WorldWideScience

Sample records for susceptibility-weighted imaging time-of-flight

  1. Susceptibility weighted imaging of the neonatal brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meoded, A.; Poretti, A. [Division of Pediatric Radiology and Division of Neuroradiology, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Northington, F.J. [Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Tekes, A.; Intrapiromkul, J. [Division of Pediatric Radiology and Division of Neuroradiology, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Huisman, T.A.G.M., E-mail: thuisma1@jhmi.edu [Division of Pediatric Radiology and Division of Neuroradiology, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2012-08-15

    Susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) is a well-established magnetic resonance technique, which is highly sensitive for blood, iron, and calcium depositions in the brain and has been implemented in the routine clinical use in both children and neonates. SWI in neonates might provide valuable additional diagnostic and prognostic information for a wide spectrum of neonatal neurological disorders. To date, there are few articles available on the application of SWI in neonatal neurological disorders. The purpose of this article is to illustrate and describe the characteristic SWI findings in various typical neonatal neurological disorders.

  2. Doppler time-of-flight imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Heide, Felix

    2015-07-30

    Over the last few years, depth cameras have become increasingly popular for a range of applications, including human-computer interaction and gaming, augmented reality, machine vision, and medical imaging. Many of the commercially-available devices use the time-of-flight principle, where active illumination is temporally coded and analyzed on the camera to estimate a per-pixel depth map of the scene. In this paper, we propose a fundamentally new imaging modality for all time-of-flight (ToF) cameras: per-pixel velocity measurement. The proposed technique exploits the Doppler effect of objects in motion, which shifts the temporal frequency of the illumination before it reaches the camera. Using carefully coded illumination and modulation frequencies of the ToF camera, object velocities directly map to measured pixel intensities. We show that a slight modification of our imaging system allows for color, depth, and velocity information to be captured simultaneously. Combining the optical flow computed on the RGB frames with the measured metric axial velocity allows us to further estimate the full 3D metric velocity field of the scene. We believe that the proposed technique has applications in many computer graphics and vision problems, for example motion tracking, segmentation, recognition, and motion deblurring.

  3. Doppler time-of-flight imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Heidrich, Wolfgang

    2017-02-16

    Systems and methods for imaging object velocity are provided. In an embodiment, at least one Time-of-Flight camera is used to capture a signal representative of an object in motion over an exposure time. Illumination and modulation frequency of the captured motion are coded within the exposure time. A change of illumination frequency is mapped to measured pixel intensities of the captured motion within the exposure time, and information about a Doppler shift in the illumination frequency is extracted to obtain a measurement of instantaneous per pixel velocity of the object in motion. The radial velocity information of the object in motion can be simultaneously captured for each pixel captured within the exposure time. In one or more aspects, the illumination frequency can be coded orthogonal to the modulation frequency of the captured motion. The change of illumination frequency can correspond to radial object velocity.

  4. Pediatric hemiplegic migraine: susceptibility weighted and MR perfusion imaging abnormality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altinok, Deniz; Agarwal, Ajay [Children' s Hospital of Michigan, Department of Radiology, Detroit, MI (United States); Ascadi, Gyula; Luat, Aimee; Tapos, Daniela [Children' s Hospital of Michigan, Department of Neurology, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2010-12-15

    We report on an 11-year-old girl suffering from a typical attack of hemiplegic migraine with characteristic abnormalities in perfusion MR and susceptibility-weighted MR imaging findings. The imaging abnormalities were resolved 48 h after the attack. Susceptibility-weighted MR imaging findings correlated well with the MR perfusion, thus it can be used along with conventional MRI for evaluation of children with complex migraine attacks. Susceptibility-weighted MR imaging might have a diagnostic role in assessing the vascular events in hemiplegic migraine. (orig.)

  5. Role of magnetic susceptibility weighted imaging in evaluation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) is a new method in MR imaging. SWI detects the signal loss created by disturbance of a homogeneous magnetic field; these disturbances can be caused by paramagnetic, ferromagnetic, or diamagnetic substances. There are many neurologic conditions that can benefit ...

  6. Velocity map imaging in time of flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouard, M; Campbell, E K; Johnsen, A J; Vallance, C; Yuen, W H; Nomerotski, A

    2008-12-01

    A new variation on time of flight mass spectrometry is presented, which uses a fast framing charge coupled device camera to velocity map image multiple product masses in a single acquisition. The technique is demonstrated on two photofragmentation processes, those of CS(2) and CH(3)S(2)CH(3) (dimethyldisulfide) at a photolysis wavelength of 193 nm. In both cases, several mass fragments are imaged simultaneously, and speed distributions and anisotropy parameters are extracted that are comparable to those obtained by imaging each fragment separately in conventional velocity map imaging studies.

  7. Susceptibility weighted imaging: differentiating between calcification and hemosiderin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, Jeam Haroldo Oliveira; Salmon, Carlos Ernesto Garrido, E-mail: jeamharoldo@hotmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FFCLRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras; Santos, Antonio Carlos [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FMRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    2015-03-15

    Objective: to present a detailed explanation on the processing of magnetic susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI), demonstrating the effects of echo time and sensitive mask on the differentiation between calcification and hemosiderin. Materials and methods: computed tomography and magnetic resonance (magnitude and phase) images of six patients (age range 41-54 years; four men) were retrospectively selected. The SWI images processing was performed using the Matlab's own routine. Results: four out of the six patients showed calcifications at computed tomography images and their SWI images demonstrated hyperintense signal at the calcification regions. The other patients did not show any calcifications at computed tomography, and SWI revealed the presence of hemosiderin deposits with hypointense signal. Conclusion: the selection of echo time and of the mask may change all the information on SWI images, and compromise the diagnostic reliability. Amongst the possible masks, the authors highlight that the sigmoid mask allows for contrasting calcifications and hemosiderin on a single SWI image. (author)

  8. Susceptibility weighted imaging: differentiating between calcification and hemosiderin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Jeam Haroldo Oliveira; Santos, Antonio Carlos; Salmon, Carlos Ernesto Garrido

    2015-01-01

    To present a detailed explanation on the processing of magnetic susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI), demonstrating the effects of echo time and sensitive mask on the differentiation between calcification and hemosiderin. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance (magnitude and phase) images of six patients (age range 41- 54 years; four men) were retrospectively selected. The SWI images processing was performed using the Matlab's own routine. Four out of the six patients showed calcifications at computed tomography images and their SWI images demonstrated hyperintense signal at the calcification regions. The other patients did not show any calcifications at computed tomography, and SWI revealed the presence of hemosiderin deposits with hypointense signal. The selection of echo time and of the mask may change all the information on SWI images, and compromise the diagnostic reliability. Amongst the possible masks, the authors highlight that the sigmoid mask allows for contrasting calcifications and hemosiderin on a single SWI image.

  9. A role for susceptibility weighted imaging in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Yap, SM

    2017-04-01

    We report a radiologic finding on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain of two cases of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) of hypointense signal of subcortical U-fibres on susceptibility weighted (SW) sequence. The first case is a 50-year-old man recently treated with chemotherapy including rituximab for non-Hodgkin\\'s lymphoma. The second case is a 64-year-old woman with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Iron deposition is a likely causative factor. We propose that SWI may be especially useful in the assessment of indeterminate cases to reduce the likelihood of a missed diagnosis of PML

  10. Susceptibility-Weighted Imaging and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirov, Ivan I; Whitlow, Christopher T; Zamora, Carlos

    2018-02-01

    Although susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) studies have suggested an increased number of microhemorrhages in concussion, most show no significant differences compared with controls. There have been mixed results on using SWI to predict neurologic outcomes. Drawbacks include inability to time microhemorrhages and difficulty in attributing them to the concussion. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in concussion can identify metabolic abnormalities, with many studies showing correlations with clinical outcome. Applications in individual patients are impeded by conflicting data and lack of consensus on an optimal protocol. Therefore, currently MRS has most utility in group-level comparisons designed to reveal the pathophysiology of concussion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Susceptibility weighted imaging: differentiating between calcification and hemosiderin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeam Haroldo Oliveira Barbosa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To present a detailed explanation on the processing of magnetic susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI, demonstrating the effects of echo time and sensitive mask on the differentiation between calcification and hemosiderin. Materials and Methods: Computed tomography and magnetic resonance (magnitude and phase images of six patients (age range 41– 54 years; four men were retrospectively selected. The SWI images processing was performed using the Matlab’s own routine. Results: Four out of the six patients showed calcifications at computed tomography images and their SWI images demonstrated hyperintense signal at the calcification regions. The other patients did not show any calcifications at computed tomography, and SWI revealed the presence of hemosiderin deposits with hypointense signal. Conclusion: The selection of echo time and of the mask may change all the information on SWI images, and compromise the diagnostic reliability. Amongst the possible masks, the authors highlight that the sigmoid mask allows for contrasting calcifications and hemosiderin on a single SWI image.

  12. Quantitative assessment of susceptibility weighted imaging processing methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ningzhi; Wang, Wen-Tung; Sati, Pascal; Pham, Dzung L.; Butman, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate different susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) phase processing methods and parameter selection, thereby improving understanding of potential artifacts, as well as facilitating choice of methodology in clinical settings. Materials and Methods Two major phase processing methods, Homodyne-filtering and phase unwrapping-high pass (HP) filtering, were investigated with various phase unwrapping approaches, filter sizes, and filter types. Magnitude and phase images were acquired from a healthy subject and brain injury patients on a 3T clinical Siemens MRI system. Results were evaluated based on image contrast to noise ratio and presence of processing artifacts. Results When using a relatively small filter size (32 pixels for the matrix size 512 × 512 pixels), all Homodyne-filtering methods were subject to phase errors leading to 2% to 3% masked brain area in lower and middle axial slices. All phase unwrapping-filtering/smoothing approaches demonstrated fewer phase errors and artifacts compared to the Homodyne-filtering approaches. For performing phase unwrapping, Fourier-based methods, although less accurate, were 2–4 orders of magnitude faster than the PRELUDE, Goldstein and Quality-guide methods. Conclusion Although Homodyne-filtering approaches are faster and more straightforward, phase unwrapping followed by HP filtering approaches perform more accurately in a wider variety of acquisition scenarios. PMID:24923594

  13. Susceptibility-weighted imaging helps to discriminate pediatric multiple sclerosis from acute disseminated encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, James E; Mar, Soe; D'Angelo, Gina; Zhou, Gongfu; Rajderkar, Dhanashree; Benzinger, Tammie L S

    2015-01-01

    Susceptibility-weighted imaging is a relatively new magnetic resonance imaging sequence that can identify lesions of multiple sclerosis in adults. This study was designed to determine if susceptibility-weighted imaging is a useful discriminator between children who develop multiple sclerosis and children with monophasic acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. Eighteen children who presented with acute central nervous system demyelination and had a brain magnetic resonance imaging study including susceptibility-weighted imaging within 6 months of the first clinical attack were studied. Final diagnosis was based on international consensus definitions. Brain lesions detected on the fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequence were assessed for abnormal signal on susceptibility-weighted imaging. The burden of susceptibility abnormalities was then analyzed for differences between the multiple sclerosis and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis groups. Eight patients had a final diagnosis of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis and ten had multiple sclerosis. Twenty-two percent of fluid-attenuated inversion recovery lesions were identified on susceptibility-weighted imaging. The percentage of fluid-attenuated inversion recovery lesions identified on susceptibility-weighted imaging differed between the multiple sclerosis and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis groups (P = 0.04). The median percentage (minimum-maximum) of lesions identified on susceptibility-weighted imaging in the multiple sclerosis group was 0.22 (0-0.68) and in the acute disseminated encephalomyelitis group was 0.0 (0-0.17). Susceptibility-weighted imaging may be a useful technique in differentiating acute disseminated encephalomyelitis from multiple sclerosis at initial presentation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Time of flight diffraction imaging for double-probe technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Young-Fo; Hsieh, Cheng-I

    2002-06-01

    Due to rapid progress in microelectronics and computer technologies, the system evolving from analog to digital, and a programmable and flexible synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) for the single-probe pulse-echo imaging technique of ultrasonic nondestructive testing (NDT) becomes feasible. The double-probe reflection technique usually is used to detect the nonhorizontal flaws in the ultrasonic NDT. Because there is an offset between the transmitter and receiver, the position and size of the flaw cannot be directly read from the image. Therefore, a digital signal processing (DSP) imaging method is proposed to process the ultrasonic image obtained by double-probe reflection technique. In the imaging, the signal is redistributed on an ellipsoid with the transmitter and receiver positions as focuses, and the traveltime sum for the echo from the ellipsoid to the focuses as the traveltime of signal. After redistributing all the signals, the useful signals can be constructively added in some point in which the reflected point is; otherwise, the signals will be destructively added. Therefore, the image resolution of the flaw can be improved and the position and size of the flaw can be estimated directly from the processed image. Based on the experimental results, the steep flaw (45 degrees) cannot be detected by the pulse echo technique but can be detected by the double-probe method, and the double-probe B-scan image of 30 degrees tilted crack is clearer than the pulse echo B-scan image. However, the flaw image departs from its true position greatly. After processing, the steep flaw image can be moved to its true position. When the flaws are not greater than the probe largely, the sizes of the flaws are difficult to be discriminated in both pulse echo and double-probe B-scan images. In the processed double-probe B-scan image, the size of the flaws can be estimated successfully, and the images of the flaws are close to their true shape.

  15. Thrombus imaging in acute stroke: correlation of thrombus length on susceptibility-weighted imaging with endovascular reperfusion success

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisstanner, Christian; Gratz, Pascal P.; Schroth, Gerhard; Verma, Rajeev K.; Koechl, Arnold; Gralla, Jan; Zubler, Christoph; Hsieh, Kety; Mordasini, Pasquale; El-Koussy, Marwan [Bern University Hospital and University of Bern, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland); Jung, Simon [Bern University Hospital and University of Bern, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland); Bern University Hospital and University of Bern, Department of Neurology, Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland); Arnold, Marcel [Bern University Hospital and University of Bern, Department of Neurology, Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland)

    2014-08-15

    Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) enables visualization of thrombotic material in acute ischemic stroke. We aimed to validate the accuracy of thrombus depiction on SWI compared to time-of-flight MRA (TOF-MRA), first-pass gadolinium-enhanced MRA (GE-MRA) and digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Furthermore, we analysed the impact of thrombus length on reperfusion success with endovascular therapy. Consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke due to middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusions undergoing endovascular recanalization were screened. Only patients with a pretreatment SWI were included. Thrombus visibility and location on SWI were compared to those on TOF-MRA, GE-MRA and DSA. The association between thrombus length on SWI and reperfusion success was studied. Eighty-four of the 88 patients included (95.5 %) showed an MCA thrombus on SWI. Strong correlations between thrombus location on SWI and that on TOF-MRA (Pearson's correlation coefficient 0.918, P < 0.001), GE-MRA (0.887, P < 0.001) and DSA (0.841, P < 0.001) were observed. Successful reperfusion was not significantly related to thrombus length on SWI (P = 0.153; binary logistic regression). In MCA occlusion thrombus location as seen on SWI correlates well with angiographic findings. In contrast to intravenous thrombolysis, thrombus length appears to have no impact on reperfusion success of endovascular therapy. (orig.)

  16. Non-destructive automatic leaf area measurements by combining stereo and time-of-flight images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Song, Y.; Glasbey, C.A.; Polder, G.; Heijden, van der G.W.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Leaf area measurements are commonly obtained by destructive and laborious practice. This study shows how stereo and time-of-flight (ToF) images can be combined for non-destructive automatic leaf area measurements. The authors focus on some challenging plant images captured in a greenhouse

  17. Imaging objects behind a partially reflective surface with a modified time-of-flight sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geerardyn, D.; Kuijk, M.

    2014-05-01

    Time-of-Flight (ToF) methods are used in different applications for depth measurements. There are mainly 2 types of ToF measurements, Pulsed Time-of-Flight and Continuous-Wave Time-of-Flight. Pulsed Time-of-Flight (PToF) techniques are mostly used in combination with a scanning mirror, which makes them not well suited for imaging purposes. Continuous-wave Time-of-Flight (CWToF) techniques are mostly used wide-field, hence they are much faster and more suited for imaging purposes but cannot be used behind partially-reflective surfaces. In commercial applications, both ToF methods require specific hardware, which cannot be exchanged. In this paper, we discuss the transformation of a CWToF sensor to a PToF camera, which is able to make images and measure the distances of objects behind a partially-reflective surface, like the air-water interface in swimming pools when looking from above. We first created our own depth camera which is suitable for both CWToF and PToF. We describe the necessary hardware components for a normal ToF camera and compare it with the adapted components which make it a range-gating depth imager. Afterwards, we modeled the distances and images of one or more objects positioned behind a partially-reflective surface and combine it with measurement data of the optical pulse. A scene was virtualized and the rays from a raytracing software tool were exported to Matlab™. Subsequently, pulse deformations were calculated for every pixel, which resulted in the calculation of the depth information.

  18. Computational imaging with multi-camera time-of-flight systems

    KAUST Repository

    Shrestha, Shikhar

    2016-07-11

    Depth cameras are a ubiquitous technology used in a wide range of applications, including robotic and machine vision, human computer interaction, autonomous vehicles as well as augmented and virtual reality. In this paper, we explore the design and applications of phased multi-camera time-of-flight (ToF) systems. We develop a reproducible hardware system that allows for the exposure times and waveforms of up to three cameras to be synchronized. Using this system, we analyze waveform interference between multiple light sources in ToF applications and propose simple solutions to this problem. Building on the concept of orthogonal frequency design, we demonstrate state-of-the-art results for instantaneous radial velocity capture via Doppler time-of-flight imaging and we explore new directions for optically probing global illumination, for example by de-scattering dynamic scenes and by non-line-of-sight motion detection via frequency gating. © 2016 ACM.

  19. Studying time of flight imaging through scattering media across multiple size scales (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velten, Andreas

    2017-05-01

    Light scattering is a primary obstacle to optical imaging in a variety of different environments and across many size and time scales. Scattering complicates imaging on large scales when imaging through the atmosphere when imaging from airborne or space borne platforms, through marine fog, or through fog and dust in vehicle navigation, for example in self driving cars. On smaller scales, scattering is the major obstacle when imaging through human tissue in biomedical applications. Despite the large variety of participating materials and size scales, light transport in all these environments is usually described with very similar scattering models that are defined by the same small set of parameters, including scattering and absorption length and phase function. We attempt a study of scattering and methods of imaging through scattering across different scales and media, particularly with respect to the use of time of flight information. We can show that using time of flight, in addition to spatial information, provides distinct advantages in scattering environments. By performing a comparative study of scattering across scales and media, we are able to suggest scale models for scattering environments to aid lab research. We also can transfer knowledge and methodology between different fields.

  20. Utility of susceptibility-weighted imaging and arterial spin perfusion imaging in pediatric brain arteriovenous shunting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nabavizadeh, Seyed Ali; Edgar, J.C.; Vossough, Arastoo [University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-10-15

    The objectives of the study are to investigate the application of susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) and arterial spin labeling (ASL) imaging in the assessment of shunting and the draining veins in pediatric patients with arteriovenous shunting and compare the utility of SWI and ASL with conventional MR and digital subtraction angiography (DSA). This study is a retrospective study of 19 pediatric patients with arteriovenous shunting on brain MRI who were also evaluated with DSA. We assessed the ability of conventional MRI sequences, susceptibility magnitude images, phase-filtered SWI images, and pulsed ASL images in the detection of arteriovenous (AV) shunting, number of draining veins and drainage pathways in comparison to DSA. The mean number of detected draining veins on DSA (3.63) was significantly higher compared to SWI phase-filtered image (mean = 2.72), susceptibility magnitude image (mean = 2.92), ASL (mean = 1.76) and conventional MRI (2.47) (p < 0.05). Pairwise comparison of DSA difference scores (i.e., difference between MR modalities in the number of missed draining veins) revealed no difference between the MR modalities (p > 0.05). ASL was the only method that correctly identified superficial and deep venous drainage in all patients. Regarding detection of shunting, ASL, SWI phase-filtered, and magnitude images demonstrated shunting in 100, 83, and 84 % of patients, respectively. SWI depicts a higher number of draining vein compared to conventional MR pulse sequences. ASL is a sensitive approach in showing 100 % sensitivity in the detection of AV shunting and in the diagnosis of the pattern of venous drainage. The present findings suggest the added utility of both SWI and ASL in the assessment of AV shunting. (orig.)

  1. Encrypted Three-dimensional Dynamic Imaging using Snapshot Time-of-flight Compressed Ultrafast Photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jinyang; Gao, Liang; Hai, Pengfei; Li, Chiye; Wang, Lihong V

    2015-10-27

    Compressed ultrafast photography (CUP), a computational imaging technique, is synchronized with short-pulsed laser illumination to enable dynamic three-dimensional (3D) imaging. By leveraging the time-of-flight (ToF) information of pulsed light backscattered by the object, ToF-CUP can reconstruct a volumetric image from a single camera snapshot. In addition, the approach unites the encryption of depth data with the compressed acquisition of 3D data in a single snapshot measurement, thereby allowing efficient and secure data storage and transmission. We demonstrated high-speed 3D videography of moving objects at up to 75 volumes per second. The ToF-CUP camera was applied to track the 3D position of a live comet goldfish. We have also imaged a moving object obscured by a scattering medium.

  2. Quantitative myocardial blood flow imaging with integrated time-of-flight PET-MR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kero, Tanja; Nordström, Jonny; Harms, Hendrik J; Sörensen, Jens; Ahlström, Håkan; Lubberink, Mark

    2017-12-01

    The use of integrated PET-MR offers new opportunities for comprehensive assessment of cardiac morphology and function. However, little is known on the quantitative accuracy of cardiac PET imaging with integrated time-of-flight PET-MR. The aim of the present work was to validate the GE Signa PET-MR scanner for quantitative cardiac PET perfusion imaging. Eleven patients (nine male; mean age 59 years; range 46-74 years) with known or suspected coronary artery disease underwent 15O-water PET scans at rest and during adenosine-induced hyperaemia on a GE Discovery ST PET-CT and a GE Signa PET-MR scanner. PET-MR images were reconstructed using settings recommended by the manufacturer, including time-of-flight (TOF). Data were analysed semi-automatically using Cardiac VUer software, resulting in both parametric myocardial blood flow (MBF) images and segment-based MBF values. Correlation and agreement between PET-CT-based and PET-MR-based MBF values for all three coronary artery territories were assessed using regression analysis and intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC). In addition to the cardiac PET-MR reconstruction protocol as recommended by the manufacturer, comparisons were made using a PET-CT resolution-matched reconstruction protocol both without and with TOF to assess the effect of time-of-flight and reconstruction parameters on quantitative MBF values. Stress MBF data from one patient was excluded due to movement during the PET-CT scanning. Mean MBF values at rest and stress were (0.92 ± 0.12) and (2.74 ± 1.37) mL/g/min for PET-CT and (0.90 ± 0.23) and (2.65 ± 1.15) mL/g/min for PET-MR (p = 0.33 and p = 0.74). ICC between PET-CT-based and PET-MR-based regional MBF was 0.98. Image quality was improved with PET-MR as compared to PET-CT. ICC between PET-MR-based regional MBF with and without TOF and using different filter and reconstruction settings was 1.00. PET-MR-based MBF values correlated well with PET-CT-based MBF values and

  3. Stochastic calculus analysis of optical time-of-flight range imaging and estimation of radial motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streeter, Lee

    2017-07-01

    Time-of-flight range imaging is analyzed using stochastic calculus. Through a series of interpretations and simplifications, the stochastic model leads to two methods for estimating linear radial velocity: maximum likelihood estimation on the transition probability distribution between measurements, and a new method based on analyzing the measured correlation waveform and its first derivative. The methods are tested in a simulated motion experiment from (-40)-(+40)  m/s, with data from a camera imaging an object on a translation stage. In tests maximum likelihood is slow and unreliable, but when it works it estimates the linear velocity with standard deviation of 1 m/s or better. In comparison the new method is fast and reliable but works in a reduced velocity range of (-20)-(+20)  m/s with standard deviation ranging from 3.5 m/s to 10 m/s.

  4. Impact of Time-of-Flight PET on Quantification Errors in MR Imaging-Based Attenuation Correction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehranian, Abolfazl; Zaidi, Habib

    Time-of-flight (TOF) PET/MR imaging is an emerging imaging technology with great capabilities offered by TOF to improve image quality and lesion detectability. We assessed, for the first time, the impact of TOF image reconstruction on PET quantification errors induced by MR imaging based attenuation

  5. Indoor and Outdoor Depth Imaging of Leaves With Time-of-Flight and Stereo Vision Sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazmi, Wajahat; Foix, Sergi; Alenya, Guilliem

    2014-01-01

    In this article we analyze the response of Time-of-Flight (ToF) cameras (active sensors) for close range imaging under three different illumination conditions and compare the results with stereo vision (passive) sensors. ToF cameras are sensitive to ambient light and have low resolution but deliver...... poorly under sunlight. Stereo vision is comparatively more robust to ambient illumination and provides high resolution depth data but is constrained by texture of the object along with computational efficiency. Graph cut based stereo correspondence algorithm can better retrieve the shape of the leaves...... of the sensors. Performance of three different ToF cameras (PMD CamBoard, PMD CamCube and SwissRanger SR4000) is compared against selected stereo correspondence algorithms (local correlation and graph cuts). PMD CamCube has better cancelation of sunlight, followed by CamBoard, while SwissRanger SR4000 performs...

  6. Susceptibility-weighted imaging of the venous networks around the brain stem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Ming; Lin, Zhong-Xiao; Zhang, Nu [Wenzhou Medical University, Department of Neurosurgery, The 2nd Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou (China); Zhang, Xiao-Fen; Qiao, Hui-Huang; Chen, Cheng-Chun [Wenzhou Medical University, Department of Human Anatomy, Wenzhou (China); Ren, Chuan-Gen; Li, Jian-Ce [Wenzhou Medical University, Department of Radiology, The 1nd Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou (China)

    2014-10-18

    The venous network of the brainstem is complex and significant. Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) is a practical technique which is sensitive to veins, especially tiny veins. Our purpose of this study was to evaluate the visualization of the venous network of brainstem by using SWI at 3.0 T. The occurrence rate of each superficial veins of brainstem was evaluated by using SWI on a 3 T MR imaging system in 60 volunteers. The diameter of the lateral mesencephalic vein and peduncular vein were measured by SWI using the reconstructed mIP images in the sagittal view. And the outflow of the veins of brainstem were studied and described according to the reconstructed images. The median anterior pontomesencephalic vein, median anterior medullary vein, peduncular vein, right vein of the pontomesencephalic sulcus, and right lateral anterior pontomesencephalic vein were detected in all the subjects (100 %). The outer diameter of peduncular vein was 1.38 ± 0.26 mm (range 0.8-1.8 mm). The lateral mesencephalic vein was found in 75 % of the subjects and the mean outer diameter was 0.81 ± 0.2 mm (range 0.5-1.2 mm). The inner veins of mesencephalon were found by using SWI. The venous networks around the brain stem can be visualized by SWI clearly. This result can not only provide data for anatomical study, but also may be available for the surgical planning in the infratentorial region. (orig.)

  7. A Brain Region-Based Deep Medullary Veins Visual Score on Susceptibility Weighted Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiting Zhang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral venous collagenosis played a role in the pathogenesis of white matter hyperintensities (WMHs through venous ischemia. Since pathological changes of veins from intramural stenosis to luminal occlusion is a dynamic process, we aimed to create a deep medullary veins (DMVs visual grade on susceptibility-weighted images (SWI and explore the relationship of DMVs and WMHs based on venous drainage regions. We reviewed clinical, laboratory and imaging data from 268 consecutive WMHs patients and 20 controls. SWI images were used to observe characteristics of DMVs and a brain region-based DMVs visual score was given by two experienced neuroradiologists. Fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR images were used to calculate WMHs volume. Logistic-regression analysis and partial Pearson’s correlation analysis were used to examine the association between the DMVs score and WMHs volume. We found that the DMVs score was significantly higher in WMHs patients than in controls (p < 0.001. Increased DMVs score was independently associated with higher WMHs volume after adjusting for total cholesterol level and number of lacunes (p < 0.001. Particularly, DMVs scores were correlated with regional PVHs volumes in the same brain region most. The newly proposed DMVs grading method allows the clinician to monitor the course of DMVs disruption. Our findings of cerebral venous insufficiency in WMHs patients may help to elucidate the pathogenic mechanisms and progression of WMHs.

  8. Focal hemodynamic patterns of status epilepticus detected by susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aellen, Jerome; Kottke, Raimund; Springer, Elisabeth; Weisstanner, Christian; El-Koussy, Marwan; Schroth, Gerhard; Wiest, Roland; Gralla, Jan; Verma, Rajeev K. [University of Bern, University Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, University Hospital Bern and Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland); Abela, Eugenio; Schindler, Kaspar [University of Bern, Department of Neurology, Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland); Buerki, Sarah E. [Inselspital, Department of Neuropaediatrics, University Children' s Hospital, Bern (Switzerland)

    2014-11-15

    To investigate pathological findings in the susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) of patients experiencing convulsive (CSE) or non-convulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) with focal hyperperfusion in the acute setting. Twelve patients (six with NCSE confirmed by electroencephalogram (EEG) and six patients with CSE with seizure event clinically diagnosed) underwent MRI in this acute setting (mean time between onset of symptoms and MRI was 3 h 8 min), including SWI, dynamic susceptibility contrast MR imaging (DSC) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). MRI sequences were retrospectively evaluated and compared with EEG findings (10/12 patients), and clinical symptoms. Twelve out of 12 (100 %) patients showed a focal parenchymal area with pseudo-narrowed cortical veins on SWI, associated with focal hyperperfused areas (increased cerebral blood flow (CBF) and mean transit time (MTT) shortening), and cortical DWI restriction in 6/12 patients (50 %). Additionally, these areas were associated with ictal or postical EEG patterns in 8/10 patients (80 %). Most frequent acute clinical findings were aphasia and/or hemiparesis in eight patients, and all of them showed pseudo-narrowed veins in those parenchymal areas responsible for these symptoms. In this study series with CSE and NCSE patients, SWI showed focally pseudo-narrowed cortical veins in hyperperfused and ictal parenchymal areas. Therefore, SWI might have the potential to identify an ictal region in CSE/NCSE. (orig.)

  9. Predicting stroke evolution: comparison of susceptibility-weighted MR imaging with MR perfusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, Hung-Wen [University of California at Irvine Medical Center, Department of Radiological Sciences, Irvine, CA (United States); Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Taipei City (China); Tsai, Fong Y. [University of California at Irvine Medical Center, Department of Radiological Sciences, Irvine, CA (United States); Taipei Medical University, Medical Imaging Research Center, Taipei City (China); Hasso, Anton N. [University of California at Irvine Medical Center, Department of Radiological Sciences, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2012-07-15

    To investigate the ability of susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) to predict stroke evolution in comparison with perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI). In a retrospective analysis of 15 patients with non-lacunar ischaemic stroke studied no later than 24 h after symptom onset, we used the Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS) to compare lesions on initial diffusion-weighted images (DWI), SWI, PWI and follow-up studies obtained at least 5 days after symptom onset. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores at entry and stroke risk factors were documented. The clinical-DWI, SWI-DWI and PWI-DWI mismatches were calculated. SWI-DWI and mean transit time (MTT)-DWI mismatches were significantly associated with higher incidence of infarct growth (P = 0.007 and 0.028) and had similar ability to predict stroke evolution (P = 1.0). ASPECTS values on initial DWI, SWI and PWI were significantly correlated with those on follow-up studies (P {<=} 0.026) but not associated with infarct growth. The SWI ASPECTS values were best correlated with MTT ones ({rho} = 0.8, P < 0.001). SWI is an alternative to PWI to assess penumbra and predict stroke evolution. Further prospective studies are needed to evaluate the role of SWI in guiding thrombolytic therapy. (orig.)

  10. Prominent cerebral veins on susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) in pulmonary embolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oeztoprak, Bilge [Cumhuriyet University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Sivas (Turkey)

    2017-07-15

    Clinical applications of susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) are increasing steadily. The aim of this study is to investigate the appearance of cerebral veins on SWI, which is very sensitive to the deoxyhaemoglobin level in vessels, in pulmonary embolism (PE). The cranial SWI images of 19 patients with PE and 22 controls from September 2013 through March 2016 were retrospectively examined for the presence of prominent cerebral veins. MRI findings were correlated with blood oxygen levels. 12 of 19 patients with PE had hypoxemia and SWI images of 11 of these hypoxemic patients depicted prominent cerebral veins in the form of increased number, diameter, and elongation. The mean PaO{sub 2} and SaO{sub 2} in these patients were 48.5 ± 9.1 mmHg and 75.2 ± 8.0 %, respectively. There was a significant correlation between the presence of prominent veins on SWI and hypoxemia (p < 0.05). Of the 7 patients with normal blood oxygen pressure and saturation, 1 also showed an augmented appearance of cerebral veins on SWI. In the presence of neurological symptoms suggestive of an intracranial pathology in patients with PE, a SWI added to the conventional MRI sequences may predict hypoxemia and exclude other intracranial pathologies. (orig.)

  11. Principles and applications of susceptibility weighted imaging; Grundlagen und Anwendungen der suszeptibilitaetsgewichteten Bildgebung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurz, F.T.; Ziener, C.H. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Radiologie E010, INF 280, Heidelberg (Germany); Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Abteilung fuer Neuroradiologie, INF 400, Heidelberg (Germany); Freitag, M.; Schlemmer, H.P. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Radiologie E010, INF 280, Heidelberg (Germany); Bendszus, M. [Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Abteilung fuer Neuroradiologie, INF 400, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI), initially developed to provide an improved method for cerebral magnetic resonance (MR) venography, is now an integral part of neuroradiological diagnostics and is steadily gaining importance in non-cerebral imaging. Tissue-inherent susceptibility differences generate a local magnetic field in which the dephasing of signal-producing protons occurs. This leads to a characteristic phase shift that can be used as a means to enhance contrast in the well-known T2*-weighted imaging. Many medically relevant pathologies induce tissue alterations that also influence the magnetic properties of tissue. Thus, the detection of blood residues and calcifications in SWI is superior to conventional MR sequences. New techniques, such as quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) and susceptibility tensor imaging (STI) allow improved differentiation between blood residues and calcifications and provide an alternative imaging method for fiber tractography with respect to diffusion tensor imaging. (orig.) [German] Die suszeptibilitaetsgewichtete Bildgebung (SWI), urspruenglich entwickelt als verbessertes Verfahren fuer die zerebrale MR-Venographie, ist inzwischen ein fester Bestandteil der neuroradiologischen Diagnostik und gewinnt zunehmend an Bedeutung in der nichtzerebralen Bildgebung. Gewebespezifische Suszeptibilitaetsunterschiede erzeugen ein lokales Magnetfeld, in dem die Dephasierung der signalgebenden Protonen stattfindet. Dabei kommt es zu einer charakteristischen Phasenverschiebung, die als Kontrastverstaerkung in der bekannten T2*-Bildgebung genutzt werden kann. Viele medizinisch relevante Pathologien erzeugen Veraenderungen im Gewebe, die auch die magnetischen Eigenschaften beeinflussen. So koennen Blutungen und Verkalkungen in der SWI besser identifiziert werden als mit konventionellen MR-Sequenzen. Neuere Techniken wie die quantitative Suszeptibilitaetskartierung (QSM) bzw. die Suszeptibilitaets-Tensor-Bildgebung (STI) ermoeglichen

  12. Single view reflectance capture using multiplexed scattering and time-of-flight imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Shuang; Velten, Andreas; Raskar, Ramesh; Bala, Kavita; Naik, Nikhil Deepak

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces the concept of time-of-flight reflectance estimation, and demonstrates a new technique that allows a camera to rapidly acquire reflectance properties of objects from a single view-point, over relatively long distances and without encircling equipment. We measure material properties by indirectly illuminating an object by a laser source, and observing its reflected light indirectly using a time-of-flight camera. The configuration collectively acquires dense angular, but l...

  13. Punctate white matter lesions in infants: new insights using susceptibility-weighted imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niwa, Tetsu [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Heidelberglaan 100, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kanagawa Children' s Medical Center, Departments of Radiology, Yokohama (Japan); Vries, Linda S. de; Benders, Manon J.N.L.; Groenendaal, Floris [Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital/University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Neonatology, KE 04.123.1, PO Box 85090, Utrecht (Netherlands); Takahara, Taro [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Heidelberglaan 100, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Nikkels, Peter G.J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Pathology, Heidelberglaan 100, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2011-09-15

    Punctate white matter lesions (PWML) are recognized with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as hypersignal on T1-weighted imaging and hyposignal on T2-weighted imaging. Our aim was to assess how often a hemorrhagic component was present in PWML using susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI). Seventeen preterm (gestational age, 25-34 weeks) and seven full-term infants (age at MRI, 37-42 weeks) with PWML were included. Seven preterm infants had sequential MRIs. PWML were diagnosed with conventional MRI and compared with SWI, where signal loss is suggestive of hemorrhage. The pattern of associated brain lesions was taken into account, and the percentage of lesions with signal loss on SWI was calculated for each infant. A significantly higher percentage of signal loss on SWI (median, 93.9%) was found among infants with germinal matrix and intraventricular hemorrhage as the primary diagnosis (n = 8) compared to those with a primary diagnosis of white matter injury (n = 14; median, 14.2%; p < 0.01). In the infants with serial MRIs, a reduction in the number of PWML and/or signal loss on SWI was noted at term equivalent age. In the patient who died, cystic lesions, associated with hemorrhage and gliosis, were demonstrated on histology. SWI can distinguish hemorrhagic and non-hemorrhagic PWML. Signal loss on SWI was more common when PWML were associated with an intraventricular hemorrhage. Longitudinal imaging showed a decrease in the number of PWML over time, with some PWML no longer showing signal loss on SWI, suggesting early gliosis. (orig.)

  14. Application of lidar techniques to time-of-flight range imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte, Refael; Streeter, Lee; Cree, Michael J; Dorrington, Adrian A

    2015-11-20

    Amplitude-modulated continuous wave (AMCW) time-of-flight (ToF) range imaging cameras measure distance by illuminating the scene with amplitude-modulated light and measuring the phase difference between the transmitted and reflected modulation envelope. This method of optical range measurement suffers from errors caused by multiple propagation paths, motion, phase wrapping, and nonideal amplitude modulation. In this paper a ToF camera is modified to operate in modes analogous to continuous wave (CW) and stepped frequency continuous wave (SFCW) lidar. In CW operation the velocity of objects can be measured. CW measurement of velocity was linear with true velocity (R2=0.9969). Qualitative analysis of a complex scene confirms that range measured by SFCW is resilient to errors caused by multiple propagation paths, phase wrapping, and nonideal amplitude modulation which plague AMCW operation. In viewing a complicated scene through a translucent sheet, quantitative comparison of AMCW with SFCW demonstrated a reduction in the median error from -1.3  m to -0.06  m with interquartile range of error reduced from 4.0 m to 0.18 m.

  15. Susceptibility-weighted imaging in stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khanipour Roshan, Sara; Salmela, Michael B.; McKinney, Alexander M. [University Of Minnesota, Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy (SMART) syndrome has a characteristic clinical presentation and postcontrast T1WI MRI appearance. Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) may help distinguish SMART from other disorders that may have a similar postcontrast MRI appearance. The MRI examinations of four patients with SMART syndrome are described herein, each of which included SWI, FLAIR, DWI, and postcontrast T1WI on the presenting and follow-up MRI examinations. In each, the initial SWI MRI demonstrated numerous susceptibility hypointensities <5 mm in size throughout the cerebrum, particularly within the periventricular white matter (PVWM), presumably related to radiation-induced cavernous hemangiomas (RICHs). By follow-up MRI, each postcontrast examination had demonstrated resolution of the gyriform enhancement on T1WI, without susceptibility hypointensities on SWI within those previously enhancing regions. These preliminary findings suggest that SWI may help identify SMART syndrome or at least help discriminate it from other disorders, by the findings of numerous susceptibility hypointensities on SWI likely representing RICHs, gyriform enhancement on T1WI, and postsurgical findings or appropriate clinical history. (orig.)

  16. Diagnostic accuracy of susceptibility-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for the evaluation of pineal gland calcification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böker, Sarah M.; Bender, Yvonne Y.; Diederichs, Gerd; Fallenberg, Eva M.; Wagner, Moritz; Hamm, Bernd; Makowski, Marcus R.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To determine the diagnostic performance of susceptibility-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (SWMR) for the detection of pineal gland calcifications (PGC) compared to conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences, using computed tomography (CT) as a reference standard. Methods 384 patients who received a 1.5 Tesla MRI scan including SWMR sequences and a CT scan of the brain between January 2014 and October 2016 were retrospectively evaluated. 346 patients were included in the analysis, of which 214 showed PGC on CT scans. To assess correlation between imaging modalities, the maximum calcification diameter was used. Sensitivity and specificity and intra- and interobserver reliability were calculated for SWMR and conventional MRI sequences. Results SWMR reached a sensitivity of 95% (95% CI: 91%-97%) and a specificity of 96% (95% CI: 91%-99%) for the detection of PGC, whereas conventional MRI achieved a sensitivity of 43% (95% CI: 36%-50%) and a specificity of 96% (95% CI: 91%-99%). Detection rates for calcifications in SWMR and conventional MRI differed significantly (95% versus 43%, p<0.001). Diameter measurements between SWMR and CT showed a close correlation (R2 = 0.85, p<0.001) with a slight but not significant overestimation of size (SWMR: 6.5 mm ± 2.5; CT: 5.9 mm ± 2.4, p = 0.02). Interobserver-agreement for diameter measurements was excellent on SWMR (ICC = 0.984, p < 0.0001). Conclusions Combining SWMR magnitude and phase information enables the accurate detection of PGC and offers a better diagnostic performance than conventional MRI with CT as a reference standard. PMID:28278291

  17. Leptomeningeal collateralization in acute ischemic stroke: Impact on prominent cortical veins in susceptibility-weighted imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Rajeev K., E-mail: rajeev.verma@insel.ch [University Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Inselspital, University of Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Hsieh, Kety; Gratz, Pascal P.; Schankath, Adrian C.; Mordasini, Pasquale; Zubler, Christoph; Kellner-Weldon, Frauke [University Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Inselspital, University of Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Jung, Simon [Department of Neurology, Inselspital, University of Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Schroth, Gerhard; Gralla, Jan; El-Koussy, Marwan [University Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Inselspital, University of Bern, Bern (Switzerland)

    2014-08-15

    Background: The extent of hypoperfusion is an important prognostic factor in acute ischemic stroke. Previous studies have postulated that the extent of prominent cortical veins (PCV) on susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) reflects the extent of hypoperfusion. Our aim was to investigate, whether there is an association between PCV and the grade of leptomeningeal arterial collateralization in acute ischemic stroke. In addition, we analyzed the correlation between SWI and perfusion-MRI findings. Methods: 33 patients with acute ischemic stroke due to a thromboembolic M1-segment occlusion underwent MRI followed by digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and were subdivided into two groups with very good to good and moderate to no leptomeningeal collaterals according to the DSA. The extent of PCV on SWI, diffusion restriction (DR) on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and prolonged mean transit time (MTT) on perfusion-imaging were graded according to the Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS). The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores at admission and the time between symptom onset and MRI were documented. Results: 20 patients showed very good to good and 13 patients poor to no collateralization. PCV-ASPECTS was significantly higher for cases with good leptomeningeal collaterals versus those with poor leptomeningeal collaterals (mean 4.1 versus 2.69; p = 0.039). MTT-ASPECTS was significantly lower than PCV-ASPECTS in all 33 patients (mean 1.0 versus 3.5; p < 0.00). Conclusions: In our small study the grade of leptomeningeal collateralization correlates with the extent of PCV in SWI in acute ischemic stroke, due to the deoxyhemoglobin to oxyhemoglobin ratio. Consequently, extensive PCV correlate with poor leptomeningeal collateralization while less pronounced PCV correlate with good leptomeningeal collateralization. Further SWI is a very helpful tool in detecting tissue at risk but cannot replace PWI since MTT detects significantly more ill

  18. Detection of vessel wall calcifications in vertebral arteries using susceptibility weighted imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Lisa C.; Boeker, Sarah M.; Bender, Yvonne Y.; Fallenberg, Eva M.; Wagner, Moritz; Hamm, Bernd; Makowski, Marcus R. [Department of Radiology, Charite, Berlin (Germany); Liebig, Thomas [Department of Neuroradiology, Charite, Berlin (Germany)

    2017-09-15

    Calcification of the brain supplying arteries has been linked to an increased risk for cerebrovascular disease. The purpose of this study was to test the potential of susceptibility weighted MR imaging (SWMR) for the detection of vertebral artery calcifications, based on CT as a reference standard. Four hundred seventy-four patients, who had received head CT and 1.5 T MR scans with SWMR, including the distal vertebral artery, between January 2014 and December 2016, were retrospectively evaluated and 389 patients were included. Sensitivity and specificity for the detection of focal calcifications and intra- and interobserver agreement were calculated for SWMR and standard MRI, using CT as a standard of reference. The diameter of vertebral artery calcifications was used to assess correlations between imaging modalities. Furthermore, the degree of vessel stenosis was determined in 30 patients, who had received an additional angiography. On CT scans, 40 patients showed a total of 52 vertebral artery calcifications. While SWMR reached a sensitivity of 94% (95% CI 84-99%) and a specificity of 97% (95% CI 94-98%), standard MRI yielded a sensitivity of 33% (95% CI 20-46%), and a specificity of 93% (95% CI 90-96%). Linear regression analysis of size measurements confirmed a close correlation between SWMR and CT measurements (R {sup 2} = 0.74, p < 0.001). Compared to standard MRI (ICC = 0.52; CI 0.45-0.59), SWMR showed a higher interobserver agreement for calcification measurements (ICC = 0.84; CI 0.81-0.87). For detection of distal vertebral artery calcifications, SWMR demonstrates a performance comparable to CT and considerably higher than conventional MRI. (orig.)

  19. An investigation of age-related iron deposition using susceptibility weighted imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Wang

    Full Text Available AIM: To quantify age-dependent iron deposition changes in healthy subjects using Susceptibility Weighted Imaging (SWI. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In total, 143 healthy volunteers were enrolled. All underwent conventional MR and SWI sequences. Subjects were divided into eight groups according to age. Using phase images to quantify iron deposition in the head of the caudate nucleus and the lenticular nucleus, the angle radian value was calculated and compared between groups. ANOVA/Pearson correlation coefficient linear regression analysis and polynomial fitting were performed to analyze the relationship between iron deposition in the head of the caudate nucleus and lenticular nucleus with age. RESULTS: Iron deposition in the lenticular nucleus increased in individuals aged up to 40 years, but did not change in those aged over 40 years once a peak had been reached. In the head of the caudate nucleus, iron deposition peaked at 60 years (p<0.05. The correlation coefficients for iron deposition in the L-head of the caudate nucleus, R-head of the caudate nucleus, L-lenticular nucleus and R-lenticular nucleus with age were 0.67691, 0.48585, 0.5228 and 0.5228 (p<0.001, respectively. Linear regression analyses showed a significant correlation between iron deposition levels in with age groups. CONCLUSIONS: Iron deposition in the lenticular nucleus was found to increase with age, reaching a plateau at 40 years. Iron deposition in the head of the caudate nucleus also increased with age, reaching a plateau at 60 years.

  20. An Investigation of Age-Related Iron Deposition Using Susceptibility Weighted Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Li, Wen-Bin; Wei, Xiao-Er; Li, Yue-Hua; Dai, Yong-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Aim To quantify age-dependent iron deposition changes in healthy subjects using Susceptibility Weighted Imaging (SWI). Materials and Methods In total, 143 healthy volunteers were enrolled. All underwent conventional MR and SWI sequences. Subjects were divided into eight groups according to age. Using phase images to quantify iron deposition in the head of the caudate nucleus and the lenticular nucleus, the angle radian value was calculated and compared between groups. ANOVA/Pearson correlation coefficient linear regression analysis and polynomial fitting were performed to analyze the relationship between iron deposition in the head of the caudate nucleus and lenticular nucleus with age. Results Iron deposition in the lenticular nucleus increased in individuals aged up to 40 years, but did not change in those aged over 40 years once a peak had been reached. In the head of the caudate nucleus, iron deposition peaked at 60 years (p<0.05). The correlation coefficients for iron deposition in the L-head of the caudate nucleus, R-head of the caudate nucleus, L-lenticular nucleus and R-lenticular nucleus with age were 0.67691, 0.48585, 0.5228 and 0.5228 (p<0.001, respectively). Linear regression analyses showed a significant correlation between iron deposition levels in with age groups. Conclusions Iron deposition in the lenticular nucleus was found to increase with age, reaching a plateau at 40 years. Iron deposition in the head of the caudate nucleus also increased with age, reaching a plateau at 60 years. PMID:23226360

  1. Vascular malformation mimicking multiple sclerosis active plaque: Usefulness of susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) to perform correct diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Marsecano, Claudia; Perri, Marco; Michelini, Giulia; Varrassi, Marco; Splendiani, Alessandra; Di Cesare, Ernesto; Masciocchi, Carlo; Gallucci, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Brain focal hyperdensity areas are common findings in computed tomography examinations, often further evaluated in magnetic resonance imaging exams. These are usually haemosiderin and calcified perivascular clusters known as cerebral microbleeds and may be secondary signs of brain disorders. Cerebral microbleeds are paramagnetic and ferromagnetic substances determining magnetic field inhomogeneity. Susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) performed at 3T with phase post-processing is very useful...

  2. Intramural hematoma detection by susceptibility-weighted imaging in intracranial vertebral artery dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Won; Choi, Hyun Seok; Koo, Jaseong; Jung, So Lyung; Ahn, Kook-Jin; Kim, Bum-Soo; Shin, Yong Sam; Lee, Kwang Soo

    2013-01-01

    The radiologic diagnosis of vertebral artery dissection (VAD) depends on characteristic intraluminal findings on angiography and intramural hematoma or a double-lumen sign on high-resolution vessel wall imaging. We aimed to evaluate the accuracy of intramural hematoma sign on susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) in VAD. We retrospectively analyzed SWI, phase map images and brain computed tomography (CT) of the consecutive patients who suffered an ischemic stroke in the vertebral artery territory from August 2010 to July 2012. We divided the patients into 2 groups: the VAD group and the nondissection group. VAD was diagnosed by conventional catheter angiographic findings (aneurysmal dilatation, pearl-and-string or tapered steno-occlusion) and pathognomonic findings such as intramural hematoma or a double-lumen sign on the source images of TOF-MRA, high-resolution T1-weighted MRI or high-resolution T2-weighted MRI. Intramural hematoma sign was considered positive if the patient had an eccentric or concentric hypointense signal lesion in the vertebral artery on SWI, a corresponding hyperintense signal on phase map and no evidence of calcification on the brain CT, suggesting blood products other than calcification. Two experienced neuroradiologists blinded to clinical information and angiographic findings were asked to judge for the presence of intramural hematoma sign on SWI. The accuracy of intramural hematoma sign on SWI was evaluated. Phase value, demographic and clinical data were compared between the VAD and the nondissection groups. Thirty-nine patients were included: 10 in the VAD group and 29 in the non-dissection group. Among the VAD group cases, intramural hematoma sign on SWI was positive in 9 of the 10 VAD cases and in 1 out of the 29 cases in the nondissection group. The intramural hematoma sign on SWI was significantly associated with VAD (p radian vs. -0.42 radian, p < 0.001). The intramural hematoma sign on SWI was significantly associated with VAD

  3. Comparison of vessel enhancement algorithms applied to time-of-flight MRA images for cerebrovascular segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phellan, Renzo; Forkert, Nils D

    2017-11-01

    Vessel enhancement algorithms are often used as a preprocessing step for vessel segmentation in medical images to improve the overall segmentation accuracy. Each algorithm uses different characteristics to enhance vessels, such that the most suitable algorithm may vary for different applications. This paper presents a comparative analysis of the accuracy gains in vessel segmentation generated by the use of nine vessel enhancement algorithms: Multiscale vesselness using the formulas described by Erdt (MSE), Frangi (MSF), and Sato (MSS), optimally oriented flux (OOF), ranking orientations responses path operator (RORPO), the regularized Perona-Malik approach (RPM), vessel enhanced diffusion (VED), hybrid diffusion with continuous switch (HDCS), and the white top hat algorithm (WTH). The filters were evaluated and compared based on time-of-flight MRA datasets and corresponding manual segmentations from 5 healthy subjects and 10 patients with an arteriovenous malformation. Additionally, five synthetic angiographic datasets with corresponding ground truth segmentation were generated with three different noise levels (low, medium, and high) and also used for comparison. The parameters for each algorithm and subsequent segmentation were optimized using leave-one-out cross evaluation. The Dice coefficient, Matthews correlation coefficient, area under the ROC curve, number of connected components, and true positives were used for comparison. The results of this study suggest that vessel enhancement algorithms do not always lead to more accurate segmentation results compared to segmenting nonenhanced images directly. Multiscale vesselness algorithms, such as MSE, MSF, and MSS proved to be robust to noise, while diffusion-based filters, such as RPM, VED, and HDCS ranked in the top of the list in scenarios with medium or no noise. Filters that assume tubular-shapes, such as MSE, MSF, MSS, OOF, RORPO, and VED show a decrease in accuracy when considering patients with an AVM

  4. Diagnostic value of susceptibility-weighted imaging in grading diffusely infiltrating astrocytomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHEN Jun-lin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the diagnostic value of susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI in grading diffusely infiltrating astrocytomas. Methods Forty-three patients with pathologically proven diffusely infiltrating astrocytomas were collected, and underwent preoperative MRI conventional sequences (including axial T1WI, T2WI and FLAIR and axial SWI. The ability of showing intratumoral small vessels and hemorrhagic focuses were compared between SWI and conventional techniques. The signal intensities, distribution of venules and bleeding incidence of the tumors were observed respectively on SWI, and the numbers of intratumoral small vessels and cerebral microbleeds, and the sectional areas of bleedings were compared within the three grades of astrocytomas. Results There were significant differences between SWI and conventional sequences in displaying numbers of small vessels and microbleeds and sizes of bleedings (P < 0.01, for all. Low-grade astrocytomas (WHO Ⅱ displayed mainly as hyperintense, while high-grade (WHO Ⅲ, Ⅳ ones showed mainly equisignal or low intensities; venules inside low-grade astrocytomas were sparse, but abundant inside high-grade ones; the incidence of hemorrhage in low-grade astrocytomas was less frequent than that in high-grade ones. The numbers of venules in three groups were 3.77 ± 1.11, 11.86 ± 1.22 and 20.00 ± 1.32, respectively. The numbers of cerebral microbleeds were 0.47 ± 0.39, 3.32 ± 0.42 and 4.38 ± 0.46, respectively. The sectional areas of bleedings were (0.78 ± 1.31 cm2, (3.05 ± 4.40 cm2 and (4.23 ± 4.55 cm2, respectively. The differences among the three groups were all statistically significant (P < 0.01, for all. Conclusion SWI was more sensitive than conventional techniques in showing small vessels and bleeding sites in astrocytomas. The signal intensities, distribution of venules and bleeding incidence of tumors were significantly different between low-grade and high-grade astrocytomas. The

  5. Molecule-Specific Imaging Analysis of Carcinogens in Breast Cancer Cells Using Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quong, J N; Knize, M G; Kulp, K S; Wu, K J

    2003-08-19

    Imaging time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) is used to study the localization of heterocyclic amines in MCF7 line of human breast cancer cells. The detection sensitivities of a model rodent mutagen, 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) were determined. Following an established criteria for the determination of status of freeze-fracture cells, the distribution of PhIP in the MCF7 cells are reported.

  6. Multi-MHz time-of-flight electronic bandstructure imaging of graphene on Ir(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tusche, C., E-mail: c.tusche@fz-juelich.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Mikrostrukturphysik, Weinberg 2, 06120 Halle (Germany); Peter Grünberg Institut (PGI-6), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Goslawski, P.; Engel, D.; Jankowiak, A. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Kutnyakhov, D.; Elmers, H. J.; Chernov, S.; Wallauer, R.; Schönhense, G. [Institut für Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Ellguth, M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Mikrostrukturphysik, Weinberg 2, 06120 Halle (Germany); Institut für Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Medjanik, K. [Institut für Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, 55128 Mainz (Germany); MAX IV Laboratory, Ole Römers vag 1, 22363 Lund (Sweden)

    2016-06-27

    In the quest for detailed spectroscopic insight into the electronic structure at solid surfaces in a large momentum range, we have developed an advanced experimental approach. It combines the 3D detection scheme of a time-of-flight momentum microscope with an optimized filling pattern of the BESSY II storage ring. Here, comprehensive data sets covering the full surface Brillouin zone have been used to study faint substrate-film hybridization effects in the electronic structure of graphene on Ir(111), revealed by a pronounced linear dichroism in angular distribution. The method paves the way to 3D electronic bandmapping with unprecedented data recording efficiency.

  7. Fast and Practical Head Tracking in Brain Imaging with Time-of-Flight Camera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilm, Jakob; Olesen, Oline Vinter; Jensen, Rasmus Ramsbøl

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the potential use of Time-of-Flight cameras (TOF) for motion correction in medical brain scans. TOF cameras have previously been used for tracking purposes, but recent progress in TOF technology has made it relevant for high speed optical tracking in high resolution medical...... scanners. Particularly in MRI and PET, the newest generation of TOF cameras could become a method of tracking small and large scale patient movement in a fast and user friendly way required in clinical environments. We present a novel methodology for fast tracking from TOF point clouds without the need...

  8. Fuzzy logic-based approach to wavelet denoising of 3D images produced by time-of-flight cameras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanov, Ljubomir; Pižurica, Aleksandra; Philips, Wilfried

    2010-10-25

    In this paper we present a new denoising method for the depth images of a 3D imaging sensor, based on the time-of-flight principle. We propose novel ways to use luminance-like information produced by a time-of flight camera along with depth images. Firstly, we propose a wavelet-based method for estimating the noise level in depth images, using luminance information. The underlying idea is that luminance carries information about the power of the optical signal reflected from the scene and is hence related to the signal-to-noise ratio for every pixel within the depth image. In this way, we can efficiently solve the difficult problem of estimating the non-stationary noise within the depth images. Secondly, we use luminance information to better restore object boundaries masked with noise in the depth images. Information from luminance images is introduced into the estimation formula through the use of fuzzy membership functions. In particular, we take the correlation between the measured depth and luminance into account, and the fact that edges (object boundaries) present in the depth image are likely to occur in the luminance image as well. The results on real 3D images show a significant improvement over the state-of-the-art in the field.

  9. Nigrosome 1 visibility at susceptibility weighted 7T MRI—A dependable diagnostic marker for Parkinson's disease or merely an inconsistent, age-dependent imaging finding?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carolin Gramsch; Iris Reuter; Oliver Kraff; Harald H Quick; Christian Tanislav; Florian Roessler; Cornelius Deuschl; Michael Forsting; Marc Schlamann

    2017-01-01

    Background Visualisation of nigrosome 1, a substructure of the healthy substantia nigra, was restricted in susceptibility weighted MR imaging in almost all patients with Parkinson's disease studied so far...

  10. Patient positioning in radiotherapy based on surface imaging using time of flight cameras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilles, M; Fayad, H; Miglierini, P; Clement, J F; Scheib, S; Cozzi, L; Bert, J; Boussion, N; Schick, U; Pradier, O; Visvikis, D

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate the patient positioning accuracy in radiotherapy using a stereo-time of flight (ToF)-camera system. A system using two ToF cameras was used to scan the surface of the patients in order to position them daily on the treatment couch. The obtained point clouds were registered to (a) detect translations applied to the table (intrafraction motion) and (b) predict the displacement to be applied in order to place the patient in its reference position (interfraction motion). The measures provided by this system were compared to the effectively applied translations. The authors analyzed 150 fractions including lung, pelvis/prostate, and head and neck cancer patients. The authors obtained small absolute errors for displacement detection: 0.8 ± 0.7, 0.8 ± 0.7, and 0.7 ± 0.6 mm along the vertical, longitudinal, and lateral axes, respectively, and 0.8 ± 0.7 mm for the total norm displacement. Lung cancer patients presented the largest errors with a respective mean of 1.1 ± 0.9, 0.9 ± 0.9, and 0.8 ± 0.7 mm. The proposed stereo-ToF system allows for sufficient accuracy and faster patient repositioning in radiotherapy. Its capability to track the complete patient surface in real time could allow, in the future, not only for an accurate positioning but also a real time tracking of any patient intrafraction motion (translation, involuntary, and breathing).

  11. Evaluation of Renal Oxygenation Level Changes after Water Loading Using Susceptibility-Weighted Imaging and T2* Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jiule; Wu, Dongmei; Chen, Jie; Pan, Liang; Sun, Jun; Xing, Shijun; Dai, Yongming

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the feasibility of susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) while monitoring changes in renal oxygenation level after water loading. Materials and Methods Thirty-two volunteers (age, 28.0 ± 2.2 years) were enrolled in this study. SWI and multi-echo gradient echo sequence-based T2* mapping were used to cover the kidney before and after water loading. Cortical and medullary parameters were measured using small regions of interest, and their relative changes due to water loading were calculated based on baseline and post-water loading data. An intraclass correlation coefficient analysis was used to assess inter-observer reliability of each parameter. A receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was conducted to compare the performance of the two methods for detecting renal oxygenation changes due to water loading. Results Both medullary phase and medullary T2* values increased after water loading (p 0.05). Interobserver reliability was excellent for the T2* values, good for SWI cortical phase values, and moderate for the SWI medullary phase values. The area under receiver operating characteristic curve of the SWI medullary phase values was 0.85 and was not different from the medullary T2* value (0.84). Conclusion Susceptibility-weighted imaging enabled monitoring changes in the oxygenation level in the medulla after water loading, and may allow comparable feasibility to detect renal oxygenation level changes due to water loading compared with that of T2* mapping. PMID:26175582

  12. Fast susceptibility-weighted imaging with three-dimensional short-axis propeller (SAP)-echo-planar imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdsworth, Samantha J; Yeom, Kristen W; Moseley, Michael E; Skare, S

    2015-05-01

    Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) in neuroimaging can be challenging due to long scan times of three-dimensional (3D) gradient recalled echo (GRE), while faster techniques such as 3D interleaved echo-planar imaging (iEPI) are prone to motion artifacts. Here we outline and implement a 3D short-axis propeller echo-planar imaging (SAP-EPI) trajectory as a faster, motion-correctable approach for SWI. Experiments were conducted on a 3T MRI system. The 3D SAP-EPI, 3D iEPI, and 3D GRE SWI scans were acquired on two volunteers. Controlled motion experiments were conducted to test the motion-correction capability of 3D SAP-EPI. The 3D SAP-EPI SWI data were acquired on two pediatric patients as a potential alternative to 2D GRE used clinically. The 3D GRE images had a better target resolution (0.47 × 0.94 × 2 mm, scan time = 5 min), iEPI and SAP-EPI images (resolution = 0.94 × 0.94 × 2 mm) were acquired in a faster scan time (1:52 min) with twice the brain coverage. SAP-EPI showed motion-correction capability and some immunity to undersampling from rejected data. While 3D SAP-EPI suffers from some geometric distortion, its short scan time and motion-correction capability suggest that SAP-EPI may be a useful alternative to GRE and iEPI for use in SWI, particularly in uncooperative patients. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Investigation of cerebral iron deposition in aged patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease using susceptibility-weighted imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Y

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Yin Liu, Jun Liu, Huanghui Liu, Yunjie Liao, Lu Cao, Bin Ye, Wei Wang Department of Radiology, The Third Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan, People’s Republic of China Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate focal iron deposition level in the brain in patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease and its correlation with cerebral small vessel disease imaging markers.Patients and methods: Seventy-four patients with first-ever transient ischemic attack (median age: 69 years; 30 males and 44 females and 77 patients with positive ischemic stroke history (median age: 72 years; 43 males and 34 females were studied retrospectively. On phase image of susceptibility-weighted imaging and regions of interest were manually drawn at the bilateral head of the caudate nucleus, lenticular nucleus (LN, thalamus (TH, frontal white matter, and occipital white matter. The correlation between iron deposition level and the clinical and imaging variables was also investigated.Results: Iron deposition level at LN was significantly higher in patients with previous stroke history. It linearly correlated with the presence and number of cerebral microbleeds (CMBs but not with white matter hyperintensity and lacunar infarct. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that deep structure CMBs were the most relevant in terms of iron deposition at LN.Conclusion: Iron deposition at LN may increase in cases of more severe ischemia in aged patients with transient ischemic attack, and it may be an imaging marker for CMB of ischemic origin. Keywords: cerebral microbleed, ischemia, susceptibility-weighted imaging, iron, lenticular nucleus

  14. Analysis of enlarged images using time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography, computed tomography, and conventional angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Yeong-Cheol; Lee, Hae-Kag; Yang, Han-Jun; Cho, Jae-Hwan

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to assess the accuracy of time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography, computed tomography, and conventional angiography in depicting the actual length of the blood vessels. Three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography and computed tomography angiography were performed using a flow phantom model that was 2.11 mm in diameter and had a total area of 0.26 cm(2). After this, volume rendering technique and the maximum intensity projection method as well as two-dimensional digital subtraction angiography and three-dimensional rotational angiography based on conventional angiography were conducted. For three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography, 8 channel sensitivity encoding (SENSE) head coil for the 3.0 Tesla equipment was used. Fluid was added to the normal saline solution at various rates, such as 11.4, 20.0, 31.4, 40.0, 51.5, 60.0, 71.5, 80.1, 91.5, and 100.1 cm/s using an automatic contrast media injector. Each image was thoroughly examined. After reconstructing the image using the maximum intensity projection method, the length of the conduit in the center of the coronal plane was measured 30 times. After performing computed tomography angiography with the 64-channel CT scanner and 16-channel CT scanner, the images were sent to TeraRecon. Then, the length of the conduit in the center of the coronal plane of each image was measured 30 times after reconstructing the images using volume rendering and maximum intensity projection techniques. For conventional angiography, three-dimensional rotational angiography and two-dimensional digital subtraction angiography were used. Images obtained by three-dimensional rotational angiography were reconstructed and enhanced by 33, 50, and 100 % in the 128 Matrix and the 256 Matrix, respectively on the Xtra Vision workstation. The maximum intensity projection was used for the reconstruction, and the length of the conduit was measured 30 times in the center of the coronal

  15. Low signal intensity in motor cortex on susceptibility-weighted MR imaging is correlated with clinical signs of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Hironobu; Sekiguchi, Kenji; Shimada, Hitoshi; Ueda, Takehiro; Kowa, Hisatomo; Kanda, Fumio; Toda, Tatsushi

    2018-03-01

    There is no reliable objective indicator for upper motor neuron dysfunction in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). To determine the clinical significance and potential utility of magnetic resonance (MR) signals, we investigated the relationship between clinical symptoms and susceptibility changes in the motor cortex measured using susceptibility-weighted MR imaging taken by readily available 3-T MRI in clinical practice. Twenty-four ALS patients and 14 control subjects underwent 3-T MR T1-weighted imaging and susceptibility-weighted MR imaging with the principles of echo-shifting with a train of observations (PRESTO) sequence. We analysed relationships between relative susceptibility changes in the motor cortex assessed using voxel-based analysis (VBA) and clinical scores, including upper motor neuron score, ALS functional rating scale revised score, and Medical Research Council sum score on physical examination. Patients with ALS exhibited significantly lower signal intensity in the precentral gyrus on susceptibility-weighted MR imaging compared with controls. Clinical scores were significantly correlated with susceptibility changes. Importantly, the extent of the susceptibility changes in the bilateral precentral gyri was significantly correlated with upper motor neuron scores. The results of our pilot study using VBA indicated that low signal intensity in motor cortex on susceptibility-weighted MR imaging may correspond to clinical symptoms, particularly upper motor neuron dysfunction. Susceptibility-weighted MR imaging may be a useful diagnostic tool as an objective indicator of upper motor neuron dysfunction.

  16. Transmission-less attenuation estimation from time-of-flight PET histo-images using consistency equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yusheng; Defrise, Michel; Metzler, Scott D.; Matej, Samuel

    2015-08-01

    In positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, attenuation correction with accurate attenuation estimation is crucial for quantitative patient studies. Recent research showed that the attenuation sinogram can be determined up to a scaling constant utilizing the time-of-flight information. The TOF-PET data can be naturally and efficiently stored in a histo-image without information loss, and the radioactive tracer distribution can be efficiently reconstructed using the DIRECT approaches. In this paper, we explore transmission-less attenuation estimation from TOF-PET histo-images. We first present the TOF-PET histo-image formation and the consistency equations in the histo-image parameterization, then we derive a least-squares solution for estimating the directional derivatives of the attenuation factors from the measured emission histo-images. Finally, we present a fast solver to estimate the attenuation factors from their directional derivatives using the discrete sine transform and fast Fourier transform while considering the boundary conditions. We find that the attenuation histo-images can be uniquely determined from the TOF-PET histo-images by considering boundary conditions. Since the estimate of the attenuation directional derivatives can be inaccurate for LORs tangent to the patient boundary, external sources, e.g. a ring or annulus source, might be needed to give an accurate estimate of the attenuation gradient for such LORs. The attenuation estimation from TOF-PET emission histo-images is demonstrated using simulated 2D TOF-PET data.

  17. Improving Signal-to-Noise Ratio in Susceptibility Weighted Imaging: A Novel Multicomponent Non-Local Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquale Borrelli

    Full Text Available In susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI, the high resolution required to obtain a proper contrast generation leads to a reduced signal-to-noise ratio (SNR. The application of a denoising filter to produce images with higher SNR and still preserve small structures from excessive blurring is therefore extremely desirable. However, as the distributions of magnitude and phase noise may introduce biases during image restoration, the application of a denoising filter is non-trivial. Taking advantage of the potential multispectral nature of MR images, a multicomponent approach using a Non-Local Means (MNLM denoising filter may perform better than a component-by-component image restoration method. Here we present a new MNLM-based method (Multicomponent-Imaginary-Real-SWI, hereafter MIR-SWI to produce SWI images with high SNR and improved conspicuity. Both qualitative and quantitative comparisons of MIR-SWI with the original SWI scheme and previously proposed SWI restoring pipelines showed that MIR-SWI fared consistently better than the other approaches. Noise removal with MIR-SWI also provided improvement in contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR and vessel conspicuity at higher factors of phase mask multiplications than the one suggested in the literature for SWI vessel imaging. We conclude that a proper handling of noise in the complex MR dataset may lead to improved image quality for SWI data.

