, Rosane Aparecida; Andrade, Silvânia Suely Caribé de Araújo; Gawryszewski, Vilma Pinheiro

    2012-02-01

    To analyze the characteristics of visits to the emergency services that result from falls and to identify the factors associated with these visits. A cross-sectional study of 12,617 visits that resulted from falls, recorded in the National Injury Surveillance System, was carried out. The data were collected in 23 Brazilian capitals and the Federal District between September and November 2009 using cluster sampling. Correspondence analysis was used, which allowed for the joint observation of a large number of qualitative variables. Most of the victims were male (56.5%), aged 0 to 19 years (45.7%), and identified as non-white skin color (62.2%). The majority of the falls occurred at home (54.6%) and in the street (17.4%); 14.3% were work-related. The predominant types were "falls on the same level" (57.0%) and "falls from a ladder/step" (15.6%). Most of the injuries were classified as sprains, dislocations, bruises, cuts, or lacerations (68.3%). Falls among children occurred mostly at home; among adolescents at school; and among young people at sports facilities. Falls among adults were associated with the work place, including falls from scaffolding, roofs, stairs/steps, and holes and were linked to alcohol use. Falls on the same level resulted in less serious injuries, mostly on the upper and lower limbs, and falls from scaffolding and roofs were associated with more severe injuries and hospitalization. The results show that strategies to prevent falls should target residences, schools, and work environments.

  13. Exercise, Health, and Falls Risks among Older African American Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Kosma

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background of Study: Although exercise has many benefits, older African American (AA women are less active than older Caucasian women and older AA men. Balance and muscle-strengthening activities are typically recommended for decreased falls, whereas the role of aerobic training alone on falls prevention is controversial. Objective: This was a mixed methods phronetic (pragmatic study – without an intervention – including quantitative data (falls risks and qualitative data on exercise behavior and its importance to health and falls prevention; therefore, the studied phenomenon was thoroughly and pragmatically investigated. The first purpose of the study was to examine differences in falls risks based on exercise type (aerobics vs. combination of aerobics, muscle training, and balance activities and exercise level (active people vs. somewhat active people. Secondly, participants’ exercise values were examined in relation to their health, falls-risk prevention, exercise behavior, and falls risks. Method: Interviews and falls risk assessments were conducted among 12 older AA women in an inner-city community center. Results: ANCOVA and ANOVA showed that the aerobics group performed better in Dynamic Gait Index (DGI and Timed Up and Go than the combination group (d =0.85, -0.97; the latter surpassed the former in Functional Reach (d = 2.27. The active group (met the 150 minutes/week exercise recommendation performed better in DGI and Six-Minute Walk than the somewhat active group (d =0.62.,50; the latter outperformed the former in balance-eyes open (d = -0.52. Emerging themes about lifestyle values included: a reasons for health conditions and staying healthy and b falls prevention. Conclusion: Exercise programs for fall risk reduction should include not only muscle strengthening and balance activities, but also aerobic exercises. Meeting minimum exercise recommendations is key to falls risk reduction. Beyond healthy diet, the role of exercise

  14. Validity and sensitivity to change of the falls efficacy scales international to assess fear of falling in older adults with and without cognitive impairment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauer, Klaus A; Kempen, Gertrudis I J M; Schwenk, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Measures of fear of falling have not yet been validated in patients with dementia, leaving a methodological gap that limits research in a population at high risk of falling and fall-related consequences....

  15. The implications of fall armyworm strains for insect resistance management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall armyworm is a long-time agricultural pest in the Western Hemisphere and has recently become a major problem in many areas of Africa. Adding to the concern is the development of resistance to a subset of Bt-toxins in some fall armyworm populations that could compromise one of the more effective...

  16. 29 CFR 1915.159 - Personal fall arrest systems (PFAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Personal fall arrest systems (PFAS). 1915.159 Section 1915... Protective Equipment (PPE) § 1915.159 Personal fall arrest systems (PFAS). The criteria of this section apply to PFAS and their use. Effective January 1, 1998, body belts and non-locking snaphooks are not...

  17. Childhood Fall from Heights in Sokoto, Nigeria. | MUNGADI | Sahel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... commonest trauma was head injury seen in 36 patients (55.4%) and was responsible for the overall mortality of 6.8% (4 cases). Extremity fractures occurred in 18 patients (27.7%) and limb lost was recorded in 5 patients (8.5%). The biomechanics of fall, the peculiarities of fall from height in this environment and preventive ...

  18. Abdominal injuries after high falls: high incidence and increased mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hensbroek, P. Boele; van Ooijen, M.; Lamers, A. B. G. N.; Ponsen, K.-J.; Goslings, J. C.

    2013-01-01

    Falls from height are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Injuries to the extremities and head are common. However, little has been reported on abdominal injuries or their treatment. This study aims to assess the abdominal injuries, treatment, and mortality after falls from height. We searched

  19. Balance impairment not predictive of falls in geriatric rehabilitation wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Terry; Kuys, Suzanne S; Morrison, Greg; Clarke, Jane; Bew, Paul

    2008-05-01

    Falls are common among hospital inpatients, particularly in rehabilitation wards. Standing balance impairment is widely held to be a contributing factor to falls, is a component of several falls risk screening tools, and has motivated the development of balance retraining programs for the reduction of in-hospital falls. Little rigorous investigation of the link between standing balance impairment and in-hospital falls has been undertaken. We identified optimal cut-off points of four commonly used balance measures (functional reach, Timed Up and Go, step test, and timed static stance) in a prospective multicenter cohort study. Admission data (n = 1373) were clustered and matched by center then randomly allocated to development and validation data sets. Optimal cut-off points for each test were identified from the development data set. The predictive accuracy of all four balance tests was poor when the optimal cut-off was applied to the validation data set (Youden Index scores ranged between 0.02 and 0.15). These findings do not support an association between admission standing balance and falls in a geriatric rehabilitation setting. This result has implications for content of falls risk screening tools and interventions to prevent falls in a geriatric rehabilitation population.

  20. Fall detection with body-worn sensors : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwickert, L.; Becker, C.; Lindemann, U.; Marechal, C.; Bourke, A.; Chiari, L.; Helbostad, J. L.; Zijlstra, Wiebren; Aminian, K.; Todd, C.; Bandinelli, S.; Klenk, J.

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims. Falls among older people remain a major public health challenge. Body-worn sensors are needed to improve the understanding of the underlying mechanisms and kinematics of falls. The aim of this systematic review is to assemble, extract and critically discuss the information

  1. The Tail-less Cat in Free-Fall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrickson, J. E.

    1989-01-01

    Describes four kinds of movement by a cat with or without angular momentum and tail or tail-less during free falling. Presents many pictures illustrating the movement. Supports the position that the angular momentum of the tail plays an important role in free fall. (YP)

  2. Optimising a fall out dust monitoring sampling programme at a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study at the specific cement manufacturing plant and open cast mine was to develop a positioning guideline for monitoring equipment and to optimise the fall out dust sampling programme. A baseline study was conducted on existing practices and legal requirements relating to fall out dust monitoring.

  3. Verbal Politeness in Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart | Arua ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article focuses on verbal politeness in Things Fall Apart. The paper adds to the available literature on Things Fall Apart, a pragmatic view. The study realizes that most of the utterances encode positive politeness which consolidates solidarity and communal living leading to cohesion in the society. There are instances of ...

  4. Falls among pregnant women in Enugu, Southeast Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-10-04

    Oct 4, 2013 ... Background: Falls during pregnancy are major public health issues and a common cause of maternal injury during pregnancy. There is paucity of ... to be associated with an increased risk of fractures, sprains, head injury .... reported causes of falls during pregnancy by the women are as shown in Table 4.

  5. Litter fall and decomposition of mangrove species Avicennia marina ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract—Litter fall and decomposition of mangrove leaves were compared for different seasons, species (Avicennia marina and Rhizophora mucronata) and sites in southern Mozambique. Mangrove leaf litter fall and decomposition was estimated using small mesh collecting-baskets and litter bags respectively in 2006 and ...

  6. Hazardous Waste Cleanup: Olin Corporation in Niagara Falls, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Olin Niagara Falls Plant (the Plant), comprised of two separate lots, is located south of Buffalo Avenue in Niagara Falls, approximately 1,000 feet north of the Upper Niagara River. Historically, Olin produced chlorine and caustic soda from rock salt

  7. The Fall of the Leaf, and Autumnal Tints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MacDonald, Alasdair A.

    2013-01-01

    A well-known marker of the difference between British and American English is the choice between fall or autumn for the third season of the year. This note explores the evolution of the difference, and suggests that fall may have had an original reference to the seasonal discoloration, rather than

  8. CIRCUMSTANCES AND CONSEQUENCES OF FALLS IN POLIO SURVIVORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bickerstaffe, Alice; Beelen, Anita; Nollet, Frans

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Many polio survivors have symptoms that are known risk factors for falls in elderly people. This study aims to determine the: (i) frequency; (ii) consequences; (iii) circumstances; and (iv) factors associated with falls in polio survivors. Methods: A survey was conducted among 376 polio

  9. Comparison of Simple Versus Performance-Based Fall Prediction Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shekhar K. Gadkaree BS

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare the predictive ability of standard falls prediction models based on physical performance assessments with more parsimonious prediction models based on self-reported data. Design: We developed a series of fall prediction models progressing in complexity and compared area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC across models. Setting: National Health and Aging Trends Study (NHATS, which surveyed a nationally representative sample of Medicare enrollees (age ≥65 at baseline (Round 1: 2011-2012 and 1-year follow-up (Round 2: 2012-2013. Participants: In all, 6,056 community-dwelling individuals participated in Rounds 1 and 2 of NHATS. Measurements: Primary outcomes were 1-year incidence of “ any fall ” and “ recurrent falls .” Prediction models were compared and validated in development and validation sets, respectively. Results: A prediction model that included demographic information, self-reported problems with balance and coordination, and previous fall history was the most parsimonious model that optimized AUC for both any fall (AUC = 0.69, 95% confidence interval [CI] = [0.67, 0.71] and recurrent falls (AUC = 0.77, 95% CI = [0.74, 0.79] in the development set. Physical performance testing provided a marginal additional predictive value. Conclusion: A simple clinical prediction model that does not include physical performance testing could facilitate routine, widespread falls risk screening in the ambulatory care setting.

  10. Prevalence of selected fall variables and relationship among them in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence of selected fall variables and relationship among them in a Nigerian stroke population. ... Design: Ex-post facto study with co-relational design. Methods-This correlation study involved 26 stroke ... interview were respectively used to assess fear, risk and incidence of falls of participants. Results- FOF prevalence ...

  11. Factors Predicting Falls and Mobility Outcomes in Patients With Stroke Returning Home After Rehabilitation Who Are at Risk of Falling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Mandy Man-Di; Hill, Keith D; Batchelor, Frances; Burton, Elissa

    2017-12-01

    To identify factors predicting falls and limited mobility in people with stroke at 12 months after returning home from rehabilitation. Observational cohort study with 12-month follow-up. Community. People with stroke (N=144) and increased falls risk discharged home from rehabilitation. Not applicable. Falls were measured using monthly calendars completed by participants, and mobility was assessed using gait speed over 5m (high mobility: >0.8m/s vs low mobility: ≤0.8m/s). Both measures were assessed at 12 months postdischarge. Demographics and functional measures, including balance, strength, visual or spatial deficits, disability, physical activity level, executive function, functional independence, and falls risk, were analyzed to determine factors significantly predicting falls and mobility levels after 12 months. Those assessed as being at high falls risk (Falls Risk for Older People in the Community [FROP-Com] score≥19) were 4.5 times more likely to fall by 12 months (odds ratio [OR], 4.506; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.71-11.86; P=.002). Factors significantly associated with lower usual gait speed (≤0.8m/s) at 12 months in the multivariable analysis were age (OR, 1.07; 95% CI, 1.01-1.14; P=.033), physical activity (OR, 1.09; 95% CI, 1.03-1.17, P=.007), and functional mobility (OR, .83; 95% CI, .75-.93; P=.001). Several factors predicted falls and limited mobility for patients with stroke 12 months after rehabilitation discharge. These results suggest that clinicians should include assessment of falls risk (FROP-Com), physical activity, and dual-task Timed Up and Go test during rehabilitation to identify those most at risk of falling and experiencing limited mobility outcomes at 12 months, and target these areas during inpatient and outpatient rehabilitation to optimize long-term outcomes. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Adoption of Evidence-Based Fall Prevention Practices in Primary Care for Older Adults with a History of Falls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Phelan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A multifactorial approach to assess and manage modifiable risk factors is recommended for older adults with a history of falls. Limited research suggests that this approach does not routinely occur in clinical practice, but most related studies are based on provider self-report, with the last chart audit of United States practice published over a decade ago. We conducted a retrospective chart review to assess the extent to which patients aged 65+ with a history of repeated falls or fall-related healthcare use received multifactorial risk assessment and interventions. The setting was an academic primary care clinic in the Pacific Northwest. Among the 116 patients meeting our inclusion criteria, 48% had some type of documented assessment. Their mean age was 79±8 years; 68% were female, and 10% were non-white. They averaged 6 primary care visits over a 12-month period subsequent to their index fall. Frequency of assessment of fall risk factors varied from 24% (for home safety to 78% (for vitamin D. An evidence-based intervention was recommended for identified risk factors 73% of the time, on average. Two risk factors were addressed infrequently: medications (21% and home safety (24%. Use of a structured visit note template independently predicted assessment of fall risk factors (P=0.003. Geriatrics specialists were more likely to use a structured note template (p=.04 and perform more fall risk factor assessments (4.6 vs. 3.6, p=.007 than general internists. These results suggest opportunities for improving multifactorial fall risk assessment and management of older adults at high fall risk in primary care. A structured visit note template facilitates assessment. Given that high-risk medications have been found to be independent risk factors for falls, increasing attention to medications should become a key focus of both public health educational efforts and fall prevention in primary care practice.

  13. Executive control deficits as a prodrome to falls in healthy older adults: a prospective study linking thinking, walking, and falling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Talia; Mirelman, Anat; Giladi, Nir; Schweiger, Avraham; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M

    2010-10-01

    Executive function (EF) deficits may increase fall risk, even among older adults with no overt cognitive impairment. Indeed, the effects of dual tasking (DT) on gait, a challenge to executive control, are more exaggerated in persons with a history of falls. Prospective evidence is, however, lacking. We prospectively evaluated whether EF predicts falls over a 2-year period among 262 community-living, healthy, and well-functioning older adults, focusing on the 201 who reported no falls during the previous year. At baseline, participants completed a computerized cognitive battery that generated an index of EF and other cognitive domains. Gait was assessed using performance-based tests and by quantifying walking during single- and dual-task conditions. The 262 participants (mean age: 76.3 ± 4.3 years, 60.3% women) had intact cognitive function on testing, a low comorbidity index, and good mobility. The EF index predicted future falls. Among those who reported no previous falls, participants in the worst EF quartile were three times more likely to fall during the 2 years of follow-up, and they were more likely to transition from nonfaller to faller sooner. DT gait variability also predicted future falls and multiple falls, whereas other measures of cognitive function, gait, and mobility did not. Among healthy older adults, individuals with poorer EF are more prone to falls. Higher-level cognitive functions such as those regulated by the frontal lobes are apparently needed for safe everyday navigation that demands multitasking. Optimal screening, early detection, and treatment of falls should, apparently, also target this cognitive domain.

  14. Individual income and falls among the elderly in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Antonio J; Puvanachandra, Prasanthi; Hyder, Adnan A

    2011-04-01

    The burden of falls amongst the elderly raises important public health concerns. Empirical evidence suggests that macroeconomic growth may not be sufficient to reduce mortality and morbidity from injuries among the elderly. This paper consolidates macro- and microeconomic evidence of the effect of income on elderly falls in Latin America. Using household databases, we estimate an empirical model to assess the relationship between income and falls. The estimations indicate that an increase in personal income reduces the probability of falling; yet, the size of the effect is negligible. A 10% increase in income reduces the probability of falling between 0.001 and 0.002% while a 20% increase reduced the probability by up to 1%. These findings are consistent with macroeconomic data where morbidity and mortality among seniors are inelastic to economic growth. Policy implications of cash transfer programs targeting the elderly are discussed. © 2010 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  15. The role of exercise for fall prevention in older age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Tiedemann

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Falls are a common, costly and preventable consequence of sensorimotor impairments that increase in prevalence with advancing age. A fall occurs when the physical ability of the individual is unable to match the immediate demands of the environment and/or of the activity being undertaken. Targeted exercise aimed at improving the physical ability of the individual, such as balance and strength training, is crucial for promoting functional independence and mobility and reducing the risk of falling in older age. Exercise programs that provide a high challenge to balance, have a high dose, include progression of intensity over time and are ongoing are most effective for preventing falls. This paper provides guidance to health professionals involved with the prescription of physical activity and exercise to older people regarding the safe and effective provision of programs aimed at improving strength and balance and preventing falls in older age.

  16. [Falls mortality trends in México, 1979-2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celis-de la Rosa, Alfredo de Jesús; Méndez-Magaña, Ana; Orozco-Valerio, María; Baez-Baez, Guadalupe Laura; Dávalos-Guzmán, Julio César

    2013-01-01

    To analyze the mortality trend by accidental falls in Mexico, from 1979 to 2010. We used official mortality data in México. Variables included were mortality cause, place of lesion, age, sex, year of mortality registration, size of the town of occurrence, state, occupation, workplace falls. During that period, 124,509 deaths by accidental and intentional falls were registered; of these 77.03% were men. From 1989 (3.20 per 100,000) to 2010 (1.99 per 100,000), the mortality trend was falling (β = -0.053/ 100,000, p ≤ 0.001). In the majority of states, we found a decreased between 1993-1997 and 2006 to 2010, except in Aguascalientes, Puebla, Baja California Sur, Durango and Nuevo León. This is the first study in México that showed the descending trend of mortality in accidental falls in the last two decades.

  17. Urinary incontinence in the prediction of falls in hospitalized elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hellen Cristina de Almeida Abreu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective Analyzing the effect of urinary incontinence as a predictor of the incidence of falls among hospitalized elderly. Method Concurrent cohort study where 221 elderly inpatients were followed from the date of admission until discharge, death or fall. The Kaplan-Meier methods, the incidence density and the Cox regression model were used for the survival analysis and the assessment of the association between the exposure variable and the other variables. Results Urinary incontinence was a strong predictor of falls in the surveyed elderly, and was associated with shorter time until the occurrence of event. Urinary incontinence, concomitant with gait and balance dysfunction and use of antipsychotics was associated with falls. Conclusion Measures to prevent the risk of falls specific to hospitalized elderly patients who have urinary incontinence are necessary.

  18. Fall-prevention pilot: hazard survey and responses to recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, David; Sample, Pat; Fruhauf, Christine

    2009-01-01

    This work reports a partial inventory of fall hazards for community-dwelling elders and characterizes older adult responses to fall prevention. Thirty-five seniors living in their homes participated in a fall-prevention initiative designed to identify hazards and make recommendations. Fifteen external hazards were identified and operationalized, and between one and four changes were reported per home in 18 of 22 homes, consistent with recommendations; however, most of the recommendations were unrelated to the cause of later participant falls. Considering the varied circumstances of falls in the community, we question the wisdom of designating specific risk posed by individual hazards and encourage future investigation on the merits of multifaceted evaluation and intervention including the consideration of combinations and interactions of hazards as well as raising caution and awareness.

  19. Reducing falls and resulting hip fractures among older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, J A; Olson, S

    2000-03-31

    Fall-related injuries are the leading cause of injury deaths and disabilities among older adults (i.e., persons aged > or = 65 years). The most serious fall injury is hip fracture; one half of all older adults hospitalized for hip fracture never regain their former level of function. In 1996, a total of 340,000 hospitalizations for hip fracture occurred among persons aged > or = 65 years, and 80% of these admissions occurred among women. From 1988 to 1996, hip fracture hospitalization rates for women aged > or = 65 years increased 23%. Risk factors for falls include increasing age, muscle weakness, functional limitations, environmental hazards, use of psychoactive medications, and a history of falls. Age is also a risk factor for hip fracture. Women aged > or = 85 years are nearly eight times more likely than women aged 65-74 years to be hospitalized for hip fracture. White women aged > or = 65 years are at higher risk for hip fracture than black women. Other riskfactors for hip fracture include lack of physical activity, osteoporosis, low body mass index, and a previous hip fracture. Because approximately 95% of hip fractures result from falls, minimizing fall risk is a practical approach to reducing these serious injuries. Research demonstrates that effective fall prevention strategies require a multifaceted approach with both behavioral and environmental components. Important elements include education and skill building to increase knowledge about fall risk factors, exercise to improve strength and balance, home modifications to reduce fall hazards, and medication assessment to minimize side effects (e.g., dizziness and grogginess). Coordination needs to be improved among the diverse Federal, state, and local organizations that conduct fall prevention activities. The effectiveness of existing fall prevention programs among specific groups of women (e.g., those aged > or = 85 years or living with functional limitations) needs careful evaluation. New primary fall

  20. Falls and Physical Activity in Persons with Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Sosnoff

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To examine the association between fall history and physical activity using an objective measure of physical activity (i.e., accelerometry in persons with multiple sclerosis. Design. A community-based sample of 75 ambulatory persons with multiple sclerosis volunteered for the investigation. Participants self-reported fall history in the last year, underwent a neurological exam to determine Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS score, and wore an accelerometer around the waist for 7 consecutive days to determine physical activity. Results. Overall, 37 persons (49.3% of the sample reported falling in the last year with 28 of the 37 falling more than once. Persons who fell in the last year had a significantly lower number of steps/day than nonfallers (3510 versus 4940 steps/day; P.05. Conclusions. Collectively, the findings suggest that fall history may have little impact on current physical activity levels in persons with multiple sclerosis.

  1. Dynamic Bayesian Networks for Context-Aware Fall Risk Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Koshmak

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Fall incidents among the elderly often occur in the home and can cause serious injuries affecting their independent living. This paper presents an approach where data from wearable sensors integrated in a smart home environment is combined using a dynamic Bayesian network. The smart home environment provides contextual data, obtained from environmental sensors, and contributes to assessing a fall risk probability. The evaluation of the developed system is performed through simulation. Each time step is represented by a single user activity and interacts with a fall sensors located on a mobile device. A posterior probability is calculated for each recognized activity or contextual information. The output of the system provides a total risk assessment of falling given a response from the fall sensor.

  2. Feasibility study for the City of Twin Falls Sewage Hydroelectric Project in Twin Falls County, Idaho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-08-01

    The City of Twin Falls, Idaho authorized J-U-B Engineers, Inc., to assess the feasibility of installing a small hydropower plant on the discharge of the City's Grandview sewage trunk line. The concept of developing hydropower from sewage flow is novel and may have applications in other areas of the nation if its technical feasibility can be established. No conventional turbine would be suitable in this application without extensively screening the influent. Therefore, finding a turbine which would work satisfactorily, was one of the major aspects of the study. A solution to this problem was found in a staged, non-clog, hydraulic turbine manufactured by Cornell Pump Co. A preliminary design configuration is presented using these turbines. The economical feasibility of the project depends on future sewage flows from Idaho Frozen Foods Company, a large contributor to the present Twin Falls sewage flows. The yearly revenue, would decrease by about one-third, if Idaho Frozen Foods disconnects from the City's sewage system. Therefore, the project is less feasible, economically, without the flow contributed by Idaho Frozen Foods. The cost of energy production is 47 mils per kilowatt-hour (kWh) with this flow, and about 60 mils/kWh without this flow. At the higher flow rate (5 cfs) the total capital investment is estimated to be $270,200 or approximately $2250 per installed kW capacity. Estimated annual energy production at 5.0 cfs is 440,650 kWh with a subsequent first year annual revenue of $59,460. Power could be put on line within nine months of the time the Twin Falls City Council makes a decision to develop the project.

  3. Defining a Fall and Reasons for Falling: Comparisons among the Views of Seniors, Health Care Providers, and the Research Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zecevic, Aleksandra A.; Salmoni, Alan W.; Speechley, Mark; Vandervoort, Anthony A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was (a) to obtain information about the perceptions held by seniors and health care providers concerning what constitutes a fall and potential reasons for falling, and (b) to compare these perceptions to the research literature. Design and Methods: As part of a larger telephone survey, interviewers asked 477…

  4. Fragility, fear of falling, physical activity and falls among older persons: some theoretical considerations to interpret mediation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijlhuizen, G.J.; Chorus, A.M.J.; Hopman-Rock, M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: In their letters to the editor, Lacherez et al. [Lacherez, P.F., Wood, J.M., Kerr, G.K., 2007. Does activity level mediate or suppress the association between fear of falling and falls? Prev. Med. 31; (Electronic publication ahead of print)] and Hafeman and Schwartz [Hafeman, D.,

  5. Fragility, fear of falling, physical activity and falls among older persons: Some theoretical considerations to interpret mediation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijlhuizen, G.J.; Chorus, A.M.J.; Hopman-Rock, M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: In their letters to the editor, Lacherez et al. [Lacherez, P.F., Wood, J.M., Kerr, G.K., 2007. Does activity level mediate or suppress the association between fear of falling and falls? Prev. Med. 31; (Electronic publication ahead of print)] and Hafeman and Schwartz [Hafeman, D.,

  6. Kyphosis and incident falls among community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniels-Davidson, C; Davis, A; Wing, D; Macera, C; Lindsay, S P; Schousboe, J T; Nichols, J F; Kado, D M

    2017-10-10

    Hyperkyphosis commonly affects older persons and is associated with morbidity and mortality. Many have hypothesized that hyperkyphosis increases fall risk. Within this prospective study of older adults, kyphosis was significantly associated with incident falls over 1 year. Measures of hyperkyphosis could enhance falls risk assessments during primary care office visits. To determine the association between four measures of kyphosis and incident and injurious falls in older persons. Community-dwelling adults aged 65 and older (n = 72) residing in southern California were invited to participate in a prospective cohort study. Participants had kyphosis assessed four ways. Two standing measures included a flexicurve ruler placed against the back to derive a kyphotic index and the Debrunner kyphometer, a protractor used to measure the kyphotic angle in degrees. Two lying measures included the blocks method (number of 1.7 cm blocks needed to achieve a neutral head position while lying supine) and traditional Cobb angle calculation derived from DXA based lateral vertebral assessment. Baseline demographic, clinical, and other health information (including a timed up and go (TUG) test) were assessed at a clinic visit. Participants were followed monthly through email or postcard for 1 year, with falls outcomes confirmed through telephone interview. Mean age was 77.8 (± 7.1) among the 52 women and 20 men. Over 12 months, 64% of participants experienced at least one incident fall and 35% experienced an injurious fall. Each standard deviation increase in kyphosis resulted in more than doubling the adjusted odds of an incident fall, even after adjusting for TUG. Odds of injurious falls were less consistent across measures; after adjusting for TUG, only the blocks method was associated with injurious falls. Each kyphosis measure was independently associated with incident falls. Findings were inconsistent for injurious falls; the blocks measure suggested the strongest

  7. Falls risk assessment begins with hello: lessons learned from the use of one home health agency's fall risk tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemming, Patricia J; Ramsay, Katherine

    2012-10-01

    Identifying older adults at risk for falls is a challenge all home healthcare agencies (HHAs) face. The process of assessing for falls risk begins with the initial home visit. One HHA affiliated with an academic medical center describes its experience in development and use of a Falls Risk Assessment (FRA) tool over a 10-year period. The FRA tool has been modified since initial development to clarify elements of the tool based on research and to reflect changes in the Outcome and Assessment Information Set (OASIS) document. The primary purpose of this article is to share a validated falls risk assessment tool to facilitate identification of fall-related risk factors in the homebound population. A secondary purpose is to share lessons learned by the HHA during the 10 years using the FRA.

