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Sample records for susceptible chickens infected

  1. MHC expression on spleen lymphocyte subsets in genetically resistant and susceptible chickens infected with Marek's disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalgaard, Tina; Boving, Mette K; Handberg, Kurt; Jensen, Karin H; Norup, Liselotte R; Juul-Madsen, Helle R

    2009-10-01

    Resistance and susceptibility to Marek's disease (MD) are strongly influenced by the chicken major histocompatibility complex (MHC). In this study, splenic lymphocytes from MD-resistant and MD-susceptible chickens of three MHC genotypes (B21/B21, B19/B21, and B19/B19) were analyzed by flow cytometry for MHC surface expression. In the spleen, constitutive MHC class I surface expression was found to be highest in homozygous B19, lowest in homozygous B21, and intermediate in heterozygous B19/B21 animals. This was observed on CD4(+), CD8(+), and Bu-1(+) splenic lymphocytes. Chickens of all three genotypes were subjected to infection with MD virus (GA strain) and spleen samples from infected as well as MHC-matched negative controls were analyzed at 1, 4, and 8 wk post-infection (p.i.). It was observed that MDV induced an increase in MHC class I expression late in the infection. Thus, MHC class I was increased on the surface of CD4(+) cells from infected chickens of all genotypes at 4 and 8 wk p.i. compared with negative controls. Also, MHC class I expression was increased on CD8(+) cells from infected chickens of all genotypes at 4 and 8 wk p.i., except for the homozygous B19 animals, that showed no increase at 8 wk p.i. MDV-induced differences in MHC class II surface levels were also found. Thus, MHC class II expression was increased on CD4(+) cells from infected B19/21 and B21/B21 chickens at 4 wk p.i., and also at 8 wk p.i. on CD4(+) cells from infected B19/B21 animals. MHC class II expression was increased on CD8(+) cells from infected chickens of all genotypes at 4 wk p.i. These findings suggest that MDV infection in vivo increases the level of MHC surface expression on splenic T cells, indicating a possible role in immunity against MDV.

  2. MHC haplotype and susceptibility to experimental infections (Salmonella Enteritidis, Pasteurella multocida or Ascaridia galli) in a commercial and an indigenous chicken breed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Torben Wilde; Labouriau, R.; Permin, A.

    2010-01-01

    In three independent experimental infection studies, the susceptibility and course of infection of three pathogens considered of importance in most poultry production systems, Ascaridia galli, Salmonella Enteritidis and Pasteurella multocida was compared in two chicken breeds, the indigenous....... Enteritidis than commercial Luong Phuong chickens. In contrast, the Ri chickens were more susceptible to P. multocida, although production parameters were more affected in the Luong Phuong chickens. Furthermore, it was shown that the individual variations observed in response to the infections were influenced...... MHC haplotypes were shown to be associated with high specific antibody response. Finally, one MHC haplotype was identified as being associated with pathological lesions and mortality in the P. multocida experiment. Although not statistically significant, our analysis suggested that this haplotype...

  3. MHC Expression on Spleen Lymphocyte Subsets in Genetically Resistant and Susceptible Chickens Infected with Marek's Disease Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Tina; Bøving, Mette K.; Handberg, Kurt

    2009-01-01

    cytometry for MHC surface expression. In the spleen, constitutive MHC class I surface expression was found to be highest in homozygous B19, lowest in homozygous B21, and intermediate in heterozygous B19/B21 animals. This was observed on CD4(+), CD8(+), and Bu-1(+) splenic lymphocytes. Chickens of all three...... genotypes were subjected to infection with MD virus (GA strain) and spleen samples from infected as well as MHC-matched negative controls were analyzed at 1, 4, and 8 wk post-infection (p.i.). It was observed that MDV induced an increase in MHC class I expression late in the infection. Thus, MHC class I...... was increased on the surface of CD4(+) cells from infected chickens of all genotypes at 4 and 8 wk p.i. compared with negative controls. Also, MHC class I expression was increased on CD8(+) cells from infected chickens of all genotypes at 4 and 8 wk p.i., except for the homozygous B19 animals, that showed...

  4. Riemerella Anatipestifer Infection in Chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. X. Li*, Y. Tang, J. Y. Gao, C. H. Huang1 and M. J. Ding

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Riemerella anatipestifer (RA is the causative agent of septicemic and exudative disease for a variety of bird species. Although RA had been isolated from chickens, whether can bring damages to them is not unrevealed yet. In this study, we report a flock of SanHuang chickens infected by RA with 15% morbidity and less than 8% mortality. The infection is further substantiated by case duplicate. The tested chickens demonstrate typical signs of pericarditis, air sacculitis and perihepatitis that are completely consistent with the field outbreak. The results suggest that RA is pathogenic to SanHuang chickens, which can then be theoretically and practicably incorporated into its infection spectrum.

  5. Chicken Astrovirus Infection: Minireview and Preliminary Serologic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chicken Astrovirus Infection: Minireview and Preliminary Serologic Evidence of Antigenically and Genetically Distinct Chicken Astroviruses in Nigerian ... This knowledge will engender research into the prevalence, distribution, pathogenicity and economic losses caused by these diseases, and ultimately lead to the design ...

  6. Naturally occurred frame-shift mutations in the tvb receptor gene are responsible for decreased susceptibility to subgroups B, D, and E avian leukosis virus infection in chicken

    Science.gov (United States)

    The group of highly related avian leukosis viruses (ALVs) in chickens were thought to have evolved from a common retroviral ancestor into six subgroups, A to E and J. These ALV subgroups use diverse cellular proteins encoded by four genetic loci in chickens as receptors to gain entry into host cells...

  7. Prevalence and Antibiotic Susceptibility of Campylobacter species Isolated From Chicken and Beef Meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Dabiri

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: To study prevalence of Campylobacter spp. in chicken and beef meat, and determine the drug susceptibility of strains, 450 samples in Tehran, Iran were investigated. Objectives: This study aimed to determine the prevalence and the antimicrobial resistance of entropathogenic Campylobacter strains ,especially C. jejuni isolated from raw chicken and beef meat in Tehran- Iran. Materials and Methods: Out of 250 chickens and 200 beef meats, 121(26.8 % contaminated cases with Campylobacter strains were isolated. Campylobacter was isolated from a significantly larger number of chickens (44% than beef meats (5.5 % (P < 0.05. Results: From all isolated Campylobacter organisms, 93 (76.8% species were identified as C. jejuni and 28 cases (23.1% as C. coli. Susceptibilities of 121 strains (93 C. jejuni and 28 C. coli were determined against 12 antimicrobial drugs using the disk agar diffusion method. Resistance to nalidixic acid (75% and ciprofloxacin (50% was an alarming finding, moreover, 32.6% of isolates was resistant to tetracycline, 10.8% to ampicillin, 29.3% to colisitin and 26.1% to amoxicillin. The highest sensitivity was seen to erythromycin (95 % and gentamicin (96%. Conclusions: These results showed that a high proportion of chicken and beef meat in Iran is contaminated with Campylobacter, particularly with Campylobacter jejuni. The high rate of contamination, especially chicken is a significant public health concern. Most of the isolates were resistant; therefore, human infection with Campylobacter spp. via consumption of these products is possible.

  8. [Susceptibility of birds other than chickens to infectious laryngotracheitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbink, F W

    1985-06-01

    Susceptibility to infectious laryngotracheitis virus was studied in peafowl (Pavo cristatus), various species of pheasant (Phasianus colchicus, Lophura swinhoeii, Lophophorus impejanus), guinea-fowl (Numida meleagris), canaries (Serinus canaria), budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) and Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnic japonica). Apart from clinical observations, experiments were evaluated in terms of histopathology, immunofluorescence, serology and recovery of virus. Only peafowl and pheasants were found to be susceptible, pheasants responding more strongly than chickens to ocular vaccination and intratracheal inoculation. The other species were found to be refractory.

  9. Susceptible-infected-recovered and susceptible-exposed-infected models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tome, Tania; De Oliveira, Mario J, E-mail: oliveira@if.usp.br [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Caixa Postal 66318, 05315-970 Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2011-03-04

    Two stochastic epidemic lattice models, the susceptible-infected-recovered and the susceptible-exposed-infected models, are studied on a Cayley tree of coordination number k. The spreading of the disease in the former is found to occur when the infection probability b is larger than b{sub c} = k/2(k - 1). In the latter, which is equivalent to a dynamic site percolation model, the spreading occurs when the infection probability p is greater than p{sub c} = 1/(k - 1). We set up and solve the time evolution equations for both models and determine the final and time-dependent properties, including the epidemic curve. We show that the two models are closely related by revealing that their relevant properties are exactly mapped into each other when p = b/[k - (k - 1)b]. These include the cluster size distribution and the density of individuals of each type, quantities that have been determined in closed forms.

  10. Differential expression of Toll-like receptor pathway genes in chicken embryo fibroblasts from chickens resistant and susceptible to Marek's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haunshi, Santosh; Cheng, Hans H

    2014-03-01

    The Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathway is one of the innate immune defense mechanisms against pathogens in vertebrates and invertebrates. However, the role of TLR in non-MHC genetic resistance or susceptibility to Marek's disease (MD) in the chicken is yet to be elucidated. Chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF) cells from MD susceptible and resistant lines were infected either with Marek's disease virus (MDV) or treated with polyionosinic-polycytidylic acid, a synthetic analog of dsRNA, and the expression of TLR and pro-inflammatory cytokines was studied at 8 and 36 h posttreatment by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR. Findings of the present study reveal that MDV infection and polyionosinic-polycytidylic acid treatment significantly elevated the mRNA expression of TLR3, IL6, and IL8 in both susceptible and resistant lines. Furthermore, basal expression levels in uninfected CEF for TLR3, TLR7, and IL8 genes were significantly higher in resistant chickens compared with those of susceptible chickens. Our results suggest that TLR3 together with pro-inflammatory cytokines may play a significant role in genetic resistance to MD.

  11. Enteric disease in broiler chickens following experimental infection with chicken parvovirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day-old broiler chickens were inoculated orally with the chicken parvovirus strain, chicken parvovirus-P1. In four independent experiments, characteristic clinical signs of enteric disease including watery, mustard color diarrhea and growth retardation were observed following infection. The virus wa...

  12. Antimicrobial Susceptibilities, Phage Types, and Molecular Characterization of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis from Chickens and Chicken Meat in Turkey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalender, H.; Sen, S.; Hasman, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Thirty-eight Salmonella Enteritidis isolates from chickens and chicken meat in Turkey were examined for antimicrobial susceptibility, XbaI pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns, phage types, plasmid profiles, and resistance genes. Seven different PFGE patterns were observed...

  13. Salmonella Enteritidis experimental infection in chickens: Effects of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-10-20

    Oct 20, 2008 ... most of the chickens by 2 weeks post-infection, highest group mean optical density values of 2.177 and. 0.984 were observed at 5 weeks for 108 and 104 cfu Salmonella Enteritidis infected groups, respectively. Chickens exposed to few Salmonella colonies during infection do not produce high IgG antibody ...

  14. Some hematological changes in chickens infected with ectoparasites in Mosul

    OpenAIRE

    T. M. Al-Saffar; E. D. Al-Mawla

    2008-01-01

    The study was conducted to identify different ectoparasites infesting 280 chicken (native breed out door house reared layers, 6 months – 2 years old), from various regions of Mosul city (poultry market, Hadba' Flock, and six flocks at Kogialli village), for one year. Total percentage of ectoparasites in chickens were 19.3 % of which (54 positive case out of 280 chicken) 81% were single infections and 19 % mixed infections. Lice infestation (12.5 %) and four types of chewing lice were classifi...

  15. Human genetic susceptibility to Candida infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantinga, T.S.; Johnson, M.D.; Scott, W.K.; Joosten, L.A.B.; van der Meer, J.W.; Perfect, J.R.; Kullberg, B.J.; Netea, M.G.

    2012-01-01

    Infections with Candida spp. have different manifestations in humans, ranging from mucosal to bloodstream and deep-seated disseminated infections. Immunocompromised patients have increased susceptibility to these types of infections, due to reduced capacity to elicit effective innate or adaptive

  16. RNA Sequence of Spleen of Newcastle Disease Infected Chickens

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — At 21 days of age, chickens were infected with Newcastle Disease virus (or a mock injection as controls), and spleens were harvested at 2 and 6 days post infection....

  17. DNA microarray global gene expression analysis of influenza virus-infected chicken and duck cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh V. Kuchipudi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The data described in this article pertain to the article by Kuchipudi et al. (2014 titled “Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus Infection in Chickens But Not Ducks Is Associated with Elevated Host Immune and Pro-inflammatory Responses” [1]. While infection of chickens with highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 virus subtypes often leads to 100% mortality within 1 to 2 days, infection of ducks in contrast causes mild or no clinical signs. The rapid onset of fatal disease in chickens, but with no evidence of severe clinical symptoms in ducks, suggests underlying differences in their innate immune mechanisms. We used Chicken Genechip microarrays (Affymetrix to analyse the gene expression profiles of primary chicken and duck lung cells infected with a low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI H2N3 virus and two HPAI H5N1 virus subtypes to understand the molecular basis of host susceptibility and resistance in chickens and ducks. Here, we described the experimental design, quality control and analysis that were performed on the data set. The data are publicly available through the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEOdatabase with accession number GSE33389, and the analysis and interpretation of these data are included in Kuchipudi et al. (2014 [1].

  18. Immunity to bacterial infection in the chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigley, Paul

    2013-11-01

    Bacterial infections remain important to the poultry industry both in terms of animal and public health, the latter due to the importance of poultry as a source of foodborne bacterial zoonoses such as Salmonella and Campylobacter. As such, much focus of research to the immune response to bacterial infection has been to Salmonella. In this review we will focus on how research on avian salmonellosis has developed our understanding of immunity to bacteria in the chicken from understanding the role of TLRs in recognition of bacterial pathogens, through the role of heterophils, macrophages and γδ lymphocytes in innate immunity and activation of adaptive responses to the role of cellular and humoral immunity in immune clearance and protection. What is known of the immune response to other bacterial infections and in particular infections that have emerged recently as major problems in poultry production including Campylobacter jejuni, Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli, Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale and Clostridium perfringens are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of Non-Susceptible Hosts on the Infection with Trypanosoma cruzi of the Vector Triatoma infestans: an Experimental Model

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    Vázquez Diego P

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available We tested experimentally the effects of the presence of non-susceptible hosts on the infection with Trypanosoma cruzi of the vector Triatoma infestans. The experiment consisted in two treatments: with chickens, including two chickens (non-susceptible hosts and two infected guinea pigs (susceptible hosts, and without chickens, including only two infected guinea pigs. The hosts were held unrestrained in individual metal cages inside a closed tulle chamber. A total of 200 uninfected T. infestans third instar nymphs were liberated in each replica, collected on day 14, and examined for infection and blood meal sources on day 32-36. The additional presence of chickens relative to infected guinea pigs: (a significantly modified the spatial distribution of bugs; (b increased significantly the likelihoods of having a detectable blood meal on any host and molting to the next instar; (c did not affect the bugs' probability of death by predation; and (d decreased significantly the overall percentage of T. infestans infected with T. cruzi. The bugs collected from inside or close to the guinea pigs' cages showed a higher infection rate (71-88% than those collected from the chickens' cages (22-32%. Mixed blood meals on chickens and guinea pigs were detected in 12-21% of bugs. Although the presence of chickens would decrease the overall percentage of infected bugs in short term experiments, the high rate of host change of T. infestans would make this difference fade out if longer exposure times had been provided.

  20. Diagnosis of Salmonella Enteritidis Infection in Broiler Chickens ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diagnosis of Salmonella Enteritidis Infection in Broiler Chickens Using Elisa. ES Soliman, E Taha, WS Abdella, C KilPatrick, AN Wise, MAA Sobieh, PG Reddy. Abstract. The program for the eradication of Salmonella Enteritidis from chickens was based on bacteriological examination of breeding flocks. There is a great need ...

  1. Changes of host DNA methylation in domestic chickens infected with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    FEI WANG

    2017-09-15

    Sep 15, 2017 ... to analyse the genomewide DNA methylation changes in domestic chickens after infected with Salmonella. The level of DNA methylation was .... At day 12, the chickens were divided ran- domly into two groups. One group was .... ing strand during DNA replication (Chilkova et al. 2007). In this study, it was ...

  2. Avian metapneumovirus subtype B experimental infection and tissue distribution in chickens, sparrows, and pigeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharaibeh, S; Shamoun, M

    2012-07-01

    Avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) is a respiratory virus that infects a range of avian hosts, including chickens and turkeys. Migratory and local wild birds are implicated in aMPV spread among farms, countries, and seasonal outbreaks of the disease. A subtype B aMPV isolate from commercial chicken flocks suffering from respiratory disease was experimentally inoculated oculonasally into 7-week old chickens, young pigeons, and sparrows. Chickens showed minimal tracheal rales, whereas pigeons and sparrows were asymptomatic. Shedding of aMPV was detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction on homogenates from nasal turbinates. At 5 days postinfection, 5 of 5 chickens, 2 of 5 pigeons, and 1 of 5 sparrows were positive; at 10 or 15 days, none were positive. At 2 and 5 days, aMPV antigens were localized at the ciliated boarder of respiratory epithelium in nasal cavity and trachea of chickens, as well as to the conjunctival epithelium. Pigeons had detectable viral antigens in only the trachea at 2 and 5 days; sparrow tissues did not show any positive staining. At the end of the experiment, at 21 days postinfection, 14 of 15 inoculated chickens seroconverted against aMPV, but none of the inoculated pigeons or sparrows did. The authors believe that pigeons and sparrows have the ability to transmit the virus between chicken farms, although they do not consider pigeons and sparrows as natural hosts for aMPV, given that they failed to seroconvert. In conclusion, pigeons and sparrows are partially susceptible to aMPV infection, probably acting more as mechanical vectors because infection is only temporary and short-lived.

  3. Some hematological changes in chickens infected with ectoparasites in Mosul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Al-Saffar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted to identify different ectoparasites infesting 280 chicken (native breed out door house reared layers, 6 months – 2 years old, from various regions of Mosul city (poultry market, Hadba' Flock, and six flocks at Kogialli village, for one year. Total percentage of ectoparasites in chickens were 19.3 % of which (54 positive case out of 280 chicken 81% were single infections and 19 % mixed infections. Lice infestation (12.5 % and four types of chewing lice were classified (Menacanthus stramineus, Cuclotogaster hetrographus, Goniocoteus gallinae, and Columbicola columbae. One species of flies (1.4% (Pseudolynchia canariensis. One species of mites (4.3% (Dermanyssus gallinae were seen. One species of soft ticks (6.8% (Argas persicus were seen. Parasitological findings of skin and feathers examination for all types of ectoparasites on chicken showed three degrees of infestation depending on the number of these ectoparasites on each bird (low degree 1–50/ bird, moderate degree 51–100/ bird, and heavy degree more than 100/ bird. Clinical signs of the infected chicken with ectoparasites especially severe infection were itching, annoyance, loss of sleep, general weakness, loss of appetite, restless, allergy, drop of egg production in layers and anemia. It clear from results of blood examinations the presence of anemia in infected birds blood sucking ectoparasites with significant decrease in PCV % , TRBC and Hb concentration in chicken especially in severe (heavily infestation with soft ticks and mites. Results also showed increase in total white blood cells (Leucocytosis with increase in heterophils, and eosinophils in infected chicken with ticks, mites and lice, with bad nutrition and unhygienic management as compared with non-infected chicken control group.

  4. Pathogenesis of Candida albicans infections in the alternative chorio-allantoic membrane chicken embryo model resembles systemic murine infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilse D Jacobsen

    Full Text Available Alternative models of microbial infections are increasingly used to screen virulence determinants of pathogens. In this study, we investigated the pathogenesis of Candida albicans and C. glabrata infections in chicken embryos infected via the chorio-allantoic membrane (CAM and analyzed the virulence of deletion mutants. The developing immune system of the host significantly influenced susceptibility: With increasing age, embryos became more resistant and mounted a more balanced immune response, characterized by lower induction of proinflammatory cytokines and increased transcription of regulatory cytokines, suggesting that immunopathology contributes to pathogenesis. While many aspects of the chicken embryo response resembled murine infections, we also observed significant differences: In contrast to systemic infections in mice, IL-10 had a beneficial effect in chicken embryos. IL-22 and IL-17A were only upregulated after the peak mortality in the chicken embryo model occurred; thus, the role of the Th17 response in this model remains unclear. Abscess formation occurs frequently in murine models, whereas the avian response was dominated by granuloma formation. Pathogenicity of the majority of 15 tested C. albicans deletion strains was comparable to the virulence in mouse models and reduced virulence was associated with significantly lower transcription of proinflammatory cytokines. However, fungal burden did not correlate with virulence and for few mutants like bcr1Δ and tec1Δ different outcomes in survival compared to murine infections were observed. C. albicans strains locked in the yeast stage disseminated significantly more often from the CAM into the embryo, supporting the hypothesis that the yeast morphology is responsible for dissemination in systemic infections. These data suggest that the pathogenesis of C. albicans infections in the chicken embryo model resembles systemic murine infections but also differs in some aspects. Despite

  5. Enteric parvovirus infections of chickens and turkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicken and turkey parvoviruses are members of the Parvovirus family. Comparative sequence analysis of their genome structure revealed that they should form a new genus within the vertebrate Parvovirinae subfamily. The first chicken and turkey parvoviruses were identified by electron microscopy duri...

  6. Avian metapneumovirus infection of chicken and turkey tracheal organ cultures: comparison of virus-host interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Sandra; Sid, Hicham; Rautenschlein, Silke

    2015-01-01

    Avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) is a pathogen with worldwide distribution, which can cause high economic losses in infected poultry. aMPV mainly causes infection of the upper respiratory tract in both chickens and turkeys, although turkeys seem to be more susceptible. Little is known about virus-host interactions at epithelial surfaces after aMPV infection. Tracheal organ cultures (TOC) are a suitable model to investigate virus-host interaction in the respiratory epithelium. Therefore, we investigated virus replication rates and lesion development in chicken and turkey TOC after infection with a virulent aMPV subtype A strain. Aspects of the innate immune response, such as interferon-α and inducible nitric oxide synthase mRNA expression, as well as virus-induced apoptosis were determined. The aMPV-replication rate was higher in turkey (TTOC) compared to chicken TOC (CTOC) (P < 0.05), providing circumstantial evidence that indeed turkeys may be more susceptible. The interferon-α response was down-regulated from 2 to 144 hours post infection in both species compared to virus-free controls (P < 0.05); this was more significant for CTOC than TTOC. Inducible nitric oxide synthase expression was significantly up-regulated in aMPV-A-infected TTOC and CTOC compared to virus-free controls (P < 0.05). However, the results suggest that NO may play a different role in aMPV pathogenesis between turkeys and chickens as indicated by differences in apoptosis rate and lesion development between species. Overall, our study reveals differences in innate immune response regulation and therefore may explain differences in aMPV - A replication rates between infected TTOC and CTOC, which subsequently lead to more severe clinical signs and a higher rate of secondary infections in turkeys.

  7. Chicken line-dependent mortality after experimental infection with three type IIxIII recombinant Toxoplasma gondii clones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schares, G; Herrmann, D C; Maksimov, P; Matzkeit, B; Conraths, F J; Moré, G; Preisinger, R; Weigend, S

    2017-09-01

    Three genetically different clones of Toxoplasma gondii, also different in mouse virulence, were studied by experimental infection in chickens. For the experiments, four chicken lines were used, which differed in phylogenetic origin and performance level: two white egg layer lines, one with high laying performance (WLA), one with low (R11) and two brown layer lines, also displaying high (BLA) and low (L68) egg number. Chickens were intraperitoneally infected with three different T. gondii isolates representing type IIxIII recombinant clones, i.e. showing both, type II- and type III-specific alleles. These clones (K119/2 2C10, B136/1 B6H6, K119/2 A7) had exhibited virulence differences in a mouse model. In chickens, a significantly higher mortality was observed in white layer lines, but not in brown layer lines, suggesting that differences in the phylogenetic background may influence the susceptibility of chickens for toxoplasmosis. In addition, antibody (IgY) levels varied in surviving chickens at 31 days post infection. While low to intermediate antibody levels were observed in white layers, intermediate to high levels were measured in brown layers. Infection with a T. gondii clone showing low chicken virulence resulted in higher antibody levels in all chicken lines compared to infection with T. gondii clones of intermediate or high chicken virulence. This was in agreement with the parasite load as determined by real-time PCR. Overall, results show that progeny resulting from natural sexual recombination of T. gondii clonal lineages, may differ in their virulence for mice and chickens. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Campylobacter jejuni infection in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhillon, A Singh; Shivaprasad, H L; Schaberg, D; Wier, F; Weber, S; Bandli, D

    2006-03-01

    Day-old, straight-run broiler chickens were procured from a hatchery located in the Pacific Northwest. The chickens were subdivided individually into nine groups of 20 chickens. The chickens were tagged, housed in isolation chambers on wire, fed commercial broiler feed, and given water ad libitum. Three isolates of Campylobacter jejuni of poultry origin and one of human origin were tested in this study. Various C. jejuni cultures were inoculated into 9-day-old chickens by crop gavage. Four groups of 20 chickens were inoculated at a dose level of 0.5 ml of 1 x 10(2) colony-forming units (CFU)/ml. The other four groups were inoculated with 0.5 ml of 1 X 10(4) CFU/ml. One group of 20 chickens was kept as an uninoculated control group. Four randomly selected chickens from each of the inoculated and uninoculated groups were necropsied at 5, 12, and 19 days postinoculation (DPI). The C. jejuni was cultured and enumerated from a composite of the upper and midintestine and the cecum. Body weights of all chicken groups at 7 days of age and at 5, 12, and 19 DPI were measured and statistically analyzed. No significant differences were present in the mean body weights (MBWs) of 7-day-old, 5 DPI, and 12 DPI male and female broiler chickens inoculated with C. jejuni at both dose levels compared with uninoculated controls. Differences in MBWs of the male and female broilers at 19 DPI were observed in some of the groups. Results of the C. jejuni culture enumeration mean (CEM) of composite intestine samples at 5 DPI from all inoculated chicken groups, irrespective of the dose level, ranged from (2.5 +/- 5.0) x 10(2) to (2.8 +/- 4.8) x 10(5) CFU/g (mean +/- SD). Results of cecum C. jejuni CEM at 5 DPI inoculated at both dose levels ranged from (2.5 +/- 5.0) x 10(6) to (1 +/- 0.0) x 10(7) CFU/g in all treatment groups irrespective of the dose level. CEM results from the composite intestine samples at 12 and 19 DPI increased by 1 log unit, or sometimes more. Results of cecum C. jejuni

  9. In ovo inoculation of chicken embryos with probiotic bacteria and its effect on posthatch Salmonella susceptibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oliveira, J.E. de; Hoeven-Hangoor, E. van der; Linde, I.B. van de; Montijn, R.C.; Vossen, J.M.B.M. van der

    2014-01-01

    The feasibility of establishing probiotic bacteria in the intestine of broiler chickens by in ovo inoculation was investigated, followed by verifying possible subsequent protection against Salmonella Enteriditis infection. In a first study, 7 commercially available probiotics were screened for

  10. Avian metapneumovirus subgroup C infection in chickens, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Li; Zhu, Shanshan; Yan, Xv; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Chunyan; Liu, Shuhang; She, Ruiping; Hu, Fengjiao; Quan, Rong; Liu, Jue

    2013-07-01

    Avian metapneumovirus causes acute respiratory tract infection and reductions in egg production in various avian species. We isolated and characterized an increasingly prevalent avian metapneumovirus subgroup C strain from meat-type commercial chickens with severe respiratory signs in China. Culling of infected flocks could lead to economic consequences.

  11. Avian Metapneumovirus Subgroup C Infection in Chickens, China

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Li; Zhu, Shanshan; Yan, Xv; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Chunyan; Liu, Shuhang; She, Ruiping; Hu, Fengjiao; Quan, Rong; Liu, Jue

    2013-01-01

    Avian metapneumovirus causes acute respiratory tract infection and reductions in egg production in various avian species. We isolated and characterized an increasingly prevalent avian metapneumovirus subgroup C strain from meat-type commercial chickens with severe respiratory signs in China. Culling of infected flocks could lead to economic consequences.

  12. Tobacco use increases susceptibility to bacterial infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demuth Donald R

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Active smokers and those exposed to secondhand smoke are at increased risk of bacterial infection. Tobacco smoke exposure increases susceptibility to respiratory tract infections, including tuberculosis, pneumonia and Legionnaires disease; bacterial vaginosis and sexually transmitted diseases, such as chlamydia and gonorrhoea; Helicobacter pylori infection; periodontitis; meningitis; otitis media; and post-surgical and nosocomial infections. Tobacco smoke compromises the anti-bacterial function of leukocytes, including neutrophils, monocytes, T cells and B cells, providing a mechanistic explanation for increased infection risk. Further epidemiological, clinical and mechanistic research into this important area is warranted.

  13. Lung Transcriptome of Newcastle Disease Virus Infected Chickens--Different Immune Response in Two Types of Chicken

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — Males and females from resistant Fayoumi and susceptible Leghorn chicken lines were either challenged with a lentogenic strain of Newcastle Disease virus or given a...

  14. Reproducible Infection Model for Clostridium perfringens in Broiler Chickens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karl; Friis-Holm, Lotte Bjerrum; Heuer, Ole Eske

    2008-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to establish an infection and disease model for Clostridium perfringens in broiler chickens. Previous experiments had failed to induce disease and only a transient colonization with challenge strains had been obtained. In the present study, two series of experiments...

  15. Poultry coccidial infection in local chicken from three selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study indicated that 16.92% (44/260) of the chickens were infected with coccidia oocysts. Four Eimeria species were identified, namely, Eimeria maxima, Eimeria acervulina, Eimeria necatrix and Eimeria tenella with the prevalence estimate of 36.3%, 29.5%, 18.2%, and 15.9%, respectively. Age unlike sex was found to ...

  16. Infectivity of Blastocystis isolates from chickens, quails and geese in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanizaki, Aya; Yoshikawa, Hisao; Iwatani, Satoru; Kimata, Isao

    2005-04-01

    The infectivity of six Blastocystis isolates obtained from two domestic chickens, two Japanese quails and two domestic geese, were examined in 1-week-old male chicks. All six isolates were able to infect the chicks via the intracecal inoculation of 1x10(6) cells of cultured organisms. Since the infected chicks discharged many cysts in their feces, the infectivity of the concentrated cysts in chicks was compared among three isolates from different bird species. The CK86-1 and QQ93-3 isolates, which were obtained from a chicken and a quail, respectively, were successfully infected in chicks by orally inoculating with 1x10(2)-1x10(6) cysts. On the other hand, the AC03-1 isolate from a goose required more cysts to infect the chicks, from 1x10(3) cysts to 1x10(6) cysts. In addition, when an uninfected normal chick was housed with five experimentally inoculated chicks with cysts of the QQ93-3 isolate, the normal chick became infected, indicating the fecal-oral transmission of the cyst form among the birds. These results show that the transmission of Blastocystis infection occurs easily between the same or different bird species. Therefore, the proposal of new Blastocystis species on the basis of different avian host species is problematic.

  17. Survival time of the susceptible-infected-susceptible infection process on a graph

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Bovenkamp, R.; Van Mieghem, P.

    2015-01-01

    The survival time T is the longest time that a virus, a meme, or a failure can propagate in a network. Using the hitting time of the absorbing state in an uniformized embedded Markov chain of the continuous-time susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) Markov process, we derive an exact expression for

  18. Comparison of the immune responses against Salmonella enterica serovar Gallinarum infection between naked neck chickens and a commercial chicken line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, María Teresa; Ledesma, Nestor; Téllez, Guillermo; Molinari, José Luis; Tato, Patricia

    2003-04-01

    The immune responses of indigenous naked neck (NaNa and Nana) and normally feathered (nana) chickens against a Salmonella Gallinarum (SG) infection were evaluated and compared with those of a commercial line (B-380). Groups of 28-day-old chickens (NaNa, Nana, nana, and B-380) were immunized orally and subcutaneously with 50 microg of SG antigens. Control non-immunized animals were inoculated with sterile saline solution. All chickens were challenged with 1 LD(50) of SG and mortality was recorded daily for 20 days. Antibodies to SG were measured in sera before immunization, before the challenge, 10 days after the challenge, and at sacrifice. Peripheral blood lymphocyte proliferation assays were performed using concanavalin A and SG antigens. Results showed that non-immunized Nana chickens exhibited the best natural resistance to Salmonella infection, since only 30% of them died. In contrast, all control B-380 chickens died by the 13th day. Immunization with SG induced immunity in chickens of all genotypes. Indigenous naked neck and normally feathered chickens showed a higher survival rate when compared with B-380 chickens. Immunized Nana chickens showed the highest antibody titres (Pchickens are the most resistant to SG infection and the best responders to vaccination with SG antigens.

  19. Antimicrobial susceptibilities, phage types, and molecular characterization of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis from chickens and chicken meat in turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalender, Hakan; Sen, Selahattin; Hasman, Henrik; Hendriksen, Rene S; Aarestrup, Frank M

    2009-04-01

    Thirty-eight Salmonella Enteritidis isolates from chickens and chicken meat in Turkey were examined for antimicrobial susceptibility, XbaI pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns, phage types, plasmid profiles, and resistance genes. Seven different PFGE patterns were observed, with the most common accounting for 71% (X1). The most common phage type was PT4, followed by PT7, PT16, PT1, PT6, and PT35. Different phage types shared the same PFGE pattern. Twenty-one isolates were susceptible to all antimicrobial agents tested whereas eight were resistant to two or more antimicrobials. Six isolates were resistant to gentamicin, spectinomycin, streptomycin, and sulphamethoxazole and one of these in addition to nalidixic acid. Two isolates were resistant to ampicillin and nalidixic acid. An additional nine isolates were resistant to nalidixic acid only. All six streptomycin-resistant isolates had aadA located in an integron class 1 structure. Both ampicillin-resistant isolates had the bla(TEM) gene. Five different plasmid profiles were found among the isolates. Sixty-five percent of isolates contained a single plasmid with an approximate size of 55-60 kb. Plasmid profiling confirmed the PFGE pattern.

  20. Meat juice serology for Toxoplasma gondii infection in chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Vismarra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma gondii is an important foodborne zoonosis. Free-range chickens are at particularly high risk of infection and are also excellent indicators of soil contamination by oocysts. In the present study, hearts of 77 freerange chickens were collected at slaughter. T. gondii meat juice enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was performed with a commercial kit, following validation with positive controls, from experimentally infected chickens, and negative ones. Out of 77 samples, only 66 gave sufficient meat juice for serology. Of these, 24 (36.4% were positive for T. gondii considering the 5*standard deviation values (calculated on the optical density of negative controls, while all the samples were negative considering sample/positive% values. Parasite-specific polymerase chain reaction was carried out on all samples obtained from heart tissue and none were positive for the presence of T. gondii DNA. Results would suggest that further study on the use of meat juice with a validated serological test to detect T. gondii in chickens could lead to widespread epidemiological studies in this important intermediate host. However, sample collection and test specificity require further evaluation.

  1. The pathogenecity of H5N1 highly pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI virus clade 2.3.2. in Indonesian indigenous chicken by contact tranmission with infected duck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Damayanti

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available An experimental transmission study was conducted using nine healthy Indonesian indigenous chickens placed together with two 30 days old ducks which were experimentally infected with H5N1 HPAI clade 2.3.2 virus in the Biosafety Laboratory Level 3 (BSL-3 facilities. The aim of the study was to find out the pathogenicity of H5N1 HPAI virus clade 2.3.2 in Indonesian indigenous chickens. The study showed that within twenty four hours rearing, the chickens were exhibited mild clinical signs and by 48 hours, all of the chickens died, whereas the ducks survived but with severe clinical signs. The H5N1 HPAI virus has been successfully isolated from chickens and ducks swabs, confirming that those animals were infected by the virus. Histologically, the infected chicken encountered with severe inflammation reaction namely non suppuratives encephalitis, tracheitis, myocarditis, interstitial pneumonia, hepatitis, proventriculitis, enteritis, pancreatitis, nephritis and bursitis. Necrotizing spleen and pancreas were also prominent. Viral antigen was detected by immunohistochemistry staining in various affected visceral organs. This suggests that Indonesian indigenous chickens were susceptible to H5N1 HPAI virus clade 2.3.2 and it can be transmitted easily to Indonesian indigenous chickens by contact transmission with infected ducks.

  2. Blood biochemistry responses of chickens experimentally infected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the blood biochemistry responses of cockerels experimentally infected with a velogenic Newcastle disease virus (NDV) strain, KUDU 113. One hundred Isa white cockerels were used for the study. The cockerels were obtained at day-old and randomly divided into groups A- vaccinated and infected, ...

  3. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Salmonella isolates from healthy pigs and chickens (2008-2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Anno; Smet, Annemieke; Ludwig, Carolin; Stephan, Bernd; De Graef, Evelyne; Vanrobaeys, Mia; Haesebrouck, Freddy

    2014-07-16

    Using the agar dilution method, antimicrobial susceptibility to human-use antibiotics was determined among Belgian faecal Salmonella isolates from healthy pigs and broiler chickens. Both epidemiological cut-off values and clinical breakpoints were applied for interpretation of the results. Cephalosporin-resistant isolates were examined for the presence of genes encoding CTX-M, SHV, TEM and CMY β-lactamases. All isolates with decreased quinolone susceptibility were screened for plasmid-borne genes qnr, qepA and aac(6')-Ib-cr. In all, 368 Salmonella isolates were recovered from pigs and 452 from chickens. Clinical resistance to ciprofloxacin was absent in isolates of both host species, and was 1.9 and 13.1% to cefotaxime in pig and poultry isolates, respectively. Decreased susceptibility to cefotaxime amounted to 2.2 and 0.7%, whereas for ciprofloxacin this was 3.0 and 23.0% in pig and poultry isolates, respectively. Ciprofloxacin decreased susceptibility was limited to few serovars, mainly Paratyphi B. Multidrug resistance was markedly higher for pig isolates (39.7%) than for chicken isolates (17.3%). Sixty-six cefotaxime-resistant isolates, 59 from chickens and 7 from pigs, were phenotypically determined as ESBL/AmpC producers; predominantly Paratyphi B and Typhimurium serovars. BlaCTX-M (mostly blaCTXM-1, but also blaCTXM-2 and blaCTXM-9) and blaTEM-52 were the predominant ESBL genes. Only few isolates expressed SHV-12 or an AmpC enzyme (CMY-2). Isolates of four serovars carried qnr genes: Brandenburg and Llandof from pigs, both qnrS; Indiana and Paratyphi B from chickens with qnrB and qnrA. The latter isolate carried blaCTX-M-9 and was the only strain with a plasmid-borne quinolone resistance gene among the ESBL/AmpC producers. This Salmonella survey confirms that the ESBL/AmpC producers are particularly prevalent in chickens (12.8%), and much less in pigs (1.9%). A link between plasmid-borne quinolone resistance genes and ESBLs/AmpC was uncommon. Copyright

  4. Sequence variations of the MHC class I gene exon 2 and exon 3 between infected and uninfected chickens challenged with Marek's disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ye; Qiu, Mohan; Yang, Jiandong; Zhao, Xiaoling; Wang, Yan; Zhu, Qing; Liu, Yiping

    2014-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) among chickens has been well established as being associated with disease resistance and pathogens infection, but the genetic differences in MHC between chickens susceptible to certain infections and those chickens that remain uninfected have not been sufficiently determined. In this study, we sought the genetic basis that may underlie differences in susceptibility to infection among chickens by challenging four groups of broilers with Marek's disease virus (MDV). Over the course of the experiment, lesions began to appear between 21 and 35 days post challenge (dpc), and commercial broilers were not necessarily better than indigenous chickens in terms of disease resistance. The four groups showed neutral resistance to MDV infection validated by challenge results and evolutionary analysis of exons 2 and 3 of the MHC class I region. Several variable sites in exon 2 and exon 3 were exclusively appeared in infected chickens. Exon 3 was likely more crucial than exon 2 in disease resistance. Our observations offered a support for a potential association between promiscuous pathogens and conspicuous genetic diversity in the MHC class I region. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Chicken IL-17F: identification and comparative expression analysis in Eimeria-infected chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Woo H; Jeong, Jipseol; Park, Ae R; Yim, Dongjean; Kim, Yong-Hwan; Kim, Kwang D; Chang, Hong H; Lillehoj, Hyun S; Lee, Byung-Hyung; Min, Wongi

    2012-11-01

    Interleukin-17F (IL-17F) is a proinflammatory cytokine, which plays an important role in gut homeostasis. A full-length chicken IL-17F (chIL-17F) cDNA with a 510-bp coding region was identified from ConA-activated chicken splenic lymphocytes. ChIL-17F shares 53% amino acid sequence identity with the previously described chicken IL-17 (chIL-17A) and 38-43% with mammalian homologues. The locus harboring chIL-17 and chIL-17F displayed inverted order compared to those of mammals. ChIL-17F transcript expression was high in lymphoblast cell line CU205 and at moderate levels in small and large intestines and liver. ChIL-17F and chIL-17 expression profiles were examined by quantitative real-time RT-PCR in mitogen-stimulated splenic lymphocytes and intestinal areas affected by Eimeria maxima and Eimeria tenella infections. Expression levels of chIL-17F, like chIL-17, were elevated in mitogen-activated splenic lymphocytes. ChIL-17F, but not chIL-17, expression was upregulated in intestinal tissues affected by E. maxima and E. tenella infections. Recombinant chIL-17F biological activities were similar to that of chIL-17 in primary chicken embryonic fibroblasts. These results suggest that chIL-17F is a unique member of the IL-17 family of cytokines. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Blood Groups in Infection and Host Susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Blood group antigens represent polymorphic traits inherited among individuals and populations. At present, there are 34 recognized human blood groups and hundreds of individual blood group antigens and alleles. Differences in blood group antigen expression can increase or decrease host susceptibility to many infections. Blood groups can play a direct role in infection by serving as receptors and/or coreceptors for microorganisms, parasites, and viruses. In addition, many blood group antigens facilitate intracellular uptake, signal transduction, or adhesion through the organization of membrane microdomains. Several blood groups can modify the innate immune response to infection. Several distinct phenotypes associated with increased host resistance to malaria are overrepresented in populations living in areas where malaria is endemic, as a result of evolutionary pressures. Microorganisms can also stimulate antibodies against blood group antigens, including ABO, T, and Kell. Finally, there is a symbiotic relationship between blood group expression and maturation of the gastrointestinal microbiome. PMID:26085552

  7. Blood Groups in Infection and Host Susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooling, Laura

    2015-07-01

    Blood group antigens represent polymorphic traits inherited among individuals and populations. At present, there are 34 recognized human blood groups and hundreds of individual blood group antigens and alleles. Differences in blood group antigen expression can increase or decrease host susceptibility to many infections. Blood groups can play a direct role in infection by serving as receptors and/or coreceptors for microorganisms, parasites, and viruses. In addition, many blood group antigens facilitate intracellular uptake, signal transduction, or adhesion through the organization of membrane microdomains. Several blood groups can modify the innate immune response to infection. Several distinct phenotypes associated with increased host resistance to malaria are overrepresented in populations living in areas where malaria is endemic, as a result of evolutionary pressures. Microorganisms can also stimulate antibodies against blood group antigens, including ABO, T, and Kell. Finally, there is a symbiotic relationship between blood group expression and maturation of the gastrointestinal microbiome. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection in chickens in Durango State, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado-Esquivel, C; González-Salazar, A M; Alvarado-Esquivel, D; Ontiveros-Vázquez, F; Vitela-Corrales, J; Villena, I; Dubey, J P

    2012-04-01

    Little is known concerning the seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection in chickens (Gallus domesticus) in Mexico. Antibodies to T. gondii were determined in 519 chickens in Durango, Mexico using the modified agglutination test (MAT). Two groups (A, B) of chickens were sampled. Group A chickens (n  =  51) were raised in backyards in 7 municipalities in 3 geographical regions in Durango State. Group B chickens were raised in farms in the Mexican States of Sinaloa (n  =  289) and Nayarit (n  =  179) but slaughtered in 2 abattoirs in Durango City. Overall, antibodies to T. gondii were found in 36 (6.9%) of 519 chickens, with MAT titers of 1∶25 in 22, 1∶50 in 8, 1∶100 in 2, 1∶200 in 3, and 1∶400 in 1. Seroprevalence of T. gondii increased significantly with age and was significantly higher in Group A chickens than in Group B chickens. In Group A chickens, a 25.5% seroprevalence of T. gondii infection was found. Seropositive chickens were found in all 7 municipalities sampled. In Group B chickens, the seroprevalence of T. gondii infection was 4.9%. This is the first report of T. gondii infection in chickens in Durango State, Mexico.

  9. Inflammatory response of different chicken lines and B haplotypes to infection with infectious bursal disease virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O.L.; Sorensen, P.; Hedemand, J.E.

    1998-01-01

    and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) was seen among chickens from the layer type line compared with the meat-type line. In addition, the haplotype of the chickens influenced the atrophy and hypertrophy of the thymus, It was concluded that the meat-type chicken line was more resistant to IBDV infection than...

  10. Seroprevalence of Salmonella Gallinarum Infection in Chicken ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ethiopia owns a large poultry population whose growth is highly constrained by diseases. Fowl typhoid is a serious concern in growing and adult poultry and results from infection by Salmonella Gallinarum (Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Gallinarum biovar Gallinarum). Knowledge of the prevalence of the ...

  11. Immune gene expression in the spleen of chickens experimentally infected with Ascaridia galli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Tina S.; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Norup, Liselotte R.

    2015-01-01

    Ascaridia galli is a gastrointestinal nematode infecting chickens. Chickens kept in alternative rearing systems or at free-range experience increased risk for infection with resulting high prevalences. A. gall infection causes reduced weight gain, decreased egg production and in severe cases...

  12. Perinatal Chicken Pox (Varicella Zoster Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Annagur

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Chickenpox is due to infection with the varicella zoster virus (VZV, a human alphaherpervirus found worldwide. Classically, the cinical disease is a febrile illness with a pruritic vesicular rash. Maternal chickenpox between 5 days before delivery to 2 days after delivery (perinatal varicella can cause severe and even fatal illness in the newborn. A 7-day old girl baby presented on day 4 of postnatal with the complaints of widespread vesicular rash and non-suckling. Mother of the baby also had a similar eruption four day prior to delivery, which was clinically characteristic of varicella. Considering history and clinical presentation, a diagnosis of perinatal chickenpox was considered and the baby was treated with acyclovir which she responded and recovered. Herein, the clinical feasures and treatment of chickenpox infection in the perinatal period have been emphasized with this case report. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(2.000: 311-314

  13. Acquisition of resistance after continuous infection with Ascaridia galli in chickens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferdushy, T; Schou, T W; Norup, Liselotte Rothmann

    2014-01-01

    Acquired resistance against Ascaridia galli infection was studied in seventy-two 18-week-old white Leghorn chickens allocated to six groups (G1–G6). In order to understand the population dynamics following trickle-infection (100 eggs per chicken twice weekly), chickens of subgroups of G1 were...... with 500 eggs. G6 was left as uninfected control. Necropsy at week 10 after first inoculation revealed a lower establishment rate, an impaired development and a more posterior localization of the larvae in G4 (trickle-infected-treated-challenged) compared with G5 (treated-challenged). IgY level in serum...... reached noticeable level at 14 dpi in G2 and G4 chickens, and in G4 chickens IgY level further increased after challenge infection. The study provides evidence that acquired resistance against A. galli in chickens leads to a significant yet incomplete protection against re-infection....

  14. Molecular characterization of eimeria species naturally infecting egyptian baldi chickens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar M Gadelhaq

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Coccidiosis is a serious protozoal disease of poultry. The identification of Eimeria species has important implications for diagnosis and control as well as for epidemiology. The molecular characterization of Eimeria species infecting Egyptian baladi chickens was investigated.Eimeria species oocysts were harvested from intestines of naturally infected Egyptian baldi chickens. The morphometry characterization of oocysts along with COCCIMORPH software was done. The DNA was extracted initially by freezing and thawing then the prepared samples was subjected to commercial DNA kits. The DNA products were analyzed through conventional polymerase chain reaction by using amplified region (SCAR marker.The PCR results confirmed the presence of 7 Eimeria species in the examined fecal samples of Egyptian baldi breed with their specific ampilicon sizes being E. acervulina (811bp, E. brunette (626bp, E. tenella (539bp, E. maxima (272bp, E. necatrix (200bp, E. mitis (327bp and E. praecopx (354bp. A sequencing of the two most predominant species of Eimeria was done, on E. tenella and E. máxima. Analysis of the obtained sequences revealed high identities 99% between Egyptian isolates and the reference one. Similarly, E. maxima isolated from Egyptian baldi chickens showed 98% nucleotide identities with the reference strain. Only single nucleotide substitution was observed among the Egyptian E. tenella isolates (A181G when compared to the reference one. The Egyptian isolates acquired 4 unique mutations (A68T, C164T, G190A and C227G in compared with the reference sequence.This is the first time to identify the 7 species of Eimeria from Egyptian baladi chickens.

  15. Escherichia coli Isolates from Broiler Chicken Meat, Broiler Chickens, Pork, and Pigs Share Phylogroups and Antimicrobial Resistance with Community-Dwelling Humans and Patients with Urinary Tract Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, L.; Kurbasic, A.; Skjot-Rasmussen, L.

    2010-01-01

    Escherichia coli is the most common cause of urinary tract infection (UTI). Phylogroup B2 and D isolates are associated with UTI. It has been proposed that E. coli causing UTI could have an animal origin. The objective of this study was to investigate the phylogroups and antimicrobial resistance...... = 197) and imported broiler chicken meat (n = 86), Danish broiler chickens (n = 138), Danish (n = 177) and imported pork (n = 10), and Danish pigs (n = 145) were tested for phylogroups (A, B1, B2, D, and nontypeable [NT] isolates) and antimicrobial susceptibility. Phylogroup A, B1, B2, D, and NT...... isolates were detected among all groups of isolates except for imported pork isolates. Antimicrobial resistance to three (for B2 isolates) or five antimicrobial agents (for A, B1, D, and NT isolates) was shared among isolates regardless of origin. Using cluster analysis to investigate antimicrobial...

  16. Ceftriaxone susceptibility of oxacillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus from patients with prosthetic joint infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E; Kohner, Peggy; Osmon, Douglas R; Virk, Abinash; Patel, Robin

    2015-06-01

    Ceftriaxone is used to treat oxacillin-susceptible S. aureus (OSSA) prosthetic joint infection (PJI). Susceptibility of ceftriaxone against OSSA has been questioned. Ceftriaxone susceptibility was determined against 100 PJI OSSA isolates. Ceftriaxone MIC90/MIC50 were 8/4 and 4/3μg/mL by broth microdilution and Etest, respectively. Ceftriaxone susceptibility is inferable by oxacillin susceptibility. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Pathological and immunohistochemical studies of subclinical infection of chicken anemia virus in 4-week-old chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haridy, Mohie; Sasaki, Jun; Ikezawa, Mitsutaka; Okada, Kosuke; Goryo, Masanobu

    2012-06-01

    Subclinical infection of chicken anemia virus (CAV) at 4 to 6 weeks of age, after maternal antibodies have waned, is implicated in several field problems in broiler flocks. In order to understand the pathogenesis of subclinical infection with CAV, an immunopathological study of CAV-inoculated 4-week-old SPF chickens was performed. Sixty 4-week-old SPF chickens were equally divided into CAV and control groups. The CAV group was inoculated intramuscularly with the MSB1-TK5803 strain of CAV. Neither mortality nor anemia was detected in the CAV and control groups. In the CAV group, no signs were observed, except that some chickens were grossly smaller compared with the control group. Sporadic thymus lobes appeared to be reddening and atrophied. Within the first two weeks p.i. of CAV, there was a mild to moderate depletion of lymphocytes in the thymus cortex and spleen in some chickens. Moreover, lymphoid depletion of the bursa of Fabricius, proventriculus and cecal tonsils was observed. Hyperplastic lymphoid foci were observed in the liver, lungs, kidneys and heart at the 4th week p.i. of CAV. Immunohistochemically, a moderate lymphoid depletion of CD4(+)and CD8(+) T cells in the thymus cortex and spleen was observed in some chickens within two weeks p.i. of CAV. CAV inclusions and antigens were detected infrequently in the thymus cortex and spleen. It could be concluded that the immunosuppression in subclinical infection with CAV occurs as a result of reduction of cellular immunity.

  18. Susceptibility to varicella zoster virus infection in health care workers.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gallagher, J

    2012-02-03

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is an occupational hazard for a percentage of health care staff. Nine hundred and seventy staff members attending the Occupational Health Department at Cork University Hospital took part in the survey. A latex agglutination assay was used to determine the health care workers immune status to VZV. Of the 970 workers tested, 928 (95.7%) were immune to VZV. The sensitivity, specificity and predictive value of an enquiry regarding a history of chicken-pox was determined on a sample of 206 health care workers. The positive predictive value was 95% (119\\/125) and the negative predictive value was 11% (4\\/35). The sensitivity of the enquiry was 79% (119\\/150), the specificity was 40% (4\\/10), reducing to 61% (119\\/195) and 36% (4\\/11) respectively when individuals with uncertain histories were included in the calculations. The advantages and disadvantages of selective staff screening are discussed. In the authors\\' opinion all health care workers involved in the clinical care of patients should be screened by serology for past VZV infection before taking up duty and those who are susceptible to VZV should be made aware of the risks and health effects associated with VZV if contracted.

  19. Marek's disease virus infection induces widespread differential chromatin marks in inbred chicken lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Apratim; Luo, Juan; Zhang, Huanming; Cui, Kairong; Zhao, Keji; Song, Jiuzhou

    2012-10-16

    Marek's disease (MD) is a neoplastic disease in chickens caused by the MD virus (MDV). Successful vaccine development against MD has resulted in increased virulence of MDV and the understanding of genetic resistance to the disease is, therefore, crucial to long-term control strategies. Also, epigenetic factors are believed to be one of the major determinants of disease response. Here, we carried out comprehensive analyses of the epigenetic landscape induced by MDV, utilizing genome-wide histone H3 lysine 4 and lysine 27 trimethylation maps from chicken lines with varying resistance to MD. Differential chromatin marks were observed on genes previously implicated in the disease such as MX1 and CTLA-4 and also on genes reported in other cancers including IGF2BP1 and GAL. We detected bivalent domains on immune-related transcriptional regulators BCL6, CITED2 and EGR1, which underwent dynamic changes in both lines as a result of MDV infection. In addition, putative roles for GAL in the mechanism of MD progression were revealed. Our results confirm the presence of widespread epigenetic differences induced by MD in chicken lines with different levels of genetic resistance. A majority of observed epigenetic changes were indicative of increased levels of viral infection in the susceptible line symptomatic of lowered immunocompetence in these birds caused by early cytolytic infection. The GAL system that has known anti-proliferative effects in other cancers is also revealed to be potentially involved in MD progression. Our study provides further insight into the mechanisms of MD progression while revealing a complex landscape of epigenetic regulatory mechanisms that varies depending on host factors.

  20. Marek’s disease virus infection induces widespread differential chromatin marks in inbred chicken lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Apratim

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Marek’s disease (MD is a neoplastic disease in chickens caused by the MD virus (MDV. Successful vaccine development against MD has resulted in increased virulence of MDV and the understanding of genetic resistance to the disease is, therefore, crucial to long-term control strategies. Also, epigenetic factors are believed to be one of the major determinants of disease response. Results Here, we carried out comprehensive analyses of the epigenetic landscape induced by MDV, utilizing genome-wide histone H3 lysine 4 and lysine 27 trimethylation maps from chicken lines with varying resistance to MD. Differential chromatin marks were observed on genes previously implicated in the disease such as MX1 and CTLA-4 and also on genes reported in other cancers including IGF2BP1 and GAL. We detected bivalent domains on immune-related transcriptional regulators BCL6, CITED2 and EGR1, which underwent dynamic changes in both lines as a result of MDV infection. In addition, putative roles for GAL in the mechanism of MD progression were revealed. Conclusion Our results confirm the presence of widespread epigenetic differences induced by MD in chicken lines with different levels of genetic resistance. A majority of observed epigenetic changes were indicative of increased levels of viral infection in the susceptible line symptomatic of lowered immunocompetence in these birds caused by early cytolytic infection. The GAL system that has known anti-proliferative effects in other cancers is also revealed to be potentially involved in MD progression. Our study provides further insight into the mechanisms of MD progression while revealing a complex landscape of epigenetic regulatory mechanisms that varies depending on host factors.

  1. Dietary Curcuma longa enhances resistance against Eimeria maxima and Eimeria tenella infections in chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of dietary supplementation with an organic extract of Curcuma longa on systemic and local immune responses to experimental Eimeria maxima and E. tenella infections were evaluated in commercial broiler chickens. Infected chickens given the C. longa-containing diet had increased body weig...

  2. Immunohistochemical investigation of the tissue distribution of mannan-binding lectin in non-infected and virus-infected chickens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O.L.; Jørgensen, Poul Henrik; Hedemand, J.

    1998-01-01

    -infected chickens, MBL was detected in the cytoplasm of a few hepatocytes and in the germinal centres of the caecal tonsils, whereas sections of kidney, heart muscle, spleen, cerebrum, thymus, adrenal gland, bursa of Fabricius, bone marrow and trachea were without staining. In the ILTV-infected chickens, an intense...

  3. Occurrence of Co-Infection of Helicobacter pullorum and Campylobacter spp. in Broiler and Village (Indigenous Chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soe Soe Wai, A. A. Saleha*, Z. Zunita, L. Hassan and A. Jalila

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The reports on prevalence of Helicobacter pullorum in broiler chickens are rather limited and lacking in village chickens. This study aimed to determine the occurrence of H. pullorum in broiler and village chickens in Selangor, Malaysia and to report the detection of co-infection of H. pullorum and Campylobacter spp. in these chickens. Village (indigenous chickens were sampled in five markets and broiler chickens from six farms in different localities. Cecal contents were aseptically obtained from the chickens and subjected to three cultural methods. The isolates were identified by biochemical tests and confirmed using a species-specific PCR assay. Helicobacter pullorum were isolated from 25% village chickens and 24.6% broiler chickens, with an overall occurrence of 24.7%. Eleven (50% of these positive chickens (nine in broiler and two in village chickens showed co-infection with Campylobacter spp.

  4. Disinfectant susceptibility of different Salmonella serotypes isolated from chicken and egg production chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, M; Lai, H; Deng, W; Zhou, K; Li, B; Liu, S; Fan, L; Wang, H; Zou, L

    2016-09-01

    The study aimed to serotype the Salmonella isolates recovered from chicken and egg production chains, and to investigate the disinfectant resistance phenotypes and genotypes of these isolates. The Salmonella isolates were serotyped, and the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of disinfectants were determined. Results showed that the Salmonella isolates recovered from both chains were diverse, and the serotypes in each part of the production chain and between the two production chains were significantly different. In the chicken production chain, 19 different serotypes were recovered, while only five serotypes were found in the egg production chain. The isolates showed a high susceptibility to didecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB) but a low susceptibility to benzalkonium chloride (BC), benzalkonium bromide (BAB) and chlorhexidine (CHX). Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium were more resistant to BC and BAB. The qacEΔ1 and qacF resistance genes were detected in 26·7 and 7·7% of the isolates respectively. The qacEΔ1 gene was frequently found in Salmonella Derby and Salm. Enteritidis (P < 0·05). Our findings indicated that Salmonella was commonly present in both chains, and could serve as a critical vector in spreading disinfectant resistance associated with different serotypes. This study first demonstrated disinfectant resistance phenotypes and genotypes of serotyped Salmonella. The study highlights the need for monitoring the disinfectant resistance varied in different Salmonella serotypes. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. Toxinotyping and antimicrobial susceptibility of enterotoxigenic Clostridium perfringens isolates from mutton, beef and chicken meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Madiha; Nazir, Jawad; Anjum, Aftab Ahmad; Ahmad, Mansur-Ud-Din; Nawaz, Muhammad; Shabbir, Muhammad Zubair

    2015-08-01

    A total of 300 meat samples comprising mutton, beef, and chicken meat (n = 100) collected from either local butcher shops or large meat outlets situated at various areas of Lahore City located in Punjab province of Pakistan were tested for the isolation of Clostridium perfringens. Prevalence of the organism was highest in the chicken (6 %) followed by mutton (5 %) and beef (1 %). Contamination level was high (10/150) in the samples collected from local butcher shops in comparison to the samples collected from large meat outlets (2/150). All of the raw meat samples were negative for the presence of alpha, beta and epsilon toxins of C. perfringens as detected through ELISA. Out of a total number of 12 isolates only half were capable of producing enterotoxins when cultured in trypticase glucose yeast (TGY) broth. Toxinotyping of the isolates showed that 3 were of type A while one each of the remaining three belonged to type B, C, and D. Antibiotic susceptibility testing of the toxin producing isolates revealed that C. perfringens were susceptible to chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, and ceftriaxone. All of the other drugs were relatively less effective with a least activity of amoxicillin against the isolates.

  6. Gene expression in three different chicken lines after Salmonella infection early in life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schokker, Dirkjan; Hoekman, Arjan

    2012-01-01

    Transcriptional profiling of jejunum infected with Salmonella in three different chicken lines early in life. Samples were taken at 8, 24 and 48 hours post infection. Salmonella was orally ingested at day zero (hatch).

  7. RNA-seq analysis revealed novel genes and signaling pathway associated with disease resistance to avian influenza virus infection in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Lupiani, B; Reddy, S M; Lamont, S J; Zhou, H

    2014-02-01

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) is a type A virus of the family Orthomyxoviridae. Avian influenza virus infection can cause significant economic losses to the poultry industry, and raises a great public health threat due to potential host jump from animals to humans. To develop more effective intervention strategies to prevent and control AIV infection in poultry, it is essential to elucidate molecular mechanisms of host response to AIV infection in chickens. The objective of this study was to identify genes and signal pathways associated with resistance to AIV infection in 2 genetically distinct highly inbred chicken lines (Fayoumi, relatively resistant to AIV infection, and Leghorn, susceptible to AIV infection). Three-week-old chickens were inoculated with 10(7) EID50 of low pathogenic H5N3 AIV, and lungs and trachea were harvested 4 d postinoculation. Four cDNA libraries (1 library each for infected and noninfected Leghorn, and infected and noninfected Fayoumi) were prepared from the lung samples and sequenced by Illumina Genome Analyzer II, which yielded a total of 116 million, 75-bp single-end reads. Gene expression levels of all annotated chicken genes were analyzed using CLC Genomics Workbench. DESeq was used to identify differentially expressed transcripts between infected and noninfected birds and between genetic lines (false discovery rate change > 2). Of the expressed transcripts in a total of 17,108 annotated chicken genes in Ensembl database, 82.44 and 81.40% were identified in Leghorn and Fayoumi birds, respectively. The bioinformatics analysis suggests that the hemoglobin family genes, the functional involvements for oxygen transportation and circulation, and cell adhesion molecule signaling pathway play significant roles in disease resistance to AIV infection in chickens. Further investigation of the roles of these candidate genes and signaling pathways in the regulation of host-AIV interaction can lead new directions for the development of antiviral

  8. Experimental infection of chickens by a flagellated motile strain of Salmonella enterica serovar Gallinarum biovar Gallinarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, P D; Freitas Neto, O C; Batista, D F A; Denadai, J; Alarcon, M F F; Almeida, A M; Vasconcelos, R O; Setta, A; Barrow, P A; Berchieri, A

    2016-08-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Gallinarum biovar Gallinarum (SG) causes fowl typhoid (FT), a septicaemic disease which can result in high mortality in poultry flocks. The absence of flagella in SG is thought to favour systemic invasion, since bacterial recognition via Toll-like receptor (TLR)-5 does not take place during the early stages of FT. In the present study, chicks susceptible to FT were inoculated with a wild type SG (SG) or its flagellated motile derivative (SG Fla(+)). In experiment 1, mortality and clinical signs were assessed, whereas in experiment 2, gross pathology, histopathology, systemic invasion and immune responses were evaluated. SG Fla(+) infection resulted in later development of clinical signs, lower mortality, lower bacterial numbers in the liver and spleen, and less severe pathological changes compared to SG. The CD8(+) T lymphocyte population was higher in the livers of chicks infected with SG at 4 days post-inoculation (dpi). Chicks infected with SG had increased expression of interleukin (IL)-6 mRNA in the caecal tonsil at 1 dpi and increased expression of IL-18 mRNA in the spleen at 4 dpi. In contrast, the CD4(+) T lymphocyte population was higher at 6 dpi in the livers of birds infected with SG Fla(+). Therefore, flagella appeared to modulate the chicken immune response towards a CD4(+) T profile, resulting in more efficient bacterial clearance from systemic sites and milder infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Embryonated chicken eggs as an alternative model for mixed Clostridium perfringens and Eimeria tenella infection in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnassan, Alaa Aldin; Shehata, Awad Ali; Kotsch, Marianne; Lendner, Matthias; Daugschies, Arwid; Bangoura, Berit

    2013-06-01

    The chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of chicken embryo eggs is a suitable model for viral and bacterial infections. In the present study, a new approach for testing the pathogenesis and virulence of Clostridium perfringens and Eimeria tenella dual infections as a model using the CAM of embryonated chicken eggs was developed. For this purpose, 24 specific pathogen-free (SPF) embryonated chicken eggs were divided into four groups (n = 6) and designated group E, group CP, group CPE, and NC. Sporozoites of E. tenella (20,000 sporozoites) were inoculated into 10-day-old embryonated SPF chicken eggs (groups E and CPE) via allantoic sac route. At 15-day-old, eggs of groups CP and CPE were infected with 10 (4)  cfu C. perfringens via the same route. Assessment of pathogenicity was assessed using gross and histopathological lesions. Embryo mortality reached 17 % after mono-infection with C. perfringens and/or E. tenella and 50 % in the mixed-infected group. Lesions in the CAMs were most numerous and most severe in co-infected eggs (group CPE), reaching the maximum score of 3 in 50 % of the inoculated eggs (P < 0.01). In Eimeria spp.-infected eggs (group E), lesions of score were between 1 and 2. Mono-infection with C. perfringens did not lead to a significant occurrence of lesions. Histopathological investigations of the CAM revealed clusters of Gram-positive bacteria, infiltration with leukocytes, lymphocytes, and developmental stages of E. tenella in the co-infected group. These data suggest that embryonated eggs could be an in ovo model for studying the pathogenesis of mixed infection with Eimeria and C. perfringens.

  10. Performance of a commercial Chicken-Ovo-transferrin-ELISA on the serum of brown layer chickens infected with Gallibacterium anatis and Streptococcus zooepidemicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Krisna; Kjelgaard-Hansen, Mads; Pors, Susanne Elisabeth; Christensen, Jens Peter; Biswas, Paritosh Kumar; Bojesen, Anders Miki

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate Ovo-transferrin (OTF), a positive acute-phase protein in chickens, as a diagnostic biomarker of selected bacterial infections we checked the performance of a commercial Chicken-OTF-ELISA (ICL, Inc., Portland, OR, USA) by analytical and overlap performances using two groups of serum samples obtained from 26 Gallibacterium anatis-infected and 20 Streptococcus zooepidemicus-infected brown layer chickens. In addition, sera from 14 apparently healthy and 19 negative control chickens were analysed in the Gallibacterium group whereas sera from 20 healthy and 11 negative control chickens from the Streptococcus group were analysed. All calibration curves revealed high coefficients of determination (≥ 0.97) between optical density (OD 450nm) and concentrations of OTF (mg/ml). OTF concentrations in high, medium and low pools (made of sera from a combination of infected and/or non-infected birds) were >6.4, >3.8 to 6.7, >3.5 to chickens (Gallibacterium, 4.4 ± 0.3 mg/ml; Streptococcus, 3.2 ± 0.4 mg/ml) compared with negative controls (1.7 ± 0.1 mg/ml) (P Chicken-OTF-ELISA can be used to measure reproducible serum OTF concentrations in brown layer chickens as a response to G. anatis infections, whereas an adjustment of dilution process is proposed to optimize to use in S. zooepidemicus-infected chickens.

  11. Depression of Vaccinal Immunity to Marek's Disease by Infection with Chicken Infectious Anemia Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yankun; Cui, Ning; Han, Ni; Wu, Jiayan; Cui, Zhizhong; Su, Shuai

    2017-01-01

    Marek's disease (MD) has been occurring with increasing frequency in chickens in recent years. To our knowledge, however, there has been no report of the very virulent plus (vv+) MD virus (MDV) field isolate in China. Studies have shown that dual infection with immunosuppressive viruses such as chicken infectious anemia virus (CIAV) occurs frequently in chickens developing MD. In this study, we performed a designed set of in vivo experiments, which comprised five different groups of chickens, including the group of CVI988/Rispens-vaccinated chickens, the groups of CVI988/Rispens-vaccinated chickens infected with MDV or CIAV or both viruses (MDV and CIAV), and the group of MDV-challenged chickens. The effects of CIAV dual infection on the immunization of commercial MDV vaccine CVI988/Rispens were evaluated. The results show that infection of the SD15 strain of CIAV significantly reduced the weight and antibody titers to avian influenza virus (AIV)/Newcastle disease virus (NDV) inactivated vaccines of chickens immunized with the CVI988/Rispens, and resulted in the atrophy of thymus/bursa and the enlargement of spleen. The CVI988/Rispens vaccination conferred good immune protection for chickens challenged with 2000 PFU of the GX0101 strain of MDV. However, dual infection with SD15 significantly reduced the body weight, antibody titers induced by AIV/NDV inactivated vaccines and protective index of CVI988/Rispens, and resulted in the aggravation of the immunosuppression, mortality, and viremia of GX0101 in CVI988/Rispens-immunized/GX0101-challenged chickens. Overall, CIAV infection significantly reduced the protective effects of the CVI988/Rispens vaccine against MDV, implying that concurrent infection with CIAV may be a major contributor in the frequent attacks of MD in China in recent years.

  12. Differential lung NK cell responses in avian influenza virus infected chickens correlate with pathogenicity

    OpenAIRE

    Jansen, C.A.; de Geus, E.D.; van Haarlem, D.A.; van de Haar, P.M.; Löndt, B.Z; Graham, S.P.; Göbel, T.W.; van Eden, W.; Brookes, S.M.; Vervelde, L.

    2013-01-01

    Infection of chickens with low pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI) virus results in mild clinical signs while infection with highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses causes death of the birds within 36–48 hours. Since natural killer (NK) cells have been shown to play an important role in influenza-specific immunity, we hypothesise that NK cells are involved in this difference in pathogenicity. To investigate this, the role of chicken NK-cells in LPAI virus infection was studied. Next...