  18. Plant Leaf Imaging using Time of Flight Camera under Sunlight, Shadow and Room Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazmi, Wajahat; Foix, Sergi; Alenya, Guillem

    2012-01-01

    in order to optimize the camera calibration. Our analysis is based on several statistical metrics estimated from the ToF data. We explain the estimation of the metrics and propose a method of predicting the deteriorating behavior of the data in each condition using camera flags. Finally, we also propose...... a method to improve the quality of a ToF image taken in a mixed condition having different ambient light exposures....

  19. Presence of a central vein within white matter lesions on susceptibility weighted imaging: a specific finding for multiple sclerosis?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lummel, Nina; Boeckh-Behrens, Tobias; Brueckmann, Hartmut; Linn, Jennifer [University of Munich, Department of Neuroradiology, Munich (Germany); Schoepf, Veronika [University of Munich, Department of Neuroradiology, Munich (Germany); Medical University of Vienna, MR Centre of Excellence, Vienna (Austria); Burke, Michael [GE Healthcare, Solingen (Germany)

    2011-05-15

    Susceptibility weighted imaging depicts the perivenous extent of multiple sclerosis white matter lesions (MS-WML) in vivo by directly visualizing their centrally running vein. The aim of this study was to investigate the specificity of this finding for MS. Fifteen patients with MS and 15 patients with microangiopathic white matter lesions (mWML) underwent 3T MRI, including a fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequence (FLAIR) and a susceptibility weighted angiography (SWAN). All WMLs were identified on FLAIR and assigned to one of the following localizations: supratentorial peripheral, supratentorial periventricular, or infratentorial. Subsequently, the presence of a central vein within these lesions was assessed on SWAN. A total of 711 MS-WMLs and 1,119 m-WMLs were identified on FLAIR, all of which could also be visualized on SWAN. A central vein was detectable in 80% of the MS-WMLs and in 78% of the m-WMLs (in 73% and 76% of the peripheral, in 92% and 94% of the periventricular, and in 71% and 75% of the infratentorial MS-WMLs and m-WMLs, respectively). With regard to the supratentorial peripheral lesions, significantly more m-WMLs showed a central vein compared to the MS-WMLs. For the other localizations, there was no significant difference between the groups with regard to the percentage of lesions with central vein. Our results indicate that the detection of a central vein within a WML should not be considered a specific finding for MS; it is also found in WMLs of other etiologies. (orig.)

  20. Vascular malformation mimicking multiple sclerosis active plaque: Usefulness of susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) to perform correct diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perri, Marco; Michelini, Giulia; Varrassi, Marco; Splendiani, Alessandra; di Cesare, Ernesto; Masciocchi, Carlo; Gallucci, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Brain focal hyperdensity areas are common findings in computed tomography examinations, often further evaluated in magnetic resonance imaging exams. These are usually haemosiderin and calcified perivascular clusters known as cerebral microbleeds and may be secondary signs of brain disorders. Cerebral microbleeds are paramagnetic and ferromagnetic substances determining magnetic field inhomogeneity. Susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) performed at 3T with phase post-processing is very useful in evaluating this field variation. In fact in the past decade SWI has been increasingly reported for its clinical value in adults with neurologic disorders, traumas, arterial venous malformations, occult venous diseases, tumours and functional brain imaging. The occasional computed tomography findings of single or multiple focal hyperdense areas can mimic many of these brain disorders and lead to misinterpretations. For these reason it is useful to have a more detailed diagnosis with MRI brain examination. The authors highlight the role of SWI sequence in the differential diagnosis among active plaque, vascular malformation and haemorrhagic lesion in a case report of a 41-year-old woman suffering from multiple sclerosis with a focal hyperdense area reported in a computed tomography brain examination. PMID:26450102

  1. Imaging and clinical characteristics of children with multiple foci of microsusceptibility changes in the brain on susceptibility-weighted MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niwa, Tetsu [Kanagawa Children' s Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Yokohama (Japan); University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Heidelberglaan 100, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Aida, Noriko; Fujita, Kazutoshi; Shishikura, Ayako [Kanagawa Children' s Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Yokohama (Japan); Takahara, Taro; Kwee, Thomas C. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Heidelberglaan 100, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Miyata, Daiki [Kanagawa Children' s Medical Center, Department of Circulation Medicine, Yokohama (Japan); Inoue, Tomio [Yokohama City University, Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Yokohama (Japan)

    2010-10-15

    Microsusceptibility changes in the brain are well known to correspond with microbleeds or micrometal fragments in adults, but this phenomenon has not been explored well in children. To assess imaging and clinical characteristics of children with multiple foci of microsusceptibility changes using susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI). Between 2006 and 2008, 12 children with multiple foci of microsusceptibility on SWI without corresponding abnormal signal on conventional MRI were identified and were retrospectively assessed. The locations of foci of microsusceptibility included the cerebral white matter, basal ganglia, brainstem and cerebellar white matter, without any clear systematic anatomic distribution. CT (n = 5) showed no calcification at the locations corresponding to the microsusceptibility on SWI. Conventional MR imaging showed white matter volume loss (n = 5), delayed myelination (n = 2), acute infarction (n = 1), chronic infarction (n = 1), meningitis (n = 1), slight signal abnormality in the white matter (n = 1) and no abnormal findings (n = 1). Follow-up SWI (n = 3) showed no change of the microsusceptibility foci. Interestingly, all children had a history of heart surgery under extracorporeal circulation for congenital heart disease. Multiple foci of microsusceptibility can be seen in the brain on SWI in children with congenital heart disease who underwent heart surgery with extracorporeal circulation. (orig.)

  2. Cerebral microhemorrhages detected by susceptibility-weighted imaging in amateur boxers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasiloglu, Z I; Albayram, S; Selcuk, H; Ceyhan, E; Delil, S; Arkan, B; Baskoy, L

    2011-01-01

    SWI is a new technique for evaluating diffuse axonal injury associated with punctate hemorrhages. The aim of our study was to determine the prevalence of cerebral microhemorrhages in amateur boxers compared with nonboxers by using SWI and to evaluate the sensitivity of SWI compared with T2 FSE and T2*GE sequences. We performed cranial MR imaging with a 1.5T scanner in 21 amateur boxers and 21 control subjects. The study protocol included conventional MR images, T2 FSE, T2*GE, and SWI sequences. The proportions of boxers and controls having CSP, DPVS, cerebral atrophy, cerebellar atrophy, ventricular dilation, PSWMD, and microhemorrhages were computed and were compared by using the χ(2) test of proportions. The relationship between microhemorrhages and boxing-related covariates was assessed by using the Wilcoxon rank sum test. The association between the categories was tested by using the Fisher exact test. Using SWI, microhemorrhages were found in 2 (9.52%) of 21 boxers. The microhemorrhages were not visible on T2 FSE or T2*GE images. The proportion of subjects with microhemorrhages did not differ significantly between the boxers and control subjects (χ(2) = 0.525, df = 1, P = .4688). The prevalence of CSP and DPVS was significantly higher in the boxers than in the control subjects. More microhemorrhages were detected in amateur boxers than in controls, but this difference was not statistically significant.

  3. Time-of-Flight Microwave Camera

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Charvat, Gregory; Temme, Andrew; Feigin, Micha; Raskar, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    .... We demonstrate a multispectral time-of-flight microwave imaging system which overcomes these challenges with a large passive aperture to improve lateral resolution, multiple illumination points...

  4. Diagnostic value of susceptibility-weighted imaging of abdominal wall endometriomas during the cyclic menstrual changes: A preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solak, Aynur, E-mail: aynursolak@yahoo.com [Radiology Department of Sifa University Hospital, 35240, Fevzipasa Boulvard 172/2, Basmane, Izmir (Turkey); Şahin, Neslin, E-mail: neslinshn@gmail.com [Radiology Department of Sifa University Hospital, 35240, Fevzipasa Boulvard 172/2, Basmane, Izmir (Turkey); Genç, Berhan, E-mail: be.genc@hotmail.com [Radiology Department of Sifa University Hospital, 35240, Fevzipasa Boulvard 172/2, Basmane, Izmir (Turkey); Sever, Ali Rıza, E-mail: arsever@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Maidstone Hospital, Breast Unit, Maidstone, Kent (United Kingdom); Genç, Mine, E-mail: drminegenc@hotmail.com [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Sifa University Hospital, 35240, Fevzipasa Boulvard 172/2, Basmane, Izmir (Turkey); Sivrikoz, Oya Nermin, E-mail: onsoral@yahoo.com [Pathology Department of Sifa University Hospital, 35240, Bornova, Izmir (Turkey)

    2013-09-15

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to investigate the value of susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) for the evaluation of cyclic morphological and hemorrhagic changes in abdominal wall endometriomas (AWE). Materials and methods: Fourteen patients with a total of 17 lesions who were admitted with complaints of abdominal wall mass and cyclic pain were evaluated by MRI. Patients were scanned during the first three days of the menstrual cycle and during the mid-cycle phase (day 13–15). In addition to conventional images SWI was performed. The signal changes within the lesions on SWI were compared and graded on both studies. Results: There was no significant difference in the size of the lesions in the early days of the menstruation compared to the mid-menstrual period. The SWI taken on mid-cycle phase showed that the center was hyperintense and the peripheral zone was hypointense in all lesions. A signal void related to increased blood and the shrinkage of complete disappearance of hyperintensity in the venter of the lesion was seen 15 (88%) of the 17 cases on the SWI series performed during the menstrual phase scan. Conclusion: SWI is a sensitive technique and has the capability to show hemorrhage and deposition of hemosiderin within the lesions. For patients suspected with AWE, valuable diagnostic findings may be obtained if the MRI examination including SWI is performed during the early and mid phase menstrual cycle.

  5. Sensors for 3D Imaging: Metric Evaluation and Calibration of a CCD/CMOS Time-of-Flight Camera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulvio Rinaudo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available 3D imaging with Time-of-Flight (ToF cameras is a promising recent technique which allows 3D point clouds to be acquired at video frame rates. However, the distance measurements of these devices are often affected by some systematic errors which decrease the quality of the acquired data. In order to evaluate these errors, some experimental tests on a CCD/CMOS ToF camera sensor, the SwissRanger (SR-4000 camera, were performed and reported in this paper. In particular, two main aspects are treated: the calibration of the distance measurements of the SR-4000 camera, which deals with evaluation of the camera warm up time period, the distance measurement error evaluation and a study of the influence on distance measurements of the camera orientation with respect to the observed object; the second aspect concerns the photogrammetric calibration of the amplitude images delivered by the camera using a purpose-built multi-resolution field made of high contrast targets.

  6. Sensors for 3D Imaging: Metric Evaluation and Calibration of a CCD/CMOS Time-of-Flight Camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiabrando, Filiberto; Chiabrando, Roberto; Piatti, Dario; Rinaudo, Fulvio

    2009-01-01

    3D imaging with Time-of-Flight (ToF) cameras is a promising recent technique which allows 3D point clouds to be acquired at video frame rates. However, the distance measurements of these devices are often affected by some systematic errors which decrease the quality of the acquired data. In order to evaluate these errors, some experimental tests on a CCD/CMOS ToF camera sensor, the SwissRanger (SR)-4000 camera, were performed and reported in this paper. In particular, two main aspects are treated: the calibration of the distance measurements of the SR-4000 camera, which deals with evaluation of the camera warm up time period, the distance measurement error evaluation and a study of the influence on distance measurements of the camera orientation with respect to the observed object; the second aspect concerns the photogrammetric calibration of the amplitude images delivered by the camera using a purpose-built multi-resolution field made of high contrast targets.

  7. Clinical Assessment of Emission- and Segmentation-Based MR-Guided Attenuation Correction in Whole-Body Time-of-Flight PET/MR Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehranian, Abolfazl; Zaidi, Habib

    2015-01-01

    The joint maximum-likelihood reconstruction of activity and attenuation (MLAA) for emission-based attenuation correction has regained attention since the advent of time-of-flight PET/MR imaging. Recently, we improved the performance of the MLAA algorithm using an MR imaging-constrained gaussian

  8. Susceptibility-weighted imaging using inter-echo-variance channel combination for improved contrast at 7 tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Zahra; Liu, Junmin; Solovey, Igor; Menon, Ravi S; Drangova, Maria

    2017-04-01

    To implement and optimize a new approach for susceptibility-weighted image (SWI) generation from multi-echo multi-channel image data and compare its performance against optimized traditional SWI pipelines. Five healthy volunteers were imaged at 7 Tesla. The inter-echo-variance (IEV) channel combination, which uses the variance of the local frequency shift at multiple echo times as a weighting factor during channel combination, was used to calculate multi-echo local phase shift maps. Linear phase masks were combined with the magnitude to generate IEV-SWI. The performance of the IEV-SWI pipeline was compared with that of two accepted SWI pipelines-channel combination followed by (i) Homodyne filtering (HPH-SWI) and (ii) unwrapping and high-pass filtering (SVD-SWI). The filtering steps of each pipeline were optimized. Contrast-to-noise ratio was used as the comparison metric. Qualitative assessment of artifact and vessel conspicuity was performed and processing time of pipelines was evaluated. The optimized IEV-SWI pipeline (σ = 7 mm) resulted in continuous vessel visibility throughout the brain. IEV-SWI had significantly higher contrast compared with HPH-SWI and SVD-SWI (P IEV-SWI pipeline processed a six-echo 16-channel dataset in under 10 min. IEV-SWI benefits from channel-by-channel processing of phase data and results in high contrast images with an optimal balance between contrast and background noise removal, thereby presenting evidence of importance of the order in which postprocessing techniques are applied for multi-channel SWI generation. 2 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;45:1113-1124. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  9. Using susceptibility-weighted images to quantify iron deposition differences in amnestic mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Zhu, Dan; Wei, Xiao-Er; Li, Yue-Hua; Li, Wen-Bin

    2013-01-01

    To quantify iron deposition in Alzheimer's disease (AD), amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), and control individuals using susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI). Sixty participants (22 aMCI, 20 AD, 18 normal controls) underwent conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and SWI using axial/oblique coronal sequences. Phase images were used to calculate bilateral iron deposition in 18 regions of interest (ROI). The radian angle value was calculated and compared between the three participant groups. The difference in radian angle value was significant between the aMCI and control groups in the left (L)-hippocampus, L-head of the caudate nucleus, R-lenticular nucleus, L-lenticular nucleus (P =0.02239, radian angle value was significant between the AD and aMCI groups in the R-cerebellar hemisphere, L-cerebellar hemisphere, R-hippocampus, L-hippocampus, R-red nucleus, R-thalamus, L-thalamus, and splenium of corpus callosum (P =0.02754, 0.01839, 0.00934, 0.04316, 0.02472, 0.00152, <0.001, 0.01448, respectively). Pearson correlation coefficients of the Mini-Mental State Examination score were all significant for the bilateral cerebellar hemisphere, hippocampus, red nucleus, lenticular nucleus, thalamus, R-head of the caudate nucleus, and splenium of corpus callosum. Iron deposition in the hippocampus, head of the caudate nucleuslenticular nucleus, and thalamus are significantly different between individuals with aMCI, AD, and controls. The thalamus is a particularly sensitive area. Using SWI to quantify the iron deposition is a useful tool in detecting aMCI and AD.

  10. Fully 3D list-mode time-of-flight PET image reconstruction on GPUs using CUDA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jing-Yu; Pratx, Guillem; Prevrhal, Sven; Levin, Craig S

    2011-12-01

    List-mode processing is an efficient way of dealing with the sparse nature of positron emission tomography (PET) data sets and is the processing method of choice for time-of-flight (ToF) PET image reconstruction. However, the massive amount of computation involved in forward projection and backprojection limits the application of list-mode reconstruction in practice, and makes it challenging to incorporate accurate system modeling. The authors present a novel formulation for computing line projection operations on graphics processing units (GPUs) using the compute unified device architecture (CUDA) framework, and apply the formulation to list-mode ordered-subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) image reconstruction. Our method overcomes well-known GPU challenges such as divergence of compute threads, limited bandwidth of global memory, and limited size of shared memory, while exploiting GPU capabilities such as fast access to shared memory and efficient linear interpolation of texture memory. Execution time comparison and image quality analysis of the GPU-CUDA method and the central processing unit (CPU) method are performed on several data sets acquired on a preclinical scanner and a clinical ToF scanner. When applied to line projection operations for non-ToF list-mode PET, this new GPU-CUDA method is >200 times faster than a single-threaded reference CPU implementation. For ToF reconstruction, we exploit a ToF-specific optimization to improve the efficiency of our parallel processing method, resulting in GPU reconstruction >300 times faster than the CPU counterpart. For a typical whole-body scan with 75 × 75 × 26 image matrix, 40.7 million LORs, 33 subsets, and 3 iterations, the overall processing time is 7.7 s for GPU and 42 min for a single-threaded CPU. Image quality and accuracy are preserved for multiple imaging configurations and reconstruction parameters, with normalized root mean squared (RMS) deviation less than 1% between CPU and GPU

  11. Prominent hypointense veins on susceptibility weighted image in the cat brain with acute infarction: DWI, SWI, and PWI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Woo; Kim, Hak Jin; Choi, Seon Hee; Kim, Dong Chan

    2014-10-01

    The multiple prominent hypointense veins on susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) have been found in the ischemic territory of patients with acute ischemic stroke. Venous side is the unknown area in the hemodynamics of brain infarction. To evaluate the venous aspect in acute brain infarction through an animal study. The acute infarction in cat brains was induced with a bolus infusion of 0.25 mL of triolein through one side of the common carotid artery. The magnetic resonance (MR) images, including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map, SW, and perfusion-weighted (PWI) images, were obtained serially at 2 h (n = 17), 1 day (n = 11), and 4 days (n = 4) after triolein infusion. The obtained MR images were evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively. For qualitative assessment, the signal intensity of the serial MR images was evaluated. The presence or absence and the location with serial changes of infarction were identified on DWI and ADC map images. The presence or absence of prominent hypointense veins and the serial changes of cortical veins were also evaluated on SWI. Quantitative assessment was performed by comparing the relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV), cerebral blood flow (rCBF), and mean transit times (MTT) of the lesions with those of the contralateral normal side calculated on PWI. The serial changes of rCBV, rCBF, and MTT ratio were also evaluated. Acute infarction in the first and second medial gyrus of lesion hemisphere was found by qualitative evaluation of DWI and ADC map images. On the serial evaluation of SWI, the cortical veins of cat brain with infarction were obscured at 2 h and then re-appeared at 1 day. The hemorrhage transformation and prominent hypointense veins were seen at 4 days on SWI. The quantitative evaluation revealed increased MTT ratios and decreased rCBV and rCBF ratios on PWIs in the acute infarction of cat brain. The prominent hypointense veins on SWI were seen in the half of the acute

  12. Improvement of Attenuation Correction in Time-of-Flight PET/MR Imaging with a Positron-Emitting Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollet, Pieter; Keereman, Vincent; Bini, Jason; Izquierdo-Garcia, David; Fayad, Zahi A.; Vandenberghe, Stefaan

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative PET imaging relies on accurate attenuation correction. Recently, there has been growing interest in combining state-of-the-art PET systems with MR imaging in a sequential or fully integrated setup. As CT becomes unavailable for these systems, an alternative approach to the CT-based reconstruction of attenuation coefficients (μ values) at 511 keV must be found. Deriving μ values directly from MR images is difficult because MR signals are related to the proton density and relaxation properties of tissue. Therefore, most research groups focus on segmentation or atlas registration techniques. Although studies have shown that these methods provide viable solutions in particular applications, some major drawbacks limit their use in whole-body PET/MR. Previously, we used an annulus-shaped PET transmission source inside the field of view of a PET scanner to measure attenuation coefficients at 511 keV. In this work, we describe the use of this method in studies of patients with the sequential time-of-flight (TOF) PET/MR scanner installed at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY. Methods Five human PET/MR and CT datasets were acquired. The transmission-based attenuation correction method was compared with conventional CT-based attenuation correction and the 3-segment, MR-based attenuation correction available on the TOF PET/MR imaging scanner. Results The transmission-based method overcame most problems related to the MR-based technique, such as truncation artifacts of the arms, segmentation artifacts in the lungs, and imaging of cortical bone. Additionally, the TOF capabilities of the PET detectors allowed the simultaneous acquisition of transmission and emission data. Compared with the MR-based approach, the transmission-based method provided average improvements in PET quantification of 6.4%, 2.4%, and 18.7% in volumes of interest inside the lung, soft tissue, and bone tissue, respectively. Conclusion In conclusion, a transmission

  13. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional dynamic imaging of live biofilms in a microchannel by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, Xin; Marshall, Matthew J.; Xiong, Yijia; Ma, Xiang; Zhou, Yufan; Tucker, Abigail E.; Zhu, Zihua; Liu, Songqin; Yu, Xiao-Ying

    2015-05-01

    A vacuum compatible microfluidic reactor, SALVI (System for Analysis at the Liquid Vacuum Interface) was employed for in situ chemical imaging of live biofilms using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). Depth profiling by sputtering materials in sequential layers resulted in live biofilm spatial chemical mapping. 2D images were reconstructed to report the first 3D images of hydrated biofilm elucidating spatial and chemical heterogeneity. 2D image principal component analysis (PCA) was conducted among biofilms at different locations in the microchannel. Our approach directly visualized spatial and chemical heterogeneity within the living biofilm by dynamic liquid ToF-SIMS.

  14. Sensitivity of 3D gradient recalled echo susceptibility-weighted imaging technique compared to computed tomography angiography for detection of middle cerebral artery thrombus in acute stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Agarwal

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We aimed at comparing the sensitivity of magnetic resonance (MR susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI with computed tomography angiography (CTA in the detection of middle cerebral artery (MCA thrombus in acute stroke. Seventy-nine patients with acute MCA stroke was selected using our search engine software; only the ones showing restricted diffusion in the MCA territory on diffusion-weighted images were included. We finally selected 35 patients who had done both MRI (including SWI and CTA. Twenty random subjects with completely normal MRI (including SWI exam were selected as control. Two neuroradiologists (blinded to the presence or absence of stroke reviewed the SW images and then compared the findings with CT angiogram (in patients with stroke. The number of MCA segments showing thrombus in each patient was tabulated to estimate the thrombus burden. Thrombus was detected on SWI in one or more MCA segments in 30 out of 35 patients, on the first review. Of the 30, SWI showed thrombus in more than one MCA segments in 7 patients. CTA depicted branch occlusion in 31 cases. Thrombus was seen on both SWI and CTA in 28 patients. Thrombus was noted in two patients on SWI only, with no corresponding abnormality seen on CTA. Two patients with acute MCA showed no vascular occlusion or thrombus on either CTA or SWI. Only two case of false-positive thrombus was reported in normal control subjects. Susceptibility-weighted images had sensitivity and specificity of 86% and 90% respectively, with positive predictive value 94%. Sensitivity was 86% for SWI, compared with 89% for CTA, and this difference was statistically insignificant (P>0.05. Of all the positive cases on CTA (31 corresponding thrombus was seen on SWI in 90% of subjects (28 of 31. Susceptibility-weighted imaging has high sensitivity for detection of thrombus in acute MCA stroke. Moreover, SWI is a powerful technique for estimation of thrombus burden, which can be challenging on CTA.

  15. Strategically acquired gradient Echo (STAGE) imaging, part I: Creating enhanced T1 contrast and standardized susceptibility weighted imaging and quantitative susceptibility mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yongsheng; Liu, Saifeng; Wang, Yu; Kang, Yan; Mark Haacke, E

    2017-10-19

    To provide whole brain grey matter (GM) to white matter (WM) contrast enhanced T1W (T1WE) images, multi-echo quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM), proton density (PD) weighted images, T1 maps, PD maps, susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI), and R2* maps with minimal misregistration in scanning times 3T) were used for both T1 mapping with radio frequency (RF) transmit field correction and creating enhanced GM/WM contrast (the T1WE). The proposed T1WE image was created from a combination of the proton density weighted (6°, PDW) and T1W (24°) images and corrected for RF transmit field variations. Prior to the QSM calculation, a multi-echo phase unwrapping strategy was implemented using the unwrapped short echo to unwrap the longer echo to speed up computation. R2* maps were used to mask deep grey matter and veins during the iterative QSM calculation. A weighted-average sum of susceptibility maps was generated to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). The proposed T1WE image has a significantly improved CNR both for WM to deep GM and WM to cortical GM compared to the acquired T1W image (the first echo of 24° scan) and the T1MPRAGE image. The weighted-average susceptibility maps have 80±26%, 55±22%, 108±33% SNR increases for the ten datasets compared to the single echo result of 17.5ms, and 80±36%, 59±29% and 108±37% CNR increases for the putamen, caudate nucleus, and globus pallidus, respectively. STAGE imaging offers the potential to create a standardized brain imaging protocol providing four pieces of quantitative tissue property information and multiple types of qualitative information in just 5min. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Validity of computational hemodynamics in human arteries based on 3D time-of-flight MR angiography and 2D electrocardiogram gated phase contrast images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Huidan (Whitney); Chen, Xi; Chen, Rou; Wang, Zhiqiang; Lin, Chen; Kralik, Stephen; Zhao, Ye

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we demonstrate the validity of 4-D patient-specific computational hemodynamics (PSCH) based on 3-D time-of-flight (TOF) MR angiography (MRA) and 2-D electrocardiogram (ECG) gated phase contrast (PC) images. The mesoscale lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is employed to segment morphological arterial geometry from TOF MRA, to extract velocity profiles from ECG PC images, and to simulate fluid dynamics on a unified GPU accelerated computational platform. Two healthy volunteers are recruited to participate in the study. For each volunteer, a 3-D high resolution TOF MRA image and 10 2-D ECG gated PC images are acquired to provide the morphological geometry and the time-varying flow velocity profiles for necessary inputs of the PSCH. Validation results will be presented through comparisons of LBM vs. 4D Flow Software for flow rates and LBM simulation vs. MRA measurement for blood flow velocity maps. Indiana University Health (IUH) Values Fund.

  17. T2*-based MR imaging (gradient echo or susceptibility-weighted imaging) in midline and off-midline intracranial germ cell tumors: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morana, Giovanni; Alves, Cesar Augusto; Tortora, Domenico; Finlay, Jonathan L; Severino, Mariasavina; Nozza, Paolo; Ravegnani, Marcello; Pavanello, Marco; Milanaccio, Claudia; Maghnie, Mohamad; Rossi, Andrea; Garrè, Maria Luisa

    2018-01-01

    The role of T2*-based MR imaging in intracranial germ cell tumors (GCTs) has not been fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) or T2* gradient echo (GRE) features of germinomas and non-germinomatous germ cell tumors (NGGCTs) in midline and off-midline locations. We retrospectively evaluated all consecutive pediatric patients referred to our institution between 2005 and 2016, for newly diagnosed, treatment-naïve intracranial GCT, who underwent MRI, including T2*-based MR imaging (T2* GRE sequences or SWI). Standard pre- and post-contrast T1- and T2-weighted imaging characteristics along with T2*-based MR imaging features of all lesions were evaluated. Diagnosis was performed in accordance with the SIOP CNS GCT protocol criteria. Twenty-four subjects met the inclusion criteria (17 males and 7 females). There were 17 patients with germinomas, including 5 basal ganglia primaries, and 7 patients with secreting NGGCT. All off-midline germinomas presented with SWI or GRE hypointensity; among midline GCT, all NGGCTs showed SWI or GRE hypointensity whereas all but one pure germinoma were isointense or hyperintense to normal parenchyma. A significant difference emerged on T2*-based MR imaging among midline germinomas, NGGCTs, and off-midline germinomas (p < 0.001). Assessment of the SWI or GRE characteristics of intracranial GCT may potentially assist in differentiating pure germinomas from NGGCT and in the characterization of basal ganglia involvement. T2*-based MR imaging is recommended in case of suspected intracranial GCT.

  18. Use of Ultrasmall Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Enhanced Susceptibility Weighted Imaging and Mean Vessel Density Imaging to Monitor Antiangiogenic Effects of Sorafenib on Experimental Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuohui Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated effectiveness of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide enhanced susceptibility weighted imaging (USPIO-enhanced SWI and mean vessel density imaging (Q in monitoring antiangiogenic effects of Sorafenib on orthotopic hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Thirty-five HCC xenografts were established. USPIO-enhanced SWI and Q were performed on a 1.5 T MR scanner at baseline, 7, 14, and 21 days after Sorafenib treatment. Intratumoral susceptibility signal intensity (ITSS and Q were serially measured and compared between the treated (n = 15 and control groups (n = 15. Both ITSS and Q were significantly lower in the treated group at each time point (P < 0.05. Measurements in the treated group showed that ITSS persisted at 7 days (P = 0.669 and increased at 14 and 21 days (P < 0.05, while Q significantly declined at 7 days (P = 0.028 and gradually increased at 14 and 21 days. In the treated group, significant correlation was found between Q and histologic microvessel density (MVD (r = 0.753, P < 0.001, and ITSS correlated well with MVD (r = 0.742, P = 0.002 after excluding the data from baseline. This study demonstrated that USPIO-enhanced SWI and Q could provide novel biomarkers for evaluating antiangiogenic effects of Sorafenib on HCC.

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in Cerebral Venous Thrombosis due to Behcet's Disease and the Importance of Susceptibility-Weighted Imaging: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Deniz Bulut

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT is an uncommon disorder that can lead to an unfavorable prognosis and even be fatal in some cases.CVT is seen mainly in females, especially those between the ages of 20 and 35 years. The disorder has many etiologic factors. This report presents the case of a 34-year-old male patient with Behçet’s disease admitted with complaints of headache and vomiting. The major venous vascular structures that were visible in cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and MR venography were found to be filled with thrombosis. The patient’s susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI revealed marked hypointensities consistent with thrombosis in the transverse sinus, sigmoid sinus, and in the venous vascular structures of the posterior fossa. Thus, it was found that cerebral venous thrombosis due to Behçet disease could clearly be determined by the SWI sequence; in addition, thrombosis by the venous vascularity in veins of the posterior fossa were more visible than via the other MR sequences. The conclusion was made that SWI can promptly demonstrate cerebral venous thrombosis, contribute to the diagnosis, and provide useful additional information.

  20. Imaging of VSOP labeled stem cells in agarose phantoms with susceptibility weighted and T2* weighted MR Imaging at 3T: determination of the detection limit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Lobsien

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to evaluate the detectability of stem cells labeled with very small iron oxide particles (VSOP at 3T with susceptibility weighted (SWI and T2* weighted imaging as a methodological basis for subsequent examinations in a large animal stroke model (sheep. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We examined ovine mesenchymal stem cells labeled with VSOP in agarose layer phantoms. The experiments were performed in 2 different groups, with quantities of 0-100,000 labeled cells per layer. 15 different SWI- and T2*-weighted sequences and 3 RF coils were used. All measurements were carried out on a clinical 3T MRI. Images of Group A were analyzed by four radiologists blinded for the number of cells, and rated for detectability according to a four-step scale. Images of Group B were subject to a ROI-based analysis of signal intensities. Signal deviations of more than the 0.95 confidence interval in cell containing layers as compared to the mean of the signal intensity of non cell bearing layers were considered significant. RESULTS: GROUP A: 500 or more labeled cells were judged as confidently visible when examined with a SWI-sequence with 0.15 mm slice thickness. Group B: 500 or more labeled cells showed a significant signal reduction in SWI sequences with a slice thickness of 0.25 mm. Slice thickness and cell number per layer had a significant influence on the amount of detected signal reduction. CONCLUSION: 500 VSOP labeled stem cells could be detected with SWI imaging at 3 Tesla using an experimental design suitable for large animal models.

  1. Measurement of the velocity of neutral fragments by the "correlated ion and neutral time of flight" method combined with "velocity-map imaging"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthias, F.; Feketeová, L.; Della Negra, R.; Dupasquier, T.; Fillol, R.; Abdoul-Carime, H.; Farizon, B.; Farizon, M.; Märk, T. D.

    2017-08-01

    In the challenging field of imaging molecular dynamics, a novel method has been developed and implemented that allows the measurement of the velocity of neutral fragments produced in collision induced dissociation experiments on an event-by-event basis. This has been made possible by combining a correlated ion and neutral time of flight method with a velocity map imaging technique. This new method relies on a multiparametric correlated detection of the neutral and charged fragments from collision induced dissociation on one single detector. Its implementation on the DIAM device (Device for irradiation of biomolecular clusters) (Dispositif d'Irradiation d'Agrégats bioMoléculaires) allowed us to measure the velocity distribution of water molecules evaporated from collision induced dissociation of mass- and energy-selected protonated water clusters.

  2. Qualitative and Quantitative Evaluation of Blob-Based Time-of-Flight PET Image Reconstruction in Hybrid Brain PET/MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leemans, Eva L; Kotasidis, Fotis; Wissmeyer, Michael; Garibotto, Valentina; Zaidi, Habib

    2015-10-01

    Many neurological diseases affect small structures in the brain and, as such, reliable visual evaluation and accurate quantification are required. Recent technological developments made the clinical use of hybrid positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance (PET/MR) systems possible, providing both functional and anatomical information in a single imaging session. Nevertheless, there is a trade-off between spatial resolution and image quality (contrast and noise), which is dictated mainly by the chosen acquisition and reconstruction protocols. Image reconstruction algorithms using spherical symmetric basis functions (blobs) for image representation have a number of additional parameters that impact both the qualitative and quantitative image characteristics. Hence, a detailed investigation of the blob-based reconstruction characteristics using different parameters is needed to achieve optimal reconstruction results. This work evaluated the impact of a range of blob parameters on image quality and quantitative accuracy of brain PET images acquired on the Ingenuity Time-of-Flight (TOF) PET/MR system. Two different phantoms were used to simulate brain imaging applications. Image contrast and noise characteristics were assessed using an image quality phantom. Quantitative performance in a clinical setting was investigated using the Hoffman 3D brain phantom at various count levels. Furthermore, the visual quality of four clinical studies was scored blindly by two experienced physicians to qualitatively evaluate the influence of different reconstruction protocols, hereby providing indications on parameters producing the best image quality. Quantitative evaluation using the image quality phantom showed that larger basis function radii result in lower contrast recovery (∼2%) and lower variance levels (∼15%). The brain phantom and clinical studies confirmed these observations since lower contrast was seen between anatomical structures. High and low count statistics

  3. On the analysis of time-of-flight spin-echo modulated dark-field imaging data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sales, Morten; Plomp, Jeroen; Bouwman, Wim G.

    2017-01-01

    Spin-Echo Modulated Small Angle Neutron Scattering with spatial resolution, i.e. quantitative Spin-Echo Dark Field Imaging, is an emerging technique coupling neutron imaging with spatially resolved quantitative small angle scattering information. However, the currently achieved relatively large...... modulation periods of the order of millimeters are superimposed to the images of the samples. So far this required an independent reduction and analyses of the image and scattering information encoded in the measured data and is involving extensive curve fitting routines. Apart from requiring a priori...... decisions potentially limiting the information content that is extractable also a straightforward judgment of the data quality and information content is hindered. In contrast we propose a significantly simplified routine directly applied to the measured data, which does not only allow an immediate first...

  4. In situ time-of-flight neutron imaging of NiO-YSZ anode support reduction under influence of stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makowska, Malgorzata Grazyna; Strobl, Markus; Lauridsen, Erik M.

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on in situ macroscopic scale imaging of NiO-YSZ (YSZ is yttria-stabilized zirconia) reduction under applied stress - a phase transition taking place in solid oxide electrochemical cells in a reducing atmosphere of a hydrogen/nitrogen mixture and at operation temperatures of up...... of chemical and physical processes requiring controlled atmosphere and elevated temperature. The first type of measurement is based on alternating stages of short-term partial chemical reaction and longer neutron image acquisition, and the second type is a real in situ neutron imaging experiment. Results...... of applying energy-resolved neutron imaging with both approaches to the NiO-YSZ reduction investigation indicate enhancement of the reduction rate due to applied stress, which is consistent with the results of the authors’ previous research....

  5. Diagnostic imaging of dementia with Lewy bodies by susceptibility-weighted imaging of nigrosomes versus striatal dopamine transporter single-photon emission computed tomography: a retrospective observational study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamagata, Koji; Sato, Kanako; Suzuki, Michimasa; Hori, Masaaki; Kumamaru, Kanako K.; Aoki, Shigeki [Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Nakatsuka, Tomoya; Inaoka, Tsutomu; Terada, Hitoshi [Toho University Sakura Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Sakura, Sakura (Japan); Sakakibara, Ryuji; Tsuyusaki, Yohei [Toho University Sakura Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Sakura, Sakura (Japan); Takamura, Tomohiro [University of Yamanashi, Department of Radiology, Chuo-shi, Yamanashi (Japan)

    2017-01-15

    The characteristics of dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), Alzheimer's disease (AD) and amnestic mild cognitive impairment (a-MCI) overlap but require different treatments; therefore, it is important to differentiate these pathologies. Assessment of dopamine uptake in the striatum using dopamine transporter (DaT) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is the gold standard for diagnosing DLB; however, this modality is expensive, time consuming and involves radiation exposure. Degeneration of the substantia nigra nigrosome-1, which occurs in DLB, but not in AD/a-MCI, can be identified by 3T susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI). Therefore, the aim of this retrospective observational study was to compare SWI with DaT-SPECT for differentiation of DLB from AD/a-MCI. SWI data were acquired for patients with clinically diagnosed DLB (n = 29), AD (n = 18), a-MCI (n = 13) and healthy controls (n = 26). Images were analysed for nigrosome-1 degeneration. Diagnostic accuracy was evaluated for DLB, AD and a-MCI compared with striatal dopamine uptake using DaT-SPECT. SWI achieved 90% diagnostic accuracy (93% sensitivity, 87% specificity) for the detection of nigrosome-1 degeneration in DLB and not in AD/a-MCI as compared with 88.3% accuracy (93% sensitivity, 84% specificity) using DaT-SPECT. SWI nigrosome-1 evaluation was useful in differentiating DLB from AD/a-MCI, with high accuracy. This less invasive and less expensive method is a potential alternative to DaT-SPECT for the diagnosis of DLB. (orig.)

  6. Time-of-flight neutron rejection to improve prompt gamma imaging for proton range verification : a simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biegun, Aleksandra K.; Seravalli, Enrica; Lopes, Patricia Cambraia; Rinaldi, Ilaria; Pinto, Marco; Oxley, David C.; Dendooven, Peter; Verhaegen, Frank; Parodi, Katia; Crespo, Paulo; Schaart, Dennis R.

    2012-01-01

    Therapeutic proton and heavier ion beams generate prompt gamma photons that may escape from the patient. In principle, this allows for real-time, in situ monitoring of the treatment delivery, in particular, the hadron range within the patient, by imaging the emitted prompt gamma rays. Unfortunately,

  7. Real Time Imaging of Deuterium in a Duplex Stainless Steel Microstructure by Time-of-Flight SIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobol, O.; Straub, F.; Wirth, Th.; Holzlechner, G.; Boellinghaus, Th.; Unger, W. E. S.

    2016-02-01

    For more than one century, hydrogen assisted degradation of metallic microstructures has been identified as origin for severe technical component failures but the mechanisms behind have not yet been completely understood so far. Any in-situ observation of hydrogen transport phenomena in microstructures will provide more details for further elucidation of these degradation mechanisms. A novel experiment is presented which is designed to elucidate the permeation behaviour of deuterium in a microstructure of duplex stainless steel (DSS). A hydrogen permeation cell within a TOF-SIMS instrument enables electrochemical charging with deuterium through the inner surface of the cell made from DSS. The outer surface of the DSS permeation cell exposed to the vacuum has been imaged by TOF-SIMS vs. increasing time of charging with subsequent chemometric treatment of image data. This in-situ experiment showed evidently that deuterium is permeating much faster through the ferrite phase than through the austenite phase. Moreover, a direct proof for deuterium enrichment at the austenite-ferrite interface has been found.

  8. Sensitivity of susceptibility-weighted imaging in detecting developmental venous anomalies and associated cavernomas and microhemorrhages in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Allen; Poretti, Andrea; Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Goel, Reema; Huisman, Thierry A G M

    2017-08-01

    Developmental venous anomalies (DVA) are common neuroimaging abnormalities that are traditionally diagnosed by contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images as the gold standard. We aimed to evaluate the sensitivity of SWI in detecting DVA and associated cavernous malformations (CM) and microhemorrhages in children in order to determine if SWI may replace contrast-enhanced MRI sequences. Contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images were used as diagnostic gold standard for DVA. The presence of DVA was qualitatively assessed on axial SWI and T2-weighted images by an experienced pediatric neuroradiologist. In addition, the presence of CM and microhemorrhages was evaluated on SWI and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. Fifty-seven children with DVA (34 males, mean age at neuroimaging 11.2 years, range 1 month to 17.9 years) were included in this study. Forty-nine out of 57 DVA were identified on SWI (sensitivity of 86%) and 16 out of 57 DVA were detected on T2-weighted images (sensitivity of 28.1%). General anesthesia-related changes in brain hemodynamics and oxygenation were most likely responsible for the majority of SWI false negative. CM were detected in 12 patients on axial SWI, but only in six on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. Associated microhemorrhages could be identified in four patients on both axial SWI and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images, although more numerous and conspicuous on SWI. SWI can identify DVA and associated cavernous malformations and microhemorrhages with high sensitivity, obviating the need for contrast-enhanced MRI sequences.

  9. Sensitivity of susceptibility-weighted imaging in detecting developmental venous anomalies and associated cavernomas and microhemorrhages in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Allen; Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Goel, Reema; Huisman, Thierry A.G.M. [The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Charlotte R. Bloomberg Children' s Center, Division of Pediatric Radiology and Pediatric Neuroradiology, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Poretti, Andrea [The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Charlotte R. Bloomberg Children' s Center, Division of Pediatric Radiology and Pediatric Neuroradiology, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Kennedy Krieger Institute, Department of Neurogenetics, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2017-08-15

    Developmental venous anomalies (DVA) are common neuroimaging abnormalities that are traditionally diagnosed by contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images as the gold standard. We aimed to evaluate the sensitivity of SWI in detecting DVA and associated cavernous malformations (CM) and microhemorrhages in children in order to determine if SWI may replace contrast-enhanced MRI sequences. Contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images were used as diagnostic gold standard for DVA. The presence of DVA was qualitatively assessed on axial SWI and T2-weighted images by an experienced pediatric neuroradiologist. In addition, the presence of CM and microhemorrhages was evaluated on SWI and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. Fifty-seven children with DVA (34 males, mean age at neuroimaging 11.2 years, range 1 month to 17.9 years) were included in this study. Forty-nine out of 57 DVA were identified on SWI (sensitivity of 86%) and 16 out of 57 DVA were detected on T2-weighted images (sensitivity of 28.1%). General anesthesia-related changes in brain hemodynamics and oxygenation were most likely responsible for the majority of SWI false negative. CM were detected in 12 patients on axial SWI, but only in six on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. Associated microhemorrhages could be identified in four patients on both axial SWI and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images, although more numerous and conspicuous on SWI. SWI can identify DVA and associated cavernous malformations and microhemorrhages with high sensitivity, obviating the need for contrast-enhanced MRI sequences. (orig.)

  10. Susceptibility-weighted imaging improves the diagnostic accuracy of 3T brain MRI in the work-up of parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, F J A; van Rumund, A; Fasen, B A C M; Titulaer, I; Aerts, M; Esselink, R; Bloem, B R; Verbeek, M M; Goraj, B

    2015-03-01

    The differentiation between Parkinson disease and atypical parkinsonian syndromes can be challenging in clinical practice, especially in early disease stages. Brain MR imaging can help to increase certainty about the diagnosis. Our goal was to evaluate the added value of SWI in relation to conventional 3T brain MR imaging for the diagnostic work-up of early-stage parkinsonism. This was a prospective observational cohort study of 65 patients presenting with parkinsonism but with an uncertain initial clinical diagnosis. At baseline, 3T brain MR imaging with conventional and SWI sequences was performed. After clinical follow-up, probable diagnoses could be made in 56 patients, 38 patients diagnosed with Parkinson disease and 18 patients diagnosed with atypical parkinsonian syndromes, including 12 patients diagnosed with multiple system atrophy-parkinsonian form. In addition, 13 healthy controls were evaluated with SWI. Abnormal findings on conventional brain MR imaging were grouped into disease-specific scores. SWI was analyzed by a region-of-interest method of different brain structures. One-way ANOVA was performed to analyze group differences. Receiver operating characteristic analyses were performed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of conventional brain MR imaging separately and combined with SWI. Disease-specific scores of conventional brain MR imaging had a high specificity for atypical parkinsonian syndromes (80%-90%), but sensitivity was limited (50%-80%). The mean SWI signal intensity of the putamen was significantly lower for multiple system atrophy-parkinsonian form than for Parkinson disease and controls (P parkinsonism by identifying severe putaminal hypointensity as a sign indicative of multiple system atrophy-parkinsonian form. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  11. Susceptibility-Weighted Imaging Improves the Diagnostic Accuracy of 3T Brain MRI in the Work-Up of Parkinsonism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, F.J.A.; Rumund, A. van; Fasen, B.A.; Titulaer, I.; Aerts, M.B.; Esselink, R.A.; Bloem, B.R.; Verbeek, M.M.; Goraj, B.M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The differentiation between Parkinson disease and atypical parkinsonian syndromes can be challenging in clinical practice, especially in early disease stages. Brain MR imaging can help to increase certainty about the diagnosis. Our goal was to evaluate the added value of SWI

  12. Decreased brain venous vasculature visibility on susceptibility-weighted imaging venography in patients with multiple sclerosis is related to chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hojnacki David

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The potential pathogenesis between the presence and severity of chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI and its relation to clinical and imaging outcomes in brain parenchyma of multiple sclerosis (MS patients has not yet been elucidated. The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between CCSVI, and altered brain parenchyma venous vasculature visibility (VVV on susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI in patients with MS and in sex- and age-matched healthy controls (HC. Methods 59 MS patients, 41 relapsing-remitting and 18 secondary-progressive, and 33 HC were imaged on a 3T GE scanner using pre- and post-contrast SWI venography. The presence and severity of CCSVI was determined using extra-cranial and trans-cranial Doppler criteria. Apparent total venous volume (ATVV, venous intracranial fraction (VIF and average distance-from-vein (DFV were calculated for various vein mean diameter categories: .9 mm. Results CCSVI criteria were fulfilled in 79.7% of MS patients and 18.2% of HC (p Conclusions MS patients with higher number of venous stenoses, indicative of CCSVI severity, showed significantly decreased venous vasculature in the brain parenchyma. The pathogenesis of these findings has to be further investigated, but they suggest that reduced metabolism and morphological changes of venous vasculature may be taking place in patients with MS.

  13. Iron deposition in the precentral grey matter in patients with multiple sclerosis: A quantitative study using susceptibility-weighted imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rumzan, Reshiana, E-mail: minouchka_16@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, No. 1 Youyi Road, Yuzhong District, Chongqing 400016 (China); Wang, Jing-jie, E-mail: jingjiewang@126.com [Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, No. 1 Youyi Road, Yuzhong District, Chongqing 400016 (China); Zeng, Chun, E-mail: zengchun19840305@163.com [Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, No. 1 Youyi Road, Yuzhong District, Chongqing 400016 (China); Chen, Xuan, E-mail: martha860831@sina.com [Department of Imaging, The Second People' s Hospital of Sichuan, 55 Renmin South Road, Chengdu 610041 (China); Li, Yongmei, E-mail: lymzhang70@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, No. 1 Youyi Road, Yuzhong District, Chongqing 400016 (China); Luo, Tianyou, E-mail: ltychy@sina.com [Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, No. 1 Youyi Road, Yuzhong District, Chongqing 400016 (China); Lv, Fajin, E-mail: fajinlv@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, No. 1 Youyi Road, Yuzhong District, Chongqing 400016 (China); Wang, Zhong-ping, E-mail: wzp20551015@126.com [Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, No. 1 Youyi Road, Yuzhong District, Chongqing 400016 (China); Hou, Huanxin, E-mail: newt948@foxmail.com [Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, No. 1 Youyi Road, Yuzhong District, Chongqing 400016 (China); Huang, Fuhong, E-mail: fuhonghuang@163.com [Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, No. 1 Youyi Road, Yuzhong District, Chongqing 400016 (China)

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: Several studies suggest that iron deposition may play a role in multiple sclerosis (MS) pathology. Three-dimensional (3D) enhanced T2*-weighted angiography (ESWAN) at 3T was used to quantify iron deposition in the precentral grey matter in MS and its relationship with disease duration, atrophy and Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) scores. Methods: We recruited 33 patients with diagnosis of clinically definite MS and 31 age- and sex-matched healthy controls who underwent conventional brain MRI, 3D-ESWAN and 3D T1sequences. We obtained the mean phase values (MPVs) of the precentral grey matter on ESWAN-filtered phase images and volume of the precentral gyrus on 3D T1 images. We investigated the correlation between precentral grey matter MPVs, precentral gyrus volume, disease duration and EDSS scores of MS patients and healthy controls. Results: The precentral grey matter MPVs in MS patients and controls were 1870.83 ± 56.61 and 1899.22 ± 51.73 respectively and had significant difference in the MS group vs. the control group (t = −2.09, P = 0.04). There was significant negative correlation between precentral grey matter MPVs and disease duration (r = −0.365, P = 0.03). No correlation was found between MPVs and EDSS scores. Mean precentral gyrus volume in MS patients was 4368.55 ± 867.78 whereas in controls was 5701.00 ± 1184.03 with significant difference between volume of the precentral gyrus in MS patients compared to healthy controls (t = −5.167, P < 0.001). There was a positive correlation between MPVs and precentral gyrus volume (r = 0.291, P = 0.020). Conclusions: Our study demonstrated that quantitative assessment of abnormal iron deposition in the precentral grey matter in MS patients can be measured using 3D-ESWAN.

  14. Correlation of the venous angioarchitecture of multiple cerebral cavernous malformations with familial or sporadic disease: a susceptibility-weighted imaging study with 7-Tesla MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dammann, Philipp; Wrede, Karsten; Zhu, Yuan; Matsushige, Toshinori; Maderwald, Stefan; Umutlu, Lale; Quick, Harald H; Hehr, Ute; Rath, Matthias; Ladd, Mark E; Felbor, Ute; Sure, Ulrich

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE Multiple cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are rare lesions that occur in sporadic or familial form. Depending on the disease form, the natural history and treatment of the lesions strongly vary. Molecular analysis of an underlying germline mutation (CCM1-3) is the most sensitive screening method to distinguish between sporadic and familial cases. However, based on the different pathomechanisms that are believed to be involved in either form, significant distinctions in the CCM-associated cerebral venous angioarchitecture should be detectable. This has not been systematically studied. METHODS A consecutive series of 28 patients with multiple CCMs (681 total) diagnosed on 1.5-T MRI underwent genetic screening for CCM1-3 mutations and high-resolution susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) of the cerebral venous angioarchitecture with 7-T MRI. Imaging data were analyzed to examine the CCM-associated venous angioarchitecture. Results were correlated with findings of molecular analysis for CCM1-3 mutations. RESULTS Two different SWI patterns (sporadic and familial) were found. The presence of associated developmental venous anomalies correlated with negative screening for germline mutations (11 sporadic) in all cases. All patients with confirmed familial disease showed normal underlying venous angioarchitecture. Additionally, a very unusual case of a probable somatic mutation is presented. CONCLUSIONS The SWI results of the venous angioarchitecture of multiple CCMs correlate with sporadic or familial disease. These results are consistent with the theory that venous anomalies are causative for the sporadic form of multiple CCMs.

  15. Susceptibility-weighted MR imaging of radiation therapy-induced cerebral microbleeds in patients with glioma: a comparison between 3T and 7T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bian, Wei [University of California San Francisco, The UC Berkeley and UCSF Graduate Program in Bioengineering, San Francisco, CA (United States); University of California San Francisco, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, 1700 4th Street, Byers Hall Room 303, UCSF Campus Box 2532, San Francisco, CA (United States); Hess, Christopher P.; Lupo, Janine M. [University of California San Francisco, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, 1700 4th Street, Byers Hall Room 303, UCSF Campus Box 2532, San Francisco, CA (United States); Chang, Susan M. [University of California San Francisco, Department of Neurological Surgery, San Francisco, CA (United States); Nelson, Sarah J. [University of California San Francisco, The UC Berkeley and UCSF Graduate Program in Bioengineering, San Francisco, CA (United States); University of California San Francisco, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, 1700 4th Street, Byers Hall Room 303, UCSF Campus Box 2532, San Francisco, CA (United States); University of California San Francisco, Department of Bioengineeing and Therapeutic Sciences, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Cerebral microbleeds have been observed in normal-appearing brain tissue of patients with glioma years after receiving radiation therapy. The contrast of these paramagnetic lesions varies with field strength due to differences in the effects of susceptibility. The purpose of this study was to compare 3T and 7T MRI as platforms for detecting cerebral microbleeds in patients treated with radiotherapy using susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI). SWI was performed with both 3T and 7T MR scanners on ten patients with glioma who had received prior radiotherapy. Imaging sequences were optimized to obtain data within a clinically acceptable scan time. Both T2*-weighted magnitude images and SWI data were reconstructed, minimum intensity projection was implemented, and microbleeds were manually identified. The number of microbleeds was counted and compared among datasets. Significantly more microbleeds were identified on SWI than magnitude images at both 7T (p = 0.002) and 3T (p = 0.023). Seven-tesla SWI detected significantly more microbleeds than 3T SWI for seven out of ten patients who had tumors located remote from deep brain regions (p = 0.016), but when the additional three patients with more inferior tumors were included, the difference was not significant. SWI is more sensitive for detecting microbleeds than magnitude images at both 3T and 7T. For areas without heightened susceptibility artifacts, 7T SWI is more sensitive to detecting radiation therapy-induced microbleeds than 3T SWI. Tumor location should be considered in conjunction with field strength when selecting the most appropriate strategy for imaging microbleeds. (orig.)

  16. Image quality improvement in three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography using the subtraction method for brain and temporal bone diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Shu-Hui; Shen, Chao-Yu; Wu, Ming-Chi; Lin, Yue-Der; Huang, Chun-Huang; Kang, Ruei-Jin; Tyan, Yeu-Sheng; Tsao, Teng-Fu

    2013-08-01

    Time-of-flight (TOF) magnetic resonance (MR) angiography is based on flow-related enhancement using the T1-weighted spoiled gradient echo, or the fast low-angle shot gradient echo sequence. However, materials with short T1 relaxation times may show hyperintensity signals and contaminate the TOF images. The objective of our study was to determine whether subtraction three-dimensional (3D) TOF MR angiography improves image quality in brain and temporal bone diseases with unwanted contaminations with short T1 relaxation times. During the 12-month study period, patients who had masses with short T1 relaxation times noted on precontrast T1-weighted brain MR images and 24 healthy volunteers were scanned using conventional and subtraction 3D TOF MR angiography. The qualitative evaluation of each MR angiogram was based on signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and scores in three categories, namely, (1) presence of misregistration artifacts, (2) ability to display arterial anatomy selectively (without contamination by materials with short T1 relaxation times), and (3) arterial flow-related enhancement. We included 12 patients with intracranial hematomas, brain tumors, or middle-ear cholesterol granulomas. Subtraction 3D TOF MR angiography yielded higher CNRs between the area of the basilar artery (BA) and normal-appearing parenchyma of the brain and lower SNRs in the area of the BA compared with the conventional technique (147.7 ± 77.6 vs. 130.6 ± 54.2, p angiography did not deteriorate image quality with misregistration artifacts and showed a better selective display of arteries (p angiography is more appropriate than the conventional method in improving the image quality in brain and temporal bone diseases with unwanted contaminations with short T1 relaxation times. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Comparison of quantitative Y-90 SPECT and non-time-of-flight PET imaging in post-therapy radioembolization of liver cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Jianting; Mauxion, Thibault; Reyes, Diane K; Lodge, Martin A; Hobbs, Robert F; Rong, Xing; Dong, Yinfeng; Herman, Joseph M; Wahl, Richard L; Geschwind, Jean-François H; Frey, Eric C

    2016-10-01

    Radioembolization with yttrium-90 microspheres may be optimized with patient-specific pretherapy treatment planning. Dose verification and validation of treatment planning methods require quantitative imaging of the post-therapy distribution of yttrium-90 (Y-90). Methods for quantitative imaging of Y-90 using both bremsstrahlung SPECT and PET have previously been described. The purpose of this study was to compare the two modalities quantitatively in humans. Calibration correction factors for both quantitative Y-90 bremsstrahlung SPECT and a non-time-of-flight PET system without compensation for prompt coincidences were developed by imaging three phantoms. The consistency of these calibration correction factors for the different phantoms was evaluated. Post-therapy images from both modalities were obtained from 15 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma who underwent hepatic radioembolization using Y-90 glass microspheres. Quantitative SPECT and PET images were rigidly registered and the total liver activities and activity distributions estimated for each modality were compared. The activity distributions were compared using profiles, voxel-by-voxel correlation and Bland-Altman analyses, and activity-volume histograms. The mean ± standard deviation of difference in the total activity in the liver between the two modalities was 0% ± 9% (range -21%-18%). Voxel-by-voxel comparisons showed a good agreement in regions corresponding roughly to treated tumor and treated normal liver; the agreement was poorer in regions with low or no expected activity, where PET appeared to overestimate the activity. The correlation coefficients between intrahepatic voxel pairs for the two modalities ranged from 0.86 to 0.94. Cumulative activity volume histograms were in good agreement. These data indicate that, with appropriate reconstruction methods and measured calibration correction factors, either Y-90 SPECT/CT or Y-90 PET/CT can be used for quantitative post-therapy monitoring of Y

  18. Removal of Arterial Vessel Contributions in Susceptibility-Weighted Images for Quantification of Normalized Visible Venous Volume in Children with Sickle Cell Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam M. Winchell

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate a new postprocessing framework that eliminates arterial vessel signal contributions in the quantification of normalized visible venous volume (NVVV, a ratio between venous and brain volume in susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI exams in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD. Materials and Methods. We conducted a retrospective study and qualitatively reviewed for hypointense arterial vessel contamination in SWI exams from 21 children with SCD. We developed a postprocessing framework using magnetic resonance angiography in combination with SWI to provide a more accurate quantification of NVVV. NVVV was calculated before and after removing arterial vessel contributions to determine the error from hypointense arterial vessels in quantifying NVVV. Results. Hypointense arterial vessel contamination was observed in 86% SWI exams and was successfully corrected by the proposed method. The contributions of hypointense arterial vessels in the original SWI were significant and accounted for approximately 33% of the NVVV [uncorrected NVVV = 0.012 ± 0.005 versus corrected NVVV = 0.008 ± 0.003 (mean ± SD, P<0.01]. Conclusion. Hypointense arterial vessel contamination occurred in the majority of SWI exams and led to a sizeable overestimation of the visible venous volume. A prospective longitudinal study is needed to evaluate if quantitation of NVVV was improved and to assess the role of NVVV as a biomarker of SCD severity or stroke risk.

  19. Quantitative Evaluation of Atlas-based Attenuation Correction for Brain PET in an Integrated Time-of-Flight PET/MR Imaging System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jaewon; Jian, Yiqiang; Jenkins, Nathaniel; Behr, Spencer C; Hope, Thomas A; Larson, Peder E Z; Vigneron, Daniel; Seo, Youngho

    2017-07-01

    Purpose To assess the patient-dependent accuracy of atlas-based attenuation correction (ATAC) for brain positron emission tomography (PET) in an integrated time-of-flight (TOF) PET/magnetic resonance (MR) imaging system. Materials and Methods Thirty recruited patients provided informed consent in this institutional review board-approved study. All patients underwent whole-body fluorodeoxyglucose PET/computed tomography (CT) followed by TOF PET/MR imaging. With use of TOF PET data, PET images were reconstructed with four different attenuation correction (AC) methods: PET with patient CT-based AC (CTAC), PET with ATAC (air and bone from an atlas), PET with ATACpatientBone (air and tissue from the atlas with patient bone), and PET with ATACboneless (air and tissue from the atlas without bone). For quantitative evaluation, PET mean activity concentration values were measured in 14 1-mL volumes of interest (VOIs) distributed throughout the brain and statistical significance was tested with a paired t test. Results The mean overall difference (±standard deviation) of PET with ATAC compared with PET with CTAC was -0.69 kBq/mL ± 0.60 (-4.0% ± 3.2) (P PET with ATACboneless (-9.4% ± 3.7) was significantly worse than that of PET with ATAC (-4.0% ± 3.2) (P PET with ATACpatientBone (-1.5% ± 1.5) improved over that of PET with ATAC (-4.0% ± 3.2) (P PET/MR imaging achieves similar quantification accuracy to that from CTAC by means of atlas-based bone compensation. However, patient-specific anatomic differences from the atlas causes bone attenuation differences and misclassified sinuses, which result in patient-dependent performance variation of ATAC. © RSNA, 2017 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  20. Application of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight Imaging Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF IMS) for Premalignant Gastrointestinal Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Kwang Hyun; Kwon, Chang Il; Park, So Hye; Han, Na Young; Lee, Hoo Keun; Kim, Eun Hee; Hahm, Ki Baik

    2013-11-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is currently receiving large attention from the mass spectrometric community, although its use is not yet well known in the clinic. As matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI)-IMS can show the biomolecular changes in cells as well as tissues, it can be an ideal tool for biomedical diagnostics as well as the molecular diagnosis of clinical specimens, especially aimed at the prompt detection of premalignant lesions much earlier before overt mass formation, or for obtaining histologic clues from endoscopic biopsy. Besides its use for pathologic diagnosis, MALDI-IMS is also a powerful tool for the detection and localization of drugs, proteins, and lipids in tissue. Measurement of parameters that define and control the implications, challenges, and opportunities associated with the application of IMS to biomedical tissue studies might be feasible through a deep understanding of mass spectrometry. In this focused review series, new insights into the molecular processes relevant to IMS as well as other field applications are introduced.

  1. Non-invasive assessment of intratumoral vascularity using arterial spin labeling: A comparison to susceptibility-weighted imaging for the differentiation of primary cerebral lymphoma and glioblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furtner, J., E-mail: julia.furtner@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Biomedical Imaging und Image-guided Therapy, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Comprehensive Cancer Center-Central Nervous System Tumors Unit (CCC-CNS), Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Schöpf, V., E-mail: veronika.schoepf@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Biomedical Imaging und Image-guided Therapy, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Preusser, M., E-mail: matthias.preusser@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Medicine I, Division of Oncology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Comprehensive Cancer Center-Central Nervous System Tumors Unit (CCC-CNS), Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Asenbaum, U., E-mail: ulrika.asenbaum@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Biomedical Imaging und Image-guided Therapy, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Woitek, R., E-mail: ramona.woitek@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Biomedical Imaging und Image-guided Therapy, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Wöhrer, A., E-mail: adelheid.woehrer@meduniwien.ac.at [Institute of Neurology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Comprehensive Cancer Center-Central Nervous System Tumors Unit (CCC-CNS), Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Hainfellner, J.A., E-mail: johannes.hainfellner@meduniwien.ac.at [Institute of Neurology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Comprehensive Cancer Center-Central Nervous System Tumors Unit (CCC-CNS), Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Wolfsberger, S., E-mail: stefan.wolfsberger@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Neurosurgery, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Comprehensive Cancer Center-Central Nervous System Tumors Unit (CCC-CNS), Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Prayer, D., E-mail: daniela.prayer@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Biomedical Imaging und Image-guided Therapy, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Comprehensive Cancer Center-Central Nervous System Tumors Unit (CCC-CNS), Medical University of Vienna (Austria)

    2014-05-15

    Using conventional MRI methods, the differentiation of primary cerebral lymphomas (PCNSL) and other primary brain tumors, such as glioblastomas, is difficult due to overlapping imaging characteristics. This study was designed to discriminate tumor entities using normalized vascular intratumoral signal intensity values (nVITS) obtained from pulsed arterial spin labeling (PASL), combined with intratumoral susceptibility signals (ITSS) from susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI). Thirty consecutive patients with glioblastoma (n = 22) and PCNSL (n = 8), histologically classified according to the WHO brain tumor classification, were included. MRIs were acquired on a 3 T scanner, and included PASL and SWI sequences. nVITS was defined by the signal intensity ratio between the tumor and the contralateral normal brain tissue, as obtained by PASL images. ITSS was determined as intratumoral low signal intensity structures detected on SWI sequences and were divided into four different grades. Potential differences in the nVITS and ITSS between glioblastomas and PCNSLs were revealed using statistical testing. To determine sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy, as well as an optimum cut-off value for the differentiation of PCNSL and glioblastoma, a receiver operating characteristic analysis was used. We found that nVITS (p = 0.011) and ITSS (p = 0.001) values were significantly higher in glioblastoma than in PCNSL. The optimal cut-off value for nVITS was 1.41 and 1.5 for ITSS, with a sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of more than 95%. These findings indicate that nVITS values have a comparable diagnostic accuracy to ITSS values in differentiating glioblastoma and PCNSL, offering a completely non-invasive and fast assessment of tumoral vascularity in a clinical setting.

  2. ALICE Time Of Flight Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Alici, A

    2013-01-01

    Charged particles in the intermediate momentum range are identified in ALICE by the Time Of Flight (TOF) detector. The time measurement with the TOF, in conjunction with the momentum and track length measured by the tracking detector, is used to calculate the particle mass.

  3. Time-of-flight MR angiography at 3 T versus digital subtraction angiography in the imaging follow-up of 51 intracranial aneurysms treated with coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferre, Jean-Christophe [Department of Neuroradiology, Hopital Pontchaillou, University Hospital Rennes, 2 rue Henri Le Guilloux, 35000 Rennes (France)], E-mail: jean-christophe.ferre@chu-rennes.fr; Carsin-Nicol, Beatrice [Department of Neuroradiology, Hopital Pontchaillou, University Hospital Rennes, 2 rue Henri Le Guilloux, 35000 Rennes (France); Morandi, Xavier [Department of Neurosurgery, Hopital Pontchaillou, University Hospital Rennes, 2 rue Henri Le Guilloux, 35000 Rennes (France); Carsin, Michel [Department of Neuroradiology, Hopital Pontchaillou, University Hospital Rennes, 2 rue Henri Le Guilloux, 35000 Rennes (France); Kersaint-Gilly, Axel de [Department of Neuroradiology, Hopital Laennec, University Hospital Nantes, Boulevard Jacques Monod, 44800 Saint-Herblain (France); Gauvrit, Jean-Yves [Department of Neuroradiology, Hopital Pontchaillou, University Hospital Rennes, 2 rue Henri Le Guilloux, 35000 Rennes (France); Desal, Hubert-Armand [Department of Neuroradiology, Hopital Laennec, University Hospital Nantes, Boulevard Jacques Monod, 44800 Saint-Herblain (France)

    2009-12-15

    Objective: To compare 3D time-of-flight MR angiography (TOF-MRA) at 3 Tesla (3 T) with digital subtraction angiography (DSA) for the evaluation of intracranial aneurysm occlusion after endovascular coiling. Methods: In a prospective study, 51 consecutive patients (25 females, 26 males; median age, 51 years) with 51 saccular aneurysms treated with endovascular coiling underwent simultaneous DSA and 3 T TOF-MRA at follow-up. DSA and TOF-MRA images were analyzed independently by two senior neuroradiologists. Findings were assigned to 1 of 3 categories in the Raymond classification: complete obliteration, residual neck or residual aneurysm. Agreement between observers and techniques was evaluated using {kappa} statistics. Results: DSA images were not interpretable for one patient. Interobserver agreement was determined as excellent for DSA ({kappa} = 0.86) and TOF-MRA ({kappa} = 0.80). After reaching a consensus, DSA follow-up showed 26 (51%) complete obliterations, 20 (39%) residual necks and 4 (8%) residual aneurysms. TOF-MRA showed 23 (45%) complete obliterations, 22 (43%) residual necks and 6 (12%) residual aneurysms. Comparison between TOF-MRA and DSA showed excellent agreement between the techniques ({kappa} = 0.86). In the four cases that were misclassified, TOF-MRA findings were assigned to a higher class than for DSA. Conclusion: TOF-MRA at 3 T is at least as efficient as DSA for the evaluation of intracranial aneurysm occlusion after endovascular treatment with detachable coils. We suggest that TOF-MRA at 3 T might be used as the primary method for imaging follow-up of coiled intracranial aneurysms.

  4. Time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography for follow-up of coil embolization with enterprise stent intracranial aneurysm: Usefulness of source images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Young Dae; Kim, Kang Min; Lee, Woong Jae; Sohn, Chul Ho; Kang, Hyun Seung; Kim, Jeong Eun; Han, Moon Hee [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the interobserver and intermodality agreement in the interpretation of time-of-flight (TOF) MR angiography (MRA) for the follow-up of coiled intracranial aneurysms with the Enterprise stent. Two experienced neurointerventionists independently reviewed the follow-up MRA studies of 40 consecutive patients with 44 coiled aneurysms. All aneurysms were treated with assistance from the Enterprise stent and the radiologic follow-up intervals were greater than 6 months after the endovascular therapy. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) served as the reference standard. The degree of aneurysm occlusion was determined by an evaluation of the maximal intensity projection (MIP) and source images (SI) of the TOF MRA. The capability of the TOF MRA to depict the residual flow within the coiled aneurysms and the stented parent arteries was compared with that of the DSA. DSA showed stable occlusions in 25 aneurysms, minor recanalization in 8, and major recanalization in 11. Comparisons between the TOF MRA and conventional angiography showed that the MIP plus SI had almost perfect agreement (κ = 0.892, range 0.767 to 1.000) and had better agreement than with the MIP images only ((κ = 0.598, range 0.370 to 0.826). In-stent stenosis of more than 33% was observed in 5 cases. Both MIP and SI of the MRA showed poor depiction of in-stent stenosis compared with the DSA. TOF MRA seemed to be reliable in screening for aneurysm recurrence after coil embolization with Enterprise stent assistance, especially in the evaluation of the SI, in addition to MIP images in the TOF MRA.