  8. Varre-Sai: The Recent Brazilian Fall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucolotto, M. E.; Antonello, L. L.; Varela, M. E.; Scorzelli, R. B.; Munayco, P.; dos Santos, E.; Ludka, Isabel P.

    2012-12-01

    Varre-Sai, the most recent Brazilian meteorite fall, on June 19th, 2010 at Varre-Sai, in Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil (20°51'41″S; 41°44'.80″W). At least eight masses (total ~3.5 kg) were recovered. Most are totally covered by fusion crust. The exposed interior is of light-grey colour with a few dark shock veins. Five thin polished and etched sections were prepared from a slice weighing 35 g on deposit at the National Museum/UFRJ. It consists mostly of chondrules ranging in size from 0.35 to ~2.2 mm, and chondrule fragments enclosed in a crystalline matrix. The matrix consists of tiny isolated subhedral and anhedral crystals and opaque minerals that are intergrown with broken chondrules. The chondritic texture is poorly defined with chondrule textures that vary from non-porphyritic to porphyritic ones. The essential minerals are olivine (Fa25±0.2) and low-Ca pyroxene (Fa21.66±0.2Wo1.4). Accessory minerals are plagioclase, apatite, Fe-Ni metal phases, troilite, chromite and magnetite. Mössbauer spectroscopy analysis confirms that the mineral phases are olivine, pyroxene, troilite and kamacite/taenite. Chemical data indicate that Varre-Sai is a member of the low iron L chondrite group. The observed texture and mineral phases led us to classify Varre-Sai as an equilibrated petrologic type 5. The shock features of the minerals (undulatory extinction, planar structure and numerous cracks), as well as plagioclase partial or totally transformed to maskelynite, suggest a shock stage S4. Also, some post-impact metamorphic processes could be inferred from the meta-sulfide conjoint grains that show complex mixtures of kamacite-taenite-tetrataenite and troilite. The occurrence of veins crosscutting the studied sections indicates that Varre-Sai was affected by a late fracturing event. Sealing of these fractures must have been a fast process, as shown by troilite globule textures pointing towards rapid solidification. The meteorite name was approved by the Nomenclature

  9. Awareness and Functional Outcome of Hip Fracture-Related Falls among Patients with a History of Recurrent Falling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizen, Efraim; Nixon, Hila; Shugaev, Inna

    2018-01-01

    There is little evidence about awareness and functional outcome of hip fracture-related falls among patients with a history of recurrent falling. To measure the awareness of recurrent falling in patients and to compare their functional outcomes with those who suffered hip fracture after a sporadic isolated fall. A prospective comparative study of patients after a hip fracture-related fall was conducted. Awareness of falls was measured and functional outcome was assessed by total and motor Functional Independence Measure (FIM) score changes and efficiency and scores at admission and on discharge. Of 97 eligible participants, 49 (50.5%) were recurrent fallers. Of these recurrent falls, 19 (38.8%) were not reported, 16 (32.7%) were reported but no action was taken, and 7 (14.3%) were reported and a partial assessment performed. A full assessment was performed in only 7 cases (14.3%). FIM scores on admission and discharge were significantly higher in once-fallers. A multiple linear regression analysis showed that being a once-faller was independently associated with higher total FIM at admission (β coefficient = 0.290, P = 0.004), higher motor FIM at admission (β coefficient = 0.295, P = 0.003), higher total FIM at discharge (β Coefficient = 0.264, P = 0.009), and higher motor FIM at discharge (β coefficient = 0.230, P = 0.023). Awareness of the syndrome of recurrent falling is extremely low. Recurrent falls before a hip fracture-related fall is associated with substantial loss of functional independence. Being a recurrent faller adversely affects rehabilitation outcome of hip fracture patients.

  10. Evidence-based guidelines for fall prevention in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwang-Il; Jung, Hye-Kyung; Kim, Chang Oh; Kim, Soo-Kyung; Cho, Hyun-Ho; Kim, Dae Yul; Ha, Yong-Chan; Hwang, Sung-Hee; Won, Chang Won; Lim, Jae-Young; Kim, Hyun Jung; Kim, Jae Gyu

    2017-01-01

    Falls and fall-related injuries are common in older populations and have negative effects on quality of life and independence. Falling is also associated with increased morbidity, mortality, nursing home admission, and medical costs. Korea has experienced an extreme demographic shift with its population aging at the fastest pace among developed countries, so it is important to assess fall risks and develop interventions for high-risk populations. Guidelines for the prevention of falls were first developed by the Korean Association of Internal Medicine and the Korean Geriatrics Society. These guidelines were developed through an adaptation process as an evidence-based method; four guidelines were retrieved via systematic review and the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation II process, and seven recommendations were developed based on the Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation framework. Because falls are the result of various factors, the guidelines include a multidimensional assessment and multimodal strategy. The guidelines were developed for primary physicians as well as patients and the general population. They provide detailed recommendations and concrete measures to assess risk and prevent falls among older people. PMID:28049285

  11. Preliminary investigation of gait initiation and falls in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wajda, Douglas A; Moon, Yaejin; Motl, Robert W; Sosnoff, Jacob J

    2015-06-01

    To examine the relationship between gait initiation, fall history, and physiological fall risk in individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) during both cognitive distracting and nondistracting conditions. Single time point cross-sectional analysis. University research laboratory. Ambulatory individuals (N=20) with MS ranging in age from 28 to 76 years. Not applicable. Gait initiation time was quantified as the time to toe-off of the first step after an auditory cue. Gait initiation was performed with and without a concurrent cognitive challenge of reciting alternating letters of the alphabet. Additionally, participants underwent a test of fall risk using the Physiological Profile Assessment (PPA) and provided a self-report of the number of falls in the previous 3 months. Gait initiation times ranged from .67 to 1.12 seconds during the single-task condition and .73 to 1.84 seconds during the cognitive challenge condition. PPA scores ranged from -.80 to 3.87. Participants reported a median of 0.0 falls (interquartile range, 0.0-2.75) in the previous 3 months. There was a significant correlation between PPA score and gait initiation times only in the cognitive distraction condition (ρ=.50). There was also a correlation between cognitive distraction gait initiation times and fall history (ρ=.60). The observations provide preliminary evidence that gait initiation during cognitive challenge may represent a target for fall prevention strategies in MS. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Risk factors for falls in the institutionalized elder population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo Romero

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective is to determine the risk factorspredictors of falls in institutionalized elderlypeople. Methodology: Analysis of data from alongitudinal cohort study. Subjects: Institutionalizedelderly volunteers residents of a nursinghome in Arbelaez, Colombia enrolled andfollowed for six months (N= 116; mean age: 78years. Main outcome measures: Falls detected via nurses reports and medical records. Independentvariables: Baseline measures of demographics,medical history, drug intake, depression, mentalstate, visual acuity, orthostatic hypotension,body mass index, cardiovascular state, limbdeformities, limb strength, tone, trophism, rageof motion, Romberg, one leg balance test, GetUp and Go test and timed Get Up and Go test.Evaluation of home facilities by the TESS-NHand SCUEQS scales. Results: Over the six monthfollow-up 36% experienced a fall. All noneinjurious falls. The independent significantpredictors of all falls using logistic regression were female gender, history of dizziness and anabnormal one leg balance test. With coefficientB values of 1.029, 2.024 and 1.712, respectively.Conclusion: The female gender, the history ofdizziness and abnormal one-leg balance testappear to be the main and significant predictorsof falls in institutionalized elderly persons.However, no single factor seems to be accurateenough to be relied on as a sole predictor of fallrisk because so many diverse factors are involvedin falling

  13. Injury from falls in infants under one year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Christopher S; Adams, Susan; Tzioumi, Dimitra; Brown, Julie

    2017-08-01

    Falls in infants are a common cause of injury. Compared to older children, infants under age one are likely to have distinctive causation and injury patterns, as they are pre-mobile or have limited independent mobility and falls are more directly the responsibility of the care giver. There is little known about the mechanistic factors, predictors of injury and injury patterns in this age group. We conducted a retrospective review of infants under age one who presented after a fall to a paediatric trauma centre in Sydney, Australia. Circumstances and mechanisms of the fall, injury patterns, burden of investigations and outcomes were analysed. Over a 3-year period (2011-2013), 916 infants presented following a fall. One hundred and six (11.6%) were admitted and there was one death. Head injury was the most common reason for admission (85%). While there were severe and critical head injuries (Abbreviated Injury Scale 4-5) these were infrequent (2% of presentations). All admitted cases involved a short distance fall. Patients dropped by others were three times more likely to be admitted than infants presenting following other fall types (95% CI 1.9-4.8). Compared to other mechanisms, patients who fell from furniture had significantly longer hospital stays. Fall mechanisms involving infants being dropped by adults, and falls from beds or couches carry the highest clinical burden. These mechanisms should be targets for injury prevention and inform the design of safe equipment and environments for babies. © 2017 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  14. Neighborhood Environment and Falls among Community-Dwelling Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Joy Nicklett

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Falls present a major challenge to active aging, but the relationship between neighborhood factors and falls is poorly understood. This study examined the relationship between fall events and neighborhood factors, including neighborhood social cohesion (sense of belonging, trust, friendliness, and helpfulness and physical environment (vandalism/graffiti, rubbish, vacant/deserted houses, and perceived safety walking home at night. Methods: Data were analyzed from 9259 participants over four biennial waves (2006–2012 of the Health and Retirement Study (HRS, a nationally representative sample of adults aged 65 and older in the United States. Results: In models adjusting for demographic and health-related covariates, a one-unit increase in neighborhood social cohesion was associated with 4% lower odds of experiencing a single fall (odds ratio (OR: 0.96, 95% confidence interval (CI: 0.93–0.99 and 6% lower odds of experiencing multiple falls (OR: 0.94, 95% CI: 0.90–0.98. A one-unit increase in the physical environment scale was associated with 4% lower odds of experiencing a single fall (OR: 0.96, 95% CI: 0.93–0.99 and with 5% lower odds of experiencing multiple falls (OR: 0.95, 95% CI: 0.91–1.00 in adjusted models. Conclusions: The physical and social neighborhood environment may affect fall risk among community-dwelling older adults. Findings support the ongoing need for evidence-based fall prevention programming in community and clinical settings.

  15. [How frequent and why are skiers and snowboarders falling?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, M; Ruedl, G; Feltus, G; Woldrich, T; Burtscher, M

    2014-12-01

    Injuries in alpine skiing and snowboarding are mainly caused by falls. In 2002, a study was conducted to gain insight into the risk factors for falls when skiing or snowboarding. Since then, the evolution of skiing, snowboarding and safety equipment, as well as slope preparation, may have altered the frequency of falls while skiing or snowboarding. In total, 1436 male and female skiers and snowboarders from all age groups were interviewed from February until April 2012, in 6 Tyrolean ski resorts. The questionnaire was nearly identical to that used in 2002. It contained questions concerning personal characteristics, falls, equipment and risk taking behaviour. The incidence of falls among skiers was 0.076 ± 0.21 per hour and that among snowboarders was 0.429 ± 0.70 per hour. Age (OR: 0.96; CI: 0.95 - 0.97), soft snow conditions (OR: 4.1; CI: 1.9 - 8.8) and poor skiing skills (beginners and intermediates) (OR: 2.6; CI: 1.2 - 8.1) were predictive for falls during skiing. Poor snowboarding skills (beginners and intermediates) (OR: 8.3; CI: 3.1 - 27.4), wearing a helmet (OR: 2.3; CI: 1.2 - 4.6) and alcohol consumption (OR: 2.1; CI: 1.2 - 3.9) were predictive for falls during snowboarding. The incidence of falls among skiers and snowboarders was substantially lower when compared to that in 2002. Improvements in skiing and snowboarding equipment as well as slope preparation may have contributed to this favourable development. We strongly assume that the lowering in fall incidence may positively affect the injury incidence. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Barometric pressure and triaxial accelerometry-based falls event detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Federico; Redmond, Stephen J; Narayanan, Michael R; Cerutti, Sergio; Lovell, Nigel H

    2010-12-01

    Falls and fall related injuries are a significant cause of morbidity, disability, and health care utilization, particularly among the age group of 65 years and over. The ability to detect falls events in an unsupervised manner would lead to improved prognoses for falls victims. Several wearable accelerometry and gyroscope-based falls detection devices have been described in the literature; however, they all suffer from unacceptable false positive rates. This paper investigates the augmentation of such systems with a barometric pressure sensor, as a surrogate measure of altitude, to assist in discriminating real fall events from normal activities of daily living. The acceleration and air pressure data are recorded using a wearable device attached to the subject's waist and analyzed offline. The study incorporates several protocols including simulated falls onto a mattress and simulated activities of daily living, in a cohort of 20 young healthy volunteers (12 male and 8 female; age: 23.7 ±3.0 years). A heuristically trained decision tree classifier is used to label suspected falls. The proposed system demonstrated considerable improvements in comparison to an existing accelerometry-based technique; showing an accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of 96.9%, 97.5%, and 96.5%, respectively, in the indoor environment, with no false positives generated during extended testing during activities of daily living. This is compared to 85.3%, 75%, and 91.5% for the same measures, respectively, when using accelerometry alone. The increased specificity of this system may enhance the usage of falls detectors among the elderly population.

  17. Orthostatic Hypotension in Middle-Age and Risk of Falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juraschek, Stephen P; Daya, Natalie; Appel, Lawrence J; Miller, Edgar R; Windham, Beverly Gwen; Pompeii, Lisa; Griswold, Michael E; Kucharska-Newton, Anna; Selvin, Elizabeth

    2017-02-01

    One-third of older adults fall each year. Orthostatic hypotension (OH) has been hypothesized as an important risk factor for falls, but findings from prior studies have been inconsistent. We conducted a prospective study of the association between baseline OH (1987-1989) and risk of falls in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study. Falls were ascertained during follow-up via ICD-9 hospital discharge codes or Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services claims data. OH was defined as a drop in systolic blood pressure (SBP) ≥20mm Hg or diastolic blood pressure (DBP) ≥10mm Hg within 2 minutes of moving from the supine to standing position. Changes in SBP or DBP during OH assessments were also examined as continuous variables. During a median follow-up of 23 years, there were 2,384 falls among 12,661 participants (mean age 54 years, 55% women, 26% black). OH was associated with risk of falls even after adjustment for demographic characteristics and other risk factors (hazard ratio (HR): 1.30; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.10, 1.54; P = 0.002). Postural change in DBP was more significantly associated with risk of falls (HR 1.09 per -5mm Hg change in DBP; 95% CI: 1.05, 1.13; P < 0.001) than postural change in SBP (HR 1.03 per -5mm Hg change in SBP; 95% CI: 1.01, 1.05; P = 0.002). In a community-based, middle-aged population, OH, and in particular, postural change in DBP, were independent risk factors for falls over 2 decades of follow-up. Future studies are needed to examine OH thresholds associated with increased risk of falls. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2016. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Do hospital fall prevention programs work? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, D; Hopper, A; Seed, P

    2000-12-01

    To analyze published hospital fall prevention programs to determine whether there is any effect on fall rates. To review the methodological quality of those programs and the range of interventions used. To provide directions for further research. Systematic review of published hospital fall prevention programs. Meta-analysis. Keyword searches of Medline, CINAHL, monographs, and secondary references. All papers were included that described fall rates before and during intervention. Risk ratios and 95% Confidence Intervals (95% CI) were estimated and random effects meta-analysis employed. Begg's test was applied to detect possible publication bias. Separate meta-analysis regressions were performed to determine whether individual components of multifaceted interventions were effective. A total of 21 papers met the criteria (18 from North America), although only 10 contained sufficient data to allow calculation of confidence intervals. A rate ratio of fall rate, resulting from an intervention. Three were randomized controlled trials (pooled rate ratio 1.0 (CI 0.60, 1.68)), seven prospective studies with historical control (0.76 (CI 0.65, 0.88)). Pooled effect rate ratio from these 10 studies was 0.79 (CI 0.69, 0.89). The remaining 11 studies were prospective studies with historical control describing fall rates only. Individual components of interventions showed no significant benefit. The pooled effect of about 25% reduction in the fall rate may be a result of intervention but may also be biased by studies that used historical controls not allowing for historical trends in the fall rate before and during the intervention. The randomized controlled trials apparent lack of effect might be due to a change in practice when patients and controls were in the same unit at the same time during a study. Studies did not analyze compliance with the intervention or opportunity costs resulting from the intervention. Research and clinical programs in hospital fall prevention should

  19. Detecting falls as novelties in acceleration patterns acquired with smartphones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Medrano

    Full Text Available Despite being a major public health problem, falls in the elderly cannot be detected efficiently yet. Many studies have used acceleration as the main input to discriminate between falls and activities of daily living (ADL. In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in using smartphones for fall detection. The most promising results have been obtained by supervised Machine Learning algorithms. However, a drawback of these approaches is that they rely on falls simulated by young or mature people, which might not represent every possible fall situation and might be different from older people's falls. Thus, we propose to tackle the problem of fall detection by applying a kind of novelty detection methods which rely only on true ADL. In this way, a fall is any abnormal movement with respect to ADL. A system based on these methods could easily adapt itself to new situations since new ADL could be recorded continuously and the system could be re-trained on the fly. The goal of this work is to explore the use of such novelty detectors by selecting one of them and by comparing it with a state-of-the-art traditional supervised method under different conditions. The data sets we have collected were recorded with smartphones. Ten volunteers simulated eight type of falls, whereas ADL were recorded while they carried the phone in their real life. Even though we have not collected data from the elderly, the data sets were suitable to check the adaptability of novelty detectors. They have been made publicly available to improve the reproducibility of our results. We have studied several novelty detection methods, selecting the nearest neighbour-based technique (NN as the most suitable. Then, we have compared NN with the Support Vector Machine (SVM. In most situations a generic SVM outperformed an adapted NN.

  20. Falls prevention revisited: a call for a new approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Jennifer

    2004-05-01

    Patient falls constitute a major threat to health services' ability to provide care. Previous studies confirm that nurses can identify patients at risk and that a preventative programme can reduce the rate of falls but few studies have been evaluated over time. A study was undertaken to test a Falls Prevention Programme in an acute medical area that was re-evaluated 5 years later to determine if the effects were sustainable. The design included two groups of patients admitted before and after the programme. Variables such as staffing, equipment, environment and routines were controlled. However, because of ethical approval constraints, some variables such as age, mental status, mobility and gender were not. The programme included a risk assessment tool, a choice of interventions, a graphic that alerted others to 'at risk patients' and simple patient and staff education. Data were collected using incident forms and a formula was used to calculate a rate of falls. A non-paired t-test compared rates and anova examined the relationship of age, gender, mobility and mental status on the incidence of falls. Control graphs determined the stability of the process. The falls rate was significantly reduced. Control graphs demonstrate that the process achieved greater control with less variation. In the next 5 years the falls rate increased to preprogramme levels and control graphs demonstrated that the process was no longer controlled. Compliance with the programme had deteriorated. The practice review considered skill mix, patient activity and acuity but provided no definitive answers to explain non-compliance. The implications to nursing are discussed. Clinicians are called to conduct more rigorous research into falls prevention but it may be more useful to direct research towards examining nursing work and increasing nurse autonomy in falls prevention.

  1. Parkinsonian signs are a risk factor for falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahodwala, Nabila; Nwadiogbu, Chinwe; Fitts, Whitney; Partridge, Helen; Karlawish, Jason

    2017-06-01

    Parkinsonian signs are common, non-specific findings in older adults and associated with increased rates of dementia and mortality. It is important to understand which motor outcomes are associated with parkinsonian signs. To determine the role of parkinsonian signs on fall rates among older adults. We conducted a longitudinal study of primary care patients from the University of Pennsylvania Health System. Adults over 55 years were assessed at baseline through surveys and a neurological examination. We recorded falls over the following 2 years. Parkinsonian signs were defined as the presence of 2 of 4 cardinal signs. Incident falls were compared between subjects with and without parkinsonian signs, and modified Poisson regression used to adjust for potential confounders in the relationship between parkinsonian signs and falls. 982 subjects with a mean age of 68 (s.d. 8.8) years participated. 29% of participants fell and 12% exhibited parkinsonian signs at baseline. The unadjusted RR for falls among individuals with parkinsonian signs was 1.36 (95% CI 1.05-1.76, p=0.02). After adjusting for age, cognitive function, urinary incontinence, depression, diabetes, stroke and arthritis, individuals with parkinsonian signs were still 38% more likely to fall than those without parkinsonian signs (RR 1.38, 95% CI 1.04-1.82; p=0.03). Falls among those with parkinsonian signs were more likely to lead to injury (53% vs 37%; p=0.04). Parkinsonian signs are a significant, independent risk factor for falls. Early detection of this clinical state is important in order to implement fall prevention programs among primary care patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Detecting falls as novelties in acceleration patterns acquired with smartphones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medrano, Carlos; Igual, Raul; Plaza, Inmaculada; Castro, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Despite being a major public health problem, falls in the elderly cannot be detected efficiently yet. Many studies have used acceleration as the main input to discriminate between falls and activities of daily living (ADL). In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in using smartphones for fall detection. The most promising results have been obtained by supervised Machine Learning algorithms. However, a drawback of these approaches is that they rely on falls simulated by young or mature people, which might not represent every possible fall situation and might be different from older people's falls. Thus, we propose to tackle the problem of fall detection by applying a kind of novelty detection methods which rely only on true ADL. In this way, a fall is any abnormal movement with respect to ADL. A system based on these methods could easily adapt itself to new situations since new ADL could be recorded continuously and the system could be re-trained on the fly. The goal of this work is to explore the use of such novelty detectors by selecting one of them and by comparing it with a state-of-the-art traditional supervised method under different conditions. The data sets we have collected were recorded with smartphones. Ten volunteers simulated eight type of falls, whereas ADL were recorded while they carried the phone in their real life. Even though we have not collected data from the elderly, the data sets were suitable to check the adaptability of novelty detectors. They have been made publicly available to improve the reproducibility of our results. We have studied several novelty detection methods, selecting the nearest neighbour-based technique (NN) as the most suitable. Then, we have compared NN with the Support Vector Machine (SVM). In most situations a generic SVM outperformed an adapted NN.

  3. Economic modelling of a public health programme for fall prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farag, Inez; Howard, Kirsten; Ferreira, Manuela L; Sherrington, Catherine

    2015-05-01

    despite evidence on what works in falls prevention, falls in older people remain an important public health problem. the purpose of this study was to model the impact and cost-effectiveness of a public health falls prevention programme, from the perspective of the health funder. a decision analytic Markov model compared the health benefits in quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and costs of treatment and residential aged care with and without a population heath falls prevention programme. Different intervention costs, uptake levels and programme effectiveness were modelled in sensitivity analyses. Uncertainty was explored using univariate and probabilistic sensitivity analysis. widespread rollout of a public health fall prevention programme could result in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of $A28,931 per QALY gained, assuming a programme cost of $700 per person and at a fall prevention risk ratio of 0.75. This ICER would be considered cost-effective at a threshold value of $A50,000 per QALY gained. Sensitivity analyses for programme cost and effectiveness indicated that the public health programme produced greater health outcomes and was less costly than no programme when programme costs were $A500 or lower and risk ratio for falls was 0.70 or lower. At a cost of $A2,500, the public health falls prevention programme ceases to be a cost-effective option. serious consideration should be given to implementation of a public health programme of falls prevention as a cost-effective option that enables population-wide access to the intervention strategies. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Risk of falling in patients with a recent fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willems Gittie

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with a history of a fracture have an increased risk for future fractures, even in short term. The aim of this study was to assess the number of patients with falls and to identify fall risk factors that predict the risk of falling in the first three months after a clinical fracture. Methods Prospective observational study with 3 months of follow-up in a large European academic and regional hospital. In 277 consenting women and men aged ≥ 50 years and with no dementia and not receiving treatment for osteoporosis who presented to hospital with a clinical fracture, fall risk factors were assessed according to the guidelines on fall prevention in the Netherlands. Follow-up information on falls and fractures was collected by monthly telephone interview. Incidence of falls and odds ratio's (OR, with 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Results 512 consecutive patients with a fracture were regarded for analysis, 87 were not eligible for inclusion and 137 patients were excluded. No follow-up data were available for 11 patients. Therefore full analysis was possible in 277 patients. A new fall incident was reported by 42 patients (15%, of whom five had a fracture. Of the 42 fallers, 32 had one new fall and 10 had two or more. Multivariate analysis in the total group with sex, age, ADL difficulties, urine incontinence and polypharmacy showed that sex and ADL were significant fall risk factors. Women had an OR of 3.02 (95% CI 1.13–8.06 and patients with ADL-difficulties had an OR of 2.50 (95% CI 1.27–4.93. Multivariate analysis in the female group with age, ADL difficulties, polypharmacy and presence of orthostatic hypotension indicated that polypharmacy was the predominant risk factor (OR 2.51; 95% CI: 1.19 – 5.28. The incidence of falls was 35% in women with low ADL score and polypharmacy compared to 15% in women without these risk factors (OR 3.56: CI 1.47 – 8.67. Conclusion 15% of patients reported a new fall

  5. Falls and outcomes amongst old people in rural dwellings | Adebiyi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    History of diabetes and alcohol use increased the odds of falling (OR 4.1, 95% CI 1.0 – 16.0; OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.0 – 4.6 respectively). Being in a monogamous marriage and having normal sight were protective of having falls (OR 0.4, 95% CI 0.2 – 0.9; OR 0.4, 95% CI 0.2 – 0.9 respectively). Conclusion: Falls often occur from ...

  6. Fall Protection Characteristics of Safety Belts and Human Impact Tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    HINO, Yasumichi; Ohdo, Katsutoshi; Takahashi, Hiroki

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: Many fatal accidents due to falls from heights have occurred at construction sites not only in Japan but also in other countries. This study aims to determine the fall prevention performance of two types of safety belts: a body belt1 ), which has been used for more than 40 yr in the Japanese construction industry as a general type of safety equipment for fall accident prevention, and a full harness2, 3 ), which has been used in many other countries. To determine human tolerance for ...

  7. Falling Person Detection Using Multi-Sensor Signal Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Enis Cetin

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Falls are one of the most important problems for frail and elderly people living independently. Early detection of falls is vital to provide a safe and active lifestyle for elderly. Sound, passive infrared (PIR and vibration sensors can be placed in a supportive home environment to provide information about daily activities of an elderly person. In this paper, signals produced by sound, PIR and vibration sensors are simultaneously analyzed to detect falls. Hidden Markov Models are trained for regular and unusual activities of an elderly person and a pet for each sensor signal. Decisions of HMMs are fused together to reach a final decision.

  8. Fear of Falling and Older Adult Peer Production of Audio-Visual Discussion Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Cathy; King, Karen; Dromey, Ben; Wynne, Ciaran

    2010-01-01

    A growing body of work suggests that negative stereotypes of, and associations between, falling, fear of falling, and ageing, may mean that older adults reject falls information and advice. Against a widely accepted backdrop of demographic ageing in Europe and that alleviating the impacts of falls and fear of falling are pressing health care…

  9. 77 FR 10503 - Fall River Community Hydro Project; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-22

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Fall River Community Hydro Project; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application... the Fall River Community Hydro Project to be located on Fall River, near the town of Fall River Mills..., 2011, Fall River Valley Community Service District, California, filed an application for a preliminary...

