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Sample records for susceptible rat model

  1. Candidate hippocampal biomarkers of susceptibility and resilience to stress in a rat model of depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Kim; Palmfeldt, Johan; Christiansen, Sofie

    2012-01-01

    Susceptibility to stress plays a crucial role in the development of psychiatric disorders such as unipolar depression and post-traumatic stress disorder. In the present study the chronic mild stress rat model of depression was used to reveal stress-susceptible and stress-resilient rats. Large......-scale proteomics was used to map hippocampal protein alterations in different stress states. Membrane proteins were successfully captured by two-phase separation and peptide based proteomics. Using iTRAQ labeling coupled with mass spectrometry, more than 2000 proteins were quantified and 73 proteins were found...... to be differentially expressed. Stress susceptibility was associated with increased expression of a sodium-channel protein (SCN9A) currently investigated as a potential antidepressant target. Differential protein profiling also indicated stress susceptibility to be associated with deficits in synaptic vesicle release...

  2. Magnesium sulfate treatment reverses seizure susceptibility and decreases neuroinflammation in a rat model of severe preeclampsia.

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    Abbie Chapman Johnson

    Full Text Available Eclampsia, defined as unexplained seizure in a woman with preeclampsia, is a life-threatening complication of pregnancy with unclear etiology. Magnesium sulfate (MgSO4 is the leading eclamptic seizure prophylactic, yet its mechanism of action remains unclear. Here, we hypothesized severe preeclampsia is a state of increased seizure susceptibility due to blood-brain barrier (BBB disruption and neuroinflammation that lowers seizure threshold. Further, MgSO4 decreases seizure susceptibility by protecting the BBB and preventing neuroinflammation. To model severe preeclampsia, placental ischemia (reduced uteroplacental perfusion pressure; RUPP was combined with a high cholesterol diet (HC to cause maternal endothelial dysfunction. RUPP+HC rats developed symptoms associated with severe preeclampsia, including hypertension, oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction and fetal and placental growth restriction. Seizure threshold was determined by quantifying the amount of pentylenetetrazole (PTZ; mg/kg required to elicit seizure in RUPP + HC ± MgSO4 and compared to normal pregnant controls (n = 6/group; gestational day 20. RUPP+HC rats were more sensitive to PTZ with seizure threshold being ∼ 65% lower vs. control (12.4 ± 1.7 vs. 36.7 ± 3.9 mg/kg PTZ; p<0.05 that was reversed by MgSO4 (45.7 ± 8.7 mg/kg PTZ; p<0.05 vs. RUPP+HC. BBB permeability to sodium fluorescein, measured in-vivo (n = 5-7/group, was increased in RUPP+HC vs. control rats, with more tracer passing into the brain (15.9 ± 1.0 vs. 12.2 ± 0.3 counts/gram ×1000; p<0.05 and was unaffected by MgSO4 (15.6 ± 1.0 counts/gram ×1000; p<0.05 vs. controls. In addition, RUPP+HC rats were in a state of neuroinflammation, indicated by 35 ± 2% of microglia being active compared to 9 ± 2% in normal pregnancy (p<0.01; n = 3-8/group. MgSO4 treatment reversed neuroinflammation, reducing microglial activation to 6 ± 2% (p<0.01 vs. RUPP+HC. Overall, RUPP+HC rats were in a state of augmented

  3. Low maternal care exacerbates adult stress susceptibility in the chronic mild stress rat model of depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Kim; Dyrvig, Mads; Bouzinova, Elena V

    2012-01-01

    to a differential stress-coping ability. Thus rats fostered by low maternal care dams became more prone to adopt a stress-susceptible phenotype developing an anhedonic-like condition. Moreover, low maternal care offspring had lower weight gain and lower locomotion, with no additive effect of stress. Subchronic......In the present study we report the finding that the quality of maternal care, in early life, increased the susceptibility to stress exposure in adulthood, when rats were exposed to the chronic mild stress paradigm. Our results indicate that high, as opposed to low maternal care, predisposed rats...... exposure to chronic mild stress induced an increase in faecal corticosterone metabolites, which was only significant in rats from low maternal care dams. Examination of glucocorticoid receptor exon 17 promoter methylation in unchallenged adult, maternally characterized rats, showed an insignificant...

  4. Whole tissue AC susceptibility after superparamagnetic iron oxide contrast agent administration in a rat model

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    Lazaro, Francisco Jose [Departamento de Ciencia y Tecnologia de Materiales y Fluidos, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain) and Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragon, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain)]. E-mail: osoro@unizar.es; Gutierrez, Lucia [Departamento de Ciencia y Tecnologia de Materiales y Fluidos, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Rosa Abadia, Ana [Dept. Farmacologia y Fisiologia, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50013 Zaragoza (Spain); Soledad Romero, Maria [Dept. Medicina y Psiquiatria, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Lopez, Antonio [CNAM - Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Jesus Munoz, Maria [Dept. Farmacologia y Fisiologia, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50013 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2007-04-15

    A magnetic AC susceptibility characterisation of rat tissues after intravenous administration of superparamagnetic iron oxide (Endorem{sup (R)}), at the same dose as established for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) contrast enhancement in humans, has been carried out. The measurements reveal the presence of the contrast agent as well as that of physiological ferritin in liver and spleen while no traces have been magnetically detected in heart and kidney. This preliminary work opens suggestive possibilities for future biodistribution studies of any type of magnetic carriers.

  5. Functional annotations of diabetes nephropathy susceptibility loci through analysis of genome-wide renal gene expression in rat models of diabetes mellitus

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    Hu, Yaomin; Kaisaki, Pamela J; Argoud, Karène

    2009-01-01

    of spontaneous (genetically determined) mild hyperglycaemia and insulin resistance (Goto-Kakizaki-GK) and experimentally induced severe hyperglycaemia (Wistar-Kyoto-WKY rats injected with streptozotocin [STZ]). RESULTS: Different patterns of transcription regulation in the two rat models of diabetes likely...... that are responsive to hyperglycaemia and may contribute to renal functional and/or structural alterations. CONCLUSION: Combining transcriptomics in animal models and comparative genomics provides important information to improve functional annotations of disease susceptibility loci in humans and experimental support...

  6. Functional annotations of diabetes nephropathy susceptibility loci through analysis of genome-wide renal gene expression in rat models of diabetes mellitus

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    Farrall Martin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyperglycaemia in diabetes mellitus (DM alters gene expression regulation in various organs and contributes to long term vascular and renal complications. We aimed to generate novel renal genome-wide gene transcription data in rat models of diabetes in order to test the responsiveness to hyperglycaemia and renal structural changes of positional candidate genes at selected diabetic nephropathy (DN susceptibility loci. Methods Both Affymetrix and Illumina technologies were used to identify significant quantitative changes in the abundance of over 15,000 transcripts in kidney of models of spontaneous (genetically determined mild hyperglycaemia and insulin resistance (Goto-Kakizaki-GK and experimentally induced severe hyperglycaemia (Wistar-Kyoto-WKY rats injected with streptozotocin [STZ]. Results Different patterns of transcription regulation in the two rat models of diabetes likely underlie the roles of genetic variants and hyperglycaemia severity. The impact of prolonged hyperglycaemia on gene expression changes was more profound in STZ-WKY rats than in GK rats and involved largely different sets of genes. These included genes already tested in genetic studies of DN and a large number of protein coding sequences of unknown function which can be considered as functional and, when they map to DN loci, positional candidates for DN. Further expression analysis of rat orthologs of human DN positional candidate genes provided functional annotations of known and novel genes that are responsive to hyperglycaemia and may contribute to renal functional and/or structural alterations. Conclusion Combining transcriptomics in animal models and comparative genomics provides important information to improve functional annotations of disease susceptibility loci in humans and experimental support for testing candidate genes in human genetics.

  7. Quetiapine attenuates cognitive impairment and decreases seizure susceptibility possibly through promoting myelin development in a rat model of malformations of cortical development.

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    Ma, Lei; Yang, Feng; Zhao, Rui; Li, Li; Kang, Xiaogang; Xiao, Lan; Jiang, Wen

    2015-10-05

    Developmental delay, cognitive impairment, and refractory epilepsy are the most frequent consequences found in patients suffering from malformations of cortical development (MCD). However, therapeutic options for these psychiatric and neurological comorbidities are currently limited. The development of white matter undergoes dramatic changes during postnatal brain maturation, thus myelination deficits resulting from MCD contribute to its comorbid diseases. Consequently, drugs specifically targeting white matter are a promising therapeutic option for the treatment of MCD. We have used an in utero irradiation rat model of MCD to investigate the effects of postnatal quetiapine treatment on brain myelination as well as neuropsychological and cognitive performances and seizure susceptibility. Fatally irradiated rats were treated with quetiapine (10mg/kg, i.p.) or saline once daily from postnatal day 0 (P0) to P30. We found that postnatal administration of quetiapine attenuated object recognition memory impairment and improved long-term spatial memory in the irradiated rats. Quetiapine treatment also reduced the susceptibility and severity of pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures. Importantly, quetiapine treatment resulted in an inhibition of irradiation-induced myelin breakdown in the cerebral cortex and corpus callosum. These findings suggest that quetiapine may have beneficial, postnatal effects in the irradiated rats, strongly suggesting that improving MCD-derived white matter pathology is a possible underlying mechanism. Collectively, these results indicate that brain myelination represents an encouraging pharmacological target to improve the prognosis of patients with MCD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Seizure susceptibility and the brain regional sensitivity to oxidative stress in male and female rats in the lithium-pilocarpine model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Peternel, Sandra; Pilipović, Kristina; Zupan, Gordana

    2009-04-30

    Several studies have shown the existence of sex differences in the sensitivity to various convulsants in animals and to the development of some epilepsy types in humans. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether there are sex differences in seizure susceptibility and sensitivity of different brain regions to oxidative stress in rats with status epilepticus (SE) induced by lithium-pilocarpine administration, that provides a common experimental model of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) in humans. Latencies to isolated full limbic seizures or SE onset as well as the number of the animals presenting full limbic seizures, SE or full limbic seizures that progressed to SE were recorded for 2 h after pilocarpine administration. Number of animals which survived 24 h after SE onset was also monitored. Levels of lipid peroxidation as well as the superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities in the piriform and entorhinal cortices, temporal neocortex, thalamus, and hippocampus in rats of both sexes, at 24 h after SE onset were determined. Results of our study showed that males developed full limbic seizures and SE more rapidly and in greater number than females. Levels of lipid peroxidation in all brain regions examined, the SOD activities in the piriform and entorhinal cortices, and temporal neocortex as well as the GSH-Px activities in the piriform and entorhinal cortices, and thalamus were significantly higher in rats with SE in comparison to the values of mentioned biochemical parameters in rats of the control groups. Lipid peroxidation level in the temporal neocortex as well as the GSH-Px activity in the hippocampus in male rats were significantly higher in comparison to the values registered in females. With the exception of the thalamus, where SOD activity in male rats with SE was significantly higher in relation to the respective control group and also to females with SE, sex differences in the response of other brain regions

  9. Graphene susceptibility in Holstein model

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    Mousavi, Hamze, E-mail: hamze.mousavi@gmail.co [Department of Physics, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nano Science and Nano Technology Research Center, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    We study the effects of the electron-phonon interaction on the temperature dependence of the orbital magnetic susceptibility of monolayer graphene. We use the linear response theory and Green's function formalism within the Holstein Hamiltonian model. The results show that the effects of the electron-phonon interaction on the susceptibility of graphene sheet have different behaviors in two temperature regions. In the low temperature region, susceptibility increases when the electron-phonon coupling strength increases. On the other hand, the susceptibility reduces with increasing the electron-phonon coupling strength in the high temperature region. - Highlights: Effect of electron-phonon interaction on the susceptibility of graphene is studied. Linear response theory and Green's function technique in Holstein model are used. Effect of electron-phonon on susceptibility has different behaviors in two temperature regions.

  10. Gender difference in acquired seizure susceptibility in adult rats after early complex febrile seizures.

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    Dai, Yun-Jian; Xu, Zheng-Hao; Feng, Bo; Xu, Ceng-Lin; Zhao, Hua-Wei; Wu, Deng-Chang; Hu, Wei-Wei; Chen, Zhong

    2014-12-01

    Gender differences are involved in many neurological disorders including epilepsy. However, little is known about the effect of gender difference on the risk of epilepsy in adults with a specific early pathological state such as complex febrile seizures (FSs) in infancy. Here we used a well-established complex FS model in rats and showed that: (1) the susceptibility to seizures induced by hyperthermia, pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), and maximal electroshock (MES) was similar in male and female rat pups, while males were more susceptible to PTZ- and MES-induced seizures than age-matched females in normal adult rats; (2) adult rats with complex FSs in infancy acquired higher seizure susceptibility than normal rats; importantly, female FS rats were more susceptible to PTZ and MES than male FS rats; and (3) the protein expression of interleukin-1β, an inflammatory factor associated with seizure susceptibility, was higher in adult FS females than in males, which may reflect a gender-difference phenomenon of seizure susceptibility. Our results provide direct evidence that the acquired seizure susceptibility after complex FSs is gender-dependent.

  11. Neuronal substrates underlying stress resilience and susceptibility in rats

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    Febbraro, Fabia; Svenningsen, Katrine; Thao Phuong Tran

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stress and stressful life events have repeatedly been shown as causally related to depression. The Chronic Mild Stress rat model is a valid model of stress-induced depression. Like humans, rats display great heterogeneity in their response to stress and adversity. Hence some individuals...... are stress-sensitive and prone to develop depression-like behaviour in response to modest stressors, while others are stress-resilient and remain essentially symptom free. OBJECTIVES: Compared to the large body of research, which describes stress-induced maladaptive neurobiological changes, relatively little...... attention has been devoted to understand resiliency to stress. The aim of the present study was to identify changes in neuronal activity, associated with stress-resilient and stress-susceptible chronic mild stress endophenotypes, by examining c-Fos expression in 13 different brain areas. Changes in c...

  12. Neuronal substrates underlying stress resilience and susceptibility in rats.

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    Fabia Febbraro

    Full Text Available Stress and stressful life events have repeatedly been shown as causally related to depression. The Chronic Mild Stress rat model is a valid model of stress-induced depression. Like humans, rats display great heterogeneity in their response to stress and adversity. Hence some individuals are stress-sensitive and prone to develop depression-like behaviour in response to modest stressors, while others are stress-resilient and remain essentially symptom free.Compared to the large body of research, which describes stress-induced maladaptive neurobiological changes, relatively little attention has been devoted to understand resiliency to stress. The aim of the present study was to identify changes in neuronal activity, associated with stress-resilient and stress-susceptible chronic mild stress endophenotypes, by examining c-Fos expression in 13 different brain areas. Changes in c-Fos expression have been reported as associated to stressful conditions.Stress-induced modulation of neuronal activation patterns in response to the chronic mild stress paradigm was mapped using the immediate early gene expression c-Fos as a marker. Quantification of the c-Fos-like immunoreactivity responses was done by semi-automated profile counting procedures and design-based stereology.Exposure to chronic mild stress significantly altered c-Fos expression in a total of 6 out of 13 investigated areas. Chronic mild stress was found to suppress the c-Fos response within the magnocellular ventral lateral geniculate nucleus of both stress subgroups. In the the lateral and ventral orbital cortices of stress-resilient rats, the c-Fos like immunoreactivity response was also repressed by stress exposure. On the contrary the c-Fos response within the amygdala, medial habenula, and infralimbic cortex was increased selectively for the stress-susceptible rats.The study was initiated to characterize neuronal substrates associated with stress-coping mechanisms. Six areas, all of which

  13. Presynaptic plasticity as a hallmark of rat stress susceptibility and antidepressant response.

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    Jose Luis Nieto-Gonzalez

    Full Text Available Two main questions are important for understanding and treating affective disorders: why are certain individuals susceptible or resilient to stress, and what are the features of treatment response and resistance? To address these questions, we used a chronic mild stress (CMS rat model of depression. When exposed to stress, a fraction of rats develops anhedonic-like behavior, a core symptom of major depression, while another subgroup of rats is resilient to CMS. Furthermore, the anhedonic-like state is reversed in about half the animals in response to chronic escitalopram treatment (responders, while the remaining animals are resistant (non-responder animals. Electrophysiology in hippocampal brain slices was used to identify a synaptic hallmark characterizing these groups of animals. Presynaptic properties were investigated at GABAergic synapses onto single dentate gyrus granule cells. Stress-susceptible rats displayed a reduced probability of GABA release judged by an altered paired-pulse ratio of evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs (1.48 ± 0.25 compared with control (0.81 ± 0.05 and stress-resilient rats (0.78 ± 0.03. Spontaneous IPSCs (sIPSCs occurred less frequently in stress-susceptible rats compared with control and resilient rats. Finally, a subset of stress-susceptible rats responding to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI treatment showed a normalization of the paired-pulse ratio (0.73 ± 0.06 whereas non-responder rats showed no normalization (1.2 ± 0.2. No changes in the number of parvalbumin-positive interneurons were observed. Thus, we provide evidence for a distinct GABAergic synaptopathy which associates closely with stress-susceptibility and treatment-resistance in an animal model of depression.

  14. Susceptibility of laboratory rats against genotypes 1, 3, 4, and rat hepatitis E viruses.

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    Li, Tian-Cheng; Yoshizaki, Sayaka; Ami, Yasushi; Suzaki, Yuriko; Yasuda, Shumpei P; Yoshimatsu, Kumiko; Arikawa, Jiro; Takeda, Naokazu; Wakita, Takaji

    2013-04-12

    To determine whether or not rats are susceptible to hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection, each of group containing three laboratory rats (Wistar) were experimentally inoculated with genotypes 1, 3, 4 and rat HEV by intravenous injection. Serum and stool samples were collected and used to detect HEV RNA and anti-HEV antibodies by RT-PCR and ELISA, respectively. The virus infection was monitored up to 3 months after inoculation. None of the serum or stool samples collected from the rats inoculated with G1, G3, or G4 HEV indicated positive sign for virus replication. Although no alteration was observed in ALT level, rat HEV RNA was detected in stools from both of the rats inoculated with rat HEV, and both rats were positive for anti-rat HEV IgG and IgM from 3 weeks after inoculation. These results demonstrated that rats are susceptible to rat HEV but not to G1, G3, and G4 HEV. We also confirm that the nude rats were useful for obtaining a large amount of rat HEV and that the rat HEV was transmitted by the fecal-oral route. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Proteochemometric modeling of HIV protease susceptibility

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lapins, Maris; Eklund, Martin; Spjuth, Ola; Prusis, Peteris; Wikberg, Jarl E S

    2008-01-01

    .... Therefore, we used proteochemometrics to model the susceptibility of HIV to protease inhibitors in current use, utilizing descriptions of the physico-chemical properties of mutated HIV proteases...

  16. Arrhythmia susceptibility in senescent rat hearts

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    Stefano Rossi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease increases with age as well as alterations of cardiac electrophysiological properties, but a detailed knowledge about changes in cardiac electrophysiology relevant to arrhythmogenesis in the elderly is relatively lacking. The aim of this study was to determine specific age-related changes in electrophysiological properties of the ventricles which can be related to a structural-functional arrhythmogenic substrate. Multiple epicardial electrograms were recorded on the ventricular surface of in vivo control and aged rats, while arrhythmia vulnerability was investigated by premature stimulation protocols. Single or multiple ectopic beats and sustained ventricular arrhythmias were frequently induced in aged but not in control hearts. Abnormal ventricular activation patterns during sinus rhythm and unchanged conduction velocity during point stimulation in aged hearts suggest the occurrence of impaired impulse conduction through the distal Purkinje system that might create a potential reentry substrate.

  17. Advances on genetic rat models of epilepsy

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    Serikawa, Tadao; Mashimo, Tomoji; Kuramoto, Takashi; Voigt, Birger; Ohno, Yukihiro; Sasa, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    Considering the suitability of laboratory rats in epilepsy research, we and other groups have been developing genetic models of epilepsy in this species. After epileptic rats or seizure-susceptible rats were sporadically found in outbred stocks, the epileptic traits were usually genetically-fixed by selective breeding. So far, the absence seizure models GAERS and WAG/Rij, audiogenic seizure models GEPR-3 and GEPR-9, generalized tonic-clonic seizure models IER, NER and WER, and Canavan-disease related epileptic models TRM and SER have been established. Dissection of the genetic bases including causative genes in these epileptic rat models would be a significant step toward understanding epileptogenesis. N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis provides a systematic approach which allowed us to develop two novel epileptic rat models: heat-induced seizure susceptible (Hiss) rats with an Scn1a missense mutation and autosomal dominant lateral temporal epilepsy (ADLTE) model rats with an Lgi1 missense mutation. In addition, we have established episodic ataxia type 1 (EA1) model rats with a Kcna1 missense mutation derived from the ENU-induced rat mutant stock, and identified a Cacna1a missense mutation in a N-Methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced mutant rat strain GRY, resulting in the discovery of episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2) model rats. Thus, epileptic rat models have been established on the two paths: ‘phenotype to gene’ and ‘gene to phenotype’. In the near future, development of novel epileptic rat models will be extensively promoted by the use of sophisticated genome editing technologies. PMID:25312505

  18. Advances on genetic rat models of epilepsy.

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    Serikawa, Tadao; Mashimo, Tomoji; Kuramoro, Takashi; Voigt, Birger; Ohno, Yukihiro; Sasa, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    Considering the suitability of laboratory rats in epilepsy research, we and other groups have been developing genetic models of epilepsy in this species. After epileptic rats or seizure-susceptible rats were sporadically found in outbred stocks, the epileptic traits were usually genetically-fixed by selective breeding. So far, the absence seizure models GAERS and WAG/Rij, audiogenic seizure models GEPR-3 and GEPR-9, generalized tonic-clonic seizure models IER, NER and WER, and Canavan-disease related epileptic models TRM and SER have been established. Dissection of the genetic bases including causative genes in these epileptic rat models would be a significant step toward understanding epileptogenesis. N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis provides a systematic approach which allowed us to develop two novel epileptic rat models: heat-induced seizure susceptible (Hiss) rats with an Scn1a missense mutation and autosomal dominant lateral temporal epilepsy (ADLTE) model rats with an Lgi1 missense mutation. In addition, we have established episodic ataxia type 1 (EA1) model rats with a Kcna1 missense mutation derived from the ENU-induced rat mutant stock, and identified a Cacna1a missense mutation in a N-Methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced mutant rat strain GRY, resulting in the discovery of episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2) model rats. Thus, epileptic rat models have been established on the two paths: 'phenotype to gene' and 'gene to phenotype'. In the near future, development of novel epileptic rat models will be extensively promoted by the use of sophisticated genome editing technologies.

  19. Fidelity susceptibility in the quantum Rabi model

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    Wei, Bo-Bo; Lv, Xiao-Chen

    2018-01-01

    Quantum criticality usually occurs in many-body systems. Recently it was shown that the quantum Rabi model, which describes a two-level atom coupled to a single model cavity field, presents quantum phase transitions from a normal phase to a superradiate phase when the ratio between the frequency of the two-level atom and the frequency of the cavity field extends to infinity. In this work, we study quantum phase transitions in the quantum Rabi model from the fidelity susceptibility perspective. We found that the fidelity susceptibility and the generalized adiabatic susceptibility present universal finite-size scaling behaviors near the quantum critical point of the Rabi model if the ratio between frequency of the two-level atom and frequency of the cavity field is finite. From the finite-size scaling analysis of the fidelity susceptibility, we found that the adiabatic dimension of the fidelity susceptibility and the generalized adiabatic susceptibility of fourth order in the Rabi model are 4 /3 and 2, respectively. Meanwhile, the correlation length critical exponent and the dynamical critical exponent in the quantum critical point of the Rabi model are found to be 3 /2 and 1 /3 , respectively. Since the fidelity susceptibility and the generalized adiabatic susceptibility are the moments of the quantum noise spectrum which are directly measurable by experiments in linear response regime, the scaling behavior of the fidelity susceptibility in the Rabi model could be tested experimentally. The simple structure of the quantum Rabi model paves the way for experimentally observing the universal scaling behavior of the fidelity susceptibility at a quantum phase transition.

  20. The differential susceptibility to media effects model

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    Valkenburg, P.M.; Peter, J.

    2013-01-01

    In this theoretical article, we introduce the Differential Susceptibility to Media Effects Model (DSMM), a new, integrative model to improve our understanding of media effects. The DSMM organizes, integrates, and extends the insights developed in earlier microlevel media-effects theories. It

  1. Female rats are less susceptible during puberty to the lethal effects of percutaneous exposure to VX

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    Linnzi K.M. Wright

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nerve agents with low volatility such as VX are primarily absorbed through the skin when released during combat or a terrorist attack. The barrier function of the stratum corneum may be compromised during certain stages of development, allowing VX to more easily penetrate through the skin. However, age-related differences in the lethal potency of VX have yet to be evaluated using the percutaneous (pc route of exposure. Thus, we estimated the 24 and 48 h median lethal dose for pc exposure to VX in male and female rats during puberty and early adulthood. Pubescent, female rats were less susceptible than both their male and adult counterparts to the lethal effects associated with pc exposure to VX possibly because of hormonal changes during that stage of development. This study emphasizes the need to control for both age and sex when evaluating the toxicological effects associated with nerve agent exposure in the rat model.

  2. Increase in seizure susceptibility in sepsis like condition explained by spiking cytokines and altered adhesion molecules level with impaired blood brain barrier integrity in experimental model of rats treated with lipopolysaccharides.

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    Sewal, Rakesh K; Modi, Manish; Saikia, Uma Nahar; Chakrabarti, Amitava; Medhi, Bikash

    2017-09-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological disorder characterized by recurrent unprovoked seizures. Sepsis is a condition which initiates a cascade of a surge of inflammatory mediators. Interplay between seizures and inflammation other than of brain origin is yet to be explored. The present study was designed to evaluate the seizure susceptibility in experimental models of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced sepsis. Experimental sepsis was induced using lipopolysaccharides in Wistar rats. Valproic acid, dexametasone were given to two different groups of animals along with LPS. Two groups of animals were subjected to administration of vehicle and LPS respectively with no other treatment. 24h later, animals were subjected to seizures by using either maximal electro shock or pentylenetetrazole. Seizures related parameters, oxidative stress and TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, ICAM-1, ICAM-2, VCAM-1, MMP-9 level in serum and brain samples were evaluated. Histopathological and blood brain barrier permeability studies were conducted. Seizures were decreased in valproic acid treated animals. Reduced oxidative stress was seen in dexamethasone plus valproic acid treated groups as compared to LPS alone treated group. TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, ICAM-1, VCAM-1, MMP-9 levels were found increased in LPS treated animals whereas a reverse observation was noted for ICAM-2 level in brain and serum. Histopathological findings confirmed the successful establishment of sepsis like state in animals. Blood brain barrier permeability was found increased in LPS treated groups of animals. Seizure susceptibility may escalate during the sepsis like inflammatory conditions and curbing the inflammatory state might reverse the phenomenon. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Apc-Mutant Kyoto Apc Delta (KAD Rats Are Susceptible to 4-NQO-Induced Tongue Carcinogenesis

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    Takuji Tanaka

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite widening interest in the possible association between infection/ inflammation and cancer development, knowledge of this issue in relation to oral cancer remains inadequate. This study aimed to determine the susceptibility of Apc-mutant Kyoto Apc Delta (KAD rats, which are vulnerable to developing inflammation-associated colorectal carcinogenesis, to 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4-NQO-induced tongue carcinogenesis in order to clarify the role of inflammation in oral cancer. KAD (20 males and 22 females and F344/NS1c (22 males and 23 females rats received drinking water with or without 4-NQO (20 ppm for eight weeks. Histopathological and immunohistochemical analyses of the tongue were performed at week 20. Additionally, the mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines in the tongue mucosa was determined at week 8. Tongue squamous cell carcinoma (SCC developed in the KAD and F344/NS1c rats that received 4-NQO. Regardless of gender, the incidence and multiplicity of tongue SCC were greater in the KAD rats than in the F344/NS1c rats. In addition, the multiplicity of tongue SCC in the female KAD rats was significantly greater than that observed in the male KAD (p < 0.01 and female F344/NS1c rats (p < 0.05. The levels of inflammation and the mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines in the tongue in the 4-NQO-treated female KAD rats were the highest among the rats given 4-NQO. These results show that KAD rats, particularly females, are susceptible to 4-NQO-induced tongue carcinogenesis, suggesting the utility of models employing KAD rats for investigating the pathobiology of oral (tongue carcinogenesis associated with inflammation.

  4. Apc-Mutant Kyoto Apc Delta (KAD) Rats Are Susceptible to 4-NQO-Induced Tongue Carcinogenesis

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    Tanaka, Takuji, E-mail: tmntt08@gmail.com [Department of Diagnostic Pathology (DDP) & Research Center of Diagnostic Pathology (RC-DiP), Gifu Municipal Hospital, 7-1 Kashima-Cho, Gifu 500-8513 (Japan); Department of Tumor Pathology, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan); Shimizu, Masahito; Kochi, Takahiro; Shirakami, Yohei [Department of Internal Medicine/Gastroenterology, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan); Mori, Takayuki [Department of Pharmacy, Ogaki Municipal Hospital, 4-86 Minaminokawa-cho, Ogaki 503-8502 (Japan); Watanabe, Naoki [Department of Diagnostic Pathology (DDP) & Research Center of Diagnostic Pathology (RC-DiP), Gifu Municipal Hospital, 7-1 Kashima-Cho, Gifu 500-8513 (Japan); Naiki, Takafumi [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Gifu Municipal Hospital, 7-1 Kashima-cho, Gifu 500-8513 (Japan); Moriwaki, Hisataka [Department of Internal Medicine/Gastroenterology, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan); Yoshimi, Kazuto; Serikawa, Tadao; Kuramoto, Takashi [The Institute of Laboratory Animals, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Yoshidakonoe-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2014-07-21

    Despite widening interest in the possible association between infection/inflammation and cancer development, knowledge of this issue in relation to oral cancer remains inadequate. This study aimed to determine the susceptibility of Apc-mutant Kyoto Apc Delta (KAD) rats, which are vulnerable to developing inflammation-associated colorectal carcinogenesis, to 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4-NQO)-induced tongue carcinogenesis in order to clarify the role of inflammation in oral cancer. KAD (20 males and 22 females) and F344/NS1c (22 males and 23 females) rats received drinking water with or without 4-NQO (20 ppm) for eight weeks. Histopathological and immunohistochemical analyses of the tongue were performed at week 20. Additionally, the mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines in the tongue mucosa was determined at week 8. Tongue squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) developed in the KAD and F344/NS1c rats that received 4-NQO. Regardless of gender, the incidence and multiplicity of tongue SCC were greater in the KAD rats than in the F344/NS1c rats. In addition, the multiplicity of tongue SCC in the female KAD rats was significantly greater than that observed in the male KAD (p < 0.01) and female F344/NS1c rats (p < 0.05). The levels of inflammation and the mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines in the tongue in the 4-NQO-treated female KAD rats were the highest among the rats given 4-NQO. These results show that KAD rats, particularly females, are susceptible to 4-NQO-induced tongue carcinogenesis, suggesting the utility of models employing KAD rats for investigating the pathobiology of oral (tongue) carcinogenesis associated with inflammation.

  5. Rat Ace allele variation determines susceptibility to AngII-induced renal damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamilic, Jelena; Hamming, Inge; Lely, A. Titia; Korstanje, Ron; Schulze, Ute; Poppinga, Wilfred J.; Turner, Anthony J.; Clarke, Nicola E.; van Goor, Harry; Navis, Gerjan J.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Ace b/l polymorphism in rats is associated with differential tissue angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) expression and activity, and susceptibility to renal damage. Same polymorphism was recently found in outbred Wistar rat strain with b allele accounting for higher renal ACE, and

  6. Perinatal Nicotine Exposure Increases Obesity Susceptibility in Adult Male Rat Offspring by Altering Early Adipogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jie; Zhang, Wan-Xia; Rao, Yi-Song; Xue, Jing-Ling; Wang, Fei-Fei; Zhang, Li; Yan, You-E

    2016-11-01

    The present study aims to evaluate whether perinatal nicotine (NIC) exposure increases obesity susceptibility in adult male rat offspring by altering early adipogenesis. NIC was sc administered (2.0 mg/kg per day) to pregnant rats from gestational day 9 to the time of weaning (postnatal day 28). At weaning, NIC-exposed male pups had an increased body weight and inguinal sc fat mass and a decreased average cell area of adipocyte, which was accompanied by an overexpression of adipogenic and lipogenic genes in the epididymal white adipose tissue. Additionally, the hepatic lipogenic gene levels from NIC-exposed male pups were also affected. At 12 and 26 weeks of age, body weight and fat mass were increased, whereas there was no change in food intake in NIC-exposed male offspring. Adipogenic and lipogenic genes, glucose transporter 4, and leptin mRNA levels were increased, whereas adiponectin mRNA levels were decreased in the epididymal white adipose tissue of NIC-exposed males. The hepatic lipogenic gene expression of NIC-exposed males was increased. NIC-exposed male offspring showed normal glycemia and a higher serum insulin level, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, and homeostasis model assessment of β-cell function. Furthermore, the NIC-exposed male offspring showed higher serum lipids and Castelli index I and lower nonesterified fatty acid. At 26 weeks, in the ip glucose and insulin tolerance tests, the glucose clearance was delayed, and the area under the curve was higher in the NIC-exposed male offspring. In conclusion, perinatal NIC exposure increased obesity susceptibility in adult male rat offspring by altering early adipogenesis.

  7. Prenatal alcohol exposure enhances the susceptibility to NMDA-induced generalized tonic-clonic seizures in developing rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sue J; Lovinger, David M; N'Gouemo, Prosper

    2017-10-01

    Prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) is associated with a higher likelihood of developing generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS) in infants and children. However, experimental studies of PAE-related seizures have yielded conflicting results. Here, we investigated the effect of acute PAE on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced seizures in developing rats. Pregnant Sprague Dawley rats were given an oral dose of either ethanol (5 g/kg body weight) or vehicle on embryonic day 18. The offspring were tested for susceptibility to NMDA-induced seizures on postnatal day 7 (P7), 21 (P21), 35 (P35), and 42 (P42). Specifically, the prevalence and latency of NMDA-induced continuous wild running-like behaviors (CWR), flexion seizures (FS), wild running seizures (WRS), GTCS, and tonic seizures (TS) were recorded and analyzed. N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced seizures consisted of CWR, FS, GTCS, and TS in P21 rats. Thus, GTCS were consistently observed during development. PAE significantly increases the prevalence of GTCS in female and male P7-P21 rats and P7-P35 rats, respectively, but not in older rats. PAE also increases the prevalence of TS in male, but not female P21-P35 rats. The PAE animal model of GTCS may provide a new opportunity to investigate the mechanisms that underlie neuronal hyperexcitability in developing animals prenatally-exposed to alcohol. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Magnetic susceptibility of a two-channel Anderson model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, J.V.B.; Oliveira, L.N. de; Cox, D.L.; Libero, V.L. E-mail: valter@if.sc.usp.br

    2001-05-01

    Temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibility is calculated for a two-channel Anderson model, by using the numerical renormalization group plus an interleaving procedure to recover the continuum of the conduction band. Fermi- and non-Fermi-liquid fixed points can be obtained in the low-temperature regime of the model susceptibility.

  9. Rat Strain Differences in Susceptibility to Alcohol-Induced Chronic Liver Injury and Hepatic Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M. DeNucci

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The finding of more severe steatohepatitis in alcohol fed Long Evans (LE compared with Sprague Dawley (SD and Fisher 344 (FS rats prompted us to determine whether host factors related to alcohol metabolism, inflammation, and insulin/IGF signaling predict proneness to alcohol-mediated liver injury. Adult FS, SD, and LE rats were fed liquid diets containing 0% or 37% (calories ethanol for 8 weeks. Among controls, LE rats had significantly higher ALT and reduced GAPDH relative to SD and FS rats. Among ethanol-fed rats, despite similar blood alcohol levels, LE rats had more pronounced steatohepatitis and fibrosis, higher levels of ALT, DNA damage, pro-inflammatory cytokines, ADH, ALDH, catalase, GFAP, desmin, and collagen expression, and reduced insulin receptor binding relative to FS rats. Ethanol-exposed SD rats had intermediate degrees of steatohepatitis, increased ALT, ADH and profibrogenesis gene expression, and suppressed insulin receptor binding and GAPDH expression, while pro-inflammatory cytokines were similarly increased as in LE rats. Ethanol feeding in FS rats only reduced IL-6, ALDH1–3, CYP2E1, and GAPDH expression in liver. In conclusion, susceptibility to chronic steatohepatitis may be driven by factors related to efficiency of ethanol metabolism and degree to which ethanol exposure causes hepatic insulin resistance and cytokine activation.

  10. Susceptibility of spiny rats (Proechimys semispinosus to Leishmania (Viannia panamensis and Leishmania (Leishmania chagasi

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    BL Travi

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available The role of Proechimys semispinosus as reservoir of Leishmania (Viannia panamensis on the Colombian Pacific coast was experimentally evaluated. The susceptibility to L. chagasi also was assessed to determine the utility of this rodent as a model for studying reservoir characteristics in the laboratory. Wild-caught animals were screened for natural trypanosomatid infections, and negative individuals were inoculated intradermally (ID in the snout or feet with 10(7 promastigotes of L. panamensis. L. chagasi was inoculated intracardially (10(7 promastigotes or ID in the ear (10(8 promastigotes. PCR-hybridization showed that 15% of 33 spiny rats were naturally infected with L. Viannia sp. Animals experimentally infected with L. panamensis developed non-ulcerated lesions that disappeared by the 7th week post-infection (p.i. and became more resistant upon reinfection. Infectivity to sand flies was low (1/20-1/48 infected/fed flies and transient, and both culture and PCR-hybridization showed that L. panamensis was cleared by the 13th week p.i. Animals inoculated with L. chagasi became subclinically infected and were non-infective to sand flies. Transient infectivity to vectors of spiny rats infected with L. panamensis, combined with population characteristics, e.g., abundance, exploitation of degraded habitats and high reproductive rates, could make them epidemiologically suitable reservoirs.

  11. Low in situ expression of antioxidative enzymes in rat cerebellar granular cells susceptible to methylmercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, M; Usuki, F

    2014-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg), an environmental neurotoxicant, induces site-specific toxicity in the brain. Although oxidative stress has been demonstrated with MeHg toxicity, the site-specific toxicity is not completely understood. Among the cerebellar neurons, cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) appear vulnerable to MeHg, whereas Purkinje cells and molecular layer neurons are resistant. Here, we use a MeHg-intoxicated rat model to investigate these cerebellar neurons for the different causes of susceptibility to MeHg. Rats were exposed to 20 ppm MeHg for 4 weeks and subsequently exhibited neuropathological changes in the cerebellum that were similar to those observed in humans. We first isolated the three cerebellar neuron types using a microdissection system and then performed real-time PCR analyses for antioxidative enzymes. We observed that expression of manganese-superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD), glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPx1), and thioredoxin reductase 1 (TRxR1) was significantly higher in Purkinje cells and molecular layer neurons than in CGCs. Finally, we performed immunohistochemical analyses on the cerebellum. Immunohistochemistry showed increased expression of Mn-SOD, GPx1, and TRxR1 in Purkinje cells and molecular layer neurons, which was coincident with the mRNA expression patterns. Considering Mn-SOD, GPx1, and TRxR1 are critical for protecting cells against MeHg intoxication, the results indicate that low expression of these antioxidative enzymes increases CGCs vulnerability to MeHg toxicity.

  12. Physical Confirmation and Comparative Genomics of the Rat Mammary carcinoma susceptibility 3 Quantitative Trait Locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saasha Le

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Human breast and rat mammary cancer susceptibility are complex phenotypes where complete sets of risk associated loci remain to be identified for both species. We tested multiple congenic rat strains to physically confirm and positionally map rat Mammary carcinoma susceptibility 3 (Mcs3—a mammary cancer resistance allele previously predicted at Rattus norvegicus chromosome 1 (RNO1. The mammary cancer susceptible Wistar Furth (WF strain was the recipient, and the mammary cancer resistant Copenhagen (Cop strain was the RNO1-segment donor for congenics. Inbred WF females averaged 6.3 carcinogen-induced mammary carcinomas per rat. Two WF.Cop congenic strains averaged 2.8 and 3.4 mammary carcinomas per rat, which confirmed Mcs3 as an independently acting allele. Two other WF.Cop congenic strains averaged 6.6 and 8.1 mammary carcinomas per rat, and, thus, did not contain Mcs3. Rat Mcs3 was delimited to 27.8 Mb of RNO1 from rs8149408 to rs105131702 (RNO1:143700228-171517317 of RGSC 6.0/rn6. Human genetic variants with p values for association to breast cancer risk below 10−7 had not been reported for Mcs3 orthologous loci; however, human variants located in Mcs3-orthologous regions with potential association to risk (10−7 < p < 10−3 were listed in some population-based studies. Further, rat Mcs3 contains sequence orthologous to human 11q13/14—a region frequently amplified in female breast cancer. We conclude that Mcs3 is an independently acting mammary carcinoma resistance allele. Human population-based, genome-targeted association studies interrogating Mcs3 orthologous loci may yield novel breast cancer risk associated variants and genes.

  13. Whole-Genome Sequences of DA and F344 Rats with Different Susceptibilities to Arthritis, Autoimmunity, Inflammation and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaosen; Brenner, Max; Zhang, Xuemei; Laragione, Teresina; Tai, Shuaishuai; Li, Yanhong; Bu, Junjie; Yin, Ye; Shah, Anish A.; Kwan, Kevin; Li, Yingrui; Jun, Wang; Gulko, Pércio S.

    2013-01-01

    DA (D-blood group of Palm and Agouti, also known as Dark Agouti) and F344 (Fischer) are two inbred rat strains with differences in several phenotypes, including susceptibility to autoimmune disease models and inflammatory responses. While these strains have been extensively studied, little information is available about the DA and F344 genomes, as only the Brown Norway (BN) and spontaneously hypertensive rat strains have been sequenced to date. Here we report the sequencing of the DA and F344 genomes using next-generation Illumina paired-end read technology and the first de novo assembly of a rat genome. DA and F344 were sequenced with an average depth of 32-fold, covered 98.9% of the BN reference genome, and included 97.97% of known rat ESTs. New sequences could be assigned to 59 million positions with previously unknown data in the BN reference genome. Differences between DA, F344, and BN included 19 million positions in novel scaffolds, 4.09 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (including 1.37 million new SNPs), 458,224 short insertions and deletions, and 58,174 structural variants. Genetic differences between DA, F344, and BN, including high-impact SNPs and short insertions and deletions affecting >2500 genes, are likely to account for most of the phenotypic variation between these strains. The new DA and F344 genome sequencing data should facilitate gene discovery efforts in rat models of human disease. PMID:23695301

  14. Whole-genome sequences of DA and F344 rats with different susceptibilities to arthritis, autoimmunity, inflammation and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaosen; Brenner, Max; Zhang, Xuemei; Laragione, Teresina; Tai, Shuaishuai; Li, Yanhong; Bu, Junjie; Yin, Ye; Shah, Anish A; Kwan, Kevin; Li, Yingrui; Jun, Wang; Gulko, Pércio S

    2013-08-01

    DA (D-blood group of Palm and Agouti, also known as Dark Agouti) and F344 (Fischer) are two inbred rat strains with differences in several phenotypes, including susceptibility to autoimmune disease models and inflammatory responses. While these strains have been extensively studied, little information is available about the DA and F344 genomes, as only the Brown Norway (BN) and spontaneously hypertensive rat strains have been sequenced to date. Here we report the sequencing of the DA and F344 genomes using next-generation Illumina paired-end read technology and the first de novo assembly of a rat genome. DA and F344 were sequenced with an average depth of 32-fold, covered 98.9% of the BN reference genome, and included 97.97% of known rat ESTs. New sequences could be assigned to 59 million positions with previously unknown data in the BN reference genome. Differences between DA, F344, and BN included 19 million positions in novel scaffolds, 4.09 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (including 1.37 million new SNPs), 458,224 short insertions and deletions, and 58,174 structural variants. Genetic differences between DA, F344, and BN, including high-impact SNPs and short insertions and deletions affecting >2500 genes, are likely to account for most of the phenotypic variation between these strains. The new DA and F344 genome sequencing data should facilitate gene discovery efforts in rat models of human disease.

  15. Differences in the cellular mechanism underlying the effects of amphetamine on prepulse inhibition in apomorphine-susceptible and apomorphine-unsusceptible rats.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elst, M.C.J. van der; Wunderink, Y.S.; Ellenbroek, B.A.; Cools, A.R.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Amphetamine is often used to mimic certain aspects of schizophrenia in laboratory animals, such as a decreased prepulse inhibition. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Apomorphine-susceptible and apomorphine-unsusceptible rats represent a well-characterized animal model for individual differences in

  16. Individual Differences in Cue-Induced Motivation and Striatal Systems in Rats Susceptible to Diet-Induced Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Mike JF; Burghardt, Paul R; Patterson, Christa M; Nobile, Cameron W; Akil, Huda; Watson, Stanley J; Berridge, Kent C; Ferrario, Carrie R

    2015-01-01

    Pavlovian cues associated with junk-foods (caloric, highly sweet, and/or fatty foods), like the smell of brownies, can elicit craving to eat and increase the amount of food consumed. People who are more susceptible to these motivational effects of food cues may have a higher risk for becoming obese. Further, overconsumption of junk-foods leading to the development of obesity may itself heighten attraction to food cues. Here, we used a model of individual susceptibility to junk-foods diet-induced obesity to determine whether there are pre-existing and/or diet-induced increases in attraction to and motivation for sucrose-paired cues (ie, incentive salience or ‘wanting’). We also assessed diet- vs obesity-associated alterations in mesolimbic function and receptor expression. We found that rats susceptible to diet-induced obesity displayed heightened conditioned approach prior to the development of obesity. In addition, after junk-food diet exposure, those rats that developed obesity also showed increased willingness to gain access to a sucrose cue. Heightened ‘wanting’ was not due to individual differences in the hedonic impact (‘liking’) of sucrose. Neurobiologically, Mu opioid receptor mRNA expression was lower in striatal ‘hot-spots’ that generate eating or hedonic impact only in those rats that became obese. In contrast, prolonged exposure to junk-food resulted in cross-sensitization to amphetamine-induced locomotion and downregulation of striatal D2R mRNA regardless of the development of obesity. Together these data shed light on individual differences in behavioral and neurobiological consequences of exposure to junk-food diets and the potential contribution of incentive sensitization in susceptible individuals to greater food cue-triggered motivation. PMID:25761571

  17. Individual Differences in Cue-Induced Motivation and Striatal Systems in Rats Susceptible to Diet-Induced Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Mike J F; Burghardt, Paul R; Patterson, Christa M; Nobile, Cameron W; Akil, Huda; Watson, Stanley J; Berridge, Kent C; Ferrario, Carrie R

    2015-08-01

    Pavlovian cues associated with junk-foods (caloric, highly sweet, and/or fatty foods), like the smell of brownies, can elicit craving to eat and increase the amount of food consumed. People who are more susceptible to these motivational effects of food cues may have a higher risk for becoming obese. Further, overconsumption of junk-foods leading to the development of obesity may itself heighten attraction to food cues. Here, we used a model of individual susceptibility to junk-foods diet-induced obesity to determine whether there are pre-existing and/or diet-induced increases in attraction to and motivation for sucrose-paired cues (ie, incentive salience or 'wanting'). We also assessed diet- vs obesity-associated alterations in mesolimbic function and receptor expression. We found that rats susceptible to diet-induced obesity displayed heightened conditioned approach prior to the development of obesity. In addition, after junk-food diet exposure, those rats that developed obesity also showed increased willingness to gain access to a sucrose cue. Heightened 'wanting' was not due to individual differences in the hedonic impact ('liking') of sucrose. Neurobiologically, Mu opioid receptor mRNA expression was lower in striatal 'hot-spots' that generate eating or hedonic impact only in those rats that became obese. In contrast, prolonged exposure to junk-food resulted in cross-sensitization to amphetamine-induced locomotion and downregulation of striatal D2R mRNA regardless of the development of obesity. Together these data shed light on individual differences in behavioral and neurobiological consequences of exposure to junk-food diets and the potential contribution of incentive sensitization in susceptible individuals to greater food cue-triggered motivation.

  18. Adenosine receptor modulation of seizure susceptibility in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szot, P.

    1987-01-01

    Adenosine is considered to be a neuromodulator or cotransmitter in the periphery and CNS. This neuromodulatory action of adenosine may be observed as an anticonvulsant effect. Dose-response curves for R-phenylisopropyladenosine (PIA), cycohexyladenosine (CHA), 2-chloroadenosine (2-ClAdo), N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA) and S-PIA were generated against PTZ seizure thresholds in the rat. The rank order of potency for adenosine agonists to elevate PTZ seizure threshold was R-PIA > 2-ClAdo > NECA > CHA > S-PIA. R-PIA was approximately 80-fold more potent than S-PIA. This 80-fold difference in potency between the diasteriomers of PIA was consistent with an A{sub 1} adenoise receptor-mediated response. The anticonvulsant action of 2-ClAdo was reversed by pretreatment with theoplylline. Chronic administration of theophylline significantly increased the specific binding of {sup 3}H-cyclohexyladenosine in membranes of the cerebral cortex and cerebellum of the rat. Chronic exposure to theophylline produced a significant increase in the densities of both the high- and low-affinity forms of A{sub 1} adenosine receptors in the cerebral cortex.

  19. Solving the Dynamic Correlation Problem of the Susceptible-Infected-Susceptible Model on Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Cai, Chao-Ran; Chen, Michael Z Q; Holme, Petter; Guan, Jian-Yue

    2016-01-01

    The Susceptible-Infected-Susceptible model is a canonical model for emerging disease outbreaks. Such outbreaks are naturally modeled as taking place on networks. A theoretical challenge in network epidemiology is the dynamic correlations coming from that if one node is occupied, or infected (for disease spreading models), then its neighbors are likely to be occupied. By combining two theoretical approaches---the heterogeneous mean-field theory and the effective degree method---we are able to include these correlations in an analytical solution of the SIS model. We derive accurate expressions for the average prevalence (fraction of infected) and epidemic threshold. We also discuss how to generalize the approach to a larger class of stochastic population models.

  20. Prenatal ethanol exposure increases osteoarthritis susceptibility in female rat offspring by programming a low-functioning IGF-1 signaling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Qubo; Tan, Yang; Zhang, Xianrong; Luo, Hanwen; Deng, Yu; Magdalou, Jacques; Chen, Liaobin; Wang, Hui

    2015-10-01

    Epidemiological evidence indicates that osteoarthritis (OA) and prenatal ethanol exposure (PEE) are both associated with low birth weight but possible causal interrelationships have not been investigated. To investigate the effects of PEE on the susceptibility to OA in adult rats that experienced intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR), and to explore potential intrauterine mechanisms, we established the rat model of IUGR by PEE and dexamethasone, and the female fetus and 24-week-old adult offspring subjected to strenuous running for 6 weeks were sacrificed. Knee joints were collected from fetuses and adult offspring for histochemistry, immunohistochemistry and qPCR assays. Histological analyses and the Mankin score revealed increased cartilage destruction and accelerated OA progression in adult offspring from the PEE group compared to the control group. Immunohistochemistry showed reduced expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) signaling pathway components. Furthermore, fetuses in the PEE group experienced IUGR but exhibited a higher postnatal growth rate. The expression of many IGF-1 signaling components was downregulated, which coincided with reduced amounts of type II collagen in the epiphyseal cartilage of fetuses in the PEE group. These results suggest that PEE enhances the susceptibility to OA in female adult rat offspring by down-regulating IGF-1 signaling and retarding articular cartilage development.

  1. Wistar-Kyoto Female Rats Are More Susceptible to Develop Sugar Binging: A Comparison with Wistar Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papacostas-Quintanilla, Helena; Ortiz-Ortega, Víctor Manuel; López-Rubalcava, Carolina

    2017-01-01

    -like behavior in the PMT. In conclusion, WKY female rats can be considered as a more susceptible rat strain to develop SBLB. PMID:28536692

  2. Wistar-Kyoto Female Rats Are More Susceptible to Develop Sugar Binging: A Comparison with Wistar Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Papacostas-Quintanilla

    2017-05-01

    anxiety-like behavior in the PMT. In conclusion, WKY female rats can be considered as a more susceptible rat strain to develop SBLB.

  3. Inflammasome sensor NLRP1 controls rat macrophage susceptibility to Toxoplasma gondii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly M Cirelli

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma gondii is an intracellular parasite that infects a wide range of warm-blooded species. Rats vary in their susceptibility to this parasite. The Toxo1 locus conferring Toxoplasma resistance in rats was previously mapped to a region of chromosome 10 containing Nlrp1. This gene encodes an inflammasome sensor controlling macrophage sensitivity to anthrax lethal toxin (LT induced rapid cell death (pyroptosis. We show here that rat strain differences in Toxoplasma infected macrophage sensitivity to pyroptosis, IL-1β/IL-18 processing, and inhibition of parasite proliferation are perfectly correlated with NLRP1 sequence, while inversely correlated with sensitivity to anthrax LT-induced cell death. Using recombinant inbred rats, SNP analyses and whole transcriptome gene expression studies, we narrowed the candidate genes for control of Toxoplasma-mediated rat macrophage pyroptosis to four genes, one of which was Nlrp1. Knockdown of Nlrp1 in pyroptosis-sensitive macrophages resulted in higher parasite replication and protection from cell death. Reciprocally, overexpression of the NLRP1 variant from Toxoplasma-sensitive macrophages in pyroptosis-resistant cells led to sensitization of these resistant macrophages. Our findings reveal Toxoplasma as a novel activator of the NLRP1 inflammasome in rat macrophages.

  4. Prenatal ethanol exposure programs an increased susceptibility of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in female adult offspring rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Lang; Liu, Zhongfen; Gong, Jun; Zhang, Li [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Wang, Linlong [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Magdalou, Jacques [UMR 7561 CNRS-Nancy Université, Faculté de Médicine, Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Chen, Liaobin [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Wang, Hui, E-mail: wanghui19@whu.edu.cn [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Research Center of Food and Drug Evaluation, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2014-01-15

    Prenatal ethanol exposure (PEE) induces dyslipidemia and hyperglycemia in fetus and adult offspring. However, whether PEE increases the susceptibility to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in offspring and its underlying mechanism remain unknown. This study aimed to demonstrate an increased susceptibility to high-fat diet (HFD)-induced NAFLD and its intrauterine programming mechanisms in female rat offspring with PEE. Rat model of intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) was established by PEE, the female fetus and adult offspring that fed normal diet (ND) or HFD were sacrificed. The results showed that, in PEE + ND group, serum corticosterone (CORT) slightly decreased and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and glucose increased with partial catch-up growth; In PEE + HFD group, serum CORT decreased, while serum IGF-1, glucose and triglyceride (TG) increased, with notable catch-up growth, higher metabolic status and NAFLD formation. Enhanced liver expression of the IGF-1 pathway, gluconeogenesis, and lipid synthesis as well as reduced expression of lipid output were accompanied in PEE + HFD group. In PEE fetus, serum CORT increased while IGF-1 decreased, with low body weight, hyperglycemia, and hepatocyte ultrastructural changes. Hepatic IGF-1 expression as well as lipid output was down-regulated, while lipid synthesis significantly increased. Based on these findings, we propose a “two-programming” hypothesis for an increased susceptibility to HFD-induced NAFLD in female offspring of PEE. That is, the intrauterine programming of liver glucose and lipid metabolic function is “the first programming”, and postnatal adaptive catch-up growth triggered by intrauterine programming of GC-IGF1 axis acts as “the second programming”. - Highlights: • Prenatal ethanol exposure increase the susceptibility of NAFLD in female offspring. • Prenatal ethanol exposure reprograms fetal liver’s glucose and lipid metabolism . • Prenatal ethanol exposure cause

  5. Early-life Sodium-exposure Unmasks Susceptibility to Stroke in hyperlipidemic-hypertensive Tg[hCETP]25-Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decano, Julius L.; Viereck, Jason C.; McKee, Ann C.; Hamilton, James A.; Ruiz-Opazo, Nelson; Herrera, Victoria L.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Early-life risk factor exposure increases aortic atherosclerosis and blood pressure in humans and animal models, however, limited insight has been made into end-organ complications. Methods and Results We investigated the effects of early-life Na-exposure (0.23% vs 0.4%NaCl regular-rat chow) on vascular disease outcomes using the inbred, transgenic[hCETP]25 Dahl salt-sensitive hypertensive rat model of male-predominant coronary atherosclerosis, Tg25. Rather than the expected increased coronary heart disease, fetal 0.4%Na-exposure (≤2g-Na/2000cal/diet/day) induced adult-onset stroke in both sexes (ANOVA Pcerebral cortical hemorrhagic infarctions, microhemorrhages, neuronal ischemia, microvascular injury. Ex-vivo MRI of stroke+ rat brains detected cerebral hemorrhages, microhemorrhages and ischemia with middle cerebral artery-distribution, and cerebellar non-involvement. Ultrasound micro-imaging detected carotid artery disease. Pre-stroke analysis detected neuronal ischemia, and decreased mass of isolated cerebral, but not cerebellar, microvessels. Conclusions Early-life Na-exposure exacerbated hypertension and unmasked stroke susceptibility with greater female vulnerability in hypertensive-hyperlipidemic Tg25-rats. The reproducible modeling in Tg25sp rats of carotid artery disease, cerebral hemorrhagic-infarctions, neuronal ischemia, microhemorrhages, and microvascular alterations suggests a pathogenic spectrum with causal interrelationships. This “mixed-stroke” spectrum could represent paradigms of ischemic-hemorrhagic transformation, and/or a microangiopathic basis for the association of ischemic-lesions, microhemorrhages, and strokes in humans. Altogether, the data reveal early-life Na-exposure as a significant modifier of hypertension and stroke disease-course, hence a potential modifiable prevention target deserving systematic study. PMID:19273719

  6. Multiple susceptibility loci for radiation-induced mammary tumorigenesis in F2[Dahl S x R]-intercross rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria L Herrera

    Full Text Available Although two major breast cancer susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, have been identified accounting for 20% of breast cancer genetic risk, identification of other susceptibility genes accounting for 80% risk remains a challenge due to the complex, multi-factorial nature of breast cancer. Complexity derives from multiple genetic determinants, permutations of gene-environment interactions, along with presumptive low-penetrance of breast cancer predisposing genes, and genetic heterogeneity of human populations. As with other complex diseases, dissection of genetic determinants in animal models provides key insight since genetic heterogeneity and environmental factors can be experimentally controlled, thus facilitating the detection of quantitative trait loci (QTL. We therefore, performed the first genome-wide scan for loci contributing to radiation-induced mammary tumorigenesis in female F2-(Dahl S x R-intercross rats. Tumorigenesis was measured as tumor burden index (TBI after induction of rat mammary tumors at forty days of age via ¹²⁷Cs-radiation. We observed a spectrum of tumor latency, size-progression, and pathology from poorly differentiated ductal adenocarcinoma to fibroadenoma, indicating major effects of gene-environment interactions. We identified two mammary tumorigenesis susceptibility quantitative trait loci (Mts-QTLs with significant linkage: Mts-1 on chromosome-9 (LOD-2.98 and Mts-2 on chromosome-1 (LOD-2.61, as well as two Mts-QTLs with suggestive linkage: Mts-3 on chromosome-5 (LOD-1.93 and Mts-4 on chromosome-18 (LOD-1.54. Interestingly, Chr9-Mts-1, Chr5-Mts-3 and Chr18-Mts-4 QTLs are unique to irradiation-induced mammary tumorigenesis, while Chr1-Mts-2 QTL overlaps with a mammary cancer susceptibility QTL (Mcs 3 reported for 7,12-dimethylbenz-[α]antracene (DMBA-induced mammary tumorigenesis in F2[COP x Wistar-Furth]-intercross rats. Altogether, our results suggest at least three distinct susceptibility QTLs for

  7. Head-turning asymmetry: A novel lateralization in rats predicts susceptibility to behavioral despair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyman, Efe; Yilmaz, Guzin Duygu; Canbeyli, Resit

    2017-10-16

    Behavioral markers of laterality reflecting underlying neurobiological asymmetries between the cerebral hemispheres are related to differential susceptibility to mood disorders. In the present study, we investigated the strength and consistency of a novel behavioral lateralization, head-turning asymmetry, and its relation to behavioral despair in adult female Wistar rats. Head-turning biases were determined in a test where water-deprived rats had to turn their head to right or left to gain access to a water dispenser. This procedure was administered 4 times over 8days. Four days after the head-turning test, rats were subjected to two forced swim tests separated by 24h to examine the relationship between head-turning asymmetry and behavioral despair. Rats were administered one more head-turning test session after the second swim test to determine whether behavioral despair induction altered head-turning direction preferences. Results revealed significant correlations among head-turning test sessions indicating head-turning direction preference as measured with our method is a consistent behavioral lateralization. Although most rats were strongly lateralized, there was no bias in either direction at the population level. Importantly, we found that while rats with a left head-turning bias showed a significant increase in the duration of immobility from the first to the second swim test, right-biased rats performed similarly in the two swim tests. Behavioral despair induction did not change head-turning direction preferences. The present findings show that head-turning asymmetries are predictive of mood disorders in rats and may serve as the basis to elucidate the mechanisms relating hemispheric asymmetries to depression in humans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Active vs. sedentary lifestyle from weaning to adulthood and susceptibility to ozone in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, C J; Phillips, P M; Ledbetter, A; Snow, S J; Schladweiler, M C; Johnstone, A F M; Kodavanti, U P

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of a sedentary (SED) life style combined with calorically rich diets has spurred the rise in childhood obesity, which, in turn, translates to adverse health effects in adulthood. Obesity and lack of active (ACT) lifestyle may increase susceptibility to air pollutants. We housed 22-day-old female Long-Evans rats in a cage without (SED) or with a running wheel (ACT). After 10 wk the rats ran 310 ± 16.3 km. Responses of SED and ACT rats to whole-body O3 (0, 0.25, 0.5, or 1.0 ppm; 5 h/day for 2 days) was assessed. Glucose tolerance testing (GTT) was performed following the first day of O3 ACT rats had less body fat and an improved glucose GTT. Ventilatory function (plethysmography) of SED and ACT groups was similarly impaired by O3 Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was collected after the second O3 exposure. SED and ACT rats were hyperglycemic following 1.0 ppm O3 GTT was impaired by O3 in both groups; however, ACT rats exhibited improved recovery to 0.25 and 1.0 ppm O3 BALF cell neutrophils and total cells were similarly increased in ACT and SED groups exposed to 1.0 ppm O3 O3-induced increase in eosinophils was exacerbated in SED rats. Chronic exercise from postweaning to adulthood improved some of the metabolic and pulmonary responses to O3 (GTT and eosinophils) but several other parameters were unaffected. The reduction in O3-induced rise in BALF eosinophils in ACT rats suggests a possible link between a SED lifestyle and incidence of asthma-related symptoms from O3. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Evaluating performances of simplified physically based models for landslide susceptibility

    OpenAIRE

    G. Formetta; G. Capparelli; P. Versace

    2015-01-01

    Rainfall induced shallow landslides cause loss of life and significant damages involving private and public properties, transportation system, etc. Prediction of shallow landslides susceptible locations is a complex task that involves many disciplines: hydrology, geotechnical science, geomorphology, and statistics. Usually to accomplish this task two main approaches are used: statistical or physically based model. Reliable models' applications involve: autom...

  10. A rat model of early stage osteonecrosis induced by glucocorticoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerachian Mohammad

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glucocorticoid (GC-induced osteonecrosis (ON is an important complication of medical therapy. The exact pathomechanisms of ON has not been clearly elucidated. There is a need for a reproducible animal model that better approximates the clinical scenario. Methods To determine the genetic susceptibility of rats to develop GC-induced femoral head ON, we evaluated 5 different inbred strains of rats (Spontaneous Hypertensive Rat, Wistar Kyoto, Wistar Furth, SASCO Fisher and Lewis. Prednisone pellets (dosage of 1.82-2.56 mg/kg/day were implanted subcutaneously for 90. After 90 days, the femurs were resected and examined histologically and radiographically. Pathological and histological examination was performed. Hematoxylin and eosin (H & E staining was used to delineate the femoral head osteonecrosis lesions as well as abnormalities of articular cartilage and growth plate. Results The greatest differences in H & E staining were seen in the Wistar Kyoto and Wistar Furth groups. In these groups 4 out of 5 and 3 out of 5, respectively, steroid-induced rats revealed growth plate disruption with acellular areas. The TUNEL apoptosis staining assay for apoptosis revealed that 4 out of 5 of Wistar Kyoto rats, 5 out of 5 of Wistar Furth, 2 out of 4 of surviving Lewis and 2 out of 2 of the surviving spontaneous hypertensive rats had apoptotic osteocytes in trabeculae, whereas none of the Fisher rats showed apoptotic osteocytes. Conclusions We postulate that Wistar Kyoto, Wistar Furth and spontaneous hypertensive rats may be strains of rats more susceptible to develop ON of the femoral head while Fisher rats were the most resistant.

  11. Evaluating performances of simplified physically based models for landslide susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formetta, G.; Capparelli, G.; Versace, P.

    2015-12-01

    Rainfall induced shallow landslides cause loss of life and significant damages involving private and public properties, transportation system, etc. Prediction of shallow landslides susceptible locations is a complex task that involves many disciplines: hydrology, geotechnical science, geomorphology, and statistics. Usually to accomplish this task two main approaches are used: statistical or physically based model. Reliable models' applications involve: automatic parameters calibration, objective quantification of the quality of susceptibility maps, model sensitivity analysis. This paper presents a methodology to systemically and objectively calibrate, verify and compare different models and different models performances indicators in order to individuate and eventually select the models whose behaviors are more reliable for a certain case study. The procedure was implemented in package of models for landslide susceptibility analysis and integrated in the NewAge-JGrass hydrological model. The package includes three simplified physically based models for landslides susceptibility analysis (M1, M2, and M3) and a component for models verifications. It computes eight goodness of fit indices by comparing pixel-by-pixel model results and measurements data. Moreover, the package integration in NewAge-JGrass allows the use of other components such as geographic information system tools to manage inputs-output processes, and automatic calibration algorithms to estimate model parameters. The system was applied for a case study in Calabria (Italy) along the Salerno-Reggio Calabria highway, between Cosenza and Altilia municipality. The analysis provided that among all the optimized indices and all the three models, the optimization of the index distance to perfect classification in the receiver operating characteristic plane (D2PC) coupled with model M3 is the best modeling solution for our test case.

  12. Optimal control in a model of malaria with differential susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hincapié, Doracelly; Ospina, Juan

    2014-06-01

    A malaria model with differential susceptibility is analyzed using the optimal control technique. In the model the human population is classified as susceptible, infected and recovered. Susceptibility is assumed dependent on genetic, physiological, or social characteristics that vary between individuals. The model is described by a system of differential equations that relate the human and vector populations, so that the infection is transmitted to humans by vectors, and the infection is transmitted to vectors by humans. The model considered is analyzed using the optimal control method when the control consists in using of insecticide-treated nets and educational campaigns; and the optimality criterion is to minimize the number of infected humans, while keeping the cost as low as is possible. One first goal is to determine the effects of differential susceptibility in the proposed control mechanism; and the second goal is to determine the algebraic form of the basic reproductive number of the model. All computations are performed using computer algebra, specifically Maple. It is claimed that the analytical results obtained are important for the design and implementation of control measures for malaria. It is suggested some future investigations such as the application of the method to other vector-borne diseases such as dengue or yellow fever; and also it is suggested the possible application of free software of computer algebra like Maxima.

