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Sample records for susceptible dogs electronic

  1. Ozone increases susceptibility to antigen inhalation in allergic dogs

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    Yanai, M.; Ohrui, T.; Aikawa, T.; Okayama, H.; Sekizawa, K.; Maeyama, K.; Sasaki, H.; Takishima, T. (Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan))

    1990-06-01

    To determine whether O3 exposure increased airway responsiveness to antigen inhalation, we studied airway responsiveness to acetylcholine (ACh) and Ascaris suum antigen (AA) before and after O3 in dogs both sensitive and insensitive to AA. Airway responsiveness was assessed by determining the provocative concentration of ACh and AA aerosols that increased respiratory resistance (Rrs) to twice the base-line value. O3 (3 parts per million) increased airway responsiveness to ACh in dogs both sensitive and insensitive to AA, and it significantly decreased the ACh provocation concentration from 0.541 +/- 0.095 to 0.102 +/- 0.047 (SE) mg/ml (P less than 0.01; n = 10). AA aerosols, even at the highest concentration in combination with O3, did not increase Rrs in dogs insensitive to AA. However, O3 increased airway responsiveness to AA in AA-sensitive dogs and significantly decreased log AA provocation concentration from 2.34 +/- 0.22 to 0.50 +/- 0.17 (SE) log protein nitrogen units/ml (P less than 0.01; n = 7). O3-induced hyperresponsiveness to ACh returned to the base-line level within 2 wk, but hyperresponsiveness to AA continued for greater than 2 wk. The plasma histamine concentration after AA challenge was significantly higher after than before O3 (P less than 0.01). Intravenous infusion of OKY-046 (100 micrograms.kg-1.min-1), an inhibitor of thromboxane synthesis, inhibited the O3-induced increase in responsiveness to ACh, but it had no effects on the O3-induced increase in responsiveness to AA and the increase in the plasma histamine concentration. These results suggest that O3 increases susceptibility to the antigen in sensitized dogs via a different mechanism from that of O3-induced muscarinic hyperresponsiveness.

  2. Brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato, infestation of susceptible dog hosts is reduced by slow release of semiochemicals from a less susceptible host.

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    de Oliveira Filho, Jaires Gomes; Ferreira, Lorena Lopes; Sarria, André Lucio Franceschini; Pickett, John A; Birkett, Michael A; Mascarin, Gabriel Moura; de León, Adalberto A Pérez; Borges, Lígia Miranda Ferreira

    2017-01-01

    Domestic dog breeds are hosts for the brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato, but infestation levels vary among breeds. Beagles are less susceptible to tick infestations than English cocker spaniels due to enhanced production of 2-hexanone and benzaldehyde that act as volatile tick repellents. We report the use of prototype slow-release formulations of these compounds to reduce the burden of R. sanguineus s. l. on English cocker spaniel dogs. Twelve dogs were randomly assigned to two groups with six dogs each. The treated group received collars with slow-release formulations of the compounds attached, while the control group received collars with clean formulations attached. Five environmental infestations were performed, with the number of ticks (at all stages) on the dogs being counted twice a day for 45days. The counts on the number of tick stages found per dog were individually fitted to linear mixed effects models with repeated measures and normal distribution for errors. The mean tick infestation in the treated group was significantly lower than in the control group. For larvae and nymphs, a decrease in tick infestation was observed at the fifth count, and for adults, lower average counts were observed in all counts. The compounds did not interfere with the distribution of the ticks on the body of the dogs, as a similar percentage of ticks was found on the anterior half of the dogs (54.5% for the control group and 56.2% for the treated group). The biological and reproductive parameters of the ticks were not affected by the repellents. This study highlights for the first time the potential use of a novel allomone (repellent)-based formulation for reduction of tick infestation on susceptible dogs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Visual perception in domestic dogs: susceptibility to the Ebbinghaus-Titchener and Delboeuf illusions.

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    Byosiere, Sarah-Elizabeth; Feng, Lynna C; Woodhead, Jessica K; Rutter, Nicholas J; Chouinard, Philippe A; Howell, Tiffani J; Bennett, Pauleen C

    2017-05-01

    Susceptibility to geometrical visual illusions has been tested in a number of non-human animal species, providing important information about how these species perceive their environment. Considering their active role in human lives, visual illusion susceptibility was tested in domestic dogs (Canis familiaris). Using a two-choice simultaneous discrimination paradigm, eight dogs were trained to indicate which of two presented circles appeared largest. These circles were then embedded in three different illusory displays; a classical display of the Ebbinghaus-Titchener illusion; an illusory contour version of the Ebbinghaus-Titchener illusion; and the classical display of the Delboeuf illusion. Significant results were observed in both the classical and illusory contour versions of the Ebbinghaus-Titchener illusion, but not the Delboeuf illusion. However, this susceptibility was reversed from what is typically seen in humans and most mammals. Dogs consistently indicated that the target circle typically appearing larger in humans appeared smaller to them, and that the target circle typically appearing smaller in humans, appeared larger to them. We speculate that these results are best explained by assimilation theory rather than other visual cognitive theories explaining susceptibility to this illusion in humans. In this context, we argue that our findings appear to reflect higher-order conceptual processing in dogs that cannot be explained by accounts restricted to low-level mechanisms of early visual processing.

  4. Identification and antibiotic susceptibility of bacterial isolates from dogs with otitis externa in Australia.

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    Bugden, D L

    2013-01-01

    To identify and quantify the five most frequently isolated significant bacterial microorganisms, and their antibiotic susceptibility, from bacterial cultures of samples taken from the ears of dogs with otitis externa. Bacterial culture and susceptibility testing data for ear swabs from dogs with presumed otitis externa were collated and evaluated. The five most frequently isolated microorganisms were: Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus pseudintermedius, Proteus sp., beta-haemolytic streptococci and Escherichia coli. Susceptibility to gentamicin was very high for most isolates, whereas for polymyxin B, high levels of resistance were seen. Beta-haemolytic streptococci had high levels of resistance to all of the antibiotics tested. This study provides veterinarians with Australian data to assist in cytological interpretation and initial empirical therapy of canine otitis externa. © 2012 The Author. Australian Veterinary Journal © 2012 Australian Veterinary Association.

  5. In vitro drug susceptibility of Leishmania infantum isolated from humans and dogs.

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    Maia, Carla; Nunes, Mónica; Marques, Mónica; Henriques, Sofia; Rolão, Nuno; Campino, Lenea

    2013-09-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) caused by parasites of Leishmania donovani complex is a severe human disease which often leads to death if left untreated. Domestic dogs are the main reservoir hosts for zoonotic human visceral infection caused by Leishmania infantum. In the absence of effective human and dog vaccines, the only feasible way to treat and control leishmaniasis is through the use of suitable medications. To know the drug susceptibility of human and canine Leishmania strains from Lisbon-Portugal, a study on a panel of strains was conducted by testing the susceptibility of promastigotes and intracellular amastigotes to the common drugs used in canine leishmaniasis (CanL) and human VL (meglumine antimoniate, amphotericin B, miltefosine and allopurinol). Although a high heterogeneity of susceptibilities was obtained to each drug on both axenic promastigote and intracellular amastigote assays, intracellular amastigotes system correlated better with treatment outcome. Parasites isolated from the refractory human case were the least susceptible to the drugs used highlighting that the emergence of cross-resistance to the drugs available for human therapy should not be neglected. Furthermore, parasites isolated from dogs showed low susceptibility to the main drugs used in CanL treatment. Our results focus the importance of reducing/avoiding the emergence and spread of resistant parasites in the canine and human populations, a factor that requires special consideration when dogs are treated using the same available anti-Leishmania drugs for human VL. In addition, efforts should be made in order to standardize the conditions used to test drug susceptibility (methodologies, drug formulations and media) in order to compare results between laboratories. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Antimicrobial susceptibility and Ribosomal-RNA gene restriction patterns among Staphylococcus-intermedius from healthy dogs and from dogs sufferning from pyoderma or otitis-externa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karl; Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    1995-01-01

    A total of 60 Staphlococcus intermedius strains from dogs were investigated by their sensitivity to various antibiotics (50 strains) and by their rRNA gene restriction patterns (ribotyping) (60 strains). Fifteen isolates were from healthy dogs, 9 with otitis externa, and 36 with pyoderma, including......, enrofloxacin, and sulphonamides with trimethoprim. There were no significant differences in antimicrobial susceptibility patterns observed among isolates from pyoderma, otitis externa or healthy dogs. Among the 60 strains studied by ribotyping, 10 different ribotypes were identified: 6 different ribotypes...... among isolates from otitis externa, 8 among isolates from pyoderma, and 5 among isolates from healthy dogs. One ribotype (profile C) was dominant among the isolates from healthy dogs while another ribotype (profile A) was dominant among strains from dogs suffering from pyoderma. This profile...

  7. In vitro evaluation of topical biocide and antimicrobial susceptibility of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius from dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Becky K; Dew, Walter; Yu, Anthony; Weese, J Scott

    2012-12-01

    Staphylococcus pseudintermedius is an important canine pathogen, and the emergence and widespread dissemination of meticillin-resistant strains (MRSP) is of significant concern. Multidrug-resistant infections may require alternative approaches, such as the use of topical therapy. There is minimal information about the in vitro susceptibility of meticillin-susceptible S. pseudintermedius (MSSP) and MRSP to biocides and topical antimicrobials. The hypothesis was that clinical isolates of MSSP and MRSP would not have universal susceptibility to topical biocides and antimicrobials. The goal of this study was to assess the susceptibility of a collection of S. pseudintermedius isolates to selected antimicrobials and biocides. The study was performed on clinical isolates of MSSP and MRSP from dogs with skin and soft tissue infections collected throughout North America between 2006 and 2008. The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of chlorhexidine digluconate, benzalkonium chloride, triclosan, accelerated hydrogen peroxide, geranium oil, tea tree oil and grapefruit seed extract were tested for 25 MRSP and 25 MSSP isolates from dogs using the agar dilution method. The MICs of fusidic acid, bacitracin and mupirocin were determined using Etests. Triclosan demonstrated excellent activity against all bacterial isolates, with no growth at the lowest concentration evaluated (MIC ≤ 0.5 μg/mL). Conversely, grapefruit seed extract did not inhibit growth at the highest concentration tested (MIC > 3.84 μg/mL). All isolates were susceptible to mupirocin, fusidic acid and bacitracin. There were no significant differences noted in the range, MIC(50) or MIC(90) between MSSP and MRSP isolates. While isolates were susceptible to most of the tested compounds, universal susceptibility to all compounds with potential antimicrobial activity cannot be assumed, and specific testing is required. © 2012 The Authors. Veterinary Dermatology © 2012 ESVD and ACVD.

  8. Antibiotic susceptibility of bacteria isolated from infections in cats and dogs throughout Europe (2002-2009).

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    Kroemer, Stéphane; El Garch, Farid; Galland, Delphine; Petit, Jean-Luc; Woehrle, Frédérique; Boulouis, Henri-Jean

    2014-03-01

    A monitoring program of the pre-treatment susceptibility of clinical isolates of bacteria from diseased dogs and cats was active between the years 2002 and 2009. Susceptibility of each isolated strain to a panel of nine antibiotics (amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, ampicillin, penicillin, clindamycin, doxycycline, enrofloxacin, marbofloxacin, trimethoprim and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole) was assessed. The Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of marbofloxacin was also determined by a standardized microdilution technique following CLSI recommendations. In total, 1857 bacterial strains were collected throughout Europe from cases of otitis, respiratory, urinary and dermatological infections. Although bacterial susceptibility varied for each of the antibiotics within the panel, patterns of susceptibility were similar to those described in the literature for comparable time periods and geographical areas. With a clinical resistance varying from 0 to 14.48% against the isolated strains, marbofloxacin susceptibility was very high and remains an effective antibiotic for the treatment of otitis, urinary, respiratory and dermatological infections in companion animals. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato, infestation ofsusceptible dog hosts is reduced by slow release of semiochemicalsfrom a less susceptible host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domestic dog breeds are hosts for the tick Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato, but infestation levels vary among breeds. Beagles are less susceptible to tick infestations than English cocker spaniels due to enhanced production of 2-hexanone and benzaldehyde that act as tick repellents. We report th...

  10. Efficacy of oral moxidectin against susceptible and resistant isolates of Dirofilaria immitis in dogs

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    Tom L. McTier

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Monthly topical and sustained-release injectable formulations of moxidectin are currently marketed; however, an oral formulation, while approved at a dose of 3 μg/kg, is not currently marketed in the United States. Although resistance of heartworms to all macrocyclic lactone (ML heartworm preventives (ivermectin, milbemycin, selamectin and moxidectin has been demonstrated, to date no data have been reported on the effectiveness of oral moxidectin against recent isolates of Dirofilaria immitis. Methods A total of nine studies were conducted to determine the efficacy of moxidectin against a range of older and recently sourced heartworm isolates. Dogs (groups of three to eight were inoculated with 50 D. immitis infective larvae (L3 from nine different isolates (MP3, Michigan, JYD-34, ZoeMO-2012, ZoeKy-2013, ZoeLA-2013, GCFL-2014, AMAL-2014 and ZoeAL-2015 and treated 28–30 days later with single oral doses of 3 μg/kg of moxidectin. Additionally, one group of dogs that was inoculated with JYD-34 was treated monthly for 3 consecutive months beginning 30 days post inoculation. Dogs were held for approximately 4 months after the initial (or only treatment and then necropsied for recovery of adult heartworms. Results A single dose of 3 μg/kg of moxidectin was 100% effective in preventing the development of five of nine heartworm isolates (MP3, Michigan, ZoeKy, GCFL and ZoeAL isolates, confirming their susceptibility to oral moxidectin at this dose. MP3 and Michigan are isolates sourced from the field more than 9 years ago, while ZoeKy, ZoeAL and GCFL were isolated from the field within the past 2 to 3 years. Against JYD-34, ZoeMO, ZoeLA and AMAL isolates, a single dose of 3 μg/kg of moxidectin was not completely effective, with efficacies of 19%, 82%, 54% and 62%, respectively, demonstrating resistance of these heartworm isolates to oral moxidectin at this dosage. Three consecutive monthly doses of 3 μg/kg of

  11. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Monitoring of Bacterial Pathogens Isolated from Urinary Tract Infections in Dogs and Cats Across Europe: ComPath Results.

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    Moyaert, Hilde; Morrissey, Ian; de Jong, Anno; El Garch, Farid; Klein, Ulrich; Ludwig, Carolin; Thiry, Julien; Youala, Myriam

    2017-04-01

    ComPath is a pan-European antimicrobial surveillance program collecting bacterial pathogens from dogs and cats not recently exposed to antimicrobials. We present minimum inhibitory concentration data obtained using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute methodology for 616 urinary tract infection (UTI) isolates collected between 2008 and 2010. In both dogs and cats, the most common pathogen was Escherichia coli (59.8% and 46.7%, respectively). Antimicrobial activity against E. coli in dogs and cats was similar with fluoroquinolone and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole susceptibility >90%. Ampicillin susceptibility was ∼80%. Staphylococcus intermedius Group isolates from dogs (67/437, 15.3%) had high antimicrobial susceptibility (>90%) toward beta-lactams, fluoroquinolones, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. Four canine isolates (6%) were oxacillin resistant, and harbored mecA. Proteus mirabilis from dogs (48/437, 11.0%) had high antimicrobial susceptibility (∼90%) to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, enrofloxacin, and marbofloxacin and slightly lower susceptibility (∼80-85%) to ampicillin and orbifloxacin. Streptococcus canis isolates (35/437, 8.0%) from dogs were all susceptible to ampicillin and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and >90% susceptible to marbofloxacin. Although resistance was not observed, high intermediate susceptibility was seen for both enrofloxacin (28.6%) and orbifloxacin (85.7%). Overall, antimicrobial in vitro activity appears to be high in UTI pathogens from dogs and cats with low multidrug resistance, although a lack of specific dog and cat breakpoints for important antimicrobials such as cefovecin, cephalexin, and ibafloxacin prevents analysis of susceptibility for these agents.

  12. Variability of laboratory identification and antibiotic susceptibility reporting of Pseudomonas spp. isolates from dogs with chronic otitis externa.

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    Schick, Anthea E; Angus, John C; Coyner, Kimberly S

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate interlaboratory variation in isolation and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of Pseudomonas spp. as reported to veterinarians for cases of canine chronic bacterial otitis externa. Twenty-six dogs with unilateral or bilateral bacterial otitis externa from multiple referral practices were included in this prospective study. Triplicate samples collected simultaneously from the same location in the external ear canal were randomly submitted to three laboratories for culture and susceptibility testing. Pseudomonas spp. were isolated from 18 of 34 (53%) ears. All three laboratories agreed on the presence of Pseudomonas spp. in 15 (83.3%) ears sampled. However, two laboratories agreed on two (11.1%) occasions, and on one occasion (5.5%) Pseudomonas spp. were identified in only one laboratory. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) susceptibilities to 11 antibiotics were compared between laboratories B and C. Using laboratory-defined susceptibility of sensitive (S), intermediate (I) and resistant (R), none of the 16 Pseudomonas spp. with MIC data reported had identical patterns of antibiotic susceptibility. Agreement in susceptibility to individual antibiotics was observed in 13 of 16 (81%) occasions for amikacin and gentamicin, 10 of 16 (63%) occasions for ticarcillin, and nine of 16 (56%) for enrofloxacin. These results indicate that Pseudomonas spp. were identified by all three laboratories chosen for this study in 83% of the time. Moreover, antibiotic susceptibility patterns and MIC values reported to veterinarians may not agree between laboratories. Veterinarians should interpret bacterial culture and susceptibility results with multiple caveats including variability between laboratories.

  13. Determining magnetic susceptibilities of everyday materials using an electronic balance

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    Laumann, Daniel; Heusler, Stefan

    2017-05-01

    The magnetic properties of an object and its interaction with an external magnetic field can be described through the magnetic (volume) susceptibility χV, which divides nearly all kinds of matter into diamagnetic, paramagnetic, and ferromagnetic substances. Quantitative measurements of χV are usually technically sophisticated or require the investigation of substances with high values of χV to reveal meaningful results. Here, we show that both diamagnetic and paramagnetic effects in everyday materials can be measured using only an electronic balance and a neodymium magnet, both of which are within the reach of typical introductory college and high school physics classrooms. The experimental results match related literature values remarkably well.

  14. Susceptibility profile of Candida spp. isolated from humans and dogs with stomatitis to the essential oil of Thymus vulgaris

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    Živković R.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Candida spp. form a part of human and animal oral cavity flora. However Candida spp. is the main cause of dental related stomatitis in humans and stomatitis in dogs. Stomatitis treatment implies the use of azoles and polyenes to which yeasts build up resistance. The research is directed to the use of natural compounds such as essential oils. The aim of this paper is to define the antifungal activity of thyme oil on 15 clinical strains of Candida spp., isolated from humans and dogs and to determine if there is a difference in susceptibility between human and dog isolates. Sampling in patients with stomatitis was done by swabbing the denture or oral mucosa swab while sampling in dogs was done by swabbing the oral cavity mucosa after stomatitis has been diagnosed. In order to investigate the antifungal activity of thyme oil in vitro, microdilution method was used. Thyme oil expressed antifungal effects on all investigated strains. Also, our data show that the values of minimum fungicide concentration (MFC and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC are lower in human strains. Explanation is that in most cases, stomatitis in humans is asymptomatic and thus not treated, so Candida strains have not developed resistance. On the other hand, stomatitis in dogs is followed by a marked clinical picture and treated is by antimicotics (mostly by azoles, therefore resistant Candida strains are more likely to occur.

  15. Dogs

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    ... Digital Press Kit Connect With Us New & Noteworthy Dogs Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Overview Diseases ... healthy. Diseases The most common diseases associated with dogs that can cause human illness are: Campylobacteriosis ( Campylobacter ...

  16. Evaluation of the Norberg angle threshold: a comparison of Norberg angle and distraction index as measures of coxofemoral degenerative joint disease susceptibility in seven breeds of dogs.

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    Culp, William T N; Kapatkin, Amy S; Gregor, Thomas P; Powers, Michelle Y; McKelvie, Pamela J; Smith, Gail K

    2006-07-01

    To evaluate the thresholds of 2 radiographic methods used to determine coxofemoral joint laxity in 7 breeds of dogs. Three hundred and fifty clinically normal dogs. Retrospective study. Hip radiographs from 7 breeds of dogs were randomly selected from a database. None of the dogs had radiographic evidence of degenerative joint disease (DJD). Distraction index (DI) and Norberg angle (NA) were measured on these radiographs and compared with DI and NA thresholds for diagnosing DJD susceptibility derived from the literature and from evaluated Borzois. Dogs with a NA or =105 degrees and a DI of >0.32 were considered false-negatives. Mean age of all dogs was 22.9 months. Mean NA for all dogs was 99.37 degrees, and mean DI for all dogs was 0.44. Borzoi mean DI of was significantly less than the mean DI of the other 6 breeds. The highest (most hip laxity) Borzoi DI was 0.32, and the lowest (most hip laxity) Borzoi NA was 99 degrees. False-positive and false-negative diagnoses were identified in 6 of the 7 breeds. Using the NA threshold of 105 degrees (literature established threshold of susceptibility to DJD) resulted in a high percentage of false-negative and false-positive diagnoses. Breeds like the Labrador Retriever and Rottweiler would have large numbers of hip dysplasia susceptible dogs remain in the breeding population based on this NA threshold. False-positive diagnoses were common in breeds like the Australian Shepherd, Borzoi, and German Shepherd effectively eliminating hip dysplasia nonsusceptible dogs from the breeding population. The NA was not an accurate predictor of DJD susceptibility in these 7 breeds of dogs when using a NA threshold of 105 degrees.

  17. Postoperative susceptibility artifact during magnetic resonance imaging of the vertebral column in two dogs and a cat.

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    Freer, Sean R; Scrivani, Peter V

    2008-01-01

    In humans that have undergone cervical diskectomy, magnetic susceptibility artifacts are often found on postoperative magnetic resonance (MR) images of the affected region. In some patients, these artifacts complicate image interpretation, while in others the artifacts lead to a false diagnosis of spinal cord compression. We describe two dogs and one cat that had susceptibility artifacts visible in postoperative MR images. In each patient, multiple, small-to-large, distinct, magnetic susceptibility artifacts were visible along the surgery site. In both dogs, interpretation was impossible and subsequently computed tomography (CT) was performed. During CT, no cause for the MR artifact was identified. The most likely source of the artifact is microscopic metal fragments from the burr, suction tip or other surgical instruments, but other possible causes include hemorrhage or paramagnetic suture material. These artifacts may cause difficulty in interpretation or suggest a clinical problem. MR imaging therefore might not be the most appropriate examination for patients following certain types of surgery due to the possibility of susceptibility artifacts. Although this artifact probably is common in the postoperative patient, the frequency that this finding will prevent accurate diagnosis is unknown.

  18. Exogenous bacterial osteomyelitis in 52 dogs: a retrospective study of etiology and in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility profile (2000-2013).

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    Siqueira, E G M; Rahal, S C; Ribeiro, M G; Paes, A C; Listoni, F P; Vassalo, F G

    2014-01-01

    Most clinical cases of osteomyelitis in dogs involve infectious agents, especially bacteria and fungi. The characterization of these microorganisms may aid in the prevention and treatment of disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate retrospectively microbiological cultures and in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility profile of isolates from 52 cases of bacterial osteomyelitis in long bones of dogs over 2000-2013. In 78% of the cases injuries were caused by a motor vehicle accident, but there were a few cases of dog bites (17%) and ascending infection due to pododermatitis (5%). The isolated microorganisms were identified based on conventional phenotypic methods. In vitro disk diffusion test was performed using 30 different antimicrobials. The isolates were obtained from femur (28%), humerus (16%), tibia (31%), and radius/ulna (25%). Among 52 cases, culture was positive in 88% of cases. Thirteen genus of different species of microorganisms were isolated. The most common microorganisms isolated were Staphylococcus spp. and Escherichia coli followed by Streptococcus spp., enteric bacteria, Corynebacterium sp. and anaerobic bacteria. In 42% of cases cultures were mixed. The most effective drugs against isolated bacteria were amoxicillin and clavulanate potassium (79%) followed by ceftriaxone (69%). High-resistance rates were documented against azithromycin (80%), penicillin (59%), and clindamycin (59%). The present study highlights diverse etiologic agents in cases of infectious bacterial osteomyelitis, with predominance of Staphylococcus genus, and reinforces the importance of obtaining cultures and susceptibility profiles given the high rates of antimicrobial resistance.

  19. Droughts may increase susceptibility of prairie dogs to fleas: Incongruity with hypothesized mechanisms of plague cycles in rodents

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    Eads, David A.; Biggins, Dean E.; Long, Dustin H.; Gage, Kenneth L.; Antolin, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    Plague is a reemerging, rodent-associated zoonosis caused by the flea-borne bacterium Yersinia pestis. As a vector-borne disease, rates of plague transmission may increase when fleas are abundant. Fleas are highly susceptible to desiccation under hot-dry conditions; we posited that their densities decline during droughts. We evaluated this hypothesis with black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) in New Mexico, June–August 2010–2012. Precipitation was relatively plentiful during 2010 and 2012 but scarce during 2011, the driest spring–summer on record for the northeastern grasslands of New Mexico. Unexpectedly, fleas were 200% more abundant in 2011 than in 2010 and 2012. Prairie dogs were in 27% better condition during 2010 and 2012, and they devoted 287% more time to grooming in 2012 than in 2011. During 2012, prairie dogs provided with supplemental food and water were in 23% better condition and carried 40% fewer fleas. Collectively, these results suggest that during dry years, prairie dogs are limited by food and water, and they exhibit weakened defenses against fleas. Long-term data are needed to evaluate the generality of whether droughts increase flea densities and how changes in flea abundance during sequences of dry and wet years might affect plague cycles in mammalian hosts.

  20. Scanning electron microscopy of pulp cavity dentin in dogs.

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    Hernández, Sabás Z; Negro, Viviana B; Paulero, Rodrigo H; Toriggia, Paula G; Saccomanno, Daniela M

    2010-01-01

    Dentin morphology and tubule diameter and density of peripulpal dentin were evaluated in 36 teeth from 12 adult dogs, aged between 2.5 and 13-years. The right maxillary canine and third premolar and right mandibular first molar teeth were extracted from euthanized dogs. The teeth were prepared and photomicrographs (n=108) were taken of the radicular and coronal dentin. Dentinal tubule density (tubules/mm2) was determined and tubular diameter and luminal area were measured in 3240 randomly chosen tubules using measurement software. Results from group 1 dogs (dogs (> 7-years-old). The majority of dentinal tubules were round or oval in shape and had uniform distribution at the radicular coronal third, and coronal levels. Dentin surfaces showed morphological differences at different levels of the tooth. Group 1 dentinal tubule diameter (1.87 +/- 0.44 microm) and area (1.91 +/- 0.83 microm2) were significantly different compared with Group 2 dentinal tubule diameter (1.53 +/- 0.39 microm) and area (1.22 +/- 0.50 microm2). There was no significant difference in tubular density between groups 1 (74,692 +/- 25,991 tubules/mm2) and 2 (72,938 +/- 24,646 tubules/mm2). Site-specific differences were observed in the pulp cavity dentin in the same tooth. These results provide a reference for future research in dogs or where dogs are used as a model for investigations in human dentistry.

  1. DNA repair deficiency as a susceptibility marker for spontaneous lymphoma in golden retriever dogs: a case-control study.

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    Douglas H Thamm

    Full Text Available There is accumulating evidence that an individual's inability to accurately repair DNA damage in a timely fashion may in part dictate a predisposition to cancer. Dogs spontaneously develop lymphoproliferative diseases such as lymphoma, with the golden retriever (GR breed being at especially high risk. Mechanisms underlying such breed susceptibility are largely unknown; however, studies of heritable cancer predisposition in dogs may be much more straightforward than similar studies in humans, owing to a high degree of inbreeding and more limited genetic heterogeneity. Here, we conducted a pilot study with 21 GR with lymphoma, 20 age-matched healthy GR and 20 age-matched healthy mixed-breed dogs (MBD to evaluate DNA repair capability following exposure to either ionizing radiation (IR or the chemical mutagen bleomycin. Inter-individual variation in DNA repair capacity was evaluated in stimulated canine lymphoctyes exposed in vitro utilizing the G2 chromosomal radiosensitivity assay to quantify clastogen-induced chromatid-type aberrations (gaps and breaks. Golden retrievers with lymphoma demonstrated elevated sensitivity to induction of chromosome damage following either challenge compared to either healthy GR or MBD at multiple doses and time points. Using the 75(th percentile of chromatid breaks per 1,000 chromosomes in the MBD population at 4 hours post 1.0 Gy IR exposure as a benchmark to compare cases and controls, GR with lymphoma were more likely than healthy GR to be classified as "sensitive" (odds ratio = 21.2, 95% confidence interval 2.3-195.8. Furthermore, our preliminary findings imply individual (rather than breed susceptibility, and suggest that deficiencies in heritable factors related to DNA repair capabilities may be involved in the development of canine lymphoma. These studies set the stage for larger confirmatory studies, as well as candidate-based approaches to probe specific genetic susceptibility factors.

  2. Evaluation of canine-specific minocycline and doxycycline susceptibility breakpoints for meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolates from dogs.

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    Hnot, Melanie L; Cole, Lynette K; Lorch, Gwendolen; Papich, Mark G; Rajala-Schultz, Paivi J; Daniels, Joshua B

    2015-10-01

    Using the US Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) human tetracycline breakpoints to predict minocycline and doxycycline susceptibility of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (SP) isolates from dogs is not appropriate because they are too high to meet pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic data using a standard dose. New breakpoints have been approved for doxycycline and proposed for minocycline. Revised breakpoints are four dilutions lower than tetracycline breakpoints, providing a more conservative standard for classification of isolates. The objectives of this study were to measure minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of minocycline and doxycycline of 100 canine meticillin-resistant SP clinical isolates, compare their susceptibilities to minocycline and doxycycline based on current and revised standards, and document their tetracycline resistance genes. E-test strips were used to determine MICs. PCR was used to identify tet genes. Using the human tetracycline breakpoint of MIC ≤ 4 μg/mL, 76 isolates were susceptible to minocycline and 36 isolates were susceptible to doxycycline. In contrast, using the proposed minocycline breakpoint (MIC ≤ 0.25 μg/mL) and approved doxycycline breakpoint (MIC ≤ 0.125 μg/mL), 31 isolates were susceptible to both minocycline and doxycycline. Thirty-one isolates carried no tet genes, two had tet(K) and 67 had tet(M). Use of the human tetracycline breakpoints misclassified 45 and five of the isolates as susceptible to minocycline and doxycycline, respectively. PCR analysis revealed that 43 and five of the isolates classified as susceptible to minocycline and doxycycline, respectively, possessed the tetracycline resistance gene, tet(M), known to confer resistance to both drugs. These results underscore the importance of utilizing the proposed minocycline and approved doxycycline canine breakpoints in place of human tetracycline breakpoints. © 2015 ESVD and ACVD.

  3. Evaluation of the susceptibility artifacts and tissue injury caused by implanted microchips in dogs on 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Miyoko; Ono, Shin; Kayanuma, Hideki; Honnami, Muneki; Muto, Makoto; Une, Yumi

    2010-05-01

    Performing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with a metallic implant raises concern over the potential complications, including susceptibility artifacts, implant migration, and heat injury. The purpose of this study was to investigate these complications in dogs with implanted microchips by evaluating MR images and the histopathological changes after 1.5 Tesla (T) MRI. Five dogs underwent microchip implantation in the cervicothoracic area. One month later, the area was imaged using 1.5T MRI in three dogs. The microchips were removed surgically together with the surrounding tissue in all dogs. There was significant signal loss and image distortion over a wide range around the area where the microchip was implanted. This change was consistent with susceptibility artifacts, which rendered the affected area including the spinal cord undiagnostic. The artifact was more extensive in T2*-weighted images (gradient-echo) and less extensive in proton density-weighted images (fast spin-echo with short echo time). Histopathologically, all microchips were well-encapsulated with granulation tissue, and there were no evidence of migration of microchips. Cell debris and a moderate number of degenerated cells with fibrin were seen in the inner layer of the granulation tissue in each dog that underwent MRI. These changes were very subtle and did not seem to be clinically significant. The results of this study suggest that, in 1.5T MRI, susceptibility artifacts produced by implanted microchips can be marked, although the dogs with implants appeared to be scanned safely.

  4. Determination of morphological, biometric and biochemical susceptibilities in healthy Eurasier dogs with suspected inherited glaucoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Boillot

    Full Text Available In both humans and dogs, the primary risk factor for glaucoma is high intraocular pressure (IOP, which may be caused by iridocorneal angle (ICA abnormalities. Oxidative stress has also been implicated in retinal ganglion cell damage associated with glaucoma. A suspected inherited form of glaucoma was recently identified in Eurasier dogs (EDs, a breed for which pedigrees are readily available. Because of difficulties in assessing ICA morphology in dogs with advanced glaucoma, we selected a cohort of apparently healthy dogsfor the investigation of ICA morphological status, IOP and plasma concentrations of oxidative stress biomarkers. We aimed to establish correlations between these factors, to identify predictive markers of glaucoma in this dog breed. A cohort of 28 subjects, volunteered for inclusion by their owners, was selected by veterinary surgeons. These dogs were assigned to four groups: young males, young females (1-3 years old, adult males and adult females (4-8 years old. Ocular examination included ophthalmoscopy, tonometry, gonioscopy, biometry and ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM, and the evaluation of oxidative stress biomarkers consisting of measurements of plasma glutathione peroxidase (GP activity and taurine and metabolic precursor (methionine and cysteine concentrations in plasma. The prevalence of pectinate ligament abnormalities was significantly higher in adult EDs than in young dogs. Moreover, in adult females, high IOP was significantly correlated with a short axial globe length, and a particularly large distance between Schwalbe's line and the anterior lens capsule. GP activity levels were significantly lower in EDs than in a randomized control group of dogs, and plasma taurine concentrations were higher. Hence, ICA abnormalities were associated with weaker antioxidant defenses in EDs, potentially counteracted by higher plasma taurine concentrations. This study suggests that EDs may constitute an appropriate canine model for

  5. Antimicrobial susceptibility monitoring of bacterial pathogens isolated from respiratory tract infections in dogs and cats across Europe: ComPath results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Ian; Moyaert, Hilde; de Jong, Anno; El Garch, Farid; Klein, Ulrich; Ludwig, Carolin; Thiry, Julien; Youala, Myriam

    2016-08-15

    ComPath is a pan-European resistance monitoring programme collecting bacterial pathogens from dogs and cats. We present data for respiratory tract infection (RTI) isolates collected between 2008 and 2010. Antimicrobial minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined and susceptibility calculated following Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) standards for veterinary medicine. The main pathogen from dogs was Staphylococcus intermedius Group (49/215, 22.8%) which was >90% susceptible to most antimicrobials (including oxacillin - 93.9%; 3 isolates confirmed mecA-positive) but only 59.2%, 73.5% and 87.8% susceptible to tetracycline, chloramphenicol and penicillin. Bordetella bronchiseptica (48/215, 22.3%), streptococci (36/215, 16.7%), Escherichia coli (24/215, 11.2%) and Pasteurella multocida (23/215, 10.7%) were also found in dog RTI. There are no breakpoints for Bordetella bronchiseptica. Most streptococci were penicillin- chloramphenicol-, ampicillin- and pradofloxacin-susceptible. None were enrofloxacin-resistant but 6 isolates (16.7%) were of intermediate susceptibility. The least active agent against streptococci was tetracycline (47.2% susceptible). For E. coli, 37.5% were ampicillin-susceptible but 83.3% were amoxicillin/clavulanic acid-susceptible. Only chloramphenicol showed susceptibility>90% against E. coli, with 66.7% tetracycline-susceptible and 79.2% to 87.5% susceptibility to enrofloxacin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole or pradofloxacin. P. multocida were susceptible to pradofloxacin (no other breakpoints are available). The main pathogen from cats was P. multocida (82/186, 44.1%), where only pradofloxacin has breakpoints (100% susceptible). Streptococci were also collected from cats (25/186, 13.4%) and were >90% susceptible to all antimicrobials except tetracycline (36% susceptible). Most susceptibility was calculated with human-derived breakpoints and some antimicrobials had no breakpoints. Therefore predictions of clinical utility

  6. Avian influenza (H5N1) susceptibility and receptors in dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, van der R.; Tacken, M.G.J.; Ruuls-van Stalle, E.M.F.; Koch, G.; Rooij, van E.M.A.; Stockhofe-Zurwieden, N.

    2007-01-01

    Inoculation of influenza (H5N1) into beagles resulted in virus excretion and rapid seroconversion with no disease. Binding studies that used labeled influenza (H5N1) showed virus attachment to higher and lower respiratory tract tissues. Thus, dogs that are subclinically infected with influenza

  7. Immunological profile of resistance and susceptibility in naturally infected dogs by Leishmania infantum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida Leal, Gleisiane Gomes; Roatt, Bruno Mendes; de Oliveira Aguiar-Soares, Rodrigo Dian; Carneiro, Cláudia Martins; Giunchetti, Rodolfo Cordeiro; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Francisco, Amanda Fortes; Cardoso, Jamille Mirelle; Mathias, Fernando Augusto Siqueira; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Carneiro, Mariângela; Coura-Vital, Wendel; Reis, Alexandre Barbosa

    2014-10-15

    Visceral leishmaniasis has a great impact on public health, and dogs are considered the main domestic reservoir of Leishmania infantum, the causal parasite. In this study, 159 animals naturally infected by L. infantum from an endemic area of Brazil were evaluated through an analysis of cellular responses, using flow cytometry, and of the hematological parameters. The results confirmed that disease progression is associated with anemia and reductions in eosinophils, monocytes and lymphocytes. The investigation of the immune response, based on the immunophenotypic profile of peripheral blood, showed declines in the absolute numbers of T lymphocytes CD5(+) and their subsets (CD4(+) and CD8(+)) and a drop of B lymphocytes in asymptomatic seropositive (AD-II) and symptomatic seropositive (SD) dogs. Neutrophils, when stimulated with soluble antigen of L. infantum, showed higher synthesis of interferon (IFN)-γ(+) in AD-II and SD groups, with decreased production of interleukin (IL)-4(+) in asymptomatic seronegative dogs positive for L. infantum infection based on polymerase chain reaction testing (AD-I group). In the AD-II and SD groups, subpopulations of stimulated lymphocytes (CD4(+) and CD8(+)) also exhibited greater synthesis of IFN-γ(+) and IL-4(+) in culture. These results suggest that the animals of the AD-II and SD groups exhibited a mixed immune response (Type 1 and 2) and the AD-I group presenting an immune profile very similar to normal control animals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Antimicrobial susceptibility monitoring of dermatological bacterial pathogens isolated from diseased dogs and cats across Europe (ComPath results).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, C; de Jong, A; Moyaert, H; El Garch, F; Janes, R; Klein, U; Morrissey, I; Thiry, J; Youala, M

    2016-11-01

    The ComPath project is a pan-European programme dedicated to the monitoring of antimicrobial susceptibility of pathogens from diseased dogs and cats using standardized methods and centralized minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) determination. Here, the susceptibility of major pathogens is reported from antimicrobial nontreated animals with acute clinical signs of skin, wound or ear infections in 2008-2010. MICs were determined by agar dilution for commonly used antibiotics and interpreted using CLSI breakpoints, if available. Of the 1408 strains recovered, the main canine species was Staphylococcus pseudintermedius, followed by Pseudomonas and Streptococcus. In cats, Pasteurella multocida and Staph. pseudintermedius were most prevalent. For Staph. pseudintermedius, resistance was 18·4-25·2% for penicillin, clindamycin and chloramphenicol, but below 11% for ampicillin, amoxi/clav and fluoroquinolones. For Staphylococcus aureus, beta-lactam resistance was high (26·7-62·1%) but low (0·0-4·4%) for other antibiotics. 6·3% of Staph. pseudintermedius and 5·4% of Staph. aureus were confirmed mecA-positive. Gentamicin and fluoroquinolones exhibited moderate activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. For streptococci, resistance was absent/very low for penicillin, ampicillin, chloramphenicol and fluoroquinolones. For Escherichia coli, resistance was low to fluoroquinolones, chloramphenicol and gentamicin. No resistance was observed in Past. multocida. Overall, antimicrobial resistance was low in skin and soft tissue infections in dogs and cats. The results show the need for ongoing monitoring. The results are a reference baseline for future surveillance. The paucity of clinical breakpoints underlines the need to set breakpoints for relevant antibiotics. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  9. Salmonella serotypes and their antimicrobial susceptibility in apparently healthy dogs in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiflu, Bitsu; Alemayehu, Haile; Abdurahaman, Mukarim; Negash, Yohannes; Eguale, Tadesse

    2017-05-19

    The close bond between pet animals and family members poses risk of infection with zoonotic bacterial pathogens such as Salmonella. No data is available on occurrence of Salmonella in dogs in Ethiopia. The aim of this study was therefore to determine the prevalence, serotype distribution and antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella from feces of apparently healthy dogs in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Of the total 360 dogs examined, 42 (11.7%; 95% Confidence limit of 8.5%-15.4%) were positive for Salmonella. Fourteen serotypes were detected and the predominant ones were S. Bronx (n = 7; 16.7%), S. Newport (n = 6; 14.3%), followed by S. Typhimurium, S. Indiana, S. Kentucky, S. Saintpaul and S. Virchow (n = 4; 9.5%) each. Salmonella infection status was significantly associated with history of symptom of diarrhea during the past 60 days (OR = 3.78; CI = 1.76-8.13; p = 0). Highest resistance rates were found for oxytetracycline (59.5%), neomycin (50%), streptomycin (38.1%), cephalothin (33.3%), doxycycline (30.9%), ampicillin (30.9%) and amoxicillin + clavulanic acid (26.2%). Thirty eight (90.5%) of the isolates were resistant or intermediately resistant to at least one of the 16 antimicrobials tested. Resistance to two or more antimicrobials was detected in 30 (71.4%) of the isolates. Resistance to three or more antimicrobials was detected in 19 (45.2%) of the isolates. This study demonstrated high carriage rate of Salmonella serotypes known for causing human salmonellosis and large proportion of them were resistant to antimicrobials used in public and veterinary medicine for management of various bacterial infections, suggesting the possible risk of infection of human population in close contact with these dogs by drug resistant pathogens. Therefore, it is vital to work on raising public awareness on zoonotic canine diseases prevention measures and good hygienic practices.

  10. Virulence genotypes and phylogenetic background of fluoroquinolone-resistant and susceptible Escherichia coli urine isolates from dogs with urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, James R; Kuskowski, Michael A; Owens, Krista; Clabots, Connie; Singer, Randall S

    2009-04-14

    The origins and virulence potential of fluoroquinolone-resistant (FQ-R) Escherichia coli from dogs with urinary tract infection (UTI) are undefined. Therefore, fluoroquinolone-resistant (n=38) or susceptible (n=62) E. coli urine isolates from dogs with UTI were characterized for phylogenetic group (A, B1, B2, D) and 61 virulence-associated genes by multiplex PCR, then were compared according to these characteristics. Compared with fluoroquinolone-susceptible (FQ-S) isolates, the fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates exhibited significantly lower prevalences for most virulence genes studied (albeit higher prevalences for several, including iutA: aerobactin receptor), significantly fewer virulence genes per isolate, and shifts away from virulence-associated group B2. Nonetheless, 26% of fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates qualified as extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC), suggesting possible human virulence potential. The findings call into question whether the fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli encountered in dogs arise through conversion of fluoroquinolone-susceptible canine resident strains to resistance, or instead are imported from an external source. They also identify dogs as a possible reservoir of drug-resistant ExPEC for transmission to other pets and humans.

  11. The susceptibility of Pseudomonas spp. isolated from dogs with otitis to topical ear cleaners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, S I; Paterson, S

    2012-10-01

    To investigate the in vitro efficacy of commercially available topical otic preparations ("ear cleaners") against Pseudomonas spp. isolated from canine ear infections. Between January and May 2011, 50 isolates that were morphologically and phenotypically confirmed as Pseudomonas spp. were isolated from 48 dogs that had been identified with clinical signs of otitis externa and media at a referral dermatology clinic in the north west of the UK. The in vitro efficacy of eight different topical preparations against these isolates was investigated using an in-agar inhibition test. Of the eight preparations tested, three showed consistently good in vitro activity against Pseudomonas spp., while a further three were consistently ineffective. For the remaining two -preparations, in vitro efficacy was variable and inconsistent. Topical treatment with ear cleaners is considered to be a valuable adjunct in the treatment of canine otitis that involves multi-antimicrobial-resistant organisms such as Pseudomonas spp. Where treatment with antimicrobials is not an option, the use of these preparations, as a sole form of therapy, may be effective in some cases. As a comparison with other similar studies looking at the activity of ear cleaners against bacterial isolates from otitis, this study uses isolates from 50 ears from 48 dogs providing a significant number of isolates for analysis. © 2012 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  12. In vitro antifungal susceptibility of Malassezia pachydermatis strains isolated from dogs with chronic and acute otitis externa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiavassa, E; Tizzani, P; Peano, A

    2014-10-01

    Malassezia pachydermatis is a yeast that is frequently involved as a secondary/perpetuating factor in canine otitis externa. Topical therapies with different antifungal agents, mainly azole compounds, are generally successful in controlling the yeast overgrowth, but treatment failure and rapid recurrences are common. This study compared the in vitro antifungal susceptibility of M. pachydermatis isolates obtained from chronic and acute cases of otitis externa. The aim was to assess the possible onset of resistance mechanisms in isolates involved in long-lasting episodes with poor response to treatment. We evaluated the in vitro susceptibility to miconazole (MCZ) and clotrimazole (CTZ) of 42 isolates of M. pachydermatis obtained from dogs with chronic (group A, n = 25) and acute otitis (group B, n = 17), using a modified CLSI M27-A3 microdilution method. All isolates were inhibited by the antifungal agents employed, but Malassezia isolates from group A were significantly associated with higher minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values for both agents (Median MIC values: MCZ group A 2 µg/ml, group B 1 µg/ml; CTZ group A 8 µg/ml, group B 4 µg/ml). These findings prove that these isolates had a reduced in vitro susceptibility to the antifungal agents tested. However, it is unlikely that this could have any influence on the outcome of a topical treatment. Indeed, marketed products include concentrations of the tested agents that largely exceed even the highest MICs found in this study (in most cases at least 1,000 × the MIC, or greater). In conclusion, this study suggests that isolates of M. pachydermatis involved in chronic cases of canine external otitis and exposed to repeated antifungal treatments are unlikely to develop mechanisms of resistance of clinical relevance.

  13. The welfare consequences and efficacy of training pet dogs with remote electronic training collars in comparison to reward based training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan J Cooper

    Full Text Available This study investigated the welfare consequences of training dogs in the field with manually operated electronic devices (e-collars. Following a preliminary study on 9 dogs, 63 pet dogs referred for recall related problems were assigned to one of three Groups: Treatment Group A were trained by industry approved trainers using e-collars; Control Group B trained by the same trainers but without use of e-collars; and Group C trained by members of the Association of Pet Dog Trainers, UK again without e-collar stimulation (n = 21 for each Group. Dogs received two 15 minute training sessions per day for 4-5 days. Training sessions were recorded on video for behavioural analysis. Saliva and urine were collected to assay for cortisol over the training period. During preliminary studies there were negative changes in dogs' behaviour on application of electric stimuli, and elevated cortisol post-stimulation. These dogs had generally experienced high intensity stimuli without pre-warning cues during training. In contrast, in the subsequent larger, controlled study, trainers used lower settings with a pre-warning function and behavioural responses were less marked. Nevertheless, Group A dogs spent significantly more time tense, yawned more often and engaged in less environmental interaction than Group C dogs. There was no difference in urinary corticosteroids between Groups. Salivary cortisol in Group A dogs was not significantly different from that in Group B or Group C, though Group C dogs showed higher measures than Group B throughout sampling. Following training 92% of owners reported improvements in their dog's referred behaviour, and there was no significant difference in reported efficacy across Groups. Owners of dogs trained using e-collars were less confident of applying the training approach demonstrated. These findings suggest that there is no consistent benefit to be gained from e-collar training but greater welfare concerns compared with

  14. The welfare consequences and efficacy of training pet dogs with remote electronic training collars in comparison to reward based training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Jonathan J; Cracknell, Nina; Hardiman, Jessica; Wright, Hannah; Mills, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the welfare consequences of training dogs in the field with manually operated electronic devices (e-collars). Following a preliminary study on 9 dogs, 63 pet dogs referred for recall related problems were assigned to one of three Groups: Treatment Group A were trained by industry approved trainers using e-collars; Control Group B trained by the same trainers but without use of e-collars; and Group C trained by members of the Association of Pet Dog Trainers, UK again without e-collar stimulation (n = 21 for each Group). Dogs received two 15 minute training sessions per day for 4-5 days. Training sessions were recorded on video for behavioural analysis. Saliva and urine were collected to assay for cortisol over the training period. During preliminary studies there were negative changes in dogs' behaviour on application of electric stimuli, and elevated cortisol post-stimulation. These dogs had generally experienced high intensity stimuli without pre-warning cues during training. In contrast, in the subsequent larger, controlled study, trainers used lower settings with a pre-warning function and behavioural responses were less marked. Nevertheless, Group A dogs spent significantly more time tense, yawned more often and engaged in less environmental interaction than Group C dogs. There was no difference in urinary corticosteroids between Groups. Salivary cortisol in Group A dogs was not significantly different from that in Group B or Group C, though Group C dogs showed higher measures than Group B throughout sampling. Following training 92% of owners reported improvements in their dog's referred behaviour, and there was no significant difference in reported efficacy across Groups. Owners of dogs trained using e-collars were less confident of applying the training approach demonstrated. These findings suggest that there is no consistent benefit to be gained from e-collar training but greater welfare concerns compared with positive reward based

  15. Towards an Electronic Dog Nose: Surface Plasmon Resonance Immunosensor for Security and Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Onodera

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This review describes an “electronic dog nose” based on a surface plasmon resonance (SPR sensor and an antigen–antibody interaction for security and safety. We have concentrated on developing appropriate sensor surfaces for the SPR sensor for practical use. The review covers different surface fabrications, which all include variations of a self-assembled monolayer containing oligo(ethylene glycol, dendrimer, and hydrophilic polymer. We have carried out detection of explosives using the sensor surfaces. For the SPR sensor to detect explosives, the vapor or particles of the target substances have to be dissolved in a liquid. Therefore, we also review the development of sampling processes for explosives, and a protocol for the measurement of explosives on the SPR sensor in the field. Additionally, sensing elements, which have the potential to be applied for the electronic dog nose, are described.

  16. Use of an electronic brachytherapy surface applicator to treat an epiglottal fibrosarcoma in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitz, Charles A; Robinson, Katherine L

    2017-07-01

    Presented is the case of an epiglottal fibrosarcoma in a dog. The location of the mass resulted in challenges in the delivery of adequate dose to the tumor, and herein we describe the treatment using an electronic brachytherapy source. The treatment consisted of four Gy fractions, twice daily for a total of 10 fractions (40 Gy total). Visual reevaluation two weeks after treatment supported adequate spatial dose delivery, and the patient was reportedly improved six weeks after treatment. We demonstrate that plesiotherapy using an electronic brachytherapy device is feasible and may be useful in the treatment of carefully selected veterinary tumors. © 2017 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  17. Susceptibility and hardening of electronic systems to fast transient threats: new challenges ahead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Sabath

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of susceptibility and hardening of electronic systems to transient threats has experienced a significant growth during the past ten years. Driven by the development in the area of non-lethal electromagnetic weapons it has become necessary to extend the classical set of transient threats, consisting of LEMP, ESD and NEMP, by a fast transient threat with an extreme bandwidth. The investigation of the susceptibility to those UWB threats, characterized by a bandwidth of more than a quarter of the center frequency, rise times of less than 200 ps and pulse durations in the ns regime, is of special interest. This paper presents an overview of current challenges of the hardening against UWB threats. It discusses recent research trends in transient susceptibility measurements, protection concepts and methods of analysis.

  18. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Escherichia coli from swine, horses, dogs and cats as determined in the BfT-GermVet monitoring program 2004-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grobbel, Mirjam; Lübke-Becker, Antina; Alesík, Eva; Schwarz, Stefan; Wallmann, Jürgen; Werckenthin, Christiane; Wieler, Lothar H

    2007-01-01

    A total of 417 isolates of Escherichia coli collected from five animal species/organ system combinations from swine [urinary/genital tract (UGT) incl. mastitis metritis agalactia syndrome], horses [genital tract (GT)] and dogs/cats [respiratory tract (RT), UGT and gastrointestinal tract (GIT)] were analysed quantitatively for their susceptibility against different antimicrobial agents by determination of minimum inhibitory concentrations. Regardless of which animal species the strains originated from, resistance appeared most frequently against sulfamethoxazole (18-59%), tetracycline (14-54 %), and ampicillin (14-39%). High percentages of intermediate isolates were observed for cephalothin (39-46 %). In general, low prevalences of resistance were detected for amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (1-4%), gentamicin (1-9%), and cefazolin (0-11%). Generally speaking, the antimicrobial resistance situation among E. coli isolates from horses and small animals is relatively good.

  19. Antimicrobial susceptibility of streptococci from various indications of swine, horses, dogs and cats as determined in the BfT-GermVet monitoring program 2004-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Stefan; Alesík, Eva; Grobbel, Mirjam; Lübke-Becker, Antina; Werckenthin, Christiane; Wieler, Lothar H; Wallmann, Jürgen

    2007-01-01

    A total of 500 streptococci from two indications of swine (beta-haemolytic streptococci from infections of the urinary/genital tract including strains from the mastitis metritis agalactia syndrome as well as S. suis from infections of the central nervous system and the musculoskeletal system), two indications of horses (S. equi from respiratory tract infections and beta-haemolytic streptococci from infections of the genital tract), as well as three indications of dogs and cats (beta-haemolytic streptococci from infections of the respiratory tract, the urinary/genital tract, and skin/ear/mouth) were investigated for their susceptibility to antimicrobial agents. Regardless of the animal origin and indication, the most frequently detected resistance properties were resistances against sulfamethoxazole (20-78%), tetracycline (17-93%) as well as gentamicin (14-79%). Resistance to penicillins or cephalosporins was very rarely detected - if at all.

  20. Demographics of dogs, cats, and rabbits attending veterinary practices in Great Britain as recorded in their electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Vizcaíno, Fernando; Noble, Peter-John M; Jones, Phil H; Menacere, Tarek; Buchan, Iain; Reynolds, Suzanna; Dawson, Susan; Gaskell, Rosalind M; Everitt, Sally; Radford, Alan D

    2017-07-11

    Understanding the distribution and determinants of disease in animal populations must be underpinned by knowledge of animal demographics. For companion animals, these data have been difficult to collect because of the distributed nature of the companion animal veterinary industry. Here we describe key demographic features of a large veterinary-visiting pet population in Great Britain as recorded in electronic health records, and explore the association between a range of animal's characteristics and socioeconomic factors. Electronic health records were captured by the Small Animal Veterinary Surveillance Network (SAVSNET), from 143 practices (329 sites) in Great Britain. Mixed logistic regression models were used to assess the association between socioeconomic factors and species and breed ownership, and preventative health care interventions. Dogs made up 64.8% of the veterinary-visiting population, with cats, rabbits and other species making up 30.3, 2.0 and 1.6% respectively. Compared to cats, dogs and rabbits were more likely to be purebred and younger. Neutering was more common in cats (77.0%) compared to dogs (57.1%) and rabbits (45.8%). The insurance and microchipping relative frequency was highest in dogs (27.9 and 53.1%, respectively). Dogs in the veterinary-visiting population belonging to owners living in least-deprived areas of Great Britain were more likely to be purebred, neutered, insured and microchipped. The same association was found for cats in England and for certain parameters in Wales and Scotland. The differences we observed within these populations are likely to impact on the clinical diseases observed within individual veterinary practices that care for them. Based on this descriptive study, there is an indication that the population structures of companion animals co-vary with human and environmental factors such as the predicted socioeconomic level linked to the owner's address. This 'co-demographic' information suggests that further

  1. Electron-phonon interaction effect on the energy levels and diamagnetic susceptibility of quantum wires: Parallelogram and triangle cross section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khordad, R.; Bahramiyan, H.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, optical phonon modes are studied within the framework of dielectric continuum approach for parallelogram and triangular quantum wires, including the derivation of the electron-phonon interaction Hamiltonian and a discussion on the effects of this interaction on the electronic energy levels. The polaronic energy shift is calculated for both ground-state and excited-state electron energy levels by applying the perturbative approach. The effects of the electron-phonon interaction on the expectation value of r2 and diamagnetic susceptibility for both quantum wires are discussed.

  2. An improved approach to identify irradiated dog feed by electron paramagnetic resonance study and thermoluminescence measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanyal, Bhaskar, E-mail: bhaskar_sanyal@rediffmail.co [Food Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-400 085 (India); Chawla, S.P.; Sharma, Arun [Food Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-400 085 (India)

    2011-05-15

    In the present study, probably for the first time, a detailed analysis of the radiation induced radical species and thermoluminescence measurements of irradiated dog feed are reported. The EPR spectrum of non-irradiated ready-to-eat dog feed was characterized by singlet g=2.0047{+-}0.0003. Irradiated samples exhibited a complex EPR spectrum. During high power (50.0 mW) EPR spectroscopy, a visible change in the shape of the EPR spectrum was observed and characterized by EPR spectrum simulation technique. An axially symmetric anisotropic signal with g{sub ||}=2.0028 and g{sub perpendicular}=1.9976 was identified. However, a negligible change in the matrix of irradiated edible dog chew was observed using EPR spectroscopy. Therefore, thermoluminescence study of the isolated minerals from dog chew was carried out. The composition of the poly-minerals was studied using SEM and EDX analysis and a complete verdict on identification of irradiation is proposed.

  3. Influence of electron beam welding parameters and metallurgical factors on intergranular liquation cracking susceptibility of cast alloy 718

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Insu; Kang, Chungyun; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi

    2001-07-01

    The factors affecting intergranular liquation cracking susceptibility in electron beam welds were investigated for cast alloy 718. The materials used were as-received plates and heat-treated plates with three different levels of grain size. Liquation cracking susceptibility in HAZ was evaluated by a bead-on-plate test and a restraint/relaxation U-type hot cracking test. The penetrated shapes in the welds were classified into wine cup-like Type W and nail head-like Type N. For a given beam current, Type w and Type N were observed at the lower and higher welding speeds, respectively. Welding defects, i.e., underfills and microcracks were seen in the electron beam welds. Compared with Type W, the liquation cracking was more sensitive for the Type N bead cross sectional shape. Furthermore, it easily occurred at grain boundaries in Region II, i.e., very near the nail head necked part. According to the restraint/relaxation U-type hot cracking test, the liquation cracking susceptibility decreased with decreasing grain size or with homogenization heat treatment. These results suggested that the liquation cracking susceptibility in cast alloy 718 electron beam welds could be improved by using the Type W bead cross sectional shape, a decreasing the grain size and using appropriate heat treatment before welding.

  4. Facial Dog Attack Injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Wei; Patil, Pavan Manohar

    2013-01-01

    The exposed position of the face makes it vulnerable to dog bite injuries. This fact combined with the short stature of children makes them a high-risk group for such attacks. In contrast to wounds inflicted by assaults and accidents, dog bite wounds are deep puncture type wounds compounded by the presence of pathologic bacteria from the saliva of the attacking dog. This, combined with the presence of crushed, devitalized tissue makes these wounds highly susceptible to infection. Key to succe...

  5. SU-F-I-24: Feasibility of Magnetic Susceptibility to Relative Electron Density Conversion Method for Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, K; Kadoya, N; Chiba, M; Matsushita, H; Jingu, K [Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan); Sato, K; Nagasaka, T; Yamanaka, K [Tohoku University Hospital, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan); Dobashi, S; Takeda, K [Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to develop radiation treatment planning using magnetic susceptibility obtained from quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) via MR imaging. This study demonstrates the feasibility of a method for generating a substitute for a CT image from an MRI. Methods: The head of a healthy volunteer was scanned using a CT scanner and a 3.0 T MRI scanner. The CT imaging was performed with a slice thickness of 2.5 mm at 80 and 120 kV (dual-energy scan). These CT images were converted to relative electron density (rED) using the CT-rED conversion table generated by a previous dual-energy CT scan. The CT-rED conversion table was generated using the conversion of the energy-subtracted CT number to rED via a single linear relationship. One T2 star-weighted 3D gradient echo-based sequence with four different echo times images was acquired using the MRI scanner. These T2 star-weighted images were used to estimate the phase data. To estimate the local field map, a Laplacian unwrapping of the phase and background field removal algorithm were implemented to process phase data. To generate a magnetic susceptibility map from the local field map, we used morphology enabled dipole inversion method. The rED map was resampled to the same resolution as magnetic susceptibility, and the magnetic susceptibility-rED conversion table was obtained via voxel-by-voxel mapping between the magnetic susceptibility and rED maps. Results: A correlation between magnetic susceptibility and rED is not observed through our method. Conclusion: Our results show that the correlation between magnetic susceptibility and rED is not observed. As the next step, we assume that the voxel of the magnetic susceptibility map comprises two materials, such as water (0 ppm) and bone (-2.2 ppm) or water and marrow (0.81ppm). The elements of each voxel were estimated from the ratio of the two materials.

  6. Antimicrobial susceptibility of coagulase-positive and coagulase-variable Staphylococci from various indications of swine, dogs and cats as determined in the BfT-GermVet monitoring program 2004-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Stefan; Alesík, Eva; Werckenthin, Christiane; Grobbel, Mirjam; Lübke-Becker, Antina; Wieler, Lothar H; Wallmann, Jürgen

    2007-01-01

    A total of 248 coagulase-positive and coagulase-variable staphylococci from two indications of swine (infections of the urinary/genital tract including strains from the mastitis metritis agalactia syndrome as well as infections of the skin) as well as two indications of dogs/cats (respiratory tract infections and infections of skin/ear/mouth) were investigated for their susceptibility to numerous antimicrobial agents. Regardless of the animal origin and indication, the most frequently detected resistance properties were resistances against penicillin G (53-77%) and ampicillin (42-75%), tetracycline (33-52%) as well as erythromycin (13-27%). Oxacillin-resistant staphylococci were rarely detected.

  7. Dog after dog revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Beck, Sigrid; Stechow, Arnim von

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a compositional semantic analysis of pluractional adverbial modifiers like 'dog after dog' and 'one dog after the other'. We propose a division of labour according to which much of the semantics is carried by a family of plural operators. The adverbial itself contributes a semantics that we call pseudoreciprocal.

  8. Clinical assessment of wounds and antimicrobial susceptibility ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted at two veterinary surgeries to investigate the common aerobic bacteria associated with dog bite wounds in dogs, and to determine their antimicrobial susceptibilities. From each wound, two swabs were collected for bacterial culture and cytology. A total of 50 wounds from 50 dogs were examined, with ...

  9. A comparative study on the effects of electron beam irradiation on imidacloprid-resistant and -susceptible Aphis gossypii (Hemiptera: Aphididae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Seung-Hwan; Koo, Hyun-Na; Lee, Seon-Woo; Kim, Hyun Kyung; Kim, Yuri; Han, Bumsoo; Kim, Gil-Hah

    2015-07-01

    The melon and cotton aphid, Aphis gossypii, is a polyphagous insect pest. This study compared the development, reproduction, DNA damage, recovery, and gene expression in imidacloprid-resistant (IMI-R) and -susceptible (S) strains of A. gossypii by electron beam irradiation. When 1st instar nymphs were irradiated with 100 Gy, the fecundity (nymphs of F1 generation) of the resultant adults were completely inhibited. When adults were irradiated with 200 Gy, the number of total 1st instar nymphs produced per adult was 3.0±1.7 and 1.9±1.4 in the S and IMI-R strains, respectively, but adult development was completely suppressed. However, electron beam irradiation did not affect adult longevity in either the S or IMI-R strain. There was no statistically significant difference between the effect of irradiation on the S and IMI-R strains. Therefore, electron beam irradiation at 200 Gy could be used as a phytosanitary irradiation treatment for both S and IMI-R strains of A. gossypii. The DNA damage caused by electron beam irradiation was evaluated by an alkaline comet assay. Exposure to an electron beam (50 Gy) induced DNA damage that was repaired to a similar level as the untreated control group (0 Gy) over time. However, at more than 100 Gy, the DNA damage was not completely repaired. The expression of P450, HSP70, cuticle protein, and elongation factor genes were higher in the IMI-R strain than in the S strain.

  10. Electronic miniband structure, heat capacity and magnetic susceptibility of monolayer and bilayer silicene in TI, VSPM and BI regimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarmohammadi, Mohsen, E-mail: m.yarmohammadi69@gmail.com

    2017-04-11

    In the current work, we theoretically study the electronic band structure (EBS), electronic heat capacity (EHC) and magnetic susceptibility (MS) of three structures including monolayer, AA-stacked and AB-stacked bilayer silicene based on the Kane–Mele Hamiltonian model and Green's function method. The particular attention of this study is paid to the effect of external electric field on the aforementioned physical properties. By variation of the electric field, three phases are found: Topological insulator (TI), valley–spin polarized metal (VSPM) and band insulator (BI). Marvellously, its electronic minibands show that the spin-up contribution of charge carriers with lowest energy bands behaves like relativistic Dirac fermions with linear (parabolic) energy dispersions in monolayer (bilayer) case near the Dirac points. An insightful analysis shows that the maximum and minimum value of EHC peak appear for (AA) AB-stacked bilayer and monolayer silicene in TI (BI) regime while in MS curves appear for (AB) AA-stacked bilayer and monolayer lattices in TI (BI) regime, respectively. Moreover, we have observed a phase transition from antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic and paramagnetic in the monolayer and bilayer structures in the VSPM regime based on the MS findings, respectively. - Highlights: • Comparison of electronic miniband structure of monolayer and bilayer silicene by using the Kane–Mele model and Green's function technique. • Investigation and comparison the electronic contribution of heat capacity for different configurations of silicene structures. • Observation of phase transition from antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic and paramagnetic phase in the monolayer and bilayer cases, respectively.