  13. Foodborne disease prevention and broiler chickens with reduced Campylobacter infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahrndorff, Simon; Rangstrup-Christensen, Lena; Nordentoft, Steen

    2013-01-01

    Studies have suggested that flies play a linking role in the epidemiology of Campylobacter spp. in broiler chickens and that fly screens can reduce the prevalence of Campylobacter spp. We examined the year-round and long-term effects of fly screens in 10 broiler chicken houses (99 flocks...... broiler chicken flocks....

  14. Co-infection dynamics of a major food-borne zoonotic pathogen in chicken

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skanseng, Beate; Trosvik, Pal; Zimonja, Monika

    2007-01-01

    , with an important reservoir in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of chickens, was used as a model. We investigated the co-colonisation dynamics of seven C. jejuni strains in a chicken GI infection trial. The seven strains were isolated from an epidemiological study showing multiple strain infections at the farm level....... We analysed time-series data, following the Campylobacter colonisation, as well as the dominant background flora of chickens. Data were collected from the infection at day 16 until the last sampling point at day 36. Chickens with two different background floras were studied, mature ( treated...... with Broilact, which is a product consisting of bacteria from the intestinal flora of healthy hens) and spontaneous. The two treatments resulted in completely different background floras, yet similar Campylobacter colonisation patterns were detected in both groups. This suggests that it is the chicken host...

  15. Effect of mild heat stress and mild infection pressure on immune responses to an E. coli infection in chickens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norup, L R; Jensen, K H; Jørgensen, E

    2008-01-01

    they are subjected to a more natural level of infection pressure. Also, exposure to non-infectious stressful situations may prepare the immune system to combat infectious challenges. The present study investigated whether the immune system could be primed by applying small doses of infective material to the chicken...... chickens or short-term heat stress, respectively. After 6 weeks of treatment, all chickens were subjected to an Escherichia coli infection and followed for another 3 weeks. Measures of body weight gain, chicken mannan-binding lectin (cMBL), percentage of CD4+ and MHCII+ lymphocytes, mean fluorescence...... intensity (m.f.i.) of CD4 on CD4+ cells and MHCII on MHCII+ cells and antibody titres to E. coli were taken. In conclusion, the chickens redistribute lymphocyte populations in peripheral blood in response to potentially infectious agents as well as to stressful non-infectious treatments. Responses to stress...

  16. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Salmonella isolates from the broiler chicken industry in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarr, C; Mitchell, W R; Carlson, H C; Fish, N A

    1977-01-01

    Antibacterial drug resistance among 219 salmonella isolates recovered during 1974 from poultry and poultry environments at the various production stages of broiler chickens in three integrated Ontario companies are recorded. All isolates were susceptible to ampicillin, trimethroprim-sulfamethoxazole complex, furazolidone, cephaloridine and amoxicillin. A relative increase in resistance to tetracycline and streptomycin with an accompanying decrease in resistance to triple sulfa compound was recorded when compared to a previous investigation of avian salmonella isolates in Ontario. The percentage and patterns of antimicrobial resistance were comparable at the various stages of production. Resistance to tetracycline and streptomycin was the most common pattern found among both Salmonella typhimurium and other serotypes. A notably high prevalence of resistance was found among Salmonella enteritidis isolates including some isolates with R factors for chloramphenicol resistance. This latter finding is of particular concern because of the high prevalence of this serotype in poultry and in human salmonellosis. PMID:318909

  17. Detection of infectious laryngotracheitis virus by real-time PCR in naturally and experimentally infected chickens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhao

    Full Text Available Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT is an acute, highly contagious upper-respiratory infectious disease of chickens. In this study, a real-time PCR method was developed for fast and accurate detection and quantitation of ILTV DNA of chickens experimentally infected with ILTV strain LJS09 and naturally infected chickens. The detection lower limit of the assay was 10 copies of DNA. There were no cross reactions with the DNA and RNA of infectious bursal disease virus, chicken anemia virus, reticuloendotheliosis virus, avian reovirus, Newcastle disease virus, and Marek's disease virus. The real-time PCR was reproducible as the coefficients of variation of reproducibility of the intra-assay and the inter-assay were less than 2%. The real-time PCR was used to detect the levels of the ILTV DNA in the tissues of specific pathogen free (SPF chickens infected with ILTV at different times post infection. ILTV DNA was detected by real-time PCR in the heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney, larynx, tongue, thymus, glandular stomach, duodenum, pancreatic gland, small intestine, large intestine, cecum, cecal tonsil, bursa of Fabricius, and brain of chickens in the infection group and the contact-exposure group. The sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility of the ILTV real-time PCR assay revealed its suitability for detection and quantitation of ILTV in the samples from clinically and experimentally ILTV infected chickens.

  18. Susceptibility of Campylobacter to high intensity near ultraviolet/visible 395±5nm light and its effectiveness for the decontamination of raw chicken and contact surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haughton, Pippa N; Grau, Elena Gomez; Lyng, James; Cronin, Denis; Fanning, Seamus; Whyte, Paul

    2012-10-15

    Campylobacter is an important cause of human gastroenteritis worldwide. Chicken meat is frequently contaminated with this organism and is considered to be a significant source of infection. It has been predicted that lowering the numbers of Campylobacter on chicken meat can reduce the risk to public health. The aims of the current study were to investigate the susceptibility of Campylobacter to high intensity near ultraviolet/visible (NUV-vis) 395±5nm light and to examine its potential for the microbiological decontamination of raw chicken and contact surfaces. Exposure of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli to NUV-vis light of irradiances was assessed at three distances (3, 12 and 23 cm) from the light source for up to 10 min, corresponding to doses of 0.06 to 18J/cm(2). Overall, levels of inactivation in liquid and on raw chicken improved with longer exposure times and shorter distances from the light source. Reductions of more than 7log(10)CFU/mL were achieved for Campylobacter isolates in liquid following 2 min exposure at 3 cm. Exposure of skinless chicken fillet to NUV-vis light for 1 or 5 min at 3 cm distance reduced C. jejuni by 2.21 and 2.62 log(10)CFU/g, respectively. Increasing the treatment time to 10 min did not significantly increase the level of inactivation. In general, NUV-vis light treatment did not affect the colour of raw chicken. Excluding treatments which resulted in excessive heating (>50°C) of chicken skin, a maximum reduction of 0.95 log(10)CFU/g was achieved for C. jejuni following 10 min exposure to NUV-vis light at 12 cm (PLight treatments were significantly effective for decontaminating contact surfaces as there were no C. jejuni recovered from stainless steel or cutting board surfaces after NUV-vis light treatments from an initial inoculum of 2-4 log(10)CFU/cm(2) (Plight for the inactivation of Campylobacter spp. in liquids, on raw chicken and contact surfaces. The incorporation of this technology could be implemented in a

  19. Observations on Arthritis in Broiler Breeder Chickens Experimentally Infected with Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Qin Gu§, Xue-Ying Hu§, Chang-Qing Xie1, Wan-Po Zhang, De-Hai Wang, Quan Zhou and Guo-Fu Cheng1*

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is the most common cause of bacterial arthritis in broiler breeder chickens. In this study, we established a model of broiler breeder chicken arthritis inoculated with Staph. aureus isolated from a spontaneously occurring bacterial arthritis in chickens. We evaluated the model by bacteriology, serology, pathology, and immunology. The results showed that 2.5 × 109 cfu Staph. aureus injected into the right joint cavity can successfully induce a chicken arthritis model. The majority of the infected chickens suffered lameness and joint swelling at 3 days post-inoculation (DPI. The death peak time was on 7 DPI and the mortality rate was 51.1%. Staph. aureus can be continuously isolated from the blood and left joint synovial fluid of the infected chickens. Lesions found on the infected chickens consisted of swollen joints full of caseous exudates, cartilage injury, and synovial membrane thickening with infiltration of inflammatory cells. The center of the lesion contained many round bacterial cocci. With joint injury aggravation, intra-articular hyaluronic acid gradually decreased, and serum interleukin-6 became significantly higher compared with the control (P<0.01 from 3 DPI. The results indicated that the chicken models of Staph. aureus-mediated arthritis were successful, and can be used to gain a better understanding of the host-bacterium relationship.

  20. Inflammatory response of different chicken lines and B haplotypes to infection with infectious bursal disease virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O.L.; Sorensen, P.; Hedemand, J.E.

    1998-01-01

    Chickens representing two different inbred lines (layer and meat-type) and three different B haplotypes (BW1, B19 and B131) were infected with infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) at 21 days of age. Mortality was recorded, and surviving chickens were killed and examined either 3 or 17 days post......-infection. Non-infected control chickens were run in parallel. The variables recorded were all significantly changed by the virus infection, including the serum concentration of mannan-binding lectin that was increased 2-fold 3 days post-infection. A significantly increased mortality, liver to body weight ratio...... the layer-type line, and that mortality rate, liver to body weight ratio and ESR were valuable variables for evaluation of the level of IBDV infection-induced inflammation and disease....

  1. Bursal transcriptome profiling of different inbred chicken lines reveals key differentially expressed genes at 3 days post-infection with very virulent infectious bursal disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhanah, Mohd Isa; Yasmin, Abd Rahaman; Mat Isa, Nurulfiza; Hair-Bejo, Mohd; Ideris, Aini; Powers, Claire; Oladapo, Omobolanle; Nair, Venugopal; Khoo, Jia-Shiun; Ghazali, Ahmad-Kamal; Yee, Wai-Yan; Omar, Abdul Rahman

    2018-01-01

    Infectious bursal disease is a highly contagious disease in the poultry industry and causes immunosuppression in chickens. Genome-wide regulations of immune response genes of inbred chickens with different genetic backgrounds, following very virulent infectious bursal disease virus (vvIBDV) infection are poorly characterized. Therefore, this study aims to analyse the bursal tissue transcriptome of six inbred chicken lines 6, 7, 15, N, O and P following infection with vvIBDV strain UK661 using strand-specific next-generation sequencing, by highlighting important genes and pathways involved in the infected chicken during peak infection at 3 days post-infection. All infected chickens succumbed to the infection without major variations among the different lines. However, based on the viral loads and bursal lesion scoring, lines P and 6 can be considered as the most susceptible lines, while lines 15 and N were regarded as the least affected lines. Transcriptome profiling of the bursa identified 4588 genes to be differentially expressed, with 2985 upregulated and 1642 downregulated genes, in which these genes were commonly or uniquely detected in all or several infected lines. Genes that were upregulated are primarily pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and IFN-related. Various genes that are associated with B-cell functions and genes related to apoptosis were downregulated, together with the genes involved in p53 signalling. In conclusion, bursal transcriptome profiles of different inbred lines showed differential expressions of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, Th1 cytokines, JAK-STAT signalling genes, MAPK signalling genes, and their related pathways following vvIBDV infection.

  2. Pharmacokinetics and oral bioavailability of amoxicillin in chicken infected with caecal coccidiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandeel, M

    2015-10-01

    Chicken infected with caecal coccidiosis (Eimeria tenella) was used to evaluate the effect of coccidiosis on the pharmacokinetic and bioavailability of amoxicillin. The level of amoxicillin was estimated by high-performance chromatography (HPLC) to calculate the pharmacokinetic parameters and oral bioavailability. For i.v. injection of amoxicillin, Vd and CL were 0.29 and 0.27 (mg/kg)/(μg/mL)/h, respectively. Compared with healthy chicken, intravenous injection of amoxicillin in the infected chicken showed higher distribution and elimination constants, delayed clearance and statistically significant higher AUC and MRT. Oral administration in healthy chicken was accompanied by rapid absorption and high bioavailability with Tmax , Cmax and F about 1.03 h, 3.26 μg/mL and 40.2, respectively. Furthermore, oral administration in the infected chicken produced higher mean absorption time, delayed Tmax, lower Cmax, smaller AUC value and lower bioavailability (16.76). Based on these results, monitoring and adjustment of amoxicillin dosing could be practiced during the presence of coccidiosis. The measured Cmax values suggest the administration of 1.3-folds of the normal dose to maintain the normal maximal serum concentrations of amoxicillin in chicken infected with caecal coccidiosis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Characterization of Cellular and Humoral Immune Responses After IBV Infection in Chicken Lines Differing in MBL Serum Concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærup, Rikke Munkholm; Dalgaard, Tina Sørensen; Norup, Liselotte Rothmann

    2014-01-01

    Chickens from two inbred lines selected for high (L10H) or low (L10L) mannose-binding lectin (MBL) serum concentrations were infected with infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), and innate as well as adaptive immunological parameters were measured throughout the experimental period. Chickens with high...... MBL serum concentrations were found to have less viral load in the trachea than chickens with low MBL serum concentrations indicating that these chickens were less severely affected by the infection. This study is the first to show that MBL expression is present in the lungs of healthy chickens...

  4. The occurrence of Toxocara species in naturally infected broiler chickens revealed by molecular approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zibaei, M; Sadjjadi, S M; Maraghi, S

    2017-09-01

    Consuming raw and undercooked meat is known to enhance the risk of human toxocariasis because Toxocara species have a wide range of paratenic hosts, including chickens. The aim of this study was to identify species of Toxocara in naturally infected broiler chickens using molecular approaches. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method was used for the differentiation of Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati larvae recovered from tissues and organs, and identified by microscopic observations. Thirty-three 35- to 47-day-old broiler chickens were used for examination of Toxocara larvae. The duodenum, liver, lungs, heart, kidneys, skeletal muscles and brain of each chicken were examined using the pepsin method, and DNA from each tissue was extracted as the template for PCR assay. The findings revealed that 5 of 33 (15.2%) broiler chickens were infected with Toxocara larvae. Larvae were recovered from the liver (n = 19), duodenum (n = 8), skeletal muscles (n = 8) and brain (n = 2) of broiler chickens naturally infected with Toxocara spp. The results showed that the frequencies of the species in the chickens were T. canis larvae (n = 5, 83.3%) and T. cati larvae (n = 1, 16.7%). Our data from the present study demonstrated the importance of broiler chickens as a paratenic host for the parasite's life cycle in the environment. The implementation of DNA amplification as a routine diagnostic technique is a specific and alternative method for identification of Toxocara larvae, and allowed the observation of specific species under field conditions within the locations where broiler chickens are typically raised and exposed to Toxocara spp. eggs or larvae.

  5. Multi-strain infections and 'relapse' of Leucocytozoon sabrazesi gametocytes in domestic chickens in southern China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenting Zhao

    Full Text Available Leucocytozoon parasites infect many species of avian hosts, including domestic chicken, and can inflict heavy economic loss to the poultry industry. Although the prevalence and distribution of two Leucocytozoon species (L. sabrazesi and L. caulleryi have been reported in China previously, there are many questions related to the parasite infection that remain unanswered, including population diversity and transmission dynamics in domestic chickens. Here we surveyed chicken blood samples from seven sites in four provinces of China to identify Leucocytozoon infection, characterized parasite diversity within individual infected hosts and between sampling sites, and investigated the dynamics of gametocytemia in chickens over time. We found high infection rates in three of the seven sites. Clustering parasite sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase III (coxIII and cytochrome b (cytb genes showed lack of grouping according to geographic origins and individual hosts carrying large numbers of L. sabrazesi strains. Monitoring gametocytemia in blood samples from infected chickens over time showed 'relapse' or persistence of low-level gametocytemia for 4-5 months, which could be explored as an in vivo model for testing drugs against liver stages of Apicomplexan parasites. This study provides important information on population diversity and transmission dynamics of L. sabrazesi and for disease control.

  6. Transcriptional profiles of chicken embryo cell cultures following infection with infectious bursal disease virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yiping; Handberg, K.J.; Juul-Madsen, H.R.

    2007-01-01

    -host interaction, we measured steady-state levels of transcripts from 28 cellular genes of chicken embryo (CE) cell cultures infected with IBDV vaccine stain Bursine-2 during a 7-day infection course by use of the quantitative real-time RT-PCR SYBR green method. Of the genes tested, 21 genes (IRF-1, IFN 1...

  7. Serum levels of chicken mannan-binding lectin (MBL) during virus infections; indication that chicken MBL is an acute phase reactant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O.L.; Jensenius, J. C.; Jørgensen, Poul Henrik

    1999-01-01

    Mannan-binding lectin (MBL) is a serum collectin which is believed to be an opsonin of the innate immune defence against various microorganisms. MBL is a minor acute phase reactant in man. We investigated the concentration of serum MBL in chickens infected with infectious bronchitis virus (IBV...... levels returned to normal values 6-10 days after infection. The results indicated that MBL is a minor acute phase reactant in chickens....

  8. Transcriptional Innate Immune Response of the Developing Chicken Embryo to Newcastle Disease Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan A. Schilling

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Traditional approaches to assess the immune response of chickens to infection are through animal trials, which are expensive, require enhanced biosecurity, compromise welfare, and are frequently influenced by confounding variables. Since the chicken embryo becomes immunocompetent prior to hatch, we here characterized the transcriptional response of selected innate immune genes to Newcastle disease virus (NDV infection in chicken embryos at days 10, 14, and 18 of embryonic development. The results suggest that the innate immune response 72 h after challenge of 18-day chicken embryo is both consistent and robust. The expression of CCL5, Mx1, and TLR3 in lung tissues of NDV challenged chicken embryos from the outbred Kuroiler and Tanzanian local ecotype lines showed that their expression was several orders of magnitude higher in the Kuroiler than in the local ecotypes. Next, the expression patterns of three additional innate-immunity related genes, IL-8, IRF-1, and STAT1, were examined in the highly congenic Fayoumi (M5.1 and M15.2 and Leghorn (Ghs6 and Ghs13 sublines that differ only at the microchromosome bearing the major histocompatibility locus. The results show that the Ghs13 Leghorn subline had a consistently higher expression of all genes except IL-8 and expression seemed to be subline-dependent rather than breed-dependent, suggesting that the innate immune response of chicken embryos to NDV infection may be genetically controlled by the MHC-locus. Taken together, the results suggest that the chicken embryo may represent a promising model to studying the patterns and sources of variation of the avian innate immune response to infection with NDV and related pathogens.

  9. Transcriptional Innate Immune Response of the Developing Chicken Embryo to Newcastle Disease Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Megan A; Katani, Robab; Memari, Sahar; Cavanaugh, Meredith; Buza, Joram; Radzio-Basu, Jessica; Mpenda, Fulgence N; Deist, Melissa S; Lamont, Susan J; Kapur, Vivek

    2018-01-01

    Traditional approaches to assess the immune response of chickens to infection are through animal trials, which are expensive, require enhanced biosecurity, compromise welfare, and are frequently influenced by confounding variables. Since the chicken embryo becomes immunocompetent prior to hatch, we here characterized the transcriptional response of selected innate immune genes to Newcastle disease virus (NDV) infection in chicken embryos at days 10, 14, and 18 of embryonic development. The results suggest that the innate immune response 72 h after challenge of 18-day chicken embryo is both consistent and robust. The expression of CCL5, Mx1, and TLR3 in lung tissues of NDV challenged chicken embryos from the outbred Kuroiler and Tanzanian local ecotype lines showed that their expression was several orders of magnitude higher in the Kuroiler than in the local ecotypes. Next, the expression patterns of three additional innate-immunity related genes, IL-8, IRF-1, and STAT1, were examined in the highly congenic Fayoumi (M5.1 and M15.2) and Leghorn (Ghs6 and Ghs13) sublines that differ only at the microchromosome bearing the major histocompatibility locus. The results show that the Ghs13 Leghorn subline had a consistently higher expression of all genes except IL-8 and expression seemed to be subline-dependent rather than breed-dependent, suggesting that the innate immune response of chicken embryos to NDV infection may be genetically controlled by the MHC-locus. Taken together, the results suggest that the chicken embryo may represent a promising model to studying the patterns and sources of variation of the avian innate immune response to infection with NDV and related pathogens.

  10. Genome analysis of Clostridium perfringens isolates from healthy and necrotic enteritis infected chickens and turkeys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronco, Troels; Stegger, Marc; Ng, Kim Lee

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Clostridium perfringens causes gastrointestinal diseases in both humans and domestic animals. Type A strains expressing the NetB toxin are the main cause of necrotic enteritis (NE) in chickens, which has remarkable impact on animal welfare and production economy in the international...... poultry industry. Three pathogenicity loci NELoc-1, -2 and -3 and a collagen adhesion gene cnaA have been found to be associated with NE in chickens, whereas the presence of these has not been investigated in diseased turkeys. The purpose was to investigate the virulence associated genome content...... and the genetic relationship among 30 C. perfringens isolates from both healthy and NE infected chickens and turkeys, applying whole-genome sequencing. Results: NELoc-1, -3, netB and cnaA were significantly associated with NE isolates from chickens, whereas only NELoc-2 was commonly observed in both diseased...

  11. Antimicrobial susceptibility and antibiotic resistance profiles of cultivable lactic acid bacteria from intestinal tract of domestic chickens collected in Adjara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lia L. Amiranashvili

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Elaboration and introduction of safe, effective probiotic preparations as alternatives to antibiotics are being actively conducted throughout the world. 66 LAB isolates were isolated from ileal, cecal and rectal samples collected from domestic chickens collected in different districts of Adjara, Georgia. Their resistance to 17 antibiotics and antibacterial activity were studied using the agar diffusion method. Among the isolates, widespread resistance was found to metronidazole and nystatin, sensitivity – to ampicillin, tylosin, rifampicin and bacitracin. Most of isolates have intermediate susceptibility to the majority of the antibiotics. 3 LAB isolates were selected by antibacterial action against the several bacterial indicator strains that makes them effective remedy to control antibiotic-independent pathogen through competitive exclusion and promotion of good protective microbiota and perspective probiotic additives for chicken food. Future investigations, proving the safety of the strains and their antimicrobial compounds will enable to apply in vivo probiotic properties on poultry production.

  12. Effect of infectious bursal disease (IBD) vaccine on Salmonella Enteritidis infected chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arafat, Nagah; Eladl, Abdelfattah H; Mahgoub, Hebatallah; El-Shafei, Reham A

    2017-06-22

    Chickens infected with both infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) and Salmonella had higher mortality. In this work, we investigated the effect of IBDV vaccine (modified live-virus bursal disease vaccine, Nobilis strain 228E®) on experimentally infected chickens with Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). Four experimental groups were included in this study, negative control group, 228E®group, 228E®+SE infected group, and SE infected group. Chickens were ocularly administrated 228E® at 12days of age and orally infected with S. Enteritidis at 13days of age. Sera, intestinal fluid, blood, cloacal swabs and tissue samples were collected at 1, 2 and 3weeks post vaccination (PV). The recorded mortalities were higher in the 228E®+SE infected group, compared to the SE infected group. The anti-S. Enteritidis serum antibody titer and the intestinal mucosal IgA level were higher in the SE infected group at 2 and 3weeks PV, compared to 228E®+SE infected group. S. Enteritidis fecal shedding and organ colonization were significantly higher in the 228E®+SE infected group than the SE infected group at 2 and 3weeks PV. The 228E®+SE group had significantly lower bursa to body weight ratios at 2 and 3weeks PV, as well as had higher bursal lesion scores than the SE infected group. IBDV vaccine depressed the specific-SE systemic and mucosal antibody responses, but did not affect the specific-SE cellular immune responses. Chickens administrated IBDV vaccine, followed by S. Enteritidis infection, could cause a significant effect on the bursa of Fabricius, resulting in failure of systemic and mucosal antibody responses to the S. Enteritidis and reduce the elimination and the clearance of S. Enteritidis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Intestinal colonization of broiler chickens by Campylobacter spp. in an experimental infection study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahrndorff, Simon; Garcia Clavero, Ana Belén; Vigre, Håkan

    2015-01-01

    Consumption of poultry meat is considered as one of the main sources of human campylobacteriosis, and there is clearly a need for new surveillance and control measures based on quantitative data on Campylobacter spp. colonization dynamics in broiler chickens. We conducted four experimental...... infection trials, using four isolators during each infection trial to evaluate colonization of individual broiler chickens by Campylobacter jejuni over time. Individual and pooled faecal samples were obtained at days 4, 7 and 12 post-inoculation (p.i.) and caecal samples at day 12 p.i. There were large...

  14. Consequences of concurrent Ascaridia galli and Escherichia coli infections in chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Permin A

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Three experiments were carried out to examine the consequences of concurrent infections with Ascaridia galli and Escherichia coli in chickens raised for table egg production. Characteristic pathological lesions including airsacculitis, peritonitis and/or polyserositis were seen in all groups infected with E. coli. Furthermore, a trend for increased mortality rates was observed in groups infected with both organisms which, however, could not be confirmed statistically. The mean worm burden was significantly lower in combined infection groups compared to groups infected only with A. galli. It was also shown that combined infections of E. coli and A. galli had an added significant negative impact on weight gain.

  15. Age related susceptibility of pigs to Cryptosporidium scrofarum infection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kváč, Martin; Němejc, K.; Kestřánová, M.; Květoňová, Dana; Wagnerová, Pavla; Kotková, Michaela; Rost, M.; Samková, E.; McEvoy, J.; Sak, Bohumil

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 202, 3-4 (2014), s. 330-334 ISSN 0304-4017 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH11061 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Cryptosporidium scrofarum * molecular analyses * transmission studies * susceptibility * infection * pigs Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.460, year: 2014

  16. Antibiotic susceptibility of organisms causing urinary tract infection in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Changes in susceptibility patterns of bacterial pathogens isolated from urinary tract infections emphasize the need for regional surveillance to generate information that can be used in management of patients. Knowledge on the current status of antimicrobial resistance in uropathogens, and the prevalence of ...

  17. Prevalence and bacterial susceptibility of hospital acquired urinary tract infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dias Neto José Anastácio

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Urinary tract infection is the most common nosocomially acquired infection. It is important to know the etiology and antibiotic susceptibility infectious agents to guide the initial empirical treatment. OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of bacterial strains and their antibiotic susceptibility in nosocomially acquired urinary tract infection in a university hospital between January and June 2003. METHODS: We analyzed the data of 188 patients with positive urine culture (= 10(5 colony-forming units/mL following a period of 48 hours after admission. RESULTS: Half of patients were male. Mean age was 50.26 ± 22.7 (SD, range 3 months to 88 years. Gram-negative bacteria were the agent in approximately 80% of cases. The most common pathogens were E. coli (26%, Klebsiella sp. (15%, P. aeruginosa (15% and Enterococcus sp. (11%. The overall bacteria susceptibility showed that the pathogens were more sensible to imipenem (83%, second or third generation cephalosporin and aminoglycosides; and were highly resistant to ampicillin (27% and cefalothin (30%. It is important to note the low susceptibility to ciprofloxacin (42% and norfloxacin (43%. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that if one can not wait the results of urine culture, the best choices to begin empiric treatment are imipenem, second or third generation cephalosporin and aminoglycosides. Cefalothin and ampicillin are quite ineffective to treat these infections.

  18. Host genetic factors in susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Institute of Infectious Disease and Molecular Medicine, University of Cape Town, Cape Town 7925, Republic of South Africa. Abstract ..... with AIDS progression or susceptibility to HIV-1 infection in a. French AIDS cohort. Biomed. Pharmacother. 60, 569–577. Doherty P. C. and Zinkernagel R. M. 1975 Enhanced immunologi-.

  19. Experimental infection with Brazilian Newcastle disease virus strain in pigeons and chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano de Oliveira Torres Carrasco

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study was designed with the goal of adding as much information as possible about the role of pigeons (Columba livia and chickens (Gallus gallus in Newcastle disease virus epidemiology. These species were submitted to direct experimental infection with Newcastle disease virus to evaluate interspecies transmission and virus-host relationships. The results obtained in four experimental models were analyzed by hemagglutination inhibition and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction for detection of virus shedding. These techniques revealed that both avian species, when previously immunized with a low pathogenic Newcastle disease virus strain (LaSota, developed high antibody titers that significantly reduced virus shedding after infection with a highly pathogenic Newcastle disease virus strain (São Joao do Meriti and that, in chickens, prevent clinical signs. Infected pigeons shed the pathogenic strain, which was not detected in sentinel chickens or control birds. When the presence of Newcastle disease virus was analyzed in tissue samples by RT-PCR, in both species, the virus was most frequently found in the spleen. The vaccination regimen can prevent clinical disease in chickens and reduce viral shedding by chickens or pigeons. Biosecurity measures associated with vaccination programs are crucial to maintain a virulent Newcastle disease virus-free status in industrial poultry in Brazil.

  20. Humoral response of chicken infected with the microsporidium Encephalitozoon hellem

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Saková, Kamila; Sak, Bohumil; Ditrich, Oleg; Kváč, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 98, č. 5 (2006), s. 488-492 ISSN 0932-0113 R&D Projects: GA ČR GD524/03/H133 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Encephalitozoon hellem * chicken * antibody Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.140, year: 2006

  1. Diagnosis of Salmonella Enteritidis Infection in Broiler Chickens ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The program for the eradication of Salmonella Enteritidis from chickens was based on bacteriological examination of breeding flocks. There is a great need for a specific and sensitive serological screening test. For that purpose, four different enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) were developed. These included ...

  2. Low pathogenicity avian influenza viruses infect chicken layers by different routes of inoculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantin-Jackwood, Mary J; Smith, Diane M; Wasilenko, Jamie L; Spackman, Erica

    2012-06-01

    In order to develop better control measures against avian influenza, it is necessary to understand how the virus transmits in poultry. In a previous study in which the infectivity and transmissibility of the pandemic H1N1 influenza virus was examined in different poultry species, we found that no or minimal infection occurred in chicken and turkeys intranasally (IN) inoculated with the virus. However, we demonstrated that the virus can infect laying turkey hens by the intracloacal (IC) and intraoviduct (IO) routes, possibly explaining the drops in egg production observed in turkey breeder farms affected by the virus. Such novel routes of exposure have not been previously examined in chickens and could also explain outbreaks of low pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI) that cause a decrease in egg production in chicken layers and breeders. In the present study, 46-wk-old specific-pathogen-free chicken layers were infected by the IN, IC, or IO routes with one of two LPAI viruses: a poultry origin virus, A/chicken/CA/1255/02 (H6N2), and a live bird market isolate, A/chicken/NJ/12220/97 (H9N2). Only hens IN inoculated with the H6N2 virus presented mild clinical signs consisting of depression and anorexia. However, a decrease in number of eggs laid was observed in all virus-inoculated groups when compared to control hens. Evidence of infection was found in all chickens inoculated with the H6N2 virus by any of the three routes and the virus transmitted to contact hens. On the other hand, only one or two hens from each of the groups inoculated with the H9N2 virus shed detectable levels of virus, or seroconverted and did not transmit the virus to contacts, regardless of the route of inoculation. In conclusion, LPAI viruses can also infect chickens through other routes besides the IN route, which is considered the natural route of exposure. However, as seen with the H9N2 virus, the infectivity of the virus did not increase when given by these alternate routes.

  3. Immune response of chicken gut to natural colonization by gut microflora and to Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crhanova, Magdalena; Hradecka, Helena; Faldynova, Marcela; Matulova, Marta; Havlickova, Hana; Sisak, Frantisek; Rychlik, Ivan

    2011-07-01

    In commercial poultry production, there is a lack of natural flora providers since chickens are hatched in the clean environment of a hatchery. Events occurring soon after hatching are therefore of particular importance, and that is why we were interested in the development of the gut microbial community, the immune response to natural microbial colonization, and the response to Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis infection as a function of chicken age. The complexity of chicken gut microbiota gradually increased from day 1 to day 19 of life and consisted of Proteobacteria and Firmicutes. For the first 3 days of life, chicken cecum was protected by increased expression of chicken β-defensins (i.e., gallinacins 1, 2, 4, and 6), expression of which dropped from day 4 of life. On the other hand, a transient increase in interleukin-8 (IL-8) and IL-17 expression could be observed in chicken cecum on day 4 of life, indicating physiological inflammation and maturation of the gut immune system. In agreement, the response of chickens infected with S. Enteritidis on days 1, 4, and 16 of life shifted from Th1 (characterized mainly by induction of gamma interferon [IFN-γ] and inducible nitric oxide synthase [iNOS]), observed in younger chickens, to Th17, observed in 16-day-old chickens (characterized mainly by IL-17 induction). Active modification of chicken gut microbiota in the future may accelerate or potentiate the maturation of the gut immune system and increase its resistance to infection with different pathogens.

  4. Mannan-binding lectin (MBL) in two chicken breeds and the correlation with experimental Pasteurella multocida infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Torben Wilde; Permin, Anders; Christensen, Jens Peter

    2010-01-01

    The present study is the first demonstration of an association of the genetic serum Mannan-binding lectin (MBL) concentration with bacterial infections in chickens. The genetic serum MBL concentration was determined in two chicken breeds, and the association with the specific Pasteurella multocida...... of the chickens, suggesting that MBL plays an important role against P. multocida. A statistically significant negative correlation was found between the specific antibody response and the genetic serum MBL concentration for both breeds. This indicates that MBL in chickens is capable of acting as the first line...... of defence against P. multocida by diminishing the infection before the adaptive immune response takes over. Udgivelsesdato: May...

  5. The polymorphism of chicken-type lysozyme gene in Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) and its association with resistance/susceptibility to Listonella anguillarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinxiang; Zhou, Nayu; Fu, Ruixue; Cao, Dandan; Si, Yu; Li, Aoyun; Zhao, Haitao; Zhang, Quanqi; Yu, Haiyang

    2017-07-01

    Lysozyme is a crucially spread hydrolase in organisms that can defend against bacterial infection in innate immunity. In this study, we successfully sequenced the coding region of chicken-type lysozyme gene (PoLysC) in Paralichthys olivaceus and identified nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We then amplified the 2500 bp promoter region of lysozyme and identified the eight sites of polymorphisms. All SNPs were genotyped between susceptible and resistance groups after Listonella anguillarum challenge. One of these SNP sites in the codon of PoLysC was genotyped and determined to be a significant marker by analyzing its distribution in the susceptible and resistant groups. As a nonsynonymous mutation, the frequency of 140G/C genotype in the resistant group was higher (67.74%) than that in the susceptible group (32.26%). The linkage between SNP140 and polymorphisms in the promoter region was also studied. Results revealed that the frequency of haplotype CC -536 /CC -1200 /GG 140 in the resistance group was significantly higher than that in the susceptible group. The quantitative expression of lysozyme gene in the resistant group was also higher than that in the susceptible group. This finding indicated that the linkage between polymorphism -536 and -1200 sites in promoter and SNP140 in codon sequence was associated with the resistance of P. olivaceus to L. anguillarum. All these results suggest that the mutations in promoter and coding region were related to changes in PoLysC for resisting L. anguillarum. The haplotype CC -536 /CC -1200 /GG 140 was a potential marker and can thus be applied to selective breeding for the disease resistance of P. olivaceus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) model for viral marketing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Siti Suhaila; Akil, Ku Azlina Ku; Chulan, Majdah; Sharif, Noorzila

    2017-11-01

    Viral marketing is a marketing strategy utilizes social media to spread information about a product or services provided. It is the most powerful way to share information in a short amount of time. The objective of this study is to investigate the dynamic of viral marketing within a time duration in the point of view of mathematics. This study used the epidemiological model known as Susceptible-Infected-Recovered (SIR). The model consists of a system of three differential equations with three state variables namely susceptible (S), infected (I) and recovered (R). It considers a case of SIR model with demography. Numerical experiments have been performed. The results show that viral marketing reaches its peak within two days. The online messages shared will become higher if the initial number of the infected individual has been increased.

  7. Chicken faeces garden fertilizer: possible source of human avian influenza H5N1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandun, I N; Samaan, G; Harun, S; Purba, W H; Sariwati, E; Septiawati, C; Silitonga, M; Dharmayanti, N P I; Kelly, P M; Wandra, T

    2010-06-01

    Avian influenza H5N1 infection in humans is typically associated with close contact with infected poultry or other infected avian species. We report on human cases of H5N1 infection in Indonesia where exposure to H5N1-infected animals could not be established, but where the investigation found chicken faeces contaminated with viable H5N1 virus in the garden fertilizer. Human cases of avian influenza H5N1 warrant extensive investigations to determine likely sources of illness and to minimize risk to others. Authorities should regulate the sale and transportation of chicken faeces as fertilizer from areas where H5N1 outbreaks are reported.

  8. Antimicrobial susceptibility in thermophilic Campylobacter species isolated from pigs and chickens in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonker, A; Picard, J A

    2010-12-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is one of the leading causes of sporadic food-borne bacterial disease in humans. In intensive poultry and pig rearing systems the use of oral antibiotics is essential to maintain health. Consequently, there is a high risk for the thermophilic Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli resident in the intestinal tract of food animals to develop resistance to commonly used antibiotics. Contamination of meat or eggs with pathogenic strains of resistant Campylobacter could, therefore, result in a form of campylobacteriosis in humans that is difficult to treat. The aim of this investigation was to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility of thermophilic Campylobacter spp. isolated from pigs and poultry by the broth microdilution minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) test. A total of 482 samples from the Western Cape and Gauteng provinces was collected and analysed. Thirty-eight Campylobacter isolates were obtained. Analysis of data revealed that C. jejuni strains mainly of poultry origin were more resistant to the fluoroquinolones, macrolides and tetracyclines and the C. coli strains were more resistant to the macrolides and lincosamides. Multi-resistance was also detected in 4 Campylobacter strains from the Western Cape. With the exception of tetracyclines, strains from high health Gauteng broiler farms were susceptible to antibiotics used to treat Campylobacter infections.

  9. Antimicrobial susceptibility in thermophilic Campylobacter species isolated from pigs and chickens in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jonker

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter jejuni is one of the leading causes of sporadic food-borne bacterial disease in humans. In intensive poultry and pig rearing systems the use of oral antibiotics is essential to maintain health. Consequently, there is a high risk for the thermophilic Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli resident in the intestinal tract of food animals to develop resistance to commonly used antibiotics. Contamination of meat or eggs with pathogenic strains of resistant Campylobacter could, therefore, result in a form of campylobacteriosis in humans that is difficult to treat. The aim of this investigation was to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility of thermophilic Campylobacter spp. isolated from pigs and poultry by the broth microdilution minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC test. A total of 482 samples from the Western Cape and Gauteng provinces was collected and analysed. Thirty-eight Campylobacter isolates were obtained. Analysis of data revealed that C. jejuni strains mainly of poultry origin were more resistant to the fluoroquinolones, macrolides and tetracyclines and the C. coli strains were more resistant to the macrolides and lincosamides. Multiresistance was also detected in 4 Campylobacter strains from the Western Cape. With the exception of tetracyclines, strains from high health Gauteng broiler farms were susceptible to antibiotics used to treat Campylobacter infections.

  10. Ascaridia galli infection influences the development of both humoral and cell-mediated immunity after Newcastle Disease vaccination in chickens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pleidrup, Janne; Dalgaard, Tina S.; Norup, Liselotte R.

    2014-01-01

    on the immunological response to vaccination against other infectious diseases. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether A. galli infection influences vaccine-induced immunity to Newcastle Disease (ND) in chickens from an MHC-characterized inbred line. Chickens were experimentally infected with A. galli...... at 4 weeks of age or left as non-parasitized controls. At 10 and 13 weeks of age half of the chickens were ND-vaccinated and at 16 weeks of age, all chickens were challenged with a lentogenic strain of Newcastle disease virus (NDV). A. galli infection influenced both humoral and cell-mediated immune...... vaccinees as compared to non-parasitized vaccinees. However, more work is needed in order to determine if vaccine-induced protective immunity is impaired in A. galli-infected chickens....

  11. Comparison of parasite-specific immunoglobulin levels in two chicken lines during sustained infection with Ascaridia galli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norup, Liselotte Rothmann; Dalgaard, Tina S.; Pleidrup, Janne

    2013-01-01

    performed.In the present experiment, 20 chickens of two inbred chicken lines containing the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) haplotypes, B14 and R5, were inoculated with 500 embryonated Ascaridia galli eggs. The A. galli-specific IgG titres of serum samples and the excretion of A. galli eggs...... in chicken faeces were measured for a period of 81 weeks.The level of excreted A. galli eggs measured as eggs per gram chicken faeces (EPG) varied greatly between chickens in each line. Significant differences were found between the two lines and with the R5 chickens reaching the highest levels. Likewise......, the A. galli-specific IgG titres in serum differed significantly between the two lines, and an inverse relationship between infection level (EPG) and antibody titres was found. Although this inverse relationship suggests that humoral immunity may be involved in protection against A. galli infection...

  12. Improved resistance to Eimeria acervulina infection in chickens due to dietary supplementation with garlic metabolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of a compound including secondary metabolites of garlic, propyl thiosulfinate (PTS) and propyl thiosulfinatate oxide (PTSO), on in vitro and in vivo parameters of chicken gut immunity during experimental Eimeria acervulina infection were evaluated. In in vitro assays, the compound of P...

  13. Eimeria tenella infections in chicken: aspects of host-parasite interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeurissen, S.H.M.; Janse, E.M.; Vermeulen, A.N.; Vervelde, L.

    1996-01-01

    Intestinal coccidiosis, caused by various species of Eimeria, has become an economically important disease of poultry and livestock throughout the world. Infection of chickens starts after ingestion of oocysts when sporozoites penetrate the epithelium of the villi. After passage through the lamina

  14. Ranking of Nodal Infection Probability in Susceptible-Infected-Susceptible Epidemic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qu, B.; Li, C.; Van Mieghem, P.F.A.; Wang, H.

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence, which is the average fraction of infected nodes, has been studied to evaluate the robustness of a network subject to the spread of epidemics. We explore the vulnerability (infection probability) of each node in the metastable state with a given effective infection rate τ.

  15. Network Analysis of Human Genes Influencing Susceptibility to Mycobacterial Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipner, Ettie M.; Garcia, Benjamin J.; Strong, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacterial infections constitute a high burden of pulmonary disease in humans, resulting in over 1.5 million deaths per year. Building on the premise that genetic factors influence the instance, progression, and defense of infectious disease, we undertook a systems biology approach to investigate relationships among genetic factors that may play a role in increased susceptibility or control of mycobacterial infections. We combined literature and database mining with network analysis and pathway enrichment analysis to examine genes, pathways, and networks, involved in the human response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacterial infections. This approach allowed us to examine functional relationships among reported genes, and to identify novel genes and enriched pathways that may play a role in mycobacterial susceptibility or control. Our findings suggest that the primary pathways and genes influencing mycobacterial infection control involve an interplay between innate and adaptive immune proteins and pathways. Signaling pathways involved in autoimmune disease were significantly enriched as revealed in our networks. Mycobacterial disease susceptibility networks were also examined within the context of gene-chemical relationships, in order to identify putative drugs and nutrients with potential beneficial immunomodulatory or anti-mycobacterial effects. PMID:26751573

  16. Immune Response of Chicken Gut to Natural Colonization by Gut Microflora and to Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Crhanova, Magdalena; Hradecka, Helena; Faldynova, Marcela; Matulova, Marta; Havlickova, Hana; Sisak, Frantisek; Rychlik, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    In commercial poultry production, there is a lack of natural flora providers since chickens are hatched in the clean environment of a hatchery. Events occurring soon after hatching are therefore of particular importance, and that is why we were interested in the development of the gut microbial community, the immune response to natural microbial colonization, and the response to Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis infection as a function of chicken age. The complexity of chicken gut micro...

  17. Susceptibility of different leukocyte cell types to Vaccinia virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sánchez-Puig Juana M

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vaccinia virus, the prototype member of the family Poxviridae, was used extensively in the past as the Smallpox vaccine, and is currently considered as a candidate vector for new recombinant vaccines. Vaccinia virus has a wide host range, and is known to infect cultures of a variety of cell lines of mammalian origin. However, little is known about the virus tropism in human leukocyte populations. We report here that various cell types within leukocyte populations have widely different susceptibility to infection with vaccinia virus. Results We have investigated the ability of vaccinia virus to infect human PBLs by using virus recombinants expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP, and monoclonal antibodies specific for PBL subpopulations. Flow cytometry allowed the identification of infected cells within the PBL mixture 1–5 hours after infection. Antibody labeling revealed that different cell populations had very different infection rates. Monocytes showed the highest percentage of infected cells, followed by B lymphocytes and NK cells. In contrast to those cell types, the rate of infection of T lymphocytes was low. Comparison of vaccinia virus strains WR and MVA showed that both strains infected efficiently the monocyte population, although producing different expression levels. Our results suggest that MVA was less efficient than WR in infecting NK cells and B lymphocytes. Overall, both WR and MVA consistently showed a strong preference for the infection of non-T cells. Conclusions When infecting fresh human PBL preparations, vaccinia virus showed a strong bias towards the infection of monocytes, followed by B lymphocytes and NK cells. In contrast, very poor infection of T lymphocytes was detected. These finding may have important implications both in our understanding of poxvirus pathogenesis and in the development of improved smallpox vaccines.

  18. The jejunal cellular responses in chickens infected with a single dose of Ascaridia galli eggs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luna Olivares, Luz Adilia; Kyvsgaard, Niels Christian; Ferdushy, Tania

    2015-01-01

    This histopathological study was carried out in order to investigate the cellular response in the jejunum to Ascaridia galli during the first 7 weeks of infection. Fourty-two ISA Brown chickens (7 weeks old) were infected orally with 500 embryonated A. galli eggs each while 28 chickens were left...... to uninfected at 3, 7, 10, 14 and 28 dpi (P cells was high, but this high level of mast cells remained for a longer period in the infected group compared to the control group. Significantly higher counts were thus found in the infected group at 21 (P ..., A. galli larvae have elicited a moderate cellular response in the lamina propria, mainly consisting of eosinophils in the early phase and later of mast cells....

  19. Prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility of Listeria monocytogenes on chicken carcasses in Bandung, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiri, Yoni Darmawan; Gölz, Greta; Meeyam, Tongkorn; Baumann, Maximilian P O; Kleer, Josef; Chaisowwong, Warangkhana; Alter, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    This study was conducted to determine the prevalence and quantify the number of Listeria monocytogenes in fresh chicken carcasses sold in traditional markets and supermarkets in Bandung, West Java, Indonesia, and to determine the antimicrobial resistance patterns of the isolated L. monocytogenes strains. The overall prevalence of L. monocytogenes in chicken carcasses was 15.8% (29/184). When comparing samples from traditional markets and supermarkets, no significant difference in the L. monocytogenes prevalence was detectable (15.2 versus 16.3%). Of the samples, 97.3% had L. monocytogenes counts study were grouped into the molecular serogroup IIb, comprising the serovars 1/2b, 3b, and 7.

  20. Occurrence of Salmonella spp. in broiler chicken carcasses and their susceptibility to antimicrobial agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Dalila Angélica Moliterno; Ribeiro, Aldemir Reginato; Vasconcelos, Ana Mércia Mendes; Santos, Sylnei Barros; Silva, Juliana Vital Domingos; de Andrade, Patrícia Lúcia Arruda; de Arruda Falcão, Lúcia Sadae Pereira da Costa

    2009-01-01

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the occurrence of Salmonellae in broiler chicken carcasses and to determine the antimicrobial resistance profile of the isolated strains. Twenty-five out of the 260 broiler chicken carcasses samples (9.6%) were positive for Salmonella. S. Enteritidis was the most frequent serovar. Nineteen Salmonella isolates were tested for antimicrobial resistance, and the results indicated that 94.7% were resistant to at least one antimicrobial agent. Resistance to streptomycin (73.7%), nitrofurantoin (52.3%), tetracycline (31.6%), and nalidixic acid (21%) were the prevalent amongst Salmonella strains tested. PMID:24031401

  1. Susceptibility of nutria (Myocastor coypus to Trichinella infection: biological aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moretti A.

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Experimental infections with three different species of Trichinella in nutria in order to evaluate the susceptibility and the role of these rodents in the spreading of parasitosis in nature were carried out. The nutria is present in many italian wet areas and its distribution is expanding. The nutria meat is utilized as food in different countries and is retained responsible for trichinellosis in man. Two groups of ten animals were infected per os with 500 and 5,000 (n. 10 infective larvae of T. britovi; an additional study was arranged with two groups of animals infected with 5,000 larvae of T. spiralis and T. pseudospiralis, respectively. After 45 days, all animals were slaughtered and samples of different muscles were processed by standard artificial digestion and by routine histological methods. Serological investigations (specific IgG have been carried out on sera samples by employing a monoclonal blocking ELISA. The animals showed a significant susceptibility to the infection with all species of tested Trichinella and immunological reactivity. Data obtained are discussed.

  2. Human genetic susceptibility and infection with Leishmania peruviana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, M.A.; Davis, C.R.; Collins, A. [and others

    1995-11-01

    Racial differences, familial clustering, and murine studies are suggestive of host genetic control of Leishmania infections. Complex segregation analysis has been carried out by use of the programs POINTER and COMDS and data from a total population survey, comprising 636 nuclear families, from an L. perurviana endemic area. The data support genetic components controlling susceptibility to clinical leishmaniasis, influencing severity of disease and resistance to disease among healthy individuals. A multifactorial model is favored over a sporadic model. Two-locus models provided the best fit to the data, the optimal model being a recessive gene (frequency .57) plus a modifier locus. Individuals infected at an early age and with recurrent lesions are genetically more susceptible than those infected with a single episode of disease at a later age. Among people with no lesions, those with a positive skin-test response are genetically less susceptible than those with a negative response. The possibility of the involvement of more than one gene together with environmental effects has implications for the design of future linkage studies. 31 refs., 7 tabs.

  3. Establishment of six homozygous MHC-B haplotype populations associated with susceptibility to Marek's disease in Chinese specific pathogen-free BWEL chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Caixia; Han, Lingxia; Han, Jianlin; Liu, Jiasen; Jiang, Qian; Guo, Dongchun; Qu, Liandong

    2015-01-01

    The highly polymorphic chicken major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is associated with different levels of immunologic responses to certain avian pathogens. MHC-B haplotype chickens are an important genetic resource for studying the genetic determination of pathogen resistance and susceptibility. The BWEL chicken population is the only specific pathogen-free (SPF) chickens bred and developed by the State Center of Poultry Genetic Resources of Laboratory Animals in China. In this study, we successfully established six homozygous MHC-B haplotype populations from the BWEL chickens using microsatellite marker technology, named as BW/G(1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7) lines, and their molecular genotypes were matched to six serologically defined MHC-B haplotypes, B13, B15, B2, B5, B21 and B19, respectively. The sequences of BF genes exons 2 and 3 from four successive generations (F1-F4) of the BW/G(n) lines were completely consistent with those of serologically defined MHC-B haplotypes. Subsequently, six BW/G(n) line specific allo-antisera were prepared by immunization with red blood cells (RBCs) and hemagglutination tests results showed the BW/G(n) SPF chickens could be serologically differentiated. Additionally, susceptibility to Marek's disease (MD) in the BW/G3 (B2 haplotype) and BW/G7 (B19 haplotype) lines were determined by comparing mortality, macroscopic and histopathological lesions, and viral loads in feather pulp. The BW/G7 line showed greater genetic susceptibility to the very virulent MD virus (MDV) strain than the BW/G3 line. The establishment of MHC-B haplotype chicken populations associated with susceptibility to MD will be helpful for studying host immune responses and further developing the more effective vaccines in the context of MHC specificities, and they are also very useful for an understanding of MHC genes architecture and function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Haematological characteristics predicting susceptibility for ascites. 1. High carbon dioxide tensions in juvenile chickens.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheele, C.W.; Klis, van der J.D.; Kwakernaak, C.; Buys, N.; Decuypere, E.

    2003-01-01

    1. Male broilers of two different genetic stocks, a pure broiler sire line (A) and commercially available Ross broilers (B), were used to study the effect of haematological characteristics in juvenile chickens on the development of clinical ascitic signs. Production performance (body weight gain

  5. Local and systemic immune responses following infection of broiler-type chickens with avian Metapneumovirus subtypes A and B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rautenschlein, Silke; Aung, Ye Htut; Haase, Christine

    2011-03-15

    Infections with avian Metapneumovirus (aMPV) are often associated with swollen head syndrome in meat type chickens. Previous studies in turkeys have demonstrated that local humoral and cell-mediated immunity plays a role in aMPV-infection. Previous experimental and field observations indicated that the susceptibility of broilers and their immune reactions to aMPV may differ from turkeys. In the presented study local and systemic immune reactions of broilers were investigated after experimental infections with subtypes A and B aMPV of turkey origin. Both virus subtypes induced a mild respiratory disease. The recovery from respiratory signs correlated with the induction of local and systemic aMPV virus-neutralizing antibodies, which began to rise at 6 days post infection (dpi), when the peak of clinical signs was observed. In a different manner to the virus neutralizing (VN) and IgG-ELISA serum antibody titres, which showed high levels until the end of the experiments between 24 and 28 dpi, the specific IgA-ELISA and VN-antibody levels in tracheal washes decreased by 10 and 14 dpi, respectively, which may explain the recurring aMPV-infections in the field. Ex vivo cultured spleen cells from aMPV-infected broilers released at 3 and 6 dpi higher levels of IFN-γ after stimulation with Concanavalin A as compared to virus-free birds. In agreement with studies in turkeys, aMPV-infected broilers showed a clear CD4+ T cell accumulation in the Harderian gland (HG) at 6 dpi (P<0.05). In contrast to other investigations in turkeys aMPV-infected broilers showed an increase in the number of CD8alpha+ cells at 6 dpi compared to virus-free birds (P<0.05). The numbers of local B cells in the Harderian gland were not affected by the infection. Both aMPV A and B induced up-regulation of interferon (IFN)-γ mRNA-expression in the nasal turbinates, while in the Harderian gland only aMPV-A induced enhanced IFN-γ expression at 3 dpi. The differences in systemic and local T cell and

  6. Antibiotic Susceptibility and Molecular Screening of Class I Integron in Salmonella Isolates Recovered from Retail Raw Chicken Carcasses in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Zengfeng; Li, Keting; Wang, Yin; Xia, Xiaodong; Wang, Xin; Xi, Meili; Meng, Jianghong; Cui, Shenghui; Yang, Baowei

    2017-03-01

    Salmonella is one of the leading causes for foodborne diseases. Foods, particularly those of animal origin, act as an important role for Salmonella transmission. In this study, the antibiotic susceptibility of 743 Salmonella isolates recovered from retail raw chicken carcasses in eight provinces was tested, and the isolates were also screened for the presence of class I integron and drug-resistant gene cassettes. One hundred thirteen (15.21%) isolates were harboring class I integron. A higher percentage of integron-positive Salmonella isolates were found in retail chicken in Sichuan Province (29.33%), followed by Beijing (22.14%), Shaanxi (19.15%), Guangxi (14.13%), Henan (12.50%), Shanghai (7.25%), Fujian (8.22%), and Guangdong (6.25%) Provinces. The respective prevalence of class I integron in Salmonella isolates recovered from retail chickens in large, free, and small markets was 16.31%, 14.04%, and 15.27%. Moreover, 20.13%, 14.02%, and 13.74% of Salmonella isolates recovered from retail chickens stored in frozen, chilled, and ambient conditions, respectively, were positive for class I integron. Subsequent sequencing of class I integron revealed the presence of 10 gene cassettes harboring resistance genes (dfrA17-aadA5, dfrA17-aadA5, dfrA1-aadA1, dfrA12-aadA2, dfrA17-aadA5-aadA4, dfrA1-aadA1-aadA2, dfrA1, dfrA5, aadA2, aacA4-catB8-aadA1-dfrA1-(aac6-II)-(bla CARB -8), bla PSE-1 -bla P1 ). The most prevalent gene cassette was dfrA17-aadA5 (59.62%). Class I integron-positive isolates were significantly more resistant to multiple antibiotics, and they commonly exhibited corresponding antibiotic resistance profiles to the antibiotic resistance gene cassettes harbored in their class I integron. The results indicated that class I integron with different antibiotic resistance gene cassettes that were prevalent in Salmonella isolates differed from provinces, marketplaces, and chicken storage conditions.

  7. Emerging Chlamydia psittaci infections in the chicken industry and pathology of Chlamydia psittaci genotype B and D strains in specific pathogen free chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Lizi; Kalmar, Isabelle D; Lagae, Stefanie; Vandendriessche, Stien; Vanderhaeghen, Wannes; Butaye, Patrick; Cox, Eric; Vanrompay, Daisy

    2013-03-23

    Sera of 30 Belgian and 10 Northern French chicken farms were tested by a Chlamydia (C.) psittaci major outer membrane protein (MOMP) based ELISA. Ninety-six percent, 93% and 90% of the Belgian broilers, broiler breeders and layers were seropositive. Ninety-one percent of the French broilers were seropositive. In addition, tissues of 5 Belgian and 5 French broiler farms were examined at slaughter. All French farms were culture positive while C. psittaci was cultured from the lungs of 80% of examined Belgian farms. C. psittaci infections are apparently emerging in chickens raised in Belgium and Northern France. We could proof Hill-Evans postulates for chicken-derived C. psittaci genotype B and D strains. Chicken-processing plant employees should be considered a risk group for human psittacosis. There is a need for higher awareness and for efficient risk assessment and management of C. psittaci infections in chickens as chlamydiosis in broilers seems to be underdiagnosed and infections with highly virulent strains do occur. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Curcuma and Scutellaria plant extracts protect chickens against inflammation and Salmonella Enteritidis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varmuzova, Karolina; Matulova, Marta Elsheimer; Gerzova, Lenka; Cejkova, Darina; Gardan-Salmon, Delphine; Panhéleux, Marina; Robert, Fabrice; Sisak, Frantisek; Havlickova, Hana; Rychlik, Ivan

    2015-09-01

    After a ban on the use of antibiotics as growth promoters in farm animals in the European Union in 2006, an interest in alternative products with antibacterial or anti-inflammatory properties has increased. In this study, we therefore tested the effects of extracts from Curcuma longa and Scutellaria baicalensis used as feed additives against cecal inflammation induced by heat stress or Salmonella Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) infection in chickens. Curcuma extract alone was not enough to decrease gut inflammation induced by heat stress. However, a mixture of Curcuma and Scutellaria extracts used as feed additives decreased gut inflammation induced by heat or S. Enteritidis, decreased S. Enteritidis counts in the cecum but was of no negative effect on BW or humoral immune response. Using next-generation sequencing of 16S rRNA we found out that supplementation of feed with the 2 plant extracts had no effect on microbiota diversity. However, if the plant extract supplementation was provided to the chickens infected with S. Enteritidis, Faecalibacterium, and Lactobacillus, both bacterial genera with known positive effects on gut health were positively selected. The supplementation of chicken feed with extracts from Curcuma and Scutelleria thus may be used in poultry production to effectively decrease gut inflammation and increase chicken performance. © 2015 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  9. Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species Modulate Mosquito Susceptibility to Plasmodium Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Giselle A.; Andersen, John F.; Oliveira, Marcus F.; Oliveira, Pedro L.; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2012-01-01

    Background Mitochondria perform multiple roles in cell biology, acting as the site of aerobic energy-transducing pathways and as an important source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that modulate redox metabolism. Methodology/Principal Findings We demonstrate that a novel member of the mitochondrial transporter protein family, Anopheles gambiae mitochondrial carrier 1 (AgMC1), is required to maintain mitochondrial membrane potential in mosquito midgut cells and modulates epithelial responses to Plasmodium infection. AgMC1 silencing reduces mitochondrial membrane potential, resulting in increased proton-leak and uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation. These metabolic changes reduce midgut ROS generation and increase A. gambiae susceptibility to Plasmodium infection. Conclusion We provide direct experimental evidence indicating that ROS derived from mitochondria can modulate mosquito epithelial responses to Plasmodium infection. PMID:22815925

  10. Genetic susceptibility to HPV infection and cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciag P.C.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix (SCCC is one of the leading causes of death in developing countries. Infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV is the major risk factor to develop malignant lesions in the cervix. Polymorphisms of the MHC and p53 genes seem to influence the outcome of HPV infection and progression to SCCC, although controversial data have been reported. MHC are highly polymorphic genes that encode molecules involved in antigen presentation, playing a key role in immune regulation, while p53 is a tumor suppressor gene that regulates cell proliferation. The HPV E6 protein from high-risk types binds p53 and mediates its degradation by the ubiquitin pathway. The role of these polymorphisms in genetic susceptibility to HPV infection and to SCCC remains under investigation.

  11. Low dose chronic Schistosoma mansoni infection increases susceptibility to Mycobacterium bovis BCG infection in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elias, D; Akuffo, H; Thors, C

    2005-01-01

    bacilli in their organs and sustained greater lung pathology compared to Schistosoma uninfected controls. Moreover, Schistosoma infected mice show depressed mycobacterial antigen specific Th1 type responses. This is an indication that chronic worm infection could affect resistance....../susceptibility to mycobacterial infections by impairing mycobacteria antigen specific Th1 type responses. This finding is potentially important in the control of TB in helminth endemic parts of the world....

  12. Urinary tract infections: etiology and antimicrobial susceptibility of uropathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Laneve

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Urinary tract infections are a serious health problem affecting millions of people each year.They are the second most common type of infection in the body.The objective of study was to determine the etiology and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of urinary tract infections pathogens isolated in our Patology Clinic laboratory. Materials and Methods: During the period July 2007- July 2008,were analysed 1422 urine samples.The determination of the total microbe load were acquire with an kit of the BIO-DETECTOR while the identification of germs with Apy sistem. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were assaied with the ATB UR strip. Results: About the total of samples analysed, 320 (22% had significant bacteriuria. Escherichia coli was the most common etiologic agent isolated (62%, followed by Klebsiella ssp. (10%, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (5,95% and Proteus mirabilis (5%. Gram-positive bacteria accounted for only 7.32% , with prevalence of Staphylococcus ssp (5,32 and Enterococcus spp (2%. The most effective antibiotics for Gram- were: Imipenem, Amikacin, Ceftazidime and Cefotaxim, while for Gram+ were: Minocyclin,Vancomycin and Oxacillin. Conclusion: Escherichia coli was the microrganism more frequently isolated between Gram negative bacteria with very susceptible to Amoxicillin. Currently, the empirical use of Cotrimoxazole and Amoxicillin is not recommended for Enterobacteriaceae. Urinary tract infections are more common in women than in men. Men are more likely to get a UTI once past the age of 65. Current data on the prevalence of multidrug resistance among urinary tract isolates should be a consideration to change the current empiric treatment of IVU.

  13. Histopathological features of Marek’s disease infections in broiler chicken in Districts of Tasikmalaya and Ciamis West Java

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Damayanti

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available An outbreak of Marek’s disease was reported to occur in broiler chicken in Districts of Tasikmalaya and Ciamis. A total number of 58 tissues samples of broiler chicken were collected from 7 flocks of commercial broiler chicken farms in both Districts. The disease affected broiler chicken aged 17 to 24 days. Those chickens had been vaccinated to Newcastle Disease (ND and at age of 10 days had been vaccinated to Gumboro using blended bursa of fabricius. Tissue samples were fixed in 10% of buffered neutral formalin (BNF prior to haematoxilin and eosin (H and E stain using standard procedures. Histopathological features show that out of 58 samples, 32 (55.2% were infected by Marek’s Disease (19.0% were infected by Marek’s Disease, 20.1% were infected by Marek’s Disease and Gumboro, 16.1% Marek’s Disease and other infections, whereas 44.8% were infected by Gumboro alone or accompanied by other infections, ND and Colibasillosis. The study reveals that Marek’s Disease infection in broiler chicken tends to be mild i.e. infiltration of neoplastic cells (lymphoid, pleomorphic in proventriculus, intestine, spleen, livers and bursa of fabricius. In addition to this, there were mild non-supurative inflammation in heart, lung, peripheral nerve and brain, as well as a severe demyelination in brain. It is concluded that the histopthological features confirm the diagnosis of Marek’s Disease.

  14. Metabolic alterations in broiler chickens experimentally infected with sporulated oocysts of Eimeria maxima

    OpenAIRE

    Freitas,Fagner Luiz da Costa

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic and morphometric alterations of the duodenal villi caused by parasitism of chickens by Eimeria maxima were evaluated, using 100 male Cobb birds, randomly distributed into two groups (control and infected). The infected group was inoculated with 0.5 ml of a solution containing 5×103 sporulated oocysts of Eimeria maxima. Ten birds per sample were sacrificed on the 6th, 11th, 22nd and 41st days post-infection (dpi). In order to evaluate the alterations, samples of duodenum, jejunum and...

  15. Monitoring chicken flock behaviour provides early warning of infection by human pathogen Campylobacter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colles, Frances M; Cain, Russell J; Nickson, Thomas; Smith, Adrian L; Roberts, Stephen J; Maiden, Martin C J; Lunn, Daniel; Dawkins, Marian Stamp

    2016-01-13

    Campylobacter is the commonest bacterial cause of gastrointestinal infection in humans, and chicken meat is the major source of infection throughout the world. Strict and expensive on-farm biosecurity measures have been largely unsuccessful in controlling infection and are hampered by the time needed to analyse faecal samples, with the result that Campylobacter status is often known only after a flock has been processed. Our data demonstrate an alternative approach that monitors the behaviour of live chickens with cameras and analyses the 'optical flow' patterns made by flock movements. Campylobacter-free chicken flocks have higher mean and lower kurtosis of optical flow than those testing positive for Campylobacter by microbiological methods. We show that by monitoring behaviour in this way, flocks likely to become positive can be identified within the first 7-10 days of life, much earlier than conventional on-farm microbiological methods. This early warning has the potential to lead to a more targeted approach to Campylobacter control and also provides new insights into possible sources of infection that could transform the control of this globally important food-borne pathogen. © 2016 The Authors.

  16. Susceptibility of broiler chickens to coccidiosis when fed subclinical doses of deoxynivalenol and fumonisins – special emphasis on the immunological response and the mycotoxin interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) and fumonisins (FB) are the most frequently encountered mycotoxins produced by Fusarium species in livestock diets. The effect of subclinical doses of mycotoxins in chickens is largely unknown, and in particular the susceptibility of birds to pathogenic challenge when fed these ...

  17. A Susceptible Mouse Model for Zika Virus Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart D Dowall

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV is a mosquito-borne pathogen which has recently spread beyond Africa and into Pacific and South American regions. Despite first being detected in 1947, very little information is known about the virus, and its spread has been associated with increases in Guillain-Barre syndrome and microcephaly. There are currently no known vaccines or antivirals against ZIKV infection. Progress in assessing interventions will require the development of animal models to test efficacies; however, there are only limited reports on in vivo studies. The only susceptible murine models have involved intracerebral inoculations or juvenile animals, which do not replicate natural infection. Our report has studied the effect of ZIKV infection in type-I interferon receptor deficient (A129 mice and the parent strain (129Sv/Ev after subcutaneous challenge in the lower leg to mimic a mosquito bite. A129 mice developed severe symptoms with widespread viral RNA detection in the blood, brain, spleen, liver and ovaries. Histological changes were also striking in these animals. 129Sv/Ev mice developed no clinical symptoms or histological changes, despite viral RNA being detectable in the blood, spleen and ovaries, albeit at lower levels than those seen in A129 mice. Our results identify A129 mice as being highly susceptible to ZIKV and thus A129 mice represent a suitable, and urgently required, small animal model for the testing of vaccines and antivirals.

  18. Effect of low-pathogenicity influenza virus H3N8 infection on Mycoplasma gallisepticum infection of chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stipkovits, Laszlo; Egyed, Laszlo; Palfi, Vilmos; Beres, Andrea; Pitlik, Ervin; Somogyi, Maria; Szathmary, Susan; Denes, Bela

    2012-01-01

    Mycoplasma infection is still very common in chicken and turkey flocks. Several low-pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI) viruses are circulating in wild birds that can be easily transmitted to poultry flocks. However, the effect of LPAI on mycoplasma infection is not well understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the infection of LPAI virus H3N8 (A/mallard/Hungary/19616/07) in chickens challenged with Mycoplasma gallisepticum. Two groups of chickens were aerosol challenged with M. gallisepticum. Later one of these groups and one mycoplasma-free group were aerosol challenged with the LPAI H3N8 virus. The birds were observed for clinical signs for 8 days, then euthanized, and examined for the presence of M. gallisepticum in the trachea, lung, air sac, liver, spleen, kidney and heart, and for developing anti-mycoplasma and anti-viral antibodies. The LPAI H3N8 virus did not cause any clinical signs but M. gallisepticum infection caused clinical signs, reduction of body weight gain and colonization of the inner organs. These parameters were more severe in the birds co-infected with M. gallisepticum and LPAI H3N8 virus than in the group challenged with M. gallisepticum alone. In addition, in the birds infected with both M. gallisepticum and LPAI H3N8 virus, the anti-mycoplasma antibody response was reduced significantly when compared with the group challenged with M. gallisepticum alone. Co-infection with LPAI H3N8 virus thus enhanced pathogenesis of M. gallisepticum infection significantly.

  19. Antimicrobial susceptibility and molecular detection of chloramphenicol and florfenicol resistance among Escherichia coli isolates from diseased chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin-Sheng; Wang, Gui-Qin; Cui, Bao-An; Zhang, Su-Mei; Shen, Jian-Zhong

    2007-01-01

    Seventy Escherichia coli isolates recovered from diseased chickens diagnosed with colibacillosis in Henan Province, China, between 2004 and 2005 were characterized for antimicrobial susceptibility profiles via a broth doubling dilution method. Overall, the isolates displayed resistance to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (100%), oxytetracycline (100%), ampicillin (83%), enrofloxacin (83%), and ciprofloxacin (81%), respectively. Among the phenicols, resistance was approximately 79% and 29% for chloramphenicol and florfenicol, respectively. Molecular detection revealed that the incidence rates of the floR, cmlA, cat1, cat2 and cat3 were 29, 31, 16, 13, and 0%, respectively. Additionally, 10% of the isolates were positive for both floR and cmlA. As these antimicrobial agents may potentially induce cross-resistance between animal and human bacterial pathogens, their prudent use in veterinary medicine is highly recommended. PMID:17679770

  20. ANTIMICROBIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY PATTERN OF ORGANISMS CAUSING SURGICAL SITE INFECTIONS (SSI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohini Murlidhar Gajbhiye

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND CDC defines surgical site infection as ‘Infections related to operative procedure that occurs at or near surgical incision within 30 days of operative procedure or within one year if the implant is left in situ’. Surgical site infection (SSI is 3 rd most frequently reported nosocomial infection (12%-16% as per National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance (NNIS. The aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of organisms causing SSI. MATERIALS AND METHODS During a two year study period in a tertiary care hospital, 19,127 patients underwent surgeries in various surgical departments. Of these 517 (2.7% developed surgical site infection. The surgical wounds were classified by CDC & NNIS criteria into 4 classes. Two wound swabs were taken and processed by standard microbiological techniques. Antimicrobial susceptibility along with testing of ESBLs, MBLs, AmpCβ lactamases was done for all isolates causing SSI. RESULTS Among 19,127 patients, 517 (2.7% developed SSI. It was highest in patients of perforation peritonitis (11.99%.Among 517 specimens, 340 (65.76% showed growth and 177 (34.23% were culture negative. E.coli (23.33% was the commonest organism isolated followed by Acinetobacter spp. (16%, Klebsiella spp. (15.66%, Pseudomonas spp. (15.33%, S. aureus (10.33%, S. epidermidis(7.3%, Proteus spp. (6.00% and Citrobacter spp. (2.66%.Staphylococcus spp. were 100 % sensitive to Vancomycin & Linezolid. (27.5% S. aureus were MRSA and (17.5% were Inducible Clindamycin resistant (ICR. Enterobacteriaceae isolates showed maximum sensitivity towards Imipenem, Piperacillin-Tazobactam and Amikacin. Klebsiella spp. (40.62%, E.coli (35.89%, Citrobacter spp. (33.33%, Proteus spp. (26.08% were ESBL producers. Klebsiella spp. (17.18%, E.coli (10.25%, Proteus spp. (11.11% and Citrobacter spp. (8.69% were AmpC producers. Acinetobacter spp. (28.57% was commonest MBL producer followed by Klebsiella spp. (20

  1. Bioluminescent avian pathogenic Escherichia coli for monitoring colibacillosis in experimentally infected chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterik, Leon H; Tuntufye, Huruma N; Tsonos, Jessica; Luyten, Tom; Noppen, Sam; Liekens, Sandra; Lavigne, Rob; Butaye, Patrick; Goddeeris, Bruno M

    2016-10-01

    Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) are responsible for significant economic losses in the poultry industry. In this study, a model for investigating the pathogenesis of APEC infections was established. APEC strain CH2 (O78) was marked with the luciferase operon (luxCDABE) using a Tn7 transposon and tissues of experimentally infected chickens were analysed for a correlation between the bioluminescent signal and the number of bacteria. Transposition of the lux operon into the chromosome of the APEC isolate did not affect sensitivity to lytic bacteriophages and there was no effect on virulence in an intratracheal infection model in 1-day-old chicks, although results with a subcutaneous infection model were inconclusive. A correlation between the number of bacteria and the luminescent signal was found in liquid medium, as well as in homogenised heart, liver, spleen and lung of 4-week-old experimentally infected chickens. This study showed that lux could be used for identification of the infecting strain after experimental infection with APEC in poultry. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of a Campylobacter jejuni infection on the development of the intestinal microflora of broiler chickens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, C. H.; Friis-Holm, Lotte Bjerrum; Finster, K.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of a Campylobacter jejuni colonization on the development of the microflora of the cecum and the ileum of broiler chickens was studied using molecular methods. The infection did affect the development and complexity of the microbial Communities of the ceca, but we found no permanent ef....... Some of these DGGE bands could be affiliated with Lactobacillus reuteri, Clostridium perfringens, and the genus Klebsiella....