  5. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS)-based analysis and imaging of polyethylene microplastics formation during sea surf simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungnickel, H; Pund, R; Tentschert, J; Reichardt, P; Laux, P; Harbach, H; Luch, A

    2016-09-01

    Plastic particles smaller than 5mm, so called microplastics have the capability to accumulate in rivers, lakes and the marine environment and therefore have begun to be considered in eco-toxicology and human health risk assessment. Environmental microplastic contaminants may originate from consumer products like body wash, tooth pastes and cosmetic products, but also from degradation of plastic waste; they represent a potential but unpredictable threat to aquatic organisms and possibly also to humans. We investigated exemplarily for polyethylene (PE), the most abundant constituent of microplastic particles in the environment, whether such fragments could be produced from larger pellets (2mm×6mm). So far only few analytical methods exist to identify microplastic particles smaller than 10μm, especially no imaging mass spectrometry technique. We used at first time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) for analysis and imaging of small PE-microplastic particles directly in the model system Ottawa sand during exposure to sea surf simulation. As a prerequisite, a method for identification of PE was established by identification of characteristic ions for PE out of an analysis of grinded polymer samples. The method was applied onto Ottawa sand in order to investigate the influence of simulated environmental conditions on particle transformation. A severe degradation of the primary PE pellet surface, associated with the transformation of larger particles into smaller ones already after 14days of sea surf simulation, was observed. Within the subsequent period of 14days to 1month of exposure the number of detected smallest-sized particles increased significantly (50%) while the second smallest fraction increased even further to 350%. Results were verified using artificially degraded PE pellets and Ottawa sand. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. An in vitro and in vivo analysis of the correlation between susceptibility-weighted imaging phase values and R2* in cirrhotic livers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Tao

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To establish a baseline of susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI phase value as a means of detecting iron abnormalities in cirrhotic liver and to analyze its relationship with R2*. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sixteen MnCl(2 phantoms, thirty-seven healthy individuals and 87 cirrhotic patients were performed SWI and multi-echo T2*-weighted imaging, and the signal processing in NMR (SPIN software was used to measure the radian on SWI phase images and the R2* on T2* maps. The mean minus two times standard deviation (SD of Siemens Phase Unit (SPU in healthy individuals was designated as a threshold to separate the regions of interest (ROIs into high- and low-iron areas in healthy participants and cirrhotic patients. The SWI phase values of high-iron areas were calculated. The R2* values was measured in the same ROI in both healthy participants and patients. RESULTS: SWI phase values correlated linearly with R2* values in cases of MnCl(2 concentrations lower than 2.3 mM in vitro (r = -0.996, P<0.001. The mean value and SD of 37 healthy participants were 2003 and 15 (SPU, respectively. A threshold of 1973 SPU (-0.115 radians was determined. The SWI phase value and R2* values had a negative correlation in the cirrhotic patients (r = -0.742, P<0.001. However, no similar relationship was found in the healthy individuals (r = 0.096, P = 0.576. Both SWI phase values and R2* values were found to have significant correlations with serum ferritin concentrations in 42 patients with blood samples (r = -0.512, P = 0.001 and r = 0.641, P<0.001, respectively. CONCLUSION: SWI phase values had significant correlations with R2* after the establishment of a baseline on the phase image. SWI phase images may be used for non-invasive quantitative measurement of mild and moderate iron deposition in hepatic cirrhosis in vivo.

  7. Diagnostic performance of susceptibility-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for the assessment of sub-coracoacromial spurs causing subacromial impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nörenberg, Dominik; Armbruster, Marco; Bender, Yi-Na; Walter, Thula; Ebersberger, Hans U; Diederichs, Gerd; Hamm, Bernd; Ockert, Ben; Makowski, Marcus R

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the potential of susceptibility-weighted-magnetic-resonance-imaging (SWMR) for the detection of sub-coracoacromial spurs in patients with clinically suspected subacromial impingement syndrome (SAIS), compared to standard MR-sequences and radiographs. Forty-four patients with suspected SAIS were included. All patients underwent radiography, standard MRI of the shoulder and SWMR. Radiograph-based identification of sub-coracoacromial spurs served as goldstandard. Radiographs identified twenty-three spurs in twenty-three patients. Twenty-one patients without spur formation served as reference group. Detection rate, sensitivity/specificity and interobserver-agreements were calculated. Linear regression was applied to determine the relationship between size measurements on radiographs and MRI. Detection rates for spurs on standard MRI and SWMR were 47.8 % and 91.3 % compared to radiography (pStandard MR-sequences achieved a sensitivity of 47.8 % (CI=0.185-0.775) and a specificity of 80.8 % (CI=0.642-0.978). Size measurements between SWMR and radiography showed a good correlation (R2=0.75;pstandard MRI (R2=0.24;psuperior to standard MR-sequences using radiography as goldstandard. • SWMR has the potential to reliably identify sub-coracoacromial spurs without radiation exposure. • SWMR provides comparable detection rates to conventional radiography for sub-coracoacromial spur formation. • SWMR yields higher detection rates compared to standard-MR regarding sub-coracoacromial spur formation. • SWMR can be implemented in routine shoulder MRI protocols.

  8. Diagnostic performance of susceptibility-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for the assessment of sub-coracoacromial spurs causing subacromial impingement syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noerenberg, Dominik; Armbruster, Marco [Munich University Hospitals Campus Grosshadern, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Bender, Yi-Na; Walter, Thula; Diederichs, Gerd; Hamm, Bernd [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Ebersberger, Hans U. [Heart Center Munich-Bogenhausen, Department of Cardiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Munich (Germany); Ockert, Ben [Munich University Hospitals Campus Grosshadern, Department of Trauma and Orthopedic Surgery, Shoulder and Elbow Service, Munich (Germany); Makowski, Marcus R. [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-03-15

    To evaluate the potential of susceptibility-weighted-magnetic-resonance-imaging (SWMR) for the detection of sub-coracoacromial spurs in patients with clinically suspected subacromial impingement syndrome (SAIS), compared to standard MR-sequences and radiographs. Forty-four patients with suspected SAIS were included. All patients underwent radiography, standard MRI of the shoulder and SWMR. Radiograph-based identification of sub-coracoacromial spurs served as goldstandard. Radiographs identified twenty-three spurs in twenty-three patients. Twenty-one patients without spur formation served as reference group. Detection rate, sensitivity/specificity and interobserver-agreements were calculated. Linear regression was applied to determine the relationship between size measurements on radiographs and MRI. Detection rates for spurs on standard MRI and SWMR were 47.8 % and 91.3 % compared to radiography (p<0.001). SWMR demonstrated a sensitivity of 97.7 % (CI=0.92-1) and a specificity of 91.3 % (CI=0.788-1) for the identification of spurs. Standard MR-sequences achieved a sensitivity of 47.8 % (CI=0.185-0.775) and a specificity of 80.8 % (CI=0.642-0.978). Size measurements between SWMR and radiography showed a good correlation (R{sup 2}=0.75;p<0.0001), while overestimating lesion size (5.7±1.2 mm; 4.3±1.3 mm;p<0.0001). Interobserver-agreement for spurs was high on SWMR (R{sup 2}=0.74;p<0.0001), but low on standard MRI (R{sup 2}=0.24;p<0.0001). SWMR allows a reliable detection of sub-coracoacromial spur formation in patients with SAIS and is superior to standard MR-sequences using radiography as goldstandard. (orig.)

  9. ALICE Time of Flight Module

    CERN Multimedia

    The Time-Of-Flight system of ALICE consists of 90 such modules, each containing 15 or 19 Multigap Resistive Plate Chamber (MRPC) strips. This detector is used for identification of charged particles. It measures with high precision (50 ps) the time of flight of charged particles and therefore their velocity. The curvature of the particle trajectory inside the magnetic field gives the momentum, thus the particle mass is calculated and the particle is identified The MRPC is a stack of resistive glass plates, separated from each other by nylon fishing line. The mass production of the chambers (~1600, covering a surface of 150 m2) was done at INFN Bologna, while the first prototypes were bult at CERN.

  10. Hockey Concussion Education Project, Part 1: Susceptibility-weighted imaging study in male and female ice hockey players over a single season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmer, Karl G.; Pasternak, Ofer; Fredman, Eli; Preciado, Ronny I.; Koerte, Inga K.; Sasaki, Takeshi; Mayinger, Michael; Johnson, Andrew M.; Holmes, Jeffrey D.; Forwell, Lorie; Skopelja, Elaine N.; Shenton, Martha E.; Echlin, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    Object Concussion, or mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), is a commonly occurring sports-related injury, especially in contact sports such as hockey. Cerebral microbleeds (CMBs), which are small, hypointense lesions on T2*-weighted images, can result from TBI. The authors use susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) to automatically detect small hypointensities that may be subtle signs of chronic and acute damage due to both subconcussive and concussive injury. The goal was to investigate how the burden of these hypointensities change over time, over a playing season, and postconcussion, compared with subjects who did not suffer a medically observed and diagnosed concussion. Methods Images were obtained in 45 university-level adult male and female ice hockey players before and after a single Canadian Interuniversity Sports season. In addition, 11 subjects (5 men and 6 women) underwent imaging at 72 hours, 2 weeks, and 2 months after concussion. To identify subtle changes in brain tissue and potential CMBs, nonvessel clusters of hypointensities on SWI were automatically identified and a hypointensity burden index was calculated for all subjects at the beginning of the season (BOS) and the end of the season (EOS), in addition to postconcussion time points (where applicable). Results A statistically significant increase in the hypointensity burden, relative to the BOS, was observed for male subjects at the 2-week postconcussion time point. A smaller, nonsignificant rise in the burden for all female subjects was also observed within the same time period. The difference in hypointensity burden was also statistically significant for men with concussions between the 2-week time point and the BOS. There were no significant changes in burden for nonconcussed subjects of either sex between the BOS and EOS time points. However, there was a statistically significant difference in the burden between male and female subjects in the nonconcussed group at both the BOS and EOS time

  11. Hockey Concussion Education Project, Part 1. Susceptibility-weighted imaging study in male and female ice hockey players over a single season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmer, Karl G; Pasternak, Ofer; Fredman, Eli; Preciado, Ronny I; Koerte, Inga K; Sasaki, Takeshi; Mayinger, Michael; Johnson, Andrew M; Holmes, Jeffrey D; Forwell, Lorie A; Skopelja, Elaine N; Shenton, Martha E; Echlin, Paul S

    2014-04-01

    Concussion, or mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), is a commonly occurring sports-related injury, especially in contact sports such as hockey. Cerebral microbleeds (CMBs), which appear as small, hypointense lesions on T₂*-weighted images, can result from TBI. The authors use susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) to automatically detect small hypointensities that may be subtle signs of chronic and acute damage due to both subconcussive and concussive injury. The goal was to investigate how the burden of these hypointensities changes over time, over a playing season, and postconcussion, in comparison with subjects who did not suffer a medically observed and diagnosed concussion. Images were obtained in 45 university-level adult male and female ice hockey players before and after a single Canadian Interuniversity Sports season. In addition, 11 subjects (5 men and 6 women) underwent imaging at 72 hours, 2 weeks, and 2 months after concussion. To identify subtle changes in brain tissue and potential CMBs, nonvessel clusters of hypointensities on SWI were automatically identified, and a hypointensity burden index was calculated for all subjects at the beginning of the season (BOS), the end of the season (EOS), and at postconcussion time points (where applicable). A statistically significant increase in the hypointensity burden, relative to the BOS, was observed for male subjects with concussions at the 2-week postconcussion time point. A smaller, nonsignificant rise in the burden for female subjects with concussions was also observed within the same time period. There were no significant changes in burden for nonconcussed subjects of either sex between the BOS and EOS time points. However, there was a statistically significant difference in the burden between male and female subjects in the nonconcussed group at both the BOS and EOS time points, with males having a higher burden. This method extends the utility of SWI from the enhancement and detection of larger (> 5

  12. Time-of-Flight Microwave Camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charvat, Gregory; Temme, Andrew; Feigin, Micha; Raskar, Ramesh

    2015-10-05

    Microwaves can penetrate many obstructions that are opaque at visible wavelengths, however microwave imaging is challenging due to resolution limits associated with relatively small apertures and unrecoverable "stealth" regions due to the specularity of most objects at microwave frequencies. We demonstrate a multispectral time-of-flight microwave imaging system which overcomes these challenges with a large passive aperture to improve lateral resolution, multiple illumination points with a data fusion method to reduce stealth regions, and a frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) receiver to achieve depth resolution. The camera captures images with a resolution of 1.5 degrees, multispectral images across the X frequency band (8 GHz-12 GHz), and a time resolution of 200 ps (6 cm optical path in free space). Images are taken of objects in free space as well as behind drywall and plywood. This architecture allows "camera-like" behavior from a microwave imaging system and is practical for imaging everyday objects in the microwave spectrum.

  13. Imaging of crystalline and amorphous surface regions using time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS): application to pharmaceutical materials

    OpenAIRE

    Iuras, Andrea; Scurr, David J.; Boissier, Catherine; Nicholas, Mark L.; Roberts, Clive J.; Alexander, Morgan R.

    2016-01-01

    The structure of a material, in particular the extremes of crystalline and amorphous forms, significantly impacts material performance in numerous sectors such as semiconductors, energy storage, and pharmaceutical products, which are investigated in this paper. To characterize the spatial distribution for crystalline−amorphous forms at the uppermost molecular surface layer, we performed time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS) measurements for quench-cooled amorphous and recr...

  14. Cerebral Hemodynamics in Patients with Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Assessed by Susceptibility Weighted Imaging and Four-Dimensional Non-Contrast MR Angiography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Löbel

    Full Text Available Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of patients with hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS and neurological symptoms performed during an epidemic outbreak of Escherichia coli O104:H4 in Northern Europe has previously shown pathological changes in only approximately 50% of patients. In contrast, susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI revealed a loss of venous contrast in a large number of patients. We hypothesized that this observation may be due to an increase in cerebral blood flow (CBF and aimed to identify a plausible cause.Baseline 1.5T MRI scans of 36 patients (female, 26; male, 10; mean age, 38.2±19.3 years were evaluated. Venous contrast was rated on standard SWI minimum intensity projections. A prototype four-dimensional (time resolved magnetic resonance angiography (4D MRA assessed cerebral hemodynamics by global time-to-peak (TTP, as a surrogate marker for CBF. Clinical parameters studied were hemoglobin, hematocrit, creatinine, urea levels, blood pressure, heart rate, and end-tidal CO2.SWI venous contrast was abnormally low in 33 of 36 patients. TTP ranged from 3.7 to 10.2 frames (mean, 7.9 ± 1.4. Hemoglobin at the time of MRI (n = 35 was decreased in all patients (range, 5.0 to 12.6 g/dL; mean, 8.2 ± 1.4; hematocrit (n = 33 was abnormally low in all but a single patient (range, 14.3 to 37.2%; mean, 23.7 ± 4.2. Creatinine was abnormally high in 30 of 36 patients (83% (range, 0.8 to 9.7; mean, 3.7 ± 2.2. SWI venous contrast correlated significantly with hemoglobin (r = 0.52, P = 0.0015, hematocrit (r = 0.65, P < 0.001, and TTP (r = 0.35, P = 0.036. No correlation of SWI with blood pressure, heart rate, end-tidal CO2, creatinine, and urea level was observed. Findings suggest that the loss of venous contrast is related to an increase in CBF secondary to severe anemia related to HUS. SWI contrast of patients with pathological conventional MRI findings was significantly lower compared to patients with normal MRI (mean SWI score, 1

  15. Analytical properties of time-of-flight PET data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Sanghee; Ahn, Sangtae; Li Quanzheng; Leahy, Richard M [Signal and Image Processing Institute, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States)], E-mail: leahy@sipi.usc.edu

    2008-06-07

    We investigate the analytical properties of time-of-flight (TOF) positron emission tomography (PET) sinograms, where the data are modeled as line integrals weighted by a spatially invariant TOF kernel. First, we investigate the Fourier transform properties of 2D TOF data and extend the 'bow-tie' property of the 2D Radon transform to the time-of-flight case. Second, we describe a new exact Fourier rebinning method, TOF-FOREX, based on the Fourier transform in the time-of-flight variable. We then combine TOF-FOREX rebinning with a direct extension of the projection slice theorem to TOF data, to perform fast 3D TOF PET image reconstruction. Finally, we illustrate these properties using simulated data.

  16. Analytical properties of time-of-flight PET data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sanghee; Ahn, Sangtae; Li, Quanzheng; Leahy, Richard M.

    2008-06-01

    We investigate the analytical properties of time-of-flight (TOF) positron emission tomography (PET) sinograms, where the data are modeled as line integrals weighted by a spatially invariant TOF kernel. First, we investigate the Fourier transform properties of 2D TOF data and extend the 'bow-tie' property of the 2D Radon transform to the time-of-flight case. Second, we describe a new exact Fourier rebinning method, TOF-FOREX, based on the Fourier transform in the time-of-flight variable. We then combine TOF-FOREX rebinning with a direct extension of the projection slice theorem to TOF data, to perform fast 3D TOF PET image reconstruction. Finally, we illustrate these properties using simulated data.

  17. Time-of-flight spectroscopy of muonic tritium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, M.C. [University of British Columbia, Physics and Astronomy (Canada)], E-mail: fujiwara@triumf.ca; Adamczak, A. [Institute of Nuclear Physics (Poland); Bailey, J.M. [Chester Technology (United Kingdom); Beer, G.A. [University of Victoria, Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Beveridge, J.L. [TRIUMF (Canada); Faifman, M.P. [Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Huber, T.M. [Gustavus Adolphus College, Physics (United States); Jacot-Guillarmod, R. [Universite de Fribourg, Physics Institute (Switzerland); Kammel, P. [University of California, Physics and LBNL (United States); Kim, S.K. [Jeonbuk National University (Korea, Republic of); Knowles, P.E. [Universite de Fribourg, Physics Institute (Switzerland); Kunselman, A.R. [University of Wyoming, Physics (United States); Maier, M. [University of Victoria, Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Markushin, V.E. [PSI (Switzerland); Marshall, G.M. [TRIUMF (Canada); Martoff, C.J. [Temple University, Physics (United States); Mason, G.R. [University of Victoria, Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Mulhauser, F. [Universite de Fribourg, Physics Institute (Switzerland); Olin, A. [TRIUMF (Canada); Petitjean, C. [PSI (Switzerland)] (and others)

    1999-06-15

    Emission of muonic tritium from a solid hydrogen layer has been studied via imaging of the muon-decay electrons and the time-of-flight distributions have been compared with detailed Monte Carlo calculations. Results are consistent at the 10% level with the theoretical prediction of a Ramsauer-Townsend minimum cross-section energy.

  18. First tests of the applicability of $\\gamma$-ray imaging for background discrimination in time-of-flight neutron capture measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Magán, D L Pérez; Domingo-Pardo, C; Agramunt-Ros, J; Albiol, F; Casanovas, A; González, A; Guerrero, C; Lerendegui-Marco, J; Tarifeño-Saldivia, A

    2016-01-01

    In this work we explore for the first time the applicability of using $\\gamma$-ray imaging in neutron capture measurements to identify and suppress spatially localized background. For this aim, a pinhole gamma camera is assembled, tested and characterized in terms of energy and spatial performance. It consists of a monolithic CeBr$_3$ scintillating crystal coupled to a position-sensitive photomultiplier and readout through an integrated circuit AMIC2GR. The pinhole collimator is a massive carven block of lead. A series of dedicated measurements with calibrated sources and with a neutron beam incident on a $^{197}$Au sample have been carried out at n\\_TOF, achieving an enhancement of a factor of 2 in the signal-to-background ratio when selecting only those events coming from the direction of the sample.

  19. ALICE Time of Flight Readout - AFRO

    CERN Document Server

    Kluge, A; CERN. Geneva

    2000-01-01

    Abstract This document describes the design of the ALICE Time of Flight readout system architecture. The requirements of the system are discussed. The architecture which copes with the requirements of the system is described. Further work and research projects concerning the readout are anticipated. In order to describe the system and also the environment, namely the chamber cells and the analog and digital front-end electronics, are described. These parts have been developed by the entire Time of Flight (TOF) collaboration. Further simulations, measurements and prototypes will reveal new results. After that the design has to be adapted accordingly.

  20. Thin Time-Of-Flight PET project

    CERN Multimedia

    The pre-R&D aims at designing and producing a compact and thin Time-Of-Flight PET detector device with depth of interaction measurement capability, which employs layered silicon sensors as active material, with a readout consisting of a new generation of very-low noise and very fast electronics based on SiGe Heterojunction Bipolar Transistors (HBT) components.

  1. Iron Deposition Is Positively Related to Cognitive Impairment in Patients with Chronic Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: Assessment with Susceptibility Weighted Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Liyan; Cao, Heli; Wei, Xiaoer; Li, Yuehua; Li, Wenbin

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the usability of SWI in assessment of brain iron to detect cognitive dysfunction in patients with chronic mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). 39 patients with mTBI and 37 normal controls were given the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and underwent SWI scanning at least 6 months after injury. Angle radian values were calculated with phase images. The angle radian values were compared between groups using analysis of covariance, and their association with MMSE scores was analyzed using Spearman correlations. Significantly higher angle radian values (p radian values in the right substantia nigra (r = -0.685, p radian values in the right substantia nigra, suggesting a role of SWI in the assessment of cognitive impairments of these patients.

  2. Iron Deposition Is Positively Related to Cognitive Impairment in Patients with Chronic Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: Assessment with Susceptibility Weighted Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liyan Lu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study aimed to evaluate the usability of SWI in assessment of brain iron to detect cognitive dysfunction in patients with chronic mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI. Methods. 39 patients with mTBI and 37 normal controls were given the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE and underwent SWI scanning at least 6 months after injury. Angle radian values were calculated with phase images. The angle radian values were compared between groups using analysis of covariance, and their association with MMSE scores was analyzed using Spearman correlations. Results. Significantly higher angle radian values (p<0.05 were found in the head of the caudate nucleus, the lenticular nucleus, the hippocampus, the thalamus, the right substantia nigra, the red nucleus, and the splenium of the corpus callosum (SCC in the mTBI group, compared to the control group. MMSE scores were negatively correlated with angle radian values in the right substantia nigra (r=-0.685, p<0.001. Conclusions. Patients with chronic mTBI might have abnormally high accumulations of iron, and their MMSE scores are negatively associated with angle radian values in the right substantia nigra, suggesting a role of SWI in the assessment of cognitive impairments of these patients.

  3. Prospective intraindividual comparison between respiratory-triggered balanced steady-state free precession and breath-hold gradient-echo and time-of-flight magnetic resonance imaging for assessment of portal and hepatic veins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willmann, Juergen K.; Goepfert, Kerstin; Lutz, Amelie M.; Marincek, Borut; Weishaupt, Dominik [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Nanz, Daniel [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Medical Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); McCormack, Lucas; Petrowsky, Henrik [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland); Seifert, Burkhardt [University of Zurich, Department of Biostatistics, Zurich (Switzerland); Hervo, Patrice [GE Healthcare, Buc Cedex (France)

    2007-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare respiratory-triggered balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) with breath-hold contrast-enhanced dynamic two-dimensional (2D) gradient-echo (GRE) and time-of-flight (TOF) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for portal and hepatic vein visualization and assessment of portal and hepatic venous variants. Sixty patients with liver disease underwent nonenhanced bSSFP and contrast-enhanced GRE, bSSFP, and TOF imaging. Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) for portal and hepatic veins were measured. Two readers rated the quality of portal and hepatic vein visualization on a 5-point Likert scale. The diagnostic performance of each MRI series in the detection of portal and hepatic venous variants was assessed in 40/60 patients who also underwent contrast-enhanced multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT). CNRs for portal and hepatic veins were highest on contrast-enhanced bSSFP images. Image quality of portal and hepatic veins was rated higher for nonenhanced bSSFP than for contrast-enhanced GRE (p<0.03) and TOF (p<0.003) and higher for contrast-enhanced than for nonenhanced bSSFP (p<0.003). Compared with MDCT, portal and hepatic venous variants were identified with an accuracy of 99% on bSSFP images, with an excellent interobserver agreement ({kappa}=0.97). Compared with MDCT, presence of surgically important portal and hepatic venous anatomical variants can be predicted with high accuracy on bSSFP images. (orig.)

  4. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging demonstrates the specific localization of deca-bromo-diphenyl-ether residues in the ovaries and adrenal glands of exposed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyer, Alexandre; Riu, Anne; Debrauwer, Laurent; Bourgès-Abella, Nathalie; Brunelle, Alain; Laprévote, Olivier; Zalko, Daniel

    2010-11-01

    Deca-bromo-diphenyl ether (DBDE) is one of the most efficient brominated flame retardant (BFR) available on the market. We recently demonstrated that when administered to female rat by oral route, DBDE is efficiently absorbed, with the highest residual concentrations found in two endocrine glands, namely the adrenal glands and the ovaries. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) imaging, a technique usually used for the study of endogenous compounds, was applied for the first time to a persistent organic pollutant, allowing to detect and to precisely localize DBDE residues in these two target tissues. The detection of the bromide ion ((81)Br isotope) by TOF-SIMS mass spectrometry imaging allowed us to demonstrate a marked cortical tropism of DBDE residues for the adrenal glands in female rats dosed per os 2 mg·kg(-1) DBDE, daily, over 96 h. In ovaries, DBDE residues were found to be concentrated in spots corresponding to part of the corpora lutea. Hepatic residues of DBDE were found to be homogeneously distributed. Due to the intrinsic toxicity of DBDE, its accumulation in the adrenal glands and the ovaries may be connected to the mechanisms of actions by which DBDE could trigger endocrine disruption in mammals. Copyright © 2010 American Society for Mass Spectrometry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Clinical validation of high-resolution image reconstruction algorithms in brain 18F-FDG-PET: effect of incorporating Gaussian filter, point spread function, and time-of-flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaki, Akio; Onoguchi, Masahisa; Matsutomo, Norikazu

    2014-12-01

    Accurate estimation of radiopharmaceutical uptake in the brain is difficult because of count statistics, low spatial resolution, and smoothing filter. The aim of this study was to assess the counting rate performance of PET scanners and the image quality with different combinations of high-resolution image reconstruction algorithms in brain F-2-fluorodeoxy-D-glucose (F-FDG)-PET. Using 23 patient studies, we analyzed the coincidence rates of true and random, random fraction, and the noise equivalent counts per axial length (NECpatient) in brain and liver bed positions. The reconstruction algorithms were combined with baseline ordered subsets expectation maximization, Gaussian filter (GF), point spread function (PSF), and time-of-flight (TOF). The image quality of the brain cortex was quantitatively evaluated with respect to spatial resolution, contrast, and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The true coincidence rate in the brain was higher by 1.86 times and the random coincidence rate was lower by 0.61 times compared with that in the liver. In the brain, random fraction was lower and NECpatient was higher than that of the liver. Although GF improved the SNR, spatial resolution and contrast were reduced by 12 and 11%, respectively (P<0.01). PSF improved spatial resolution and SNR by 11 and 53%, respectively (P<0.01), and TOF improved SNR by ∼23% (P<0.01). We have demonstrated that a high-resolution image reconstruction algorithm for brain F-FDG-PET is promising without the use of a GF because of high true coincidence counts and that combined with PSF and TOF is optimal for obtaining a better SNR of the image.

  6. Using 'swallow-tail' sign and putaminal hypointensity as biomarkers to distinguish multiple system atrophy from idiopathic Parkinson's disease: A susceptibility-weighted imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Na; Yang, HuaGuang; Li, ChengBo; Fan, GuoGuang [The First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, Department of Radiology, Shenyang, Liaoning (China); Luo, XiaoGuang [The First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, Department of Neurology, Shenyang, Liaoning (China)

    2017-08-15

    To investigate the value of 'swallow-tail' sign and putaminal hypointensity on 3 T susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) for distinguishing multiple system atrophy (MSA) from idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD). Three groups - 39 MSA patients, 18 IPD patients,and 31 healthy controls (HCs) - were administered a 3 T SWI sequence to evaluate 'swallow-tail' sign and putaminal hypointensity using visual scales from 0 to 2 and 0 to 3 scores, respectively. The diagnostic accuracy of the two signs separately and combined was calculated using a receiver operating characteristic curve, with clinical diagnosis as the gold standard. The scores of 'swallow-tail' sign were lower in IPD than in MSA or in HCs, as well as for putaminal hypointensity in IPD or HCs than in MSA (p < 0.05). The sensitivity and specificity of 'swallow-tail' sign and putaminal hypointensity were 87.9% and 83.3%, and 35.9% and 100%, respectively, in the respective patient groups. The area under the curve of combined signs was increased from 0.85 ('swallow tail') or 0.68 (putaminal hypointensity) to 0.93. The combination of 'swallow-tail' sign and putaminal hypointensity can increase the accuracy of discriminating between MSA and IPD. (orig.)

  7. Diagnostic examination performance by using microvascular leakage, cerebral blood volume, and blood flow derived from 3-T dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced perfusion MR imaging in the differentiation of glioblastoma multiforme and brain metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Server, Andres; Nakstad, Per H. [Oslo University Hospital-Ullevaal, Section of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Oslo (Norway); University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Orheim, Tone E.D. [Oslo University Hospital, Interventional Centre, Oslo (Norway); Graff, Bjoern A. [Oslo University Hospital-Ullevaal, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Oslo (Norway); Josefsen, Roger [Oslo University Hospital-Ullevaal, Department of Neurosurgery, Oslo (Norway); Kumar, Theresa [Oslo University Hospital-Ullevaal, Department of Pathology, Oslo (Norway)

    2011-05-15

    Conventional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has limited capacity to differentiate between glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and metastasis. The purposes of this study were: (1) to compare microvascular leakage (MVL), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and blood flow (CBF) in the distinction of metastasis from GBM using dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced perfusion MR imaging (DSC-MRI), and (2) to estimate the diagnostic accuracy of perfusion and permeability MR imaging. A prospective study of 61 patients (40 GBMs and 21 metastases) was performed at 3 T using DSC-MRI. Normalized rCBV and rCBF from tumoral (rCBVt, rCBFt), peri-enhancing region (rCBVe, rCBFe), and by dividing the value in the tumor by the value in the peri-enhancing region (rCBVt/e, rCBFt/e), as well as MVL were calculated. Hemodynamic and histopathologic variables were analyzed statistically and Spearman/Pearson correlations. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was performed for each of the variables. The rCBVe, rCBFe, and MVL were significantly greater in GBMs compared with those of metastases. The optimal cutoff value for differentiating GBM from metastasis was 0.80 which implies a sensitivity of 95%, a specificity of 92%, a positive predictive value of 86%, and a negative predictive value of 97% for rCBVe ratio. We found a modest correlation between rCBVt and rCBFt ratios. MVL measurements in GBMs are significantly higher than those in metastases. Statistically, both rCBVe, rCBVt/e and rCBFe, rCBFt/e were useful in differentiating between GBMs and metastases, supporting the hypothesis that perfusion MR imaging can detect infiltration of tumor cells in the peri-enhancing region. (orig.)

  8. Neuronavigation using susceptibility-weighted venography: application to deep brain stimulation and comparison with gadolinium contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bériault, Silvain; Sadikot, Abbas F; Alsubaie, Fahd; Drouin, Simon; Collins, D Louis; Pike, G Bruce

    2014-07-01

    Careful trajectory planning on preoperative vascular imaging is an essential step in deep brain stimulation (DBS) to minimize risks of hemorrhagic complications and postoperative neurological deficits. This paper compares 2 MRI methods for visualizing cerebral vasculature and planning DBS probe trajectories: a single data set T1-weighted scan with double-dose gadolinium contrast (T1w-Gd) and a multi-data set protocol consisting of a T1-weighted structural, susceptibility-weighted venography, and time-of-flight angiography (T1w-SWI-TOF). Two neurosurgeons who specialize in neuromodulation surgery planned bilateral STN DBS in 18 patients with Parkinson's disease (36 hemispheres) using each protocol separately. Planned trajectories were then evaluated across all vascular data sets (T1w-Gd, SWI, and TOF) to detect possible intersection with blood vessels along the entire path via an objective vesselness measure. The authors' results show that trajectories planned on T1w-SWI-TOF successfully avoided the cerebral vasculature imaged by conventional T1w-Gd and did not suffer from missing vascular information or imprecise data set registration. Furthermore, with appropriate planning and visualization software, trajectory corridors planned on T1w-SWI-TOF intersected significantly less fine vasculature that was not detected on the T1w-Gd (p < 0.01 within 2 mm and p < 0.001 within 4 mm of the track centerline). The proposed T1w-SWI-TOF protocol comes with minimal effects on the imaging and surgical workflow, improves vessel avoidance, and provides a safe cost-effective alternative to injection of gadolinium contrast.

  9. SHMS Hodoscopes and Time of Flight System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craycraft, Kayla; Malace, Simona

    2017-09-01

    As part of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility's (Jefferson Lab) upgrade from 6 GeV to 12 GeV, a new magnetic focusing spectrometer, the Super High Momentum Spectrometer (SHMS), was installed in experimental Hall C. The detector stack consists of horizontal drift chambers for tracking, gas Cerenkov and Aerogel detectors and a lead glass calorimeter for particle identification. A hodoscope system consisting of three planes of scintillator detectors (constructed by James Madison University) and one plane of quartz bars (built by North Carolina A&T State University) is used for triggering and time of flight measurements. This presentation consists of discussion of the installation, calibration, and characterization of the detectors used in this Time of Flight system. James Madison University, North Carolina A&T State University.

  10. TORCH - a Cherenkov-based time-of-flight detector

    CERN Document Server

    van Dijk, M W U; Cowie, E N; Cussans, D; D' Ambrosio, C; Forty, R; Frei, C; Gys, T; Piedigrossi, D; Castillo Garcia, L; Fopma, J; Gao, R; Harnew, N; Keri, T

    2014-01-01

    TORCH is an innovative high-precision time-of-flight system to provide particle identification in the difficult intermediate momentum region up to 10 GeV/c. It is also suitable for large-area applications. The detector provides a time-of-flight measurement from the imaging of Cherenkov photons emitted in a 1 cm thick quartz radiator. The photons propagate by total internal reflection to the edge of the quartz plate, where they are focused onto an array of photon detectors at the periphery. A time-of-flight resolution of about 10–15 ps per incident charged particle needs to be achieved for a three sigma kaon–pion separation up to 10 GeV/c momentum for the TORCH located 9.5 m from the interaction point. Given ∼ 30 detected photons per incident charged particle, this requires measuring the time-of-arrival of individual photons to about 70 ps. This paper will describe the design of a TORCH prototype involving a number of ground-breaking and challenging techniques.

  11. Time-of-flight cameras principles, methods and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hansard, Miles; Choi, Ouk; Horaud, Radu

    2012-01-01

    Time-of-flight (TOF) cameras provide a depth value at each pixel, from which the 3D structure of the scene can be estimated. This new type of active sensor makes it possible to go beyond traditional 2D image processing, directly to depth-based and 3D scene processing. Many computer vision and graphics applications can benefit from TOF data, including 3D reconstruction, activity and gesture recognition, motion capture and face detection. It is already possible to use multiple TOF cameras, in order to increase the scene coverage, and to combine the depth data with images from several colour came

  12. The CDF Time of Flight Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Cabrera et al.

    2004-01-06

    A new Time of Flight (TOF) detector based on scintillator bars with fine-mesh photomultipliers at both ends has been in operation since 2001 in the CDF experiment. With a design resolution of 100 ps, the TOF can provide separation between K{sup +-} and {pi}{sup +-} in p{bar p} collisions at the 2{omega} level for low momentum, which enhances b flavor tagging capabilities. Because of its very fast response, the TOF is an excellent triggering device, and it is used to trigger on highly ionizing particles, multiple minimum ionizing particles and cosmic rays. Particle identification is achieved by comparing the time-of-flight of the particle measured by the TOF to the time expected for a given mass hypothesis. In order to obtain the resolution necessary for particle ID, optimal calibrations are critical. This paper describes the TOF detector, its calibration procedure, the achieved resolution, the long term operation performances and some of the first results from data analysis using this detector.

  13. The TORCH time-of-flight detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnew, N.; Brook, N.; Castillo García, L.; Cussans, D.; Föhl, K.; Forty, R.; Frei, C.; Gao, R.; Gys, T.; Piedigrossi, D.; Rademacker, J.; Ros Garcia, A.; van Dijk, M.

    2016-07-01

    The TORCH time-of-flight detector is being developed to provide particle identification between 2 and 10 GeV/c momentum over a flight distance of 10 m. TORCH is designed for large-area coverage, up to 30 m2, and has a DIRC-like construction. The goal is to achieve a 15 ps time-of-flight resolution per incident particle by combining arrival times from multiple Cherenkov photons produced within quartz radiator plates of 10 mm thickness. A four-year R&D programme is underway with an industrial partner (Photek, UK) to produce 53×53 mm2 Micro-Channel Plate (MCP) detectors for the TORCH application. The MCP-PMT will provide a timing accuracy of 40 ps per photon and it will have a lifetime of up to at least 5 Ccm-2 of integrated anode charge by utilizing an Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) coating. The MCP will be read out using charge division with customised electronics incorporating the NINO chipset. Laboratory results on prototype MCPs are presented. The construction of a prototype TORCH module and its simulated performance are also described.

  14. The TORCH time-of-flight detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harnew, N., E-mail: Neville.Harnew@physics.ox.ac.uk [University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Brook, N. [University College London, Department of Physics & Astronomy, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Castillo García, L. [CERN, PH Department, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Laboratory for High Energy Physics, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Cussans, D. [H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Föhl, K.; Forty, R.; Frei, C. [CERN, PH Department, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Gao, R. [University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Gys, T.; Piedigrossi, D. [CERN, PH Department, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Rademacker, J.; Ros Garcia, A.; Dijk, M. van [H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-11

    The TORCH time-of-flight detector is being developed to provide particle identification between 2 and 10 GeV/c momentum over a flight distance of 10 m. TORCH is designed for large-area coverage, up to 30 m{sup 2}, and has a DIRC-like construction. The goal is to achieve a 15 ps time-of-flight resolution per incident particle by combining arrival times from multiple Cherenkov photons produced within quartz radiator plates of 10 mm thickness. A four-year R&D programme is underway with an industrial partner (Photek, UK) to produce 53×53 mm{sup 2} Micro-Channel Plate (MCP) detectors for the TORCH application. The MCP-PMT will provide a timing accuracy of 40 ps per photon and it will have a lifetime of up to at least 5 Ccm{sup −2} of integrated anode charge by utilizing an Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) coating. The MCP will be read out using charge division with customised electronics incorporating the NINO chipset. Laboratory results on prototype MCPs are presented. The construction of a prototype TORCH module and its simulated performance are also described.

  15. Determination of spatial distribution of melamine-cyanuric acid crystals in rat kidney tissue by histology and imaging matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chae-Wook; Yun, Jun-Won; Bae, Il-Hong; Lee, Joon-Seok; Kang, Hyun-Jin; Joo, Kyung-Mi; Jeong, Hye-Jin; Chung, Jin-Ho; Park, Young-Ho; Lim, Kyung-Min

    2010-01-01

    After the outbreak of acute renal failure associated with melamine-contaminated pet food, many attempts have been made to uncover the mechanism underlying the renal toxicity caused by melamine and melamine-related compounds. Using rat models, we investigated the renal crystal formation following the ingestion of a melamine-cyanuric acid mixture (M+CA, 1:1) to gain insight into the M+CA-induced renal toxicity. M+CA did not induce toxicity in precision-cut kidney slices, suggesting that M+CA does not have a direct nephrotoxicity. On the contrary, oral administration of M+CA for 3 days induced nephrotoxicity as determined by increased serum blood urea nitrogen and creatinine, reduced creatinine clearance, and enlarged kidneys in the animals treated with 50 mg/kg M+CA (melamine, 25 mg/kg, and cyanuric acid, 25 mg/kg; 2 of 10 animals) and 100 mg/kg M+CA (9 of 9 animals). While urine crystals were found in all animals treated with M+CA (25-100 mg/kg), histological examination revealed that renal crystals could be observed only in the kidneys of animals showing signs of nephrotoxicity. Remarkably, at 50 mg/kg M+CA, crystals were observed mainly in the medulla region of the kidney, while at 100 mg/kg, crystals were disseminated throughout the cortex and medulla regions. To further investigate the crystal formation by M+CA, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization quadrupole time-of-flight (MALDI-Q-TOF) imaging mass spectrometry detecting melamine distribution through monitoring the product ion (m/z 85, M + H) from melamine (m/z 127, M + H) was developed to directly obtain the image of melamine distribution in the kidney. The distribution image of melamine in kidney tissue confirmed that dense points of melamine were located only in the medulla region at 50 mg/kg M+CA, while at 100 mg/kg, they were disseminated widely from the cortex to medulla. These results demonstrated that M+CA ingestion could lead to crystal formation in kidney tubules along the osmotic gradient and

  16. Cluster Tracking with Time-of-Flight Cameras

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Dan Witzner; Hansen, Mads; Kirschmeyer, Martin

    2008-01-01

    We describe a method for tracking people using a time-of-flight camera and apply the method for persistent authentication in a smart-environment. A background model is built by fusing information from intensity and depth images. While a geometric constraint is employed to improve pixel cluster...... coherence and reducing the influence of noise, the EM algorithm (expectation maximization) is used for tracking moving clusters of pixels significantly different from the background model. Each cluster is defined through a statistical model of points on the ground plane. We show the benefits of the time...

  17. The HADES time-of-flight wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agodi, C.; Bassi, A.; Bassini, R.; Bellia, G.; Benovic, M.; Boiano, C.; Brambilla, S.; Coniglione, R.; Cosentino, L.; Finocchiaro, P.; Hlavac, S.; Iori, I.; Koenig, W.; Kugler, A.; Maiolino, C.; Marek, T.; Piattelli, P.; Pleskač, R.; Sapienza, P.; Spataro, S.; Suk, M.; Taranenko, A.; Tlustý, P.; Turzo, I.; Vassiliev, D.; Wagner, V.; Zovinec, D.

    2002-10-01

    In the framework of the High Acceptance DiElectron Spectrometer collaboration a Time-of-Flight wall subdetector has been developed. In order to efficiently select rare events with dilepton pairs produced in the nuclear matter, in a high hadron multiplicity environment, such a wall must be able to resolve electrons from pions up to 0.5 GeV/ c and from protons up to 2 GeV/ c. The short flight path of about 2 m requires a time resolution better than 150 ps, while impact position and multiplicity measurements need adequate granularity. These requirements have been fulfilled by employing scintillator rods read-out at both ends by photomultipliers.

  18. Photometric stereo-based single time-of-flight camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun Kwon; Kang, Byongmin; Heo, Jingu; Jung, Seung-Won; Choi, Ouk

    2014-01-01

    We present a method to enhance depth quality of a time-of-flight (ToF) camera without additional devices or hardware modifications. By controlling the turn-off patterns of the LEDs of the camera, we obtain depth and normal maps simultaneously. Sixteen subphase images are acquired with variations in gate-pulse timing and light emission pattern of the camera. The subphase images allow us to obtain a normal map, which are combined with depth maps for improved depth details. These details typically cannot be captured by conventional ToF cameras. By the proposed method, the average of absolute differences between the measured and laser-scanned depth maps has decreased from 4.57 to 3.77 mm.

  19. Single-photon pulsed-light indirect time-of-flight 3D ranging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellisai, S; Bronzi, D; Villa, F A; Tisa, S; Tosi, A; Zappa, F

    2013-02-25

    "Indirect" time-of-flight is one technique to obtain depth-resolved images through active illumination that is becoming more popular in the recent years. Several methods and light timing patterns are used nowadays, aimed at improving measurement precision with smarter algorithms, while using less and less light power. Purpose of this work is to present an indirect time-of-flight imaging camera based on pulsed-light active illumination and a 32 × 32 single-photon avalanche diode array with an improved illumination timing pattern, able to increase depth resolution and to reach single-photon level sensitivity.

  20. Hadamard Transform Time-of-Flight Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-26

    the deflected and undeflected components of the ion beam can be isolated from an image generated from the sum of all ions collected during the course...acids where the third residue is either lysine or arginine. AMC is an acronym for 7-amino 4-methyl coumarin , a fluorophore whose hydrolysis can be

  1. Potential advantages of a cesium fluoride scintillator for a time-of-flight positron camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allemand, R; Gresset, C; Vacher, J

    1980-02-01

    In order to improve the quality of positron tomographic imaging, a time-of-flight technique combined with a classical reconstruction method has been investigated. The decay time of NaI(Tl) and bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillators is too long for this application, and efficiency of the plastic scintillators is too low. Cesium fluoride appears to be a very promising detector material. This paper presents preliminary results obtained with a time-of-flight technique using CsF scintillators. The expected advantages were realized.

  2. TORCH: Time of Flight Identification with Cherenkov Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Charles, M J

    2011-01-01

    TORCH is a time-of-flight detector concept using Cherenkov light to provide charged particle identification up to 10 GeV/c. The concept and design are described and performance in simulation is quantified.

  3. BGO as a hybrid scintillator / Cherenkov radiator for cost-effective time-of-flight PET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunner, S.E.K.; Schaart, D.R.

    2017-01-01

    Due to detector developments in the last decade, the time-of-flight (TOF) method is now commonly used to improve the quality of positron emission tomography (PET) images. Clinical TOF-PET systems based on L(Y)SO:Ce crystals and silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) with coincidence resolving times

  4. Time-of-flight atom probe measurements on Ni3Al and Co3W

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soer, W.A.; Bronsveld, P.M.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    2003-01-01

    In this study, a VG FIM100 was taken into operation, consisting of a field-ion microscope (FIM), a time-of-flight atom probe (TOFAP) and an imaging atom probe. A tungsten specimen was used to calibrate the conversion of flight times to m/n values. The resulting relative mass resolution of the TOFAP

  5. A photoelectron-photoion coincidence imaging apparatus for femtosecond time-resolved molecular dynamics with electron time-of-flight resolution of sigma=18 ps and energy resolution Delta E/E=3.5%.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vredenborg, Arno; Roeterdink, Wim G; Janssen, Maurice H M

    2008-06-01

    We report on the construction and performance of a novel photoelectron-photoion coincidence machine in our laboratory in Amsterdam to measure the full three-dimensional momentum distribution of correlated electrons and ions in femtosecond time-resolved molecular beam experiments. We implemented sets of open electron and ion lenses to time stretch and velocity map the charged particles. Time switched voltages are operated on the particle lenses to enable optimal electric field strengths for velocity map focusing conditions of electrons and ions separately. The position and time sensitive detectors employ microchannel plates (MCPs) in front of delay line detectors. A special effort was made to obtain the time-of-flight (TOF) of the electrons at high temporal resolution using small pore (5 microm) MCPs and implementing fast timing electronics. We measured the TOF distribution of the electrons under our typical coincidence field strengths with a temporal resolution down to sigma=18 ps. We observed that our electron coincidence detector has a timing resolution better than sigma=16 ps, which is mainly determined by the residual transit time spread of the MCPs. The typical electron energy resolution appears to be nearly laser bandwidth limited with a relative resolution of DeltaE(FWHM)/E=3.5% for electrons with kinetic energy near 2 eV. The mass resolution of the ion detector for ions measured in coincidence with electrons is about Deltam(FWHM)/m=14150. The velocity map focusing of our extended source volume of particles, due to the overlap of the molecular beam with the laser beams, results in a parent ion spot on our detector focused down to sigma=115 microm.

  6. Recent developments in time-of-flight PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandenberghe, S.; Mikhaylova, E.; D’Hoe, E.; Mollet, P. [ELIS-IMINDS-Medical IT-IBITECH Ghent University, De Pintelaan 185, Blok B, Gent, 9000 (Belgium); Karp, J. S. [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2016-02-16

    While the first time-of-flight (TOF)-positron emission tomography (PET) systems were already built in the early 1980s, limited clinical studies were acquired on these scanners. PET was still a research tool, and the available TOF-PET systems were experimental. Due to a combination of low stopping power and limited spatial resolution (caused by limited light output of the scintillators), these systems could not compete with bismuth germanate (BGO)-based PET scanners. Developments on TOF system were limited for about a decade but started again around 2000. The combination of fast photomultipliers, scintillators with high density, modern electronics, and faster computing power for image reconstruction have made it possible to introduce this principle in clinical TOF-PET systems. This paper reviews recent developments in system design, image reconstruction, corrections, and the potential in new applications for TOF-PET. After explaining the basic principles of time-of-flight, the difficulties in detector technology and electronics to obtain a good and stable timing resolution are shortly explained. The available clinical systems and prototypes under development are described in detail. The development of this type of PET scanner also requires modified image reconstruction with accurate modeling and correction methods. The additional dimension introduced by the time difference motivates a shift from sinogram- to listmode-based reconstruction. This reconstruction is however rather slow and therefore rebinning techniques specific for TOF data have been proposed. The main motivation for TOF-PET remains the large potential for image quality improvement and more accurate quantification for a given number of counts. The gain is related to the ratio of object size and spatial extent of the TOF kernel and is therefore particularly relevant for heavy patients, where image quality degrades significantly due to increased attenuation (low counts) and high scatter fractions. The

  7. Performance of the Tachyon Time-of-Flight PET Camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Q; Choong, W-S; Vu, C; Huber, J S; Janecek, M; Wilson, D; Huesman, R H; Qi, Jinyi; Zhou, Jian; Moses, W W

    2015-02-01

    We have constructed and characterized a time-of-flight Positron Emission Tomography (TOF PET) camera called the Tachyon. The Tachyon is a single-ring Lutetium Oxyorthosilicate (LSO) based camera designed to obtain significantly better timing resolution than the ~ 550 ps found in present commercial TOF cameras, in order to quantify the benefit of improved TOF resolution for clinically relevant tasks. The Tachyon's detector module is optimized for timing by coupling the 6.15 × 25 mm(2) side of 6.15 × 6.15 × 25 mm(3) LSO scintillator crystals onto a 1-inch diameter Hamamatsu R-9800 PMT with a super-bialkali photocathode. We characterized the camera according to the NEMA NU 2-2012 standard, measuring the energy resolution, timing resolution, spatial resolution, noise equivalent count rates and sensitivity. The Tachyon achieved a coincidence timing resolution of 314 ps +/- ps FWHM over all crystal-crystal combinations. Experiments were performed with the NEMA body phantom to assess the imaging performance improvement over non-TOF PET. The results show that at a matched contrast, incorporating 314 ps TOF reduces the standard deviation of the contrast by a factor of about 2.3.

  8. Neutron Time-Of-Flight (n_TOF) experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Brugger, M; Kaeppeler, F K; Jericha, E; Cortes rossell, G P; Riego perez, A; Baccomi, R; Laurent, B G; Griesmayer, E; Leeb, H; Dressler, M; Cano ott, D; Variale, V; Ventura, A; Carrillo de albornoz trillo, A; Lo meo, S; Andrzejewski, J J; Pavlik, A F; Kadi, Y; Zanni vlastou, R; Krticka, M; Weiss, C; Kokkoris, M; Praena rodriguez, A J; Cortes giraldo, M A; Perkowski, J; Losito, R; Audouin, L; Tagliente, G; Wallner, A; Woods, P J; Mengoni, A; Guerrero sanchez, C G; Tain enriquez, J L; Vlachoudis, V; Calviani, M; Reifarth, R; Mendoza cembranos, E; Quesada molina, J M; Babiano suarez, V; Schumann, M D; Tsinganis, A; Rauscher, T; Calvino tavares, F; Mingrone, F; Gonzalez romero, E M; Colonna, N; Negret, A L; Chiaveri, E; Milazzo, P M; De almeida carrapico, C A; Castelluccio, D M

    The neutron time-of-flight facility n_TOF at CERN, Switzerland, operational since 2001, delivers neutrons using the Proton Synchrotron (PS) 20 GeV/c proton beam impinging on a lead spallation target. The facility combines a very high instantaneous neutron flux, an excellent time of flight resolution due to the distance between the experimental area and the production target (185 meters), a low intrinsic background and a wide range of neutron energies, from thermal to GeV neutrons. These characteristics provide a unique possibility to perform neutron-induced capture and fission cross-section measurements for applications in nuclear astrophysics and in nuclear reactor technology.

  9. Detector Description Database for the DELPHI Time of Flight Counter

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, P.; De Fez, M; Ferrer, A.; Cuevas, J; Ruiz, A.

    1992-01-01

    This note describes the physical and geometrical constants of the various components of the DELPHI time of flight Scintillation Counter. We describe the construction of a database which enables this information to be organized for use in the analysis of data. We list in detail the meaning of each word in the database.

  10. Time-of-flight estimation based on covariance models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, Ferdinand; Tuquerres, G.; Regtien, Paulus P.L.

    We address the problem of estimating the time-of-flight (ToF) of a waveform that is disturbed heavily by additional reflections from nearby objects. These additional reflections cause interference patterns that are difficult to predict. The introduction of a model for the reflection in terms of a

  11. Highly segmented, high resolution time-of-flight system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nayak, T.K.; Nagamiya, S.; Vossnack, O.; Wu, Y.D.; Zajc, W.A. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Miake, Y.; Ueno, S.; Kitayama, H.; Nagasaka, Y.; Tomizawa, K.; Arai, I.; Yagi, K [Univ. of Tsukuba, (Japan)

    1991-12-31

    The light attenuation and timing characteristics of time-of-flight counters constructed of 3m long scintillating fiber bundles of different shapes and sizes are presented. Fiber bundles made of 5mm diameter fibers showed good timing characteristics and less light attenuation. The results for a 1.5m long scintillator rod are also presented.

  12. Proposal for Cherenkov Time of Flight Technique with Picosecond Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Majewski; A. Margaryan; L. Tang

    2005-08-05

    A new particle identification device for Jlab 12 GeV program is proposed. It is based on the measurement of time information obtained by means of a new photon detector and time measuring concept. The expected time measurement precision for the Cherenkov time-of-flight detector is about or less than 10 picosecond for Cherenkov radiators with lengths less than 50 cm.

  13. Magnetic excitations studied with time-of-flight spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rainford, B. [Southampton Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics

    1996-11-01

    An introduction to time-of-flight neutron spectroscopy is presented in the context of the study of magnetic materials. Examples are taken from the class of rare earth and actinide magnetic materials known as `strongly correlated electron` systems. (author) 11 figs., 24 refs.

  14. Model based scattering correction in time-of-flight cameras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Henrik; Lenzen, Frank; Garbe, Christoph S

    2014-12-01

    In-camera light scattering is a systematic error of Time-of-Flight depth cameras that significantly reduces the accuracy of the systems. A completely new model is presented, based on raw data calibration and only one additional intrinsic camera parameter. It is shown that the approach effectively removes the errors of in-camera light scattering.

  15. 18F Fluorocholine Dynamic Time-of-Flight PET/MR Imaging in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Intermediate- to High-Risk Prostate Cancer: Initial Clinical-Pathologic Comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Joon Young; Yang, Jaewon; Noworolski, Susan M; Behr, Spencer; Chang, Albert J; Simko, Jeffry P; Nguyen, Hao G; Carroll, Peter R; Kurhanewicz, John; Seo, Youngho

    2017-02-01

    Purpose To investigate the initial clinical value of fluorine 18 (18F) fluorocholine (FCH) dynamic positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance (MR) imaging by comparing its parameters with clinical-pathologic findings in patients with newly diagnosed intermediate- to high-risk prostate cancer (PCa) who plan to undergo radical prostatectomy. Materials and Methods The institutional review board approved the study protocol, and informed written consent was obtained from all subjects for this HIPAA-compliant study. Twelve men (mean age ± standard deviation, 61.7 years ± 8.4; range, 46-74 years) with untreated intermediate- to high-risk PCa characterized according to Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment (CAPRA) underwent preoperative FCH dynamic PET/MR imaging followed by radical prostatectomy between April and November 2015. PET/MR imaging parameters including average and maximum K1 (delivery rate constant) and standardized uptake values (SUVs) and Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS) version 2 scores were measured and compared with clinical-pathologic characteristics. For statistical analysis, the Spearman rank correlation and Mann-Whitney U tests were performed. Results Of the PET parameters, maximum SUV of primary tumors showed significant correlations with several clinical-pathologic parameters including serum prostate-specific antigen level (ρ = 0.71, P = .01), pathologic stage (ρ = 0.59, P = .043), and postsurgical CAPRA score (ρ = 0.72, P = .008). The overall PI-RADS score showed significant correlations with pathologic tumor volume (ρ = 0.81, P PET/MR imaging show good correlation with clinical-pathologic characteristics, such as postsurgical CAPRA score, which are related to prognosis in patients with newly diagnosed intermediate- to high-risk PCa. © RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  16. INVESTIGATIONS ON A COMBINED RGB / TIME-OF-FLIGHT APPROACH FOR CLOSE RANGE APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hastedt

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available 3D surface and scene reconstruction for close range applications mainly rely on high resolution and accurate system devices and powerful algorithms. Camera systems based on the time-of-flight principle allow for real-time 3D distance measurements. Unfortunately these devices are limited in resolution and accuracy. But applying calibration models and combining with high-resolution image data offers a promising approach in order to form a multisensor system for close range applications. This article will present investigations on such a multisensor system. Different options on data fusion processing of distance information and high-resolution color information in order to generate dense 2 1/2 D and 3D point clouds will be presented. The multisensor system is calibrated with respect to its interior and exterior orientation. The time-of-flight distance information is optimized extracting best information of different data captures with a set of integration times following the principle of high dynamic range imaging. The high-resolution RGB image information is projected into object space and intersected with the object surface from the time-of-flight camera. First results of this solution on dense monoplotting and its verification will be presented.

  17. Mass spectrometric imaging of brain tissue by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry--How do polyatomic primary beams C₆₀⁺, Ar₂₀₀₀⁺, water-doped Ar₂₀₀₀⁺ and (H₂O)₆₀₀₀⁺ compare?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razo, Irma Berrueta; Sheraz, Sadia née Rabbani; Henderson, Alex; Lockyer, Nicholas P; Vickerman, John C

    2015-10-30

    To discover the degree to which water-containing cluster beams increase secondary ion yield and reduce the matrix effect in time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) imaging of biological tissue. The positive SIMS ion yields from model compounds, mouse brain lipid extract and mouse brain tissue together with mouse brain images were compared using 20 keV C60(+), Ar2000(+), water-doped Ar2000(+) and pure (H2O)6000(+) primary beams. Water-containing cluster beams where the beam energy per nucleon (E/nucleon) ≈ 0.2 eV are optimum for enhancing ion yields dependent on protonation. Ion yield enhancements over those observed using Ar2000(+) lie in the range 10 to >100 using the (H2 O)6000 (+) beam, while with water-doped (H2O)Ar2000(+) they lie in the 4 to 10 range. The two water-containing beams appear to be optimum for tissue imaging and show strong evidence of increasing yields from molecules that experience matrix suppression under other primary beams. The application of water-containing primary beams is suggested for biological SIMS imaging applications, particularly if the beam energy can be raised to 40 keV or higher to further increase ion yield and enhance spatial resolution to ≤1 µm. © 2015 The Authors. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Three-dimensional time of flight magnetic resonance angiography of the heart and associated vessels in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arencibia, A; Corbera, J A; Ramírez, G; Contreras, S; Morales, M; Jaber, J R; Orós, J; Vázquez, J M

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the normal magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) of the heart and associated vessels in a mature female cat using a 1.5-Tesla magnet. Non-contrast enhanced MRA was performed using a three-dimensional time of flight (TOF) sequence in parasagittal and dorsal aspects. Relevant cardiac and vascular structures were labelled on three-dimensional Time of flight images. Time of flight imaging showed details of the heart cavities and vessels lumen due to the high signal intensity of fast-flowing blood compared with bones, muscles, and lungs, which appeared with low signal intensity. Three-dimensional TOF sequences provided adequate anatomical details of the heart and good differentiation of the vascular structures that could be used for interpretation of cardiac images and to assist in future MRA studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Status of the TORCH time-of-flight detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnew, N.; Brook, N. H.; Castillo García, L.; Cussans, D.; van Dijk, M. W. U.; Föhl, K.; Forty, R.; Frei, C.; Gao, R.; Gys, T.; Hancock, T. H.; Piedigrossi, D.; Rademacker, J.; Ros García., A.

    2017-11-01

    The TORCH time-of-flight detector is designed for large-area coverage, up to 30 m2, to provide particle identification between 2–10 GeV/c momentum over a flight distance of 10 m. The arrival times from Cherenkov photons produced within a quartz radiator plate of 10 mm thickness are combined to achieve a 15 ps time-of-flight resolution per incident particle. Micro-Channel Plate Photomultiplier Tube (MCP-PMT) detectors of 53 × 53 mm2 active area have been developed with industrial partners for the TORCH application. The MCP-PMT is read out using charge division to give a 128 × 8 effective granularity. Laboratory results of development MCP-PMTs will be described, and testbeam studies using a small-scale TORCH prototype module will be presented.

  20. The time-of-flight spectrometer for heavy ions PISOLO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montagnoli, G. E-mail: montagnoli@pd.infn.it; Scarlassara, F.; Beghini, S.; Dal Bello, A.; Segato, G.F.; Stefanini, A.M.; Ackermann, D.; Corradi, L.; He, J.H.; Lin, C.J

    2000-11-11

    A time-of-flight spectrometer with magnetic focusing has been installed at the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro. The spectrometer's length is 3.6 m and allows for high-resolution time-of-flight measurements. Magnetic focusing is accomplished by two quadrupole doublets. The spectrometer is connected to a sliding seal scattering chamber rotating over a large angular range. Micro channel-plate detectors for start/stop signals and an ionization chamber for {delta}E-E measurements at the focal plane, are used. The setup provides a maximum effective solid angle {delta}{omega}=2.8 msr, and is dedicated to the study of quasi-elastic reactions between heavy ions; in particular, it has already been used to investigate near-barrier multi-nucleon transfer processes.

  1. The ANTARES recoil time-of-flight spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, J.W.; Russell, G.J. [New South Wales Univ., Kensington, NSW (Australia); Cohen, D.D.; Dytlewski, N. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    The Australian National Tandem for Applied Research (ANTARES), is a 8MV FN tandem particle accelerator at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation. Research on the accelerator is divided between two groups, Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) and lon Beam Analysis (IBA). The IBA group carries out a range of research projects from nuclear physics to materials characterisation. The major IBA project on the accelerator is a recoil time-of-flight spectrometer which consists of two electrostatic time pulse generators and an ion-implanted surface barrier detector. The spectrometer is ideally suited to the profiling of layered multi-element materials, and has been used to characterise materials such as metal-germanides, optoelectronics, superconductors and catalytic converters. This paper will describe the time-of-flight system as well as some recent materials characterisation results. 1 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Time of flight measurement on the SOFIA experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bail, A.; Taieb, J.; Chatillon, A.; Belier, G.; Laurent, B.; Pellereau, E. [CEA/DAM/DIF, Arpajon (France)

    2011-07-01

    The SOFIA experiment, which will be held at GSI (Darmstadt (Germany)) will allow to completely determine the mass and charge numbers of fragments produced in the fission reaction of radioactive actinides in reverse kinematics. Therefore, a dedicated setup has been developed for the Time of Flight measurement of relativistic heavy ions. The studies, which led to the choice of the adequate plastic scintillators and photomultipliers, are presented. Tests have been undertaken with the ELSA laser and electron beam facility. They shown that a suitable choice would be EJ-232 plastic scintillator for the ToF wall and EJ-232Q for the start detector and Hamamatsu H6533 and H10580 photomultipliers. This was confirmed by two test experiments realized at GSI with relativistic heavy ion beam ({sup 56}Fe and {sup 238}U), where a time of flight resolution better than 20 ps FWHM was reached. (authors)

  3. Time-of-Flight Three Dimensional Neutron Diffraction in Transmission Mode for Mapping Crystal Grain Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cereser, Alberto; Strobl, Markus; Hall, Stephen A.

    2017-01-01

    constituting the material. This article presents a new non-destructive 3D technique to study centimeter-sized bulk samples with a spatial resolution of hundred micrometers: time-of-flight three-dimensional neutron diffraction (ToF 3DND). Compared to existing analogous X-ray diffraction techniques, ToF 3DND...... enables studies of samples that can be both larger in size and made of heavier elements. Moreover, ToF 3DND facilitates the use of complicated sample environments. The basic ToF 3DND setup, utilizing an imaging detector with high spatial and temporal resolution, can easily be implemented at a time......-of-flight neutron beamline. The technique was developed and tested with data collected at the Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility of the Japan Proton Accelerator Complex (J-PARC) for an iron sample. We successfully reconstructed the shape of 108 grains and developed an indexing procedure...

  4. Acquisition of Time of Flight Diffraction Data by Mobile Robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, S.; Sattar, T. P.; Bridge, B.

    2003-03-01

    It is shown that Time of Flight Diffraction (TOFD) data acquired with 6 and 7 axes robot scanning arms (that are carried by mobile wall climbing vehicles which can travel on curved surface) is of a much better quality than that acquired by manual deployment. The robotic devices are able to operate in remote and hazardous locations while maintaining more constant contact forces and obtaining repeatable data unaffected by fatigue which manual operators find very difficult to match.

  5. The AMS-02 Time of Flight System. Final Design

    CERN Document Server

    Bindi, V.; Casadei, D.; Castellini, G.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Giovacchini, F.; Giusti, P.; Laurenti, G.; Levi, G.; Martelli, R.; Palmonari, F.; Quadrani, L.; Salvadore, M.; Sbarra, C.; Zichichi, A.

    2003-01-01

    The AMS-02 detector is a superconducting magnetic spectrometer that will operate on the International Space Station. The time of flight (TOF) system of AMS-02 is composed by four scintillator planes with 8, 8, 10, 8 counters each, read at both ends by a total of 144 phototubes. This paper describes the new design, the expected performances, and shows preliminary results of the ion beam test carried on at CERN on October 2002.

  6. A time of flight detector for high energy heavy particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Z.; O`Connor, D.J. [Newcastle Univ., NSW (Australia). Dept. of Physics

    1993-12-31

    As a commonly used method to measure the energy of a particle with known mass, the flight time of the particle travelling over a certain distance is measured. A detector based on this principle is called a time-of-flight (TOF) detector which has attracted interests constantly during the last 15 years. For high energy heavy particle energy detection, TOF detector is an appropriated choice and such a system, developed recently, is described in this paper. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Time of flight mass spectrometry of pharmaceutical systems

    OpenAIRE

    Armitage Nolan, Jennifer Claire

    2013-01-01

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) is a widely used surface chemical analysis technique that is traditionally employed to characterise the first few molecular layers of a material interface. The ability of this technique to accurately reflect the surface chemistry of polymers, biomaterials and many other solid materials is well documented. However, the majority of research that utilises this technique is based upon a qualitative rather than quantitative assessment of th...

  8. Nanometer scale elemental analysis in the helium ion microscope using time of flight spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingner, N; Heller, R; Hlawacek, G; Borany, J von; Notte, J; Huang, J; Facsko, S

    2016-03-01

    Time of flight backscattering spectrometry (ToF-BS) was successfully implemented in a helium ion microscope (HIM). Its integration introduces the ability to perform laterally resolved elemental analysis as well as elemental depth profiling on the nm scale. A lateral resolution of ≤54nm and a time resolution of Δt≤17ns(Δt/t≤5.4%) are achieved. By using the energy of the backscattered particles for contrast generation, we introduce a new imaging method to the HIM allowing direct elemental mapping as well as local spectrometry. In addition laterally resolved time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) can be performed with the same setup. Time of flight is implemented by pulsing the primary ion beam. This is achieved in a cost effective and minimal invasive way that does not influence the high resolution capabilities of the microscope when operating in standard secondary electron (SE) imaging mode. This technique can thus be easily adapted to existing devices. The particular implementation of ToF-BS and ToF-SIMS techniques are described, results are presented and advantages, difficulties and limitations of this new techniques are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Multiband multislab 3D time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography for reduced acquisition time and improved sensitivity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulz, J.; Boyacioǧlu, R.; Norris, David Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the use of multiband (MB) imaging in multislab (MS) 3D time-of-flight-magnetic resonance angiography (TOF-MRA) and to improve acquisition time efficiency (TA), inflow contrast and sensitivity in vessel detection. Theory and Methods: TOF-MRA is commonly used for imaging

  10. Time of Flight Transients in the Dipolar Glass Model

    OpenAIRE

    Novikov, S. V.; Tyutnev, A. P.; Schein, L. B.

    2013-01-01

    Using Monte Carlo simulation we investigated time of flight current transients predicted by the dipolar glass model for a random spatial distribution of hopping centers. Behavior of the carrier drift mobility was studied at room temperature over a broad range of electric field and sample thickness. A flat plateau followed by $j\\propto t^{-2}$ current decay is the most common feature of the simulated transients. Poole-Frenkel mobility field dependence was confirmed over 5 to 200 V/$\\mu$m as we...

  11. Miniature Focusing Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanik, Isik; Srivastava, Santosh

    2005-01-01

    An improved miniature time-of-flight mass spectrometer has been developed in a continuing effort to minimize the sizes, weights, power demands, and costs of mass spectrometers for such diverse applications as measurement of concentrations of pollutants in the atmosphere, detecting poisonous gases in mines, and analyzing exhaust gases of automobiles. Advantageous characteristics of this mass spectrometer include the following: It is simple and rugged. Relative to prior mass spectrometers, it is inexpensive to build. There is no need for precise alignment of its components. Its mass range is practically unlimited Relative to prior mass spectrometers, it offers high sensitivity (ability to measure relative concentrations as small as parts per billion). Its resolution is one dalton (one atomic mass unit). An entire mass spectrum is recorded in a single pulse. (In a conventional mass spectrometer, a spectrum is recorded mass by mass.) The data-acquisition process takes only seconds. It is a lightweight, low-power, portable instrument. Although time-of-flight mass spectrometers (TOF-MSs) have been miniaturized previously, their performances have not been completely satisfactory. An inherent adverse effect of miniaturization of a TOF-MS is a loss of resolution caused by reduction of the length of its flight tube. In the present improved TOF-MS, the adverse effect of shortening the flight tube is counteracted by (1) using charged-particle optics to constrain ion trajectories to the flight-tube axis while (2) reducing ion velocities to increase ion flight times. In the present improved TOF-MS, a stream of gas is generated by use of a hypodermic needle. The stream of gas is crossed by an energy-selected, pulsed beam of electrons (see Figure 1). The ions generated by impingement of the electrons on the gas atoms are then focused by three cylindrical electrostatic lenses, which constitute a segmented flight tube. After traveling along the flight tube, the ions enter a charged

  12. Bakelite chambers for time-of-flight measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Cwiok, M; Górski, M; Królikowski, J

    1999-01-01

    We report on the search of composite organic materials with the volume resistivity ranging from 10 sup 8 to 10 sup 1 sup 1 OMEGA cm. Materials having resistivity in this range may be used for electrodes of thin gap Parallel Plate Avalanche Chambers. Gas detectors of such structure and operated at increased gas pressure allow, potentially, a sub-nanosecond time resolution. Using bakelite-like material with electrical properties well tuned during manufacturing opens the possibility to overcome limitations related to the semi-conductive glass employed usually for ultrafast gas detectors of parallel plate structure for time-of-flight technique.

  13. Material Classification Using Raw Time-of-Flight Measurements

    KAUST Repository

    Su, Shuochen

    2016-12-13

    We propose a material classification method using raw time-of-flight (ToF) measurements. ToF cameras capture the correlation between a reference signal and the temporal response of material to incident illumination. Such measurements encode unique signatures of the material, i.e. the degree of subsurface scattering inside a volume. Subsequently, it offers an orthogonal domain of feature representation compared to conventional spatial and angular reflectance-based approaches. We demonstrate the effectiveness, robustness, and efficiency of our method through experiments and comparisons of real-world materials.

  14. Role of magnetic susceptibility weighted imaging in evaluation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mohamed Masoud Radwan

    3. 1. 4. Total. 30. 0. 11. 19. 30. Figure 3. Sixty year old hypertensive male patient presenting with right hemiparesis. While T1 (A), T2 (B) and FLAIR (C) show only lacunar infarcts, SWI (D) reveals foci of hemorrhage in both parietal and frontal lobes matching with chronic hypertensive encephalopathy. 302. M.M. Radwan et al.