  11. Exposure to Advertisements and Susceptibility to Electronic Cigarette Use Among Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Hongying; Hao, Jianqiang

    2016-12-01

    Despite the rapid increase in e-cigarette use among youth, little is known about the social and behavioral factors that have contributed to this rise. We investigated whether young e-cigarette users are susceptible to e-cigarette advertisements. Estimates of e-cigarette use and exposure to e-cigarette advertisements from the 2014 National Young Tobacco Survey were investigated. Factors associated with the prevalence and levels of e-cigarette use were analyzed using multinomial logistic regression. Of all respondents (n = 21,491), 19.8% had tried e-cigarettes and 9.4% were current e-cigarette users. Exposure to e-cigarette ads was prevalent among youth, with 38.6%/29.6%/53.2%/35.4% having medium to high exposure to e-cigarette ads from the Internet/newspapers/stores/TV, respectively. Current use of e-cigarettes among youth was associated with frequent exposure (high vs. low) to e-cigarette advertising from the Internet (odd ratio [OR] = 3.1, p advertisement channels and covariates, greater exposure to e-cigarette ads on the Internet (adjusted OR = 1.9, p advertising regulations and educational campaigns are critically needed. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Determination of susceptibility and specific heat critical exponents for weak itinerant-electron ferromagnets from vibrating reed experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, K.; Kaul, S. N.

    2002-04-01

    We report the observation of a linear relationship between the magnetic contribution to Young's modulus, ΔE/E0, and inverse magnetic susceptibility χ-1 for amorphous weak itinerant-electron ferromagnets Fe90Zr10 and Fe91Zr9 in the asymptotic critical region near the ferromagnetic-paramagnetic phase transition. The proportionality ΔE(T)/E0~χ-1(T) is shown to provide as accurate a means of determining the asymptotic critical exponent γ and the leading ``correction-to-scaling'' amplitudes for susceptibilty from the ΔE/E0 data as a direct measurement of magnetic susceptibilty does. Similarly, the well-known relation between the magnetic contributions to sound velocity and specific heat is fully exploited to extract accurate estimates for the universal critical amplitude ratio A+/A- and the asymptotic critical exponents α+/- for the specific heat from the sound velocity data. The presently determined values of α+/- and γ, together with the reported value for spontaneous magnetization critical exponent β, not only obey the scaling equalities α+=α- and α+2β+γ=2 but also assert that the atomic magnetic moments in the alloys in question interact with one another through an attractive interaction which decays faster than 1/r5 with the interatomic spacing, r.

  13. Prevalence of inherited disorders among mixed-breed and purebred dogs: 27,254 cases (1995-2010).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellumori, Thomas P; Famula, Thomas R; Bannasch, Danika L; Belanger, Janelle M; Oberbauer, Anita M

    2013-06-01

    To determine the proportion of mixed-breed and purebred dogs with common genetic disorders. Case-control study. 27,254 dogs with an inherited disorder. Electronic medical records were reviewed for 24 genetic disorders: hemangiosarcoma, lymphoma, mast cell tumor, osteosarcoma, aortic stenosis, dilated cardiomyopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, mitral valve dysplasia, patent ductus arteriosus, ventricular septal defect, hyperadrenocorticism, hypoadrenocorticism, hypothyroidism, elbow dysplasia, hip dysplasia, intervertebral disk disease, patellar luxation, ruptured cranial cruciate ligament, atopy or allergic dermatitis, bloat, cataracts, epilepsy, lens luxation, and portosystemic shunt. For each disorder, healthy controls matched for age, body weight, and sex to each affected dog were identified. Genetic disorders differed in expression. No differences in expression of 13 genetic disorders were detected between purebred dogs and mixed-breed dogs (ie, hip dysplasia, hypo- and hyperadrenocorticism, cancers, lens luxation, and patellar luxation). Purebred dogs were more likely to have 10 genetic disorders, including dilated cardiomyopathy, elbow dysplasia, cataracts, and hypothyroidism. Mixed-breed dogs had a greater probability of ruptured cranial cruciate ligament. Prevalence of genetic disorders in both populations was related to the specific disorder. Recently derived breeds or those from similar lineages appeared to be more susceptible to certain disorders that affect all closely related purebred dogs, whereas disorders with equal prevalence in the 2 populations suggested that those disorders represented more ancient mutations that are widely spread through the dog population. Results provided insight on how breeding practices may reduce prevalence of a disorder.

  14. Electron paramagnetic resonance and AC susceptibility studies of Mn and Gd doped 1:2:3 superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Robina, M.A. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1997-12-31

    For many years superconductivity was considered to be a low temperature phenomenon occurring below {approx} 25K. All this changed in April 1986 when J. G. Bednorz and K. A. Muller showed that the oxide La{sub 2-x}Ba{sub x}CuO{sub 4} becomes a superconductor at {approx} 30K. Later in December 1986 the oxides La{sub 2-x} Sr{sub x} CuO{sub 4} and La{sub 2-x}Ba{sub x}CuO{sub 4} synthesised under high pressure, were shown to superconduct at {approx} 40K and {approx} 50K, respectively. Finally in February 1987, Chu synthesised the classic superconductor YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6.8}, the so-called 1:2:3 material, which has a critical temperature circa 92K. In this thesis, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and susceptibility measurements are reported on various superconductors. In 1987 Bowden et al., showed that pure phase 1:2:3 samples are characterised by an absence of Cu EPR signals. This contrasts sharply with the Green phase material, Y{sub 2}Ba{sub 1}Cu{sub 1}O{sub 5}, which shows a very large EPR signal with a g{sub eff} of 2.08. In an attempt to induce EPR signals, Mn doped 1:2:3 samples have been synthesised and characterised with EPR , AC susceptibility, XRD and SEM measurements. It is shown that Mn EPR signals are not evident in the Mn doped samples with a g{sub eff} of 2.09. Also, below T{sub c} the EPR signals of the lightly doped Mn samples vanish. It is argued that this is due to fluxoids motion within the superconductor, which gives rise to very large non-reproducible signals. It is suggested that the signals originate from Cu, impurity contaminants and multiple phases produced when the 1:2:3 superconductor is doped with Manganese (author) refs., figs.

  15. Breed-Predispositions to Cancer in Pedigree Dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Dobson, Jane M.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is a common problem in dogs and although all breeds of dog and crossbred dogs may be affected, it is notable that some breeds of pedigree dogs appear to be at increased risk of certain types of cancer suggesting underlying genetic predisposition to cancer susceptibility. Although the aetiology of most cancers is likely to be multifactorial, the limited genetic diversity seen in purebred dogs facilitates genetic linkage or association studies on relatively small populations as compared ...

  16. Breed-Predispositions to Cancer in Pedigree Dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Dobson, Jane M.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is a common problem in dogs and although all breeds of dog and crossbred dogs may be affected, it is notable that some breeds of pedigree dogs appear to be at increased risk of certain types of cancer suggesting underlying genetic predisposition to cancer susceptibility. Although the aetiology of most cancers is likely to be multifactorial, the limited genetic diversity seen in purebred dogs facilitates genetic linkage or association studies on relatively small populations as compared...

  17. Measuring the magnetic-field-dependent chemical potential of a low-density three-dimensional electron gas in n -GaAs and extracting its magnetic susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy Choudhury, Aditya N.; Venkataraman, V.

    2016-01-01

    We report the magnetic-field-dependent shift of the electron chemical potential in bulk, n -type GaAs at room temperature. A transient voltage of ˜100 μ V was measured across a Au-Al2O3 -GaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitor in a pulsed magnetic field of ˜6 T . Several spurious voltages larger than the signal that had plagued earlier researchers performing similar experiments were carefully eliminated. The itinerant magnetic susceptibility of GaAs is extracted from the experimentally measured data for four different doping densities, including one as low as 5 ×1015cm-3 . Though the susceptibility in GaAs is dominated by Landau-Peierls diamagnetism, the experimental technique demonstrated can be a powerful tool for extracting the total free carrier magnetization of any electron system. The method is also virtually independent of the carrier concentration and is expected to work better in the nondegenerate limit. Such experiments had been successfully performed in two-dimensional electron gases at cryogenic temperatures. However, an unambiguous report on having observed this effect in any three-dimensional electron gas has been lacking. We highlight the 50 year old literature of various trials and discuss the key details of our experiment that were essential for its success. The technique can be used to unambiguously yield only the itinerant part of the magnetic susceptibility of complex materials such as magnetic semiconductors and hexaborides, and thus shed light on the origin of ferromagnetism in such systems.

  18. Zn induced in-gap electronic states in La214 probed by uniform magnetic susceptibility: relevance to the suppression of superconducting T c

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, R. S.; Naqib, S. H.

    2018-02-01

    Substitution of isovalent non-magnetic defects, such as Zn, in the CuO2 plane strongly modifies the magnetic properties of strongly electron correlated hole doped cuprate superconductors. The reason for enhanced uniform magnetic susceptibility, χ, in Zn substituted cuprates is debatable. Generally the defect induced magnetic behavior has been analyzed mainly in terms of two somewhat contrasting scenarios. The first one is due to independent localized moments appearing in the vicinity of Zn arising because of the strong electronic/magnetic correlations present in the host compound and the second one is due to transfer of quasiparticle (QP) spectral weight and creation of weakly localized low-energy electronic states associated with each Zn atom in place of an in-plane Cu. If the second scenario is correct, one should expect a direct correspondence between Zn induced suppression of the superconducting transition temperature, T c, and the extent of the enhanced magnetic susceptibility at low temperature. In this case, the low-T enhancement of χ would be due to weakly localized QP states at low energy and these electronic states will be precluded from taking part in Cooper pairing. We explore this second possibility by analyzing the χ(T) data for La2‑x Sr x Cu1‑y Zn y O4 with different hole contents, p (=x), and Zn concentrations (y) in this paper. The results of our analysis support this scenario.

  19. Identification and antimicrobial susceptibility of bacteria isolated from corneal ulcers of dogs Identificação e susceptibilidade antimicrobiana de bactérias isoladas de úlceras de córnea em cães

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Prado

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available A total of 22 clinical specimens were obtained from 19 dogs with corneal ulcer (16 unilateral and three bilateral for isolation and antimicrobial susceptibility evaluation of the isolated bacteria. Bacterial growth was observed in 100% of the samples (n=22. Staphylococcus intermedius was the predominant species (35.5%, followed by Corynebacterium xerosis (19.3%. Gentamicin, ciprofloxacin, chloramphenicol and tobramycin had a high efficacy against all of the isolated bacteria. The results evidenced that 80.7% of the isolates were Gram positive cocci and Gram positive bacilli, and that those microorganisms were sensitive to gentamicin, ciprofloxacin, chloramphenicol and tobramycin.Utilizaram-se 22 amostras de material, obtidas de 19 cães com úlcera de córnea, sendo 16 unilaterais e três bilaterais, para isolamento e avaliação da susceptibilidade antimicrobiana das bactérias isoladas. Observou-se crescimento bacteriano em 100% das amostras (n=22. A espécie predominante foi Staphylococcus intermedius (35,5% seguido de Corynebacterium xerosis (19,3%. Gentamicina, ciprofloxacina, cloranfenicol e tobramicina apresentaram alta eficácia contra todas as bactérias isoladas. Os resultados evidenciam que 80,7% dos isolados foram cocos e bacilos Gram positivos e que estes microrganismos foram sensíveis à gentamicina, ciprofloxacina, cloranfenicol e tobramicina.

  20. Pigmented cutaneous papillomatosis (pigmented epidermal nevus) in three pug dogs; histopathology, electron microscopy and analysis of viral DNA by the polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narama, I; Kobayashi, Y; Yamagami, T; Ozaki, K; Ueda, Y

    2005-01-01

    Canine pigmented epidermal nevus (CPEN) is a skin disorder of some breeds of dog characterized by multiple black plaques of the haired and non-haired skin. Three cases of pigmented cutaneous papillomatosis (previously described also as CPEN) in pug dogs were investigated histopathologically, immunohistochemically and electron microscopically. Additionally, DNA analyses with the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were performed in two cases. Many nuclei of the stratum granulosa were diffusely immunolabelled for specific structural antigens of bovine papillomavirus (subgroup A), but nuclear inclusion bodies were not detected by retrospective examination of haematoxylin and eosin-stained sections of the affected skin. Aggregates of small numbers of viral particles (ranging from 37 to 43 nm in diameter) with a hexagonal structure were sparsely scattered throughout the nuclei of some of the superficial keratinocytes. PCR amplification targeted for the L1 gene of papillomavirus cloned from a case of CPEN yielded an expected fragment of 194-bp in the two CPEN cases examined but not in a case of canine oral papilloma.

  1. Nasal carriage of Staphylococcus schleiferi from healthy dogs and dogs with otitis, pyoderma or both.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Elizabeth R; Kinyon, Joann M; Noxon, James O

    2012-12-07

    In veterinary medicine, Staphylococcus schleiferi was previously assumed to be an inhabitant of carnivore skin, however, more recently, it has been repeatedly documented in the literature as both an inhabitant and as a pathogen. In order to determine the frequency of nasal carriage, and the methicillin susceptibility pattern of S. schleiferi from healthy dogs as well as dogs with otitis and/or pyoderma, a prospective study including 24 dogs with healthy ears and skin, 27 dogs with healthy ears and pyoderma, 15 dogs with otitis without pyoderma and 20 dogs with both otitis and pyoderma was performed. Specimens were obtained and cultured and isolates were identified as S. schleiferi based on growth and biochemical characteristics. S. schleiferi was isolated from the nares of 1 healthy dog, 3 dogs with recurrent pyoderma, 2 dogs with recurrent otitis, and 1 dog with both recurrent otitis and pyoderma. One of the S. schleiferi isolates was methicillin resistant. Nasal carriage of S. schleiferi does occur in healthy dogs as well as dogs with otitis and pyoderma. Methicillin resistant and sensitive S. schleiferi can be found in the nares of dogs with diseased ears and skin. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Graphene susceptibility in Holstein model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mousavi, Hamze, E-mail: hamze.mousavi@gmail.co [Department of Physics, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nano Science and Nano Technology Research Center, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    We study the effects of the electron-phonon interaction on the temperature dependence of the orbital magnetic susceptibility of monolayer graphene. We use the linear response theory and Green's function formalism within the Holstein Hamiltonian model. The results show that the effects of the electron-phonon interaction on the susceptibility of graphene sheet have different behaviors in two temperature regions. In the low temperature region, susceptibility increases when the electron-phonon coupling strength increases. On the other hand, the susceptibility reduces with increasing the electron-phonon coupling strength in the high temperature region. - Highlights: Effect of electron-phonon interaction on the susceptibility of graphene is studied. Linear response theory and Green's function technique in Holstein model are used. Effect of electron-phonon on susceptibility has different behaviors in two temperature regions.

  3. Gastrointestinal decontamination of dogs treated with total body irradiation and bone marrow transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vriesendorp, H.M.; Heidt, P.J.; Zurcher, C.

    1981-01-01

    Procedures for total and selective gastrointestinal decontamination of dogs are described. The selective procedure removed only Gram negative aerobic bacteria, yeast and fungi. Dogs receiving total decontamination were less susceptible to the GI syndrome following total body irradiation (TBI) than

  4. One-electron spectra and susceptibilities of the three-dimensional electron gas from self-consistent solutions of Hedin's equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutepov, A. L.; Kotliar, G.

    2017-07-01

    A few approximate schemes to solve the Hedin equations self-consistently introduced in Phys. Rev. B 94, 155101 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevB.94.155101 are explored and tested for the three-dimensional (3D) electron gas at metallic densities. We calculate one-electron spectra, dielectric properties, compressibility, and correlation energy. Considerable reduction in the calculated bandwidth (as compared to the self-consistent G W result) has been found when vertex correction was used for both polarizability and self-energy. Generally, it is advantageous to obtain the diagrammatic representation of polarizability from the definition of this quantity as a functional derivative of the electronic density with respect to the total field (external plus induced). For self-energy, the first-order vertex correction seems to be sufficient for the range of densities considered. Whenever it is possible, we compare the accuracy of our vertex-corrected schemes with the accuracy of the self-consistent quasiparticle G W approximation (QSGW), which is less expensive computationally. We show that the QSGW approach performs poorly and we relate this poor performance with an inaccurate description of the screening in the QSGW method (with an error comprising a factor 2-3 in the physically important range of momenta).

  5. Allegheny County Dog Licenses

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — A list of dog license dates, dog breeds, and dog name by zip code. Currently this dataset does not include City of Pittsburgh dogs.

  6. Trained dogs finding place in oil industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toop, L.

    2008-01-15

    This article reported on the use of trained detector dogs to track down leaks in pipelines instead of using electronic methods. Detector Dog Services International has more than 20 years of experience in training dogs for police and security work around the world, including training dogs to pick up the scent of oil leaking from pipelines. Instead of using a chemical scent to help the dogs track in, the company trains its dogs to pick up on the scent of components in oil that make their way from a buried pipeline leak up to the surface. The compounds in the oil are used to train the dogs. The dog is trained to signal when the appropriate scent is picked up and is rewarded for finding the leak. A properly trained dog can cover a kilometre of pipeline in half an hour, and can typically cover 10 kilometres in a day's work. To date, the use of leak detection dogs in the oil industry has yet to be adopted on a regular basis. Although Detector Dog Services International has worked with Duke Energy near Fort St. John doing some leak detection work, the trend towards using costly high-tech equipment has continued.

  7. Stereo and scanning electron microscopy of in-shell Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa H.B.K.): part two-surface sound nut fungi spoilage susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scussel, Vildes M; Manfio, Daniel; Savi, Geovana D; Moecke, Elisa H S

    2014-11-01

    This work reports the in-shell Brazil nut spoilage susceptible morpho-histological characteristics and fungi infection (shell, edible part, and brown skin) through stereo and scanning electron microscopies (SEM). The following characteristics related to shell (a) morphology-that allow fungi and insects' entrance to inner nut, and (b) histology-that allow humidity absorption, improving environment conditions for living organisms development, were identified. (a.1) locule in testae-the nut navel, which is a cavity formed during nut detaching from pods (located at 1.0 to 2.0/4th of the shell B&C nut faces linkage). It allows the nut brown skin (between shell and edible part) first contact to the external environment, through the (a.2) nut channel-the locule prolongation path, which has the water/nutrients cambium function for their transport and distribution to the inner seed (while still on the tree/pod). Both, locule followed by the channel, are the main natural entrance of living organisms (fungi and insects), including moisture to the inner seed structures. In addition, the (a.3) nut shell surface-which has a crinkled and uneven surface morphology-allows water absorption, thus adding to the deterioration processes too. The main shell histological characteristic, which also allows water absorption (thus improving environment conditions for fungi proliferation), is the (b.1) cell wall porosity-the multilayered wall and porous rich cells that compose the shell faces double tissue layers and the (b.2) soft tissue-the mix of tissues 2 faces corner/linkage. This work also shows in details the SEM nut spoilage susceptible features highly fungi infected with hyphae and reproductive structures distribution. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  8. Breed-Predispositions to Cancer in Pedigree Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Jane M.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is a common problem in dogs and although all breeds of dog and crossbred dogs may be affected, it is notable that some breeds of pedigree dogs appear to be at increased risk of certain types of cancer suggesting underlying genetic predisposition to cancer susceptibility. Although the aetiology of most cancers is likely to be multifactorial, the limited genetic diversity seen in purebred dogs facilitates genetic linkage or association studies on relatively small populations as compared to humans, and by using newly developed resources, genome-wide association studies in dog breeds are proving to be a powerful tool for unravelling complex disorders. This paper will review the literature on canine breed susceptibility to histiocytic sarcoma, osteosarcoma, haemangiosarcoma, mast cell tumours, lymphoma, melanoma, and mammary tumours including the recent advances in knowledge through molecular genetic, cytogenetic, and genome wide association studies. PMID:23738139

  9. Breed-predispositions to cancer in pedigree dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Jane M

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is a common problem in dogs and although all breeds of dog and crossbred dogs may be affected, it is notable that some breeds of pedigree dogs appear to be at increased risk of certain types of cancer suggesting underlying genetic predisposition to cancer susceptibility. Although the aetiology of most cancers is likely to be multifactorial, the limited genetic diversity seen in purebred dogs facilitates genetic linkage or association studies on relatively small populations as compared to humans, and by using newly developed resources, genome-wide association studies in dog breeds are proving to be a powerful tool for unravelling complex disorders. This paper will review the literature on canine breed susceptibility to histiocytic sarcoma, osteosarcoma, haemangiosarcoma, mast cell tumours, lymphoma, melanoma, and mammary tumours including the recent advances in knowledge through molecular genetic, cytogenetic, and genome wide association studies.

  10. Dog Ecology and Dog Rabies Control

    OpenAIRE

    Wandeler, A. I.; Budde, A; Capt, S.; Kappeler, A; Matter, H.

    2017-01-01

    Dog populations, like other populations, depend on the availability of resources (food, water, and shelter). Humans either make available or deliberately withhold resources for varying proportions of dog populations. Dog-keeping practices and the duties of responsible ownership vary with the cultural setting. Dog populations often attain densities that allow the species to be a main host of rabies. The epidemiology of dog rabies is not well understood, despite the easy access to dog populatio...

  11. Dog owner awareness on dog obesity

    OpenAIRE

    大石, 武士; 森中, しをり; 中野, かをる

    2004-01-01

    [Author abstract]Recently, obesity in pet dogs is increasing. The owner is considered mostly responsible for the pet dog's obesity. However, there is little information available about owner awareness of thier pet dog's obesity. Then, the owners of 426 dogs in Osaka, Hyogo and Nara were surveyed to verify their awareness of pet dog's obesity.Nearly 70% of pet dog owners answered that the number of obese dogs has been increasing because they saw obese dogs more often than before. But only abou...

  12. Impact of Exposure to Electronic Cigarette Advertising on Susceptibility and Trial of Electronic Cigarettes and Cigarettes in US Young Adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanti, Andrea C; Rath, Jessica M; Williams, Valerie F; Pearson, Jennifer L; Richardson, Amanda; Abrams, David B; Niaura, Raymond S; Vallone, Donna M

    2016-05-01

    This study assessed the impact of brief exposure to four electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) print advertisements (ads) on perceptions, intention, and subsequent use of e-cigarettes and cigarettes in US young adults. A randomized controlled trial was conducted in a national sample of young adults from an online panel survey in 2013. Participants were randomized to ad exposure or control. Curiosity, intentions, and perceptions regarding e-cigarettes were assessed post-exposure and e-cigarette and cigarette use at 6-month follow-up. Analyses were conducted in 2014. Approximately 6% of young adults who had never used an e-cigarette at baseline tried an e-cigarette at 6-month follow-up, half of whom were current cigarette smokers at baseline. Compared to the control group, ad exposure was associated with greater curiosity to try an e-cigarette (18.3% exposed vs. 11.3% unexposed, AOR = 1.63, 95% CI = 1.18, 2.26) among never e-cigarette users and greater likelihood of e-cigarette trial at follow-up (3.6% exposed vs. 1.2% unexposed, AOR = 2.85; 95% CI = 1.07, 7.61) among never users of cigarettes and e-cigarettes. Exploratory analyses did not find an association between ad exposure and cigarette trial or past 30-day use among never users, nor cigarette use among smokers over time. Curiosity mediated the relationship between ad exposure and e-cigarette trial among e-cigarette never users. Exposure to e-cigarette ads may enhance curiosity and limited trial of e-cigarettes in never users. Future studies are needed to examine the net effect of curiosity and trial of e-cigarettes on longer-term patterns of tobacco use. This randomized trial provides the first evidence of the effect of e-cigarette advertising on a behavioral outcome in young adults. Compared to the control group, ad exposure was associated with greater curiosity to try an e-cigarette among never e-cigarette users and greater likelihood of e-cigarette trial at follow-up in a small number of never e

  13. Antimicrobial susceptibility and minimal inhibitory concentration of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antibiotic susceptibility profile of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from different animal species with septic ocular surface disease. Sixteen strains of P. aeruginosa were isolated from different species of animals (dog, cat, horse, penguin and brown bear) with ocular surface ...

  14. Dog Fights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Kelley R.

    2010-01-01

    Bringing service animals into schools raises serious questions about how to meet one student's special needs while ensuring the educational well-being of all. This article discusses how schools grapple with the practical and legal questions involved in allowing service dogs on campus. The author cites a case in 2009 called "Kalbfleisch v. Columbia…

  15. Breeding implications resulting from classification of patellae luxation in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Grevenhof, E M; Hazewinkel, H A W; Heuven, H C M

    2016-08-01

    Patellar luxation (PL) is one of the major hereditary orthopaedic abnormalities observed in a variety of dog breeds. When the patellae move sideways out of the trochlear groove, this is called PL. The PL score varies between dogs from normal to very severe. Reducing the prevalence of PL by breeding could prevent surgery, thereby improve welfare. Orthopaedic specialists differentiate between normal and loose patellae, where the patellae can be moved to the edge of the trochlear groove, considering scoring loose patellae as normal in the future. Loose patellae are considered acceptable for breeding so far by the breeding organization. The aim of this study was to analyse the genetic background of PL to decide on the importance of loose patellae when breeding for healthy dogs. Data are available from two dog breeds, that is Flat-coated Retrievers (n = 3808) and Kooiker dogs (n = 794), with a total of 4602 dogs. Results show that loose patellae indicate that dogs are genetically more susceptible to develop PL because family members of the dogs with loose patellae showed more severe PL. In addition, the estimated breeding values for dogs with loose patellae indicate that breeding values of dogs with loose patellae were worse than breeding values obtained for dogs with a normal score. Given these results, it is advised to orthopaedic specialists to continue to score loose patellae as a separate class and to dog breeders to minimize the use of dogs in breeding with a genetically higher susceptibility for PL. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  16. Dog Bite Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Emergency Care Animal Welfare Veterinary Careers Public Health Dog bite emergencies What do I do if I’ ... vaccination records. What do I do if my dog bites someone? Dog bites are scary for everyone ...

  17. Everyday behaviour in dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Eken Asp, Helena

    2015-01-01

    The absolute majority of dogs are kept as companion animals. Dogs kept as family pets are frequently exposed to noisy and crowded environments, and often have to interact with unfamiliar dogs and humans. In Sweden, we have a long history of recording behaviour in dogs on a large scale. The Swedish Working Dog Association (SBK) has, since 1989, carried out a standardized behavioural test called Dog Mentality Assessment (DMA). Results from the DMA can be condensed into five personality traits: ...

  18. Contact with domestic dogs increases pathogen exposure in endangered African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodroffe, Rosie; Prager, Katherine C; Munson, Linda; Conrad, Patricia A; Dubovi, Edward J; Mazet, Jonna A K

    2012-01-01

    Infectious diseases have contributed to the decline and local extinction of several wildlife species, including African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus). Mitigating such disease threats is challenging, partly because uncertainty about disease dynamics makes it difficult to identify the best management approaches. Serious impacts on susceptible populations most frequently occur when generalist pathogens are maintained within populations of abundant (often domestic) "reservoir" hosts, and spill over into less abundant host species. If this is the case, disease control directed at the reservoir host might be most appropriate. However, pathogen transmission within threatened host populations may also be important, and may not be controllable by managing another host species. We investigated interspecific and intraspecific transmission routes, by comparing African wild dogs' exposure to six canine pathogens with behavioural measures of their opportunities for contact with domestic dogs and with other wild dogs. Domestic dog contact was associated with exposure to canine parvovirus, Ehrlichia canis, Neospora caninum and perhaps rabies virus, but not with exposure to canine distemper virus or canine coronavirus. Contact with other wild dogs appeared not to increase the risk of exposure to any of the pathogens. These findings, combined with other data, suggest that management directed at domestic dogs might help to protect wild dog populations from rabies virus, but not from canine distemper virus. However, further analyses are needed to determine the management approaches--including no intervention--which are most appropriate for each pathogen.

  19. Contact with Domestic Dogs Increases Pathogen Exposure in Endangered African Wild Dogs (Lycaon pictus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodroffe, Rosie; Prager, Katherine C.; Conrad, Patricia A.; Dubovi, Edward J.; Mazet, Jonna A. K.

    2012-01-01

    Background Infectious diseases have contributed to the decline and local extinction of several wildlife species, including African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus). Mitigating such disease threats is challenging, partly because uncertainty about disease dynamics makes it difficult to identify the best management approaches. Serious impacts on susceptible populations most frequently occur when generalist pathogens are maintained within populations of abundant (often domestic) “reservoir” hosts, and spill over into less abundant host species. If this is the case, disease control directed at the reservoir host might be most appropriate. However, pathogen transmission within threatened host populations may also be important, and may not be controllable by managing another host species. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated interspecific and intraspecific transmission routes, by comparing African wild dogs' exposure to six canine pathogens with behavioural measures of their opportunities for contact with domestic dogs and with other wild dogs. Domestic dog contact was associated with exposure to canine parvovirus, Ehrlichia canis, Neospora caninum and perhaps rabies virus, but not with exposure to canine distemper virus or canine coronavirus. Contact with other wild dogs appeared not to increase the risk of exposure to any of the pathogens. Conclusions/Significance These findings, combined with other data, suggest that management directed at domestic dogs might help to protect wild dog populations from rabies virus, but not from canine distemper virus. However, further analyses are needed to determine the management approaches – including no intervention – which are most appropriate for each pathogen. PMID:22238695

  20. Contact with domestic dogs increases pathogen exposure in endangered African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosie Woodroffe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Infectious diseases have contributed to the decline and local extinction of several wildlife species, including African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus. Mitigating such disease threats is challenging, partly because uncertainty about disease dynamics makes it difficult to identify the best management approaches. Serious impacts on susceptible populations most frequently occur when generalist pathogens are maintained within populations of abundant (often domestic "reservoir" hosts, and spill over into less abundant host species. If this is the case, disease control directed at the reservoir host might be most appropriate. However, pathogen transmission within threatened host populations may also be important, and may not be controllable by managing another host species. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated interspecific and intraspecific transmission routes, by comparing African wild dogs' exposure to six canine pathogens with behavioural measures of their opportunities for contact with domestic dogs and with other wild dogs. Domestic dog contact was associated with exposure to canine parvovirus, Ehrlichia canis, Neospora caninum and perhaps rabies virus, but not with exposure to canine distemper virus or canine coronavirus. Contact with other wild dogs appeared not to increase the risk of exposure to any of the pathogens. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings, combined with other data, suggest that management directed at domestic dogs might help to protect wild dog populations from rabies virus, but not from canine distemper virus. However, further analyses are needed to determine the management approaches--including no intervention--which are most appropriate for each pathogen.

  1. DogPulse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Christoffer; Thomsen, Josephine Raun; Verdezoto, Nervo

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents DogPulse, an ambient awareness system to support the coordination of dog walking among family members at home. DogPulse augments a dog collar and leash set to activate an ambient shape-changing lamp and visualize the last time the dog was taken for a walk. The lamp gradually...... changes its form and pulsates its lights in order to keep the family members aware of the dog walking activity. We report the iterative prototyping of DogPulse, its implementation and its preliminary evaluation. Based on our initial findings, we present the limitations and lessons learned as well...

  2. Isoniazid toxicosis in dogs: 137 cases (2004-2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Dustin R; Lee, Justine A; Wismer, Tina A; Diniz, Pedro Paulo V P; Murtaugh, Robert J

    2017-09-15

    OBJECTIVE To establish the minimum toxic dose of isoniazid in dogs, characterize the clinical signs and outcomes for dogs following isoniazid ingestion, and determine whether IV administration of pyridoxine to dogs with isoniazid toxicosis is protective against death. DESIGN Retrospective case series. ANIMALS 137 dogs with isoniazid toxicosis. PROCEDURES The electronic database of the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Animal Poison Control Center was reviewed from January 2004 through December 2014 to identify dogs with isoniazid toxicosis. For each dog identified, information extracted from the medical record included signalment, estimated dose of isoniazid ingested, clinical signs, treatment, and outcome. Follow-up communication with pet owners or primary care veterinarians was performed when necessary to obtain missing information. RESULTS Clinical signs of isoniazid toxicosis were observed in 134 of 137 (98%) dogs and included seizures (n = 104), CNS signs without seizures (94), and gastrointestinal (41), cardiovascular (19), urogenital (4), and respiratory (1) abnormalities. Of the 87 dogs for which the outcome was available, 61 survived, 18 died, and 8 were euthanized. Probability of survival was positively associated with body weight and IV administration of pyridoxine and negatively associated with dose of isoniazid ingested and presence of seizures. Dogs that received pyridoxine IV were 29 times as likely to survive as dogs that did not receive pyridoxine IV. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated rapid diagnosis of isoniazid toxicosis and prompt treatment of affected dogs with pyridoxine and other supportive care were imperative for achieving a successful outcome.

  3. Oocysts and high seroprevalence of Neospora caninum in dogs living in remote Aboriginal communities and wild dogs in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Jessica S; Brown, Graeme K; Jenkins, David J; Ellis, John T; Fleming, Peter J S; Windsor, Peter A; Slapeta, Jan

    2012-06-08

    Canines are definitive hosts of Neospora caninum (Apicomplexa). For horizontal transmission from canines to occur, viable oocysts of N. caninum must occur in the environment of susceptible intermediate hosts. Canids in Australia include wild dogs and Aboriginal community dogs. Wild dogs are those dogs that are not dependent on humans for survival and consist of the dingo, feral domestic dog and their hybrid genotypes. Aboriginal community dogs are dependent on humans, domesticated and owned by a family, but are free-roaming and have free access throughout the community. In this study the extent of N. caninum infection was determined in a total of 374 dogs (75 wild dogs and 299 Aboriginal community dogs) using a combination of microscopic, molecular and serological techniques. Oocysts of N. caninum were observed in the faeces of two juvenile Aboriginal community dogs (2/132; 1.5%). To estimate N. caninum prevalence, a new optimised cut-off of 18.5% inhibition for a commercial competitive ELISA was calculated using a two-graph receiver-operating characteristic (TG-ROC) analysis and IFAT as the gold standard resulting in equal sensitivity and specificity of 67.8%. Of the 263 dog sera tested the true prevalence of N. caninum antibodies was 27.0% (95% confidence limit: 10.3-44.1%). The association between the competitive ELISA results in dogs less than 12 month old and older dogs was significant (P=0.042). To our knowledge this is the first large scale parasitological survey of the Aboriginal community dogs and wild dogs from Australia. The high prevalence of N. caninum infection in Aboriginal community dogs illustrates that horizontal transmission of N. caninum is occurring in Australia. These results demonstrated that N. caninum in dogs is widespread, including the semi-arid to arid regions of north-western New South Wales and the Northern Territory. The populations of free-ranging dogs are likely to be important contributors to the sylvatic life cycle of N. caninum

  4. An Infectious Disease and Mortality Survey in a Population of Free-Ranging African Wild Dogs and Sympatric Domestic Dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Flacke, G.; Becker, P; Cooper, D; Szykman Gunther, M.; Robertson, I.; Holyoake, C.; Donaldson, R.; Warren, K

    2013-01-01

    Disease can cause declines in wildlife populations and significantly threaten their survival. Recent expansion of human and domestic animal populations has made wildlife more susceptible to transmission of pathogens from domestic animal hosts. We conducted a pathogen surveillance and mortality survey for the population of African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus) in KwaZulu-Natal (KZN), South Africa, from January 2006–February 2007. Samples were obtained from 24 wild dogs for canine distemper virus (...

  5. An Infectious Disease and Mortality Survey in a Population of Free-Ranging African Wild Dogs and Sympatric Domestic Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Flacke

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Disease can cause declines in wildlife populations and significantly threaten their survival. Recent expansion of human and domestic animal populations has made wildlife more susceptible to transmission of pathogens from domestic animal hosts. We conducted a pathogen surveillance and mortality survey for the population of African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus in KwaZulu-Natal (KZN, South Africa, from January 2006–February 2007. Samples were obtained from 24 wild dogs for canine distemper virus (CDV and canine parvovirus (CPV serological testing. Data were collected on the presence of CDV, CPV, and rabies virus in the KZN domestic dog (Canis familiaris population from 2004–06. The presence of these pathogens was confirmed in domestic dogs throughout KZN. Wild dogs exhibited 0% and 4.2% prevalence for CDV and CPV antibodies, respectively. In 2006 the largest wild dog pack in KZN was reduced from 26 individuals to a single animal; disease due to rabies virus was considered the most probable cause. This study provides evidence that CDV, CPV and rabies are potential threats to African wild dog conservation in KZN. The most economical and practical way to protect wild dogs from canine pathogens may be via vaccination of sympatric domestic dogs; however, such programmes are currently limited.

  6. Emergence of Arthropod Transmitted infections in Kennel Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javed Jameel

    Full Text Available Changing scenario of climate resulting from global warming and adversity of nature has also resulted in emergence and re-emergence of diseases transmitted by arthropods. Increasing trends of population growth of dogs has increased the chance of disease transmission due to readily available susceptible host. Babesiosis and Hepatozoonosis and Ehrlichiosis are the main arthropod borne diseases of dogs prevalent in India. The present article explains the importance of these arthropod transmitted infections in kennel dogs, research progress and reason for their emergence in the present scenario. [Vet. World 2011; 4(11.000: 522-528

  7. Resistance to plague among black-tailed prairie dog populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocke, Tonie E; Williamson, Judy; Cobble, Kacy R; Busch, Joseph D; Antolin, Michael F; Wagner, David M

    2012-02-01

    In some rodent species frequently exposed to plague outbreaks caused by Yersinia pestis, resistance to the disease has evolved as a population trait. As a first step in determining if plague resistance has developed in black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus), animals captured from colonies in a plague-free region (South Dakota) and two plague-endemic regions (Colorado and Texas) were challenged with Y. pestis at one of three doses (2.5, 250, or 2500 mouse LD50s). South Dakota prairie dogs were far more susceptible to plague than Colorado and Texas prairie dogs (pplague resistance.

  8. Collie eye anomaly in Hokkaido dogs: case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizukami, Keijiro; Chang, Hye-Sook; Ota, Mitsuharu; Yabuki, Akira; Hossain, Mohammand A; Rahman, Mohammad M; Uddin, Mohammad M; Yamato, Osamu

    2012-03-01

    To describe a Hokkaido dog, one of the traditional Japanese breeds that was affected by Collie eye anomaly (CEA), and to report the genotype of this dog and the Hokkaido dog allelic frequency of the CEA-associated mutation. A nine-month-old intact female Hokkaido dog without any obvious visual disturbance was diagnosed ophthalmoscopically with CEA. Severe choroidal hypoplasia was observed in the bilateral temporal area adjacent to the optic nerve head, appearing as whitish areas. Therefore, the dog was suspected of possessing the CEA-associated mutation that was previously reported as an intronic 7.8-kilo base deletion in the canine NHEJ1 gene. SYBR Green-based real-time PCR with a melting curve analysis, conventional PCR with agarose gel electrophoresis, and direct DNA sequencing were carried out to determine the genotype of the dog. Furthermore, a preliminary genotyping survey was carried out in 17 Hokkaido dogs from three kennels using the real-time PCR method, and the pedigree relationships were analyzed using their pedigree papers. The Hokkaido dog affected by CEA was proven to possess the CEA-associated mutation. Of these 17 Hokkaido dogs, 12 dogs were heterozygous carriers and five dogs were affected by this mutation. The preliminary genotyping survey and pedigree analysis demonstrated that the allelic frequency of the CEA-associated mutation is very high in Hokkaido dogs. These data suggest that the Hokkaido breed is highly susceptible to CEA because of the known CEA-associated mutation much like the Collie-related breeds. © 2011 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  9. Magnetic susceptibility measurements of {sigma} plutonium alloys. Contribution to the study of the 5f electrons localization in the plutonium; Mesure de la susceptibilite magnetique d`alliages de plutonium en phase delta. Contribution a l`etude de la localisation des electrons 5f dans le plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meot-Reymond, S

    1996-12-31

    Physical properties of actinide metals are essentially ruled by the 5f electrons localization. From a theoretically point of view, this localization is more important in the {delta}-phase than in the {alpha}-one. To compare their magnetic behaviour, low temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements have been performed and previous-resistivity data have been analysed. Experimental results and theoretical data can be conciliate by the existence of a Kondo effect in the {delta}-Pu phase. (author) 63 refs.

  10. IASCC susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels and alloy 690 in high dissolved oxygen water environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y.; Chopra, O.K.; Soppet, W.K. [Argonne National Lab., Nuclear Engineering Div., Argonne, Illinois (United States); Dietz Rago, N.L. [Argonne National Lab., Chemical Engineering Div., Argonne, Illinois (United States); Shack, W.J. [Argonne National Lab., Nuclear Engineering Div., Argonne, Illinois (United States)

    2007-07-01

    The influences of grain boundary engineering, alloying elements, and neutron dose on irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic stainless steels and Alloy 690 were investigated. Flat dog-bone specimens irradiated in the Halden boiling heavy water reactor to {approx}2 dpa were tested in slow strain rate tensile tests in high dissolved oxygen water at 289 {sup o}C. The area fractions of intergranular or transgranular fracture were measured using a scanning electron microscope. All tested materials showed significant hardening and loss of ductility after irradiation. The area fractions of the intergranular cracking decreased with increase of uniform elongation, and were used to rank IASCC susceptibility. The grain boundary engineering treatment employed in this study does not have a significant impact on IASCC susceptibility for austenitic SSs at {approx}2 dpa, but does affect the cracking behavior of Alloy 690. High-sulfur and low-carbon SSs are more susceptible to IASCC. Oxygen content also contributes to the IASCC susceptibility in high-purity Type 304L SS. (author)

  11. Circovirus in Dogs FAQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Reports Tools for K-12 Educators Circovirus in Dogs FAQ November 22, 2013 Update November 22, 2013: ... information. Canine circovirus infections have been documented in dogs with vomiting and diarrhea. The distribution of the ...

  12. Urethral Plugs in Dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Stiller, A.T.; LULICH, J.P.; Furrow, E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Crystalline?matrix urethral plugs have not been previously reported in dogs. Hypothesis/Objectives To report the composition of urethral plugs in dogs, describe clinical features of the disease, and identify overrepresented breeds. Methods Retrospective case series. A Minnesota Urolith Center (MUC) record search was performed for urethral plugs in dogs submitted during a 6?year period. The composition of the plugs and signalment of affected dogs were recorded. Breed risk analysis w...

  13. Prevalence. Ascice. faotic dogs.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BSN

    . Ascice. faotic dogs. IY J"ROD UCTION. In Nigeria. the population or dogs local and exotic breeds) is being constrained by ell\\ iron mental stress, .... Ho\\\\e\\ er. most questions asked by dog owners and breeders are: "hat type of food and ho".

  14. Which dogs bite?

    OpenAIRE

    Jarrett, P

    1991-01-01

    Young children (less than 11 years old) are a particular risk group for dog bites. Dog bites commonly occur from the family pet. Alsatian or alsatian mixes are the biggest group in the study causing dog bites. Alsations are a popular breed. By comparison Retrievers (Labrador and Golden), also a popular breed, caused few bites.

  15. Evidence of an oncogenic gammaherpesvirus in domestic dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Shih-Hung, E-mail: ncku309@gmail.com [Department of Clinical Studies, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 335 Hill Pavilion, 380 South University Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6010 (United States); Kozak, Philip J., E-mail: philj@vet.upenn.edu [Department of Clinical Studies, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 335 Hill Pavilion, 380 South University Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6010 (United States); Kim, Jessica, E-mail: jesskim820@gmail.com [Department of Clinical Studies, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 335 Hill Pavilion, 380 South University Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6010 (United States); Habineza-Ndikuyeze, Georges, E-mail: georgesh@vet.upenn.edu [Department of Clinical Studies, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 335 Hill Pavilion, 380 South University Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6010 (United States); Meade, Charles, E-mail: cmeade@vet.upenn.edu [Department of Clinical Studies, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 335 Hill Pavilion, 380 South University Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6010 (United States); Gaurnier-Hausser, Anita, E-mail: anitag@vet.upenn.edu [Department of Clinical Studies, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 335 Hill Pavilion, 380 South University Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6010 (United States); Patel, Reema, E-mail: rtpatel@vet.upenn.edu [Department of Pathobiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 315 Hill Pavilion, 380 South University Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6010 (United States); Robertson, Erle, E-mail: erle@mail.med.upenn.edu [Department of Microbiology, and Abramson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Tumor Virology Program, University of Pennsylvania, 202A Johnson Pavilion, 3610 Hamilton Walk, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6076 (United States); and others

    2012-06-05

    In humans, chronic infection with the gammaherpesvirus Epstein-Barr virus is usually asymptomatic; however some infected individuals develop hematological and epithelial malignancies. The exact role of EBV in lymphomagenesis is poorly understood partly because of the lack of clinically relevant animal models. Here we report the detection of serological responses against EBV capsid antigens in healthy dogs and dogs with spontaneous lymphoma and that dogs with the highest antibody titers have B cell lymphoma. Moreover, we demonstrate the presence of EBV-like viral DNA and RNA sequences and Latent Membrane Protein-1 in malignant lymph nodes of dogs with lymphoma. Finally, electron microscopy of canine malignant B cells revealed the presence of classic herpesvirus particles. These findings suggest that dogs can be naturally infected with an EBV-like gammaherpesvirus that may contribute to lymphomagenesis and that dogs might represent a spontaneous model to investigate environmental and genetic factors that influence gammaherpesvirus-associated lymphomagenesis in humans.

  16. Polaritons and retarded interactions in nonlinear optical susceptibilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoester, Jasper; Mukamel, Shaul

    1989-01-01

    The role of retarded intermolecular interactions (polariton effects) in the nonlinear optical susceptibilities of condensed phases is studied. A systematic method for calculating these susceptibilities is developed, based on the derivation of reduced equations of motion which couple the electronic

  17. Do domestic dogs (Canis lupus familiaris) perceive the Delboeuf illusion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miletto Petrazzini, Maria Elena; Bisazza, Angelo; Agrillo, Christian

    2017-05-01

    In the last decade, visual illusions have been repeatedly used as a tool to compare visual perception among species. Several studies have investigated whether non-human primates perceive visual illusions in a human-like fashion, but little attention has been paid to other mammals, and sensitivity to visual illusions has been never investigated in the dog. Here, we studied whether domestic dogs perceive the Delboeuf illusion. In human and non-human primates, this illusion creates a misperception of item size as a function of its surrounding context. To examine this effect in dogs, we adapted the spontaneous preference paradigm recently used with chimpanzees. Subjects were presented with two plates containing food. In control trials, two different amounts of food were presented in two identical plates. In this circumstance, dogs were expected to select the larger amount. In test trials, equal food portion sizes were presented in two plates differing in size: if dogs perceived the illusion as primates do, they were expected to select the amount of food presented in the smaller plate. Dogs significantly discriminated the two alternatives in control trials, whereas their performance did not differ from chance in test trials with the illusory pattern. The fact that dogs do not seem to be susceptible to the Delboeuf illusion suggests a potential discontinuity in the perceptual biases affecting size judgments between primates and dogs.

  18. GENDER INFLUENCE ON SNIFFING BEHAVIOR IN DOGS

    OpenAIRE

    Michaela Šedivá; Petr Řezáč; Eva Jeřábková

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the study was to examine sniffing behavior in male and female dogs in open places. It was observed 468 dogs. Female dogs more often sniffed the head of another dog than male dogs. Male dogs more frequently sniffed the backside of another dog than female dogs. Female dogs more often sniffed the belly of another dog than male dogs. Further research is needed to understand the dog’s sniffing behavior on walks.

  19. Cognitive Aging in Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapagain, Durga; Range, Friederike; Huber, Ludwig; Virányi, Zsófia

    2017-10-25

    A decline in the physical or mental health of older dogs can be a challenge for the owners, whose relationship with their dog is compromised by the cognitive and behavioral changes in their dogs. Although dog owners tend to consider many physiological and behavioral changes in old dogs as part of the normal aging process, it is important to differentiate between normal aging and pathologic aging, since behavioral changes may be the first indication of declining health and welfare in old dogs. Most reviews on cognitive aging in dogs have focused on translational approaches to human Alzheimer's disease; from a practical perspective, however, understanding normal cognitive aging in pet dogs and screening cognitively affected dogs are important in their own right. Here we review the literature on different cognitive functions that decline during aging, signs of cognitive dysfunction, screening methods, and preventive measures for age-related cognitive decline. Moreover, we discuss the drawbacks of using questionnaires as subjective measures of aging and propose the development of objective methods to distinguish normal cognitive aging from severe cognitive dysfunction. We suggest that multi-targeted approaches that combine owner-evaluated questionnaires with neuropsychological tests can be most effective in screening cognitively affected dogs from normally aging dogs. Regarding preventive measures, we conclude that combinations of dietary intervention and behavioral enrichment may be more beneficial than single-pathway manipulations in delaying cognitive aging or retaining various cognitive functions during aging. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Evidence for extensive DLA polymorphism in different dog populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, L J; Barnes, A; Happ, G M; Quinnell, R J; Courtenay, O; Carter, S D; Ollier, W E R; Thomson, W

    2002-07-01

    Many of the genes within the Canine Major Histocompatibility Complex are highly polymorphic. Most of the alleles defined to date for DLA-DRB1, DQA1 and DQB1 come from the analysis of European or North American pure bred dogs. Little is known about DLA gene polymorphisms in other dog populations. We have studied Alaskan Husky dogs and Brazilian mongrel dogs and compared them with a panel of 568 European dogs and 40 Alaskan gray wolves. DNA sequence based typing was used to characterize a series of 12 Alaskan Huskies and 115 Brazilian mongrels for their DLA-DRB1, DQA1 and DQB1 alleles. Within these dogs, 22 previously undescribed DLA class II alleles were identified: 10 DRB1, 5 DQA1 and 7 DQB1 alleles. All these alleles were found in more than one animal, and, in some cases, as a homozygote. Several alleles initially observed in Alaskan gray wolves were found in these dogs. Each new allele was found in specific haplotypic combinations. Many new DLA class II haplotypes were identified. Several of the new alleles and haplotypes were also identified in the European dogs used for comparison. One new haplotype, containing a previously unknown DLA-DRB1 allele together with DQA1 and DQB1 alleles only seen before in gray wolves, was found in 20 Brazilian dogs, including three homozygous animals. It appears likely that the extent of polymorphism of the DLA genes will increase substantially as dogs from a wider geographic distribution are studied. This has major implications for the study of disease susceptibility and immune responsiveness in dogs.

  1. Lungworm (Crenosoma vulpis) infection in dogs on Prince Edward Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bihr, T; Conboy, G A

    1999-08-01

    Crenosoma vulpis is a nematode lungworm that is highly prevalent in the red fox population of Atlantic Canada. Dogs are susceptible to infection with clinical signs consisting primarily of a chronic cough. A recent report of C. vulpis infection in 3 dogs on Prince Edward Island prompted an investigation into the importance of this parasite as a cause of chronic respiratory disease in Island dogs. A general prevalence was determined through the necropsy of dogs euthanized at the local humane society. Lungs were removed and examined for parasites using a lung flush technique. Rectal feces was collected and examined for first-stage larvae using the Baermann technique and zinc sulfate centrifugal flotation. Ten of 310 dogs (3.2%) were positive with 0-35 worms (mean = 11.0 +/- 13.4) recovered. First-stage larvae of C. vulpis were recovered in the rectal feces of the one animal in which no worms were recovered on lung flush. A second survey was conducted examining fecal samples with the Baermann technique from afebrile dogs with presenting signs of chronic cough that had no history of recent anthelmintic treatment and showed no signs of cardiac disease, based on physical examination. Fifteen of 55 dogs examined (27.3%) were definitively diagnosed as C. vulpis-positive. All of the infected dogs were treated with fenbendazole (50 mg/kg body weight, p.o. q24 h for 3-7 days). Clinical signs resolved in all of the dogs and fecal samples were negative 2-4 weeks posttreatment. It was concluded that C. vulpis infection was a significant cause of upper respiratory disease in dogs on Prince Edward Island and should be considered in all dogs with presenting signs of chronic cough.

  2. Dogs recognize dog and human emotions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, Natalia; Wilkinson, Anna; Savalli, Carine; Otta, Emma; Mills, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The perception of emotional expressions allows animals to evaluate the social intentions and motivations of each other. This usually takes place within species; however, in the case of domestic dogs, it might be advantageous to recognize the emotions of humans as well as other dogs. In this sense, the combination of visual and auditory cues to categorize others' emotions facilitates the information processing and indicates high-level cognitive representations. Using a cross-modal preferential looking paradigm, we presented dogs with either human or dog faces with different emotional valences (happy/playful versus angry/aggressive) paired with a single vocalization from the same individual with either a positive or negative valence or Brownian noise. Dogs looked significantly longer at the face whose expression was congruent to the valence of vocalization, for both conspecifics and heterospecifics, an ability previously known only in humans. These results demonstrate that dogs can extract and integrate bimodal sensory emotional information, and discriminate between positive and negative emotions from both humans and dogs. PMID:26763220

  3. Dogs recognize dog and human emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, Natalia; Guo, Kun; Wilkinson, Anna; Savalli, Carine; Otta, Emma; Mills, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The perception of emotional expressions allows animals to evaluate the social intentions and motivations of each other. This usually takes place within species; however, in the case of domestic dogs, it might be advantageous to recognize the emotions of humans as well as other dogs. In this sense, the combination of visual and auditory cues to categorize others' emotions facilitates the information processing and indicates high-level cognitive representations. Using a cross-modal preferential looking paradigm, we presented dogs with either human or dog faces with different emotional valences (happy/playful versus angry/aggressive) paired with a single vocalization from the same individual with either a positive or negative valence or Brownian noise. Dogs looked significantly longer at the face whose expression was congruent to the valence of vocalization, for both conspecifics and heterospecifics, an ability previously known only in humans. These results demonstrate that dogs can extract and integrate bimodal sensory emotional information, and discriminate between positive and negative emotions from both humans and dogs. © 2016 The Author(s).

  4. Five patellar proximodistal positioning indices compared in clinically normal Greenland sled dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miles, James E; Dickow, Marlene; Nielsen, Dorte H

    2012-01-01

    Patellar luxation in large-breed dogs is associated with abnormal proximodistal patellar positioning. Using a clinically normal population of Greenland sled dogs, measurement reliability and the effect of limb position were compared for five patellar proximodistal positioning indices based...... on the Insall-Salvati (IS), modified Insall-Salvati (mIS), de Carvalho (dC), patellotrochlear (PT) and Blackburne-Peel (BP) indices. Indices were measured at one knee angle in 44 dogs and two knee angles in 10 dogs. Index susceptibility to error was modelled for different errors in knee angle estimation. Two...

  5. Suscetibilidade à azitromicina de isolados bacterianos de processos infecciosos em cães e gatos Susceptibility to azithromycin of bacteria isolated from infectious processes in dogs and cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid A. Pereira

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available O presente estudo avaliou o perfil de suscetibilidade à azitromicina de patógenos bacterianos prevalentes em diferentes sítios infecciosos de animais de companhia. Adicionalmente, foram estudados o perfil de atividade in vitro de azitromicina contra esses patógenos e sua concentração inibitória mínima (CIM. Testes como a difusão em disco e a microdiluição em caldo detectaram resistência respectivamente em 48,6% e 55% dos isolados de Staphylococcus spp. e em 55,3% e 72,7% dos bastonetes Gram-negativos. A CIM50 para S. aureus foi 4,0mg/mL, para S. intermedius foi de 1,0mg/mL, para Staphylococcus spp. coagulase-negativas foi de e"512mg/mL e para bastonetes Gram-negativos foi de 256mg/mL. Quinze por cento (9/60 dos isolados oxacilina-resistente e multidroga-resistentes, mecA-positivos, de Staphylococcus spp. apresentaram também resistência à azitromicina. A disseminação de bactérias multidroga-resistentes aponta para a necessidade da avaliação da atividade antimicrobiana para selecionar o fármaco mais indicado e, assim, minimizar falhas terapêuticas na conduta clínica veterinária.The susceptibility pattern to azithromycin of bacterial pathogens from various infectious sites, and the in vitro activity and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of azithromycin were studied. Tests such as disc diffusion and broth microdilution detected respectively 48.6% and 55% of resistant Staphylococcus spp., and 55.3% and 72.7% resistant gram-negative rods. MIC50 for S. aureus was 4.0mg/mL, that for S. intermedius was 1.0mg/mL, for coagulase-negative Staphylococcus e"512mg/mL, and for gram-negative rods 256mg/mL. Fifteen percent (9/60 of oxacilin-resistant, multidrug-resistant and mecA-positive Staphylococcus spp. isolates were also azithromycin resistant. The dissemination of multidrug resistant bacteria points out to the need of antimicrobial evaluation activity in order to select the best indicated drug and thus minimizing therapeutic

  6. The Use of Portable X-ray Flourescence, Magnetic Susceptibility and Scanning Electron Microscope to Classify, characterize, and Determine Redox State of Granites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, J. R.; Fellows, S. A.

    2016-12-01

    Utah contains granitic intrusions associated with various ore deposits that vary spatially, temporally, and chemically. Utah is a great location to study mineralization associated with granites because it encompasses three unique geologic provinces and offers a wide array of emplacement configurations. Past studies in Utah have primarily focused on major elements and there is also a paucity of trace analyses and most studies are only on one discrete location. Trace element analysis can be used for classifying granites and also locating potential mineralized granites. Trace element analysis of granites may also lend insight into magma redox, which is important for ore formation. Trace element and redox analyses are both expensive and time consuming. We wanted to determine redox and trace element distribution using tools that are cost effective and readily available. Portable x-ray fluorescence (pXRF) offers an affordable solution to quickly acquire large counts for key trace elements in granites. These semi-quantitative results may also help determine redox. We present a technique to better determine the redox state of granitic rocks using pXRF and magnetic susceptibility a tool that is underutilized in the field. Additionally, we show that mineral mapping of oxides and sulfur-bearing minerals in thin section by SEM, aids in determining the redox state of granites by looking at Fe and Ti ratios and observing the presence of sulfate or sulfide. By utilizing equipment that is readily available and cost effective we are able to better understand the redox state, and mineralizing potential of various granites. This is important to workers interested in locating ore deposits or understanding the granitic system.

  7. Dynamical spin dependent susceptibility of graphene like structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradian, Rostam; Rezania, Hamed; Marvi, Saeed

    2018-02-01

    Spin dependent susceptibility of gapped graphene is calculated using Hubbard model. We found that by increasing the electron density, energy gap and repulsive coulomb interaction the imaginary part of the susceptibility peaks will be shifted towards higher frequencies and by increasing the magnetization the imaginary part of the susceptibility peaks will be shifted towards lower frequencies. It means that plasmonic frequency depends on electrons band filling, electronic coulomb repulsion, magnetization and graphene initial energy gap.

  8. Traumatic lung injury attributed to tornadic activity-induced barometric pressure changes in two dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichocki, Brandy N; Dugat, Danielle R; Snider, Timothy A

    2016-06-01

    CASE DESCRIPTION A 7-year-old castrated male Italian Greyhound (dog 1) and an approximately 1-year-old female Labrador Retriever (dog 2) were evaluated because of respiratory distress 8 and 10 days, respectively, after a tornado. CLINICAL FINDINGS No obvious external injuries were identified auscultation revealed decreased bronchovesicular sounds in the affected hemithorax of both dogs. Clinicopathologic changes were mild, with evidence of inflammation in both dogs. Thoracic radiography of both dogs revealed pneumothorax and pleural effusion with effacement of the diaphragm; findings on CT included severe pulmonary atelectasis of affected lung lobes with normal bronchial tree configurtion and no evidence of diaphragmatic hernia. TREATMENT AND OUTCOME Exploratory thoracotomy of both dogs confirmed CT findings Pulmonary parenchymal damage consistent with a large rupture was found in both patients. A large hematoma was adhered to the ruptured lung lobe of dog 1. Grossly affected lung tissue was removed; histologic examination revealed atelectasis, pulmonary fib osis, thrombosis, and minimal (dog 1) to marked (dog 2) inflammation Microbial culture of lung tissue yielded no growth for dog 1 and Streptococcus spp and Escherichia coli susceptible to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid for dog 2. Dog 1 had a recurrence of pneumothorax treated by drainage with a thoracostomy tube 1 month after surgery. Eighteen months after surgery, both dogs were reportedly doing well. CLINICAL RELEVANCE Development of clinical signs after a tornado, together with clinical, diagnostic imaging, surgical, and histologic findings led to a presumptive diagnosis of pulmonary barotrauma for both dogs. Long-term outcome for these dogs, treated at a referral hospital, was good.

  9. [Alimentary thyrotoxcicosis in two dogs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempker, Karsten; Güssow, Arne; Cook, Andrea M; Rick, Markus; Neiger, Reto

    2017-06-20

    Two dogs with increased thyroxin concentrations compatible with hyperthyroidism were referred for further examinations. One dog displayed clinical signs of hyperthyroidism. Based on history, clinical examination, laboratory evaluation and scintigraphy an alimentary thyrotoxicosis was identified. It was caused by feeding a BARF diet containing thyroidal tissue in one dog and by conventional dog food in the other patient. After changing the diet the clinical signs resolved in the affected dog. A control examination revealed thyroxin concentrations within the reference range in both dogs.

  10. Jealousy in Dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, Christine R; Caroline Prouvost

    2014-01-01

    It is commonly assumed that jealousy is unique to humans, partially because of the complex cognitions often involved in this emotion. However, from a functional perspective, one might expect that an emotion that evolved to protect social bonds from interlopers might exist in other social species, particularly one as cognitively sophisticated as the dog. The current experiment adapted a paradigm from human infant studies to examine jealousy in domestic dogs. We found that dogs exhibited signif...

  11. Efficiency of electronically monitored amblyopia treatment between 5 and 16 years of age: new insight into declining susceptibility of the visual system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fronius, Maria; Cirina, Licia; Ackermann, Hanns; Kohnen, Thomas; Diehl, Corinna M

    2014-10-01

    The notion of a limited, early period of plasticity of the visual system has been challenged by more recent research demonstrating functional enhancement even into adulthood. In amblyopia ("lazy eye") it is still unclear to what extent the reduced effect of treatment after early childhood is due to declining plasticity or lower compliance with prescribed patching. The aim of this study was to determine the dose-response relationship and treatment efficiency from acuity gain and electronically recorded patching dose rates, and to infer from these parameters on a facet of age dependence of functional plasticity related to occlusion for amblyopia. The Occlusion Dose Monitor was used to record occlusion in 27 participants with previously untreated strabismic and/or anisometropic amblyopia aged between 5.4 and 15.8 (mean 9.2) years during 4months of conventional treatment. Group data showed improvement of acuity throughout the age span, but significantly more in patients younger than 7years despite comparable patching dosages. Treatment efficiency declined with age, with the most pronounced effects before the age of 7years. Thus, electronic recording allowed this first quantitative insight into occlusion treatment spanning the age range from within to beyond the conventional age for patching. Though demonstrating improvement in over 7year old patients, it confirmed the importance of early detection and treatment of amblyopia. Treatment efficiency is presented as a tool extending insight into age-dependent functional plasticity of the visual system, and providing a basis for comparisons of effects of patching vs. emerging alternative treatment approaches for amblyopia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Service dogs. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-05

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) amends its regulations concerning veterans in need of service dogs. Under this final rule, VA will provide to veterans with visual, hearing, or mobility impairments benefits to support the use of a service dog as part of the management of such impairments. The benefits include assistance with veterinary care, travel benefits associated with obtaining and training a dog, and the provision, maintenance, and replacement of hardware required for the dog to perform the tasks necessary to assist such veterans.

  13. Urethral plugs in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiller, A T; Lulich, J P; Furrow, E

    2014-01-01

    Crystalline-matrix urethral plugs have not been previously reported in dogs. To report the composition of urethral plugs in dogs, describe clinical features of the disease, and identify overrepresented breeds. Retrospective case series. A Minnesota Urolith Center (MUC) record search was performed for urethral plugs in dogs submitted during a 6-year period. The composition of the plugs and signalment of affected dogs were recorded. Breed risk analysis was performed using a control group without plugs from the Veterinary Medical Center, University of Minnesota (VMC UMN). Breed risk was also calculated for a group of dogs with struvite (plugs and uroliths). Medical records for the subset of plug cases from the VMC UMN were reviewed and described. Between 2006 and 2011, 42 urethral plugs from dogs were submitted to the MUC. All came from male dogs, and the mineral component of the majority (83%) was struvite. Thirty (71%) samples were from Pugs. Pugs were overrepresented in plug submissions (OR 179; CI 88-389; P Pugs. None of these cases had bacteriuria or positive urine cultures, and no underlying cause of plug formation was identified. When evaluating dogs with urethral obstruction, plugs need to be considered, especially in male Pugs. Further investigation into the underlying cause of plug formation in dogs is warranted. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  14. Dog ownership, abundance and potential for bat-borne rabies spillover in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astorga, F; Escobar, L E; Poo-Muñoz, D A; Medina-Vogel, G

    2015-03-01

    Rabies is a viral infectious disease that affects all mammals, including humans. Factors associated with the incidence of rabies include the presence and density of susceptible hosts and potential reservoirs. Currently, Chile is declared free of canine-related rabies, but there is an overpopulation of dogs within the country and an emergence of rabies in bats. Our objectives are to determine potential areas for bat-borne rabies spillover into dog populations expressed as a risk map, and to explore some key features of dog ownership, abundance, and management in Chile. For the risk map, our variables included a dog density surface (dog/km(2)) and a distribution model of bat-borne rabies presence. From literature review, we obtained dog data from 112 municipalities, which represent 33% of the total municipalities (339). At country level, based on previous studies the median human per dog ratio was 4.8, with 64% of houses containing at least one dog, and a median of 0.9 dog per house. We estimate a national median of 5.3 dog/km(2), and a median of 3680 dogs by municipality, from which we estimate a total population of 3.5×10(6) owned dogs. The antirabies vaccination presented a median of 21% of dogs by municipality, and 29% are unrestricted to some degree. Human per dog ratio have a significant (but weak) negative association with human density. Unrestricted dogs have a negative association with human density and income, and a positive association with the number of dogs per house. Considering dog density by municipality, and areas of potential bat-borne rabies occurrence, we found that 163 (∼48%) of Chilean municipalities are at risk of rabies spillover from bats to dogs. Risk areas are concentrated in urban settlements, including Santiago, Chile's capital. To validate the risk map, we included cases of rabies in dogs from the last 27 years; all fell within high-risk areas of our map, confirming the assertive risk prediction. Our results suggest that the use of

  15. Splenitis in 33 Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, F; Zini, E; Auriemma, E; Castagnaro, M; Coppola, L M; Peano, A; Martella, V; Decaro, N; Kuhnert, P; Ferro, S

    2017-01-01

    Splenitis is uncommonly reported in dogs. Herein, the authors describe its prevalence, clinical findings and outcomes, histologic patterns, and causes. Splenic samples of dogs diagnosed with splenitis between 2005 and 2013 were collected and stained with hematoxylin and eosin, Gram, green-Gram, Giemsa, periodic acid-Schiff, and Ziehl-Neelsen. Samples were processed for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect bacteria, fungi, and protozoa ( Leishmania infantum, Hepatozoon canis). Thirty-three of 660 splenic samples (5%) had splenitis. Clinical findings and outcomes were available in 19 dogs (58%); 49% had weakness, 33% had fever, and 84% survived. The most frequent inflammatory patterns included purulent splenitis (27%), pyogranulomatous splenitis (24%), and neutrophilic perisplenitis (15%). One dog had a putative diagnosis of primary splenitis; in 8 dogs, microorganisms were identified histologically or by PCR in the spleen without obvious comorbidities. Twenty-four dogs (73%) had concurrent diseases; a permissive role in the development of splenitis was suspected in 21 of these cases. Histologic examination identified the cause of splenitis in 10 dogs. Bacteria were identified by PCR in 23 cases, but the bacteria were confirmed histologically in only 6 of these. Leishmania was detected with PCR in 6 dogs. Leishmania was identified in 1 dog and H. canis in another histologically, but both were PCR negative. Fungi were identified in 8 spleens by PCR and in 1 by histology. This study suggests that splenitis is uncommon in dogs and is frequently associated with systemic diseases. Prognosis is favorable in most cases. Identification of bacteria, fungi, and protozoa in the spleens of affected dogs with PCR should be interpreted cautiously, because the findings are not confirmed histologically in many cases.