  3. The consequence of low mannose-binding lectin plasma concentration in relation to susceptibility to Salmonella Infantis in chickens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrich-Lynge, Sofie Louise; Dalgaard, Tina S.; Norup, Liselotte R.

    2015-01-01

    a significantly higher relative expression than L10L at days 1 and 41 pi, regardless of infection. Finally, flow cytometric analysis of whole blood from infected chickens showed that L10H had a significantly higher count of all assessed leucocyte subsets on day 5 pi, and also a higher count of monocytes on day 12...

  4. Transcriptional profiling of chicken immunity-related genes during infection with Avibacterium paragallinarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Charlotte E; Theron, Chrispian W; Jansen, Arina C; Bragg, Robert R

    2014-04-15

    Avibacterium paragallinarum is the causative agent of Infectious Coryza (IC), which is an upper respiratory tract disease in chickens. The occurrence of outbreaks has emphasized the significance of the disease globally in the chicken industry. Studies have demonstrated that early immune responses are critical in defining the severity and physiological outcome of an infection. This prompted the need to investigate the regulation of immune functions by the number of genes that are expressed during the chickens' response to A. paragallinarum serovar C3 insult. This study consisted of 15 male leghorn birds that were scored into groups (score 1, 2, 3) according to severity of symptoms after they were challenged. Expression patterns of immunity-related genes were followed as symptoms progressed from a disease score of 1 to 3. The data proposed that initial pathogen recognition was either through Toll-like receptors 2 or 4. Unique expression patterns were observed such as the up-regulation of TLR7 which recognizes viral-like particles. This substantiated the presence of prophages reported in the genome of A. paragallinarum. Significant down-regulation of metabolic pathways was observed, which led us to hypothesize that the host may rely on an oxidative stress response as initial immune response. The data sheds light onto the mechanisms that govern the immune system towards infection and/or towards the initial response to infections with highly virulent A. paragallinarum. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Immune Response of Chicken Gut to Natural Colonization by Gut Microflora and to Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crhanova, Magdalena; Hradecka, Helena; Faldynova, Marcela; Matulova, Marta; Havlickova, Hana; Sisak, Frantisek; Rychlik, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    In commercial poultry production, there is a lack of natural flora providers since chickens are hatched in the clean environment of a hatchery. Events occurring soon after hatching are therefore of particular importance, and that is why we were interested in the development of the gut microbial community, the immune response to natural microbial colonization, and the response to Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis infection as a function of chicken age. The complexity of chicken gut microbiota gradually increased from day 1 to day 19 of life and consisted of Proteobacteria and Firmicutes. For the first 3 days of life, chicken cecum was protected by increased expression of chicken β-defensins (i.e., gallinacins 1, 2, 4, and 6), expression of which dropped from day 4 of life. On the other hand, a transient increase in interleukin-8 (IL-8) and IL-17 expression could be observed in chicken cecum on day 4 of life, indicating physiological inflammation and maturation of the gut immune system. In agreement, the response of chickens infected with S. Enteritidis on days 1, 4, and 16 of life shifted from Th1 (characterized mainly by induction of gamma interferon [IFN-γ] and inducible nitric oxide synthase [iNOS]), observed in younger chickens, to Th17, observed in 16-day-old chickens (characterized mainly by IL-17 induction). Active modification of chicken gut microbiota in the future may accelerate or potentiate the maturation of the gut immune system and increase its resistance to infection with different pathogens. PMID:21555397

  6. Phase transition of the susceptible-infected-susceptible dynamics on time-varying configuration model networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Onge, Guillaume; Young, Jean-Gabriel; Laurence, Edward; Murphy, Charles; Dubé, Louis J.

    2018-02-01

    We present a degree-based theoretical framework to study the susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) dynamics on time-varying (rewired) configuration model networks. Using this framework on a given degree distribution, we provide a detailed analysis of the stationary state using the rewiring rate to explore the whole range of the time variation of the structure relative to that of the SIS process. This analysis is suitable for the characterization of the phase transition and leads to three main contributions: (1) We obtain a self-consistent expression for the absorbing-state threshold, able to capture both collective and hub activation. (2) We recover the predictions of a number of existing approaches as limiting cases of our analysis, providing thereby a unifying point of view for the SIS dynamics on random networks. (3) We obtain bounds for the critical exponents of a number of quantities in the stationary state. This allows us to reinterpret the concept of hub-dominated phase transition. Within our framework, it appears as a heterogeneous critical phenomenon: observables for different degree classes have a different scaling with the infection rate. This phenomenon is followed by the successive activation of the degree classes beyond the epidemic threshold.

  7. Speciation and susceptibility of Nocardia isolated from ocular infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, A K; Garg, P; Kaur, I

    2010-08-01

    Twenty Nocardia spp. isolated from ocular infections were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and susceptibility was determined using the E-test (AB Biodisk, Sweden). Species distribution among the 20 isolates was as follows: Nocardia levis (n = 7), Nocardia farcinica (n = 3), Nocardia abscessus (n = 2), Nocardia brasiliensis (n = 2), Nocardia amamiensis (n = 2), Nocardia puris (n = 1), Nocardia beijingensis (n = 1), Nocardia otitidiscaviarum (n = 1) and Nocardia thailandica (n = 1). All isolates were sensitive to amikacin. Eighteen (90%) isolates were sensitive to tobramycin, 11 (55%) to ciprofloxacin and gatifloxacin, and seven (35%) to azithromycin and clarithromycin. Molecular methods are useful for the identification and for the detection of Nocardia species that have not so far been reported in human infections.

  8. Early-life environment influencing susceptibility to cytomegalovirus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Laust Hvas; Maier, A B; Slagbom, P E

    2012-01-01

    genetically informative cohorts. From the Leiden Longevity Study (LLS) we selected long-lived sib-pairs (n=844) and their middle-aged offspring and the offspring's partners (n=1452). From the Longitudinal Study of Aging Danish Twins (LSADT) 604 (302 pairs) same-sex monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twins...... aged 73-94 years were included (n=302 pairs). Offspring of the long-lived LLS participants had significantly lower seroprevalence of CMV compared to their partners (offspring: 42% vs. partners: 51%, P=0·003). Of 372 offspring living with a CMV-positive partner, only 58% were infected. The corresponding...... number for partners was 71% (Penvironment accounts for the similarity within twin pairs. Our findings suggest that susceptibility to CMV infection...

  9. Quantitation of Marek's disease and chicken anemia viruses in organs of experimentally infected chickens and commercial chickens by multiplex real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Irit; Raibshtein, I; Al-Touri, A

    2013-06-01

    The worldwide distribution of chicken anemia virus (CAV) and Marek's disease virus (MDV) is well documented. In addition to their economic significance in single- or dual-virus infections, the two viruses can often accompany various other pathogens and affect poultry health either directly, by causing tumors, anemia, and delayed growth, or indirectly, by aggravating other diseases, as a result of their immunosuppressive effects. After a decade of employing the molecular diagnosis of those viruses, which replaced conventional virus isolation, we present the development of a real-time multiplex PCR for the simultaneous detection of both viruses. The real-time PCRs for MDV and for CAV alone are more sensitive than the respective end-point PCRs. In addition, the multiplex real-time shows a similar sensitivity when compared to the single real-time PCR for each virus. The newly developed real-time multiplex PCR is of importance in terms of the diagnosis and detection of low copies of each virus, MDV and CAV in single- and in multiple-virus infections, and its applicability will be further evaluated.

  10. Yellow Fever 17DD Vaccine Virus Infection Causes Detectable Changes in Chicken Embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manso, Pedro Paulo de Abreu; Dias de Oliveira, Barbara C. E. P.; de Sequeira, Patrícia Carvalho; Maia de Souza, Yuli Rodrigues; Ferro, Jessica Maria dos Santos; da Silva, Igor José; Caputo, Luzia Fátima Gonçalves; Guedes, Priscila Tavares; dos Santos, Alexandre Araujo Cunha; Freire, Marcos da Silva; Bonaldo, Myrna Cristina; Pelajo-Machado, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    The yellow fever (YF) 17D vaccine is one of the most effective human vaccines ever created. The YF vaccine has been produced since 1937 in embryonated chicken eggs inoculated with the YF 17D virus. Yet, little information is available about the infection mechanism of YF 17DD virus in this biological model. To better understand this mechanism, we infected embryos of Gallus gallus domesticus and analyzed their histopathology after 72 hours of YF infection. Some embryos showed few apoptotic bodies in infected tissues, suggesting mild focal infection processes. Confocal and super-resolution microscopic analysis allowed us to identify as targets of viral infection: skeletal muscle cells, cardiomyocytes, nervous system cells, renal tubular epithelium, lung parenchyma, and fibroblasts associated with connective tissue in the perichondrium and dermis. The virus replication was heaviest in muscle tissues. In all of these specimens, RT-PCR methods confirmed the presence of replicative intermediate and genomic YF RNA. This clearer characterization of cell targets in chicken embryos paves the way for future development of a new YF vaccine based on a new cell culture system. PMID:26371874

  11. Susceptibility of Broiler Chickens to Coccidiosis When Fed Subclinical Doses of Deoxynivalenol and Fumonisins—Special Emphasis on the Immunological Response and the Mycotoxin Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenier, Bertrand; Dohnal, Ilse; Shanmugasundaram, Revathi; Eicher, Susan D.; Selvaraj, Ramesh K.; Schatzmayr, Gerd; Applegate, Todd J.

    2016-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) and fumonisins (FB) are the most frequently encountered mycotoxins produced by Fusarium species in livestock diets. The effect of subclinical doses of mycotoxins in chickens is largely unknown, and in particular the susceptibility of birds to pathogenic challenge when fed these fungal metabolites. Therefore, the present study reports the effects of DON and FB on chickens challenged with Eimeria spp, responsible for coccidiosis. Broilers were fed diets from hatch to day 20, containing no mycotoxins, 1.5 mg DON/kg, 20 mg FB/kg, or both toxins (12 pens/diet; 7 birds/pen). At day 14, six pens of birds per diet (half of the birds) were challenged with a 25×-recommended dose of coccidial vaccine, and all birds (challenged and unchallenged) were sampled 6 days later. As expected, performance of birds was strongly affected by the coccidial challenge. Ingestion of mycotoxins did not further affect the growth but repartitioned the rate of reduction (between the fraction due to the change in maintenance and feed efficiency), and reduced apparent nitrogen digestibility. Intestinal lesions and number of oocysts in the jejunal mucosa and feces of challenged birds were more frequent and intense in the birds fed mycotoxins than in birds fed control feed. The upregulation of cytokines (interleukin (IL) IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10) following coccidial infection was higher in the jejunum of birds fed mycotoxins. Further, the higher intestinal immune response was associated with a higher percentage of T lymphocytes CD4+CD25+, also called Tregs, observed in the cecal tonsils of challenged birds fed mycotoxins. Interestingly, the increase in FB biomarker of exposure (sphinganine/sphingosine ratio in serum and liver) suggested a higher absorption and bioavailability of FB in challenged birds. The interaction of DON and FB was very dependent on the endpoint assessed, with three endpoints reporting antagonism, nine additivity, and two synergism. In conclusion

  12. Susceptibility of Broiler Chickens to Coccidiosis When Fed Subclinical Doses of Deoxynivalenol and Fumonisins-Special Emphasis on the Immunological Response and the Mycotoxin Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenier, Bertrand; Dohnal, Ilse; Shanmugasundaram, Revathi; Eicher, Susan D; Selvaraj, Ramesh K; Schatzmayr, Gerd; Applegate, Todd J

    2016-07-27

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) and fumonisins (FB) are the most frequently encountered mycotoxins produced by Fusarium species in livestock diets. The effect of subclinical doses of mycotoxins in chickens is largely unknown, and in particular the susceptibility of birds to pathogenic challenge when fed these fungal metabolites. Therefore, the present study reports the effects of DON and FB on chickens challenged with Eimeria spp, responsible for coccidiosis. Broilers were fed diets from hatch to day 20, containing no mycotoxins, 1.5 mg DON/kg, 20 mg FB/kg, or both toxins (12 pens/diet; 7 birds/pen). At day 14, six pens of birds per diet (half of the birds) were challenged with a 25×-recommended dose of coccidial vaccine, and all birds (challenged and unchallenged) were sampled 6 days later. As expected, performance of birds was strongly affected by the coccidial challenge. Ingestion of mycotoxins did not further affect the growth but repartitioned the rate of reduction (between the fraction due to the change in maintenance and feed efficiency), and reduced apparent nitrogen digestibility. Intestinal lesions and number of oocysts in the jejunal mucosa and feces of challenged birds were more frequent and intense in the birds fed mycotoxins than in birds fed control feed. The upregulation of cytokines (interleukin (IL) IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10) following coccidial infection was higher in the jejunum of birds fed mycotoxins. Further, the higher intestinal immune response was associated with a higher percentage of T lymphocytes CD4⁺CD25⁺, also called Tregs, observed in the cecal tonsils of challenged birds fed mycotoxins. Interestingly, the increase in FB biomarker of exposure (sphinganine/sphingosine ratio in serum and liver) suggested a higher absorption and bioavailability of FB in challenged birds. The interaction of DON and FB was very dependent on the endpoint assessed, with three endpoints reporting antagonism, nine additivity, and two synergism. In conclusion

  13. Susceptibility of Broiler Chickens to Coccidiosis When Fed Subclinical Doses of Deoxynivalenol and Fumonisins—Special Emphasis on the Immunological Response and the Mycotoxin Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand Grenier

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Deoxynivalenol (DON and fumonisins (FB are the most frequently encountered mycotoxins produced by Fusarium species in livestock diets. The effect of subclinical doses of mycotoxins in chickens is largely unknown, and in particular the susceptibility of birds to pathogenic challenge when fed these fungal metabolites. Therefore, the present study reports the effects of DON and FB on chickens challenged with Eimeria spp, responsible for coccidiosis. Broilers were fed diets from hatch to day 20, containing no mycotoxins, 1.5 mg DON/kg, 20 mg FB/kg, or both toxins (12 pens/diet; 7 birds/pen. At day 14, six pens of birds per diet (half of the birds were challenged with a 25×-recommended dose of coccidial vaccine, and all birds (challenged and unchallenged were sampled 6 days later. As expected, performance of birds was strongly affected by the coccidial challenge. Ingestion of mycotoxins did not further affect the growth but repartitioned the rate of reduction (between the fraction due to the change in maintenance and feed efficiency, and reduced apparent nitrogen digestibility. Intestinal lesions and number of oocysts in the jejunal mucosa and feces of challenged birds were more frequent and intense in the birds fed mycotoxins than in birds fed control feed. The upregulation of cytokines (interleukin (IL IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10 following coccidial infection was higher in the jejunum of birds fed mycotoxins. Further, the higher intestinal immune response was associated with a higher percentage of T lymphocytes CD4+CD25+, also called Tregs, observed in the cecal tonsils of challenged birds fed mycotoxins. Interestingly, the increase in FB biomarker of exposure (sphinganine/sphingosine ratio in serum and liver suggested a higher absorption and bioavailability of FB in challenged birds. The interaction of DON and FB was very dependent on the endpoint assessed, with three endpoints reporting antagonism, nine additivity, and two synergism. In

  14. Reactivating dynamics for the susceptible-infected-susceptible model: a simple method to simulate the absorbing phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo-Filho, A.; Alves, G. A.; Costa Filho, R. N.; Alves, T. F. A.

    2018-04-01

    We investigated the susceptible-infected-susceptible model on a square lattice in the presence of a conjugated field based on recently proposed reactivating dynamics. Reactivating dynamics consists of reactivating the infection by adding one infected site, chosen randomly when the infection dies out, avoiding the dynamics being trapped in the absorbing state. We show that the reactivating dynamics can be interpreted as the usual dynamics performed in the presence of an effective conjugated field, named the reactivating field. The reactivating field scales as the inverse of the lattice number of vertices n, which vanishes at the thermodynamic limit and does not affect any scaling properties including ones related to the conjugated field.

  15. In vitro antifungal susceptibility of Malassezia furfur from bloodstream infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iatta, Roberta; Figueredo, Luciana A; Montagna, Maria Teresa; Otranto, Domenico; Cafarchia, Claudia

    2014-11-01

    Fungaemia caused by Malassezia spp. in hospitalized patients requires prompt and appropriate therapy, but standard methods for the definition of the in vitro antifungal susceptibility have not been established yet. In this study, the in vitro susceptibility of Malassezia furfur from bloodstream infections (BSIs) to amphotericin B (AMB), fluconazole (FLC), itraconazole (ITC), posaconazole (POS) and voriconazole (VRC) was assessed using the broth microdilution (BMD) method of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) with different media such as modified Sabouraud dextrose broth (SDB), RPMI and Christensen's urea broth (CUB). Optimal broth media that allow sufficient growth of M. furfur, and produce reliable and reproducible MICs using the CLSI BMD protocol were assessed. Thirty-six M. furfur isolates collected from BSIs of patients before and during AMB therapy, and receiving FLC prophylaxis, were tested. A good growth of M. furfur was observed in RPMI, CUB and SDB at 32 °C for 48 and 72 h. No statistically significant differences were detected between the MIC values registered after 48 and 72 h incubation. ITC, POS and VRC displayed lower MICs than FLC and AMB. These last two antifungal drugs showed higher and lower MICs, respectively, when the isolates were tested in SDB. SDB is the only medium in which it is possible to detect isolates with high FLC MICs in patients receiving FLC prophylaxis. A large number of isolates showed high AMB MIC values regardless of the media used. In conclusion, SDB might be suitable to determine triazole susceptibility. However, the media, the drug formulation or the breakpoints herein applied might not be useful for assessing the AMB susceptibility of M. furfur from BSIs. © 2014 The Authors.

  16. Identification and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of Pasteurella multocida isolated from chickens and japanese quails in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everlon Cid Rigobelo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A study was performed to verify the presence of Pasteurella multocida in eight different poultry groups of 90 birds each. Groups I to IV were chickens (I being > 6 weeks of age with a history of respiratory illness, II > 6 weeks of age and free of respiratory illness, III < 6 weeks of age with respiratory illness and IV being < 6 weeks of age and with no respiratory illness. Groups V to VIII had the matching characteristics of Groups I to V but consisted of Japanese Quails. The P. multocida isolation rate from the groups was as follows; Group I 56/90 (62.3% Group II 18/90 (20.0%, Group III 12/90 (13.3%, Group IV 3/90 (3.33%, Group V 8/90 (8.88%, Group VI 2/90 (2.22% Group VII 2/90 (2.22% and Group VIII 1/90 (1.11%. These isolation rates were not significantly different within the groups of a bird type but the overall chicken isolation rate was significantly higher than the quail isolation rate (p < 0.01. All isolates were examined for their sensitivity to four antimicrobial agents. The results showed only low levels of resistance to the agents tested. The highest level of resistance detected was to cephalothin (5.1% of isolates followed by amikacin (3.4%.

  17. Haematology of infectious bursal disease virus infected chickens on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Garlic (Allium sativum) is an herbal spice proven to posses antimicrobial and immunostimulating properties which could be useful in the control of endemic diseases of poultry such as infectious bursal disease (IBD). Its effect on IBD virus infection was therefore investigated via haematological assessment. One hundred and ...

  18. Changes of host DNA methylation in domestic chickens infected with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cytosine methylation is an effectiveway to modulate gene transcription.However, very little is knownabout the epigenetic changes in the host that is infected with Salmonella enterica. In this study, we usedmethylatedDNA immunoprecipitation sequencing to analyse the genomewide DNA methylation changes in domestic ...

  19. Changes of host DNA methylation in domestic chickens infected with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    FEI WANG

    2017-09-15

    Sep 15, 2017 ... Abstract. Cytosine methylation is an effective way to modulate gene transcription. However, very little is known about the epigenetic changes in the host that is infected with Salmonella enterica. In this study, we used methylated DNA immunoprecipitation sequencing to analyse the genomewide DNA ...

  20. Dietary Curcuma longa enhances resistance against Eimeria maxima and Eimeria tenella infections in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Duk Kyung; Lillehoj, Hyun S; Lee, Sung Hyen; Jang, Seung I; Lillehoj, Erik P; Bravo, David

    2013-10-01

    The effects of dietary supplementation with an organic extract of Curcuma longa on systemic and local immune responses to experimental Eimeria maxima and Eimeria tenella infections were evaluated in commercial broiler chickens. Dietary supplementation with C. longa enhanced coccidiosis resistance as demonstrated by increased BW gains, reduced fecal oocyst shedding, and decreased gut lesions compared with infected birds fed a nonsupplemented control diet. The chickens fed C. longa-supplemented diet showed enhanced systemic humoral immunity, as assessed by greater levels of serum antibodies to an Eimeria microneme protein, MIC2, and enhanced cellular immunity, as measured by concanavalin A-induced spleen cell proliferation, compared with controls. At the intestinal level, genome-wide gene expression profiling by microarray hybridization identified 601 differentially expressed transcripts (287 upregulated, 314 downregulated) in gut lymphocytes of C. longa-fed chickens compared with nonsupplemented controls. Based on the known functions of the corresponding mammalian genes, the C. longa-induced intestinal transcriptome was mostly associated with genes mediating anti-inflammatory effects. Taken together, these results suggest that dietary C. longa could be used to attenuate Eimeria-induced, inflammation-mediated gut damage in commercial poultry production.

  1. The Prevalence of Toxoplasma Infection among Free-Ranging Chickens in Southern Iran Using IFA and Nested-PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GhR Hatam

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: As consumption of chicken meat may be as one of the sources of human infection, this study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of T. gondii in farm chickens (Gallus gallus domesti­cus in Shiraz, southern Iran. "nMethods: Two hundred and thirty one blood samples were collected from farm chickens by a cluster ran­dom sampling method and tested for toxoplasmosis by indirect fluorescent antibody technique (IFAT. The samples of the brain, heart, and liver of the chickens were tested by a Nested PCR method. The re­sults were analyzed by SPSS software using Chi-Square test and a P value <0.05 was considered statically sig­nificant. "nResults: Out of 58 seropositive chickens, 29 (1:16 in eight, 1:32 in 14, 1:64 in five and 1:128 in two birds and out of seronegative chickens, three were enrolled in the study. The most infected tissue was liver (27 out of 29 and the lowest was the heart (16 out of 29 (α=0.05, P=0.002. None of the seronegative chick­ens was positive in PCR method. Only 2 out of 8 cases with a titer of 1:16 (as cut off point were negative in PCR method whereas the remained were positive. "nConclusion: Based on cultural and food habits in our area, the meat and viscera of chicken may be impor­tant sources of infection in human when consuming semi-cooked meats. Considering the high prevalence of toxoplasmosis in chickens, standards in chicken breeding, education of environmental health personnel and standardization for preparation and handling techniques are required by Health and Veterinary organizations.

  2. Risk factors for Campylobacter infection in Danish broiler chickens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chowdhury, S; Sandberg, M; Themudo, Goncalo Espregueira Cruz

    2012-01-01

    Data from the Quality Assurance System in Danish Broiler Production (KIK system) were analyzed to identify within farm biosecurity- and management-related risk factors for Campylobacter infection in Danish broiler flocks. In the study, data from 2,835 flocks originating from 187 farms in the time...... period of December 2009 to November 2010 were included. The PCR test results of fecal samples collected on socks revealed that 14% of the Danish broiler flocks were positive to Campylobacter during the study period. Of the positive flocks, 55% were positive during summer time and the positive flocks...... during summer time were related to areas where clustering of infected farms was identified in previous conducted studies. The median number of people working in or entering broiler houses was 2 (from 1 to 7). The median slaughter age of Danish broiler flocks was 35 d (from 31–61 d). A multivariable...

  3. Detection of Natural Toxoplasma gondii Infection in Chicken in Thika Region of Kenya Using Nested Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanja, Simon Muturi; Ngotho, Maina; Kamau, David Muchina; Njuguna, Adele Nyambura

    2016-01-01

    The detection of Toxoplasma gondii in free-range chickens is a good indicator of possible risk to human beings. The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of T. gondii in free-range chicken using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Brain samples from 105 free-range chickens from three administrative areas in Thika region, Kenya, were collected, DNA-extracted, and analyzed using PCR to detect presence of T. gondii. The overall prevalence of T. gondii in all the three areas was 79.0% (95% CI: 70.0–86.4%) and the prevalence across the three areas was not significantly different (P = 0.5088; χ 2 = 1.354). Female chickens had higher (79.4%) prevalence than males (78.6%), although the difference was not significant (P = 0.922, χ 2 = 0.01). However, chickens that were more than 2 years old had significantly (P = 0.003; χ 2 = 11.87) higher prevalence compared to younger ones. The study indicates that there was a high occurrence of T. gondii infection in free-range chickens from Thika region and that the infection rate is age dependent. Further studies should be carried out to determine the possible role of roaming chickens in the epidemiology of the disease among humans in the area. PMID:27981052

  4. Detection of Natural Toxoplasma gondii Infection in Chicken in Thika Region of Kenya Using Nested Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Mokua Mose

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The detection of Toxoplasma gondii in free-range chickens is a good indicator of possible risk to human beings. The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of T. gondii in free-range chicken using polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Brain samples from 105 free-range chickens from three administrative areas in Thika region, Kenya, were collected, DNA-extracted, and analyzed using PCR to detect presence of T. gondii. The overall prevalence of T. gondii in all the three areas was 79.0% (95% CI: 70.0–86.4% and the prevalence across the three areas was not significantly different (P=0.5088; χ2=1.354. Female chickens had higher (79.4% prevalence than males (78.6%, although the difference was not significant (P=0.922, χ2 = 0.01. However, chickens that were more than 2 years old had significantly (P=0.003; χ2 = 11.87 higher prevalence compared to younger ones. The study indicates that there was a high occurrence of T. gondii infection in free-range chickens from Thika region and that the infection rate is age dependent. Further studies should be carried out to determine the possible role of roaming chickens in the epidemiology of the disease among humans in the area.

  5. Differential modulation of avian β-defensin and Toll-like receptor expression in chickens infected with infectious bronchitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yang; Zhang, Tingting; Xu, Qianqian; Han, Zongxi; Liang, Shuling; Shao, Yuhao; Ma, Deying; Liu, Shengwang

    2015-11-01

    The host innate immune response either clears invading viruses or allows the adaptive immune system to establish an effective antiviral response. In this study, both pathogenic (passage 3, P3) and attenuated (P110) infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) strains were used to study the immune responses of chicken to IBV infection. Expression of avian β-defensins (AvBDs) and Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in 16 tissues of chicken were compared at 7 days PI. The results showed that P3 infection upregulated the expression of AvBDs, including AvBD2, 4, 5, 6, 9, and 12, while P110 infection downregulated the expression of AvBDs, including AvBD3, 4, 5, 6, and 9 in most tissues. Meanwhile, the expression level of several TLRs showed a general trend of upregulation in the tissues of P3-infected chickens, while they were downregulated in the tissues of P110-infected chickens. The result suggested that compared with the P110 strain, the P3 strain induced a more pronounced host innate immune response. Furthermore, we observed that recombinant AvBDs (including 2, 6, and 12) demonstrated obvious anti-viral activity against IBV in vitro. Our findings contribute to the proposal that IBV infection induces an increase in the messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of some AvBDs and TLRs, which suggests that AvBDs may play significant roles in the resistance of chickens to IBV replication.

  6. Expression of endogenous ALV antigens and susceptibility to subgroup E ALV in three strains of chickens (Endogenous avian C. type virus)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, H.L.; Lamoreux, W.F.

    1976-01-01

    Cells from three strains of Kimber Farms chickens, K16, K18, and K28, have been characterized for the expression of endogenous avian C-type virus (ALV) antigens and for susceptibility to subgroup E ALV. In K16 the coordinate dominant expression of chick helper factor (chf ), the type specific antigen of endogenous subgroup E ALV, and the group specific (gs) antigen of ALV was observed. The expression of chf and gs antigen in K16 chf + gs + cells was similar to that observed in SPAFAS and H and N gs + cells. In K18 chf but not gs antigen was expressed. The expression of chf in K18 chf + gs + cells was distinct from that observed for the chf + gs + pedigrees but similar to that found in SPAFAS chf + gs - helper extremely high (h/sub E/) cells. Cells from K16 and K18 chickens were uniformly resistant to subgroup E ALV. In cells from K28 chickens, susceptibility to subgroup B virus correlated with susceptibility to subgroup E virus. The efficiency of plating of subgroup E virus on susceptible K28 cells with 10 3 --10 4 -fold lower on chf + cells than on chf - cells

  7. Susceptibility of broiler chickens to hemorrhages in muscles: The effect of stock and rearing temperature regimen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kranen, R.W.; Scheele, C.W.; Veerkamp, C.H.; Lambooy, E.; Kuppevelt, van T.H.; Veerkamp, J.H.

    1998-01-01

    In this study, the effect of genetic constitution (stock) and rearing temperature on the occurrence of hemorrhages in thighs and breasts of water bath stunned broilers was investigated. Particular attention was given to the relation between the susceptibility for hemorrhages, body composition, and

  8. Major Histocompatibility Complex and Background Genes in Chickens Influence Susceptibility to High Pathogenicity Avian Influenza Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chicken’s major histocompatibility complex (MHC) haplotype has profound influence on the resistance or susceptibility to certain pathogens such as B21 MHC haplotype confers resistance to Marek’s disease (MD). However, non-MHC genes are also important in disease resistance. For example, both line...

  9. The chicken as a natural model for extraintestinal infections caused by avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antão, Esther-Maria; Glodde, Susanne; Li, Ganwu; Sharifi, Reza; Homeier, Timo; Laturnus, Claudia; Diehl, Ines; Bethe, Astrid; Philipp, Hans-C; Preisinger, Rudolf; Wieler, Lothar H; Ewers, Christa

    2008-01-01

    E. coli infections in avian species have become an economic threat to the poultry industry worldwide. Several factors have been associated with the virulence of E. coli in avian hosts, but no specific virulence gene has been identified as being entirely responsible for the pathogenicity of avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC). Needless to say, the chicken would serve as the best model organism for unravelling the pathogenic mechanisms of APEC, an extraintestinal pathogen. Five-week-old white leghorn SPF chickens were infected intra-tracheally with a well characterized APEC field strain IMT5155 (O2:K1:H5) using different doses corresponding to the respective models of infection established, that is, the lung colonization model allowing re-isolation of bacteria only from the lung but not from other internal organs, and the systemic infection model. These two models represent the crucial steps in the pathogenesis of APEC infections, including the colonization of the lung epithelium and the spread of bacteria throughout the bloodstream. The read-out system includes a clinical score, pathomorphological changes and bacterial load determination. The lung colonization model has been established and described for the first time in this study, in addition to a comprehensive account of a systemic infection model which enables the study of severe extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) infections. These in vivo models enable the application of various molecular approaches to study host-pathogen interactions more closely. The most important application of such genetic manipulation techniques is the identification of genes required for extraintestinal virulence, as well as host genes involved in immunity in vivo. The knowledge obtained from these studies serves the dual purpose of shedding light on the nature of virulence itself, as well as providing a route for rational attenuation of the pathogen for vaccine construction, a measure by which extraintestinal infections, including

  10. ALV-J infection induces chicken monocyte death accompanied with the production of IL-1β and IL-18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Manman; Feng, Min; Xie, Tingting; Li, Yuanfang; Ruan, Zhuohao; Shi, Meiqing; Liao, Ming; Zhang, Xiquan

    2017-11-21

    Immunosuppression induced by avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) causes serious reproduction problems and secondary infections in chickens. Given that monocytes are important precursors of immune cells including macrophages and dendritic cells, we investigated the fate of chicken monocytes after ALV-J infection. Our results indicated that most monocytes infected with ALV-J including field or laboratory strains could not successfully differentiate into macrophages due to cells death. And cells death was dependent upon viral titer and accompanied with increased IL-1β and IL-18 mRNA levels. In addition, ALV-J infection up-regulated caspase-1 and caspase-3 activity in monocytes. Collectively, we found that ALV-J could cause cell death in chicken monocytes, especially pyroptosis, which may be a significant reason for ALV-J induced immunosuppression.

  11. Chicken pox infection in patients undergoing chemotherapy: A retrospective analysis from a tertiary care center in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noronha, Vanita; Ostwal, Vikas; Ramaswamy, Anant; Joshi, Amit; Nair, Reena; Banavali, Shripad D; Prabhash, Kumar

    There is paucity of data on the incidence, severity and management of chicken pox in patients receiving active chemotherapy for cancer. From October 2010 to October 2011, patients were included in this study if they developed a chicken pox infection during their chemotherapy. The details of patients' cancer diagnosis and treatment along with clinical and epidemiological data of the chicken pox infections were assessed from a prospectively maintained database. Twenty-four patients had a chicken pox infection while receiving chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. The median age of the patients was 21 years, and two-thirds of the patients had solid tumor malignancies. Overall, eight (33%) patients had complications, six (25%) patients had febrile neutropenia, four (17%) had diarrhea/mucositis, and four (17%) had pneumonia. The median time for recovery of the infection and complications in the patients was 9.5 days (5-29 days), whereas for neutropenic patients, it was 6.5 days (3-14 days). The median time for recovery from chicken pox infections in neutropenic patients was 10 days (5-21 days), compared with 8.5 days (0-29 days) in non-neutropenic patients (P=0.84). The median time for recovery from infections was 8.5 days in patients with comorbidities (N=4), which was the same for patients with no comorbidities. The clinical presentation and complication rates of chicken pox in cancer patients, who were on active chemotherapy, are similar to the normal population. The recovery from a varicella infection and complications may be delayed in patients with neutropenia. The varicella infection causes a therapy delay in 70% of patients. Aggressive antiviral therapy, supportive care and isolation of the index cases remain the backbone of treatment. Copyright © 2016 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Immunohistochemical examination of plexiform-like complex vascular lesions in the lungs of broiler chickens selected for susceptibility to idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamal, Krishna R; Erf, Gisela F; Anthony, Nicholas B; Wideman, Robert F

    2012-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) is a disease of unknown cause that is characterized by elevated pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance, and by extensive vascular remodelling. In human IPAH patients, remodelling of the pulmonary vasculature results in the formation of plexiform lesions in the terminal pulmonary arterioles. Various molecules are expressed in the human plexiform lesions, including alpha smooth muscle actin, von Willebrand factor, vascular endothelial growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor type 2, hypoxia inducible factor-1α, survivin, tenascin, collagen, fibronectin, and various immune/inflammatory cells such as, cytotoxic lymphocytes, B lymphocytes, MHC class II cells, and monocytes/macrophages are also present. Plexiform lesions rarely develop in the lungs of laboratory animals, but plexiform-like complex vascular lesions (CVL) do develop spontaneously in the lungs of broiler chickens from an IPAH-susceptible line. To examine angioproliferative and immune-system-related activities associated with CVL in broiler lungs, paraformaldehyde-fixed, paraffin-embedded lung sections from 8-week-old to 24-week-old broiler chickens were stained immunohistochemically using monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies specific for angioproliferative molecules and immune/inflammatory cells. The CVL in the lungs of broiler chickens exhibited positive staining for both angioproliferative molecules and immune/inflammatory cells. These observations combined with the close histological resemblance of broiler CVL to the plexiform lesions of human IPAH patients further validates chickens from our IPAH-susceptible line as an excellent animal model of spontaneous plexogenic arteriopathy.

  13. Experimental infection of chicken embryos with recently described Brucella microti: Pathogenicity and pathological findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wareth, Gamal; Böttcher, Denny; Melzer, Falk; Shehata, Awad Ali; Roesler, Uwe; Neubauer, Heinrich; Schoon, Heinz-Adolf

    2015-08-01

    Brucellae are facultative intracellular pathogens causing disease in a wide range of domestic and wild animals as well as in humans. Brucella (B.) microti is a recently recognized species and was isolated from common voles (Microtus arvalis), red foxes and soil in Austria and the Czech Republic. Its pathogenicity for livestock and its zoonotic potential has not been confirmed yet. In the present study 25 SPF chicken embryos were inoculated at day 11 of age with 1.6×10(3) and 1.6×10(5)B. microti by yolk sac and allantoic sac routes. Re-isolation of B. microti indicated rapid multiplication of bacteria (up to 1.7×10(12)CFU). B. microti provoked marked gross lesions, i.e. hemorrhages and necroses. All inoculated embryos were dead (100% mortality) in between 2nd and 4th day post inoculation. The predominant histopathological lesion was necroses in liver, kidneys, lungs, spleen, gastrointestinal tract, spinal meninges, yolk sac and chorioallantoic membrane. Immunohistochemical examination showed the presence of Brucella antigen in nearly all of these organs, with infection being mainly restricted to non-epithelial cells or tissues. This study provides the first results on the multiplication and pathogenicity of the mouse pathogenic B. microti in chicken embryos. These data suggest that, even though chicken are not mammals, they could provide a useful tool for understanding the pathogenesis of B. microti associated disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Protection of avian influenza (AI vaccines for poultry against infection of field isolates A/Chicken/West Java/Smi-Pat/2006 and A/Chicken/West Java/Smi-Mae/2008 under laboratory condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risa Indriani

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to study level of protection of avian influenza (AI commercial vaccines available in Indonesia (subtipe H5N1, H5N2 and H5N9 against infection of HPAI field isolates of A/Chicken/West Java/Smi-Pat/2006 and A/Chicken/West Java/Smi-Mae/2008. There were 7 commercial vaccines used in this study, the each vaccines were injected in to 3 weeks old of layer chichickenen intramuscularly. At 3 weeks after vaccination, ten chichickenens from each group were challenged separately with the A/Chicken/West Java/Smi-Pat/2006 and A/Chicken/West Java/Smi-Mae/2008 isolates intranasaly with dose 106 ELD50 per 0,1 ml per chicken. Ten unvaccinated chicken were included in the challenge test as control. The study demonstrate that the AI vaccines with subtipe H5N1 protected chicken (100% against virus of A/Chicken/West Java/Smi-Pat/2006 and 90-100% against virus A/Chicken/West Java/Smi-Mae/2008. Viral shedding were not seen by 2 days post challenge. The AI vaccines with subtipe H5N2 protected chicken at 20-30% against virus of A/Chicken/West Java/Smi-Pat/2006 and protected chicken at 70-100% against virus of A/Chicken/West Java/Smi-Mae/2008. Viral shedding still detected at 8 days post challenge. The AI vaccines AI with subtipe H5N9 did not protect chicken (0% against virus A/Chicken/West Java/Smi-Pat/2006 and protected chicken at 50% against virus A/Chicken/West Java/Smi-Mae/2008. Viral shedding still detected by 8 days post challenge. This study concluded that AI vaccines with subtipe H5N1 are better than other AI subtipe vaccines in preventing HPAI virus A/Chicken/West Java/Smi-Pat/2006 dan A/Chicken/West Java/Smi-Mae/2008 infections under laboratory condition.

  15. Anticoccidial efficacy of toltrazuril and halofuginone against Eimeria tenella infection in broiler chickens in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, A; Abo el-Sooud, K; el-Bahy, M M

    1997-01-01

    The anticoccidial activities of toltrazuril and halofuginone against Eimeria tenella were tested in broiler chickens. Comparisons were made between ummedicated infected and uninfected control birds in addition to infected groups given either toltrazuril at 37.5, 75 and 150 ppm in the drinking water, or halofuginone at 1.5, 3 and 6 ppm in the feed. Both drugs were highly efficacious against E tenella. Treatment improved the bodyweight gain and survival percentage in comparison with the unmedicated, infected group. Intestinal lesions, faecal and oocyst scores and oocyst shedding in dropping were significantly reduced by both drugs. Toltrazuril gave better protection than halofuginone; 75 and 150 ppm toltrazuril in drinking water gave good protection when administered four and five days after inoculation.

  16. Microbial Shifts in the Intestinal Microbiota of Salmonella Infected Chickens in Response to Enrofloxacin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Li

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Fluoroquinolones (FQs are important antibiotics used for treatment of Salmonella infection in poultry in many countries. However, oral administration of fluoroquinolones may affect the composition and abundance of a number of bacterial taxa in the chicken intestine. Using 16S rRNA gene sequencing, the microbial shifts in the gut of Salmonella infected chickens in response to enrofloxacin treatments at different dosages (0, 0.1, 4, and 100 mg/kg b.w. were quantitatively evaluated. The results showed that the shedding levels of Salmonella were significantly reduced in the high dosage group as demonstrated by both the culturing method and 16S rRNA sequencing method. The average values of diversity indices were higher in the control group than in the three medicated groups. Non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS analysis results showed that the microbial community of high dosage group was clearly separated from the other three groups. In total, 25 genera were significantly enriched (including 6 abundant genera: Lactococcus, Bacillus, Burkholderia, Pseudomonas, Rhizobium, and Acinetobacter and 23 genera were significantly reduced in the medicated groups than in the control group for the treatment period, but these bacterial taxa recovered to normal levels after therapy withdrawal. Additionally, 5 genera were significantly reduced in both treatment and withdrawal periods (e.g., Blautia and Anaerotruncus and 23 genera (e.g., Enterobacter and Clostridium were significantly decreased only in the withdrawal period, indicating that these genera might be the potential targets for the fluoroquinolones antimicrobial effects. Specially, Enterococcus was significantly reduced under high dosage of enrofloxacin treatment, while significantly enriched in the withdrawal period, which was presumably due to the resistance selection. Predicted microbial functions associated with genetic information processing were significantly decreased in the high dosage group

  17. Cytokine gene expression profiles in chicken spleen and intestinal tissues during Ascaridia galli infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pleidrup, Janne A.; Norup, Liselotte R.; Dalgaard, Tina S.

    2014-01-01

    , the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and TGF-beta 4 and the proinflammatory cytokine IL-17F were determined over a period of 3 weeks in A. galli and non-A. galli-infected chickens. A characteristic Th2 response was observed in the jejunum of A. galli-infected chickens with increased expression of IL-13...... and decreased expression of IFN-gamma from day 14 post infection. At the putative time of larvae invasion into the intestinal mucosa (day 7), an increased expression of IFN-gamma, IL-10, and TGF-beta 4 was observed in the spleen. At the putative onset of the innate immune response (day 10), a decreased...... expression of jejunal IFN-gamma and IL-13 was observed. Finally, at the expected period of an adaptive immune response (days 14-21) a general decreased expression of IFN-gamma and TGF-beta 4 in spleen and IFN-gamma in jejunum was followed by a decreased expression of IFN-gamma and IL-10 at day 21 in caecal...

  18. Infection-related hemolysis and susceptibility to Gram-negative bacterial co-infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine eOrf

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Increased susceptibility to co-infection with enteric Gram-negative bacteria, particularly non-typhoidal Salmonella, is reported in malaria and Oroya fever (Bartonella bacilliformis infection, and can lead to increased mortality. Accumulating epidemiological evidence indicates a causal association with risk of bacterial co-infection, rather than just co-incidence of common risk factors. Both malaria and Oroya fever are characterised by hemolysis, and observations in humans and animal models suggest that hemolysis causes the susceptibility to bacterial co-infection. Evidence from animal models implicates hemolysis in the impairment of a variety of host defence mechanisms, including macrophage dysfunction, neutrophil dysfunction and impairment of adaptive immune responses. One mechanism supported by evidence from animal models and human data, is the induction of heme oxygenase-1 in bone marrow, which impairs the ability of developing neutrophils to mount a competent oxidative burst. As a result, dysfunctional neutrophils become a new niche for replication of intracellular bacteria. Here we critically appraise and summarize the key evidence for mechanisms which may contribute to these very specific combinations of co-infections, and propose interventions to ameliorate this risk.

  19. Chlorine gas exposure increases susceptibility to invasive lung fungal infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessner, Melissa A; Doran, Stephen F; Yu, Zhihong; Dunaway, Chad W; Matalon, Sadis; Steele, Chad

    2013-06-01

    Chlorine (Cl₂) is a highly irritating and reactive gas with potential occupational and environmental hazards. Acute exposure to Cl₂ induces severe epithelial damage, airway hyperreactivity, impaired alveolar fluid clearance, and pulmonary edema in the presence of heightened inflammation and significant neutrophil accumulation in the lungs. Herein, we investigated whether Cl₂ exposure affected the lung antimicrobial immune response leading to increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections. Mice exposed to Cl₂ and challenged intratracheally 24 h thereafter with the opportunistic mold Aspergillus fumigatus demonstrated an >500-fold increase in A. fumigatus lung burden 72 h postchallenge compared with A. fumigatus mice exposed to room air. Cl₂-exposed A. fumigatus challenged mice also demonstrated significantly higher lung resistance following methacholine challenge and increased levels of plasma proteins (albumin and IgG) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Despite enhanced recruitment of inflammatory cells to the lungs of Cl₂-exposed A. fumigatus challenged mice, these cells (>60% of which were neutrophils) demonstrated a profound impairment in generating superoxide. Significantly higher A. fumigatus burden in the lungs of Cl₂ exposed mice correlated with enhanced production of IL-6, TNF-α, CXCL1, CCL2, and CCL3. Surprisingly, however, Cl₂-exposed A. fumigatus challenged mice had a specific impairment in the production of IL-17A and IL-22 in the lungs compared with mice exposed to room air and challenged with A. fumigatus. In summary, our results indicate that Cl₂ exposure markedly impairs the antimicrobial activity and inflammatory reactivity of myeloid cells in the lung leading to increased susceptibility to opportunistic pathogens.

  20. FUNCTIONS EXERTED BY THE VIRULENCE ASSOCIATED TYPE THREE SECRETION SYSTEMS DURING SALMONELLA ENTERICA SEROVAR ENTERITIDIS INFECTION OF CHICKEN OVIDUCT EPITHELIAL CELLS AND MACROPHAGES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmonella enterica serovar, Enteritidis (SE) infection of chicken is a major contributing factor to non-typhoidal salmonellosis. The roles of the type three secretion systems (T3SS-1 and T3SS-2) in the pathogenesis of SE infection of chickens are poorly understood. In this study, the functions exer...

  1. Salmonellosis outbreak due to chicken contact leading to a foodborne outbreak associated with infected delicatessen workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedican, Erin; Miller, Ben; Ziemer, Brian; LeMaster, Pam; Jawahir, Selina; Leano, Fe; Smith, Kirk

    2010-08-01

    Salmonella is the most common bacterial cause of foodborne outbreaks in the United States. Starting in June 2007, investigation of a cluster of Salmonella Montevideo cases with indistinguishable pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns resulted in the identification of an outbreak associated with contact with chickens purchased from a single hatchery. Nine Minnesota cases from May through August 2007 were part of this outbreak. Cases with the outbreak PFGE pattern of Salmonella Montevideo continued to occur in Minnesota after August, but none of these cases reported chicken contact. The majority of these cases resided in the same town in rural Minnesota. Routine interviews revealed that all cases from these counties purchased groceries from the same local grocery store, with two specifically reporting consuming items from the grocery store delicatessen in the week before illness. As a result, an investigation into the delicatessen was initiated. Illness histories and stool samples were collected from all delicatessen employees, and food and environmental samples were collected. None of the employees reported experiencing recent gastrointestinal symptoms, but the outbreak PFGE subtype of Salmonella Montevideo was identified from stool from two food workers. Food and environmental samples collected tested negative for Salmonella. One of the positive employees reported having chickens at home, but the animals did not test positive for Salmonella. The positive food workers were excluded from work until they had two consecutive negative stool cultures for Salmonella. There was no evidence of ongoing transmission thereafter. This was an outbreak of Salmonella Montevideo infections that began as an animal-contact-associated outbreak which subsequently resulted in a foodborne outbreak associated with infected food workers. These outbreaks illustrate the complex epidemiology of salmonellosis.

  2. The infection of chicken tracheal epithelial cells with a H6N1 avian influenza virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-I Shen

    Full Text Available Sialic acids (SAs linked to galactose (Gal in α2,3- and α2,6-configurations are the receptors for avian and human influenza viruses, respectively. We demonstrate that chicken tracheal ciliated cells express α2,3-linked SA, while goblet cells mainly express α2,6-linked SA. In addition, the plant lectin MAL-II, but not MAA/MAL-I, is bound to the surface of goblet cells, suggesting that SA2,3-linked oligosaccharides with Galβ1-3GalNAc subterminal residues are specifically present on the goblet cells. Moreover, both α2,3- and α2,6-linked SAs are detected on single tracheal basal cells. At a low multiplicity of infection (MOI avian influenza virus H6N1 is exclusively detected in the ciliated cells, suggesting that the ciliated cell is the major target cell of the H6N1 virus. At a MOI of 1, ciliated, goblet and basal cells are all permissive to the AIV infection. This result clearly elucidates the receptor distribution for the avian influenza virus among chicken tracheal epithelial cells and illustrates a primary cell model for evaluating the cell tropisms of respiratory viruses in poultry.

  3. Risk of infection by the consumption of liver of chickens inoculated with low doses of Toxocara canis eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutra, Gisele Ferreira; Pinto, Nitza Souto França; de Avila, Luciana Farias da Costa; Dutra, Paula Cardoso; Telmo, Paula de Lima; Rodrigues, Lourdes Helena; Silva, Ana Maria Wolkmer Azambuja; Scaini, Carlos James

    2014-06-16

    Experimental studies and registries of cases of human toxocariasis have shown that the consumption of raw or undercooked offal of the paratenic host of Toxocara canis may pose a risk of infection. Thus, we evaluated the risk of infection due to the consumption of liver of chickens inoculated with different doses of embryonated T. canis eggs. Doses were 5-100 times smaller than the ones previously employed in this type of study. Groups of five chickens were inoculated with 5000 (control), 1000, 500, 300 or 50 eggs of T. canis, and at 72 h post-inoculation, the liver of each bird was consumed by a BALB/c receptor mouse. Forty-eight hours after consumption, we examined the organs and carcasses of the mice for larvae of T. canis. All mice were positive for larvae, except the group that consumed the chicken liver inoculated with 50 eggs. This group contained only one positive mouse, in which the larva was lodged in the brain. In mice that consumed livers of chickens inoculated with ≥300 eggs, larvae concentration was primarily in the liver and lungs, characterizing the initial phase of infection. We conclude that the consumption of raw poultry liver, under the studied conditions, poses a risk of infection even with a low number of infected T. canis eggs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Proteomic analysis of chicken embryonic trachea and kidney tissues after infection in ovo by avian infectious bronchitis coronavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kong Xiangang

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Avian infectious bronchitis (IB is one of the most serious diseases of economic importance in chickens; it is caused by the avian infectious coronavirus (IBV. Information remains limited about the comparative protein expression profiles of chicken embryonic tissues in response to IBV infection in ovo. In this study, we analyzed the changes of protein expression in trachea and kidney tissues from chicken embryos, following IBV infection in ovo, using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-TOF MS. Results 17 differentially expressed proteins from tracheal tissues and 19 differentially expressed proteins from kidney tissues were identified. These proteins mostly related to the cytoskeleton, binding of calcium ions, the stress response, anti-oxidative, and macromolecular metabolism. Some of these altered proteins were confirmed further at the mRNA level using real-time RT-PCR. Moreover, western blotting analysis further confirmed the changes of annexin A5 and HSPB1 during IBV infection. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, we have performed the first analysis of the proteomic changes in chicken embryonic trachea and kidney tissues during IBV infection in ovo. The data obtained should facilitate a better understanding of the pathogenesis of IBV infection.

  5. Comparative susceptibility of five species of Toxorhynchites mosquitoes to parenteral infection with dengue and other flaviviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, L; Shroyer, D A

    1985-07-01

    Five species of colonized Toxorhynchites mosquitoes were compared for relative susceptibility to parenteral infection with the four dengue serotypes and St. Louis and Japanese encephalitis viruses. Tx. amboinensis, Tx. brevipalpis, Tx. rutilus, and Tx. splendens were equally susceptible to infection with the dengue viruses, while Tx. theobaldi was relatively resistant to infection with those viruses. All five mosquito species were equally susceptible to infection with the encephalitis viruses. The intensity of immunofluorescence in head squashes was slightly less in Tx. brevipalpis infected with the dengue viruses as compared to the other three mosquito species susceptible to those viruses. Immunofluorescence was also less in Tx. theobaldi infected with the encephalitis viruses as compared with all the other mosquito species.

  6. Proteomics analysis of the DF-1 chicken fibroblasts infected with avian reovirus strain S1133.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Ting Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Avian reovirus (ARV is a member of the Orthoreovirus genus in the Reoviridae family. It is the etiological agent of several diseases, among which viral arthritis and malabsorption syndrome are the most commercially important, causing considerable economic losses in the poultry industry. Although a small but increasing number of reports have characterized some aspects of ARV infection, global changes in protein expression in ARV-infected host cells have not been examined. The current study used a proteomics approach to obtain a comprehensive view of changes in protein levels in host cells upon infection by ARV. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The proteomics profiles of DF-1 chicken fibroblast cells infected with ARV strain S1133 were analyzed by two-dimensional differential-image gel electrophoresis. The majority of protein expression changes (≥ 1.5 fold, p<0.05 occurred at 72 h post-infection. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry identified 51 proteins with differential expression levels, including 25 that were upregulated during ARV infection and 26 that were downregulated. These proteins were divided into eight groups according to biological function: signal transduction, stress response, RNA processing, the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, lipid metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism, energy metabolism, and cytoskeleton organization. They were further examined by immunoblotting to validate the observed alterations in protein expression. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first report of a time-course proteomic analysis of ARV-infected host cells. Notably, all identified proteins involved in signal transduction, RNA processing, and the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway were downregulated in infected cells, whereas proteins involved in DNA synthesis, apoptosis, and energy production pathways were upregulated. In addition, other differentially expressed proteins were linked with the cytoskeleton

  7. Chemokines and chemokine receptors in susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and progression to AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Animesh; Rathore, Anurag; Vidyant, Sanjukta; Kakkar, Kavita; Dhole, Tapan N

    2012-01-01

    A multitude of host genetic factors plays a crucial role in susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and progression to AIDS, which is highly variable among individuals and populations. This review focuses on the chemokine-receptor and chemokine genes, which were extensively studied because of their role as HIV co-receptor or co-receptor competitor and influences the susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and progression to AIDS in HIV-1 infected individuals.

  8. Experimental investigation of the susceptibility of Italian Culex pipiens mosquitoes to Zika virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccolini, Daniela; Toma, Luciano; Di Luca, Marco; Severini, Francesco; Romi, R; Remoli, Maria Elena; Sabbatucci, Michela; Venturi, Giulietta; Rezza, Giovanni; Fortuna, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the susceptibility of an Italian population of Culex pipiens mosquitoes to Zika virus (ZIKV) infection, tested in parallel with Aedes aegypti, as a positive control. We analysed mosquitoes at 0, 3, 7, 10, 14, 20 and 24 days after an infectious blood meal. Viral RNA was detected in the body of Cx. pipiens up to three days post-infection, but not at later time points. Our results indicate that Cx. pipiens is not susceptible to ZIKV infection. PMID:27605056

  9. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of antimicrobial susceptibility of avian pathogenicEscherichia coliisolated from broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younis, Gamal; Awad, Amal; Mohamed, Nada

    2017-10-01

    Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) is pathogenic strains of E. coli that are responsible for one of the most common bacterial diseases affecting poultry worldwide. This study was designed to determine the occurrence, antibiotic resistance profile, and antibiotic resistance genes of E. coli isolated from diseased and freshly dead broilers. In that context, a total of 200 broilers samples were examined by standard microbiological techniques for isolation of E. coli , and tested for their antimicrobial susceptibility against 15 antimicrobial agents using disc diffusion method. In addition, E. coli isolates were screened by multiplex polymerase chain reaction for detection of a number of resistance genes including aadA1 gene encodes streptomycin/neomycin, tetA encodes resistance to tetracycline, sul1 encodes sulfonamides, and β-lactamase encoding genes (bla TEM and bla SHV ). A total of 73 (36.5%) isolates were biochemically identified as E. coli strains. O78, O2, and O1 are the most prevalent serotypes detected. E. coli displayed a high resistance against penicillin (100%), followed by cefepime (95.8%) and a low resistance to norfloxacin (36.9%), and chloramphenicol (30%). Depending on the results of PCR, sul 1 gene was the most predominant antibiotic resistant gene (87%) followed by bla TEM (78%), tetA genes (60%), and aadA (54%). However, bla SHV had the lowest prevalence (23%). The obtained results demonstrated the importance of studies on APEC and antibiotic resistance genes in our region which associated with intensive poultry industry, aiming to acquire preventive measures to minimize losses due to APEC and associated multidrug-resistance and resistance genes that of high significance to the rational use of antibiotics in clinical and public health.

  10. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of antimicrobial susceptibility of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli isolated from broiler chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamal Younis

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC is pathogenic strains of E. coli that are responsible for one of the most common bacterial diseases affecting poultry worldwide. This study was designed to determine the occurrence, antibiotic resistance profile, and antibiotic resistance genes of E. coli isolated from diseased and freshly dead broilers. Materials and Methods: In that context, a total of 200 broilers samples were examined by standard microbiological techniques for isolation of E. coli, and tested for their antimicrobial susceptibility against 15 antimicrobial agents using disc diffusion method. In addition, E. coli isolates were screened by multiplex polymerase chain reaction for detection of a number of resistance genes including aadA1 gene encodes streptomycin/neomycin, tetA encodes resistance to tetracycline, sul1 encodes sulfonamides, and β-lactamase encoding genes (blaTEM and blaSHV. Results: A total of 73 (36.5% isolates were biochemically identified as E. coli strains. O78, O2, and O1 are the most prevalent serotypes detected. E. coli displayed a high resistance against penicillin (100%, followed by cefepime (95.8% and a low resistance to norfloxacin (36.9%, and chloramphenicol (30%. Depending on the results of PCR, sul1 gene was the most predominant antibiotic resistant gene (87% followed by blaTEM (78%, tetA genes (60%, and aadA (54%. However, blaSHV had the lowest prevalence (23%. Conclusion: The obtained results demonstrated the importance of studies on APEC and antibiotic resistance genes in our region which associated with intensive poultry industry, aiming to acquire preventive measures to minimize losses due to APEC and associated multidrug-resistance and resistance genes that of high significance to the rational use of antibiotics in clinical and public health.

  11. Increased susceptibility of tumor cells and chicken erythrocytes to lysis by antibody and complement after treatment with aminoethylisothiouronium bromide hydrobromide (AET)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langone, J.J.; Borsos, T. (National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1979-01-01

    After treatment with aminoethylisothiouronium bromide hydrobromide (AET), the ascites forms of the diethylnitrosamine-induced guinea pig hepatomas, line-1 and line-10, were susceptible or more susceptible to killing in vitro by certain combinations of tumor-specific or IgM anti-Forssman antibody and either human or guinea pig complement. Since AET could be toxic to either cell line, conditions of pH, concentration of AET, and duration of exposure of the cells to the reagent were determined that resulted in enhanced susceptibility without significantly affecting cell viability. Chicken erythrocytes (CE) also were tested and AET-treated cells found to be more susceptible to lysis by IgM anti-Forssman antibody and guinea pig complement. The enhancement apparently was not due to increased ability of AET-treated CE to fix antibody. In contrast to CE, the lytic susceptibility of sheep cells was not affected by AET treatment. In addition to AET, several drugs and enzymes that also can affect the susceptibility of the tumor cells to antibody and complement were tested and found to be ineffective against CE. Since AET reputedly acts directly on the cell surface, it seems reasonable to assume that the increased susceptibility of the tumor cells and CE to antibody and complement may result from a modification of the cell surface.

  12. Performance of a commercial Chicken-Ovo-transferrin-ELISA on the serum of brown layer chickens infected with Gallibacterium anatis and Streptococcus zooepidemicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roy, Krisna; Kjelgaard-Hansen, Mads; Pors, Susanne Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate Ovo-transferrin (OTF), a positive acute-phase protein in chickens, as a diagnostic biomarker of selected bacterial infections we checked the performance of a commercial Chicken-OTF-ELISA (ICL, Inc., Portland, OR, USA) by analytical and overlap performances using two groups of serum sa......-infected birds) were >6.4, >3.8 to 6.7, >3.5 to...

  13. Incidence, Antimicrobial Susceptibility, and Toxin Genes Possession Screening of Staphylococcus aureus in Retail Chicken Livers and Gizzards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubna S. Abdalrahman

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Few recent outbreaks in Europe and the US involving Campylobacter and Salmonella were linked to the consumption of chicken livers. Studies investigating Staphylococcus aureus in chicken livers and gizzards are very limited. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence, antimicrobial resistance, and virulence of S. aureus and MRSA (Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in retail chicken livers and gizzards in Tulsa, Oklahoma. In this study, 156 chicken livers and 39 chicken gizzards samples of two brands were collected. While one of the brands showed very low prevalence of 1% (1/100 for S. aureus in chicken livers and gizzards, the second brand showed prevalence of 37% (31/95. No MRSA was detected since none harbored the mecA or mecC gene. Eighty seven S. aureus isolates from livers and 28 from gizzards were screened for antimicrobial resistance to 16 antimicrobials and the possession of 18 toxin genes. Resistance to most of the antimicrobials screened including cefoxitin and oxacillin was higher in the chicken gizzards isolates. While the prevalence of enterotoxin genes seg and sei was higher in the gizzards isolates, the prevalence of hemolysin genes hla, hlb, and hld was higher in the livers ones. The lucocidin genes lukE-lukD was equally prevalent in chicken livers and gizzards isolates. Using spa typing, a subset of the recovered isolates showed that they are not known to be livestock associated and, hence, may be of a human origin. In conclusion, this study stresses the importance of thorough cooking of chicken livers and gizzards since it might contain multidrug resistant enterotoxigenic S. aureus. To our knowledge this is the first study to specifically investigate the prevalence of S. aureus in chicken livers and gizzards in the US.

  14. Antibody expressing pea seeds as fodder for prevention of gastrointestinal parasitic infections in chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macek Jeanette

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coccidiosis caused by protozoans of genus Eimeria is a chicken parasitic disease of great economical importance. Conventional disease control strategies depend on vaccination and prophylactic use of anticoccidial drugs. Alternative solution to prevent and treat coccidiosis could be provided by passive immunization using orally delivered neutralizing antibodies. We investigated the possibility to mitigate the parasitic infection by feeding poultry with antibody expressing transgenic crop seeds. Results Using the phage display antibody library, we generated a panel of anti-Eimeria scFv antibody fragments with high sporozoite-neutralizing activity. These antibodies were expressed either transiently in agrobacteria-infiltrated tobacco leaves or stably in seeds of transgenic pea plants. Comparison of the scFv antibodies purified either from tobacco leaves or from the pea seeds demonstrated no difference in their antigen-binding activity and molecular form compositions. Force-feeding experiments demonstrated that oral delivery of flour prepared from the transgenic pea seeds had higher parasite neutralizing activity in vivo than the purified antibody fragments isolated from tobacco. The pea seed content was found to protect antibodies against degradation by gastrointestinal proteases (>100-fold gain in stability. Ad libitum feeding of chickens demonstrated that the transgenic seeds were well consumed and not shunned. Furthermore, feeding poultry with shred prepared from the antibody expressing pea seeds led to significant mitigation of infection caused both by high and low challenge doses of Eimeria oocysts. Conclusion The results suggest that our strategy offers a general approach to control parasitic infections in production animals using cost-effective antibody expression in crop seeds affordable for the animal health market.

  15. Antibody expressing pea seeds as fodder for prevention of gastrointestinal parasitic infections in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Jana; Saalbach, Isolde; Jahn, Doreen; Giersberg, Martin; Haehnel, Sigrun; Wedel, Julia; Macek, Jeanette; Zoufal, Karen; Glünder, Gerhard; Falkenburg, Dieter; Kipriyanov, Sergey M

    2009-09-11

    Coccidiosis caused by protozoans of genus Eimeria is a chicken parasitic disease of great economical importance. Conventional disease control strategies depend on vaccination and prophylactic use of anticoccidial drugs. Alternative solution to prevent and treat coccidiosis could be provided by passive immunization using orally delivered neutralizing antibodies. We investigated the possibility to mitigate the parasitic infection by feeding poultry with antibody expressing transgenic crop seeds. Using the phage display antibody library, we generated a panel of anti-Eimeria scFv antibody fragments with high sporozoite-neutralizing activity. These antibodies were expressed either transiently in agrobacteria-infiltrated tobacco leaves or stably in seeds of transgenic pea plants. Comparison of the scFv antibodies purified either from tobacco leaves or from the pea seeds demonstrated no difference in their antigen-binding activity and molecular form compositions. Force-feeding experiments demonstrated that oral delivery of flour prepared from the transgenic pea seeds had higher parasite neutralizing activity in vivo than the purified antibody fragments isolated from tobacco. The pea seed content was found to protect antibodies against degradation by gastrointestinal proteases (>100-fold gain in stability). Ad libitum feeding of chickens demonstrated that the transgenic seeds were well consumed and not shunned. Furthermore, feeding poultry with shred prepared from the antibody expressing pea seeds led to significant mitigation of infection caused both by high and low challenge doses of Eimeria oocysts. The results suggest that our strategy offers a general approach to control parasitic infections in production animals using cost-effective antibody expression in crop seeds affordable for the animal health market.

  16. Coccidiosis Immunization: Effects of Mushroom and Herb Polysaccharides on Immune Responses of Chickens Infected with Eimeria Tenella

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guo, F.C.; Kwakkel, R.P.; Williams, B.A.; Suo, X.; Li, W.K.; Verstegen, M.W.A.

    2005-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of polysaccharide extracts (E) of two mushrooms, Lentinus edodes (LenE) and Tremella fuciformis (TreE), and an herb, Astragalus membranaceus (AstE), on the immune responses of chickens infected with Eimeria tenella. A total of 180 broiler

  17. Impact of heterophil granulocyte depletion caused by 5-fluorouracil on infectious bursal disease virus infection in specific pathogen free chickens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kabell, Susanne; Igyarto, Botond-Zoltan; Magyar, Attila

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of the cytostatic drug, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), which causes depletion of heterophil granulocytes, on clinical symptoms and histological lesions during the progress of infectious bursal disease virus ( IBDV) infection in chickens. The aim ...

  18. Virus-specific antibodies interfere with avian influenza infection in peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes from young or aged chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) infection was examined in peripheral blood mononuclear leukocyte cultures (PBMC) that were collected from 1-day-old chicks or from 52-week-old chickens. Virus-specific antibodies were incubated with AIV to model maternal antibody interference in vitro. Interferon-alpha (I...

  19. Carbapenem-resistant-only Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in patients formerly infected by carbapenem-susceptible strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ming-Han; Wu, Tsu-Lan; Su, Lin-Hui; Lo, Wei-Lin; Chen, Chyi-Liang; Liang, Yi-Hua; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun

    2014-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates that were initially carbapenem-susceptible and later became selective carbapenem-resistant following antimicrobial therapy were identified from individual cases during the same hospitalisation. Cross-resistance to other β-lactams was not found and their susceptibilities remained identical in consecutive isolates. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR was performed to investigate the role of OprD, an outer membrane protein regulating the entry of carbapenems, in the appearance of carbapenem-resistant-only P. aeruginosa (CROPA). Fifteen paired isolates of carbapenem-susceptible P. aeruginosa (CS-PA) and CROPA were identified. All of the cases had carbapenem exposure history within 1 month before the appearance of CROPA (mean 10 days). Reduced OprD expression was found in 93% (14/15) of the isolates, suggesting that oprD inactivation was the major contributor to selective carbapenem resistance. Of the 14 cases with CROPA due to oprD mutation, 71% (10/14) were persistent infection, as genotype analysis revealed that their paired strains were isogenic; 29% (4/14) represented re-infections as they were heterogenic, suggesting that oprD-deficient CROPA existed in the hospital and that carbapenem selective pressure promoted its spread to patients. We conclude that CROPA may occur soon after the use of carbapenems to treat CS-PA infections and that oprD mutation is the major mechanism of resistance in CROPA. Restriction of empirical use of carbapenems by antibiotic stewardship is important to halt the occurrence of CROPA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  20. Discrete time Markov chains (DTMC) susceptible infected susceptible (SIS) epidemic model with two pathogens in two patches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lismawati, Eka; Respatiwulan; Widyaningsih, Purnami

    2017-06-01

    The SIS epidemic model describes the pattern of disease spread with characteristics that recovered individuals can be infected more than once. The number of susceptible and infected individuals every time follows the discrete time Markov process. It can be represented by the discrete time Markov chains (DTMC) SIS. The DTMC SIS epidemic model can be developed for two pathogens in two patches. The aims of this paper are to reconstruct and to apply the DTMC SIS epidemic model with two pathogens in two patches. The model was presented as transition probabilities. The application of the model obtain that the number of susceptible individuals decreases while the number of infected individuals increases for each pathogen in each patch.