  10. The Chelyabinsk meteorite fall: Geochemistry and Mineralogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galimov, Eric

    Just after the Chelyabinsk meteorite fall, the Vernadsky Institute and the Committee on Meteorites of the Russian Academy of Sciences have organized an expedition to collect fragments of the meteorite shower. The collected material has been comprehensively studied for textural characteristics, mineral chemistry, major and trace elements, nuclear tracks, and isotopic composition. The texture, mineral chemistry, and major element contents indicate that the Chelyabinsk meteorite belongs to the LL5group of ordinary chondrites and was affected by a moderate degree of shock metamorphism (stage S4). The majority (2/3) of the collected stones is composed from a light lithology with a typical chondritic texture. Chondrules ( 63%) are readily delineated and set within a fragmental matrix. The chondrule glass is devitrified. The main phases are olivine and orthopyroxene. Olivine has mosaicism and planar fractures. Rare grains of augite and clinobronzite are present. Small and rare feldspar grains show undulutory extinction, planar deformation features, and are partly isotropic. Troilite (4 vol.%) and FeNi metal (1.3 vol.%) occur as irregularly shaped grains. Accessories are chromite, ilmenite, Cl-apatite, and native Cu. A significant portion (1/3) of the stones consists of a dark impact melt breccia containing mineral and chondrule fragments. Feldspar of the lithology is well developed and practically isotropic. No high-pressure phases were found in the impact melt. There are black colored thin shock veins in both light and dark lithologies. Olivine Fa 27.9±0.35, N=22; ortopyroxene Fs 22.8±0.79, Wo 1.30±0.26, N=17; feldspar Ab 86; chromite Fe/Fe+Mg=0.90, Cr/Cr+Al=0.85 (at.). Major element composition of the light lithology (wt%): Si=18.3, Ti=0.053, Al=1.12, Cr=0.40, Fe=19.8, Mn=0.26, Ca=1.43, Na=0.74, K=0.11, P=0.10, Ni=1.06, Co=0.046, S=1.7. The dark lithology has almost the same composition but it is distinctly higher in Ag, Pb, Bi. Sm-Nd isotopic characteristics

  11. Representing and Retrieving Patients' Falls Risk Factors and Risk for Falls among Adults in Acute Care through the Electronic Health Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, Jann

    2013-01-01

    Defining fall risk factors and predicting fall risk status among patients in acute care has been a topic of research for decades. With increasing pressure on hospitals to provide quality care and prevent hospital-acquired conditions, the search for effective fall prevention interventions continues. Hundreds of risk factors for falls in acute care…

  12. [Randomized clinical trial of a fall-prevention strategy for institutionalized elderly based on the Mini Falls Assessment Instrument].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvà, Antoni; Rojano, Xavier; Coll-Planas, Laura; Domènech, Sara; Roqué I Figuls, Marta

    2016-01-01

    The Mini Falls Assessment Instrument (MFAI) identifies risk factors for falls in an individual and links them to specific interventions. This study evaluates the effectiveness of MFAI as the basis for a falls prevention strategy in institutionalized elderly. A cluster randomized clinical trial (identifier NCT00888953) was conducted in 16 nursing homes randomized to apply MFAI (intervention) or a modified version not linked to actions (control). The primary endpoint was the occurrence of falls during follow-up (12 months). Secondary variables were total number of falls, physical function, quality of life, functional status, and adverse effects. Data from 330 participants (197 intervention, 137 control) were analyzed. Both groups had a similar number of risk factors: 7 in the intervention group (range 1-12) and 8 (1-13) in the control group. In the intervention group there were more fallers (49% vs. 38%), and higher number of falls (315 vs. 109), and fall rate per 100 person-years (192.5 vs. 179.8) than the control group. In the multivariate analysis, there were no significant differences in fall risk (odds ratio=1.45; 95% confidence interval [CI]: .67 to 3.14; P=.350), but the incidence rate is significantly higher in the intervention group (Incidence rate ratio=2.23; 95% CI: 1.43 to 3.48; P<.001). The results on the efficacy of the MFAI as a fall prevention strategy are inconclusive. Additional studies are needed in order to provide good quality evidence. Copyright © 2014 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. SEAMAP 2013 Fall Plankton Survey (PC1305, ME70)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During the 2013 Fall Plankton Survey, plankton samples were collected from a systematic grid of stations to assess distribution, occurrence and abundance of the...

  14. Fall Chinook Distribution, Pacific Northwest (updated March, 2006)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission — This dataset is a record of fish distribution and activity for FALL CHINOOK contained in the StreamNet database. This feature class was created based on linear event...

  15. SEAMAP Fall 2014 Plankton Survey (GU1405, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During the 2014 Fall Plankton Survey, plankton samples were collected from a systematic grid of stations to assess distribution, occurrence and abundance of the...

  16. Nursing Home - Falls within the Past 30 days

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Percent of residents reporting one or more falls within the past 30 days. The Minimum Data Set (MDS) is part of the federally mandated process for clinical...

  17. NOS CO-OPS Meteorological Data, Rain Fall, 6-Minute

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has Rain Fall data from NOAA NOS Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS). WARNING: These preliminary data have not been...

  18. U.S. Opioid Prescriptions Fall, But Numbers Still High

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_167050.html U.S. Opioid Prescriptions Fall, But Numbers Still High: CDC And ... THURSDAY, July 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Prescriptions for opioid painkillers have dropped since 2010 in the United ...

  19. Fall 2010 Small Pelagics Survey (PC1006, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Objectives of the Fall 2010 Small Pelagics Survey were to sample the waters of the northern Gulf of Mexico less than 500 meters deep with 90-ft high opening fish...

  20. Automatic fall detection using wearable biomedical signal measurement terminal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thuy-Trang; Cho, Myeong-Chan; Lee, Tae-Soo

    2009-01-01

    In our study, we developed a mobile waist-mounted device which can monitor the subject's acceleration signal and detect the fall events in real-time with high accuracy and automatically send an emergency message to a remote server via CDMA module. When fall event happens, the system also generates an alarm sound at 50Hz to alarm other people until a subject can sit up or stand up. A Kionix KXM52-1050 tri-axial accelerometer and a Bellwave BSM856 CDMA standalone modem were used to detect and manage fall events. We used not only a simple threshold algorithm but also some supporting methods to increase an accuracy of our system (nearly 100% in laboratory environment). Timely fall detection can prevent regrettable death due to long-lie effect; therefore increase the independence of elderly people in an unsupervised living environment.

  1. Lidar-Based Rock-Fall Hazard Characterization of Cliffs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Brian; Greg M.Stock,

    2017-01-01

    Rock falls from cliffs and other steep slopes present numerous challenges for detailed geological characterization. In steep terrain, rock-fall source areas are both dangerous and difficult to access, severely limiting the ability to make detailed structural and volumetric measurements necessary for hazard assessment. Airborne and terrestrial lidar survey methods can provide high-resolution data needed for volumetric, structural, and deformation analyses of rock falls, potentially making these analyses straightforward and routine. However, specific methods to collect, process, and analyze lidar data of steep cliffs are needed to maximize analytical accuracy and efficiency. This paper presents observations showing how lidar data sets should be collected, filtered, registered, and georeferenced to tailor their use in rock fall characterization. Additional observations concerning surface model construction, volumetric calculations, and deformation analysis are also provided.

  2. Optimizing footwear for older people at risk of falls

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Menant, Jasmine C; Steele, Julie R; Menz, Hylton B; Munro, Bridget J; Lord, Stephen R

    2008-01-01

    Footwear influences balance and the subsequent risk of slips, trips, and falls by altering somatosensory feedback to the foot and ankle and modifying frictional conditions at the shoe/floor interface...

  3. Ninigret National Wildlife Refuge 2009 Fall Banding Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes bird banding results at Ninigret National Wildlife Refuge during the fall of 2009. The Ninigret banding station opened nets on 21 August and...

  4. Ninigret National Wildlife Refuge 2012 Fall Banding Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes bird banding results at Ninigret National Wildlife Refuge during the fall of 2012. The Ninigret banding station opened nets on 4 September and...

  5. Ninigret National Wildlife Refuge 2010 Fall Banding Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes bird banding results at Ninigret National Wildlife Refuge during the fall of 2010. The Ninigret banding station opened nets on 26 August and...

  6. Postural balance and the risk of falling during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakmak, Bulent; Ribeiro, Ana Paula; Inanir, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy is a physiological process and many changes occur in a woman's body during pregnancy. These changes occur in all systems to varying degrees, including the cardiovascular, respiratory, genitourinary, and musculoskeletal systems. The hormonal, anatomical, and physiological changes occurring during pregnancy result in weight gain, decreased abdominal muscle strength and neuromuscular control, increased ligamentous laxity, and spinal lordosis. These alterations shift the centre of gravity of the body, altering the postural balance and increasing the risk of falls. Falls during pregnancy can cause maternal and foetal complications, such as maternal bone fractures, head injuries, internal haemorrhage, abruption placenta, rupture of the uterus and membranes, and occasionally maternal death or intrauterine foetal demise. Preventative strategies, such as physical exercise and the use of maternity support belts, can increase postural stability and reduce the risk of falls during pregnancy. This article reviews studies that have investigated changes in postural balance and risk of falling during pregnancy.

  7. Walk-In Hunting Access (WIHA) Fall 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This shapefile represents the private lands leased by the Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks for fall 2009 public hunting access through the Walk-In Hunting...

  8. Walk-In Hunting Access (WIHA) Fall 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This shapefile represents the private lands leased by the Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism (KDWPT) for fall 2011 public hunting access through the...

  9. Flu Shot Falls Short More Often for Obese People: Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166544.html Flu Shot Falls Short More Often for Obese People: ... 2017 TUESDAY, June 13, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A flu shot is the best way to avoid getting ...

  10. Ninigret National Wildlife Refuge 2011 Fall Banding Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes bird banding results at Ninigret National Wildlife Refuge during the fall of 2011. The Ninigret banding station opened nets on 19 August and...

  11. SEAMAP 2013 Fall Plankton Survey (PC1305, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During the 2013 Fall Plankton Survey, plankton samples were collected from a systematic grid of stations to assess distribution, occurrence and abundance of the...

  12. Fall detection using supervised machine learning algorithms: A comparative study

    KAUST Repository

    Zerrouki, Nabil

    2017-01-05

    Fall incidents are considered as the leading cause of disability and even mortality among older adults. To address this problem, fall detection and prevention fields receive a lot of intention over the past years and attracted many researcher efforts. We present in the current study an overall performance comparison between fall detection systems using the most popular machine learning approaches which are: Naïve Bayes, K nearest neighbor, neural network, and support vector machine. The analysis of the classification power associated to these most widely utilized algorithms is conducted on two fall detection databases namely FDD and URFD. Since the performance of the classification algorithm is inherently dependent on the features, we extracted and used the same features for all classifiers. The classification evaluation is conducted using different state of the art statistical measures such as the overall accuracy, the F-measure coefficient, and the area under ROC curve (AUC) value.

  13. Ninigret National Wildlife Refuge 2008 Fall Banding Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes bird banding results at Ninigret National Wildlife Refuge during the fall of 2008. The Ninigret banding station opened nets on 29 August and...

  14. American Concrete Institute fall 2008 conference : sponsorship and student training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    The national American Concrete Institute Fall Conference was held in St. Louis, Missouri on November 2nd 6th, 2008. This : educational and outreach activity provided sponsorship to the conference and provided an opportunity for Missouri S&T gradu...

  15. Fire Perimeters - Southern California, Fall 2007 [ds385

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Southern Callifornia fire perimeters for the Fall 2007 wildfires. The perimeters were assembled from various sources by California Department of Fish and Game (DFG)...

  16. SEAMAP 2015 Fall Plankton Survey (PC1504, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During the 2015 Fall Plankton Survey, plankton samples were collected from a systematic grid of stations to assess distribution, occurrence and abundance of the...

  17. Walk-In Hunting Access (WIHA) Fall 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This shapefile represents the private lands leased by the Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks for fall 2008 public hunting access through the Walk-In Hunting...

  18. Walk-In Hunting Access (WIHA) Fall 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This shapefile represents the private lands leased by the Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks for fall 2010 public hunting access through the Walk-In Hunting...

  19. Falls and Fall-Prevention in Older Persons: Geriatrics Meets Spaceflight!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandu Goswami

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a general overview of key physiological consequences of microgravity experienced during spaceflight and of important parallels and connections to the physiology of aging. Microgravity during spaceflight influences cardiovascular function, cerebral autoregulation, musculoskeletal, and sensorimotor system performance. A great deal of research has been carried out to understand these influences and to provide countermeasures to reduce the observed negative consequences of microgravity on physiological function. Such research can inform and be informed by research related to physiological changes and the deterioration of physiological function due to aging. For example, head-down bedrest is used as a model to study effects of spaceflight deconditioning due to reduced gravity. As hospitalized older persons spend up to 80% of their time in bed, the deconditioning effects of bedrest confinement on physiological functions and parallels with spaceflight deconditioning can be exploited to understand and combat both variations of deconditioning. Deconditioning due to bed confinement in older persons can contribute to a downward spiral of increasing frailty, orthostatic intolerance, falls, and fall-related injury. As astronauts in space spend substantial amounts of time carrying out exercise training to counteract the microgravity-induced deconditioning and to counteract orthostatic intolerance on return to Earth, it is logical to suggest some of these interventions for bed-confined older persons. Synthesizing knowledge regarding deconditioning due to reduced gravitational stress in space and deconditioning during bed confinement allows for a more comprehensive approach that can incorporate aspects such as (mal- nutrition, muscle strength and function, cardiovascular (de- conditioning, and cardio-postural interactions. The impact of such integration can provide new insights and lead to methods of value for both space medicine and

  20. Falls in ambulatory non-demented patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rascol, Olivier; Perez-Lloret, Santiago; Damier, Philippe; Delval, Arnaud; Derkinderen, Pascal; Destée, Alain; Meissner, Wassilios G; Tison, Francois; Negre-Pages, Laurence

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed at determining the prevalence of falling in PD patients, to assess generic and disease-specific clinical and pharmacological factors, relationship with health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) and changes in falls from OFF to ON in patients with motor fluctuations. Six-hundred and eighty-three PD patients of the COPARK survey were evaluated (11 had missing data and were excluded from the analysis). Patients with falls were identified as those with a UPDRS Item 13 ≥ 1 in the ON condition. All patients were assessed in a standardized manner [demographics, treatments, Unified PD Rating Scale (UPDRS), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Pittsburg questionnaire and HR-QoL scales (SF36, PDQ39)]. Falling was reported by 108/672 (16%) PD patients during the ON state and prevalence increased according to PD severity, from 5% in Hoehn and Yahr stage 1-60% in stage 4. Falling was significantly related to lower HR-QoL. Falling correlated with (1) generic factors such as female gender, age at the end of academic studies and diuretics consumption, (2) motor PD-specific factors including disease severity, frozen gait, difficulties when arising from a chair, dyskinesia and higher levodopa daily equivalent dose and (3) non-motor PD-specific factors such as orthostatic hypotension and hallucinations. Falling was more frequent in OFF than in ON in 48/74 (64%) patients with motor fluctuations and remained unchanged in 27 patients (36%). In summary, falling affected a significant proportion of PD patients, especially in advanced stages. It was associated with a variety of generic and PD-specific factors and was related to reduced HR-QoL.

  1. Clinical decision making in exercise prescription for fall prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Romi; Maloney, Stephen; Pausenberger, Eva; Keating, Jennifer L; Sims, Jane; Molloy, Elizabeth; Jolly, Brian; Morgan, Prue; Haines, Terry

    2012-05-01

    Physical therapists often prescribe exercises for fall prevention. Understanding the factors influencing the clinical decision-making processes used by expert physical therapists working in specialist fall and balance clinics may assist other therapists in prescribing exercises for fall prevention with greater efficacy. The objective of this study was to describe the factors influencing the clinical decision-making processes used by expert physical therapists to prescribe exercises for fall prevention. This investigation was a qualitative study from a phenomenological perspective. Semistructured telephone interviews were conducted with 24 expert physical therapists recruited primarily from the Victorian Falls Clinic Coalition. Interviews focused on 3 exercise prescription contexts: face-to-face individual therapy, group exercise programs, and home exercise programs. Interviews elicited information about therapist practices and the therapist, patient, and environmental factors influencing the clinical decision-making processes for the selection of exercise setting, type, dosage (intensity, quantity, rest periods, duration, and frequency), and progression. Strategies for promoting adherence and safety were also discussed. Data were analyzed with a framework approach by 3 investigators. Participants described highly individualized exercise prescription approaches tailored to address key findings from physical assessments. Dissonance between prescribing a program that was theoretically correct on the basis of physiological considerations and prescribing one that a client would adhere to was evident. Safety considerations also were highly influential on the exercise type and setting prescribed. Terminology for describing the intensity of balance exercises was vague relative to terminology for describing the intensity of strength exercises. Physical therapists with expertise in fall prevention adopted an individualized approach to exercise prescription that was based on

  2. Seed fall in an oldgrowth northern hardwood forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond E. Graber; William B. Leak; William B. Leak

    1992-01-01

    Seed fall was measured for 11 years in a 200-year-old stand of sugar maple, yellow birch, and beech in New Hampshire. Yellow birch had 5 good seed years, sugar maple had 3, and beech had none. Viable seed fall of yellow birch began in August and continued through autumn and winter. Most of the viable sugar maple seed fell during a short period in October. Beech seed...

  3. Relationships of Stroke Patients’ Gait Parameters with Fear of Falling

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Jin; Yoo, Ingyu

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to assess the correlation of gait parameters with fear of falling in stroke survivors. [Subjects] In total, 12 patients with stroke participated. [Methods] The subjects performed on a Biodex Gait Trainer 2 for 5 min to evaluate characteristic gait parameters. The kinematic gait parameters measured were gait speed, step cycle, step length, and time on each foot (step symmetry). All the subjects also completed a fall anxiety survey. [Results] Correlations...

  4. Youth Attitude Tracking Study II Wave 16 - Fall 1985,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-06-01

    may be particularly keen for several reasons. Youth unemployment rates are down; economic indicators suggest a strengthening economy through the end...AD-AI7I 517 YOUTH ATTITUDE TRACKING STUDY 11 NAVE 16 - FALL I9 M .’ (U) RESEARCH TRIANGLE INST RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK NCELJN8 R136/50F UNCL ASSIFIED...J ~ Jj -- -DEFENSE MANPOWER DATA CENTER Youth Attitude Tracking Study II -’ Wave 16 -- Fall 19850Report Re~earch Triangle Intitute DTIC COD ELECTE LU

  5. Youth Attitude Tracking Study II Wave 18 -- Fall 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-01

    remain unrelated to unemployment rates. C. Intentions, Alternatives and Active Propensity (Chapter 5) Youths measure the attractiveness of military...0 - -DEFENSE o -MANPOWER DATA CENTER < Youth Attitude Tracking Study II Wave 18-- Fall 1987 Report Research Triangle Institute DTIC ELECTEI - OCT 2...11988D 88 10 21 053 1600 WILSON BOULEVARD ARLINGTON, VIRGINIA 22209 CC". 4J c *, II 11v-z- YOUTH ATTITUDE TRACKING STUDY Fall 1987 by Nancy N. Ostrove

  6. Schimmelpilze hinter dem Schrank - Eurotium rubrum, ein bemerkenswerter Fall

    OpenAIRE

    Hofbauer, W.; Breuer, K.; Sedlbauer, K.

    2003-01-01

    Der besprochene Fall von Schimmelpilzen hinter einem Schrank ist bemerkenswert, da visuell keine typische Schimmelbildung (watteartiger Belag) festzustellen war und auch olfaktorisch keine Hinweise auf unerwünschtes Pilzwachstum vorlagen. Vor allem der Kontrast durch weinrote Pigmente zum Anstrich charakterisierte die Auffälligkeit des Falles. Die Stellung von "Eurotium rubrum" im taxonomischen System wird diskutiert. Der bauphysikalische Hintergrund des aufgetretenen Befalls wird aufgezeigt.

  7. Fall detection using smart floor sensor and supervised learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minvielle, Ludovic; Atiq, Mounir; Serra, Renan; Mougeot, Mathilde; Vayatis, Nicolas

    2017-07-01

    Falls are a major risk for elderly people's health and independence. Fast and reliable fall detection systems can improve chances of surviving the accident and coping with its physical and psychological consequences. Recent research has come up with various solutions, all suffering from significant drawbacks, one of them being the intrusiveness into patient's life. This paper proposes a novel fall detection monitoring system based on a sensitive floor sensor made out of a piezoelectric material and a machine learning approach. The detection is done by a combination between a supervised Random Forest and an aggregation of its output over time. The database was made using acquisitions from 28 volunteers simulating falls and other behaviours. Unlike existent fall detection systems, our solution offers the advantages of having a passive sensor (no power supply is needed) and being completely unobtrusive since the sensor comes with the floor. Results are compared with state-of-the-art classification algorithms. On our database, good performance of fall detection was obtained with a True Positive Rate of 94.4% and a False Positive Rate of 2.4%.

  8. Analysis of Android Device-Based Solutions for Fall Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Casilari

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Falls are a major cause of health and psychological problems as well as hospitalization costs among older adults. Thus, the investigation on automatic Fall Detection Systems (FDSs has received special attention from the research community during the last decade. In this area, the widespread popularity, decreasing price, computing capabilities, built-in sensors and multiplicity of wireless interfaces of Android-based devices (especially smartphones have fostered the adoption of this technology to deploy wearable and inexpensive architectures for fall detection. This paper presents a critical and thorough analysis of those existing fall detection systems that are based on Android devices. The review systematically classifies and compares the proposals of the literature taking into account different criteria such as the system architecture, the employed sensors, the detection algorithm or the response in case of a fall alarms. The study emphasizes the analysis of the evaluation methods that are employed to assess the effectiveness of the detection process. The review reveals the complete lack of a reference framework to validate and compare the proposals. In addition, the study also shows that most research works do not evaluate the actual applicability of the Android devices (with limited battery and computing resources to fall detection solutions.

  9. Analysis of Android Device-Based Solutions for Fall Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casilari, Eduardo; Luque, Rafael; Morón, María-José

    2015-07-23

    Falls are a major cause of health and psychological problems as well as hospitalization costs among older adults. Thus, the investigation on automatic Fall Detection Systems (FDSs) has received special attention from the research community during the last decade. In this area, the widespread popularity, decreasing price, computing capabilities, built-in sensors and multiplicity of wireless interfaces of Android-based devices (especially smartphones) have fostered the adoption of this technology to deploy wearable and inexpensive architectures for fall detection. This paper presents a critical and thorough analysis of those existing fall detection systems that are based on Android devices. The review systematically classifies and compares the proposals of the literature taking into account different criteria such as the system architecture, the employed sensors, the detection algorithm or the response in case of a fall alarms. The study emphasizes the analysis of the evaluation methods that are employed to assess the effectiveness of the detection process. The review reveals the complete lack of a reference framework to validate and compare the proposals. In addition, the study also shows that most research works do not evaluate the actual applicability of the Android devices (with limited battery and computing resources) to fall detection solutions.

  10. Falls event detection using triaxial accelerometry and barometric pressure measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Federico; Redmond, Stephen J; Narayanan, Michael R; Cerutti, Sergio; Celler, Branko G; Lovell, Nigel H

    2009-01-01

    A falls detection system, employing a Bluetooth-based wearable device, containing a triaxial accelerometer and a barometric pressure sensor, is described. The aim of this study is to evaluate the use of barometric pressure measurement, as a surrogate measure of altitude, to augment previously reported accelerometry-based falls detection algorithms. The accelerometry and barometric pressure signals obtained from the waist-mounted device are analyzed by a signal processing and classification algorithm to discriminate falls from activities of daily living. This falls detection algorithm has been compared to two existing algorithms which utilize accelerometry signals alone. A set of laboratory-based simulated falls, along with other tasks associated with activities of daily living (16 tests) were performed by 15 healthy volunteers (9 male and 6 female; age: 23.7 +/- 2.9 years; height: 1.74 +/- 0.11 m). The algorithm incorporating pressure information detected falls with the highest sensitivity (97.8%) and the highest specificity (96.7%).

  11. Falls amongst older people in Southeast Asia: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romli, M H; Tan, M P; Mackenzie, L; Lovarini, M; Suttanon, P; Clemson, L

    2017-04-01

    The older population in the Southeast Asian region is accelerating and is expected to surpass the proportion of the ageing population in North America and Europe in the future. This study aims to identify the research literature related to falls among older people in Southeast Asia, to examine current practice and discuss the future direction on falls prevention and interventions in the region. A scoping review design was used. A systematic literature search was conducted using the Medline, CINAHL, AMED, Ageline, PsycINFO, Web of Sciences, Scopus, Thai-Journal Citation Index, MyCite and trial registries databases. Thirty-seven studies and six study protocols were included, from Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Vietnam, Indonesia and the Philippines. One-sixth of the studies involved interventions, while the remainder were observational studies. The observational studies mainly determined the falls risk factors. The intervention studies comprised multifactorial interventions and single interventions such as exercises, educational materials and visual correction. Many of the studies replicated international studies and may not have taken into account features unique to Southeast Asia. Our review has revealed studies evaluating falls and management of falls in the Southeast Asian context. More research is required from all Southeast Asian countries to prepare for the future challenges of managing falls as the population ages. Copyright © 2016 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Falls from heights in and around the city of Batman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al, Behçet; Yildirim, Cuma; Coban, Sacid

    2009-03-01

    We evaluated the demographic data, mortality rates, fall causes, and post-mortem findings of individuals who fell from heights. Five hundred thirty-eight patients who sustained injuries after an accidental fall from heights were entered into the study. Our cases were collected prospectively in Batman over a seven- month period. The mean age was 12.4+/-3.22 years (3 months-98 years); 56.5% of patients were under 6 years old and 83.5% were under 20 years old. The mean fall height was 3.2+/-2.4 m. The mortality rate was 2.2%, and was highest among the patients who fell from flat-roofed houses. The most common injuries were to the head, and 100% of those who died had a head injury. Six patients were followed because of abdominal bleeding and 141 patients due to extremity fractures; 6.7% of patients were operated on and 83.8% of patients were treated in the emergency department. The results of this study were at variance with literature data with respect to the following: falls from heights were most common in the 0-5 years of age group. Craniocerebral trauma is the most common injury in fatal falls. Males had a higher rate of falls from height than females.

  13. Detecting Falls with Wearable Sensors Using Machine Learning Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Turan Özdemir

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Falls are a serious public health problem and possibly life threatening for people in fall risk groups. We develop an automated fall detection system with wearable motion sensor units fitted to the subjects’ body at six different positions. Each unit comprises three tri-axial devices (accelerometer, gyroscope, and magnetometer/compass. Fourteen volunteers perform a standardized set of movements including 20 voluntary falls and 16 activities of daily living (ADLs, resulting in a large dataset with 2520 trials. To reduce the computational complexity of training and testing the classifiers, we focus on the raw data for each sensor in a 4 s time window around the point of peak total acceleration of the waist sensor, and then perform feature extraction and reduction. Most earlier studies on fall detection employ rule-based approaches that rely on simple thresholding of the sensor outputs. We successfully distinguish falls from ADLs using six machine learning techniques (classifiers: the k-nearest neighbor (k-NN classifier, least squares method (LSM, support vector machines (SVM, Bayesian decision making (BDM, dynamic time warping (DTW, and artificial neural networks (ANNs. We compare the performance and the computational complexity of the classifiers and achieve the best results with the k-NN classifier and LSM, with sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy all above 99%. These classifiers also have acceptable computational requirements for training and testing. Our approach would be applicable in real-world scenarios where data records of indeterminate length, containing multiple activities in sequence, are recorded.