  15. Time of flight Laue fiber diffraction studies of perdeuterated DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsyth, V.T.; Whalley, M.A.; Mahendrasingam, A.; Fuller, W. [Keele Univ. (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    The diffractometer SXD at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory ISIS pulsed neutron source has been used to record high resolution time-of-flight Laue fiber diffraction data from DNA. These experiments, which are the first of their kind, were undertaken using fibers of DNA in the A conformation and prepared using deuterated DNA in order to minimis incoherent background scattering. These studies complement previous experiments on instrument D19 at the Institute Laue Langevin using monochromatic neutrons. Sample preparation involved drawing large numbers of these deuterated DNA fibers and mounting them in a parallel array. The strategy of data collection is discussed in terms of camera design, sample environment and data collection. The methods used to correct the recorded time-of-flight data and map it into the final reciprocal space fiber diffraction dataset are also discussed. Difference Fourier maps showing the distribution of water around A-DNA calculated on the basis of these data are compared with results obtained using data recorded from hydrogenated A-DNA on D19. Since the methods used for sample preparation, data collection and data processing are fundamentally different for the monochromatic and Laue techniques, the results of these experiments also afford a valuable opportunity to independently test the data reduction and analysis techniques used in the two methods.

  16. Time-of-flight mass spectrometry: Introduction to the basics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesl, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    The intention of this tutorial is to introduce into the basic concepts of time-of-flight mass spectrometry, beginning with the most simple single-stage ion source with linear field-free drift region and continuing with two-stage ion sources combined with field-free drift regions and ion reflectors-the so-called reflectrons. Basic formulas are presented and discussed with the focus on understanding the physical relations of geometric and electric parameters, initial distribution of ionic parameters, ion flight times, and ion flight time incertitude. This tutorial is aimed to help the applicant to identify sources of flight time broadening which limit good mass resolution and sources of ion losses which limit sensitivity; it is aimed to stimulate creativity for new experimental approaches by discussing a choice of instrumental options and to encourage those who toy with the idea to build an own time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Large parts of mathematics are shifted into a separate chapter in order not to overburden the text with too many mathematical deviations. Rather, thumb-rule formulas are supplied for first estimations of geometry and potentials when designing a home-built instrument, planning experiments, or searching for sources of flight time broadening. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Mass Spec Rev 36:86-109, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. The ALICE Time of Flight Readout System AFRO

    CERN Document Server

    Kluge, A

    1999-01-01

    The ALICE Time of Flight Detector system comprises more than 100.000 channels and covers an area of more than 100 m2. The timing resolution should be better than 150 ps. This combination of requirements poses a major challenge to the readout system. All detector timing measurements are referenced to a unique start signal t0. This signal is generated at the time an event occurs. Timing measurements are performed using a multichannel TDC chip which requires a 40 MHz reference clock signal. The general concept of the readout system is based on a modular architecture. Detector cells are combined to modules of 1024 channels. Each of these modules can be read out and calibrated independently from each other. By distributing a reference signal, a timing relationship between the modules is established. This reference signal can either be the start signal t0 or the TDC-reference clock. The readout architecture is divided into three steps; the TDC controller, the module controller, and the time of flight controller. Th...

  18. Absent Vascular Signal on Time-of-Flight Magnetic Resonance Angiography Due to Recent Ferumoxytol Infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Aparna; Curé, Joel K

    Time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography is used for craniocervical arterial evaluation. Absent flow-related signal may be the result of slow flow, complex flow, or focal susceptibility effects. We report a case with complete absence of flow-related signal in the intracranial and cervical vessels due to ferumoxytol infusion given 5 days before magnetic resonance angiography. Ferumoxytol is a newly approved parenteral therapy for iron-deficiency anemia in patients with renal failure and awareness of this drug-magnetic resonance imaging interaction is needed.

  19. IceBridge Sigma Space Prototype L0 Raw Time-of-Flight Data, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA IceBridge Sigma Space Prototype L0 Raw Time-of-Flight Data set (ILSSP0) contains time-of-flight data captured over Antarctica using the Sigma Space Photon...

  20. IceBridge Sigma Space Prototype L0 Raw Time-of-Flight Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA IceBridge Sigma Space Prototype L0 Raw Time-of-Flight Data set (ILSSP0) contains time-of-flight data captured over Antarctica using the Sigma Space Photon...

  1. IceBridge Sigma Space Lidar L0 Raw Time-of-Flight Data, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA IceBridge Sigma Space Lidar L0 Raw Time-of-Flight Data (ILSIG0) contain raw time-of-flight values for Antarctica and Greenland using the Sigma Space Lidar....

  2. Tests and calibration of NIF neutron time of flight detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Z A; Glebov, V Yu; Cruz, M; Duffy, T; Stoeckl, C; Roberts, S; Sangster, T C; Tommasini, R; Throop, A; Moran, M; Dauffy, L; Horsefield, C

    2008-10-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) neutron time of flight (NTOF) diagnostic will measure neutron yield and ion temperature in all NIF campaigns in DD, DT, and THD(*) implosions. The NIF NTOF diagnostic is designed to measure neutron yield from 1x10(9) to 2x10(19). The NTOF consists of several detectors of varying sensitivity located on the NIF at about 5 and 20 m from the target. Production, testing, and calibration of the NIF NTOF detectors have begun at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). Operational tests of the NTOF detectors were performed on several facilities including the OMEGA laser at LLE and the Titan laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Neutron calibrations were carried out on the OMEGA laser. Results of the NTOF detector tests and calibration will be presented.

  3. Time-of-flight detector for heavy ion backscattering spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, J.A.; Banks, J.C.; Doyle, B.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Ion Solid Interactions and Defect Physics Dept.

    1994-04-01

    This report describes the results of a two-year laboratory directed research and development project to explore advanced concepts in Heavy Ion Backscattering Spectrometry (HIBS), undertaken with the goal of extending the sensitivity of this relatively new technique to levels unattainable by any other existing trace element surface analysis. Improvements in sensitivity are required for the application of HIBS to contamination control in the microelectronics industry. Tools with sensitivity approaching 10{sup 8} atoms/cm{sup 2} are expected to be essential for enabling advanced IC production by the year 2000. During the project the authors developed a new analysis chamber with channeling goniometer and a prototype time-of-flight detector with a demonstrated sensitivity of {approximately} 5 {times} 10{sup 8} atoms/cm{sup 2} for Au on Si and {approximately} 5 {times} 10{sup 10} for Fe, and sufficient mass resolution to separate contributions from Fe and Cu.

  4. Time-of-flight neutral particle analyzer and calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, W S; Garate, E P; Heidbrink, W W; McWilliams, R; Roche, T; Trask, E; Zhang, Yang

    2008-10-01

    A time-of-flight diagnostic has been implemented on the Irvine field reversed configuration (IFRC) to obtain an energy distribution function from charge-exchanged neutral hydrogen. The diagnostic includes a 13 cm radius slotted disk rotating at 165 Hz in vacuum which chops the emitted neutrals at a rate of 26 kHz. In situ timing verification was performed with a dc xenon discharge lamp with an uncertainty less than 100 ns for a 38 micros chopping period. Energy calibration was accomplished with a singly ionized lithium source in the range of 300-1500 eV, achieving an average energy uncertainty, DeltaE/E, of 0.11. The diagnostic has measured neutrals in the range of 20-80 eV from the IFRC and the corresponding energy distribution function has been obtained.

  5. Highly charged ion based time of flight emission microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Alan V.; Schenkel, Thomas; Hamza, Alex V.; Schneider, Dieter H.; Doyle, Barney

    2001-01-01

    A highly charged ion based time-of-flight emission microscope has been designed, which improves the surface sensitivity of static SIMS measurements because of the higher ionization probability of highly charged ions. Slow, highly charged ions are produced in an electron beam ion trap and are directed to the sample surface. The sputtered secondary ions and electrons pass through a specially designed objective lens to a microchannel plate detector. This new instrument permits high surface sensitivity (10.sup.10 atoms/cm.sup.2), high spatial resolution (100 nm), and chemical structural information due to the high molecular ion yields. The high secondary ion yield permits coincidence counting, which can be used to enhance determination of chemical and topological structure and to correlate specific molecular species.

  6. VCSELs as light source for time-of-flight sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moench, Holger; Frey, Manuel; Grabherr, Martin; Gronenborn, Stephan; Gudde, Ralph; Kolb, Johanna; Miller, Michael; Weigl, Alexander

    2017-02-01

    VCSELs and VCSEL arrays are an ideal light source for time-of-flight based sensors. The narrow emission spectrum and the ability for short pulses make them superior to LEDs. Combined with fast photodiodes or special camera chips spatial 3D information can be obtained which is needed in diverse applications like camera autofocus, indoor navigation, 3Dobject recognition or even autonomously driving vehicles. VCSEL arrays are the way to tailor the output power. For pulse operation at low duty cycle average heat dissipation is no longer the upper limit to the operating point of VCSELs but over-pulsing becomes possible. Taking into account electrical boundary conditions and optimum conversion efficiency arrays can be designed for specific operating conditions. Measurements of arrays under short pulse operation are presented using a package with integrated driver.

  7. Time Of Flight Detectors: From phototubes to SiPM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurenti, G. [INFN of Bologna, Viale B.Pichat 4/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Levi, G.; Foschi, E.; Guandalini, C.; Quadrani, L. [Department of Physics and INFN, Viale B.Pichat 4/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Sbarra, C. [Department of Physics and INFN, Viale B.Pichat 4/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Enrico Fermi Research Center, Via Panisperna 89, 06100 Roma (Italy)], E-mail: cristina.sbarra@bo.infn.it; Zuffa, M. [INFN of Bologna, Viale B.Pichat 4/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy)

    2008-04-01

    A sample of Silicon Photomultipliers was tested because they looked promising for future space missions: low consumption, low weight, resistance to radiation damage and insensitivity to magnetic fields. They have been studied in laboratory by means of the same characterization methods adopted to calibrate the fine mesh photomultipliers used by the Time Of Flight of the AMS-02 experiment. A detailed simulation was made to reproduce the SiPM response to the various experimental conditions. A possible counter design has been studied with front end electronics card equipped with SiPMs and Peltier cell for thermoregulation. A proper simulation based on COMSOL Multiphysics package reproduces quite well the Peltier cell nominal cooling capability.

  8. Comparison of 3T and 7T susceptibility-weighted angiography of the substantia nigra in diagnosing Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosottini, M; Frosini, D; Pesaresi, I; Donatelli, G; Cecchi, P; Costagli, M; Biagi, L; Ceravolo, R; Bonuccelli, U; Tosetti, M

    2015-03-01

    Standard neuroimaging fails in defining the anatomy of the substantia nigra and has a marginal role in the diagnosis of Parkinson disease. Recently 7T MR target imaging of the substantia nigra has been useful in diagnosing Parkinson disease. We performed a comparative study to evaluate whether susceptibility-weighted angiography can diagnose Parkinson disease with a 3T scanner. Fourteen patients with Parkinson disease and 13 healthy subjects underwent MR imaging examination at 3T and 7T by using susceptibility-weighted angiography. Two expert blinded observers and 1 neuroradiology fellow evaluated the 3T and 7T images of the sample to identify substantia nigra abnormalities indicative of Parkinson disease. Diagnostic accuracy and intra- and interobserver agreement were calculated separately for 3T and 7T acquisitions. Susceptibility-weighted angiography 7T MR imaging can diagnose Parkinson disease with a mean sensitivity of 93%, specificity of 100%, and diagnostic accuracy of 96%. 3T MR imaging diagnosed Parkinson disease with a mean sensitivity of 79%, specificity of 94%, and diagnostic accuracy of 86%. Intraobserver and interobserver agreement was excellent at 7T. At 3T, intraobserver agreement was excellent for experts, and interobserver agreement ranged between good and excellent. The less expert reader obtained a diagnostic accuracy of 89% at 3T. Susceptibility-weighted angiography images obtained at 3T and 7T differentiate controls from patients with Parkinson disease with a higher diagnostic accuracy at 7T. The capability of 3T in diagnosing Parkinson disease might encourage its use in clinical practice. The use of the more accurate 7T should be supported by a dedicated cost-effectiveness study. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  9. APPLICATION OF TIME-OF-FLIGHT PMD-CAMERAS FOR DISTANCE MEASUREMENT TO WATER SURFACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Y. Krysin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with results that confirm the possibility of time-of-flight PMD-cameras application for shortdistance measuring (0.2-5 m to water surface. Main features of the PMD-technology are considered. Developed experimental setup is presented. An experiment, confirming the efficiency of PMD-cameras under natural conditions is described. Experimental 3D-images of water surface shape are presented with corresponding explanation. Graphical results of statistical processing of valid pixels of 3D-images are presented. 3D-image processing algorithms are proposed for estimate of distance. The results may be useful in solving the problems of liquid level measurement, determining the parameters of sea waves and measuring the height of the movement of object above the water surface.

  10. A Clinical and Experimental Comparison of Time of Flight PET/MRI and PET/CT Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Oprea-Lager, Daniela E.; Yaqub, Maqsood; Pieters, Indra C; Reinhard, Rinze; van Moorselaar, Reindert J. A.; van den Eertwegh, Alfons J. M.; Hoekstra, Otto S; Lammertsma, Adriaan A; Boellaard, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the study was to compare image quality and quantitative accuracy of positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) and PET/computed tomography (PET/CT) systems with time of flight PET gantries, using phantom and clinical studies. Procedures Identical phantom experiments were performed on both systems. Calibration, uniformity, and standardized uptake value (SUV) recovery were measured. A clinical PET/CT versus PET/MRI comparison was performed using [18...

  11. Polarisation analysis on the LET time-of-flight spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, G. J.; Košata, J.; Devonport, M.; Galsworthy, P.; Bewley, R. I.; Voneshen, D. J.; Dalgliesh, R.; Stewart, J. R.

    2017-06-01

    We present a design for implementing uniaxial polarisation analysis on the LET cold neutron time-of-flight spectrometer, installed on the second target station at ISIS. The polarised neutron beam is to be produced by a transmission-based supermirror polariser with the polarising mirrors arranged in a “double-V” formation. This will be followed by a Mezei-type precession coil spin flipper, selected for its small spatial requirements, as well as a permanent magnet guide field to transport the beam polarisation to the sample position. The sample area will contain a set of holding field coils, whose purpose is to produce a highly homogenous magnetic field for the wide-angle 3He analyser cell. To facilitate fast cell changes and reduce the risk of cell failure, we intend to separate the cell and cryostat from the vacuum of the sample tank by installing both in a vessel at atmospheric pressure. When the instrument upgrade is complete, the performance of LET is expected to be commensurate with existing and planned polarised cold neutron spectrometers at other sources. Finally, we discuss the implications of performing uniaxial polarisation analysis only, and identify quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) on ionic conducting materials as an interesting area to apply the technique.

  12. Proton Transfer Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, Thomas B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTRMS) measures gas-phase compounds in ambient air and headspace samples before using chemical ionization to produce positively charged molecules, which are detected with a time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. This ionization method uses a gentle proton transfer reaction method between the molecule of interest and protonated water, or hydronium ion (H3O+), to produce limited fragmentation of the parent molecule. The ions produced are primarily positively charged with the mass of the parent ion, plus an additional proton. Ion concentration is determined by adding the number of ions counted at the molecular ion’s mass-to-charge ratio to the number of air molecules in the reaction chamber, which can be identified according to the pressure levels in the reaction chamber. The PTRMS allows many volatile organic compounds in ambient air to be detected at levels from 10–100 parts per trillion by volume (pptv). The response time is 1 to 10 seconds.

  13. TORCH: A Large-Area Detector for Precision Time-of-Flight Measurements at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Harnew, N

    2012-01-01

    The TORCH (Time Of internally Reflected CHerenkov light) is an innovative high-precision time-of-flight detector which is suitable for large areas, up to tens of square metres, and is being developed for the upgraded LHCb experiment. The TORCH provides a time-of-flight measurement from the imaging of photons emitted in a 1 cm thick quartz radiator, based on the Cherenkov principle. The photons propagate by total internal reflection to the edge of the quartz plane and are then focused onto an array of Micro-Channel Plate (MCP) photon detectors at the periphery of the detector. The goal is to achieve a timing resolution of 15 ps per particle over a flight distance of 10 m. This will allow particle identification in the challenging momentum region up to 20 GeV/c. Commercial MCPs have been tested in the laboratory and demonstrate the required timing precision. An electronics readout system based on the NINO and HPTDC chipset is being developed to evaluate an 8×8 channel TORCH prototype. The simulated performance...

  14. Dynamically multiplexed ion mobility time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belov, Mikhail E; Clowers, Brian H; Prior, David C; Danielson, William F; Liyu, Andrei V; Petritis, Brianne O; Smith, Richard D

    2008-08-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (IMS-TOFMS) has been increasingly used in analysis of complex biological samples. A major challenge is to transform IMS-TOFMS to a high-sensitivity, high-throughput platform, for example, for proteomics applications. In this work, we have developed and integrated three advanced technologies, including efficient ion accumulation in an ion funnel trap prior to IMS separation, multiplexing (MP) of ion packet introduction into the IMS drift tube, and signal detection with an analog-to-digital converter, into the IMS-TOFMS system for the high-throughput analysis of highly complex proteolytic digests of, for example, blood plasma. To better address variable sample complexity, we have developed and rigorously evaluated a novel dynamic MP approach that ensures correlation of the analyzer performance with an ion source function and provides the improved dynamic range and sensitivity throughout the experiment. The MP IMS-TOFMS instrument has been shown to reliably detect peptides at a concentration of 1 nM in the presence of a highly complex matrix, as well as to provide a 3 orders of magnitude dynamic range and a mass measurement accuracy of better than 5 ppm. When matched against human blood plasma database, the detected IMS-TOF features were found to yield approximately 700 unique peptide identifications at a false discovery rate (FDR) of approximately 7.5%. Accounting for IMS information gave rise to a projected FDR of approximately 4%. Signal reproducibility was found to be greater than 80%, while the variations in the number of unique peptide identifications were <15%. A single sample analysis was completed in 15 min that constitutes almost 1 order of magnitude improvement compared to a more conventional LC-MS approach.

  15. Electronics for a Picosecond Time-of-flight Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, Andrew Gerhart [University of Texas, Arlington; Rijssenbeek, Michael [Stony Brook

    2014-11-03

    TITLE: Electronics for a Picosecond Time-of-flight Measurement ABSTRACT: Time-of-flight (TOF) detectors have historically been used as part of the particle identification capability of multi-purpose particle physics detectors. An accurate time measurement, combined with a momentum measurement based on the curvature of the track in a magnetic field, is often sufficient to determine the particle's mass, and thus its identity. Such detectors typically have measured the particle flight time extremely precisely, with an uncertainty of one hundred trillionths of a second (also referred to as 100 picoseconds). To put this in perspective it would be like counting all the people on the Earth and getting it right within 1 person! Another use of TOFs is to measure the vertex of the event, which is the location along the beam line where the incoming particles (typically protons) collide. This vertex positon is a well measured quantity for events where the protons collide “head on” as the outgoing particles produced when you blast the proton apart can be used to trace back to a vertex point from which they originated. More frequently the protons just strike a glancing blow and remain intact—in this case they are nearly parallel to the beam and you cannot tell their vertex without this ability to precisely measure the time of flight of the protons. Occasionally both happen in the same event, that is, a central system and two protons are produced. But are they from the same collision, or just a boring background where more than one collision in the same bunch crossing conspire to fake the signal of interest? That’s where the timing of the protons comes into play. The main idea is to measure the time it takes for the two protons to reach TOF detectors positioned equidistant from the center of the main detector. If the vertex is displaced to one side than that detector will measure a shorter time while the other side detector will measure a correspondingly longer time

  16. Vasa previa evaluated by noncontrast time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwahashi, Naoyuki; Ota, Nami; Shiro, Michihisa; Yagi, Shigetaka; Minami, Sawako; Ino, Kazuhiko

    2016-08-01

    Vasa previa is a rare complication, and rupture of vasa previa during pregnancy may lead to significant perinatal mortality. Here, we report a case of vasa previa evaluated prenatally using noncontrast time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (TOF MRA). A 22-year-old primiparous woman was referred to our hospital due to suspicion of vasa previa. Transvaginal ultrasonography showed two vessels running over the internal os. To obtain further information, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and TOF MRA were performed. Caesarean section was carried out, and macroscopic findings of the vascular distribution on the fetal membrane were consistent with those identified by TOF MRA. TOF MRA in addition to MRI may be an option for prenatal identification of the precise three-dimensional vascular distribution in patients with vasa previa. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Distance Measurement Error in Time-of-Flight Sensors Due to Shot Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Illade-Quinteiro

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Unlike other noise sources, which can be reduced or eliminated by different signal processing techniques, shot noise is an ever-present noise component in any imaging system. In this paper, we present an in-depth study of the impact of shot noise on time-of-flight sensors in terms of the error introduced in the distance estimation. The paper addresses the effect of parameters, such as the size of the photosensor, the background and signal power or the integration time, and the resulting design trade-offs. The study is demonstrated with different numerical examples, which show that, in general, the phase shift determination technique with two background measurements approach is the most suitable for pixel arrays of large resolution.

  18. Analysis of Gait Using a Treadmill and a Time-of-Flight Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Rasmus R.; Paulsen, Rasmus R.; Larsen, Rasmus

    We present a system that analyzes human gait using a treadmill and a Time-of-flight camera. The camera provides spatial data with local intensity measures of the scene, and data are collected over several gait cycles. These data are then used to model and analyze the gait. For each frame the spatial data and the intensity image are used to fit an articulated model to the data using a Markov random field. To solve occlusion issues the model movement is smoothened providing the missing data for the occluded parts. The created model is then cut into cycles, which are matched and through Fourier fitting a cyclic model is created. The output data are: Speed, Cadence, Step length and Range-of-motion. The described output parameters are computed with no user interaction using a setup with no requirements to neither background nor subject clothing.

  19. Time-of-Flight Three Dimensional Neutron Diffraction in Transmission Mode for Mapping Crystal Grain Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cereser, Alberto; Strobl, Markus; Hall, Stephen A.

    2017-01-01

    -of-flight neutron beamline. The technique was developed and tested with data collected at the Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility of the Japan Proton Accelerator Complex (J-PARC) for an iron sample. We successfully reconstructed the shape of 108 grains and developed an indexing procedure...... constituting the material. This article presents a new non-destructive 3D technique to study centimeter-sized bulk samples with a spatial resolution of hundred micrometers: time-of-flight three-dimensional neutron diffraction (ToF 3DND). Compared to existing analogous X-ray diffraction techniques, ToF 3DND...... enables studies of samples that can be both larger in size and made of heavier elements. Moreover, ToF 3DND facilitates the use of complicated sample environments. The basic ToF 3DND setup, utilizing an imaging detector with high spatial and temporal resolution, can easily be implemented at a time...

  20. Probing nanoparticles and nanoparticle-conjugated biomolecules using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Pil; Shon, Hyun Kyong; Shin, Seung Koo; Lee, Tae Geol

    2015-01-01

    Bio-conjugated nanoparticles have emerged as novel molecular probes in nano-biotechnology and nanomedicine and chemical analyses of their surfaces have become challenges. The time-of-flight (TOF) secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) has been one of the most powerful surface characterization techniques for both nanoparticles and biomolecules. When combined with various nanoparticle-based signal enhancing strategies, TOF-SIMS can probe the functionalization of nanoparticles as well as their locations and interactions in biological systems. Especially, nanoparticle-based SIMS is an attractive approach for label-free drug screening because signal-enhancing nanoparticles can be designed to directly measure the enzyme activity. The chemical-specific imaging analysis using SIMS is also well suited to screen nanoparticles and nanoparticle-biomolecule conjugates in complex environments. This review presents some recent applications of nanoparticle-based TOF-SIMS to the chemical analysis of complex biological systems. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Detection of renal cell carcinoma using neutron time of flight spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viana, Rodrigo S.; Yoriyaz, Helio, E-mail: rodrigossviana@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Lakshmanan, Manu N.; Agasthya, Greeshma A.; Kapadia, Anuj J. [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, (United States). Ravin Advanced Imaging Labs, Radiology

    2013-07-01

    The diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is challenging because the symptoms accompanying it are not unique to the disease, and can therefore be misdiagnosed as other diseases. Due to this characteristic, detection of renal cancer is incidental most of time, occurring via abdominal radiographic examinations unrelated to the disease. Presently, biopsy, which is invasive and an unpleasant procedure for the patient, is the most commonly used technique to diagnose RCC. In this study, we demonstrate the application of a novel noninvasive technique for detecting and imaging RCC in vivo. The elemental composition of biological tissues including kidneys has been investigated using a new technique called Neutron Stimulated Emission Computed Tomography (NSECT). This technique is based on detecting the energy signature emitted by the stable isotopes of elements in the body, which are stimulated to emit gamma radiation via inelastic neutron scattering. Methods for improving detection sensitivity and reducing dose, such as time-of-flight neutron spectroscopy have been explored. MCNP5 simulations were used to model the NSECT scanning of the human kidney where the energy and time of arrival of gamma photons were recorded in an ideal detector placed around the human torso. A 5 MeV collimated neutron beam was used to irradiate the kidney containing an RCC lesion. The resulting spectra were resolved in 100 picosecond and 1 keV time and energy bins, respectively. The preliminary results demonstrate the ability to localize the lesion through neutron time of flight spectroscopy and generate a tomographic image at a low dose to the patient. (author)

  2. Velocity-space sensitivity of the time-of-flight neutron spectrometer at JET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Asger Schou; Salewski, Mirko; Eriksson, J.

    2014-01-01

    spectrometry (NES) are independent of the particular NES diagnostic. Here we apply these NES weight functions to the time-of-flight spectrometer TOFOR at JET. By taking the instrumental response function of TOFOR into account, we calculate time-of-flight NES weight functions that enable us to directly...

  3. Time-of-Flight Adjustment Procedure for Acoustic Measurements in Structural Timber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danbiel F. Llana; Guillermo Iñiguez-Gonzalez; Francisco Arriaga; Xiping Wang

    2016-01-01

    The effect of timber length on time-of-flight acoustic longitudinal measurements was investigated on the structural timber of four Spanish species: radiata pine (Pinus radiata D. Don), Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), laricio pine (Pinus nigra Arn.), and maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Ait.). Time-of-flight longitudinal measurements were conducted on 120 specimens of...

  4. Defocus Deblurring and Superresolution for Time-of-Flight Depth Cameras

    KAUST Repository

    Xiao, Lei

    2015-06-07

    Continuous-wave time-of-flight (ToF) cameras show great promise as low-cost depth image sensors in mobile applications. However, they also suffer from several challenges, including limited illumination intensity, which mandates the use of large numerical aperture lenses, and thus results in a shallow depth of field, making it difficult to capture scenes with large variations in depth. Another shortcoming is the limited spatial resolution of currently available ToF sensors. In this paper we analyze the image formation model for blurred ToF images. By directly working with raw sensor measurements but regularizing the recovered depth and amplitude images, we are able to simultaneously deblur and super-resolve the output of ToF cameras. Our method outperforms existing methods on both synthetic and real datasets. In the future our algorithm should extend easily to cameras that do not follow the cosine model of continuous-wave sensors, as well as to multi-frequency or multi-phase imaging employed in more recent ToF cameras.

  5. 3D-guided CT reconstruction using time-of-flight camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Mahmoud; Taguchi, Katsuyuki; Xu, Jingyan; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2011-03-01

    We propose the use of a time-of-flight (TOF) camera to obtain the patient's body contour in 3D guided imaging reconstruction scheme in CT and C-arm imaging systems with truncated projection. In addition to pixel intensity, a TOF camera provides the 3D coordinates of each point in the captured scene with respect to the camera coordinates. Information from the TOF camera was used to obtain a digitized surface of the patient's body. The digitization points are transformed to X-Ray detector coordinates by registering the two coordinate systems. A set of points corresponding to the slice of interest are segmented to form a 2D contour of the body surface. Radon transform is applied to the contour to generate the 'trust region' for the projection data. The generated 'trust region' is integrated as an input to augment the projection data. It is used to estimate the truncated, unmeasured projections using linear interpolation. Finally the image is reconstructed using the combination of the estimated and the measured projection data. The proposed method is evaluated using a physical phantom. Projection data for the phantom were obtained using a C-arm system. Significant improvement in the reconstructed image quality near the truncation edges was observed using the proposed method as compared to that without truncation correction. This work shows that the proposed 3D guided CT image reconstruction using a TOF camera represents a feasible solution to the projection data truncation problem.

  6. Combining endoscopic ultrasound with Time-Of-Flight PET: The EndoTOFPET-US Project

    CERN Document Server

    Frisch, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    The EndoTOFPET-US collaboration develops a multimodal imaging technique for endoscopic exams of the pancreas or the prostate. It combines the benefits of high resolution metabolic imaging with Time-Of-Flight Positron Emission Tomography (TOF PET) and anatomical imaging with ultrasound (US). EndoTOFPET-US consists of a PET head extension for a commercial US endoscope and a PET plate outside the body in coincidence with the head. The high level of miniaturization and integration creates challenges in fields such as scintillating crystals, ultra-fast photo-detection, highly integrated electronics, system integration and image reconstruction. Amongst the developments, fast scintillators as well as fast and compact digital SiPMs with single SPAD readout are used to obtain the best coincidence time resolution (CTR). Highly integrated ASICs and DAQ electronics contribute to the timing performances of EndoTOFPET. In view of the targeted resolution of around 1 mm in the reconstructed image, we present a prototype dete...

  7. Depth Errors Analysis and Correction for Time-of-Flight (ToF Cameras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying He

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Time-of-Flight (ToF cameras, a technology which has developed rapidly in recent years, are 3D imaging sensors providing a depth image as well as an amplitude image with a high frame rate. As a ToF camera is limited by the imaging conditions and external environment, its captured data are always subject to certain errors. This paper analyzes the influence of typical external distractions including material, color, distance, lighting, etc. on the depth error of ToF cameras. Our experiments indicated that factors such as lighting, color, material, and distance could cause different influences on the depth error of ToF cameras. However, since the forms of errors are uncertain, it’s difficult to summarize them in a unified law. To further improve the measurement accuracy, this paper proposes an error correction method based on Particle Filter-Support Vector Machine (PF-SVM. Moreover, the experiment results showed that this method can effectively reduce the depth error of ToF cameras to 4.6 mm within its full measurement range (0.5–5 m.

  8. Depth Errors Analysis and Correction for Time-of-Flight (ToF) Cameras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ying; Liang, Bin; Zou, Yu; He, Jin; Yang, Jun

    2017-01-05

    Time-of-Flight (ToF) cameras, a technology which has developed rapidly in recent years, are 3D imaging sensors providing a depth image as well as an amplitude image with a high frame rate. As a ToF camera is limited by the imaging conditions and external environment, its captured data are always subject to certain errors. This paper analyzes the influence of typical external distractions including material, color, distance, lighting, etc. on the depth error of ToF cameras. Our experiments indicated that factors such as lighting, color, material, and distance could cause different influences on the depth error of ToF cameras. However, since the forms of errors are uncertain, it's difficult to summarize them in a unified law. To further improve the measurement accuracy, this paper proposes an error correction method based on Particle Filter-Support Vector Machine (PF-SVM). Moreover, the experiment results showed that this method can effectively reduce the depth error of ToF cameras to 4.6 mm within its full measurement range (0.5-5 m).

  9. Results from the commissioning of a multi-modal endoscope for ultrasound and time of flight PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bugalho, Ricardo [LIP, Lisbon, (Portugal)

    2015-07-01

    The EndoTOFPET-US collaboration has developed a multi-modal imaging system combining Ultrasound with Time-of-Flight Positron Emission Tomography into an endoscopic imaging device. The objective of the project is to obtain a coincidence time resolution of about 200 ps FWHM and to achieve about 1 mm spatial resolution of the PET system, while integrating all the components in a very compact detector suitable for endoscopic use. This scanner aims to be exploited for diagnostic and surgical oncology, as well as being instrumental in the clinical test of new biomarkers especially targeted for prostate and pancreatic cancer. (authors)

  10. Time-of-flight camera technique for augmented reality in computer-assisted interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mersmann, Sven; Müller, Michael; Seitel, Alexander; Arnegger, Florian; Tetzlaff, Ralf; Dinkel, Julien; Baumhauer, Matthias; Schmied, Bruno; Meinzer, Hans-Peter; Maier-Hein, Lena

    2011-03-01

    Augmented reality (AR) for enhancement of intra-operative images is gaining increasing interest in the field of navigated medical interventions. In this context, various imaging modalities such as ultrasound (US), C-Arm computed tomography (CT) and endoscopic images have been applied to acquire intra-operative information about the patient's anatomy. The aim of this paper was to evaluate the potential of the novel Time-of-Flight (ToF) camera technique as means for markerless intra-operative registration. For this purpose, ToF range data and corresponding CT images were acquired from a set of explanted non-transplantable human and porcine organs equipped with a set of marker that served as targets. Based on a rigid matching of the surfaces generated from the ToF images with the organ surfaces generated from the CT data, the targets extracted from the planning images were superimposed on the 2D ToF intensity images, and the target visualization error (TVE) was computed as quality measure. Color video data of the same organs were further used to assess the TVE of a previously proposed marker-based registration method. The ToF-based registration showed promising accuracy yielding a mean TVE of 2.5+/-1.1 mm compared to 0.7+/-0.4 mm with the marker-based approach. Furthermore, the target registration error (TRE) was assessed to determine the anisotropy in the localization error of ToF image data. The TRE was 8.9+/- 4.7 mm on average indicating a high localization error in the viewing direction of the camera. Nevertheless, the young ToF technique may become a valuable means for intra-operative surface acquisition. Future work should focus on the calibration of systematic distance errors.

  11. Time-of-Flight Sensor Calibration for a Color and Depth Camera Pair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jiyoung; Lee, Joon-Young; Jeong, Yekeun; Kweon, In So

    2015-07-01

    We present a calibration method of a time-of-flight (ToF) sensor and a color camera pair to align the 3D measurements with the color image correctly. We have designed a 2.5D pattern board with irregularly placed holes to be accurately detected from low resolution depth images of a ToF camera as well as from high resolution color images. In order to improve the accuracy of the 3D measurements of a ToF camera, we propose to perform ray correction and range bias correction. We reset the transformation of the ToF sensor which transforms the radial distance into the scene depth in Cartesian coordinate through ray correction. Then we capture a planar scene from different depths to correct the distance error that is shown to be dependent not only on the distance but also on the pixel location. The range error profiles along the calibrated distance are classified according to their wiggling shapes and each cluster of profiles with similar shape are separately estimated using a B-spline function. The standard deviation of the remaining random noise is recorded as an uncertainty information of distance measurements. We show the performance of our calibration method quantitatively and qualitatively on various datasets, and validate the impact of our method by demonstrating an RGB-D shape refinement application.

  12. Locomotion Strategy Selection for a Hybrid Mobile Robot Using Time of Flight Depth Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Saudabayev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of a mobile robot can be improved by utilizing different locomotion modes in various terrain conditions. This creates the necessity of having a supervisory controller capable of recognizing different terrain types and changing the locomotion mode of the robot accordingly. This work focuses on the locomotion strategy selection problem for a hybrid legged wheeled mobile robot. Supervisory control of the robot is accomplished by the terrain recognizer, which classifies depth images obtained from a commercial time of flight depth sensor and selects different locomotion mode subcontrollers based on the recognized terrain type. For the terrain recognizer, a database is generated consisting of five terrain classes (Uneven, Level Ground, Stair Up, Stair Down, and Nontraversable. Depth images are enhanced using confidence map based filtering. The accuracy of the terrain classification using Support Vector Machine classifier for the testing database in five-class terrain recognition problem is 97%. Real-world experiments assess the locomotion abilities of the quadruped and the capability of the terrain recognizer in real-time settings. The results of these experiments show depth images processed in real time using machine learning algorithms can be used for the supervisory control of hybrid robots with legged and wheeled locomotion capabilities.

  13. Assessment of cerebral iron content in patients with Parkinson's disease by the susceptibility-weighted MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S-F; Zhu, Z-F; Kong, Y; Zhang, H-P; Zhou, G-Q; Jiang, Q-T; Meng, X-P

    2014-01-01

    The overall goal of this study was to evaluate the usability of the susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) in (1) assessment of iron deposition to enhance our ability to detect PD in the early phase and (2) in estimation of the degree of PD. SWI scans were carried out in 54 patients with PD (18 patients with the Hoehn-Yahr scale Hoehn-Yahr stage > 1.5) and 40 control individuals. The phase values of the substantia nigra, red nucleus, caudate nucleus, putamen, and globus pallidus were measured on the corrected phase image. Compared with control individuals, patients with both the early and intermediate/ advanced stages of PD had significantly different phase values in the substantia nigra, red nucleus, caudate nucleus, putamen, and globus pallidus (all p Hoehn-Yahr scale (respectively, r = -0.845, p Hoehn-Yahr scale (red nucleus r = -0.543, caudate nucleus r = -0.620, p < 0.05, putamen r = -0.537). A semi-quantitative assessment of the iron content of the substantia nigra and globus pallidus with the help of SWI may be useful for early diagnosis of PD and evaluation of the degree of this disease.

  14. High sensitivity probe absorption technique for time-of-flight ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Absorption imaging using a high sensitivity CCD camera gives the size of the expanding cloud and hence ... (LVIS) [2], the peak signal in a 1 mm thick resonant probe beam corresponds to the absorption by 3 × 105 ... used in our atom optics experiments on the reflection of atoms from magnetic thin films [13]. The sensitivity ...

  15. Hadamard Transform Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-26

    and undeflected components of the ion beam can be isolated from an image generated from the sum of all ions collected during the course of an...third residue is either lysine or arginine. AMC is an acronym for 7-amino 4-methyl coumarin , a fluorophore whose hydrolysis can be monitored by

  16. Analyzing Gait Using a Time-of-Flight Camera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Ramsbøl; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold; Larsen, Rasmus

    2009-01-01

    An algorithm is created, which performs human gait analysis using spatial data and amplitude images from a Time-of-flight camera. For each frame in a sequence the camera supplies cartesian coordinates in space for every pixel. By using an articulated model the subject pose is estimated in the depth...... map in each frame. The pose estimation is based on likelihood, contrast in the amplitude image, smoothness and a shape prior used to solve a Markov random field. Based on the pose estimates, and the prior that movement is locally smooth, a sequential model is created, and a gait analysis is done...... on this model. The output data are: Speed, Cadence (steps per minute), Step length, Stride length (stride being two consecutive steps also known as a gait cycle), and Range of motion (angles of joints). The created system produces good output data of the described output parameters and requires no user...

  17. A technology review of time-of-flight photon counting for advanced remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Robert A.

    2010-04-01

    Time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) has made tremendous progress during the past ten years enabling improved performance in precision time-of-flight (TOF) rangefinding and lidar. In this review the development and performance of several ranging systems is presented that use TCSPC for accurate ranging and range profiling over distances up to 17km. A range resolution of a few millimetres is routinely achieved over distances of several kilometres. These systems include single wavelength devices operating in the visible; multi-wavelength systems covering the visible and near infra-red; the use of electronic gating to reduce in-band solar background and, most recently, operation at high repetition rates without range aliasing- typically 10MHz over several kilometres. These systems operate at very low optical power (military, security and surveillance sensing applications. The review will highlight the theoretical principles of photon counting and progress made in developing absolute ranging techniques that enable high repetition rate data acquisition that avoids range aliasing. Technology trends in TCSPC rangefinding are merging with those of quantum cryptography and its future application to revolutionary quantum imaging provides diverse and exciting research into secure covert sensing, ultra-low power active imaging and quantum rangefinding.

  18. Bayesian Time-of-Flight for Realtime Shape, Illumination and Albedo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Amit; Dann, Christoph; Yair, Omer; Mazor, Shai; Nowozin, Sebastian

    2017-05-01

    We propose a computational model for shape, illumination and albedo inference in a pulsed time-of-flight (TOF) camera. In contrast to TOF cameras based on phase modulation, our camera enables general exposure profiles. This results in added flexibility and requires novel computational approaches. To address this challenge we propose a generative probabilistic model that accurately relates latent imaging conditions to observed camera responses. While principled, realtime inference in the model turns out to be infeasible, and we propose to employ efficient non-parametric regression trees to approximate the model outputs. As a result we are able to provide, for each pixel, at video frame rate, estimates and uncertainty for depth, effective albedo, and ambient light intensity . These results we present are state-of-the-art in depth imaging. The flexibility of our approach allows us to easily enrich our generative model. We demonstrate this by extending the original single-path model to a two-path model, capable of describing some multipath effects. The new model is seamlessly integrated in the system at no additional computational cost. Our work also addresses the important question of optimal exposure design in pulsed TOF systems. Finally, for benchmark purposes and to obtain realistic empirical priors of multipath and insights into this phenomena, we propose a physically accurate simulation of multipath phenomena.

  19. Miniature Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer for Space and Extraterrestrial Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The PI has developed a miniature time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS), which can be op-timized for space and extraterrestrial applications, by using a...

  20. Diffuse mirrors: 3D reconstruction from diffuse indirect illumination using inexpensive time-of-flight sensors

    KAUST Repository

    Heide, Felix

    2014-06-01

    The functional difference between a diffuse wall and a mirror is well understood: one scatters back into all directions, and the other one preserves the directionality of reflected light. The temporal structure of the light, however, is left intact by both: assuming simple surface reflection, photons that arrive first are reflected first. In this paper, we exploit this insight to recover objects outside the line of sight from second-order diffuse reflections, effectively turning walls into mirrors. We formulate the reconstruction task as a linear inverse problem on the transient response of a scene, which we acquire using an affordable setup consisting of a modulated light source and a time-of-flight image sensor. By exploiting sparsity in the reconstruction domain, we achieve resolutions in the order of a few centimeters for object shape (depth and laterally) and albedo. Our method is robust to ambient light and works for large room-sized scenes. It is drastically faster and less expensive than previous approaches using femtosecond lasers and streak cameras, and does not require any moving parts.

  1. Time-of-Flight Based Calibration of an Ultrasonic Computed Tomography System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Filipik

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a novel method for calibration of measuring geometry and of individual signal delays of transducers in ultrasonic computed tomography (USCT systems via computational processing of multiple time-of-flight measurements of ultrasonic (US impulses. The positions and time-delay parameters of thousands of ultrasonic transducers inside the USCT tank are calibrated by this approach with a high precision required for the tomographic reconstruction; such accuracy cannot be provided by any other known method. Although utilising similar basic principles as the global positioning system (GPS, the method is importantly generalised in treating all transducer parameters as the to-be calibrated (floating unknowns, without any a-priori known positions and delays. The calibration is formulated as a non-linear least-squares problem, minimizing the differences between the calculated and measured time-of-arrivals of ultrasonic pulses. The paper provides detailed derivation of the method, and compares two implemented approaches (earlier calibration of individual transducers with the new approach calibrating rigid transducer arrays via detailed simulations, aimed at testing the convergence properties and noise robustness of both approaches. Calibration using real US signals is described and, as an illustration of the utility of the presented method, a comparison is shown of two image reconstructions using the tomographic US data from a concrete experimental USCT system measuring a 3D phantom, without and after the calibration.

  2. Characterization studies of Silicon Photomultipliers and crystals matrices for a novel time of flight PET detector

    CERN Document Server

    Auffray, Etiennette; Cortinovis, Daniele; Doroud, Katayoun; Garutti, Erika; Lecoq, Paul; Liu, Zheng; Martinez, Rosana; Paganoni, Marco; Pizzichemi, Marco; Silenzi, Alessandro; Xu, Chen; Zvolský, Milan

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the characterization of crystal matrices and silicon photomultiplier arrays for a novel Positron Emission Tomography (PET) detector, namely the external plate of the EndoTOFPET-US system. The EndoTOFPET-US collaboration aims to integrate Time-Of-Flight PET with ultrasound endoscopy in a novel multimodal device, capable to support the development of new biomarkers for prostate and pancreatic tumors. The detector consists in two parts: a PET head mounted on an ultrasound probe and an external PET plate. The challenging goal of 1 mm spatial resolution for the PET image requires a detector with small crystal size, and therefore high channel density: 4096 LYSO crystals individually readout by Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM) make up the external plate. The quality and properties of these components must be assessed before the assembly. The dark count rate, gain, breakdown voltage and correlated noise of the SiPMs are measured, while the LYSO crystals are evaluated in terms of light yield and en...

  3. Open architecture time of flight 3D SWIR camera operating at 150 MHz modulation frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheaton, Skyler; Bonakdar, Alireza; Nia, Iman Hassani; Tan, Chee Leong; Fathipour, Vala; Mohseni, Hooman

    2017-08-07

    In the past two decades 3-D cameras have proven to be one of the next revolutions in machine vision. However, these devices are still an emerging technology with a particularly narrow set of commercially available devices. In this paper, the concept and execution of the first short wavelength infrared (SWIR) time-of-flight (ToF) 3-D camera system operating at a wavelength of 1550 nm is presented. By decoupling the optical and electrical components of the system in an open architecture we not only surpass many of the limitations of an on-chip integrated solution, but also can easily change the imaging device based on the requirements of the application. We achieve modulation frequencies up to 150 MHz, which exceeds the conventional values currently published for other large format modulators by about five times. This increase in the modulation frequency allows for a TOF camera with significantly higher depth resolution, while the open architecture design allows for a highly reconfigurable device that can be modified for specific working conditions.

  4. Precise Time-of-Flight Calculation For 3-D Synthetic Aperture Focusing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Henrik; Nikolov, Svetoslav; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2009-01-01

    Conventional linear arrays can be used for 3D ultrasound imaging, by moving the array in the elevation direction and stacking the planes in a volume. The point spread function (PSF) is larger in the elevation plane, as the aperture is smaller and has a fixed elevation focus. Resolution improvements...... in elevation can be achieved by applying synthetic aperture (SA) focusing to the beamformed in-plane RF-data. The proposed method uses a virtual source (VS) placed at the elevation focus for postbeamforming. This has previously been done in two steps, in plane focusing followed by SA post-focusing in elevation......, because of a lack of a simple expression for the exact time of flight (ToF). This paper presents a new method for calculating the ToF for a 3D case in a single step using a linear array. This method is more flexible than the previously proposed method and is able to beamform a fewer number of points much...

  5. Precise Time-of-Flight Calculation For 3D Synthetic Aperture Focusing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Henrik; Nikolov, Svetoslav; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2007-01-01

    Conventional linear arrays can be used for 3D ultrasound imaging, by moving the array in the elevation direction and stacking the planes in a volume. The point spread function (PSF) is larger in the elevation plane, as the aperture is smaller and has a fixed elevation focus. Resolution improvements...... in elevation can be achieved by applying synthetic aperture (SA) focusing to the beamformed in-plane RF-data. The method uses a virtual source (VS) placed at the elevation focus for post-beamforming. This has previously been done in two steps, in plane focusing followed by SA post-focusing in elevation......, because of a lack of a simple expression for the exact time of flight (ToF). This paper presents a new method for calculating the ToF for a 3D case in a single step using a spherical defocused emission from a linear array. The method is evaluated using both simulated data obtained by Field II and phantom...

  6. Simulation of time of flight defraction signals for reactor vessel head penetrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Tae Hun; Kim, Young Sik; Lee, Jeong Seok [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    The simulation of nondestructive testing has been used in the prediction of the signal characteristics of various defects and in the development of the procedures. CIVA, a simulation tool dedicated to nondestructive testing, has good accuracy and speed, and provides a three-dimensional graphical user interface for improved visualization and familiar data displays consistent with an NDE technique. Even though internal validations have been performed by the CIVA software development specialists, an independent validation study is necessary for the assessment of the accuracy of the software prior to practical use. In this study, time of flight diffraction signals of ultrasonic inspection of a calibration block for reactor vessel head penetrations were simulated using CIVA. The results were compared to the experimentally inspected signals. The accuracy of the simulated signals and the possible range for simulation were verified. It was found that, there is a good agreement between the CIVA simulated and experimental results in the A-scan signal, B-scan image, and measurement of depth.

  7. [Separation and identification of bovine lactoferricin by high performance liquid chromatography-matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight/ time of flight mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Meichen; Liu, Ning

    2010-02-01

    A high performance liquid chromatography-matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight/time of flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-MALDI-TOF/TOF MS) method was developed for the separation and identification of bovine lactoferricin (LfcinB). Bovine lactoferrin was hydrolyzed by pepsin and then separated by ion exchange chromatography and reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RP-LC). The antibacterial activities of the fractions from RP-LC separation were determined and the protein concentration of the fraction with the highest activity was measured, whose sequence was indentified by MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. The relative molecular mass of LfcinB was 3 124.89 and the protein concentration was 18.20 microg/mL. The method of producing LfcinB proposed in this study has fast speed, high accuracy and high resolution.

  8. Assessing and minimizing contamination in time of flight based validation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennox, Kristin P.; Rosenfield, Paul; Blair, Brenton; Kaplan, Alan; Ruz, Jaime; Glenn, Andrew; Wurtz, Ronald

    2017-10-01

    Time of flight experiments are the gold standard method for generating labeled training and testing data for the neutron/gamma pulse shape discrimination problem. As the popularity of supervised classification methods increases in this field, there will also be increasing reliance on time of flight data for algorithm development and evaluation. However, time of flight experiments are subject to various sources of contamination that lead to neutron and gamma pulses being mislabeled. Such labeling errors have a detrimental effect on classification algorithm training and testing, and should therefore be minimized. This paper presents a method for identifying minimally contaminated data sets from time of flight experiments and estimating the residual contamination rate. This method leverages statistical models describing neutron and gamma travel time distributions and is easily implemented using existing statistical software. The method produces a set of optimal intervals that balance the trade-off between interval size and nuisance particle contamination, and its use is demonstrated on a time of flight data set for Cf-252. The particular properties of the optimal intervals for the demonstration data are explored in detail.

  9. STiC — a mixed mode silicon photomultiplier readout ASIC for time-of-flight applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harion, T.; Briggl, K.; Chen, H.; Fischer, P.; Gil, A.; Kiworra, V.; Ritzert, M.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Shen, W.; Stankova, V.

    2014-02-01

    STiC is an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for the readout of silicon photomultipliers. The chip has been designed to provide a very high timing resolution for time-of-flight applications in medical imaging and particle physics. It is dedicated in particular to the EndoToFPET-US project, which is developing an endoscopic PET detector combined with ultrasound imaging for early pancreas and prostate cancer detection. This PET system aims to provide a spatial resolution of 1 mm and a time-of-flight resolution of 200 ps FWHM. The analog frontend of STiC can use either a differential or single ended connection to the SiPM. The time and energy information of the detector signal is encoded into two time stamps. A special linearized time-over-threshold method is used to obtain a linear relation between the signal charge and the measured signal width, improving the energy resolution. The trigger signals are digitized by an integrated TDC module with a resolution of less than 20 ps. The TDC data is stored in an internal memory and transfered over a 160 MBit/s serial link using 8/10 bit encoding. First coincidence measurements using a 3.1 × 3.1 × 15 mm3 LYSO crystal and a S10362-33-50 Hamamtsu MPPC show a coincidence time resolution of less than 285 ps. We present details on the chip design as well as first characterization measurements.

  10. Coupling high-pressure MALDI with ion mobility/orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillig, K J; Ruotolo, B; Stone, E G; Russell, D H; Fuhrer, K; Gonin, M; Schultz, A J

    2000-09-01

    A new ion mobility/time-of-flight mass spectrometer employing a high-pressure MALDI source has been designed and tested. The prototype instrument operates at a source/drift cell pressure of 1-10 Torr helium, resulting in a mobility resolution of approximately 25. A small time-of-flight mass spectrometer (20 cm) with a mass resolution of up to 200 has been attached to the drift cell to identify (in terms of mass-to-charge ratio) the separated ions. A simple tripeptide mixture has been separated in the drift tube and mass identified as singly protonated species. The ability to separate peptide mixtures, e.g., tryptic digest of a protein, is illustrated and compared to results obtained on a high-vacuum time-of-flight instrument.

  11. Precision electronics for a system of custom MCPs in the TORCH Time of Flight detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, R.; Brook, N.; Castillo García, L.; Conneely, T.; Cussans, D.; Föhl, K.; Forty, R.; Frei, C.; Gys, T.; Harnew, N.; Piedigrossi, D.; Rademacker, J.; Ros García, A.; Van Dijk, M.

    2017-03-01

    The TORCH detector will provide charged particle pi/K/p identification up to 10 GeV/c, combining Time-of-Flight and Cherenkov techniques to achieve a timing resolution of 70 ps for single photons. Based on a scalable design, a Time-of-Flight electronics readout system has been developed to instrument a novel customized 512-channel Micro Channel Plate (MCP) device. A Gigabit Ethernet-based readout scheme that operates the TORCH demonstration unit consisting of ten such MCPs will be reported. The trigger and clock distribution will also be discussed.

  12. Time-of-flight 3D Neutron Diffraction for Multigrain Crystallography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cereser, Alberto

    This thesis presents a new technique for measuring spatially resolved microstructures in crystalline materials using pulsed neutron beams. The method, called Time-of-Flight Three Dimensional Neutron Diffraction (ToF 3DND), identifies the position, shape and crystallographic orientation of the ind......This thesis presents a new technique for measuring spatially resolved microstructures in crystalline materials using pulsed neutron beams. The method, called Time-of-Flight Three Dimensional Neutron Diffraction (ToF 3DND), identifies the position, shape and crystallographic orientation...

  13. Spectral characterisation of dairy products using photon time-of-flight spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Otto Højager Attermann; Subash, Arman Ahamed; Nielsen, Frederik Donbæk

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present, for the first time, the absorption and reduced scattering spectra of commercially available milk and yoghurt products, obtained using photon-time-of-flight spectroscopy. The ability of this technique to separate the contributions from absorption and scattering in the sa......In this paper, we present, for the first time, the absorption and reduced scattering spectra of commercially available milk and yoghurt products, obtained using photon-time-of-flight spectroscopy. The ability of this technique to separate the contributions from absorption and scattering...

  14. Endo-TOFPET-US: A multimodal ultrasonic probe featuring time of flight PET in diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, T.C., E-mail: thomas.meyer@cern.ch [CERN, European Organization for Nuclear Research, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2013-08-01

    This work outlines the functionality of a new medical instrument and describes the research and development work aiming at new and higher performance imaging techniques with Time of Flight-PET capability in endoscopy and surgical oncology. It focuses on the associated scientific and technological challenges to be met in fields such as scintillating crystallography, ultra-fast photo-detection, highly integrated electronics, and system integration. This will highlight possible answers and solutions that derive from techniques and instrumentation prominent in high energy physics. Special emphasis is put on new developments of scintillators and diffractive optics to increase light output, and fast and compact photodetectors such as silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) with the option of single SPAD readout. In view of the targeted coincidence time of flight performance of 200 ps FWHM equivalent to 30 mm along the line of response (LOR), tests using cerium–calcium-co-doped LSO crystals of 10 mm length and commercial SiPMs from Hamamatsu already produced a coincidence time resolution (CTR) of better than 170 ps FWHM.

  15. Endo-TOFPET-US: A multimodal ultrasonic probe featuring time of flight PET in diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, T. C.; Endo-Tofpet-Us Collaboration

    2013-08-01

    This work outlines the functionality of a new medical instrument and describes the research and development work aiming at new and higher performance imaging techniques with Time of Flight-PET capability in endoscopy and surgical oncology. It focuses on the associated scientific and technological challenges to be met in fields such as scintillating crystallography, ultra-fast photo-detection, highly integrated electronics, and system integration. This will highlight possible answers and solutions that derive from techniques and instrumentation prominent in high energy physics. Special emphasis is put on new developments of scintillators and diffractive optics to increase light output, and fast and compact photodetectors such as silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) with the option of single SPAD readout. In view of the targeted coincidence time of flight performance of 200 ps FWHM equivalent to 30 mm along the line of response (LOR), tests using cerium-calcium-co-doped LSO crystals of 10 mm length and commercial SiPMs from Hamamatsu already produced a coincidence time resolution (CTR) of better than 170 ps FWHM.

  16. SR-4000 and CamCube3.0 Time of Flight (ToF Cameras: Tests and Comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulvio Rinaudo

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper experimental comparisons between two Time-of-Flight (ToF cameras are reported in order to test their performance and to give some procedures for testing data delivered by this kind of technology. In particular, the SR-4000 camera by Mesa Imaging AG and the CamCube3.0 by PMD Technologies have been evaluated since they have good performances and are well known to researchers dealing with Time-of-Flight (ToF cameras. After a brief overview of commercial ToF cameras available on the market and the main specifications of the tested devices, two topics are presented in this paper. First, the influence of camera warm-up on distance measurement is analyzed: a warm-up of 40 minutes is suggested to obtain the measurement stability, especially in the case of the CamCube3.0 camera, that exhibits distance measurement variations of several centimeters. Secondly, the variation of distance measurement precision variation over integration time is presented: distance measurement precisions of some millimeters are obtained in both cases. Finally, a comparison between the two cameras based on the experiments and some information about future work on evaluation of sunlight influence on distance measurements are reported.

  17. PET camera performance design evaluation for BGO and BaF2 scintillators (non-time-of-flight).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, W H

    1988-03-01

    Bismuth germanate (BGO) and barium fluoride (BaF2) scintillators are presently used in positron emission tomegraphy (PET) cameras. This study evaluates the important PET performance parameters of image resolution, true sensitivity, scatter background, accidental background, and realistic maximum radioactivity in the field of view for both BGO and BaF2 in an identical non-time-of-flight, whole-body camera configuration. These performance parameters are evaluated for three phantoms simulating (a) the head, (b) whole-body cross-section and (c) heart/kidney. This study finds that the high stopping power of BGO yields higher sensitivity, higher resolution, less vignetting, better immunity from scattered gamma, and lower accident/true ratio at any dose level. The faster BaF2 timing acceptance window is traded off by its vulnerability to noncoincidental scatter-gamma which increases accidental coincidences. The BGO is found to be a better choice for non-time-of-flight systems especially with large objects which produce a lot of noncoincidental scatter-gammas. This study also found that the practical diminishing return maximum activity within the field-of-view is approximately 20-25 mCi for existing conventional cameras.

  18. High Energy Collisions on Tandem Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, Robert J.

    2013-05-01

    Long before the introduction of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI), electrospray ionization (ESI), Orbitraps, and any of the other tools that are now used ubiquitously for proteomics and metabolomics, the highest performance mass spectrometers were sector instruments, providing high resolution mass measurements by combining an electrostatic energy analyzer (E) with a high field magnet (B). In its heyday, the four sector mass spectrometer (or EBEB) was the crown jewel, providing the highest performance tandem mass spectrometry using single, high energy collisions to induce fragmentation. During a time in which quadrupole and tandem triple quadrupole instruments were also enjoying increased usage and popularity, there were, nonetheless, some clear advantages for sectors over their low collision energy counterparts. Time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometers are high voltage, high vacuum instruments that have much in common with sectors and have inspired the development of tandem instruments exploiting single high energy collisions. In this retrospective, we recount our own journey to produce high performance TOFs and tandem TOFs, describing the basic theory, problems, and the advantages for such instruments. An experiment testing impulse collision theory (ICT) underscores the similarities with sector mass spectrometers where this concept was first developed. Applications provide examples of more extensive fragmentation, side chain cleavages, and charge-remote fragmentation, also characteristic of high energy sector mass spectrometers. Moreover, the so-called curved-field reflectron has enabled the design of instruments that are simpler, collect and focus all of the ions, and may provide the future technology for the clinic, for tissue imaging, and the characterization of microorganisms.

  19. Fourier rebinning and consistency equations for time-of-flight PET planograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yusheng; Defrise, Michel; Matej, Samuel; Metzler, Scott D

    2016-01-01

    Due to the unique geometry, dual-panel PET scanners have many advantages in dedicated breast imaging and on-board imaging applications since the compact scanners can be combined with other imaging and treatment modalities. The major challenges of dual-panel PET imaging are the limited-angle problem and data truncation, which can cause artifacts due to incomplete data sampling. The time-of-flight (TOF) information can be a promising solution to reduce these artifacts. The TOF planogram is the native data format for dual-panel TOF PET scanners, and the non-TOF planogram is the 3D extension of linogram. The TOF planograms is five-dimensional while the objects are three-dimensional, and there are two degrees of redundancy. In this paper, we derive consistency equations and Fourier-based rebinning algorithms to provide a complete understanding of the rich structure of the fully 3D TOF planograms. We first derive two consistency equations and John's equation for 3D TOF planograms. By taking the Fourier transforms, we obtain two Fourier consistency equations and the Fourier-John equation, which are the duals of the consistency equations and John's equation, respectively. We then solve the Fourier consistency equations and Fourier-John equation using the method of characteristics. The two degrees of entangled redundancy of the 3D TOF data can be explicitly elicited and exploited by the solutions along the characteristic curves. As the special cases of the general solutions, we obtain Fourier rebinning and consistency equations (FORCEs), and thus we obtain a complete scheme to convert among different types of PET planograms: 3D TOF, 3D non-TOF, 2D TOF and 2D non-TOF planograms. The FORCEs can be used as Fourier-based rebinning algorithms for TOF-PET data reduction, inverse rebinnings for designing fast projectors, or consistency conditions for estimating missing data. As a byproduct, we show the two consistency equations are necessary and sufficient for 3D TOF planograms

  20. A unified Fourier theory for time-of-flight PET data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yusheng; Matej, Samuel; Metzler, Scott D

    2016-01-21

    Fully 3D time-of-flight (TOF) PET scanners offer the potential of previously unachievable image quality in clinical PET imaging. TOF measurements add another degree of redundancy for cylindrical PET scanners and make photon-limited TOF-PET imaging more robust than non-TOF PET imaging. The data space for 3D TOF-PET data is five-dimensional with two degrees of redundancy. Previously, consistency equations were used to characterize the redundancy of TOF-PET data. In this paper, we first derive two Fourier consistency equations and Fourier-John equation for 3D TOF PET based on the generalized projection-slice theorem; the three partial differential equations (PDEs) are the dual of the sinogram consistency equations and John's equation. We then solve the three PDEs using the method of characteristics. The two degrees of entangled redundancy of the TOF-PET data can be explicitly elicited and exploited by the solutions of the PDEs along the characteristic curves, which gives a complete understanding of the rich structure of the 3D x-ray transform with TOF measurement. Fourier rebinning equations and other mapping equations among different types of PET data are special cases of the general solutions. We also obtain new Fourier rebinning and consistency equations (FORCEs) from other special cases of the general solutions, and thus we obtain a complete scheme to convert among different types of PET data: 3D TOF, 3D non-TOF, 2D TOF and 2D non-TOF data. The new FORCEs can be used as new Fourier-based rebinning algorithms for TOF-PET data reduction, inverse rebinnings for designing fast projectors, or consistency conditions for estimating missing data. Further, we give a geometric interpretation of the general solutions--the two families of characteristic curves can be obtained by respectively changing the azimuthal and co-polar angles of the biorthogonal coordinates in Fourier space. We conclude the unified Fourier theory by showing that the Fourier consistency equations are

  1. AMOR – the time-of-flight neutron reflectometer at SINQ/PSI

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of the instrument and setting-up of the polarization option is described. Results from some of the recent studies with polarized neutrons and measurements on liquid surfaces are presented. Keywords. Apparatus for multioptional reflectometry; neutron reflectivity; neutron re- flectometer; time-of-flight; polarized neutrons; liquid ...

  2. TOF-SEMSANS—Time-of-flight spin-echo modulated small-angle neutron scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strobl, M.; Tremsin, A.S.; Hilger, A.; Wieder, F.; Kardjilov, N.; Manke, I.; Bouwman, W.G.; Plomp, J.

    2012-01-01

    We report on measurements of spatial beam modulation of a polarized neutron beam induced by triangular precession regions in time-of-flight mode and the application of this novel technique spin-echo modulated small-angle neutron scattering (SEMSANS) to small-angle neutron scattering in the very

  3. Improving the performance of a quadrupole time-of-flight instrument for macromolecular mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvel, van den R.H.H.; Duijn, van E.; Mazon, H.; Synowsky, S.A.; Lorenzen, K.; Versluis, C.; Brouns, S.J.J.; Langridge, D.; Oost, van der J.; Hoyes, J.; Heck, C.K.

    2006-01-01

    We modified and optimized a first generation quadrupole time-of-flight (Q-TOF) 1 to perform tandem mass spectrometry on macromolecular protein complexes. The modified instrument allows isolation and subsequent dissociation of high-mass protein complexes through collisions with argon molecules. The

  4. FOCUS: neutron time-of-flight spectrometer at SINQ: recent progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssen, S.; Mesot, J.; Holitzner, L. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Hempelmann, R. [Saarbruecken Univ. (Germany)

    1997-09-01

    At the Swiss neutron spallation source SINQ a time-of-flight spectrometer for cold neutrons is under construction. The design foresees a Hybrid solution combining a Fermi chopper with a doubly focusing crystal monochromator. During 1996 important progress has been made concerning the main spectrometer components such as the spectrometer housing and the detector system. (author) 2 figs., 3 refs.

  5. Time-of-Flight Experiments in Molecular Motion and Electron-Atom Collision Kinematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Denis P.; And Others

    1971-01-01

    Describes a set of experiments for an undergraduate laboratory which demonstrates the relationship between velocity, mass, and temperature in a gas. The experimental method involves time-of-flight measurements on atoms excited to metastable states by electron impact. Effects resulting from recoil in the electron-atom collision can also be…

  6. An indigenous cluster beam apparatus with a reflectron time-of-flight ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    An indigenous cluster beam apparatus with a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer. G RAINAa, G U KULKARNI a, R T YADAV a, V S RAMAMURTHYb and. C N R RAOa,*. aChemistry and Physics of Materials Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for. Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur PO, Bangalore 560 064, India.

  7. AMOR–the time-of-flight neutron reflectometer at SINQ/PSI

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The apparatus for multioptional reflectometry (AMOR) at SINQ/PSI is a versatile reflectometer operational in the time-of-flight (TOF) mode (in a wavelength range of 0.15 nm > > 1.3 nm) as well as in the monochromatic ( - 2) mode with both polarized and unpolarized neutrons. AMOR is designed to perform reflectometry ...

  8. Grasping objects from a user’s hand using time-of-flight camera data

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Govender, N

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available . This paper presents a system which allows a robotic arm manipulator to grasp any moving object from a user’s hand and releases the object when indicated to do so. Data from a Time-of-Flight camera is fused with an ordinary laboratory camera to create a robust...

  9. Particle Identification: Time-of-Flight, Cherenkov and Transition Radiation Detectors - Particle Detectors and Detector Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ullaland, O

    2011-01-01

    Particle Identification: Time-of-Flight, Cherenkov and Transition Radiation Detectors in 'Particle Detectors and Detector Systems', part of 'Landolt-Börnstein - Group I Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms: Numerical Data and Functional Relationships in Science and Technology, Volume 21B1: Detectors for Particles and Radiation. Part 1: Principles and Methods'. This document is part of Part 1 'Principles and Methods' of Subvolume B 'Detectors for Particles and Radiation' of Volume 21 'Elementary Particles' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I 'Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It contains the Section '3.3 Particle Identification: Time-of-Flight, Cherenkov and Transition Radiation Detectors' of Chapter '3 Particle Detectors and Detector Systems' with the content: 3.3 Particle Identification: Time-of-Flight, Cherenkov and Transition Radiation Detectors 3.3.1 Introduction 3.3.2 Time of Flight Measurements 3.3.2.1 Scintillator hodoscopes 3.3.2.2 Parallel plate ToF detectors 3.3.3 Cherenkov Radiation 3.3.3.1 ...

  10. Apple II direct memory access interface to acquire neutron scattering time of flight spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilloco, F.; Ippoliti, A.; Sacchetti, F.

    1990-07-01

    A data acquisition system designed to acquire time of flight spectra in neutron scattering experiments is described. The system is completely hardware, so that even employing a relatively slow clock (1 MHz) it is adequate to work at 300 kHz with no loss of information.

  11. Efficient and Fast Implementation of Embedded Time-of-Flight Ranging System Based on FPGAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Weiguo; Lyu, Congyi; Jiang, Xin

    2017-01-01

    Time-of-flight cameras perceive depth information about the surrounding environment with an amplitude-modulated near-infrared light source. The distance between the sensor and objects is calculated through measuring the time the light needs to travel. To be used in fast and embedded applications,...

  12. High-throughput shotgun lipidomics by quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ståhlman, Marcus; Ejsing, Christer S.; Tarasov, Kirill

    2009-01-01

    we describe a novel high-throughput shotgun lipidomic platform based on 96-well robot-assisted lipid extraction, automated sample infusion by mircofluidic-based nanoelectrospray ionization, and quantitative multiple precursor ion scanning analysis on a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer...

  13. Design and fabrication of a time-of-flight spectrometer for studies of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of the spectrometer, its time- and mass-focussing conditions, transmissions and detection efficiency etc. are given. A few typical test ..... initial velocity U0 =0, the time of flight is given by the equation. T =(2m)1 2 q a1 2. Es .... incident electrons collected at a biased Faraday cup ( 60 V) as a function of the extraction voltage.

  14. A High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Clinical PET Detection System Using a Gapless PMT-Quadrant-Sharing Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wai-Hoi; Li, Hongdi; Zhang, Yuxuan; Ramirez, Rocio; An, Shaohui; Wang, Chao; Liu, Shitao; Dong, Yun; Baghaei, Hossain

    2015-10-01

    We developed a high-resolution Photomultiplier-Quadrant-Sharing (PQS) PET system for human imaging. This system is made up of 24 detector panels. Each panel (bank) consists of 3 ×7 detector blocks, and each block has 16 ×16 LYSO crystals of 2.35 ×2.35 ×15.2 mm3. We used a novel detector-grinding scheme that is compatible with the PQS detector-pixel-decoding requirements to make a gapless cylindrical detector ring for maximizing detection efficiency while delivering an ultrahigh spatial-resolution for a whole-body PET camera with a ring diameter of 87 cm and axial field of view of 27.6 cm. This grinding scheme enables two adjacent gapless panels to share one row of the PMTs to extend the PQS configuration beyond one panel and thus maximize the economic benefit (in PMT usage) of the PQS design. The entire detector ring has 129,024 crystals, all of which are clearly decoded using only 576 PMTs (38-mm diameter). Thus, each PMT on average decodes 224 crystals to achieve a high crystal-pitch resolution of 2.44 mm ×2.44 mm. The detector blocks were mass-produced with our slab-sandwich-slice technique using a set of optimized mirror-film patterns (between crystals) to maximize light output and achieve high spatial and timing resolution. This detection system with time-of-flight capability was placed in a human PET/CT gantry. The reconstructed image resolution of the system was about 2.87 mm using 2D-filtered back-projection. The time-of-flight resolution was 473 ps. The preliminary images of phantoms and clinical studies presented in this work demonstrate the capability of this new PET/CT system to produce high-quality images.