  13. Brain responses to chronic social defeat stress: effects on regional oxidative metabolism as a function of a hedonic trait, and gene expression in susceptible and resilient rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanarik, Margus; Alttoa, Aet; Matrov, Denis; Kõiv, Kadri; Sharp, Trevor; Panksepp, Jaak; Harro, Jaanus

    2011-01-01

    Chronic social defeat stress, a depression model in rats, reduced struggling in the forced swimming test dependent on a hedonic trait-stressed rats with high sucrose intake struggled less. Social defeat reduced brain regional energy metabolism, and this effect was also more pronounced in rats with high sucrose intake. A number of changes in gene expression were identified after social defeat stress, most notably the down-regulation of Gsk3b and Map1b. The majority of differences were between stress-susceptible and resilient rats. Conclusively, correlates of inter-individual differences in stress resilience can be identified both at gene expression and oxidative metabolism levels. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  14. Role of spontaneous physical activity in prediction of susceptibility to activity based anorexia in male and female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Leighton, Claudio E; Grace, Martha; Billington, Charles J; Kotz, Catherine M

    2014-08-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a chronic eating disorder affecting females and males, defined by body weight loss, higher physical activity levels and restricted food intake. Currently, the commonalities and differences between genders in etiology of AN are not well understood. Animal models of AN, such as activity-based anorexia (ABA), can be helpful in identifying factors determining individual susceptibility to AN. In ABA, rodents are given an access to a running wheel while food restricted, resulting in paradoxical increased physical activity levels and weight loss. Recent studies suggest that different behavioral traits, including voluntary exercise, can predict individual weight loss in ABA. A higher inherent drive for movement may promote development and severity of AN, but this hypothesis remains untested. In rodents and humans, drive for movement is defined as spontaneous physical activity (SPA), which is time spent in low-intensity, non-volitional movements. In this paper, we show that a profile of body weight history and behavioral traits, including SPA, can predict individual weight loss caused by ABA in male and female rats with high accuracy. Analysis of the influence of SPA on ABA susceptibility in males and females rats suggests that either high or low levels of SPA increase the probability of high weight loss in ABA, but with larger effects in males compared to females. These results suggest that the same behavioral profile can identify individuals at-risk of AN for both male and female populations and that SPA has predictive value for susceptibility to AN. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Enhanced susceptibility to a chemical carcinogen in rats carrying MHC-linked genes influencing development (GRC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, K N; Shinozuka, H; Kunz, H W; Gill, T J

    1984-07-15

    In an approach to testing the possible relationship between embryogenesis and carcinogenesis, we examined the susceptibility of rats carrying the grc, which is an MHC-linked gene complex affecting growth and development, to the development of the cellular and biochemical changes known to be associated with the induction of cancer. Genetically related strains which differed mainly by the presence or absence of the grc were fed a diet containing 0.02% N-2-acetylaminofluorene (AAF), and the induction of gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase (GGT)-positive foci, bile-duct proliferation and oval-cell proliferation in the livers of the two groups of animals were scored. All of the rats homozygous for the grc displayed GGT-positive foci (from three to six per section) and extensive bile-duct and oval-cell proliferation. By contrast, only 27% of the animals which did not carry the grc had GGT-positive foci in the liver, and these were present in smaller numbers (from one to three per section); there was no bile-duct or oval-cell proliferation. Biochemical studies of the liver and testes showed that the grc homozygotes had the metabolic abnormalities associated with the development of cancer: increased cholesterol biosynthesis; increased DNA synthesis, as indicated by an enhanced incorporation of 3H-thymidine into DNA; stimulation of the hexose monophosphate (HMP) pathway, as indicated by increased levels of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD); and decreased levels of circulating lipoproteins. Both the morphological response of the rats carrying the grc to feeding AAF and the biochemical abnormalities that exist in these animal are consistent with the changes which eventually lead to cancer. Thus, there appears to be a relationship in rats between aberrations in the control of growth and development, susceptibility to the chemical induction of cancer and the control of cholesterol biosynthesis.

  16. Dobutamine "stress" test and latent cardiac susceptibility to inhaled diesel exhaust in normal and hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazari, Mehdi S; Callaway, Justin; Winsett, Darrell W; Lamb, Christina; Haykal-Coates, Najwa; Krantz, Q Todd; King, Charly; Costa, Daniel L; Farraj, Aimen K

    2012-08-01

    Exercise "stress" testing is a screening tool used to determine the amount of stress for which the heart can compensate before developing abnormal rhythm or ischemia, particularly in susceptible persons. Although this approach has been used to assess risk in humans exposed to air pollution, it has never been applied to rodent studies. We hypothesized that a single exposure to diesel exhaust (DE) would increase the risk of adverse cardiac events such as arrhythmia and myocardial ischemia in rats undergoing a dobutamine challenge test, which can be used to mimic exercise-like stress. Wistar-Kyoto normotensive (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rats implanted with radiotelemeters and a chronic intravenous catheter were whole-body exposed to 150 μg/m3 DE for 4 hr. Increasing doses of dobutamine, a β1-adrenergic agonist, were administered to conscious unrestrained rats 24 hr later to elicit the cardiac response observed during exercise while heart rate (HR) and electrocardiogram (ECG) were monitored. A single exposure to DE potentiated the HR response of WKY and SH rats during dobutamine challenge and prevented HR recovery at rest. During peak challenge, DE-exposed SH rats had lower overall HR variability when compared with controls, in addition to transient ST depression. All DE-exposed animals also had increased arrhythmias. These results are the first evidence that rats exhibit stress-induced cardiac dysrhythmia and ischemia sensitivity comparable to humans after a single exposure to a toxic air pollutant, particularly when in the presence of underlying cardiovascular disease. Thus, exposure to low concentrations of air pollution can impair the heart's ability to respond to stress and increase the risk of subsequent triggered dysfunction.

  17. An Animal Model of Active (Act) Versus Sedentary (Sed) Lifestyle and Susceptibility to Air Pollution: Response to Ozone (O3) in Female Sprague-Dawley Rats Allowed to Train Chronically On Running Wheels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epidemiological data suggest that a sedentary lifestyle may contribute to increased suseptibility to environmental pollutants. Furthermore, the association between a sedentary pattern and development of obesity may exacerbate susceptibility. To study the effects of ACT vs. SED l...

  18. Multifractal model of magnetic susceptibility distributions in some igneous rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Gettings

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of in-situ magnetic susceptibility were compiled from mainly Precambrian crystalline basement rocks beneath the Colorado Plateau and ranges in Arizona, Colorado, and New Mexico. The susceptibility meter used measures about 30 cm3 of rock and measures variations in the modal distribution of magnetic minerals that form a minor component volumetrically in these coarsely crystalline granitic to granodioritic rocks. Recent measurements include 50–150 measurements on each outcrop, and show that the distribution of magnetic susceptibilities is highly variable, multimodal and strongly non-Gaussian. Although the distribution of magnetic susceptibility is well known to be multifractal, the small number of data points at an outcrop precludes calculation of the multifractal spectrum by conventional methods. Instead, a brute force approach was adopted using multiplicative cascade models to fit the outcrop scale variability of magnetic minerals. Model segment proportion and length parameters resulted in 26 676 models to span parameter space. Distributions at each outcrop were normalized to unity magnetic susceptibility and added to compare all data for a rock body accounting for variations in petrology and alteration. Once the best-fitting model was found, the equation relating the segment proportion and length parameters was solved numerically to yield the multifractal spectrum estimate. For the best fits, the relative density (the proportion divided by the segment length of one segment tends to be dominant and the other two densities are smaller and nearly equal. No other consistent relationships between the best fit parameters were identified. The multifractal spectrum estimates appear to distinguish between metamorphic gneiss sites and sites on plutons, even if the plutons have been metamorphosed. In particular, rocks that have undergone multiple tectonic events tend to have a larger range of scaling exponents.

  19. Application of Physically based landslide susceptibility models in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho Vieira, Bianca; Martins, Tiago D.

    2017-04-01

    Shallow landslides and floods are the processes responsible for most material and environmental damages in Brazil. In the last decades, some landslides events induce a high number of deaths (e.g. Over 1000 deaths in one event) and incalculable social and economic losses. Therefore, the prediction of those processes is considered an important tool for land use planning tools. Among different methods the physically based landslide susceptibility models having been widely used in many countries, but in Brazil it is still incipient when compared to other ones, like statistical tools and frequency analyses. Thus, the main objective of this research was to assess the application of some Physically based landslide susceptibility models in Brazil, identifying their main results, the efficiency of susceptibility mapping, parameters used and limitations of the tropical humid environment. In order to achieve that, it was evaluated SHALSTAB, SINMAP and TRIGRS models in some studies in Brazil along with the Geotechnical values, scales, DEM grid resolution and the results based on the analysis of the agreement between predicted susceptibility and the landslide scar's map. Most of the studies in Brazil applied SHALSTAB, SINMAP and to a lesser extent the TRIGRS model. The majority researches are concentrated in the Serra do Mar mountain range, that is a system of escarpments and rugged mountains that extends more than 1,500 km along the southern and southeastern Brazilian coast, and regularly affected by heavy rainfall that generates widespread mass movements. Most part of these studies used conventional topographic maps with scales ranging from 1:2000 to 1:50000 and DEM-grid resolution between 2 and 20m. Regarding the Geotechnical and hydrological values, a few studies use field collected data which could produce more efficient results, as indicated by international literature. Therefore, even though they have enormous potential in the susceptibility mapping, even for comparison

  20. Polygenic inheritance of cryptorchidism susceptibility in the LE/orl rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthold, Julia Spencer; Pugarelli, Joan; MacDonald, Madolyn L; Ren, Jia; Adetunji, Modupeore O; Polson, Shawn W; Mateson, Abigail; Wang, Yanping; Sol-Church, Katia; McCahan, Suzanne M; Akins, Robert E; Devoto, Marcella; Robbins, Alan K

    2016-01-01

    Susceptibility to inherited cryptorchidism in the LE/orl rat may be associated with genetic loci that influence developmental patterning of the gubernaculum by the fetal testis. Cryptorchidism in the LE/orl rat is associated with a unique combination of homozygous minor alleles at multiple loci, and the encoded proteins are co-localized with androgen receptor (AR) and Leydig cells in fetal gubernaculum and testis, respectively. Prior studies have shown aberrant perinatal gubernacular migration, muscle patterning defects and reduced fetal testicular testosterone in the LE/orl strain. In addition, altered expression of androgen-responsive, cytoskeletal and muscle-related transcripts in the LE/orl fetal gubernaculum suggest a role for defective AR signaling in cryptorchidism susceptibility. The long-term LE/orl colony and short-term colonies of outbred Crl:LE and Crl:SD, and inbred WKY/Ncrl rats were maintained for studies. Animals were intercrossed (LE/orl X WKY/Ncrl), and obligate heterozygotes were reciprocally backcrossed to LE/orl rats to generate 54 F2 males used for genotyping and/or linkage analysis. At least five fetuses per gestational time point from two or more litters were used for quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and freshly harvested embryonic (E) day 17 gubernaculum was used to generate conditionally immortalized cell lines. We completed genotyping and gene expression analyses using genome-wide microsatellite markers and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays, PCR amplification, direct sequencing, restriction enzyme digest with fragment analysis, whole genome sequencing (WGS), and qRT-PCR. Linkage analysis was performed in Haploview with multiple testing correction, and qRT-PCR data were analyzed using ANOVA after log transformation. Imaging was performed using custom and commercial antibodies directed at candidate proteins in gubernaculum and testis tissues, and gubernaculum cell lines. LE/orl rats showed reduced fertility and fecundity

  1. GRAPHICAL USER INTERFACE WITH APPLICATIONS IN SUSCEPTIBLE-INFECTIOUS-SUSCEPTIBLE MODELS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilea, M; Turnea, M; Arotăriţei, D; Rotariu, Mariana; Popescu, Marilena

    2015-01-01

    Practical significance of understanding the dynamics and evolution of infectious diseases increases continuously in contemporary world. The mathematical study of the dynamics of infectious diseases has a long history. By incorporating statistical methods and computer-based simulations in dynamic epidemiological models, it could be possible for modeling methods and theoretical analyses to be more realistic and reliable, allowing a more detailed understanding of the rules governing epidemic spreading. To provide the basis for a disease transmission, the population of a region is often divided into various compartments, and the model governing their relation is called the compartmental model. To present all of the information available, a graphical user interface provides icons and visual indicators. The graphical interface shown in this paper is performed using the MATLAB software ver. 7.6.0. MATLAB software offers a wide range of techniques by which data can be displayed graphically. The process of data viewing involves a series of operations. To achieve it, I had to make three separate files, one for defining the mathematical model and two for the interface itself. Considering a fixed population, it is observed that the number of susceptible individuals diminishes along with an increase in the number of infectious individuals so that in about ten days the number of individuals infected and susceptible, respectively, has the same value. If the epidemic is not controlled, it will continue for an indefinite period of time. By changing the global parameters specific of the SIS model, a more rapid increase of infectious individuals is noted. Using the graphical user interface shown in this paper helps achieving a much easier interaction with the computer, simplifying the structure of complex instructions by using icons and menus, and, in particular, programs and files are much easier to organize. Some numerical simulations have been presented to illustrate theoretical

  2. The susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) model for viral marketing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Siti Suhaila; Akil, Ku Azlina Ku; Chulan, Majdah; Sharif, Noorzila

    2017-11-01

    Viral marketing is a marketing strategy utilizes social media to spread information about a product or services provided. It is the most powerful way to share information in a short amount of time. The objective of this study is to investigate the dynamic of viral marketing within a time duration in the point of view of mathematics. This study used the epidemiological model known as Susceptible-Infected-Recovered (SIR). The model consists of a system of three differential equations with three state variables namely susceptible (S), infected (I) and recovered (R). It considers a case of SIR model with demography. Numerical experiments have been performed. The results show that viral marketing reaches its peak within two days. The online messages shared will become higher if the initial number of the infected individual has been increased.

  3. Susceptibility to stress induced visceral hypersensitivity in maternally separated rats is transferred across generations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Wijngaard, R. M.; Stanisor, O. I.; van Diest, S. A.; Welting, O.; Wouters, M. M.; Cailotto, C.; de Jonge, W. J.; Boeckxstaens, G. E.

    2013-01-01

    In irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), familial clustering and transfer across generations may largely depend on environmental factors but this is difficult to establish in the human setting. Therefore, we aimed to set up a relevant animal model. We investigated whether susceptibility to stress induced

  4. Endothelial dilatory function predicts individual susceptibility to renal damage in the 5/6 nephrectomized rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gschwend, S; Buikema, H; Navis, G; Henning, RH; De Zeeuw, D; Van Dokkum, RPE

    2002-01-01

    In experimental animal models of renal disease the degree of renal damage varies between individuals. This could be caused by variation in the noxious event or by differences in individual susceptibility. Intact endothelial function is assumed to provide a defense mechanism against progressive renal

  5. Wavevector-Dependent Susceptibility in Quasiperiodic Ising Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au-Yang, Helen; Jin, Bai-Qi; Perk, Jacques H. H.

    2001-02-01

    Using the various functional relations for correlation functions in planar Ising models, new results are obtained for the correlation functions and the q-dependent susceptibility for Ising models on a quadratic lattice with quasiperiodic coupling constants. The effects are clearest if the interactions are both attractive and repulsive according to a quasiperiodic pattern. In particular, an exact scaling limit result for the two-point correlation function of the Z-invariant inhomogeneous Ising model is presented and the q-dependent susceptibility is calculated for some cases where the coupling constants vary according to Fibonacci rules. It is found that the ferromagnetic case differs drastically from the case with both ferro- and antiferromagnetic bonds. In the mixed case, the peaks of the q-dependent susceptibility are everywhere dense for temperature T both above or below the critical temperature Tc, but due to overlap only a finite number of peaks is visible. This number of visible peaks decreases as T moves away from Tc. In the ferromagnetic case, there is typically only one single peak at q=0, in spite of the aperiodicity present in the lattice. These results provide evidence that in real systems, even if the atoms arrange themselves aperiodically, there will be no dramatic difference in the diffraction pattern, unless the pair correlation function has clear aperiodic oscillations. The number of oscillations per correlation length determines the number of visible peaks.

  6. Systemic Inflammatory Responses and Lung Injury following Hip Fracture Surgery Increases Susceptibility to Infection in Aged Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary infections frequently occur following hip fracture surgery in aged patients. However, the underlying reasons are not fully understood. The present study investigates the systemic inflammatory response and pulmonary conditions following hip fracture surgery as a means of identifying risk factors for lung infections using an aged rodent model. Aged, male Sprague-Dawley rats (8 animals per group underwent a sham procedure or hip fracture plus femoral intramedullary pinning. Animals were sacrificed 1, 3, and 7 days after the injury. Markers of systemic inflammation and pulmonary injury were analyzed. Both sham-operated and injured/surgical group animals underwent intratracheal inoculation with Pseudomonas aeruginosa 1, 3, and 7 days after surgery. P. aeruginosa counts in blood and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid and survival rates were recorded. Serum TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, and IL-10 levels and markers of pulmonary injury were significantly increased at 1 and 3 days following hip fracture and surgery. Animals challenged with P. aeruginosa at 1 and 3 days after injury had a significantly decreased survival rate and more P. aeruginosa recovered from blood and BAL fluid. This study shows that hip fracture and surgery in aged rats induced a systemic inflammatory response and lung injury associated with increased susceptibility to infection during the acute phase after injury and surgery.

  7. Female Rats are Less Susceptible during Puberty to Lethal Effects of Percutaneous Exposure to VX

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-17

    age groups (PND 42 and 70). PND 70 rats were chosen to model the typ - ical combat soldier between 18- and 25-years old. Unfortunately, we were unable...being compared were determined to be sig- nificantly (p < 0.05) different. SigmaPlot 12.3 (Systat Software , San Jose, CA) was used to plot the dose

  8. L-carnitine reduces susceptibility to bupivacaine-induced cardiotoxicity: an experimental study in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Gail K; Pehora, Carolyne; Crawford, Mark W

    2017-03-01

    The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of acute administration of L-carnitine 100 mg·kg -1 iv on susceptibility to bupivacaine-induced cardiotoxicity in rats. In the first of two experiments, L-carnitine 100 mg·kg -1 iv (n = 10) or saline iv (n = 10) was administered to anesthetized and mechanically ventilated Sprague-Dawley rats following which an infusion of bupivacaine 2.0 mg·kg -1 ·min -1 iv was given until asystole occurred. The primary outcome was the probability of survival. Secondary outcomes included times to asystole, first dysrhythmia, and to 50% reductions in heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP). To determine whether the same dose of L-carnitine is effective in treating established bupivacaine cardiotoxicity, we also conducted a second experiment in which bupivacaine 20 mg·kg -1 iv was infused over 20 sec. Animals (n = 10 per group) received one of four iv treatments: 30% lipid emulsion 4.0 mL·kg -1 , L-carnitine 100 mg·kg -1 , 30% lipid emulsion plus L-carnitine, or saline. The primary outcome was the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) during resuscitation. In the first study, L-carnitine 100 mg·kg -1 increased the probability of survival during bupivacaine infusion (hazard ratio, 12.0; 95% confidence interval, 3.5 to 41.5; P L-carnitine-treated animals, the times to asystole, first dysrhythmia, and to 50% reductions in HR and MAP increased by 33% (P L-carnitine alone groups achieved ROSC when compared with the lipid emulsion groups (P L-carnitine 100 mg·kg -1 decreases susceptibility to bupivacaine cardiotoxicity, but is ineffective during resuscitation from bupivacaine-induced cardiac arrest.

  9. Increased susceptibility to amyloid-β toxicity in rat brain microvascular endothelial cells under hyperglycemic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Cristina; Katz, Paige S; Dutta, Somhrita; Katakam, Prasad V G; Moreira, Paula I; Busija, David W

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesized that hyperglycemia-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are closely associated with amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) toxicity in endothelial cells. Brain microvascular endothelial cells from rat (RBMEC) and mice (MBMEC) were isolated from adult Sprague-Dawley rats and homozygous db/db (Leprdb/Leprdb) and heterozygous (Dock7m/Leprdb) mice, and cultured under normo- and hyperglycemic conditions for 7 d followed by 24 h exposure to Aβ1-40. Some experiments were also performed with two mitochondrial superoxide (O2•-) scavengers, MitoTempo and Peg-SOD. Cell viability was measured by the Alamar blue assay and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) by confocal microscopy. Mitochondrial O2•- and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production was assessed by fluorescence microscopy and H2O2 production was confirmed by microplate reader. Hyperglycemia or Aβ1-40 alone did not affect cell viability in RBMEC. However, the simultaneous presence of high glucose and Aβ1-40 reduced cell viability and ΔΨm, and enhanced mitochondrial O2•- and H2O2 production. MitoTempo and PEG-SOD prevented Aβ1-40 toxicity. Interestingly, MBMEC presented a similar pattern of alterations with db/db cultures presenting higher susceptibility to Aβ1-40. Overall, our results show that high glucose levels increase the susceptibility of brain microvascular endothelial cells to Aβ toxicity supporting the idea that hyperglycemia is a major risk factor for vascular injury associated with AD.

  10. Anxiety levels and wild running susceptibility in rats: assessment with elevated plus maze test and predator odor exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paula, Hugo Medeiros Garrido; Gouveia, Amauri; de Almeida, Marcos Vinícius; Hoshino, Katsumasa

    2005-02-28

    It is reported in the literature that nearly 20% of rats are susceptible to displays of wild running (WR) behavior when submitted to high intensity acoustic stimulation. Some characteristics of WR suggest that it can be viewed as a panic-like reaction. This work aimed to test whether WR-sensitive rats show higher levels of anxiety in elevated-plus-maze (EPM) and predator-odor exposure paradigms in comparison with WR-resistant ones. Male adult Wistar rats were submitted to two trials of acoustic stimulation (104 dB, 60 s) in order to assess WR susceptibility. Seven WR-sensitive and 15 WR-resistant rats were evaluated by the EPM test. Other 13 WR-sensitive and 18 WR-resistant animals were submitted to the predator-odor exposure test which consisted of a 10 min-session of free exploration in a specific apparatus containing two odoriferous stimuli: cotton swab imbedded with snake cloacal gland secretion or with iguana feces (control). WR-sensitive rats presented a significantly higher closed-to open-arm-entry ratio in the EPM test. All rats responded with anxiety-like behaviors to the predator odor exposure, although the WR-sensitive ones showed a marked behavioral inhibition regardless of the odor condition. We conclude that WR-sensitive rats present elevated levels of anxiety manifested by means of passive behavioral strategies. (c) 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Susceptibility of Diabetic Rats to Pulmonary and Systemic Effects of Inhaled Photochemically-Aged Atmosphere and Ozone (O3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susceptibility of Diabetic Rats to Pulmonary and Systemic Effects of Inhaled Photochemically-Aged Atmosphere and Ozone (O3)MC Schladweiler1, SJ Snow2, QT Krantz1, C King1, JD Krug2, N Modak2, A Henriquez3, V Bass4, DJ Miller3, JE Richards1, EH Boykin1, R Jaskot1, MI Gilmour1 and ...

  12. Landslide susceptibility analysis using an artificial neural network model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansor, Shattri; Pradhan, Biswajeet; Daud, Mohamed; Jamaludin, Normalina; Khuzaimah, Zailani

    2007-10-01

    This paper deals with landslide susceptibility analysis using an artificial neural network model for Cameron Highland, Malaysia. Landslide locations were identified in the study area from interpretation of aerial photographs and field surveys. Topographical/geological data and satellite images were collected and processed using GIS and image processing tools. There are ten landslide inducing parameters which are considered for the landslide hazards. These parameters are topographic slope, aspect, curvature and distance from drainage, all derived from the topographic database; geology and distance from lineament, derived from the geologic database; landuse from Landsat satellite images; soil from the soil database; precipitation amount, derived from the rainfall database; and the vegetation index value from SPOT satellite images. Landslide hazard was analyzed using landslide occurrence factors employing the logistic regression model. The results of the analysis were verified using the landslide location data and compared with logistic regression model. The accuracy of hazard map observed was 85.73%. The qualitative landslide susceptibility analysis was carried out using an artificial neural network model by doing map overlay analysis in GIS environment. This information could be used to estimate the risk to population, property and existing infrastructure like transportation network.

  13. The utility of Apc-mutant rats in modeling human colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy A. Irving

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Prior to the advent of genetic engineering in the mouse, the rat was the model of choice for investigating the etiology of cancer. Now, recent advances in the manipulation of the rat genome, combined with a growing recognition of the physiological differences between mice and rats, have reignited interest in the rat as a model of human cancer. Two recently developed rat models, the polyposis in the rat colon (Pirc and Kyoto Apc Delta (KAD strains, each carry mutations in the intestinal-cancer-associated adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc gene. In contrast to mouse models carrying Apc mutations, in which cancers develop mainly in the small intestine rather than in the colon and there is no gender bias, these rat models exhibit colonic predisposition and gender-specific susceptibility, as seen in human colon cancer. The rat also provides other experimental resources as a model organism that are not provided by the mouse: the structure of its chromosomes facilitates the analysis of genomic events, the size of its colon permits longitudinal analysis of tumor growth, and the size of biological samples from the animal facilitates multiplexed molecular analyses of the tumor and its host. Thus, the underlying biology and experimental resources of these rat models provide important avenues for investigation. We anticipate that advances in disease modeling in the rat will synergize with resources that are being developed in the mouse to provide a deeper understanding of human colon cancer.

  14. The utility of Apc-mutant rats in modeling human colon cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, Amy A.; Yoshimi, Kazuto; Hart, Marcia L.; Parker, Taybor; Clipson, Linda; Ford, Madeline R.; Kuramoto, Takashi; Dove, William F.; Amos-Landgraf, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Prior to the advent of genetic engineering in the mouse, the rat was the model of choice for investigating the etiology of cancer. Now, recent advances in the manipulation of the rat genome, combined with a growing recognition of the physiological differences between mice and rats, have reignited interest in the rat as a model of human cancer. Two recently developed rat models, the polyposis in the rat colon (Pirc) and Kyoto Apc Delta (KAD) strains, each carry mutations in the intestinal-cancer-associated adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc) gene. In contrast to mouse models carrying Apc mutations, in which cancers develop mainly in the small intestine rather than in the colon and there is no gender bias, these rat models exhibit colonic predisposition and gender-specific susceptibility, as seen in human colon cancer. The rat also provides other experimental resources as a model organism that are not provided by the mouse: the structure of its chromosomes facilitates the analysis of genomic events, the size of its colon permits longitudinal analysis of tumor growth, and the size of biological samples from the animal facilitates multiplexed molecular analyses of the tumor and its host. Thus, the underlying biology and experimental resources of these rat models provide important avenues for investigation. We anticipate that advances in disease modeling in the rat will synergize with resources that are being developed in the mouse to provide a deeper understanding of human colon cancer. PMID:25288683

  15. Rat penis as a replantation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamürsel, Sebat; Karamürsel, Tamer; Celebioğlu, Selim

    2005-11-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the feasibility of rat penile replantation as a new microsurgical training model. The study was performed in 2 parts. ANATOMIC STUDIES: Fifteen Wistar albino rats were used to study and document the penile vascular anatomy. In 5 rats, dissections were performed after colored silicone injections, while 5 rats were operated under anesthesia to develop the strategy of flap elevation. In the remaining 5 rats, microangiographic study was performed with silicone-lead oxide mixture. FLAP STUDIES: As flap studies in 5 rats, penis were elevated based on right-side internal pudendal artery and internal pudendal vein and resutured. In 6 rats, penis were elevated as free flaps, and in 3 rats the penis were implanted in right thigh of the rats being the femoral artery and vein recipient. In the remaining 3 rats, penis were resutured in their original place, with saphenous artery and vein being the recipient and rerouted to the pubic region. At postoperative fifth day, the penis were examined for viability, and selected ones were histologically examined. Rat penis has a dual blood supply from bilateral internal pudendal arteries. Venous drainage is via both crural veins and dorsal vein. One side of the internal pudendal artery and anastomotic vein (branch of pudendal plexus) may be used as the vascular pedicle of the flap. Rat penis may be successfully elevated as a free flap and also may be replanted in its original place.

  16. A Susceptible Mouse Model for Zika Virus Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart D Dowall

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV is a mosquito-borne pathogen which has recently spread beyond Africa and into Pacific and South American regions. Despite first being detected in 1947, very little information is known about the virus, and its spread has been associated with increases in Guillain-Barre syndrome and microcephaly. There are currently no known vaccines or antivirals against ZIKV infection. Progress in assessing interventions will require the development of animal models to test efficacies; however, there are only limited reports on in vivo studies. The only susceptible murine models have involved intracerebral inoculations or juvenile animals, which do not replicate natural infection. Our report has studied the effect of ZIKV infection in type-I interferon receptor deficient (A129 mice and the parent strain (129Sv/Ev after subcutaneous challenge in the lower leg to mimic a mosquito bite. A129 mice developed severe symptoms with widespread viral RNA detection in the blood, brain, spleen, liver and ovaries. Histological changes were also striking in these animals. 129Sv/Ev mice developed no clinical symptoms or histological changes, despite viral RNA being detectable in the blood, spleen and ovaries, albeit at lower levels than those seen in A129 mice. Our results identify A129 mice as being highly susceptible to ZIKV and thus A129 mice represent a suitable, and urgently required, small animal model for the testing of vaccines and antivirals.

  17. A Susceptible Mouse Model for Zika Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowall, Stuart D; Graham, Victoria A; Rayner, Emma; Atkinson, Barry; Hall, Graham; Watson, Robert J; Bosworth, Andrew; Bonney, Laura C; Kitchen, Samantha; Hewson, Roger

    2016-05-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is a mosquito-borne pathogen which has recently spread beyond Africa and into Pacific and South American regions. Despite first being detected in 1947, very little information is known about the virus, and its spread has been associated with increases in Guillain-Barre syndrome and microcephaly. There are currently no known vaccines or antivirals against ZIKV infection. Progress in assessing interventions will require the development of animal models to test efficacies; however, there are only limited reports on in vivo studies. The only susceptible murine models have involved intracerebral inoculations or juvenile animals, which do not replicate natural infection. Our report has studied the effect of ZIKV infection in type-I interferon receptor deficient (A129) mice and the parent strain (129Sv/Ev) after subcutaneous challenge in the lower leg to mimic a mosquito bite. A129 mice developed severe symptoms with widespread viral RNA detection in the blood, brain, spleen, liver and ovaries. Histological changes were also striking in these animals. 129Sv/Ev mice developed no clinical symptoms or histological changes, despite viral RNA being detectable in the blood, spleen and ovaries, albeit at lower levels than those seen in A129 mice. Our results identify A129 mice as being highly susceptible to ZIKV and thus A129 mice represent a suitable, and urgently required, small animal model for the testing of vaccines and antivirals.

  18. Reflection and transmission in nonlocal susceptibility models with multiple resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchill, R. J.; Philbin, T. G.

    2017-05-01

    We consider a semi-infinite dielectric with multiple spatially dispersive resonances in the susceptibility. The effect of the boundary is described by an arbitrary reflection coefficient for polarization waves in the material at the surface, with specific values corresponding to various additional boundary conditions (ABCs) for Maxwell's equations. We derive exact expressions for the electromagnetic reflection and transmission coefficients and present the results for a variety of materials with multiple exciton bands. We find an improved single-band approximation for heavy/light exciton bands and extend our model to exciton dispersion relations with linear k terms which occur in uniaxial crystals. Finally, we calculate the spectral energy density of thermal and zero-point radiation for a variety of multiresonance models and ABCs.

  19. Penile autotransplantation in rats: An animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raouf M Seyam

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: Penile autotransplantation in rats is feasible and provides the basis for evaluation of the corpora cavernosa in an allotransplantation model. Long-term urethral continuity and dorsal neurovascular bundle survival in this model is difficult to establish.

  20. Analysis of adrenocortical secretory responses during acute an prolonged immune stimulation in inflammation-susceptible and -resistant rat strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, I M; Lorentzen, J C; Ericsson-Dahlstrand, A

    2000-11-01

    Endogenous corticosterone secreted during immune challenge restricts the inflammatory process and genetic variations in this neuroendocrine-immune dialogue have been suggested to influence an individuals sensitivity to develop chronic inflammatory disorders. We have tested inflammation-susceptible Dark Agouti (DA) rats and resistant, MHC-identical, PVG.1AV1 rats for their abilities to secrete corticosterone in response to acute challenge with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or a prolonged activation of the nonspecific immune system with arthritogenic yeast beta-glucan. Intravenous injection of LPS triggered equipotent secretion of corticosterone in both rat strains. Interestingly, peak concentrations of corticosterone did not differ significantly between the strains. Intradermal injection of beta-glucan caused severe, monophasic, polyarthritis in DA rats while PVG.1AV1 responded with significantly milder joint inflammation. Importantly, serial sampling of plasma from glucan-injected DA and PVG.1AV1 rats did not reveal elevated concentrations of plasma corticosterone at any time from days 1-30 postinjection compared to preinjection values, in spite of the ongoing inflammatory process. Interestingly, adrenalectomized, beta-glucan-challenged DA rats responded with an aggravated arthritic process, indicating an anti-inflammatory role for the basal levels of corticosterone that were detected in intact DA rats challenged with beta-glucan. Moreover, substitution with subcutaneous corticosterone-secreting pellets, yielding moderate stress-levels, significantly attenuated the arthritic response. In contrast, adrenalectomized and glucan-challenged PVG.1AV1 rats did not respond with an elevated arthritic response, suggesting that these rats contain the arthritic process via corticosterone-independent mechanisms. In conclusion, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in both rat strains exhibited strong activation after challenge with LPS. This contrasted to the basal

  1. Cell lines from grc congenic strains of rats having different susceptibilities to chemical carcinogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, D; Kunz, H W; Melhem, M F; Gill, T J

    1993-09-01

    The growth and reproduction complex (grc-) strains of rats have a 70-kilobase deletion in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-linked grc-G/C region that is associated with embryonic death, developmental defects, and an increased susceptibility to chemical carcinogens. To study further the effects associated with the deletion, fibroblastic cell lines from grc-, grc+, and grc+/- rat embryos were developed: BIL-derived cell lines are congenic for the MHC and grc, whereas R16-derived cell lines are congenic for the grc alone. In early passages, all cell lines expressed the MHC class I antigen RT1.A, had a diploid chromosome number, and did not display anchorage-independent growth or in vivo tumorigenicity. The grc- cells [median population doubling time (PDT), 47 h] grew more slowly than the grc+ (PDT, 30.5 h) and grc+/- (PDT, 33 h) cells. All cells underwent crisis, but the crisis stage began earlier and lasted longer in the grc- cells. The established grc- cell lines (PDT, 32.5 h) grew faster than the grc+ (PDT, 48.5 h) and grc+/- (PDT, 54 h) cell lines. Two of the three BIL-derived grc- lines that survived crisis became anchorage independent in tissue culture and tumorigenic in histocompatible F1 rats (highly malignant fibrosarcomas) at passages 33 and 48, respectively; by contrast, none of the R16-derived grc- cell lines transformed. None of 8 grc+ or 8 grc+/- cell lines that survived crisis displayed anchorage-independent growth or tumorigenicity under the same conditions up to passage 50. All of the established cell lines, including the two tumorigenic ones, expressed MHC class I antigens. Southern and Northern blot analyses of BIL-derived cell lines before and after crisis showed that they all constitutively expressed H-ras and Rb and that no cell line showed rearrangement, amplification, or overexpression of c-myc, H-ras, Rb, and p53 either before or after crisis. These observations indicate that: (a) the homozygous grc- deletion is necessary but not

  2. Exposure to AT1 Receptor Autoantibodies during Pregnancy Increases Susceptibility of the Maternal Heart to Postpartum Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Ping Wang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that women with a history of preeclampsia have a two-fold increased risk of developing cardiovascular diseases in later life. It is not known whether or not this risk is associated with angiotensin II receptor type 1 autoantibody (AT1-AA, an agonist acting via activation of AT1 receptor (AT1R, which is believed to be involved in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia. The objective of the present study was to confirm the hypothesis that AT1-AA exposure during pregnancy may change the maternal cardiac structure and increase the susceptibility of the postpartum heart to ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI. In the present study, we first established a preeclampsia rat model by intravenous injection of AT1-AA extracted from the plasma of rats immunized with AT1R, observed the susceptibility of the postpartum maternal heart to IRI at 16 weeks postpartum using the Langendorff preparation, and examined the cardiac structure using light and transmission electron microscopy. The modeled animals presented with symptoms very similar to the clinical symptoms of human preeclampsia during pregnancy, including hypertension and proteinuria. The left ventricular weight (LVW and left ventricular mass index (LVMI in AT1-AA treatment group were significantly increased as compared with those of the control group (p < 0.01, although there was no significant difference in final weight between the two groups. AT1-AA acting on AT1R not only induced myocardial cell hypertrophy, mitochondrial swelling, cristae disorganization and collagen accumulation in the interstitium but affected the left ventricular (LV function and delayed recovery from IRI. In contrast, co-treatment with AT1-AA + losartan completely blocked AT1-AA-induced changes in cardiac structure and function. These data indicate that the presence of AT1-AA during pregnancy was strongly associated with the markers of LV geometry changes and remodeling, and increased the cardiac

  3. Gravitational Biology: The Rat Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    In this session, Session JP3, the discussion focuses on the following topics: Morphology of brain, pituitary and thyroid in the rats exposed to altered gravity; Biochemical Properties of B Adrenoceptors After Spaceflight (LMS-STS78) or Hindlimb Suspension in Rats; Influence of Hypergravity on the Development of Monoaminergic Systems in the Rat Spinal Cord; A Vestibular Evoked Potentials (VsEPs) Study of the Function of the Otolith Organs in Different Head Orientations with respect to Earth Gravity Vector in the Rat; Quantitative Observations on the Structure of Selected Proprioceptive Components in Adult Rats that Underwent About Half of their Fetal Development in Space; Effects of a Nine-Day Shuttle Mission on the Development of the Neonatal Rat Nervous System, A Behavioral Study; Muscle Atrophy Associated to Microgravity in Rat, Basic Data For Countermeasures; Simulated Weightlessness by Unloading in the Rat, Results of a Time Course Study of Biochemical Events Occurring During Unloading and Lack of Effect of a rhBNP-2 Treatment on Bone Formation and Bone Mineral Content in Unloading Rats; and Cytological Mechanism of the Osteogenesis Under Microgravity Conditions.

  4. Different effect of l-NAME treatment on susceptibility to decompression sickness in male and female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, Aleksandra; Buzzacott, Peter; Lambrechts, Kate; Wang, Qiong; Belhomme, Marc; Theron, Michael; Popov, Georgi; Distefano, Giovanni; Guerrero, Francois

    2014-11-01

    Vascular bubble formation results from supersaturation during inadequate decompression contributes to endothelial injuries, which form the basis for the development of decompression sickness (DCS). Risk factors for DCS include increased age, weight-fat mass, decreased maximal oxygen uptake, chronic diseases, dehydration, and nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. Production of NO is often affected by diving and its expression-activity varies between the genders. Little is known about the influence of sex on the risk of DCS. To study this relationship we used an animal model of Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) to induce decreased NO production. Male and female rats with diverse ages and weights were divided into 2 groups: treated with l-NAME (in tap water; 0.05 mg·mL(-1) for 7 days) and a control group. To control the distribution of nitrogen among tissues, 2 different compression-decompression protocols were used. Results showed that l-NAME was significantly associated with increased DCS in female rats (p = 0.039) only. Weight was significant for both sexes (p = 0.01). The protocol with the highest estimated tissue pressures in the slower compartments was 2.6 times more likely to produce DCS than the protocol with the highest estimated tissue pressures in faster compartments. The outcome of this study had significantly different susceptibility to DCS after l-NAME treatment between the sexes, while l-NAME per se had no effect on the likelihood of DCS. The analysis also showed that for the appearance of DCS, the most significant factors were type of protocol and weight.

  5. Enduring deficits in brain reward function after chronic social defeat in rats: susceptibility, resilience, and antidepressant response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Der-Avakian, Andre; Mazei-Robison, Michelle S; Kesby, James P; Nestler, Eric J; Markou, Athina

    2014-10-01

    Anhedonia, or diminished interest or pleasure in rewarding activities, characterizes depression and reflects deficits in brain reward circuitries. Social stress induces anhedonia and increases risk of depression, although the effect of social stress on brain reward function is incompletely understood. This study assessed the following: 1) brain reward function in rats (using the intracranial self-stimulation procedure) and protein levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and related signaling molecules in response to chronic social defeat, 2) brain reward function during social defeat and long-term treatment with the antidepressants fluoxetine (5 mg/kg/day) and desipramine (10 mg/kg/day), and 3) forced swim test behavior after social defeat and fluoxetine treatment. Social defeat profoundly and persistently decreased brain reward function, reflecting an enduring anhedonic response, in susceptible rats, whereas resilient rats showed no long-term brain reward deficits. In the ventral tegmental area, social defeat, regardless of susceptibility or resilience, decreased brain-derived neurotrophic factor and increased phosphorylated AKT, whereas only susceptibility was associated with increased phosphorylated mammalian target of rapamycin. Fluoxetine and desipramine reversed lower, but not higher, stress-induced brain reward deficits in susceptible rats. Fluoxetine decreased immobility in the forced swim test, as did social defeat. These results suggest that the differential persistent anhedonic response to psychosocial stress may be mediated by ventral tegmental area signaling molecules independent of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and indicate that greater stress-induced anhedonia is associated with resistance to antidepressant treatment. Consideration of these behavioral and neurobiological factors associated with resistance to stress and antidepressant action may promote the discovery of novel targets to treat stress-related mood disorders. Copyright © 2014

  6. model in female wistar rats

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-12-31

    Dec 31, 2013 ... cyclodextrin on wister rats : histopathologic analoges. Fundan Clin. Pharmacol.; 23(6) :747-755. Sandor, V., Cuparencu, B., Dumitrascu, L.D., Birt, A.M. and Krausz, L.T. (2006). Protective effects of amphetamine on gastric ulcerations induced by indomethacin in rats. World J. Gastroenterol.; 12(44): ...

  7. Individual behavioral characteristics of wild-type rats predict susceptibility to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kavelaars, A; Heijnen, CJ; Tennekes, R; Bruggink, JE; Koolhaas, JM

    1999-01-01

    Neuroendocrine-immune interactions are thought to be important in determining susceptibility to autoimmune disease. Animal studies have revealed that differences in susceptibility to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) are related to:reactivity in the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis.

  8. Multiple phase transitions of the susceptible-infected-susceptible epidemic model on complex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Mata, Angélica S

    2014-01-01

    We show that the susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) epidemic dynamics running on the top of networks with a power law degree distribution can exhibit multiple phase transitions. Three main transitions involving different mechanisms responsible by sustaining the epidemics are identified: A short-term epidemics concentrated around the most connected vertex; a long-term (asymptotically stable) localized epidemics with a vanishing threshold; and an endemic phase occurring at a finite threshold. The different transitions are suited through different mean-field approaches. We finally show that the multiple transitions are due to the activations of different domains of the network that are observed in rapid (singular) variations of both stationary density of infected vertices and the participation ratio against the infection rate.

  9. Experimental model to induce obesity in rats

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vinicius Von Diemen; Eduardo Neubarth Trindade; Manoel Roberto Maciel Trindade

    2006-01-01

    .... Obesity can be induced in animals by neuroendocrine, dietary or genetic changes. The most widely used models to induce obesity in rats are a lesion of the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH...

  10. Acute Ethanol Exposure Increases the Susceptibility of the Donor Hearts to Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury after Transplantation in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loganathan, Sivakkanan; Weymann, Alexander; Radovits, Tamás; Barnucz, Enikő; Hirschberg, Kristóf; Hegedüs, Peter; Zhou, Yan; Tao, Liang; Páli, Szabolcs; Veres, Gábor; Karck, Matthias; Szabó, Gábor

    2012-01-01

    , oxidative stress and altered protein expression were observed. Conclusions These results demonstrate acute alcohol abuse increases the susceptibility of donor hearts to ischemia/reperfusion in a rat heart transplant model even though the global contractile function recovers 6 h after ethanol-administration. PMID:23155471

  11. Acute ethanol exposure increases the susceptibility of the donor hearts to ischemia/reperfusion injury after transplantation in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiliang Li

    contractility and relaxation, oxidative stress and altered protein expression were observed. CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate acute alcohol abuse increases the susceptibility of donor hearts to ischemia/reperfusion in a rat heart transplant model even though the global contractile function recovers 6 h after ethanol-administration.

  12. Murine models susceptibility to distinct Trypanosoma cruzi I genotypes infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Cielo M; Montilla, Marleny; Vanegas, Ricardo; Castillo, Maria; Parra, Edgar; Ramírez, Juan David

    2017-04-01

    Chagas disease is a complex zoonosis that affects around 8 million people worldwide. This pathology is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, a kinetoplastid parasite that shows tremendous genetic diversity evinced in six distinct Discrete Typing Units (TcI-TcVI) including a recent genotype named as TcBat and associated with anthropogenic bats. TcI presents a broad geographical distribution and has been associated with chronic cardiomyopathy. Recent phylogenetic studies suggest the existence of two genotypes (Domestic (TcIDom) and sylvatic TcI) within TcI. The understanding of the course of the infection in different mouse models by these two genotypes is not yet known. Therefore, we infected 126 animals (ICR-CD1, National Institute of Health (NIH) and Balb/c) with two TcIDom strains and one sylvatic strain for a follow-up period of 60 days. We quantified the parasitaemia, immune response and histopathology observing that the maximum day of parasitaemia was achieved at day 21 post-infection. Domestic strains showed higher parasitaemia than the sylvatic strain in the three mouse models; however in the survival curves Balb/c mice were less susceptible to infection compared with NIH and ICR-CD1. Our results suggest that the genetic background plays a fundamental role in the natural history of the infection and the sympatric TcI genotypes have relevant implications in disease pathogenesis.

  13. Network modeling links breast cancer susceptibility and centrosome dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujana, Miguel Angel; Han, Jing-Dong J; Starita, Lea M; Stevens, Kristen N; Tewari, Muneesh; Ahn, Jin Sook; Rennert, Gad; Moreno, Víctor; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Gold, Bert; Assmann, Volker; Elshamy, Wael M; Rual, Jean-François; Levine, Douglas; Rozek, Laura S; Gelman, Rebecca S; Gunsalus, Kristin C; Greenberg, Roger A; Sobhian, Bijan; Bertin, Nicolas; Venkatesan, Kavitha; Ayivi-Guedehoussou, Nono; Solé, Xavier; Hernández, Pilar; Lázaro, Conxi; Nathanson, Katherine L; Weber, Barbara L; Cusick, Michael E; Hill, David E; Offit, Kenneth; Livingston, David M; Gruber, Stephen B; Parvin, Jeffrey D; Vidal, Marc

    2007-11-01

    Many cancer-associated genes remain to be identified to clarify the underlying molecular mechanisms of cancer susceptibility and progression. Better understanding is also required of how mutations in cancer genes affect their products in the context of complex cellular networks. Here we have used a network modeling strategy to identify genes potentially associated with higher risk of breast cancer. Starting with four known genes encoding tumor suppressors of breast cancer, we combined gene expression profiling with functional genomic and proteomic (or 'omic') data from various species to generate a network containing 118 genes linked by 866 potential functional associations. This network shows higher connectivity than expected by chance, suggesting that its components function in biologically related pathways. One of the components of the network is HMMR, encoding a centrosome subunit, for which we demonstrate previously unknown functional associations with the breast cancer-associated gene BRCA1. Two case-control studies of incident breast cancer indicate that the HMMR locus is associated with higher risk of breast cancer in humans. Our network modeling strategy should be useful for the discovery of additional cancer-associated genes.

  14. Early-life sodium exposure unmasks susceptibility to stroke in hyperlipidemic, hypertensive heterozygous Tg25 rats transgenic for human cholesteryl ester transfer protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decano, Julius L; Viereck, Jason C; McKee, Ann C; Hamilton, James A; Ruiz-Opazo, Nelson; Herrera, Victoria L M

    2009-03-24

    Early-life risk factor exposure increases aortic atherosclerosis and blood pressure in humans and animal models; however, limited insight has been gained as to end-organ complications. We investigated the effects of early-life Na exposure (0.23% versus 0.4% NaCl regular rat chow) on vascular disease outcomes using the inbred, transgenic [hCETP](25) Dahl salt-sensitive hypertensive rat model of male-predominant coronary atherosclerosis, Tg25. Rather than the expected increase in coronary heart disease, fetal 0.4% Na exposure (cerebral cortical hemorrhagic infarctions, microhemorrhages, neuronal ischemia, and microvascular injury. Ex vivo MRI of stroke-positive rat brains detected cerebral hemorrhages, microhemorrhages, and ischemia with middle cerebral artery distribution and cerebellar noninvolvement. Ultrasound microimaging detected carotid artery disease. Prestroke analysis detected neuronal ischemia and decreased mass of isolated cerebral but not cerebellar microvessels. Early-life Na exposure exacerbated hypertension and unmasked stroke susceptibility, with greater female vulnerability in hypertensive, hyperlipidemic Tg25 rats. The reproducible modeling in stroke-prone Tg25 rats of carotid artery disease, cerebral hemorrhagic infarctions, neuronal ischemia, microhemorrhages, and microvascular alterations suggests a pathogenic spectrum with causal interrelationships. This "mixed-stroke" spectrum could represent paradigms of ischemic-hemorrhagic transformation and/or a microangiopathic basis for the association of ischemic lesions, microhemorrhages, and strokes in humans. Together, the data reveal early-life Na exposure to be a significant modifier of hypertension and stroke disease course and hence a potentially modifiable prevention target that deserves systematic study.

  15. Enhanced Susceptibility to Spontaneous Seizures of Noda Epileptic Rats by Loss of Synaptic Zn2+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Atsushi; Iida, Masashi; Ando, Masaki; Nakamura, Masatoshi; Tamano, Haruna; Oku, Naoto

    2013-01-01

    Zinc homeostasis in the brain is associated with the etiology and manifestation of epileptic seizures. Adult Noda epileptic rats (NER, >12-week-old) exhibit spontaneously generalized tonic-clonic convulsion about once a day. To pursue the involvement of synaptic Zn2+ signal in susceptibility to spontaneous seizures, in the present study, the effect of zinc chelators on epileptogenesis was examined using adult NER. Clioquinol (CQ) and TPEN are lipophilic zinc chelotors, transported into the brain and reduce the levels of synaptic Zn2+. The incidence of tonic-clonic convulsion was markedly increased after i.p. injection of CQ (30–100 mg/kg) and TPEN (1 mg/kg). The basal levels of extracellular Zn2+ measured by ZnAF-2 were decreased before tonic-clonic convulsion was induced with zinc chelators. The hippocampal electroencephalograms during CQ (30 mg/kg)-induced convulsions were similar to those during sound-induced convulsions in NER reported previously. Exocytosis of hippocampal mossy fibers, which was measured with FM4-64, was significantly increased in hippocampal slices from CQ-injected NER that did not show tonic-clonic convulsion yet. These results indicate that the abnormal excitability of mossy fibers is induced prior to epileptic seizures by injection of zinc chelators into NER. The incidence of tonic-clonic convulsion induced with CQ (30 mg/kg) was significantly reduced by co-injection with aminooxyacetic acid (5–10 mg/kg), an anticonvulsant drug enhancing GABAergic activity, which did not affect locomotor activity. The present paper demonstrates that the abnormal excitability in the brain, especially in mossy fibers, which is potentially associated with the insufficient GABAergic neuron activity, may be a factor to reduce the threshold for epileptogenesis in NER. PMID:23951148

  16. Diabetes increases the susceptibility to acute kidney injury after myocardial infarction through augmented activation of renal Toll-like receptors in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Kouhei; Kuno, Atsushi; Murase, Hiromichi; Muratsubaki, Shingo; Miki, Takayuki; Tanno, Masaya; Yano, Toshiyuki; Ishikawa, Satoko; Yamashita, Tomohisa; Miura, Tetsuji

    2017-12-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) after acute myocardial infarction (MI) worsens the prognosis of MI patients. Although type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) is a major risk factor of AKI after MI, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here, we examined the roles of renal Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in the impact of DM on AKI after MI. MI was induced by coronary artery ligation in Otsuka-Long-Evans-Tokushima fatty (OLETF) rats, a rat DM model, and Long-Evans-Tokushima-Otsuka (LETO) rats, nondiabetic controls. Sham-operated rats served as no-MI controls. Renal mRNA levels of TLR2 and myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) were significantly higher in sham-operated OLETF rats than in sham-operated LETO rats, although levels of TLR1, TLR3, and TLR4 were similar. At 12 h after MI, protein levels of kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) in the kidney were elevated by 5.3- and 4.0-fold, respectively, and their mRNA levels were increased in OLETF but not LETO rats. The increased KIM-1 and NGAL expression levels after MI in the OLETF kidney were associated with upregulated expression of TLR1, TLR2, TLR4, MyD88, IL-6, TNF-α, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2, and transforming growth factor-β1 and also with activation of p38 MAPK, JNK, and NF-κB. Cu-CPT22, a TLR1/TLR2 antagonist, administered before MI significantly suppressed MI-induced upregulation of KIM-1, TLR2, TLR4, MyD88, and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 levels and activation of NF-κB, whereas NGAL levels and IL-6 and TNF-α expression levels were unchanged. The results suggest that DM increases the susceptibility to AKI after acute MI by augmented activation of renal TLRs and that TLR1/TLR2-mediated signaling mediates KIM-1 upregulation after MI.NEW & NOTEWORTHY This is the first report to demonstrate the involvement of Toll-like recpetors (TLRs) in diabetes-induced susceptibility to acute kidney injury after acute myocardial infarction. We propose that the TLR1/TLR2

  17. ideal hepatotoxicity model in rats using carbon tetrachloride (ccl4)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    ABSTRACT. A study to produce ideal Hepatotoxicity rats' models using varying concentrations of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) was carried out. A total of seventy five rats were divided into five (5) groups of twenty five (25) rats each; rats in group I are negative control, were not induced with lipid peroxidation. Rats in groups II, ...

  18. Shallow Landslide Susceptibility Modeling Using the Data Mining Models Artificial Neural Network and Boosted Tree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Joo Oh

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this paper is to present some potential applications of sophisticated data mining techniques, such as artificial neural network (ANN and boosted tree (BT, for landslide susceptibility modeling in the Yongin area, Korea. Initially, landslide inventory was detected from visual interpretation using digital aerial photographic maps with a high resolution of 50 cm taken before and after the occurrence of landslides. The debris flows were randomly divided into two groups: training and validation sets with a 50:50 proportion. Additionally, 18 environmental factors related to landslide occurrence were derived from the topography, soil, and forest maps. Subsequently, the data mining techniques were applied to identify the influence of environmental factors on landslide occurrence of the training set and assess landslide susceptibility. Finally, the landslide susceptibility indexes from ANN and BT were compared with a validation set using a receiver operating characteristics curve. The slope gradient, topographic wetness index, and timber age appear to be important factors in landslide occurrence from both models. The validation result of ANN and BT showed 82.25% and 90.79%, which had reasonably good performance. The study shows the benefit of selecting optimal data mining techniques in landslide susceptibility modeling. This approach could be used as a guideline for choosing environmental factors on landslide occurrence and add influencing factors into landslide monitoring systems. Furthermore, this method can rank landslide susceptibility in urban areas, thus providing helpful information when selecting a landslide monitoring site and planning land-use.

  19. Effect of habituation on the susceptibility of the rat to restraint ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, M. S.; Martin, F.; Lambert, R.

    1980-01-01

    The frequency and gravity of restraint ulcers were found to significantly diminish in rats previously exposed to brief periods of immobilization. The rats' becoming habituated to restraint conditions probably explains this phenomenon.

  20. Significant overlap between human genome-wide association-study nominated breast cancer risk alleles and rat mammary cancer susceptibility loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Jennifer; Samuelson, David J

    2014-01-27

    Human population-based genome-wide association (GWA) studies identify low penetrance breast cancer risk alleles; however, GWA studies alone do not definitively determine causative genes or mechanisms. Stringent genome- wide statistical significance level requirements, set to avoid false-positive associations, yield many false-negative associations. Laboratory rats (Rattus norvegicus) are useful to study many aspects of breast cancer, including genetic susceptibility. Several rat mammary cancer associated loci have been identified using genetic linkage and congenic strain based-approaches. Here, we sought to determine the amount of overlap between GWA study nominated human breast and rat mammary cancer susceptibility loci. We queried published GWA studies to identify two groups of SNPs, one that reached genome-wide significance and one comprised of SNPs failing a validation step and not reaching genome- wide significance. Human genome locations of these SNPs were compared to known rat mammary carcinoma susceptibility loci to determine if risk alleles existed in both species. Rat genome regions not known to associate with mammary cancer risk were randomly selected as control regions. Significantly more human breast cancer risk GWA study nominated SNPs mapped at orthologs of rat mammary cancer loci than to regions not known to contain rat mammary cancer loci. The rat genome was useful to predict associations that had met human genome-wide significance criteria and weaker associations that had not. Integration of human and rat comparative genomics may be useful to parse out false-negative associations in GWA studies of breast cancer risk.

  1. AGING AND SUSCEPTIBILITY TO TOLUENE IN RATS: A PHARMACOKINETIC, BIOMARKER, AND PHYSIOLOGICAL APPROACH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aging adults are a growing segment of the U.S. population and are likely to exhibit increased susceptibility to many environmental toxicants. However, there is little information on the susceptibility of the aged to toxicants. The toxicity of toluene has been well characterized i...

  2. Sleep deprivation does not affect neuronal susceptibility to mild traumatic brain injury in the rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caron AM

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aimee M Caron, Richard Stephenson Department of Cell and Systems Biology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Abstract: Mild and moderate traumatic brain injuries (TBIs (and concussion occur frequently as a result of falls, automobile accidents, and sporting activities, and are a major cause of acute and chronic disability. Fatigue and excessive sleepiness are associated with increased risk of accidents, but it is unknown whether prior sleep debt also affects the pathophysiological outcome of concussive injury. Using the “dark neuron” (DN as a marker of reversible neuronal damage, we tested the hypothesis that acute (48 hours total sleep deprivation (TSD and chronic sleep restriction (CSR; 10 days, 6-hour sleep/day affect DN formation following mild TBI in the rat. TSD and CSR were administered using a walking wheel apparatus. Mild TBI was administered under anesthesia using a weight-drop impact model, and the acute neuronal response was observed without recovery. DNs were detected using standard bright-field microscopy with toluidine blue stain following appropriate tissue fixation. DN density was low under home cage and sleep deprivation control conditions (respective median DN densities, 0.14% and 0.22% of neurons, and this was unaffected by TSD alone (0.1%. Mild TBI caused significantly higher DN densities (0.76%, and this was unchanged by preexisting acute or chronic sleep debt (TSD, 0.23%; CSR, 0.7%. Thus, although sleep debt may be predicted to increase the incidence of concussive injury, the present data suggest that sleep debt does not exacerbate the resulting neuronal damage. Keywords: sleep deprivation, concussion, traumatic brain injury, dark neuron, neurodegeneration, rat cortex

  3. Voluntary wheel running attenuates ethanol withdrawal-induced increases in seizure susceptibility in male and female rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaud, Leslie L.; Walls, Shawn A.; McCulley, Walter D.; Rosenwasser, Alan M.

    2012-01-01

    We recently found that voluntary wheel running attenuated ethanol withdrawal-induced increased susceptibility to chemoconvulsant-induced seizures in male rats. Since female rats recover from ethanol withdrawal (EW) more quickly than male rats across several behavioral measures, this study was designed to determine whether the effects of exercise on EW seizures also exhibited sex differences. Animals were maintained under No-Wheel, Locked-Wheel or Free-Wheel conditions and ethanol was administered by liquid diet for 14 days with control animals pair-fed an isocaloric diet, after which seizure thresholds were determined at 1 day or 3 days of EW. Consistent with previous reports, females ran significantly more than males, regardless of diet condition. Introduction of the ethanol-containing liquid diet dramatically increased running for females during the day (rest) phase, with little impact on night phase activity. Consistent with previous reports, EW increased seizure susceptibility at 1 day in non-exercising males and females and at 3 days in males. These effects were attenuated by access to running wheels in both sexes. We also assessed the effects of sex, ethanol diet and exercise on ethanol clearance following an acute ethanol administration at 1 day EW in a separate set of animals. Blood ethanol concentrations at 30 min post-injection were lower in males, ethanol-exposed animals, and runners, but no interactions among these factors were detected. Interestingly, females displayed more rapid ethanol clearance than males and there were no effects of either diet or wheel access on clearance rates. Taken together, these data suggest that voluntary wheel running during ethanol administration provides protective effects against EW seizures in both males and females. This effect may be mediated, in part, in male, but not female rat, by effects of exercise on early pharmacokinetic contributions. This supports the idea that encouraging alcoholics to exercise may benefit

  4. Dobutamine “Stress” Test and Latent Cardiac Susceptibility to Inhaled Diesel Exhaust in Normal and Hypertensive Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaway, Justin; Winsett, Darrell W.; Lamb, Christina; Haykal-Coates, Najwa; Krantz, Q. Todd; King, Charly; Costa, Daniel L.; Farraj, Aimen K.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Exercise “stress” testing is a screening tool used to determine the amount of stress for which the heart can compensate before developing abnormal rhythm or ischemia, particularly in susceptible persons. Although this approach has been used to assess risk in humans exposed to air pollution, it has never been applied to rodent studies. Objective: We hypothesized that a single exposure to diesel exhaust (DE) would increase the risk of adverse cardiac events such as arrhythmia and myocardial ischemia in rats undergoing a dobutamine challenge test, which can be used to mimic exercise-like stress. Methods: Wistar-Kyoto normotensive (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rats implanted with radiotelemeters and a chronic intravenous catheter were whole-body exposed to 150 μg/m3 DE for 4 hr. Increasing doses of dobutamine, a β1-adrenergic agonist, were administered to conscious unrestrained rats 24 hr later to elicit the cardiac response observed during exercise while heart rate (HR) and electrocardiogram (ECG) were monitored. Results: A single exposure to DE potentiated the HR response of WKY and SH rats during dobutamine challenge and prevented HR recovery at rest. During peak challenge, DE-exposed SH rats had lower overall HR variability when compared with controls, in addition to transient ST depression. All DE-exposed animals also had increased arrhythmias. Conclusions: These results are the first evidence that rats exhibit stress-induced cardiac dysrhythmia and ischemia sensitivity comparable to humans after a single exposure to a toxic air pollutant, particularly when in the presence of underlying cardiovascular disease. Thus, exposure to low concentrations of air pollution can impair the heart’s ability to respond to stress and increase the risk of subsequent triggered dysfunction. PMID:22543081

  5. LIEER OF WISTAR RAT MODELS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    homeostasis synthesised in the liver, has been raised in cases of impaired liver. fimcflun. ... Bil rats served as co:|rtrols, while Eflmts more test animals. The .... between 13D-15tJg were used. These anin1alswe1'edividedlntotwo[2]n1eiJ1 groups: the control group and the test animals. Each group comprised sixty [60].

  6. Increased seizure susceptibility and up-regulation of nNOS expression in hippocampus following recurrent early-life seizures in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Doo-Kwun

    2010-06-01

    This study aimed to determine the long-term change of seizure susceptibility and the role of nNOS on brain development following recurrent early-life seizures in rats. Video-EEG recordings were conducted between postnatal days 50 and 60. Alterations in seizure susceptibility were assayed on day 22 or 50 using the flurothyl method. Changes in nNOS expression were determined by quantitative immunoblotting on day 50. On average, rats had 8.4+/-2.7 seizures during 10 daily 1 hr behavioral monitoring sessions. As adults (days 50-60), all rats displayed interictal spikes in the hippocampus and/or overlying cortex. Brief electrographic seizures were recorded in only one of five animals. Rats appeared to progress from a period of marked seizure susceptibility (day 22) to one of lessened seizure susceptibility (day 50). Up-regulation of nNOS expression following early-life recurrent seizures was observed on day 50. In conclusion, these data suggested that recurrent early-life seizures had the long-term effects on seizure susceptibility late in life and up-regulatory nNOS expression on the hippocampus during brain development, and nNOS appeared to contribute to the persistent changes in seizure susceptibility, and epileptogenesis.

  7. A rat model for hepatitis E virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannick Debing

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis E virus (HEV is one of the prime causes of acute viral hepatitis, and chronic hepatitis E is increasingly recognized as an important problem in the transplant setting. Nevertheless, the fundamental understanding of the biology of HEV replication is limited and there are few therapeutic options. The development of such therapies is partially hindered by the lack of a robust and convenient animal model. We propose the infection of athymic nude rats with the rat HEV strain LA-B350 as such a model. A cDNA clone, pLA-B350, was constructed and the infectivity of its capped RNA transcripts was confirmed in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, a subgenomic replicon, pLA-B350/luc, was constructed and validated for in vitro antiviral studies. Interestingly, rat HEV proved to be less sensitive to the antiviral activity of α-interferon, ribavirin and mycophenolic acid than genotype 3 HEV (a strain that infects humans. As a proof-of-concept, part of the C-terminal polymerase sequence of pLA-B350/luc was swapped with its genotype 3 HEV counterpart: the resulting chimeric replicon replicated with comparable efficiency as the wild-type construct, confirming that LA-B350 strain is amenable to humanization (replacement of certain sequences or motifs by their counterparts from human HEV strains. Finally, ribavirin effectively inhibited LA-B350 replication in athymic nude rats, confirming the suitability of the rat model for antiviral studies.

  8. Differential susceptibility of rats and guinea pigs to the ototoxic effects of ethyl benzene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cappaert, NLM; Klis, SFL; Muijser, H; Kulig, BM; Ravensberg, LC; Smoorenburg, GF

    2002-01-01

    The present study was designed to compare the ototoxic effects of volatile ethyl benzene in guinea pigs and rats. Rats showed deteriorated auditory thresholds in the mid-frequency range, based on electrocochleography, after 550-ppm ethyl benzene (8 h/day, 5 days). Outer hair cell (OHC) loss was

  9. Landslide Susceptibility Assessment Using Spatial Multi-Criteria Evaluation Model in Rwanda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Baptiste Nsengiyumva

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Landslides susceptibility assessment has to be conducted to identify prone areas and guide risk management. Landslides in Rwanda are very deadly disasters. The current research aimed to conduct landslide susceptibility assessment by applying Spatial Multi-Criteria Evaluation Model with eight layers of causal factors including: slope, distance to roads, lithology, precipitation, soil texture, soil depth, altitude and land cover. In total, 980 past landslide locations were mapped. The relationship between landslide factors and inventory map was calculated using the Spatial Multi-Criteria Evaluation. The results revealed that susceptibility is spatially distributed countrywide with 42.3% of the region classified from moderate to very high susceptibility, and this is inhabited by 49.3% of the total population. In addition, Provinces with high to very high susceptibility are West, North and South (40.4%, 22.8% and 21.5%, respectively. Subsequently, the Eastern Province becomes the peak under low susceptibility category (87.8% with no very high susceptibility (0%. Based on these findings, the employed model produced accurate and reliable outcome in terms of susceptibility, since 49.5% of past landslides fell within the very high susceptibility category, which confirms the model’s performance. The outcomes of this study will be useful for future initiatives related to landslide risk reduction and management.

  10. Increased susceptibility of post-weaning rats on high-fat diet to metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hong Sheng; Ton, So Ha; Phang, Sonia Chew Wen; Tan, Joash Ban Lee; Abdul Kadir, Khalid

    2017-11-01

    The present study aimed to examine the effects of the types of high-calorie diets (high-fat and high-fat-high-sucrose diets) and two different developmental stages (post-weaning and young adult) on the induction of metabolic syndrome. Male, post-weaning and adult (3- and 8-week old, respectively) Sprague Dawley rats were given control, high-fat (60% kcal), and high-fat-high-sucrose (60% kcal fat + 30% sucrose water) diets for eight weeks (n = 6 to 7 per group). Physical, biochemical, and transcriptional changes as well as liver histology were noted. Post-weaning rats had higher weight gain, abdominal fat mass, fasting glucose, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, faster hypertension onset, but lower circulating advanced glycation end products compared to adult rats. This is accompanied by upregulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α and γ in the liver and receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) in the visceral adipose tissue. Post-weaning rats on high-fat diet manifested all phenotypes of metabolic syndrome and increased hepatic steatosis, which are linked to increased hepatic and adipocyte PPARγ expression. Adult rats on high-fat-high-sucrose diet merely became obese and hypertensive within the same treatment duration. Thus, it is more effective and less time-consuming to induce metabolic syndrome in male post-weaning rats with high-fat diet compared to young adult rats. As male rats were selectively included into the study, the results may not be generalisable to all post-weaning rats and further investigation on female rats is required.