  16. Susceptibility of murine norovirus and hepatitis A virus to electron beam irradiation in oysters and quantifying the reduction in potential infection risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praveen, Chandni; Dancho, Brooke A; Kingsley, David H; Calci, Kevin R; Meade, Gloria K; Mena, Kristina D; Pillai, Suresh D

    2013-06-01

    Consumption of raw oysters is an exposure route for human norovirus (NoV) and hepatitis A virus (HAV). Therefore, efficient postharvest oyster treatment technology is needed to reduce public health risks. This study evaluated the inactivation of HAV and the NoV research surrogate, murine norovirus-1 (MNV-1), in oysters (Crassostrea virginica) by electron beam (E-beam) irradiation. The reduction of potential infection risks was quantified for E-beam irradiation technology employed on raw oysters at various virus contamination levels. The E-beam dose required to reduce the MNV and HAV titer by 90% (D(10) value) in whole oysters was 4.05 (standard deviations [SD], ±0.63) and 4.83 (SD, ±0.08) kGy, respectively. Microbial risk assessment suggests that if a typical serving of 12 raw oysters was contaminated with 10(5) PFU, a 5-kGy treatment would achieve a 12% reduction (from 4.49 out of 10 persons to 3.95 out of 10 persons) in NoV infection and a 16% reduction (from 9.21 out of 10 persons to 7.76 out of 10 persons) in HAV infections. If the serving size contained only 10(2) PFU of viruses, a 5-kGy treatment would achieve a 26% reduction (2.74 out of 10 persons to 2.03 out of 10 persons) of NoV and 91% reduction (2.1 out of 10 persons to 1.93 out of 100 persons) of HAV infection risks. This study shows that although E-beam processing cannot completely eliminate the risk of viral illness, infection risks can be reduced.

  17. Dogs and cats as environmental fall hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Judy A; Teh, S L; Haileyesus, Tadesse

    2010-02-01

    Falls are the leading cause of non-fatal injuries in the United States. This study assessed the prevalence of fall injuries associated with cats and dogs in the United States and describes the types of injuries sustained, the location, activity, and circumstances under which they occurred. Data were from a nationally representative sample of emergency department visits from January 1, 2001 to December 31, 2006, available through the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System All Injury Program (NEISS-AIP). Based on 7,456 cases, an estimated 86,629 fall injuries each year were associated with cats and dogs, for an injury rate of 29.7. There were 7.5 times as many injuries involving dogs as cats and females were 2.1 times more likely to be injured than males. Injury rates were highest among people aged >/=75, but pets were a fall hazard for all ages. Fractures and contusions or abrasions were the most common injuries; the highest rates were for injuries to the extremities. About 66.4% of falls associated with cats and 31.3 % of falls associated with dogs were caused by falling or tripping over the pet. An additional 21.2% of falls related to dogs were caused by being pushed or pulled. Although pets were associated with fall injuries, this risk can be reduced by increasing public awareness about situations that can lead to falls, such as dog-walking and chasing pets, and by calling attention to the importance of obedience training for dogs to minimize hazardous behaviors such as pulling and pushing. Fall injuries represent a burden to individuals, our society and our health care system. Increasing public awareness and implementing basic prevention strategies can help people of all ages enjoy their pets, reduce their chances of experiencing pet-related falls, and lessen the impact of fall injuries on our health care system. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Electrons in Condensed Matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    entire liquid or solid. The variety of electronic behaviour which ... sity of electronic behaviour in condensed matter, ego ferro- ..... a big dog? We do not know the reasons yet. As it turns out for many fundamentally interesting phenomena, colossal magneto- resistance may also find applications, this time in magnetic recording.

  19. Does the Company of a Dog Influence Affective Response to Exercise? Using Ecological Momentary Assessment to Study Dog-Accompanied Physical Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yue; Solomon, Olga; Dunton, Genevieve F

    2017-09-01

    This study used ecological momentary assessment (EMA), a real-time self-report strategy, to examine (1) whether dog owners were more likely to be physically active when they were with their dogs and (2) whether being with a dog amplifies positive and dampens negative affective response during physical activity. Electronic EMA surveys for 12 days. Free-living. Seventy-one adult dog owners. The EMA survey included 1 question about current activity, 3 questions about positive affect (Cronbach α = .837), 4 questions about negative affect (Cronbach α = .865), and 1 question about the presence of dog. Multilevel modeling. The company of a dog did not increase the likelihood of being active versus sedentary at any given EMA prompt. However, greater positive affect during physical activity was reported in the company of a dog. Negative affect did not differ between active and sedentary activity, regardless of being with a dog or not. This study demonstrates the utility of electronic EMA as a promising methodology to study dog-accompanied physical activity. Future studies may use EMA to collect further contextual information about dog-accompanied activity to inform the development of innovative physical activity interventions.

  20. Pet Dogs and Children's Health: Opportunities for Chronic Disease Prevention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadomski, Anne M; Scribani, Melissa B; Krupa, Nicole; Jenkins, Paul; Nagykaldi, Zsolt; Olson, Ardis L

    2015-11-25

    Positive associations between having a pet dog and adult health outcomes have been documented; however, little evidence exists regarding the benefits of pet dogs for young children. This study investigates the hypothesis that pet dogs are positively associated with healthy weight and mental health among children. This cross-sectional study accrued a consecutive sample of children over 18 months in a pediatric primary care setting. The study enrolled 643 children (mean age, 6.7 years); 96% were white, 45% were female, 56% were privately insured, and 58% had pet dogs in the home. Before an annual visit, parents of children aged 4 to 10 years completed the DartScreen, a comprehensive Web-based health risk screener administered using an electronic tablet. The screener domains were child body mass index (BMI), physical activity, screen time, mental health, and pet-related questions. Children with and children without pet dogs did not differ in BMI (P = .80), screen time of 2 hours or less (P = 0.99), or physical activity (P = .07). A lower percentage of children with dogs (12%) met the clinical cut-off value of Screen for Child Anxiety and Related Disorders (SCARED-5) of 3 or more, compared with children without dogs (21%, P = .002). The mean SCARED-5 score was lower among children with dogs (1.13) compared with children without dogs (1.40; P = .01). This relationship was retained in multivariate analysis after controlling for several covariates. Having a pet dog in the home was associated with a decreased probability of childhood anxiety. Future studies need to establish whether this relationship is causal and, if so, how pet dogs alleviate childhood anxiety.

  1. Allopurinol Resistance in Leishmania infantum from Dogs with Disease Relapse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Yasur-Landau

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Visceral leishmaniasis caused by the protozoan Leishmania infantum is a zoonotic, life threatening parasitic disease. Domestic dogs are the main peridomestic reservoir, and allopurinol is the most frequently used drug for the control of infection, alone or in combination with other drugs. Resistance of Leishmania strains from dogs to allopurinol has not been described before in clinical studies.Following our observation of clinical disease relapse in dogs under allopurinol treatment, we tested susceptibility to allopurinol of L. infantum isolated from groups of dogs pre-treatment, treated in remission, and with disease relapse during treatment. Promastigote isolates obtained from four treated relapsed dogs (TR group showed an average half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 of 996 μg/mL. A significantly lower IC50 (P = 0.01 was found for isolates from ten dogs before treatment (NT group, 200 μg/mL, as well as for five isolates obtained from treated dogs in remission (TA group, 268 μg/mL. Axenic amastigotes produced from isolates of the TR group also showed significantly higher (P = 0.002 IC50 compared to the NT group (1678 and 671 μg/mL, respectively. The lower sensitivity of intracellular amastigotes from the TR group relative to those from the NT group (P = 0.002 was confirmed using an infected macrophage model (6.3% and 20% growth inhibition, respectively at 300 μg/mL allopurinol.This is the first study to demonstrate allopurinol resistance in L. infantum and to associate it with disease relapse in the canine host. These findings are of concern as allopurinol is the main drug used for long term control of the disease in dogs, and resistant L. infantum strains may enhance uncontrolled transmission to humans and to other dogs.

  2. Allopurinol Resistance in Leishmania infantum from Dogs with Disease Relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasur-Landau, Daniel; Jaffe, Charles L; David, Lior; Baneth, Gad

    2016-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis caused by the protozoan Leishmania infantum is a zoonotic, life threatening parasitic disease. Domestic dogs are the main peridomestic reservoir, and allopurinol is the most frequently used drug for the control of infection, alone or in combination with other drugs. Resistance of Leishmania strains from dogs to allopurinol has not been described before in clinical studies. Following our observation of clinical disease relapse in dogs under allopurinol treatment, we tested susceptibility to allopurinol of L. infantum isolated from groups of dogs pre-treatment, treated in remission, and with disease relapse during treatment. Promastigote isolates obtained from four treated relapsed dogs (TR group) showed an average half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 996 μg/mL. A significantly lower IC50 (P = 0.01) was found for isolates from ten dogs before treatment (NT group, 200 μg/mL), as well as for five isolates obtained from treated dogs in remission (TA group, 268 μg/mL). Axenic amastigotes produced from isolates of the TR group also showed significantly higher (P = 0.002) IC50 compared to the NT group (1678 and 671 μg/mL, respectively). The lower sensitivity of intracellular amastigotes from the TR group relative to those from the NT group (P = 0.002) was confirmed using an infected macrophage model (6.3% and 20% growth inhibition, respectively at 300 μg/mL allopurinol). This is the first study to demonstrate allopurinol resistance in L. infantum and to associate it with disease relapse in the canine host. These findings are of concern as allopurinol is the main drug used for long term control of the disease in dogs, and resistant L. infantum strains may enhance uncontrolled transmission to humans and to other dogs.

  3. Systemic nocardiosis in a dog caused by Nocardia cyriacigeorgica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eroksuz, Yesari; Gursoy, Nafia Canan; Karapinar, Tolga; Karabulut, Burak; Incili, Canan Akdeniz; Yerlikaya, Zeynep; Toraman, Zulal Asci; Timurkan, Mehmet Ozkan; Eroksuz, Hatice

    2017-01-21

    Systemic nocardiosis due to Nocardia cyriacigeorgica has not been reported in dogs. Light and electron microscopy, microbiological culture and molecular identification (PCR) were used to diagnose systemic nocardiosis caused by Nocardia cyriacigeorgica in a 3-month-old husky dog. The postmortem changes included multifocal to coalescing, sharply circumscribed pyogranulomatous inflammation and abscess formation in lungs, liver, myocardium, spleen, kidneys, brain, and hilar lymph nodes. The organism was isolated and sequencing of its 16S rRNA allowed its identification and speciation. Examination of the bacterial culture by scanning electron-microscope showed filamentous branching with fragmentation into widely bacillary and cocoid forms of the bacteria. There was no history of immunosupressive drug administration and infection by the immunosuppresive viral pathogens, canine distemper and parvovirus were excluded via PCR. N. cyriacigeorgica should be considered potential cause of systemic pyogranulomatous lesions in dogs. It is the first reported case of systemic nocardiosis due to N. cyriacigeorgica in a dog.

  4. Magnetic order and electronic properties of Li{sub 2}Mn{sub 2}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 3} material for lithium-ion batteries: ESR and magnetic susceptibility studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suleimanov, N.M. [E. K. Zavoisky Physical-Technical Institute of Russian Academy of Sciences, Kazan (Russian Federation); Kazan State Power Engineering University, Kazan (Russian Federation); Prabaharan, S.R.S. [VIT University, School of Electronics Engineering, Chennai (India); Khantimerov, S.M.; Nizamov, F.A. [E. K. Zavoisky Physical-Technical Institute of Russian Academy of Sciences, Kazan (Russian Federation); Michael, M.S. [SSN College of Engineering, Department of Chemistry, Chennai (India); Drulis, H.; Wisniewski, P. [Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research of Polish Academy of Sciences, Wroclaw (Poland)

    2016-08-15

    We describe the application of electron spin resonance (ESR) and magnetic susceptibility methods to study the magnetic properties and valence state of transition metal ions in Li{sub 2}Mn{sub 2}(MoO4){sub 3} polyanion compound previously studied for its cathode-active properties in lithium containing batteries. ESR measurements of Li{sub 2}Mn{sub 2}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 3} have shown the presence of Mn{sup 2+} ions in the octahedral environment of oxygen ions. It is found that the part of manganese ions occupy the anti-site positions in lithium sublattice. The absence of the ESR signal from molybdenum ions indicates that they are non-magnetic and adopt the 6{sup +} valence state. Considerable overlapping between 3d orbitals of transition metal and 2p oxygen orbitals has been experimentally established. This leads to the indirect exchange interaction and antiferromagnetic ordering of manganese ions at 1.4 K. (orig.)

  5. BigDog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Playter, R.; Buehler, M.; Raibert, M.

    2006-05-01

    BigDog's goal is to be the world's most advanced quadruped robot for outdoor applications. BigDog is aimed at the mission of a mechanical mule - a category with few competitors to date: power autonomous quadrupeds capable of carrying significant payloads, operating outdoors, with static and dynamic mobility, and fully integrated sensing. BigDog is about 1 m tall, 1 m long and 0.3 m wide, and weighs about 90 kg. BigDog has demonstrated walking and trotting gaits, as well as standing up and sitting down. Since its creation in the fall of 2004, BigDog has logged tens of hours of walking, climbing and running time. It has walked up and down 25 & 35 degree inclines and trotted at speeds up to 1.8 m/s. BigDog has walked at 0.7 m/s over loose rock beds and carried over 50 kg of payload. We are currently working to expand BigDog's rough terrain mobility through the creation of robust locomotion strategies and terrain sensing capabilities.

  6. Dogs discriminate identical twins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludvík Pinc

    Full Text Available Earlier studies have shown variation among experimental attempts to establish whether human monozygotic twins that are genetically identical also have identical individual scents. In none of the cases were the dogs able to distinguish all the individual scents of monozygotic twins living in the same environment if the scents were presented to them separately. Ten specially trained police German Shepherd dogs of three Czech Republic Police Regional Headquarters were used for scent identification in our study. The dogs were supposed to match scents of two monozygotic pairs (5 and 7 years old and two dizygotic twin pairs (8 and 13 years old. Scents were collected on cotton squares stored in glass jars. Dog handlers were blind to the experiment details. In each trial (line-up, one scent was used as a starting scent and the dog was then sent to determine if any of the 7 presented glass jars contained a matching scent. Scents of children of similar ages were used as distractors. In the matching procedure, the dogs matched correctly the scent of one twin with the other, as well as two scents collected from every single identical and non-identical twin to prove their efficacy and likewise, the presence of the matching twin scent in any given glass jar. All dogs in all trials distinguished correctly the scents of identical as well as non-identical twins. All dogs similarly matched positively two scents collected from the same individuals. Our findings indicated that specially trained German Shepherd dogs are able to distinguish individual scents of identical twins despite the fact that they live in the same environment, eat the same food and even if the scents are not presented to them simultaneously.

  7. Dogs Discriminate Identical Twins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinc, Ludvík; Bartoš, Luděk; Reslová, Alice; Kotrba, Radim

    2011-01-01

    Earlier studies have shown variation among experimental attempts to establish whether human monozygotic twins that are genetically identical also have identical individual scents. In none of the cases were the dogs able to distinguish all the individual scents of monozygotic twins living in the same environment if the scents were presented to them separately. Ten specially trained police German Shepherd dogs of three Czech Republic Police Regional Headquarters were used for scent identification in our study. The dogs were supposed to match scents of two monozygotic pairs (5 and 7 years old) and two dizygotic twin pairs (8 and 13 years old). Scents were collected on cotton squares stored in glass jars. Dog handlers were blind to the experiment details. In each trial (line-up), one scent was used as a starting scent and the dog was then sent to determine if any of the 7 presented glass jars contained a matching scent. Scents of children of similar ages were used as distractors. In the matching procedure, the dogs matched correctly the scent of one twin with the other, as well as two scents collected from every single identical and non-identical twin to prove their efficacy and likewise, the presence of the matching twin scent in any given glass jar. All dogs in all trials distinguished correctly the scents of identical as well as non-identical twins. All dogs similarly matched positively two scents collected from the same individuals. Our findings indicated that specially trained German Shepherd dogs are able to distinguish individual scents of identical twins despite the fact that they live in the same environment, eat the same food and even if the scents are not presented to them simultaneously. PMID:21698282

  8. Enterococcal Infective Endocarditis following Periodontal Disease in Dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Semedo-Lemsaddek

    Full Text Available In humans, one of the major factors associated with infective endocarditis (IE is the concurrent presence of periodontal disease (PD. However, in veterinary medicine, the relevance of PD in the evolution of dogs' endocarditis remains poorly understood. In order to try to establish a correlation between mouth-associated Enterococcus spp. and infective endocarditis in dogs, the present study evaluated the presence and diversity of enterococci in the gum and heart of dogs with PD. Samples were collected during necropsy of 32 dogs with PD and visually diagnosed with IE, which died of natural causes or euthanasia. Enterococci were isolated, identified and further characterized by Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE; susceptibility to antimicrobial agents and pathogenicity potential was also evaluated. In seven sampled animals, PFGE-patterns, resistance and virulence profiles were found to be identical between mouth and heart enterococci obtained from the same dog, allowing the establishment of an association between enterococcal periodontal disease and endocarditis in dogs. These findings represent a crucial step towards understanding the pathogenesis of PD-driven IE, and constitute a major progress in veterinary medicine.

  9. Mössbauer, electron paramagnetic resonance, and magnetic susceptibility studies on members of a new family of cyano-bridged 3d-4f complexes. Demonstration of anisotropic exchange in a Fe-Gd complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoian, Sebastian A; Paraschiv, Carmen; Kiritsakas, Nathalie; Lloret, Francesc; Münck, Eckard; Bominaar, Emile L; Andruh, Marius

    2010-04-05

    The synthesis and crystallographic characterization of a new family of M(mu-CN)Ln complexes are reported. Two structural series have been prepared by reacting in water rare earth nitrates (Ln(III) = La, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Dy, Ho) with K(3)[M(CN)(6)] (M(III) = Fe, Co) in the presence of hexamethylenetetramine (hmt). The first series consists of six isomorphous heterobinuclear complexes, [(CN)(5)M-CN-Ln(H(2)O)(8)].2hmt ([FeLa] 1, [FePr] 2, [FeNd] 3, [FeSm] 4, [FeEu] 5, [FeGd] 6), while the second series consists of four isostructural ionic complexes, [M(CN)(6)][Ln(H(2)O)(8)].hmt ([FeDy] 7, [FeHo] 8, [CoEu] 9, [CoGd] 10). The hexamethylenetetramine molecules contribute to the stabilization of the crystals by participating in an extended network of hydrogen bond interactions. In both series the aqua ligands are hydrogen bonded to the nitrogen atoms from both the terminal CN(-) groups and the hmt molecules. The [FeGd] complex has been analyzed with (57)Fe Mossbauer spectroscopy and magnetic susceptibility measurements. We have also analyzed the [FeLa] complex, in which the paramagnetic Gd(III) is replaced by diamagnetic La(III), with (57)Fe Mossbauer spectroscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and magnetic susceptibility measurements, to obtain information about the low-spin Fe(III) site that is not accessible in the presence of a paramagnetic ion at the complementary site. For the same reason, the [CoGd] complex, containing diamagnetic Co(III), was studied with EPR and magnetic susceptibility measurements, which confirmed the S = 7/2 spin of Gd(III). Prior knowledge about the paramagnetic sites in [FeGd] allows a detailed analysis of the exchange interactions between them. In particular, the question of whether the exchange interaction in [FeGd] is isotropic or anisotropic has been addressed. Standard variable-temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements provide only the value for a linear combination of J(x), J(y), and J(z) but contain no information

  10. Sylvatic plague vaccine and management of prairie dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocke, Tonie E.

    2012-01-01

    Scientists at the USGS National Wildlife Health Center (NWHC), in collaboration with colleagues at the University of Wisconsin (UW), have developed a sylvatic plague vaccine that shows great promise in protecting prairie dogs against plague (Mencher and others, 2004; Rocke and others, 2010). Four species of prairie dogs reside in the United States and Canada, and all are highly susceptible to plague and regularly experience outbreaks with devastating losses. Along with habitat loss and poisoning, plague has contributed to a significant historical decline in prairie dog populations. By some estimates, prairie dogs now occupy only 1 to 2 percent of their former range (Proctor and others, 2006), with prairie dog colonies being now much smaller and fragmented than they were historically, making individual colonies more vulnerable to elimination by plague (Antolin and others, 2002). At least one species, the Utah prairie dog (Cynomys parvidens) is listed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) as "threatened." Controlling plague is a vital concern for ongoing management and conservation efforts for prairie dogs. Current efforts to halt the spread of plague in prairie dog colonies typically rely on dusting individual prairie dog burrows with pesticides to kill plague-infected fleas. Although flea-control insecticides, such as deltamethrin, are useful in stopping plague outbreaks in these prairie dog colonies, dusting of burrows is labor intensive and time consuming and may affect other insects and arthropods. As an alternative approach, NWHC and UW scientists developed a sylvatic plague vaccine (SPV) for prairie dogs that can be delivered via oral bait. Laboratory studies have shown that consumption of this vaccine-laden bait by different prairie dog species results in significant protection against plague infection that can last for at least 9 months (Rocke and others, 2010; Rocke, unpublished). Work has now shifted to optimizing baits and distribution methods for

  11. Dog and owner demographic characteristics and dog personality trait associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubinyi, Eniko; Turcsán, Borbála; Miklósi, Adám

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the relationships between four personality traits (calmness, trainability, dog sociability and boldness) of dogs (Canis familiaris) and dog and owner demographics on a large sample size with 14,004 individuals. German speaking dog owners could characterize their dog by filling out a form on the Internet. There were five demographic variables for dogs and nine for owners. Two statistical methods were used for investigating the associations between personality and demographic traits: the more traditional general linear methods and regression trees that are ideal for analyzing non-linear relationships in the structure of the data. The results showed that calmness is influenced primarily by the dog's age, the neutered status, the number of different types of professional training courses (e.g. obedience, agility) the dog had experienced and the age of acquisition. The least calm dogs were less than 2.5 years old, neutered and acquired after the first 12 weeks of age, while the calmest dogs were older than 6.9 years. Trainability was affected primarily by the training experiences, the dog's age, and the purpose of keeping the dog. The least trainable dogs had not received professional training at all and were older than 3 years. The most trainable dogs were those who participated in three or more types of professional training. Sociability toward conspecifics was mainly determined by the age, sex, training experience and time spent together. The least sociable dogs were older than 4.8 years and the owners spent less than 3h with the dog daily. The most sociable dogs were less than 1.5 years old. Males were less sociable toward their conspecifics than females. Boldness was affected by the sex and age of the dog and the age of acquisition. The least bold were females acquired after the age of 1 year or bred by the owner. The boldest dogs were males, acquired before the age of 12 weeks, and were younger than 2 years old. Other variables

  12. Platelet function in dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Line A.; Zois, Nora Elisabeth; Pedersen, Henrik D.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Clinical studies investigating platelet function in dogs have had conflicting results that may be caused by normal physiologic variation in platelet response to agonists. Objectives: The objective of this study was to investigate platelet function in clinically healthy dogs of 4...... different breeds by whole-blood aggregometry and with a point-of-care platelet function analyzer (PFA-100), and to evaluate the effect of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) administration on the results from both methods. Methods: Forty-five clinically healthy dogs (12 Cavalier King Charles Spaniels [CKCS], 12...... applied. However, the importance of these breed differences remains to be investigated. The PFA-100 method with Col + Epi as agonists, and ADP-induced platelet aggregation appear to be sensitive to ASA in dogs....

  13. Jealousy in dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine R Harris

    Full Text Available It is commonly assumed that jealousy is unique to humans, partially because of the complex cognitions often involved in this emotion. However, from a functional perspective, one might expect that an emotion that evolved to protect social bonds from interlopers might exist in other social species, particularly one as cognitively sophisticated as the dog. The current experiment adapted a paradigm from human infant studies to examine jealousy in domestic dogs. We found that dogs exhibited significantly more jealous behaviors (e.g., snapping, getting between the owner and object, pushing/touching the object/owner when their owners displayed affectionate behaviors towards what appeared to be another dog as compared to nonsocial objects. These results lend support to the hypothesis that jealousy has some "primordial" form that exists in human infants and in at least one other social species besides humans.

  14. Dog Bite Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    IF YOU are bitten • If your own dog bit you, confine it immediately and call your veterinarian to check your dog’s vaccination records. Consult with your veterinarian about your dog’s aggressive ...

  15. Nutrition of aging dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Jennifer A; Farcas, Amy

    2014-07-01

    Aging is a normal process characterized by a variety of physiologic changes. Geriatric dogs are also more likely to be afflicted with certain disease conditions. Both normal and abnormal physiologic changes associated with aging in the dog may be amenable to nutritional intervention. Specific alterations in nutrients or in dietary characteristics can be beneficial; however, these are best done in the context of an individualized nutritional assessment and monitoring paradigm. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Xylitol toxicosis in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Lisa A; Coleman, Adrienne E

    2012-03-01

    The sugar alcohol xylitol is a popular sweetener used in gums, candies, and baked goods. While xylitol has a wide margin of safety in people and most mammalian species, when ingested by dogs it is believed to stimulate excessive insulin secretion leading to severe hypoglycemia, potentially followed by acute hepatic failure and coagulopathies. Additional clinical findings may include thrombocytopenia, hypokalemia, and hyperphosphatemia. The prognosis for recovery in dogs that develop uncomplicated hypoglycemia is generally good with prompt and aggressive veterinary care.

  17. The role of assistance dogs in society

    OpenAIRE

    Audrestch, Hilary M.; Whelan, Chantelle T.; Grice, David; Asher, Lucy; England, Gary C.W.; Freeman, Sarah L.

    2015-01-01

    Assistance dogs are specially trained to undertake a variety of tasks to help individuals with disabilities. This review gives an overview of the different types of assistance dogs in the UK, including guide dogs, hearing dogs, mobility assistance dogs, service dogs and dual purpose dogs. The literature describes many benefits of assistance dogs, including their impact on physical wellbeing and safety of their ‘owners,’ as well as on psychological wellbeing and social inclusion. The role of a...

  18. [Prevalence of Dog circovirus in healthy and diarrhoeic dogs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentil, Michaela; Gruber, Achim D; Müller, Elisabeth

    2017-04-19

    In 2012, a Dog circovirus (DogCV) was discovered in the USA, which was followed by further descriptions of the virus in the USA, Italy and Germany. The present study is the first to examine the prevalence of DogCV in faeces of dogs from Germany and other European countries. Faecal samples from 184 dogs with diarrhoea and from 82 clinically healthy dogs (control group) were analysed for the presence of DogCV by PCR. Furthermore, the detection of parvovirus, coronavirus, Giardia and Cryptosporidium was performed in all samples. In the group of dogs with diarrhoea the prevalence of DogCV was 20.1% (37/184), in the healthy control group it was 7.3% (6/82). Therefore, the virus could be detected significantly more frequently in dogs with diarrhoea. The detection frequency of DogCV is comparable with those of the other tested pathogens. In approximately 50% of the DogCV-positive dogs, infections with other enteropathogenic organisms were diagnosed. The role of co-infection in the pathogenesis of the disease remains unclear, but there appears to be an association between co-infection and disease severity. Evidence of DogCV in clinically healthy dogs appears important for the epidemiology and raises questions about its pathogenicity. Further studies are needed to clarify questions regarding the pathogenesis, causal relevance and possible interference by other diarrhoeal pathogens. Nevertheless, the results of this study are an important indication that DogCV should be considered as a differential diagnosis in dogs with diarrhoea.

  19. Chromosome analyses in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimann-Berg, N; Bullerdiek, J; Murua Escobar, H; Nolte, I

    2012-01-01

    Cytogenetics is the study of normal and abnormal chromosomes. Every species is characterized by a given number of chromosomes that can be recognized by their specific shape. The chromosomes are arranged according to standard classification schemes for the respective species. While pre- and postnatal chromosome analyses investigate the constitutional karyotype, tumor cytogenetics is focused on the detection of clonal acquired, tumor-associated chromosome aberrations. Cytogenetic investigations in dogs are of great value especially for breeders dealing with fertility problems within their pedigrees, for veterinarians and last but not least for the dog owners. Dogs and humans share a variety of genetic diseases, including cancer. Thus, the dog has become an increasingly important model for genetic diseases. However, cytogenetic analyses of canine cells are complicated by the complex karyotype of the dog. Only just 15 years ago, a standard classification scheme for the complete canine karyotype was established. For chromosome analyses of canine cells the same steps of chromosome preparation are used as in human cytogenetics. There are few reports about cytogenetic changes in non-neoplastic cells, involving predominantly the sex chromosomes. Cytogenetic analyses of different entities of canine tumors revealed that, comparable to human tumors, tumors of the dog are often characterized by clonal chromosome aberrations, which might be used as diagnostic and prognostic markers. The integration of modern techniques (molecular genetic approaches, adaptive computer programs) will facilitate and complete conventional cytogenetic studies. However, conventional cytogenetics is still non-replaceable.

  20. Serological and molecular detection of spotted fever group Rickettsia in a group of pet dogs from Luanda, Angola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barradas, Patrícia F; Vilhena, Hugo; Oliveira, Ana Cristina; Granada, Sara; Amorim, Irina; Ferreira, Paula; Cardoso, Luís; Gärtner, Fátima; de Sousa, Rita

    2017-05-31

    Infections with tick-borne rickettsiae can cause diseases well known in humans but still not so well characterized in dogs. Susceptibility to infection depends on the virulence of Rickettsia spp. and only a few of them have been described to cause disease in dogs. The aim of this study was to investigate the exposure to Rickettsia spp. among a group of pet dogs from Luanda, Angola. Out of 103 dogs included in the study, 62 (60.2%) were infested with ticks. Plasma specimens tested for serology by an immunofluorescence assay (IFA) revealed that six (5.8%) dogs had detectable immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies to spotted fever group Rickettsia (SFGR), with endpoint titers of 64 for two dogs, 128 for three dogs and 1024 for one dog. From the seropositive group of dogs, five (83%) of them were males, with their age ranging from 1 to 8 years old. Among the seropositive dogs, four (66.7%) were parasitized with ticks and no breed (or cross) was found to be associated with specific antibodies. Rickettsia spp. DNA was detected by nested-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in two (1.9%) dogs that were found to be seronegative. Seroprevalence and molecular detection of Rickettsia spp. infection in this group of pet dogs from Luanda is low compared with other studies performed in the same type of hosts in other areas. Although many dogs were parasitized with ticks, a low prevalence of Rickettsia spp. could be related with the hypothesis of a low rickettsial prevalence in the infesting ticks. This study provides evidence that dogs in Luanda are exposed to Rickettsia spp., but further studies are needed to better characterize the bacterial infections in dogs and in their ectoparasites.

  1. Canine β-defensin-1 (CBD1) gene as a possible marker for Leishmania infantum infection in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Lidiane Gomes; Costa-Júnior, César Raimundo Lima; Figueiredo-Júnior, Carlos Alberto Santiago; Leal-Balbino, Tereza Cristina; Crovella, Sergio; Otranto, Domenico; Balbino, Valdir de Queiroz; Dantas-Torres, Filipe

    2017-04-20

    Canine leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania infantum is a parasitic disease of great veterinary significance. Some dogs infected by L. infantum may mount a strong cellular immune response and clear the infection, while others may respond with exaggerated antibody production against the parasite and develop an overt disease, which may be fatal, if left untreated. The initial factors triggering the polarization of the immune response towards a predominantly T-helper 1 or T-helper 2 cytokines, as well as the markers of resistance and susceptibility to L. infantum infection and disease development in dogs, are not fully understood. Herein, we assessed the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the canine β-defensin-1 (CBD1) gene and the infection by L. infantum in two dog populations from Brazil (Sobral in Ceará State and São Raimundo Nonato in Piauí State) and one dog population from Italy. A total of 387 dogs were assessed for L. infantum by real time PCR and 34.6% of them were positive. In CBD1 gene sequences from these positive dogs, nine polymorphic sites were detected, but only SNPs 3, 4, 7 and 8 were associated with L. infantum, in dogs from southern Italy. No association was found with dogs from Brazil. This study sets the basis for further studies on the usefulness of CBD1 as a marker of L. infantum infection susceptibility in dogs.

  2. Amylase activity is associated with AMY2B copy numbers in dog: implications for dog domestication, diet and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, Maja; Fall, Tove; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Axelsson, Erik

    2014-10-01

    High amylase activity in dogs is associated with a drastic increase in copy numbers of the gene coding for pancreatic amylase, AMY2B, that likely allowed dogs to thrive on a relatively starch-rich diet during early dog domestication. Although most dogs thus probably digest starch more efficiently than do wolves, AMY2B copy numbers vary widely within the dog population, and it is not clear how this variation affects the individual ability to handle starch nor how it affects dog health. In humans, copy numbers of the gene coding for salivary amylase, AMY1, correlate with both salivary amylase levels and enzyme activity, and high amylase activity is related to improved glycemic homeostasis and lower frequencies of metabolic syndrome. Here, we investigate the relationship between AMY2B copy numbers and serum amylase activity in dogs and show that amylase activity correlates with AMY2B copy numbers. We then describe how AMY2B copy numbers vary in individuals from 20 dog breeds and find strong breed-dependent patterns, indicating that the ability to digest starch varies both at the breed and individual level. Finally, to test whether AMY2B copy number is strongly associated with the risk of developing diabetes mellitus, we compare copy numbers in cases and controls as well as in breeds with varying diabetes susceptibility. Although we see no such association here, future studies using larger cohorts are needed before excluding a possible link between AMY2B and diabetes mellitus. © 2014 The Authors. Animal Genetics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  3. Progressive juvenile glomerulonephropathy in 16 related French Mastiff (Bordeaux) dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoué, R; van der Lugt, J J; Day, M J; Georges, M; Busoni, V; Merveille, A C; Poujade, A; Peeters, D

    2010-01-01

    Familial juvenile glomerulonephropathy (JGN) is reported in several breeds of dogs. The mode of inheritance and spectrum of pathological lesions vary among breeds. A progressive JGN was detected in a pedigree of French Mastiff (FM) dogs. To describe clinical, laboratory, and histopathologic findings in related FM dogs suffering from progressive JGN and to determine the mode of inheritance of this condition. Sixteen affected and 35 healthy related FM dogs FM dogs pedigree data were recorded. Clinical signs were typical of progressive glomerulopathy with resultant renal failure. Increased blood urea nitrogen, creatinine and total cholesterol concentrations, and proteinuria were found in all patients. Affected dogs had abnormal kidney structure on abdominal ultrasound examination. Histopathologic examination revealed extensive cystic glomerular atrophy, glomerular hypercellularity, and capillary wall thickening without immune complex deposition when tested with immunohistochemistry or immunofluorescence. Electron microscopy did not disclose specific primary glomerular lesions. Mean age at death was 20 months and mean length of survival after diagnosis was 6 months. Both males and females from healthy parents were affected. An autosomal recessive mode of transmission is suspected, but a more complex mode of inheritance cannot be excluded. Progressive familial JGN occurs in FM dogs. Characterization of the pathogenesis and mode of inheritance of this disease warrants additional study.

  4. Problem behavior in dogs. Understanding the shy dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, W E

    1975-04-01

    The term "shy dog" should be qualified by examination of the dog's actual behavior and those things that stimulate the shyness. Dogs that display submissive behavior may suffer from a punishment syndrome created by overly harsh treatment. Others may suffer from kennelosis or other improper socialization during early critical periods. In all cases the dog's level of confidence must be increased vis a vis people. Rehabilitation requires avoidance of physical manipulation, gradual socialization, and demonstrative teaching for command responses.

  5. Detection of respiratory viruses and Bordetella bronchiseptica in dogs with acute respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, B S; Kurz, S; Weber, K; Balzer, H-J; Hartmann, K

    2014-09-01

    Canine infectious respiratory disease (CIRD) is an acute, highly contagious disease complex caused by a variety of infectious agents. At present, the role of viral and bacterial components as primary or secondary pathogens in CIRD is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of canine parainfluenza virus (CPIV), canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2), canine influenza virus (CIV), canine respiratory coronavirus (CRCoV), canine herpes virus-1 (CHV-1), canine distemper virus (CDV) and Bordetella bronchiseptica in dogs with CIRD and to compare the data with findings in healthy dogs. Sixty-one dogs with CIRD and 90 clinically healthy dogs from Southern Germany were prospectively enrolled in this study. Nasal and pharyngeal swabs were collected from all dogs and were analysed for CPIV, CAV-2, CIV, CRCoV, CHV-1, CDV, and B. bronchiseptica by real-time PCR. In dogs with acute respiratory signs, 37.7% tested positive for CPIV, 9.8% for CRCoV and 78.7% for B. bronchiseptica. Co-infections with more than one agent were detected in 47.9% of B. bronchiseptica-positive, 82.6% of CPIV-positive, and 100% of CRCoV-positive dogs. In clinically healthy dogs, 1.1% tested positive for CAV-2, 7.8% for CPIV and 45.6% for B. bronchiseptica. CPIV and B. bronchiseptica were detected significantly more often in dogs with CIRD than in clinically healthy dogs (P infections with several pathogens were common. In conclusion, clinically healthy dogs can carry respiratory pathogens and could act as sources of infection for susceptible dogs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Contagious yawning in domestic dog puppies (Canis lupus familiaris): the effect of ontogeny and emotional closeness on low-level imitation in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Elainie Alenkær; Persson, Tomas

    2013-03-01

    Contagious yawning is a well-documented phenomenon in humans and has recently attracted much attention from developmental and comparative sciences. The function, development and underlying mechanisms of the phenomenon, however, remain largely unclear. Contagious yawning has been demonstrated in dogs and several non-human primate species, and theoretically and empirically associated with empathy in humans and non-human primates. Evidence of emotional closeness modulating contagious yawning in dogs has, nonetheless, been contradictory. Humans show a developmental increase in susceptibility to yawn contagion, with typically developing children displaying a substantial increase at the age of four, when a number of cognitive abilities (e.g. accurate identification of others' emotions) begin to clearly manifest. Explicit tests of yawn contagion in non-human animals have, however, thus far only involved adult individuals. Here, we report a study of the ontogeny of domestic dogs' (Canis lupus familiaris) susceptibility to yawn contagion, and whether emotional closeness to the yawning model affects this. Thirty-five dogs, aged 4-14 months, observed a familiar and unfamiliar human repeatedly yawn or gape. The dogs yawned contagiously, but emotional closeness with the model did not affect the strength of contagion, raising questions as to recent evidence of emotionally modulated auditory contagious yawning in dogs. The dogs showed a developmental effect, with only dogs above 7 months evidencing contagion. The results support the notion of a developmental increase in dogs' attention to others and identification of others' emotional states and suggest that yawn contagion is underpinned by developmental processes shared by humans and other animals.

  7. May-Hegglin anomaly in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flatland, Bente; Fry, Michael M; Baek, Seung J; Bahn, Jae H; LeBlanc, Casey J; Dunlap, John R; Carroll, Roger C; Kosiba, Deborah J; Millsaps, Doris J; Schleis, Stephanie E

    2011-06-01

    An 8-year-old female spayed Pug dog was presented for evaluation of cutaneous lesions occurring secondary to immunosuppressive treatment of presumed immune-mediated thrombocytopenia. Abnormal hematologic findings included persistent thrombocytopenia, macrothrombocytes, and variably shaped, often fusiform, blue cytoplasmic inclusions in neutrophils. May-Hegglin anomaly (MHA) was suspected based on the morphologic appearance of platelets and neutrophils. Examination of cells by transmission electron microscopy revealed normal platelet ultrastructure; neutrophil inclusions had features similar to those reported for inclusions in human MHA. Neutrophil function was within normal limits based on flow cytometric analysis. Thrombelastography indicated a prolonged clotting time (r), and PlateletMapping showed a lack of response to 2 μM ADP compared with a moderate response in the control dog. Immunocytochemical staining of blood smears using 2 commercially available antibodies against MYH9 protein (nonmuscle myosin heavy chain II) yielded negative results. However, genomic DNA sequencing analysis of the dog's MYH9 gene identified a single point mutation, resulting in substitution of lysine for glutamine at the 1841 amino acid position; this mutation is identical to one identified in people with MHA. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an MYH9 mutation in the dog. MHA-associated macrothrombocytopenia may be mistaken for immune-mediated thrombocytopenia. ©2011 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  8. Post-anesthesia deafness in dogs and cats following dental and ear cleaning procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens-Sparks, Cathryn K; Strain, George M

    2010-07-01

    The present study was performed to document hearing loss in dogs and cats following procedures performed under anesthesia. Most cases of reported hearing loss were subsequent to dental and ear cleaning procedures. Prospective and retrospective case survey. Subjects were dogs and cats with deafness, personally communicated to one author, cases discussed on a veterinary information web site, and cases communicated through a survey of general practice and dental specialist veterinarians. Reported deafness cases were characterized by species (dog, cat), breed, gender, age, and dog breed size. Sixty-two cases of hearing loss following anesthesia were reported between the years 2002 and 2009. Five additional cases were reported by survey respondents. Forty-three cases occurred following dental procedures. Sixteen cases occurred following ear cleaning. No relationship was observed between deafness and dog or cat breed, gender, anesthetic drug used, or dog size. Geriatric animals appeared more susceptible to post-anesthetic, post-procedural hearing loss. Deafness may occur in dogs and cats following anesthesia for dental and ear cleaning procedures, but the prevalence is low. The hearing loss appears to be permanent. Deafness can be a consequence following anesthesia for dental or ear cleaning procedures. Older animals may have greater susceptibility.

  9. Domestic Dogs and Cancer Research: A Breed-Based Genomics Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Brian W.; Ostrander, Elaine A.

    2014-01-01

    Domestic dogs are unique from other animal models of cancer in that they generally experience spontaneous disease. In addition, most types of cancer observed in humans are found in dogs, suggesting that canines may be an informative system for the study of cancer genetics. Domestic dogs are divided into over 175 breeds, with members of each breed sharing significant phenotypes. The breed barrier enhances the utility of the model, especially for genetic studies where small numbers of genes are hypothesized to account for the breed cancer susceptibility. These facts, combined with recent advances in high-throughput sequencing technologies allows for an unrivaled ability to use pet dog populations to find often subtle mutations that promote cancer susceptibility and progression in dogs as a whole. The meticulous record keeping associated with dog breeding makes the model still more powerful, as it facilitates both association analysis and family-based linkage studies. Key to the success of these studies is their cooperative nature, with owners, scientists, veterinarians and breed clubs working together to avoid the cost and unpopularity of developing captive populations. In this article we explore these principals and advocate for colony-free, genetic studies that will enhance our ability to diagnose and treat cancer in dogs and humans alike. PMID:24936030

  10. Dog Ownership, Dog Walking, and Children's and Parents' Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Jo; Timperio, Anna; Chu, Binh; Veitch, Jenny

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to determine cross-sectional associations of dog ownership, dog walking, and physical activity (PA) among children and their parents. Objective measures of PA were obtained for children ages 5-6 and 10-12 years from 19 primary schools across Melbourne, Australia. Parents self-reported their PA, dog ownership, and frequency of dog…

  11. Treating Cushing's Disease in Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Consumer Updates Treating Cushing's Disease in Dogs Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... FDA Consumer Health Information Your 9-year old dog has been drinking a lot more lately and ...

  12. Endurance Exercise Training Reduces Cardiac Sodium/Calcium Exchanger Expression in Animals Susceptible to Ventricular Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica eKukielka

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Increased sodium/calcium exchanger activity (NCX1, an important regulator of cardiomyocyte cystolic calcium may provoke arrhythmias. Exercise training can decrease NCX1 expression in animals with heart failure improving cytosolic calcium regulation, and could thereby reduce the risk for ventricular fibrillation (VF. Methods: To test this hypothesis, a 2-min coronary occlusion was made during the last min. of exercise in dogs with healed myocardial infarctions; 23 had VF (S, susceptible and 13 did not (R, resistant. The animals were randomly assigned to either 10-wk exercise training (progressively increasing treadmill running (S n = 9; R n = 8 or 10-wk sedentary (S n = 14; R n = 5 groups. At the end of the 10-wk period, the exercise + ischemia test provoked VF in sedentary but not trained susceptible dogs. On a subsequent day, cardiac tissue was harvested and NCX1 protein expression was determined by Western blot. Results: In the sedentary group, NCX1 expression was significantly (ANOVA, P<0.05 higher in susceptible compared to resistant dogs. In contrast, NCX1 levels were similar in the exercise trained resistant and susceptible animals. Conclusion: These data suggest that exercise training can restore a more normal NCX1 level in dogs susceptible to ventricular fibrillation, improving cystolic calcium regulation and could thereby reduce the risk for sudden death following myocardial infarction.

  13. Fatal nocardiosis in a dog caused by multiresistant Nocardia veterana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhde, Ann-Kathrin; Kilwinski, Jochen; Peters, Martin; Verspohl, Jutta; Feßler, Andrea T; Schwarz, Stefan; Wohlsein, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Among pathogenic Nocardia species in humans and animals, infections caused by Nocardia (N.) veterana have rarely been described and so far, all non-human cases are linked to bovine mastitis in Brazil. The aim of this study was to identify the causative microorganism involved in the death of a three-month-old dog suffering from dyspnea and neurological deficits ante mortem. Pathomorphological investigation revealed (pyo-)granulomatous lesions in various organs. Bacteriological examination was performed and the respective bacteria were subjected to matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), 16S rDNA sequencing, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing by broth microdilution. Gram-staining and colony morphology suggested the presence of an actinomycete which was identified as N. veterana by MALDI-TOF MS. This identification was confirmed by 16S rDNA sequence analysis. Distemper-associated immunosuppression may have played a role in the pathogenesis of systemic nocardiosis in this dog. Retrospective analysis of the antimicrobial susceptibility status showed that the N. veterana isolate was multiresistant and displayed high minimal inhibitory concentrations to all antimicrobial agents used for the dog's therapy. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a systemic nocardiosis caused by N. veterana in a dog with a concurrent canine distemper virus infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Automatic behavior sensing for a bomb-detecting dog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hoa G.; Nans, Adam; Talke, Kurt; Candela, Paul; Everett, H. R.

    2015-05-01

    Bomb-detecting dogs are trained to detect explosives through their sense of smell and often perform a specific behavior to indicate a possible bomb detection. This behavior is noticed by the dog handler, who confirms the probable explosives, determines the location, and forwards the information to an explosive ordnance disposal (EOD) team. To improve the speed and accuracy of this process and better integrate it with the EOD team's robotic explosive disposal operation, SPAWAR Systems Center Pacific has designed and prototyped an electronic dog collar that automatically tracks the dog's location and attitude, detects the indicative behavior, and records the data. To account for the differences between dogs, a 5-minute training routine can be executed before the mission to establish initial values for the k-mean clustering algorithm that classifies a specific dog's behavior. The recorded data include GPS location of the suspected bomb, the path the dog took to approach this location, and a video clip covering the detection event. The dog handler reviews and confirms the data before it is packaged up and forwarded on to the EOD team. The EOD team uses the video clip to better identify the type of bomb and for awareness of the surrounding environment before they arrive at the scene. Before the robotic neutralization operation commences at the site, the location and path data (which are supplied in a format understandable by the next-generation EOD robots—the Advanced EOD Robotic System) can be loaded into the robotic controller to automatically guide the robot to the bomb site. This paper describes the project with emphasis on the dog-collar hardware, behavior-classification software, and feasibility testing.

  15. Dogs, zoonoses and immunosuppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, R A; Pugh, R N

    2002-06-01

    Dogs are the source of a wide range of zoonotic infections that pose a significant threat to human health. This is particularly the case for immunocompromised people, although there are few robust studies that determine immunosuppression as a risk factor for transmission of zoonoses from dogs to humans. An increasing proportion of human society is immunodeficient, principally through the advent of HIV infection and through more people, particularly the expanding elderly group, being subjected to immunosuppressive agents. This is happening at a time when more such people are capitalizing on the acknowledged benefits of dog ownership, making for a potentially dangerous mix. Enteric pathogens (for example, Salmonella, Campylobacter and Cryptosporidium species, that may be canine derived) are a frequent risk to the health of immunocompromised persons. Veterinarians and physicians can be criticised for not communicating with each other, and for not providing adequate risk assessment to pet owners. There is scope for voluntary groups to provide information and support for the immunosuppressed who wish to keep their dogs. Key recommendations are to maintain a clean personal environment and intact mucocutaneous barriers. Public health professionals could help rectify the current communications gap between veterinary and medical staff and so facilitate in the appropriate management of dog-owning immunocompromised people.

  16. 77 FR 54368 - Service Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-05

    ... Service Dogs AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) amends its regulations concerning veterans in need of service dogs. Under this final... use of a service dog as part of the management of such impairments. The benefits include assistance...

  17. 76 FR 35162 - Service Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-16

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 17 RIN 2900-AN51 Service Dogs AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs. ACTION: Proposed... veterans in need of service dogs. Under current regulations, VA provides benefits to veterans with guide dogs, and this rulemaking would broaden and clarify those benefits. This rulemaking would also...

  18. Escape rates and biting histories of dogs confined to their owner's property through the use of various containment methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starinsky, Nicole S; Lord, Linda K; Herron, Meghan E

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine escape rates for dogs confined to their owner's property by various containment methods and determine whether biting history was associated with containment method. DESIGN Cross-sectional survey. SAMPLE 974 owners of 1,053 dogs. PROCEDURES Individuals patronizing pet stores in Columbus, Ohio, were recruited to complete a survey on the method they used to confine their dogs to their property and their dogs' behavior history. RESULTS Dogs were confined to their owner's property by a physical fence (821/1,053 [78.0%]), electronic fence (150/1,053 [14.2%]), or tether system (82/1,053 [7.8%]). Dogs confined by an electronic fence were more likely to have escaped (66/150 [44.0%]) than were dogs confined by a see-through fence (153/658 [23.3%]), privacy fence (38/163 [23.3%]), or tether (22/82 [26.8%]). Forty-eight (4.6%) dogs had reportedly bitten a person in the past, and 81 (7.7%) had reportedly bitten another dog, but containment method was not significantly associated with whether dogs had ever bitten a person or another dog. Greeting behavior (growling, snarling, or trying to bite) was significantly associated with a history of biting a person or another dog. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that escape rate, but not biting history, was associated with the method owners used to confine dogs to their properties. Greeting behavior was associated with biting history, suggesting that owners of dogs that growl, snarl, or attempt to bite when meeting an unfamiliar person or dog should seek assistance to prevent future bites.

  19. Do Dogs Provide Information Helpfully?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia Piotti

    Full Text Available Dogs are particularly skilful during communicative interactions with humans. Dogs' abilities to use human communicative cues in cooperative contexts outcompete those of other species, and might be the result of selection pressures during domestication. Dogs also produce signals to direct the attention of humans towards outside entities, a behaviour often referred to as showing behaviour. This showing behaviour in dogs is thought to be something dogs use intentionally and referentially. However, there is currently no evidence that dogs communicate helpfully, i.e. to inform an ignorant human about a target that is of interest to the human but not to the dog. Communicating with a helpful motive is particularly interesting because it might suggest that dogs understand the human's goals and need for information. In study 1, we assessed whether dogs would abandon an object that they find interesting in favour of an object useful for their human partner, a random novel distractor, or an empty container. Results showed that it was mainly self-interest that was driving the dogs' behaviour. The dogs mainly directed their behaviour towards the object they had an interest in, but dogs were more persistent when showing the object relevant to the human, suggesting that to some extent they took the humans interest into account. Another possibility is that dogs' behaviour was driven by an egocentric motivation to interact with novel targets and that the dogs' neophila might have masked their helpful tendencies. Therefore, in study 2 the dogs had initial access to both objects, and were expected to indicate only one (relevant or distractor. The human partner interacted with the dog using vocal communication in half of the trials, and remaining silent in the other half. Dogs from both experimental groups, i.e. indicating the relevant object or indicating the distractor, established joint attention with the human. However, the human's vocal communication and the

  20. Do Dogs Provide Information Helpfully?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotti, Patrizia; Kaminski, Juliane

    2016-01-01

    Dogs are particularly skilful during communicative interactions with humans. Dogs' abilities to use human communicative cues in cooperative contexts outcompete those of other species, and might be the result of selection pressures during domestication. Dogs also produce signals to direct the attention of humans towards outside entities, a behaviour often referred to as showing behaviour. This showing behaviour in dogs is thought to be something dogs use intentionally and referentially. However, there is currently no evidence that dogs communicate helpfully, i.e. to inform an ignorant human about a target that is of interest to the human but not to the dog. Communicating with a helpful motive is particularly interesting because it might suggest that dogs understand the human's goals and need for information. In study 1, we assessed whether dogs would abandon an object that they find interesting in favour of an object useful for their human partner, a random novel distractor, or an empty container. Results showed that it was mainly self-interest that was driving the dogs' behaviour. The dogs mainly directed their behaviour towards the object they had an interest in, but dogs were more persistent when showing the object relevant to the human, suggesting that to some extent they took the humans interest into account. Another possibility is that dogs' behaviour was driven by an egocentric motivation to interact with novel targets and that the dogs' neophila might have masked their helpful tendencies. Therefore, in study 2 the dogs had initial access to both objects, and were expected to indicate only one (relevant or distractor). The human partner interacted with the dog using vocal communication in half of the trials, and remaining silent in the other half. Dogs from both experimental groups, i.e. indicating the relevant object or indicating the distractor, established joint attention with the human. However, the human's vocal communication and the presence of the

  1. Susceptibility to malignant hyperthermia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snoeck, Marcus Matheus Johannes

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis the author studied the diagnostic procedures for susceptibility to malignant hyperthermia (MH), with special emphasis upon refining the biological diagnostic test and improving protocols and guidelines for investigation of MH susceptibility. MH is a pharmacogenetic disease of skeletal

  2. Degenerative myelopathy in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolovski Goran

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available One of the chronic progressive disorders of the spinal cord in dogs is the degenerative myelopathy (DM. The most predisposed age in dog is 5 to 14 years, while rarely noted in younger, there is no gender predisposition. This disorder most commonly appears in dogs of the German shepherd breed, but it can appear in other breeds too. The main changes about this disease are degeneration of the myelin, especially in the thoracic-lumbar segments of the spinal cord and the dorsal nerve roots. The progression of the disease is slow and can last months to years. Undoubtedly, diagnosis is made by examinations of the CSF and establishing elevated level of protein segments.

  3. Identification of risk loci for necrotizing meningoencephalitis in Pug dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Renee M; Schatzberg, Scott J; Corneveaux, Jason J; Allen, April N; Porter, Brian F; Pruzin, Jeremy J; Platt, Simon R; Kent, Marc; Huentelman, Matthew J

    2011-01-01

    Due to their unique population structure, purebred dogs have emerged as a key model for the study of complex genetic disorders. To evaluate the utility of a newly available high-density canine whole-genome array with >170,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), genome-wide association was performed on a small number of case and control dogs to determine disease susceptibility loci in canine necrotizing meningoencephalitis (NME), a disorder with known non-Mendelian inheritance that shares clinical similarities with atypical variants of multiple sclerosis in humans. Genotyping of 30 NME-affected Pug dogs and 68 healthy control Pugs identified 2 loci associated with NME, including a region within dog leukocyte antigen class II on chromosome 12 that remained significant after Bonferroni correction. Our results support the utility of this high-density SNP array, confirm that dogs are a powerful model for mapping complex genetic disorders and provide important preliminary data to support in depth genetic analysis of NME in numerous affected breeds.

  4. Utilization of dog in health - social field

    OpenAIRE

    Tůmová, Michala

    2012-01-01

    Graduate thesis ,,Utilization of dog in health-social field" discuss animal therapy, such as zoo therapy, guide dogs, service dogs for people with handicaps. I specialize mostly on questions of guide and service dogs training, ethology, difference, dog welfare and guide and service dog acquisition process. I have presented the history of guide and service dog training, the process of the training itself as well as its positive and negative aspects. I have also presented the issue of visual or...

  5. Tapetal dysplasia in a Swedish Vallhund dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Erin M; Teixeira, Leandro B C; Dubielzig, Richard R; Komáromy, András M

    2013-07-01

    To describe the gross, histopathological, and ultrastructural findings in a dog with bilateral tapetal dysplasia. The globes of a 15-year-old neutered male Swedish Vallhund dog with a ventrally displaced tapetum in both eyes were fixed in 10% formalin and submitted to the Comparative Ocular Pathology Laboratory of Wisconsin for histological evaluation. Sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, Masson's trichrome, and Melan-A immunohistochemistry (IHC), and tissues were subsequently processed for transmission electron microscopy. Bilateral fundic and gross examination revealed a tapetal fundus inferior to the optic nerve head (ONH) and a nontapetal fundus with mild scattering of tapetal tissue superior to the ONH. Histologically, there was decreased pigmentation of the retinal pigment epithelium with only a few melanin granules in the peripheral retina. The affected tapetum was relatively acellular and fibrous with occasional tapetal cells scattered throughout the inner choroid or displaced into the vascular outer choroid. Special stains revealed that the tapetum was mostly composed of collagen (Masson's trichrome) and failed to express Melan-A (IHC) unlike a normal canine control tapetum. Ultrastructurally, the tapetum was markedly dysplastic both superior and inferior to the ONH with no uniformly arranged tapetal cells. The few cells identified within the tapetum contained irregularly arranged and disorganized electron-dense structures within their cytoplasm, which were interpreted as dysplastic tapetal rodlets. Based on microscopic and ultrastructural findings, this is the first report of tapetal dysplasia in a dog. © 2013 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  6. Greater virulence of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus in cats than in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Heui Man; Park, Eun Hye; Yum, Jung; Kim, Hyun Soo; Seo, Sang Heui

    2015-01-01

    Highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus continues to infect animals and humans. We compared the infectivity and pathogenesis of H5N1 virus in domestic cats and dogs to find out which animal is more susceptible to H5N1 influenza virus. When cats and dogs were infected with the H5N1 virus, cats suffered from severe outcomes including death, whereas dogs did not show any mortality. Viruses were shed in the nose and rectum of cats and in the nose of dogs. Viruses were detected in brain, lung, kidney, intestine, liver, and serum in the infected cats, but only in the lung in the infected dogs. Genes encoding inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, Toll-like receptors, and apoptotic factors were more highly expressed in the lungs of cats than in those of dogs. Our results suggest that the intensive monitoring of dogs is necessary to prevent human infection by H5N1 influenza virus, since infected dogs may not show clear clinical signs, in contrast to infected cats.

  7. Evaluation of phenotypic factors for anti-rabies antibody in vaccinated pet dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savaliya, Bhumika F; Mathakiya, R A; Bhanderi, B B; Jhala, M K

    2015-12-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate various factors associated with protective anti-rabies antibody status (0.5 EU/ml) in vaccinated pet dogs and anti-rabies antibody status in unvaccinated stray dogs. One hundred and seven serum samples were collected from vaccinated pet dogs, out of these 58 (62.36 %) dogs showed antibody titre above 0.5 EU/ml. All the dogs were divided into different groups based on age, sex, breed, vaccine brand and time of vaccination after last vaccine to assess the relationship of these factors with vaccinal immune response. One way analysis of variance was performed in graphpad prism software to check the effect of all these factors. Statistical analysis of ELISA titres of pet dog serum samples suggested that age, sex, breed and vaccine brands have no significant effect on the anti-rabies antibody titres. To check anti-rabies antibody status in stray dogs 53 serum samples were collected and only one out of 53 (1.88 %) stray dogs showed anti-rabies antibody titre above 0.5 EU/ml indicating susceptibility to rabies infection and thereby posing possible threat to surrounding human and animal populations.

  8. Hypothyroid dogs treated with intravenous levothyroxine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullen, William H; Hess, Rebecka S

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to report clinical and clinicopathologic findings, response to treatment, and outcome of hypothyroid dogs treated with levothyroxine intravenously (IV). Seven levothyroxine IV treated hypothyroid dogs and 799 other hypothyroid dogs examined during the same period were included. Rottweiler dogs were overrepresented in the group of levothyroxine IV-treated hypothyroid dogs compared with other hypothyroid dogs (P dogs), mental dullness (5 dogs), and nonpitting edema (4 dogs). Anemia (4 dogs) and hypercholesterolemia (5) were common, although 1 dog had neither. Concurrent disease (most commonly infection) was observed in 5 dogs. Glucocorticoids and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs had been administered to 2 dogs before examination. Surgery was performed in 2 dogs before treatment with levothyroxine IV. Four of the 7 dogs received 4-5 microg/kg of levothyroxine IV. Subjective improvement in mentation or ambulation (6 of 7 dogs) and systolic hypotension (2 of 2 dogs) occurred within 30 hours of levothyroxine IV administration. Six of the 7 dogs responded well to therapy and were discharged from the hospital. It was concluded that physical examination and clinicopathologic findings of dogs with a hypothyroid crisis are nonspecific, although Rottweiler dogs may be at increased risk. Concurrent disorder, such as infection, concurrent administration of thyroid hormone-altering medication, and surgery, may be associated with development of a hypothyroid crisis. Resolution of abnormal mentation, ambulation, and systolic hypotension should be expected within 30 hours. Prognosis is good in most treated dogs.

  9. Lessons learned from cloning dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M J; Oh, H J; Kim, G A; Park, J E; Park, E J; Jang, G; Ra, J C; Kang, S K; Lee, B C

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this article is to review dog cloning research and to suggest its applications based on a discussion about the normality of cloned dogs. Somatic cell nuclear transfer was successfully used for production of viable cloned puppies despite limited understanding of in vitro dog embryo production. Cloned dogs have similar growth characteristics to those born from natural fertilization, with no evidence of serious adverse effects. The offspring of cloned dogs also have similar growth performance and health to those of naturally bred puppies. Therefore, cloning in domestic dogs can be applied as an assisted reproductive technique to conserve endangered species, to treat sterile canids or aged dogs, to improve reproductive performance of valuable individuals and to generate disease model animals. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  10. Is your dog empathic? Developing a Dog Emotional Reactivity Survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flóra Szánthó

    Full Text Available Dogs' seemingly empathic behaviour attracts general and scientific attention alike. Behaviour tests are usually not sufficiently realistic to evoke empathic-like behaviour; therefore we decided to ask owners about their experiences with their dogs in emotionally loaded situations. Owners from Hungary (N = 591 and from Germany (N = 2283 were asked to rate their level of agreement on a 1-5 Likert scale with statements about the reactivity of their dogs to their emotions and to other dogs' behaviour. We created two scales with satisfactory internal reliability: reactivity to the owner's emotion and reactivity to other dogs' behaviour. Based on an owner-dog personality matching theory, we hypothesised that the owner's empathy, as measured by the subscale on the cooperativeness character factor of the human personality, will correlate with their dog's emotional reactivity in emotionally loaded situations. In addition we also examined how anthropomorphism, contagious yawning, attitude toward the dog are related to emotional reactivity in dogs as perceived by the owner. In addition we examined how owners rate dog pictures. We found that the scale scores were largely independent from demographic and environmental variables like breed, sex, age, age at acquiring, keeping practices, training experiences and owner's age. However, anthropomorphic and emotional attitude of the owners probably biased the responses. In the German sample more empathic owners reported to have more emotionally reactive dog, as expected by the personality matching theory. More empathic owners reported to have fewer problems with their dogs and they rated a puppy picture as more cute in both countries. 62% of owners from Hungary and 36% of owner from Germany agreed with the statement "My dog is more important for me than any human being". In Germany, more empathic owners agreed less with this statement and indicated that their dogs have a tendency for contagious yawning. Owners

  11. Is your dog empathic? Developing a Dog Emotional Reactivity Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szánthó, Flóra; Miklósi, Ádám; Kubinyi, Enikő

    2017-01-01

    Dogs' seemingly empathic behaviour attracts general and scientific attention alike. Behaviour tests are usually not sufficiently realistic to evoke empathic-like behaviour; therefore we decided to ask owners about their experiences with their dogs in emotionally loaded situations. Owners from Hungary (N = 591) and from Germany (N = 2283) were asked to rate their level of agreement on a 1-5 Likert scale with statements about the reactivity of their dogs to their emotions and to other dogs' behaviour. We created two scales with satisfactory internal reliability: reactivity to the owner's emotion and reactivity to other dogs' behaviour. Based on an owner-dog personality matching theory, we hypothesised that the owner's empathy, as measured by the subscale on the cooperativeness character factor of the human personality, will correlate with their dog's emotional reactivity in emotionally loaded situations. In addition we also examined how anthropomorphism, contagious yawning, attitude toward the dog are related to emotional reactivity in dogs as perceived by the owner. In addition we examined how owners rate dog pictures. We found that the scale scores were largely independent from demographic and environmental variables like breed, sex, age, age at acquiring, keeping practices, training experiences and owner's age. However, anthropomorphic and emotional attitude of the owners probably biased the responses. In the German sample more empathic owners reported to have more emotionally reactive dog, as expected by the personality matching theory. More empathic owners reported to have fewer problems with their dogs and they rated a puppy picture as more cute in both countries. 62% of owners from Hungary and 36% of owner from Germany agreed with the statement "My dog is more important for me than any human being". In Germany, more empathic owners agreed less with this statement and indicated that their dogs have a tendency for contagious yawning. Owners whose attitudes

  12. Neosporosis in dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neospora caninum is a protozoan parasite of animals. Until 1988, it was misdiagnosed as Toxoplasma gondii. Since its first recognition in 1984 and the description of a new genus and species Neospora caninum in 1988, neosporosis has emerged as a serious disease of dogs and cattle worldwide. Additiona...