  15. Feasibility of automated body trait determination using the SR4K time-of-flight camera in cow barns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salau, Jennifer; Haas, Jan H; Junge, Wolfgang; Bauer, Ulrike; Harms, Jan; Bieletzki, Sascha

    2014-01-01

    As herd sizes have increased in the last decades, computerized monitoring solutions, which provide fast, objective and accurate evaluations of the herd status, gain more and more importance. This study analyzes the feasibility of a Time-of-Flight-camera-based system for gathering body traits in dairy cows for use under cow barn conditions. Recording, determination of body condition score on a 5 point scale by visual and manual inspection, and measuring the backfat thickness with ultrasound took place from July 2011 to May 2012 at the dairy research farm Karkendamm of the Institute of Animal Breeding and Husbandry, Christian-Albrechts-University Kiel (Germany) and between August 2010 and July 2012 at the Institute for Agricultural Engineering and Animal Husbandry of Bavarian State Research Center for Agriculture in Grub (Germany). The two breeds Holstein Friesian cows (Karkendamm) and Fleckvieh (Grub) were considered in this study. Software for recording, image sorting and evaluation, determining the body parts needed, and extracting traits from the images was written and assembled to an automated system. Sorting the images and finding ischeal tuberosities, base of the tail, and dishes of the rump, backbone, and hips had error rates of 0.2%, 1.5%, 0.1%, and 2.6%, respectively. 13 traits were extracted and compared to backfat thickness and body condition score as well as between breeds. All traits depend significantly on the animal and showed very large effect sizes. Coefficients of determination restricted to individual animals were reaching up to 0.89. The precision in measuring the traits and gathering backfat thickness was comparable. Results indicated that the application of Time-Of-Flight in determination of body traits is feasible.

  16. Calibration of time-of-flight cameras for accurate intraoperative surface reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mersmann, Sven; Seitel, Alexander; Erz, Michael; Jähne, Bernd; Nickel, Felix; Mieth, Markus; Mehrabi, Arianeb; Maier-Hein, Lena

    2013-08-01

    In image-guided surgery (IGS) intraoperative image acquisition of tissue shape, motion, and morphology is one of the main challenges. Recently, time-of-flight (ToF) cameras have emerged as a new means for fast range image acquisition that can be used for multimodal registration of the patient anatomy during surgery. The major drawbacks of ToF cameras are systematic errors in the image acquisition technique that compromise the quality of the measured range images. In this paper, we propose a calibration concept that, for the first time, accounts for all known systematic errors affecting the quality of ToF range images. Laboratory and in vitro experiments assess its performance in the context of IGS. For calibration the camera-related error sources depending on the sensor, the sensor temperature and the set integration time are corrected first, followed by the scene-specific errors, which are modeled as function of the measured distance, the amplitude and the radial distance to the principal point of the camera. Accounting for the high accuracy demands in IGS, we use a custom-made calibration device to provide reference distance data, the cameras are calibrated too. To evaluate the mitigation of the error, the remaining residual error after ToF depth calibration was compared with that arising from using the manufacturer routines for several state-of-the-art ToF cameras. The accuracy of reconstructed ToF surfaces was investigated after multimodal registration with computed tomography (CT) data of liver models by assessment of the target registration error (TRE) of markers introduced in the livers. For the inspected distance range of up to 2 m, our calibration approach yielded a mean residual error to reference data ranging from 1.5±4.3 mm for the best camera to 7.2±11.0 mm. When compared to the data obtained from the manufacturer routines, the residual error was reduced by at least 78% from worst calibration result to most accurate manufacturer data. After

  17. Direct Chemical Analysis of Solids by Laser Ablation in an Ion-Storage Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klunder, G L; Grant, P M; Andresen, B D; Russo, R E

    2003-09-29

    A laser ablation/ionization mass spectrometer system is described for the direct analysis of solids, particles, and fibers. The system uses a quadrupole ion trap operated in an ion-storage (IS) mode, coupled with a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS). The sample is inserted radially into the ring electrode and an imaging system allows direct viewing and selected analysis of the sample. Measurements identified trace contaminants of Ag, Sn, and Sb in a Pb target with single laser-shot experiments. Resolution (m/{micro}m) of 1500 and detection limits of approximately 10 pg have been achieved with a single laser pulse. The system configuration and related operating principles for accurately measuring low concentrations of isotopes are described.

  18. Analyse d'une technique de teledetection time-of-flight a pleine saisie pour la metrologie des refractaires siderurgiques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher-Rheaume, Philippe

    L'etude d'une technique de teledetection time-of-flight indirecte par dephasage homodyne et heterodyne par intensificateur d'image est presentee dans le contexte de la mesure du refractaire de contenants et reacteurs pyrometallurgiques. Cette etude ayant pour objectif d'augmenter la securite et la rentabilite des procedes siderurgiques lourds a grand deploiement presente les principes de mesure fondamentaux, les contraintes optiques, thermiques, materielles et les defis d'une telle approche du point de vue theorique. Les principaux constituants du systeme sont presentes et une solution integree permettant d'obtenir un nuage de points a partir de l'observation d'un recipient siderurgique a haute temperature est elaboree.

  19. Qualitative Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Root Dentin Irrigated with Sodium Hypochlorite, EDTA, or Chlorhexidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolosowski, Kamil P; Sodhi, Rana N S; Kishen, Anil; Basrani, Bettina R

    2015-10-01

    Sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), chelating agents, and chlorhexidine (CHX), which are commonly used irrigants during endodontic treatment, have the potential to alter the physical and chemical properties of the dentin structure. The aim of this study was to use time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry to qualitatively evaluate the chemical characteristics of dentin surface and compare it with dentin exposed to NaOCl, EDTA, or CHX. Four blocks of dentin from a root of a human maxillary molar were embedded in resin and trimmed with a microtome to expose the dentin. Samples were randomly assigned to 4 treatment groups: (1) no irrigation treatment (sample A), (2) 2.5% NaOCl (sample B), (3) 17% EDTA (sample C), and (4) 2% CHX (sample D). Dentin surfaces were analyzed by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry, which allowed characterization of dentin surface chemistry by both imaging and mass spectroscopic analysis obtained in high mass and spatial resolution modes. Sample A revealed intense peaks characteristics of hydroxyapatite in addition to Na(+), K(+), CH4N(+), CN(-), CNO(-), Mg(+), F(-), and HCO2(-) peaks. Sample B showed severely decreased CH4N(+) and increased intensity of Cl(-). Sample C lacked Ca(+) and Mg(+) and showed decreased PO2(-) and PO3(-). Sample D exhibited a distinct presence of CHX. The spectral image of sample A displayed even distribution of Na(+) and Ca(+) on a smeared surface. The surfaces of samples B and D had patent dentinal tubules, whereas sample D showed an intense CHX signal. Sample C had some patent dentinal tubules and lacked Ca(+). NaOCl removed protein components from the dentin matrix, EDTA removed calcium and magnesium ions from the dentin, and CHX formed an adsorbed layer on the dentin surface. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. BGO as a hybrid scintillator / Cherenkov radiator for cost-effective time-of-flight PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, S. E.; Schaart, D. R.

    2017-06-01

    Due to detector developments in the last decade, the time-of-flight (TOF) method is now commonly used to improve the quality of positron emission tomography (PET) images. Clinical TOF-PET systems based on L(Y)SO:Ce crystals and silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) with coincidence resolving times (CRT) between 325 ps and 400 ps FWHM have recently been developed. Before the introduction of L(Y)SO:Ce, BGO was used in many PET systems. In addition to a lower price, BGO offers a superior attenuation coefficient and a higher photoelectric fraction than L(Y)SO:Ce. However, BGO is generally considered an inferior TOF-PET scintillator. In recent years, TOF-PET detectors based on the Cherenkov effect have been proposed. However, the low Cherenkov photon yield in the order of  ˜10 photons per event complicates energy discrimination-a severe disadvantage in clinical PET. The optical characteristics of BGO, in particular its high transparency down to 310 nm and its high refractive index of  ˜2.15, are expected to make it a good Cherenkov radiator. Here, we study the feasibility of combining event timing based on Cherenkov emission with energy discrimination based on scintillation in BGO, as a potential approach towards a cost-effective TOF-PET detector. Rise time measurements were performed using a time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) setup implemented on a digital photon counter (DPC) array, revealing a prompt luminescent component likely to be due to Cherenkov emission. Coincidence timing measurements were performed using BGO crystals with a cross-section of 3 mm  ×  3 mm and five different lengths between 3 mm and 20 mm, coupled to DPC arrays. Non-Gaussian coincidence spectra with a FWHM of 200 ps were obtained with the 27 mm3 BGO cubes, while FWHM values as good as 330 ps were achieved with the 20 mm long crystals. The FWHM value was found to improve with decreasing temperature, while the FWTM value showed the opposite trend.

  1. Time-of-flight mass spectrometry of laser exploding foil initiated PETN samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo, Mario E.; Molek, Christopher D.; Fossum, Emily C.

    2017-01-01

    We report the results of time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) measurements of the gaseous products of thin-film pentaerythritol tetranitrate [PETN, C(CH2NO3)4] samples reacting in vacuo. The PETN sample spots are produced by masked physical vapor deposition [A.S. Tappan, et al., AIP Conf. Proc. 1426, 677 (2012)] onto a first-surface aluminum mirror. A pulsed laser beam imaged through the soda lime glass mirror substrate converts the aluminum layer into a high-temperature high-pressure plasma which initiates chemical reactions in the overlying PETN sample. We had previously proposed [E.C. Fossum, et al., AIP Conf. Proc. 1426, 235 (2012)] to exploit differences in gaseous product chemical identities and molecular velocities to provide a chemically-based diagnostic for distinguishing between "detonation-like" and deflagration responses. Briefly: we expect in-vacuum detonations to produce hyperthermal (v˜10 km/s) thermodynamically-stable products such as N2, CO2, and H2O, and for deflagrations to produce mostly reaction intermediates, such as NO and NO2, with much slower molecular velocities - consistent with the expansion-quenched thermal decomposition of PETN. We observe primarily slow reaction intermediates (NO2, CH2NO3) at low laser pulse energies, the appearance of NO at intermediate laser pulse energies, and the appearance of hyperthemal CO/N2 at mass 28 amu at the highest laser pulse energies. However, these results are somewhat ambiguous, as the NO, NO2, and CH2NO3 intermediates persist and all species become hyperthermal at the higher laser pulse energies. Also, the purported CO/N2 signal at 28 amu may be contaminated by silicon ablated from the glass mirror substrate. We plan to mitigate these problems in future experiments by adopting the "Buelow" sample configuration which employs an intermediate foil barrier to shield the energetic material from the laser and the laser driven plasma [S.J. Buelow, et al., AIP Conf. Proc. 706, 1377 (2003)].

  2. Digitizing data acquisition and time-of-flight pulse processing for ToF-ERDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julin, Jaakko, E-mail: jaakko.julin@jyu.fi; Sajavaara, Timo

    2016-01-01

    A versatile system to capture and analyze signals from multi channel plate (MCP) based time-of-flight detectors and ionization based energy detectors such as silicon diodes and gas ionization chambers (GIC) is introduced. The system is based on commercial digitizers and custom software. It forms a part of a ToF-ERDA spectrometer, which has to be able to detect recoil atoms of many different species and energies. Compared to the currently used analogue electronics the digitizing system provides comparable time-of-flight resolution and improved hydrogen detection efficiency, while allowing the operation of the spectrometer be studied and optimized after the measurement. The hardware, data acquisition software and digital pulse processing algorithms to suit this application are described in detail.

  3. Time of flight and range of the motion of a projectile in a constant gravitational field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Karkantzakos

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we study the classical problem of the motion of a projectile in a constant gravitational field under the influenceof a retarding force proportional to the velocity. Specifically, we express the time of flight, the time of fall and the range ofthe motion as a function of the constant of resistance per unit mass of the projectile. We also prove that the time of fall isgreater than the time of rise with the exception of the case of zero constant of resistance where we have equality. Finally weprove a formula from which we can compute the constant of resistance per unit mass of the projectile from time of flight andrange of the motion when the acceleration due to gravity and the initial velocity of the projectile are known.

  4. Position sensitivty with the St. George time of flight vs energy detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Luis; Kalkal, Sunil; Jung, Hyo Soon; Laurence, J.; Meisel, Zachary; Feltman, William; Hanner, A.; Thornton, E.-Lexis; Wiggins, B. B.; Desouza, Romualdo; Hinnefeld, Jerry; Couder, Manoel; Wiescher, Michael

    2017-09-01

    At the University of Notre Dame the St. George recoil mass separator will be used to study (α , γ) reactions of astrophysical interest. The particle identification system developed for the St. George recoil mass separator at the University of Notre Dame, in collaboration with Indiana University South Bend, utilizes time-of-flight and energy to separate reaction products from residual unreacted beam particles. The detection system uses two microchannel plate (MCP) detectors for time-of-flight, and a silicon strip detector to measure the particles kinetic energy. A position sensitive anode was designed in collaboration with Indiana University Bloomington to enhance particle identification (PID). The performance of the PID system will be presented. NSF PHY-1419765 & PHY-0959816.

  5. Plane-parallel chamber as detector for time-of-flight measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Akimov, V A; Boyarinov, S V

    2002-01-01

    To arrange time-of-flight measurements in terms of the ALICE experiment one designed a system of gas detectors to record minimal-ionizing particles (MIP). Detector system is based on a plane-parallel gas-filled chamber (PPC) operating under gas intensification avalanche-type regime. One presents the results of simulation of gas discharge in PPC and evaluates the accuracy of measurement of MIP time-of-flight. One analyzes the test results of performances of PPC of various dimensions and with working gas medium various compositions. One detected correlation of flight time and of signal amplitude of PPC. One stresses, as well, positive effect of admission of electronegative additions into gas mixture. PPC time resolution constitutes 200-250 ps and MIP recording efficiency - exactly 70-90%

  6. Identification of heavy nuclei by combination of magnetic analysis time of flight and energy measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Stéphan, C; Garron, J P; Jacmart, J C; Poffé, N; Tassan-Got, L

    1976-01-01

    The addition of a time of flight measurement to a Delta E-E telescope set up in the focal plane of a magnetic spectrometer improves the identification of very heavy ions. The Delta E silicon detector is 8 mu thick. The time of flight is measured between a thin plastic scintillator at the entrance of the spectrometer and the Delta E detector, which gives a flight path of 3 m. In order to compensate for the different lengths of the trajectories, the plastic is bent at 15 degrees along the mean trajectory. In these conditions, one has obtained a time resolution of 0.7 ns with a solid angle of 1.8 10/sup -3/ sr (horizontal 2 degrees , vertical 3 degrees ). In these conditions, preliminary results already give an unambiguous identification up to mass approximately=100.

  7. MEASUREMENT AND ANALYSIS OF GAIT BY USING A TIME-OF-FLIGHT CAMERA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Altuntas

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Biomedical applications generally needs measurement the human body parts in motion. On the other hand, the analysis of the human motion includes mobile measurements. The mobile measurement is complicated task because it needs two or more sensor combination, specific measurement techniques and huge computation. Thus, it is actual research topic in photogrammetry and computer sciences community. Time-of-flight (ToF camera can make measurement the moving object. It can be used for robotic and simultaneous localization and mapping applications. Human motion capture is recent application area for ToF camera. In this study analysis of the body motion were made with time-of-flight camera. We made measurement to runner on treadmill. The motion was analysed with computing the angle between body parts.

  8. Wavelength resolution options for a time-of-flight reflectometer using VITESS code of simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Amitesh

    2011-08-01

    I report on the wavelength resolution options that can be made available on a time-of-flight reflectometer. I take the example of the newly commissioned reflectometer BioRef at Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin for the purpose. Calculations and simulations using the software package VITESS, I show potential increase in flux densities, an extension of the momentum transfer range accessible as well as a significant extension of the range of constant wavelength resolution of the instrument. It is therefore possible to achieve a virtually continuous range of wavelength resolution from 5% to 11% by using a combination of four different chopper systems. This can be a unique advantage on the time-of-flight reflectometer in investigating thin-film structures accessing a wide range of thicknesses.

  9. A new type of detector time of flight - multi-gap resistive plate chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, H; Eppley, G; Geurts, F J M; Huang, S; Li, C; Liu, H; Llope, W J; Ruan, L; Shao, M; Wang, X L; Wang, Z; Wu, J; Xu, Z; Zhang, Z

    2004-01-01

    Multi-gap resistive plate chamber is a new detector technology. It was first developed by the LHC-ALICE group at CERN in the late 1990s. The MRPC is a ideal detector for time-of-flight measurement due to its small gaps and works in the proportional (avalanche) mode. The beam test of single module result shows that MRPC tuning resolution is better than 70ps and the detection efficiency is higher than 95%. It is also radiation hard. A time-of-flight tray with 28 on MRPC modules. was tested at AGS. The average timing resolution is about 75ps (including the 4cm of beam spread) and detection efficiency is better than 95%. This tray has been installed on STAR detector system in October 2002 and used on the 200GeV d+Au experiment.

  10. Mobile high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer for in-situ analytics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, Johannes; Ebert, Jens [II. Physikalisches Institut, JLU, Giessen (Germany); Dickel, Timo; Geissel, Hans; Plass, Wolfgang; Scheidenberger, Christoph [II. Physikalisches Institut, JLU, Giessen (Germany); GSI, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    A compact multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer (MR-TOF-MS) has been developed. For the first time it allows for mass measurements with a resolving power exceeding 100000 and sub ppm accuracy in a mobile device. Thus it allows to resolve isobars and enables to accurately determine the composition and structure of biomolecules. The MR-TOF-MS consists of an atmospheric pressure interface for DESI and REIMS, ion cooler, ion trap, time-of-flight analyzer, MCP detector and DAQ. Vacuum system components, power supplies as well as electronics are mounted together with the ion optical spectrometer parts on a single frame with a total volume of 0.8 m{sup 3}. Applications of the device within the AmbiProbe research program include in-situ mass spectrometry such as real-time tissue recognition in electrosurgery, identification of mycotoxins and analysis of soil samples for environmental studies.

  11. Environmental Effects on Measurement Uncertainties of Time-of-Flight Cameras

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmundsson, Sigurjon Arni; Aanæs, Henrik; Larsen, Rasmus

    2007-01-01

    In this paper the effect the environment has on the SwissRanger SR3000 Time-Of-Flight camera is investigated. The accuracy of this camera is highly affected by the scene it is pointed at: Such as the reflective properties, color and gloss. Also the complexity of the scene has considerable effects...... description of how a surface color intensity influences the depth measurement, and illustrate how multiple reflections influence the resulting depth measurement....

  12. Timing performances of a data acquisition system for Time of Flight PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrocchi, Matteo, E-mail: matteo.morrocchi@pi.infn.it [University of Pisa and INFN Sezione di Pisa, I 56127 Pisa (Italy); Marcatili, Sara; Belcari, Nicola; Bisogni, Maria G. [University of Pisa and INFN Sezione di Pisa, I 56127 Pisa (Italy); Collazuol, Gianmaria [University of Padova and INFN Sezione di Padova (Italy); Ambrosi, Giovanni [INFN Sezione di Perugia, I 06100 Perugia (Italy); Corsi, Francesco; Foresta, Maurizio; Marzocca, Cristoforo; Matarrese, Gianvito [Politecnico di Bari and INFN Sezione di Bari, I 70100 Bari (Italy); Sportelli, Giancarlo; Guerra, Pedro; Santos, Andres [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, E 28040 Madrid (Spain); Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red en Bioingenieria, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN) (Spain); Del Guerra, Alberto [University of Pisa and INFN Sezione di Pisa, I 56127 Pisa (Italy)

    2012-12-11

    We are investigating the performances of a data acquisition system for Time of Flight PET, based on LYSO crystal slabs and 64 channels Silicon Photomultipliers matrices (1.2 cm{sup 2} of active area each). Measurements have been performed to test the timing capability of the detection system (SiPM matices coupled to a LYSO slab and the read-out electronics) with both test signal and radioactive source.

  13. Time-of-Flight Effects in Microwave Transmission Through a Thin Metal Slab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, J. O.; Falk, David S.

    1971-01-01

    A 45-GHz size-effect experiment on Ag revealed significant structure in the combined transmission and leakage signal below the first-belly-electron size effects. The oscillations, which behave differently for different field orientations, are shown to be due to the time-of-flight phase delay of e...... of electron trajectories across the sample. The signal is calculated assuming circular orbits and using parameters from the literature. We suggest a modified experiment for obtaining Fermi velocities....

  14. Time-of-flight studies on TiO2/CuInS2 heterojunctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofhuis, J.; Schoonman, J.; Goossens, A.

    2008-01-01

    Time-of-Flight (TOF) measurements have been performed on n-type TiO2/p-type CuInS2 heterojunctions. The TiO2 film thickness has been varied between 200 and 400 nm, while the CuInS2 film thickness has been fixed at 500 nm. The TOF response can be accurately modeled, if the potential drop across the

  15. Towards practical time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry lignocellulolytic enzyme assays

    OpenAIRE

    Goacher, Robyn E; Tsai, Alex Yi-Lin; Master, Emma R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) is a surface sensitive mass spectrometry technique with potential strengths as a method for detecting enzymatic activity on solid materials. In particular, ToF-SIMS has been applied to detect the enzymatic degradation of woody lignocellulose. Proof-of-principle experiments previously demonstrated the detection of both lignin-degrading and cellulose-degrading enzymes on solvent-extracted hardwood and softwood. However, these ...

  16. Timing and Spectroscopy Requirements for a Plastic Scintillating Fiber Bundle Time-of-Flight Neutron Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    the spinthariscope, which was first built in 1903 by Sir William Crookes. The spinthariscope featured a ZnS screen, which produced scintillations ...linearity, speed, density, transparency, and favorable costs to manufacture [1]. Over time scintillators have transformed from the ZnS of the early...TIMING AND SPECTROSCOPY REQUIREMENTS FOR A PLASTIC SCINTILLATING FIBER BUNDLE TIME-OF-FLIGHT NEUTRON SPECTROMETER THESIS Paul A. Clement, First

  17. Determining the Time of Flight and Speed of Sound on Different types of Edible Oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azman, N. A.; Hamid, S. B. Abd

    2017-11-01

    Edible oil is most often plant-based oils that have been extracted from various seeds. There are cases where the fully virgin edible oil was found to be a fraud. The adulterated edible oil indicates the intentional, fraudulent addition of extraneous, improper or cheaper ingredients puts into the oil or the dilution or removal of some valuable ingredient of the oil in order to increase profits. Hence, decrease the reliability of the Malaysian food product quality. This research was done by using the method of time of flight obtained using the Texas Instrument board, TDC1000-TDC7200 EVM connected to an ultrasonic transducer with 1 MHz frequency. The authors measured the time of flight and temperatures controlled from 20°C to 40°C of five vegetable oils (olive oil, sunflower oil, corn oil, coconut oil, and mustard oil). The value is observed and compared with other research from the literature review. From the study, time of flight values decreases exponentially while speed of sound value increases. This relationship will be useful in spectrum unfolding method to investigate the adulteration in different type of edible oil.This research outcome is to investigate the quality value of the different type of edible oil while eliminates the issues where the quality of Malaysian food product is not reliable.

  18. Picosecond resolution on relativistic heavy ions' time-of-flight measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebran, A., E-mail: adeline.ebran@cea.fr; Taieb, J., E-mail: julien.taieb@cea.fr; Belier, G.; Chatillon, A.; Laurent, B.; Martin, J.-F.; Pellereau, E.

    2013-11-11

    We developed a time-of-flight measurement system for relativistic heavy ions with a requested resolution of 40 ps Full Width Half Maximum. Such a resolution is mandatory to assign the correct mass number to every fission fragment, identified using the Bρ-ToF-ΔE method with the recoil spectrometer designed for the SOFIA experiment—which hold very recently at GSI. To achieve such a performance, fast plastic scintillators read-out by dedicated photomultiplier tubes were chosen among other possible options. We have led several test-measurements from 2009 to 2011, in order to investigate: the effect of the addition of a quenching molecule in the scintillator's matrix, the influence of the detector's size and the impact of the photomultiplier tube. The contribution of the dedicated electronics is also characterized. Time-of-flight measurements were performed realized with electron pulses and relativistic heavy ions, respectively provided by the LASER driven electron–accelerator (ELSA) at CEA–DAM Ile-de-France and by the SIS18/FRS facility at GSI. The reported results exhibit a time resolution better than 20 ps Full Width Half Maximum reached with the last prototype at GSI with an Uranium beam. These results confirm that the SOFIA experiment should enable the measurement of the relativistic fission fragments' time-of-flight with the requested resolution.

  19. Semiquantitative analysis of atherosclerotic plaque using optical coherence tomography and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korol, Renee M.; Togonu-Bickersteth, Babajide; Yang, Victor X.; Dimov, Stamen; Vatsya, Pracha; Gordon, Maggie; Vitkin, Alex; Liu, Liying; Canham, Peter; Clarke, Sharon; Lucas, Alexandra

    2003-10-01

    Atherosclerosis is the underlying vascular pathology that initiates arterial thromboembolic occlusions (myocardial infarctions, strokes and peripheral vessel blockage). Two imaging modalities, Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), were investigated for detection and compositional analysis of unstable plaque associated with plaque erosion and sudden occlusion. OCT produces high resolution images whereas mass spectrometry images provide information on the spatial distribution of chemical elements. Diseased carotid arteries taken from patients with high-risk lesions were imaged with OCT and ToF-SIMS to give molecular and metabolic information, and matched with histopathology. OCT results show clear indications of vascular remodeling by the presence of fatty acid deposits, fibrous tissue and calcifications. ToF-SIMS further characterized changes based on secondary ion topography analysis where a high 23Na/39K ratio was indicative of arterial tissue degradation and the amount of 40Ca corresponded with late stage atherosclerosis. This pilot experiment has demonstrated that in vitro OCT imaging and ToF-SIMS of diseased carotid arteries have scientific merit for targeting clinically relevant morphology and metabolic changes to compare stable and unstable plaque. These optical techniques provide complimentary metabolic and molecular information on unstable plaque, specifically cell break-down with altered ion ratios of 23Na, 39K and 40Ca.

  20. A Clinical and Experimental Comparison of Time of Flight PET/MRI and PET/CT Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oprea-Lager, Daniela E; Yaqub, Maqsood; Pieters, Indra C; Reinhard, Rinze; van Moorselaar, Reindert J A; van den Eertwegh, Alfons J M; Hoekstra, Otto S; Lammertsma, Adriaan A; Boellaard, Ronald

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare image quality and quantitative accuracy of positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) and PET/computed tomography (PET/CT) systems with time of flight PET gantries, using phantom and clinical studies. Identical phantom experiments were performed on both systems. Calibration, uniformity, and standardized uptake value (SUV) recovery were measured. A clinical PET/CT versus PET/MRI comparison was performed using [(18)F]fluoromethylcholine ([(18)F]FCH). Calibration accuracy and image uniformity were comparable between systems. SUV recovery met EANM/EARL requirements on both scanners. Thirty-four lesions with comparable PET image quality were identified. Lesional SUVmax differences of 4 ± 26% between PET/MRI and PET/CT data were observed (R (2) = 0.79, slope = 1.02). In healthy tissues, PET/MRI-derived SUVs were 16 ± 11% lower than on PET/CT (R (2) = 0.98, slope = 0.86). PET/MRI and PET/CT showed comparable performance with respect to calibration accuracy, image uniformity, and SUV recovery. [(18)F]FCH uptake values for both healthy tissues and lesions corresponded reasonably well between MR- and CT-based systems, but only in regions free of MR-based attenuation artifacts.

  1. Using convolutional neural networks to estimate time-of-flight from PET detector waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Eric; Cherry, Simon R.

    2018-01-01

    Although there have been impressive strides in detector development for time-of-flight positron emission tomography, most detectors still make use of simple signal processing methods to extract the time-of-flight information from the detector signals. In most cases, the timing pick-off for each waveform is computed using leading edge discrimination or constant fraction discrimination, as these were historically easily implemented with analog pulse processing electronics. However, now with the availability of fast waveform digitizers, there is opportunity to make use of more of the timing information contained in the coincident detector waveforms with advanced signal processing techniques. Here we describe the application of deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs), a type of machine learning, to estimate time-of-flight directly from the pair of digitized detector waveforms for a coincident event. One of the key features of this approach is the simplicity in obtaining ground-truth-labeled data needed to train the CNN: the true time-of-flight is determined from the difference in path length between the positron emission and each of the coincident detectors, which can be easily controlled experimentally. The experimental setup used here made use of two photomultiplier tube-based scintillation detectors, and a point source, stepped in 5 mm increments over a 15 cm range between the two detectors. The detector waveforms were digitized at 10 GS s‑1 using a bench-top oscilloscope. The results shown here demonstrate that CNN-based time-of-flight estimation improves timing resolution by 20% compared to leading edge discrimination (231 ps versus 185 ps), and 23% compared to constant fraction discrimination (242 ps versus 185 ps). By comparing several different CNN architectures, we also showed that CNN depth (number of convolutional and fully connected layers) had the largest impact on timing resolution, while the exact network parameters, such as convolutional

  2. (A new time of flight) Acoustic flow meter using wide band signals and adaptive beamforming techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgan, I.; Ioana, C.; Candel, I.; Anghel, A.; Ballester, J. L.; Reeb, B.; Combes, G.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we present the result of our research concerning the improvement of acoustic time of flight flow metering for water pipes. Current flow meters are based on the estimation of direct time of flight by matched filtering of the received and emitted signals by acoustic transducers. Currently, narrow band signals are used, as well as a single emitter/receptor transducer configuration. Although simple, this configuration presents a series of limitations such as energy losses due to pipe wall/water interface, pressure/flow transients, sensitivity to flow induced vibrations, acoustic beam deformations and shift due to changes in flow velocity and embedded turbulence in the flow. The errors associated with these limitations reduce the overall robustness of existing flow meters, as well as the measured flow rate range and lower accuracy. In order to overcome these limitations, two major innovations were implemented at the signal processing level. The first one concerns the use of wide band signals that optimise the power transfer throughout the acoustic path and also increase the number of velocity/flow readings per second. Using wide band signals having a high duration-bandwidth product increases the precision in terms of time of flight measurements and, in the same time, improves the system robustness. The second contribution consists in the use of a multiple emitter - multiple receivers configuration (for one path) in order to compensate the emitted acoustic beam shift, compensate the time of flight estimation errors and thus increase the flow meter's robustness in case of undesired effects such as the “flow blow” and transient/rapid flow rate/velocity changes. Using a new signal processing algorithm that take advantage of the controlled wide band content coming from multiple receivers, the new flow meters achieves a higher accuracy in terms of flow velocity over a wider velocity range than existing systems. Tests carried out on real scale experimental

  3. Contribution of 3-T Susceptibility-Weighted MRI to Detection of Intraarticular Hemosiderin Accumulation in Patients With Hemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyuz, Behic; Polat, Ahmet Veysel; Ozturk, Mesut; Aslan, Kerim; Tomak, Leman; Selcuk, Mustafa Bekir

    2018-02-22

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of 3-T susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) for detecting intraarticular hemosiderin accumulation in patients with hemophilia. Forty-one joints in 24 patients with hemophilia were imaged with conventional MRI and SWI sequences. Two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists and one general radiologist (reader 3) interpreted the images for hemosiderin accumulation. The final decision was determined in consensus by readers 1 and 2 using both conventional MRI and SWI sequences. The diagnostic consistencies of each MRI sequence with the reference and pairwise agreements between interpreters were assessed. For conventional MRI sequences, the diagnostic consistencies of the two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists with the reference were substantial (κ = 0.63 and 0.62), whereas the consistency of the general radiologist with the reference was moderate (κ = 0.47). The SWI interpretations of all readers had almost perfect agreement with the reference (κ = 1, κ = 1, κ = 0.97). Interobserver agreement also improved at SWI interpretations. SWI contributes to more accurate grading of intraarticular hemosiderin accumulation than is achieved with conventional MRI sequences.

  4. Fully automatic and precise data analysis developed for time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Stefan; Riedo, Andreas; Neuland, Maike B; Tulej, Marek; Wurz, Peter

    2017-09-01

    Scientific objectives of current and future space missions are focused on the investigation of the origin and evolution of the solar system with the particular emphasis on habitability and signatures of past and present life. For in situ measurements of the chemical composition of solid samples on planetary surfaces, the neutral atmospheric gas and the thermal plasma of planetary atmospheres, the application of mass spectrometers making use of time-of-flight mass analysers is a technique widely used. However, such investigations imply measurements with good statistics and, thus, a large amount of data to be analysed. Therefore, faster and especially robust automated data analysis with enhanced accuracy is required. In this contribution, an automatic data analysis software, which allows fast and precise quantitative data analysis of time-of-flight mass spectrometric data, is presented and discussed in detail. A crucial part of this software is a robust and fast peak finding algorithm with a consecutive numerical integration method allowing precise data analysis. We tested our analysis software with data from different time-of-flight mass spectrometers and different measurement campaigns thereof. The quantitative analysis of isotopes, using automatic data analysis, yields results with an accuracy of isotope ratios up to 100 ppm for a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 10 4 . We show that the accuracy of isotope ratios is in fact proportional to SNR -1 . Furthermore, we observe that the accuracy of isotope ratios is inversely proportional to the mass resolution. Additionally, we show that the accuracy of isotope ratios is depending on the sample width T s by T s 0.5 . Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Quasi-dynamic mode of nanomembranes for time-of-flight mass spectrometry of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jonghoo; Kim, Hyunseok; Blick, Robert H

    2012-04-21

    Mechanical resonators realized on the nano-scale by now offer applications in mass-sensing of biomolecules with extraordinary sensitivity. The general idea is that perfect mechanical biosensors should be of extremely small size to achieve zeptogram sensitivity in weighing single molecules similar to a balance. However, the small scale and long response time of weighing biomolecules with a cantilever restrict their usefulness as a high-throughput method. Commercial mass spectrometry (MS) such as electro-spray ionization (ESI)-MS and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-time of flight (TOF)-MS are the gold standards to which nanomechanical resonators have to live up to. These two methods rely on the ionization and acceleration of biomolecules and the following ion detection after a mass selection step, such as time-of-flight (TOF). Hence, the spectrum is typically represented in m/z, i.e. the mass to ionization charge ratio. Here, we describe the feasibility and mass range of detection of a new mechanical approach for ion detection in time-of-flight mass spectrometry, the principle of which is that the impinging ion packets excite mechanical oscillations in a silicon nitride nanomembrane. These mechanical oscillations are henceforth detected via field emission of electrons from the nanomembrane. Ion detection is demonstrated in MALDI-TOF analysis over a broad range with angiotensin, bovine serum albumin (BSA), and an equimolar protein mixture of insulin, BSA, and immunoglobulin G (IgG). We find an unprecedented mass range of operation of the nanomembrane detector.

  6. Solid Phase Microextraction and Miniature Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiller, j.m.

    1999-01-26

    A miniature mass spectrometer, based on the time-of-flight principle, has been developed for the detection of chemical warfare agent precursor molecules. The instrument, with minor modifications, could fulfill many of the needs for sensing organic molecules in various Defense Programs, including Enhanced Surveillance. The basic footprint of the instrument is about that of a lunch box. The instrument has a mass range to about 300, has parts-per-trillion detection limits, and can return spectra in less than a second. The instrument can also detect permanent gases and is especially sensitive to hydrogen. In volume, the device could be manufactured for under $5000.

  7. Testing a new NIF neutron time-of-flight detector with a bibenzyl scintillator on OMEGA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glebov, V Yu; Forrest, C; Knauer, J P; Pruyne, A; Romanofsky, M; Sangster, T C; Shoup, M J; Stoeckl, C; Caggiano, J A; Carman, M L; Clancy, T J; Hatarik, R; McNaney, J; Zaitseva, N P

    2012-10-01

    A new neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) detector with a bibenzyl crystal as a scintillator has been designed and manufactured for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This detector will replace a nTOF20-Spec detector with an oxygenated xylene scintillator currently operational on the NIF to improve the areal-density measurements. In addition to areal density, the bibenzyl detector will measure the D-D and D-T neutron yield and the ion temperature of indirect- and direct-drive-implosion experiments. The design of the bibenzyl detector and results of tests on the OMEGA Laser System are presented.

  8. Stopping power measurements with the Time-of-Flight (ToF) technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontana, Cristiano L., E-mail: fontana@pd.infn.it [Materials Science & Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Chen, Chien-Hung; Crespillo, Miguel L.; Graham, Joseph T.; Xue, Haizhou [Department of Materials Science & Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J. [Materials Science & Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Department of Materials Science & Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States)

    2016-01-01

    A review of measurements of the stopping power of ions in matter is presented along with new measurements of the stopping powers of O, Si, Ti, and Au ions in self-supporting thin foils of SiO{sub 2}, Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}, and Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}. A Time-of-Flight system at the Ion Beam Materials Laboratory at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, was used in transmission geometry in order to reduce experimental uncertainties. The resulting stopping powers show good precision and accuracy and corroborate previously quoted values in the literature. New stopping data are determined.

  9. Detector response in time-of-flight mass spectrometry at high pulse repetition frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulcicek, Erol E.; Boyle, James G.

    1993-01-01

    Dead time effects in chevron configured dual microchannel plates (MCPs) are investigated. Response times are determined experimentally for one chevron-configured dual MCP-type detector and two discrete dynode-type electron multipliers with 16 and 23 resistively divided stages. All of these detectors are found to be suitable for time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF MS), yielding 3-6-ns (FWHM) response times triggered on a single ion pulse. It is concluded that, unless there are viable solutions to overcome dead time disadvantages for continuous dynode detectors, suitable discrete dynode detectors for TOF MS appear to have a significant advantage for high repetition rate operation.

  10. A composition analyzer for microparticles using a spark ion source. [using time of flight spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, S. O.; Berg, O. E.

    1975-01-01

    Iron microparticles were fired onto a capacitor-type microparticle detector which responded to an impact with a spark discharge. Ion currents were extracted from the spark and analyzed in a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The mass spectra showed the element of both detector and particle materials. The total extracted ion currents was typically 10A within a period of 100ns, indicating very efficient vaporization of the particle and ionization of the vapor. Potential applications include research on cosmic dust, atmospheric aerosols and cloud droplets, particles ejected by rocket or jet engines, by machining processes, or by nuclear bomb explosions.

  11. Aerosol matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization for liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, K.K.; Lewis, T.M.; Beeson, M.D.; Russell, D.H. (Texas A M Univ., College Station, TX (United States))

    1994-05-15

    We report the application of aerosol matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) to liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). The aerosol MALDI experiment uses aerosol liquid introduction in conjunction with pulsed UV laser ionization to form ions from large biomolecules in solution. Mass analysis is achieved in a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. In the LC/MALDI-MS experiment, the matrix solution is combined with the column effluent in a mixing tee, LC/MALDI-MS is demonstrated for the separation of bradykinin, gramicidin S, and myoglobin. 32 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Feasibility Study of a Neutron Time Of Flight Facility at the CERN-PS

    CERN Document Server

    Andriamonje, Samuel A; Zanolli, M; Buono, S; Buttkus, J; Cennini, E; Cennini, P; Daems, G; Delaprison, J; Dobers, T; Dupont, M; Durieu, L; Ferrari, A; Giovannozzi, Massimo; Jacot, C; Magnin, R; Mahner, E; Métral, G; Pavlopoulos, P; Raich, U; Silari, Marco; Vlachoudis, V; Wilhelmsson, M

    1998-01-01

    This report summarises the feasibility study of a neutron time-of-flight facility at the CERN-PS as described in Refs. [1] and [2]. The idea is to extract at 24 GeV/cproton bunches (r.m.s. length ~7 ns) on to a target. The neutrons produced by spallation are directed to an experimental area located 230 m downstream throughout a vacuum pipe (diameter ~80 cm) making use of the existing TT2A tunnel about 7 m below the ISR tunnel

  13. Analysis of gait using a treadmill and a Time-of-flight camera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Ramsbøl; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold; Larsen, Rasmus

    2009-01-01

    We present a system that analyzes human gait using a treadmill and a Time-of-flight camera. The camera provides spatial data with local intensity measures of the scene, and data are collected over several gait cycles. These data are then used to model and analyze the gait. For each frame the spat...... fitting a cyclic model is created. The output data are: Speed, Cadence, Step length and Range-of-motion. The described output parameters are computed with no user interaction using a setup with no requirements to neither background nor subject clothing....

  14. Time-of-flight discrimination between gamma-rays and neutrons by neural networks

    OpenAIRE

    Serkan AKKOYUN

    2012-01-01

    In gamma-ray spectroscopy, a number of neutrons are emitted from the nuclei together with the gamma-rays and these neutrons influence gamma-ray spectra. An obvious method of separating between neutrons and gamma-rays is based on the time-of-flight (tof) technique. This work aims obtaining tof distributions of gamma-rays and neutrons by using feed-forward artificial neural network (ANN). It was shown that, ANN can correctly classify gamma-ray and neutron events. Testing of trained networks on ...

  15. New fast-neutron time-of-flight facilities at CYRIC

    CERN Document Server

    Terakawa, A; Kumagai, K; Kikuchi, Y; Uekusa, T; Uemori, T; Fujisawa, H; Sugimoto, N; Itoh, K; Baba, M; Orihara, H; Maeda, K

    2002-01-01

    An outline of the new fast-neutron time-of-flight facilities equipped with the K=110 MeV AVF cyclotron at Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center is described. Results of the performance test for analyzing neutrons from the sup 6 Li(p,n) sup 6 Be reaction at E sub p =70 MeV show that the total system of facilities works reasonably well and present good place for extended nuclear spectroscopic studies, together with the newly installed AVF cyclotron which provides high-time resolution beams in the order of several hundred pico-seconds.

  16. Calibration of the time response functions of a quenched plastic scintillator for neutron time of flight

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, J B; Peng, H S; Tang, C H; Zhang, B H; Ding, Y K; Chen, M; Chen, H S; Li, C G; Wen, T S; Yu, R Z

    2002-01-01

    The time response functions of an ultrafast quenched plastic scintillation detector used to measure neutron time of flight spectra were calibrated by utilizing cosmic rays and implosion neutrons from DT-filled capsules at the Shenguang II laser facility. These sources could be regarded as delta function pulses due to their much narrower time widths than those of the time response functions of the detection system. The results showed that the detector responses to DT neutrons and to cosmic rays were 1.18 and 0.96 ns FWHM, respectively.

  17. FOCUS: time-of-flight spectrometer for cold neutrons at SINQ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssen, S.; Mesot, J. [Lab. for Neutron Scattering ETH Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland) and Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Hempelmann, R. [Saarbruecken Univ., Physical Chemistry, Saarbruecken (Germany)

    1996-11-01

    The physical layout of the Time-Of-Flight spectrometer at the new spallation source SINQ is presented. The concept shows up a hybrid-TOF combining a Fermi-chopper with a crystal monochromator. The demand of a versatile and flexible instrument for several applications is taken into account by the option of switching from time-focusing to monochromatic focusing mode such that the spectrometer can be optimised for both quasielastic and inelastic scattering applications. (author) 5 figs., 2 tabs., 16 refs.

  18. Time-of-flight spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen atoms and molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, M.C. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada)]|[Dept. of Physics, Faculty of Science, Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Adamczak, A. [Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Krakow (Poland); Bailey, J.M. [Chester Technology, Chester (United Kingdom); Beer, G.A.; Mason, G.R. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Victoria, BC (Canada); Beveridge, J.L.; Marshall, G.M.; Olin, A. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Faifman, M.P. [Russian Research Center, Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Huber, T.M. [Dept. of Physics, Gustavus Adolphus Coll., St. Peter, MN (United States); Kammel, P. [Dept. of Physics and Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Kim, S.K. [Dept. of Physics, Jeonbuk National Univ., Jeonju City (Korea); Knowles, P.E.; Mulhauser, F. [Inst. of Physics, Univ. of Fribourg (Switzerland); Kunselman, A.R. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States); Markushin, V.E.; Petitjean, C. [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland); Porcelli, T.A. [Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Northern British Columbia, Prince George, BC (Canada); Zmeskal, J. [Inst. for Medium Energy Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna (Austria)

    2001-07-01

    Studies of muonic hydrogen atoms and molecules have been performed traditionally in bulk targets of gas, liquid or solid. At TRIUMF, Canada's meson facility, we have developed a new type of target system using multilayer thin films of solid hydrogen, which provides a beam of muonic hydrogen atoms in vacuum. Using the time-of-flight of the muonic atoms, the energy-dependent information of muonic reactions are obtained in direct manner.We discuss some unique measurements enabled by the new technique, with emphasis on processes relevant to muon catalyzed fusion.

  19. Testing a new NIF neutron time-of-flight detector with a bibenzyl scintillator on OMEGA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glebov, V. Yu.; Forrest, C.; Knauer, J. P.; Pruyne, A.; Romanofsky, M.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M. J. III; Stoeckl, C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Caggiano, J. A.; Carman, M. L.; Clancy, T. J.; Hatarik, R.; McNaney, J.; Zaitseva, N. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    A new neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) detector with a bibenzyl crystal as a scintillator has been designed and manufactured for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This detector will replace a nTOF20-Spec detector with an oxygenated xylene scintillator currently operational on the NIF to improve the areal-density measurements. In addition to areal density, the bibenzyl detector will measure the D-D and D-T neutron yield and the ion temperature of indirect- and direct-drive-implosion experiments. The design of the bibenzyl detector and results of tests on the OMEGA Laser System are presented.

  20. Computationally effective solution of the inverse problem in time-of-flight spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamran, Faisal; Abildgaard, Otto Højager Attermann; Subash, Arman Ahamed

    2015-01-01

    Photon time-of-flight (PTOF) spectroscopy enables the estimation of absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of turbid media by measuring the propagation time of short light pulses through turbid medium. The present investigation provides a comparison of the assessed absorption and reduced......: the Liemert-Kienle model (LKM), the diffusion model (DM) and a white Monte-Carlo (WMC) simulation-based algorithm. For the infinite space geometry, a very good agreement is found between the LKM and WMC, while the results obtained by the DM differ, indicating that the LKM can provide accurate estimation...

  1. Barrel time-of-flight detector for the PANDA experiment at FAIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, L.; Brunner, S. E.; Marton, J.; Orth, H.; Suzuki, K.; Panda Tof Group

    2016-07-01

    The barrel time-of-flight detector for the PANDA experiment at FAIR is foreseen as a Scintillator Tile (SciTil) Hodoscope based on several thousand small plastic scintillator tiles read-out with directly attached Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs). The main tasks of the system are an accurate determination of the time origin of particle tracks to avoid event mixing at high collision rates, relative time-of-flight measurements as well as particle identification in the low momentum regime. The main requirements are the use of a minimum material amount and a time resolution of σ < 100 ps. We have performed extensive optimization studies and prototype tests to prove the feasibility of the SciTil design and finalize the R&D phase. In a 2.7 GeV/c proton beam at Forschungszentrum Jülich a time resolution of about 80 ps has been achieved using SiPMs from KETEK and Hamamatsu with an active area of 3 × 3mm2. Employing the Digital Photon Counter from Philips a time resolution of about 30 ps has been reached.

  2. A fast large-area position-sensitive time-of-flight neutron detection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, R.K.; Haumann, J.R.

    1989-10-13

    A new position-sensitive time-of-flight neutron detection and histograming system has been developed for use at the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source. Spatial resolution of roughly 1 cm {times} 1 cm and time-of-flight resolution of {approximately}1 {mu}sec are combined in a detection system which can ultimately be expanded to cover several square meters of active detector area. This system is based on the use of arrays of cylindrical one-dimensional position-sensitive proportional counters, and is capable of collecting the x-y-t data and sorting them into histograms at time-averaged data rates up to {approximately}300,000 events/sec over the full detector area and with instantaneous data rates up to more than fifty times that. Numerous hardware features have been incorporated to facilitate initial tuning of the position encoding, absolute calibration of the encoded positions, and automatic testing for drifts. 7 refs., 11 figs., 1 tabs.

  3. Electron field emission from freestanding Diamond nanomembranes and Application to time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunseok; Park, Jonghoo; Shin, Hyuncheol; Blick, Robert H.

    2013-03-01

    We introduce a prototype of a freestanding diamond nanomembrane for large protein detection in time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Doped diamond as a material for mass spectroscopy is extremely interesting due to its mechanical and electrical properties. The freestanding diamond nanomembranes we are able to fabricate have lateral extensions of 400 μm × 400 μm with a thickness of 100nm. We employ optical lithography and a Buffered Oxide Etch (BOE) of SiO2 followed by anisotropic etching of the substrate silicon using TMAH solution and finally removing SiO2. The electron field emission from the surface of the membrane is traced in the IV characteristics at room temperature. The membrane is then applied for detection of the large ionized proteins using time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Ion detection is demonstrated in our nanomembrane MALDI-TOF analysis of Insulin (5,735 Da). That is when the ions with a large kinetic energy bombard the nanomembrane, their energy is thermalized upon impact into phonons. The phonons give a thermal energy to the electrons with the membrane, which are then excited to higher energetic states. Given an extraction voltage this leads to electron field emission from the membrane which we labeled phonon-assisted field emission (PAFE). In other words, the MALDI mass spectra are obtained by exploiting ballistic phonon propagation and quasi-diffusive phonon propagation.

  4. Time-of-flight Extreme Environment Diffractometer at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokhnenko, Oleksandr; Stein, Wolf-Dieter; Bleif, Hans-Jürgen; Fromme, Michael; Bartkowiak, Maciej; Wilpert, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    The Extreme Environment Diffractometer (EXED) is a new neutron time-of-flight instrument at the BER II research reactor at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Germany. Although EXED is a special-purpose instrument, its early construction made it available for users as a general-purpose diffractometer. In this respect, EXED became one of the rare examples, where the performance of a time-of-flight diffractometer at a continuous source can be characterized. In this paper, we report on the design and performance of EXED with an emphasis on the unique instrument capabilities. The latter comprise variable wavelength resolution and wavelength band, control of the incoming beam divergence, the possibility to change the angular positions of detectors and their distance to the sample, and use of event recording and offline histogramming. These features combined make EXED easily tunable to the requirements of a particular problem, from conventional diffraction to small angle neutron scattering. The instrument performance is demonstrated by several reference measurements and user experiments.

  5. Impact energy measurement in time-of-flight mass spectrometry with cryogenic microcalorimeters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, G C; Martinis, J M; Wollman, D A; Irwin, K D; Dulcie, L L; Gerber, D; Gillevet, P M; Twerenbold, D

    1998-02-12

    Time-of-flight mass spectrometry-most notably matrix-assisted laser-desorption-ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) spectrometry-is an important class of techniques for the study of proteins and other biomolecules. Although these techniques provide excellent performance for masses up to about 20,000 daltons, there has been limited success in achieving good mass resolution at higher masses. This is because the sensitivity of the microchannel plate (MCP) detectors used in most systems decreases rapidly with increasing particle mass, limiting the utility of MCP detectors for very large masses. It has recently been proposed that cryogenic particle detectors may provide a solution to these difficulties. Cryogenic detectors measure the thermal energy deposited by the particle impact, and thus have a sensitivity that is largely independent of particle mass. Recent experiments have demonstrated the sensitivity of cryogenic particle detectors to single biomolecules, a quantum efficiency several orders of magnitude larger than the MCP detectors, and sensitivity to masses as large as 750,000 daltons. Here we present results demonstrating an order of magnitude better energy resolution than previous measurements, allowing direct determination of particle charge state during acceleration. Although application of these detectors to practical mass spectrometry will require further development of the detectors and cryogenics, these detectors can be used to elucidate the performance-limiting processes that occur in such systems.

  6. Time-of-flight Extreme Environment Diffractometer at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prokhnenko, Oleksandr, E-mail: prokhnenko@helmholtz-berlin.de; Stein, Wolf-Dieter; Bleif, Hans-Jürgen; Fromme, Michael; Bartkowiak, Maciej; Wilpert, Thomas [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, Lise-Meitner-Campus, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-03-15

    The Extreme Environment Diffractometer (EXED) is a new neutron time-of-flight instrument at the BER II research reactor at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Germany. Although EXED is a special-purpose instrument, its early construction made it available for users as a general-purpose diffractometer. In this respect, EXED became one of the rare examples, where the performance of a time-of-flight diffractometer at a continuous source can be characterized. In this paper, we report on the design and performance of EXED with an emphasis on the unique instrument capabilities. The latter comprise variable wavelength resolution and wavelength band, control of the incoming beam divergence, the possibility to change the angular positions of detectors and their distance to the sample, and use of event recording and offline histogramming. These features combined make EXED easily tunable to the requirements of a particular problem, from conventional diffraction to small angle neutron scattering. The instrument performance is demonstrated by several reference measurements and user experiments.

  7. Status and outlook of the neutron time-of-flight facility n_TOF at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Gunsing, F

    2007-01-01

    The neutron time-of-flight facility n_TOF at CERN, fully operational since 2002, combines a high instantaneous neutron flux with high energy resolution. The wide energy range and the high neutron flux per time-of-flight burst result in a much enhanced signal to background ratio for neutron capture of radioactive isotopes and makes this facility well suited for the measurement of high quality neutron-induced reaction cross-sections. Neutrons are created by spallation reactions induced by a pulsed 20 GeV/c proton beam impinging on a lead target. A 5 cm water slab surrounding the lead target serves as a coolant and at the same time as a moderator of the spallation neutron spectrum, providing a wide energy spectrum from 0.1 eV to about 250 MeV. By the end of 2005, a first phase of data taking has been successfully terminated. Fission and capture experiments have been performed on a variety of isotopes of interest for nuclear astrophysics, advanced nuclear technologies and for basic nuclear physics. The instrument...

  8. Breath Analysis Using a Time-of-Flight Camera and Pressure Belts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalud, Ludek; Kotova, Marketa; Kocmanová, Petra; Dobsak, Petr; Kolarova, Jana

    2016-06-01

    The proper way of breathing is important for everyone. Healthy people often do not follow respiration until breathing problems start-during stress or during sport activity in physiological cases. More serious cases are stroke, injury, or surgery of the chest and others. So, learning to breathe correctly and/or breathing diagnosis is considerable for many reasons. Two novel methods of breath analysis suitable for diagnostics and rehabilitation are presented. The first technique utilizes pressure belts fastened to the patient's belly and chest, and the second method relies on a SwissRanger SR-4000 time-of-flight camera. The measurement principles are described together with the advantages and disadvantages of the applied techniques. The SwissRanger camera depth calibration is proposed to facilitate better results during the breath analysis. The methods are tested on a group of students to provide a comparison of their individual performances. As it was demonstrated, presented methods proved to work reliably. The method based on time-of-flight camera seems to be more suitable for diagnosis, while the method based on pressure belts is more suitable for rehabilitation and biofeedback applications. Copyright © 2015 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Neutron Spectroscopy for pulsed beams with frame overlap using a double time-of-flight technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrig, K. P.; Goldblum, B. L.; Brown, J. A.; Bleuel, D. L.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bevins, J.; Harasty, M.; Laplace, T. A.; Matthews, E. F.

    2018-01-01

    A new double time-of-flight (dTOF) neutron spectroscopy technique has been developed for pulsed broad spectrum sources with a duty cycle that results in frame overlap, where fast neutrons from a given pulse overtake slower neutrons from previous pulses. Using a tunable beam at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, neutrons were produced via thick-target breakup of 16 MeV deuterons on a beryllium target in the cyclotron vault. The breakup spectral shape was deduced from a dTOF measurement using an array of EJ-309 organic liquid scintillators. Simulation of the neutron detection efficiency of the scintillator array was performed using both GEANT4 and MCNP6. The efficiency-corrected spectral shape was normalized using a foil activation technique to obtain the energy-dependent flux of the neutron beam at zero degrees with respect to the incoming deuteron beam. The dTOF neutron spectrum was compared to spectra obtained using HEPROW and GRAVEL pulse height spectrum unfolding techniques. While the unfolding and dTOF results exhibit some discrepancies in shape, the integrated flux values agree within two standard deviations. This method obviates neutron time-of-flight spectroscopy challenges posed by pulsed beams with frame overlap and opens new opportunities for pulsed white neutron source facilities.

  10. TOFPET 2: A high-performance circuit for PET time-of-flight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Francesco, Agostino, E-mail: agodifra@lip.pt [LIP, Lisbon (Portugal); Bugalho, Ricardo [LIP, Lisbon (Portugal); PETsys Electronics, Oeiras (Portugal); Oliveira, Luis [CTS-UNINOVA, DEE FCT-UNL, Caparica (Portugal); Rivetti, Angelo [INFN - sez. Torino (Italy); Rolo, Manuel [LIP, Lisbon (Portugal); INFN - sez. Torino (Italy); Silva, Jose C.; Varela, Joao [LIP, Lisbon (Portugal); PETsys Electronics, Oeiras (Portugal)

    2016-07-11

    We present a readout and digitization ASIC featuring low-noise and low-power for time-of flight (TOF) applications using SiPMs. The circuit is designed in standard CMOS 110 nm technology, has 64 independent channels and is optimized for time-of-flight measurement in Positron Emission Tomography (TOF-PET). The input amplifier is a low impedance current conveyor based on a regulated common-gate topology. Each channel has quad-buffered analogue interpolation TDCs (time binning 20 ps) and charge integration ADCs with linear response at full scale (1500 pC). The signal amplitude can also be derived from the measurement of time-over-threshold (ToT). Simulation results show that for a single photo-electron signal with charge 200 (550) fC generated by a SiPM with (320 pF) capacitance the circuit has 24 (30) dB SNR, 75 (39) ps r.m.s. resolution, and 4 (8) mW power consumption. The event rate is 600 kHz per channel, with up to 2 MHz dark counts rejection.

  11. Time-of-flight detector applied to mass measurements in Rare-RI Ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagae, D., E-mail: nagae@tac.tsukuba.ac.jp [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Abe, Y. [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Okada, S.; Ozawa, A. [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Yamaguchi, T. [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Shimo-Okubo 255, Sakura-ku Saitama-shi, 338-8570 (Japan); Suzuki, H.; Moriguchi, T. [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Ishibashi, Y. [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Fukuoka, S.; Nishikiori, R.; Niwa, T. [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Suzuki, T.; Suzaki, F.; Sato, K.; Furuki, H.; Ichihashi, N.; Miyazawa, S. [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Shimo-Okubo 255, Sakura-ku Saitama-shi, 338-8570 (Japan); Yamaguchi, Y.; Uesaka, T.; Wakasugi, M. [RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • We have developed Time-of-flight detectors for the Rare-RI Ring. • Measurements to evaluate a time resolution and a detection efficiency have been performed using alpha particle and heavy ion beams. • Preliminary time resolution is about 130 ps and detection efficiency is about 56% for the heavy ion beams. -- Abstract: A large time-of-flight (TOF) detector has been developed for the Rare-RI Ring. This detector consists of a Multi Channel Plate (MCP) and a carbon foil. Secondary electrons from the carbon foil are transported to the MCP by crossed electric and magnetic fields. In order to cover the beam size of the ring, a large and thin carbon foil (100 mm × 50 mm{sup 2} and 60 μg/cm{sup 2}) is used as a sensitive material. The time resolution of σ≈130 ps, the detection efficiency about 56% and a position dependence of the TOF about 1 ns are obtained. A calculated position dependence of TOF adopting experimental (inhomogeneous) electric field and a homogeneous magnetic field is in agreement with the experimental one. These results suggest that the homogeneity of electric field is important to improve the time resolution in the large size detector.

  12. Improvement of energy resolution in time-of-flight method for high energy neutron measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Shigyo, N; Satoh, D; Kitsuki, H; Ishibashi, K; Numajiri, M

    2000-01-01

    In the time-of-flight measurement of high energy neutrons, the time resolution is often required to be as good as possible. For improvement of the energy resolution, the time-of-flight study was made by the use of Li (p, n) reaction at forward angles. Two types of detectors were tested. One was a liquid organic scintillator NE-213 5 inches (127 mm) in diameter and 127 mm thick connected with three Hamamatsu H2431 photomultipliers 2 inches (51 mm) in diameter. The other was NE-213 of the same size with a Hamamatsu R1250 127 mm in diameter. The experiment was made at pi2 beam line of 12 GeV proton synchrotron in High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK). The incident proton energy was 800 MeV, and the flight path was 5 m. Two neutron detectors were set at 0 and 5 degrees, respectively. The time resolutions for prompt gamma rays were 0.5 ns for NE-213 with three H2431s and 1.0 ns for NE-213 with R1250. The energy resolutions for 800 MeV neutrons were derived from these values were 70 and 100 MeV, respe...

  13. Constant-momentum acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometry with energy focusing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Elise A; Ray, Steven J; Gundlach-Graham, Alexander W; Enke, Christie G; Barinaga, Charles J; Koppenaal, David W; Hieftje, Gary M

    2013-12-01

    Fundamental aspects of constant-momentum acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometry (CMA-TOFMS) are explored as a means to improve mass resolution. By accelerating all ions to the same momentum rather than to the same energy, the effects of the initial ion spatial and energy distributions upon the total ion flight time are decoupled. This decoupling permits the initial spatial distribution of ions in the acceleration region to be optimized independently, and energy focus, including ion turn-around-time error, to be accomplished with a linear-field reflectron. Constant-momentum acceleration also linearly disperses ions across time according to mass-to-charge (m/z) ratio, instead of the quadratic relationship between flight time and m/z found in conventional TOFMS. Here, CMA-TOFMS is shown to achieve simultaneous spatial and energy focusing over a selected portion of the mass spectrum. An orthogonal-acceleration time-of-flight system outfitted with a reduced-pressure DC glow discharge (GD) ionization source is used to demonstrate CMA-TOFMS with atomic ions. The influence of experimental parameters such as the amplitude and width of the time-dependent CMA pulse on mass resolution is investigated, and a useful CMA-TOFMS focusing window of 2 to 18 Da is found for GD-CMA-TOFMS.

  14. TOF plotter—a program to perform routine analysis time-of-flight mass spectral data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knippel, Brad C.; Padgett, Clifford W.; Marcus, R. Kenneth

    2004-03-01

    The main article discusses the operation and application of the program to mass spectral data files. This laboratory has recently reported the construction and characterization of a linear time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ToF-MS) utilizing a radio frequency glow discharge ionization source. Data acquisition and analysis was performed using a digital oscilloscope and Microsoft Excel, respectively. Presently, no software package is available that is specifically designed for time-of-flight mass spectral analysis that is not instrument dependent. While spreadsheet applications such as Excel offer tremendous utility, they can be cumbersome when repeatedly performing tasks which are too complex or too user intensive for macros to be viable. To address this situation and make data analysis a faster, simpler task, our laboratory has developed a Microsoft Windows-based software program coded in Microsoft Visual Basic. This program enables the user to rapidly perform routine data analysis tasks such as mass calibration, plotting and smoothing on x- y data sets. In addition to a suite of tools for data analysis, a number of calculators are built into the software to simplify routine calculations pertaining to linear ToF-MS. These include mass resolution, ion kinetic energy and single peak identification calculators. A detailed description of the software and its associated functions is presented followed by a characterization of its performance in the analysis of several representative ToF-MS spectra obtained from different GD-ToF-MS systems.

  15. Design Features and Mutual Compatibility Studies of the Time-of-Flight PET Capable GE SIGNA PET/MR System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Craig S; Maramraju, Sri Harsha; Khalighi, Mohammad Mehdi; Deller, Timothy W; Delso, Gaspar; Jansen, Floris

    2016-08-01

    A recent entry into the rapidly evolving field of integrated PET/MR scanners is presented in this paper: a whole body hybrid PET/MR system (SIGNA PET/MR, GE Healthcare) capable of simultaneous acquisition of both time-of-flight (TOF) PET and high resolution MR data. The PET ring was integrated into an existing 3T MR system resulting in a (patient) bore opening of 60 cm diameter, with a 25 cm axial FOV. PET performance was evaluated both on the standalone PET ring and on the same detector integrated into the MR system, to assess the level of mutual interference between both subsystems. In both configurations we obtained detector performance data. PET detector performance was not significantly affected by integration into the MR system. The global energy resolution was within 2% (10.3% versus 10.5%), and the system coincidence time resolution showed a maximum change of < 3% (385 ps versus 394 ps) when measured outside MR and during simultaneous PET/MRI acquisitions, respectively. To evaluate PET image quality and resolution, the NEMA IQ phantom was acquired with MR idle and with MR active. Impact of PET on MR IQ was assessed by comparing SNR with PET acquisition on and off. B0 and B1 homogeneities were acquired before and after the integration of the PET ring inside the magnet. In vivo brain and whole body head-to-thighs data were acquired to demonstrate clinical image quality.

  16. Quantification of Tumor Vessels in Glioblastoma Patients Using Time-of-Flight Angiography at 7 Tesla: A Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radbruch, Alexander; Eidel, Oliver; Wiestler, Benedikt; Paech, Daniel; Burth, Sina; Kickingereder, Philipp; Nowosielski, Martha; Bäumer, Philipp; Wick, Wolfgang; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Bendszus, Martin; Ladd, Mark; Nagel, Armin Michael; Heiland, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To analyze if tumor vessels can be visualized, segmented and quantified in glioblastoma patients with time of flight (ToF) angiography at 7 Tesla and multiscale vessel enhancement filtering. Materials and Methods Twelve patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma were examined with ToF angiography (TR = 15 ms, TE = 4.8 ms, flip angle = 15°, FOV = 160×210 mm2, voxel size: 0.31×0.31×0.40 mm3) on a whole-body 7 T MR system. A volume of interest (VOI) was placed within the border of the contrast enhancing part on T1-weighted images of the glioblastoma and a reference VOI was placed in the non-affected contralateral white matter. Automated segmentation and quantification of vessels within the two VOIs was achieved using multiscale vessel enhancement filtering in ImageJ. Results Tumor vessels were clearly visible in all patients. When comparing tumor and the reference VOI, total vessel surface (45.3±13.9 mm2 vs. 29.0±21.0 mm2 (pTesla MRI enables characterization and quantification of the internal vascular morphology of glioblastoma and may be used for the evaluation of therapy response within future studies. PMID:25415327

  17. Effect of time-of-flight and point spread function modeling on detectability of myocardial defects in PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefferkoetter, Joshua, E-mail: dnrjds@nus.edu.sg [A-STAR-NUS Clinical Imaging and Research Centre (CIRC), Singapore 117599 (Singapore); Ouyang, Jinsong; Rakvongthai, Yothin; El Fakhri, Georges [Center for Advanced Medical Imaging Sciences, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 and Radiology Department, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Nappi, Carmela [Radiology Department, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, University of Naples Federico II, Naples 80131 (Italy); SDN Foundation, Institute of Diagnostic and Nuclear Development, Naples 80142 (Italy)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: A study was designed to investigate the impact of time-of-flight (TOF) and point spread function (PSF) modeling on the detectability of myocardial defects. Methods: Clinical FDG-PET data were used to generate populations of defect-present and defect-absent images. Defects were incorporated at three contrast levels, and images were reconstructed by ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) iterative methods including ordinary Poisson, alone and with PSF, TOF, and PSF+TOF. Channelized Hotelling observer signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was the surrogate for human observer performance. Results: For three iterations, 12 subsets, and no postreconstruction smoothing, TOF improved overall defect detection SNR by 8.6% as compared to its non-TOF counterpart for all the defect contrasts. Due to the slow convergence of PSF reconstruction, PSF yielded 4.4% less SNR than non-PSF. For reconstruction parameters (iteration number and postreconstruction smoothing kernel size) optimizing observer SNR, PSF showed larger improvement for faint defects. The combination of TOF and PSF improved mean detection SNR as compared to non-TOF and non-PSF counterparts by 3.0% and 3.2%, respectively. Conclusions: For typical reconstruction protocol used in clinical practice, i.e., less than five iterations, TOF improved defect detectability. In contrast, PSF generally yielded less detectability. For large number of iterations, TOF+PSF yields the best observer performance.

  18. Development of an ion time-of-flight spectrometer for neutron depth profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetiner, Mustafa Sacit

    Ion time-of-flight spectrometry techniques are investigated for applicability to neutron depth profiling. Time-of-flight techniques are used extensively in a wide range of scientific and technological applications including energy and mass spectroscopy. Neutron depth profiling is a near-surface analysis technique that gives concentration distribution versus depth for certain technologically important light elements. The technique uses thermal or sub-thermal neutrons to initiate (n, p) or (n, alpha) reactions. Concentration versus depth distribution is obtained by the transformation of the energy spectrum into depth distribution by using stopping force tables of the projectiles in the substrate, and by converting the number of counts into concentration using a standard sample of known dose value. Conventionally, neutron depth profiling measurements are based on charged particle spectrometry, which employs semiconductor detectors such as a surface barrier detector (SBD) and the associated electronics. Measurements with semiconductor detectors are affected by a number of broadening mechanisms, which result from the interactions between the projectile ion and the detector material as well as fluctuations in the signal generation process. These are inherent features of the detection mechanism that involve the semiconductor detectors and cannot be avoided. Ion time-of-flight spectrometry offers highly precise measurement capabilities, particularly for slow particles. For high-energy low-mass particles, measurement resolution tends to degrade with all other parameters fixed. The threshold for more precise ion energy measurements with respect to conventional techniques, such as direct energy measurement by a surface barrier detector, is directly related to the design and operating parameters of the device. Time-of-flight spectrometry involves correlated detection of two signals by a coincidence unit. In ion time-of-flight spectroscopy, the ion generates the primary input

  19. Development of grazing incidence devices for space-borne time of flight mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadu, A.; Devoto, P.; Louarn, P.; Sauvaud, J.-A.