  14. The Association Between Anxiety and Falls: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallford, David John; Nicholson, Geoff; Sanders, Kerrie; McCabe, Marita P

    2017-09-01

    Falls occur frequently among older adults and can lead to a range of adverse and debilitating outcomes. Although symptoms of clinical anxiety have been implicated as risk factors for falls, there is no current consensus on the empirical association between anxiety and falls. The current study aimed to address this gap in the literature by conducting a quantitative, meta-analytic review of findings from previous studies. A systematic literature search of bibliographic databases was conducted, yielding 18 studies that fit the criteria for inclusion in the meta-analysis. A random-effects model of all 18 studies showed a significant overall odds ratio of 1.53 (95% CI 1.28-1.83, p anxiety were associated with a 53% increased likelihood of falls. A high amount of variance among effect sizes was observed. Only age was identified as a moderator of this relationship in a subgroup of the samples. Clinical anxiety is associated with falls, however, further research is required to elucidate the factors that might moderate or mediate this relationship, the casual pathways through which they are related, and the associations between different types of anxiety and falls.

  15. Tephra fall clean-up in urban environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Josh L.; Wilson, Thomas M.; Magill, Christina

    2015-10-01

    Tephra falls impact urban communities by disrupting transport systems, contaminating and damaging buildings and infrastructures, and are potentially hazardous to human health. Therefore, prompt and effective tephra clean-up measures are an essential component of an urban community's response to tephra fall. This paper reviews case studies of tephra clean-up operations in urban environments around the world, spanning 50 years. It identifies methods used in tephra clean-up and assesses a range of empirical relationships between level of tephra accumulation and clean-up metrics such as collected tephra volume, costs, and duration of operations. Results indicate the volume of tephra collected from urban areas is proportional to tephra accumulation. Urban areas with small tephra accumulations (1,000 m3/km2 or an average of 1 mm thickness) may collect 50,000 m3/km2 or an average of 50 mm thickness) remove up to 80%. This relationship can inform impact and risk assessments by providing an estimate of the likely response required for a given tephra fall. No strong relationship was found between tephra fall accumulation and clean-up cost or duration for urban environments which received one-off tephra falls, suggesting that these aspects of tephra fall clean-up operations are context specific. Importantly, this study highlights the advantage of effective planning for tephra clean-up and disposal in potentially exposed areas.

  16. Factors associated with the completion of falls prevention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, Anamica; Page, Timothy; Melchior, Michael; Seff, Laura; Vieira, Edgar Ramos; Palmer, Richard C

    2013-12-01

    Falls and fear of falling can affect independence and quality of life of older adults. Falls prevention programs may help avoiding these issues if completed. Understanding factors that are associated with completion of falls prevention programs is important. To reduce fear of falling and increase activity levels, a Matter of Balance (MOB) and un Asunto de Equilibrio (ADE) workshops were offered to 3420 older adults in South Florida between 1 October 2008 and 31 December 2011. Workshops were conducted in English or Spanish over eight, 2-hour sessions. Participants completed a demographic and a pre-post questionnaire. Factors associated with program completion were identified using logistic regression. For MOB, females were more likely to complete the program (OR = 2.076, P = 0.02). For ADE, females, moderate and extreme interference by falls in social activities were found to affect completion (OR = 2.116, P = 0.001; OR = 2.269, P = 0.003 and OR = 4.133, P = 0.008, respectively). Different factors predicted completion of both programs. Awareness of these factors can help lower the attrition rates, increase benefits and cost effectiveness of program. Future research needs to explore why certain groups had a higher likelihood of completing either program.

  17. Predictors of How Often and When People Fall in Love

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Galperin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A leading theory of romantic love is that it functions to make one feel committed to one's beloved, as well as to signal this commitment to the beloved (Frank, 1988. Because women tend to be skeptical of men's commitment, this view entails that men may have evolved to fall in love first, in order to show their commitment to women. Using a sample of online participants of a broad range of ages, this study tested this sex difference and several related individual difference hypotheses concerning the ease of falling in love. There was mixed evidence for sex differences: only some measures indicated that men are generally more love-prone than are women. We also found that men were more prone to falling in love if they tended to overestimate women's sexual interest and highly valued physical attractiveness in potential partners. Women were more prone to falling in love if they had a stronger sex drive. These results provide modest support for the existence of sex differences in falling in love, as well as initial evidence for links between several individual difference variables and the propensity to fall in love.

  18. Fall scenarios In causing older women's hip fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hägvide, Mona-Lisa; Larsson, Tore J; Borell, Lena

    2013-01-01

    Falls and fall-related injuries among older women constitute a major public health problem with huge costs for the society and personal suffering. The aim of this study was to describe and illustrate how a number of circumstances, conceptualized as a scenario, that were related to the individual, the environment, and the ongoing occupation contributed to a fall that led to a hip fracture among women. The sample included 48 women over 55 years old. Interviews were conducted during home visits and the analysis provided a descriptive picture of circumstances in the shape of a scenario related to the risk of falling. A number of scenarios were developed based on the data and named to provide an understanding of the interplay between the individual, the environment, and the ongoing occupation at the time of the fall. By applying the concept of a scenario, occupational therapists can increase the awareness of fall risks among older people, and are relevant also for interior designers, architects, and town planners to consider when designing the local environment as well as furniture and other objects.

  19. Epidemiology of falls and osteoporotic fractures: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morrison A

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Alan Morrison,1 Tao Fan,2 Shuvayu S Sen,2 Lauren Weisenfluh11SCRIBCO, Effort, PA, 2Global Health Outcomes, Merck and Co, Inc, Whitehouse Station, NJ, USABackground and methods: Fractures in elderly populations result from the combination of falls and osteoporosis. We report a systematic review of studies indexed in PubMed reporting annual rates of low-trauma falls and associated osteoporotic fractures among older community-dwelling people (age ≥ 50 years. An osteoporotic fracture was defined as either a fracture resulting from a low-impact fall in subjects with clinical osteoporosis, a fall resulting in an investigator-defined osteoporotic fracture, or a fall resulting in a low-trauma fracture. Rates are presented using descriptive statistics. Meta-analysis was conducted for statistically homogeneous data sets.Results: The median (range annual fall prevalence rates (median proportion of people who experienced one or more falls during the past year for cohorts of women and men (10 determinations, women alone (seven determinations, and men alone (four determinations were, respectively, 0.334 (0.217–0.625, 0.460 (0.372–0.517, and 0.349 (0.284–0.526. In studies that reported fall prevalence rates for Western men and women separately (four determinations, the pooled risk ratio (95% confidence interval [CI] for men versus women was 0.805 (95% CI 0.721–0.900. The ranges of fall prevalence rates in East Asian women (two studies and East Asian men (two studies were, respectively, 0.163–0.258 and 0.087–0.184. The risk ratio (95% CI for fall prevalence in East Asian men versus women was 0.634 (0.479–0.838 in studies (two determinations reporting results for East Asian men and women separately. In cohorts of Western women and men (five determinations, the pooled rate (95% CI of low-impact falls resulting in fractures was 0.041 (0.031–0.054. The proportion of low-trauma fractures attributable to falls among the Western community

  20. Exchange flows of two immiscible Newtonian liquids in a vertical tube: From falling drops to falling slugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varges, P. R.; Fonseca, B. S.; Naccache, M. F.; de Souza Mendes, P. R.

    2017-06-01

    We present an experimental study of buoyancy-driven flows of two immiscible Newtonian liquids in a vertical tube where initially the heavier and more viscous one is placed on the top of the lighter one. Flow visualization was performed using a digital camera, and inversion velocities were determined through image analysis. The influence of the governing parameters on the speed and flow regime was examined for pairs of liquids with small density differences. Two different flow regimes were observed, namely, falling drops and falling slugs. In the first regime, spherical and ellipsoidal drops are obtained, depending on the ratio between the drop and tube diameters. The falling slug regime is a core-annular flow pattern above a critical value of interfacial tension, while no flow is noticed below this critical value. The experimental results are in good agreement with model predictions from the literature. Indeed, the results showed that terminal velocity can be estimated by empirical correlations for falling spheres.

  1. Relationship Between Difficulties in Daily Activities and Falling: Loco-Check as a Self-Assessment of Fall Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akahane, Manabu; Maeyashiki, Akie; Yoshihara, Shingo; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Imamura, Tomoaki

    2016-06-20

    People aged 65 years or older accounted for 25.1% of the Japanese population in 2013, and this characterizes the country as a "super-aging society." With increased aging, fall-related injuries are becoming important in Japan, because such injuries underlie the necessity for nursing care services. If people could evaluate their risk of falling using a simple self-check test, they would be able to take preventive measures such as exercise, muscle training, walking with a cane, or renovation of their surroundings to remove impediments. Loco-check is a checklist measure of early locomotive syndrome (circumstances in which elderly people need nursing care service or are at high risk of requiring the service within a short time), prepared by the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) in 2007, but it is unclear if there is any association between this measure and falls. To investigate the association between falls during the previous year and the 7 "loco-check" daily activity items and the total number of items endorsed, and sleep duration. We conducted an Internet panel survey. Subjects were 624 persons aged between 30 and 90 years. The general health condition of the participants, including their experience of falling, daily activities, and sleep duration, was investigated. A multivariate analysis was carried out using logistic regression to investigate the relationship between falls in the previous year and difficulties with specific daily activities and total number of difficulties (loco-check) endorsed, and sleep duration, adjusting for sex and age. One-fourth of participants (157 persons) experienced at least one fall during the previous year. Fall rate of females (94/312: 30.1%) was significantly higher than that of males (63/312: 20.2%). Fall rate of persons aged more than 65 years (80/242: 33.1%) was significantly higher than that of younger persons (77/382: 20.2%). Logistic regression analysis revealed that daily activities such as "impossibility of getting

  2. Adoption of Evidence-Based Fall Prevention Practices in Primary Care for Older Adults with a History of Falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, Elizabeth A; Aerts, Sally; Dowler, David; Eckstrom, Elizabeth; Casey, Colleen M

    2016-01-01

    A multifactorial approach to assess and manage modifiable risk factors is recommended for older adults with a history of falls. Limited research suggests that this approach does not routinely occur in clinical practice, but most related studies are based on provider self-report, with the last chart audit of United States practice published over a decade ago. We conducted a retrospective chart review to assess the extent to which patients aged 65+ years with a history of repeated falls or fall-related health-care use received multifactorial risk assessment and interventions. The setting was an academic primary care clinic in the Pacific Northwest. Among the 116 patients meeting our inclusion criteria, 48% had some type of documented assessment. Their mean age was 79 ± 8 years; 68% were female, and 10% were non-white. They averaged six primary care visits over a 12-month period subsequent to their index fall. Frequency of assessment of fall-risk factors varied from 24% (for home safety) to 78% (for vitamin D). An evidence-based intervention was recommended for identified risk factors 73% of the time, on average. Two risk factors were addressed infrequently: medications (21%) and home safety (24%). Use of a structured visit note template independently predicted assessment of fall-risk factors (p = 0.003). Geriatrics specialists were more likely to use a structured note template (p = 0.04) and perform more fall-risk factor assessments (4.6 vs. 3.6, p = 0.007) than general internists. These results suggest opportunities for improving multifactorial fall-risk assessment and management of older adults at high fall risk in primary care. A structured visit note template facilitates assessment. Given that high-risk medications have been found to be independent risk factors for falls, increasing attention to medications should become a key focus of both public health educational efforts and fall prevention in primary care practice.

  3. Phylogenetic position of a whale-fall lancelet (Cephalochordata inferred from whole mitochondrial genome sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishida Mutsumi

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The lancelet Asymmetron inferum (subphylum Cephalochordata was recently discovered on the ocean floor off the southwest coast of Japan at a depth of 229 m, in an anaerobic and sulfide-rich environment caused by decomposing bodies of the sperm whale Physeter macrocephalus. This deep sulfide-rich habitat of A. inferum is unique among the lancelets. The distinguishing adaptation of this species to such an extraordinary habitat can be considered in a phylogenetic framework. As the first step of reconstruction of the evolutionary processes in this species, we investigated its phylogenetic position based on 11 whole mitochondrial genome sequences including the newly determined ones of the whale-fall lancelet A. inferum and two coral-reef congeners. Results Our phylogenetic analyses showed that extant lancelets are clustered into two major clades, the Asymmetron clade and the Epigonichthys + Branchiostoma clade. A. inferum was in the former and placed in the sister group to A. lucayanum complex. The divergence time between A. inferum and A. lucayanum complex was estimated to be 115 Mya using the penalized likelihood (PL method or 97 Mya using the nonparametric rate smoothing (NPRS method (the middle Cretaceous. These are far older than the first appearance of large whales (the middle Eocene, 40 Mya. We also discovered that A. inferum mitogenome (mitochondrial genome has been subjected to large-scale gene rearrangements, one feature of rearrangements being unique among the lancelets and two features shared with A. lucayanum complex. Conclusion Our study supports the monophyly of genus Asymmetron assumed on the basis of the morphological characters. Furthermore, the features of the A. inferum mitogenome expand our knowledge of variation within cephalochordate mitogenomes, adding a new case of transposition and inversion of the trnQ gene. Our divergence time estimation suggests that A. inferum remained a member of the Mesozoic and the

  4. Kenosha County falls prevention study: a randomized, controlled trial of an intermediate-intensity, community-based multifactorial falls intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Jane E; Shea, Terry A; Przybelski, Robert; Jaros, LaVerne; Gangnon, Ronald; Cech, Sandy; Schwalbe, Alice

    2007-04-01

    To decrease the rate of falls in high-risk community-dwelling older adults. Randomized, controlled trial. Community-based. Three hundred forty-nine adults aged 65 and older with two falls in the previous year or one fall in the previous 2 years with injury or balance problems. Subjects received two in-home visits from a trained nurse or physical therapist who assessed falls risk factors using an algorithm. The intervention consisted of recommendations to the subject and their primary physician, referrals to physical therapy and other providers, 11 monthly telephone calls, and a balance exercise plan. Control subjects received a home safety assessment. The primary outcome was rate of falls per year in the community. Secondary outcomes included all-cause hospitalizations and nursing home admissions per year. There was no difference in rate of falls between the intervention and control groups (rate ratio (RR)=0.81, P=.27). Nursing home days were fewer in the intervention group (10.3 vs 20.5 days, P=.04). Intervention subjects with a Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score of 27 or less had a lower rate of falls (RR=0.55; P=.05) and, if they lived with someone, had fewer hospitalizations (RR=0.44, P=.05), nursing home admissions (RR=0.15, P=.003), and nursing home days (7.5 vs 58.2, P=.008). This multifactorial intervention did not decrease falls in at-risk community-living adults but did decrease nursing home utilization. There was evidence of efficacy in the subgroup who had an MMSE score of 27 or less and lived with a caregiver, but validation is required.

  5. How to identify patients with cancer at risk of falling: a review of the evidence.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Stone, Carol A

    2011-02-01

    Clinical experience and a limited number of studies suggest that a cancer diagnosis confers a high risk of accidental falls. The negative sequelae of falls in older persons are well documented; risk factors for falls in this population have been extensively investigated and evidence for the efficacy of interventions to reduce falls is steadily emerging. It is not known whether the risk factors for falls and effective interventions for falls risk reduction in patients with cancer are different from those in older persons.

  6. Dominance of Epsilonproteobacteria associated with a whale fall at a 4204 m depth - South Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalett, Angélica; Silva, Marcus Adonai Castro da; Toyofuku, Takashi; Mendes, Rodrigo; Taketani, Rodrigo Gouvêa; Pedrini, Jéssica; Freitas, Robert Cardoso de; Sumida, Paulo Yukio Gomes; Yamanaka, Toshiro; Nagano, Yuriko; Pellizari, Vivian Helena; Perez, José Angel Alvarez; Kitazato, Hiroshi; Lima, André Oliveira de Souza

    2017-12-01

    The deep ocean is the largest marine environment on Earth and is home to a large reservoir of biodiversity. Within the deep ocean, large organic falls attract a suite of metazoans and microorganisms, which form an important community that, in part, relies on reduced chemical compounds. Here, we describe a deep-sea (4204 m) microbial community associated with sediments collected underneath a whale fall skeleton in the South Atlantic Ocean. Metagenomic analysis of 1 Gb of Illumina HiSeq. 2000 reads, including taxonomic and functional genes, was performed by using the MG-RAST pipeline, SEED, COG and the KEGG database. The results showed that Proteobacteria (79%) was the main phylum represented. The most dominant bacterial class in this phylum was Epsilonproteobacteria (69%), and Sulfurovum sp. NBC37-1 (97%) was the dominant species. Different species of Epsilonproteobacteria have been described in marine and terrestrial environments as important organisms for nutrient cycling. Functional analysis revealed key genes for nitrogen and sulfur cycles, including protein sequences for Sox system (sulfur oxidation) enzymes. These enzymes were mainly those of the Epsilonproteobacteria, indicating their importance for nitrogen and sulfur cycles and the balance of nutrients in this environment.

  7. Summary of the IADR Cariology Research, Craniofacial Biology, and Mineralized Tissue Groups Symposium, Iguaçu Falls, Brazil, June 2012: Gene-environment Interactions and Epigenetics in Oral Diseases: Enamel Formation and its Clinical Impact on Tooth Defects, Caries, and Erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Modesto

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Characteristics of enamel may influence or modulate individual susceptibility to caries and erosion. These characteristics are defined during development, which is under strict genetic control, but can easily be modified in many ways by environmental factors. In the symposium, translational aspects of embryology, biochemistry, and genetics of amelogenesis were presented. The symposium provided unique insight into how basic sciences integrate with clinically relevant problems. The need for improved understanding of risks at the individual level, taking into consideration both environmental exposures and genetic background, was presented. The symposium was divided into four stepwise and interconnected topics as follows:  1 The Many Faces of Enamel Development; 2 Enamel Pathogenesis: Biochemistry Lessons; 3 Environmental Factors on Enamel Formation; and, 4 Genetic Variation in Enamel Formation Genes.

  8. Gender Differences in Risk Factors for Single and Recurrent Falls Among the Community-Dwelling Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Mei O

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to identify gender differences in risk factors of fall accidents among older people, and whether these factors differ between single and recurrent fallers. A total of 4,426 individuals aged ≥65 years from two large-scale health surveys provided data. Logistic regression analyses were used to identify risk factors and to determine the risk model for falling and recurrent falling in men and women separately. Three major risk factors for falling regardless of gender or fall history are fear of falling, limitations in activities of daily living (ADL, and age ≥75 years. Fear of falling remains one of the common modifiable risk factors. Among those without a fall history, the use of sedatives or tranquilizers increases the risk of falling. Regarding gender differences, ADL limitations and fear of falling appear to be stronger fall risk factors for men than for women. Among women, alcohol use and educational level are significant risk factors for falling, while loneliness is associated with recurrent falling. Men with fear of falling or ADL limitations are at higher risk to have a recurrent fall accident than women with these conditions. Having a visual impairment or living with someone is associated with recurrent falling among men. Our findings emphasize the importance of multifactorial fall interventions, taking into account a variety of subgroup characteristics such as gender and fall history.

  9. Falling in Old Age in Samsun: 2010-2015

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    Ömer Kılınç

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study is to evaluate cases over the age of 65 who are admitted for falling and to lead the way for the measures to be taken to minimize the harm. Materials and Methods: 489 patients at and over the age of 65 who were admitted to Ondokuz Mayıs University Health Application and Research Center due to falling between the dates of 01.08.2010 and 31.07.2015 were included in the study. Forensic files and hospital automation system data of the cases were analyzed and their genders, ages, time of admission, type of fall, wound areas, fractured bones, presence of comorbid disease, the department in which they were treated and their treatment status were examined retrospectively. The data obtained from this cross- sectional study were assessed with SPSS 15.0 program. Results: 230 (47,0% of the cases were men, while 259 (53,0% were women. The cases were mostly admitted in July (12.3%, on Sundays (15.7% and between 16.00 and 23.59 (46.6%. The most frequent place of fall was inside the house (43,3%. Internal organ injury was seen in 16,4% of the patients while bone fracture was seen in 53,2%. Most frequently fractured bone was the femur (41,5%. Conclusion: Injuries associated with falling due to the increase in old population creates an important social problem. Falling is not an inevitable result of old age. Preventing falls in old age will decrease the dependency about daily life activities, increase life quality and decrease health care costs.

  10. Appetite and falls: Old age and lived experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Mahler

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Falling among older adults is a well-known public health problem but the association between falling and appetite is seldom studied although poor nutritional status is accepted as a risk factor for falls. On this background the aim of this study was to understand how older adults, who have fallen several times within a year, related their experiences of appetite as a phenomenon in everyday life. In narrative in-depth interviews, eight women and four men contributed with their stories. Using interpretative phenomenology the thematic analysis resulted in three main themes: appetite for food; appetite for social relations and appetite for influence. Eating was not trivial everyday routine and required self-regimentation. Meals were not an object of desire, but of discipline out of the wish to survive. Feelings, reflections and ambivalence were bound to the lack of appetite on food. The participants were oriented towards the forbidden, the delicious and to everyday food as a strengthener and as medicine. In their dependency on help, home was the framework for establishing social relations as means of social support. As well as family and neighbours, the significant others were persons on whom the participants were dependent. Personal relationships and mutual dependencies may ensure social security in lives characterised by contingency and maintain influence in daily life. Falling is both a dramatic and a trivial incident where life and death could be at stake. From this perspective, connectedness was prominent in all fall stories. The quest for influence and a sense of social connectedness was the incentive to re-enter local community arenas and to express solidarity. In health-care practice multi-factorial fall-prevention should be complemented with a multi-dimensional approach in order to balance the medical approach with humanistic and societal approaches towards fall-prevention.

  11. Balance performance in older adults and its relationship with falling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalali, Mir Mohammad; Gerami, Hooshang; Heidarzadeh, Abtin; Soleimani, Robabeh

    2015-06-01

    A normal consequence of aging is a general deterioration in a number of musculoskeletal and sensory systems that affect postural control and balance. The aim of this study was to evaluate history of falls among active older individuals in Iran, and estimate the risk factors for falls among this population. A total of 448 active older subjects from rural region of Rasht city, Iran, were included. They were divided into three groups depending on their age: young-old (n = 266); middle-old (n = 154) and oldest-old (n = 28). We assessed balance performance by One-Leg Balance (OLB), Functional Reach (FR), Timed Up and Go (TUG) and Romberg tests. The fall rate (>2 in the last year) was 27.0 %. The cut-off point 13.75 s for TUG test showed 84.7 % sensitivity and 56 % specificity. Also the best cut-off point for OLB test was 12.7 s (63 % sensitivity and 83.5 % specificity). Logistic regression analysis revealed that age, BMI, diabetes, and failure in OLB, FR, and Romberg tests predicted fall risk. The decision tree classification of older individuals showed three categorical variables, which in their order of importance included diabetes, Romberg test, and OLB test. This study revealed the value of history taking about diabetes as a predictor for existing falling. Decision tree technique showed that Romberg and OLB tests help in identifying older adults with balance problems. Given the incidence and consequences of falls among older adults, large-scale prospective studies on older individuals to identify those prone to falls are warranted.

  12. Analysis of Public Datasets for Wearable Fall Detection Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casilari, Eduardo; Santoyo-Ramón, José-Antonio; Cano-García, José-Manuel

    2017-06-27

    Due to the boom of wireless handheld devices such as smartwatches and smartphones, wearable Fall Detection Systems (FDSs) have become a major focus of attention among the research community during the last years. The effectiveness of a wearable FDS must be contrasted against a wide variety of measurements obtained from inertial sensors during the occurrence of falls and Activities of Daily Living (ADLs). In this regard, the access to public databases constitutes the basis for an open and systematic assessment of fall detection techniques. This paper reviews and appraises twelve existing available data repositories containing measurements of ADLs and emulated falls envisaged for the evaluation of fall detection algorithms in wearable FDSs. The analysis of the found datasets is performed in a comprehensive way, taking into account the multiple factors involved in the definition of the testbeds deployed for the generation of the mobility samples. The study of the traces brings to light the lack of a common experimental benchmarking procedure and, consequently, the large heterogeneity of the datasets from a number of perspectives (length and number of samples, typology of the emulated falls and ADLs, characteristics of the test subjects, features and positions of the sensors, etc.). Concerning this, the statistical analysis of the samples reveals the impact of the sensor range on the reliability of the traces. In addition, the study evidences the importance of the selection of the ADLs and the need of categorizing the ADLs depending on the intensity of the movements in order to evaluate the capability of a certain detection algorithm to discriminate falls from ADLs.

  13. Analysis of Public Datasets for Wearable Fall Detection Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Casilari

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to the boom of wireless handheld devices such as smartwatches and smartphones, wearable Fall Detection Systems (FDSs have become a major focus of attention among the research community during the last years. The effectiveness of a wearable FDS must be contrasted against a wide variety of measurements obtained from inertial sensors during the occurrence of falls and Activities of Daily Living (ADLs. In this regard, the access to public databases constitutes the basis for an open and systematic assessment of fall detection techniques. This paper reviews and appraises twelve existing available data repositories containing measurements of ADLs and emulated falls envisaged for the evaluation of fall detection algorithms in wearable FDSs. The analysis of the found datasets is performed in a comprehensive way, taking into account the multiple factors involved in the definition of the testbeds deployed for the generation of the mobility samples. The study of the traces brings to light the lack of a common experimental benchmarking procedure and, consequently, the large heterogeneity of the datasets from a number of perspectives (length and number of samples, typology of the emulated falls and ADLs, characteristics of the test subjects, features and positions of the sensors, etc.. Concerning this, the statistical analysis of the samples reveals the impact of the sensor range on the reliability of the traces. In addition, the study evidences the importance of the selection of the ADLs and the need of categorizing the ADLs depending on the intensity of the movements in order to evaluate the capability of a certain detection algorithm to discriminate falls from ADLs.

  14. Safety Standards: Implementing Fall Prevention Interventions and Sustaining Lower Fall Rates by Promoting the Culture of Safety on an Inpatient Rehabilitation Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Rita Marie; Adams, Rachel Joy

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review a quality improvement project aimed to examine how nurse leaders in an inpatient rehabilitation (IPR) unit can reduce the number of patient falls by implementing multiple fall prevention interventions and sustain their results by promoting a strong culture of safety on the unit. A retrospective review of IPR fall rates was performed. Quarterly fall rates were then compared with implementation dates of fall prevention interventions (safety huddles, signage, and hourly rounding). Culture of safety scores were also examined to assess the effect of an enhanced culture of safety on the sustainability of lowered fall rates. The largest decrease in fall rate was noted after initial revitalization efforts of the IPR unit's culture of safety concurrently with hourly rounding. Fall rates rise and fall despite multiple fall prevention interventions and encouraging a positive shift in the culture of safety. Physical injuries following a fall can reduce mobility and increase morbidity. Costs associated with falls negatively impact costs and reimbursement. Employing evidence-based fall prevention strategies are then of critical importance to nurse leaders as falls remain an ongoing serious adverse event. © 2015 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

  15. Long-term surveillance plan for the Falls City Disposal Site, Falls City, Texas. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    The need for ground water monitoring at the Falls City disposal site was evaluated in accordance with NRC regulations and guidelines established by the DOE in Guidance for Implementing the Long-term Surveillance Program for UMTRA Project Title 1 Disposal Sites (DOE, 1996). Based on evaluation of site characterization data, it has been determined that a program to monitor ground water for demonstration of disposal cell performance based on a set of concentration limits is not appropriate because ground water in the uppermost aquifer is of limited use, and a narrative supplemental standard has been applied to the site that does not include numerical concentration limits or a point of compliance. The limited use designation is based on the fact that ground water in the uppermost aquifer is not currently or potentially a source of drinking water in the area because it contains widespread ambient contamination that cannot be cleaned up using methods reasonably employed by public water supply systems. Background ground water quality varies by orders of magnitude since the aquifer is in an area of redistribution of uranium mineralization derived from ore bodies. The DOE plans to perform post-closure ground water monitoring in the uppermost aquifer as a best management practice (BMP) as requested by the state of Texas.