  1. Burst of virus infection and a possibly largest epidemic threshold of non-Markovian susceptible-infected-susceptible processes on networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiang; Van Mieghem, Piet

    2018-02-01

    Since a real epidemic process is not necessarily Markovian, the epidemic threshold obtained under the Markovian assumption may be not realistic. To understand general non-Markovian epidemic processes on networks, we study the Weibullian susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) process in which the infection process is a renewal process with a Weibull time distribution. We find that, if the infection rate exceeds 1 /ln(λ1+1 ) , where λ1 is the largest eigenvalue of the network's adjacency matrix, then the infection will persist on the network under the mean-field approximation. Thus, 1 /ln(λ1+1 ) is possibly the largest epidemic threshold for a general non-Markovian SIS process with a Poisson curing process under the mean-field approximation. Furthermore, non-Markovian SIS processes may result in a multimodal prevalence. As a byproduct, we show that a limiting Weibullian SIS process has the potential to model bursts of a synchronized infection.

  2. Molecular analysis of Pasteurella multocida strains isolated from fowl cholera infection in backyard chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Mohamed-Wael Abdelazeem; Mageed, Moemen Abdel Azeem Mohamed Abdel

    2014-01-01

    To characterize Pasteurella isolated from backyard chickens using whole cell protein lysate profiles and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) techniques to show their genetic relationship because Pasteurella multocida (P. multocida) is an important cause of fatal infections in backyard chickens. Twenty one P. multocida isolates were recovered previously from clinical cases of fowl cholera belonging to individual owners and phenotypically analyzed using biochemical tests and serotyping were used for the genetic characterization. Phylogenetic study based on both methods revealed that the recovered population of P. multocida isolated from backyard chickens differs markedly, constituting a well-separated cluster and appearance of 3 distinguishing lineages with greater discrimination shown by RAPD-PCR that resulted in two suclusters in cluster A and three subclusters in cluster B and were related greatly with capsular serogroups for the examined strains. The whole cell protein revealed the presence of dominant protein bands at approximately 41 and 61 kDa in all of the examined isolates that may be a virulent proteins share in the increasing of its pathogenicity. Clear distinctive bands ranged from 123 to 1554 bp. Based on the previous findings, there are three spreading clusters that may indicate the association of a small number of P. multocida variants with the majority of cases suggesting that certain clones of P. multocida are able to colonize the examined backyard chickens. Also, the ease and rapidity of RAPD-PCR support the use of this technique as alternative to the more labour-intensive SDS-PAGE system for strain differentiation and epidemiological studies of avian P. multocida. Further application of RAPD technology to the examination of avian cholera outbreaks in commercially available flocks may facilitate more effective management of this disease by providing the potential to investigate correlations of P. multocida genotypes, to identify affiliations

  3. Metabolic alterations in broiler chickens experimentally infected with sporulated oocysts of Eimeria maxima

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fagner Luiz da Costa Freitas

    Full Text Available Metabolic and morphometric alterations of the duodenal villi caused by parasitism of chickens by Eimeria maxima were evaluated, using 100 male Cobb birds, randomly distributed into two groups (control and infected. The infected group was inoculated with 0.5 ml of a solution containing 5×103 sporulated oocysts of Eimeria maxima. Ten birds per sample were sacrificed on the 6th, 11th, 22nd and 41st days post-infection (dpi. In order to evaluate the alterations, samples of duodenum, jejunum and ileum fragments were collected after necropsy for histological analysis. Villus biometry was determined by means of a slide graduated in microns that was attached to a binocular microscope. To evaluate the biochemical data, 5 ml of blood were sampled from the birds before sacrifice. The statistical analyses were performed using the GraphPad 5 statistical software for Windows. Tukey's multiple comparison test (p <0.05 was performed for the different dpi's and the unpaired t test for the difference between the groups. Infection by E. maxima causes both qualitative and quantitative alterations to the structure of the intestinal villi, thereby interfering with the absorption of nutrients such as calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, protein and lipids, with consequent reductions in the birds' weights.

  4. Metabolic alterations in broiler chickens experimentally infected with sporulated oocysts of Eimeria maxima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Fagner Luiz da Costa

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic and morphometric alterations of the duodenal villi caused by parasitism of chickens by Eimeria maxima were evaluated, using 100 male Cobb birds, randomly distributed into two groups (control and infected). The infected group was inoculated with 0.5 ml of a solution containing 5 × 10³ sporulated oocysts of Eimeria maxima. Ten birds per sample were sacrificed on the 6th, 11th, 22nd and 41st days post-infection (dpi). In order to evaluate the alterations, samples of duodenum, jejunum and ileum fragments were collected after necropsy for histological analysis. Villus biometry was determined by means of a slide graduated in microns that was attached to a binocular microscope. To evaluate the biochemical data, 5 ml of blood were sampled from the birds before sacrifice. The statistical analyses were performed using the GraphPad 5 statistical software for Windows. Tukey's multiple comparison test (p <0.05) was performed for the different dpi's and the unpaired t test for the difference between the groups. Infection by E. maxima causes both qualitative and quantitative alterations to the structure of the intestinal villi, thereby interfering with the absorption of nutrients such as calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, protein and lipids, with consequent reductions in the birds' weights.

  5. [Acute illness following chicken pox: spleen infarction as a complication of varicella zoster infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teeninga, Nynke; Willemze, Annemieke J; Emonts, Marieke; Appel, Inge M

    2011-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection can cause temporary acquired protein S or C deficiency via cross reacting antibodies and consequently inducing a hypercoagulable state. A 6-year-old girl with a history of congenital cardiac disease was seen at an Emergency Department with acute chest pain, dyspnoea and fever, seven days after developing chicken pox. Diagnostic tests revealed massive infarction of the spleen, and a protein S and C deficiency. In addition, blood cultures revealed a Lancefield group A β-haemolytic streptococcus (GABHS). The patient recovered fully after treatment with low molecular weight heparin and antibiotics. In this patient, septic emboli caused splenic infarction. Thromboembolic complications should be suspected in children with VZV who present with acute symptoms, in particular if bacterial superinfection is found.

  6. Monitoring of local CD8 β-expressing cell populations during Eimeria tenella infection of naïve and immune chickens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wattrang, Eva; Thebo, Per; Lunden, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to monitor abundance and activation of local CD8β-expressing T-cell populations during Eimeria tenella infections of naïve chickens and chickens immune by previous infections. Chickens were infected with E. tenella up to three times. Caecal T-cell receptor (TCR) γ/δ-CD......8β+ cells (cytotoxic T lymphocytes; CTL) and TCRγ/δ+CD8β+ cells were characterized with respect to activation markers (blast transformation, CD25 and cell surface CD107a). Cells were also induced to degranulate in vitro as a measure of activation potential. Major findings included a prominent long...

  7. Detection of mcr-1 encoding plasmid-mediated colistin-resistant Escherichia coli isolates from human bloodstream infection and imported chicken meat, Denmark 2015

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasman, H.; Hammerum, A. M.; Hansen, F.

    2015-01-01

    The plasmid-mediated colistin resistance gene, mcr-1, was detected in an Escherichia coli isolate from a Danish patient with bloodstream infection and in five E. coli isolates from imported chicken meat. One isolate from chicken meat belonged to the epidemic spreading sequence type ST131...

  8. The impact of natural helminth infections and supplementary protein on growth performance of free-range chickens on smallholder farms in El Sauce, Nicaragua

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skallerup, Per; Luna, Luz A; Johansen, Maria V

    2005-01-01

    Three on-farm studies were conducted in Nicaragua during three consecutive years (1999-2001) to assess the impact of natural helminth infections on growth performance of free-range chickens aged 3-4 months. On all participating farms, half of the chickens were treated regularly with anthelmintics...

  9. Experimental neosporosis in chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) with oocysts and tachyzoites of two recent isolates of Neospora caninum reveals resistance to infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    The importance of birds in the biological cycle of Neospora caninum is not clear. Here, we report unsuccessful Neospora infection in Chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) using two isolates of N. caninum. In experiment #1 conducted in Brazil, 30 White Leghorn chickens were orally inoculated with viabl...

  10. Serological evidence of avian encephalomyelitis virus and Pasteurella multocida infections in free-range indigenous chickens in Southern Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taunde, Paula; Timbe, Palmira; Lucas, Ana Felicidade; Tchamo, Cesaltina; Chilundo, Abel; Dos Anjos, Filomena; Costa, Rosa; Bila, Custodio Gabriel

    2017-06-01

    A total of 398 serum samples from free-range indigenous chickens originating from four villages in Southern Mozambique were tested for the presence of avian encephalomyelitis virus (AEV) and Pasteurella multocida (PM) antibodies through commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. AEV and PM antibodies were detected in all villages surveyed. The proportion of positive samples was very high: 59.5% (95% confidence interval (CI) 51.7-67.7%) for AEV and 71.5% (95% CI 67.7-77.3%) for PM. Our findings revealed that these pathogens are widespread among free-range indigenous chickens in the studied villages and may represent a threat in the transmission of AEV and PM to wild, broiler or layer chickens in the region. Further research is warranted on epidemiology of circulating strains and impact of infection on the poultry industry.

  11. Susceptibilities of Chlamydia trachomatis isolates causing uncomplicated female genital tract infections and pelvic inflammatory disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Rice, R J; Bhullar, V; Mitchell, S H; Bullard, J; Knapp, J S

    1995-01-01

    The in vitro susceptibilities of 45 recent clinical isolates of Chlamydia trachomatis obtained from women with asymptomatic genital tract infection, mucopurulent cervicitis, or pelvic inflammatory disease to doxycycline, azithromycin, ofloxacin, and clindamycin were determined. In addition, susceptibilities of 12 isolates to amoxicillin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole were also determined. Isolates also were serotyped with a panel of monoclonal antibodies specific for chlamydial major outer...

  12. Effect of soybean leaf and plant age on susceptibility to initiation of infection by Phakopsora pachyrhizi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although previous studies have been conducted to determine the relationship of plant and leaf age to susceptibility to soybean rust, this relationship still is unresolved. Some studies suggest that as plants reach the flowering stage they become more susceptible to initiation of infection. However, ...

  13. Antimicrobial Resistance Profiles of Campylobacter spp. Isolated from Broiler Chicken Meat of Estonian, Latvian and Lithuanian Origin at Estonian Retail Level and from Patients with Severe Enteric Infections in Estonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäesaar, M; Kramarenko, T; Meremäe, K; Sõgel, J; Lillenberg, M; Häkkinen, L; Ivanova, M; Kovalenko, K; Hörman, A; Hänninen, M-L; Roasto, M

    2016-03-01

    The resistance patterns of Campylobacter spp. isolated from retail broiler chicken meat originating either from Estonia, Lithuania or Latvia collected in Estonia were determined. Additionally, in collaboration with the laboratories of several Estonian hospitals, antimicrobial susceptibility patterns were determined for Campylobacter isolates from patients with severe Campylobacter enteric infections. The isolates were identified at the species level by the PCR method. Respectively, 88.8% of the isolates were C. jejuni, and 11.2% were C. coli. In total, 126 Campylobacter isolates of broiler chicken meat and human origin were tested for minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) with the broth microdilution VetMIC(TH) method (National Veterinary Institute; Uppsala, Sweden) for a total of six antimicrobials. Resistance to one or more antimicrobials was detected in 62 (63.3%) of Campylobacter broiler chicken meat isolates and in 20 (71.4%) of human-origin isolates. Large proportions of the broiler chicken meat isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin (60.2%). Multidrug resistance (i.e. to three or more unrelated antimicrobials) was detected in five (5.1%) C. jejuni isolates. Among the human isolates, 20 (71.4%) were resistant to fluoroquinolones, and two (7.1%) C. jejuni isolates exhibited multidrug resistance. The chicken meat isolates of Estonian origin were the most susceptible. However, a high proportion of fluoroquinolone-resistant C. jejuni isolates were found in Latvian and Lithuanian products. The results of this study indicate that the problems caused by the inappropriate use of antimicrobials extend beyond the country in which a food originates; therefore, both domestic and international interventions and agreements are required to implement common policies on antimicrobial usage and to minimize the emergence of Campylobacter drug resistance. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  14. CHICKEN COOPS, Triatoma dimidiata INFESTATION AND ITS INFECTION WITH Trypanosoma cruzi IN A RURAL VILLAGE OF YUCATAN, MEXICO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar KOYOC-CARDEÑA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study longitudinally investigated the association between Triatoma dimidiata infestation, triatomine infection with Trypanosoma cruzi and household/backyard environmental characteristics in 101 homesteads in Molas and Yucatan, Mexico, between November 2009 (rainy season and May 2010 (dry season. Logistic regression models tested the associations between insect infestation/infection and potential household-level risk factors. A total of 200 T. dimidiata were collected from 35.6% of the homesteads, mostly (73% from the peridomicile. Of all the insects collected, 48% were infected with T. cruzi. Infected insects were collected in 31.6% of the homesteads (54.1% and 45.9% intra- and peridomiciliary, respectively. Approximately 30% of all triatomines collected were found in chicken coops. The presence of a chicken coop in the backyard of a homestead was significantly associated with both the odds of finding T. dimidiata (OR = 4.10, CI 95% = 1.61-10.43, p = 0.003 and the presence of triatomines infected with T. cruzi (OR = 3.37, CI 95% = 1.36-8.33, p = 0.006. The results of this study emphasize the relevance of chicken coops as a putative source of T. dimidiata populations and a potential risk for T. cruzi transmission.

  15. Narrow groove and restricted anchors of MHC class I molecule BF2*0401 plus peptide transporter restriction can explain disease susceptibility of B4 chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianhua; Chen, Yong; Qi, Jianxun; Gao, Feng; Liu, Yanjie; Liu, Jun; Zhou, Xuyu; Kaufman, Jim; Xia, Chun; Gao, George F

    2012-11-01

    The MHC has genetic associations with many diseases, often due to differences in presentation of antigenic peptides by polymorphic MHC molecules to T lymphocytes of the immune system. In chickens, only a single classical class I molecule in each MHC haplotype is expressed well due to coevolution with the polymorphic TAPs which means that resistance and susceptibility to infectious pathogens are particularly easy to observe. Previously, structures of chicken MHC class I molecule BF2*2101 from B21 haplotype showed an unusually large peptide-binding groove that accommodates a broad spectrum of peptides to present as epitopes to CTLs, explaining the MHC-determined resistance of B21 chickens to Marek's disease. In this study, we report the crystal structure of BF2*0401 from the B4 (also known as B13) haplotype, showing a highly positively charged surface hitherto unobserved in other MHC molecules, as well as a remarkably narrow groove due to the allele-specific residues with bulky side chains. Together, these properties limit the number of epitope peptides that can bind this class I molecule. However, peptide-binding assays show that in vitro, BF2*0401 can bind a wider variety of peptides than are found on the surface of B4 cells. Thus, a combination of the specificities of the polymorphic TAP and the MHC results in a very limited set of BF2*0401 peptides with negatively charged anchors to be presented to T lymphocytes.

  16. First report of Toxoplasma gondii infection in market-sold adult chickens, ducks and pigeons in northwest China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong Wei

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Toxoplasma gondii infection is a global concern, affecting a wide range of warm-blooded animals and humans worldwide, including poultry. Domestic and companion birds are considered to play an important role in the transmission of T. gondii to humans and other animals. However, little information on T. gondii infection in domestic birds in Lanzhou, northwest China was available. Therefore, this study was performed to determine the seroprevalence of T. gondii infection in domestic birds in Lanzhou, northwest China. Methods In the present study, the seroprevalence of T. gondii antibodies in 413 (305 caged and 108 free-range adult chickens, 334 (111 caged and 223 free-range adult ducks and 312 adult pigeons in Lanzhou, northwest China, were examined using the modified agglutination test (MAT. Results 30 (7.26% chickens, 38 (11.38% ducks and 37 (11.86% pigeons were found to be positive for T. gondii antibodies at the cut-off of 1:5. The prevalences in caged and free-range chickens were 6.23% and 10.19% respectively, however, statistical analysis showed that the difference was not significant (P > 0.05. The seroprevalences in caged and free-range ducks were 6.31% and 13.90% respectively, but the difference was not statistically significant (P > 0.05. Conclusions The results of the present survey indicated the presence of T. gondii infection in adult chickens, ducks and pigeons sold for meat in poultry markets in Lanzhou, northwest China, which poses a potential risk for T. gondii infection in humans and other animals in this region. This is the first seroprevalence study of T. gondii infection in domestic birds in this region.

  17. Interleukin gene polymorphisms and susceptibility to HIV-1 infection

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Some subjects are repeatedly exposed to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), yet they remain uninfected. This suggests the existence of host-resistance mechanisms. The current study synthesizes the evidence regarding the association between interleukin (IL) gene polymorphisms and HIV susceptibility. Medline ...

  18. Mendelian Genetics of Human Susceptibility to Fungal Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lionakis, M.S.; Netea, M.G.; Holland, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    A recent surge in newly described inborn errors of immune function-related genes that result in susceptibility to fungal disease has greatly enhanced our understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of antifungal immune responses. Characterization of single-gene defects that predispose to

  19. Resident alveolar macrophages are susceptible to and permissive of Coxiella burnetii infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Calverley

    Full Text Available Coxiella burnetii, the causative agent of Q fever, is a zoonotic disease with potentially life-threatening complications in humans. Inhalation of low doses of Coxiella bacteria can result in infection of the host alveolar macrophage (AM. However, it is not known whether a subset of AMs within the heterogeneous population of macrophages in the infected lung is particularly susceptible to infection. We have found that lower doses of both phase I and phase II Nine Mile C. burnetii multiply and are less readily cleared from the lungs of mice compared to higher infectious doses. We have additionally identified AM resident within the lung prior to and shortly following infection, opposed to newly recruited monocytes entering the lung during infection, as being most susceptible to infection. These resident cells remain infected up to twelve days after the onset of infection, serving as a permissive niche for the maintenance of bacterial infection. A subset of infected resident AMs undergo a distinguishing phenotypic change during the progression of infection exhibiting an increase in surface integrin CD11b expression and continued expression of the surface integrin CD11c. The low rate of phase I and II Nine Mile C. burnetii growth in murine lungs may be a direct result of the limited size of the susceptible resident AM cell population.

  20. Scutellaria polysaccharide inhibits the infectivity of Newcastle disease virus to chicken embryo fibroblast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaona, Zhao; Jianzhu, Liu

    2014-03-15

    To select the antiviral active site of Scutellaria polysaccharide (SPS), safe concentrations of crude total Scutellaria polysaccharide (SPS(t)) and fractional polysaccharide SPS₅₀, SPS₆₀, SPS₇₀ and SPS₈₀ on chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF) were first compared using the MTT method. Then, SPS(t), SPS₅₀, SPS₆₀, SPS₇₀, and SPS₈₀ at five concentrations within the safe concentration, together with Newcastle disease virus (NDV), were added to the cultivating system of CEF in three models: pre-addition of polysaccharide, post-addition of polysaccharide, and simultaneous addition of polysaccharides and NDV after mixing. The effects of SPS on the cellular infectivity of NDV (A₅₇₀ value and the highest viral inhibitory rate) were compared using the MTT method. At appropriate concentrations, the five polysaccharides could significantly inhibit the infectivity of NDV on CEF. Among the five polysaccharide groups, the SPS₈₀ group exhibited the highest viral inhibitory rate in the three sample-addition modes. This finding indicates that SPS₈₀ possesses the best efficacy as a component of antiviral polysaccharide drug. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Host genetic factors in susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A lot of investigations have been targeted towards the ex- ploration of the viral genetics of HIV-1, associated with the progression to AIDS in HIV-1 infected individuals. How- ever, very little is known about the host genetic aspects in the pathogenesis of the infection (Michael 1999; Carrington et al. 2001; Kumar et al. 2006 ...

  2. Experimental investigation of the susceptibility of Italian Culex pipiens mosquitoes to Zika virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccolini, Daniela; Toma, Luciano; Di Luca, Marco; Severini, Francesco; Romi, R; Remoli, Maria Elena; Sabbatucci, Michela; Venturi, Giulietta; Rezza, Giovanni; Fortuna, Claudia

    2016-09-01

    We investigated the susceptibility of an Italian population of Culex pipiens mosquitoes to Zika virus (ZIKV) infection, tested in parallel with Aedes aegypti, as a positive control. We analysed mosquitoes at 0, 3, 7, 10, 14, 20 and 24 days after an infectious blood meal. Viral RNA was detected in the body of Cx. pipiens up to three days post-infection, but not at later time points. Our results indicate that Cx. pipiens is not susceptible to ZIKV infection. This article is copyright of The Authors, 2016.

  3. Susceptibility of Skeletal Muscle to Coxsackie A2 Virus Infection: Effects of Botulinum Toxin and Denervation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Clifford G.; Drachman, Daniel B.; Pestronk, Alan; Narayan, Opendra

    1984-02-01

    Coxsackie A viruses can infect denervated but not innervated mature skeletal muscles. The role of synaptic transmission in preventing susceptibility to Coxsackievirus infection was studied by surgically denervating leg muscles of mice or injecting the muscles with botulinum toxin to block quantal release of acetylcholine. Control muscles were injected with heat-inactivated toxin. Subsequent injection of Coxsackie A2 virus resulted in extensive virus replication and tissue destruction in the denervated and botulinum toxin-treated muscles, while the control muscles showed only minimal changes. This suggests that the susceptibility of skeletal muscle to Coxsackievirus infection is regulated by synaptic transmission.

  4. Anticoccidial efficacy of drinking water soluble diclazuril in the control of Eimeria acervulina oocysts on experimentally-infected broiler chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.C.L. Assis

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The experiment was carried out with 150 Cobb broiler chickens divided into 3 groups with 50 birds each. The groups of infected chickens orally received 1ml of inoculum containing 3x103 Eimeria acervulina sporulated oocysts at 12 days of age. Group 1 was kept as a positive control with infected non-medicated birds, group 2 was medicated with diclazuril (1% with a dose of 1mL/4 L of drinking water for 2 successive days, 5 days after infection, while group 3 was kept as negative control with non-infected and non-medicated birds. Oocysts count per gram of feces, score of macroscopic intestinal lesions and weight gain were evaluated. The group treated with diclazuril showed significant and satisfactory improvement in the assessment criteria when compared to the infected non-medicated group. The results revealed more reduction in the total oocyst count and intestinal lesion score in the medicated than in the infected non-treated group. The results confirmed that (1% liquid diclazuril is effective to control Eimeria infection.

  5. Seroepidemiological Evidence for the Presence of Japanese Encephalitis Virus Infection in Ducks, Chickens, and Pigs, Bali-Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anak Agung Ayu Mirah Adi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The presence of various animals, such as: ducks, chickens and pigs in households increases the potential risks of zoonosis from animal to human. One of the diseases is Japanese encephalitis (JE.  The seroepidemiological studies on the presence JE among animals especially those raised in household is very important for emerging and reemerging disease control program. Ducks, chickens and pigs have long been considered as carrier and even the amplifier hosts of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV replication. The presence of the animal hosts and mosquitoes as vector could result in transmission of the JEV to humans. Methods: A seroepidemiological study of the presence of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV was conducted by collecting sera and detecting the antibody against JEV in ducks, chickens and pigs in Bali. As pig is the amplifying animal of JEV, comparison JEV antibody between ducks reared in households with pig nearby and with no pig were also determined the presence of antibody against JEV was examined by using indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA.  The serum samples with over cut off value (COV of optical density were considered as those containing Ab against JEV. Results: Antibody against JEV was demonstrated in ducks (20.6%, chickens (36.7% and pigs (32.2% evaluated in this study. Moreover, there was no significant difference (p>0.05 in the prevalence of antibody against JEV in ducks kept closely with pigs compared to the antibody in the ducks reared without pigs around. Conclusion: This study convinced that antibody against JEV is found in ducks, chickens and pigs in Bali. Indicating that these animals was infected or previously infected by the virus.

  6. Transcriptome Analysis of Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli O1 in Chicken Serum Reveals Adaptive Responses to Systemic Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Ganwu; Tivendale, Kelly A.; Liu, Peng; Feng, Yaping; Wannemuehler, Yvonne; Cai, Wentong; Mangiamele, Paul; Johnson, Timothy J.; Constantinidou, Chrystala; Penn, Charles W.; Nolan, Lisa K.

    2011-01-01

    Infections of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) result in annual multimillion-dollar losses to the poultry industry. Despite this, little is known about the mechanisms by which APEC survives and grows in the bloodstream. Thus, the aim of this study was to identify molecular mechanisms enabling APEC to survive and grow in this critical host environment. To do so, we compared the transcriptome of APEC O1 during growth in Luria-Bertani broth and chicken serum. Several categories of genes,...

  7. Differential TCR Vbeta Usage in the Peripheral T Cells of Chickens Resistant and Susceptible to Marek’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek's disease (MD) is a herpesvirus-induced lymphoma in chickens with a significant economic impact to the poultry industry, costing the industry over $1 billion annually worldwide. MD is controllable by vaccination and improving genetic resistance in the host. Two inbred layer lines, matched at...

  8. Fowl Adenovirus Serotype 4 SD0828 Infections Causes High Mortality Rate and Cytokine Levels in Specific Pathogen-Free Chickens Compared to Ducks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rong; Li, Gen; Lin, Jing; Han, Shaojie; Hou, Xiaolan; Weng, Hongyu; Guo, Mengjiao; Lu, Zhong; Li, Ning; Shang, Yingli; Chai, Tongjie; Wei, Liangmeng

    2018-01-01

    Hydropericardium syndrome and inclusion body hepatitis, together called hydropericardium-hepatitis syndrome, are acute infectious diseases found in chickens. These diseases are caused primarily by fowl adenovirus serotype 4 (FAdV-4) strains. In this study, we isolated a FAdV-4 strain (SD0828) from clinically diseased chickens and phylogenetically analyzed the L1 loops of the hexon protein sequences in 3-week-old specific pathogen-free chickens and ducks infected intramuscularly and orally, determining differences in the pathogenicity by observing clinical signs and gross and histological lesions. We also detected the viral load in tissue samples. Postinfection necropsy showed that all chickens but no ducks exhibited typical necropsy lesions. Additionally, all chickens infected intramuscularly died within 2 days postinfection (dpi), and all those infected orally died within 5 dpi, whereas no infected ducks died before 28 dpi. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis was used to determine the viral load in the tissues of hearts, livers, spleens, lungs, and kidneys and in cloacal cotton swabs from infected chickens and ducks at 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 14, 21, and 28 dpi. The greatest number of viral DNA copies was found in the livers of infected chickens, yet no virus was found in any samples from infected ducks. In addition, the viral load increased over time in both chicken and duck embryo fibroblasts (CEFs and DEFs, respectively); in the former, replication speed was significantly greater than in the latter. Innate immune responses were also studied, both in vivo and in vitro. In CEFs, DEFs, and chickens infected intramuscularly, but not in infected ducks, mRNA expression levels of proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin-6 and -8) and interferon-stimulated genes (Mx and OAS) were significantly upregulated. Although some cytokines showed significant upregulation in the oral chickens, most did not change significantly. Finally, the duck retinoic acid

  9. Biochemical studies in experimentally Escherichia coli infected broiler chicken supplemented with neem (Azadirachta indica leaf extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikash Sharma

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: An experimental study was conducted on 192-day-old broiler chicks for evaluating the effect of 10% neem leaf extract (NLE supplementationon biochemical parameters in chickens experimentally infected with Escherichia coli O78 at 107 CFU/0.5 ml at 7 days of age. Materials and Methods: The 192-day-old broiler chicks were procured. These chicks were divided into two groups (A and B containing 96 birds each on the 1st day. Diet of all the chicks of Group A was supplemented with 10%NLE in water, whereas chicks of Group B were given feed and water devoid of NLE supplementation throughout the experiment. After rearing for 1 week, chicks of both the groups (A and B were again divided into two subgroups (Group A into A1 and A2 and Group B into B1 and B2 of 54 and 42 birds, respectively. At the age of 7 days all the chicks of groups A1 and B1 were injected with E. coli O78 at 107 CFU/0.5 ml intraperitoneally. Blood samples were collected from six chicks from each group at day 0, 2, 4, 7, 14, 21, 28 days post-infection and serum was separated for biochemical studies. Results: There was a significant increase in serum alanine transaminase (ALT, aspartate transaminase (AST, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH activities, globulin concentration and a decrease in total protein (TP, albumin concentrations, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity in both the infected groups. However, the changes in biochemical values, i.e., ALT, AST, LDH, ALP, TP, albumin, and globulin wereof lower magnitude in NLE supplemented group suggesting hepatoprotective and cardioprotective effect of NLE. Conclusions: Fromthe present study, it is reasonable to conclude that significant increase in the value of ALT, AST, LDH, globulin, and significant decrease in the value of ALP, TP, and albumin was of lower magnitude in supplemented infected group (A1 as compared to non-supplemented infected group (B1 suggesting hepatoprotective and cardioprotective effect of NLE.

  10. Phase variable expression of capsular polysaccharide modifications allows Campylobacter jejuni to avoid bacteriophage infection in chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martine Camilla Holst Sørensen

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophages are estimated to be the most abundant entities on earth and can be found in every niche where their bacterial hosts reside. The initial interaction between phages and Campylobacter jejuni, a common coloniser of poultry intestines and a major source of foodborne bacterial gastroenteritis in humans, is not well understood. Recently, we isolated and characterised a phage F336 resistant variant of C. jejuni NCTC11168 called 11168R. Comparisons of 11168R with the wildtype lead to the identification of a novel phage receptor, the phase variable O-methyl phosphoramidate (MeOPN moiety of the C. jejuni capsular polysaccharide (CPS. In this study we demonstrate that the 11168R strain has gained cross-resistance to four other phages in our collection (F198, F287, F303 and F326. The reduced plaquing efficiencies suggested that MeOPN is recognized as a receptor by several phages infecting C. jejuni. To further explore the role of CPS modifications in C. jejuni phage recognition and infectivity, we tested the ability of F198, F287, F303, F326 and F336 to infect different CPS variants of NCTC11168, including defined CPS mutants. These strains were characterised by high-resolution magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy. We found that in addition to MeOPN, the phase variable 3-O-Me and 6-O-Me groups of the NCTC11168 CPS structure may influence the plaquing efficiencies of the phages. Furthermore, co-infection of chickens with both C. jejuni NCTC11168 and phage F336 resulted in selection of resistant C. jejuni bacteria, which either lack MeOPN or gain 6-O-Me groups on their surface, demonstrating that resistance can be acquired in vivo. In summary, we have shown that phase variable CPS structures modulate phage infectivity in C. jejuni and suggest that the constant phage predation in the avian gut selects for changes in these structures leading to a continuing phage-host co-evolution.

  11. Telomerase Activity in Chicken EmbryoFibroblast Cell Cultures Infected withMarek's Disease Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory A. Tannock

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Background:Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein, which adds telomeric repeats onto the 3’end of existing telomers at the end of chromosomes ineukaryotes. One hypothesis states that telomere length may function as a mitoticclock, therefore expression of telomerase activity in cancer cells may be a necessary and essential step for tumor development and progression.Methods:The detectability of telomerase activity in chicken embryofibroblast (CEF cells infected with different passages of Marek's disease virus(MDV was tested with the TRAPEZE® telomerase detection kit at passages14 (P14, P80/1 and P120 for the Woodland strain, and passage 9 (P9 for theMPF57 strain. Results:The results showed increased telomerase activity in MDV Woodlands strain at P14 and MPF57 strain at P9. Conclusion:Our results suggest that MDV-transformed cells at low passage are a suitable system for the study of telomerases in tumor developmentand for testing telomerase-inhibiting drugs.

  12. Transcriptional profiling avian beta-defensins in chicken oviduct epithelial cells before and after infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bailey R Hartford

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE colonizes the ovary and oviduct of chickens without causing overt clinical signs which can lead to SE-contamination of the content and membrane of shell-eggs as well as hatchery eggs. The organism utilizes the Salmonella Pathogenicity Island-2 encoded type III secretion system (T3SS-2 to promote persistence in the oviduct of laying hens. In this study, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR was carried out to determine the expression profiles of 14 known avian beta defensins (AvBDs in primary chicken oviduct epithelial cells (COEC before and after infections with a wild type SE strain and T3SS mutant SE strains carrying an inactivated sipA or pipB gene. Results Based on the expression levels in uninfected COEC, AvBDs can be loosely grouped into three categories with AvBD4-5 and AvBD9-12 being constitutively expressed at high levels; AvBD1, AvBD3, and AvBD13-14 at moderate levels; and AvBD2 and AvBD6-8 at minimal levels. Infection with the wild type SE strain temporarily repressed certain highly expressed AvBDs and induced the expression of minimally expressed AvBDs. The pipB mutant, compared to the wild type strain, had reduced suppressive effect on the expression of highly expressed AvBDs. Moreover, the pipB mutant elicited significantly higher levels of the minimally expressed AvBDs than the wild type SE or the sipA mutant did. Conclusion Chicken oviduct epithelial cells express most of the known AvBD genes in response to SE infection. PipB, a T3SS-2 effector protein, plays a role in dampening the β-defensin arm of innate immunity during SE invasion of chicken oviduct epithelium.

  13. Transcriptional profiling avian beta-defensins in chicken oviduct epithelial cells before and after infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebers, Katie L; Zhang, C Yan; Zhang, M Zhenyu; Bailey, R Hartford; Zhang, Shuping

    2009-07-30

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE) colonizes the ovary and oviduct of chickens without causing overt clinical signs which can lead to SE-contamination of the content and membrane of shell-eggs as well as hatchery eggs. The organism utilizes the Salmonella Pathogenicity Island-2 encoded type III secretion system (T3SS-2) to promote persistence in the oviduct of laying hens. In this study, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was carried out to determine the expression profiles of 14 known avian beta defensins (AvBDs) in primary chicken oviduct epithelial cells (COEC) before and after infections with a wild type SE strain and T3SS mutant SE strains carrying an inactivated sipA or pipB gene. Based on the expression levels in uninfected COEC, AvBDs can be loosely grouped into three categories with AvBD4-5 and AvBD9-12 being constitutively expressed at high levels; AvBD1, AvBD3, and AvBD13-14 at moderate levels; and AvBD2 and AvBD6-8 at minimal levels. Infection with the wild type SE strain temporarily repressed certain highly expressed AvBDs and induced the expression of minimally expressed AvBDs. The pipB mutant, compared to the wild type strain, had reduced suppressive effect on the expression of highly expressed AvBDs. Moreover, the pipB mutant elicited significantly higher levels of the minimally expressed AvBDs than the wild type SE or the sipA mutant did. Chicken oviduct epithelial cells express most of the known AvBD genes in response to SE infection. PipB, a T3SS-2 effector protein, plays a role in dampening the beta-defensin arm of innate immunity during SE invasion of chicken oviduct epithelium.

  14. Crohn disease ATG16L1 polymorphism increases susceptibility to infection with Helicobacter pylori in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, Deepa; Hussey, Séamus; Jones, Nicola L

    2012-09-01

    Autophagy plays key roles both in host defense against bacterial infection and in tumor biology. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection causes chronic gastritis and is the single most important risk factor for the development of gastric cancer in humans. Its vacuolating cytotoxin (VacA) promotes gastric colonization and is associated with more severe disease. Acute exposure to VacA initially triggers host autophagy to mitigate the effects of the toxin in epithelial cells. Recently, we demonstrated that chronic exposure to VacA leads to the formation of defective autophagosomes that lack CTSD/cathepsin D and have reduced catalytic activity. Disrupted autophagy results in accumulation of reactive oxygen species and SQSTM1/p62 both in vitro and in vivo in biopsy samples from patients infected with VacA(+) but not VacA(-) strains. We also determined that the Crohn disease susceptibility polymorphism in the essential autophagy gene ATG16L1 increases susceptibility to H. pylori infection. Furthermore, peripheral blood monocytes from individuals with the ATG16L1 risk variant show impaired autophagic responses to VacA exposure. This is the first study to identify both a host autophagy susceptibility gene for H. pylori infection and to define the mechanism by which the autophagy pathway is affected following H. pylori infection. Collectively, these findings highlight the synergistic effects of host and bacterial autophagy factors on H. pylori pathogenesis and the potential for subsequent cancer susceptibility.

  15. Multidrug‑resistant acinetobacter infection and their susceptibility ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Major infections found in different medical wards, surgical wards and ICU were due to Acinetobacter baumannii (74.02%), A. lowfii (14.2%), A. haemolyticus (7.79%), A. junii (3.8%) among Acinetobacter spices. Acinetobacter showed increased resistant against majority of commercially available drugs imipenem ...

  16. Evaluation of dna extraction methods of the Salmonella sp. bacterium in artificially infected chickens eggs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cristina dos Reis Ferreira

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. Ferreira A.C.dosR. & dos Santos B.M. [Evaluation of dna extraction methods of the Salmonella sp. bacterium in artificially infected chickens eggs.] Avaliação de três métodos de extração de DNA de Salmonella sp. em ovos de galinhas contaminados artificialmente. Revista Brasileira de Medicina Veterinária, 37(2:115-119, 2015. Departamento de Veterinária, Universidade Federal de Viçosa, Campus Universitário, Av. Peter Henry Rolfs, s/n, Viçosa, MG 36571-000, Brasil. E-mail: bmsantos@ufv.br The present study evaluated the efficiency of different protocols for the genomic DNA extraction of Salmonella bacteria in chicken eggs free of specific pathogens – SPF. Seventy-five eggs were used and divided into five groups with fifteen eggs each. Three of the five groups of eggs were inoculated with enteric Salmonella cultures. One of the five groups was inoculated with Escherichia coli bacterium culture. And another group of eggs was the negative control that received saline solution 0.85% infertile. The eggs were incubated on a temperature that varied from 20 to 25°C during 24, 48 and 72 hours. Five yolks of each group were collected every 24 hours. These yolks were homogenized and centrifuged during 10 minutes. The supernatant was rejected. After the discard, PBS ph 7.2 was added and centrifuged again. The sediment obtained of each group was used for the extraction of bacterial genomic DNA. Silica particles and a commercial kit were utilized as the extraction methods. The extracted DNA was kept on a temperature of 20°C until the evaluation through PCR. The primers utilized were related with the invA gene and they were the following: 5’ GTA AAA TTA TCG CCA CGT TCG GGC AA 3’ and 5’ TCA TCG CAC CGT CAA AGG AAC C 3’. The amplification products were visualized in transilluminator with ultraviolet light. The obtained results through the bacterial DNA extractions demonstrated that the extraction method utilizing silica particles was

  17. Isolation and molecular detection of Pasteurella multocida Type A from naturally infected chickens, and their histopathological evaluation in artificially infected chickens in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayedun Nahar Panna

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Pasteurella multocida type A is the etiologic agent of fowl cholera, a highly contagious and fatal disease of chickens. The present research work was performed for the isolation, identification and molecular detection of P. multocida Type A from chickens. Liver, heart and spleen of suspected dead chicken (n=35 were collected from Gazipur and Pabna districts in Bangladesh. The targeted bacteria from the samples were isolated, identified and characterized based on their morphology, staining, cultural, biochemical characters, pathogenicity test, histopathological study and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR. The P. multocida organism was isolated from 11.42% (n=4/35 samples. The organisms were gram negative, non-spore forming rod, non-motile, occurring singly or pairs in Gram staining, whereas in Leishman's stain, bipolar shaped organisms were observed. All the isolates were found positive for oxidase and catalase tests, produced indole, and fermented glucose, mannitol and sucrose. Necrotic foci in liver and congestion with hemorrhages in heart were found on necropsy. After pathogenicity test, the pathological changes were reconfirmed by histopathology depicting congestion, hemorrhage and lymphocyte infiltration in heart, liver and spleen tissues. In type specific PCR reaction, the organisms were confirmed as P. multocida Type A. In conclusion, P. multocida type A is prevalent among poultry in the studied regions; thus, care must be taken to control of the disease. [J Adv Vet Anim Res 2015; 2(3.000: 338-345

  18. A new reporter cell line to monitor HIV infection and drug susceptibility in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervaix, Alain; West, Daniel; Leoni, Lorenzo M.; Richman, Douglas D.; Wong-Staal, Flossie; Corbeil, Jacques

    1997-01-01

    Determination of HIV infectivity in vitro and its inhibition by antiretroviral drugs by monitoring reduction of production of p24 antigen is expensive and time consuming. Such assays also do not allow accurate quantitation of the number of infected cells over time. To develop a simple, rapid, and direct method for monitoring HIV infection, we generated a stable T-cell line (CEM) containing a plasmid encoding the green fluorescent protein (humanized S65T GFP) driven by the HIV-1 long terminal repeat. Clones were selected that displayed low constitutive background fluorescence, but a high level of GFP expression upon infection with HIV. HIV-1 infection induced a 100- to 1,000-fold increase in relative fluorescence of cells over 2 to 4 days as monitored by fluorescence microscopy, cytofluorimetry, and flow cytometry. Addition of inhibitors of reverse transcriptase, protease, and other targets at different multiplicities of infection permitted the accurate determination of drug susceptibility. This technique also permitted quantitation of infectivity of viral preparations by assessment of number of cells infected in the first round of infection. In conclusion, the CEM-GFP reporter cell line provides a simple, rapid, and direct method for monitoring HIV infectivity titers and antiretroviral drug susceptibility of syncytium-inducing strains. PMID:9114046

  19. Virus interference between H7N2 low pathogenic avian influenza virus and lentogenic Newcastle disease virus in experimental co-infections in chickens and turkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa-Hurtado, Mar; Afonso, Claudio L; Miller, Patti J; Spackman, Erica; Kapczynski, Darrell R; Swayne, David E; Shepherd, Eric; Smith, Diane; Zsak, Aniko; Pantin-Jackwood, Mary

    2014-01-06

    Low pathogenicity avian influenza virus (LPAIV) and lentogenic Newcastle disease virus (lNDV) are commonly reported causes of respiratory disease in poultry worldwide with similar clinical and pathobiological presentation. Co-infections do occur but are not easily detected, and the impact of co-infections on pathobiology is unknown. In this study chickens and turkeys were infected with a lNDV vaccine strain (LaSota) and a H7N2 LPAIV (A/turkey/VA/SEP-67/2002) simultaneously or sequentially three days apart. No clinical signs were observed in chickens co-infected with the lNDV and LPAIV or in chickens infected with the viruses individually. However, the pattern of virus shed was different with co-infected chickens, which excreted lower titers of lNDV and LPAIV at 2 and 3 days post inoculation (dpi) and higher titers at subsequent time points. All turkeys inoculated with the LPAIV, whether or not they were exposed to lNDV, presented mild clinical signs. Co-infection effects were more pronounced in turkeys than in chickens with reduction in the number of birds shedding virus and in virus titers, especially when LPAIV was followed by lNDV. In conclusion, co-infection of chickens or turkeys with lNDV and LPAIV affected the replication dynamics of these viruses but did not affect clinical signs. The effect on virus replication was different depending on the species and on the time of infection. These results suggest that infection with a heterologous virus may result in temporary competition for cell receptors or competent cells for replication, most likely interferon-mediated, which decreases with time.

  20. Infections caused by Acinetobacter species and their susceptibility to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toutes les infections sont acquises à travers la nosocomiale et elles avaient des rapports avec la faiblesse de l'immaturité de l'hóte, la defense du corps défectueux, la chirurgie ou la catechization urinaire, avec Acinetobacter baumannil qui était l'espèce le plus predominant. On avait note la predominance de male par ...

  1. Sidestream smoke exposure increases the susceptibility of airway epithelia to adenoviral infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Sharma

    Full Text Available Although significant epidemiological evidence indicates that cigarette smoke exposure increases the incidence and severity of viral infection, the molecular mechanisms behind the increased susceptibility of the respiratory tract to viral pathogens are unclear. Adenoviruses are non-enveloped DNA viruses and important causative agents of acute respiratory disease. The Coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR is the primary receptor for many adenoviruses. We hypothesized that cigarette smoke exposure increases epithelial susceptibility to adenovirus infection by increasing the abundance of apical CAR.Cultured human airway epithelial cells (CaLu-3 were used as a model to investigate the effect of sidestream cigarette smoke (SSS, mainstream cigarette smoke (MSS, or control air exposure on the susceptibility of polarized respiratory epithelia to adenoviral infection. Using a Cultex air-liquid interface exposure system, we have discovered novel differences in epithelial susceptibility between SSS and MSS exposures. SSS exposure upregulates an eight-exon isoform of CAR and increases adenoviral entry from the apical surface whilst MSS exposure is similar to control air exposure. Additionally, the level of cellular glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β is downregulated by SSS exposure and treatment with a specific GSK3β inhibitor recapitulates the effects of SSS exposure on CAR expression and viral infection.This is the first time that SSS exposure has been shown to directly enhance the susceptibility of a polarized epithelium to infection by a common respiratory viral pathogen. This work provides a novel understanding of the impact of SSS on the burden of respiratory viral infections and may lead to new strategies to alter viral infections. Moreover, since GSK3β inhibitors are under intense clinical investigation as therapeutics for a diverse range of diseases, studies such as these might provide insight to extend the use of clinically relevant

  2. Sidestream smoke exposure increases the susceptibility of airway epithelia to adenoviral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Priyanka; Kolawole, Abimbola O; Core, Susan B; Kajon, Adriana E; Excoffon, Katherine J D A

    2012-01-01

    Although significant epidemiological evidence indicates that cigarette smoke exposure increases the incidence and severity of viral infection, the molecular mechanisms behind the increased susceptibility of the respiratory tract to viral pathogens are unclear. Adenoviruses are non-enveloped DNA viruses and important causative agents of acute respiratory disease. The Coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is the primary receptor for many adenoviruses. We hypothesized that cigarette smoke exposure increases epithelial susceptibility to adenovirus infection by increasing the abundance of apical CAR. Cultured human airway epithelial cells (CaLu-3) were used as a model to investigate the effect of sidestream cigarette smoke (SSS), mainstream cigarette smoke (MSS), or control air exposure on the susceptibility of polarized respiratory epithelia to adenoviral infection. Using a Cultex air-liquid interface exposure system, we have discovered novel differences in epithelial susceptibility between SSS and MSS exposures. SSS exposure upregulates an eight-exon isoform of CAR and increases adenoviral entry from the apical surface whilst MSS exposure is similar to control air exposure. Additionally, the level of cellular glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) is downregulated by SSS exposure and treatment with a specific GSK3β inhibitor recapitulates the effects of SSS exposure on CAR expression and viral infection. This is the first time that SSS exposure has been shown to directly enhance the susceptibility of a polarized epithelium to infection by a common respiratory viral pathogen. This work provides a novel understanding of the impact of SSS on the burden of respiratory viral infections and may lead to new strategies to alter viral infections. Moreover, since GSK3β inhibitors are under intense clinical investigation as therapeutics for a diverse range of diseases, studies such as these might provide insight to extend the use of clinically relevant therapeutics and

  3. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Clostridium perfringens strains isolated from broiler chickens Sensibilidade antimicrobiana de estirpes de Clostridium perfringens isoladas de aves de corte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. O. S. Silva

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens is a normal inhabitant of the intestinal tract of chickens as well as a potential pathogen that causes necrotic enteritis and colangio hepatitis. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of seven different compounds used for therapy, growth promotion or prevention of coccidiosis was determined by agar dilution method for 55 C. perfringens strains isolated from the intestines of broiler chickens. All strains showed high susceptibility to penicillin, avilamycin, monensin and narasin. Only 7.3% of the strains showed an intermediated sensitivity to lincomycin, and 49 (89.1% were considered susceptible. For tetracycline and bacitracin, 41.8% and 47.3% of strains, respectively, were considered resistant.Clostridium perfringens é um habitante normal da microbiota intestinal de frangos, sendo um agente potencialmente patogênico, causador de enterite necrótica e colangio-hepatite. A concentração inibitória mínima (CIM de sete drogas utilizadas na terapêutica, como agentes promotores de crescimento ou na prevenção de coccidiose foi determinada pelo método de diluição em ágar para 55 estirpes de C. perfringens isoladas do intestino de frangos de corte. Todas as estirpes revelaram alta sensibilidade à penicilina, avilamicina, narasin e monensina, apenas 7,3% demonstraram CIM intermediário para lincomicina e 89.1% foram consideradas sensíveis. Para tetraciclina e bacitracina, 41,8% e 47.3% das amostras, respectivamente, foram consideradas resistentes.

  4. Prolonged pre-incubation increases the susceptibility of Galleria mellonella larvae to bacterial and fungal infection.

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    Browne, Niall; Surlis, Carla; Maher, Amie; Gallagher, Clair; Carolan, James C; Clynes, Martin; Kavanagh, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Galleria mellonella larvae are widely used for assessing the virulence of microbial pathogens and for measuring the in vivo activity of antimicrobial agents and produce results comparable to those that can be obtained using mammals. The aim of the work described here was to ascertain the effect of pre-incubation at 15°C for 1, 3, 6 or 10 weeks on the susceptibility of larvae to infection with Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus. Larvae infected with C. albicans after 1 week pre-incubation at 15°C showed 73.3 ± 3.3% survival at 24 hours post-infection while those infected after 10 weeks pre-incubation showed 30 ± 3.3% survival (P system but the duration of the pre-incubation stage significantly affects their susceptibility to microbial pathogens possibly as a result of altered metabolism.

  5. Defining nervous system susceptibility during acute and latent herpes simplex virus-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menendez, Chandra M; Carr, Daniel J J

    2017-07-15

    Herpes simplex viruses are neurotropic human pathogens that infect and establish latency in peripheral sensory neurons of the host. Herpes Simplex Virus-1 (HSV-1) readily infects the facial mucosa that can result in the establishment of a latent infection in the sensory neurons of the trigeminal ganglia (TG). From latency, HSV-1 can reactivate and cause peripheral pathology following anterograde trafficking from sensory neurons. Under rare circumstances, HSV-1 can migrate into the central nervous system (CNS) and cause Herpes Simplex Encephalitis (HSE), a devastating disease of the CNS. It is unclear whether HSE is the result of viral reactivation within the TG, from direct primary infection of the olfactory mucosa, or from other infected CNS neurons. Areas of the brain that are susceptible to HSV-1 during acute infection are ill-defined. Furthermore, whether the CNS is a true reservoir of viral latency following clearance of virus during acute infection is unknown. In this context, this review will identify sites within the brain that are susceptible to acute infection and harbor latent virus. In addition, we will also address findings of HSV-1 lytic gene expression during latency and comment on the pathophysiological consequences HSV-1 infection may have on long-term neurologic performance in animal models and humans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Hepatitis B Virus Infection, Genetic Susceptibility and Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Wen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Liver cancer is a sever cancer burden in the world, especially in developing countries. Its late diagnosis and high mortality rate urges early prediction. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is the major histopathological type of liver cancer. Chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV is a well-established risk factor for HCC. On one side, HBV sequence variation may influence the outcome of HBV infection and the development of HCC. At least ten HBV genotypes (A to J are identified. Several HBV genotypes and mutations in pre-S and pre-core/core promoter regions are closely associated with HCC pathogenesis, and have been regarded as biomarkers to predict the occurrence of HCC. On the other side, only a small fraction of chronic hepatitis B patients developed HCC, and some HCC cases were diagnosed with no known predisposing risk factors, suggesting host genetic variations may also play important roles in the carcinogenesis. In this review, we summarized current findings of HBV genotypes and mutations, host genetic variations and their interactions involved in HCC carcinogenesis. Understanding the key viral and host genetic variations is essential for generating effective predictive biomarkers for HCC development.

  7. Culex pipiens and Culex torrentium populations from Central Europe are susceptible to West Nile virus infection

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    Mayke Leggewie

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available West Nile virus (WNV, a Flavivirus with an avian primary host, is already widespread in Europe and might also pose an infection risk to Germany, should competent mosquito vectors be present. Therefore, we analysed the ability of WNV to infect German Culex mosquitoes with special emphasis on field collected specimens of Culex torrentium and Culex pipiens biotype pipiens. We collected egg rafts of Culex mosquitoes over two subsequent seasons at two geographically distinct sampling areas in Germany and differentiated the samples by molecular methods. Adult females, reared from the various egg rafts, were challenged with WNV by feeding of artificial blood meals. WNV infection was confirmed by real-time RT-PCR and virus titration. The results showed that field collected C. pipiens biotype pipiens and C. torrentium mosquitoes native to Germany are susceptible to WNV infection at 25 °C as well as 18 °C incubation temperature. C. torrentium mosquitoes, which have not been established as WNV vector so far, were the most permissive species tested with maximum infection rates of 96% at 25 °C. Furthermore, a disseminating infection was found in up to 94% of tested C. pipiens biotype pipiens and 100% of C. torrentium. Considering geographical variation of susceptibility, C. pipiens biotype pipiens mosquitoes from Southern Germany were more susceptible to WNV infection than corresponding populations from Northern Germany. All in all, we observed high infection and dissemination rates even at a low average ambient temperature of 18 °C. The high susceptibility of German Culex populations for WNV indicates that an enzootic transmission cycle in Germany could be possible.

  8. Enhanced susceptibility to urinary tract infection in the spinal cord-injured host with neurogenic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsara, Zarine R; Ross, Sherry S; Dolber, Paul C; Wiener, John S; Tang, Yuping; Seed, Patrick C

    2013-08-01

    Neurogenic bladder predisposes to recurrent urinary tract infections (UTI) and renal failure, and susceptibility is commonly ascribed to urinary stasis from elevated residual urine volumes. Escherichia coli UTI was modeled in the spinal cord-injured (SCI) rat with the hypothesis that SCI animals would require fewer bacteria to establish infection, have an exaggerated inflammatory response, and have delayed clearance of infection compared to normal-voiding controls. T10 SCI rats and controls had median infectious doses (ID50) of 10(2) and 10(5) CFU, respectively. Mean residual volumes in the SCI animals did not correlate with susceptibility to initiation of UTI or outcome. In the acute infection, control and SCI rats developed acute cystitis and pyelitis without acute differences in histopathological scores of inflammation. However, in vivo imaging of infected animals revealed persistently higher levels of bacteria in the SCI urine and bladders than were seen for controls over 2 weeks. Likewise, at 2 weeks, acute and chronic inflammatory infiltrates persisted in the bladders and kidneys of SCI rats, whereas inflammation largely resolved within the controls. Together these data demonstrate that SCI rats exhibit delayed clearance of infection and exaggerated inflammatory responses in bladders and kidneys; however, the severity of residual volumes does not predict increased susceptibility to UTI. These studies suggest that host-dependent mechanisms that are discrete from alterations in bladder physiology influence UTI susceptibility with the SCI-neurogenic bladder. This model will allow elucidation of SCI-neurogenic bladder-mediated changes in host response that yield UTI susceptibility and may lead to new preventative and therapeutic options.

  9. Prior infection of chickens with H1N1 or H1N2 avian influenza elicits partial heterologous protection against highly pathogenic H5N1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Nfon

    Full Text Available There is a critical need to have vaccines that can protect against emerging pandemic influenza viruses. Commonly used influenza vaccines are killed whole virus that protect against homologous and not heterologous virus. Using chickens we have explored the possibility of using live low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI A/goose/AB/223/2005 H1N1 or A/WBS/MB/325/2006 H1N2 to induce immunity against heterologous highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI A/chicken/Vietnam/14/2005 H5N1. H1N1 and H1N2 replicated in chickens but did not cause clinical disease. Following infection, chickens developed nucleoprotein and H1 specific antibodies, and reduced H5N1 plaque size in vitro in the absence of H5 neutralizing antibodies at 21 days post infection (DPI. In addition, heterologous cell mediated immunity (CMI was demonstrated by antigen-specific proliferation and IFN-γ secretion in PBMCs re-stimulated with H5N1 antigen. Following H5N1 challenge of both pre-infected and naïve controls chickens housed together, all naïve chickens developed acute disease and died while H1N1 or H1N2 pre-infected chickens had reduced clinical disease and 70-80% survived. H1N1 or H1N2 pre-infected chickens were also challenged with H5N1 and naïve chickens placed in the same room one day later. All pre-infected birds were protected from H5N1 challenge but shed infectious virus to naïve contact chickens. However, disease onset, severity and mortality was reduced and delayed in the naïve contacts compared to directly inoculated naïve controls. These results indicate that prior infection with LPAI virus can generate heterologous protection against HPAI H5N1 in the absence of specific H5 antibody.

  10. Gene expression profile and long non-coding RNA analysis, using RNA-Seq, in chicken embryonic fibroblast cells infected by avian leukosis virus J.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xuming; Chen, Shihao; Jia, Chongxin; Xue, Songlei; Dou, Chunfeng; Dai, Zhenqing; Xu, Hui; Sun, Zhen; Geng, Tuoyu; Cui, Hengmi

    2018-03-01

    Avian leukosis virus J (ALVJ) infection induces hematopoietic malignancy in myeloid leukemia and hemangioma in chickens. However, little is known about the mechanisms underpinning the unique pathogenesis of ALVJ. In this study, we investigated the gene expression profiles of ALVJ-infected chicken cells and performed a comprehensive analysis of the long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in CEF cells using RNA-Seq. As a result, 36 differentially expressed lncRNAs and 91 genes (FC > 2 and q-values IL4I1, and IRF1 (FC > 2 and correlation > 0.95), were highly correlated with the upregulation of several lncRNAs, including MG066618, MG066617, MG066601, MG066629, MG066609 and MG066616. These findings identify the expression profile of lncRNAs in chicken CEF cells infected by ALVJ virus and provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms of ALVJ infection.

  11. Pathogenicity of Shigella in Chickens

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    Chen, Lu; Chang, Hong-tao; Liu, Hong-ying; Zhao, Jun; Wang, Xin-wei; Wang, Chuan-qing

    2014-01-01

    Shigellosis in chickens was first reported in 2004. This study aimed to determine the pathogenicity of Shigella in chickens and the possibility of cross-infection between humans and chickens. The pathogenicity of Shigella in chickens was examined via infection of three-day-old SPF chickens with Shigella strain ZD02 isolated from a human patient. The virulence and invasiveness were examined by infection of the chicken intestines and primary chicken intestinal epithelial cells. The results showed Shigella can cause death via intraperitoneal injection in SPF chickens, but only induce depression via crop injection. Immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy revealed the Shigella can invade the intestinal epithelia. Immunohistochemistry of the primary chicken intestinal epithelial cells infected with Shigella showed the bacteria were internalized into the epithelial cells. Electron microscopy also confirmed that Shigella invaded primary chicken intestinal epithelia and was encapsulated by phagosome-like membranes. Our data demonstrate that Shigella can invade primary chicken intestinal epithelial cells in vitro and chicken intestinal mucosa in vivo, resulting in pathogenicity and even death. The findings suggest Shigella isolated from human or chicken share similar pathogenicity as well as the possibility of human-poultry cross-infection, which is of public health significance. PMID:24949637

  12. Protection Efficacy of Multivalent Egg Yolk Immunoglobulin against Eimeria Tenella Infection in Chickens

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    JJ Xu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: To control avian coccidiosis with drug-independent strategy effec­tively and safely, multivalent hyperimmune egg yolk immunoglobulin (IgY was prepared and its ability to protect against Eimeria tenella infection was evaluated.Methods: Hens were orally immunized with live oocysts of 5 species of Eimeria for six times, antibody titers in serum and yolk were monitored by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The specific IgY was isolated, purified and lyophi­lized. IgY powder was orally administrated as dietary supplement in newly hatched chicks at various dosages. Birds were orally challenged with 10000 sporulated oo­cysts of E. tenella at 10 days of age, weighed and killed at 8 days post challenge, and the protective effect was assessed.Results: The averge yeid of IgY was 9.2 mg/ml yolk, the antibody titer of IgY reached to 1:163840 per mg with the purity up to 98%. Chickens fed IgY resulted in reduced mortality, increased body weight gain (BWG, reduced oocyst shedding, reduced caecal lesion score and increased anti-coccidial index. In terms of BWG and caecal lesion, IgY significantly enhanced the resistance of bird at ≥ 0.05% of IgY in the diet when compared with the challenged control group (P0.05.Conclusion: Supplementing newly hatched chicks with Eimeria-specific IgY represents a promising strategy to prevent avian coccidiosis.

  13. Ontogenetic changes in immunity and susceptibility to fungal infection in Mormon crickets Anabrus simplex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insects have innate immunity that may be weakened by resource allocation to growth. I measured enzymatic immunity, encapsulation response, and susceptibility to fungal infection in Mormon crickets of known age. Although the concentrations of circulating spontaneous and total phenoloxidase (PO) incr...

  14. Urinary tract infection in male general practice patients: uropathogens and antibiotic susceptibility.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koeijers, J.J.; Verbon, A.; Kessels, A.G.H.; Bartelds, A.; Donker, G.; Nys, S.; Stobberingh, E.E.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate uropathogens and their antibiotic susceptibility in male general practitioner (GP) patients presenting with an uncomplicated urinary tract infection (UTI). Material and Methods: A population-based study was conducted among males, 18 years and older, general practice patients,

  15. Infection susceptibility and immune senescence with advancing age replicated in accelerated aging Lmna(Dhe) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Lijun; Jiang, Tony T; Kinder, Jeremy M; Ertelt, James M; Way, Sing Sing

    2015-12-01

    Aging confers increased susceptibility to common pathogens including influenza A virus. Despite shared vulnerability to infection with advancing age in humans and rodents, the relatively long time required for immune senescence to take hold practically restricts the use of naturally aged mice to investigate aging-induced immunological shifts. Here, we show accelerated aging Lmna(Dhe) mice with spontaneous mutation in the nuclear scaffolding protein, lamin A, replicate infection susceptibility, and substantial immune cell shifts that occur with advancing age. Naturally aged (≥ 20 month) and 2- to 3-month-old Lmna(Dhe) mice share near identically increased influenza A susceptibility compared with age-matched Lmna(WT) control mice. Increased mortality and higher viral burden after influenza infection in Lmna(Dhe) mice parallel reduced accumulation of lung alveolar macrophage cells, systemic expansion of immune suppressive Foxp3⁺ regulatory T cells, and skewed immune dominance among viral-specific CD8⁺T cells similar to the immunological phenotype of naturally aged mice. Thus, aging-induced infection susceptibility and immune senescence are replicated in accelerated aging Lmna(Dhe) mice. © 2015 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Increased susceptibility to infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAv) in Lepeophtheirus salmonis – infected Atlantic salmon

    Science.gov (United States)

    The salmon louse and infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAv) are the two most significant pathogens of concern to the Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) aquaculture industry. However, the interactions between sea lice and ISAv, as well as the impact of a prior sea lice infection on the susceptibility of th...

  17. Experimental infection of Aphanomyces invadans and susceptibility in seven species of tropical fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedeh F. Afzali

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Epizootic ulcerative syndrome (EUS causes by aquatic oomycete fungus, Aphanomyces invadans is a dangerous fish disease of a wide range of fresh and brackish water, wild and farmed fish throughout the world. The objective of the present study was to determine the susceptibility of a number of tropical fish species to the EUS and compare the severity of infection between experimental groups. Materials and Methods: Snakehead, Channa striata (Bloch, 1793; snakeskin gourami, Trichopodus pectoralis (Regan, 1910; koi carp, Cyprinus carpio (Linnaeus, 1758; broadhead catfish, Clarias macrocephalus (Günther, 1864; goldfish, Carassius auratus (Linnaeus, 1758; climbing perch, Anabas testudineus (Bloch, 1792; and Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus (Linnaeus, 1758 were challenged by intramuscular injection using zoospores of Aphanomyces invadans (NJM9701. The infected fish skins and muscles were examined for EUS histopathological characteristics, and the results on the severity of lesions and mortality were analyzed using SPSS program. Results: All zoospore-injected fish were shown to be susceptible to the EUS infection except Nile tilapia. Although, the general histopathological pattern was similar in the zoospore-injected group, but there were some variation in granulomatous reaction, that is the presence or absence of giant cells, and time of mortality were detected. The result of statistical analysis showed that there was a significant difference between species, (c2=145.11 and p<0.01. Conclusion: Gourami, koi carp, and catfish were demonstrated to be highly susceptible while goldfish and climbing perch were found to be moderately susceptible to the EUS infection. These findings suggested that the cellular response of fish to mycotic infection and granulomatous reaction varied in different fish species, which could not be an indicator of susceptibility or resistant to the EUS itself, although it was shown that the granulation rate and the level of

  18. Experimental infection of highly and low pathogenic avian influenza viruses to chickens, ducks, tree sparrows, jungle crows, and black rats for the evaluation of their roles in virus transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiono, Takahiro; Okamatsu, Masatoshi; Yamamoto, Naoki; Ogasawara, Kohei; Endo, Mayumi; Kuribayashi, Saya; Shichinohe, Shintaro; Motohashi, Yurie; Chu, Duc-Huy; Suzuki, Mizuho; Ichikawa, Takaya; Nishi, Tatsuya; Abe, Yuri; Matsuno, Keita; Tanaka, Kazuyuki; Tanigawa, Tsutomu; Kida, Hiroshi; Sakoda, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIVs) have spread in both poultry and wild birds. Determining transmission routes of these viruses during an outbreak is essential for the control of avian influenza. It has been widely postulated that migratory ducks play crucial roles in the widespread dissemination of HPAIVs in poultry by carrying viruses along with their migrations; however close contacts between wild migratory ducks and poultry are less likely in modern industrial poultry farming settings. Therefore, we conducted experimental infections of HPAIVs and low pathogenic avian influenza viruses (LPAIVs) to chickens, domestic ducks, tree sparrows, jungle crows, and black rats to evaluate their roles in virus transmission. The results showed that chickens, ducks, sparrows, and crows were highly susceptible to HPAIV infection. Significant titers of virus were recovered from the sparrows and crows infected with HPAIVs, which suggests that they potentially play roles of transmission of HPAIVs to poultry. In contrast, the growth of LPAIVs was limited in each of the animals tested compared with that of HPAIVs. The present results indicate that these common synanthropes play some roles in influenza virus transmission from wild birds to poultry. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern of Aerobic and Anaerobic Bacteria Isolated From Surgical Site Infection of Hospitalized Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhi, Mohammad Taghi; Ghotaslou, Reza; Beheshtirouy, Samad; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad; Pirzadeh, Tahereh; Asghari, Babak; Alizadeh, Naser; Toloue Ostadgavahi, Ali; Sorayaei Somesaraei, Vida; Memar, Mohammad Yousef

    2015-07-01

    Surgical Site Infections (SSIs) are infections of incision or deep tissue at operation sites. These infections prolong hospitalization, delay wound healing, and increase the overall cost and morbidity. This study aimed to investigate anaerobic and aerobic bacteria prevalence in surgical site infections and determinate antibiotic susceptibility pattern in these isolates. One hundred SSIs specimens were obtained by needle aspiration from purulent material in depth of infected site. These specimens were cultured and incubated in both aerobic and anaerobic condition. For detection of antibiotic susceptibility pattern in aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, we used disk diffusion, agar dilution, and E-test methods. A total of 194 bacterial strains were isolated from 100 samples of surgical sites. Predominant aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria isolated from these specimens were the members of Enterobacteriaceae family (66, 34.03%) followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (26, 13.4%), Staphylococcus aureus (24, 12.37%), Acinetobacter spp. (18, 9.28%), Enterococcus spp. (16, 8.24%), coagulase negative Staphylococcus spp. (14, 7.22%) and nonhemolytic streptococci (2, 1.03%). Bacteroides fragilis (26, 13.4%), and Clostridium perfringens (2, 1.03%) were isolated as anaerobic bacteria. The most resistant bacteria among anaerobic isolates were B. fragilis. All Gram-positive isolates were susceptible to vancomycin and linezolid while most of Enterobacteriaceae showed sensitivity to imipenem. Most SSIs specimens were polymicrobial and predominant anaerobic isolate was B. fragilis. Isolated aerobic and anaerobic strains showed high level of resistance to antibiotics.

  20. Susceptibility and resistance to Echinococcus granulosus infection: Associations between mouse strains and early peritoneal immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourglia-Ettlin, Gustavo; Merlino, Alicia; Capurro, Rafael; Dematteis, Sylvia

    2016-03-01

    In helminth infections, there are no easy associations between host susceptibility and immune responses. Interestingly, immunity to cestodes - unlike most helminths - seems to require Th1-type effectors. In this sense, we reported recently that Balb/c and C57Bl/6 mice are high and low susceptible strains, respectively, to experimental infection by Echinococcus granulosus. However, the role of the early cellular peritoneal response in such differential susceptibility is unknown. Here, we analyzed the kinetics of cytokines expression and cellular phenotypes in peritoneal cells from infected Balb/c and C57Bl/6 mice. Additionally, Principal Components Analysis (PCA) were conducted to highlight the most relevant differences between strains. Finally, the anti-parasite activities of peritoneal cells were assessed through in vitro systems. PCAs clustered C57Bl/6 mice by their early mixed IL-5/TNF-α responses and less intense expression of Th2-type cytokines. Moreover, they exhibited lower counts of eosinophils and higher numbers of macrophages and B cells. Functional studies showed that peritoneal cells from infected C57Bl/6 mice displayed greater anti-parasite activities, in accordance with higher rates of NO production and more efficient ADCC responses. In conclusion, mild Th2-responses and active cellular mechanisms are key determinants in murine resistance to E. granulosus infection, supporting the cestode immune exception among helminth parasites. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Wild Birds, a Source of Reticuloendotheliosis Virus Infection for the Endangered Attwater's Prairie-Chicken ( Tympanuchus cupido attwateri)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Pamela J; Morrow, Michael E; Flanagan, Joseph P; Ortego, Brent; Chester, Rebecca E; Mueller, James M; Lupiani, Blanca

    2017-07-01

    Reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) infects a wide range of avian species. Since 1998, when it was first reported in a captive flock of the endangered Attwater's Prairie-chicken ( Tympanuchus cupido attwateri; APC), REV has plagued APC recovery efforts. While REV frequently occurs in captive bird flocks throughout the world, including commercial poultry, the reservoir for initial infection of flocks is poorly understood. From 2008-16, 412 blood samples and 216 liver samples collected from 32 species of birds on or near Attwater Prairie Chicken National Wildlife Refuge in Colorado County, Texas, US, and 89 blood samples obtained from a Texas game farm that provides thousands of Northern Bobwhites ( Colinus virginianus ) and Ring-necked Pheasants ( Phasianus colchicus ) for hunting throughout Texas, were tested for REV by real-time PCR. Of the 717 samples, one liver sample from a Savannah Sparrow ( Passerculus sandwichensis ) and three blood samples from game farm Ring-necked Pheasants tested positive for REV. These data, although limited, indicate a low prevalence of REV in birds sharing or in close proximity to APC habitat. More-extensive surveillance testing is warranted to determine the spatial and temporal dynamics of REV in wild bird populations and the relative role these birds may play as potential reservoirs for maintaining REV infections in both the wild and captive setting.

  2. Immunodeficiency in the chicken. II. Production of monomeric IgM following testosterone treatment or infection with Gumboro disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanyi, J

    1975-06-01

    Chickens were treated at an early embryonal age with testosterone propionate or infected neonatally with the virus producing Gumboro disease. Their sera were subsequently fractionated by Sephadex G-200 chromatography, and showed a complete deficiency of IgG and the presence of IgM which was eluted with the 7S protein fraction. Purified and 125-I-labelled monomeric IgM was examined by SDS-acrylamide gel electrophoresis and found to contain both mu and light chains, together with a chain of intermediary size, which was absent from the patterns of 19S IgM or IgG.