    2012-04-01

    Time of flight mass spectrometer is widely used to study space plasmas in planetary and solar missions. This space-borne instrument selects ions in function of their energy through an electrostatic analyzer. Particles are then post-accelerated to energies in the range of 20 keV to cross a carbon foil. At the foil exit, electrons are emitted and separated from ion beam in the time of flight section. A first detector (a Micro-Channel Plate or MCP) emits a start signal at electron arrival and a second one emits a stop signal at incident ion end of path. The time difference gives the speed of the particle and its mass can be calculated, knowing its initial energy. However, current instruments suffer from strong limitations. The post acceleration needs very high voltage power supplies which are heavy, have a high power consumption and imply technical constraints for the development. A typical instrument weighs from 5 to 6 kg, includes a 20 kV power supply, consumes a least 5 W and encounters corona effect and electrical breakdown problems. Moreover, despite the particle high energy range, scattering and straggling phenomena in the carbon foil significantly reduce the instrument overall resolution. Some methods, such as electrostatic focus lenses or reflectrons, really improve mass separation but global system efficiency remains very low because of the charge state dependence of such devices. The main purpose of our work is to replace carbon foil by grazing incidence MCP's - also known as MPO's, for Micro Pore Optics - for electron emission. Thus, incident particles would back-scatter onto the channel inner surface with an angle of a few degrees. With this solution, we can decrease dispersion sources and lower the power supplies to post accelerate ions. The result would be a lighter and simpler instrument with a substantial resolution improvement. We have first simulated MPO's behavior with TRIM and MARLOWE Monte-Carlo codes. Energy scattering and output angle computed

  20. Toward Respiratory Assessment Using Depth Measurements from a Time-of-Flight Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Charles; Soleimani, Vahid; Hannuna, Sion; Camplani, Massimo; Damen, Dima; Viner, Jason; Mirmehdi, Majid; Dodd, James W

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: There is increasing interest in technologies that may enable remote monitoring of respiratory disease. Traditional methods for assessing respiratory function such as spirometry can be expensive and require specialist training to perform and interpret. Remote, non-contact tracking of chest wall movement has been explored in the past using structured light, accelerometers and impedance pneumography, but these have often been costly and clinical utility remains to be defined. We present data from a 3-Dimensional time-of-flight camera (found in gaming consoles) used to estimate chest volume during routine spirometry maneuvres. Methods: Patients were recruited from a general respiratory physiology laboratory. Spirometry was performed according to international standards using an unmodified spirometer. A Microsoft Kinect V2 time-of-flight depth sensor was used to reconstruct 3-dimensional models of the subject's thorax to estimate volume-time and flow-time curves following the introduction of a scaling factor to transform measurements to volume estimates. The Bland-Altman method was used to assess agreement of model estimation with simultaneous recordings from the spirometer. Patient characteristics were used to assess predictors of error using regression analysis and to further explore the scaling factors. Results: The chest volume change estimated by the Kinect camera during spirometry tracked respiratory rate accurately and estimated forced vital capacity (FVC) and vital capacity to within ± 150 ml difference. Linear regression including age, gender, height, weight, and pack years of smoking explained 37.0% of the variance in the scaling factor for volume estimation. This technique had a positive predictive value of 0.833 to detect obstructive spirometry. Conclusion: These data illustrate the potential of 3D time-of-flight cameras to remotely monitor respiratory rate. This is not a replacement for conventional spirometry and needs further refinement

  1. The multigap RPC detector and the ALICE time-of-flight

    CERN Document Server

    Zichichi, A

    2003-01-01

    One of the new detectors invented within the LAA project is the Multigap Resistive Plate Chamber (MRPC). The MRPC has been selected as the Time-of-Flight detector of choice for the ALICE experiment. The R and D program to optimise the MRPC for this application has now been completed, resulting in a device with 10 gas gaps of 250 mu m in width; a summary is given in this paper. Concerning the front-end electronics, there is an on-going development of an ASIC using 0.25 micron CMOS; the excellent performance of the ASIC is evident from the initial tests; some results will be shown here. Finally the timing properties of this detector open up other applications such as for Positron Electron Tomography. (author)

  2. Precision Neutron Time-of-Flight Detectors Provide Insight into NIF Implosion Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlossberg, David; Eckart, M. J.; Grim, G. P.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Moore, A. S.; Waltz, C. S.

    2017-10-01

    During inertial confinement fusion, higher-order moments of neutron time-of-flight (nToF) spectra can provide essential information for optimizing implosions. The nToF diagnostic suite at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) was recently upgraded to include novel, quartz Cherenkov detectors. These detectors exploit the rapid Cherenkov radiation process, in contrast with conventional scintillator decay times, to provide high temporal-precision measurements that support higher-order moment analyses. Preliminary measurements have been made on the NIF during several implosions and initial results are presented here. Measured line-of-sight asymmetries, for example in ion temperatures, will be discussed. Finally, advanced detector optimization is shown to advance accessible physics, with possibilities for energy discrimination, gamma source identification, and further reduction in quartz response times. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  3. Fusion neutron energy spectra measured by time-of-flight spectrometers

    CERN Document Server

    Elevant, T

    2002-01-01

    Evaluation of measured neutron energy spectra provides information on the central ion velocity distribution; e.g. ion temperature and fast ions induced by NBI- or ICR-heating and on impurity content in fusion grade plasmas. Two self-contained high-energy resolution time-of-flight neutron spectrometers have been used at the JET- and JT-60U tokamaks during DD-operation. In the spectrometers, each neutron undergoes (n, p) elastic scattering in two sets of hydrogen based scintillators. Elapsed time between the two scatter events is measured and the energy of the neutron is evaluated. Interpretation of acquired data together with results obtained from other diagnostics yields information on central plasma parameters. Deduced ion temperatures, fast ion fractional contributions during auxiliary NBI- and ICR-heating and impurity content is presented. In general, good agreement is obtained between neutron data and data from other diagnostics.

  4. Non-Linear Beam Dynamics in High Resolution Multi-Pass Time of Flight Mass Separator

    CERN Document Server

    Shchepunov, Viatcheslav A

    2005-01-01

    A multi-pass time-of-flight (MTOF) mass separator is under development by the UNIRIB collaboration. The MTOF consists of two coaxial electrostatic mirrors, focusing lenses and auxiliary injection, extraction and separation elements. The injected ions having almost the same energy but different masses undergo hundreds or thousands of reflections between the mirrors. In the course of this periodic motion, the ions of different masses and hence velocities are spatially separated in longitudinal direction. The periodic motion in the MTOF has been investigated with a recently developed ray tracing program utilizing the canonical integration technique. Results of the performed numerical simulations are discussed. The simulations displayed nonlinear character of the ion’s behavior both in transverse and longitudinal phase spaces. The ion’s transverse stability and longitudinal isochronicity were the matters of primary attention. It is shown in particular that at transverse tunes of around q=0.75 ...

  5. Identification of Molds by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posteraro, Brunella

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although to a lesser extent than diagnostic bacteriology, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has recently revolutionized the diagnostic mycology workflow. With regard to filamentous fungi (or molds), the precise recognition of pathogenic species is important for rapid diagnosis and appropriate treatment, especially for invasive diseases. This review summarizes the current experience with MALDI-TOF MS-based identification of common and uncommon mold species of Aspergillus, Fusarium, Mucorales, dimorphic fungi, and dermatophytes. This experience clearly shows that MALDI-TOF MS holds promise as a fast and accurate identification tool, particularly with common species or typical strains of filamentous fungi. PMID:27807151

  6. Identification of Molds by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Posteraro, Brunella

    2017-02-01

    Although to a lesser extent than diagnostic bacteriology, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has recently revolutionized the diagnostic mycology workflow. With regard to filamentous fungi (or molds), the precise recognition of pathogenic species is important for rapid diagnosis and appropriate treatment, especially for invasive diseases. This review summarizes the current experience with MALDI-TOF MS-based identification of common and uncommon mold species of Aspergillus, Fusarium, Mucorales, dimorphic fungi, and dermatophytes. This experience clearly shows that MALDI-TOF MS holds promise as a fast and accurate identification tool, particularly with common species or typical strains of filamentous fungi. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  7. Time-of-flight electron spectrometer for a broad range of kinetic energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kothe, Alexander; Metje, Jan; Wilke, Martin; Moguilevski, Alexandre; Engel, Nicholas; Al-Obaidi, Ruba; Richter, Clemens; Golnak, Ronny; Kiyan, Igor Yu.; Aziz, Emad F. [Joint Ultrafast Dynamics Lab in Solutions and at Interfaces (JULiq), Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie (HZB), Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany) and Freie Universitaet Berlin, Fachbereich Physik, Arnimallee 14, 14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-02-15

    A newly constructed time-of-flight electron spectrometer of the magnetic bottle type is characterized for electron detection in a broad range of kinetic energies. The instrument is designed to measure the energy spectra of electrons generated from liquids excited by strong laser fields and photons in the range of extreme ultra violet and soft X-rays. Argon inner shell electrons were recorded to calibrate the spectrometer and investigate its characteristics, such as energy resolution and collection efficiency. Its energy resolution {Delta}E/E of 1.6% allows resolving the Ar 2p spin orbit structure at kinetic energies higher than 100 eV. The collection efficiency is determined and compared to that of the spectrometer in its field-free configuration.

  8. Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance versus time of flight for precision mass measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouzes, R.T.

    1993-02-01

    Both Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance and ICR Time-of-Flight mass spectroscopy (FTICR-MS and ICR-TOF-MS, respectively) have been applied to precision atomic mass measurements. This paper reviews the status of these approaches and compares their limitations. Comparisons are made of FTICR-MS and ICR-TOF-MS for application to precision atomic mass measurements of stable and unstable nuclei, where the relevant scale is an accuracy of 1 keV and where halflives are longer than 10 milliseconds (optimistically). The atomic mass table is built up from mass chains, and ICR-MS brings a method of producing new types of mass chains to the mass measurement arena.

  9. Energy and time of flight measurements of REX-ISOLDE stable beams using Si detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Cantero, E D; Fraser, M A; Lanaia, D; Sosa, A; Voulot, D; Zocca, F

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present energy and time spectroscopy measurements for the stable beams of REX-ISOLDE obtained using Si detectors. By using an alpha source as a calibration reference, the absolute energy E of stable beam particles (A/q = 4) was determined in spectroscopy mode in the energy range 1 MeV < E < 8 MeV (0.30 MeV/u < E/A < 1.87 MeV/u). The time of flight of the beam particles (2.18 MeV/u < E/A < 2.27 MeV/u) was determined by installing identical Si detectors in two diagnostic boxes separated by 7.7 m. The results obtained with these two techniques are compared with the values obtained by dipole scans using a bending magnet. The measurements took place between January and February of 2013.

  10. Weakly populated multinucleon transfer channels studied with a new time-of-flight magnetic spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corradi, L.; Stefanini, A.M.; He, J.H.; Lin, C. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Via Romea 4, I-35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Beghini, S.; Montagnoli, G.; Scarlassara, F.; Segato, G.F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita' di Padova, and INFN (Italy); Pollarolo, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica Teorica, Universita' di Torino, and INFN (Italy); Dasso, C.H.; Winther, A. The Niels Bohr Institute, Blegdamsvej 17,2100 Copenhagen Oe. (DK))

    1997-10-01

    A new time-of-flight spectrometer with magnetic quadrupoles has been developed. Its high detection efficiency and resolution allows one to identify ions produced with low cross sections in a binary reaction. The study of multinucleon transfer channels in the system {sup 48}Ca+{sup 124}Sn revealed a large drift of the experimental total cross sections with respect to calculations which include independent single nucleon transfer modes. Incorporating pair and {alpha}-cluster channels into theory accounts, at least qualitatively, for the discrepancies. New data coming from the study of {sup 64}Ni+{sup 238}U show the striking presence of -1{alpha}, -2{alpha} and -3{alpha} channels, supporting once more the idea that cluster degrees of freedom must be considered in a correct description of the reaction mechanism. (author)

  11. 3D Indoor Positioning of UAVs with Spread Spectrum Ultrasound and Time-of-Flight Cameras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, José A; Álvarez, Fernando J; Aguilera, Teodoro; Villadangos, José M

    2017-12-30

    This work proposes the use of a hybrid acoustic and optical indoor positioning system for the accurate 3D positioning of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). The acoustic module of this system is based on a Time-Code Division Multiple Access (T-CDMA) scheme, where the sequential emission of five spread spectrum ultrasonic codes is performed to compute the horizontal vehicle position following a 2D multilateration procedure. The optical module is based on a Time-Of-Flight (TOF) camera that provides an initial estimation for the vehicle height. A recursive algorithm programmed on an external computer is then proposed to refine the estimated position. Experimental results show that the proposed system can increase the accuracy of a solely acoustic system by 70-80% in terms of positioning mean square error.

  12. Pose estimation and tracking of non-cooperative rocket bodies using Time-of-Flight cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Martínez, Harvey; Giorgi, Gabriele; Eissfeller, Bernd

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents a methodology for estimating the position and orientation of a rocket body in orbit - the target - undergoing a roto-translational motion, with respect to a chaser spacecraft, whose task is to match the target dynamics for a safe rendezvous. During the rendezvous maneuver the chaser employs a Time-of-Flight camera that acquires a point cloud of 3D coordinates mapping the sensed target surface. Once the system identifies the target, it initializes the chaser-to-target relative position and orientation. After initialization, a tracking procedure enables the system to sense the evolution of the target's pose between frames. The proposed algorithm is evaluated using simulated point clouds, generated with a CAD model of the Cosmos-3M upper stage and the PMD CamCube 3.0 camera specifications.

  13. A new beam profile monitor and time of flight system for CologneAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pascovici, G. [CologneAMS, University of Cologne (Germany); Dewald, A., E-mail: dewald@ikp.uni-koeln.de [CologneAMS, University of Cologne (Germany); Institute of Nuclear Physics, University of Cologne (Germany); Heinze, S., E-mail: heinze@ikp.uni-koeln.de [CologneAMS, University of Cologne (Germany); Fink, L.; Mueller-Gatermann, C.; Schiffer, M.; Feuerstein, C. [CologneAMS, University of Cologne (Germany); Pfeiffer, M.; Jolie, J.; Thiel, S.; Zell, K.O.; Arnopolina, O. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, University of Cologne (Germany); Blanckenburg, F. von [GFZ, German Research Centre for Geosciences, Potsdam (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    A complex beam detector consisting of a high-resolution beam profile monitor (BPM) and a time of flight (TOF) spectrometer with tracking capabilities was designed especially for the special needs of the Cologne center for accelerator mass spectrometry (CologneAMS). The beam detector assembly is designed to match the beam specifications of the 6 MV Tandetron AMS setup and its data acquisition system. It will have a reconfigurable structure, either as a fast TOF subsystem with a ca. 10 cm{sup 2} equivalent active area, or as a more complex BPM-TOF detector with beam tracking capabilities and a larger active area (16 cm{sup 2}). The purpose of this detector is to suppress background during spectrometry of heavy ions (U, Cm, Pu, Am etc.) and to suppress isobaric interferences such as {sup 36}S in {sup 36}Cl spectra.

  14. High precision electric gate for time-of-flight ion mass spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sittler, Edward C. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A time-of-flight mass spectrometer having a chamber with electrodes to generate an electric field in the chamber and electric gating for allowing ions with a predetermined mass and velocity into the electric field. The design uses a row of very thin parallel aligned wires that are pulsed in sequence so the ion can pass through the gap of two parallel plates, which are biased to prevent passage of the ion. This design by itself can provide a high mass resolution capability and a very precise start pulse for an ion mass spectrometer. Furthermore, the ion will only pass through the chamber if it is within a wire diameter of the first wire when it is pulsed and has the right speed so it is near all other wires when they are pulsed.

  15. Analysis of anthocyanins in red onion using capillary electrophoresis-time of flight-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersson, Erik V; Puerta, Angel; Bergquist, Jonas; Turner, Charlotta

    2008-06-01

    For the first time, a capillary electrophoresis-time of flight-mass spectrometry analysis method for detecting anthocyanins in red onion was developed. The analysis method included the use of silica capillaries coated with poly-LA 313 (polycationic amine-containing polymer) and an MS-compatible volatile background electrolyte (BGE). The method was environmentally friendly and sensitive; and its rapidness combined with an acidic BGE helped in preventing anthocyanin degradation. By using high-resolution TOF-MS with pre-run tuning of masses, low mass errors were achieved in the determination of conjugated anthocyanins in red onion, and a simultaneous up-front fragmentation provided confirmation of the aglycon backbone for their secure identification. Most anthocyanins (at least seven out of ten) known in red onion from the literature were found, as well as one new for this matrix.

  16. National Ignition Facility (NIF) Neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerche, R A; Glebov, V Y; Moran, M J; McNaney, J M; Kilkenny, J D; Eckart, M; Zacharias, R A; Haslam, J J; Clancy, T J; Yeoman, M F; Warwas, D P; Sangster, T C; Stoeckl, C; Knauer, J; Horsfield, C J

    2010-05-13

    The first three of eighteen neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) channels have been installed at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The role of these detectors includes yield, temperature, and bang time measurements. This article focuses on nTOF data analysis and quality of results obtained for the first set of experiments to use all 192 NIF beams. Targets produced up to 2 x 10{sup 10} 2.45-MeV neutrons for initial testing of the nTOF detectors. Differences in neutron scattering at the OMEGA laser facility where the detectors were calibrated and at NIF result in different response functions at the two facilities. Monte Carlo modeling shows this difference. The nTOF performance on these early experiments indicates the nTOF system with its full complement of detectors should perform well in future measurements of yield, temperature, and bang time.

  17. ISAC time-of-flight system with laser-based calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verzilov, V.A., E-mail: verzilov@triumf.ca

    2015-06-11

    The time-of-flight (TOF) system is available at the ISAC rare isotope facility to measure the energy of stable and radioactive ion beams in the range of 0.5–22 Mev/u. The system, comprised of three secondary electron emission based monitors, is operated with practically all available beam intensities starting from as low as 10{sup 3} ions per second. Recently the system was equipped with the calibration setup based on a 266 nm ultraviolet laser. Laser light interacting with the TOF monitors generates secondary electrons due to the photoelectric effect and acts as a reference beam traveling at a well- known velocity. After calibration, accuracy of energy measurements improved to be better than 0.1%.

  18. ISAC time-of-flight system with laser-based calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verzilov, V. A.

    2015-06-01

    The time-of-flight (TOF) system is available at the ISAC rare isotope facility to measure the energy of stable and radioactive ion beams in the range of 0.5-22 Mev/u. The system, comprised of three secondary electron emission based monitors, is operated with practically all available beam intensities starting from as low as 103 ions per second. Recently the system was equipped with the calibration setup based on a 266 nm ultraviolet laser. Laser light interacting with the TOF monitors generates secondary electrons due to the photoelectric effect and acts as a reference beam traveling at a well- known velocity. After calibration, accuracy of energy measurements improved to be better than 0.1%.

  19. Neutral particle energy analyser based on time of flight technique for EXTRAP-T2R

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cecconello, M. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Fusion Plasma Physics; Costa, S.; Murari, A.; Barzon, A. [Consorzio RFX, Padova (Italy)

    2001-07-01

    An important and not well-understood problem in the Reversed Field Pinch configuration is the anomalous ion heating. In all Ohmically heated RFPs, the ion temperature has been experimentally observed to be higher than can be accounted for by equilibration of energy from an Ohmically heated electron population. The mechanism driving the ions to such high energies is still debated. Different possible explanations have been investigated: kinetic Alfven waves turbulence, MHD relaxation processes and the excitation of an ion electrostatic wave by supra-thermal electrons. The measurement of the ion temperature is important in order to evaluate confinement. Furthermore, measurements can provide information on the mechanism behind the anomalous ion heating. The ion temperature is calculated from the neutral particles energy spectrum obtained by a neutral particles energy analyser based on the time of flight specifically developed for EXTRAP - T2R and here described in detail.

  20. Fluence measurement at the neutron time of flight experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Weiss, Christina; Jericha, Erwin

    At the neutron time of flight facility n_TOF at CERN a new spallation target was installed in 2008. In 2008 and 2009 the commissioning of the new target took place. During the summer 2009 a fission chamber of the Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) Braunschweig was used for the neutron fluence measurement. The evaluation of the data recorded with this detector is the primary topic of this thesis. Additionally a neutron transmission experiment with air has been performed at the TRIGA Mark II reactor of the Atomic Institute of the Austrian Universities (ATI). The experiment was implemented to clarify a question about the scattering cross section of molecular gas which could not be answered clearly via the literature. This problem came up during the evaluations for n_TOF.

  1. The MRPC-based ALICE Time-Of-Flight detector: Commissioning and first performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akindinov, A. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Alici, A., E-mail: Andrea.Alici@cern.ch [Sezione INFN, Bologna (Italy); Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche & #x27; Enrico Fermi& #x27; , Roma (Italy); CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Antonioli, P. [Sezione INFN, Bologna (Italy); Arcelli, S.; Basile, M. [Sezione INFN, Bologna (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell& #x27; Universita, Bologna (Italy); Bellini, F. [Sezione INFN, Bologna (Italy); Caffarri, D. [Sezione INFN, Bologna (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell& #x27; Universita, Bologna (Italy); INFN and University of Padova (Italy); Cara Romeo, G. [Sezione INFN, Bologna (Italy); Cifarelli, L. [Sezione INFN, Bologna (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell& #x27; Universita, Bologna (Italy); Cindolo, F. [Sezione INFN, Bologna (Italy); De Caro, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Pasquale, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell& #x27; Universita and INFN, Salerno (Italy); Doroud, K. [World Laboratory, Geneva (Switzerland); Fusco Girard, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell& #x27; Universita and INFN, Salerno (Italy); Guerzoni, B. [Sezione INFN, Bologna (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell& #x27; Universita, Bologna (Italy); Hatzifotiadou, D. [Sezione INFN, Bologna (Italy); Jung, W.W.; Kim, D.W.; Kim, J.S. [Department of Physics, Gangneung-Wonju National University, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2012-01-01

    The ALICE Time-Of-Flight (TOF) detector is a cylindrical array with a total area of about 150 m{sup 2} and more than 153,000 readout channels; it will allow charged hadron separation for momentum up to a few GeV/c. The very good performance required for such a system has been achieved by means of the Multigap Resistive Plate Chamber (MRPC) whose time resolution is better than 50 ps with an overall efficiency close to 100%. The TOF detector is fully installed since April 2008; it has successfully been operated during cosmic ray data taking. The very good stability, noise level and time performance are reported here. The status of the calibration and the first physics results with the TOF detector are given.

  2. Tests of a high resolution time of flight system based on long and narrow scintillator

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, E; Sun, W; Yamamoto, H

    1996-01-01

    We have tested a prototype time-of-flight system based on bulk scintillator block of dimensions 2.5 \\times 2.5 \\times 200 cm. Using a calibration scheme similar to the one used in actual collider experiments, we have achieved a resolution of 71 ps using Amperex XP2020/UR photomultipliers and 81 ps using proximity-focusing fine-mesh photomultipliers (Hamamatsu R2021). Results are also obtained for scintillating fiber blocks of the same dimensions. Good internal reflectivity of the bulk scintillator block resulted in resolutions superior to the fibre blocks. A single-photon pulsed laser system was used to study photomultipliers and the results were used in a Monte Carlo simulation of the system to study the critical elements that determine the resolution.

  3. Heavy ion time-of-flight ERDA of high dose metal implanted germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dytlewski, N.; Evans, P.J.; Noorman, J.T. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Wielunski, L.S. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Lindfield, NSW (Australia). Div. of Applied Physics; Bunder, J. [New South Wales Univ., Wollongong, NSW (Australia). Wollongong Univ. Coll

    1996-12-31

    With the thick Ge substrates used in ion implantation, RBS can have difficulty in resolving the mass-depth ambiguities when analysing materials composed of mixtures of elements with nearly equal masses. Additional, and complimentary techniques are thus required. This paper reports the use of heavy ion time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis (ToF- ERDA), and conventional RBS in the analysis of Ge(100) implanted with high dose Ti and Cu ions from a MEWA ion source . Heavy ion ToF ERDA has been used to resolve, and profile the implanted transition metal species, and also to study any oxygen incorporation into the sample resulting from the implantation, or subsequential reactions with air or moisture. This work is part of a study on high dose metal ion implantation of medium atomic weight semiconductor materials. 13 refs., 6 figs.

  4. Performance of the neutron time-of-flight facility n_TOF at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, C.; Tsinganis, A.; Berthoumieux, E.; Barbagallo, M.; Belloni, F.; Gunsing, F.; Weiß, C.; Chiaveri, E.; Calviani, M.; Vlachoudis, V.; Altstadt, S.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Audouin, L.; Bécares, V.; Bečvář, F.; Billowes, J.; Boccone, V.; Bosnar, D.; Brugger, M.; Calviño, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Carrapiço, C.; Cerutti, F.; Chin, M.; Colonna, N.; Cortés, G.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Diakaki, M.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Duran, I.; Dressler, R.; Dzysiuk, N.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Ferrari, A.; Fraval, K.; Ganesan, S.; García, A. R.; Giubrone, G.; Göbel, K.; Gómez-Hornillos, M. B.; Gonçalves, I. F.; González-Romero, E.; Griesmayer, E.; Gurusamy, P.; Hernández-Prieto, A.; Gurusamy, P.; Jenkins, D. G.; Jericha, E.; Kadi, Y.; Käppeler, F.; Karadimos, D.; Kivel, N.; Koehler, P.; Kokkoris, M.; Krtička, M.; Kroll, J.; Lampoudis, C.; Langer, C.; Leal-Cidoncha, E.; Lederer, C.; Leeb, H.; Leong, L. S.; Losito, R.; Manousos, A.; Marganiec, J.; Martínez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P. F.; Mastromarco, M.; Meaze, M.; Mendoza, E.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Mingrone, F.; Mirea, M.; Mondalaers, W.; Papaevangelou, T.; Paradela, C.; Pavlik, A.; Perkowski, J.; Plompen, A.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J. M.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Riego, A.; Roman, F.; Rubbia, C.; Sabate-Gilarte, M.; Sarmento, R.; Saxena, A.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Schmidt, S.; Schumann, D.; Steinegger, P.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tarrío, D.; Tassan-Got, L.; Valenta, S.; Vannini, G.; Variale, V.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Versaci, R.; Vermeulen, M. J.; Vlastou, R.; Wallner, A.; Ware, T.; Weigand, M.; Wright, T.; Žugec, P.

    2013-02-01

    The neutron time-of-flight facility n_TOF features a white neutron source produced by spallation through 20GeV/ c protons impinging on a lead target. The facility, aiming primarily at the measurement of neutron-induced reaction cross sections, was operating at CERN between 2001 and 2004, and then underwent a major upgrade in 2008. This paper presents in detail all the characteristics of the new neutron beam in the currently available configurations, which correspond to two different collimation systems and two choices of neutron moderator. The characteristics discussed include the intensity and energy dependence of the neutron flux, the spatial profile of the beam, the in-beam background components and the energy resolution/broadening. The discussion of these features is based on dedicated measurements and Monte Carlo simulations, and includes estimations of the systematic uncertainties of the mentioned quantities.

  5. Time-of-flight isotope separator for a second-generation ISOL facility

    CERN Document Server

    Jacquot, B

    2003-01-01

    We focus on the study of a low energy and a high resolving power separator dedicated for an exotic isotope accelerator facility. The approach is based on the use of a time-of-flight technique in a long isochronous section. Different ion species are bunched and then separated in time, in an energy-isochronous section. We then transform the time shift in a transverse shift by a chopper in order to eliminate the unwanted ions using slits. A mass-resolving power of R sub M =10,000 seems feasible for low energy, multi-charged or mono-charged beams with a transverse acceptance up to 50 pi mm mrad.

  6. Electrophoretic time-of-flight measurements of single DNA molecules with two stacked nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langecker, Martin; Pedone, Daniel; Simmel, Friedrich C; Rant, Ulrich

    2011-11-09

    Electrophoretic transport through a solid-state nanodevice comprised of two stacked nanopore sensors is used to determine the free-solution mobility of DNA molecules based on their "time-of-flight" between the two pores. Mobility measurements are possible at very low (100 pM) DNA concentration and for low as well as high salt concentrations (here 30 mM and 1 M KCl). The mechanism of DNA transport through the device is elucidated by statistical analysis, showing the free-draining nature of the translocating DNA polymers and a barrier-dominated escape through the second pore. Furthermore, consecutive threading of single molecules through the two pores can be used to gain more detailed information on the dynamics of the molecules by correlation analysis, which also provides a direct electrical proof for translocation.

  7. Invited article: polarization "down under": the polarized time-of-flight neutron reflectometer PLATYPUS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saerbeck, T; Klose, F; Le Brun, A P; Füzi, J; Brule, A; Nelson, A; Holt, S A; James, M

    2012-08-01

    This review presents the implementation and full characterization of the polarization equipment of the time-of-flight neutron reflectometer PLATYPUS at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO). The functionality and efficiency of individual components are evaluated and found to maintain a high neutron beam polarization with a maximum of 99.3% through polarizing Fe/Si supermirrors. Neutron spin-flippers with efficiencies of 99.7% give full control over the incident and scattered neutron spin direction over the whole wavelength spectrum available in the instrument. The first scientific experiments illustrate data correction mechanisms for finite polarizations and reveal an extraordinarily high reproducibility for measuring magnetic thin film samples. The setup is now fully commissioned and available for users through the neutron beam proposal system of the Bragg Institute at ANSTO.

  8. Time of Flight resolution of the prototype of the electromagnetic calorimeter PHOS

    CERN Document Server

    Bogolyubsky, M; Kuryakin, A; Manko, V; Muller, H; Nomokonov, P; Punin, V; Rohrich, D; Sadovsky, S; Sibiriak, I; Skaali, B; Sugitate, T; Vasil’ev, A; Vinogradov, A; Vodopianov, A; Zhou, D

    2009-01-01

    The Time of Flight (TOF) resolution of one of the LHC ALICE detectors, a prototype of the electromagnetic calorimeter PHOS (PHOton Spectrometer), was measured in beam tests carried out at CERN PS. The prototype of the calorimeter consists of 256 cells of light-detecting PbWO4 (PWO) monocrystals read out with Avalanche Photo Diodes (APDs). Three dedicated front end cards with 24 channels of electronics were designed and produced for using in the tests, each channel consisting of one fast and two slow shapers, a time to amplitude converter and three identical 12-bit peak sensitive Analog to Digital Converters (ADCs). The high voltage bias regulator for APD is located on the same card. The measured TOF resolution is described as[...] .

  9. Joint Temperature-Lasing Mode Compensation for Time-of-Flight LiDAR Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anas Alhashimi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We propose an expectation maximization (EM strategy for improving the precision of time of flight (ToF light detection and ranging (LiDAR scanners. The novel algorithm statistically accounts not only for the bias induced by temperature changes in the laser diode, but also for the multi-modality of the measurement noises that is induced by mode-hopping effects. Instrumental to the proposed EM algorithm, we also describe a general thermal dynamics model that can be learned either from just input-output data or from a combination of simple temperature experiments and information from the laser’s datasheet. We test the strategy on a SICK LMS 200 device and improve its average absolute error by a factor of three.

  10. Underwater 3D scanning using Kinect v2 time of flight camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwer, Atif; Ali, Syed Saad Azhar; Khan, Amjad; Mériaudeau, Fabrice

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents preliminary results of using commercial time of flight depth camera for 3D scanning of underwater objects. Generating accurate and detailed 3D models of objects in underwater environment is a challenging task. This work presents experimental results of using Microsoft Kinect v2 depth camera for dense depth data acquisition underwater that gives reasonable 3D scanned data but with smaller scanning range. Motivations for this research are the user friendliness and low-cost of the device as compared to multi view stereo cameras or marine-hardened laser scanning solutions and equipment. Preliminary results of underwater point cloud generation and volumetric reconstruction are also presented. The novelty of this work is the utilization of the Kinect depth camera for real-time 3D mesh reconstruction and the main objective is to develop an economical and compact solution for underwater 3D scanning.

  11. Figures of Merit for Indirect Time-of-Flight 3D Cameras: Definition and Experimental Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Perenzoni

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Indirect Time-of-Flight (I-TOF cameras can be implemented in a number of ways, each with specific characteristics and performances. In this paper a comprehensive analysis of the implementation possibilities is developed in order to model the main performances with a high level of abstraction. After the extraction of the main characteristics for the high-level model, several figures of merit (FoM are defined with the purpose of obtaining a common metric: noise equivalent distance, correlated and uncorrelated power responsivity, and background light rejection ratio. The obtained FoMs can be employed for the comparison of different implementations of range cameras based on the I-TOF method: specifically, they are applied for several different sensors developed by the authors in order to compare their performances.

  12. Campaign 1.7 Pu Aging. Development of Time of Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venhaus, Thomas J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-09-09

    The first application of Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS) to an aged plutonium surface has resulted in a rich set of surface chemistry data, as well as some unexpected results. FY15 was highlighted by not only the first mapping of hydrogen-containing features within the metal, but also a prove-in series of experiments using the system’s Sieverts Reaction Cell. These experiments involved successfully heating the sample to ~450 oC for nearly 24 hours while the sample was dosed several times with hydrogen, followed by an in situ ToF-SIMS analysis. During this year, the data allowed for better and more consistent identification of the myriad peaks that result from the SIMS sputter process. In collaboration with the AWE (U.K), the system was also fully aligned for sputter depth profiling for future experiments.

  13. Resonant formation measurements of dt{mu} via time of flight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, G.M. [TRIUMF (Canada)], E-mail: mrshl@triumf.ca; Porcelli, T.A. [University of Victoria, Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Adamczak, A. [Institute of Nuclear Physics (Poland); Bailey, J.M. [Chester Technology (United Kingdom); Beer, G.A. [University of Victoria, Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Faifman, M.P. [Kurchatov Institute' , Russian Research Center ' (Russian Federation); Fujiwara, M.C. [University of British Columbia, Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Huber, T.M. [Gustavus Adolphus College, Physics (United States); Jacot-Guillarmod, R. [Physics Institute, University of Fribourg (Switzerland); Kammel, P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (United States); Kim, S.K. [Jeonbuk National University (Korea, Republic of); Knowles, P.E. [University of Victoria, Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Kunselman, A.R. [Physics, University of Wyoming (United States); Maier, M. [University of Victoria, Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Markushin, V.E. [PSI (Switzerland); Mason, G.R. [University of Victoria, Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Mulhauser, F. [Physics Institute, University of Fribourg (Switzerland); Olin, A. [University of Victoria, Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Petitjean, C. [PSI (Switzerland); Zmeskal, J. [Austrian Academy of Sciences, Medium Energy Physics (Austria)

    1999-06-15

    Solid hydrogen in the form of an inhomogeneous layered target offers several experimental advantages when compared with liquid or gas. Beams of non-thermalized muonic hydrogen atoms allow us to explore resonant molecular ion formation processes near eV kinetic energies. Isotopically specific layers make it possible to separate competing and confusing interactions and to employ the time of flight for comparison with predictions based on theoretical energy dependences. Unambiguous charged fusion product detection simplifies absolute intensity measurements.The systematic uncertainties encountered in resonant molecular ion formation measurements, using solid hydrogen target layers, are being investigated with simulations which use the many calculated energy-dependent rates and cross-sections which are now available. The importance of the rates for processes such as muon transfer and elastic scattering are discussed, and results of some recent analyses are presented.

  14. Deuterium-tritium neutron yield measurements with the 4.5 m neutron-time-of-flight detectors at NIF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, M J; Bond, E J; Clancy, T J; Eckart, M J; Khater, H Y; Glebov, V Yu

    2012-10-01

    The first several campaigns of laser fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) included a family of high-sensitivity scintillator∕photodetector neutron-time-of-flight (nTOF) detectors for measuring deuterium-deuterium (DD) and DT neutron yields. The detectors provided consistent neutron yield (Y(n)) measurements from below 10(9) (DD) to nearly 10(15) (DT). The detectors initially demonstrated detector-to-detector Y(n) precisions better than 5%, but lacked in situ absolute calibrations. Recent experiments at NIF now have provided in situ DT yield calibration data that establish the absolute sensitivity of the 4.5 m differential tissue harmonic imaging (DTHI) detector with an accuracy of ± 10% and precision of ± 1%. The 4.5 m nTOF calibration measurements also have helped to establish improved detector impulse response functions and data analysis methods, which have contributed to improving the accuracy of the Y(n) measurements. These advances have also helped to extend the usefulness of nTOF measurements of ion temperature and downscattered neutron ratio (neutron yield 10-12 MeV divided by yield 13-15 MeV) with other nTOF detectors.

  15. Defect detection of partially complete SAW and TIG welds using the ultrasonic time-of-flight diffraction method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Shaun W.; Bonser, Gary R.

    1998-03-01

    An application of machine vision applied to the analysis of ultrasonic images formed using the time-of-flight diffraction (TOFD) method on incomplete weld geometries is described. The rationale of the work being to identify weld defects as soon as they are produced, thereby reducing the costs of any subsequent repairs. The analysis uses TOFD scans as input to a filtering and 'window' based variance operator for the segmentation of suspect defect areas inside the weld region. A suite of pc based software and a high temperature TOFD data acquisition system have been benchmarked through a series of demonstration trials on both 80mm thick carbon steel submerged arc welded testpieces, and 25mm thick carbon steel tungsten inert gas welded testpieces. The range of intentionally implanted defects, from root cracks to lack of side wall fusion, were detected with an overall accuracy of 79 percent on a data set of 174 defects on scans performed at 10-90 percent weld completion.

  16. Deuterium-tritium neutron yield measurements with the 4.5 m neutron-time-of-flight detectors at NIF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, M. J.; Bond, E. J.; Clancy, T. J.; Eckart, M. J.; Khater, H. Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Glebov, V. Yu. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    The first several campaigns of laser fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) included a family of high-sensitivity scintillator/photodetector neutron-time-of-flight (nTOF) detectors for measuring deuterium-deuterium (DD) and DT neutron yields. The detectors provided consistent neutron yield (Y{sub n}) measurements from below 10{sup 9} (DD) to nearly 10{sup 15} (DT). The detectors initially demonstrated detector-to-detector Y{sub n} precisions better than 5%, but lacked in situ absolute calibrations. Recent experiments at NIF now have provided in situ DT yield calibration data that establish the absolute sensitivity of the 4.5 m differential tissue harmonic imaging (DTHI) detector with an accuracy of {+-}10% and precision of {+-}1%. The 4.5 m nTOF calibration measurements also have helped to establish improved detector impulse response functions and data analysis methods, which have contributed to improving the accuracy of the Y{sub n} measurements. These advances have also helped to extend the usefulness of nTOF measurements of ion temperature and downscattered neutron ratio (neutron yield 10-12 MeV divided by yield 13-15 MeV) with other nTOF detectors.

  17. Peptide Profiling Using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry for Identification of Animal Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izuchi, Yukari; Tokuhara, Mutsumi; Takashima, Tsuneo; Kuramoto, Kanya

    2013-01-01

    Identification of fibers for verification of their specific animal origin is necessary for maintaining quality and value in the clothing industry. In order to examine adulteration in animal fibers, there is a commercially accepted method of microscopy analysis. However, this method is subjective and time-consuming due to its reliance on an operator identifying magnified fibers from their scale image and other features. Therefore, alternative reliable identification methods are required. In this study, peptide analysis using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOFMS) is presented and used to distinguish between cashmere, wool, mohair, yak, camel, angora, and alpaca in untreated and treated fibers (dyed, chlorinated wool). Typical m/z values for each specific type of animal fiber were identified. Predictive models that could identify seven types of animal fibers as well as 50% blended samples were successfully constructed using multivariate analyses such as PCA and PLS regression. This technique is therefore extremely useful for complementing the conventional tests for detecting adulteration in animal fiber fabrics and clothing.

  18. Mapping dynamical mechanical properties of osteonal bone by scanning acoustic microscopy in time-of-flight mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blouin, Stéphane; Puchegger, Stephan; Roschger, Andreas; Berzlanovich, Andrea; Fratzl, Peter; Klaushofer, Klaus; Roschger, Paul

    2014-06-01

    An important determinant of mechanical properties of bone is Young's modulus and its variation in individual osteons of cortical bone tissue. Its mechanical behavior also depends on deformation rate owing to its visco- or poroelastic properties. We developed a method to measure dynamical mechanical properties of bulk bone tissue at osteonal level based on scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM) using time-of-flight (TOF) measurements in combination with quantitative backscattered electron imaging (qBEI). SAM-TOF yields local sound velocities and qBEI corresponding material densities together providing elastic properties. Osteons (n=55) were measured in three human femoral diaphyseal ground bone sections (∼ 30 µm in thickness). In addition, subchondral bone and mineralized articular cartilage were investigated. The mean mineral contents, the mean sound velocities, and the mean elastic modulus of the osteons ranged from 20 to 26 wt%, from 3,819 to 5,260 m/s, and from 21 to 44 GPa, respectively. There was a strong positive correlation between material density and sound velocity (Pearson's r=0.701; pSound velocities between cartilage and bone was similar, though material density was higher in cartilage (+4.46%, p<0.0001). These results demonstrate the power of SAM-TOF to estimate dynamic mechanical properties of the bone materials at the osteonal level.

  19. High-resolution Time-Of-Flight PET with Depth-Of-Interaction becomes feasible: a proof of principle

    CERN Document Server

    Cosentino, Luigi; Pappalardo, Alfio; Garibaldi, Franco

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we prove that the choice of a suitable treatment of the scintillator surfaces, along with suitable photodetectors electronics and specific algorithms for raw data analysis, allow to achieve an optimal tradeoff between energy, time and DOI resolution, thus strongly supporting the feasibility of a prostate TOF- PET probe, MRI compatible, with the required features and performance. In numbers this means a detector element of 1.5mm x 1.5mm x 10mm, achieving at the same time energy resolution around 11.5%, time-of- flight resolution around 150 ps and DOI resolution even below 1 mm. We stress that such a time resolution allows to increase significantly the Noise Equivalent Counting Rate, and consequently improve the image quality and the lesion detection capability. These individual values correspond to the best obtained so far by other groups, but we got all of them simultaneously. In our opinion this proof of principle paves the way to the feasibility of a TOF-PET MRI compatible probe with unprecede...

  20. New beam line for time-of-flight medium energy ion scattering with large area position sensitive detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnarsson, M K; Hallén, A; Åström, J; Primetzhofer, D; Legendre, S; Possnert, G

    2012-09-01

    A new beam line for medium energy ion mass scattering (MEIS) has been designed and set up at the Ångström laboratory, Uppsala University, Sweden. This MEIS system is based on a time-of-flight (ToF) concept and the electronics for beam chopping relies on a 4 MHz function generator. Repetition rates can be varied between 1 MHz and 63 kHz and pulse widths below 1 ns are typically obtained by including beam bunching. A 6-axis goniometer is used at the target station. Scattering angle and energy of backscattered ions are extracted from a time-resolved and position-sensitive detector. Examples of the performance are given for three kinds of probing ions, (1)H(+), (4)He(+), and (11)B(+). Depth resolution is in the nanometer range and 1 and 2 nm thick Pt layers can easily be resolved. Mass resolution between nearby isotopes can be obtained as illustrated by Ga isotopes in GaAs. Taking advantage of the large size detector, a direct imaging (blocking pattern) of crystal channels are shown for hexagonal, 4H-SiC. The ToF-MEIS system described in this paper is intended for use in semiconductor and thin film areas. For example, depth profiling in the sub nanometer range for device development of contacts and dielectric interfaces. In addition to applied projects, fundamental studies of stopping cross sections in this medium energy range will also be conducted.

  1. Quantification of the effects of fur, fur color, and velocity on Time-Of-Flight technology in dairy production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salau, Jennifer; Bauer, Ulrike; Haas, Jan H; Thaller, Georg; Harms, Jan; Junge, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    With increasing herd sizes, camera based monitoring solutions rise in importance. 3D cameras, for example Time-Of-Flight (TOF) cameras, measure depth information. These additional information (3D data) could be beneficial for monitoring in dairy production. In previous studies regarding TOF technology, only standing cows were recorded to avoid motion artifacts. Therefore, necessary conditions for a TOF camera application in dairy cows are examined in this study. For this purpose, two cow models with plaster and fur surface, respectively, were recorded at four controlled velocities to quantify the effects of movement, fur color, and fur. Comparison criteria concerning image usability, pixel-wise deviation, and precision in coordinate determination were defined. Fur and fur color showed large effects (η (2)=0.235 and η (2)=0.472, respectively), which became even more considerable when the models were moving. The velocity of recorded animals must therefore be controlled when using TOF cameras. As another main result, body parts which lie in the middle of the cow model's back can be determined neglecting the effect of velocity or fur. With this in mind, further studies may obtain sound results using TOF technology in dairy production.

  2. Geometry Survey of the Time-of-Flight Neutron-Elastic Scattering (Antonella) Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshinowo, Babatunde O. [Fermilab; Izraelevitch, Federico [Buenos Aires U.

    2016-10-17

    The Antonella experiment is a measurement of the ionization efficiency of nuclear recoils in silicon at low energies [1]. It is a neutron elastic scattering experiment motivated by the search for dark matter particles. In this experiment, a proton beam hits a lithium target and neutrons are produced. The neutron shower passes through a collimator that produces a neutron beam. The beam illuminates a silicon detector. With a certain probability, a neutron interacts with a silicon nucleus of the detector producing elastic scattering. After the interaction, a fraction of the neutron energy is transferred to the silicon nucleus which acquires kinetic energy and recoils. This kinetic energy is then dissipated in the detector producing ionization and thermal energy. The ionization produced is measured with the silicon detector electronics. On the other hand, the neutron is scattered out of the beam. A neutron-detector array (made of scintillator bars) registers the neutron arrival time and the scattering angle to reconstruct the kinematics of the neutron-nucleus interaction with the time-of-flight technique [2]. In the reconstruction equations, the energy of the nuclear recoil is a function of the scattering angle with respect to the beam direction, the time-of-flight of the neutron and the geometric distances between components of the setup (neutron-production target, silicon detector, scintillator bars). This paper summarizes the survey of the different components of the experiment that made possible the off-line analysis of the collected data. Measurements were made with the API Radian Laser Tracker and I-360 Probe Wireless. The survey was completed at the University of Notre Dame, Indiana, USA in February 2015.

  3. A novel principle for an ion mirror design in time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, S.; Altwegg, K.; Balsiger, H.; Fischer, J.; Jäckel, A.; Korth, A.; Mildner, M.; Piazza, D.; Reme, H.; Wurz, P.

    2006-03-01

    A novel design for a gridless two-stage ion mirror, or reflectron, for time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) will be presented. The development of this novel design was driven by the stringent engineering requirements for the ion mirror's utilization by the reflectron time-of-flight (RTOF) sensor in the Rosetta orbiter spectrometer for ion and neutral analysis (ROSINA) instrument package of the Rosetta cometary mission launched by the European Space Agency in March 2004. The reflectron consists of ceramic and titanium alloy components joined by brazing and welding processes. The device serves as both the mechanical structure and as an ultra-high-vacuum (UHV) enclosure for the TOFMS system. The electrostatic fields of the reflectron are generated along two individually adjustable sections of a resistor helix applied to the inner surface of a ceramic cylinder. This design allows for increased homogeneity of the electrostatic fields, and minimizes fringe fields close to the cylindrical boundary of the reflectron structure. Thus, the usable inner diameter of ion flight path for a given outer diameter is maximized; a feature required by spacecraft constraints. An additional electrostatic lens in front of the reflectron allows the geometrical alteration of the shape of the ion beam, and its direction with regard to the ion optical axis. This makes it possible to switch the operation of the TOFMS system between a single-reflection and a triple-reflection mode, the latter using an additional ion mirror. Typically, mass resolutions of up to 5000 at full width at half maximum (FWHM) have been achieved in the triple-reflection mode for an overall sensor dimension of 1 m. Experimental results in the single-reflection mode and in the triple-reflection mode will be presented. Environmental constraints for space applications will also be discussed.

  4. Asymmetry of deep medullary veins on susceptibility weighted MRI in patients with acute MCA stroke is associated with poor outcome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Mucke

    Full Text Available Due to its sensitivity to deoxyhemoglobin, susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI enables the visualization of deep medullary veins (DMV in patients with acute stroke, which are difficult to depict under physiological circumstances. This study assesses the asymmetric appearance of prominent DMV as an independent predictor for stroke severity and outcome.SWI of 86 patients with acute middle cerebral artery (MCA stroke were included. A scoring system from 0 (no visible DMV to 3 (very prominent DMV was applied for both hemispheres separately. A difference of scores between ipsi- and contralateral side was defined as asymmetric (AMV+. Occurrence of AMV+ was correlated with the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS Score on admission and discharge, as well as the modified Rankin Scale (mRS at discharge. Ordinal regression analysis was used to evaluate NIHSS and mRS as predictors of stroke severity, clinical course of disease and outcome.55 patients displayed AMV+ while 31 did not show an asymmetry (AMV-. Median NIHSS on admission was 17 (11-21 in the AMV+ group and 9 (5-15 in the AMV- group (p = 0.001. On discharge median NIHSS was 11 (5-20 for AMV+ and 5 (2-14 for AMV- (p = 0.005. The median mRS at discharge was 4 (3-5 in the AMV+ group and 3 (1-4 in AMV- (p = 0.001. Odds ratio was 3.19 (95% CI: 1.24-8.21 for AMV+ to achieve a higher mRS than AMV- (p = 0.016.The asymmetric appearance of DMV on SWI is a fast and easily evaluable parameter for the prediction of stroke severity and can be used as an additional imaging parameter in patients with acute MCA stroke.

  5. Whole-Brain Susceptibility-Weighted Thrombus Imaging in Stroke: Fragmented Thrombi Predict Worse Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratz, P P; Schroth, G; Gralla, J; Mattle, H P; Fischer, U; Jung, S; Mordasini, P; Hsieh, K; Verma, R K; Weisstanner, C; El-Koussy, M

    2015-07-01

    The prevalence and clinical importance of primarily fragmented thrombi in patients with acute ischemic stroke remains elusive. Whole-brain SWI was used to detect multiple thrombus fragments, and their clinical significance was analyzed. Pretreatment SWI was analyzed for the presence of a single intracranial thrombus or multiple intracranial thrombi. Associations with baseline clinical characteristics, complications, and clinical outcome were studied. Single intracranial thrombi were detected in 300 (92.6%), and multiple thrombi, in 24 of 324 patients (7.4%). In 23 patients with multiple thrombi, all thrombus fragments were located in the vascular territory distal to the primary occluding thrombus; in 1 patient, thrombi were found both in the anterior and posterior circulation. Only a minority of thrombus fragments were detected on TOF-MRA, first-pass gadolinium-enhanced MRA, or DSA. Patients with multiple intracranial thrombi presented with more severe symptoms (median NIHSS scores, 15 versus 11; P = .014) and larger ischemic areas (median DWI ASPECTS, 5 versus 7; P = .006); good collaterals, rated on DSA, were fewer than those in patients with a single thrombus (21.1% versus 44.2%, P = .051). The presence of multiple thrombi was a predictor of unfavorable outcome at 3 months (P = .040; OR, 0.251; 95% CI, 0.067-0.939). Patients with multiple intracranial thrombus fragments constitute a small subgroup of patients with stroke with a worse outcome than patients with single thrombi. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  6. Reflux venous flow in dural sinus and internal jugular vein on 3D time-of-flight MR angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Jinhee; Kim, Bum-soo; Kim, Bom-yi; Choi, Hyun Seok; Jung, So-Lyung; Ahn, Kook-Jin; Byun, Jae Young [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Reflux venous signal on the brain and neck time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (TOF MRA) is thought to be related to a compressed left brachiocephalic vein. This study is aimed to assess the prevalence of venous reflux flow in internal jugular vein (IJV), sigmoid sinus/transverse sinus (SS/TS), and inferior petrosal sinus (IPS) on the brain and neck TOF MRA and its pattern. From the radiology database, 3,475 patients (1,526 men, 1,949 women, age range 19-94, median age 62 years) with brain and neck standard 3D TOF MRA at 3 T and 1.5 T were identified. Rotational maximal intensity projection images of 3D TOF MRA were assessed for the presence of reflux flow in IJV, IPS, and SS/TS. Fifty-five patients (1.6 %) had reflux flow, all in the left side. It was more prevalent in females (n = 43/1,949, 2.2 %) than in males (n = 12/1,526, 0.8 %) (p = 0.001). The mean age of patients with reflux flow (66 years old) was older than those (60 years old) without reflux flow (p = 0.001). Three patients had arteriovenous shunt in the left arm for hemodialysis. Of the remaining 52 patients, reflux was seen on IJV in 35 patients (67.3 %). There were more patients with reflux flow seen on SS/TS (n = 34) than on IPS (n = 25). Venous reflux flow on TOF MRA is infrequently observed, and reflux pattern is variable. Because it is exclusively located in the left side, the reflux signal on TOF MRA could be an alarm for an undesirable candidate for a contrast injection on the left side for contrast-enhanced imaging study. (orig.)

  7. Quantification of tumor vessels in glioblastoma patients using time-of-flight angiography at 7 Tesla: a feasibility study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Radbruch

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To analyze if tumor vessels can be visualized, segmented and quantified in glioblastoma patients with time of flight (ToF angiography at 7 Tesla and multiscale vessel enhancement filtering. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twelve patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma were examined with ToF angiography (TR = 15 ms, TE = 4.8 ms, flip angle = 15°, FOV = 160 × 210 mm(2, voxel size: 0.31 × 0.31 × 0.40 mm(3 on a whole-body 7 T MR system. A volume of interest (VOI was placed within the border of the contrast enhancing part on T1-weighted images of the glioblastoma and a reference VOI was placed in the non-affected contralateral white matter. Automated segmentation and quantification of vessels within the two VOIs was achieved using multiscale vessel enhancement filtering in ImageJ. RESULTS: Tumor vessels were clearly visible in all patients. When comparing tumor and the reference VOI, total vessel surface (45.3 ± 13.9 mm(2 vs. 29.0 ± 21.0 mm(2 (p<0.035 and number of branches (3.5 ± 1.8 vs. 1.0 ± 0.6 (p<0.001 per cubic centimeter were significantly higher, while mean vessel branch length was significantly lower (3.8 ± 1.5 mm vs 7.2 ± 2.8 mm (p<0.001 in the tumor. DISCUSSION: ToF angiography at 7-Tesla MRI enables characterization and quantification of the internal vascular morphology of glioblastoma and may be used for the evaluation of therapy response within future studies.

  8. Investigation of a Multi-Anode Microchannel Plate PMT for Time-of-Flight PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choong, Woon-Seng

    2010-01-01

    We report on an investigation of a mulit-anode microchannel plate PMT for time-of-flight PET detector modules. The primary advantages of an MCP lie in its excellent timing properties (fast rise time and low transit time spread), compact size, and reasonably large active area, thus making it a good candidate for TOF applications. In addition, the anode can be segmented into an array of collection electrodes with fine pitch to attain good position sensitivity. In this paper, we investigate using the Photonis Planacon MCP-PMT with a pore size of 10 µm to construct a PET detector module, specifically for time-of-flight applications. We measure the single electron response by exciting the Planacon with pulsed laser diode. We also measure the performance of the Planacon as a PET detector by coupling a 4 mm × 4 mm × 10 mm LSO crystal to individual pixel to study its gain uniformity, energy resolution, and timing resolution. The rise time of the Planacon is 440 ps with pulse duration of about 1 ns. A transit time spread of 120 ps FWHM is achieved. The gain is fairly uniform across the central region of the Planacon, but drops off by as much as a factor of 2.5 around the edges. The energy resolution is fairly uniform across the Planacon with an average value of 18.6±0.7% FWHM. While the average timing resolution of 252±7 ps FWHM is achieved in the central region of the Planacon, it degrades to 280±9 ps FWHM for edge pixels and 316±15 ps FWHM for corner pixels. We compare the results with measurements performed with a fast timing conventional PMT (Hamamatsu R-9800). We find that the R9800, which has significantly higher PDE, has a better timing resolution than the Planacon. Furthermore, we perform detector simulations to calculate the improvement that can be achieved with a higher PDE Planacon. The calculation shows that the Planacon can achieve significantly better timing resolution if it can attain the same PDE as the R-9800, while only a 30% improvement is needed

  9. Investigation of a Multi-Anode Microchannel Plate PMT for Time-of-Flight PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choong, Woon-Seng

    2010-09-13

    We report on an investigation of a mulit-anode microchannel plate PMT for time-of-flight PET detector modules. The primary advantages of an MCP lie in its excellent timing properties (fast rise time and low transit time spread), compact size, and reasonably large active area, thus making it a good candidate for TOF applications. In addition, the anode can be segmented into an array of collection electrodes with fine pitch to attain good position sensitivity. In this paper, we investigate using the Photonis Planacon MCP-PMT with a pore size of 10 µm to construct a PET detector module, specifically for time-of-flight applications. We measure the single electron response by exciting the Planacon with pulsed laser diode. We also measure the performance of the Planacon as a PET detector by coupling a 4 mm × 4 mm × 10 mm LSO crystal to individual pixel to study its gain uniformity, energy resolution, and timing resolution. The rise time of the Planacon is 440 ps with pulse duration of about 1 ns. A transit time spread of 120 ps FWHM is achieved. The gain is fairly uniform across the central region of the Planacon, but drops off by as much as a factor of 2.5 around the edges. The energy resolution is fairly uniform across the Planacon with an average value of 18.6±0.7% FWHM. While the average timing resolution of 252±7 ps FWHM is achieved in the central region of the Planacon, it degrades to 280±9 ps FWHM for edge pixels and 316±15 ps FWHM for corner pixels. We compare the results with measurements performed with a fast timing conventional PMT (Hamamatsu R-9800). We find that the R9800, which has significantly higher PDE, has a better timing resolution than the Planacon. Furthermore, we perform detector simulations to calculate the improvement that can be achieved with a higher PDE Planacon. The calculation shows that the Planacon can achieve significantly better timing resolution if it can attain the same PDE as the R-9800, while only a 30% improvement is needed

  10. HYSPEC : A CRYSTAL TIME OF FLIGHT HYBRID SPECTROMETER FOR THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SHAPIRO,S.M.; ZALIZNYAK,I.A.

    2002-12-30

    This document lays out a proposal by the Instrument Development Team (IDT) composed of scientists from leading Universities and National Laboratories to design and build a conceptually new high-flux inelastic neutron spectrometer at the pulsed Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge. This instrument is intended to supply users of the SNS and scientific community, of which the IDT is an integral part, with a platform for ground-breaking investigations of the low-energy atomic-scale dynamical properties of crystalline solids. It is also planned that the proposed instrument will be equipped with a polarization analysis capability, therefore becoming the first polarized beam inelastic spectrometer in the SNS instrument suite, and the first successful polarized beam inelastic instrument at a pulsed spallation source worldwide. The proposed instrument is designed primarily for inelastic and elastic neutron spectroscopy of single crystals. In fact, the most informative neutron scattering studies of the dynamical properties of solids nearly always require single crystal samples, and they are almost invariably flux-limited. In addition, in measurements with polarization analysis the available flux is reduced through selection of the particular neutron polarization, which puts even more stringent limits on the feasibility of a particular experiment. To date, these investigations have mostly been carried out on crystal spectrometers at high-flux reactors, which usually employ focusing Bragg optics to concentrate the neutron beam on a typically small sample. Construction at Oak Ridge of the high-luminosity spallation neutron source, which will provide intense pulsed neutron beams with time-averaged fluxes equal to those at medium-flux reactors, opens entirely new opportunities for single crystal neutron spectroscopy. Drawing upon experience acquired during decades of studies with both crystal and time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometers, the IDT has developed a conceptual

  11. Gas-phase pesticide measurement using iodide ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murschell, Trey; Fulgham, S. Ryan; Farmer, Delphine K.

    2017-06-01

    Volatilization and subsequent processing in the atmosphere are an important environmental pathway for the transport and chemical fate of pesticides. However, these processes remain a particularly poorly understood component of pesticide lifecycles due to analytical challenges in measuring pesticides in the atmosphere. Most pesticide measurements require long (hours to days) sampling times coupled with offline analysis, inhibiting observation of meteorologically driven events or investigation of rapid oxidation chemistry. Here, we present chemical ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry with iodide reagent ions as a fast and sensitive measurement of four current-use pesticides. These semi-volatile pesticides were calibrated with injections of solutions onto a filter and subsequently volatilized to generate gas-phase analytes. Trifluralin and atrazine are detected as iodide-molecule adducts, while permethrin and metolachlor are detected as adducts between iodide and fragments of the parent analyte molecule. Limits of detection (1 s) are 0.37, 0.67, 0.56, and 1.1 µg m-3 for gas-phase trifluralin, metolachlor, atrazine, and permethrin, respectively. The sensitivities of trifluralin and metolachlor depend on relative humidity, changing as much as 70 and 59, respectively, as relative humidity of the sample air varies from 0 to 80 %. This measurement approach is thus appropriate for laboratory experiments and potentially near-source field measurements.

  12. Development of a Portable Single Photon Ionization-Photoelectron Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunguang Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A vacuum ultraviolet lamp based single photon ionization- (SPI- photoelectron ionization (PEI portable reflecting time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS was designed for online monitoring gas samples. It has a dual mode ionization source: SPI for analyte with ionization energy (IE below 10.6 eV and PEI for IE higher than 10.6 eV. Two kinds of sampling inlets, a capillary inlet and a membrane inlet, are utilized for high concentration and trace volatile organic compounds, respectively. A mass resolution of 1100 at m/z 64 has been obtained with a total size of 40 × 31 × 29 cm, the weight is 27 kg, and the power consumption is only 70 W. A mixture of benzene, toluene, and xylene (BTX, SO2, and discharging products of SF6 were used to test its performance, and the result showed that the limit of quantitation for BTX is as low as 5 ppbv (S/N = 10 : 1 with linear dynamic ranges greater than four orders of magnitude. The portable TOFMS was also evaluated by analyzing volatile organic compounds from wine and decomposition products of SF6 inside of a gas-insulated switchgear.

  13. Matrix assisted laser desorption time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) in clinical microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeletti, Silvia

    2017-07-01

    The microbiological management of patients with suspected bacterial infection includes the identification of the pathogen and the determination of the antibiotic susceptibility. These traditional approaches, based on the pure culture of the microorganism, require at least 36-48h. A new method, Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), has been recently developed to profile bacterial proteins from whole cell extracts and obtain a bacterial fingerprint able to discriminate microorganisms from different genera and species. By whole cell-mass spectrometry, microbial identification can be achieved within minutes from cultured isolate, rather than traditional phenotypic or genotypic characterizations. From the year 2009 an explosion of applications of this technology has been observed with promising results. Several studies have been performed and showed that MALDI-TOF represents a reliable alternative method for rapid bacteria and fungi identification in clinical setting. A future area of expansion is represented by the application of MALDI-TOF technology to the antibiotic susceptibility test. In conclusion, the revision of the literature available up to date demonstrated that MALDI-TOF MS represents an innovative technology for the rapid and accurate identification of bacterial and fungal isolates in clinical settings. By an earlier microbiological diagnosis, MALDI-TOF MS contributes to a reduced mortality and hospitalization time of the patients and consequently has a significant impact on cost savings and public health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A time-of-flight detector for thermal neutrons from radiotherapy Linacs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conti, V. [Universita degli Studi di Milano and INFN di Milano (Italy)], E-mail: conti.Valentina@gmail.com; Bartesaghi, G. [Universita degli Studi di Milano and INFN di Milano (Italy); Bolognini, D.; Mascagna, V.; Perboni, C.; Prest, M.; Scazzi, S. [Universita dell' Insubria, Como and INFN di Milano (Italy); Mozzanica, A. [Universita degli Studi di Brescia and INFN sezione di Pavia (Italy); Cappelletti, P.; Frigerio, M.; Gelosa, S.; Monti, A.; Ostinelli, A. [Fisica Sanitaria, Ospedale S. Anna di Como (Italy); Giannini, G.; Vallazza, E. [INFN, sezione di Trieste and Universita degli Studi di Trieste (Italy)

    2007-10-21

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a therapeutic technique exploiting the release of dose inside the tumour cell after a fission of a {sup 10}B nucleus following the capture of a thermal neutron. BNCT could be the treatment for extended tumors (liver, stomach, lung), radio-resistant ones (melanoma) or tumours surrounded by vital organs (brain). The application of BNCT requires a high thermal neutron flux (>5x10{sup 8}ncm{sup -2}s{sup -1}) with the correct energy spectrum (neutron energy <10keV), two requirements that for the moment are fulfilled only by nuclear reactors. The INFN PhoNeS (Photo Neutron Source) project is trying to produce such a neutron beam with standard radiotherapy Linacs, maximizing with a dedicated photo-neutron converter the neutrons produced by Giant Dipole Resonance by a high energy (>8MeV) photon beam. In this framework, we have developed a real-time detector to measure the thermal neutron time-of -flight to compute the flux and the energy spectrum. Given the pulsed nature of Linac beams, the detector is a single neutron counting system made of a scintillator detecting the photon emitted after the neutron capture by the hydrogen nuclei. The scintillator signal is sampled by a dedicated FPGA clock thus obtaining the exact arrival time of the neutron itself. The paper will present the detector and its electronics, the feasibility measurements with a Varian Clinac 1800/2100CD and comparison with a Monte Carlo simulation.

  15. Liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry selective determination of ochratoxin A in wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Cabo, T; Rodríguez, I; Ramil, M; Cela, R

    2016-05-15

    The performance of liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS) for ochratoxin A (OTA) determination in wine is evaluated for the first time. Sample preparation was optimized to obtain quantitative recoveries at the same time that the efficiency of electrospray ionization (ESI) remained unaltered between sample extracts and calibration standards. Under final conditions, samples (20 mL) were concentrated using a reversed-phase solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridge, followed by OTA elution with 1 mL of ethyl acetate. The absolute recoveries of the method, established against calibration standards, were 91-121% and 90-113% (without and with internal standard correction, respectively), for wines fortified at 3 concentration levels. The attained LOQ (0.05 ng mL(-1)) remained below the maximum permitted OTA concentration (2 ng mL(-1)) in dry wines. The method was applied to different samples, with OTA being found in some dessert wines at concentrations below 1 ng mL(-1). The ethyl ester of OTA (OTC) could be identified in the same wine samples from its accurate full product ion spectra. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Upgraded Neutron Time-of-Flight Detectors for DT Cryogenic Implosions on OMEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glebov, V. Yu.; Forrest, C. J.; Knauer, J. P.; Mannion, O. M.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.

    2017-10-01

    The neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) system on the OMEGA laser was recently upgraded. Three new nTOF detectors of different designs were added to the existing detectors. There are now six nTOF detectors on OMEGA in the different lines of sight (LOS) to record the DT primary yield in 1 ×1012 to 1 ×1014 ranges and infer ion temperature above 2 keV. One new nTOF detector is located in a collimated LOS with a photomultiplier tube in a shielded location. For this nTOF detector it is possible to measure x-ray instrument response function, construct neutron response function, and calculate ion temperature by forward-fitting method. The ion-temperature fitting parameters for the other nTOF detectors located in the OMEGA Target Bay on an uncollimated LOS were adjusted to match the ion temperature against the nTOF detector in the collimated LOS on low-areal-density, warm target shots. All six nTOF detectors were calibrated by DT yield against a copper activation diagnostic on warm target shots. The design details, calibration results, and limitations of these OMEGA nTOF detectors will be presented. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  17. Time-of-flight electron energy loss spectroscopy using TM110 deflection cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Verhoeven

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate the use of two TM110 resonant cavities to generate ultrashort electron pulses and subsequently measure electron energy losses in a time-of-flight type of setup. The method utilizes two synchronized microwave cavities separated by a drift space of 1.45 m. The setup has an energy resolution of 12 ± 2 eV FWHM at 30 keV, with an upper limit for the temporal resolution of 2.7 ± 0.4 ps. Both the time and energy resolution are currently limited by the brightness of the tungsten filament electron gun used. Through simulations, it is shown that an energy resolution of 0.95 eV and a temporal resolution of 110 fs can be achieved using an electron gun with a higher brightness. With this, a new method is provided for time-resolved electron spectroscopy without the need for elaborate laser setups or expensive magnetic spectrometers.

  18. Diting: A polarized time-of-flight neutron reflectometer at CMRR reactor in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinxi; Huang, Chaoqiang; Wang, Yan; Chen, Bo; Sun, Guang'ai; Liu, Yaoguang; Gong, Jian; Kang, Wu; Liu, Hangang

    2016-11-01

    A new time-of-flight neutron reflectometer with a polarization option is developed and tested at the Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, China. Its scattering geometry is horizontal. The constructed neutron reflectometer is a multipurpose instrument that can be used for the characterization of a stratified microstructure and hidden interfaces of solid thin films. Diting is designed for both magnetic and nonmagnetic multi-layer thin films. Spin polarization and analysis are achieved by transmission magnetized supermirrors. The sample unit is equipped with an electromagnet, which can provide a vertical magnetic field range of 0-1.2 tesla. The available neutron beam is a white beam with wavelength range of 0.15-1.25 nm, which can be cut into different wavelength resolution neutron pulses by a four-disk chopper. A two-dimensional position-sensitive detector is employed to count the specular and off-specular reflected neutron beam. A minimum reflectivity of 10-6 is measured on this instrument.

  19. Time-of-flight measurement of fast neutrons with Timepix detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, B.; Nelson, R. O.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Pospisil, S.; Solc, J.; Takai, H.; Vykydal, Z.

    2014-05-01

    Timepix pixel detectors have been used to study the response of silicon hybrid pixel detectors to fast neutrons from a pulsed neutron beam at WNR FP30R, a 14 m long flight path, in the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. Neutrons with kinetic energies up to 600 MeV were available. In order to enhance the conversion of neutrons to energetic charged particles, several converter foils and filters were attached to the 300 μm thick silicon sensor, i.e. polyethylene, polyethylene with aluminum, 6LiF, 6LiF with aluminum, aluminum. The Time-of-Arrival mode of the Timepix detectors has permitted the application of the Time-of-Flight (TOF) technique for the assignment of the detected interactions in the form of clusters (groups of adjacent pixels) in the pixel matrix, to the kinetic energies of the incident neutrons. It was found that, for lower neutron energies ( ~ MeV range) the cluster rates below the polyethylene and the polyethylene and aluminum region, produced by recoil protons, are a good measure for the mean kinetic energies of neutrons. For energies above 50 MeV nuclear reactions in the silicon dominate the detector response. In this energy range the shape of the clusters indicates the neutron kinetic energy.

  20. Time-of-flight thermal flowrate sensor for lab-on-chip applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthet, Helene; Jundt, Jacques; Durivault, Jerome; Mercier, Bruno; Angelescu, Dan

    2011-01-21

    We describe a thermal microflowrate sensor for measuring liquid flow velocity in microfluidic channels, which is capable of providing a highly accurate response independent of the thermal and physical properties of the working liquid. The sensor consists of a rectangular channel containing a heater and several temperature detectors microfabricated on suspended silicon bridges. Heat pulses created by the heater are advected downstream by the flow and are detected using the temperature detector bridges. By injecting a pseudo-stochastic thermal signal at the heater and performing a cross correlation between the detected and the injected signals, we can measure the single-pulse response of the system with excellent signal-to-noise ratio and hence deduce the thermal signal time-of-flight from heater to detector. Combining results from several detector bridges allows us to eliminate diffusion effects, and thus calculate the flow velocity with excellent accuracy and linearity over more than two orders of magnitude. The experimental results obtained with several test fluids closely agree with data from finite element analysis. We developed a phenomenological model which supports and explains the observed sensor response. Several fully functional sensor prototypes were built and characterized, proving the feasibility and providing a critical component to microfluidic lab-on-chip applications where accurate flow measurements are of importance.