  11. Role of pulmonary intravascular macrophages in endotoxin-induced lung inflammation and mortality in a rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duke Tanya

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bile-duct ligated (BDL rats recruit pulmonary intravascular macrophages (PIMs and are highly susceptible to endotoxin-induced mortality. The mechanisms of this enhanced susceptibility and mortality in BDL rats, which are used as a model of hepato-pulmonary syndrome, remain unknown. We tested a hypothesis that recruited PIMs promote endotoxin-induced mortality in a rat model. Methods Rats were subjected to BDL to induce PIM recruitment followed by treatment with gadolinium chloride (GC to deplete PIMs. Normal and BDL rats were treated intravenously with E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS with or without GC pre-treatment followed by collection and analyses of lungs for histopathology, electron microscopy and cytokine quantification. Results BDL rats recruited PIMs without any change in the expression of IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-10. GC caused reduction in PIMs at 48 hours post-treatment (P E. coli LPS died within 3 hours of the challenge while the normal LPS-treated rats were euthanized at 6 hours after the LPS treatment. GC treatment of rats 6 hours or 48 hours before LPS challenge resulted in 80% (1/5 and 100% (0/5 survival, respectively, at 6 hours post-LPS treatment. Lungs from BDL+LPS rats showed large areas of perivascular hemorrhages compared to those pre-treated with GC. Concentrations of IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-10 were increased in lungs of BDL+LPS rats compared to BDL rats treated with GC 48 hours but not 6 hours before LPS (P Conclusion We conclude that PIMs increase susceptibility for LPS-induced lung injury and mortality in this model, which is blocked by a reduction in their numbers or their inactivation.

  12. A Novel Hypoxia Challenge Test Demonstrates Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Susceptibility to Acrolein Gas in Hypertensive Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    High levels of air pollution increase the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, especially in susceptible populations including those with hypertension. Stress tests are useful for manifesting latent effects of exposure, particularly at low concentrations, often when no...

  13. Increased susceptibility to cardiovascular effects of dihydrocapcaicin in resuscitated rats. Cardiovascular effects of dihydrocapsaicin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosgerau, Keld; Ristagno, Giuseppe; Jayatissa, Magdalena Niepsuj

    2010-01-01

    Survivors of a cardiac arrest often have persistent cardiovascular derangements following cardiopulmonary resuscitation including decreased cardiac output, arrhythmias and morphological myocardial damage. These cardiovascular derangements may lead to an increased susceptibility towards the extern...... and internal environment of the cardiovascular system as compared to the healthy situation.......Survivors of a cardiac arrest often have persistent cardiovascular derangements following cardiopulmonary resuscitation including decreased cardiac output, arrhythmias and morphological myocardial damage. These cardiovascular derangements may lead to an increased susceptibility towards the external...

  14. Outer membrane permeability of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus mediates susceptibility to rat polymorphonuclear leukocyte granule contents.

    OpenAIRE

    Loeffelholz, M J; Modrzakowski, M C

    1987-01-01

    Growth of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus on specific alkanes altered the outer membrane permeability of the organism, as indicated by a change in sensitivity to the antibiotic actinomycin D. As the carbon length of the alkane energy source decreased, outer membrane permeability and susceptibility to actinomycin D increased. Concomitant with the increase in outer membrane permeability, A. calcoaceticus became more susceptible to the oxygen-independent antimicrobial activity of extracted contents ...

  15. Indomethacin-Induced Gastric Ulcer: Model in Female Wistar Rats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Indomethacin-Induced Gastric Ulcer: Model in Female Wistar Rats. ... In this regard, an animal model experiment was carried-out to determine the ulcer-dose of indomethacin on female Wistar rats. Based on this objective, ... from 32 Countries:.

  16. Low susceptibility of stress ulcer in diabetic rats: role of cholinergic gastric motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, C R

    1998-09-30

    The induction of gastric hemorrhage ulcer by cold restraint stress (CRS) and the changes of cholinergic gastric motilities were studied in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic (DM) rats to compare with the age-matched normoglycemic rats. After receiving cold restraint stress for 4 h, a lower of both gastric motility and hemorrhagic ulcer was found in the STZ-induced diabetic rats in a time-dependent way from 0-16 week (s) parallel with the induction of diabetes. The mucosal ulceration induced by CRS was correlated with the amplitude (r=0.8928, pdiabetic rats. A significant (pmucus production also was observed in stressed diabetic rats. Under stress condition, the cholinergic gastric motility and mucosal lesion were markedly reduced by an intraperitoneal injection (i.p.) of atropine (1.0 mg/kg, i.p.) or bilateral vagotomy in 8-week STZ-DM rats. Otherwise, bethanechol (2.0 mg/kg, i.p.), 2-deoxy-D-glucose (135 mg/kg, i.p.) and metoclopramide (20 mg/kg, i.p.) stimulated gastric motility and aggravated mucosal lesions significantly (p<0.05). It is indicated that cholinergic gastric motility was lowered in DM rats in a manner can decrease mucosal lesion induced by CRS.

  17. Enhanced cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization and intrinsic excitability of NAc medium spiny neurons in adult but not adolescent rats susceptible to diet-induced obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oginsky, Max F.; Maust, Joel D.; Corthell, John T.; Ferrario, Carrie R.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Basal and diet-induced differences in mesolimbic function, particularly within the nucleus accumbens (NAc), may contribute to human obesity; these differences may be more pronounced in susceptible populations. Objectives We determined whether there are differences in cocaine-induced behavioral plasticity in rats that are susceptible vs. resistant to diet-induced obesity, and basal differences in the striatal neuron function in adult and adolescent obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats. Methods Susceptible and resistant outbred rats were identified based on “junk-food” diet-induced obesity. Then, the induction and expression of cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization, which is mediated by enhanced striatal function and is associated with increased motivation for rewards and reward-paired cues, were evaluated. Basal differences in mesolimbic function were examined in selectively bred obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats (P70-80 and P30-40) using both cocaine induced locomotion and whole-cell patch clamping approaches in NAc core medium spiny neurons (MSNs). Results In rats that became obese after eating “junk-food”, the expression of locomotor sensitization was enhanced compared to non-obese rats, with similarly strong responses to 7.5 and 15 mg/kg cocaine. Without diet manipulation, obesity-prone rats were hyper-responsive to the acute locomotor-activating effects of cocaine, and the intrinsic excitability of NAc core MSNs was enhanced by ~60% at positive and negative potentials. These differences were present in adult, but not adolescent rats. Post-synaptic glutamatergic transmission was similar between groups. Conclusions Mesolimbic systems, particularly NAc MSNs, are hyper-responsive in obesity-prone individuals; and interactions between predisposition and experience influence neurobehavioral plasticity in ways that may promote weight gain and hamper weight loss in susceptible rats. PMID:26612617

  18. Enhanced cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization and intrinsic excitability of NAc medium spiny neurons in adult but not in adolescent rats susceptible to diet-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oginsky, Max F; Maust, Joel D; Corthell, John T; Ferrario, Carrie R

    2016-03-01

    Basal and diet-induced differences in mesolimbic function, particularly within the nucleus accumbens (NAc), may contribute to human obesity; these differences may be more pronounced in susceptible populations. We examined differences in cocaine-induced behavioral plasticity in rats that are susceptible vs. resistant to diet-induced obesity and basal differences in striatal neuron function in adult and in adolescent obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats. Susceptible and resistant outbred rats were identified based on "junk-food" diet-induced obesity. Then, the induction and expression of cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization, which is mediated by enhanced striatal function and is associated with increased motivation for rewards and reward-paired cues, were evaluated. Basal differences in mesolimbic function were examined in selectively bred obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats (P70-80 and P30-40) using both cocaine-induced locomotion and whole-cell patch clamping approaches in NAc core medium spiny neurons (MSNs). In rats that became obese after eating junk-food, the expression of locomotor sensitization was enhanced compared to non-obese rats, with similarly strong responses to 7.5 and 15 mg/kg cocaine. Without diet manipulation, obesity-prone rats were hyper-responsive to the acute locomotor-activating effects of cocaine, and the intrinsic excitability of NAc core MSNs was enhanced by ∼60 % at positive and negative potentials. These differences were present in adult, but not adolescent rats. Post-synaptic glutamatergic transmission was similar between groups. Mesolimbic systems, particularly NAc MSNs, are hyper-responsive in obesity-prone individuals, and interactions between predisposition and experience influence neurobehavioral plasticity in ways that may promote weight gain and hamper weight loss in susceptible rats.

  19. GIS Supported Landslide Susceptibility Modeling at Regional Scale: An Expert-Based Fuzzy Weighting Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos Chalkias

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this paper is landslide susceptibility assessment using fuzzy expert-based modeling. Factors that influence landslide occurrence, such as elevation, slope, aspect, lithology, land cover, precipitation and seismicity were considered. Expert-based fuzzy weighting (EFW approach was used to combine these factors for landslide susceptibility mapping (Peloponnese, Greece. This method produced a landslide susceptibility map of the investigated area. The landslides under investigation have more or less same characteristics: lateral based and downslope shallow movement of soils or rocks. The validation of the model reveals, that predicted susceptibility levels are found to be in good agreement with the past landslide occurrences. Hence, the obtained landslide susceptibility map could be acceptable, for landslide hazard prevention and mitigation at regional scale.

  20. The calcitonin receptor gene is a candidate for regulation of susceptibility to herpes simplex type 1 neuronal infection leading to encephalitis in rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada Abdelmagid

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE is a fatal infection of the central nervous system (CNS predominantly caused by Herpes simplex virus type 1. Factors regulating the susceptibility to HSE are still largely unknown. To identify host gene(s regulating HSE susceptibility we performed a genome-wide linkage scan in an intercross between the susceptible DA and the resistant PVG rat. We found one major quantitative trait locus (QTL, Hse1, on rat chromosome 4 (confidence interval 24.3-31 Mb; LOD score 29.5 governing disease susceptibility. Fine mapping of Hse1 using recombinants, haplotype mapping and sequencing, as well as expression analysis of all genes in the interval identified the calcitonin receptor gene (Calcr as the main candidate, which also is supported by functional studies. Thus, using unbiased genetic approach variability in Calcr was identified as potentially critical for infection and viral spread to the CNS and subsequent HSE development.

  1. Fine Structure of Susceptible Enamel Lamellae against Dentin Caries in the Fissures of Rat Molar Teeth

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tetsuo KODAKA; Masayuki ABE; Shohei HIGASHI

    1997-01-01

    .... In this study, we observed enamel lamellae in the fissures of caries-free molar teeth of rats, 2 and 4 weeks after birth, by transmitted light microscopy with decalcified sections and by scanning...

  2. Diabetes Enhances Dental Caries and Apical Periodontitis in Caries-Susceptible WBN/KobSlc Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Kodama, Yasushi; Matsuura, Masahiro; Sano, Tomoya; Nakahara, Yutaka; Ozaki, Kiyokazu; NARAMA, Isao; Matsuura, Tetsuro

    2011-01-01

    Many epidemiologic studies have suggested that diabetes may be an important risk factor for periodontal disease. To determine whether diabetes induces or enhances periodontal disease or dental caries, dental tissue from diabetic male and nondiabetic female WBN/KobSlc rats and male and female age-matched nondiabetic F344 rats was analyzed morphologically and morphometrically for these 2 types of lesions. Soft X-ray examination revealed that the incidence and severity of both molar caries and a...

  3. Individual Differences in Cue-Induced Motivation and Striatal Systems in Rats Susceptible to Diet-Induced Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, Mike JF; Burghardt, Paul R; Patterson, Christa M.; Nobile, Cameron W; Akil, Huda; Watson, Stanley J.; Berridge, Kent C.; Ferrario, Carrie R.

    2015-01-01

    Pavlovian cues associated with junk-foods (caloric, highly sweet, and/or fatty foods), like the smell of brownies, can elicit craving to eat and increase the amount of food consumed. People who are more susceptible to these motivational effects of food cues may have a higher risk for becoming obese. Further, overconsumption of junk-foods leading to the development of obesity may itself heighten attraction to food cues. Here, we used a model of individual susceptibility to junk-foods diet-indu...

  4. Quantitative spatial analysis of rockfalls from road inventories: a combined statistical and physical susceptibility model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhme, M.; Derron, M.-H.; Jaboyedoff, M.

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative spatial analyses and statistical susceptibility assessments based on road inventories are often complicated due to the registration of impacts instead of source areas. A rockfall inventory from the Norwegian Directorate of Public Roads is analysed spatially in order to investigate potential controlling parameters in the Norwegian county Sogn and Fjordane. Quantitative spatial relationships are then used to model rockfall susceptibility with the help of the Weights-of-Evidence method. The controlling parameters tectono-stratigraphic position, quaternary geology, geological lineament density, relative relief and slope aspect resulted in the best performing model and thus yielded the basis for the statistical susceptibility map for the entire county of Sogn and Fjordane. Due to registered impacts instead of sources, the important parameter slope angle could not be included in the statistical models. Combining the statistical susceptibility model with a physically based model, restricts the susceptibility map to areas that are steep enough to represent a potential rockfall source. This combination makes it possible to use road inventories, with registered impacts instead of sources, for susceptibility modelling.

  5. Female rats are more susceptible to the deleterious effects of paradoxical sleep deprivation on cognitive performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajali, Vahid; Sheibani, Vahid; Esmaeili-Mahani, Saeed; Shabani, Mohammad

    2012-03-17

    Paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD) may alter subsequent learning and memory capacity. There are differences in both the intensity and direction of responses of the male and female species to the same environmental stimuli and experimental conditions. In the present study, we examined the extent of the effects of PSD for 72h on spatial learning and memory, anxiety-like behavior, corticosterone levels, and the body weight in male as well as in intact and ovariectomized (OVX) female Wistar rats. Multiple platform method was used for PSD induction. Spatial learning and memory and anxiety-like behavior were determined using Morris water maze (MWM) task and open field test, respectively. The data showed that PSD could not significantly affect subsequent spatial learning and short-term memory in male rats, while it significantly impaired the performance of the intact and OVX female rats. The PSD-intact and -OVX female rats showed more memory impairment than the PSD-male animals. Those impairments do not appear to be due to elevated stress level, since the plasma corticosterone did not significantly change following PSD induction. The open field data showed that PSD significantly reduced anxiety-like behavior in all experimental groups. In addition, PSD had a reducing effect on the mean body weight of female groups. Such results suggest that the female rats are more vulnerable to the deleterious effects of sleep loss on cognitive performance. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Diabetes enhances dental caries and apical periodontitis in caries-susceptible WBN/KobSlc rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Yasushi; Matsuura, Masahiro; Sano, Tomoya; Nakahara, Yutaka; Ozaki, Kiyokazu; Narama, Isao; Matsuura, Tetsuro

    2011-02-01

    Many epidemiologic studies have suggested that diabetes may be an important risk factor for periodontal disease. To determine whether diabetes induces or enhances periodontal disease or dental caries, dental tissue from diabetic male and nondiabetic female WBN/KobSlc rats and male and female age-matched nondiabetic F344 rats was analyzed morphologically and morphometrically for these 2 types of lesions. Soft X-ray examination revealed that the incidence and severity of both molar caries and alveolar bone resorption were much higher in male WBN/KobSlc rats with chronic diabetes than in nondiabetic female rats of the same strain. Histopathologic examination showed that dental caries progressed from acute to subacute inflammation due to bacterial infections and necrosis in the pulp when the caries penetrated the dentin. In the most advanced stage of dental caries, inflammatory changes caused root abscess and subsequent apical periodontitis, with the formation of granulation tissue around the dental root. Inflammatory changes resulted in resorption of alveolar bone and correlated well with the severity of molar caries. Our results suggest that diabetic conditions enhance dental caries in WBN/KobSlc rats and that periodontal lesions may result from the apical periodontitis that is secondary to dental caries.

  7. Does obesity increase susceptibility to ozone? Respiratory, behavioral, and metabolic assessments in Brown Norway rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    There may be a link between obesity and susceptibility to the respiratory, cardiovascular, and other health effects of air pollutants. Furthermore, it has been proposed that some air pollutants are obesogenic and may contribute to obesity. In view of the epidemic growth of obesit...

  8. Differential Gene Expression Profile in the Rat Caudal Vestibular Nucleus is Associated with Individual Differences in Motion Sickness Susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Qin Wang

    Full Text Available To identify differentially expressed genes associated with motion sickness (MS susceptibility in the rat caudal vestibular nucleus.We identified MS susceptible (MSS and insusceptible (inMSS rats by quantifying rotation-induced MS symptoms: defecation and spontaneous locomotion activity. Microarray analysis was used to screen differentially expressed genes in the caudal vestibular nucleus (CVN after rotation. Plasma stress hormones were identified by radioimmunoassay. Candidate genes were selected by bioinformatics analysis and the microarray results were verified by real-time quantitative-PCR (RT-qPCR methods. By using Elvax implantation, receptor antagonists or recombinant adenovirus targeting the candidate genes were applied to the CVN to evaluate their contribution to MS susceptibility variability. Validity of gene expression manipulation was verified by RT-qPCR and western blot analysis.A total of 304 transcripts were differentially expressed in the MSS group compared with the inMSS group. RT-qPCR analysis verified the expression pattern of candidate genes, including nicotinic cholinergic receptor (nAchR α3 subunit, 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 4 (5-HT4R, tachykinin neurokinin-1 (NK1R, γ-aminobutyric acid A receptor (GABAAR α6 subunit, olfactory receptor 81 (Olr81 and homology 2 domain-containing transforming protein 1 (Shc1. In MSS animals, the nAchR antagonist mecamylamine significantly alleviated rotation-induced MS symptoms and the plasma β-endorphin response. The NK1R antagonist CP99994 and Olr81 knock-down were effective for the defecation response, while the 5-HT4R antagonist RS39604 and Shc1 over-expression showed no therapeutic effect. In inMSS animals, rotation-induced changes in spontaneous locomotion activity and the plasma β-endorphin level occurred in the presence of the GABAAR antagonist gabazine.Our findings suggested that the variability of the CVN gene expression profile after motion stimulation might be a putative

  9. Susceptibility of young and adult rats to the oral toxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun; Chen, Zhangjian; Ba, Te; Pu, Ji; Chen, Tian; Song, Yanshuang; Gu, Yongen; Qian, Qin; Xu, Yingying; Xiang, Kun; Wang, Haifang; Jia, Guang

    2013-05-27

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) have potential applications as food additives, but concerns persist about their safety. Children are identified as having the highest exposure and may face the greatest health risks. However, the toxicological sensitivity of TiO2 NPs in different ages is not clear. Here, a comparative toxicity study of TiO2 NPs in 3-week (youth) and 8-week (adult) old Sprague-Dawley rats is reported following oral exposure at doses of 0, 10, 50, 200 mg kg(-1) body weight per day for 30 days. The organ mass and histology, blood biochemistry and redox state, intestinal function, and biodistribution of NPs are characterized. The results show that TiO2 NPs induce different toxic effects on young and adult rats. The liver edema, heart injuries and non-allergic mast cell activation in stomach tissues are found in young rats. On the other hand, only slight injury in the liver and kidney and decreased intestinal permeability and molybdenum contents are found in adult rats. Furthermore, TiO2 NP exposure can provoke reductive stress (i.e., increased reduced glutathione (GSH)/oxidized glutathione (GSSG) ratios) in plasmas through enhancing the glucose and GSH levels in young rats or reducing the glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) acitivity and GSSG levels in adult rats. These results suggest that different ages may require different biomarkers for identifying and monitoring oral toxicity of nanoparticles. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Gender-specific increase in susceptibility to metabolic syndrome of offspring rats after prenatal caffeine exposure with post-weaning high-fat diet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jing [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Luo, Hanwen [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Wu, Yimeng; He, Zheng; Zhang, Li; Guo, Yu [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Ma, Lu [Department of Epidemiology & Health Statistics, Public Health School of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Magdalou, Jacques [UMR 7561 CNRS-NancyUniversité, Faculté de Médicine, Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Chen, Liaobin [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Hubei Provincial Key Laboratory of Developmentally Originated Disease, Wuhan 430071 (China); Wang, Hui, E-mail: wanghui19@whu.edu.cn [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Hubei Provincial Key Laboratory of Developmentally Originated Disease, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2015-05-01

    Prenatal caffeine exposure (PCE) alters the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenocortical (HPA) axis-associated neuroendocrine metabolic programming and induces an increased susceptibility to metabolic syndrome (MS) in intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) offspring rats. High-fat diet (HFD) is one of the main environmental factors accounting for the incidence of MS. In this study, we aimed to clarify the gender-specific increase in susceptibility to MS in offspring rats after PCE with post-weaning HFD. Maternal Wistar rats were administered with caffeine (120 mg/kg·d) from gestational day 11 until delivery. The offspring rats with normal diet or HFD were euthanized at postnatal week 24, and blood samples were collected. Results showed that PCE not only reduced serum adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone levels, but also enhanced serum glucose, triglyceride and total cholesterol (TCH) concentrations in the offspring rats. Moreover, several interactions among PCE, HFD and gender were observed by a three-way ANOVA analysis. In PCE offspring, HFD could aggravate the degree of increased serum triglyceride level. Meanwhile, serum corticosterone levels of females were decreased more obviously than those of males in PCE offspring. The results also revealed interactions between HFD and gender in the levels of serum ACTH, triglyceride and TCH, which were changed more evidently in female HFD offspring. These results indicate that HFD could exacerbate the dysfunction of lipid metabolism and the susceptibility to MS induced by PCE, and the female offspring are more sensitive to HFD-induced neuroendocrine metabolic dysfunction than their male counterparts. - Highlights: • Caffeine induced HPA axis dysfunction in offspring rats fed by high-fat diet (HFD). • Caffeine induced an increased susceptibility to metabolic syndrome. • HFD aggravated susceptibility to metabolic syndrome induced by caffeine. • Female was more sensitive to HFD-induced neuroendocrine

  11. Ontology driven modeling for the knowledge of genetic susceptibility to disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu; Sakamoto, Norihiro

    2009-05-12

    For the machine helped exploring the relationships between genetic factors and complex diseases, a well-structured conceptual framework of the background knowledge is needed. However, because of the complexity of determining a genetic susceptibility factor, there is no formalization for the knowledge of genetic susceptibility to disease, which makes the interoperability between systems impossible. Thus, the ontology modeling language OWL was used for formalization in this paper. After introducing the Semantic Web and OWL language propagated by W3C, we applied text mining technology combined with competency questions to specify the classes of the ontology. Then, an N-ary pattern was adopted to describe the relationships among these defined classes. Based on the former work of OGSF-DM (Ontology of Genetic Susceptibility Factors to Diabetes Mellitus), we formalized the definition of "Genetic Susceptibility", "Genetic Susceptibility Factor" and other classes by using OWL-DL modeling language; and a reasoner automatically performed the classification of the class "Genetic Susceptibility Factor". The ontology driven modeling is used for formalization the knowledge of genetic susceptibility to complex diseases. More importantly, when a class has been completely formalized in an ontology, the OWL reasoning can automatically compute the classification of the class, in our case, the class of "Genetic Susceptibility Factors". With more types of genetic susceptibility factors obtained from the laboratory research, our ontologies always needs to be refined, and many new classes must be taken into account to harmonize with the ontologies. Using the ontologies to develop the semantic web needs to be applied in the future.

  12. Enhanced muscimol-induced behavioral responses after 6-OHDA lesions: relevance to susceptibility for self-mutilation behavior in neonatally lesioned rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breese, G.R.; Hulebak, K.L.; Napier, T.C.; Baumeister, A.; Frye, G.; Mueller, R.A.

    2010-01-01

    Adult rats lesioned with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), either as neonates or as adults, demonstrated increased turning, compared to unlesioned controls, when muscimol was unilaterally microinjected into the substantia nigra reticulata (SNR). At the higher doses of muscimol, the lesioned rats were so intensely lateralized that circling was impeded. These data suggest a functional supersensitivity of receptors associated with GABA function in the SNR of 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. When 30 ng muscimol was administered bilaterally into the SNR, self-mutilation behavior (SMB) was observed in 2/11 of the control unlesioned rats, in 0/8 adult 6-OHDA-lesioned rats, and in 11/11 of the neonatally-lesioned rats tested. The ability of muscimol to produce SMB in the rats lesioned as neonates was dose related. Behavioral observations indicated that behaviors associated with SMB (self-biting and taffy pulling) were present in neonatal, but not adult lesioned rats. Behavioral responses to dopamine agonist administration were also different between rats lesioned as neonates and those lesioned as adults with 6-OHDA. These data support the view that lesions of dopaminergic neurons cause an increased functional responsiveness of receptors acted upon by muscimol in the SNR, and that the increased susceptibility for SMB in neonatally lesioned rats is determined by neurons distal to the GABA receptor complex in the SNR. PMID:3104958

  13. Effects of maternal high-fat diet and sedentary lifestyle on susceptibility of adult offspring to ozone exposure in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, C J; Phillips, P M; Johnstone, A F M; Schmid, J; Schladweiler, M C; Ledbetter, A; Snow, S J; Kodavanti, U P

    2017-05-01

    Epidemiological and experimental data suggest that obesity exacerbates the health effects of air pollutants such as ozone (O3). Maternal inactivity and calorically rich diets lead to offspring that show signs of obesity. Exacerbated O3 susceptibility of offspring could thus be manifested by maternal obesity. Thirty-day-old female Long-Evans rats were fed a control (CD) or high-fat (HF) (60% calories) diet for 6 wks and then bred. GD1 rats were then housed with a running wheel (RW) or without a wheel (SED) until parturition, creating four groups of offspring: CD-SED, CD-RW, HF-SED and HF-RW. HF diet was terminated at PND 35 and all offspring were placed on CD. Body weight and %fat of dams were greatest in order; HF-SED > HF-RW > CD-SED > CD-RW. Adult offspring were exposed to O3 for two consecutive days (0.8 ppm, 4 h/day). Glucose tolerance tests (GTT), ventilatory parameters (plethysmography), and bronchoalveolar fluid (BALF) cell counts and protein biomarkers were performed to assess response to O3. Exercise and diet altered body weight and %fat of young offspring. GTT, ventilation and BALF cell counts were exacerbated by O3 with responses markedly exacerbated in males. HF diet and O3 led to significant exacerbation of several BALF parameters: total cell count, neutrophils and lymphocytes were increased in male HF-SED versus CD-SED. Males were hyperglycemic after O3 exposure and exhibited exacerbated GTT responses. Ventilatory dysfunction was also exacerbated in males. Maternal exercise had minimal effects on O3 response. The results of this exploratory study suggest a link between maternal obesity and susceptibility to O3 in their adult offspring in a sex-specific manner.

  14. Rat gastric banding model for bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, Hitoshi; Kiyama, Teruo; Fujita, Itsuo; Kato, Shunji; Yoshiyuki, Toshiro; Tajiri, Takashi

    2008-08-01

    Adjustable gastric banding is a surgical approach to weight reduction. In this study we created a gastric banding model in rats to better understand the mechanism of body weight loss. Male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 260 to 280 g were subjected to gastric banding (band group) (n=8) or to a sham operation (control group) (n=8). Body weights were monitored for 14 days, and daily food and water intake and nitrogen balance were monitored for 7 days. Two rats in the band group died of malnutrition due to gastric stomal stenosis and obstruction caused by the gastric banding. Body weight gain during the 14 days after the operation was less in the band group than in the control group (pwater intake during the 7 days after the operation was significantly less in the band group than in the control group (pbalance was significantly less in the band group than in the control group (p<0.01). Gastric banding decreased the body weight gain of rats by decreasing the amount of food intake because of the creation of a small gastric pouch.

  15. Lack of bladder carcinogenicity of dietary sodium saccharin in analbuminaemic rats, which are highly susceptible to N-nitroso-n-butyl-(4-hydroxybutyl)amine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homma, Y; Kondo, Y; Kakizoe, T; Aso, Y; Nagase, S

    1991-06-01

    A previous 1-wk study measuring the agglutinability of bladder epithelial cells by concanavalin A had suggested a high susceptibility of analbuminaemic rats to bladder carcinogenesis by sodium saccharin (Honma et al., Cancer Letters 1983, 19, 7). A long-term study was conducted to confirm the results of this short-term assay. Sodium saccharin was administered at 5% in the diet to groups of 35 male analbuminaemic rats and 36 male rats of the Sprague-Dawley strain. No bladder carcinomas nor precancerous lesions were observed in any of the rats exposed to sodium saccharin. The discrepancy between the results of the agglutination assay and the long-term experiment might be attributable to a sharp increase in urine volume in analbuminaemic rats during the first week of treatment. The resultant distension of the bladder wall might make the epithelial cells more susceptible to concanavalin A agglutination. The results indicated no demonstrable bladder carcinogenicity of sodium saccharin in analbuminaemic rats and excluded the possibility that these particular mutant rats could be useful animals for shorter-duration screening for bladder carcinogens.

  16. Effect of dietary antioxidant supplementation (Cuminum cyminum) on bacterial susceptibility of diabetes-induced rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moubarz, Gehan; Embaby, Mohamed A; Doleib, Nada M; Taha, Mona M

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic patients are at risk of acquiring infections. Chronic low-grade inflammation is an important factor in the pathogenesis of diabetic complication. Diabetes causes generation of reactive oxygen species that increases oxidative stress, which may play a role in the development of complications as immune-deficiency and bacterial infection. The study aimed to investigate the role of a natural antioxidant, cumin, in the improvement of immune functions in diabetes. Diabetes was achieved by interperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ). Bacterial infection was induced by application of Staphylococcus aureus suspension to a wound in the back of rats. The antioxidant was administered for 6 weeks. Results revealed a decrease in blood glucose levels in diabetic rats (p cumin may serve as anti-diabetic treatment and may help in attenuating diabetic complications by improving immune functions. Therefore, a medical dietary antioxidant supplementation is important to improve the immune functions in diabetes.

  17. Prepubertal exposure to cow's milk reduces susceptibility to carcinogen-induced mammary tumorigenesis in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Tina Skau; Khan, Galam; Davis, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    whole milk or tap water to drink from postnatal day (PND) 14 to PND 35, and thereafter normal tap water. Mammary tumorigenesis was induced by administering 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene on PND 50. Milk exposure increased circulating E2 levels on PND 25 by 10-fold (p ... glands of the milk-exposed rats had significantly less terminal end buds (TEBs) than the tap water-exposed controls (p water (p

  18. Plasma paraoxonase 1 arylesterase activity in D-galactose-induced aged rat model: correlation with LDL oxidation and redox status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dileep; Rizvi, Syed Ibrahim

    2014-06-01

    There is much evidence linking the involvement of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of aging. Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is an HDL-associated antioxidant enzyme that inhibits the oxidative modification of low-density lipoproteins (LDL). We have investigated the changes in plasma PON1 activity, LDL oxidation, radical scavenging activity and lipid peroxidation in D-galactose-induced aging rat model and also compared the results with 24-month naturally aged rats. Arylesterase activity of PON1, susceptibility of LDL for oxidation, plasma radical scavenging activity and plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were measured in normal control rats (4-months-old control rats subjected to D-galactose-induced experimental aging, and 24-month-old naturally aged rats). There was a significant decrease in plasma PON1 arylesterase activity in both subcutaneous D-galactose-treated groups and 24-month-old aged rats (P oxidative stress marker, was seen to increase in the experimental groups (P aged rats, there was a significant rise in plasma LDL oxidation (P aging mimics the naturally aged rat with reference to PON1 arylesterase activity and susceptibility to LDL oxidation. The results emphasize the importance of PON1 with respect to aging and its association with redox balance of the body.

  19. Why do Individuals Differ in Viral Susceptibility? A Story Told by Model Organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa van Sluijs

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Viral susceptibility and disease progression is determined by host genetic variation that underlies individual differences. Genetic polymorphisms that affect the phenotype upon infection have been well-studied for only a few viruses, such as HIV-1 and Hepatitis C virus. However, even for well-studied viruses the genetic basis of individual susceptibility differences remains elusive. Investigating the effect of causal polymorphisms in humans is complicated, because genetic methods to detect rare or small-effect polymorphisms are limited and genetic manipulation is not possible in human populations. Model organisms have proven a powerful experimental platform to identify and characterize polymorphisms that underlie natural variations in viral susceptibility using quantitative genetic tools. We summarize and compare the genetic tools available in three main model organisms, Mus musculus, Drosophila melanogaster, and Caenorhabditis elegans, and illustrate how these tools can be applied to detect polymorphisms that determine the viral susceptibility. Finally, we analyse how candidate polymorphisms from model organisms can be used to shed light on the underlying mechanism of individual variation. Insights in causal polymorphisms and mechanisms underlying individual differences in viral susceptibility in model organisms likely provide a better understanding in humans.

  20. Evaluating performance of simplified physically based models for shallow landslide susceptibility

    OpenAIRE

    Formetta, Giuseppe; Capparelli, Giovanna; Versace, Pasquale

    2016-01-01

    Rainfall-induced shallow landslides can lead to loss of life and significant damage to private and public properties, transportation systems, etc. Predicting locations that might be susceptible to shallow landslides is a complex task and involves many disciplines: hydrology, geotechnical science, geology, hydrogeology, geomorphology, and statistics. Two main approaches are commonly used: statistical or physically based models. Reliable model applications involve automatic pa...

  1. Evaluating performance of simplified physically based models for shallow landslide susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formetta, Giuseppe; Capparelli, Giovanna; Versace, Pasquale

    2016-11-01

    Rainfall-induced shallow landslides can lead to loss of life and significant damage to private and public properties, transportation systems, etc. Predicting locations that might be susceptible to shallow landslides is a complex task and involves many disciplines: hydrology, geotechnical science, geology, hydrogeology, geomorphology, and statistics. Two main approaches are commonly used: statistical or physically based models. Reliable model applications involve automatic parameter calibration, objective quantification of the quality of susceptibility maps, and model sensitivity analyses. This paper presents a methodology to systemically and objectively calibrate, verify, and compare different models and model performance indicators in order to identify and select the models whose behavior is the most reliable for particular case studies.The procedure was implemented in a package of models for landslide susceptibility analysis and integrated in the NewAge-JGrass hydrological model. The package includes three simplified physically based models for landslide susceptibility analysis (M1, M2, and M3) and a component for model verification. It computes eight goodness-of-fit indices by comparing pixel-by-pixel model results and measurement data. The integration of the package in NewAge-JGrass uses other components, such as geographic information system tools, to manage input-output processes, and automatic calibration algorithms to estimate model parameters. The system was applied for a case study in Calabria (Italy) along the Salerno-Reggio Calabria highway, between Cosenza and Altilia. The area is extensively subject to rainfall-induced shallow landslides mainly because of its complex geology and climatology. The analysis was carried out considering all the combinations of the eight optimized indices and the three models. Parameter calibration, verification, and model performance assessment were performed by a comparison with a detailed landslide inventory map for the

  2. Evaluating performance of simplified physically based models for shallow landslide susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Formetta

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Rainfall-induced shallow landslides can lead to loss of life and significant damage to private and public properties, transportation systems, etc. Predicting locations that might be susceptible to shallow landslides is a complex task and involves many disciplines: hydrology, geotechnical science, geology, hydrogeology, geomorphology, and statistics. Two main approaches are commonly used: statistical or physically based models. Reliable model applications involve automatic parameter calibration, objective quantification of the quality of susceptibility maps, and model sensitivity analyses. This paper presents a methodology to systemically and objectively calibrate, verify, and compare different models and model performance indicators in order to identify and select the models whose behavior is the most reliable for particular case studies.The procedure was implemented in a package of models for landslide susceptibility analysis and integrated in the NewAge-JGrass hydrological model. The package includes three simplified physically based models for landslide susceptibility analysis (M1, M2, and M3 and a component for model verification. It computes eight goodness-of-fit indices by comparing pixel-by-pixel model results and measurement data. The integration of the package in NewAge-JGrass uses other components, such as geographic information system tools, to manage input–output processes, and automatic calibration algorithms to estimate model parameters. The system was applied for a case study in Calabria (Italy along the Salerno–Reggio Calabria highway, between Cosenza and Altilia. The area is extensively subject to rainfall-induced shallow landslides mainly because of its complex geology and climatology. The analysis was carried out considering all the combinations of the eight optimized indices and the three models. Parameter calibration, verification, and model performance assessment were performed by a comparison with a detailed landslide

  3. Modeling landslide susceptibility in data-scarce environments using optimized data mining and statistical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Hyun; Sameen, Maher Ibrahim; Pradhan, Biswajeet; Park, Hyuck-Jin

    2018-02-01

    This study evaluated the generalizability of five models to select a suitable approach for landslide susceptibility modeling in data-scarce environments. In total, 418 landslide inventories and 18 landslide conditioning factors were analyzed. Multicollinearity and factor optimization were investigated before data modeling, and two experiments were then conducted. In each experiment, five susceptibility maps were produced based on support vector machine (SVM), random forest (RF), weight-of-evidence (WoE), ridge regression (Rid_R), and robust regression (RR) models. The highest accuracy (AUC = 0.85) was achieved with the SVM model when either the full or limited landslide inventories were used. Furthermore, the RF and WoE models were severely affected when less landslide samples were used for training. The other models were affected slightly when the training samples were limited.

  4. Developing an Accessible Landslide Susceptibility Model Using Open-Source Resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyungjin An

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Landslide susceptibility models are important for public safety, but often rely on inaccessible or unaffordable software and geospatial data. Thus, affordable and accessible landslide prediction systems would be especially useful in places that lack the infrastructure for acquiring and analyzing geospatial data. Current landslide susceptibility models and existing methodologies do not consider such issues; therefore, this study aimed to develop an accessible and affordable landslide susceptibility modeling application and methodology based on open-source software and geospatial data. This model used TRIGRS (asc format and QGIS (Digital Elevation Models (DEMs extracted from GeoTIFF format with widely accessible environmental parameters to identify potential landslide risks. In order to verify the suitability of the proposed application and methodology, a case study was conducted on Lantau Island, Hong Kong to assess the validity of the results, a comparison with 1999 landslide locations. The application developed in this study showed a good agreement with the four previous landslide locations marked as highly susceptible, which proves the validity of the study. Therefore, the developing model and the cost-effective approach, in this study simulated the landslide performance well and suggested the new approach of the landslide prediction system.

  5. Uncertainty into statistical landslide susceptibility models resulting from terrain mapping units and landslide input data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zêzere, José Luis; Pereira, Susana; Melo, Raquel; Oliveira, Sérgio; Garcia, Ricardo

    2017-04-01

    There are multiple sources of uncertainty within statistically-based landslide susceptibility assessment that needs to be accounted and monitored. In this work we evaluate and discuss differences observed on landslide susceptibility maps resulting from the selection of the terrain mapping unit and the selection of the feature type to represent landslides (polygon vs point). The work is performed in the Silveira Basin (18.2 square kilometres) located north of Lisbon, Portugal, using a unique database of geo-environmental landslide predisposing factors and an inventory of 81 shallow translational slides. The Logistic Regression is the statistical method selected to combine the predictive factors with the dependent variable. Four landslide susceptibility models were computed using the complete landslide inventory and considering the total landslide area over four different terrain mapping units: Slope Terrain Units (STU), Geo-Hydrological Terrain Units (GHTU), Census Terrain Units (CTU) and Grid Cell Terrain Units (GCTU). Four additional landslide susceptibility models were made over the same four terrain mapping units using a landslide training group (50% of the inventory randomly selected). These models were independently validated with the other 50% of the landslide inventory (landslide test group). Lastly, two additional landslide susceptibility models were computed over GCTU, one using the landslide training group represented as point features corresponding to the centroid of landslide, and other using the centroid of landslide rupture zone. In total, 10 landslide susceptibility maps were constructed and classified in 10 classes of equal number of terrain units to allow comparison. The evaluation of the prediction skills of susceptibility models was made using ROC metrics and Success and Prediction rate curves. Lastly, the landslide susceptibility maps computed over GCTU were compared using the Kappa statistics. With this work we conclude that large differences

  6. Carcinogenically relevant split dose repair increased with age in rat skin model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Fredric; Tang, Moon-Shong Eric; Wu, Feng; Uddin, Ahmed

    2012-07-01

    These experiments utilize cancer induction to evaluate cancer-relevant repair during the interval between dose fractions. Low LET electron radiation(LET ~ 0.34 keV/u) were utilized in experiments that involved exposing rat dorsal skin to 2 equal 8 Gy dose fractions separated at various intervals from 0.25 h to 24 h. Cancer onset was established for 80 weeks after the exposures and only histologically verified cancers were included in the analysis. This experiment involved a total of 540 rats and 880 induced cancers. In the youngest rats (irradiated at 28 days of age) the cancer yield declined with a halftime of approximately 3.5 hrs. In 113 day old rats the cancer yield halftime was shortened to 1.3 hrs. In the oldest rats (182 days of age), the halftime could not be established quantitatively, because it was less than the shortest interval (15 min) utilized in the protocol (best estimate ~5 min). In the oldest rats the cancer yields for all fractionated exposures dropped essentially to the expected level of 2 single fractions, below which theoretically no further reduction is possible. The follow-up times for obtaining cancer yields were the same for all exposure groups in spite of the differing ages at exposure. These results indicate that repair of carcinogenically-relevant damage accelerates with age of the rat. No information is available on the possible mechanistic basis for this finding, although the model might be useful for delineating which of the many postulated split dose repair pathways is the correct one. The finding indicates that older rats should be less susceptible to the carcinogenic action of single doses of low LET radiation in comparison to younger rats, which has been verified in separate studies.

  7. Predictive modeling of gingivitis severity and susceptibility via oral microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shi; Li, Rui; Zeng, Xiaowei; He, Tao; Zhao, Helen; Chang, Alice; Bo, Cunpei; Chen, Jie; Yang, Fang; Knight, Rob; Liu, Jiquan; Davis, Catherine; Xu, Jian

    2014-09-01

    Predictive modeling of human disease based on the microbiota holds great potential yet remains challenging. Here, 50 adults underwent controlled transitions from naturally occurring gingivitis, to healthy gingivae (baseline), and to experimental gingivitis (EG). In diseased plaque microbiota, 27 bacterial genera changed in relative abundance and functional genes including 33 flagellar biosynthesis-related groups were enriched. Plaque microbiota structure exhibited a continuous gradient along the first principal component, reflecting transition from healthy to diseased states, which correlated with Mazza Gingival Index. We identified two host types with distinct gingivitis sensitivity. Our proposed microbial indices of gingivitis classified host types with 74% reliability, and, when tested on another 41-member cohort, distinguished healthy from diseased individuals with 95% accuracy. Furthermore, the state of the microbiota in naturally occurring gingivitis predicted the microbiota state and severity of subsequent EG (but not the state of the microbiota during the healthy baseline period). Because the effect of disease is greater than interpersonal variation in plaque, in contrast to the gut, plaque microbiota may provide advantages in predictive modeling of oral diseases.

  8. Rat models of cardiometabolic diseases: baseline clinical chemistries, and rationale for their use in examining air pollution health effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodavanti, Urmila P; Russell, James C; Costa, Daniel L

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with cardiovascular and metabolic diseases (CVD) are shown to be more susceptible to adverse health effects of pollutants. Rodent models of CVD are used for examining susceptibility variations. CVD models developed by selective inbreeding are shown to represent the etiology of human disease and metabolic dysfunction. The goal of this article was to review the origin and the pathobiological features of rat models of varying CVD with or without metabolic syndrome and healthy laboratory rat strains to allow better interpretation of the data regarding their susceptibility to air pollutant exposures. Age-matched healthy Sprague-Dawley (SD), Wistar (WIS) and Wistar Kyoto (WKY), and CVD-prone spontaneously hypertensive (SH), Fawn-Hooded hypertensive (FHH), SH stroke-prone (SHSP), SHHF/Mcc heart failure obese (SHHF) and insulin-resistant JCR:LA-cp obese (JCR) rat models were considered for this study. The genetics and the underlying pathologies differ between these models. Normalized heart weights correlated with underlying cardiac disease while wide differences exist in the number of white blood cells and platelets within healthy strains and those with CVD. High plasma fibrinogen and low angiotensin converting enzyme activity in FHH might relate to kidney disease and associated hypertension. However, other obese strains with known kidney lesions do not exhibit decreases in ACE activity. The increased activated partial thromboplastin time only in SHSP correlates with their hemorrhagic stroke susceptibility. Increases plasma lipid peroxidation in JCR might reflect their susceptibility to acquire atherosclerosis. These underlying pathologies involving CVD and metabolic dysfunction are critical in interpretation of findings related to susceptibility variations of air pollution health effects.

  9. Repeated Moderate Noise Exposure in the Rat--an Early Adulthood Noise Exposure Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannström, Paula; Kirkegaard, Mette; Ulfendahl, Mats

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of varying intensity levels of repeated moderate noise exposures on hearing. The aim was to define an appropriate intensity level that could be repeated several times without giving rise to a permanent hearing loss, and thus establish a model for early adulthood moderate noise exposure in rats. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to broadband noise for 90 min, with a 50 % duty cycle at levels of 101, 104, 107, or 110 dB sound pressure level (SPL), and compared to a control group of non-exposed animals. Exposure was repeated every 6 weeks for a maximum of six repetitions or until a permanent hearing loss was observed. Hearing was assessed by the auditory brainstem response (ABR). Rats exposed to the higher intensities of 107 and 110 dB SPL showed permanent threshold shifts following the first exposure, while rats exposed to 101 and 104 dB SPL could be exposed at least six times without a sustained change in hearing thresholds. ABR amplitudes decreased over time for all groups, including the non-exposed control group, while the latencies were unaffected. A possible change in noise susceptibility following the repeated moderate noise exposures was tested by subjecting the animals to high-intensity noise exposure of 110 dB for 4 h. Rats previously exposed repeatedly to 104 dB SPL were slightly more resistant to high-intensity noise exposure than non-exposed rats or rats exposed to 101 dB SPL. Repeated moderate exposure to 104 dB SPL broadband noise is a viable model for early adulthood noise exposure in rats and may be useful for the study of noise exposure on age-related hearing loss.

  10. Striatal grafts in a rat model of Huntington's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guzman, R; Meyer, M; Lövblad, K O

    1999-01-01

    Survival and integration into the host brain of grafted tissue are crucial factors in neurotransplantation approaches. The present study explored the feasibility of using a clinical MR scanner to study striatal graft development in a rat model of Huntington's disease. Rat fetal lateral ganglionic...... eminences grown as free-floating roller-tube cultures can be successfully grafted in a rat Huntington model and that a clinical MR scanner offers a useful noninvasive tool for studying striatal graft development....

  11. Effect of lithological data of different scales on modelling landslide susceptibility maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassner, C.; Petschko, H.; Bell, R.; Glade, T.

    2012-04-01

    In landslide susceptibility modelling, lithology is often only available at rather coarse scales. The effects of this course resolution on the final map are often unknown. Thus, the aim of this study is to investigate how different lithological data affect the results of landslide susceptibility modelling and to analyse spatial differences in the resulting maps in Scheibbs, a district of Lower Austria. Within this study logistic regression is used to model landslide susceptibility, focusing on the consequences deriving from the use of two different lithological datasets (mapping scale 1:200,000 and 1:50,000). Here, the dependent variable is the landslide inventory and the independent variables are derivates of the digital elevation model (DEM) at a 10m resolution (slope, aspect, and curvature), the land cover map (10m x 10m) and lithological maps. Nominal data (land cover and lithology) were transformed to metric data by frequency ratios. Three different techniques are applied to evaluate model performance to allow for a comparison of the models/maps using lithological data with varying scales. The first approach uses AUROC curves of the test and training datasets, which were generated by random sampling. Secondly, the resulting susceptibility maps were classified into four classes with equal intervals. Then, the performance was evaluated from the percentages of terrain units that each model correctly classifies and the number of landslides falling within the area classified as unstable (true positives). In a third evaluation step the geomorphological quality of the resulting susceptibility maps was visually interpreted. Different classification methods (e.g. quartiles, jenks) were tested. The results show that the lithological data (1:50,000) have slightly better AUROC values. Surprisingly, the statistical validation of the true positives does not allow a definite preference in terms of best accuracy for either dataset. Test results on geomorphological value show

  12. Spread of Ebola disease with susceptible exposed infected isolated recovered (SEIIhR) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizah, Afina; Widyaningsih, Purnami; Retno Sari Saputro, Dewi

    2017-06-01

    Ebola is a deadly infectious disease and has caused an epidemic on several countries in West Africa. Mathematical modeling to study the spread of Ebola disease has been developed, including through models susceptible infected removed (SIR) and susceptible exposed infected removed (SEIR). Furthermore, susceptible exposed infected isolated recovered (SEIIhR) model has been derived. The aims of this research are to derive SEIIhR model for Ebola disease, to determine the patterns of its spread, to determine the equilibrium point and stability of the equilibrium point using phase plane analysis, and also to apply the SEIIhR model on Ebola epidemic in Sierra Leone in 2014. The SEIIhR model is a differential equation system. Pattern of ebola disease spread with SEIIhR model is solution of the differential equation system. The equilibrium point of SEIIhR model is unique and it is a disease-free equilibrium point that stable. Application of the model is based on the data Ebola epidemic in Sierra Leone. The free-disease equilibrium point (Se; Ee; Ie; Ihe; Re )=(5743865, 0, 0, 0, 0) is stable.

  13. Congenic rats with higher arylamine N-acetyltransferase 2 activity exhibit greater carcinogen-induced mammary tumor susceptibility independent of carcinogen metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepp, Marcus W; Doll, Mark A; Samuelson, David J; Sanders, Mary Ann G; States, J Christopher; Hein, David W

    2017-03-31

    Recent investigations suggest role(s) of human arylamine N-acetyltransferase 1 (NAT1) in breast cancer. Rat NAT2 is orthologous to human NAT1 and the gene products are functional homologs. We conducted in vivo studies using F344.WKY-Nat2 rapid/slow rats, congenic at rat Nat2 for high (rapid) and low (slow) arylamine N-acetyltransferase activity, to assess a possible role for rat NAT2 in mammary tumor susceptibility. Mammary carcinogens, methylnitrosourea (MNU) and 7,12-dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA) neither of which is metabolized by N-acetyltransferase, were administered to assess mammary tumors. MNU was administered at 3 or 8 weeks of age. DMBA was administered at 8 weeks of age. NAT2 enzymatic activity and endogenous acetyl-coenzyme A (AcCoA) levels were measured in tissue samples and embryonic fibroblasts isolated from the congenic rats. Tumor latency was shorter in rapid NAT2 rats compared to slow NAT2 rats, with statistical significance for MNU administered at 3 and 8 weeks of age (p = 0.009 and 0.050, respectively). Tumor multiplicity and incidence were higher in rapid NAT2 rats compared to slow NAT2 rats administered MNU or DMBA at 8 weeks of age (MNU, p = 0.050 and 0.035; DMBA, p = 0.004 and 0.027, respectively). Recombinant rat rapid-NAT2, as well as tissue samples and embryonic fibroblasts derived from rapid NAT2 rats, catalyzed p-aminobenzoic acid N-acetyl transfer and folate-dependent acetyl-coenzyme A (AcCoA) hydrolysis at higher rates than those derived from rat slow-NAT2. Embryonic fibroblasts isolated from rapid NAT2 rats displayed lower levels of cellular AcCoA than slow NAT2 rats (p rat NAT2 in mammary cancer was discovered unrelated to carcinogen metabolism, suggesting a role for human NAT1 in breast cancer.

  14. Lyapunov functions and global stability for SIR and SEIR models with age-dependent susceptibility

    KAUST Repository

    Korobeinikov, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    We consider global asymptotic properties for the SIR and SEIR age structured models for infectious diseases where the susceptibility depends on the age. Using the direct Lyapunov method with Volterra type Lyapunov functions, we establish conditions for the global stability of a unique endemic steady state and the infection-free steady state.

  15. GIS-aided Statistical Landslide Susceptibility Modeling And Mapping Of Antipolo Rizal (Philippines)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumlao, A. J.; Victor, J. A.

    2015-09-01

    Slope instability associated with heavy rainfall or earthquake is a familiar geotechnical problem in the Philippines. The main objective of this study is to perform a detailed landslide susceptibility assessment of Antipolo City. The statistical method of assessment used was logistic regression. Landslide inventory was done through interpretation of aerial photographs and satellite images with corresponding field verification. In this study, morphologic and non-morphologic factors contributing to landslide occurrence and their corresponding spatial relationships were considered. The analysis of landslide susceptibility was implemented in a Geographic Information System (GIS). The 17320 randomly selected datasets were divided into training and test data sets. K- cross fold validation is done with k= 5. The subsamples are then fitted five times with k-1 training data set and the remaining fold as the validation data set. The AUROC of each model is validated using each corresponding data set. The AUROC of the five models are; 0.978, 0.977, 0.977, 0.974, and 0.979 respectively, implying that the models are effective in correctly predicting the occurrence and nonoccurrence of landslide activity. Field verification was also done. The landslide susceptibility map was then generated from the model. It is classified into four categories; low, moderate, high and very high susceptibility. The study also shows that almost 40% of Antipolo City has been assessed to be potentially dangerous areas in terms of landslide occurrence.

  16. On the Baryonic Density and Susceptibilities in a Holographic Model of QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Keun-young; Liao, Jinfeng

    2009-06-16

    In this paper, we calculate analytically the baryonic density and susceptibilities, which are sensitive probes to the fermionic degrees of freedom, in a holographic model of QCD both in its hot QGP phase and in its cold dense phase. Interesting patterns due to strong coupling dynamics will be shown and valuable lessons for QCD will be discussed.

  17. Novel approaches to identify low-penetrance cancer susceptibility genes using mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Koning, John P; Mao, Jian-Hua; Balmain, Allan

    2003-01-01

    Studies of cancer predisposition have largely concentrated on the role of high-penetrance susceptibility genes. Less than 10% of the total human tumor burden, however, is accounted for by mutations in these genes. More genetic variation in cancer risk is likely to be due to commoner but lower penetrance alleles. In man, such modifier genes will be difficult to find since they do not segregate as single Mendelian traits. The mouse offers a powerful system for studying polygenic traits such as cancer and has been widely used for this purpose. Novel approaches that might accelerate the identification of these low-penetrance cancer susceptibility genes by using mouse models will be discussed.

  18. Cardiomyopathy confers susceptibility to particulate matter-induced oxidative stress, vagal dominance, arrhythmia and pulmonary inflammation in heart failure-prone rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carll, Alex P; Haykal-Coates, Najwa; Winsett, Darrell W; Hazari, Mehdi S; Ledbetter, Allen D; Richards, Judy H; Cascio, Wayne E; Costa, Daniel L; Farraj, Aimen K

    2015-02-01

    Acute exposure to ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is tied to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, especially among those with prior cardiac injury. The mechanisms and pathophysiological events precipitating these outcomes remain poorly understood but may involve inflammation, oxidative stress, arrhythmia and autonomic nervous system imbalance. Cardiomyopathy results from cardiac injury, is the leading cause of heart failure, and can be induced in heart failure-prone rats through sub-chronic infusion of isoproterenol (ISO). To test whether cardiomyopathy confers susceptibility to inhaled PM2.5 and can elucidate potential mechanisms, we investigated the cardiophysiologic, ventilatory, inflammatory and oxidative effects of a single nose-only inhalation of a metal-rich PM2.5 (580 µg/m(3), 4 h) in ISO-pretreated (35 days × 1.0 mg/kg/day sc) rats. During the 5 days post-treatment, ISO-treated rats had decreased HR and BP and increased pre-ejection period (PEP, an inverse correlate of contractility) relative to saline-treated rats. Before inhalation exposure, ISO-pretreated rats had increased PR and ventricular repolarization time (QT) and heterogeneity (Tp-Te). Relative to clean air, PM2.5 further prolonged PR-interval and decreased systolic BP during inhalation exposure; increased tidal volume, expiratory time, heart rate variability (HRV) parameters of parasympathetic tone and atrioventricular block arrhythmias over the hours post-exposure; increased pulmonary neutrophils, macrophages and total antioxidant status one day post-exposure; and decreased pulmonary glutathione peroxidase 8 weeks after exposure, with all effects occurring exclusively in ISO-pretreated rats but not saline-pretreated rats. Ultimately, our findings indicate that cardiomyopathy confers susceptibility to the oxidative, inflammatory, ventilatory, autonomic and arrhythmogenic effects of acute PM2.5 inhalation.

  19. High-fat/fructose feeding during prenatal and postnatal development in female rats increases susceptibility to renal and metabolic injury later in life

    OpenAIRE

    Flynn, Elizabeth R.; Alexander, Barbara T.; Lee, Jonathan; Hutchens, Zachary M.; Maric-Bilkan, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that both an adverse prenatal and early postnatal environment increase susceptibility to renal and metabolic dysfunction later in life; however, whether exposure to adverse conditions during both prenatal and postnatal development act synergistically to potentiate the severity of renal and metabolic injury remains unknown. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed either a standard diet or a diet high in fat/fructose throughout pregnancy and lactation. After being weaned, fe...

  20. Multifractal magnetic susceptibility distribution models of hydrothermally altered rocks in the Needle Creek Igneous Center of the Absaroka Mountains, Wyoming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Gettings

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic susceptibility was measured for 700 samples of drill core from thirteen drill holes in the porphyry copper-molybdenum deposit of the Stinkingwater mining district in the Absaroka Mountains, Wyoming. The magnetic susceptibility measurements, chemical analyses, and alteration class provided a database for study of magnetic susceptibility in these altered rocks. The distribution of the magnetic susceptibilities for all samples is multi-modal, with overlapping peaked distributions for samples in the propylitic and phyllic alteration class, a tail of higher susceptibilities for potassic alteration, and an approximately uniform distribution over a narrow range at the highest susceptibilities for unaltered rocks. Samples from all alteration and mineralization classes show susceptibilities across a wide range of values. Samples with secondary (supergene alteration due to oxidation or enrichment show lower susceptibilities than primary (hypogene alteration rock. Observed magnetic susceptibility variations and the monolithological character of the host rock suggest that the variations are due to varying degrees of alteration of blocks of rock between fractures that conducted hydrothermal fluids. Alteration of rock from the fractures inward progressively reduces the bulk magnetic susceptibility of the rock. The model introduced in this paper consists of a simulation of the fracture pattern and a simulation of the alteration of the rock between fractures. A multifractal model generated from multiplicative cascades with unequal ratios produces distributions statistically similar to the observed distributions. The reduction in susceptibility in the altered rocks was modelled as a diffusion process operating on the fracture distribution support. The average magnetic susceptibility was then computed for each block. For the purpose of comparing the model results with observation, the simulated magnetic susceptibilities were then averaged over the same

  1. Mathematical Model for Dengue Epidemics with Differential Susceptibility and Asymptomatic Patients Using Computer Algebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldarriaga Vargas, Clarita

    When there are diseases affecting large populations where the social, economic and cultural diversity is significant within the same region, the biological parameters that determine the behavior of the dispersion disease analysis are affected by the selection of different individuals. Therefore and because of the variety and magnitude of the communities at risk of contracting dengue disease around all over the world, suggest defining differentiated populations with individual contributions in the results of the dispersion dengue disease analysis. In this paper those conditions were taken in account when several epidemiologic models were analyzed. Initially a stability analysis was done for a SEIR mathematical model of Dengue disease without differential susceptibility. Both free disease and endemic equilibrium states were found in terms of the basic reproduction number and were defined in the Theorem (3.1). Then a DSEIR model was solved when a new susceptible group was introduced to consider the effects of important biological parameters of non-homogeneous populations in the spreading analysis. The results were compiled in the Theorem (3.2). Finally Theorems (3.3) and (3.4) resumed the basic reproduction numbers for three and n different susceptible groups respectively, giving an idea of how differential susceptibility affects the equilibrium states. The computations were done using an algorithmic method implemented in Maple 11, a general-purpose computer algebra system.

  2. Application of a perialpine landslide susceptibility model in the Alpine region (Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Komac

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available A very good landslide susceptibility prediction model was developed for the area in the perialpine region in the central western Slovenia. Using multivariate statistics the interactions between spatial factors and landslide distribution were tested, and the importance of individual factor to the landslide susceptibility was defined. On the basis of the statistical results several landslide prediction models were developed using the Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP method. These models gave very different results, with a prediction error ranging from 6,89 % to 31,8 %. As a final result of the research, weights of different spatial factors from the best models calculated with the AHP method were derived. The results showed that the lithology (31 % variance, the slope inclination (21,2% variance, land cover type (13,7 % variance, the terrain roughness (10,1 % variance, and the terrain curvature (8,6 % variance play an important role in landslide susceptibility in general. Minor roles also play the distance to streams and the distance to structuralelements. These factors weights values were later used as input values in a simple linear weighted landslide susceptibility prediction model for the area in the Alpine region (north-western Slovenia. The fact is that the ideal weight’s value of a factor differs from area to area. Each original weight value used in the new (Alpine model presented only the mean of the new weight’s range/distribution, which was used as an input to the linearmodel. The analysis of the ideal factors weights in the Alpine area included several analytical trials, where different factors with different weight distribution were used.Altogether, almost 65 000 different models were calculated and tested to the landslide distribution. The best prediction results gave the model, where lithology played the major role in the landslide susceptibility (30 %, slope inclination contributed less (22 %, andland cover type contributed 20

  3. Assessment of neural network, frequency ratio and regression models for landslide susceptibility analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, B.; Buchroithner, M. F.; Mansor, S.

    2009-04-01

    This paper presents the assessment results of spatially based probabilistic three models using Geoinformation Techniques (GIT) for landslide susceptibility analysis at Penang Island in Malaysia. Landslide locations within the study areas were identified by interpreting aerial photographs, satellite images and supported with field surveys. Maps of the topography, soil type, lineaments and land cover were constructed from the spatial data sets. There are nine landslide related factors were extracted from the spatial database and the neural network, frequency ratio and logistic regression coefficients of each factor was computed. Landslide susceptibility maps were drawn for study area using neural network, frequency ratios and logistic regression models. For verification, the results of the analyses were compared with actual landslide locations in study area. The verification results show that frequency ratio model provides higher prediction accuracy than the ANN and regression models.

  4. Evaluating machine learning and statistical prediction techniques for landslide susceptibility modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, J. N.; Brenning, A.; Petschko, H.; Leopold, P.

    2015-08-01

    Statistical and now machine learning prediction methods have been gaining popularity in the field of landslide susceptibility modeling. Particularly, these data driven approaches show promise when tackling the challenge of mapping landslide prone areas for large regions, which may not have sufficient geotechnical data to conduct physically-based methods. Currently, there is no best method for empirical susceptibility modeling. Therefore, this study presents a comparison of traditional statistical and novel machine learning models applied for regional scale landslide susceptibility modeling. These methods were evaluated by spatial k-fold cross-validation estimation of the predictive performance, assessment of variable importance for gaining insights into model behavior and by the appearance of the prediction (i.e. susceptibility) map. The modeling techniques applied were logistic regression (GLM), generalized additive models (GAM), weights of evidence (WOE), the support vector machine (SVM), random forest classification (RF), and bootstrap aggregated classification trees (bundling) with penalized discriminant analysis (BPLDA). These modeling methods were tested for three areas in the province of Lower Austria, Austria. The areas are characterized by different geological and morphological settings. Random forest and bundling classification techniques had the overall best predictive performances. However, the performances of all modeling techniques were for the majority not significantly different from each other; depending on the areas of interest, the overall median estimated area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) differences ranged from 2.9 to 8.9 percentage points. The overall median estimated true positive rate (TPR) measured at a 10% false positive rate (FPR) differences ranged from 11 to 15pp. The relative importance of each predictor was generally different between the modeling methods. However, slope angle, surface roughness and plan

  5. Analysis of significance of environmental factors in landslide susceptibility modeling: Case study Jemma drainage network, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vít Maca

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the paper is to describe methodology for calculating significance of environmental factors in landslide susceptibility modeling and present result of selected one. As a study area part of a Jemma basin in Ethiopian Highland is used. This locality is highly affected by mass movement processes. In the first part all major factors and their influence are described briefly. Majority of the work focuses on research of other methodologies used in susceptibility models and design of own methodology. This method is unlike most of the methods used completely objective, therefore it is not possible to intervene in the results. In article all inputs and outputs of the method are described as well as all stages of calculations. Results are illustrated on specific examples. In study area most important factor for landslide susceptibility is slope, on the other hand least important is land cover. At the end of article landslide susceptibility map is created. Part of the article is discussion of results and possible improvements of the methodology.

  6. Groove model of tibia-femoral osteoarthritis in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Visser, H.M.; Weinans, H.H.; Coeleveld, K.; van Rijen, M.H.P.; Lafeber, F.P.J.G.; Mastbergen, S.C.

    2016-01-01

    Several experimental models of osteoarthritis in rats are used to study the pathophysiology of osteoarthritis. Many mechanically induced models have the limitation that permanent joint instability is induced by, for example, ligament transection or meniscal damage. This permanent instability will

  7. Restoring susceptibility induced MRI signal loss in rat brain at 9.4 T: A step towards whole brain functional connectivity imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupeng Li

    Full Text Available The aural cavity magnetic susceptibility artifact leads to significant echo planar imaging (EPI signal dropout in rat deep brain that limits acquisition of functional connectivity fcMRI data. In this study, we provide a method that recovers much of the EPI signal in deep brain. Needle puncture introduction of a liquid-phase fluorocarbon into the middle ear allows acquisition of rat fcMRI data without signal dropout. We demonstrate that with seeds chosen from previously unavailable areas, including the amygdala and the insular cortex, we are able to acquire large scale networks, including the limbic system. This tool allows EPI-based neuroscience and pharmaceutical research in rat brain using fcMRI that was previously not feasible.

  8. A Sustained Depressive State Promotes a Guanfacine Reversible Susceptibility to Alcohol Seeking in Rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Riga (Danai); L.J.M. Schmitz (Leanne); J.E. van der Harst (Johanneke); Y. van Mourik (Yvar); W.J.G. Hoogendijk (Witte); A.B. Smit (August); S. Spijker; T.J. de Vries (Taco)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractHigh rates of comorbidity between alcohol use disorder (AUD) and major depressive disorder (MDD) are reported. Preclinical models examining effects of primary depression on secondary AUD are currently absent, preventing adequate testing of drug treatment. Here, we combined social

  9. Effect of ozone on colon anastomoses in rat peritonitis model

    OpenAIRE

    Çakır,Tuğrul; Aslaner, Arif; Tekeli,Seçkin Özgür; Avcı,Sema; Doğan,Uğur; Tekeli,Feyza; Soylu,Hakan; Akyüz, Cebrail; Koç,Süleyman; Üstünel,İsmail; Yılmaz,Necat

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the effects of medical ozone theraphy on the colon anastomosis of peritonitis model in rats. METHODS: Eighteen rats were randomly assigned into three equal groups; control, cecal punctuation and colon anastomosis and ozone theraphy. Sepsis was performed with a cecal punctuation in groups 2 and 3. The medical ozone theraphy was administered intraperitonealy for three weeks in group 3 while the other rats received saline injection. At the twenty second day serum were ob...

  10. A comparison of the pulmonary defenses against streptococcal infection in rats and mice following O3 exposure: Differences in disease susceptibility and neutrophil recruitment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilmour, M.I.; Selgrade, M.K. (Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (United States))

    1993-12-01

    Ozone (O3) exposure reduces alveolar macrophage (AM) phagocytosis in mice and increases their susceptibility to Streptococcus zooepidemicus. O3 exposure also decreases AM phagocytosis in rats but does not result in mortality to infection. To investigate the mechanism of disease protection in rats, antibacterial defenses of two strains of mice and F344 rats were compared. O3 exposure (3 hr, 0.4 or 0.8 ppm) and infection with S. zooepidemicus resulted in a dose-dependent proliferation of bacteria in the lungs of mice and high mortality. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) were observed in severely affected individuals 2 or more days postinfection and did not alter the fatal infection. In contrast, microbial inactivation was only impaired in O3-exposed rat lungs during the first 48 hr after infection. In these animals PMNs could be isolated from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid between 6 and 48 hr postinfection with the peak response occurring at 24 hr. Pretreatment with anti-PMN serum eliminated the neutrophil influx and impaired further the bactericidal activity in ozone-exposed rats. The results suggest that inhaled streptococci are cleared normally from the mouse lung by AMs. Following exposure to O3, AM phagocytosis is reduced and the mice develop a fatal infection. The persistence of bacteria in the lungs of O3-exposed rats triggers a transient influx of PMNs whose appearance corresponds with elimination of the bacteria. Differences in antimicrobial defenses between various experimental species and humans need to be better understood in order to predict effects of air pollutants on susceptibility to infection in man.