  13. Inherited epilepsy in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekenstedt, Kari J; Oberbauer, Anita M

    2013-05-01

    Epilepsy is the most common neurologic disease in dogs and many forms are considered to have a genetic basis. In contrast, some seizure disorders are also heritable, but are not technically defined as epilepsy. Investigation of true canine epilepsies has uncovered genetic associations in some cases, however, many remain unexplained. Gene mutations have been described for 2 forms of canine epilepsy: primary epilepsy (PE) and progressive myoclonic epilepsies. To date, 9 genes have been described to underlie progressive myoclonic epilepsies in several dog breeds. Investigations into genetic PE have been less successful, with only 1 causative gene described. Genetic testing as an aid to diagnosis, prognosis, and breeding decisions is available for these 10 forms. Additional studies utilizing genome-wide tools have identified PE loci of interest; however, specific genetic tests are not yet developed. Many studies of dog breeds with PE have failed to identify genes or loci of interest, suggesting that, similar to what is seen in many human genetic epilepsies, inheritance is likely complex, involving several or many genes, and reflective of environmental interactions. An individual dog's response to therapeutic intervention for epilepsy may also be genetically complex. Although the field of inherited epilepsy has faced challenges, particularly with PE, newer technologies contribute to further advances. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Prevalence. Ascice. faotic dogs.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BSN

    ell\\ iron mental stress, nutrition. management and disease problems. Some or the diseascs arise a:-. ... diseases. lalnourished animals have lower resistance to other disorders such as infectious and parasitic diseases (I lunter. 1994: I lunter ... I: Sho\\\\ ing an Exotic breed of dog \\\\ ith ascites. (abdomen with nu id accumulation ...

  15. Cat and Dog Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... coyotes. If you know the owner of the cat or dog that bit you, ask for their health records. They will show the pet’s vaccination records. It may be a good idea to isolate the pet and monitor it ...

  16. Susceptibility variation of Malassezia pachydermatis to antifungal agents according to isolate source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Borges Weiler

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Malassezia pachydermatisis associated with dermatomycoses and otomycosis in dogs and cats. This study compared the susceptibility of M. pachydermatis isolates from sick (G1 and healthy (G2 animals to azole and polyene antifungals using the M27-A3 protocol. Isolates from G1 animals were less sensitive to amphotericin B, nystatin, fluconazole, clotrimazole and miconazole.

  17. Dog and owner characteristics affecting the dog-owner relationship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Iben Helene Coakley; Forkman, Björn

    2014-01-01

    The nature of the relationship between companion dogs and their owners has important impact on the effect of life for both dog and owner. Identifying factors that affect the dogeowner relationship will assist the understanding of how the successful relationship is achieved and how the less...... linear regressions: 1 for each of the 3 subscales of the MDORS. Overall, the variables investigated only predicted a small proportion of the variance in MDORS scores, and owner characteristics appeared to influence the dogeowner relationship more than dog personality traits did. We found that children...... in the family and using the dog only for company were negatively associated with the owners’ perception of the relationship with their dogs. The only dog characteristics to predict the dogeowner relationship were fearfulness and fear-related behavior problems....

  18. Development, factor structure and application of the Dog Obesity Risk and Appetite (DORA) questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Stephen P.; O’Rahilly, Stephen; Wardle, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Background. Dogs are compelling models in which to study obesity since the condition shares many characteristics between humans and dogs. Differences in eating behaviour are recognised to contribute to obesity susceptibility in other species but this has not been systematically studied in dogs. Aim. To develop and validate an owner-reported measure of canine eating behaviour and owner or dog related factors which can alter the development of obesity. Further, to then test variation in food-motivation in dogs and its association with obesity and owner management. Methods. Owner interviews, a literature review and existing human appetite scales were used to identify relevant topics and generate items for the questionnaire. Following a pilot phase, a 75 item online questionnaire was distributed via social media. Responses from 302 dog/owner dyads were analysed and factor structure and descriptive statistics calculated. Results were compared with descriptions of dog behaviour and management from a subset of respondents during semi-structured interviews. The optimum questions were disseminated as a 34 item final questionnaire completed by 213 owners, with a subset of respondents repeating the questionnaire 3 weeks later to assess test–retest reliability. Results. Analysis of responses to the final questionnaire relating to 213 dog/owner dyads showed a coherent factor structure and good test–retest reliability. There were three dog factors (food responsiveness and satiety, lack of selectivity, Interest in food), four owner factors (owner motivation to control dog weight, owner intervention to control dog weight, restriction of human food, exercise taken) and two dog health factors (signs of gastrointestinal disease, current poor health). Eating behaviour differed between individuals and between breed groups. High scores on dog factors (high food-motivation) and low scores on owner factors (less rigorous control of diet/exercise) were associated with obesity. Owners

  19. A cross-sectional study examining the prevalence and risk factors for anti-microbial-resistant generic Escherichia coli in domestic dogs that frequent dog parks in three cities in south-western Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procter, T D; Pearl, D L; Finley, R L; Leonard, E K; Janecko, N; Reid-Smith, R J; Weese, J S; Peregrine, A S; Sargeant, J M

    2014-06-01

    Anti-microbial resistance can threaten health by limiting treatment options and increasing the risk of hospitalization and severity of infection. Companion animals can shed anti-microbial-resistant bacteria that may result in the exposure of other dogs and humans to anti-microbial-resistant genes. The prevalence of anti-microbial-resistant generic Escherichia coli in the faeces of dogs that visited dog parks in south-western Ontario was examined and risk factors for shedding anti-microbial-resistant generic E. coli identified. From May to August 2009, canine faecal samples were collected at ten dog parks in three cities in south-western Ontario, Canada. Owners completed a questionnaire related to pet characteristics and management factors including recent treatment with antibiotics. Faecal samples were collected from 251 dogs, and 189 surveys were completed. Generic E. coli was isolated from 237 of the faecal samples, and up to three isolates per sample were tested for anti-microbial susceptibility. Eighty-nine percent of isolates were pan-susceptible; 82.3% of dogs shed isolates that were pan-susceptible. Multiclass resistance was detected in 7.2% of the isolates from 10.1% of the dogs. Based on multilevel multivariable logistic regression, a risk factor for the shedding of generic E. coli resistant to ampicillin was attending dog day care. Risk factors for the shedding of E. coli resistant to at least one anti-microbial included attending dog day care and being a large mixed breed dog, whereas consumption of commercial dry and home cooked diets was protective factor. In a multilevel multivariable model for the shedding of multiclass-resistant E. coli, exposure to compost and being a large mixed breed dog were risk factors, while consumption of a commercial dry diet was a sparing factor. Pet dogs are a potential reservoir of anti-microbial-resistant generic E. coli; some dog characteristics and management factors are associated with the prevalence of anti

  20. Radiographic liver size in Pekingese dogs versus other dog breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jihye; Keh, Seoyeon; Kim, Hyunwook; Kim, Junyoung; Yoon, Junghee

    2013-01-01

    Differential diagnoses for canine liver disease are commonly based on radiographic estimates of liver size, however little has been published on breed variations. Aims of this study were to describe normal radiographic liver size in Pekingese dogs and to compare normal measurements for this breed with other dog breeds and Pekingese dogs with liver disease. Liver measurements were compared for clinically normal Pekingese (n = 61), normal non-Pekingese brachycephalic (n = 45), normal nonbrachycephalic (n = 71), and Pekingese breed dogs with liver disease (n = 22). For each dog, body weight, liver length, T11 vertebral length, thoracic depth, and thoracic width were measured on right lateral and ventrodorsal abdominal radiographs. Liver volume was calculated using a formula and ratios of liver length/T11 vertebral length and liver volume/body weight ratio were determined. Normal Pekingese dogs had a significantly smaller liver volume/body weight ratio (16.73 ± 5.67, P dogs (19.54 ± 5.03) and normal nonbrachycephalic breed dogs (18.72 ± 6.52). The liver length/T11 vertebral length ratio in normal Pekingese (4.64 ± 0.65) was significantly smaller than normal non-Pekingese brachycephalic breed dogs (5.16 ± 0.74) and normal nonbrachycephalic breed dogs (5.40 ± 0.74). Ratios of liver volume/body weight and liver length/T11 vertebral length in normal Pekingese were significantly different from Pekingese with liver diseases (P dogs have a smaller normal radiographic liver size than other breeds. We recommend using 4.64× the length of the T11 vertebra as a radiographic criterion for normal liver length in Pekingese dogs. © 2012 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  1. Impact of collaborative care on survival time for dogs with congestive heart failure and revenue for attending primary care veterinarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefbom, Bonnie K; Peckens, Neal K

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the effects of in-person collaborative care by primary care veterinarians (pcDVMs) and board-certified veterinary cardiologists (BCVCs) on survival time of dogs after onset of congestive heart failure (CHF) and on associated revenue for the attending pcDVMs. DESIGN Retrospective cohort study. ANIMALS 26 small-breed dogs treated for naturally occurring CHF secondary to myxomatous mitral valve disease at a multilocation primary care veterinary hospital between 2008 and 2013. PROCEDURES Electronic medical records were reviewed to identify dogs with confirmed CHF secondary to myxomatous mitral valve disease and collect information on patient care, survival time, and pcDVM revenue. Data were compared between dogs that received collaborative care from the pcDVM and a BCVC and dogs that received care from the pcDVM alone. RESULTS Dogs that received collaborative care had a longer median survival time (254 days) than did dogs that received care from the pcDVM alone (146 days). A significant positive correlation was identified between pcDVM revenue and survival time for dogs that received collaborative care (ie, the longer the dog survived, the greater the pcDVM revenue generated from caring for that patient). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Findings suggested that collaborative care provided to small-breed dogs with CHF by a BCVC and pcDVM could result in survival benefits for affected dogs and increased revenue for pcDVMs, compared with care provided by a pcDVM alone.

  2. Increased sarcolemmal Na+/H+ exchange activity in hypertrophied myocytes from dogs with chronic atrioventricular block

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Borren, Marcel M. G. J.; Vos, Marc A.; Houtman, Marien J. C.; Antoons, Gudrun; Ravesloot, Jan H.

    2013-01-01

    Dogs with compensated biventricular hypertrophy due to chronic atrioventricular block (cAVB), are more susceptible to develop drug-induced Torsade-de-Pointes arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. It has been suggested that the increased Na+ influx in hypertrophied cAVB ventricular myocytes

  3. Kennel enrichment: exercise and socialization of dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppinger, R; Zuccotti, J

    1999-01-01

    In the last 50 years, there has been a growing need for storage and management systems for the production and maintenance of large numbers of dogs. Unwanted dogs and strays, detained in kennels, stay for various lengths of time. Large kennels also produce dogs for sale as companion animals, for the service dog industry (police and guide dogs), for biomedical research, and for use by dog food companies. Across the United States, literally tens of thousands of dogs are born in kennels and spend their lives in kennels. The laboratory dog, the kennel dog, the service dog, and the companion dog are in an evolutionary transition period, accompanied by concomitant adaptation to stresses signaled by a high frequency of genetic disease and behavioral abnormalities. For kennel enrichment programs, such as socialization and exercise, the modern kenneled dog is a genetically moving target. Specific recommendations apply neither to all breeds nor to the variations within a single breed.

  4. Xylitol and Your Dog: Danger, Paws Off

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Xylitol and Your Dog: Danger, Paws Off Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it ... vitamins mouthwash toothpaste Why is Xylitol Dangerous to Dogs, but Not People? In both people and dogs, ...

  5. Sero-prevalence of visceral leishmaniasis (VL among dogs in VL endemic areas of Mymensingh district, Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariful Islam

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study was conducted to determine the sero-prevalence of canine visceral leishmaniasis (VL among street and owned dogs at Trishal Upazila of Mymensingh district, Bangladesh. Material and methods: Blood was collected asceptically from targeted dogs and serum was separated out using standard centrifigation method. The rK39-antigen-based dipstick test was used to detect anti-leishmania antibodies in serum. Results: The study revealed that 35% of the dogs in the study area were sero-positive for L. donovani. Living status of the dogs (street or owned was a potential risk factor and sero-prevalence was significantly higher in free roaming street dogs (P=0.009 and dogs with skin lesions and enlarged lymph nodes (P<0.05. The female and adult dogs were more susceptible. Conclusion: VL is an important zoonotic disease wich is transmissible to humans by the bite of phlebotomine sand fly. Dogs are the main reservoir. The higher sero-prevalence of VL indicates the potential rule of dogs to maintain the zoonosis wich need to be explored more specifically by isolation and typing of the parasite. [J Adv Vet Anim Res 2017; 4(3.000: 241-248

  6. A survey of rabies virus antibodies in confined, hunting and roaming dogs in Ogun and Oyo States, Southwestern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Oladimeji Oluwayelu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To screen for rabies virus (RABV antibodies in apparently healthy confined, hunting and roaming dogs by a community-based approach. Methods: Sera from 230 (80 confined, 92 hunting and 58 roaming dogs in some urban and periurban communities in Ogun and Oyo states, Southwestern Nigeria were screened for RABV antibodies using the indirect ELISA method. Results: Analysis of administered questionnaires showed that of 80 confined dog owners, 37 were aware of anti-rabies vaccination (i.e. they were informed while 17 were negligent and 26 uninformed. Of the 230 sera tested, only 13 (5.7% from vaccinated confined dogs in Oyo state were positive (i.e. had optimal RABV antibody titres (mean 0.54, 95% CI: 0.42–0.67 while all confined dog sera in Ogun state were negative. Eleven (12.0% and 14 (24.1% of the hunting and roaming dogs respectively had sub-optimal RABV antibody titres while the rest were negative. Conclusions: Evidently, these groups of dogs are a totally unprotected and susceptible dog population that can serve as potential reservoirs of RABV in the study area. Responsible pet ownership, vaccination of hunting and roaming dogs, and community-based active rabies surveillance are therefore advocated in Nigeria.

  7. Looking after chronically ill dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Stine B.; Kristensen, Annemarie Thuri; Sandøe, Peter

    2013-01-01

    thus face similar challenges when caring for their animals. This qualitative study uncovers impacts on an owner's life, when attending to the care of an aged or chronically ill dog and reflects on the differing roles of caregivers with animal and human patients. Twelve dog owners were selected for in......-depth interviews based on the dogs' diagnoses, and the choice of treatments and care expected to affect the owner's life. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed qualitatively. The dog owners reported several changes in their lives due to their dog's condition: practicalities like extra care, changes...... in use of the home, and restrictions relating to work, social life, and finances. These were time-consuming, tough, and annoying, but could often be dealt with through planning and prioritizing. Changes in the human–dog relationship and activities caused sadness and frustration, which in turn led...

  8. An Internet-based survey of risk factors for surgical gastric dilatation-volvulus in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipan, Marko; Brown, Dorothy Cimino; Battaglia, Carmelo L; Otto, Cynthia M

    2012-06-15

    To evaluate risk factors for gastric dilatation-volvulus (GDV) in a large number of privately owned dogs across a wide geographic area. Internet-based, cross-sectional study. 2,551 privately owned dogs. A questionnaire addressed dog-specific, management, environmental, and personality-associated risk factors for GDV in dogs. Respondents were recruited through the posting of the electronic link to the questionnaire on websites for dog owners; the information was also disseminated at meetings of dog owners and via newsletters, e-mail lists for dog owners and breeders, owner-oriented dog publications, and e-mails forwarded by participants. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression analysis were performed. Factors significantly associated with an increased risk of GDV were being fed dry kibble, anxiety, residence in the United Kingdom, being born in the 1990s, being a family pet, and spending at least 5 hours a day with the owner. Factors associated with a decreased risk of GDV were playing with other dogs and running the fence after meals, fish and egg dietary supplements, and spending equal time indoors and outdoors. A significant interaction between sex and neuter status was observed, with sexually intact females having the highest risk for GDV. In dogs with a high risk of GDV, regular moderate daily and postprandial activity appeared to be beneficial. Feeding only commercial dry dog food may not be the best choice for dogs at risk; however, supplements with fish or eggs may reduced this risk. The effect of neuter status on GDV risk requires further characterization.

  9. Prevalence and risk factors for isolation of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus in dogs with keratitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoPinto, Alexander J; Mohammed, Hussni O; Ledbetter, Eric C

    2015-07-01

    To determine the prevalence of, and risk factors for, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus (MRS) isolation in dogs with naturally acquired bacterial keratitis. All Staphylococcus spp. isolated from corneal samples of dogs with keratitis during a 2-year period were evaluated for methicillin resistance by bacteriologic methods. Each MRS isolate was subjected to in vitro susceptibility testing for systemic and ocular antimicrobials. Nasal swabs for culture were collected from all dogs with MRS corneal isolation to evaluate for nasal carrier status. Potential risk factors for MRS isolation were investigated by medical record review and administration of an epidemiological survey to dog owners. Collected information characterizing animal, client, and environmental variables was analyzed for association with MRS isolation. Seventy-one Staphylococcus spp. were isolated from seventy individual dogs with keratitis during the study period. Seventeen of the Staphylococcus isolates (23.9%) were methicillin resistant. The MRS isolates included Staphylococcus epidermidis (n = 10), Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (n = 6), and Staphylococcus aureus (n = 1). The MRS corneal isolates displayed extensive antimicrobial resistance. Four dogs (23.5%) with MRS corneal isolates had positive nasal cultures for MRS. Client occupation was significantly (P = 0.01) associated with MRS isolation, and dogs belonging to owners employed in veterinary or human healthcare fields were four times more likely to have MRS keratitis than dogs owned by clients with different professions. There were no significant associations between the other evaluated animal, client, and environmental factors. Methicillin resistance is relatively common in Staphylococcus isolates from dogs with corneal infections, particularly among dogs belonging to healthcare workers. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  10. Characterization of a surface glycoprotein from Echinococcus multilocularis and its mucosal vaccine potential in dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokazu Kouguchi

    Full Text Available Alveolar echinococcosis is a refractory disease caused by the metacestode stage of Echinococcus multilocularis. The life cycle of this parasite is maintained primarily between foxes and many species of rodents; thus, dogs are thought to be a minor definitive host except in some endemic areas. However, dogs are highly susceptible to E. multilocularis infection. Because of the close contact between dogs and humans, infection of dogs with this parasite can be an important risk to human health. Therefore, new measures and tools to control and prevent parasite transmission required. Using 2-dimensional electrophoresis followed by western blot (2D-WB analysis, a large glycoprotein component of protoscoleces was identified based on reactivity to intestinal IgA in dogs experimentally infected with E. multilocularis. This component, designated SRf1, was purified by gel filtration using a Superose 6 column. Glycosylation analysis and immunostaining revealed that SRf1 could be distinguished from Em2, a major mucin-type antigen of E. multilocularis. Dogs (n=6 were immunized intranasally with 500 µg of SRf1 with cholera toxin subunit B by using a spray syringe, and a booster was given orally using an enteric capsule containing 15 mg of the same antigen. As a result, dogs immunized with this antigen showed an 87.6% reduction in worm numbers compared to control dogs (n=5 who received only PBS administration. A weak serum antibody response was observed in SRf1-immunized dogs, but there was no correlation between antibody response and worm number. We demonstrated for the first time that mucosal immunization using SRf1, a glycoprotein component newly isolated from E. multilocularis protoscoleces, induced a protection response to E. multilocularis infection in dogs. Thus, our data indicated that mucosal immunization using surface antigens will be an important tool to facilitate the development of practical vaccines for definitive hosts.

  11. Alteration of the fecal microbiota and serum metabolite profiles in dogs with idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamoto, Yasushi; Otoni, Cristiane C; Steelman, Samantha M; Büyükleblebici, Olga; Steiner, Jörg M; Jergens, Albert E; Suchodolski, Jan S

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a common cause of chronic gastrointestinal (GI) disease in dogs. The combination of an underlying host genetic susceptibility, an intestinal dysbiosis, and dietary/environmental factors are suspected as main contributing factors in the pathogenesis of canine IBD. However, actual mechanisms of the host-microbe interactions remain elusive. The aim of this study was to compare the fecal microbiota and serum metabolite profiles between healthy dogs (n = 10) and dogs with IBD before and after 3 weeks of medical therapy (n = 12). Fecal microbiota and metabolite profiles were characterized by 454-pyrosequencing of 16 S rRNA genes and by an untargeted metabolomics approach, respectively. Significantly lower bacterial diversity and distinct microbial communities were observed in dogs with IBD compared to the healthy control dogs. While Gammaproteobacteria were overrepresented, Erysipelotrichia, Clostridia, and Bacteroidia were underrepresented in dogs with IBD. The functional gene content was predicted from the 16 S rRNA gene data using PICRUSt, and revealed overrepresented bacterial secretion system and transcription factors, and underrepresented amino acid metabolism in dogs with IBD. The serum metabolites 3-hydroxybutyrate, hexuronic acid, ribose, and gluconic acid lactone were significantly more abundant in dogs with IBD. Although a clinical improvement was observed after medical therapy in all dogs with IBD, this was not accompanied by significant changes in the fecal microbiota or in serum metabolite profiles. These results suggest the presence of oxidative stress and a functional alteration of the GI microbiota in dogs with IBD, which persisted even in the face of a clinical response to medical therapy.

  12. Miastenia gravis diagnostic in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Patricia Suraniti

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Miastenia Gravis is a neuromuscular disease caused by auto antibodies. Early Clinical and biochemical diagnosis and treatment is demanded in the assurementof quality and time of life in all dogs. In this study we describe the conventional diagnosis methods and therapy in 32 dogs with suspected myasthenia gravis and propose the administration of bromide of piridostigmin as another use full diagnosis method in dogs.

  13. Primary renal neoplasia of dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Jeffrey N; Henry, Carolyn J; Turnquist, Susan E; Tyler, Jeff W; Liptak, Julius M; Rizzo, Scott A; Sfiligoi, Gabriella; Steinberg, Steven J; Smith, Annette N; Jackson, Tarraca

    2006-01-01

    Primary renal tumors are diagnosed uncommonly in dogs. Signs and survival will differ among different categories of primary renal tumors. Data were collected from the medical records of 82 dogs with primary renal tumors diagnosed by examination of tissue obtained by ultrasound-guided biopsy, needle aspiration, surgery, or at postmortem examination. This was a multi-institutional, retrospective study. Forty-nine dogs had carcinomas, 28 had sarcomas, and 5 had nephroblastomas. The dogs were geriatric (mean 8.1 years; range: 1-17) with a weight of 24.9 kg (range: 4.5-80). Tumors occurred with equal frequency in each kidney with 4% occurring bilaterally. Initial signs included one or more of hematuria, inappetance, lethargy. weight loss, or a palpable abdominal mass. Pain was reported more frequently in dogs with sarcomas (5/28). The most common hematologic abnormalities were neutrophilia (22/63), anemia (21/64), and thrombocytopenia (6/68). Polycythemia was present in 3 dogs and resolved with treatment. Hematuria (28/49), pyuria (26/49), proteinuria (24/50), and isosthenuria (20/56) were the most frequently observed abnormalities on urinalysis. Pulmonary metastases were noted on thoracic radiographs in 16% of dogs at diagnosis. Seventy-seven percent of dogs had metastatic disease at the time of death. Median survival for dogs with carcinomas was 16 months (range 0-59 months), for dogs with sarcomas 9 months (range 0-70 months), and for dogs with nephroblastomas 6 months (range 0-6 months). Primary renal tumors in dogs are generally highly malignant with surgery being the only treatment that improves survival.

  14. Schrödinger's dog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrique Alves Monteiro, Luiz

    2009-09-01

    As I am sure everyone will know, a hot dog is a popular snack consisting of a cooked sausage in a soft bun. The name of this sandwich originates from the fact that in the 18th century some people suspected that sausages were made of dog meat. This may sound strange, but as I have learned, the true nature of the humble hot dog may be stranger still.

  15. Evaluation of risk factors for degenerative joint disease associated with hip dysplasia in German Shepherd Dogs, Golden Retrievers, Labrador Retrievers, and Rottweilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, G K; Mayhew, P D; Kapatkin, A S; McKelvie, P J; Shofer, F S; Gregor, T P

    2001-12-15

    To determine whether age, breed, sex, weight, or distraction index (DI) was associated with the risk that dogs of 4 common breeds (German Shepherd Dog, Golden Retriever, Labrador Retriever, Rottweiler) would have radiographic evidence of degenerative joint disease (DJD) associated with hip dysplasia. Cross-sectional prevalence study. 15,742 dogs. Hips of dogs were evaluated radiographically by use of the ventrodorsal hip-extended view, the compression v ew, and the distraction view. The ventrodorsal hip-extended view was examined to determine whether dogs had DJD. For each breed, a multiple logistic regression model incorporating age, sex, weight, and DI was created. For each breed, disease-susceptibility curves were produced, using all dogs, regardless of age, and dogs grouped on the basis of age. Weight and DI were significant risk factors for DJD in all breeds. For German Shepherd Dogs, the risk of having DJD was 4.95 times the risk for dogs of the other 3 breeds combined. In all breeds, the probability of having DJD increased with age. Results indicated that the probability of having hip DJD increased with hip joint laxity as measured by use of DI. This association was breed-specific, indicating that breed-specific information on disease susceptibility should be incorporated when making breeding decisions and when deciding on possible surgical treatment of hip dysplasia.

  16. Feed the dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Gry Høngsmark; Bajde, Domen

    2016-01-01

    MedieKultur | Journal of media and communication research | ISSN 1901-9726Article – Open sectionPublished by SMID | Society of Media researchers In Denmark | www.smid.dkTh e online version of this text can be found open access at www.mediekultur.dk196Feed the dogsA case of humanitarian communicat......MedieKultur | Journal of media and communication research | ISSN 1901-9726Article – Open sectionPublished by SMID | Society of Media researchers In Denmark | www.smid.dkTh e online version of this text can be found open access at www.mediekultur.dk196Feed the dogsA case of humanitarian...

  17. "... Formanden dog det dobbelte"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werlauff, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Artiklen analyserer, hvorvidt den traditionsbestemte honorargrundsætning i aktieselskaber ”... formanden dog det dobbelte” gennemsyrer både ret- og pligtsiden for formanden, således at forstå, at ikke blot rettighedssiden med retten til honorar og andre goder forøges for en formand, men også...... næppe er urimeligt at genbruge talemåden ”... formanden dog det dobbelte”, her forstået som: en generelt øget ansvarsrisiko, uanset om dette udspringer af ansvarsstandarden, af den bevismæssige nærhed ved beslutningerne eller en kombination af begge disse faktorer. Artiklen foretager en gennemgang af de...

  18. Using dogs for tiger conservation and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerley, Linda L

    2010-12-01

    This paper is a review of the history, development and efficacy of using dogs in wildlife studies and considers the use of dogs in the research and conservation of wild tigers (Panthera tigris Linnaeus, 1758). Using scat detection dogs, scent-matching dogs, law enforcement detection dogs and protection dogs are proven methods that can be effectively used on tigers. These methods all take advantage of the dog's extremely evolved sense of smell that allows them to detect animals or animal byproducts (often the focus of tiger studies). Dogs can be trained to communicate this information to their handlers. © 2010 ISZS, Blackwell Publishing and IOZ/CAS.

  19. Noise Phobia in Dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mangle

    Full Text Available Fear of thunderstorms and other forms of noise phobia are common problems in dogs. Administering medications along with changing the pet’s environment, and using behavior modification techniques can help ease the fear. Above all, do not give your pet any attention or reward when he is showing signs of fear; this will only reinforce the fearful behavior. [Veterinary World 2008; 1(11.000: 351-352

  20. DOG optical gas analyzers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azbukin, A.A.; Buldakov, M.A.; Korolev, B.V.; Korolo' kov, V.A.; Matrosov, I.I. [Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk (Russian Federation). Inst. of Optical Monitoring

    2002-01-01

    Stationary gas analyzers for continuous monitoring of sulfur and nitrogen oxides in exhaust gases of electric power plants burning fossil fuels have been developed. The DOG series of gas-analyzers use non-laser UV radiation sources and the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) measurement technique. Operation of the gas-analyzers at Russian electric power plants showed their high efficiency, reliability, and easiness in operation at lower cost as compared to similar foreign devices. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Protecting Black-Footed Ferrets and Prairie Dogs Against Sylvatic Plague

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocke, Tonie E.

    2008-01-01

    Scientists at the USGS National Wildlife Health Center (NWHC), in collaboration with colleagues at other federal agencies and the University of Wisconsin, are developing and testing vaccines that can be used to protect black-footed ferrets and prairie dogs against plague. The black-footed ferret is commonly regarded as the most endangered mammal in North America, and sylvatic plague is a major impediment to its recovery. The three prairie dog species (Gunnison's, black-tailed, and white-tailed prairie dogs), upon which the ferret depends for food and whose burrows they use for shelter, have been drastically reduced from historical levels, resulting in the near extinction of the ferret. All three species are considered 'at risk' and have been petitioned for listing as 'threatened' or 'endangered' by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS). Additionally, the Utah prairie dog is listed as threatened and the Mexican prairie dog is considered endangered in Mexico. Like the black-footed ferret, all five prairie dog species are highly susceptible to plague and regularly experience outbreaks with devastating losses. Controlling plague outbreaks in prairie dogs and ferrets is a vital concern for ongoing recovery programs and conservation efforts for both species.

  2. Prevalence, antimicrobial resistance and risk factors for Campylobacter colonising dogs and cats in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Lazou

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted to determine the prevalence, antimicrobial resistance and risk factors for Campylobacter colonising dogs and cats in Greece. Faecal specimens were collected from 181 dogs and 132 cats. Culture methods were applied to detect Campylobacter spp. and a multiplex PCR assay to identify the isolates. The prevalence of Campylobacter spp. was 3.8% in dogs and 12.1% in cats. The most frequently identified Campylobacter species in dogs was C. jejuni (57.1% followed by C. coli (42.9%. All feline isolates were identified as C. jejuni apart from one isolate that was characterised as Campylobacter-like organism. Gender, age, breed, life style, diarrhoea and type of diet of dogs and cats did not significantly correlate (P>0.05 with Campylobacter isolation. Possible predictors regarding Campylobacter presence in dogs and cats were assessed by binary logistic regression. A tendency towards higher risk for Campylobacter contamination was observed in dogs consuming a homemade diet and in outdoor cats. Disk diffusion method revealed that all Campylobacter isolates exhibited susceptibility to erythromycin, gentamicin and streptomycin. Contrariwise, 66.7% of canine isolates were resistant concurrently to tetracycline and quinolones and 59.0%, 13.6% and 4.5% of feline isolates were resistant to quinolones, quinolones along with tetracycline and tetracycline alone, respectively

  3. Why are there several species of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato detected in dogs and humans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skotarczak, Bogumiła

    2014-04-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato is a group of spirochete bacteria species some of which cause borreliosis in humans and dogs. Humans and dogs are susceptible to illness from many of the same tick-borne pathogens, including B. burgdorferi s.l. (Bbsl). Little is known about the pathogenic role of the species of Bbsl in canines. The molecular methods which detect and amplify the DNA of borreliae and allow differentiating borreliae species or strains have not been used in canine diagnostics yet. Until now, it has been believed that in European dogs, like in humans, at least three pathogenic species occur but the most frequently described symptoms may be associated with the infection caused by B. burgdorferi sensu stricto species. A dog as well as a human is a host for many species of Bbsl, because borreliacidal ability of serum of dogs and humans is evident only in certain genospecies of Bbsl. Therefore both a dog and a human harbor more species than in case of some wild animal species which create older phylogenetic Bbsl species-host systems and these animals may act even as a non-competent reservoir host. Apart from many genospecies of Bbsl, a dog harbors other tick-borne agents and dual or triple infections may occur. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Detection of Hepatitis E Virus Antibodies in Dogs in the United Kingdom.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aoife McElroy

    Full Text Available Hepatitis E virus (HEV genotypes 3 and 4 are zoonotic pathogens, with pigs predominantly implicated in disease transmission. The rapid rise in human cases in developed countries over the past decade indicates a change in epidemiology of HEV, and it has been suggested that additional animal species may be involved in transmission of infection. Multiple studies have identified contact with dogs as a risk factor for HEV infection in industrialised nations, and a low seroprevalence to HEV has previously been reported in dogs in low-income countries. In this study we aimed to evaluate the possibility that dogs are susceptible to HEV, and determine the frequency with which this occurs. Serum samples from UK dogs with and without hepatitis were screened for HEV-specific antibodies, and canine liver and stool samples were analysed by qPCR for the presence of HEV RNA. We describe evidence to show HEV infection occurs at low levels in dogs in the UK, but the strain of origin is undetermined. The low seroprevalence level of HEV in dogs implies the risk of zoonotic disease transmission is likely to be limited, but further investigations will be required to determine if HEV-infected dogs can transmit HEV to man.

  5. Effects of Soy Lecithin Extender on Dog Sperm Cryopreservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalmazzo, Andressa; Losano, João Diego A; Rocha, Carolina C; Tsunoda, Roberta H; Angrimani, Daniel de Souza Ramos; Mendes, Camilla M; Assumpção, Mayra Elena O D Ávila; Nichi, Marcilio; Barnabe, Valquíria H

    2017-06-28

    Semen cryopreservation is an essential biotechnology in canine reproduction and during the cryopreservation process commonly egg yolk are used. The discrepancy in the egg yolk composition and the potential risk of disease dissemination are obstacles for semen exportation and use. Therefore, studies aiming to substitute egg yolk are extremely important. In this context, soy lecithin contains a low-density lipoprotein fraction, is an interesting alternative. Thus, the objective of this study was to compare extenders based on soy lecithin (several concentrations and forms) with egg yolk during the cryopreservation process of dog sperm. For this purpose, we used twelve dogs. Semen was evaluated at different time points (after refrigeration, glycerolization, and thawing), by motility analysis (CASA) and functional tests (e.g., membrane integrity-eosin/nigrosin, acrosome integrity-fast green/Bengal rose, mitochondrial activity-3'3 diaminobenzidine, Chromatin susceptibility to acid-induced denaturation-SCSA, and susceptibility to oxidative stress-thiobarbituric acid reactive substances). The results indicated that egg yolk and lower concentrations of lecithin had similar effects on mitochondrial activity and motility. Thus, soy lecithin is a potentially viable alternative to egg yolk for the cryopreservation of dog semen.

  6. A Survey of Dog Owners in Remote Northern Australian Indigenous Communities to Inform Rabies Incursion Planning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily G Hudson

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Australia is underprepared for a rabies incursion due to a lack of information about how a rabies outbreak would spread within the susceptible canine populations and which control strategies would be best to control it. The aim of this study was to collect information to parameterize a recently developed dog rabies spread model as well as use this information to gauge how the community would accept potential control strategies. Such information-together with model outputs-would be used to inform decision makers on the best control strategies and improve Australia's preparedness against a canine rabies incursion. The parameters this study focussed on were detection time, vaccination rates and dog-culling and dog movement restriction compliance. A cross-sectional survey of 31 dog-owners, using a questionnaire, was undertaken in the five communities of the Northern Peninsular Area (NPA in northern Australia regarding community dog movements, veterinary visits, reporting systems, perceptions of sick dogs and potential human behaviours during hypothetical rabies outbreaks. It highlighted the significant shortfalls in veterinary care that would need to be vastly improved during an outbreak, who educational programs should be targeted towards and which dog movements should be restricted. The results indicate that men were significantly more likely than women to allow their dogs to roam and to move their dogs. The current low vaccination rate of 12% highlighted the limited veterinary services that would need to be substantially increased to achieve effective rabies control. Participation in mass vaccination was accepted by 100% of the respondents. There was lower acceptance for other possible rabies control strategies with 10-20% of the respondents stating a resistance to both a mass culling program and a ban on dog movements. Consequently, movement bans and mass dog culling would have limited effectiveness as a control strategy in the NPA community

  7. A Survey of Dog Owners in Remote Northern Australian Indigenous Communities to Inform Rabies Incursion Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Emily G.; Dhand, Navneet; Dürr, Salome; Ward, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Australia is underprepared for a rabies incursion due to a lack of information about how a rabies outbreak would spread within the susceptible canine populations and which control strategies would be best to control it. The aim of this study was to collect information to parameterize a recently developed dog rabies spread model as well as use this information to gauge how the community would accept potential control strategies. Such information–together with model outputs–would be used to inform decision makers on the best control strategies and improve Australia’s preparedness against a canine rabies incursion. The parameters this study focussed on were detection time, vaccination rates and dog-culling and dog movement restriction compliance. A cross-sectional survey of 31 dog-owners, using a questionnaire, was undertaken in the five communities of the Northern Peninsular Area (NPA) in northern Australia regarding community dog movements, veterinary visits, reporting systems, perceptions of sick dogs and potential human behaviours during hypothetical rabies outbreaks. It highlighted the significant shortfalls in veterinary care that would need to be vastly improved during an outbreak, who educational programs should be targeted towards and which dog movements should be restricted. The results indicate that men were significantly more likely than women to allow their dogs to roam and to move their dogs. The current low vaccination rate of 12% highlighted the limited veterinary services that would need to be substantially increased to achieve effective rabies control. Participation in mass vaccination was accepted by 100% of the respondents. There was lower acceptance for other possible rabies control strategies with 10–20% of the respondents stating a resistance to both a mass culling program and a ban on dog movements. Consequently, movement bans and mass dog culling would have limited effectiveness as a control strategy in the NPA community. More than

  8. Host-Specific Patterns of Genetic Diversity among IncI1-I gamma and IncK Plasmids Encoding CMY-2 beta-Lactamase in Escherichia coli Isolates from Humans, Poultry Meat, Poultry, and Dogs in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Katrine Hartung; Bortolaia, Valeria; Nielsen, Christine Ahl

    2016-01-01

    and commensal E. coli isolates collected from 2006 to 2012 from humans, retail poultry meat, broilers, and dogs. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST), antimicrobial susceptibility testing, and conjugation were performed in conjunction with plasmid replicon typing, plasmid multilocus sequence typing (p...

  9. Etiologic study of urinary tract infection in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Mery Kogika

    1995-03-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infections were documented in 51 dogs. Several factors such as etiologic agents, localization of the infection, predisposing factors, sex, age, and breed were considered. The diagnosis of urinary tract infection (UTI was based on bacteriological investigation and it was considered positive when urine sample collected by catheterization contained more than 105 bacteria/ml. Mixed infection was found in 4 of the infected dogs, totallizing 55 isolates. Among them, Escherichia coli (35.3% was the most frequently isolated, followed by Staphylococcus sp. (23.5%, Proteus mirabilis (15.7%, Streptococcus sp. (13.7%, Klebsiella sp. (9.8%. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (3.9%, Enterobacter cloacae (2.0%, Citrobacter freundii (2.0% and Providencia rettgeri (2.0%. As to antimicrobial susceptibility, norfloxacin and gentamicin were successful for the treatment of gram-negative microorganisms, while the most effective drugs for gram-positive bacteria were cephalothin and nitrofurantoin. UTI was observed more frequently in Cocker Spaniel and German Shepherd; male dogs were more involved, and pyelonephritis was the predominant disease observed. Infection was seen in all ages, but the frequency was higher in middle aged dogs. Urolithiasis were observed as common predisposing or underlying factors to UTI being, cither Staphylococcus sp. or Proteus mirabilis isolated in those cases which alkaline urine pH was observed.

  10. The bald and the beautiful: hairlessness in domestic dog breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Heidi G; Harris, Alexander; Dreger, Dayna L; Davis, Brian W; Ostrander, Elaine A

    2017-02-05

    An extraordinary amount of genomic variation is contained within the chromosomes of domestic dogs, manifesting as dramatic differences in morphology, behaviour and disease susceptibility. Morphology, in particular, has been a topic of enormous interest as biologists struggle to understand the small window of dog domestication from wolves, and the division of dogs into pure breeding, closed populations termed breeds. Many traits related to morphology, including body size, leg length and skull shape, have been under selection as part of the standard descriptions for the nearly 400 breeds recognized worldwide. Just as important, however, are the minor traits that have undergone selection by fanciers and breeders to define dogs of a particular appearance, such as tail length, ear position, back arch and variation in fur (pelage) growth patterns. In this paper, we both review and present new data for traits associated with pelage including fur length, curl, growth, shedding and even the presence or absence of fur. Finally, we report the discovery of a new gene associated with the absence of coat in the American Hairless Terrier breed.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evo-devo in the genomics era, and the origins of morphological diversity'. © 2016 The Authors.

  11. Resistance to plague among black-tailed prairie dog populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocke, Tonie E.; Williamson, Judy; Cobble, Kacy R.; Busch, Joseph D.; Antolin, Michael F.; Wagner, David M.

    2012-01-01

    In some rodent species frequently exposed to plague outbreaks caused by Yersinia pestis, resistance to the disease has evolved as a population trait. As a first step in determining if plague resistance has developed in black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus), animals captured from colonies in a plague-free region (South Dakota) and two plague-endemic regions (Colorado and Texas) were challenged with Y. pestis at one of three doses (2.5, 250, or 2500 mouse LD50s). South Dakota prairie dogs were far more susceptible to plague than Colorado and Texas prairie dogs (pdogs were quite similar in their response, with overall survival rates of 50% and 60%, respectively. Prairie dogs from these states were heterogenous in their response, with some animals dying at the lowest dose (37% and 20%, respectively) and some surviving even at the highest dose (29% and 40%, respectively). Microsatellite analysis revealed that all three groups were distinct genetically, but further studies are needed to establish a genetic basis for the observed differences in plague resistance.

  12. Tear ferning in normal dogs and dogs with keratoconjunctivitis sicca ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study evaluates tear ferning as an ancillary technique for the evaluation of the canine tear film in normal eyes and eyes affected by keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS). Thirty dogs with KCS and 50 control dogs with normal tear film were evaluated with a full ophthalmoscopic examination and a Schirmer tear test type 1 ...

  13. Collection Development "Dog Care & Training": The Well-Behaved Dog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpi, Kristine M.; Sherman, Barbara L.

    2008-01-01

    Dogs are indeed people's best friends. A majority of owners report that their dog is a "member of the family," and that acceptable canine behavior and optimal care are high priorities for them. The human-animal bond, the close connection between people and their pets, is forged by positive interactions, but unacceptable canine behaviors that…

  14. Dog detectives : sniffer dogs proving indispensable in finding pipeline leaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, A.

    2004-09-06

    This article reports on the use of dogs to detect leaks in gas pipelines. A project was undertaken by Benoit Oilfield Construction in which dogs were trained to smell mercaptans, the odourant used by pipeline companies for safety and leak detection in natural gas. In the event of a leak, the odourant is released and migrates directly to the soil surface where it can be detected by the dogs. A leak can shut down several wells at once and can result in fines for regulatory non-compliance. If the cost of repair and cleanup is added, leaks can have a major negative financial effect on operations. The pinpointing ability of the dogs is good enough to determine if there is one large leak or several smaller ones. This helps determine if the problem resulted from a manufacturing defect or a bad welder, and thus determine who should pay the associated costs. A trained dog is worth about $11,000. 3 figs.

  15. Genetic susceptibility of periodontitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laine, M.L.; Crielaard, W.; Loos, B.G.

    2012-01-01

    In this systematic review, we explore and summarize the peer-reviewed literature on putative genetic risk factors for susceptibility to aggressive and chronic periodontitis. A comprehensive literature search on the PubMed database was performed using the keywords ‘periodontitis’ or ‘periodontal

  16. Fourie susceptible.pmd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adipala Ekwamu

    a number of cultivars exhibited field resistance to halo blight and bacterial brown spot, all cultivars were more or less susceptible to .... Cerillos. Alubia. I. 91. 57. Kranskop. Red speckled sugar. II. 97. 63. OPS-RS1. Red speckled sugar. II. 96. 63. OPS-RS2. Red speckled sugar. I. 100. 61. OPS-RS3. Red speckled sugar. II. 97.

  17. Pancreatic torsion in a dog

    OpenAIRE

    Brabson, Tamera L.; Maki, Lynn C.; Newell, Susan M.; Ralphs, S. Christopher

    2015-01-01

    A 6-month-old male intact Cane Corso mastiff dog was presented for a recent history of vomiting, abdominal pain, and lethargy. A diagnosis of pancreatic torsion was made during abdominal exploratory surgery and was confirmed with histopathology. The dog underwent partial pancreatectomy and recovered with no complications.

  18. Electroencephalography in dogs with epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berendt, Martin Ole; Høgenhaven, H; Flagstad, Annette Borgbjerg

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the diagnostic value of electroencephalography (EEG) in dogs with epilepsy, applying human criteria for EEG abnormalities observed with this disorder.......To investigate the diagnostic value of electroencephalography (EEG) in dogs with epilepsy, applying human criteria for EEG abnormalities observed with this disorder....

  19. Degenerative lumbosacral stenosis in dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meij, B.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/164045805; Bergknut, N.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314418059

    2010-01-01

    Volume 40, Issue 5, Pages 983-1009 (September 2010) Degenerative Lumbosacral Stenosis in Dogs Björn P. Meij, DVM, PhDa, Niklas Bergknut, DVM, MSab Degenerative lumbosacral stenosis (DLSS) is the most common disorder of the caudal lumbar spine in dogs. This article reviews the management of this

  20. Are dogs just like us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Michael

    2015-08-31

    Dogs have evolved to become the animal species most integrated with human society. Surprisingly, the origins and mechanisms of the remarkable co-evolution are still obscure and provide fuel for debates. Brain imaging studies showing up similarities and recent results implicating the hormone oxytocin also suggest that it makes sense to compare the social mind of dogs to our own. Michael Gross reports.

  1. Dog Mathematics: Exploring Base-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Terri L.; Yanik, H. Bahadir; Lee, Mi Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Using a dog's paw as a basis for numerical representation, sixth grade students explored how to count and regroup using the dog's four digital pads. Teachers can connect these base-4 explorations to the conceptual meaning of place value and regrouping using base-10.

  2. Mosquito-borne heartworm Dirofilaria immitis in dogs from Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Chloe; Koh, Wei Ling; Casteriano, Andrea; Beijerink, Niek; Godfrey, Christopher; Brown, Graeme; Emery, David; Šlapeta, Jan

    2016-10-07

    Heartworm (Dirofilaria immitis) in dogs is considered endemic in Australia, but the clinical heartworm disease caused by the heartworm is rare and prevalence is low. The mainstream prevention of the heartworm is based on macrocyclic lactone (ML) administration. The aim of this study was to confirm endemism of the heartworm under current Australian conditions using a cohort of recent microfilaria-positive dogs which were on variable heartworm prevention. A hotspot of canine heartworm antigen-positive and microfilaria-positive dogs has been detected recently in Queensland, Australia. Blood samples from 39 dogs from Queensland and two dogs from New South Wales were investigated for canine filarioids. Rapid antigen diagnostic tests capable of detection of D. immitis and real-time PCR for quantification and differentiation between D. immitis from Acanthocheilonema reconditum with quantification of microfilariae in canine blood samples, together with D. immitis specific real-time PCR assay, were applied to microfilaria-positive dogs. The P-glycoprotein genotype was determined to test whether Australian-sourced heartworm shared the same genetic markers as those suspected of ML-resistance in North America. Only D. immitis was detected in the samples from Queensland and New South Wales, Australia. Using high resolution melt real-time PCR and D. immitis specific real-time PCR, the calculated microfilaria concentration ranged from 1 to 44,957 microfilariae/ml and from 7 to 60,526 microfilariae/ml, respectively. DNA sequencing of the PCR products confirmed D. immitis. Fifteen of the examined dogs were on putative, rigorous ML prevention. For the remaining dogs, compliance with heartworm prevention was unknown or reported as inconsistent. Wild-type genotype AA-GG of the P-glycoprotein locus of D. immitis sequence has been obtained for three blood samples. Due to the incomplete history, any suggestion of a loss of efficacy of MLs must be treated as 'remotely possible'. In the

  3. A village dog is not a stray : human-dog interactions in coastal Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiz Izaguirre, E.

    2013-01-01

    Dogs (Canis familiaris) are considered one of the most numerous carnivores worldwide. Although in the Global North dogs are popular companions, that live inside homes, about 80% of the dogs in the world are village dogs. Village dogs are typically free-roaming, scavenge refuse around human dwellings

  4. Do Dog Behavioral Characteristics Predict the Quality of the Relationship between Dogs and Their Owners?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Christy L; Chen, Pan; Serpell, James A; Jacobson, Kristen C

    This paper explores whether dog behavioral characteristics predict the quality of the relationship between dogs and their owners (i.e., owner attachment to dog), and whether relations between dog behavior and owner attachment are moderated by demographic characteristics. In this study, N = 92 children and N = 60 adults from 60 dog-owning families completed questionnaires about their attachment to their pet dog, their level of responsibility for that dog, and their general attitudes toward pets. They also rated their dogs on observable behavioral characteristics. Individuals who held positive attitudes about pets and who provided much of their dog's care reported stronger attachments to their dogs. The strength of owners' attachments to their dogs was associated with dog trainability and separation problems. Relationships between owner attachment and both dog excitability and attention-seeking behavior were further moderated by demographic characteristics: for Caucasians but not for non-Caucasians, dog excitability was negatively associated with owner attachment to dog; and for adults, dog attention-seeking behavior was positively associated with owner attachment, but children tended to be highly attached to their dogs, regardless of their dogs' attention-seeking behaviors. This study demonstrates that certain dog behavioral traits are indeed associated with the strength of owners' attachments to their dogs.

  5. Longevity and mortality of owned dogs in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, D G; Church, D B; McGreevy, P D; Thomson, P C; Brodbelt, D C

    2013-12-01

    Improved understanding of longevity represents a significant welfare opportunity for the domestic dog, given its unparalleled morphological diversity. Epidemiological research using electronic patient records (EPRs) collected from primary veterinary practices overcomes many inherent limitations of referral clinic, owner questionnaire and pet insurance data. Clinical health data from 102,609 owned dogs attending first opinion veterinary practices (n=86) in central and southeast England were analysed, focusing on 5095 confirmed deaths. Of deceased dogs with information available, 3961 (77.9%) were purebred, 2386 (47.0%) were female, 2528 (49.8%) were neutered and 1105 (21.7%) were insured. The overall median longevity was 12.0 years (IQR 8.9-14.2). The longest-lived breeds were the Miniature poodle, Bearded collie, Border collie and Miniature dachshund, while the shortest-lived were the Dogue de Bordeaux and Great Dane. The most frequently attributed causes of death were neoplastic, musculoskeletal and neurological disorders. The results of multivariable modelling indicated that longevity in crossbred dogs exceeded purebred dogs by 1.2 years (95% confidence interval 0.9-1.4; Pdogs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A service dog in group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothberg, Brian; Collins, Emily

    2015-04-01

    Service dogs are sanctioned by the Americans with Disabilities Act as having protected rights allowing them to assist owners with disabilities. These dogs are appearing with increasing frequency in healthcare settings, and it is important for healthcare providers to understand the rules and regulations given to service animals and owners. We discuss processes that transpired when a service dog was brought into a psychodynamic psychotherapy group. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the unintended consequences of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 2010 as it concerns service dogs and the impact on the group process. Problems resulting from the introduction of service dogs into therapy groups should be anticipated and explicitly discussed in the course of the group's transactions.

  7. Pet Dogs and Children’s Health: Opportunities for Chronic Disease Prevention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scribani, Melissa B.; Krupa, Nicole; Jenkins, Paul; Nagykaldi, Zsolt; Olson, Ardis L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Positive associations between having a pet dog and adult health outcomes have been documented; however, little evidence exists regarding the benefits of pet dogs for young children. This study investigates the hypothesis that pet dogs are positively associated with healthy weight and mental health among children. Methods This cross-sectional study accrued a consecutive sample of children over 18 months in a pediatric primary care setting. The study enrolled 643 children (mean age, 6.7 years); 96% were white, 45% were female, 56% were privately insured, and 58% had pet dogs in the home. Before an annual visit, parents of children aged 4 to 10 years completed the DartScreen, a comprehensive Web-based health risk screener administered using an electronic tablet. The screener domains were child body mass index (BMI), physical activity, screen time, mental health, and pet-related questions. Results Children with and children without pet dogs did not differ in BMI (P = .80), screen time of 2 hours or less (P = 0.99), or physical activity (P = .07). A lower percentage of children with dogs (12%) met the clinical cut-off value of Screen for Child Anxiety and Related Disorders (SCARED-5) of 3 or more, compared with children without dogs (21%, P = .002). The mean SCARED-5 score was lower among children with dogs (1.13) compared with children without dogs (1.40; P = .01). This relationship was retained in multivariate analysis after controlling for several covariates. Conclusions Having a pet dog in the home was associated with a decreased probability of childhood anxiety. Future studies need to establish whether this relationship is causal and, if so, how pet dogs alleviate childhood anxiety. PMID:26605705

  8. Enteropathogens identified in dogs entering a Florida animal shelter with normal feces or diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tupler, Tiffany; Levy, Julie K; Sabshin, Stephanie J; Tucker, Sylvia J; Greiner, Ellis C; Leutenegger, Christian M

    2012-08-01

    To determine the frequency of enteropathogens in dogs entering an animal shelter with normal feces or diarrhea. Cross-sectional study. 100 dogs evaluated at an open-admission municipal animal shelter in Florida. Fecal samples were collected within 24 hours after admission from 50 dogs with normal feces and 50 dogs with diarrhea. Feces were tested by fecal flotation, antigen testing, PCR assay, and electron microscopy for selected enteropathogens. 13 enteropathogens were identified. Dogs with diarrhea were significantly more likely to be infected with ≥ 1 enteropathogens (96%) than were dogs with normal feces (78%). Only Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin A gene was significantly more common in dogs with diarrhea (64%) than in dogs with normal feces (40%). Other enteropathogens identified in dogs with and without diarrhea included hookworms (58% and 48%, respectively), Giardia spp (22% and 16%, respectively), canine enteric coronavirus (2% and 18%, respectively), whipworms (12% and 8%, respectively), Cryptosporidium spp (12% and 2%, respectively), ascarids (8% and 8%, respectively), Salmonella spp (2% and 6%, respectively), Cystoisospora spp (2% and 4%, respectively), canine distemper virus (8% and 0%, respectively), Dipylidium caninum (2% and 2%, respectively), canine parvovirus (2% and 2%, respectively), and rotavirus (2% and 0%, respectively). Dogs entered the shelter with a variety of enteropathogens, many of which are pathogenic or zoonotic. Most infections were not associated with diarrhea or any specific dog characteristics, making it difficult to predict the risk of infection for individual animals. Guidelines for preventive measures and empirical treatments that are logistically and financially feasible for use in shelters should be developed for control of the most common and important enteropathogens.

  9. Why do dogs (Canis familiaris) select the empty container in an observational learning task?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupán, Krisztina; Miklósi, Ádám; Gergely, György; Topál, József

    2011-03-01

    Many argue that dogs show unique susceptibility to human communicative signals that make them suitable for being engaged in complex co-operation with humans. It has also been revealed that socially provided information is particularly effective in influencing the behaviour of dogs even when the human's action demonstration conveys inefficient or mistaken solution of task. It is unclear, however, how the communicative nature of the demonstration context and the presence of the human demonstrator affect the dogs' object-choice behaviour in observational learning situations. In order to unfold the effects of these factors, 76 adult pet dogs could observe a communicative or a non-communicative demonstration in which the human retrieved a tennis ball from under an opaque container while manipulating another distant and obviously empty (transparent) one. Subjects were then allowed to choose either in the presence of the demonstrator or after she left the room. Results showed a significant main effect of the demonstration context (presence or absence of the human's communicative signals), and we also found some evidence for the response-modifying effect of the presence of the human demonstrator during the dogs' choice. That is, dogs predominantly chose the baited container, but if the demonstration context was communicative and the human was present during the dogs' choice, subjects' tendency to select the baited container has been reduced. In agreement with the studies showing sensitivity to human's communicative signals in dogs, these findings point to a special form of social influence in observational learning situations when it comes to learning about causally opaque and less efficient (compared to what comes natural to the dog) action demonstrations. © Springer-Verlag 2010

  10. Evaluation of Faecal Salmonella Shedding Among Dogs at Seven Animal Shelters across Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahy, A M; Cummings, K J; Rodriguez-Rivera, L D; Rankin, S C; Hamer, S A

    2016-11-01

    Estimates of prevalence of faecal Salmonella shedding among dogs in the United States have varied widely. Surveillance among shelter dogs has been limited, although dogs in animal shelters may be at elevated risk of Salmonella infection because of their previous exposure history as well as factors inherent to shelter environments. Our objectives were to estimate the prevalence of Salmonella shedding among shelter dogs across Texas, to identify risk factors for shedding and to characterize the isolates. Using a repeated cross-sectional study design, we collected faecal samples from dogs on two or three visits to each of seven Texas animal shelters between May 2013 and December 2014. Standard bacteriologic culture methods were used to isolate Salmonella from samples, and isolates were characterized via serotyping and anti-microbial susceptibility testing. The prevalence of faecal Salmonella shedding among sampled dogs was 4.9% (27/554), and within-shelter prevalence ranged from 1.9% to 8.3%. There was a marginal association (P = 0.09) between watery faecal samples and positive Salmonella status, as estimated by a logistic regression model that controlled for shelter as a random effect. However, over 60% of Salmonella-positive dogs had grossly normal faeces. Salmonella prevalence did not vary significantly by age group or sex. The most common serovars were Newport (22%) and Javiana (15%), both of which were widespread among shelters. Resistance to anti-microbial agents was uncommon. The prevalence of faecal Salmonella shedding among shelter dogs in Texas appears to be comparable to that seen among pet dogs in general. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  11. Familiarity bias and physiological responses in contagious yawning by dogs support link to empathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Romero

    Full Text Available In humans, the susceptibility to yawn contagion has been theoretically and empirically related to our capacity for empathy. Because of its relevance to evolutionary biology, this phenomenon has been the focus of recent investigations in non-human species. In line with the empathic hypothesis, contagious yawning has been shown to correlate with the level of social attachment in several primate species. Domestic dogs (Canis familiaris have also shown the ability to yawn contagiously. To date, however, the social modulation of dog contagious yawning has received contradictory support and alternative explanations (i.e., yawn as a mild distress response could explain positive evidence. The present study aims to replicate contagious yawning in dogs and to discriminate between the two possible mediating mechanisms (i.e., empathic vs. distress related response. Twenty-five dogs observed familiar (dog's owner and unfamiliar human models (experimenter acting out a yawn or control mouth movements. Concurrent physiological measures (heart rate were additionally monitored for twenty-one of the subjects. The occurrence of yawn contagion was significantly higher during the yawning condition than during the control mouth movements. Furthermore, the dogs yawned more frequently when watching the familiar model than the unfamiliar one demonstrating that the contagiousness of yawning in dogs correlated with the level of emotional proximity. Moreover, subjects' heart rate did not differ among conditions suggesting that the phenomenon of contagious yawning in dogs is unrelated to stressful events. Our findings are consistent with the view that contagious yawning is modulated by affective components of the behavior and may indicate that rudimentary forms of empathy could be present in domesticated dogs.

  12. Hypoadrenocorticism in a kindred of Pomeranian dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Erin T; Hammond, Tara N; Mahony, Orla M

    2015-01-01

    Three adult Pomeranian dogs, full siblings from 2 litters, were diagnosed with primary hypoadrenocorticism following onset of hypoadrenal crisis. Review of the family history revealed the dogs' maternal grandmother also had hypoadrenocorticism. All 4 dogs were pedigree-certified by the American Kennel Club. An inherited basis for hypoadrenocorticism is proposed in these Pomeranian dogs.

  13. When You Meet a Dog Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrey, Pauline

    1994-01-01

    Tips are offered for use in an encounter with a dog guide and its blind owner. Tips include approaching the person from the right side, not taking hold of the dog guide's harness, not offering food to the dog guide, and not petting the dog guide without the owner's permission. (JDD)

  14. Nonverbal Communication and Human–Dog Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Iben Helene Coakley; Forkman, Björn

    2014-01-01

    Human–dog interaction relies to a large extent on nonverbal communication, and it is therefore plausible that human sensitivity to nonverbal signals affects interactions between human and dog. Experience with dogs is also likely to influence human–dog interactions, and it has been suggested that ...

  15. Evaluation of risk factors for degenerative joint disease associated with hip dysplasia in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, G K; Popovitch, C A; Gregor, T P; Shofer, F S

    1995-03-01

    Passive coxofemoral joint laxity of dogs, as quantitated by a distraction-stress radiographic method, may have important prognostic value in determining susceptibility to hip dysplasia. Data from 151 dogs, representing 13 breeds, were included in a logistic regression model to evaluate the contribution of factors such as age, breed, weight, sex, distraction index, and Norberg angle to the risk of developing degenerative joint disease (DJD) of the coxofemoral joint. Of the factors studied, the amount of passive hip laxity, as quantitated by the distraction index, was the most significant (P joint. In the longitudinal and cross-sectional components of the study, distraction index was a significant (P hip laxity:DJD correlation increased with the age of dog. In contrast, the Norberg angle, a measure of hip laxity on the standard hip-extended radiograph, was not found to be a significant risk factor for DJD, either in the longitudinal or cross-sectional analyses. Breed-specific probability curves of DJD susceptibility indicated that German Shepherd Dogs had a significantly (P Dogs. The information derived from this statistical model will help to scientifically characterize the role of passive hip laxity as a component in the pathogenesis of DJD of the coxofemoral joint.

  16. Public Perceptions of Service Dogs, Emotional Support Dogs, and Therapy Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Schoenfeld-Tacher

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available As service dogs, emotional support dogs, and therapy dogs have become more prevalent in the USA, so too has the controversy surrounding their legitimacy. Yet, there is a lack of objective data regarding the public’s understanding of the role played by each of these types of animals, as well as their perceptions regarding the legitimacy of their integration. An anonymous, online survey was distributed to examine the perceptions of US adults who do not own any type of assistance animal. A total of 505 individuals responded to the online survey, yielding 284 usable responses. Results suggest widespread misconceptions about definitions, rules, regulations, and rights associated with each type of assistance dog. In general, service dogs are more likely to be perceived as helping with a legitimate need, and their access to public spaces is viewed favorably. While there are some concerns about the legitimacy and necessary access rights for emotional support dogs, members of the public correctly identified the roles and rights of therapy dogs. Despite the media’s focus on abuses and false representation of these dogs, most participants reported feeling the majority of people are not taking advantage of the system.

  17. Public Perceptions of Service Dogs, Emotional Support Dogs, and Therapy Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld-Tacher, Regina; Hellyer, Peter; Cheung, Louana; Kogan, Lori

    2017-06-15

    As service dogs, emotional support dogs, and therapy dogs have become more prevalent in the USA, so too has the controversy surrounding their legitimacy. Yet, there is a lack of objective data regarding the public's understanding of the role played by each of these types of animals, as well as their perceptions regarding the legitimacy of their integration. An anonymous, online survey was distributed to examine the perceptions of US adults who do not own any type of assistance animal. A total of 505 individuals responded to the online survey, yielding 284 usable responses. Results suggest widespread misconceptions about definitions, rules, regulations, and rights associated with each type of assistance dog. In general, service dogs are more likely to be perceived as helping with a legitimate need, and their access to public spaces is viewed favorably. While there are some concerns about the legitimacy and necessary access rights for emotional support dogs, members of the public correctly identified the roles and rights of therapy dogs. Despite the media's focus on abuses and false representation of these dogs, most participants reported feeling the majority of people are not taking advantage of the system.

  18. Rotary slot dog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutburth, Ronald W.; Smauley, David A.

    1987-01-01

    A clamp or dog is disclosed which preferably comprises a slotted stepped cylindrical body which is inserted into a hole in a workpiece and then fastened to a base or fixture using a screw which is inserted through the slot. The stepped configuration provides an annular clamping surface which securely clamps the workpiece against the base or fixture. The slotted cylindrical configuration permits adjustment of the workpiece and retaining clamp in any direction, i.e., over 360.degree., relative to the mounting position of the screw in the base or fixture.

  19. Volvulus of the colon in four dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Adrienne M; O'Toole, Therese E; Kowaleski, Michael P; Casale, Sue A; McCarthy, Robert J

    2005-07-15

    Four dogs were examined because of vomiting of 7 to 48 hours' duration. Gas-distended segments of intestine were identified radiographically in all dogs, but the affected portion of the intestinal tract could not always be identified as the colon. Volvulus of the colon was diagnosed during surgery in all 4 dogs. Gastrocolopexy was performed following derotation of the colon in 3 of the dogs. In 1 dog, a colectomy and an ileorectal anastomosis were performed. All 4 dogs survived. Volvulus of the colon should be considered as a cause of vomiting of short duration in dogs for which there is radiographic evidence of intestinal dilatation.

  20. Complex population structure in African village dogs and its implications for inferring dog domestication history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyko, Adam R; Boyko, Ryan H; Boyko, Corin M; Parker, Heidi G; Castelhano, Marta; Corey, Liz; Degenhardt, Jeremiah D; Auton, Adam; Hedimbi, Marius; Kityo, Robert; Ostrander, Elaine A; Schoenebeck, Jeffrey; Todhunter, Rory J; Jones, Paul; Bustamante, Carlos D

    2009-08-18

    High genetic diversity of East Asian village dogs has recently been used to argue for an East Asian origin of the domestic dog. However, global village dog genetic diversity and the extent to which semiferal village dogs represent distinct, indigenous populations instead of admixtures of various dog breeds has not been quantified. Understanding these issues is critical to properly reconstructing the timing, number, and locations of dog domestication. To address these questions, we sampled 318 village dogs from 7 regions in Egypt, Uganda, and Namibia, measuring genetic diversity >680 bp of the mitochondrial D-loop, 300 SNPs, and 89 microsatellite markers. We also analyzed breed dogs, including putatively African breeds (Afghan hounds, Basenjis, Pharaoh hounds, Rhodesian ridgebacks, and Salukis), Puerto Rican street dogs, and mixed breed dogs from the United States. Village dogs from most African regions appear genetically distinct from non-native breed and mixed-breed dogs, although some individuals cluster genetically with Puerto Rican dogs or United States breed mixes instead of with neighboring village dogs. Thus, African village dogs are a mosaic of indigenous dogs descended from early migrants to Africa, and non-native, breed-admixed individuals. Among putatively African breeds, Pharaoh hounds, and Rhodesian ridgebacks clustered with non-native rather than indigenous African dogs, suggesting they have predominantly non-African origins. Surprisingly, we find similar mtDNA haplotype diversity in African and East Asian village dogs, potentially calling into question the hypothesis of an East Asian origin for dog domestication.