  3. Antibiotic susceptibility of bacteria isolated from infections in cats and dogs throughout Europe (2002-2009).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroemer, Stéphane; El Garch, Farid; Galland, Delphine; Petit, Jean-Luc; Woehrle, Frédérique; Boulouis, Henri-Jean

    2014-03-01

    A monitoring program of the pre-treatment susceptibility of clinical isolates of bacteria from diseased dogs and cats was active between the years 2002 and 2009. Susceptibility of each isolated strain to a panel of nine antibiotics (amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, ampicillin, penicillin, clindamycin, doxycycline, enrofloxacin, marbofloxacin, trimethoprim and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole) was assessed. The Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of marbofloxacin was also determined by a standardized microdilution technique following CLSI recommendations. In total, 1857 bacterial strains were collected throughout Europe from cases of otitis, respiratory, urinary and dermatological infections. Although bacterial susceptibility varied for each of the antibiotics within the panel, patterns of susceptibility were similar to those described in the literature for comparable time periods and geographical areas. With a clinical resistance varying from 0 to 14.48% against the isolated strains, marbofloxacin susceptibility was very high and remains an effective antibiotic for the treatment of otitis, urinary, respiratory and dermatological infections in companion animals. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. The effects of inbreeding on disease susceptibility: Gyrodactylus turnbulli infection of guppies, Poecilia reticulata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallbone, Willow; van Oosterhout, Cock; Cable, Jo

    2016-08-01

    Inbreeding can threaten population persistence by reducing disease resistance through the accelerated loss of gene diversity (i.e. heterozygosity). Such inbreeding depression can affect many different fitness-related traits, including survival, reproductive success, and parasite susceptibility. Empirically quantifying the effects of inbreeding on parasite resistance is therefore important for ex-situ conservation of vertebrates. The present study evaluates the disease susceptibility of individuals bred under three different breeding regimes (inbred, crossed with full siblings; control, randomly crossed mating; and fully outbred). Specifically, we examined the relationship between inbreeding coefficient (F-coefficient) and susceptibility to Gyrodactylus turnbulli infection in a live bearing vertebrate, the guppy Poecilia reticulata. Host-breeding regime significantly affected the trajectories of parasite population growth on individual fish. Inbred fish showed significantly higher mean parasite intensity than fish from the control and outbred breeding regimes, and in addition, inbred fish were slower in purging their gyrodactylid infections. We discuss the role of inbreeding on the various arms of the immune system, and argue that the increased disease susceptibility of inbred individuals could contribute to the extinction vortex. This is one of the first studies to quantify the effects of inbreeding and breeding regime on disease susceptibility in a captive bred vertebrate of wild origin, and it highlights the risks faced by small (captive-bred) populations when exposed to their native parasites. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Virus Infection of Plants Alters Pollinator Preference: A Payback for Susceptible Hosts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, Matthew P.; Bruce, Toby J. A.; Caulfield, John C.; Furzer, Oliver J.; Reed, Alison; Robinson, Sophie I.; Miller, Elizabeth; Davis, Christopher N.; Pickett, John A.; Whitney, Heather M.; Glover, Beverley J.; Carr, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Plant volatiles play important roles in attraction of certain pollinators and in host location by herbivorous insects. Virus infection induces changes in plant volatile emission profiles, and this can make plants more attractive to insect herbivores, such as aphids, that act as viral vectors. However, it is unknown if virus-induced alterations in volatile production affect plant-pollinator interactions. We found that volatiles emitted by cucumber mosaic virus (CMV)-infected tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and Arabidopsis thaliana plants altered the foraging behaviour of bumblebees (Bombus terrestris). Virus-induced quantitative and qualitative changes in blends of volatile organic compounds emitted by tomato plants were identified by gas chromatography-coupled mass spectrometry. Experiments with a CMV mutant unable to express the 2b RNA silencing suppressor protein and with Arabidopsis silencing mutants implicate microRNAs in regulating emission of pollinator-perceivable volatiles. In tomato, CMV infection made plants emit volatiles attractive to bumblebees. Bumblebees pollinate tomato by ‘buzzing’ (sonicating) the flowers, which releases pollen and enhances self-fertilization and seed production as well as pollen export. Without buzz-pollination, CMV infection decreased seed yield, but when flowers of mock-inoculated and CMV-infected plants were buzz-pollinated, the increased seed yield for CMV-infected plants was similar to that for mock-inoculated plants. Increased pollinator preference can potentially increase plant reproductive success in two ways: i) as female parents, by increasing the probability that ovules are fertilized; ii) as male parents, by increasing pollen export. Mathematical modeling suggested that over a wide range of conditions in the wild, these increases to the number of offspring of infected susceptible plants resulting from increased pollinator preference could outweigh underlying strong selection pressures favoring pathogen resistance

  6. Virus Infection of Plants Alters Pollinator Preference: A Payback for Susceptible Hosts?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon C Groen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Plant volatiles play important roles in attraction of certain pollinators and in host location by herbivorous insects. Virus infection induces changes in plant volatile emission profiles, and this can make plants more attractive to insect herbivores, such as aphids, that act as viral vectors. However, it is unknown if virus-induced alterations in volatile production affect plant-pollinator interactions. We found that volatiles emitted by cucumber mosaic virus (CMV-infected tomato (Solanum lycopersicum and Arabidopsis thaliana plants altered the foraging behaviour of bumblebees (Bombus terrestris. Virus-induced quantitative and qualitative changes in blends of volatile organic compounds emitted by tomato plants were identified by gas chromatography-coupled mass spectrometry. Experiments with a CMV mutant unable to express the 2b RNA silencing suppressor protein and with Arabidopsis silencing mutants implicate microRNAs in regulating emission of pollinator-perceivable volatiles. In tomato, CMV infection made plants emit volatiles attractive to bumblebees. Bumblebees pollinate tomato by 'buzzing' (sonicating the flowers, which releases pollen and enhances self-fertilization and seed production as well as pollen export. Without buzz-pollination, CMV infection decreased seed yield, but when flowers of mock-inoculated and CMV-infected plants were buzz-pollinated, the increased seed yield for CMV-infected plants was similar to that for mock-inoculated plants. Increased pollinator preference can potentially increase plant reproductive success in two ways: i as female parents, by increasing the probability that ovules are fertilized; ii as male parents, by increasing pollen export. Mathematical modeling suggested that over a wide range of conditions in the wild, these increases to the number of offspring of infected susceptible plants resulting from increased pollinator preference could outweigh underlying strong selection pressures favoring pathogen

  7. PFGE and antibiotic susceptibility phenotype analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain chronically infecting Cystic Fibrosis patients

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    Giovanna Pulcrano

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the leading cause of chronic lung infection and following pulmonary worsening of cystic fibrosis patients. To verify whether bacterial modifications regarding motility, mucoidy, and serum susceptibility proceeded from an adaptation to chronic infection or a replacement with a new strain, sequential P. aeruginosa isolates of known phenotype collected from 5 cystic fibrosis patients were typed by pulsed-field gel electophoresis (PFGE. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of all isolates was performed by the disc diffusion method. PFGE typing demonstrated that strains dissimilar in colony morphotype and of different antibiotic susceptibility patterns could be of the same genotype. Some patients were colonized with a rather constant P. aeruginosa flora, with strains of different phenotypes but of one genotype. Instead, some patients may be colonized by more than one genotype. Secretion of mucoid exopolysaccharide and acquisition of a new antibiotic susceptibility phenotype in these strain appear to evolve during chronic colonization in cystic fibrosis patients from specific adaptation to infection rather than from acquisition of new bacterial strains.

  8. beta-lactam susceptibility of Escherichia coli isolates from urinary tract infections exhibiting different resistance phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerma, M; Cebrián, L; Giménez, Mj; Coronel, P; Gimeno, M; Aguilar, L; García de Lomas, J

    2008-09-01

    Susceptibility to beta-lactams was determined in 203 recent Spanish E. coli isolates from urinary tract infections exhibiting different resistance phenotypes: a) susceptible (n = 60); b) quinolone-resistant (n = 45); c) penicillinase (n=64); d) hyperproduction of penicillinase (n=8); e) inhibitor resistant TEM (IRT) (n=18), and f) extended spectrum betalactamase (ESBL) (n=8).Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) determination by agar dilution and susceptibility tests for ESBL detection by macrodilution were performed following CLSI recommendations. All the beta-lactams tested showed high activity against susceptible and penicillinase phenotypes, with close to 100 % susceptibility. Hyperproduction of penicillinase increased MIC90 values for all antibiotics except for meropenem, with 100% resistance to cefuroxime and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, and 100% susceptibility to cefotaxime, piperacillin/tazobactam and meropenem. All the antibiotics, except for amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, exhibited high activity against IRT. Meropenem, cefminox and piperacillin/tazobactam exhibited the highest activity against ESBL, followed by amoxicillin/clavulanic acid. The most active compound among the parenteral antibiotics was meropenem, regardless of the resistance phenotype. Among the oral antibiotics, the most active compound was cefditoren with the exception of ESBL where amoxicillin/clavulanic acid where the MIC90 value was one dilution lower.

  9. Are European lobsters (Homarus gammarus) susceptible to infection by a temperate Hematodinium sp.?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Charlotte E; Rowley, Andrew F

    2015-05-01

    Hematodinium spp. infect over 40 species of crustaceans worldwide, but have not been reported to infect the European lobster, Homarus gammarus. In this study, Hematodinium parasites (a mixture of uni- and multinucleate trophont-like stages) were taken from donor crabs (Cancer pagurus) and injected into juvenile H. gammarus. Juvenile C. pagurus were also injected with the same inoculum. Haemolymph was taken at regular intervals and examined for the presence of Hematodinium using light microscopy and PCR, in two separate experiments of duration 4 and 8months. All lobsters were negative for Hematodinium whilst the C. pagurus challenged became infected. It is concluded that European lobsters are not susceptible to infection with a clade of Hematodinium that infects C. pagurus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of antibiotic susceptibility in wound infections: A pilot study from Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sushmita; Ahmed, Mejbah Uddin; Uddin, Bhuiyan Mohammad Mahtab; Ratan, Zubair Ahmed; Rajawat, Monali; Mehta, Varshil; Zaman, Sojib Bin

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Infections due to antibiotic resistant bacteria have increased alarmingly in both developed and developing countries. Unrestrained and rapidly spreading bacterial growth has turned the management of wound infections into a serious challenge. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of different bacterial pathogens and their antibiotic susceptibility in various types of wound infections. Methods:  A cross-sectional study was conducted to collect 105 wound swabs. All isolated bacteria were identified based on colony characteristics, gram stain and standard biochemical tests, and antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST) with the disc diffusion method. Descriptive statistics were used to present the study findings, and all analyses were performed using Stata Version 13. Results:  The rate of isolation of bacteria was 92.3%. Staphylococcus aureus was found to be the most frequent isolate (55.7%), followed by Escherichia coli (23.7%), Pseudomonas spp. (8.2%), and Streptococcus pyogenes (7.2%). Gram-positive bacteria were mostly (60%) found sensitive to vancomycin, azithromycin, gentamicin, imipenem, cefixime, and ceftriaxone in this study. Among the Gram-negative bacteria, Escherichia coli (>60%) showed sensitivity to cefixime, azithromycin, cefuroxime, ceftriaxone, cefotaxime, gentamycin, and ceftazidime. Conclusions: The diversity of isolated bacteria and their susceptibility patterns signify a need to implement a proper infection control strategy, which can be achieved by carrying out antibiotic sensitivity tests of the isolates. PMID:29527295

  11. Susceptibility and Response of Human Blood Monocyte Subsets to Primary Dengue Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kok Loon; Chen, Weiqiang; Balakrishnan, Thavamalar; Toh, Ying Xiu

    2012-01-01

    Human blood monocytes play a central role in dengue infections and form the majority of virus infected cells in the blood. Human blood monocytes are heterogeneous and divided into CD16− and CD16+ subsets. Monocyte subsets play distinct roles during disease, but it is not currently known if monocyte subsets differentially contribute to dengue protection and pathogenesis. Here, we compared the susceptibility and response of the human CD16− and CD16+ blood monocyte subsets to primary dengue virus in vitro. We found that both monocyte subsets were equally susceptible to dengue virus (DENV2 NGC), and capable of supporting the initial production of new infective virus particles. Both monocyte subsets produced anti-viral factors, including IFN-α, CXCL10 and TRAIL. However, CD16+ monocytes were the major producers of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in response to dengue virus, including IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, CCL2, 3 and 4. The susceptibility of both monocyte subsets to infection was increased after IL-4 treatment, but this increase was more profound for the CD16+ monocyte subset, particularly at early time points after virus exposure. These findings reveal the differential role that monocyte subsets might play during dengue disease. PMID:22574162

  12. Infection Susceptibility in Gastric Intrinsic Factor (Vitamin B12-Defective Mice Is Subject to Maternal Influences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynda Mottram

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Mice harboring a mutation in the gene encoding gastric intrinsic factor (Gif, a protein essential for the absorption of vitamin B12/cobalamin (Cbl, have potential as a model to explore the role of vitamins in infection. The levels of Cbl in the blood of Giftm1a/tm1a mutant mice were influenced by the maternal genotype, with offspring born to heterozygous (high Cbl, F1 mothers exhibiting a significantly higher serum Cbl level than those born to homozygous (low Cbl, F2 equivalents. Low Cbl levels correlated with susceptibility to an infectious challenge with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium or Citrobacter rodentium, and this susceptibility phenotype was moderated by Cbl administration. Transcriptional and metabolic profiling revealed that Cbl deficient mice exhibited a bioenergetic shift similar to a metabolic phenomenon commonly found in cancerous cells under hypoxic conditions known as the Warburg effect, with this metabolic effect being exacerbated further by infection. Our findings demonstrate a role for Cbl in bacterial infection, with potential general relevance to dietary deficiency and infection susceptibility.

  13. Susceptibility and response of human blood monocyte subsets to primary dengue virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kok Loon Wong

    Full Text Available Human blood monocytes play a central role in dengue infections and form the majority of virus infected cells in the blood. Human blood monocytes are heterogeneous and divided into CD16(- and CD16(+ subsets. Monocyte subsets play distinct roles during disease, but it is not currently known if monocyte subsets differentially contribute to dengue protection and pathogenesis. Here, we compared the susceptibility and response of the human CD16(- and CD16(+ blood monocyte subsets to primary dengue virus in vitro. We found that both monocyte subsets were equally susceptible to dengue virus (DENV2 NGC, and capable of supporting the initial production of new infective virus particles. Both monocyte subsets produced anti-viral factors, including IFN-α, CXCL10 and TRAIL. However, CD16(+ monocytes were the major producers of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in response to dengue virus, including IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, CCL2, 3 and 4. The susceptibility of both monocyte subsets to infection was increased after IL-4 treatment, but this increase was more profound for the CD16(+ monocyte subset, particularly at early time points after virus exposure. These findings reveal the differential role that monocyte subsets might play during dengue disease.

  14. Cytokines produced by susceptible and resistant mice in the course of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calich V.L.G.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM is the most prevalent deep mycosis in Latin America and presents a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations. We established a genetically controlled murine model of PCM, where A/Sn mice develop an infection which mimics the benign disease (immune responses which favor cellular immunity and B10.A animals present the progressive disseminated form of PCM (preferential activation of B cells and impairment of cellular immune responses. To understand the immunoregulatory phenomena associated with resistance and susceptibility in experimental PCM, A/Sn and B10.A mice were studied regarding antigen-elicited secretion of monokines (TNF-a and TGF-ß and type-1 (IL-2 and IFN-g and type-2 (IL-4,5,10 cytokines. Total lymph node cells from resistant mice infected ip with P. brasiliensis produced early and sustained levels of IFN-g and IL-2; type-2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-5 started to appear 8 weeks after infection. In contrast, susceptible mice produced low levels of IFN-g concomitant with significant levels of IL-5 and IL-10 early in the infection. In the chronic phase of the disease, susceptible animals presented a transitory secretion of IL-2, and IL-4. In the pulmonary infection IL-4, IL-5 and IL-10 were preferentially detected in the lung cells washings of susceptible animals. After in vitro challenge with fungal antigens, normal peritoneal macrophages from B10.A mice secreted high levels of TGF-ß and low levels of TNF-a. In contrast, macrophages from A/Sn animals released high levels of TNF-a associated with a small production of TGF-ß. The in vivo depletion of IFN-g not only abrogated the resistance of A/Sn mice but also diminished the relative resistance of B10.A animals. The in vivo depletion of IL-4 did not alter the disease outcome, whereas administration of rIL-12 significantly enhanced resistance in susceptible animals. Taken together, these results suggest that an early secretion of high levels of TNF-a and IFN

  15. Species distribution & antifungal susceptibility pattern of oropharyngeal Candida isolates from human immunodeficiency virus infected individuals

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    Partha Pratim Das

    2016-01-01

    Results: From the 59 culture positive HIV seropositive cases, 61 Candida isolates were recovered; Candidaalbicans (n=47, 77.0%, C. dubliniensis (n=9, 14.7%, C. parapsilosis (n=2, 3.2%, C. glabrata (n=2, 3.2%, and C. famata (n=1, 1.6%. Candida colonization in HIV-seropositive individuals was significantly higher than that of HIV-seronegative (control group. Antifungal susceptibility testing revealed (n=6, 9.3% C. albicans isolates resistant to voriconazole and fluconazole by disk-diffusion method whereas no resistance was seen by Fungitest method. Interpretation & conclusions: C. albicans was the commonest Candida species infecting or colonizing HIV seropositive individuals. Oropharyngeal Candida isolates had high level susceptibility to all the major antifungals commonly in use. Increased level of immunosuppression in HIV-seropositives and drug resistance of non-albicans Candida species makes identification and susceptibility testing of Candida species necessary in different geographical areas of the country.

  16. The Emergence of Reduced Ciprofloxacin Susceptibility in Salmonella enterica Causing Bloodstream Infections in Rural Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eibach, Daniel; Al-Emran, Hassan M; Dekker, Denise Myriam; Krumkamp, Ralf; Adu-Sarkodie, Yaw; Cruz Espinoza, Ligia Maria; Ehmen, Christa; Boahen, Kennedy; Heisig, Peter; Im, Justin; Jaeger, Anna; von Kalckreuth, Vera; Pak, Gi Deok; Panzner, Ursula; Park, Se Eun; Reinhardt, Alexander; Sarpong, Nimako; Schütt-Gerowitt, Heidi; Wierzba, Thomas F; Marks, Florian; May, Jürgen

    2016-03-15

    Salmonella ranks among the leading causes of bloodstream infections in sub-Saharan Africa. Multidrug resistant typhoidal and nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) isolates have been previously identified in this region. However, resistance to ciprofloxacin has rarely been reported in West Africa. This study aims to assess susceptibility against ciprofloxacin in Salmonella causing invasive bloodstream infections among children in rural Ghana. From May 2007 until May 2012, children attending a rural district hospital in central Ghana were eligible for recruitment. Salmonella enterica isolated from blood cultures were assessed for ciprofloxacin susceptibility by Etest (susceptible minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC] ≤ 0.06 µg/mL). The gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE genes were sequenced to identify mutations associated with changes in susceptibility to fluoroquinolones. Two hundred eighty-five Salmonella enterica isolates from 5211 blood cultures were most commonly identified as Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (n = 129 [45%]), Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (n = 89 [31%]), Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin (n = 20 [7%]), and Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (n = 19 [7%]). All S. Typhi and S. Dublin were susceptible to ciprofloxacin. Reduced susceptibility (MIC >0.06 µg/mL) was found in 53% (10/19) of S. Enteritidis and in 2% (3/129) of S. Typhimurium isolates. Sequencing detected a single gyrB mutation (Glu466Asp) and a single gyrA mutation (Ser83Tyr) in all 3 S. Typhimurium isolates, while 9 of 10 S. Enteritidis harbored single gyrA mutations (Asp87Gly, Asp87Asn, or Asp87Tyr). No mutations were found in the parC and parE genes. Ciprofloxacin susceptibility in invasive NTS in rural Ghana is highly dependent on serotype. Although reduced ciprofloxacin susceptibility is low in S. Typhimurium, more than half of all S. Enteritidis isolates are affected. Healthcare practitioners in Ghana should be aware of potential treatment failure in patients with invasive

  17. Down-regulation of chicken interleukin-17 receptor A in Eimeria infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Both IL-17A and IL-17F are proinflammatory cytokines, which play an important role in intestinal homeostasis through their receptor signaling. In chickens, these two cytokines have been recently characterized, but to date, very little is known about their receptors and their functional activity. Th...

  18. Performance and oocyst shedding in broiler chickens orally infected with Cryptosporidium baileyi and Cryptosporidium meleagridis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marounek, Milan; Tůmová, E.; Skřivan, M.; Pavlásek, I.; Ledvinka, Z.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 46, - (2002), s. 203-207 ISSN 0005-2086 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA524/99/0480; GA AV ČR KSK5020115 Keywords : chickens * experimental cryptosporidiosis * performance Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.151, year: 2002

  19. Immune Regulatory Effects of Enteromorphaclathrata Polysaccharides on Nd Attenuated Vaccine in a Chicken Model Infected with Reticuloendotheliosis Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q Sun

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV infection has frequently affected the poultry industry in recent years. The infection with REV weakens the immune responses of the infected poultry. It is reported that Enteromorphaclathrata polysaccharides are capable of regulating immune function. In order to investigate the immuno regulatory effects of Enteromorphaclathrata polysaccharides (EPS on the response of REV-infected broilers to a live attenuated Newcastle disease (ND vaccine. Broilers were intraperitoneally injected with REV at one day of age, subcutaneously infected with EPS at 2 days of age, and vaccinated by nasal drip with a live attenuated ND (Lasota strain vaccine at 5 days of age. Immune organ index, secretory immunoglobulinA (SIgA, peripheral blood heterophil to lymphocyte ratios (H/L ratio, peripheral blood lymphocyte transformation rates, and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ and interleukin-2 (IL-2 levels were measured at 3, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, 42, and 56 days of age. The results showed that EPS increased the immune organ index, and the secretion of small intestine secretory immunoglobulin A, serum ND antibody titers, blood H/L ratio, peripheral blood lymphocyte transformation rates, and IL-2 and IFN-γ levels. These results indicate that EPS are able to enhance the immune responses of chickens both to REV infection and to ND vaccination. Therefore, Enteromorphaclathrata polysaccharides can be considered as an immune regulator in the future.

  20. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Acinetobacter clinical isolates and emerging antibiogram trends for nosocomial infection management

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    Muhammad Sohail

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Introduction: The drug resistant Acinetobacter strains are important causes of nosocomial infections that are difficult to control and treat. This study aimed to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of Acinetobacter strains isolated from different clinical specimens obtained from patients belonging to different age groups. METHODS: In total, 716 non-duplicate Acinetobacter isolates were collected from the infected patients admitted to tertiary-care hospitals at Lahore, Pakistan, over a period of 28 months. The Acinetobacter isolates were identified using API 20E, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed and interpreted according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI guidelines. RESULTS: The isolation rate of Acinetobacter was high from the respiratory specimens, followed by wound samples. Antibiotic susceptibility analyses of the isolates revealed that the resistance to cefotaxime and ceftazidime was the most common, in 710 (99.2% specimens each, followed by the resistance to gentamicin in 670 (93.6% isolates, and to imipenem in 651 (90.9% isolates. However, almost all isolates were susceptible to tigecycline, colistin, and polymyxin B. CONCLUSIONS: The present study showed the alarming trends of resistance of Acinetobacter strains isolated from clinical specimens to the various classes of antimicrobials. The improvement of microbiological techniques for earlier and more accurate identification of bacteria is necessary for the selection of appropriate treatments.

  1. Genetic markers between Biomphalaria glabrata snails susceptible and resistant to Schistosoma mansoni infection

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    RGM Spada

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the genetic variability related to susceptibility to Schistosoma mansoni infection in the vector of the genus Biomphalaria is important in terms of a better understanding of the epidemiology of schistosomiasis itself, the possible pathological implications of this interaction in vertebrate hosts, and the formulation of new strategies and approaches for disease control. In the present study, the genetic variability of B. glabrata strains found to be resistant or susceptible to S. mansoni infection was investigated using DNA amplification by random amplified polymorphic DNA-polymerase chain reaction (RAPD-PCR. The amplification products were analyzed on 8% polyacrylamide gel and stained with silver. We selected 10 primers, since they have previously been useful to detect polymorphism among B. glabrata and/or B. tenagophila. The results showed polymorphisms with 5 primers. Polymorphic bands observed only in the susceptible strain. The RAPD-PCR methodology represents an adequate approach for the analysis of genetic polymorphisms. The understanding of the genetic polymorphisms associated to resistance may contribute to the future identification of genomic sequences related to the resistance/susceptibility of Biomphalaria to the larval forms of S. mansoni and to the development of new strategies for the control of schistosomiasis.

  2. Comparative study of genetic influence on the susceptibility of exotic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated comparatively the genetic influence on the susceptibility of exotic cockerels, pullets and broilers to natural infection with infectious bursal disease (IBD) virus in a flock of 150 seven-week-old exotic breed of chickens comprising of 50 Black Harco cockerels, 50 Black Harco pullets and 50 White ...

  3. Susceptibility to Yersinia pestis experimental infection in wild Rattus rattus, reservoir of plague in Madagascar

    OpenAIRE

    Tollenaere, C.; Rahalison, L.; Ranjalahy, M.; Duplantier, Jean-Marc; Rahelinirina, S.; Telfer, S.; Brouat, Carine

    2010-01-01

    In Madagascar, the black rat, Rattus rattus, is the main reservoir of plague (Yersinia pestis infection), a disease still responsible for hundreds of cases each year in this country. This study used experimental plague challenge to assess susceptibility in wild-caught rats to better understand how R. rattus can act as a plague reservoir. An important difference in plague resistance between rat populations from the plague focus (central highlands) and those from the plague-free zone (low altit...

  4. Susceptibility of bacteria isolated from acute gastrointestinal infections to rifaximin and other antimicrobial agents in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoa-Farías, O; Frati-Munari, A C; Peredo, M A; Flores-Juárez, S; Novoa-García, O; Galicia-Tapia, J; Romero-Carpio, C E

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial resistance may hamper the antimicrobial management of acute gastroenteritis. Bacterial susceptibility to rifaximin, an antibiotic that achieves high fecal concentrations (up to 8,000μg/g), has not been evaluated in Mexico. To determine the susceptibility to rifaximin and other antimicrobial agents of enteropathogenic bacteria isolated from patients with acute gastroenteritis in Mexico. Bacterial strains were analyzed in stool samples from 1,000 patients with diagnosis of acute gastroenteritis. The susceptibility to rifaximin (RIF) was tested by microdilution (<100, <200, <400 and <800μg/ml) and susceptibility to chloramphenicol (CHL), trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (T-S), neomycin (NEO), furazolidone (FUR), fosfomycin (FOS), ampicillin (AMP) and ciprofloxacin (CIP) was tested by agar diffusion at the concentrations recommended by the Clinical & Laboratory Standards Institute and the American Society for Microbiology. Isolated bacteria were: enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli) (EPEC) 531, Shigella 120, non-Typhi Salmonella 117, Aeromonas spp. 80, enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) 54, Yersinia enterocolitica 20, Campylobacter jejuni 20, Vibrio spp. 20, Plesiomonas shigelloides 20, and enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC 0:157) 18. The overall cumulative susceptibility to RIF at <100, <200, <400, and <800μg/ml was 70.6, 90.8, 99.3, and 100%, respectively. The overall susceptibility to each antibiotic was: AMP 32.2%, T-S 53.6%, NEO 54.1%, FUR 64.7%, CIP 67.3%, CLO 73%, and FOS 81.3%. The susceptibility to RIF <400 and RIF <800μg/ml was significantly greater than with the other antibiotics (p<0.001). Resistance of enteropathogenic bacteria to various antibiotics used in gastrointestinal infections is high. Rifaximin was active against 99-100% of these enteropathogens at reachable concentrations in the intestine with the recommended dose. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  5. Phosphoproteomic analysis of the resistant and susceptible genotypes of maize infected with sugarcane mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Liuji; Wang, Shunxi; Wu, Jianyu; Han, Zanping; Wang, Rui; Wu, Liancheng; Zhang, Huimin; Chen, Yanhui; Hu, Xiuli

    2015-03-01

    Protein phosphorylation plays a pivotal role in the regulation of many cellular events. No information is yet available, however, on protein phosphorylation in plants in response to virus infection. In this study, we characterized phosphoproteomes of resistant and susceptible genotypes of maize (Zea mays L.) in response to Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) infection. Based on isotope tags for relative and absolute quantification technology, TiO2 enrichment method and LC-MS/MS analysis, we identified 65 and 59 phosphoproteins respectively, whose phosphorylation level regulated significantly in susceptible and resistant plants. Some identified phosphoproteins were shared by both genotypes, suggesting a partial overlapping of the responsive pathways to virus infection. While several phosphoproteins are well-known pathogen response phosphoproteins, virus infection differentially regulates most other phosphoproteins, which has not been reported in literature. Changes in protein phosphorylation status indicated that response to SCMV infection encompass a reformatting of major cellular processes. Our data provide new valuable insights into plant-virus interactions.

  6. Association of human platelet antigens polymorphisms with susceptibility to hepatitis C virus infection in Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, S-H; Liang, X-H; Shao, L-N; Yu, W-J; Zhao, C; Liu, M

    2017-12-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of chronic hepatitis. Previous studies have identified a number of single nucleotide polymorphisms that are associated with HCV infection. Human platelet antigens (HPAs) polymorphisms play an important role in several diseases. Here, we demonstrated the association of the HPA-2, HPA-3, HPA-5 and HPA-15 polymorphisms with susceptibility to HCV infection in Chinese population. Overall, 118 patients with HCV and 167 controls were genotyped for HPAs. There were no significant differences in the allele and genotype frequency distribution for the HPA-3, HPA-5 and HPA-15 systems between the patients with chronic HCV infection and the healthy controls (p > .05). However, the genotype frequency of HPA-2aa was significantly lower, while HPA-2ab/bb was significantly higher in patients than that in the controls (p = .006). The allele frequency of HPA-2a in patients was significantly lower than that in the control group (p = .005). In contrast, HPA-2b in patients was significantly higher than that in the control group (p = .005). We conclude that HPA-2 polymorphism is associated with susceptibility to HCV infection, and individuals carrying the HPA-2b allele may have a higher risk of HCV infection compared with individuals carrying HPA-2a. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Knowledge, attitudes, susceptibility and self-efficacy against HIV infection in adolescents from Cartagena, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irma Yolanda Castillo Avila

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine knowledge, attitudes, susceptibility and self-efficacy facing HIV infection in school adolescents in the city of Cartagena. Materials and methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was made with a reference population of 15,686 adolescents from formal educational institutions who are enrolled in tenth and eleventh grades. A sample of 580 adolescents was estimated, and a probabilistic multi-stage sample was applied. The HIV/AIDS-65 Scale was used for data collection, previous informed consent. The data were processed using the Microsoft Excel program and were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Results: A total of 579 adolescents with an average age of 15.6 years (= 0.9 years, mainly of female sex (65.6% (380 successfully completed the questionnaire. The 45% (261 presents deficient knowledge, 55% (318 presents misconceptions about the disease, 69.6% (400 showed negative attitudes, 46.1% (266 do not considered themselves susceptible to contract the disease and 49.5% (286 showed low self-efficacy for the prevention of the infection. Conclusion: Little knowledge about HIV and its modes of transmission, mixed with misconceptions, increases the likelihood of infection among adolescents, especially when negative attitudes, low perception of susceptibility and little self-efficacy for prevention are combined.

  8. Spread of Ebola disease with susceptible exposed infected isolated recovered (SEIIhR) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizah, Afina; Widyaningsih, Purnami; Retno Sari Saputro, Dewi

    2017-06-01

    Ebola is a deadly infectious disease and has caused an epidemic on several countries in West Africa. Mathematical modeling to study the spread of Ebola disease has been developed, including through models susceptible infected removed (SIR) and susceptible exposed infected removed (SEIR). Furthermore, susceptible exposed infected isolated recovered (SEIIhR) model has been derived. The aims of this research are to derive SEIIhR model for Ebola disease, to determine the patterns of its spread, to determine the equilibrium point and stability of the equilibrium point using phase plane analysis, and also to apply the SEIIhR model on Ebola epidemic in Sierra Leone in 2014. The SEIIhR model is a differential equation system. Pattern of ebola disease spread with SEIIhR model is solution of the differential equation system. The equilibrium point of SEIIhR model is unique and it is a disease-free equilibrium point that stable. Application of the model is based on the data Ebola epidemic in Sierra Leone. The free-disease equilibrium point (Se; Ee; Ie; Ihe; Re )=(5743865, 0, 0, 0, 0) is stable.

  9. Spread of Ebola disease with susceptible exposed infected isolated recovered (SEIIhR) model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azizah, Afina; Widyaningsih, Purnami; Saputro, Dewi Retno Sari

    2017-01-01

    Ebola is a deadly infectious disease and has caused an epidemic on several countries in West Africa. Mathematical modeling to study the spread of Ebola disease has been developed, including through models susceptible infected removed (SIR) and susceptible exposed infected removed (SEIR). Furthermore, susceptible exposed infected isolated recovered (SEII h R) model has been derived. The aims of this research are to derive SEII h R model for Ebola disease, to determine the patterns of its spread, to determine the equilibrium point and stability of the equilibrium point using phase plane analysis, and also to apply the SEII h R model on Ebola epidemic in Sierra Leone in 2014. The SEII h R model is a differential equation system. Pattern of ebola disease spread with SEII h R model is solution of the differential equation system. The equilibrium point of SEII h R model is unique and it is a disease-free equilibrium point that stable. Application of the model is based on the data Ebola epidemic in Sierra Leone. The free-disease equilibrium point ( S e ; E e ; I e ; I he ; R e )=(5743865, 0, 0, 0, 0) is stable. (paper)

  10. Susceptibility of pregnant women to toxoplasma infection--potential benefits for newborn screening.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ferguson, W

    2008-08-20

    Congenital toxoplasmosis (CT) arises as a result of new acquisition of Toxoplasma infection by a susceptible woman during pregnancy. Early detection of CT through neonatal screening programmes could optimize management and improve infant outcome. This study sought to estimate the prevalence of Toxoplasma susceptibility in pregnant women. As detection of Toxoplasma antibodies in neonatal blood reflects maternal exposure history, maternal antibody seroprevalence was determined using anonymized residual blood from newborn screening cards. A total of 20,252 cards were tested in 1 year. 4,991 (24.6%) cards tested positive for Toxoplasma antibody. Results were stratified by county. Toxoplasma antibody seroprevalence rates of 25% indicated that Toxoplasma infection is common in Ireland and that up to 75% of women remain susceptible to primary infection during pregnancy. This study aimed to a) determine the seroprevalence of Toxoplasma antibody in pregnant women, and hence b) estimate the risk for acquisition of primary toxoplasmosis in pregnancy in order to support an application to fund a pilot newborn screening programme.

  11. Staphylococcus aureus ocular infection: methicillin-resistance, clinical features, and antibiotic susceptibilities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Chun Chuang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA infection is an important public health issue. The study aimed to determine the prevalence of ocular infections caused by MRSA and to identify the clinical characteristics and antibiotic susceptibility of ocular MRSA infections by comparing those of ocular methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA infections. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The medical records of the patients (n = 519 with culture-proven S. aureus ocular infections seen between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 2008 in Chang Gung Memorial Hospital were retrospectively reviewed. Two hundred and seventy-four patients with MRSA and 245 with MSSA ocular infections were identified. The average rate of MRSA in S. aureus infections was 52.8% and the trend was stable over the ten years (P value for trend  = 0.228. MRSA ocular infections were significantly more common among the patients with healthcare exposure (P = 0.024, but 66.1% (181/274 patients with MRSA ocular infections had no healthcare exposure. The most common clinical presentation for both MRSA and MSSA ocular infections was keratitis; MRSA and MSSA caused a similar disease spectrum except for lid infections. MRSA was significantly more resistant than MSSA to clindamycin, erythromycin and sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (all P<0.001. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrated a paralleled trend of ocular MRSA infection in a highly prevalent MRSA country by hospital-based survey. Except for lid disorder, MRSA shared similar spectrum of ocular pathology with MSSA. Since S. aureus is a common ocular pathogen, our results raise clinician's attention to the existence of highly prevalent MRSA.

  12. The use of genetically marked infection cohorts to study changes in establishment rates during the time course of a repeated Ascaridia galli infection in chickens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferdushy, Tania; Luna Olivares, Luz Adilia; Nejsum, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the changes in establishment rates during the time course of a 6week trickle infection of chickens with Ascaridia galli at two different dose levels, using a molecular marker. To differentiate early and late infection, two different egg cohorts (haplotype a and haplotype b...

  13. Expression kinetics of chicken β2-microglobulin and Class I MHC in vitro and in vivo during Marek's disease viral infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chuan; Liu, Qiu; Qin, Aijian; Hu, Xuming; Xu, Wencai; Qian, Kun; Shao, Hongxia; Jin, Wenjie

    2013-12-01

    Marek's disease virus (MDV) is a highly cell-associated herpesvirus that causes a disease in chickens characterized by tumor formation and immunosuppression. The changes of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) expression in different MDV-infected cells are not completely understood. In this study, we investigated the expression of the Class I MHC and β2-microglobulin (β2m) genes in response to MDV infection at different time points by real-time PCR. In both in vitro and in vivo, the expression levels of Class I MHC and β2m genes were upregulated during early MDV infections in comparison to control cells; We also found that the expression of Class I MHC gene was downregulated in BudR (5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine)-treated MSB1 cells at 48 h and MDV-infected chicken embryo fibroblast cells (CEF) at 120 and 168 h post infection (hpi); Furthermore, compared to control groups, Class I MHC and β2m expression levels were downregulated in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLC) from MDV-infected chickens at 14 and 28 days post infection (dpi); Interestingly, both Class I MHC and β2m gene expression levels increased again in PBLC from MDV RB1B-infected chickens at 35 dpi, in which MDV was in the latent or transformed infection stages. In addition, Class I MHC expression was clearly decreased in MDV-infected CEF at 120 hpi although β2m expression was significantly increased. These changes in Class I MHC and β2m gene expression might provide more insights into host-virus interaction.

  14. Chicken-type lysozyme in channel catfish: expression analysis, lysozyme activity, and efficacy as immunostimulant against Aeromonas hydrophila infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pridgeon, Julia W; Klesius, Phillip H; Dominowski, Paul J; Yancey, Robert J; Kievit, Michele S

    2013-09-01

    To understand whether chicken-type lysozyme (Lys-c) in channel catfish was induced by infection of Aeromonas hydrophila, the transcriptional levels of Lys-c in skin, gut, liver, spleen, posterior kidney, and blood cells in healthy channel catfish was compared to that in channel catfish infected with A. hydrophila by bath immersion. Quantitative PCR revealed that the transcription levels of Lys-c in infected catfish were significantly (P lysozyme-c (pcDNA-Lys-c) was transfected in channel catfish gill cells G1B, the over-expression of pcDNA-Lys-c offered significant (P < 0.05) protection to G1B against A. hydrophila infection. When channel catfish were intraperitoneally injected with QCDCR adjuvant formulated pcDNA-Lys-c and challenged with a highly virulent A. hydrophila strain AL-09-71 at 1-, 2-, 14-, and 28-days post treatment, pcDNA-Lys-c offered 75%, 100%, 60%, and 77% protection to channel catfish, respectively. Macrophages of fish treated with pcDNA-Lys-c produced significantly (P < 0.05) higher amounts of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide than that of fish treated with pcDNA vector alone. Taken together, our results suggest that pcDNA-Lys-c could be used as a novel immunostimulant to protect channel catfish against A. hydrophila infection. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Tracing isolates from domestic human Campylobacter jejuni infections to chicken slaughter batches and swimming water using whole-genome multilocus sequence typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovanen, Sara; Kivistö, Rauni; Llarena, Ann-Katrin; Zhang, Ji; Kärkkäinen, Ulla-Maija; Tuuminen, Tamara; Uksila, Jaakko; Hakkinen, Marjaana; Rossi, Mirko; Hänninen, Marja-Liisa

    2016-06-02

    Campylobacter jejuni is the leading cause of bacterial gastroenteritis and chicken is considered a major reservoir and source of human campylobacteriosis. In this study, we investigated temporally related Finnish human (n=95), chicken (n=83) and swimming water (n=20) C. jejuni isolates collected during the seasonal peak in 2012 using multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and whole-genome MLST (wgMLST). Our objective was to trace domestic human C. jejuni infections to C. jejuni isolates from chicken slaughter batches and swimming water. At MLST level, 79% of the sequence types (STs) of the human isolates overlapped with chicken STs suggesting chicken as an important reservoir. Four STs, the ST-45, ST-230, ST-267 and ST-677, covered 75% of the human and 64% of the chicken isolates. In addition, 50% of the swimming water isolates comprised ST-45, ST-230 and ST-677. Further wgMLST analysis of the isolates within STs, accounting their temporal relationship, revealed that 22 of the human isolates (24%) were traceable back to C. jejuni positive chicken slaughter batches. None of the human isolates were traced back to swimming water, which was rather sporadically sampled. The highly discriminatory wgMLST, together with the patient background information and temporal relationship data with possible sources, offers a new, accurate approach to trace back the origin of domestic campylobacteriosis. Our results suggest that potentially a substantial proportion of campylobacteriosis cases during the seasonal peak most probably are due to other sources than chicken meat consumption. These findings warrant further wgMLST-based studies to reassess the role of other reservoirs in the Campylobacter epidemiology both in Finland and elsewhere. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Susceptibility of ePTFE vascular grafts and bioengineered human acellular vessels to infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkton, Robert D; Prichard, Heather L; Santiago-Maysonet, Maribel; Niklason, Laura E; Lawson, Jeffrey H; Dahl, Shannon L M

    2018-01-01

    Synthetic expanded polytetrafluorethylene (ePTFE) grafts are routinely used for vascular repair and reconstruction but prone to sustained bacterial infections. Investigational bioengineered human acellular vessels (HAVs) have shown clinical success and may confer lower susceptibility to infection. Here we directly compared the susceptibility of ePTFE grafts and HAV to bacterial contamination in a preclinical model of infection. Sections (1 cm 2 ) of ePTFE (n = 42) or HAV (n = 42) were inserted within bilateral subcutaneous pockets on the dorsum of rats and inoculated with Staphylococcus aureus (10 7  CFU/0.25 mL) or Escherichia coli (10 8  CFU/0.25 mL) before wound closure. Two weeks later, the implant sites were scored for abscess formation and explanted materials were halved for quantification of microbial recovery and histological analyses. The ePTFE implants had significantly higher abscess formation scores for both S. aureus and E. coli inoculations compared to that of HAV. In addition, significantly more bacteria were recovered from explanted ePTFE compared to HAV. Gram staining of explanted tissue sections revealed interstitial bacterial contamination within ePTFE, whereas no bacteria were identified in HAV tissue sections. Numerous CD45 + leukocytes, predominantly neutrophils, were found surrounding the ePTFE implants but minimal intact neutrophils were observed within the ePTFE matrix. The host cells surrounding and infiltrating the HAV explants were primarily nonleukocytes (CD45 - ). In an established animal model of infection, HAV was significantly less susceptible to bacterial colonization and abscess formation than ePTFE. The preclinical findings presented in this manuscript, combined with previously published clinical observations, suggest that bioengineered HAV may exhibit low rates of infection. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Ambiguous Role of Interleukin-12 in Yersinia enterocolitica Infection in Susceptible and Resistant Mouse Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohn, Erwin; Schmitt, Edgar; Bielfeldt, Claudia; Noll, Annette; Schulte, Ralf; Autenrieth, Ingo B.

    1998-01-01

    Endogenous interleukin-12 (IL-12) mediates protection against Yersinia enterocolitica in C57BL/6 mice by triggering gamma interferon (IFN-γ) production in NK and CD4+ T cells. Administration of exogenous IL-12 confers protection against yersiniae in Yersinia-susceptible BALB/c mice but exacerbates yersiniosis in resistant C57BL/6 mice. Therefore, we wanted to dissect the different mechanisms exerted by IL-12 during Yersinia infections by using different models of Yersinia-resistant and -susceptible mice, including resistant C57BL/6 mice, susceptible BALB/c mice, intermediate-susceptible wild-type 129/Sv mice, 129/Sv IFN-γ-receptor-deficient (IFN-γR−/−) mice and C57BL/6 tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor p55 chain-deficient (TNFR p55−/−) mice. IFN-γR−/− mice turned out to be highly susceptible to infection by Y. enterocolitica compared with IFN-γR+/+ mice. Administration of IL-12 was protective in IFN-γR+/+ mice but not in IFN-γR−/− mice, suggesting that IFN-γR-induced mechanisms are essential for IL-12-induced resistance against yersiniae. BALB/c mice could be rendered Yersinia resistant by administration of anti-CD4 antibodies or by administration of IL-12. In contrast, C57BL/6 mice could be rendered more resistant by administration of transforming growth factor β (TGF-β). Furthermore, IL-12-triggered toxic effects in C57BL/6 mice were abrogated by coadministration of TGF-β. While administration of IL-12 alone increased TNF-α levels, administration of TGF-β or TGF-β plus IL-12 decreased both TNF-α and IFN-γ levels in Yersinia-infected C57BL/6 mice. Moreover, IL-12 did not induce toxicity in Yersinia-infected TNFR p55−/− mice, suggesting that TNF-α accounts for IL-12-induced toxicity. Taken together, IL-12 may induce different effector mechanisms in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice resulting either in protection or exacerbation. These results are important for understanding the critical balance of proinflammatory and regulatory

  18. Oral epithelial cells are susceptible to cell-free and cell-associated HIV-1 infection in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, Jennifer S.; Rahemtulla, Firoz; Kent, Leigh W.; Hall, Stacy D.; Ikizler, Mine R.; Wright, Peter F.; Nguyen, Huan H.; Jackson, Susan

    2003-01-01

    Epithelial cells lining the oral cavity are exposed to HIV-1 through breast-feeding and oral-genital contact. Genital secretions and breast milk of HIV-1-infected subjects contain both cell-free and cell-associated virus. To determine if oral epithelial cells can be infected with HIV-1 we exposed gingival keratinocytes and adenoid epithelial cells to cell-free virus and HIV-1-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells and monocytes. Using primary isolates we determined that gingival keratinocytes are susceptible to HIV-1 infection via cell-free CD4-independent infection only. R5 but not X4 viral strains were capable of infecting the keratinocytes. Further, infected cells were able to release infectious virus. In addition, primary epithelial cells isolated from adenoids were also susceptible to infection; both cell-free and cell-associated virus infected these cells. These data have potential implications in the transmission of HIV-1 in the oral cavity

  19. Antifungal susceptibility patterns of yeasts and filamentous fungi isolated from nail infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataides, F S; Chaul, M H; El Essal, F E; Costa, C R; Souza, L K H; Fernandes, O F L; Silva, M R R

    2012-12-01

    Onychomycosis is the nail infection caused by a wide spectrum of fungi species, including yeasts, dermatophytes and filamentous fungi non-dermatophytes (FFND). This fungal infection represents an important medical problem because it involves the patient's life quality. The aim was to isolate and identify the fungal agents of onychomycosis, and to determine the in vitro susceptibility to antifungal agents. During the period of March 2008 to March 2009, 114 patients clinically suspected of having onychomycosis were examined. Demographic data, mainly age and gender were obtained from each patient. The nail samples collected (136) were submitted to direct examination with potassium hydroxide 20% and grown on Sabouraud dextrose agar. The in vitro antifungal susceptibility testing was performed according to the method of broth microdilution, recommended by the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). Onychomycosis was observed in 95 (83.3%) patients, including 16 men (16.8%) and 79 women (83.2%), with mean age of 48.1 years. Candida parapsilosis, Trichophyton rubrum and Fusarium spp were the fungi most frequently isolated. The most of the isolated yeasts showed susceptibility to antifungal agents studied. Among filamentous fungi, high MIC values to itraconazole were found for T. rubrum and T. mentagrophytes, while Fusarium spp showed decreased susceptibility to itraconazole and voriconazole. C. parapsilosis was the most common fungal species isolated from patients with onychomycosis. The different response obtained by in vitro susceptibility testing to drugs shows the importance of these methods to assist clinicians in choosing the best therapeutic option. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2011 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  20. Susceptibilities of Chlamydia trachomatis isolates causing uncomplicated female genital tract infections and pelvic inflammatory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, R J; Bhullar, V; Mitchell, S H; Bullard, J; Knapp, J S

    1995-03-01

    The in vitro susceptibilities of 45 recent clinical isolates of Chlamydia trachomatis obtained from women with asymptomatic genital tract infection, mucopurulent cervicitis, or pelvic inflammatory disease to doxycycline, azithromycin, ofloxacin, and clindamycin were determined. In addition, susceptibilities of 12 isolates to amoxicillin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole were also determined. Isolates also were serotyped with a panel of monoclonal antibodies specific for chlamydial major outer membrane protein; 24 of 45 (53%) belonged to serovars Ia and E. For all isolates, the MIC range of doxycycline was 0.008 to 0.06 micrograms/ml, for trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole it was 0.03 to 0.25 micrograms/ml, for azithromycin it was 0.125 to 2.0 micrograms/ml, for ofloxacin it was 0.5 to 1.0 micrograms/ml, for clindamycin it was 0.25 to 2.0 micrograms/ml, and for amoxicillin it was 0.25 to 4.0 microgram/ml. The ranges of minimum chlamydiacidal concentrations were generally 1 to 4 dilutions above the MICs of most agents, with a rank order similar to those of the MICs. Comparing the minimum chlamydiacidal concentrations for 90% of isolates tested, isolates causing asymptomatic infection belonged to a greater variety of serovars and were relatively more susceptible to doxycycline and azithromycin than isolates causing mucopurulent cervicitis or pelvic inflammatory disease; these differences in susceptibility were not detected among the other study agents. These data indicate that additional studies are needed to better define the apparent association of certain chlamydial serovars with the clinical severity of disease and the in vitro susceptibilities to certain antimicrobial agents.

  1. Pathogens Causing Blood Stream Infections and their Drug Susceptibility Profile in Immunocompromised Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayyaz, M.; Mirza, I.A.; Ikram, A.; Hussain, A.; Ghafoor, T.; Shujat, U.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the types of pathogens causing blood stream infections and their drug susceptibility profile in immunocompromised patients. Study Design: Cross-sectional, observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Microbiology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Rawalpindi, from January to September 2012. Methodology: Blood culture bottles received from immunocompromised patients were dealt by two methods, brain heart infusion (BHI) broth based manual method and automated BACTEC system. The samples yielding positive growth from either of two methods were further analyzed. The identification of isolates was done with the help of biochemical reactions and rapid tests. Antimicrobial susceptibility of the isolates was carried out as per recommendations of Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). Results: Out of the 938 blood culture specimens received from immunocompromised patients, 188 (20%) yielded positive growth. Out of these, 89 (47.3%) isolates were Gram positive and Gram negative each, while 10 (5.3%) isolates were fungi (Candida spp.). In case of Gram positive isolates, 75 (84.3%) were Staphylococcus spp. and 51 (67%) were Methicillin resistant. Amongst Gram negative group 49 (55.1%) isolates were of enterobacteriaceae family, while 40 (44.9%) were non-lactose fermenters (NLF). In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of Staphylococci revealed 100% susceptibility to vancomycin and linezolid. The enterobacteriaceae isolates had better susceptibility against amikacin 85.7% compared to tigecycline 61.2% and imipenem 59.2%. For NLF, the in vitro efficacy of aminoglycosides was 72.5%. Conclusion: The frequency of Gram positive and Gram negative organisms causing blood stream infections in immunocompromised patients was equal. Vancomycin in case of Gram positive and amikacin for Gram negative organisms revealed better in vitro efficacy as compared to other antibiotics. (author)

  2. Influence of silver nanoparticles on growth and health of broiler chickens after infection with Campylobacter jejuni

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vadalasetty, Krishna Prasad; Lauridsen, Charlotte; Engberg, Ricarda Margarete

    2018-01-01

    Background Silver nanoparticles (AgNP) have gained much attention in recent years due to their biomedical applications, especially as antimicrobial agents. AgNP may be used in poultry production as an alternative to the use of antibiotic growth promoter. However, little is known about the impact...... functions and had no antibacterial effect on different intestinal bacterial groups, which may limit the applicability of AgNP against C. jejuni in broiler chickens...

  3. Immuno-pathological studies on broiler chicken experimentally infected with Escherichia coli and supplemented with neem (Azadirachta indica) leaf extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vikash; Jakhar, K K; Dahiya, Swati

    2016-07-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the effects of neem leaf extract (NLE) supplementation on immunological response and pathology of different lymphoid organs in experimentally Escherichia coli challenged broiler chickens. For this study, we procured 192-day-old broiler chicks from local hatchery and divided them into Groups A and Group B containing 96 birds each on the first day. Chicks of Group A were supplemented with 10% NLE in water, whereas chicks of Group B were not supplemented with NLE throughout the experiment. At 7(th) day of age, chicks of Group A were divided into A1 and A2 and Group B into B1 and B2 with 54 and 42 chicks, respectively, and chicks of Groups A1 and B1 were injected with E. coli O78 at 10(7) colony-forming units/0.5 ml intraperitoneally. Six chicks from each group were sacrificed at 0, 2, 4, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days post infection; blood was collected and thorough post-mortem examination was conducted. Tissue pieces of spleen and bursa of Fabricius were collected in 10% buffered formalin for histopathological examination. Serum was separated for immunological studies. E. coli specific antibody titer was significantly higher in Group A1 in comparison to Group B1. Delayed-type hypersensitivity response against 2,4 dinirochlorobenzene (DNCB) antigen was significantly higher in Group A1 as compared to Group B1. Pathological studies revealed that E. coli infection caused depletion of lymphocytes in bursa of Fabricius and spleen. Severity of lesions in Group A1 was significantly lower in comparison to Group B1. 10% NLE supplementation enhanced the humoral as well as cellular immune responses attributed to its immunomodulatory property in experimentally E. coli infected broiler chicken.

  4. Immuno-pathological studies on broiler chicken experimentally infected with Escherichia coli and supplemented with neem (Azadirachta indica leaf extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikash Sharma

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was conducted to evaluate the effects of neem leaf extract (NLE supplementation on immunological response and pathology of different lymphoid organs in experimentally Escherichia coli challenged broiler chickens. Materials and Methods: For this study, we procured 192-day-old broiler chicks from local hatchery and divided them into Groups A and Group B containing 96 birds each on the first day. Chicks of Group A were supplemented with 10% NLE in water, whereas chicks of Group B were not supplemented with NLE throughout the experiment. At 7th day of age, chicks of Group A were divided into A1 and A2 and Group B into B1 and B2 with 54 and 42 chicks, respectively, and chicks of Groups A1 and B1 were injected with E. coli O78 at 107 colony-forming units/0.5 ml intraperitoneally. Six chicks from each group were sacrificed at 0, 2, 4, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days post infection; blood was collected and thorough post-mortem examination was conducted. Tissue pieces of spleen and bursa of Fabricius were collected in 10% buffered formalin for histopathological examination. Serum was separated for immunological studies. Result: E. coli specific antibody titer was significantly higher in Group A1 in comparison to Group B1. Delayed-type hypersensitivity response against 2,4 dinirochlorobenzene (DNCB antigen was significantly higher in Group A1 as compared to Group B1. Pathological studies revealed that E. coli infection caused depletion of lymphocytes in bursa of Fabricius and spleen. Severity of lesions in Group A1 was significantly lower in comparison to Group B1. Conclusion: 10% NLE supplementation enhanced the humoral as well as cellular immune responses attributed to its immunomodulatory property in experimentally E. coli infected broiler chicken.

  5. Eimeria-induced chicken cNK-2 is an anti-infective host defense peptide and an immunomodulator of host innate immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avian coccidiosis is one of the most widespread infectious diseases of chickens. The etiologic agent of avian coccidiosis is Eimeria, a genus of eukaryotic obligate intracellular parasites belonging to the phylum Apicomplexa. Clinical manifestations of infection include damage to the intestinal epit...

  6. [Studies on susceptibility of Pomacea canaliculata of different developmental stages to infection with Angiostrongylus cantonensis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, He-xiang; Zhang, Yi; Zhou, Xiao-nong; Lv, Shan; Zhu, Dan; Lin, Jin-xiang; Li, Li-sha; Li, You-song; Yin, Wei-gang

    2005-10-30

    OBJECTIVE To study the susceptibility of Pomacea canaliculata of different developmental stages to Angiostrongylus cantonensis infection. P. canaliculata snails breeding at laboratory were divided into four rank (I-IV) according to the weight, and infected with the first stage larvae of A. cantonensis from Fujian Province. Their mortality, infection rate, worm burden, and the size, development and distribution of larvae in snails were examined. Snails at different developmental stages were readily infected with A. cantonensis. The infection rate was between 76% and 100%, with no significant difference among the groups (P>0.05). Snails at earlier developmental stage showed higher mortality. The heaviest worm burden and the largest number of snails harboring more than 100 larvae were found in snails of rank III. In general the larvae in snails showed a synchronous development in the groups. Sizes of the third stage larvae in snails of various ranks were homogeneous. The period before the third stage larva emergence and the time for a peak percentage of the larvae exhibited no significant difference among the four ranks. The larvae widely distributed in various parts of snails, with more in the lung and foot, and larvae from snails of different ranks could all infect rats successfully. P. canaliculata of the four ranks can all be infected by the first stage larvae of A. cantonensis. Rank III snails may be better for studying the relationship between P. canaliculata and A. cantonensis. The potential role of young snails in angiostrongyliasis transmission should be recognized.

  7. Genetic variations of NTCP are associated with susceptibility to HBV infection and related hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Mo, Ruidong; Lai, Rongtao; Xu, Yumin; Lu, Jie; Zhao, Gangde; Liu, Yuhan; Cao, Zhujun; Wang, Xiaolin; Li, Ziqiang; Lin, Lanyi; Zhou, Huijuan; Cai, Wei; Wang, Hui; Bao, Shisan; Xiang, Xiaogang; Xie, Qing

    2017-12-01

    Sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP), encoded by gene SLC10A1, is a receptor for hepatitis B virus (HBV). The aim of the current study was to investigate the role of NTCP polymorphisms in HBV susceptibility, cirrhosis and hepatocarcinogenesis. A total 1221 cases [including 866 chronic hepatitis B (CHB), 238 liver cirrhosis (LC), 117 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients] and 1232 healthy controls (HCs) were recruited, and 6 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped. Meta-analysis was executed among 14591 CHBs and 12396 HCs to determine the association between NTCP polymorphisms and HBV infection, cirrhosis or hepatocarcinogenesis. The frequency of rs2296651-GA was inversely correlated with CHB, LC or HCC patients [adjusted OR(95%CI)=0.16(0.11-0.23), p HBV infection [OR(95%CI)=0.532(0.287-0.986), p =0.028, codominant] or HBV-related HCC [OR(95%CI)=0.701(0.564-0.872), p =0.001, recessive]. Furthermore, the frequency of rs943277-GA was positively correlated with HBV infection [adjusted OR(95%CI)=2.42(1.05-5.54), p =0.032, codominant]. Our data suggest that NTCP mutants contribute to the susceptibility of HBV infection or HBV-related HCC.

  8. A regulatory polymorphism in HAVCR2 modulates susceptibility to HIV-1 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Sironi

    Full Text Available The HAVCR2 gene encodes TIM-3, an immunoglobulin superfamily member expressed by exhausted CD8+ T cells during chronic viral infection. We investigated whether genetic variation at HAVCR2 modulates the susceptibility to HIV-1 acquisition; specifically we focused on a 3' UTR variant (rs4704846, A/G that represents a natural selection target. We genotyped rs4704846 in three independent cohorts of HIV-1 exposed seronegative (HESN individuals with different geographic origin (Italy and Spain and distinct route of exposure to HIV-1 (sexual and injection drug use. Matched HIV-1 positive subjects and healthy controls were also analyzed. In all case-control cohorts the minor G allele at rs4704846 was more common in HIV-1 infected individuals than in HESN, with healthy controls showing intermediate frequency. Results from the three association analyses were combined through a random effect meta-analysis, which revealed no heterogeneity among samples (Cochrane's Q, p value = 0.89, I2 = 0 and yielded a p value of 6.8 ×10(-4. The minor G allele at rs4704846 was found to increase HAVCR2 expression after in vitro HIV-1 infection. Thus, a positively selected polymorphism in the 3' UTR, which modulates HAVCR2 expression, is associated with the susceptibility to HIV-1 infection. These data warrant further investigation into the role of TIM-3 in the prevention and treatment of HIV-1/AIDS.

  9. Antimicrobial susceptibility of intra-abdominal infection isolates from a tertiary care hospital in karachi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saad, U.; Anwar, S.; Kahara, U.Z.; Saeed, H.

    2016-01-01

    Intra-abdominal infections are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The most frequent pathogens involved are the gastrointestinal flora which can cause poly-microbial infections. Microbiological diagnosis is required to determine the aetiology and antimicrobial susceptibility of the organisms involved. Prompt initiation of antimicrobials is essential for improving patient's outcome. Knowledge of local trends of antimicrobial resistance in nosocomial isolates is essential for empiric therapy. Methods: A total of 190 clinical isolates collected from intra-abdominal infections during July 2013 to July 2014 were included in the study. Organism identification and Antimicrobial sensitivity testing using standard biochemical tests and CLSI recommended criteria was carried out. Result: Of the total 190 isolates from abdominal infection sources 52% were from fluid sources (peritoneal and ascitic fluid), 41% were from gall bladder and 6.5% were from other abdominal sources. E. coli (46.8%) was the most frequently isolated gram negative and Enterococcus (13.1%) was the most frequently isolated gram positive organism. Carbapenem (imipenem) was the most active agent against enterobacteraceae exhibiting, 94.4% and 91.3% sensitivity against E. coli and Klebsiella respectively. While vancomycin was the most active agent against gram positive organisms. Eighty-four percent of the Enterococci isolated were sensitive to vancomycin. Most isolates exhibited resistance to one or more antibiotics. Conclusion: Continuous evolution of antimicrobial resistance patterns in bacteria necessitates updating of local data on antimicrobial susceptibility profiles to ensure the safety and efficacy of pathogen specific antimicrobial therapies. (author)

  10. Susceptibility to Yersinia pestis experimental infection in wild Rattus rattus, reservoir of plague in Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollenaere, C; Rahalison, L; Ranjalahy, M; Duplantier, J-M; Rahelinirina, S; Telfer, S; Brouat, C

    2010-06-01

    In Madagascar, the black rat, Rattus rattus, is the main reservoir of plague (Yersinia pestis infection), a disease still responsible for hundreds of cases each year in this country. This study used experimental plague challenge to assess susceptibility in wild-caught rats to better understand how R. rattus can act as a plague reservoir. An important difference in plague resistance between rat populations from the plague focus (central highlands) and those from the plague-free zone (low altitude area) was confirmed to be a widespread phenomenon. In rats from the plague focus, we observed that sex influenced plague susceptibility, with males slightly more resistant than females. Other individual factors investigated (weight and habitat of sampling) did not affect plague resistance. When infected at high bacterial dose (more than 10⁵ bacteria injected), rats from the plague focus died mainly within 3-5 days and produced specific antibodies, whereas after low-dose infection (plague resistance level and the course of infection in the black rat would contribute to a better understanding of plague circulation in Madagascar.

  11. Susceptibility and initial immune response of Tupaia belangeri cells to dengue virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayesh, Mohammad Enamul Hoque; Kitab, Bouchra; Sanada, Takahiro; Hayasaka, Daisuke; Morita, Kouichi; Kohara, Michinori; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko

    2017-07-01

    Dengue is an emerging disease of great public health significance worldwide. The lack of a suitable infection model has hampered dengue virus (DENV) pathogenesis study, and developing a suitable small animal model has been a long-standing challenge. The aim of this study was to develop a feasible experimental model of DENV infection using Tupaia belangeri. The susceptibility of tupaia to DENV infection and characteristics of its innate immune response were examined in vitro. We found that tupaia fibroblast cells support replication of DENV serotypes 1-4 with a linear increase in viral load 24-96h post-infection in both cells and culture supernatants. DENV-2 resulted in the highest viral growth among all serotypes. To characterize the innate immune response in tupaia cells during the early phase of DENV infection, we first evaluated the evolutionary relationship between tupaia Toll-like receptors (TLR1-9) and those of other mammalian species. Phylogenetic analysis showed that tupaia TLRs are evolutionarily much closer to human than they are to rodent. We next established an innate immune response measurement system by assessing the mRNA expression of TLR1-9 and four cytokines in DENV-infected tupaia cells. All serotypes induced the upregulation of TLR8 mRNA expression in infected tupaia cells. Silencing of TLR8 led to an increase in viral replication, indicating the existence of antiviral response through TLR8 on DENV infection. Although upregulation of IFN-β and IL-6 expression was only observed in DENV-1 infected cells and a significant suppression of TNF-α was observed in DENV-2 infected cells alone, IL-8 was upregulated in all DENV-1-4. Thus, this study demonstrates for the first time the susceptibility of tupaia cells to DENV infections and the role of TLR8 in the anti-viral response of tupaia cells to DENV. These findings demonstrate the potential utility of tupaia as a model for DENV research in the future. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by

  12. Hypoxia inducible factor signaling modulates susceptibility to mycobacterial infection via a nitric oxide dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elks, Philip M; Brizee, Sabrina; van der Vaart, Michiel; Walmsley, Sarah R; van Eeden, Fredericus J; Renshaw, Stephen A; Meijer, Annemarie H

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a current major world-health problem, exacerbated by the causative pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), becoming increasingly resistant to conventional antibiotic treatment. Mtb is able to counteract the bactericidal mechanisms of leukocytes to survive intracellularly and develop a niche permissive for proliferation and dissemination. Understanding of the pathogenesis of mycobacterial infections such as tuberculosis (TB) remains limited, especially for early infection and for reactivation of latent infection. Signaling via hypoxia inducible factor α (HIF-α) transcription factors has previously been implicated in leukocyte activation and host defence. We have previously shown that hypoxic signaling via stabilization of Hif-1α prolongs the functionality of leukocytes in the innate immune response to injury. We sought to manipulate Hif-α signaling in a well-established Mycobacterium marinum (Mm) zebrafish model of TB to investigate effects on the host's ability to combat mycobacterial infection. Stabilization of host Hif-1α, both pharmacologically and genetically, at early stages of Mm infection was able to reduce the bacterial burden of infected larvae. Increasing Hif-1α signaling enhanced levels of reactive nitrogen species (RNS) in neutrophils prior to infection and was able to reduce larval mycobacterial burden. Conversely, decreasing Hif-2α signaling enhanced RNS levels and reduced bacterial burden, demonstrating that Hif-1α and Hif-2α have opposing effects on host susceptibility to mycobacterial infection. The antimicrobial effect of Hif-1α stabilization, and Hif-2α reduction, were demonstrated to be dependent on inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) signaling at early stages of infection. Our findings indicate that induction of leukocyte iNOS by stabilizing Hif-1α, or reducing Hif-2α, aids the host during early stages of Mm infection. Stabilization of Hif-1α therefore represents a potential target for therapeutic

  13. Hypoxia inducible factor signaling modulates susceptibility to mycobacterial infection via a nitric oxide dependent mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip M Elks

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis is a current major world-health problem, exacerbated by the causative pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, becoming increasingly resistant to conventional antibiotic treatment. Mtb is able to counteract the bactericidal mechanisms of leukocytes to survive intracellularly and develop a niche permissive for proliferation and dissemination. Understanding of the pathogenesis of mycobacterial infections such as tuberculosis (TB remains limited, especially for early infection and for reactivation of latent infection. Signaling via hypoxia inducible factor α (HIF-α transcription factors has previously been implicated in leukocyte activation and host defence. We have previously shown that hypoxic signaling via stabilization of Hif-1α prolongs the functionality of leukocytes in the innate immune response to injury. We sought to manipulate Hif-α signaling in a well-established Mycobacterium marinum (Mm zebrafish model of TB to investigate effects on the host's ability to combat mycobacterial infection. Stabilization of host Hif-1α, both pharmacologically and genetically, at early stages of Mm infection was able to reduce the bacterial burden of infected larvae. Increasing Hif-1α signaling enhanced levels of reactive nitrogen species (RNS in neutrophils prior to infection and was able to reduce larval mycobacterial burden. Conversely, decreasing Hif-2α signaling enhanced RNS levels and reduced bacterial burden, demonstrating that Hif-1α and Hif-2α have opposing effects on host susceptibility to mycobacterial infection. The antimicrobial effect of Hif-1α stabilization, and Hif-2α reduction, were demonstrated to be dependent on inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS signaling at early stages of infection. Our findings indicate that induction of leukocyte iNOS by stabilizing Hif-1α, or reducing Hif-2α, aids the host during early stages of Mm infection. Stabilization of Hif-1α therefore represents a potential target for

  14. Repeated Schistosoma japonicum infection following treatment in two cohorts: evidence for host susceptibility to helminthiasis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth J Carlton

    Full Text Available In light of multinational efforts to reduce helminthiasis, we evaluated whether there exist high-risk subpopulations for helminth infection. Such individuals are not only at risk of morbidity, but may be important parasite reservoirs and appropriate targets for disease control interventions.We followed two longitudinal cohorts in Sichuan, China to determine whether there exist persistent human reservoirs for the water-borne helminth, Schistosoma japonicum, in areas where treatment is ongoing. Participants were tested for S. japonicum infection at enrollment and two follow-up points. All infections were promptly treated with praziquantel. We estimated the ratio of the observed to expected proportion of the population with two consecutive infections at follow-up. The expected proportion was estimated using a prevalence-based model and, as highly exposed individuals may be most likely to be repeatedly infected, a second model that accounted for exposure using a data adaptive, machine learning algorithm. Using the prevalence-based model, there were 1.5 and 5.8 times more individuals with two consecutive infections than expected in cohorts 1 and 2, respectively (p<0.001 in both cohorts. When we accounted for exposure, the ratio was 1.3 (p = 0.013 and 2.1 (p<0.001 in cohorts 1 and 2, respectively.We found clustering of infections within a limited number of hosts that was not fully explained by host exposure. This suggests some hosts may be particularly susceptible to S. japonicum infection, or that uncured infections persist despite treatment. We propose an explanatory model that suggests that as cercarial exposure declines, so too does the size of the vulnerable subpopulation. In low-prevalence settings, interventions targeting individuals with a history of S. japonicum infection may efficiently advance disease control efforts.