  11. Generation and characterization of rat liver stem cell lines and their engraftment in a rat model of liver failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijk, Ewart W; Rasmussen, Shauna; Blokzijl, Francis; Huch, Meritxell; Gehart, Helmuth; Toonen, Pim; Begthel, Harry; Clevers, Hans; Geurts, Aron M; Cuppen, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    The rat is an important model for liver regeneration. However, there is no in vitro culture system that can capture the massive proliferation that can be observed after partial hepatectomy in rats. We here describe the generation of rat liver stem cell lines. Rat liver stem cells, which grow as

  12. Comparative power spectrum analysis of EEG activity in spontaneously hypertensive and Wistar rats in kainate model of temporal model of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchekalarova, Jana; Kortenska, Lidia; Marinov, Pencho; Boyanov, Kiril

    2016-06-01

    Recently, we have reported that spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) exhibit higher susceptibility than Wistar rats in kainate (KA) model of epilepsy. The aim of the present study is to compare the baseline of EEG signals in SHRs and Wistar rats using Discrete Fourier transform (DFT) during the three phases of KA model (acute, latent and chronic). The SHRs showed higher baseline relative power of delta waves in the left frontal cortex and lower gamma-HF waves in the left frontal and left/right parietal cortex, respectively, compared to Wistar rats. During the acute phase, both absolute and relative power of fast EEG bands (gamma-HF) was lower in the left/right frontal and the left/right parietal cortex in SHRs compared to Wistar rats. During the latent phase, no difference in the power of the investigated bands was detected between the two strains. During the chronic epileptic phase, the SHRs were characterized with higher power of HF oscillations than Wistar rats both in the frontal and parietal cortex without brain lateralization while theta, alpha and beta bands were with diminished power in the left parietal cortex of SHRs compared to normotensive Wistar rats. Taken together, the presented results suggest that the increased delta waves and lower gamma-HF waves in the frontal/parietal cortex are associated with a higher seizure susceptibility of SHRs compared to Wistar rats while fastest oscillations has a critical role in seizure generation and propagation of hypertensive rats. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Selecting statistical or machine learning techniques for regional landslide susceptibility modelling by evaluating spatial prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Jason; Brenning, Alexander; Petschko, Helene; Leopold, Philip

    2015-04-01

    With so many techniques now available for landslide susceptibility modelling, it can be challenging to decide on which technique to apply. Generally speaking, the criteria for model selection should be tied closely to end users' purpose, which could be spatial prediction, spatial analysis or both. In our research, we focus on comparing the spatial predictive abilities of landslide susceptibility models. We illustrate how spatial cross-validation, a statistical approach for assessing spatial prediction performance, can be applied with the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) as a prediction measure for model comparison. Several machine learning and statistical techniques are evaluated for prediction in Lower Austria: support vector machine, random forest, bundling with penalized linear discriminant analysis, logistic regression, weights of evidence, and the generalized additive model. In addition to predictive performance, the importance of predictor variables in each model was estimated using spatial cross-validation by calculating the change in AUROC performance when variables are randomly permuted. The susceptibility modelling techniques were tested in three areas of interest in Lower Austria, which have unique geologic conditions associated with landslide occurrence. Overall, we found for the majority of comparisons that there were little practical or even statistically significant differences in AUROCs. That is the models' prediction performances were very similar. Therefore, in addition to prediction, the ability to interpret models for spatial analysis and the qualitative qualities of the prediction surface (map) are considered and discussed. The measure of variable importance provided some insight into the model behaviour for prediction, in particular for "black-box" models. However, there were no clear patterns in all areas of interest to why certain variables were given more importance over others.

  14. Hypoxia-Induced Intrauterine Growth Restriction Increases the Susceptibility of Rats to High-Fat Diet–Induced Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda-Clausen, Christian F.; Dolinsky, Vernon W.; Morton, Jude S.; Proctor, Spencer D.; Dyck, Jason R.B.; Davidge, Sandra T.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE It is recognized that there is a remarkable variability in the systemic response to high-fat (HF) diets that cannot be completely explained by genetic factors. In addition, pregnancy complications leading to intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) have been associated with an increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome (MetS) later in life. Thus, we hypothesized that offspring born with IUGR exhibit permanent metabolic changes that make them more susceptible to HF diet–induced MetS. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS SD rats born normal (control) or with hypoxia-induced IUGR were randomized to low-fat (10% fat) or HF (45% fat) diets. After 9 weeks of feeding, physiological and molecular pathways involved in the MetS were evaluated. RESULTS IUGR offspring exhibited decreased energy intake and physical activity relative to controls. In offspring fed a HF diet, IUGR was associated with decreased total body fat content, a relative increase in intra-abdominal fat deposition and adipocyte size, an increase in fasting plasma concentrations of leptin, triglyceride and free fatty acids, and an increased concentration of triglycerides and ceramides in both liver and skeletal muscle. These changes in lipid homeostasis were accompanied by in vivo insulin resistance and impaired glucose tolerance and associated with increased phosphorylation of protein kinase C θ, inhibition of insulin receptor substrate 1, and a decreased activation of protein kinase B (PKB; also known as Akt) in liver and skeletal muscle in response to insulin. CONCLUSIONS IUGR enhances specific deleterious metabolic responses to a HF diet. Our results suggest that offspring born with IUGR may require special attention and follow-up to prevent the early onset of MetS. PMID:21270262

  15. Cerebral markers of the serotonergic system in rat models of obesity and after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ratner, Cecilia; Ettrup, Anders; Bueter, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Food intake and body weight are regulated by a complex system of neural and hormonal signals, of which the anorexigenic neurotransmitter serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine or 5-HT) is central. In this study, rat models of obesity and weight loss intervention were compared with regard to several 5-HT...... and suggests that susceptibility to develop obesity is associated with changed 5-HT tone in the brain that may also regulate hedonic aspects of feeding....... markers. Using receptor autoradiography, brain regional-densities of the serotonin transporter (SERT) and the 5-HT(2A) and 5-HT(4) receptors were measured in (i) selectively bred polygenic diet-induced obese (pgDIO) rats, (ii) outbred DIO rats, and (iii) Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB)-operated rats. pg...

  16. Neuroprotective Effects of Liraglutide for Stroke Model of Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichiro Sato

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The number of diabetes mellitus (DM patients is increasing, and stroke is deeply associated with DM. Recently, neuroprotective effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 are reported. In this study, we explored whether liraglutide, a GLP-1 analogue exerts therapeutic effects on a rat stroke model. Wistar rats received occlusion of the middle cerebral artery for 90 min. At one hour after reperfusion, liraglutide or saline was administered intraperitoneally. Modified Bederson’s test was performed at 1 and 24 h and, subsequently, rats were euthanized for histological investigation. Peripheral blood was obtained for measurement of blood glucose level and evaluation of oxidative stress. Brain tissues were collected to evaluate the level of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. The behavioral scores of liraglutide-treated rats were significantly better than those of control rats. Infarct volumes of liraglutide-treated rats at were reduced, compared with those of control rats. The level of derivatives of reactive oxygen metabolite was lower in liraglutide-treated rats. VEGF level of liraglutide-treated rats in the cortex, but not in the striatum significantly increased, compared to that of control rats. In conclusion, this is the first study to demonstrate neuroprotective effects of liraglutide on cerebral ischemia through anti-oxidative effects and VEGF upregulation.

  17. A Rat Excised Larynx Model of Vocal Fold Scar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welham, Nathan V.; Montequin, Douglas W.; Tateya, Ichiro; Tateya, Tomoko; Choi, Seong Hee; Bless, Diane M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a rat excised larynx model for the measurement of acoustic, aerodynamic, and vocal fold vibratory changes resulting from vocal fold scar. Method: Twenty-four 4-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to 1 of 4 experimental groups: chronic vocal fold scar, chronic vocal fold scar treated with 100-ng basic…

  18. Linking susceptibility genes and pathogenesis mechanisms using mouse models of systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve P. Crampton

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE represents a challenging autoimmune disease from a clinical perspective because of its varied forms of presentation. Although broad-spectrum steroids remain the standard treatment for SLE, they have many side effects and only provide temporary relief from the symptoms of the disease. Thus, gaining a deeper understanding of the genetic traits and biological pathways that confer susceptibility to SLE will help in the design of more targeted and effective therapeutics. Both human genome-wide association studies (GWAS and investigations using a variety of mouse models of SLE have been valuable for the identification of the genes and pathways involved in pathogenesis. In this Review, we link human susceptibility genes for SLE with biological pathways characterized in mouse models of lupus, and discuss how the mechanistic insights gained could advance drug discovery for the disease.

  19. Linking susceptibility genes and pathogenesis mechanisms using mouse models of systemic lupus erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crampton, Steve P.; Morawski, Peter A.; Bolland, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) represents a challenging autoimmune disease from a clinical perspective because of its varied forms of presentation. Although broad-spectrum steroids remain the standard treatment for SLE, they have many side effects and only provide temporary relief from the symptoms of the disease. Thus, gaining a deeper understanding of the genetic traits and biological pathways that confer susceptibility to SLE will help in the design of more targeted and effective therapeutics. Both human genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and investigations using a variety of mouse models of SLE have been valuable for the identification of the genes and pathways involved in pathogenesis. In this Review, we link human susceptibility genes for SLE with biological pathways characterized in mouse models of lupus, and discuss how the mechanistic insights gained could advance drug discovery for the disease. PMID:25147296

  20. Detecting phase transitions and crossovers in Hubbard models using the fidelity susceptibility

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Li; Wang, Lei; Werner, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    A generalized version of the fidelity susceptibility of single-band and multi-orbital Hubbard models is systematically studied using single-site dynamical mean-field theory in combination with a hybridization expansion continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo impurity solver. We find that the fidelity susceptibility is extremely sensitive to changes in the state of the system. It can be used as a numerically inexpensive tool to detect and characterize a broad range of phase transitions and crossovers in Hubbard models, including (orbital-selective) Mott metal-insulator transitions, high-spin to low-spin transitions, Fermi-liquid to non-Fermi-liquid crossovers, and spin-freezing crossovers.

  1. Ovariectomized rats as a model of postmenopausal osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høegh-Andersen, Pernille; Tankó, László B; Andersen, Thomas L

    2004-01-01

    We aimed to assess the effect of ovariectomy on cartilage turnover and degradation, to evaluate whether ovariectomized (OVX) rats could form an experimental model of postmenopausal osteoarthritis. The effect of ovariectomy on cartilage was studied using two cohorts of female Sprague-Dawley rats...... a useful experimental model for the evaluation of the chondroprotective effects of estrogens and estrogen-like substances and the model may be an in vivo representation of osteoarthritis in postmenopausal women....

  2. Comparative Metabolism of Carbon Tetrachloride in Rats, Mice and Hamsters Using Gas Uptake and PBPK Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thrall, Karla D.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Vucelick, Mark E.(FLUOR HANFORD, INC); Gies, Richard A.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Zangar, Richard C.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Weitz, Karl K.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Poet, Torka S.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Springer, David L.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Grant, Donna M.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Benson, Janet M.(Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute)

    2000-08-25

    No study has comprehensively compared the rate of metabolism of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) across species. Therefore, the in vivo metabolism of CCl4 was evaluated using groups of male animals (F344 rats, B6C3F1 mice, and Syrian hamsters) exposed to 40-1800 ppm CCl4 in a closed, recirculating gas-uptake system. For each species, an optimal fit of the family of uptake curves was obtained by adjusting Michaelis-Menten metabolic constants Km (affinity) and Vmax (capacity) using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. The results show that the mouse has a slightly higher capacity and lower affinity for metabolizing CCl4 compared to the rat, while the hamster has a higher capacity and lower affinity than either rat or mouse. A comparison of the Vmax to Km ratio, normalized for mg of liver protein (L/hr/mg) across species indicates that hamsters metabolize more CCl4 than either rats or mice, and should be more susceptible to CCl4-induced hepatotoxicity. These species comparisons were evaluated against toxicokinetic studies conducted in animals exposed by nose-only inhalation to 20 ppm 14C-labeled CCl4 for 4 hours. The toxicokinetic study results are consistent with the in vivo rates of metabolism, with rats eliminating less radioactivity associated with metabolism (14CO2 and urine/feces) and more radioactivity associated with the parent compound (radioactivity trapped on charcoal) compared to either hamsters or mice. The in vivo metabolic constants determined here, together with in vitro constants determined using rat, mouse, hamster and human liver microsomes, were used to estimate human in vivo metabolic rates of 1.49 mg/hr/kg body weight and 0.25 mg/L for Vmax and Km, respectively. Normalizing the rate of metabolism (Vmax/Km) by mg liver protein, the rate of metabolism of CCl4 differs across species, with hamster > mouse& > rat > human.

  3. SPATIAL RESOLUTION EFFECTS OF DIGITAL TERRAIN MODELS ON LANDSLIDE SUSCEPTIBILITY ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. T. Chang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of this study are to identify the maximum number of correlated factors for landslide susceptibility mapping and to evaluate landslide susceptibility at Sihjhong river catchment in the southern Taiwan, integrating two techniques, namely certainty factor (CF and artificial neural network (ANN. The landslide inventory data of the Central Geological Survey (CGS, MOEA in 2004-2014 and two digital elevation model (DEM datasets including a 5-meter LiDAR DEM and a 30-meter Aster DEM were prepared. We collected thirteen possible landslide-conditioning factors. Considering the multi-collinearity and factor redundancy, we applied the CF approach to optimize these thirteen conditioning factors. We hypothesize that if the CF values of the thematic factor layers are positive, it implies that these conditioning factors have a positive relationship with the landslide occurrence. Therefore, based on this assumption and positive CF values, seven conditioning factors including slope angle, slope aspect, elevation, terrain roughness index (TRI, terrain position index (TPI, total curvature, and lithology have been selected for further analysis. The results showed that the optimized-factors model provides a better accuracy for predicting landslide susceptibility in the study area. In conclusion, the optimized-factors model is suggested for selecting relative factors of landslide occurrence.

  4. Sex differences in PTSD resilience and susceptibility: Challenges for animal models of fear learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca M. Shansky

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available PTSD occurs in only a small fraction of trauma-exposed individuals, but risk is twice as high in women as in men. The neurobiological basis for this discrepancy is not known, but the identification of biological determinants of resilience and susceptibility in each sex could lead to more targeted preventions and treatments. Animal models are a useful tool for dissecting the circuits and mechanisms that underlie the brain's response to stress, but the vast majority of this work has been developed and conducted in males. The limited work that does incorporate female animals is often inconsistent across labs and does not broadly reflect human populations in terms of female susceptibility to PTSD-like behaviors. In this review, we suggest that interpreting male vs. female comparisons in these models be approached carefully, since common behavioral outcome measures may in fact reflect distinct neural processes. Moreover, since the factors that determine resilience and susceptibility are likely at least in part distinct in men and women, models that take a within-sex approach to response variability may be more useful in identifying critical mechanisms for manipulation.

  5. Manifestation of a neuro-fuzzy model to produce landslide susceptibility map using remote sensing data derived parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Biswajeet; Lee, Saro; Buchroithner, Manfred

    Landslides are the most common natural hazards in Malaysia. Preparation of landslide suscep-tibility maps is important for engineering geologists and geomorphologists. However, due to complex nature of landslides, producing a reliable susceptibility map is not easy. In this study, a new attempt is tried to produce landslide susceptibility map of a part of Cameron Valley of Malaysia. This paper develops an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) based on a geographic information system (GIS) environment for landslide susceptibility mapping. To ob-tain the neuro-fuzzy relations for producing the landslide susceptibility map, landslide locations were identified from interpretation of aerial photographs and high resolution satellite images, field surveys and historical inventory reports. Landslide conditioning factors such as slope, plan curvature, distance to drainage lines, soil texture, lithology, and distance to lineament were extracted from topographic, soil, and lineament maps. Landslide susceptible areas were analyzed by the ANFIS model and mapped using the conditioning factors. Furthermore, we applied various membership functions (MFs) and fuzzy relations to produce landslide suscep-tibility maps. The prediction performance of the susceptibility map is checked by considering actual landslides in the study area. Results show that, triangular, trapezoidal, and polynomial MFs were the best individual MFs for modelling landslide susceptibility maps (86

  6. FKBP5 and specific microRNAs via glucocorticoid receptor in the basolateral amygdala involved in the susceptibility to depressive disorder in early adolescent stressed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jingjing; Wang, Rui; Liu, Yuan; Liu, Dexiang; Jiang, Hong; Pan, Fang

    2017-12-01

    Exposure to stressful events induces depressive-like symptoms and increases susceptibility to depression. However, the molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. Studies reported that FK506 binding protein51 (FKBP5), the co-chaperone protein of glucocorticoid receptors (GR), plays a crucial role. Further, miR-124a and miR-18a are involved in the regulation of FKBP5/GR function. However, few studies have referred to effects of early life stress on depressive-like behaviours, GR and FKBP5, as well as miR-124a and miR-18a in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) from adolescence to adulthood. This study aimed to examine the dynamic alternations of depressive-like behaviours, GR and FKBP5, as well as miR-124a and miR-18a expressions in the BLA of chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) rats and dexamethasone administration rats during the adolescent period. Meanwhile, the GR antagonist, RU486, was used as a means of intervention. We found that CUMS and dexamethasone administration in the adolescent period induced permanent depressive-like behaviours and memory impairment, decreased GR expression, and increased FKBP5 and miR-124a expression in the BLA of both adolescent and adult rats. However, increased miR-18a expression in the BLA was found only in adolescent rats. Depressive-like behaviours were positively correlated with the level of miR-124a, whereas GR levels were negatively correlated with those in both adolescent and adult rats. Our results suggested FKBP5/GR and miR-124a in the BLA were associated with susceptibility to depressive disorder in the presence of stressful experiences in early life. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Lack of enhancement of susceptibility to mammary and thyroid carcinogenesis in rats exposed to DMBA and DHPN following prepubertal iodine deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young-Man; Imai, Toshio; Hasumura, Mai; Hirose, Masao

    2006-10-01

    Epidemiologic and experimental studies suggest that iodine deficiency increases the risk of mammary as well as thyroid cancers, but susceptibility to tumor development when this occurs during the prepubertal stage is not completely understood. In the present study, we therefore evaluated this question in F344 rats. Dams during the lactation period and their weaned offspring until postnatal week 7 were fed an iodine-free diet. Female offspring were then given 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA, 50 mg/kg body weight) by gavage for mammary tumor induction in week 7. Both the male and female rats were given free access to drinking water containing N-bis(2-hydroxypropyl)nitrosamine (DHPN), (0.1 and 0.2% for male and female rats, respectively) for wide spectrum tumor induction in organs, including the thyroid gland, from weeks 7-11. All offspring were killed at week 50 for histopathological examination. The iodine deficiency had no significant influence on incidences and/or multiplicities of mammary and thyroid tumors. Furthermore, tumor induction in the liver, kidney, lung, esophagus and urinary bladder was not affected in either sex. The present results thus indicate a lack of influence of iodine deficiency condition early in life on subsequent carcinogenic susceptibility.

  8. Handling high predictor dimensionality in slope-unit-based landslide susceptibility models through LASSO-penalized Generalized Linear Model

    KAUST Repository

    Camilo, Daniela Castro

    2017-08-30

    Grid-based landslide susceptibility models at regional scales are computationally demanding when using a fine grid resolution. Conversely, Slope-Unit (SU) based susceptibility models allows to investigate the same areas offering two main advantages: 1) a smaller computational burden and 2) a more geomorphologically-oriented interpretation. In this contribution, we generate SU-based landslide susceptibility for the Sado Island in Japan. This island is characterized by deep-seated landslides which we assume can only limitedly be explained by the first two statistical moments (mean and variance) of a set of predictors within each slope unit. As a consequence, in a nested experiment, we first analyse the distributions of a set of continuous predictors within each slope unit computing the standard deviation and quantiles from 0.05 to 0.95 with a step of 0.05. These are then used as predictors for landslide susceptibility. In addition, we combine shape indices for polygon features and the normalized extent of each class belonging to the outcropping lithology in a given SU. This procedure significantly enlarges the size of the predictor hyperspace, thus producing a high level of slope-unit characterization. In a second step, we adopt a LASSO-penalized Generalized Linear Model to shrink back the predictor set to a sensible and interpretable number, carrying only the most significant covariates in the models. As a result, we are able to document the geomorphic features (e.g., 95% quantile of Elevation and 5% quantile of Plan Curvature) that primarily control the SU-based susceptibility within the test area while producing high predictive performances. The implementation of the statistical analyses are included in a parallelized R script (LUDARA) which is here made available for the community to replicate analogous experiments.

  9. Age-related changes in arthritis susceptibility and severity in a murine model of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemeth Peter

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA most often begins in females in the fourth-fifth decade of their life, suggesting that the aging of the immune system (immunosenescence has a major role in this disease. Therefore, in the present study, we sought to investigate the effect of age on arthritis susceptibility in BALB/c mice using the proteoglycan (PG-induced arthritis (PGIA model of RA. Results We have found that young, 1-month-old female BALB/c mice are resistant to the induction of PGIA, but with aging they become susceptible. PG-induced T cell responses decline with age, whereas there is a shift toward Th1 cytokines. An age-dependent decrease in T cell number is associated with an increased ratio of the memory phenotype, and lower CD28 expression. Antigen-presenting cells shifted from macrophages and myeloid dendritic cells in young mice toward B cells in older mice. The regulatory/activated T cell ratio decreases in older mice after PG injections indicating impaired regulation of the immune response. Conclusion We conclude that immunosenescence could alter arthritis susceptibility in a very complex manner including both adaptive and innate immunities, and it cannot be determined by a single trait. Cumulative alterations in immunoregulatory functions closely resemble human disease, which makes this systemic autoimmune arthritis model of RA even more valuable.

  10. Unveiling time in dose-response models to infer host susceptibility to pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine Pessoa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The biological effects of interventions to control infectious diseases typically depend on the intensity of pathogen challenge. As much as the levels of natural pathogen circulation vary over time and geographical location, the development of invariant efficacy measures is of major importance, even if only indirectly inferrable. Here a method is introduced to assess host susceptibility to pathogens, and applied to a detailed dataset generated by challenging groups of insect hosts (Drosophila melanogaster with a range of pathogen (Drosophila C Virus doses and recording survival over time. The experiment was replicated for flies carrying the Wolbachia symbiont, which is known to reduce host susceptibility to viral infections. The entire dataset is fitted by a novel quantitative framework that significantly extends classical methods for microbial risk assessment and provides accurate distributions of symbiont-induced protection. More generally, our data-driven modeling procedure provides novel insights for study design and analyses to assess interventions.

  11. Establish susceptibility and risk assessment models for rainfall-induced landslide: A case in Central Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chunhung; Huang, Jyuntai

    2017-04-01

    Most of the landslide cases in Taiwan were triggered by rainfall or earthquake events. The heavy rainfall in the typhoon seasons, from June to October, causes the landslide hazard more serious. Renai Towhship is of the most large landslide cases after 2009 Typhoon Morakot (from Aug. 5 to Aug. 10, 2009) in Taiwan. Around 2,744 landslides cases with the total landslide area of 21.5 km2 (landslide ratio =1.8%), including 26 large landslide cases, induced after 2009 Typhoon Morakot in Renai Towhship. The area of each large landslides case is more than 0.1 km2, and the area of the largest case is around 0.96 km2. 58% of large landslide cases locate in the area with metamorphosed sandstone. The mean slope of 26 large landslide cases ranges from 15 degree to 56 degree, and the accumulated rainfall during 2009 Typhoon Morakot ranges from 530 mm to 937 mm. Three methods, including frequency ratio method (abbreviated as FR), weights of evidence method (abbreviated as WOE), and logistic regression method (abbreviated as LR), are used in this study to establish the landslides susceptibility in the Renai Township, Nantou County, Taiwan. Eight landslide related-factors, including elevation, slope, aspect, geology, land use, distance to drainage, distance to fault, accumulation rainfall during 2009 Typhoon Morakot, are used to establish the landslide susceptibility models in this study. The landslide inventory after 2009 Typhoon Morakot is also used to test the model performance in this study. The mean accumulated rainfall in Renai Township during 2009 typhoon Morakot was around 735 mm with the maximum 1-hr, 3-hrs, and 6-hrs rainfall intensity of 44 mm/1-hr, 106 mm/3-hrs and 204 mm/6-hrs, respectively. The range of original susceptibility values established by three methods are 4.0 to 20.9 for FR, -33.8 to -16.1 for WOE, and -41.7 to 5.7 for LR, and the mean landslide susceptibility value are 8.0, -24.6 and 0.38, respectively. The AUC values are 0.815 for FR, 0.816 for WOE, and 0

  12. Constitutive expression of SMAR1 confers susceptibility to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in a transgenic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Bhawna; Malonia, Sunil K; Majumdar, Subeer S; Gupta, Pushpa; Wadhwa, Neerja; Badhwar, Archana; Gupta, Umesh D; Katoch, Vishwa M; Chattopadhyay, Samit

    2015-12-01

    Studies involving animal models of experimental tuberculosis have elucidated the predominant role of cytokines secreted by T cells and macrophages to be an essential component of the immune response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. The immune activities of CD4+ T cells are mediated in part by Th1 cytokine interferon gamma (IFN-γ) which is produced primarily by T cells and natural killer (NK) cells and critical for initiating the immune response against intracellular pathogen such as M. tuberculosis. Nuclear matrix protein SMAR1 plays an important role in V(D)J recombination, T helper cell differentiation and inflammatory diseases. In this study a transgenic mouse model was used to study the role of SMAR1 in M. tuberculosis infection. Wild type BALB/c, C57BL/6, BALB/c-EGFP-SMAR1 and C57BL/6-SMAR1 transgenic mice were infected with M. tuberculosis (H37Rv). A dose of 100 bacilli was used for infection via respiratory route. Bacterial load in lung and spleen of infected mice was determined at 2, 4, 6 and 8 wk post-infection. Gene expression analysis for Th1 cytokines and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was performed in infected lung tissues by quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. SMAR1 transgenic mice from both BALB/c and C57BL/6 genetic background displayed higher bacillary load and susceptibility to M. tuberculosis infection compared to wild type mice. This susceptibility was attributed due to compromised of Th1 response exhibited by transgenic mice. SMAR1 transgenic mice exhibited susceptibility to M. tuberculosis infection in vivo irrespective of genetic background. This susceptibility was attributed to downregulation of Th1 response and its hallmark cytokine IFN-γ. Hence, SMAR1 plays an important role in modulating host immune response after M. tuberculosis infection.

  13. Modelling increased landslide susceptibility near highways in the Andes of southern Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenning, Alexander; Muenchow, Jannes

    2016-04-01

    Modelling increased landslide susceptibility near highways in the Andes of southern Ecuador A. Brenning (1), J. Muenchow (1) (1) Department of Geography, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Loebdergraben 32, 07743 Jena, Germany Mountain roads are affected by and also affect themselves landslide suceptibility. Especially in developing countries, inadequate drainage systems and mechanical destabilization of hillslopes by undercutting and overloading are known processes through which road construction and maintenance can enhance landslide activity within the immediate surroundings of road infrastructure. In the Andes of southern Ecuador, strong precipitation gradients as well as lithological differences provide an excellent study site in which the relationship between highways and landslide susceptibility and its regional differentiation can be studied. This study uses Generalized Additive Models (GAM) to investigate patterns of landslide susceptibility along two paved interurban highways in the tropical Andes of southern Ecuador. The relationship of landslides to distance from road is modeled while accounting for topographic, climatic and lithological predictors as possible confounders and modifiers, focusing on the odds ratio of landslide occurrence at 25 m versus 200 m distance from the highway. Spatial attention is given to uncertainties in estimated odds ratios of landslide occurrence using spatial block bootstrap techniques. The GAM is able to represent nonlinear additive terms as well as bivariate smooth interaction terms, providing a good tradeoff between model complexity and interpretability. The estimated odds of landslide occurrence were 18-21 times higher near the highway than at 200 m distance, based on different analyses, with lower 95% confidence limits always >13. (Semi-) parametric estimates confirmed this general range of values but suggests slightly higher odds ratios (95% confidence interval: 15.5-25.3). Highway-related effects were observed to

  14. Landslide susceptibility mapping using GIS-based statistical models and Remote sensing data in tropical environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabi, Himan; Hashim, Mazlan

    2015-04-22

    This research presents the results of the GIS-based statistical models for generation of landslide susceptibility mapping using geographic information system (GIS) and remote-sensing data for Cameron Highlands area in Malaysia. Ten factors including slope, aspect, soil, lithology, NDVI, land cover, distance to drainage, precipitation, distance to fault, and distance to road were extracted from SAR data, SPOT 5 and WorldView-1 images. The relationships between the detected landslide locations and these ten related factors were identified by using GIS-based statistical models including analytical hierarchy process (AHP), weighted linear combination (WLC) and spatial multi-criteria evaluation (SMCE) models. The landslide inventory map which has a total of 92 landslide locations was created based on numerous resources such as digital aerial photographs, AIRSAR data, WorldView-1 images, and field surveys. Then, 80% of the landslide inventory was used for training the statistical models and the remaining 20% was used for validation purpose. The validation results using the Relative landslide density index (R-index) and Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) demonstrated that the SMCE model (accuracy is 96%) is better in prediction than AHP (accuracy is 91%) and WLC (accuracy is 89%) models. These landslide susceptibility maps would be useful for hazard mitigation purpose and regional planning.

  15. A precipitation-induced landslide susceptibility model for natural gas transmission pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finley, Jason P. [Fugro William Lettis and Associates, Inc., Valencia, California (United States); Slayter, David L.; Hitchcock, Chris S. [Fugro William Lettis and Associates, Inc., Walnut Creek, California (United States); Lee, Chih-Hung [Pacific Gas and Electric Company, Gas Systems Integrity Management, Walnut Creek, California (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Landslides related to heavy rainfall can cause extensive damage to natural gas transmission pipelines. Fugro William Lettis and Associates Inc. have developed and implemented a geographic information system (GIS) model that evaluates near real-time precipitation-induced landslide susceptibility. The model incorporates state-wide precipitation data and geologically-based landslide classifications to produce rapid landslide risk evaluation for Pacific Gas and Electric Company's (PGandE) gas transmission system during winter rain storms in California. The precipitation data include pre-storm event quantitative precipitation forecasts (QPF) and post-storm event quantitative precipitation estimate (QPE) from the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The geologic classifications are based on slope, susceptible geologic formations, and the locations of historic or known landslide occurrences. Currently the model is calibrated using qualitative measures. This paper describes the development of the model algorithm and input data, model results, calibration efforts, and the on-going research and landslide collection warranted for continued refinement of the model.

  16. Landslide susceptibility mapping using GIS-based statistical models and Remote sensing data in tropical environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Mazlan

    2015-01-01

    This research presents the results of the GIS-based statistical models for generation of landslide susceptibility mapping using geographic information system (GIS) and remote-sensing data for Cameron Highlands area in Malaysia. Ten factors including slope, aspect, soil, lithology, NDVI, land cover, distance to drainage, precipitation, distance to fault, and distance to road were extracted from SAR data, SPOT 5 and WorldView-1 images. The relationships between the detected landslide locations and these ten related factors were identified by using GIS-based statistical models including analytical hierarchy process (AHP), weighted linear combination (WLC) and spatial multi-criteria evaluation (SMCE) models. The landslide inventory map which has a total of 92 landslide locations was created based on numerous resources such as digital aerial photographs, AIRSAR data, WorldView-1 images, and field surveys. Then, 80% of the landslide inventory was used for training the statistical models and the remaining 20% was used for validation purpose. The validation results using the Relative landslide density index (R-index) and Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) demonstrated that the SMCE model (accuracy is 96%) is better in prediction than AHP (accuracy is 91%) and WLC (accuracy is 89%) models. These landslide susceptibility maps would be useful for hazard mitigation purpose and regional planning. PMID:25898919

  17. Pairing susceptibility of iron-based superconductors within a two-layer Hubbard model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Dan; Wang, Jingyao; Wu, Yang; Liang, Ying; Ma, Tianxing

    2017-12-01

    By using the determinant quantum Monte Carlo method, we studied the dominant pairing susceptibility of iron-based superconductors within an extended Hubbard model, which describes the underlying electronic structure of both iron pnictides and iron chalcogenides. The extended Hubbard model is constructed by two iron layers, each of which forms two sublattices on a square structure. Although the coupling between the two layers has different effects on the behavior of pairings in iron pnictides and iron chalcogenides, our non-biased numerical simulations reveal that the pairing with Sxy symmetry dominates over the studied parameter for both materials.

  18. Multimammate rat (Mastomys natalensis), Tristram's jird (Meriones tristrami) and Wagner's gerbil (Gerbillus dasyurus) as laboratory models of acute neosporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hůrková-Hofmannová, L; Václavek, P; Skoric, M; Fictum, P; Modrý, D

    2007-06-01

    To test the different sensitivity of rodents of the subfamily Murinae and Gerbillinae, Wagner's gerbils (Gerbillus dasyurus), Tristram's jirds (Meriones tristrami) and multimammate rats (Mastomys natalensis) were inoculated with Neospora caninum tachyzoites. Clinical signs of neosporosis appeared in all inoculated animals. Histopathological examination confirmed the presence of tachyzoites in brains, lungs, skeletal muscle, myocardium, liver, in serosa of stomach and intestines, and in vesicular accessory genital glands. An examination of brains by PCR revealed presence of N. caninum DNA in all experimentally N. caninum infected rodents. The susceptibility of Wagner's gerbils and Tristram's jirds further proved the high sensitivity of gerbiline rodents to the N. caninum infection. The finding of N. caninum tachyzoites in the vesicular accessory genital glands of the infected gerbils suggests the usefulness of the rodent model for demonstration of N. caninum in the male reproductive system. Moreover, the multimammate rat was a susceptible experimental host to be the first immunocompetent rodent of the subfamily Murinae.

  19. Dietary models for inducing hypercholesterolemia in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheyla Leite Matos

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The present work aimed at finding a dietetical model capable of promoting the highest hypercholesterolemia without affecting the development of the rats. Sixty female Fisher rats were divided into five groups. The first one was fed a control diet; the remaining four were fed hypercholesterolemic diets with cholesterol and different contents of soybean oil, starch, casein, micronutrients and fiber and, consequently, different caloric values. After eight weeks animals were evaluated in relation to growth, fecal excretion, liver weight and fat, cholesterol and its fractions, serum biochemical parameters and sistolic pressure and compared with controls. The best result was obtained with the diet containing 25 % soybean oil, 1.0 % cholesterol, 13 % fiber and 4,538.4 Kcal/Kg, since it promoted an increase in LDL-cholesterol, a decrease in the HDL fraction and affected less the hepatic function of the animals.Modelos animais têm sido usados para investigar a relação entre desordens no metabolismo do colesterol e a aterogênese. A estratégia utilizada a fim de induzir hipercolesterolemia (dietas com alto teor de gordura e com colesterol adicionado leva à redução de sua ingestão pelos animais, o que induz desnutrição. O presente trabalho objetivou encontrar um modelo dietético capaz de promover a maior hipercolesterolemia, sem afetar o desenvolvimento dos animais. Sessenta ratas Fisher foram divididas em cinco grupos. O primeiro foi alimentado com uma dieta controle; os quatros restantes receberam dietas hipercolesterolêmicas, com colesterol e diferentes teores de óleo de soja, amido, caseína, micronutrientes e fibra e, conseqüentemente, diferentes valores calóricos. Após oito semanas os animais foram avaliados em relação ao crescimento, excreção fecal, peso e teor de gordura do fígado, colesterol e suas frações, parâmetros bioquímicos séricos e pressão sistólica. Os melhores resultados foram obtidos com a dieta contendo 25

  20. Modelling of Source Areas and Runout for Debris Flow Susceptibility Assessment at Regional Scale (Norway)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchiorre, Caterina; Stalsberg, Knut; Horton, Pascal

    2010-05-01

    This contribution focuses on combined methods to map debris flow susceptibility at regional scale. Classification of watersheds and an index approach framework, based on topographic/hydrological characteristics, was used to discriminate debris flow source areas, whereas runout areas were assessed by means of an energy-limited model coupled with a routing algorithm based on the random walk concept. Those methods were tested at basin scale in the Balsfjord municipality in northern Norway, where debris flows frequently affect road transportation. For this area a DEM at 5 m, a quaternary map at 5:000, and a map of debris flow tracks and source areas at 5:000 are available. The classification of watersheds was performed first by extracting attributes related to sediment production and internal relief, and then by means of multivariate analysis. The selection of source area cells was done only on debris flow watersheds by following an index approach framework. The runout model was then executed on those cells. The model uses hydrological routines to calculate the runout path and empirical relationship of debris flow trajectories to assess the runout distance. A preliminary analysis of the results shows that circa 90% or the debris flow watersheds were correctly classified. A good correlation between mapped and modelled source and runout areas was found. Future work will consist of evaluating different strategies to quantitatively assess the quality of the obtained susceptibility map. A complete validation of the model is difficult due to the sparse information on debris flows in the area.

  1. Present susceptibility status of rat flea Xenopsylla cheopis (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae), vector of plague against organochlorine, organophosphate and synthetic pyrethroids 1. The Nilgiris District, Tamil Nadu, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyamal, Biswas; Ravi Kumar, R; Sohan, Lal; Balakrishnan, N; Veena, Mittal; Shiv, Lal

    2008-03-01

    The susceptibility status of Xenopsylla cheopis, the efficient vector of human plague in India was assessed in erstwhile plague endemic areas of Nilgiris district, Tamil Nadu following standard WHO techniques. The studies revealed the development of resistance in rat fleas to DDT--4.0%, Malathion--5.0%, Deltamethrin--0.05% and tolerance to Permethrin--0.75% in all the four blocks of Nilgiris hill district. Development of resistance may be due to the extensive use of insecticides in tea plantations and agricultural sectors where the domestic/peri-domestic rodents find their natural habitats and intermingle with each other.

  2. Maternal treatment with agonistic autoantibodies against type-1 angiotensin II receptor in late pregnancy increases apoptosis of myocardial cells and myocardial susceptibility to ischemia-reperfusion injury in offspring rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Jin

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that offspring born to mothers preeclampsia (PE are at increased risk for developing cardiovascular diseases after birth, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. Angiotensin II receptor type 1 autoantibody (AT1-AA, an agonist acting via activation of the AT1 receptor, is believed to be involved in the pathogenesis of both PE and fetal growth restriction. The aim of the present study was to confirm the hypothesis that prenatal AT1-AA exposure increases the heart susceptibility to ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI in the offspring in an AT1-AA-induced animal model of PE, and determine whether or not the increase of maternal AT1-AA level is a factor contributing to sustained abnormalities of the heart structure during infancy. The hearts of 45-day-old offspring rats were studied using Langendorff preparation to determine the susceptibility of the heart to IRI. The results showed that the body weight of the maternal rats was not significantly different between the study and control groups, but the body weight of their offspring in AT1-AA group was decreased slightly at day 21 of gestational age, and at day 3 after birth. Although the heart weight index was not significantly affected at all ages examined, AT1-AA significantly increased the size of myocardial cells of the left ventricle (LV at the age of 45 days. AT1-AA gained access to fetal circulation via the placenta and induced apoptosis of fetal myocardial cells. AT1-AA also significantly delayed recovery from IRI and affected the LV function of 45-day-old offspring. This was associated with a significant increase in IRI-induced LV myocardial infarct size. These results suggest that AT1-AA induced abnormal apoptosis of fetal myocardial cells during the fetal period and increased the cardiac susceptibility to IRI in adult offspring.

  3. Maternal treatment with agonistic autoantibodies against type-1 angiotensin II receptor in late pregnancy increases apoptosis of myocardial cells and myocardial susceptibility to ischemia-reperfusion injury in offspring rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Zhu; Zhang, Wenhui; Yang, Hailiang; Wang, Xiaofang; Zheng, Yanqian; Zhang, Qiaoyan; Zhi, Jianming

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that offspring born to mothers preeclampsia (PE) are at increased risk for developing cardiovascular diseases after birth, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. Angiotensin II receptor type 1 autoantibody (AT1-AA), an agonist acting via activation of the AT1 receptor, is believed to be involved in the pathogenesis of both PE and fetal growth restriction. The aim of the present study was to confirm the hypothesis that prenatal AT1-AA exposure increases the heart susceptibility to ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) in the offspring in an AT1-AA-induced animal model of PE, and determine whether or not the increase of maternal AT1-AA level is a factor contributing to sustained abnormalities of the heart structure during infancy. The hearts of 45-day-old offspring rats were studied using Langendorff preparation to determine the susceptibility of the heart to IRI. The results showed that the body weight of the maternal rats was not significantly different between the study and control groups, but the body weight of their offspring in AT1-AA group was decreased slightly at day 21 of gestational age, and at day 3 after birth. Although the heart weight index was not significantly affected at all ages examined, AT1-AA significantly increased the size of myocardial cells of the left ventricle (LV) at the age of 45 days. AT1-AA gained access to fetal circulation via the placenta and induced apoptosis of fetal myocardial cells. AT1-AA also significantly delayed recovery from IRI and affected the LV function of 45-day-old offspring. This was associated with a significant increase in IRI-induced LV myocardial infarct size. These results suggest that AT1-AA induced abnormal apoptosis of fetal myocardial cells during the fetal period and increased the cardiac susceptibility to IRI in adult offspring.

  4. A Drosophila model for toxicogenomics: Genetic variation in susceptibility to heavy metal exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanshan Zhou

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The genetic factors that give rise to variation in susceptibility to environmental toxins remain largely unexplored. Studies on genetic variation in susceptibility to environmental toxins are challenging in human populations, due to the variety of clinical symptoms and difficulty in determining which symptoms causally result from toxic exposure; uncontrolled environments, often with exposure to multiple toxicants; and difficulty in relating phenotypic effect size to toxic dose, especially when symptoms become manifest with a substantial time lag. Drosophila melanogaster is a powerful model that enables genome-wide studies for the identification of allelic variants that contribute to variation in susceptibility to environmental toxins, since the genetic background, environmental rearing conditions and toxic exposure can be precisely controlled. Here, we used extreme QTL mapping in an outbred population derived from the D. melanogaster Genetic Reference Panel to identify alleles associated with resistance to lead and/or cadmium, two ubiquitous environmental toxins that present serious health risks. We identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associated with variation in resistance to both heavy metals as well as SNPs associated with resistance specific to each of them. The effects of these SNPs were largely sex-specific. We applied mutational and RNAi analyses to 33 candidate genes and functionally validated 28 of them. We constructed networks of candidate genes as blueprints for orthologous networks of human genes. The latter not only provided functional contexts for known human targets of heavy metal toxicity, but also implicated novel candidate susceptibility genes. These studies validate Drosophila as a translational toxicogenomics gene discovery system.

  5. Is the full susceptibility of the square-lattice Ising model a differentially algebraic function?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttmann, A. J.; Jensen, I.; Maillard, J.-M.; Pantone, J.

    2016-12-01

    We study the class of non-holonomic power series with integer coefficients that reduce, modulo primes, or powers of primes, to algebraic functions. In particular we try to determine whether the susceptibility of the square-lattice Ising model belongs to this class, and more broadly whether the susceptibility is a solution of a differentially algebraic equation. Initial results on Tutte's nonlinear ordinary differential equation (ODE) and other simple quadratic nonlinear ODEs suggest that a large set of differentially algebraic power series solutions with integer coefficients might reduce to algebraic functions modulo primes, or powers of primes. Since diagonals of rational functions are well-known to reduce, modulo primes, or powers of primes, to algebraic functions, a large subset of differentially algebraic power series with integer coefficients may be viewed as a natural ‘nonlinear’ generalisation of diagonals of rational functions. Here we give several examples of series with integer coefficients and non-zero radius of convergence that reduce to algebraic functions modulo (almost) every prime (or power of a prime). These examples satisfy differentially algebraic equations with the encoding polynomial occasionally possessing quite high degree (and thus difficult to identify even with long series). These examples shed important light on the very nature of such differentially algebraic series. Additionally, we have extended both the high- and low-temperature Ising square-lattice susceptibility series to 5043 coefficients. We find that even this long series is insufficient to determine whether it reduces to algebraic functions modulo 3, 5, etc. This negative result is in contrast to the comparatively easy confirmation that the corresponding series reduce to algebraic functions modulo powers of 2. Finally we show that even with 5043 terms we are unable to identify an underlying differentially algebraic equation for the susceptibility, ruling out a number of

  6. Bayesian multinomial probit modeling of daily windows of susceptibility for maternal PM2.5 exposure and congenital heart defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Past epidemiologic studies suggest maternal ambient air pollution exposure during critical periods of the pregnancy is associated with fetal development. We introduce a multinomial probit model that allows for the joint identification of susceptible daily periods during the pregn...

  7. Global Lithospheric Apparent Susceptibility Distribution Converted from Geomagnetic Models by CHAMP and Swarm Satellite Magnetic Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jinsong; Chen, Chao; Xiong, Xiong; Li, Yongdong; Liang, Qing

    2016-04-01

    Recently, because of continually accumulated magnetic measurements by CHAMP satellite and Swarm constellation of three satellites and well developed methodologies and techniques of data processing and geomagnetic field modeling etc., global lithospheric magnetic anomaly field models become more and more reliable. This makes the quantitative interpretation of lithospheric magnetic anomaly field possible for having an insight into large-scale magnetic structures in the crust and uppermost mantle. Many different approaches have been utilized to understand the magnetized sources, such as forward, inversion, statistics, correlation analysis, Euler deconvolution, signal transformations etc. Among all quantitative interpretation methods, the directly converting a magnetic anomaly map into a magnetic susceptibility anomaly map proposed by Arkani-Hamed & Strangway (1985) is, we think, the most fast quantitative interpretation tool for global studies. We just call this method AS85 hereinafter for short. Although Gubbins et al. (2011) provided a formula to directly calculate the apparent magnetic vector distribution, the AS85 method introduced constraints of magnetized direction and thus corresponding results are expected to be more robust especially in world-wide continents. Therefore, in this study, we first improved the AS85 method further considering non-axial dipolar inducing field using formulae by Nolte & Siebert (1987), initial model or priori information for starting coefficients in the apparent susceptibility conversion, hidden longest-wavelength components of lithospheric magnetic field and field contaminations from global oceanic remanent magnetization. Then, we used the vertically integrated susceptibility model by Hemant & Maus (2005) and vertically integrated remanent magnetization model by Masterton et al. (2013) to test the validity of our improved method. Subsequently, we applied the conversion method to geomagnetic field models by CHAMP and Swarm satellite

  8. Phenotypic Characterization of LEA Rat: A New Rat Model of Nonobese Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadashi Okamura

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal models have provided important information for the genetics and pathophysiology of diabetes. Here we have established a novel, nonobese rat strain with spontaneous diabetes, Long-Evans Agouti (LEA rat derived from Long-Evans (LE strain. The incidence of diabetes in the males was 10% at 6 months of age and 86% at 14 months, while none of the females developed diabetes. The blood glucose level in LEA male rats was between 200 and 300 mg/dl at 120 min according to OGTT. The glucose intolerance in correspondence with the impairment of insulin secretion was observed in male rats, which was the main cause of diabetes in LEA rats. Histological examination revealed that the reduction of β-cell mass was caused by progressive fibrosis in pancreatic islets in age-dependent manner. The intracytoplasmic hyaline droplet accumulation and the disappearance of tubular epithelial cell layer associated with thickening of basement membrane were evident in renal proximal tubules. The body mass index and glycaemic response to exogenous insulin were comparable to those of control rats. The unique characteristics of LEA rat are a great advantage not only to analyze the progression of diabetes, but also to disclose the genes involved in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  9. Phenotypic Characterization of LEA Rat: A New Rat Model of Nonobese Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Tadashi; Pei, Xiang Yuan; Miyoshi, Ichiro; Shimizu, Yukiko; Takanashi-Yanobu, Rieko; Mototani, Yasumasa; Kanai, Takao; Satoh, Jo; Kimura, Noriko; Kasai, Noriyuki

    2013-01-01

    Animal models have provided important information for the genetics and pathophysiology of diabetes. Here we have established a novel, nonobese rat strain with spontaneous diabetes, Long-Evans Agouti (LEA) rat derived from Long-Evans (LE) strain. The incidence of diabetes in the males was 10% at 6 months of age and 86% at 14 months, while none of the females developed diabetes. The blood glucose level in LEA male rats was between 200 and 300 mg/dl at 120 min according to OGTT. The glucose intolerance in correspondence with the impairment of insulin secretion was observed in male rats, which was the main cause of diabetes in LEA rats. Histological examination revealed that the reduction of β-cell mass was caused by progressive fibrosis in pancreatic islets in age-dependent manner. The intracytoplasmic hyaline droplet accumulation and the disappearance of tubular epithelial cell layer associated with thickening of basement membrane were evident in renal proximal tubules. The body mass index and glycaemic response to exogenous insulin were comparable to those of control rats. The unique characteristics of LEA rat are a great advantage not only to analyze the progression of diabetes, but also to disclose the genes involved in type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:23691528

  10. Persistence and distribution of a stochastic susceptible-infected-removed epidemic model with varying population size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lihong; Wei, Fengying

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, the dynamics of a stochastic susceptible-infected-removed model in a population with varying size is investigated. We firstly show that the stochastic epidemic model has a unique global positive solution with any positive initial value. Then we verify that random perturbations lead to extinction when some conditions are being valid. Moreover, we prove that the solution of the stochastic epidemic model is persistent in the mean by building up a suitable Lyapunov function and using generalized Itô's formula. Further, the stochastic epidemic model admits a stationary distribution around the endemic equilibrium when parameters satisfy some sufficient conditions. To end this contribution and to check the validity of the main results, numerical simulations are separately carried out to illustrate these results.

  11. Percutaneous Salivary Gland Ablation using Ethanol in a Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Burch

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Sialorrhea is a common health and psychosocial problem for children with neuromuscular dysfunction secondary to a variety of disorders such as cerebral palsy. Current accepted treatments include the injection of botulinum toxin into the submandibular glands for temporary symptom relief. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of percutaneous ethanol injection for longer lasting salivary gland ablation in an animal model. Material and Methods: Twenty rats were used in this study. In each rat, 98% ethanol was injected into the right submandibular gland under ultrasound guidance. No intervention was performed on the left gland, which served as the control. Ten rats were sacrificed and glands evaluated at three weeks, with the remaining 10 rats sacrificed and evaluated at three months. Unpaired, 1-tailed T-tests were used to analyse the data. Results: Ethanol injections induced a significant and sustained reduction in salivary gland size. Treated glands were 41% smaller by mass than untreated controls in the 10 rats sacrificed at three weeks (P < 0.001. Treated glands were 43% smaller by mass than untreated controls in the 10 rats sacrificed at three months (P < 0.001. Qualitative histologic analysis demonstrated extensive parenchymal damage, inflammation, and fibrosis at both three week and three month time points. Conclusions: Using a rat model, we demonstrated dramatic and sustained submandibular gland damage after percutaneous injection of ethanol.

  12. Evaluation of different machine learning models for predicting and mapping the susceptibility of gully erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmati, Omid; Tahmasebipour, Nasser; Haghizadeh, Ali; Pourghasemi, Hamid Reza; Feizizadeh, Bakhtiar

    2017-12-01

    Gully erosion constitutes a serious problem for land degradation in a wide range of environments. The main objective of this research was to compare the performance of seven state-of-the-art machine learning models (SVM with four kernel types, BP-ANN, RF, and BRT) to model the occurrence of gully erosion in the Kashkan-Poldokhtar Watershed, Iran. In the first step, a gully inventory map consisting of 65 gully polygons was prepared through field surveys. Three different sample data sets (S1, S2, and S3), including both positive and negative cells (70% for training and 30% for validation), were randomly prepared to evaluate the robustness of the models. To model the gully erosion susceptibility, 12 geo-environmental factors were selected as predictors. Finally, the goodness-of-fit and prediction skill of the models were evaluated by different criteria, including efficiency percent, kappa coefficient, and the area under the ROC curves (AUC). In terms of accuracy, the RF, RBF-SVM, BRT, and P-SVM models performed excellently both in the degree of fitting and in predictive performance (AUC values well above 0.9), which resulted in accurate predictions. Therefore, these models can be used in other gully erosion studies, as they are capable of rapidly producing accurate and robust gully erosion susceptibility maps (GESMs) for decision-making and soil and water management practices. Furthermore, it was found that performance of RF and RBF-SVM for modelling gully erosion occurrence is quite stable when the learning and validation samples are changed.

  13. Exploring the effect of absence selection on landslide susceptibility models: A case study in Sicily, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conoscenti, Christian; Rotigliano, Edoardo; Cama, Mariaelena; Caraballo-Arias, Nathalie Almaru; Lombardo, Luigi; Agnesi, Valerio

    2016-05-01

    A statistical approach was employed to model the spatial distribution of rainfall-triggered landslides in two areas in Sicily (Italy) that occurred during the winter of 2004-2005. The investigated areas are located within the Belice River basin and extend for 38.5 and 10.3 km2, respectively. A landslide inventory was established for both areas using two Google Earth images taken on October 25th 2004 and on March 18th 2005, to map slope failures activated or reactivated during this interval. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) were used to prepare 5 m grids of the dependent variables (absence/presence of landslide) and independent variables (lithology and 13 DEM-derivatives). Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines (MARS) were applied to model landslide susceptibility whereas receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and the area under the ROC curve (AUC) were used to evaluate model performance. To evaluate the robustness of the whole procedure, we prepared 10 different samples of positive (landslide presence) and negative (landslide absence) cases for each area. Absences were selected through two different methods: (i) extraction from randomly distributed circles with a diameter corresponding to the mean width of the landslide source areas; and (ii) selection as randomly distributed individual grid cells. A comparison was also made between the predictive performances of models including and not including the lithology parameter. The models trained and tested on the same area demonstrated excellent to outstanding fit (AUC > 0.8). On the other hand, predictive skill decreases when measured outside the calibration area, although most of the landslides occur where susceptibility is high and the overall model performance is acceptable (AUC > 0.7). The results also showed that the accuracy of the landslide susceptibility models is higher when lithology is included in the statistical analysis. Models whose absences were selected using random circles showed a

  14. Cirrus Susceptibility to Changes in Ice Nuclei: Physical Processes, Model Uncertainties, and Measurement Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Eric

    2017-01-01

    In this talk, I will begin by discussing the physical processes that govern the competition between heterogeneous and homogeneous ice nucleation in upper tropospheric cirrus clouds. Next, I will review the current knowledge of low-temperature ice nucleation from laboratory experiments and field measurements. I will then discuss the uncertainties and deficiencies in representations of cirrus processes in global models used to estimate the climate impacts of changes in cirrus clouds. Lastly, I will review the critical field measurements needed to advance our understanding of cirrus and their susceptibility to changes in aerosol properties.

  15. Experimental model in rat for sentinel node biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira Filho Renato Santos de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Although sentinel node procedure has been used world wide, there are many aspects to be defined and better standardized. This study address if the experimental model in rats is appropriate for sentinel node biopsy. In this model, the lymph nodes are showed by lymphoscintigraphy, they are dyed by patent blue and identified by intraoperative gamma probe detection. It isn?t necessary to use magnification for the procedure. The model demonstrated that sentinel node biopsy in rats is feasible. So, besides allowing researches in this field, the model is useful for training and diffusing this technique.

  16. Optimizing landslide susceptibility zonation: Effects of DEM spatial resolution and slope unit delineation on logistic regression models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlögel, R.; Marchesini, I.; Alvioli, M.; Reichenbach, P.; Rossi, M.; Malet, J.-P.

    2018-01-01

    We perform landslide susceptibility zonation with slope units using three digital elevation models (DEMs) of varying spatial resolution of the Ubaye Valley (South French Alps). In so doing, we applied a recently developed algorithm automating slope unit delineation, given a number of parameters, in order to optimize simultaneously the partitioning of the terrain and the performance of a logistic regression susceptibility model. The method allowed us to obtain optimal slope units for each available DEM spatial resolution. For each resolution, we studied the susceptibility model performance by analyzing in detail the relevance of the conditioning variables. The analysis is based on landslide morphology data, considering either the whole landslide or only the source area outline as inputs. The procedure allowed us to select the most useful information, in terms of DEM spatial resolution, thematic variables and landslide inventory, in order to obtain the most reliable slope unit-based landslide susceptibility assessment.

  17. ENVIRONMENTAL AND GENETIC INTERACTIONS IN HYPERTENSIVE RATS: OXIDATIVE STRESS AS A COMMON SUSCEPTABILITY ATTRIBUTE FOR NON-CANCER RISKS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Individuals compromised with preexisting conditions are likely to be more susceptible to environmental exposures, and the uncertainty factors employed to correct for this concern may not be adequate. Although diseases such as congestive heart failure, chronic pulmonary disease;...

  18. A combined triggering-propagation modeling approach for the assessment of rainfall induced debris flow susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stancanelli, Laura Maria; Peres, David Johnny; Cancelliere, Antonino; Foti, Enrico

    2017-07-01

    Rainfall-induced shallow slides can evolve into debris flows that move rapidly downstream with devastating consequences. Mapping the susceptibility to debris flow is an important aid for risk mitigation. We propose a novel practical approach to derive debris flow inundation maps useful for susceptibility assessment, that is based on the integrated use of DEM-based spatially-distributed hydrological and slope stability models with debris flow propagation models. More specifically, the TRIGRS infiltration and infinite slope stability model and the FLO-2D model for the simulation of the related debris flow propagation and deposition are combined. An empirical instability-to-debris flow triggering threshold calibrated on the basis of observed events, is applied to link the two models and to accomplish the task of determining the amount of unstable mass that develops as a debris flow. Calibration of the proposed methodology is carried out based on real data of the debris flow event occurred on 1 October 2009, in the Peloritani mountains area (Italy). Model performance, assessed by receiver-operating-characteristics (ROC) indexes, evidences fairly good reproduction of the observed event. Comparison with the performance of the traditional debris flow modeling procedure, in which sediment and water hydrographs are inputed as lumped at selected points on top of the streams, is also performed, in order to assess quantitatively the limitations of such commonly applied approach. Results show that the proposed method, besides of being more process-consistent than the traditional hydrograph-based approach, can potentially provide a more accurate simulation of debris-flow phenomena, in terms of spatial patterns of erosion and deposition as well on the quantification of mobilized volumes and depths, avoiding overestimation of debris flow triggering volume and, thus, of maximum inundation flow depths.

  19. Discrete-time dynamic network model for the spread of susceptible-infective-recovered diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Sanjeev Kumar

    2017-07-01

    We propose a discrete-time dynamic network model describing the spread of susceptible-infective-recovered diseases in a population. We consider the case in which the nodes in the network change their links due to social mixing dynamics as well as in response to the disease. The model shows the behavior that, as we increase social mixing, disease spread is inhibited in certain cases, while in other cases it is enhanced. We also extend this dynamic network model to take into account the case of hidden infection. Here we find that, as expected, the disease spreads more readily if there is a time period after contracting the disease during which an individual is infective but is not known to have the disease.

  20. Novel rat model for neurocysticercosis using Taenia solium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verastegui, Manuela R; Mejia, Alan; Clark, Taryn; Gavidia, Cesar M; Mamani, Javier; Ccopa, Fredy; Angulo, Noelia; Chile, Nancy; Carmen, Rogger; Medina, Roxana; García, Hector H; Rodriguez, Silvia; Ortega, Ynes; Gilman, Robert H

    2015-08-01

    Neurocysticercosis is caused by Taenia solium infecting the central nervous system and is the leading cause of acquired epilepsy and convulsive conditions worldwide. Research into the pathophysiology of the disease and appropriate treatment is hindered by lack of cost-effective and physiologically similar animal models. We generated a novel rat neurocysticercosis model using intracranial infection with activated T. solium oncospheres. Holtzman rats were infected in two separate groups: the first group was inoculated extraparenchymally and the second intraparenchymally, with different doses of activated oncospheres. The groups were evaluated at three different ages. Histologic examination of the tissue surrounding T. solium cysticerci was performed. Results indicate that generally infected rats developed cysticerci in the brain tissue after 4 months, and the cysticerci were observed in the parenchymal, ventricle, or submeningeal brain tissue. The route of infection did not have a statistically significant effect on the proportion of rats that developed cysticerci, and there was no dependence on infection dose. However, rat age was crucial to the success of the infection. Epilepsy was observed in 9% of rats with neurocysticercosis. In histologic examination, a layer of collagen tissue, inflammatory infiltrate cells, perivascular infiltrate, angiogenesis, spongy change, and mass effect were observed in the tissue surrounding the cysts. This study presents a suitable animal model for the study of human neurocysticercosis. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. High temperature series expansions for the susceptibility of Ising model on the Kagome lattice with nearest neighber interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Jalali mola

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available  The Ising model is one of the simplest models describing the interacting particles. In this work, we calculate the high temperature series expansions of zero field susceptibility of ising model with ferromagnetic, antiferromagnetic and one antiferromagnetic interactions on two dimensional kagome lattice. Using the Pade´ approximation, we calculate the susceptibility of critical exponent of ferromagnetic ising model γ ≈ 1.75, which is consistent with universality hypothesis. However, antiferromagnetic and one antiferromagnetic interaction ising model doesn’t show any transition at finite temperature because of the effect of magnetic frustration.

  2. Surgical Intervention to Rescue Hirschsprung Disease in a Rat Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamp, Lincon A; Obermayr, Florian; Pontell, Louise; Young, Heather M; Xie, Dan; Croaker, David H; Song, Zan-Min; Furness, John B

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Rats with a spontaneous null mutation in endothelin receptor type B or Ednrb (sl/sl; spotting lethal) lack enteric neurons in the distal bowel and usually die within the first week after birth. This early postnatal lethality limits their use for examining the potential of cell therapy to treat Hirschsprung disease, and for studies of the influence of EDNRB on the mature CNS and vascular systems. Methods We have developed a surgical intervention to prolong the life of the spotting lethal sl/sl rat, in which we perform a colostomy on postnatal (P) day 4–6 rats to avoid the fatal obstruction caused by the lack of colonic enteric neurons. Results The stomas remained patent and functional and the rats matured normally following surgery. Weight gains were comparable between control and Hirschsprung phenotype (sl/sl) rats, which were followed until 4 weeks after surgery (5 weeks old). We confirmed the absence of enteric neurons in the distal colon of rats whose lives were saved by the surgical intervention. Conclusions This study provides a novel approach for studying EDNRB signalling in multiple organ systems in mature rats, including an animal model to study the efficacy of cell therapy to treat Hirschsprung disease. PMID:26424040

  3. Surgical Intervention to Rescue Hirschsprung Disease in a Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamp, Lincon A; Obermayr, Florian; Pontell, Louise; Young, Heather M; Xie, Dan; Croaker, David H; Song, Zan-Min; Furness, John B

    2015-10-01

    Rats with a spontaneous null mutation in endothelin receptor type B or Ednrb (sl/sl; spotting lethal) lack enteric neurons in the distal bowel and usually die within the first week after birth. This early postnatal lethality limits their use for examining the potential of cell therapy to treat Hirschsprung disease, and for studies of the influence of EDNRB on the mature CNS and vascular systems. We have developed a surgical intervention to prolong the life of the spotting lethal sl/sl rat, in which we perform a colostomy on postnatal (P) day 4-6 rats to avoid the fatal obstruction caused by the lack of colonic enteric neurons. The stomas remained patent and functional and the rats matured normally following surgery. Weight gains were comparable between control and Hirschsprung phenotype (sl/sl) rats, which were followed until 4 weeks after surgery (5 weeks old). We confirmed the absence of enteric neurons in the distal colon of rats whose lives were saved by the surgical intervention. This study provides a novel approach for studying EDNRB signalling in multiple organ systems in mature rats, including an animal model to study the efficacy of cell therapy to treat Hirschsprung disease.

  4. Landslide susceptibility mapping along road corridors in the Indian Himalayas using Bayesian logistic regression models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Iswar; Stein, Alfred; Kerle, Norman; Dadhwal, Vinay K.

    2012-12-01

    Landslide susceptibility mapping (LSM) along road corridors in the Indian Himalayas is an essential exercise that helps planners and decision makers in determining the severity of probable slope failure areas. Logistic regression is commonly applied for this purpose, as it is a robust and straightforward technique that is relatively easy to handle. Ordinary logistic regression as a data-driven technique, however, does not allow inclusion of prior information. This study presents Bayesian logistic regression (BLR) for landslide susceptibility assessment along road corridors. The methodology is tested in a landslide-prone area in the Bhagirathi river valley in the Indian Himalayas. Parameter estimates from BLR are compared with those obtained from ordinary logistic regression. By means of iterative Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulation, BLR provides a rich set of results on parameter estimation. We assessed model performance by the receiver operator characteristics curve analysis, and validated the model using 50% of the landslide cells kept apart for testing and validation. The study concludes that BLR performs better in posterior parameter estimation in general and the uncertainty estimation in particular.

  5. Cannabis exacerbates depressive symptoms in rat model induced by reserpine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadrawy, Yasser A; Sawie, Hussein G; Abdel-Salam, Omar M E; Hosny, Eman N

    2017-05-01

    Cannabis sativa is one of the most widely recreational drugs and its use is more prevalent among depressed patients. Some studies reported that Cannabis has antidepressant effects while others showed increased depressive symptoms in Cannabis users. Therefore, the present study aims to investigate the effect of Cannabis extract on the depressive-like rats. Twenty four rats were divided into: control, rat model of depression induced by reserpine and depressive-like rats treated with Cannabis sativa extract (10mg/kg expressed as Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol). The depressive-like rats showed a severe decrease in motor activity as assessed by open field test (OFT). This was accompanied by a decrease in monoamine levels and a significant increase in acetylcholinesterase activity in the cortex and hippocampus. Na + ,K + -ATPase activity increased in the cortex and decreased in the hippocampus of rat model. In addition, a state of oxidative stress was evident in the two brain regions. This was indicated from the significant increase in the levels of lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide. No signs of improvement were observed in the behavioral and neurochemical analyses in the depressive-like rats treated with Cannabis extract. Furthermore, Cannabis extract exacerbated the lipid peroxidation in the cortex and hippocampus. According to the present findings, it could be concluded that Cannabis sativa aggravates the motor deficits and neurochemical changes induced in the cortex and hippocampus of rat model of depression. Therefore, the obtained results could explain the reported increase in the depressive symptoms and memory impairment among Cannabis users. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Flood susceptible analysis at Kelantan river basin using remote sensing and logistic regression model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Biswajeet

    Recently, in 2006 and 2007 heavy monsoons rainfall have triggered floods along Malaysia's east coast as well as in southern state of Johor. The hardest hit areas are along the east coast of peninsular Malaysia in the states of Kelantan, Terengganu and Pahang. The city of Johor was particularly hard hit in southern side. The flood cost nearly billion ringgit of property and many lives. The extent of damage could have been reduced or minimized if an early warning system would have been in place. This paper deals with flood susceptibility analysis using logistic regression model. We have evaluated the flood susceptibility and the effect of flood-related factors along the Kelantan river basin using the Geographic Information System (GIS) and remote sensing data. Previous flooded areas were extracted from archived radarsat images using image processing tools. Flood susceptibility mapping was conducted in the study area along the Kelantan River using radarsat imagery and then enlarged to 1:25,000 scales. Topographical, hydrological, geological data and satellite images were collected, processed, and constructed into a spatial database using GIS and image processing. The factors chosen that influence flood occurrence were: topographic slope, topographic aspect, topographic curvature, DEM and distance from river drainage, all from the topographic database; flow direction, flow accumulation, extracted from hydrological database; geology and distance from lineament, taken from the geologic database; land use from SPOT satellite images; soil texture from soil database; and the vegetation index value from SPOT satellite images. Flood susceptible areas were analyzed and mapped using the probability-logistic regression model. Results indicate that flood prone areas can be performed at 1:25,000 which is comparable to some conventional flood hazard map scales. The flood prone areas delineated on these maps correspond to areas that would be inundated by significant flooding

  7. The development of a mouse model to explore resistance and susceptibility to early Ascaris suum infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, R; Behnke, J M; Stafford, P; Holland, C V

    2006-02-01

    Ascaris suum and Ascaris lumbricoides exhibit an over-dispersed frequency distribution in their host populations in both the adult and larval stages. The impact of host factors on this observed distribution is still poorly understood and difficult to investigate in the natural host populations. The use of a mouse model has been supported by the observations that the larval migratory pattern, in this host, mimics the pattern observed in the pig. We explored the extrinsic factors that might affect the quantitative recovery of larvae during this migration in order to standardize a model system facilitating accurate future assessment of host genetic variation on this phase of the infection. In Exp. 1 larvae accumulated in the livers of both C57BL/6j and BALB/c mice up to and including days 4-5 p.i. and then declined in both strains until day 9. Loss of larvae from the livers corresponded to arrival in the lungs and maximum accumulation on day 7 p.i. but recovery was considerably higher in C57BL/6j mice. It was concluded that day 7 recoveries gave the best indication of relative resistance/susceptibility to this parasite. In Exp. 2 A/J, BALB/c, CBA/Ca, C57BL/6j, C3H/HeN, DBA/2, NIH, SJL, and SWR mice were compared. C57BL/6j mice were identified as the most susceptible strain and CBA/Ca mice as having the most contrasting phenotype, but with a similar kinetic pattern of migration. Finally, in Exp. 3, a strong positive correlation between the size of the inoculum and the mean worm recovery from the lungs was found in CBA/Ca and C57BL/6j mice, but the difference between these strains was highly consistent, 66.6-80%, regardless of the initial dose. These results demonstrate that, using our protocols for infection and recovery, between-experiment variation in A. suum worm burdens is minimal, and that C57BL/6j mice are highly susceptible to infection compared to other strains. The mechanistic basis of this susceptibility in relation to the resistance of other strains is

  8. A novel model of invasive fungal rhinosinusitis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fang; An, Yunfang; Li, Zeqing; Zhao, Changqing

    2013-01-01

    Invasive fungal rhinosinusitis (IFRS) is a life-threatening inflammatory disease that affects immunocompromised patients, but animal models of the disease are scarce. This study aimed to develop an IFRS model in neutropenic rats. The model was established in three consecutive steps: unilateral nasal obstruction with Merocel sponges, followed by administration of cyclophosphamide (CPA), and, finally, nasal inoculation with Aspergillus fumigatus. Fifty healthy Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups, with group I as the controls, group II undergoing unilateral nasal obstruction alone, group III undergoing nasal obstruction with fungal inoculation, group IV undergoing nasal obstruction with administration of CPA, and group V undergoing nasal obstruction with administration of CPA and fungal inoculation. Hematology, histology, and mycology investigations were performed. The changes in the rat absolute neutrophil counts (ANCs) were statistically different across the groups. The administration of CPA decreased the ANCs, whereas nasal obstruction with fungal inoculation increased the ANCs, and nasal obstruction did not change them. Histological examination of the rats in group V revealed the hyphal invasion of sinus mucosa and bone, thrombosis, and tissue infarction. No pathology indicative of IFRS was observed in the remaining groups. Positive rates of fungal culture in tissue homogenates from the maxillary sinus (62.5%) and lung (25%) were found in group V, whereas groups I, II, III, and IV showed no fungal culture in the homogenates. A rat IFRS model was successfully developed through nasal obstruction, CPA-induced neutropenia, and fungal inoculation. The disease model closely mimics the pathophysiology of anthropic IFRS.