  16. Fall Injuries in Nepal: A Countrywide Population-based Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shailvi; Gupta, Shyam Kumar; Devkota, Sagar; Ranjit, Anju; Swaroop, Mamta; Kushner, Adam L; Nwomeh, Benedict C; Victorino, Gregory P

    2015-01-01

    An estimated 424,000 fatal falls occur globally each year, making falls the second leading cause of unintentional injury-related deaths after road traffic injuries. More than 80% of fall-related fatalities occur in low- and middle-income countries. Data from low-income South Asian countries like Nepal are lacking, particularly at the population level. The aim of this study was to provide an estimate of fall-injury prevalence and the number of fall injury-related deaths countrywide in Nepal and to describe the epidemiology of fall injuries in Nepal at the community level. A countrywide cross-sectional study was performed in 15 of the 75 districts in Nepal using the Surgeons OverSeas Assessment of Surgical Need (SOSAS) survey tool. The SOSAS survey gathers data in 2 sections: demographic data, including the household's access to health care and recent deaths in the household, and assessment of a representative spectrum of surgical conditions, including injuries. Data was collected regarding an individuals' experience of injury including road traffic injuries, falls, penetrating trauma, and burns. Data included anatomic location, timing of injury, and whether health care was sought. If health care was not sought, the reason for barrier to care was included. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. Of 2695 individuals from 1350 households interviewed, 141 reported injuries secondary to falls (5.2%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.4%-6.1%), with a mean age of 30.7 years; 58% were male. Falls represented 37.2% of total injuries (n = 379) reported (95% CI, 32.3%-42.3%). Twelve individuals who suffered from a fall injury were unable to access surgical care (8.5%; 95% CI, 4.5%-14.4%). Reasons for barrier to care included no money for health care (n = 3), facility/personnel not available (n = 7), and fear/no trust (n = 2). Of the 80 recent deaths reported, 7 were due to fall injury (8.8%; 95% CI, 3.6%-17.2%), and patients had a mean age of 46 years (SD 22

  17. Validity of the “Fall Back” Test for Boldness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saša Veličković

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Synonyms for the word boldness include courage, fearlessness, heroism and bravery. The best examples of courage in sport are athletes who, despite difficult situations, conditions and strong competition, perform very risky elements, break records, etc. The “Fall back” measurement instrument has been used in the selection process for artistic gymnastics. Bearing in mind that this test requires a drop back down an inclined plane, it requires a degree of courage in the realization of this motor task. The aim of this research is to determine the validity of the “fall back” test and to answer the question: Is the “Fall back” test actually a measure of courage among beginners in the sport? In this study, the research sample consisted of 16 boys and 33 girls, third graders from the Jovan Cvijic elementary school in Kostolac, aged nine years (+/- 6 months. The sample of variables represented the results written using two measurement instruments: 1. Psychological survey -test of boldness and courage–PSBC (a test modeled after the–Erikson`s theory of Psyhosocial Development test–About.com Psyhology; 2. Situational motor measuring instrument–Fall back–MFIB. The resulting measurements were analyzed by the appropriate statistical methods, which are congruent with the set objective and task ofthe study. The validity of the “Fall back” situational-motor test is determined by calculating the coefficient of correlation (r between said composite test and a psychological test of courage. The very high coefficients of correlation that resulted in all three cases (total sample r = .846, sample of boys r = .873, a sample of girls r = .845 indicate a high validity level for the test, “Fall back”, that is, the subject of measurement in the test, largely corresponds with the subject of measurement in the PSBC psychological test. The height of the correlation coefficient also justifies the use of the “Fall back” test as a composite test

  18. Yale FICSIT: risk factor abatement strategy for fall prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinetti, M E; Baker, D I; Garrett, P A; Gottschalk, M; Koch, M L; Horwitz, R I

    1993-03-01

    Based on finding a strong association between number of impairments and risk of falling in earlier studies, Yale FICSIT investigators are conducting an intervention trial comparing the effectiveness of usual care plus social visits (SV) and a targeted risk abatement intervention (TI) strategy in reducing falls among at risk community elderly persons. Subjects include members of a participating HMO who are > or = 70 years of age, cognitively intact, not terminally ill, not too physically active, and possess at least one fall risk factor. The targeted risk factors include postural hypotension; sedative use; at least four targeted medications; upper and lower extremity strength and range of motion impairments; foot problems; and balance, gait, and transfer dysfunctions. The interventions include medication adjustments, behavioral change recommendations, education and training, and home-based exercise regimens targeting the identified risk factors. The interventions are carried out by the study nurse practitioner and physical therapist in TI subjects' homes. The SV subjects receive a comparable number of home visits as the TI subjects during which a structured life review is performed by social work students. The primary outcome is occurrence of falls during the 12-month followup. Secondary outcomes include change in mobility performance and fall-related efficacy.

  19. Fall Protection Characteristics of Safety Belts and Human Impact Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hino, Yasumichi; Ohdo, Katsutoshi; Takahashi, Hiroki

    2014-08-23

    Many fatal accidents due to falls from heights have occurred at construction sites not only in Japan but also in other countries. This study aims to determine the fall prevention performance of two types of safety belts: a body belt1), which has been used for more than 40 yr in the Japanese construction industry as a general type of safety equipment for fall accident prevention, and a full harness2, 3), which has been used in many other countries. To determine human tolerance for impact trauma, this study discusses features of safety belts with reference4-9) to relevant studies in the medical science, automobile crash safety, and aircrew safety. For this purpose, simple drop tests were carried out in a virtual workplace to measure impact load, head acceleration, and posture in the experiments, the Hybrid-III pedestrian model10) was used as a human dummy. Hybrid-III is typically employed in official automobile crash tests (New Car Assessment Program: NCAP) and is currently recognized as a model that faithfully reproduces dynamic responses. Experimental results shows that safety performance strongly depends on both the variety of safety belts used and the shock absorbers attached onto lanyards. These findings indicate that fall prevention equipment, such as safety belts, lanyards, and shock absorbers, must be improved to reduce impact injuries to the human head and body during falls.

  20. Transcultural adaptation of the Johns Hopkins Fall Risk Assessment Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Maria Carmen; Iwamoto, Viviane Ernesto; Latorre, Maria do Rosário Dias de Oliveira; Noronha, Adriana Moreira; Oliveira, Ana Paula de Sousa; Cardoso, Carlos Eduardo Alves; Marques, Ifigenia Augusta Braga; Vendramim, Patrícia; Lopes, Paula Cristina; de Sant'Ana, Thais Helena Saes

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to perform the transcultural adaptation and content validity analysis of the Johns Hopkins Fall Risk Assessment Tool to assess both fall risk and fall-related injury risk for hospitalized elderly in Brazil. Method: the transcultural adaptation consisted of translating the scale to Portuguese (Brazil), back-translating it into its language of origin, establishing a consensus version, and having an expert committee verify its transcultural equivalence. Content assessment was conducted by a committee of judges, ending with the calculation of the items and scales' content validity index. Nurses tested the tool. Results: the scale's translated version went through two evaluation rounds by the judges, based on which, the items with unsatisfactory performance were changed. The content validity index for the items was ≥80.0% and the global index 97.1%. The experimental application showed the scale is user-friendly. Conclusion: the scale presents valid content for the assessment of fall risk and risk of fall-related injuries and is easy to use, with the potential to contribute to the proper identification of risks and the establishment of care actions. PMID:27579936

  1. Relationship between vitamin D, osteoporotic fracture and falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candel Romero, Carmen; Forner Cordero, Ángeles; Sánchez Santos, José Cristóbal; Pereiró Berenguer, Inmaculada

    2017-11-22

    Link low levels of vitamin D, osteoporotic fracture and falls. Transversal observational study with the study variables of age, levels of vitamin D, osteoporotic fracture and falls. The study population was patients evaluated by the Rehabilitation Department, Hospital of Sagunto, from January 2013 to December 2014. Of the 242 patients who underwent vitamin D analysis, 70.6% showed levels under 30ng/ml. Forty-eight percent of the patients with below normal levels of vitamin D suffered a fracture, opposed to 32.4% patients with normal levels. Thus, controlling by age, patients with low levels of vitamin D are 4.8 times more likely to suffer a fracture than those with normal levels. Regarding falls, controlling by age, there is a higher risk of falling (adjusted OR 2.68) in those patients with low levels of vitamin D. Patients with low vitamin D levels are more likely to suffer falls and fractures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Fall protection characteristics of safety belts and human impact tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hino, Yasumichi; Ohdo, Katsutoshi; Takahashi, Hiroki

    2014-01-01

    Many fatal accidents due to falls from heights have occurred at construction sites not only in Japan but also in other countries. This study aims to determine the fall prevention performance of two types of safety belts: a body belt, which has been used for more than 40 yr in the Japanese construction industry as a general type of safety equipment for fall accident prevention, and a full harness, which has been used in many other countries. To determine human tolerance for impact trauma, this study discusses features of safety belts with reference to relevant studies in the medical science, automobile crash safety, and aircrew safety. For this purpose, simple drop tests were carried out in a virtual workplace to measure impact load, head acceleration, and posture in the experiments, the Hybrid-III pedestrian model was used as a human dummy. Hybrid-III is typically employed in official automobile crash tests (New Car Assessment Program: NCAP) and is currently recognized as a model that faithfully reproduces dynamic responses. Experimental results shows that safety performance strongly depends on both the variety of safety belts used and the shock absorbers attached onto lanyards. These findings indicate that fall prevention equipment, such as safety belts, lanyards, and shock absorbers, must be improved to reduce impact injuries to the human head and body during falls.

  3. Terminal velocity of a shuttlecock in vertical fall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peastrel, Mark; Lynch, Rosemary; Armenti, Angelo

    1980-07-01

    We have performed a straightforward vertical fall experiment for a case where the effects of air resistance are important and directly measurable. Using a commonly available badminton shuttlecock, a tape measure, and a millisecond timer, the times required for the shuttlecock to fall given distances (up to almost ten meters) were accurately measured. The experiment was performed in an open stairwell. The experimental data was compared to the predictions of several models. The best fit was obtained with the model which assumes a resistive force quadratic in the instantaneous speed of the falling object. This model was fitted to the experimental data enabling us to predict the terminal velocity of the shuttlecock (6.80 m/sec). The results indicate that, starting from rest, the vertically falling shuttlecock achieves 99% of its terminal velocity in 1.84 sec, after falling 9.2 m. The relative ease in collecting the data, as well as the excellent agreement with theory, make this an ideal experiment for use in physics courses at a variety of levels.

  4. Defying gravity and fear: the prevention of falls in community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, S L

    1999-09-01

    In older adults, falls represent a very common and dangerous problem. Older adults lack the normal overlap or redundancy of cognitive, sensory, and musculoskeletal mechanisms that help younger people avoid falling while remaining active. Many of the risk factors for falls in older adults are modifiable and deserve aggressive attention. Successful prevention of falls, fall-related injuries, and fear of falling is complicated by the multifactorial nature of the problem. Advanced practice nurses' comprehensive health assessment skills, holistic orientation, and willingness to collaborate with healthcare providers from a range of disciplines are helpful in dealing with the complexity of balance problems and falls. Nurse practitioners can be effective case managers for older adults at risk for falling. Older adults need accurate information, and sometimes counseling, to realize that falls, fall-related injuries, and fear of falls are warning signs that can provide direction and motivation for change and prevention.

  5. Modeling of falling snow properties for snowpack models: towards a better link between falling snow and snow on the ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vionnet, Vincent; Milbrandt, Jason; Yamaguchi, Satoru; Morrison, Hugh

    2017-04-01

    Falling snow is made of different types of solid hydrometeors including single ice crystals, aggregates at different riming stages and graupel. This variability results from complex in-cloud processes (deposition, riming and aggregation) and sub-cloud processes (melting and sublimation). It has consequences for the properties of fresh fallen snow accumulating on the ground including density and specific surface area (SSA). These properties strongly affect the evolution of snow on the ground by modifying for example the albedo and the thermal conductivity. Detailed snowpack models such as Crocus or SNOWPACK use near-surface wind speed, air temperature and humidity to compute the density and SSA of falling snow. The shape, size and degree of riming of falling solid hydrometeors are not directly taken into account, which limit the accurate determination of properties of fresh fallen snow. An alternative is offered by new bulk cloud microphysics schemes implemented in numerical weather prediction system that can be used to drive snowpack model. In particular, the scheme P3 (Predicted Particle Properties) proposes an innovative representation of all ice-phase particles by predicting several physical properties (e.g. size, rime fraction, rime density …). In this study, we first theoretically analyze the strengths and limitations of P3 to represent the density and SSA of falling snow. Parameterizations are then proposed to derive density and SSA from P3 output. Finally, P3 implemented in the Canadian Global Environmental Multiscale (GEM) weather prediction model is used to simulate snowfall events observed at the Falling Snow Observatory (Nagoaka, Japan). Model predictions are compared with (i) observations of the type of falling snow particles derived from disdrometer data and (ii) manual measurements of fresh fallen snow density and SSA. This study is a first step towards the development of a more integrated approach between falling snow and snow on the ground.

  6. Volcanic Ash fall Impact on Vegetation, Colima 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, M. G.; Martin, A.; Fonseca, R.; Nieto, A.; Radillo, R.; Armienta, M.

    2007-05-01

    An ash sampling network was established arround Colima Volcano in 2005. Ash fall was sampled on the North, Northeast, East, Southeast, South, Southwest and West of the volcano. Samples were analyzed for ash components, geochemistry and leachates. Ash fall ocurred on April (12), May (10, 23), June (2, 6, 9, 10, 12, 14), July (27), September (27), October (23) and November (24). Most of the ash is made of andesitic dome-lithics but shows diferences in crystal, juvenile material and lithic content. In May, some samples contained grey and dark pumice (scoria). Texture varies from phi >4 to phi 0. Leachate concentration were low: SO4 (7.33-54.19) Cl- (2.29-4.97) and F- (0.16-0.37). During 2005, Colima Volcano's ash fall rotted some of the guava and peach fruits and had a drying effect on spearment and epazote plants. Even these small ash amounts could have hindered sugar cane and agave growth.

  7. Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project, 2001 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terra-Burns, Mary (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group, Boise, ID)

    2002-02-11

    The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group was actively engaged in implementing wildlife mitigation activities in 2001. The Work Group met quarterly to discuss management and budget issues affecting the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Program. Work Group members protected 851 acres of wetland habitat in 2001. Wildlife habitat protected to date for the Albeni Falls project is approximately 5,248.31 acres ({approx}4,037.48 Habitat Units). Approximately 14% of the total wildlife habitat lost has been mitigated. Administrative activities increased as funding was more evenly distributed among Work Group members and protection opportunities became more time consuming. In 2001, Work Group members focused on development and implementation of the monitoring and evaluation program as well as completion of site-specific management plans. With the implementation of the monitoring and evaluation program, and as management plans are reviewed and executed, on the ground management activities are expected to increase in 2002.

  8. Rock fall dynamics and deposition: an integrated analysis of the 2009 Ahwiyah Point rock fall, Yosemite National Park, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valerie L. Zimmer,; Collins, Brian; Greg M. Stock,; Nicholas Sitar,

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed a combination of airborne and terrestrial LiDAR, high-resolution photography, seismic, and acoustic data in order to gain insights into the initiation, dynamics, and talus deposition of a complex rock fall. A large (46 700 m3) rock fall originated from near Ahwiyah Point in eastern Yosemite Valley and fell a total of 730 m to the valley floor on 28 March 2009. Analyses of remote sensing, seismic, and acoustic data were integrated to reconstruct the rock fall, which consisted of (1) the triggering of a 25 400 m3 rock block in an area of intersecting and sometimes highly weathered joint planes, (2) the sliding and subsequent ballistic trajectory of the block from a steeply dipping ledge, (3) dislodging of additional rock from the cliff surface from beneath the rock fall source area, (4) a mid-cliff ledge impact that detached a volume of rock nearly equivalent in volume to the initial block, (5) sliding of the deteriorating rock mass down the remainder of the cliff, and (6) final impact at the base of the cliff that remobilized the existing talus downward and outward and produced an airblast that knocked down hundreds of trees. The depositional geomorphology indicates that the porosity of the fresh talus is significantly lower than that expected for typical blocky talus slopes, likely because the rock debris from this event was pulverized into smaller, more poorly sorted fragments and densified via dynamic compaction when compared to less energetic, fragmental-type rock falls. These results suggest that accumulation of individual rock-fall boulders tends to steepen talus slopes, whereas large, energetic rock falls tend to flatten them. Detachment and impact signals were recorded by seismic and acoustic instruments and highlight the potential use of this type of instrumentation for generalized rock fall monitoring, while LiDAR and photography data were able to quantify the cliff geometry, rock fall volume, source and impact locations, and

  9. An interdisciplinary intervention to prevent falls in community-dwelling elderly persons: protocol of a cluster-randomized trial [PreFalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schuster Tibor

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prevention of falls in the elderly is a public health target in many countries around the world. While a large number of trials have investigated the effectiveness of fall prevention programs, few focussed on interventions embedded in the general practice setting and its related network. In the Prevent Falls (PreFalls trial we aim to investigate the effectiveness of a pre-tested multi-modal intervention compared to usual care in this setting. Methods/Design PreFalls is a controlled multicenter prospective study with cluster-randomized allocation of about 40 general practices to an experimental or a control group. We aim to include 382 community dwelling persons aged 65 and older with an increased risk of falling. All participating general practitioners are trained to systematically assess the risk of falls using a set of validated tests. Patients from intervention practices are invited to participate in a 16-weeks exercise program with focus on fall prevention delivered by specifically trained local physiotherapists. Patients from practices allocated to the control group receive usual care. Main outcome measure is the number of falls per individual in the first 12 months (analysis by negative binomial regression. Secondary outcomes include falls in the second year, the proportion of participants falling in the first and the second year, falls associated with injury, risk of falls, fear of falling, physical activity and quality of life. Discussion Reducing falls in the elderly remains a major challenge. We believe that with its strong focus on a both systematic and realistic fall prevention strategy adapted to primary care setting PreFalls will be a valuable addition to the scientific literature in the field. Trial registration NCT01032252

  10. Weather warnings predict fall-related injuries among older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondor, Luke; Charland, Katia; Verma, Aman; Buckeridge, David L

    2015-05-01

    weather predictions are a useful tool for informing public health planning and prevention strategies for non-injury health outcomes, but the association between winter weather warnings and fall-related injuries has not been assessed previously. to examine the association between fall-related injuries among older adults and government-issued winter weather warnings. using a dynamic cohort of individuals ≥65 years of age who lived in Montreal between 1998 and 2006, we identified all fall-related injuries from administrative data using a validated set of diagnostic and procedure codes. We compared rates of injuries on days with freezing rain or snowstorm warnings to rates observed on days without warnings. We also compared the incidence of injuries on winter days to non-winter days. All analyses were performed overall and stratified by age and sex. freezing rain alerts were associated with an increase in fall-related injuries (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 1.20, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.08-1.32), particularly among males (IRR = 1.31, 95% CI: 1.10-1.56), and lower rates of injuries were associated with snowstorm alerts (IRR = 0.89, 95% CI: 0.80-0.99). The rate of fall-related injuries did not differ seasonally (IRR = 1.00, 95% CI: 0.97-1.03). official weather warnings are predictive of increases in fall-related injuries among older adults. Public health agencies should consider using these warnings to trigger initiation of injury prevention strategies in advance of inclement weather. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Falls and postural control in older adults with cataracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nodehi Moghadam, Afsun; Goudarzian, Maryam; Azadi, Farhad; Hosseini, Seide Masume; Mosallanezhad, Zahra; Karimi, Nouraddin; Larne, Yassin; Habibi, Maryam; Yaghmaei, Poorya

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that visual impairment contribute to falling. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of vision impairment of old adult patients with cataract on the occurrence of falls and postural control. According to the results of screening ophthalmic examination, 48 cataract patients (mean±SD aged 68.5 ± 6.08 yrs.) and 50 individuals without any obvious eye disorders (mean age ± SD 70.7 ± 5.97 yrs.) were enrolled in this study. The postural control was determined using the clinical test of Sensory Interaction and Balance (CTSIB) and Timed up and Go (TUG) test. The results of this study revealed that 18% (n = 9) of the normal individuals and 22.9% (n =11) of the cataract patients had at least two falls in the past 12 months. However, the result of chisquare test did not show any differences between the two groups (p= 0.36). The mean ± SD TUG times in cataract and control groups in our study were15.17 ± 3.58 and13.77 ± 4.90, respectively. However, no significant differences were found between the two groups (p= 0.12).The results of CTSIB test showed no significant differences between the two groups on standing on the floor with eyes open and eyes closed (p= 0.61, p= 0.89) and on standing on the foam with eyes open and eyes closed (p= 0.32, p= 0.74 ). According to the results of CTSIB and TUG tests, vision impairment of old adult patients with cataract is not associated with falls and balance disorders. Further work including assessment of postural control with advanced devices and considering other falls risk factors are also required to identify predictors of falls in cataract patients.

  12. [Effects of community-based comprehensive fall prevention program on muscle strength, postural balance and fall efficacy in elderly people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jeongyee; Cho, Seong Il

    2014-12-01

    The purposes of this study was to develop a comprehensive community-based fall prevention program and to test the effects of the program on the muscle strength, postural balance and fall efficacy for elderly people. The design of this study was a nonequivalent control group pretest-posttest design. There were 28 participants in the experimental group and 29 in the control group. The program consisted of balance exercises, elastic resistance exercises and prevention education. The program was provided five times a week for 8 weeks and each session lasted 90 minutes. Data were analyzed using χ²-test, independent t-test and paired t-test using the SPSS program. Muscle strength of the lower extremities, postural balance and fall efficacy scores significantly improved in the experimental group compared to the control group. These results suggest that this program can improve lower extremity muscle strength, postural balance and fall efficacy in elders. Therefore, this program is recommended for use in fall prevention programs for elders living in the community.

  13. Genome-Wide Identification of Different Dormant Medicago sativa L. MicroRNAs in Response to Fall Dormancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Hongqi; Sun, Xiaoge; Shi, Yinghua; Wang, Chengzhang

    2014-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of regulatory small RNAs (sRNAs) that regulate gene post-transcriptional expression in plants and animals. High-throughput sequencing technology is capable of identifying small RNAs in plant species. Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is one of the most widely cultivated perennial forage legumes worldwide, and fall dormancy is an adaptive characteristic related to the biomass production and winter survival in alfalfa. Here, we applied high-throughput sRNA sequencing to identify some miRNAs that were responsive to fall dormancy in standard variety (Maverick and CUF101) of alfalfa. Results Four sRNA libraries were generated and sequenced from alfalfa leaves in two typical varieties at distinct seasons. Through integrative analysis, we identified 51 novel miRNA candidates of 206 families. Additionally, we identified 28 miRNAs associated with fall dormancy in standard variety (Maverick and CUF101), including 20 known miRNAs and eight novel miRNAs. Both high-throughput sequencing and RT-qPCR confirmed that eight known miRNA members were up-regulated and six known miRNA members were down-regulated in response to fall dormancy in standard variety (Maverick and CUF101). Among the 51 novel miRNA candidates, five miRNAs were up-regulated and three miRNAs were down-regulated in response to fall dormancy in standard variety (Maverick and CUF101), and five of them were confirmed by Northern blot analysis. Conclusion We identified 20 known miRNAs and eight new miRNA candidates that were responsive to fall dormancy in standard variety (Maverick and CUF101) by high-throughput sequencing of small RNAs from Medicago sativa. Our data provide a useful resource for investigating miRNA-mediated regulatory mechanisms of fall dormancy in alfalfa, and these findings are important for our understanding of the roles played by miRNAs in the response of plants to abiotic stress in general and fall dormancy in alfalfa. PMID:25473944

  14. Genome-wide identification of different dormant Medicago sativa L. MicroRNAs in response to fall dormancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wenna; Zhang, Senhao; Du, Hongqi; Sun, Xiaoge; Shi, Yinghua; Wang, Chengzhang

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of regulatory small RNAs (sRNAs) that regulate gene post-transcriptional expression in plants and animals. High-throughput sequencing technology is capable of identifying small RNAs in plant species. Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is one of the most widely cultivated perennial forage legumes worldwide, and fall dormancy is an adaptive characteristic related to the biomass production and winter survival in alfalfa. Here, we applied high-throughput sRNA sequencing to identify some miRNAs that were responsive to fall dormancy in standard variety (Maverick and CUF101) of alfalfa. Four sRNA libraries were generated and sequenced from alfalfa leaves in two typical varieties at distinct seasons. Through integrative analysis, we identified 51 novel miRNA candidates of 206 families. Additionally, we identified 28 miRNAs associated with fall dormancy in standard variety (Maverick and CUF101), including 20 known miRNAs and eight novel miRNAs. Both high-throughput sequencing and RT-qPCR confirmed that eight known miRNA members were up-regulated and six known miRNA members were down-regulated in response to fall dormancy in standard variety (Maverick and CUF101). Among the 51 novel miRNA candidates, five miRNAs were up-regulated and three miRNAs were down-regulated in response to fall dormancy in standard variety (Maverick and CUF101), and five of them were confirmed by Northern blot analysis. We identified 20 known miRNAs and eight new miRNA candidates that were responsive to fall dormancy in standard variety (Maverick and CUF101) by high-throughput sequencing of small RNAs from Medicago sativa. Our data provide a useful resource for investigating miRNA-mediated regulatory mechanisms of fall dormancy in alfalfa, and these findings are important for our understanding of the roles played by miRNAs in the response of plants to abiotic stress in general and fall dormancy in alfalfa.

  15. Youth Attitude Tracking Study. Volume 2. Fall 1976.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    youth as coming from rela- tively modest socio-economic backgrounds. Periods of high unemployment affect the less-educated, less-skilled, and less...FRD-fl143 187 YOUTH ATTITUDE TRACKING STUDY VOLUME 2 FALL 1976(U) 1/2 MARKET FACTS INC CHICAGO IL J T HEISLER JAN 76 H390 UNCLASSIFIED ___ F/G 5/9 NL...PRACTS ag e 8 Analytic Comment. I MARKET FAOTS YOUTH ATTITUDE TRACKING STUDY -. FALL 1976 e4.? .2 L A Report Prepared for: . The Department of Defense p’V

  16. Conceptual model of the Klamath Falls, Oregon geothermal area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prucha, R.H.; Benson, S.M.; Witherspoon, P.A.

    1987-01-01

    Over the last 50 years significant amounts of data have been obtained from the Klamath Falls geothermal resource. To date, the complexity of the system has stymied researchers, leading to the development of only very generalized hydrogeologic and geothermal models of the area. Recently, the large quantity of available temperature data have been re-evaluated, revealing new information on subsurface heat flow and locations of faults in the system. These inferences are supported by borehole, geochemical, geophysical, and hydrologic data. Based on re-evaluation of all available data, a detailed conceptual model for the Klamath Falls geothermal resource is proposed.

  17. Optimization of fall height setting for drop weight tested polypropylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hylova Lenka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study deals with polypropylene (PP which was subjected the drop-weight test. PP is a semicrystalline thermoplastic polymer which is commonly used in many indoor applications and also in the automotive industry in the car interiors. The injection moulded PP samples were subjected the penetration test at different fall heights and the results were subsequently evaluated and discussed. It was found out that the fall heights from 100 to 230 J are suitable for PP penetration, but the optimal one is 100 J. Higher heights are not needed because of increasing power consumption of the test device.