  15. Drug susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium Avium subsp. Avium isolates from naturally infected domestic pigeons to avian tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaveh Parvandar

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: We suggest drug susceptibility testing for more nontuberculous mycobateria, particularly M. avium complex isolated from infected birds and humans, as well as molecular basics of drug sensitivity in order to detect resistance genes of pathogenic M. avium subsp. avium.

  16. Does Animal Behavior Underlie Covariation Between Hosts' Exposure to Infectious Agents and Susceptibility to Infection? Implications for Disease Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hawley, Dana M.; Etienne, Rampal S.; Ezenwa, Vanessa O.; Jolles, Anna E.

    2011-01-01

    Animal behavior is unique in influencing both components of the process of transmission of disease: exposure to infectious agents, and susceptibility to infection once exposed. To date, the influence of behavior on exposure versus susceptibility has largely been considered separately. Here, we ask

  17. Discrete-time dynamic network model for the spread of susceptible-infective-recovered diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Sanjeev Kumar

    2017-07-01

    We propose a discrete-time dynamic network model describing the spread of susceptible-infective-recovered diseases in a population. We consider the case in which the nodes in the network change their links due to social mixing dynamics as well as in response to the disease. The model shows the behavior that, as we increase social mixing, disease spread is inhibited in certain cases, while in other cases it is enhanced. We also extend this dynamic network model to take into account the case of hidden infection. Here we find that, as expected, the disease spreads more readily if there is a time period after contracting the disease during which an individual is infective but is not known to have the disease.

  18. Occurrence of infection with Toxoplasma gondii and factors associated with transmission in broiler chickens and laying hens in different raising systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia R. Millar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasmosis is a zoonotic disease caused by the protozoan Toxoplasma gondii. The aim of the present study was to determine the occurrence and identify the risk factors associated with transmission of T. gondii to chickens raised in different systems (free-ranged and confined to produce eggs or meat. The 810 animals were allocated in two experimental groups according to the production system purpose: 460 broiler chickens (Group 1 and 350 layer chickens (Group 2. In order to analyze the possible factors involved in T. gondii infection in the chickens, an epidemiological questionnaire was developed for all properties.The serological detection of anti-Toxoplasma gondii antibodies was performed by Indirect Immunofluorescence (IFAT and by Enzime Linked Imunossorbent Assay (ELISA. Since the agreement index (kappa between these two serological techniques was considered high, 21.2% of the 810 animals were considered reactive. In Group 1, 12.2% (56/460 were positive, while in the Group 2 the positivity rate was 33.1% (116/350. The production system may be influencing the seropositivity of the animals in both groups. However, only in Group 2 it was possible to notice a statistically significant relationship between the breeding system and the frequency of positive sera. This result indicates that, at least for laying hens, the production system is directly involved in T. gondii infection. The contact with cats in Group 1 did not influence the distribution of seroreactive animals, but in Group 2 a significant relationship was observed. The occurrence of anti-T. gondii antibodies was high in both groups (broiler and posture chickens. Free-ranged chickens raised for egg production proved to be the most exposed group to the T. gondii infection. This can be related to the fact that these animals stay for longer periods in the farms, in direct contact with possibly contaminated soil by the presence of domestic cats.

  19. Spinal cord injury-induced immune deficiency syndrome enhances infection susceptibility dependent on lesion level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brommer, Benedikt; Engel, Odilo; Kopp, Marcel A; Watzlawick, Ralf; Müller, Susanne; Prüss, Harald; Chen, Yuying; DeVivo, Michael J; Finkenstaedt, Felix W; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Liebscher, Thomas; Meisel, Andreas; Schwab, Jan M

    2016-03-01

    Pneumonia is the leading cause of death after acute spinal cord injury and is associated with poor neurological outcome. In contrast to the current understanding, attributing enhanced infection susceptibility solely to the patient's environment and motor dysfunction, we investigate whether a secondary functional neurogenic immune deficiency (spinal cord injury-induced immune deficiency syndrome, SCI-IDS) may account for the enhanced infection susceptibility. We applied a clinically relevant model of experimental induced pneumonia to investigate whether the systemic SCI-IDS is functional sufficient to cause pneumonia dependent on spinal cord injury lesion level and investigated whether findings are mirrored in a large prospective cohort study after human spinal cord injury. In a mouse model of inducible pneumonia, high thoracic lesions that interrupt sympathetic innervation to major immune organs, but not low thoracic lesions, significantly increased bacterial load in lungs. The ability to clear the bacterial load from the lung remained preserved in sham animals. Propagated immune susceptibility depended on injury of central pre-ganglionic but not peripheral postganglionic sympathetic innervation to the spleen. Thoracic spinal cord injury level was confirmed as an independent increased risk factor of pneumonia in patients after motor complete spinal cord injury (odds ratio = 1.35, P spinal cord injury directly causes increased risk for bacterial infection in mice as well as in patients. Besides obvious motor and sensory paralysis, spinal cord injury also induces a functional SCI-IDS ('immune paralysis'), sufficient to propagate clinically relevant infection in an injury level dependent manner. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Transcriptome analysis of resistant and susceptible alfalfa cultivars infected with root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga A Postnikova

    Full Text Available Nematodes are one of the major limiting factors in alfalfa production. Root-knot nematodes (RKN, Meloidogyne spp. are widely distributed and economically important sedentary endoparasites of agricultural crops and they may inflict significant damage to alfalfa fields. As of today, no studies have been published on global gene expression profiling in alfalfa infected with RKN or any other plant parasitic nematode. Very little information is available about molecular mechanisms that contribute to pathogenesis and defense responses in alfalfa against these pests and specifically against RKN. In this work, we performed root transcriptome analysis of resistant (cv. Moapa 69 and susceptible (cv. Lahontan alfalfa cultivars infected with RKN Meloidogyne incognita, widespread root-knot nematode species and a major pest worldwide. A total of 1,701,622,580 pair-end reads were generated on an Illumina Hi-Seq 2000 platform from the roots of both cultivars and assembled into 45,595 and 47,590 transcripts in cvs Moapa 69 and Lahontan, respectively. Bioinformatic analysis revealed a number of common and unique genes that were differentially expressed in susceptible and resistant lines as a result of nematode infection. Although the susceptible cultivar showed a more pronounced defense response to the infection, feeding sites were successfully established in its roots. Characteristically, basal gene expression levels under normal conditions differed between the two cultivars as well, which may confer advantage to one of the genotypes toward resistance to nematodes. Differentially expressed genes were subsequently assigned to known Gene Ontology categories to predict their functional roles and associated biological processes. Real-time PCR validated expression changes in genes arbitrarily selected for experimental confirmation. Candidate genes that contribute to protection against M. incognita in alfalfa were proposed and alfalfa-nematode interactions with

  1. Transcriptome analysis of resistant and susceptible alfalfa cultivars infected with root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postnikova, Olga A; Hult, Maria; Shao, Jonathan; Skantar, Andrea; Nemchinov, Lev G

    2015-01-01

    Nematodes are one of the major limiting factors in alfalfa production. Root-knot nematodes (RKN, Meloidogyne spp.) are widely distributed and economically important sedentary endoparasites of agricultural crops and they may inflict significant damage to alfalfa fields. As of today, no studies have been published on global gene expression profiling in alfalfa infected with RKN or any other plant parasitic nematode. Very little information is available about molecular mechanisms that contribute to pathogenesis and defense responses in alfalfa against these pests and specifically against RKN. In this work, we performed root transcriptome analysis of resistant (cv. Moapa 69) and susceptible (cv. Lahontan) alfalfa cultivars infected with RKN Meloidogyne incognita, widespread root-knot nematode species and a major pest worldwide. A total of 1,701,622,580 pair-end reads were generated on an Illumina Hi-Seq 2000 platform from the roots of both cultivars and assembled into 45,595 and 47,590 transcripts in cvs Moapa 69 and Lahontan, respectively. Bioinformatic analysis revealed a number of common and unique genes that were differentially expressed in susceptible and resistant lines as a result of nematode infection. Although the susceptible cultivar showed a more pronounced defense response to the infection, feeding sites were successfully established in its roots. Characteristically, basal gene expression levels under normal conditions differed between the two cultivars as well, which may confer advantage to one of the genotypes toward resistance to nematodes. Differentially expressed genes were subsequently assigned to known Gene Ontology categories to predict their functional roles and associated biological processes. Real-time PCR validated expression changes in genes arbitrarily selected for experimental confirmation. Candidate genes that contribute to protection against M. incognita in alfalfa were proposed and alfalfa-nematode interactions with respect to resistance

  2. G6PD Deficiency Does Not Enhance Susceptibility for Acquiring Helicobacter pylori Infection in Sardinian Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dore, Maria Pina; Marras, Giuseppina; Rocchi, Chiara; Soro, Sara; Pes, Giovanni Mario

    2016-01-01

    Subjects with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency may be more susceptible to infections due to impaired leukocyte bactericidal activity. The disorder is common in the Mediterranean area. The aim of this study was to investigate whether G6PD deficiency may be a risk factor for acquiring H. pylori infection. We performed a retrospective study. Data from clinical records of 6565 patients (2278 men and 4287 women, median age 51, range 7‒94) who underwent upper endoscopy between 2002 and 2014 were collected. H. pylori status, assessed by histology plus rapid urease test or 13C-urea breath test, and G6PD status were also reported. A multiple logistic regression model was used to investigate the association between G6PD deficiency and H. pylori infection. Enzyme deficiency was detected in 12% (789/6565) of the entire cohort, and more specifically in 8.3% of men and in 14.0% of women. Overall, the proportion of patients positive for H. pylori was 50.6% and 51.5% among G6PD deficient and non-deficient patients (χ² = 0.271; p = 0.315). Moreover, among G6PD-deficient and normal patients the frequency of previous H. pylori infection was similar. After adjustment for age and gender the risk for acquiring H. pylori infection was similar in G6PD-deficient and normal patients. Only age was a strong statistically significant risk predictor. These results demonstrate for the first time that G6PD deficiency does not enhance patients' susceptibility to acquire H. pylori infection in Sardinia.

  3. Aotus infulatus monkey is susceptible to Plasmodium falciparum infection and may constitute an alternative experimental model for malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carvalho Leonardo JM

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Aotus is one of the WHO-recommended primate models for studies in malaria, and several species can be infected with Plasmodium falciparum or P. vivax. Here we describe the successful infection of the species A. infulatus from eastern Amazon with blood stages of P. falciparum. Both intact and splenectomized animals were susceptible to infection; the intact ones were able to keep parasitemias at lower levels for several days, but developed complications such as severe anemia; splenectomized monkeys developed higher parasitemias but no major complications. We conclude that A. infulatus is susceptible to P. falciparum infection and may represent an alternative model for studies in malaria.

  4. Detection of infectious bursal disease virus in various lymphoid tissues of experimentally infected specific pathogen free chickens by different reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kabell, Susanne; Handberg, Kurt; Kusk, Mette

    2005-01-01

    Infectious bursal disease (IBD) is a worldwide distributed immunosuppressive viral disease in young chickens, controlled by vaccination. Emergence of several strains of IBD virus (IBDV) has created a demand for strain-specific diagnostic tools. In the present experiment, five different reverse...... transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays, including two recently developed strain-specific assays, were employed for detection of ribonucleic acid (RNA) from three different IBDV strains in bursa tissue samples from experimentally infected specific pathogen free chickens. The virus strains...

  5. Susceptibility of human Th17 cells to human immunodeficiency virus and their perturbation during infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hed, Aimee; Khaitan, Alka; Kozhaya, Lina; Manel, Nicolas; Daskalakis, Demetre; Borkowsky, William; Valentine, Fred; Littman, Dan R; Unutmaz, Derya

    2010-03-15

    Identification of the Th17 T cell subset as important mediators of host defense and pathology prompted us to determine their susceptibility to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. We found that a sizeable portion of Th17 cells express HIV coreceptor CCR5 and produce very low levels of CCR5 ligands macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1alpha and MIP-1beta. Accordingly, CCR5(+) Th17 cells were efficiently infected with CCR5-tropic HIV and were depleted during viral replication in vitro. Remarkably, HIV-infected individuals receiving treatment had significantly reduced Th17 cell counts, compared with HIV-uninfected subjects, regardless of viral load or CD4 cell count, whereas treatment-naive subjects had normal levels. However, there was a preferential reduction in CCR5(+) T cells that were also CCR6 positive, which is expressed on all Th17 cells, compared with CCR6(-)CCR5(+) cells, in both treated and untreated HIV-infected subjects. This observation suggests preferential targeting of CCR6(+)CCR5(+) Th17 cells by CCR5-tropic viruses in vivo. Th17 cell levels also inversely correlated with activated CD4(+) T cells in HIV-infected individuals who are receiving treatment. Our findings suggest a complex perturbation of Th17 subsets during the course of HIV disease potentially through both direct viral infection and virus indirect mechanisms, such as immune activation.

  6. Relationship and susceptibility profile of Staphylococcus aureus infection diabetic foot ulcers with Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Aza Bahadeen

    2013-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the main cause of diabetic foot infection with the patient's endogenous flora as the principal source. Nasal carriage of S. aureus has been identified as an important risk factor for the acquisition of diabetic foot infections. The study assessment the associations of S. aureus with methicillin resistant S. aureus were isolation from diabetic foot infection and nasal carriage of the same patients and their antibiotic susceptibility profile. Diagnosis of S. aureus and methicillin resistant S. aureus were carried out by using standard procedures. Antibiotic sensitivity profiles were determent by breakpoint dilution method. Out of 222 S. aureus isolation, 139 (62.61%) were isolated from the diabetic foot and 83 (37.39%) from the nasal carriage. Seventy one (30.87%) of the patients were S. aureus infection diabetic foot with nasal carriage. Among diabetic foot infection and nasal carriage patients, 40.85% of S. aureus were considered as methicillin resistant S. aureus. Rifampicin (96.40%) and Levofloxacin (91.44%) were active against S. aureus. Patients at strong risk for methicillin resistant S. aureus nasal carriage and subsequent diabetic foot infection with high resistance to antibiotics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Survival and infectivity of chicken ascarid eggs in soil after exposure to an egg-degrading microfungus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejer, Helena; Thamsborg, Stig M.; Meyling, Nicolai V.

    to sterilised (S) or non-sterilised (N) soil in Petri dishes that were either treated with P. chlamydosporia (F) or left untreated (C) during incubation at 22°C for 35 days. Egg recovery was estimated before (day 0) and after (day 35) treatment. Thereafter, each of four groups of parasite-free egg-laying hens......The microfungus Pochonia chlamydosporia has been shown to kill high numbers of chicken ascarid (Ascaridia galli and Heterakis spp.) eggs in vitro but it is not known if surviving eggs may be infective. Unembryonated ascarid eggs (predominantly A. galli) were therefore isolated from faeces and added...... was exposed to the soil from one of the four treatments in the feed over 12 days. The hens were necropsied day 42 post first exposure. The number of surviving eggs was most substantially reduced in SF soil and SF hens had statistically lower worm burdens (both parasites) compared to SC, NC and NF hens...

  8. Pelacakan Secara Imunohistokimiawi Antigen Virus pada Ayam yang Diinfeksi dengan Virus Penyakit Tetelo (IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL DETECTION OF VIRAL ANTIGEN IN TISSUE OF CHICKENS EXPERIMENTALLY INFECTED WITH NEWCASTLE DISEASE VIRUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anak Agung Ayu Mirah Adi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the distribution of Newcastle disease virus (NDV following infection, chickenswere experimentally infected with visceretropic velogenic NDV isolate. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbsagainst the NDV LaSota vaccine strain were then produced to detect viral antigen in the infectedorgans. The mAbs were firstly tested for their specificity by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay(ELISA using NDV and normal allantoic fluids as antigens. Eight mAbs specific against NDVwere isolated and two mAbs were used for immunodetection of NDV antigen in chicken’s tissues.By immunohistochemistry labeled streptavidin-biotin (LSAB staining NDV–antigen was detectedin paraffin embedded tissues of NDV-infected chickens. NDV antigen was not detected in noninfected chickens. In the infected chickens, high intensity of NDV antigen was detected in thelymphoid tissues, lung and intestine. The NDV antigen with a lesser intensity was detected in thebrain, trachea, liver and myocardium. This study shows that although viscerotropic velogenicNDV isolate can infect almost all organs, the main target of infection are lung, intestine andlymphoids tissues

  9. Incidence of Aeromonas spp. infection in fish and chicken meat and its related public health hazards: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen Kumar Praveen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aeromonas is recognized to cause a variety of diseases in man. In humans, they are associated with intestinal and extraintestinal infections. With the growing importance of Aeromonas as an emerging pathogen, it is important to combat this organism. It is indisputable that Aeromonas strains may produce many different putative virulence factors such as enterotoxins, hemolysins or cytotoxins, and antibiotic resistance against different antibiotics. The ability of these bacteria to grow competitively at 5°C may be indicative of their potential as a public health hazard. Comprehensive enteric disease surveillance strategies, prevention and education are essential for meeting the challenges in the years ahead. It is important for us to promote the value of enteric cultures when patients have a gastrointestinal illness or bloody diarrhea or when multiple cases of enteric disease occur after a common exposure. With the growing importance of Aeromonas as an emerging pathogen, it is important to combat this organism. It is indisputable that Aeromonas strains may produce many different putative virulence factors, such as enterotoxins, hemolysins or cytotoxins. It has been established that aerolysin is a virulence factor contributing to the pathogenesis of Aeromonas hydrophila infection. Fish and chicken play an important role in the transmission of this pathogen to humans. In the present study, the high prevalence of toxin-producing strains was found among the Aeromonas isolates. The ability of these bacteria to grow competitively at 5°C may be indicative of their potential as a public health hazard. The present review was constructed with a view to highlight the zoonotic importance of Aeromonas pathogen in fish and chicken meat.

  10. Drug susceptibility and treatment response of common urinary tract infection pathogens in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pei-Chun; Chang, Luan-Yin; Lu, Chun-Yi; Shao, Pei-Lan; Tsai, I-Jung; Tsau, Yong-Kwei; Lee, Ping-Ing; Chen, Jong-Ming; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Huang, Li-Min

    2014-12-01

    To document the trends of sensitivity and to find whether it is necessary to change antibiotics in selected patients according to the sensitivity test results in our clinical practice. We collected urine culture results from 0-18-year-old patients in the National Taiwan University Hospital from January 1, 2003 to October 31, 2012. Their medical chart was reviewed to identify true pathogens responsible for their urinary tract infection (UTI). We checked the percentage of susceptibility of these pathogens to ampicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanate (AMC), cefazolin, cefmetazole, ceftriaxone, gentamicin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guideline. The extended-spectrum-beta-lactamases (ESBLs) rate was also checked. In addition, we reviewed the treatment response of different antibiotics. Defervescence within 48 hours after initial antibiotics use was considered responsive. A total of 7758 urine cultures positive for Escherichia coli infection were collected during the 10-year period. The E. coli cefazolin susceptibility rate was 62-73% during 2003-2010, but it dropped to 23% in 2011 and 28% in 2012 after the new CLSI guideline (M100-S21) was released. However, other antibiotics did not show a significant difference. In UTI caused by E. coli, on average, the sensitivity rates for various antibiotics were as follows: cefmetazole, 90%; ceftriaxone, 85%; gentamicin, 77%; AMC, 61%; TMP-SMX, 47%; and ampicillin, 20%. The ESBL rate was also found to increase (2-11%; p first-line antibiotics such as first-generation cephalosporin and/or gentamicin was 78%. The susceptibility of common urinary tract pathogens to cefazolin has decreased dramatically since 2010. This trend may be due to the change in the CLSI guideline. Although the susceptibility rate to first-line empirical antibiotics shows a decreasing trend, we found that the clinical response was acceptable for our first-line empirical antibiotics

  11. Establishment of gastro-intestinal helminth infections in free-range chickens: a longitudinal on farm study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongrak, Kalyakorn; Daş, Gürbüz; Moors, Eva; Sohnrey, Birgit; Gauly, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to monitor establishment and development of gastro-intestinal helminth infections in chickens over two production years (PY) on a free-range farm in Lower Saxony, Germany. The data were collected between July 2010 and June 2011 (PY1) and July 2011 and January 2013 (PY2), respectively. During PY1, Lohmann Brown classic (LB classic, N = 450) was tested, while in PY2 two different genotypes (230 LB classic, 230 LB plus) were used. The hens were kept in two mobile stalls that were moved to a new position at regular intervals. In both PY1 and PY2, 20 individual faecal samples per stall were randomly collected at monthly intervals in order to calculate the number of internal parasite eggs per gram of faeces (EPG). At the end of the laying periods, approximately 10% (N = 42) or more than 50% (N = 265) of hens were subjected to post-mortem parasitological examinations in PY1 and PY2, respectively. No parasite eggs were found in the faecal samples during PY1, whereas almost all of the hens (97.6%) were infected with Heterakis gallinarum (36 worms/hen) at the end of the period. In PY2, nematode eggs in faeces were found from the third month onwards at a low level, increasing considerably towards the final three months. There was no significant difference between the two genotypes of brown hens neither for EPG (P = 0.456) or for overall prevalence (P = 0.177). Mortality rate ranged from 18.3 to 27.4% but did not differ significantly between genotypes or production years. Average worm burden was 207 worms/hen in PY2. The most prevalent species were H. gallinarum (98.5%) followed by Ascaridia galli (96.2%) and Capillaria spp. (86.1%). Furthermore, three Capillaria species, C. obsignata, C. bursata and C. caudinflata were differentiated. In conclusion chickens kept on free-range farms are exposed to high risks of nematode infections and have high mortality rates with no obvious link to parasite infections. Once the farm environment is contaminated

  12. Understanding the Patterns of Antibiotic Susceptibility of Bacteria Causing Urinary Tract Infection in West Bengal, India

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    Sunayana eSaha

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infection (UTI is one of the most common infectious diseases at the community level. In order to assess the adequacy of empirical therapy, the susceptibility of antibiotics and resistance pattern of bacteria responsible for UTI in West Bengal, India, were evaluated throughout the period of 2008-2013. The infection reports belonging to all age groups and both sexes were considered. E. coli was the most abundant uropathogen with a prevalence rate of 67.1%, followed by Klebsiella spp. (22% and Pseudomonas spp. (6%. Penicillin was least effective against UTI-causing E. coli and maximum susceptibility was recorded for the drugs belonging to fourth generation cephalosporins. Other abundant uropathogens, Klebsiella spp., were maximally resistant to broad-spectrum penicillin, followed by aminoglycosides and third generation cephalosporin. The antibiotic resistance pattern of two principal UTI pathogens, E. coli and Klebsiella spp. in West Bengal, appears in general to be similar to that found in other parts of the Globe. Higher than 50% resistance were observed for broad-spectrum penicillin. Fourth generation cephalosporin and macrolides seems to be the choice of drug in treating UTIs in Eastern India. Furthermore, improved maintenance of infection incident logs is needed in Eastern Indian hospitals in order to facilitate regular surveillance of the occurrence of antibiotic resistance patterns, since such levels continue to change.

  13. Standardization of an inactivated H17N1 avian influenza vaccine and efficacy against A/Chicken/Italy/13474/99 high-pathogenicity virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Trani, L; Cordioli, P; Falcone, E; Lombardi, G; Moreno, A; Sala, G; Tollis, M

    2003-01-01

    The minimum requirements for assessing the immunogenicity of an experimental avian influenza (AI) vaccine prepared from inactivated A/Turkey/Italy/2676/99 (H7N1) low-pathogenicity (LP) AI (LPAI) virus were determined in chickens of different ages. A correlation between the amount of hemagglutinin (HA) per dose of vaccine and the protection against clinical signs of disease and infection by A/Chicken/Italy/13474/99 highly pathogenic (HP) AI (HPAI) virus was established. Depending on the vaccination schedule, one or two administrations of 0.5 microg of hemagglutinin protected chickens against clinical signs and death and completely prevented virus shedding from birds challenged at different times after vaccination.

  14. Genetic Contribution of MHC Class II Genes in Susceptibility to West Nile Virus Infection.

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    Constantina A Sarri

    Full Text Available WNV is a zoonotic neurotropic flavivirus that has recently emerged globally as a significant cause of viral encephalitis. The last five years, 624 incidents of WNV infection have been reported in Greece. The risk for severe WNV disease increases among immunosuppressed individuals implying thus the contribution of the MHC locus to the control of WNV infection. In order to investigate a possible association of MHC class II genes, especially HLA-DPA1, HLA-DQA1, HLA-DRB1, we examined 105 WNV patients, including 68 cases with neuroinvasive disease and 37 cases with mild clinical phenotype, collected during the period from 2010 to2013, and 100 control individuals selected form the Greek population. Typing was performed for exon 2 for all three genes. DQA1*01:01 was considered to be "protective" against WNV infection (25.4% vs 40.1%, P = 0.004 while DQA1*01:02 was associated with increased susceptibility (48.0% vs 32.1%, P = 0.003. Protection against neuroinvasion was associated with the presence of DRB1*11:02 (4.99% vs 0.0%, P = 0.018. DRB1*16:02 was also absent from the control cohort (P = 0.016. Three additional population control groups were used in order to validate our results. No statistically significant association with the disease was found for HLA-DPA alleles. The results of the present study provide some evidence that MHC class II is involved in the response to WNV infection, outlining infection "susceptibility" and "CNS-high-risk" candidates. Furthermore, three new alleles were identified while the frequency of all alleles in the study was compared with worldwide data. The characterization of the MHC locus could help to estimate the risk for severe WNV cases in a country.

  15. Burn wound infections and antibiotic susceptibility patterns at pakistan institute of medical sciences, islamabad, pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saaiq, Muhammad; Ahmad, Shehzad; Zaib, Muhammad Salman

    2015-01-01

    Burn wound infections carry considerable mortality and morbidity amongst burn injury victims who have been successfully rescued through the initial resuscitation. This study assessed the prevalent microrganisms causing burn wound infections among hospitalized patients; their susceptibility pattern to commonly used antibiotics; and the frequency of infections with respect to the duration of the burn wounds. This study was carried out at Burn Care Centre, Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences (PIMS), Islamabad, Pakistan over a period of two years (i.e. from June 2010 to May 2012). The study included all wound-culture-positive patients of either gender and all ages, who had sustained deep burns and underwent definitive management with wound excisions and skin auto-grafting. Patients with negative cultures of the wounds were excluded. Tissue specimens for culture and sensitivity were collected from burn wounds using standard collection techniques and analyzed at microbiological laboratory. Out of a total of 95 positive microbial growths, 36 were Pseudomonas aeruginosa (35.29%) as the most frequent isolate found, followed by 21 Klebsiella pneumoniae (20.58%), 19 Staphylococcus aureaus (18.62%), 10 Proteus (9.80%), 7 E. coli (6.86%), 7 Acinetobacter (6.86%), and 4 Candida (3.92%). A variable antibiotic susceptibility pattern was observed among the grown microbes. Positive cultures were significantly more frequent among patients with over two weeks duration of burn wounds. P. aeruginosa, K. pneumoniae and S. aureus constituted the most common bacterial microbes of burn wounds in our in-patients cases. Positive cultures were more frequent among patients with over two weeks duration of burn wounds. Early excision and skin grafting of deep burns and adherence to infection control measures can help to effectively reduce the burden of these infections.

  16. FREQUENCY, URINALYSIS AND SUSCEPTIBILITY PROFILE OF PATHOGENS CAUSING URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS IN ENUGU STATE, SOUTHEAST NIGERIA

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    Uju M.E. Dibua

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was designed to determine the frequency and causative agent(s of urinary tract infections (UTIs in individuals with symptoms of urinary tract infections in Enugu State of Southeast Nigeria, and to determine the antibiotic susceptibility pattern of microbial agents isolated from urine culture. Methods: The study involved 211 individuals (149 females and 62 males clinically suspected for UTI. Urine samples were collected by the mid-stream ‘clean catch' method and tested using standard procedures. Antibiotic susceptibility of the isolated pathogens was tested using the Kirby-Bauer technique according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI guidelines. Results: Microscopy of centrifuged urine samples showed 16 patients had pyuria while 54 had pus cells. Calcium oxalate crystals were found in 14 samples. Urinalysis performed with urine samples showed 17 had protein; seven were nitrite positive and three had moderate to high glucose concentration. Fifty-four urine samples (36.2% from females and 12 (19.4% from males showed significant growth upon culture. Gram stain and biochemical tests identified nine different organisms with Escherichia coli as the most common isolated species. Forty three randomly selected strains were further tested for their susceptibility against a panel of antibiotics. Thirty isolates (81.08% were resistant to four or more antibiotics with the highest resistance shown by E. coli (76.67%. All the Gram- negative isolates were resistant to Ampicilox, Cefuroxime and Amoxicillin. Conclusion: Urinary tract infections were found more in females in the area under study. As found in other studies, E. coli was the most predominant isolate, although other organisms seem to be on the increase.

  17. Is susceptibility to severe infection in low-income countries inherited or acquired?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaby, P

    2007-02-01

    From a low-income country perspective, we need to emphasize factors which affect acquired susceptibility to severe infection. Such factors may lend themselves to modification by public health interventions. The present paper reviews the experience with understanding the causes of severe measles infection and the impact of health interventions in Guinea-Bissau over a 28-year period. In the 1970s, acquired susceptibility because of malnutrition was considered to be the main cause of high mortality. However, we found no association between nutritional status and subsequent risk of dying of measles. Instead, crowding and intensity of exposure were the main determinants of severe measles. Factors related to transmission have been substantiated for measles, chickenpox, whooping cough and polio. We found measles vaccination to be associated with a major reduction in mortality, particularly for girls. This suggested that measles vaccine has a beneficial nontargeted immune stimulatory effect. The importance of nontargeted effects was clearly documented when World Health Organization introduced a new high-titre measles vaccine (HTMV). HTMV was fully protective but associated with twofold higher mortality for girls. Bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG), diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) and oral polio vaccine (OPV) have also shown nontargeted effects, the effect being beneficial for BCG and OPV but negative for DTP. Both beneficial and negative effects are strongest for girls. There are many acquired factors, which affect susceptibility to infection in ways which have not been explored by medical science. They may have a major impact on child survival in low-income countries.

  18. Insufficient Innate Immunity Contributes to the Susceptibility of the Castaneous Mouse to Orthopoxvirus Infection.

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    Earl, Patricia L; Americo, Jeffrey L; Moss, Bernard

    2017-10-01

    The castaneous (CAST) mouse, a wild-derived inbred strain, is highly susceptible to orthopoxvirus infection by intranasal and systemic routes. The 50% lethal intraperitoneal dose of vaccinia virus (VACV) was 3 PFU for CAST mice, whereas BALB/c mice survived 10 6 PFU. At all times and in all organs analyzed, virus titers were higher in CAST than in BALB/c mice. In individual CAST mice, luciferase-expressing VACV was seen to replicate rapidly leading to death, whereas virus levels increased for a few days and then declined in BALB/c mice. Increases in gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) were delayed and low in CAST mice compared to BALB/c mice following VACV infection or poly(I-C) inoculation, consistent with differences in innate immune responses. In addition, naive CAST mice had considerably lower numbers of NK and T cells than BALB/c mice. The percentage of IFN-γ-producing CD4 + and CD8 + T cells increased following infection of CAST mice only after considerable virus spread, and the absolute cell numbers remained low. Administration of exogenous IFN-γ or -α to CAST mice before or during the first days of infection suppressed virus replication and prolonged survival, allowing the mice to make adaptive CD4 + and CD8 + T cell responses that were necessary to clear the virus after cessation of interferon treatment. Thus, insufficient innate cytokine and cellular immune responses contribute to the unique susceptibility of CAST mice to VACV, whereas the adaptive immune response can be protective only if virus replication is suppressed during the first several days of infection. IMPORTANCE Most inbred mouse strains are relatively resistant to orthopoxviruses. The castaneous (CAST) mouse is a notable exception, exhibiting extreme vulnerability to monkeypox virus, cowpox virus, and vaccinia virus and thus providing a unique model for studying pathogenicity, immunity, vaccines, and antiviral drugs. To fully utilize the CAST mouse for such

  19. Clinical characteristics of infections caused by Tsukamurella spp. and antimicrobial susceptibilities of the isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chia-Ying; Lai, Chih-Cheng; Lee, Meng-Rui; Lee, Yi-Chieh; Huang, Yu-Tsung; Liao, Chun-Hsing; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2011-12-01

    To investigate the clinical and microbiological characteristics of infections caused by Tsukamurella spp., the computerised database of the Bacteriology Laboratory at National Taiwan University Hospital (Taipei, Taiwan) was reviewed retrospectively to identify patients with infections caused by this species during the period January 1997 to December 2008. All of the isolates had been initially misidentified as Rhodococcus spp. Identification of Tsukamurella isolates to species level was carried out by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis of the heat shock protein gene (hsp65) as well as 16S rRNA gene sequencing. During the study period, a total of eight patients with Tsukamurella infection and two patients with Tsukamurella colonisation were identified. Tsukamurella tyrosinosolvens (n=6) was the most prevalent species, followed by Tsukamurella spumae (n=3) and Tsukamurella pulmonis (n=1). Keratitis was the most common type of infection (n=3), followed by catheter-related bloodstream infection (n=2). One of the patients with Tsukamurella infection died due to bacteraemia; the other seven patients with Tsukamurella infection had favourable outcomes. The three species had different drug susceptibility patterns; T. pulmonis was the most resistant pathogen, with higher minimum inhibitory concentrations of clindamycin (>2 mg/L), erythromycin (2 mg/L) and tetracycline (8 mg/L) than those for the other Tsukamurella spp. In conclusion, strains of Tsukamurella spp., including T. spumae, are uncommon causative agents of ocular infections and bacteraemia in cancer patients. Molecular diagnostic methods are essential to distinguish species in the Tsukamurella genus from species in other phylogenetically related genera such as Rhodococcus. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  20. Virulence Genes in Expanded-Spectrum-Cephalosporin-Resistant and -Susceptible Escherichia coli Isolates from Treated and Untreated Chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, S; Delannoy, S; Bougeard, S; Larvor, E; Jouy, E; Balan, O; Fach, P; Kempf, I

    2015-12-14

    This study investigated antimicrobial resistance, screened for the presence of virulence genes involved in intestinal infections, and determined phylogenetic groups of Escherichia coli isolates from untreated poultry and poultry treated with ceftiofur, an expanded-spectrum cephalosporin. Results show that none of the 76 isolates appeared to be Shiga toxin-producing E. coli or enteropathogenic E. coli. All isolates were negative for the major virulence factors/toxins tested (ehxA, cdt, heat-stable enterotoxin [ST], and heat-labile enterotoxin [LT]). The few virulence genes harbored in isolates generally did not correlate with isolate antimicrobial resistance or treatment status. However, some of the virulence genes were significantly associated with certain phylogenetic groups. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Inherited MST1 deficiency underlies susceptibility to EV-HPV infections.

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    Amandine Crequer

    Full Text Available Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV is characterized by persistent cutaneous lesions caused by a specific group of related human papillomavirus genotypes (EV-HPVs in otherwise healthy individuals. Autosomal recessive (AR EVER1 and EVER2 deficiencies account for two thirds of known cases of EV. AR RHOH deficiency has recently been described in two siblings with EV-HPV infections as well as other infectious and tumoral manifestations. We report here the whole-exome based discovery of AR MST1 deficiency in a 19-year-old patient with a T-cell deficiency associated with EV-HPV, bacterial and fungal infections. MST1 deficiency has recently been described in seven patients from three unrelated kindreds with profound T-cell deficiency and various viral and bacterial infections. The patient was also homozygous for a rare ERCC3 variation. Our findings broaden the clinical range of infections seen in MST1 deficiency and provide a new genetic etiology of susceptibility to EV-HPV infections. Together with the recent discovery of RHOH deficiency, they suggest that T cells are involved in the control of EV-HPVs, at least in some individuals.

  2. Protein energy malnutrition decreases immunity and increases susceptibility to influenza infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Andrew K; Cao, Weiping; Vora, Keyur P; De La Cruz, Juan; Shieh, Wun-Ju; Zaki, Sherif R; Katz, Jacqueline M; Sambhara, Suryaprakash; Gangappa, Shivaprakash

    2013-02-01

    Protein energy malnutrition (PEM), a common cause of secondary immune deficiency in children, is associated with an increased risk of infections. Very few studies have addressed the relevance of PEM as a risk factor for influenza. We investigated the influence of PEM on susceptibility to, and immune responses following, influenza virus infection using isocaloric diets providing either adequate protein (AP; 18%) or very low protein (VLP; 2%) in a mouse model. We found that mice maintained on the VLP diet, when compared to mice fed with the AP diet, exhibited more severe disease following influenza infection based on virus persistence, trafficking of inflammatory cell types to the lung tissue, and virus-induced mortality. Furthermore, groups of mice maintained on the VLP diet showed significantly lower virus-specific antibody response and a reduction in influenza nuclear protein-specific CD8(+) T cells compared with mice fed on the AP diet. Importantly, switching diets for the group maintained on the VLP diet to the AP diet improved virus clearance, as well as protective immunity to viral challenge. Our results highlight the impact of protein energy on immunity to influenza infection and suggest that balanced protein energy replenishment may be one strategy to boost immunity against influenza viral infections.

  3. Susceptibility of in vitro produced hatched bovine blastocysts to infection with bluetongue virus serotype 8

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    Vandaele Leen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bluetongue virus serotype 8 (BTV-8, which caused an epidemic in ruminants in central Western Europe in 2006 and 2007, seems to differ from other bluetongue serotypes in that it can spread transplacentally and has been associated with an increased incidence of abortion and other reproductive problems. For these reasons, and also because BTV-8 is threatening to spread to other parts of the world, there is a need for more information on the consequences of infection during pregnancy. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether hatched (i.e. zona pellucida-free in vitro produced bovine blastocysts at 8-9 days post insemination are susceptible to BTV-8 and whether such infection induces cell death as indicated by apoptosis. Exposure of hatched in vitro produced bovine blastocysts for 1 h to a medium containing 103.8 or 104.9 TCID50 of the virus resulted in active viral replication in between 25 and 100% of the cells at 72 h post exposure. The infected blastocysts also showed growth arrest as evidenced by lower total cell numbers and a significant level of cellular apoptosis. We conclude from this in vitro study that some of the reproductive problems that are reported when cattle herds are infected with BTV-8 may be attributed to direct infection of blastocysts and other early-stage embryos in utero.

  4. SEQUENTIAL PATHOLOGICAL CHANGES IN TURKEYS EXPERIMENTALLY INFECTED WITH CHICKEN POX VIRUS

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    Muhammd Mubarak and Muhammad Mahmoud

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 25, 4-weeks old, turkey poults were used in the present study. Birds were inoculated by chicken pox virus at the dose of 3 x l07.6/ml. Skin biopsy samples were taken sequentially from the same inoculated bird at 12 and 24 hours and at 2nd, 3rd, 4'h, 5th, 7th, l0th, 14th and 21 days post inoculation (PI. Tissue samples from upper respiratory and digestive tracts were also collected. Pox cytoplasmic inclusions (Bollinger bodies were detected between 4 and 7 days PI in epidermal the cell as well as in the follicular and sinus epithelium. Proliferative and necrobiotic epithelial changes were observed. Thereafter, pox inclusions disappeared with the appearance of vesicular, pustular and ulcerative lesions. This was accompanied by the gradual development of granulation tissue and finally scar tissue formed. Ultrastructure of the inclusion bodies and fine changes of the affected epidermal cell were illustrated.. It was concluded that the inoculated chicken pox virus is highly pathogenic for turkeys. Taking sequential biopsy samples from the same inoculated bird was found to yield more accurate follow up of the pox skin lesions.

  5. Prevalence and antibiotic susceptibility profiles of Listeria monocytogenes contamination of chicken flocks and meat in Oyo State, south-western Nigeria: Public health implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishola, O O; Mosugu, J I; Adesokan, H K

    2016-09-01

    Food contamination with Listeria monocytogenes is on the increase posing threats to public health with growing trends in food products recalls due to suspected Listeria contamination. We conducted a cross-sectional study to determine the prevalence and antibiotic susceptibility profiles of Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) among 71 randomly selected poultry farms in Oyo State, Nigeria. A total of 450 samples comprising cloacal swabs (426) and randomly selected dressed chicken meat (24) were cultured for Lm isolation using BrillianceTM Selective Listeria Agar with antibiotics and microbial load count with Nutrient Agar. Further identification was done using microscopic, biochemical characterization and antibiotic sensitivity tests. Data were analysed using bivariate analysis and student t-test. An overall prevalence of 91.8% Lm contamination was obtained comprising 91.5% (390/426) in cloacal swabs and 95.8% (23/24) in meat. The prevalence of Lm in cloacal samples was significantly associated with poultry type (p = 0.008) and breed (p = 0.000. In addition, all the flocks had at least one positive sample yielding 100% flock prevalence. Antibiotic sensitivity test revealed that most of the isolates were resistant to common antibiotics like Ampicillin-cloxacillin and cefuroxime. The results revealed a high level of contamination with Lm in the poultry flock and meat and the observed resistance to most common antibiotics has implications for future disease control as well as public health. There is need to step up routine screening of food animal products for Listeria contamination as well as measures towards reducing such contaminations.

  6. Differential gene expression in chicken primary B cells infected ex vivo with attenuated and very virulent strains of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulwich, Katherine L; Giotis, Efstathios S; Gray, Alice; Nair, Venugopal; Skinner, Michael A; Broadbent, Andrew J

    2017-12-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) belongs to the family Birnaviridae and is economically important to the poultry industry worldwide. IBDV infects B cells in the bursa of Fabricius (BF), causing immunosuppression and morbidity in young chickens. In addition to strains that cause classical Gumboro disease, the so-called 'very virulent' (vv) strain, also in circulation, causes more severe disease and increased mortality. IBDV has traditionally been controlled through the use of live attenuated vaccines, with attenuation resulting from serial passage in non-lymphoid cells. However, the factors that contribute to the vv or attenuated phenotypes are poorly understood. In order to address this, we aimed to investigate host cell-IBDV interactions using a recently described chicken primary B-cell model, where chicken B cells are harvested from the BF and cultured ex vivo in the presence of chicken CD40L. We demonstrated that these cells could support the replication of IBDV when infected ex vivo in the laboratory. Furthermore, we evaluated the gene expression profiles of B cells infected with an attenuated strain (D78) and a very virulent strain (UK661) by microarray. We found that key genes involved in B-cell activation and signalling (TNFSF13B, CD72 and GRAP) were down-regulated following infection relative to mock, which we speculate could contribute to IBDV-mediated immunosuppression. Moreover, cells responded to infection by expressing antiviral type I IFNs and IFN-stimulated genes, but the induction was far less pronounced upon infection with UK661, which we speculate could contribute to its virulence.

  7. Alternative states and population crashes in a resource-susceptible-infected model for planktonic parasites and hosts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerla, D.J.; Gsell, A.S.; Kooi, B.W.; Ibelings, B.W.; Donk, van E.; Mooij, W.M.

    2013-01-01

    1. Despite the strong impact parasites can have, only few models of phytoplankton ecology or aquatic food webs have specifically included parasitism. 2. Here, we provide a susceptible-infected model for a diatom-chytrid hostparasite system that explicitly includes nutrients, infected and uninfected

  8. Estimating host genetic effects on susceptibility and infectivity to infectious diseases and their contribution to response to selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anche, M.T.

    2016-01-01

    Mahlet Teka Anche. (2016). Estimating host genetic effects on susceptibility and infectivity to infectious diseases and their contribution to response to selection. PhD thesis, Wageningen University, the Netherlands

    Genetic approaches aiming to reduce the prevalence of an infection in a

  9. Daptomycin exposure precedes infection and/or colonization with daptomycin non-susceptible enterococcus

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    Storm Jeremy C

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Daptomycin non-susceptible enterococci (DNSE are emerging as an important cause of healthcare-associated infection, however little is known about the epidemiology of DNSE. At the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics (UIHC an increase in the frequency of patients infected and/or colonized with DNSE has occurred. The goals of this study were to evaluate potential factors associated with the development of DNSE colonization and/or infection and to compare the characteristics of patients with prior daptomycin exposure to those without prior daptomycin exposure. Methods The study is a retrospective case-series involving all patients with DNSE infection and/or colonization at UIHC, a 734-bed academic referral center, from June 1, 2005 to June 1, 2011. Results The majority of patients with DNSE colonization and/or infection had prior daptomycin exposure (15 of 25; 60%, a concomitant gastrointestinal process (19 of 25; 76%, or were immunosuppressed (21 of 25; 84%. DNSE infection was confirmed in 17 of 25 (68% patients, including 9 patients with bacteremia. Twelve of 17 (71% patients with DNSE infection had prior daptomycin exposure, including 7 of 9 (78% patients with bacteremia. Compared to patients without prior daptomycin exposure, patients with prior daptomycin exposure were less likely to harbor E. faecalis (0% vs. 33%; p = 0.019. A high proportion of patients (10 of 25; 40% died during their hospitalizations. Most enterococcal isolates were E. faecium (86%, and were vancomycin-resistant (72%. Molecular typing revealed a diverse population of DNSE. Conclusions Prior daptomycin exposure, immunosuppression, and/or a concomitant gastrointestinal process, may be associated with the development of DNSE. PFGE revealed a diverse population of DNSE, which along with both increasing numbers of DNSE detected yearly and increasing annual rates of daptomycin usage, suggests the emergence of DNSE under antimicrobial pressure.

  10. [Susceptibility to infections and behavior of stainless steel : Comparison with titanium implants in traumatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haubruck, Patrick; Schmidmaier, Gerhard

    2017-02-01

    Despite modern treatment options, implant-associated infections (IAI) remain a severe and challenging complication in the treatment of trauma patients. Almost 30 years after the introduction of implants made of titanium alloy into the treatment of trauma patients, there is still no uniform consensus regarding the clinical benefit of titanium alloy in the context of patients with IAI. We sought to determine if implants made of titanium alloy have been proven to be less susceptible regarding IAI in contrast to implants made of stainless steel. A review of the current literature on IAI in association with the utilized implant material was conducted. Relevant articles from the years 1995 to 2016 were searched in the PubMed database. A total of 183 articles were identified and all abstracts were reviewed for relevance. A total of 14 articles met the inclusion criteria and were stratified according to the level of evidence and furthermore evaluated regarding the influence of the implant material on IAI. Considerable debate remains concerning the influence of the implant material on the susceptibility to IAI; however, the available literature shows that despite slight tendencies, there is no proof of titanium alloy being favorable in the susceptibility to IAI. Furthermore, the literature shows that the design of plates for osteosynthesis might influence IAI. In particular, plates that cause less soft tissue damage and preserve perfusion of the periosteum proved to be beneficial regarding IAI.

  11. [Surveillance of antimicrobial susceptibility of Escherichia coli producing urinary tract infections in Galicia (Spain)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treviño, Mercedes; Losada, Isabel; Fernández-Pérez, Begoña; Coira, Amparo; Peña-Rodríguez, Maria F; Hervada, Xurxo

    2016-04-01

    Escherichia coli is the microorganism responsible for most of the community-acquired urinary tract infections (UTI). Our purpose was to determine the susceptibility of E. coli associated with UTI in Galicia and consider the most appropriate antibiotics for empirical treatment. Retrospective study during the period 2011- 2012 of the isolation of E. coli in urine samples from almost all the Galician population. Demographic variables, minimum inhibitory concentration, and reading data were collected: amoxicillin-clavulanate, cefotaxime, gentamicin, amikacin, ciprofloxacin, cotrimoxazole, nitrofurantoin and fosfomycin. The identification and susceptibility studies were mainly conducted by automated systems. The interpretation of the results was performed according to CLSI criteria. During the study period 55,046 E. coli were isolated in UTI. The percentages of resistance were: cotrimoxazole, 30%; ciprofloxacin, 33%; amoxicillin-clavulanate, 23% and 10% for 3rd generation cephalosporins. Fosfomycin and nitrofurantoin showed the highest activity with more than 96% of susceptibility in our study. The linear trend of resistance regarding age was statistically significant (p Galicia, the most active antibiotics against E. coli associated with UTI are fosfomycin and nitrofurantoin so they should be considered as empirical treatment of choice by the community-acquired UTI not complicated by E. coli.

  12. Childhood socioeconomic status, telomere length, and susceptibility to upper respiratory infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Sheldon; Janicki-Deverts, Denise; Turner, Ronald B; Marsland, Anna L; Casselbrant, Margaretha L; Li-Korotky, Ha-Sheng; Epel, Elissa S; Doyle, William J

    2013-11-01

    Low socioeconomic status (SES) during childhood and adolescence has been found to predict greater susceptibility to common cold viruses in adults. Here, we test whether low childhood SES is associated with shorter leukocyte telomere length in adulthood, and whether telomere length mediates the association between childhood SES and susceptibility to acute upper respiratory disease in adulthood. At baseline, 196 healthy volunteers reported whether they currently owned their home and, for each year of their childhood, whether their parents owned the family home. Volunteers also had blood drawn for assessment of specific antibody to the challenge virus, and for CD8+ CD28- T-lymphocyte telomere length (in a subset, n=135). They were subsequently quarantined in a hotel, exposed to a virus (rhinovirus [RV] 39) that causes a common cold and followed for infection and illness (clinical cold) over five post-exposure days. Lower childhood SES as measured by fewer years of parental home ownership was associated with shorter adult CD8+ CD28- telomere length and with an increased probability of developing infection and clinical illness when exposed to a common cold virus in adulthood. These associations were independent of adult SES, age, sex, race, body mass, neuroticism, and childhood family characteristics. Associations with infections and colds were also independent of pre-challenge viral-specific antibody and season. Further analyses do not support mediating roles for smoking, alcohol consumption or physical activity but suggest that CD8+ CD28- cell telomere length may act as a partial mediator of the associations between childhood SES and infection and childhood SES and colds. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Perinatal Exposure to Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS Enhances Susceptibility to Viral and Secondary Bacterial Infections

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    Jocelyn A. Claude

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Studies suggest childhood exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS leads to increased incidence of infections of the lower respiratory tract. The objective of this study was to determine whether perinatal exposure to ETS increases the incidence, morbidity and severity of respiratory influenza infection and whether a secondary bacterial challenge at the peak of a pre-existing viral infection creates an enhanced host-pathogen susceptibility to an opportunistic infection. Timed-pregnant female Balb/c mice were exposed to either ETS for 6 h/day, 7 d/week beginning on gestation day 14 and continuing with the neonates to 6 weeks of age. Control animals were exposed to filtered air (FA. At the end of exposure, mice were intranasally inoculated with a murine-adapted influenza A. One week later, an intranasal inoculation of S. aureus bacteria was administered. The respective treatment groups were: bacteria only, virus only or virus+bacteria for both FA and ETS-exposed animals for a total of six treatment groups. Animal behavior and body weights were documented daily following infection. Mice were necropsied 1-day post-bacterial infection. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF cell analysis demonstrated perinatal exposure to ETS, compared to FA, leads to delayed but enhanced clinical symptoms and enhanced total cell influx into the lungs associated with viral infection followed by bacterial challenge. Viral infection significantly increases the number of neutrophils entering the lungs following bacterial challenge with either FA or ETS exposure, while the influx of lymphocytes and monocytes is significantly enhanced only by perinatal ETS exposure. There is a significant increase in peribronchiolar inflammation following viral infection in pups exposed to ETS compared with pups exposed to FA, but no change is noted in the degree of lung injury between FA and ETS-exposed animals following bacterial challenge. The data suggests perinatal exposure to ETS

  14. Strongyle Infection and Gut Microbiota: Profiling of Resistant and Susceptible Horses Over a Grazing Season

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    Allison Clark

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal strongyles are a major threat to horses' health and welfare. Given that strongyles inhabit the same niche as the gut microbiota, they may interact with each other. These beneficial or detrimental interactions are unknown in horses and could partly explain contrasted susceptibility to infection between individuals. To address these questions, an experimental pasture trial with 20 worm-free female Welsh ponies (10 susceptible (S and 10 resistant (R to parasite infection was implemented for 5 months. Fecal egg counts (FEC, hematological and biochemical data, body weight and gut microbiological composition were studied in each individual after 0, 24, 43, 92 and 132 grazing days. R and S ponies displayed divergent immunological profiles and slight differences in microbiological composition under worm-free conditions. After exposure to natural infection, the predicted R ponies exhibited lower FEC after 92 and 132 grazing days, and maintained higher levels of circulating monocytes and eosinophils, while lymphocytosis persisted in S ponies. Although the overall gut microbiota diversity and structure remained similar during the parasite infection between the two groups, S ponies exhibited a reduction of bacteria such as Ruminococcus, Clostridium XIVa and members of the Lachnospiraceae family, which may have promoted a disruption of mucosal homeostasis at day 92. In line with this hypothesis, an increase in pathobionts such as Pseudomonas and Campylobacter together with changes in several predicted immunological pathways, including pathogen sensing, lipid metabolism, and activation of signal transduction that are critical for the regulation of immune system and energy homeostasis were observed in S relative to R ponies. Moreover, S ponies displayed an increase in protozoan concentrations at day 92, suggesting that strongyles and protozoa may contribute to each other's success in the equine intestines. It could also be that S individuals

  15. Fanconi anemia patients are more susceptible to infection with tumor virus SV40.

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    Manola Comar

    Full Text Available Fanconi anemia (FA is a recessive DNA repair disease characterized by a high predisposition to developing neoplasms. DNA tumor polyomavirus simian virus 40 (SV40 transforms FA fibroblasts at high efficiency suggesting that FA patients could be highly susceptible to SV40 infection. To test this hypothesis, the large tumor (LT antigen of SV40, BKV, JCV and Merkel Cell (MC polyomaviruses were tested in blood samples from 89 FA patients and from 82 of their parents. Two control groups consisting of 47 no-FA patients affected by other genetic bone marrow failure diseases and 91 healthy subjects were also evaluated. Although JCV, BKV and MC were not found in any of the FA samples, the prevalence and viral load of SV40 were higher in FA patients (25%; mean viral load: 1.1×10(2 copies/10(5cells as compared with healthy individuals (4.3%; mean viral load: 0.8×10(1 copies/10(5cells and genetic controls (0% (p<0.005. A marked age-dependent frequency of SV40 was found in FA with respect to healthy subjects suggesting that, although acquired early in life, the virus can widespread more easily in specific groups of population. From the analysis of family pedigrees, 60% of the parents of SV40-positive probands were positive for the virus compared to 2% of the parents of the SV40-negative probands (p<0.005. It is worthy of note that the relative frequency of SV40-positive relatives detected in this study was the highest ever reported, showing that asymptomatic FA carriers are also more susceptible to SV40. In conclusion, we favor the hypothesis that SV40 spread could be facilitated by individuals who are genetically more susceptible to infection, such as FA patients. The increased susceptibility to SV40 infection seems to be associated with a specific defect of the immune system which supports a potential interplay of SV40 with an underlying genetic alteration that increases the risk of malignancies.

  16. Antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of bacteria isolated from patients with urinary tract infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, I.U.; Mirza, I.A.; Ikram, A.; Afzal, A.; Ali, S.; Hussain, A.; Ghafoor, T.

    2014-01-01

    To determine the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of bacterial pathogens in the patients of urinary tract infection reporting at a tertiary care hospital. Study Design: Laboratory based study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Microbiology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Rawalpindi, from January to December 2012. Methodology: A total of 440 culture positive bacterial isolates from 1110 urine samples; submitted over a period of one year were included in this study. Identification of bacterial isolates was done by standard biochemical profile of the organisms. The antimicrobial susceptibility of culture positive bacterial isolates was performed by disk diffusion method as recommended by Clinical Laboratory Standard Institute guidelines (CLSI). Results: Out of the 440 culture positive urine samples, 152 (34.6%) were from indoor patients whereas 288 (65.4%) from outdoor patients. Gram negative bacteria accounted for 414 (94%) of the total isolates while rest of the 26 (6%) were Gram positive bacteria. The most prevalent bacterial isolate was Escherichia (E.) coli 270 (61.3%) followed by Pseudomonas (P.) aeruginosa 52 (12%) and Klebsiella (K.) pneumoniae 42 (9.5%). The susceptibility pattern of E. coli showed that 96.2% of the bacterial isolates were sensitive to imipenem, 85.1% to amikacin, 80.7% to piperacillin/tazobactam and 72.6% to nitrofurantoin. In case of P. aeruginsosa, 73% bacterial isolates were sensitive to tazobactam/piperacillin, 69.2% to sulbactam/cefoperazone and 65.38% to imipenem. The antibiogram of K. pneumoniae has revealed that 76.1% of the bacterial isolates were sensitive to imipenem and 52.3% to piperacillin/tazobactam. Nitrofurantoin and imipenem were the most effective antimicrobials amongst the Enterococcus spp. as 92.3% showed susceptibility to this bacterial isolate. Conclusion: Majority of the bacterial isolates were sensitive to imipenem and piperacillin/tazobactam while susceptibility to most of the commonly used oral

  17. Candida Species From Eye Infections: Drug Susceptibility, Virulence Factors, and Molecular Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjith, Konduri; Sontam, Bhavani; Sharma, Savitri; Joseph, Joveeta; Chathoth, Kanchana N; Sama, Kalyana C; Murthy, Somasheila I; Shivaji, Sisinthy

    2017-08-01

    To determine the type of Candida species in ocular infections and to investigate the relationship of antifungal susceptibility profile to virulence factors. Fifty isolates of yeast-like fungi from patients with keratitis, endophthalmitis, and orbital cellulitis were identified by Vitek-2 compact system and DNA sequencing of ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 regions of the rRNA gene, followed by phylogenetic analysis for phenotypic and genotypic identification, respectively. Minimum inhibitory concentration of six antifungal drugs was determined by E test/microbroth dilution methods. Phenotypic and genotypic methods were used to determine the virulence factors. Phylogenetic analysis showed the clustering of all isolates into eight distinct groups with a major cluster formed Candida parapsilosis (n = 21), which was the most common species by both Vitek 2 and DNA sequencing. Using χ2 test no significant difference was noted between the techniques except that Vitek 2 did not identify C. viswanathii, C. orthopsilosis, and two non-Candida genera. Of 43 tested Candida isolates high susceptibility to amphotericin B (39/43, 90.6%) and natamycin (43/43, 100%) was noted. While none of the isolates produced coagulase, all produced esterase and catalase. The potential to form biofilm was detected in 23/43 (53.4%) isolates. Distribution of virulence factors by heat map analysis showed difference in metabolic activity of biofilm producers from nonbiofilm producers. Identified by Vitek 2 and DNA sequencing methods C. parapsilosis was the most common species associated with eye infections. Irrespective of the virulence factors elaborated, the Candida isolates were susceptible to commonly used antifungal drugs such as amphotericin B and natamycin.

  18. Molecular analysis of Pasteurella multocida strains isolated from fowl cholera infection in backyard chickens

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    Mohamed-Wael Abdelazeem Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Based on the previous findings, there are three spreading clusters that may indicate the association of a small number of P. multocida variants with the majority of cases suggesting that certain clones of P. multocida are able to colonize the examined backyard chickens. Also, the ease and rapidity of RAPD-PCR support the use of this technique as alternative to the more labour-intensive SDS-PAGE system for strain differentiation and epidemiological studies of avian P. multocida. Further application of RAPD technology to the examination of avian cholera outbreaks in commercially available flocks may facilitate more effective management of this disease by providing the potential to investigate correlations of P. multocida genotypes, to identify affiliations between bird types and bacterial genotypes, and to elucidate the role of specific bird species in disease transmission.

  19. In vitro susceptibility to methicillin, vancomycin and linezolid of staphylococci isolated from bloodstream infections in eastern Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekin, Alicem; Dal, Tuba; Deveci, Özcan; Tekin, Recep; Özcan, Nida; Atmaca, Selahattin; Dayan, Saim

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus species are one of the major causes of bacterial bloodstream infections. Multi-resistant staphylococci infections are major therapeutic problems. This study was aimed to detect methicillin, linezolid and vancomycin susceptibilities of Staphylococcus isolates. A total of 870 Staphylococcus strains isolated from blood cultures of hospitalized patients with BSI. Antimicrobial susceptibilities of methicillin, linezolid and vancomycin were detected according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). A total of 771 (88.6%) isolates were coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS). 700 (80.5%) isolates were methicillin-resistant (MR) and 170 (19.5%) were methicillin-susceptible (MS). All the MS isolates were also susceptible to linezolid. However 15 (1.7%) of MR strains were resistant to linezolid. The minimum inhibitory concentration range for the linezolid-resistant isolates by Etest was 6-32 μg/mL. The difference between linezolid susceptibilities for MS and MR staphylococci was not quite statistically significant (p = 0.052). There was no statistically significant difference between S. aureus and CoNS isolates for linezolid susceptibility. All of the isolates were susceptible to vancomycin. In conclusion, linezolid is currently an efficient option for the treatment of methicillin-resistant staphylococci infections.

  20. Comparative Transcriptomic Analysis of Primary Duck Hepatocytes Provides Insight into Differential Susceptibility to DHBV Infection.

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    Liang Yan

    Full Text Available Primary duck hepatocytes (PDH displays differential susceptibility to duck hepatitis B virus when maintained in the media supplemented with fetal bovine serum or dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO which has been widely used for the maintenance of hepatocytes, and prolonging susceptibility to hepadnavirus. However the mechanism underlying maintenance of susceptibility to hepadnavirus by DMSO treatment remains unclear. In this study, a global transcriptome analysis of PDHs under different culture conditions was conducted for investigating the effects of DMSO on maintenance of susceptibility of PDH to DHBV in vitro. The 384 differential expressed genes (DEGs were identified by comparisons between each library pair (PDHs cultured with or without DMSO or fresh isolated PDH. We analyzed canonical pathways in which the DEGs were enriched in Hepatic Fibrosis / Hepatic Stellate Cell Activation, Bile Acid Biosynthesis and Tight Junction signaling. After re-annotation against human genome data, the 384 DEGs were pooled together with proteins belonging to hepatitis B pathway to construct a protein-protein interaction network. The combination of decreased expression of liver-specific genes (CYP3A4, CYP1E1, CFI, RELN and GSTA1 et al with increased expression of hepatocyte-dedifferentiation-associated genes (PLA2G4A and PLCG1 suggested that in vitro culture conditions results in the fading of hepatocyte phenotype in PDHs. The expression of seven DEGs associated with tight junction formation (JAM3, PPP2R2B, PRKAR1B, PPP2R2C, MAGI2, ACTA2 and ACTG2 was up-regulated after short-term culture in vitro, which was attenuated in the presence of DMSO. Those results could shed light on DHBV infection associated molecular events affected by DMSO.

  1. Lack of the pattern recognition molecule mannose-binding lectin increases susceptibility to influenza A virus infection

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    Hartshorn Kevan L

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mannose-binding lectin (MBL, a pattern recognition innate immune molecule, inhibits influenza A virus infection in vitro. MBL deficiency due to gene polymorphism in humans has been associated with infection susceptibility. These clinical observations were confirmed by animal model studies, in which mice genetically lacking MBL were susceptible to certain pathogens, including herpes simplex virus 2. Results We demonstrate that MBL is present in the lung of naïve healthy wild type (WT mice and that MBL null mice are more susceptible to IAV infection. Administration of recombinant human MBL (rhMBL reverses the infection phenotype, confirming that the infection susceptibility is MBL-mediated. The anti-viral mechanisms of MBL include activation of the lectin complement pathway and coagulation, requiring serum factors. White blood cells (WBCs in the lung increase in WT mice compared with MBL null mice on day 1 post-infection. In contrast, apoptotic macrophages (MΦs are two-fold higher in the lung of MBL null mice compared with WT mice. Furthermore, MBL deficient macrophages appear to be susceptible to apoptosis in vitro. Lastly, soluble factors, which are associated with lung injury, are increased in the lungs of MBL null mice during IAV infection. These results suggest that MBL plays a key role against IAV infection. Conclusion MBL plays a key role in clearing IAV and maintaining lung homeostasis. In addition, our findings also suggest that MBL deficiency maybe a risk factor in IAV infection and MBL may be a useful adjunctive therapy for IAV infection.

  2. Virus interference between H7N2 low pathogenic avian influenza virus and lentogenic Newcastle disease virus in experimental co-infections in chickens and turkeys

    OpenAIRE

    Costa-Hurtado, Mar; Afonso, Claudio L; Miller, Patti J; Spackman, Erica; Kapczynski, Darrell R; Swayne, David E; Shepherd, Eric; Smith, Diane; Zsak, Aniko; Pantin-Jackwood, Mary

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Low pathogenicity avian influenza virus (LPAIV) and lentogenic Newcastle disease virus (l NDV) are commonly reported causes of respiratory disease in poultry worldwide with similar clinical and pathobiological presentation. Co-infections do occur but are not easily detected, and the impact of co-infections on pathobiology is unknown. In this study chickens and turkeys were infected with a l NDV vaccine strain (LaSota) and a H7N2 LPAIV (A/turkey/VA/SEP-67/2002) simultan...

  3. Immunization of chickens with a recombinant Ascaridia galli protein results in parasite-specific IgG with no protective effect against infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Dorte Rosenbek; Schou, T. W.; Norup, L. R.

    2012-01-01

    Parasite infections are causing increasing concern in the poultry production industry, because the prevalence of several roundworms is rising. This is mainly due to changes in rearing systems, where the European Union ban of conventional cages for egg laying hens has led to an increase...... the i.m./oral group and the control group. Three weeks after the last immunization, all animals were infected with 500 embryonated A. galli eggs, and 8 or 9 days post infection chickens were slaughtered and larvae numbers determined. No statistically significant differences in larvae numbers were...

  4. Development of mixed-type autoimmune hemolytic anemia and Evans' syndrome following chicken pox infection in a case of low-titer cold agglutinin disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yumi; Masuya, Masahiro; Katayama, Naoyuki; Miyata, Eri; Sugimoto, Yuka; Shibasaki, Tetsunori; Yamamura, Kentaro; Ohishi, Kohshi; Minami, Nobuyuki; Shiku, Hiroshi; Nobori, Tsutomu

    2006-10-01

    We describe a patient with low-titer cold agglutinin disease (CAD) who developed mixed-type autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) and idiopathic thrombocytopenia following chicken pox infection. At least 1 year before admission to hospital, the patient had mild hemolytic anemia associated with low-titer cold agglutinins. A severe hemolytic crisis and thrombocytopenia (Evans' syndrome) occurred several days after infection with chicken pox, and the patient was referred to our hospital. Serological findings revealed the presence of both cold agglutinins and warm-reactive autoantibodies against erythrocytes, and the diagnosis was mixed-type AIHA. Following steroid therapy, the hemoglobin (Hb) level and platelet count improved. The patient was closely followed over a 10-year period with recurrent documented hemolysis after viral or bacterial infections. Warm-reactive autoantibodies have not been detected in the last 2 years, and only the immunoglobulin M anti-I cold agglutinins with a low titer and wide thermal amplitude have remained unchanged. Therefore, the patient has received at least 10 mg prednisolone daily to maintain a Hb level of 10 g/dL. To the best of our knowledge, no adult case of low-titer CAD that has evolved into mixed-type AIHA and Evans' syndrome after chicken pox infection has been previously reported in the literature.

  5. Evaluation of antibiotic susceptibility in wound infections: A pilot study from Bangladesh [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    OpenAIRE

    Sushmita Roy; Mejbah Uddin Ahmed; Bhuiyan Mohammad Mahtab Uddin; Zubair Ahmed Ratan; Monali Rajawat; Varshil Mehta; Sojib Bin Zaman

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Infections due to antibiotic resistant bacteria have increased alarmingly in both developed and developing countries. Unrestrained and rapidly spreading bacterial growth has turned the management of wound infections into a serious challenge. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of different bacterial pathogens and their antibiotic susceptibility in various types of wound infections. Methods:  A cross-sectional study was conducted to collect 105 wound swabs. All isolated ...

  6. Transcriptome analysis of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli O1 in chicken serum reveals adaptive responses to systemic infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ganwu; Tivendale, Kelly A; Liu, Peng; Feng, Yaping; Wannemuehler, Yvonne; Cai, Wentong; Mangiamele, Paul; Johnson, Timothy J; Constantinidou, Chrystala; Penn, Charles W; Nolan, Lisa K

    2011-05-01

    Infections of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) result in annual multimillion-dollar losses to the poultry industry. Despite this, little is known about the mechanisms by which APEC survives and grows in the bloodstream. Thus, the aim of this study was to identify molecular mechanisms enabling APEC to survive and grow in this critical host environment. To do so, we compared the transcriptome of APEC O1 during growth in Luria-Bertani broth and chicken serum. Several categories of genes, predicted to contribute to adaptation and growth in the avian host, were identified. These included several known virulence genes and genes involved in adaptive metabolism, protein transport, biosynthesis pathways, stress resistance, and virulence regulation. Several genes with unknown function, which were localized to pathogenicity islands or APEC O1's large virulence plasmid, pAPEC-O1-ColBM, were also identified, suggesting that they too contribute to survival in serum. The significantly upregulated genes dnaK, dnaJ, phoP, and ybtA were subsequently subjected to mutational analysis to confirm their role in conferring a competitive advantage during infection. This genome-wide analysis provides novel insight into processes that are important to the pathogenesis of APEC O1.

  7. Chicken pox in pregnancy : an obstetric concern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2010-10-01

    Chicken pox is a common viral infection presenting with fever and discrete vesicular lesions. This infection can be widely detected in developing countries, especially for those tropical countries. The pregnant can get chicken pox, and this becomes an important obstetrical concern. In this specific paper, the author hereby details and discusses on chicken pox in pregnancy. Clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention are briefly summarized. In addition, the effects of chicken pox on pregnancy as well as the vertical transmission are also documented.

  8. Virulence factors and antibiotic susceptibility in enterococci isolated from oral mucosal and deep infections

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    Gunnar Dahlén

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the presence of virulence factors and antibiotic susceptibility among enterococcal isolates from oral mucosal and deep infections. Forty-three enterococcal strains from oral mucosal lesions and 18 from deep infections were isolated from 830 samples that were sent during 2 years to Oral Microbiology, University of Gothenburg, for analysis. The 61 strains were identified by 16S rDNA, and characterized by the presence of the virulence genes efa A (endocarditis gene, gel E (gelatinase gene, ace (collagen binding antigen gene, asa (aggregation substance gene, cyl A (cytolysin activator gene and esp (surface adhesin gene, tested for the production of bacteriocins and presence of plasmids. MIC determination was performed using the E-test method against the most commonly used antibiotics in dentistry, for example, penicillin V, amoxicillin and clindamycin. Vancomycin was included in order to detect vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE strains. Sixty strains were identified as Enterococcus faecalis and one as Enterococcus faecium. All the virulence genes were detected in more than 93.3% (efa A and esp of the E. faecalis strains, while the presence of phenotypic characteristics was much lower (gelatinase 10% and hemolysin 16.7%. Forty-six strains produced bacteriocins and one to six plasmids were detected in half of the isolates. Enterococcal strains from oral infections had a high virulence capacity, showed bacteriocin production and had numerous plasmids. They were generally susceptible to ampicillins but were resistant to clindamycin, commonly used in dentistry, and no VRE-strain was found.