  9. Zero inflation in ordinal data: incorporating susceptibility to response through the use of a mixture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Mary E; Anderson, Stewart J

    2008-08-15

    The aim of this paper is to produce a methodology that will allow users of ordinal scale data to more accurately model the distribution of ordinal outcomes in which some subjects are susceptible to exhibiting the response and some are not (i.e. the dependent variable exhibits zero inflation). This situation occurs with ordinal scales in which there is an anchor that represents the absence of the symptom or activity, such as 'none', 'never' or 'normal,' and is particularly common when measuring abnormal behavior, symptoms, and side effects. Due to the unusually large number of zeros, traditional statistical tests of association can be non-informative. We propose a mixture model for ordinal data with a built-in probability of non-response, which allows modeling of the range (e.g. severity) of the scale, while simultaneously modeling the presence/absence of the symptom. Simulations show that the model is well behaved and a likelihood ratio test can be used to choose between the zero-inflated and the traditional proportional odds model. The model, however, does have minor restrictions on the nature of the covariates that must be satisfied in order for the model to be identifiable. The method is particularly relevant for public health research such as large epidemiological surveys where more careful documentation of the reasons for response may be difficult. 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd

  10. Modeling Fire Susceptibility to Delineate Wildland-Urban Interface for Municipal-Scale Fire Risk Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, Ellen; Rapaport, Eric; Sherren, Kate

    2013-12-01

    The wildland-urban interface (WUI) is the region where development meets and intermingles with wildlands. The WUI has an elevated fire risk due to the proximity of development and residents to wildlands with natural wildfire regimes. Existing methods of delineating WUI are typically applied over a large region, use proxies for risk, and do not consider site-specific fire hazard drivers. While these models are appropriate for federal and provincial risk management, municipal managers require models intended for smaller regions. The model developed here uses the Burn-P3 fire behavior model to model WUI from local fire susceptibility (FS) in two study communities. Forest fuel code (FFC) maps for the study communities were modified using remote sensing data to produce detailed forest edges, including ladder fuels, update data currency, and add buildings and roads. The modified FFC maps used in Burn-P3 produced bimodal FS distributions for each community. The WUI in these communities was delineated as areas within community bounds where FS was greater than or equal to -1 SD from the mean FS value (), which fell in the trough of the bimodal distribution. The WUI so delineated conformed to the definition of WUI. This model extends WUI modeling for broader risk management initiatives for municipal management of risk, as it (a) considers site-specific drivers of fire behavior; (b) models risk, represented by WUI, specific to a community; and, (c) does not use proxies for risk.

  11. Susceptibility and antibody response of the laboratory model zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) to West Nile Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeister, Erik K.; Lund, Melissa; Shearn-Bochsler, Valerie I.; Balakrishnan, Christopher N.

    2017-01-01

    Since the introduction of West Nile virus (WNV) into North America in 1999 a number of passerine bird species have been found to play a role in the amplification of the virus. Arbovirus surveillance, observational studies and experimental studies have implicated passerine birds (songbirds, e.g., crows, American robins, house sparrows, and house finches) as significant reservoirs of WNV in North America, yet we lack a tractable passerine animal model for controlled studies of the virus. The zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) serves as a model system across a diversity of fields, and here we develop the zebra finch a songbird model for WNV. Like many natural hosts of WNV, we found that zebra finches developed sufficient viremia to serve as a competent host, yet in general resisted mortality from infection. In the Australian zebra finch (AZF) T. g. castanotis, we detected WNV in the majority of sampled tissues by 4 days post injection (dpi). However, WNV was not detected in tissues of sacrificed birds at 14 dpi, shortly after the development of detectable anti-WNV antibodies in the majority of birds indicating successful viral clearance. We compared susceptibility between the two zebra finch subspecies AZF and Timor zebra finch (TZF) T. g. guttata. Compared to AZF, WNV RNA was detected in a larger proportion of challenged TZF and molecular detection of virus in the serum of TZF was significantly higher than in AZF. Given the observed moderate host competence and disease susceptibility, we suggest that zebra finches are appropriate as models for the study of WNV and although underutilized in this respect, may be ideal models for the study of the many diseases carried and transmitted by songbirds.

  12. Susceptibility and Antibody Response of the Laboratory Model Zebra Finch (Taeniopygia guttata to West Nile Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik K Hofmeister

    Full Text Available Since the introduction of West Nile virus (WNV into North America in 1999 a number of passerine bird species have been found to play a role in the amplification of the virus. Arbovirus surveillance, observational studies and experimental studies have implicated passerine birds (songbirds, e.g., crows, American robins, house sparrows, and house finches as significant reservoirs of WNV in North America, yet we lack a tractable passerine animal model for controlled studies of the virus. The zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata serves as a model system across a diversity of fields, and here we develop the zebra finch a songbird model for WNV. Like many natural hosts of WNV, we found that zebra finches developed sufficient viremia to serve as a competent host, yet in general resisted mortality from infection. In the Australian zebra finch (AZF T. g. castanotis, we detected WNV in the majority of sampled tissues by 4 days post injection (dpi. However, WNV was not detected in tissues of sacrificed birds at 14 dpi, shortly after the development of detectable anti-WNV antibodies in the majority of birds indicating successful viral clearance. We compared susceptibility between the two zebra finch subspecies AZF and Timor zebra finch (TZF T. g. guttata. Compared to AZF, WNV RNA was detected in a larger proportion of challenged TZF and molecular detection of virus in the serum of TZF was significantly higher than in AZF. Given the observed moderate host competence and disease susceptibility, we suggest that zebra finches are appropriate as models for the study of WNV and although underutilized in this respect, may be ideal models for the study of the many diseases carried and transmitted by songbirds.

  13. Ototoxicity of boric acid powder in a rat animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salihoglu, Murat; Dogru, Salim; Cesmeci, Enver; Caliskan, Halil; Kurt, Onuralp; Kuçukodaci, Zafer; Gungor, Atila

    2017-04-22

    Boric acid, which has antiseptic and acidic properties, is used to treat external and middle ear infections. However, we have not found any literature about the effect of boric acid powder on middle ear mucosa and inner ear. The purpose of this study is to investigate possible ototoxic effects of boric acid powder (BAP) on cochlear outer hair cell function and histological changes in middle ear mucosa in a rat animal model. Twenty healthy, mature Wistar albino rats were used in this study. The rats were divided into two groups, Group A and Group B, each of which consisted of 10 rats. Initially, the animals in each group underwent distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) testing of their right and left ears. After the first DPOAE test, a surgical microscope was used to make a small perforation in both ears of the rats in each group, and a second DPOAE test was used to measure both ears in all of the rats. BAP was applied to the right middle ear of the rats using tympanic membrane perforation, and the DPOAEs were measured immediately after the BAP application. The histological changes and DPOAEs were evaluated three days later in Group A and 40 days later in Group B. No significant differences were found at all of the DPOAE frequencies. In Group A, mild inflammation of the middle ear mucosa was found on the third day after BAP application. In Group B, BAP caused mild inflammatory changes on the 40th day, which declined over time. Those changes did not lead to significant fibrosis within the mucosa. In rats, BAP causes mild inflammation in middle ear mucosa and it has no ototoxic effects on cochlear outer hair cell function in the inner ear of rats. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. Genetic propensities to increase ethanol intake in response to stress: studies with selectively bred swim test susceptible (SUS), alcohol-preferring (P), and non-preferring (NP) lines of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertholomey, Megan L; West, Charles H K; Jensen, Meredith L; Li, Ting-Kai; Stewart, Robert B; Weiss, Jay M; Lumeng, Lawrence

    2011-11-01

    Swim test susceptible (SUS) rats selectively bred for reduced struggling in the forced swim test (FST) following stress show high voluntary ethanol intake like alcohol-preferring (P) rats selectively bred for ethanol preference. It is unknown whether stress enhances drinking in SUS rats or FST behavior in P and non-preferring (NP) rats. The aim of this study was to assess the response to stress in male SUS, Sprague-Dawley (SD), P, and NP rats on 10% ethanol drinking and FST behavior. In experiment 1, SUS and SD rats had limited access to ethanol and water following white noise, rehousing, and forced swim stress. In experiment 2, P and NP rats received footshock, white noise, restraint, or no stress prior to the FST. Rats then had continuous access to ethanol and water, and the effects of weekly exposures to stress were measured. SUS rats drank more ethanol (M = 2.98 g/kg) than SD rats (M = 1.26 g/kg) at baseline. Stress produced sustained increases (~33% of baseline) in ethanol intake in SUS rats. NP rats spent twice as much time immobile as P rats in the FST. Stress did not alter FST behavior in P or NP rats. Only footshock produced an increase (~29%) in ethanol intake in P rats. Selection for stress-induced depressive-like behavior in SUS rats is associated with enhanced stress-induced ethanol drinking. However, the selection for alcohol preference is not associated with stress-induced depressive-like behavior but is associated with footshock stress-induced ethanol drinking. In these experiments, relationships among stress, depressive-like behavior, and alcohol preference were not symmetrical.

  15. Establishment of a rat model for canine necrotizing meningoencephalitis (NME).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, E-S; Uchida, K; Nakayama, H

    2014-11-01

    The pathogenesis of necrotizing meningoencephalitis (NME), necrotizing leukoencephalitis (NLE), and granulomatous meningoencephalomyelitis (GME) is still uncertain, although they are considered immune-mediated diseases. The purpose of the present study is to generate a rodent model(s) of these diseases. Rats were injected with rat cerebral or cerebellar homogenate. Rats injected with cerebral homogenate (Cbr) exhibited vacuolar or malacic changes mainly in the cerebral cortex. CD3-positive T cells and Iba-1-positive and CD163-negative microglia infiltrated and activated around the lesions. IgG deposited in the glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP)-positive glia limitans from the early phase, and CD3-positive T cells attached to GFAP-positive astrocytes. Autoantibodies against GFAP were detected in the sera. These pathological features of Cbr rats were consistent with those of canine NME. In contrast, rats injected with cerebral homogenate (Cbe) exhibited demyelinating lesions with inflammatory reactions in the cerebellum, brainstem, and spinal cord. The presence of demyelination and autoantibodies against myelin proteins in Cbe rats was similar to murine experimental autoimmune encephalitis and differed from NME, NLE, and GME. All the present findings indicate that autoantibodies together with microglia and T cells may play a major role in the pathogenesis of idiopathic canine meningoencephalomyelitis. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Neonatal Lipopolysaccharide Exposure Gender-Dependently Increases Heart Susceptibility to Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in Male Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Lv, Juanxiu; Li, Yong; Zhang, Lubo; Xiao, Daliao

    2017-01-01

    Background: Adverse stress exposure during the early neonatal period has been shown to cause aberrant development, resulting in an increased risk of adult disease. We tested the hypothesis that neonatal exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) does not alter heart function at rest condition but causes heart dysfunction under stress stimulation later in life. Methods: Saline control or LPS were administered to neonatal rats via intraperitoneal injection. Experiments were conducted in 6 week-old male and female rats. Isolated hearts were perfused in a Langendorff preparation. Results: Neonatal LPS exposure exhibited no effects on the body weight of the developing rats, but induced decreases in the left ventricle (LV) to the body weight ratio in male rats. Neonatal LPS exposure showed no effects on the baseline heart function determined by in vivo and ex vivo experiments, but caused decreases in the post-ischemic recovery of the LV function in male but not female rats. Neonatal LPS-mediated LV dysfunction was associated with an increase in myocardial infarct size and the LDH release in the male rats. Conclusion: The present study provides novel evidence that neonatal immune challenges could induce gender-dependent long-term effects on cardiac development and heart function, which reinforces the notion that adverse stress exposure during the early neonatal period can aggravate heart functions and the development of a heart ischemia-sensitive phenotype later in life.

  17. Determination of disk diffusion susceptibility testing interpretive criteria using model-based analysis: development and implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePalma, Glen; Turnidge, John; Craig, Bruce A

    2017-02-01

    The determination of diffusion test breakpoints has become a challenging issue due to the increasing resistance of microorganisms to antibiotics. Currently, the most commonly-used method for determining these breakpoints is the modified error-rate bounded method. Its use has remained widespread despite the introduction of several model-based methods that have been shown superior in terms of precision and accuracy. However, the computational complexities associated with these new approaches has been a significant barrier for clinicians. To remedy this, we developed and examine the utility of a free online software package designed for the determination of diffusion test breakpoints: dBETS (diffusion Breakpoint Estimation Testing Software). This software package allows clinicians to easily analyze data from susceptibility experiments through visualization, error-rate bounded, and model-based approaches. We analyze four publicly available data sets from the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute using dBETS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Bacterial otitis media: a new non-invasive rat model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tonnaer, E.L.G.M.; Sanders, E.A.M.; Curfs, J.H.A.J.

    2003-01-01

    This study describes the development of a physiological rat model for otitis media. The model is based on the assumption that bacteria, intranasally introduced into the nasopharynx, will be transferred into the middle ear cavity during swallowing provided that the ambient air pressure is higher than

  19. Enhanced anticonvulsant activity of neuroactive steroids in a rat model of catamenial epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, D S; Rogawski, M A

    2001-03-01

    Perimenstrual catamenial epilepsy may in part be due to withdrawal of the endogenous progesterone-derived neurosteroid allopregnanolone that potentiates gamma-aminobutyric acidA (GABA(A)) receptor-mediated inhibition. Here we sought to determine whether the anticonvulsant potencies of neuroactive steroids, benzodiazepines, phenobarbital (PB), and valproate (VPA) are altered during the heightened seizure susceptibility accompanying neurosteroid withdrawal in a rat model of perimenstrual catamenial epilepsy. Test drugs were evaluated for their ability to alter the convulsant activity of pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) in young adult female rats, in pseudopregnant rats with prolonged exposure to high levels of progesterone (and its neurosteroid metabolites), and in pseudopregnant rats 24 h after acute withdrawal of neurosteroids by treatment with the 5alpha-reductase inhibitor finasteride. Test drugs were administered at doses equivalent to twice their ED50 values for protection against PTZ-induced clonic seizures in naive young adult female rats. The anticonvulsant activity of allopregnanolone (5 mg/kg, s.c.), pregnanolone (5 mg/kg, s.c.), allotetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone (15 mg/kg, s.c.), and tetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone (10 mg/kg, s.c.) were enhanced by 34-127% after neurosteroid withdrawal. The anticonvulsant activity of PB (65 mg/kg, i.p.) was also enhanced by 24% in neurosteroid-withdrawn animals. In contrast, the anticonvulsant activity of diazepam (4 mg/kg, i.p.), bretazenil (0.106 mg/kg, i.p.), and VPA (560 mg/kg, i.p.) were reduced or unchanged in neurosteroid-withdrawn animals. The anticonvulsant activity of neuroactive steroids is potentiated after neurosteroid withdrawal, supporting the use of such agents in the treatment of perimenstrual catamenial epilepsy.

  20. AGING AND LIFE-STAGE SUSCEPTIBILITY: TOLUENE EFFECTS ON PROTEIN CARBONYL CONTENT IN FRONTAL CORTEX AND CEREBELLUM OF BROWN NORWAY RATS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The influence of aging on susceptibility to environmental contaminants is poorly understood, largely due to a lack of data on exposures in older adults and adequate animal models. We examined the acute effects of the volatile organic compound, toluene, in a study investigating m...

  1. Landslide susceptibility modelling using Fuzzy Logic in the oued Larbaa basin (Oriental Rif, Morocco)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zezere, J. L.; Sadiki, A.; Faleh, A.; Elkoulali, E.; Garcia, R. A. C.; Oliveira, S. C.

    2009-04-01

    Together with flash floods and soil erosion, landslides are relevant natural hazards that affect marly slopes in the oued Larbaa basin, located in the Oriental Rif, Morocco. Landslides have been generated important economic, social and ecological effects, by the destruction of farming lands, and by the collapse and interruption of roads and other human infrastructures (e.g., houses). The reduction of socio-economic losses due to landslide activity needs to be accomplished through the implementation of a comprehensive mitigation landslide risk program. The first task of this program is the definition of landslide susceptible areas based on the study of relationships between spatial distribution of past landslides and the cartographic set of landslide predisposing factors. Therefore, the major aim of this work is to create a landslide susceptibility map for the study area. The oued Larbaa basin, located northwards the Taza city, has an area of 245 km2 and the elevation ranges between 450 m and 1300 m. Morphology is characterized by rounded hills cutting marly formations essentially of Cretaceous age. Land use is dominated by cereal cultures and a few sparse tree plantations. Natural vegetation shows a very high level of degradation and usually appears as shrub tufts. The inventory of instability events has been made for the study area and it includes both rainfall-triggered rotational and shallow translational slides. These landslides were included into a GIS database that comprises also the following landslide predisposing factors: slope angle, aspect and curvature, inverse wetness index, lithology and land use. The susceptibility assessment was carried out for each type of landslide (rotational slides and shallow translational slides) under the assumption that future landslides will occur under the same environmental patterns that generated landslides in the past. The modelling of landslide susceptibility was made using the Fuzzy Logic method (Fuzzy Algebraic

  2. Infrared Thermography in Serotonin-Induced Itch Model in Rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jasemian, Yousef; Gazerani, Parisa; Dagnæs-Hansen, Frederik

    2012-01-01

    The study validated the application of infrared thermography in a serotonin-induced itch model in rats since the only available method in animal models of itch is the count of scratching bouts. Twenty four adult Sprague-Dawley male rats were used in 3 experiments: 1) local vasomotor response...... with no scratching reflex was investigated. Serotonin elicited significant scratching and lowered the local temperature at the site of injection. A negative dose-temperature relationship of serotonin was found by thermography. Vasoregulation at the site of serotonin injection took place in the absence of scratching...... reflexes. Thermography is a reliable, non-invasive, and objective method for assessment in serotonin-induced itch model in rat....

  3. Landslide susceptibility mapping in Mawat area, Kurdistan Region, NE Iraq: a comparison of different statistical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, A. A.; Gloaguen, R.; Andreani, L.; Rahnama, M.

    2015-03-01

    During the last decades, expansion of settlements into areas prone to landslides in Iraq has increased the importance of accurate hazard assessment. Susceptibility mapping provides information about hazardous locations and thus helps to potentially prevent infrastructure damage due to mass wasting. The aim of this study is to evaluate and compare frequency ratio (FR), weight of evidence (WOE), logistic regression (LR) and probit regression (PR) approaches in combination with new geomorphological indices to determine the landslide susceptibility index (LSI). We tested these four methods in Mawat area, Kurdistan Region, NE Iraq, where landslides occur frequently. For this purpose, we evaluated 16 geomorphological, geological and environmental predicting factors mainly derived from the advanced spaceborne thermal emission and reflection radiometer (ASTER) satellite. The available reference inventory includes 351 landslides representing a cumulative surface of 3.127 km2. This reference inventory was mapped from QuickBird data by manual delineation and partly verified by field survey. The areas under curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC), and relative landslide density (R index) show that all models perform similarly and that focus should be put on the careful selection of proxies. The results indicate that the lithology and the slope aspects play major roles for landslide occurrences. Furthermore, this paper demonstrates that using hypsometric integral as a prediction factor instead of slope curvature gives better results and increases the accuracy of the LSI.

  4. A murine model for cerebral toxocariasis: characterization of host susceptibility and behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, C M; Stafford, P; Pinelli, E; Holland, C V

    2006-06-01

    Toxocara canis, the parasitic roundworm of dogs, can infect a number of paratenic hosts, such as mice and humans, due to the widespread dissemination of its ova in the environment. In these paratenic hosts, larvae have been shown to exhibit a predilection for the central nervous system, resulting in an increasing number of parasites migrating to the brain as infection progresses. In an initial experiment, we investigated the differential brain involvement of T. canis in 7 strains of inbred mice, and chose 2 strains, susceptible (BALB/c) and resistant (NIH) to cerebral infection. In a second experiment, both strains were investigated in terms of course of migration, larval accumulation, and behavioural response to T. canis infection. Results revealed that infected BALB/c mice took significantly longer to drink from a water source (following a period of deprivation), compared with control mice, indicating some degree of memory impairment. Cerebral larval recoveries from both strains of mice demonstrated variation between the two experiments, suggesting that larval burdens may not be a reliable indicator of susceptibility or resistance to T. canis infection. The percentage of total recovered larvae in each organ may be a better representation of larval distribution. Our model system may provide insights into the impact of chronic geohelminth infection on cognitive development.

  5. Transgenic Rat Models for Breast Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-10-01

    medium). Using bovine embryos, cytochalasin B has been shown to increase the rigidity of the membranes and to restrict the movement of the pronuclei with...non surgical transfer of frozen- thawed bovine embryos. Theriogenology 1984; 21: 767-790. 16. Papaioannou VE, Fox JG. Efficacy of tribromoethanol...0, Tsunoda Y. Cryopreservation of rat blastocysts by vitrification . Cryobiology 1988; 25: 170-173. 24 Helmuth and Griep FIGURE LEGENDS Figure 1

  6. Characterizing a Rat Brca2 Knockout Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    gel. m Yeast transformation and sequencing. yIG397 (ref. 15) yeast was cultured overnight at 30 OC in YPD medium supplemented with adenine (200...colonies when plated on selective medium . In the absence VOLUME 21 NUMBER 6 JUNE 2003 NATURE BIOTECHNOLOGY Table 2 ENU-induced heritable phenotypes mately...and a PCR product enriched for BrcaZfragment 2 (nucleotides 3518-5204) were plated on selective medium . When gDNA obtained from a rat (SD) with two

  7. Susceptibility or resilience? Prenatal stress predisposes male rats to social subordination, but facilitates adaptation to subordinate status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Karen A; de Kloet, Annette D; Smeltzer, Michael D; Krause, Eric G; Flak, Jonathan N; Melhorn, Susan J; Foster, Michelle T; Tamashiro, Kellie L K; Sakai, Randall R

    2017-09-01

    Mood disorders such as major depressive disorder (MDD) affect a significant proportion of the population. Although progress has been made in the development of therapeutics, a large number of individuals do not attain full remission of symptoms and adverse side effects affect treatment compliance for some. In order to develop new therapies, there is a push for new models that better reflect the multiple risk factors that likely contribute to the development of depressive illness. We hypothesized that early life stress would exacerbate the depressive-like phenotype that we have previously observed in socially subordinate (SUB) adult male rats in the visible burrow system (VBS), a semi-natural, ethologically relevant environment in which males in a colony form a dominance hierarchy. Dams were exposed to chronic variable stress (CVS) during the last week of gestation, resulting in a robust and non-habituating glucocorticoid response that did not alter maternal food intake, body weight or litter size and weight. As adults, one prenatal CVS (PCVS) and one non-stressed (NS) male were housed in the VBS with adult females. Although there were no overt differences between PCVS and NS male offspring prior to VBS housing, a greater percentage of PCVS males became SUB. However, the depressive-like phenotype of SUB males was not exacerbated in PCVS males; rather, they appeared to better cope with SUB status than NS SUB males. They had lower basal plasma corticosterone than NS SUB males at the end of VBS housing. In situ hybridization for CRH in the PVN and CeA did not reveal any prenatal treatment or status effects, while NPY expression was higher within the MeA of dominant and subordinate males exposed to the VBS in comparison with controls, but with no effect of prenatal treatment. These data suggest that prenatal chronic variable stress may confer resilience to offspring when exposed to social stress in adulthood. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Rain-triggered lahar susceptibility using a shallow landslide and surface erosion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, Stuart; Magill, Christina; Hilton, James

    2016-11-01

    Lahars are mass flows containing variable concentrations of water and volcanic debris that can cause catastrophic impacts to life, livelihoods and infrastructure downstream from their volcanic origin. Accurate and quantitative information on lahar hazards are essential for reducing the impact of these events. Lahar hazard assessments often focus on the use of numeric or empirical models to describe flow behaviour and inundation areas, which rely on historic lahar events and expert elicitation to define model inputs. This results in qualitative or semi-quantitative estimates of hazard that do not account for the mechanics of lahar initiation or, in the case of rain-triggered lahars, the dependence of rainfall intensity and duration on initiation. Here we develop a method for calculating rain-triggered lahar susceptibility, defined as the occurrence probability of a particular lahar initial volume at a specific location. The model relies on terrain and deposit characteristics and a probabilistic measure of rainfall in the form of rainfall intensity-frequency-duration relationships. Results for a case study of the October 28, 1995 lahar at Mangatoetoenui stream, Ruapehu Volcano, New Zealand, indicate lahar volume is controlled by a characteristic timescale, relating the deposit depth H to the hydraulic diffusivity D0 in the ratio H2/D0. The timescale describes the transmission of positive pore pressures within the deposit, leading to shallow failure. As a consequence of this timescale, rainfall duration is the most important factor determining initial lahar sediment volume. Rainfall intensity plays a minor role, controlling the volume of water in the lahar mixture. This observation is consistent with power-law relationships used to determine lahar triggering rainfall thresholds. The rain-triggered lahar susceptibility approach developed here is anticipated to improve probabilistic lahar hazard assessments by providing quantitative, reproducible estimates of initial

  9. Experimental rat models of chronic allograft nephropathy: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrestha B

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Badri Shrestha, John HaylorSheffield Kidney Institute, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Sheffield, UKAbstract: Chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN is the leading cause of late allograft loss after renal transplantation (RT, which continues to remain an unresolved problem. A rat model of CAN was first described in 1969 by White et al. Although the rat model of RT can be technically challenging, it is attractive because the pathogenesis of CAN is similar to that following human RT and the pathological features of CAN develop within months as compared with years in human RT. The rat model of RT is considered as a useful investigational tool in the field of experimental transplantation research. We have reviewed the literature on studies of rat RT reporting the donor and recipient strain combinations that have investigated resultant survival and histological outcomes. Several different combinations of inbred and outbred rat combinations have been reported to investigate the multiple aspects of transplantation, including acute rejection, cellular and humoral rejection mechanisms and their treatments, CAN, and potential targets for its prevention.Keywords: interventions, therapy, late allograft loss, renal transplantation

  10. Individual differences in renal ACE activity in healthy rats predict susceptibility to adriamycin-induced renal damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rook, M; Lely, AT; Kramer, AB; van Goor, H; Navis, G

    Background. In man, differences in angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) levels, related to ACE (I/D) genotype, are associated with renal prognosis. This raises the hypothesis that individual differences in renal ACE activity are involved in renal susceptibility to inflicted damage. Therefore, we

  11. AGING AND LIFE-STAGE SUSCEPTIBILITY: TOLUENE EFFECTS ON BRAIN OXIDATIVE STRESS PARAMETERS IN BROWN NORWAY RATS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The influence of aging on susceptibility to environmental contaminants is poorly understood. The objectives of this study were to test whether oxidative stress (OS) is a potential toxicity pathway following toluene exposure and to determine if these effects are age-dependent. We ...

  12. EFFECTS OF MATERNAL HIGH FAT DIET AND SEDENTARY LIFESTYLE ON SUSCEPTIBILITY OF ADULT OFFSPRING TO OZONE EXPOSURE IN RATS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epidemiological and experimental data suggest that obesity exacerbates the health effects of air pollutants such as ozone (O3). Maternal inactivity and calorically rich diets lead to offspring that show signs of obesity. Exacerbated O3 susceptibility of offspring could thus be m...

  13. Susceptibility of the aging Brown Norway rat to carbaryl, an anti-cholinesterase-based insecticide: Thermoregulatory and cardiovascular responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The proportion of aged in the United States is projected to expand markedly for the next several decades. Hence, the U.S.EPA is assessing if the aged are more susceptible to environmental toxicants. The thermoregulatory and cardiovascular responses of young adult, mature adult, a...

  14. Decreases in 15-lipoxygenase metabolites in Olmsted syndrome model rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Masato; Yoshioka, Takeshi; Higashino, Kenichi; Numata, Yoshito; Igarashi, Yasuyuki; Kihara, Akio

    2017-03-01

    Olmsted syndrome (OS) is a congenital dermatosis characterized by palmoplantar keratoderma and periorificial keratotic plaque. TRPV3 (transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 3) encodes a thermosensitive Ca 2+ channel and is the causative gene of OS. However, the molecular mechanism that causes the pathological development of OS is unclear. We aimed to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying OS pathology from the perspective of lipid metabolism. Comprehensive lipidomics and microarray analyses were conducted on tissue samples from a non-lesional skin area of OS model rats (Ht rats) and from wild type (WT) rats as the control. Infiltration of leukocytes such as eosinophils and neutrophils and an increase in the fibrotic region were detected in the unaffected skin area of Ht rats compared with the WT rats. Among about 600 lipid species examined, the levels of 15-lipoxygenase (LOX) metabolites, the precursors of anti-inflammatory and pro-resolving lipid mediators, and dihydroceramides decreased by ≥16-fold in Ht rats compared with WT rats. Consistent with the decreases in the 15-LOX metabolites, expression levels of the genes that encode the 15-LOXs, Alox15 and Alox15b, were largely reduced. Conversely, increased expression levels were detected of Il36b, Ccl20, Cxcl1, and Cxcl2, which encode cytokines/chemokines, and S100a8 and S100a9, which encode the Ca 2+ binding proteins that are implicated in epidermal proliferation. The pro-inflammatory state in the unaffected skin of Ht rats caused by decreases in 15-LOX metabolites and increases in cytokines/chemokines may contribute to the pathogenesis of OS. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Is it beneficial to approximate pre-failure topography to predict landslide susceptibility with empirical models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steger, Stefan; Schmaltz, Elmar; Glade, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Empirical landslide susceptibility maps spatially depict the areas where future slope failures are likely due to specific environmental conditions. The underlying statistical models are based on the assumption that future landsliding is likely to occur under similar circumstances (e.g. topographic conditions, lithology, land cover) as past slope failures. This principle is operationalized by applying a supervised classification approach (e.g. a regression model with a binary response: landslide presence/absence) that enables discrimination between conditions that favored past landslide occurrences and the circumstances typical for landslide absences. The derived empirical relation is then transferred to each spatial unit of an area. Literature reveals that the specific topographic conditions representative for landslide presences are frequently extracted from derivatives of digital terrain models at locations were past landslides were mapped. The underlying morphology-based landslide identification becomes possible due to the fact that the topography at a specific locality usually changes after landslide occurrence (e.g. hummocky surface, concave and steep scarp). In a strict sense, this implies that topographic predictors used within conventional statistical landslide susceptibility models relate to post-failure topographic conditions - and not to the required pre-failure situation. This study examines the assumption that models calibrated on the basis of post-failure topographies may not be appropriate to predict future landslide locations, because (i) post-failure and pre-failure topographic conditions may differ and (ii) areas were future landslides will occur do not yet exhibit such a distinct post-failure morphology. The study was conducted for an area located in the Walgau region (Vorarlberg, western Austria), where a detailed inventory consisting of shallow landslides was available. The methodology comprised multiple systematic comparisons of models

  16. A novel rat contact lens model for Fusarium keratitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Shousha, Mohamed; Santos, Andrea Rachelle C; Oechsler, Rafael A; Iovieno, Alfonso; Maestre-Mesa, Jorge; Ruggeri, Marco; Echegaray, Jose J; Dubovy, Sander R; Perez, Victor L; Miller, Darlene; Alfonso, Eduardo C; Bajenaru, M Livia

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and characterize a new contact lens-associated fungal keratitis rat model and to assess the ability of non-invasive spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) to detect pathological changes in vivo in fungal keratitis. We used SD-OCT to image and measure the cornea of Sprague Dawley rats. Fusarium infection was initiated in the rat eye by fitting Fusarium solani-soaked contact lenses on the experimental eye, while the control animals received contact lenses soaked in sterile saline. The fungal infection was monitored with periodic slit-lamp examination and in vivo SD-OCT imaging of the rat eye, and confirmed by histology, counting of viable fungi in the infected rat cornea, and PCR with specific primers for Fusarium sp. We imaged and measured the rat cornea with SD-OCT. Custom-made contact lenses were developed based on the OCT measurements. Incubation of contact lenses in a F. solani suspension resulted in biofilm formation. We induced contact lens-associated Fusarium keratitis by fitting the rat eyes for 4 h with the Fusarium-contaminated contact lenses. The SD-OCT images of the cornea correlated well with the slit-lamp and histopathological results and clearly defined clinical signs of infection, namely, increased corneal thickening, loss of epithelial continuity, hyper-reflective areas representing infiltrates, and endothelial plaques characteristic of fungal infection. Moreover, in three cases, SD-OCT detected the infection without any clear findings on slit-lamp examination. Infection was confirmed with histological fungal staining, PCR, and microbiological culture positivity. We developed a highly reproducible rat contact lens model and successfully induced contact lens-associated Fusarium keratitis in this model. The clinical presentation of contact lens-associated Fusarium keratitis in the rat model is similar to the human condition. SD-OCT is a valuable tool that non-invasively revealed characteristic signs

  17. A novel rat contact lens model for Fusarium keratitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Shousha, Mohamed; Santos, Andrea Rachelle C.; Oechsler, Rafael A.; Iovieno, Alfonso; Maestre-Mesa, Jorge; Ruggeri, Marco; Echegaray, Jose J.; Dubovy, Sander R.; Perez, Victor L.; Miller, Darlene; Alfonso, Eduardo C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to develop and characterize a new contact lens–associated fungal keratitis rat model and to assess the ability of non-invasive spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) to detect pathological changes in vivo in fungal keratitis. Methods We used SD-OCT to image and measure the cornea of Sprague Dawley rats. Fusarium infection was initiated in the rat eye by fitting Fusarium solani–soaked contact lenses on the experimental eye, while the control animals received contact lenses soaked in sterile saline. The fungal infection was monitored with periodic slit-lamp examination and in vivo SD-OCT imaging of the rat eye, and confirmed by histology, counting of viable fungi in the infected rat cornea, and PCR with specific primers for Fusarium sp. Results We imaged and measured the rat cornea with SD-OCT. Custom-made contact lenses were developed based on the OCT measurements. Incubation of contact lenses in a F. solani suspension resulted in biofilm formation. We induced contact lens–associated Fusarium keratitis by fitting the rat eyes for 4 h with the Fusarium-contaminated contact lenses. The SD-OCT images of the cornea correlated well with the slit-lamp and histopathological results and clearly defined clinical signs of infection, namely, increased corneal thickening, loss of epithelial continuity, hyper-reflective areas representing infiltrates, and endothelial plaques characteristic of fungal infection. Moreover, in three cases, SD-OCT detected the infection without any clear findings on slit-lamp examination. Infection was confirmed with histological fungal staining, PCR, and microbiological culture positivity. Conclusions We developed a highly reproducible rat contact lens model and successfully induced contact lens–associated Fusarium keratitis in this model. The clinical presentation of contact lens–associated Fusarium keratitis in the rat model is similar to the human condition. SD-OCT is a valuable tool that

  18. Effective spreading from multiple leaders identified by percolation in the susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Shenggong; Lü, Linyuan; Yeung, Chi Ho; Hu, Yanqing

    2017-07-01

    Social networks constitute a new platform for information propagation, but its success is crucially dependent on the choice of spreaders who initiate the spreading of information. In this paper, we remove edges in a network at random and the network segments into isolated clusters. The most important nodes in each cluster then form a set of influential spreaders, such that news propagating from them would lead to extensive coverage and minimal redundancy. The method utilizes the similarities between the segmented networks before percolation and the coverage of information propagation in each social cluster to obtain a set of distributed and coordinated spreaders. Our tests of implementing the susceptible-infected-recovered model on Facebook and Enron email networks show that this method outperforms conventional centrality-based methods in terms of spreadability and coverage redundancy. The suggested way of identifying influential spreaders thus sheds light on a new paradigm of information propagation in social networks.

  19. Magnetic susceptibility and heat capacity of graphene in two-band Harrison model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi, Hamze; Bagheri, Mehran; Khodadadi, Jabbar

    2015-11-01

    Using a two-band tight-binding Harrison model and Green's function technique, the influences of both localized σ and delocalized π electrons on the density of states, the Pauli paramagnetic susceptibility, and the heat capacity of a graphene sheet are investigated. We witness an extension in the bandwidth and an increase in the number of Van-Hove singularities as well. As a notable point, besides the magnetic nature which includes diamagnetism in graphene-based nanosystems, a paramagnetic behavior associated with the itinerant π electrons could be occurred. Further, we report a Schottky anomaly in the heat capacity. This study asserts that the contribution of both σ and π electrons play dominant roles in the mentioned physical quantities.

  20. Predicting the epidemic threshold of the susceptible-infected-recovered model

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Wei; Zhong, Lin-Feng; Tang, Ming; Gao, Hui; Stanley, H Eugene

    2015-01-01

    Researchers have developed several theoretical methods for predicting epidemic thresholds, including the mean-field like (MFL) method, the quenched mean-field (QMF) method, and the dynamical message passing (DMP) method. When these methods are applied to predict epidemic threshold they often produce differing results and their relative levels of accuracy are still unknown. We systematically analyze these two issues---relationships among differing results and levels of accuracy---by studying the susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) model on uncorrelated configuration networks and a group of 56 real-world networks. In uncorrelated configuration networks the MFL and DMP methods yield identical predictions that are larger and more accurate than the prediction generated by the QMF method. When compared to the 56 real-world networks, the epidemic threshold obtained by the DMP method is closer to the actual epidemic threshold because it incorporates full network topology information and some dynamical correlations. ...

  1. Alternative states and population crashes in a resource-susceptible-infected model for planktonic parasites and hosts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerla, D.J.; Gsell, A.S.; Kooi, B.W.; Ibelings, B.W.; Donk, van E.; Mooij, W.M.

    2013-01-01

    1. Despite the strong impact parasites can have, only few models of phytoplankton ecology or aquatic food webs have specifically included parasitism. 2. Here, we provide a susceptible-infected model for a diatom-chytrid hostparasite system that explicitly includes nutrients, infected and uninfected

  2. Alternative states and population crashes in a resource-susceptible-infected model for planktonic parasites and hosts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerla, D.J.; Gsell, A.S.; Kooi, B.W.; Ibelings, B.W.; Van Donk, E.; Mooij, W.M.

    2013-01-01

    1. Despite the strong impact parasites can have, only few models of phytoplankton ecology or aquatic food webs have specifically included parasitism. 2. Here, we provide a susceptible-infected model for a diatom-chytrid host–parasite system that explicitly includes nutrients, infected and uninfected

  3. Antihyperalgesic Activity of Rhodiola rosea in a Diabetic Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Déciga-Campos, Myrna; González-Trujano, Maria Eva; Ventura-Martínez, Rosa; Montiel-Ruiz, Rosa Mariana; Ángeles-López, Guadalupe Esther; Brindis, Fernando

    2016-02-01

    Preclinical Research Rhodiola rosea L. (Crassulaceae) is used for enhancing physical and mental performance. Recent studies demonstrated that R. rosea had anti-inflammatory activity in animal models, for example, carrageenan- and nystatin-induced edema in rats, possibly by inhibiting phospholipase A2 and cyclooxygenases-1 and -2. In addition, R. rosea had antinociceptive activity in thermal and chemical pain tests as well as mechanical hyperalgesia. The purpose of the present study was to assess the antihyperalgesic effect of an ethanol extract of Rhodiola rosea (R. rosea) in a diabetic rat model. Rats were administered a single dose of streptozotocin (STZ; 50 mg/kg, i.p.) and hyperalgesia was evaluated four weeks later. Formalin-evoked (0.5%) flinching was increased in diabetic rats compared with nondiabetic controls Systemic (1-100 mg/kg, i.p.) and local (0.1-10 mg/paw into the dorsal surface of the right hind paw) administration of R. rosea ethanol extract dose-dependently reduced formalin-induced hyperalgesia in diabetic rats. The antihyperalgesic effect of R. rosea was compared with gabapentin. These results suggest that R. rosea ethanol extract may have potential as a treatment for diabetic hyperalgesia. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Different landslide sampling strategies in a grid-based bi-variate statistical susceptibility model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussin, Haydar Y.; Zumpano, Veronica; Reichenbach, Paola; Sterlacchini, Simone; Micu, Mihai; van Westen, Cees; Bălteanu, Dan

    2016-01-01

    This study had three aims. The first was to assess the performance of the weights-of-evidence (WofE) landslide susceptibility model in areas that are very different in terms of size, geoenvironmental settings, and landslide types. The second was to test the appropriate strategies to sample the mapped landslide polygon. The final aim was to evaluate the performance of the method to changes in the landslide sample size used to train the model. The method was applied to two areas: the Fella River basin (eastern Italian Alps) containing debris flows, and Buzau County (Romanian Carpathians) with shallow landslides. The three landslide sampling strategies used were: (1) the landslide scarp centroid, (2) points populating the scarp on a 50-m grid, and (3) the entire scarp polygon. The highest success rates were obtained when sampling shallow landslides as 50-m grid-points and debris flow scarps as polygons. Prediction rates were highest when using the entire scarp polygon method for both landslide types. The sample size test using the landslide centroids showed that a sample of 104 debris flow scarps was sufficient to predict the remaining 941 debris flows in the Fella River basin, while 161 shallow landslides was the minimum required number to predict the remaining 1451 scarps in Buzau County. Below these landslide sample thresholds, model performance was too low. However, using more landslides than the threshold produced a plateau effect with little to no increase in the model performance rates.

  5. Anticonvulsant and proconvulsant effects of tramadol, its enantiomers and its M1 metabolite in the rat kindling model of epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potschka, Heidrun; Friderichs, Elmar; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2000-01-01

    The centrally acting analgesic tramadol has recently been reported to cause seizures at re-commended dosages in patients, whereas animal experiments had indicated that seizures only occur in high, toxic doses. Tramadol has a dual mechanism of action that includes weak agonistic effects at the mu-opioid receptor as well as inhibition of monoamine (serotonin, norepinephrine) re-uptake. Its major (M1) metabolite mono-O-desmethyltramadol, which is rapidly formed in vivo, has a markedly higher affinity for mu receptors and may thus contribute to the effects of the parent compound. Furthermore, the pharmacological effects of tramadol appear to be related to the different, but complementary and interactive pharmacologies of its enantiomers. In the present study, we evaluated (±)-tramadol, its enantiomers, and its M1 metabolite ((+)-enantiomer) in the amygdala kindling model of epilepsy in rats. Adverse effects determined in kindled rats were compared to those in nonkindled rats. At doses within the analgesic range, (±)-tramadol and its enantiomers induced anticonvulsant effects in kindled rats. However, at only slightly higher doses seizures occurred. With (±)-tramadol, generalized seizures were observed at 30 mg kg−1 in most kindled but not in nonkindled rats. The (−)-enantiomer induced myoclonic seizures at 30 mg kg−1 in most kindled but not in nonkindled rats, although myoclonic seizure activity was observed in some nonkindled rats at 10 or 20 mg kg−1. Seizures were also observed after the (+)-enantiomer and the (+)-enantiomer of the M1 metabolite, but experiments with higher doses of these compounds were limited by marked respiratory depression. The data demonstrate that kindling enhances the susceptibility of rats to convulsant adverse effects of tramadol and its enantiomers, indicating that a preexisting lowered seizure threshold increases the risk of tramadol-induced seizures. PMID:10991912

  6. Differential expression of cytochrome P450 genes between bromadiolone-resistant and anticoagulant-susceptible Norway rats:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Mette Drude; Heiberg, Ann-Charlotte; Fredholm, Merete

    2008-01-01

    Anticoagulant resistance in Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) has been suggested to be due to mutations in the VKORC1 gene, encoding the target protein of anticoagulant rodenticides such as warfarin and bromadiolone. Other factors, e.g. pharmacokinetics, may however also contribute to resistance. We...

  7. Differential expression of cytochrome P450 genes between bromadiolone-resistant and anticoagulant-susceptible Norway rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Mette Drude Kjær; Heiberg, Ann-Charlotte; Fredholm, Merete

    2008-01-01

    Background: Anticoagulant resistance in Norway rats, Rattus norvegicus (Berk.), has been suggested to be conferred by mutations in the VKORC1 gene, encoding the target protein of anticoagulant rodenticides. Other factors, e.g. pharmacokinetics, may also contribute to resistance, however. To examine...

  8. The spatial prediction of landslide susceptibility applying artificial neural network and logistic regression models: A case study of Inje, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saro, Lee; Woo, Jeon Seong; Kwan-Young, Oh; Moung-Jin, Lee

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study is to predict landslide susceptibility caused using the spatial analysis by the application of a statistical methodology based on the GIS. Logistic regression models along with artificial neutral network were applied and validated to analyze landslide susceptibility in Inje, Korea. Landslide occurrence area in the study were identified based on interpretations of optical remote sensing data (Aerial photographs) followed by field surveys. A spatial database considering forest, geophysical, soil and topographic data, was built on the study area using the Geographical Information System (GIS). These factors were analysed using artificial neural network (ANN) and logistic regression models to generate a landslide susceptibility map. The study validates the landslide susceptibility map by comparing them with landslide occurrence areas. The locations of landslide occurrence were divided randomly into a training set (50%) and a test set (50%). A training set analyse the landslide susceptibility map using the artificial network along with logistic regression models, and a test set was retained to validate the prediction map. The validation results revealed that the artificial neural network model (with an accuracy of 80.10%) was better at predicting landslides than the logistic regression model (with an accuracy of 77.05%). Of the weights used in the artificial neural network model, `slope' yielded the highest weight value (1.330), and `aspect' yielded the lowest value (1.000). This research applied two statistical analysis methods in a GIS and compared their results. Based on the findings, we were able to derive a more effective method for analyzing landslide susceptibility.

  9. The spatial prediction of landslide susceptibility applying artificial neural network and logistic regression models: A case study of Inje, Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saro Lee

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to predict landslide susceptibility caused using the spatial analysis by the application of a statistical methodology based on the GIS. Logistic regression models along with artificial neutral network were applied and validated to analyze landslide susceptibility in Inje, Korea. Landslide occurrence area in the study were identified based on interpretations of optical remote sensing data (Aerial photographs followed by field surveys. A spatial database considering forest, geophysical, soil and topographic data, was built on the study area using the Geographical Information System (GIS. These factors were analysed using artificial neural network (ANN and logistic regression models to generate a landslide susceptibility map. The study validates the landslide susceptibility map by comparing them with landslide occurrence areas. The locations of landslide occurrence were divided randomly into a training set (50% and a test set (50%. A training set analyse the landslide susceptibility map using the artificial network along with logistic regression models, and a test set was retained to validate the prediction map. The validation results revealed that the artificial neural network model (with an accuracy of 80.10% was better at predicting landslides than the logistic regression model (with an accuracy of 77.05%. Of the weights used in the artificial neural network model, ‘slope’ yielded the highest weight value (1.330, and ‘aspect’ yielded the lowest value (1.000. This research applied two statistical analysis methods in a GIS and compared their results. Based on the findings, we were able to derive a more effective method for analyzing landslide susceptibility.

  10. Exposure to lard-based high-fat diet during fetal and lactation periods modifies breast cancer susceptibility in adulthood in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Andrade, Fábia; Fontelles, Camile Castilho; Rosim, Mariana Papaléo; de Oliveira, Tiago Franco; de Melo Loureiro, Ana Paula; Mancini-Filho, Jorge; Rogero, Marcelo Macedo; Moreno, Fernando Salvador; de Assis, Sonia; Barbisan, Luiz Fernando; Hilakivi-Clarke, Leena; Ong, Thomas Prates

    2014-06-01

    The present study investigated whether early life exposure to high levels of animal fat increases breast cancer risk in adulthood in rats. Dams consumed a lard-based high-fat (HF) diet (60% fat-derived energy) or an AIN93G control diet (16% fat-derived energy) during gestation or gestation and lactation. Their 7-week-old female offspring were exposed to 7,12-dimethyl-benzo[a]anthracene to induce mammary tumors. Pregnant dams consuming an HF diet had higher circulating leptin levels than pregnant control dams. However, compared to the control offspring, significantly lower susceptibility to mammary cancer development was observed in the offspring of dams fed an HF diet during pregnancy (lower tumor incidence, multiplicity and weight), or pregnancy and lactation (lower tumor multiplicity only). Mammary epithelial elongation, cell proliferation (Ki67) and expression of NFκB p65 were significantly lower and p21 expression and global H3K9me3 levels were higher in the mammary glands of rats exposed to an HF lard diet in utero. They also tended to have lower Rank/Rankl ratios (P=.09) and serum progesterone levels (P=.07) than control offspring. In the mammary glands of offspring of dams consuming an HF diet during both pregnancy and lactation, the number of terminal end buds, epithelial elongation and the BCL-2/BAX ratio were significantly lower and serum leptin levels were higher than in the controls. Our data confirm that the breast cancer risk of offspring can be programmed by maternal dietary intake. However, contrary to our expectation, exposure to high levels of lard during early life decreased later susceptibility to breast cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Cellular Hypertrophy and Increased Susceptibility to Spontaneous Calcium-Release of Rat Left Atrial Myocytes Due to Elevated Afterload.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifei Zhang

    Full Text Available Atrial remodeling due to elevated arterial pressure predisposes the heart to atrial fibrillation (AF. Although abnormal sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR function has been associated with AF, there is little information on the effects of elevated afterload on atrial Ca2+-handling. We investigated the effects of ascending aortic banding (AoB on Ca2+-handling in rat isolated atrial myocytes in comparison to age-matched sham-operated animals (Sham. Myocytes were either labelled for ryanodine receptor (RyR or loaded with fluo-3-AM and imaged by confocal microscopy. AoB myocytes were hypertrophied in comparison to Sham controls (P<0.0001. RyR labeling was localized to the z-lines and to the cell edge. There were no differences between AoB and Sham in the intensity or pattern of RyR-staining. In both AoB and Sham, electrical stimulation evoked robust SR Ca2+-release at the cell edge whereas Ca2+ transients at the cell center were much smaller. Western blotting showed a decreased L-type Ca channel expression but no significant changes in RyR or RyR phosphorylation or in expression of Na+/Ca2+ exchanger, SR Ca2+ ATPase or phospholamban. Mathematical modeling indicated that [Ca2+]i transients at the cell center were accounted for by simple centripetal diffusion of Ca2+ released at the cell edge. In contrast, caffeine (10 mM induced Ca2+ release was uniform across the cell. The caffeine-induced transient was smaller in AoB than in Sham, suggesting a reduced SR Ca2+-load in hypertrophied cells. There were no significant differences between AoB and Sham cells in the rate of Ca2+ extrusion during recovery of electrically-stimulated or caffeine-induced transients. The incidence and frequency of spontaneous Ca2+-transients following rapid-pacing (4 Hz was greater in AoB than in Sham myocytes. In conclusion, elevated afterload causes cellular hypertrophy and remodeling of atrial SR Ca2+-release.

  12. Analgesic Effect of Xenon in Rat Model of Inflammatory Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukushkin, M L; Igon'kina, S I; Potapov, S V; Potapov, A V

    2017-02-01

    The analgesic effects of inert gas xenon were examined on rats. The formalin model of inflammatory pain, tail-flick test, and hot-plate test revealed the antinociceptive effects of subanesthetizing doses of inhalation anesthetic xenon. Inhalation of 50/50 xenon/oxygen mixture moderated the nociceptive responses during acute and tonic phases of inflammatory pain.

  13. Cognitive symptoms in a rat model of Parkinson's Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holslag, Joost; Beck, Anne-Kathrin; Krauss, Joachim K.; Schwabe, K

    2017-01-01

    Objective: We here investigated the effect of bilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesions, a rat model for Parkinson's disease (PD), on impulsivity and attention in an auditory oddball paradigm. In PD, the progressive loss of dopamine (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra leads to disturbed motor

  14. A rat model with an isolated bladder in situ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thulesen, J; Olsen, P S; Grevstad, J U

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes our method for producing a rat model with an isolated bladder in situ in which the bladder makes no contact with urine. First, the right kidney was removed, then an external catheter was placed in the right ureter for bladder infusions, and next the left ureter was anatomosed...

  15. A New Rat Model for Orthotopic Abdominal Wall Allotransplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William W. Lao, MD

    2014-04-01

    Conclusions: Technical, histological, and immunological aspects of a new rat model are described. These results give clues to what occurs in human abdominal wall transplantation. In addition, Th1, a proinflammatory cell, was found to be a potential biomarker for allograft rejection.

  16. [Biomarker screening of rat pulmonary hypertension model by transcriptome sequencing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, F; Xie, L; Yu, L; Chen, J; Liu, H M

    2016-04-01

    To screen relative gene and pathway of rat severe pulmonary hypertension by transcriptome sequencing. Pulmonary hypertension animal model of SD rats was established by left lung resection and hypodermic injection of monocrotaline.Monocrotaline was injected subcutaneously one week after left lung resection.Eight rats at 1, 3, 5 weeks after the injection of monocrotaline respectively were named group M1, group M2 and group M3.Eight normal rats were assigned into control group (group C). The right lung tissue was used for transcriptome sequencing to screen the differentially expressed genes.KEGG pathway analysis was performed to screen the pathways with enriched differentially expressed genes. The animal model was established successfully.The pulmonary artery pressure was as follows: group C (28.6±3.0) mmHg(1 mmHg=0.133 kPa), group M1 (38.9±3.3) mmHg, group M2 (50.8±3.9) mmHg, group M3 (51.5±3.5) mmHg.The pressure elevated in group M1 compared with group C (P=0.007). The pressure in M2 and M3 elevated compared with M1(P=0.002 and Ppulmonary hypertension were epithelial specific receptor tyrosine kinase(Tie2) and thrombospondin-1(TSP-1). Tie2 was down-regulated (qpulmonary hypertension and up-regulated (qpulmonary hypertension.TSP-1 was up-regulated (qpulmonary hypertension and down-regulated (qpulmonary hypertension.In the stage of severe pulmonary hypertension, the differentially expressed genes were enriched mainly in the pathways of phosphatidylinostitol 3-kinase, focal adhesion kinase and extracellular matrix receptor interaction. The study provides transcriptome information of rat pulmonary hypertension model and normal rat.Possible mechanisms of pulmonary hypertension are found.These genes and pathways might be new precursor for the diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary hypertension.

  17. Aotus infulatus monkey is susceptible to Plasmodium falciparum infection and may constitute an alternative experimental model for malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carvalho Leonardo JM

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Aotus is one of the WHO-recommended primate models for studies in malaria, and several species can be infected with Plasmodium falciparum or P. vivax. Here we describe the successful infection of the species A. infulatus from eastern Amazon with blood stages of P. falciparum. Both intact and splenectomized animals were susceptible to infection; the intact ones were able to keep parasitemias at lower levels for several days, but developed complications such as severe anemia; splenectomized monkeys developed higher parasitemias but no major complications. We conclude that A. infulatus is susceptible to P. falciparum infection and may represent an alternative model for studies in malaria.

  18. Lessons from rat models of hypertension : from Goldblatt to genetic engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pinto, YM; Paul, M; Ganten, D

    Over the past 50 years various animal models of hypertension have been developed, predominantly in the rat. In this review we discuss the use of the rat as a model of hypertension, and evaluate what these models have taught us. Interestingly, the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) is by far the

  19. Lessons from rat models of hypertension: from Goldblatt to genetic engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pinto, Y. M.; Paul, M.; Ganten, D.

    1998-01-01

    Over the past 50 years various animal models of hypertension have been developed, predominantly in the rat. In this review we discuss the use of the rat as a model of hypertension, and evaluate what these models have taught us. Interestingly, the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) is by far the

  20. Simvastatin Exposure and Rotator Cuff Repair in a Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deren, Matthew E; Ehteshami, John R; Dines, Joshua S; Drakos, Mark C; Behrens, Steve B; Doty, Stephen; Coleman, Struan H

    2017-03-01

    Simvastatin is a common medication prescribed for hypercholesterolemia that accelerates local bone formation. It is unclear whether simvastatin can accelerate healing at the tendon-bone interface after rotator cuff repair. This study was conducted to investigate whether local and systemic administration of simvastatin increased tendon-bone healing of the rotator cuff as detected by maximum load to failure in a controlled animal-based model. Supraspinatus tendon repair was performed on 120 Sprague-Dawley rats. Sixty rats had a polylactic acid membrane overlying the repair site. Of these, 30 contained simvastatin and 30 did not contain medication. Sixty rats underwent repair without a polylactic acid membrane. Of these, 30 received oral simvastatin (25 mg/kg/d) and 30 received a regular diet. At 4 weeks, 5 rats from each group were killed for histologic analysis. At 8 weeks, 5 rats from each group were killed for histologic analysis and the remaining 20 rats were killed for biomechanical analysis. One rat that received oral simvastatin died of muscle necrosis. Average maximum load to failure was 35.2±6.2 N for those receiving oral simvastatin, 36.8±9.0 N for oral control subjects, 39.5±12.8 N for those receiving local simvastatin, and 39.1±9.3 N for control subjects with a polylactic acid membrane. No statistically significant differences were found between any of the 4 groups (P>.05). Qualitative histologic findings showed that all groups showed increased collagen formation and organization at 8 weeks compared with 4 weeks, with no differences between the 4 groups at each time point. The use of systemic and local simvastatin offered no benefit over control groups. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(2):e288-e292.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Landslide susceptibility mapping along PLUS expressways in Malaysia using probabilistic based model in GIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, Norbazlan M.; Pradhan, Biswajeet

    2014-06-01

    PLUS Berhad holds the concession for a total of 987 km of toll expressways in Malaysia, the longest of which is the North-South Expressway or NSE. Acting as the backbone' of the west coast of the peninsula, the NSE stretches from the Malaysian-Thai border in the north to the border with neighbouring Singapore in the south, linking several major cities and towns along the way. North-South Expressway in Malaysia contributes to the country economic development through trade, social and tourism sector. Presently, the highway is good in terms of its condition and connection to every state but some locations need urgent attention. Stability of slopes at these locations is of most concern as any instability can cause danger to the motorist. In this paper, two study locations have been analysed; they are Gua Tempurung (soil slope) and Jelapang (rock slope) which are obviously having two different characteristics. These locations passed through undulating terrain with steep slopes where landslides are common and the probability of slope instability due to human activities in surrounding areas is high. A combination of twelve (12) landslide conditioning factors database on slope stability such as slope degree and slope aspect were extracted from IFSAR (interoferometric synthetic aperture radar) while landuse, lithology and structural geology were constructed from interpretation of high resolution satellite data from World View II, Quickbird and Ikonos. All this information was analysed in geographic information system (GIS) environment for landslide susceptibility mapping using probabilistic based frequency ratio model. Consequently, information on the slopes such as inventories, condition assessments and maintenance records were assessed through total expressway maintenance management system or better known as TEMAN. The above mentioned system is used by PLUS as an asset management and decision support tools for maintenance activities along the highways as well as for data

  2. Memory effects on epidemic evolution: The susceptible-infected-recovered epidemic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeedian, M.; Khalighi, M.; Azimi-Tafreshi, N.; Jafari, G. R.; Ausloos, M.

    2017-02-01

    Memory has a great impact on the evolution of every process related to human societies. Among them, the evolution of an epidemic is directly related to the individuals' experiences. Indeed, any real epidemic process is clearly sustained by a non-Markovian dynamics: memory effects play an essential role in the spreading of diseases. Including memory effects in the susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) epidemic model seems very appropriate for such an investigation. Thus, the memory prone SIR model dynamics is investigated using fractional derivatives. The decay of long-range memory, taken as a power-law function, is directly controlled by the order of the fractional derivatives in the corresponding nonlinear fractional differential evolution equations. Here we assume "fully mixed" approximation and show that the epidemic threshold is shifted to higher values than those for the memoryless system, depending on this memory "length" decay exponent. We also consider the SIR model on structured networks and study the effect of topology on threshold points in a non-Markovian dynamics. Furthermore, the lack of access to the precise information about the initial conditions or the past events plays a very relevant role in the correct estimation or prediction of the epidemic evolution. Such a "constraint" is analyzed and discussed.

  3. Theta-specific susceptibility in a model of adaptive synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, Christian; Schmiedt, Joscha T; Pawelzik, Klaus R

    2013-01-01

    Learning and memory formation are processes which are still not fully understood. It is widely believed that synaptic plasticity is the most important neural substrate for both. However, it has been observed that large-scale theta band oscillations in the mammalian brain are beneficial for learning, and it is not clear if and how this is linked to synaptic plasticity. Also, the underlying dynamics of synaptic plasticity itself have not been completely uncovered yet, especially for non-linear interactions between multiple spikes. Here, we present a new and simple dynamical model of synaptic plasticity. It incorporates novel contributions to synaptic plasticity including adaptation processes. We test its ability to reproduce non-linear effects on four different data sets of complex spike patterns, and show that the model can be tuned to reproduce the observed synaptic changes in great detail. When subjected to periodically varying firing rates, already linear pair based spike timing dependent plasticity (STDP) predicts a specific susceptibility of synaptic plasticity to pre- and postsynaptic firing rate oscillations in the theta-band. Our model retains this band-pass property, while for high firing rates in the non-linear regime it modifies the specific phase relation required for depression and potentiation. For realistic parameters, maximal synaptic potentiation occurs when the postsynaptic is trailing the presynaptic activity slightly. Anti-phase oscillations tend to depress it. Our results are well in line with experimental findings, providing a straightforward and mechanistic explanation for the importance of theta oscillations for learning.

  4. Landslide susceptibility mapping for a part of North Anatolian Fault Zone (Northeast Turkey) using logistic regression model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Gökhan; aytekin, mustafa; banu ikizler, sabriye; angın, zekai

    2013-04-01

    The North Anatolian Fault is know as one of the most active and destructive fault zone which produced many earthquakes with high magnitudes. Along this fault zone, the morphology and the lithological features are prone to landsliding. However, many earthquake induced landslides were recorded by several studies along this fault zone, and these landslides caused both injuiries and live losts. Therefore, a detailed landslide susceptibility assessment for this area is indispancable. In this context, a landslide susceptibility assessment for the 1445 km2 area in the Kelkit River valley a part of North Anatolian Fault zone (Eastern Black Sea region of Turkey) was intended with this study, and the results of this study are summarized here. For this purpose, geographical information system (GIS) and a bivariate statistical model were used. Initially, Landslide inventory maps are prepared by using landslide data determined by field surveys and landslide data taken from General Directorate of Mineral Research and Exploration. The landslide conditioning factors are considered to be lithology, slope gradient, slope aspect, topographical elevation, distance to streams, distance to roads and distance to faults, drainage density and fault density. ArcGIS package was used to manipulate and analyze all the collected data Logistic regression method was applied to create a landslide susceptibility map. Landslide susceptibility maps were divided into five susceptibility regions such as very low, low, moderate, high and very high. The result of the analysis was verified using the inventoried landslide locations and compared with the produced probability model. For this purpose, Area Under Curvature (AUC) approach was applied, and a AUC value was obtained. Based on this AUC value, the obtained landslide susceptibility map was concluded as satisfactory. Keywords: North Anatolian Fault Zone, Landslide susceptibility map, Geographical Information Systems, Logistic Regression Analysis.

  5. Sex and age specific effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol during the periadolescent period in the rat: The unique susceptibility of the prepubescent animal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Lindsay; Black, Rita; Michaelides, Michael; Hurd, Yasmin L; Dow-Edwards, Diana

    Adolescents who use marijuana are more likely to exhibit anxiety, depression, and other mood disorders, including psychotic-like symptoms. Additionally, the age at onset of use and the stress history of the individual can affect responses to cannabis. To examine the effect of early life experience on adolescent Δ-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) exposure, we exposed adolescent (postnatal day (P) 29-38) male and female rats, either shipped from a supplier or born in our vivarium, to once daily injections of 3mg/kg THC. Our findings suggest that males are more sensitive to the anxiolytic and antidepressant effects of THC, as measured by the elevated plus maze (EPM) and forced swim test (FST), respectively, than females. Exposure to the FST increased plasma corticosterone levels, regardless of drug treatment or origin and females had higher levels than males overall. Shipping increased THC responses in females (acoustic startle habituation) and in males (latency to immobility in FST). No significant effects of THC or shipping on pre-pulse inhibition were observed. Due to differences in timing of puberty in males and females during the P29-38 period of THC treatment, we also dosed female rats between P21-30 (pre-puberty) and male rats between P39-48 (puberty). Pre-pubertal animals showed reductions in anxiety on the EPM, an effect that was not seen in animals treated during puberty. These results suggest that both sexes are more susceptible to changes in emotional behavior when THC exposure occurs just prior to the onset of puberty. Within the animals dosed from P29-38, THC increased cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R) mRNA expression and tended to decrease CP55,940 stimulated [35S]GTPγS binding in the central amygdala only of females. Therefore, early stress enhances THC responses in males (in FST) and females (ASR habituation), THC alters CB1R expression and function in females only and prepubescent rats are generally more responsive to THC than pubertal rats. In summary

  6. Rat Models of Ventricular Fibrillation Following Acute Myocardial Infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hundahl, Laura A.; Tfelt-Hansen, Jacob; Jespersen, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    A number of animal models have been designed in order to unravel the underlying mechanisms of acute ischemia-induced arrhythmias and to test compounds and interventions for antiarrhythmic therapy. This is important as acute myocardial infarction (AMI) continues to be the major cause of sudden...... cardiac death, and we are yet to discover safe and effective treatments of the lethal arrhythmias occurring in the acute setting. Animal models therefore continue to be relevant for our understanding and treatment of acute ischemic arrhythmias. This review discusses the applicability of the rat as a model...... for ventricular arrhythmias occurring during the acute phase of AMI. It provides a description of models developed, advantages and disadvantages of rats, as well as an overview of the most important interventions investigated and the relevance for human pathophysiology....

  7. Rat model of focal cerebral ischemia in the dominant hemisphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Shen, Yan; Wang, Wei; Gao, Huanmin

    2015-01-01

    In the human brain, the dominant hemisphere is more complex than the non-dominant hemisphere. Hence, cerebral ischemia of the dominant hemisphere often leads to serious consequences. This study aims to establish a rodent model of focal cerebral ischemia in the dominant hemisphere. The quadruped feeding test was used to screen 70 male Sprague Dawley rats. From this test, 48 rats with right paw preference were selected and randomly assigned numbers. Half were assigned to the dominant hemisphere ischemia (DHI) group, and the other half were assigned to the non-dominant hemisphere ischemia (NDHI) group. The middle cerebral artery was occluded 2 h before reperfusion. Neurological functions were tested. TTC and HE staining were performed. The volume of cerebral infarction was calculated. Rats in the DHI group had significantly worse neurological scores than rats in the NDHI group (P dominant hemisphere than in the non-dominant hemisphere. The dominant hippocampus indicated severe neuronal loss and disorderly cellular arrangement. The volume of cerebral infarction was also greater in the DHI group compared to the NDHI group (P dominant hemisphere, MCA occlusion in the dominant hemisphere caused greater impairment in neurological functions. The proposed rodent model is reliable and has high levels of reproducibility. Therefore, his model can be reliably for investigating the mechanism of focal cerebral ischemia in the dominant hemisphere of human brains.