  18. Stepping to stability and fall prevention in adult psychiatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emory, Sara L; Silva, Susan G; Christopher, Eric J; Edwards, Pamela B; Wahl, Leanne E

    2011-12-01

    Fall prevention is a major area of concern in inpatient settings. This article reports on the feasibility of implementing a daily exercise program that features line dancing to promote stability, balance, and flexibility in adult psychiatric patients and describes the impact of that program. Six hundred sixty-five patient charts drawn from before and after the practice change were reviewed. The fall rate after the introduction of line dancing was 2.8% compared with 3.2% before implementation. In a setting that treats both men and women of many ages and with varying levels of mobility, line dancing offers a viable approach to exercise in a secure setting.

  19. Motion transitions of falling plates via quasisteady aerodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ruifeng; Wang, Lifeng

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we study the dynamics of freely falling plates based on the Kirchhoff equation and the quasisteady aerodynamic model. Motion transitions among fluttering, tumbling along a cusp-like trajectory, irregular, and tumbling along a straight trajectory are obtained by solving the dynamical equations. Phase diagrams spanning between the nondimensional moment of inertia and aerodynamic coefficients or aspect ratio are built to identify regimes for these falling styles. We also investigate the stability of fixed points and bifurcation scenarios. It is found that the transitions are all heteroclinic bifurcations and the influence of the fixed-point stability is local.

  20. Relationship between location and activity in injurious falls: an exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendriks Marike RC

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge about the circumstances under which injurious falls occur could provide healthcare workers with better tools to prevent falls and fall-related injuries. Therefore, we assessed whether older persons who sustain an injurious fall can be classified into specific fall types, based on a combination of fall location and activity up to the moment of the fall. In addition, we assessed whether specific injurious fall types are related to causes of the fall, consequences of the fall, socio-demographic characteristics, and health-related characteristics. Methods An exploratory, cross-sectional study design was used to identify injurious fall types. The study population comprised 333 community-dwelling Dutch elderly people aged 65 years or over who attended an accident and emergency department after a fall. All participants received a self-administered questionnaire after being discharged home. The questionnaire comprised items concerning circumstances of the injurious fall, causes of the fall, consequences of the fall, socio-demographic characteristics and health-related characteristics. Injurious fall types were distinguished by analyzing data by means of HOMALS (homogeneity analysis by means of alternating least squares. Results We identified 4 injurious fall types: 1 Indoor falls related to lavatory visits (hall and bathroom; 2 Indoor falls during other activities of daily living; 3 Outdoor falls near the home during instrumental activities of daily living; 4 Outdoor falls away from home, occurring during walking, cycling, and shopping for groceries. These injurious fall types were significantly related to age, cause of the fall, activity avoidance and daily functioning. Conclusion The face validity of the injurious fall typology is obvious. However, we found no relationship between the injurious fall types and severity of the consequences of the fall. Nevertheless, there appears to be a difference between the prevalence of

  1. Factors related to the high fall rate in long-term care residents with dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kosse, Nienke M.; de Groot, Maartje H.; Vuillerme, Nicolas; Hortobagyi, Tibor; Lamoth, Claudine J. C.

    Background: Falls in long-term care residents with dementia represent a costly but unresolved safety issue. The aim of the present study was to (1) determine the incidence of falls, fall-related injuries and fall circumstances, and (2) identify the relationship between patient characteristics and

  2. Fall detection in walking robots by multi-way principal component analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karssen, J.G.; Wisse, M.

    2008-01-01

    Large disturbances can cause a biped to fall. If an upcoming fall can be detected, damage can be minimized or the fall can be prevented. We introduce the multi-way principal component analysis (MPCA) method for the detection of upcoming falls. We study the detection capability of the MPCA method in

  3. Taking a Whipper--The Fall-Factor Concept in Rock Climbing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Dan

    2005-01-01

    Most serious rock climbers are familiar with a counter-intuitive fact about their sport: The force experienced by a falling climber due to the rope as it arrests his fall does not depend simply on the length of the fall, but rather on a ratio called the fall-factor. This article explains, using elementary physics and simple differential equations,…

  4. Risks, consequences, and prevention of falls of older people in oral healthcare centers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baat, C. de; Baat, P. de; Gerritsen, A.E.; Flohil, K.A.; Putten, G.J. van der; Maarel-Wierink, C.D. van der

    2017-01-01

    One-third of community-dwelling people older than 65 years of age fall each year, and half of them fall at least twice a year. Older care home residents are approximately three times more likely to fall when compared to community-dwelling older people. Risk indicators for falls are related to the

  5. Taking Steps to Prevent Falls (A Cup of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-09-22

    For older adults, falls can mean serious injury, loss of independence, or even death. Certain changes associated with aging increase the risk for falls, but falls can be prevented. In this podcast, Elizabeth Burns discusses falls among older adults and ways to prevent them.  Created: 9/22/2016 by MMWR.   Date Released: 9/22/2016.

  6. Evaluation of a Nurse-Led Fall Prevention Education Program in Turkish Nursing Home Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uymaz, Pelin E.; Nahcivan, Nursen O.

    2016-01-01

    Falls are a major cause of morbidity and mortality among the elderly living in nursing homes. There is a need to implement and evaluate fall prevention programs in nursing homes to reduce the number of falls. The purpose of this research was to examine the effect of a nurse-led fall prevention education program in a sample of nursing home…

  7. Fall Injuries and Related Factors of Elderly Patients at a Medical Center in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Yun Tsai

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: Fall injuries have a negative and serious impact on elderly patients to their health condition and quality of life. Nursing staff need to instruct fall prevention measures at an early stage of elderly patient hospitalization. This study should provide a reference for nursing staff in assessing fall risks and reducing resultant falls and injuries among elderly patients.

  8. The Effectiveness of a Participatory Program on Fall Prevention in Oncology Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li-Chi; Ma, Wei-Fen; Li, Tsai-Chung; Liang, Yia-Wun; Tsai, Li-Yun; Chang, Fy-Uan

    2015-01-01

    Falls are known to be one of the most common in patient adverse events. A high incidence of falls was reported on patients with cancer. The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of a participatory program on patient's knowledge and self-efficacy of fall prevention and fall incidence in an oncology ward. In this quasi-experimental study,…

  9. Frequency and circumstances of falls in people with inclusion body myositis: a questionnaire survey to explore falls management and physiotherapy provision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiscock, A; Dewar, L; Parton, M; Machado, P; Hanna, M; Ramdharry, G

    2014-03-01

    To survey the incidence and circumstances of falls for people with inclusion body myositis (IBM) in the UK, and to investigate the provision of physiotherapy and falls management. Postal questionnaire survey. Participants completed questionnaires at home. Ninety-four people diagnosed with IBM were screened against the inclusion criteria. Seventy-two potential participants were sent a questionnaire, and 62 were completed and returned. Invited participants were sent an adapted Falls Event Questionnaire pertaining to falls, perceived causes of falls and the provision of physiotherapy. Questionnaires were returned anonymously. The proportions of respondents who reported a fall or a near fall, along with the frequencies of falls and near falls were calculated. Descriptive data of falls were collected pertaining to location and cause. Data analysis was performed to investigate provision of physiotherapy services. The response rate was 86% [62/72, mean (standard deviation) age 68 (8) years]. Falls were reported by 98% (61/62) of respondents, with 60% (37/62) falling frequently. In this study, age was not found to be an indicator of falls risk or frequency. Twenty-one percent (13/62) of respondents had not seen a physiotherapist in relation to their IBM symptoms, and of those that had, 31% (15/49) had not seen a physiotherapist until more than 12 months after IBM was diagnosed. Only 18% (11/61) of fallers reported that they had received falls management input. Falls are a common occurrence for people with IBM, independent of age and years since symptoms first presented, and are poorly addressed by appropriate physiotherapy management. National falls guidelines are not being followed, and referral rates to physiotherapy need to improve. Copyright © 2013 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Validation of Evidence-Based Fall Prevention Programs for Adults with Intellectual and/or Developmental Disorders (FallPAIDD): A Modified Otago Exercise Program

    OpenAIRE

    Mindy Renfro; Donna Bernhardt Bainbridge; Matthew Lee Smith; Matthew Lee Smith

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Evidence-based fall prevention (EBFP) programs significantly decrease fall risk, falls, and fall-related injuries in community-dwelling older adults. To date, EBFP programs are only validated for use among people with normal cognition and, therefore, are not evidence-based for adults with intellectual and/or developmental disorders (IDD) such as Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias (ADRD), cerebral vascular accident (CVA), or traumatic brain injury (TBI). BACKGROUND: Adults...

  11. The "Aachen fall prevention App" - a Smartphone application app for the self-assessment of elderly patients at risk for ground level falls

    OpenAIRE

    Rasche, Peter Wilhelm Victor; Mertens, Alexander Wilhelm; Bröhl, Christina; Theis, Sabine; Seinsch, Tobias; Wille, Matthias; Pape, Hans-Christoph; Knobe, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Background Fall incidents are a major problem for patients and healthcare. The ?Aachen Fall Prevention App? (AFPA) represents the first mobile Health (mHealth) application (app) empowering older patients (persons 50+ years) to self-assess and monitor their individual fall risk. Self-assessment is based on the ?Aachen Fall Prevention Scale,? which consists of three steps. First, patients answer ten standardized yes?no questions (positive criterion???5 ?Yes? responses). Second, a ten-second tes...

  12. Investigating the hydrological origins of Blood Falls - geomicrobiological insights into a briny subglacial Antarctic aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikucki, J.; Tulaczyk, S. M.; Purcell, A. M.; Dachwald, B.; Lyons, W. B.; Welch, K. A.; Auken, E.; Dugan, H. A.; Walter, J. I.; Pettit, E. C.; Doran, P. T.; Virginia, R. A.; Schamper, C.; Foley, N.; Feldmann, M.; Espe, C.; Ghosh, D.; Francke, G.

    2015-12-01

    Subglacial waters tend to accumulate solutes from extensive rock-water interactions, which, when released to the surface, can provide nutrients to surface ecosystems providing a 'hot spot' for microbial communities. Blood Falls, an iron-rich, saline feature at the terminus of Taylor Glacier in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica is a well-studied subglacial discharge. Here we present an overview of geophysical surveys, thermomechanical drilling exploration and geomicrobiological analyses of the Blood Falls system. A helicopter-borne transient electromagnetic system (SkyTEM) flown over the Taylor Glacier revealed a surprisingly extensive subglacial aquifer and indicates that Blood Falls may be the only surface manifestation of this extensive briny groundwater. Ground-based temperature sensing and GPR data combined with the helicopter-borne TEM data enabled targeted drilling into the englacial conduit that delivers brine to the surface. During the 2014-15 austral summer field season, we used a novel ice-melting drill (the IceMole) to collect englacial brine for geomicrobiological analyses. Results from previously collected outflow and more recent samples indicate that the brine harbors a metabolically active microbial community that persists, despite cold, dark isolation. Isotope geochemistry and molecular analysis of functional genes from BF suggested that a catalytic or 'cryptic' sulfur cycle was linked to iron reduction. Recent metagenomic analysis confirms the presence of numerous genes involved in oxidative and reductive sulfur transformations. Metagenomic and metabolic activity data also indicate that subglacial dark CO2 fixation occurs via various pathways. Genes encoding key steps in CO2 fixation pathways including the Calvin Benson Basham and Wood Ljungdahl pathway were present and brine samples showed measureable uptake of 14C-labeled bicarbonate. These results support the notion that, like the deep subsurface, subglacial environments are chemosynthetic

  13. Falls prevention in persons with intellectual disabilities: Development, implementation, and process evaluation of a tailored multifactorial fall risk assessment and intervention strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smulders, E.; Enkelaar, L.; Schoon, Y.; Geurts, A.C.H.; Valk, H. van der; Weerdesteijn, V.G.M.

    2013-01-01

    In the general elderly population, multifactorial screening of fall risks has been shown to be effective. Although persons with intellectual disabilities (ID) fall more often, there appears to be no targeted screening for them. The aim of this study was to develop, implement, and evaluate a falls

  14. [Cost] effectiveness of withdrawal of fall-risk increasing drugs versus conservative treatment in older fallers: Design of a multicenter randomized controlled trial (IMPROveFALL-study)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.A. Hartholt (Klaas); N. van der Velde (Nathalie); E.M.M. van Lieshout (Esther); S. Polinder (Suzanne); O.J. de Vries (Oscar); N.D.A. Boyé (Nicole); A.L.A. Kerver (Anton); G. Ziere; M.M.M. Bruijninckx (Milko); F.U.S. Mattace Raso (Francesco); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); E.F. van Beeck (Ed); P. Lips (Paul); P. Patka (Peter); T.J.M. van der Cammen (Tischa)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Fall incidents represent an increasing public health problem in aging societies worldwide. A major risk factor for falls is the use of fall-risk increasing drugs. The primary aim of the study is to compare the effect of a structured medication assessment including the

  15. No Bridge Too High: Infants Decide Whether to Cross Based on the Probability of Falling not the Severity of the Potential Fall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretch, Kari S.; Adolph, Karen E.

    2013-01-01

    Do infants, like adults, consider both the probability of falling and the severity of a potential fall when deciding whether to cross a bridge? Crawling and walking infants were encouraged to cross bridges varying in width over a small drop-off, a large drop-off, or no drop-off. Bridge width affects the probability of falling, whereas drop-off…

  16. Predictors of serious consequences of falls in residential aged care: analysis of more than 70,000 falls from residents of Bavarian nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büchele, Gisela; Becker, Clemens; Cameron, Ian D; König, Hans-Helmut; Robinovitch, Stephen; Rapp, Kilian

    2014-08-01

    Falls are common in nursing homes and cause a high burden of injuries. The objective of this study was to analyze factors associated with serious consequences of falls in nursing home residents. Prospective observational study. Falls were recorded over 1 year, covering all residents from 528 nursing homes in Bavaria, Germany. The database consisted of 70,196 falls. The standardized form included information about date, time, sex, age, functional status, location of fall, activity leading to the fall, footwear, and about potential consequences, such as transfer to hospital or a suspected fracture. Transfer to hospital was the main outcome and served as surrogate for a serious fall. The association of potential risk factors with hospital transfer after a fall was estimated in multiple logistic regression models. Serious falls were associated with increasing age, being female, and less restricted functional status. Walking compared with transferring, and particularly the morning hours were also associated with a serious fall. Compared with midday, for example, the time period between 6 am and 8 am was associated with a more than 60% increased chance of transfer to hospital. Inappropriate footwear and weekends were associated with serious falls only in women. Some observed factors or indicators associated with transfer to hospital are modifiable and targeted interventions may reduce injuries or costs after a fall. Copyright © 2014 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Efficacy of a short multidisciplinary falls prevention program for elderly persons with osteoporosis and a fall history: a randomized controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smulders, E.; Weerdesteijn, V.G.M.; Groen, B.E.; Duysens, J.E.J.; Eijsbouts, A.; Laan, R.F.J.M.; Lankveld, W.G.J.M. van

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of the Nijmegen Falls Prevention Program (NFPP) for persons with osteoporosis and a fall history in a randomized controlled trial. Persons with osteoporosis are at risk for fall-related fractures because of decreased bone strength. A decrease in the number of

  18. Falls prediction in elderly people : A 1-year prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swanenburg, Jaap; de Bruin, Eling D.; Uebelhart, Daniel; Mulder, Theo

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether force plate variables in single- and dual-task situations are able to predict the risk of multiple falls in a community-dwelling elderly population. Two hundred and seventy elderly persons (225 females, 45 males; age, 73 7 years) performed

  19. The Women's Rights Convention at Seneca Falls: A Lesson Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    OAH Magazine of History, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Uses the text of the Declaration of Sentiments, written at the 1848 women's rights convention in Seneca Falls, New York. Familiarizes students with key personalities and organizations in the women's movement and illustrates the significance of the history of women's rights. Provides discussion questions and related activities. (LS)

  20. Muscle Spindles and Locomotor Control-An Unrecognized Falls Determinant?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marks Ray

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Historically, evidence muscle spindles might be involved in locomotion was provided by their presence in tetrapod antigravity muscles associated with posture and locomotion. Later, Brodal (1962 noted muscle spindles in all muscles of locomotion. To unravel the complexity of the muscle spindle and its role in human locomotor control many investigators have since conducted lesion and/or anaesthesia studies in subhuman species and human contexts. QUESTIONS: How strong is the evidence linking muscle spindles to normal human locomotion and its control? Can a case be made for an association between muscle spindle dysfunction and falls injuries? METHODS: All relevant publications in the leading electronic databases were searched using the key terms muscle afferents, falls, gait, locomotion, muscle spindles. There were numerous related listings, but here only selected reports are examined and discussed because the articles had to be linked in some way to the key question driving the research. RESULTS: Evidence supports a key role for muscle spindles in the control of human locomotion, and by analogy to falls related injuries. CONCLUSION: Future work to explore the role of muscle spindles in the context of falls that occur when walking is warranted.

  1. Managing Problems of Acceptability through High Rise-Fall Repetitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Trevor; Walker, Traci

    2013-01-01

    This article examines one of the ways in which matters of truth, appropriateness, and acceptability are raised and managed within the course of everyday conversation. Using the methodology of conversation analysis, we show that by repeating what another participant has said and doing so with a high rise-fall intonation contour, a speaker claims…

  2. The Rise and Fall of the Australian DBA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortt, Michael A.; Pervan, Simon J; Hogan, Owen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify and discuss the drivers behind the rise and fall of the Australian Doctor of Business Administration (DBA) and to assess its future. Design/methodology/approach: Data covering the period 1993-2013 was sourced from the Commonwealth Department of Education and Training to provide a comprehensive…

  3. [Evaluation of a safe rate when falling on one's head].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebennikov, E I; Kuznetsov, V A; Loshakov, V A; Morozov, V N

    1988-01-01

    The authors analysed 303 patients with closed craniocerebral trauma resulting from falling from a height. The material obtained was treated by the methods of statistical analysis to reveal the relations of the severity of the craniocerebral trauma and the rate of the impact.

  4. Falls and other geriatric syndromes in Blantyre, Malawi: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Background: The prevalence of geriatric syndromes (falls, immobility, intellectual or memory impairment, and incontinence) is unknown in many resource-poor countries. With an aging population such knowledge is essential to develop national policies on the health and social needs of older people. The aim of this ...

  5. [Anorectal injury after a fall from a jet ski

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieboer, T.E.; Assmann, R.F.; Withagen, M.I.J.; Geeraedts, L.M.G.

    2007-01-01

    A 28-year-old female sustained an anorectal rupture after a fall from a jet ski. The rupture was sutured and a double-loop colostomy was created. Three months later, following a test of functional continence, the colostomy was removed. The patient recovered without complications and with

  6. A video surveillance system designed to detect multiple falls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Chih Chen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a fall detection system that is based on image processing technology. The system can detect falling by various humans via analysis of video frame. First, the system utilizes the method of mixture and Gaussian background model to generate information about the background, and the noise and shadow of background are eliminated to extract the possible positions of moving objects. The extraction of a foreground image generates more noise and damage. Therefore, morphological and size filters are utilized to eliminate this noise and repair the damage to the image. Extraction of the foreground image yields the locations of human heads in the image. The median point, height, and aspect ratio of the people in the image are calculated. These characteristics are utilized to trace objects. The change of the characteristics of objects among various consecutive images can be used to evaluate those persons enter or leave the scene. The method of fall detection uses the height and aspect ratio of the human body, analyzes the image in which one person overlaps with another, and detects whether a human has fallen or not. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can efficiently detect falls by multiple persons.

  7. A new Squirrel from the Stanley-falls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jentink, F.A.

    1906-01-01

    This beautiful greenish tinged Squirrel has been procured by Mr. G. J. A. Pool at the Stanley-falls, Congostate, in August 1905; Professor Dr. A. A. W. Hubrecht (Utrecht) had the kindness as to present it to our National Museum. It apparently is an animal belonging to a hitherto undescribed species;

  8. Occurrence and Predictors of Falls in People With Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minet, Lisbeth Rosenbek; Peterson, Elizabeth; Koch, Lena von

    2015-01-01

    structured interviews and assessments. Generalized estimating equation modeling using proportional odds was used to explore the predictive value of fall history, functioning/disability, and personal factors during 6 years. RESULTS: The proportion of fallers constituted of 35%, 26%, 33%, and 35% of the sample...

  9. Interpersonal Variability of the Experience of Falling in Love

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    José Manuel Sanz Cruces; María Fernández Hawrylak; Ana Benito Delegido

    2015-01-01

    ... as they obtain significant higher scores on intensity of falling in love and on accepting attitudes of the myths of romantic love. An opposite pattern was observed in people prone to avoidant attachment. The extraversion personality trait relates differently to amorousness in men and women. We also discuss the possible interpretations of the dif...

  10. Free Fall and Harmonic Oscillations: Analyzing Trampoline Jumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendrill, Ann-Marie; Eager, David

    2015-01-01

    Trampolines can be found in many gardens and also in some playgrounds. They offer an easily accessible vertical motion that includes free fall. In this work, the motion on a trampoline is modelled by assuming a linear relation between force and deflection, giving harmonic oscillations for small amplitudes. An expression for the cycle-time is…

  11. Taste for falls prevention: a social-analytical perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evron, Lotte; Schultz-Larsen, Kirsten; Egerod, Ingrid

    We explored the modernization of the health care system by using social-analytic contemporary diagnosis to explain new tendencies in the health care system such as empowerment and self-care. A falls clinic situated in a Danish hospital was studied. We were interested in how new legal obligations ...

  12. The Disruption of Tephra Fall Deposits by Basaltic Lava Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R. J.; Thordarson, T.; Self, S.; Blake, S.

    2010-12-01

    Complex physical and stratigraphic relationships between lava and proximal tephra fall deposits around vents of the Roza Member in the Columbia River Basalt Province, (CRBP), USA, illustrate how basaltic lavas can disrupt, dissect (spatially and temporally) and alter tephra fall deposits. Thin pahoehoe lobes and sheet lobes occur intercalated with tephra deposits and provide evidence for synchronous effusive and explosive activity. Tephra that accumulated on the tops of inflating pahoehoe flows became disrupted by tumuli, which dissected the overlying sheet into a series of mounds. During inflation of subjacent tumuli tephra percolated down into the clefts and rubble at the top of the lava, and in some cases came into contact with lava hot enough to thermally alter it. Lava breakouts from the tumuli intruded up through the overlying tephra deposit and fed pahoehoe flows that spread across the surface of the aggrading tephra fall deposit. Non-welded scoria fall deposits were compacted and welded to a depth of ~50 cm underneath thick sheet lobes. These processes, deduced from the field relationships, have resulted in considerable stratigraphic complexity in proximal regions. We also demonstrate that, when the advance of lava and the fallout of tephra are synchronous, the contacts of some tephra sheets can be diachronous across their extent. The net effect is to reduce the usefulness of pyroclastic deposits in reconstructing eruption dynamics.

  13. Survival of northern red oak acorns after fall burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    L.R. Auchmoody; H. Clay Smith; H. Clay Smith

    1993-01-01

    Survival of recently fallen northern red oak acorns after exposure to a cool fall burn was evaluated in northwestern Pennsylvania. Although no acorns were consumed by the fire, some were charred. Between 40 and 49 percent of the acorns in the litter were destroyed. The fire was not hot enough to kill Curculio larvae within the acorns. Burned acorns infested with...

  14. Slip, Trip and Fall Prevention for Healthcare Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... preparation and serving areas ■■ Under sinks ■■ Water fountains ■■ Histology labs Prevention Strategies ■■ Mats and runners at healthcare facility entrances should be sufficiently large so that several foot- steps fall on the mat, cleaning contaminants off ...

  15. Despatch: Field Marshal Auchinleck, the Fall of the Tobruk Garrison ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hennie

    78. The 'Atomic' Despatch: Field Marshal Auchinleck, the Fall of the Tobruk Garrison and Post-War. Anglo-South African Relations. Dr Andrew Stewart*. King's College. In January 1948, a despatch written by Field Marshal Sir Claude Auchinleck was published in London. These detailed military operations involving British.

  16. Neurovestibular analysis and falls in Parkinson's disease and atypical parkinsonism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venhovens, J.; Meulstee, J.; Bloem, B.R.; Verhagen, W.I.

    2016-01-01

    The primary aim of our study was to determine the extent of vestibular dysfunction in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Our secondary aim was to determine if vestibular dysfunction in PD is a risk factor for falling. The tertiary aim was to determine both the extent of vestibular dysfunction

  17. A Phenomenological Study of Falling out of Romantic Love

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailor, Joanni L.

    2013-01-01

    Romantic love is considered a necessary ingredient in marriage. In this study, the experience of falling out of romantic love with one's spouse was examined. Eight individuals who had fallen out of romantic love with their spouse were interviewed. By using Moustakas' Transcendental Phenomenological method, several themes emerged which provided a…

  18. STARS Quarterly Review. Fall 2012: The Role of Institutional Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanski, Monika

    2012-01-01

    The Fall 2012 SQR: "The Role of Institutional Diversity," explores how the diversity of STARS institutions has changed over time and how participation in STARS according to institution type compares to U.S. demographics. Findings in this review suggest that the institutional characteristics that make higher education institutions…

  19. Geographic Origins of First Time Students Fall 1971.

    Science.gov (United States)

    State Univ. of New York, Albany. Central Staff Office of Institutional Research.

    This report presents the results of the annual survey of geographic origins of permanent residence of all first-time credit course students attending the State University of New York during the 1971 fall term. Part one presents summary tables of first-time students by institution and permanent residence. Part two indicates the permanent residence…

  20. Ring Falling into a Chain: No Magic--Just Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, Michael; Mollmann, Klaus-Peter

    2011-01-01

    Magic tricks are very popular, and they can and should be used in teaching when the underlying principle is easily explained by physics. Such tricks often fall in the realm of hands-on experiments, which are considered to be potentially very effective in raising interest and motivating students. Unfortunately, many hands-on experiments are easy to…

  1. Page 1 38 SATYA DEV WERMA Manitoba; Sioux Falls, South ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    sum of the calculated secondary flux and the incident flux (re-entrant albedo). i. Fig. 12. Measured vertical electron flux from 10 MeV 100 MeV and from 100 to 1, 100 MeV ; : vs. depth over Sioux Falls, South Dakota (March 1962). - calculated secondary electron flux: - - - - - - - -. calculated incident vertical flux (matched with.

  2. Silvicultural activities in Pringle Falls Experimental Forest, Central Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew Youngblood; Kim Johnson; Jim Schlaich; Boyd Wickman

    2004-01-01

    Pringle Falls Experimental Forest has been a center for research in ponderosa pine forests east of the crest of the Cascade Range since 1931. Long-term research facilities, sites, and future research opportunities are currently at risk from stand-replacement wildfire because of changes in stand structure resulting from past fire exclusion. At the same time, many of the...

  3. Mensa 21 Research Journal, Fall 1986-Spring 1990.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Phyllis, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Eight issues of this research journal on gifted children include the following topics: (1) Profile of a Gifted Child: The Johns Hopkins Program for Mathematically Precocious Youth--Fall 1986; (2) The Impact of the Arts on Our Civilization: Excerpts from Colloquium III (Louisville, Kentucky)--Summer 1987; (3) Why Are Asians so Smart? An…

  4. Time required for a sphere to fall through a funnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, J.; Altschul, B.; Crittenden, S.