  9. Detection of infectious bursal disease virus in various lymphoid tissues of experimentally infected specific pathogen free chickens by different reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kabell, Susanne; Handberg, Kurt; Kusk, Mette

    2005-01-01

    Infectious bursal disease (IBD) is a worldwide distributed immunosuppressive viral disease in young chickens, controlled by vaccination. Emergence of several strains of IBD virus (IBDV) has created a demand for strain-specific diagnostic tools. In the present experiment, five different reverse...... transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays, including two recently developed strain-specific assays, were employed for detection of ribonucleic acid (RNA) from three different IBDV strains in bursa tissue samples from experimentally infected specific pathogen free chickens. The virus strains...... included vaccine strain D78, classical strain Faragher 52/70, and the very virulent Danish strain DK01 The presence of the virus infection was confirmed by histopathologic evaluation of bursa lesions. The largest number of positive samples was obtained with a strain-specific two-step multiplex (MPX) RT...

  10. Antibiotic susceptibility, heteroresistance, and updated treatment strategies in Helicobacter pylori infection

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    Mascellino MT

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Maria Teresa Mascellino,1 Barbara Porowska,2 Massimiliano De Angelis,1 Alessandra Oliva1 1Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, 2Department of Cardio-Thoracic, Vascular, General Surgery and of Organ Transplants, Policlinico Umberto I, Rome, Italy Abstract: In this review, we discuss the problem of antibiotic resistance, heteroresistance, the utility of cultures and antibiotic susceptibility tests in Helicobacter pylori (Hp eradication, as well as the updated treatment strategies for this infection. The prevalence of antibiotic resistance is increasing all over the world, especially for metronidazole and clarithromycin, because of their heavy use in some geographical areas. Heteroresistance (simultaneous presence of both susceptible and resistant strains in different sites of a single stomach is another important issue, as an isolate could be mistakenly considered susceptible if a single biopsy is used for antimicrobial tests. We also examined literature data regarding eradication success rates of culture-guided and empiric therapies. The empiric therapy and the one based on susceptibility testing, in Hp eradication, may depend on several factors such as concomitant diseases, the number of previous antibiotic treatments, differences in bacterial virulence in individuals with positive or negative cultures, together with local antibiotic resistance patterns in real-world settings. Updated treatment strategies in Hp infection presented in the guidelines of the Toronto Consensus Group (2016 are reported. These suggest to prolong eradication therapy up to 14 days, replacing the old triple therapy with a quadruple therapy based on proton pump inhibitor (PPI, bismuth, metronidazole, and tetracycline for most of the patients, or as an alternative quadruple therapy without bismuth, based on the use of PPI, amoxicillin, metronidazole, and clarithromycin. The new drug vonoprazan, a first-in-class potassium-competitive acid blocker recently

  11. Differential Gene Expression from Midguts of Refractory and Susceptible Lines of the Mosquito, Aedes aegypti, Infected with Dengue-2 Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Bar?n, Olga L.; Ursic-Bedoya, Raul J.; Lowenberger, Carl A.; Ocampo, Clara B.

    2010-01-01

    Suppressive subtractive hybridization was used to evaluate the differential expression of midgut genes of feral populations of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) from Colombia that are naturally refractory or susceptible to Dengue-2 virus infection. A total of 165 differentially expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were identified in the subtracted libraries. The analysis showed a higher number of differentially expressed genes in the susceptible Ae. aegypti individuals than the refractory mosquito...

  12. A model to estimate effects of SNPs on host susceptibility and infectivity for an endemic infectious disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biemans, Floor; de Jong, Mart C M; Bijma, Piter

    2017-06-30

    Infectious diseases in farm animals affect animal health, decrease animal welfare and can affect human health. Selection and breeding of host individuals with desirable traits regarding infectious diseases can help to fight disease transmission, which is affected by two types of (genetic) traits: host susceptibility and host infectivity. Quantitative genetic studies on infectious diseases generally connect an individual's disease status to its own genotype, and therefore capture genetic effects on susceptibility only. However, they usually ignore variation in exposure to infectious herd mates, which may limit the accuracy of estimates of genetic effects on susceptibility. Moreover, genetic effects on infectivity will exist as well. Thus, to design optimal breeding strategies, it is essential that genetic effects on infectivity are quantified. Given the potential importance of genetic effects on infectivity, we set out to develop a model to estimate the effect of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on both host susceptibility and host infectivity. To evaluate the quality of the resulting SNP effect estimates, we simulated an endemic disease in 10 groups of 100 individuals, and recorded time-series data on individual disease status. We quantified bias and precision of the estimates for different sizes of SNP effects, and identified the optimum recording interval when the number of records is limited. We present a generalized linear mixed model to estimate the effect of SNPs on both host susceptibility and host infectivity. SNP effects were on average slightly underestimated, i.e. estimates were conservative. Estimates were less precise for infectivity than for susceptibility. Given our sample size, the power to estimate SNP effects for susceptibility was 100% for differences between genotypes of a factor 1.56 or more, and was higher than 60% for infectivity for differences between genotypes of a factor 4 or more. When disease status was recorded 11 times on each

  13. Experimental Mycobacterium bovis infection in three white rhinoceroses (Ceratotherium simum): Susceptibility, clinical and anatomical pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Emily P.; de Klerk-Lorist, Lin-Mari; Hofmeyr, Markus; van der Heijden, Elisabeth M. D. L.; Botha, Louise; van Helden, Paul; Miller, Michele; Buss, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium bovis is endemic in the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) population in the Kruger National Park and other conservation areas in South Africa. The disease has been diagnosed in a total of 21 free ranging or semi-free ranging wildlife species in the country with highly variable presentations in terms of clinical signs as well as severity and distribution of tuberculous lesions. Most species are spillover or dead-end hosts without significant role in the epidemiology of the disease. White rhinoceroses (Ceratotherium simum) are translocated from the Kruger National Park in substantial numbers every year and a clear understanding of their risk to manifest overt tuberculosis disease and to serve as source of infection to other species is required. We report the findings of experimental infection of three white rhinoceroses with a moderately low dose of a virulent field isolate of Mycobacterium bovis. None of the animals developed clinical signs or disseminated disease. The susceptibility of the white rhinoceros to bovine tuberculosis was confirmed by successful experimental infection based on the ante mortem isolation of M. bovis from the respiratory tract of one rhinoceros, the presence of acid-fast organisms and necrotizing granulomatous lesions in the tracheobronchial lymph nodes and the detection of M. bovis genetic material by PCR in the lungs of two animals. PMID:28686714

  14. Experimental Mycobacterium bovis infection in three white rhinoceroses (Ceratotherium simum: Susceptibility, clinical and anatomical pathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita L Michel

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium bovis is endemic in the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer population in the Kruger National Park and other conservation areas in South Africa. The disease has been diagnosed in a total of 21 free ranging or semi-free ranging wildlife species in the country with highly variable presentations in terms of clinical signs as well as severity and distribution of tuberculous lesions. Most species are spillover or dead-end hosts without significant role in the epidemiology of the disease. White rhinoceroses (Ceratotherium simum are translocated from the Kruger National Park in substantial numbers every year and a clear understanding of their risk to manifest overt tuberculosis disease and to serve as source of infection to other species is required. We report the findings of experimental infection of three white rhinoceroses with a moderately low dose of a virulent field isolate of Mycobacterium bovis. None of the animals developed clinical signs or disseminated disease. The susceptibility of the white rhinoceros to bovine tuberculosis was confirmed by successful experimental infection based on the ante mortem isolation of M. bovis from the respiratory tract of one rhinoceros, the presence of acid-fast organisms and necrotizing granulomatous lesions in the tracheobronchial lymph nodes and the detection of M. bovis genetic material by PCR in the lungs of two animals.

  15. Prevalence of chronic infections and susceptibility to measles and varicella-zoster virus in Latin American immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Yves; Santos, Lilian; Arm-Vernez, Isabelle; Mauris, Anne; Wolff, Hans; Chappuis, François; Getaz, Laurent

    2016-05-11

    Large numbers of Latin American immigrants recently arrived in Western Europe. Curative and preventive programmes need to take account of their risk of suffering and transmitting imported chronic infections and of their susceptibility to cosmopolitan infections. We aimed to assess the prevalence and co-occurrence of imported chronic infections among Latin American immigrants, and their susceptibility to highly prevalent cosmopolitan infections. Adult participants were recruited in the community and in a primary health centre in Geneva in 2008. Serological tests were performed on stored sera for HIV, HBV, syphilis, Strongyloides stercoralis, Trypanosoma cruzi, varicella and measles. We considered only chronic active infections in the analysis. The 1 012 participants, aged 37.2 (SD 11.3) years, were mostly female (82.5 %) and Bolivians (48 %). Overall, 209 (20.7 %) had at least one and 27 (2.7 %) two or more chronic infections. T. cruzi (12.8 %) and S. stercoralis (8.4 %) were the most prevalent chronic active infections compared to syphilis (0.4 %), HBV (0.4 %) and HIV (1.4 %). Concomitant infections affected 28.2 and 18.5 % of T. cruzi and S. stercoralis infected cases. Bolivian origin (aOR: 13.6; 95 % CI: 3.2-57.9) was associated with risk of multiple infections. Susceptibilities for VZV and measles were 0.7 and 1.4 %, respectively. Latin American immigrants are at risk of complications and possible reactivation of chronic parasitic infections but have overall low risks of chronic viral and syphilitic active infections. Systematic screening for chronic active parasitic infections is therefore necessary especially among Bolivians. The high protection rate against measles and VZV doesn't require specific preventive interventions.

  16. Nanomechanical sensor applied to blood culture pellets: a fast approach to determine the antibiotic susceptibility against agents of bloodstream infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupar, P; Opota, O; Longo, G; Prod'hom, G; Dietler, G; Greub, G; Kasas, S

    2017-06-01

    The management of bloodstream infection, a life-threatening disease, largely relies on early detection of infecting microorganisms and accurate determination of their antibiotic susceptibility to reduce both mortality and morbidity. Recently we developed a new technique based on atomic force microscopy capable of detecting movements of biologic samples at the nanoscale. Such sensor is able to monitor the response of bacteria to antibiotic's pressure, allowing a fast and versatile susceptibility test. Furthermore, rapid preparation of a bacterial pellet from a positive blood culture can improve downstream characterization of the recovered pathogen as a result of the increased bacterial concentration obtained. Using artificially inoculated blood cultures, we combined these two innovative procedures and validated them in double-blind experiments to determine the susceptibility and resistance of Escherichia coli strains (ATCC 25933 as susceptible and a characterized clinical isolate as resistant strain) towards a selection of antibiotics commonly used in clinical settings. On the basis of the variance of the sensor movements, we were able to positively discriminate the resistant from the susceptible E. coli strains in 16 of 17 blindly investigated cases. Furthermore, we defined a variance change threshold of 60% that discriminates susceptible from resistant strains. By combining the nanomotion sensor with the rapid preparation method of blood culture pellets, we obtained an innovative, rapid and relatively accurate method for antibiotic susceptibility test directly from positive blood culture bottles, without the need for bacterial subculture. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Requirement for cobalamin by Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium, Pullorum, Gallinarum and Enteritidis during infection in chickens

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    Jacqueline Boldrin de Paiva

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium synthesizes cobalamin (vitamin B12 only during anaerobiosis. Two percent of the S. Typhimurium genome is devoted to the synthesis and uptake of vitamin B12 and to B12-dependent reactions. To understand the requirement for cobalamin synthesis better, we constructed mutants of Salmonella serovars Enteritidis and Pullorum that are double-defective in cobalamin biosynthesis (ΔcobSΔcbiA. We compared the virulence of these mutants to that of their respective wild type strains and found no impairment in their ability to cause disease in chickens. We then assessed B12 production in these mutants and their respective wild type strains, as well as in S. Typhimurium ΔcobSΔcbiA, Salmonella Gallinarum ΔcobSΔcbiA, and their respective wild type strains. None of the mutants was able to produce detectable B12. B12 was detectable in S. Enteritidis, S. Pullorum and S. Typhimurium wild type strains but not in S. Gallinarum. In conclusion, the production of vitamin B12 in vitro differed across the tested Salmonella serotypes and the deletion of the cbiA and cobS genes resulted in different levels of alteration in the host parasite interaction according to Salmonella serotype tested.

  18. MDA5 can be exploited as efficacious genetic adjuvant for DNA vaccination against lethal H5N1 influenza virus infection in chickens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Liniger

    Full Text Available Chickens lack the retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I and sense avian influenza virus (AIV infections by means of the melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 product (chMDA5. Plasmid-driven expression of the N-terminal half of chMDA5 containing the caspase activation and recruitment domains [chMDA5(1-483] triggers interferon-β responses in chicken cells. We hypothesized that mimicking virus infection by chMDA5(1-483 expression may enhance vaccine-induced adaptive immunity. In order to test this, the potential genetic adjuvant properties of chMDA5(1-483 were evaluated in vivo in combination with a suboptimal quantity of a plasmid DNA vaccine expressing haemagglutinin (HA of H5N1 AIV. Co-administration of the HA plasmid with plasmid DNA for chMDA5(1-483 expression resulted in approximately 10-fold higher HA-specific antibody responses than injection of the HA plasmid mixed with empty vector DNA as control. Accordingly, compared with HA DNA vaccination alone, the chMDA5(1-483-adjuvanted HA DNA vaccine mediated enhanced protection against a lethal H5N1 challenge infection in chickens, with reduced clinical signs and cloacal virus shedding. These data demonstrate that innate immune activation by expression of signaling domains of RIG-I-like receptors can be exploited to enhance vaccine efficacy.

  19. 'Surprise': Outbreak of Campylobacter infection associated with chicken liver pâté at a surprise birthday party, Adelaide, Australia, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Amy; Fearnley, Emily; Denehy, Emma

    2012-10-01

    In July 2012, an outbreak of Campylobacter infection was investigated by the South Australian Communicable Disease Control Branch and Food Policy and Programs Branch. The initial notification identified illness at a surprise birthday party held at a restaurant on 14 July 2012. The objective of the investigation was to identify the potential source of infection and institute appropriate intervention strategies to prevent further illness. A guest list was obtained and a retrospective cohort study undertaken. A combination of paper-based and telephone questionnaires were used to collect exposure and outcome information. An environmental investigation was conducted by Food Policy and Programs Branch at the implicated premises. All 57 guests completed the questionnaire (100% response rate), and 15 met the case definition. Analysis showed a significant association between illness and consumption of chicken liver pâté (relative risk: 16.7, 95% confidence interval: 2.4-118.6). No other food or beverage served at the party was associated with illness. Three guests submitted stool samples; all were positive for Campylobacter. The environmental investigation identified that the cooking process used in the preparation of chicken liver pâté may have been inconsistent, resulting in some portions not cooked adequately to inactivate potential Campylobacter contamination. Chicken liver products are a known source of Campylobacter infection; therefore, education of food handlers remains a high priority. To better identify outbreaks among the large number of Campylobacter notifications, routine typing of Campylobacter isolates is recommended.

  20. ‘Surprise’: Outbreak of Campylobacter infection associated with chicken liver pâté at a surprise birthday party, Adelaide, Australia, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearnley, Emily; Denehy, Emma

    2012-01-01

    Objective In July 2012, an outbreak of Campylobacter infection was investigated by the South Australian Communicable Disease Control Branch and Food Policy and Programs Branch. The initial notification identified illness at a surprise birthday party held at a restaurant on 14 July 2012. The objective of the investigation was to identify the potential source of infection and institute appropriate intervention strategies to prevent further illness. Methods A guest list was obtained and a retrospective cohort study undertaken. A combination of paper-based and telephone questionnaires were used to collect exposure and outcome information. An environmental investigation was conducted by Food Policy and Programs Branch at the implicated premises. Results All 57 guests completed the questionnaire (100% response rate), and 15 met the case definition. Analysis showed a significant association between illness and consumption of chicken liver pâté (relative risk: 16.7, 95% confidence interval: 2.4–118.6). No other food or beverage served at the party was associated with illness. Three guests submitted stool samples; all were positive for Campylobacter. The environmental investigation identified that the cooking process used in the preparation of chicken liver pâté may have been inconsistent, resulting in some portions not cooked adequately to inactivate potential Campylobacter contamination. Discussion Chicken liver products are a known source of Campylobacter infection; therefore, education of food handlers remains a high priority. To better identify outbreaks among the large number of Campylobacter notifications, routine typing of Campylobacter isolates is recommended. PMID:23908933

  1. The mRNA expression of amino acid and sugar transporters, aminopeptidase, as well as the di- and tri-peptide transporter PepT1 in the intestines of Eimeria infected broiler chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coccidiosis in chickens is caused by infection of gut epithelial cells with protozoan parasites of the genus Eimeria. This disease causes losses to the poultry industry since infected birds fail to gain weight as rapidly as non-infected birds and efficiency of feed conversion is compromised. For t...

  2. Dietary protease can alleviate negative effects of a coccidiosis infection on production performance in broiler chickens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peek, H.W.; Klis, van der J.D.; Vermeulen, B.; Landman, W.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the effect of dietary protease on coccidiosis infection, production performance, the intestinal mucus layer thickness, and brush border enzyme activity using broilers challenged with Eimeria spp. laboratory isolates (Eimeria acervulina, E. maxima and E.

  3. Effective spreading from multiple leaders identified by percolation in the susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Shenggong; Lü, Linyuan; Yeung, Chi Ho; Hu, Yanqing

    2017-07-01

    Social networks constitute a new platform for information propagation, but its success is crucially dependent on the choice of spreaders who initiate the spreading of information. In this paper, we remove edges in a network at random and the network segments into isolated clusters. The most important nodes in each cluster then form a set of influential spreaders, such that news propagating from them would lead to extensive coverage and minimal redundancy. The method utilizes the similarities between the segmented networks before percolation and the coverage of information propagation in each social cluster to obtain a set of distributed and coordinated spreaders. Our tests of implementing the susceptible-infected-recovered model on Facebook and Enron email networks show that this method outperforms conventional centrality-based methods in terms of spreadability and coverage redundancy. The suggested way of identifying influential spreaders thus sheds light on a new paradigm of information propagation in social networks.

  4. Candidate gene molecular markers as tools for analyzing genetic susceptibility to morbillivirus infection in stranded Cetaceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stejskalova, K; Bayerova, Z; Futas, J; Hrazdilova, K; Klumplerova, M; Oppelt, J; Splichalova, P; Di Guardo, G; Mazzariol, S; Di Francesco, C E; Di Francesco, G; Terracciano, G; Paiu, R-M; Ursache, T D; Modry, D; Horin, P

    2017-12-01

    Morbilliviruses, such as Cetacean morbillivirus (CeMV) or Phocine distemper virus (PDV), represent a growing threat for marine mammals on both hemispheres. Because free-ranging animal populations strongly rely on natural resistance mechanisms, innate immunity-related genes and virus cell entry receptor genes may represent key factors involved in susceptibility to CeMV in Cetaceans. Using the next generation sequencing technology, we have sequenced 11 candidate genes in two model species, Stenella coeruleoalba and Phocoena phocoena. Suitable single nucleotide polymorphism markers of potential functional importance, located in genes coding for basigin (BSG, CD147), the signaling lymphocyte activating molecule (SLAMF1), the poliovirus-related receptor-4 (NECTIN4, PVRL4), toll-like receptors 3, 7, 8 (TLR3, TLR7, TLR8), natural resistance-associated macrophage protein (SLC11A1) and natural cytotoxicity triggering receptor 1 (NCR1), were identified in each model species, along with MHC-DQB haplotypes unique for each species. This set of molecular markers represents a potentially useful tool for studying host genetic variation and susceptibility to morbillivirus infection in Cetaceans as well as for studying functionally important genetic diversity of selected Cetacean populations. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Gene polymorphisms in African buffalo associated with susceptibility to bovine tuberculosis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    le Roex, Nikki; Koets, Ad P; van Helden, Paul D; Hoal, Eileen G

    2013-01-01

    Bovine tuberculosis (BTB) is a chronic, highly infectious disease that affects humans, cattle and numerous species of wildlife. In developing countries such as South Africa, the existence of extensive wildlife-human-livestock interfaces poses a significant risk of Mycobacterium bovis transmission between these groups, and has far-reaching ecological, economic and public health impacts. The African buffalo (Syncerus caffer), acts as a maintenance host for Mycobacterium bovis, and maintains and transmits the disease within the buffalo and to other species. In this study we aimed to investigate genetic susceptibility of buffalo for Mycobacterium bovis infection. Samples from 868 African buffalo of the Cape buffalo subspecies were used in this study. SNPs (n = 69), with predicted functional consequences in genes related to the immune system, were genotyped in this buffalo population by competitive allele-specific SNP genotyping. Case-control association testing and statistical analyses identified three SNPs associated with BTB status in buffalo. These SNPs, SNP41, SNP137 and SNP144, are located in the SLC7A13, DMBT1 and IL1α genes, respectively. SNP137 remained significantly associated after permutation testing. The three genetic polymorphisms identified are located in promising candidate genes for further exploration into genetic susceptibility to BTB in buffalo and other bovids, such as the domestic cow. These polymorphisms/genes may also hold potential for marker-assisted breeding programmes, with the aim of breeding more BTB-resistant animals and herds within both the national parks and the private sector.

  6. Increased pathogenicity and shedding in chickens of a wild bird-origin low pathogenicity avian influenza virus of the H7N3 subtype following multiple in vivo passages in quail and turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilloni, Filippo; Toffan, Anna; Giannecchini, Simone; Clausi, Valeria; Azzi, Alberta; Capua, Ilaria; Terregino, Calogero

    2010-03-01

    In order to investigate viral adaptation mechanisms to poultry, we performed serial in vivo passages of a wild bird low pathogenicity avian influenza isolate of the H7N3 subtype (A/mallard/Italy/33/01) in three different domestic species (chicken, turkey, and Japanese quail). The virus under study was administered via natural routes at the dose of 10(6) egg infective dose50/ 0.1 ml to chickens, turkeys, and quails in order to investigate the clinical susceptibility and the shedding levels after infection. Multiple in vivo passages of the virus were performed by serially infecting groups of five naive birds of each species, with samples collected from a previously infected group. Quails and turkeys were susceptible to infection for 10 serial passages, whereas chickens were susceptible to two cycles of infection only. Infection of chicken with the quail- and turkey-adapted viruses showed an increased pathogenicity and/or shedding, causing more severe clinical signs and/or higher levels of viral excretion compared to the original strain. The data obtained herein suggest that infection of selected avian species may facilitate the adaptation of avian influenza viruses originating from the wild bird reservoir to chicken. This is the first time turkey has been shown to act as a species in which a virus from the wild reservoir can increase its replication activity in other domestic species.

  7. Diseases and causes of death in European bats: dynamics in disease susceptibility and infection rates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Mühldorfer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bats receive increasing attention in infectious disease studies, because of their well recognized status as reservoir species for various infectious agents. This is even more important, as bats with their capability of long distance dispersal and complex social structures are unique in the way microbes could be spread by these mammalian species. Nevertheless, infection studies in bats are predominantly limited to the identification of specific pathogens presenting a potential health threat to humans. But the impact of infectious agents on the individual host and their importance on bat mortality is largely unknown and has been neglected in most studies published to date. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Between 2002 and 2009, 486 deceased bats of 19 European species (family Vespertilionidae were collected in different geographic regions in Germany. Most animals represented individual cases that have been incidentally found close to roosting sites or near human habitation in urban and urban-like environments. The bat carcasses were subjected to a post-mortem examination and investigated histo-pathologically, bacteriologically and virologically. Trauma and disease represented the most important causes of death in these bats. Comparative analysis of pathological findings and microbiological results show that microbial agents indeed have an impact on bats succumbing to infectious diseases, with fatal bacterial, viral and parasitic infections found in at least 12% of the bats investigated. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data demonstrate the importance of diseases and infectious agents as cause of death in European bat species. The clear seasonal and individual variations in disease prevalence and infection rates indicate that maternity colonies are more susceptible to infectious agents, underlining the possible important role of host physiology, immunity and roosting behavior as risk factors for infection of bats.

  8. Risk factors for Campylobacter spp. infection in Senegalese broiler-chicken flocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinale, E; Tall, F; Guèye, E F; Cisse, M; Salvat, G

    2004-06-10

    Our objective was to identify the risk factors for Campylobacter infection in Senegalese broiler flocks. Seventy broiler farms were studied around Dakar from January 2000 to December 2001 around Dakar. A questionnaire was administered to the farmers, and samples of fresh droppings were taken to assess the flocks' Campylobacter status. About 63% of the flocks were infected by Campylobacter spp.; Campylobacter jejuni was the most-prevalent species (P hatchery to the farm as feed plates (rather than specifically designed feed plates). Alternatively, thorough cleaning and disinfection of poultry-house surroundings and manure disposal outside the farm were associated with decreased flock risk.

  9. Molecular and antimicrobial susceptibility characterization of Globicatella sulfidifaciens isolated from sow's urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matajira, Carlos E C; Moreno, Luisa Z; Gomes, Vasco T M; Silva, Ana Paula S; Mesquita, Renan E; Amigo, Cristina R; Christ, Ana Paula G; Sato, Maria Inês Z; Moreno, Andrea M

    2017-12-01

    The Globicatella genus comprises Gram-positive, facultative anaerobic, α-hemolytic and catalase negative cocci morphologically and phenotypically very similar to Streptococcus and Aerococcus genus which can lead to misidentification and underestimation of this pathogen. Globicatella species have already been isolated from human and animals with heart and brain disorders. Their clinical relevance in animals, and its zoonotic potential, remains unknown due to the difficulty in their identification. To present the isolation, phenotypic and molecular characterization of G. sulfidifaciens from urinary tract infection in sows. Urine samples from 140 sows of two swine herds located in São Paulo State (Brazil) yielded the isolation of three presumptive G. sulfidifaciens strains. Identification and species confirmation were done by MALDI-TOF MS and 16S rRNA sequencing. Strains were further characterized by single enzyme amplified fragments length polymorphism (SE-AFLP) and broth microdilution techniques. All three isolates were confirmed as G. sulfidifaciens. The SE-AFLP genotyping resulted in distinct fingerprint patterns for each strain. All isolates presented high MIC values to tetracycline, sulphonamides, aminoglycosides and tylosin tartrate, which present high usage in human and animal medicine. Globicatella sulfidifaciens could be related to sporadic urinary tract infections in swine and appear to present alarming antimicrobial susceptibility profile. It is necessary to differentiate Streptococcus-like microorganisms in routine laboratory diagnostics for the correct identification of underestimated species potentially pathogenic to animals.

  10. Unified mean-field framework for susceptible-infected-susceptible epidemics on networks, based on graph partitioning and the isoperimetric inequality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devriendt, K.; Van Mieghem, P.

    2017-11-01

    We propose an approximation framework that unifies and generalizes a number of existing mean-field approximation methods for the susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) epidemic model on complex networks. We derive the framework, which we call the unified mean-field framework (UMFF), as a set of approximations of the exact Markovian SIS equations. Our main novelty is that we describe the mean-field approximations from the perspective of the isoperimetric problem, which results in bounds on the UMFF approximation error. These new bounds provide insight in the accuracy of existing mean-field methods, such as the N-intertwined mean-field approximation and heterogeneous mean-field method, which are contained by UMFF. Additionally, the isoperimetric inequality relates the UMFF approximation accuracy to the regularity notions of Szemerédi's regularity lemma.

  11. A survey of the economic impact of subclinical Eimeria infections in broiler chickens in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Anita; Gjevre, Anne-Gerd; Skjerve, Eystein; Kaldhusdal, Magne

    2008-06-01

    The objective of this work was to examine the impact of subclinical coccidial infection on commercial performance, expressed as a modified European Production Index, in broilers. Performance data, and litter and faecal samples, were collected from two independent observational surveys of Norwegian broilers receiving in-feed narasin during 2000 to 2004. Numbers of oocysts per gram (OPG) of litter collected during rearing (Study 1) or faecal samples collected at slaughter (both studies), and relative frequencies of Eimeria species categories (both studies) were calculated. Polymerase chain reaction-based identification of Eimeria species was performed in Study 2. A definition of flocks at risk of impaired performance associated with coccidia ("risk flock"), using the predominant species and OPG level as criteria, was tested. Coccidia had a significant effect on performance in the first, but not the second study. In Study 1 the following coccidia variables were found to be associated with impaired performance in multivariate models: OPG at slaughter (ordinal), mean OPG during rearing (ordinal) and "risk flock" (binomial). The European Production Index was approximately 9% lower in flocks with infection levels >50 000 OPG at slaughter in Study 1. The composition of coccidial populations shifted between Study 1 and Study 2, from a dominance of medium and large oocysts to a dominance of small oocysts. There was a substantial increase in prevalence of coccidial infection from Study 1 to Study 2, but mean infection levels were similar in the two surveys. The "risk flock" definition was useful as an indicator of coccidia-associated performance loss in Study 1, where subclinical coccidiosis was an important factor. The results suggest that the economic importance of subclinical coccidiosis may vary substantially with time, and they emphasize the need for population studies on the importance and dynamics of specific coccidial infections under different field conditions.

  12. Epidemiology and molecular characterization of chicken anaemia virus from commercial and native chickens in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, S-C; Lin, H-L; Liu, P-C; Huang, H-J; Lee, M-S; Lien, Y-Y; Tsai, Y-L

    2018-04-25

    Chicken infectious anaemia (CIA) is a disease with a highly economic impact in the poultry industry. The infected chickens are characterized by aplastic anaemia and extreme immunosuppression, followed by the increased susceptibility to secondary infectious pathogens and suboptimal immune responses for vaccination. Commercially available CIA vaccines are routinely used in the breeders in Taiwan to protect their progeny with maternal-derived antibodies. However, CIA cases still occur in the field and little is known about the genetic characteristics of Taiwanese chicken anaemia viruses (CAVs). In this study, CAV DNA was detected in 72 of 137 flocks collected during 2010-2015. Among the PCR-positive samples, the coding regions of 51 CAVs were sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis of the VP1 gene revealed that, although most of Taiwanese CAVs belonged to genotypes II and III, some isolates were clustered into a novel genotype (genotype IV). Moreover, a Taiwanese isolate in this novel genotype IV appeared to be derived from a recombination event between genotypes II and III viruses. Five Taiwanese CAV isolates were highly similar to the vaccine strains, 26P4 or Del-Ros. Taken together, these results indicate that the sequences of CAVs in Taiwan are variable, and inter-genotypic recombination had occurred between viruses of different genotypes. Moreover, vaccine-like strains might induce clinical signs of CIA in chickens. Our findings could be useful for understanding the evolution of CAVs and development of a better control strategy for CIA. © 2018 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  13. The effect of “patikan kebo”(Euphorbia hirta L preparations on erythrocyte number, haemoglobin level and haematocrit value of chicken infected with Eimeria tenella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    April H Wardhana

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Patikan kebo” (Euphorbia hirta L is a medicinal plant mostly used to treat gastro-intestinal track problems empirically. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of distillation, infusion and extract of “patikan kebo” (Euphorbia hirta L preparations on erythrocyte number, haemoglobin level and haematocrit value in chickens that were infected by Eimeria tenella. Twenty four Hubbard strain broiler chicken raised from one-day-old until three-week-old were used for this study and divided randomly into 4 groups: P 0 (control, P I (distillation treatment, P II (infusion treatment, and P III (extract treatment. A total of 5.000 oocyst of E. tenella were infected into each chicken and the dose of Euphorbia hirta L was 500 mg/kg Wb. A completely randomized design was used and the data were tested by ANOVA. The result indicated that distillation, infusion and extract preparations of Euphorbia hirta L had the potency to increase erythrocyte number, haemoglobin level and haematocrit value.

  14. Spectrum and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of pathogens causing urinary tract infection experience in a tertiary care setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amjad, A.; Mirza, I.A.; Abbasi, S.A.; Farwa, U.; Sattar, A.; Qureshi, Z.A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the spectrum and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of pathogens causing urinary tract infection from the samples received at AFIP Rawalpindi. Place and duration of study. The study was carried out at Department of Microbiology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology from January 2010 to June 2010. Material and Method: This was descriptive cross-sectional study. A total of 500 bacterial isolates out of 2050 urine culture samples, for a period of six month were included in the study. Indentification was carried out by standard biochemical profile of the organisms. The antimicrobial susceptibilities of isolated organisms were performed by disk diffusion method as recommended by Clinical Laboratory Standard Institute. Results Out of the culture positive cases, gram-negative bacteria constituted the largest group with a total of 434 (87%) isolates, while gram-positive bacteria constituted only 44 (8.8%) isolates. E. coli was the most common isolate accounting for 63% of the total positive bacterial cultures followed by Klebsiella spp (9%) and P. aernginosa (7%). Susceptibility pattern of E. coli revealed that 96% of isolates were sensitive to imipenem, 91% to piperacillin-tazobactam and 87% to Nitrofurantoin. For Klebsiella spp, 86% of Isolates were susceptible to Imipenem and 71 % to piperacillin-tazobactam. As regards acinetobacter spp, 94% of Isolates were susceptible to piperacillin-tazobactam and 70 % to Imipenem an piperacilline-sulbactam. Antibiogram of P. aeruginosa revealed that 94% of isolates were sensitive to ceftazidime and 86% to imipenem. Nitrofurantoin was the most effective urinary antibiotic in case of enterococcus spp as 85% of isolates were susceptible to this compound. Conclusion: From the present study we conclude that E. coli was the predominant urinary pathogen in our set up. The antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of E. coli revealed that majority of isolates were susceptible to imipenem and piperacilline

  15. Chicken Picadillo

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... low-sodium chicken broth 1/3 cup fresh lemon juice 1/3 cup water 1/4 teaspoon ground cumin 2 bay leaves ... cooked through. Add the tomato sauce, chicken broth, lemon juice, cumin, bay leaves, water, and raisins to the vegetables and chicken. Cover ...

  16. The effect of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase polymorphisms on susceptibility to human papilloma virus infection and cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajiesmaeil, Mogge; Tafvizi, Farzaneh; Sarmadi, Soheila

    2016-12-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer among women worldwide. Several factors lead to cervical cancer, among which human papilloma virus (HPV) infection has a prominent role. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) is crucial in folate metabolic pathway and plays an important role in DNA synthesis and DNA methylation. MTHFR gene polymorphisms, including C677T and A1298C, lead to reduced enzyme activity. This case-control study aims to illustrate the association between MTHFR gene polymorphisms and the risk of cervical cancer. This study was conducted on 196 samples, which included 96 cervical biopsy samples compared to 100 Pap smear samples of normal healthy women without HPV infection. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method was used for the MTHFR polymorphism detection, followed by fluorescent amplification-based specific hybridization PCR method to detect HPV16 and HPV18. The results show that the MTHFR 677TT genotype plays a protective role in cervical cancer (P=0.0030) (OR=0.21, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.07-0.59). Furthermore, there was a strong significant association between MTHFR 1298CC genotype and the risk of cervical cancer (OR=10.69; 95% CI: 4.28-26.71, P=0.0001). It can be concluded that A1298C polymorphism is a genetic risk factor for cervical cancer in the assessed Iranian population group. It seems that MTHFR 1298CC genotype is more susceptible to HPV 16 infection. Combination analysis of MTHFR C677T and A1298C polymorphisms revealed that combined MTHFR 677CC and 1298CC are strongly associated with a risk of cervical cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Poly I:C enhances susceptibility to secondary pulmonary infections by gram-positive bacteria.

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    Xiaoli Tian

    Full Text Available Secondary bacterial pneumonias are a frequent complication of influenza and other respiratory viral infections, but the mechanisms underlying viral-induced susceptibility to bacterial infections are poorly understood. In particular, it is unclear whether the host's response against the viral infection, independent of the injury caused by the virus, results in impairment of antibacterial host defense. Here, we sought to determine whether the induction of an "antiviral" immune state using various viral recognition receptor ligands was sufficient to result in decreased ability to combat common bacterial pathogens of the lung. Using a mouse model, animals were administered polyinosine-polycytidylic acid (poly I:C or Toll-like 7 ligand (imiquimod or gardiquimod intranasally, followed by intratracheal challenge with Streptococcus pneumoniae. We found that animals pre-exposed to poly I:C displayed impaired bacterial clearance and increased mortality. Poly I:C-exposed animals also had decreased ability to clear methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Furthermore, we showed that activation of Toll-like receptor (TLR3 and Retinoic acid inducible gene (RIG-I/Cardif pathways, which recognize viral nucleic acids in the form of dsRNA, both contribute to poly I:C mediated impairment of bacterial clearance. Finally, we determined that poly I:C administration resulted in significant induction of type I interferons (IFNs, whereas the elimination of type I IFN signaling improved clearance and survival following secondary bacterial pneumonia. Collectively, these results indicate that in the lung, poly I:C administration is sufficient to impair pulmonary host defense against clinically important gram-positive bacterial pathogens, which appears to be mediated by type I IFNs.

  18. Genetic Analysis of Integrons among Methicillin-resistant and Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Nosocomial Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somayyeh Moatti

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Integrons are mobile genetic elements that play an important role in dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes. The aim of present study is to determine the antibiotic resistance profile, frequency of integrons genes (class 1, 2, 3 and compare it between MRSA and MSSA isolates from clinical infections. Materials and Methods: 50 MRSA and 50 MSSA isolates from March to September 2015 were isolated from infection site of hospitalized patients referred to Valiasr hospital Arak, Iran were subjected to this study. All isolates were tested for susceptibility to antibiotics using disk diffusion method. Then, the mecA gene was studied to validate resistance. The frequency of integrons (class 1, 2, 3 and the variable region genes like qacE 1 and sul1 in isolates were determined by PCR method. Results: The highest antibiotic resistances rate in isolates was found for clindamycin. All of the isolates were susceptibel to vancomycin. 80% of MRSA and 40% of the MSSA isolates carried class 1 integrons, whereas class 2 integron were found in 12 % and 4% of MRSA and MSSA isolates, respectively. Also, all isolates that were class 1 integron gene positive contain qacE 1 and sul1 genes. Class 3 integrons were not found. Conclusion: The high frequency of class 1 integron in MRSA and MSSA isolates associated with high rate of antibiotic resistance indicating that may be integrons play an important role facilitating the spread of antimicrobial resistance in this region. Clinical doctors and infection control committee should take this issue seriously.

  19. Differential Gene Expression from Midguts of Refractory and Susceptible Lines of the Mosquito, Aedes aegypti, Infected with Dengue-2 Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barón, Olga L.; Ursic-Bedoya, Raul J.; Lowenberger, Carl A.; Ocampo, Clara B.

    2010-01-01

    Suppressive subtractive hybridization was used to evaluate the differential expression of midgut genes of feral populations of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) from Colombia that are naturally refractory or susceptible to Dengue-2 virus infection. A total of 165 differentially expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were identified in the subtracted libraries. The analysis showed a higher number of differentially expressed genes in the susceptible Ae. aegypti individuals than the refractory mosquitoes. The functional annotation of ESTs revealed a broad response in the susceptible library that included immune molecules, metabolic molecules and transcription factors. In the refractory strain, there was the presence of a trypsin inhibitor gene, which could play a role in the infection. These results serve as a template for more detailed studies aiming to characterize the genetic components of refractoriness, which in turn can be used to devise new approaches to combat transmission of dengue fever. PMID:20572793

  20. Karyotype analysis of the acute fibrosarcoma from chickens infected with subgroup J avian leukosis virus associated with v-src oncogene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xuan; Ju, Sidi; Chen, Junxia; Meng, Fanfeng; Sun, Peng; Li, Yang; Wang, Xin; Wang, Yixin; Liu, Juan; Chang, Shuang; Zhao, Peng; Cui, Zhizhong

    2016-01-01

    To understand the cytogenetic characteristics of acute fibrosarcoma in chickens infected with the subgroup J avian leukosis virus associated with the v-src oncogene, we performed a karyotype analysis of fibrosarcoma cell cultures. Twenty-nine of 50 qualified cell culture spreads demonstrated polyploidy of some macrochromosomes, 21 of which were trisomic for chromosome 7, and others were trisomic for chromosomes 3, 4, 5 (sex chromosome w), and 10. In addition, one of them was trisomic for both chromosome 7 and the sex chromosome 5 (w). In contrast, no aneuploidy was found for 10 macrochromosomes of 12 spreads of normal chicken embryo fibroblast cells, although aneuploidy for some microchromosomes was demonstrated in five of the 12 spreads. The cytogenetic mosaicism or polymorphism of the aneuploidy in the acute fibrosarcoma described in this study suggests that the analysed cells are polyclonal.

  1. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the Toll-like receptor pathway increase susceptibility to infections in severely injured trauma patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.W.G.A. Bronkhorst (Maarten); N.D.A. Boyé (Nicole); M.A.Z. Lomax (Miranda); R. Vossen (Rolf); J. Bakker (Jan); P. Patka (Peter); E.M.M. van Lieshout (Esther)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Sepsis and subsequent multiple-organ failure are the predominant causes of late mortality in trauma patients. Susceptibility and response to infection is, in part, heritable. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in Toll-like receptor (TLR) and cluster of differentiation 14

  2. Study of Candida Bloodstream Infections in Surgical Intensive Care Unit Patients and Susceptibility Profile of the Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijaya S. Rajmane

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The increased incidence of fungal infections in the past two decades has been overwhelming. Despite the fact that invasive fungal infections are still under-diagnosed and underreported, bloodstream infection due to Candida is now being recognized as an important public health problem especially in ICU patients with considerable morbidity, mortality and health care costs. Objective: To study the incidence, risk factors and antifungal susceptibility of Candida bloodstream infection in our hospital. Material and Methods: In the present study, the blood samples were collected from patients admitted in Surgical ICU. Samples were processed and antifungal susceptibility of the isolates was performed using standard protocol. Results: Out of total 93 patients, 14 (15.05% were positive for candidemia with equal distribution of both C. albicans and nonalbicans Candida spp. The risk factors associated with candidemia showing statistical significance were length of ICU stay > 7 days, mechanical ventilation, central venous catheters and uncontrolled diabetes. Among the patients with candidemia the mortality rate was 78.57 %. Resistance to Amphotericin B was seen in 33.33 % isolates of C. tropicalis and 100 % isolates of C. rugosa. 33.33 % of C. tropicalis and 50 % of C. rugosa showed dose dependent susceptibility to Fluconazole. Conclusion: Early diagnosis and antifungal susceptibility testing is very important in the treatment of candidemia for reducing the mortality rate.

  3. Susceptibility to Campylobacter infection is associated with the species composition of the human fecal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicksved, Johan; Ellström, Patrik; Engstrand, Lars; Rautelin, Hilpi

    2014-09-16

    The gut microbiota is essential for human health, but very little is known about how the composition of this ecosystem can influence and respond to bacterial infections. Here we address this by prospectively studying the gut microbiota composition before, during, and after natural Campylobacter infection in exposed poultry abattoir workers. The gut microbiota composition was analyzed with 16S amplicon sequencing of fecal samples from poultry abattoir workers during the peak season of Campylobacter infection in Sweden. The gut microbiota compositions were compared between individuals who became culture positive for Campylobacter and those who remained negative. Individuals who became Campylobacter positive had a significantly higher abundance of Bacteroides (P = 0.007) and Escherichia (P = 0.002) species than those who remained culture negative. Furthermore, this group had a significantly higher abundance of Phascolarctobacterium (P = 0.017) and Streptococcus (P = 0.034) sequences than the Campylobacter-negative group, which had an overrepresentation of Clostridiales (P = 0.017), unclassified Lachnospiraceae (P = 0.008), and Anaerovorax (P = 0.015) sequences. Intraindividual comparisons of the fecal microbiota compositions yielded small differences over time in Campylobacter-negative participants, but significant long-term changes were found in the Campylobacter-positive group (P microbiota reduces resistance to Campylobacter colonization in humans and that Campylobacter infection can have long-term effects on the composition of the human fecal microbiota. Studies using mouse models have made important contributions to our understanding of the role of the gut microbiota in resistance to bacterial enteropathogen colonization. The relative abundances of Escherichia coli and Bacteroides species have been pointed out as important determinants of susceptibility to Gram-negative pathogens in general and Campylobacter infection in particular. In this study, we assessed the

  4. Susceptibility to Helicobacter pylori infection: results of an epidemiological investigation among gastric cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panic, Nikola; Mastrostefano, Elena; Leoncini, Emanuele; Persiani, Roberto; Arzani, Dario; Amore, Rosarita; Ricci, Riccardo; Sicoli, Federico; Sioletic, Stefano; Bulajic, Milutin; D' Ugo, Domenico; Ricciardi, Walter; Boccia, Stefania

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the clinical, demographic, lifestyle factors and selected genetic polymorphisms that affect the susceptibility towards Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in gastric cancer patients. Histological confirmed gastric adenocarcinoma cases that underwent curative gastrectomy between 2002 and 2012 were included. Gastric biopsy samples were obtained to determine the H. pylori status, and further cagA status and vacA m and s genotypes by polymerase chain reaction. Patients were interviewed with structured questionnaires, and blood samples were collected for EPHX1, GSTM1, GSTT1, IL1B, IL1-RN, MTHFR and p53 genotyping. Proportions were compared in univariate analysis, while the relation between putative risk factors and H. pylori status and genotype were measured using logistic regression analysis. One hundred forty-nine gastric cancer patients were included, of which 78.5% were H. pylori positive. Among positive patients 50% were cagA+, 72.5% vacA m1 and 80.7% vacA s1. The presence of cagA was less frequent among vacA m1 (p = 0.031) and vacA s1 (p = 0.052) subtypes. The presence of father history for any cancer was a significant risk factor for H. pylori infection [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 8.18, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04-64.55]. EPHX1 exon 3 T > C (OR = 0.35, CI 95% 0.13-0.94), IL1B-511 T > C (OR = 0.38, CI 95% 0.15-0.97) and IL1-RN VNTR (OR = 0.19, CI 95% 0.06-0.58) polymorphisms were protective towards H. pylori infection in the univariate analysis. Wine consumption was associated with higher risk of carrying the H. pylori vacA m1 virulent subtype (p = 0.034). Lastly, cardiovascular diseases were less common among cagA positive subjects (p = 0.023). Father history of any cancer is a risk factor for H. pylori infection. Polymorphisms in IL1B-511, IL1-RN and EPHX1 exon 3 genes might be protective towards H. pylori infection.

  5. Diversity of interferon inducible Mx gene in horses and association of variations with susceptibility vis-à-vis resistance against equine influenza infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuja, Balvinder K; Manuja, Anju; Dahiya, Rajni; Singh, Sandeep; Sharma, R C; Gahlot, S K

    2014-10-01

    Equine influenza (EI) is primarily an infection of the upper respiratory tract and is one of the major infectious respiratory diseases of economic importance in equines. Re-emergence of the disease, species jumping by H3N8 virus in canines and possible threat of human pandemic due to the unpredictable nature of the virus have necessitated research on devising strategies for preventing the disease. The myxovirus resistance protein (Mx) has been reported to confer resistance to Orthomyxo virus infection by modifying cellular functions needed along the viral replication pathway. Polymorphisms and differential antiviral activities of Mx gene have been reported in pigs and chicken. Here we report the diversity of Mx gene, its expression in response to stimulation with interferon (IFN) α/β and their association with EI resistance and susceptibility in Marwari horses. Blood samples were collected from horses declared positive for equine influenza and in contact animals with a history of no clinical signs. Mx gene was amplified by reverse transcription from total RNA isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) stimulated with IFN α/β using gene specific primers. The amplified gene products from representative samples were cloned and sequenced. Nucleotide sequences and deduced amino acid sequences were analyzed. Out of a total 24 amino acids substitutions sorting intolerant from tolerant (SIFT) analysis predicted 13 substitutions with functional consequences. Five substitutions (V67A, W123L, E346Y, N347Y, S689N) were observed only in resistant animals. Evolutionary distances based on nucleotide sequences with in equines ranged between 0.3-2.0% and 20-24% with other species. On phylogenetic analysis all equine sequences clustered together while other species formed separate clades. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A Cluster of Paediatric Invasive Group A Streptococcal and Chicken Pox Infections

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ó Maoldomhnaigh, C

    2018-03-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) causes a variety of acute clinical syndromes from pharyngitis and scarlet fever commonly seen in primary care to more severe life-threatening invasive disease. Invasive GAS, categorised into three groups - necrotising fasciitis, streptococcal toxic shock syndrome and sepsis with or without an identifiable source of infection- is a notifiable disease to the Health Protection Surveillance Centre (HPSC)1. Laboratory criteria for a confirmed case require isolation of GAS from a normally sterile site. The HPSC previously reported a marked increase in the incidence of invasive GAS infections from 1.65\\/100,000 population in 2011 to 3.65\\/100,000 in 20132. The increased incidence was notable also for a 300% increase in the proportion of invasive GAS cases in children. After a slight decrease in incidence in 20153 (2.3\\/100000), we noted a cluster of invasive GAS cases referred to the paediatric infectious disease (PID) department of Children’s University Hospital (CUH), Temple Street, in 2016. We sought to further characterise this cluster of paediatric invasive GAS infections.

  7. High interferon type I responses in the lung, plasma and spleen during highly pathogenic H5N1 infection of chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moulin Hervé R

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study shows that high pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus infection of chicken induced high levels of bioactive interferon type I in the lung (4.3 × 105 U/mg tissue, plasma (1.1 × 105 U/mL, and spleen (9.1 × 105 U/mg tissue. In contrast, a low pathogenic attenuated H5N1 vaccine strain only induced approximately 24 times less IFN in the lung, 441 times less in the spleen and 649 less in the plasma. This was in the same range as a reassortant carrying the HA from the vaccine strain and the remaining genes from the high pathogenic virus. On the other hand, a reassortant virus with the HA from the high pathogenic H5N1 with the remaining genes from the vaccine strain had intermediate levels of IFN. The level of interferon responses related to the viral load, and those in the spleen and blood to the spread of virus to lymphoid tissue, as well as disease severity. In vitro, the viruses did not induce interferon in chicken embryonic fibroblasts, but high levels in splenocytes, with not clear relationship to pathogenicity and virulence. This, and the responses also with inactivated viruses imply the presence of plasmacytoid dendritic cell-like leukocytes within the chicken immune system, possibly responsible for the high interferon responses during H5N1 infection. Our data also indicate that the viral load as well as the cleavability of the HA enabling systemic spread of the virus are two major factors controlling systemic IFN responses in chicken.

  8. Salmonella enterica isolated from infections in Australian livestock remain susceptible to critical antimicrobials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Sam; Groves, Mitchell D; Trott, Darren J; Chapman, Toni A; Turner, Bernadette; Hornitzky, Michael; Jordan, David

    2014-02-01

    Salmonella enterica is a zoonotic pathogen causing a variety of diseases in humans and animals. Many countries are reporting an increase in the prevalence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) S. enterica in food animals. The aim of this study was to determine whether S. enterica isolated from livestock in New South Wales, Australia, have similar resistance traits to those reported internationally. Salmonella enterica (n=165) from clinical infections in food animals between 2007 and 2011 were serotyped and tested for susceptibility to 18 antimicrobials. Also, 22 antimicrobial resistance genes (ARGs), 3 integrons and 18 plasmid replicon types were screened for using PCR. Most isolates (66.1%) remained susceptible to all antimicrobials; 8.5% of the isolates were resistant to four or more antimicrobials. Antimicrobials with the highest prevalence of resistance were sulfafurazole (28.5%), ampicillin (17.0%), tetracycline (15.8%) and trimethoprim (8.5%). There was no resistance to fluoroquinolones or third-generation cephalosporins. The most common ARGs were blaTEM (15.2%), sul2 (10.3%), tetB (9.1%), tetA (5.5%), aphA1 (4.8%) and dhfrV (4.8%). Class 1 integrons (7.9%) and IncFIIA (69.7%) were the most commonly detected integron and plasmid replicon types, respectively. Class 1 integrons were positively associated with MDR phenotypes and ARG carriage (P≤0.001). Internationally prominent MDR serovars associated with severe disease in humans (e.g. AmpC-positive Salmonella Newport) were not detected. Overall, the comparatively favourable resistance status of S. enterica in Australian livestock represents minimal public health risk associated with MDR strains and supports a conservative approach to the registration of antimicrobial drug classes in food-producing animals. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Gene polymorphisms in African buffalo associated with susceptibility to bovine tuberculosis infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikki le Roex

    Full Text Available Bovine tuberculosis (BTB is a chronic, highly infectious disease that affects humans, cattle and numerous species of wildlife. In developing countries such as South Africa, the existence of extensive wildlife-human-livestock interfaces poses a significant risk of Mycobacterium bovis transmission between these groups, and has far-reaching ecological, economic and public health impacts. The African buffalo (Syncerus caffer, acts as a maintenance host for Mycobacterium bovis, and maintains and transmits the disease within the buffalo and to other species. In this study we aimed to investigate genetic susceptibility of buffalo for Mycobacterium bovis infection. Samples from 868 African buffalo of the Cape buffalo subspecies were used in this study. SNPs (n = 69, with predicted functional consequences in genes related to the immune system, were genotyped in this buffalo population by competitive allele-specific SNP genotyping. Case-control association testing and statistical analyses identified three SNPs associated with BTB status in buffalo. These SNPs, SNP41, SNP137 and SNP144, are located in the SLC7A13, DMBT1 and IL1α genes, respectively. SNP137 remained significantly associated after permutation testing. The three genetic polymorphisms identified are located in promising candidate genes for further exploration into genetic susceptibility to BTB in buffalo and other bovids, such as the domestic cow. These polymorphisms/genes may also hold potential for marker-assisted breeding programmes, with the aim of breeding more BTB-resistant animals and herds within both the national parks and the private sector.

  10. Characterization of vancomycin-resistant and vancomycin-susceptible Enterococcus faecium isolates from humans, chickens and pigs by RiboPrinting and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammerum, Anette Marie; Fussing, Vivian; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2000-01-01

    Forty-eight vancomycin-resistant and 35 vancomycin-sensitive Danish Enterococcus faecium isolates obtained from pigs, chickens and humans, as well as the human vanA reference isolate BM4147, were characterized by EcoRI RiboPrinting and Smal pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. RiboPrinting of the 84...

  11. Osteoblasts from osteoarthritis patients show enhanced susceptibility to Ross River virus infection associated with delayed type I interferon responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weiqiang; Foo, Suan-Sin; Li, Rachel W; Smith, Paul N; Mahalingam, Suresh

    2014-11-19

    Arthritogenic alphaviruses such as Ross River virus (RRV) and chikungunya virus (CHIKV) have caused widespread outbreaks of chronic polyarthritis. The inflammatory responses in alphavirus-induced arthritis and osteoarthritis (OA) share many similar features, which suggests the possibility of exacerbated alphavirus-induced bone pathology in individuals with pre-existing OA. Here, we investigated the susceptibility of osteoblasts (OBs) from OA patients to RRV infection and dissected the immune mechanisms elicited from infection. Primary hOBs obtained from trabecular bone of healthy donors and OA patients were infected with RRV. Infectivity and viral replication were determined using flow cytometry and plaque assay, respectively. Real-time PCR was performed to determine expression kinetics of type I interferon (IFN)-related immune mediators and osteotropic factors. OA hOBs showed enhanced RRV infectivity and replication during infection, which was associated with delayed induction of IFN-β and RIG-I expression. Enhanced susceptibility of OA hOBs to RRV was associated with a more pronounced increase in RANKL/OPG ratio and expression of osteotropic factors (IL-6, IL-1β, TNF-α and CCL2) in comparison to RRV-infected healthy hOBs. Delayed activation of type I IFN-signalling pathway may have contributed to enhanced susceptibility to RRV infection in hOBs from OA patients. RRV-induced increases in RANKL/OPG ratio and expression of osteotropic factors that favour bone resorption, which may be exacerbated during osteoarthritis. This study provides the novel insight that osteoarthritis may be a risk factor for exacerbated arthritogenic alphaviral infection.

  12. M. tuberculosis genotypic diversity and drug susceptibility pattern in HIV-infected and non-HIV-infected patients in northern Tanzania.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kibiki, G.S.; Mulder, B.; Dolmans, W.M.V.; Beer, J.L. de; Boeree, M.J.; Sam, N.; Soolingen, D. van; Sola, C.; Zanden, A.G. van der

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tuberculosis (TB) is a major health problem and HIV is the major cause of the increase in TB. Sub-Saharan Africa is endemic for both TB and HIV infection. Determination of the prevalence of M. tuberculosis strains and their drug susceptibility is important for TB control.TB positive

  13. Ascaridia galli infection in chickens - immunological and immuno-modulatory aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Janne Pleidrup

    infection is able to impair the development of both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses induced by a commercial Newcastle disease virus (NDV) vaccine. Even though this impairment was not fully confirmed to cause a functional reduction in protective immunity against the virus, it proves an immune...... face several fundamental challenges, e.g. isolation of native antigens and the capability to produce a recombinant form of the immunogenic antigen allowing commercial production. Very few veterinary anti-parasitic vaccines are commercially available. For poultry, vaccines against intestinal coccidiosis...

  14. Host specific glycans are correlated with susceptibility to infection by lagoviruses, but not with their virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Ana M; Breiman, Adrien; Lora, Mónica; Le Moullac-Vaidye, Béatrice; Galanina, Oxana; Nyström, Kristina; Marchandeau, Stephane; Le Gall-Reculé, Ghislaine; Strive, Tanja; Neimanis, Aleksija; Bovin, Nicolai V; Ruvoën-Clouet, Nathalie; Esteves, Pedro J; Abrantes, Joana; Le Pendu, Jacques

    2017-11-29

    The rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) and the European brown hare syndrome virus (EBHSV) are two lagoviruses from the family Caliciviridae that cause fatal diseases in two leporid genera, Oryctolagus and Lepus , respectively. In the last few years, several examples of host jumps of lagoviruses among leporids were recorded. In addition, a new pathogenic genotype of RHDV emerged and many non-pathogenic strains of lagoviruses have been described. The molecular mechanisms behind host shifts and the emergence of virulence are unknown. Since RHDV uses glycans of the histo-blood group antigen type as attachment factors to initiate infection, we studied if glycan specificities of the new pathogenic RHDV genotype, non-pathogenic lagoviruses and EBHSV potentially play a role in determining host range and virulence of lagoviruses. We observed binding to A, B or H antigens of the histo-blood group family for all strains known to primarily infect European rabbits ( Oryctolagus cuniculus ), that have recently been classified as GI strains. Yet, we could not explain the emergence of virulence since similar glycan specificities were found between several pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains. By contrast, EBHSV, recently classified as GII.1, bound to terminal β-linked N-acetylglucosamine residues of O-glycans. Expression of these attachment factors in the upper respiratory and digestive tracts in three lagomorph species ( Oryctolagus cuniculus, Lepus europaeus and Sylvilagus floridanus ) showed species-specific patterns regarding the susceptibility to infection by these viruses, indicating that species-specific glycan expression is likely a major contributor to lagoviruses host specificity and range. IMPORTANCE Lagoviruses constitute a genus of the Caliciviridae family, comprising highly pathogenic viruses, RHDV and EBHSV, which infect rabbits and hares, respectively. Recently, non-pathogenic strains were discovered and new pathogenic strains have emerged. In addition, host

  15. Defects in early cell recruitment contribute to the increased susceptibility to respiratory Klebsiella pneumoniae infection in diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Nuria; Ketheesan, Natkunam; Martens, Gregory W; West, Kim; Lien, Egil; Kornfeld, Hardy

    2016-10-01

    Diabetes is associated with increased susceptibility to Klebsiella pneumoniae and poor prognosis with infection. We demonstrate accelerated mortality in mice with streptozotocin-induced diabetes following tracheal instillation of K. pneumoniae. Diabetic mice recruited fewer granulocytes to the alveolar airspace and had reduced early production of CXCL1, CXCL2, IL-1β and TNF-α following tracheal instillation of K. pneumoniae-lipopolysaccharide. Additionally, TLR2 and TIRAP expression following K. pneumoniae-lipopolysaccharide exposure was decreased in hyperglycemic mice. These findings indicate that impaired innate sensing and failure to rapidly recruit granulocytes to the site of infection is a mechanism for diabetic susceptibility to respiratory K. pneumoniae infection. Copyright © 2016 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of long-term voluntary exercise wheel running on susceptibility to bacterial pulmonary infections in a mouse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van de Weert-van Leeuwen, Pauline B; de Vrankrijker, Angélica M M; Fentz, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    moderate exercise has many health benefits, healthy mice showed increased bacterial (P. aeruginosa) load and symptoms, after regular voluntary exercise, with perseverance of the phagocytic capacity of monocytes and neutrophils. Whether patients, suffering from bacterial infectious diseases, should......Regular moderate exercise has been suggested to exert anti-inflammatory effects and improve immune effector functions, resulting in reduced disease incidence and viral infection susceptibility. Whether regular exercise also affects bacterial infection susceptibility is unknown. The aim...... of this study was to investigate whether regular voluntary exercise wheel running prior to a pulmonary infection with bacteria (P. aeruginosa) affects lung bacteriology, sickness severity and phagocyte immune function in mice. Balb/c mice were randomly placed in a cage with or without a running wheel. After 28...

  17. Clinical implications of reduced susceptibility to fluoroquinolones in paediatric Shigella sonnei and Shigella flexneri infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Corinne N; Thieu, Nga Tran Vu; Vinh, Phat Voong; Duc, Anh Nguyen; Wolbers, Marcel; Vinh, Ha; Campbell, James I; Ngoc, Dung Tran Thi; Hoang, Nguyen Van Minh; Thanh, Tuyen Ha; The, Hao Chung; Nguyen, To Nguyen Thi; Lan, Nguyen Phu Huong; Parry, Christopher M; Chau, Nguyen Van Vinh; Thwaites, Guy; Thanh, Duy Pham; Baker, Stephen

    2016-03-01

    We aimed to quantify the impact of fluoroquinolone resistance on the clinical outcome of paediatric shigellosis patients treated with fluoroquinolones in southern Vietnam. Such information is important to inform therapeutic management for infections caused by this increasingly drug-resistant pathogen, responsible for high morbidity and mortality in young children globally. Clinical information and bacterial isolates were derived from a randomized controlled trial comparing gatifloxacin with ciprofloxacin for the treatment of paediatric shigellosis. Time-kill experiments were performed to evaluate the impact of MIC on the in vitro growth of Shigella and Cox regression modelling was used to compare clinical outcome between treatments and Shigella species. Shigella flexneri patients treated with gatifloxacin had significantly worse outcomes than those treated with ciprofloxacin. However, the MICs of fluoroquinolones were not significantly associated with poorer outcome. The presence of S83L and A87T mutations in the gyrA gene significantly increased MICs of fluoroquinolones. Finally, elevated MICs and the presence of the qnrS gene allowed Shigella to replicate efficiently in vitro in high concentrations of ciprofloxacin. We found that below the CLSI breakpoint, there was no association between MIC and clinical outcome in paediatric shigellosis infections. However, S. flexneri patients had worse clinical outcomes when treated with gatifloxacin in this study regardless of MIC. Additionally, Shigella harbouring the qnrS gene are able to replicate efficiently in high concentrations of ciprofloxacin and we hypothesize that such strains possess a competitive advantage against fluoroquinolone-susceptible strains due to enhanced shedding and transmission. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy.

  18. Clinical implications of reduced susceptibility to fluoroquinolones in paediatric Shigella sonnei and Shigella flexneri infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Corinne N.; Thieu, Nga Tran Vu; Vinh, Phat Voong; Duc, Anh Nguyen; Wolbers, Marcel; Vinh, Ha; Campbell, James I.; Ngoc, Dung Tran Thi; Hoang, Nguyen Van Minh; Thanh, Tuyen Ha; The, Hao Chung; Nguyen, To Nguyen Thi; Lan, Nguyen Phu Huong; Parry, Christopher M.; Chau, Nguyen Van Vinh; Thwaites, Guy; Thanh, Duy Pham; Baker, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to quantify the impact of fluoroquinolone resistance on the clinical outcome of paediatric shigellosis patients treated with fluoroquinolones in southern Vietnam. Such information is important to inform therapeutic management for infections caused by this increasingly drug-resistant pathogen, responsible for high morbidity and mortality in young children globally. Methods Clinical information and bacterial isolates were derived from a randomized controlled trial comparing gatifloxacin with ciprofloxacin for the treatment of paediatric shigellosis. Time–kill experiments were performed to evaluate the impact of MIC on the in vitro growth of Shigella and Cox regression modelling was used to compare clinical outcome between treatments and Shigella species. Results Shigella flexneri patients treated with gatifloxacin had significantly worse outcomes than those treated with ciprofloxacin. However, the MICs of fluoroquinolones were not significantly associated with poorer outcome. The presence of S83L and A87T mutations in the gyrA gene significantly increased MICs of fluoroquinolones. Finally, elevated MICs and the presence of the qnrS gene allowed Shigella to replicate efficiently in vitro in high concentrations of ciprofloxacin. Conclusions We found that below the CLSI breakpoint, there was no association between MIC and clinical outcome in paediatric shigellosis infections. However, S. flexneri patients had worse clinical outcomes when treated with gatifloxacin in this study regardless of MIC. Additionally, Shigella harbouring the qnrS gene are able to replicate efficiently in high concentrations of ciprofloxacin and we hypothesize that such strains possess a competitive advantage against fluoroquinolone-susceptible strains due to enhanced shedding and transmission. PMID:26679253

  19. Memory effects on epidemic evolution: The susceptible-infected-recovered epidemic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeedian, M.; Khalighi, M.; Azimi-Tafreshi, N.; Jafari, G. R.; Ausloos, M.

    2017-02-01

    Memory has a great impact on the evolution of every process related to human societies. Among them, the evolution of an epidemic is directly related to the individuals' experiences. Indeed, any real epidemic process is clearly sustained by a non-Markovian dynamics: memory effects play an essential role in the spreading of diseases. Including memory effects in the susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) epidemic model seems very appropriate for such an investigation. Thus, the memory prone SIR model dynamics is investigated using fractional derivatives. The decay of long-range memory, taken as a power-law function, is directly controlled by the order of the fractional derivatives in the corresponding nonlinear fractional differential evolution equations. Here we assume "fully mixed" approximation and show that the epidemic threshold is shifted to higher values than those for the memoryless system, depending on this memory "length" decay exponent. We also consider the SIR model on structured networks and study the effect of topology on threshold points in a non-Markovian dynamics. Furthermore, the lack of access to the precise information about the initial conditions or the past events plays a very relevant role in the correct estimation or prediction of the epidemic evolution. Such a "constraint" is analyzed and discussed.

  20. DEFB1 polymorphisms are involved in susceptibility to human papillomavirus infection in Brazilian gynaecological patients

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    Ludovica Segat

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The human beta defensin 1 (hBD-1 antimicrobial peptide is a member of the innate immune system known to act in the first line of defence against microorganisms, including viruses such as human papillomavirus (HPV. In this study, five functional polymorphisms (namely g-52G>A, g-44C>G and g-20G>A in the 5’UTR and c.*5G>A and c.*87A>G in the 3’UTR in the DEFB1 gene encoding for hBD-1 were analysed to investigate the possible involvement of these genetic variants in susceptibility to HPV infection and in the development of HPV-associated lesions in a population of Brazilian women. The DEFB1 g-52G>A and c.*5G>A single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and the GCAAA haplotype showed associations with HPV-negative status; in particular, the c.*5G>A SNP was significantly associated after multiple test corrections. These findings suggest a possible role for the constitutively expressed beta defensin-1 peptide as a natural defence against HPV in the genital tract mucosa.

  1. Uncomplicated Urinary Tract Infections in Women in a Sao Paulo Quaternary Care Hospital: Bacterial Spectrum and Susceptibility Patterns

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    Marcelo Hisano

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTI in women are very common. Regular analysis of bacterial flora is important to formulate updated guidelines. The objective of this study is to determine and compare the microbiology of UTIs and their susceptibility patterns in a quaternary care hospital. In a seven-year review, the urine culture results of 480 female patients with uncomplicated UTIs were analyzed. Patients were divided into three groups according to their diagnosis and treatment characteristics: Group 1, cystitis at outpatient basis; group 2, cystitis at the Emergency Unit; and group 3, pyelonephritis. Group 1 included older patients, with a higher incidence of concomitant diabetes mellitus and recurrent UTIs. E. coli was the most common pathogen, responsible for 75.1% of cases, mainly for pyelonephritis (87.3%. Of the oral antimicrobials tested for cystitis, amoxicillin/clavulanate and nitrofurantoin had the highest susceptibility profiles (84.4% and 87.3%, respectively. For E. coli only, their susceptibility profiles were as high as 90.8% and 97.4%, respectively. For pyelonephritis treatment, fluoroquinoles had a susceptibility profile <90%, while ceftriaxone and gentamicin had susceptibility >90%. Uncomplicated UTI treatment is becoming more challenging because the susceptibility profiles of oral antimicrobials are increasingly resistant. In our environment, cystitis can still be managed with nitrofurantoin. Uncomplicated pyelonephritis should be managed with ceftriaxone or gentamicin.

  2. Priming astrocytes with TNF enhances their susceptibility to Trypanosoma cruzi infection and creates a self-sustaining inflammatory milieu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Andrea Alice; Silva, Rafael Rodrigues; Gibaldi, Daniel; Mariante, Rafael Meyer; Dos Santos, Jessica Brandão; Pereira, Isabela Resende; Moreira, Otacílio Cruz; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli

    2017-09-06

    In conditions of immunosuppression, the central nervous sty 5ystem (CNS) is the main target tissue for the reactivation of infection by Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. In experimental T. cruzi infection, interferon gamma (IFNγ) + microglial cells surround astrocytes harboring amastigote parasites. In vitro, IFNγ fuels astrocyte infection by T. cruzi, and IFNγ-stimulated infected astrocytes are implicated as potential sources of tumor necrosis factor (TNF). Pro-inflammatory cytokines trigger behavioral alterations. In T. cruzi-infected mice, administration of anti-TNF antibody hampers depressive-like behavior. Herein, we investigated the effects of TNF on astrocyte susceptibility to T. cruzi infection and the regulation of cytokine production. Primary astrocyte cultures of neonatal C57BL/6 and C3H/He mice and the human U-87 MG astrocyte lineage were infected with the Colombian T. cruzi strain. Cytokine production, particularly TNF, and TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1/p55) expression were analyzed. Recombinant cytokines (rIFNγ and rTNF), the anti-TNF antibody infliximab, and the TNFR1 modulator pentoxifylline were used to assess the in vitro effects of TNF on astrocyte susceptibility to T. cruzi infection. To investigate the role of TNF on CNS colonization by T. cruzi, infected mice were submitted to anti-TNF therapy. rTNF priming of mouse and human astrocytes enhanced parasite/astrocyte interaction (i.e., the percentage of astrocytes invaded by trypomastigote parasites and the number of intracellular parasite forms/astrocyte). Furthermore, T. cruzi infection drove astrocytes to a pro-inflammatory profile with TNF and interleukin-6 production, which was amplified by rTNF treatment. Adding rTNF prior to infection fueled parasite growth and trypomastigote egression, in parallel with increased TNFR1 expression. Importantly, pentoxifylline inhibited the TNF-induced increase in astrocyte susceptibility to T. cruzi invasion. In T. cruzi-infected mice

  3. ‘Surprise’: Outbreak of Campylobacter infection associated with chicken liver pâté at a surprise birthday party, Adelaide, Australia, 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Denehy

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In July 2012, an outbreak of Campylobacter infection was investigated by the South Australian Communicable Disease Control Branch and Food Policy and Programs Branch. The initial notification identified illness at a surprise birthday party held at a restaurant on 14 July 2012. The objective of the investigation was to identify the potential source of infection and institute appropriate intervention strategies to prevent further illness.Methods: A guest list was obtained and a retrospective cohort study undertaken. A combination of paper-based and telephone questionnaires were used to collect exposure and outcome information. An environmental investigation was conducted by Food Policy and Programs Branch at the implicated premises.Results: All 57 guests completed the questionnaire (100% response rate, and 15 met the case definition. Analysis showed a significant association between illness and consumption of chicken liver pâté (relative risk: 16.7, 95% confidence interval: 2.4–118.6. No other food or beverage served at the party was associated with illness. Three guests submitted stool samples; all were positive for Campylobacter. The environmental investigation identified that the cooking process used in the preparation of chicken liver pâté may have been inconsistent, resulting in some portions not cooked adequately to inactivate potential Campylobacter contamination.Discussion: Chicken liver products are a known source of Campylobacter infection; therefore, education of food handlers remains a high priority. To better identify outbreaks among the large number of Campylobacter notifications, routine typing of Campylobacter isolates is recommended.