  1. Relationship Between Scarring and Dog Aggression in Pit Bull-Type Dogs Involved in Organized Dogfighting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Katherine A; Touroo, Rachel; Spain, C Victor; Jones, Kelly; Reid, Pamela; Lockwood, Randall

    2016-11-15

    When pit bull-type dogs are seized in an investigation of organized dogfighting, heavily scarred dogs are often assumed to be highly dog aggressive due to a history of fighting. These dogs may be deemed dangerous and euthanized based on scarring alone. We analyzed our existing data on dogs seized from four dogfighting investigations, examining the relationship between the dogs' scars with aggression towards other dogs. Scar and wound data were tallied in three body zones where dogfighting injuries tend to be concentrated. Dog aggression was assessed using a model dog and a friendly stimulus dog in a standardized behavior evaluation. Scarring and dog aggression were significantly related, more strongly among male (Fisher's Exact p < 0.001) than female dogs (Fisher's Exact p = 0.05). Ten or more scars in the three body zones was a reasonable threshold with which to classify a dog as high risk for dog aggression: 82% of males and 60% of females with such scarring displayed dog aggression. However, because many unscarred dogs were dog aggressive while some highly scarred dogs were not, we recommend collecting behavioral information to supplement scar counts when making disposition decisions about dogs seized in dogfighting investigations.

  2. Genetic Susceptibility to Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanja Kovacic

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a complex multifocal arterial disease involving interactions of multiple genetic and environmental factors. Advances in techniques of molecular genetics have revealed that genetic ground significantly influences susceptibility to atherosclerotic vascular diseases. Besides further investigations of monogenetic diseases, candidate genes, genetic polymorphisms, and susceptibility loci associated with atherosclerotic diseases have been identified in recent years, and their number is rapidly increasing. This paper discusses main genetic investigations fields associated with human atherosclerotic vascular diseases. The paper concludes with a discussion of the directions and implications of future genetic research in arteriosclerosis with an emphasis on prospective prediction from an early age of individuals who are predisposed to develop premature atherosclerosis as well as to facilitate the discovery of novel drug targets.

  3. Stray dog meat consumption and rebies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sir, the recent report on “stray dog trade, dog meat consumption and rabies” is very interesting [1]. Ekanem et al. noted that “: stray dog trade, fuelled by eating of dog meat, is a risk factor for human and animal rabies in Calabar, southern Nigeria [1].” In fact, eating of dog meat is not a usual way that rabies can be transmitted ...

  4. Rabies Vaccination Targets for Stray Dog Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Tiffany; Davis, Stephen A.

    2017-01-01

    The role of stray dogs in the persistence of domestic dog rabies, and whether removal of such dogs is beneficial, remains contentious issues for control programs seeking to eliminate rabies. While a community might reach the WHO vaccination target of 70% for dogs that can be handled, the stray or neighborhood dogs that are too wary of humans to be held are a more problematic population to vaccinate. Here, we present a method to estimate vaccination targets for stray dogs when the dog population is made up of stray, free-roaming, and confined dogs, where the latter two types are considered to have an identifiable owner. The control effort required for stray dogs is determined by the type-reproduction number, T1, the number of stray dogs infected by one rabid stray dog either directly or via any chain of infection involving owned dogs. Like the basic reproduction number R0 for single host populations, T1 determines the vaccination effort required to control the spread of disease when control is targeted at one host type, and there is a mix of host types. The application of T1 to rabies in mixed populations of stray and owned dogs is novel. We show that the outcome is sensitive to the vaccination coverage in the owned dog population, such that if vaccination rates of owned dogs were too low then no control effort targeting stray dogs is able to control or eliminate rabies. The required vaccination level also depends on the composition of the dog population, where a high proportion of either stray or free-roaming dogs implies unrealistically high vaccination levels are required to prevent rabies. We find that the required control effort is less sensitive to continuous culling that increases the death rate of stray dogs than to changes in the carrying capacity of the stray dog population. PMID:28451589

  5. Social rearing environment influences dog behavioral development

    OpenAIRE

    Harvey, Naomi D.; Craigon, Peter J.; Blythe, Simon A.; England, Gary C.W.; Asher, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    Early life experiences are known to influence behavior later in life. In dogs, environmental influences of early home rearing could be exploited to improve the chances of developing adult behavior most suited to the adult environment. For working dog organizations, such as Guide Dogs, suitable adult behavior is important to ensure that dogs can fulfill their role as guides for people with visual impairment. Here, we test the hypothesis that dogs' home rearing environment will influence behavi...

  6. Special requirements canistherapeutic dog during his training

    OpenAIRE

    WEISSOVÁ, Denisa

    2013-01-01

    The thesis is focused on the process of training of a dog, with subsequent completion of canistherapeutic exam, and deployment of the dog to his duties. Since the dawn of man, dogs helped man with various tasks. As the knowledge of dogs progressed, there were attempts to employ it for therapeutic purposes. Dogs began to take on their function as assistants to handicapped patients. With this function, the universal method of canistheraupetic training began to be implemented. The basis of this ...

  7. Marijuana Usage and Hypnotic Susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzini, Louis R.; McDonald, Roy D.

    1973-01-01

    Anonymous self-reported drug usage data and hypnotic susceptibility scores were obtained from 282 college students. Frequent marijuana users (more than 10 times) showed greater susceptibility to hypnosis than nonusers. (Author)

  8. "She's a dog at the end of the day": Guide dog owners' perspectives on the behaviour of their guide dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craigon, Peter J; Hobson-West, Pru; England, Gary C W; Whelan, Chantelle; Lethbridge, Emma; Asher, Lucy

    2017-01-01

    A guide dog is a domestic dog (Canis familiaris) that is specifically educated to provide mobility support to a blind or visually impaired owner. Current dog suitability assessments focus on behavioural traits, including: trainability, reactivity or attention to environmental stimuli, low aggressiveness, fearfulness and stress behaviour, energy levels, and attachment behaviour. The aim of this study was to find out which aspects of guide dog behaviour are of key importance to guide dog owners themselves. Sixty-three semi-structured interview surveys were carried out with guide dog owners. Topics included the behaviour of their guide dog both within and outside their working role, and also focused on examples of behaviour which might be considered outside a guide dog owner's typical expectations. Both positive and negative examples and situations were covered. This allowed for the discovery of new perspectives and emerging themes on living and working with a guide dog. Thematic analysis of the results reveals that a dog's safe behaviour in the face of traffic was the most important positive aspect of a guide dog's behaviour and pulling or high tension on the lead and /or harness was the most discussed negative aspect. Other aspects of guide dog behaviour were highlighted as particularly pleasing or disappointing by owners including attentiveness to the task, work, environment and owner; confidence in work and decision making (with confident dogs resulting in confident owners) obedience and control; calmness and locating objectives. The results reveal important areas of behaviour that are not currently considered priorities in guide dog assessments; these key areas were consistency of behaviour, the dog's maturity and the dog's behaviour in relation to children. The survey revealed a large range in what owners considered problematic or pleasing behaviours and this highlights the heterogeneity in guide dog owners and the potential multifarious roles of the guide dog

  9. "She's a dog at the end of the day": Guide dog owners' perspectives on the behaviour of their guide dog.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J Craigon

    Full Text Available A guide dog is a domestic dog (Canis familiaris that is specifically educated to provide mobility support to a blind or visually impaired owner. Current dog suitability assessments focus on behavioural traits, including: trainability, reactivity or attention to environmental stimuli, low aggressiveness, fearfulness and stress behaviour, energy levels, and attachment behaviour. The aim of this study was to find out which aspects of guide dog behaviour are of key importance to guide dog owners themselves. Sixty-three semi-structured interview surveys were carried out with guide dog owners. Topics included the behaviour of their guide dog both within and outside their working role, and also focused on examples of behaviour which might be considered outside a guide dog owner's typical expectations. Both positive and negative examples and situations were covered. This allowed for the discovery of new perspectives and emerging themes on living and working with a guide dog. Thematic analysis of the results reveals that a dog's safe behaviour in the face of traffic was the most important positive aspect of a guide dog's behaviour and pulling or high tension on the lead and /or harness was the most discussed negative aspect. Other aspects of guide dog behaviour were highlighted as particularly pleasing or disappointing by owners including attentiveness to the task, work, environment and owner; confidence in work and decision making (with confident dogs resulting in confident owners obedience and control; calmness and locating objectives. The results reveal important areas of behaviour that are not currently considered priorities in guide dog assessments; these key areas were consistency of behaviour, the dog's maturity and the dog's behaviour in relation to children. The survey revealed a large range in what owners considered problematic or pleasing behaviours and this highlights the heterogeneity in guide dog owners and the potential multifarious roles

  10. Inherited polyneuropathy in Leonberger dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultin Jäderlund, K; Baranowska Körberg, I; Nødtvedt, A

    2011-01-01

    Although reporting the same clinical phenotype, inherited polyneuropathy in Leonberger dogs (ILPN) has been attributed to various modes of inheritance. The ILPN is one disease with a major risk factor on chromosome X. Dogs affected by ILPN (n = 104). Pedigree analyses were performed by means of a case-control approach. Data were retrieved either from medical records of cases diagnosed by the first author (n = 13), from breeders (n = 18) or from different registries publishing data on affected dogs (n = 73). A comparison was made between the X-chromosome ancestry of fathers of affected male dogs and the ancestry of the X-chromosomes of mothers of affected dogs of either sex. A systematic random sample, obtained from an international database of registered Leonberger dogs, served as a reference population regarding ancestry. Having one particular female, born 1943, in the X-chromosomal lineage is a major risk factor for developing ILPN. Sex distribution among affected dogs is in favor of a risk factor on the X-chromosome and contradicts a monogenic autosomal or mitochondrial inheritance. The ILPN is considered most likely to be one disease, and the inheritance of ILPN is best explained by an underlying X-linked mode of transmission for the phenotype. However, age at onset and severity of signs might be determined by contributing loci. This has consequences in molecular genetic studies and for breeding strategies aimed at eliminating this disease. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  11. Evolutionary genomics of dog domestication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne, Robert K; vonHoldt, Bridgett M

    2012-02-01

    We review the underlying principles and tools used in genomic studies of domestic dogs aimed at understanding the genetic changes that have occurred during domestication. We show that there are two principle modes of evolution within dogs. One primary mode that accounts for much of the remarkable diversity of dog breeds is the fixation of discrete mutations of large effect in individual lineages that are then crossed to various breed groupings. This transfer of mutations across the dog evolutionary tree leads to the appearance of high phenotypic diversity that in actuality reflects a small number of major genes. A second mechanism causing diversification involves the selective breeding of dogs within distinct phenotypic or functional groups, which enhances specific group attributes such as heading or tracking. Such progressive selection leads to a distinct genetic structure in evolutionary trees such that functional and phenotypic groups cluster genetically. We trace the origin of the nuclear genome in dogs based on haplotype-sharing analyses between dogs and gray wolves and show that contrary to previous mtDNA analyses, the nuclear genome of dogs derives primarily from Middle Eastern or European wolves, a result more consistent with the archeological record. Sequencing analysis of the IGF1 gene, which has been the target of size selection in small breeds, further supports this conclusion. Finally, we discuss how a black coat color mutation that evolved in dogs has transformed North American gray wolf populations, providing a first example of a mutation that appeared under domestication and selectively swept through a wild relative.

  12. Flea abundance on black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) increases during plague epizootics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripp, Daniel W; Gage, Kenneth L; Montenieri, John A; Antolin, Michael F

    2009-06-01

    Black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) on the Great Plains of the United States are highly susceptible to plague, caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis, with mortality on towns during plague epizootics often approaching 100%. The ability of flea-borne transmission to sustain disease spread has been questioned because of inefficiency of flea vectors. However, even with low individual efficiency, overall transmission can be increased if flea abundance (the number of fleas on hosts) increases. Changes in flea abundance on hosts during plague outbreaks were recorded during a large-scale study of plague outbreaks in prairie dogs in north central Colorado during 3 years (2004-2007). Fleas were collected from live-trapped black-tailed prairie dogs before and during plague epizootics and tested by PCR for the presence of Y. pestis. The predominant fleas were two prairie dog specialists (Oropsylla hirsuta and Oropsylla tuberculata cynomuris), and a generalist flea species (Pulex simulans) was also recorded from numerous mammals in the area. The three species differ in seasonal abundance, with greatest abundance in spring (February and March) and fall (September and October). Flea abundance and infestation intensity increased during epizootics and were highest on prairie dogs with Y. pestis-infected fleas. Seasonal occurrence of epizootics among black-tailed prairie dogs was found to coincide with seasonal peaks in flea abundance. Concentration of infected fleas on surviving animals may account for rapid spread of plague during epizootics. In particular, the role of the generalist flea P. simulans was previously underappreciated.

  13. A plague epizootic in the black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauli, Jonathan N; Buskirk, Steven W; Williams, Elizabeth S; Edwards, William H

    2006-01-01

    Plague is the primary cause for the rangewide decline in prairie dog (Cynomys spp.) distribution and abundance, yet our knowledge of plague dynamics in prairie dog populations is limited. Our understanding of the effects of plague on the most widespread species, the black-tailed prairie dog (C. ludovicianus), is particularly weak. During a study on the population biology of black-tailed prairie dogs in Wyoming, USA, plague was detected in a colony under intensive monitoring, providing a unique opportunity to quantify various consequences of plague. The epizootic reduced juvenile abundance by 96% and adult abundance by 95%. Of the survivors, eight of nine adults and one of eight juveniles developed antibodies to Yersinia pestis. Demographic groups appeared equally susceptible to infection, and age structure was unaffected. Survivors occupied three small coteries and exhibited improved body condition, but increased flea infestation compared to a neighboring, uninfected colony. Black-tailed prairie dogs are capable of surviving a plague epizootic and reorganizing into apparently functional coteries. Surviving prairie dogs may be critical in the repopulation of plague-decimated colonies and, ultimately, the evolution of plague resistance.

  14. Relationship Between Scarring and Dog Aggression in Pit Bull-Type Dogs Involved in Organized Dogfighting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A. Miller

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available When pit bull-type dogs are seized in an investigation of organized dogfighting, heavily scarred dogs are often assumed to be highly dog aggressive due to a history of fighting. These dogs may be deemed dangerous and euthanized based on scarring alone. We analyzed our existing data on dogs seized from four dogfighting investigations, examining the relationship between the dogs’ scars with aggression towards other dogs. Scar and wound data were tallied in three body zones where dogfighting injuries tend to be concentrated. Dog aggression was assessed using a model dog and a friendly stimulus dog in a standardized behavior evaluation. Scarring and dog aggression were significantly related, more strongly among male (Fisher’s Exact p < 0.001 than female dogs (Fisher’s Exact p = 0.05. Ten or more scars in the three body zones was a reasonable threshold with which to classify a dog as high risk for dog aggression: 82% of males and 60% of females with such scarring displayed dog aggression. However, because many unscarred dogs were dog aggressive while some highly scarred dogs were not, we recommend collecting behavioral information to supplement scar counts when making disposition decisions about dogs seized in dogfighting investigations.

  15. Structural and molecular basis of the peroxynitrite-mediated nitration and inactivation of Trypanosoma cruzi iron-superoxide dismutases (Fe-SODs) A and B: disparate susceptibilities due to the repair of Tyr35 radical by Cys83 in Fe-SODB through intramolecular electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Alejandra; Peluffo, Gonzalo; Petruk, Ariel A; Hugo, Martín; Piñeyro, Dolores; Demicheli, Verónica; Moreno, Diego M; Lima, Analía; Batthyány, Carlos; Durán, Rosario; Robello, Carlos; Martí, Marcelo A; Larrieux, Nicole; Buschiazzo, Alejandro; Trujillo, Madia; Radi, Rafael; Piacenza, Lucía

    2014-05-02

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, contains exclusively iron-dependent superoxide dismutases (Fe-SODs) located in different subcellular compartments. Peroxynitrite, a key cytotoxic and oxidizing effector biomolecule, reacted with T. cruzi mitochondrial (Fe-SODA) and cytosolic (Fe-SODB) SODs with second order rate constants of 4.6 ± 0.2 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) and 4.3 ± 0.4 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) at pH 7.4 and 37 °C, respectively. Both isoforms are dose-dependently nitrated and inactivated by peroxynitrite. Susceptibility of T. cruzi Fe-SODA toward peroxynitrite was similar to that reported previously for Escherichia coli Mn- and Fe-SODs and mammalian Mn-SOD, whereas Fe-SODB was exceptionally resistant to oxidant-mediated inactivation. We report mass spectrometry analysis indicating that peroxynitrite-mediated inactivation of T. cruzi Fe-SODs is due to the site-specific nitration of the critical and universally conserved Tyr(35). Searching for structural differences, the crystal structure of Fe-SODA was solved at 2.2 Å resolution. Structural analysis comparing both Fe-SOD isoforms reveals differences in key cysteines and tryptophan residues. Thiol alkylation of Fe-SODB cysteines made the enzyme more susceptible to peroxynitrite. In particular, Cys(83) mutation (C83S, absent in Fe-SODA) increased the Fe-SODB sensitivity toward peroxynitrite. Molecular dynamics, electron paramagnetic resonance, and immunospin trapping analysis revealed that Cys(83) present in Fe-SODB acts as an electron donor that repairs Tyr(35) radical via intramolecular electron transfer, preventing peroxynitrite-dependent nitration and consequent inactivation of Fe-SODB. Parasites exposed to exogenous or endogenous sources of peroxynitrite resulted in nitration and inactivation of Fe-SODA but not Fe-SODB, suggesting that these enzymes play distinctive biological roles during parasite infection of mammalian cells.

  16. Assessment of an optimized dog-culling program in the dynamics of canine Leishmania transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Edson Duarte; Mendes de Souza, Verena Maria; Sreenivasan, Meera; Nascimento, Eliane Góes; Pontes de Carvalho, Lain

    2004-08-06

    In Brazil, zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis (ZVL) control programs based on the mass elimination of seropositive dogs have failed to reduce the number of leishmaniasis cases. However, these programs have been done under sub-optimal conditions. We studied a cohort of dogs in an urban area in Brazil to determine, whether a dog-culling program optimized with: (i) replacement of a relatively low-sensitivity indirect immune-fluorescent test on blood eluate by a more sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay on serum blood samples; (ii) shortening of the time interval from serodiagnosis to removal of dogs; (iii) screening a high proportion of the dog population could reduce the incidence of canine Leishmania infection (CLI). The study ran from December 1997 to July 2000, with four follow-up assessments performed at approximately 8-month intervals. All dogs seropositive for anti-Leishmania antibodies were promptly eliminated. A large number of new dogs immigrated to the study area throughout the study period. They comprised 43.8-49.8% of the cohort at each follow-up assessment, and upto 15% of them already had Leishmania infection. Overall, 42 news cases of CLI were identified, for a crude incidence rate of 11.8 cases per 100 dog-years (95% CI 8.6-15.6). In the first, second, third and fourth follow-up assessments the incidence rates were 8.2 (95% CI 3.0-17.9), 12.2 (95% CI 6.3-21.2), 16.4 (95% CI 8.5-28.6) and 13.6 (95% CI 7.1-23.8), respectively. There was no statistically significant change in these rates throughout the study period. Our results suggest that dog-culling programs do not reduce the incidence of CLI, even with an optimized intervention. Possible reasons for this failure include: currently available serologic methods lack sufficient sensitivity and/or specificity to accurately identify all infected dogs warranting removal in order to prevent Leishmania transmission; destroyed dogs are immediately replaced by susceptible puppies, and quite often, by

  17. A survey of risk factors for digit injuries among dogs training and competing in agility events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellon, Debra C; Martucci, Katherine; Wenz, John R; Marcellin-Little, Denis J; Powers, Michelle; Cullen, Kimberley L

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify potential risk factors for digit injuries in dogs training and competing in agility events. DESIGN Internet-based, retrospective, cross-sectional survey. ANIMALS 1,081 dogs training or competing in agility events. PROCEDURES Data were collected for eligible animals via retrospective surveys distributed electronically to handlers of dogs participating in agility-related activities. Variables evaluated included demographic (handlers) and signalment (dogs) information, physical characteristics of dogs, and injury characteristics. A separate survey of dogs competing in similar agility-related activities but without digit injuries was also administered. Multivariable logistic regression was used to develop a model for assessment of risk factors. RESULTS Data were collected from 207 agility dogs with digit injuries and 874 agility dogs without digit injuries. Factors associated with significantly increased odds of injury included Border Collie breed (OR, 2.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.5 to 3.3), long nails (OR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.3 to 4.5), absence of front dewclaws (OR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.3 to 2.6), and greater weight-to-height ratio (OR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.1 to 2.0). Odds of injury decreased with increasing age of the dog (OR, 0.8; 95% CI, 0.76 to 0.86). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results should be cautiously interpreted because of potential respondent and recall bias and lack of review of medical records. Nevertheless, results suggested that retaining healthy dewclaws, maintaining lean body mass, and trimming nails short for training and competition may decrease the likelihood of digit injuries. Research to investigate training practices, obstacle construction specifcations, and surface considerations for dogs competing in agility activities is indicated.

  18. Factors associated with anesthetic-related death in dogs and cats in primary care veterinary hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Nora S; Mohn, Thomas J; Yang, Mingyin; Spofford, Nathaniel; Marsh, Alison; Faunt, Karen; Lund, Elizabeth M; Lefebvre, Sandra L

    2017-03-15

    OBJECTIVE To identify risk factors for anesthetic-related death in pet dogs and cats. DESIGN Matched case-control study. ANIMALS 237 dogs and 181 cats. PROCEDURES Electronic medical records from 822 hospitals were examined to identify dogs and cats that underwent general anesthesia (including sedation) or sedation alone and had death attributable to the anesthetic episode ≤ 7 days later (case animals; 115 dogs and 89 cats) or survived > 7 days afterward (control animals [matched by species and hospital]; 122 dogs and 92 cats). Information on patient characteristics and data related to the anesthesia session were extracted. Conditional multivariable logistic regression was performed to identify factors associated with anesthetic-related death for each species. RESULTS The anesthetic-related death rate was higher for cats (11/10,000 anesthetic episodes [0.11%]) than for dogs (5/10,000 anesthetic episodes [0.05%]). Increasing age was associated with increased odds of death for both species, as was undergoing nonelective (vs elective) procedures. Odds of death for dogs were significantly greater when preanesthetic physical examination results were not recorded (vs recorded) or when preanesthetic Hct was outside (vs within) the reference range. Odds of death for cats were greater when intra-anesthesia records for oxygen saturation as measured by pulse oximetry were absent. Underweight dogs had almost 15 times the odds of death as nonunderweight dogs; for cats, odds of death increased with increasing body weight (but not with overweight body condition). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Several factors were associated with anesthetic-related death in cats and dogs. This information may be useful for development of strategies to reduce anesthetic-related risks when possible and for education of pet owners about anesthetic risks.

  19. Public Perceptions of Service Dogs, Emotional Support Dogs, and Therapy Dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Regina Schoenfeld-Tacher; Peter Hellyer; Louana Cheung; Lori Kogan

    2017-01-01

    As service dogs, emotional support dogs, and therapy dogs have become more prevalent in the USA, so too has the controversy surrounding their legitimacy. Yet, there is a lack of objective data regarding the public’s understanding of the role played by each of these types of animals, as well as their perceptions regarding the legitimacy of their integration. An anonymous, online survey was distributed to examine the perceptions of US adults who do not own any type of assistance animal. A total...

  20. Cranial mediastinal carcinomas in nine dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liptak, J M; Kamstock, D A; Dernell, W S; Ehrhart, E J; Rizzo, S A; Withrow, S J

    2008-03-01

    Nine dogs were diagnosed with cranial mediastinal carcinomas. Based on histological and immunohistochemical analysis, four dogs were diagnosed with ectopic follicular cell thyroid carcinomas, one dog with ectopic medullary cell thyroid carcinoma, two dogs with neuroendocrine carcinomas and two dogs with anaplastic carcinomas. Clinical signs and physical examination findings were associated with a space-occupying mass, although one dog was diagnosed with functional hyperthyroidism. Surgical resection was attempted in eight dogs. The cranial mediastinal mass was invasive either into the heart or into the cranial vena cava in three dogs. Resection was complete in six dogs and unresectable in two dogs. All dogs survived surgery, but four dogs developed pulmonary thromboembolism and two dogs died of respiratory complications postoperatively. Adjunctive therapies included pre-operative radiation therapy (n=1) and postoperative chemotherapy (n=3). Three dogs had metastasis at the time of diagnosis, but none developed metastasis following surgery. The overall median survival time was 243 days. Local invasion, pleural effusion and metastasis did not have a negative impact on survival time in this small case series.

  1. Primary nodal hemangiosarcoma in four dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Catherine M; Zwahlen, Courtney H; de Lorimier, Louis-Philippe; Yeomans, Stephen M; Hoffmann, Karon L; Moore, Antony S

    2016-11-01

    CASE DESCRIPTION 4 dogs with a slow-growing mass in the cervical region were evaluated. CLINICAL FINDINGS All dogs had no clinical signs at the time of the evaluation. There was no apparent evidence of visceral metastases or other primary tumor based on available CT or MRI data for any dog. TREATMENT AND OUTCOME For each dog, surgery to remove the mass was performed. Histologic examination of the excised tissue revealed a completely excised grade 1 or 2 lymph node hemangiosarcoma. All dogs received adjuvant chemotherapy; 2 dogs underwent curative intent chemotherapy, 1 dog underwent metronomic treatment with cyclophosphamide, and 1 dog underwent metronomic treatment with chlorambucil. The survival time was 259 days in 1 dog; 3 dogs were still alive 615, 399, and 365 days after surgery. CLINICAL RELEVANCE Primary nodal hemangiosarcoma in dogs is a rare and, to the authors' knowledge, previously undescribed disease that appears to develop in the cervical lymph nodes as a slow-growing mass or masses. Surgical excision and adjunct treatment resulted in long survival times for 3 of the 4 dogs of the present report. Given the aggressive biologic behavior of hemangiosarcomas in other body locations, adjunct chemotherapy should be considered for affected dogs, although its role in the cases described in this report was unclear. Additional clinical information is required to further characterize the biologic behavior of this tumor type and determine the expected survival times and associated risk factors in dogs.

  2. Degenerative lumbosacral stenosis in dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suwankong, N.

    2007-01-01

    Degenerative lumbosacral stenosis (DLS) is now recognized as a significant cause of caudal lumbar pain and pelvic limb lameness in dogs. The condition includes lumbosacral intervertebral disc degeneration and protrusion, spondylosis deformans, sclerosis of the vertebral end plates, osteoarthrosis of

  3. Disease Precautions for Dog Walkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... somewhat familiar. But, did you know that some plants (e.g. foxglove, cycad palms, yews, and many more), certain algae, and even pennies are toxic to dogs? You don’t need to be a toxicologist ...

  4. Feed the dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Gry Høngsmark; Bajde, Domen

    2016-01-01

    MedieKultur | Journal of media and communication research | ISSN 1901-9726Article – Open sectionPublished by SMID | Society of Media researchers In Denmark | www.smid.dkTh e online version of this text can be found open access at www.mediekultur.dk196Feed the dogsA case of humanitarian...... in unpredictable ways and demonstrate the breakdown between sender and receiver positions. Th e case shows how communicative practices are challenged and how humanitarian organizations are destabilized in a new and unpredictable commu-nication environment. Using mediatization theory, we outline four aspects...... communication in social mediaGry Høngsmark Knudsen and Domen BajdeAbstractIn this paper, we address negative aspects of the interplay between networked media and humanitarian communication through the lens of mediatization theory. We analyze a case of humanitarian communication that travelled through Facebook...

  5. Fear and aggression in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzunova Krasimira

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In this review, the concepts of fear, phobia and aggression in dogs were precisely defined, as well as their underlying causes. The behavioural activities specific for these conditions were indicated. The accompanying symptoms were consistently explained. The causes that the development of pathological fear leads to aggression in dogs as well as the ex various therapy options depending on the clinical signs were presented.

  6. Why do adult dogs 'play'?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, John W S; Pullen, Anne J; Rooney, Nicola J

    2015-01-01

    Among the Carnivora, play behaviour is usually made up of motor patterns characteristic of predatory, agonistic and courtship behaviour. Domestic dogs are unusual in that play is routinely performed by adults, both socially, with conspecifics and with humans, and also asocially, with objects. This enhanced playfulness is commonly thought to be a side effect of paedomorphosis, the perpetuation of juvenile traits into adulthood, but here we suggest that the functions of the different types of play are sufficiently distinct that they are unlikely to have arisen through a single evolutionary mechanism. Solitary play with objects appears to be derived from predatory behaviour: preferred toys are those that can be dismembered, and a complex habituation-like feedback system inhibits play with objects that are resistant to alteration. Intraspecific social play is structurally different from interspecific play and may therefore be motivationally distinct and serve different goals; for example, dogs often compete over objects when playing with other dogs, but are usually more cooperative when the play partner is human. The majority of dogs do not seem to regard competitive games played with a human partner as "dominance" contests: rather, winning possession of objects during games appears to be simply rewarding. Play may be an important factor in sociality, since dogs are capable of extracting social information not only from games in which they participate, but also from games that they observe between third parties. We suggest that the domestic dog's characteristic playfulness in social contexts is an adaptive trait, selected during domestication to facilitate both training for specific purposes, and the formation of emotionally-based bonds between dog and owner. Play frequency and form may therefore be an indicator of the quality of dog-owner relationships. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Swiss legislation on dog ownership

    CERN Multimedia

    DSU Department

    2008-01-01

    The Swiss Permanent Mission in Geneva has requested CERN to inform the members of its personnel that a notice relating to Swiss legislation on dog ownership has been published on-line at the following address: http://www.eda.admin.ch/eda/en/home/topics/intorg/un/unge/gepri/pet.html This legislation is applicable to all international civil servants who own a dog. Relations with the Host States Service mailto:relations.secretariat@cern.ch http://www.cern.ch/relations/

  8. Spontaneous ischaemic stroke in dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gredal, Hanne Birgit; Skerritt, G. C.; Gideon, P.

    2013-01-01

    Translation of experimental stroke research into the clinical setting is often unsuccessful. Novel approaches are therefore desirable. As humans, pet dogs suffer from spontaneous ischaemic stroke and may hence offer new ways of studying genuine stroke injury mechanisms.......Translation of experimental stroke research into the clinical setting is often unsuccessful. Novel approaches are therefore desirable. As humans, pet dogs suffer from spontaneous ischaemic stroke and may hence offer new ways of studying genuine stroke injury mechanisms....

  9. Antimicrobial resistance in methicillin susceptible and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius of canine origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moodley, Arshnee; Damborg, Peter Panduro; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus pseudintermedius is a commensal and a common opportunistic pathogen causing mainly infections of the integumentary system in dogs. The recent emergence of multidrug-resistant S. pseudintermedius isolates, in particular methicillin-resistant strains (MRSP) is a threat to small animal...... health and highlights the need for antimicrobial resistance surveillance to detect trends and potentially perform timeous interventions. We systematically reviewed 202 published articles to investigate temporal changes in antimicrobial resistance in clinical and commensal S. pseudintermedius isolated...... from dogs in 27 countries between 1980 and 2013. Resistance to the most common antimicrobials tested for in published studies and important for the treatment of staphylococcal infections in dogs were assessed separately for methicillin resistant (MRSP) and methicillin susceptible (MSSP) isolates...

  10. Does the A-not-B error in adult pet dogs indicate sensitivity to human communication?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kis, Anna; Topál, József; Gácsi, Márta; Range, Friederike; Huber, Ludwig; Miklósi, Adám; Virányi, Zsófia

    2012-07-01

    Recent dog-infant comparisons have indicated that the experimenter's communicative signals in object hide-and-search tasks increase the probability of perseverative (A-not-B) errors in both species (Topál et al. 2009). These behaviourally similar results, however, might reflect different mechanisms in dogs and in children. Similar errors may occur if the motor response of retrieving the object during the A trials cannot be inhibited in the B trials or if the experimenter's movements and signals toward the A hiding place in the B trials ('sham-baiting') distract the dogs' attention. In order to test these hypotheses, we tested dogs similarly to Topál et al. (2009) but eliminated the motor search in the A trials and 'sham-baiting' in the B trials. We found that neither an inability to inhibit previously rewarded motor response nor insufficiencies in their working memory and/or attention skills can explain dogs' erroneous choices. Further, we replicated the finding that dogs have a strong tendency to commit the A-not-B error after ostensive-communicative hiding and demonstrated the crucial effect of socio-communicative cues as the A-not-B error diminishes when location B is ostensively enhanced. These findings further support the hypothesis that the dogs' A-not-B error may reflect a special sensitivity to human communicative cues. Such object-hiding and search tasks provide a typical case for how susceptibility to human social signals could (mis)lead domestic dogs.

  11. Extramedullary spinal cysts in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowrie, Mark L; Platt, Simon R; Garosi, Laurent S

    2014-08-01

    To (1) synthesize the terminology used to classify extramedullary spinal cysts in dogs to clarify some of the commonly reported misconceptions, and (2) propose a classification scheme to limit confusion with terminology. Literature review. An online bibliographic search was performed in January 2013 for articles relating to extramedullary spinal cysts in dogs using PubMed (http://www.pubmed.gov/) and Google Scholar (http://scholar.google.com/) databases. Only peer-reviewed clinical literature describing cystic lesions pertaining to the spinal cord and associated structures was included. From 1962 to 2013, 42 articles were identified; 25 (95 dogs) reported meningeal cysts, 10 (24 dogs) described 60 extradural cysts, 3 reports (18 dogs) described discal cysts or acute compressive hydrated nucleus pulposus extrusions (HNPE). Spinal cysts were categorized by location based on cross-sectional imaging as meningeal or extradural non-meningeal. Sub-classification was then performed based on surgical findings and pathology. Meningeal cysts included arachnoid diverticulae and Tarlov (perineural) cysts. Extradural non-meningeal cysts included intraspinal cysts of the vertebral joints, ligaments and discs. Discal cysts also fit this category and have been reported extensively in humans but appear rare in dogs. Extramedullary spinal cysts should be first classified according to location with a sub-classification according to pathologic and surgical findings. Previous canine cases of discal cysts appear to represent a different disease entity and the term acute compressive HNPE is therefore preferred. © Copyright 2014 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  12. Service Dogs in the Perioperative Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levey, Janet A; Chappy, Sharon L

    2017-04-01

    Service dogs are critical for the independence of individuals with disabilities because they assist with daily living activities and help these individuals navigate society. Perioperative nurses need a working knowledge of disability laws pertaining to service dogs to provide patient-centered care for individuals using service dogs. This article provides information on the Americans With Disabilities Act regulations regarding service dogs, makes recommendations for the care of patients with service dogs across the perioperative continuum, and offers policy directives to ensure that safe, high-quality care is delivered to patients using service dogs. Copyright © 2017 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Erectile mechanism studied using penile vascular casts in the dog

    OpenAIRE

    狩野, 健一; 羽入, 修吾; 佐藤, 昭太郎; 岩永, 敏彦; 金澤, 寛明

    1987-01-01

    The possible mechanism of penile erection was discussed based on the findings obtained by the scanning electron microscope observations of the penile vascular casts in the dog. Polsters protruding into the lumen of the distal helicine arteries regulate blood flow into the cavernous spaces. The drainage veins from the corpus cavernosum penis arose on the dorsal surface and crept on the corpus until changing direction perpendicularly. This suggested that these veins were efficiently compressed ...

  14. Magnetic susceptibilities of minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, Sam; Brownfield, I.K.

    2000-01-01

    Magnetic separation of minerals is a topic that is seldom reported in the literature for two reasons. First, separation data generally are byproducts of other projects; and second, this study requires a large amount of patience and is unusually tedious. Indeed, we suspect that most minerals probably are never investigated for this property. These data are timesaving for mineralogists who concentrate mono-mineralic fractions for chemical analysis, age dating, and for other purposes. The data can certainly be used in the ore-beneficiation industries. In some instances, magnetic-susceptibility data may help in mineral identification, where other information is insufficient. In past studies of magnetic separation of minerals, (Gaudin and Spedden, 1943; Tille and Kirkpatrick, 1956; Rosenblum, 1958; Rubinstein and others, 1958; Flinter, 1959; Hess, 1959; Baker, 1962; Meric and Peyre, 1963; Rojas and others, 1965; and Duchesne, 1966), the emphasis has been on the ferromagnetic and paramagnetic ranges of extraction. For readers interested in the history of magnetic separation of minerals, Krumbein and Pettijohn (1938, p. 344-346) indicated nine references back to 1848. The primary purpose of this paper is to report the magnetic-susceptibility data on as many minerals as possible, similar to tables of hardness, specific gravity, refractive indices, and other basic physical properties of minerals. A secondary purpose is to demonstrate that the total and best extraction ranges are influenced by the chemistry of the minerals. The following notes are offered to help avoid problems in separating a desired mineral concentrate from mixtures of mineral grains.

  15. Alcohol increases hypnotic susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semmens-Wheeler, Rebecca; Dienes, Zoltán; Duka, Theodora

    2013-09-01

    One approach to hypnosis suggests that for hypnotic experience to occur frontal lobe activity must be attenuated. For example, cold control theory posits that a lack of awareness of intentions is responsible for the experience of involuntariness and/or the subjective reality of hypnotic suggestions. The mid-dorso-lateral prefrontal cortex and the ACC are candidate regions for such awareness. Alcohol impairs frontal lobe executive function. This study examined whether alcohol affects hypnotisability. We administered 0.8 mg/kg of alcohol or a placebo to 32 medium susceptible participants. They were subsequently hypnotised and given hypnotic suggestions. All participants believed they had received some alcohol. Participants in the alcohol condition were more susceptible to hypnotic suggestions than participants in the placebo condition. Impaired frontal lobe activity facilitates hypnotic responding, which supports theories postulating that attenuation of executive function facilitates hypnotic response, and contradicts theories postulating that hypnotic response involves enhanced inhibitory, attentional or other executive function. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Prevalence and risk factors of Staphylococcus spp. carriage among dogs and their owners: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jae-Ik; Yang, Cheol-Ho; Park, Hee-Myung

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated colonization and association of staphylococci between healthy dogs and their owners. In a cross-sectional study, nasal carriage and antibiotic susceptibility of isolated staphylococci were determined for 119 dogs and 107 owners. Relatedness of the Staphylococcus isolates in dogs and their owners was investigated using antibiograms, toxin profiles, and genotyping by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus sequence type, and spa typing. Risk factors for carriage of methicillin-resistant staphylococci in dogs were also evaluated. Staphylococcus spp. were isolated from 65 (60.7%) owners and 44 (37.0%) dogs. The following species were isolated, listed in order of decreasing frequency: S. epidermidis, S. pseudintermedius, S. aureus, S. scheiferi subsp. coagulans, S. haemolyticus, S. sciuri, S. saprophyticus and S. warneri. S. pseudintermedius (65.9%) was the major isolate in dogs while S. epidermidis (81.5%) was the major type in owners. Among the isolates, 71.6% were methicillin resistant (MR) and 95.4% of the isolates demonstrated multi-drug resistance regardless of the origin. Only one dog-owner pair shared the same Staphylococcus spp. (S. pseudintermedius); however, the organisms were of different PFGE subtypes and exhibited different antibiotic resistance and toxin profiles while both isolates displayed same sequence type (ST365). While the dog-origin isolate showed spa type t02, the owner-origin isolate was negative to PCRs targeting spa gene sequence. Risk factor analysis showed that the presence of cohabitant animals was correlated with the nasal carriage of MR staphylococci in dogs. The cumulative data indicated that animal- and owner-origin staphylococci have various subtypes with high prevalence of MR; however, the bacteria are not shared between healthy dogs and their owners. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Novel phenotype in beagle dogs characterized by skin response to compound 48/80 focusing on skin mast cell degranulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Mitsuhiro; Ito, Fumi; Tsuchiya, Toshiyuki; Shoji, Yoko; Kurosawa, Toru

    2015-01-01

    Beagle dogs have long been employed in toxicology studies and as skin disease models. Compared with other experimental animal species, they are known to be susceptible to skin responses, such as rashes, from exposure to various chemical compounds. Here, a unique dog phenotype was identified that showed no skin response to compound 48/80, a mast cell degranulating agent. Although the skin responses to intradermal injection of polyoxyethylene castor oil derivative (HCO-60, a nonionic detergent), histamine dihydrochloride, concanavalin A (IgE receptor-mediated stimuli), or calcium ionophore A23187 were comparable in wild-type (WT) dogs and these nonresponder (NR) dogs, only the response to compound 48/80 was entirely absent from NR dogs. The skin mast cell density and histamine content per mast cell were histologically comparable between WT and NR dogs. By checking for skin responses to compound 48/80, NR dogs were found to exist at the proportion of 17–20% among four animal breeders. From retrospective analysis of in-house breeding histories, the NR phenotype appears to conform to the Mendelian pattern of recessive inheritance. The standard skin response in WT dogs developed at 2–4 months of age. In conclusion, this unique phenotype, typified by insensitivity in the compound 48/80-induced degranulation pathway in mast cells, has been widely retained by recessive inheritance in beagle dogs among general experimental animal breeders. The knowledge concerning this phenotype could lead to better utilization of dogs in studies and aid in model development. PMID:26062768

  18. 9 CFR 93.600 - Importation of dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Importation of dogs. 93.600 Section 93... CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Dogs § 93.600 Importation of dogs. (a) All dogs. Dogs from Angola... applicable requirements of this part: (1) Dogs must be accompanied by a certificate signed by a full-time...

  19. Lymphangiosarcoma of dogs : a review : review article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.H. Williams

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Lymphangiosarcoma in dogs, an extremely rare tumour with only 16 cases reported in the literature, is reviewed. Lymphangiosarcoma in humans, also very rare, and known in post-mastectomy, chronically-lymphoedematous patients as 'Stewart-Treves' syndrome, is briefly outlined, as well as the various other causes of lymphoedema, both primary and secondary, which usually precede malignancy. Comparisons between human and canine lymphoedema are made when such references were found. The genetic links to primary lymphoedema and the manifestation thereof in humans are mentioned. Lymphangiosarcoma in the majority of human and canine patients is an aggressively malignant tumour with few patients surviving despite various attempted treatments. The tumour most commonly arises in the subcutaneous tissues and rapidly invades underlying tissues and may spread widely internally via haematogenous and lymphatic routes, with frequent pleural and chest involvement. The tumour has been reported mostly in medium- to large-breed dogs, in slightly more males than females, and in an age-range of 8 weeks to 13 years, with more cases aged 5 years and older. Methods of diagnosis, with the variations encountered, including routine histopathology, immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy, tissue culture characteristics and endothelial expression of glycocongugates, are discussed.

  20. Orthopoxvirus variola infection of Cynomys ludovicianus (North American black tailed prairie dog).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Darin S; Olson, Victoria A; Smith, Scott K; Braden, Zach H; Patel, Nishi; Abel, Jason; Li, Yu; Damon, Inger K; Karem, Kevin L

    2013-09-01

    Since the eradication of Smallpox, researchers have attempted to study Orthopoxvirus pathogenesis and immunity in animal models in order to correlate results human smallpox. A solely human pathogen, Orthopoxvirus variola fails to produce authentic smallpox illness in any other animal species tested to date. In 2003, an outbreak in the USA of Orthopoxvirus monkeypox, revealed the susceptibility of the North American black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus) to infection and fulminate disease. Prairie dogs infected with Orthopoxvirus monkeypox present with a clinical scenario similar to ordinary smallpox, including prodrome, rash, and high mortality. This study examines if Black-tailed prairie dogs can become infected with O. variola and serve as a surrogate model for the study of human smallpox disease. Substantive evidence of infection is found in immunological seroconversion of animals to either intranasal or intradermal challenges with O. variola, but in the absence of overt illness. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Occurrence of antimicrobial resistance in bacteria from diagnostic samples from dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karl; Pedersen, Kristina; Jensen, Helene

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To study the occurrence of antimicrobial resistance among common bacterial pathogens from dogs and relate resistance patterns to data on consumption of antimicrobials. Methods: The antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of 201 Staphylococcus intermedius, 37 Streptococcus canis, 39...... Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 25 Pasteurella multocida, 29 Proteus spp. and 449 Escherichia coli isolates from clinical submissions from dogs were determined by a broth-dilution method for determination of minimal inhibitory concentration. Data for consumption of antimicrobials were retrieved from Vet......Stat, a national database for reporting antimicrobial prescriptions. Results: The majority of the antimicrobials prescribed for dogs were broad-spectrum compounds, and extended-spectrum penicillins, cephalosporins and sulphonamides 1 trimethoprim together accounted for 81% of the total amount used for companion...

  2. spa typing and antimicrobial resistance of Staphylococcus aureus from healthy humans, pigs and dogs in Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katakweba, Abdul S.; Muhairwa, Amandus P.; Espinosa-Gongora, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen causing infections in humans and animals. Here we report for the first time the prevalence of nasal carriage, spa typing and antimicrobial resistance of S. aureus in a Tanzanian livestock community. Methodology: Nasal swabs were taken...... from 100 humans, 100 pigs and 100 dogs in Morogoro Municipal. Each swab was enriched in Mueller Hinton broth with 6.5% NaCl and subcultured on chromogenic agar for S. aureus detection. Presumptive S. aureus colonies were confirmed to the species level by nuc PCR and analysed by spa typing....... Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns were determined by disc diffusion method. Results: S. aureus was isolated from 22 % of humans, 4 % of pigs and 11 % of dogs. A total of 21 spa types were identified: 13, 7 and 1 in human, dogs, and pigs, respectively. Three spa types (t314, t223 and t084) were shared...

  3. A novel locus on canine chromosome 13 is associated with cataract in the Australian Shepherd breed of domestic dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricketts, Sally L; Pettitt, Louise; McLaughlin, Bryan; Jenkins, Christopher A; Mellersh, Cathryn S

    2015-06-01

    Hereditary cataract is a common ocular disorder in the purebred dog population and is a leading cause of visual impairment and blindness in dogs. Despite this, little is known to date about the genetics underlying this condition. We have used a genome-wide association study and targeted resequencing approach to identify a novel locus for cataracts in the Australian Shepherd breed of dog, using dogs that are clear of an HSF4 mutation, previously identified as the major susceptibility locus in this breed. Cataract cases were defined as dogs with bilateral posterior cataracts, or bilateral nuclear cataracts. Controls were at least 8 years of age with no evidence of cataracts or other ocular abnormality. Using 15 bilateral posterior polar cataract cases and 68 controls, we identified a genome-wide statistical association for cataracts in the Australian Shepherd on canine chromosome 13 at 46.4 Mb (P value: 1.5 × 10(-7)). We sequenced the 14.16 Mb associated region in ten Australian Shepherds to search for possible causal variants underlying the association signal and conducted additional fine-mapping of the region by genotyping 28 intronic variants that segregated correctly in our ten sequenced dogs. From this analysis, the strongest associated variants were located in intron 5 of the SCFD2 gene. Further study will require analysis of additional cases and controls and ocular tissue from dogs affected with bilateral cataracts that are free of the HSF4 mutation.

  4. [Dangerous dogs in Berlin in comparison to the dog population--ways to reduce the dangerousness of dogs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhne, Franziska; Struwe, Rainer

    2006-01-01

    The law for handling and control of dogs in Berlin of September 29, 2004 was enacted to prevent the risks for humans and animals when ever they have contact with dogs. "Dangerous dogs" are defined by this law. There are 10 breeds of dogs supposed to be dangerous due to specific characteristics of their breed ("listed breeds"). The dangerousness of a dog's breed is not identical with the dangerousness of an individual dog. The subject of this study is to examine the potential dangerousness of dog breeds and not the individual dangerousness of a dog. This study refers to statistics of incidents between dogs and humans in Berlin for the years 1998 to 2004. The population density of a breed is based on the dogs assessed for tax purposes in Berlin of January 1, 2005 and on the dog registrations maintained at veterinary hospitals. The fourfold-table-test was used to compare the quantity of the recorded incidents of two statistically independent dog breeds. Of the total population of 107,804 tax assessed dogs in Berlin in 2004, 0.9% was documented as dogs involved in incidents with humans. The incidents per year decreased in the "listed breeds"about 68% and in the "unlisted breeds" about 41% during the last 7 years in Berlin. Therefore, the probability (the odds ratio) of a breed to be conspicuous was analysed. The values for the calculation of this probability were the number of dogs of a breed having been involved in incidents compared to the population of this breed based on tax records. The comparison of the probability of a breed with another to be conspicuous was used to compile a cluster of breeds which had the same probability to be conspicuous in 2004. A cluster was assessed for dogs of the following breeds: Sheep dogs, Rottweiler, Doberman, Pitbull Terrier and American Staffordshire Terrier. A listing of breeds is not the right way to reduce the potential dangerousness of a dog, especially in the private domain of their owners. Most incidents with dogs occur in

  5. Evaluation of pulsatile plasma concentrations of growth hormone in healthy dogs and dogs with dilated cardiomyopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijerink, N.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/31147764X; Lee, W.M.; Stokhof, A.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/067528937; Voorhout, G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073903329; Mol, J.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070918775; Kooistra, H.S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/205285864

    2011-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate plasma concentrations of growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) in healthy dogs and large-breed dogs with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). ANIMALS: 8 dogs with DCM and 8 healthy control dogs of comparable age and body weight. PROCEDURES: Blood

  6. Assisting Handlers Following Attacks on Dog Guides: Implications for Dog Guide Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godley, Cheryl A.; Gillard, Marc A.

    2011-01-01

    Attacks by dogs on dog guides are traumatic for dog guide teams. One variable that affects a team's recovery is how handlers cope with emotional responses to the attack. This article presents a three-stage model for assisting handlers that is useful for handlers and dog guide instructors.

  7. Experimental Dirofilaria immitis infection in dogs: effects of doxycycline and Advantage Multi® administration on immature adult parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrashekar, R; Beall, M J; Saucier, J; O'Connor, T; McCall, J W; McCall, S D

    2014-11-15

    To better understand the efficacy of doxycycline and 10% imidacloprid+2.5% moxidectin (Advantage Multi(®); Bayer Animal Health, Shawnee Mission, Kansas) on immature adult Dirofilaria immitis parasites and the results of antigen tests, 12 healthy, randomly selected dogs were experimentally infected with D. immitis and monitored for 407 days. Two dogs in each of three subgroups of four dogs were each infected with six (total of 6 dogs) or 12 (total of 6 dogs) D. immitis infective third-stage larvae (L3) obtained from infected mosquitoes. Doxycycline (10mg/kg per os twice daily×30 days) and 10% imidacloprid+2.5% moxidectin (1ml/kg by topical application every 30 days) treatment was initiated at 105 (Group A) and 149 (Group B) days post infection (PI) in two groups. One subgroup of two dogs given 6 L3 and one subgroup of two dogs given 12 L3 remained as untreated controls (GroupC). Serum obtained regularly throughout the study was evaluated by ELISA (PetChek(®) Heartworm-PF Antigen Test, IDEXX Laboratories, Inc.) for D. immitis adult circulating antigens. Six of the eight dogs in the treated groups had detectable antigenemia starting between 148 and 240 days post infection, but antigen was not detected in any treated dog at the end of the study. In the control subgroups, the dogs that received 6 L3 had no detectable antigen while the two dogs that received 12 L3 had detectable antigen beginning on Day 180 that persisted until the end of the study. None of the infected dogs had evidence of circulating microfilariae. At necropsy, no heartworms were recovered from the treated dogs, but all dogs in the untreated group had viable adult heartworms. These results indicate that early immature adult worms (3.5 and 5 months of age) of D. immitis were susceptible to a combined treatment regimen of doxycycline and 10% imidacloprid+2.5% moxidectin. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Identification of novel genetic risk loci in Maltese dogs with necrotizing meningoencephalitis and evidence of a shared genetic risk across toy dog breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrauwen, Isabelle; Barber, Renee M; Schatzberg, Scott J; Siniard, Ashley L; Corneveaux, Jason J; Porter, Brian F; Vernau, Karen M; Keesler, Rebekah I; Matiasek, Kaspar; Flegel, Thomas; Miller, Andrew D; Southard, Teresa; Mariani, Christopher L; Johnson, Gayle C; Huentelman, Matthew J

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing meningoencephalitis (NME) affects toy and small breed dogs causing progressive, often fatal, inflammation and necrosis in the brain. Genetic risk loci for NME previously were identified in pug dogs, particularly associated with the dog leukocyte antigen (DLA) class II complex on chromosome 12, but have not been investigated in other susceptible breeds. We sought to evaluate Maltese and Chihuahua dogs, in addition to pug dogs, to identify novel or shared genetic risk factors for NME development. Genome-wide association testing of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in Maltese dogs with NME identified 2 regions of genome-wide significance on chromosomes 4 (chr4:74522353T>A, p = 8.1×10-7) and 15 (chr15:53338796A>G, p = 1.5×10-7). Haplotype analysis and fine-mapping suggests that ILR7 and FBXW7, respectively, both important for regulation of immune system function, could be the underlying associated genes. Further evaluation of these regions and the previously identified DLA II locus across all three breeds, revealed an enrichment of nominal significant SNPs associated with chromosome 15 in pug dogs and DLA II in Maltese and Chihuahua dogs. Meta-analysis confirmed effect sizes the same direction in all three breeds for both the chromosome 15 and DLA II loci (p = 8.6×10-11 and p = 2.5×10-7, respectively). This suggests a shared genetic background exists between all breeds and confers susceptibility to NME, but effect sizes might be different among breeds. In conclusion, we identified the first genetic risk factors for NME development in the Maltese, chromosome 4 and chromosome 15, and provide evidence for a shared genetic risk between breeds associated with chromosome 15 and DLA II. Last, DLA II and IL7R both have been implicated in human inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system such as multiple sclerosis, suggesting that similar pharmacotherapeutic targets across species should be investigated.

  9. Topological susceptibility from slabs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bietenholz, Wolfgang [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, A.P. 70-543, Distrito Federal, C.P. 04510 (Mexico); Forcrand, Philippe de [Institute for Theoretical Physics, ETH Zürich,CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland); CERN, Physics Department, TH Unit, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Gerber, Urs [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, A.P. 70-543, Distrito Federal, C.P. 04510 (Mexico); Instituto de Física y Matemáticas, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo,Edificio C-3, Apdo. Postal 2-82, Morelia, Michoacán, C.P. 58040 (Mexico)

    2015-12-14

    In quantum field theories with topological sectors, a non-perturbative quantity of interest is the topological susceptibility χ{sub t}. In principle it seems straightforward to measure χ{sub t} by means of Monte Carlo simulations. However, for local update algorithms and fine lattice spacings, this tends to be difficult, since the Monte Carlo history rarely changes the topological sector. Here we test a method to measure χ{sub t} even if data from only one sector are available. It is based on the topological charges in sub-volumes, which we denote as slabs. Assuming a Gaussian distribution of these charges, this method enables the evaluation of χ{sub t}, as we demonstrate with numerical results for non-linear σ-models.

  10. Topological Susceptibility from Slabs

    CERN Document Server

    Bietenholz, Wolfgang; Gerber, Urs

    2015-01-01

    In quantum field theories with topological sectors, a non-perturbative quantity of interest is the topological susceptibility chi_t. In principle it seems straightforward to measure chi_t by means of Monte Carlo simulations. However, for local update algorithms and fine lattice spacings, this tends to be difficult, since the Monte Carlo history rarely changes the topological sector. Here we test a method to measure chi_t even if data from only one sector are available. It is based on the topological charges in sub-volumes, which we denote as slabs. Assuming a Gaussian distribution of these charges, this method enables the evaluation of chi_t, as we demonstrate with numerical results for non-linear sigma-models.

  11. Clinical and microbiological effects of a subantimicrobial dose of oral doxycycline on periodontitis in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S E; Hwang, S Y; Jeong, M; Lee, Y; Lee, E R; Park, Y W; Ahn, J S; Kim, S; Seo, K

    2016-02-01

    Doxycycline is regarded as an effective treatment for periodontal inflammation. In humans, it has been shown that the long-term administration of a subantimicrobial dose of doxycycline (SDD) does not induce antimicrobial effects on the subgingival microflora and furthermore does not affect antimicrobial susceptibility. The present study was designed to evaluate the influence of oral administration of SDD on normal periodontal microflora and antimicrobial susceptibility in dogs. Experimental periodontitis was induced in 12 experimental dogs using a silk and wire-twisted ligature for 60 days. After the periodontitis induction period, the ligature was removed, and dental cleaning (subgingival and supragingival ultrasonic scaling) was performed. The dogs were randomly assigned to one of two groups: an SDD group with six dogs receiving 2 mg/kg PO once daily and a control group with six dogs receiving a placebo. At weeks 0, 4 and 8, clinical periodontal parameters were evaluated. After the clinical assessments, subgingival plaque was sampled and then cultured in an anaerobic system for one week, and the total anaerobes, Porphyromonas spp., Bacteroides spp. and Pasteurella spp. counts were investigated. Using the agar dilution method, the minimum bactericidal concentration of doxycycline was evaluated and the resistance for doxycycline was monitored during this experimental phase. The clinical periodontal status of the SDD group was significantly improved compared to the control group (P  0.05), and antibacterial resistance was not established in the SDD group during the experimental periods (P <0.05). These results suggest that the once daily oral regimen of 2 mg/kg of doxycycline could serve as a SDD in dogs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Relationship Between Scarring and Dog Aggression in Pit Bull-Type Dogs Involved in Organized Dogfighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Katherine A.; Touroo, Rachel; Spain, C. Victor; Jones, Kelly; Reid, Pamela; Lockwood, Randall

    2016-01-01

    Simple Summary Organizations responsible for placing dogs seized from dogfighting investigations often must determine if a particular dog should be euthanized because it is too dangerous or if it is safe to place the dog in an adoptive home. In this study, we examine whether the extent of scarring from dog fighting is a reliable predictor of aggression towards other dogs and therefore could be used to help make that decision. We found that dogs with 10 or more scars in the three body zones where dogfighting injuries tend to be concentrated were more likely, on average, to show aggression to other dogs. The relationship is imperfect, however. Many unscarred dogs were dog aggressive while some highly scarred dogs were not. Therefore, we recommend also assessing a dog’s behavior before making decisions about its disposition. Abstract When pit bull-type dogs are seized in an investigation of organized dogfighting, heavily scarred dogs are often assumed to be highly dog aggressive due to a history of fighting. These dogs may be deemed dangerous and euthanized based on scarring alone. We analyzed our existing data on dogs seized from four dogfighting investigations, examining the relationship between the dogs’ scars with aggression towards other dogs. Scar and wound data were tallied in three body zones where dogfighting injuries tend to be concentrated. Dog aggression was assessed using a model dog and a friendly stimulus dog in a standardized behavior evaluation. Scarring and dog aggression were significantly related, more strongly among male (Fisher’s Exact p < 0.001) than female dogs (Fisher’s Exact p = 0.05). Ten or more scars in the three body zones was a reasonable threshold with which to classify a dog as high risk for dog aggression: 82% of males and 60% of females with such scarring displayed dog aggression. However, because many unscarred dogs were dog aggressive while some highly scarred dogs were not, we recommend collecting behavioral information to

  13. Evolutionary history of dog rabies in Brazil

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kobayashi, Yuki; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Itou, Takuya; Ito, Fumio H; Sakai, Takeo; Gojobori, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    .... In order to investigate the evolutionary history of dog rabies virus (RABV) in Brazil, we performed a phylogenetic analysis of carnivore RABV isolates from around the world and estimated the divergence times for dog RABV in Brazil...

  14. Evolutionary history of dog rabies in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yuki; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Itou, Takuya; Ito, Fumio H; Sakai, Takeo; Gojobori, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Although dogs are considered to be the principal transmitter of rabies in Brazil, dog rabies had never been recorded in South America before European colonization. In order to investigate the evolutionary history of dog rabies virus (RABV) in Brazil, we performed a phylogenetic analysis of carnivore RABV isolates from around the world and estimated the divergence times for dog RABV in Brazil. Our estimate for the time of introduction of dog RABV into Brazil was the late-19th to early-20th century, which was later than the colonization period but corresponded to a period of increased immigration from Europe to Brazil. In addition, dog RABVs appeared to have spread to indigenous animals in Brazil during the latter half of the 20th century, when the development and urbanization of Brazil occurred. These results suggest that the movement of rabid dogs, along with human activities since the 19th century, promoted the introduction and expansion of dog RABV in Brazil.

  15. Service Dogs, Psychiatric Hospitalization, and the ADA

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Muramatsu, Russ S; Thomas, Kelly Jones; Leong, Stephanie L; Ragukonis, Frank

    A service dog is defined as “any dog that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including a physical, sensory, psychiatric, intellectual, or other mental disability...

  16. Effect of potassium oxalate on liver function and kidney tissue of dogs (beagles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamaden Walaa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium oxalate crystalluria is a problem of growing concern in dogs. A few reports have discussed acute kidney injury by oxalates in dogs, describing ultrastructural findings in particular. We evaluated the possibility of deposition of calcium oxalate crystals in renal tissue and its probable consequences. Six dogs were intravenously injected with 0.5 M potassium oxalate (KOx for seven consecutive days. By the end of the experiment, ultrasonography revealed a significant increase in the renal mass and renal parenchymal echogenicity. Serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen levels were gradually increased. The histopathological features of the kidneys were assessed by both light and electron microscopy, which showed CaOx crystal deposition accompanied by morphological changes in the renal tissue of KOx injected dogs. Canine renal oxalosis provides a good model to study the biological and pathological changes induced upon damage of renal tissue by KOx injection.

  17. Dog allergen levels in homes with hypoallergenic compared with nonhypoallergenic dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Charlotte E; Wegienka, Ganesa R; Havstad, Suzanne L; Zoratti, Edward M; Ownby, Dennis R; Johnson, Christine Cole

    2011-01-01

    Despite the public interest in hypoallergenic dogs, few scientific, including epidemiological studies have attempted to evaluate claims of hypoallergenicity. This study was designed to determine whether dog breeds reported as hypoallergenic correspond to lower dog allergen in the home versus nonhypoallergenic dogs. A web search was conducted to identify breeds cited as hypoallergenic. Four separate classification schemes using combinations of purebred and mixed breed dogs were used to compare the levels of Canis familiaris 1 in dust samples collected from homes with hypoallergenic versus nonhypoallergenic dogs from an established birth cohort. No classification scheme showed that the level of dog allergen in homes with hypoallergenic dogs differed from other homes. Dog-allergic individuals should have access to scientifically valid information on the level of allergen shedding of different breeds of dogs.

  18. Pulmonary adenosquamous carcinoma in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, T; Ito, J; Shibuya, H; Asano, K; Watari, T

    2005-12-01

    A mass that developed in the lung of a 10-year-old mixed-breed dog was pathologically examined. Histopathological examination showed papillary and tubular growth of glandular epithelium-like cells in some areas and growth of squamous cells arranged in nests in other areas, showing coexistence of adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma in a lung tumour. Immunohistochemical staining with anti-keratin-cytokeratin antibody was strongly positive for cytoplasms in both components. Electron microscopically, the neoplastic cells of the adenocarcinoma component had features of glandular cells, with microvilli, numerous free ribosomes, large round secretory granules and intercellular desmosomes. Non-keratinized squamous cells had tonofilaments and intercellular desmosomes. These findings led to the diagnosis of primary adenosquamous carcinoma, which demonstrates phenotypic profiles characteristic of both epidermal keratinocytes and glandular epithelium.

  19. Continued Distress among Abandoned Dogs in Fukushima

    OpenAIRE

    Nagasawa, Miho; Mogi, Kazutaka; Kikusui, Takefumi

    2012-01-01

    In Fukushima, Japan, a prolonged refugee situation caused by a major nuclear incident after the earthquake of March 11, 2011 has led to the unintentional abandonment of many pets. We received stray or abandoned dogs from rescue centers in Fukushima Prefecture. During re-socialization training and health care, we accessed the behavioral characteristics and the urine cortisol level of each dog and compared them with those of other abandoned dogs not involved in this earthquake. The dogs from Fu...

  20. Factors associated with dog ownership and contact with dogs in a UK community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaskell Rosalind M

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dogs are popular pets in many countries. Identifying differences between those who own dogs or have contact with dogs, and those who do not, is useful to those interested in the human-animal bond, human health and for provision of veterinary services. This census-based, epidemiological study aimed to investigate factors associated with dog ownership and contact with dogs, in a semi-rural community of 1278 households in Cheshire, UK. Results Twenty-four percent of households were identified as dog-owning and 52% owned a pet of some type. Multivariable logistic regression suggested that households were more likely to own a dog if they had more occupants (five or more; if they had an adult female household member; or if they owned a horse. The age structure of the households was also associated with dog ownership, with households containing older children (between six and 19 years of age and young adults (between 20 and 29 years of age, more likely to own dogs. We also found that dog owning households were more likely to be multi-dog households than single-dog if they also owned a cat or a bird, or if the household contained a person of 20–29 years old. Dog owners reported increased contact with dogs, other than their own, compared to those that did not own dogs and this contact appeared to be mainly through walking. Conclusion Some household types are more likely to own a dog than others. This study supports the suggestion that dogs are more common in families who have older children (6–19 years, as has been generally observed in other countries. Dog owners are also more likely to have contact with dogs other than their own, compared with those not owning a dog.

  1. Effects of dietary protein on glomerular mesangial area and basement membrane thickness in aged uninephrectomized dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, R A; Steffens, W L; Brown, C A; Brown, S A; Ard, M; Finco, D R

    2001-04-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine the effects of diets containing 18% or 34% protein on glomerular mesangial area (GMA) and basement membrane thickness (GBMT) in uninephrectomized aged dogs. A secondary objective was to determine the combined effects of aging and uninephrectomy on GMA and GBMT in dogs. Ten clinically healthy, pure-bred dogs were unilaterally nephrectomized at about 8 y of age. After 2 mo, 5 dogs were fed an 18% protein diet and 5 dogs were fed a 34% protein diet for 48 mo. At month 48, the dogs were euthanized and the remaining kidney was collected. Samples of kidney from both times of collection were used to measure GMA and GBMT using electron microscopy. The effects of diet on GMA and GBMT were analyzed (student's t-test) using necropsy/nephrectomy score ratios. The effects of time-nephrectomy were determined by comparing nephrectomy values for GMA and GBMT with necropsy values (paired t-test). Dogs fed 34% dietary protein did not have a significant increase in GMA and GBM thickness when compared to dogs fed the 18% protein diet. A significant increase in GMA and GBMT occurred with time-nephrectomy (P = 0.011 and 0.018, respectively). Although dietary protein intake was not a significant factor in causing structural changes to glomeruli in uninephrectomized aged dogs, the power to detect a difference was low. However, significant effects of aging and nephrectomy were detected despite the low power of the study. These results suggest that the increases in GMA and GBMT that occur over time are not markedly influenced by dietary protein intake. However, subtle protein effects cannot be eliminated as a possibility based on this study.