  1. Development and characterization of an aircraft aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Kerri A; Mayer, Joseph E; Holecek, John C; Moffet, Ryan C; Sanchez, Rene O; Rebotier, Thomas P; Furutani, Hiroshi; Gonin, Marc; Fuhrer, Katrin; Su, Yongxuan; Guazzotti, Sergio; Prather, Kimberly A

    2009-03-01

    Vertical and horizontal profiles of atmospheric aerosols are necessary for understanding the impact of air pollution on regional and global climate. To gain further insight into the size-resolved chemistry of individual atmospheric particles, a smaller aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS) with increased data acquisition capabilities was developed for aircraft-based studies. Compared to previous ATOFMS systems, the new instrument has a faster data acquisition rate with improved ion transmission and mass resolution, as well as reduced physical size and power consumption, all required advances for use in aircraft studies. In addition, real-time source apportionment software allows the immediate identification and classification of individual particles to guide sampling decisions while in the field. The aircraft (A)-ATOFMS was field-tested on the ground during the Study of Organic Aerosols in Riverside, CA (SOAR) and aboard an aircraft during the Ice in Clouds Experiment-Layer Clouds (ICE-L). Initial results from ICE-L represent the first reported aircraft-based single-particle dual-polarity mass spectrometry measurements and provide an increased understanding of particle mixing state as a function of altitude. Improved ion transmission allows for the first single-particle detection of species out to approximately m/z 2000, an important mass range for the detection of biological aerosols and oligomeric species. In addition, high time resolution measurements of single-particle mixing state are demonstrated and shown to be important for airborne studies where particle concentrations and chemistry vary rapidly.

  2. Plastic scintillation detectors for precision Time-of-Flight measurements of relativistic heavy ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wen-Jian; Zhao, Jian-Wei; Sun, Bao-Hua; He, Liu-Chun; Lin, Wei-Ping; Liu, Chuan-Ye; Tanihata, Isao; Terashima, Satoru; Tian, Yi; Wang, Feng; Wang, Meng; Zhang, Guang-Xin; Zhang, Xue-Heng; Zhu, Li-Hua; Duan, Li-Min; Hu, Rong-Jiang; Liu, Zhong; Lu, Chen-Gui; Ren, Pei-Pei; Sheng, Li-Na; Sun, Zhi-Yu; Wang, Shi-Tao; Wang, Tao-Feng; Xu, Zhi-Guo; Zheng, Yong

    2017-06-01

    Plastic scintillation detectors for Time-of-Flight (TOF) measurements are almost essential for event-by-event identification of relativistic rare isotopes. In this work, a pair of plastic scintillation detectors of dimensions 50 × 50 × 3t mm3 and 80 × 100 × 3t mm3 have been set up at the External Target Facility (ETF), Institute of Modern Physics (IMP). Their time, energy and position responses are measured with the 18O primary beam at 400 MeV/nucleon. After off-line corrections for walk effect and position, the time resolutions of the two detectors are determined to be 27 ps (σ) and 36 ps (σ), respectively. Both detectors have nearly the same energy resolution of 3.1% (σ) and position resolution of about 3.4 mm (σ). The detectors have been used successfully in nuclear reaction cross section measurements, and will be be employed for upgrading the RIBLL2 beam line at IMP as well as for the high energy branch at HIAF. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11475014,11235002) and National Key Research and Development Program (2016YFA0400500)

  3. Particle identification with the ALICE Time-Of-Flight detector at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alici, A., E-mail: alici@bo.infn.it [Centro Fermi - Centro Studi e Ricerche e Museo Storico della Fisica “Enrico Fermi”, Rome (Italy); Sezione INFN, Bologna (Italy)

    2014-12-01

    High performance Particle Identification system (PID) is a distinguishing characteristic of the ALICE experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Charged particles in the intermediate momentum range are identified in ALICE by the Time-Of-Flight (TOF) detector. The TOF exploits the Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chamber (MRPC) technology, capable of an intrinsic time resolution at the level of few tens of ps with an overall efficiency close to 100% and a large operation plateau. The full system is made of 1593 MRPC chambers with a total area of 141 m{sup 2}, covering the pseudorapidity interval [−0.9,+0.9] and the full azimuthal angle. The ALICE TOF system has shown very stable operation during the first 3 years of collisions at the LHC. In this paper a summary of the system performance as well as main results with data from collisions will be reported. - Highlights: • We report the performance of large area, small granularity ALICE TOF system based on MRPC technology. • Description and performance of PID analysis with the TOF are reported. • A non-exhaustive list of physics analyses, where the TOF PID is used, is given.

  4. Time-of-flight mass spectrometry for time-resolved measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blitz, Mark A; Goddard, Andrew; Ingham, Trevor; Pilling, Michael J

    2007-03-01

    A time-resolved time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS) that can simultaneously monitor multiple species on the millisecond time scale has been constructed. A pulsed photolysis laser is used to initiate reaction, and then via a pinhole the reaction mixture is sampled by the TOF-MS. The ions are created by photoionization via either a discharge lamp or a pulsed laser. Comparison between the two ionization sources showed that the laser is at least an order of magnitude more efficient, based on the time to accumulate the data. Also, unlike the continuous lamp the pulsed laser is not mass limited. Frequency tripling the 355 nm output of a Nd:YAG laser provided a convenient laser ionization source. However, using a dye laser provided an equally intense laser ionization source with the ability to tune the vacuum ultraviolet (vuv) light. To show the versatility of the system the kinetics of the reaction of SO and ClSO radicals with NO(2) were simultaneously measured, and using the dye laser the vuv light was tuned to 114 nm in order to observe H(2)CO being formed from the reaction between CH(3)CO and O(2).

  5. Time-of-flight mass measurements for nuclear processes in neutron star crusts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estradé, A; Matoš, M; Schatz, H; Amthor, A M; Bazin, D; Beard, M; Becerril, A; Brown, E F; Cyburt, R; Elliot, T; Gade, A; Galaviz, D; George, S; Gupta, S S; Hix, W R; Lau, R; Lorusso, G; Möller, P; Pereira, J; Portillo, M; Rogers, A M; Shapira, D; Smith, E; Stolz, A; Wallace, M; Wiescher, M

    2011-10-21

    We present results from time-of-flight nuclear mass measurements at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory that are relevant for neutron star crust models. The masses of 16 neutron-rich nuclei in the scandium-nickel range were determined simultaneously, with the masses of (61)V, (63)Cr, (66)Mn, and (74)Ni measured for the first time with mass excesses of -30.510(890) MeV, -35.280(650) MeV, -36.900(790) MeV, and -49.210(990) MeV, respectively. With these results the locations of the dominant electron capture heat sources in the outer crust of accreting neutron stars that exhibit super bursts are now experimentally constrained. We find the experimental Q value for the (66)Fe→(66)Mn electron capture to be 2.1 MeV (2.6σ) smaller than predicted, resulting in the transition occurring significantly closer to the neutron star surface. © 2011 American Physical Society

  6. Time-of-flight mass spectrographs—From ions to neutral atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möbius, E.; Galvin, A. B.; Kistler, L. M.; Kucharek, H.; Popecki, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    After their introduction to space physics in the mid 1980s time-of-flight (TOF) spectrographs have become a main staple in spaceborne mass spectrometry. They have largely replaced magnetic spectrometers, except when extremely high mass resolution is required to identify complex molecules, for example, in the vicinity of comets or in planetary atmospheres. In combination with electrostatic analyzers and often solid state detectors, TOF spectrographs have become key instruments to diagnose space plasma velocity distributions, mass, and ionic charge composition. With a variety of implementation schemes that also include isochronous electric field configurations, TOF spectrographs can respond to diverse science requirements. This includes a wide range in mass resolution to allow the separation of medium heavy isotopes or to simply provide distributions of the major species, such as H, He, and O, to obtain information on source tracers or mass fluxes. With a top-hat analyzer at the front end, or in combination with deflectors for three-axis stabilized spacecraft, the distribution function of ions can be obtained with good time resolution. Most recently, the reach of TOF ion mass spectrographs has been extended to include energetic neutral atoms. After selecting the arrival direction with mechanical collimation, followed by conversion to ions, adapted TOF sensors form a new branch of the spectrograph family tree. We review the requirements, challenges, and implementation schemes for ion and neutral atom spectrographs, including potential directions for the future, while largely avoiding overlap with complementary contributions in this special issue.

  7. Correction of a phase dependent error in a time-of-flight range sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiter, Johannes; Hofbauer, Michael; Davidovic, Milos; Zimmermann, Horst

    2013-04-01

    Time-of-Flight (TOF) 3D cameras determine the distance information by means of a propagation delay measurement. The delay value is acquired by correlating the sent and received continuous wave signals in discrete phase delay steps. To reduce the measurement time as well as the resources required for signal processing, the number of phase steps can be decreased. However, such a change results in the arising of a crucial systematic distance dependent distance error. In the present publication we investigate this phase dependent error systematically by means of a fiber based measurement setup. Furthermore, the phase shift is varied with an electrical delay line device rather than by moving an object in front of the camera. This procedure allows investigating the above mentioned phase dependent error isolated from other error sources, as, e.g., the amplitude dependent error. In other publications this error is corrected by means of a look-up table stored in a memory device. In our paper we demonstrate an analytical correction method that dramatically minimizes the demanded memory size. For four phase steps, this approach reduces the error dramatically by 89.4 % to 13.5 mm at a modulation frequency of 12.5 MHz. For 20.0 MHz, a reduction of 86.8 % to 11.5 mm could be achieved.

  8. Facile time-of-flight methods for characterizing pulsed superfluid helium droplet beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yunteng; Zhang, Jie; Li, Yang; Freund, William M; Kong, Wei

    2015-08-01

    We present two facile time-of-flight (TOF) methods of detecting superfluid helium droplets and droplets with neutral dopants. Without an electron gun and with only a heated filament and pulsed electrodes, the electron impact ionization TOF mass spectrometer can resolve ionized helium clusters such as He2(+) and He4(+), which are signatures of superfluid helium droplets. Without ionizing any helium atoms, multiphoton non-resonant laser ionization of CCl4 doped in superfluid helium droplets at 266 nm generates complex cluster ions of dopant fragments with helium atoms, including (He)(n)C(+), (He)(n)Cl(+), and (He)(n)CCl(+). Using both methods, we have characterized our cryogenic pulsed valve—the Even-Lavie valve. We have observed a primary pulse with larger helium droplets traveling at a slower speed and a rebound pulse with smaller droplets at a faster speed. In addition, the pickup efficiency of dopant is higher for the primary pulse when the nozzle temperature is higher than 13 K, and the total time duration of the doped droplet pulse is only on the order of 20 μs. These results stress the importance of fast and easy characterization of the droplet beam for sensitive measurements such as electron diffraction of doped droplets.

  9. Measuring time-of-flight in an ultrasonic LPS system using generalized cross-correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villladangos, José Manuel; Ureña, Jesús; García, Juan Jesús; Mazo, Manuel; Hernández, Alvaro; Jiménez, Ana; Ruíz, Daniel; De Marziani, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    In this article, a time-of-flight detection technique in the frequency domain is described for an ultrasonic local positioning system (LPS) based on encoded beacons. Beacon transmissions have been synchronized and become simultaneous by means of the DS-CDMA (direct-sequence code Division multiple access) technique. Every beacon has been associated to a 255-bit Kasami code. The detection of signal arrival instant at the receiver, from which the distance to each beacon can be obtained, is based on the application of the generalized cross-correlation (GCC), by using the cross-spectral density between the received signal and the sequence to be detected. Prior filtering to enhance the frequency components around the carrier frequency (40 kHz) has improved estimations when obtaining the correlation function maximum, which implies an improvement in distance measurement precision. Positioning has been achieved by using hyperbolic trilateration, based on the time differences of arrival (TDOA) between a reference beacon and the others.

  10. Measuring Time-of-Flight in an Ultrasonic LPS System Using Generalized Cross-Correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos De Marziani

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article, a time-of-flight detection technique in the frequency domain is described for an ultrasonic Local Positioning System (LPS based on encoded beacons. Beacon transmissions have been synchronized and become simultaneous by means of the DS-CDMA (Direct-Sequence Code Division Multiple Access technique. Every beacon has been associated to a 255-bit Kasami code. The detection of signal arrival instant at the receiver, from which the distance to each beacon can be obtained, is based on the application of the Generalized Cross-Correlation (GCC, by using the cross-spectral density between the received signal and the sequence to be detected. Prior filtering to enhance the frequency components around the carrier frequency (40 kHz has improved estimations when obtaining the correlation function maximum, which implies an improvement in distance measurement precision. Positioning has been achieved by using hyperbolic trilateration, based on the Time Differences of Arrival (TDOA between a reference beacon and the others.

  11. Design of the TORCH detector: A Cherenkov based Time-of-Flight system for particle identification

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2078663; Rademacker, Jonas

    The LHCb detector at the LHC collider has been very successfully operated over the past years, providing new and profound insights into the Standard Model, in particular through study of $b$-hadrons to achieve a better understanding of CP violation. One of the key components of LHCb is its particle identification system, comprised of two RICH detectors, which allow for high precision separation of particle species over a large momentum range. In order to retain and improve the performance of the particle identification system in light of the LHCb upgrade, the TORCH detector has been proposed to supplement the RICH system at low momentum (2-10 GeV/c). The TORCH detector provides (charged) particle identification through precision timing of particles passing through it. Assuming a known momentum from the tracking, it is possible to derive the species of a particle from the time of flight from its primary vertex. This measurement is achieved by timing and combining photons generated in a solid radiator. The geom...

  12. Development of a picosecond time-of-flight system in the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Grabas, Hervé

    In this thesis, we present a study of the sensitivity to Beyond Standard Model physics brought by the design and installation of picosecond time-of-flight detectors in the forward region of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. The first part of the thesis present a study of the sensitivity to the quartic gauge anomalous coupling between the photon and the W boson, using exclusive WW pair production in ATLAS. The event selection is built considering the semi-leptonic decay of WW pair and the presence of the AFP detector in ATLAS. The second part gives a description of large area picosecond photo-detectors design and time reconstruction algorithms with a special care given to signal sampling and processing for precision timing.The third part presents the design of SamPic: a custom picosecond readout integrated circuit. At the end, its first results are reported, and in particular a world-class 5ps timing precision in measuring the delay between two fast pulses.

  13. Gas-phase pesticide measurement using iodide ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Murschell

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Volatilization and subsequent processing in the atmosphere are an important environmental pathway for the transport and chemical fate of pesticides. However, these processes remain a particularly poorly understood component of pesticide lifecycles due to analytical challenges in measuring pesticides in the atmosphere. Most pesticide measurements require long (hours to days sampling times coupled with offline analysis, inhibiting observation of meteorologically driven events or investigation of rapid oxidation chemistry. Here, we present chemical ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry with iodide reagent ions as a fast and sensitive measurement of four current-use pesticides. These semi-volatile pesticides were calibrated with injections of solutions onto a filter and subsequently volatilized to generate gas-phase analytes. Trifluralin and atrazine are detected as iodide–molecule adducts, while permethrin and metolachlor are detected as adducts between iodide and fragments of the parent analyte molecule. Limits of detection (1 s are 0.37, 0.67, 0.56, and 1.1 µg m−3 for gas-phase trifluralin, metolachlor, atrazine, and permethrin, respectively. The sensitivities of trifluralin and metolachlor depend on relative humidity, changing as much as 70 and 59, respectively, as relative humidity of the sample air varies from 0 to 80 %. This measurement approach is thus appropriate for laboratory experiments and potentially near-source field measurements.

  14. Spherical neutron polarimetry applied to spin-echo and time-of-flight spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lelievre-Berna, E., E-mail: lelievre@ill.e [Institut Laue Langevin (ILL), 6 rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Bentley, P.; Bourgeat-Lami, E.; Thomas, M. [Institut Laue Langevin (ILL), 6 rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Pappas, C. [Helmholtz Centre Berlin for Materials and Energy (HCB), Glienickerstr. 100, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Kischnik, R.; Moskvin, E. [Helmholtz Centre Berlin for Materials and Energy (HCB), Glienickerstr. 100, 14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2009-09-01

    The changes in direction of the neutron spin that take place on scattering by a magnetic interaction vector are highly dependent on their relative directions. In some circumstances, without zero-field polarimeter, it is impossible to distinguish between a simple depolarisation and a rotation of the polarisation vector. Motivated by the investigation of chiral magnetic fluctuations, we have implemented the third-generation zero-field polarimeter Cryopad on the neutron spin-echo spectrometer SPAN at the Helmholtz Centre Berlin (HCB). We present the method and the limitations of this novel technique that is now available on IN15 at the ILL. The huge progress accomplished with {sup 3}He neutron spin filters/flippers are going to facilitate the exploitation of polarised beams at spallation sources. Zero-field polarimeters like Cryopad are used routinely at several steady-state sources but their design would be inefficient at a pulse source. We have investigated the possibility to implement a zero-field polarimeter on a time-of-flight spectrometer. We propose a design that would lead to a better efficiency and present the finite element calculations.

  15. Analysis of the neutron time-of-flight spectra from inertial confinement fusion experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatarik, R., E-mail: hatarik1@llnl.gov; Sayre, D. B.; Caggiano, J. A.; Phillips, T.; Eckart, M. J.; Bond, E. J.; Cerjan, C.; Grim, G. P.; Hartouni, E. P.; Mcnaney, J. M.; Munro, D. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Knauer, J. P. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2015-11-14

    Neutron time-of-flight diagnostics have long been used to characterize the neutron spectrum produced by inertial confinement fusion experiments. The primary diagnostic goals are to extract the d + t → n + α (DT) and d + d → n + {sup 3}He (DD) neutron yields and peak widths, and the amount DT scattering relative to its unscattered yield, also known as the down-scatter ratio (DSR). These quantities are used to infer yield weighted plasma conditions, such as ion temperature (T{sub ion}) and cold fuel areal density. We report on novel methodologies used to determine neutron yield, apparent T{sub ion}, and DSR. These methods invoke a single temperature, static fluid model to describe the neutron peaks from DD and DT reactions and a spline description of the DT spectrum to determine the DSR. Both measurements are performed using a forward modeling technique that includes corrections for line-of-sight attenuation and impulse response of the detection system. These methods produce typical uncertainties for DT T{sub ion} of 250 eV, 7% for DSR, and 9% for the DT neutron yield. For the DD values, the uncertainties are 290 eV for T{sub ion} and 10% for the neutron yield.

  16. Impulse responses of visible phototubes used in National Ignition Facility neutron time of flight diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datte, P. S.; Eckart, M.; Moore, A. S.; Thompson, W.; Vergel de Dios, G.

    2016-11-01

    Neutron-induced visible scintillation in neutron time of flight (NToF) diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is measured with 40 mm single stage micro-channel plate photomultipliers and a 40 mm vacuum photodiode, outside the neutron line of sight. In NIF experiments with 14 MeV neutron yields above Y > 10 × 1015 these tubes are configured to deliver of order 1 nC of charge in the nominally 5 ns NToF into a 50 Ω load. We have examined a number of 40 mm tubes manufactured by Photek Ltd. of St. Leonards on Sea, UK, to determine possible changes in the instrument impulse response as a function of signal charge delivered in 1 ns. Precision NToF measurements at approximately 20 m require that we characterize changes in the impulse response moments to <40 ps for the first central moment and ˜2% rms for the square root of the second central moment with ˜500 ps value. Detailed results are presented for three different diode configurations.

  17. The measurement programme at the neutron time-of-flight facility n_TOF at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunsing, F.; Aberle, O.; Andrzejewski, J.; Audouin, L.; Bécares, V.; Bacak, M.; Balibrea-Correa, J.; Barbagallo, M.; Barros, S.; Bečvář, F.; Beinrucker, C.; Belloni, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Billowes, J.; Bosnar, D.; Brown, A.; Brugger, M.; Caamaño, M.; Calviño, F.; Calviani, M.; Cano-Ott, D.; Cardella, R.; Casanovas, A.; Castelluccio, D. M.; Cerutti, F.; Chen, Y. H.; Chiaveri, E.; Colonna, N.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Cortés, G.; Cosentino, L.; Damone, L. A.; Deo, K.; Diakaki, M.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dressler, R.; Dupont, E.; Durán, I.; Fernández-Domínguez, B.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira, P.; Finocchiaro, P.; Frost, R. J. W.; Furman, V.; Ganesan, S.; García, A. R.; Gawlik, A.; Gheorghe, I.; Gilardoni, S.; Glodariu, T.; Gonçalves, I. F.; González, E.; Goverdovski, A.; Griesmayer, E.; Guerrero, C.; Göbel, K.; Harada, H.; Heftrich, T.; Heinitz, S.; Hernández-Prieto, A.; Heyse, J.; Jenkins, D. G.; Jericha, E.; Käppeler, F.; Kadi, Y.; Kalamara, A.; Katabuchi, T.; Kavrigin, P.; Ketlerov, V.; Khryachkov, V.; Kimura, A.; Kivel, N.; Kokkoris, M.; Krtička, M.; Kurtulgil, D.; Leal-Cidoncha, E.; Lederer, C.; Leeb, H.; Lerendegui, J.; Licata, M.; Meo, S. Lo; Lonsdale, S. J.; Losito, R.; Macina, D.; Marganiec, J.; Martínez, T.; Masi, A.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mastromarco, M.; Matteucci, F.; Maugeri, E. A.; Mazzone, A.; Mendoza, E.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Mingrone, F.; Mirea, M.; Montesano, S.; Musumarra, A.; Nolte, R.; Negret, A.; Oprea, A.; Palomo-Pinto, F. R.; Paradela, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Perkowski, J.; Porras, I.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J. M.; Radeck, D.; Rajeev, K.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Riego-Perez, A.; Robles, M.; Rout, P.; Rubbia, C.; Ryan, J. A.; Sabaté-Gilarte, M.; Saxena, A.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Schmidt, S.; Schumann, D.; Sedyshev, P.; Smith, A. G.; Sosnin, N. V.; Stamatopoulos, A.; Suryanarayana, S. V.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tarifeño-Saldivia, A.; Tarrío, D.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tsinganis, A.; Valenta, S.; Vannini, G.; Variale, V.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Wallner, A.; Warren, S.; Weigand, M.; Weiss, C.; Wolf, C.; Woods, P. J.; Wright, T.; Žugec, P.

    2017-09-01

    Neutron-induced reaction cross sections are important for a wide variety of research fields ranging from the study of nuclear level densities, nucleosynthesis to applications of nuclear technology like design, and criticality and safety assessment of existing and future nuclear reactors, radiation dosimetry, medical applications, nuclear waste transmutation, accelerator-driven systems and fuel cycle investigations. Simulations and calculations of nuclear technology applications largely rely on evaluated nuclear data libraries. The evaluations in these libraries are based both on experimental data and theoretical models. CERN's neutron time-of-flight facility n_TOF has produced a considerable amount of experimental data since it has become fully operational with the start of its scientific measurement programme in 2001. While for a long period a single measurement station (EAR1) located at 185 m from the neutron production target was available, the construction of a second beam line at 20 m (EAR2) in 2014 has substantially increased the measurement capabilities of the facility. An outline of the experimental nuclear data activities at n_TOF will be presented.

  18. 3-D operation situs reconstruction with time-of-flight satellite cameras using photogeometric data fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, Sven; Bauer, Sebastian; Wasza, Jakob; Kilgus, Thomas; Maier-Hein, Lena; Schneider, Armin; Kranzfelder, Michael; Feubner, Hubertus; Hornegger, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Minimally invasive procedures are of growing importance in modern surgery. Navigation and orientation are major issues during these interventions as conventional endoscopes only cover a limited field of view. We propose the application of a Time-of-Flight (ToF) satellite camera at the zenith of the pneumoperitoneum to survey the operation situs. Due to its limited field of view we propose a fusion of different 3-D views to reconstruct the situs using photometric and geometric information provided by the ToF sensor. We were able to reconstruct the entire abdomen with a mean absolute mesh-to-mesh error of less than 5 mm compared to CT ground truth data, at a frame rate of 3 Hz. The framework was evaluated on real data from a miniature ToF camera in an open surgery pig study and for quantitative evaluation with a realistic human phantom. With the proposed approach to operation situs reconstruction we improve the surgeons' orientation and navigation and therefore increase safety and speed up surgical interventions.

  19. Exploiting sparsity in time-of-flight range acquisition using a single time-resolved sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirmani, Ahmed; Colaço, Andrea; Wong, Franco N C; Goyal, Vivek K

    2011-10-24

    Range acquisition systems such as light detection and ranging (LIDAR) and time-of-flight (TOF) cameras operate by measuring the time difference of arrival between a transmitted pulse and the scene reflection. We introduce the design of a range acquisition system for acquiring depth maps of piecewise-planar scenes with high spatial resolution using a single, omnidirectional, time-resolved photodetector and no scanning components. In our experiment, we reconstructed 64 × 64-pixel depth maps of scenes comprising two to four planar shapes using only 205 spatially-patterned, femtosecond illuminations of the scene. The reconstruction uses parametric signal modeling to recover a set of depths present in the scene. Then, a convex optimization that exploits sparsity of the Laplacian of the depth map of a typical scene determines correspondences between spatial positions and depths. In contrast with 2D laser scanning used in LIDAR systems and low-resolution 2D sensor arrays used in TOF cameras, our experiment demonstrates that it is possible to build a non-scanning range acquisition system with high spatial resolution using only a standard, low-cost photodetector and a spatial light modulator. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  20. Advances in quantitative hepcidin measurements by time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorine W Swinkels

    Full Text Available Assays for the detection of the iron regulatory hormone hepcidin in plasma or urine have not yet been widely available, whereas quantitative comparisons between hepcidin levels in these different matrices were thus far even impossible due to technical restrictions. To circumvent these limitations, we here describe several advances in time-of flight mass spectrometry (TOF MS, the most important of which concerned spiking of a synthetic hepcidin analogue as internal standard into serum and urine samples. This serves both as a control for experimental variation, such as recovery and matrix-dependent ionization and ion suppression, and at the same time allows value assignment to the measured hepcidin peak intensities. The assay improvements were clinically evaluated using samples from various patients groups and its relevance was further underscored by the significant correlation of serum hepcidin levels with serum iron indices in healthy individuals. Most importantly, this approach allowed kinetic studies as illustrated by the paired analyses of serum and urine samples, showing that more than 97% of the freely filtered serum hepcidin can be reabsorbed in the kidney. Thus, the here reported advances in TOF MS-based hepcidin measurements represent critical steps in the accurate quantification of hepcidin in various body fluids and pave the way for clinical studies on the kinetic behavior of hepcidin in both healthy and diseased states.

  1. Advances in quantitative hepcidin measurements by time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinkels, Dorine W; Girelli, Domenico; Laarakkers, Coby; Kroot, Joyce; Campostrini, Natascia; Kemna, Erwin H J M; Tjalsma, Harold

    2008-07-16

    Assays for the detection of the iron regulatory hormone hepcidin in plasma or urine have not yet been widely available, whereas quantitative comparisons between hepcidin levels in these different matrices were thus far even impossible due to technical restrictions. To circumvent these limitations, we here describe several advances in time-of flight mass spectrometry (TOF MS), the most important of which concerned spiking of a synthetic hepcidin analogue as internal standard into serum and urine samples. This serves both as a control for experimental variation, such as recovery and matrix-dependent ionization and ion suppression, and at the same time allows value assignment to the measured hepcidin peak intensities. The assay improvements were clinically evaluated using samples from various patients groups and its relevance was further underscored by the significant correlation of serum hepcidin levels with serum iron indices in healthy individuals. Most importantly, this approach allowed kinetic studies as illustrated by the paired analyses of serum and urine samples, showing that more than 97% of the freely filtered serum hepcidin can be reabsorbed in the kidney. Thus, the here reported advances in TOF MS-based hepcidin measurements represent critical steps in the accurate quantification of hepcidin in various body fluids and pave the way for clinical studies on the kinetic behavior of hepcidin in both healthy and diseased states.

  2. Superconducting NbN Thin-Film Nanowire Detectors for Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Koji; Miki, Shigehito; Wang, Zhen; Kobayashi, Yohei; Shiki, Shigetomo; Ohkubo, Masataka

    2008-05-01

    Superconducting nanowire detectors (SND) have been applied for time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS) for the first time. In this study, we used the SND, which consists of a very thin niobium nitride (NbN) film having a nanowire meander pattern with a thickness of 6.8 nm and a width of 200 nm on a MgO substrate. The experiments were carried out for Angiotensin I and bovine serum albumin (BSA). These biomolecules were ionized by laser radiation with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI). The ions were accelerated by a static high voltage of 17.5 kV, and incident on the NbN meander, which is dc-biased below a superconducting critical current ( I c). It was found that the output pulses have a rise time of about 640 ps, which is extremely faster than superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) detectors, and a fall time of about 50 ns. Moreover, we investigated the bias current dependence of output pulses, and confirmed that molecules can be detected even for bias currents of about 50% of I c.

  3. Determination of triacetone triperoxide using ultraviolet femtosecond multiphoton ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezoe, Ryota; Imasaka, Tomoko; Imasaka, Totaro

    2015-01-01

    Triacetone triperoxide (TATP), an explosive compound, was measured using gas chromatography combined with multiphoton ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC/MPI-TOFMS). By decreasing the pulse width of a femtosecond laser from 80 to 35 fs, a molecular ion was drastically enhanced and was measured as one of the major ions in the mass spectrum. The detection limits obtained using the molecular (M(+)) and fragment (C2H3O(+)) ions were similar or slightly superior to those obtained using conventional mass spectrometry based on electron and chemical ionization. In order to improve the reliability, an isotope of TATP, i.e., TATP-d18, was synthesized and used as an internal standard in the trace analysis of TATP in a sample of human blood. TATP could be identified in a two-dimensional display, even though numerous interfering compounds were present in the sample. Acetone, which is frequently used as a solvent in sampling TATP, produced a chemical species with a retention time nearly identical to that of TATP and provided a C2H3O(+) fragment ion that was employed for measuring a chromatogram of TATP in conventional MS. This compound, the structure of which was assigned as phorone, was clearly differentiated from TATP based on a molecular ion observable in MPI-TOFMS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Time-of-flight measurement of resonant molecular formation in muon-catalyzed dt fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, G.M.; Beveridge, J.L.; Mulhauser, F. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). TRIUMF Facility; Adamczak, A. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland); Bailey, J.M. [EA Technology, Capenhurst (United Kingdom); Beer, G.A.; Douglas, J.L.; Knowles, P.E.; Maier, M.; Mason, G.R.; Olin, A.; Porcelli, T.A. [Victoria Univ., BC (Canada); Faifman, M.P.; Markushin, V.E. [Gosudarstvennyj Komitet po Ispol`zovaniyu Atomnoj Ehnergii SSSR, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. Atomnoj Ehnergii; Fujiwara, M.C. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada); Huber, T.M.; Steffens, C.P. [Gustavus Adolphus Coll., St. Peter, MN (United States); Jacot-Guillarmod, R.; Piller, C. [Fribourg Univ. (Switzerland); Kammel, P. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Kherani, N.P. [Ontario Hydro, Toronto, ON (Canada); Kim, S.K. [Jeonbuk National Univ., Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Kunselman, A.R. [Wyoming Univ., Laramie, WY (United States); Martoff, C.J.; Zhang, Y. [Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Melezhik, V.S. [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Petitjean, C. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Zmeskal, J. [Oesterreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Vienna (Austria). Inst. fuer Mittelenergiephysik

    1996-10-01

    Preliminary results are reported for an experiment at TRIUMF where a time-of-flight technique was tested for measuring the energy dependence of the rate for muon-catalyzed DT fusion. Muonic tritium atoms were created following transfer of negative muons from muonic protium in a layer of solid hydrogen (protium) containing a small fraction of tritium. The atoms escaped from the solid layer via the Ramsauer-Townsend mechanism, traversed a drift region of 18 mm, and then struck an adjacent layer of deuterium, where the muonic atom could form a molecular system. The time of detection of a fusion product (neutron or alpha) following muon arrival is dependent upon the energy of the muonic tritium atom as it traverses the drift region. By comparison of the time distribution of fusion events with a prediction based on the theoretical energy dependence of the rate, the strength of resonant formation can in principle be determined. The results extracted so far are discussed and the limitations of the method are examined. (orig.). 19 refs.

  5. The pulse digitization for measuring the time of flight of ionizing particles

    CERN Document Server

    Codino, A

    2000-01-01

    A new method of processing the output signals of preamplifiers connected to silicon strip detectors operated for time-of-flight measurements is described. Pulse pairs coming out from the two arms of a silicon strip telescope are stored in a transient digitizer with a minimum sampling period of 5 ps and software analyzed. This method eliminates both discriminators and time-to-digital converters from the readout system. Using the new technique, the time resolution of the telescope, at various thresholds, is determined by software algorithms that reproduce the functions of both amplitude and constant-fraction discriminators. Measurements of time resolution of the telescope of the new readout system, using electrons from the source sup 9 sup 0 Sr are reported. At room temperature the time resolution of the telescope, obtained with this new technique and an unoptimized software algorithms is 235+-55 ps to be compared with that of 160+-35 ps resulting from the use of the classical readout method. Technical limitati...

  6. The measurement programme at the neutron time-of-flight facility n_TOF at CERN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunsing F.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutron-induced reaction cross sections are important for a wide variety of research fields ranging from the study of nuclear level densities, nucleosynthesis to applications of nuclear technology like design, and criticality and safety assessment of existing and future nuclear reactors, radiation dosimetry, medical applications, nuclear waste transmutation, accelerator-driven systems and fuel cycle investigations. Simulations and calculations of nuclear technology applications largely rely on evaluated nuclear data libraries. The evaluations in these libraries are based both on experimental data and theoretical models. CERN’s neutron time-of-flight facility n_TOF has produced a considerable amount of experimental data since it has become fully operational with the start of its scientific measurement programme in 2001. While for a long period a single measurement station (EAR1 located at 185 m from the neutron production target was available, the construction of a second beam line at 20 m (EAR2 in 2014 has substantially increased the measurement capabilities of the facility. An outline of the experimental nuclear data activities at n_TOF will be presented.

  7. Multi-Reflection Time-of-Flight Mass Separation and Spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Kreim, Susanne; Wolf, R N

    2014-01-01

    The mass of a nucleus is one of its most fundamental ground-state properties and reveals the strength of nuclear binding. Investigating the binding energy of nuclei with respect to the number of protons and neutrons in a nucleus is important for advancing nuclear theory and increases our understanding of nucleosynthesis in supernovae and neutron stars. Precision mass measurements on radioactive nuclides belong to the state-of-the-art techniques [1, 2]. Presently, four complementary techniques are applied: isochronous and Schottky mass spectrometry in storage rings (IMS and SMS, respectively), magnetic-rigidity time-of-flight (TOF-ρ) measurements, and Penning-trap mass spectrometry (PTMS). With measurement cycles in the sub-ms range, IMS and TOF-Bρ MS are well suited for very short-lived species while offering moderate relative precision on the level of 10−6. A higher precision is achieved by SMS but with the need for measurement times on the order of several seconds. As soon as masses with a relative prec...

  8. Alternating-direction method of multipliers estimation of attenuation and activity distributions in time-of-flight flat-panel positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Yueh; Chou, Cheng-Ying [National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2015-05-18

    A quantitative reconstruction of radiotracer activity distribution in positron emission tomography (PET) requires correction of attenuation, which was typically estimated through transmission measurements. The advancement in hardware development has prompted the use of time-of-flight (TOF) to improve PET imaging. Recently, the application of TOF-PET has been further extended to obtain attenuation map in addition to activity distribution simultaneously by use of iterative algorithms. Two flat-panel detectors are employed thus many transaxial lines of response are not detected. In this work, we applied the alternating-direction method of multipliers (ADMM) to simultaneously reconstruct TOF-PET and attenuation estimation in a dualhead small-animal PET system. The results were compared with those obtained by use of the maximum-likelihood algorithm. The computer simulation results showed that the application of the ADMM algorithm could greatly improve the image quality and reduce noisy appearance.

  9. Phenotypic identification of Porphyromonas gingivalis validated with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rams, Thomas E; Sautter, Jacqueline D; Getreu, Adam; van Winkelhoff, Arie J

    OBJECTIVE: Porphyromonas gingivalis is a major bacterial pathogen in human periodontitis. This study used matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry to assess the accuracy of a rapid phenotypic identification scheme for detection of cultivable P.

  10. Time-of-flight MR angiography of carotid artery stenosis: does a flow void represent severe stenosis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nederkoorn, Paul J.; van der Graaf, Yolanda; Eikelboom, Bert C.; van der Lugt, Aad; Bartels, Lambertus W.; Mali, Willem P. T. M.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Time-of-flight (TOF) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is commonly used to visualize the carotid arteries; however, flow void artifacts can appear. Our purpose was to determine the frequency and diagnostic meaning of flow voids by using real patient data, as part of a

  11. High mass resolution time of flight mass spectrometer for measuring products in heterogeneous catalysis in highly sensitive microreactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas; Jensen, Robert; Christensen, M. K.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a combined microreactor and time of flight system for testing and characterization of heterogeneous catalysts with high resolution mass spectrometry and high sensitivity. Catalyst testing is performed in silicon-based microreactors which have high sensitivity and fast thermal...

  12. Broadband photon time of flight spectroscopy: advanced spectroscopic analysis for ensuring safety and performance of pharmaceutical tablets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamran, Faisal; Nielsen, Otto Højager Attermann; Andersson-Engels, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    We report on extended spectroscopic analysis of pharmaceutical tablets performed with broadband photon time-of-flight absorption/scaring spectroscopy. Precise monitoring of absorption and scattering spectra enables cost-efficient monitoring of key safety and performance parameters of the drugs....

  13. Identification of molecules in graphite furnace by laser ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry: sulfur and chlorine containing compounds

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Raseleka, RM

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available An electro thermal vaporizer (ETV) coupled to a time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS) with laser ionization (LI) was applied to the identification of molecules from sulphur and chlorine matrices in the furnace. An interface was developed...

  14. Gas chromatographic quadrupole time-of-flight full scan high resolution mass spectrometric screening of human urine in antidoping analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abushareeda, Wadha; Lyris, Emmanouil; Kraiem, Suhail; Wahaibi, Aisha Al; Alyazidi, Sameera; Dbes, Najib; Lommen, Arjen; Nielen, Michel; Horvatovich, Peter L.; Alsayrafi, Mohammed; Georgakopoulos, Costas

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the development and validation of a high-resolution full scan (FS) electron impact ionization (EI) gas chromatography coupled to quadrupole Time-of-Flight mass spectrometry (GC/QTOF) platform for screening anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) in human urine samples. The World

  15. Gas chromatographic quadrupole time-of-flight full scan high resolution mass spectrometric screening of human urine in antidoping analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abushareeda, Wadha; Lyris, Emmanouil; Kraiem, Suhail; Wahaibi, Aisha Al; Alyazidi, Sameera; Dbes, Najib; Lommen, Arjen; Nielen, Michel; Horvatovich, Peter L.; Alsayrafi, Mohammed; Georgakopoulos, Costas

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the development and validation of a high-resolution full scan (FS) electron impact ionization (EI) gas chromatography coupled to quadrupole Time-of-Flight mass spectrometry (GC/QTOF) platform for screening anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) in human urine samples. The World

  16. Electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometric analysis of hexamethylenediamine-modified maltodextrin and dextran

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sisu, E.; Bosker, W.T.E.; Norde, W.; Slaghek, T.M.; Timmermans, J.W.; Peter-Katalinić, J.; Cohen-Stuart, M.A.; Zamfir, A.D.

    2006-01-01

    A combined methodology for obtaining at the preparative scale and characterization by nanoelectrospray ionization (nanoESI) quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) mass spectrometry (MS) and tandem MS (MS/MS) of linear polysaccharides modified at the reducing end is presented. Two polydisperse

  17. Rules for Flight Paths and Time of Flight for Flows in Porous Media with Heterogeneous Permeability and Porosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihua Zuo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Porous media like hydrocarbon reservoirs may be composed of a wide variety of rocks with different porosity and permeability. Our study shows in algorithms and in synthetic numerical simulations that the flow pattern of any particular porous medium, assuming constant fluid properties and standardized boundary and initial conditions, is not affected by any spatial porosity changes but will vary only according to spatial permeability changes. In contrast, the time of flight along the streamline will be affected by both the permeability and porosity, albeit in opposite directions. A theoretical framework is presented with evidence from flow visualizations. A series of strategically chosen streamline simulations, including systematic spatial variations of porosity and permeability, visualizes the respective effects on the flight path and time of flight. Two practical rules are formulated. Rule  1 states that an increase in permeability decreases the time of flight, whereas an increase in porosity increases the time of flight. Rule  2 states that the permeability uniquely controls the flight path of fluid flow in porous media; local porosity variations do not affect the streamline path. The two rules are essential for understanding fluid transport mechanisms, and their rigorous validation therefore is merited.

  18. Evaluation of the ID220 single photon avalanche diode for extended spectral range of photon time-of-flight spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Otto Højager Attermann; Dahl, Anders Bjorholm; Anderson-Engels, Stefan

    This paper describe the performance of the ID220 single photon avalanche diode for single photon counting, and investigates its performance for photon time-of-flight (PToF) spectroscopy. At first this report will serve as a summary to the group for PToF spectroscopy at the Department of Physics...

  19. Isobar Separation in a Multiple-Reflection Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer by Mass-Selective Re-Trapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickel, Timo; Plaß, Wolfgang R; Lippert, Wayne; Lang, Johannes; Yavor, Mikhail I; Geissel, Hans; Scheidenberger, Christoph

    2017-06-01

    A novel method for (ultra-)high-resolution spatial mass separation in time-of-flight mass spectrometers is presented. Ions are injected into a time-of-flight analyzer from a radio frequency (rf) trap, dispersed in time-of-flight according to their mass-to-charge ratios and then re-trapped dynamically in the same rf trap. This re-trapping technique is highly mass-selective and after sufficiently long flight times can provide even isobaric separation. A theoretical treatment of the method is presented and the conditions for optimum performance of the method are derived. The method has been implemented in a multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer and mass separation powers (FWHM) in excess of 70,000, and re-trapping efficiencies of up to 35% have been obtained for the protonated molecular ion of caffeine. The isobars glutamine and lysine (relative mass difference of 1/4000) have been separated after a flight time of 0.2 ms only. Higher mass separation powers can be achieved using longer flight times. The method will have important applications, including isobar separation in nuclear physics and (ultra-)high-resolution precursor ion selection in multiple-stage tandem mass spectrometry. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  20. A high-resolution time-of-flight spectrometer for fission fragments and ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosev, Krasimir Milchev

    2007-07-01

    For the purpose of fission-fragment detection a double time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer has been developed. The key component of the TOF spectrometer is a TOF detector consisting of multichannel-plate (MCP) detectors with a position-sensitive readout, a foil for secondary electron (SE) production and an electrostatic mirror. The fission fragments are detected by measuring the SEs impinging on the position-sensitive anode after emission from the foil, acceleration and deflection by the electrostatic mirror. The functionality of the different detector components is proven in detail. Optimised schemes for the high-voltage supplies of the MCP detectors have been implemented successfully. In order to process the multichannel-plate detector signals optimally, a new state-of-the-art constant-fraction discriminator based on the amplitude and rise time compensated technique with very low threshold capabilities and optimised walk properties has been developed and incorporated into the setup. In a setup consisting of two mirror MCP detectors, we could successfully observe the TOF spectrum of a mixed ({sup 226}Ra,{sup 222}Rn,{sup 210}Po,{sup 218}Po,{sup 214}Po) {alpha}-source. Testing photo-fission experiments were performed at the bremsstrahlung facility at the ELBE accelerator. The setup consisted of two mirror detectors (first arm) and a 80 mm diameter MCP detector (second arm) with a {sup 238}U target positioned in between. TOF measurements with two bremsstrahlung end-point energies of 12.9 and 16.0 MeV were carried out. A clear cut separation of the TOF peaks for the medium-mass and heavy fission fragments was observed. (orig.)

  1. The TORCH time-of-flight detector for particle identification and photon vertex association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo García, L.; Brook, N.; Cussans, D.; Föhl, K.; Forty, R.; Frei, C.; Gao, R.; Gys, T.; Harnew, N.; Piedigrossi, D.; Rademacker, J.; Ros García, A.; van Dijk, M.

    2017-02-01

    TORCH (Time Of internally Reflected CHerenkov light) is a novel time-of-flight detector, designed to provide π /K/p particle identification up to 0~ 1 GeV/c momentum and beyond. To achieve this, a time resolution of ~ 15 ps combining information from 0~ 3 detected photons is required over a 10 m flight path. Large areas can be covered with TORCH, nominally up to 30 m2. One such application is for the LHCb experiment, to complement the particle identification capabilities of its RICH detectors. TORCH has a DIRC-like construction with 10 mm-thick synthetic amorphous fused-silica plates as a radiator. Cherenkov photons propagate by total internal reflection to the plate edges and there are focussed onto an array of position-sensitive photodetectors. Custom-built micro-channel plate photo-multipliers (MCP-PMTs) are being developed in collaboration with industry to provide the lifetime, granularity and time resolution to meet the TORCH specifications. In the present paper, laboratory tests of the MCP-PMTs developed for TORCH and its readout electronics are presented. Test beam measurements of a prototype TORCH detector in a low-momentum mixed beam of pions and protons are highlighted. Time resolutions for individual photons approaching 100 ps is achieved, after correction for dispersion effects in the quartz medium. In addition to the particle identification capabilities, the high-precision timing information that TORCH provides could be used at the high-luminosity LHC to associate high-energy photons with the correct primary interaction vertex amongst the many expected.

  2. Time-Of-Flight Camera, Optical Tracker and Computed Tomography in Pairwise Data Registration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartlomiej Pycinski

    Full Text Available A growing number of medical applications, including minimal invasive surgery, depends on multi-modal or multi-sensors data processing. Fast and accurate 3D scene analysis, comprising data registration, seems to be crucial for the development of computer aided diagnosis and therapy. The advancement of surface tracking system based on optical trackers already plays an important role in surgical procedures planning. However, new modalities, like the time-of-flight (ToF sensors, widely explored in non-medical fields are powerful and have the potential to become a part of computer aided surgery set-up. Connection of different acquisition systems promises to provide a valuable support for operating room procedures. Therefore, the detailed analysis of the accuracy of such multi-sensors positioning systems is needed.We present the system combining pre-operative CT series with intra-operative ToF-sensor and optical tracker point clouds. The methodology contains: optical sensor set-up and the ToF-camera calibration procedures, data pre-processing algorithms, and registration technique. The data pre-processing yields a surface, in case of CT, and point clouds for ToF-sensor and marker-driven optical tracker representation of an object of interest. An applied registration technique is based on Iterative Closest Point algorithm.The experiments validate the registration of each pair of modalities/sensors involving phantoms of four various human organs in terms of Hausdorff distance and mean absolute distance metrics. The best surface alignment was obtained for CT and optical tracker combination, whereas the worst for experiments involving ToF-camera.The obtained accuracies encourage to further develop the multi-sensors systems. The presented substantive discussion concerning the system limitations and possible improvements mainly related to the depth information produced by the ToF-sensor is useful for computer aided surgery developers.

  3. Laser-induced surface ionization in a time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schriemer, David C.; Li, Liang

    1995-01-01

    A laser-induced ionization scheme based on laser-metal interaction is described. It is found that when a low power, pulsed UV laser beam is directed to the repeller plate of a Wiley-McLaren time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS), which is held at much higher positive potential than the extraction grid, extensive ionization of gas phase species can take place. For monatomic species such as Ar and Xe, multiply charged ions up to Ar6+ and Xe9+ are obtained. For both aromatic and aliphatic organic molecules, classical electron-impact-type mass spectra are observed. Mass resolution is in the range of 300-400, comparable to that obtained using laser-induced resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI) in the same linear TOFMS. It is shown that this technique can be quite efficient in ionizing organic species. A detection limit of 5 ng and a linear dynamic range of four orders of magnitude for benzene are demonstrated. While not as sensitive as R2PI, it has a much wider applicability and more uniform ionization efficiency than R2PI. It also appears about 1000 times more sensitive than the incorporation of an electron gun in TOFMS. The technique can be interchanged with R2PI very readily by simply adjusting the position and focus of the laser beam. While the ionization mechanism involved in the technique is currently unknown, some preliminary investigation of the ionization process is reported. It is suspected that photoelectron generation from the plate surface may play some important role in producing the ions detected.

  4. Time-Of-Flight Camera, Optical Tracker and Computed Tomography in Pairwise Data Registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pycinski, Bartlomiej; Czajkowska, Joanna; Badura, Pawel; Juszczyk, Jan; Pietka, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    A growing number of medical applications, including minimal invasive surgery, depends on multi-modal or multi-sensors data processing. Fast and accurate 3D scene analysis, comprising data registration, seems to be crucial for the development of computer aided diagnosis and therapy. The advancement of surface tracking system based on optical trackers already plays an important role in surgical procedures planning. However, new modalities, like the time-of-flight (ToF) sensors, widely explored in non-medical fields are powerful and have the potential to become a part of computer aided surgery set-up. Connection of different acquisition systems promises to provide a valuable support for operating room procedures. Therefore, the detailed analysis of the accuracy of such multi-sensors positioning systems is needed. We present the system combining pre-operative CT series with intra-operative ToF-sensor and optical tracker point clouds. The methodology contains: optical sensor set-up and the ToF-camera calibration procedures, data pre-processing algorithms, and registration technique. The data pre-processing yields a surface, in case of CT, and point clouds for ToF-sensor and marker-driven optical tracker representation of an object of interest. An applied registration technique is based on Iterative Closest Point algorithm. The experiments validate the registration of each pair of modalities/sensors involving phantoms of four various human organs in terms of Hausdorff distance and mean absolute distance metrics. The best surface alignment was obtained for CT and optical tracker combination, whereas the worst for experiments involving ToF-camera. The obtained accuracies encourage to further develop the multi-sensors systems. The presented substantive discussion concerning the system limitations and possible improvements mainly related to the depth information produced by the ToF-sensor is useful for computer aided surgery developers.

  5. Fast Orthogonal Separation by Superposition of Time of Flight and Field Asymmetric Ion Mobility Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnhorst, Alexander; Kirk, Ansgar T; Berger, Marc; Zimmermann, Stefan

    2017-12-22

    Ion mobility spectrometry is a powerful and low-cost technique for the identification of chemical warfare agents, toxic chemicals, or explosives in air. Drift tube ion mobility spectrometers (DT-IMS) separate ions by the absolute value of their low field ion mobility, while field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometers (FAIMS) separate them by the change of their ion mobility at high fields. However, using one of these devices alone, some common and harmless substances show the same response as the hazardous target substances. In order to increase the selectivity, orthogonal data are required. Thus, in this work, we present for the first time an ambient pressure ion mobility spectrometer which is able to separate ions both by their differential and low field mobility, providing additional information for selectivity enhancement. This novel field asymmetric time of flight ion mobility spectrometer (FAT-IMS) allows high repetition rates and reaches limits of detection in the low ppb range common for DT-IMS. The device consists of a compact 44 mm drift tube with a tritium ionization source and a resolving power of 70. An increased separation of four substances with similar low field ion mobility is shown: phosgene (K0 = 2.33 cm2/(V s)), 1,1,2-trichlorethane (K0 = 2.31 cm2/(V s)), chlorine (K0 = 2.24 cm2/(V s)), and nitrogen dioxide (K0 = 2.25 cm2/(V s)). Furthermore, the behavior and limits of detection for acetonitrile, dimethyl methylphosphonate, diisopropyl methyl phosphonate in positive polarity and carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, hydrochloric acid, cyanogen chloride, and hydrogen cyanide in negative polarity are investigated.

  6. Field-deployable, high-resolution, time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCarlo, Peter F; Kimmel, Joel R; Trimborn, Achim; Northway, Megan J; Jayne, John T; Aiken, Allison C; Gonin, Marc; Fuhrer, Katrin; Horvath, Thomas; Docherty, Kenneth S; Worsnop, Doug R; Jimenez, Jose L

    2006-12-15

    The development of a new high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) is reported. The high-resolution capabilities of this instrument allow the direct separation of most ions from inorganic and organic species at the same nominal m/z, the quantification of several types of organic fragments (CxHy, CxHyOz, CxHyNp, CxHyOzNp), and the direct identification of organic nitrogen and organosulfur content. This real-time instrument is field-deployable, and its high time resolution (0.5 Hz has been demonstrated) makes it well-suited for studies in which time resolution is critical, such as aircraft studies. The instrument has two ion optical modes: a single-reflection configuration offers higher sensitivity and lower resolving power (up to approximately 2100 at m/z 200), and a two-reflectron configuration yields higher resolving power (up to approximately 4300 at m/z 200) with lower sensitivity. The instrument also allows the determination of the size distributions of all ions. One-minute detection limits for submicrometer aerosol are <0.04 microg m(-3) for all species in the high-sensitivity mode and <0.4 microg m(-3) in the high-resolution mode. Examples of ambient aerosol data are presented from the SOAR-1 study in Riverside, CA, in which the spectra of ambient organic species are dominated by CxHy and CxHyOz fragments, and different organic and inorganic fragments at the same nominal m/z show different size distributions. Data are also presented from the MIRAGE C-130 aircraft study near Mexico City, showing high correlation with independent measurements of surrogate aerosol mass concentration.

  7. Transformation products elucidation of forchlorfenuron in postharvest kiwifruit by time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiwei; Gao, Zhenhong; Wang, Yuan; Yuan, Yahong; Dong, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Forchlorfenuron (1-(2-chloro-4-pyridyl)-3-phenylurea, FCF) is a plant growth regulator, being extensively used for increasing kiwifruit size. The toxicological properties of its may persist in their transformation products (TPs) or even higher toxicity than FCF. TPs elucidation of FCF in postharvest kiwifruit (Actinidia chinensis, Chinese gooseberry) by the liquid chromatography ionization hybrid ion trap and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-IT-TOF/MS) in positive mode was the objective of the present study. Fifteen days after full bloom, kiwifruits were dipped for 5s with high dosage FCF solution (60 mg/L), so that sufficient peaks could be detected. The chemical structure of unknown TPs was analyzed in combination of functions of LCMS-IT-TOF, such as high-accurate MSn, formula predictor, metabolite structural analysis software MetID Solution, profiling solution metabolomics software, and neutral loss, characteristic isotopic patterns of chlorine, the fragmentation pattern and retention time of standard substances, nitrogen rule, chemical components of kiwifruit. Total 17 TPs were detected via comparisons of their accurate MSn data of commercial analytical standards and synthesized standards with high purity, such as 4-amino-2-chloropyridine, phenylurea, 2-hydroxy-FCF, 1-(2-chloro-6-((3, 4, 5-trihydroxy-6-(hydroxymethyl) tetrahydro-2H-pyran-2-yl) oxy) pyridin-4-yl)-3-phenylurea, 1, 3-bis (2-chloropyridin-4-yl) urea, 1,3-diphenylurea, 1-(2-chloropyridin-4-yl)urea, FCF-2-O-β-D-glucoside, and so on. The major transformation pathways of FCF in kiwifruit were biochemical and photochemical cleavage pathway. The experimental results indicate that LCMS-IT-TOF is powerful and effective tool for identification of FCF TPs. PMID:28877224

  8. Time-of-flight and activation experiments on 147Pm and 171Tm for astrophysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guerrero C.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The neutron capture cross section of several key unstable isotopes acting as branching points in the s-process are crucial for stellar nucleosynthesis studies, but they are very challenging to measure due to the difficult production of sufficient sample material, the high activity of the resulting samples, and the actual (n,γ measurement, for which high neutron fluxes and effective background rejection capabilities are required. As part of a new program to measure some of these important branching points, radioactive targets of 147Pm and 171Tm have been produced by irradiation of stable isotopes at the ILL high flux reactor. Neutron capture on 146Nd and 170Er at the reactor was followed by beta decay and the resulting matrix was purified via radiochemical separation at PSI. The radioactive targets have been used for time-of-flight measurements at the CERN n_TOF facility using the 19 and 185 m beam lines during 2014 and 2015. The capture cascades were detected using a set of four C6D6 scintillators, allowing to observe the associated neutron capture resonances. The results presented in this work are the first ever determination of the resonance capture cross section of 147Pm and 171Tm. Activation experiments on the same 147Pm and 171Tm targets with a high-intensity 30 keV quasi-Maxwellian flux of neutrons will be performed using the SARAF accelerator and the Liquid-Lithium Target (LiLiT in order to extract the corresponding Maxwellian Average Cross Section (MACS. The status of these experiments and preliminary results will be presented and discussed as well.

  9. Time-of-flight and activation experiments on 147Pm and 171Tm for astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, C.; Lerendegui-Marco, J.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Casanovas, A.; Dressler, R.; Halfon, S.; Heinitz, S.; Kivel, N.; Köster, U.; Paul, M.; Quesada-Molina, J. M.; Schumann, D.; Tarifeño-Saldivia, A.; Tessler, M.; Weissman, L.; Aberle, O.; Andrzejewski, J.; Audouin, L.; Bacak, M.; Balibrea, J.; Barbagallo, M.; Becvar, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Billowes, J.; Bosnar, D.; Brown, A.; Caamaño, M.; Calviño, F.; Calviani, M.; Cano-Ott, D.; Cardella, R.; Cerutti, F.; Chen, Y. H.; Chiaveri, E.; Colonna, N.; Cortés, G.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Cosentino, L.; Damone, L. A.; Diakaki, M.; Dupont, E.; Durán, I.; Fernández-Domínguez, B.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira, P.; Finocchiaro, P.; Göbel, K.; García, A. R.; Gawlik, A.; Gilardoni, S.; Glodariu, T.; Gonçalves, I. F.; González, E.; Griesmayer, E.; Gunsing, F.; Harada, H.; Heyse, J.; Jenkins, D. G.; Jericha, E.; Käppeler, F.; Kadi, Y.; Kalamara, A.; Kavrigin, P.; Kimura, A.; Kivel, N.; Kokkoris, M.; Krticka, M.; Kurtulgil, D.; Leal-Cidoncha, E.; Lederer, C.; Leeb, H.; Meo, S. Lo; Lonsdale, S. J.; Macina, D.; Marganiec, J.; Martínez, T.; Masi, A.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mastromarco, M.; Maugeri, E. A.; Mazzone, A.; Mendoza, E.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Mingrone, F.; Musumarra, A.; Negret, A.; Nolte, R.; Oprea, A.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Perkowski, J.; Porras, I.; Praena, J.; Radeck, D.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rout, P. C.; Rubbia, C.; Ryan, J. A.; Sabaté-Gilarte, M.; Saxena, A.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Smith, A. G.; Sosnin, N. V.; Stamatopoulos, A.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tsinganis, A.; Valenta, S.; Vannini, G.; Variale, V.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Wallner, A.; Warren, S.; Weiss, C.; Woods, P. J.; Wright, T.; Žugec, P.

    2017-09-01

    The neutron capture cross section of several key unstable isotopes acting as branching points in the s-process are crucial for stellar nucleosynthesis studies, but they are very challenging to measure due to the difficult production of sufficient sample material, the high activity of the resulting samples, and the actual (n,γ) measurement, for which high neutron fluxes and effective background rejection capabilities are required. As part of a new program to measure some of these important branching points, radioactive targets of 147Pm and 171Tm have been produced by irradiation of stable isotopes at the ILL high flux reactor. Neutron capture on 146Nd and 170Er at the reactor was followed by beta decay and the resulting matrix was purified via radiochemical separation at PSI. The radioactive targets have been used for time-of-flight measurements at the CERN n_TOF facility using the 19 and 185 m beam lines during 2014 and 2015. The capture cascades were detected using a set of four C6D6 scintillators, allowing to observe the associated neutron capture resonances. The results presented in this work are the first ever determination of the resonance capture cross section of 147Pm and 171Tm. Activation experiments on the same 147Pm and 171Tm targets with a high-intensity 30 keV quasi-Maxwellian flux of neutrons will be performed using the SARAF accelerator and the Liquid-Lithium Target (LiLiT) in order to extract the corresponding Maxwellian Average Cross Section (MACS). The status of these experiments and preliminary results will be presented and discussed as well.

  10. The diagnostic accuracy of time-of-flight MR angiography in diagnosing Moyamoya disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shono, Tadahisa; Ikezaki, Kiyonobu; Matsushima, Toshio; Inoue, Tooru; Fujii, Kiyotaka; Fukui, Masashi [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1995-09-01

    Conventional cerebral angiography is essential for achieving the diagnosis of Moyamoya disease. It is, however, an invasive examination, especially for the pediatric patients. In this paper, we report on the results of an investigation as to whether MRA is able to accurately visualize the steno-occlusive changes in the carotid fork and the basal moyamoya vessels less invasively. Twenty patients among them, 16 children who were diagnosed as having Moyamoya disease with conventional angiography underwent MRI and MRA using a 1.5T MR unit (Signa, G.E.). Angiographically, 37 sides were determined to be in stage 3. MRA was performed using two-dimensional time-of-flight (2D-TOF), 3D-TOF, and gadolinium (Gd)-enhanced 3D-TOF methods. The 3D-TOF MRAs showed almost equal sensitivity to that of conventional angiography for the detection of steno-occlusive changes in the carotid fork. However, it was difficult to visualize the moyamoya vessels clearly. Further, 3D-TOF, 2D-TOF, and Gd-enhanced 3D-TOF methods depicted the moyamoya vessels in 65%, 79%, and 80% of the examined sides, respectively. In contrast, MRI visualized the moyamoya vessels as multiple flow voids in the basal ganglia in 38 of 40 sides (95%). Based on the above findings, it was thus concluded that approximately 90% of the stage 3 Moyamoya disease cases could be diagnosed by a combination of 3D-TOF MRA and MRI without the use of conventional angiography. (author).

  11. SU-E-J-184: Stereo Time-Of-Flight System for Patient Positioning in Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wentz, T; Gilles, M; Visvikis, D [INSERM UMR 1101 - LaTIM, Brest (France); Le Fur, E; Pradier, O [CHRU Morvan, Radiotherapy, Brest (France)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The objective of this work is to test the advantage of using the surface acquired by two stereo Time-of-Flight (ToF) cameras in comparison of the use of one camera only for patient positioning in radiotherapy. Methods: A first step consisted on validating the use of a stereo ToFcamera system for positioning management of a phantom mounted on a linear actuator producing very accurate and repeatable displacements. The displacements between two positions were computed from the surface point cloud acquired by either one or two cameras thanks to an iterative closest point algorithm. A second step consisted on determining the displacements on patient datasets, with two cameras fixed on the ceiling of the radiotherapy room. Measurements were done first on voluntary subject with fixed translations, then on patients during the normal clinical radiotherapy routine. Results: The phantom tests showed a major improvement in lateral and depth axis for motions above 10 mm when using the stereo-system instead of a unique camera (Fig1). Patient measurements validate these results with a mean real and measured displacement differences in the depth direction of 1.5 mm when using one camera and 0.9 mm when using two cameras (Fig2). In the lateral direction, a mean difference of 1 mm was obtained by the stereo-system instead of 3.2 mm. Along the longitudinal axis mean differences of 5.4 and 3.4 mm with one and two cameras respectively were noticed but these measurements were still inaccurate and globally underestimated in this direction as in the literature. Similar results were also found for patient subjects with a mean difference reduction of 35%, 7%, and 25% for the lateral, depth, and longitudinal displacement with the stereo-system. Conclusion: The addition of a second ToF-camera to determine patient displacement strongly improved patient repositioning results and therefore insures better radiation delivery.

  12. Design and relevant sample calculations for a neutral particle energy diagnostic based on time of flight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cecconello, M

    1999-05-01

    Extrap T2 will be equipped with a neutral particles energy diagnostic based on time of flight technique. In this report, the expected neutral fluxes for Extrap T2 are estimated and discussed in order to determine the feasibility and the limits of such diagnostic. These estimates are based on a 1D model of the plasma. The input parameters of such model are the density and temperature radial profiles of electrons and ions and the density of neutrals at the edge and in the centre of the plasma. The atomic processes included in the model are the charge-exchange and the electron-impact ionization processes. The results indicate that the plasma attenuation length varies from a/5 to a, a being the minor radius. Differential neutral fluxes, as well as the estimated power losses due to CX processes (2 % of the input power), are in agreement with experimental results obtained in similar devices. The expected impurity influxes vary from 10{sup 14} to 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The neutral particles detection and acquisition systems are discussed. The maximum detectable energy varies from 1 to 3 keV depending on the flight distances d. The time resolution is 0.5 ms. Output signals from the waveform recorder are foreseen in the range 0-200 mV. An 8-bit waveform recorder having 2 MHz sampling frequency and 100K sample of memory capacity is the minimum requirement for the acquisition system 20 refs, 19 figs.

  13. High-performance electronics for time-of-flight PET systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choong, W-S; Peng, Q; Vu, C Q; Turko, B T; Moses, W W

    2013-01-01

    We have designed and built a high-performance readout electronics system for time-of-flight positron emission tomography (TOF PET) cameras. The electronics architecture is based on the electronics for a commercial whole-body PET camera (Siemens/CPS Cardinal electronics), modified to improve the timing performance. The fundamental contributions in the electronics that can limit the timing resolution include the constant fraction discriminator (CFD), which converts the analog electrical signal from the photo-detector to a digital signal whose leading edge is time-correlated with the input signal, and the time-to-digital converter (TDC), which provides a time stamp for the CFD output. Coincident events are identified by digitally comparing the values of the time stamps. In the Cardinal electronics, the front-end processing electronics are performed by an Analog subsection board, which has two application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs), each servicing a PET block detector module. The ASIC has a built-in CFD and TDC. We found that a significant degradation in the timing resolution comes from the ASIC's CFD and TDC. Therefore, we have designed and built an improved Analog subsection board that replaces the ASIC's CFD and TDC with a high-performance CFD (made with discrete components) and TDC (using the CERN high-performance TDC ASIC). The improved Analog subsection board is used in a custom single-ring LSO-based TOF PET camera. The electronics system achieves a timing resolution of 60 ps FWHM. Prototype TOF detector modules are read out with the electronics system and give coincidence timing resolutions of 259 ps FWHM and 156 ps FWHM for detector modules coupled to LSO and LaBr3 crystals respectively.

  14. Determination of triacetone triperoxide using ultraviolet femtosecond multiphoton ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezoe, Ryota [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Imasaka, Tomoko [Laboratory of Chemistry, Graduate School of Design, Kyushu University, 4-9-1, Shiobaru, Minami-ku, Fukuoka 815-8540 (Japan); Imasaka, Totaro, E-mail: imasaka@cstf.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Division of Optoelectronics and Photonics, Center for Future Chemistry, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A UV ultrashort laser pulse was useful for ionization of triacetone triperoxide. • A molecular ion was strongly enhanced in multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry. • Triacetone triperoxide in the human blood was measured without any interferences. • An organic compound of phorone was formed in the human blood from acetone. - Abstract: Triacetone triperoxide (TATP), an explosive compound, was measured using gas chromatography combined with multiphoton ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC/MPI-TOFMS). By decreasing the pulse width of a femtosecond laser from 80 to 35 fs, a molecular ion was drastically enhanced and was measured as one of the major ions in the mass spectrum. The detection limits obtained using the molecular (M·{sup +}) and fragment (C{sub 2}H{sub 3}O{sup +}) ions were similar or slightly superior to those obtained using conventional mass spectrometry based on electron and chemical ionization. In order to improve the reliability, an isotope of TATP, i.e., TATP-d18, was synthesized and used as an internal standard in the trace analysis of TATP in a sample of human blood. TATP could be identified in a two-dimensional display, even though numerous interfering compounds were present in the sample. Acetone, which is frequently used as a solvent in sampling TATP, produced a chemical species with a retention time nearly identical to that of TATP and provided a C{sub 2}H{sub 3}O{sup +} fragment ion that was employed for measuring a chromatogram of TATP in conventional MS. This compound, the structure of which was assigned as phorone, was clearly differentiated from TATP based on a molecular ion observable in MPI-TOFMS.