    2014-12-01

    We experimentally test a recently proposed theory of the behavior of a single frictional, inelastic, spherical particle falling under gravity through a symmetric funnel. We find that, while many qualitative results of the theory are supported by the data, the quantitative behavior of a real sphere falling through a real funnel differs from the predictions. The behavior above a 45∘ funnel angle, the duration, and the dependence of the duration on the initial horizontal position all show significant deviations from the predicted results. In particular, for drop positions near the gap, the duration of the fall is often significantly less than predicted for 50∘ and 60∘ funnel angles; and at a 60∘ funnel angle, where the data best matches the model, the R2 goodness of fit is only 0.27. The fit can be significantly improved for 60∘ funnel angle by relaxing the most stringent approximation of the theory, which asserts that the transition from slipping to rolling is governed by a single constant parameter, β, independent of impact speed and angle. We conclude that, although the theory captures most of the key features of the dynamics of a ball falling through a funnel, it does not do so with quantitative accuracy, indicating that for commonly encountered balls and drop heights, a more realistic model of particle collisions is required.

  5. Time required for a sphere to fall through a funnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Sridharan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We experimentally test a recently proposed theory of the behavior of a single frictional, inelastic, spherical particle falling under gravity through a symmetric funnel. We find that, while many qualitative results of the theory are supported by the data, the quantitative behavior of a real sphere falling through a real funnel differs from the predictions. The behavior above a 45∘ funnel angle, the duration, and the dependence of the duration on the initial horizontal position all show significant deviations from the predicted results. In particular, for drop positions near the gap, the duration of the fall is often significantly less than predicted for 50∘ and 60∘ funnel angles; and at a 60∘ funnel angle, where the data best matches the model, the R2 goodness of fit is only 0.27. The fit can be significantly improved for 60∘ funnel angle by relaxing the most stringent approximation of the theory, which asserts that the transition from slipping to rolling is governed by a single constant parameter, β, independent of impact speed and angle. We conclude that, although the theory captures most of the key features of the dynamics of a ball falling through a funnel, it does not do so with quantitative accuracy, indicating that for commonly encountered balls and drop heights, a more realistic model of particle collisions is required.

  6. Macroeconomic Stabilization When the Natural Real Interest Rate Is Falling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttet, Sebastien; Roy, Udayan

    2015-01-01

    The authors modify the Dynamic Aggregate Demand-Dynamic Aggregate Supply model in Mankiw's widely used intermediate macroeconomics textbook to discuss monetary policy when the natural real interest rate is falling over time. Their results highlight a new role for the central bank's inflation target as a tool of macroeconomic stabilization. They…

  7. ENGINEERING AND TECHNICIAN ENROLLMENTS FALL 1967. SUMMARY REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALDEN, JOHN D.

    THIS REPORT SUMMARIZES IMPORTANT DATA OF THE ENROLLMENT SURVEY CONDUCTED BY THE ENGINEERING MANPOWER COMMISSION OF ENGINEERS JOINT COUNCIL IN THE FALL OF 1967. QUESTIONNAIRES WERE SENT TO ALL KNOWN UNITED STATES TECHNICAL INSTITUTES, JUNIOR COLLEGES, AND OTHER INSTITUTIONS OFFERING ENGINEERING OR INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY. MORE THAN 97…

  8. Hazardous Waste Cleanup: Durez Corporation in Niagara Falls, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Durez, Niagara Plant is a phenol-formaldehyde resin manufacturing plant, located in the City of Niagara Falls, New York, approximately two miles north of the Niagara River. The plant property consists of 4.6 acres, which are dedicated to manufacturing

  9. Niagara Falls HEW 309 Project 1974-1975: Evaluation Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeen, Elois M.

    The document reports an outside evaluation of a Niagara Falls Adult Basic Education Program special project entitled "Identification of Preferred Cognitive Styles and Matching Adult Reading Program Alternatives for the 0-4 Grade Levels." It was concerned with (1) research, training in cognitive style mapping, and development of a survey…

  10. Recent blooms of the dinoflagellate Ceratium in Albert Falls Dam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recent blooms of the dinoflagellate Ceratium in Albert Falls Dam (KZN): History, causes, spatial features and impacts on a reservoir ecosystem and its zooplankton. ... Ceratium totally dominated the phytoplankton assemblage, accounting almost completely for coincident chlorophyll levels, which generally increased with ...

  11. Falls in older people: risk factors and strategies for prevention

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lord, Stephen R. (Stephen Ronald)

    2007-01-01

    ... on visual, neuropsychological and medical risk factors. The book also reviews the numerous new randomized controlled trials that have examined the effects of exercise, visual, cardiovascular and environmental interventions in preventing falls. The new edition will be an invaluable update for medical practitioners, physiotherapists, occupational therap...

  12. 29 CFR 1926.501 - Duty to have fall protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... surfaces on which its employees are to work have the strength and structural integrity to support employees... strength and structural integrity. (b)(1) Unprotected sides and edges. Each employee on a walking/working..., or personal fall arrest systems. (2) Leading edges. (i) Each employee who is constructing a leading...

  13. Opal phytoliths in a north atlantic dust fall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folger, D W; Burckle, L H; Heezen, B C

    1967-03-10

    Minute bodies (less than 80 microns) of isotropic silica, originally precipitated by terrestrial plants, are found together with freshwater diatoms in falls of dust over the ocean. Eolian transport from Africa can explain the occurrence of similar plant remains in deep-sea sediments of the equatorial Atlantic as far west as the Mid-Atlantic Ridge.

  14. Safety yoke would protect construction workers from falling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goforth, O. H.

    1967-01-01

    Simple dismountable yoke protects construction workers on narrow steel I beams at high levels. The yoke engages the upper flat of the I beam and slides freely along it to permit freedom of movement to the worker while limiting his ability to fall by a harness attached to the yoke.

  15. Falls and other geriatric syndromes in Blantyre, Malawi: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The prevalence of geriatric syndromes (falls, immobility, intellectual or memory impairment, and incontinence) is unknown in many resource-poor countries. With an aging population such knowledge is essential to develop national policies on the health and social needs of older people. The aim of this study ...

  16. Chinua Achebe and Albert Camus: Okonkwo's suicide in Things Fall ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper discussed Camus' Vision of the Absurd as demonstrated by Chinua Achebe in Things Fall Apart through his Character, Okonkwo. Using sociological and psychological details, it considered the issue of suicide as the absurd outcome of an upsetting effect of the new world order and a contradiction or divorce ...

  17. A prospective study of the incidence of falls in patients with advanced cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Stone, Carol

    2011-10-01

    The association between aging and falls risk, and the morbidity and mortality resulting from falls in older persons, is well documented. Results from a small number of studies of patients with cancer in inpatient settings suggest that patients with advanced cancer may be at high risk of falling. We present preliminary results pertaining to the incidence of falls in patients with advanced cancer from an ongoing study of risk factors for falls.

  18. Utilizing Weather RADAR for Rapid Location of Meteorite Falls and Space Debris Re-Entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, Marc D.

    2016-01-01

    This activity utilizes existing NOAA weather RADAR imagery to locate meteorite falls and space debris falls. The near-real-time availability and spatial accuracy of these data allow rapid recovery of material from both meteorite falls and space debris re-entry events. To date, at least 22 meteorite fall recoveries have benefitted from RADAR detection and fall modeling, and multiple debris re-entry events over the United States have been observed in unprecedented detail.

  19. Circumstances and outcomes of falls among high risk community-dwelling older adults

    OpenAIRE

    Judy A Stevens; Mahoney, Jane E; Ehrenreich, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    Background For older adults, falls threaten their health, independence, and quality of life. Knowing the circumstances surrounding falls is essential for understanding how behavioral and environmental factors interact in fall events. It is also important for developing and implementing interventions that are effective and acceptable to older adults. This study investigated the circumstances and injury outcomes of falls among community-dwelling older adults at high risk for falls. Methods In t...

  20. Standardizing Falls Reporting: Using Data From Adverse Event Reporting to Drive Quality Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Lea Anne; Bray, Phyllis J; Finley, Edward; Sterner, Carly; Ignudo, Thomas L; Stauffer, Cherie L; Kincaid, Shawn A; Marella, William M

    2015-09-01

    To enhance the value of the Pennsylvania Patient Safety Reporting System (PA-PSRS) falls reports by developing a falls reporting program that standardizes falls reporting and provides timely benchmarked falls rates and process measurement reports hospitals can use to identify areas of improvement in their falls program. The new PA-PSRS falls reporting program requires adherence to standardized definitions of falls to generate standardized, customizable analytic reports. An advisory committee and statewide survey guided the development of the program, data definitions, system features and functionality, and methods for stratifying reporting criteria. Three real-time falls outcomes and 2 falls process reports with multiple configurable options were created. A falls dashboard was developed based on gaps in falls risk assessment processes identified in PA-PSRS falls event reports. Six months after launching the program, 41.3% of Pennsylvania hospitals enrolled. The Authority's annual survey indicated 82.9% of participating hospitals found that the new falls analytic reports were somewhat useful to very useful. Preliminary impact on the falls with harm rate has been limited, a less than 1% reduction, but the ability to identify specific organizational and patient risk factors in a timely manner provides hospitals with opportunities to target falls prevention resources more effectively. The PA-PSRS falls reporting program's standardized definition of falls offers new analytic reports that include falls rates with benchmarking data and a falls dashboard. The benchmarking data allow hospitals to compare themselves to peer hospitals statewide. The newly expanded PA-PSRS falls reporting program has turned an adverse event-reporting program into a quality improvement tool.

  1. Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gene therapy Overview Gene therapy involves altering the genes inside your body's cells in an effort to treat or stop disease. Genes contain your ... that don't work properly can cause disease. Gene therapy replaces a faulty gene or adds a new ...

  2. Pilot case-control study of paediatric falls from windows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Brian D; Quistberg, D Alexander; Shandro, Jamie R; Partridge, Rebecca L; Song, Hyun Rae; Ebel, Beth E

    2011-12-01

    Unintentional falls from windows are an important cause of paediatric morbidity. There have been no controlled studies to identify modifiable environmental risk factors for window falls in young children. The authors have piloted a case-control study to test procedures for case identification, subject enrolment, and environmental data collection. Case windows were identified when a child 0-9 years old presented for care after a fall from that window. Control windows were identified (1) from the child's home and (2) from the home of an age- and gender-matched child seeking care for an injury diagnosis not related to a window fall. Study staff visited enrolled homes to collect window measurements and conduct window screen performance tests. The authors enrolled and collected data on 18 case windows, 18 in-home controls, and 14 matched community controls. Six potential community controls were contacted for every one enrolled. Families who completed the home visit viewed study procedures positively. Case windows were more likely than community controls to be horizontal sliders (100% vs 50%), to have deeper sills (6.28 vs 4.31 inches), to be higher above the exterior surface (183 vs 82 inches), and to have screens that failed below a threshold derived from the static pressure of a 3-year-old leaning against the mesh (60.0% vs 16.7%). Case windows varied very little from in-home controls. Case-control methodology can be used to study risk factors for paediatric falls from windows. Recruitment of community controls is challenging but essential, because in-home controls tend to be over-matched on important variables. A home visit allows direct measurement of window type, height, sill depth, and screen performance. These variables should all be investigated in subsequent, larger studies covering major housing markets.

  3. Severe cranial neuropathies caused by falls from heights in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahavi, A; Luckman, J; Yassur, I; Michowiz, S; Goldenberg-Cohen, N

    2016-04-01

    Falls from heights are the most common traumatic event associated with emergency department visits in children. This study investigated the incidence and clinical course of cranial neuropathies caused by falls from heights in children. The computerized records of a tertiary pediatric medical center were searched for all patients admitted to the emergency department in 2004-2014 with a head injury caused by falling from a height. Those with cranial neuropathies involving optic and eye-motility disturbances were identified, and their clinical, imaging, and outcome data were evaluated. Of the estimated 61,968 patients who presented to the emergency department during the study period because of a fall, 18,758 (30.3 %) had head trauma. Only 12 (seven boys, five girls, average age 6.7 years) had a visual disturbance. Eight were diagnosed with traumatic optic neuropathy, one after a 6-month delay, including two with accompanying cranial nerve (CN) III injuries. Five patients had anisocoria or an abnormal pupillary response to light at presentation, one patient had CN VI paralysis and temporary vision loss, and one patient had an isolated CN III injury diagnosed on follow-up. Visual improvement varied among the patients. Cranial neuropathies due to falls from heights are rare in children and are associated with high visual morbidity. Vision or ocular motility impairment, especially monocular vision loss, may be missed during acute intake to the emergency department, and a high index of suspicion is needed. Assessment of the pupillary response to light is essential.

  4. THE FREE-FALL TIME OF FINITE SHEETS AND FILAMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toala, Jesus A. [Currently at Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia, CSIC, E-1808, Granada (Spain); Vazquez-Semadeni, Enrique; Gomez, Gilberto C. [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Campus Morelia Apartado Postal 3-72, 58090 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)

    2012-01-10

    Molecular clouds often exhibit filamentary or sheet-like shapes. We compute the free-fall time ({tau}{sub ff}) for finite, uniform, self-gravitating circular sheets and filamentary clouds of small but finite thickness, so that their volume density {rho} can still be defined. We find that, for thin sheets, the free-fall time is larger than that of a uniform sphere with the same volume density by a factor proportional to {radical}A, where the aspect ratio A is given by A = R/h, R being the sheet's radius and h is its thickness. For filamentary clouds, the aspect ratio is defined as A=L/R, where L is the filament's half-length and R is its (small) radius, and the modification factor is more complicated, although in the limit of large A it again reduces to nearly {radical}A. We propose that our result for filamentary shapes naturally explains the ubiquitous configuration of clumps fed by filaments observed in the densest structures of molecular clouds. Also, the longer free-fall times for non-spherical geometries in general may contribute toward partially alleviating the 'star formation conundrum', namely, the star formation rate in the Galaxy appears to be proceeding in a timescale much larger than the total molecular mass in the Galaxy divided by its typical free-fall time. If molecular clouds are in general formed by thin sheets and long filaments, then their relevant free-fall time may have been systematically underestimated, possibly by factors of up to one order of magnitude.

  5. Free Fall and Self-Force: an Historical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spallicci, Alessandro

    Free fall has signed the greatest markings in the history of physics through the leaning Pisa tower, the Woolsthorpe apple tree and the Einstein lift. The perspectives offered by the capture of stars by supermassive black holes are to be cherished, because the study of the motion of falling stars will constitute a giant step forward in the understanding of gravitation in the regime of strong field. After an account on the perception of free fall in ancient times and on the behaviour of a gravitating mass in Newtonian physics, this chapter deals with last century debate on the repulsion for a Schwarzschild-Droste black hole and mentions the issue of an infalling particle velocity at the horizon. Further, black hole perturbations and numerical methods are presented, paving the way to the introduction of the self-force and other back-action related methods. The impact of the perturbations on the motion of the falling particle is computed via the tail, the back-scattered part of the perturbations, or via a radiative Green function. In the former approach, the self-force acts upon the background geodesic; in the latter, the geodesic is conceived in the total (background plus perturbations) field. Regularisation techniques (mode-sum and Riemann-Hurwitz z function) intervene to cancel divergencies coming from the infinitesimal size of the particle. An account is given on the state of the art, including the last results obtained in this most classical problem, together with a perspective encompassing future space gravitational wave interferometry and head-on particle physics experiments. As free fall is patently non-adiabatic, it requires the most sophisticated techniques for studying the evolution of the motion. In this scenario, the potential of the self-consistent approach, by means of which the background geodesic is continuously corrected by the self-force contribution, is examined.

  6. Low-Impact Flooring: Does It Reduce Fall-Related Injuries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanger, H Carl

    2017-07-01

    To compare fall rates and injuries from falls on low-impact flooring (LIF) compared with a standard vinyl flooring. Prospective, observational, nonrandomized controlled study. Subacute Older Persons Health ward (N = 20 beds). Older inpatients. Three different types of LIF. All falls in the ward were prospectively monitored using incident reporting, noting location and consequences of each fall. Fall rates (per 1000 bed days) and injuries, were compared between bedroom falls on LIF against those occurring on standard vinyl flooring (controls). Over 31 months, there were 278 bedroom falls (from 178 fallers). The bedroom fall rate (falls per 1000 bed days occupied) did not differ between the LIF and control groups (median 15 [IQR 8-18] versus 17 [IQR 9-23], respectively; P = .47). However, fall-related injuries were significantly less frequent when they occurred on LIFs (22% of falls versus 34% of falls on control flooring; P = .02). Fractures occurred in 0.7% of falls in the LIF cohort versus 2.3% in the control cohort. Rolling resistance when moving heavier equipment, such as beds or hoists, was an issue for staff on LIF. LIF significantly reduced fall-related injuries compared with a standard vinyl flooring, whereas they did not alter the overall risk of falling. Copyright © 2017 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Are Foot and Ankle Characteristics Associated With Falls in People With Rheumatoid Arthritis? A Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenton-Rule, Angela; Dalbeth, Nicola; Menz, Hylton B; Bassett, Sandra; Rome, Keith

    2017-08-01

    To determine whether foot and ankle characteristics are associated with falls in people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A total of 201 adults with RA were recruited from rheumatology outpatient clinics in Auckland, New Zealand. Clinical characteristics, common fall risk factors, and foot and ankle variables were measured. Participants were prospectively studied for 12 months to record the occurrence of falls using falls diaries. Logistic regression analysis identified baseline variables that were independent predictors of falls over the 12 months. Eighty-four participants (42%) fell at least once and 39 (19%) experienced multiple (>1) falls over the 12-month followup period. In logistic regression analysis, including age and significant baseline variables in bivariate analysis but not baseline fall history, presence of foot or ankle tender joints (odds ratio [OR] 1.95, P = 0.034) and psychotropic medication (OR 2.35, P = 0.025) were independent predictors of prospective falls. However, when baseline fall history was included in the analysis, psychotropic medication (OR 2.34, P = 0.025) and baseline fall history (over the preceding 12 months) (OR 2.27, P = 0.008) were independent predictors of prospective falls. Foot and ankle characteristics are not associated with falls in people with RA, independent of prior falls. Inquiry about prior falls and psychotropic medications may assist in identifying patients with RA who are at high risk of future falls. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  8. Prospective monitoring and self-report of previous falls among older women at high risk of falls and fractures: a study of comparison and agreement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Patrícia A.; Dias, João M. D.; Silva, Silvia L. A.; Dias, Rosângela C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The identification of the occurrence of falls is an important step for screening and for rehabilitation processes for the elderly. The methods of monitoring these events are susceptible to recording biases, and the choice of the most accurate method remains challenging. Objectives: (i) To investigate the agreement between retrospective self-reporting and prospective monitoring of methods of recording falls, and (ii) to compare the retrospective self-reporting of falls and the prospective monitoring of falls and recurrent falls over a 12-month period among older women at high risk of falls and fractures. Method: A total of 118 community-dwelling older women with low bone density were recruited. The incidence of falls was monitored prospectively in 116 older women (2 losses) via monthly phone calls over the course of a year. At the end of this monitoring period, the older women were asked about their recall of falls in the same 12-month period. The agreement between the two methods was analyzed, and the sensitivity and specificity of self-reported previous falls in relation to the prospective monitoring were calculated. Results: There was moderate agreement between the prospective monitoring and the retrospective self-reporting of falls in classifying fallers (Kappa=0.595) and recurrent fallers (Kappa=0.589). The limits of agreement were 0.35±1.66 falls. The self-reporting of prior falls had a 67.2% sensitivity and a 94.2% specificity in classifying fallers among older women and a 50% sensitivity and a 98.9% specificity in classifying recurrent fallers. Conclusion: Self-reporting of falls over a 12-month period underestimated 32.8% of falls and 50% of recurrent falls. The findings recommend caution if one is considering replacing monthly monitoring with annual retrospective questioning. PMID:26083603

  9. Prospective monitoring and self-report of previous falls among older women at high risk of falls and fractures: a study of comparison and agreement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia A. Garcia

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The identification of the occurrence of falls is an important step for screening and for rehabilitation processes for the elderly. The methods of monitoring these events are susceptible to recording biases, and the choice of the most accurate method remains challenging. Objectives: (i To investigate the agreement between retrospective self-reporting and prospective monitoring of methods of recording falls, and (ii to compare the retrospective self-reporting of falls and the prospective monitoring of falls and recurrent falls over a 12-month period among older women at high risk of falls and fractures. Method: A total of 118 community-dwelling older women with low bone density were recruited. The incidence of falls was monitored prospectively in 116 older women (2 losses via monthly phone calls over the course of a year. At the end of this monitoring period, the older women were asked about their recall of falls in the same 12-month period. The agreement between the two methods was analyzed, and the sensitivity and specificity of self-reported previous falls in relation to the prospective monitoring were calculated. Results: There was moderate agreement between the prospective monitoring and the retrospective self-reporting of falls in classifying fallers (Kappa=0.595 and recurrent fallers (Kappa=0.589. The limits of agreement were 0.35±1.66 falls. The self-reporting of prior falls had a 67.2% sensitivity and a 94.2% specificity in classifying fallers among older women and a 50% sensitivity and a 98.9% specificity in classifying recurrent fallers. Conclusion: Self-reporting of falls over a 12-month period underestimated 32.8% of falls and 50% of recurrent falls. The findings recommend caution if one is considering replacing monthly monitoring with annual retrospective questioning.

  10. Prospective monitoring and self-report of previous falls among older women at high risk of falls and fractures: a study of comparison and agreement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Patrícia A; Dias, João M D; Silva, Silvia L A; Dias, Rosângela C

    2015-01-01

    The identification of the occurrence of falls is an important step for screening and for rehabilitation processes for the elderly. The methods of monitoring these events are susceptible to recording biases, and the choice of the most accurate method remains challenging. (i) To investigate the agreement between retrospective self-reporting and prospective monitoring of methods of recording falls, and (ii) to compare the retrospective self-reporting of falls and the prospective monitoring of falls and recurrent falls over a 12-month period among older women at high risk of falls and fractures. A total of 118 community-dwelling older women with low bone density were recruited. The incidence of falls was monitored prospectively in 116 older women (2 losses) via monthly phone calls over the course of a year. At the end of this monitoring period, the older women were asked about their recall of falls in the same 12-month period. The agreement between the two methods was analyzed, and the sensitivity and specificity of self-reported previous falls in relation to the prospective monitoring were calculated. There was moderate agreement between the prospective monitoring and the retrospective self-reporting of falls in classifying fallers (Kappa = 0.595) and recurrent fallers (Kappa = 0.589). The limits of agreement were 0.35 ± 1.66 falls. The self-reporting of prior falls had a 67.2% sensitivity and a 94.2% specificity in classifying fallers among older women and a 50% sensitivity and a 98.9% specificity in classifying recurrent fallers. Self-reporting of falls over a 12-month period underestimated 32.8% of falls and 50% of recurrent falls. The findings recommend caution if one is considering replacing monthly monitoring with annual retrospective questioning.

  11. Falls in advanced old age: recalled falls and prospective follow-up of over-90-year-olds in the Cambridge City over-75s Cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthews Fiona E

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The "oldest old" are now the fastest growing section of most western populations, yet there are scarcely any data concerning even the common problem of falls amongst the very old. Prospective data collection is encouraged as the most reliable method for researching older people's falls, though in clinical practice guidelines advise taking a history of any recalled falls. This study set out to inform service planning by describing the epidemiology of falls in advanced old age using both retrospectively and prospectively collected falls data. Methods Design: Re-survey of over-90-year-olds in a longitudinal cohort study – cross-sectional interview and intensive 12-month follow-up. Participants and setting: 90 women and 20 men participating in a population-based cohort (aged 91–105 years, in care-homes and community-dwelling recruited from representative general practices in Cambridge, UK Measurements: Prospective falls data were collected using fall calendars and telephone follow-up for one year after cross-sectional survey including fall history. Results 58% were reported to have fallen at least once in the previous year and 60% in the 1-year follow-up. The proportion reported to have fallen more than once was lower using retrospective recall of the past year than prospective reports gathered the following year (34% versus 45%, as were fall rates (1.6 and 2.8 falls/person-year respectively. Repeated falls in the past year were more highly predictive of falls during the following year – IRR 4.7, 95% CI 2.6–8.7 – than just one – IRR 3.6, 95% CI 2.0–6.3, using negative binomial regression. Only 1/5 reportedly did not fall during either the year before or after interview. Conclusion Fall rates in this representative sample of over-90-year-olds are even higher than previous reports from octogenarians. Recalled falls last year, particularly repeated falls, strongly predicted falls during follow-up. Similar proportions

  12. A comparison of accuracy of fall detection algorithms (threshold-based vs. machine learning) using waist-mounted tri-axial accelerometer signals from a comprehensive set of falls and non-fall trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Omar; Musngi, Magnus; Park, Edward J; Mori, Greg; Robinovitch, Stephen N

    2017-01-01

    Falls are the leading cause of injury-related morbidity and mortality among older adults. Over 90 % of hip and wrist fractures and 60 % of traumatic brain injuries in older adults are due to falls. Another serious consequence of falls among older adults is the 'long lie' experienced by individuals who are unable to get up and remain on the ground for an extended period of time after a fall. Considerable research has been conducted over the past decade on the design of wearable sensor systems that can automatically detect falls and send an alert to care providers to reduce the frequency and severity of long lies. While most systems described to date incorporate threshold-based algorithms, machine learning algorithms may offer increased accuracy in detecting falls. In the current study, we compared the accuracy of these two approaches in detecting falls by conducting a comprehensive set of falling experiments with 10 young participants. Participants wore waist-mounted tri-axial accelerometers and simulated the most common causes of falls observed in older adults, along with near-falls and activities of daily living. The overall performance of five machine learning algorithms was greater than the performance of five threshold-based algorithms described in the literature, with support vector machines providing the highest combination of sensitivity and specificity.

  13. The Caenorhabditis chemoreceptor gene families

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    Robertson Hugh M

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemoreceptor proteins mediate the first step in the transduction of environmental chemical stimuli, defining the breadth of detection and conferring stimulus specificity. Animal genomes contain families of genes encoding chemoreceptors that mediate taste, olfaction, and pheromone responses. The size and diversity of these families reflect the biology of chemoperception in specific species. Results Based on manual curation and sequence comparisons among putative G-protein-coupled chemoreceptor genes in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, we identified approximately 1300 genes and 400 pseudogenes in the 19 largest gene families, most of which fall into larger superfamilies. In the related species C. briggsae and C. remanei, we identified most or all genes in each of the 19 families. For most families, C. elegans has the largest number of genes and C. briggsae the smallest number, suggesting changes in the importance of chemoperception among the species. Protein trees reveal family-specific and species-specific patterns of gene duplication and gene loss. The frequency of strict orthologs varies among the families, from just over 50% in two families to less than 5% in three families. Several families include large species-specific expansions, mostly in C. elegans and C. remanei. Conclusion Chemoreceptor gene families in Caenorhabditis species are large and evolutionarily dynamic as a result of gene duplication and gene loss. These dynamics shape the chemoreceptor gene complements in Caenorhabditis species and define the receptor space available for chemosensory responses. To explain these patterns, we propose the gray pawn hypothesis: individual genes are of little significance, but the aggregate of a large number of diverse genes is required to cover a large phenotype space.