  2. Patient benefit of dog-assisted interventions in health care: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundqvist, Martina; Carlsson, Per; Sjödahl, Rune; Theodorsson, Elvar; Levin, Lars-Åke

    2017-07-10

    Dogs are the most common companion animal, and therefore not surprisingly a popular choice for animal-assisted interventions. Dog-assisted interventions are increasingly used in healthcare. The aim of the review was to conduct a systematic literature review of quantitative studies on dog-assisted interventions in healthcare, with the intention of assessing the effects and cost-effectiveness of the interventions for different categories of patients. A systematic review of the scientific literature reporting results of studies in healthcare, nursing home or home care settings, was conducted. The inclusion criteria applied for this review were: quantitative studies, inclusion of at least 20 study subjects, existence of a control and performed in healthcare settings including nursing homes and home care. The electronic databases PubMed, AMED, CINAHL and Scopus were searched from their inception date through January 2017, for published articles from peer-reviewed journals with full text in English. Eighteen studies that fulfilled the inclusion criteria, and were judged to be of at least moderate quality, were included in the analysis. Three of them showed no effect. Fifteen showed at least one significant positive effect but in most studied outcome measures there was no significant treatment effect. Dog-assisted therapy had the greatest potential in treatment of psychiatric disorders among both young and adult patients. Dog-assisted activities had some positive effects on health, wellbeing, depression and quality of life for patients with severe cognitive disorders. Dog-assisted support had positive effects on stress and mood. The overall assessment of the included studies indicates minor to moderate effects of dog-assisted therapy in psychiatric conditions, as well as for dog-assisted activities in cognitive disorders and for dog-assisted support in different types of medical interventions. However, the majority of studied outcome measures showed no significant effect.

  3. [Biology of aggression in dogs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feddersen-Petersen, D U

    2001-03-01

    The science of ethology is concerned with the way external stimuli and internal events cause animals to fight in a particular way. The classification of dog breeds with respect to their relative danger to humans makes no sense, as both, the complex antecedent conditions in which aggressive behaviour occurs, and its ramifying consequences in the individual dog's ecological and social environment, are not considered. From a biological point of view, environmental and learning effects are always superimposed upon genetic influences. Based on the recent developments in the study of ethology, aggression of wolves (Canis lupus L.) and domesticated dogs (Canis lupus f. familiaris) was put into context with respect to other aspects of the lifestyle of wild and domestic canids. Aggressive behaviour does not occur in a biological vacuum. This is also true for domestic dogs and their relationship to human partners. Individual dogs can become highly aggressive and dangerous. Their development and social situation will be presented and discussed in case studies. Finally, there is the question about defining "normal aggression" versus symptoms for maladaptive aggression resp. danger to humans as conspecifics. It is possible to protect the safety of the public and at the the same time practise animal care. Effective animal control legislation must focus on responsible ownership and socialisation of pups f.e. Problems are not unique to some breeds.

  4. Neosporosis and hammondiosis in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichel, M P; Ellis, J T; Dubey, J P

    2007-06-01

    The dog is a definitive host of the protozoan parasite Neospora caninum, and in many parts of the world, infection is relatively common as determined by serology. Reported seroprevalences usually range from 0 to 20 per cent, however, reports of clinically affected dogs are infrequent. Affected dogs are generally less than six months old and predominantly have signs of an ascending hindleg paralysis, with the associated lesions of polyradiculoneuritis and granulomatous polymyositis. Although any organ may be affected, infections are more common in the central nervous system, muscles, lungs and skin. Ante-mortem diagnosis is difficult but serology and cytology can aid diagnosis. The diagnosis can be confirmed by histology, immunohistochemistry, the use of molecular techniques on biopsy material, or on post-mortem examination. Neospora caninum oocysts are rarely found in faeces and must be differentiated from oocysts of related coccidians such as Hammondia heydorni and Toxoplasma gondii. Hammondia heydorni can cause diarrrhoea in immunosuppressed dogs. Neosporosis should be suspected in young pups with an ascending paralysis of the hindlegs. Treatment with clindamycin and potentiated sulphonamides may be useful in cases where muscular atrophy and fibrosis are absent. Feeding of raw meat is a potential risk factor for infection of dogs and should be discouraged.

  5. Experimental Chagas' disease in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta de Lana

    1992-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development of experimental Chagas' disease in 64 out-bred young dogs. Twenty-nine animals were inoculated with the Be-62 and 35 with Be-78 Trypanosoma cruzi strains. Twenty-six were infected with blood trypomastigotes by different inoculation routes and 38 with metacyclic trypomastigotes from the vector via the conjunctival route. Twenty of the 26 dogs infected with blood trypomastigotes were autopsied during the acute phase. Eleven died spontaneously and nine were sacrificed. Six remained alive until they died suddenly (two or were autopsied (four. Twelve of the 38 dogs infected with metacyclic trypomastigotes evolved naturally to the chronic phase and remained alive for 24-48 months. The parasitemia, clinical aspects and serology (IgM and IgG as well as electrocardiogram, hemogram and heart anatomo-histopathologic patterns of acute and chronic cardiac forms of Chagas' disease as seen in human infections, were reproduced. The most important finding is the reproductibility of diffuse fibrosing chronic chagasic cardiopathy in all dogs infected with Be-78 T. cruzi strain autopsied between the 90th and 864th days of infection. Thus, the dog can be considered as a suitable experimental model to study Chagas' disease according to the requisites of the World Health Organization (1984. Futhermore the animal is easily obtained and easy to handle and maintain in experimental laboratory conditions.

  6. Chronic mesenteric volvulus in a dog

    OpenAIRE

    Spevakow, Andrea B.; Nibblett, Belle Marie D.; Carr, Anthony P.; Linn, Kathleen A.

    2010-01-01

    A chronic, partial mesenteric volvulus was found on laparotomy of an adult Bernese mountain dog with a 4-month history of intermittent vomiting, diarrhea, and weight loss. The dog had elevated cholestatic and hepatocellular leakage enzymes, increased bile acids, azotemia, isosthenuria, and a hypokalemic, hypochloremic, metabolic alkalosis. The dog recovered fully following reduction of the volvulus.

  7. 50 CFR 216.82 - Dogs prohibited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dogs prohibited. 216.82 Section 216.82... Pribilof Islands Administration § 216.82 Dogs prohibited. In order to prevent molestation of fur seal herds, the landing of any dogs at Pribilof Islands is prohibited. ...

  8. [Demographic characteristics of dog population in Switzerland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horisberger, U; Stärk, K D; Rüfenacht, J; Pillonel, C; Steiger, A

    2004-05-01

    Dog Registration data from three Cantons, patient data of 13 veterinary practices and registrations in the Swiss Dog Pedigree Book were collected, analysed and compared to results of a commercial household survey, to assess demographic characteristics of dog population in Switzerland. The proportion of "pure-bred" dogs was different depending on how the term was used, varying from 24% regarding registrations in the Swiss Dog Pedigree Book, to 75% regarding dogs with only one breed recorded in Veterinarian's patient-history-management systems. Most popular breeds were dogs called "German Shepherd/Shepherd", followed by the Labrador and Golden Retriever. Comparison of different data sources suggested regional differences in popularity of breeds. The average life expectancy was estimated on 10.5 and 11 years. Sex distribution was equal. One third of all male dogs and half of the female dogs were neutered. Regardless sex, neutering was more common in cross-bred dogs than in "pure-bred" dogs (OR = 1.9). Some bias in all sources had to be considered and there was a major concern regarding definition of breeds. However, the study was able to add different parameters out of different sources to a homogenous picture of demographic data of dog population in Switzerland.

  9. [Type-C botulism in dogs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borst, G H; Lambers, G M; Haagsma, J

    1986-11-15

    Twelve dogs died from an outbreak of type-C botulism. The origin of the outbreak was found to consist in feeding the dogs broiler carcasses contaminated with Clostridium botulinum type-C. High concentrations of toxin type-C could be detected in the stomach contents. Botulism in dogs was only fatal when large amounts of toxin had been produced.

  10. Hendra Virus Infection in Dog, Australia, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkland, Peter D; Gabor, Melinda; Poe, Ian; Neale, Kristie; Chaffey, Kim; Finlaison, Deborah S; Gu, Xingnian; Hick, Paul M; Read, Andrew J; Wright, Therese; Middleton, Deborah

    2015-12-01

    Hendra virus occasionally causes severe disease in horses and humans. In Australia in 2013, infection was detected in a dog that had been in contact with an infected horse. Abnormalities and viral RNA were found in the dog's kidney, brain, lymph nodes, spleen, and liver. Dogs should be kept away from infected horses.

  11. So Your Child Wants a Dog

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-04-27

    Our question this week is from a mom whose child is begging to get a dog. She's concerned that having a dog is unsafe because she's heard so much in the news about dog bites.  Created: 4/27/2009 by National Center for Health Marketing.   Date Released: 4/27/2009.

  12. Hypoadrenocorticism in a kindred of Pomeranian dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Mooney, Erin T.; Hammond, Tara N.; Mahony, Orla M.

    2015-01-01

    Three adult Pomeranian dogs, full siblings from 2 litters, were diagnosed with primary hypoadrenocorticism following onset of hypoadrenal crisis. Review of the family history revealed the dogs’ maternal grandmother also had hypoadrenocorticism. All 4 dogs were pedigree-certified by the American Kennel Club. An inherited basis for hypoadrenocorticism is proposed in these Pomeranian dogs.

  13. 49 CFR 236.743 - Dog, swing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dog, swing. 236.743 Section 236.743 Transportation... OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.743 Dog, swing. A locking dog mounted in such a manner that it is free to rotate on a trunnion which is riveted to a locking...

  14. Dog-directed speech: why do we use it and do dogs pay attention to it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Aderet, Tobey; Gallego-Abenza, Mario; Reby, David; Mathevon, Nicolas

    2017-01-11

    Pet-directed speech is strikingly similar to infant-directed speech, a peculiar speaking pattern with higher pitch and slower tempo known to engage infants' attention and promote language learning. Here, we report the first investigation of potential factors modulating the use of dog-directed speech, as well as its immediate impact on dogs' behaviour. We recorded adult participants speaking in front of pictures of puppies, adult and old dogs, and analysed the quality of their speech. We then performed playback experiments to assess dogs' reaction to dog-directed speech compared with normal speech. We found that human speakers used dog-directed speech with dogs of all ages and that the acoustic structure of dog-directed speech was mostly independent of dog age, except for sound pitch which was relatively higher when communicating with puppies. Playback demonstrated that, in the absence of other non-auditory cues, puppies were highly reactive to dog-directed speech, and that the pitch was a key factor modulating their behaviour, suggesting that this specific speech register has a functional value in young dogs. Conversely, older dogs did not react differentially to dog-directed speech compared with normal speech. The fact that speakers continue to use dog-directed with older dogs therefore suggests that this speech pattern may mainly be a spontaneous attempt to facilitate interactions with non-verbal listeners. © 2017 The Author(s).

  15. CONTRAST-ENHANCED ULTRASONOGRAPHY OF THE PANCREAS IN HEALTHY DOGS AND IN DOGS WITH ACUTE PANCREATITIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rademacher, Nathalie; Schur, David; Gaschen, Frédéric; Kearney, Michael; Gaschen, Lorrie

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatitis is the most frequent disease affecting the exocrine pancreas in dogs and reliable diagnostic techniques for predicting fatal complications are lacking. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) improves detection of tissue perfusion as well as organ lesion vascular pattern. Objectives of this prospective case control study were to compare perfusion characteristics and enhancement patterns of the pancreas in healthy dogs and dogs with pancreatitis using CEUS. Ten healthy dogs and eight dogs with pancreatitis were selected based on physical examination, abdominal ultrasound, and blood analysis findings. A CEUS study of the pancreas was performed for each dog and two observers who were aware of clinical status used advanced ultrasound quantification software to analyze time-intensity curves. Perfusion patterns were compared between healthy and affected dogs. In dogs with acute pancreatitis, mean pixel and peak intensity of the pancreatic parenchyma was significantly higher than that of normal dogs (P = 0.05) in between 6 and 60 s (P = dogs with acute pancreatitis compared to healthy dogs. Wash-in rates were greater and had a consistently steeper slope to peak in dogs with pancreatitis as opposed to healthy dogs. All dogs with pancreatitis showed a decrease in pixel intensity 10-15 days after the initial examination (P = 0.011) and their times to peak values were prolonged compared to the initial exam. Findings from the current study supported the use of CEUS for diagnosing pancreatitis, pancreatic necrosis, and disease monitoring following therapy in dogs. © 2015 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  16. Local magnetic susceptibility in rare-earth compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Shiozawa, H; Obu, K

    2003-01-01

    The element specific magnetic susceptibilities of some rare-earth compounds are estimated by measuring magnetic circular dichroism at rare-earth M sub 4 sub , sub 5 absorption edges. The temperature dependences of the rare-earth 4f local magnetic susceptibilities in dense Kondo materials, CeNi, CeSn sub 3 and CeRu sub 4 Sb sub 1 sub 2 , are remarkably different from those of the bulk magnetic susceptibilities measured by a conventional magnetometer, although the 4f electron is regarded to mainly hold the magnetic moment in these compounds. In contrast, the rare-earth 4f local magnetic susceptibility of ferromagnetic NdFe sub 4 P sub 1 sub 2 shows almost as similar behavior as the bulk one.

  17. Facilitation of lethal ventricular arrhythmias by therapeutic digoxin in conscious post infarction dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, J J; Montgomery, D G; Lucchesi, B R

    1986-05-01

    The proarrhythmic potential of digoxin, administered in a therapeutic dosage regimen, was evaluated in conscious dogs in the subacute phase of myocardial infarction. In this evaluation, digoxin (0.0125 mg/kg/day intravenously) or vehicle were administered to conscious dogs for periods of 5 to 7 days, commencing 4 to 5 days after anterior myocardial infarction. Before treatment, programmed ventricular stimulation failed to initiate ventricular tachycardia in 26 post infarction dogs. After treatment, programmed stimulation initiated ventricular tachyarrhythmias in only 1 of 13 digoxin-treated dogs (1.36 +/- 0.17 ng/ml serum digoxin) and in 0 of 13 vehicle-treated dogs. However, the incidences of early ventricular fibrilation (4 of 10 digoxin vs 0 of 12 vehicle; p less than 0.05) and of 24-hour mortality (6 of 10 digoxin vs 2 of 12 vehicle; p less than 0.05) occurring in response to the development of posterolateral ischemia in the presence of previous anterior myocardial infarction was significantly greater in digoxin-treated (1.47 +/- 0.19 ng/ml serum digoxin) than in vehicle-treated animals. These findings suggest an enhanced susceptibility toward the development of ischemia-related lethal arrhythmias in the presence of therapeutic digoxin serum concentrations early after myocardial infarction, which is not predicted by programmed ventricular stimulation testing.

  18. spa typing and antimicrobial resistance of Staphylococcus aureus from healthy humans, pigs and dogs in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katakweba, Abdul Sekemani; Muhairwa, Amandus Pachificus; Espinosa-Gongora, Carmen; Guardabassi, Luca; Mtambo, Madundo M A; Olsen, John Elmerdahl

    2016-02-28

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen causing infections in humans and animals. Here we report for the first time the prevalence of nasal carriage, spa typing and antimicrobial resistance of S. aureus in a Tanzanian livestock community. Nasal swabs were taken from 100 humans, 100 pigs and 100 dogs in Morogoro Municipal. Each swab was enriched in Mueller Hinton broth with 6.5% NaCl and subcultured on chromogenic agar for S. aureus detection. Presumptive S. aureus colonies were confirmed to the species level by nuc PCR and analysed by spa typing. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns were determined by disc diffusion method. S. aureus was isolated from 22% of humans, 4% of pigs and 11% of dogs. A total of 21 spa types were identified: 13, 7 and 1 in human, dogs, and pigs, respectively. Three spa types (t314, t223 and t084) were shared between humans and dogs. A novel spa type (t10779) was identified in an isolate recovered from a colonized human. Antimicrobials tested revealed resistance to ampicillin in all isolates, moderate resistances to other antimicrobials with tetracycline resistance being the most frequent. S. aureus carrier frequencies in dogs and humans were within the expected range and low in pigs. The S. aureus spa types circulating in the community were generally not shared by different hosts and majority of types belonged to known clones. Besides ampicillin resistance, moderate levels of antimicrobial resistance were observed irrespective of the host species from which the strains were isolated.

  19. Prevalence of Giardia and Cryptosporidium species in dog park attending dogs compared to non-dog park attending dogs in one region of Colorado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Andrea; Ruch-Gallie, Rebecca; Scorza, Valeria; Lin, Philip; Lappin, Michael R

    2012-03-23

    Dog parks are very popular in urban areas, but there are no current studies attempting to correlate visits to dog parks and risk of colonization by enteric parasites. The purpose of this study was to determine whether dog park visitation is associated with an increased prevalence of enteric parasites or an increase in prevalence of gastrointestinal signs in dogs in northern Colorado. Feces from dogs owned by veterinary students or Veterinary Teaching Hospital staff members were submitted with a completed survey form detailing dog park attendance rates, fecal character scores, and other clinical information. Feces were examined microscopically for parasites after sugar centrifugation, for Giardia spp. cysts and Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts by a commercially available immunofluorescence assay (FA) and the FA positive samples were genotyped after PCR amplification. The Giardia assemblages were determined using the glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) β-giardin and triose phosphate isomerase (TPI) genes and the Cryptosporidium species were determined using the heat shock protein-70 gene. A total of 129 fecal samples were assayed; 66 were from dog park attending dogs and 63 were from non-dog park-attending dogs. The overall parasite prevalence rate was 7.0% (9 of 129 samples). Dog park attending dogs were more likely to be positive for Giardia or Cryptosporidium than non-dog park-attending dogs (p=0.0279), but there was no association of gastrointestinal signs with dog park attendance or with fecal flotation or FA results. The five Giardia isolates were assemblage C and/or D and the one Cryptosporidium isolate was Ctenocephalides canis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Negative electric susceptibility and magnetism from translational invariance and rotational invariance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Je Huan, E-mail: koo@kw.ac.kr

    2015-02-01

    In this work we investigate magnetic effects in terms of the translational and rotational invariances of magnetisation. Whilst Landau-type diamagnetism originates from translational invariance, a new diamagnetism could result from rotational invariance. Translational invariance results in only conventional Landau-type diamagnetism, whereas rotational invariance can induce a paramagnetic susceptibility for localised electrons and also a new kind of diamagnetism that is specific to conducting electrons. In solids, the moving electron shows a paramagnetic susceptibility but the surrounding screening of electrons may produce a new diamagnetic response by Lenz's law, resulting in a total susceptibility that tends to zero. For electricity, similar behaviours are obtained. We also derive the DC-type negative electric susceptibility via two methods in analogy with Landau diamagnetism. - Highlights: • The translational invariance of magnetisation. • The rotational invariance of magnetisation. • An electron attached to an electric vortex. • A kind of Landau paramagnetism. • A kind of Pauli diamagnetism.

  1. K-9 Police Dog Bite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vy Han

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 30-year-old male who was brought into the emergency department (ED by police officers after being bitten in the right lower extremity by a police German Shepard after attempting to flee authorities on foot. The patient stated that the dog immediately bit down on his right calf and proceeded to violently shake its head side to side without releasing its grip until police manually pulled the dog off of him. Upon arrival to the ED, he was tachycardic in the 120’s, complaining of severe, throbbing, sharp pain in the right lower extremity, and was neurovascular intact on exam. Significant findings: The photograph is of the anterior compartment of the right lower leg demonstrating multiple deep lacerations with exposed and torn muscle. X-ray showed no foreign body. Discussion: Police dog bites should be treated more cautiously than typical dog bites because these highly-trained dogs are generally larger breeds which are taught to subdue suspects with a bite-and-hold technique rather than bite and release. This can lead to extensive crush injuries, fractures, large caliber lacerations with associated muscle tissue injury and/or severe neurovascular compromise.1 Hence, police dog bites often require provocative diagnostic testing, specialist consultation for possible operative repair, and aggressive irrigation and ultimately admission for intravenous antibiotics.1 This patient’s wound was aggressively irrigated and evaluated by plastic surgery in the ED. He was ultimately admitted for intravenous antibiotics, pain control, wound care, and healing by secondary intention.

  2. Microwave susceptibility experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConaghy, C.

    1984-05-29

    In certain experimental environments, systems can be affected or damaged by microwave pulses. I have conducted tests at LLNL to understand the phenomenology of microwave susceptibility of system components and subsystem components. To date, my experiments have concentrated on bipolar transistors, similar to what might be used in discrete analog circuits, and on CMOS RAM chips, which might be used in a computer memory system. I observed a decrease in failure energies for both the transistor and the integrated curcuit as I shortened the microwave pulse width. An S band (2.86 GHz) transmit/receive (T/R) tube has also been tested both at S band and at X band (8.16 GHz). The S band pulse had limitations in rise-time from zero power, which had an effect on the amount of power that could be transmitted through the T/R tube, as much as 0.7% of the incident power passed through the tube. All tests were conducted in closed-waveguide or coax test-fixtures, in contrast to the anechoic chambers utilized by other experimenters. I have used both S band and X band Klystron generators. For very high power (greater than 1 MW), I used an additional pulse-compression cavity at S band. Other subsystem components such as an X band mixer and an X band T/R tube will be tested in the future. 8 references.

  3. [Antimicrobial susceptibility cumulative reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canut-Blasco, Andrés; Calvo, Jorge; Rodríguez-Díaz, Juan Carlos; Martínez-Martínez, Luis

    2016-10-01

    Cumulative reports on antimicrobial susceptibility tests data are important for selecting empirical treatments, as an educational tool in programs on antimicrobial use, and for establishing breakpoints defining clinical categories. These reports should be based on data validated by clinical microbiologists using diagnostic samples (not surveillance samples). In order to avoid a bias derived from including several isolates obtained from the same patient, it is recommended that, for a defined period, only the first isolate is counted. A minimal number of isolates per species should be presented: a figure of >=30 isolates is statistically acceptable. The report is usually presented in a table format where, for each cell, information on clinically relevant microorganisms-antimicrobial agents is presented. Depending on particular needs, multiple tables showing data related to patients, samples, services or special pathogens can be prepared. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  4. Risk factors associated with struvite urolithiasis in dogs evaluated at general care veterinary hospitals in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okafor, Chika C; Pearl, David L; Lefebvre, Sandra L; Wang, Mansen; Yang, Mingyin; Blois, Shauna L; Lund, Elizabeth M; Dewey, Cate E

    2013-12-15

    To identify factors associated with development of struvite urolithiasis in dogs evaluated at general care veterinary hospitals in the United States. Retrospective case-control study. 508 dogs with a first-time diagnosis of struvite urolithiasis and 7,135 control dogs. Electronic medical records of all dogs evaluated at 787 general care veterinary hospitals in the United States between October 2007 and December 2010 were reviewed to identify dogs that developed struvite urolithiasis and 2 groups of control dogs with no history of urolithiasis. Information extracted included diet, age, sex, neuter status, breed size category, hospital location, and date of diagnosis. Urinalysis results, urolith composition, and other disease conditions were recorded if applicable. Potential risk factors were assessed with univariable and multivariable regression analysis. Toy- or small-sized breeds had significantly greater odds of struvite urolithiasis, compared with medium- or large-sized breeds. Neutering significantly increased the odds of this outcome in females only; sexually intact females were more likely to develop struvite urolithiasis than were sexually intact males, but only up to 5 years of age. Urinary factors significantly associated with the outcome were basic (vs acidic) pH, presence of RBCs or WBCs, protein concentration > 30 mg/dL, and ketone concentration ≥ 5 mg/dL. Evaluation of demographic characteristics and urinalysis results may be useful in the early identification of struvite urolithiasis in dogs. Periodic urinalysis in dogs is recommended because of the potential health impact of a late diagnosis of urolithiasis.

  5. Nasopharyngeal turbinates in brachycephalic dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginn, Jennifer A; Kumar, M S A; McKiernan, Brendan C; Powers, Barbara E

    2008-01-01

    This retrospective study reports the presence and incidence of nasal turbinates in the nasopharynx (nasopharyngeal turbinates) in a population of brachycephalic dogs and cats exhibiting signs of upper respiratory disease. Medical records were reviewed for 53 brachycephalic dogs and 10 brachycephalic cats undergoing upper airway endoscopy. Nasopharyngeal turbinates were identified in 21% of brachycephalic animals, including 21% of dogs and 20% of cats. Pugs accounted for 32% of all dogs in the study population and 82% of dogs with nasopharyngeal turbinates. The presence of nasopharyngeal turbinates may play a role in upper airway obstruction in the brachycephalic airway syndrome.

  6. History of guide dog use by veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostermeier, Mark

    2010-08-01

    The first guide dog school was established in Germany during World War I to care for German soldiers blinded in that war. Other schools in Germany followed. Observation by an American at one of the schools led to the creation of the first guide dog school in the United States in 1929, "The Seeing Eye." Additional U.S. schools were opened during and after World War II. This article discusses the history of guide dog use by veterans, including the formation of the first guide dog schools in response to aiding blinded servicemen, and the involvement of federal agencies and guide dog schools in providing assistance to blinded veterans.

  7. Risk factors for carriage of antimicrobial-resistant Salmonella spp and Escherichia coli in pet dogs from volunteer households in Ontario, Canada, in 2005 and 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Erin K; Pearl, David L; Janecko, Nicol; Finley, Rita L; Reid-Smith, Richard J; Weese, J Scott; Peregrine, Andrew S

    2015-11-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine pet-related management factors associated with the carriage of antimicrobial-resistant Salmonella spp and Escherichia coli in a population of pet dogs. SAMPLE 138 dogs from 84 households in Ontario, Canada. PROCEDURES From October 2005 through May 2006, dogs and households in Ontario, Canada, were recruited to participate in a cross-sectional study. Fecal samples were submitted for culture of Salmonella spp and E coli, which provided 515 bacterial isolates for antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Multilevel logistic regression models with random effects for household and dog were created to identify pet-related management factors associated with antimicrobial resistance. RESULTS Bacterial species, feeding a homemade diet or adding homemade food to the diet, feeding a raw diet or adding anything raw to the diet, feeding a homemade raw food diet, and feeding raw chicken in the past week were significant risk factors for antimicrobial resistance in this population of dogs. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE In this study, several potentially important pet-related risk factors for the carriage of antimicrobial-resistant Salmonella spp and E coli in pet dogs were identified. Further evaluation of risk factors for antimicrobial resistance in dogs may lead to development of evidence-based guidelines for safe and responsible dog ownership and management to protect the public, especially pet owners who are immunocompromised.

  8. Cost-Effectiveness of Mass Dog Vaccination Campaigns against Rabies in Flores Island, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wera, E; Mourits, M C M; Siko, M M; Hogeveen, H

    2017-12-01

    A dynamic deterministic simulation model was developed to determine the cost-effectiveness of different mass dog vaccination strategies against rabies in a dog population representative of a typical village on Flores Island. Cost-effectiveness was measured as public cost per averted dog-rabies case. Simulations started with the introduction of one infectious dog into a susceptible dog population of 399 dogs and subsequently ran for a period of 10 years. The base scenario represented a situation without any control intervention. Evaluated vaccination strategies were as follows: annual vaccination campaigns with short-acting vaccine (immunity duration of 52 weeks) (AV_52), annual campaigns with long-acting vaccine (immunity duration of 156 weeks) (AV_156), biannual campaigns with short-acting vaccine (BV_52) and once-in-2-years campaigns with long-acting vaccine (O2V_156). The effectiveness of the vaccination strategies was simulated for vaccination coverages of 50% and 70%. Cumulative results were reported for the 10-year simulation period. The base scenario resulted in three epidemic waves, with a total of 1274 dog-rabies cases. The public cost of applying AV_52 at a coverage of 50% was US$5342 for a village. This strategy was unfavourable compared to other strategies, as it was costly and ineffective in controlling the epidemic. The costs of AV_52 at a coverage of 70% and AV_156 at a coverage of 70% were, respectively, US$3646 and US$3716, equivalent to US$3.00 and US$3.17 per averted dog-rabies case. Increasing the coverage of AV_156 from 50% to 70% reduced the number of cases by 7% and reduced the cost by US$1452, resulting in a cost-effectiveness ratio of US$1.81 per averted dog-rabies case. This simulation model provides an effective tool to explore the public cost-effectiveness of mass dog vaccination strategies in Flores Island. Insights obtained from the simulation results are useful for animal health authorities to support decision-making in rabies

  9. Hypogammaglobulinemia in racing Alaskan sled dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, E; Lupfer, C; Banse, H; Hinchcliff, K; Love, S; Nelson, S; Davis, M; Payton, M; Pastey, M

    2010-01-01

    Serum immunoglobulin dynamics have not been studied in racing sled dogs, despite hypoglobulinemia having been reported during racing events. Hypoglobulinemia in racing sled dogs is associated with decreases in serum IgA, IgE, IgG, and IgM concentrations during prolonged exercise. One hundred and fifty-seven Alaskan sled dogs that successfully completed a 1,000 mile race. Serum was obtained from 118 sled dogs within 1 month before the race and within 12 hours after completing the race. Serum also was obtained after 4 months of rest from 51 dogs that successfully completed the race, including 12 previously sampled dogs. Serum total protein ([TP]), albumin, and globulin ([Gl]) were measured, and serum IgA, IgE, IgG, and IgM were quantified by ELISA. The proportion of dogs with [Gl] racing (38 of 118 dogs, 32.2%) than before racing (21 of 118 dogs, 17.8%, P = .005). Four months after racing, [Gl] was racing compared with 4 months after racing (18.88 +/- 5.76). Serum [IgM] and [IgE] were higher and [IgA] was lower before racing compared with immediately after racing. Sled dogs participating in long-distance racing have substantial decreases in [IgG] in addition to decreases in [IgM] and [IgE]. The pronounced hypogammaglobulinemia observed in a large proportion of racing sled dogs might predispose them to infectious disease.

  10. Multifocal retinitis in New Zealand sheep dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, P L; Dubielzig, R R; Kazacos, K R

    1987-01-01

    Thirty-nine percent of 1,448 working sheep dogs were affected with varying degrees of multifocal retinal disease on ophthalmoscopic examination. Lesions consisted of localized areas of hyperreflexia in the tapetal fundus, often associated with hyperpigmentation. Severely affected animals had widespread hyperreflexia with retinal vascular attenuation. Only 6% of 125 New Zealand dogs raised in urban environment were similarly affected. Both eyes of 70 dogs from New Zealand were examined histologically. Forty-seven of 70 dogs had ocular inflammatory disease. Ten other dogs had noninflammatory eye disease, and 13 dogs had normal eyes. Histologically, eyes with inflammatory disease were divided into three categories: Dogs 3 years of age or less with active inflammatory disease of the retina, uvea, and vitreous. Four dogs in this group had migrating nematode larvae identified morphologically as genus Toxocara. Diffuse retinitis and retinal atrophy in conjunction with localized retinal necrosis and choroidal fibrosis. Dogs in this category were severely, clinically affected. Chronic, low-grade retinitis with variable retinal atrophy. Most dogs in this category were over 3 years of age, and many were visually functional. The existence of a definable spectrum of morphological changes associated with inflammation, suggests that Toxocara sp. ocular larva migrans may be the cause of a highly prevalent, potentially blinding syndrome of working sheep dogs in New Zealand.

  11. Comparison between cranial thoracic intervertebral disc herniations in German Shepherd dogs and other large breed dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaitero, Luis; Nykamp, Stephanie; Daniel, Rob; Monteith, Gabrielle

    2013-01-01

    Cranial thoracic intervertebral disc herniations have been reported to be rare in dogs due to the presence of the intercapital ligament, however some studies have proposed they may not be uncommon in German Shepherd dogs. The purpose of this retrospective study was to compare cranial thoracic intervertebral disc herniations in German Shepherd dogs and other large breed dogs (control group). Medical records at the Ontario Veterinary College were searched for German Shepherd dogs and other large breed dogs that had magnetic resonance imaging studies including the T1-T9 region. For each dog and each disc space from T1-T9, three variables (compression, disc degeneration, and herniation) were recorded and graded based on review of sagittal T2-weighted images. Twenty-three German Shepherd dogs and 47 other large breed dogs met inclusion criteria. The German Shepherd dog group had higher scores than the control group for compression (P = 0.0099) and herniation (P dog group, intervertebral discs T2-T3 and T4-T5 had an increased risk for compression and T3-T4 had an increased risk for compression and herniation. Findings from this study indicated that German Shepherd dogs may be more likely than other large breed dogs to have spinal cord compression due to cranial thoracic disc herniations. Imaging of the cranial thoracic spine, including T2-T3, is recommended for German Shepherd dogs with T3-L3 neurological signs. © 2012 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  12. Impacts of Encouraging Dog Walking on Returns of Newly Adopted Dogs to a Shelter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunter, Lisa; Protopopova, Alexandra; Hooker, Steven P; Der Ananian, Cheryl; Wynne, Clive D L

    2017-01-01

    This study involved examining the ability of a postadoption intervention to reduce returns of newly adopted dogs to shelters by encouraging physical activity between adopters and their dogs. Guardians in the intervention group received emails with dog behavior and human activity advice as well as invitations to join weekly dog walks. Both the intervention and control groups completed surveys regarding outdoor activity with their dogs, their dog-walking habits, and perceptions of their dogs' behaviors. Adopter-dog pairs in the intervention group were not significantly more active than those in the control group, nor did they show a reduced incidence of returning their dogs. Guardians in both groups who reported higher obligation and self-efficacy in their dog walking were more active regardless of experimental condition; however, obligation, dog-walking self-efficacy, and perceptions about their dogs' on-leash behaviors did not predict rates of return to the shelter. These findings add to the understanding of shelter dog re-relinquishment and the effective utilization of resources postadoption, and they indicate further research is needed to address the complexities of this newly forming human-dog relationship.

  13. Incidence and impact of dog attacks on guide dogs in the UK: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moxon, R; Whiteside, H; England, G C W

    2016-04-09

    Data on dog attacks on Guide Dogs' stock were reviewed to investigate the characteristics of the attacks. An average of 11.2 attacks occurred each month. Nearly all of the attacks occurred in public areas, 68.4 per cent of victim dogs were qualified guide dogs and 55.5 per cent of victim dogs were working in harness when they were attacked. Guide Dogs' stock were injured in 43.2 per cent of attacks and veterinary costs for attacks were estimated at £34,514.30. Over 40 per cent of qualified guide dogs' working ability was affected and >20 per cent of qualified guide dogs required some time off from working after a dog attack. Twenty dogs were permanently withdrawn from the Guide Dogs' programme as a result of dog attacks, 13 of which were qualified and working with guide dog owners at the time of the withdrawal; this resulted in a financial cost of >£600,000 to the charity. More importantly perhaps, temporary and permanent withdrawals have a significant impact upon the mobility and independence of guide dog owners and in many cases significantly impacted their emotional well-being. British Veterinary Association.

  14. Helminth infections in domestic dogs from Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskvina, T. V.; Ermolenko, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    Dogs are the hosts for a wide helminth spectrum including tapeworms, flatworms, and nematodes. These parasites affect the dog health and cause morbidity and mortality, especially in young and old animals. Some species, as Toxocara canis, Ancylostoma caninum, Dipylidium caninum, and Echinococcus spp. are well-known zoonotic parasites worldwide, resulting in high public health risks. Poor data about canine helminth species and prevalence are available in Russia, mainly due to the absence of official guidelines for the control of dog parasites. Moreover, the consequent low quality of veterinary monitoring and use of preventive measures, the high rate of environmental contamination by dog feces and the increase of stray dog populations, make the control of the environmental contamination by dog helminths very difficult in this country. This paper reviews the knowledge on canine helminth fauna and prevalence in Russia. Practical aspects related to diagnosis, treatment, and control of parasitic diseases of dogs in Russia are discussed. PMID:27956777

  15. Continued distress among abandoned dogs in Fukushima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, Miho; Mogi, Kazutaka; Kikusui, Takefumi

    2012-01-01

    In Fukushima, Japan, a prolonged refugee situation caused by a major nuclear incident after the earthquake of March 11, 2011 has led to the unintentional abandonment of many pets. We received stray or abandoned dogs from rescue centers in Fukushima Prefecture. During re-socialization training and health care, we accessed the behavioral characteristics and the urine cortisol level of each dog and compared them with those of other abandoned dogs not involved in this earthquake. The dogs from Fukushima showed significantly lower aggression toward unfamiliar people, trainability, and attachment to their caretakers; also, urine cortisol levels in the dogs from Fukushima were 5-10-fold higher than those in abandoned dogs from another area of Japan. These results suggested that the dogs from Fukushima suffered through an extremely stressful crisis.

  16. Primary rib tumors in 54 dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirkey-Ehrhart, N; Withrow, S J; Straw, R C; Ehrhart, E J; Page, R L; Hottinger, H L; Hahn, K A; Morrison, W B; Albrecht, M R; Hedlund, C S

    1995-01-01

    Fifty-four dogs with primary tumors of the rib were evaluated. Thirty-four dogs had osteosarcomas, 15 dogs had chondrosarcomas, three dogs had hemangiosarcomas, and two dogs had fibrosarcomas. Forty-nine dogs had en bloc excision. Within the osteosarcoma group, nine animals received postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy. These animals had significantly longer median disease-free intervals (225 days) and median survival times (240 days) than dogs with osteosarcoma treated by surgery alone (median disease-free interval, 60 days; median survival, 90 days). Chondrosarcoma had a better prognosis (median disease-free interval, 1,080 days; median survival, 1,080 days) than osteosarcoma, hemangiosarcoma, or fibrosarcoma of the rib. Age, weight, sex, number of ribs resected, tumor volume, and total cisplatin dose did not influence survival nor disease-free interval.

  17. Gene susceptibility in Iranian asthmatic patients: a narrative review ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hence, we carried out a systematic review to assess the susceptible genes for asthma in Iranian population. We conducted a literature search by using the electronic database PubMed, Biological Abstracts Web of Science, Current Contents Connect, Cinahl, ScienceDirect, Scopus, IranMedex, and Scientific Information ...

  18. Risk of reduced animal welfare by permanent outdoor keeping of dogs and by use of dogs in long-distance sled dog racing

    OpenAIRE

    Norwegian Scientific Committee for Food Safety

    2016-01-01

    The Norwegian Food Safety Authority (NFSA) asks the Norwegian Scientific Committee for Food Safety (VKM) to assess the risk of reduced animal welfare in dogs kept permanently outdoors and dogs used for long-distance sled dog racing In Norway, sled dogs are often kept outdoors. This is also true for several farm- or hunting dogs. The NFSA asks VKM to assess the risk of reduced animal welfare when dogs are kept permanently outdoors. The NFSA will use the risk assessment as sci...

  19. Urban dogs in rural areas: Human-mediated movement defines dog populations in southern Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villatoro, Federico J; Sepúlveda, Maximiliano A; Stowhas, Paulina; Silva-Rodríguez, Eduardo A

    2016-12-01

    Management strategies for dog populations and their diseases include reproductive control, euthanasia and vaccination, among others. However, the effectiveness of these strategies can be severely affected by human-mediated dog movement. If immigration is important, then the location of origin of dogs imported by humans will be fundamental to define the spatial scales over which population management and research should apply. In this context, the main objective of our study was to determine the spatial extent of dog demographic processes in rural areas and the proportion of dogs that could be labeled as immigrants at multiple spatial scales. To address our objective we conducted surveys in households located in a rural landscape in southern Chile. Interviews allowed us to obtain information on the demographic characteristics of dogs in these rural settings, human influence on dog mortality and births, the localities of origin of dogs living in rural areas, and the spatial extent of human-mediated dog movement. We found that most rural dogs (64.1%) were either urban dogs that had been brought to rural areas (40.0%), or adopted dogs that had been previously abandoned in rural roads (24.1%). Some dogs were brought from areas located as far as ∼700km away from the study area. Human-mediated movement of dogs, especially from urban areas, seems to play a fundamental role in the population dynamics of dogs in rural areas. Consequently, local scale efforts to manage dog populations or their diseases are unlikely to succeed if implemented in isolation, simply because dogs can be brought from surrounding urban areas or even distant locations. We suggest that efforts to manage or study dog populations and related diseases should be implemented using a multi-scale approach. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Electronics and electronic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Olsen, George H

    1987-01-01

    Electronics and Electronic Systems explores the significant developments in the field of electronics and electronic devices. This book is organized into three parts encompassing 11 chapters that discuss the fundamental circuit theory and the principles of analog and digital electronics. This book deals first with the passive components of electronic systems, such as resistors, capacitors, and inductors. These topics are followed by a discussion on the analysis of electronic circuits, which involves three ways, namely, the actual circuit, graphical techniques, and rule of thumb. The remaining p

  1. Carriage of Staphylococcus species in the veterinary visiting dog population in mainland UK: molecular characterisation of resistance and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedley, Amy L; Dawson, Susan; Maddox, Thomas W; Coyne, Karen P; Pinchbeck, Gina L; Clegg, Peter; Jamrozy, Dorota; Fielder, Mark D; Donovan, David; Nuttall, Tim; Williams, Nicola J

    2014-05-14

    This study investigated the prevalence of nasal carriage of staphylococci in dogs and determined the characteristics of the isolates. A total of 724 dogs from 87 veterinary practices across the mainland UK were screened for carriage of Staphylococcus spp. All isolates were examined for meticillin resistance (MR) and the presence of the mecA gene investigated in those isolates showing resistance. All coagulase-positive staphylococci and MR coagulase-negative staphylococci (MRCoNS) were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Spa typing and DNA microarray analysis of resistance and virulence genes was carried out on all MR S. aureus (MRSA) and a subset of meticillin susceptible S. aureus (MSSA). Staphylococci were isolated from 399 (55.1%) of the dogs; only seven (1%) carried MRSA, all of which were identified as the dominant UK healthcare-associated strain (EMRSA-15, ST22). MSSA was identified in 47 (6.5%) dogs, the sequence types of which have been suggested as precursors to successful MRSA clones. Forty (5.5%) dogs carried MRCoNS, while no dogs carried MR S. pseudintermedius, although this is increasingly reported in mainland Europe. Resistance to antimicrobials among the isolates varied between species, with multidrug resistance (MDR) in 87.5% of MRCoNS and 21.8% of coagulase positive staphylococci. Microarray analysis of MRSA and a subset of MSSA isolates identified numerous virulence genes associated with pathogenesis, which are commonly identified in isolates of human origin. However, no isolates carried Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) genes. This study suggests that MRSA carriage is low in the vet visiting dog population, but there is a diverse range of virulence and resistance determinants in canine S. aureus and MRCoNS isolates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Intervertebral disc degeneration in dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergknut, N.

    2011-01-01

    Back pain is common in both dogs and humans, and is often associated with intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. The IVDs are essential structures of the spine and degeneration can ultimately result in diseases such as IVD herniation or spinal instability. In order to design new treatments halting

  3. Retinal astrocytoma in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroki, Keiichi; Kice, Nathan; Ota-Kuroki, Juri

    2017-09-01

    A miniature schnauzer dog presenting with hyphema and glaucoma of the right eye had a retinal neoplasm. Neoplastic cells stained positively for glial fibrillary acidic protein, vimentin, and S-100 and largely negatively for oligodendrocyte transcription factor 2 by immunohistochemistry. The clinical and histopathological features of canine retinal astrocytomas are discussed.

  4. Intervertebral disc degeneration in dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergknut, Niklas

    Back pain is common in both dogs and humans, and is often associated with intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. The IVDs are essential structures of the spine and degeneration can ultimately result in diseases such as IVD herniation or spinal instability. In order to design new treatments halting

  5. SlideDog / Siim Sein

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Sein, Siim

    2015-01-01

    SlideDog on multimeediumi esitluse tööriist, mis võimaldab ühendada PowerPointi esitlused, PDF-failid, Prezi esitlused, videoklipid, helifailid, veebilehed ja palju muud üheks sujuvaks esitluskogemuseks konverentsil, seminaril või muul üritusel

  6. Shoulder arthrodesis in 14 dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Noel; Yeadon, Russell; Smith, Thomas J; Johnson, Jacqueline; Baltzer, Wendy I; Amils, Raquel; Farrell, Michael; Frost, Alasdair O; Frost, Alastair; Holsworth, Ian G

    2012-08-01

    To report surgical technique and clinical outcome of shoulder arthrodesis in dogs. Multicenter clinical case series. Dogs (n = 14). Shoulder arthrodesis featured craniolateral plate and screw application, with application of a 2nd plate and screws craniolaterally or caudolaterally in 5 shoulders. Implants included the locking string of pearls (SOP)™ plate in 7 shoulders. Subjective preoperative, 5-8 weeks postoperative, and 11-16 weeks postoperative clinical and radiographic findings were documented. Owner questionnaire evaluation of outcome was performed 6-20 months postoperatively. Mean angle of arthrodesis was 114° (range 102°-122°). Progression of arthrodesis was noted in 13/14 cases at both the 5-8 and 11-16 weeks postoperative radiographic assessments. Nine complications occurred in 7/14 dogs, graded as catastrophic in 2/9, major in 2/9, and minor in 5/9. Where morbidity was successfully managed, 11-16-week and 6-10-month postoperative limb function was positive on both veterinary and owner evaluations in almost all cases, and in several, functional lameness was considered sufficiently mild as to be imperceptible on subjective veterinary evaluation. Where present, limb circumduction was noted as the major feature of persistent lameness. Shoulder arthrodesis in dogs results in acceptable limb function and should be considered for the management of debilitating shoulder pathology despite a high incidence of complications. Application of the SOP plate to aid shoulder arthrodesis warrants further study. © Copyright 2012 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  7. [Antimicrobial susceptibility in Chile 2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifuentes-D, Marcela; Silva, Francisco; García, Patricia; Bello, Helia; Briceño, Isabel; Calvo-A, Mario; Labarca, Jaime

    2014-04-01

    Bacteria antimicrobial resistance is an uncontrolled public health problem that progressively increases its magnitude and complexity. The Grupo Colaborativo de Resistencia, formed by a join of experts that represent 39 Chilean health institutions has been concerned with bacteria antimicrobial susceptibility in our country since 2008. In this document we present in vitro bacterial susceptibility accumulated during year 2012 belonging to 28 national health institutions that represent about 36% of hospital discharges in Chile. We consider of major importance to report periodically bacteria susceptibility so to keep the medical community updated to achieve target the empirical antimicrobial therapies and the control measures and prevention of the dissemination of multiresistant strains.

  8. Prevalence of genetic disorders in dog breeds: a literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wirth, J.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic disorders are common in dogs and in the media it is reported that genetic disorders are more frequent in pedigree dogs than in look-a-likes or in mixed-breed dogs. Here, we consider pedigree dogs as purebred dogs (i.e. matching a breed-specific morphology) with a registered and certified

  9. Complex polysaccharide inclusions in skeletal muscle adjacent to sarcomas in two dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, B A; Bildfell, R J; Cooper, B J; Giger, U; Fischer, K A

    2002-03-01

    Inclusions of periodic acid-Schiff-positive, amylase resistant material were found within skeletal muscle fibers adjacent to an osteosarcoma in the proximal femur of an 8-year-old intact female Cocker Spaniel dog (dog No. 1) and adjacent to a synovial cell sarcoma of the stifle joint in a 7-year-old spayed female Bouvier des Flandres dog (dog No. 2). Inclusions were pale blue-gray with hematoxylin and eosin stain and formed irregular inclusions, replacing up to approximately 80% of the fiber diameter. Inclusions from dog No. 2 were of non-membrane-bound granular to filamentous material that occasionally formed discrete, elongate electron-dense masses. The features of these inclusions were similar to those of materials previously described as complex polysaccharide, polyglucosan bodies, amylopectin, and Lafora bodies. Evidence for a generalized metabolic disorder was not found in these two dogs, suggesting that storage of complex polysaccharide can occur as a relatively nonspecific response to metabolic alterations in skeletal muscle in a variety of conditions.

  10. Clioquinol and 2,5-hexanedione induce different types of distal axonopathy in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krinke, G; Schaumburg, H H; Spencer, P S; Thomann, P; Hess, R

    1979-08-01

    The central distal axonopathy induced in dogs by the administration of high doses of clioquinol is contrasted with the central-peripheral distal axonopathy precipitated by intoxication with 2,5-hexanedione. Mature, pure-bred Beagle dogs received a daily oral dose of 400 mg/kg of clioquinol for up to 7 months, or 1 ml per animal (approximately corresponding to 110 mg/kg) of 2,5-hexanedione for up to 5 months. Intoxicated and control animal were killed and perfused at monthly intervals, so that the spatial-temporal development of the lesion could be followed and correlated with clinical symptoms. During the treatment, dogs intoxicated with 2,5-hexanedione developed symptoms of peripheral neuropathy consisting of flaccid weakness, muscle atrophy, hind-limb foot-drop and areflexia. By contrast, the dogs surviving clioquinol intoxication exhibited a stiff-legged gait, hyperreflexia but no muscle atrophy. Light and electron microscope examination of central and peripheral nervous tissue from dogs intoxicated with 2,5-hexanedione revealed giant axonal swelling and distal axonal degeneration. By contrast, dogs receiving clioquinol showed a distal axonal degeneration confined to the optic tract and the long spinal cord tracts, without any visible involvement of peripheral nerves.

  11. Canine distemper outbreak in pet store puppies linked to a high-volume dog breeder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumaker, Brant A; Miller, Myrna M; Grosdidier, Paul; Cavender, Jacqueline L; Montgomery, Donald L; Cornish, Todd E; Farr, Robert M; Driscoll, Michael; Maness, Lori J; Gray, Tangney; Petersen, Dana; Brown, William L; Logan, Jim; O'Toole, Donal

    2012-11-01

    Canine distemper is uncommon in the pet trade in the United States, in large part due to effective vaccines against Canine distemper virus (CDV). This is a report of CDV affecting 24 young dogs of multiple breeds shortly after sale by 2 pet stores in Wyoming during August-October 2010. Cases were diagnosed over 37 days. Diagnosis was established by a combination of fluorescent antibody staining, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, negative stain electron microscopy, and necropsy with histopathology. Viral hemagglutinin gene sequences were analyzed from 2 affected dogs and were identical (GenBank accession no. JF283477). Sequences were distinct from those in a contemporaneous unrelated case of CDV in a Wyoming dog (JF283476) that had no contact with the pet store dogs. The breeding property from which the puppies originated was quarantined by the Kansas Animal Health Department. Puppies intended for sale were tested for CDV. Canine distemper was diagnosed on site in November 2010. At that point 1,466 dogs were euthanized to eliminate dispersal of the disease through commercial channels. The investigation underscores the risks inherent in large-scale dog breeding when vaccination and biosecurity practices are suboptimal.

  12. The enigma of the dog mummy from ancient Egypt and the origin of 'Rhipicephalus sanguineus'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otranto, Domenico; Huchet, Jean-Bernard; Giannelli, Alessio; Callou, Cecile; Dantas-Torres, Filipe

    2014-01-20

    Ticks belonging to the Rhipicephalus sanguineus group are amongst the most important vectors of pathogenic microorganisms to dogs and humans. However, the taxonomy of this species group is still the subject of debate, especially because there is no type specimen or reliable morphological description for Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu stricto. Recently, a comprehensive morphological and genetic study on representative tick specimens from Europe, Africa, Americas, and Oceania, revealed the existence of at least four morphologically and genetically distinct species under the name 'R. sanguineus' infesting dogs from different countries. Herein, we examined morphologically tick specimens retrieved on a dog mummy from Ancient Egypt (ca. 1st century - 4th century A.D.). The dog mummy and associated ticks were found during an archaeological expedition conducted in El Deir. Scanning electron micrographs allowed us to assess their identity as belonging to the R. sanguineus group. In addition on the basis of the scutal punctation pattern, spiracular plates, width of dorsal tail of spiracular plates relative to the adjacent festoon, female genital aperture, male adanal plates and accessory shields, these ticks were tentatively identified as Rhipicephalus sp. II (=temperate species). It can be concluded that R. sanguineus group ticks have infested dogs living in the Mediterranean region since ancient times. This finding represents the oldest record of ticks on any animal species and adds a new piece in the complex puzzle regarding tick parasitism on dogs and humans and their role as vectors of pathogens.

  13. Leishmania (Viannia braziliensis infection in two Colombian dogs: a note on infectivity for sand flies and response to treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno L. Travi

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Although canine cutaneous leishmaniasis has been reported in several foci of South America, no published information from Colombia is available. Objective. We report on two cases found in the Pacific coast region of this country, which presented as a single scrotal ulcer in one dog, and two ulcers on the external surface of the ear in a second dog. Materials and methods. Parasites were isolated by culture in Senekjie’s culture medium and identified using monoclonal antibodies. The capacity of these dogs to transmit the parasites to sand fly vectors (Lutzomyia trapidoi, Lutzomyia gomezi, Lutzomyia longipalpis, Lutzomyia youngi was tested by allowing the flies to feed on the lesion borders. Results. Both isolates were identified as Leishmania (Viannia braziliensis. No infections were detected upon dissection of engorged flies. A single peri-and sub-lesional injection of 1-2 ml of pentavalent antimony in the dog with ear lesions resulted in clinical cure 6 weeks post-treatment. Conclusions. These observations suggest that although dogs are susceptible to L. braziliensis, their reservoir competence could be low. However, if further studies indicate that canines are capable reservoir hosts of L. Viannia spp., the local treatment of lesions could become a feasible approach to diminish the risk of human infection in the peridomestic setting, without sacrificing infected dogs.

  14. Clinical presentation, convalescence, and relapse of rocky mountain spotted fever in dogs experimentally infected via tick bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Michael L; Killmaster, Lindsay F; Zemtsova, Galina E; Ritter, Jana M; Langham, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a tick-borne disease caused by R. rickettsii in North and South America. Domestic dogs are susceptible to infection and canine RMSF can be fatal without appropriate treatment. Although clinical signs of R. rickettsii infection in dogs have been described, published reports usually include descriptions of either advanced clinical cases or experimental infections caused by needle-inoculation of cultured pathogen rather than by tick bite. The natural progression of a tick-borne R. rickettsii infection has not been studied in sufficient detail. Here, we provide a detailed description of clinical, hematological, molecular, and serological dynamics of RMSF in domestic dogs from the day of experimental exposure to infected ticks through recovery. Presented data indicate that neither the height/duration of fever nor detection of rickettsial DNA in dogs' blood by PCR are good indicators for clinical prognosis. Only the apex and subsequent subsidence of neutrophilia seem to mark the beginning of recovery and allow predicting a favorable outcome in Rickettsia-infected dogs, even despite the continuing persistence of mucosal petechiae and skin rash. On the other hand the appropriate (doxycycline) antibiotic therapy of sufficient duration is crucial in prevention of RMSF relapses in dogs.

  15. Orthopaedic problems in old dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, L C

    1990-04-21

    With advancing years a dog may suffer from a variety of conditions of its musculoskeletal system which adversely affect its ability to exercise and may cause it to be retired from activities in work and sport for which it has been trained. Arthritis is common, and in many cases arises from developmental errors suffered in puppyhood, such as hip dysplasia, osteochondrosis and growth plate disorders. Trauma to joints (ligament ruptures, dislocations and fractures) may also be the precursor of degenerative joint changes later in life. It is important, therefore, for all such conditions to be corrected as effectively as possible if joint disease is to be minimised as the dog grows older. Preventive action is also required for some conditions for which correction may not be entirely feasible, so the identification of modes of inheritance is important if those are to be controlled by breeding. Certain spinal disorders also tend to increase in prevalence with age, particularly spondylosis deformans, neoplasms and chronic degenerative radiculomyelopathy. As it happens, spondylosis in mild to moderate degree affects pet dogs very little, but a reduction in spinal flexibility can cause problems for dogs required to be agile in work or sport. In common with other body tissues, neoplasm of the locomotor system increases in occurrence in older dogs, and although the overall incidence of tumours of bones, joints, nervous tissue and muscle is relatively low, these are the most serious of all the limb and spinal conditions encountered because of their life threatening propensities. The treatment required covers a wide range from simple changes of management in order to reduce exercise, to the use of analgesics and anti-inflammatory drugs and to surgery to remove diseased tissue, stabilise joints or reduce pain with forms of arthroplasty or arthrodesis.

  16. pso.ATION AND ANTIMICROBIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    isolates vere made using standard methods, Antibiotic susceptibility tests against commonly prescribed ... Acute otitis media is rapid with short .... sensitivity tests. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests: The antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of major Gram positive and negative bacterial isolates obtained from clinical specimens.

  17. [Lens luxation in dogs: a retrospective study of 134 dogs (2000-2011)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betschart; Hässig; Spiess

    2014-03-01

    This retrospective study evaluated cases of lens luxation in dogs that were documented at the University of Zurich Veterinary Teaching Hospital between 2000 and 2011. A total 134 dogs were included in the study. This population of dogs with lens luxation represents 0.41 % of all dogs presented to the Zurich Veterinary Teaching Hospital (32'523) and 3.02 % of all dogs presented to the ophthalmology service during the same time period. The 134 dogs represented over 40 different breeds, including mixed breeds. 63 of the dogs were male, 71 were female. The 134 dogs were divided in primary lens luxation (86 of the 134 dogs, 64 %) and secondary lens luxation (48 dogs, 36 %). The most frequent causes for secondary lens luxation were glaucoma (58 %), cataract (19 %) and trauma (17 %). This study shows the predisposition for primary lens luxations in terrier breeds, Chinese Crested dogs, Pinscher and Spitz. In contrast, Siberian Huskies, Basset Hounds, Bearded Collies, Cairn Terriers, mixed breed dogs, Bolonka Zwetna, Boston Terriers, Borzoi, Doberman, Eurasian, Leonberg, Luzerner Niederlaufhund and Weimaraner suffered significantly more often from secondary lens luxation. There was no sex predilection for primary or secondary lens luxation. Dogs with primary lens luxation were on average 7.39 ± 3.02 years old, which is significantly younger than the dogs with secondary lens luxation (9.12 ± 3.38 years). Dogs with primary lens luxation showed a significantly higher rate of a bilateral development than those with secondary lens luxation (85.5 % of the dogs with primary lens luxation and only 14.5 % of the dogs with secondary lens luxation showed it in both their eyes).

  18. Does getting a dog increase recreational walking?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knuiman Matthew W

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study examines changes in socio-demographic, environmental and intrapersonal factors associated with dog acquisition in non-dog owners at baseline to 12-months follow-up and the effect of dog acquisition on minutes per week of recreational walking. Methods RESIDE study participants completed self-administered questionnaires (baseline and 12-months follow-up measuring physical activity, dog ownership, dog walking behavior as well as environmental, intrapersonal and socio-demographic factors. Analysis was restricted to 'Continuing non-owners' (i.e., non-owners at both baseline and follow-up; n = 681 and 'New dog owners' (i.e., non-owners who acquired a dog by follow-up; n = 92. Results Overall, 12% of baseline non-owners had acquired a dog at follow-up. Dog acquisition was associated with working and having children at home. Those who changed from single to couple marital status were also more likely to acquire a dog. The increase in minutes of walking for recreation within the neighborhood from baseline to follow-up was 48 minutes/week for new dog owners compared with 12 minutes/week for continuing non-owners (p p p > 0.05 after further adjustment for change in baseline to follow-up variables. Increase in intention to walk was the main factor contributing to attenuation of the effect of dog acquisition on recreational walking. Conclusion This study used a large representative sample of non-owners to examine the relationship between dog acquisition and recreational walking and provides evidence to suggest that dog acquisition leads to an increase in walking. The most likely mechanism through which dog acquisition facilitates increased physical activity is through behavioral intention via the dog's positive effect on owner's cognitive beliefs about walking, and through the provision of motivation and social support for walking. The results suggest that behavioral intention mediates the relationship between dog acquisition

  19. Growth standard charts for monitoring bodyweight in dogs of different sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salt, Carina; Morris, Penelope J; German, Alexander J; Wilson, Derek; Lund, Elizabeth M; Cole, Tim J; Butterwick, Richard F

    2017-01-01

    Limited information is available on what constitutes optimal growth in dogs. The primary aim of this study was to develop evidence-based growth standards for dogs, using retrospective analysis of bodyweight and age data from >6 million young dogs attending a large corporate network of primary care veterinary hospitals across the USA. Electronic medical records were used to generate bodyweight data from immature client-owned dogs, that were healthy and had remained in ideal body condition throughout the first 3 years of life. Growth centile curves were constructed using Generalised Additive Models for Location, Shape and Scale. Curves were displayed graphically as centile charts covering the age range 12 weeks to 2 years. Over 100 growth charts were modelled, specific to different combinations of breed, sex and neuter status. Neutering before 37 weeks was associated with a slight upward shift in growth trajectory, whilst neutering after 37 weeks was associated with a slight downward shift in growth trajectory. However, these shifts were small in comparison to inter-individual variability amongst dogs, suggesting that separate curves for neutered dogs were not needed. Five bodyweight categories were created to cover breeds up to 40kg, using both visual assessment and hierarchical cluster analysis of breed-specific growth curves. For 20/24 of the individual breed centile curves, agreement with curves for the corresponding bodyweight categories was good. For the remaining 4 breed curves, occasional deviation across centile lines was observed, but overall agreement was acceptable. This suggested that growth could be described using size categories rather than requiring curves for specific breeds. In the current study, a series of evidence-based growth standards have been developed to facilitate charting of bodyweight in healthy dogs. Additional studies are required to validate these standards and create a clinical tool for growth monitoring in pet dogs.

  20. Growth standard charts for monitoring bodyweight in dogs of different sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salt, Carina; Morris, Penelope J.; Wilson, Derek; Lund, Elizabeth M.; Cole, Tim J.; Butterwick, Richard F.

    2017-01-01

    Limited information is available on what constitutes optimal growth in dogs. The primary aim of this study was to develop evidence-based growth standards for dogs, using retrospective analysis of bodyweight and age data from >6 million young dogs attending a large corporate network of primary care veterinary hospitals across the USA. Electronic medical records were used to generate bodyweight data from immature client-owned dogs, that were healthy and had remained in ideal body condition throughout the first 3 years of life. Growth centile curves were constructed using Generalised Additive Models for Location, Shape and Scale. Curves were displayed graphically as centile charts covering the age range 12 weeks to 2 years. Over 100 growth charts were modelled, specific to different combinations of breed, sex and neuter status. Neutering before 37 weeks was associated with a slight upward shift in growth trajectory, whilst neutering after 37 weeks was associated with a slight downward shift in growth trajectory. However, these shifts were small in comparison to inter-individual variability amongst dogs, suggesting that separate curves for neutered dogs were not needed. Five bodyweight categories were created to cover breeds up to 40kg, using both visual assessment and hierarchical cluster analysis of breed-specific growth curves. For 20/24 of the individual breed centile curves, agreement with curves for the corresponding bodyweight categories was good. For the remaining 4 breed curves, occasional deviation across centile lines was observed, but overall agreement was acceptable. This suggested that growth could be described using size categories rather than requiring curves for specific breeds. In the current study, a series of evidence-based growth standards have been developed to facilitate charting of bodyweight in healthy dogs. Additional studies are required to validate these standards and create a clinical tool for growth monitoring in pet dogs. PMID:28873413

  1. Hypnotic susceptibility and dream characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamore, N; Barrett, D

    1989-11-01

    This study examined the relationship of hypnotic susceptibility to a variety of dream characteristics and types of dream content. A Dream Questionnaire was constructed synthesizing Gibson's dream inventory and Hilgard's theoretical conceptions of hypnosis. Employing the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility and the Field Inventory for evaluating hypnotic response, several dream dimensions correlated significantly with hypnotizability. For subjects as a whole, the strongest correlates were the frequency of dreams which they believed to be precognitive and out-of-body dreams. Ability to dream on a chosen topic also correlated significantly with hypnotic susceptibility for both genders. For females only, there was a negative correlation of hypnotic susceptibility to flying dreams. Absorption correlated positively with dream recall, ability to dream on a chosen topic, reports of conflict resolution in dreams, creative ideas occurring in dreams, amount of color in dreams, pleasantness of dreams, bizarreness of dreams, flying dreams and precognitive dreams.

  2. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Clostridium difficile isolated from animals and humans in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Otávio Silveira Silva

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate antimicrobial susceptibility in Clostridium difficile strains isolated from animals and humans in Brazil. The 54 C. difficile strains used were isolated from stool samples from piglets (n=16, dogs (n=13, humans (n=13, foals (n=8 calves (n=2, an ocelot (n=1 and a maned wolf (n=1. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined using the serial plate agar dilution method for penicillin, florfenicol, oxytetracycline, erythromycin, vancomycin, metronidazole and tylosin. The C. difficile strains assessed were susceptible to metronidazole and vancomycin. Florfenicol resistance was rarely observed; 52 (96.4% strains were sensitive to this antimicrobial. Five (9.3%, five (9.3%, 14 (25.9% and 20 (37.0% strains were resistant to oxytetracycline, penicillin, tylosin and erythromycin respectively.

  3. Personality of owners and their dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuša Klinar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to find association between the personality of owners and the personality of their dogs, assessed by their owners. Furthermore, we were interested in finding differences between dogs of different breeds. The sample included 661 owners (556 women and 105 men and an equal number of their dogs (332 females and 329 males. The participants filled in the Big Five Inventory and slightly adopted the Big Five Inventory for dogs. The results indicated statistically significant correlations between almost all owner's personality dimensions and personality dimensions of their dogs. Besides the influence of owners and their personalities on the dog's personality, a possible cause of these associations could be their misevaluation as they want their dogs to have some equal characteristics as they have. Analysis of the data also revealed significant differences in dimensions between breeds in three of four dogs' personalities. Results were partly in accordance with hypothesized differences which were based upon official descriptions of temperament of specific breeds. Despite the fact that the research confirms that owners can judge dog's personality with satisfactory levels of accuracy, it is necessary to account all limitations of measuring dogs' personality in interpreting the results.