  8. Experimental model of heterotopic ossification in Wistar rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zotz, T.G.G. [Escola Politécnica, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Tecnologia em Saúde, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Paraná, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Paula, J.B. de [Médico,Doutor em Engenharia Biomédica, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Moser, A.D.L. [Escola Politécnica, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Tecnologia em Saúde, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Paraná, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2012-04-05

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) is a metaplastic biological process in which there is newly formed bone in soft tissues adjacent to large joints, resulting in joint mobility deficit. In order to determine which treatment techniques are more appropriate for such condition, experimental models of induced heterotopic bone formation have been proposed using heterologous demineralized bone matrix implants and bone morphogenetic protein and other tissues. The objective of the present experimental study was to identify a reliable protocol to induce HO in Wistar rats, based on autologous bone marrow (BM) implantation, comparing 3 different BM volumes and based on literature evidence of this HO induction model in larger laboratory animals. Twelve male Wistar albino rats weighing 350/390 g were used. The animals were anesthetized for blood sampling before HO induction in order to quantify serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP). HO was induced by BM implantation in both quadriceps muscles of these animals, experimental group (EG). Thirty-five days after the induction, another blood sample was collected for ALP determination. The results showed a weight gain in the EG and no significant difference in ALP levels when comparing the periods before and after induction. Qualitative histological analysis confirmed the occurrence of heterotopic ossification in all 12 EG rats. In conclusion, the HO induction model was effective when 0.35 mL autologous BM was applied to the quadriceps of Wistar rats.

  9. A rat model of temporomandibular joint pain with histopathologic modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoll, Steven B; Hee, Christopher K; Davis, Martin B; Winkelstein, Beth A

    2010-01-01

    To develop a rat model of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain and to characterize in it the development and temporal response of behavioral hypersensitivity as well as to evaluate if and to what extent a loading protocol is associated with histological changes in the TMJ consistent with osteoarthritic pathology. A novel rat model of TMJ pain was developed using a noninvasive, mechanical loading protocol. Rats were exposed to steady mouth-opening for 7 days (2 N force, 1 hour/day), and mechanical hyperalgesia (increased pain response) was measured during the loading period and for 14 days thereafter. Histological modifications in the joint cartilage were also evaluated. Outcomes for the mouth-opening exposure were compared to age-matched controls. Thresholds for evoking responses were compared using a ranked ANOVA with repeated measures. Increased mechanical hypersensitivity in the temporomandibular region developed during daily loading and persisted even after the termination of the loading protocol. Histologic characterization revealed thinning of the cartilaginous structures of the joint and irregular zonal cellular arrangements in the condylar cartilage of rats subjected to the daily loading protocol. The injury model presented here is the first to demonstrate mechanically-induced behavioral hypersensitivity accompanied by osteoarthritic pathology in the TMJ.

  10. A rat model of pulmonary infection after cardiac transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Yu, Weiyong; Lu, Chen; Zhan, Yanxia; Cheng, Yunfeng; Mei, Yunqing

    2015-04-01

    Cardiac allograft rejection and infection are leading causes of morbidity and mortality after transplant. The lack of an animal model has hindered related research. We have developed a rat model of pulmonary infection after cardiac transplant to address this issue. Lewis rats received Wistar rat heart allografts, cardiac rejection was induced by cessation of cyclosporine injection, and pulmonary infection was induced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa intrabronchial inoculation. Development of pulmonary infection and/or heart rejection was assessed by histopathology. Histopathologic findings showed that a dose of 2 × 108 colony forming units of Pseudomonas aeruginosa intrabronchial inoculation is sufficient to cause severe pneumonia without being lethal to transplanted animals. Daily administration of 10 mg/kg of cyclosporine reliably suppressed rejection, and withdrawal for 7 days can obtain a consistent International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation 3R rejection. The current study represents a simple and effective rat model of pulmonary infection along, or in combination, with rejection after heart transplant, which can be used for research of infection-rejection in cardiac transplant settings.

  11. Application of Firefly Algorithm in Voltage Stability Environment Incorporating Circuit Element Model of SSSC with Variable Susceptance Model of SVC

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    Luke Jebaraj

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an application of firefly algorithm (FA based extended voltage stability margin and minimization of active (or real power loss incorporating Series-Shunt flexible AC transmission system (FACTS controller named as static synchronous series compensator (SSSC combined with static var compensator (SVC. A circuit model of SSSC and variable susceptance model of SVC are utilized to control the line power flows and bus voltage magnitudes, respectively, for real power loss minimization and voltage stability limit improvement. The line quality proximity index (LQP is used to assess the voltage stability of a power system. The values of voltage profile improvement, real power loss minimization, and the location and size of FACTS devices were optimized by FA. The results are obtained from the IEEE 14- and 30-bus test case systems under different operating conditions and compared with other leading evolutionary techniques such as shuffled frog leaping algorithm (SFLA, differential evolution (DE and particle swarm optimization (PSO.

  12. Groove model of tibia‐femoral osteoarthritis in the rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Visser, Huub M.; Weinans, Harrie; Coeleveld, Katja; van Rijen, Mattie H. P.; Lafeber, Floris P. J. G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Several experimental models of osteoarthritis in rats are used to study the pathophysiology of osteoarthritis. Many mechanically induced models have the limitation that permanent joint instability is induced by, for example, ligament transection or meniscal damage. This permanent instability will counteract the potential beneficial effects of therapy. The groove model of osteoarthritis uses a one‐time trigger, surgically induced cartilage damage on the femoral condyles, and has been validated for the canine tibia‐femoral compartment. The present study evaluates this model for the rat knee joint. The articular cartilage of the weight bearing surface of both femoral condyles and trochlea were damaged (grooved) without damaging the underlying subchondral bone. Severity of joint degeneration was histologically assessed, in addition to patella cartilage damage, and subchondral bone characteristics by means of (contrast‐enhanced) micro‐CT. Mild histological degeneration of the surgically untouched tibial plateau cartilage was observed in addition to damage of the femoral condyles, without clear synovial tissue inflammation. Contrast enhanced micro‐CT demonstrated proteoglycan loss of the surgically untouched patella cartilage. Besides, a more sclerotic structure of the subchondral bone was observed. The tibia‐femoral groove model in a rat results in mild knee joint degeneration, without permanent joint instability and joint inflammation. This makes the rat groove model a useful model to study the onset and progression of post‐traumatic non‐inflammatory osteoarthritis, creating a relatively sensitive model to study disease modifying osteoarthritic drugs. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Orthopaedic Research published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the Orthopaedic Research Society. J Orthop Res 35:496–505, 2017. PMID:27183198

  13. Gut Microbiota in a Rat Oral Sensitization Model: Effect of a Cocoa-Enriched Diet.

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    Camps-Bossacoma, Mariona; Pérez-Cano, Francisco J; Franch, Àngels; Castell, Margarida

    2017-01-01

    Increasing evidence is emerging suggesting a relation between dietary compounds, microbiota, and the susceptibility to allergic diseases, particularly food allergy. Cocoa, a source of antioxidant polyphenols, has shown effects on gut microbiota and the ability to promote tolerance in an oral sensitization model. Taking these facts into consideration, the aim of the present study was to establish the influence of an oral sensitization model, both alone and together with a cocoa-enriched diet, on gut microbiota. Lewis rats were orally sensitized and fed with either a standard or 10% cocoa diet. Faecal microbiota was analysed through metagenomics study. Intestinal IgA concentration was also determined. Oral sensitization produced few changes in intestinal microbiota, but in those rats fed a cocoa diet significant modifications appeared. Decreased bacteria from the Firmicutes and Proteobacteria phyla and a higher percentage of bacteria belonging to the Tenericutes and Cyanobacteria phyla were observed. In conclusion, a cocoa diet is able to modify the microbiota bacterial pattern in orally sensitized animals. As cocoa inhibits the synthesis of specific antibodies and also intestinal IgA, those changes in microbiota pattern, particularly those of the Proteobacteria phylum, might be partially responsible for the tolerogenic effect of cocoa.

  14. Gut Microbiota in a Rat Oral Sensitization Model: Effect of a Cocoa-Enriched Diet

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    Mariona Camps-Bossacoma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence is emerging suggesting a relation between dietary compounds, microbiota, and the susceptibility to allergic diseases, particularly food allergy. Cocoa, a source of antioxidant polyphenols, has shown effects on gut microbiota and the ability to promote tolerance in an oral sensitization model. Taking these facts into consideration, the aim of the present study was to establish the influence of an oral sensitization model, both alone and together with a cocoa-enriched diet, on gut microbiota. Lewis rats were orally sensitized and fed with either a standard or 10% cocoa diet. Faecal microbiota was analysed through metagenomics study. Intestinal IgA concentration was also determined. Oral sensitization produced few changes in intestinal microbiota, but in those rats fed a cocoa diet significant modifications appeared. Decreased bacteria from the Firmicutes and Proteobacteria phyla and a higher percentage of bacteria belonging to the Tenericutes and Cyanobacteria phyla were observed. In conclusion, a cocoa diet is able to modify the microbiota bacterial pattern in orally sensitized animals. As cocoa inhibits the synthesis of specific antibodies and also intestinal IgA, those changes in microbiota pattern, particularly those of the Proteobacteria phylum, might be partially responsible for the tolerogenic effect of cocoa.

  15. Proteochemometric modeling of the susceptibility of mutated variants of the HIV-1 virus to reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

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    Muhammad Junaid

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Reverse transcriptase is a major drug target in highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART against HIV, which typically comprises two nucleoside/nucleotide analog reverse transcriptase (RT inhibitors (NRTIs in combination with a non-nucleoside RT inhibitor or a protease inhibitor. Unfortunately, HIV is capable of escaping the therapy by mutating into drug-resistant variants. Computational models that correlate HIV drug susceptibilities to the virus genotype and to drug molecular properties might facilitate selection of improved combination treatment regimens. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We applied our earlier developed proteochemometric modeling technology to analyze HIV mutant susceptibility to the eight clinically approved NRTIs. The data set used covered 728 virus variants genotyped for 240 sequence residues of the DNA polymerase domain of the RT; 165 of these residues contained mutations; totally the data-set covered susceptibility data for 4,495 inhibitor-RT combinations. Inhibitors and RT sequences were represented numerically by 3D-structural and physicochemical property descriptors, respectively. The two sets of descriptors and their derived cross-terms were correlated to the susceptibility data by partial least-squares projections to latent structures. The model identified more than ten frequently occurring mutations, each conferring more than two-fold loss of susceptibility for one or several NRTIs. The most deleterious mutations were K65R, Q151M, M184V/I, and T215Y/F, each of them decreasing susceptibility to most of the NRTIs. The predictive ability of the model was estimated by cross-validation and by external predictions for new HIV variants; both procedures showed very high correlation between the predicted and actual susceptibility values (Q2=0.89 and Q2ext=0.86. The model is available at www.hivdrc.org as a free web service for the prediction of the susceptibility to any of the clinically used NRTIs for any HIV

  16. An Age-Dependent Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Model for the Organophosphorus Insecticide Chlorpyrifos in the Preweanling Rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timchalk, Chuck; Kousba, Ahmed A.; Poet, Torka S.

    2007-08-01

    Juvenile rats are more susceptible than adults to the acute toxicity of organophosphorus insecticides like chlorpyrifos (CPF). Age- and dose-dependent differences in metabolism may be responsible. Of importance is CYP450 activation and detoxification of CPF to chlorpyrifos-oxon (CPF-oxon) and trichloropyridinol (TCP), as well as B-esterase (cholinesterase; ChE) and A-esterase (PON-1) detoxification of CPF-oxon to TCP. In the current study, a modified physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) model incorporating age-dependent changes in CYP450, PON-1, and tissue ChE levels for rats was developed. In this model, age was used as a dependent function to estimate body weight which was then used to allometrically scale both metabolism and tissue ChE levels. Model simulations suggest that preweanling rats are particularly sensitive to CPF toxicity, with levels of CPF-oxon in blood and brain disproportionately increasing, relative to the response in adult rats. This age-dependent non-linear increase in CPF-oxon concentration may potentially result from the depletion of non-target B-esterases, and a lower PON-1 metabolic capacity in younger animals. These results indicate that the PBPK/PD model behaves consistently with the general understanding of CPF toxicity, pharmacokinetics and tissue ChE inhibition in neonatal and adult rats. Hence, this model represents an important starting point for developing a computational model to assess the neurotoxic potential of environmentally relevant organophosphate exposures in infants and children.

  17. Signal attenuation as a rat model of obsessive compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goltseker, Koral; Yankelevitch-Yahav, Roni; Albelda, Noa S; Joel, Daphna

    2015-01-09

    In the signal attenuation rat model of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), lever-pressing for food is followed by the presentation of a compound stimulus which serves as a feedback cue. This feedback is later attenuated by repeated presentations of the stimulus without food (without the rat emitting the lever-press response). In the next stage, lever-pressing is assessed under extinction conditions (i.e., no food is delivered). At this stage rats display two types of lever-presses, those that are followed by an attempt to collect a reward, and those that are not. The latter are the measure of compulsive-like behavior in the model. A control procedure in which rats do not experience the attenuation of the feedback cue serves to distinguish between the effects of signal attenuation and of extinction. The signal attenuation model is a highly validated model of OCD and differentiates between compulsive-like behaviors and behaviors that are repetitive but not compulsive. In addition the measures collected during the procedure eliminate alternative explanations for differences between the groups being tested, and are quantitative, unbiased and unaffected by inter-experimenter variability. The major disadvantages of this model are the costly equipment, the fact that it requires some technical know-how and the fact that it is time-consuming compared to other models of OCD (11 days). The model may be used for detecting the anti- or pro-compulsive effects of pharmacological and non-pharmacological manipulations and for studying the neural substrate of compulsive behavior.

  18. Acoustic noise improves motor learning in spontaneously hypertensive rats, a rat model of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderlund, Göran B W; Eckernäs, Daniel; Holmblad, Olof; Bergquist, Filip

    2015-03-01

    The spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rat model of ADHD displays impaired motor learning. We used this characteristic to study if the recently described acoustic noise benefit in learning in children with ADHD is also observed in the SH rat model. SH rats and a Wistar control strain were trained in skilled reach and rotarod running under either ambient noise or in 75 dBA white noise. In other animals the effect of methylphenidate (MPH) on motor learning was assessed with the same paradigms. To determine if acoustic noise influenced spontaneous motor activity, the effect of acoustic noise was also determined in the open field activity paradigm. We confirm impaired motor learning in the SH rat compared to Wistar SCA controls. Acoustic noise restored motor learning in SH rats learning the Montoya reach test and the rotarod test, but had no influence on learning in Wistar rats. Noise had no effect on open field activity in SH rats, but increased corner time in Wistar. MPH completely restored rotarod learning and performance but did not improve skilled reach in the SH rat. It is suggested that the acoustic noise benefit previously reported in children with ADHD is shared by the SH rat model of ADHD, and the effect is in the same range as that of stimulant treatment. Acoustic noise may be useful as a non-pharmacological alternative to stimulant medication in the treatment of ADHD. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A comparative assessment of decision trees algorithms for flash flood susceptibility modeling at Haraz watershed, northern Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosravi, Khabat; Pham, Binh Thai; Chapi, Kamran; Shirzadi, Ataollah; Shahabi, Himan; Revhaug, Inge; Prakash, Indra; Tien Bui, Dieu

    2018-02-01

    Floods are one of the most damaging natural hazards causing huge loss of property, infrastructure and lives. Prediction of occurrence of flash flood locations is very difficult due to sudden change in climatic condition and manmade factors. However, prior identification of flood susceptible areas can be done with the help of machine learning techniques for proper timely management of flood hazards. In this study, we tested four decision trees based machine learning models namely Logistic Model Trees (LMT), Reduced Error Pruning Trees (REPT), Naïve Bayes Trees (NBT), and Alternating Decision Trees (ADT) for flash flood susceptibility mapping at the Haraz Watershed in the northern part of Iran. For this, a spatial database was constructed with 201 present and past flood locations and eleven flood-influencing factors namely ground slope, altitude, curvature, Stream Power Index (SPI), Topographic Wetness Index (TWI), land use, rainfall, river density, distance from river, lithology, and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). Statistical evaluation measures, the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve, and Freidman and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used to validate and compare the prediction capability of the models. Results show that the ADT model has the highest prediction capability for flash flood susceptibility assessment, followed by the NBT, the LMT, and the REPT, respectively. These techniques have proven successful in quickly determining flood susceptible areas. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. GIS-based landslide susceptibility mapping models applied to natural and urban planning in Trikala, Central Greece

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bathrellos, G. D.; Kalivas, D. P.; Skilodimou, H. D.

    2009-07-01

    Landslide susceptibility mapping is a practical tool in natural and urban planning; it can be applied for determining land use zones, in construction design and planning of a variety of projects. In this study, two different GIS based landslide susceptibility maps were generated in the mountainous part of the Trikala Prefecture in Thessaly, Central Greece. This was accomplished by using different methods for correlating factors, which have an effect on landslide occurrences. The instability factors taken into account were: lithology, tectonic features, slope gradients, road network, drainage network, land use and rainfall. A frequency distribution of the half number of the landslide events of the study area in each class of the instability factors was performed in order to rate the classes. Two models have been used to combine the instability factors and assess the overall landslide susceptibility, namely: the Weight Factor Model (WeF), which is a statistical method, and the Multiple Factor Model (MuF) that is a logical method. The produced maps were classified into four zones: Low, Moderate, High and Very High susceptible zones and validated using the other half number of the landslide events of the area. Evaluation of the results is optimized through a Landslide Models Indicator (La.M.I.). (Author) 36 refs.

  1. Validation of a region-wide model of landslide susceptibility in the Manawatu Wanganui region of New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dymond, John R.; Ausseil, Anne-Gaelle; Shepherd, James D.; Buettner, Lars

    2006-03-01

    Since European settlement 160 years ago, much of the indigenous forest in New Zealand hill country has been cleared for pastoral agriculture, resulting in increased erosion and sedimentation. To prioritise soil conservation work in the Manawatu-Wanganui region, we developed a model of landslide susceptibility. It assigns high susceptibility to steep land not protected by woody vegetation and low susceptibility everywhere else, following the commonly used approach for identifying inappropriate land use. A major storm on 15-16 February 2004 that produced many landslides was used to validate the model. The model predicted hills at risk to landsliding with moderate accuracy: 58% of erosion scars in the February storm occurred on hillsides considered to be susceptible. The model concept of slope thresholds, above which the probability of landsliding is high and below which the probability is low, is not adequate because below 30° the probability of landsliding is approximately linearly related to slope. Thus, reforestation of steep slopes will need to be combined with improved vegetation management for soil conservation on moderate slopes to significantly reduce future landsliding.

  2. Azithromycin reduces inflammation in a rat model of acute conjunctivitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Robredo, Patricia; Recalde, Sergio; Moreno-Orduña, Maite; García-García, Laura; Zarranz-Ventura, Javier; García-Layana, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Macrolide antibiotics are known to have various anti-inflammatory effects in addition to their antimicrobial activity, but the mechanisms are still unclear. The effect of azithromycin on inflammatory molecules in the lipopolysaccharide-induced rat conjunctivitis model was investigated. Methods Twenty-four Wistar rats were divided into two groups receiving topical ocular azithromycin (15 mg/g) or vehicle. In total, six doses (25 µl) were administered as one dose twice a day for three days before subconjunctival lipopolysaccharide injection (3 mg/ml). Before the rats were euthanized, mucus secretion, conjunctival and palpebral edema and redness were evaluated. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to determine gene expression for interleukin-6, cyclooxygenase-2, tumor necrosis factor-α, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, and MMP-9. Interleukin-6 was determined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, nuclear factor-kappa B with western blot, and MMP-2 activity with gelatin zymogram. Four eyes per group were processed for histology and subsequent periodic acid-Schiff staining and CD68 for immunofluorescence. The Student t test or the Wilcoxon test for independent samples was applied (SPSS v.15.0). Results Azithromycin-treated animals showed a significant reduction in all clinical signs (pazithromycin group (p=0.063). Mucus secretion by goblet cells and the macrophage count in conjunctival tissue were also decreased in the azithromycin group (pazithromycin administration ameliorates induced inflammation effects in a rat model of acute conjunctivitis. PMID:23378729

  3. Shaofu Zhuyu Decoction Regresses Endometriotic Lesions in a Rat Model

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    Guanghui Zhu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The current therapies for endometriosis are restricted by various side effects and treatment outcome has been less than satisfactory. Shaofu Zhuyu Decoction (SZD, a classic traditional Chinese medicinal (TCM prescription for dysmenorrhea, has been widely used in clinical practice by TCM doctors to relieve symptoms of endometriosis. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of SZD on a rat model of endometriosis. Forty-eight female Sprague-Dawley rats with regular estrous cycles went through autotransplantation operation to establish endometriosis model. Then 38 rats with successful ectopic implants were randomized into two groups: vehicle- and SZD-treated groups. The latter were administered SZD through oral gavage for 4 weeks. By the end of the treatment period, the volume of the endometriotic lesions was measured, the histopathological properties of the ectopic endometrium were evaluated, and levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, CD34, and hypoxia inducible factor- (HIF- 1α in the ectopic endometrium were detected with immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, apoptosis was assessed using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT deoxyuridine 5′-triphosphate (dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL assay. In this study, SZD significantly reduced the size of ectopic lesions in rats with endometriosis, inhibited cell proliferation, increased cell apoptosis, and reduced microvessel density and HIF-1α expression. It suggested that SZD could be an effective therapy for the treatment and prevention of endometriosis recurrence.

  4. Rat tail revascularization model for advanced microsurgery training and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakrak, Tamer; Köse, A Aydan; Karabağli, Yakup; Koçman, A Emre; Ozbayoğlu, A Ceyla; Cetįn, Cengiz

    2011-09-01

    We describe a time-saving microsurgical exercise for continuing microsurgical training and research. The rat tail replantation model was simplified by excluding bone detachment. Rats were divided into two groups: devascularization only ( N = 3) and revascularization after devascularization ( N = 7). The tail was devascularized by ligation and division of artery and veins in the first group to reveal if a collateral circulation from bone existed. The divided vessels were reanastomosed in the second group. The circulation of the rat tails was followed for 1 week. The tails showed total necrosis in the devascularization group, whereas only two of seven tails showed partial necrosis in the revascularization group. Reexploration showed thrombosis narrowing the lumen at the anastomotic site of the partially necrosed tails, most likely due to an anastomotic insufficiency. The present study revealed that total amputation is not necessary for tail devascularization. The rat tail revascularization model provides a practical tool for advanced and continuing microsurgical training and research. © Thieme Medical Publishers.

  5. Genetic analysis of inherited hydrocephalus in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Hazel C; Yehia, Baligh; Chen, Gin-Fu; Carter, Barbara J

    2004-11-01

    Congenital hydrocephalus is a serious neurological disorder with a diverse etiology. Although there is strong evidence for genetic causes, few genes have been identified in humans. The rodent model, the H-Tx rat, has hydrocephalus with an onset in late gestation and a complex mode of inheritance. Ventricular dilatation is associated with abnormalities in the cerebral aqueduct and subcommissural organ. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping was performed on DNA from the progeny of a backcross with the non-hydrocephalic Fischer F344 strain, using DNA microsatellite markers. The hydrocephalus trait was quantified by measuring the severity of the ventricular dilatation. Four chromosomes, each with a locus for hydrocephalus (Chrs 9, 10, 11, and 17), were mapped using additional markers and DNA from four subsets of backcross progeny with allelic recombination at or near each locus. The genetic positions for the markers and the loci were located using the Ensemble Rat Genome Browser. For each chromosome studied, the interval containing the locus was examined for known rat genes and for human genes identified from human-rat homology. Genes expressed in brain and with a function associated with known causes of hydrocephalus were identified as possible candidate genes. Future studies to characterize the causative genes in this animal model will improve the understanding of genetic causes in humans.

  6. Experimental model of distraction osteogenesis in edentulous rats

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    Maria Montserrat Pujadas Bigi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Distraction osteogenesis (DO is a surgical technique producing bone lengthening by distraction of the fracture callus. Although a large number of experimental studies on the events associated with DO of craniofacial skeleton have been reported, the few employing rat mandibular bone DO used complicated designs and produced a small volume of newly formed bone. Thus, this study aims to present an original experimental model of mandibular DO in edentulous rats that produces a sufficient quantity and quality of intramembranous bone. Eight male Wistar rats, weighing 75 g, underwent extraction of lower molars. With rats weighing 350 g, right mandibular osteotomy was performed and the distraction device was placed. The distraction device was custom made using micro-implants, expansion screws, and acrylic resin. Study protocol: latency: 6 days, distraction: ¼ turn (0.175 mm once a day during 6 d, consolidation: 28 d after distraction phase, sacrifice. DO-treated and contralateral hemimandibles were dissected and compared macroscopically and using radiographic studies. Histological sections were obtained and stained with H&E. A distraction gap filled with newly formed and mature bone tissue was obtained. This model of mandibular DO proved useful to obtain adequate quantity and quality of bone to study bone regeneration.

  7. Characterization of a frozen shoulder model using immobilization in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Du Hwan; Lee, Kil-Ho; Lho, Yun-Mee; Ha, Eunyoung; Hwang, Ilseon; Song, Kwang-Soon; Cho, Chul-Hyun

    2016-12-08

    The objective of this study was to investigate serial changes for histology of joint capsule and range of motion of the glenohumeral joint after immobilization in rats. We hypothesized that a rat shoulder contracture model using immobilization would be capable of producing effects on the glenohumeral joint similar to those seen in patients with frozen shoulder. Sixty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into one control group (n = 8) and seven immobilization groups (n = 8 per group) that were immobilized with molding plaster for 3 days, or for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, or 6 weeks. At each time point, eight rats were euthanized for histologic evaluation of the axillary recess and for measurement of the abduction angle. Infiltration of inflammatory cells was found in the synovial tissue until 2 weeks after immobilization. However, inflammatory cells were diminished and fibrosis was dominantly observed in the synovium and subsynovial tissue 3 weeks after immobilization. From 1 week after immobilization, the abduction angle of all immobilization groups at each time point was significantly lower than that of the control group. Our study demonstrated that a rat frozen shoulder model using immobilization generates the pathophysiologic process of inflammation leading to fibrosis on the glenohumeral joint similar to that seen in patients with frozen shoulder. This model was attained within 3 weeks after immobilization. It may serve as a useful tool to investigate pathogenesis at the molecular level and identify potential target genes that are involved in the development of frozen shoulder.

  8. Ranking candidate genes in rat models of type 2 diabetes

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    Ståhl Fredrik

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rat models are frequently used to find genomic regions that contribute to complex diseases, so called quantitative trait loci (QTLs. In general, the genomic regions found to be associated with a quantitative trait are rather large, covering hundreds of genes. To help selecting appropriate candidate genes from QTLs associated with type 2 diabetes models in rat, we have developed a web tool called Candidate Gene Capture (CGC, specifically adopted for this disorder. Methods CGC combines diabetes-related genomic regions in rat with rat/human homology data, textual descriptions of gene effects and an array of 789 keywords. Each keyword is assigned values that reflect its co-occurrence with 24 different reference terms describing sub-phenotypes of type 2 diabetes (for example "insulin resistance". The genes are then ranked based on the occurrences of keywords in the describing texts. Results CGC includes QTLs from type 2 diabetes models in rat. When comparing gene rankings from CGC based on one sub-phenotype, with manual gene ratings for four QTLs, very similar results were obtained. In total, 24 different sub-phenotypes are available as reference terms in the application and based on differences in gene ranking, they fall into separate clusters. Conclusion The very good agreement between the CGC gene ranking and the manual rating confirms that CGC is as a reliable tool for interpreting textual information. This, together with the possibility to select many different sub-phenotypes, makes CGC a versatile tool for finding candidate genes. CGC is publicly available at http://ratmap.org/CGC.

  9. Combating Combination of Hypertension and Diabetes in Different Rat Models

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    Talma Rosenthal

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Rat experimental models are used extensively for studying physiological mechanisms and treatments of hypertension and diabetes co-existence. Each one of these conditions is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD, and the combination of the two conditions is a potent enhancer of CVD. Five major animal models that advanced our understanding of the mechanisms and therapeutic approaches in humans are discussed in this review: Zucker, Goto-Kakizaki, SHROB, SHR/NDmcr-cp and Cohen Rosenthal diabetic hypertensive (CRDH rats. The use of various drugs, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors (ACEIs, various angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs, and calcium channel blockers (CCBs, to combat the effects of concomitant pathologies on the combination of diabetes and hypertension, as well as the non-pharmacological approach are reviewed in detail for each rat model. Results from experiments on these models indicate that classical factors contributing to the pathology of hypertension and diabetes combination—Including hypertension, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia and hyperlipidemia—can now be treated, although these treatments do not completely prevent renal complications. Animal studies have focused on several mechanisms involved in hypertension/diabetes that remain to be translated into clinical medicine, including hypoxia, oxidative stress, and advanced glycation. Several target molecules have been identified that need to be incorporated into a treatment modality. The challenge continues to be the identification and interpretation of the clinical evidence from the animal models and their application to human treatment.

  10. Drug-seeking motivation level in male rats determines offspring susceptibility or resistance to cocaine-seeking behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Le, Qiumin; Yan, Biao; Yu, Xiangchen; Li, Yanqing; Song, Haikun; Zhu, Huiwen; Hou, Weiqing; Ma, Dingailu; Wu, Feizhen; Zhou, Yuqing; Ma, Lan

    2017-01-01

    Liability to develop drug addiction is heritable, but the precise contribution of non-Mendelian factors is not well understood. Here we separate male rats into addiction-like and non-addiction-like groups, based on their incentive motivation to seek cocaine. We find that the high incentive responding of the F0 generation could be transmitted to F1 and F2 generations. Moreover, the inheritance of high incentive response to cocaine is contingent on high motivation, as it is elicited by voluntar...

  11. Sample size matters: Investigating the optimal sample size for a logistic regression debris flow susceptibility model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckmann, Tobias; Gegg, Katharina; Becht, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Statistical approaches to landslide susceptibility modelling on the catchment and regional scale are used very frequently compared to heuristic and physically based approaches. In the present study, we deal with the problem of the optimal sample size for a logistic regression model. More specifically, a stepwise approach has been chosen in order to select those independent variables (from a number of derivatives of a digital elevation model and landcover data) that explain best the spatial distribution of debris flow initiation zones in two neighbouring central alpine catchments in Austria (used mutually for model calculation and validation). In order to minimise problems arising from spatial autocorrelation, we sample a single raster cell from each debris flow initiation zone within an inventory. In addition, as suggested by previous work using the "rare events logistic regression" approach, we take a sample of the remaining "non-event" raster cells. The recommendations given in the literature on the size of this sample appear to be motivated by practical considerations, e.g. the time and cost of acquiring data for non-event cases, which do not apply to the case of spatial data. In our study, we aim at finding empirically an "optimal" sample size in order to avoid two problems: First, a sample too large will violate the independent sample assumption as the independent variables are spatially autocorrelated; hence, a variogram analysis leads to a sample size threshold above which the average distance between sampled cells falls below the autocorrelation range of the independent variables. Second, if the sample is too small, repeated sampling will lead to very different results, i.e. the independent variables and hence the result of a single model calculation will be extremely dependent on the choice of non-event cells. Using a Monte-Carlo analysis with stepwise logistic regression, 1000 models are calculated for a wide range of sample sizes. For each sample size

  12. Particulate matter inhalation exacerbates cardiopulmonary injury in a rat model of isoproterenol-induced cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambient particulate matter (PM) exposure is linked to cardiovascular events and death, especially among individuals with heart disease. A model of toxic cardiomyopathy was developed in Spontaneously Hypertensive Heart Failure (SHHF) rats to explore potential mechanisms. Rats were...

  13. Increased susceptibility to otitis media in a Splunc1-deficient mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Jennifer A.; Meyerholz, David K.; Wohlford-Lenane, Christine L.; Naumann, Paul W.; Salzman, Nita H.; McCray, Paul B.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Otitis media (inflammation of the middle ear) is one of the most common diseases of early childhood. Susceptibility to otitis is influenced by a number of factors, including the actions of innate immune molecules secreted by the epithelia lining the nasopharynx, middle ear and Eustachian tube. The SPLUNC1 (short palate, lung, nasal epithelial clone 1) protein is a highly abundant secretory product of the mammalian nasal, oral and respiratory mucosa that is thought to play a multifunctional role in host defense. In this study we investigated Splunc1 expression in the ear of the mouse, and examined whether this protein contributes to overall host defense in the middle ear and/or Eustachian tube. We found that Splunc1 is highly expressed in both the surface epithelium and in submucosal glands in these regions in wild-type mice. In mice lacking Splunc1, we noted histologically an increased frequency of otitis media, characterized by the accumulation of leukocytes (neutrophils with scattered macrophages), proteinaceous fluid and mucus in the middle ear lumens. Furthermore, many of these mice had extensive remodeling of the middle ear wall, suggesting a chronic course of disease. From these observations, we conclude that loss of Splunc1 predisposes mice to the development of otitis media. The Splunc1−/− mouse model should help investigators to better understand both the biological role of Splunc1 as well as host defense mechanisms in the middle ear. PMID:25765466

  14. Susceptibility of zebrafish (Danio rerio) to a model pathogen, spring viremia of carp virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, George E.; Batts, William N.; Winton, James R.

    2003-01-01

    To improve our understanding of the genetic basis of fish disease, we developed a pathogen model, using zebrafish (Danio rerio) and spring virema of carp virus (SVCV). Replicate groups of 10 fish were acclimated to 20 or 24°C, then were exposed to SVCV concentrations of 103 to 105 plaque-forming units per milliliter (PFU/ml) of water and observed daily. In a second trial, fish were acclimated to 15°C, and replicate groups of 10 fish were exposed to SVCV at a concentration of 105 PFU/ml; however, the temperature was raised 1°C/wk. Moribund fish were collected for histologic examination, and dead fish were assayed for virus by use of cell culture and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. Mortality exceeded 50% in fish exposed to 105 PFU of SVCV/ml at the lower temperatures. Clinical signs of disease became evident seven days after viral exposure and were observed most consistently in fish of the 105 PFU/ml groups. Affected zebrafish were anorectic and listless, with epidermal petechial hemorrhages followed by death. Use of plaque assays and RT-PCR analysis confirmed presence of SVCV at titers ≥ 104 PFU/g of tissue. Histologic lesions included multifocal brachial necrosis and melanomacrophage proliferation in gills, liver, and kidneys. These results indicate that zebrafish are susceptible to infection by SVCV under conditions that mimic a natural route of exposure.

  15. Increased susceptibility to structural acute kidney injury in a mouse model of presymptomatic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleasant, LaTawnya; Ma, Qing; Devarajan, Mahima; Parameswaran, Priyanka; Drake, Keri; Siroky, Brian; Shay-Winkler, Kritton; Robbins, Jeffrey; Devarajan, Prasad

    2017-09-01

    The early events that signal renal dysfunction in presymptomatic heart failure are unclear. We tested the hypothesis that functional and mechanistic changes occur in the kidney that precede the development of symptomatic heart failure. We employed a transgenic mouse model with cardiomyocyte-specific overexpression of mutant α-B-crystallin that develops slowly progressive cardiomyopathy. Presymptomatic transgenic mice displayed an increase in serum creatinine (1.17 ± 0.34 vs. wild type 0.65 ± 0.16 mg/dl, P kidneys exhibited a twofold upregulation of the Ren1 gene, marked overexpression of renin protein in the tubules, and a worsened response to ischemia-reperfusion injury based on serum creatinine (2.77 ± 0.66 in transgenic mice vs. 2.01 ± 0.58 mg/dl in wild type, P kidney that occur in early presymptomatic heart failure, which increase the susceptibility to subsequent acute kidney injury. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Modified impact of emotion on temporal discrimination in a transgenic rat model of Huntington disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis eFaure

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Huntington’s disease (HD is characterized by triad of motor, cognitive and emotional symptoms along with neuropathology in fronto-striatal circuit and limbic system including amygdala. Emotional alterations, which have a negative impact on patient well-being, represent some of the earliest symptoms of HD and might be related to the onset of the neurodegenerative process. In the transgenic rat model (tgHD rats, evidence suggest emotional alterations at the symptomatic stage along with neuropathology of the central nucleus of amygdala (CE. Studies in humans and animals demonstrate that emotion can modulate time perception. The impact of emotion on time perception has never been tested in HD, nor is it known if that impact could be part of the presymptomatic emotional phenotype of the pathology. The aim of this paper was to characterize the effect of emotion on temporal discrimination in presymptomatic tgHD animals. In the first experiment, we characterized the acute effect of an emotion (fear conditioned stimulus on temporal discrimination using a bisection procedure, and tested its dependency upon an intact central amygdala. The second experiment was aimed at comparing presymptomatic homozygous transgenic animals at 7-months of age and their wild-type littermates (WT in their performance on the modulation of temporal discrimination by emotion. Our principal findings show that (1 a fear cue produces a short-lived decrease of temporal precision after its termination, and (2 animals with medial CE lesion and presymptomatic tgHD animals demonstrate an alteration of this emotion-evoked temporal distortion. The results contribute to our knowledge about the presymptomatic phenotype of this HD rat model, showing susceptibility to emotion that may be related to dysfunction of the central nucleus of amygdala.

  17. Technical Note: Assessing predictive capacity and conditional independence of landslide predisposing factors for shallow landslide susceptibility models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pereira

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to identify the landslide predisposing factors' combination using a bivariate statistical model that best predicts landslide susceptibility. The best model is one that has simultaneously good performance in terms of suitability and predictive power and has been developed using variables that are conditionally independent. The study area is the Santa Marta de Penaguião council (70 km2 located in the Northern Portugal.

    In order to identify the best combination of landslide predisposing factors, all possible combinations using up to seven predisposing factors were performed, which resulted in 120 predictions that were assessed with a landside inventory containing 767 shallow translational slides. The best landslide susceptibility model was selected according to the model degree of fitness and on the basis of a conditional independence criterion. The best model was developed with only three landslide predisposing factors (slope angle, inverse wetness index, and land use and was compared with a model developed using all seven landslide predisposing factors.

    Results showed that it is possible to produce a reliable landslide susceptibility model using fewer landslide predisposing factors, which contributes towards higher conditional independence.

  18. Predictive modeling of freezing and thawing of frost-susceptible soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Frost depth is an essential factor in design of various transportation infrastructures. In frost : susceptible soils, as soils freezes, water migrates through the soil voids below the freezing line : towards the freezing front and causes excessive he...

  19. Models for the magnetic ac susceptibility of granular superferromagnetic CoFe/Al$_2$O$_3$

    OpenAIRE

    Petracic, O.; Glatz, A.; Kleemann, W.

    2004-01-01

    The magnetization and magnetic ac susceptibility, $\\chi = \\chi' - i \\chi''$, of superferromagnetic systems are studied by numerical simulations. The Cole-Cole plot, $\\chi''$ vs. $\\chi'$, is used as a tool for classifying magnetic systems by their dynamical behavior. The simulations of the magnetization hysteresis and the ac susceptibility are performed with two approaches for a driven domain wall in random media. The studies are motivated by recent experimental results on the interacting nano...

  20. Evaluation of two experimental models of hepatic encephalopathy in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.M. García-Moreno

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The serious neuropsychological repercussions of hepatic encephalopathy have led to the creation of several experimental models in order to better understand the pathogenesis of the disease. In the present investigation, two possible causes of hepatic encephalopathy, cholestasis and portal hypertension, were chosen to study the behavioral impairments caused by the disease using an object recognition task. This working memory test is based on a paradigm of spontaneous delayed non-matching to sample and was performed 60 days after surgery. Male Wistar rats (225-250 g were divided into three groups: two experimental groups, microsurgical cholestasis (N = 20 and extrahepatic portal hypertension (N = 20, and a control group (N = 20. A mild alteration of the recognition memory occurred in rats with cholestasis compared to control rats and portal hypertensive rats. The latter group showed the poorest performance on the basis of the behavioral indexes tested. In particular, only the control group spent significantly more time exploring novel objects compared to familiar ones (P < 0.001. In addition, the portal hypertension group spent the shortest time exploring both the novel and familiar objects (P < 0.001. These results suggest that the existence of portosystemic collateral circulation per se may be responsible for subclinical encephalopathy.

  1. Effect of ozone on colon anastomoses in rat peritonitis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çakır, Tuğrul; Aslaner, Arif; Tekeli, Seçkin Özgür; Avcı, Sema; Doğan, Uğur; Tekeli, Feyza; Soylu, Hakan; Akyüz, Cebrail; Koç, Süleyman; Üstünel, İsmail; Yılmaz, Necat

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the effects of medical ozone theraphy on the colon anastomosis of peritonitis model in rats. Eighteen rats were randomly assigned into three equal groups; control, cecal punctuation and colon anastomosis and ozone theraphy. Sepsis was performed with a cecal punctuation in groups 2 and 3. The medical ozone theraphy was administered intraperitonealy for three weeks in group 3 while the other rats received saline injection. At the twenty second day serum were obtained for TNF-α and IL-1β, the colonic burst pressures were measured and colonic tissue samples were obtained for MDA and MPO levels. Histolopatological examination was evaluated with H&E stain, and Ki-67, IL-1β and the VEGF immunostaining densities were also compared. Intraperitoneal ozone administration reversed TNF-α, IL-1β, MDA and MPO levels and the colonic burst pressures. There was also a significant difference at immunostaining densities of histopathological examination. Medical ozone therapy may contribute to tissue healing by affecting the proliferation and the vascularization thus has benefits on colonic anastomosis at peritonitis in rats.

  2. Genetics of hypertensive organ-damage in consomic rat models

    OpenAIRE

    Wendt, Norbert

    2010-01-01

    The clinical importance of hypertension is due to its high prevalence and the resulting hypertensive organ-damage (HOD). Especially salt-sensitive patients tend to develope increased levels of HOD. Aim of this thesis was to investigate the genetic basis of HOD in salt-sensitive hypertension. The salt-sensitive Dahl-rat (SS) was considered a suitable animal-model, which besides severe HOD like left-ventricular hypertrophy with fibrosis-deposition, also developes hypercholesteremia. By expe...

  3. Capsular Contracture In Silicone Breast Implants: Insights From Rat Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VILBERTO J. VIEIRA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Breast augmentation with silicone implants is one of the most common procedures performed by plastic surgeons around the world. Capsular contracture is a frequent complication in breast augmentation and reconstructive surgery, that requires invasive intervention. The inflammatory response to implanted mammary prostheses appears to be directly associated to capsular contracture. This review discusses the evidences from rat models studies, on the role of inflammation and fibrosis in capsular contraction and its relation to silicone breast implants surface.

  4. Drug-seeking motivation level in male rats determines offspring susceptibility or resistance to cocaine-seeking behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Qiumin; Yan, Biao; Yu, Xiangchen; Li, Yanqing; Song, Haikun; Zhu, Huiwen; Hou, Weiqing; Ma, Dingailu; Wu, Feizhen; Zhou, Yuqing; Ma, Lan

    2017-05-30

    Liability to develop drug addiction is heritable, but the precise contribution of non-Mendelian factors is not well understood. Here we separate male rats into addiction-like and non-addiction-like groups, based on their incentive motivation to seek cocaine. We find that the high incentive responding of the F0 generation could be transmitted to F1 and F2 generations. Moreover, the inheritance of high incentive response to cocaine is contingent on high motivation, as it is elicited by voluntary cocaine administration, but not high intake of cocaine itself. We also find DNA methylation differences between sperm of addiction-like and non-addiction-like groups that were maintained from F0 to F1, providing an epigenetic link to transcriptomic changes of addiction-related signalling pathways in the nucleus accumbens of offspring. Our data suggest that highly motivated drug seeking experience may increase vulnerability and/or reduce resistance to drug addiction in descendants.

  5. Duration of treatment and activation of α1-containing GABAA receptors variably affect the level of anxiety and seizure susceptibility after diazepam withdrawal in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovačević, Jovana; Timić, Tamara; Tiruveedhula, Veera V; Batinić, Bojan; Namjoshi, Ojas A; Milić, Marija; Joksimović, Srđan; Cook, James M; Savić, Miroslav M

    2014-05-01

    Long-term use of benzodiazepine-type drugs may lead to physical dependence, manifested by withdrawal syndrome after abrupt cessation of treatment. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of duration of treatment, as well as the role of α1-containing GABAA receptors, in development of physical dependence to diazepam, assessed through the level of anxiety and susceptibility to pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures, 24h after withdrawal from protracted treatment in rats. Withdrawal of 2mg/kg diazepam after 28, but not after 14 or 21 days of administration led to an anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze. Antagonism of the diazepam effects at α1-containing GABAA receptors, achieved by daily administration of the neutral modulator βCCt (5mg/kg), did not affect the anxiety level during withdrawal. An increased susceptibility to PTZ-induced seizures was observed during diazepam withdrawal after 21 and 28 days of treatment. Daily co-administration of βCCt further decreased the PTZ-seizure threshold after 21 days of treatment, whilst it prevented the diazepam withdrawal-elicited decrease of the PTZ threshold after 28 days of treatment. In conclusion, the current study suggests that the role of α1-containing GABAA receptors in mediating the development of physical dependence may vary based on the effect being studied and duration of protracted treatment. Moreover, the present data supports previous findings that the lack of activity at α1-containing GABAA receptors is not sufficient to eliminate physical dependence liability of ligands of the benzodiazepine type. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. High-fat/fructose feeding during prenatal and postnatal development in female rats increases susceptibility to renal and metabolic injury later in life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Elizabeth R; Alexander, Barbara T; Lee, Jonathan; Hutchens, Zachary M; Maric-Bilkan, Christine

    2013-02-15

    Accumulating evidence suggests that both an adverse prenatal and early postnatal environment increase susceptibility to renal and metabolic dysfunction later in life; however, whether exposure to adverse conditions during both prenatal and postnatal development act synergistically to potentiate the severity of renal and metabolic injury remains unknown. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed either a standard diet or a diet high in fat/fructose throughout pregnancy and lactation. After being weaned, female offspring were randomized to either standard diet or the high-fat/high-fructose diet, resulting in the following treatment groups: NF-NF, offspring of mothers fed a standard diet and fed a standard diet postnatally; NF-HF, offspring of mothers fed a standard diet and fed a high-fat/fructose diet postnatally; HF-NF, offspring of mothers fed a high-fat/fructose diet and fed a standard diet postnatally; HF-HF, offspring of mothers fed a high-fat/fructose diet and fed a high-fat/fructose diet postnatally. At the time of euthanasia (17 wk of age), HF-HF offspring weighed 30% more and had 110% more visceral fat than NF-NF offspring. The HF-HF offspring also had elevated blood glucose levels, glucose intolerance, 286% increase in urine albumin excretion, and 60% increase in glomerulosclerosis compared with NF-NF. In addition, HF-HF offspring exhibited a 100% increase in transforming growth factor-β protein expression and 116% increase in the abundance of infiltrated macrophages compared with the NF-NF offspring. These observations suggest that high-fat/fructose feeding during prenatal and throughout postnatal life increases the susceptibility to renal and metabolic injury later in life.

  7. An improved experimental model for peripheral neuropathy in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q.M. Dias

    Full Text Available A modification of the Bennett and Xie chronic constriction injury model of peripheral painful neuropathy was developed in rats. Under tribromoethanol anesthesia, a single ligature with 100% cotton glace thread was placed around the right sciatic nerve proximal to its trifurcation. The change in the hind paw reflex threshold after mechanical stimulation observed with this modified model was compared to the change in threshold observed in rats subjected to the Bennett and Xie or the Kim and Chung spinal ligation models. The mechanical threshold was measured with an automated electronic von Frey apparatus 0, 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, and this threshold was compared to that measured in sham rats. All injury models produced significant hyperalgesia in the operated hind limb. The modified model produced mean ± SD thresholds in g (19.98 ± 3.08, 14.98 ± 1.86, and 13.80 ± 1.00 at 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, respectively similar to those obtained with the spinal ligation model (20.03 ± 1.99, 13.46 ± 2.55, and 12.46 ± 2.38 at 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, respectively, but less variable when compared to the Bennett and Xie model (21.20 ± 8.06, 18.61 ± 7.69, and 18.76 ± 6.46 at 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, respectively. The modified method required less surgical skill than the spinal nerve ligation model.

  8. An improved experimental model for peripheral neuropathy in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, Q.M.; Rossaneis, A.C.; Fais, R.S.; Prado, W.A. [Departamento de Farmacologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2013-03-15

    A modification of the Bennett and Xie chronic constriction injury model of peripheral painful neuropathy was developed in rats. Under tribromoethanol anesthesia, a single ligature with 100% cotton glace thread was placed around the right sciatic nerve proximal to its trifurcation. The change in the hind paw reflex threshold after mechanical stimulation observed with this modified model was compared to the change in threshold observed in rats subjected to the Bennett and Xie or the Kim and Chung spinal ligation models. The mechanical threshold was measured with an automated electronic von Frey apparatus 0, 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, and this threshold was compared to that measured in sham rats. All injury models produced significant hyperalgesia in the operated hind limb. The modified model produced mean ± SD thresholds in g (19.98 ± 3.08, 14.98 ± 1.86, and 13.80 ± 1.00 at 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, respectively) similar to those obtained with the spinal ligation model (20.03 ± 1.99, 13.46 ± 2.55, and 12.46 ± 2.38 at 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, respectively), but less variable when compared to the Bennett and Xie model (21.20 ± 8.06, 18.61 ± 7.69, and 18.76 ± 6.46 at 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, respectively). The modified method required less surgical skill than the spinal nerve ligation model.

  9. Closed-loop seizure control on epileptic rat models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Sheng-Fu; Liao, Yi-Cheng; Shaw, Fu-Zen; Chang, Da-Wei; Young, Chung-Ping; Chiueh, Herming

    2011-08-01

    In this paper numerous alternative treatments in addition to pharmacological therapy are proposed for their use in epileptic patients. Epileptic animal models can play a crucial role in the performance evaluation of new therapeutic techniques. The objective of this research is to first develop various epileptic rat models; second, develop a portable wireless closed-loop seizure controller including on-line seizure detection and real-time electrical stimulation for seizure elimination; and third, apply the developed seizure controller to the animal models to perform on-line seizure elimination. The closed-loop seizure controller was applied to three Long-Evans rats with spontaneous spike-wave discharges (non-convulsive) and three Long-Evans rats with epileptiform activities induced by pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) injection (convulsive) for evaluation. The seizure detection accuracy is greater than 92% (up to 99%), and averaged seizure detection latency is less than 0.6 s for both spontaneous non-convulsive and PTZ-induced convulsive seizures. The average false stimulation rate is 3.1%. Near 30% of PTZ-induced convulsive seizures need more than two times of 0.5 s electrical stimulation for suppression and 90% of the non-convulsive seizures can be suppressed by only one 0.5 s electrical stimulation.

  10. The Fischer 344 rat as a model of presbycusis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syka, Josef

    2010-06-01

    Due to the rising number of the aged human population all over the world, presbycusis is a phenomenon that deserves the increasing attention of the medical community as regards to prevention and treatment. This requires finding appropriate animal models for human presbycusis that will be useful in future experiments. Among the available rat strains, the Fischer 344 (F344) strain promises to serve as a model producing prompt and profound presbycusis. Hearing thresholds begin to increase in this strain during the first year of life; toward the end of the second year, the thresholds are very high. The threshold shifts progress independently in both ears. The rapid deterioration of distortion product otoacoustic emissions, with the majority of outer hair cells (OHC) being present and morphologically intact, is apparently produced by the disruption of prestin. The age-related changes within inner ear function are accompanied by deterioration of acoustical signal processing within central auditory system, mainly due to impaired GABA inhibition. The loss of GABA inhibition in old animals is expressed primarily in the inferior colliculus but is also present in the cochlear nuclei and the auditory cortex. Sound-evoked behavioral reactions are also impaired in old F344 rats. Taken together, the described characteristics of the aging F344 rat auditory system supports the idea that this strain may serve as a suitable model for studying the mechanisms of presbycusis, its prevention and treatment. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Molecular epidemiology of acute leukemia in children: causal model, interaction of three factors-susceptibility, environmental exposure and vulnerability period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejía-Aranguré, Juan Manuel

    Acute leukemias have a huge morphological, cytogenetic and molecular heterogeneity and genetic polymorphisms associated with susceptibility. Every leukemia presents causal factors associated with the development of the disease. Particularly, when three factors are present, they result in the development of acute leukemia. These phenomena are susceptibility, environmental exposure and a period that, for this model, has been called the period of vulnerability. This framework shows how the concepts of molecular epidemiology have established a reference from which it is more feasible to identify the environmental factors associated with the development of leukemia in children. Subsequently, the arguments show that only susceptible children are likely to develop leukemia once exposed to an environmental factor. For additional exposure, if the child is not susceptible to leukemia, the disease does not develop. In addition, this exposure should occur during a time window when hematopoietic cells and their environment are more vulnerable to such interaction, causing the development of leukemia. This model seeks to predict the time when the leukemia develops and attempts to give a context in which the causality of childhood leukemia should be studied. This information can influence and reduce the risk of a child developing leukemia. Copyright © 2016 Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  12. Flash flood susceptibility analysis and its mapping using different bivariate models in Iran: a comparison between Shannon's entropy, statistical index, and weighting factor models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosravi, Khabat; Pourghasemi, Hamid Reza; Chapi, Kamran; Bahri, Masoumeh

    2016-12-01

    Flooding is a very common worldwide natural hazard causing large-scale casualties every year; Iran is not immune to this thread as well. Comprehensive flood susceptibility mapping is very important to reduce losses of lives and properties. Thus, the aim of this study is to map susceptibility to flooding by different bivariate statistical methods including Shannon's entropy (SE), statistical index (SI), and weighting factor (Wf). In this regard, model performance evaluation is also carried out in Haraz Watershed, Mazandaran Province, Iran. In the first step, 211 flood locations were identified by the documentary sources and field inventories, of which 70% (151 positions) were used for flood susceptibility modeling and 30% (60 positions) for evaluation and verification of the model. In the second step, ten influential factors in flooding were chosen, namely slope angle, plan curvature, altitude, topographic wetness index (TWI), stream power index (SPI), distance from river, rainfall, geology, land use, and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). In the next step, flood susceptibility maps were prepared by these four methods in ArcGIS. As the last step, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was drawn and the area under the curve (AUC) was calculated for quantitative assessment of each model. The results showed that the best model to estimate the susceptibility to flooding in Haraz Watershed was SI model with the prediction and success rates of 99.71 and 98.72%, respectively, followed by Wf and SE models with the AUC values of 98.1 and 96.57% for the success rate, and 97.6 and 92.42% for the prediction rate, respectively. In the SI and Wf models, the highest and lowest important parameters were the distance from river and geology. Flood susceptibility maps are informative for managers and decision makers in Haraz Watershed in order to contemplate measures to reduce human and financial losses.

  13. A rat model for embolic encephalitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Lærke Boye; Agerholm, Jørgen Steen; Aalbæk, Bent

    2011-01-01

    gain access to the brain by the circulation and, no foreign materials other than bacteria are implated in the brain. This ensures high face-validity and high construct-validity of the model for three reasons: 1) Cerebral infarction by thrombosis or disseminated intravascular coagulation is a key...

  14. High intake of palatable food predicts binge-eating independent of susceptibility to obesity: an animal model of lean vs obese binge-eating and obesity with and without binge-eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggiano, M M; Artiga, A I; Pritchett, C E; Chandler-Laney, P C; Smith, M L; Eldridge, A J

    2007-09-01

    To determine the stability of individual differences in non-nutritive 'junk' palatable food (PF) intake in rats; assess the relationship of these differences to binge-eating characteristics and susceptibility to obesity; and evaluate the practicality of using these differences to model binge-eating and obesity. Binge-eating prone (BEP) and resistant (BER) groups were identified. Differential responses to stress, hunger, macronutrient-varied PFs, a diet-induced obesity (DIO) regimen and daily vs intermittent access to a PF+chow diet, were assessed. One hundred and twenty female Sprague-Dawley rats. Reliability of intake patterns within rats; food intake and body weight after various challenges over acute (1, 2, 4 h), 24-h and 2-week periods. Although BEP and BER rats did not differ in amount of chow consumed, BEPs consumed >50% more intermittent PF than BERs (Pobesity prone after a no-choice high fat diet (DIO diet) but a continuous diet of PF+chow normalized the BEPs high drive for PF. Greater intermittent intake of PF predicts binge-eating independent of susceptibility to weight gain. Daily fat consumption in a nutritious source (DIO-diet; analogous to a fatty meal) promoted overeating and weight gain but limiting fat to daily non-nutritive food (PF+chow; analogous to a snack with a low fat meal), did not. The data offer an animal model of lean and obese binge-eating, and obesity with and without binge-eating that can be used to identify the unique physiology of these groups and henceforth suggest more specifically targeted treatments for binge-eating and obesity.

  15. A rat model for embolic encephalitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Lærke Boye; Rasmussen, Rune Skovgaard; Aalbæk, Bent

    2011-01-01

    have recently shown that sepsis is a common cause of microabscesses in the brain, and that S. aureus is one of the most common organisms isolated from these abscesses. This raises the question whether the blood-brain barrier truly makes the brain an immune-privileged organ or not. This makes the brain...... a most interesting organ in sepsis patients. However, symptoms of brain infection may be confused with systemic responses and gross neuropathologic lesions may be absent. Brain infection in sepsis patients is therefore prone to misclassification or diagnostic delay, and when the diagnosis is made...... coagulation is a key mechanism involved in neurologic complications to human bacteriaemia. 2: Human brain abscesses are primarily located in the same anatomical area that we target in our model. Our model therefore offers a tool for several scientific areas within research of brain infection and inflammation....

  16. Achilles tendinosis: a morphometrical study in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Rafael Duarte; Glazebrook, Mark Anthony; Campos, Vinicius Castro; Vasconcelos, Anilton Cesar

    2011-01-01

    This study addresses the morphopathogenesis of Achilles tendinosis, using a rat model and presenting quantitative analysis of time-dependent histological changes. Thirty Wistar rats were used, randomly split in experimental and control groups. Animals of the experimental group were submitted to a treadmill running scheme. Five animals of each group were euthanized at four, eight and sixteen weeks. Achilles tendons were collected and processed routinely for histopath sections. Slides were stained by Hematoxylin-Eosin, Picrosirius Red, Alcian Blue, AgNOR, TUNEL and evaluated morphometrically. Cellular density decreased slightly along the time and was higher in the experimental group than in controls at fourth, eighth and sixteenth weeks. Fiber microtearing, percentual of reticular fibers and glycosaminoglycans content increased along the time and were higher in experimental group than in controls at all-time intervals. AgNOR labeling here interpreted as a marker of transcription activity was higher in the experimental groups than in controls at all-time intervals. Apoptotic cells were more frequent and diffusely distributed in tendinosis samples than in control groups. These results suggest that as mechanical overload is becoming chronic, cellular turnover and matrix deposition increases leading to tendinosis. The combination of staining techniques and morphometry used here to describe the evolution of lesions occurring in a rat model system has proved to be suited for the study of induced Achilles tendinosis.

  17. Respiratory deficits in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuppy, M; Barna, B F; Alves-Dos-Santos, L; Britto, L R G; Chiavegatto, S; Moreira, T S; Takakura, A C

    2015-06-25

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by loss of the dopaminergic nigrostriatal pathway. In addition to deficits in voluntary movement, PD involves a disturbance of breathing regulation. However, the cause and nature of this disturbance are not well understood. Here, we investigated breathing at rest and in response to hypercapnia (7% CO2) or hypoxia (8% O2), as well as neuroanatomical changes in brainstem regions essential for breathing, in a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) rat model of PD. Bilateral injections of 6-OHDA (24μg/μl) into the striatum decreased tyrosine hydroxylase (TH(+))-neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc), transcription factor phox2b-expressing neurons in the retrotrapezoid nucleus and neurokinin-1 receptors in the ventral respiratory column. In 6-OHDA-lesioned rats, respiratory rate was reduced at rest, leading to a reduction in minute ventilation. These animals also showed a reduction in the tachypneic response to hypercapnia, but not to hypoxia challenge. These results suggest that the degeneration of TH(+) neurons in the SNpc leads to impairment of breathing at rest and in hypercapnic conditions. Our data indicate that respiratory deficits in a 6-OHDA rat model of PD are related to downregulation of neural systems involved in respiratory rhythm generation. The present study suggests a new avenue to better understand the respiratory deficits observed in chronic stages of PD. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Assessment of earthquake-triggered landslide susceptibility in El Salvador based on an Artificial Neural Network model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. García-Rodríguez

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an approach for assessing earthquake-triggered landslide susceptibility using artificial neural networks (ANNs. The computational method used for the training process is a back-propagation learning algorithm. It is applied to El Salvador, one of the most seismically active regions in Central America, where the last severe destructive earthquakes occurred on 13 January 2001 (Mw 7.7 and 13 February 2001 (Mw 6.6. The first one triggered more than 600 landslides (including the most tragic, Las Colinas landslide and killed at least 844 people.

    The ANN is designed and programmed to develop landslide susceptibility analysis techniques at a regional scale. This approach uses an inventory of landslides and different parameters of slope instability: slope gradient, elevation, aspect, mean annual precipitation, lithology, land use, and terrain roughness. The information obtained from ANN is then used by a Geographic Information System (GIS to map the landslide susceptibility. In a previous work, a Logistic Regression (LR was analysed with the same parameters considered in the ANN as independent variables and the occurrence or non-occurrence of landslides as dependent variables. As a result, the logistic approach determined the importance of terrain roughness and soil type as key factors within the model. The results of the landslide susceptibility analysis with ANN are checked using landslide location data. These results show a high concordance between the landslide inventory and the high susceptibility estimated zone. Finally, a comparative analysis of the ANN and LR models are made. The advantages and disadvantages of both approaches are discussed using Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC curves.

  19. Galactomannan enzyme immunoassay and quantitative Real Time PCR as tools to evaluate the exposure and response in a rat model of aspergillosis after posaconazole prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cendejas-Bueno, Emilio; Forastiero, Agustina; Ruiz, Isabel; Mellado, Emilia; Buitrago, María José; Gavaldà, Joan; Gomez-Lopez, Alicia

    2016-11-01

    A steroid-immunosuppressed rat model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis was use to examine the usefulness of galactomannan enzyme immunoassay (GM) and quantitative real time PCR (RT-PCR) in evaluating the association between response and exposure after a high dose of prophylactic posaconazole. Two different strains of Aspergillus fumigatus with different in vitro posaconazole susceptibility were used. Serum concentrations demonstrated similar posaconazole exposure for all treated animals. However, response to posaconazole relied on the in vitro susceptibility of the infecting strain. After prophylaxis, galactomannan index and fungal burden only decreased in those animals infected with the most susceptible strain. This study demonstrated that both biomarkers may be useful tools for predicting efficacy of antifungal compounds in prophylaxis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  20. Frequency dependence of the complex susceptibility for a spin-1 Ising model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdem, Riza [Department of Physics, Gaziosmanpasa University, 60250 Tokat (Turkey)], E-mail: rerdem29@hotmail.com

    2009-09-15

    The complex susceptibility or the dynamic susceptibility ({chi}({omega})={chi}'({omega})-i{chi}''({omega})) for a spin-1 Ising system with bilinear and biquadratic interactions is obtained on the basis of Onsager theory of irreversible processes. If the logarithm of the susceptibilities is plotted as a function of the logarithm of frequency, then the real part ({chi}') displays a sequence of plateau regions and the imaginary part ({chi}'') has a sequence of maxima in the ordered or ferromagnetic phase. On the other hand, only one plateau region in {chi}' and one maximum in {chi}'' is observed in the disordered or paramagnetic phase. Argand or Cole-Cole plots ({chi}''-{chi}') for a selection of temperatures are also shown, and a sequence of semicircles is illustrated in the ordered phase and only one semicircle for the disordered phase in these plots.

  1. Frequency dependence of the complex susceptibility for a spin-1 Ising model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, Rıza

    2009-09-01

    The complex susceptibility or the dynamic susceptibility ( χ( ω)= χ'( ω)- iχ″( ω)) for a spin-1 Ising system with bilinear and biquadratic interactions is obtained on the basis of Onsager theory of irreversible processes. If the logarithm of the susceptibilities is plotted as a function of the logarithm of frequency, then the real part ( χ') displays a sequence of plateau regions and the imaginary part ( χ″) has a sequence of maxima in the ordered or ferromagnetic phase. On the other hand, only one plateau region in χ' and one maximum in χ″ is observed in the disordered or paramagnetic phase. Argand or Cole-Cole plots ( χ″- χ') for a selection of temperatures are also shown, and a sequence of semicircles is illustrated in the ordered phase and only one semicircle for the disordered phase in these plots.

  2. Galleria mellonella (greater wax moth) larvae as a model for antibiotic susceptibility testing and acute toxicity trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignasiak, Katarzyna; Maxwell, Anthony

    2017-08-29

    Infectivity trials and toxicity testing in rodents are important prerequisites to the use of compounds in man. However, trials in rats and mice are expensive and there are ethical considerations. Galleria mellonella (greater wax moth) larvae are a potential alternative. We have assessed the use of these insects in infectivity trials and toxicity testing. Using four bacterial species (two Gram-negative and two Gram-positive) we have assessed the efficacy of four antibiotics against infections in Galleria and compared the antibiotic susceptibility with that in humans. In general, we find a good correlation. Similarly, we have assessed 11 compounds (initially tested blind) for their toxicity in Galleria and compared this with toxicity trials in mice and rats. Again we found a good correlation between toxicity in Galleria and that in rodents. We have found, in our hands, that G. mellonella larvae can be used in infectivity trials and toxicity testing, and that these assays represent an inexpensive and readily executable alternative to testing in rodents.

  3. Neurons in the hippocampal CA1 region, but not the dentate gyrus, are susceptible to oxidative stress in rats with streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Gun Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the effects of streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetes on antioxidant-like protein-1 immunoreactivity, protein carbonyl levels, and malondialdehyde formation, a marker for lipid peroxidation, in the hippocampus. For this study, streptozotocin (75 mg/kg was intraperitoneally injected into adult rats to induce type 1 diabetes. The three experimental parameters were determined at 2, 3, 4 weeks after streptozotocin treatment. Fasting blood glucose levels significantly increased by 20.7-21.9 mM after streptozotocin treatment. The number of antioxidant-like protein-1 immunoreactive neurons significantly decreased in the hippocampal CA1 region, but not the dentate gyrus, 3 weeks after streptozotocin treatment compared to the control group. Malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl levels, which are modified by oxidative stress, significantly increased with a peak at 3 weeks after malondialdehyde treatment, and then decreased 4 weeks after malondialdehyde treatment. These results suggest that neurons in the hippocampal CA1 region, but not the dentate gyrus, are susceptible to oxidative stress 3 weeks after malondialdehyde treatment.

  4. A rat model for muscle regeneration in the soft palate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola L Carvajal Monroy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Children with a cleft in the soft palate have difficulties with speech, swallowing, and sucking. Despite successful surgical repositioning of the muscles, optimal function is often not achieved. Scar formation and defective regeneration may hamper the functional recovery of the muscles after cleft palate repair. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate the anatomy and histology of the soft palate in rats, and to establish an in vivo model for muscle regeneration after surgical injury. METHODS: Fourteen adult male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into four groups. Groups 1 (n = 4 and 2 (n = 2 were used to investigate the anatomy and histology of the soft palate, respectively. Group 3 (n = 6 was used for surgical wounding of the soft palate, and group 4 (n = 2 was used as unwounded control group. The wounds (1 mm were evaluated by (immunohistochemistry (AZAN staining, Pax7, MyoD, MyoG, MyHC, and ASMA after 7 days. RESULTS: The present study shows that the anatomy and histology of the soft palate muscles of the rat is largely comparable with that in humans. All wounds showed clinical evidence of healing after 7 days. AZAN staining demonstrated extensive collagen deposition in the wound area, and initial regeneration of muscle fibers and salivary glands. Proliferating and differentiating satellite cells were identified in the wound area by antibody staining. CONCLUSIONS: This model is the first, suitable for studying muscle regeneration in the rat soft palate, and allows the development of novel adjuvant strategies to promote muscle regeneration after cleft palate surgery.