  14. Experiences of falls and strategies to manage the consequences of falls in persons with late effects of polio: A qualitative study

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    Christina Brogårdh

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore how persons with late effects of polio experience falls and what strategies they use to manage the consequences of falls. Design: A qualitative study with face-to-face interviews. Data were analysed by systematic text condensation. Participants: Fourteen ambulatory persons (7 women; mean age 70 years with late effects of polio. Results: Analysis resulted in one main theme, “Everyday life is a challenge to avoid the consequences of falls”, and 3 categories with 7 subcategories. Participants perceived that falls were unpredictable and could occur anywhere. Even slightly uneven surfaces could cause a fall, and increased impairments following late effects of polio led to reduced movement control and an inability to adjust balance quickly. Physical injuries were described after the falls, as well as emotional and psychological reactions, such as embarrassment, frustration and fear of falling. Assistive devices, careful planning and strategic thinking were strategies to prevent falls, together with adaptation and social comparisons to mitigate the emotional reactions. Conclusion: Experiences of falls greatly affect persons with late effects of polio in daily life. To reduce falls and fall-related consequences both problem-focused and emotion-focused strategies are used. In order to increase daily functioning, these findings should be included in a multifaceted falls management programme.

  15. Analysis and functional annotation of expressed sequence tags from the fall armyworm Spodoptera frugiperda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clem Rollie J

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the genome sequences of lepidopteran insects, although this group of insects has been studied extensively in the fields of endocrinology, development, immunity, and pathogen-host interactions. In addition, cell lines derived from Spodoptera frugiperda and other lepidopteran insects are routinely used for baculovirus foreign gene expression. This study reports the results of an expressed sequence tag (EST sequencing project in cells from the lepidopteran insect S. frugiperda, the fall armyworm. Results We have constructed an EST database using two cDNA libraries from the S. frugiperda-derived cell line, SF-21. The database consists of 2,367 ESTs which were assembled into 244 contigs and 951 singlets for a total of 1,195 unique sequences. Conclusion S. frugiperda is an agriculturally important pest insect and genomic information will be instrumental for establishing initial transcriptional profiling and gene function studies, and for obtaining information about genes manipulated during infections by insect pathogens such as baculoviruses.

  16. Transmission of Force in the Lumbosacral Spine During Backward Falls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Toen, Carolyn; Sran, Meena M.; Robinovitch, Stephen N.; Cripton, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    Study Design Mathematical model, combined with and verified using human subject data. Objective (1) To develop and verify a lumped-parameter mathematical model for prediction of spine forces during backward falls; (2) to use this model to evaluate the effect of floor stiffness on spine forces during falls; and (3) to compare predicted impact forces with forces previously measured to fracture the spine. Summary of Background Data Vertebral fractures are the most common osteoporotic fractures and commonly result from falls from standing height. Compliant flooring reduces the force at the ground during a backward fall from standing; however, the effect on spine forces is unknown. Methods A 6-df model of the body was developed and verified using data from 10 human subjects falling from standing onto 3 types of compliant floors (soft: 59 kN/m, medium: 67 kN/m, and firm: 95 kN/m). The simulated ground forces were compared with those measured experimentally. The model was also used to assess the effect of floor stiffness on spine forces at various intervertebral levels. Results There was less than 14% difference between model predictions and experimentally measured peak ground reaction forces, when averaged over all floor conditions. When compared with the rigid floor, average peak spine force attenuations of 46%, 43%, and 41% were achieved with the soft, medium, and firm floors, respectively (3.7, 3.9, 4.1 kN vs. 6.9 kN at L4/L5). Spine forces were lower than those at the ground and decreased cranially (4.9, 3.9, 3.7, 3.5 kN at the ground, L5/S1, L4/L5, and L3/L4, respectively, for the soft floor). Conclusion Lowering the floor stiffness (from 400 to 59 kN/m) can attenuate peak lumbosacral spine forces in a backward fall onto the buttocks from standing by 46% (average peak from 6.9 to 3.7 kN at L4/L5) to values closer to the average tolerance of the spine to fracture (3.4 kN). PMID:22076645

  17. Ammonia emissions from deciduous forest after leaf fall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hansen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of biochemical feedback mechanisms in the climate system is lacking knowledge in relation to bi-directional ammonia (NH3 exchange between natural ecosystems and the atmosphere. We therefore study the atmospheric NH3 fluxes during a 25-day period during autumn 2010 (21 October to 15 November for the Danish beech forest Lille Bøgeskov to address the hypothesis that NH3 emissions occur from deciduous forests in relation to leaf fall. This is accomplished by using observations of vegetation status, NH3 fluxes and model calculations. Vegetation status was observed using plant area index (PAI and leaf area index (LAI. NH3 fluxes were measured using the relaxed eddy accumulation (REA method. The REA-based NH3 concentrations were compared to NH3 denuder measurements. Model calculations of the atmospheric NH3 concentration were obtained with the Danish Ammonia MOdelling System (DAMOS. The relative contribution from the forest components to the atmospheric NH3 flux was assessed using a simple two-layer bi-directional canopy compensation point model. A total of 57.7% of the fluxes measured showed emission and 19.5% showed deposition. A clear tendency of the flux going from deposition of −0.25 ± 0.30 μg NH3-N m−2 s−1 to emission of up to 0.67 ± 0.28 μg NH3-N m−2 s−1 throughout the measurement period was found. In the leaf fall period (23 October to 8 November, an increase in the atmospheric NH3 concentrations was related to the increasing forest NH3 flux. Following leaf fall, the magnitude and temporal structure of the measured NH3 emission fluxes could be adequately reproduced with the bi-directional resistance model; it suggested the forest ground layer (soil and litter to be the main contributing component to the NH3 emissions. The modelled concentration from DAMOS fits well the measured concentrations before leaf fall, but during and after leaf fall, the modelled concentrations are too low. The results indicate that the

  18. Implementation of a community pharmacy-based falls prevention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casteel, Carri; Blalock, Susan J; Ferreri, Stefanie; Roth, Mary T; Demby, Karen B

    2011-10-01

    Falls are the leading cause of fatal and nonfatal unintentional injury among older adults in the United States. Multifaceted falls prevention programs, which have been reported to reduce the risk for falls among older adults, usually include a medication review and modification component. Based on a literature search, no randomized trials that have examined the effectiveness of this component have been published. The aim of this article was to report on a retrospective process evaluation of data from a randomized, controlled trial conducted to examine the effectiveness of a medication review intervention, delivered through community pharmacies, on the rate of falls among community-dwelling older adults. Patients were recruited through 32 pharmacies in North Carolina. Participants were community-dwelling older adults at high risk for falls based on age (≥ 65 years), number of concurrent medications (≥ 4), and medication classes (emphasis on CNS-active agents). The process evaluation measured the recruitment of patients into the study, the process through which the intervention was delivered, the extent to which patients implemented the recommendations for intervention, and the acceptance of pharmacists' recommendations by prescribing physicians. Of the 7793 patients contacted for study participation, 981 (12.6%) responded to the initial inquiry. A total of 801 (81.7%) participated in an eligibility interview, of whom 342 (42.7%) were eligible. Baseline data collection was completed in 186 of eligible patients (54.4%), who were randomly assigned to the intervention group (n = 93) or the control group (n = 93). Pharmacists delivered a medication review to 73 of the patients (78.5%) in the intervention group, with 41 recommendations for changes in medication, of which 10 (24.4%) were implemented. Of the 31 prescribing physicians contacted with pharmacists' recommendations, 14 (45.2%) responded, and 10 (32.3%) authorized the changes. Based on the findings from the

  19. Risk of falls in Parkinson's disease: a cross-sectional study of 160 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Ana; Grandas, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Falls are a major source of disability in Parkinson's disease. Risk factors for falling in Parkinson's disease remain unclear. To determine the relevant risk factors for falling in Parkinson's disease, we screened 160 consecutive patients with Parkinson's disease for falls and assessed 40 variables. A comparison between fallers and nonfallers was performed using statistical univariate analyses, followed by bivariate and multivariate logistic regression, receiver-operating characteristics analysis, and Kaplan-Meier curves. 38.8% of patients experienced falls since the onset of Parkinson's disease (recurrent in 67%). Tinetti Balance score and Hoehn and Yahr staging were the best independent variables associated with falls. The Tinetti Balance test predicted falls with 71% sensitivity and 79% specificity and Hoehn and Yahr staging with 77% sensitivity and 71% specificity. The risk of falls increased exponentially with age, especially from 70 years onward. Patients aged >70 years at the onset of Parkinson's disease experienced falls significantly earlier than younger patients.

  20. The role of culture and diversity in the prevention of falls among older Chinese people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Khim; Dickinson, Angela

    2011-03-01

    This grounded-theory study explored the perceptions of Chinese older people, living in England, on falls and fear of falling, and identified facilitators and barriers to fall prevention interventions. With a sample of 30 Chinese older people, we conducted two focus groups and 10 in-depth interviews in Mandarin or Cantonese. Interview transcripts, back translated, were analyzed using N6. Constant comparative analysis highlighted a range of health-seeking behaviors after a fall: Chinese older people were reluctant to use formal health services; talking about falls was avoided; older people hid falls from their adult children to avoid worrying them; and fatalistic views about falls and poor knowledge about availability and content of interventions were prevalent. Cost of interventions was important. Chinese older adults valued their independence, and cultural intergenerational relations had an impact on taking action to prevent falls. Cultural diversity affects older adults' acceptance of fall prevention interventions.

  1. The Impact of Fear of Falling on Functional Independence Among Older Adults Receiving Home Health Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A. Lawson OTR, LMSSW, PhD

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Falls are the fifth leading cause of death for adults aged 65 years and older. Several intrinsic and extrinsic fall risk factors have been identified, butthere is less understanding of the impact of a fear of falling on falls. Seventy percent of recent fallers and 40% percent of non-fallers report a fear of falling. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the correlation between a fear of falling and a history of falls, as well as the impact on the functional independence of community-dwelling older adults receiving home health services. Methods: The participants completed the Falls Efficacy Scale, the Modified Timed Up and Go Test, self- reported fear of falling, and the KATZ ADL-staircase. The participants were primarily Hispanic females. Results: There was not a significant correlation between a fear of falling and a history of falls. Only participants' age, gender, and the number of medical diagnoses were predictive of past falls. There was a moderate correlation between impaired functional mobility and dependence with activities of daily living (ADL. Additionally, a fear of falling was associated with dependence to perform ADLs as measured objectively. Conclusion: Future studies need to examine the effectiveness of interventions that include dual-task challenges during therapeutic interventions and ADL retraining to reduce fall risk among older adults.

  2. Characteristics and associated factors in patient falls, and effectiveness of the lower height of beds for the prevention of bed falls in an acute geriatric hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menéndez, M D; Alonso, J; Miñana, J C; Arche, J M; Díaz, J M; Vazquez, F

    2013-01-01

    Whereas several studies about patient falls have provided data for long-term healthcare institutions, less information is available for acute care centres. The objective was to analyze the characteristics of the patient falls and associated factors, and the effectiveness of the lower beds' height to reduce the frequency and the harms of the patient falls in an acute geriatric hospital. A descriptive and retrospective study using a mandatory safety incident report, the IHI Global Trigger Tool, and the claims related to patient falls between 2007 and 2011 in a 200-bed university-associated geriatric hospital. The falls rate was 5.4 falls per 1000 patient days (1.3% of falls led to fractures) and there was exitus in 6 patients (0.6%). Nearly half of the falls ocurred during the night shift (42.4%). By wards, falls were more frequent in acute geriatric wards (42.9%). A 7.5% of patients had a fall before admission. 3 (0.2%) claims due to possible clinical negligence were found. A reduction (28.3%) of bed falls with the lower height of the bed and a 1.88 times less falls with harm (RR 0.53; CI 95% 0.83-0.34) (p=0.006) was observed. The prevention of patient falls is an important task in geriatric units with a potential reduction of harms and costs, some measures such as the lower height of the bed showed a significant reduction of the falls. Copyright © 2012 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. The contribution of staff call light response time to fall and injurious fall rates: an exploratory study in four US hospitals using archived hospital data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Fall prevention programs for hospitalized patients have had limited success, and the effect of programs on decreasing total falls and fall-related injuries is still inconclusive. This exploratory multi-hospital study examined the unique contribution of call light response time to predicting total fall rates and injurious fall rates in inpatient acute care settings. The conceptual model was based on Donabedian's framework of structure, process, and health-care outcomes. The covariates included the hospital, unit type, total nursing hours per patient-day (HPPDs), percentage of the total nursing HPPDs supplied by registered nurses, percentage of patients aged 65 years or older, average case mix index, percentage of patients with altered mental status, percentage of patients with hearing problems, and call light use rate per patient-day. Methods We analyzed data from 28 units from 4 Michigan hospitals, using archived data and chart reviews from January 2004 to May 2009. The patient care unit-month, defined as data aggregated by month for each patient care unit, was the unit of analysis (N = 1063). Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were used. Results Faster call light response time was associated with lower total fall and injurious fall rates. Units with a higher call light use rate had lower total fall and injurious fall rates. A higher percentage of productive nursing hours provided by registered nurses was associated with lower total fall and injurious fall rates. A higher percentage of patients with altered mental status was associated with a higher total fall rate but not a higher injurious fall rate. Units with a higher percentage of patients aged 65 years or older had lower injurious fall rates. Conclusions Faster call light response time appeared to contribute to lower total fall and injurious fall rates, after controlling for the covariates. For practical relevance, hospital and nursing executives should consider strategizing fall and

  4. The contribution of staff call light response time to fall and injurious fall rates: an exploratory study in four US hospitals using archived hospital data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzeng Huey-Ming

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fall prevention programs for hospitalized patients have had limited success, and the effect of programs on decreasing total falls and fall-related injuries is still inconclusive. This exploratory multi-hospital study examined the unique contribution of call light response time to predicting total fall rates and injurious fall rates in inpatient acute care settings. The conceptual model was based on Donabedian's framework of structure, process, and health-care outcomes. The covariates included the hospital, unit type, total nursing hours per patient-day (HPPDs, percentage of the total nursing HPPDs supplied by registered nurses, percentage of patients aged 65 years or older, average case mix index, percentage of patients with altered mental status, percentage of patients with hearing problems, and call light use rate per patient-day. Methods We analyzed data from 28 units from 4 Michigan hospitals, using archived data and chart reviews from January 2004 to May 2009. The patient care unit-month, defined as data aggregated by month for each patient care unit, was the unit of analysis (N = 1063. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were used. Results Faster call light response time was associated with lower total fall and injurious fall rates. Units with a higher call light use rate had lower total fall and injurious fall rates. A higher percentage of productive nursing hours provided by registered nurses was associated with lower total fall and injurious fall rates. A higher percentage of patients with altered mental status was associated with a higher total fall rate but not a higher injurious fall rate. Units with a higher percentage of patients aged 65 years or older had lower injurious fall rates. Conclusions Faster call light response time appeared to contribute to lower total fall and injurious fall rates, after controlling for the covariates. For practical relevance, hospital and nursing executives should consider

  5. The Kinematics of a Falling Dipterocarpus Alatus Seed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun-Woo Song

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dipterocarpus Alatus (Thai:ยางนา, Yang Na is a tree found in Thailand and other Southeast Asian countries. The seeds have two wings and rotate as they fall. High-speed video analysis was used to determine the terminal velocity and spin frequency as a function of the mass of a seed. Values of wing velocity, lift force, and drag force were then determined. It was found that as the mass of the seed increased, terminal velocity, frequency, and lift force also increased. It was shown that 80-95% of the retarding force generated during the fall was from lift and that the coefficient of lift for the seed used was approximately 1.5.

  6. Annual International DIC Society Conference and SEM Fall Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Reu, Phillip

    2017-01-01

    This collection represents a single volume of technical papers presented at the Annual International DIC Society Conference and SEM Fall Conference organized by the Society for Experimental Mechanics and Sandia National Laboratories and held in Philadelphia, PA, November 7-10, 2016. The volume presents early findings from experimental, standards development and various other investigations concerning digital image correlation - an important area within Experimental Mechanics. The area of Digital Image Correlation has been an integral track within the SEM Annual Conference spearheaded by Professor Michael Sutton from the University of South Carolina. In 2016, the SEM and Sandia joined their collaborative strengths to launch a standing fall meeting focusing specifically on developments in the area of Digital Image Correlation. The contributed papers within this volume span numerous technical aspects of DIC including standards development for the industry. .

  7. Ammonia emissions from deciduous forest after leaf fall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristina; Sørensen, Lise Lotte; Hertel, Ole

    2013-01-01

    leaf fall, the magnitude and temporal structure of the measured NH3 emission fluxes could be adequately reproduced with the bi-directional resistance model; it suggested the forest ground layer (soil and litter) to be the main contributing component to the NH3 emissions. The modelled concentration from...... to 15 November) for the Danish beech forest Lille Bøgeskov to address the hypothesis that NH3 emissions occur from deciduous forests in relation to leaf fall. This is accomplished by using observations of vegetation status, NH3 fluxes and model calculations. Vegetation status was observed using plant...... area index (PAI) and leaf area index (LAI). NH3 fluxes were measured using the relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) method. The REA-based NH3 concentrations were compared to NH3 denuder measurements. Model calculations of the atmospheric NH3 concentration were obtained with the Danish Ammonia MOdelling...

  8. AGU Cinema: Festival of short science films at Fall Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harned, Douglas A.

    2012-11-01

    New technologies have revolutionized the use of video as a means of science communication and have made it easier to create, distribute, and view. With video having become omnipresent in our culture, it sometime supplements or even replaces writing in many science and education applications. An inaugural science film festival sponsored by AGU at the 2012 Fall Meeting in San Francisco, Calif., in December will showcase short videos—30 minutes or less in length—developed to disseminate scientific results to various audiences and to enhance learning in the classroom. AGU Cinema will feature professionally produced, big budget films alongside low-budget videos aimed at niche audiences and made by amateurs. The latter category includes videos made by governmental agency scientists, educators, communications specialists within scientific organizations, and Fall Meeting oral and poster presenters.

  9. Not whale-fall specialists, Osedax worms also consume fishbones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, Greg W; Goffredi, Shana K; Johnson, Shannon B; Vrijenhoek, Robert C

    2011-10-23

    Marine annelid worms of the genus Osedax exploit sunken vertebrate bones for food. To date, the named species occur on whale or other mammalian bones, and it is argued that Osedax is a whale-fall specialist. To assess whether extant Osedax species could obtain nutrition from non-mammalian resources, we deployed teleost bones and calcified shark cartilage at approximately 1000 m depth for five months. Although the evidence from shark cartilage was inconclusive, the teleost bones hosted three species of Osedax, each of which also lives off whalebones. This suggests that rather than being a whale-fall specialist, Osedax has exploited and continues to exploit a variety of food sources. The ability of Osedax to colonize and to grow on fishbone lends credibility to a hypothesis that it might have split from its siboglinid relatives to assume the bone-eating lifestyle during the Cretaceous, well before the origin of marine mammals.

  10. Assessment of risk of falls in elderly living at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Adriana de Azevedo; Silva, Antonia Oliveira; Rodrigues, Rosalina Aparecida Partezani; Moreira, Maria Adelaide Silva Paredes; Nogueira, Jordana de Almeida; Tura, Luiz Fernando Rangel

    2017-04-06

    to assess the risk of falls in elderly, by comparing the sociodemographic and cognitive factors, history of falls and self-reported comorbidities. cross-sectional and quantitative study with 240 elderly. Data were collected based on the social profile, through the instrument of risk of falls and assessment of falls, by univariate analysis, bivariate and multiple logistic regression. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 19 was used for statistical analysis. there was a significant association of the risk of falls, as measured by the Fall Risk Score, with sex (idosos, comparando com os fatores sóciodemográficos, cognitivos, presença de quedas e co-morbidades autorreferidas. Estudo transversal e quantitativo com 240 idosos. Os dados foram coletados a partir do perfil social, instrumento do risco de quedas e avaliação de quedas, utilizando análise univariada, bivariada e regressão logística múltipla. Para a análise estatística, utilizou-se o Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) versão 19. há associação entre o risco de quedas, mensurado pelo Fall Risk Score, com o sexo (idoso mais velho (acima de 80 anos), com baixo desempenho cognitivo e apresentar quedas anteriores nos últimos seis meses, aumentam a prevalência de quedas. Na regressão logística, as variáveis que apresentaram associação com o risco de quedas foram: queda, com quem mora, visão prejudicada e doenças reumatológicas. evaluar el riesgo de caídas del adulto mayor, mediante la comparación de los factores cognitivos y sociodemográficos, antecedentes de caídas y comorbilidades auto-reportadas. estudio transversal y cuantitativo con 240 adultos mayores. Los datos fueron recolectados utilizando instrumento del riesgo de caídas y evaluación de caídas, mediante el análisis univariado, bivariado y regresión logística múltiple. Para el anpalisis estadístico, fue utilizado software Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) versi

  11. Niagara Falls Storage Site, Lewiston, New York: geologic report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-06-01

    This report is one of a series of engineering and environmental reports planned for the US Department of Energy's properties at Niagara Falls, New York. It describes the essential geologic features of the Niagara Falls Storage Site. It is not intended to be a definitive statement of the engineering methods and designs required to obtain desired performance features for any permanent waste disposal at the site. Results are presented of a geological investigation that consisted of two phases. Phase 1 occurred during July 1982 and included geologic mapping, geophysical surveys, and a limited drilling program in the vicinity of the R-10 Dike, planned for interim storage of radioactive materials. Phase 2, initiated in December 1982, included excavation of test pits, geophysical surveys, drilling, observation well installation, and field permeability testing in the South Dike Area, the Northern Disposal Area, and the K-65 Tower Area.

  12. Experimental study of heat transfer to falling liquid films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagerholm, N. E.; Kivioja, K.; Ghazanfari, A. R.; Jaervinen, E.

    1985-12-01

    This project was initiated in order to obtain more knowledge about thermal design of falling film heat exchangers and to find methods to improve heat transfer in film flow. A short literature survey of film flow characteristics and heat transfer is presented. An experimental apparatus designed and built for studying falling film evaporation is described. The first experiments were made with smooth Cu tube 25/22 mm and refrigerant R114 as evaporating liquid. A significant amount of droplet entrainment was observed during the tests. The measured average heat transfer coefficient varied from 1000 to 1800 W/m K when Re=1300 to 11000 respectively and when the transfer mode is surface evaporation. This could be predicted accurately with the experimental correlation of Chun and Seban. When nucleate boiling is dominant the heat transfer could be predicted well with pool boiling correlation of VDI-84.

  13. Free workshop for teachers at AGU's 2012 Fall Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm Adamec, Bethany

    2012-10-01

    AGU is committed to fostering the next generation of Earth and space scientists. We work on this commitment in many ways, one of which is partnering with the National Earth Science Teacher's Association (NESTA) to hold the annual Geophysical Information for Teachers (GIFT) workshop at the Fall Meeting. GIFT allows K-12 science educators (both classroom and informal) to hear from scientists about their latest Earth and space science research, explore new classroom resources for engaging students, and visit exhibits and technical sessions during the Fall Meeting. Six teams of leading scientists and education/public outreach professionals will give talks and lead teachers through interactive classroom activities over the course of 2 days at GIFT 2012. Becoming a GIFT presenter is a highly competitive process, with 29 applications evaluated through a peer review system this year. Science standards, prior classroom testing of materials, expertise of presenters, teacher interests, and AGU's science priorities are all taken into account during the selection process.

  14. Central nervous system medications and falls risk in men aged 60-75 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masud, Tahir; Frost, Morten; Ryg, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: drugs acting on the central nervous system (CNS) increase falls risk. Most data on CNS drugs and falls are in women/mixed-sex populations. This study assessed the relationship between CNS drugs and falls in men aged 60-75 years.......Introduction: drugs acting on the central nervous system (CNS) increase falls risk. Most data on CNS drugs and falls are in women/mixed-sex populations. This study assessed the relationship between CNS drugs and falls in men aged 60-75 years....

  15. Army Communicator. Volume 27, Number 3, Fall 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    strip character, Chip Gizmo, represents the Signaleer. (Copyright 2002 King Features Syndicate; used by permission) 58 Fall 2002 Sarge, LT Jack Flap, GEN...Station to Fort Buckner, which had a larger cus- tomer base,” Tanabe explained. “ Jack - son is the LCC chief and, under his leadership, they relocated the...greeted them with toys, stuffed ani- mals and other goodies . The children were very determined and aggressive at times, but they were just so excited

  16. Andrew Beatty, A shadow falls; In the heart of Java.

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew Beatty; Edwin Wieringa; Michael Peletz; Pujo Semedi

    2010-01-01

    In this feature we highlight a recently launched book. We invite specialists in the field to comment on the book, and we invite the author to respond to their comments. In this issue we focus on Andrew Beatty's, A shadow falls; In the heart of Java. Those invited to comment on the book are Puja Semedi, Michael Peletz and Edwin Wieiringa. Registered readers may participate in the debate.

  17. Andrew Beatty, A shadow falls; In the heart of Java.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Beatty

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In this feature we highlight a recently launched book. We invite specialists in the field to comment on the book, and we invite the author to respond to their comments. In this issue we focus on Andrew Beatty's, A shadow falls; In the heart of Java. Those invited to comment on the book are Puja Semedi, Michael Peletz and Edwin Wieiringa. Registered readers may participate in the debate.

  18. Neurovestibular analysis and falls in Parkinson's disease and atypical parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venhovens, J; Meulstee, J; Bloem, B R; Verhagen, W I M

    2016-06-01

    The primary aim of our study was to determine the extent of vestibular dysfunction in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Our secondary aim was to determine if vestibular dysfunction in PD is a risk factor for falling. The tertiary aim was to determine both the extent of vestibular dysfunction and if this dysfunction is a risk factor for falling in patients with atypical parkinsonism (AP). Twenty-five healthy subjects, 30 PD patients and 14 AP patients were matched for age and gender in a case-control study design. All subjects underwent clinical neurological and neurotological assessments, cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs), brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs), subjective visual vertical measurements, and videonystagmography with caloric and rotatory chair stimulation. Ninety per cent of PD patients (27 of 30) and all 14 AP patients had signs of vestibular dysfunction on laboratory examinations. The evoked potential (VEMPs and BAEPs) test results of PD patients showed significant prolongation of the p13, n1 and interpeak III-V latencies on the symptomatic brainstem side (0.003 ≤  P ≤ 0.019) compared with healthy subjects. Also, vestibular testing abnormalities were correlated with an increased risk for falling when fallers among PD and AP patients were compared with the non-fallers (P ≤ 0.001). To conclude, vestibular dysfunction on vestibular laboratory testing is highly prevalent in both PD and AP patients compared with healthy subjects, and is associated with an increased risk for falling. © 2016 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Bonobos Fall within the Genomic Variation of Chimpanzees

    OpenAIRE

    Anne Fischer; Kay Prüfer; Good, Jeffrey M.; Michel Halbwax; Victor Wiebe; Claudine André; Rebeca Atencia; Lawrence Mugisha; Ptak, Susan E.; Svante Pääbo

    2011-01-01

    To gain insight into the patterns of genetic variation and evolutionary relationships within and between bonobos and chimpanzees, we sequenced 150,000 base pairs of nuclear DNA divided among 15 autosomal regions as well as the complete mitochondrial genomes from 20 bonobos and 58 chimpanzees. Except for western chimpanzees, we found poor genetic separation of chimpanzees based on sample locality. In contrast, bonobos consistently cluster together but fall as a group within the variation of ch...

  20. [Fall during dancing can lead to urinary bladder rupture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winck-Flyvholm, Lili

    2013-12-02

    The definition of dancing is body movements performed to music. It is hard to imagine any festive occasion without music and dancing. It is also a great exercise which helps you to stay in shape. As with any other form of sports, dancing can lead to injury. In this case report it is described how a fall during dancing resulted in urinary bladder rupture. This type of injury under these circumstances has never been described before in the literature.