  4. Ancestral susceptibility to colorectal cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Huhn, S.; Pardini, Barbara; Naccarati, Alessio; Vodička, Pavel (ed.); Hemminki, K.; Försti, A.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 2 (2012), s. 197-204 ISSN 0267-8357 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/07/1430; GA ČR GAP304/10/1286 Grant - others:EU FP7(XE) HEALTH-F4-2007-200767 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : cancer susceptibility * molecular epidemiology * genetic susceptibility Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.500, year: 2012

  5. Domestic dog demographic structure and dynamics relevant to rabies control planning in urban areas in Africa: the case of Iringa, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gsell, Alena S; Knobel, Darryn L; Kazwala, Rudovick R; Vounatsou, Penelope; Zinsstag, Jakob

    2012-12-05

    Mass vaccinations of domestic dogs have been shown to effectively control canine rabies and hence human exposure to rabies. Knowledge of dog population demography is essential for planning effective rabies vaccination programmes; however, such information is still rare for African domestic dog populations, particularly so in urban areas. This study describes the demographic structure and population dynamics of a domestic dog population in an urban sub-Saharan African setting. In July to November 2005, we conducted a full household-level census and a cross-sectional dog demography survey in four urban wards of Iringa Municipality, Tanzania. The achievable vaccination coverage was assessed by a two-stage vaccination campaign, and the proportion of feral dogs was estimated by a mark-recapture transect study. The estimated size of the domestic dog population in Iringa was six times larger than official town records assumed, however, the proportion of feral dogs was estimated to account for less than 1% of the whole population. An average of 13% of all households owned dogs which equalled a dog:human ratio of 1:14, or 0.31 dogs per household or 334 dogs km-2. Dog female:male ratio was 1:1.4. The average age of the population was 2.2 years, 52% of all individuals were less than one year old. But mortality within the first year was high (72%). Females became fertile at the age of 10 months and reportedly remained fertile up to the age of 11 years. The average number of litters whelped per fertile female per year was 0.6 with an average of 5.5 pups born per litter. The population growth was estimated at 10% y-1. Such high birth and death rates result in a rapid replacement of anti-rabies immunised individuals with susceptible ones. This loss in herd immunity needs to be taken into account in the design of rabies control programmes. The very small proportion of truly feral dogs in the population implies that vaccination campaigns aimed at the owned dog population are

  6. Survey-based analysis of risk factors for injury among dogs participating in agility training and competition events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Kimberley L; Dickey, James P; Bent, Leah R; Thomason, Jeffrey J; Moëns, Noel M M

    2013-10-01

    To identify potential risk factors for agility-related injuries among dogs. Internet-based, retrospective, cross-sectional survey. 3,801 privately owned dogs participating in agility training or trials. A retrospective electronic survey was used to investigate potential risk factors for injury among dogs participating in agility-related activities. Respondents were handlers recruited through member lists of large canine agility associations in Canada and the United Kingdom and through promotion on an agility blog site. Variables evaluated included demographic information for handlers and dogs, exposure variables (eg, frequency of agility practice and competition in the past year), and use of preventive measures intended to keep dogs fit for agility (warmup, cooldown, or conditioning exercises; alternative therapeutic treatments [eg, acupuncture, massage, or chiropractic care]; or dietary supplement products). Data were collected from 1,669 handlers of 3,801 agility dogs internationally; 1,209 (32%) dogs incurred ≥ 1 injury. Previous injury (OR, 100.5), ≤ 4 years of agility experience for dogs (OR, 1.5), use of alternative therapeutic treatments (OR, 1.5), and Border Collie breed (OR, 1.7) were associated with increased odds of injury. Handlers having 5 to 10 or > 10 years of experience (OR, 0.8 and 0.6, respectively) and dogs having > 4 years of experience in the sport (OR, 0.6) were associated with decreased odds of injury. Specific factors were associated with agility-related injuries in dogs. Educational prevention strategies should target at-risk populations in an effort to reduce potential injuries. Future research should focus on the biomechanical factors associated with agility-related injuries.

  7. Prevalence of and risk factors for degenerative mitral valve disease in dogs attending primary-care veterinary practices in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattin, M J; Boswood, A; Church, D B; López-Alvarez, J; McGreevy, P D; O'Neill, D G; Thomson, P C; Brodbelt, D C

    2015-01-01

    To date, epidemiological studies on degenerative mitral valve disease (DMVD) in dogs have largely reported referral caseloads or been limited to predisposed breeds. Analysis of primary-care data to identify factors associated with DMVD would help clinicians identify high-risk individuals and improve understanding. To estimate the prevalence of and identify risk factors for DMVD in dogs attending primary-care veterinary practices in England. Cases were identified within the electronic patient records of 111,967 dogs attending 93 practices. Four hundred and 5 dogs were diagnosed with DMVD (diagnosed cases) and a further 3,557 dogs had a heart murmur (HM) consistent with DMVD (possible cases). Retrospective cross-sectional study design. Prevalence was adjusted for the sampling approach. Mixed effects logistic regression models identified factors associated with DMVD. Prevalence estimates of diagnosed DMVD and HMs consistent with DMVD (both diagnosed and possible cases) were 0.36% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.29-0.45) and 3.54% (95% CI: 3.26-3.84) respectively. In the multivariable analysis, males had higher odds of diagnosed DMVD than did females (odds ratio [OR] 1.40, 95% CI: 1.12-1.74). Insured dogs had increased odds of DMVD compared with noninsured dogs (OR 3.56, 95% CI: 2.79-4.55) and dogs ≥20 kg had approximately half the odds of DMVD diagnosis compared with dogs dogs. Knowledge of identified risk factors for DMVD could improve clinical diagnosis and direct future research. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  8. Phylogenetic distinctiveness of Middle Eastern and Southeast Asian village dog Y chromosomes illuminates dog origins

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brown, Sarah K; Pedersen, Niels C; Jafarishorijeh, Sardar; Bannasch, Danika L; Ahrens, Kristen D; Wu, Jui-Te; Okon, Michaella; Sacks, Benjamin N

    2011-01-01

    Modern genetic samples are commonly used to trace dog origins, which entails untested assumptions that village dogs reflect indigenous ancestry or that breed origins can be reliably traced to particular regions...

  9. Behavioural changes in dogs treated with corticosteroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notari, Lorella; Burman, Oliver; Mills, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    In human medicine, psychiatric side effects among patients on corticosteroid therapy are widely reported, but this appears to have been largely overlooked in the animal literature despite glucocorticoids being widely used in veterinary medicine. Therefore the aim of the current study was to identify possible psycho-behavioural changes in dogs treated with corticosteroids. Two different methodologies were used. Firstly, dog owners were asked to fill a 12 item questionnaire aimed at further validating the initial results of a previous survey relating to changes seen when their dog was receiving corticosteroid treatment. In a second study, a population of dogs undertook behavioural tests aimed at objectively identifying changes when receiving corticosteroid therapy. In the first study, a sample of owners whose dogs were receiving treatment for dermatological, orthopaedic or other conditions evaluated their dogs' behaviour on and off therapy, using a seven point scale. The survey was completed by 44 dog owners with dogs receiving treatment with a range of corticosteroid preparations (mainly prednisolone and methylprednisolone) and 54 dog owners with dogs receiving treatment with other drugs, mainly antibiotics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Dogs under corticosteroid treatment were reported to be significantly less playful, more nervous/restless, more fearful/less confident, more aggressive in the presence of food, more prone to barking, more prone to startle, more prone to reacting aggressively when disturbed, and more prone to avoiding people or unusual situations. In the second study, eleven “treatment” dogs were tested both before and during corticosteroid treatment with either methyl-prednisolone or prednisolone to assess their sensitivity to a potentially aversive sound stimulus. Eleven control dogs were also tested at the same time intervals in the same environment. Dogs were exposed to a brief dog growl while they explored bowls containing food

  10. Welcoming max: Increasing pediatric provider knowledge of service dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stace, Laura Britton

    2016-08-01

    Service dogs have been used in the adult population for decades. Recently, there has been a diversification in types of service dogs, specifically for the pediatric population. Although guide dogs and mobility dogs are accepted in society, autism assistance dogs, seizure alert and response dogs and diabetic alert dogs are relatively new. As pediatric service dogs attract more attention, pediatric providers need to be prepared to answer parental inquires regarding service dog use. The pediatric provider is well equipped to identify children who could benefit from a service dog intervention and should be able to make a referral to a reputable service dog provider. This article presents guidance on appropriate patient selection, making a service dog referral, and risks and benefits involved. Pediatric providers are ideally positioned to be leaders in implementing this evolving new assistive technology that can help to alleviate pediatric disabilities for both the patient and family. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Neospora Caninum and Leishmania Infantum Co-Infection in Domestic Dogs (Canis Familiaris in Meshkin-Shahr District, Northwestern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Rahimi Foroushani

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mediterranean visceral leishmaniasis (MVL is an infectious disease that affects both human and ani­mals. Domestic dogs (Canis familiaris are principal reservoir hosts of MVL caused by Leishmania infantum. Dogs are definitive hosts for Neospora caninum and a risk factor for infecting intermediate hosts. The immunosuppression caused by visceral leishmaniasis (VL can promote the occurrence of co-infections with other agents such as neosporo­sis. This study aimed to determine the frequency of co-infection of the both protozoan parasites in the en­demic areas of VL from Meshkin-Shahr District, north-west of Iran. Methods: Altogether, 171 serum samples were collected from domestic dogs of Meshkin- Shahr District by multistage cluster sampling from October 2008 to August 2009. The collected serum samples were tested for the detection of simultaneous infection of L. infantum and N. caninum using direct agglutination test (DAT and indirect ELISA, respectively. Results: Of the 171 domestic dogs, 27 (15.8% and 52 (30.4% were showed antibodies against L. infantum and N. caninum, respectively. Simultaneous infections of N. caninum and L. infantum was found in 16 (9.4% of the dogs. In VL-positive and VL-negative dogs, N. caninum infection was found in 59.3% and 25.0%, respectively. A statisti­cally significant difference was found between VL-positive and VL-negative dogs with N. caninum infection (P= 0.001. Conclusion: These findings indicate that Meshkin-Shahr District in northwestern Iran is an active focus of canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL. Neospora caninum and L. infantum co-infection is prevalent in the area and infection by L. infantum seems to enhance susceptibility to N. caninum infection in domestic dogs.

  12. Neospora caninum and Leishmania infantum Co-Infection in Domestic Dogs (Canis familiaris in Meshkin-Shahr District, Northwestern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Sharifdini

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mediterranean visceral leishmaniasis (MVL is an infectious disease that affects both human and ani­mals. Domestic dogs (Canis familiaris are principal reservoir hosts of MVL caused by Leishmania infantum. Dogs are definitive hosts for Neospora caninum and a risk factor for infecting intermediate hosts. The immunosuppression caused by visceral leishmaniasis (VL can promote the occurrence of co-infections with other agents such as neosporo­sis. This study aimed to determine the frequency of co-infection of the both protozoan parasites in the en­demic areas of VL from Meshkin-Shahr District, north-west of Iran. Methods: Altogether, 171 serum samples were collected from domestic dogs of Meshkin- Shahr District by multistage cluster sampling from October 2008 to August 2009. The collected serum samples were tested for the detection of simultaneous infection of L. infantum and N. caninum using direct agglutination test (DAT and indirect ELISA, respectively. Results: Of the 171 domestic dogs, 27 (15.8% and 52 (30.4% were showed antibodies against L. infantum and N. caninum, respectively. Simultaneous infections of N. caninum and L. infantum was found in 16 (9.4% of the dogs. In VL-positive and VL-negative dogs, N. caninum infection was found in 59.3% and 25.0%, respectively. A statisti­cally significant difference was found between VL-positive and VL-negative dogs with N. caninum infection (P= 0.001. Conclusion: These findings indicate that Meshkin-Shahr District in northwestern Iran is an active focus of canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL. Neospora caninum and L. infantum co-infection is prevalent in the area and infection by L. infantum seems to enhance susceptibility to N. caninum infection in domestic dogs.

  13. VegeDog: Formalism, Vegetarian Dogs, and Partonomies in Transition

    OpenAIRE

    E. Nissan; Shimony, S. E.

    2012-01-01

    The pragmatics of 'vegetarian' and 'carnivorous' exhibits an asymmetry that we put in evidence by analyzing a newspaper  report about vegetarian dog-owners imposing a vegetarian diet on their pets. More fundamental is the problem of partonomy versus containment, for which we attempt a naive but formal analysis applied to ingestion and the food chain, an issue we derive from the same text analyzed. Our formal tools belong in commonsense modelling, a domain of artificial intelligence relat...

  14. Review on Dog Rabies Vaccination Coverage in Africa: A Question of Dog Accessibility or Cost Recovery?

    OpenAIRE

    Jibat, Tariku; Hogeveen, Henk; Mourits, Monique C. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Rabies still poses a significant human health problem throughout most of Africa, where the majority of the human cases results from dog bites. Mass dog vaccination is considered to be the most effective method to prevent rabies in humans. Our objective was to systematically review research articles on dog rabies parenteral vaccination coverage in Africa in relation to dog accessibility and vaccination cost recovery arrangement (i.e.free of charge or owner charged). Methodology/Prin...

  15. Magnetic susceptibility and Landau diamagnetism of quantum collisional plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latyshev, A. V.; Yushkanov, A. A.

    2017-04-01

    Quantum collisional plasma with an arbitrary degree of degeneracy of the electron gas is considered. Using the exact expression for the transverse electric conductivity of quantum collisional plasma, the magnetic susceptibility is described using the kinetic approach and a formula for calculating Landau diamagnetism is derived. Quantum Maxwellian plasma is considered as a special case. To this end, in the formulas derived, the limit is taken for the chemical potential tending to minus infinity. The properties of the magnetic susceptibility of quantum plasma are compared to those of degenerate and Maxwellian plasmas.

  16. Degenerative myelopathy in two Boxer dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, A D; Barber, R; Porter, B F; Peters, R M; Kent, M; Platt, S R; Schatzberg, S J

    2009-07-01

    Degenerative myelopathy (DM) is a common, slowly progressive, debilitating disease reported in several dog breeds, including the German Shepherd Dog and Pembroke Welsh Corgi. Boxer dogs present occasionally for a thoracolumbar myelopathy for which no cause is identified on MRI or cerebrospinal fluid analysis. Despite a lack of a histologic description of DM in the Boxer in the veterinary literature, such dogs are presumed to have DM. Here we report 2 histologically confirmed cases of DM in the Boxer breed in which histologic studies disclosed marked degenerative changes in the spinal cord that were most prominent in the thoracic and cranial lumbar segments. Lesions consisted of myelin vacuolation and degeneration, myelophagocytosis, reactive astrocytosis, and ellipsoid formation most prominent in the lateral and ventral funiculi. We present a detailed histologic description of DM in the Boxer dog and compare it to DM in other purebred dogs.

  17. Infrared Thermography in Dogs with Mammary Tumors and Healthy Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavelski, M; Silva, D M; Leite, N C; Junior, D A; de Sousa, R S; Guérios, S D; Dornbusch, P T

    2015-01-01

    Infrared thermography is a painless, noninvasive, nonionizing diagnostic imaging exam used in human medicine as an auxiliary tool for breast cancer diagnosis in women. Define thermographic mean temperatures of healthy mammary glands and compare these temperatures with those of mammary glands with tumors in dogs. Fifty client-owned female dogs were evaluated, including 20 with histopathologically confirmed mammary tumor and 30 clinically healthy (control). A randomized study using infrared thermography analyzed each mammary gland of the animals from the control group and mammary glands with tumors from the tumor group, then the thermographic temperatures obtained were compared. Thermographic exam was performed in a temperature-controlled room with a cooled thermographic camera-Flir E-40 (Flir Systems(®) ) There was significantly a higher temperature in the caudal abdominal and inguinal mammary glands than the other glands in the healthy group (P < .05). Dogs with mammary tumors had significantly higher thermographic temperature compared with unaffected glands regardless of the tumor size and the location (P < .05). The technique seems to be able to assess for the presence of neoplasia within the mammary tissue in bitches. Further investigation is necessary to determine the impact of this technique when adopted clinically. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  18. Serum Protein Electrophoresis in Dogs With Intestinal Parasites

    OpenAIRE

    KAYMAZ, Alev AKDOĞAN; BAKIREL, Utku; GÖNÜL, Remzi; TAN, Hüseyin

    2014-01-01

    The serum of 66 dogs with intestinal parasites (showing gastrointestinal problems caused by taeniosis, coccidiosis, ancylostomosis, trichuriosis and ascarididosis) was examined by electrophoresis. There were 6 dogs with coccidiosis, 6 dogs with ancylostomosis, 6 dogs with trichuriosis, 24 dogs with taeniosis and 24 dogs with ascarididosis. After agar gel protein electorphoresis of the serum samples, ?1 globulin levels were significantly lower in the coccidiosis group than in the other grou...

  19. Congenital portosystemic shunts in five mature dogs with neurological signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windsor, Rebecca Christine; Olby, Natasha J

    2007-01-01

    Congenital portosystemic shunts are a common cause of hepatic encephalopathy and are typically first identified when dogs are dogs with congenital portosystemic shunts; the dogs were presented for severe encephalopathic signs during middle or old age. Three dogs had portoazygos shunts, and four dogs had multifocal and lateralizing neurological abnormalities, including severe gait abnormalities and vestibular signs. All five dogs responded to medical or surgical treatment, demonstrating that older animals can respond to treatment even after exhibiting severe neurological signs.

  20. Evaluation of the relationship between Orthopedic Foundation for Animals' hip joint scores and PennHIP distraction index values in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Michelle Y; Karbe, Georga T; Gregor, Thomas P; McKelvie, Pamela; Culp, William T N; Fordyce, Hilary H; Smith, Gail K

    2010-09-01

    To compare 2 screening methods for detecting evidence of hip dysplasia (Orthopedic Foundation for Animals [OFA] and PennHIP) in dogs. Diagnostic test evaluation study. Animals-439 dogs >or= 24 months of age that received routine hip joint screening from June 1987 through July 2008. Dogs were sedated, and PennHIP radiography was performed (hip joint- extended [HE], compression, and distraction radiographic views). The HE radiographic view was submitted for OFA evaluation. A copy of the HE radiographic view plus the compression and distraction radiographic views were submitted for routine PennHIP evaluation, including quantification of hip joint laxity via the distraction index (DI). 14% (60/439) of dogs had hip joints scored as excellent by OFA standards; however, 52% (31/60) of those had a DI >or= 0.30 (range, 0.14 to 0.61). Eighty-two percent of (183/223) dogs with OFA-rated good hip joints had a DI >or= 0.30 (range, 0.10 to 0.77), and 94% (79/84) of dogs with OFA-rated fair hip joints had a DI >or= 0.30 (range, 0.14 to 0.77). Of all dogs with fair to excellent hip joints by OFA standards, 80% (293/367) had a DI >or= 0.30. All dogs with OFA-rated borderline hip joints or mild, moderate, or severe hip dysplasia had a DI >or= 0.30 (range, 0.30 to 0.83). Dogs judged as phenotypically normal by the OFA harbored clinically important passive hip joint laxity as determined via distraction radiography. Results suggested that OFA scoring of HE radiographs underestimated susceptibility to osteoarthritis in dogs, which may impede progress in reducing or eliminating hip dysplasia through breeding.

  1. Plasma aldosterone concentrations and plasma renin activity in healthy dogs and dogs with hyperadrenocorticism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Javadi, S; Mol, JA; Boer, P; Boer, WH; Runberk, A

    2003-01-01

    The mean (se) basal plasma aldosterone concentrations were significantly lower in 31 dogs with pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism (PDH) (75 [9] pmol/litre) than in 12 healthy dogs (118 [14] pmol/litre), whereas in five dogs with hyperadrenocorticism due to an adrenocortical tumour they were

  2. Stray dog trade fuelled by dog meat consumption as a risk factor for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Rabies is a preventable zoonosis with the highest case fatality of any disease in the world. In the developing world, it is transmitted mainly by dog bites. In parts of southern Nigeria, dog meat is a delicacy. Objective: To highlight trade in stray dogs as a major risk factor for rabies in animals and humans in ...

  3. Dog owners show experience-based viewing behaviour in judging dog face approachability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavin, Carla Jade; Houghton, Sarah; Guo, Kun

    2017-01-01

    Our prior visual experience plays a critical role in face perception. We show superior perceptual performance for differentiating conspecific (vs non-conspecific), own-race (vs other-race) and familiar (vs unfamiliar) faces. However, it remains unclear whether our experience with faces of other species would influence our gaze allocation for extracting salient facial information. In this eye-tracking study, we asked both dog owners and non-owners to judge the approachability of human, monkey and dog faces, and systematically compared their behavioural performance and gaze pattern associated with the task. Compared to non-owners, dog owners assessed dog faces with shorter time and fewer fixations, but gave higher approachability ratings. The gaze allocation within local facial features was also modulated by the ownership. The averaged proportion of the fixations and viewing time directed at the dog mouth region were significantly less for the dog owners, and more experienced dog owners tended to look more at the dog eyes, suggesting the adoption of a prior experience-based viewing behaviour for assessing dog approachability. No differences in behavioural performance and gaze pattern were observed between dog owners and non-owners when judging human and monkey faces, implying that the dog owner's experience-based gaze strategy for viewing dog faces was not transferable across faces of other species.

  4. Transthoracic lung ultrasound in normal dogs and dogs with cardiogenic pulmonary edema: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rademacher, Nathalie; Pariaut, Romain; Pate, Julie; Saelinger, Carley; Kearney, Michael T; Gaschen, Lorrie

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary edema is the most common complication of left-sided heart failure in dogs and early detection is important for effective clinical management. In people, pulmonary edema is commonly diagnosed based on transthoracic ultrasonography and detection of B line artifacts (vertical, narrow-based, well-defined hyperechoic rays arising from the pleural surface). The purpose of this study was to determine whether B line artifacts could also be useful diagnostic predictors for cardiogenic pulmonary edema in dogs. Thirty-one normal dogs and nine dogs with cardiogenic pulmonary edema were prospectively recruited. For each dog, presence or absence of cardiogenic pulmonary edema was based on physical examination, heartworm testing, thoracic radiographs, and echocardiography. A single observer performed transthoracic ultrasonography in all dogs and recorded video clips and still images for each of four quadrants in each hemithorax. Distribution, sonographic characteristics, and number of B lines per thoracic quadrant were determined and compared between groups. B lines were detected in 31% of normal dogs (mean 0.9 ± 0.3 SD per dog) and 100% of dogs with cardiogenic pulmonary edema (mean 6.2 ± 3.8 SD per dog). Artifacts were more numerous and widely distributed in dogs with congestive heart failure (P ultrasonography and detection of B lines as techniques for diagnosing cardiogenic pulmonary edema in dogs. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  5. Acceptance of Dog Guides and Daily Stress Levels of Dog Guide Users and Nonusers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaka, Kumiko; Koda, Naoko

    2008-01-01

    The degree of acceptance of dog guides at public facilities, which is required by law in Japan, was investigated, and evidence of rejection was found. Japanese people with visual impairments who used dog guides reported higher daily stress levels than did those who did not use dog guides. (Contains 3 tables and 1 figure.)

  6. Incidence and impact of dog attacks on guide dogs in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, A; Moxon, R; England, G C W

    2010-06-19

    In a retrospective survey, researchers identified 100 incidents of attacks on guide dogs by other dogs. These were reviewed in order to determine the number, severity and impact on the handler and dog, and the characteristics of the aggressors and victims. During the study period there were more than three attacks reported each month, with 61 per cent of the attacks being upon dogs that were in harness and working with an owner or trainer. The majority of the dogs that were attacked were male (62 per cent), and the breeds that were over-represented (relative to their prevalence in the general guide dog population) were the labrador and the golden retriever x flat-coated retriever crossbreed. Most of the attacks occurred in public places between 09.00 and 15.00 and the majority (61 per cent) of the attacking dogs were off the lead at the time of the attack. Thirty-eight per cent of the attacking dogs were of bull breeds, which were over-represented among attackers compared with the proportion of this breed type in the general dog population. Veterinary attention was sought after 41 per cent of the attacks, and in 19 per cent of instances there was injury to the handler or to a member of the public. The attacks were reported to have affected the working performance and behaviour of the victim dog in 45 per cent of the instances, and two dogs had to be subsequently withdrawn from working as guide dogs.

  7. Factors associated with the stages of change for dog walking among Japanese dog owners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Koichiro; Shibata, Ai

    2013-01-01

    There are no previous data on factors at multiple levels associated with the stages of change for dog walking. The current study examined psychosocial and environmental correlates of the stages of change for dog walking among Japanese dog owners. Dog owners (N = 1940) completed a self-administered questionnaire that included items about demographics as well as psychosocial (dog attachment, dog obligation, normative belief, social norm, social support, self-efficacy) and environmental (access to areas, neighborhood safety, enjoyable scenery, frequently observing others dog walking, area where dogs are allowed to be off the lead) factors. MANOVA and discriminant functional analysis were used. The distribution of the dog owners across the stages was as follows: precontemplation (14.7%), contemplation (7.6%), preparation (39.7%), action (2.8%), and maintenance (35.2%). Although differences among the stages were found for all factors in MANOVA, the pattern of distinction among stages differed depending on the factors. Dog obligation and self-efficacy were the best predictors of the stages of change for dog walking. Although psychosocial and environmental correlates differed with the stages, psychosocial factors such as the sense of obligation and self-efficacy in dog walking seem to make relatively stronger contributions to distinctions among the stages.

  8. Discrimination of human and dog faces and inversion responses in domestic dogs (Canis familiaris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racca, Anaïs; Amadei, Eleonora; Ligout, Séverine; Guo, Kun; Meints, Kerstin; Mills, Daniel

    2010-05-01

    Although domestic dogs can respond to many facial cues displayed by other dogs and humans, it remains unclear whether they can differentiate individual dogs or humans based on facial cues alone and, if so, whether they would demonstrate the face inversion effect, a behavioural hallmark commonly used in primates to differentiate face processing from object processing. In this study, we first established the applicability of the visual paired comparison (VPC or preferential looking) procedure for dogs using a simple object discrimination task with 2D pictures. The animals demonstrated a clear looking preference for novel objects when simultaneously presented with prior-exposed familiar objects. We then adopted this VPC procedure to assess their face discrimination and inversion responses. Dogs showed a deviation from random behaviour, indicating discrimination capability when inspecting upright dog faces, human faces and object images; but the pattern of viewing preference was dependent upon image category. They directed longer viewing time at novel (vs. familiar) human faces and objects, but not at dog faces, instead, a longer viewing time at familiar (vs. novel) dog faces was observed. No significant looking preference was detected for inverted images regardless of image category. Our results indicate that domestic dogs can use facial cues alone to differentiate individual dogs and humans and that they exhibit a non-specific inversion response. In addition, the discrimination response by dogs of human and dog faces appears to differ with the type of face involved.

  9. Dirofilaria infections in working dogs in Slovakia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miterpáková, M; Antolová, D; Hurníková, Z; Dubinský, P; Pavlacka, A; Németh, J

    2010-06-01

    A monitoring programme aimed at the diagnosis of subcutaneous dirofilariasis and heartworm disease in working (police and military) dogs in Slovakia has been performed during the period of September 2007 to February 2008. In co-operation with the Ministry of the Interior and the Ministry of Defence, in total, 710 dogs (591 police dogs and 119 military dogs) were investigated for the presence of microfilariae in blood. All police and military dogs in active service held on the territory of Slovakia were included. Microfilariae were detected in 118 (20.0%) police dogs and 10 (8.4%) military dogs. The most infected individuals originated from southern parts of Slovakia (Trnava region 53.6% and Nitra region 39.6%); the prevalence was low in northern regions (Zilina 3.1% and Presov 6.6%). In several districts of southern Slovakia, the prevalence of subcutaneous dirofilariasis in working dogs exceeded 40%. In all infected animals, the autochthonous origin of the disease was confirmed; however, due to the frequent movement of working dogs, it was not possible to identify the exact locality of infection. At present, a dog living in Nemsová village in Trencín district (north-western part of the country) is regarded as the northernmost localized autochthonous case of subcutaneous dirofilariasis in Slovakia. In three dogs, co-infection of Dirofilaria repens and Dirofilaria immitis was detected. High prevalence rates in working dogs and the zoonotic characteristic of the disease represent an undoubtedly important veterinary and medical problem that requires the urgent introduction of prophylactic and control measures.

  10. Hearing dogs - Assistive devices for the Deaf?

    OpenAIRE

    Záhorská, Kateřina

    2015-01-01

    This bachelor thesis deals with dogs employed in the socio-medical field, especially with assistance and hearing dogs. The thesis is divided into two parts, theoretical and practical. In the theoretical part the reader is introduced to the categories of dogs employed in this field, their special training (including interested organizations) is described and last but not least appropriate legislative measures are described. Attention is also paid to the situation abroad (in the USA, Great Brit...

  11. Bacterial Cholangitis, Cholecystitis, or both in Dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Tamborini, A.; Jahns, H; McAllister, H; Kent, A; Harris, B; Procoli, F.; Allenspach, K.; Hall, E. J.; Day, M J; Watson, P J; O'Neill, E.J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Bacterial cholangitis and cholecystitis are rarely reported, poorly characterized diseases in the dog. Objectives: To characterize the clinical features of these conditions. Animals: Twenty-seven client-owned dogs with bacterial cholangitis, cholecystitis, or both. Methods: Multicenter, retrospective cases series of dogs with bacterial cholangitis, cholecystitis, or both, presenting January 2000 to June 2011 to 4 Veterinary Schools in Ireland/United Kingdom. Interrogation of hospi...

  12. The Blue Dog: evaluation of an interactive software program to teach young children how to interact safely with dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwebel, David C; Morrongiello, Barbara A; Davis, Aaron L; Stewart, Julia; Bell, Melissa

    2012-04-01

    Pre-post-randomized design evaluated The Blue Dog, a dog safety software program. 76 children aged 3.5-6 years completed 3 tasks to evaluate dog safety pre- and postintervention: (a) pictures (recognition of safe/risky behavior), (b) dollhouse (recall of safe behavior via simulated dollhouse scenarios), and (c) live dog (actual behavior with unfamiliar live dog). Following preintervention evaluation, children were randomly assigned to dog or fire safety conditions, each involving 3 weeks of home computer software use. Children using Blue Dog had greater change in recognition of risky dog situations than children learning fire safety. No between-group differences emerged in recall (dollhouse) or engagement (live-dog) in risky behavior. Families enjoyed using the software. Blue Dog taught children knowledge about safe engagement with dogs, but did not influence recall or implementation of safe behaviors. Dog bites represent a significant pediatric injury concern and continued development of effective interventions is needed.

  13. Induction of allopurinol resistance in Leishmania infantum isolated from dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasur-Landau, Daniel; Jaffe, Charles L; Doron-Faigenboim, Adi; David, Lior; Baneth, Gad

    2017-09-01

    Resistance to allopurinol in zoonotic canine leishmaniasis has been recently shown to be associated with disease relapse in naturally-infected dogs. However, information regarding the formation of resistance and its dynamics is lacking. This study describes the successful in-vitro induction of allopurinol resistance in Leishmania infantum cultured under increasing drug pressure. Allopurinol susceptibility and growth rate of induced parasites were monitored over 23 weeks and parasite clones were tested at selected time points and compared to their parental lines, both as promastigotes and as amastigotes. Allopurinol resistance was formed in strains from two parasite stocks producing a 20-fold rise in IC50 along three distinct growth phases. In addition, characteristic differential clustering of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) was found in drug sensitive and resistant parasite clones. Results confirm that genetic polymorphism, as well as clonal heterogeneity, contribute to in-vitro resistance to allopurinol, which is likely to occur in natural infection.

  14. Induction of allopurinol resistance in Leishmania infantum isolated from dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Yasur-Landau

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to allopurinol in zoonotic canine leishmaniasis has been recently shown to be associated with disease relapse in naturally-infected dogs. However, information regarding the formation of resistance and its dynamics is lacking. This study describes the successful in-vitro induction of allopurinol resistance in Leishmania infantum cultured under increasing drug pressure. Allopurinol susceptibility and growth rate of induced parasites were monitored over 23 weeks and parasite clones were tested at selected time points and compared to their parental lines, both as promastigotes and as amastigotes. Allopurinol resistance was formed in strains from two parasite stocks producing a 20-fold rise in IC50 along three distinct growth phases. In addition, characteristic differential clustering of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP was found in drug sensitive and resistant parasite clones. Results confirm that genetic polymorphism, as well as clonal heterogeneity, contribute to in-vitro resistance to allopurinol, which is likely to occur in natural infection.

  15. CANINE: a robotic mine dog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stancil, Brian A.; Hyams, Jeffrey; Shelley, Jordan; Babu, Kartik; Badino, Hernán.; Bansal, Aayush; Huber, Daniel; Batavia, Parag

    2013-01-01

    Neya Systems, LLC competed in the CANINE program sponsored by the U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) which culminated in a competition held at Fort Benning as part of the 2012 Robotics Rodeo. As part of this program, we developed a robot with the capability to learn and recognize the appearance of target objects, conduct an area search amid distractor objects and obstacles, and relocate the target object in the same way that Mine dogs and Sentry dogs are used within military contexts for exploration and threat detection. Neya teamed with the Robotics Institute at Carnegie Mellon University to develop vision-based solutions for probabilistic target learning and recognition. In addition, we used a Mission Planning and Management System (MPMS) to orchestrate complex search and retrieval tasks using a general set of modular autonomous services relating to robot mobility, perception and grasping.

  16. Primary hypoparathyroidism in a dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateus do Amaral Freitas

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The hypoparathyroidism is a rare endocrinopathy reported in dogs, caused by a deficiency in the synthesis of parathyroid hormone (PTH. The lack of PTH causes hypocalcemia and hyperphosphatemia, resulting in a series of neurological and neuromuscular disorders. Unlike most endocrinopathies, hypoparathyroidism is a disease in which the exogenous hormone replacement is not being viable, becoming the treatment a challenge. The present report aims to describe a case of primary hypoparathyroidism in a Schnauzer dog with seizures and neuromuscular disorders, and successful treatment employed, this being the first case, according to the literature, of hypoparathyroidism diagnosed in Brazil. The hypoparathyroidism should be considered as a differential diagnosis in cases of seizure. A complete neurological evaluation and determination of serum ionized calcium and parathyroid hormone are essential for the diagnosis of this disease. Early diagnosis may improve the quality of life of affected animals, since after the initiation of therapy, there is complete remission of clinical signs.

  17. Multiple and ancient origins of the domestic dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilà, C; Savolainen, P; Maldonado, J E; Amorim, I R; Rice, J E; Honeycutt, R L; Crandall, K A; Lundeberg, J; Wayne, R K

    1997-06-13

    Mitochondrial DNA control region sequences were analyzed from 162 wolves at 27 localities worldwide and from 140 domestic dogs representing 67 breeds. Sequences from both dogs and wolves showed considerable diversity and supported the hypothesis that wolves were the ancestors of dogs. Most dog sequences belonged to a divergent monophyletic clade sharing no sequences with wolves. The sequence divergence within this clade suggested that dogs originated more than 100,000 years before the present. Associations of dog haplotypes with other wolf lineages indicated episodes of admixture between wolves and dogs. Repeated genetic exchange between dog and wolf populations may have been an important source of variation for artificial selection.

  18. Dogs' Social Referencing towards Owners and Strangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merola, Isabella; Prato-Previde, Emanuela; Marshall-Pescini, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Social referencing is a process whereby an individual uses the emotional information provided by an informant about a novel object/stimulus to guide his/her own future behaviour towards it. In this study adult dogs were tested in a social referencing paradigm involving a potentially scary object with either their owner or a stranger acting as the informant and delivering either a positive or negative emotional message. The aim was to evaluate the influence of the informant's identity on the dogs' referential looking behaviour and behavioural regulation when the message was delivered using only vocal and facial emotional expressions. Results show that most dogs looked referentially at the informant, regardless of his/her identity. Furthermore, when the owner acted as the informant dogs that received a positive emotional message changed their behaviour, looking at him/her more often and spending more time approaching the object and close to it; conversely, dogs that were given a negative message took longer to approach the object and to interact with it. Fewer differences in the dog's behaviour emerged when the informant was the stranger, suggesting that the dog-informant relationship may influence the dog's behavioural regulation. Results are discussed in relation to studies on human-dog communication, attachment, mood modification and joint attention. PMID:23071828

  19. Dogs' social referencing towards owners and strangers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Merola

    Full Text Available Social referencing is a process whereby an individual uses the emotional information provided by an informant about a novel object/stimulus to guide his/her own future behaviour towards it. In this study adult dogs were tested in a social referencing paradigm involving a potentially scary object with either their owner or a stranger acting as the informant and delivering either a positive or negative emotional message. The aim was to evaluate the influence of the informant's identity on the dogs' referential looking behaviour and behavioural regulation when the message was delivered using only vocal and facial emotional expressions. Results show that most dogs looked referentially at the informant, regardless of his/her identity. Furthermore, when the owner acted as the informant dogs that received a positive emotional message changed their behaviour, looking at him/her more often and spending more time approaching the object and close to it; conversely, dogs that were given a negative message took longer to approach the object and to interact with it. Fewer differences in the dog's behaviour emerged when the informant was the stranger, suggesting that the dog-informant relationship may influence the dog's behavioural regulation. Results are discussed in relation to studies on human-dog communication, attachment, mood modification and joint attention.

  20. [Recognizing and assessing aggressive behaviour in dogs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalke, E; Hackbarth, H

    2006-03-01

    Within the population the sensitivity to aggressive behaviour in dogs has increased. The authorities are confronted with a problem: if any incident occurs it is their task to decide whether the dogs involved constitute a threat to other people or whether the charge is only the result of a quarrel between neighbours. For this reason, an examination of the dogs with regard to their aggressive behaviour is necessary. Seen from the biological point of view, aggressive behaviour is one of four possibilities a dog can chose from to solve a conflict. The dog's intention in showing aggressive behaviour is to eliminate disturbances and to maintain a distance in space and time. Aggressive behaviour might also be necessary to acquire or defend resources essential to the dog's life. This is to secure its survival and its success in reproduction. One can see from this that aggressive behaviour is a very important and biologically necessary adjustment factor. However, when living together with man aggressive behaviour might become a problem. For the assessment and the therapy of the problem it is necessary to exa-mine the behaviour shown by the dog with regard to its cause. To be able to do this an exact anamnesis, a medical check, and an examination of the dog on the basis of its display in special situations are necessary. For this reason, exclusively veterinarians with a special further education in the field of behaviour should carry out the examination of dogs.

  1. Antiepileptic drug withdrawal in dogs with epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Kaspar Gesell

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders in dogs and is treated by chronic administration of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs. In humans with epilepsy, it is common clinical practice to consider drug withdrawal after a patient has been in remission (seizure free for three or more years, but withdrawal is associated with the risk of relapse. In the present study, the consequences of AED withdrawal were studied in dogs with epilepsy. Therefore, 200 owners of dogs with idiopathic or presumed idiopathic epilepsy were contacted by telephone interview, 138 cases could be enrolled. In 11 cases the therapy had been stopped after the dogs had become seizure free for a median time of 1 year. Reasons for AED withdrawal were appearance or fear of adverse side effects, financial aspects and the idea that the medication could be unnecessary. Following AED withdrawal, 4 of these dogs remained seizure free, 7 dogs suffered from seizure recurrence, of which only 3 dogs could regain seizure freedom after resuming AED therapy. Due to the restricted case number, an exact percentage of dogs with seizure recurrence after AED withdrawal cannot be given. However, the present study gives a hint that similar numbers as in human patients are found, and the data can help owners of epileptic dogs and the responsible clinician to decide when and why to stop antiepileptic medication.

  2. Antiepileptic Drug Withdrawal in Dogs with Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesell, Felix Kaspar; Hoppe, Sonja; Löscher, Wolfgang; Tipold, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders in dogs and is treated by chronic administration of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). In human beings with epilepsy, it is common clinical practice to consider drug withdrawal after a patient has been in remission (seizure free) for three or more years, but withdrawal is associated with the risk of relapse. In the present study, the consequences of AED withdrawal were studied in dogs with epilepsy. Therefore, 200 owners of dogs with idiopathic or presumed idiopathic epilepsy were contacted by telephone interview, 138 cases could be enrolled. In 11 cases, the therapy had been stopped after the dogs had become seizure free for a median time of 1 year. Reasons for AED withdrawal were appearance or fear of adverse side effects, financial aspects, and the idea that the medication could be unnecessary. Following AED withdrawal, four of these dogs remained seizure free, seven dogs suffered from seizure recurrence, of which only three dogs could regain seizure freedom after resuming AED therapy. Due to the restricted case number, an exact percentage of dogs with seizure recurrence after AED withdrawal cannot be given. However, the present study gives a hint that similar numbers as in human patients are found, and the data can help owners of epileptic dogs and the responsible clinician to decide when and why to stop antiepileptic medication.

  3. Seroepidemiology of Canine parvovirus infection in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indrawati Sendow

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Canine parvovirus is an acute and fatal viral disease in dogs. A total of 209 local, cross breed and breed dogs sera from Kodya Bogor, Kabupaten Bogor, Sukabumi, and Jakarta, had been tested using Haemagglutination Inhibition Test (HI with pig red blood cells. A total of 64 breed and cross breed dogs from Sukabumi and Kodya Bogor, were used as a sentinel dogs to study the epidemiology of Canine parvovirus (CPV infection and its immunological responses caused by vaccination. The results indicated that 78% (95 breed and cross bred dogs and 59% (51 local dogs had antibody to CPV. Sentinel dogs results indicated that dogs had been vaccinated showed antibody response with the varied titre dependant upon prevaccination titre. Low prevaccinated titre gave better response than protective level titre. From 19 puppies observed, Maternal antibodi were still detected until 5 weeks old puppies. First vaccination given at less than 3 months old, should be boosted after 3 months old puppied. Antibodi titre produced by natural infection will keep untill 2 years. These data concluded that the dog condition and time of vaccination will affect the optimum antibody response.

  4. Tick-Borne Relapsing Fever in Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccione, J; Levine, G J; Duff, C A; Kuhlman, G M; Scott, K D; Esteve-Gassent, M D

    2016-07-01

    In the United States, Tick-Borne Relapsing Fever (TBRF) in dogs is caused by the spirochete bacteria Borrelia turicatae and Borrelia hermsii, transmitted by Ornithodoros spp. ticks. The hallmark diagnostic feature of this infection is the visualization of numerous spirochetes during standard blood smear examination. Although the course of spirochetemia has not been fully characterized in dogs, in humans infected with TBRF the episodes of spirochetemia and fever are intermittent. To describe TBRF in dogs by providing additional case reports and reviewing the disease in veterinary and human medicine. Five cases of privately-owned dogs naturally infected with TBRF in Texas are reviewed. Case series and literature review. All dogs were examined because of lethargy, inappetence, and pyrexia. Two dogs also had signs of neurologic disease. All dogs had thrombocytopenia and spirochetemia. All cases were administered tetracyclines orally. Platelet numbers improved and spirochetemia and pyrexia resolved in 4 out of 5 dogs, where follow-up information was available. TBRF is likely underdiagnosed in veterinary medicine. In areas endemic to Ornithodoros spp. ticks, TBRF should be considered in dogs with thrombocytopenia. Examination of standard blood smears can provide a rapid and specific diagnosis of TBRF when spirochetes are observed. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  5. Seroprevalence of Coxiella burnetii in Australian dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, A J; Norris, J M; Heller, J; Brown, G; Malik, R; Bosward, K L

    2016-09-01

    The role of dogs in the transmission of Coxiella burnetii to humans is uncertain, and extensive seroprevalence studies of dogs have not been previously conducted in Australia. This study determined C. burnetii exposure in four diverse canine subpopulations by adapting, verifying and comparing an indirect immunofluoresence assay (IFA) and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) used to detect anti-C. burnetii antibodies in humans. Canine serum samples (n = 1223) were tested with IFA from four subpopulations [breeding establishments; household pets; free-roaming dogs in Aboriginal communities; shelter dogs]. The proportions of seropositive dogs were as follows: breeding (7/309, 2.3%), household pets (10/328, 3%), Aboriginal communities (21/321, 6.5%) and shelters (5/265, 1.9%). Dogs from Aboriginal communities were 2.8 times (CI 1.5-5.1; P burnetii and that a higher seroprevalence was observed amongst free-roaming dogs associated with Aboriginal communities. As C. burnetii recrudesces during pregnancy and birth products contain the highest concentration of organism, individuals assisting at the time of parturition, those handling pups shortly after birth as well as those residing in the vicinity of whelping dogs are potentially at risk of developing Q fever. However, the identification of active antigen shed in excreta from seropositive dogs is required in order to accurately define and quantify the public health risk. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  6. Genomic Analyses of Modern Dog Breeds

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, Heidi G.

    2012-01-01

    A rose may be a rose by any other name, but when you call a dog a poodle it becomes a very different animal than if you call it a bulldog. Both the poodle and the bulldog are examples of dog breeds of which there are >400 recognized world-wide. Breed creation has played a significant role in shaping the modern dog from the length of his leg to the cadence of his bark. The selection and line-breeding required to maintain a breed has also reshaped the genome of the dog resulting in a unique gen...

  7. Effect of different types of classical music played at a veterinary hospital on dog behavior and owner satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engler, Whitney J; Bain, Melissa

    2017-07-15

    OBJECTIVE To determine the effect of different types of classical music played during a veterinary visit on dog behavior and owner satisfaction. DESIGN Prospective randomized controlled study. ANIMALS 74 dogs examined at a veterinary teaching hospital. PROCEDURES Dogs examined for a wellness visit, presurgical health evaluation, or nonurgent illness were exposed to 1 of 3 treatments (modified classical music, the same music in its original format, and no music [control]) while in the examination room. Owners completed a standardized survey regarding the dog's behavior and their satisfaction with the visit. Clinicians completed a separate standardized survey regarding the dog's behavior. Information regarding monetary charges, procedures performed, diagnoses, and physiologic variables was obtained from the electronic medical record after the appointment. RESULTS Owners rated their dog's anxiety level in the waiting room greater than that in the examination room regardless of treatment. Mean anxiety and aggression scores of dogs during the physical examination as rated by owners were significantly greater than those assigned by clinicians. Visit satisfaction for owners exposed to original classical music was significantly greater than that for owners not exposed to music. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested placing a pet and its owner into an examination room instead of a waiting room immediately after clinic arrival may ameliorate pet anxiety during the veterinary visit. Playing classical music at a low volume can be a simple and cost-effective way to improve owner satisfaction with the veterinary visit. Further research is necessary to determine the effects of music on pet anxiety.

  8. Monitoring Military Dogs by Biotelemetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-09-01

    electrode. The hole in the adhesive donut must be centered over the recessed center portion of the electrode. 6. A small portion of EKG electrode...place, the saddle was placed on the dog and the harness straps fastened. Prior to each data collection run the electro - 19 cardiocorder was prepared by...collect[on run was completed, the magnetic tape was returned to the lab for playback and paper stripchart printout. This was done with the electro

  9. Dangerous Dogs, Constructivism and Normativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Allan Dreyer

    2010-01-01

    This article argues that although there is no necessary link between constructivism and particular sets of norms, constructivism opens up a space for normativity and can be articulated through particular normative or political programs. I show how Laclau’s deconstructive constructivism can be art...... be articulated within the framework of an ethos of democratization. The article takes its empirical point of departure in debates over dangerous dogs....

  10. Ototoxicity in dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Naoki; Talaska, Andra E; Schacht, Jochen

    2012-11-01

    A variety of drugs in veterinary use have side effects that can potentially damage the senses of hearing or balance in animals. A large body of literature exists on the incidence and mechanisms of ototoxicity in experimental animals and in humans, but little is documented in domestic dogs and cats. However, the generality of these adverse actions across species allows one to extrapolate and provide the veterinarian with insight into possible complications of chemotherapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Are owners' reports of their dogs? ?guilty look? influenced by the dogs? action and evidence of the misdeed?

    OpenAIRE

    Ostoji?, Ljerka; Tkal?i?, Mladenka; Clayton, Nicola S.

    2015-01-01

    While dog owners claim that their dogs? greeting behaviour after having performed a misdeed indicates the dogs' ?guilt?, current experimental evidence suggests that dogs show these ?guilty look? behaviours as a response to being scolded by their owners. Given reports that ?guilty look? behaviours are shown also in the absence of being scolded, we investigated whether the dogs' own actions or the evidence of a misdeed might serve as triggering cues. We manipulated whether or not dogs ate a ?fo...

  12. Susceptibility Genes in Thyroid Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki Ban

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD are complex diseases which are caused by an interaction between susceptibility genes and environmental triggers. Genetic susceptibility in combination with external factors (e.g. dietary iodine is believed to initiate the autoimmune response to thyroid antigens. Abundant epidemiological data, including family and twin studies, point to a strong genetic influence on the development of AITD. Various techniques have been employed to identify the genes contributing to the etiology of AITD, including candidate gene analysis and whole genome screening. These studies have enabled the identification of several loci (genetic regions that are linked with AITD, and in some of these loci, putative AITD susceptibility genes have been identified. Some of these genes/loci are unique to Graves' disease (GD and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT and some are common to both the diseases, indicating that there is a shared genetic susceptibility to GD and HT. The putative GD and HT susceptibility genes include both immune modifying genes (e.g. HLA, CTLA-4 and thyroid specific genes (e.g. TSHR, Tg. Most likely, these loci interact and their interactions may influence disease phenotype and severity.

  13. The Association of Inbreeding With Lung Fibrosis Incidence in Beagle Dogs That Inhaled 238PuO2 or 239PuO2.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Dulaney A.; Brigantic, Andrea M.; Morgan, William F.

    2011-09-12

    Studies of health effects in animals after exposure to internally deposited radionuclides were intended to supplement observational studies in humans. Both nuclear workers and Beagle dogs have exhibited plutonium associated lung fibrosis; however, the dogs smaller gene pool may limit the applicability of findings to humans. Data on Beagles that inhaled either plutonium-238 dioxide (238PuO2) or plutonium-239 dioxide (239PuO2) were analyzed. Wright's Coefficient of Inbreeding was used to measure genetic or familial susceptibility and was assessed as an explanatory variable when modeling the association between lung fibrosis incidence and plutonium exposure. Lung fibrosis was diagnosed in approximately 80% of the exposed dogs compared with 23.7% of the control dogs. The maximum degree of inbreeding was 9.4%. Regardless of isotope, the addition of inbreeding significantly improved the model in female dogs but not in males. In female dogs an increased inbreeding coefficient predicted decreased hazard of a lung fibrosis diagnosis. Lung fibrosis was common in these dogs with inbreeding affecting models of lung fibrosis incidence in females but not in males. The apparent protective effect in females predicted by these models of lung fibrosis incidence is likely to be minimal given the small degree of inbreeding in these groups.

  14. Staphylococcus pseudintermedius in the dog

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bannoehr, Jeanette; Guardabassi, Luca

    2012-01-01

    The dog is the natural host of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius. Many research efforts are currently being undertaken to expand our knowledge and understanding of this important canine commensal and opportunistic pathogen. The objective of this review is to summarize the current knowledge of the s......The dog is the natural host of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius. Many research efforts are currently being undertaken to expand our knowledge and understanding of this important canine commensal and opportunistic pathogen. The objective of this review is to summarize the current knowledge...... consequences for clinical practice. Staphylococcus pseudintermedius carriage in the dog is more frequent and genetically heterogeneous compared with that of Staphylococcus aureus in man. It appears that these staphylococcal species have evolved separately through adaptation to their respective natural hosts...... and differ with regard to various aspects concerning ecology, population structure and evolution of antibiotic resistance. Further understanding of the ecology and epidemiology of S. pseudintermedius is hampered by the lack of a standard method for rapid and discriminatory typing and by the limited data...

  15. Detection of rotavirus in dogs with diarrhea in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabbay Yvone B.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Rotavirus was detected by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA in the faeces of a diarrheic dog. Virus particles with morphology typical of rotavirus were visualized by direct electron microscopy. This sample was subsequently tested for the four main human serotypes (G1-G4, by ELISA with monoclonal antibodies. G genotyping was attempted by RT-PCR using G1-G6 and G8-G11 primers but no positive results could be yielded. Also using RT-PCR it was possible to characterize this canine strain as belonging to P[ 3] genotype. This is the first canine rotavirus detected in Brazil.

  16. Dog ecology and population studies in Lagos State, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambolu, Sunday Emmanuel; Dzikwi, Asabe A; Kwaga, Jacob K P; Kazeem, Haruna M; Umoh, Jarlath U; Hambolu, Dupe A

    2014-02-14

    Dog population dynamics have a major impact upon the effectiveness of rabies control strategies. As such, understanding domestic dog ecology has been recognized as central to the design of effective rabies control programmes. This study was conducted to determine the dog ecology in Lagos State using compound dog count and street dog count in the three senatorial districts (Lagos West, East and Central) of Lagos State from February, 2011 to January, 2012. A total of 546 questionnaires were distributed for the compound dog count and all were completed and returned. Various aspects of dog ecology were determined, including size, sex, breed of the dog population, management of dogs and rabies awareness among the respondents. Out of the 546 compounds surveyed, 518 (94.87%) owned at least one dog. A total of 1,427 dogs were counted from the street counts while a total of 1,447 dogs (2.8 dogs/compound) were counted from the compound count. The dogs comprised of 583 males and 864 females, out of which 64.10% are confined. The dog vaccination coverage in the dog population surveyed was 64.10% and administered majorly (91.30%) by veterinarians. Security (60%) and pets (26%) were the major reasons for keeping dogs. Majority (88.80%) of the respondents were aware of rabies and its mode of transmission, but still believed in the use of concoctions (40.40%), herbs (19.90%) and consumption of the organ of the offending dog (11.50%) for the treatment of rabies. The findings of this study showed a male: female ratio of dog to be 1:1.5 and a dog: human ratio of 1:5.6. There was also a responsible dog ownership as majority of the respondents do confine, vaccinate and provide food for their dogs. Vaccination coverage of the total dog population was however below the 70-80% target recommended by the World Health Organization to achieve herd immunity.

  17. Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Dietary Supplementation Induces Lipid Peroxidation in Normal Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M. Walters

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs have anti-inflammatory effects at low concentrations; however increased dietary consumption may conversely increase susceptibility to oxidation by free radicals. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of PUFAs on selective oxidative injury and inflammatory biomarkers in canine urine and serum. Dogs (n=54 consumed a diet supplemented with 0.5% conjugated linoleic acid/dry matter, 1.0% conjugated linoleic acid/dry matter, or 200 mg/kg docosahexaenoic acid/eicosapentaenoic acid for 21 days. All dogs exhibited significantly increased plasma PUFA concentrations. All dogs had significant elevations in urinary F2a isoprostane concentration, though dogs consuming a diet containing 1.0% conjugated linoleic acid/dry matter had the highest increase (P=.0052. Reduced glutathione concentrations within erythrocytes decreased significantly in all three dietary treatment groups (P=.0108. Treatment with diets containing 1.0% conjugated linoleic acid/dry matter resulted in the greatest increase in oxidant injury. Caution should be exercised when supplementing PUFAs as some types may increase oxidation.

  18. Microbiota alterations in acute and chronic gastrointestinal inflammation of cats and dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honneffer, Julia B; Minamoto, Yasushi; Suchodolski, Jan S

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota is the collection of the living microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, protozoa, and viruses) inhabiting the gastrointestinal tract. Novel bacterial identification approaches have revealed that the gastrointestinal microbiota of dogs and cats is, similarly to humans, a highly complex ecosystem. Studies in dogs and cats have demonstrated that acute and chronic gastrointestinal diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), are associated with alterations in the small intestinal and fecal microbial communities. Of interest is that these alterations are generally similar to the dysbiosis observed in humans with IBD or animal models of intestinal inflammation, suggesting that microbial responses to inflammatory conditions of the gut are conserved across mammalian host types. Studies have also revealed possible underlying susceptibilities in the innate immune system of dogs and cats with IBD, which further demonstrate the intricate relationship between gut microbiota and host health. Commonly identified microbiome changes in IBD are decreases in bacterial groups within the phyla Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes, and increases within Proteobacteia. Furthermore, a reduction in the diversity of Clostridium clusters XIVa and IV (i.e., Lachnospiraceae and Clostridium coccoides subgroups) are associated with IBD, suggesting that these bacterial groups may play an important role in maintenance of gastrointestinal health. Future studies are warranted to evaluate the functional changes associated with intestinal dysbiosis in dogs and cats. PMID:25469017

  19. The challenges of pedigree dog health: approaches to combating inherited disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Lindsay L; Schoenebeck, Jeffrey J; Wiener, Pamela; Clements, Dylan N; Summers, Kim M

    2015-01-01

    The issue of inherited disorders and poor health in pedigree dogs has been widely discussed in recent years. With the advent of genome-wide sequencing technologies and the increasing development of new diagnostic DNA disease tests, the full extent and prevalence of inherited disorders in pedigree dogs is now being realized. In this review we discuss the challenges facing pedigree dog breeds: the common pitfalls and problems associated with combating single gene mediated disorders, phenotypic selection on complex disorders, and ways of managing genetic diversity. Breeding strategies incorporating screening schemes have been shown to be successful in significantly reducing the prevalence of an inherited disorder and improving the overall health in certain breeds. However, with 215 breeds officially recognized by the Kennel Club in the United Kingdom and 396 inherited disorders currently identified, many breeds have reached the point at which successfully breeding away from susceptible individuals at a population-wide scale will require new genomic selection strategies in combination with currently available breeding schemes. Whilst DNA-based tests identifying disease causing mutation(s) remain the most informative and effective approach for single gene disorder disease management, they must be used along with current screening schemes, genomic selection, and pedigree information in breeding programs in the effort to maintain genetic diversity while also significantly reducing the number of inherited disorders in pedigree dogs.

  20. Man's best friend: what can pet dogs teach us about non-Hodgkin's lymphoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Kristy L; Suter, Steven E

    2015-01-01

    Animal models are essential for understanding lymphoma biology and testing new treatments prior to human studies. Spontaneously arising lymphomas in pet dogs represent an underutilized resource that could be used to complement current mouse lymphoma models, which do not adequately represent all aspects of the human disease. Canine lymphoma resembles human lymphoma in many important ways, including characteristic translocations and molecular abnormalities and similar therapeutic responses to chemotherapy, radiation, and newer targeted therapies (e.g. ibrutinib). Given the large number of pet dogs and high incidence of lymphoma, particularly in susceptible breeds, dogs represent a largely untapped resource for advancing the understanding and treatment of human lymphoma. This review highlights similarities in molecular biology, diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes between human and canine lymphoma. It also describes resources that are currently available to study canine lymphoma, advantages to be gained by exploiting the genetic breed structure in dogs, and current and future challenges and opportunities to take full advantage of this resource for lymphoma studies. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Man’s best friend: what can pet dogs teach us about non-Hodgkin lymphoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Kristy L.; Suter, Steven E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Animal models are essential for understanding lymphoma biology and testing new treatments prior to human studies. Spontaneously arising lymphomas in pet dogs represent an underutilized resource that could be used to complement current mouse lymphoma models, which do not adequately represent all aspects of the human disease. Canine lymphoma resembles human lymphoma in many important ways, including characteristic translocations and molecular abnormalities and similar therapeutic responses to chemotherapy, radiation, and newer targeted therapies (e.g. ibrutinib). Given the large number of pet dogs and high incidence of lymphoma, particularly in susceptible breeds, dogs represent a largely untapped resource for advancing the understanding and treatment of human lymphoma. This review highlights similarities in molecular biology, diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes between human and canine lymphoma. It also describes resources that are currently available to study canine lymphoma, advantages to be gained by exploiting the genetic breed structure in dogs, and current and future challenges and opportunities to take full advantage of this resource for lymphoma studies. PMID:25510277

  2. Inherited susceptibility and radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, J.B. [Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States)

    1997-03-01

    There is continuing concern that some people in the general population may have genetic makeups that place them at particularly high risk for radiation-induced cancer. The existence of such a susceptible subpopulation would have obvious implications for the estimation of risks of radiation exposure. Although it has been long known that familial aggregations of cancer do sometimes occur, recent evidence suggests that a general genetic predisposition to cancer does not exist; most cancers occur sporadically. On the other hand, nearly 10% of the known Mendelian genetic disorders are associated with cancer. A number of these involve a familial predisposition to cancer, and some are characterized by an enhanced susceptibility to the induction of cancer by various physical and chemical carcinogens, including ionizing radiation. Such increased susceptibility will depend on several factors including the frequency of the susceptibility gene in the population and its penetrance, the strength of the predisposition, and the degree to which the cancer incidence in susceptible individuals may be increased by the carcinogen. It is now known that these cancer-predisposing genes may be responsible not only for rare familial cancer syndromes, but also for a proportion of the common cancers. Although the currently known disorders can account for only a small fraction of all cancers, they serve as models for genetic predisposition to carcinogen-induced cancer in the general population. In the present report, the author describes current knowledge of those specific disorders that are associated with an enhanced predisposition to radiation-induced cancer, and discusses how this knowledge may bear on the susceptibility to radiation-induced cancer in the general population and estimates of the risk of radiation exposure.

  3. ?She?s a dog at the end of the day?: Guide dog owners? perspectives on the behaviour of their guide dog

    OpenAIRE

    Craigon, Peter J.; Hobson- West, Pru; England, Gary C. W.; Whelan, Chantelle; Lethbridge, Emma; Asher, Lucy

    2017-01-01

    A guide dog is a domestic dog (Canis familiaris) that is specifically educated to provide mobility support to a blind or visually impaired owner. Current dog suitability assessments focus on behavioural traits, including: trainability, reactivity or attention to environmental stimuli, low aggressiveness, fearfulness and stress behaviour, energy levels, and attachment behaviour. The aim of this study was to find out which aspects of guide dog behaviour are of key importance to guide dog owners...

  4. Identification and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of Staphylococcus spp. isolated from canine chronic otitis externa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva N.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Swab samples obtained from 96 dogs with chronic otitis externa were cultured for the isolation of Staphylococcus species. Of 57 staphylococcal strains, 41 (72% were coagulase-negative (CNS. The identification of staphylococci strains was made by standard procedures for the routine identification of staphylococci in clinical practice. S. sciuri was the most frequent species isolated (22.8% from chronic otitis externa in dogs followed by S. intermedius (12.3%, S. auricularis (10.5% and S. aureus (8.8%. Three (5.2% CNS strains could not be identified. Bacterial isolates were susceptible to enrofloxacin, gentamicin, cephalothin, chloramphenicol and neomycin. Resistance was most common to penicillin G, oxacillin and ampicillin.

  5. Recognizing the value of assistance dogs in society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audrestch, Hilary M; Whelan, Chantelle T; Grice, David; Asher, Lucy; England, Gary C W; Freeman, Sarah L

    2015-10-01

    Assistance dogs are specially trained to undertake a variety of tasks to help individuals with disabilities. This review gives an overview of the different types of assistance dogs in the UK, including guide dogs, hearing dogs, mobility assistance dogs, service dogs and dual-purpose dogs. The literature describes many benefits of assistance dogs, including their impact on physical wellbeing and safety of their 'owners,' as well as on psychological wellbeing and social inclusion. The role of assistance dogs in society is widely recognized by the public, but is not currently acknowledged in government social policy. The current evidence on the benefits of assistance dogs is limited by the type and scale of current research. This article highlights the need for independent funding for high quality research to enable social care and policy makers to make evidence-based decisions on the value of assistance dogs to people with disabilities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. pitting corrosion susceptibility pitting corrosion susceptibility of aisi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    Abstract. The susceptibility of austenitic (AISI 301) stainless steel to pitting corrosion was evaluated in sodium chloride. (NaCl) solutions ... AISI 301 steel suffers from pitting corrosion in all the investigated solutions. AISI 301 steel suffers from ..... [1] Ijeomah, M.N.C. Elements of Corrosion and Protection. Theory, Auto Century ...

  7. Perianal pruritus in dogs with skin disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maina, Elisa; Galzerano, Mario; Noli, Chiara

    2014-06-01

    Perianal pruritus has been reported in dogs with anal sac disease but not in healthy dogs. Some authors describe it as typical of allergy, but there is little evidence in support of this. The aim was to investigate the association between perianal pruritus and canine atopic dermatitis (CAD), adverse food reaction (ARF) and other skin diseases in dogs. Two hundred and fifty privately owned dogs with skin disease and without anal sac disease. The presence or absence of perianal pruritus, macroscopic and cytological evaluation of the perianal skin surface and the macroscopic appearance of anal sac contents were assessed. Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were performed to compare the frequency of perianal pruritus with the clinical diagnoses and with clinical and cytological parameters. Perianal pruritus was seen in 39 of 75 dogs with CAD, in 29 of 57 dogs with ARF and in only 24 of 118 dogs with other conditions. The frequency of perianal pruritus in dogs with CAD and/or ARF was significantly higher than that in dogs with other diagnoses (P disease was significantly associated with perianal pruritus. Perianal pruritus was significantly associated with signs of perianal alopecia, erythema, excoriations, lichenification and hyperpigmentation; it was not associated with the presence of bacteria or yeasts or with anal sac impaction. Perianal pruritus was seen more frequently in dogs with AFR/CAD than with other dermatological diseases. This is the first study to evaluate perianal pruritus in dogs with skin disease and without anal sac disease. © 2014 ESVD and ACVD.

  8. Magnetic Susceptability Measurements in Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jason; Mallory, Kendall; Seim, Ryan

    2000-04-01

    A new undergraduate research facility in magnetic susceptability measurements on superconductors is being developed at the University of Northern Colorado. Initial data measurements of the magnetic susceptability of various superconductors will be presented. These measurements were obtained with a liquid helium/nitrogen dewar that was reassembled for use in this project. The cryostat consists of two separate dewars, the first of which contains liquid nitrogen, the second, liquid helium. The liquid nitrogen dewar is used to keep the helium bath from evaporating off too quickly. Data on the evaporation rates of the two liquids will also be presented.

  9. Dog ownership, dog behaviour and transmission of Echinococcus spp. in the Alay Valley, southern Kyrgyzstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Kesteren, Freya; Mastin, Alexander; Mytynova, Bermet; Ziadinov, Iskender; Boufana, Belgees; Torgerson, Paul R; Rogan, Michael T; Craig, Philip S

    2013-11-01

    Echinococcosis is a re-emerging zoonotic disease in Kyrgyzstan, and the incidence of human infection has increased substantially since the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991. Domestic dogs are hosts of Echinococcus spp. and play an important role in the transmission of these parasites. The demography, ecology and behaviour of dogs are therefore relevant in studying Echinococcus spp. transmission. Dog demographics, roles of dogs, dog movements and faecal environmental contamination were assessed in four rural communities in the Alay Valley, southern Kyrgyzstan. Arecoline purge data revealed for the first time that E. granulosus, E. canadensis and E. multilocularis were present in domestic dogs in the Alay Valley. Surveys revealed that many households had dogs and that dogs played various roles in the communities, as pets, guard dogs or sheep dogs. Almost all dogs were free to roam, and GPS data revealed that many moved outside their communities, thus being able to scavenge offal and consume rodents. Faecal environmental contamination was high, presenting a significant infection risk to the local communities.