  15. Quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry screening for synthetic cannabinoids in herbal blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez, María; Bijlsma, Lubertus; van Nuijs, Alexander L N; Sancho, Juan V; Haro, Gonzalo; Covaci, Adrian; Hernández, Félix

    2013-06-01

    'Legal highs' are novel substances which are intended to elicit a psychoactive response. They are sold from 'head shops', the internet and from street suppliers and may be possessed without legal restriction. Several months ago, a 19-year-old woman came searching for medical treatment as she had health problems caused by smoking legal highs. The substances were sold as herbal blends in plastic bags under four different labels. In this work, samples of these herbal blends have been analysed to investigate the presence of psychoactive substances without any reference standard being available at the laboratory. A screening strategy for a large number of synthetic and natural cannabinoids has been applied based on the use of ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QTOF MS) under MS(E) mode. A customized home-made database containing literature-based exact masses for parent and product ions of around 200 synthetic and natural cannabinoids was compiled. The presence of the (de)protonated molecule measured at its accurate mass was evaluated in the samples. When a peak was detected, collision-induced dissociation fragments and characteristic isotopic ions were also evaluated and used for tentative identification. After this tentative identification, four synthetic cannabinoids (JWH-081, JWH-250, JWH-203 and JWH-019) were unequivocally confirmed by subsequent acquisition of reference standards. The presence in the herbal blends of these synthetic cannabinoids might explain the psychotic and catatonic symptoms observed in the patient, as JWH compounds could act as potent agonists of CB1 and CB2 receptors located in the Limbic System and Basal ganglia of the human brain. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Three Gelatinous Chinese Medicines and Their Authentications by Tryptic-digested Peptides Profiling using Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-time of Flight/Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huan; Zheng, Jie; Wang, Hai-Yan; Li, Nan; Yang, Ya-Ya; Shen, Yu-Ping

    2017-01-01

    Gelatinous Chinese medicines (GCMs) including Asini Corii Colla, Testudinis Carapacis ET Plastri Colla, and Cervi Cornus Colla, were made from reptile shell or mammalian skin or deer horn, and consumed as a popular tonic, as well as hemopoietic and hemostatic agents. Misuse of them would not exert their functions, and fake or adulterate products have caused drug market disorder and affected food and drug safety. GCMs are rich in denatured proteins, but insufficient in available DNA fragments, hence commonly used cytochrome c oxidase I barcoding was not successful for their authentication. In this study, we performed comparative proteomic analysis of them and their animal origins to identify the composition of intrinsic proteins for the first time. A reliable and convenient approach was proposed for their authentication, by the incorporation of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, two-dimensional electrophoresis, and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight/time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS). A total of 26 proteins were identified from medicinal parts of original animals, and GCMs proteins presented in a dispersive manner in electrophoresis analyses due to complicated changes in the structure of original proteins caused by long-term decoction and the addition of ingredients during their manufacturing. In addition, by comparison of MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS profiling, 19 signature peptide fragments originated from the protein of GCM products were selected according to criteria. These could assist in the discrimination and identification of adulterates of GCMs and other ACMs for their form of raw medicinal material, the pulverized, and even the complex. Comparative proteomic analysis of three gelatinous Chinese medicines was conducted, and their authentications were based on tryptic-digested peptides profiling using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight/time of flight mass spectrometry. Abbreviations

  17. Studies of a Next-Generation Silicon-Photomultiplier-Based Time-of-Flight PET/CT System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, David F C; Ilan, Ezgi; Peterson, William T; Uribe, Jorge; Lubberink, Mark; Levin, Craig S

    2017-09-01

    This article presents system performance studies for the Discovery MI PET/CT system, a new time-of-flight system based on silicon photomultipliers. System performance and clinical imaging were compared between this next-generation system and other commercially available PET/CT and PET/MR systems, as well as between different reconstruction algorithms. Methods: Spatial resolution, sensitivity, noise-equivalent counting rate, scatter fraction, counting rate accuracy, and image quality were characterized with the National Electrical Manufacturers Association NU-2 2012 standards. Energy resolution and coincidence time resolution were measured. Tests were conducted independently on two Discovery MI scanners installed at Stanford University and Uppsala University, and the results were averaged. Back-to-back patient scans were also performed between the Discovery MI, Discovery 690 PET/CT, and SIGNA PET/MR systems. Clinical images were reconstructed using both ordered-subset expectation maximization and Q.Clear (block-sequential regularized expectation maximization with point-spread function modeling) and were examined qualitatively. Results: The averaged full widths at half maximum (FWHMs) of the radial/tangential/axial spatial resolution reconstructed with filtered backprojection at 1, 10, and 20 cm from the system center were, respectively, 4.10/4.19/4.48 mm, 5.47/4.49/6.01 mm, and 7.53/4.90/6.10 mm. The averaged sensitivity was 13.7 cps/kBq at the center of the field of view. The averaged peak noise-equivalent counting rate was 193.4 kcps at 21.9 kBq/mL, with a scatter fraction of 40.6%. The averaged contrast recovery coefficients for the image-quality phantom were 53.7, 64.0, 73.1, 82.7, 86.8, and 90.7 for the 10-, 13-, 17-, 22-, 28-, and 37-mm-diameter spheres, respectively. The average photopeak energy resolution was 9.40% FWHM, and the average coincidence time resolution was 375.4 ps FWHM. Clinical image comparisons between the PET/CT systems demonstrated the high

  18. Diagnostic value of 3D time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography for detecting intracranial aneurysm: a meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, HaiFeng; Xu, YongSheng [First Hospital of LanZhou University, Department of Radiology, Lanzhou, Gansu (China); First Clinical Medical College of LanZhou University, Lanzhou, Gansu (China); Xun, YangQin [Lanzhou University, Evidence-based Medicine Center, Lanzhou (China); Dou, Yu; Wang, ShuaiWen; Lu, XingRu; Lei, JunQiang [First Hospital of LanZhou University, Department of Radiology, Lanzhou, Gansu (China)

    2017-11-15

    This meta-analysis is to comprehensively evaluate the diagnostic performance of three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (3D-TOF-MRA) for detecting intracranial aneurysm (IA). PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and the Cochrane library were systematically searched for retrieving eligible studies. Study inclusion, data extraction, and risk of bias assessment were performed by two researchers independently. Pooled sensitivity (SEN), specificity (SPE), positive likelihood ratio (PLR), negative likelihood ratio (NLR), diagnostic odds ratio (DOR), and area under the curve (AUC) were calculated to assess the diagnostic value. In addition, heterogeneity and subgroup analysis were carried out. In total, 18 studies comprising 3463 patients were selected. The results of 3D-TOF-MRA for diagnosing IA were SEN 0.89 (95% CI 0.82-0.94), SPE 0.94 (0.86-0.97), PLR 13.79 (5.92-32.12), NLR 0.11 (0.07-0.19), DOR 121.90 (38.81-382.94), and AUC 0.96 (0.94-0.98), respectively. In the subgroup analysis, studies without subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) tend to perform statistical significantly better (P < 0.05) in detecting IAs than studies with SAH 0.99 (0.98-1.00) vs. 0.89 (0.86-0.91). The diagnostic value of studies with a two-image reconstruction method was higher than studies with only one image reconstruction method: 0.99 (0.98-1.00) vs. 0.91 (0.89-0.94) with P < 0.05. The 3D-TOF-MRA had better SEN in aneurysms > 3 mm than the aneurysms ≤ 3 mm in diameter: 0.89 (0.87-0.92) vs. 0.78 (0.71-0.84) with P < 0.05. This study demonstrated that 3D-TOF-MRA has an excellent diagnostic performance for the overall assessment of IA and may serve as an alternative for further patient management with IA. (orig.)

  19. Emission-based estimation of lung attenuation coefficients for attenuation correction in time-of-flight PET/MR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehranian, Abolfazl; Zaidi, Habib

    2015-06-01

    In standard segmentation-based MRI-guided attenuation correction (MRAC) of PET data on hybrid PET/MRI systems, the inter/intra-patient variability of linear attenuation coefficients (LACs) is ignored owing to the assignment of a constant LAC to each tissue class. This can lead to PET quantification errors, especially in the lung regions. In this work, we aim to derive continuous and patient-specific lung LACs from time-of-flight (TOF) PET emission data using the maximum likelihood reconstruction of activity and attenuation (MLAA) algorithm. The MLAA algorithm was constrained for estimation of lung LACs only in the standard 4-class MR attenuation map using Gaussian lung tissue preference and Markov random field smoothness priors. MRAC maps were derived from segmentation of CT images of 19 TOF-PET/CT clinical studies into background air, lung, soft tissue and fat tissue classes, followed by assignment of predefined LACs of 0, 0.0224, 0.0864 and 0.0975 cm-1, respectively. The lung LACs of the resulting attenuation maps were then estimated from emission data using the proposed MLAA algorithm. PET quantification accuracy of MRAC and MLAA methods was evaluated against the reference CT-based AC method in the lungs, lesions located in/near the lungs and neighbouring tissues. The results show that the proposed MLAA algorithm is capable of retrieving lung density gradients and compensate fairly for respiratory-phase mismatch between PET and corresponding attenuation maps. It was found that the mean of the estimated lung LACs generally follow the trend of the reference CT-based attenuation correction (CTAC) method. Quantitative analysis revealed that the MRAC method resulted in average relative errors of  -5.2   ±   7.1% and  -6.1   ±   6.7% in the lungs and lesions, respectively. These were reduced by the MLAA algorithm to  -0.8   ±   6.3% and  -3.3   ±   4.7%, respectively. In conclusion, we demonstrated

  20. Laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry of Ge-As-Te chalcogenides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šútorová, Katarína; Hawlová, Petra; Prokeš, Lubomír; Němec, Petr; Boidin, Rémi; Havel, Josef

    2015-03-15

    Ge(x)As(y)Te(z) glasses have a broad window of optical transparency and high refractive index which make them promising for applications in the infrared region. The aim of this work is to reveal structural motifs which could be present during the fabrication of Ge-As-Te thin films by plasma deposition techniques; such knowledge is important for the optimization of thin film growth. Mass spectra were acquired using a laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (LDI-TOF) mass spectrometer equipped with a nitrogen laser (337 nm) coupled with a quadrupole ion trap, and recorded in positive and negative ion reflectron modes. XRD, SEM (EDX) and Raman spectroscopy were also used for the characterization of Ge-As-Te bulk or powdered samples. Bulk Ge(x)As(y)Te(z) samples (x = 10-20%, y = 20-60%, z = 30-70%) were synthesized. LDI-MS of Ge-As-Te powders provided evidence for the formation of both positively and negatively charged clusters, whose stoichiometry was determined as Te(n)(+/-) (n = 1-4), Te(5)(+), binary AsTe(n)(+/-) (n = 1-3), GeTe(n)(+/-) (n = 1-3), As(2)Te(+/-), As(2)Te(3)(+), As(3)Te(+), AsTe(4) (+), Ge(2)H(6) (+/-), ternary GeAsTe(+), GeAsTe(2)(+/-), GeAsH5 (+), GeAsH(6)(+), GeAsH(12)(+), and tertiary GeAsTeH(5)(-), GeAsTeH(8)(-), GeAsTe(2)H(3) (+/-). The local structure of Gex Asy Tez materials is at least partly different from that of species identified in plasma by mass spectrometry, as deduced from Raman scattering spectroscopy analysis. However, LDI-TOFMS was found to be a suitable technique for the partial structure characterization of Ge-As-Te bulk samples and especially for the identification of the structural motifs present in the plasma during the preparation of the corresponding thin films. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Fast time-of-flight camera based surface registration for radiotherapy patient positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Placht, Simon; Stancanello, Joseph; Schaller, Christian; Balda, Michael; Angelopoulou, Elli

    2012-01-01

    This work introduces a rigid registration framework for patient positioning in radiotherapy, based on real-time surface acquisition by a time-of-flight (ToF) camera. Dynamic properties of the system are also investigated for future gating/tracking strategies. A novel preregistration algorithm, based on translation and rotation-invariant features representing surface structures, was developed. Using these features, corresponding three-dimensional points were computed in order to determine initial registration parameters. These parameters became a robust input to an accelerated version of the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm for the fine-tuning of the registration result. Distance calibration and Kalman filtering were used to compensate for ToF-camera dependent noise. Additionally, the advantage of using the feature based preregistration over an "ICP only" strategy was evaluated, as well as the robustness of the rigid-transformation-based method to deformation. The proposed surface registration method was validated using phantom data. A mean target registration error (TRE) for translations and rotations of 1.62 ± 1.08 mm and 0.07° ± 0.05°, respectively, was achieved. There was a temporal delay of about 65 ms in the registration output, which can be seen as negligible considering the dynamics of biological systems. Feature based preregistration allowed for accurate and robust registrations even at very large initial displacements. Deformations affected the accuracy of the results, necessitating particular care in cases of deformed surfaces. The proposed solution is able to solve surface registration problems with an accuracy suitable for radiotherapy cases where external surfaces offer primary or complementary information to patient positioning. The system shows promising dynamic properties for its use in gating/tracking applications. The overall system is competitive with commonly-used surface registration technologies. Its main benefit is the

  2. Development of capacitive multiplexing circuit for SiPM-based time-of-flight (TOF) PET detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Hyeok-Jun; Choi, Yong; Hu, Wei; Yan, Jianhua; Ho Jung, Jin

    2017-04-07

    There has been great interest in developing a time-of-flight (TOF) PET to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of PET image relative to that of non-TOF PET. Silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) arrays have attracted attention for use as a fast TOF PET photosensor. Since numerous SiPM arrays are needed to construct a modern human PET, a multiplexing method providing both good timing performance and high channel reduction capability is required to develop a SiPM-based TOF PET. The purpose of this study was to develop a capacitive multiplexing circuit for the SiPM-based TOF PET. The proposed multiplexing circuit was evaluated by measuring the coincidence resolving time (CRT) and the energy resolution as a function of the overvoltage using three different capacitor values of 15, 30, and 51 pF. A flood histogram was also obtained and quantitatively assessed. Experiments were performed using a [Formula: see text] array of [Formula: see text] mm 2 SiPMs. Regarding the capacitor values, the multiplexing circuit using a smaller capacitor value showed the best timing performance. On the other hand, the energy resolution and flood histogram quality of the multiplexing circuit deteriorated as the capacitor value became smaller. The proposed circuit was able to achieve a CRT of [Formula: see text] ps FWHM and an energy resolution of 17.1[Formula: see text] with a pair of [Formula: see text] mm 3 LYSO crystals using a capacitor value of 30 pF at an overvoltage of 3.0 V. It was also possible to clearly resolve a [Formula: see text] array of LYSO crystals in the flood histogram using the multiplexing circuit. The experiment results indicate that the proposed capacitive multiplexing circuit is useful to obtain an excellent timing performance and a crystal-resolving capability in the flood histogram with a minimal degradation of the energy resolution, as well as to reduce the number of the readout channels of the SiPM-based TOF PET detector.

  3. Symmetry-broken momentum distributions induced by matter-wave diffraction during time-of-flight expansion of ultracold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonet, Juliette; Weinberg, Malte; Juergensen, Ole; Oelschlaeger, Christoph; Luehmann, Dirk-Soeren; Sengstock, Klaus

    2016-05-01

    The information about quantum gas systems is still commonly inferred from time-of-flight measurements. Here, we demonstrate that interaction during the time-of-flight expansion can strongly alter the measurement of the initial atomic momentum distribution. We discuss the observation of symmetry-broken momentum distributions for bosonic mixtures in state-dependent honeycomb lattices due to scattering processes within the first milliseconds of the expansion time. These findings are of fundamental importance in a broad range of systems, including state-dependent lattices and superlattices, where the lattice symmetry does not cancel the influence of the scattering processes on the interference pattern. Beyond that, the interactions during a free expansion can be used as an interferometric probe to reveal novel quantum phases, such as supersolids.

  4. An ion trap time-of-flight mass spectrometer with high mass resolution for cold trapped ion experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, P. C.; Greenberg, J.; Miller, M. I.; Loeffler, K.; Lewandowski, H. J.

    2017-12-01

    Trapping molecular ions that have been sympathetically cooled with laser-cooled atomic ions is a useful platform for exploring cold ion chemistry. We designed and characterized a new experimental apparatus for probing chemical reaction dynamics between molecular cations and neutral radicals at temperatures below 1 K. The ions are trapped in a linear quadrupole radio-frequency trap and sympathetically cooled by co-trapped, laser-cooled, atomic ions. The ion trap is coupled to a time-of-flight mass spectrometer to readily identify product ion species and to accurately determine trapped ion numbers. We discuss, and present in detail, the design of this ion trap time-of-flight mass spectrometer and the electronics required for driving the trap and mass spectrometer. Furthermore, we measure the performance of this system, which yields mass resolutions of m/Δm ≥ 1100 over a wide mass range, and discuss its relevance for future measurements in chemical reaction kinetics and dynamics.

  5. Rapid Detection of OXA-48-Producing Enterobacteriaceae by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization−Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oviaño, Marina; Barba, Maria José; Fernández, Begoña; Ortega, Adriana; Aracil, Belén; Oteo, Jesús; Campos, José

    2015-01-01

    A rapid and sensitive (100%) matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization−time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) assay was developed to detect OXA-48-type producers, using 161 previously characterized clinical isolates. Ertapenem was monitored to detect carbapenem resistance, and temocillin was included in the assay as a marker for OXA-48-producers. Structural analysis of temocillin is described. Data are obtained within 60 min. PMID:26677247

  6. MCP PMT with high time response and linear output current for neutron time-of-flight detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolotov, A. S.; Konovalov, P. I.; Nurtdinov, R. I.

    2016-09-01

    A microchannel plate (MCP) photomultiplier tube (PMT) with a subnanosecond time response and a high linear output current has been developed. PMT is designed for detection of weak pulses of radiation in UV-, visible and nearer-IR ranges and can be used in neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) detectors in experiments on laser compression of thermonuclear fuel. The results of measurements of MCP PMT main parameters are presented: photocathode spectral sensitivity, gain, maximum linear output current, and time response.

  7. Implementation of TTIK method and time of flight for resonance reaction studies at heavy ion accelerator DC-60

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nurmukhanbetova, A.K. [National Laboratory Astana, Nazarbayev University, Astana 010000 (Kazakhstan); Goldberg, V.Z. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX (United States); Nauruzbayev, D.K. [National Laboratory Astana, Nazarbayev University, Astana 010000 (Kazakhstan); Saint Petersburg State University, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation); Rogachev, G.V. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX (United States); Golovkov, M.S. [Joint Institute of Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Dubna State University, Dubna (Russian Federation); Mynbayev, N.A. [National Laboratory Astana, Nazarbayev University, Astana 010000 (Kazakhstan); Artemov, S.; Karakhodjaev, A. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Kuterbekov, K. [L.N. Gumilov Eurasian National University, Astana (Kazakhstan); Rakhymzhanov, A. [National Laboratory Astana, Nazarbayev University, Astana 010000 (Kazakhstan); Berdibek, Zh. [School of Science and Technology, Nazarbayev University, Astana (Kazakhstan); Ivanov, I. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Astana (Kazakhstan); Tikhonov, A. [School of Science and Technology, Nazarbayev University, Astana (Kazakhstan); Zherebchevsky, V.I.; Torilov, S. Yu. [Saint Petersburg State University, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation); Tribble, R.E. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX (United States)

    2017-03-01

    To study resonance reactions of heavy ions at low energy we have combined the Thick Target Inverse Kinematics Method (TTIK) with Time of Flight method (TF). We used extended target and TF to resolve the identification problems of various possible nuclear processes inherent to the simplest popular version of TTIK. Investigations of the {sup 15}N interaction with hydrogen and helium gas targets by using this new approach are presented.

  8. Identification of Nocardia Species by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khot, Prasanna D.; Bird, Brian A.; Durrant, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry for identification of Nocardia species remains challenging. By identifying 83.1% (64 of 77) and 80% (8 of 10) to the species and complex levels, respectively, and 94.3% (82 of 87) to the genus level, we show that an approach using routine sample preparation, an up-to-date commercial database minimally augmented with custom spectra, and testing at an early stage of growth is promising. PMID:26269617

  9. Quantifying time-of-flight-resolved optical field dynamics in turbid media with interferometric near-infrared spectroscopy (iNIRS) (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borycki, Dawid; Kholiqov, Oybek; Zhou, Wenjun; Srinivasan, Vivek J.

    2017-03-01

    Sensing and imaging methods based on the dynamic scattering of coherent light, including laser speckle, laser Doppler, and diffuse correlation spectroscopy quantify scatterer motion using light intensity (speckle) fluctuations. The underlying optical field autocorrelation (OFA), rather than being measured directly, is typically inferred from the intensity autocorrelation (IA) through the Siegert relationship, by assuming that the scattered field obeys Gaussian statistics. In this work, we demonstrate interferometric near-infrared spectroscopy (iNIRS) for measurement of time-of-flight (TOF) resolved field and intensity autocorrelations in fluid tissue phantoms and in vivo. In phantoms, we find a breakdown of the Siegert relationship for short times-of-flight due to a contribution from static paths whose optical field does not decorrelate over experimental time scales, and demonstrate that eliminating such paths by polarization gating restores the validity of the Siegert relationship. Inspired by these results, we developed a method, called correlation gating, for separating the OFA into static and dynamic components. Correlation gating enables more precise quantification of tissue dynamics. To prove this, we show that iNIRS and correlation gating can be applied to measure cerebral hemodynamics of the nude mouse in vivo using dynamically scattered (ergodic) paths and not static (non-ergodic) paths, which may not be impacted by blood. More generally, correlation gating, in conjunction with TOF resolution, enables more precise separation of diffuse and non-diffusive contributions to OFA than is possible with TOF resolution alone. Finally, we show that direct measurements of OFA are statistically more efficient than indirect measurements based on IA.

  10. Monolithic scintillators and SiPMs in time-of-flight PET detectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dam, H.T.

    2012-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is one of the key medical imaging modalities in the diagnosis and staging of e.g. cancer and cardiovascular diseases. The image formation is based on the measurement of annihilation photon pairs in the detector ring of the PET scanner. The diagnostic value of a PET

  11. MR Performance Comparison of a PET/MR System Before and After SiPM-Based Time-of-Flight PET Detector Insertion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalighi, Mohammad Mehdi; Delso, Gaspar; Maramraju, Sri Harsha; Deller, Timothy W.; Levin, Craig S.; Glover, Gary H.

    2016-10-01

    A silicon photomultiplier (SiPM)-based time-of-flight capable PET detector has been integrated with a 70 cm wide-bore 3T MR scanner for simultaneous whole-body imaging (MR750w, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI). After insertion of the PET detector, the final PET/MR bore is 60 cm wide (SIGNA PET/MR, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI). The MR performance was compared before and after the PET ring insertion. B0 homogeneity, B1+ uniformity of the body coil along with peak B1+, coherent noise, and FBIRN (Function Biomedical Informatics Research Network) tests are used to compare the MR performance. It is shown that B0 homogeneity and coherent noise have not changed according to the system specifications. Peak B1+ is increased by 33% and B1+ inhomogeneity is increased by 4% after PET ring insertion due to a smaller diameter body coil design. The FBIRN test shows similar temporal stability before and after PET ring insertion. Due to a smaller body coil on the PET/MR system, the signal fluctuation to noise ratio (SFNR) and SNR for body receive coil, are improved by 40% and 160% for Echo Planar Imaging (EPI) and spiral sequences respectively. Comparison using RF- and gradient-intensive clinical sequences shows inserting the PET detectors into the wide-bore MRI has not compromised the MR image quality according to these tests.

  12. Rapid Quadrupole-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry Method Quantifies Oxygen-Rich Lignin Compound in Complex Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boes, Kelsey S.; Roberts, Michael S.; Vinueza, Nelson R.

    2017-12-01

    Complex mixture analysis is a costly and time-consuming task facing researchers with foci as varied as food science and fuel analysis. When faced with the task of quantifying oxygen-rich bio-oil molecules in a complex diesel mixture, we asked whether complex mixtures could be qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed on a single mass spectrometer with mid-range resolving power without the use of lengthy separations. To answer this question, we developed and evaluated a quantitation method that eliminated chromatography steps and expanded the use of quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry from primarily qualitative to quantitative as well. To account for mixture complexity, the method employed an ionization dopant, targeted tandem mass spectrometry, and an internal standard. This combination of three techniques achieved reliable quantitation of oxygen-rich eugenol in diesel from 300 to 2500 ng/mL with sufficient linearity (R2 = 0.97 ± 0.01) and excellent accuracy (percent error = 0% ± 5). To understand the limitations of the method, it was compared to quantitation attained on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer, the gold standard for quantitation. The triple quadrupole quantified eugenol from 50 to 2500 ng/mL with stronger linearity (R2 = 0.996 ± 0.003) than the quadrupole-time-of-flight and comparable accuracy (percent error = 4% ± 5). This demonstrates that a quadrupole-time-of-flight can be used for not only qualitative analysis but also targeted quantitation of oxygen-rich lignin molecules in complex mixtures without extensive sample preparation. The rapid and cost-effective method presented here offers new possibilities for bio-oil research, including: (1) allowing for bio-oil studies that demand repetitive analysis as process parameters are changed and (2) making this research accessible to more laboratories. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  13. A comparison between magnetic resonance angiography at 3 teslas (time-of-flight and contrast-enhanced and flat-panel digital subtraction angiography in the assessment of embolized brain aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme S. Nakiri

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To compare the time-of-flight and contrast-enhanced- magnetic resonance angiography techniques in a 3 Tesla magnetic resonance unit with digital subtraction angiography with the latest flat-panel technology and 3D reconstruction in the evaluation of embolized cerebral aneurysms. INTRODUCTION: Many embolized aneurysms are subject to a recurrence of intra-aneurismal filling. Traditionally, imaging surveillance of coiled aneurysms has consisted of repeated digital subtraction angiography. However, this method has a small but significant risk of neurological complications, and many authors have advocated the use of noninvasive imaging methods for the surveillance of embolized aneurysms. METHODS: Forty-three aneurysms in 30 patients were studied consecutively between November 2009 and May 2010. Two interventional neuroradiologists rated the time-of-flight-magnetic resonance angiography, the contrast-enhanced-magnetic resonance angiography, and finally the digital subtraction angiography, first independently and then in consensus. The status of aneurysm occlusion was assessed according to the Raymond scale, which indicates the level of recanalization according to degrees: Class 1: excluded aneurysm; Class 2: persistence of a residual neck; Class 3: persistence of a residual aneurysm. The agreement among the analyses was assessed by applying the Kappa statistic. RESULTS: Inter-observer agreement was excellent for both methods (K = 0.93; 95 % CI: 0.84-1. Inter-technical agreement was almost perfect between time-of-flight-magnetic resonance angiography and digital subtraction angiography (K = 0.98; 95 % CI: 0.93-1 and between time-of-flight-magnetic resonance angiography and contrast-enhanced-magnetic resonance angiography (K = 0.98; 95% CI: 0.93-1. Disagreement occurred in only one case (2.3%, which was classified as Class I by time-of-flight-magnetic resonance angiography and Class II by digital subtraction angiography. The agreement between

  14. A comparison between magnetic resonance angiography at 3 teslas (time-of-flight and contrast-enhanced) and flat-panel digital subtraction angiography in the assessment of embolized brain aneurysms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakiri, Guilherme S.; Santos, Antonio C.; Abud, Thiago G.; Abud, Daniel G., E-mail: gsnakiri@yahoo.com.b [University of Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Medical School. Div. of Radiology; Aragon, Davi C. [University of Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Medical School. Div. of Statistics; Colli, Benedicto O. [University of Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Medical School. Div. of Neurosurgery

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: to compare the time-of-flight and contrast-enhanced- magnetic resonance angiography techniques in a 3 Tesla magnetic resonance unit with digital subtraction angiography with the latest flat-panel technology and 3D reconstruction in the evaluation of embolized cerebral aneurysms. Introduction: many embolized aneurysms are subject to a recurrence of intra-aneurysmal filling. Traditionally, imaging surveillance of coiled aneurysms has consisted of repeated digital subtraction angiography. However, this method has a small but significant risk of neurological complications, and many authors have advocated the use of noninvasive imaging methods for the surveillance of embolized aneurysms. Methods: forty-three aneurysms in 30 patients were studied consecutively between November 2009 and May 2010. Two interventional neuro radiologists rated the time-of-flight-magnetic resonance angiography, the contrast enhanced-magnetic resonance angiography, and finally the digital subtraction angiography, first independently and then in consensus. The status of aneurysm occlusion was assessed according to the Raymond scale, which indicates the level of recanalization according to degrees: Class 1: excluded aneurysm; Class 2: persistence of a residual neck; Class 3: persistence of a residual aneurysm. The agreement among the analyses was assessed by applying the Kappa statistic. Results: inter-observer agreement was excellent for both methods (K = 0.93; 95 % CI: 0.84-1). Inter-technical agreement was almost perfect between time-of-flight-magnetic resonance angiography and digital subtraction angiography (K = 0.98; 95 % CI: 0.93-1) and between time-of-flight-magnetic resonance angiography and contrast enhanced-magnetic resonance angiography (K = 0.98; 95% CI: 0.93-1). Disagreement occurred in only one case (2.3%), which was classified as Class I by time-of-flight-magnetic resonance angiography and Class II by digital subtraction angiography. The agreement between contrast

  15. A comparison between magnetic resonance angiography at 3 Teslas (time-of-flight and contrast-enhanced) and flat-panel digital subtraction angiography in the assessment of embolized brain aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakiri, Guilherme S; Santos, Antonio C; Abud, Thiago G; Aragon, Davi C; Colli, Benedicto O; Abud, Daniel G

    2011-01-01

    To compare the time-of-flight and contrast-enhanced- magnetic resonance angiography techniques in a 3 Tesla magnetic resonance unit with digital subtraction angiography with the latest flat-panel technology and 3D reconstruction in the evaluation of embolized cerebral aneurysms. Many embolized aneurysms are subject to a recurrence of intra-aneurismal filling. Traditionally, imaging surveillance of coiled aneurysms has consisted of repeated digital subtraction angiography. However, this method has a small but significant risk of neurological complications, and many authors have advocated the use of noninvasive imaging methods for the surveillance of embolized aneurysms. Forty-three aneurysms in 30 patients were studied consecutively between November 2009 and May 2010. Two interventional neuroradiologists rated the time-of-flight-magnetic resonance angiography, the contrast-enhanced-magnetic resonance angiography, and finally the digital subtraction angiography, first independently and then in consensus. The status of aneurysm occlusion was assessed according to the Raymond scale, which indicates the level of recanalization according to degrees: Class 1: excluded aneurysm; Class 2: persistence of a residual neck; Class 3: persistence of a residual aneurysm. The agreement among the analyses was assessed by applying the Kappa statistic. Inter-observer agreement was excellent for both methods (K = 0.93; 95 % CI: 0.84-1). Inter-technical agreement was almost perfect between time-of-flight-magnetic resonance angiography and digital subtraction angiography (K = 0.98; 95 % CI: 0.93-1) and between time-of-flight-magnetic resonance angiography and contrast-enhanced-magnetic resonance angiography (K = 0.98; 95% CI: 0.93-1). Disagreement occurred in only one case (2.3%), which was classified as Class I by time-of-flight-magnetic resonance angiography and Class II by digital subtraction angiography. The agreement between contrast-enhanced-magnetic resonance angiography and

  16. Dispositivo de navegación para personas invidentes basado en la tecnología time of flight

    OpenAIRE

    LENGUA, ISMAEL; DUNAI, LARISA; PERIS FAJARNÉS, GUILLERMO; DEFEZ, BEATRIZ

    2013-01-01

    El artículo presenta un nuevo dispositivo de navegación y detección de obstáculos para las personas ciegas, basado en la tecnología Time-of-Flight y en sonidos acústicos. El dispositivo se ha desarrollado como un dispositivo de ayuda, complementario al bastón, para las personas invidentes. Su objetivo primordial es detectar los obstáculos e informar al usuario mediante sonidos acústicos de la locación de los mismos, tanto en distancia como en dirección. El dispositivo tiene un rango de trabaj...

  17. Measurements of the capture cross sections of natural silver in the resonance range with the time of flight technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šalamon L.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutron capture cross section measurements have been performed at the time-of-flight facility GELINA of the EC-JRC-Geel. Prompt gamma rays, originating from a natural silver sample, were detected by a pair of C6D6 liquid scintillation detectors. The total energy detection principle in combination with the pulse height weighting technique has been used. In this contribution the experimental details together with the data reduction process are described. In addition, first results of calculations with REFIT are presented to verify the quality of recommended cross section data in the resolved resonance region.

  18. A gas ionisation detector in the axial (Bragg) geometry used for the time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siketić, Zdravko; Skukan, Natko; Bogdanović Radović, Iva [Ruđer Bošković Institute, Bijenička cesta 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2015-08-15

    In this paper, time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis spectrometer with a newly constructed gas ionization detector for energy detection is presented. The detector is designed in the axial (Bragg) geometry with a 3 × 3 array of 50 nm thick Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} membranes as an entrance window. 40 mbar isobutane gas was sufficient to stop a 30 MeV primary iodine beam as well as all recoils in the detector volume. Spectrometer and detector performances were determined showing significant improvement in the mass and energy resolution, respectively, comparing to the spectrometer with a standard silicon particle detector for an energy measurement.

  19. Some remarks on the time of flight and range of a projectile in a linear resisting medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Stewart

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In view of the recent work by Karkantzakos [Journal of Engineering Science and Technology Review 2 (2009 76–81], anumber of remarks highlighting the connection between the Lambert W function and the time of flight and range of a projectilemoving in a resisting medium where the retarding force acting on the projectile is proportional to its velocity are made.In particular, we show how each of these quantities can be expressed in closed form in terms of the Lambert W function andindicate how the analysis of the motion becomes greatly simplified by its introduction.

  20. Irradiation of polymers using electron beams: characterization of positive ions through the time-of-flight technique

    OpenAIRE

    Rocco, Maria Luiza Miranda; Pontes, Frederico Celestino; Faraudo, Gustavo Sebastian; Souza, Gerardo Gerson Bezerra de; Weibel, Daniel Eduardo; Pinho, Roberto Rosas

    2004-01-01

    With the aim of studying the interaction of fast electrons with solid surfaces we have developed an experimental set-up based on electron stimulated desorption (ESD) coupled to time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry. Poly(methyl methacrylate) and poly(vynil chloride) samples have been irradiated by a pulsed electron beam of 1.2 keV and 0.18 µs FWHM. The results show that H+ is the main ionic species to desorb after electron bombardment. In addition, other ionic fragments were also observed an...

  1. Species identification of clinical Prevotella isolates by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wybo, Ingrid; Soetens, Oriane; De Bel, Annelies; Echahidi, Fedoua; Vancutsem, Ellen; Vandoorslaer, Kristof; Piérard, Denis

    2012-04-01

    The performance of matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for species identification of Prevotella was evaluated and compared with 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Using a Bruker database, 62.7% of the 102 clinical isolates were identified to the species level and 73.5% to the genus level. Extension of the commercial database improved these figures to, respectively, 83.3% and 89.2%. MALDI-TOF MS identification of Prevotella is reliable but needs a more extensive database.

  2. Species Identification of Clinical Prevotella Isolates by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soetens, Oriane; De Bel, Annelies; Echahidi, Fedoua; Vancutsem, Ellen; Vandoorslaer, Kristof; Piérard, Denis

    2012-01-01

    The performance of matrix-assisted laser desorption–ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for species identification of Prevotella was evaluated and compared with 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Using a Bruker database, 62.7% of the 102 clinical isolates were identified to the species level and 73.5% to the genus level. Extension of the commercial database improved these figures to, respectively, 83.3% and 89.2%. MALDI-TOF MS identification of Prevotella is reliable but needs a more extensive database. PMID:22301022

  3. Time-of-flight diffractometer with multiple pulse overlap - an example for the application of modern tools for instrument design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuhr, U.; Bauer, G.S.; Wagner, W. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    A Time-of-Flight Diffractometer with high pulse rates, allowing multiple frame overlap, is a completely novel design of an instrument dedicated for high resolution strain-field mapping. We elaborated a detailed concept of this instrument applying analytical calculations and Monte Carlo computer simulations. Having established the instrument concept, the computer simulations will now be extended to optimize the total performance of the instrument. To illustrate the necessity and possibilities of applying modem tools for instrument design, we describe, as an example, the different steps towards the development of the detailed design of this instrument, which we intend to build at the Swiss spallation. source SINQ in the near future.

  4. A new Time-of-Flight mass measurement project for exotic nuclei and ultra-high precision detector development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Bao-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The time-of-flight (TOF mass spectrometry (MS, a high-resolution magnetic spectrometer equipped with a fast particle tracking system, is well recognized by its ability in weighing the most exotic nuclei. Currently such TOF-MS can achieve a mass resolution power of about 2×10−4. We show that the mass resolution can be further improved by one order of magnitude with augmented timing and position detectors. We report the progress in developing ultra-fast detectors to be used in TOF-MS.

  5. Sequencing of Isotope-Labeled Small RNA Using Femtosecond Laser Ablation Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurata-Nishimura, Mizuki; Ando, Yoshinari; Kobayashi, Tohru; Matsuo, Yukari; Suzuki, Harukazu; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Kawai, Jun

    2010-04-01

    A novel method for the analysis of sequences of small RNAs using nucleotide triphosphates labeled with stable isotopes has been developed using time-of-flight mass spectroscopy combined with femtosecond laser ablation (fsLA-TOF-MS). Small RNAs synthesized with nucleotides enriched in 13C and 15N were efficiently atomized and ionized by single-shot fsLA and the isotope ratios 13C/12C and 15N/14N were evaluated using the TOF-MS method. By comparing the isotope ratios among four different configurations, the number of nucleotide contents of the control RNA sample were successfully reproduced.

  6. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry applied to virus identification

    OpenAIRE

    Calderaro, Adriana; Arcangeletti, Maria-Cristina; Rodighiero, Isabella; Buttrini, Mirko; Gorrini, Chiara; Motta, Federica; Germini, Diego; Medici, Maria-Cristina; Chezzi, Carlo; De Conto, Flora

    2014-01-01

    Virus detection and/or identification traditionally rely on methods based on cell culture, electron microscopy and antigen or nucleic acid detection. These techniques are good, but often expensive and/or time-consuming; furthermore, they not always lead to virus identification at the species and/or type level. In this study, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) was tested as an innovative tool to identify human polioviruses and to identif...

  7. Two-step Laser Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry to Elucidate Organic Diversity in Planetary Surface Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getty, Stephanie A.; Brinckerhoff, William B.; Cornish, Timothy; Li, Xiang; Floyd, Melissa; Arevalo, Ricardo Jr.; Cook, Jamie Elsila; Callahan, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LD-TOF-MS) holds promise to be a low-mass, compact in situ analytical capability for future landed missions to planetary surfaces. The ability to analyze a solid sample for both mineralogical and preserved organic content with laser ionization could be compelling as part of a scientific mission pay-load that must be prepared for unanticipated discoveries. Targeted missions for this instrument capability include Mars, Europa, Enceladus, and small icy bodies, such as asteroids and comets.

  8. Possibilities for polarized pulsed neutron instrumentation based on the time-of-flight spin-resonance energy filter

    CERN Document Server

    Parizzi, A A; Klose, F

    2002-01-01

    We present a new approach for dynamic energy filtering at spallation neutron sources, based on the original concept of the Drabkin spin-resonance flipper. The setup takes advantage of the neutron magnetic moment, and consists of a wavelength-selective magnetic resonator and a supermirror polarizer/analyzer system. We are proposing refinements (time dependence and revised magnetic field profiles) to the basic concepts of the setup, making it suitable for time-of-flight experiments at spallation neutron sources. We outline here possibilities for using this spin resonator as the core of new neutron instruments. (orig.)

  9. Thermal diffuse scattering in time-of-flight neutron diffraction studies on SBN and TSCC single crytals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prokert, F. [Forschungszentrum Rossendorf e.V. (FZR) (Germany). Inst. fuer Ionenstrahlphysik und Materialforschung; Savenko, B.N. [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation). LNP; Balagurov, A.M. [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation). LNP

    1995-03-01

    Thermal diffuse scattering (TDS) from single crystals of barium strontium niobate (SBN) and from a partly deuterated single crystal of tris(sarcosine) calcium chloride (TSCC) measured on the time-of-flight (TOF) Laue single-crystal diffractometer DN-2/IBR-2, Dubna, Russia, are presented. Various characteristic distributions of the TDS were measured and could be interpreted for the elastically (nearly) isotropic SBN crystals as well as for the anisotropic TSCC sample in accordance with the theory. The velocities of sound propagation are determined in both cases. Temperature-dependent changes of the TDS are qualitatively analysed for SBN crystals. (orig.).

  10. Time-of-flight delay between oscillating neutrinos and gravitational waves from supernovae and the neutrino mass problem

    CERN Document Server

    Cuesta, H J M

    2001-01-01

    Neutrino oscillations during core bounce of a supernova collapse may induce detectable gravitational-wave bursts by the time they are trapped in the core. For large-scale distances the flavor changing neutrinos get delayed on its trip to earth while the gravitational waves they emit do not. Since the oscillation mechanism sets up the offset for both emissions, this fact yields in a time-of-flight delay between both the radiations that, whenever measured, could provide an inedit estimative of the absolute scale of neutrino masses.

  11. Classification of stevia sweeteners in soft drinks using liquid chromatography and time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakigi, Y; Suzuki, T; Icho, T; Uyama, A; Mochizuki, N

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a comprehensive analytical method for the characterisation of stevia sweeteners in soft drinks. By using LC and time-of-flight MS, we detected 30 steviol glycosides from nine stevia sweeteners. The mass spectral data of these compounds were applied to the analysis to determine steviol glycosides in nine soft drinks. On the basis of chromatographic data and principal-component analysis, these soft drinks were classified into three groups, and the soft drinks of each group, respectively, contained high-rebaudioside A extract, normal stevia extract or alfa-glucosyltransferase-treated stevia extract.

  12. Development of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer for ion desorption studies at HiSOR

    CERN Document Server

    Fujii, K; Nakashima, Y; Waki, S; Sardar, S A; Yasui, Y; Wada, S I; Sekitani, T; Tanaka, K

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a time-of-flight mass spectrometer which is now under operation at HiSOR storage ring for research of photon stimulated ion desorption (PSID). The employment of the pulsed high voltage method as a trigger allowed us to perform the investigations at a multi bunch operation of the storage ring. The performance of this spectrometer was evaluated by applying to the PSID measurements of PMMA (poly-methylmethacrylate) thin films. The results are compared with those obtained at Photon Factory by using pulsed synchrotron radiation in a single bunch operation. The capabilities of the apparatus for ion desorption studies are discussed.

  13. Bacillus subtilis chitinase identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of flight/time of flight mass spectrometry has insecticidal activity against Spodoptera litura Fab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Rajamanickam; Revathi, Kannan; Thanigaivel, Annamalai; Kirubakaran, Suyambulingam Arunachalam; Senthil-Nathan, Sengottayan

    2014-11-01

    An extracellular chitinase was identified and purified (CS1 and CS2) from Bacillus subtilis. The 16S rRNA sequencing was submitted in GenBank (accession numbers KC336487 and KC412256). The purified crude enzymes were identified through matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) analysis. The peptide sequences were matched with chitinase sequences. The peak m/z with 1297. 592 and 3094.570 mascot search resulted sequence was blasted with NCBI protein sequences and confirmed that it is a chitinase enzyme. The effects of chitinase on gut enzymes lactate dehydrogenase, acid phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase and adenosine triphosphatase of the tobacco cutworm Spodoptera litura larvae were investigated. At all concentrations tested, chitinase decreased the activities of these gut enzymes relative to the control. When chitinase treated leaves were fed to larvae in bioassays, gut tissue and gut enzymes were affected. The histological study clearly shows the chitinase treated larval gut, peritrophic membrane and epithelial cells were affected significantly. Chitinase isolated from B. subtilis has effectively reduced the gut enzyme activity and growth of S. litura. The chitin based bioformulation may serve as an effective biocide against the polyphagous pest like S. litura. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Do Susceptibility Weighted Imaging and Multi-Shot Echo Planar Imaging Optimally Demonstrate and Predict Outcome for Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-27

    Arlington, VA 22202-4302. Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law , no person shall be subject to any penalty...injury to ligaments, discs, and other soft tissue that are crucial for planning optimal surgery and rehabilitation. However, conventional MRI or...discs, and other soft tissue that are crucial for planning optimal surgery and rehabilitation. However, conventional MRI or multiple detector computed

  15. Imaging the effects of oxygen saturation changes in voluntary apnea and hyperventilation on susceptibility-weighted imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, K; Barnes, S; Haacke, E M; Grossman, R I; Ge, Y

    2014-06-01

    Cerebrovascular oxygenation changes during respiratory challenges have clinically important implications for brain function, including cerebral autoregulation and the rate of brain metabolism. SWI is sensitive to venous oxygenation level by exploitation of the magnetic susceptibility of deoxygenated blood. We assessed cerebral venous blood oxygenation changes during simple voluntary breath-holding (apnea) and hyperventilation by use of SWI at 3T. We performed SWI scans (3T; acquisition time of 1 minute, 28 seconds; centered on the anterior commissure and the posterior commissure) on 10 healthy male volunteers during baseline breathing as well as during simple voluntary hyperventilation and apnea challenges. The hyperventilation and apnea tasks were separated by a 5-minute resting period. SWI venograms were generated, and the signal changes on SWI before and after the respiratory stress tasks were compared by means of a paired Student t test. Changes in venous vasculature visibility caused by the respiratory challenges were directly visualized on the SWI venograms. The venogram segmentation results showed that voluntary apnea decreased the mean venous blood voxel number by 1.6% (P hyperventilation increased the mean venous blood voxel number by 2.7% (P < .0001). These results can be explained by blood CO2 changes secondary to the respiratory challenges, which can alter cerebrovascular tone and cerebral blood flow and ultimately affect venous oxygen levels. These results highlight the sensitivity of SWI to simple and noninvasive respiratory challenges and its potential utility in assessing cerebral hemodynamics and vasomotor responses. © 2014 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  16. Silicon Photomultipliers and Monolithic Scintillators for Time-of-Flight PET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seifert, S.

    2012-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a nuclear medical imaging modality. Its aim is to visualize the 3-dimensional distribution of a radiopharmaceutical (also called the tracer) within a patient (clinical PET) or test-animal (in case of preclinical investigations). The information that can be

  17. Time-of-flight studies of emission of {mu}t from frozen hydrogen films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, T.M. [Gustavus Adolphus College (United States); Adamczak, A. [Institute of Nuclear Physics (Poland); Bailey, J.M. [Chester Technology (United Kingdom); Beer, G.A. [University of Victoria (Canada); Beveridge, J.L. [TRIUMF (Canada); Ellerbusch, B.P. [Gustavus Adolphus College (United States); Fujiwara, M.C. [University of British Columbia (Canada); Jacot-Guillarmod, R. [Universite de Fribourg (Switzerland); Kammel, P. [University of California Berkeley (United States); Kim, S.K. [Jeonbuk National University (Korea, Republic of); Knowles, P.E. [Universite de Fribourg (Switzerland); Kunselman, A.R. [University of Wyoming (United States); Lindquist, G.J. [Gustavus Adolphus College (United States); Maier, M. [University of Victoria (Canada); Markushin, V.E. [Paul Scherrer Institute (Switzerland); Marshall, G.M. [TRIUMF (Canada); Martoff, C.J. [Temple University (United States); Mason, G.R. [University of Victoria (Canada); Mulhauser, F. [Universite de Fribourg (Switzerland); Olin, A. [TRIUMF (Canada)] (and others)

    1999-06-15

    In recent TRIUMF experiments, a {mu}{sup -} beam is stopped in a solid hydrogen film with a small fraction of T{sub 2}. The Ramsauer-Townsend (RT) mechanism allows {mu}t to escape into vacuum with a few eV of energy. To study the emission process, an imaging system was used to determine the position of muon decays. Experimental histograms are in good agreement with a Monte Carlo simulation.

  18. Clinical evaluation of whole-body oncologic PET with time-of-flight and point-spread function for the hybrid PET/MR system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Kun; Cui, Bixiao; Ma, Jie; Shuai, Dongmei; Liang, Zhigang; Jansen, Floris; Zhou, Yun; Lu, Jie; Zhao, Guoguang

    2017-08-01

    Hybrid positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance (PET/MR) imaging is a new multimodality imaging technology that can provide structural and functional information simultaneously. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the time-of-flight (TOF) and point-spread function (PSF) on small lesions observed in PET/MR images from clinical patient image sets. This study evaluated 54 small lesions in 14 patients who had undergone 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/MR. Lesions up to 30mm in diameter were included. The PET data were reconstructed with a baseline ordered-subsets expectation-maximization (OSEM) algorithm, OSEM+PSF, OSEM+TOF and OSEM+TOF+PSF. PET image quality and small lesions were visually evaluated and scored by a 3-point scale. A quantitative analysis was then performed using the mean and maximum standardized uptake value (SUV) of the small lesions (SUVmean and SUVmax). The lesions were divided into two groups according to the long-axis diameter and the location respectively and evaluated with each reconstruction algorithm. We also evaluated the background signal by analyzing the SUVliver. OSEM+TOF+PSF provided the highest value and OSEM+TOF or PSF showed a higher value than OSEM for the visual assessment and quantitative analysis. The combination of TOF and PSF increased the SUVmean by 26.6% and the SUVmax by 30.0%. The SUVliverwas not influenced by PSF or TOF. For the OSEM+TOF+PSF model, the change in SUVmean and SUVmax for lesions PET/MR images, potentially improving small lesion detectability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A multi-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrograph for short-lived and super-heavy nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schury, P., E-mail: schury@riken.jp [University of Tsukuba, Institute of Physics, Tsukuba City, Ibaraki (Japan); RIKEN, Nishina Center for Accelerator Based Science, Wako City, Saitama (Japan); New Mexico State University, Dept. of Chem. and BioChem., Las Cruces, NM (United States); Wada, M. [RIKEN, Nishina Center for Accelerator Based Science, Wako City, Saitama (Japan); Ito, Y. [University of Tsukuba, Institute of Physics, Tsukuba City, Ibaraki (Japan); RIKEN, Nishina Center for Accelerator Based Science, Wako City, Saitama (Japan); Naimi, S.; Sonoda, T. [RIKEN, Nishina Center for Accelerator Based Science, Wako City, Saitama (Japan); Mita, H. [University of Tsukuba, Institute of Physics, Tsukuba City, Ibaraki (Japan); RIKEN, Nishina Center for Accelerator Based Science, Wako City, Saitama (Japan); Takamine, A. [RIKEN, Nishina Center for Accelerator Based Science, Wako City, Saitama (Japan); Aoyama Gakuin University, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Okada, K. [Sophia University, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Wollnik, H. [New Mexico State University, Dept. of Chem. and BioChem., Las Cruces, NM (United States); Chon, S. [KEK, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Haba, H.; Kaji, D. [RIKEN, Nishina Center for Accelerator Based Science, Wako City, Saitama (Japan); Koura, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Ibaraki (Japan); Miyatake, H. [KEK, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Morimoto, K.; Morita, K. [RIKEN, Nishina Center for Accelerator Based Science, Wako City, Saitama (Japan); Ozawa, A. [University of Tsukuba, Institute of Physics, Tsukuba City, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Demonstrated very fast mass measurements with a multi-reflection time of flight mass spectrograph. • Mass resolving power of R{sub m}≈150,000 was achieved in 1.2-ms for A/q=39 ions. • Mass precision of (δm)/m =7.7×10{sup 8} was demonstrated for {sup 40}Ca{sub +}. • Effects of thermal and voltage instabilities are described. • Effects of thermal and voltage instabilities are described. -- Abstract: A multi-reflection time-of-flight (MRTOF) mass spectrograph has been implemented at RIKEN to provide high-precision mass measurements of very short-lived nuclei. Of particular interest are mass measurements of r-process nuclei and trans-uranium nuclei. In such nuclei, the MRTOF can perform on par with or better than traditional Penning trap systems. We demonstrate that the MRTOF-MS is capable of accurately attaining relative mass precision of δm/m<10{sup -7} and describe it’s utility with heavy, short-lived nuclei.

  20. Decomposition of cyclohexane ion induced by intense femtosecond laser fields by ion-trap time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazaki, Takao; Watanabe, Yusuke; Kanya, Reika [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Yamanouchi, Kaoru, E-mail: kaoru@chem.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); NANOQUINE, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2016-01-14

    Decomposition of cyclohexane cations induced by intense femtosecond laser fields at the wavelength of 800 nm is investigated by ion-trap time-of-flight mass spectrometry in which cyclohexane cations C{sub 6}H{sub 12}{sup +} stored in an ion trap are irradiated with intense femtosecond laser pulses and the generated fragment ions are recorded by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The various fragment ion species, C{sub 5}H{sub n}{sup +} (n = 7, 9), C{sub 4}H{sub n}{sup +} (n = 5–8), C{sub 3}H{sub n}{sup +} (n = 3–7), C{sub 2}H{sub n}{sup +} (n = 2–6), and CH{sub 3}{sup +}, identified in the mass spectra show that decomposition of C{sub 6}H{sub 12}{sup +} proceeds efficiently by the photo-irradiation. From the laser intensity dependences of the yields of the fragment ion species, the numbers of photons required for producing the respective fragment ions are estimated.

  1. Derivatization of Dextran for Multiply Charged Ion Formation and Electrospray Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometric Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Jesus B.; Hibbard, Hailey A. J.; Reynolds, Melissa M.

    2017-10-01

    We present the use of a simple, one-pot derivatization to allow the polysaccharide dextran to carry multiple positive charges, shifting its molecular weight distribution to a lower m/ z range. We performed this derivatization because molecular weight measurements of polysaccharides by mass spectrometry are challenging because of their lack of readily ionizable groups. The absence of ionizable groups limits proton abstraction and suppresses proton adduction during the ionization process, producing mass spectra with predominantly singly charged metal adduct ions, thereby limiting the detection of large polysaccharides. To address this challenge, we derivatized dextran T1 (approximately 1 kDa) by attaching ethylenediamine, giving dextran readily ionizable, terminal amine functional groups. The attached ethylenediamine groups facilitated proton adduction during the ionization process in positive ion mode. Using the low molecular weight dextran T1, we tracked the number of ethylenediamine attachments by measuring the mass shift from underivatized to derivatized dextran T1. Using electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, we observed derivatized dextran chains ranging from two to nine glucose residues with between one and four attachments/charges. Our success in shifting derivatized dextran T1 toward the low m/ z range suggests potential for this derivatization as a viable route for analysis of high molecular weight polysaccharides using electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  2. Concrete Infill Monitoring in Concrete-Filled FRP Tubes Using a PZT-Based Ultrasonic Time-of-Flight Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Mingzhang; Li, Weijie; Hei, Chuang; Song, Gangbing

    2016-12-07

    Concrete-filled fiber-reinforced polymer tubes (CFFTs) have attracted interest for their structural applications in corrosive environments. However, a weak interfacial strength between the fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) tube and the concrete infill may develop due to concrete shrinkage and inadequate concrete compaction during concrete casting, which will destroy the confinement effect and thereby reduce the load bearing capacity of a CFFT. In this paper, the lead zirconate titanate (PZT)-based ultrasonic time-of-flight (TOF) method was adopted to assess the concrete infill condition of CFFTs. The basic idea of this method is that the velocity of the ultrasonic wave propagation in the FRP material is about half of that in concrete material. Any voids or debonding created along the interface between the FRP tube and the concrete will delay the arrival time between the pairs of PZT transducers. A comparison of the arrival times of the PZT pairs between the intact and the defected CFFT was made to assess the severity of the voids or the debonding. The feasibility of the methodology was analyzed using a finite-difference time-domain-based numerical simulation. Experiments were setup to validate the numerical results, which showed good agreement with the numerical findings. The results showed that the ultrasonic time-of-flight method is able to detect the concrete infill condition of CFFTs.

  3. Sound propagation in a lattice of elastic beads: Time of flight, dispersion relation and time-frequency analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coste, Christophe; Gilles, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    We study sound propagation in a model granular medium, which is a triangular array of nominally identical spherical beads under isotropic stress. Because of the point-like nature of the contacts between the beads, the slightest polydispersity makes the lattice of effective contacts random. This randomness evolves with the overall stress applied on the boundaries, and we use detection of longitudinal burst waves, with gaussian envelope, as a probe for the medium. At low and moderate stress, the velocity dependency on the applied stress exhibits clear discrepancies with Hertzian behavior, which shows that the contact lattice is indeed random. Time-frequency analysis gives full access to the dispersion relation of the lattice, both for long and short waves. For long waves, the time-of-flight is shown to be identical to the group delay, as expected. This method also allows measurements for short waves, which probe small-scale heterogeneities in the contact lattice: At high stress, almost all possible contacts are effective, and time-of-flight measurements indicate almost perfect Hertzian behavior. Group delay measurements for short waves, on the contrary, reveal persistent small-scale disorder. We discuss in some details the algorithms used for time-frequency analysis (Wigner-Ville distributions, pseudo Wigner-Ville distributions, reassignment method).

  4. Analysis of sucralose and other sweeteners in water and beverage samples by liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Imma; Thurman, E Michael

    2010-06-18

    A methodology for the chromatographic separation and analysis of three of the most popular artificial sweeteners (aspartame, saccharin, and sucralose) in water and beverage samples was developed using liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/TOF-MS). The sweeteners were extracted from water samples using solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridges. Furthermore, several beverages were analyzed by a rapid and simple method without SPE, and the presence of the sweeteners was confirmed by accurate mass measurements below 2-ppm error. The unambiguous confirmation of the compounds was based on accurate mass measurements of the protonated molecules [M+H](+), their sodium adducts and their main fragment ions. Quantitation was carried out using matrix-matched standard calibration and linearity of response over 2 orders of magnitude was demonstrated (r>0.99). A detailed fragmentation study for sucralose was carried out by time-of-flight and a characteristic spectrum fingerprint pattern was obtained for the presence of this compound in water samples. Finally, the analysis of several wastewater, surface water and groundwater samples from the US showed that sucralose can be found in the aquatic environment at concentrations up to 2.4microg/L, thus providing a good indication of wastewater input from beverage sources. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS: A New Tool for the Analysis of Toxicological Effects on Single Cell Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald Jungnickel

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Single cell imaging mass spectrometry opens up a complete new perspective for strategies in toxicological risk assessment and drug discovery. In particular, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS with its high spatial and depth resolution is becoming part of the imaging mass spectrometry toolbox used for single cell analysis. Recent instrumentation advancements in combination with newly developed cluster ion guns allow 3-dimensional reconstruction of single cells together with a spatially resolved compound location and quantification on nanoscale depth level. The exact location and quantification of a single compound or even of a set of compounds is no longer restricted to the two dimensional space within single cells, but is available for voxels, a cube-sized 3-dimensional space, rather than pixels. The information gathered from one voxel is further analysed using multivariate statistical methodology like maximum autocorrelation factors to co-locate the compounds of interest within intracellular organelles like nucleus, mitochondria or golgi apparatus. Furthermore, the cell membrane may be resolved, including adhering compounds and potential changes of the lipid patterns. The generated information can be used further for a first evaluation of intracellular target specifity of new drug candidates or for the toxicological risk assessment of environmental chemicals and their intracellular metabolites. Additionally, single cell lipidomics and metabolomics enable for the first time an in-depth understanding of the activation or inhibition of cellular biosynthesis and signalling pathways.

  6. Detection of Large Ions in Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry: Effects of Ion Mass and Acceleration Voltage on Microchannel Plate Detector Response

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, Ranran; Li, Qiyao; Smith, Lloyd M

    2014-01-01

    In time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS), ion detection is typically accomplished by the generation and amplification of secondary electrons produced by ions colliding with a microchannel plate (MCP) detector...

  7. The value of total protein in guiding management of infectious parapneumonic effusion by using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chiu, Chih-Yung; Hsieh, Sen-Yung; Wong, Kin-Sun; Lai, Shen-Hao; Chen, Jen-Kun; Huang, Jing-Long

    2015-01-01

    .... The purpose of this study was to investigate the value of total protein analysis in guiding management of infectious PE by using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry...

  8. GEO-REFERENCED MAPPING USING AN AIRBORNE 3D TIME-OF-FLIGHT CAMERA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. K. Kohoutek

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the first experience of a close range bird's eye view photogrammetry with range imaging (RIM sensors for the real time generation of high resolution geo-referenced 3D surface models. The aim of this study was to develop a mobile, versatile and less costly outdoor survey methodology to measure natural surfaces compared to the terrestrial laser scanning (TLS. Two commercial RIM cameras (SR4000 by MESA Imaging AG and a CamCube 2.0 by PMDTechnologies GmbH were mounted on a lightweight crane and on an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV. The field experiments revealed various challenges in real time deployment of the two state-of-the-art RIM systems, e.g. processing of the large data volume. Acquisition strategy and data processing and first measurements are presented. The precision of the measured distances is less than 1 cm for good conditions. However, the measurement precision degraded under the test conditions due to direct sunlight, strong illumination contrasts and helicopter vibrations.

  9. Modeling RP-1 Fuel Advanced Distillation Data using Comprehensive Two-Dimensional Gas Chromatography Coupled with Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry and Partial Least Squares Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-07

    Advanced Distillation Data using Comprehensive Two- Dimensional Gas Chromatography coupled with Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry and Partial Least Squares...that included comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography combined with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC –TOFMS) to analyze RP-1 fuels...secondary dimensions, respectively, to separate the chemical compound classes ( alkanes , cycloalkanes, aromatics, etc), providing a significant level of

  10. The Effect of Magnetic Field on Positron Range and Spatial Resolution in an Integrated Whole-Body Time-Of-Flight PET/MRI System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shih-Ying; Savic, Dragana; Yang, Jaewon; Shrestha, Uttam; Seo, Youngho

    2014-11-01

    Simultaneous imaging systems combining positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been actively investigated. A PET/MR imaging system (GE Healthcare) comprised of a time-of-flight (TOF) PET system utilizing silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) and 3-tesla (3T) MRI was recently installed at our institution. The small-ring (60 cm diameter) TOF PET subsystem of this PET/MRI system can generate images with higher spatial resolution compared with conventional PET systems. We have examined theoretically and experimentally the effect of uniform magnetic fields on the spatial resolution for high-energy positron emitters. Positron emitters including 18F, 124I, and 68Ga were simulated in water using the Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit in the presence of a uniform magnetic field (0, 3, and 7 Tesla). The positron annihilation position was tracked to determine the 3D spatial distribution of the 511-keV gammy ray emission. The full-width at tenth maximum (FWTM) of the positron point spread function (PSF) was determined. Experimentally, 18F and 68Ga line source phantoms in air and water were imaged with an investigational PET/MRI system and a PET/CT system to investigate the effect of magnetic field on the spatial resolution of PET. The full-width half maximum (FWHM) of the line spread function (LSF) from the line source was determined as the system spatial resolution. Simulations and experimental results show that the in-plane spatial resolution was slightly improved at field strength as low as 3 Tesla, especially when resolving signal from high-energy positron emitters in the air-tissue boundary.

  11. Multi-Channel Optical Coherence Elastography Using Relative and Absolute Shear-Wave Time of Flight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elyas, Eli; Grimwood, Alex; Erler, Janine Terra

    2017-01-01

    propagating in a three-dimensional (3D) medium. A needle, embedded in the gel, was excited to vibrate along its long axis and the displacement as a function of time and distance from the needle associated with the resulting shear waves was detected using four M-mode images acquired simultaneously using...... of this technique should ply the field of cellular biology with valuable information with regard to elastic properties of cells and their environment. This paper evaluates the potential to develop such a tool by modifying a commercial optical coherence tomography (OCT) device to measure the speed of shear waves...... a commercial four-channel swept-source OCT system. Shear-wave time of arrival (TOA) was detected by tracking the axial OCT-speckle motion using cross-correlation methods. Shear-wave speed was then calculated from inter-channel differences of TOA for a single burst (the relative TOA method) and compared...

  12. Association of Lumbar Arterial Stenosis with Low Back Symptoms: A Cross-Sectional Study Using Two-Dimensional Time-of-Flight Magnetic Resonance Angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korkiakoski, A.; Niinimaeki, J.; Karppinen, J.; Korpelainen, R.; Haapea, M.; Natri, A.; Tervonen, O. (Inst. of Clinical Sciences, Dept. of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, Univ. of Oulu, Oulu (Finland))

    2009-01-15

    Background: Recent studies indicate that diminished blood flow may cause low back symptoms and intervertebral disc degeneration. Purpose: To explore the association between lumbar arterial stenosis as detected by two-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (2D TOF-MRA) and lumbar pain symptoms in an occupational cohort of middle-aged Finnish males. Material and Methods: 228 male subjects aged 36 to 55 years (mean 47 years) were imaged with 2D TOF-MRA. Additionally, 20 randomly selected subjects were scanned with contrast-enhanced MRA (ceMRA). In each subject, the first (L1) to fourth (L4) segmental lumbar arteries were evaluated for lumbar artery stenosis using a dichotomic scale. One subject was excluded because of poor image quality, reducing the study population to 227 subjects. Logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the association between arterial stenosis in 2D TOF-MRA and low back pain and sciatica symptoms (intensity, duration, frequency). Results: Comparing 2D TOF-MRA and ceMRA images, the kappa value (95% confidence interval) was 0.52 (0.31-0.73). The intraobserver reliability kappa value for 2D TOF-MRA was 0.85 (0.77-0.92), and interobserver kappa was 0.57 (0.49-0.65). The sensitivity of 2D TOF-MRA in detecting stenosis was 0.58, the accuracy 0.89, and the specificity 0.94. In 97 (43%) subjects all arteries were normal, whereas 130 (57%) had at least one stenosed artery. The left L4 artery was most often affected. The degree of arterial stenosis was associated with intensity of low back and sciatic pain, and sciatica pain duration during the past 3 months. Conclusion: 2D TOF-MRA is an acceptable imaging method for arterial stenosis compared to ceMRA. Arterial stenosis was associated with subjective pain symptoms, indicating a role of decreased nutrition in spinal disorders

  13. Phosphopeptide detection and sequencing by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennett, Keiryn L; Stensballe, Allan; Podtelejnikov, Alexandre V

    2002-01-01

    A prototype matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization quadrupole time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) tandem mass spectrometer was used to sequence a series of phosphotyrosine-, phosphothreonine- and phosphoserine-containing peptides. The high mass resolution and mass accuracy of the instrument allowed...... ion at m/z 216.04 was observed in these MALDI low-energy CID tandem mass spectra. Elimination of phosphate groups was evident from the triphosphorylated peptide but not from the monophosphorylated species. The main fragmentation pathway for the synthetic phosphothreonine-containing peptide...... the localization of one, three or four phosphorylated amino acid residues in phosphopeptides up to 3.1 kDa. Tandem mass spectra of two different phosphotyrosine peptides permitted amino acid sequence determination and localization of one and three phosphorylation sites, respectively. The phosphotyrosine immonium...

  14. Performance of matrix-assisted laser desorption-time of flight mass spectrometry for identification of clinical yeast isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenvinge, Flemming S; Dzajic, Esad; Knudsen, Elisa

    2013-01-01

    Accurate and fast yeast identification is important when treating patients with invasive fungal disease as susceptibility to antifungal agents is highly species related. Matrix-assisted laser desorption-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) provides a powerful tool with a clear potential...... to improve current diagnostic practice. Two MALDI-TOF-MS-systems (BioTyper/Bruker and Saramis/AXIMA) were evaluated using: (i) A collection of 102 archived, well characterised yeast isolates representing 14 different species and (ii) Prospectively collected isolates obtained from clinical samples at two...... identification, respectively, whereas the other laboratory identified 83/98 (85%) to species level by both BioTyper/Bruker and conventional identification. Both MALDI-TOF-MS systems are fast, have built-in databases that cover the majority of clinically relevant Candida species, and have an accuracy...

  15. Design of Cherenkov bars for the optical part of the time-of-flight detector in Geant4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozka, L; Brandt, A; Rijssenbeek, M; Sykora, T; Hoffman, T; Griffiths, J; Steffens, J; Hamal, P; Chytka, L; Hrabovsky, M

    2014-11-17

    We present the results of studies devoted to the development and optimization of the optical part of a high precision time-of-flight (TOF) detector for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). This work was motivated by a proposal to use such a detector in conjunction with a silicon detector to tag and measure protons from interactions of the type p + p → p + X + p, where the two outgoing protons are scattered in the very forward directions. The fast timing detector uses fused silica (quartz) bars that emit Cherenkov radiation as a relativistic particle passes through and the emitted Cherenkov photons are detected by, for instance, a micro-channel plate multi-anode Photomultiplier Tube (MCP-PMT). Several possible designs are implemented in Geant4 and studied for timing optimization as a function of the arrival time, and the number of Cherenkov photons reaching the photo-sensor.

  16. Transmission Near-Infrared (NIR) and Photon Time-of-Flight (PTOF) Spectroscopy in a Comparative Analysis of Pharmaceuticals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamran, Faisal; Abildgaard, Otto Højager Attermann; Sparén, Anders

    2015-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the application of photon time-of-flight spectroscopy (PTOFS) in the wavelength range 1050– 1350 nm as a spectroscopic technique for the evaluation of the chemical composition and structural properties of pharmaceutical tablets. PTOFS is compared to transmission...... of PTOFS is better than that of transmission NIRS. Analysis of reduced scattering spectra shows that PTOFS is able to characterize tablet microstructure and manufacturing process parameters. In contrast to the chemometric pseudovariables provided by transmission NIRS, PTOFS provides physically meaningful...... quantities such as scattering strength and slope of particle size. The ability of PTOFS to quantify the reduced scattering spectra, together with its robustness in predicting drug content, makes it suitable for such evaluations in the pharmaceutical industry....

  17. Research and development on a sub 100 PICO second time-of-flight system based on silicon avalanche diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Y.; Hirsch, A.; Hauger, A.; Scharenberg, R.; Tincknell, M. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Rai, G. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1991-12-31

    Particle identification requires a momentum measurement and a second independent determination either energy loss (dE/dx) or time of flight (TOF). To cover a momentum range from 0.1 GeV/c to 1.5 GeV/c in the STAR detector requires both the dE/dx and TOF techniques. This research is designed to develop the avalanche diode (AVD) detectors for TOF systems and evaluate their performance. The test of a small prototype system would be carried out at Purdue and at accelerator test beam sites. The Purdue group has developed a complete test setup for evaluating the time resolution of the AVD`s which includes fast-slow electronic channels, CAMAC based electronic modules and a temperature controlled environment. The AVDs also need to be tested in a 0.5 tesla magnetic field. The Purdue group would augment this test set up to include a magnetic field.

  18. ATLAS Forward Proton Detector - Offline Data Quality Monitoring, Time of Flight Efficiency and Internal Alignment

    CERN Document Server

    Hohmann, Marcel

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS Forward proton Detector (AFP) aims to study diffractive events where protons are scattered at an angle of the order of several microradians from the beamlines.The AFP consists of four stations, two near stations located 205m either side of the ATLAS interaction point (IP1) and two far stations located 217m either side of IP1 (Figure 1). Each station consists of a Roman Pot containing a Silicon tracker (SiT) with the far stations having an additional Time of Flight (ToF) detector. The AFP is still commissioning with the full 2+2 configuration, that is two stations on each side of ATLAS, having only recently been installed during the winter 2016/2017 technical shutdown. There is still significant work to be done on data quality before physics analysis can begin.

  19. The accuracy of heavy-ion mass measurements using time of flight-ion cyclotron resonance in a Penning trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollen, G.; Moore, R. B.; Savard, G.; Stolzenberg, H.

    1990-11-01

    Ion motion in a Penning trap and the electrical signals it can produce have been analyzed for the purpose of identifying the important causes of uncertainty in high-accuracy mass measurements of heavy ions. The role of the azimuthal quadrupole electric field in signal pickup, and its effects on ion motion at the sum frequency of the cyclotron and magnetron motions, have been identified. A useful scheme for calculating the signal strength and strength of the interaction between an applied field and the ion motion has been developed. The important sources of uncertainty in using the sum frequency of the cyclotron and magnetron motions for determining the ion mass are discussed. Particular application is made to the case of cyclotron resonance detection by observation of the time of flight of ejected ions.

  20. GEANT4 simulation and evaluation of a time-of-flight spectrometer for nuclear cross section measurements in particle therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruenwald, Oxana

    2011-06-08

    In 2007 a new project has been launched in a cooperation between the RWTH Aachen Physics Department, the University Hospital Aachen and the Philips Research Laboratories. The project aim is to validate and improve GEANT4 nuclear interaction models for use in proton and ion therapy. The method chosen here is the measurement of nuclear reaction cross sections which will not only provide a comparison to the simulation but will also allow to improve some of the parameters in the nuclear models. In the first phase of the project 200 MeV protons are used as a projectile in combination with a thin graphite target. For use in particle therapy the excitation functions of the most frequently produced isotopes need to be measured with an accuracy of 10% or less. For this purpose a dedicated detector system has been designed and implemented in GEANT4. The detection of target fragments produced by protons in graphite is achieved via time-of-flight spectrometry. In the setup presented here the primary beam first hits the Start detector and initiates the time-of-flight measurement before it passes through the apertures of two Veto detectors and impinges on the target. Successively, the secondary particles emanating from the target travel a short distance of 70/80 cm through vacuum (0.1 mbar) before they hit one of the 20 Stop detectors which end the time-of-flight measurement and record the energy deposited by the particle. The dissertation at hand describes the underlying detector concept and presents a detailed GEANT4 simulation of the setup which allows to evaluate the detector performance with respect to target fragment identification at a projectile energy of 200 MeV. At first, correlations of time-of-flight and energy deposition are built from simulated data and are subsequently used to reconstruct mass spectra of the detected fragments. Such influences on the detection performance as the target thickness, the residual pressure within the detector chamber, the Veto system