  4. Characterization of vancomycin-resistant and vancomycin-susceptible Enterococcus faecium isolates from humans, chickens and pigs by RiboPrinting and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammerum, Anette Marie; Fussing, Vivian; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2000-01-01

    Forty-eight vancomycin-resistant and 35 vancomycin-sensitive Danish Enterococcus faecium isolates obtained from pigs, chickens and humans, as well as the human vanA reference isolate BM4147, were characterized by EcoRI RiboPrinting and Smal pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. RiboPrinting of the 84...... of E. faecium spreads freely between the animal and human reservoir....

  5. Evaluation of antibiotic susceptibility in wound infections: A pilot study from Bangladesh [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushmita Roy

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Infections due to antibiotic resistant bacteria have increased alarmingly in both developed and developing countries. Unrestrained and rapidly spreading bacterial growth has turned the management of wound infections into a serious challenge. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of different bacterial pathogens and their antibiotic susceptibility in various types of wound infections. Methods:  A cross-sectional study was conducted to collect 105 wound swabs. All isolated bacteria were identified based on colony characteristics, gram stain and standard biochemical tests, and antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST with the disc diffusion method. Descriptive statistics were used to present the study findings, and all analyses were performed using Stata Version 13. Results:  The rate of isolation of bacteria was 92.3%. Staphylococcus aureus was found to be the most frequent isolate (55.7%, followed by Escherichia coli (23.7%, Pseudomonas spp. (8.2%, and Streptococcus pyogenes (7.2%. Gram-positive bacteria were mostly (60% found sensitive to vancomycin, azithromycin, gentamicin, imipenem, cefixime, and ceftriaxone in this study. Among the Gram-negative bacteria, Escherichia coli (>60% showed sensitivity to cefixime, azithromycin, cefuroxime, ceftriaxone, cefotaxime, gentamycin, and ceftazidime. Conclusions: The diversity of isolated bacteria and their susceptibility patterns signify a need to implement a proper infection control strategy, which can be achieved by carrying out antibiotic sensitivity tests of the isolates.

  6. Increased susceptibility for superinfection with Streptococcus pneumoniae during influenza virus infection is not caused by TLR7-mediated lymphopenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Stegemann

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus (IAV causes respiratory tract infections leading to recurring epidemics with high rates of morbidity and mortality. In the past century IAV induced several world-wide pandemics, the most aggressive occurring in 1918 with a death toll of 20-50 million cases. However, infection with IAV alone is rarely fatal. Instead, death associated with IAV is usually mediated by superinfection with bacteria, mainly Streptococcus pneumoniae. The reasons for this increased susceptibility to bacterial superinfection have not been fully elucidated. We previously demonstrated that triggering of TLR7 causes immune incompetence in mice by induction of lymphopenia. IAV is recognized by TLR7 and infections can lead to lymphopenia. Since lymphocytes are critical to protect from S. pneumoniae it has long been speculated that IAV-induced lymphopenia might mediate increased susceptibility to superinfection. Here we show that sub-lethal pre-infections of mice with IAV-PR8/A/34 strongly increased their mortality in non-lethal SP infections, surprisingly despite the absence of detectable lymphopenia. In contrast to SP-infection alone co-infected animals were unable to control the exponential growth of SP. However, lymphopenia forced by TLR7-triggering or antibody-mediated neutropenia did not increase SP-susceptibility or compromise the ability to control SP growth. Thus, the immune-incompetence caused by transient lympho- or leukopenia is not sufficient to inhibit potent antibacterial responses of the host and mechanisms distinct from leukodepletion must account for increased bacterial superinfection during viral defence.

  7. Assessment of chicken protection against Campylobacter jejuni infection by immunization with avirulent Salmonella enterica sv. Typhimurium strain producing Campylobacter CjaD/Pal protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łaniewski P

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Pawel Laniewski,1 Malgorzata Lis,2 Agnieszka Wyszynska,1 Pawel Majewski,3 Renata Godlewska,1 Elzbieta Katarzyna Jagusztyn-Krynicka11Department of Bacterial Genetics, Institute of Microbiology, Faculty of Biology, University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland; 2Biowet Pulawy Ltd, Pulawy, Poland; 3Department of Vertebrate Physiology, Institute of Zoology, Faculty of Biology, University of Warsaw, Warsaw, PolandAbstract: Campylobacter jejuni is a major food-borne pathogen, causing gastroenteritis worldwide. Chickens are considered to be one of the most common sources of human C. jejuni infection in developed countries. Campylobacter CjaD/Pal protein (annotated as Cj0113 in C. jejuni strain NCTC11168 is a highly immunogenic, membrane-located antigen, conserved among different strains, with the potential to provide broad protection against C. jejuni colonization. The present study examines the immunogenicity and the general efficacy of avirulent S. enterica sv. Typhimurium Δcrp Δcya expressing C. jejuni CjaD as a chicken vaccine against Campylobacter colonization. The high copy number plasmid pYA3341 Asd+ was used as a cloning vector. Here, 1- and 14-day old chickens were orally immunized with a delivery vector strain, expressing C. jejuni CjaD. Two weeks later, they were challenged with a wild-type C. jejuni strain isolated from chicken carcasses. This schedule of immunization induced significant levels of serum-specific IgG as well as mucosal intestinal sIgA as measured by ELISA tests using Campylobacter membrane proteins as a coating antigen. Nevertheless, protection experiments did not result in significant reduction of colonization of vaccinated birds relative to nonvaccinated birds.Keywords: Campylobacter, cjaD, immunization, Pal

  8. Association of TNF-Alpha gene polymorphisms and susceptibility to hepatitis B virus infection in Egyptians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talaat, Roba M; Abdelkhalek, Mohamed S; El-Maadawy, Eman A; Abdel-Mageed, Wael S; El-Shenawy, Soha Z; Osman, Mohamed A

    2017-11-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is one of the important cytokine in generating an immune response against hepatitis B virus (HBV). Genetic polymorphisms might influence gene transcription, leading to disturbance in cytokine production. We hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) in TNF-α gene could affect the pathogenesis of HBV. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the role of TNF-α polymorphism [-863C/A (rs1800630), -308G/A (rs1800629), -376G/A (rs1800750), -857C/T (rs1799724) and +489G/A (rs1800610)] in the susceptibility to chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection. Polymorphisms of the TNF-α (-863C/A (rs1800630), -308G/A) were analyzed by Polymerase chain reaction sequence specific primer (PCR-SSP) while TNF-α (-376G/A, -857C/T and +489G/A) by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) in 104 patients with CHB and 104 healthy controls. The plasma level of TNF-α was measured using Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The study showed a significant increase in the frequency of -863CC, -376GA, -857CC, -857TT and +489GA genotypes and -863C, -376A, -857C, and +489A alleles in CHB patients compared to controls. In addition, CAGCG haplotype had a highest frequency in CHB patients. A strong Linkage Disequilibrium (LD) between TNF-α -863C/A (rs1800630) and -376G/A (D' = 0.7888, r 2  = 0.0200); -308G/A and -857C/T (D' = 0.9213, r 2  = 0.1770); -308G/A and +489G/A (D' = 0.9088, r 2  = 0.1576) was demonstrated. CHB patients had significantly lower levels of TNF-α compared to controls. In conclusion, our preliminary results suggest that -863C/A (rs1800630), -308G/A, -376G/A, and +489G/A of the TNF-α gene may play a role in HBV susceptibility in Egyptians. The significant reduction in TNF-α in CHB patient was independent of any particular genotype/haplotype in TNF-α. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of chicken anaemia virus obtained from backyard and commercial chickens in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oluwayelu, D O; Todd, D; Olaleye, O D

    2008-12-01

    This work reports the first molecular analysis study of chicken anaemia virus (CAV) in backyard chickens in Africa using molecular cloning and sequence analysis to characterize CAV strains obtained from commercial chickens and Nigerian backyard chickens. Partial VP1 gene sequences were determined for three CAVs from commercial chickens and for six CAV variants present in samples from a backyard chicken. Multiple alignment analysis revealed that the 6% and 4% nucleotide diversity obtained respectively for the commercial and backyard chicken strains translated to only 2% amino acid diversity for each breed. Overall, the amino acid composition of Nigerian CAVs was found to be highly conserved. Since the partial VP1 gene sequence of two backyard chicken cloned CAV strains (NGR/CI-8 and NGR/CI-9) were almost identical and evolutionarily closely related to the commercial chicken strains NGR-1, and NGR-4 and NGR-5, respectively, we concluded that CAV infections had crossed the farm boundary.

  10. Prevalence of Eimeria species in local breed chickens in Gombe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eimeria species are protozoan parasites causing coccidiosis in exotic and local breeds of chickens. Coccidiosis is the most important protozoan disease to the world poultry industry and domestic chickens are considered susceptible to seven ... Most of the chickens reared under this system, scavenge for most of their food.

  11. The onset of virus shedding and clinical signs in chickens infected with high-pathogenicity and low-pathogenicity avian influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spickler, Anna R; Trampel, Darrell W; Roth, James A

    2008-12-01

    Some avian influenza viruses may be transmissible to mammals by ingestion. Cats and dogs have been infected by H5N1 avian influenza viruses when they ate raw poultry, and two human H5N1 infections were linked to the ingestion of uncooked duck blood. The possibility of zoonotic influenza from exposure to raw poultry products raises concerns about flocks with unrecognized infections. The present review examines the onset of virus shedding and the development of clinical signs for a variety of avian influenza viruses in chickens. In experimentally infected birds, some high-pathogenicity avian influenza (HPAI) and low-pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI) viruses can occur in faeces and respiratory secretions as early as 1 to 2 days after inoculation. Some HPAI viruses have also been found in meat 1 day after inoculation and in eggs after 3 days. There is no evidence that LPAI viruses can be found in meat, and the risk of their occurrence in eggs is poorly understood. Studies in experimentally infected birds suggest that clinical signs usually develop within a few days of virus shedding; however, some models and outbreak descriptions suggest that clinical signs may not become evident for a week or more in some H5 or H7 HPAI-infected flocks. During this time, avian influenza viruses might be found in poultry products. LPAI viruses can be shed in asymptomatically infected or minimally affected flocks, but these viruses are unlikely to cause significant human disease.

  12. Expression of the Blood-Group-Related Gene B4galnt2 Alters Susceptibility to Salmonella Infection.

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    Philipp Rausch

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Glycans play important roles in host-microbe interactions. Tissue-specific expression patterns of the blood group glycosyltransferase β-1,4-N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 2 (B4galnt2 are variable in wild mouse populations, and loss of B4galnt2 expression is associated with altered intestinal microbiota. We hypothesized that variation in B4galnt2 expression alters susceptibility to intestinal pathogens. To test this, we challenged mice genetically engineered to express different B4galnt2 tissue-specific patterns with a Salmonella Typhimurium infection model. We found B4galnt2 intestinal expression was strongly associated with bacterial community composition and increased Salmonella susceptibility as evidenced by increased intestinal inflammatory cytokines and infiltrating immune cells. Fecal transfer experiments demonstrated a crucial role of the B4galnt2-dependent microbiota in conferring susceptibility to intestinal inflammation, while epithelial B4galnt2 expression facilitated epithelial invasion of S. Typhimurium. These data support a critical role for B4galnt2 in gastrointestinal infections. We speculate that B4galnt2-specific differences in host susceptibility to intestinal pathogens underlie the strong signatures of balancing selection observed at the B4galnt2 locus in wild mouse populations.

  13. Serum levels of mannan-binding lectin in chickens prior to and during experimental infection with avian infectious bronchitis virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul-Madsen, H.R.; Munch, M.; Handberg, Kurt

    2003-01-01

    Mannan-binding lectin (MBL) is a glycoprotein and a member of the C-type lectin super family, the collectin family, and the acute phase protein family. The MBL exerts its function by directly binding to microbial surfaces through its carbohydrate recognition domains, followed by direct opsonization......, the highest value was found in chickens inoculated after 12 h of activity. Thus, an inverse relation exists between the MBL response and the IBV specific antibody response. The ability of MBL to activate the complement cascade was tested in a heterologous system by deposition of human C4 on the chicken MBL...

  14. High fluoroquinolone MIC is associated with fluoroquinolone treatment failure in urinary tract infections caused by fluoroquinolone susceptible Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattanaumpawan, Pinyo; Nachamkin, Irving; Bilker, Warren B; Roy, Jason A; Metlay, Joshua P; Zaoutis, Theoklis E; Lautenbach, Ebbing

    2017-04-08

    Suboptimal clinical response to fluoroquinolone (FQ) therapy has been clearly documented in patients with Salmonella typhi infection with reduced FQ susceptibility. However, the clinical impact of reduced FQ susceptibility on other infections including E. coli urinary tract infections (UTIs) has never been evaluated. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of female patients with fluoroquinolone susceptible E. coli (FQSEC) UTIs who received FQ therapy at outpatient services within University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia. Exposed patients were those with high MIC-FQSEC UTIs (the levofloxacin MIC > 0.12 but ≤ 2 mg/L) while unexposed patients were those with low MIC-FQSEC UTIs (the levofloxacin MIC ≤ 0.12 mg/L). The primary treatment outcome was treatment failure within 10 weeks after initiation of FQ therapy. From May 2008 to April 2011, we enrolled 29 exposed patients and 246 unexposed patients. Two patients in each group experienced treatment failure; exposed vs. unexposed (6.9 vs. 0.8%; p = 0.06). Risk difference and risk ratio (RR) for treatment failure were 0.06 [95% CI -0.03-0.15; exact-p = 0.06] and 8.48 [95% CI 1.24-57.97; exact-p = 0.06], respectively. After adjusting for underlying cerebrovascular disease, the RR was 7.12 (95% CI 1.20-42.10; MH-p = 0.04). Our study demonstrated the negative impact of reduced FQ susceptibility on the treatment response to FQ therapy in FQSEC UTIs. This negative impact may be more intensified in other serious infections. Future studies in other clinical situations should be conducted to fill the gap of knowledge.

  15. Osteoblasts from osteoarthritis patients show enhanced susceptibility to Ross River virus infection associated with delayed type I interferon responses

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Weiqiang; Foo, Suan-Sin; Li, Rachel W; Smith, Paul N; Mahalingam, Suresh

    2014-01-01

    Background Arthritogenic alphaviruses such as Ross River virus (RRV) and chikungunya virus (CHIKV) have caused widespread outbreaks of chronic polyarthritis. The inflammatory responses in alphavirus-induced arthritis and osteoarthritis (OA) share many similar features, which suggests the possibility of exacerbated alphavirus-induced bone pathology in individuals with pre-existing OA. Here, we investigated the susceptibility of osteoblasts (OBs) from OA patients to RRV infection and dissected ...

  16. No association between histo-blood group antigens and susceptibility to clinical infections with genogroup II norovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halperin, Tamar; Vennema, Harry; Koopmans, Marion; Kahila Bar-Gal, Gila; Kayouf, Raid; Sela, Tamar; Ambar, Ruhama; Klement, Eyal

    2008-01-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are a leading cause of viral gastroenteritis in humans. In the present study, the association between NoV susceptibility and the ABO histo-blood group was studied during 2 outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis in military units in Israel caused by genogroup II (GII) NoVs. The findings demonstrate that, unlike for genogroup I of NoV, there is no association between the ABO histo-blood group and clinical infection with GII NoVs. This is the largest study to test the association between NoVs, proven clinical infection with GII, and the ABO histo-blood group.

  17. Stability Analysis Susceptible, Exposed, Infected, Recovered (SEIR) Model for Spread Model for Spread of Dengue Fever in Medan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Side, Syafruddin; Molliq Rangkuti, Yulita; Gerhana Pane, Dian; Setia Sinaga, Marlina

    2018-01-01

    Dengue fever is endemic disease which spread through vector, Aedes Aegypty. This disease is found more than 100 countries, such as, United State, Africa as well Asia, especially in country that have tropic climate. Mathematical modeling in this paper, discusses the speed of the spread of dengue fever. The model adopting divided over four classes, such as Susceptible (S), Exposed (E), Infected (I) and Recovered (R). SEIR model further analyzed to detect the re-breeding value based on the number reported case by dengue in Medan city. Analysis of the stability of the system in this study is asymptotically stable indicating a case of endemic and unstable that show cases the endemic cases. Simulation on the mathematical model of SEIR showed that require a very long time to produce infected humans will be free of dengue virus infection. This happens because of dengue virus infection that occurs continuously between human and vector populations.

  18. Diagnosis of oral fungal infection in patients undergoing head and neck cancer radiation. Antifungal susceptibility of isolates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulacio, L.; Paz, M.; Ramadan, S.; Ramos, L.; Marozzi, M.L.; Sortino, M.; Escovich, L.; Lopez, C.

    2008-01-01

    Radiotherapy adverse effects are very common, they contribute to development of opportunistic infections. Genus Candida is often associated with oral diseases in susceptible patients. The aim of this study was to study the presence of yeast in oral lesions, in patients receiving radiotherapy for head and neck cancer, and to evaluate antifungal susceptibility of isolates. Swabs of oral mucosal lesions of 76 patients were studied. Antifungal susceptibility of the isolates was evaluated, with ATB Fungus-3 method, which tests 5-fluorcitosine (5-FC), amphotericin B (AMB), fluconazole (FCA), itraconazole (ITR) and voriconazole (VRC); and allows the estimation of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). Yeasts were isolated in 74% of samples, being Candida albicans, most frequent specie (53%), followed by C.tropicalis (24%), C.parapsilosis (14%), C.krusei (5%), C.dubliniensis (2%) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (2%). All strains were susceptible to VRC. For other antifungals, there were resistant or dose-dependent-susceptible strains. Only C.krusei was resistant to the FCA. About AMB, 2 isolates of C. tropicalis presented a value of 2 mg/l MIC, dose with high incidence of adverse effects. These studies are important to establish early and suitable therapy, wich contribute to achieve lowers rates of disseminated forms of candidiasis, and to reduce the difficulties in food intake that carries the presence of oral lesions. (authors)

  19. Incidence and antimicrobial resistance profiling of Campylobacter in retail chicken livers and gizzards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noormohamed, Aneesa; Fakhr, Mohamed K

    2012-07-01

    Campylobacter species are one of the leading causes of foodborne disease in the United States. Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are the two main species that are of concern to human health, and they cause approximately 95% of human infections. The number of studies investigating Campylobacter in chicken livers and gizzards is very limited in the literature. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli in retail chicken livers and gizzards purchased from grocery stores in the Tulsa, Oklahoma, area and to further characterize the isolates obtained through antimicrobial susceptibility testing. A total of 202 retail chilled chicken livers and gizzards (159 livers and 43 gizzards) were purchased on a weekly basis from several grocery stores. The overall prevalence of Campylobacter in chicken livers and gizzards was 136/202 (67%), where 69/202 (34%) of the samples were contaminated with Campylobacter jejuni and 66/202 (33%) with Campylobacter coli. While the prevalence of Campylobacter in chicken livers was 77%, its prevalence in chicken gizzards was lower at 33%. The prevalence of Campylobacter jejuni was slightly higher in chicken livers (36%) than gizzards (26%), while the prevalence of Campylobacter coli was significantly higher in the chicken livers (40%) than chicken gizzards (7%). The prevalence of resistance among C. jejuni and C. coli isolates recovered against 16 antimicrobials were as follows: amoxicillin (98%, 99%), ampicillin (32%, 55%), azithromycin (10%, 25%), cephalothin (92%, 99%), chloramphenicol (4%, 12%), ciprofloxacin (58%, 48%), clindamycin (5%, 19%), doxycycline (39%, 66%), erythromycin (6%, 32%), gentamicin (9%, 43%), kanamycin (11%, 43%), nalidixic acid (50%, 43%), oxytetracycline (99%, 100%), streptomycin (3%, 18%), tetracycline (37%, 60%), and tilmicosin (9%, 16%). Multidrug resistance was higher among Campylobacter coli than Campylobacter jejuni isolates.

  20. Long Term Persistence of IgE Anti-Varicella Zoster Virus in Pediatric and Adult Serum Post Chicken Pox Infection and after Vaccination with Varicella Virus Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Norowitz, Tamar A; Josekutty, Joby; Silverberg, Jonathan I; Lev-Tov, Hadar; Norowitz, Yitzchok M; Kohlhoff, Stephan; Nowakowski, Maja; Durkin, Helen G; Bluth, Martin H

    2009-12-01

    The production of IgE specific to different viruses (HIV-1, Parvovirus B19, RSV), and the ability for IgE anti-HIV-1 to suppress HIV-1 production in vitro, strongly suggest an important role for IgE and/or anti viral specific IgE in viral pathogenesis. Previous studies in our laboratory were the first to report the presence of IgE anti-varicella zoster virus (VZV) in an adolescent patient with shingles. However, the presence and long term persistence of IgE anti VZV antibodies has not been studied in adults. The presence of serum IgE in addition to IgE and IgG anti-VZV antibody in sera were studied in children (N=12) (0-16 y/o) and adults (N=9) (32-76 y/o) with either a past history of (wild type) chicken pox (N=7 children, 9 adults) or 5 years after vaccination with varicella zoster (N=2 children) (Varicella virus vaccine live, Oka/Merck), as well as in non-infected subjects (N=3 children). Of the patients who had a positive history of chicken pox 13 of 16 (81%) contained IgE anti-VZV antibodies; they were both serum IgEHi (>100 IU/ml) and IgELo (chicken pox or vaccination did not make either IgE or IgG anti-VZV antibodies. This is the first demonstration of the existence of IgE anti-VZV antibodies, and its long-term persistence in serum of previously infected subjects. Future studies regarding the functional role of anti-viral IgE and its relationship to VZV are warranted.

  1. The effects of fish gender on susceptibility to acute Streptococcus agalactiae infection in Javanese medaka Oryzias javanicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amal, M N A; Zarif, S T; Suhaiba, M S; Aidil, M R M; Shaqinah, N N; Zamri-Saad, M; Ismail, A

    2017-12-05

    This study describes the susceptibility of different fish gender following acute Streptococcus agalactiae infection by using Javanese medaka Oryzias javanicus as test fish. The fish were grouped into four groups, which were: (1) all-male; (2) all-female; (3) mixed-gender (1 male: 1 female ratio); and (4) control non-infected (1 male: 1 female ratio). The fish in group 1, 2 and 3 were intraperitoneally exposed to 5.4 × 10 8  CFU/mL of S. agalactiae, while for group 4, the fish were exposed using sterile broth. The main clinical signs and histopathological changes of infected Javanese medaka were commonly observed in S. agalactiae infected fishes. However, no difference on clinical signs and histopathological changes of fish in group 1, 2 and 3 were noticed. The Javanese medaka mortality in group 1, 2 and 3 were observed from 4 h post infection (hpi) to 6 hpi, with the cumulative mortality from 3% to 30%. Then, the mortality increased at 12 hpi, with the range from 53% to 80%. However, 100% of the infected fish dead at 24 hpi. No clinical sign, histopathological change and fish mortality recorded in group 4. Generally, the clinical signs, mortality patterns, cumulative mortality and histopathological changes of Javanese medaka infected by S. agalactiae did not show any difference between the all-male, all-female and mixed-gender groups. This indicates that the susceptibility of fish to S. agalactiae infection is not influenced by their gender. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The effect of fish gender on susceptibility to acute Streptococcus agalactiae infection in Javanese medaka Oryzias javanicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amal, M N A; Zarif, S T; Suhaiba, M; Aidil, M R M; Shaqinah, N N; Zamri-Saad, M; Ismail, A

    2017-12-04

    This study describes the susceptibility of different fish gender following acute Streptococcus agalactiae infection by using Javanese medaka Oryzias javanicus as test fish. The fish were grouped into four groups, which were: (1) all-male; (2) all-female; (3) mixed-gender (1 male: 1 female ratio); and (4) control non-infected (1 male: 1 female ratio). The fish in group 1, 2 and 3 were intraperitoneally exposed to 5.4 × 10 8  CFU/ml of S. agalactiae, while for group 4, the fish were exposed using sterile broth. The main clinical signs and histopathological changes of infected Javanese medaka were commonly observed in S. agalactiae infected fishes. However, no difference on clinical signs and histopathological changes of fish in group 1, 2 and 3 were noticed. The Javanese medaka mortality in group 1, 2 and 3 were observed from 4 h post infection (hpi) to 6 hpi, with the cumulative mortality from 3% to 30%. Then, the mortality increased at 12 hpi, with the range from 53% to 80%. However, 100% of the infected fish dead at 24 hpi. No clinical signs, histopathological changes and fish mortality recorded in group 4. Generally, the clinical signs, mortality patterns, cumulative mortality and histopathological changes of Javanese medaka infected by S. agalactiae did not show any difference between the all-male, all-female and mixed-gender groups. This indicates that the susceptibility of fish to S. agalactiae infection is not influenced by their gender. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Antifungal Efficacy during Candida krusei Infection in Non-Conventional Models Correlates with the Yeast In Vitro Susceptibility Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scorzoni, Liliana; de Lucas, Maria Pilar; Mesa-Arango, Ana Cecilia; Fusco-Almeida, Ana Marisa; Lozano, Encarnación; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Mendes-Giannini, Maria Jose; Zaragoza, Oscar

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of opportunistic fungal infections has increased in recent decades due to the growing proportion of immunocompromised patients in our society. Candida krusei has been described as a causative agent of disseminated fungal infections in susceptible patients. Although its prevalence remains low among yeast infections (2–5%), its intrinsic resistance to fluconazole makes this yeast important from epidemiologic aspects. Non mammalian organisms are feasible models to study fungal virulence and drug efficacy. In this work we have used the lepidopteran Galleria mellonella and the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as models to assess antifungal efficacy during infection by C. krusei. This yeast killed G. mellonella at 25, 30 and 37°C and reduced haemocytic density. Infected larvae melanized in a dose-dependent manner. Fluconazole did not protect against C. krusei infection, in contrast to amphotericin B, voriconazole or caspofungin. However, the doses of these antifungals required to obtain larvae protection were always higher during C. krusei infection than during C. albicans infection. Similar results were found in the model host C. elegans. Our work demonstrates that non mammalian models are useful tools to investigate in vivo antifungal efficacy and virulence of C. krusei. PMID:23555877

  4. Impact of coccidial infection on vaccine- and vvIBDV in lymphoid tissues of SPF chickens as detected by RT-PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bisgaard Magne

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aimed at investigating a potential effect caused by coccidia on the immune response to vaccine- and very virulent infectious bursal disase virus (vvIBDV in SPF chickens. Methods Two groups of three weeks old SPF chickens were vaccinated prior to inoculation with coccidia and challenge with virulent IBDV, all within a period of eight days. Two control groups were similarly treated, except that challenge with field virus was omitted in one group while inoculation with coccidia was omitted in the other group. Clinical signs, lesions in the intestines caused by coccidia, lesions in the bursa of Fabricius caused by IBDV, IBDV-antibody titres, and virus detection by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR were compared among the groups. Lymphoid tissues and swab samples were analysed by general RT-PCR, and positive results were identified by strain specific duplex (DPX RT-PCR. Results In the tripple-infected groups, vaccine strain IBDV was detected in spleen and thymus tissues, and no field virus was detected in bursa samples, contrary to the double-infected groups. Conclusion The results suggest an enhancing effect on the immune response caused by subclinical coccidiosis and vvIBDV acting in concert.

  5. In situ hybridization for the detection of infectious laryngotracheitis virus in sections of trachea from experimentally infected chickens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O.L.; Handberg, Kurt; Jørgensen, Poul Henrik

    1998-01-01

    with a mixture of 2 biotinylated, polymerase chain reaction-generated DNA fragments. The fragments correspond to sequences of the ILTV glycoprotein C and thymidine kinase genes. In situ hybridization was seen in 7 out of 7 chickens examined on day 3 p.i., 2 out of 2 examined on day 4 p.i. and 3 out of 3 examined...

  6. Genome-Wide Transcriptome Analysis Reveals the Comprehensive Response of Two Susceptible Poplar Sections to Marssonina brunnea Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanfeng Zhang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Marssonina leaf spot disease of poplar (MLDP, caused by the hemibiotrophic pathogen Marssonina brunnea, frequently results in damage to many poplar species. In nature, two formae speciales of M. brunnea exist that are susceptible to different poplar subgenera. Marssonina brunnea f. sp. monogermtubi infects poplar hosts from Populus sect. Aigeiros (Aig, while M. brunnea f. sp. multigermtubi always infects poplar hosts from Populus sect. Leuce Duby (Leu. Based on the fungal penetration structures, a comprehensive transcriptomic approach was used to investigate the gene expression patterns of these two poplar subgenera at three crucial infection stages. MLDP significantly altered the expression patterns of many genes involved in mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPKs and calcium signaling, transcription factors, primary and secondary metabolism, and other processes in both poplar subgenera. However, major differences in gene expression were also observed between the two poplar subgenera. Aig was most responsive at the initial infection stage, while Leu largely interacted with M. brunnea at the necrotrophic phase. Furthermore, the differentially expressed genes (DEGs involved in pathways related to biotic stress also differed substantially between the two poplar subgenera. Further analysis indicated that the genes involved in cell wall metabolism and phenylpropanoid metabolism were differentially expressed in the progression of the disease. By examining the expression patterns of genes related to the defense against disease, we found that several genes annotated with causing hypersensitive cell death were upregulated at the necrotrophic phase of MLDP, inferring that plant immune response potentially happened at this infection stage. The present research elucidated the potential molecular differences between the two susceptible interaction systems in MLDP and provided novel insight into the temporal regulation of genes during the susceptible

  7. [The effect of Mycoplasma synoviae infection on the state of health and results of fattening of broiler chickens compared with the effects of various virus infections. A field study (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goren, E

    1979-05-01

    Field studies in 160 flocks of broiler chickens in two areas in the Netherlands showed that Mycoplasma synoviae infection, the presence of which was detected by serological testing in 17.5 per cent, had only a slight adverse effect on the results of fattening. Mycoplasma synoviae as well as IB infections were found to be more common in flocks affected with colibacillosis and/or in which higher proportions of birds were condemned because of polyserositis. Infectious bursal disease, IB and CELO virus infections are very common particularly in the southern areas of the Netherlands, and have a significantly adverse effect on the results of fattening. The findings suggest that vaccination against IB and Gumboro disease often fails in flocks in areas showing a high incidence of infection.

  8. Chicken Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickett, Marianne

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how a visit from a flock of chickens provided inspiration for the children's chicken art. The gentle clucking of the hens, the rooster crowing, and the softness of the feathers all provided rich aural, tactile, visual, and emotional experiences. The experience affirms the importance and value of direct…

  9. Transfer of innate resistance and susceptibility to Leishmania donovani infection in mouse radiation bone marrow chimaeras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crocker, P.R.; Blackwell, J.M.; Bradley, D.J. (London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (UK))

    1984-07-01

    Reciprocal radiation bone marrow chimaeras were made between H-2-compatible strains of mice innately resistant or susceptible to visceral leishmaniasis. In initial experiments, susceptibility but not resistance to Leishmania donovani could be transferred with donor bone marrow into irradiated recipients. In subsequent experiments it was possible to transfer both resistance and susceptibility. This was achieved either by selecting more radiosensitive mouse strains as susceptible recipients, or alternatively by increasing the irradiation dose for the susceptible recipients used in the initial experiments. Using the higher irradiation dose, successful transfer of resistance and susceptibility between congenic mice carrying the Lshsup(r) and Lshsup(s) alleles on the more radioresistant B10 genetic background provided firm evidence that the results obtained in this study were specifically related to expression of the Lsh gene. It is concluded that Lsh gene-controlled resistance and susceptibility to L. donovani is determined by bone marrow-derived cells. The cell type(s) involved is likely to be of the macrophage lineage.

  10. Time-course investigation of infection with a low virulent Pasteurella multocida strain in normal and immune-suppressed 12-week-old free-range chickens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbuthia, P.G.; Njagi, L.W.; Nyaga, P.N.

    2011-01-01

    Twelve-week-old indigenous chickens, either immune-suppressed using dexamethasone (IS) or non-immune-suppressed (NIS), were challenged with a low virulent strain, Pasteurella multocida strain NCTC 10322(T), and developed clinical signs and pathological lesions typical of chronic fowl cholera. NIS...... in fowl cholera. P. multocida signals by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) were observed between 1 h and 14 days in the lungs, trachea, air sacs, liver, spleen, bursa of Fabricius and caecal tonsils, while signals from other organs mostly were observed after 24 h. More organs had FISH signals...... in NIS birds than in IS birds and at higher frequency per organ. Many organs were positive by FISH even 14 days post infection, and it is suggested that these organs may be likely places for long-term carriage of P. multocida following infection. The present study has demonstrated the spread of P...

  11. Cryptoccocal meningitis in Yaoundé (Cameroon) HIV infected patients: Diagnosis, frequency and Cryptococcus neoformans isolates susceptibility study to fluconazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammalac Ngouana, T; Dongtsa, J; Kouanfack, C; Tonfack, C; Fomena, S; Mallié, M; Delaporte, E; Boyom, F-Fekam; Bertout, S

    2015-03-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis is a mycosis encountered especially in patients with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome and is fatal in the absence of treatment. Information on epidemiology, diagnosis and susceptibility profile to antifungal drugs, are scarce in Cameroon. Authors evaluated the diagnosis possibilities of the cryptococcal meningitis in Cameroon, and studied the antifungal susceptibility of isolated strains to fluconazole, used as first line treatment of the disease in Cameroon. Between December 2009 and July 2011, 146 cerebrospinal fluids obtained from HIV patients with suspicion of meningitis were analysed. The diagnosis procedure involved macroscopic and cyto-chemical analysis, India ink test, culture on Sabouraud chloramphenicol medium and antigen latex agglutination test. Antifungal susceptibility testing of isolated strains to fluconazole was done by the E-test(®) method. The diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis gave 28.08% positive cases. Among these patients, 80% were at stages III and IV and 20% at stage I of the HIV infection, according to the WHO previous classification. Cyto-chemical analysis showed current findings in the case of cryptococcal meningitis. India ink test and latex agglutination test exhibited very high sensitivity and specificity (>94%). Fluconazole antifungal susceptibility testing gave MICs lower than 32μg/mL to 92.7% of isolated strains and MICs greater than this value to 7.3% of isolates. These results showed that cryptococcal meningitis remains a real problem among HIV infected patients in Yaoundé. The emergence of fluconazole reduced susceptibility strains is worrying. Nevertheless, efficacy of rapid detection tests is interesting because this will help in rapid diagnosis and treatment of patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Factors associated with carriage of carbapenem-non-susceptible Enterobacteriaceaein North-Eastern France and outcomes of infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muggeo, Anaëlle; Guillard, Thomas; Barbe, Coralie; Thierry, Aurore; Bajolet, Odile; Vernet-Garnier, Véronique; Limelette, Anne; Brasme, Lucien; De Champs, Christophe

    2017-05-01

    Carbapenems are frequently used as a last resort to treat infections caused by multidrug-resistant Gram-negative organisms, thus carbapenem-non-susceptible Enterobacteriaceae (CNSE) is an emerging health threat. To assess risk factors and outcomes of CNSE carriage. We conducted a matched case-control study in six hospitals in North-Eastern France. The controls were patients harbouring carbapenem-susceptible Enterobacteriaceae. Fifty-five cases and 110 controls were included. Most of the CNSE isolates were Enterobacter cloacae and Klebsiella pneumoniae . Carbapenemase production was observed in 40% of isolates and they produced OXA-48 only. CNSE carriage was significantly associated with recent antibiotic use ( P =  0.014), particularly carbapenems ( P =  0.03) and fluoroquinolones ( P =  0.016). A multivariate analysis using conditional logistic regression showed that the presence of concomitant infection(s) (OR: 9.83; 95% CI 3.04-21.39, P =  0.0031), nosocomial infections (OR: 7.84; 95% CI 2.00-12.54, P  =   0.0063) and a high age (OR: 1.07; 95% CI 1.01-1.06, P =  0.038) were independently associated with CNSE carriage. Moreover, patients infected with CNSE had worse outcomes: fewer resolved infections at 1 month ( P =  0.02), and they had a higher mortality rate ( P =  0.0004) and longer hospital stays ( P =  0.02). We identified three independent risk factors for CNSE carriage as well as worse outcomes in infected patients in North-Eastern France. This highlights the importance of early detection of CNSE and the need for antimicrobial therapy re-evaluation after bacteriological analysis has been performed. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Differential susceptibility and response of primary human myeloid BDCA1(+ dendritic cells to infection with different Enteroviruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara M Schulte

    Full Text Available Coxsackie B viruses (CVBs and echoviruses (EVs form the Human Enterovirus-B (HEV-B species within the family Picornaviridae. HEV-B infections are widespread and generally cause mild disease; however, severe infections occur and HEV-B are associated with various chronic diseases such as cardiomyopathy and type 1 diabetes. Dendritic cells (DCs are the professional antigen-presenting cells of our immune system and initiate and control immune responses to invading pathogens, yet also maintain tolerance to self-antigens. We previously reported that EVs, but not CVBs, can productively infect in vitro generated monocyte-derived DCs. The interactions between HEV-B and human myeloid DCs (mDCs freshly isolated from blood, however, remain unknown. Here, we studied the susceptibility and responses of BDCA1(+ mDC to HEV-B species and found that these mDC are susceptible to EV, but not CVB infection. Productive EV7 infection resulted in massive, rapid cell death without DC activation. Contrary, EV1 infection, which resulted in lower virus input at the same MOI, resulted in DC activation as observed by production of type I interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs, upregulation of co-stimulatory and co-inhibitory molecules (CD80, CD86, PDL1 and production of IL-6 and TNF-α, with a relative moderate decrease in cell viability. EV1-induced ISG expression depended on virus replication. CVB infection did not affect DC viability and resulted in poor induction of ISGs and CD80 induction in part of the donors. These data show for the first time the interaction between HEV-B species and BDCA1(+ mDCs isolated freshly from blood. Our data indicate that different HEV-B species can influence DC homeostasis in various ways, possibly contributing to HEV-B associated pathology.

  14. Antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of bacterial isolates from surgical wound infections in Tertiary Care Hospital in Allahabad, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A K Kapoor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of present study to analyze the occurrence and in-vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of bacterial pathogens isolated from surgical wound infections. Specimens from a total of 129 patients undergoing either emergency or elective surgery were collected from infected sites or stitch lines and inoculated onto appropriate media. The bacterial cultures were identified utilizing standard microbiological and biochemical methods. Isolates were tested for susceptibility to antimicrobials using the Kirby Bauer disk diffusion method. Statistical analysis was performed using the chi-square test. Of 129 patients investigated (62 emergency and 67 elective surgery cases, bacterial isolates were isolated with almost equal frequency both from emergency and elective surgery cases. Of 108 (83.72% culture positive samples, 62 (57.41% were Gram negative, 39 (36.11% Gram positive, and 7 (6.48% showed multiple organisms. Of total 115 bacteria isolated (101 single and 7 double organisms culture positive, 33 (28.69% were Escherichia coli and were also the commonest; followed by Staphylococcus aureus, 30 (26.09% cases. S. aureus and Streptococcus spp. showed maximum susceptibility (100% to linezolid and vancomycin. Maximum susceptibility of E. coli was observed to ciprofloxacin (75.7%, followed by gentamicin (54.5%; of Klebsiella spp. to ceftriaxone and gentamicin (66.6% each, of Proteus spp. to gentamicin (70% followed by ciprofloxacin (60%, and of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to piperacillin (100% and tobramycin (71.4%. E. coli and S. aureus were the most common and Salmonella spp. and Acinetobacter spp. were the least common organism causing surgical site infections. The definitive therapy included ciprofloxacin and gentamicin for E. coli; linezolid and vancomycin for S. aureus and Streptococcus spp; ceftriaxone and ciprofloxacin for Klebsiella spp., Citrobacter spp., acinetobacter spp and Salmonella spp.

  15. Evaluation of the effect of simultaneous infection with E. coli O2 and H9N2 influenza virus on inflammatory factors in broiler chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habiballah Dadras

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of experimental infection with Escherichia coli O2 and H9N2 influenza virus on inflammato- ry factors in broiler chickens. A total of 120 one-day-old Cobb broiler chicks were divided randomly to 6 groups. Inoculation program with 109 EID50/bird of the A/Chicken/Iran/772/1998 (H9N2 virus and 109 CFU/mL/bird of E. coli O2 was carried out as follows: the chicks in group 1 were inoculated with virus and bacteria simultaneously on day 26, group 2 received virus on day 26 and then bacteria 3 days later, group 3 were inoculated with bacteria on day 23 and then virus on day 26, group 4 received only bacteria on day 26, group 5 were inoculated with only virus on day 26 and group 6 served as control. Serum samples were collected from wing vein at days 20, 30, and 40. Sera were examined for inflammatory mediators (TNF-a and INF-γ, acute phase reactants (haptoglobin and serum amyloid A and gangliosides (total, lipid-bound and protein-bound sialic acids using validated standard procedures. Among the measured parameters, serum gangliosides showed significant differences between the challenged and control groups in different days post inoculation (P<0.05. Significant increase in serum concentrations of serum sialic acids was observed on the 30th day in challenged groups. Elevations were found in the concentrations of serum gangliosides on day 40 compared to their first concentrations. The most obvious increase in serum sialic acids was observed in group 1 challenged with avian influenza virus and E. coli O2 simultaneously. Bacterial infected group showed more significant changes in comparison with viral infected one. These findings suggest that serum sialic acids may be a useful indicator of H9N2 avian influenza virus and avian pathogenic E. coli O2 co-infection.

  16. Alpha/beta interferon receptor deficiency in mice significantly enhances susceptibility of the animals to pseudorabies virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jingyun; Ma, Yanmei; Wang, Long; Chi, Xiaojuan; Yan, Ruoxiang; Wang, Song; Li, Xinxin; Chen, Xiaoyong; Shao, Wenhan; Chen, Ji-Long

    2017-05-01

    Pseudorabies virus, one of the neurotropic viruses, can infect numerous mammals. In particular, pseudorabies virus infection of swine occurs worldwide, and is a major threat to swine industry. However, the mechanism underlying the interaction between pseudorabies virus and host innate immune system is not fully understood. Here, we investigated the involvement of interferon α/β (IFN-α/β) receptor (IFNAR) in the pathogenesis of pseudorabies virus in a mouse model. The results showed that IFNAR-deficient (IFNAR -/- ) mice were highly susceptible to the virus infection, as evidenced by markedly reduced survival rate of infected animals and increased viral replication. The expression of IFN-α/β and relevant interferon-stimulated genes in IFNAR -/- mice was significantly lower than that in wild-type (WT) littermates after the viral infection. Moreover, in response to the virus challenge, IFNAR -/- mice displayed elevated levels of inflammatory cytokines including interleukin 6 (IL-6) and IL-1β, and IFNAR -/- cells showed increased phosphorylation of STAT3. Collectively, these data reveal that the IFNAR -/- mice are more sensitive to pseudorabies virus infection than WT animals, and excessive IL-6/STAT3 response in IFNAR -/- mice may contribute to the pathogenesis. Our findings suggest that type I IFNs/IFNAR-dependent homeostatic control of the innate immunity is required for host defense against pseudorabies virus infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Large Isoform of Mammalian Relative of DnaJ is a Major Determinant of Human Susceptibility to HIV-1 Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ping Chiang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Individual differences in susceptibility to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection have been of interest for decades. We aimed to determine the contribution of large isoform of Mammalian DnaJ (MRJ-L, a HIV-1 Vpr-interacting cellular protein, to this natural variation. Expression of MRJ-L in monocyte-derived macrophages was significantly higher in HIV-infected individuals (n = 31 than their uninfected counterparts (n = 27 (p = 0.009. Fifty male homosexual subjects (20 of them are HIV-1 positive were further recruited to examine the association between MRJ-L levels and occurrence of HIV infection. Bayesian multiple logistic regression revealed that playing a receptive role and increased levels of MRJ-L in macrophages were two risk factors for HIV-1 infection. A 1% rise in MRJ-L expression was associated with a 1.13 fold (95% CrI 1.06–1.29 increase in odds of contracting HIV-1 infection. Ex vivo experiments revealed that MRJ-L facilitated Vpr-dependent nuclear localization of virus. Infection of macrophage-tropic strain is a critical step in HIV-1 transmission. MRJ-L is a critical factor in this process; hence, subjects with higher macrophage MRJ-L levels are more vulnerable to HIV-1 infection.

  18. Medroxyprogesterone acetate and levonorgestrel increase genital mucosal permeability and enhance susceptibility to genital herpes simplex virus type 2 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quispe Calla, N E; Vicetti Miguel, R D; Boyaka, P N; Hall-Stoodley, L; Kaur, B; Trout, W; Pavelko, S D; Cherpes, T L

    2016-11-01

    Depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) is a hormonal contraceptive especially popular in areas with high prevalence of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STI). Although observational studies identify DMPA as an important STI risk factor, mechanisms underlying this connection are undefined. Levonorgestrel (LNG) is another progestin used for hormonal contraception, but its effect on STI susceptibility is much less explored. Using a mouse model of genital herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infection, we herein found that DMPA and LNG similarly reduced genital expression of the desmosomal cadherin desmoglein-1α (DSG1α), enhanced access of inflammatory cells to genital tissue by increasing mucosal epithelial permeability, and increased susceptibility to viral infection. Additional studies with uninfected mice revealed that DMPA-mediated increases in mucosal permeability promoted tissue inflammation by facilitating endogenous vaginal microbiota invasion. Conversely, concomitant treatment of mice with DMPA and intravaginal estrogen restored mucosal barrier function and prevented HSV-2 infection. Evaluating ectocervical biopsy tissue from women before and 1 month after initiating DMPA remarkably revealed that inflammation and barrier protection were altered by treatment identically to changes seen in progestin-treated mice. Together, our work reveals DMPA and LNG diminish the genital mucosal barrier; a first-line defense against all STI, but may offer foundation for new contraceptive strategies less compromising of barrier protection.

  19. Effect of long-term voluntary exercise wheel running on susceptibility to bacterial pulmonary infections in a mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline B van de Weert-van Leeuwen

    Full Text Available Regular moderate exercise has been suggested to exert anti-inflammatory effects and improve immune effector functions, resulting in reduced disease incidence and viral infection susceptibility. Whether regular exercise also affects bacterial infection susceptibility is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate whether regular voluntary exercise wheel running prior to a pulmonary infection with bacteria (P. aeruginosa affects lung bacteriology, sickness severity and phagocyte immune function in mice. Balb/c mice were randomly placed in a cage with or without a running wheel. After 28 days, mice were intranasally infected with P. aeruginosa. Our study showed that regular exercise resulted in a higher sickness severity score and bacterial (P. aeruginosa loads in the lungs. The phagocytic capacity of monocytes and neutrophils from spleen and lungs was not affected. Although regular moderate exercise has many health benefits, healthy mice showed increased bacterial (P. aeruginosa load and symptoms, after regular voluntary exercise, with perseverance of the phagocytic capacity of monocytes and neutrophils. Whether patients, suffering from bacterial infectious diseases, should be encouraged to engage in exercise and physical activities with caution requires further research.

  20. Chicken Astrovirus Infection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    ABSTRACT: Poultry have gradually assumed a very important role in the economy of many industrialized and developing countries. However, with the continued discovery of new viral agents affecting the poultry industry worldwide, it is important that stakeholders in the industry in Nigeria be updated about these emerging ...

  1. Antifungal susceptibility testing of Candida species isolated from the immunocompromised patients admitted to ten university hospitals in Iran : comparison of colonizing and infecting isolates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Badiee, Parisa; Badali, Hamid; Boekhout, Teun; Diba, Kambiz; Moghadam, Abdolkarim Ghadimi; Hossaini Nasab, Ali; Jafarian, Hadis; Mohammadi, Rasoul; Mirhendi, Hossein; Najafzadeh, Mohammad Javad; Shamsizadeh, Ahmad; Soltani, Jafar

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Antifungal susceptibility testing is a subject of interest in the field of medical mycology. The aim of the present study were the distributions and antifungal susceptibility patterns of various Candida species isolated from colonized and infected immunocompromised patients admitted to

  2. Therapeutic implications in the treatment of aural Pseudomonas infections based on in vitro susceptibility patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohar, J E; Kenna, M A; Wadowsky, R M

    1995-09-01

    To examine the in vitro susceptibility patterns of aural isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and to identify changes over a 4-year period. Retrospective case series. The outpatient department at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh (Pa), a tertiary referral center. Ambulatory children younger than 18 years from whose ears P aeruginosa was isolated. The in vitro susceptibility of aural isolates of P aeruginosa to ampicillin, cefotaxime, chloramphenicol, sulfisoxazole, ticarcillin, mezlocillin, gentamicin, tobramycin, cefazolin, tetracycline, piperacillin, nitrofurantoin, cephalexin hydrochloride, ceftriaxone, cefuroxime axetil, and sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim. No changes were found in the trends of the susceptibility patterns over the 4-year study period, with the exception of the semisynthetic penicillins, ticarcillin and mezlocillin. These two agents were found to be relatively ineffective against the strains of P aeruginosa isolated in 1989 (59% and 18% susceptibility, respectively). This finding is in contrast to their effectiveness over the remainder of the study period (96% and 90% susceptibility, respectively), which was excellent. These observations likely reflect a change in the breakpoints for the minimal inhibitory concentrations between these periods. The intravenous agent with the best susceptibility profile was piperacillin (96%). Of the aminoglycosides tested, 94% of the isolates were sensitive to tobramycin, as opposed to only 79% for gentamicin. This finding may have significance when one is empirically selecting ototopical therapy, since both tobramycin and gentamicin are available as topical preparations. Of the oral agents, the combination of sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim was most effective (46%).

  3. Pasture contamination with infective larvae of gastrointestinal nematodes after grazing by sheep resistant or susceptible to parasitic infection

    OpenAIRE

    Bassetto, César Cristiano [UNESP; Silva, Bruna Fernanda da [UNESP; Fernandes, Simone [UNESP; Amarante, Alessandro Francisco Talamini do [UNESP

    2009-01-01

    O grau de contaminação da pastagem por larvas de terceiro estágio (L3) de nematoides gastrintestinais foi avaliado em piquetes pastejados por ovelhas resistentes ou susceptíveis à verminose. O experimento foi realizado de 23 de novembro de 2007 a 22 de julho de 2008. Inicialmente, realizou-se a contagem de ovos por grama de fezes (OPG) de amostras individuais de 130 ovelhas adultas da raça Bergamácia. Dessas, foram selecionadas as nove ovelhas com contagens mais elevadas de OPG (susceptíveis)...

  4. Seasonal variation and trend of chicken pox in the southern region of Saudi Arabia (2007-2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Noha; Al Moghazy, Bassem

    2014-12-01

    Chicken pox is a contagious disease caused by varicella zoster virus. Children are most susceptible to infection. In 1998, the WHO recommended that routine childhood varicella vaccination be considered in countries where the disease is a relatively important public health concern. There are few data on the trends of chicken pox. We aimed to evaluate the trend of chicken pox in Saudi Arabia (KSA) during the period 2007-2012. Data were collected by retrospective review of the existing anonymous surveillance records and book registries of chicken pox cases at the preventive medicine department of Armed Forces Hospital of the Southern Region of Saudi Arabia from 2007 to 2012. The collected data included the number, age, and sex of registered cases. A seasonal pattern was clearly demonstrated, with peak in March and April. There was also a decreasing trend from 2007 to 2012. Most cases occurred in the age group 4-15 years. The number of infected male patients was a little higher compared with female patients. These results indicate success in controlling the disease in the southern region of Saudi Arabia, which may be attributed to the implementation of public health interventions targeted at reducing infectious diseases (such as the introduction of varicella zoster vaccine in 2008). We recommend that a future study be conducted on the severity of chicken pox infection in adults (hospitalization, complications, and death) and a national survey among adults for the seroprevalence of markers of infection with varicella zoster.

  5. A Strong Immune Response in Young Adult Honeybees Masks Their Increased Susceptibility to Infection Compared to Older Bees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, James C.; Ryabov, Eugene V.; Prince, Gill; Mead, Andrew; Zhang, Cunjin; Baxter, Laura A.; Pell, Judith K.; Osborne, Juliet L.; Chandler, Dave

    2012-01-01

    Honeybees, Apis mellifera, show age-related division of labor in which young adults perform maintenance (“housekeeping”) tasks inside the colony before switching to outside foraging at approximately 23 days old. Disease resistance is an important feature of honeybee biology, but little is known about the interaction of pathogens and age-related division of labor. We tested a hypothesis that older forager bees and younger “house” bees differ in susceptibility to infection. We coupled an infection bioassay with a functional analysis of gene expression in individual bees using a whole genome microarray. Forager bees treated with the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae s.l. survived for significantly longer than house bees. This was concomitant with substantial differences in gene expression including genes associated with immune function. In house bees, infection was associated with differential expression of 35 candidate immune genes contrasted with differential expression of only two candidate immune genes in forager bees. For control bees (i.e. not treated with M. anisopliae) the development from the house to the forager stage was associated with differential expression of 49 candidate immune genes, including up-regulation of the antimicrobial peptide gene abaecin, plus major components of the Toll pathway, serine proteases, and serpins. We infer that reduced pathogen susceptibility in forager bees was associated with age-related activation of specific immune system pathways. Our findings contrast with the view that the immunocompetence in social insects declines with the onset of foraging as a result of a trade-off in the allocation of resources for foraging. The up-regulation of immune-related genes in young adult bees in response to M. anisopliae infection was an indicator of disease susceptibility; this also challenges previous research in social insects, in which an elevated immune status has been used as a marker of increased disease

  6. Impaired TNF, IL-1β, and IL-17 production and increased susceptibility to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in HTLV-1 infected individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Natália B; de Lourdes Bastos, Maria; Souza, Anselmo S; Netto, Eduardo M; Arruda, Sérgio; Santos, Silvane B; Carvalho, Edgar M

    2018-01-01

    IFN-γ and TNF play critical roles in the control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. Despite leading to an exaggerated production of inflammatory cytokines, HTLV-1 infection increases the risk of developing tuberculosis (TB). However, the immune mechanisms accounting for this phenomenon are still unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate immunological aspects of the HTLV-1/M. tuberculosis co-infection. In this cross-sectional study, the levels of TNF, IL-1β, and IL-17 were determined by ELISA in the supernatants of either unstimulated or tuberculin purified protein derivative (PPD) stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Cells from HTLV-1 infected individuals produced lower levels of TNF following PPD stimulation compared to unstimulated cells. IL-1β and IL-17 production by cells from HTLV-1/M. tuberculosis co-infected individuals was lower than in cells from patients with TB. Impairment in TNF, IL-1β, and IL-17 production upon stimulation with mycobacterial antigens may contribute to the increased susceptibility to M. tuberculosis infection observed in HTLV-1 infected individuals. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Difference in the susceptibility to certain molluscicides and Schistosoma mansoni infection of three forms Egyptian Biomphalaria glabrata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragab, F M A; El Khayat, H M M; Mostafa, B B; Gawish, F A

    2003-12-01

    The first generation of 3 morphologically different forms of B. glabrata collected from Giza were compared for LC50 values susceptibility to bayluscide and copper sulphate (chemical molluscicides) and Anagallis arvensis and Calendula micrantha (plant molluscicides) and to Schistosoma mansoni infection. Form (2) as juvenile and adult were less sensitive to C. micrantha and A. arvensis. Form (3) as juvenile and form (1) as adult were least sensitive to CuSO4. Approximately the same susceptibility to bayluscide was observed in the 3 forms either as juvenile or adult. The sublethal concentrations of the molluscicides on B. glabrata 3 forms showed no significant difference in the growth or survival rate in between. Form (2) was significantly higher in the egg lying capacity. The total protein concentration was not affected except in certain cases where the increase was primarily due to the increase in the globulin concentrations which indicate with the marked increase observed in the urea concentration and marked increase or inhibition in the activity of either AST or ALT that the digestive gland of the 3 forms of snails is seriously affected by molluscicides. The 3 forms of B. glabrata showed low susceptibility to infection with the local strain of S. mansoni.

  8. The brain-specific factor FEZ1 is a determinant of neuronal susceptibility to HIV-1 infection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Haedicke, Juliane

    2009-08-18

    Neurons are one of the few cell types in the human body that do not support HIV type-1 (HIV-1) replication. Although the lack of key receptors is a major obstacle to infection, studies suggest that additional functions inhibit virus replication to explain the exquisite resistance of neurons to HIV-1. However, specific neuronal factors that may explain this resistance remain to be discovered. In a screen for antiviral factors using a fibroblast line chemically mutagenized and selected for resistance to retroviral infection, we recently identified induction of rat FEZ1 (fasciculation and elongation protein zeta-1), a brain-specific protein, as the cause of this resistance. When exogenously expressed in nonneuronal cell lines rat FEZ1 blocked nuclear entry of retroviral DNA. Here, we demonstrate that among human brain cells, neurons naturally express high levels of FEZ1 compared to astrocytes or microglia cells and are correspondingly less susceptible to infection with pseudotyped HIV-1 that bypasses receptor-mediated viral entry. Demonstrating that endogenous FEZ1 was functionally important in the resistance of neurons to HIV-1 infection, siRNA-mediated knockdown of endogenous FEZ1 increased the infectivity of neurons while sensitive brain cell types like microglia became more resistant upon FEZ1 overexpression. In addition, FEZ1 expression was not induced in response to IFN treatment. As such, in contrast to other widely expressed, IFN-inducible antiviral factors, FEZ1 appears to represent a unique neuron-specific determinant of cellular susceptibility to infection in a cell type that is naturally resistant to HIV-1.

  9. Expression of SCGB1C1 gene as a potential marker of susceptibility to upper respiratory tract infections in elite athletes ? a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Orysiak, J; Malczewska-Lenczowska, J; Bik-Multanowski, M

    2016-01-01

    High levels of exercise in athletes result in temporary immunosuppression, which could increase the susceptibility to upper respiratory tract infections. Understanding of immunological mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon could enable optimization of training schemes for elite athletes and avoidance of infection-related episodes of absence during sports championships. The aim of this study was to detect genes that may be responsible for modulation of individual susceptibility to infecti...

  10. Chicken pox in pregnancy : An obstetric concern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiwanitkit Viroj

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Chicken pox is a common viral infection presenting with fever and discrete vesicular lesions. This infection can be widely detected in developing countries, especially for those tropical countries. The pregnant can get chicken pox, and this becomes an important obstetrical concern. In this specific paper, the author hereby details and discusses on chicken pox in pregnancy. Clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention are briefly summarized. In addition, the effects of chicken pox on pregnancy as well as the vertical transmission are also documented.

  11. Association of Marek's Disease induced immunosuppression with activation of a novel regulatory T cells in chickens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angila Gurung

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Marek's Disease Virus (MDV is an alphaherpesvirus that infects chickens, transforms CD4+ T cells and causes deadly lymphomas. In addition, MDV induces immunosuppression early during infection by inducing cell death of the infected lymphocytes, and potentially due to activation of regulatory T (Treg-cells. Furthermore, immunosuppression also occurs during the transformation phase of the disease; however, it is still unknown how the disease can suppress immune response prior or after lymphoma formation. Here, we demonstrated that chicken TGF-beta+ Treg cells are found in different lymphoid tissues, with the highest levels found in the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (cecal tonsil: CT, fostering an immune-privileged microenvironment exerted by TGF-beta. Surprisingly, significantly higher frequencies of TGF-beta+ Treg cells are found in the spleens of MDV-susceptible chicken lines compared to the resistant line, suggesting an association between TGF-beta+ Treg cells and host susceptibility to lymphoma formation. Experimental infection with a virulent MDV elevated the levels of TGF-beta+ Treg cells in the lungs as early as 4 days post infection, and during the transformation phase of the disease in the spleens. In contrast to TGF-beta+ Treg cells, the levels of CD4+CD25+ T cells remained unchanged during the infection and transformation phase of the disease. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that the induction of TGF-beta+ Treg cells is associated with pathogenesis of the disease, as the vaccine strain of MDV did not induce TGF-beta+ Treg cells. Similar to human haematopoietic malignant cells, MDV-induced lymphoma cells expressed high levels of TGF-beta but very low levels of TGF-beta receptor I and II genes. The results confirm that COX-2/ PGE2 pathway is involved in immunosuppression induced by MDV-lymphoma cells. Taken together, our results revealed a novel TGF-beta+ Treg subset in chickens that is activated during MDV infection and tumour

  12. Genetic analysis of infectious diseases: Estimating gene effects for susceptibility and infectivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anche, M.T.; Bijma, P.; Jong, de M.C.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Genetic selection of livestock against infectious diseases can complement existing interventions to control infectious diseases. Most genetic approaches that aim at reducing disease prevalence assume that individual disease status (infected/not-infected) is solely a function of its

  13. In Situ Microscopy Analysis Reveals Local Innate Immune Response Developed around Brucella Infected Cells in Resistant and Susceptible Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copin, Richard; Vitry, Marie-Alice; Hanot Mambres, Delphine; Machelart, Arnaud; De Trez, Carl; Vanderwinden, Jean-Marie; Magez, Stefan; Akira, Shizuo; Ryffel, Bernhard; Carlier, Yves; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Muraille, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Brucella are facultative intracellular bacteria that chronically infect humans and animals causing brucellosis. Brucella are able to invade and replicate in a broad range of cell lines in vitro, however the cells supporting bacterial growth in vivo are largely unknown. In order to identify these, we used a Brucella melitensis strain stably expressing mCherry fluorescent protein to determine the phenotype of infected cells in spleen and liver, two major sites of B. melitensis growth in mice. In both tissues, the majority of primary infected cells expressed the F4/80 myeloid marker. The peak of infection correlated with granuloma development. These structures were mainly composed of CD11b+ F4/80+ MHC-II+ cells expressing iNOS/NOS2 enzyme. A fraction of these cells also expressed CD11c marker and appeared similar to inflammatory dendritic cells (DCs). Analysis of genetically deficient mice revealed that differentiation of iNOS+ inflammatory DC, granuloma formation and control of bacterial growth were deeply affected by the absence of MyD88, IL-12p35 and IFN-γ molecules. During chronic phase of infection in susceptible mice, we identified a particular subset of DC expressing both CD11c and CD205, serving as a reservoir for the bacteria. Taken together, our results describe the cellular nature of immune effectors involved during Brucella infection and reveal a previously unappreciated role for DC subsets, both as effectors and reservoir cells, in the pathogenesis of brucellosis. PMID:22479178

  14. Clostridial necrotic enteritis in chicken associated with growth rate depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adin Priadi

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens is a normal inhabitant of the intestinal tract of chickens as well as a potential pathogen causing necrotic enteritis. C. perfringens only causes necrotic enteritis when it transforms from non-toxin producing type to toxin producing type. The alpha toxin, (phospholipase C is believed to be a key to the occurrence of Clostridial necrotic enteritis (CNE. The best known predisposing factor is mucosal damage, caused by coccidiosis that damages the intestinal lining, making the gut susceptible to infections including C. perfringens. The purpose of this study was to observe the chicken performance in experimental CNE and field cases of CNE. Diagnosis of CNE were made by latex agglutination test, isolation and identification of the agent. Pathological and histopathological changes were also observed. Experimentally, NE could be reproduced when Eimeria sp and C. perfringens spores are inoculated in chicken. Signs of an NE are wet litter and diarrhea, and an increase in mortality is not often obvious. The depression of growth rate and feed efficiency of chicken become noticeable by week 5 because of damage to the intestine and the subsequent reduction in digestion and absorption of food. Subclinical form of CNE was also frequently found in the field, leading to significant decreases in performance. Chicken gut samples examinations revealed that subclinical form of CNE causes damage to the intestinal mucosa caused by C. perfringens leads to decreased digestion and absorption, increased feed conversion ratio and reduced weight gain. Dual infection with C. perfringens and Eimeria sp. was frequently found in field. The results of these studies provide evidence for C. perfringens as a causative bacteria for growth depression.

  15. Utility of Combining Whole Genome Sequencing with Traditional Investigational Methods To Solve Foodborne Outbreaks of Salmonella Infections Associated with Chicken: A New Tool for Tackling This Challenging Food Vehicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Samuel J; Green, Alice; Hernandez, Kimberly; Peralta, Vi; Bottichio, Lyndsay; Defibaugh-Chavez, Stephanie; Douris, Aphrodite; Gieraltowski, Laura; Hise, Kelley; La-Pham, Karen; Neil, Karen P; Simmons, Mustafa; Tillman, Glenn; Tolar, Beth; Wagner, Darlene; Wasilenko, Jamie; Holt, Kristin; Trees, Eija; Wise, Matthew E

    2017-04-01

    High consumption rates and a multitude of brands make multistate foodborne outbreaks of Salmonella infections associated with chicken challenging to investigate, but whole genome sequencing is a powerful tool that can be used to assist investigators. Whole genome sequencing of pathogens isolated from clinical, environmental, and food samples is increasingly being used in multistate foodborne outbreak investigations to determine with unprecedented resolution how closely related these isolates are to one another genetically. In 2014, federal and state health officials investigated an outbreak of 146 Salmonella Heidelberg infections in 24 states. A follow-up analysis was conducted after the conclusion of the investigation in which 27 clinical and 24 food isolates from the outbreak underwent whole genome sequencing. These isolates formed seven clades, the largest of which contained clinical isolates from a subcluster of case patients who attended a catered party. One isolate from a chicken processed by a large producer was closely related genetically (zero to three single-nucleotide polymorphism differences) to the clinical isolates from these subcluster case patients. Chicken from this large producer was also present in the kitchen of the caterer on the day before the event, thus providing additional evidence that the chicken from this producer was the outbreak source. This investigation highlights how whole genome sequencing can be used with epidemiologic and traceback evidence to identify chicken sources of foodborne outbreaks.

  16. Campylobacter hepaticus, the cause of spotty liver disease in chickens, is present throughout the small intestine and caeca of infected birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van, Thi Thu Hao; Gor, Mian-Chee; Anwar, Arif; Scott, Peter C; Moore, Robert J

    2017-08-01

    Spotty liver disease (SLD) causes significant egg production losses and mortality in chickens and is therefore a disease of concern for some sectors of the poultry industry. Although the first reports of the disease came from the United States in the 1950s it is only recently that the organism that causes the disease was identified, isolated, and characterised as a new bacterial species, Campylobacter hepaticus. The first isolations of C. hepaticus were from the livers and bile of SLD affected birds. Isolates could only be recovered from samples that had a monoculture of C. hepaticus in the tissues, as a selective culturing method has not yet been developed. In non-selective growth conditions the slow growing C. hepaticus is quickly outgrown by many other members of the chicken microbiota. Therefore, it is currently not possible to use a culturing approach to evaluate C. hepaticus carriage in tissues, such as the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), that also carry complex microbial populations. As it is suspected that birds become infected via the faecal-oral route it is important that pathogen carriage in the GIT is investigated. In the present study, a specific and sensitive quantitative real-time PCR assay, based on the glycerol kinase gene of C. hepaticus, was developed. The assay facilitated the detection and quantification of C. hepaticus in tissue samples from clinical cases of SLD. It was shown that in infected birds C. hepaticus colonises the small intestine, increasing in abundance from duodenum to ileum, and is at highest levels within the ceaca. C. hepaticus was also readily detected in cloacal swabs, indicating that thecl-oral infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. In ovo evaluation of FloraMax®-B11 on Marek´s disease HVT vaccine protective efficacy, hatchability, microbiota composition, morphometric analysis, and Salmonella Enteritidis infection in broiler chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Four experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of in ovo administration of FloraMax®-B11 (FM) on Marek´s disease (MD) herpesvirus of turkeys (HVT) vaccine protective efficacy, hatchability, microbiota composition, morphometric analysis and Salmonella enteritidis (SE) infection in chickens. I...

  18. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing before first-line treatment for Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with dual or triple antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosme, Angel; Montes, Milagrosa; Ibarra, Begoña; Tamayo, Esther; Alonso, Horacio; Mendarte, Usua; Lizasoan, Jacobo; Herreros-Villanueva, Marta; Bujanda, Luis

    2017-05-14

    To evaluate the efficacy of antimicrobial susceptibility-guided therapy before first-line treatment for infection in patients with dual or triple antibiotic resistance. A total of 1034 patients infected by Helicobacter pylori ( H. pylori ) during 2013-2014 were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility. 157 of 1034 (15%) patients showed resistance to two (127/1034; 12%) and to three (30/1034; 3%) antibiotics. Sixty-eight patients with dual H. pylori -resistance (clarithromycin, metronidazole or levofloxacin) were treated for 10 d with triple therapies: OAL (omeprazole 20 mg b.i.d., amoxicillin 1 g b.i.d., and levofloxacin 500 mg b.i.d.) 43 cases, OAM (omeprazole 20 mg b.i.d., amoxicillin 1 g b.i.d., and metronidazole 500 mg b.i.d.) 12 cases and OAC (omeprazole 20 mg b.id., amoxicillin 1 g b.i.d., and clarithromycin 500 mg b.i.d.) 13 cases based on the antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Twelve patients showed triple H. pylori -resistance (clarithromycin, metronidazole and levofloxacin) and received for 10 d triple therapy with OAR (omeprazole 20 mg b.id., amoxicillin 1 g b.i.d., and rifabutin 150 mg b.i.d.). Eradication was confirmed by 13C-urea breath test. Adverse effects and compliance were assessed by a questionnaire. Intention-to-treat eradication rates were: OAL (97.6%), OAM (91.6%), OAC (92.3%) and OAR (58.3%). Cure rate was significantly higher in naïve patients treated with OAR-10 compared to patients who had two or three previous treatment failures (83% vs 33%). Adver