  10. Dog Bite Risk: An Assessment of Child Temperament and Child-Dog Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Bell

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Annually approximately 400,000 American children receive treatment for dog bites. Young children are at greatest risk and are frequently bitten following behavior that provokes familiar dogs. This study investigated the effects of child temperament on children’s interaction with dogs. Eighty-eight children aged 3.5–6 years interacted with a live dog. Dog and child behaviors were assessed through observational coding. Four child temperament constructs—impulsivity, inhibitory control, approach and shyness—were assessed via the parent-report Children’s Behavioral Questionnaire. Less shy children took greater risks with the dog, even after controlling for child and dog characteristics. No other temperament traits were associated with risk-taking with the dog. Based on these results, children’s behavior with unfamiliar dogs may parallel behavior with other novel or uncertain situations. Implications for dog bite intervention programs include targeting at-risk children and merging child- and parent-oriented interventions with existing programs geared toward the physical environment and the dog.

  11. Prevalence of Campylobacter and four endoparasites in dog populations associated with Hearing Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, C M; Stephen, J M; Price, C J

    2007-11-01

    This study established the prevalence of four gastrointestinal parasites (Isopora species, Giardia species, Uncinaria stenocephala, Toxocara canis) and one bacterial infection (Campylobacter jejuni/coli) in dogs associated with the charity Hearing Dogs for Deaf People. Dogs' faeces were routinely sampled from dogs according to whether they were in Socialising, Kennelling or Visiting the Hearing Dogs site. A further group consisted of dogs with diarrhoea. Prevalence rates for dogs in Socialising (n=326), Kennelling (n=117), Visiting (n=106) and Diarrhoea (n=59) groups, respectively, were as follows: Campylobacter- 26, 21, 15 and 31 per cent; Coccidia - 3, 0, 0 and 2 per cent; Giardia- 13, 3, 2 and 10 per cent; hookworm - 1, 1, 4 and 5 per cent; and Toxocara- 4, 2, 3 and 2 per cent. There were significant differences in the levels of Giardia and hookworm found between the four different groups of dogs. No significant gender differences were found, and dogs that were positive for Campylobacter in the Visiting group were significantly younger. This study provides current information on the infection rates in specific dog populations in the UK. This is relevant to the veterinary health of dogs and the possible risk of zoonotic infection to humans.

  12. VARIABILITY IN THE ULTRASONOGRAPHIC APPEARANCE OF THE PANCREAS IN HEALTHY DOGS COMPARED TO DOGS WITH HYPERADRENOCORTICISM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, L Abbigail; Hilferty, Michael; Francis, Taylor; Steiner, Jörg M; Gaschen, Lorrie

    2015-01-01

    Anecdotally, an unusually hyperechoic pancreas can be found in seemingly healthy dogs on ultrasound examination and the prevalence and clinical significance of this finding is unknown. The objective of this study was to describe the prevalence of a hyperechoic and/or heterogenous pancreas in healthy dogs and correlate these findings to weight, age, and body condition score (BCS). An additional objective was to describe the prevalence of a hyperechoic and/or heterogenous pancreas in dogs with hyperadrenocorticism and compare this to the healthy dogs. Pancreata of 74 healthy dogs were evaluated prospectively and pancreatic echogenicity and echotexture were graded. Each dog's age, BCS, and weight were recorded. Dogs were screened for health by physical examination, serum chemistry panel, urine specific gravity, and a canine pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity assay. Pancreatic images for 92 dogs having hyperadrenocorticism were also reviewed and pancreatic echogenicity and echotexture were recorded. The prevalence of pancreatic hyperechogenicity in normal dogs was 7% (5 of 74) and heterogeneity was 40% (30 of 74). No correlation existed between pancreatic echogenicity and weight, age, or BCS (P > 0.1 for all sets). A statistically significant increase in the proportion of dogs having a hyperechoic pancreas was found in the hyperadrenocorticism sample of dogs (40%, 37 of 92, P pancreas in these samples confounds interpretation of diseases such as chronic pancreatitis. © 2015 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  13. Serial plasma glucose changes in dogs suffering from severe dog bite wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeman, J P; Kitshoff, A M; du Plessis, C J; Thompson, P N

    2011-03-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the changes in plasma glucose concentration in 20 severely injured dogs suffering from dog bite wounds over a period of 72 hours from the initiation of trauma. Historical, signalment, clinical and haematological factors were investigated for their possible effect on plasma glucose concentration. Haematology was repeated every 24 hours and plasma glucose concentrations were measured at 8-hourly intervals post-trauma. On admission, 1 dog was hypoglycaemic, 8 were normoglycaemic and 11 were hyperglycaemic. No dogs showed hypoglycaemia at any other stage during the study period. The median blood glucose concentrations at each of the 10 collection points, excluding the 56-hour and 64-hour collection points, were in the hyperglycaemic range (5.8- 6.2 mmol/l). Puppies and thin dogs had significantly higher median plasma glucose concentrations than adult and fat dogs respectively (P dogs survived the 72-hour study period. Overall 13 dogs (81.3 %) made a full recovery after treatment. Three of 4 dogs that presented in a collapsed state died, whereas all dogs admitted as merely depressed or alert survived (P = 0.004). The high incidence of hyperglycaemia can possibly be explained by the "diabetes of injury" phenomenon. However, hyperglycaemia in this group of dogs was marginal and potential benefits of insulin therapy are unlikely to outweigh the risk of adverse effects such as hypoglycaemia.

  14. Serial plasma glucose changes in dogs suffering from severe dog bite wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Schoeman

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to describe the changes in plasma glucose concentration in 20 severely injured dogs suffering from dog bite wounds over a period of 72 hours from the initiation of trauma. Historical, signalment, clinical and haematological factors were investigated for their possible effect on plasma glucose concentration. Haematology was repeated every 24 hours and plasma glucose concentrations were measured at 8-hourly intervals post-trauma. On admission, 1 dog was hypoglycaemic, 8 were normoglycaemic and 11 were hyperglycaemic. No dogs showed hypoglycaemia at any other stage during the study period. The median blood glucose concentrations at each of the 10 collection points, excluding the 56-hour and 64-hour collection points, were in the hyperglycaemic range (5.8– 6.2 mmol/ . Puppies and thin dogs had significantly higher median plasma glucose concentrations than adult and fat dogs respectively (P < 0.05 for both. Fifteen dogs survived the 72-hour study period. Overall 13 dogs (81.3 % made a full recovery after treatment. Three of 4 dogs that presented in a collapsed state died, whereas all dogs admitted as merely depressed or alert survived (P = 0.004. The high incidence of hyperglycaemia can possibly be explained by the ’diabetes of injury“ phenomenon. However, hyperglycaemia in this group of dogs was marginal and potential benefits of insulin therapy are unlikely to outweigh the risk of adverse effects such as hypoglycaemia.

  15. In vitro evaluation of Malassezia pachydermatis susceptibility to azole compounds using E-test and CLSI microdilution methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cafarchia, Claudia; Figueredo, Luciana A; Iatta, Roberta; Colao, Valeriana; Montagna, Maria T; Otranto, Domenico

    2012-11-01

    Dermatitis caused by Malassezia spp., one of most common skin disease in dogs, requires prolonged therapy and/or high doses of antifungal agents. In the present study, the antifungal susceptibility of M. pachydermatis to ketoconazole (KTZ), fluconazole (FLZ), itraconazole (ITZ), posaconazole (POS) and voriconazole (VOR) was evaluated in vitro using both CLSI reference broth microdilution (CLSI BMD) and E-test. A total of 62 M. pachydermatis strains from dogs with and without skin lesions were tested. M. pachydermatis strains were susceptible to ITZ, KTZ and POS using both test methods, with the highest MIC found in tests of FLZ. Essential agreement between the two methods ranged from 87.1% (VOR) to 91.9% (ITZ), and categorical agreement from 74.2% (FLZ) to 96.8% (ITZ). Minor error discrepancies were observed between the two methods, with major discrepancies observed for KTZ. A higher MIC(50) value for FLZ was noted with M. pachydermatis genotype B. The MICs(50) of M. pachydermatis genotype B for KTZ, VOR and POS were higher in isolates from dogs with skin lesions than those in isolates from animals without skin lesions. The results suggest a link between genotypes of M. pachydermatis and in vitro drug susceptibility. The categorical agreement for both E-test and CLSI BMD methods found in this investigation confirms the E-test as a reliable diagnostic method for routine use in clinical mycology laboratories.

  16. Fecal calprotectin concentrations in adult dogs with chronic diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grellet, Aurélien; Heilmann, Romy M; Lecoindre, Patrick; Feugier, Alexandre; Day, Michael J; Peeters, Dominique; Freiche, Valérie; Hernandez, Juan; Grandjean, Dominique; Suchodolski, Jan S; Steiner, Jorg M

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate fecal calprotectin concentrations in healthy dogs and dogs with chronic diarrhea, to identify cutoff values for fecal calprotectin concentrations for use in differentiating dogs with chronic diarrhea and a canine chronic enteropathy clinical activity index (CCECAI) chronic diarrhea and a CCECAI ≥ 12, and to evaluate the association between histologic evidence of intestinal mucosal changes and fecal calprotectin concentrations in dogs with chronic diarrhea. Fecal samples from 96 adult dogs (27 dogs with chronic diarrhea and 69 healthy control dogs). Severity of clinical signs was evaluated on the basis of the CCECAI scoring system. Endoscopy was performed in all dogs with chronic diarrhea, and mucosal biopsy specimens were evaluated histologically. Fecal calprotectin concentration was quantified via radioimmunoassay. Fecal calprotectin concentrations were significantly higher in dogs with chronic diarrhea than in healthy control dogs. Fecal calprotectin concentrations were also significantly higher in dogs with a CCECAI ≥ 12, compared with concentrations for dogs with a CCECAI between 4 and 11. Fecal calprotectin concentrations were significantly higher in dogs with chronic diarrhea associated with histologic lesions, compared with concentrations in control dogs, and were significantly correlated with the severity of histologic intestinal lesions. Among dogs with chronic diarrhea, the best cutoff fecal calprotectin concentration for predicting a CCECAI ≥ 12 was 48.9 μg/g (sensitivity, 53.3%; specificity, 91.7%). Fecal calprotectin may be a useful biomarker in dogs with chronic diarrhea, especially dogs with histologic lesions.

  17. Pet dogs and child physical activity: the role of child-dog attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadomski, A M; Scribani, M B; Krupa, N; Jenkins, P

    2017-10-01

    Dog ownership has been associated with increased physical activity in children which in turn may mitigate childhood obesity. To measure the association between child-dog attachment and child physical activity and screen time. Cross-sectional study including 370 children (ages 4-10) who had pet dogs in the home. Parents completed the DartScreen, a web-based screener, before a well-child visit. Screener domains included child body mass index (BMI), physical activity, screen time and dog-related questions. The Companion Animal Bonding Scale (CABS) was used to measure child attachment to the dog. Clinic nurses weighed and measured the children. Associations between CABS, BMI z-score, screen time and physical activity were estimated. CABS was strongly associated with time spent being active with the dog (F = 22.81, p dog is associated with increased child physical activity. © 2016 World Obesity Federation.

  18. Degenerative mitral valve disease: Survival of dogs attending primary-care practice in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattin, M J; Boswood, A; Church, D B; McGreevy, P D; O'Neill, D G; Thomson, P C; Brodbelt, D C

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate survival of dogs with degenerative mitral valve disease (DMVD). A retrospective cohort study of dogs with DMVD attending primary-care practices in England was undertaken. Cases of DMVD were identified within the electronic patient records (EPRs) of practices sharing data with VetCompass. Kaplan-Meier curves were used to explore survival and Cox regression models identified factors associated with hazard of death. The EPRs from 111,967 dogs, attending 93 veterinary practices between January 2010 and December 2011 identified 405 cases diagnosed with DMVD giving a prevalence of diagnosed DMVD of 0.36% (95% CI: 0.29-0.45%). A further 3557 dogs were classified as possible cases (heart murmurs consistent with DMVD). Overall, a total of 3962 dogs were classified as heart murmur cases (possible and diagnosed DMVD), giving a prevalence of 3.54% (95% CI: 3.26-3.84%). One hundred and sixteen (28.6%) of the diagnosed DMVD cases were incident, newly diagnosed with DMVD. The mean age at diagnosis was 9.52 years (95% CI: 8.98-10.14 years). Fifty-eight (50.0%) of the incident cases died during the study period. The median survival time (MST) for all-cause mortality was 25.4 months (95% CI: 20.4-34.4 months) after disease detection for DMVD cases. For possible cases, 121 (29.7%) from a random sample of 407 possible DMVD cases were incident cases (newly detected heart murmur consistent with DMVD during the study period). The mean age at which a heart murmur was first recorded in possible cases was 9.73 years (95% CI: 9.02-10.44 years). Forty-nine (40.5%) possible cases died during the study period. The MST for all-cause mortality was 33.8 months (95% CI: 23.7-43.1 months) after a heart murmur was initially detected. In the multivariable survival analysis for possible and diagnosed cases, Cavalier King Charles Spaniels (CKCSs) and other purebreds had higher hazards of death than crossbreds. Dogs weighing ≥20.0kg and older dogs had an increased hazard of

  19. The Use of Trazodone to Facilitate Post-Surgical Confinement in Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruen, Margaret E.; Roe, Simon C.; Griffith, Emily; Hamilton, Alexandra; Sherman, Barbara L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the safety and efficacy of the oral serotonin antagonist/reuptake inhibitor trazodone hydrochloride to facilitate confinement and calming after orthopedic surgery in dogs. Design Prospective open-label trial. Animals 36 client-owned dogs. Procedures Healthy dogs were recruited when presented for pre-surgical evaluation for orthopedic procedures. Starting the day after surgery, dogs were administered trazodone (~3.5 mg/kg, per os (PO), q12h) with tramadol (4–6 mg/kg, PO, q8–12h) for pain management. After 3 days, tramadol was discontinued and trazodone was increased (~7 mg/kg, PO, q12h) and maintained for at least 4 weeks. If needed, trazodone dosage was increased to 7–10 mg/kg, PO, q8h. Clients completed electronic surveys rating their dogs’ confinement tolerance, calmness/hyperactivity level, and responses to specific provocative situations, prior to surgery and at 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks and at the post-surgical evaluation (8–12 weeks). Results The majority of clients (~90%) reported that, when given trazodone during the 8–12 weeks following orthopedic surgery, their dogs improved moderately or extremely with regard to confinement tolerance and calmness. Trazodone was well tolerated, even in combination with non-steroidal drugs, antibiotics, and other medications; no dogs were withdrawn from the study due to adverse reactions. Client-reported median onset of action of trazodone was 31–45 minutes and median duration of action was four or more hours. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance The results suggest that oral trazodone is a safe and efficacious medication that may be used to facilitate confinement and enhance behavioral calmness of dogs during the critical recovery period following orthopedic surgery. PMID:25029308

  20. Prevalence of Enteropathogens in Dogs Attending 3 Regional Dog Parks in Northern California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hascall, K L; Kass, P H; Saksen, J; Ahlmann, A; Scorza, A V; Lappin, M R; Marks, S L

    2016-11-01

    The prevalence and risk factors for infection with enteropathogens in dogs frequenting dog parks have been poorly documented, and infected dogs can pose a potential zoonotic risk for owners. To determine the prevalence and risk factors of infection with enteropathogens and zoonotic Giardia strains in dogs attending dog parks in Northern California and to compare results of fecal flotation procedures performed at a commercial and university parasitology laboratory. Three-hundred dogs attending 3 regional dog parks in Northern California. Prospective study. Fresh fecal specimens were collected from all dogs, scored for consistency, and owners completed a questionnaire. Specimens were analyzed by fecal centrifugation flotation, DFA, and PCR for detection of 11 enteropathogens. Giardia genotyping was performed for assemblage determination. Enteropathogens were detected in 114/300 dogs (38%), of which 62 (54%) did not have diarrhea. Frequency of dog park attendance correlated significantly with fecal consistency (P = .0039), but did not correlate with enteropathogen detection. Twenty-seven dogs (9%) were infected with Giardia, and genotyping revealed nonzoonotic assemblages C and D. The frequency of Giardia detection on fecal flotation was significantly lower at the commercial laboratory versus the university laboratory (P = .013), and PCR for Giardia was negative in 11/27 dogs (41%) that were positive on fecal flotation or DFA. Enteropathogens were commonly detected in dogs frequenting dog parks, and infection with Giardia correlated with fecal consistency. PCR detection of Giardia had limited diagnostic utility, and detection of Giardia cysts by microscopic technique can vary among laboratories. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  1. Care of dogs and attitudes of dog owners in Port-au-Prince, the Republic of Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, William J; Gall, Melanie; Green, Dick; Eller, Warren S

    2012-01-01

    This article reports the first known study on dogs in Port-au-Prince. Interviews with 1,290 residents provided information on 1,804 dogs. More than 57.7% of homes kept dogs. Not all the dogs received vaccinations for rabies (41.6%), even though 28.2% of households had had a household member bitten by a dog. Although the "owned" dog population had decreased as a result of the earthquake in January 2010, the number of roaming dogs appeared to have been uninfluenced by the disaster. Given that 64.8% of dogs probably had access to the street and only 6.0% of the females were spayed, to humanely contain the dog population will require both confinement and neutering. Although roaming dogs were considered a nuisance by 63.3% of respondents, 42.6% of households fed dogs they did not own.

  2. [Affective behavioural responses by dogs to tactile human-dog interactions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhne, Franziska; Hössler, Johanna C; Struwe, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    The communication of dogs is based on complex, subtle body postures and facial expressions. Some social interaction between dogs includes physical contact. Humans generally use both verbal and tactile signals to communicate with dogs. Hence, interaction between humans and dogs might lead to conflicts because the behavioural responses of dogs to human-dog interaction may be misinterpreted and wrongly assessed. The behavioural responses of dogs to tactile human-dog interactions and human gestures are the focus of this study. The participating dogs (n = 47) were privately owned pets.They were of varying breed and gender.The test consisted of nine randomised test sequences (e. g. petting the dog's head or chest). A test sequence was performed for a period of 30 seconds. The inter-trial interval was set at 60 seconds and the test-retest interval was set at 10 minutes. The frequency and duration of the dogs'behavioural responses were recorded using INTERACT. To examine the behavioural responses of the dogs, a two-way analysis of variance within the linear mixed models procedure of IBM SPSS Statistics 19 was conducted. A significant influence of the test-sequenc order on the dogs' behaviour could be analysed for appeasement gestures (F8,137 = 2.42; p = 0.018), redirected behaviour (F8,161 = 6.31; p = 0.012) and socio-positive behaviour (F8,148 = 6.28; p = 0.012). The behavioural responses of the dogs, which were considered as displacement activities (F8,109 = 2.5; p = 0.014) differed significantly among the test sequences. The response of the dogs, measured as gestures of appeasement, redirected behaviours, and displacement activities, was most obvious during petting around the head and near the paws.The results of this study conspicuously indicate that dogs respond to tactile human-dog interactions with gestures of appeasement and displacement activities. Redirected behaviours, socio-positive behaviours as well displacement activities are behavioural responses which dogs

  3. Magnetic susceptibility of molecular carbon: nanotubes and fullerite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, A.P.; Haddon, R.C.; Zhou, O.; Fleming, R.M.; Zhang, J.; McClure, S.M.; Smalley, R.E. (AT T Bell Laboratories, Murray Hill, NJ (United States))

    1994-07-01

    Elemental carbon can be synthesized in a variety of geometrical forms, from three-dimensional extended structures (diamond) to finite molecules (C[sub 60] fullerite). Results are presented here on the magnetic susceptibility of the least well-understood members of this family, nanotubes and C[sub 60] fullerite. (1) Nanotubes represent the cylindrical form of carbon, intermediate between graphite and fullerite. They are found to have significantly larger orientation-averaged susceptibility, on a per carbon basis, than any other form of elemental carbon. This susceptibility implies an average band structure among nanotubes similar to that of graphite. (2) High-resolution magnetic susceptibility data on C[sub 60] fullerite near the molecular orientational-ordering transition at 259 K show a sharp jump corresponding to 2.5 centimeter-gram-second parts per million per mole of C[sub 60]. This jump directly demonstrates the effect of an intermolecular cooperative transition on an intramolecular electronic property, where the susceptibility jump may be ascribed to a change in the shape of the molecule due to lattice forces.

  4. Histoplasmosis in a dog from New Brunswick

    OpenAIRE

    Tyre, Erica; Eisenbart, David; Foley, Peter; Burton, Shelley

    2007-01-01

    A young dog was presented with a history of chronic diarrhea, anorexia, and weight loss. Histoplasma capsulatum was suspected, based on cytologic examination of lymph node aspirates and peritoneal fluid, and confirmed by fungal culture. To our knowledge, this is the first case of histoplasmosis diagnosed in a dog in Atlantic Canada.

  5. High visual acuity revealed in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Olle; Milton, Ida; Andersson, Elin; Jensen, Per; Roth, Lina S V

    2017-01-01

    Humans have selectively bred and used dogs over a period of thousands of years, and more recently the dog has become an important model animal for studies in ethology, cognition and genetics. These broad interests warrant careful descriptions of the senses of dogs. Still there is little known about dog vision, especially what dogs can discriminate in different light conditions. We trained and tested whippets, pugs, and a Shetland sheepdog in a two-choice discrimination set-up and show that dogs can discriminate patterns with spatial frequencies between 5.5 and 19.5 cycle per degree (cpd) in the bright light condition (43 cd m-2). This is a higher spatial resolution than has been previously reported although the individual variation in our tests was large. Humans tested in the same set-up reached acuities corresponding to earlier studies, ranging between 32.1 and 44.2 cpd. In the dim light condition (0.0087 cd m-2) the acuity of dogs ranged between 1.8 and 3.5 cpd while in humans, between 5.9 and 9.9 cpd. Thus, humans make visual discrimination of objects from roughly a threefold distance compared to dogs in both bright and dim light.

  6. Spermatogenesis and testicular tumours in ageing dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, M. A.; de rooij, D. G.; Teerds, K. J.; van de Gaag, I.; van Sluijs, F. J.

    2001-01-01

    The aims of this investigation were to quantify the changes in canine spermatogenesis that occur during ageing and to study the prevalence of testicular tumours and their effects on spermatogenesis in dogs. Testes from 74 dogs of various breeds without clinically detected testicular disease and from

  7. Serum paraoxonase 1 activity in dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossi, Gabriele; Giordano, Alessia; Pezzia, Francesca

    2013-01-01

    Serum activity of paraoxonase (PON1) decreases during inflammation in many species. Little information is available on paraoxon-based tests and the possible role of PON1 in dogs.......Serum activity of paraoxonase (PON1) decreases during inflammation in many species. Little information is available on paraoxon-based tests and the possible role of PON1 in dogs....

  8. Etiology of patent ductus arteriosus in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, James W; Patterson, Donald F

    2003-01-01

    Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) is the most common congenital heart disease in dogs and usually causes heart failure and death unless corrected at a young age. Previous histologic studies in a line of dogs derived from Miniature Poodles with hereditary PDA identified varying degrees of hypoplasia and asymmetry of ductus-specific smooth muscle and the presence of aortalike elastic tissue in the ductus wall sufficient to cause patency. To determine if similar structural abnormalities cause PDA in other dogs, serial-section, 3-dimensional histology of ductal architecture was studied in 8 non-Poodle purebred dogs with PDA with no immediate family history of PDA. Morphologic abnormalities were observed in 7 of 8 dogs with PDA and essentially were the same as those in dogs known to have a hereditary form of PDA. These findings suggest that apparently sporadic PDA in these breeds is caused by a genetic defect in the structure of the ductus arteriosus that is similar or identical to that in the Poodle. The relatives of dogs with PDA, particularly parents, offspring, and siblings, should be screened for evidence of PDA. Dogs with PDA should not be used for breeding, regardless of breed.

  9. Zonisamide monotherapy for idiopathic epilepsy in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, J Y; Hwang, C Y; Chae, J S; Ahn, J O; Kim, T H; Seo, K W; Lee, S Y; Youn, H Y

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of zonisamide as a monotherapy in dogs with idiopathic epileptic seizure. The experiment was conducted on 10 dogs with idiopathic epilepsy that were treated at the Seoul National University Hospital for Animals. A diagnosis was conducted based on physical and neurologic examination, complete blood count and chemical analysis, magnetic resonance imaging and cerebrospinal fluid analyses. Idiopathic epilepsy was diagnosed when all of these examinations were normal. Oral zonisamide was administrated to 10 dogs with idiopathic epilepsy at 5-15 mg/kg per os every 12 h to achieve a concentration of zonisamide in serum of 10-40 μg/mL. The frequency of seizures before and after the administration of zonisamide therapy was recorded and the concentrations of zonisamide in serum were measured. Six (60%) of the dogs were favourable responders to treatment, showing a ≥50% reduction in monthly frequency of seizures. Of the remaining four, two dogs did not show a reduction and the other two showed an increase in frequency of seizures. The mean dosage of zonisamide for favourable responders was 7.92 (SD 3.79) mg/kg, which was administered orally twice a day. Only one dog, which was one of the unfavourable responders in the whole study, experienced mild side effects. Among the dogs treated with oral zonisamide, 60% responded favourably. The effect of zonisamide as an anticonvulsant drug was demonstrated in this study. Based on these results, zonisamide monotherapy is effective in some dogs with idiopathic epilepsy.

  10. An exploratory model of dog disciplining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ben Michael-Steinberg, Judith; Korzilius, H.P.L.M.; Vossen, J.M.H.; Felling, A.J.A.

    2000-01-01

    This study examines the possible relationships among dog owners' perceptions of, and emotional and behavioral responses to, problematic situations involving their dogs, and investigates differences in these in different subgroups of owners. The dominant sequence of the interaction is defined as

  11. Interactions of wolves and dogs in Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritts, S.H.; Paul, W.J.

    1989-01-01

    This article reports on the nature and extent of wolf-dog interactions in Minnesota, based on investigations of complaints received by personnel of the federal government dealing with wolf-depredation control. Findings may indicate the wolf-dog interactions that can be expected in other recovery areas.

  12. Accidental Datura stramonium poisoning in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tostes, Raimundo A

    2002-02-01

    Datura stramonium is potentially poisonous to humans and livestock; however, there's little description of clinical and pathological findings in dogs naturally intoxicated. We report an accidental Datura stramonium poisoning in a dog emphasizing the importance of recognizing the classical signs of anticholinergic poisoning.

  13. Diagnostic approach to malocclusions in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennet, P R; Harvey, C E

    1992-06-01

    Malocclusions may be associated with any of the cranial shapes recognized in dogs. Orthodontic treatments for malocclusions are frequently reported. However, these reports often lack a diagnostic plan and use confusing terminologies. The purpose of this paper is to describe, using standardized terms, a diagnostic approach to the most common malocclusions found in dogs.

  14. Rocky Mountain spotted fever in dogs, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labruna, Marcelo B; Kamakura, Orson; Moraes-Filho, Jonas; Horta, Mauricio C; Pacheco, Richard C

    2009-03-01

    Clinical illness caused by Rickettsia rickettsii in dogs has been reported solely in the United States. We report 2 natural clinical cases of Rocky Mountain spotted fever in dogs in Brazil. Each case was confirmed by seroconversion and molecular analysis and resolved after doxycycline therapy.

  15. Hepatocellular carcinoma in a young dog

    OpenAIRE

    Teshima, Takahiro; Matsumoto, Hirotaka; Shigihara, Kae; Sawada, Harumi; Michishita, Masaki; Takahashi, Kimimasa; Koyama, Hidekazu

    2013-01-01

    A 25-month-old Chihuahua dog with no clinical signs was evaluated for high serum liver enzymes. Ultrasonography and computed tomography revealed a mass in the left hepatic medial lobe. The histological diagnosis reached using resected tissues was hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). To the authors’ knowledge, this is the youngest dog diagnosed with HCC.

  16. MANAGEMENT OF PELVIC FRACTURES IN DOG

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

    Fracture of ilium, the most common fracture seen in the pelvis account for 46% of all pelvic fracture (Henry, 1985; De Camp, 2005). Whereas, acetabular fracture comprises 12 % of pelvic fractures in dogs (De Camp, 2005). In smaller dogs, most of the pelvic fractures recover without surgery. But immediate surgery is.

  17. Dogs' Body Language Relevant to Learning Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Masashi; Ohtani, Nobuyo; Ohta, Mitsuaki

    2014-02-27

    The facial expressions and body postures of dogs can give helpful information about their moods and emotional states. People can more effectively obedience train their dogs if we can identify the mannerisms associated with learning in dogs. The aim of this study was to clarify the dog's body language during operant conditioning to predict achievement in the test that followed by measuring the duration of behaviors. Forty-six untrained dogs (17 males and 26 females) of various breeds were used. Each session consisted of 5 minutes of training with a treat reward followed by 3 minutes of rest and finally an operant conditioning test that consisted of 20 "hand motion" cues. The operant tests were conducted a total of nine times over three consecutive days, and the success numbers were counted. The duration of the dog's behavior, focusing on the dog's eyes, mouth, ears, tail and tail-wagging, was recorded during the operant conditioning sessions before the test. Particular behaviors, including wide-eyes, closed mouth, erect ears, and forward and high tail carriage, without wagging or with short and quick wagging, related to high achievement results. It is concluded that dogs' body language during operant conditioning was related to their success rate.

  18. Management of tick infestation in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somasani Ayodhya

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out during the month of January 2014 when a total of 148 dogs with history of various diseases were presented to the Campus Veterinary Hospital, Teaching Veterinary Clinical Complex, College of Veterinary Science, Rajendranagar, Hyderabad, India. Out of 148 dogs that were presented to the hospital, 48 dogs had the clinical signs of loss of hair, itching, and reduced food intake. The dogs were restless and continuously rubbed their bodies against the walls in the houses, and scratching with their legs. Clinical examination of the dogs revealed presence of alopecia, pruritus, and the formation of small crusts. All 48 dogs were treated with ivermectin by subcutaneous injection dosed at 0.02 mL/kg body weight at a weekly interval for 2 to 3 weeks. All dogs were bathed with cypermethrin shampoo weekly once for 2-3 weeks. In the present study, it was observed that ivermectin/cypermethrin combination therapy was effective for the management of tick infestation in dogs.

  19. 49 CFR 236.742 - Dog, locking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dog, locking. 236.742 Section 236.742 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION..., MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.742 Dog...

  20. Training Shelter Volunteers to Teach Dog Compliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Veronica J.; DiGennaro Reed, Florence D.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the degree to which training procedures influenced the integrity of behaviorally based dog training implemented by volunteers of an animal shelter. Volunteers were taught to implement discrete-trial obedience training to teach 2 skills (sit and wait) to dogs. Procedural integrity during the baseline and written instructions…

  1. 49 CFR 236.718 - Chart, dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Chart, dog. 236.718 Section 236.718 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.718 Chart, dog. A...

  2. It's a Tough Flu Season for Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it, but new canine virus can make your pet 'sick as a dog' To use the sharing features on this page, ... so the main reason for not vaccinating your pet is the cost, Parrish said. Dubovi advises dog owners to assess for themselves what risk their ...

  3. Carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius in dogs--a longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Windahl Ulrika

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methicillin-resistant S. pseudintermedius strains (MRSP are reported with increasing frequency in bacterial cultures from dogs. The objectives of this study were to determine whether MRSP could be found in dogs several months after a clinically apparent infection and whether the length of carriage varied depending on systemic antimicrobial treatment, diagnosis at time of the first positive MRSP culture and the presence of skin disease or wounds. Thirty-one dogs previously diagnosed with a clinical infection were sampled repeatedly for a minimum of eight months or, with the exception of two dogs, until two consecutive negative results were obtained. Five specified locations were sampled, and the results were evaluated to determine future recommendations concerning sample strategies when screening for MRSP carriage. Information was collected from medical records and questionnaires to evaluate factors that may influence length of carriage. Results The overall median length of MRSP carriage was 11 months (48 weeks. The presence of wounds and signs of dermatitis did not influence length of carriage. Systemic treatment for three weeks or longer with antimicrobial agents to which the bacterium was resistant was associated with prolonged carriage compared to dogs treated for a shorter period of time. Three of five dogs treated with an antimicrobial to which their MRSP-isolates were susceptible (tetracycline were found to still be MRSP-positive when sampled after the end of treatment. Wound samples had the highest positive MRSP yield (81% for the positive sample sites, compared to less than 70% for each of the other four sample sites. Cultures from the nostrils were less likely to detect MRSP carriage relative to the pharynx, perineum, wounds and the corner of the mouth. Conclusions Dogs can carry MRSP for more than a year after a clinically apparent infection. Systemic antimicrobial treatment of infections with antimicrobial agents

  4. Topological susceptibility from the overlap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Del Debbio, Luigi; Pica, Claudio

    2003-01-01

    The chiral symmetry at finite lattice spacing of Ginsparg-Wilson fermionic actions constrains the renormalization of the lattice operators; in particular, the topological susceptibility does not require any renormalization, when using a fermionic estimator to define the topological charge. Theref...

  5. Characterisation of antimicrobial usage in cats and dogs attending UK primary care companion animal veterinary practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckland, E L; O'Neill, D; Summers, J; Mateus, A; Church, D; Redmond, L; Brodbelt, D

    2016-11-12

    There is scant evidence describing antimicrobial (AM) usage in companion animal primary care veterinary practices in the UK. The use of AMs in dogs and cats was quantified using data extracted from 374 veterinary practices participating in VetCompass. The frequency and quantity of systemic antibiotic usage was described.Overall, 25 per cent of 963,463 dogs and 21 per cent of 594,812 cats seen at veterinary practices received at least one AM over a two-year period (2012-2014) and 42 per cent of these animals were given repeated AMs. The main agents used were aminopenicillin types and cephalosporins. Of the AM events, 60 per cent in dogs and 81 per cent in cats were AMs classified as critically important (CIAs) to human health by the World Health Organisation. CIAs of highest importance (fluoroquinolones, macrolides, third-generation cephalosporins) accounted for just over 6 per cent and 34 per cent of AMs in dogs and cats, respectively. The total quantity of AMs used within the study population was estimated to be 1473 kg for dogs and 58 kg for cats.This study has identified a high frequency of AM usage in companion animal practice and for certain agents classified as of critical importance in human medicine. The study highlights the usefulness of veterinary practice electronic health records for studying AM usage. British Veterinary Association.

  6. Propylene glycol intoxication in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claus, Melissa A; Jandrey, Karl E; Poppenga, Robert H

    2011-12-01

    To describe the clinical course, treatment, and outcome of a dog with propylene glycol intoxication. An adult castrated male Australian cattle dog presented to an emergency clinic for an acute onset of ataxia and disorientation after roaming a construction site unsupervised. He tested positive for ethylene glycol using a point-of-care test kit. Treatment for ethylene glycol intoxication included intermittent intravenous boluses of 20% ethanol and hemodialysis. Predialysis and postdialysis blood samples were submitted to the toxicology lab to assess for both ethylene and propylene glycol. The patient tested negative for ethylene glycol and positive for propylene glycol at 1100 mg/dL predialysis and 23 mg/dL postdialysis. The dog made a full recovery. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of documented propylene glycol intoxication in a dog, as well as the first report to describe hemodialysis as treatment for propylene glycol intoxication in a dog. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2011.

  7. Functional MRI in awake unrestrained dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory S Berns

    Full Text Available Because of dogs' prolonged evolution with humans, many of the canine cognitive skills are thought to represent a selection of traits that make dogs particularly sensitive to human cues. But how does the dog mind actually work? To develop a methodology to answer this question, we trained two dogs to remain motionless for the duration required to collect quality fMRI images by using positive reinforcement without sedation or physical restraints. The task was designed to determine which brain circuits differentially respond to human hand signals denoting the presence or absence of a food reward. Head motion within trials was less than 1 mm. Consistent with prior reinforcement learning literature, we observed caudate activation in both dogs in response to the hand signal denoting reward versus no-reward.

  8. Nasca classification of hemivertebra in five dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Besalti Omer

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Five dogs, four small mixed breed and a Doberman Pinscher, presented in our clinic with hemivertebra. Complete physical, radiological and neurological examinations were done and the spinal deformities were characterized in accord with the Nasca classification used in human medicine. Two dogs had multiple hemivertebrae (round, oval or wedge-shaped: Type 3 in the thoracic region; one dog had an individual surplus half vertebral body (Type 1 plus a wedge-shaped hemivertebra (Type 2b in the lumbar region; one dog had multiple hemivertebrae which were fused on one side (Type 4a in the thoracic region; and one dog had a wedge-shaped hemivertebra (Type 2a in the cervical region.

  9. Do dogs (Canis lupus familiaris) prefer family?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Jennifer; Vonk, Jennifer

    2015-10-01

    Kin recognition requires the ability to discriminate between one's own genetic relatives and non-relatives. There are two mechanisms that aid in kin discrimination: phenotype matching and familiarity. Dogs may be a good model for assessing these mechanisms as dogs are a promiscuous social species with a keen sense of smell. Domestic dogs of both sexes were presented with two scents (close kin, distant-kin) and preference was assessed through three measures (latency to approach, number of visits, time spent). Experiment 1 explored the possibility of phenotype matching as subjects had no contact with sires, whose scent was presented alongside a control male's scent. Experiment 2 explored recognition of siblings raised with the subjects and then separated at seven weeks of age. Whereas female dogs in this experiment did not show a statistically significant preference, male dogs showed a preference for distant-kin when presented with sire and female sibling samples. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Hyperferritinemia in dogs with splenic hemangiosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikazawa, Seishiro; Hori, Yasutomo; Hoshi, Fumio; Kanai, Kazutaka; Ito, Naoyuki; Higuchi, Seiichi

    2013-11-01

    Serum ferritin concentration increases in dogs in association with various diseases. In this study, we measured serum ferritin levels in dogs with splenic masses, using a sandwich ELISA assay. Eleven dogs with hemangiosarcoma (HSA), six with hematoma, 1 with hemangioma and 3 with lymphoma were enrolled. All dogs with HSA had serum ferritin concentrations above the normal limit (1,357 ng/ml, mean + 2× standard deviation of normal). Increased serum ferritin concentrations have also been observed in few cases of hematoma, hemangioma and lymphoma. Therefore, hyperferritinemia is not specific for splenic HSA, but may have clinical usefulness as a sensitive test for the disease. Further evaluation of serum ferritin concentrations in dogs with splenic HSA is needed.

  11. Slipped capital femoral epiphysis in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moores, A P; Owen, M R; Fews, D; Coe, R J; Brown, P J; Butterworth, S J

    2004-12-01

    In a retrospective review of 43 femoral fractures, three dogs had separation of the femoral capital epiphysis from the metaphysis in the absence of trauma. Two of these dogs also had evidence of pathology in the contralateral femoral neck including, in one dog, displacement of the capital epiphysis in relation to the metaphysis without actual separation. The case histories, radiographic features and histopathological findings of these cases were reviewed and compared with previous cases of slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) reported in dogs and also with SCFE in children. Pre-slip, acute, chronic and acute-on-chronic slips were Identified. Based on the cases reviewed, the authors advise internal fixation of stable slipped epiphyses in dogs. This may also be appropriate for unstable separations, although resorption of the femoral neck may preclude stable fixation and necessitate femoral head and neck excision.

  12. Genetic profiles of ten Dirofilaria immitis isolates susceptible or resistant to macrocyclic lactone heartworm preventives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourguinat, Catherine; Keller, Kathy; Xia, Jianguo; Lepage, Pierre; McTier, Tom L; Woods, Debra J; Prichard, Roger K

    2017-11-09

    For dogs and cats, chemoprophylaxis with macrocyclic lactone (ML) preventives for heartworm disease is widely used in the United States and other countries. Since 2005, cases of loss of efficacy (LOE) of heartworm preventives have been reported in the U.S. More recently, ML-resistant D. immitis isolates were confirmed. Previous work identified 42 genetic markers that could predict ML response in individual samples. For field surveillance, it would be more appropriate to work on microfilarial pools from individual dogs with a smaller subset of genetic markers. MiSeq technology was used to identify allele frequencies with the 42 genetic markers previously reported. Microfilaria from ten well-characterized new isolates called ZoeKY, ZoeMI, ZoeGCFL, ZoeAL, ZoeMP3, ZoeMO, ZoeAMAL, ZoeLA, ZoeJYD-34, and Metairie were extracted from fresh blood from dogs. DNA were extracted and sequenced with MiSeq technology. Allele frequencies were calculated and compared with the previously reported susceptible, LOE, and resistant D. immitis populations. The allele frequencies identified in the current resistant and susceptible isolates were in accordance with the allele frequencies previously reported in related phenotypes. The ZoeMO population, a subset of the ZoeJYD-34 population, showed a genetic profile that was consistent with some reversion towards susceptibility compared with the parental ZoeJYD-34 population. The Random Forest algorithm was used to create a predictive model using different SNPs. The model with a combination of three SNPs (NODE_42411_RC, NODE_21554_RC, and NODE_45689) appears to be suitable for future monitoring. MiSeq technology provided a suitable methodology to work with the microfilarial samples. The list of SNPs that showed good predictability for ML resistance was narrowed. Additional phenotypically well characterized D. immitis isolates are required to finalize the best set of SNPs to be used for large scale ML resistance screening.

  13. Novel Allelic Variants in the Canine Cyclooxgenase-2 (Cox-2) Promoter Are Associated with Renal Dysplasia in Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteley, Mary H.; Bell, Jerold S.; Rothman, Debby A.

    2011-01-01

    Renal dysplasia (RD) in dogs is a complex disease with a highly variable phenotype and mode of inheritance that does not follow a simple Mendelian pattern. Cox-2 (Cyclooxgenase-2) deficient mice have renal abnormalities and a pathology that has striking similarities to RD in dogs suggesting to us that mutations in the Cox-2 gene could be the cause of RD in dogs. Our data supports this hypothesis. Sequencing of the canine Cox-2 gene was done from clinically affected and normal dogs. Although no changes were detected in the Cox-2 coding region, small insertions and deletions of GC boxes just upstream of the ATG translation start site were found. These sequences are putative SP1 transcription factor binding sites that may represent important cis-acting DNA regulatory elements that govern the expression of Cox-2. A pedigree study of a family of Lhasa apsos revealed an important statistical correlation of these mutant alleles with the disease. We examined an additional 22 clinical cases from various breeds. Regardless of the breed or severity of disease, all of these had one or two copies of the Cox-2 allelic variants. We suggest that the unusual inheritance pattern of RD is due to these alleles, either by changing the pattern of expression of Cox-2 or making Cox-2 levels susceptible to influences of other genes or environmental factors that play an unknown but important role in the development of RD in dogs. PMID:21346820

  14. Novel allelic variants in the canine cyclooxgenase-2 (Cox-2 promoter are associated with renal dysplasia in dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary H Whiteley

    Full Text Available Renal dysplasia (RD in dogs is a complex disease with a highly variable phenotype and mode of inheritance that does not follow a simple Mendelian pattern. Cox-2 (Cyclooxgenase-2 deficient mice have renal abnormalities and a pathology that has striking similarities to RD in dogs suggesting to us that mutations in the Cox-2 gene could be the cause of RD in dogs. Our data supports this hypothesis. Sequencing of the canine Cox-2 gene was done from clinically affected and normal dogs. Although no changes were detected in the Cox-2 coding region, small insertions and deletions of GC boxes just upstream of the ATG translation start site were found. These sequences are putative SP1 transcription factor binding sites that may represent important cis-acting DNA regulatory elements that govern the expression of Cox-2. A pedigree study of a family of Lhasa apsos revealed an important statistical correlation of these mutant alleles with the disease. We examined an additional 22 clinical cases from various breeds. Regardless of the breed or severity of disease, all of these had one or two copies of the Cox-2 allelic variants. We suggest that the unusual inheritance pattern of RD is due to these alleles, either by changing the pattern of expression of Cox-2 or making Cox-2 levels susceptible to influences of other genes or environmental factors that play an unknown but important role in the development of RD in dogs.

  15. Novel allelic variants in the canine cyclooxgenase-2 (Cox-2) promoter are associated with renal dysplasia in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteley, Mary H; Bell, Jerold S; Rothman, Debby A

    2011-02-08

    Renal dysplasia (RD) in dogs is a complex disease with a highly variable phenotype and mode of inheritance that does not follow a simple Mendelian pattern. Cox-2 (Cyclooxgenase-2) deficient mice have renal abnormalities and a pathology that has striking similarities to RD in dogs suggesting to us that mutations in the Cox-2 gene could be the cause of RD in dogs. Our data supports this hypothesis. Sequencing of the canine Cox-2 gene was done from clinically affected and normal dogs. Although no changes were detected in the Cox-2 coding region, small insertions and deletions of GC boxes just upstream of the ATG translation start site were found. These sequences are putative SP1 transcription factor binding sites that may represent important cis-acting DNA regulatory elements that govern the expression of Cox-2. A pedigree study of a family of Lhasa apsos revealed an important statistical correlation of these mutant alleles with the disease. We examined an additional 22 clinical cases from various breeds. Regardless of the breed or severity of disease, all of these had one or two copies of the Cox-2 allelic variants. We suggest that the unusual inheritance pattern of RD is due to these alleles, either by changing the pattern of expression of Cox-2 or making Cox-2 levels susceptible to influences of other genes or environmental factors that play an unknown but important role in the development of RD in dogs.

  16. Incidence of Dirofiaria immitis in dogs presented at University of Nigeria, Nsukka Veterinary Teaching Hospital using wet smear and buffy coat techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chukwuebuka Iniobong Ikenna Ugochukwu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the incidence of Dirofilaria immitis (D. immitis in dogs using the wet mount and buffy coat techniques for rapid detection of microfilaria in blood samples collected from dogs, to compare the two techniques for quick detection, to find if there is age susceptibility in the incidence of dirofilariasis in dogs presented at the Veterinary Teaching Hospital, University of Nigeria, Nsukka and to find out if there are breed and sex variations in the incidence of dirofilariasis in dogs presented at Veterinary Teaching Hospital, University of Nigeria, Nsukka. Methods: Blood samples were collected from the cephalic vein of 119 dogs. The blood samples were aseptically collected via cephalic venepuncture of each dog, collected into a tube containing ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid as anticoagulant, stored in an ice pack box at 5 °C and processed and examined for microfilaria using wet mount and buffy coat techniques. Results: A total of 4 dogs were positive for D. immitis microfilaria giving a prevalence of 3.36%, more male (4.83% than female (1.75% dogs were affected in this study. Although there was no significant difference between both groups, the prevalence was the highest in cross breeds (6.66%, moderate in local breeds (3.63% and absent in exotic breeds (0.00%. Although there was no significant (P < 0.05 difference amongst the 3 groups, only adult dogs were found positive for D. immitis microfilaria. Conclusions: Based on the results of this present study, both the wet mount and buffy coat techniques can be used at the discretion of the clinician and in the absence of modified Knott’s filter test, ELISA test and other diagnostic imaging techniques, in the rapid detection of microfilaria in blood samples from suspected cases of dirofilariasis.

  17. Distraction index as a risk factor for osteoarthritis associated with hip dysplasia in four large dog breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runge, J J; Kelly, S P; Gregor, T P; Kotwal, S; Smith, G K

    2010-05-01

    To determine if age, breed, gender, weight or distraction index (DI) influenced the risk of radiographic osteoarthritis (OA) of canine hip dysplasia (CHD) in four common dog breeds; the American bulldog, Bernese mountain dog, Newfoundland and standard poodle. This was a cross sectional prevalence study with 4349 dogs. Canine hips were evaluated using 3 radiographic projections: the hip-extended view, the compression view and the distraction view. The hip-extended view was examined for the presence of OA. The PennHIP distraction view was utilized to calculate the DI. For all breeds, a multiple logistic regression model incorporating age, weight, gender, and DI was created. For each breed, disease-susceptibility curves grouping dogs on the basis of age were constructed. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves were developed for each breed regardless of age. For all breeds, DI was the most significant risk factor for the development of OA associated with CHD. Weight and age were also significant risk factors in all four breeds, but gender was not. Results from this study support previous findings, that irrespective of breed, the probability of radiographic OA increases with hip joint laxity as measured by the DI. Breed-specific differences in this relationship, however, warrant investigation of all breeds affected by CHD to determine inherent dependency of hip OA on joint laxity. Such findings guide veterinarians in helping dog breeders to make evidence-based breeding decisions and in informing dog owners to implement preventative treatments for CHD for dogs found to be at risk.

  18. 36 CFR 262.11 - Impounding of dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Impounding of dogs. 262.11... ENFORCEMENT SUPPORT ACTIVITIES Impoundments and Removals § 262.11 Impounding of dogs. Any dog found running at large in a part of the National Forest System, which has been closed to dogs running at large, may be...

  19. 44 CFR 15.13 - Dogs and other animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dogs and other animals. 15.13 Section 15.13 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF... EMERGENCY TRAINING CENTER § 15.13 Dogs and other animals. Dogs and other animals, except seeing-eye dogs...

  20. 4 CFR 25.12 - Dogs and other animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 4 Accounts 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dogs and other animals. 25.12 Section 25.12 Accounts GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE GENERAL PROCEDURES CONDUCT IN THE GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE BUILDING AND ON ITS GROUNDS § 25.12 Dogs and other animals. Dogs and other animals, except seeing eye dogs or...

  1. 36 CFR 520.11 - Dogs and other animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dogs and other animals. 520.11 Section 520.11 Parks, Forests, and Public Property SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION RULES AND REGULATIONS... Dogs and other animals. Dogs and other animals, except seeing-eye dogs, shall not be brought upon the...

  2. 36 CFR 504.10 - Dogs and other animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dogs and other animals. 504... GOVERNING SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS § 504.10 Dogs and other animals. Dogs and other animals, except seeing-eye dogs, shall not be brought upon the premises for other than official purposes. ...

  3. 31 CFR 91.11 - Dogs and other animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dogs and other animals. 91.11 Section... CONDUCT IN OR ON THE BUREAU OF THE MINT BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS § 91.11 Dogs and other animals. Dogs and other animals, except seeing-eye dogs, shall not be brought upon the property for other than official...

  4. 31 CFR 407.11 - Dogs and other animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dogs and other animals. 407.11 Section 407.11 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) SECRET... TREASURY ANNEX § 407.11 Dogs and other animals. Dogs and other animals, except seeing-eye dogs, shall not...

  5. Studies on dog population and its implication for rabies control ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The level of rabies vaccination observed was 33.3% while only 5% of the dogs were immunized against canine distemper, hepatitis and leptospirosis. Four people were bitten either by their dog or other people's dog. 68% of the household dogs were outdoor most of the time and unleashed deriving their food from family ...

  6. Barking up the right tree: Understanding local attitudes towards dogs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Exotic carnivores, particularly feral and domestic dogs, represent a serious threat to Madagascar's endemic fauna. ... Of individuals with dogs (N=148), 8.1% of respondents reported using their dog for hunting, and 41.2% reported that their dog had killed at least one wild animal, with 11.8% reporting that this occurred on a ...

  7. Black-tailed prairie dog status and future conservation planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel W. Mulhern; Craig J. Knowles

    1997-01-01

    The black-tailed prairie dog is one of five prairie dog species estimated to have once occupied up to 100 million ha or more in North America. The area occupied by black-tailed prairie dogs has declined to approximately 2% of its former range. Conversion of habitat to other land uses and widespread prairie dog eradication efforts combined with sylvatic plague,

  8. Human behavior preceding dog bites to the face.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezac, P; Rezac, K; Slama, P

    2015-12-01

    Facial injuries caused by dog bites pose a serious problem. The aims of this study were to determine human behavior immediately preceding a dog bite to the face and to assess the effects of victim age and gender and dog sex and size on the location of the bite to the face and the need for medical treatment. Complete data on 132 incidents of bites to the face were analysed. A human bending over a dog, putting the face close to the dog's face, and gazing between victim and dog closely preceded a dog bite to the face in 76%, 19% and 5% of cases, respectively. More than half of the bites were directed towards the central area of the victim's face (nose, lips). More than two thirds of the victims were children, none of the victims was an adult dog owner and only adult dogs bit the face. Victim's age and gender and dog's sex and size did not affect the location of the bite on the face. People who were bitten by large dogs sought medical treatment more often than people who were bitten by small dogs (P dog, putting the face close to the dog's face and gazing between human and dog should be avoided, and children should be carefully and constantly supervised when in the presence of dogs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Proteinuria in dogs and cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harley, Leyenda; Langston, Cathy

    2012-01-01

    Proteinuria is defined as the presence of protein in the urine. Normally, circulating serum proteins are blocked by the glomerulus due to size and/or charge. Any small proteins that pass through a healthy glomerulus are reabsorbed by the renal tubules or broken down by renal tubular epithelial cells. Persistent proteinuria, in the absence of lower urinary tract disease or reproductive tract disease, is usually an indication of renal damage or dysfunction. Less commonly persistent proteinuria can be caused by increased circulating levels of low molecular weight proteins. This article reviews mechanisms of proteinuria in dogs and cats and discusses the importance of screening for and ultimately treating proteinuria. PMID:23204582

  10. Decline in human dog-bite cases during a street dog sterilisation programme in Jaipur, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reece, J F; Chawla, S K; Hiby, A R

    2013-05-04

    Human dog-bite injuries are a major public health problem, particularly where there are large populations of free-roaming or street dogs. Dog bites are also the major source of human rabies infections. There is little information on the means to reduce these injuries. Monthly human animal-bite injury records from January 2003 to June 2011 were obtained from the main government hospital in Jaipur, India. The data were analysed and compared with records of pregnancy in street dogs in Jaipur obtained from a street dog sterilisation programme. Human animal-bite injuries showed a seasonal pattern which followed by approximately 10 weeks the seasonal peak of street dog breeding. The number of human animal bites has declined significantly since 2003. It is concluded that a street dog sterilisation programme can reduce human dog-bite injuries by reducing the maternal protective behaviour of the street dogs, as well as reducing the total size of the roaming dog population.

  11. Phylogenetic distinctiveness of Middle Eastern and Southeast Asian village dog Y chromosomes illuminates dog origins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah K Brown

    Full Text Available Modern genetic samples are commonly used to trace dog origins, which entails untested assumptions that village dogs reflect indigenous ancestry or that breed origins can be reliably traced to particular regions. We used high-resolution Y chromosome markers (SNP and STR and mitochondrial DNA to analyze 495 village dogs/dingoes from the Middle East and Southeast Asia, along with 138 dogs from >35 modern breeds to 1 assess genetic divergence between Middle Eastern and Southeast Asian village dogs and their phylogenetic affinities to Australian dingoes and gray wolves (Canis lupus and 2 compare the genetic affinities of modern breeds to regional indigenous village dog populations. The Y chromosome markers indicated that village dogs in the two regions corresponded to reciprocally monophyletic clades, reflecting several to many thousand years divergence, predating the Neolithic ages, and indicating long-indigenous roots to those regions. As expected, breeds of the Middle East and East Asia clustered within the respective regional village dog clade. Australian dingoes also clustered in the Southeast Asian clade. However, the European and American breeds clustered almost entirely within the Southeast Asian clade, even sharing many haplotypes, suggesting a substantial and recent influence of East Asian dogs in the creation of European breeds. Comparison to 818 published breed dog Y STR haplotypes confirmed this conclusion and indicated that some African breeds reflect another distinct patrilineal origin. The lower-resolution mtDNA marker consistently supported Y-chromosome results. Both marker types confirmed previous findings of higher genetic diversity in dogs from Southeast Asia than the Middle East. Our findings demonstrate the importance of village dogs as windows into the past and provide a reference against which ancient DNA can be used to further elucidate origins and spread of the domestic dog.

  12. Phylogenetic distinctiveness of Middle Eastern and Southeast Asian village dog Y chromosomes illuminates dog origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Sarah K; Pedersen, Niels C; Jafarishorijeh, Sardar; Bannasch, Danika L; Ahrens, Kristen D; Wu, Jui-Te; Okon, Michaella; Sacks, Benjamin N

    2011-01-01

    Modern genetic samples are commonly used to trace dog origins, which entails untested assumptions that village dogs reflect indigenous ancestry or that breed origins can be reliably traced to particular regions. We used high-resolution Y chromosome markers (SNP and STR) and mitochondrial DNA to analyze 495 village dogs/dingoes from the Middle East and Southeast Asia, along with 138 dogs from >35 modern breeds to 1) assess genetic divergence between Middle Eastern and Southeast Asian village dogs and their phylogenetic affinities to Australian dingoes and gray wolves (Canis lupus) and 2) compare the genetic affinities of modern breeds to regional indigenous village dog populations. The Y chromosome markers indicated that village dogs in the two regions corresponded to reciprocally monophyletic clades, reflecting several to many thousand years divergence, predating the Neolithic ages, and indicating long-indigenous roots to those regions. As expected, breeds of the Middle East and East Asia clustered within the respective regional village dog clade. Australian dingoes also clustered in the Southeast Asian clade. However, the European and American breeds clustered almost entirely within the Southeast Asian clade, even sharing many haplotypes, suggesting a substantial and recent influence of East Asian dogs in the creation of European breeds. Comparison to 818 published breed dog Y STR haplotypes confirmed this conclusion and indicated that some African breeds reflect another distinct patrilineal origin. The lower-resolution mtDNA marker consistently supported Y-chromosome results. Both marker types confirmed previous findings of higher genetic diversity in dogs from Southeast Asia than the Middle East. Our findings demonstrate the importance of village dogs as windows into the past and provide a reference against which ancient DNA can be used to further elucidate origins and spread of the domestic dog.

  13. Personality and social skills in human-dog interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Iben Helene Coakley

    Dogs have been part of human life for many thousands years, with the dog most likely being the first animal to be domesticated by humans. The dog as a species has had an enormous success in the human world, and research suggests that a co-evolution of humans and dogs has resulted in the dog......-questionnaire measures humans’ emotional empathy for animals, and is based on a human-oriented empathy scale. It was investigated how em-pathy for animals affects human interpretation of dog behaviour watched on video. The PONS test measures the ability to interpret human nonverbal communication and its reliability...... differed between breeds. Human social skills were shown to be associated with the interpretation of dog behaviour as well as the quality of human-dog interaction. Lower levels of empathy for animals were associated with interpreting the behaviour of dogs as more aggressive. In human-dog greeting...

  14. Ectoparasites of dogs and cats in Albania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xhaxhiu, Dashamir; Kusi, Ilir; Rapti, Dhimiter; Visser, Martin; Knaus, Martin; Lindner, Thomas; Rehbein, Steffen

    2009-11-01

    One hundred eighty-one dogs and 26 short-hair cats from suburban areas around Tirana, Albania were examined for ectoparasite infestation. The dogs were examined on several occasions from 2005 through 2009 representing three seasons: winter (December-February), spring (March-May), and summer (June-August); the cats were examined in late autumn (November). In addition, deep ear swab specimens of 30 dogs were examined for ear mites. The arthropod ectoparasite fauna of the dogs included two tick species (Rhipicephalus sanguineus and Ixodes ricinus), three mite species (Sarcoptes scabiei var. canis, Otodectes cynotis, and Demodex canis), three flea species (Ctenocephalides canis, Ctenocephalides felis, and Pulex irritans), and one louse species (Trichodectes canis). In the dogs, rates of infestation were 23.8% for R. sanguineus, 0.6% for I. ricinus, 4.4% for S. scabiei var. canis, 6.7% for O. cynotis, 0.6% for D. canis, 75.7% for C. canis, 5.0% for C. felis, 8.3% for P. irritans, and 6.6% for T. canis. Mixed infestation with two or three species of ectoparasites was recorded on 38.1% of the dogs. Fleas infested 75.7% dogs (geometric mean, 3.96; range, 1-80) and were observed in winter, spring, and summer with increasing prevalences of 64.3%, 75.9%, and 100%. Ticks parasitized 24.3% of the dogs (geometric mean, 0.41; range, 1-331). R. sanguineus ticks were recorded on 34.2% and 50% of the dogs examined in spring and summer, respectively, but were absent on the dogs during winter except for a single I. ricinus specimen observed. Prevalence of infestation with R. sanguineus, S. scabiei var. canis, C. felis, P. irritans, and T. canis did not differ between dogs dogs > 6 months of age; however, prevalence of infestation with C. canis was significantly (p dogs > 6 months old. There was no difference between the sexes for the prevalences of infestation with those parasites. The examination of the cats revealed infestation with only one species of ectoparasite, C. felis

  15. Geographic distribution of babesiosis among dogs in the United States and association with dog bites: 150 cases (2000-2003).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkenheuer, Adam J; Correa, Maria T; Levy, Michael G; Breitschwerdt, Edward B

    2005-09-15

    To identify the geographic distribution of babesiosis among dogs in the United States and determine, for dogs other than American Pit Bull Terriers (APBTs), whether infection was associated with a recent dog bite. Retrospective study. 150 dogs. Canine blood samples submitted to the North Carolina State University Vector-Borne Disease Diagnostic Laboratory between May 2000 and October 2003 for which results of a Babesia-specific polymerase chain reaction assay were positive were identified, and breed and geographic origin of dogs from which samples were obtained were recorded. History and hematologic abnormalities for dogs that were not APBTs were recorded, and possible associations with a recent dog bite were examined. Dogs positive for Babesia DNA were located in 29 states and 1 Canadian province (Ontario). Babesia gibsoni was the most commonly detected species, with B gibsoni DNA detected in blood samples from 131 of 144 (91%) dogs. Of the 131 dogs positive for B gibsoni DNA, 122 (93%) were APBTs. Of the 10 dogs positive for Babesia canis vogeli DNA, 6 were Greyhounds. In dogs other than APBTs, there was an association between having recently been bitten by another dog, particularly an APBT, and infection with B gibsoni. Results document an expansion of the known geographic range for babesiosis among dogs in the United States. Testing for babesiosis should be pursued in dogs with clinicopathologic abnormalities consistent with immune-mediated hemolytic anemia or thrombocytopenia, particularly if there is a history of a recent dog bite.

  16. Cats are not small dogs: is there an immunological explanation for why cats are less affected by arthropod-borne disease than dogs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Michael J

    2016-09-20

    It is widely recognized that cats appear to be less frequently affected by arthropod-borne infectious diseases than dogs and share fewer zoonotic pathogens with man. This impression is supported by the relative lack of scientific publications related to feline vector-borne infections. This review explores the possible reasons for the difference between the two most common small companion animal species, including the hypothesis that cats might have a genetically-determined immunological resistance to arthropod vectors or the microparasites they transmit. A number of simple possibilities might account for the lower prevalence of these diseases in cats, including factors related to the lifestyle and behaviour of the cat, lesser spend on preventative healthcare for cats and reduced opportunities for research funding for these animals. The dog and cat have substantially similar immune system components, but differences in immune function might in part account for the markedly distinct prevalence and clinicopathological appearance of autoimmune, allergic, idiopathic inflammatory, immunodeficiency, neoplastic and infectious diseases in the two species. Cats have greater genetic diversity than dogs with much lower linkage disequilibrium in feline compared with canine breed groups. Immune function is intrinsically related to the nature of the intestinal microbiome and subtle differences between the canine and feline microbial populations might also impact on immune function and disease resistance. The reasons for the apparent lesser susceptibility of cats to arthropod-borne infectious diseases are likely to be complex, but warrant further investigation.

  17. Cellular morphometry of the bronchi of human and dog lungs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbins, E.S.

    1992-09-01

    Quantitative data of the human bronchial epithelial cells at possible risk for malignant transformation in lung cancer is crucial for accurate radon dosimetry and risk analysis. The locations and other parameters of the nuclei which may be damaged by [alpha] particles must be determined and compared in different airway generations, among smokers, non-smokers and ex-smokers, between men and women and in people of different ages. This proposal includes extended morphometric studies on electron micrographs of human epithelium of defined airway generations and in parallel on electron micrographs of the dog bronchial lining. The second part of this proposal describes studies to quantitate the cycling bronchial epithelial population(s) using proliferation markers and immunocytochemistry on frozen and paraffin sections and similar labeling of isolated bronchial epithelial cells sorted flow cytometry.

  18. Policies to promote socialization and welfare in dog breeding

    OpenAIRE

    Morris, Amy

    2013-01-01

    Dog breeding is an unregulated industry in British Columbia and most of Canada, resulting in poor outcomes in some dogs’ welfare: genetic make-up, physical health, and mental health. This suffering in dogs results in subsequent costs to taxpayers and dog guardians. This study explores the question: How can British Columbia overcome the negative externalities surrounding the welfare and socialization of dogs in the dog- breeding industry? Policies in five countries are reviewed, informed by le...

  19. Assessment of afoxolaner efficacy against Otodectes cynotis infestations of dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Carithers, Doug; Crawford, Jordan; de Vos, Christa; Lotriet, Alta; Fourie, Josephus

    2016-01-01

    Background The efficacy of a single 2.5?mg/kg dose of afoxolaner (NexGard?, Merial) against induced Otodectes cynotis infestations was assessed in eight afoxolaner-treated dogs, compared to eight untreated dogs. Methods After O. cynotis infestations were established and confirmed by otoscopic assessments in 16 dogs, all of the dogs were included in the study and allocated to two separate treatment groups. The first group of eight ear mite-infested dogs remained untreated, while afoxolaner was...

  20. Review on dog rabies vaccination coverage in Africa: a question of dog accessibility or cost recovery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jibat, Tariku; Hogeveen, Henk; Mourits, Monique C M

    2015-02-01

    Rabies still poses a significant human health problem throughout most of Africa, where the majority of the human cases results from dog bites. Mass dog vaccination is considered to be the most effective method to prevent rabies in humans. Our objective was to systematically review research articles on dog rabies parenteral vaccination coverage in Africa in relation to dog accessibility and vaccination cost recovery arrangement (i.e.free of charge or owner charged). A systematic literature search was made in the databases of CAB abstracts (EBSCOhost and OvidSP), Scopus, Web of Science, PubMed, Medline (EBSCOhost and OvidSP) and AJOL (African Journal Online) for peer reviewed articles on 1) rabies control, 2) dog rabies vaccination coverage and 3) dog demography in Africa. Identified articles were subsequently screened and selected using predefined selection criteria like year of publication (viz. ≥ 1990), type of study (cross sectional), objective(s) of the study (i.e. vaccination coverage rates, dog demographics and financial arrangements of vaccination costs), language of publication (English) and geographical focus (Africa). The selection process resulted in sixteen peer reviewed articles which were used to review dog demography and dog ownership status, and dog rabies vaccination coverage throughout Africa. The main review findings indicate that 1) the majority (up to 98.1%) of dogs in African countries are owned (and as such accessible), 2) puppies younger than 3 months of age constitute a considerable proportion (up to 30%) of the dog population and 3) male dogs are dominating in numbers (up to 3.6 times the female dog population). Dog rabies parenteral vaccination coverage was compared between "free of charge" and "owner charged" vaccination schemes by the technique of Meta-analysis. Results indicate that the rabies vaccination coverage following a free of charge vaccination scheme (68%) is closer to the World Health Organization recommended coverage rate