  5. Experience modulates vicarious freezing in rats: a model for empathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piray Atsak

    Full Text Available The study of the neural basis of emotional empathy has received a surge of interest in recent years but mostly employing human neuroimaging. A simpler animal model would pave the way for systematic single cell recordings and invasive manipulations of the brain regions implicated in empathy. Recent evidence has been put forward for the existence of empathy in rodents. In this study, we describe a potential model of empathy in female rats, in which we studied interactions between two rats: a witness observes a demonstrator experiencing a series of footshocks. By comparing the reaction of witnesses with or without previous footshock experience, we examine the role of prior experience as a modulator of empathy. We show that witnesses having previously experienced footshocks, but not naïve ones, display vicarious freezing behavior upon witnessing a cage-mate experiencing footshocks. Strikingly, the demonstrator's behavior was in turn modulated by the behavior of the witness: demonstrators froze more following footshocks if their witness froze more. Previous experiments have shown that rats emit ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs when receiving footshocks. Thus, the role of USV in triggering vicarious freezing in our paradigm is examined. We found that experienced witness-demonstrator pairs emitted more USVs than naïve witness-demonstrator pairs, but the number of USVs was correlated with freezing in demonstrators, not in witnesses. Furthermore, playing back the USVs, recorded from witness-demonstrator pairs during the empathy test, did not induce vicarious freezing behavior in experienced witnesses. Thus, our findings confirm that vicarious freezing can be triggered in rats, and moreover it can be modulated by prior experience. Additionally, our result suggests that vicarious freezing is not triggered by USVs per se and it influences back onto the behavior of the demonstrator that had elicited the vicarious freezing in witnesses, introducing a paradigm

  6. Experience Modulates Vicarious Freezing in Rats: A Model for Empathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atsak, Piray; Orre, Marie; Bakker, Petra; Cerliani, Leonardo; Roozendaal, Benno

    2011-01-01

    The study of the neural basis of emotional empathy has received a surge of interest in recent years but mostly employing human neuroimaging. A simpler animal model would pave the way for systematic single cell recordings and invasive manipulations of the brain regions implicated in empathy. Recent evidence has been put forward for the existence of empathy in rodents. In this study, we describe a potential model of empathy in female rats, in which we studied interactions between two rats: a witness observes a demonstrator experiencing a series of footshocks. By comparing the reaction of witnesses with or without previous footshock experience, we examine the role of prior experience as a modulator of empathy. We show that witnesses having previously experienced footshocks, but not naïve ones, display vicarious freezing behavior upon witnessing a cage-mate experiencing footshocks. Strikingly, the demonstrator's behavior was in turn modulated by the behavior of the witness: demonstrators froze more following footshocks if their witness froze more. Previous experiments have shown that rats emit ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) when receiving footshocks. Thus, the role of USV in triggering vicarious freezing in our paradigm is examined. We found that experienced witness-demonstrator pairs emitted more USVs than naïve witness-demonstrator pairs, but the number of USVs was correlated with freezing in demonstrators, not in witnesses. Furthermore, playing back the USVs, recorded from witness-demonstrator pairs during the empathy test, did not induce vicarious freezing behavior in experienced witnesses. Thus, our findings confirm that vicarious freezing can be triggered in rats, and moreover it can be modulated by prior experience. Additionally, our result suggests that vicarious freezing is not triggered by USVs per se and it influences back onto the behavior of the demonstrator that had elicited the vicarious freezing in witnesses, introducing a paradigm to study empathy

  7. Newly Developed Rat Model of Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral Bone Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kentaro; Fujii, Hideki; Goto, Shunsuke; Nakai, Kentaro; Kono, Keiji; Watanabe, Shuhei; Shinohara, Masami; Nishi, Shinichi

    2018-02-01

    Chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD) is associated with all-cause and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with CKD. Thus, elucidating its pathophysiological mechanisms is essential for improving the prognosis. We evaluated characteristics of CKD-MBD in a newly developed CKD rat model. We used male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats and spontaneously diabetic Torii (SDT) rats, which are used as models for nonobese type 2 diabetes. CKD was induced by 5/6 nephrectomy (Nx). At 10 weeks, the rats were classified into six groups and administered with a vehicle or a low- or high-dose paricalcitol thrice a week. At 20 weeks, the rats were sacrificed; blood and urinary biochemical analyses and histological analysis of the aorta were performed. At 20 weeks, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels, blood pressure, and renal function were not significantly different among the six groups. Serum calcium and phosphate levels tended to be higher in SDT-Nx rats than in SD-Nx rats. The urinary excretion of calcium and phosphate was significantly greater in SDT-Nx rats than in SD-Nx rats. After administering paricalcitol, serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) and fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) levels were significantly higher in SDT-Nx rats than in SD-Nx rats. The degree of aortic calcification was significantly more severe and the aortic calcium content was significantly greater in SDT-Nx rats than in SD-Nx rats. We suggest that our new CKD rat model using SDT rats represents a useful CKD-MBD model, and this model was greatly influenced by paricalcitol administration. Further studies are needed to clarify the detailed mechanisms underlying this model.

  8. Studies on sensitivity of zebrafish as a model organism for Parkinson's disease: Comparison with rat model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhija, Dinesh T.; Jagtap, Aarti G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the utility of zebra fish as an animal model for Parkinson's disease (PD) in comparison with rat model. Materials and Methods: MTT assay was performed on rat and zebrafish brain synaptosomal fractions using rotenone as a neurotoxic agent. Quercetin and resveratrol were used as standards to compare anti-apoptotic activity in both organisms. Catalepsy was induced in zebrafish by exposing them to haloperidol (9 μM) solution. Drug-treated groups were exposed to bromocriptine and pramipexole, 30 min prior to haloperidol exposure at the dose of 2, 5, and 10 μg/mL. Swimming speed, time spent in the bottom of the tank, and complete cataleptic time were evaluated to assess behavioral changes. In rats, catalepsy was induced using haloperidol (1.25 mg/kg i.p.). Drug-treated groups received bromocriptine (2.5 mg/kg.) and pramipexole (1 mg/kg) orally. Bar test, block test, and locomotor activity were carried out to assess behavioral changes. Results: Resveratrol and quercetin showed comparable inhibition of apoptosis in rats and zebrafish. In anti-cataleptic study, bromocriptine and pramipexole-treated groups showed significant difference (P behavioral parameters as compared to haloperidol control group in both the experimental organisms. Results obtained from fish model were in correlation with rat model. Conclusion: Findings of the present study revealed that zebrafish model is highly sensitive and can be used for basic screening of drugs against PD. PMID:24554909

  9. A proposed cell model for multiple-occurrence regional landslide events: Implications for landslide susceptibility mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crozier, M. J.

    2017-10-01

    Multiple-occurrence regional landslide events (MORLEs) consist of hundreds to thousands of shallow landslides occurring more or less simultaneously within defined areas, ranging from tens to thousands of square kilometres. While MORLEs can be triggered by rainstorms and earthquakes, this paper is confined to those landslide events triggered by rainstorms. Globally, MORLEs occur in a range of geological settings in areas of moderate to steep slopes subject to intense rainstorms. Individual landslides in rainstorm-triggered events are dominantly small, shallow debris and earth flows, and debris and earth slides involving regolith or weathered bedrock. The model used to characterise these events assumes that energy distribution within the event area is represented on the land surface by a cell structure; with maximum energy expenditure within an identifiable core and rapid dissipation concentrically away from the centre. The version of the model presented here has been developed for rainfall-triggered landslide events. It proposes that rainfall intensity can be used to determine different critical landslide response zones within the cell (referred to as core, middle, and periphery zones). These zones are most readily distinguished by two conditions: the proportion of the slope that fails and the particular type of the slope stability factor that assumes dominance in determining specific sites of landslide occurrence. The latter condition means that the power of any slope stability factor to distinguish between stable and unstable sites varies throughout the affected area in accordance with the landslide response zones within the cell; certain factors critical for determining the location of landslide sites in one part of the event area have little influence in other parts of the event area. The implication is that landslide susceptibility maps (and subsequently derived mitigation measures) based on conventional slope stability factors may have only limited validity

  10. Comparison of different models for susceptibility mapping of earthquake triggered landslides related with the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chong; Xu, Xiwei; Dai, Fuchu; Saraf, Arun K.

    2012-09-01

    The main purpose of this study is to compare the following six GIS-based models for susceptibility mapping of earthquake triggered landslides: bivariate statistics (BS), logistic regression (LR), artificial neural networks (ANN), and three types of support vector machine (SVM) models that use the three different kernel functions linear, polynomial, and radial basis. The models are applied in a tributary watershed of the Fu River, a tributary of the Jialing River, which is part of the area of China affected by the May 12, 2008 Wenchuan earthquake. For this purpose, eleven thematic data layers are used: landslide inventory, slope angle, aspect, elevation, curvature, distance from drainages, topographic wetness index (TWI), distance from main roads, distance from surface rupture, peak ground acceleration (PGA), and lithology. The data layers were specifically constructed for analysis in this study. In the subsequent stage of the study, susceptibility maps were produced using the six models and the same input for each one. The validations of the resulting susceptibility maps were performed and compared by means of two values of area under curve (AUC) that represent the respective success rates and prediction rates. The AUC values obtained from all six results showed that the LR model provides the highest success rate (AUC=80.34) and the highest prediction rate (AUC=80.27). The SVM (radial basis function) model generates the second-highest success rate (AUC=80.302) and the second-highest prediction rate (AUC=80.151), which are close to the value from the LR model. The results using the SVM (linear) model show the lowest AUC values. The AUC values from the SVM (linear) model are only 72.52 (success rates) and 72.533 (prediction rates). Furthermore, the results also show that the radial basis function is the most appropriate kernel function of the three kernel functions applied using the SVM model for susceptibility mapping of earthquake triggered landslides in the study

  11. [Establishment of rat model with diabetes mellitus and concomitant periodontitis and the carotid artery lesions in the model rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, X Y; Wang, C; Liu, X; Li, H; Gao, J H; Ge, X J

    2017-12-09

    Objectives: To establish SD rat model with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and concomitant chronic periodontitis (CP) and to evaluate the influence of periodontitis on the vascular lesions of type 2 diabetes rats. Methods: Totally 241 clean level SD rats were randomly divided into four groups, group A (normal control, NC, n= 27), group B (DM, n= 34), group C (CP, n= 90) and group D (DM+CP, n= 90). The rats of DM group were fed with high-fat and high-sugar diet for 8 to 10 weeks, and then were multiply injected with small dose streptozotocin under the condition of ice bath. Blood sugar levels after the injection were dynamically monitored at 72 h, 1 week, 2 weeks and 4 weeks, respectively. The CP model was established by means of ligation. Bilateral maxillary first and second molars were selected and ligated using 0.2 mm orthodontic wires binding with 4-0 surgical suture soaked with Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) suspension. After a period of 14 weeks, all the rats were put to death. Maxillary samples were subjected to methylene blue staining to observe alveolar bone loss. Bilateral carotid artery specimens were collected. The left carotid artery specimens were used to detect the prevalence of Pg using quantitative real-time PCR. The right carotid artery specimens were used to observe pathological changes. Results: Blood sugar levels of rats in group B and D increased and changed sharply after Streptozotocin injection with in 1 week. Symptoms of 'more drink, more food and body weight loss' appeared. The fasting blood glucose (FBG) was more than 7.8 mmol/L and (or) the random blood glucose (RBG) was more than 17.8 mmol/L. Both FBG and RBG became stable after 2 to 3 weeks. Levels of HbA1C in group B and D ([7.32±0.45]%, [9.41±0.45]%) were significantly higher than that of group A ([4.02±0.45]%) ( Pdiabetes vascular lesions.

  12. Behavioral and molecular responses to electroconvulsive shock differ between genetic and environmental rat models of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jie; Min, Su; Wei, Ke; Cao, Jun; Wang, Bin; Li, Ping; Dong, Jun; Liu, Yuanyuan

    2015-04-30

    Depression׳s causes play a role in individuals׳ different responses to antidepressant treatments, which require advancements. We investigated the mechanisms behind and responses to a highly effective antidepressant treatment, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), in rat models with different (genetic or environmental) depression causes. Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats and Wistar rats treated with chronic unpredictable mild stresses (CUMS) were used as genetic and environmental rat models of depression, respectively. The rats underwent electroconvulsive shock (ECS, the animal analog of ECT) or sham ECS. We performed a sucrose preference test, open field test, and Morris water maze to assess behavior. Hippocampal neuron numbers were measured with Nissl stain. Hippocampal BDNF, CREB, and p-CREB proteins were assayed with ELISA or western blotting. The main results showed that ECS impaired WKY rats׳ memories but improved CUMS rats׳ memories. It elevated hippocampal BDNF and CREB proteins only in CUMS rats, while it improved depressive behavior and hippocampal p-CREB protein levels in both rats, with more effective regulations in the CUMS rats. ECS did not change the hippocampal neuron number in both rats. These findings suggest that ECS exerted up-regulating effects on hippocampal BDNF and CREB (and its phosphorylation) in depressed rats, and the environmental model responded better. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Surgery results in exaggerated and persistent cognitive decline in a rat model of the Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaomei; Degos, Vincent; Koch, Lauren G; Britton, Steven L; Zhu, Yinggang; Vacas, Susana; Terrando, Niccolò; Nelson, Jeffrey; Su, Xiao; Maze, Mervyn

    2013-05-01

    Postoperative cognitive decline can be reproduced in animal models. In a well-validated rat model of the Metabolic Syndrome, we sought to investigate whether surgery induced a more severe and persistent form of cognitive decline similar to that noted in preliminary clinical studies. In rats that had been selectively bred for low and high exercise endurance, the low capacity runners (LCR) exhibited features of Metabolic Syndrome (obesity, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, and hypertension). Tibial fracture surgery was performed under isoflurane anesthesia in LCR and high capacity runner (HCR) rats and cognitive function was assessed postoperatively in a trace-fear conditioning paradigm and Morris Water Maze; non-operated rats were exposed to anesthesia and analgesia (sham). Group sizes were n = 6. On postoperative D7, LCR rats had shorter freezing times than postoperative HCR rats. Five months postoperatively, LCR rats had a flatter learning trajectory and took longer to locate the submerged platform than postoperative HCR rats; dwell-time in the target quadrant in a probe trial was shorter in the postoperative LCR compared to HCR rats. LCR and HCR sham rats did not differ in any test. Postoperatively, LCR rats diverged from HCR rats exhibiting a greater decline in memory, acutely, with persistent learning and memory decline, remotely; this could not be attributed to changes in locomotor or swimming performance. This Metabolic Syndrome animal model of surgery-induced cognitive decline corroborates, with high fidelity, preliminary findings of postoperative cognitive dysfunction in Metabolic Syndrome patients.

  14. Active versus sedentary lifestyle from childhood to adult and susceptibility to ozone: An animal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    A pattern of sedentary lifestyle beginning in childhood is associated with obesity and related disorders such as type 2 diabetes. Obesity is associated with increased susceptibility to air pollutants and initiating regular exercise early in life should impact positively on respir...

  15. Use of a Regression Model to Study Host-Genomic Determinants of Phage Susceptibility in MRSA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zschach, Henrike; Larsen, Mette V; Hasman, Henrik

    2018-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major agent of nosocomial infections. Especially in methicillin-resistant strains, conventional treatment options are limited and expensive, which has fueled a growing interest in phage therapy approaches. We have tested the susceptibility of 207 clinical S. aureus...

  16. Establishment of animal model of dual liver transplantation in rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Zhang

    Full Text Available The animal model of the whole-size and reduced-size liver transplantation in both rat and mouse has been successfully established. Because of the difficulties and complexities in microsurgical technology, the animal model of dual liver transplantation was still not established for twelve years since the first human dual liver transplantation has been made a success. There is an essential need to establish this animal model to lay a basic foundation for clinical practice. To study the physiological and histopathological changes of dual liver transplantation, "Y" type vein from the cross part between vena cava and two iliac of donor and "Y' type prosthesis were employed to recanalize portal vein and the bile duct between dual liver grafts and recipient. The dual right upper lobes about 45-50% of the recipient liver volume were taken as donor, one was orthotopically implanted at its original position, the other was rotated 180° sagitally and heterotopically positioned in the left upper quadrant. Microcirculation parameters, liver function, immunohistochemistry and survival were analyzed to evaluate the function of dual liver grafts. No significant difference in the hepatic microcirculatory flow was found between two grafts in the first 90 minutes after reperfusion. Light and electronic microscope showed the liver architecture was maintained without obvious features of cellular destruction and the continuity of the endothelium was preserved. Only 3 heterotopically positioned graft appeared patchy desquamation of endothelial cell, mitochondrial swelling and hepatocytes cytoplasmic vacuolization. Immunohistochemistry revealed there is no difference in hepatocyte activity and the ability of endothelia to contract and relax after reperfusion between dual grafts. Dual grafts made a rapid amelioration of liver function after reperfusion. 7 rats survived more than 7 days with survival rate of 58.3.%. Using "Y" type vein and bile duct prosthesis, we

  17. Sildenafil after cardiac arrest and infarction; an experimental rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mennander, Ari A; Vuohelainen, Vilma; Aanismaa, Riikka S; Narkilahti, Susanna; Paavonen, Timo; Tarkka, Matti

    2013-02-01

    Resuscitation after cardiac arrest may lead to ischemia-reperfusion injury and infarction. We evaluated whether sildenafil, a phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor, has an impact on recovery after cardiac arrest in a rat cardiac transplantation model. Sixty-one Fischer344 rats underwent syngeneic heterotopic cardiac transplantation after ischemia and ligation of the left anterior coronary artery of the heart to yield myocardial infarction (IRI + MI). Of these, 22 rats received subcutaneously injected sildenafil (1 mg/kg/day) (IRI +MI + S). Twenty-three additional grafted animals with transplantation only served as controls with ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI). After 2 days, immunohistochemistry for eNOS, and RT-PCR for iNOS and Aquaporin-7 were performed after graft harvesting and histology. Two days after transplantation, remote intramyocardial arteries were more preserved in IRI + MI + S as compared with IRI +MI and IRI (0.74 ± 0.14, 0.56 ± 0.23 and 0.55 ± 0.22, PSU, p cardiac arrest and ischemia.

  18. Azithromycin reduces inflammation in a rat model of acute conjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Robredo, Patricia; Recalde, Sergio; Moreno-Orduña, Maite; García-García, Laura; Zarranz-Ventura, Javier; García-Layana, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Macrolide antibiotics are known to have various anti-inflammatory effects in addition to their antimicrobial activity, but the mechanisms are still unclear. The effect of azithromycin on inflammatory molecules in the lipopolysaccharide-induced rat conjunctivitis model was investigated. Twenty-four Wistar rats were divided into two groups receiving topical ocular azithromycin (15 mg/g) or vehicle. In total, six doses (25 µl) were administered as one dose twice a day for three days before subconjunctival lipopolysaccharide injection (3 mg/ml). Before the rats were euthanized, mucus secretion, conjunctival and palpebral edema and redness were evaluated. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to determine gene expression for interleukin-6, cyclooxygenase-2, tumor necrosis factor-α, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, and MMP-9. Interleukin-6 was determined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, nuclear factor-kappa B with western blot, and MMP-2 activity with gelatin zymogram. Four eyes per group were processed for histology and subsequent periodic acid-Schiff staining and CD68 for immunofluorescence. The Student t test or the Wilcoxon test for independent samples was applied (SPSS v.15.0). Azithromycin-treated animals showed a significant reduction in all clinical signs (pconjunctivitis.

  19. Ozone enema: a model of microscopic colitis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliakim, R; Karmeli, F; Rachmilewitz, D; Cohen, P; Zimran, A

    2001-11-01

    Ozone is one of the most powerful oxidants available, with many applications in industry and medicine. Medically relevant features of ozone include bacterial and virucidal properties, disinfection, sterilization, circulatory stimulation, and disruption of malignant cells. Ozone therapy is administered in various ways, including intravenously, intramuscularly, and intrarectally. The latter modality is used for the treatment of colitis and hepatitis. Our aim was to examine the effect of ozone water enema on normal and inflamed rat colonic mucosa. Ozone water (20 microg/ml) was prepared via ozone generator and administered intrarectally (0.5 ml) daily. Rats were killed one, three, and seven days after rectal ozone water administration, and their colons resected, rinsed, and weighed (grams per 10 cm). Damage was assessed macro- and microscopically and tissue processed for myeloperoxidase and nitric oxide synthase activity. Rats receiving saline served as controls. In an additional experiment colitis was induced by intrarectal iodoacetamide. Ozone therapy caused no macroscopic damage. Ozone therapy induced microscopic colitis, which lasted for at least a week and was accompanied by increase in segmental weight, myeloperoxidase and nitric oxide activity, and prostaglandin E2 generation. Ozone therapy had no protective effect on inflamed mucosa. In conclusion, ozone water therapy had a deleterious effect on normal colonic mucosa, suggesting intrarectal administration be reevaluated. Ozone water enema may serve as a model of microscopic colitis.

  20. IHG: an Integrated Hydrological-Geotechnical model for large landslides' susceptibility assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passalacqua, R.; Bovolenta, R.

    2012-04-01

    70 positions and, additionally, an array set-up of six seismic stations allowed the study of the Rayleigh and Love wave dispersion. Thus, by using the well known Nakamura's technique, the overall spread of the bedrock depths was finally obtained. Because of a rather large territorial dimension, the relevant issues were into finding the most proper techniques to assess an affordable but reliable site recognition over all its extension, as well as to spatially distribute both the loose-soils' depths information and the pertinent geotechnical/hydrological parameters, which are usually gathered at spot locations. The entire sets of data were spatially distributed, by selecting the appropriate interpolators among those normally available within a Geographical Information System (GIS) platform. GIS is a very useful and effective tool to integrate and analyze georeferenced information, thus allowing wide scale monitoring, management, planning, and supporting risk analyses. In particular, the overall model was developed using a free-open-source GIS environment (GRASS), which permit the direct implementation of additional features, which can then be re-used and updated by its worldwide Users' Community. The whole watershed was tested, in order to better understand the zone from the hydrological point of view. The steady groundwater table was obtained by applying a suitable model to the extensive zone. Within this Conference, the Authors shall present the details of the most recent research development which have been attained on this site's model. It consist into the on-GIS implementation of an Integrated Hydrological-Geotechnical method of analysis (IHG), which allows to obtain (1) the groundwater's level variations, due to selected rain histories, and (2) the spatially distributed susceptibility of the loose-soils' deposit to slide. The IHG model's behavior shows a good conceptual fit with the ground level's movements, which were rendered by a Permanent Scatterers

  1. A hybrid feature selection algorithm integrating an extreme learning machine for landslide susceptibility modeling of Mt. Woomyeon, South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasu, Nikhil N.; Lee, Seung-Rae

    2016-06-01

    An ever-increasing trend of extreme rainfall events in South Korea owing to climate change is causing shallow landslides and debris flows in mountains that cover 70% of the total land area of the nation. These catastrophic, gravity-driven processes cost the government several billion KRW (South Korean Won) in losses in addition to fatalities every year. The most common type of landslide observed is the shallow landslide, which occurs at 1-3 m depth, and may mobilize into more catastrophic flow-type landslides. Hence, to predict potential landslide areas, susceptibility maps are developed in a geographical information system (GIS) environment utilizing available morphological, hydrological, geotechnical, and geological data. Landslide susceptibility models were developed using 163 landslide points and an equal number of nonlandslide points in Mt. Woomyeon, Seoul, and 23 landslide conditioning factors. However, because not all of the factors contribute to the determination of the spatial probability for landslide initiation, and a simple filter or wrapper-based approach is not efficient in identifying all of the relevant features, a feedback-loop-based hybrid algorithm was implemented in conjunction with a learning scheme called an extreme learning machine, which is based on a single-layer, feed-forward network. Validation of the constructed susceptibility model was conducted using a testing set of landslide inventory data through a prediction rate curve. The model selected 13 relevant conditioning factors out of the initial 23; and the resulting susceptibility map shows a success rate of 85% and a prediction rate of 89.45%, indicating a good performance, in contrast to the low success and prediction rate of 69.19% and 56.19%, respectively, as obtained using a wrapper technique.

  2. Differential susceptibility of primary cultured human skin cells to hypericin PDT in an in vitro model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovic, A; Wiggins, T; Davids, L M

    2015-08-01

    Skin cancer is the most common cancer worldwide, and its incidence rate in South Africa is increasing. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been shown to be an effective treatment modality, through topical administration, for treatment of non-melanoma skin cancers. Our group investigates hypericin-induced PDT (HYP-PDT) for the treatment of both non-melanoma and melanoma skin cancers. However, a prerequisite for effective cancer treatments is efficient and selective targeting of the tumoral cells with minimal collateral damage to the surrounding normal cells, as it is well established that cancer therapies have bystander effects on normal cells in the body, often causing undesirable side effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the cellular and molecular effects of HYP-PDT on normal primary human keratinocytes (Kc), melanocytes (Mc) and fibroblasts (Fb) in an in vitro tissue culture model which represented both the epidermal and dermal cellular compartments of human skin. Cell viability analysis revealed a differential cytotoxic response to a range of HYP-PDT doses in all the human skin cell types, showing that Fb (LD50=1.75μM) were the most susceptible to HYP-PDT, followed by Mc (LD50=3.5μM) and Kc (LD50>4μM HYP-PDT) These results correlated with the morphological analysis which displayed distinct morphological changes in Fb and Mc, 24h post treatment with non-lethal (1μM) and lethal (3μM) doses of HYP-PDT, but the highest HYP-PDT doses had no effect on Kc morphology. Fluorescent microscopy displayed cytoplasmic localization of HYP in all the 3 skin cell types and additionally, HYP was excluded from the nuclei in all the cell types. Intracellular ROS levels measured in Fb at 3μM HYP-PDT, displayed a significant 3.8 fold (pPDT. These results depict a differential response to HYP-PDT by different human skin cells thus highlighting the efficacy and indeed, the potential bystander effect of if administered in vivo. This study contributes toward our knowledge

  3. Flow-R, a model for susceptibility mapping of debris flows and other gravitational hazards at a regional scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Horton

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of susceptibility maps for debris flows is of primary importance due to population pressure in hazardous zones. However, hazard assessment by process-based modelling at a regional scale is difficult due to the complex nature of the phenomenon, the variability of local controlling factors, and the uncertainty in modelling parameters. A regional assessment must consider a simplified approach that is not highly parameter dependant and that can provide zonation with minimum data requirements. A distributed empirical model has thus been developed for regional susceptibility assessments using essentially a digital elevation model (DEM. The model is called Flow-R for Flow path assessment of gravitational hazards at a Regional scale (available free of charge under http://www.flow-r.org and has been successfully applied to different case studies in various countries with variable data quality. It provides a substantial basis for a preliminary susceptibility assessment at a regional scale. The model was also found relevant to assess other natural hazards such as rockfall, snow avalanches and floods. The model allows for automatic source area delineation, given user criteria, and for the assessment of the propagation extent based on various spreading algorithms and simple frictional laws. We developed a new spreading algorithm, an improved version of Holmgren's direction algorithm, that is less sensitive to small variations of the DEM and that is avoiding over-channelization, and so produces more realistic extents. The choices of the datasets and the algorithms are open to the user, which makes it compliant for various applications and dataset availability. Amongst the possible datasets, the DEM is the only one that is really needed for both the source area delineation and the propagation assessment; its quality is of major importance for the results accuracy. We consider a 10 m DEM resolution as a good compromise between processing time

  4. Genetic threshold hypothesis of neocortical spike-and-wave discharges in the rat: An animal model of petit mal epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vadasz, C.; Fleischer, A. [Nathan Kline Inst. for Psychiatric Research, Orangeburg, NY (United States); Carpi, D.; Jando, G. [State Univ. of New Jersey, Newark, NJ (United States)] [and others

    1995-02-27

    Neocortical high-voltage spike-and-wave discharges (HVS) in the rat are an animal model of petit mal epilepsy. Genetic analysis of total duration of HVS (s/12 hr) in reciprocal F1 and F2 hybrids of F344 and BN rats indicated that the phenotypic variability of HVS cannot be explained by simple, monogenic Mendelian model. Biometrical analysis suggested the presence of additive, dominance, and sex-linked-epistatic effects, buffering maternal influence, and heterosis. High correlation was observed between average duration (s/episode) and frequency of occurrence of spike-and-wave episodes (n/12 hr) in parental and segregating generations, indicating that common genes affect both duration and frequency of the spike-and-wave pattern. We propose that both genetic and developmental - environmental factors control an underlying quantitative variable, which, above a certain threshold level, precipitates HVS discharges. These findings, together with the recent availability of rat DNA markers for total genome mapping, pave the way to the identification of genes that control the susceptibility of the brain to spike-and-wave discharges. 67 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. QTL Analysis Identifies a Modifier Locus of Aganglionosis in the Rat Model of Hirschsprung Disease Carrying Ednrbsl Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Ruihua; Torigoe, Daisuke; Sasaki, Nobuya; Agui, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) exhibits complex genetics with incomplete penetrance and variable severity thought to result as a consequence of multiple gene interactions that modulate the ability of enteric neural crest cells to populate the developing gut. As reported previously, when the same null mutation of the Ednrb gene, Ednrbsl, was introgressed into the F344 strain, almost 60% of F344-Ednrbsl/sl pups did not show any symptoms of aganglionosis, appearing healthy and normally fertile. These findings strongly suggested that the severity of HSCR was affected by strain-specific genetic factor (s). In this study, the genetic basis of such large strain differences in the severity of aganglionosis in the rat model was studied by whole-genome scanning for quantitative trait loci (QTLs) using an intercross of (AGH-Ednrbsl×F344-Ednrbsl) F1 with the varying severity of aganglionosis. Genome linkage analysis identified one significant QTL on chromosome 2 for the severity of aganglionosis. Our QTL analyses using rat models of HSCR revealed that multiple genetic factors regulated the severity of aganglionosis. Moreover, a known HSCR susceptibility gene, Gdnf, was found in QTL that suggested a novel non-coding sequence mutation in GDNF that modifies the penetrance and severity of the aganglionosis phenotype in EDNRB-deficient rats. A further identification and analysis of responsible genes located on the identified QTL could lead to the richer understanding of the genetic basis of HSCR development. PMID:22132166

  6. Protective effect of chlorogenic acid on the focal cerebral ischemia reperfusion rat models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingsan Miao

    2017-05-01

    Conclusion: The results showed that chlorogenic acid could protect the focal cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury rat models by adjusting the inflammatory factor, hypoxia factor and nerve growth factor.

  7. Mechanism of auditory hypersensitivity in human autism using autism model rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ida-Eto, Michiru; Hara, Nao; Ohkawara, Takeshi; Narita, Masaaki

    2017-04-01

    Auditory hypersensitivity is one of the major complications in autism spectrum disorder. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the auditory brain center is affected in autism model rats. Autism model rats were prepared by prenatal exposure to thalidomide on embryonic day 9 and 10 in pregnant rats. The superior olivary complex (SOC), a complex of auditory nuclei, was immunostained with anti-calbindin d28k antibody at postnatal day 50. In autism model rats, SOC immunoreactivity was markedly decreased. Strength of immunostaining of SOC auditory fibers was also weak in autism model rats. Surprisingly, the size of the medial nucleus of trapezoid body, a nucleus exerting inhibitory function in SOC, was significantly decreased in autism model rats. Auditory hypersensitivity may be, in part, due to impairment of inhibitory processing by the auditory brain center. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  8. Photon and electron absorbed fractions calculated from a new tomographic rat model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peixoto, P H R [Departamento de Energia Nuclear, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Av. Prof. Luiz Freire 1000, Cidade Universitaria, CEP 50740-540, Recife, PE (Brazil); Vieira, J W [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil); Yoriyaz, H [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Lima, F R A [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares-CNEN, Recife, PE (Brazil)], E-mail: phrpeixoto@yahoo.com.br

    2008-10-07

    This paper describes the development of a tomographic model of a rat developed using CT images of an adult male Wistar rat for radiation transport studies. It also presents calculations of absorbed fractions (AFs) under internal photon and electron sources using this rat model and the Monte Carlo code MCNP. All data related to the developed phantom were made available for the scientific community as well as the MCNP inputs prepared for AF calculations in that phantom and also all estimated AF values, which could be used to obtain absorbed dose estimates-following the MIRD methodology-in rats similar in size to the presently developed model. Comparison between the rat model developed in this study and that published by Stabin et al (2006 J. Nucl. Med. 47 655) for a 248 g Sprague-Dawley rat, as well as between the estimated AF values for both models, has been presented.

  9. A model to estimate the impact of changes in MMR vaccine uptake on inequalities in measles susceptibility in Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napier, Gary; Lee, Duncan; Robertson, Chris; Lawson, Andrew; Pollock, Kevin G

    2016-08-01

    An article published in 1998 by Andrew Wakefield in The Lancet (volume 351, pages 637-641) led to concerns surrounding the safety of the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine, by associating it with an increased risk of autism. The paper was later retracted after multiple epidemiological studies failed to find any association, but a substantial decrease in UK vaccination rates was observed in the years following publication. This paper proposes a novel spatio-temporal Bayesian hierarchical model with accompanying software (the R package CARBayesST) to simultaneously address three key epidemiological questions about vaccination rates: (i) what impact did the controversy have on the overall temporal trend in vaccination rates in Scotland; (ii) did the magnitude of the spatial inequality in measles susceptibility in Scotland increase due to the measles, mumps and rubella vaccination scare; and (iii) are there any covariate effects, such as deprivation, that impacted on measles susceptibility in Scotland. The efficacy of the model is tested by simulation, before being applied to measles susceptibility data in Scotland among a series of cohorts of children who were aged 2.5-4.5, in September of the years 1998 to 2014. © The Author(s) 2016.

  10. A new rat model of neonatal bilirubin encephalopathy (kernicterus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Naser; Vousooghi, Nasim; Soleimani, Mansoureh; Samadikuchaksaraei, Ali; Akbari, Mehdi; Safakheil, Hosein; Atafimanesh, Pezhman; Shahbazi, Ali; Brouki Milan, Peiman; Ramezani, Sara; Mozafari, Masoud; Joghataei, Mohammad Taghi

    Hemolytic kernicterus, an indirect bilirubin-induced brain dysfunction, is associated with hyper-bilirubinemia in mammalian neonates. In this study, a new model of kernicterus has been developed using intra-peritoneal injections of phenyl hydrazine and subcutaneous injections of sulfisoxazole. These drugs can potentially induce kernicterus in neonatal through changes in hemolysis and hypo-albumin. For this purpose, 7-day-old male Wistar rats (n=72; mean weight 11±1g) were used. The animals have been divided into six different groups which received the drugs alone and their combination, and the drugs' solvents and their combination. Biochemical parameters, brain iron and bilirubin, behavioural performance, auditory function and apoptosis were measured using auto-analyser instruments; atomic absorption spectroscopy, Sawasaki, footprint, auditory brainstem response (ABR) and TUNEL test, respectively. The drug-injected groups showed a significant reduction in serum haematocrit and an increase in the concentration of brain bilirubin, total and indirect bilirubin as well as TUNEL positive cells in basal ganglia. In addition, the obtained results showed that there was a significant increase in behavioural disturbance and auditory dysfunction in the group injected with the combination of two drugs. This kernicterus-induced rat model could perfectly mimic the common conditions of the hyperbilirubinemia in human neonates. This study offers an easy technique to develop more stable models for follow-up studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Implant-related infection model in rat spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofluoglu, Ender Ali; Zileli, Mehmet; Aydin, Derya; Baris, Yakup Sancar; Kuçukbasmaci, Omer; Gonullu, Nevriye; Ofluoglu, Onder; Toplamaoglu, Halil

    2007-07-01

    The rate of postoperative infections is approximately 1% in spine surgery. However, when metal implants are used, postoperative infection rates significantly increase and were reported between 2.1 and 8.5%. This study aim to set up an infection model in the rat spine with a metal implant. Forty white male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided in four groups. In all rats, under operation microscope, a 3 mm titanium microscrew was implanted in the thoracolumbar area (T10-L1) after laminar decortication. In Group I (control group), sterile isotonic solution and in other three groups, different concentrations of Staphylococcus aureus [Group II: (10(2)), Group III: (10(3)), Group IV: (10(6))] were squirted on the decorticated lamina site. All animals were sacrificed after 2 weeks, and then blood cultures and cultures from fascia, muscle and bone were obtained. Bacterial number in each tissue was measured as colony-forming unit per gram tissue. Titanium microscrews were placed in 0.5 ml tryptic soy broth and vortexed than plated on trypticase soy agar to determine bacterial growth. Two animals from each group were subjected to histological examination. Blood cultures obtained by intra-atrial puncture after 2 weeks were negative in all groups indicating no systemical infection developed. Bacterial cultures were negative in all specimens of Group I (control group). A significant osseous infection was confirmed in Groups II, III and IV. Comparison of bacterial counts in bone cultures showed no significant difference between Group III (10(3) CFU/10 microl) and Group IV (10(6) CFU/10 microl) (P > 0.05), while both groups had significantly higher counts than Group II (10(2) CFU/10 microl) (P > 0.05). Microscopic findings of supurrative inflammation were present only in Group IV (10(6) CFU/10 microl). This study shows that inoculation of S. aureus in 10(6) CFU/10 microl concentration at the decorticated lamina after implantation of a titanium screw in rat spine is a

  12. Rehabilitative exercise in a rat model of doxorubicin cardiotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydock, David S; Lien, Chia-Ying; Jensen, Brock T; Parry, Traci L; Schneider, Carole M; Hayward, Reid

    2012-12-01

    The use of exercise to minimize doxorubicin (DOX)-induced cardiotoxicity is gaining attention. However, very few clinically relevant reports exist investigating the effects of exercise performed during and following DOX treatments. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to examine the effects of voluntary wheel running during and following DOX treatment using two models of late-onset DOX cardiotoxicity in the rat. Female Sprague-Dawley rats received either DOX or saline injections using one of two separate treatment regimens. These regimens involved either daily or weekly DOX injections with cumulative doses for both protocols totaling 15 mg/kg. Daily DOX injections were 1 mg/kg and lasted for 15 consecutive days while weekly DOX injections were 2.5 mg/kg and lasted for six consecutive weeks with control animals receiving matched saline injection regimens. Immediately following the initial DOX/saline injection, animals were randomly housed in cages with voluntary running wheels or standard rat cages throughout DOX/saline treatments and continued until reaching 10 weeks. Cardiac function was then assessed using echocardiography and an isolated working heart model, and myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform distribution was assessed using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. When compared wth controls, daily DOX treatment resulted in reduced running wheel distances at weeks 2-10 (P running wheel distances at weeks 2, 6 and 10 (P running during and following daily and weekly DOX dosing protected against DOX-induced cardiotoxicity by preserving maximal mitral and aortic blood flow velocities, left ventricular developed pressure and MHC isoform expression. In conclusion, the overall reduced volume of activity during and following daily and weekly DOX treatments attenuated DOX-induced cardiac dysfunction suggesting that low-volume endurance training may be an effective rehabilitative approach in minimizing DOX cardiotoxicity in cancer patients.

  13. A SIMPLE EXPERIMENTAL MODEL OF HEAT SHOCK RESPONSE IN RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tufi Neder Meyer

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To obtain a simple model for the elicitation of the heat shock response in rats. Design: Laboratory study. Setting: University research laboratories. Sample: Seventy-nine adult male albino rats (weight range 200 g to 570 g. Procedures: Exposure to heat stress by heating animals in a warm bath for 5 min after their rectal temperatures reached 107.60 F (420 C. Liver and lung samples were collected for heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70 detection (Western analysis. Results: Western analysis was positive for HSP70 in the liver and in the lungs of heated animals. There was a temporal correlation between heating and HSP70 detection: it was strongest 1 day after heating and reduced afterwards. No heated animals died. Conclusion: These data show that heating rats in a warm (45o C bath, according to parameters set in this model, elicits efficiently the heat shock response.OBJETIVO: Obter um modelo simples para tentar esclarecer a resposta ao choque térmico em ratos. LOCAL: Laboratório de pesquisa da Universidade. MÉTODO: Amostra: 79 ratos albinos, adultos, entre 200g a 570g. Procedimentos: Exposição ao calor, em banho quente, por 5 minutos, após a temperatura retal chegar a 42 graus centigrados. Biópsias de fígado e pulmão foram obtidas para detectar a proteina 70 (HSP 70, pelo "Western blot". RESULTADOS: As análises foram positivas nos animais aquecidos, com uma correlação entre aquecimento e constatação da HSP 70. Foi mais elevada no primeiro dia e não houve óbitos nos animais aquecidos. CONCLUSÃO: Os ratos aquecidos a 45 graus centígrados respondem eficientemente ao choque térmico.

  14. New rat model that phenotypically resembles autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Nauta (Jeroen); M.A. Goedbloed (Miriam); H.V. Herck; D.A. Hesselink (Dennis); P. Visser (Pim); R. Willemsen (Rob); R.P.E. van Dokkum (Richard); C.J. Wright; L.M. Guay-Woodford

    2000-01-01

    textabstractNumerous murine models of polycystic kidney disease (PKD) have been described. While mouse models are particularly well suited for investigating the molecular pathogenesis of PKD, rats are well established as an experimental model of renal physiologic

  15. Artificial neural network approach for selection of susceptible single nucleotide polymorphisms and construction of prediction model on childhood allergic asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobayashi Takeshi

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Screening of various gene markers such as single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP and correlation between these markers and development of multifactorial disease have previously been studied. Here, we propose a susceptible marker-selectable artificial neural network (ANN for predicting development of allergic disease. Results To predict development of childhood allergic asthma (CAA and select susceptible SNPs, we used an ANN with a parameter decreasing method (PDM to analyze 25 SNPs of 17 genes in 344 Japanese people, and select 10 susceptible SNPs of CAA. The accuracy of the ANN model with 10 SNPs was 97.7% for learning data and 74.4% for evaluation data. Important combinations were determined by effective combination value (ECV defined in the present paper. Effective 2-SNP or 3-SNP combinations were found to be concentrated among the 10 selected SNPs. Conclusion ANN can reliably select SNP combinations that are associated with CAA. Thus, the ANN can be used to characterize development of complex diseases caused by multiple factors. This is the first report of automatic selection of SNPs related to development of multifactorial disease from SNP data of more than 300 patients.

  16. Generalized non-local surface susceptibility model and Fresnel coefficients for the characterization of periodic metafilms with bianisotropic scatterers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimitriadis, Alexandros I., E-mail: aldimitr@ee.auth.gr [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Kantartzis, Nikolaos V., E-mail: kant@auth.gr [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Tsiboukis, Theodoros D., E-mail: tsibukis@auth.gr [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Hafner, Christian, E-mail: hafner@ethz.ch [Department of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, ETH Zurich, Gloriastrasse 35, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: •Formulas for E/M fields radiated by continuous surface polarization distributions. •Non-local effective surface susceptibility model for periodic metafilms. •Generalized reflection and transmission coefficients for an arbitrary metafilm. •Successful treatment of non-planar scatterer arrays and spatial dispersion effects. -- Abstract: A non-local surface susceptibility model for the consistent description of periodic metafilms formed by arbitrarily-shaped, electrically-small, bianisotropic scatterers is developed in this paper. The rigorous scheme is based on the point-dipole approximation technique and is valid for any polarization and propagation direction of an electromagnetic wave impinging upon the metafilm, unlike existing approaches whose applicability is practically confined to very specific cases of incidence. Next, the universal form of the resulting surface susceptibility matrix is employed for the derivation of the generalized Fresnel coefficients for such surfaces, which enable the comprehensive interpretation of several significant, yet relatively unexamined, physical interactions. Essentially, these coefficients include eight distinct terms, corresponding to the co-polarized and cross-polarized reflection and transmission coefficients for the two orthogonal eigenpolarizations of a linearly-polarized incident plane wave. The above formulas are, then, utilized for the prediction of the scattering properties of metafilms with different planar and non-planar resonators, which are characterized via the featured model and two previously reported local ones. Their comparison with numerical simulation outcomes substantiates the merits of the proposed method, reveals important aspects of the underlying physics, and highlights the differences between the various modeling procedures.

  17. Correction of liver disease following transplantation of normal rat hepatocytes into Long-Evans Cinnamon rats modeling Wilson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irani, A N; Malhi, H; Slehria, S; Gorla, G R; Volenberg, I; Schilsky, M L; Gupta, S

    2001-03-01

    To establish the efficacy of cell therapy in Wilson's disease, we used the Long-Evans Cinnamon (LEC) rat model with atp7b gene mutation and copper toxicosis. Several groups of LEC rats were established, including animals pretreated with retrorsine to exacerbate copper toxicosis and inhibit proliferation in native hepatocytes followed by partial hepatectomy to promote liver repopulation. Hepatocytes from normal, syngeneic LEA rats were transplanted intrasplenically. Animal survival, biliary copper excretion, and hepatic copper were determined. The magnitude of liver repopulation was demonstrated by measuring serum ceruloplasmin and hepatic atp7b mRNA. Long-term survival in LEC rats treated with retrorsine, partial hepatectomy, and cell transplantation was up to 90%, whereas fewer than 10% of animals pretreated with retrorsine, without cell therapy, survived, P Wilson's disease.

  18. Face Graft Scaffold Production in a Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duisit, Jérôme; Amiel, Hadrien; Orlando, Giuseppe; Dedriche, Adeline; Behets, Catherine; Gianello, Pierre; Lengelé, Benoît

    2018-01-01

    As a route toward face bioengineering, the authors previously reported the production of a complete scaffold by perfusion-decellularization of a porcine ear subunit graft and partial recellularization. To extend the scaffold to the whole face and to down-scale it, they applied their findings to a rodent hemifacial graft model. After the animals were killed, seven full-thickness rat hemiface grafts were harvested with the common carotid artery and the external jugular vein as a pedicle, and cannulated. Grafts were decellularized by a detergent-based protocol: either by perfusion through the common carotid artery, or by mechanical agitation. After decellularization, samples were analyzed for DNA quantification and histology by hematoxylin and eosin, Masson trichrome, Sirius red, or Safranin O staining. Vascular tree patency was assessed by microangiographic computed tomography after contrast injection. Cell-friendly extracellular matrix was assessed by seeding of human adipose-derived stem cells and vital staining after 7 days of culture. Decellularization was effective in both groups, with a cell clearance at all levels, with the exception of cartilage areas in the agitation-treated groups. Microscopic assessment found a well-preserved extracellular matrix in both groups. Vascular contrast was found in all regions of the scaffolds. After the animals were killed, seeded cells were found viable and well distributed on all scaffolds. The authors successfully decellularized face grafts in a rodent model, with a preserved vascular tree. Perfusion-decellularization led to better and faster results compared with mechanical agitation but is not mandatory in this model. The rat face is an interesting scaffold model for further recellularization studies, in the final goal of human face bioengineering.

  19. Metformin and atorvastatin reduce adhesion formation in a rat uterine horn model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Bulent; Aksakal, Orhan; Gungor, Tayfun; Sirvan, Levent; Sut, Necdet; Kelekci, Sefa; Soysal, Sunullah; Mollamahmutoglu, Leyla

    2009-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether atorvastatin and metformin are effective in preventing adhesions in a rat uterine horn model. A total of 40 non-pregnant, female Wistar albino rats, weighing 180-210 g, were used as a model for post-operative adhesion formation. The rats were randomized into four groups after seven standard lesions were inflicted in each uterine horn and lower abdominal sidewall using bipolar cauterization. The rats were given atorvastatin 2.5 mg/kg/day, p.o. (10 rats), atorvastatin 30 mg/kg/day, p.o. (10 rats), metformin 50 mg/kg/day, p.o. (10 rats) and no treatment was applied in the control group (10 rats). The animals were killed 2 weeks later and adhesions were scored both clinically and pathologically by authors blinded to groups. One rat in the control group died before the end of the 2 week period. Total clinical adhesion scores regarding extent, severity and degree of adhesions and histopathological findings including inflammation and fibrosis were significantly lower in the metformin (P < 0.001 and P < 0.01, respectively) and atorvastatin 30 mg/kg/day (P < 0.001 and P < 0.01, respectively) groups when compared with control group. Metformin and atorvastatin are both effective for prevention of adhesion formation in a rat uterine horn model.

  20. Teriparatide and the treatment of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw: a rat model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ersan, N.; van Ruijven, L.J.; Bronckers, A.L.J.J.; Olgaç, V.; Ìlgüy, D.; Everts, V.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The objectives of this study were to establish a bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) rat model and to analyse the effects of teriparatide (TP) on this model. Methods: Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: I—zoledronic acid (ZA, n = 10); II—ZA and

  1. Validation of infrared thermography in serotonin-induced itch model in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dagnæs-Hansen, Frederik; Jasemian, Yousef; Gazerani, Parisa

    The number of scratching bouts is generally used as a standard method in animal models of itch. The aim of the present study was to validate the application of infrared thermography (IR-Th) in a serotonin-induced itch model in rats. Adult Sprague-Dawley male rats (n = 24) were used in 3 consecutive...

  2. Respiratory tract lung geometry and dosimetry model for male Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Frederick J.; Asgharian, Bahman; Schroeter, Jeffry D.; Price, Owen; Corley, Richard A.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Jacob, Rick E.; Cox, Timothy C.; Kabilan, Senthil; Bentley, Timothy

    2014-08-26

    While inhalation toxicological studies of various compounds have been conducted using a number of different strains of rats, mechanistic dosimetry models have only had tracheobronchial (TB) structural data for Long-Evans rats, detailed morphometric data on the alveolar region of Sprague-Dawley rats and limited alveolar data on other strains. Based upon CT imaging data for two male Sprague-Dawley rats, a 15-generation, symmetric typical path model was developed for the TB region. Literature data for the alveolar region of Sprague-Dawley rats were analyzed to develop an eight-generation model, and the two regions were joined to provide a complete lower respiratory tract model for Sprague-Dawley rats. The resulting lung model was used to examine particle deposition in Sprague-Dawley rats and to compare these results with predicted deposition in Long-Evans rats. Relationships of various physiologic variables and lung volumes were either developed in this study or extracted from the literature to provide the necessary input data for examining particle deposition. While the lengths, diameters and branching angles of the TB airways differed between the two Sprague- Dawley rats, the predicted deposition patterns in the three major respiratory tract regions were very similar. Between Sprague-Dawley and Long-Evans rats, significant differences in TB and alveolar predicted deposition fractions were observed over a wide range of particle sizes, with TB deposition fractions being up to 3- to 4-fold greater in Sprague-Dawley rats and alveolar deposition being significantly greater in Long-Evans rats. Thus, strain-specific lung geometry models should be used for particle deposition calculations and interspecies dose comparisons.

  3. Respiratory Tract Lung Geometry and Dosimetry Model for Male Sprague-Dawley Rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Frederick J.; Asgharian, Bahman; Schroeter, Jeffry D.; Price, Owen; Corley, Richard A.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Jacob, Rick E.; Cox, Timothy C.; Kabilan, Senthil; Bentley, Timothy

    2015-07-24

    While inhalation toxicological studies of various compounds have been conducted using a number of different strains of rats, mechanistic dosimetry models have only had tracheobronchial (TB) structural data for Long-Evans rats, detailed morphometric data on the alveolar region of Sprague-Dawley rats and limited alveolar data on other strains. Based upon CT imaging data for two male Sprague-Dawley rats, a 15-generation, symmetric typical path model was developed for the TB region. Literature data for the alveolar region of Sprague-Dawley rats were analyzed to develop an eight-generation model, and the two regions were joined to provide a complete lower respiratory tract model for Sprague-Dawley rats. The resulting lung model was used to examine particle deposition in Sprague-Dawley rats and to compare these results with predicted deposition in Long-Evans rats. Relationships of various physiologic variables and lung volumes were either developed in this study or extracted from the literature to provide the necessary input data for examining particle deposition. While the lengths, diameters and branching angles of the TB airways differed between the two Sprague-Dawley rats, the predicted deposition patterns in the three major respiratory tract regions were very similar. Between Sprague-Dawley and Long-Evans rats, significant differences in TB and alveolar predicted deposition fractions were observed over a wide range of particle sizes, with TB deposition fractions being up to 3- to 4-fold greater in Sprague-Dawley rats and alveolar deposition being significantly greater in Long-Evans rats. Thus, strain-specific lung geometry models should be used for particle deposition calculations and interspecies dose comparisons.

  4. Rheumatoid arthritis: identifying and characterising polymorphisms using rat models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory joint disorder characterised by erosive inflammation of the articular cartilage and by destruction of the synovial joints. It is regulated by both genetic and environmental factors, and, currently, there is no preventative treatment or cure for this disease. Genome-wide association studies have identified ∼100 new loci associated with rheumatoid arthritis, in addition to the already known locus within the major histocompatibility complex II region. However, together, these loci account for only a modest fraction of the genetic variance associated with this disease and very little is known about the pathogenic roles of most of the risk loci identified. Here, we discuss how rat models of rheumatoid arthritis are being used to detect quantitative trait loci that regulate different arthritic traits by genetic linkage analysis and to positionally clone the underlying causative genes using congenic strains. By isolating specific loci on a fixed genetic background, congenic strains overcome the challenges of genetic heterogeneity and environmental interactions associated with human studies. Most importantly, congenic strains allow functional experimental studies be performed to investigate the pathological consequences of natural genetic polymorphisms, as illustrated by the discovery of several major disease genes that contribute to arthritis in rats. We discuss how these advances have provided new biological insights into arthritis in humans. PMID:27736747

  5. Modafinil improves monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyeryon; Kim, Kwan Chang; Cho, Min-Sun; Suh, Suk-Hyo; Hong, Young Mi

    2016-07-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) progressively leads to increases in pulmonary vasoconstriction. Modafinil plays a role in vasorelaxation and blocking KCa3.1 channel with a result of elevating intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects on modafinil in monocrotaline (MCT)-induced PAH rat. The rats were separated into three groups: the control group, the monocrotaline (M) group (MCT 60 mg/kg), and the modafinil (MD) group (MCT 60 mg/kg + modafinil). Reduced right ventricular pressure (RVP) was observed in the MD group. Right ventricular hypertrophy was improved in the MD group. Reduced number of intra-acinar pulmonary arteries and medial wall thickness were noted in the MD group. After the administration of modafinil, protein expressions of endothelin-1 (ET-1), endothelin receptor A (ERA) and KCa3.1 channel were significantly reduced. Modafinil suppressed pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) proliferation via cAMP and KCa3.1 channel. Additionally, we confirmed protein expressions such as Bcl-2-associated X, vascular endothelial growth factor, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-6 were reduced in the MD group. Modafinil improved PAH by vasorelaxation and a decrease in medial thickening via ET-1, ERA, and KCa3.1 down regulation. This is a meaningful study of a modafinil in PAH model.

  6. Neuropathogenesis of Zika Virus in a Highly Susceptible Immunocompetent Mouse Model after Antibody Blockade of Type I Interferon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darci R Smith

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal models are needed to better understand the pathogenic mechanisms of Zika virus (ZIKV and to evaluate candidate medical countermeasures. Adult mice infected with ZIKV develop a transient viremia, but do not demonstrate signs of morbidity or mortality. Mice deficient in type I or a combination of type I and type II interferon (IFN responses are highly susceptible to ZIKV infection; however, the absence of a competent immune system limits their usefulness for studying medical countermeasures. Here we employ a murine model for ZIKV using wild-type C57BL/6 mice treated with an antibody to disrupt type I IFN signaling to study ZIKV pathogenesis. We observed 40% mortality in antibody treated mice exposed to ZIKV subcutaneously whereas mice exposed by intraperitoneal inoculation were highly susceptible incurring 100% mortality. Mice infected by both exposure routes experienced weight loss, high viremia, and severe neuropathologic changes. The most significant histopathological findings occurred in the central nervous system where lesions represent an acute to subacute encephalitis/encephalomyelitis that is characterized by neuronal death, astrogliosis, microgliosis, scattered necrotic cellular debris, and inflammatory cell infiltrates. This model of ZIKV pathogenesis will be valuable for evaluating medical countermeasures and the pathogenic mechanisms of ZIKV because it allows immune responses to be elicited in immunologically competent mice with IFN I blockade only induced at the time of infection.

  7. Landslide Hazard Assessment and Mapping in the Guil Catchment (Queyras, Southern French Alps): From Landslide Inventory to Susceptibility Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roulleau, Louise; Bétard, François; Carlier, Benoît; Lissak, Candide; Fort, Monique

    2016-04-01

    Landslides are common natural hazards in the Southern French Alps, where they may affect human lives and cause severe damages to infrastructures. As a part of the SAMCO research project dedicated to risk evaluation in mountain areas, this study focuses on the Guil river catchment (317 km2), Queyras, to assess landslide hazard poorly studied until now. In that area, landslides are mainly occasional, low amplitude phenomena, with limited direct impacts when compared to other hazards such as floods or snow avalanches. However, when interacting with floods during extreme rainfall events, landslides may have indirect consequences of greater importance because of strong hillslope-channel connectivity along the Guil River and its tributaries (i.e. positive feedbacks). This specific morphodynamic functioning reinforces the need to have a better understanding of landslide hazards and their spatial distribution at the catchment scale to prevent local population from disasters with multi-hazard origin. The aim of this study is to produce a landslide susceptibility mapping at 1:50 000 scale as a first step towards global estimation of landslide hazard and risk. The three main methodologies used for assessing landslide susceptibility are qualitative (i.e. expert opinion), deterministic (i.e. physics-based models) and statistical methods (i.e. probabilistic models). Due to the rapid development of geographical information systems (GIS) during the last two decades, statistical methods are today widely used because they offer a greater objectivity and reproducibility at large scales. Among them, multivariate analyses are considered as the most robust techniques, especially the logistic regression method commonly used in landslide susceptibility mapping. However, this method like others is strongly dependent on the accuracy of the input data to avoid significant errors in the final results. In particular, a complete and accurate landslide inventory is required before the modelling

  8. Curative effect of sesame oil in a rat model of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chuan-Teng; Chien, Se-Ping; Hsu, Dur-Zong; Periasamy, Srinivasan; Liu, Ming-Yie

    2015-12-01

    Chronic kidney disease causes a progressive and irreversible loss of renal function. We investigated the curative effect of sesame oil, a natural, nutrient-rich, potent antioxidant, in a rat model of chronic kidney disease. Chronic kidney disease was induced by subcutaneously injecting uni-nephrectomized rats with deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA) and 1% NaCl [DOCA/salt] in drinking water. Four weeks later, the rats were gavaged with sesame oil (0.5 or 1 mL/kg per day) for 7 days. Renal injury, histopathological changes, hydroxyl radical, peroxynitrite, lipid peroxidation, Nrf2, osteopontin expression, and collagen were assessed 24 h after the last dose of sesame oil. Blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, urine volume, and albuminuria were significantly higher in the DOCA/salt treated rats than in control rats. Sesame oil significantly decreased these four tested parameters in DOCA/salt treated rats. In addition, creatinine clearance rate and nuclear Nrf2 expression were significantly decreased in the DOCA/salt treated rats compared to control rats. Sesame oil significantly decreased hydroxyl radical, peroxynitrite level, lipid peroxidation, osteopontin, and renal collagen deposition, but increased creatinine clearance rate and nuclear Nrf2 expression in DOCA/salt treated rats. We conclude that supplementation of sesame oil mitigates DOCA/salt induced chronic kidney disease in rats by activating Nrf2 and attenuating osteopontin expression and inhibiting renal fibrosis in rats. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  9. Altered explorative strategies and reactive coping style in the FSL rat model of depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore eMagara

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Modeling depression in animals is based on the observation of behaviors interpreted as analogue to human symptoms. Typical tests used in experimental depression research are designed to evoke an either-or outcome. It is known that explorative and coping strategies are relevant for depression, however these aspects are generally not considered in animal behavioral testing. Here we investigate the Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL, a rat model of depression, compared to the Sprague-Dawley (SD rat in three independent tests where the animals are allowed to express a more extensive behavioral repertoire. The multivariate concentric square field™ (MCSF and the novel cage tests evoke exploratory behaviors in a novel environment and the home cage change test evokes social behaviors in the re-establishment of a social hierarchy. In the MCSF test, FSL rats exhibited less exploratory drive and more risk-assessment behavior compared to SD rats. When re-exposed to the arena, FSL, but not SD rats, increased their exploratory behavior compared to the first trial and displayed risk-assessment behavior to the same extent as SD rats. Thus, the behavior of FSL rats was more similar to that of SDs when the rats were familiar with the arena. In the novel cage test FSL rats exhibited a reactive coping style, consistent with the reduced exploration observed in the MCSF. Reactive coping is associated with less aggressive behavior. Accordingly, FSL rats displayed less aggressive behavior in the home cage change test. Taken together, our data show that FSL rats express altered explorative behavior and reactive coping style. Reduced interest is a core symptom of depression, and individuals with a reactive coping style are more vulnerable to the disease. Our results support the use of FSL rats as an animal model of depression and increase our understanding of the FSL rat beyond the behavioral dimensions targeted by the traditional depression-related tests.

  10. Impaired voluntary wheel running behavior in the unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Qi; Zhang, Wangming; Wang, Jinyan; Luo, Fei; Chang, Jingyu; Xu, Ruxiang

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate voluntary wheel running behavior in the unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) rat model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to 2 groups : 6-OHDA group (n=17) and control group (n=8). The unilateral 6-OHDA rat model was induced by injection of 6-OHDA into unilateral medial forebrain bundle using a stereotaxic instrument. Voluntary wheel running activity was assessed per day in successfully lesioned rats (n=10) and control rats. Each behavioral test lasted an hour. The following parameters were investigated during behavioral tests : the number of running bouts, the distance moved in the wheel, average peak speed in running bouts and average duration from the running start to the peak speed. The number of running bouts and the distance moved in the wheel were significantly decreased in successfully lesioned rats compared with control rats. In addition, average peak speed in running bouts was decreased, and average duration from the running start to the peak speed was increased in lesioned animals, which might indicate motor deficits in these rats. These behavioral changes were still observed 42 days after lesion. Voluntary wheel running behavior is impaired in the unilateral 6-OHDA rat model and may represent a useful tool to quantify motor deficits in this model.

  11. A GRASS GIS-based deterministic model for shallow and deep-seated landslide susceptibility analysis over large areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mergili, Martin; Marchesini, Ivan; Rossi, Mauro; Guzzetti, Fausto; Fellin, Wolfgang

    2013-04-01

    Various deterministic slope stability models, based on the assumption of an infinite slope with a plane, slope-parallel failure plane, have been proposed in the literature. These models are commonly implemented in a GIS environment and are mostly used to model shallow landslides. Other models consider the three-dimensional geometry of possible slope failures and assume an ellipsoidal sliding surface. Such models are best suited to investigate deep-seated landslides. The latter models rely on complex neighbourhood relationships and are difficult to implement in a GIS environment. Here, we present a GIS-based landslide modelling tool that considers the three-dimensional geometry of the sliding surfaces and is capable of dealing with shallow and deep-seated failures. The model is developed in the GRASS GIS software as the C-based raster module r.rotstab, and adopts a modification of the three-dimensional sliding surface model proposed by Hovland and revised and extended by Xie and co-workers. Given a Digital Elevation Model and a set of thematic layers, the model evaluates slope stability for a large number of randomly selected potential slip surfaces, ellipsoidal in shape. Truncated ellipsoids can be used to model the presence of shallow weak layers in the soil or the bedrock. Any single raster cell may be intersected by multiple sliding surfaces, each associated with a computed safety factor. For each grid cell, the lowest value of the safety factor and the depth of the associated slip surface are stored. This information can be used to obtain a spatial overview of the potentially unstable regions in the study area. In addition, a landslide susceptibility index in the range 0 - 1 is calculated. The index relates the number of unstable slip surfaces to the total number of slip surfaces simulated for each pixel. We tested the model in the Collazzone area, Umbria, Central Italy, which is susceptible to landslides of different types. The presence of both shallow

  12. Nicotine self-administration reverses cognitive deficits in a rat model for schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterhouse, Uta; Brennan, Katharine A; Ellenbroek, Bart A

    2018-03-01

    High comorbidity between schizophrenia and tobacco addiction has been well established. Explanatory theories include nicotine as a cognitive enhancer ameliorating symptoms of schizophrenia and underlying shared substrates increasing susceptibility to addiction in these individuals. To test these non-mutually exclusive theories, the maternal immune activation (MIA) model was utilized. To this end, pregnant Sprague Dawley rats were subcutaneously injected with a bacterial endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide (0.5 mg/kg), on gestation days 10 and 11. Selective attention and working memory in adult male offspring were subsequently assessed using the latent inhibition and delayed non-matching to sample paradigms both before and after nicotine or saline self-administration. MIA led to deficits in both latent inhibition and delayed non-matching to sample in male offspring. Further, these animals showed a small but significantly increased responding for nicotine during self-administration acquisition, although there was no difference in dose-response effect or in progressive ratio testing. However, nicotine, but not saline self-administration, significantly ameliorated the cognitive deficits induced by MIA. While the male offspring of mothers prenatally exposed to lipopolysaccharide was only slightly more sensitive to the reinforcing effects of nicotine, after self-administration, the MIA-induced cognitive deficits significantly improved. These data lend support for the self-medication hypothesis of schizophrenia. © 2017 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  13. [Analysis for susceptibility of breast cancer due to gene SMC4L1 based on a multi-criteria evaluation model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chao; Jiang, Yan

    2011-06-01

    The recent literature has proposed a multi-criteria evaluation model for breast cancer susceptibility. In this paper we employ the model to analyze the breast cancer susceptibility of several candidate genes having various relations with known breast cancer genes. Based on the model, we employed weight sum and TOPSIS methods to calculate the quantitative relations between candidate genes and breast cancer susceptibility. After the calculation, two ranking evaluation lists of alternatives were resulted from the two methods. The results generated with the two different methods were remarkably similar, while the top 7 were exactly identical. So the top 7 genes were analyzed, and the result from multi-criteria model was consistent with the previous research. A search of the literature using PubMed demonstrates CDC2 gene ranked first is researched frequently. Furthermore, TopBP1 gene ranked second and HMMR gene ranked 6th are identified as susceptibility genes for breast cancer by references in the literature. This multi-objective evaluation model can accurately represent the complex relationship between candidate genes and breast cancer susceptibility. Then this paper focuses on SMC4L1 gene ranked third. The analysis from various aspects indicates that SMC4L1 is potential to be a susceptibility gene for breast cancer. It's worthwhile to research on SMC4L1 and other top genes in result prior to and afterwards.

  14. Nonlinear mixed-effects modelling of in vitro drug susceptibility and molecular correlates of multidrug resistant Plasmodium falciparum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie A Simpson

    Full Text Available The analysis of in vitro anti-malarial drug susceptibility testing is vulnerable to the effects of different statistical approaches and selection biases. These confounding factors were assessed with respect to pfmdr1 gene mutation and amplification in 490 clinical isolates. Two statistical approaches for estimating the drug concentration associated with 50% effect (EC50 were compared: the commonly used standard two-stage (STS method, and nonlinear mixed-effects modelling. The in vitro concentration-effect relationships for, chloroquine, mefloquine, lumefantrine and artesunate, were derived from clinical isolates obtained from patients on the western border of Thailand. All isolates were genotyped for polymorphisms in the pfmdr1 gene. The EC50 estimates were similar for the two statistical approaches but 15-28% of isolates in the STS method had a high coefficient of variation (>15% for individual estimates of EC50 and these isolates had EC50 values that were 32 to 66% higher than isolates derived with more precision. In total 41% (202/490 of isolates had amplification of pfmdr1 and single nucleotide polymorphisms were found in 50 (10%. Pfmdr1 amplification was associated with an increase in EC50 for mefloquine (139% relative increase in EC50 for 2 copies, 188% for 3+ copies, lumefantrine (82% and 75% for 2 and 3+ copies respectively and artesunate (63% and 127% for 2 and 3+ copies respectively. In contrast pfmdr1 mutation at codons 86 or 1042 were associated with an increase in chloroquine EC50 (44-48%. Sample size calculations showed that to demonstrate an EC50 shift of 50% or more with 80% power if the prevalence was 10% would require 430 isolates and 245 isolates if the prevalence was 20%. In conclusion, although nonlinear mixed-effects modelling did not demonstrate any major advantage for determining estimates of anti-malarial drug susceptibility, the method includes all isolates, thereby, potentially improving confirmation of candidate

  15. Clusterin and Pycr1 alterations associate with strain and model differences in susceptibility to experimental pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Sapna; Park, Min-Jung; Moons, David; Kwan, Raymond; Liao, Jian; Liu, Li; Omary, M Bishr

    2017-01-22

    Acute pancreatitis has several underlying etiologies, and results in consequences ranging from mild to complex multi-organ failure. The wide range of pathology suggests a genetic predisposition for progression. We compared the susceptibility to acute pancreatitis in BALB/c and FVB/N mice, coupled with proteomic analysis, in order to identify potential protein associations with pancreatitis progression. Pancreatitis was induced in BALB/c and FVB/N mice by administration of cerulein or feeding a choline-deficient, ethionine-supplemented (CDE) diet. Histology and changes in serum amylase were examined. Proteome profiling in cerulein-treated mice was performed using 2-dimensional differential in gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) followed by mass spectrometry analysis and biochemical validation. Male and female FVB/N mice manifested more severe cerulein-induced pancreatitis as compared with BALB/c mice, but both strains were similarly susceptible to CDE-induced pancreatitis. Few of the 2D-DIGE alterations were validated by immunoblotting. Clusterin was markedly up-regulated after cerulein-induced pancreatitis in FVB/N but less-so in BALB/c mice. Pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase (Pycr1), an enzyme involved in proline biosynthesis, had higher basal levels in FVB/N male and female mouse pancreata compared with BALB/c pancreata, and was relatively more resistant to degradation in FVB/N pancreata. However, serum and pancreas tissue proline levels were similar in the two strains. FVB/N is more susceptible than BALB/c mice to cerulein-induced but not CDE-induced pancreatitis. Most of the 2D-DIGE alterations in the two strains likely relate to posttranslational modifications rather than protein level differences. Clusterin levels increase dramatically in association with pancreatitis severity, while Pycr1 is higher in FVB/N versus BALB/c pancreata basally and after induction of pancreatitis. Changes in proline metabolism may represent a novel potential genetic modifier in the

  16. Hyperglycemia Increases Susceptibility to Ischemic Necrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Lévigne

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic patients are at risk for spontaneous foot ulcers, chronic wounds, infections, and tissue necrosis. Current theories suggest that the development and progression of diabetic foot ulcers are mainly caused by arteriosclerosis and peripheral neuropathy. Tissue necrosis plays a primordial role in the progression of diabetic foot ulcers but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of hyperglycemia per se on the susceptibility of ischemic tissue to necrosis, using a critical ischemic hind limb animal model. We inflicted the same degree of ischemia in both euglycemic and streptozotocin-induced hyperglycemic rats by resecting the external iliac, the femoral, and the saphenous arteries. Postoperative laser Doppler flowmetry of the ischemic feet showed the same degree of reduction in skin perfusion in both hyperglycemic and euglycemic animals. Nevertheless, we found a significantly higher rate of limb necrosis in hyperglycemic rats compared to euglycemic rats (71% versus 29%, resp.. In this study, we revealed that hyperglycemia per se increases the susceptibility to limb necrosis in ischemic conditions. Our results may help to better understand the physiopathology of progressive diabetic wounds and underline the importance of strict glycemic control in patients with critical limb ischemia.

  17. Effect of castration on the susceptibility of male rats to the sleep deprivation-induced impairment of behavioral and synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajali, Vahid; Sheibani, Vahid; Ghazvini, Hamed; Ghadiri, Tahereh; Valizadeh, Toktam; Saadati, Hakimeh; Shabani, Mohammad

    2015-09-01

    In both human and animal studies, the effect of sleep deficiency on cognitive performances has mostly been studied during adulthood in males, but very little data exist concerning the effects of poor sleep in gonadal hormones-depleted status, such as aging or gonadectomized (GDX) male animal models. The present study investigated the potential modulatory effects of the endogenous male sex hormones on the 48h REM sleep deprivation (SD)-induced cognitive and synaptic impairments by comparing the gonadally intact with castrated male rats, a rodent model of androgen-deprived male animals. The multiple platform method was used for inducing REM-SD and spatial performances were evaluated using Morris water maze (MWM) task. Early long-term potentiation (E-LTP) was measured in area CA1 of the hippocampus and PCR and western blotting assays were employed to assess brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene and protein expression in the hippocampus. To reveal any influence of sleep loss on stress level, we also evaluated the plasma corticosterone levels of animals. Regardless of reproductive status, REM-SD significantly disrupted short-term memory and LTP, as well as hippocampal BDNF expression. The corticosterone levels were not significantly changed following REM-SD neither in intact nor in GDX male rats. These findings suggest that depletion of male sex steroid hormones by castration does not lead to any heightened sensitivity of male animals to the deleterious effects of 48h REM-SD on cognitive and synaptic performances. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Antiulcer activity and the mechanism of action of magaldrate in gastric ulceration models of rat

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Patel, A V; Santani, D D; Goyal, R K

    2000-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the mechanism of cytoprotective effects of magaldrate in aspirin plus pylorus-ligation model and ethanol-induced gastric ulcer model in rats. Magaldrate (60 mg/kg, p.o...

  19. Bone quantitative susceptibility mapping using a chemical species-specific R2* signal model with ultrashort and conventional echo data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimov, Alexey V; Liu, Zhe; Spincemaille, Pascal; Prince, Martin R; Du, Jiang; Wang, Yi

    2017-03-05

    To develop quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) of bone using an ultrashort echo time (UTE) gradient echo (GRE) sequence for signal acquisition and a bone-specific effective transverse relaxation rate ( R2*) to model water-fat MR signals for field mapping. Three-dimensional radial UTE data (echo times ≥ 40 μs) was acquired on a 3 Tesla scanner and fitted with a bone-specific signal model to map the chemical species and susceptibility field. Experiments were performed ex vivo on a porcine hoof and in vivo on healthy human subjects (n = 7). For water-fat separation, a bone-specific model assigning R2* decay mostly to water was compared with the standard models that assigned the same decay for both fat and water. In the ex vivo experiment, bone QSM was correlated with CT. Compared with standard models, the bone-specific R2* method significantly reduced errors in the fat fraction within the cortical bone in all tested data sets, leading to reduced artifacts in QSM. Good correlation was found between bone CT and QSM values in the porcine hoof (R(2)  = 0.77). Bone QSM was successfully generated in all subjects. The QSM of bone is feasible using UTE with a conventional echo time GRE acquisition and a bone-specific R2* signal model. Magn Reson Med 000:000-000, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  20. Sleep Changes in a Rat Prenatal Stress Model of Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skoven, Christian; Sickman, Helle M.; Bastlund, Jesper Frank

    determination of sleep-wakefulness state. As traumatic episodes can trigger episodes of clinical depression, we also investigated effects of an acute stressor during the recording period. PNS animals (n=21) had an 82% increase in amount of REMS (11.6±1.4% vs 6.3±0.9%; phours of the dark......Major depression is one of the most frequently occurring mental health disorders, but is characterized by diverse symptomatology. Sleep disturbances, however, are commonplace in depressive patients. These alterations include increased duration of Rapid Eye Movement Sleep (REMS) and increased sleep...... fragmentation. Stressful life events during the second trimester of human pregnancy increase the risk of depression in the offspring. Similarly, rodents exposed to prenatal stress (PNS) during gestation express depression- like behavioral changes. Accordingly, we investigated sleep changes in a rat PNS model...

  1. A model of calcium homeostasis in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granjon, David; Bonny, Olivier; Edwards, Aurélie

    2016-11-01

    We developed a model of calcium homeostasis in the rat to better understand the impact of dysfunctions such as primary hyperparathyroidism and vitamin D deficiency on calcium balance. The model accounts for the regulation of calcium intestinal uptake, bone resorption, and renal reabsorption by parathyroid hormone (PTH), vitamin D 3 , and Ca 2+ itself. It is the first such model to incorporate recent findings regarding the role of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) in the kidney, the presence of a rapidly exchangeable pool in bone, and the delayed response of vitamin D 3 synthesis. Accounting for two (fast and slow) calcium storage compartments in bone allows the model to properly predict the effects of bisphophonates on the plasma levels of Ca 2+ ([Ca 2+ ] p ), PTH, and vitamin D 3 Our model also suggests that Ca 2+ exchange rates between plasma and the fast pool vary with both sex and age, allowing [Ca 2+ ] p to remain constant in spite of sex- and age-based hormonal and other differences. Our results suggest that the inconstant hypercalciuria that is observed in primary hyperparathyroidism can be attributed in part to counterbalancing effects of PTH and CaSR in the kidney. Our model also correctly predicts that calcimimetic agents such as cinacalcet bring down [Ca 2+ ] p to within its normal range in primary hyperparathyroidism. In addition, the model provides a simulation of CYP24A1 inactivation that leads to a situation reminiscent of infantile hypercalcemia. In summary, our model of calcium handling can be used to decipher the complex regulation of calcium homeostasis. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Modeling interpopulation dispersal by banner-tailed kangaroo rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skvarla, J.L.; Nichols, J.D.; Hines, J.E.; Waser, P.M.

    2004-01-01

    Many metapopulation models assume rules of population connectivity that are implicitly based on what we know about within-population dispersal, but especially for vertebrates, few data exist to assess whether interpopulation dispersal is just within-population dispersal "scaled up." We extended existing multi-stratum mark-release-recapture models to incorporate the robust design, allowing us to compare patterns of within- and between-population movement in the banner-tailed kangaroo rat (Dipodomys spectabilis). Movement was rare among eight populations separated by only a few hundred meters: seven years of twice-annual sampling captured >1200 individuals but only 26 interpopulation dispersers. We developed a program that implemented models with parameters for capture, survival, and interpopulation movement probability and that evaluated competing hypotheses in a model selection framework. We evaluated variants of the island, stepping-stone, and isolation-by-distance models of interpopulation movement, incorporating effects of age, season, and habitat (short or tall grass). For both sexes, QAICc values clearly favored isolation-by-distance models, or models combining the effects of isolation by distance and habitat. Models with probability of dispersal expressed as linear-logistic functions of distance and as negative exponentials of distance fit the data equally well. Interpopulation movement probabilities were similar among sexes (perhaps slightly biased toward females), greater for juveniles than adults (especially for females), and greater before than during the breeding season (especially for females). These patterns resemble those previously described for within-population dispersal in this species, which we interpret as indicating that the same processes initiate both within- and between-population dispersal.

  3. Impact of host age and parity on susceptibility to severe urinary tract infection in a murine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly A Kline

    Full Text Available The epidemiology and bacteriology of urinary tract infection (UTI varies across the human lifespan, but the reasons for these differences are poorly understood. Using established monomicrobial and polymicrobial murine UTI models caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC and/or Group B Streptococcus (GBS, we demonstrate age and parity as inter-related factors contributing to UTI susceptibility. Young nulliparous animals exhibited 10-100-fold higher bacterial titers compared to older animals. In contrast, multiparity was associated with more severe acute cystitis in older animals compared to age-matched nulliparous controls, particularly in the context of polymicrobial infection where UPEC titers were ∼1000-fold higher in the multiparous compared to the nulliparous host. Multiparity was also associated with significantly increased risk of chronic high titer UPEC cystitis and ascending pyelonephritis. Further evidence is provided that the increased UPEC load in multiparous animals required TLR4-signaling. Together, these data strongly suggest that the experience of childbearing fundamentally and permanently changes the urinary tract and its response to pathogens in a manner that increases susceptibility to severe UTI. Moreover, this murine model provides a system for dissecting these and other lifespan-associated risk factors contributing to severe UTI in at-risk groups.

  4. Cyclosporin safety in a simplified rat brain tumor implantation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco H. C. Felix

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain cancer is the second neurological cause of death. A simplified animal brain tumor model using W256 (carcinoma 256, Walker cell line was developed to permit the testing of novel treatment modalities. Wistar rats had a cell tumor solution inoculated stereotactically in the basal ganglia (right subfrontal caudate. This model yielded tumor growth in 95% of the animals, and showed absence of extracranial metastasis and systemic infection. Survival median was 10 days. Estimated tumor volume was 17.08±6.7 mm³ on the 7th day and 67.25±19.8 mm³ on 9th day post-inoculation. Doubling time was 24.25 h. Tumor growth induced cachexia, but no hematological or biochemical alterations. This model behaved as an undifferentiated tumor and can be promising for studying tumor cell migration in the central nervous system. Dexamethasone 3.0 mg/kg/day diminished significantly survival in this model. Cyclosporine 10 mg/kg/day administration was safely tolerated.

  5. A rat model for determining the postprandial response to foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belobrajdic, Damien P; Wei, Jiangqin; Bird, Anthony R

    2017-03-01

    The use of small animal models for studying postprandial changes in circulating nutrients, hormones and metabolic biomarkers is hampered by the limited quantity of blood that can be withdrawn for analysis. Here, we describe the development of an unrestrained, meal-fed rat model, having a permanent or temporary vascular cannula that permits repeated blood sampling. The applicability and performance of the model were evaluated in a series of experiments on acute glycaemic and insulinaemic responses to carbohydrate-based test meals. A test food containing 0.4 g carbohydrate raised blood glucose by 1.5 mmol L -1 . Postprandial blood glucose levels peaked at 15 min and returned to baseline at 180 min, whereas they remained elevated for longer when the test meal contained 1.25 g carbohydrate. The glycaemic response tended (P = 0.063) to be higher when the meal tolerance test was conducted at the start rather than the end of the dark period, but the insulinaemic response was unaffected. The magnitude of the glycaemic response was less for blood collected from the caudal vein compared to that from the jugular vein. Both cannulation strategies were equally effective in enabling return of red blood cells, thus preserving blood volume. This improved small animal model affords new opportunities to screen foods for nutrient bioavailability and explore metabolic mechanisms mediating responses to food consumption. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Circadian urinary citrate excretion in a rat model of exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuñez, Paula; Diaz, Irene; Perillan, Carmen; Arguelles, Juan; Diaz, Elena

    2017-01-15

    Circadian rhythms are the approximate 24h biological cycles that function to prepare an organism for daily environmental changes. Circadian rhythms unquestionably play critical roles in metabolic homeostasis and the exercise has emerged as a strong non-photic time cue or zeitgeber in animal models and humans. Numerous studies about the effects of exercise on the citrate synthase activity have been published. Citrate is used to assess energy production or expenditure because it is a substrate of the Krebs Cycle, a cycle for oxidative energy production. We tested the existence of a rhythmic urinary citrate excretion in a rat model that is made to exercise at six different points during the day. The data obtained by the enzyme assays were fitted to a mathematical model (Fourier series), showing for the first time, the existence of a distinct ultradian rhythm in the urinary citrate excretion. The aerobic exercise led to the increase in the period length of the ultradian rhythm and raised the acrophase value of the urinary citrate excretion. Therefore, the urinary citrate excretion pattern changed after exercise, showing a clear circadian rhythm fitted to the mathematical model. The citrate urine samples could provide accurate data for ranking an individual's metabolic status. Using exercise to maintain the circadian clock at an appropriate phase and amplitude might be effective to prevent cardiometabolic disease development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Differentiated analysis of orthodontic tooth movement in rats with an improved rat model and three-dimensional imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschneck, Christian; Proff, Peter; Fanghaenel, Jochen; Behr, Michael; Wahlmann, Ulrich; Roemer, Piero

    2013-12-01

    Rat models currently available for analysis of orthodontic tooth movement often lack differentiated, reliable and precise measurement systems allowing researchers to separately investigate the individual contribution of tooth tipping, body translation and root torque to overall displacement. Many previously proposed models have serious limitations such as the rather inaccurate analysis of the effects of orthodontic forces on rat incisors. We therefore developed a differentiated measurement system that was used within a rat model with the aim of overcoming the limitations of previous studies. The first left upper molar and the upper incisors of 24 male Wistar rats were subjected to a constant orthodontic force of 0.25 N by means of a NiTi closed coil spring for up to four weeks. The extent of the various types of tooth movement was measured optometrically with a CCD microscope camera and cephalometrically by means of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Both types of measurement proved to be reliable for consecutive measurements and the significant tooth movement induced had no harmful effects on the animals. Movement kinetics corresponded to known physiological processes and tipping and body movement equally contributed to the tooth displacement. The upper incisors of the rats were significantly deformed and their natural eruption was effectively halted. The results showed that our proposed measurement systems used within a rat model resolved most of the inadequacies of previous studies. They are reliable, precise and physiological tools for the differentiated analysis of orthodontic tooth movement while simultaneously preserving animal welfare. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. In Situ Perfusion Model in Rat Colon for Drug Absorption Studies: Comparison with Small Intestine and Caco-2 Cell Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozoya-Agullo, Isabel; González-Álvarez, Isabel; González-Álvarez, Marta; Merino-Sanjuán, Matilde; Bermejo, Marival

    2015-09-01

    Our aim is to develop and to validate the in situ closed loop perfusion method in rat colon and to compare with small intestine and Caco-2 cell models. Correlations with human oral fraction absorbed (Fa) and human colon fraction absorbed (Fa_colon) were developed to check the applicability of the rat colon model for controlled release (CR) drug screening. Sixteen model drugs were selected and their permeabilities assessed in rat small intestine and colon, and in Caco-2 monolayers. Correlations between colon/intestine/Caco-2 permeabilities versus human Fa and human Fa_colon have been explored to check model predictability and to apply a BCS approach in order to propose a cut off value for CR screening. Rat intestine perfusion with Doluisio's method and single-pass technique provided a similar range of permeabilities demonstrating the possibility of combining data from different laboratories. Rat colon permeability was well correlated with Caco-2 cell-4 days model reflecting a higher paracellular permeability. Rat colon permeabilities were also higher than human colon ones. In spite of the magnitude differences, a good sigmoidal relationship has been shown between rat colon permeabilities and human colon fractions absorbed, indicating that rat colon perfusion can be used for compound classification and screening of CR candidates. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  9. Rat model of cancer-induced bone pain: changes in nonnociceptive sensory neurons in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yong Fang; Ungard, Robert; Zacal, Natalie; Huizinga, Jan D; Henry, James L; Singh, Gurmit

    2017-07-01

    Clinical data on cancer-induced bone pain (CIBP) suggest extensive changes in sensory function. In a previous investigation of an animal model of CIBP, we have observed that changes in intrinsic membrane properties and excitability of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) nociceptive neurons correspond to mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia. To investigate the mechanisms underlying changes in nonnociceptive sensory neurons in this model, we have compared the electrophysiological properties of primary nonnociceptive sensory neurons at 2 weeks after CIBP model induction with properties in sham control animals. Copenhagen rats were injected with 10 6 MAT-LyLu rat prostate cancer cells into the distal femur epiphysis to generate a model of CIBP. After von Frey tactile measurement of mechanical withdrawal thresholds, the animals were prepared for acute electrophysiological recordings of mechanically sensitive neurons in the DRG in vivo. The mechanical withdrawal threshold progressively decreased in CIBP model rats. At neurons between CIBP model rats and sham rats. However, at >2 weeks, the Aβ-fiber low-threshold mechanoreceptors (LTMs) in CIBP model rats exhibited a slowing of the dynamics of action potential (AP) genesis, including wider AP duration and lower AP amplitude compared with sham rats. Furthermore, enhanced excitability of Aβ-fiber LTM neurons was observed as an excitatory discharge in response to intracellular injection of depolarizing current into the soma. After induction of the CIBP model, Aβ-fiber LTMs at >2 weeks but not sensory neurons might be involved in the peripheral sensitization and tumor-induced tactile hypersensitivity in CIBP.

  10. Landslide-susceptibility analysis using light detection and ranging-derived digital elevation models and logistic regression models: a case study in Mizunami City, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang-Jie; Sawada, Kazuhide; Moriguchi, Shuji

    2013-01-01

    To mitigate the damage caused by landslide disasters, different mathematical models have been applied to predict landslide spatial distribution characteristics. Although some researchers have achieved excellent results around the world, few studies take the spatial resolution of the database into account. Four types of digital elevation model (DEM) ranging from 2 to 20 m derived from light detection and ranging technology to analyze landslide susceptibility in Mizunami City, Gifu Prefecture, Japan, are presented. Fifteen landslide-causative factors are considered using a logistic-regression approach to create models for landslide potential analysis. Pre-existing landslide bodies are used to evaluate the performance of the four models. The results revealed that the 20-m model had the highest classification accuracy (71.9%), whereas the 2-m model had the lowest value (68.7%). In the 2-m model, 89.4% of the landslide bodies fit in the medium to very high categories. For the 20-m model, only 83.3% of the landslide bodies were concentrated in the medium to very high classes. When the cell size decreases from 20 to 2 m, the area under the relative operative characteristic increases from 0.68 to 0.77. Therefore, higher-resolution DEMs would provide better results for landslide-susceptibility mapping.

  11. Spatial prediction of flood susceptible areas using rule based decision tree (DT) and a novel ensemble bivariate and multivariate statistical models in GIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tehrany, Mahyat Shafapour; Pradhan, Biswajeet; Jebur, Mustafa Neamah

    2013-11-01

    Decision tree (DT) machine learning algorithm was used to map the flood susceptible areas in Kelantan, Malaysia.We used an ensemble frequency ratio (FR) and logistic regression (LR) model in order to overcome weak points of the LR.Combined method of FR and LR was used to map the susceptible areas in Kelantan, Malaysia.Results of both methods were compared and their efficiency was assessed.Most influencing conditioning factors on flooding were recognized.

  12. Validity of the spin-susceptibility ``glue'' approximation for pairing in the two-dimensional Hubbard model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatami, E.; Macridin, A.; Jarrell, M.

    2009-11-01

    We examine the validity of the weak-coupling spin-susceptibility “glue” approximation (SSGA) in a two-dimensional Hubbard model for cuprates. For comparison, we employ the well-established dynamical cluster approximation (DCA) with a quantum Monte Carlo algorithm as a cluster solver. We compare the leading eigenvalues and corresponding eigenfunctions of the DCA and SSGA pairing matrices. For realistic model parameters, we find that the SSGA fails to capture the leading pairing symmetries seen in the DCA. Furthermore, when the SSGA is improved through the addition of a term with d -wave symmetry, the strength of this additional term is found to be larger than that of the glue approximation.

  13. Susceptibility of Marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) to Monkeypox Virus: A Low Dose Prospective Model for Monkeypox and Smallpox Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucker, Eric M; Chapman, Jennifer; Huzella, Louis M; Huggins, John W; Shamblin, Joshua; Robinson, Camenzind G; Hensley, Lisa E

    2015-01-01

    Although current nonhuman primate models of monkeypox and smallpox diseases provide some insight into disease pathogenesis, they require a high titer inoculum, use an unnatural route of infection, and/or do not accurately represent the entire disease course. This is a concern when developing smallpox and/or monkeypox countermeasures or trying to understand host pathogen relationships. In our studies, we altered half of the test system by using a New World nonhuman primate host, the common marmoset. Based on dose finding studies, we found that marmosets are susceptible to monkeypox virus infection, produce a high viremia, and have pathological features consistent with smallpox and monkeypox in humans. The low dose (48 plaque forming units) required to elicit a uniformly lethal disease and the extended incubation (preclinical signs) are unique features among nonhuman primate models utilizing monkeypox virus. The uniform lethality, hemorrhagic rash, high viremia, decrease in platelets, pathology, and abbreviated acute phase are reflective of early-type hemorrhagic smallpox.

  14. Rat indwelling urinary catheter model of Candida albicans biofilm infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nett, Jeniel E; Brooks, Erin G; Cabezas-Olcoz, Jonathan; Sanchez, Hiram; Zarnowski, Robert; Marchillo, Karen; Andes, David R

    2014-12-01

    Indwelling urinary catheters are commonly used in the management of hospitalized patients. Candida can adhere to the device surface and propagate as a biofilm. These Candida biofilm communities differ from free-floating Candida, exhibiting high tolerance to antifungal therapy. The significance of catheter-associated candiduria is often unclear, and treatment may be problematic considering the biofilm drug-resistant phenotype. Here we describe a rodent model for the study of urinary catheter-associated Candida albicans biofilm infection that mimics this common process in patients. In the setting of a functioning, indwelling urinary catheter in a rat, Candida proliferated as a biofilm on the device surface. Characteristic biofilm architecture was observed, including adherent, filamentous cells embedded in an extracellular matrix. Similar to what occurs in human patients, animals with this infection developed candiduria and pyuria. Infection progressed to cystitis, and a biofilmlike covering was observed over the bladder surface. Furthermore, large numbers of C. albicans cells were dispersed into the urine from either the catheter or bladder wall biofilm over the infection period. We successfully utilized the model to test the efficacy of antifungals, analyze transcriptional patterns, and examine the phenotype of a genetic mutant. The model should be useful for future investigations involving the pathogenesis, diagnosis, therapy, prevention, and drug resistance of Candida biofilms in the urinary tract. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Rapamycin is neuroprotective in a rat chronic hypertensive glaucoma model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenru Su

    Full Text Available Glaucoma is a leading cause of irreversible blindness. Injury of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs accounts for visual impairment of glaucoma. Here, we report rapamycin protects RGCs from death in experimental glaucoma model and the underlying mechanisms. Our results showed that treatment with rapamycin dramatically promote RGCs survival in a rat chronic ocular hypertension model. This protective action appears to be attributable to inhibition of neurotoxic mediators release and/or direct suppression of RGC apoptosis. In support of this mechanism, in vitro, rapamycin significantly inhibits the production of NO, TNF-α in BV2 microglials by modulating NF-κB signaling. In experimental animals, treatment with rapamycin also dramatically inhibited the activation of microglials. In primary RGCs, rapamycin was capable of direct suppression the apoptosis of primary RGCs induced by glutamate. Mechanistically, rapamycin-mediated suppression of RGCs apoptosis is by sparing phosphorylation of Akt at a site critical for maintenance of its survival-promoting activity in cell and animal model. These results demonstrate that rapamycin is neuroprotective in experimental glaucoma, possibly via decreasing neurotoxic releasing and suppressing directly apoptosis of RGCs.

  16. Standardised Models for Inducing Experimental Peritoneal Adhesions in Female Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard Kraemer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal models for adhesion induction are heterogeneous and often poorly described. We compare and discuss different models to induce peritoneal adhesions in a randomized, experimental in vivo animal study with 72 female Wistar rats. Six different standardized techniques for peritoneal trauma were used: brushing of peritoneal sidewall and uterine horns (group 1, brushing of parietal peritoneum only (group 2, sharp excision of parietal peritoneum closed with interrupted sutures (group 3, ischemic buttons by grasping the parietal peritoneum and ligating the base with Vicryl suture (group 4, bipolar electrocoagulation of the peritoneum (group 5, and traumatisation by electrocoagulation followed by closure of the resulting peritoneal defect using Vicryl sutures (group 6. Upon second look, there were significant differences in the adhesion incidence between the groups (P<0.01. Analysis of the fraction of adhesions showed that groups 2 (0% and 5 (4% were significantly less than the other groups (P<0.01. Furthermore, group 6 (69% was significantly higher than group 1 (48% (P<0.05 and group 4 (47% (P<0.05. There was no difference between group 3 (60% and group 6 (P=0.2. From a clinical viewpoint, comparison of different electrocoagulation modes and pharmaceutical adhesion barriers is possible with standardised models.

  17. Thujone corrects cholesterol and triglyceride profiles in diabetic rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baddar, Nour W Al-Haj; Aburjai, Talal A; Taha, Mutasem O; Disi, Ahmad M

    2011-07-01

    Thujone, which is the major constituent in Salvia sp. (Lamiaceae), was found to correct the lipid profile (cholesterol and triglycerides) in diabetic rats. Oral treatment with thujone (5 mg kg⁻¹ body weight dose) significantly adjusted cholesterol and triglyceride levels in diabetic rats (p ≤ 0.05) to normal levels compared to diabetic untreated rats. This provides a premise in the field of finding new agents to treat diabetic complications.

  18. Osteoprotective effect of Monascus-fermented dioscorea in ovariectomized rat model of postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Shen-Shih; Chang, Shang-Ping; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2011-09-14

    This experiment established the ovariectomized (OVX) rat model of postmenopausal osteoporosis and examined the effect of the oral administration of different dosages of dioscorea, red mold dioscorea (RMD), and soy isoflavones on bone mineral density (BMD). Three months after osteoporosis had been induced and 4 weeks after feeding had begun, the tibia and femur BMD of OVX rats administered RMD showed significant increases compared with that of all other groups of OVX rats. Closer examination using microcomputed tomography also revealed that the RMD-administered rats had denser trabecular bone volume and a higher trabecular number compared to all other rat groups. Reconstructed 3D imaging indicated increases in cancellous bone mineral content, cancellous bone mineral density, and cortical bone mineral content of the proximal tibia in OVX rats. These findings indicate that administration of monacolin K and phytoestrogen diosgenin could prevent bone loss induced by estrogen deficiency.

  19. A RAT MODEL OF HEART FAILURE INDUCED BY ISOPROTERENOL AND A HIGH SALT DIET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rat models of heart failure (HF) show varied pathology and time to disease outcome, dependent on induction method. We found that subchronic (4wk) isoproterenol (ISO) infusion in Spontaneously Hypertensive Heart Failure (SHHF) rats caused cardiac injury with minimal hypertrophy. O...

  20. Fenugreek Prevents the Development of STZ-Induced Diabetic Nephropathy in a Rat Model of Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingli Jin

    2014-01-01

    evidently reduced by fenugreek treatment. Furthermore, the upregulation of TGF-β1 and CTGF at a transcriptional and translational level in DN rats was distinctly inhibited by fenugreek. Consequently, fenugreek prevents DN development in a STZ-induced diabetic rat model.

  1. Effects of Ecballium elaterium on brain in a rat model of sepsis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Demet Arslan

    2017-08-31

    Aug 31, 2017 ... model of sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE) [induced by cecal ligation and puncture. (CLP)]. Thirty rats were divided into three groups of 10 each: control, sepsis, and treatment. Rats were subjected to CLP except for the control group, which underwent laparatomy only. The treatment group received ...

  2. Evaluation of novel resorbable membranes for bone augmentation in a rat model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeng, N.; van Leeuwen, A.C.; Yuan, Huipin; Bos, R.R.M.; Grijpma, Dirk W.; Kuijer, R.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Our study compared two novel, biodegradable poly(trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC) barrier membranes to clinically applied barrier membranes in maintaining volume of block autologous bone grafts in a rat mandible model. Material and methods Two hundred and forty rats were included in this

  3. Canine Macrophage DH82 Cell Line As a Model to Study Susceptibility to Trypanosoma cruzi Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Henrique Braz Mendonça

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi is an obligatory intracellular protozoan parasite, and it is the etiological agent of Chagas’ disease that is endemic in the Americas. In addition to humans, a wide spectrum of mammals can be infected by T. cruzi, including dogs. Dogs develop acute and chronic disease, similar to human infection. T. cruzi can infect almost all cell types and after cell invasion, the metacyclics trypomastigotes localize in the cytoplasm, where they transform into amastigotes, the replicative form of T. cruzi in mammals. After amastigote multiplication and differentiation, parasites lyse host cells and spread through the body by blood circulation. In this work, we evaluated the in vitro ability of T. cruzi to infect a canine macrophage cell line DH82 compared with RAW264.7, a murine tissue culture macrophage. Our results have shown that the T. cruzi is able to infect, replicate and differentiate in DH82 cell line. We observed that following treatment with LPS and IFN-γ DH82 cells were more resistant to infection and that resistance was not related reactive oxygen species production in our system. In this study, we also found that DH82 cells became more susceptible to T. cruzi infection when cocultured with apoptotic cells. The analysis of cytokine production has showed elevated levels of the TGF-β, IL-10, and TNF-α produced by T. cruzi-infected canine macrophages. Additionally, we demonstrated a reduced expression of the MHC class II and CD80 by infected DH82 cell line.

  4. GIS-based landslide susceptibility mapping models applied to natural and urban planning in Trikala, Central Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skilodimou, H. D.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Landslide susceptibility mapping is a practical tool in natural and urban planning; it can be applied for determining land use zones, in construction design and planning of a variety of projects. In this study, two different GIS based landslide susceptibility maps were generated in the mountainous part of the Trikala Prefecture in Thessaly, Central Greece. This was accomplished by using different methods for correlating factors, which have an effect on landslide occurrences. The instability factors taken into account were: lithology, tectonic features, slope gradients, road network, drainage network, land use and rainfall. A frequency distribution of the half number of the landslide events of the study area in each class of the instability factors was performed in order to rate the classes. Two models have been used to combine the instability factors and assess the overall landslide susceptibility, namely: the Weight Factor Model (WeF, which is a statistical method, and the Multiple Factor Model (MuF that is a logical method. The produced maps were classified into four zones: Low, Moderate, High and Very High susceptible zones and validated using the other half number of the landslide events of the area. Evaluation of the results is optimized through a Landslide Models Indicator (La.M.I..Los mapas de susceptibilidad de deslizamientos representan una práctica herramienta en la planificación urbana y de espacios naturales. Así, puede aplicarse a la determinación de los usos de terrenos, en el diseño de construcción civil y para la planificación de gran variedad de actividades. En este estudio se generaron dos tipos diferentes de mapas de susceptibilidad basados en GIS para la parte montañosa de la prefectura de Trikala en Tesalia (Grecia Central. Estos se llevaron a cabo usando dos métodos de correlación de los factores que pueden tener un efecto en la generación de deslizamientos. Los factores de desestabilización tenidos en cuenta

  5. Plasma hormones facilitated the hypermotility of the colon in a chronic stress rat model.

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    Chengbai Liang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To study the relationship between brain-gut peptides, gastrointestinal hormones and altered motility in a rat model of repetitive water avoidance stress (WAS, which mimics the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS. METHODS: Male Wistar rats were submitted daily to 1-h of water avoidance stress (WAS or sham WAS (SWAS for 10 consecutive days. Plasma hormones were determined using Enzyme Immunoassay Kits. Proximal colonic smooth muscle (PCSM contractions were studied in an organ bath system. PCSM cells were isolated by enzymatic digestion and IKv and IBKca were recorded by the patch-clamp technique. RESULTS: The number of fecal pellets during 1 h of acute restraint stress and the plasma hormones levels of substance P (SP, thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH, motilin (MTL, and cholecystokinin (CCK in WAS rats were significantly increased compared with SWAS rats, whereas vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP and corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH in WAS rats were not significantly changed and peptide YY (PYY in WAS rats was significantly decreased. Likewise, the amplitudes of spontaneous contractions of PCSM in WAS rats were significantly increased comparing with SWAS rats. The plasma of WAS rats (100 µl decreased the amplitude of spontaneous contractions of controls. The IKv and IBKCa of PCSMs were significantly decreased in WAS rats compared with SWAS rats and the plasma of WAS rats (100 µl increased the amplitude of IKv and IBKCa in normal rats. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that WAS leads to changes of plasma hormones levels and to disordered myogenic colonic motility in the short term, but that the colon rapidly establishes a new equilibrium to maintain the normal baseline functioning.

  6. The characterization of obese polycystic ovary syndrome rat model suitable for exercise intervention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuyan Wu

    Full Text Available To develop a new polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS rat model suitable for exercise intervention.Thirty six rats were randomly divided into three experimental groups: PCOS rats with high-fat diet (PF, n = 24, PCOS rats with ordinary diet (PO, n = 6, and control rats with ordinary diet (CO, n = 6. Two kinds of PCOS rat model were made by adjustment diet structure and testosterone injection for 28 days. After a successful animal model, PF model rats were randomly assigned to three groups: exercise with a continuation of high-fat diet (PF-EF, n = 6, sedentary with a continuation of high-fat diet (PF-SF, n = 6, exercise with an ordinary diet (PF-EO, n = 6. Fasting blood glucose (FBG and insulin (FINS, estrogen (E2, progesterone (P, and testosterone (T in serum were determined by RIA, and ovarian morphology was evaluated by Image-Pro plus 6.0.Body weight, Lee index, FINS increased significantly in PF rat model. Serum levels of E2 and T were significantly higher in PF and PO than in CO. Ovary organ index and ovarian areas were significant lower in PF than in CO. After intervention for 2 weeks, the levels of 1 h postprandial blood glucose (PBG1, 2 h postprandial blood glucose (PBG2, FINS and the serum levels of T decreased significantly in PF-EF rats and PF-EO rats. The ratio of FBG/FINS was significant higher in PF-EO rats than in PF-SF rats. Ovarian morphology showed that the numbers of preantral follicles and atretic follicles decreased significantly, and the numbers of antral follicles and corpora lutea increased significantly in the rats of PF-EF and PF-EO.By combination of high-fat diet and testosterone injection, the obese PCOS rat model is conformable with the lifestyle habits of fatty foods and insufficient exercise, and has metabolic and reproductive characteristics of human PCOS. This model can be applied to study exercise intervention.

  7. A Semimetal Model of the Normal State Susceptibility and Transport Properties of Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2 Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales, Brian; Sefat, Athena; McGuire, Michael; Mandrus, David

    2010-03-01

    A simple two-band 3D model of a semimetal is constructed to see which normal state features of the Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2 superconductors can be qualitatively understood within this framework. The model is able to account in a semiquantitative fashion for the measured magnetic susceptibility, Hall, and Seebeck data, and the low temperature Sommerfeld coefficient for 0 thinking about the physics of these interesting materials. Although many of the static magnetic properties, such as the increase of the magnetic susceptibility with temperature, are reproduced by the model, none of the spin-fluctuation dynamics are addressed. A general conclusion from the model is that the magnetic susceptibility of most semimetals should increase with temperatures. This is indeed found to be the case for two well-known semimetals Bi and TiSe2. Research supported by the US DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering.

  8. A semimetal model of the normal state magnetic susceptibility and transport properties of Ba(Fe 1-xCo x) 2As 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales, B. C.; McGuire, M. A.; Sefat, A. S.; Mandrus, D.

    2010-02-01

    A simple two-band 3D model of a semimetal is constructed to determine which normal state features of the Ba(Fe 1-xCo x) 2As 2 superconductors can be qualitatively understood within this framework. The model is able to account in a semiquantitative fashion for the measured magnetic susceptibility, Hall, and Seebeck data, and the low temperature Sommerfeld coefficient for 0 thinking about the physics of these interesting materials. Although many of the static magnetic properties, such as the increase of the magnetic susceptibility with temperature, are reproduced by the model, none of the spin-fluctuation dynamics are addressed. A general conclusion from the model is that the magnetic susceptibility of most semimetals should increase with temperatures.

  9. A Novel Model of Intravital Platelet Imaging Using CD41-ZsGreen1 Transgenic Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Mizuno

    Full Text Available Platelets play pivotal roles in both hemostasis and thrombosis. Although models of intravital platelet imaging are available for thrombosis studies in mice, few are available for rat studies. The present effort aimed to generate fluorescent platelets in rats and assess their dynamics in a rat model of arterial injury. We generated CD41-ZsGreen1 transgenic rats, in which green fluorescence protein ZsGreen1 was expressed specifically in megakaryocytes and thus platelets. The transgenic rats exhibited normal hematological and biochemical values with the exception of body weight and erythroid parameters, which were slightly lower than those of wild-type rats. Platelet aggregation, induced by 20 μM ADP and 10 μg/ml collagen, and blood clotting times were not significantly different between transgenic and wild-type rats. Saphenous arteries of transgenic rats were injured with 10% FeCl3, and the formation of fluorescent thrombi was evaluated using confocal microscopy. FeCl3 caused time-dependent increases in the mean fluorescence intensity of injured arteries of vehicle-treated rats. Prasugrel (3 mg/kg, p.o., administered 2 h before FeCl3, significantly inhibited fluorescence compared with vehicle-treated rats (4.5 ± 0.4 vs. 14.9 ± 2.4 arbitrary fluorescence units at 30 min, respectively, n = 8, P = 0.0037. These data indicate that CD41-ZsGreen1 transgenic rats represent a useful model for intravital imaging of platelet-mediated thrombus formation and the evaluation of antithrombotic agents.

  10. Functional gait analysis in a spinal contusion rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhimani, Abhiraj D; Kheirkhah, Pouyan; Arnone, Gregory D; Nahhas, Cindy R; Kumar, Prateek; Wonais, Matt; Hidrogo, Hugo; Aguilar, Eddy; Spalinski, Daniel; Gopalka, Mahie; Roth, Steven; Mehta, Ankit I

    2017-09-08

    Evaluating functional performance of spinal cord injury (SCI) rat models is essential for the development of novel treatments and breakthroughs. However, due to the variety of functional analysis methods available - each with its own strengths and weaknesses - it can be challenging to choose the most appropriate functional analysis test for the animal model. Therefore, we analyzed the strengths and weaknesses of five methods in order to determine which test is not only accurate and easily reproducible, but also relatively inexpensive so that it can be adopted universally. When comparing the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) test, Ladder walking test, CatWalk test, Rotating Rod test, Microsoft Kinect system and VICON, we used the criteria of sensitivity, quality of data generated, statistical analysis of data, and rate of human error. These specific tests were chosen in order to compare the advantages and disadvantages of simple yet effective methods (BBB, Ladder test, and Rotating Rod test) to more complex and computerized methods (Catwalk, Microsoft Kinect and VICON). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Mathematical Model of Ammonia Handling in the Rat Renal Medulla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noiret, Lorette; Baigent, Stephen; Jalan, Rajiv; Thomas, S. Randall

    2015-01-01

    The kidney is one of the main organs that produces ammonia and release it into the circulation. Under normal conditions, between 30 and 50% of the ammonia produced in the kidney is excreted in the urine, the rest being absorbed into the systemic circulation via the renal vein. In acidosis and in some pathological conditions, the proportion of urinary excretion can increase to 70% of the ammonia produced in the kidney. Mechanisms regulating the balance between urinary excretion and renal vein release are not fully understood. We developed a mathematical model that reflects current thinking about renal ammonia handling in order to investigate the role of each tubular segment and identify some of the components which might control this balance. The model treats the movements of water, sodium chloride, urea, NH3 and NH4+, and non-reabsorbable solute in an idealized renal medulla of the rat at steady state. A parameter study was performed to identify the transport parameters and microenvironmental conditions that most affect the rate of urinary ammonia excretion. Our results suggest that urinary ammonia excretion is mainly determined by those parameters that affect ammonia recycling in the loops of Henle. In particular, our results suggest a critical role for interstitial pH in the outer medulla and for luminal pH along the inner medullary collecting ducts. PMID:26280830

  12. Defensin susceptibility and colonization in the mouse model of AJ100, a polymyxin B-resistant, Brucella abortus RB51 isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halling, Shirley M; Jensen, Allen E; Olsen, Steven C

    2008-03-01

    Intracellular pathogens selected for increased susceptibility to polycations are commonly attenuated, yet the effect of decreased susceptibility to polycations on pathogenicity has not been researched. The polymyxin-resistant mutant Brucella abortus AJ100 was characterized by comparing its susceptibility to the polycationic antibiotic polymyxin B, defensins, and lactoferricin, and its colonization and clearance in the mouse model to the parent strain RB51. MIC (minimum inhibitory concentration) values determined by Etest for AJ100 and RB51 were 1.5 and 0.25 mug/ml, respectively. Though AJ100 is less susceptible to polymyxin B than RB51, it was more susceptible than its parent strain to the cationic defensins melittin, magainin 2, and cecropin P1. In the mouse model, initial colonization of the spleen was lower for AJ100 than RB51, and the rate of clearance from the spleen was faster for AJ100 than RB51. However, initial colonization and clearance rates of AJ100 from the liver were indistinguishable from those of RB51. This study suggests that the susceptibility profile of Brucella to polycationic defensins rather than polymyxin B may be indicative of differential survival in the spleen and liver in the mouse and is indicative of spleen and liver residential macrophages' differing ability to inactivate Brucella.

  13. Susceptibility of adult and senescent brown norway rats to repeated ozone exposure: An assessment of behavior, serum biochemistry and cardiopulmonary function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tropospheric ozone (03) is a pervasive air pollutant that produces pulmonary and cardiovascular dysfunction and there is growing evidence suggesting neurological dysfunction as well. Young and old individuals are generally recognized as being susceptible to ozone toxicity; howeve...

  14. Presence of lymphatics in a rat tendon lesion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempfer, Herbert; Kaser-Eichberger, Alexandra; Korntner, Stefanie; Lehner, Christine; Kunkel, Nadja; Traweger, Andreas; Trost, Andrea; Strohmaier, Clemens; Bogner, Barbara; Runge, Christian; Bruckner, Daniela; Krefft, Karolina; Heindl, Ludwig M; Reitsamer, Herbert A; Schrödl, Falk

    2015-04-01

    Tendons lack sufficient blood supply and represent a bradytroph tissue with prolonged healing time under pathological conditions. While the role of lymphatics in wound/defect healing in tissues with regular blood supply is well investigated, its involvement in tendon defects is not clear. We here try to identify the role of the lymphatic system in a tendon lesion model with morphological methods. A rat Achilles tendon lesion model (n = 5) was created via surgical intervention. Two weeks after surgery, animals were killed and lesioned site removed and prepared for polarization microscopy (picrosirius red) and immunohistochemistry using the lymphatic markers PROX1, VEGFR3, CCL21, LYVE-1, PDPN, and the vascular marker CD31. Additionally, DAPI was applied. Untreated tendons served as controls, confocal laser-scanning microscopy was used for documentation. At the lesion site, polarization microscopy revealed a structural reintegration while immunohistochemistry detected band-like profiles immunoreactive for PDPN, VEGFR3, CCL21, LYVE1, and CD31, surrounding DAPI-positive nuclei. PROX1-positive nuclei were detected within the lesion forming lines and opposed to each other. These PROX1-positive nuclei were surrounded by LYVE-1- or VEGFR3-positive surfaces. Few CD31-positive profiles contained PROX1-positive nuclei, while the majority of CD31-positive profiles lacked PROX1-positive nuclei. VEGFR3-, PDPN-, and LYVE-1-positive profiles were numerous within the lesion site, but absent in control tissue. Within 2 weeks, a structural rearrangement takes place in this lesion model, with dense lymphatic supply. The role of lymphatics in tendon wound healing is unclear, and proposed model represents a good possibility to study healing dynamics and lymphangiogenesis in a tissue almost completely lacking lymphatics in physiological conditions.

  15. Are all models susceptible to dysfunctional cognitions about eating and body image? The moderating role of personality styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasczyk-Schiep, Sybilla; Sokoła, Kaja; Fila-Witecka, Karolina; Kazén, Miguel

    2016-06-01

    We investigated dysfunctional cognitions about eating and body image in relation to personality styles in a group of professional models. Dysfunctional cognitions in professional models (n = 43) and a control group (n = 43) were assessed with the 'Eating Disorder Cognition Questionnaire' (EDCQ), eating attitudes with the 'Eating Attitudes Test' (EAT), and personality with the 'Personality Styles and Disorders Inventory' (PSDI-S). Models had higher scores than controls on the EDCQ and EAT and on nine scales of the PSDI-S. Moderation analyses showed significant interactions between groups and personality styles in predicting EDCQ scales: The ambitious/narcissistic style was related to "negative body and self-esteem", the conscientious/compulsive style to "dietary restraint", and the spontaneous/borderline style to "loss of control in eating". The results indicate that not all models are susceptible to dysfunctional cognitions about eating and body image. Models are at a higher risk of developing negative automatic thoughts and dysfunctional assumptions relating to body size, shape and weight, especially if they have high scores on the above personality styles.

  16. A rat model of chronic moderate alcohol consumption and risk of decompression sickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzacott, Peter; Mazur, Aleksandra; Wang, Qiong; Lambrechts, Kate; Theron, Michael; Guerrero, François

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to establish if chronic, moderate, pre-dive alcohol consumption had any affect upon susceptibility to decompression sickness (DCS) in rats. A treatment group of 15 rats were given water containing 12 mL ·L ⁻¹ of ethanol for four weeks. Controls (n = 15) were given water. Both groups were compressed with air to 1,000 kPa, followed by staged decompression. An additional 30 control rats from a similar previous experiment were added, raising the control-treatment ratio to 3:1. Rats in the treatment group consumed the equivalent of an 80 kg man drinking 2 L of 5 % alcohol by volume beer per day, which is three times the recommended daily limit for men. Overall, comparing the treatment group with the combined control groups neither weight (P = 0.23) nor alcohol consumption (P = 0.69) were associated with DCS. We observed that chronic, moderate alcohol consumption prior to compression was neither prophylactic nor deleterious for DCS in young, male rats.

  17. Virgin Coconut Oil Supplementation Prevents Bone Loss in Osteoporosis Rat Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayatullina, Zil; Muhammad, Norliza; Mohamed, Norazlina; Soelaiman, Ima-Nirwana

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress and free radicals have been implicated in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis. Therefore, antioxidant compounds have the potential to be used in the prevention and treatment of the disease. In this study, we investigated the effects of virgin coconut oil (VCO) on bone microarchitecture in a postmenopausal osteoporosis rat model. VCO is a different form of coconut oil as it is rich with antioxidants. Three-month-old female rats were randomly grouped into baseline, sham-operated, ovariectomized control (Ovx), and ovariectomized rats fed with 8% VCO in their diet for six weeks (Ovx+VCO). Bone histomorphometry of the right femora was carried out at the end of the study. Rats supplemented with VCO had a significantly greater bone volume and trabecular number while trabecular separation was lower than the Ovx group. In conclusion, VCO was effective in maintaining bone structure and preventing bone loss in estrogen-deficient rat model. PMID:23024690

  18. A reproducible in-vivo model of lymphatic malformation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y; Jia, J; Zhang, W; Liu, B; Zhang, Z; Zhao, Y

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a reproducible rat model of lymphatic malformation. Different types of adjuvant, with and without vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C, was injected into the neck and floor of the mouth of rats. The rats were killed 2 months after the injection. Injected rats developed cystic lesions in the neck and floor of the mouth. Immunohistochemical examination revealed that the cysts were lined by endothelium, which expressed the lymphatic endothelial markers LYVE-1 and VEGF receptor-3. Raman spectra of the liquid contents of the cysts were similar in all injected rats. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the endothelial cells had no basement membrane or surrounding pericytes. The cystic lesions were consistent with human lymphatic malformation. This animal model could be used to investigate pathogenesis of lymphatic malformation and its responses to candidate therapies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The Influence of a High Salt Diet on a Rat Model of Isoproterenol-Induced Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rat models of heart failure (HF) show varied pathology and time to disease outcome, dependent on induction method. We found that subchronic (4 weeks) isoproterenol (ISO) infusion exacerbated cardiomyopathy in Spontaneously Hypertensive Heart Failure (SHHF) rats. Others have shown...

  20. Induced hypothermia is protective in a rat model of pneumococcal pneumonia associated with increased adenosine triphosphate availability and turnover

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beurskens, Charlotte J. P.; Aslami, Hamid; Kuipers, Maria T.; Horn, Janneke; Vroom, Margreeth B.; van Kuilenburg, André B. P.; Roelofs, Joris J. T. H.; Schultz, Marcus J.; Juffermans, Nicole P.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effect of induced hypothermia on bacterial growth, lung injury, and mitochondrial function in a rat model of pneumococcal pneumosepsis. Design: Animal study. Setting: University research laboratory. Subjects: Male Sprague-Dawley rats. Interventions: Subjects were

  1. DEFEROXAMINE ACCELERATED HEALING IN OPEN EXCISION WOUND MODEL IN RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahendra Ram

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Forty apparently healthy male Wister rats were used in this study and full thickness cutaneous wounds were created under pentobarbitone anesthesia. All the rats were divided into two groups, of which one (control was treated with ointment base and other with DFO ointment (0.1%. Wound size measurement and tissue collection were done on days 3, 7, 11 and 14 post-wounding. Histopathological changes were assessed by H&E staining. The percent wound healing was significantly higher on days 7, 11 and 14 in DFO-treated rats as compared to control. DFO markedly facilitated cutaneous wound healing in rats by recruitment of inflammatory cells, deposition of fibroblasts, formation of new blood vessels and epithelialization to the wound site. Therefore, topical application of DFO ointment might be of great use in cutaneous wound healing in rats.

  2. A novel newborn rat kernicterus model created by injecting a bilirubin solution into the cisterna magna.

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    Sijie Song

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Kernicterus still occurs around the world; however, the mechanism of bilirubin neurotoxicity remains unclear, and effective treatment strategies are lacking. To solve these problems, several kernicterus (or acute bilirubin encephalopathy animal models have been established, but these models are difficult and expensive. Therefore, the present study was performed to establish a novel kernicterus model that is simple and affordable by injecting unconjugated bilirubin solution into the cisterna magna (CM of ordinary newborn Sprague-Dawley (SD rats. METHODS: On postnatal day 5, SD rat pups were randomly divided into bilirubin and control groups. Then, either bilirubin solution or ddH2O (pH = 8.5 was injected into the CM at 10 µg/g (bodyweight. For model characterization, neurobehavioral outcomes were observed, mortality was calculated, and bodyweight was recorded after bilirubin injection and weaning. Apoptosis in the hippocampus was detected by H&E staining, TUNEL, flow cytometry and Western blotting. When the rats were 28 days old, learning and memory ability were evaluated using the Morris water maze test. RESULTS: The bilirubin-treated rats showed apparently abnormal neurological manifestations, such as clenched fists, opisthotonos and torsion spasms. Bodyweight gain in the bilirubin-treated rats was significantly lower than that in the controls (P<0.001. The early and late mortality of the bilirubin-treated rats were both dramatically higher than those of the controls (P = 0.004 and 0.017, respectively. Apoptosis and necrosis in the hippocampal nerve cells in the bilirubin-treated rats were observed. The bilirubin-treated rats performed worse than the controls on the Morris water maze test. CONCLUSION: By injecting bilirubin into the CM, we successfully created a new kernicterus model using ordinary SD rats; the model mimics both the acute clinical manifestations and the chronic sequelae. In particular, CM injection is easy

  3. Effect of paroxetine on left ventricular remodeling in an in vivo rat model of myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassen, Thomas Ravn; Nielsen, Jan Møller; Johnsen, Jacob; Ringgaard, Steffen; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Kristiansen, Steen Buus

    2017-05-01

    Left ventricular (LV) remodeling following a myocardial infarction (MI) involves formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Paroxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, has an antioxidant effect in the vascular wall. We investigated whether paroxetine reduces myocardial ROS formation and LV remodeling following a MI. In a total of 32 Wistar rats, MI was induced by a 30-min ligation of the left anterior descending artery followed by 7- or 28-day reperfusion. During the 28 days of reperfusion, LV remodeling was evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and echocardiography (n = 20). After 28 days of reperfusion, the susceptibility to ventricular tachycardia was evaluated prior to sacrifice and histological assessment of myocyte cross-sectional area, fibrosis, and presence of myofibroblasts. Myocardial ROS formation was measured with dihydroethidium after 7 days of reperfusion in separate groups (n = 12). Diastolic LV volume, evaluated by MRI (417 ± 60 vs. 511 ± 64 µL, p paroxetine group than in controls. Furthermore, myocyte cross-sectional area was reduced in the paroxetine group compared with controls (277 ± 26 vs. 354 ± 23 mm(3), p paroxetine reduced the susceptibility to ventricular tachycardia (induced in 2/11 vs. 6/8 rats, p Paroxetine treatment following MI decreases LV remodeling and susceptibility to arrhythmias, probably by reducing ROS formation.

  4. Lemon juice has protective activity in a rat urolithiasis model

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    Oussama Abdelkhalek

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of herbal medicines (medicinal plants or phytotherapy has recently gained popularity in Europe and the United States. Nevertheless the exact mechanism of the preventive effects of these products is still far to be clearly established, being its knowledge necessary to successfully apply these therapies to avoid stone formation. Methods The effect of oral lemon juice administration on calcium oxalate urolithiasis was studied in male Wistar rats. Rats were rendered nephrolithic by providing drinking water containing 0.75% ethylene glycol [v/v] (EG and 2% ammonium chloride [w/v] (AC for 10 days. In addition to EG/AC treatment, three groups of rats were also gavage-administered solutions containing 100%, 75% or 50% lemon juice [v/v] (6 μl solution/g body weight. Positive control rats were treated with EG/AC but not lemon juice. Negative control rats were provided with normal drinking water, and were administered normal water by gavage. Each group contained 6 rats. After 10 days, serum samples were collected for analysis, the left kidney was removed and assessed for calcium levels using flame spectroscopy, and the right kidney was sectioned for histopathological analysis using light microscopy. Results Analysis showed that the rats treated with EG/AC alone had higher amounts of calcium in the kidneys compared to negative control rats. This EG/AC-induced increase in kidney calcium levels was inhibited by the administration of lemon juice. Histology showed that rats treated with EG/AC alone had large deposits of calcium oxalate crystals in all parts of the kidney, and that such deposits were not present in rats also treated with either 100% or 75% lemon juice. Conclusion These data suggest that lemon juice has a protective activity against urolithiasis.

  5. Synaptoproteomic analysis of a rat gene-environment model of depression reveals involvement of energy metabolism and cellular remodeling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallei, Alessandra; Failler, Marion; Corna, Stefano; Racagni, Giorgio; Mathé, Aleksander A; Popoli, Maurizio

    2014-10-31

    Major depression is a severe mental illness that causes heavy social and economic burdens worldwide. A number of studies have shown that interaction between individual genetic vulnerability and environmental risk factors, such as stress, is crucial in psychiatric pathophysiology. In particular, the experience of stressful events in childhood, such as neglect, abuse, or parental loss, was found to increase the risk for development of depression in adult life. Here, to reproduce the gene x environment interaction, we employed an animal model that combines genetic vulnerability with early-life stress. The Flinders Sensitive Line rats (FSL), a validated genetic animal model of depression, and the Flinders Resistant Line (FRL) rats, their controls, were subjected to a standard protocol of maternal separation (MS) from postnatal days 2 to 14. A basal comparison between the two lines for the outcome of the environmental manipulation was performed at postnatal day 73, when the rats were into adulthood. We carried out a global proteomic analysis of purified synaptic terminals (synaptosomes), in order to study a subcellular compartment enriched in proteins involved in synaptic function. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE), mass spectrometry, and bioinformatic analysis were used to analyze proteins and related functional networks that were modulated by genetic susceptibility (FSL vs. FRL) or by exposure to early-life stress (FRL + MS vs. FRL and FSL + MS vs. We found that, at a synaptic level, mainly proteins and molecular pathways related to energy metabolism and cellular remodeling were dysregulated. The present results, in line with previous works, suggest that dysfunction of energy metabolism and cytoskeleton dynamics at a synaptic level could be features of stress-related pathologies, in particular major depression. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  6. Parental Bonds, Attachment Anxiety, Media Susceptibility, and Body Dissatisfaction: A Mediation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Sarah C.; Beaujean, A. Alexander; Benedict, Helen E.

    2014-01-01

    The developmental trajectory of body image dissatisfaction is unclear. Researchers have investigated sociocultural and developmental risk factors; however, the literature needs an integrative etiological model. In 2009, Cheng and Mallinckrodt proposed a dual mediation model, positing that poor-quality parental bonds, via the mechanisms of…

  7. An effective nonlinear susceptibility model for general three-wave mixing in quasi-phase-matching structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chen-Yang; Li, Zhi-Yuan

    2017-03-01

    We develop an effective nonlinear susceptibility model (ENSM) to solve analytically the general three-wave mixing nonlinear optical interaction problem under the quasi-phase-matching (QPM) scheme. The nonlinear processes including sum-frequency generation, difference-frequency generation and second harmonic generation are discussed in both periodic poled lithium niobate (PPLN) and chirped PPLN (CPPLN) structures. The analytical ENSM results show great consistency with rigorous numerical simulation based on direct solution of the nonlinear coupled-wave equations. This indicates that the ENSM is a brief, convenient, accurate, and efficient theoretical tool to quantitatively evaluate the performance of various three-wave mixing interactions in general QPM structures such as PPLN and CPPLN and to design and optimize the QPM structures for many specific functionalities of nonlinear frequency conversion.

  8. Reduced erythrocyte susceptibility and increased host clearance of young parasites slows Plasmodium growth in a murine model of severe malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, David S.; Cromer, Deborah; Best, Shannon E.; James, Kylie R.; Sebina, Ismail; Haque, Ashraful; Davenport, Miles P.

    2015-05-01

    The best correlate of malaria severity in human Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) infection is the total parasite load. Pf-infected humans could control parasite loads by two mechanisms, either decreasing parasite multiplication, or increasing parasite clearance. However, few studies have directly measured these two mechanisms in vivo. Here, we have directly quantified host clearance of parasites during Plasmodium infection in mice. We transferred labelled red blood cells (RBCs) from Plasmodium infected donors into uninfected and infected recipients, and tracked the fate of donor parasites by frequent blood sampling. We then applied age-based mathematical models to characterise parasite clearance in the recipient mice. Our analyses revealed an increased clearance of parasites in infected animals, particularly parasites of a younger developmental stage. However, the major decrease in parasite multiplication in infected mice was not mediated by increased clearance alone, but was accompanied by a significant reduction in the susceptibility of RBCs to parasitisation.

  9. Spatial prediction of landslide susceptibility in parts of Garhwal Himalaya, India, using the weight of evidence modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guri, Pardeep Kumar; Ray, P K Champati; Patel, Ramesh Chandra

    2015-06-01

    Garhwal Himalaya in northern India has emerged as one of the most prominent hot spots of landslide occurrences in the Himalaya mainly due to geological causes related to mountain building processes, steep topography and frequent occurrences of extreme precipitation events. As this region has many pilgrimage and tourist centres, it is visited by hundreds of thousands of people every year, and in the recent past, there has been rapid development to provide adequate roads and building infrastructure. Additionally, attempts are also made to harness hydropower by constructing tunnels, dams and reservoirs and thus altering vulnerable slopes at many places. As a result, the overall risk due to landslide hazards has increased many folds and, therefore, an attempt was made to assess landslide susceptibility using 'Weights of Evidence (WofE)', a well-known bivariate statistical modelling technique implemented in a much improved way using remote sensing and Geographic Information System. This methodology has dual advantage as it demonstrates how to derive critical parameters related to geology, geomorphology, slope, land use and most importantly temporal landslide distribution in one of the data scarce region of the world. Secondly, it allows to experiment with various combination of parameters to assess their cumulative effect on landslides. In total, 15 parameters related to geology, geomorphology, terrain, hydrology and anthropogenic factors and 2 different landslide inventories (prior to 2007 and 2008-2011) were prepared from high-resolution Indian remote sensing satellite data (Cartosat-1 and Resourcesat-1) and were validated by field investigation. Several combinations of parameters were carried out using WofE modelling, and finally using best combination of eight parameters, 76.5 % of overall landslides were predicted in 24 % of the total area susceptible to landslide occurrences. The study has highlighted that using such methodology landslide susceptibility assessment

  10. Young Sprague Dawley rats infected by Plasmodium berghei: A relevant experimental model to study cerebral malaria.

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    Sokhna Keita Alassane

    Full Text Available Cerebral malaria (CM is the most severe manifestation of human malaria yet is still poorly understood. Mouse models have been developed to address the subject. However, their relevance to mimic human pathogenesis is largely debated. Here we study an alternative cerebral malaria model with an experimental Plasmodium berghei Keyberg 173 (K173 infection in Sprague Dawley rats. As in Human, not all infected subjects showed cerebral malaria, with 45% of the rats exhibiting Experimental Cerebral Malaria (ECM symptoms while the majority (55% of the remaining rats developed severe anemia and hyperparasitemia (NoECM. These results allow, within the same population, a comparison of the noxious effects of the infection between ECM and severe malaria without ECM. Among the ECM rats, 77.8% died between day 5 and day 12 post-infection, while the remaining rats were spontaneously cured of neurological signs within 24-48 hours. The clinical ECM signs observed were paresis quickly evolving to limb paralysis, global paralysis associated with respiratory distress, and coma. The red blood cell (RBC count remained normal but a drastic decrease of platelet count and an increase of white blood cell numbers were noted. ECM rats also showed a decrease of glucose and total CO2 levels and an increase of creatinine levels compared to control rats or rats with no ECM. Assessment of the blood-brain barrier revealed loss of integrity, and interestingly histopathological analysis highlighted cyto-adherence and sequestration of infected RBCs in brain vessels from ECM rats only. Overall, this ECM rat model showed numerous clinical and histopathological features similar to Human CM and appears to be a promising model to achieve further understanding the CM pathophysiology in Humans and to evaluate the activity of specific antimalarial drugs in avoiding/limiting cerebral damages from malaria.

  11. Young Sprague Dawley rats infected by Plasmodium berghei: A relevant experimental model to study cerebral malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keita Alassane, Sokhna; Nicolau-Travers, Marie-Laure; Menard, Sandie; Andreoletti, Olivier; Cambus, Jean-Pierre; Gaudre, Noémie; Wlodarczyk, Myriam; Blanchard, Nicolas; Berry, Antoine; Abbes, Sarah; Colongo, David; Faye, Babacar; Augereau, Jean-Michel; Lacroux, Caroline; Iriart, Xavier; Benoit-Vical, Françoise

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is the most severe manifestation of human malaria yet is still poorly understood. Mouse models have been developed to address the subject. However, their relevance to mimic human pathogenesis is largely debated. Here we study an alternative cerebral malaria model with an experimental Plasmodium berghei Keyberg 173 (K173) infection in Sprague Dawley rats. As in Human, not all infected subjects showed cerebral malaria, with 45% of the rats exhibiting Experimental Cerebral Malaria (ECM) symptoms while the majority (55%) of the remaining rats developed severe anemia and hyperparasitemia (NoECM). These results allow, within the same population, a comparison of the noxious effects of the infection between ECM and severe malaria without ECM. Among the ECM rats, 77.8% died between day 5 and day 12 post-infection, while the remaining rats were spontaneously cured of neurological signs within 24-48 hours. The clinical ECM signs observed were paresis quickly evolving to limb paralysis, global paralysis associated with respiratory distress, and coma. The red blood cell (RBC) count remained normal but a drastic decrease of platelet count and an increase of white blood cell numbers were noted. ECM rats also showed a decrease of glucose and total CO2 levels and an increase of creatinine levels compared to control rats or rats with no ECM. Assessment of the blood-brain barrier revealed loss of integrity, and interestingly histopathological analysis highlighted cyto-adherence and sequestration of infected RBCs in brain vessels from ECM rats only. Overall, this ECM rat model showed numerous clinical and histopathological features similar to Human CM and appears to be a promising model to achieve further understanding the CM pathophysiology in Humans and to evaluate the activity of specific antimalarial drugs in avoiding/limiting cerebral damages from malaria.

  12. The rat: a laboratory model for studies of the diving response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Qi; Juric, Rajko

    2010-01-01

    Underwater submersion in mammals induces apnea, parasympathetically mediated bradycardia, and sympathetically mediated peripheral vasoconstriction. These effects are collectively termed the diving response, potentially the most powerful autonomic reflex known. Although these physiological responses are directed by neurons in the brain, study of neural control of the diving response has been hampered since 1) it is difficult to study the brains of animals while they are underwater, 2) feral marine mammals are usually large and have brains of variable size, and 3) there are but few references on the brains of naturally diving species. Similar responses are elicited in anesthetized rodents after stimulation of their nasal mucosa, but this nasopharyngeal reflex has not been compared directly with natural diving behavior in the rat. In the present study, we compared hemodynamic responses elicited in awake rats during volitional underwater submersion with those of rats swimming on the water's surface, rats involuntarily submerged, and rats either anesthetized or decerebrate and stimulated nasally with ammonia vapors. We show that the hemodynamic changes to voluntary diving in the rat are similar to those of naturally diving marine mammals. We also show that the responses of voluntary diving rats are 1) significantly different from those seen during swimming, 2) generally similar to those elicited in trained rats involuntarily “dunked” underwater, and 3) generally different from those seen from dunking naive rats underwater. Nasal stimulation of anesthetized rats differed most from the hemodynamic variables of rats trained to dive voluntarily. We propose that the rat trained to dive underwater is an excellent laboratory model to study neural control of the mammalian diving response, and also suggest that some investigations may be done with nasal stimulation of decerebrate preparations to decipher such control. PMID:20093670

  13. Metal-mediated climate susceptibility in a warming world: Larval and latent effects on a model amphibian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallman, Tyler A; Brooks, Marjorie L

    2016-07-01

    Although sophisticated models predict the effects of future temperatures on ectotherms, few also address how ubiquitous sublethal contaminants alter an organism's response to thermal stress. In ectotherms, higher metabolic rates from warming temperatures can beneficially speed metabolism and development. If compounded by chronic, sublethal pollution, additional resource demands for elimination or detoxification may limit their ability to cope with rising temperatures-the toxicant-induced climate susceptibility hypothesis. In outdoor bioassays, using natural lake water as the background, the authors investigated the development of a model ectotherm in 6 levels of Cd, Cu, and Pb mixtures and 3 thermal regimes of diel temperature fluctuations: ambient, +1.5 °C, and +2.5 °C. Warming had no effect on wild-caught Cope's gray tree frog (Hyla chrysoscelis) until metals concentrations were approximately 10-fold of their bioavailable chronic criterion unit (sums of bioavailable fractions of chronic